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Sample records for earth lithium silicate

  1. X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy Studies of the Atomic Structure of Zirconium-Doped Lithium Silicate Glasses and Glass-Ceramics, Zirconium-Doped Lithium Borate Glasses, and Vitreous Rare-Earth Phosphates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Changhyeon

    In the first part of this work, the atomic-scale structure around rare-earth (RE = Pr, Nd, Eu, Dy, and Er) cations (RE3+) in rare-earth sodium ultraphosphate (REUP) glasses were investigated using RE LIII -edge (RE = Nd, Er, Dy, and Eu) and K-edge (RE = Pr and Dy) Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. (RE2O 3)x(Na2O)y(P2O5) 1-x-y glasses in the compositional range 0 ≤ x ≤ 0.14 and 0.3 ≤ x + y ≤ 0.4 were studied. For the nearest oxygen shell, the RE-oxygen (RE-O) coordination number decreases from 10.8 to 6.5 with increasing RE content for Pr-, Nd-, Dy-, and Er-doped sodium ultraphosphate glasses. For Eu-doped samples, the Eu-O coordination number was between 7.5 and 8.8. Also, the RE-O mean distance ranges were between 2.43-2.45 A, 2.40-2.43 A, 2.36-2.38 A, 2.30-2.35 A, and 2.28-2.30 A for Pr-, Nd-, Eu-, Dy-, and Er-doped samples, respectively. In the second part, a series of Zr-doped (3-10 mol%) lithium silicate (ZRLS) glass-ceramics and their parent glasses and a series of Zr-doped (2-6 mol% ZrO2) lithium borate (ZRLB) glasses were investigated using Zr K-edge EXAFS and X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) spectroscopy. Immediate coordination environments of all ZRLS glasses are remarkably similar for different compositions. For the nearest oxygen shell, the Zr-O coordination number ranges were between 6.1 and 6.3 for nucleated and crystallized samples, respectively. Also, the Zr-O mean distance remains similar around 2.10 A. For these glasses, the composition dependence of structural parameters was small. Small changes in the coordination environment were observed for ZRLS glass-ceramics after thermal treatments. In contrast, Zr coordination environment in ZRLB glasses appear to depend appreciably on the Zr concentration. For the nearest oxygen shell, the Zr-O coordination number increased from 6.1 to 6.8 and the Zr-O distance decreased from 2.18 A to 2.14 A with decreasing ZrO2 content.

  2. Mechanical properties of zirconia reinforced lithium silicate glass-ceramic.

    PubMed

    Elsaka, Shaymaa E; Elnaghy, Amr M

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the mechanical properties of recently introduced zirconia reinforced lithium silicate glass-ceramic. Two types of CAD/CAM glass-ceramics (Vita Suprinity (VS); zirconia reinforced lithium silicate and IPS e.max CAD (IC); lithium disilicate) were used. Fracture toughness, flexural strength, elastic modulus, hardness, brittleness index, and microstructures were evaluated. Data were analyzed using independent t tests. Weibull analysis of flexural strength data was also performed. VS had significantly higher fracture toughness (2.31±0.17MPam(0.5)), flexural strength (443.63±38.90MPa), elastic modulus (70.44±1.97GPa), and hardness (6.53±0.49GPa) than IC (P<0.001). On the other hand, VS glass-ceramic revealed significantly a higher brittleness index (2.84±0.26μm(-1/2)) (lower machinability) than IC glass-ceramic (P<0.05). VS demonstrated a homogeneous fine crystalline structure while, IC revealed a structure with needle-shaped fine-grained crystals embedded in a glassy matrix. The VS glass-ceramic revealed a lower probability of failure and a higher strength than IC glass-ceramic according to Weibull analysis. The VS zirconia reinforced lithium silicate glass-ceramic revealed higher mechanical properties compared with IC lithium disilicate glass-ceramic. Copyright © 2016 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Calcium Isotopic Composition of Bulk Silicate Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, J.; Ionov, D. A.; Liu, F.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, Z.; Huang, F.

    2016-12-01

    Ca isotopes are used to study the accretion history of the Earth and terrestrial planets, but, Ca isotopic composition of the Bulk Silicate Earth (BSE) remains poorly constrained [1]. To better understand the Ca isotopic composition of BSE, we analyzed 22 well studied peridotite xenoliths from Tariat (Mongolia), Vitim (southern Siberia) and Udachnaya (Siberian Craton). These samples include both fertile and highly depleted garnet and spinel peridotites that show no or only minor post-melting metasomatism or alteration. Ca isotope measurements were done on a Triton-TIMS using double spike method at the Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, CAS. The data are reported as δ44/40Ca (relative to NIST SRM 915a). Results for geostandards are consistent with those from other laboratories. 2 standard deviations of SRM 915a analyses are 0.13‰ (n=48). δ44/40Ca of both and fertile and refractory peridotites range from 0.79 to 1.07‰ producing an average of 0.93±0.12‰ (2SD). This value defines the Ca isotopic composition of the BSE, which is consistent with the average δ44/40Ca of oceanic basalts ( 0.90‰)[2,3]. [1] Huang et al (2010) EPSL 292; [2] Valdes et al (2014) EPSL 394; [3]DePaolo (2004) RMG 55.

  4. Ultrafast Carbon Dioxide Sorption Kinetics Using Lithium Silicate Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Nambo, Apolo; He, Juan; Nguyen, Tu Quang; Atla, Veerendra; Druffel, Thad; Sunkara, Mahendra

    2017-06-14

    In this paper, the Li 4 SiO 4 nanowires (NWs) were shown to be promising for CO 2 capture with ultrafast kinetics. Specifically, the nanowire powders exhibited an uptake of 0.35 g g -1 of CO 2 at an ultrafast adsorption rate of 0.22 g g -1 min -1 at 650-700 °C. Lithium silicate (Li 4 SiO 4 ) nanowires and nanopowders were synthesized using a "solvo-plasma" technique involving plasma oxidation of silicon precursors mixed with lithium hydroxide. The kinetic parameter values (k) extracted from sorption kinetics obtained using NW powders are 1 order of magnitude higher than those previously reported for the Li 4 SiO 4 -CO 2 reaction system. The time scales for CO 2 sorption using nanowires are approximately 3 min and two orders magnitude faster compared to those obtained using lithium silicate powders with spherical morphologies and aggregates. Furthermore, Li 4 SiO 4 nanowire powders showed reversibility through sorption-desorption cycles indicating their suitability for CO 2 capture applications. All of the morphologies of Li 4 SiO 4 powders exhibited a double exponential behavior in the adsorption kinetics indicating two distinct time constants for kinetic and the mass transfer limited regimes.

  5. Cobalt silicate hierarchical hollow spheres for lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun; Guo, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Yufei; Sun, Chencheng; Yan, Qingyu; Dong, Xiaochen

    2016-09-09

    In this paper, the synthesis of cobalt silicate novel hierarchical hollow spheres via a facile hydrothermal method is presented. With a unique hollow structure, the Co2SiO4 provides a large surface area, which can shorten the lithium ions diffusion length and effectively accommodate the volumetic variation during the lithiation/de-lithiation process. Serving as an anode material in lithium-ion battery application, the Co2SiO4 electrode demonstrates a high reversible specific capacity (first-cycle charge capacity of 948.6 mAh g(-1) at 100 mA g(-1)), a cycling durability (specific capacity of 791.4 mAh g(-1) after 100 cycles at 100 mA g(-1)), and a good rate capability (specific capacity of 349.4 mAh g(-1) at 10 A g(-1)). The results indicate that the cobalt silicate hierarchical hollow sphere holds the potential applications in energy storage electrodes.

  6. Stabilization of Lithium Transition Metal Silicates in the Olivine Structure

    DOE PAGES

    Sun, Xiaoqi; Tripathi, Rajesh; Popov, Guerman; ...

    2017-07-28

    While olivine LiFePO 4 shows amongst the best electrochemical properties of Li-ion positive electrodes with respect to rate behavior owing to facile Li + migration pathways in the framework, replacing the [PO 4] 3- polyanion with a silicate [SO 4] 4- moitie in olivine is desirable. This would allow additional balancing alkali content and hence electron transfer, and increase the capacity. We demonstrate the first stabilization of a lithium transition-metal silicate (as a pure silicate) in the olivine structure type. Using LiInSiO 4 and LiScSiO 4 as the parent materials, transition metal (Mn, Fe, Co) substitutions on the In/Sc sitemore » were investigated by computational modelling via atomic scale simulation. Transition metal substitution was found to be only favourable for Co, a finding confirmed by the successful solid state synthesis of olivine LixInyCo 2-x-ySiO 4. Finally, the stabilization of the structure was achieved by entropy provided by cation disorder.« less

  7. Thermal Expansion and Thermal Conductivity of Rare Earth Silicates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Lee, Kang N.; Bansal, Narottam P.

    2006-01-01

    Rare earth silicates are considered promising candidate materials for environmental barrier coatings applications at elevated temperature for ceramic matrix composites. High temperature thermophysical properties are of great importance for coating system design and development. In this study, the thermal expansion and thermal conductivity of hot-pressed rare earth silicate materials were characterized at temperatures up to 1400 C. The effects of specimen porosity, composition and microstructure on the properties were also investigated. The materials processing and testing issues affecting the measurements will also be discussed.

  8. Deep-Earth Equilibration between Molten Iron and Solid Silicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brennan, M.; Zurkowski, C. C.; Chidester, B.; Campbell, A.

    2017-12-01

    Elemental partitioning between iron-rich metals and silicate minerals influences the properties of Earth's deep interior, and is ultimately responsible for the nature of the core-mantle boundary. These interactions between molten iron and solid silicates were influential during planetary accretion, and persist today between the mantle and liquid outer core. Here we report the results of diamond anvil cell experiments at lower mantle conditions (40 GPa, >2500 K) aimed at examining systems containing a mixture of metals (iron or Fe-16Si alloy) and silicates (peridotite). The experiments were conducted at pressure-temperature conditions above the metallic liquidus but below the silicate solidus, and the recovered samples were analyzed by FIB/SEM with EDS to record the compositions of the coexisting phases. Each sample formed a three-phase equilibrium between bridgmanite, Fe-rich metallic melt, and an oxide. In one experiment, using pure Fe, the quenched metal contained 6 weight percent O, and the coexisting oxide was ferropericlase. The second experiment, using Fe-Si alloy, was highly reducing; its metal contained 10 wt% Si, and the coexisting mineral was stishovite. The distinct mineralogies of the two experiments derived from their different starting metals. These results imply that metallic composition is an important factor in determining the products of mixed phase iron-silicate reactions. The properties of deep-Earth interfaces such as the core-mantle boundary could be strongly affected by their metallic components.

  9. Thermochemistry of Rare Earth Silicates for Environmental Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costa, Gustavo; Jacobson, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    Rare earth silicates are promising candidates as environmental protective coatings (EBCs) for silica-forming ceramics and composites in combustion environments since they are predicted to have lower reactivity with the water vapor combustion products. The reactivity of rare earth silicates is assessed by the thermodynamic activity of the silica component which is best measured by Knudsen effusion mass spectrometry (KEMS). Here, we discuss a novel method based on a reducing agent to increase the partial pressure of SiO(g) which is then used to calculate thermodynamic activity of silica in Y2O3-SiO2 and Yb2O3-SiO2 systems. After the KEMS measurements, samples were probed by X-ray diffraction and their phase content was calculated from Rietveld refinement.

  10. Nanotubes within transition metal silicate hollow spheres: Facile preparation and superior lithium storage performances

    SciT

    Zhang, Fan; An, Yongling; Zhai, Wei

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • The hollow Co{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}, MnSiO{sub 3} and CuSiO{sub 3} were successfully prepared by a facile hydrothermal method using SiO{sub 2} nanosphere. • The hollow Co{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}, MnSiO{sub 3} and CuSiO{sub 3} were tested as anode materials for lithium batteries. • The hollow Co{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}, MnSiO{sub 3} and CuSiO{sub 3} delivered superior electrochemical performance. • The lithium storage mechanism is probe via cyclic voltammetry and XPS. - Abstract: A series of transition metal silicate hollow spheres, including cobalt silicate (Co{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}), manganese silicate (MnSiO{sub 3}) and copper silicate (CuSiO{sub 3}.2H{sub 2}O, CuSiO{sub 3} as abbreviationmore » in the text) were prepared via a simple and economic hydrothermal method by using silica spheres as chemical template. Time-dependent experiments confirmed that the resultants formed a novel type of hierarchical structure, hollow spheres assembled by numerous one-dimensional (1D) nanotubes building blocks. For the first time, the transition metal silicate hollow spheres were characterized as novel anode materials of Li-ion battery, which presented superior lithium storage capacities, cycle performance and rate performance. The 1D nanotubes assembly and hollow interior endow this kind of material facilitate fast lithium ion and electron transport and accommodate the big volume change during the conversion reactions. Our study shows that low-cost transition metal silicate with rationally designed nanostructures can be promising anode materials for high capacity lithium-ion battery.« less

  11. CHEMISTRY OF SILICATE ATMOSPHERES OF EVAPORATING SUPER-EARTHS

    SciT

    Schaefer, Laura; Fegley, Bruce, E-mail: laura_s@levee.wustl.ed, E-mail: bfegley@levee.wustl.ed

    2009-10-01

    We model the formation of silicate atmospheres on hot volatile-free super-Earths. Our calculations assume that all volatile elements such as H, C, N, S, and Cl have been lost from the planet. We find that the atmospheres are composed primarily of Na, O{sub 2}, O, and SiO gas, in order of decreasing abundance. The atmospheric composition may be altered by fractional vaporization, cloud condensation, photoionization, and reaction with any residual volatile elements remaining in the atmosphere. Cloud condensation reduces the abundance of all elements in the atmosphere except Na and K. We speculate that large Na and K clouds suchmore » as those observed around Mercury and Io may surround hot super-Earths. These clouds would occult much larger fractions of the parent star than a closely bound atmosphere, and may be observable through currently available methods.« less

  12. Iron-magnesium silicate bioweathering on Earth (and Mars?).

    PubMed

    Fisk, M R; Popa, R; Mason, O U; Storrie-Lombardi, M C; Vicenzi, E P

    2006-02-01

    We examined the common, iron-magnesium silicate minerals olivine and pyroxene in basalt and in mantle rocks to determine if they exhibit textures similar to bioweathering textures found in glass. Our results show that weathering in olivine may occur as long, narrow tunnels (1-3 microm in diameter and up to 100 microm long) and as larger irregular galleries, both of which have distinctive characteristics consistent with biological activity. These weathering textures are associated with clay mineral by-products and nucleic acids. We also examined olivine and pyroxene in martian meteorites, some of which experienced preterrestrial aqueous alteration. Some olivines and pyroxenes in the martian meteorite Nakhla were found to contain tunnels that are similar in size and shape to tunnels in terrestrial iron-magnesium silicates that contain nucleic acids. Though the tunnels found in Nakhla are similar to the biosignatures found in terrestrial minerals, their presence cannot be used to prove that the martian alteration features had a biogenic origin. The abundance and wide distribution of olivine and pyroxene on Earth and in the Solar System make bioweathering features in these minerals potentially important new biosignatures that may play a significant role in evaluating whether life ever existed on Mars.

  13. Fracture strength of lithium disilicate crowns compared to polymer-infiltrated ceramic-network and zirconia reinforced lithium silicate crowns.

    PubMed

    Sieper, Kim; Wille, Sebastian; Kern, Matthias

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the fracture strength of crowns made from current CAD/CAM materials. In addition the influence of crown thickness and chewing simulation on the fracture strength was evaluated. Crowns were fabricated from lithium disilicate, zirconia reinforced lithium silicate (ZLS-ceramic) and a polymer-infiltrated ceramic-network (PICN) with an occlusal thickness of 1.0mm or 1.5mm, respectively (n=16). Crowns were cemented on composite dies. Subgroups of eight specimens were loaded with 5kg in a chewing simulator for 1,200,000 cycles with thermal cycling. Finally, all specimens were loaded until fracture in a universal testing machine. Three-way ANOVA was used to detect statistical interaction. Differences regarding the materials were tested with two-way ANOVA, following one-way ANOVA and a post-hoc Tukey's-Test. All crowns survived the chewing simulation. The material had a significant influence on the fracture resistance (p≤0.05). Lithium disilicate achieved the highest values of fracture strength in almost all groups followed by ZLS-ceramic. PICN achieved the lowest values of fracture strength. Chewing simulation increased the fracture strength of thick lithium disilicate crown significantly. Greater occlusal thickness of all crown materials resulted in higher crown fracture strength before chewing simulation. After chewing simulation occlusal thickness of lithium disilicate and PICN crowns had no significant influence on the fracture strength. All crowns revealed fracture strength above the clinically expected loading forces. Therefore the durability of the tested CAD/CAM materials seems promising also in an occlusal thickness of 1.0mm. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Non-Chondritic Ni Isotope Composition of the Bulk Silicate Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaver, M.; Elliott, T.

    2018-05-01

    We present high-precision Ni isotope data of chondritic meteorites and carefully selected mantle peridotites. These data show that the Bulk Silicate Earth is ca. 90 ppm lighter than chondritic meteorites, possibly as the result of core formation.

  15. Molecular dynamics simulations of lithium silicate/vanadium pentoxide interfacial lithium ion diffusion in thin film lithium ion-conducting devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weiqun

    The lithium ion diffusion behavior and mechanism in the glassy electrolyte and the electrolyte/cathode interface during the initial stage of lithium ion diffusing from electrolyte into cathode were investigated using Molecular Dynamics simulation technique. Lithium aluminosilicate glass electrolytes with different R (ratio of the concentration of Al to Li) were simulated. The structural features of the simulated glasses are analyzed using Radial Distribution Function (RDF) and Pair Distribution Function (PDF). The diffusion coefficient and activation energy of lithium ion diffusion in simulated lithium aluminosilicate glasses were calculated and the values are consistent with those in experimental glasses. The behavior of lithium ion diffusion from the glassy electrolyte into a polycrystalline layered intercalation cathode has been studied. The solid electrolyte was a model lithium silicate glass while the cathode was a nanocrystalline vanadia with amorphous V2O5 intergranular films (IGF) between the V2O5 crystals. Two different orientations between the V2O5 crystal planes are presented for lithium ion intercalation via the amorphous vanadia IGF. A series of polycrystalline vanadia cathodes with 1.3, 1.9, 2.9 and 4.4 nm thickness IGFs were simulated to examine the effects of the IGF thickness on lithium ion transport in the polycrystalline vanadia cathodes. The simulated results showed that the lithium ions diffused from the glassy electrolyte into the IGF of the polycrystalline vanadia cathode and then part of those lithium ions diffused into the crystalline V2O5 from the IGF. The simulated results also showed an ordering of the vanadium ion structure in the IGF near the IGF/V2 O5 interface. The ordering structure still existed with glass former silica additive in IGF. Additionally, 2.9 run is suggested to be the optimal thickness of the IGF, which is neither too thick to decrease the capacity of the cathode nor too thin to impede the transport of lithium from

  16. Fabrication of Zirconia-Reinforced Lithium Silicate Ceramic Restorations Using a Complete Digital Workflow

    PubMed Central

    Rödiger, Matthias; Ziebolz, Dirk; Schmidt, Anne-Kathrin

    2015-01-01

    This case report describes the fabrication of monolithic all-ceramic restorations using zirconia-reinforced lithium silicate (ZLS) ceramics. The use of powder-free intraoral scanner, generative fabrication technology of the working model, and CAD/CAM of the restorations in the dental laboratory allows a completely digitized workflow. The newly introduced ZLS ceramics offer a unique combination of fracture strength (>420 MPa), excellent optical properties, and optimum polishing characteristics, thus making them an interesting material option for monolithic restorations in the digital workflow. PMID:26509088

  17. Dispersion and thermal properties of lithium aluminum silicate glasses doped with Cr3+ ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Diasty, Fouad; Abdel-Baki, Manal; Abdel Wahab, Fathy A.; Darwish, Hussein

    2006-10-01

    A series of new lithium aluminum silicate (LAS) glass systems doped with chromium ion is prepared. The reflectance and transmittance of the glass slabs are recorded. By means of an iteration procedure, the glass refractive index n and the extinction coefficient k and their dispersions are obtained. Across a wide spectral range of 0.2-1.6 μm, the dispersion curves are used to determine the atomic and quantum constants of the prepared glasses. These findings provide the average oscillator wavelength, the average oscillator strength, oscillator energy, dispersion energy, lattice energy, and material dispersion of the glass materials to be calculated. For optical waveguide applications, the wavelength for zero material dispersion is obtained. Dilatometric measurements are performed and the thermal expansion coefficient is calculated to throw some light on the thermo-optical properties of the present glasses correlating them with their structure and the presence of nonbridging oxygen ions.

  18. Experimentally determined Si isotope fractionation between silicate and Fe metal and implications for Earth's core formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahar, Anat; Ziegler, Karen; Young, Edward D.; Ricolleau, Angele; Schauble, Edwin A.; Fei, Yingwei

    2009-10-01

    Stable isotope fractionation amongst phases comprising terrestrial planets and asteroids can be used to elucidate planet-forming processes. To date, the composition of the Earth's core remains largely unknown though cosmochemical and geophysical evidence indicates that elements lighter than iron and nickel must reside there. Silicon is often cited as a light element that could explain the seismic properties of the core. The amount of silicon in the core, if any, can be deduced from the difference in 30Si/ 28Si between meteorites and terrestrial rocks if the Si isotope fractionation between silicate and Fe-rich metal is known. Recent studies (e.g., [Georg R.B., Halliday A.N., Schauble E.A., Reynolds B.C., 2007. Silicon in the Earth's core. Nature 447 (31), 1102-1106.]; [Fitoussi, C., Bourdon, B., Kleine, T., Oberli, F., Reynolds, B. C., 2009. Si isotope systematics of meteorites and terrestrial peridotites: implications for Mg/Si fractionation in the solar nebula and for Si in the Earth's core. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 287, 77-85.]) showing (sometimes subtle) differences between 30Si/ 28Si in meteorites and terrestrial rocks suggest that Si missing from terrestrial rocks might be in the core. However, any conclusion based on Earth-meteorite comparisons depends on the veracity of the 30Si/ 28Si fractionation factor between silicates and metals at appropriate conditions. Here we present the first direct experimental evidence that silicon isotopes are not distributed uniformly between iron metal and rock when equilibrated at high temperatures. High-precision measurements of the silicon isotope ratios in iron-silicon alloy and silicate equilibrated at 1 GPa and 1800 °C show that Si in silicate has higher 30Si/ 28Si than Si in metal, by at least 2.0‰. These findings provide an experimental foundation for using isotope ratios of silicon as indicators of terrestrial planet formation processes. They imply that if Si isotope equilibrium existed during segregation of Earth

  19. Carbon and sulfur budget of the silicate Earth explained by accretion of differentiated planetary embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuan; Dasgupta, Rajdeep; Tsuno, Kyusei; Monteleone, Brian; Shimizu, Nobumichi

    2016-10-01

    The abundances of volatile elements in the Earth's mantle have been attributed to the delivery of volatile-rich material after the main phase of accretion. However, no known meteorites could deliver the volatile elements, such as carbon, nitrogen, hydrogen and sulfur, at the relative abundances observed for the silicate Earth. Alternatively, Earth could have acquired its volatile inventory during accretion and differentiation, but the fate of volatile elements during core formation is known only for a limited set of conditions. Here we present constraints from laboratory experiments on the partitioning of carbon and sulfur between metallic cores and silicate mantles under conditions relevant for rocky planetary bodies. We find that carbon remains more siderophile than sulfur over a range of oxygen fugacities; however, our experiments suggest that in reduced or sulfur-rich bodies, carbon is expelled from the segregating core. Combined with previous constraints, we propose that the ratio of carbon to sulfur in the silicate Earth could have been established by differentiation of a planetary embryo that was then accreted to the proto-Earth. We suggest that the accretion of a Mercury-like (reduced) or a sulfur-rich (oxidized) differentiated body--in which carbon has been preferentially partitioned into the mantle--may explain the Earth's carbon and sulfur budgets.

  20. A general route to hollow mesoporous rare-earth silicate nanospheres as a catalyst support.

    PubMed

    Jin, Renxi; Yang, Yang; Zou, Yongcun; Liu, Xianchun; Xing, Yan

    2014-02-17

    Hollow mesoporous structures have recently aroused intense research interest owing to their unique structural features. Herein, an effective and precisely controlled synthesis of hollow rare-earth silicate spheres with mesoporous shells is reported for the first time, produced by a simple hydrothermal method, using silica spheres as the silica precursors. The as-prepared hollow rare-earth silicate spheres have large specific surface area, high pore volume, and controllable structure parameters. The results demonstrate that the selection of the chelating reagent plays critical roles in forming the hollow mesoporous structures. In addition, a simple and low-energy-consuming approach to synthesize highly stable and dispersive gold nanoparticle-yttrium silicate (AuNPs/YSiO) hollow nanocomposites has also been developed. The reduction of 4-nitrophenol with AuNPs/YSiO hollow nanocomposites as the catalyst has clearly demonstrated that the hollow rare-earth silicate spheres are good carriers for Au nanoparticles. This strategy can be extended as a general approach to prepare multifunctional yolk-shell structures with diverse compositions and morphologies simply by replacing silica spheres with silica-coated nanocomposites. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Sulfide in the core and the composition of the silicate Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, K. W.

    2015-12-01

    The chemical composition of the Earth is traditionally explained in terms of evolution from a solar-like composition, similar to that found in primitive 'chondritic' meteorites. It now appears, however, that the silicate Earth is not 'chondritic', but depleted in incompatible elements, including refractory lithophile and heat-producing elements. Either Earth lost material during planet-building due to collisional erosion or else internal differentiation processes produced a hidden reservoir deep in the early Earth. Sulfide in the core may provide a reservoir capable of balancing the composition of the silicate Earth. Recent experimental work suggests that the core contains a significant proportion of sulfide, added during the final stages of accretion and new data suggests that at high pressures sulfide can incorporate a substantial amount of refractory lithophile and heat-producing elements [1]. Pioneering work using the short-lived 146Sm-142Nd system strongly suggests that Earth's silicate mantle is non-chondritic [e.g. 2]. The drawback of such radiogenic isotope systems is that it is not possible to distinguish the fractionation of Sm/Nd that occurs during silicate melting from that occurring during the segregation of a sulfide-melt to form the core. Neodymium stable isotopes have the potential to provide just such a tracer of sulfide segregation, because there is a significant contrast in bonding environment between sulfide and silicate, where heavy isotopes should be preferentially incorporated into high force-constant bonds involving REE3+ (i.e. the silicate mantle). Preliminary data indicate that mantle rocks do indeed possess heavier 146Nd/144Nd values than chondritic meteorites, consistent with the removal of light Nd into sulfide in the core, driving the residual mantle to heavy values. Overall, our isotope and elemental data indicate that the rare earths and other incompatible elements are substantially incorporated into sulfide. While Nd Stable isotope

  2. Optical band gap and spectroscopic study of lithium alumino silicate glass containing Y3+ ions.

    PubMed

    Shakeri, M S; Rezvani, M

    2011-09-01

    The effect of different amounts of Y2O3 dopant on lithium alumino silicate (LAS) glass has been studied in this work. Glasses having 14.8Li2O-20Al2O3-65.2SiO2 (wt%) composition accompanied with Y2O3 dopant were prepared by normal melting process. In order to calculate the absorption coefficient of samples, transmittance and reflectance spectra of polished samples were measured in the room temperature. Optical properties i.e. Fermi energy level, direct and indirect optical band gaps and Urbach energy were calculated using functionality of extinction coefficient from Fermi-Dirac distribution function, Tauc's plot and the exponential part of absorption coefficient diagram, respectively. It has been clarified that variation in mentioned optical parameters is associated with the changes in physical properties of samples i.e. density or molar mass. On the other hand, increasing of Y3+ ions in the glassy microstructure of samples provides a semiconducting character to LAS glass by reducing the direct and indirect optical band gaps of glass samples from 1.97 to 1.67 and 3.46 to 2.1 (eV), respectively. These changes could be attributed to the role of Y3+ ions as the network former in the track of SiO4 tetrahedrals. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Optical band gap studies on lithium aluminum silicate glasses doped with Cr3+ ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Diasty, Fouad; Abdel Wahab, Fathy A.; Abdel-Baki, Manal

    2006-11-01

    Lithium aluminum silicate glass system (LAS) implanted with chromium ions is prepared. The reflectance and transmittance measurements are used to determine the dispersion of absorption coefficient. The optical data are explained in terms of the different oxidation states adopted by the chromium ions into the glass network. It is found that the oxidation state of the chromium depends on its concentration. Across a wide spectral range, 0.2-1.6μm, analysis of the fundamental absorption edge provides values for the average energy band gaps for allowed direct and indirect transitions. The optical absorption coefficient just below the absorption edge varies exponentially with photon energy indicating the presence of Urbach's tail. Such tail is decreased with the increase of the chromium dopant. From the analysis of the optical absorption data, the absorption peak at ground state exciton energy, the absorption at band gap, and the free exciton binding energy are determined. The extinction coefficient data are used to determine the Fermi energy level of the studied glasses. The metallization criterion is obtained and discussed exploring the nature of the glasses. The measured IR spectra of the different glasses are used to throw some light on the optical properties of the present glasses correlating them with their structure and composition.

  4. Optical band gap and spectroscopic study of lithium alumino silicate glass containing Y 3+ ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakeri, M. S.; Rezvani, M.

    2011-09-01

    The effect of different amounts of Y 2O 3 dopant on lithium alumino silicate (LAS) glass has been studied in this work. Glasses having 14.8Li 2O-20Al 2O 3-65.2SiO 2 (wt%) composition accompanied with Y 2O 3 dopant were prepared by normal melting process. In order to calculate the absorption coefficient of samples, transmittance and reflectance spectra of polished samples were measured in the room temperature. Optical properties i.e. Fermi energy level, direct and indirect optical band gaps and Urbach energy were calculated using functionality of extinction coefficient from Fermi-Dirac distribution function, Tauc's plot and the exponential part of absorption coefficient diagram, respectively. It has been clarified that variation in mentioned optical parameters is associated with the changes in physical properties of samples i.e. density or molar mass. On the other hand, increasing of Y 3+ ions in the glassy microstructure of samples provides a semiconducting character to LAS glass by reducing the direct and indirect optical band gaps of glass samples from 1.97 to 1.67 and 3.46 to 2.1 (eV), respectively. These changes could be attributed to the role of Y 3+ ions as the network former in the track of SiO 4 tetrahedrals.

  5. Misfit and fracture load of implant-supported monolithic crowns in zirconia-reinforced lithium silicate

    PubMed Central

    GOMES, Rafael Soares; de SOUZA, Caroline Mathias Carvalho; BERGAMO, Edmara Tatiely Pedroso; BORDIN, Dimorvan; DEL BEL CURY, Altair Antoninha

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Zirconia-reinforced lithium silicate (ZLS) is a ceramic that promises to have better mechanical properties than other materials with the same indications as well as improved adaptation and fracture strength. Objective In this study, marginal and internal misfit and fracture load with and without thermal-mechanical aging (TMA) of monolithic ZLS and lithium disilicate (LDS) crowns were evaluated. Material and methods Crowns were milled using a computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing system. Marginal gaps (MGs), absolute marginal discrepancy (AMD), axial gaps, and occlusal gaps were measured by X-ray microtomography (n=8). For fracture load testing, crowns were cemented in a universal abutment, and divided into four groups: ZLS without TMA, ZLS with TMA, LDS without TMA, and LDS with TMA (n=10). TMA groups were subjected to 10,000 thermal cycles (5-55°C) and 1,000,000 mechanical cycles (200 N, 3.8 Hz). All groups were subjected to compressive strength testing in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min until failure. Student’s t-test was used to examine misfit, two-way analysis of variance was used to analyze fracture load, and Pearson’s correlation coefficients for misfit and fracture load were calculated (α=0.05). The materials were analyzed according to Weibull distribution, with 95% confidence intervals. Results Average MG (p<0.001) and AMD (p=0.003) values were greater in ZLS than in LDS crowns. TMA did not affect the fracture load of either material. However, fracture loads of ZLS crowns were lower than those of LDS crowns (p<0.001). Fracture load was moderately correlated with MG (r=-0.553) and AMD (r=-0.497). ZLS with TMA was least reliable, according to Weibull probability. Conclusion Within the limitations of this study, ZLS crowns had lower fracture load values and greater marginal misfit than did LDS crowns, although these values were within acceptable limits. PMID:28678947

  6. Sulfide in the core and the Nd isotopic composition of the silicate Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoy-West, A.; Millet, M. A.; Nowell, G. M.; Wohlers, A.; Wood, B. J.; Burton, K. W.

    2016-12-01

    The chemical composition of the Earth is traditionally explained in terms of evolution from a solar-like composition, similar to that found in primitive chondritic meteorites. It now appears, however, that the silicate Earth is not chondritic, but depleted in incompatible elements and a resovable 20 ppm excess is observed in 142Nd relative to chondirtes [1, 2]. This anomaly requires a process that occurred within 30 Myr of solar system formation and has been variably ascribed to: a complementary enriched reservoir in the deep Earth [1]; loss to space through collisional erosion [3]; or the inhertence of nucleosynthetic anomalies [4]. Sulfide in the core may provide a reservoir capable of balancing the composition of the silicate Earth. Recent experimental work suggests that the core contains a significant proportion of sulfide, added during the final stages of accretion and new data suggests that at high pressures sulfide can incorporate a substantial amount of refractory lithophile and heat-producing elements [5]. The drawback of the short-lived 146Sm-142Nd radiogenic isotope system is that it is not possible to distinguish between fractionations of Sm/Nd that occurs during silicate melting or segregation of a sulfide-melt. Neodymium stable isotopes have the potential to provide just such a tracer of sulfide segregation, because there is a significant contrast in bonding environment between sulfide and silicate, where heavy isotopes should be preferentially incorporated into high force-constant bonds involving REE3+ (i.e. the silicate mantle). Preliminary data indicate that mantle rocks do indeed possess heavier 146Nd/144Nd values than chondritic meteorites by 0.3 ‰, consistent with the removal of light Nd into sulfide in the core, driving the residual mantle to heavier values. Overall, our isotope and elemental data indicate that the rare earths and other incompatible elements are substantially incorporated into sulfide. While Nd stable isotope data for

  7. Influence of Surface Conditioning Protocols on Reparability of CAD/CAM Zirconia-reinforced Lithium Silicate Ceramic.

    PubMed

    Al-Thagafi, Rana; Al-Zordk, Walid; Saker, Samah

    2016-01-01

    To test the effect of surface conditioning protocols on the reparability of CAD/CAM zirconia-reinforced lithium silicate ceramic compared to lithium-disilicate glass ceramic. Zirconia-reinforced lithium silicate ceramic (Vita Suprinity) and lithium disilicate glass-ceramic blocks (IPS e.max CAD) were categorized into four groups based on the surface conditioning protocol used. Group C: no treatment (control); group HF: 5% hydrofluoric acid etching for 60 s, silane (Monobond-S) application for 60 s, air drying; group HF-H: 5% HF acid etching for 60 s, application of silane for 60 s, air drying, application of Heliobond, light curing for 20 s; group CO: sandblasting with CoJet sand followed by silanization. Composite resin (Tetric EvoCeram) was built up into 4 x 6 x 3 mm blocks using teflon molds. All specimens were subjected to thermocycling (5000x, 5°C to 55°C). The microtensile bond strength test was employed at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. SEM was employed for evaluation of all the debonded microbars, the failure type was categorized as either adhesive (failure at adhesive layer), cohesive (failure at ceramic or composite resin), or mixed (failure between adhesive layer and substrate). Two-way ANOVA and the Tukey's HSD post-hoc test were applied to test for significant differences in bond strength values in relation to different materials and surface pretreatment (p < 0.05). The highest microtensile repair bond strength for Vita Suprinity was reported in group CO (33.1 ± 2.4 MPa) and the lowest in group HF (27.4 ± 4.4 MPa). Regarding IPS e.max CAD, group CO showed the highest (30.5 ± 4.9 MPa) and HF the lowest microtensile bond strength (22.4 ± 5.7 MPa). Groups HF, HF-H, and CO showed statistically significant differences in terms of all ceramic types used (p < 0.05). The control group showed exclusively adhesive failures, while in HF, HF-H, and CO groups, mixed failures were predominant. Repair bond strength to zirconia-reinforced lithium silicate

  8. Making Earth's earliest continental crust - an analogue from voluminous Neogene silicic volcanism in NE-Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, Sylvia E.; Troll, Valentin R.; Burchardt, Steffi; Riishuus, Morten S.; Deegan, Frances M.; Harris, Chris; Whitehouse, Martin J.; Gústafsson, Ludvik E.

    2014-05-01

    Borgarfjörður Eystri in NE-Iceland represents the second-most voluminous exposure of silicic eruptive rocks in Iceland and is a superb example of bimodal volcanism (Bunsen-Daly gap), which represents a long-standing controversy that touches on the problem of crustal growth in early Earth. The silicic rocks in NE-Iceland approach 25 % of the exposed rock mass in the region (Gústafsson et al., 1989), thus they significantly exceed the usual ≤ 12 % in Iceland as a whole (e.g. Walker, 1966; Jonasson, 2007). The origin, significance, and duration of the voluminous (> 300 km3) and dominantly explosive silicic activity in Borgarfjörður Eystri is not yet constrained (c.f. Gústafsson, 1992), leaving us unclear as to what causes silicic volcanism in otherwise basaltic provinces. Here we report SIMS zircon U-Pb ages and δ18O values from the region, which record the commencement of silicic igneous activity with rhyolite lavas at 13.5 to 12.8 Ma, closely followed by large caldera-forming ignimbrite eruptions from the Breiðavik and Dyrfjöll central volcanoes (12.4 Ma). Silicic activity ended abruptly with dacite lava at 12.1 Ma, defining a ≤ 1 Myr long window of silicic volcanism. Magma δ18O values estimated from zircon range from 3.1 to 5.5 (± 0.3; n = 170) and indicate up to 45 % assimilation of a low-δ18O component (e.g. typically δ18O = 0 ‰, Bindeman et al., 2012). A Neogene rift relocation (Martin et al., 2011) or the birth of an off-rift zone to the east of the mature rift associated with a thermal/chemical pulse in the Iceland plume (Óskarsson & Riishuus, 2013), likely brought mantle-derived magma into contact with fertile hydrothermally-altered basaltic crust. The resulting interaction triggered large-scale crustal melting and generated mixed-origin silicic melts. Such rapid formation of silicic magmas from sustained basaltic volcanism may serve as an analogue for generating continental crust in a subduction-free early Earth (e.g. ≥ 3 Ga, Kamber et

  9. Chairside Fabrication of an All-Ceramic Partial Crown Using a Zirconia-Reinforced Lithium Silicate Ceramic

    PubMed Central

    Pabel, Anne-Kathrin; Rödiger, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    The chairside fabrication of a monolithic partial crown using a zirconia-reinforced lithium silicate (ZLS) ceramic is described. The fully digitized model-free workflow in a dental practice is possible due to the use of a powder-free intraoral scanner and the computer-aided design/computer-assisted manufacturing (CAD/CAM) of the restorations. The innovative ZLS material offers a singular combination of fracture strength (>370 Mpa), optimum polishing characteristics, and excellent optical properties. Therefore, this ceramic is an interesting alternative material for monolithic restorations produced in a digital workflow. PMID:27042362

  10. Silicate garnet studies at high pressures: A view into the Earth's mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrad, Pamela Gales

    Silicate garnets are an abundant component in the Earth's upper mantle and transition zone. Therefore, an understanding of garnet behavior under the pressure and temperature conditions of the mantle is critical to the development of models for mantle mineralogy and dynamics. Work from three projects is presented in this report. Each investigation explores an aspect of silicate garnet behavior under high pressures. Moreover, each investigation was made possible by state-of-the-art methods that have previously been unavailable. Brillouin scattering was used to determine the elastic constants and aggregate elastic moduli of three end-member garnets at high pressures in a diamond anvil cell. These are the first high-pressure measurements of the elastic constants of end-member silicate garnets by direct measurement of acoustic velocities. The results indicate that the pressure dependence of silicate garnet elastic constants varies with composition. Therefore, extrapolation from measurements on mixed composition garnets is not possible. A new method of laser heating minerals in a diamond anvil cell has made possible the determination of the high-pressure and high-temperature stability of almandine garnet. This garnet does not transform to a silicate perovskite phase as does pyrope garnet, but it decomposes to its constituent oxides: FeO, Alsb2Osb3, and SiOsb2. These results disprove an earlier prediction that ferrous iron may expand the stability field of garnet to the lower mantle. The present results demonstrate that this is not the case. The third topic is a presentation of the results of a new technique for studying inclusions in mantle xenoliths with synchrotron X-ray microdiffraction. The results demonstrate the importance of obtaining structural as well as chemical information on inclusions within diamonds and other high-pressure minerals. An unusual phase with garnet composition is investigated and several other phases are identified from a suite of natural

  11. Metal/Silicate Partitioning, Melt Speciation, Accretion, and Core Formation in the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, M. J.; Hillgren, V. J.; Dearo, J. A.; Capobianco, C. J.

    1993-07-01

    Core formation in terrestrial planets was concomitant with accretion. Siderophile and chalcophile element signatures in the mantles of planets are the result of these processes. For Earth, abundances of most siderophile and chalcophile elements are elevated relative to predictions from simple metal/silicate equilibria at low pressures [1]. This observation has led to three hypotheses for how these abundances were established: heterogeneous accretion [2], inefficient core formation [3], and metal/silicate equilibria at magma ocean pressures and temperatures [4]. Knowledge of speciation of siderophile elements in silicate melts in equilibrium with metal may help distinguish between these hypotheses. But there is some uncertainty regarding speciation. For example, Ni and Co have been reported to be present as 1+ or zero valence species in silicate melts at redox states appropriate to planetary accretion, rather than the expected 2+ state [5-7]. Independent metal/silicate partitioning experiments by three members of this group using two different experimental designs on both synthetic and natural compositions do not show evidence for Ni and Co in valence states other than 2+ over a wide range of redox states. For example, solid metal/silicate melt partition coefficients for Ni at 1260 degrees C obtained by VJH from experiments investigating the partitioning of Ni, Co, Mo, W, and P are indistinguishable from those obtained by JAD in similar experiments investigating the partitioning of Ni, Ge, and Sn. Both datasets define a line with the equation: log D(Ni) = - 0.54log fO2 - 3.14 with r^2 > 0.995. (Note that fO2 was calculated in both studies from thermodynamic data and phase compositions. A small, systematic offset from the true fO2 as measured by a solid electrolyte cell affects both equations similarly, but does not diminish their close agreement.) The valence of Ni in the silicate melt is obtained by multiplying the slope of the line by -4, indicating divalent Ni in

  12. Heterogeneous Delivery of Silicate and Metal to the Earth via Large Planetesimals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchi, S.; Canup, R. M.; Walker, R. J.

    2017-12-01

    Earth's mantle abundances of at least some highly siderophile elements, (HSE; Re, Os, Ir, Ru, Pt, Rh, Pd, and Au), are much higher than would result from metal-silicate equilibration during terrestrial core formation, and can be better explained as a result of late accretion of a minimum of 0.5% Earth's masses after core formation was complete. Traditional models assume that HSEs delivered by late projectiles completely mixed and chemically equilibrated with the Earth's mantle. This appears likely for undifferentiated, well-mixed projectiles, or for relatively small, differentiated projectiles. However several arguments suggest that late projectiles may have been large (> 1500 km in diameter) and differentiated, and in this case, portions of the projectile's core may merge with the Earth's core, rather than being mixed into the Earth's mantle. We investigate projectile mixing with a suite of SPH simulations of differentiated planetesimal colliding with the Earth. A range of outcomes emerge from our simulations suggesting that for large impactors (>1500 km), the delivery of HSE to the Earth's mantle may be disproportionate with the overall delivery of mass. For impacts with impact angles < 45° , between ˜ 20% to 80% of the impactor's core may merge directly with the Earth's core; while for impact angle > 60°, most of the impactor core escapes for moderate impact speeds. An implication is that the late accreted mass inferred from terrestrial HSE abundances may be a substantial underestimate, by a factor 2-5. In addition, partial mixing of projectiles result in an enrichment in mantle vs core material delivered to the bulk silicate Earth, implying substantial compositional variations in the accreted mass. Such variations could produce initially localized domains in Earth's mantle with distinct, mass independent isotopic signatures, given the isotopic variability resulting from nucleosynthetic heterogeneities among genetically diverse meteorites. In general we find

  13. Metal-silicate Partitioning and Its Role in Core Formation and Composition on Super-Earths

    SciT

    Schaefer, Laura; Petaev, M. I.; Sasselov, Dimitar D.

    We use a thermodynamic framework for silicate-metal partitioning to determine the possible compositions of metallic cores on super-Earths. We compare results using literature values of the partition coefficients of Si and Ni, as well as new partition coefficients calculated using results from laser shock-induced melting of powdered metal-dunite targets at pressures up to 276 GPa, which approaches those found within the deep mantles of super-Earths. We find that larger planets may have little to no light elements in their cores because the Si partition coefficient decreases at high pressures. The planet mass at which this occurs will depend on themore » metal-silicate equilibration depth. We also extrapolate the equations of state (EOS) of FeO and FeSi alloys to high pressures, and present mass–radius diagrams using self-consistent planet compositions assuming equilibrated mantles and cores. We confirm the results of previous studies that the distribution of elements between mantle and core will not be detectable from mass and radius measurements alone. While observations may be insensitive to interior structure, further modeling is sensitive to compositionally dependent properties, such as mantle viscosity and core freeze-out properties. We therefore emphasize the need for additional high pressure measurements of partitioning as well as EOSs, and highlight the utility of the Sandia Z-facilities for this type of work.« less

  14. The neodymium stable isotope composition of the silicate Earth and chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoy-West, Alex J.; Millet, Marc-Alban; Burton, Kevin W.

    2017-12-01

    The non-chondritic neodymium (Nd) 142Nd/144Nd ratio of the silicate Earth potentially provides a key constraint on the accretion and early evolution of the Earth. Yet, it is debated whether this offset is due to the Earth being formed from material enriched in s-process Nd isotopes or results from an early differentiation process such as the segregation of a late sulfide matte during core formation, collisional erosion or a some combination of these processes. Neodymium stable isotopes are potentially sensitive to early sulfide segregation into Earth's core, a process that cannot be resolved using their radiogenic counterparts. This study presents the first comprehensive Nd stable isotope data for chondritic meteorites and terrestrial rocks. Stable Nd measurements were made using a double spike technique coupled with thermal ionisation mass spectrometry. All three of the major classes of chondritic meteorites, carbonaceous, enstatite and ordinary chondrites have broadly similar isotopic compositions allowing calculation of a chondritic mean of δ146/144Nd = -0.025 ± 0.025‰ (±2 s.d.; n = 39). Enstatite chondrites yield the most uniform stable isotope composition (Δ146/144Nd = 26 ppm), with considerably more variability observed within ordinary (Δ146/144Nd = 72 ppm) and carbonaceous meteorites (Δ146/144Nd = 143 ppm). Terrestrial weathering, nucleosynthetic variations and parent body thermal metamorphism appear to have little measurable effect on δ146/144Nd in chondrites. The small variations observed between ordinary chondrite groups most likely reflect inherited compositional differences between parent bodies, with the larger variations observed in carbonaceous chondrites being linked to varying modal proportions of calcium-aluminium rich inclusions. The terrestrial samples analysed here include rocks ranging from basaltic to rhyolitic in composition, MORB glasses and residual mantle lithologies. All of these terrestrial rocks possess a broadly similar Nd

  15. Pulse energy dependence of refractive index change in lithium niobium silicate glass during femtosecond laser direct writing.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jing; Poumellec, Bertrand; Brisset, François; Lancry, Matthieu

    2018-03-19

    Femtosecond laser-induced refractive index changes in lithium niobium silicate glass were explored at high repetition rate (300 fs, 500 kHz) by polarized light microscopy, full-wave retardation plate, quantitative birefringence microscopy, and digital holographic microscopy. We found three regimes on energy increase. The first one corresponds to isotropic negative refractive index change (for pulse energy ranging 0.4-0.8 μJ/pulse, 0.6 NA, 5μm/s, 650μm focusing depth in the glass). The second one (0.8-1.2 μJ/pulse) corresponds to birefringence with well-defined slow axis orientation. The third one (above 1.2 μJ/pulse) is related to birefringence direction fluctuation. Interestingly, these regimes are consistent with crystallization ones. In addition, an asymmetric orientational writing effect has been detected on birefringence. These topics extend the possibility of controlling refractive index change in multi-component glasses.

  16. Digital evaluation of the fit of zirconia-reinforced lithium silicate crowns with a new three-dimensional approach.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Moritz; Valcanaia, Andre; Neiva, Gisele; Mehl, Albert; Fasbinder, Dennis

    2017-11-30

    Several methods for the evaluation of fit of computer-aided design/computer-assisted manufacture (CAD/CAM)-fabricated restorations have been described. In the study, digital models were recorded with an intraoral scanning device and were measured using a new three-dimensional (3D) computer technique to evaluate restoration internal fit. The aim of the study was to evaluate the internal adaptation and fit of chairside CAD/CAM-fabricated zirconia-reinforced lithium silicate ceramic crowns fabricated with different post-milling protocols. The null hypothesis was that different post-milling protocols did not influence the fitting accuracy of zirconia-reinforced lithium silicate restorations. A master all-ceramic crown preparation was completed on a maxillary right first molar on a typodont. Twenty zirconia-reinforced lithium silicate ceramic crowns (Celtra Duo, Dentsply Sirona) were designed and milled using a chairside CAD/CAM system (CEREC Omnicam, Dentsply Sirona). The 20 crowns were randomly divided into two groups based on post-milling protocols: no manipulation after milling (Group MI) and oven fired-glazing after milling (Group FG). A 3D computer method was used to evaluate the internal adaptation of the crowns. This was based on a subtractive analysis of a digital scan of the crown preparation and a digital scan of the thickness of the cement space over the crown preparation as recorded by a polyvinylsiloxane (PVS) impression material. The preparation scan and PVS scan were matched in 3D and a 3D difference analysis was performed with a software program (OraCheck, Cyfex). Three areas of internal adaptation and fit were selected for analysis: margin (MA), axial wall (AX), and occlusal surface (OC). Statistical analysis was performed using 80% percentile and one-way ANOVA with post-hoc Scheffé test (P = .05). The closest internal adaptation of the crowns was measured at the axial wall with 102.0 ± 11.7 µm for group MI-AX and 106.3 ± 29.3 µm for group FG

  17. Thermoluminescent properties of rare earth doped lithium strontium borate phosphors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakathamani, S.; Annalakshmi, O.; Jose, M. T.

    2018-04-01

    Thermoluminescence (TL) of borates is remarkable in the field of radiation dosimetry because they can detect both neutron and gamma radiations. Usually, the TL efficiency of pure borates is low and hence dopants have to be added to increase their TL output. Their sensitivity and thermal stability vary widely and depend strongly on the preparation method. In this study polycrystalline powders of different rare earth doped thermoluminescent phosphors of Lithium Strontium borate (LSB) were synthesized by solid state sintering technique. Among the different rare earth dopants, the phosphor doped with cerium was found to have a simple glow curve structure with a dosimetric peak at around 265°C for a heating rate of 5°C/s. In order to study the effect of dopant on the TL characteristics, LSB phosphor with different concentrations of Ce dopant was synthesized and the TL intensity was found to be maximum for a dopant concentration of 0.7 mol%. All other important dosimetric characteristics like dose response and fading were carried out for the LSB:Ce (0.7 mol%) phosphor. Kinetic parameters like trap depth and frequency factor were determined using Peak shape method from Chen's equation.

  18. NREL, NASA, and UCL Team Up to Make Lithium-Ion Batteries Safer on Earth

    and in Space | News | NREL NREL, NASA, and UCL Team Up to Make Lithium-Ion Batteries Safer on Earth and in Space NREL, NASA, and UCL Team Up to Make Lithium-Ion Batteries Safer on Earth and in Space . NREL joined forces with NASA in finding new, more precise ways to trigger internal short circuits

  19. MAS-NMR investigations of the crystallization behaviour of lithium aluminum silicate (LAS) glasses containing P 2O 5 and TiO 2 nucleants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ananthanarayanan, A.; Kothiyal, G. P.; Montagne, L.; Revel, B.

    2010-06-01

    Lithium aluminum silicate (LAS) glass of composition (mol%) 20.4Li 2O-4.0Al 2O 3-68.6SiO 2-3.0K 2O-2.6B 2O 3-0.5P 2O 5-0.9TiO 2 was prepared by melt quenching. The glass was then nucleated and crystallized based on differential thermal analysis (DTA) data and was characterized by 29Si, 31P, 11B and 27Al MAS-NMR. XRD and 29Si NMR showed that lithium metasilicate (Li 2SiO 3) is the first phase to c form followed by cristobalite (SiO 2) and lithium disilicate (Li 2Si 2O 5). 29Si MAS-NMR revealed a change in the network structure already for the glasses nucleated at 550 °C. Since crystalline Li 3PO 4, as observed by 31P MAS-NMR, forms concurrently with the silicate phases, we conclude that crystalline Li 3PO 4 does not act as a nucleating agent for lithium silicate phases. Moreover, 31P NMR indicates the formation of M-PO 4 ( M=B, Al or Ti) complexes. The presence of BO 3 and BO 4 structural units in all the glass/glass-ceramic samples is revealed through 11B MAS-NMR. B remains in the residual glass and the crystallization of silicate phases causes a reduction in the number of alkali ions available for charge compensation. As a result, the number of trigonally coordinated B (BO 3) increases at the expense of tetrahedrally coordinated B (BO 4). The 27Al MAS-NMR spectra indicate the presence of tetrahedrally coordinated Al species, which are only slightly perturbed by the crystallization.

  20. Ag-doped Lithium alumino silicate photostructurable glass for microdevice fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Richa; Goswami, Madhumita; Krishnan, Madangopal

    2018-04-01

    Ag-doped LAS glass of composition (wt.%):74SiO2-6Al2O3-15Li2O-5X (X=other additives) were prepared by melt-quench technique and characterized for thermal and optical properties using DTA and UV-Visible spectrometer. XRD technique was used for phase identification in the heat treated glasses. Glass samples were exposed to UV-light for conversion of Ce3+ to Ce4+ state and Ag+ into Ago metallic state. DTA shows a lower crystallization temperature (Tp) at around 605°C for exposed samples as compared to unexposed base glass which is at around 625°C. UV-Visible spectra shows a broad band at around 305nm which indicates Ce3+ in base glass whereas in case of UV-exposed sample the reduced peak intensity indicates conversion of Ce3+ to Ce4+ ions, which also confirm formation of Ago in glass samples. Ag agglomeration was also confirmed from the band position at 430nm in heat treated sample, found responsible for early growth of meta-silicate phase in exposed sample. The meta-silicate phase was selectively etched for fabrication of micro-devices.

  1. The adsorption kinetics of metal ions onto different microalgae and siliceous earth.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, D; Müller, A; Csögör, Z; Frimmel, F H; Posten, C

    2001-03-01

    In the present work the adsorption kinetics of the six metal ions aluminum, zinc, mercury, lead, copper, and cadmium onto living microalgae were measured. The freshwater green microalga Scenedesmus subspicatus, the brackish water diatom Cyclotella cryptica, the seawater diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum, and the seawater red alga Porphyridium purpureum were the subject of investigation. In most cases the adsorption rate of the metals could be well described by using the equation of the Langmuir adsorption rate expression. Inverse parameter estimation allowed the determination of the rate constants of the adsorption process and the maximum metal content of the algae. The highest values for the rate constant were obtained for Porphyridium purpureum followed by Phaeodactylum tricornutum. High values for the maximum content were obtained for Cyclotella cryptica and Scenedesmus subspicatus. The maximum rate constant was 24.21 h-1 for the adsorption of Hg to Porphyridium purpureum whereas the maximum metal content (0.243 g g-1) was obtained for Zn on Cyclotella cryptica. A comparison of these values with those obtained for the mineral siliceous earth exhibiting low maximum content and high adsorption rates reveals that the mechanism of adsorption onto the algae is a mixture of adsorption and accumulation.

  2. Alkaline earth silicate wools - A new generation of high temperature insulation.

    PubMed

    Brown, Robert C; Harrison, Paul T C

    2012-11-01

    Intensive study of the natural asbestiform minerals that cause human diseases, and the consequent understanding of their hazardous characteristics, has enabled the development of manufactured fibres whose physical and/or chemical properties, in particular as they relate to biopersistence, have been adjusted to minimize possible harm to health. A strong driver for the developmentof new high temperature insulation materials wasthe perception of the toxicity of refractory ceramic fibres (RCF)and their classification in the EU as a category 2 carcinogen under Directive 67/548/EEC. Such classification carries with it the requirement for substitution by less hazardous materials. This paper focuses on the development of alkaline earth silicate (AES) wools as a new class of high temperature insulation with the capability of such substitution in a number of applications. These wools have only a low potential to cause harm because they do not persist in lung tissue once deposited, and have produced minimal effects in experimental test systems. AES wools are increasingly being used in a wide range of high temperature applications. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Thermal Cycling and High-Temperature Corrosion Tests of Rare Earth Silicate Environmental Barrier Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darthout, Émilien; Gitzhofer, François

    2017-12-01

    Lutetium and yttrium silicates, enriched with an additional secondary zirconia phase, environmental barrier coatings were synthesized by the solution precursor plasma spraying process on silicon carbide substrates. A custom-made oven was designed for thermal cycling and water vapor corrosion testing. The oven can test four specimens simultaneously and allows to evaluate environmental barrier performances under similar corrosion kinetics compared to turbine engines. Coatings structural evolution has been observed by SEM on the polished cross sections, and phase composition has been analyzed by XRD. All coatings have been thermally cycled between 1300 °C and the ambient temperature, without spallation, due to their porosity and the presence of additional secondary phase which increases the thermal cycling resistance. During water vapor exposure at 1200 °C, rare earth disilicates showed a good stability, which is contradictory with the literature, due to impurities—such as Si- and Al-hydroxides—in the water vapor jets. The presence of vertical cracks allowed the water vapor to reach the substrate and then to corrode it. It has been observed that thin vertical cracks induced some spallation after 24 h of corrosion.

  4. Preparation and physicochemical properties of surfactant-free emulsions using electrolytic-reduction ion water containing lithium magnesium sodium silicate.

    PubMed

    Okajima, Masahiro; Wada, Yuko; Hosoya, Takashi; Hino, Fumio; Kitahara, Yoshiyasu; Shimokawa, Ken-ichi; Ishii, Fumiyoshi

    2013-04-01

    Surfactant-free emulsions by adding jojoba oil, squalane, olive oil, or glyceryl trioctanoate (medium chain fatty acid triglycerides, MCT) to electrolytic-reduction ion water containing lithium magnesium sodium silicate (GE-100) were prepared, and their physiochemical properties (thixotropy, zeta potential, and mean particle diameter) were evaluated. At an oil concentration of 10%, the zeta potential was ‒22.3 ‒ ‒26.8 mV, showing no marked differences among the emulsions of various types of oil, but the mean particle diameters in the olive oil emulsion (327 nm) and MCT emulsion (295 nm) were smaller than those in the other oil emulsions (452-471 nm). In addition, measurement of the hysteresis loop area of each type of emulsion revealed extremely high thixotropy of the emulsion containing MCT at a low concentration and the olive emulsion. Based on these results, since surfactants and antiseptic agents markedly damage sensitive skin tissue such as that with atopic dermatitis, surfactant- and antiseptic-free emulsions are expected to be new bases for drugs for external use.

  5. Indirect zirconia-reinforced lithium silicate ceramic CAD/CAM restorations: Preliminary clinical results after 12 months.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Moritz; Koller, Christina; Mehl, Albert; Hickel, Reinhard

    2017-01-01

    No clinical data are available for the new computer-aided design/computer-assisted manufacture (CAD/CAM) material zirconia-reinforced lithium silicate (ZLS) ceramic. This study describes preliminary clinical results for indirect ZLS CAD/CAM restorations after 12 months. Indirect restorations were fabricated, using the CEREC method and intraoral scanning (CEREC Omnicam, CEREC MCXL). Sixty-seven restorations were seated adhesively (baseline). Sixty restorations were evaluated after 12 months (follow-up), using modified FDI criteria. Two groups were established, according to ZLS restorations' post-processing procedure prior to adhesive seating: group I (three-step polishing, n = 32) and group II (fire glazing, n = 28). Statistical analysis was performed with Mann-Whitney U test and Wilcoxon test (P < .05). The success rate of indirect ZLS CAD/CAM restorations after 12 months was 96.7%. Two restorations clinically failed as a result of bulk fracture (failure rate 3.3%). No statistically significant differences were found for baseline and follow-up criteria (Wilcoxon test, P > .05). Statistically significant differences were found for criteria surface gloss for group I and group II (Mann-Whitney U test, P < .05). This study demonstrates ZLS CAD/CAM restorations have a high clinical success rate after 12 months. A longer clinical evaluation period is necessary to draw further conclusions.

  6. Lithium conductivity in an Li-bearing double-ring silicate mineral, sogdianite

    SciT

    Park, S.-H.; Hoelzel, M.; Forschungsneutronenquelle Heinz Maier-Leibnitz

    The crystal structure of an Li-bearing double-ring silicate mineral, sogdianite ((Zr{sub 1.18}Fe{sup 3+} {sub 0.55}Ti{sub 0.24}Al{sub 0.03})(Y {sub 1.64},Na{sub 0.36})K{sub 0.85}[Li{sub 3}Si{sub 12}O{sub 30}], P6/mcc, a{approx}10.06 A, c{approx}14.30 A, Z=2), was investigated by neutron powder diffraction from 300 up to 1273 K. Rietveld refinements of displacement parameters revealed high anisotropic Li motions perpendicular to the crystallographic c-axis, indicating an exchange process between tetrahedral T2 and octahedral A sites. AC impedance spectra of a sogdianite single crystal (0.04x0.09x0.25 cm{sup 3}) show that the material is an ionic conductor with conductivity values of {sigma}=4.1x10{sup -5} S cm{sup -1} at 923 K andmore » 1.2x10{sup -3} S cm{sup -1} at 1219 K perpendicular to the c-axis, involving two relaxation processes with activation energies of 1.26(3) and 1.08(3) eV, respectively. - Graphical abstract: Structure of sogdianite with atomic displacement parameter (ADP) ellipsoids at 1273 K.« less

  7. Mantle convection and the distribution of geochemical reservoirs in the silicate shell of the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walzer, Uwe; Hendel, Roland

    2010-05-01

    We present a dynamic 3-D spherical-shell model of mantle convection and the evolution of the chemical reservoirs of the Earth`s silicate shell. Chemical differentiation, convection, stirring and thermal evolution constitute an inseparable dynamic system. Our model is based on the solution of the balance equations of mass, momentum, energy, angular momentum, and four sums of the number of atoms of the pairs 238U-206Pb, 235U-207Pb, 232Th-208Pb, and 40K-40Ar. Similar to the present model, the continental crust of the real Earth was not produced entirely at the start of the evolution but developed episodically in batches [1-7]. The details of the continental distribution of the model are largely stochastic, but the spectral properties are quite similar to the present real Earth. The calculated Figures reveal that the modeled present-day mantle has no chemical stratification but we find a marble-cake structure. If we compare the observational results of the present-day proportion of depleted MORB mantle with the model then we find a similar order of magnitude. The MORB source dominates under the lithosphere. In our model, there are nowhere pure unblended reservoirs in the mantle. It is, however, remarkable that, in spite of 4500 Ma of solid-state mantle convection, certain strong concentrations of distributed chemical reservoirs continue to persist in certain volumes, although without sharp abundance boundaries. We deal with the question of predictable and stochastic portions of the phenomena. Although the convective flow patterns and the chemical differentiation of oceanic plateaus are coupled, the evolution of time-dependent Rayleigh number, Rat , is relatively well predictable and the stochastic parts of the Rat(t)-curves are small. Regarding the juvenile growth rates of the total mass of the continents, predictions are possible only in the first epoch of the evolution. Later on, the distribution of the continental-growth episodes is increasingly stochastic

  8. Open system models of isotopic evolution in Earth's silicate reservoirs: Implications for crustal growth and mantle heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumari, Seema; Paul, Debajyoti; Stracke, Andreas

    2016-12-01

    An open system evolutionary model of the Earth, comprising continental crust (CC), upper and lower mantle (UM, LM), and an additional isolated reservoir (IR) has been developed to study the isotopic evolution of the silicate Earth. The model is solved numerically at 1 Myr time steps over 4.55 Gyr of Earth history to reproduce both the present-day concentrations and isotope ratios of key radioactive decay systems (Rb-Sr, Sm-Nd, and U-Th-Pb) in these terrestrial reservoirs. Various crustal growth scenarios - continuous versus episodic and early versus late crustal growth - and their effect on the evolution of Sr-Nd-Pb isotope systematics in the silicate reservoirs have been evaluated. Modeling results where the present-day UM is ∼60% of the total mantle mass and a lower mantle that is non-primitive reproduce the estimated geochemical composition and isotope ratios in Earth's silicate reservoirs. The isotopic evolution of the silicate Earth is strongly affected by the mode of crustal growth; only an exponential crustal growth pattern with crustal growth since the early Archean satisfactorily explains the chemical and isotopic evolution of the crust-mantle system and accounts for the so-called Pb paradoxes. Assuming that the OIB source is located in the deeper mantle, our model could, however, not reproduce its target ɛNd of +4.6 for the UM, which has been estimated from the average isotope ratios of 32 individual ocean island localities. Hence, either mantle plumes sample the LM in a non-representative way, or the simplified model set-up does not capture the full complexity of Earth's lower mantle (Nd isotope) evolution. Compared to the results obtained for a 4.55 Ga Earth, a model assuming a protracted U-Pb evolution of silicate Earth by ca. 100 Myr reproduces a slightly better fit for the Pb isotope ratios in Earth's silicate reservoirs. One notable feature of successful models is the early depletion of incompatible elements (as well as rapid decrease in Th/U) in

  9. Misfit and fracture load of implant-supported monolithic crowns in zirconia-reinforced lithium silicate.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Rafael Soares; Souza, Caroline Mathias Carvalho de; Bergamo, Edmara Tatiely Pedroso; Bordin, Dimorvan; Del Bel Cury, Altair Antoninha

    2017-01-01

    In this study, marginal and internal misfit and fracture load with and without thermal-mechanical aging (TMA) of monolithic ZLS and lithium disilicate (LDS) crowns were evaluated. Crowns were milled using a computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing system. Marginal gaps (MGs), absolute marginal discrepancy (AMD), axial gaps, and occlusal gaps were measured by X-ray microtomography (n=8). For fracture load testing, crowns were cemented in a universal abutment, and divided into four groups: ZLS without TMA, ZLS with TMA, LDS without TMA, and LDS with TMA (n=10). TMA groups were subjected to 10,000 thermal cycles (5-55°C) and 1,000,000 mechanical cycles (200 N, 3.8 Hz). All groups were subjected to compressive strength testing in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min until failure. Student's t-test was used to examine misfit, two-way analysis of variance was used to analyze fracture load, and Pearson's correlation coefficients for misfit and fracture load were calculated (α=0.05). The materials were analyzed according to Weibull distribution, with 95% confidence intervals. Average MG (p<0.001) and AMD (p=0.003) values were greater in ZLS than in LDS crowns. TMA did not affect the fracture load of either material. However, fracture loads of ZLS crowns were lower than those of LDS crowns (p<0.001). Fracture load was moderately correlated with MG (r=-0.553) and AMD (r=-0.497). ZLS with TMA was least reliable, according to Weibull probability. Within the limitations of this study, ZLS crowns had lower fracture load values and greater marginal misfit than did LDS crowns, although these values were within acceptable limits.

  10. Fatigue failure load of two resin-bonded zirconia-reinforced lithium silicate glass-ceramics: Effect of ceramic thickness.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Jaiane Bandoli; Riquieri, Hilton; Prochnow, Catina; Guilardi, Luís Felipe; Pereira, Gabriel Kalil Rocha; Borges, Alexandre Luiz Souto; de Melo, Renata Marques; Valandro, Luiz Felipe

    2018-06-01

    To evaluate the effect of ceramic thickness on the fatigue failure load of two zirconia-reinforced lithium silicate (ZLS) glass-ceramics, adhesively cemented to a dentin analogue material. Disc-shaped specimens were allocated into 8 groups (n=25) considering two study factors: ZLS ceramic type (Vita Suprinity - VS; and Celtra Duo - CD), and ceramic thickness (1.0; 1.5; 2.0; and 2.5mm). A trilayer assembly (ϕ=10mm; thickness=3.5mm) was designed to mimic a bonded monolithic restoration. The ceramic discs were etched, silanized and luted (Variolink N) into a dentin analogue material. Fatigue failure load was determined using the Staircase method (100,000 cycles at 20Hz; initial fatigue load ∼60% of the mean monotonic load-to-failure; step size ∼5% of the initial fatigue load). A stainless-steel piston (ϕ=40mm) applied the load into the center of the specimens submerged in water. Fractographic analysis and Finite Element Analysis (FEA) were also performed. The ceramic thickness influenced the fatigue failure load for both ZLS materials: Suprinity (716N up to 1119N); Celtra (404N up to 1126N). FEA showed that decreasing ceramic thickness led to higher stress concentration on the cementing interface. Different ZLS glass-ceramic thicknesses influenced the fatigue failure load of the bonded system (i.e. the thicker the glass ceramic is, the higher the fatigue failure load will be). Different microstructures of the ZLS glass-ceramics might affect the fatigue behavior. FEA showed that the thicker the glass ceramic is, the lower the stress concentration at the tensile surface will be. Copyright © 2018 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Thermoluminescence response of rare earth activated zinc lithium borate glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saidu, A.; Wagiran, H.; Saeed, M. A.; Obayes, H. K.; Bala, A.; Usman, F.

    2018-03-01

    New glasses of zinc lithium borate doped with terbium oxide were synthesized by high temperature solid-state reaction. The amorphous nature of the glasses was confirmed using x-ray diffraction analysis (XRD). Thermoluminescence (TL) response of pure zinc lithium borate (ZLB) and zinc lithium borate doped with terbium (ZLB: Tb) exposed to gamma radiation was measured and compared. There is significant enhancement in the TL yields of ZLB: Tb compared to that of pure ZLB. Effect of varying concentration of dopant (Tb4O7) on the TL response of zinc lithium borate was investigated. 0.3 mol% concentration of Tb exhibited strongest TL intensity. Thermoluminescence curve of the phosphor consist of single isolated peak. The TL response of the new materials to the exposed radiation is linear within 0.5-100 Gy range of dose with sublinearity at the lower region of the curve. High sensitivity was exhibited by the new amorphous materials. Reproducibility, thermal fading and energy response of the proposed TLD were investigated and shows remarkable result that made the phosphor suitable for radiation dosimetry.

  12. Tin isotope fractionation during magmatic processes and the isotope composition of the bulk silicate Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xueying; Amet, Quentin; Fitoussi, Caroline; Bourdon, Bernard

    2018-05-01

    Tin is a moderately volatile element whose isotope composition can be used to investigate Earth and planet differentiation and the early history of the Solar System. Although the Sn stable isotope composition of several geological and archaeological samples has been reported, there is currently scarce information about the effect of igneous processes on Sn isotopes. In this study, high-precision Sn isotope measurements of peridotites and basalts were obtained by MC-ICP-MS with a double-spike technique. The basalt samples display small variations in δ124/116Sn ranging from -0.01 ± 0.11 to 0.27 ± 0.11‰ (2 s.d.) relative to NIST SRM 3161a standard solution, while peridotites have more dispersed and more negative δ124Sn values ranging from -1.04 ± 0.11 to -0.07 ± 0.11‰ (2 s.d.). Overall, basalts are enriched in heavy Sn isotopes relative to peridotites. In addition, δ124Sn in peridotites become more negative with increasing degrees of melt depletion. These results can be explained by different partitioning behavior of Sn4+ and Sn2+ during partial melting. Sn4+ is overall more incompatible than Sn2+ during partial melting, resulting in Sn4+-rich silicate melt and Sn2+-rich residue. As Sn4+ has been shown experimentally to be enriched in heavy isotopes relative to Sn2+, the effect of melting is to enrich residual peridotites in relatively more compatible Sn2+, which results in isotopically lighter peridotites and isotopically heavier mantle-derived melts. This picture can be disturbed partly by the effect of refertilization. Similarly, the presence of enriched components such as recycled oceanic crust or sediments could explain part of the variations in Sn isotopes in oceanic basalts. The most primitive peridotite analyzed in this study was used for estimating the Sn isotope composition of the BSE, with δ124Sn = -0.08 ± 0.11‰ (2 s.d.) relative to the Sn NIST SRM 3161a standard solution. Altogether, this suggests that Sn isotopes may be a powerful probe of

  13. Deformation and seismic anisotropy of silicate post-perovskite in the Earth's lowermost mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    wu, X.; Lin, J.; Mao, Z.; Liu, J.; Kaercher, P. M.; Wenk, H.; Prakapenka, V.; Zhuravlev, K. K.

    2013-12-01

    The D' layer in the Earth's lowermost mantle with an average thickness of 250 km right above the core-mantle boundary plays a significant role in the geophysics, geochemistry, and geodynamics of the planet's interior. Seismic observations of the region have shown a number of enigmatic features including shear wave discontinuity and seismic wave anisotropy. The seismic anisotropy, in which the horizontally-polarized shear wave (VSH) travels faster than the vertically-polarized shear wave (VSV) by 1%~3% in areas below the circum Pacific, has been proposed to be a result of the lattice-preferred orientation of silicate post-perovskite (PPv) that is to be the most abundant phase in the D' layer [1]. Therefore, understanding the elasticity and deformation of the PPv phase is critical under relevant P-T conditions of the region. However, experimental results on the textures and the elastic anisotropy of PPv remain largely limited and controversial. Specifically, a number of slip systems of PPv, such as (010), (100), (110) and (001), have been proposed based on experimental and theoretical results [2-4]. Here we have studied the textures and deformation mechanism of iron-bearing PPv ((Mg0.75,Fe0.25)SiO3) at relevant P-T conditions of the lowermost mantle using synchrotron radiation radial x-ray diffraction in a membrane-driven laser-heated diamond anvil cell. The diffraction patterns were recorded from the laser-heated PPv sample during further compression between 130 GPa and 150 GPa. Analyses of the diffraction patterns and simulation results from viscoplastic self-consistent polycrystal plasticity code (VPSC) show that the development of active slip systems can be strongly influenced by experimental pressure-temperature-time conditions. At relevant P-T conditions of the lowermost mantle, our results demonstrate that the dominant slip systems of PPv should be (001)[100] and (001)[010]. Combined these results with the elasticity of PPv, we provide more constrains on the

  14. Performance and Comparison of Lithium-Ion Batteries Under Low-Earth-Orbit Mission Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Concha M.; Smart, Marshall C.; Bugga, Ratnakumar V.; Manzo, Michelle A.; Miller, Thomas B.; Gitzendanner, Rob

    2007-01-01

    The performance of two 28 V, 25 Ah lithium-ion batteries is being evaluated under low-Earth-orbit mission profiles for satellite and orbiter applications. The batteries are undergoing life testing and have achieved over 12,000 cycles to 40 percent depth-of-discharge.

  15. The Carbonate-Silicate Cycle on Earth-like Planets Near The End Of Their Habitable Lifetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rushby, A. J.; Mills, B.; Johnson, M.; Claire, M.

    2016-12-01

    The terrestrial cycle of silicate weathering and metamorphic outgassing buffers atmospheric CO2 and global climate over geological time on Earth. To first order, the operation of this cycle is assumed to occur on Earth-like planets in the orbit of other main-sequence stars in the galaxy that exhibit similar continent/ocean configurations. This has important implications for studies of planetary habitability, atmospheric and climatic evolution, and our understanding of the potential distribution of life in the Universe. We present results from a simple biogeochemical carbon cycle model developed to investigate the operation of the carbonate-silicate cycle under conditions of differing planet mass and position within the radiative habitable zone. An active carbonate-silicate cycle does extend the length of a planet's habitable period through the regulation of the CO2 greenhouse. However, the breakdown of the negative feedback between temperature, pCO2, and weathering rates towards the end of a planet's habitable lifespan results in a transitory regime of `carbon starvation' that would inhibit the ability of oxygenic photoautotrophs to metabolize, and result in the collapse of any putative biosphere supported by these organisms, suggesting an earlier limit for the initiation of inhabitable conditions than when considering temperature alone. This conclusion stresses the importance of considering the full suite of planetary properties when determining potential habitability. A small sample of exoplanets was tested using this model, and the length of their habitable periods were found to be significantly longer than that of the Earth, primarily as a function of the differential rates of stellar evolution expected from their host stars. Furthermore, we carried out statistical analysis of a series of model input parameters, determining that both the mass of the planet and the sensitivity of seafloor weathering processes to dissolved CO2 exhibit significant controls on the

  16. Lithium

    Jaskula, B.W.

    2011-01-01

    In 2010, lithium consumption in the United States was estimated to have been about 1 kt (1,100 st) of contained lithium, a 23-percent decrease from 2009. The United States was estimated to be the fourth largest consumer of lithium. It remained the leading importer of lithium carbonate and the leading producer of value-added lithium materials. Only one company, Chemetall Foote Corp. (a subsidiary of Chemetall GmbH of Germany), produced lithium compounds from domestic resources. In 2010, world lithium consumption was estimated to have been about 21 kt (22,000 st) of lithium contained in minerals and compounds, a 12-percent increase from 2009.

  17. Lithium

    Jaskula, B.W.

    2010-01-01

    In 2009, lithium consumption in the United States was estimated to have been about 1.2 kt (1,300 st) of contained lithium, a 40-percent decrease from 2008. The United States was estimated to be the fourth largest consumer of lithium, and remained the leading importer of lithium carbonate and the leading producer of value-added lithium materials. Only one company, Chemetall Foote Corp. (a subsidiary of Chemetall GmbH of Germany), produced lithium compounds from domestic resources. In 2009, world lithium consumption was estimated to have been about 18.7 kt (20,600 st) of lithium contained in minerals and compounds.

  18. Lithium

    Jaskula, B.W.

    2012-01-01

    In 2011, world lithium consumption was estimated to have been about 25 kt (25,000 st) of lithium contained in minerals and compounds, a 10-percent increase from 2010. U.S. consumption was estimated to have been about 2 kt (2,200 st) of contained lithium, a 100-percent increase from 2010. The United States was estimated to be the fourth-ranked consumer of lithium and remained the leading importer of lithium carbonate and the leading producer of value-added lithium materials. One company, Chemetall Foote Corp. (a subsidiary of Chemetall GmbH of Germany), produced lithium compounds from domestic brine resources near Silver Peak, NV.

  19. The composition of Earth's core from equations of state, metal-silicate partitioning, and core formation modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Rebecca; Campbell, Andrew; Ciesla, Fred

    2016-04-01

    The Earth accreted in a series of increasingly large and violent collisions. Simultaneously, the metallic core segregated from the silicate mantle, acquiring its modern composition through high pressure (P), high temperature (T) partitioning reactions. Here we present a model that couples these aspects of early planetary evolution, building on recent accretion simulations and metal-silicate partitioning experiments, constrained by density measurements of Fe-rich alloys. Previously, the equations of state of FeO, Fe-9Si, Fe-16Si, and FeSi were measured to megabar pressures and several thousand K using a laser-heated diamond anvil cell. With these equations of state, we determined that the core's density can be reproduced through the addition of 11.3 +/- 0.6 wt% silicon or 8.1 +/- 1.1 wt% oxygen to an Fe-Ni alloy (Fischer et al., 2011, 2014). Metal-silicate partitioning experiments of Ni, Co, V, Cr, Si, and O have been performed in a diamond anvil cell to 100 GPa and 5700 K, allowing the effects of P, T, and composition on the partitioning behaviors of these elements to be parameterized (Fischer et al., 2015; Siebert et al., 2012). Here we apply those experimental results to model Earth's core formation, using N-body simulations to describe the delivery, masses, and original locations of planetary building blocks (Fischer and Ciesla, 2014). As planets accrete, their core and mantle compositions are modified by high P-T reactions with each collision (Rubie et al., 2011). For partial equilibration of the mantle at 55% of the evolving core-mantle boundary pressure and the liquidus temperature, we find that the core contains 5.4 wt% Si and 1.9 wt% O. This composition is consistent with the seismologically-inferred density of Earth's core, based on comparisons to our equations of state, and indicate that the core cannot contain more than ~2 wt% S or C. Earth analogues experience 1.2 +/- 0.2 log units of oxidation during accretion, due to both the effects of high P

  20. Lithium

    Ober, J.A.

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, lithium consumption in the United States was at 2.5 kt of contained lithium, nearly 32% more than the estimate for 2004. World consumption was 14.1 kt of lithium contained in minerals and compounds in 2003. Exports from the US increased slightly compared with 2004. Due to strong demand for lithium compounds in 2005, both lithium carbonate plants in Chile were operating at or near capacity.

  1. MAS-NMR studies of lithium aluminum silicate (LAS) glasses and glass-ceramics having different Li 2O/Al 2O 3 ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ananthanarayanan, A.; Kothiyal, G. P.; Montagne, L.; Revel, B.

    2010-01-01

    Emergence of phases in lithium aluminum silicate (LAS) glasses of composition (wt%) xLi 2O-71.7SiO 2-(17.7- x)Al 2O 3-4.9K 2O-3.2B 2O 3-2.5P 2O 5 (5.1≤ x≤12.6) upon heat treatment were studied. 29Si, 27Al, 31P and 11B MAS-NMR were employed for structural characterization of both LAS glasses and glass-ceramics. In glass samples, Al is found in tetrahedral coordination, while P exists mainly in the form of orthophosphate units. B exists as BO 3 and BO 4 units. 27Al NMR spectra show no change with crystallization, ruling out the presence of any Al containing phase. Contrary to X-ray diffraction studies carried out, 11B (high field 18.8 T) and 29Si NMR spectra clearly indicate the unexpected crystallization of a borosilicate phase (Li,K)BSi 2O 6, whose structure is similar to the aluminosilicate virgilite. Also, lithium disilicate (Li 2Si 2O 5), lithium metasilicate (Li 2SiO 3) and quartz (SiO 2) were identified in the 29Si NMR spectra of the glass-ceramics. 31P NMR spectra of the glass-ceramics revealed the presence of Li 3PO 4 and a mixed phase (Li,K) 3PO 4 at low alkali concentrations.

  2. Emergence of silicic continents as the lower crust peels off on a hot plate-tectonic Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Priyadarshi; Gerya, Taras; Chakraborty, Sumit

    2017-09-01

    The rock record and geochemical evidence indicate that continental recycling has been occurring since the early history of the Earth. The stabilization of felsic continents in place of Earth's early mafic crust about 3.0 to 2.0 billion years ago, perhaps due to the initiation of plate tectonics, implies widespread destruction of mafic crust during this time interval. However, the physical mechanisms of such intense recycling on a hotter, (late) Archaean and presumably plate-tectonic Earth remain largely unknown. Here we use thermomechanical modelling to show that extensive recycling via lower crustal peeling-off (delamination but not eclogitic dripping) during continent-continent convergence was near ubiquitous during the late Archaean to early Proterozoic. We propose that such destruction of the early mafic crust, together with felsic magmatism, may have caused both the emergence of silicic continents and their subsequent isostatic rise, possibly above the sea level. Such changes in the continental character have been proposed to influence the Great Oxidation Event and, therefore, peeling-off plate tectonics could be the geodynamic trigger for this event. A transition to the slab break-off controlled syn-orogenic recycling occurred as the Earth aged and cooled, leading to reduced recycling and enhanced preservation of the continental crust of present-day composition.

  3. Lithium

    Ober, J.

    1998-01-01

    The lithium industry can be divided into two sectors: ore concentrate producers and chemical producers. Ore concentrate producers mine lithium minerals. They beneficiate the ores to produce material for use in ceramics and glass manufacturing.

  4. Lithium

    MedlinePlus

    Lithium is used to treat and prevent episodes of mania (frenzied, abnormally excited mood) in people with ... depression, episodes of mania, and other abnormal moods). Lithium is in a class of medications called antimanic ...

  5. Lithium

    Bradley, Dwight C.; Stillings, Lisa L.; Jaskula, Brian W.; Munk, LeeAnn; McCauley, Andrew D.; Schulz, Klaus J.; DeYoung,, John H.; Seal, Robert R.; Bradley, Dwight C.

    2017-12-19

    Lithium, the lightest of all metals, is used in air treatment, batteries, ceramics, glass, metallurgy, pharmaceuticals, and polymers. Rechargeable lithium-ion batteries are particularly important in efforts to reduce global warming because they make it possible to power cars and trucks from renewable sources of energy (for example, hydroelectric, solar, or wind) instead of by burning fossil fuels. Today, lithium is extracted from brines that are pumped from beneath arid sedimentary basins and extracted from granitic pegmatite ores. The leading producer of lithium from brine is Chile, and the leading producer of lithium from pegmatites is Australia. Other potential sources of lithium include clays, geothermal brines, oilfield brines, and zeolites. Worldwide resources of lithium are estimated to be more than 39 million metric tons, which is enough to meet projected demand to the year 2100. The United States is not a major producer at present but has significant lithium resources.

  6. Experimental investigation of the partitioning of phosphorus between metal and silicate phases - Implications for the earth, moon and eucrite parent body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newsom, H. E.; Drake, M. J.

    1983-01-01

    An experimental study is reported of the partitioning of Phosphorus between solid metal and basaltic silicate liquid as a function of temperature and oxygen fugacity and of the implications for the earth, moon and eucrite parent body (EPB). The relationship established between the partition coefficient and the fugacity is given at 1190 C by log D(P) = -1.12 log fO2 - 15.95 and by log D(P) = -1.53 log fO2 17.73 at 1300 C. The partition coefficient D(P) was determined, and it is found to be consistent with a valence state of 5 for P in the molten silicate. Using the determined coefficient the low P/La ratios of the earth, moon, and eucrites relative to C1 chondrites can be explained. The lowering of the P/La ratio in the eucrites relative to Cl chondrite by a factor of 40 can be explained by partitioning P into 20-25 wt% sulfur-bearing metallic liquid corresponding to 5-25% of the total metal plus silicate system. The low P/La and W/La ratios in the moon may be explained by the partitioning of P and W into metal during formation of a small core by separation of liquid metal from silicate at low degrees of partial melting of the silicates. These observations are consistent with independent formation of the moon and the earth.

  7. High-temperature ultrasonic characterization of the mechanical and microstructural behavior of a fibrous composite with a magnesium lithium aluminum silicate glass-ceramic matrix

    SciT

    Cutard, T.; Huger, M.; Fargeot, D.

    The mechanical behavior and the microstructural modifications of a SiC-fiber-reinforced magnesium lithium aluminum silicate glass-ceramic (SiC/MASL) have been characterized by ultrasonic measurement of uniaxial Young`s modulus at high temperature. Under vacuum, long isothermal agings in the 750--1,000 C temperature range have shown matrix modifications in terms of crystallization of residual glassy phases, and of phase transformations in the Li{sub 2}O-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2} system. In air, long isothermal agings performed under the same conditions have led to the same matrix transformations but in competition with oxidation mechanisms of the carbon fiber-matrix interphase. All of these matrix and/or interface transformations havemore » been confirmed by X-ray diffraction analysis, scanning electron microscopy, scanning acoustic microscopy, and microindentation tests.« less

  8. Copper Silicate Hydrate Hollow Spheres Constructed by Nanotubes Encapsulated in Reduced Graphene Oxide as Long-Life Lithium-Ion Battery Anode.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiujuan; Tang, Chunjuan; Wang, Xuanpeng; Zhou, Liang; Wei, Qiulong; Yan, Mengyu; Sheng, Jinzhi; Hu, Ping; Wang, Bolun; Mai, Liqiang

    2015-12-09

    Hierarchical copper silicate hydrate hollow spheres-reduced graphene oxide (RGO) composite is successfully fabricated by a facile hydrothermal method using silica as in situ sacrificing template. The electrochemical performance of the composite as lithium-ion battery anode was studied for the first time. Benefiting from the synergistic effect of the hierarchical hollow structure and conductive RGO matrix, the composite exhibits excellent long-life performance and rate capability. A capacity of 890 mAh/g is achieved after 200 cycles at 200 mA/g and a capacity of 429 mAh/g is retained after 800 cycles at 1000 mA/g. The results indicate that the strategy of combining hierarchical hollow structures with conductive RGO holds the potential in addressing the volume expansion issue of high capacity anode materials.

  9. Mechanical properties of silicate glasses exposed to a low-Earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiedlocher, David E.; Tucker, Dennis S.; Nichols, Ron; Kinser, Donald L.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of a 5.8 year exposure to low earth orbit environment upon the mechanical properties of commercial optical fused silica, low iron soda-lime-silica, Pyrex 7740, Vycor 7913, BK-7, and the glass ceramic Zerodur were examined. Mechanical testing employed the ASTM-F-394 piston on 3-ball method in a liquid nitrogen environment. Samples were exposed on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) in two locations. Impacts were observed on all specimens except Vycor. Weibull analysis as well as a standard statistical evaluation were conducted. The Weibull analysis revealed no differences between control samples and the two exposed samples. We thus concluded that radiation components of the Earth orbital environment did not degrade the mechanical strength of the samples examined within the limits of experimental error. The upper bound of strength degradation for meteorite impacted samples based upon statistical analysis and observation was 50 percent.

  10. Stability and Solid Solutions of Hydrous Alumino-Silicates in the Earth's Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panero, W. R.; Caracas, R.

    2017-12-01

    The degree to which the Earth's mantle stores and cycles water in excess of the storage capacity of nominally anhydrous minerals is dependent upon the stability of hydrous phases under mantle-relevant pressures, temperatures, and compositions. Two hydrous phases, phase D and phase H are stable to the pressures and temperatures of the Earth's lower mantle, suggesting that the Earth's lower mantle may participate in the cycling of water. Each phase has a wide solid solution series between MgSi2O6H2-Al2SiO6H2 and MgSiO4H2-2δAlOOH-SiO2, respectively, yet most work addresses end-member compositions for analysis of stability and elastic properties. We present the results of density functional theory calculations on the stability, structure, bonding, partitioning, and elasticity of hydrous phases D and H in the Al2O3-SiO2-MgO-H2O system, addressing the solid solution series through a statistical sampling of site occupancy and calculation of the partition function from the grand canonical ensemble. We find that the addition of Al to the endmember compositions stabilizes each phase to higher temperatures through additional configurational entropy. We further find that solid solutions tend not to undergo hydrogen-bond symmetrization as is found in the end member compositions as a result of non-symmetric bonding environments.

  11. High modulus rare earth and beryllium containing silicate glass compositions. [for glass reinforcing fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacon, J. F. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    Glass compositions having a Young's modulus of at least 16 million psi and a specific modulus of at least 110 million inches consisting essentially of approximately, by weight, 20 to 43% SiO2, 8 to 21% Al2O3, 4 to 10% BeO, 27 to 58% of at least one oxide selected from a first group consisting of Y2O3, La2O3, Nd2O3, Ce2O3, Ce2O3, and the mixed rare earth oxides, and 3 to 12% of at least one oxide selected from a second group consisting of MgO, ZrO2, ZnO and CaO are described. The molar ratio of BeO to the total content of the first group oxides is from 1.0 to 3.0.

  12. The distribution of Sr and REE between diopside and silicate liquid. [Rare Earth Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grutzeck, M.; Kridelbaugh, S.; Weill, D.

    1974-01-01

    Experimental determination of the distribution coefficients in diopside-liquid pairs for strontium and nine rare-earth elements in the system CaMgSi2O6-NaAlSi3O8-CaAl2Si2O8. In experiments in air at 1265 C it is found that most of the Sr(2+), Eu(2+), and RE(3+) ions substitute for Ca(2+) and, in addition, a coupled substitution of Al(3+) for Si(4+) occurs. All of the trace ions considered are found to be excluded from the diopside lattice relative to the liquid. In the case of the trivalent ions the exclusion is much more pronounced for La and Ce, which have ionic radii larger than that of Ca(2+) in 8-fold oxygen coordination. Divalent Sr and Eu with even larger radii are also strongly excluded.

  13. Dissolution of glass wool, rock wool and alkaline earth silicate wool: morphological and chemical changes in fibers.

    PubMed

    Campopiano, Antonella; Cannizzaro, Annapaola; Angelosanto, Federica; Astolfi, Maria Luisa; Ramires, Deborah; Olori, Angelo; Canepari, Silvia; Iavicoli, Sergio

    2014-10-01

    The behavior of alkaline earth silicate (AES) wool and of other biosoluble wools in saline solution simulating physiological fluids was compared with that of a traditional wool belonging to synthetic vitreous fibers. Morphological and size changes of fibers were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The elements extracted from fibers were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry. SEM analysis showed a larger reduction of length-weighted geometric mean fiber diameter at 4.5 pH than at 7.4 pH. At the 7.4 pH, AES wool showed a higher dissolution rate and a dissolution time less than a few days. Their dissolution was highly non-congruent with rapid leaching of calcium. Unlike rock wool, glass wool dissolved more rapidly at physiological pH than at acid pH. Dissolution of AES and biosoluble rock wool is accompanied by a noticeable change in morphology while by no change for glass wool. Biosoluble rock wool developed a leached surface with porous honeycomb structure. SEM analysis showed the dissolution for glass wool is mainly due to breakage transverse of fiber at pH 7.4. AES dissolution constant (Kdis) was the highest at pH 7.4, while at pH 4.5 only biosoluble rockwool 1 showed a higher Kdis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. On the formation of continental silicic melts in thermochemical mantle convection models: implications for early Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Thienen, P.; van den Berg, A. P.; Vlaar, N. J.

    2004-12-01

    Important constituents of Archean cratons, formed in the early and hot history of the Earth, are Tonalite-Trondhjemite-Granodiorite (TTG) plutons and greenstone belts. The formation of these granite-greenstone terrains is often ascribed to plate-tectonic processes. Buoyancy considerations, however, do not allow plate tectonics to take place in a significantly hotter Earth. We therefore propose an alternative mechanism for the coeval and proximate production of TTG plutons and greenstone-like crustal successions. That is, when a locally anomalously thick basaltic crust has been produced by continued addition of extrusive or intrusive basalts due to partial melting of the underlying convecting mantle, the transition of a sufficient amount of basalt in the lower crust to eclogite may trigger a resurfacing event, in which a complete crustal section of over 1000 km long sinks into the mantle in less than 2 million years. Pressure release partial melting in the complementary upwelling mantle produces large volumes of basaltic material replacing the original crust. Partial melting at the base of this newly produced crust may generate felsic melts which are added as intrusives and/or extrusives to the generally mafic crustal succession, adding to what resembles a greenstone belt. Partial melting of metabasalt in the sinking crustal section produces a significant volume of TTG melt which is added to the crust directly above the location of 'subduction', presumably in the form of a pluton. This scenario is self-consistently produced by numerical thermochemical mantle convection models, presented in this paper, including partial melting of mantle peridotite and crustal (meta)basalt. The metamorphic p, T conditions under which partial melting of metabasalt takes place in this scenario are consistent with geochemical trace element data for TTGs, which indicate melting under amphibolite rather than eclogite facies. Other geodynamical settings which we have also investigated

  15. A volatile topic: Parsing out the details of Earth's formation through experimental metal-silicate partitioning of volatile and moderately volatile elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahan, B. M.; Siebert, J.; Blanchard, I.; Badro, J.; Sossi, P.; Moynier, F.

    2017-12-01

    Volatile and moderately volatile elements display different volatilities and siderophilities, as well as varying sensitivity to thermodynamic controls (X, P, T, fO2) during metal-silicate differentiation. The experimental determination of the metal-silicate partitioning of these elements permits us to evaluate processes controlling the distribution of these elements in Earth. In this work, we have combined metal-silicate partitioning data and results for S, Sn, Zn and Cu, and input these characterizations into Earth formation models. Model parameters such as source material, timing of volatile delivery, fO2 path, and degree of impactor equilibration were varied to encompass an array of possible formation scenarios. These models were then assessed to discern plausible sets of conditions that can produce current observed element-to-element ratios (e.g. S/Zn) in the Earth's present-day mantle, while also satisfying current estimates on the S content of the core, at no more than 2 wt%. The results of our models indicate two modes of accretion that can maintain chondritic element-to-element ratios for the bulk Earth and can arrive at present-day mantle abundances of these elements. The first mode requires the late addition of Earth's entire inventory of these elements (assuming a CI-chondritic composition) and late-stage accretion that is marked by partial equilibration of large impactors. The second, possibly more intuitive mode, requires that Earth accreted - at least initially - from volatile poor material preferentially depleted in S relative to Sn, Zn, and Cu. From a chemical standpoint, this source material is most similar to type I chondrule rich (and S poor) materials (Hewins and Herzberg, 1996; Mahan et al., 2017; Amsellem et al., 2017), such as the metal-bearing carbonaceous chondrites.

  16. Enamel and Dentin Surface Finishing Influence on the Roughness and Microshear Bond Strength of a Lithium Silicate Glass-Ceramic for Laminate Veneers.

    PubMed

    Gonzaga, Carla Castiglia; Bravo, Ruth Peggy; Pavelski, Thiago Vinícius; Garcia, Paula Pontes; Correr, Gisele Maria; Leonardi, Denise Piotto; da Cunha, Leonardo Fernandes; Furuse, Adilson Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. This study evaluated the influence of cavity surface finishing with diamond burs of different grit mounted on high-speed turbine and ultrasound on the roughness and microshear bond strength (MBS) of a lithium silicate glass-ceramic to enamel and dentin. Methods. Enamel and dentin specimens were divided into seven groups, according to the type of surface finishing: 1200-grit sandpaper (control), two different brands of medium-grit and fine-grit diamond burs in a high-speed turbine; medium-grit and fine-grit CVD (chemical vapor deposition) tips in an ultrasonic device. Roughness parameters (n = 5) and MSBS to a glass-ceramic (n = 10) were determined. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's test (α = 5%). Results. Control group showed lower mean roughness readings and groups that used medium-grit diamond burs showed the highest mean roughness values. Regarding MSBS, there was no statistical difference when comparing the groups gritted with the same brand of medium- and fine-grit burs and tips. Conclusions. Cavity surface finishing influenced the roughness parameters and MSBS of a glass-ceramic to enamel and dentin. Medium-grit diamond burs in high-speed turbine showed the highest mean roughness values. Fine-grit CVD tips in ultrasound presented the highest MSBS values for both enamel and dentin.

  17. Enamel and Dentin Surface Finishing Influence on the Roughness and Microshear Bond Strength of a Lithium Silicate Glass-Ceramic for Laminate Veneers

    PubMed Central

    Gonzaga, Carla Castiglia; Bravo, Ruth Peggy; Pavelski, Thiago Vinícius; Garcia, Paula Pontes; Correr, Gisele Maria; Leonardi, Denise Piotto; da Cunha, Leonardo Fernandes; Furuse, Adilson Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. This study evaluated the influence of cavity surface finishing with diamond burs of different grit mounted on high-speed turbine and ultrasound on the roughness and microshear bond strength (MBS) of a lithium silicate glass-ceramic to enamel and dentin. Methods. Enamel and dentin specimens were divided into seven groups, according to the type of surface finishing: 1200-grit sandpaper (control), two different brands of medium-grit and fine-grit diamond burs in a high-speed turbine; medium-grit and fine-grit CVD (chemical vapor deposition) tips in an ultrasonic device. Roughness parameters (n = 5) and MSBS to a glass-ceramic (n = 10) were determined. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's test (α = 5%). Results. Control group showed lower mean roughness readings and groups that used medium-grit diamond burs showed the highest mean roughness values. Regarding MSBS, there was no statistical difference when comparing the groups gritted with the same brand of medium- and fine-grit burs and tips. Conclusions. Cavity surface finishing influenced the roughness parameters and MSBS of a glass-ceramic to enamel and dentin. Medium-grit diamond burs in high-speed turbine showed the highest mean roughness values. Fine-grit CVD tips in ultrasound presented the highest MSBS values for both enamel and dentin. PMID:27347507

  18. Silicate melt inclusion evidence for extreme pre-eruptive enrichment and post-eruptive depletion of lithium in silicic volcanic rocks of the western United States: implications for the origin of lithium-rich brines

    Hofstra, Albert H.; Todorov, T.I.; Mercer, C.N.; Adams, D.T.; Marsh, E.E.

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate whether anatectic and/or highly fractionated lithophile element-enriched rhyolite tuffs deposited in arid lacustrine basins lose enough lithium during eruption, lithification, and weathering to generate significant Li brine resources, pre-eruptive melt compositions, preserved in inclusions, and the magnitude of post-eruptive Li depletions, evident in host rhyolites, were documented at six sites in the western United States. Each rhyolite is a member of the bimodal basalt-rhyolite assemblage associated with extensional tectonics that produced the Basin and Range province and Rio Grande rift, an evolving pattern of closed drainage basins, and geothermal energy or mineral resources. Results from the 0.8 Ma Bishop tuff (geothermal) in California, 1.3 to 1.6 Ma Cerro Toledo and Upper Bandelier tephra (geothermal) and 27.9 Ma Taylor Creek rhyolite (Sn) in New Mexico, 21.7 Ma Spor Mountain tuff (Be, U, F) and 24.6 Ma Pine Grove tuff (Mo) in Utah, and 27.6 Ma Hideaway Park tuff (Mo) in Colorado support the following conclusions. Melt inclusions in quartz phenocrysts from rhyolite tuffs associated with hydrothermal deposits of Sn, Mo, and Be are extremely enriched in Li (1,000s of ppm); those from Spor Mountain have the highest Li abundance yet recorded (max 5,200 ppm, median 3,750 ppm). Forty-five to 98% of the Li present in pre-eruptive magma was lost to the environment from these rhyolite tuffs. The amount of Li lost from the small volumes (1–10 km3) of Li-enriched rhyolite deposited in closed basins is sufficient to produce world-class Li brine resources. After each eruption, meteoric water leaches Li from tuff, which drains into playas, where it is concentrated by evaporation. The localized occurrence of Li-enriched rhyolites may explain why brines in arid lacustrine basins seldom have economic concentrations of Li. Considering that hydrothermal deposits of Sn, Mo, Be, U, and F may indicate potential for Li brines in nearby basins, we surmise that the

  19. Partitioning of Moderately Siderophile Elements Among Olivine, Silicate Melt, and Sulfide Melt: Constraints on Core Formation in the Earth and Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaetani, Glenn A.; Grove, Timothy L.

    1997-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of Variations in the fugacities of oxygen and sulfur on the partitioning of first series transition metals (V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni. and Cu) and W among coexisting sulfide melt, silicate melt, and olivine. Experiments were performed at 1 atm pressure, 1350 C, with the fugacities of oxygen and sulfur controlled by mixing CO2, CO, and SO2 gases. Starting compositions consisted of a CaO-MgO-Al2O3-SiO2-FeO-Na2O analog for a barred olivine chondrule from an ordinary chondrite and a synthetic komatiite. The f(sub O2)/f(sub S2), conditions ranged from log of f(sub O2) = -7.9 to - 10.6, with log of f(sub S2) values ranging from - 1.0 to -2.5. Our experimental results demonstrate that the f(sub O2)/f(sub S2) dependencies of sulfide melt/silicate melt partition coefficients for the first series transition metals arc proportional to their valence states. The f(sub O2)/f(sub S2) dependencies for the partitioning of Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu are weaker than predicted on the basis of their valence states. Variations in conditions have no significant effect on olivine/melt partitioning other than those resulting from f(sub O2)-induced changes in the valence state of a given element. The strong f(sub O2)/f(sub S2) dependence for the olivine/silicate melt partitioning of V is attributable to a change of valence state, from 4+ to 3+, with decreasing f(sub O2). Our experimentally determined partition coefficients are used to develop models for the segregation of sulfide and metal from the silicate portion of the early Earth and the Shergottite parent body (Mars). We find that the influence of S is not sufficient to explain the overabundance of siderophile and chalcophile elements that remained in the mantle of the Earth following core formation. Important constraints on core formation in Mars are provided by our experimental determination of the partitioning of Cu between silicate and sulfide melts. When combined with existing estimates for siderophile

  20. Calcium isotopic fractionation in mantle peridotites by melting and metasomatism and Ca isotope composition of the Bulk Silicate Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Jin-Ting; Ionov, Dmitri A.; Liu, Fang; Zhang, Chen-Lei; Golovin, Alexander V.; Qin, Li-Ping; Zhang, Zhao-Feng; Huang, Fang

    2017-09-01

    To better constrain the Ca isotopic composition of the Bulk Silicate Earth (BSE) and explore the Ca isotope fractionation in the mantle, we determined the Ca isotopic composition of 28 peridotite xenoliths from Mongolia, southern Siberia and the Siberian craton. The samples are divided in three chemical groups: (1) fertile, unmetasomatized lherzolites (3.7-4.7 wt.% Al2O3); (2) moderately melt-depleted peridotites (1.3-3.0 wt.% Al2O3) with no or very limited metasomatism (LREE-depleted cpx); (3) strongly metasomatized peridotites (LREE-enriched cpx and bulk rock) further divided in subgroups 3a (harzburgites, 0.1-1.0% Al2O3) and 3b (fertile lherzolites, 3.9-4.3% Al2O3). In Group 1, δ44/40Ca of fertile spinel and garnet peridotites, which experienced little or no melting and metasomatism, show a limited variation from 0.90 to 0.99‰ (relative to SRM 915a) and an average of 0.94 ± 0.05‰ (2SD, n = 14), which defines the Ca isotopic composition of the BSE. In Group 2, the δ44/40Ca is the highest for three rocks with the lowest Al2O3, i.e. the greatest melt extraction degrees (average 1.06 ± 0.04 ‰, i.e. ∼0.1‰ heavier than the BSE estimate). Simple modeling of modal melting shows that partial melting of the BSE with 103 ln ⁡αperidotite-melt ranging from 0.10 to 0.25 can explain the Group 2 data. By contrast, δ44/40Ca in eight out of nine metasomatized Group 3 peridotites are lower than the BSE estimate. The Group 3a harzburgites show the greatest δ44/40Ca variation range (0.25-0.96‰), with δ44/40Ca positively correlated with CaO and negatively correlated with Ce/Eu. Chemical evidence suggests that the residual, melt-depleted, low-Ca protoliths of the Group 3a harzburgites were metasomatized, likely by carbonate-rich melts/fluids. We argue that such fluids may have low (≤0.25‰) δ44/40Ca either because they contain recycled crustal components or because Ca isotopes, similar to trace elements and their ratios, may be fractionated by kinetic and

  1. An Update on the Lithium-Ion Cell Low-Earth-Orbit Verification Test Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Concha M.; Manzo, Michelle A.; Miller, Thomas B.; McKissock, Barbara I.; Bennett, William

    2007-01-01

    A Lithium-Ion Cell Low-Earth-Orbit Verification Test Program is being conducted by NASA Glenn Research Center to assess the performance of lithium-ion (Li-ion) cells over a wide range of low-Earth-orbit (LEO) conditions. The data generated will be used to build an empirical model for Li-ion batteries. The goal of the modeling will be to develop a tool to predict the performance and cycle life of Li-ion batteries operating at a specified set of mission conditions. Using this tool, mission planners will be able to design operation points of the battery system while factoring in mission requirements and the expected life and performance of the batteries. Test conditions for the program were selected via a statistical design of experiments to span a range of feasible operational conditions for LEO aerospace applications. The variables under evaluation are temperature, depth-of-discharge (DOD), and end-of-charge voltage (EOCV). The baseline matrix was formed by generating combinations from a set of three values for each variable. Temperature values are 10 C, 20 C and 30 C. Depth-of-discharge values are 20%, 30% and 40%. EOCV values are 3.85 V, 3.95 V, and 4.05 V. Test conditions for individual cells may vary slightly from the baseline test matrix depending upon the cell manufacturer s recommended operating conditions. Cells from each vendor are being evaluated at each of ten sets of test conditions. Cells from four cell manufacturers are undergoing life cycle tests. Life cycling on the first sets of cells began in September 2004. These cells consist of Saft 40 ampere-hour (Ah) cells and Lith ion 30 Ah cells. These cells have achieved over 10,000 cycles each, equivalent to about 20 months in LEO. In the past year, the test program has expanded to include the evaluation of Mine Safety Appliances (MSA) 50 Ah cells and ABSL battery modules. The MSA cells will begin life cycling in October 2006. The ABSL battery modules consist of commercial Sony hard carbon 18650 lithium

  2. Lithium in Jack Hills zircons: Evidence for extensive weathering of Earth's earliest crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushikubo, Takayuki; Kita, Noriko T.; Cavosie, Aaron J.; Wilde, Simon A.; Rudnick, Roberta L.; Valley, John W.

    2008-08-01

    In situ Li analyses of 4348 to 3362 Ma detrital zircons from the Jack Hills, Western Australia by SIMS reveal that the Li abundances (typically 10 to 60 ppm) are commonly over 10,000 times higher than in zircons crystallized from mantle-derived magmas and in mantle-derived zircon megacrysts (typically < 2 ppb). High Li concentrations in zircons (10 to 250 ppm) have also been found in igneous zircons from three continental parent rocks: granites, Li-rich pegmatites, and migmatites in pelitic metasediment. The substitution of trivalent cations (REEs and Y) in zircon correlates with Li + 1 and P + 5 , suggesting that an interstitial site for Li, as well as the xenotime substitution for P, provides charge balance for REEs. Li is thus fixed in the zircon structure by coupled substitutions, and diffusive changes in [Li] composition are rate-limited by slow diffusion of REEs. The Jack Hills zircons also have fractionated lithium isotope ratios ( δ7Li = - 19 to + 13‰) about five times more variable than those recorded in primitive ocean floor basalts (2 to 8‰), but similar to continental crust and its weathering products. Values of δ7Li below - 10‰ are found in zircons that formed as early as 4300 Ma. The high Li compositions indicate that primitive magmas were not the source of Jack Hills zircons and the fractionated values of δ7Li suggest that highly weathered regolith was sampled by these early Archean magmas. These new Li data provide evidence that the parent magmas of ancient zircons from Jack Hills incorporated materials from the surface of the Earth that interacted at low temperature with liquid water. These data support the hypothesis that continental-type crust and oceans existed by 4300 Ma, within 250 million years of the formation of Earth and the low values of δ7Li suggest that weathering was extensive in the early Archean.

  3. Lithium-Ion Batteries Being Evaluated for Low-Earth-Orbit Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKissock, Barbara I.

    2005-01-01

    The performance characteristics and long-term cycle life of aerospace lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries in low-Earth-orbit applications are being investigated. A statistically designed test using Li-ion cells from various manufacturers began in September 2004 to study the effects of temperature, end-of-charge voltage, and depth-of-discharge operating conditions on the cycle life and performance of these cells. Performance degradation with cycling is being evaluated, and performance characteristics and failure modes are being modeled statistically. As technology improvements are incorporated into aerospace Li-ion cells, these new designs can be added to the test to evaluate the effect of the design changes on performance and life. Cells from Lithion and Saft have achieved over 2000 cycles under 10 different test condition combinations and are being evaluated. Cells from Mine Safety Appliances (MSA) and modules made up of commercial-off-the-shelf 18650 Li-ion cells connected in series/parallel combinations are scheduled to be added in the summer of 2005. The test conditions include temperatures of 10, 20, and 30 C, end-of-charge voltages of 3.85, 3.95, and 4.05 V, and depth-of-discharges from 20 to 40 percent. The low-Earth-orbit regime consists of a 55 min charge, at a constant-current rate that is 110 percent of the current required to fully recharge the cells in 55 min until the charge voltage limit is reached, and then at a constant voltage for the remaining charge time. Cells are discharged for 35 min at the current required for their particular depth-of-discharge condition. Cells are being evaluated in four-cell series strings with charge voltage limits being applied to individual cells by the use of charge-control units designed and produced at the NASA Glenn Research Center. These charge-control units clamp the individual cell voltages as each cell reaches its end-of-charge voltage limit, and they bypass the excess current from that cell, while allowing the full

  4. Tracing metal-silicate segregation and late veneer in the Earth and the ureilite parent body with palladium stable isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creech, J. B.; Moynier, F.; Bizzarro, M.

    2017-11-01

    Stable isotope studies of highly siderophile elements (HSE) have the potential to yield valuable insights into a range of geological processes. In particular, the strong partitioning of these elements into metal over silicates may lead to stable isotope fractionation during metal-silicate segregation, making them sensitive tracers of planetary differentiation processes. We present the first techniques for the precise determination of palladium stable isotopes by MC-ICPMS using a 106Pd-110Pd double-spike to correct for instrumental mass fractionation. Results are expressed as the per mil (‰) difference in the 106Pd/105Pd ratio (δ106Pd) relative to an in-house solution standard (Pd_IPGP) in the absence of a certified Pd isotopic standard. Repeated analyses of the Pd isotopic composition of the chondrite Allende demonstrate the external reproducibility of the technique of ±0.032‰ on δ106Pd. Using these techniques, we have analysed Pd stable isotopes from a range of terrestrial and extraterrestrial samples. We find that chondrites define a mean δ106Pdchondrite = -0.19 ± 0.05‰. Ureilites reveal a weak trend towards heavier δ106Pd with decreasing Pd content, similar to recent findings based on Pt stable isotopes (Creech et al., 2017), although fractionation of Pd isotopes is significantly less than for Pt, possibly related to its weaker metal-silicate partitioning behaviour and the limited field shift effect. Terrestrial mantle samples have a mean δ106Pdmantle = -0.182 ± 0.130‰, which is consistent with a late-veneer of chondritic material after core formation.

  5. Simultaneous alloy-silicate fractionation of carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur at high pressures and temperatures: Implications for establishing the volatile budget of the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grewal, D. S.; Dasgupta, R.; Sun, C.; Tsuno, K.

    2017-12-01

    Constraining the origin, distribution and evolution of volatiles such as carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and sulfur (S) in terrestrial planets is essential to understand planetary differentiation, habitability and comparative planetology [1]. C/N ratio of Bulk Silicate Earth (BSE) is superchondritic (40 ± 8), while C/S ratio is nearly chondritic (0.49 ± 0.14) [2]. Accretion, core formation, and magma ocean (MO) crystallization are the key processes that could have set the relative budgets of C, N and S in different planetary reservoirs [3]. However, experiments using either C-N or C-S-bearing systems have shown that C is more siderophile than N and S, consequently core formation would have left behind subchondritic C/N and C/S ratios in BSE [4-6]. Accretion of extremely C-rich bodies during core formation or/and as a late veneer along with an early atmospheric blow-off are amongst the scenarios that have been suggested to explain C/N ratio while the addition of a differentiated body with a C-rich mantle has been suggested to explain C/S ratio in BSE [4-6]. However, no internally consistent explanations exist on the origin of all the volatile elements. We performed piston cylinder and multi-anvil experiments, using Fe-Ni-N-C±S alloy with variable amounts of S and mafic-ultramafic silicate mixtures in graphite saturated conditions at 1-7 GPa, 1600-1800 °C, and fO2 ranging from ΔIW of -1.1 to -0.3. EPMA and SIMS were used to determine major elements and volatile abundances in the coexisting alloy and silicate melt phases, while the speciation of the volatiles was determined using Raman spectroscopy. Our experimental data reveals that C becomes less siderophile in the presence of N and S during core-mantle differentiation involving an S-rich alloy. Using a set of inverse Monte-Carlo simulations, we propose that a disequilibrium merger of a Mars-sized planetary embryo with a C-saturated, S-rich core to a volatile-depleted proto-Earth during the main stage of accretion

  6. Effect of H2O on metal-silicate partitioning of Ni, Co, V, Cr, Mn and Fe: Implications for the oxidation state of the Earth and Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clesi, V.; Bouhifd, M. A.; Bolfan-Casanova, N.; Manthilake, G.; Fabbrizio, A.; Andrault, D.

    2016-11-01

    This study investigates the metal-silicate partitioning of Ni, Co, V, Cr, Mn and Fe during core mantle differentiation of terrestrial planets under hydrous conditions. For this, we equilibrated a molten hydrous CI chondrite model composition with various Fe-rich alloys in the system Fe-C-Ni-Co-Si-S in a multi-anvil over a range of P, T, fO2 and water content (5-20 GPa, 2073-2500 K, from 1 to 5 log units below the iron-wüstite (IW) buffer and for XH2O varying from 500 ppm to 1.5 wt%). By comparing the present experiments with the available data sets on dry systems, we observes that the effect of water on the partition coefficients of moderately siderophile elements is only moderate. For example, for iron we observed a decrease in the partition coefficient of Fe (Dmet/silFe) from 9.5 to 4.3, with increasing water content of the silicate melt, from 0 to 1.44 wt%, respectively. The evolution of metal-silicate partition coefficients of Ni, Co, V, Cr, Mn and Fe are modelled based on sets of empirical parameters. These empirical models are then used to refine the process of core segregation during accretion of Mars and the Earth. It appears that the likely presence of 3.5 wt% water on Mars during the core-mantle segregation could account for ∼74% of the FeO content of the Martian mantle. In contrast, water does not play such an important role for the Earth; only 4-6% of the FeO content of its mantle could be due to the water-induced Fe-oxidation, for a likely initial water concentration of 1.8 wt%. Thus, in order to reproduce the present-day FeO content of 8 wt% in the mantle, the Earth could initially have been accreted from a large fraction (between 85% and 90%) of reducing bodies (similar to EH chondrites), with 10-15% of the Earth's mass likely made of more oxidized components that introduced the major part of water and FeO to the Earth. This high proportion of enstatite chondrites in the original constitution of the Earth is consistent with the 17O,48Ca,50Ti,62Ni

  7. Metal-silicate thermochemistry at high temperature - Magma oceans and the 'excess siderophile element' problem of the earth's upper mantle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capobianco, Christopher J.; Jones, John H.; Drake, Michael J.

    1993-01-01

    Low-temperature metal-silicate partition coefficients are extrapolated to magma ocean temperatures. If the low-temperature chemistry data is found to be applicable at high temperatures, an important assumption, then the results indicate that high temperature alone cannot account for the excess siderophile element problem of the upper mantle. For most elements, a rise in temperature will result in a modest increase in siderophile behavior if an iron-wuestite redox buffer is paralleled. However, long-range extrapolation of experimental data is hazardous when the data contains even modest experimental errors. For a given element, extrapolated high-temperature partition coefficients can differ by orders of magnitude, even when data from independent studies is consistent within quoted errors. In order to accurately assess siderophile element behavior in a magma ocean, it will be necessary to obtain direct experimental measurements for at least some of the siderophile elements.

  8. The Stability of Hydrous Silicates in Earth's Lower Mantle: Experimental constraints from the System MgO-Al2O3-SiO2-H2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, M. J.; Thomson, A. R.; Wang, W.; Lord, O. T.; Kleppe, A. K.; Ross, J.; Kohn, S. C.

    2014-12-01

    Laser-heated diamond anvil cell experiments were performed at pressures from ~ 30 to 125 GPa on bulk compositions in the system MgO-Al2O3-SiO2-H2O (MASH) to constrain the stability of hydrous phases in Earth's lower mantle. Phase identification in run products by synchrotron powder diffraction reveals a consistent set of stability relations for the high-pressure, dense hydrous silicate phases D and H. Experiments show that aluminous phase D is stable to ~ 55 GPa. Aluminous phase H becomes stable at ~ 40 GPa and remains stable to higher pressures throughout the lower mantle depth range in both model peridotitic and basaltic lithologies. Preliminary FEG-probe analyses indicate that Phase H is alumina-rich at ~ 50 GPa, with only 5 to 10 wt% each of MgO and SiO2. Variations in ambient unit cell volumes show that Mg-perovskite becomes more aluminous with pressure throughout the pressure range studied, and that Phase H may become more Mg- and Si-rich with pressure. We also find that at pressures above ~ 90 GPa stishovite is replaced in Si-rich compositions by seifertite, at which point there is a corresponding increase in the Al-content of phase H. The melting curves of MASH compositions have been determined using thermal perturbations in power versus temperature curves, and are observed to be shallow with dT/dP slopes of ~ 4K/GPa. Our results show that hydrated peridotitic or basaltic compositions in the lower mantle should be partially molten at all depths along an adiabatic mantle geotherm. Aluminous Phase H will be stable in colder, hydrated subducting slabs, potentially to the core-mantle boundary. Thus, aluminous phase H is the primary vessel for transport of hydrogen to the deepest mantle, but hydrous silicate melt will be the host of hydrogen at ambient mantle temperatures.

  9. Boson peak of alkali and alkaline earth silicate glasses: influence of the nature and size of the network-modifying cation.

    PubMed

    Richet, Nicolas F

    2012-01-21

    The influence of the size of the alkaline earth cation on the boson peak of binary metasilicate glasses, MSiO(3) (M = Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba), has been investigated from vibrational densities of states determined by inversion of low-temperature heat capacities. As given both by C(p)/T(3) and g(ω)/ω(2), the intensity of the boson peak undergoes a 7-fold increase from Mg to Ba, whereas its temperature and frequency correlatively decrease from 18 to 10 K and from 100 to 20 cm(-1), respectively. The boson peak results from a combination of librations of SiO(4) tetrahedra and localized vibrations of network-modifying cations with non-bridging oxygens whose contribution increases markedly with the ionic radius of the alkaline earth. As a function of ionic radii, the intensity for Sr and Ba varies in the same way as previously found for alkali metasilicate glasses. The localized vibrations involving alkali and heavy alkaline earth cations appear to be insensitive to the overall glass structure. Although the new data are coherent with an almost linear relationship between the temperature of the boson peak and transverse sound velocity, pure SiO(2) and SiO(2)-rich glasses make marked exceptions to this trend because of the weak transverse character of SiO(4) librations. Finally, the universality of the calorimetric boson peak is again borne out because all data for silicate glasses collapse on the same master curve when plotted in a reduced form (C(P)∕/T(3))/(C(P)/T(3))(b) vs. T/T(b). © 2012 American Institute of Physics

  10. Partitioning of carbon between Fe-rich alloy melt and silicate melt in a magma ocean - Implications for the abundance and origin of volatiles in Earth, Mars, and the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Han; Dasgupta, Rajdeep; Duncan, Megan S.; Shimizu, Nobumichi

    2014-08-01

    The budget and origin of carbon in Earth and other terrestrial planets are debated and one of the key unknowns is the fate of carbon during early planetary processes including accretion, core formation, and magma ocean (MO) crystallization. Here we determine, experimentally, the solubility of carbon in coexisting Fe-Ni alloy melt and basaltic silicate melt in shallow MO conditions, i.e., at 1-3 GPa, 1500-1800 °C. Oxygen fugacity of the experiments, estimated based on Fe (in metallic alloy melt)-FeO (in silicate melt) equilibrium, varied between ∼IW-0.4 and IW-1.0, where IW refers to the oxygen fugacity imposed by the coexistence of iron and wüstite. Four different starting mixes, each with 7:3 silicate:metal mass ratio and silicate melt NBO/T (estimated proportion of non-bridging oxygen with respect to tetrahedral cations; NBO/T=2×/total OT -4, where T = Si + Ti + Al + Cr + P) ranging from 0.81 to 1.54 were studied. Concentrations of carbon in the alloy melt were determined using electron microprobe whereas carbon contents of quenched basaltic glasses were determined using secondary ionization mass spectrometry (SIMS). Identification of carbon and hydrogen-bearing species in silicate glasses was performed using Raman and Fourier Transformed Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Our results show that carbon in the metallic melt varies between 4.4 wt.% and 7.4 wt.% and increases with increasing temperature and modestly with increasing pressure but decreases with increasing Ni content of the alloy melt. Carbon concentration in the silicate melts, on the other hand, varies from 11 ± 1 ppm to 111 ± 7 ppm and is negatively correlated with pressure but positively correlated with temperature, the NBO/T, the oxygen fugacity and the water content of the silicate melts. Raman and FTIR results show that at our experimental conditions, carbon in silicate melt is dissolved both as hydrogenated species and CO32-. The calculated carbon partition coefficient DCmetal/silicate varies

  11. Silicates in Alien Asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    This plot of data from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescopes shows that asteroid dust around a dead 'white dwarf' star contains silicates a common mineral on Earth. The data were taken primarily by Spitzer's infrared spectrograph, an instrument that breaks light apart into its basic constituents. The yellow dots show averaged data from the spectrograph, while the orange triangles show older data from Spitzer's infrared array camera. The white dwarf is called GD 40.

  12. Physical and optical absorption studies of Fe{sup 3+} - ions doped lithium borate glasses containing certain alkaline earths

    SciT

    Bhogi, Ashok; Kumar, R. Vijaya; Kistaiah, P., E-mail: pkistaiah@yahoo.com

    Iron ion doped lithium borate glasses with the composition 15RO-25Li{sub 2}O-59B{sub 2}O{sub 3}-1Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} (where R= Ca, Sr and Ba) have been prepared by the conventional melt quenching technique and characterized to investigate the physical and optical properties using XRD, density, molar volume and UV-Visible spectroscopy. The optical absorption spectra exhibit a band at around 460 nm which is assigned to {sup 6}A{sub 1g}(S) → 4E{sub g} (G) of Fe{sup 3+} ions with distorted octahedral symmetry. From ultraviolet absorption edges, the optical band gap and Urbach energies have been evaluated. The effect of alkaline earths on these properties ismore » discussed.« less

  13. Rare Earth Element Behavior During Incongruent Weathering and Varying Discharge Conditions in Silicate Dominated River Systems: The Australian Victorian Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagedorn, K. B.; Cartwright, I.

    2008-12-01

    The distribution of rare earth elements (REE) and trace elements was measured by ICP-MS on fresh, slightly weathered and weathered granite and surface water samples from a network of 11 pristine rivers draining the Australian Victorian Alps during (i) high and (ii) low discharge conditions. River water REE concentrations are largely derived from atmospheric precipitation (rain, snow), as indicated by similar Chondrite normalized REE patterns (higher LREE over HREE; negative Ce anomalies, positive Eu anomalies) and similar total REE concentrations during both dry and wet seasons. Calculations based on the covariance between REE and Cl concentrations and oxygen and hydrogen isotopes indicate precipitation input coupled with subsequent evaporation may account for 30% o 100% of dissolved REE in stream waters. The dissolved contribution to the granitic substratum to stream water comes mainly from the transformation of plagioclase to smectite, kaolinite and gibbsite and minor apatite dissolution. However, since most REE of the regional granite are present in accessory minerals (titanite, zircon, etc.) they do not significantly contribute to the river REE pool. REE concentrations drop sharply downstream as a result of dilution and chemical attenuation. A trend of downstream enrichment of the heavier REE is due to selective partitioning of the lighter REE (as both free REE or REECO3 complexes) to hydrous oxides of suspended Al which, in turn, is controlled by a downstream increase of pH to values > 6.1 (for free REE) and > 7.3 (for REECO3 complexes). Although most circumneutral waters were supersaturated with REE phosphate compounds, precipitation of LnPO4 is not believed to have been a dominant process because the predicted phosphate fractionation pattern is inconsistent with the observed trends. Negative saturation indices of hydrous ferric oxides also militate against surface complexation onto goethite. Instead, REE attenuation most likely resulted from adsorption onto

  14. Predictions of lithium interactions with earth's bow shock in the presence of wave activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, R. B.; Lui, A. T. Y.; Vlahos, L.

    1984-01-01

    The results of a test-particle simulation studying the movement of a lithium tracer ion injected upstream of the bow shock are reported. Wave activity consists of parallel and antiparallel propagating Alfven waves characterized by a frequency power spectrum within a frequency or range of amplitudes defined separately in the upstream and downstream regions. The results show that even a moderate level of wave activity can substantially change the results obtained in the absence of waves. Among the effects observed are: (1) increased ion transmission; (2) both the average energy gain and spread about the average are increased for transmitted and reflected particles; (3) the average final pitch angle for transmitted particles tends to 90 deg, and the spread of reflected particles is reduced; and (4) the spatial dispersion of the ions on the bow shock after a single encounter is increased.

  15. Utility of Lithium in Rare-Earth Metal Reduction Reactions to Form Nontraditional Ln2+ Complexes and Unusual [Li(2.2.2-cryptand)]1+ Cations.

    PubMed

    Huh, Daniel N; Darago, Lucy E; Ziller, Joseph W; Evans, William J

    2018-02-19

    The utility of lithium compared to other alkali metals in generating Ln 2+ rare-earth metal complexes via reduction of Ln 3+ precursors in reactions abbreviated as LnA 3 /M (Ln = rare-earth metal; A = anionic ligand; M = alkali metal) is described. Lithium reduction of Cp' 3 Ln (Cp' = C 5 H 4 SiMe 3 ; Ln = Y, Tb, Dy, Ho) under Ar in the presence of 2.2.2-cryptand (crypt) forms new examples of crystallographically characterizable Ln 2+ complexes of these metals, [Li(crypt)][Cp' 3 Ln]. In each complex, lithium is found in an N 2 O 4 donor atom coordination geometry that is unusual for the cryptand ligand. Magnetic susceptibility data on these new examples of nontraditional divalent lanthanide complexes are consistent with 4f n 5d 1 electronic configurations. The Dy and Ho complexes have exceptionally high single-ion magnetic moments, 11.35 and 11.67 μ B , respectively. Lithium reduction of Cp' 3 Y under N 2 at -35 °C forms the Y 2+ complex (Cp' 3 Y) 1- , which reduces dinitrogen upon warming to room temperature to generate the (N 2 ) 2- complex [Cp' 2 Y(THF)] 2 (μ-η 2 :η 2 -N 2 ). These results provide insight on the factors that lead to reduced dinitrogen complexes and/or stable divalent lanthanide complexes as a function of the specific reducing agent and conditions.

  16. Low Temperature Life-Cycle Testing of a Lithium-Ion Battery for Low-Earth-Orbiting Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Concha

    2006-01-01

    A flight-qualified, lithium-ion (Li-ion) battery developed for the Mars Surveyor Program 2001 Landeris undergoing life-testing at low temperature under a low-Earth-orbit (LEO) profile to assess its capability to provide long term energy storage for aerospace missions. NASA has embarked upon an ambitious course to return humans to the moon by 2015-2020 in preparation for robotic and human exploration of Mars and robotic exploration of the moons of outer planets. Li-ion batteries are excellent candidates to provide power and energy storage for multiple aspects of these missions due to their high specific energy, high energy density, and excellent low temperature performance. Laboratory testing of Li-ion technology is necessary in order to assess lifetime, characterize multi-cell battery-level performance under aerospace conditions, and to gauge safety aspects of the technology. Life-cycle testing provides an opportunity to examine battery-level performance and the dynamics of individual cells in the stack over the entire life of the battery. Data generated through this testing will be critical to establish confidence in the technology for its widespread use in manned and unmanned missions.

  17. Lithium Oxysilicate Compounds Final Report.

    SciT

    Apblett, Christopher A.; Coyle, Jaclyn

    In this study, the structure and composition of lithium silicate thin films deposited by RF magnetron co-sputtering is investigated. Five compositions ranging from Li2Si2O5 to Li8SiO6 were confirmed by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) and structure analysis on the evolution of non-bridging oxygens in the thin films was conducted with fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. It was found that non-bridging oxygens (NBOs) increased as the silicate network breaks apart with increasing lithium content which agrees with previous studies on lithium silicates. Thin film impurities were examined with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time of flight secondary ion mass spectroscopymore » (TOFSIMS) and traced back to target synthesis. This study utilizes a unique synthesis technique for lithium silicate thin films and can be referred to in future studies on the ionic conductivity of lithium silicates formed on the surface of silicon anodes in lithium ion batteries.« less

  18. The effects of sulfur on carbon partitioning and solubility in high pressure-temperature alloy-silicate systems: Implications for fractionation of carbon and sulfur during accretion and core formation of Earth and Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuno, K.; Dasgupta, R.; Grewal, D. S.

    2017-12-01

    Constraining the carbon (C) fractionation between the silicate magma ocean (MO) and core-forming alloy liquid is required to determine the origin and evolution of C between reservoirs such as atmosphere, crust, mantle, and core of terrestrial planets. [1]. Alloy-silicate partitioning experiments of C have shown that preferential fractionation of C into the alloy liquid would have left the bulk silicate Earth (BSE) devoid of C [2-4]. Merger of a sulfur (S)-rich differentiated planetary embryo into the proto-Earth could have supplied almost the entire C budget of the present-day BSE [5], however, experimental data on the systematic effect of S on C solubility in Fe-Ni alloy liquid and its partitioning between the alloy liquid and silicate melt are lacking. We have performed multi anvil experiments with alloy-silicate±glassy carbon mixtures at 6-13 GPa and 1800-2000 °C, fO2 of ΔIW of -0.4 to -2.3, using graphite or MgO capsules and varying alloy S content from 10 to 36 wt.%. We find that C content of the alloy liquid decreases from 4.6 to 0.2 wt.% with increasing alloy S content of 10 to 36 wt.%. Temperature has a small positive effect and pressure has little effect on alloy C solubility. Alloy-silicate partition coefficient of C also decreases with increasing alloy S content at a given P-T-fO2. We used the data to quantify the distribution of C between the silicate MO and core-forming alloy liquid of an S-rich planetary embryo. The model calculations using our data suggest that the addition of a relatively oxidized, C-poor ( 0.3 wt.%) and S-rich ( 3 wt.%) large embryo (6-20% of the present-day Earth mass) to a volatile-poor growing Earth can establish the C and S contents [6, 7] and C/S ratio [8] in BSE. The resulting core composition after the accretion and core formation process is estimated to be C- and S-poor ( 0.05 wt.% and 0.6 wt.%, respectively). On the other hand, a single stage core formation on Mars that results in a core with 8-10 wt.% S can yield a

  19. Some properties of lithium aluminium silicate (LAS) glass-ceramics used in glass-ceramic to metal compressive seal for vacuum applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ananthanarayanan, A.; Kumar, R.; Bhattacharya, S.; Shrikhande, V. K.; Kothiyal, G. P.

    2008-05-01

    We report here the preparation of LAS glass-ceramics and some studies on their thermo-physical properties and microstructure, for compressive seals in vacuum applications. Glass of composition 12.6Li2O-71.7SiO2-5.1Al2O3-4.9K2O-3.2B2O3-2.5P2O5 was prepared by the conventional melt quench technique. Based on differential thermal analysis (DTA) data, glass samples were nucleated at 600°C for 2hr and were then crystallized at 800°C for 2-5hr. X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectra showed lithium disilicate to be the major phase. A dwell time of 3hr yielded a sample of good crystallinity. Dilatometric measurements of this sample on a thermo-mechanical analyzer (TMA) measured a thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) of 94.61×10-7°C-1. Glass transition temperature (Tg), and dilatometric softening temperature (Tds) of the sample was recorded as 585°C and 830°C respectively. Considering TEC and Tds compression type seals were prepared with SS304 (TEC = 172×10-7°C-1) housing of length 15mm, outer diameter 30mm and inner diameter 15mm. After pre-heat treatment of the metal components, sealing was carried out under a protective atmosphere of flowing Argon gas. The finished seal was tested for leak tightness on a He leak detector. The seal was capable of withstanding a vacuum of 10-6 Torr; at a leak rate of 10-9 Torr lit s-1. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was carried out on LAS before and after fabrication of compressive seal to elucidate the effect of compressive stress and the presence of metal near the interface. We observe a significant difference in microstructure due to compressive stresses of sealing and due to the presence of metal. Energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (EDAX) revealed no interdiffusion of species from glass-ceramic to metal or vice-versa.

  20. Evaporation behavior of lithium, potassium, uranium and rare earth chlorides in pyroprocessing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Junhyuk; Kim, Tackjin; Park, Sungbin; Kim, Gha-Young; Kim, Sihyoung; Lee, Sungjai

    2017-12-01

    The evaporation behaviors of Li, K, U, and rare earth (RE) chlorides were examined for the cathode process in pyroprocessing. The evaporation temperatures of the chlorides were evaluated in vacuum by measuring the weight decrease. In addition, an evaporation test up to 1473 K of the cathode process using a surrogate mixture of uranium and chlorides was conducted. It was found that LiCl evaporated more readily than the other chlorides. The weight of LiCl was rapidly decreased at temperatures above 981 K, while that of KCl was decreased above 1035 K, indicating the evaporation. UCl3 evaporated at temperatures above 1103 K. RE chlorides showed a similar evaporation behavior, evaporating first at 1158 K then rapidly evaporating at temperatures above 1230 K. Thus, the order of evaporation with increasing temperature was found to be LiCl < KCl < UCl3 < RE chlorides, with different RE chlorides evaporating at similar temperature. The surrogate test confirmed the observed evaporation trend of the chlorides during the cathode process, and revealed that the contamination of uranium remains by the back-reaction of RE chlorides is negligible.

  1. Low Temperature Life-cycle Testing of a Lithium-ion Battery for Low-earth-orbiting Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Concha

    2004-01-01

    A flight-qualified, lithium-ion (Li-ion) battery developed for the Mars Surveyor Program 2001 lander is undergoing life-testing at low temperature under a low-Earth-orbit (LEO) profile to assess its capability to provide long term energy storage for aerospace missions. NASA has embarked upon an ambitious course to return humans to the moon by 2015-2020 in preparation for robotic and human exploration of Mars and robotic exploration of the moons of outer planets. Li-ion batteries are excellent candidates to provide power and energy storage for multiple aspects of these missions due to their low specific energy, low energy density, and excellent low temperature performance. Laboratory testing of Li-ion technology is necessary in order to assess lifetime, characterize multi-cell battery-level performance under aerospace conditions, and to gauge safety aspects of the technology. Life-cycle testing provides an opportunity to examine battery-level performance and the dynamics of individual cells in the stack over the entire life of the battery. Data generated through this testing will be critical to establish confidence in the technology for its widespread use in manned and unmanned mission. This paper discusses the performance of the 28 volt, 25 ampere-hour battery through 6000 LEO cycles, which corresponds to one year on LEO orbit. Testing is being performed at 0 C and 40% depth-of-discharge. Individual cell behaviors and their effect on the performance of the battery are described. Capacity, impedance, energy efficiency and end-of-discharge voltage at 1000 cycle intervals are reported. Results from this life-testing will help contribute to the database on battery-level performance of aerospace Li-ion batteries and low temperature cycling under LEO conditions.

  2. Partitioning of Ru, Rh, Pd, Re, Ir and Pt between liquid metal and silicate at high pressures and high temperatures - Implications for the origin of highly siderophile element concentrations in the Earth's mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Ute; Frost, Daniel J.; Rubie, David C.; Becker, Harry; Audétat, Andreas

    2012-05-01

    The apparent overabundance of the highly siderophile elements (HSEs: Pt-group elements, Re and Au) in the mantles of Earth, Moon and Mars has not been satisfactorily explained. Although late accretion of a chondritic component seems to provide the most plausible explanation, metal-silicate equilibration in a magma ocean cannot be ruled out due to a lack of HSE partitioning data suitable for extrapolations to the relevant high pressure and high temperature conditions. We provide a new data set of partition coefficients simultaneously determined for Ru, Rh, Pd, Re, Ir and Pt over a range of 3.5-18 GPa and 2423-2773 K. In multianvil experiments, molten peridotite was equilibrated in MgO single crystal capsules with liquid Fe-alloy that contained bulk HSE concentrations of 53.2-98.9 wt% (XFe = 0.03-0.67) such that oxygen fugacities of IW - 1.5 to IW + 1.6 (i.e. logarithmic units relative to the iron-wüstite buffer) were established at run conditions. To analyse trace concentrations of the HSEs in the silicate melt with LA-ICP-MS, two silicate glass standards (1-119 ppm Ru, Rh, Pd, Re, Ir, Pt) were produced and evaluated for this study. Using an asymmetric regular solution model we have corrected experimental partition coefficients to account for the differences between HSE metal activities in the multicomponent Fe-alloys and infinite dilution. Based on the experimental data, the P and T dependence of the partition coefficients (D) was parameterized. The partition coefficients of all HSEs studied decrease with increasing pressure and to a greater extent with increasing temperature. Except for Pt, the decrease with pressure is stronger below ˜6 GPa and much weaker in the range 6-18 GPa. This change might result from pressure induced coordination changes in the silicate liquid. Extrapolating the D values over a large range of potential P-T conditions in a terrestrial magma ocean (peridotite liquidus at P ⩽ 60-80 GPa) we conclude that the P-T-induced decrease of D

  3. Influence of Silicate Melt Composition on Metal/Silicate Partitioning of W, Ge, Ga and Ni

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singletary, S. J.; Domanik, K.; Drake, M. J.

    2005-01-01

    The depletion of the siderophile elements in the Earth's upper mantle relative to the chondritic meteorites is a geochemical imprint of core segregation. Therefore, metal/silicate partition coefficients (Dm/s) for siderophile elements are essential to investigations of core formation when used in conjunction with the pattern of elemental abundances in the Earth's mantle. The partitioning of siderophile elements is controlled by temperature, pressure, oxygen fugacity, and by the compositions of the metal and silicate phases. Several recent studies have shown the importance of silicate melt composition on the partitioning of siderophile elements between silicate and metallic liquids. It has been demonstrated that many elements display increased solubility in less polymerized (mafic) melts. However, the importance of silicate melt composition was believed to be minor compared to the influence of oxygen fugacity until studies showed that melt composition is an important factor at high pressures and temperatures. It was found that melt composition is also important for partitioning of high valency siderophile elements. Atmospheric experiments were conducted, varying only silicate melt composition, to assess the importance of silicate melt composition for the partitioning of W, Co and Ga and found that the valence of the dissolving species plays an important role in determining the effect of composition on solubility. In this study, we extend the data set to higher pressures and investigate the role of silicate melt composition on the partitioning of the siderophile elements W, Ge, Ga and Ni between metallic and silicate liquid.

  4. Lithium and Beryllium By-product Recovery from the Round Top Mountain, Texas, Peraluminous Rhyolite Heavy Rare Earth Deposit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pingitore, N. E., Jr.; Clague, J. W.; Gorski, D.

    2016-12-01

    The technology metals Li and Be combine low mass and unique properties. Li batteries are critical in applications at scales from micro-electronics to automotive and grid storage. Low mass Be structural components are essential in aerospace/defense applications and in non-sparking BeCu alloy oilfield tools. Most Li is sourced from desert salarsin the "Lithium Triangle" of Argentina—Bolivia—Chile. In contrast, Materion Corp mines >80% of global Be at Spor Mountain, UT. The massive peraluminous rhyolite heavy rare earth deposit at Round Top Mountain, TX is also enriched in Li, 500 ppm, and Be, 50 ppm. 2016 prices of 7000/tonne Li2CO3 (19% Li) and 1000/kg Be metal suggest favorable economics to extract Li and Be as by-products of HREE mining. Li and some Be are hosted in annite biotite that comprises up to 5% of the rhyolite. Texas Mineral Resources Corp proposes to heap leach crushed rhyolite with dilute H2SO4to release the yttrofluorite-hosted HREEs. At bench scale the annite biotite dissolves, but not quartz and feldspars (>90% of the rock). A series of 40 high-yield laboratory tests at various acid strength, particle size, and exposure time released up to 350 ppm (70%) of the Li and 14 ppm (30%) of the Be. For a 20,000 tonne/day operation, these recoveries correspond to daily production of >3 tonnes Li and 250 kg Be. Higher Li and Be recoveries also increased yields of gangue elements, Fe & Al, into solution. This complicates subsequent separation of Li, Be, and HREEs from the pregnant leach solution. Recovery of target HREEs did not increase beyond 200 ppm Li and 8 ppm Be recovery. Greater Li and Be recoveries increased acid consumption. Thus the "sweet spot" economics for heap leach is likely under conditions of acid strength, grain size, and exposure time that do not maximize by-product Li and Be recoveries. Evolving market prices for the full target element suite and additional costs to recover and purify the Li and Be must also be considered.

  5. How Deep and Hot was Earth's Magma Ocean? Combined Experimental Datasets for the Metal-silicate Partitioning of 11 Siderophile Elements - Ni, Co, Mo, W, P, Mn, V, Cr, Ga, Cu and Pd

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Righter, Kevin

    2008-01-01

    Since approximately 1990 high pressure and temperature (PT) experiments on metal-silicate systems have showed that partition coefficients (D) for siderophile (iron-loving) elements are much different than those measured at low PT conditions. The high PT data have been used to argue for a magma ocean during growth of the early Earth. Initial conclusions were based on experiments and calculations for a small number of elements such as Ni and Co. However, for many elements only a limited number of experimental data were available then, and they only hinted at values of metal-silicate D's at high PT conditions. In the ensuing decades there have been hundreds of new experiments carried out and published on a wide range of siderophile elements. At the same time several different models have been advanced to explain the siderophile elements in the earth's mantle: a) intermediate depth magma ocean; 25-30 GPa, b) deep magma ocean; up to 50 GPa, and c) early reduced and later oxidized magma ocean. Some studies have drawn conclusions based on a small subset of siderophile elements, or a set of elements that provides little leverage on the big picture (like slightly siderophile elements), and no single study has attempted to quantitatively explain more than 5 elements at a time. The purpose of this abstract is to update the predictive expressions outlined by Righter et al. (1997) with new experimental data from the last decade, test the predictive ability of these expressions against independent datasets (there are more data now to do this properly), and to apply the resulting expressions to the siderophile element patterns in Earth's upper mantle. The predictive expressions have the form: lnD = alnfO2 + b/T + cP/T + d(1Xs) + e(1Xc) + SigmafiXi + g These expressions are guided by the thermodynamics of simple metal-oxide equilibria that control each element, include terms that mimic the activity coefficients of each element in the metal and silicate, and quantify the effect of

  6. A Cesium Rare-Earth Silicate Cs3 RESi6 O15 (RE=Dy-Lu, Y, In): The Parent of an Unusual Structural Class Featuring a Remarkable 57 Å Unit Cell Axis.

    PubMed

    Terry, Rylan; Vinton, Daniel; McMillen, Colin D; Kolis, Joseph W

    2018-02-19

    The structure of Cs 3 RESi 6 O 15 , where RE=Dy-Lu, Y, In, is unusual in that it contains octahedrally coordinated rare-earth ions; their relative orientation dictates the structure, as they rotate about the c-axis supported by the cyclic Si 6 O 15 framework. The repeat unit of the rotation is eight units generating a very long (ca. 57 Å) unit cell axis. This unusual repeat unit is created by the structural flexibility of the hexasilicate ring, which is in turn affected by the size of the rare earth ion as well as the size of alkali ion residing within the silicate layers. Previous work showed for the smaller Sc 3+ ion, the rotation of the octahedra is not sufficient to achieve closure at an integral repeat unit and an incommensurate structure results. The products are prepared as large, high quality single crystals using a high-temperature (650 °C) hydrothermal method with CsOH and F - mineralizers. The presence of fluoride is essential to the formation of the product. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Silicate-catalyzed chemical grouting compositions

    SciT

    Not Available

    1972-09-28

    Chemical grouting compositions for stabilizing earth, sand, and other porous particulate formations or agglomerates of solids are described. The composition for producing a chemically grouting structure consists of an aqueous base solution of: (1) vegetative polyphenolic material consisting of condensed type tannins, and an aqueous catalyst solution of (2) a water-soluble alkali metal silicate. The polyphenolic material is present in an amount from 5% to 40% based on the weight of the base solution, and the water- soluble alkali metal silicate is present in an amount to provide from 1% to 15% SiOD2U in the silicate compound based on themore » weight of the polyphenolic material. These grouting compositions are completely safe to operating personnel and to surrounding environment, since the potassium or sodium silicate catalysts are nontoxic. (15 claims)« less

  8. Nanosheets of earth-abundant jarosite as novel anodes for high-rate and long-life lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yuan-Li; Wen, Yuren; Chen, Chia-Chin; van Aken, Peter A; Maier, Joachim; Yu, Yan

    2015-05-20

    Nanosheets of earth-abundant jarosite were fabricated via a facile template-engaged redox coprecipitation strategy at room temperature and employed as novel anode materials for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) for the first time. These 2D materials exhibit high capacities, excellent rate capability, and prolonged cycling performance. As for KFe3(SO4)2(OH)6 jarosite nanosheets (KNSs), the reversible capacities of above 1300 mAh g(-1) at 100 mA g(-1) and 620 mAh g(-1) after 4000 cycles at a very high current density of 10 A g(-1) were achieved, respectively. Moreover, the resulting 2D nanomaterials retain good structural integrity upon cycling. These results reveal great potential of jarosite nanosheets as low-cost and high-performance anode materials for next-generation LIBs.

  9. Surface protected lithium-metal-oxide electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Thackeray, Michael M.; Kang, Sun-Ho

    2016-04-05

    A lithium-metal-oxide positive electrode having a layered or spinel structure for a non-aqueous lithium electrochemical cell and battery is disclosed comprising electrode particles that are protected at the surface from undesirable effects, such as electrolyte oxidation, oxygen loss or dissolution by one or more lithium-metal-polyanionic compounds, such as a lithium-metal-phosphate or a lithium-metal-silicate material that can act as a solid electrolyte at or above the operating potential of the lithium-metal-oxide electrode. The surface protection significantly enhances the surface stability, rate capability and cycling stability of the lithium-metal-oxide electrodes, particularly when charged to high potentials.

  10. Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Silicate Vaporization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Nathan S.; Costa, Gustavo C. C.

    2015-01-01

    Silicates are a common class of materials that are often exposed to high temperatures. The behavior of these materials needs to be understood for applications as high temperature coatings in material science as well as the constituents of lava for geological considerations. The vaporization behavior of these materials is an important aspect of their high temperature behavior and it also provides fundamental thermodynamic data. The application of Knudsen effusion mass spectrometry (KEMS) to silicates is discussed. There are several special considerations for silicates. The first is selection of an appropriate cell material, which is either nearly inert or has well-understood interactions with the silicate. The second consideration is proper measurement of the low vapor pressures. This can be circumvented by using a reducing agent to boost the vapor pressure without changing the solid composition or by working at very high temperatures. The third consideration deals with kinetic barriers to vaporization. The measurement of these barriers, as encompassed in a vaporization coefficient, is discussed. Current measured data of rare earth silicates for high temperature coating applications are discussed. In addition, data on magnesium-iron-silicates (olivine) are presented and discussed.

  11. Lattice thermal conductivity of silicate glasses at high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Y. Y.; Hsieh, W. P.

    2016-12-01

    Knowledge of the thermodynamic and transport properties of magma holds the key to understanding the thermal evolution and chemical differentiation of Earth. The discovery of the remnant of a deep magma ocean above the core mantle boundary (CMB) from seismic observations suggest that the CMB heat flux would strongly depend on the thermal conductivity, including lattice (klat) and radiative (krad) components, of dense silicate melts and major constituent minerals around the region. Recent measurements on the krad of dense silicate glasses and lower-mantle minerals show that krad of dense silicate glasses could be significantly smaller than krad of the surrounding solid mantle phases, and therefore the dense silicate melts would act as a thermal insulator in deep lower mantle. This conclusion, however, remains uncertain due to the lack of direct measurements on the lattice thermal conductivity of silicate melts under relevant pressure-temperature conditions. Besides the CMB, magmas exist in different circumstances beneath the surface of the Earth. Chemical compositions of silicate melts vary with geological and geodynamic settings of the melts and have strong influences on their thermal properties. In order to have a better view of heat transport within the Earth, it is important to study compositional and pressure dependences of thermal properties of silicate melts. Here we report experimental results on lattice thermal conductivities of silicate glasses with basaltic and rhyolitic compositions up to Earth's lower mantle pressures using time-domain thermoreflectance coupled with diamond-anvil cell techniques. This study not only provides new data for the thermal conductivity of silicate melts in the Earth's deep interior, but is crucial for further understanding of the evolution of Earth's complex internal structure.

  12. Earth

    2012-01-30

    Behold one of the more detailed images of the Earth yet created. This Blue Marble Earth montage shown above -- created from photographs taken by the Visible/Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument on board the new Suomi NPP satellite -- shows many stunning details of our home planet. The Suomi NPP satellite was launched last October and renamed last week after Verner Suomi, commonly deemed the father of satellite meteorology. The composite was created from the data collected during four orbits of the robotic satellite taken earlier this month and digitally projected onto the globe. Many features of North America and the Western Hemisphere are particularly visible on a high resolution version of the image. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA18033

  13. Constraints on cosmic silicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ossenkopf, V.; Henning, Th.; Mathis, J. S.

    1992-08-01

    Observational determinations of opacities of circumstellar silicates, relative to the peak value near 10 microns, are used to estimate the optical constants n and k, the real and imaginary parts of the index of refraction. Circumstellar dust is modified by processing within the interstellar medium. This leads to higher band strengths and a somewhat larger ratio of the opacities at the 18 and 10-micron peaks, compared with circumstellar silicates. By using an effective-medium theory, we calculate the effects of small spherical inclusions of various materials (various oxides, sulfides, carbides, amorphous carbon, and metallic iron) upon silicate opacities. Some of these can increase the absorption coefficient k in the 2-8 micron region appreciably, as is needed to reconcile laboratory silicate opacities with observations of both the interstellar medium and envelopes around late-type stars. We give tables of two sets of optical constants for warm oxygen-deficient and cool oxygen-rich silicates, representative for circumstellar and interstellar silicates. The required opacity in the 2-8 micron region is provided by iron and magnetite.

  14. EPR of radiation defects in lithium-oxyfluoride glass ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedotovs, A.; Rogulis, U.; Sarakovskis, A.; Dimitrocenko, L.

    2010-11-01

    We studied oxyfluoride composites based on lithium silicate glasses with yttrium fluorides and rare-earth dopants. The electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) has been used to obtain information about radiation induced defects in these materials. Spectra have been measured before and after X-ray irradiation at room temperature and at liquid nitrogen temperature. Fluoride crystallites within samples were created by means of thermal treatment at specific temperatures. EPR spectra of radiation induced defects in oxyfluoride glass ceramics, in which crystallites have not been yet created, show no explicit hfs interaction of fluorine nuclei. However, in glass ceramics, which already contains fluoride crystallites, the hfs characteristic to fluorine nuclei appears in the EPR spectra. EPR hyperfine structure could be explained within a model of an F-type centre in YF3 crystalline phase.

  15. Asymmetric epoxidation of unsaturated ketones catalyzed by heterobimetallic rare earth-lithium complexes bearing phenoxy-functionalized chiral diphenylprolinolate ligand.

    PubMed

    Qian, Qinqin; Tan, Yufang; Zhao, Bei; Feng, Tao; Shen, Qi; Yao, Yingming

    2014-09-05

    Four novel heterobimetallic complexes [REL2]{[(THF)3Li]2(μ-Cl)} stabilized by chiral phenoxy-functionalized prolinolate (RE = Yb (1), Y (2), Sm (3), Nd (4), H2L = (S)-2,4-di-tert-butyl-6-[[2-(hydroxydiphenylmethyl)pyrrolidin-1-yl]methyl]phenol have been synthesized and characterized. These readily available complexes are highly active in catalyzing the epoxidation of α,β-unsaturated ketones, while the enantioselectivity varies according to the ionic radii of the rare earth center. A series of chalcone derivatives were converted to chiral epoxides in 80 → 99% ee at 0 °C using TBHP as the oxidant in the presence of 10 mol % of 1.

  16. Calcium silicate insulation structure

    DOEpatents

    Kollie, Thomas G.; Lauf, Robert J.

    1995-01-01

    An insulative structure including a powder-filled evacuated casing utilizes a quantity of finely divided synthetic calcium silicate having a relatively high surface area. The resultant structure-provides superior thermal insulating characteristics over a broad temperature range and is particularly well-suited as a panel for a refrigerator or freezer or the insulative barrier for a cooler or a insulated bottle.

  17. Solubility of copper in silicate melts as function of oxygen and sulfur fugacities, temperature, and silicate composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzheid, A.; Lodders, K.

    2001-06-01

    liquid CuO 0.5 at 1300°C for the silicate melts used here. A comparison with literature data shows that log γ CuO 0.5 increases in proportion to the mass percentages [CaO +(Al 2O 3)/2] in silicate melts. We recommend the following equations for Cu metal/silicate and sulfide/silicate partitioning for geochemical and cosmochemical modeling if silicate composition and the activity of Cu in the metal or sulfide is known: log D met/sil = -0.48 - 0.25 · log fO 2 - log γ Cu metal + 0.02 · [CaO + (Al 2O 3)/2; wt%] silicate logD sul/sil=+0.76-0.25 · logfO 2+0.25logfS 2-logγ CS 0.5,sulfide +0.02 · [CaO+Al 2O 3/2;wt%] silicate. The derived Cu metal/silicate and metal/sulfide partition coefficients are applied to core formation in the Earth and Mars. The observed Cu abundances in the Earth cannot be easily explained by simple core-mantle equilibrium, but the observed Cu abundances for Mars are consistent with core-mantle equilibrium at low pressure and temperatures.

  18. High Pressure/Temperature Metal Silicate Partitioning of Tungsten

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shofner, G. A.; Danielson, L.; Righter, K.; Campbell, A. J.

    2010-01-01

    The behavior of chemical elements during metal/silicate segregation and their resulting distribution in Earth's mantle and core provide insight into core formation processes. Experimental determination of partition coefficients allows calculations of element distributions that can be compared to accepted values of element abundances in the silicate (mantle) and metallic (core) portions of the Earth. Tungsten (W) is a moderately siderophile element and thus preferentially partitions into metal versus silicate under many planetary conditions. The partitioning behavior has been shown to vary with temperature, silicate composition, oxygen fugacity, and pressure. Most of the previous work on W partitioning has been conducted at 1-bar conditions or at relatively low pressures, i.e. <10 GPa, and in two cases at or near 20 GPa. According to those data, the stronger influences on the distribution coefficient of W are temperature, composition, and oxygen fugacity with a relatively slight influence in pressure. Predictions based on extrapolation of existing data and parameterizations suggest an increased pressured dependence on metal/ silicate partitioning of W at higher pressures 5. However, the dependence on pressure is not as well constrained as T, fO2, and silicate composition. This poses a problem because proposed equilibration pressures for core formation range from 27 to 50 GPa, falling well outside the experimental range, therefore requiring exptrapolation of a parametereized model. Higher pressure data are needed to improve our understanding of W partitioning at these more extreme conditions.

  19. Water in silicate melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, Paul; Stolper, Edward

    Water is one of the more important volatile species in magmas, both in terms of its abundance and its influence on the properties of a given magma. Many workers in the geological sciences have measured, modeled, and speculated on the interaction of water with silicate melts as a function of pressure. At the same time, glass and materials scientists have collected a considerable body of data on the effect of water on the properties of liquid and glassy silicates at 1 atmosphere (1.01325×105 N m-2) and below. A special session on “Solubility and Transport Properties of Water in Silicate Melts” was held during the 1983 AGU Spring Meeting, May 30-June 3, in Baltimore. The session had three main objectives: (1) review the present data base and discuss the status of current models in order to identify areas where further work is needed; (2) introduce interested geologists to the large body of work being carried out in the glass and materials sciences; and (3) consider static properties, such as thermodynamic relations, structure of hydrous melts, and dynamic properties including diffusion and viscosity. This report summarizes the major topics discussed. More detailed information may be found in the published abstracts (Eos, May 3, 1983, pp. 338-343).

  20. Thermochemistry of Silicates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costa, Gustavo; Jacobson, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    The thermodynamic properties of vapor and condensed phases of silicates are crucial in many fields of science. These quantities address fundamental questions on the formation, stability, transformation, and physical properties of silicate minerals and silicate coating compositions. Here the thermodynamic activities of silica and other species in solid solution have been measured by the analysis of the corresponding high temperature vapors using Knudsen Effusion Mass Spectrometry (KEMS). In first set of experiments KEMS has been used to examine the volatility sequence of species (Fe, SiO, Mg, O2 and O) present in the vapor phase during heating of fosterite-rich olivine (Fo93Fa7) up to 2400 C and to measure the Fe, SiO and Mg activities in its solid solution. The data of fosterite-rich olivine are essential for thermochemical equilibrium models to predict the atmospheric and surface composition of hot, rocky exoplanets (Lava Planets). In the second set of experiments the measured thermodynamic activities of the silica in Y2O3-SiO2 and Yb2O3-SiO2 systems are used to assess their reactivity and degradation recession as environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) in combustion environments (e.g. non-moveable parts of gas turbine engine).

  1. Equation of state of silicate liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Zhicheng

    Equation of state of silicate liquids is crucial to our understanding of melting processes such as the generation and differentiation of silicate melts in Earth and hence to explore the geophysical and geochemical consequences of melting. A comparison of compressional properties reveals fundamental differences in compressional mechanisms between silicate liquids and solids. Due to a liquid's ability to change structures, the compression of liquids is largely controlled by the entropic contribution to the free energy in addition to the internal energy contribution that is available to solids. In order to account for the entropic contribution, a new equation of state of silicate liquids is proposed based on the theory of hard-sphere mixtures. The equation of state is calibrated for SiO2-Al 2O3-FeO-MgO-CaO liquids and other systems. The new equation of state provides a unified explanation for the experimental observations on compressional properties of liquids including the bulk moduli of silicate liquids as well as the pressure dependence of Gruneisen parameter. The effect of chemical composition on melt density can be studied by the equation of state. Results show that FeO and H2O are the most important components in melts that control the melt density at high pressure due to their very different mean atomic masses from other melt components. Adding SiO2 can make a melt more compressible at high pressure due to its continuous change of coordination from 4-fold to 6-fold. The effect of 1-120 on melt density is further investigated by high-pressure experiments at the conditions of 9 to 15 GPa (corresponding to the depths of 300-500 km in the Earth) and 1900 °C to 2200 °C. The density of three dry melts and four hydrous melts with 2-7 wt% H2O was determined. Density data are analyzed by both the Birch-Mumaghan equation of state and the hard sphere equation of state. The partial molar volume of H2O is determined to be 8.8 cm3/mol at 14 GPa and 2173 K. The hypothesis

  2. Metal/Silicate Partitioning of P, Ga, and W at High Pressures and Temperatures: Dependence on Silicate Melt Composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Edward; Drake, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    The distinctive pattern of element concentrations in the upper mantle provides essential evidence in our attempts to understand the accretion and differentiation of the Earth (e.g., Drake and Righter, 2002; Jones and Drake, 1986; Righter et al., 1997; Wanke 1981). Core formation is best investigated through use of metal/silicate partition coefficients for siderophile elements. The variables influencing partition coefficients are temperature, pressure, the major element compositions of the silicate and metal phases, and oxygen fugacity. Examples of studies investigating the effects of these variables on partitioning behavior are: composition of the metal phase by Capobianco et al. (1999) and Righter et al. (1997); silicate melt composition by Watson (1976), Walter and Thibault (1995), Hillgren et al. (1996), Jana and Walker (1997), and Jaeger and Drake (2000); and oxygen fugacity by Capobianco et al. (1999), and Walter and Thibault (1995). Here we address the relative influences of silicate melt composition, pressure and temperature.

  3. Hydrogen, lithium, and lithium hydride production

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Sam W.; Spencer, Larry S.; Phillips, Michael R.; Powell, G. Louis; Campbell, Peggy J.

    2017-06-20

    A method is provided for extracting hydrogen from lithium hydride. The method includes (a) heating lithium hydride to form liquid-phase lithium hydride; (b) extracting hydrogen from the liquid-phase lithium hydride, leaving residual liquid-phase lithium metal; (c) hydriding the residual liquid-phase lithium metal to form refined lithium hydride; and repeating steps (a) and (b) on the refined lithium hydride.

  4. Hydrogen, lithium, and lithium hydride production

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Sam W; Spencer, Larry S; Phillips, Michael R; Powell, G. Louis; Campbell, Peggy J

    2014-03-25

    A method of producing high purity lithium metal is provided, where gaseous-phase lithium metal is extracted from lithium hydride and condensed to form solid high purity lithium metal. The high purity lithium metal may be hydrided to provide high purity lithium hydride.

  5. Evolution of trees and mycorrhizal fungi intensifies silicate mineral weathering

    PubMed Central

    Quirk, Joe; Beerling, David J.; Banwart, Steve A.; Kakonyi, Gabriella; Romero-Gonzalez, Maria E.; Leake, Jonathan R.

    2012-01-01

    Forested ecosystems diversified more than 350 Ma to become major engines of continental silicate weathering, regulating the Earth's atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration by driving calcium export into ocean carbonates. Our field experiments with mature trees demonstrate intensification of this weathering engine as tree lineages diversified in concert with their symbiotic mycorrhizal fungi. Preferential hyphal colonization of the calcium silicate-bearing rock, basalt, progressively increased with advancement from arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) to later, independently evolved ectomycorrhizal (EM) fungi, and from gymnosperm to angiosperm hosts with both fungal groups. This led to ‘trenching’ of silicate mineral surfaces by AM and EM fungi, with EM gymnosperms and angiosperms releasing calcium from basalt at twice the rate of AM gymnosperms. Our findings indicate mycorrhiza-driven weathering may have originated hundreds of millions of years earlier than previously recognized and subsequently intensified with the evolution of trees and mycorrhizas to affect the Earth's long-term CO2 and climate history. PMID:22859556

  6. Evolution of trees and mycorrhizal fungi intensifies silicate mineral weathering.

    PubMed

    Quirk, Joe; Beerling, David J; Banwart, Steve A; Kakonyi, Gabriella; Romero-Gonzalez, Maria E; Leake, Jonathan R

    2012-12-23

    Forested ecosystems diversified more than 350 Ma to become major engines of continental silicate weathering, regulating the Earth's atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration by driving calcium export into ocean carbonates. Our field experiments with mature trees demonstrate intensification of this weathering engine as tree lineages diversified in concert with their symbiotic mycorrhizal fungi. Preferential hyphal colonization of the calcium silicate-bearing rock, basalt, progressively increased with advancement from arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) to later, independently evolved ectomycorrhizal (EM) fungi, and from gymnosperm to angiosperm hosts with both fungal groups. This led to 'trenching' of silicate mineral surfaces by AM and EM fungi, with EM gymnosperms and angiosperms releasing calcium from basalt at twice the rate of AM gymnosperms. Our findings indicate mycorrhiza-driven weathering may have originated hundreds of millions of years earlier than previously recognized and subsequently intensified with the evolution of trees and mycorrhizas to affect the Earth's long-term CO(2) and climate history.

  7. Lithium Poisoning.

    PubMed

    Baird-Gunning, Jonathan; Lea-Henry, Tom; Hoegberg, Lotte C G; Gosselin, Sophie; Roberts, Darren M

    2017-05-01

    Lithium is a commonly prescribed treatment for bipolar affective disorder. However, treatment is complicated by lithium's narrow therapeutic index and the influence of kidney function, both of which increase the risk of toxicity. Therefore, careful attention to dosing, monitoring, and titration is required. The cause of lithium poisoning influences treatment and 3 patterns are described: acute, acute-on-chronic, and chronic. Chronic poisoning is the most common etiology, is usually unintentional, and results from lithium intake exceeding elimination. This is most commonly due to impaired kidney function caused by volume depletion from lithium-induced nephrogenic diabetes insipidus or intercurrent illnesses and is also drug-induced. Lithium poisoning can affect multiple organs; however, the primary site of toxicity is the central nervous system and clinical manifestations vary from asymptomatic supratherapeutic drug concentrations to clinical toxicity such as confusion, ataxia, or seizures. Lithium poisoning has a low mortality rate; however, chronic lithium poisoning can require a prolonged hospital length of stay from impaired mobility and cognition and associated nosocomial complications. Persistent neurological deficits, in particular cerebellar, are described and the incidence and risk factors for its development are poorly understood, but it appears to be uncommon in uncomplicated acute poisoning. Lithium is readily dialyzable, and rationale support extracorporeal treatments to reduce the risk or the duration of toxicity in high-risk exposures. There is disagreement in the literature regarding factors that define patients most likely to benefit from treatments that enhance lithium elimination, including specific plasma lithium concentration thresholds. In the case of extracorporeal treatments, there are observational data in its favor, without evidence from randomized controlled trials (none have been performed), which may lead to conservative practices and

  8. Polysilicate binding for silicate paints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanovna, Loganina Valentina; Nikolaevna, Kislitsyna Svetlana; Bisengalievich, Mazhitov Yerkebulan

    2018-06-01

    It was suggested, that the polysilicate solutions obtained by mixing liquid glass and silicic acid sol as a binder in the manufacture of silicate paints. Information is provided on the structure and a property of the sodium polysilicate binder is presented. It has been found that the addition of silica powder to a liquid glass causes gelling in the course of time. It has been established that the introduction of the sol (increasing the silicate module) contributes to an increase in the fraction of high-polymer fractions of silicic anion, with the increase in the sol content of the polymer form of silica increasing. The research results the structure of sols and polysilicate solutions by the method of violation of total internal reflection. By the method of IR spectroscopy, the molybdate method established the presence of silica in the polysilicate binder polymeric varieties, which provides an increase in the stability of silicate coatings.

  9. Biological and therapeutic effects of ortho-silicic acid and some ortho-silicic acid-releasing compounds: New perspectives for therapy.

    PubMed

    Jurkić, Lela Munjas; Cepanec, Ivica; Pavelić, Sandra Kraljević; Pavelić, Krešimir

    2013-01-08

    Silicon (Si) is the most abundant element present in the Earth's crust besides oxygen. However, the exact biological roles of silicon remain unknown. Moreover, the ortho-silicic acid (H4SiO4), as a major form of bioavailable silicon for both humans and animals, has not been given adequate attention so far. Silicon has already been associated with bone mineralization, collagen synthesis, skin, hair and nails health atherosclerosis, Alzheimer disease, immune system enhancement, and with some other disorders or pharmacological effects. Beside the ortho-silicic acid and its stabilized formulations such as choline chloride-stabilized ortho-silicic acid and sodium or potassium silicates (e.g. M2SiO3; M= Na,K), the most important sources that release ortho-silicic acid as a bioavailable form of silicon are: colloidal silicic acid (hydrated silica gel), silica gel (amorphous silicon dioxide), and zeolites. Although all these compounds are characterized by substantial water insolubility, they release small, but significant, equilibrium concentration of ortho-silicic acid (H4SiO4) in contact with water and physiological fluids. Even though certain pharmacological effects of these compounds might be attributed to specific structural characteristics that result in profound adsorption and absorption properties, they all exhibit similar pharmacological profiles readily comparable to ortho-silicic acid effects. The most unusual ortho-silicic acid-releasing agents are certain types of zeolites, a class of aluminosilicates with well described ion(cation)-exchange properties. Numerous biological activities of some types of zeolites documented so far might probably be attributable to the ortho-silicic acid-releasing property. In this review, we therefore discuss biological and potential therapeutic effects of ortho-silicic acid and ortho-silicic acid -releasing silicon compounds as its major natural sources.

  10. Lithium-aluminum-iron electrode composition

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, Thomas D.

    1979-01-01

    A negative electrode composition is presented for use in a secondary electrochemical cell. The cell also includes an electrolyte with lithium ions such as a molten salt of alkali metal halides or alkaline earth metal halides that can be used in high-temperature cells. The cell's positive electrode contains a a chalcogen or a metal chalcogenide as the active electrode material. The negative electrode composition includes up to 50 atom percent lithium as the active electrode constituent in an alloy of aluminum-iron. Various binary and ternary intermetallic phases of lithium, aluminum and iron are formed. The lithium within the intermetallic phase of Al.sub.5 Fe.sub.2 exhibits increased activity over that of lithium within a lithium-aluminum alloy to provide an increased cell potential of up to about 0.25 volt.

  11. Magmatic (silicates/saline/sulfur-rich/CO2) immiscibility and zirconium and rare-earth element enrichment from alkaline magma chamber margins : Evidence from Ponza Island, Pontine Archipelago, Italy

    Belkin, H.E.; de Vivo, B.; Lima, A.; Torok, K.

    1996-01-01

    Fluid inclusions were measured from a feldspathoid-bearing syenite xenolith entrained in trachyte from Ponza, one of the islands of the Pontine Archipelago, located in the Gulf of Gaeta, Italy. The feldspathoid-bearing syenite consists mainly of potassium feldspar, clinopyroxene, amphibole, biotite, titanite, manganoan magnetite, apatite with minor nosean, Na-rich feldspar, pyrrhotite, and rare cheralite. Baddeleyite and zirkelite occur associated with manganoan magnetite. Detailed electron-microprobe analysis reveals enrichments in REE, Y, Nb, U, Th as well as Cl and F in appropriate phases. Fluid inclusions observed in potassium feldspar are either silicate-melt or aqueous inclusions. The aqueous inclusions can be further classified as. (1) one-phase vapor, (2) two-phase (V + L) inclusions, vapor-rich inclusions with a small amount of CO2 in most cases; homogenization of the inclusions always occurred in the vapor phase between 359 and 424??C, salinities vary from 2.9 to 8.5 wt. % NaCl equivalent; and. (3) three-phase and multiphase inclusions (hypersaline/sulfur-rich aqueous inclusions sometimes with up to 8 or more solid phases). Daughter minerals dissolve on heating before vapor/liquid homogenization. Standardless quantitative scanning electron microscope X-ray fluorescence analysis has tentatively identified the following chloride and sulfate daughter crystals; halite, sylvite, glauberite. arcanite, anhydrite, and thenardite. Melting of the daughter crystals occurs between 459 and 536??C (54 to 65 wt. % NaCI equivalent) whereas total homogenization is between 640 and 755??C. The occurrence of silicate-melt inclusions and high-temperature, solute-rich aqueous inclusions suggests that the druse or miarolitic texture of the xenolith is late-stage magmatic. The xenolith from Ponza represents a portion of the peripheral magma chamber wall that has recorded the magmatic/hydrothermal transition and the passage of high solute fluids enriched in chlorides, sulfur, and

  12. The stable Cr isotopic compositions of chondrites and silicate planetary reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoenberg, Ronny; Merdian, Alexandra; Holmden, Chris; Kleinhanns, Ilka C.; Haßler, Kathrin; Wille, Martin; Reitter, Elmar

    2016-06-01

    The depletion of chromium in Earth's mantle (∼2700 ppm) in comparison to chondrites (∼4400 ppm) indicates significant incorporation of chromium into the core during our planet's metal-silicate differentiation, assuming that there was no significant escape of the moderately volatile element chromium during the accretionary phase of Earth. Stable Cr isotope compositions - expressed as the ‰-difference in 53Cr/52Cr from the terrestrial reference material SRM979 (δ53/52CrSRM979 values) - of planetary silicate reservoirs might thus yield information about the conditions of planetary metal segregation processes when compared to chondrites. The stable Cr isotopic compositions of 7 carbonaceous chondrites, 11 ordinary chondrites, 5 HED achondrites and 2 martian meteorites determined by a double spike MC-ICP-MS method are within uncertainties indistinguishable from each other and from the previously determined δ53/52CrSRM979 value of -0.124 ± 0.101‰ for the igneous silicate Earth. Extensive quality tests support the accuracy of the stable Cr isotope determinations of various meteorites and terrestrial silicates reported here. The uniformity in stable Cr isotope compositions of samples from planetary silicate mantles and undifferentiated meteorites indicates that metal-silicate differentiation of Earth, Mars and the HED parent body did not cause measurable stable Cr isotope fractionation between these two reservoirs. Our results also imply that the accretionary disc, at least in the inner solar system, was homogeneous in its stable Cr isotopic composition and that potential volatility loss of chromium during accretion of the terrestrial planets was not accompanied by measurable stable isotopic fractionation. Small but reproducible variations in δ53/52CrSRM979 values of terrestrial magmatic rocks point to natural stable Cr isotope variations within Earth's silicate reservoirs. Further and more detailed studies are required to investigate whether silicate

  13. Analysis of a Sheet Silicate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, J. M.; Evans, S.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a student project in analytical chemistry using sheet silicates. Provides specific information regarding the use of phlogopite in an experiment to analyze samples for silicon, aluminum, magnesium, iron, potassium, and fluoride. (CS)

  14. 21 CFR 172.410 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 172.410 Section 172.410 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Agents § 172.410 Calcium silicate. Calcium silicate, including synthetic calcium silicate, may be safely...

  15. 21 CFR 172.410 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium silicate. 172.410 Section 172.410 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Agents § 172.410 Calcium silicate. Calcium silicate, including synthetic calcium silicate, may be safely...

  16. 21 CFR 172.410 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 172.410 Section 172.410 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Agents § 172.410 Calcium silicate. Calcium silicate, including synthetic calcium silicate, may be safely...

  17. 21 CFR 172.410 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 172.410 Section 172.410 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Agents § 172.410 Calcium silicate. Calcium silicate, including synthetic calcium silicate, may be safely...

  18. 21 CFR 172.410 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 172.410 Section 172.410 Food and... PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Anticaking Agents § 172.410 Calcium silicate. Calcium silicate, including synthetic calcium silicate, may be safely used in food in accordance with the...

  19. The Earth's Mantle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKenzie, D. P.

    1983-01-01

    The nature and dynamics of the earth's mantle is discussed. Research indicates that the silicate mantle is heated by the decay of radioactive isotopes and that the heat energizes massive convention currents in the upper 700 kilometers of the ductile rock. These currents and their consequences are considered. (JN)

  20. Thermochemistry of dense hydrous magnesium silicates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bose, Kunal; Burnley, Pamela; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    1994-01-01

    Recent experimental investigations under mantle conditions have identified a suite of dense hydrous magnesium silicate (DHMS) phases that could be conduits to transport water to at least the 660 km discontinuity via mature, relatively cold, subducting slabs. Water released from successive dehydration of these phases during subduction could be responsible for deep focus earthquakes, mantle metasomatism and a host of other physico-chemical processes central to our understanding of the earth's deep interior. In order to construct a thermodynamic data base that can delineate and predict the stability ranges for DHMS phases, reliable thermochemical and thermophysical data are required. One of the major obstacles in calorimetric studies of phases synthesized under high pressure conditions has been limitation due to the small (less than 5 mg) sample mass. Our refinement of calorimeter techniques now allow precise determination of enthalpies of solution of less than 5 mg samples of hydrous magnesium silicates. For example, high temperature solution calorimetry of natural talc (Mg(0.99) Fe(0.01)Si4O10(OH)2), periclase (MgO) and quartz (SiO2) yield enthalpies of drop solution at 1044 K to be 592.2 (2.2), 52.01 (0.12) and 45.76 (0.4) kJ/mol respectively. The corresponding enthalpy of formation from oxides at 298 K for talc is minus 5908.2 kJ/mol agreeing within 0.1 percent to literature values.

  1. Natural Weathering Rates of Silicate Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, A. F.

    2003-12-01

    Silicates constitute more than 90% of the rocks exposed at Earth's land surface (Garrels and Mackenzie, 1971). Most primary minerals comprising these rocks are thermodynamically unstable at surface pressure/temperature conditions and are therefore susceptible to chemical weathering. Such weathering has long been of interest in the natural sciences. Hartt (1853) correctly attributed chemical weathering to "the efficacy of water containing carbonic acid in promoting the decomposition of igneous rocks." Antecedent to the recent interest in the role of vegetation on chemical weathering, Belt (1874) observed that the most intense weathering of rocks in tropical Nicaragua was confined to forested regions. He attributed this effect to "the percolation through rocks of rain water charged with a little acid from decomposing vegetation." Chamberlin (1899) proposed that the enhanced rates of chemical weathering associated with major mountain building episodes in Earth's history resulted in a drawdown of atmospheric CO2 that led to periods of global cooling. Many of the major characteristics of chemical weathering had been described when Merrill (1906) published the groundbreaking volume Rocks, Rock Weathering, and Soils.The major advances since that time, particularly during the last several decades, have centered on understanding the fundamental chemical, hydrologic, and biologic processes that control weathering and in establishing quantitative weathering rates. This research has been driven by the importance of chemical weathering to a number environmentally and economically important issues. Undoubtedly, the most significant aspect of chemical weathering is the breakdown of rocks to form soils, a process that makes life possible on the surface of the Earth. The availability of many soil macronutrients such as magnesium, calcium, potassium, and PO4 is directly related to the rate at which primary minerals weather. Often such nutrient balances are upset by anthropogenic

  2. Thermal Ablation Modeling for Silicate Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yih-Kanq

    2016-01-01

    A general thermal ablation model for silicates is proposed. The model includes the mass losses through the balance between evaporation and condensation, and through the moving molten layer driven by surface shear force and pressure gradient. This model can be applied in the ablation simulation of the meteoroid and the glassy ablator for spacecraft Thermal Protection Systems. Time-dependent axisymmetric computations are performed by coupling the fluid dynamics code, Data-Parallel Line Relaxation program, with the material response code, Two-dimensional Implicit Thermal Ablation simulation program, to predict the mass lost rates and shape change. The predicted mass loss rates will be compared with available data for model validation, and parametric studies will also be performed for meteoroid earth entry conditions.

  3. Thermal Ablation Modeling for Silicate Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yih-Kanq

    2016-01-01

    A thermal ablation model for silicates is proposed. The model includes the mass losses through the balance between evaporation and condensation, and through the moving molten layer driven by surface shear force and pressure gradient. This model can be applied in ablation simulations of the meteoroid or glassy Thermal Protection Systems for spacecraft. Time-dependent axi-symmetric computations are performed by coupling the fluid dynamics code, Data-Parallel Line Relaxation program, with the material response code, Two-dimensional Implicit Thermal Ablation simulation program, to predict the mass lost rates and shape change. For model validation, the surface recession of fused amorphous quartz rod is computed, and the recession predictions reasonably agree with available data. The present parametric studies for two groups of meteoroid earth entry conditions indicate that the mass loss through moving molten layer is negligibly small for heat-flux conditions at around 1 MW/cm(exp. 2).

  4. Comparison of light harmonic generation in Al and Ge consisted silicate materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, Vitaly A.; Vostrikova, Liubov I.

    2018-04-01

    The silicate materials are perspective for different areas of laser physics and photonics. In this paper the comparison of the nonlinear conversion with the generation of the light harmonic in Al- and Ge-containing silicate materials is presented. The peculiarities of the processes of the light harmonic generation in dependence on the concentrations of the chemical components are discussed and the influences of the additional small inclusion of the elements of fifth group and the rare-earth elements are estimated.

  5. Mg-perovskite/silicate melt and magnesiowuestite/silicate melt partition coefficients for KLB-1 at 250 Kbars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, Michael J.; Rubie, David C.; Mcfarlane, Elisabeth A.

    1992-01-01

    The partitioning of elements amongst lower mantle phases and silicate melts is of interest in unraveling the early thermal history of the Earth. Because of the technical difficulty in carrying out such measurements, only one direct set of measurements was reported previously, and these results as well as interpretations based on them have generated controversy. Here we report what are to our knowledge only the second set of directly measured trace element partition coefficients for a natural system (KLB-1).

  6. Lithium isotope fractionation by diffusion in minerals Part 2: Olivine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Frank; Chaussidon, Marc; Bruce Watson, E.; Mendybaev, Ruslan; Homolova, Veronika

    2017-12-01

    Recent experiments have shown that lithium isotopes can be significantly fractionated by diffusion in silicate liquids and in augite. Here we report new laboratory experiments that document similarly large lithium isotopic fractionation by diffusion in olivine. Two types of experiments were used. A powder-source method where lithium from finely ground spodumene (LiAlSi2O6) diffused into oriented San Carlos olivine, and piston cylinder annealing experiments where Kunlun clinopyroxene (∼30 ppm lithium) and oriented San Carlos olivine (∼2 ppm lithium) were juxtaposed. The lithium concentration along traverses across the run products was measured using both laser ablation as a source for a Varian 820-MS quadrupole mass spectrometer and a CAMECA 1270 secondary ion mass spectrometer. The CAMECA 1270 was also used to measure the lithium isotopic fractionation across olivine grains recovered from the experiments. The lithium isotopes were found to be fractionationed by many tens of permil in the diffusion boundary layer at the grain edges as a result of 6Li diffusing significantly faster than 7Li. The lithium concentration and isotopic fractionation data across the olivine recovered from the different experiments were modeled using calculations in which lithium was assumed to be of two distinct types - one being fast diffusing interstitial lithium, the other much less mobile lithium on a metal site. The two-site diffusion model involves a large number of independent parameters and we found that different choices of the parameters can produce very comparable fits to the lithium concentration profiles and associated isotopic fractionation. Because of this nonuniqueness we are able to determine only a range for the relative diffusivity of 6Li compared to 7Li. When the mass dependence of lithium diffusion is parameterized as D6Li /D7Li =(7 / 6) β , the isotope fractionation for diffusion along the a and c crystallographic direction of olivine can be fit by β = 0.4 ± 0

  7. Determining the Metal/Silicate Partition Coefficient of Germanium: Implications for Core and Mantle Differentiation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, C.; Righter, K.; Danielson, L.; Pando, K.; Lee, C.

    2010-01-01

    Currently there are several hypotheses for the thermal state of the early Earth. Some hypothesize a shallow magma ocean, or deep magma ocean, or heterogeneous accretion which requires no magma ocean at all. Previous models are unable to account for Ge depletion in Earth's mantle relative to CI chondrites. In this study, the element Ge is used to observe the way siderophile elements partition into the metallic core. The purpose of this research is to provide new data for Ge and to further test these models for Earth's early stages. The partition coefficients (D(sub Ge) = c(sub metal)/c(sub silicate), where D = partition coefficient of Ge and c = concentration of Ge in the metal and silicate, respectively) of siderophile elements were studied by performing series of high pressure, high temperature experiments. They are also dependent on oxygen fugacity, and metal and silicate composition. Ge is a moderately siderophile element found in both the mantle and core, and has yet to be studied systematically at high temperatures. Moreover, previous work has been limited by the low solubility of Ge in silicate melts (less than 100 ppm and close to detection limits for electron microprobe analysis). Reported here are results from 14 experiments studying the partitioning of Ge between silicate and metallic liquids. The Ge concentrations were then analyzed using Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Mass Spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) which is sensitive enough to detect ppm levels of Ge in the silicate melt.

  8. Battery components employing a silicate binder

    DOEpatents

    Delnick, Frank M [Albuquerque, NM; Reinhardt, Frederick W [Albuquerque, NM; Odinek, Judy G [Rio Rancho, NM

    2011-05-24

    A battery component structure employing inorganic-silicate binders. In some embodiments, casting or coating of components may be performed using aqueous slurries of silicates and electrode materials or separator materials.

  9. Characterization of iron-phosphate-silicate chemical garden structures.

    PubMed

    Barge, Laura M; Doloboff, Ivria J; White, Lauren M; Stucky, Galen D; Russell, Michael J; Kanik, Isik

    2012-02-28

    Chemical gardens form when ferrous chloride hydrate seed crystals are added or concentrated solutions are injected into solutions of sodium silicate and potassium phosphate. Various precipitation morphologies are observed depending on silicate and phosphate concentrations, including hollow plumes, bulbs, and tubes. The growth of precipitates is controlled by the internal osmotic pressure, fluid buoyancy, and membrane strength. Additionally, rapid bubble-led growth is observed when silicate concentrations are high. ESEM/EDX analysis confirms compositional gradients within the membranes, and voltage measurements across the membranes during growth show a final potential of around 150-200 mV, indicating that electrochemical gradients are maintained across the membranes as growth proceeds. The characterization of chemical gardens formed with iron, silicate, and phosphate, three important components of an early earth prebiotic hydrothermal system, can help us understand the properties of analogous structures that likely formed at submarine alkaline hydrothermal vents in the Hadean-structures offering themselves as the hatchery of life. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  10. Lithium in 2012

    Jaskula, B.W.

    2013-01-01

    In 2012, estimated world lithium consumption was about 28 kt (31,000 st) of lithium contained in minerals and compounds, an 8 percent increase from that of 2011. Estimated U.S. consumption was about 2 kt (2,200 st) of contained lithium, the same as that of 2011. The United States was thought to rank fourth in consumption of lithium and remained the leading importer of lithium carbonate and the leading producer of value-added lithium materials. One company, Rockwood Lithium Inc., produced lithium compounds from domestic brine resources near Silver Peak, NV.

  11. Sulfur Saturation Limits in Silicate Melts and their Implications for Core Formation Scenarios for Terrestrial Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holzheid, Astrid; Grove, Timothy L.

    2002-01-01

    This study explores the controls of temperature, pressure, and silicate melt composition on S solubility in silicate liquids. The solubility of S in FeO-containing silicate melts in equilibrium with metal sulfide increases significantly with increasing temperature but decreases with increasing pressure. The silicate melt structure also exercises a control on S solubility. Increasing the degree of polymerization of the silicate melt structure lowers the S solubility in the silicate liquid. The new set of experimental data is used to expand the model of Mavrogenes and O'Neill(1999) for S solubility in silicate liquids by incorporating the influence of the silicate melt structure. The expected S solubility in the ascending magma is calculated using the expanded model. Because the negative pressure dependence of S solubility is more influential than the positive temperature dependence, decompression and adiabatic ascent of a formerly S-saturated silicate magma will lead to S undersaturation. A primitive magma that is S-saturated in its source region will, therefore, become S-undersaturated as it ascends to shallower depth. In order to precipitate magmatic sulfides, the magma must first cool and undergo fractional crystallization to reach S saturation. The S content in a metallic liquid that is in equilibrium with a magma ocean that contains approx. 200 ppm S (i.e., Earth's bulk mantle S content) ranges from 5.5 to 12 wt% S. This range of S values encompasses the amount of S (9 to 12 wt%) that would be present in the outer core if S is the light element. Thus, the Earth's proto-mantle could be in equilibrium (in terms of the preserved S abundance) with a core-forming metallic phase.

  12. 21 CFR 182.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 182.2437 Section 182.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations, restrictions...

  13. 21 CFR 582.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 582.2437 Section 582.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations, restrictions...

  14. 21 CFR 582.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 582.2437 Section 582.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations, restrictions...

  15. 21 CFR 582.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 582.2437 Section 582.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations, restrictions...

  16. 21 CFR 182.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Magnesium silicate. 182.2437 Section 182.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations, restrictions...

  17. 21 CFR 582.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 582.2437 Section 582.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations, restrictions...

  18. 21 CFR 182.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 182.2437 Section 182.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations, restrictions...

  19. 21 CFR 582.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 582.2437 Section 582.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations, restrictions...

  20. 21 CFR 182.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 182.2437 Section 182.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations, restrictions...

  1. 21 CFR 182.2227 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium silicate. 182.2227 Section 182.2227 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Calcium silicate. (a) Product. Calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent and 5 percent. (c) Limitations...

  2. 21 CFR 182.2227 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 182.2227 Section 182.2227 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Calcium silicate. (a) Product. Calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent and 5 percent. (c) Limitations...

  3. 21 CFR 582.2227 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 582.2227 Section 582.2227 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium silicate. (a) Product. Calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent and 5 percent. (c) Limitations...

  4. 21 CFR 582.2227 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 582.2227 Section 582.2227 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium silicate. (a) Product. Calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent and 5 percent. (c) Limitations...

  5. 21 CFR 182.2227 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 182.2227 Section 182.2227 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Calcium silicate. (a) Product. Calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent and 5 percent. (c) Limitations...

  6. 21 CFR 582.2227 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 582.2227 Section 582.2227 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium silicate. (a) Product. Calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent and 5 percent. (c) Limitations...

  7. 21 CFR 582.2227 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 582.2227 Section 582.2227 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium silicate. (a) Product. Calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent and 5 percent. (c) Limitations...

  8. 21 CFR 182.2227 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 182.2227 Section 182.2227 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Anticaking Agents § 182.2227 Calcium silicate. (a) Product. Calcium silicate...

  9. 21 CFR 582.2227 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 582.2227 Section 582.2227 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium silicate. (a) Product. Calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent and 5 percent. (c) Limitations...

  10. 21 CFR 182.2227 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 182.2227 Section 182.2227 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Calcium silicate. (a) Product. Calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent and 5 percent. (c) Limitations...

  11. Chemistry of the subalkalic silicic obsidians

    MacDonald, Ray; Smith, Robert L.; Thomas, John E.

    1992-01-01

    Nonhydrated obsidians are quenched magmatic liquids that record in their chemical compositions details of the tectonic environment of formation and of the differentiation mechanisms that affected their subsequent evolution. This study attempts to analyze, in terms of geologic processes, the compositional variations in the subalkalic silicic obsidians (Si02≥70 percent by weight, molecular (Na2O+K20)>Al2O3). New major- and trace-element determinations of 241 samples and a compilation of 130 published major-element analyses are reported and interpreted. Obsidians from five different tectonic settings are recognized: (1) primitive island arcs, (2) mature island arcs, (3) continental margins, (4) continental interiors, and (5) oceanic extensional zones. Tectonomagmatic discrimination between these groups is successfully made on Nb-Ta, Nb-FeOt and Th-Hf-Ta plots, and compositional ranges and averages for each group are presented. The chemical differences between groups are related to the type of crust in which magmas were generated. With increasingly sialic (continental type) crust, the obsidians show overall enrichment in F, Be, Li, Mo, Nb, Rb, Sn, Ta, U, W, Zn, and the rare-earth elements, and depletion in Mg, Ca, Ba, Co, Sc, Sr, and Zr. They become more potassic, have higher Fe/Mg and F/Cl ratios, and lower Zr/Hf, Nb/Ta, and Th/U ratios. Higher values of total rare-earth elements are accompanied by light rare-earth-element enrichment and pronounced negative Eu anomalies. An attempt is made to link obsidian chemistry to genetic mechanlism. Two broad groups of rocks are distinguished: one generated where crystal-liquid processes dominated (CLPD types), which are the products of crustal anatexis, possibly under conditions of low halogen fugacity, ± crystal fractionation ± magma mixing; and a second group represented by rocks formed in the upper parts of large magma chambers by interplays of crystal fractionation, volatile transfer, magma mixing, and possibly various

  12. Metal/Silicate Partitioning of W, Ge, Ga and Ni: Dependence on Silicate Melt Composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singletary, S.; Drake, M. J.

    2004-12-01

    Metal/silicate partition coefficients (Dm/s) for siderophile elements are essential to investigations of core formation when used in conjunction with the pattern of elemental abundances in the Earth's mantle (Drake and Righter, 2002; Jones and Drake, 1986; Righter et al. 1997). The partitioning of siderophile elements is controlled by temperature, pressure, oxygen fugacity, and by the compositions of the metal and silicate phases. In this work, we investigate the role of silicate melt composition on the partitioning of the siderophile elements W, Ge, Ga and Ni between metallic and silicate liquid. Experiments were performed in the Experimental Geochemistry Laboratory at the University of Arizona utilizing a non-end loaded piston cylinder apparatus with a barium carbonate pressure medium. Starting materials were created by combining the mafic and silicic compositions of Jaeger and Drake (2000) with Fe powder (~25 wt% of the total mixture) to achieve metal saturation. Small amounts of W, Ge, Ga2O3 and NiO powder (less than 2 wt% each) were also added to the starting compositions. The experiments were contained in a graphite capsule and performed with temperature and pressure fixed at 1400ºC and 1.5 GPa. Experimental run products were analyzed with the University of Arizona Cameca SX50 electron microprobe with four wavelength dispersive spectrometers and a PAP ZAF correction program. All experiments in our set are saturated with metal and silicate liquid, indicating that oxygen fugacity is below IW. Several of the runs also contain a gallium-rich spinel as an additional saturating phase. Quench phases are also present in the silicate liquid in all runs. The experimentally produced liquids have nbo/t values (calculated using the method of Mills, 1993) that range from 1.10 to 2.97. These values are higher than those calculated for the liquids in the Jaeger and Drake (2000) study. The higher nbo/t values are due to uptake of Fe by the melt. The initial silicate

  13. Phospho-silicate and silicate layers modified by hydroxyapatite particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rokita, M.; Brożek, A.; Handke, M.

    2005-06-01

    Common used metal materials do not ensure good connection between an implant and biological neighbourhood. Covering implants by thin silicate or phosphate layers enable to improve biological properties of implants and create conditions for producing the non-concrete bonding between the implant and tissue. The project includes preparing silicate sols of different concentrations and proper (powder) fraction of synthetic as well as natural ox hydroxyapatite, depositing the sol mixed with hydroxyapatite onto the base material (metal, ceramic carbon) and heat treatment. Our work includes also preparation of phospho-silicate layers deposited onto different base materials using sol-gel method. Deposited sols were prepared regarding composition, concentration and layer heat treatment conditions. The prepared layers are examined to determine their phase composition (XRD, IR spectroscopy methods), density and continuity (scanning microscopy with EDX methods). Biological activity of layers was evaluated by means of estimation of their corrosive resistance in synthetic body fluids ('in vitro' method) and of bone cells growth on the layers surface. Introducing hydroxyapatite to the layer sol should improve connection between tissue and implant as well as limit the disadvantageous, corrosive influence of implant material (metal) on the tissue.

  14. Metal/Silicate Partitioning at High Pressures and Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shofner, G.; Campbell, A.; Danielson, L.; Righter, K.; Rahman, Z.

    2010-01-01

    The behavior of siderophile elements during metal-silicate segregation, and their resulting distributions provide insight into core formation processes. Determination of partition coefficients allows the calculation of element distributions that can be compared to established values of element abundances in the silicate (mantle) and metallic (core) portions of the Earth. Moderately siderophile elements, including W, are particularly useful in constraining core formation conditions because they are sensitive to variations in T, P, oxygen fugacity (fO2), and silicate composition. To constrain the effect of pressure on W metal/silicate partitioning, we performed experiments at high pressures and temperatures using a multi anvil press (MAP) at NASA Johnson Space Center and laser-heated diamond anvil cells (LHDAC) at the University of Maryland. Starting materials consisted of natural peridotite mixed with Fe and W metals. Pressure conditions in the MAP experiments ranged from 10 to 16 GPa at 2400 K. Pressures in the LHDAC experiments ranged from 26 to 58 GPa, and peak temperatures ranged up to 5000 K. LHDAC experimental run products were sectioned by focused ion beam (FIB) at NASA JSC. Run products were analyzed by electron microprobe using wavelength dispersive spectroscopy. Liquid metal/liquid silicate partition coefficients for W were calculated from element abundances determined by microprobe analyses, and corrected to a common fO2 condition of IW-2 assuming +4 valence for W. Within analytical uncertainties, W partitioning shows a flat trend with increasing pressure from 10 to 16 GPa. At higher pressures, W becomes more siderophile, with an increase in partition coefficient of approximately 0.5 log units.

  15. Modifying Silicates for Better Dispersion in Nanocomposites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Sandi

    2005-01-01

    An improved chemical modification has been developed to enhance the dispersion of layered silicate particles in the formulation of a polymer/silicate nanocomposite material. The modification involves, among other things, the co-exchange of an alkyl ammonium ion and a monoprotonated diamine with interlayer cations of the silicate. The net overall effects of the improved chemical modification are to improve processability of the nanocomposite and maximize the benefits of dispersing the silicate particles into the polymer. Some background discussion is necessary to give meaning to a description of this development. Polymer/silicate nanocomposites are also denoted polymer/clay composites because the silicate particles in them are typically derived from clay particles. Particles of clay comprise layers of silicate platelets separated by gaps called "galleries." The platelet thickness is 1 nm. The length varies from 30 nm to 1 m, depending on the silicate. In order to fully realize the benefits of polymer/silicate nanocomposites, it is necessary to ensure that the platelets become dispersed in the polymer matrices. Proper dispersion can impart physical and chemical properties that make nanocomposites attractive for a variety of applications. In order to achieve nanometer-level dispersion of a layered silicate into a polymer matrix, it is typically necessary to modify the interlayer silicate surfaces by attaching organic functional groups. This modification can be achieved easily by ion exchange between the interlayer metal cations found naturally in the silicate and protonated organic cations - typically protonated amines. Long-chain alkyl ammonium ions are commonly chosen as the ion-exchange materials because they effectively lower the surface energies of the silicates and ease the incorporation of organic monomers or polymers into the silicate galleries. This completes the background discussion. In the present improved modification of the interlayer silicate surfaces

  16. Properties of Tricalcium Silicate Sealers.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Issam; Naaman, Alfred; Camilleri, Josette

    2016-10-01

    Sealers based on tricalcium silicate cement aim at an interaction of the sealer with the root canal wall, alkalinity with potential antimicrobial activity, and the ability to set in a wet field. The aim of this study was to characterize and investigate the properties of a new tricalcium silicate-based sealer and verify its compliance to ISO 6876 (2012). A new tricalcium silicate-based sealer (Bio MM; St Joseph University, Beirut, Lebanon), BioRoot RCS (Septodont, St Maure de Fosses, France), and AH Plus (Dentsply, DeTrey, Konstanz, Germany) were investigated. Characterization using scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction analysis was performed. Furthermore, sealer setting time, flow, film thickness, and radiopacity were performed following ISO specifications. pH and ion leaching in solution were assessed by pH analysis and inductively coupled plasma. Bio MM and BioRoot RCS were both composed of tricalcium silicate and tantalum oxide in Bio MM and zirconium oxide in BioRoot RCS. In addition, the Bio MM contained calcium carbonate and a phosphate phase. The inorganic components of AH Plus were calcium tungstate and zirconium oxide. AH Plus complied with the ISO norms for both flow and film thickness. BioRoot RCS and Bio MM exhibited a lower flow and a higher film thickness than that specified for sealer cements in ISO 6876. All test sealers exhibited adequate radiopacity. Bio MM interacted with physiologic solution, thus showing potential for bioactivity. Sealer properties were acceptable and comparable with other sealers available clinically. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Lithium-associated hyperthyroidism.

    PubMed

    Siyam, Fadi F; Deshmukh, Sanaa; Garcia-Touza, Mariana

    2013-08-01

    Goiters and hypothyroidism are well-known patient complications of the use of lithium for treatment of bipolar disease. However, the occurrence of lithium-induced hyperthyroidism is a more rare event. Many times, the condition can be confused with a flare of mania. Monitoring through serial biochemical measurement of thyroid function is critical in patients taking lithium. Hyperthyroidism induced by lithium is a condition that generally can be controlled medically without the patient having to discontinue lithium therapy, although in some circumstances, discontinuation of lithium therapy may be indicated. We report on a patient case of lithium-associated hyperthyroidism that resolved after discontinuation of the medication.

  18. Scenario of Growing Crops on Silicates in Lunar Gargens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozyrovska, N.; Kovalchuk, M.; Negutska, V.; Lar, O.; Korniichuk, O.; Alpatov, A.; Rogutskiy, I.; Kordyum, V.; Foing, B.

    Self-perpetuating gardens will be a practical necessity for humans, living in permanently manned lunar bases. A lunar garden has to supplement less appetizing packaged food brought from the Earth, and the ornamental plants have to serve as valuable means for emotional relaxation of crews in a hostile lunar environment. The plants are less prone to the inevitable pests and diseases when they are in optimum condition, however, in lunar greenhouses there is a threat for plants to be hosts for pests and predators. Although the lunar rocks are microorganism free, there will be a problem with the acquired infection (pathogens brought from the Earth) in the substrate used for the plant growing. On the Moon pests can be removed by total fumigation, including seed fumigation. However, such a treatment is not required when probiotics (biocontrol bacteria) for seed inoculation are used. A consortium of bacteria, controlling plant diseases, provides the production of an acceptable harvest under growth limiting factors and a threatening infection. To model lunar conditions we have used terrestrial alumino-silicate mineral anorthosite (Malyn, Ukraine) which served us as a lunar mineral analog for a substrate composition. With the idea to provide a plant with some essential growth elements siliceous bacterium Paenibacillus sp. has been isolated from alumino-silicate mineral, and a mineral leaching has been simulated in laboratory condition. The combination of mineral anorthosite and siliceous bacteria, on one hand, and a consortium of beneficial bacteria for biocontrol of plant diseases, on the other hand, are currently used in model experiments to examine the wheat and potato growth and production in cultivating chambers under controlled conditions.

  19. The influence of different alkaline earth oxides on the structural and optical properties of undoped, Ce-doped, Sm-doped, and Sm/Ce co-doped lithium alumino-phosphate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Othman, H. A.; Arzumanyan, G. M.; Möncke, D.

    2016-12-01

    Undoped, singly Sm doped, Ce doped, and Sm/Ce co-doped lithium alumino-phosphate glasses with different alkaline earth modifiers were prepared by melt quenching. The structure of the prepared glasses was investigated by FT-IR and Raman, as well as by optical spectroscopy. The effect of the optical basicity of the host glass matrix on the added active dopants was studied, as was the effect doping had on the phosphate structural units. The optical edge shifts toward higher wavelengths with an increase in the optical basicity due to the increased polarizability of the glass matrix, but also with increasing CeO2 concentration as a result of Ce3+/Ce4+ inter valence charge transfer (IV-CT) absorption. The optical band gap for direct and indirect allowed transitions was calculated for the undoped glasses. The glass sample containing Mg2+ modifier ions is found to have the highest value (4.16 eV) for the optical band gap while Ba2+ has the lowest value (3.61 eV). The change in the optical band gap arises from the structural changes and the overall polarizability (optical basicity). Refractive index, molar refractivity Rm and molar polarizability αm values increase with increasing optical basicity of the glasses. The characteristic absorption peaks of Sm3+ were also investigated. For Sm/Ce co-doped glasses, especially at high concentration of CeO2, the absorption of Ce3+ hinders the high energy absorption of Sm3+ and this effect becomes more obvious with increasing optical basicity.

  20. Partitioning of light lithophile elements during basalt eruptions on Earth and application to Martian shergottites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmonds, Marie

    2015-02-01

    An enigmatic record of light lithophile element (LLE) zoning in pyroxenes in basaltic shergottite meteorites, whereby LLE concentrations decrease dramatically from the cores to the rims, has been interpreted as being due to partitioning of LLE into a hydrous vapor during magma ascent to the surface on Mars. These trends are used as evidence that Martian basaltic melts are water-rich (McSween et al., 2001). Lithium and boron are light lithophile elements (LLE) that partition into volcanic minerals and into vapor from silicate melts, making them potential tracers of degassing processes during magma ascent to the surface of Earth and of other planets. While LLE degassing behavior is relatively well understood for silica-rich melts, where water and LLE concentrations are relatively high, very little data exists for LLE abundance, heterogeneity and degassing in basaltic melts. The lack of data hampers interpretation of the trends in the shergottite meteorites. Through a geochemical study of LLE, volatile and trace elements in olivine-hosted melt inclusions from Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, it can be demonstrated that lithium behaves similarly to the light to middle rare Earth elements during melting, magma mixing and fractionation. Considerable heterogeneity in lithium and boron is inherited from mantle-derived primary melts, which is dominant over the fractionation and degassing signal. Lithium and boron are only very weakly volatile in basaltic melt erupted from Kilauea Volcano, with vapor-melt partition coefficients <0.1. Degassing of LLE is further inhibited at high temperatures. Pyroxene and associated melt inclusion LLE concentrations from a range of volcanoes are used to quantify lithium pyroxene-melt partition coefficients, which correlate negatively with melt H2O content, ranging from 0.13 at low water contents to <0.08 at H2O contents >4 wt%. The observed terrestrial LLE partitioning behavior is extrapolated to Martian primitive melts through modeling. The zoning

  1. Spectroscopy `outside the box': Towards wider application of NMR to minerals and glasses with abundant paramagnetic cations - Fe, Ni, Co, and Cu silicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stebbins, J. F.

    2017-12-01

    Since the early applications of solid-state NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) to silicates in the early 1980's, this powerful method has been widely applied to problems of short- to medium-range structure, particularly for materials in which order/disorder is critical, such as crystalline solid solutions, glasses, and even melts. However, almost all such work has been on materials with low (< a few %) contents of ions with unpaired electron spins. Such spins interact strongly with NMR-observed nuclear spins, and can cause severe line broadening and loss of information, in some cases making spectra nearly unobservable. Many groups of minerals with abundant, paramagnetic transition metals (notably Fe2+) and rare earth cations, as well as wide, petrologically important ranges of glass composition have thus been excluded. Inspired by in-depth NMR studies of 31P, 7Li, and other nuclides in lithium-transition metal oxide and phosphate battery materials (C. Grey and others), and with some serendipitous discovery plus persistence to look far outside of "normal" parameter space, we have recently shown that high resolution, structurally informative spectra can actually be obtained for silicate, oxide, and phosphate solid solutions with moderate (0.1 up to 10%) contents of paramagnetic cations such as Fe2+, Ni2+, Co2+ and REE3+. Very recently we have extended this to observe some of the first quantitative NMR spectra of silicate minerals in which a paramagnetic transition metal is the major cation, obtaining useful data for a series of Cu2+ silicates, fayalite (Fe2SiO4) and Ni- and Co- equivalents of diopside (CaMSi2O6). New data for glasses of the latter compositions may be the first such accurate results for any transition metal-rich glass. Although we are still far from a detailed theoretical understanding of these data, the spectra for the glasses are quite different from those of the crystals, suggesting the possibility of medium-range ordering and clustering of NiO and

  2. Carbon substitution for oxygen in silicates in planetary interiors.

    PubMed

    Sen, Sabyasachi; Widgeon, Scarlett J; Navrotsky, Alexandra; Mera, Gabriela; Tavakoli, Amir; Ionescu, Emanuel; Riedel, Ralf

    2013-10-01

    Amorphous silicon oxycarbide polymer-derived ceramics (PDCs), synthesized from organometallic precursors, contain carbon- and silica-rich nanodomains, the latter with extensive substitution of carbon for oxygen, linking Si-centered SiO(x)C(4-x) tetrahedra. Calorimetric studies demonstrated these PDCs to be thermodynamically more stable than a mixture of SiO2, C, and silicon carbide. Here, we show by multinuclear NMR spectroscopy that substitution of C for O is also attained in PDCs with depolymerized silica-rich domains containing lithium, associated with SiO(x)C(4-x) tetrahedra with nonbridging oxygen. We suggest that significant (several percent) substitution of C for O could occur in more complex geological silicate melts/glasses in contact with graphite at moderate pressure and high temperature and may be thermodynamically far more accessible than C for Si substitution. Carbon incorporation will change the local structure and may affect physical properties, such as viscosity. Analogous carbon substitution at grain boundaries, at defect sites, or as equilibrium states in nominally acarbonaceous crystalline silicates, even if present at levels at 10-100 ppm, might form an extensive and hitherto hidden reservoir of carbon in the lower crust and mantle.

  3. Carbon substitution for oxygen in silicates in planetary interiors

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Sabyasachi; Widgeon, Scarlett J.; Navrotsky, Alexandra; Mera, Gabriela; Tavakoli, Amir; Ionescu, Emanuel; Riedel, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    Amorphous silicon oxycarbide polymer-derived ceramics (PDCs), synthesized from organometallic precursors, contain carbon- and silica-rich nanodomains, the latter with extensive substitution of carbon for oxygen, linking Si-centered SiOxC4-x tetrahedra. Calorimetric studies demonstrated these PDCs to be thermodynamically more stable than a mixture of SiO2, C, and silicon carbide. Here, we show by multinuclear NMR spectroscopy that substitution of C for O is also attained in PDCs with depolymerized silica-rich domains containing lithium, associated with SiOxC4-x tetrahedra with nonbridging oxygen. We suggest that significant (several percent) substitution of C for O could occur in more complex geological silicate melts/glasses in contact with graphite at moderate pressure and high temperature and may be thermodynamically far more accessible than C for Si substitution. Carbon incorporation will change the local structure and may affect physical properties, such as viscosity. Analogous carbon substitution at grain boundaries, at defect sites, or as equilibrium states in nominally acarbonaceous crystalline silicates, even if present at levels at 10–100 ppm, might form an extensive and hitherto hidden reservoir of carbon in the lower crust and mantle. PMID:24043830

  4. Evidence against a chondritic Earth.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Ian H; O'Neill, Hugh St C

    2012-03-28

    The (142)Nd/(144)Nd ratio of the Earth is greater than the solar ratio as inferred from chondritic meteorites, which challenges a fundamental assumption of modern geochemistry--that the composition of the silicate Earth is 'chondritic', meaning that it has refractory element ratios identical to those found in chondrites. The popular explanation for this and other paradoxes of mantle geochemistry, a hidden layer deep in the mantle enriched in incompatible elements, is inconsistent with the heat flux carried by mantle plumes. Either the matter from which the Earth formed was not chondritic, or the Earth has lost matter by collisional erosion in the later stages of planet formation.

  5. Pt, Au, Pd and Ru Partitioning Between Mineral and Silicate Melts: The Role of Metal Nanonuggets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malavergne, V.; Charon, E.; Jones, J.; Agranier, A.; Campbell, A.

    2012-01-01

    The partition coefficients of Pt and other Pt Group Elements (PGE) between metal and silicate D(sub Metal-Silicate) and also between silicate minerals and silicate melts D(sub Metal-Silicate) are among the most challenging coefficients to obtain precisely. The PGE are highly siderophile elements (HSE) with D(sub Metal-Silicate) >10(exp 3) due to the fact that their concentrations in silicates are very low (ppb to ppt range). Therefore, the analytical difficulty is increased by the possible presence of HSE-rich-nuggets in reduced silicate melts during experiments). These tiny HSE nuggets complicate the interpretation of measured HSE concentrations. If the HSE micro-nuggets are just sample artifacts, then their contributions should be removed before calculations of the final concentration. On the other hand, if they are produced during the quench, then they should be included in the analysis. We still don't understand the mechanism of nugget formation well. Are they formed during the quench by precipitation from precursor species dissolved homogeneously in the melts, or are they precipitated in situ at high temperature due to oversaturation? As these elements are important tracers of early planetary processes such as core formation, it is important to take up this analytical and experimental challenge. In the case of the Earth for example, chondritic relative abundances of the HSE in some mantle xenoliths have led to the concept of the "late veneer" as a source of volatiles (such as water) and siderophiles in the silicate Earth. Silicate crystal/liquid fractionation is responsible for most, if not all, the HSE variation in the martian meteorite suites (SNC) and Pt is the element least affected by these fractionations. Therefore, in terms of reconstructing mantle HSE abundances for Mars, Pt becomes a very important player. In the present study, we have performed high temperature experiments under various redox conditions in order to determine the abundances of Pt, Au

  6. Pulsed deposition of silicate films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, W.; Solanki, R.; Conley, J. F.; Ono, Y.

    2003-09-01

    A sequential pulsed process is utilized for deposition of nonstoichiometric silicate films without employing an oxidizing agent. The metal precursors were HfCl4, AlCl3, and ZrCl4, as well as Hf(NO3)4 and the silicon source was tris(tert-butoxy)silanol. Unlike atomic layer deposition, the growth per cycle was several monolayers thick, where the enhancement in growth was due to a catalytic reaction. The bulk and electrical properties of these films are similar to those of silicon dioxide. Silicon carbide devices coated with these films show good insulating characteristics.

  7. A review of bioactive silicate ceramics.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chengtie; Chang, Jiang

    2013-06-01

    Silicate bioceramics, as a new family of biomaterials, have received significant attention in their application to hard tissue regeneration. Some silicate bioceramics have shown excellent apatite mineralization in simulated body fluids and their ionic products have been shown to enhance the proliferation, osteogenic differentiation and gene expression of stem cells. In this paper, we review the advances in the research of silicate system bioceramics, including preparation methods, mechanical strength, apatite mineralization, dissolution and in vitro and in vivo biological properties. The biological properties and the corresponding mechanism have been highlighted. A look forward to the application of silicate bioceramics to bone regeneration is further suggested.

  8. Effect of silicate ions on electrode overvoltage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gras, J. M.; Seite, C.

    1979-01-01

    The influence of the addition of a silicate to a caustic solution (KOH) is studied in order to determine the degree to which silicates inhibit the corrosion of chrysotile under conditions of electrolysis at working temperatures of 100 C and above. In an alkaline solution containing various silicate concentrations, current density was increased and electrode overvoltage was measured. Results show that silicate ion concentrations in the electrolyte increase with temperature without effecting electrochemical performance up to 115 C at 700 MA/sqcm. At this point the concentration is about 0.5 g Si/100 g KOH. Beyond this limit, electrolytic performance rapidly degenerates due to severe oxidation of the electrodes.

  9. High-temperature silicate volcanism on Jupiter's moon Io

    McEwen, A.S.; Keszthelyi, L.; Spencer, J.R.; Schubert, G.; Matson, D.L.; Lopes-Gautier, R.; Klaasen, K.P.; Johnson, T.V.; Head, J.W.; Geissler, P.; Fagents, S.; Davies, A.G.; Carr, M.H.; Breneman, H.H.; Belton, M.J.S.

    1998-01-01

    Infrared wavelength observations of Io by the Galileo spacecraft show that at last 12 different vents are erupting lavas that are probably hotter than the highest temperature basaltic eruptions on Earth today. In at least one case, the eruption near Pillan Patea, two independent instruments on Galileo show that the lava temperature must have exceeded 1700 kelvin and may have reached 2000 kelvin. The most likely explanation is that these lavas are ultramafic (magnesium-rich) silicates, and this idea is supported by the tentative identification of magnesium-rich orthopyroxene in lava flows associated with thse high-temperature hot spots.

  10. Molten salt lithium cells

    DOEpatents

    Raistrick, I.D.; Poris, J.; Huggins, R.A.

    1980-07-18

    Lithium-based cells are promising for applications such as electric vehicles and load-leveling for power plants since lithium is very electropositive and light weight. One type of lithium-based cell utilizes a molten salt electrolyte and is operated in the temperature range of about 400 to 500/sup 0/C. Such high temperature operation accelerates corrosion problems and a substantial amount of energy is lost through heat transfer. The present invention provides an electrochemical cell which may be operated at temperatures between about 100 to 170/sup 0/C. The cell is comprised of an electrolyte, which preferably includes lithium nitrate, and a lithium or lithium alloy electrode.

  11. Molten salt lithium cells

    DOEpatents

    Raistrick, Ian D.; Poris, Jaime; Huggins, Robert A.

    1983-01-01

    Lithium-based cells are promising for applications such as electric vehicles and load-leveling for power plants since lithium is very electropositive and light weight. One type of lithium-based cell utilizes a molten salt electrolyte and is operated in the temperature range of about 400.degree.-500.degree. C. Such high temperature operation accelerates corrosion problems and a substantial amount of energy is lost through heat transfer. The present invention provides an electrochemical cell (10) which may be operated at temperatures between about 100.degree.-170.degree. C. Cell (10) comprises an electrolyte (16), which preferably includes lithium nitrate, and a lithium or lithium alloy electrode (12).

  12. Molten salt lithium cells

    DOEpatents

    Raistrick, Ian D.; Poris, Jaime; Huggins, Robert A.

    1982-02-09

    Lithium-based cells are promising for applications such as electric vehicles and load-leveling for power plants since lithium is very electropositive and light weight. One type of lithium-based cell utilizes a molten salt electrolyte and is operated in the temperature range of about 400.degree.-500.degree. C. Such high temperature operation accelerates corrosion problems and a substantial amount of energy is lost through heat transfer. The present invention provides an electrochemical cell (10) which may be operated at temperatures between about 100.degree.-170.degree. C. Cell (10) comprises an electrolyte (16), which preferably includes lithium nitrate, and a lithium or lithium alloy electrode (12).

  13. Nanoscale zinc silicate from phytoliths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qadri, S. B.; Gorzkowski, E. P.; Rath, B. B.; Feng, C. R.; Amarasinghe, R.; Freitas, J. A.; Culbertson, J. C.; Wollmershauser, J. A.

    2017-10-01

    We report a faster, less expensive method of producing zinc silicate nanoparticles. Such particles are used in high volume to make phosphors and anti-corrosion coatings. The approach makes use of phytoliths (plant rocks), which are microscopic, amorphous, and largely silicate particles embedded in plants, that lend themselves to being easily broken down into nanoparticles. Nanoparticles of Zn2SiO4 were produced in a two stage process. In the refinement stage, plant residue, mixed with an appropriate amount of ZnO, was heated in an argon atmosphere to a temperature exceeding 1400 °C for four to six hours and then heated in air at 650 °C to remove excess carbon. TEM shows 50-100 nm nanoparticles. Raman scattering indicates that only the -Zn2SiO4 crystalline phase was present. X-ray analysis indicated pure rhombohedral R 3 bar phase results from using rice/wheat husks. Both samples luminesced predominantly at 523 nm when illuminated with X-rays or UV laser light.

  14. Mantle Mineral/Silicate Melt Partitioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFarlane, E. A.; Drake, M. J.

    1992-07-01

    Introduction: The partitioning of elements among mantle phases and silicate melts is of interest in unraveling the early thermal history of the Earth. It has been proposed that the elevated Mg/Si ratio of the upper mantle of the Earth is a consequence of the flotation of olivine into the upper mantle (Agee and Walker, 1988). Agee and Walker (1988) have generated a model via mass balance by assuming average mineral compositions to generate upper mantle peridotite. This model determines that upper mantle peridotite could result from the addition of 32.7% olivine and 0.9% majorite garnet into the upper mantle, and subtraction of 27.6% perovskite from the upper mantle (Agee and Walker, 1988). The present contribution uses experimental data to examine the consequences of such multiple phase fractionations enabling an independent evaluation of the above mentioned model. Here we use Mg-perovskite/melt partition coefficients from both a synthetic and a natural system (KLB-1) obtained from this laboratory. Also used are partition coefficient values for majorite garnet/melt, beta spinel/melt and olivine/melt partitioning (McFarlane et al., 1991b; McFarlane et al., 1992). Multiple phase fractionations are examined using the equilibrium crystallization equation and partition coefficient values. The mineral proportions determined by Agee and Walker (1988) are converted into weight fractions and used to compute a bulk partition coefficient value. Discussion: There has been a significant debate concerning whether measured values of trace element partition coefficients permit large-scale fractionation of liquidus phases from an early terrestrial magma ocean (Kato et al., 1988a,b; Walker and Agee, 1989; Drake, 1989; Drake et al., 1991; McFarlane et al., 1990, 1991). It should be noted that it is unclear which, if any, numerical values of partition coefficients are appropriate for examining this question, and certainly the assumptions for the current model must be more fully

  15. Lithium and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... best live chat Live Help Fact Sheets Share Lithium Wednesday, 01 November 2017 In every pregnancy, a ... risk. This sheet talks about whether exposure to lithium may increase the risk for birth defects over ...

  16. 21 CFR 182.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 182.2437 Section 182.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Anticaking Agents § 182.2437 Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium...

  17. High Pressure Response of Siliceous Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-01

    quartz, Starphire soda lime silicate glass, hydrated Starphire, BOROFLOAT borosilicate glass, an iron-containing soda lime silicate glass, opal (a hydrated... Opal (hydrated amorphous silica). .............................................................................. 10 2.7. ROBAX glass ceramic...spectrum as a function of stress for BOROFLOAT borosilicate glass. .......... 29 4.8. Raman spectrum as a function of stress for opal (hydrated

  18. High Pressure Response of Siliceous Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-01

    iron-containing soda lime silicate glass, opal (a hydrated silicate glass), ROBAX glass ceramic, and others were single crystal (α-quartz) and...10 2.6. Opal (hydrated amorphous silica...Raman spectrum as a function of stress for opal (hydrated silica) glass. ................... 29 4.9. Raman spectrum as a function of stress for

  19. Calcium silicate-based drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ying-Jie; Guo, Xiao-Xuan; Sham, Tsun-Kong

    2017-02-01

    Compared with other inorganic materials such as silica, metal oxides, noble metals and carbon, calcium silicate-based materials, especially nanostructured calcium silicate materials, have high biocompatibility, bioactivity and biodegradability, high specific surface area, nanoporous/hollow structure, high drug-loading capacity, pH-responsive drug release behavior and desirable drug release properties, and thus they are promising for the application in drug delivery. Calcium silicate-based drug delivery systems have a long drug-release time, which can significantly prolong the therapeutic effect of drugs. Another advantage of calcium silicate-based drug delivery systems is their pH-responsive drug release property, which can act as an ideal platform for targeted drug delivery. Areas covered: In recent years, studies have been carried out on calcium silicate-based drug delivery systems, and important results and insights have been documented. This article is not intended to offer a comprehensive review on the research on calcium silicate-based drug delivery systems, but presents some examples reported in the literature, and includes new insights obtained by tracking the interactions between drug molecules and calcium silicate carriers on the molecular level using the synchrotron-based X-ray spectroscopy. Expert opinion: Finally, our opinions on calcium silicate-based drug delivery systems are provided, and several research directions for the future studies are proposed.

  20. Mesoporous Silicate Materials in Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Melde, Brian J.; Johnson, Brandy J.; Charles, Paul T.

    2008-01-01

    Mesoporous silicas, especially those exhibiting ordered pore systems and uniform pore diameters, have shown great potential for sensing applications in recent years. Morphological control grants them versatility in the method of deployment whether as bulk powders, monoliths, thin films, or embedded in coatings. High surface areas and pore sizes greater than 2 nm make them effective as adsorbent coatings for humidity sensors. The pore networks also provide the potential for immobilization of enzymes within the materials. Functionalization of materials by silane grafting or through co-condensation of silicate precursors can be used to provide mesoporous materials with a variety of fluorescent probes as well as surface properties that aid in selective detection of specific analytes. This review will illustrate how mesoporous silicas have been applied to sensing changes in relative humidity, changes in pH, metal cations, toxic industrial compounds, volatile organic compounds, small molecules and ions, nitroenergetic compounds, and biologically relevant molecules. PMID:27873810

  1. Inheritance of silicate differentiation during lunar origin by giant impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, Paul H.

    1992-01-01

    It is pointed out that the implication of the popular giant impact model of lunar origin (e.g., Hartmann and Davis, 1975; Cameron and Ward, 1976; Stevenson, 1987) is that any depth-related silicate differentiation within the impactor (and/or the earth) at the time of the impact must be partly inherited by the preferentially peripheral matter that forms the moon. This paper presents calculations of the magnitude of the net differentiation of the protolunar matter for a variety of elements and scenarios, with different assumptions regarding the geometries of the 'sampled' peripheral zones, the relative proportions of the earth-derived to impactor-derived matter in the final moon, and the degree to which the impactor mantle had crystallized prior to the giant impact. It is shown that these differention effects constrain the overall plausibility of the giant impact hypothesis.

  2. Geochemical Constraints on Core Formation in the Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, John H.; Drake, Michael J.

    1986-01-01

    New experimental data on the partitioning of siderophile and chalcophile elements among metallic and silicate phases may be used to constrain hypotheses of core formation in the Earth. Three current hypotheses can explain gross features of mantle geochemistry, but none predicts siderophile and chalcophile element abundances to within a factor of two of observed values. Either our understanding of metal-silicate interactions and/or our understanding of the early Earth requires revision.

  3. REM-containing silicate concentrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, V. F.; Shabanova, O. V.; Pavlov, I. V.; Pavlov, M. V.; Shabanov, A. V.

    2016-01-01

    A new method of advanced complex processing of ores containing rare-earth elements (REE) is proposed to obtain porous X-ray amorphous aluminosilicate material with a stable chemical composition which concentrates oxides of rare-earth metals (REM). The ferromanganese oxide ores of Chuktukon deposit (Krasnoyarsk Region, RF) were used for the experiment. The obtained aluminosilicate material is appropriate for treatment with 5 - 15% solutions of mineral acids to leach REM.

  4. Melting in super-earths.

    PubMed

    Stixrude, Lars

    2014-04-28

    We examine the possible extent of melting in rock-iron super-earths, focusing on those in the habitable zone. We consider the energetics of accretion and core formation, the timescale of cooling and its dependence on viscosity and partial melting, thermal regulation via the temperature dependence of viscosity, and the melting curves of rock and iron components at the ultra-high pressures characteristic of super-earths. We find that the efficiency of kinetic energy deposition during accretion increases with planetary mass; considering the likely role of giant impacts and core formation, we find that super-earths probably complete their accretionary phase in an entirely molten state. Considerations of thermal regulation lead us to propose model temperature profiles of super-earths that are controlled by silicate melting. We estimate melting curves of iron and rock components up to the extreme pressures characteristic of super-earth interiors based on existing experimental and ab initio results and scaling laws. We construct super-earth thermal models by solving the equations of mass conservation and hydrostatic equilibrium, together with equations of state of rock and iron components. We set the potential temperature at the core-mantle boundary and at the surface to the local silicate melting temperature. We find that ancient (∼4 Gyr) super-earths may be partially molten at the top and bottom of their mantles, and that mantle convection is sufficiently vigorous to sustain dynamo action over the whole range of super-earth masses.

  5. Lithium use in batteries

    Goonan, Thomas G.

    2012-01-01

    Lithium has a number of uses but one of the most valuable is as a component of high energy-density rechargeable lithium-ion batteries. Because of concerns over carbon dioxide footprint and increasing hydrocarbon fuel cost (reduced supply), lithium may become even more important in large batteries for powering all-electric and hybrid vehicles. It would take 1.4 to 3.0 kilograms of lithium equivalent (7.5 to 16.0 kilograms of lithium carbonate) to support a 40-mile trip in an electric vehicle before requiring recharge. This could create a large demand for lithium. Estimates of future lithium demand vary, based on numerous variables. Some of those variables include the potential for recycling, widespread public acceptance of electric vehicles, or the possibility of incentives for converting to lithium-ion-powered engines. Increased electric usage could cause electricity prices to increase. Because of reduced demand, hydrocarbon fuel prices would likely decrease, making hydrocarbon fuel more desirable. In 2009, 13 percent of worldwide lithium reserves, expressed in terms of contained lithium, were reported to be within hard rock mineral deposits, and 87 percent, within brine deposits. Most of the lithium recovered from brine came from Chile, with smaller amounts from China, Argentina, and the United States. Chile also has lithium mineral reserves, as does Australia. Another source of lithium is from recycled batteries. When lithium-ion batteries begin to power vehicles, it is expected that battery recycling rates will increase because vehicle battery recycling systems can be used to produce new lithium-ion batteries.

  6. Equilibrium lithium isotope fractionation in Li-rich minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, S.; Li, Y.; Liu, J.

    2017-12-01

    Lithium is the lightest alkali metal, and only exhibits +1 valence state in minerals. It is widely distributed on the Earth, and usually substitutes for Mg in silicate minerals. Li has two stable isotopes, 6Li and 7Li, with the relative abundances of 7.52% and 92.48%, respectively. The large mass difference between 6Li and 7Li could induce significant isotope fractionation in minerals. Li isotopes can provide an important geochemical tracer for mantle processes. However, the fractionation factors for Li in most minerals remain poorly known, which makes the geochemical implications of Li isotope fractionations in minerals difficult to assess. Here, we try to use the vibrational frequencies obtained by the first-principles methods based on density-functional theory to calculate the Li isotope fractionation parameters for amblygonite (LiAlPO4F), bikitaite (LiSi2AlO7H2), eucryptite (LiAlSiO4), lithiophilite (LiMnPO4), lithiophosphate (Li3PO4), montebrasite (LiAlPO5H), and spodumene (LiAlSi2O6) in the temperature range of 0-1200 ºC. For forsterite (Mg2SiO4) and diopside (CaMgSi2O6) in which Li takes the place of Mg, the equilibrium Li isotope fractionation between them also be studied. Our preliminary calculations show that the coordination number of Li seems to play an important role in controlling Li isotope fractionation in these minerals, and concentration of Li in forsterite and diopside seems to have great effects on Li isotope fractionation factors of them.

  7. SILICATE COMPOSITION OF THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM

    SciT

    Fogerty, S.; Forrest, W.; Watson, D. M.

    2016-10-20

    The composition of silicate dust in the diffuse interstellar medium and in protoplanetary disks around young stars informs our understanding of the processing and evolution of the dust grains leading up to planet formation. An analysis of the well-known 9.7 μ m feature indicates that small amorphous silicate grains represent a significant fraction of interstellar dust and are also major components of protoplanetary disks. However, this feature is typically modeled assuming amorphous silicate dust of olivine and pyroxene stoichiometries. Here, we analyze interstellar dust with models of silicate dust that include non-stoichiometric amorphous silicate grains. Modeling the optical depth alongmore » lines of sight toward the extinguished objects Cyg OB2 No. 12 and ζ Ophiuchi, we find evidence for interstellar amorphous silicate dust with stoichiometry intermediate between olivine and pyroxene, which we simply refer to as “polivene.” Finally, we compare these results to models of silicate emission from the Trapezium and protoplanetary disks in Taurus.« less

  8. Lithium-aluminum-magnesium electrode composition

    DOEpatents

    Melendres, Carlos A.; Siegel, Stanley

    1978-01-01

    A negative electrode composition is presented for use in a secondary, high-temperature electrochemical cell. The cell also includes a molten salt electrolyte of alkali metal halides or alkaline earth metal halides and a positive electrode including a chalcogen or a metal chalcogenide as the active electrode material. The negative electrode composition includes up to 50 atom percent lithium as the active electrode constituent and a magnesium-aluminum alloy as a structural matrix. Various binary and ternary intermetallic phases of lithium, magnesium, and aluminum are formed but the electrode composition in both its charged and discharged state remains substantially free of the alpha lithium-aluminum phase and exhibits good structural integrity.

  9. Interactions between tectonics, silicate weathering, and climate explored with carbon cycle modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penman, D. E.; Caves Rugenstein, J. K.; Ibarra, D. E.; Winnick, M.

    2017-12-01

    Earth's long-term carbon cycle is thought to benefit from a stabilizing negative feedback in the form of CO2 consumption by the chemical weathering of silicate minerals: during periods of elevated atmospheric pCO2, chemical weathering rates increase, thus consuming more atmospheric CO2 and cooling global climate, whereas during periods of low pCO2, weathering rates decrease, allowing buildup of CO2 in the atmosphere and warming. At equilibrium, CO2 consumption by silicate weathering balances volcanic CO2 degassing at a specific atmospheric pCO2 dictated by the relationship between total silicate weathering rate and pCO2: Earth's "weathering curve." We use numerical carbon cycle modeling to demonstrate that the shape and slope of the weathering curve is crucial to understanding proposed tectonic controls on pCO2 and climate. First, the shape of the weathering curve dictates the equilibrium response of the carbon cycle to changes in the rate of background volcanic/solid Earth CO2 degassing, which has been suggested to vary significantly with plate tectonic reorganizations over geologic timescales. Second, we demonstrate that if tectonic events can significantly change the weathering curve, this can act as an effective driver of pCO2 and climate on tectonic timescales by changing the atmospheric pCO2 at which silicate weathering balances a constant volcanic/solid Earth degassing rate. Finally, we review the complex interplay of environmental factors that affect modern weathering rates in the field and highlight how the resulting uncertainty surrounding the shape of Earth's weathering curve significantly hampers our ability to quantitatively predict the response of pCO2 and climate to tectonic forcing, and thus represents a substantial knowledge gap in Earth science. We conclude with strategies for closing this knowledge gap by using precise paleoclimatic reconstructions of intervals with known tectonic forcings.

  10. Alkali Silicate Vehicle Forms Durable, Fireproof Paint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutt, John B.; Seindenberg, Benjamin

    1964-01-01

    The problem: To develop a paint for use on satellites or space vehicles that exhibits high resistance to cracking, peeling, or flaking when subjected to a wide range of temperatures. Organic coatings will partially meet the required specifications but have the inherent disadvantage of combustibility. Alkali-silicate binders, used in some industrial coatings and adhesives, show evidence of forming a fireproof paint, but the problem of high surface-tension, a characteristic of alkali silicates, has not been resolved. The solution: Use of a suitable non-ionic wetting agent combined with a paint incorporating alkali silicate as the binder.

  11. Method of recycling lithium borate to lithium borohydride through diborane

    DOEpatents

    Filby, Evan E.

    1976-01-01

    This invention provides a method for the recycling of lithium borate to lithium borohydride which can be reacted with water to generate hydrogen for utilization as a fuel. The lithium borate by-product of the hydrogen generation reaction is reacted with hydrogen chloride and water to produce boric acid and lithium chloride. The boric acid and lithium chloride are converted to lithium borohydride through a diborane intermediate to complete the recycle scheme.

  12. Prometheus Silicates/Sulfur dioxide/NIMS

    2000-05-18

    The Prometheus region of Jupiter moon Io was imaged by NASA Galileo spacecraft in 1999. The maps made from spectrometer data show the interplay between hot silicates on the surface and sulfur dioxide frost.

  13. Silicate Emission in the TW Hydrae Association

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitko, Michael L.; Lynch, David K.; Russell, Ray W.

    2000-11-01

    The TW Hydrae association is the nearest young stellar association. Among its members are HD 98800, HR 4796A, and TW Hydrae itself, the nearest known classical T Tauri star. We have observed these three stars spectroscopically between 3 and 13 μm. In TW Hya, the spectrum shows a silicate emission feature that is similar to many other young stars' with protostellar disks. The 11.2 μm feature indicative of significant amounts of crystalline olivine is not as strong as in some young stars and solar system comets. In HR 4796A, the thermal emission in the silicate feature is very weak, suggesting little in the way of (small silicate) grains near the star. The silicate band of HD 98800 (observed by us, but also reported by Sylvester & Skinner) is intermediate in strength between TW Hya and HR 4796A.

  14. Silicate calculi, a rare cause of kidney stones in children.

    PubMed

    Taşdemir, Mehmet; Fuçucuoğlu, Dilara; Özman, Oktay; Sever, Lale; Önal, Bülent; Bilge, Ilmay

    2017-02-01

    Urinary silicate calculi in humans are extremely rare. Reported cases of silicate calculi are mostly documented in adults and are commonly related to an excessive intake of magnesium trisilicate in food or drugs. Published studies on the presence of silicate calculi in children are scarce. Three cases of silicate kidney stones without prior silicate intake are reported. Two patients underwent surgical treatment, and the third patient was treated using conservative methods. Urinalysis revealed no underlying metabolic abnormalities. Analyses revealed that silicate was the major component of the stones. Siliceous deposits in urinary stones may be more common than anticipated, and the underlying pathophysiology remains to be clarified.

  15. Q-Speciation and Network Structure Evolution in Invert Calcium Silicate Glasses.

    PubMed

    Kaseman, Derrick C; Retsinas, A; Kalampounias, A G; Papatheodorou, G N; Sen, S

    2015-07-02

    Binary silicate glasses in the system CaO-SiO2 are synthesized over an extended composition range (42 mol % ≤ CaO ≤ 61 mol %), using container-less aerodynamic levitation techniques and CO2-laser heating. The compositional evolution of Q speciation in these glasses is quantified using (29)Si and (17)O magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The results indicate progressive depolymerization of the silicate network upon addition of CaO and significant deviation of the Q speciation from the binary model. The equilibrium constants for the various Q species disproportionation reactions for these glasses are found to be similar to (much smaller than) those characteristic of Li (Mg)-silicate glasses, consistent with the corresponding trends in the field strengths of these modifier cations. Increasing CaO concentration results in an increase in the packing density and structural rigidity of these glasses and consequently in their glass transition temperature Tg. This apparent role reversal of conventional network-modifying cations in invert alkaline-earth silicate glasses are compared and contrasted with that in their alkali silicate counterparts.

  16. Interpreting the 10 micron Astronomical Silicate Feature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowey, Janet E.

    1998-11-01

    10micron spectra of silicate dust in the diffuse medium towards Cyg OB2 no. 12 and towards field and embedded objects in the Taurus Molecular Cloud (TMC) were obtained with CGS3 at the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope (UKIRT). Cold molecular-cloud silicates are sampled in quiescent lines of sight towards the field stars Taurus-Elias 16 and Elias 13, whilst observations of the embedded young stellar objects HL Tau, Taurus-Elias 7 (Haro6-10) and Elias 18 also include emission from heated dust. To obtain the foreground silicate absorption profiles, featureless continua are estimated using smoothed astronomical and laboratory silicate emissivities. TMC field stars and Cyg OB2 no. 12 are modelled as photospheres reddened by foreground continuum and silicate extinction. Dust emission in the non-photospheric continua of HL Tau and Elias 7 (Haro6-10) is distinguished from foreground silicate absorption using a 10micron disk model, based on the IR-submm model of T Tauri stars by Adams, Lada & Shu (1988), with terms added to represent the foreground continuum and silicate extinction. The absorption profiles of HL Tau and Elias 7 are similar to that of the field star Elias 16. Fitted temperature indices of 0.43 (HL Tau) and 0.33 (Elias 7) agree with Boss' (1996) theoretical models of the 200-300K region, but are lower than those of IR-submm disks (0.5-0.61; Mannings & Emerson 1994); the modelled 10micron emission of HL Tau is optically thin, that of Elias 7 is optically thick. A preliminary arcsecond-resolution determination of the 10micron emissivity near θ1 Ori D in the Trapezium region of Orion and a range of emission temperatures (225-310K) are derived from observations by T. L. Hayward; this Ney-Allen emissivity is 0.6micron narrower than the Trapezium emissivity obtained by Forrest et al. (1975) with a large aperture. Published interstellar grain models, elemental abundances and laboratory studies of Solar System silicates (IDPs, GEMS and meteorites), the 10micron

  17. Lithium purification technique

    DOEpatents

    Keough, Robert F.; Meadows, George E.

    1985-01-01

    A method for purifying liquid lithium to remove unwanted quantities of nitrogen or aluminum. The method involves precipitation of aluminum nitride by adding a reagent to the liquid lithium. The reagent will be either nitrogen or aluminum in a quantity adequate to react with the unwanted quantity of the impurity to form insoluble aluminum nitride. The aluminum nitride can be mechanically separated from the molten liquid lithium.

  18. Lithium purification technique

    DOEpatents

    Keough, R.F.; Meadows, G.E.

    1984-01-10

    A method for purifying liquid lithium to remove unwanted quantities of nitrogen or aluminum. The method involves precipitation of aluminum nitride by adding a reagent to the liquid lithium. The reagent will be either nitrogen or aluminum in a quantity adequate to react with the unwanted quantity of the impurity to form insoluble aluminum nitride. The aluminum nitride can be mechanically separated from the molten liquid lithium.

  19. Lithium ion cell safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobishima, Shin-ichi; Takei, Koji; Sakurai, Yoji; Yamaki, Jun-ichi

    The safety characteristics of recent commercial lithium ion cells are examined in relation to their use for cellular phones. These are prismatic cells with an aluminum cell housing (can) and a 500-600 mA h capacity. They have one of two types of 4-V class cathodes, lithium cobalt oxide (LiCoO 2) or lithium manganese oxide (LiMn 2O 4). This report provides results of the safety tests that we performed on lithium ion cells and outlines our views regarding their safety.

  20. Siliceous Shrubs in Yellowstone's Hot Springs: Implications for Exobiological Investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guidry, S. A.; Chafetz, H. S.

    2003-01-01

    Potential relict hot springs have been identified on Mars and, using the Earth as an analog, Martian hot springs are postulated to be an optimal locality for recognizing preserved evidence of extraterrestrial life. Distinctive organic and inorganic biomarkers are necessary to recognize preserved evidence of life in terrestrial and extraterrestrial hot spring accumulations. Hot springs in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, U.S.A., contain a wealth of information about primitive microbial life and associated biosignatures that may be useful for future exobiological investigations. Numerous siliceous hot springs in Yellowstone contain abundant, centimeter-scale, spinose precipitates of opaline silica (opal-A). Although areally extensive in siliceous hot spring discharge channel facies, these spinose forms have largely escaped attention. These precipitates referred to as shrubs, consist of porous aggregates of spinose opaline silica that superficially resemble miniature woody plants, i.e., the term shrubs. Shrubs in carbonate precipitating systems have received considerable attention, and represent naturally occurring biotically induced precipitates. As such, shrubs have great potential as hot spring environmental indicators and, more importantly, proxies for pre-existing microbial life.

  1. Experimentally determined sulfur isotope fractionation between metal and silicate and implications for planetary differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labidi, J.; Shahar, A.; Le Losq, C.; Hillgren, V. J.; Mysen, B. O.; Farquhar, J.

    2016-02-01

    The Earth's mantle displays a subchondritic 34S/32S ratio. Sulfur is a moderately siderophile element (i.e. iron-loving), and its partitioning into the Earth's core may have left such a distinctive isotope composition on the terrestrial mantle. In order to constrain the sulfur isotope fractionation occurring during core-mantle differentiation, high-pressure and temperature experiments were conducted with synthetic mixtures of metal and silicate melts. With the purpose to identify the mechanism(s) responsible for the S isotope fractionations, we performed our experiments in different capsules - namely, graphite and boron nitride capsules - and thus at different fO2, with varying major element chemistry of the silicate and metal fractions. The S isotope fractionations Δ34Smetal-silicate of equilibrated metal alloys versus silicate melts is +0.2 ± 0.1‰ in a boron-free and aluminum-poor system quenched at 1-1.5 GPa and 1650 °C. The isotope fractionation increases linearly with increasing boron and aluminum content, up to +1.4 ± 0.2‰, and is observed to be independent of the silicon abundance as well as of the fO2 over ∼3.5 log units of variations explored here. The isotope fractionations are also independent of the graphite or nitride saturation of the metal. Only the melt structural changes associated with aluminum and boron concentration in silicate melts have been observed to affect the strength of sulfur bonding. These results establish that the structure of silicate melts has a direct influence on the S2- average bonding strengths. These results can be interpreted in the context of planetary differentiation. Indeed, the structural environments of silicate evolve strongly with pressure. For example, the aluminum, iron or silicon coordination numbers increase under the effect of pressure. Consequently, based on our observations, the sulfur-bonding environment is likely to be affected. In this scheme, we tentatively hypothesize that S isotope fractionations

  2. Venusian pancake domes: Insights from terrestrial voluminous silicic lavas and thermal modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manley, Curtis R.

    1993-01-01

    The so-called 'pancake' domes, and several other volcanoes on Venus, appear to represent large extrusions of silicic lava. Similar voluminous rhyolite lava flows, often associated with mantle plumes, are known on Earth. Venus' high ambient temperature, and insulation by the dome's brecciated carapace, both act to prolong cooling of a dome's interior, allowing for episodic lava input over an extended period of time. Field relations and aspect ratios of terrestrial voluminous rhyolite lavas imply continuous, non-episodic growth, reflecting tapping of a large volume of dry, anatectic silicic magma. Petrogenetically, the venusian domes may be analogous to chains of small domes on Earth, which represent 'leakage' of evolved material from magma bodies fractionating from much more mafic liquids.

  3. Phosphorus Equilibria Among Mafic Silicate Phases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berlin, Jana; Xirouchakis, Dimitris

    2002-01-01

    Phosphorus incorporation in major rock-forming silicate minerals has the following implications: (1) Reactions between phosphorus-hosting major silicates and accessory phosphates, which are also major trace element carriers, may control the stability of the latter and thus may affect the amount of phosphorus and other trace elements released to the coexisting melt or fluid phase. (2) Less of a phosphate mineral is needed to account for the bulk phosphorus of planetaty mantles. (3) During partial melting of mantle mineral assemblages or equilibrium fractional crystallization of basaltic magmas, and in the absence or prior to saturation with a phosphate mineral, silicate melts may become enriched in phosphorus, especially in the geochemically important low melt fraction regime, Although the small differences in the ionic radii of IVp5+, IVSi4+, and IV Al3+ makes phosphoms incorporation into crystalline silicates perhaps unsurprising, isostructural silicate and phosphate crystalline solids do not readily form solutions, e.g., (Fe, Mg)2SiO4 vs. LiMgPO4, SiO)2 VS. AlPO4. Nonetheless, there are reports of, poorly characterized silico-phosphate phases in angrites , 2-4 wt% P2O5 in olivine and pyroxene grains in pallasites and reduced terestrial basalts which are little understood but potentially useful, and up to 17 wt% P2O5 in olivine from ancient slags. However, such enrichments are rare and only underscore the likelihood of phosphoms incorporation in silicate minerals. The mechanisms that allow phosphorus to enter major rock-forming silicate minerals (e.g., Oliv, Px, Gt) remain little understood and the relevant data base is limited. Nonetheless, old and new high-pressure (5-10 GPa) experimental data suggest that P2O5 wt% decreases from silica-poor to silica-rich compositions or from orthosilicate to chain silicate structures (garnet > olivine > orthopyroxene) which implies that phosphorus incorporation in silicates is perhaps more structure-than site-specific. The

  4. Experimental evidence for the absence of iron isotope fractionation between metal and silicate liquids at 1 GPa and 1250-1300 °C and its cosmochemical consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hin, Remco C.; Schmidt, Max W.; Bourdon, Bernard

    2012-09-01

    Iron isotope fractionation during metal-silicate differentiation has been proposed as a cause for differences in iron isotope compositions of chondrites, iron meteorites and the bulk silicate Earth. Stable isotope fractionation, however, rapidly decreases with increasing temperature. We have thus performed liquid metal-liquid silicate equilibration experiments at 1250-1300 °C and 1 GPa to address whether Fe isotope fractionation is resolvable at the lowest possible temperatures for magmatic metal-silicate differentiation. A centrifuging piston cylinder apparatus enabled quantitative metal-silicate segregation. Elemental tin or sulphur was used in the synthetic metal-oxide mixtures to lower the melting temperature of the metal. The analyses demonstrate that eight of the 10 experimental systems equilibrated in a closed isotopic system, as was assessed by varying run durations and starting Fe isotope compositions. Statistically significant iron isotope fractionation between quenched metals and silicates was absent in nine of the 10 experiments and all 10 experiments yield an average metal-silicate fractionation factor of 0.01 ± 0.04‰, independent of whether graphite or silica glass capsules were used. This implies that Fe isotopes do not fractionate during low pressure metal-silicate segregation under magmatic conditions. In large bodies such as the Earth, fractionation between metal and high pressure (>20 GPa) silicate phases may still be a possible process for equilibrium fractionation during metal-silicate differentiation. However, the 0.07 ± 0.02‰ heavier composition of bulk magmatic iron meteorites relative to the average of bulk ordinary/carbonaceous chondrites cannot result from equilibrium Fe isotope fractionation during core segregation. The up to 0.5‰ lighter sulphide than metal fraction in iron meteorites and in one ordinary chondrite can only be explained by fractionation during subsolidus processes.

  5. The Effect of Core-Mantle Differentiation on V, Cr, and Mn: Experimental Metal/Silicate Partitioning Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chabot, N. L.; Agee, C. B.

    2001-01-01

    The abundances of V, Cr, and Mn are similarly depleted in the Earth and Moon. We present metal/silicate partitioning results which examine if the depletions can be explained by a core formation event. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  6. Experimental determination of the Mo isotope fractionation factor between metal and silicate liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hin, R. C.; Burkhardt, C.; Schmidt, M. W.; Bourdon, B.

    2011-12-01

    The conditions and chemical consequences of core formation have mainly been reconstructed from experimentally determined element partition coefficients between metal and silicate liquids. However, first order questions such as the mode of core formation or the nature of the light element(s) in the Earth's core are still debated [1]. In addition, the geocentric design of most experimental studies leaves the conditions of core formation on other terrestrial planets and asteroids even more uncertain than for Earth. Through mass spectrometry, records of mass-dependent stable isotope fractionation during high-temperature processes such as metal-silicate segregation are detectable. Stable isotope fractionation may thus yield additional constrains on core formation conditions and its consequences for the chemical evolution of planetary objects. Experimental investigations of equilibrium mass-dependent stable isotope fractionation have shown that Si isotopes fractionate between metal and silicate liquids at temperatures of 1800°C and pressures of 1 GPa, while Fe isotopes leave no resolvable traces of core formation processes [2,3]. Molybdenum is a refractory and siderophile trace element in the Earth, and thus much less prone to complications arising from mass balancing core and mantle and from potential volatile behaviour than other elements. To determine equilibrium mass-dependent Mo isotope fractionation during metal-silicate segregation, we have designed piston cylinder experiments with a basaltic silicate composition and an iron based metal with ~8 wt% Mo, using both graphite and MgO capsules. Metal and silicate phases are completely segregated by the use of a centrifuging piston cylinder at ETH Zurich, thus preventing analysis of mixed metal and silicate signatures. Molybdenum isotope compositions were measured using a Nu Instruments 1700 MC-ICP-MS at ETH Zurich. To ensure an accurate correction of analytical mass fractionation a 100Mo-97Mo double spike was admixed

  7. NASA lithium cell applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juvinall, G. L.

    1978-01-01

    The advantages of lithium systems are described and a general summary of their application in present and future NASA programs is presented. Benefits of the lithium systems include an increased payload weight and an increased cost effectiveness to the customer. This also allows for more flexibility in the design of future space transportation systems.

  8. Lithium Battery Diaper Ulceration.

    PubMed

    Maridet, Claire; Taïeb, Alain

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of lithium battery diaper ulceration in a 16-month-old girl. Gastrointestinal and ear, nose, and throat lesions after lithium battery ingestion have been reported, but skin involvement has not been reported to our knowledge. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Cathode material for lithium batteries

    DOEpatents

    Park, Sang-Ho; Amine, Khalil

    2013-07-23

    A method of manufacture an article of a cathode (positive electrode) material for lithium batteries. The cathode material is a lithium molybdenum composite transition metal oxide material and is prepared by mixing in a solid state an intermediate molybdenum composite transition metal oxide and a lithium source. The mixture is thermally treated to obtain the lithium molybdenum composite transition metal oxide cathode material.

  10. Cathode material for lithium batteries

    DOEpatents

    Park, Sang-Ho; Amine, Khalil

    2015-01-13

    A method of manufacture an article of a cathode (positive electrode) material for lithium batteries. The cathode material is a lithium molybdenum composite transition metal oxide material and is prepared by mixing in a solid state an intermediate molybdenum composite transition metal oxide and a lithium source. The mixture is thermally treated to obtain the lithium molybdenum composite transition metal oxide cathode material.

  11. Molybdenum Valence in Basaltic Silicate Melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danielson, L. R.; Righter, K.; Newville, M.; Sutton, S.; Pando, K.

    2010-01-01

    The moderately siderophile element molybdenum has been used as an indicator in planetary differentiation processes, and is particularly relevant to core formation [for example, 1-6]. However, models that apply experimental data to an equilibrium differentiation scenario infer the oxidation state of molybdenum from solubility data or from multivariable coefficients from metal-silicate partitioning data [1,3,7]. Partitioning behavior of molybdenum, a multivalent element with a transition near the J02 of interest for core formation (IW-2) will be sensitive to changes in JO2 of the system and silicate melt structure. In a silicate melt, Mo can occur in either 4+ or 6+ valence state, and Mo6+ can be either octahedrally or tetrahedrally coordinated. Here we present first XANES measurements of Mo valence in basaltic run products at a range of P, T, and JO2 and further quantify the valence transition of Mo.

  12. Hydrothermal Synthesis of Dicalcium Silicate Based Cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, N.; Chatterjee, A.

    2017-06-01

    It is imperative to develop low energy alternative binders considering the large amounts of energy consumed as well as carbon dioxide emissions involved in the manufacturing of ordinary Portland cement. This study is on the synthesis of a dicalcium silicate based binder using a low temperature hydrothermal route.The process consists of synthesizing an intermediate product consisting of a calcium silicate hydrate phase with a Ca:Si ratio of 2:1 and further thermal treatment to produce the β-Ca2SiO4 (C2S) phase.Effect of various synthesis parameters like water to solid ratio, dwell time and temperature on the formation of the desired calcium silicate hydrate phase is reported along with effect of heating conditions for formation of the β-C2S phase. Around 77.45% of β-C2S phase was synthesized by thermal treatment of the intermediate phase at 820°C.

  13. Computational and experimental studies of iron-bearing carbonates and silicate glasses at lower mantle pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomatova, N. V.; Jackson, J. M.; Asimow, P. D.; Sturhahn, W.; Rossman, G. R.; Roskosz, M.

    2017-12-01

    Decomposition of carbonates may be responsible for creating silicate melts within the lower mantle by lowering the melting temperature of surrounding rock. Identifying and characterizing the stability of carbonates is therefore a necessary step towards understanding the transport of carbon in Earth's interior. Dolomite is one of the major mineral forms in which carbon is subducted into the Earth's mantle. Although iron-free dolomite is expected to break down upon compression, high-pressure polymorphs of iron-bearing dolomite may resist decomposition. Using a genetic algorithm that predicts crystal structures, we found a monoclinic phase with space group C2/c that has a lower energy than all previously reported dolomite structures at pressures above 15 GPa, where the substitution of iron for magnesium stabilizes monoclinic dolomite at certain pressures of the lower mantle. Thus, an iron-bearing dolomite polymorph may be an important carbon carrier in regions of Earth's lower mantle. The depth at which carbonates will decompose is dependent on the age, temperature and density of subducting slabs. Decarbonation reactions may lower the melting temperature of surrounding rocks to produce silicate melts. In regions of the mantle where silicate melts may exist, it is important to understand the physical properties and dynamic behavior of the melts because they affect the chemical and thermal evolution of its interior. Composition, degree of polymerization, and iron's spin state affect such properties. The behavior of iron in silicate melts is poorly understood but, in some cases, may be approximated by iron-bearing glasses. We measured the hyperfine parameters of iron-bearing rhyolitic and basaltic glasses up to 120 GPa and 100 GPa, respectively, in a neon pressure medium using time-domain synchrotron Mössbauer spectroscopy. The spectra for rhyolitic and basaltic glasses are well explained by three high-spin Fe2+-like sites with distinct quadrupole splittings, reflecting

  14. Lithium metal oxide electrodes for lithium batteries

    DOEpatents

    Thackeray, Michael M [Naperville, IL; Kim, Jeom-Soo [Naperville, IL; Johnson, Christopher S [Naperville, IL

    2008-01-01

    An uncycled electrode for a non-aqueous lithium electrochemical cell including a lithium metal oxide having the formula Li.sub.(2+2x)/(2+x)M'.sub.2x/(2+x)M.sub.(2-2x)/(2+x)O.sub.2-.delta., in which 0.ltoreq.x<1 and .delta. is less than 0.2, and in which M is a non-lithium metal ion with an average trivalent oxidation state selected from two or more of the first row transition metals or lighter metal elements in the periodic table, and M' is one or more ions with an average tetravalent oxidation state selected from the first and second row transition metal elements and Sn. Methods of preconditioning the electrodes are disclosed as are electrochemical cells and batteries containing the electrodes.

  15. Lithium isotope constraints on crust-mantle interactions and surface processes on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magna, Tomáš; Day, James M. D.; Mezger, Klaus; Fehr, Manuela A.; Dohmen, Ralf; Aoudjehane, Hasnaa Chennaoui; Agee, Carl B.

    2015-08-01

    Lithium abundances and isotope compositions are reported for a suite of martian meteorites that span the range of petrological and geochemical types recognized to date for Mars. Samples include twenty-one bulk-rock enriched, intermediate and depleted shergottites, six nakhlites, two chassignites, the orthopyroxenite Allan Hills (ALH) 84001 and the polymict breccia Northwest Africa (NWA) 7034. Shergottites unaffected by terrestrial weathering exhibit a range in δ7Li from 2.1 to 6.2‰, similar to that reported for pristine terrestrial peridotites and unaltered mid-ocean ridge and ocean island basalts. Two chassignites have δ7Li values (4.0‰) intermediate to the shergottite range, and combined, these meteorites provide the most robust current constraints on δ7Li of the martian mantle. The polymict breccia NWA 7034 has the lowest δ7Li (-0.2‰) of all terrestrially unaltered martian meteorites measured to date and may represent an isotopically light surface end-member. The new data for NWA 7034 imply that martian crustal surface materials had both a lighter Li isotope composition and elevated Li abundance compared with their associated mantle. These findings are supported by Li data for olivine-phyric shergotitte NWA 1068, a black glass phase isolated from the Tissint meteorite fall, and some nakhlites, which all show evidence for assimilation of a low-δ7Li crustal component. The range in δ7Li for nakhlites (1.8 to 5.2‰), and co-variations with chlorine abundance, suggests crustal contamination by Cl-rich brines. The differences in Li isotope composition and abundance between the martian mantle and estimated crust are not as large as the fractionations observed for terrestrial continental crust and mantle, suggesting a difference in the styles of alteration and weathering between water-dominated processes on Earth versus possibly Cl-S-rich brines on Mars. Using high-MgO shergottites (>15 wt.% MgO) it is possible to estimate the δ7Li of Bulk Silicate Mars

  16. Recent Progress in Advanced Materials for Lithium Ion Batteries

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiajun

    2013-01-01

    The development and commercialization of lithium ion batteries is rooted in material discovery. Promising new materials with high energy density are required for achieving the goal toward alternative forms of transportation. Over the past decade, significant progress and effort has been made in developing the new generation of Li-ion battery materials. In the review, I will focus on the recent advance of tin- and silicon-based anode materials. Additionally, new polyoxyanion cathodes, such as phosphates and silicates as cathode materials, will also be discussed. PMID:28809300

  17. Grain Boundary Engineering of Lithium-Ion-Conducting Lithium Lanthanum Titanate for Lithium-Air Batteries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-01

    release; distribution is unlimited. 1 1. Introduction Lithium (Li)- ion batteries are currently one of the leading energy storage device technologies...ARL-TR-7584 ● JAN 2016 US Army Research Laboratory Grain Boundary Engineering of Lithium - Ion - Conducting Lithium Lanthanum...Titanate for Lithium -Air Batteries by Victoria L Blair, Claire V Weiss Brennan, and Joseph M Marsico Approved for public

  18. PROCESS FOR SEPARATING AMERICIUM AND CURIUM FROM RARE EARTH ELEMENTS

    DOEpatents

    Baybarz, R.D.; Lloyd, M.H.

    1963-02-26

    This invention relates to methods of separating americium and curium values from rare earth values. In accordance with the invention americium, curium, and rare earth values are sorbed on an anion exchange resin. A major portion of the rare earth values are selectively stripped from the resin with a concentrated aqueous solution of lithium chloride, and americium, curium, and a minor portion of rare earth values are then stripped from the resin with a dilute aqueous solution of lithium chloride. The americium and curium values are further purified by increasing the concentration of lithium chloride in the solution to at least 8 molar and selectively extracting rare earth values from the resulting solution with a monoalkylphosphoric acid. (AEC)

  19. Microfabrics in Siliceous Hotsprings: Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guidry, S. A.; Chafetz, H. S.; Westall, F.

    2001-01-01

    Microfabrics shed light on the mechanisms governing siliceous sinter precipitation, the profound effects of microorganisms, as well as a conventional facies model for siliceous hotsprings. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  20. Lithium Iron Orthosilicate Cathode: Progress and Perspectives

    SciT

    Ni, Jiangfeng; Jiang, Yu; Bi, Xuanxuan

    2017-07-18

    The pursuit of cathodes with a high capacity is remarkably driven by the ever increasing demand of high-energy lithium ion batteries in electronics and transportation. In this regard, polyanionic lithium iron orthosilicate (Li2FeSiO4) offers a promising opportunity because it affords a high theoretical capacity of 331 mAh g–1. However, such a high theoretical capacity of Li2FeSiO4 has frequently been compromised in practice because of the extremely low electronic and ionic conductivity. To address this issue, material engineering strategies to boost the Li storage kinetics in Li2FeSiO4 have proven indispensable. In this Perspective, we will briefly present the structural characteristics, intrinsicmore » physicochemical properties, and electrochemical behavior of Li2FeSiO4. We particularly focus on recent materials engineering of silicates, which is implemented mainly through advanced synthetic techniques and elaborate controls. This Perspective highlights the importance of integrating theoretical analysis into experimental implementation to further advance the Li2FeSiO4 materials.« less

  1. Lithium isotopes as indicators of meteorite parent body alteration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sephton, Mark A.; James, Rachael H.; Fehr, Manuela A.; Bland, Philip A.; Gounelle, Matthieu

    2013-05-01

    Hydrothermal processing on planetesimals in the early solar system produced new mineral phases, including those generated by the transformation of anhydrous silicates into their hydrated counterparts. Carbonaceous chondrites represent tangible remnants of such alteration products. Lithium isotopes are known to be responsive to aqueous alteration, yet previously recognized variability within whole rock samples from the same meteorite appears to complicate the use of these isotopes as indicators of processing by water. We demonstrate a new way to use lithium isotopes that reflects aqueous alteration in carbonaceous chondrites. Temperature appears to exert a control on the production of acetic acid-soluble phases, such as carbonates and poorly crystalline Fe-oxyhydroxides. Temperature and degree of water-rock interaction determines the amount of lithium isotope fractionation expressed as the difference between whole rock and acetic acid-leachable fractions. Using these features, the type 1 chondrite Orgueil (δ7Li(whole rock) = 4.3‰; Δ7Li(acetic-whole) = 1.2‰) can be distinguished from the type 2 chondrites Murchison (δ7Li(whole rock) = 3.8; Δ7Li(acetic-whole) = 8.8‰) and carbonate-poor Tagish Lake (δ7Li(whole rock) = 4.3; Δ7Li(acetic-whole) = 9.4‰). This initial study suggests that lithium isotopes have the potential to reveal the role of liquid water in the early solar system.

  2. Laser cutting of sodium silicate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchanov, V. V.; Kazarian, M. A.; Kustov, M. E.; Mashir, Yu. I.; Murav'ev, E. N.; Revenko, V. I.; Solinov, E. F.

    2018-04-01

    The problems of through laser cutting of sodium silicate glasses by laser-controlled thermal cleavage are considered. A wide variety of obtained end face shapes is demonstrated. It is shown that the strength of glass samples cut by the laser is about two times higher than that of samples cut by a glass cutter.

  3. Chemically bonded phospho-silicate ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Wagh, Arun S.; Jeong, Seung Y.; Lohan, Dirk; Elizabeth, Anne

    2003-01-01

    A chemically bonded phospho-silicate ceramic formed by chemically reacting a monovalent alkali metal phosphate (or ammonium hydrogen phosphate) and a sparsely soluble oxide, with a sparsely soluble silicate in an aqueous solution. The monovalent alkali metal phosphate (or ammonium hydrogen phosphate) and sparsely soluble oxide are both in powder form and combined in a stochiometric molar ratio range of (0.5-1.5):1 to form a binder powder. Similarly, the sparsely soluble silicate is also in powder form and mixed with the binder powder to form a mixture. Water is added to the mixture to form a slurry. The water comprises 50% by weight of the powder mixture in said slurry. The slurry is allowed to harden. The resulting chemically bonded phospho-silicate ceramic exhibits high flexural strength, high compression strength, low porosity and permeability to water, has a definable and bio-compatible chemical composition, and is readily and easily colored to almost any desired shade or hue.

  4. Dynamic Fatigue of a Titanium Silicate Glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Dennis S.; Nettles, Alan T.; Cagle, Holly A.; Smith, W. Scott (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A dynamic fatigue study was performed on a Titanium Silicate Glass in order to assess its susceptibility to delayed failure. Fracture mechanics techniques were used to analyze the results for the purpose of making lifetime predictions for optical elements made from this material. The material has reasonably good resistance (N=23 to stress corrosion in ambient conditions).

  5. Synthesis of non-siliceous mesoporous oxides.

    PubMed

    Gu, Dong; Schüth, Ferdi

    2014-01-07

    Mesoporous non-siliceous oxides have attracted great interest due to their unique properties and potential applications. Since the discovery of mesoporous silicates in 1990s, organic-inorganic assembly processes by using surfactants or block copolymers as soft templates have been considered as a feasible path for creating mesopores in metal oxides. However, the harsh sol-gel conditions and low thermal stabilities have limited the expansion of this method to various metal oxide species. Nanocasting, using ordered mesoporous silica or carbon as a hard template, has provided possibilities for preparing novel mesoporous materials with new structures, compositions and high thermal stabilities. This review concerns the synthesis, composition, and parameter control of mesoporous non-siliceous oxides. Four synthesis routes, i.e. soft-templating (surfactants or block copolymers as templates), hard-templating (mesoporous silicas or carbons as sacrificial templates), colloidal crystal templating (3-D ordered colloidal particles as a template), and super lattice routes, are summarized in this review. Mesoporous metal oxides with different compositions have different properties. Non-siliceous mesoporous oxides are comprehensively described, including a discussion of constituting elements, synthesis, and structures. General aspects concerning pore size control, atomic scale crystallinity, and phase control are also reviewed.

  6. 21 CFR 573.260 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 573.260 Section 573.260 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive...

  7. 21 CFR 573.260 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 573.260 Section 573.260 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive...

  8. 21 CFR 573.260 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 573.260 Section 573.260 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive...

  9. 21 CFR 573.260 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 573.260 Section 573.260 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive...

  10. 21 CFR 573.260 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 573.260 Section 573.260 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive...

  11. Lithium cell test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragg, B. J.

    1977-01-01

    Three lithium SO2 cells, two lithium CF cells, and a vinyl chloride cell, all with crimped seals, and all strictly experimental, were independently discharged on resistors. Three temperatures were used and several different storage temperatures. Discharge rate generally on the nominal discharges were 0.1 amp, 0.5 amp, and 1 amp. Tests results show that the crimp seals are inadequate, especially for the SO2 cells. Normal discharges present no hazards. All cells discharge to zero. The problem of lithium cell explosions, such as occurred during off-limits testing, is discussed.

  12. Textural constraints on effusive silicic volcanism - Beyond the permeable foam model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, Jonathan H.; Anderson, Steven W.; Manley, Curtis R.

    1992-01-01

    The paper reports textural observations and presents isotopic evidence from active and recent silicic lava flows which show that at least some vesiculation occurs during surface advance of extrusions, after magma has reached the earth's surface. This view is in contrast to the widely promoted 'permeable foam' model, which states that all volatiles escape during ascent of the magma, and that all dense glassy material in lava flows forms from the collapse of pumiceous lava, i.e., that silicic lavas emerge as highly inflated foam flows. The permeable foam model also implies the unlikely requirement that explosive-to-effusive transitions be associated with an increase in the eruption rate. A more comprehensive model for the emplacement of silicic extrusions that allows for early gas loss during ascent, as well as late-stage vesiculation, is presented. The way in which the redistribution of volatiles during surface flow can increase explosive hazards from silicic lavas days, weeks, or months after the lava emerges from the event is discussed.

  13. The importance of the Maillard-metal complexes and their silicates in astrobiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liesch, Patrick J.; Kolb, Vera M.

    2007-09-01

    The Maillard reaction occurs when sugars and amino acids are mixed together in the solid state or in the aqueous solution. Since both amino acids and sugar-like compounds are found on meteorites, we hypothesized that they would also undergo the Maillard reaction. Our recent work supports this idea. We have shown previously that the water-insoluble Maillard products have substantial similarities with the insoluble organic materials from the meteorites. The Maillard organic materials are also part of the desert varnish on Earth, which is a dark, shiny, hard rock coating that contains iron and manganese and is glazed in silicate. Rocks that are similar in appearance to the desert varnish have been observed on the Martian surface. They may also contain the organic materials. We have undertaken study of the interactions between the Maillard products, iron and other metals, and silicates, to elucidate the role of the Maillard products in the chemistry of desert varnish and meteorites. Specifically, we have synthesized a series of the Maillard-metal complexes, and have tested their reactivity towards silicates. We have studied the properties of these Maillard-metal-silicate products by the IR spectroscopy. The astrobiological potential of the Maillard-metal complexes is assessed.

  14. Carbonate-silicate liquid immiscibility upon impact melting, Ries Crater, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graup, Guenther

    1999-05-01

    The 24-km-diameter Ries impact crater in southern Germany is one of the most studied impact structures on Earth. The Ries impactor struck a Triassic to Upper Jurassic sedimentary sequence overlying Hercynian crystalline basement. At the time of impact (14.87 +/- 0.36 Ma; Storzer et al., 1995), the 350 m thick Malm limestone was present only to the S and E of the impact site. To the N and W, the Malm had been eroded away, exposing the underlying Dogger and Lias. The largest proportion of shocked target material is in the impact melt-bearing breccia suevite. The suevite had been believed to be derived entirely from the crystalline basement. Calcite in the suevite has been interpreted as a post-impact hydrothermal deposit. From optical inspection of 540 thin sections of suevite from 32 sites, I find that calcite in the suevite shows textural evidence of liquid immiscibility with the silicate impact melt. Textural evidence of liquid immiscibility between silicate and carbonate melt in the Ries suevite includes: carbonate globules within silicate glass, silicate globules embedded in carbonate, deformable and coalescing carbonate spheres within silicate glass, sharp menisci or cusps and budding between silicate and carbonate melt, fluidal textures and gas vesicles in carbonate schlieren, a quench crystallization sequence of the carbonate, spinifex textured quenched carbonate, separate carbonate spherules in the suevite mineral-fragment-matrix, and inclusions of mineral fragments suspended in carbonate blebs. Given this evidence of liquid immiscibility, the carbonate in the suevite has, therefore, like the silicate melt a primary origin by impact shock melting. Evidence of carbonate-silicate liquid immiscibility is abundant in the suevites to the SW to E of the Ries crater. The rarer suevites to the W to NE of the crater are nearly devoid of carbonate melts. This correspondence between the occurrence of outcropping limestones at the target surface and the formation of

  15. Exploring Iron Silicate Precursors of Ancient Iron Formations through Rock Record, Laboratory and Field Analogue Investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, J. E.; Rasmussen, B.; Muhling, J.; Benzerara, K.; Jezequel, D.; Cosmidis, J.; Templeton, A. S.

    2016-12-01

    crater lakes that are variably iron- and silica-rich. As we continue to probe the mechanism of Fe(II/III)-silicate formation, we can constrain the activity of silica, pH, and pO2 on early Earth and describe any potential influence of microbial activity on the precipitation of these phases.

  16. Lithium metal oxide electrodes for lithium batteries

    DOEpatents

    Thackeray, Michael M.; Johnson, Christopher S.; Amine, Khalil; Kang, Sun-Ho

    2010-06-08

    An uncycled preconditioned electrode for a non-aqueous lithium electrochemical cell including a lithium metal oxide having the formula xLi.sub.2-yH.sub.yO.xM'O.sub.2.(1-x)Li.sub.1-zH.sub.zMO.sub.2 in which 0lithium metal ion with an average trivalent oxidation state selected from two or more of the first row transition metals or lighter metal elements in the periodic table, and M' is one or more ions with an average tetravalent oxidation state selected from the first and second row transition metal elements and Sn. The xLi.sub.2-yH.sub.y.xM'O.sub.2.(1-x)Li.sub.1-zH.sub.zMO.sub.2 material is prepared by preconditioning a precursor lithium metal oxide (i.e., xLi.sub.2M'O.sub.3.(1-x)LiMO.sub.2) with a proton-containing medium with a pH<7.0 containing an inorganic acid. Methods of preparing the electrodes are disclosed, as are electrochemical cells and batteries containing the electrodes.

  17. High chloride content calcium silicate glasses.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaojing; Karpukhina, Natalia; Brauer, Delia S; Hill, Robert G

    2017-03-08

    Chloride is known to volatilize from silicate glass melts and until now, only a limited number of studies on oxychloride silicate glasses have been reported. In this paper we have synthesized silicate glasses that retain large amounts of CaCl 2 . The CaCl 2 has been added to the calcium metasilicate composition (CaO·SiO 2 ). Glasses were produced via a melt quench route and an average of 70% of the chloride was retained after melting. Up to 31.6 mol% CaCl 2 has been successfully incorporated into these silicate glasses without the occurrence of crystallization. 29 Si MAS-NMR spectra showed the silicon being present mainly as a Q 2 silicate species. This suggests that chloride formed Cl-Ca(n) species, rather than Si-Cl bonds. Upon increasing the CaCl 2 content, the T g reduced markedly from 782 °C to 370 °C. Glass density and glass crystallization temperature decreased linearly with an increase in the CaCl 2 content. However, both linear regressions revealed a breakpoint at a CaCl 2 content just below 20 mol%. This might be attributed to a significant change in the structure and is also correlated with the nature of the crystallizing phases formed upon heat treatment. The glasses with less than 19.2 mol% CaCl 2 crystallized to wollastonite, whilst the compositions with CaCl 2 content equal to or greater than 19.2 mol% are thought to crystallize to CaCl 2 . In practice, the crystallization of CaCl 2 could not occur until the crystallization temperature fell below the melting point of CaCl 2 . The implications of the results along with the high chloride retention are discussed.

  18. Grain Growth and Silicates in Dense Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pendeleton, Yvonne J.; Chiar, J. E.; Ennico, K.; Boogert, A.; Greene, T.; Knez, C.; Lada, C.; Roellig, T.; Tielens, A.; Werner, M.; hide

    2006-01-01

    Interstellar silicates are likely to be a part of all grains responsible for visual extinction (Av) in the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM) and dense clouds. A correlation between Av and the depth of the 9.7 micron silicate feature (measured as optical depth, tau(9.7)) is expected if the dust species are well 'mixed. In the di&se ISM, such a correlation is observed for lines of sight in the solar neighborhood. A previous study of the silicate absorption feature in the Taurus dark cloud showed a tendency for the correlation to break down at high Av (Whittet et al. 1988, MNRAS, 233,321), but the scatter was large. We have acquired Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph data of several lines of sight in the IC 5 146, Barnard 68, Chameleon I and Serpens dense clouds. Our data set spans an Av range between 2 and 35 magnitudes. All lines of sight show the 9.7 micron silicate feature. The Serpens data appear to follow the diffuse ISM correlation line whereas the data for the other clouds show a non-linear correlation between the depth of the silicate feature relative to Av, much like the trend observed in the Taurus data. In fact, it appears that for visual extinctions greater than about 10 mag, tau(9.7) begins to level off. This decrease in the growth of the depth of the 9.7 micron feature with increasing Av could indicate the effects of grain growth in dense clouds. In this poster, we explore the possibility that grain growth causes an increase in opacity (Av) without causing a corresponding increase in tau(9.7).

  19. Silicate Dust in Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yanxia; Li, Aigen; Hao, Lei

    2017-01-01

    The unification theory of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) hypothesizes that all AGNs are surrounded by an anisotropic dust torus and are essentially the same objects but viewed from different angles. However, little is known about the dust that plays a central role in the unification theory. There are suggestions that the AGN dust extinction law appreciably differs from that of the Galaxy. Also, the silicate emission features observed in type 1 AGNs appear anomalous (I.e., their peak wavelengths and widths differ considerably from that of the Galaxy). In this work, we explore the dust properties of 147 AGNs of various types at redshifts z≲ 0.5, with special attention paid to 93 AGNs that exhibit the 9.7 and 18 μm silicate emission features. We model their silicate emission spectra obtained with the Infrared Spectrograph aboard the Spitzer Space Telescope. We find that 60/93 of the observed spectra can be well explained with “astronomical silicate,” while the remaining sources favor amorphous olivine or pyroxene. Most notably, all sources require the dust to be micron-sized (with a typical size of ˜1.5 ± 0.1 μm), much larger than submicron-sized Galactic interstellar grains, implying a flat or “gray” extinction law for AGNs. We also find that, while the 9.7 μm emission feature arises predominantly from warm silicate dust of temperature T ˜ 270 K, the ˜5-8 μm continuum emission is mostly from carbon dust of T ˜ 640 K. Finally, the correlations between the dust properties (e.g., mass, temperature) and the AGN properties (e.g., luminosity, black hole mass) have also been investigated.

  20. 40 CFR 721.9513 - Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Modified magnesium silicate polymer... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9513 Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic). (a) Chemical... as modified magnesium silicate polymer (PMN P-98-604) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  1. 40 CFR 721.9513 - Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Modified magnesium silicate polymer... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9513 Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic). (a) Chemical... as modified magnesium silicate polymer (PMN P-98-604) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  2. 21 CFR 182.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Aluminum calcium silicate. 182.2122 Section 182.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c...

  3. 21 CFR 182.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 182.2122 Section 182.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c...

  4. 21 CFR 582.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 582.2122 Section 582.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c...

  5. 21 CFR 582.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 582.2122 Section 582.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c...

  6. 21 CFR 582.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 582.2122 Section 582.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c...

  7. 21 CFR 182.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 182.2122 Section 182.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c...

  8. 21 CFR 582.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 582.2122 Section 582.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c...

  9. 21 CFR 582.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 582.2122 Section 582.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c...

  10. 21 CFR 182.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 182.2122 Section 182...) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Anticaking Agents § 182.2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation. This...

  11. 21 CFR 182.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 182.2122 Section 182.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c...

  12. 40 CFR 721.9513 - Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Modified magnesium silicate polymer... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9513 Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic). (a) Chemical... as modified magnesium silicate polymer (PMN P-98-604) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  13. 40 CFR 721.9513 - Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Modified magnesium silicate polymer... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9513 Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic). (a) Chemical... as modified magnesium silicate polymer (PMN P-98-604) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  14. 40 CFR 721.9513 - Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Modified magnesium silicate polymer... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9513 Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic). (a) Chemical... as modified magnesium silicate polymer (PMN P-98-604) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  15. Conference on Deep Earth and Planetary Volatiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The following topics are covered in the presented papers: (1) rare gases systematics and mantle structure; (2) volatiles in the earth; (3) impact degassing of water and noble gases from silicates; (4) D/H ratios and H2O contents of mantle-derived amphibole megacrysts; (5) thermochemistry of dense hydrous magnesium silicates; (6) modeling of the effect of water on mantle rheology; (7) noble gas isotopes and halogens in volatile-rich inclusions in diamonds; (8) origin and loss of the volatiles of the terrestrial planets; (9) structure and the stability of hydrous minerals at high pressure; (10) recycling of volatiles at subduction zones and various other topics.

  16. APPARATUS FOR THE PRODUCTION OF LITHIUM METAL

    DOEpatents

    Baker, P.S.; Duncan, F.R.; Greene, H.B.

    1961-08-22

    Methods and apparatus for the production of high-purity lithium from lithium halides are described. The apparatus is provided for continuously contacting a molten lithium halide with molten barium, thereby forming lithium metal and a barium halide, establishing separate layers of these reaction products and unreacted barium and lithium halide, and continuously withdrawing lithium and barium halide from the reaction zone. (AEC)

  17. Detrital zircons and Earth system evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenzie, R.

    2016-12-01

    Zircon is a mineral commonly produced in silicic magmatism. Therefore, due to its resilience and exceedingly long residence times in the continental crust, detrital zircon records can be used to track processes associated with silicic magmatism throughout Earth history. In this contribution I will address the potential role of preservational biases in zircon record, and further discuss how zircon datasets can be used to help better understand the relationship between lithospheric and Earth system evolution. I will use large compilations of zircon data to trace the composition and weatherability of the continental crust, to evaluate temporal rates of crustal recycling, and finally to track spatiotemporal variation in continental arc magmatism and volcanic CO2 outgassing throughout Earth history. These records demonstrate that secular changes in plate tectonic regimes played a prominent role in modulating conditions of the ocean+atmosphere system and long-term climate state for the last 3 billion years.

  18. Lithium Mining, Nevada

    2014-08-05

    This image from NASA Terra spacecraft shows the once-abandoned mining town of Silver Peak, Nevada, which began to thrive again when Foote Mineral Company began extracting lithium from brine below the floor of Clayton Valley in 1966.

  19. Solid-state lithium battery

    DOEpatents

    Ihlefeld, Jon; Clem, Paul G; Edney, Cynthia; Ingersoll, David; Nagasubramanian, Ganesan; Fenton, Kyle Ross

    2014-11-04

    The present invention is directed to a higher power, thin film lithium-ion electrolyte on a metallic substrate, enabling mass-produced solid-state lithium batteries. High-temperature thermodynamic equilibrium processing enables co-firing of oxides and base metals, providing a means to integrate the crystalline, lithium-stable, fast lithium-ion conductor lanthanum lithium tantalate (La.sub.1/3-xLi.sub.3xTaO.sub.3) directly with a thin metal foil current collector appropriate for a lithium-free solid-state battery.

  20. Lithium battery management system

    DOEpatents

    Dougherty, Thomas J [Waukesha, WI

    2012-05-08

    Provided is a system for managing a lithium battery system having a plurality of cells. The battery system comprises a variable-resistance element electrically connected to a cell and located proximate a portion of the cell; and a device for determining, utilizing the variable-resistance element, whether the temperature of the cell has exceeded a predetermined threshold. A method of managing the temperature of a lithium battery system is also included.

  1. Lithium Combustion: A Review

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-12-01

    42) that is brighter than any of the other alkali metal fires (Reference 36). Combustion of lithium is accompanied by emission of dense, white, opaque...extinguishing alkali metal fires (Reference 64). Application of an inert gas such as argon to a well-established lithium fire was found to be...extinguishers be used against alkali metal fires (References 1, 64); water reacts with explosive violence with alkali metals (References 35, 36). In an

  2. Biological and Organic Chemical Decomposition of Silicates. Chapter 7.2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliverman, M. P.

    1979-01-01

    The weathering of silicate rocks and minerals, an important concern of geologists and geochemists for many years, traditionally has been approached from strictly physical and chemical points of view. Biological effects were either unrecognized, ignored, or were mentioned in passing to account for such phenomena as the accumulation of organic matter in sediments or the generation of reducing environments. A major exception occurred in soil science where agricultural scientists, studying the factors important in the development of soils and their ability to nourish and sustain various crops, laid the foundation for much of what is known of the biological breakdown of silicate rocks and minerals. The advent of the space age accelerated the realization that many environmental problems and geochemical processes on Earth can only be understood in terms of ecosystems. This in turn, spurred renewed interest and activity among modem biologists, geologists and soil scientists attempting to unravel the intimate relations between biology and the weathering of silicate rocks and minerals of the earth's surface.

  3. Biological and Organic Chemical Decomposition of Silicates. Chapter 7.2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silverman, M. P.

    1979-01-01

    The weathering of silicate rocks and minerals, an important concern of geologists and geochemists for many years, traditionally has been approached from strictly physical and chemical points of view. Biological effects were either unrecognized, ignored, or were mentioned in passing to account for such phenomena as the accumulation of organic matter in sediments or the generation of reducing environments. A major exception occurred in soil science where agricultural scientists, studying the factors important in the development of soils and their ability to nourish and sustain various crops, laid the foundation for much of what is known of the biological breakdown of silicate rocks and minerals. The advent of the space age accelerated the realization that many environmental problems and geo- chemical processes on Earth can only be understood in terms of ecosystems. This in turn, spurred renewed interest and activity among modem biologists, geologists and soil scientists attempting to unravel the intimate relations between biology and the weathering of silicate rocks and minerals of the earth surface.

  4. Characterizing Amorphous Silicates in Extraterrestrial Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, X.; Wang, A.; Krawczynski, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    Amorphous silicates are common in extraterrestrial materials. They are seen in the matrix of carbonaceous chondrites as well as in planetary materials. Tagish Lake is one of the most primitive carbonaceous meteorites in which TEM and XRD analyses found evidence for poorly crystalline phyllosilicate-like species; Raman spectra revealed amorphous silicates with variable degree of polymerization and low crystallinity. On Mars, CheMin discovered amorphous phases in all analyzed samples, and poorly crystalline smectite in mudstone samples. These discoveries pose questions on the crystallinity of phyllosilicates found by remote sensing on Mars, which is directly relevant to aqueous alteration during geologic history of Mars. Our goal is to use spectroscopy to better characterize amorphous silicates. We use three approaches: (1) using silicate glasses synthesized with controlled chemistry to study the effects of silicate polymerization and (2) using phyllosilicates synthesized with controlled hydrothermal treatment to study the effect of crystallinity on vibrational spectroscopy, finally (3) to use the developed correlations in above two steps to study amorphous phases in meteorites, and those found in future missions to Mars. In the 1st step, silicate glasses were synthesized from pure oxides in a range of NBO/T ratios (from 0 to 4). Depending on the targeted NBO/T and composition of mixed oxides, temperatures for each experiment fell in a range from 1260 to 1520 °C, run for ~ 4 hrs. The melt was quenched in liquid N2 or water. Homogeneity of glass was checked under optical microscopy. Raman spectra were taken over 100 spots on small chips free of bubbles and crystals. We have observed that accompanying an increase of NBO/T, there is a strengthening and a position shift of the Raman peak near 1000 cm-1 (Si-Onon-bridging stretching mode), and the weakening of broad Raman peaks near 500 cm-1 (ring breathing mode) and 700cm-1 (Si-Obridging-Si mode). We are building the

  5. Experimental, in-situ carbon solution mechanisms and isotope fractionation in and between (C-O-H)-saturated silicate melt and silicate-saturated (C-O-H) fluid to upper mantle temperatures and pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mysen, Bjorn

    2017-02-01

    Our understanding of materials transport processes in the Earth relies on characterizing the behavior of fluid and melt in silicate-(C-O-H) systems at high temperature and pressure. Here, Raman spectroscopy was employed to determine structure of and carbon isotope partitioning between melts and fluids in alkali aluminosilicate-C-O-H systems. The experimental data were recorded in-situ while the samples were at equilibrium in a hydrothermal diamond anvil cell at temperatures and pressures to 825 °C and >1300 MPa, respectively. The carbon solution equilibrium in both (C-O-H)-saturated melt and coexisting, silicate-saturated (C-O-H) fluid is 2CO3 + H2O + 2Qn + 1 = 2HCO3 + 2Qn. In the Qn-notation, the superscript, n, is the number of bridging oxygen in silicate structural units. At least one oxygen in CO3 and HCO3 groups likely is shared with silicate tetrahedra. The structural behavior of volatile components described with this equilibrium governs carbon isotope fractionation factors between melt and fluid. For example, the ΔH equals 3.2 ± 0.7 kJ/mol for the bulk 13C/12C exchange equilibrium between fluid and melt. From these experimental data, it is suggested that at deep crustal and upper mantle temperatures and pressures, the δ13C-differences between coexisting silicate-saturated (C-O-H) fluid and (C-O-H)-saturated silicate melts may change by more than 100‰ as a function of temperature in the range of magmatic processes. Absent information on temperature and pressure, the use of carbon isotopes of mantle-derived magma to derive isotopic composition of magma source regions in the Earth's interior, therefore, should be exercised with care.

  6. Partitioning of Mo, P and other siderophile elements (Cu, Ga, Sn, Ni, Co, Cr, Mn, V, and W) between metal and silicate melt as a function of temperature and silicate melt composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Righter, K.; Pando, K. M.; Danielson, L.; Lee, Cin-Ty

    2010-03-01

    Metal-silicate partition coefficients can provide information about the earliest differentiation histories of terrestrial planets and asteroids. Systematic studies of the effects of key parameters such as temperature and melt composition are lacking for many elements. In particular, data for Mo is scarce, but given its refractory nature, is of great value in interpreting metal-silicate equilibrium. Two series of experiments have been carried out to study Mo and P partitioning between Fe metallic liquid and basaltic to peridotitic silicate melt, at 1 GPa and temperatures between 1500 and 1900 °C. Because the silicate melt utilized was natural basalt, there are also measurable quantities of 9 other siderophile elements (Ni, Co, W, Sn, Cu, Mn, V, Cr, Ga and Zn). The Ni and Co data can be used to assess consistency with previous studies. In addition, the new data also allow a first systematic look at the temperature dependence of Cu, Ga, Sn, Cr, Mn V and W for basaltic to peridotitic melts. Many elements exhibit an increase in siderophile behavior at higher temperature, contrary to popular belief, but consistent with predictions from thermodynamics. Using these new data we examine DMomet/sil and DPmet/sil in detail and show that increasing temperature causes a decrease in the former and an increase in the latter, whereas both increase with MgO content of the silicate melt. The depletions of Mo and P in the mantle of the Earth can be explained by metal-silicate equilibrium at magma ocean conditions — both elements are satisfied at PT conditions of an intermediate depth magma ocean for the Earth 22.5 GPa and 2400 °C.

  7. Final report on the safety assessment of potassium silicate, sodium metasilicate, and sodium silicate.

    PubMed

    Elmore, Amy R

    2005-01-01

    Potassium Silicate, Sodium Metasilicate, and Sodium Silicate combine metal cations with silica to form inorganic salts used as corrosion inhibitors in cosmetics. Sodium Metasilicate also functions as a chelating agent and Sodium Silicate as a buffering and pH adjuster. Sodium Metasilicate is currently used in 168 formulations at concentrations ranging from 13% to 18%. Sodium Silicate is currently used in 24 formulations at concentrations ranging from 0.3% to 55%. Potassium Silicate and Sodium Silicate have been reported as being used in industrial cleaners and detergents. Sodium Metasilicate is a GRAS (generally regarded as safe) food ingredient. Aqueous solutions of Sodium Silicate species are a part of a chemical continuum of silicates based on an equilibrium of alkali, water, and silica. pH determines the solubility of silica and, together with concentration, determines the degree of polymerization. Sodium Silicate administered orally is readily absorbed from the alimentary canal and excreted in the urine. The toxicity of these silicates has been related to the molar ratio of SiO2/Na2O and the concentration being used. The Sodium Metasilicate acute oral LD50 ranged from 847 mg/kg in male rats to 1349.3 mg/kg in female rats and from 770 mg/kg in female mice to 820 mg/kg in male mice. Gross lesions of variable severity were found in the oral cavity, pharynx, esophagus, stomach, larynx, lungs, and kidneys of dogs receiving 0.25 g/kg or more of a commercial detergent containing Sodium Metasilicate; similar lesions were also seen in pigs administered the same detergent and dose. Male rats orally administered 464 mg/kg of a 20% solution containing either 2.0 or 2.4 to 1.0 ratio of sodium oxide showed no signs of toxicity, whereas doses of 1000 and 2150 mg/kg produced gasping, dypsnea, and acute depression. Dogs fed 2.4 g/kg/day of Sodium Silicate for 4 weeks had gross renal lesions but no impairment of renal function. Dermal irritation of Potassium Silicate, Sodium

  8. Polymer Layered Silicate Nanocomposites: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Vikas

    2009-01-01

    This review aims to present recent advances in the synthesis and structure characterization as well as the properties of polymer layered silicate nanocomposites. The advent of polymer layered silicate nanocomposites has revolutionized research into polymer composite materials. Nanocomposites are organic-inorganic hybrid materials in which at least one dimension of the filler is less than 100 nm. A number of synthesis routes have been developed in the recent years to prepare these materials, which include intercalation of polymers or pre-polymers from solution, in-situ polymerization, melt intercalation etc. The nanocomposites where the filler platelets can be dispersed in the polymer at the nanometer scale owing to the specific filler surface modifications, exhibit significant improvement in the composite properties, which include enhanced mechanical strength, gas barrier, thermal stability, flame retardancy etc. Only a small amount of filler is generally required for the enhancement in the properties, which helps the composite materials retain transparency and low density.

  9. Al Speciation in Silicate Melts: AlV a new Network Former?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuville, D. R.; Florian, P.; de Ligny, D.; Montouillout, V.; Massiot, D.

    2009-05-01

    The first human glasses were made 3500 BC. It was essentially sodo-lime silicate glass. To improve the chemical resistance, the thermal properties and increase the viscosity it is interesting to add aluminum in these silicates. But what is the speciation of the aluminum and how it varies according to the chemical composition and to the temperature? The aluminum appears essentially in four or five fold coordination in glasses and melts melted. The proportion of [5]Al varies according to the alkaline or to the earth-alkaline content and to the temperature. We shall present in a first part the influence of the network-modifier on the proportion of [5]Al and then we shall present some new results of absorption of high-temperature using NMR and XANES spectroscopy at the Al K-edge. Finally, from glass transition temperature measurements we propose to explain that [5]Al can be a new network former.

  10. The formation of cobalt-bearing ferromanganese crusts under fluid destruction of silicate matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksimov, S. O.; Safronov, P. P.

    2016-02-01

    The processes of fluid destruction of various silicate rocks under diffusion of flows of compressed gases (mainly carbonaceous) were studied. The gas condensate nature was ascertained for the forming alumoslilicate and ore (cobalt-iron-manganese hydroxide) substances produced under this fluid destruction in the forms of microcrusts and microconcretions. The ore condensates contained in high concentrations the typomorphic elements of oceanic ferromanganese formations (Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Pb, Ce, and Pt). The elemental composition of the ore oxide substance formed under the destruction of various silicate matrices exhibits a definite degree of endemism with prevalence of the Co-Mn association. The pronounced concentration of barium is related to the substantially carbonaceous composition of the fluid systems. A cerium paradox is revealed: Ce3+ is oxidized into Ce4+ and absorbed by ferromanganese hydrogel and the minimum of cerium appears in rare-earth phosphates.

  11. Lithium conductivity in glasses of the Li2O-Al2O3-SiO2 system.

    PubMed

    Ross, Sebastian; Welsch, Anna-Maria; Behrens, Harald

    2015-01-07

    To improve the understanding of Li-dynamics in oxide glasses, i.e. the effect of [AlO4](-) tetrahedra and non-bridging oxygens on the potential landscape, electrical conductivity of seven fully polymerized and partly depolymerized lithium aluminosilicate glasses was investigated using impedance spectroscopy (IS). Lithium is the only mobile particle in these materials. Data derived from IS, i.e. activation energies, pre-exponential factors and diffusivities for lithium, are interpreted in light of Raman spectroscopic analyses of local structures in order to identify building units, which are crucial for lithium dynamics and migration. In polymerized glasses (compositional join LiAlSiO4-LiAlSi4O10) the direct current (DC) electrical conductivity continuously increases with increasing lithium content while lithium diffusivity is not affected by the Al/Si ratio in the glasses. Hence, the increase in electrical conductivity can be solely assigned to lithium concentration in the glasses. An excess of Li with respect to Al, i.e. the introduction of non-bridging oxygen into the network, causes a decrease in lithium mobility in the glasses. Activation energies in polymerized glasses (66 to 70 kJ mol(-1)) are significantly lower than those in depolymerized networks (76 to 78 kJ mol(-1)) while pre-exponential factors are nearly constant across all compositions. Comparison of the data with results for lithium silicates from the literature indicates a minimum in lithium diffusivity for glasses containing both aluminium tetrahedra and non-bridging oxygens. The findings allow a prediction of DC conductivity for a large variety of lithium aluminosilicate glass compositions.

  12. Siderophile Element Partitioning between Sulfide- and Silicate melts.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackler, S.; Rohrbach, A.; Loroch, D. C.; Klemme, S.; Berndt, J.

    2017-12-01

    Different theories concerning the formation of the Earth are debated. Either Earth accreted mostly `dry' or volatile elements were delivered late after core formation was largely inactive [1, 2], or volatile rich material was accreted during the main stages of accretion and core formation [3, 4, 5]. The partitioning behavior of siderophile volatile elements (SVE; S, Se, Te, Tl, Ag, Au, Cd, Bi, Pb, Sn, Cu, Ge, and In) may provide first order constraints whether these element concentrations in Earth's mantle were established before or after core-mantle differentiation or perhaps during both periods by multi stage core formation [6]. A special interest is laid into chalcophile element behavior with respective to the possible formation and segregation of a hadean matte [7]. To examine the influence of sulfur on SVE partitioning between metal-silicate melts, we performed experiments simulating a magma ocean stage evolving from sulfur poor- (low fO2) to more oxidizing sulfur rich- (Fe, Ni)-S melts ( 20 wt% S) towards the end of accretion. We carried out partitioning experiments under various P-T-fO2 conditions with a Bristol type end loaded piston cylinder apparatus (<3 GPa) and a 1000 t walker-type multi-anvil press (3-20 GPa). Our results will be presented at the meeting. References: [1] Albarède F. (2009) Nature, 461, 1227-1233. [2] Ballhaus C. et al. (2013) EPSL, 362, 237-245. [3] Fischer-Gödde M. and Kleine T. (2017) Nature, 541, 525 527. [4] Wade J. and Wood B. J. (2005) EPSL, 236, 78-95. [5] Rubie D. et al. (2016) Science, 253, 1141-1144. [6] Rubie D. et al. (2011) EPSL, 301, 31-42. [7] O'Neill H. St. C. (1991) GCA, 55, 1159-1172.

  13. Rechargeable ambient temperature lithium cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holleck, G. L.

    1980-01-01

    The cycling performance of a secondary lithium cell with a 2-methyl THF lithium hectofluorarsenate electrolyte is discussed. Stripping efficiency, dendritization, passivation on standing, and discharge efficiency are considered.

  14. Lithium: for harnessing renewable energy

    Bradley, Dwight; Jaskula, Brian W.

    2014-01-01

    Lithium, which has the chemical symbol Li and an atomic number of 3, is the first metal in the periodic table. Lithium has many uses, the most prominent being in batteries for cell phones, laptops, and electric and hybrid vehicles. Worldwide sources of lithium are broken down by ore-deposit type as follows: closed-basin brines, 58%; pegmatites and related granites, 26%; lithium-enriched clays, 7%; oilfield brines, 3%; geothermal brines, 3%; and lithium-enriched zeolites, 3% (2013 statistics). There are over 39 million tons of lithium resources worldwide. Of this resource, the USGS estimates there to be approximately 13 million tons of current economically recoverable lithium reserves. To help predict where future lithium supplies might be located, USGS scientists study how and where identified resources are concentrated in the Earth’s crust, and they use that knowledge to assess the likelihood that undiscovered resources also exist.

  15. US Navy lithium cell applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowers, F. M.

    1978-01-01

    Applications of lithium systems that are already in the fleet are discussed. The approach that the Navy is taking in the control of the introduction of lithium batteries into the fleet is also discussed.

  16. Conductimetric determination of decomposition of silicate melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroeger, C.; Lieck, K.

    1986-01-01

    A description of a procedure is given to detect decomposition of silicate systems in the liquid state by conductivity measurements. Onset of decomposition can be determined from the temperature curves of resistances measured on two pairs of electrodes, one above the other. Degree of decomposition can be estimated from temperature and concentration dependency of conductivity of phase boundaries. This procedure was tested with systems PbO-B2O3 and PbO-B2O3-SiO2.

  17. Premixed calcium silicate cement for endodontic applications

    PubMed Central

    Persson, Cecilia; Engqvist, Håkan

    2011-01-01

    Calcium silicate-based materials (also called MTA) are increasingly being used in endodontic applications. However, the handling properties of MTA are not optimal when it comes to injectability and cohesion. Premixing the cements using glycerol avoids these issues. However, there is a lack of data on the effect of common cement variables on important properties of premixed cements for endodontic applications. In this study, the effects of liquid-to-powder ratio, amount of radiopacifier and amount of calcium sulfate (added to control the setting time) were screened using a statistical model. In the second part of the study, the liquid-to-powder ratio was optimized for cements containing three different amounts of radiopacifier. Finally, the effect of using glycerol rather than water was evaluated in terms of radiopacity. The setting time was found to increase with the amount of radiopacifier when the liquid-to-powder ratio was fixed. This was likely due to the higher density of the radiopacifier in comparison to the calcium silicate, which gave a higher liquid-to-powder ratio in terms of volume. Using glycerol rather than water to mix the cements led to a decrease in radiopacity of the cement. In conclusion, we were able to produce premixed calcium silicate cements with acceptable properties for use in endodontic applications. PMID:23507729

  18. Multiscale understanding of tricalcium silicate hydration reactions.

    PubMed

    Cuesta, Ana; Zea-Garcia, Jesus D; Londono-Zuluaga, Diana; De la Torre, Angeles G; Santacruz, Isabel; Vallcorba, Oriol; Dapiaggi, Monica; Sanfélix, Susana G; Aranda, Miguel A G

    2018-06-04

    Tricalcium silicate, the main constituent of Portland cement, hydrates to produce crystalline calcium hydroxide and calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H) nanocrystalline gel. This hydration reaction is poorly understood at the nanoscale. The understanding of atomic arrangement in nanocrystalline phases is intrinsically complicated and this challenge is exacerbated by the presence of additional crystalline phase(s). Here, we use calorimetry and synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction to quantitatively follow tricalcium silicate hydration process: i) its dissolution, ii) portlandite crystallization and iii) C-S-H gel precipitation. Chiefly, synchrotron pair distribution function (PDF) allows to identify a defective clinotobermorite, Ca 11 Si 9 O 28 (OH) 2 . 8.5H 2 O, as the nanocrystalline component of C-S-H. Furthermore, PDF analysis also indicates that C-S-H gel contains monolayer calcium hydroxide which is stretched as recently predicted by first principles calculations. These outcomes, plus additional laboratory characterization, yielded a multiscale picture for C-S-H nanocomposite gel which explains the observed densities and Ca/Si atomic ratios at the nano- and meso- scales.

  19. A volatile rich Earth's core?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morard, G.; Antonangeli, D.; Andrault, D.; Nakajima, Y.

    2017-12-01

    The composition of the Earth's core is still an open question. Although mostly composed of iron, it contains impurities that lower its density and melting point with respect to pure Fe. Knowledge of the nature and abundance of light elements (O, S, Si, C or H) in the core has major implications for establishing the bulk composition of the Earth and for building the model of Earth's differentiation. Geochemical models of the Earth's formation point out that its building blocks were depleted in volatile elements compared to the chondritic abundance, therefore light elements such as S, H or C cannot be the major elements alloyed with iron in the Earth's core. However, such models should be compatible with the comparison of seismic properties of the Earth's core and physical properties of iron alloys under extreme conditions, such as sound velocity or density of solid and liquid. The present work will discuss the recent progress for compositional model issued from studies of phase diagrams and elastic properties of iron alloys under core conditions and highlight the compatibility of volatile elements with observed properties of the Earth's core, in potential contradiction with models derived from metal-silicate partitioning experiments.

  20. Measuring DAC metal-silicate partitioning experiments by electron microprobe: Thickness, fluorescence, and oxide spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jennings, E. S.; Wade, J.; Laurenz, V.; Kearns, S.; Buse, B.; Rubie, D. C.

    2017-12-01

    The process by which the Earth's core segregated, and its resulting composition, can be inferred from the composition of the bulk silicate Earth if the partitioning of various elements into metal at relevant conditions is known. As such, partitioning experiments between liquid metal and liquid silicate over a wide range of pressures and temperatures are frequently performed to constrain the partitioning behaviour of many elements. The use of diamond anvil cell experiments to access more extreme conditions than those achievable by larger volume presses is becoming increasingly common. With a volume several orders of magnitude smaller than conventional samples, these experiments present unique analytical challenges. Typically, sample preparation is performed by FIB as a 2 mm thick slice, containing a small iron ball surrounded by a layer of silicate melt. This implies that analyses made by EPMA will be made near boundaries where fluoresced X-rays from the neighbouring phase may be significant. By measuring and simulating synthetic samples, we investigate thickness and fluorescence limitations. We find that for typical sample geometries, a thickness of 2 μm contains the entire analytical volume for standard 15kV analyses of metals. Fluoresced X-rays from light elements into the metal are below detection limits if there is no direct electron interaction with the silicate. Continuum fluorescence from higher atomic number elements from the metal into silicate poses significant difficulties [1]. This can cause metal-silicate partition coefficients of siderophile elements to be underestimated. Finally, we examine the origin and analytical consequences of oxide-rich exsolutions that are frequently found in the metal phase of such experiments. These are spherical with diameters of 100 nm and can be sparsely to densely packed. They appear to be carbon-rich and result in low analytical totals by violating the assumption of homogeneity in matrix corrections (e.g. φρz), which

  1. Experimental evidence for Mo isotope fractionation between metal and silicate liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hin, Remco C.; Burkhardt, Christoph; Schmidt, Max W.; Bourdon, Bernard; Kleine, Thorsten

    2013-10-01

    Stable isotope fractionation of siderophile elements may inform on the conditions and chemical consequences of core-mantle differentiation in planetary objects. The extent to which Mo isotopes fractionate during such metal-silicate segregation, however, is so far unexplored. We have therefore investigated equilibrium fractionation of Mo isotopes between liquid metal and liquid silicate to evaluate the potential of Mo isotopes as a new tool to study core formation. We have performed experiments at 1400 and 1600 °C in a centrifuging piston cylinder. Tin was used to lower the melting temperature of the Fe-based metal alloys to <1400 °C, while variable Fe-oxide contents were used to vary oxygen fugacity in graphite and MgO capsules. Isotopic analyses were performed using a double spike technique. In experiments performed at 1400 °C, the 98Mo/95Mo ratio of silicate is 0.19±0.03‰ (95% confidence interval) heavier than that of metal. This fractionation is not significantly affected by the presence or absence of carbon. Molybdenum isotope fractionation is furthermore independent of oxygen fugacity in the range IW -1.79 to IW +0.47, which are plausible values for core formation. Experiments at 1600 °C show that, at equilibrium, the 98Mo/95Mo ratio of silicate is 0.12±0.02‰ heavier than that of metal and that the presence or absence of Sn does not affect this fractionation. Equilibrium Mo isotope fractionation between liquid metal and liquid silicate as a function of temperature can therefore be described as ΔMoMetal-Silicate98/95=-4.70(±0.59)×105/T2. Our experiments show that Mo isotope fractionation may be resolvable up to metal-silicate equilibration temperatures of about 2500 °C, rendering Mo isotopes a novel tool to investigate the conditions of core formation in objects ranging from planetesimals to Earth sized bodies.

  2. An introduction to lithium batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrard, W. N. C.

    1988-09-01

    Lithium batteries are being introduced into all three services in the Australian Defence Force. However, general information concerning lithium batteries is not available in a condensed form. This review examines various aspects of lithium batteries, including battery technology, safety aspects, purchasing, packaging, transport, storage and disposal.

  3. Lithium-induced downbeat nystagmus.

    PubMed

    Schein, Flora; Manoli, Pierre; Cathébras, Pascal

    2017-09-01

    We report the case of a 76-year old lady under lithium carbonate for a bipolar disorder who presented with a suspected optic neuritis. A typical lithium-induced downbeat nystagmus was observed. Discontinuation of lithium therapy resulted in frank improvement in visual acuity and disappearance of the nystagmus.

  4. Silicate release from glass for pharmaceutical preparations.

    PubMed

    Bohrer, Denise; Bortoluzzi, Fabiana; Nascimento, Paulo Cícero; Carvalho, Leandro Machado; Ramirez, Adrian Gustavo

    2008-05-01

    Glass is made of polymeric silica and other minor components, which are necessary for turning the silica into a material more easily moldable and resistant to temperature changes. Glass containers for pharmaceutical usage are classified according to their resistance to a chemical attack, a test carried out in the presence of water and heat. The test is designed to show the released alkalinity, a variable dependent on the amount of sodium oxide, one of the minor components added to the glass mass. In this work, the release of silica from glass by action of constituents from pharmaceutical formulations was investigated. The study included products used in large volumes and usually stored in glass containers. Solutions of amino acids, electrolytes, glucose, oligoelements and others such as heparin and sodium bicarbonate were individually stored in glass containers and heated at 121 degrees C for 30min, as in the water attack test. The test was also carried out only with water, where the pH varied from 2 to 12. The released silicate was measured either by photometry or atomic absorption spectrometry, depending on the nature of the sample. The results showed that silicate is released during the heating cycle even if the contact is with pure water only. The pH exerts a considerable influence on the release, being that the higher the pH, the higher the silica dissolved. An elevated pH, however, is not the only factor responsible for silica dissolution. While in the solutions of NaCl, KCl, Mg Cl2 and ZnSO4 and in most of the amino acids, the concentration of silicate was as high as in pure water (0.1-1.0mg Si/L). In the solutions of sodium acetate, bicarbonate and gluconate, its concentration was much higher, over 30mg Si/L. These results were confirmed by the analysis of commercial products, where in solutions of amino acids the level of silicate ranged from 0.14 to 0.19mg Si/L. On the other hand, calcium gluconate, sodium bicarbonate and potassium phosphate presented

  5. Earth After the Moon Forming Impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahnle, Kevin

    2006-01-01

    The Hadean Earth is widely and enduringly pictured as a world of exuberant volcanism, exploding meteors, huge craters, infernal heat, and billowing sulfurous steams; i.e., a world of fire and brimstone punctuated with blows to the head. In the background the Moon looms gigantic in the sky. The popular image has given it a name that celebrates our mythic roots. A hot early Earth is an inevitable consequence of accretion. The Moon-forming impact ensured that Earth as we know it emerged from a fog of silicate vapor. The impact separated the volatiles from the silicates. It took -100 years to condense and rain out the bulk of the vaporized silicates, although relatively volatile elements may have remained present in the atmosphere throughout the magma ocena stage. The magma ocean lasted approx. 2 Myr, its lifetime prolonged by tidal heating and thermal blanketing by a thick (CO2-rich steam atmosphere. Water oceans condensed quickly after the mantle solidified, but for some 10-100 Myr the surface would have stayed warm (approx. 500 K) until the CO2 was removed into the mantle. Thereafter the faint young Sun suggests that a lifeless Earth would always have been evolving toward a bitterly cold ice world, but the cooling trend was frequently interrupted by volcanic or impact induced thaws.

  6. Early Earth differentiation [rapid communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, Michael J.; Trønnes, Reidar G.

    2004-09-01

    The birth and infancy of Earth was a time of profound differentiation involving massive internal reorganization into core, mantle and proto-crust, all within a few hundred million years of solar system formation ( t0). Physical and isotopic evidence indicate that the formation of iron-rich cores generally occurred very early in planetesimals, the building blocks of proto-Earth, within about 3 million years of t0. The final stages of terrestrial planetary accretion involved violent and tremendously energetic giant impacts among core-segregated Mercury- to Mars-sized objects and planetary embryos. As a consequence of impact heating, the early Earth was at times partially or wholly molten, increasing the likelihood for high-pressure and high-temperature equilibration among core- and mantle-forming materials. The Earth's silicate mantle harmoniously possesses abundance levels of the siderophile elements Ni and Co that can be reconciled by equilibration between iron alloy and silicate at conditions comparable to those expected for a deep magma ocean. Solidification of a deep magma ocean possibly involved crystal-melt segregation at high pressures, but subsequent convective stirring of the mantle could have largely erased nascent layering. However, primitive upper mantle rocks apparently have some nonchondritic major and trace element refractory lithophile element ratios that can be plausibly linked to early mantle differentiation of ultra-high-pressure mantle phases. The geochemical effects of crystal fractionation in a deep magma ocean are partly constrained by high-pressure experimentation. Comparison between compositional models for the primitive convecting mantle and bulk silicate Earth generally allows, and possibly favors, 10-15% total fractionation of a deep mantle assemblage comprised predominantly of Mg-perovskite and with minor but geochemically important amounts of Ca-perovskite and ferropericlase. Long-term isolation of such a crystal pile is generally

  7. Tableting properties of silica aerogel and other silicates.

    PubMed

    Hentzschel, C M; Alnaief, M; Smirnova, I; Sakmann, A; Leopold, C S

    2012-04-01

    In solid oral dosage forms silicates are commonly used as glidants in low concentration. However, due to their large specific surface area, silicates may also be used as carrier materials for drugs. Moreover, silicates allow amorphisation of drugs by co-grinding or processing with supercritical fluids. The aim of this study was to investigate the physical and the tableting properties of Silica Aerogel (special type of silica with an extremely large specific surface area), Neusilin(®) US2 (magnesium aluminometasilicate), Florite(®) (calcium silicate) and Aerosil(®) 200 (colloidal silica). Powder blends of Avicel(®) PH102 (microcrystalline cellulose) and different amounts of the respective silicate were compacted and analyzed for their tabletability (tensile strength vs. compaction pressure) as well as their Heckel plot. With Neusilin(®) the tabletability appeared to be independent of the silicate concentration, whereas with Florite(®) an increasing silicate concentration led to a higher tensile strength. In contrast, the addition of Silica Aerogel and Aerosil(®) resulted in a decrease of the tensile strength. With Aerosil(®) a maximum tolerable concentration of 20% [w/w] was determined. Plastic deformation of all powder blends decreased with increasing silicate concentration. This effect was most pronounced with Aerosil(®) and least with Florite(®). Tablets with acceptable tensile strength were obtained with all plain silicates except for Aerosil(®). Therefore, these silicates may be used in tablet formulations, e.g. as carrier materials for liquid or amorphous drugs.

  8. Determination of total tin in silicate rocks by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    Elsheimer, H.N.; Fries, T.L.

    1990-01-01

    A method is described for the determination of total tin in silicate rocks utilizing a graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometer with a stabilized-temperature platform furnace and Zeeman-effect background correction. The sample is decomposed by lithium metaborate fusion (3 + 1) in graphite crucibles with the melt being dissolved in 7.5% hydrochloric acid. Tin extractions (4 + 1 or 8 + 1) are executed on portions of the acid solutions using a 4% solution of tricotylphosphine oxide in methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK). Ascorbic acid is added as a reducing agent prior to extraction. A solution of diammonium hydrogenphosphate and magnesium nitrate is used as a matrix modifier in the graphite furnace determination. The limit of detection is > 10 pg, equivalent to > 1 ??g l-1 of tin in the MIBK solution or 0.2-0.3 ??g g-61 in the rock. The concentration range is linear between 2.5 and 500 ??g l-1 tin in solution. The precision, measured as relative standard deviation, is < 20% at the 2.5 ??g l-1 level and < 7% at the 10-30 ??g l-1 level of tin. Excellent agreement with recommended literature values was found when the method was applied to the international silicate rock standards BCR-1, PCC-1, GSP-1, AGV-1, STM-1, JGb-1 and Mica-Fe. Application was made to the determination of tin in geological core samples with total tin concentrations of the order of 1 ??g g-1 or less.

  9. A nucleosynthetic origin for the Earth's anomalous (142)Nd composition.

    PubMed

    Burkhardt, C; Borg, L E; Brennecka, G A; Shollenberger, Q R; Dauphas, N; Kleine, T

    2016-09-15

    A long-standing paradigm assumes that the chemical and isotopic compositions of many elements in the bulk silicate Earth are the same as in chondrites. However, the accessible Earth has a greater (142)Nd/(144)Nd ratio than do chondrites. Because (142)Nd is the decay product of the now-extinct (146)Sm (which has a half-life of 103 million years), this (142)Nd difference seems to require a higher-than-chondritic Sm/Nd ratio for the accessible Earth. This must have been acquired during global silicate differentiation within the first 30 million years of Solar System formation and implies the formation of a complementary (142)Nd-depleted reservoir that either is hidden in the deep Earth, or lost to space by impact erosion. Whether this complementary reservoir existed, and whether or not it has been lost from Earth, is a matter of debate, and has implications for determining the bulk composition of Earth, its heat content and structure, as well as for constraining the modes and timescales of its geodynamical evolution. Here we show that, compared with chondrites, Earth's precursor bodies were enriched in neodymium that was produced by the slow neutron capture process (s-process) of nucleosynthesis. This s-process excess leads to higher (142)Nd/(144)Nd ratios; after correction for this effect, the (142)Nd/(144)Nd ratios of chondrites and the accessible Earth are indistinguishable within five parts per million. The (142)Nd offset between the accessible silicate Earth and chondrites therefore reflects a higher proportion of s-process neodymium in the Earth, and not early differentiation processes. As such, our results obviate the need for hidden-reservoir or super-chondritic Earth models and imply a chondritic Sm/Nd ratio for the bulk Earth. Although chondrites formed at greater heliocentric distances and contain a different mix of presolar components than Earth, they nevertheless are suitable proxies for Earth's bulk chemical composition.

  10. Intricate Li-Sn Disorder in Rare-Earth Metal-Lithium Stannides. Crystal Chemistry of RE3Li4- xSn4+ x (RE = La-Nd, Sm; x < 0.3) and Eu7Li8- xSn10+ x ( x ≈ 2.0).

    PubMed

    Suen, Nian-Tzu; Guo, Sheng-Ping; Hoos, James; Bobev, Svilen

    2018-05-07

    Reported are the syntheses, crystal structures, and electronic structures of six rare-earth metal-lithium stannides with the general formulas RE 3 Li 4- x Sn 4+ x (RE = La-Nd, Sm) and Eu 7 Li 8- x Sn 10+ x . These new ternary compounds have been synthesized by high-temperature reactions of the corresponding elements. Their crystal structures have been established using single-crystal X-ray diffraction methods. The RE 3 Li 4- x Sn 4+ x phases crystallize in the orthorhombic body-centered space group Immm (No. 71) with the Zr 3 Cu 4 Si 4 structure type (Pearson code oI22), and the Eu 7 Li 8- x Sn 10+ x phase crystallizes in the orthorhombic base-centered space group Cmmm (No. 65) with the Ce 7 Li 8 Ge 10 structure type (Pearson code oC50). Both structures can be consdered as part of the [RESn 2 ] n [RELi 2 Sn] m homologous series, wherein the structures are intergrowths of imaginary RESn 2 (AlB 2 -like structure type) and RELi 2 Sn (MgAl 2 Cu-like structure type) fragments. Close examination the structures indicates complex occupational Li-Sn disorder, apparently governed by the drive of the structure to achieve an optimal number of valence electrons. This conclusion based on experimental results is supported by detailed electronic structure calculations, carried out using the tight-binding linear muffin-tin orbital method.

  11. Kinetics of lithium peroxide monohydrate thermal decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nefedov, Roman; Posternak, Nikolay; Ferapontov, Yuriy

    2017-11-01

    Topochemical dehydration of lithium peroxide was studied to determine kinetic parameters at the range of temperatures from 90°C to 147°C in non-isothermal conditions by derivatographic method. The study was conducted to select optimal conditions of lithium peroxide synthesis in dehydration reaction of triple LiOH-H2O2-H2O system in ultra-high frequency radiation field. Conditions of dehydration reaction were caused by the thermal conductivity of LiOH -H2O2-H2O system. It is determined that dehydration process runs close to the first order reaction (n=0.85±0.03). The activation energy and pre-exponential factor values were found as Eak = 86.0 ± 0.8 kJ/mol, k0 = (2.19 ± 0.16) .1011 min-1, correspondingly. It is supposed that there is a similarity between the dehydration mechanism of lithium peroxide monohydrate and peroxide hydrates of alkaline-earth metals (calcium, barium and strontium).

  12. International strategic minerals inventory summary report; lithium

    Anstett, T.F.; Krauss, U.H.; Ober, J.A.; Schmidt, H.W.

    1990-01-01

    Major world resources of lithium are described in this summary report of information in the International Strategic Minerals Inventory (ISMI). ISMI is a cooperative data-collection effort of earth-science and mineral-resource agencies in Australia, Canada, the Federal Republic of Germany, the Republic of South Africa, the United Kingdom, and the United States of America. Part I of this report presents an overview of the resources and potential supply of lithium on the basis of inventory information; Part II contains tables of some of the geologic information and mineral-resource information and production data collected by ISMI participants. In terms of lithium-resource availability, present economically viable resources are more than sufficient to meet likely demand in the foreseeable future. In times of excess capacity such as currently exist, some pegmatite operations cannot compete with brine operations, which are less costly. A further production shift from pegmatites to brines will result in the concentration of supply in a few countries such as Chile and the United States. This shift would lead to the dependence of industrialized countries on deliveries from these sources.

  13. Lithium Dinitramide as an Additive in Lithium Power Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorkovenko, Alexander A.

    2007-01-01

    Lithium dinitramide, LiN(NO2)2 has shown promise as an additive to nonaqueous electrolytes in rechargeable and non-rechargeable lithium-ion-based electrochemical power cells. Such non-aqueous electrolytes consist of lithium salts dissolved in mixtures of organic ethers, esters, carbonates, or acetals. The benefits of adding lithium dinitramide (which is also a lithium salt) include lower irreversible loss of capacity on the first charge/discharge cycle, higher cycle life, lower self-discharge, greater flexibility in selection of electrolyte solvents, and greater charge capacity. The need for a suitable electrolyte additive arises as follows: The metallic lithium in the anode of a lithium-ion-based power cell is so highly reactive that in addition to the desired main electrochemical reaction, it engages in side reactions that cause formation of resistive films and dendrites, which degrade performance as quantified in terms of charge capacity, cycle life, shelf life, first-cycle irreversible capacity loss, specific power, and specific energy. The incidence of side reactions can be reduced through the formation of a solid-electrolyte interface (SEI) a thin film that prevents direct contact between the lithium anode material and the electrolyte. Ideally, an SEI should chemically protect the anode and the electrolyte from each other while exhibiting high conductivity for lithium ions and little or no conductivity for electrons. A suitable additive can act as an SEI promoter. Heretofore, most SEI promotion was thought to derive from organic molecules in electrolyte solutions. In contrast, lithium dinitramide is inorganic. Dinitramide compounds are known as oxidizers in rocket-fuel chemistry and until now, were not known as SEI promoters in battery chemistry. Although the exact reason for the improvement afforded by the addition of lithium dinitramide is not clear, it has been hypothesized that lithium dinitramide competes with other electrolyte constituents to react with

  14. Behaviour of Rare Earth Elements during the Earth's core formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faure, Pierre; Bouhifd, Mohamed Ali; Boyet, Maud; Hammouda, Tahar; Manthilake, Geeth

    2017-04-01

    Rare Earth Elements (REE) are classified in the refractory group, which means that they have a high temperature condensation and their volatility-controlled fractionation is limited to high-temperature processes. Anomalies have been measured for Eu, Yb and Sm, which are the REE with the lowest condensation temperatures in CAIs and chondrules (e.g. [1]). REE are particularly abundant in the sulfides of enstatite chondrites, 100 to 1000 times the CI value [e.g. 2,3], proving that these elements are not strictly lithophile under extremely reducing conditions. However by investigating experimentally the impact of Earth's core formation on the behavior of Sm and Nd, we have shown the absence of fractionation between Sm and Nd during the segregation of the metallic phase [4]. Recently, Wohlers and Wood [5] proposed that Nd and Sm could be fractionated in presence of a S-rich alloy phase. However, their results were obtained at pressure and temperature conditions below the plausible conditions of the Earth's core formation. Clearly, large pressure range needs to be covered before well-constrained model can be expected. Furthermore, our preliminary metal-silicate partitioning results show that Ce and Eu have higher metal/silicate partition coefficients than their neighboring elements, and that the presence of sulphur enhances the relative difference between partition coefficients. In this presentation, we will present and discuss new metal-silicate partition coefficients of all REE at a deep magma ocean at pressures ranging from those of the uppermost upper mantle ( 5 GPa) to a maximum pressure expected in the range of 20 GPa, temperatures ranging from 2500 to about 3000 K, and oxygen fugacities within IW-1 to IW-5 (1 to 5 orders of magnitude lower than the iron-wüstite buffer). We will discuss the effect of S, as well as the effect of H2O on the behaviour of REE during the Earth's core formation: recent models suggest that contrary to currently accepted beliefs, the

  15. The effect of melt composition on the partitioning of trace elements between titanite and silicate melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prowatke, S.; Klemme, S.

    2003-04-01

    The aim of this study is to systematically investigate the influence of melt composition on the partitioning of trace elements between titanite and different silicate melts. Titanite was chosen because of its important role as an accessory mineral, particularly with regard to intermediate to silicic alkaline and calc-alkaline magmas [e.g. 1] and of its relative constant mineral composition over a wide range of bulk compositions. Experiments at atmospheric pressure were performed at temperatures between 1150°C and 1050°C. Bulk compositions were chosen to represent a basaltic andesite (SH3 - 53% SiO2), a dacite (SH2 - 65 SiO2) and a rhyolite (SH1 - 71% SiO2). Furthermore, two additional experimental series were conducted to investigate the effect of Al-Na and the Na-K ratio of melts on partitioning. Starting materials consisted of glasses that were doped with 23 trace elements including some selected rare earth elements (La, Ce, Pr, Sm, Gd, Lu), high field strength elements (Zr, Hf, Nb, Ta) and large ion lithophile elements (Cs, Rb, Ba) and Th and U. The experimental run products were analysed for trace elements using secondary ion mass spectrometry at Heidelberg University. Preliminary results indicate a strong effect of melt composition on trace element partition coefficients. Partition coefficients for rare-earth elements uniformly show a convex-upward shape [2, 3], since titanite accommodates the middle rare-earth elements more readily than the light rare-earth elements or the heavy rare-earth elements. Partition coefficients for the rare-earth elements follow a parabolic trend when plotted against ionic radius. The shape of the parabola is very similar for all studied bulk compositions, the position of the parabola, however, is strongly dependent on bulk composition. For example, isothermal rare-earth element partition coefficients (such as La) are incompatible (D<1) in alkali-rich silicate melts and strongly compatible (D>>1) in alkali-poor melt compositions

  16. Regularities in Low-Temperature Phosphatization of Silicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savenko, A. V.

    2018-01-01

    The regularities in low-temperature phosphatization of silicates are defined from long-term experiments on the interaction between different silicate minerals and phosphate-bearing solutions in a wide range of medium acidity. It is shown that the parameters of the reaction of phosphatization of hornblende, orthoclase, and labradorite have the same values as for clayey minerals (kaolinite and montmorillonite). This effect may appear, if phosphotization proceeds, not after silicate minerals with a different structure and composition, but after a secondary silicate phase formed upon interaction between silicates and water and stable in a certain pH range. Variation in the parameters of the reaction of phosphatization at pH ≈ 1.8 is due to the stability of the silicate phase different from that at higher pH values.

  17. Lithium Ion Batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Lithium ion batteries, which use a new battery chemistry, are being developed under cooperative agreements between Lockheed Martin, Ultralife Battery, and the NASA Lewis Research Center. The unit cells are made in flat (prismatic) shapes that can be connected in series and parallel to achieve desired voltages and capacities. These batteries will soon be marketed to commercial original-equipment manufacturers and thereafter will be available for military and space use. Current NiCd batteries offer about 35 W-hr/kg compared with 110 W-hr/kg for current lithium ion batteries. Our ultimate target for these batteries is 200 W-hr/kg.

  18. Testing Urey's carbonate-silicate cycle using the calcium isotopic composition of sedimentary carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blättler, Clara L.; Higgins, John A.

    2017-12-01

    Carbonate minerals constitute a major component of the sedimentary geological record and an archive of a fraction of the carbon and calcium cycled through the Earth's surface reservoirs for over three billion years. For calcium, carbonate minerals constitute the ultimate sink for almost all calcium liberated during continental and submarine weathering of silicate minerals. This study presents >500 stable isotope ratios of calcium in Precambrian carbonate sediments, both limestones and dolomites, in an attempt to characterize the isotope mass balance of the sedimentary carbonate reservoir through time. The mean of the dataset is indistinguishable from estimates of the calcium isotope ratio of bulk silicate Earth, consistent with the Urey cycle being the dominant mechanism exchanging calcium among surface reservoirs. The variability in bulk sediment calcium isotope ratios within each geological unit does not reflect changes in the global calcium cycle, but rather highlights the importance of local mineralogical and/or diagenetic effects in the carbonate record. This dataset demonstrates the potential for calcium isotope ratios to help assess these local effects, such as the former presence of aragonite, even in rocks with a history of neomorphism and recrystallization. Additionally, 29 calcium isotope measurements are presented from ODP (Ocean Drilling Program) Site 801 that contribute to the characterization of altered oceanic crust as an additional sink for calcium, and whose distinct isotopic signature places a limit on the importance of this subduction flux over Earth history.

  19. Silicate Liquid Equations of State from Molten Shock Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asimow, P. D.; Ahrens, T. J.

    2005-12-01

    Over the past 20 years the Caltech shockwave lab has pioneered the direct measurement of equations of state of silicate liquids by shockwave experiments on targets preheated to 1250-1700 °C. A glass of the desired composition is welded into a Mo capsule; the capsule is heated by induction to above the liquidus of the sample. Upon impact with a gun-launched flyer plate, a planar shockwave is driven into the molten sample. Passage of the shock through the sample and capsule cover is measured with a high-speed streak camera; impactor velocity is measured with a double-exposure flash X-ray. Initial sample density is inferred from measured temperature and known 1 bar density and thermal expansion data. Previously, a 40 mm single-stage gun launched 80 g projectiles carrying 1.5 mm thick flyers at up to 2.7 km/s. Maximum pressures in the range of 25 to 45 GPa were achieved in diopside, anorthite, the diopside-anorthite eutectic, komatiite, MORB, and fayalite. Results of prior work are briefly reviewed. Also revisited are arguments that, although the silicate liquids achieve their relaxed hydrostatic states, crystallization does not occur on the timescale of the experiment. Densities of the compositions studied appear to converge in the 20-40 GPa range to that expected for a mixture of dense oxide phases of equal composition and temperature. Previous data, however, do not test whether, with further compression, the liquids can become denser than the equivalent solid oxide mixes. In the case of the diopside-anorthite eutectic, earlier experiments showed anomalous stiffening above 25 GPa. We have improved the technique in several ways that allow us to extend measurements to pressures exceeding the core-mantle boundary in the Earth. These improvements include a higher writing-rate image converter streak camera, high-temperature shorting pins to trigger the image converter camera, digital profiling of pre-shot capsule shape, pyrometry (in place of thermocouples) to measure

  20. The young age of Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Youxue

    1998-09-01

    Patterson (1956) established that the age of Earth is close to that of meteorites. Over the last 20 years, workers argued for younger age for core differentiation based on Pb-Pb model ages and tungsten isotopic data and for gas retention based on I-Xe modeling. However, disagreement is abundant, and the young age of Earth has not been widely accepted. In this work, I examine all radiogenic noble gases in the atmosphere and use a model-independent approach and total inversion to show that (1) the Xe-closure age of Earth is 109 ± 23 million years younger than the formation of meteorite Bjurbole (˜4560 Ma) and (2) all radiogenic components of noble gases in the atmosphere can be quantitatively accounted for by production and degassing ˜60% of the bulk silicate earth. The agreement between the 129I- 129Xe clock and 244Pu- 238U- 136Xe- 134Xe- 132Xe- 131Xe clock suggests that the volatility of iodine does not affect the 129I- 129Xe clock. Earth's Xe-closure age is 4.45 ± 0.02 Ga, consistent with the model age of Pb and the 146Sm- 142Nd, 147Sm- 143Nd and 182Hf- 182W systematics. On the basis of the consistency of these ages, 4.45 ± 0.02 Ga probably represents the time when the last Martian-sized planetesimal hit Earth and reinitialized the global clocks.

  1. 77 FR 28259 - Mailings of Lithium Batteries

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-14

    ... containing lithium metal or lithium-ion cells or batteries and applies regardless of quantity, size, watt... ``lithium content'' for secondary lithium-ion batteries when describing maximum quantity limits. In addition...-ion (Rechargeable) Cells and Batteries [Revise 10.20.6 as follows:] Small consumer-type lithium-ion...

  2. What can the Hf–W System tell Us About the Mechanism and Timing of Earth's Core Formation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, R. A.; Nimmo, F.; O'Brien, D. P.

    2018-05-01

    Strong tradeoff between effects of depth and extent of metal-silicate equilibration and formation timescale on the Hf-W system. Whole mantle equilibration requires k = 0.4. Later formation times require less equilibration to match Earth's anomaly.

  3. Ultrasonic Monitoring of the Interaction between Cement Matrix and Alkaline Silicate Solution in Self-Healing Systems.

    PubMed

    Ait Ouarabi, Mohand; Antonaci, Paola; Boubenider, Fouad; Gliozzi, Antonio S; Scalerandi, Marco

    2017-01-07

    Alkaline solutions, such as sodium, potassium or lithium silicates, appear to be very promising as healing agents for the development of encapsulated self-healing concretes. However, the evolution of their mechanical and acoustic properties in time has not yet been completely clarified, especially regarding their behavior and related kinetics when they are used in the form of a thin layer in contact with a hardened cement matrix. This study aims to monitor, using linear and nonlinear ultrasonic methods, the evolution of a sodium silicate solution interacting with a cement matrix in the presence of localized cracks. The ultrasonic inspection via linear methods revealed that an almost complete recovery of the elastic and acoustic properties occurred within a few days of healing. The nonlinear ultrasonic measurements contributed to provide further insight into the kinetics of the recovery due to the presence of the healing agent. A good regain of mechanical performance was ascertained through flexural tests at the end of the healing process, confirming the suitability of sodium silicate as a healing agent for self-healing cementitious systems.

  4. Preparation of reactive beta-dicalcium silicate

    DOEpatents

    Shen, Ming-Shing; Chen, James M.; Yang, Ralph T.

    1982-01-01

    This invention relates to the preparation of fine particles of reactive beta-dicalcium silicate by means of a solid state process which comprises firing a mixture of calcium sulfate, silica and a reducing additive selected from the group consisting of calcium sulfide, carbon, carbon monoxide, methane and hydrogen, at a temperature of about 850.degree.-1000.degree. C. A carrier gas such as nitrogen or carbon dioxide may also be added, if desired. A high concentration of sulfur dioxide is a by-product of this process.

  5. Determination of chlorine in silicate rocks

    Peck, L.C.

    1959-01-01

    In a rapid accurate method for the determination of chlorine in silicate rocks, the rock powder is sintered with a sodium carbonate flux containing zinc oxide and magnesium carbonate. The sinter cake is leached with water, the resulting solution is filtered, and the filtrate is acidified with nitric acid. Chlorine is determined by titrating this solution with mercuric nitrate solution using sodium nitroprusside as the indicator. The titration is made in the dark with a beam of light shining through the solution. The end point of the titration is found by visually comparing the intensity of this beam of light with that of a similar beam of light in a reference solution.

  6. Preparation of reactive beta-dicalcium silicate

    DOEpatents

    Shen, M.S.; Chen, J.M.; Yang, R.T.

    1980-02-28

    This invention relates to the preparation of fine particles of reactive beta-dicalcium silicate by means of a solid state process which comprises firing a mixture of calcium sulfate, silica, and a reducing additive selected from the group consisting of calcium sulfide, carbon, carbon monoxide, methane, and hydrogen, at a temperature of about 850 to 1000/sup 0/C. A carrier gas such as nitrogen or carbon dioxide may also be added, if desired. A high concentration of sulfur dioxide is a by-product of this process.

  7. Laboratory synthesis of silicate glass spherules: Application to impact ejecta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoddard, P. S.; Pahlevan, K.; Tumber, S.; Weber, R.; Lee, K. K.

    2012-12-01

    To investigate the process by which molten droplets of impact ejecta solidify into glassy spherule tektites, we employed laser levitation experiments to recreate the hot temperatures of falling molten rock. Following models for Earth composition based on enstatite chondrites, we levitated mixtures of oxide powders in a stream of gas and melted them with a laser, producing silicate glass beads. After quenching, we polished the ~1 mm diameter samples in cross-section and analyzed with electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). Fine and coarsely-spaced EPMA transects across each bead displayed diffusion profiles at their edges, particularly in their SiO2 and MgO content. Heating altered the beads' bulk composition as well; all of the glassy spherules were compositionally different from the initial combination of powders. By comparing these changes to the environmental factors acting on the bead (e.g., temperature, type of levitation gas, duration of heating and amount of rotation), we produced a model for how molten ejecta change chemically and physically as they solidify into a glass. We find that high temperatures likely generated on impact have a strong effect on the composition of tektites; therefore, attempts to correlate tektites to their parent rocks should correct for this effect.

  8. Monitoring the Hazards of Silicic Volcanoes with Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, Jonathan; Wessels, Rick; Eisinger, Chris; Ramsey, Michael; Hellman, Melanie; Kuhn, Sally

    2004-01-01

    This report details the final progress on the Solid Earth and Natural Hazards project: Monitoring of Hazards of Silicic Volcanoes with Remote Sensing (SENH99-0000-0159). The original award went to Arizona State University (ASU) with Dr. Jonathan Fink as the P.I. and Dr. Michael Ramsey as the Co-I. In May 2000, Dr. Ramsey left ASU to take a tenure-track faculty position at the University of Pittsburgh. The principle investigators and NASA Headquarters agreed to split the grant award at the HQ level and therefore avoid the double overhead charges that would arise from a university subcontract. The objectives of the science were divided, and coordinated yearly progress reports have been submitted from each University. This report details the final progress on work carried out at Arizona State. A report by Dr. Ramsey at the University of Pittsburgh has already been submitted. The work from both institutions is closely related and this report will reflect that connection.

  9. Metal-Silicate Partitioning of Various Siderophile Elements at High Pressure and High Temperatures: a Diamond Anvil Cell Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badro, J.; Blanchard, I.; Siebert, J.

    2015-12-01

    Core formation is the major chemical fractionation that occurred on Earth. This event is widely believed to have happened at pressures of at least 40 GPa and temperatures exceeding 3000 K. It has left a significant imprint on the chemistry of the mantle by removing most of the siderophile (iron-loving) elements from it. Abundances of most siderophile elements in the bulk silicate Earth are significantly different than those predicted from experiments at low P-T. Among them, vanadium, chromium, cobalt and gallium are four siderophile elements which abundances in the mantle have been marked by core formation processes. Thus, understand their respective abundance in the mantle can help bringing constraints on the conditions of Earth's differentiation. We performed high-pressure high-temperature experiments using laser heating diamond anvil cell to investigate the metal-silicate partitioning of those four elements. Homogeneous glasses doped in vanadium, chromium, cobalt and gallium were synthesized using a levitation furnace and load inside the diamond anvil cell along with metallic powder. Samples were recovered using a Focused Ion Beam and chemically analyzed using an electron microprobe. We investigate the effect of pressure, temperature and metal composition on the metal-silicate partitioning of V, Cr, Co and Ga. Three previous studies focused on V, Cr and Co partitioning at those conditions of pressure and temperature, but none explore gallium partitioning at the relevant extreme conditions of core formation. We will present the first measurements of gallium metal-silicate partitioning performed at the appropriate conditions of pressure and temperature of Earth's differentiation.

  10. Earth Observation

    2014-06-01

    ISS040-E-006327 (1 June 2014) --- A portion of International Space Station solar array panels and Earth?s horizon are featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 40 crew member on the space station.

  11. Trace element and isotope studies in oxide/phosphate/silicate inclusions of iron meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, Edward J.

    1996-01-01

    Under the above grant research was funded in the following areas: 1. Pallasites: Rare earth element measurements in phosphates to determine if all pallasites fit into only two trace element groups. This work has been completed. 2. HIAB irons: To complete work on the only known silicate inclusion in a IIIAB iron meteorite. This work has been completed. 3. IIIAB irons: To continue the search for Cr-53 excesses in IIIAB iron meteorite phosphates. A part of this work has been completed 4. IIIAB irons: To complete the identification of the phosphate minerals in IIIAB iron meteorites and try to determine the phase relations and chemical history of trace element distributions during the core formation process. Work on this has been largely completed and preliminary results have been reported. The final work is being assessed prior to preparation of a manuscript for publication. 5. IIE irons: To complete work on the unique silicate assemblage in the IIE iron meteorite. Work on this was completed and a paper published. 6. Ungrouped irons: A partially devitrified silicate glass inclusion has been found in the ungrouped iron meteorite. Preliminary work on this has been reported. All the work on this has been now completed and a manuscript has been prepared and submitted for publication.

  12. Incorporation of bitumen and calcium silicate in cement and lime stabilized soil blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwan, W. H.; Cheah, C. B.; Ramli, M.; Al-Sakkaf, Y. K.

    2017-04-01

    Providing affordable housing is the most critical problem in many of the developing countries. Using earth materials in building construction is one of the feasible methods to address this issue and it can be a way towards sustainable construction as well. However, the published information on the stabilized soil blocks is limited. Therefore, the present study is conducted to examine the characterization of the soils and engineering properties of the stabilized soil blocks. Four types of stabilizer were used in the study, namely; cement, slaked lime, bitumen emulsion and calcium silicate. Cement and slaked lime were added at different percentages in the range of 5% to 15%, with interval of 2.5%. The percentage was determined based on weight of soil. Meanwhile, bitumen emulsion and calcium silicate were incorporated at various percentages together with 10% of cement. Dosage of bitumen emulsion is in the range of 2% to 10% at interval of 2% while calcium silicate was incorporated at 0.50%, 0.75%, 1.00%, 1.25%, 1.50% and 2.00%. Results show that cement is the most viable stabilizer for the soil block among all stabilizers in this study. The bulk density, optimum moisture content and compressive strengths were increased with the increasing cement content. The most suitable cement content was 10% added at moisture content of 12%. Lime, bitumen and calcium contents were recommended at 5.0%, 6.0% and 1.25%, respectively.

  13. Lithium ion conducting electrolytes

    DOEpatents

    Angell, C. Austen; Liu, Changle

    1996-01-01

    A liquid, predominantly lithium-conducting, ionic electrolyte having exceptionally high conductivity at temperatures of 100.degree. C. or lower, including room temperature, and comprising the lithium salts selected from the group consisting of the thiocyanate, iodide, bromide, chloride, perchlorate, acetate, tetrafluoroborate, perfluoromethane sulfonate, perfluoromethane sulfonamide, tetrahaloaluminate, and heptahaloaluminate salts of lithium, with or without a magnesium-salt selected from the group consisting of the perchlorate and acetate salts of magnesium. Certain of the latter embodiments may also contain molecular additives from the group of acetonitrile (CH.sub.3 CN) succinnonitrile (CH.sub.2 CN).sub.2, and tetraglyme (CH.sub.3 --O--CH.sub.2 --CH.sub.2 --O--).sub.2 (or like solvents) solvated to a Mg.sup.+2 cation to lower the freezing point of the electrolyte below room temperature. Other particularly useful embodiments contain up to about 40, but preferably not more than about 25, mol percent of a long chain polyether polymer dissolved in the lithium salts to provide an elastic or rubbery solid electrolyte of high ambient temperature conductivity and exceptional 100.degree. C. conductivity. Another embodiment contains up to about but not more than 10 mol percent of a molecular solvent such as acetone.

  14. Lithium ion conducting electrolytes

    DOEpatents

    Angell, C.A.; Liu, C.

    1996-04-09

    A liquid, predominantly lithium-conducting, ionic electrolyte is described having exceptionally high conductivity at temperatures of 100 C or lower, including room temperature, and comprising the lithium salts selected from the group consisting of the thiocyanate, iodide, bromide, chloride, perchlorate, acetate, tetrafluoroborate, perfluoromethane sulfonate, perfluoromethane sulfonamide, tetrahaloaluminate, and heptahaloaluminate salts of lithium, with or without a magnesium-salt selected from the group consisting of the perchlorate and acetate salts of magnesium. Certain of the latter embodiments may also contain molecular additives from the group of acetonitrile (CH{sub 3}CN), succinnonitrile (CH{sub 2}CN){sub 2}, and tetraglyme (CH{sub 3}--O--CH{sub 2}--CH{sub 2}--O--){sub 2} (or like solvents) solvated to a Mg{sup +2} cation to lower the freezing point of the electrolyte below room temperature. Other particularly useful embodiments contain up to about 40, but preferably not more than about 25, mol percent of a long chain polyether polymer dissolved in the lithium salts to provide an elastic or rubbery solid electrolyte of high ambient temperature conductivity and exceptional 100 C conductivity. Another embodiment contains up to about but not more than 10 mol percent of a molecular solvent such as acetone. 2 figs.

  15. Lithium battery discharge tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, C. J.

    1980-01-01

    The long term discharge of a variety of lithium cells was characterized and the susceptibility of the cells to chemical variation during the slow discharge was tested. A shunt resistor was set across the terminals to monitor the voltage as a function of time. Failures were identified by premature voltage drops.

  16. Lithium disulfide battery

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, Thomas D.

    1988-01-01

    A negative electrode limited secondary electrochemical cell having dense FeS.sub.2 positive electrode operating exclusively on the upper plateau, a Li alloy negative electrode and a suitable lithium-containing electrolyte. The electrolyte preferably is 25 mole percent LiCl, 38 mole percent LiBr and 37 mole percent KBr. The cell may be operated isothermally.

  17. Lithium alloy negative electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huggins, Robert A.

    The 1996 announcement by Fuji Photo Film of the development of lithium batteries containing convertible metal oxides has caused a great deal of renewed interest in lithium alloys as alternative materials for use in the negative electrode of rechargeable lithium cells. The earlier work on lithium alloys, both at elevated and ambient temperatures is briefly reviewed. Basic principles relating thermodynamics, phase diagrams and electrochemical properties under near-equilibrium conditions are discussed, with the Li-Sn system as an example. Second-phase nucleation, and its hindrance under dynamic conditions plays an important role in determining deviations from equilibrium behavior. Two general types of composite microstructure electrodes, those with a mixed-conducting matrix, and those with a solid electrolyte matrix, are discussed. The Li-Sn-Si system at elevated temperatures, and the Li-Sn-Cd at ambient temperatures are shown to be examples of mixed-conducting matrix microstructures. The convertible oxides are an example of the solid electrolyte matrix type. Although the reversible capacity can be very large in this case, the first cycle irreversible capacity required to convert the oxides to alloys may be a significant handicap.

  18. Evidence for seismogenic fracture of silicic magma.

    PubMed

    Tuffen, Hugh; Smith, Rosanna; Sammonds, Peter R

    2008-05-22

    It has long been assumed that seismogenic faulting is confined to cool, brittle rocks, with a temperature upper limit of approximately 600 degrees C (ref. 1). This thinking underpins our understanding of volcanic earthquakes, which are assumed to occur in cold rocks surrounding moving magma. However, the recent discovery of abundant brittle-ductile fault textures in silicic lavas has led to the counter-intuitive hypothesis that seismic events may be triggered by fracture and faulting within the erupting magma itself. This hypothesis is supported by recent observations of growing lava domes, where microearthquake swarms have coincided with the emplacement of gouge-covered lava spines, leading to models of seismogenic stick-slip along shallow shear zones in the magma. But can fracturing or faulting in high-temperature, eruptible magma really generate measurable seismic events? Here we deform high-temperature silica-rich magmas under simulated volcanic conditions in order to test the hypothesis that high-temperature magma fracture is seismogenic. The acoustic emissions recorded during experiments show that seismogenic rupture may occur in both crystal-rich and crystal-free silicic magmas at eruptive temperatures, extending the range of known conditions for seismogenic faulting.

  19. Tip-induced nanoreactor for silicate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Ming; Ma, Liran; Liang, Yong; Gao, Yuan; Luo, Jianbin

    2015-09-01

    Nanoscale scientific issues have attracted an increasing amount of research interest due to their specific size-effect and novel structure-property. From macro to nano, materials present some unique chemical reactivity that bulk materials do not own. Here we introduce a facile method to generate silicate with nanoscale control based on the establishment of a confined space between a meso/nanoscale tungsten tip and a smooth silica/silicon substrate. During the process, local water-like droplets deposition can be obviously observed in the confinement between the Si/SiO2 surfaces and the KOH-modified tungsten tip. By the combination of in-situ optical microscopy and Raman spectroscopy, we were able to take a deep insight of both the product composition and the underlying mechanism of such phenomena. It was indicated that such nanoreactor for silicate could be quite efficient as a result of the local capillarity and electric field effect, with implications at both nano and meso scales.

  20. Tip-induced nanoreactor for silicate.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ming; Ma, Liran; Liang, Yong; Gao, Yuan; Luo, Jianbin

    2015-09-14

    Nanoscale scientific issues have attracted an increasing amount of research interest due to their specific size-effect and novel structure-property. From macro to nano, materials present some unique chemical reactivity that bulk materials do not own. Here we introduce a facile method to generate silicate with nanoscale control based on the establishment of a confined space between a meso/nanoscale tungsten tip and a smooth silica/silicon substrate. During the process, local water-like droplets deposition can be obviously observed in the confinement between the Si/SiO2 surfaces and the KOH-modified tungsten tip. By the combination of in-situ optical microscopy and Raman spectroscopy, we were able to take a deep insight of both the product composition and the underlying mechanism of such phenomena. It was indicated that such nanoreactor for silicate could be quite efficient as a result of the local capillarity and electric field effect, with implications at both nano and meso scales.

  1. Tip-induced nanoreactor for silicate

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Ming; Ma, Liran; Liang, Yong; Gao, Yuan; Luo, Jianbin

    2015-01-01

    Nanoscale scientific issues have attracted an increasing amount of research interest due to their specific size-effect and novel structure-property. From macro to nano, materials present some unique chemical reactivity that bulk materials do not own. Here we introduce a facile method to generate silicate with nanoscale control based on the establishment of a confined space between a meso/nanoscale tungsten tip and a smooth silica/silicon substrate. During the process, local water-like droplets deposition can be obviously observed in the confinement between the Si/SiO2 surfaces and the KOH-modified tungsten tip. By the combination of in-situ optical microscopy and Raman spectroscopy, we were able to take a deep insight of both the product composition and the underlying mechanism of such phenomena. It was indicated that such nanoreactor for silicate could be quite efficient as a result of the local capillarity and electric field effect, with implications at both nano and meso scales. PMID:26364882

  2. Carbon Mineralization Using Phosphate and Silicate Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gokturk, H.

    2013-12-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) reduction from combustion of fossil fuels has become an urgent concern for the society due to marked increase in weather related natural disasters and other negative consequences of global warming. CO2 is a highly stable molecule which does not readily interact with other neutral molecules. However it is more responsive to ions due to charge versus quadrupole interaction [1-2]. Ions can be created by dissolving a salt in water and then aerosolizing the solution. This approach gives CO2 molecules a chance to interact with the hydrated salt ions over the large surface area of the aerosol. Ion containing aerosols exist in nature, an example being sea spray particles generated by breaking waves. Such particles contain singly and doubly charged salt ions including Na+, Cl-, Mg++ and SO4--. Depending on the proximity of CO2 to the ion, interaction energy can be significantly higher than the thermal energy of the aerosol. For example, an interaction energy of 0.6 eV is obtained with the sulfate (SO4--) ion when CO2 is the nearest neighbor [2]. In this research interaction between CO2 and ions which carry higher charges are investigated. The molecules selected for the study are triply charged phosphate (PO4---) ions and quadruply charged silicate (SiO4----) ions. Examples of salts which contain such molecules are potassium phosphate (K3PO4) and sodium orthosilicate (Na4SiO4). The research has been carried out with first principle quantum mechanical calculations using the Density Functional Theory method with B3LYP functional and Pople type basis sets augmented with polarization and diffuse functions. Atomic models consist of the selected ions surrounded by water and CO2 molecules. Similar to the results obtained with singly and doubly charged ions [1-2], phosphate and silicate ions attract CO2 molecules. Energy of interaction between the ion and CO2 is 1.6 eV for the phosphate ion and 3.3 eV for the silicate ion. Hence one can expect that the selected

  3. Lithium rich cathode/graphite anode combination for lithium ion cells with high tolerance to near zero volt storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crompton, K. R.; Staub, J. W.; Hladky, M. P.; Landi, B. J.

    2017-03-01

    Management of reversible lithium is an advantageous approach to design lithium ion cells that are tolerant to near zero volt (NZV) storage under fixed resistive load towards highly controllable, enhanced user-inactive safety. Presently, the first cycle loss from a high energy density Li-rich HE5050 cathode is used to provide excess reversible lithium when paired with an appropriately capacity matched mesocarbon microbead (MCMB) anode. Cells utilizing 1.2 M LiPF6 3:7 v/v ethylene carbonate:ethyl methyl carbonate electrolyte and a lithium reference were used for 3-electrode testing. After conditioning, a fixed resistive load was applied to 3-electrode cells for 72 or 168-h during which the anode potential and electrode asymptotic potential (EAP) remained less than the copper dissolution potential. After multiple storage cycles (room temperature or 40 °C), the NZV coulombic efficiency (cell reversibility) exceeded 97% and the discharge capacity retention was >98%. Conventional 2-electrode HE5050/MCMB pouch cells stored at NZV or open circuit for 3 days had nearly identical rate capability (up to 5C) and discharge performance stability (for 500 cycles under a 30% depth of discharge low-earth-orbit regime). Thus, lithium ion cells with appropriately capacity matched HE5050/MCMB electrodes have excellent tolerance to prolonged NZV storage, which can lead to enhanced user-inactive safety.

  4. Chemical evidence for differentiation, evaporation and recondensation from silicate clasts in Gujba

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oulton, Jonathan; Humayun, Munir; Fedkin, Alexei; Grossman, Lawrence

    2016-03-01

    The silicate and metal clasts in CB chondrites have been inferred to form as condensates from an impact-generated vapor plume between a metal-rich body and a silicate body. A detailed study of the condensation of impact-generated vapor plumes showed that the range of CB silicate clast compositions could not be successfully explained without invoking a chemically differentiated target. Here, we report the most comprehensive elemental study yet performed on CB silicates with 32 silicate clasts from nine slices of Gujba analyzed by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for 53 elements. Like in other studies of CBs, the silicate clasts are either barred olivine (BO) or cryptocrystalline (CC) in texture. In major elements, the Gujba silicate clasts ranged from chondritic to refractory enriched. Refractory element abundances ranged from 2 to 10 × CI, with notable anomalies in Ba, Ce, Eu, and U abundances. The two most refractory-enriched BO clasts exhibited negative Ce anomalies and were depleted in U relative to Th, characteristic of volatilization residues, while other BO clasts and the CC clasts exhibited positive Ce anomalies with excess U (1-3 × CI), and Ba (1-6 × CI) anomalies indicating re-condensation of ultra-refractory element depleted vapor. The Rare Earth Elements (REE) also exhibit light REE (LREE) enrichment or depletion in several clasts with a range of (La/Sm)CI of 0.9-1.8. This variation in the LREE is essentially impossible to accomplish by processes involving vapor-liquid or vapor-solid exchange of REE, and appears to have been inherited from a differentiated target. The most distinctive evidence for inherited chemical differentiation is observed in highly refractory element (Sc, Zr, Nb, Hf, Ta, Th) systematics. The Gujba clasts exhibit fractionations in Nb/Ta that correlate positively with Zr/Hf and span the range known from lunar and Martian basalts, and exceed the range in Zr/Hf variation known from eucrites. Variations of

  5. Commercial silicate phosphate sequestration and desorption leads to a gradual decline of aquatic systems.

    PubMed

    Svatos, Karl B W

    2018-02-01

    Laboratory desorption behaviour, function and elemental composition of commercially marketed silicate minerals used to sequester phosphorus pollution as well as Zeolite, Smectite, and Kaolinite were determined to see whether their use by environmental scientists and water managers in eutrophic waterways has the potential to contribute to longer-term environmental impacts. As expected, lower phosphorus concentrations were observed, following treatment. However, data relating to desorption, environmental fate and bioavailability of phospho-silicate complexes (especially those containing rare earth elements) appear to be underrepresented in product testing and trial publications. Analysis of desorption of phosphate (P) was > 5 μg[P]/L for all three non-commercial samples and 0 > μg[P]/L > 5 for all commercial silicates for a range of concentrations from 0 to 300 μg[P]/L. Based on a review of bioaccumulation data specific to the endangered Cherax tenuimanus (Hairy Marron) and other endemic species, this is significant considering anything > 20 μg[La]/L is potentially lethal to the hairy marron, other crustaceans and even other phyla. Where prokaryotic and eukaryotic effects are underreported, this represents a significant challenge. Especially where product protocols recommend continual reapplication, this is significant because both the forward and reverse reactions are equally important. The users of silicate minerals in water columns should accept the dynamic nature of the process and pay equal attention to both adsorption and desorption because desorption behaviour is an inherent trait. Even if broader desorption experimentation is difficult, expensive and time-consuming, it is a critical consideration nonetheless.

  6. Magnetic mineralogy and rock magnetic properties of silicate and carbonatite rocks from Oldoinyo Lengai volcano (Tanzania)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattsson, H. B.; Balashova, A.; Almqvist, B. S. G.; Bosshard-Stadlin, S. A.; Weidendorfer, D.

    2018-06-01

    Oldoinyo Lengai, a stratovolcano in northern Tanzania, is most famous for being the only currently active carbonatite volcano on Earth. The bulk of the volcanic edifice is dominated by eruptive products produced by silica-undersaturated, peralkaline, silicate magmas (effusive, explosive and/or as cumulates at depth). The recent (2007-2008) explosive eruption produced the first ever recorded pyroclastic flows at this volcano and the accidental lithics incorporated into the pyroclastic flows represent a broad variety of different rock types, comprising both extrusive and intrusive varieties, in addition to various types of cumulates. This mix of different accidental lithics provides a unique insight into the inner workings of the world's only active carbonatite volcano. Here, we focus on the magnetic mineralogy and the rock magnetic properties of a wide selection of samples spanning the spectrum of Oldoinyo Lengai rock types compositionally, as well from a textural point of view. Here we show that the magnetic properties of most extrusive silicate rocks are dominated by magnetite-ulvöspinel solid solutions, and that pyrrhotite plays a larger role in the magnetic properties of the intrusive silicate rocks. The natrocarbonatitic lavas, for which the volcano is best known for, show distinctly different magnetic properties in comparison with the silicate rocks. This discrepancy may be explained by abundant alabandite crystals/blebs in the groundmass of the natrocarbonatitic lavas. A detailed combination of petrological/mineralogical studies with geophysical investigations is an absolute necessity in order to understand, and to better constrain, the overall architecture and inner workings of the subvolcanic plumbing system. The results presented here may also have implications for the quest in order to explain the genesis of the uniquely natrocarbonatitic magmas characteristic of Oldoinyo Lengai.

  7. Dependence of the critical cooling rate for lithium-silicate glass on nucleating agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, W.; Ray, C. S.; Day, D. E.

    1986-01-01

    The critical cooling rate, Rc, for glass formation of a glass containing 40 mol pct Li2O and 60 mol pct SiO2, doped with small amounts of Pt, Au, P2O5, and TiO2 nucleating agents, has been measured. Rc increases with increasing Pt and Au additions, but Pt has a larger effect than Au. Additions of P2O5 tend to decrease Rc, whereas TiO2 has practically no effect on Rc. The devitrified glass nucleated with Pt contains only crystalline Li2O-SiO2, but all the other devitrified glasses, including the undoped glass, contain both Li2O-SiO2 and Li2O-2SiO2. Analysis shows that Rc increases as the concentration of the Li2O-SiO2 phase in the devitrified glass increases.

  8. Nucleation and Crystallization as Induced by Bending Stress in Lithium Silicate Glass Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reis, Signo T.; Kim, Cheol W.; Brow, Richard K.; Ray, Chandra S.

    2003-01-01

    Glass Fibers of Li2O.2SiO2 (LS2) and Li2O.1.6SiO2 (LS1.6) compositions were heated near, but below, the glass transition temperature for different times while subjected to a constant bending stress of about 1.2 GPa. The nucleation density and the crystallization tendency estimated by differential thermal analysis (DTA) of a glass sample in the vicinity of the maximum of the bending stress increased relative to that of stress-free glass fibers. LS2 glass fibers were found more resistant to nucleation and crystallization than the Ls1.6 glass fibers. These results are discussed in regards to shear thinning effects on glass stability.

  9. Deformation, Stress Relaxation, and Crystallization of Lithium Silicate Glass Fibers Below the Glass Transition Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Chandra S.; Brow, Richard K.; Kim, Cheol W.; Reis, Signo T.

    2004-01-01

    The deformation and crystallization of Li(sub 2)O (center dot) 2SiO2 and Li(sub 2)O (center dot) 1.6SiO2 glass fibers subjected to a bending stress were measured as a function of time over the temperature range -50 to -150 C below the glass transition temperature (Tg). The glass fibers can be permanently deformed at temperatures about 100 C below T (sub)g, and they crystallize significantly at temperatures close to, but below T,, about 150 C lower than the onset temperature for crystallization for these glasses in the no-stress condition. The crystallization was found to occur only on the surface of the glass fibers with no detectable difference in the extent of crystallization in tensile and compressive stress regions. The relaxation mechanism for fiber deformation can be best described by a stretched exponential (Kohlrausch-Williams-Watt (KWW) approximation), rather than a single exponential model.The activation energy for stress relaxation, Es, for the glass fibers ranges between 175 and 195 kJ/mol, which is considerably smaller than the activation energy for viscous flow, E, (about 400 kJ/mol) near T, for these glasses at normal, stress-free condition. It is suspected that a viscosity relaxation mechanism could be responsible for permanent deformation and crystallization of the glass fibers below T,

  10. Electrochemical performance of carbon-coated lithium manganese silicate for asymmetric hybrid supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karthikeyan, K.; Aravindan, V.; Lee, S. B.; Jang, I. C.; Lim, H. H.; Park, G. J.; Yoshio, M.; Lee, Y. S.

    Nanoscale carbon-coated Li 2MnSiO 4 powder is prepared using a conventional solid-state method and can be used as the negative electrode in a Li 2MnSiO 4/activated carbon (AC) hybrid supercapacitor. Carbon-coated Li 2MnSiO 4 material presents a well-developed orthorhombic crystal structure with a P mn2 1 space group, although there is a small impurity of MnO. The maximum specific capacitance of the Li 2MnSiO 4/AC hybrid supercapacitor is 43.2 F g -1 at 1 mA cm -2 current density. The cell delivers a specific energy as high as 54 Wh kg -1 at a specific power of 150 W kg -1 and also exhibits an excellent cycle performance with more than 99% columbic efficiency and the maintenance of 85% of its initial capacitance after 1000 cycles.

  11. SILICATES FOR CORROSION CONTROL IN BUILDING POTABLE WATER SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Silicates have been used to control the corrosion of drinking water distribution system materials. Previous work has shown that they are particularly useful in reducing the release of zinc from galvanized materials in hot water systems. Negatively charged silicate species were re...

  12. 77 FR 21676 - Silicic Acid, Sodium Salt etc.; Tolerance Exemption

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-11

    ... Silicic acid, sodium salt, reaction products with chlorotrimethylsilane and iso-propyl alcohol, reaction..., reaction products with chlorotrimethylsilane and iso-propyl alcohol, reaction with poly(oxypropylene)-poly... from the requirement of a tolerance for residues of Silicic acid, sodium salt, reaction products with...

  13. Membranes in Lithium Ion Batteries

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Min; Hou, Junbo

    2012-01-01

    Lithium ion batteries have proven themselves the main choice of power sources for portable electronics. Besides consumer electronics, lithium ion batteries are also growing in popularity for military, electric vehicle, and aerospace applications. The present review attempts to summarize the knowledge about some selected membranes in lithium ion batteries. Based on the type of electrolyte used, literature concerning ceramic-glass and polymer solid ion conductors, microporous filter type separators and polymer gel based membranes is reviewed. PMID:24958286

  14. Silicate Inclusions in the Kodaikanal IIE Iron Meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurat, G.; Varela, M. E.; Zinner, E.

    2005-01-01

    Silicate inclusions in iron meteorites display an astonishing chemical and mineralogical variety, ranging from chondritic to highly fractionated, silica- and alkali-rich assemblages. In spite of this, their origin is commonly considered to be a simple one: mixing of silicates, fractionated or unfractionated, with metal. The latter had to be liquid in order to accommodate the former in a pore-free way which all models accomplish by assuming shock melting. II-E iron meteorites are particularly interesting because they contain an exotic zoo of silicate inclusions, including some chemically strongly fractionated ones. They also pose a formidable conundrum: young silicates are enclosed by very old metal. This and many other incompatibilities between models and reality forced the formulation of an alternative genetic model for irons. Here we present preliminary findings in our study of Kodaikanal silicate inclusions.

  15. Discover Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, Colleen

    1998-01-01

    Discover Earth is a NASA-sponsored project for teachers of grades 5-12, designed to: (1) enhance understanding of the Earth as an integrated system; (2) enhance the interdisciplinary approach to science instruction; and (3) provide classroom materials that focus on those goals. Discover Earth is conducted by the Institute for Global Environmental Strategies in collaboration with Dr. Eric Barron, Director, Earth System Science Center, The Pennsylvania State University; and Dr. Robert Hudson, Chair, the Department of Meteorology, University of Maryland at College Park. The enclosed materials: (1) represent only part of the Discover Earth materials; (2) were developed by classroom teachers who are participating in the Discover Earth project; (3) utilize an investigative approach and on-line data; and (4) can be effectively adjusted to classrooms with greater/without technology access. The Discover Earth classroom materials focus on the Earth system and key issues of global climate change including topics such as the greenhouse effect, clouds and Earth's radiation balance, surface hydrology and land cover, and volcanoes and climate change. All the materials developed to date are available on line at (http://www.strategies.org) You are encouraged to submit comments and recommendations about these materials to the Discover Earth project manager, contact information is listed below. You are welcome to duplicate all these materials.

  16. Endocrine abnormalities in lithium toxicity.

    PubMed

    Shanks, Gabriella; Mishra, Vinita; Nikolova, Stanka

    2017-10-01

    Lithium toxicity can manifest as a variety of biochemical -abnormalities. This case report describes a patient -presenting to the emergency department with neuropsychiatric -symptoms on a background of bipolar disorder, for which she was prescribed lithium for 26 years previously. Cases of lithium toxicity are rare but can be severe and this case report -demonstrates to clinicians that they must be thorough in investigating patients with lithium toxicity, as there are many potential abnormalities that can manifest concurrently. © Royal College of Physicians 2017. All rights reserved.

  17. Zero-gravity growth of a sodium chloride-lithium fluoride eutectic mixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yue, A. S.; Yeh, C. W.; Yue, B. K.

    1982-01-01

    Continuous and discontinuous lithium fluoride fibers embedded in a sodium chloride matrix were produced in space and on Earth, respectively. The production of continuous fibers in a eutectic mixture was attributed to the absence of convective current in the liquid during solidification in space. Image transmission and optical transmittance measurements of transverse sections of the space-grown and Earth-grown ingots were made with a light microscope and a spectrometer. It was found that better optical properties were obtained from samples grown in space. This was attributed to a better alignment of lithium fluoride fibers along the growth direction.

  18. Bioactive calcium silicate ceramics and coatings.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuanyong; Morra, Marco; Carpi, Angelo; Li, Baoe

    2008-10-01

    CaO-SiO2 based ceramics have been regarded as potential candidates for artificial bone due to their excellent bone bioactivity and biocompatibility. However, they cannot be used as implants under a heavy load because of their poor mechanical properties, in particular low fracture toughness. Plasma spraying CaO-SiO2 based ceramic coatings onto titanium alloys can expand their application to the hard tissue replacement under a heavy load. Plasma sprayed wollastonite, dicalcium silicate and diopside coatings have excellent bone bioactivity and high bonding strength to titanium alloys. It is possible that these plasma sprayed CaO-SiO2 based ceramic coatings will be applied in clinic after they are widely and systematically researched.

  19. Dust silicate emission in FIR/submm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coupeaud, A.; Demyk, K.; Mény, C.; Nayral, C.

    2010-12-01

    The far-infrared to millimeter wavelength (FIR-mm) range in astronomical observations is dominated by the thermal emission from large (10-100 nm) and cold (10-20 K) dust grains, which are in thermal equilibrium with the interstellar radiation field. However, the physics of the FIR-mm emission from such cold matter is not well understood as shown by the observed dependence with the temperature of the spectral index of the dust emissivity β and by the observed far infrared excess. Interestingly, a similar behaviour is observed in experiments of characterization of the spectral properties of dust analogues. We present a study of the optical properties of analogues of interstellar silicate grains at low temperature in the FIR/submm range aiming to understand their peculiar behaviour. Such studies are essential for the interpretation of the Herschel and Planck data.

  20. Cesium titanium silicate and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Balmer, M.L.

    1997-01-07

    The invention is the new material, a ternary compound of cesium, silica, and titania, together with a method of making the ternary compound, cesium titanium silicate pollucite. More specifically, the invention is Cs{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}Si{sub 4}O{sub 13} pollucite which is a new crystalline phase representing a novel class of Ti-containing zeolites. Compositions contain relatively high Cs{sub 2}O and TiO{sub 2} loadings and are durable glass and ceramic materials. The amount of TiO{sub 2} and Cs{sub 2} that can be incorporated into these glasses and crystalline ceramics far exceeds the limits set for the borosilicate high level waste glass. 10 figs.

  1. Cesium titanium silicate and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Balmer, Mari L.

    1997-01-01

    The invention is the new material, a ternary compound of cesium, silica, and titania, together with a method of making the ternary compound, cesium titanium silicate pollucite. More specifically, the invention is Cs.sub.2 Ti.sub.2 Si.sub.4 O.sub.13 pollucite which is a new crystalline phase representing a novel class of Ti-containing zeolites. Compositions contain relatively high Cs.sub.2 O and TiO.sub.2 loadings and are durable glass and ceramic materials. The amount of TiO.sub.2 and Cs.sub.2 that can be incorporated into these glasses and crystalline ceramics far exceeds the limits set for the borosilicate high level waste glass.

  2. Synthesis and re-investigation of the elastic properties of single-crystal magnesium silicate perovskite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeganeh-Haeri, Amir

    1994-12-01

    Single crystals of MgSiO3 in the perovskite structure have been grown at a peak pressure of 26 GPa and temperature of approximately 1600 K using a 2000 ton uniaxial split-sphere high-pressure apparatus (USSA-2000). The specimens were subsequently utilized to re-investigate the single-crystal elastic properties of this phase at ambient conditions using laser Brillouin spectroscopy. The nine adiabatic single-crystal elastic stiffness coefficients, in units of GPa, are: C11 = 482, C22 = 537, C33 = 485, C44 = 204, C55 = 186, C66 = 147, C12 = 144, C13 = 147, C23 = 146. The resulting estimated Voigt-Reuss-Hill (VRH) aggregate isotropic elastic moduli are: K=264.0 and mu = 177.3 GPa, respectively. The single-crystal elastic moduli of MgSiO3 perovskite display a pattern that is elastically somewhat anisotropic. The maximum shear and compressional velocities are 18% and 7% greater than the minimum. The (010) crystallographic direction contains both the fastest and the slowest shear wave velocities. If, under lower mantle conditions, magnesium silicate perovskite grains were to become preferentially oriented, a shear wave propagating in the Earth's lower mantle could become polarized with two distinct velocities. The observed density and seismic parameter of the lower mantle over the depth range of 1000-2700 km are compared with the calculated profiles for a model mantle consisting of pure perovskite (Mg(0.89)Fe(0.11))SiO3 and for a mixture composed of silicate perovskite and magnesiowuestite using our new elasticity results. At present, literature values of thermoelastic properties for silicate perovskite, in particular, the coefficient of thermal expansion and the temperature derivative of the isothermal bulk modulus, vary widely. Because of this disparity, we find that mantle models ranging from pure perovskite to 'pyrolitic'-type compositions provide acceptable fits to the seismically observed density and velocity profiles of the Earth's lower mantle.

  3. Lithium in M67

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hobbs, L. M.; Pilachowski, Catherine

    1986-01-01

    Echelle spectra recorded at the Li I 6707-A line are reported for seven main-sequence members and one cool subgiant in M67. The spectral types of the seven dwarfs studied range from about F8 at the turnoff point to about G5. The principal result is that the average lithium abundance in the three hottest main-sequence stars is 0.45 x 10 to the -9th. Any enrichment of lithium in the gas of the Galactic disk in the last 5 Gyr therefore has not exceeded a factor of about two and probably is entirely negligible, when the corresponding results for NGC 752 and the Hyades are taken into account.

  4. Time Evolution of Radiation-Induced Luminescence in Terbium-Doped Silicate Glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, Michael S.; Winfree, William P.

    1996-01-01

    A study was made on two commercially available terbium-doped silicate glasses. There is an increased interest in silicate glasses doped with rare-earth ions for use in high-energy particle detection and radiographic applications. These glasses are of interest due to the fact that they can be formed into small fiber sensors; a property that can be used to increase the spatial resolution of a detection system. Following absorption of radiation, the terbium ions become excited and then emit photons via 4f-4f electronic transitions as they relax back to the ground state. The lifetime of these transitions is on the order of milliseconds. A longer decay component lasting on the order of minutes has also been observed. While radiative transitions in the 4f shell of rare-earth ions are generally well understood by the Judd-Olfelt theory, the pr'esence of a longer luminescence decay component is not. Experimental evidence that the long decay component is due, in part, to the thermal release of trapped charge carriers will be presented. In addition, a theoretical model describing the time evolution of the radiation-induced luminescence will be presented.

  5. The Oxidation State of Tungsten in Iron Bearing and Iron Free Silicate Glasses: Results from W L-Edge Xanes Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danielson, Lisa R.; Righter, K.; Sutton S.; Newville, M.; Le, L.

    2007-01-01

    Tungsten is important in constraining core formation of the Earth because this element is a moderately siderophile element (depleted approx. 10 relative to chondrites) and, as a member of the Hf-W isotopic system, it is useful in constraining the timing of core formation. A number of previous experimental studies have been carried out to determine the silicate solubility and metal-silicate partitioning behavior of W, including its concomitant oxidation state. However, results of previous studies (figure 1) are inconsistent on whether W occurs as W(4+) or W(6+).

  6. 77 FR 21714 - Hazardous Materials: Transportation of Lithium Batteries

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-11

    ... and configurations of lithium batteries: 1. Lithium ion batteries (PI 965). 2. Lithium ion batteries packed with equipment (PI 966). 3. Lithium ion batteries contained in equipment (PI 967). 4. Lithium... requirements including package weight limits (10 kg for lithium ion cells and batteries and 2.5 kg for lithium...

  7. Lithium-ion conducting electrolyte salts for lithium batteries.

    PubMed

    Aravindan, Vanchiappan; Gnanaraj, Joe; Madhavi, Srinivasan; Liu, Hua-Kun

    2011-12-16

    This paper presents an overview of the various types of lithium salts used to conduct Li(+) ions in electrolyte solutions for lithium rechargeable batteries. More emphasis is paid towards lithium salts and their ionic conductivity in conventional solutions, solid-electrolyte interface (SEI) formation towards carbonaceous anodes and the effect of anions on the aluminium current collector. The physicochemical and functional parameters relevant to electrochemical properties, that is, electrochemical stabilities, are also presented. The new types of lithium salts, such as the bis(oxalato)borate (LiBOB), oxalyldifluoroborate (LiODFB) and fluoroalkylphosphate (LiFAP), are described in detail with their appropriate synthesis procedures, possible decomposition mechanism for SEI formation and prospect of using them in future generation lithium-ion batteries. Finally, the state-of-the-art of the system is given and some interesting strategies for the future developments are illustrated. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. A Non-Arrhenian Viscosity Model for Natural Silicate Melts with Applications to Volcanology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, J. K.; Giordano, D.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2005-12-01

    silicate melts converge to a common, but unknown, high-T limit (e.g., A) and that all compositional dependence is accommodated for by B and C. We adopt a linear compositional dependence for B and C: B = σi=1..n [xi βi] C = σi=1..n [xi γi] where xi's are the mole fractions of oxide components (n=8) and βi and γi are adjustable parameters. The model, therefore, comprises 2 · n+1 adjustable parameters which are optimized for against the experimental database including a common value of A and compositional coefficeints for B and C. The new model reproduces the original database to within experimental uncertainty and can predict the viscosity of silicate melts across the full range of conditions found in Nature. References Cited: [1] Friedman et al., 1963. J Geophys Res 68, 6523-6535. [2] Bottinga Y & Weill D 1972. Am J Sci 272, 438- 475. [3] Shaw HR 1972. Am J Sci 272, 438- 475. [4] Persikov ES 1991. Adv Phys Geochem 9, 1-40. [5] Prusevich AA 1988. Geol Geofiz 29, 67-69. [6] Baker DR 1996. Am Min 81, 126-134. [7] Hess KU & Dingwell DB 1996. Am Min 81, 1297- 1300. [8] Zhang, et al. 2003. Am min 88, 1741- 1752. [9] Russell et al. 2002. Eur J Min 14, 417-428. [10] Russell et al. 2003. Am Min 8, 1390- 1394. [11] Russell JK & Giordano D In Press. Geochim Cosmochim Acta. [12] Giordano D & Dingwell DB 2003. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 208, 337-349.

  9. Origin of silicic crust by rifting and bimodal plume volcanism in the Afar Depression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghatak, A.; Basu, A. R.; Ebinger, C. J.

    2010-12-01

    The youngest mantle plume province worldwide occurs at the seismically and volcanically active East African - Red Sea - Gulf of Aden (Afar) triple junction, where one or more upwellings has impinged the thick cratonic lithosphere since ~45 Ma. A spectacular example of magmatism in the Afar depression is seen in the present to < 2 Ma old bimodal fissural mafic and peralkaline silicic eruptions in the ~60 km-long Dabbahu-Manda Hararo (DMH) Rift. In this study we report major, trace elements, and Nd-Sr-Pb isotopes in recent basaltic and silicic rocks originating from the center of the DMH rift segment, exposed along the rift axis and flanks of this segment. The rare earth element (REE) patterns of the silicic rocks and basalts are different in two significant ways: (1) the silicic rocks show a prominent positive Ce-anomaly that is extremely rare in volcanic rocks; and (2) this positive Ce-anomaly is accompanied by a strong negative Eu-anomaly. These anomalies are absent in the basaltic rocks. The positive Ce-anomaly is probably due to interaction in a magma chamber, similar in composition to the basalts, with deep saline aquifer or brines that typically show positive Ce-anomaly. The REE patterns of the two lava groups are interpreted to be due to fractional crystallization of plagioclase in a magma chamber similar in REE composition as the basalts that erupted in the DMH segments. We interpret the silicic rocks to be residues after ~20% fractional crystallization of plagioclase in the DMH basalts. The Nd-Pb isotopic composition of the basalts and rhyolites of the DMH are similar to the Ethiopian plume as defined by the ~30 Ma old Ethiopian flood basalts. Based on their high 3He/4He ratios (R/RA ~30) and Nd-Sr-Pb isotopic data, the source of the Ethiopian plume is generally believed to be in the lower mantle. Therefore, the similarity of the Nd-Pb and Pb-Pb isotopic variations between the Ethiopian plume and the DMH lavas indicates that these lavas were sourced from

  10. Water-bearing, high-pressure Ca-silicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Németh, Péter; Leinenweber, Kurt; Ohfuji, Hiroaki; Groy, Thomas; Domanik, Kenneth J.; Kovács, István J.; Kovács, Judit S.; Buseck, Peter R.

    2017-07-01

    Water-bearing minerals provide fundamental knowledge regarding the water budget of the mantle and are geophysically significant through their influence on the rheological and seismic properties of Earth's interior. Here we investigate the CaO-SiO2-H2O system at 17 GPa and 1773 K, corresponding to mantle transition-zone condition, report new high-pressure (HP) water-bearing Ca-silicates and reveal the structural complexity of these phases. We document the HP polymorph of hartrurite (Ca3SiO5), post-hartrurite, which is tetragonal with space group P4/ncc, a = 6.820 (5), c = 10.243 (8) Å, V = 476.4 (8) Å3, and Z = 4, and is isostructural with Sr3SiO5. Post-hartrurite occurs in hydrous and anhydrous forms and coexists with larnite (Ca2SiO4), which we find also has a hydrous counterpart. Si is 4-coordinated in both post-hartrurite and larnite. In their hydrous forms, H substitutes for Si (4H for each Si; hydrogrossular substitution). Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy shows broad hydroxyl absorption bands at ∼3550 cm-1 and at 3500-3550 cm-1 for hydrous post-hartrurite and hydrous larnite, respectively. Hydrous post-hartrurite has a defect composition of Ca2.663Si0.826O5H1.370 (5.84 weight % H2O) according to electron-probe microanalysis (EPMA), and the Si deficiency relative to Ca is also observed in the single-crystal data. Hydrous larnite has average composition of Ca1.924Si0.851O4H0.748 (4.06 weight % H2O) according to EPMA, and it is in agreement with the Si occupancy obtained using X-ray data collected on a single crystal. Superlattice reflections occur in electron-diffraction patterns of the hydrous larnite and could indicate crystallographic ordering of the hydroxyl groups and their associated cation defects. Although textural and EPMA-based compositional evidence suggests that hydrous perovskite may occur in high-Ca-containing (or low silica-activity) systems, the FTIR measurement does not show a well-defined hydroxyl absorption band for this

  11. Reagentless and calibrationless silicate measurement in oceanic waters.

    PubMed

    Giraud, William; Lesven, Ludovic; Jońca, Justyna; Barus, Carole; Gourdal, Margaux; Thouron, Danièle; Garçon, Véronique; Comtat, Maurice

    2012-08-15

    Determination of silicate concentration in seawater without addition of liquid reagents was the key prerequisite for developing an autonomous in situ electrochemical silicate sensor (Lacombe et al., 2007) [11]. The present challenge is to address the issue of calibrationless determination. To achieve such an objective, we chose chronoamperometry performed successively on planar microelectrode (ME) and ultramicroelectrode (UME) among the various possibilities. This analytical method allows estimating simultaneously the diffusion coefficient and the concentration of the studied species. Results obtained with ferrocyanide are in excellent agreement with values of the imposed concentration and diffusion coefficient found in the literature. For the silicate reagentless method, successive chronoamperometric measurements have been performed using a pair of gold disk electrodes for both UME and ME. Our calibrationless method was tested with different concentrations of silicate in artificial seawater from 55 to 140×10(-6) mol L(-1). The average value obtained for the diffusion coefficient of the silicomolybdic complex is 2.2±0.4×10(-6) cm(2) s(-1), consistent with diffusion coefficient values of molecules in liquid media. Good results were observed when comparing known concentration of silicate with experimentally derived ones. Further work is underway to explore silicate determination within the lower range of oceanic silicate concentration, down to 0.1×10(-6) mol L(-1). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Earth Wisdom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Matre, Steve

    1985-01-01

    In our human-centered ignorance and arrogance we are rapidly destroying the earth. We must start helping people understand the big picture of ecological concepts. What these concepts mean for our own lives and how we must begin to change our lifestyles in order to live more harmoniously with the earth. (JHZ)

  13. Earth Science

    1976-01-01

    The LAGEOS I (Laser Geodynamics Satellite) was developed and launched by the Marshall Space Flight Center on May 4, 1976 from Vandenberg Air Force Base, California . The two-foot diameter satellite orbited the Earth from pole to pole and measured the movements of the Earth's surface.

  14. Sidewall crystallization and saturation front formation in silicic magma chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lake, E. T.

    2012-12-01

    The cooling and crystallization style of silicic magma bodies in the upper crust falls on a continuum between whole-chamber processes of convection, crystal settling, and cumulate formation and interface driven processes of conduction and crystallization front migration. In the former case, volatile saturation occurs uniformly chamber wide, in the latter volatile saturation occurs along an inward propagating front. Ambient thermal gradient primarily controls the propagation rate; warm (> 30 °C / km) geothermal gradients promote 1000m+ thick crystal mush zones but slow crystallization front propagation. Cold geothermal gradients support the opposite. Magma chamber geometry plays a second order role in controlling propagation rates; bodies with high surface to magma ratio and large Earth's surface parallel faces exhibit more rapid propagation and smaller mush zones. Crystallization front propagation occurs at speeds of up to 6 cm/year (rhyolitic magma, thin sill geometry, 10 °C / km geotherm), far faster than diffusion of volatiles in magma and faster than bubbles can nucleate and ascend under certain conditions. Saturation front propagation is fixed by pressure and magma crystal content; above certain modest initial water contents (4.4 wt% in a dacite) mobile magma above 10 km depth always contains a saturation front. Saturation fronts propagate down from the magma chamber roof at lower water contents (3.3 wt% in a dacite at 5 km depth), creating an upper saturated interface for most common (4 - 6 wt%) magma water contents. This upper interface promotes the production of a fluid pocket underneath the apex of the magma chamber. Magma de-densification by bubble nucleation promotes convection and homogenization in dacitic systems. If the fluid pocket grew rapidly without draining, hydro-fracturing and eruption would result. The combination of fluid escape pathways and metal scavenging would generate economic vein or porphyry deposits.

  15. Solid lithium-ion electrolyte

    DOEpatents

    Zhang, Ji-Guang; Benson, David K.; Tracy, C. Edwin

    1998-01-01

    The present invention relates to the composition of a solid lithium-ion electrolyte based on the Li.sub.2 O--CeO.sub.2 --SiO.sub.2 system having good transparent characteristics and high ion conductivity suitable for uses in lithium batteries, electrochromic devices and other electrochemical applications.

  16. Solid lithium-ion electrolyte

    DOEpatents

    Zhang, J.G.; Benson, D.K.; Tracy, C.E.

    1998-02-10

    The present invention relates to the composition of a solid lithium-ion electrolyte based on the Li{sub 2}O--CeO{sub 2}--SiO{sub 2} system having good transparent characteristics and high ion conductivity suitable for uses in lithium batteries, electrochromic devices and other electrochemical applications. 12 figs.

  17. Microstructures of Rare Silicate Stardust from Nova and Supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, A. N.; Keller, L. P.; Rahman, Z.; Messenger, S

    2011-01-01

    Most silicate stardust analyzed in the laboratory and observed around stellar environments derives from O-rich red giant and AGB stars [1,2]. Supernova (SN) silicates and oxides are comparatively rare, and fewer than 10 grains from no-va or binary star systems have been identified to date. Very little is known about dust formation in these stellar environments. Mineralogical studies of only three O-rich SN [3-5] and no nova grains have been performed. Here we report the microstructure and chemical makeup of two SN silicates and one nova grain.

  18. The Mineralogy of Circumstellar Silicates Preserved in Cometary Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, L. P.; Messenger, S.

    2010-01-01

    Interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) contain a record of the building blocks of the solar system including presolar grains, molecular cloud material, and materials formed in the early solar nebula. Cometary IDPs have remained relatively unaltered since their accretion because of the lack of parent body thermal and aqueous alteration. We are using coordinated transmission electron microscope (TEM) and ion microprobe studies to establish the origins of the various components within cometary IDPs. Of particular interest is the nature and abundance of presolar silicates in these particles because astronomical observations suggest that crystalline and amorphous silicates are the dominant grain types produced in young main sequence stars and evolved O-rich stars. Five circumstellar grains have been identified including three amorphous silicate grains and two polycrystalline aggregates. All of these grains are between 0.2 and 0.5 micrometers in size. The isotopic compositions of all five presolar silicate grains fall within the range of presolar oxides and silicates, having large (17)O-enrichments and normal (18)O/(16)O ratios (Group 1 grains from AGB and RG stars). The amorphous silicates are chemically heterogeneous and contain nanophase FeNi metal and FeS grains in a Mg-silicate matrix. Two of the amorphous silicate grains are aggregates with subgrains showing variable Mg/Si ratios in chemical maps. The polycrystalline grains show annealed textures (equilibrium grains boundaries, uniform Mg/Fe ratios), and consist of 50-100 nm enstatite and pyrrhotite grains with lesser forsterite. One of the polycrystalline aggregates contains a subgrain of diopside. The polycrystalline aggregates form by subsolidus annealing of amorphous precursors. The bulk compositions of the five grains span a wide range in Mg/Si ratios from 0.4 to 1.2 (avg. 0.86). The average Fe/Si (0.40) and S/Si (0.21) ratios show a much narrower range of values and are approximately 50% of their solar

  19. Experimental investigation on V isotope equilibrium fractionation factor between metal and silicate melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S.; Zhang, H.; Huang, F.

    2017-12-01

    Equilibrium fractionation factors of stable isotopes between metal and silicate melt are of vital importance for understanding the isotope variations within meteorites and planetary bodies. The V isotope composition (reported as δ51V = 1000 × [(51V/50Vsample/51V/50VAA)-1] ) of the bulk silicate Earth (BSE) has been estimated as δ51V = -0.7 ± 0.2‰ (2sd) [1], which is significantly heavier than most meteorites by 1‰ [2]. Such isotopic offset may provide insights for the core formation and core-mantle segregation. Therefore, it is important to understand V isotope equilibrium fractionation factor between silicate melt and metal. Nielsen et al. (2014) [2] had performed 3 experiments using starting materials of pure Fe metal and An50Di28Fo22 composition, revealing no resolvable V isotope fractionation. However, it is not clear whether chemical compositions in the melts can affect V isotope fractionations. Therefore, we experimentally calibrated equilibrium V isotope fractionation between Fe metallic and basaltic melt, with particular focus on the effect of Ni and other light elements. Experiments were performed at 1 GPa and 1600 oC using a 3/4″ end-loaded piston cylinder. The starting materials consisted of 1:1 mixture of pure Fe metal and basaltic composition [3]. The isotope equilibrium was assessed using time series experiments combined with the reverse reaction method. Carbon saturation and C-free experiments were achieved by using graphite and silica capsules, respectively. The Ni series experiments were doped with 6 wt% Ni into the starting Fe metal. The metal and silicate phases of samples were mechanically separated, V was purified using a chromatographic technique, and V isotope ratios were measured using MC-ICP-MS [4]. Carbon saturation, C-free experiments and Ni series experiment all show non-resolvable V isotope fractionation between metal and basaltic melt, which indicates that the presence of C and Ni could not affect V isotope fractionation

  20. A case of the tail wagging the dog? Reverse weathering and Earth's CO2 thermostat.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, J. A.

    2017-12-01

    Feedbacks between climate, the global carbon cycle, and the chemistry of seawater stabilize Earth's surface temperature on geologic timescales and are likely responsible for its habitability over billions of years of Earth history. The most important component of the geologic carbon cycle is the precipitation and burial of carbonate sediments. The amount of carbonate sediment produced depends, in turn, on the alkalinity generated during silicate weathering less the amount consumed during the formation of secondary clay minerals both on the continents and in the ocean. In marine enviroments this process, often referred to as reverse weathering, consumes seawater alkalinity (and cations) via reaction with degraded Al-silicate minerals. Because these reactions constitute a sink of seawater alkalinity, changes in the amount of reverse weathering will lead to imbalances between alkalinity sources and sinks. The net effect is that on timescales greater than the timescale of carbonate compensation (< 10 kyr), changes in reverse weathering will lead to changes in the rate of continental silicate weathering through the dependence of continental silicate weathering on atmospheric CO2 and climate. This mechanism is capable of changing rates of continental silicate weathering without changing either the rate of volcanic outgassing or the rate constant for continental silicate weathering (i.e. through mountain-building or the exposure of different rock types) and as a result represents a unique way of modulating the global carbon cycle and Earth's climate on geologic timescales.

  1. Experimental constraints on Earth's core formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouhifd, Mohamed Ali

    2017-04-01

    The Earth contains a Fe-rich metallic core that segregated from the primitive silicate mantle very early in its 4.5 billion year history. One major consequence of this segregation is the depletion of the Earth's mantle from the siderophile elements "high core affinity" relative to primitive solar system abundances. The way in which siderophile elements partition between metal and silicate depends strongly on pressure (P), temperature (T), oxygen fugacity (fO2) and chemical compositions of both metal and silicate phases. In the present presentation, I will discuss the experimental results of metal-silicate partitioning of Ni and Co that show a marked change with increasing pressure (e.g. Bouhifd and Jephcoat, 2011; Siebert et al., 2012; Fischer et al., 2015 for the most recent studies). This behavior coincides with a change in the coordination of silicon (in a basaltic melt composition) from 4-fold coordination under ambient conditions to 6-fold coordination at about 35 GPa, indicating that melt compressibility may controls siderophile-element partitioning (Sanloup et al., 2013). I will also discuss the impact of Earth's core formation on "lithophile" elements such as Sm, Nd, Ta and Nb (e.g. Bouhifd et al. 2015; Cartier et al., 2014), as well as the impact of sulphur on the behavior of various elements during core formation (e.g. Boujibar et al., 2014; Wohlers and Wood, 2015). By combining the metal-silicate partitioning data from siderophile, lithophile and chalcophile elements I will present and discuss the most plausible conditions for Earth's core formation. References Bouhifd and Jephcoat (2011) EPSL, 307, 341-348. Bouhifd et al. (2015) EPSL 413, 158-166. Boujibar et al. (2014) EPSL 391, 42-54. Cartier et al. (2014) Nature Geoscience, 7, 573-576. Fischer et al. (2015) GCA 167, 177-194. Sanloup et al. (2013) Nature, 503, 104-107. Siebert et al. (2012) EPSL 321-322, 189-197. Wohlers and Wood (2015) Nature 520, 337-340.

  2. Influence of accretion on lead in the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galer, Stephen J. G.; Goldstein, Steven L.

    The Pb abundance and isotope composition of the Earth is fundamentally altered from bulk solar system values by the processes occurring during accretion. The most important of the possible processes are volatile element loss and core formation, or some form of inhomogeneous accretion/condensation. The final result is an Earth highly impoverished in 204Pb and other Pb isotopes in primordial abundance. Depending on the exact timing, some radiogenic Pb is also lost either to space or to the core; the degree of loss occurs in the same order as the parent decay constants, namely 207Pb > 206Pb > 208Pb. In this contribution, we explore the likely effects accretion had on the Pb isotope composition of the present day bulk silicate Earth and its secular isotope evolution. This is used to address a number of questions: (1) What can be learned about accretion from the Pb isotope composition of the bulk silicate Earth? (2) Can effects of accretion reconcile the classical "Pb paradox" of a 206Pb-rich bulk silicate Earth? (3) What exactly is the meaning of the "age of the Earth" within the context of Pb isotopes? By consideration of a number of accretion scenarios it is demonstrated that Pb isotopes yield information only on the following two coupled quantities: Firstly, the accretion interval Δ T, the time between initial condensation of the solar nebula (at 4.566Ga) and when accretion-produced U/Pb fractionation (whether loss of Pb to the core or to space) in the silicate Earth ceased. Secondly, the mean 238U/204 Pb ratio μ during accretion—no details of changes in μ during the accretion interval can be resolved. The effects of accretion are thus adequately considered in terms of a simple two-stage model described by μ over ΔT followed by a postaccretion μ. The systematics of μ and ΔT are then examined for the cases of present day terrestrial reservoirs and Archean leads. These estimates of μ and ΔT for the present and past silicate Earth are not compatible with

  3. Spin-polarized Molecular Dynamics simulations of liquid iron silicate at high pressures.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munoz Ramo, David; Stixrude, Lars

    2010-05-01

    Liquid iron silicate (Fe2SiO4) is an important component of natural silicate liquids appearing in Earth's interior. The effect of iron in the properties of these melts is a crucial issue, as it displays a high-spin to low-spin transition at high pressures which is accompanied by volume reduction and changes in the optical absorption spectrum. This phenomenon has a major influence on properties like the buoyancy or the thermal conductivity of the melt, and ultimately on the chemical and thermal evolution of our planet. Computer simulations using ab initio methods have proven to be a powerful approach to the study of liquid silicate systems[1,2], although not yet including Fe. In this paper, we report ab initio molecular dynamics studies of liquid iron silicate at high pressure (up to 400 GPa) and high temperatures (from 3000K to 6000K) that allow us to predict different properties of the system. We use the spin-polarized formalism and the GGA+U density functional for a better treatment of the iron magnetic moments in the system. Previous studies in the solid phase have shown that GGA predicts fayalite as a metal, while the introduction of U leads to a correct description of the band gap and the magnetic ordering of the system. We extend this analysis to the liquid phase. By means of these simulations we predict the liquid structure and thermodynamic properties of the liquid. We compute the theoretical Hugoniot for the system and find good agreement with values obtained from shock experiments [3]. Our calculations show large differences in the magnitude and orientation of the magnetic moments depending on the choice of functional; the GGA+U functional consistently provides larger values of the individual moments (about 1 unit larger) and of the total magnetization of the system. The high-spin to low-spin transition is predicted to take place at pressures from around 260GPa at 3000K to around 280GPa at 6000K in this iron-rich system. [1] N. P. de Koker, L. Stixrude, B

  4. Composition of the core from gallium metal–silicate partitioning experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Blanchard, I.; Badro, J.; Siebert, J.; ...

    2015-07-24

    We present gallium concentration (normalized to CI chondrites) in the mantle is at the same level as that of lithophile elements with similar volatility, implying that there must be little to no gallium in Earth's core. Metal-silicate partitioning experiments, however, have shown that gallium is a moderately siderophile element and should be therefore depleted in the mantle by core formation. Moreover, gallium concentrations in the mantle (4 ppm) are too high to be only brought by the late veneer; and neither pressure, nor temperature, nor silicate composition has a large enough effect on gallium partitioning to make it lithophile. Wemore » therefore systematically investigated the effect of core composition (light element content) on the partitioning of gallium by carrying out metal–silicate partitioning experiments in a piston–cylinder press at 2 GPa between 1673 K and 2073 K. Four light elements (Si, O, S, C) were considered, and their effect was found to be sufficiently strong to make gallium lithophile. The partitioning of gallium was then modeled and parameterized as a function of pressure, temperature, redox and core composition. A continuous core formation model was used to track the evolution of gallium partitioning during core formation, for various magma ocean depths, geotherms, core light element contents, and magma ocean composition (redox) during accretion. The only model for which the final gallium concentration in the silicate Earth matched the observed value is the one involving a light-element rich core equilibrating in a FeO-rich deep magma ocean (>1300 km) with a final pressure of at least 50 GPa. More specifically, the incorporation of S and C in the core provided successful models only for concentrations that lie far beyond their allowable cosmochemical or geophysical limits, whereas realistic O and Si amounts (less than 5 wt.%) in the core provided successful models for magma oceans deeper that 1300 km. In conclusion, these results

  5. Silicate melts density, buoyancy relations and the dynamics of magmatic processes in the upper mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Valle, Carmen; Malfait, Wim J.

    2016-04-01

    Although silicate melts comprise only a minor volume fraction of the present day Earth, they play a critical role on the Earth's geochemical and geodynamical evolution. Their physical properties, namely the density, are a key control on many magmatic processes, including magma chamber dynamics and volcanic eruptions, melt extraction from residual rocks during partial melting, as well as crystal settling and melt migration. However, the quantitative modeling of these processes has been long limited by the scarcity of data on the density and compressibility of volatile-bearing silicate melts at relevant pressure and temperature conditions. In the last decade, new experimental designs namely combining large volume presses and synchrotron-based techniques have opened the possibility for determining in situ the density of a wide range of dry and volatile-bearing (H2O and CO2) silicate melt compositions at high pressure-high temperature conditions. In this contribution we will illustrate some of these progresses with focus on recent results on the density of dry and hydrous felsic and intermediate melt compositions (rhyolite, phonolite and andesite melts) at crustal and upper mantle conditions (up to 4 GPa and 2000 K). The new data on felsic-intermediate melts has been combined with in situ data on (ultra)mafic systems and ambient pressure dilatometry and sound velocity data to calibrate a continuous, predictive density model for hydrous and CO2-bearing silicate melts with applications to magmatic processes down to the conditions of the mantle transition zone (up to 2773 K and 22 GPa). The calibration dataset consist of more than 370 density measurements on high-pressure and/or water-and CO2-bearing melts and it is formulated in terms of the partial molar properties of the oxide components. The model predicts the density of volatile-bearing liquids to within 42 kg/m3 in the calibration interval and the model extrapolations up to 3000 K and 100 GPa are in good agreement

  6. In Situ XANES of U and Th in Silicate Liquids at High Pressure and Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallmann, G.; Wykes, J.; Berry, A.; O'Neill, H. S.; Cline, C. J., II; Turner, S.; Rushmer, T. A.

    2016-12-01

    Although the chemical environments of elements in silicate melts at specific conditions of temperature, pressure and oxygen fugacity (fO2) are often inferred from measurements after quenching the melts to glasses, it is widely recognized that changes may occur during the quenching process, making measurements in situ at high pressure and temperature highly desirable. A case of importance in geochemistry is the speciation of uranium in silicate melts as a function of pressure. Evidence from mineral-melt partitioning and XANES (X-ray Absorption Near-Edge Structure) spectroscopy of glasses suggests that U5+ may be stable at low pressures in the Earth's crust (along with U4+ or U6+, depending on fO2) where basaltic liquids crystallize, but not in the Earth's upper mantle where peridotite partially melts to produce such liquids. To test these observations we recorded in situ transmission U and Th L3-edge XANES spectra of U and Th-doped silicate liquids at 1.6 GPa and 1350°C using the D-DIA apparatus at the X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Beamline of the Australian Synchrotron. Data for thorium, which occurs exclusively as a tetravalent cation under terrestrial fO2 conditions, were collected as a `control' to monitor for changes in coordination. The cell assembly consisted of a boron-epoxy cube as pressure medium, alumina sleeve and cylindrical graphite heater. The starting mix, a powdered synthetic average MORB silicate glass doped with 2 wt.% of U and Th, was loaded into San Carlos olivine capsules along with solid oxygen buffers (either Re-ReO2 or Ru-RuO2) in a sandwich arrangement. The capsule was then placed inside the graphite heater and insulated with crushable MgO powder. Temperature was monitored using a type D thermocouple. U and Th L3-edge XANES spectra were recorded throughout the heating/compression cycle and then after quenching. Our preliminary assessment indicates that the U-XANES spectra recorded for the liquid in situ at high pressure and temperature and

  7. Ancient Earth, Alien Earths Event

    2014-08-20

    Panelists pose for a group photo at the “Ancient Earth, Alien Earths” Event at NASA Headquarters in Washington, DC Wednesday, August 20, 2014. The event was sponsored by NASA, the National Science Foundation (NSF), and the Smithsonian Institution and highlighted how research on early Earth could help guide our search for habitable planets orbiting other stars. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  8. Effects of Incorporating High-Volume Fly Ash into Tricalcium Silicate on the Degree of Silicate Polymerization and Aluminum Substitution for Silicon in Calcium Silicate Hydrate

    DOE PAGES

    Bae, Sungchul; Taylor, Rae; Kilcoyne, David; ...

    2017-02-04

    This study assesses the quantitative effects of incorporating high-volume fly ash (HVFA) into tricalcium silicate (C 3S) paste on the hydration, degree of silicate polymerization, and Al substitution for Si in calcium silicate hydrate (C–S–H). Thermogravimetric analysis and isothermal conduction calorimetry showed that, although the induction period of C 3S hydration was significantly extended, the degree of hydration of C 3S after the deceleration period increased due to HVFA incorporation. Synchrotron-sourced soft X-ray spectromicroscopy further showed that most of the C 3S in the C 3S-HVFA paste was fully hydrated after 28 days of hydration, while that in the puremore » C 3S paste was not. The chemical shifts of the Si K edge peaks in the near-edge X-ray fine structure of C–S–H in the C 3S-HVFA paste directly indicate that Al substitutes for Si in C–S–H and that the additional silicate provided by the HVFA induces an enhanced degree of silicate polymerization. This new spectromicroscopic approach, supplemented with 27Al and 29Si magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy, turned out to be a powerful characterization tool for studying a local atomic binding structure of C–S–H in C 3S-HVFA system and presented results consistent with previous literature.« less

  9. Effects of Incorporating High-Volume Fly Ash into Tricalcium Silicate on the Degree of Silicate Polymerization and Aluminum Substitution for Silicon in Calcium Silicate Hydrate

    SciT

    Bae, Sungchul; Taylor, Rae; Kilcoyne, David

    This study assesses the quantitative effects of incorporating high-volume fly ash (HVFA) into tricalcium silicate (C 3S) paste on the hydration, degree of silicate polymerization, and Al substitution for Si in calcium silicate hydrate (C–S–H). Thermogravimetric analysis and isothermal conduction calorimetry showed that, although the induction period of C 3S hydration was significantly extended, the degree of hydration of C 3S after the deceleration period increased due to HVFA incorporation. Synchrotron-sourced soft X-ray spectromicroscopy further showed that most of the C 3S in the C 3S-HVFA paste was fully hydrated after 28 days of hydration, while that in the puremore » C 3S paste was not. The chemical shifts of the Si K edge peaks in the near-edge X-ray fine structure of C–S–H in the C 3S-HVFA paste directly indicate that Al substitutes for Si in C–S–H and that the additional silicate provided by the HVFA induces an enhanced degree of silicate polymerization. This new spectromicroscopic approach, supplemented with 27Al and 29Si magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy, turned out to be a powerful characterization tool for studying a local atomic binding structure of C–S–H in C 3S-HVFA system and presented results consistent with previous literature.« less

  10. Effects of Incorporating High-Volume Fly Ash into Tricalcium Silicate on the Degree of Silicate Polymerization and Aluminum Substitution for Silicon in Calcium Silicate Hydrate

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Sungchul; Taylor, Rae; Kilcoyne, David; Moon, Juhyuk; Monteiro, Paulo J. M.

    2017-01-01

    This study assesses the quantitative effects of incorporating high-volume fly ash (HVFA) into tricalcium silicate (C3S) paste on the hydration, degree of silicate polymerization, and Al substitution for Si in calcium silicate hydrate (C–S–H). Thermogravimetric analysis and isothermal conduction calorimetry showed that, although the induction period of C3S hydration was significantly extended, the degree of hydration of C3S after the deceleration period increased due to HVFA incorporation. Synchrotron-sourced soft X-ray spectromicroscopy further showed that most of the C3S in the C3S-HVFA paste was fully hydrated after 28 days of hydration, while that in the pure C3S paste was not. The chemical shifts of the Si K edge peaks in the near-edge X-ray fine structure of C–S–H in the C3S-HVFA paste directly indicate that Al substitutes for Si in C–S–H and that the additional silicate provided by the HVFA induces an enhanced degree of silicate polymerization. This new spectromicroscopic approach, supplemented with 27Al and 29Si magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy, turned out to be a powerful characterization tool for studying a local atomic binding structure of C–S–H in C3S-HVFA system and presented results consistent with previous literature. PMID:28772490

  11. Climate stability of habitable Earth-like planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menou, Kristen

    2015-11-01

    The carbon-silicate cycle regulates the atmospheric CO2 content of terrestrial planets on geological timescales through a balance between the rates of CO2 volcanic outgassing and planetary intake from rock weathering. It is thought to act as an efficient climatic thermostat on Earth and, by extension, on other habitable planets. If, however, the weathering rate increases with the atmospheric CO2 content, as expected on planets lacking land vascular plants, the carbon-silicate cycle feedback can become severely limited. Here we show that Earth-like planets receiving less sunlight than current Earth may no longer possess a stable warm climate but instead repeatedly cycle between unstable glaciated and deglaciated climatic states. This has implications for the search for life on exoplanets in the habitable zone of nearby stars.

  12. Positive electrode for a lithium battery

    DOEpatents

    Park, Sang-Ho; Amine, Khalil

    2015-04-07

    A method for producing a lithium alkali transition metal oxide for use as a positive electrode material for lithium secondary batteries by a precipitation method. The positive electrode material is a lithium alkali transition metal composite oxide and is prepared by mixing a solid state mixed with alkali and transition metal carbonate and a lithium source. The mixture is thermally treated to obtain a small amount of alkali metal residual in the lithium transition metal composite oxide cathode material.

  13. Lithologic mapping of silicate rocks using TIMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillespie, A. R.

    1986-01-01

    Common rock-forming minerals have thermal infrared spectral features that are measured in the laboratory to infer composition. An airborne Daedalus scanner (TIMS) that collects six channels of thermal infrared radiance data (8 to 12 microns), may be used to measure these same features for rock identification. Previously, false-color composite pictures made from channels 1, 3, and 5 and emittance spectra for small areas on these images were used to make lithologic maps. Central wavelength, standard deviation, and amplitude of normal curves regressed on the emittance spectra are related to compositional information for crystalline igneous silicate rocks. As expected, the central wavelength varies systematically with silica content and with modal quartz content. Standard deviation is less sensitive to compositional changes, but large values may result from mixed admixture of vegetation. Compression of the six TIMS channels to three image channels made from the regressed parameters may be effective in improving geologic mapping from TIMS data, and these synthetic images may form a basis for the remote assessment of rock composition.

  14. Metal-Silicate Segregation in Asteroidal Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrin, Jason S.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.

    2006-01-01

    A fundamental process of planetary differentiation is the segregation of metal-sulfide and silicate phases, leading eventually to the formation of a metallic core. Asteroidal meteorites provide a glimpse of this process frozen in time from the early solar system. While chondrites represent starting materials, iron meteorites provide an end product where metal has been completely concentrated in a region of the parent asteroid. A complimentary end product is seen in metal-poor achondrites that have undergone significant igneous processing, such as angrites, HED's and the majority of aubrites. Metal-rich achondrites such as acapulcoite/lodranites, winonaites, ureilites, and metal-rich aubrites may represent intermediate stages in the metal segregation process. Among these, acapulcoite-lodranites and ureilites are examples of primary metal-bearing mantle restites, and therefore provide an opportunity to observe the metal segregation process that was captured in progress. In this study we use bulk trace element compositions of acapulcoites-lodranites and ureilites for this purpose.

  15. Hydrogen mobility in transition zone silicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caracas, R.; Panero, W. R.

    2016-12-01

    Hydrogen defects in mantle silicates adopt a variety of charge-balanced defects, including VMg''+2(H*), VSi''''+4(H*), and VSi'+(Mg+2H*). Constraining the defect mechanism experimentally can be quite difficult, as it relies almost entirely on vibrational spectroscopy whose interpretation can often be controversial. Here we use a computational alternative: we study the above-mentioned defect mechanisms using molecular dynamics simulations based on the density-functional theory, in the VASP implementation. We perform isokinetical NVT simulations over a 1500 - 2500K temperature range using supercells containing 16 equivalent formula units of Mg2SiO4. Our results show that temperature has a tremendous effect on mobility. H is significantly more mobile when incorporated as VMg''+2H* defects than as hydrogarnet defects and that VMg''+2H* defects are more mobile in wadsleyite than ringwoodite. This result is the opposite from the proton conductivity inferences of Yoshino et al. [2008] and Huang et al [2006], as well as the observed increase in electrical conductivity with depth through the transition zone [e.g. Kuvshinov et al, 2005; Olsen 1998]. Over the simulation time of several tens of picoseconds the H travel over several lattice sites. However, during its path it spends a considerable amount of time pinned in the defect sites. The lowest mobility is for the VSi''''+4(H*) defect, where the H atoms remain inside the octahedron from which they replaced the Si.

  16. Nanostructured silicon anodes for lithium ion rechargeable batteries.

    PubMed

    Teki, Ranganath; Datta, Moni K; Krishnan, Rahul; Parker, Thomas C; Lu, Toh-Ming; Kumta, Prashant N; Koratkar, Nikhil

    2009-10-01

    Rechargeable lithium ion batteries are integral to today's information-rich, mobile society. Currently they are one of the most popular types of battery used in portable electronics because of their high energy density and flexible design. Despite their increasing use at the present time, there is great continued commercial interest in developing new and improved electrode materials for lithium ion batteries that would lead to dramatically higher energy capacity and longer cycle life. Silicon is one of the most promising anode materials because it has the highest known theoretical charge capacity and is the second most abundant element on earth. However, silicon anodes have limited applications because of the huge volume change associated with the insertion and extraction of lithium. This causes cracking and pulverization of the anode, which leads to a loss of electrical contact and eventual fading of capacity. Nanostructured silicon anodes, as compared to the previously tested silicon film anodes, can help overcome the above issues. As arrays of silicon nanowires or nanorods, which help accommodate the volume changes, or as nanoscale compliant layers, which increase the stress resilience of silicon films, nanoengineered silicon anodes show potential to enable a new generation of lithium ion batteries with significantly higher reversible charge capacity and longer cycle life.

  17. Development of lithium doped radiation resistent solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berman, P. A.

    1972-01-01

    Lithium-doped solar cells have been fabricated with initial lot efficiencies averaging 11.9 percent in an air mass zero (AMO) solar simulator and a maximum observed efficiency of 12.8 percent. The best lithium-doped solar cells are approximately 15 percent higher in maximum power than state-of-the-art n-p cells after moderate to high fluences of 1-MeV electrons and after 6-7 months exposure to low flux irradiation by a Sr-90 beta source, which approximates the electron spectrum and flux associated with near Earth space. Furthermore, lithium-doped cells were found to degrade at a rate only one tenth that of state-of-the-art n-p cells under 28-MeV electron irradiation. Excellent progress has been made in quantitative predictions of post-irradiation current-voltage characteristics as a function of cell design by means of capacitance-voltage measurements, and this information has been used to achieve further improvements in lithium-doped cell design.

  18. Lithium niobate explosion monitor

    DOEpatents

    Bundy, Charles H.; Graham, Robert A.; Kuehn, Stephen F.; Precit, Richard R.; Rogers, Michael S.

    1990-01-01

    Monitoring explosive devices is accomplished with a substantially z-cut lithium niobate crystal in abutment with the explosive device. Upon impact by a shock wave from detonation of the explosive device, the crystal emits a current pulse prior to destruction of the crystal. The current pulse is detected by a current viewing transformer and recorded as a function of time in nanoseconds. In order to self-check the crystal, the crystal has a chromium film resistor deposited thereon which may be heated by a current pulse prior to detonation. This generates a charge which is detected by a charge amplifier.

  19. Lithium niobate explosion monitor

    DOEpatents

    Bundy, C.H.; Graham, R.A.; Kuehn, S.F.; Precit, R.R.; Rogers, M.S.

    1990-01-09

    Monitoring explosive devices is accomplished with a substantially z-cut lithium niobate crystal in abutment with the explosive device. Upon impact by a shock wave from detonation of the explosive device, the crystal emits a current pulse prior to destruction of the crystal. The current pulse is detected by a current viewing transformer and recorded as a function of time in nanoseconds. In order to self-check the crystal, the crystal has a chromium film resistor deposited thereon which may be heated by a current pulse prior to detonation. This generates a charge which is detected by a charge amplifier. 8 figs.

  20. Synthesis of the Tube Silicate Litidionite and Structural Relationships between It and Some Other Silicates.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-02-17

    CuSi4015 Others are agrellite, NaCa2Si4O0oF, 1 6 narsarsukite, Na2TiSi4O 1 7 miserite, KCa5 i2 07 Si601 5 (OH)F,18 and probably canasite , Na4K2Ca 5...and canasite are rare. Litidionite is apparently very rare, the only reported occurrence of it being in the crater of Mt. Vesuvius. Both litidionite1...narsarsukite, miserite, and probably canasite contain, like 13-19 lititionite, tube silicate ions. The first three contain ions that are the same as that in

  1. Earth after the Moon-forming Impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahnle, K. J.

    2006-01-01

    The Hadean Earth is widely and enduringly pictured as a world of exuberant volcanism, exploding meteors, huge craters, infernal heat, and billowing sulfurous steams; i.e., a world of fire and brimstone punctuated with blows to the head. In the background the Moon looms gigantic in the sky. The popular image has given it a name that celebrates our mythic roots. A hot early Earth is an inevitable consequence of accretion. The Moon-forming impact ensured that Earth as we know it emerged from a fog of silicate vapor. The impact separated the volatiles from the silicates. It took approx. 100 years to condense and rain out the bulk of the vaporized silicates, although relatively volatile elements may have remained present in the atmosphere throughout the magma ocena stage. The magma ocean lasted approx. 2 Myr, its lifetime prolonged by tidal heating and thermal blanketing by a thick CO2-rich steam atmosphere. Water oceans condensed quickly after the mantle solidified, but for some 10-100 Myr the surface would have stayed warm (approx. 500 K) until the CO2 was removed into the mantle. Thereafter the faint young Sun suggests that a lifeless Earth would always have been evolving toward a bitterly cold ice world, but the cooling trend was fiequently interrupted by volcanic or impact induced thaws. A cartoon history of water, temperature, and carbon dioxide in the aftermath of the moon-formining-impact is shown. How long it stays hot depends on how long it takes to scrub the C02 out of the atmosphere.

  2. Method of recycling lithium borate to lithium borohydride through methyl borate

    DOEpatents

    Filby, Evan E.

    1977-01-01

    This invention provides a method for the recycling of lithium borate to lithium borohydride which can be reacted with water to generate hydrogen for utilization as a fuel. The lithium borate by-product of the hydrogen generation reaction is reacted with hydrogen chloride and water to produce boric acid and lithium chloride. The boric acid and lithium chloride are converted to lithium borohydride through a methyl borate intermediate to complete the recycle scheme.

  3. International Space Station Lithium-Ion Battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalton, Penni J.; Balcer, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) Electric Power System (EPS) currently uses Nickel-Hydrogen (Ni-H2) batteries to store electrical energy. The batteries are charged during insolation and discharged during eclipse. The Ni-H2 batteries are designed to operate at a 35 depth of discharge (DOD) maximum during normal operation in a Low Earth Orbit. Since the oldest of the 48 Ni-H2 battery Orbital Replacement Units (ORUs) has been cycling since September 2006, these batteries are now approaching their end of useful life. In 2010, the ISS Program began the development of Lithium-Ion (Li-ion) batteries to replace the Ni-H2 batteries and concurrently funded a Li-ion cell life testing project. This paper will include an overview of the ISS Li-Ion battery system architecture and the progress of the Li-ion battery design and development.

  4. Metal-silicate partitioning and the light element in the core (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, B. J.; Wade, J.; Tuff, J.

    2009-12-01

    Most attempts to constrain the concentrations of “light” elements in the Earth’s core rely either on cosmochemical arguments or on arguments based on the densities and equations of state of Fe-alloys containing the element of concern. Despite its utility, the latter approach yields a wide range of permissible compositions and hence weak constraints. The major problem with the cosmochemical approach is that the abundances in the bulk Earth of all the candidate “light” elements- H, C, O, Si and S are highly uncertain because of their volatile behavior during planetary accretion. In contrast, refractory elements appear to be in approximately CI chondritic relative abundances in the Earth. This leads to the potential for using the partitioning of refractory siderophile elements between the mantle and core to constrain the concentrations of light elements in the core. Recent experimental metal-silicate partitioning data, coupled with mantle abundances of refractory siderophile elements (e.g. Wade and Wood, EPSL v.236, 78—95,2005; Kegler et. al. EPSL v.268, 28-40,2008) have shown that the core segregated from the mantle under high pressure conditions (~40 GPa). If a wide range of elements, from very siderophile, (e.g. Mo) through moderately (Ni, Co, W) to weakly siderophile (V, Cr, Nb, Si) are considered, the Earth also appears to have become more oxidized during accretion. Metal-silicate partitioning of some elements is also sensitive to the light element content of the metal. For example, Nb and W partitioning depend strongly on carbon, Mo on silicon and Cr on sulfur. Given the measured mantle abundances of the refractory elements, these observations enable the Si and C contents of the core to be constrained at ~5% and <2% respectively while partitioning is consistent with a cosmochemically-estimated S content of ~2%.

  5. Porphyrin-Embedded Silicate Materials for Detection of Hydrocarbon Solvents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-14

    Sensors 2011, 11, 886-904; doi:10.3390/s110100886 sensors ISSN 1424-8220 www.mdpi.com/journal/ sensors Article Porphyrin-Embedded Silicate...Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 Sensors 2011, 11 887 1. Introduction Mesoporous silicates have been widely described in sensing...absorption spectroscopy, quartz crystal microbalance ( QCM ), and FTIR have been utilized for aromatic hydrocarbon sensing applications based on these

  6. History of Nebular Processing Traced by Silicate Stardust in IDPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messenger, Scott R.; Keller, L. P.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.

    2010-01-01

    Chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles (CP-IDPs) may be the best preserved remnants of primordial solar system materials, in part because they were not affected by parent body hydrothermal alteration. Their primitive characteristics include fine grained, unequilibrated, anhydrous mineralogy, enrichment in volatile elements, and abundant molecular cloud material and silicate stardust. However, while the majority of CP-IDP materials likely derived from the Solar System, their formation processes and provenance are poorly constrained. Stardust abundances provide a relative measure of the extent of processing that the Solar System starting materials has undergone in primitive materials. For example, among primitive meteorites silicate stardust abundances vary by over two orders of magnitude (less than 10-200 ppm). This range of abundances is ascribed to varying extents of aqueous processing in the meteorite parent bodies. The higher average silicate stardust abundances among CP-IDPs (greater than 375 ppm) are thus attributable to the lack of aqueous processing of these materials. Yet, silicate stardust abundances in IDPs also vary considerably. While the silicate stardust abundance in IDPs having anomalous N isotopic compositions was reported to be 375 ppm, the abundance in IDPs lacking N anomalies is less than 10 ppm. Furthermore, these values are significantly eclipsed among some IDPs with abundances ranging from 2,000 ppm to 10,000 ppm. Given that CP-IDPs have not been significantly affected by parent body processes, the difference in silicate stardust abundances among these IDPs must reflect varying extents of nebular processing. Here we present recent results of a systematic coordinated mineralogical/isotopic study of large cluster IDPs aimed at (1) characterizing the mineralogy of presolar silicates and (2) delineating the mineralogical and petrographic characteristics of IDPs with differing silicate stardust abundances. One of the goals of this study is

  7. The boron and lithium isotopic composition of mid-ocean ridge basalts and the mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marschall, Horst R.; Wanless, V. Dorsey; Shimizu, Nobumichi; Pogge von Strandmann, Philip A. E.; Elliott, Tim; Monteleone, Brian D.

    2017-06-01

    variation is unrelated to differentiation, assimilation or mantle source indicators, such as radiogenic isotopes or trace elements. It, therefore, seems likely that kinetic fractionation of Li isotopes during magma extraction, transport and storage may generate δ7 Li excursions in MORB. No mantle heterogeneities, such as those generated by deeply recycled subducted materials, are invoked in the interpretation of the Li and B isotope data presented here, in contrast to previous work on smaller data sets. Lithium and boron budgets for the silicate Earth are presented that are based on isotope and element mass balance. A refined estimate for the B isotopic composition of the bulk continental crust is given as δ11 B = - 9.1 ± 2.4 ‰ . Mass balance allows the existence of recycled B reservoirs in the deep mantle, but these are not required. However, mass balance among the crust, sediments and seawater shows enrichment of 6 Li in the surface reservoirs, which requires the existence of 7 Li -enriched material in the mantle. This may have formed by the subduction of altered oceanic crust since the Archaean.

  8. Earth Observation

    2013-08-20

    Earth observation taken during day pass by an Expedition 36 crew member on board the International Space Station (ISS). Per Twitter message: Looking southwest over northern Africa. Libya, Algeria, Niger.

  9. Earth Observation

    2014-09-01

    Earth Observation taken during a night pass by the Expedition 40 crew aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Folder lists this as: New Zealand Aurora night pass. On crewmember's Flickr page - Look straight down into an aurora.

  10. Earth Observation

    2014-06-07

    ISS040-E-008174 (7 June 2014) --- Layers of Earth's atmosphere, brightly colored as the sun rises, are featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 40 crew member on the International Space Station.

  11. Earth Observation

    2014-06-02

    ISS040-E-006817 (2 June 2014) --- Intersecting the thin line of Earth's atmosphere, International Space Station solar array wings are featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 40 crew member on the International Space Station.

  12. Earth Science

    1992-07-18

    Workers at Launch Complex 17 Pad A, Kennedy Space Center (KSC) encapsulate the Geomagnetic Tail (GEOTAIL) spacecraft (upper) and attached payload Assist Module-D upper stage (lower) in the protective payload fairing. GEOTAIL project was designed to study the effects of Earth's magnetic field. The solar wind draws the Earth's magnetic field into a long tail on the night side of the Earth and stores energy in the stretched field lines of the magnetotail. During active periods, the tail couples with the near-Earth magnetosphere, sometimes releasing energy stored in the tail and activating auroras in the polar ionosphere. GEOTAIL measures the flow of energy and its transformation in the magnetotail and will help clarify the mechanisms that control the imput, transport, storage, release, and conversion of mass, momentum, and energy in the magnetotail.

  13. Discover Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Discover Earth is a NASA-funded project for teachers of grades 5-12 who want to expand their knowledge of the Earth system, and prepare to become master teachers who promote Earth system science in their own schools, counties, and throughout their state. Participants from the following states are invited to apply: Connecticut, Delaware, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Washington, DC. Teachers selected for the project participate in a two-week summer workshop conducted at the University of Maryland, College Park; develop classroom-ready materials during the workshop for broad dissemination; conduct a minimum of two peer training activities during the coming school year; and participate in other enrichment/education opportunities as available and desired. Discover Earth is a team effort that utilizes expertise from a range of contributors, and balances science content with hands-on classroom applications.

  14. Earth Observation

    2014-05-31

    Earth Observation taken during a day pass by the Expedition 40 crew aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Folder lists this as: CEO - Arena de Sao Paolo. View used for Twitter message: Cloudy skies over São Paulo Brazil

  15. Earth Observation

    2013-07-26

    Earth observation taken during day pass by an Expedition 36 crew member on board the International Space Station (ISS). Per Twitter message: Never tire of finding shapes in the clouds! These look very botanical to me. Simply perfect.

  16. Earth Observation

    2014-06-12

    Earth Observation taken during a day pass by the Expedition 40 crew aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Folder lists this as: Moon, Japan, Kamchatka with a wild cloud. Part of a solar array is also visible.

  17. Earth Science

    1990-10-24

    Solar Vector Magnetograph is used to predict solar flares, and other activities associated with sun spots. This research provides new understanding about weather on the Earth, and solar-related conditions in orbit.

  18. Earth Observation

    2013-08-03

    Earth observation taken during day pass by an Expedition 36 crew member on board the International Space Station (ISS). Per Twitter message: Perhaps a dandelion losing its seeds in the wind? Love clouds!

  19. Earth Observation

    2014-06-27

    Earth Observation taken during a day pass by the Expedition 40 crew aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Part of Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) is visible. Folder lists this as: the Middle East, Israel.

  20. The largest volcanic eruptions on Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryan, Scott E.; Peate, Ingrid Ukstins; Peate, David W.; Self, Stephen; Jerram, Dougal A.; Mawby, Michael R.; Marsh, J. S. (Goonie); Miller, Jodie A.

    2010-10-01

    Large igneous provinces (LIPs) are sites of the most frequently recurring, largest volume basaltic and silicic eruptions in Earth history. These large-volume (> 1000 km 3 dense rock equivalent) and large-magnitude (> M8) eruptions produce areally extensive (10 4-10 5 km 2) basaltic lava flow fields and silicic ignimbrites that are the main building blocks of LIPs. Available information on the largest eruptive units are primarily from the Columbia River and Deccan provinces for the dimensions of flood basalt eruptions, and the Paraná-Etendeka and Afro-Arabian provinces for the silicic ignimbrite eruptions. In addition, three large-volume (675-2000 km 3) silicic lava flows have also been mapped out in the Proterozoic Gawler Range province (Australia), an interpreted LIP remnant. Magma volumes of > 1000 km 3 have also been emplaced as high-level basaltic and rhyolitic sills in LIPs. The data sets indicate comparable eruption magnitudes between the basaltic and silicic eruptions, but due to considerable volumes residing as co-ignimbrite ash deposits, the current volume constraints for the silicic ignimbrite eruptions may be considerably underestimated. Magma composition thus appears to be no barrier to the volume of magma emitted during an individual eruption. Despite this general similarity in magnitude, flood basaltic and silicic eruptions are very different in terms of eruption style, duration, intensity, vent configuration, and emplacement style. Flood basaltic eruptions are dominantly effusive and Hawaiian-Strombolian in style, with magma discharge rates of ~ 10 6-10 8 kg s -1 and eruption durations estimated at years to tens of years that emplace dominantly compound pahoehoe lava flow fields. Effusive and fissural eruptions have also emplaced some large-volume silicic lavas, but discharge rates are unknown, and may be up to an order of magnitude greater than those of flood basalt lava eruptions for emplacement to be on realistic time scales (< 10 years). Most

  1. Cometary crystalline silicate before and after perihelion passage II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ootsubo, Takafumi

    2014-01-01

    Crystalline silicate is often observed in comets as an 11.3-micron resonant emission feature, and may be used for probing the early solar nebula. Because the formation of the crystalline silicate requires high temperature, they are thought to have been born from amorphous silicate at the inner region, and then transported toward the outer regions where comets were born. This transportation can produce the difference in the crystalline fraction in the cometary silicate dust between two dynamical types of comets, Oort-cloud comets (OCs) and Ecliptic comets (ECs), due to the different heliocentric distances of their birth places. The study of peak wavelengths in crystalline features is important to investigate the conditions of the crystalline silicate formation as well. Thus far, we don't have enough observational samples of OCs. Fortunately, we can observe comet C/2012 K1 (PanSTARRS) along with C/2013 A1 (Siding Spring) in this semester. In particular, the comet C/2012 K1 (PanSTARRS) is a bright and good target for this silicate peak feature study. Observations at pre- and post-perihelion provide us precious information on the dust evolution of the comet.

  2. Microstructure of ultra high performance concrete containing lithium slag.

    PubMed

    He, Zhi-Hai; Du, Shi-Gui; Chen, Deng

    2018-04-03

    Lithium slag (LS) is discharged as a byproduct in the process of the lithium carbonate, and it is very urgent to explore an efficient way to recycle LS in order to protect the environments and save resources. Many available supplementary cementitious materials for partial replacement of cement and/or silica fume (SF) can be used to prepare ultra high performance concrete (UHPC). The effect of LS to replace SF partially by weight used as a supplementary cementitious material (0%, 5%, 10% and 15% of binder) on the compressive strengths and microstructure evolution of UHPC has experimentally been studied by multi-techniques including mercury intrusion porosimetry, scanning electron microscope and nanoindentation technique. The results show that the use of LS degrades the microstructure of UHPC at early ages, and however, the use of LS with the appropriate content improves microstructure of UHPC at later ages. The hydration products of UHPC are mainly dominated by ultra-high density calcium-silicate-hydrate (UHD C-S-H) and interfacial transition zone (ITZ) in UHPC has similar compact microstructure with the matrix. The use of LS improves the hydration degree of UHPC and increases the elastic modulus of ITZ in UHPC. LS is a promising substitute for SF for preparation UHPC. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Earth Observations

    2010-06-16

    ISS024-E-006136 (16 June 2010) --- Polar mesospheric clouds, illuminated by an orbital sunrise, are featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 24 crew member on the International Space Station. Polar mesospheric, or noctilucent (?night shining?), clouds are observed from both Earth?s surface and in orbit by crew members aboard the space station. They are called night-shining clouds as they are usually seen at twilight. Following the setting of the sun below the horizon and darkening of Earth?s surface, these high clouds are still briefly illuminated by sunlight. Occasionally the ISS orbital track becomes nearly parallel to Earth?s day/night terminator for a time, allowing polar mesospheric clouds to be visible to the crew at times other than the usual twilight due to the space station altitude. This unusual photograph shows polar mesospheric clouds illuminated by the rising, rather than setting, sun at center right. Low clouds on the horizon appear yellow and orange, while higher clouds and aerosols are illuminated a brilliant white. Polar mesospheric clouds appear as light blue ribbons extending across the top of the image. These clouds typically occur at high latitudes of both the Northern and Southern Hemispheres, and at fairly high altitudes of 76?85 kilometers (near the boundary between the mesosphere and thermosphere atmospheric layers). The ISS was located over the Greek island of Kos in the Aegean Sea (near the southwestern coastline of Turkey) when the image was taken at approximately midnight local time. The orbital complex was tracking northeastward, nearly parallel to the terminator, making it possible to observe an apparent ?sunrise? located almost due north. A similar unusual alignment of the ISS orbit track, terminator position, and seasonal position of Earth?s orbit around the sun allowed for striking imagery of polar mesospheric clouds over the Southern Hemisphere earlier this year.

  4. Earth Rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickey, Jean O.

    1995-01-01

    The study of the Earth's rotation in space (encompassing Universal Time (UT1), length of day, polar motion, and the phenomena of precession and nutation) addresses the complex nature of Earth orientation changes, the mechanisms of excitation of these changes and their geophysical implications in a broad variety of areas. In the absence of internal sources of energy or interactions with astronomical objects, the Earth would move as a rigid body with its various parts (the crust, mantle, inner and outer cores, atmosphere and oceans) rotating together at a constant fixed rate. In reality, the world is considerably more complicated, as is schematically illustrated. The rotation rate of the Earth's crust is not constant, but exhibits complicated fluctuations in speed amounting to several parts in 10(exp 8) [corresponding to a variation of several milliseconds (ms) in the Length Of the Day (LOD) and about one part in 10(exp 6) in the orientation of the rotation axis relative to the solid Earth's axis of figure (polar motion). These changes occur over a broad spectrum of time scales, ranging from hours to centuries and longer, reflecting the fact that they are produced by a wide variety of geophysical and astronomical processes. Geodetic observations of Earth rotation changes thus provide insights into the geophysical processes illustrated, which are often difficult to obtain by other means. In addition, these measurements are required for engineering purposes. Theoretical studies of Earth rotation variations are based on the application of Euler's dynamical equations to the problem of finding the response of slightly deformable solid Earth to variety of surface and internal stresses.

  5. The effects of lithium hydroxide solution on alkali silica reaction gels created with opal

    SciT

    Mitchell, Lyndon D.; Beaudoin, James J.; Grattan-Bellew, Patrick

    The reaction of Nevada opal with calcium hydroxide, potassium hydroxide and lithium hydroxide solutions was investigated. In addition, opal was exposed to a combined solution of these three hydroxides. The progress of the three reactions was followed using X-ray diffraction (XRD), {sup 29}Si nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The XRD results indicated the presence of a low-angle peak exclusive to the lithium-based reactions. The NMR results suggested a change in the silicate structure in the presence of lithium. These techniques indicated that the reaction of the alkali with the opal starting material is inhibited and perhapsmore » stopped in the presence of lithium hydroxide. SEM revealed that the morphology of the reaction products on the surface of the reacted opal grains is markedly different invariably. It was concluded that evidence to support the theory of a protective layer exists and that the nature of the layer varies with ion type.« less

  6. A lithium superionic conductor.

    PubMed

    Kamaya, Noriaki; Homma, Kenji; Yamakawa, Yuichiro; Hirayama, Masaaki; Kanno, Ryoji; Yonemura, Masao; Kamiyama, Takashi; Kato, Yuki; Hama, Shigenori; Kawamoto, Koji; Mitsui, Akio

    2011-07-31

    Batteries are a key technology in modern society. They are used to power electric and hybrid electric vehicles and to store wind and solar energy in smart grids. Electrochemical devices with high energy and power densities can currently be powered only by batteries with organic liquid electrolytes. However, such batteries require relatively stringent safety precautions, making large-scale systems very complicated and expensive. The application of solid electrolytes is currently limited because they attain practically useful conductivities (10(-2) S cm(-1)) only at 50-80 °C, which is one order of magnitude lower than those of organic liquid electrolytes. Here, we report a lithium superionic conductor, Li(10)GeP(2)S(12) that has a new three-dimensional framework structure. It exhibits an extremely high lithium ionic conductivity of 12 mS cm(-1) at room temperature. This represents the highest conductivity achieved in a solid electrolyte, exceeding even those of liquid organic electrolytes. This new solid-state battery electrolyte has many advantages in terms of device fabrication (facile shaping, patterning and integration), stability (non-volatile), safety (non-explosive) and excellent electrochemical properties (high conductivity and wide potential window).

  7. Anodes for rechargeable lithium batteries

    DOEpatents

    Thackeray, Michael M.; Kepler, Keith D.; Vaughey, John T.

    2003-01-01

    A negative electrode (12) for a non-aqueous electrochemical cell (10) with an intermetallic host structure containing two or more elements selected from the metal elements and silicon, capable of accommodating lithium within its crystallographic host structure such that when the host structure is lithiated it transforms to a lithiated zinc-blende-type structure. Both active elements (alloying with lithium) and inactive elements (non-alloying with lithium) are disclosed. Electrochemical cells and batteries as well as methods of making the negative electrode are disclosed.

  8. Lithium-Thionyl Chloride Battery.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-04-01

    EEEElhIhEEEEEE 1111 1 - MI(CRO( fy Hl ff1Sf UIIIUN Ift I IA I~t Research and Development Technical Report DELET - TR - 78 - 0563 - F Cq LITHIUM -THIONYL CHLORIDE...2b(1110) S. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED Lithium -Thionyl Chloride Battery -10/1/78 - 11/30/80 6. PNING ORG. REPORT NUMBER Z %A a.~as B.,OWRACT OR...block number) Inorganic Electrolyte battery, Thionyl Chloride, lithium , high rate D cell, high rate flat cylindrical cell, laser designator battery. C//i

  9. Lithium ion conducting ionic electrolytes

    DOEpatents

    Angell, C.A.; Xu, K.; Liu, C.

    1996-01-16

    A liquid, predominantly lithium-conducting, ionic electrolyte is described which has exceptionally high conductivity at temperatures of 100 C or lower, including room temperature. It comprises molten lithium salts or salt mixtures in which a small amount of an anionic polymer lithium salt is dissolved to stabilize the liquid against recrystallization. Further, a liquid ionic electrolyte which has been rubberized by addition of an extra proportion of anionic polymer, and which has good chemical and electrochemical stability, is described. This presents an attractive alternative to conventional salt-in-polymer electrolytes which are not cationic conductors. 4 figs.

  10. Lithium ion conducting ionic electrolytes

    DOEpatents

    Angell, C. Austen; Xu, Kang; Liu, Changle

    1996-01-01

    A liquid, predominantly lithium-conducting, ionic electrolyte is described which has exceptionally high conductivity at temperatures of 100.degree. C. or lower, including room temperature. It comprises molten lithium salts or salt mixtures in which a small amount of an anionic polymer lithium salt is dissolved to stabilize the liquid against recrystallization. Further, a liquid ionic electrolyte which has been rubberized by addition of an extra proportion of anionic polymer, and which has good chemical and electrochemical stability, is described. This presents an attractive alternative to conventional salt-in-polymer electrolytes which are not cationic conductors.

  11. Genesis of IIICD Iron Meteorites: Evidence From Silicate Inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoy, T. J.; Keil, K.; Scott, E. R. D.; Haack, H.

    1992-07-01

    The IAB and IIICD iron meteorite groups exhibit much larger ranges in siderophile concentrations than other groups and commonly contain silicate inclusions. Extensive studies of metal in both groups and silicates in IAB irons have led to a variety of ideas to explain the genesis of these groups. Wasson et al. (1980) envision each meteorite forming in a separate impact melt pool. Kracher (1982, 1985) suggested that the siderophile trends might result from fractional crystallization of both metal and troilite in a S-saturated magma. A role for oxidation-reduction in these groups has been proposed by Scott and Bild (1974). Similarities in siderophile elemental trends indicate that IIICD metal has a similar origin, although data on silicate inclusions in IIICD irons are scarce (Ramdohr, 1973; Scott and Bild, 1974; Kracher and Kurat, 1977; Prinz et al., 1982; Clayton et al., 1983). We report the first detailed study of silicate inclusions in IIICD iron meteorites in an attempt to elucidate their history. We have studied the only silicate-bearing IIICD irons - Carlton, Dayton, and the recently reported Maltahohe. Silicate-graphite-phosphate inclusions comprise at most a few percent of the bulk meteorite, and silicates comprise <25 vol% of the inclusion. Silicate mineralogy and chemistry vary systematically with increasing M content of the metal. Maltahohe (10.7 wt% Ni) and Carlton (13.0%) contain olivine, pyroxene, and plagioclase, whereas Dayton (17.0%) contains pyroxene, plagioclase, and SiO2. Pyroxene becomes more FeO-rich from Maltahohe (FS(sub)7.8) to Carlton (Fs(sub)9.7) to Dayton (Fs(sub)11.6). Inverse FeO zoning in silicates and lower Fa than Fs indicate reduction in all three meteorites. Plagioclase compositions in IIICD (An(sub)1.1-4.9) are lower than IAB (An(sub)9.2-2l.5) and uncorrelated with Ni content. The abundances of associated phases also vary. Graphite comprises ~25 vol% of Maltahohe silicate inclusions, but only a few percent in Carlton, and is absent

  12. Giant siliceous spicules from the deep-sea glass sponge Monorhaphis chuni.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaohong; Schröder, Heinz C; Müller, Werner E G

    2009-01-01

    Only 13 years after realizing, during a repair of a telegraph cable pulled out from the deep sea, that the depth of the ocean is plentifully populated with a highly diverse fauna and flora, the Challenger expedition (1873-1876) treasured up a rich collection of vitreous sponges (Hexactinellida). They had been described by Schulze and represent the phylogenetically oldest class of siliceous sponges (phylum Porifera); they are eye-catching because of their distinct body plan, which relies on a filigree skeleton. It is constructed by an array of morphologically determined elements, the spicules. Soon after, during the German Deep Sea Expedition "Valdivia" (1898-1899), Schulze could describe the largest siliceous hexactinellid sponge on Earth, the up to 3-m high Monorhaphis chuni, which develops the equally largest bio-silica structure, the giant basal spicules (3 mx10 mm). Using these spicules as a model, basic knowledge on the morphology, formation, and development of the skeletal elements could be achieved. They are formed by a proteinaceous scaffold (composed of a 27-kDa protein), which mediates the formation of the siliceous lamellae, into which the proteins are encased. The high number of 800 of 5-10 microm thick lamellae is concentrically arranged around the axial canal. The silica matrix is composed of almost pure silicon oxide, providing it with unusually optophysical properties, which are superior to those of man-made waveguides. Experiments might suggest that the spicules function in vivo as a nonocular photoreception system. In addition, the spicules have exceptional mechanical properties, combining mechanical stability with strength and stiffness. Like demosponges, also the hexactinellids synthesize their silica enzymatically, via the enzyme silicatein (27-kDa protein). It is suggested that these basic insights will surely contribute to a further applied utilization and exploration of silica in bio-material/biomedical science.

  13. Io's Volcanism: Thermo-Physical Models of Silicate Lava Compared with Observations of Thermal Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, Ashely G.

    1996-01-01

    Analyses of thermal infrared outbursts from the jovian satellite Io indicate that at least some of these volcanic events are due to silicate lava. Analysis of the January 9, 1990 outburst indicates that this was an active eruption consisting of a large lava flow (with mass eruption rate of order 10(exp 5) cubic m/sec) and a sustained area at silicate liquidus temperatures. This is interpreted as a series of fire fountains along a rift zone. A possible alternative scenario is that of an overflowing lava lake with extensive fire fountaining. The January 9, 1990 event is unique as multispectral observations with respect to time were obtained. In this paper, a model is presented for the thermal energy lost by active and cooling silicate lava flows and lakes on Io. The model thermal emission is compared with Earth-based observations and Voyager IRIS data. The model (a) provides an explanation of the thermal anomalies on Io's surface; (b) provides constraints on flow behavior and extent and infers some flow parameters; and (c) determines flow geometry and change in flow size with time, and the temperature of each part of the flow or lava lake surface as a function of its age. Models of heat output from active lava flows or inactive but recently emplaced lava flows or overturning lava lakes alone are unable to reproduce the observations. If the January 9, 1990 event is the emplacement of a lava flow, the equivalent of 27 such events per year would yield a volume of material sufficient, if uniformly distributed, to resurface all of Io at a rate of 1 cm/year.

  14. Effect of water on the fluorine and chlorine partitioning behavior between olivine and silicate melt.

    PubMed

    Joachim, Bastian; Stechern, André; Ludwig, Thomas; Konzett, Jürgen; Pawley, Alison; Ruzié-Hamilton, Lorraine; Clay, Patricia L; Burgess, Ray; Ballentine, Christopher J

    2017-01-01

    Halogens show a range from moderate (F) to highly (Cl, Br, I) volatile and incompatible behavior, which makes them excellent tracers for volatile transport processes in the Earth's mantle. Experimentally determined fluorine and chlorine partitioning data between mantle minerals and silicate melt enable us to estimate Mid Ocean Ridge Basalt (MORB) and Ocean Island Basalt (OIB) source region concentrations for these elements. This study investigates the effect of varying small amounts of water on the fluorine and chlorine partitioning behavior at 1280 °C and 0.3 GPa between olivine and silicate melt in the Fe-free CMAS+F-Cl-Br-I-H 2 O model system. Results show that, within the uncertainty of the analyses, water has no effect on the chlorine partitioning behavior for bulk water contents ranging from 0.03 (2) wt% H 2 O (D Cl ol/melt = 1.6 ± 0.9 × 10 -4 ) to 0.33 (6) wt% H 2 O (D Cl ol/melt = 2.2 ± 1.1 × 10 -4 ). Consequently, with the effect of pressure being negligible in the uppermost mantle (Joachim et al. Chem Geol 416:65-78, 2015), temperature is the only parameter that needs to be considered for the determination of chlorine partition coefficients between olivine and melt at least in the simplified iron-free CMAS+F-Cl-Br-I-H 2 O system. In contrast, the fluorine partition coefficient increases linearly in this range and may be described at 1280 °C and 0.3 GPa with ( R 2  = 0.99): [Formula: see text]. The observed fluorine partitioning behavior supports the theory suggested by Crépisson et al. (Earth Planet Sci Lett 390:287-295, 2014) that fluorine and water are incorporated as clumped OH/F defects in the olivine structure. Results of this study further suggest that fluorine concentration estimates in OIB source regions are at least 10% lower than previously expected (Joachim et al. Chem Geol 416:65-78, 2015), implying that consideration of the effect of water on the fluorine partitioning behavior between Earth's mantle minerals and

  15. Lithium metal doped electrodes for lithium-ion rechargeable chemistry

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Gao; Battaglia, Vince; Wang, Lei

    2016-09-13

    An embodiment of the invention combines the superior performance of a polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) or polyethyleneoxide (POE) binder, the strong binding force of a styrene-butadiene (SBR) binder, and a source of lithium ions in the form of solid lithium metal powder (SLMP) to form an electrode system that has improved performance as compared to PVDF/SBR binder based electrodes. This invention will provide a new way to achieve improved results at a much reduced cost.

  16. Cyanoethylated compounds as additives in lithium/lithium batteries

    DOEpatents

    Nagasubramanian, Ganesan

    1999-01-01

    The power loss of lithium/lithium ion battery cells is significantly reduced, especially at low temperatures, when about 1% by weight of an additive is incorporated in the electrolyte layer of the cells. The usable additives are organic solvent soluble cyanoethylated polysaccharides and poly(vinyl alcohol). The power loss decrease results primarily from the decrease in the charge transfer resistance at the interface between the electrolyte and the cathode.

  17. Earth: Earth Science and Health

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maynard, Nancy G.

    2001-01-01

    A major new NASA initiative on environmental change and health has been established to promote the application of Earth science remote sensing data, information, observations, and technologies to issues of human health. NASA's Earth Sciences suite of Earth observing instruments are now providing improved observations science, data, and advanced technologies about the Earth's land, atmosphere, and oceans. These new space-based resources are being combined with other agency and university resources, data integration and fusion technologies, geographic information systems (GIS), and the spectrum of tools available from the public health community, making it possible to better understand how the environment and climate are linked to specific diseases, to improve outbreak prediction, and to minimize disease risk. This presentation is an overview of NASA's tools, capabilities, and research advances in this initiative.

  18. Ancient Earth, Alien Earths Event

    2014-08-20

    Panelists discuss how research on early Earth could help guide our search for habitable planets orbiting other stars at the “Ancient Earth, Alien Earths” Event at NASA Headquarters in Washington, DC Wednesday, August 20, 2014. The event was sponsored by NASA, the National Science Foundation (NSF), and the Smithsonian Institution and was moderated by Dr. David H. Grinspoon, Senior Scientist at the Planetary Science Institute. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  19. Ancient Earth, Alien Earths Event

    2014-08-20

    Dr. David H. Grinspoon, Senior Scientist, Planetary Science Institute, moderates a panel at the “Ancient Earth, Alien Earths” Event at NASA Headquarters in Washington, DC Wednesday, August 20, 2014. The event was sponsored by NASA, the National Science Foundation (NSF), and the Smithsonian Institution and highlighted how research on early Earth could help guide our search for habitable planets orbiting other stars. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  20. Ancient Earth, Alien Earths Event

    2014-08-20

    An audience member asks the panelists a question at the “Ancient Earth, Alien Earths” Event at NASA Headquarters in Washington, DC Wednesday, August 20, 2014. The event was sponsored by NASA, the National Science Foundation (NSF), and the Smithsonian Institution and was moderated by Dr. David H. Grinspoon, Senior Scientist at the Planetary Science Institute. Six scientists discussed how research on early Earth could help guide our search for habitable planets orbiting other stars. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  1. Grain Boundary Engineering of Lithium-Ion-Conducting Lithium Lanthanum Titanate for Lithium-Air Batteries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    Tojo T, Sakurai Y. Synthesis and lithium - ion conductivity for perovskite-type Li3/8Sr7/16Ta3/4Zr1/4O3 solid electrolyte by powder-bed sintering...battery performance is limited by the electrolytic membrane, which needs high Li-ionic conductivity. Lithium lanthanum titanate (Li3xLa(2/3)-xTiO3, or...of the A-site ions and lithium ion conductivity in the perovskite solid solution La0.67-xLi3xTiO3 (x=0.11). Journal of Solid State Ionics. 1999;121

  2. 49 CFR 173.185 - Lithium cells and batteries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 20 Wh for a lithium ion cell or 100 Wh for a lithium ion battery. After December 31, 2015, each lithium ion battery subject to this provision must be marked with the Watt-hour rating on the outside case... cell and 25 g for a lithium metal battery and 60 Wh for a lithium ion cell or 300 Wh for a lithium ion...

  3. 21 CFR 862.3560 - Lithium test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Lithium test system. 862.3560 Section 862.3560....3560 Lithium test system. (a) Identification. A lithium test system is a device intended to measure lithium (from the drug lithium carbonate) in serum or plasma. Measurements of lithium are used to assure...

  4. 21 CFR 862.3560 - Lithium test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Lithium test system. 862.3560 Section 862.3560....3560 Lithium test system. (a) Identification. A lithium test system is a device intended to measure lithium (from the drug lithium carbonate) in serum or plasma. Measurements of lithium are used to assure...

  5. 21 CFR 862.3560 - Lithium test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Lithium test system. 862.3560 Section 862.3560....3560 Lithium test system. (a) Identification. A lithium test system is a device intended to measure lithium (from the drug lithium carbonate) in serum or plasma. Measurements of lithium are used to assure...

  6. 21 CFR 862.3560 - Lithium test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Lithium test system. 862.3560 Section 862.3560....3560 Lithium test system. (a) Identification. A lithium test system is a device intended to measure lithium (from the drug lithium carbonate) in serum or plasma. Measurements of lithium are used to assure...

  7. 21 CFR 862.3560 - Lithium test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Lithium test system. 862.3560 Section 862.3560....3560 Lithium test system. (a) Identification. A lithium test system is a device intended to measure lithium (from the drug lithium carbonate) in serum or plasma. Measurements of lithium are used to assure...

  8. 76 FR 53056 - Outbound International Mailings of Lithium Batteries

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-25

    ... or lithium-ion batteries in accordance with Packing Instruction 967, Section II, or Packing... Secondary Lithium-ion (Rechargeable) Cells and Batteries. Small consumer-type lithium-ion cells and... shipment may contain a maximum of four lithium-ion cells or two lithium-ion batteries. c. The lithium...

  9. Galileo lithium/SO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blagdon, L. J.

    1980-01-01

    The current status of the Galileo lithium SO2 battery is described. The following general requirements of the battery are discussed: (1) electrical characteristics, (2) storage, (3) reliability, and (4) performance.

  10. Probing quantum effects in lithium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deemyad, Shanti; Zhang, Rong

    2018-05-01

    In periodic table lithium is the first element immediately after helium and the lightest metal. While fascinating quantum nature of condensed helium is suppressed at high densities, lithium is expected to adapt more quantum solid behavior under compression. This is due to the presence of long range interactions in metallic systems for which an increase in the de-Boer parameter (λ/σ, where σ is the minimum interatomic distance and λ is the de-Broglie wavelength) is predicted at higher densities [1,2]. Physics of dense lithium offers a rich playground to look for new emergent quantum phenomena in condensed matter and has been subject of many theoretical and experimental investigations. In this article recent progress in studying the quantum nature of dense lithium will be discussed.

  11. Silica Precipitation and Lithium Sorption

    DOE Data Explorer

    Jay Renew

    2015-09-20

    This file contains silica precipitation and lithium sorption data from the project. The silica removal data is corrected from the previous submission. The previous submission did not take into account the limit of detection of the ICP-MS procedure.

  12. Iron isotopic fractionation between silicate mantle and metallic core at high pressure

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jin; Dauphas, Nicolas; Roskosz, Mathieu; Hu, Michael Y.; Yang, Hong; Bi, Wenli; Zhao, Jiyong; Alp, Esen E.; Hu, Justin Y.; Lin, Jung-Fu

    2017-01-01

    The +0.1‰ elevated 56Fe/54Fe ratio of terrestrial basalts relative to chondrites was proposed to be a fingerprint of core-mantle segregation. However, the extent of iron isotopic fractionation between molten metal and silicate under high pressure–temperature conditions is poorly known. Here we show that iron forms chemical bonds of similar strengths in basaltic glasses and iron-rich alloys, even at high pressure. From the measured mean force constants of iron bonds, we calculate an equilibrium iron isotope fractionation between silicate and iron under core formation conditions in Earth of ∼0–0.02‰, which is small relative to the +0.1‰ shift of terrestrial basalts. This result is unaffected by small amounts of nickel and candidate core-forming light elements, as the isotopic shifts associated with such alloying are small. This study suggests that the variability in iron isotopic composition in planetary objects cannot be due to core formation. PMID:28216664

  13. Thermochemistry of amorphous and crystalline zirconium and hafnium silicates.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushakov, S.; Brown, C. E.; Navrotsky, Alexandra; Boatner, L. A.; Demkov, A. A.; Wang, C.; Nguyen, B.-Y.

    2003-03-01

    Calorimetric investigation of amorphous and crystalline zirconium and hafnium silicates was performed as part of a research program on thermochemistry of alternative gate dielectrics. Amorphous hafnium and zirconium silicates with varying SiO2 content were synthesized by a sol-gel process. Crystalline zirconium and hafnium silicates (zircon and hafnon) were synthesized by solid state reaction at 1450 °C from amorphous gels and grown as single crystals from flux. High temperature oxide melt solution calorimetry in lead borate (2PbO.B2O3) solvent at 800 oC was used to measure drop solution enthalpies for amorphous and crystalline zirconium and hafnium silicates and corresponding oxides. Applying appropriate thermochemical cycles, formation enthalpy of crystalline ZrSiO4 (zircon) from binary oxides (baddeleite and quartz) at 298 K was calculated as -23 +/-2 kJ/mol and enthalpy difference between amorphous and crystalline zirconium silicate (vitrification enthalpy) was found to be 61 +/-3 kJ/mol. Crystallization onset temperatures of amorphous zirconium and hafnium silicates, as measured by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), increased with silica content. The resulting crystalline phases, as characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), were tetragonal HfO2 and ZrO2. Critical crystallite size for tetragonal to monoclinic transformation of HfO2 in the gel was estimated as 6 +/-2 nm from XRD data Crystallization enthalpies per mole of hafnia and zirconia in gels decrease slightly together with crystallite size with increasing silica content, for example from -22 to -15 +/-1 kJ per mol of HfO2 crystallized at 740 and 1006 °C from silicates with 10 and 70 mol Applications of thermal analyses and solution calorimetry techniques together with first-principles density functional calculations to estimate interface and surface energies are discussed.

  14. Secondary lithium batteries for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, B.; Khanna, S. K.; Yen, S. P. S.; Shen, D.; Somoano, R. B.

    1981-01-01

    Secondary lithium cells which use a LiAsF6-2-Me-THF electrolyte and a TiS2 intercalatable cathode exhibit encouraging cycle life at ambient temperature. Electrochemical and surface analytical studies indicate that the electrolyte is unstable in the presence of metallic lithium, leading to the formation of a lithium passivating film composed of lithium arsenic oxyfluorides and lithium fluorsilicates. The lithium cyclability remains as the most important problem to solve. Different electrolyte solvents, such as sulfolane, exhibit promising characteristics but lead to new compatibility problems with the other cell component materials.

  15. Dendrite preventing separator for secondary lithium batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, David H. (Inventor); Surampudi, Subbarao (Inventor); Huang, Chen-Kuo (Inventor); Halpert, Gerald (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Dendrites are prevented from shorting a secondary lithium battery by use of a first porous separator, such as porous polypropylene, adjacent to the lithium anode that is unreactive with lithium and a second porous fluoropolymer separator between the cathode and the first separator, such as polytetrafluoroethylene, that is reactive with lithium. As the tip of a lithium dendrite contacts the second separator, an exothermic reaction occurs locally between the lithium dendrite and the fluoropolymer separator. This results in the prevention of the dendrite propagation to the cathode.

  16. Dendrite preventing separator for secondary lithium batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, David H. (Inventor); Surampudi, Subbarao (Inventor); Huang, Chen-Kuo (Inventor); Halpert, Gerald (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Dendrites are prevented from shorting a secondary lithium battery by use of a first porous separator such as porous polypropylene adjacent the lithium anode that is unreactive with lithium and a second porous fluoropolymer separator between the cathode and the first separator such as polytetrafluoroethylene that is reactive with lithium. As the tip of a lithium dendrite contacts the second separator, an exothermic reaction occurs locally between the lithium dendrite and the fluoropolymer separator. This results in the prevention of the dendrite propagation to the cathode.

  17. Lithium compensation for full cell operation

    DOEpatents

    Xiao, Jie; Zheng, Jianming; Chen, Xilin; Lu, Dongping; Liu, Jun; Jiguang, Jiguang

    2016-05-17

    Disclosed herein are embodiments of a lithium-ion battery system comprising an anode, an anode current collector, and a layer of lithium metal in contact with the current collector, but not in contact with the anode. The lithium compensation layer dissolves into the electrolyte to compensate for the loss of lithium ions during usage of the full cell. The specific placement of the lithium compensation layer, such that there is no direct physical contact between the lithium compensation layer and the anode, provides certain advantages.

  18. Lithium-ion rechargeable batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megahed, Sid; Scrosati, Bruno

    The large availability of insertion electrodes capable to exchange substantial quantities of lithium ions with relatively fast kinetics, has promoted the development of various types of rechargeable lithium batteries having different design, size, capacity, power and energy capabilities. All these lithium batteries offer a series of considerable specific advantages, such as high energy density and relatively low cost. However, their widespread utilization is still influenced by the high reactivity of the metal which, from one side assures the high energetic content, from the other induces safety hazards and limited cycleability. Attempts to overcome this shortcoming have resulted in the development of batteries where the lithium metal is most commonly replaced by a carbon electrode. Penalties in energy density in respect to the lithium systems and counterbalanced by an expected safer and longer cycle life from the carbon systems. Although a very recent innovation, the rocking-chair idea has already found enthusiastic support in many research laboratories which are presently involved in its investigation and development. As a result of this, small size, lithium rockingchair batteries or, as otherwise named 'lithium-ion batteries', are currently under development in Japan, USA and Europe. In this review paper we describe the properties of the anode, cathode and electrolyte materials which presently seem to be the most promising for the development of these batteries, and we will attempt to evaluate the impact that the rockingchair concept may ultimately have on the progress of rechargeable lithium battery technology. We will also summarize the status of practical rocking-chair batteries for various emerging applications.

  19. Air breathing lithium power cells

    DOEpatents

    Farmer, Joseph C.

    2014-07-15

    A cell suitable for use in a battery according to one embodiment includes a catalytic oxygen cathode; a stabilized zirconia electrolyte for selective oxygen anion transport; a molten salt electrolyte; and a lithium-based anode. A cell suitable for use in a battery according to another embodiment includes a catalytic oxygen cathode; an electrolyte; a membrane selective to molecular oxygen; and a lithium-based anode.

  20. Modeling the Lithium Ion Battery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Summerfield, John

    2013-01-01

    The lithium ion battery will be a reliable electrical resource for many years to come. A simple model of the lithium ions motion due to changes in concentration and voltage is presented. The battery chosen has LiCoO[subscript 2] as the cathode, LiPF[subscript 6] as the electrolyte, and LiC[subscript 6] as the anode. The concentration gradient and…

  1. Lithium-iodine pacemaker cell

    SciT

    Schneider, A.A.; Snyder, S.E.; DeVan, T.

    1980-01-01

    The lithium-iodine pacemaker cell is described as supplied by several manufacturers. The features of each design are discussed along with their effect on energy density, self-discharge and shape of the discharge curve. Differences in performance characteristics are related to morphology of the lithium iodine electrolyte and to the form of the cathode. A new, high-drain cell is mentioned which can supply 60 /mu/a/cm/sup 2/. 10 refs.

  2. Earth Science

    1994-03-08

    Workers at the Astrotech processing facility in Titusville prepared for a news media showing of the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite-1 (GOES-1). GOES-1 was the first in a new generation of weather satellites deployed above Earth. It was the first 3-axis, body-stabilized meteorological satellite to be used by the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and NASA. These features allowed GOES-1 to continuously monitor the Earth, rather than viewing it just five percent of the time as was the case with spin-stabilized meteorological satellites. GOES-1 also has independent imaging and sounding instruments which can operate simultaneously yet independently. As a result, observations provided by each instrument will not be interrupted. The imager produces visual and infrared images of the Earth's surface, oceans, cloud cover and severe storm development, while the prime sounding products include vertical temperature and moisture profiles, and layer mean moisture.

  3. Comment on "The shape and composition of interstellar silicate grains"

    SciT

    Bradley, J P; Ishii, H

    2007-09-27

    In the paper entitled 'The shape and composition of interstellar silicate grains' (A & A, 462, 667-676 (2007)), Min et al. explore non-spherical grain shape and composition in modeling the interstellar 10 and 20 {micro}m extinction features. This progression towards more realistic models is vitally important to enabling valid comparisons between dust observations and laboratory measurements. Min et al. proceed to compare their model results with GEMS (glass with embedded metals and sulfides) from IDPs (interplanetary dust particles) and to discuss the nature and origin of GEMS. Specifically, they evaluate the hypothesis of Bradley (1994) that GEMS are interstellar (IS)more » amorphous silicates. From a comparison of the mineralogy, chemical compositions, and infrared (IR) spectral properties of GEMS with their modeling results, Min et al. conclude: 'GEMS are, in general, not unprocessed leftovers from the diffuse ISM'. This conclusion is based, however, on erroneous and incomplete GEMS data. It is important to clarify first that Bradley (1994) never proposed that GEMS are unprocessed leftovers from the diffuse ISM, nor did he suggest that individual subnanogram mass GEMS are a representative sampling of the enormous mass of silicates in the diffuse ISM. Bradley (1994) simply showed that GEMS properties are consistent with those of IS amorphous silicates. It is widely accepted that circumstellar outflows are important sources of IS silicates, and whether GEMS are processed or not, the circumstellar heritage of some has been rigorously confirmed through measurements of non-solar oxygen (O) isotope abundances (Messenger et al., 2003; Floss et al., 2006). Keller et al. (2000) assert that even GEMS without detectable O isotope anomalies are probably also extrasolar IS silicates because they are embedded in carbonaceous material with non-solar D/H isotopic composition. (Much of the silicate dust in the ISM may be isotopically homogenized (Zhukovska et al., 2007

  4. Earth Science

    1994-09-02

    This image depicts a full view of the Earth, taken by the Geostationary Operational Environment Satellite (GOES-8). The red and green charnels represent visible data, while the blue channel represents inverted 11 micron infrared data. The north and south poles were not actually observed by GOES-8. To produce this image, poles were taken from a GOES-7 image. Owned and operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), GOES satellites provide the kind of continuous monitoring necessary for intensive data analysis. They circle the Earth in a geosynchronous orbit, which means they orbit the equatorial plane of the Earth at a speed matching the Earth's rotation. This allows them to hover continuously over one position on the surface. The geosynchronous plane is about 35,800 km (22,300 miles) above the Earth, high enough to allow the satellites a full-disc view of the Earth. Because they stay above a fixed spot on the surface, they provide a constant vigil for the atmospheric triggers for severe weather conditions such as tornadoes, flash floods, hail storms, and hurricanes. When these conditions develop, the GOES satellites are able to monitor storm development and track their movements. NASA manages the design and launch of the spacecraft. NASA launched the first GOES for NOAA in 1975 and followed it with another in 1977. Currently, the United States is operating GOES-8, positioned at 75 west longitude and the equator, and GOES-10, which is positioned at 135 west longitude and the equator. (GOES-9, which malfunctioned in 1998, is being stored in orbit as an emergency backup should either GOES-8 or GOES-10 fail. GOES-11 was launched on May 3, 2000 and GOES-12 on July 23, 2001. Both are being stored in orbit as a fully functioning replacement for GOES-8 or GOES-10 on failure.

  5. Aqueous lithium air batteries

    DOEpatents

    Visco, Steven J.; Nimon, Yevgeniy S.; De Jonghe, Lutgard C.; Petrov, Alexei; Goncharenko, Nikolay

    2017-05-23

    Aqueous Li/Air secondary battery cells are configurable to achieve high energy density and prolonged cycle life. The cells include a protected a lithium metal or alloy anode and an aqueous catholyte in a cathode compartment. The aqueous catholyte comprises an evaporative-loss resistant and/or polyprotic active compound or active agent that partakes in the discharge reaction and effectuates cathode capacity for discharge in the acidic region. This leads to improved performance including one or more of increased specific energy, improved stability on open circuit, and prolonged cycle life, as well as various methods, including a method of operating an aqueous Li/Air cell to simultaneously achieve improved energy density and prolonged cycle life.

  6. Earth Observation

    2010-08-23

    ISS024-E-016042 (23 Aug. 2010) --- This night time view captured by one of the Expedition 24 crew members aboard the International Space Station some 220 miles above Earth is looking southward from central Romania over the Aegean Sea toward Greece and it includes Thessaloniki (near center), the larger bright mass of Athens (left center), and the Macedonian capital of Skopje (lower right). Center point coordinates of the area pictured are 46.4 degrees north latitude and 25.5 degrees east longitude. The picture was taken in August and was physically brought back to Earth on a disk with the return of the Expedition 25 crew in November 2010.

  7. Earth Observation

    2014-07-19

    ISS040-E-070412 (19 July 2014) --- One of the Expedition 40 crew members aboard the Earth-orbiting International Space Station recorded this July 19 panorama featuring wildfires which are plaguing the Northwest and causing widespread destruction. (Note: south is at the top of the frame). The orbital outpost was flying 223 nautical miles above Earth at the time of the photo. Parts of Oregon and Washington are included in the scene. Mt. Jefferson, Three Sisters and Mt. St. Helens are all snow-capped and visible in the photo, and the Columbia River can also be delineated.

  8. Earth Observation

    2014-07-19

    ISS040-E-070424 (19 July 2014) --- One of the Expedition 40 crew members aboard the Earth-orbiting International Space Station recorded this July 19 image of wildfires which are plaguing the Northwest and causing widespread destruction. The orbital outpost was flying 223 nautical miles above Earth at the time of the photo. Lightning has been given as the cause of the Ochoco Complex fires in the Ochoco National Forest in central Oregon. The complex has gotten larger since this photo was taken.

  9. Earth observation

    2014-09-04

    ISS040-E-129950 (4 Sept. 2014) --- In this photograph. taken by one of the Expedition 40 crew members aboard the Earth-orbiting International Space Station, the orange spot located in the very center is the sun, which appears to be sitting on Earth's limb. At far right, a small bright spot is believed to be a reflection from somewhere in the camera system or something on the orbital outpost. When the photographed was exposed, the orbital outpost was flying at an altutude of 226 nautical miles above a point near French Polynesia in the Pacific Ocean.

  10. Earth Science

    2004-08-13

    This panoramic view of Hurricane Charley was photographed by the Expedition 9 crew aboard the International Space Station (ISS) on August 13, 2004, at a vantage point just north of Tampa, Florida. The small eye was not visible in this view, but the raised cloud tops near the center coincide roughly with the time that the storm began to rapidly strengthen. The category 2 hurricane was moving north-northwest at 18 mph packing winds of 105 mph. Crew Earth Observations record Earth surface changes over time, as well as more fleeting events such as storms, floods, fires, and volcanic eruptions.

  11. Earth Science

    2004-09-11

    This image hosts a look at the eye of Hurricane Ivan, one of the strongest hurricanes on record, as the storm topped the western Caribbean Sea on Saturday, September 11, 2004. The hurricane was photographed by astronaut Edward M. (Mike) Fincke from aboard the International Space Station (ISS) at an altitude of approximately 230 miles. At the time, the category 5 storm sustained winds in the eye of the wall that were reported at about 160 mph. Crew Earth Observations record Earth surface changes over time, as well as more fleeting events such as storms, floods, fires, and volcanic eruptions.

  12. Earth Science

    2004-09-15

    Except for a small portion of the International Space Station (ISS) in the foreground, Hurricane Ivan, one of the strongest hurricanes on record, fills this image over the northern Gulf of Mexico. As the downgraded category 4 storm approached landfall on the Alabama coast Wednesday afternoon on September 15, 2004, sustained winds in the eye of the wall were reported at about 135 mph. The hurricane was photographed by astronaut Edward M. (Mike) Fincke from aboard the ISS at an altitude of approximately 230 miles. Crew Earth Observations record Earth surface changes over time, as well as more fleeting events such as storms, floods, fires, and volcanic eruptions.

  13. Earth Science

    2004-09-15

    This image hosts a look into the eye of Hurricane Ivan, one of the strongest hurricanes on record, as the storm approached landfall on the central Gulf coast Wednesday afternoon on September 15, 2004. The hurricane was photographed by astronaut Edward M. (Mike) Fincke from aboard the International Space Station (ISS) at an altitude of approximately 230 miles. At the time, sustained winds in the eye of the wall were reported at about 135 mph as the downgraded category 4 storm approached the Alabama coast. Crew Earth Observations record Earth surface changes over time, as well as more fleeting events such as storms, floods, fires, and volcanic eruptions.

  14. Li2C2, a High-Capacity Cathode Material for Lithium Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Tian, Na; Gao, Yurui; Li, Yurong; Wang, Zhaoxiang; Song, Xiaoyan; Chen, Liquan

    2016-01-11

    As a typical alkaline earth metal carbide, lithium carbide (Li2C2) has the highest theoretical specific capacity (1400 mA h g(-1)) among all the reported lithium-containing cathode materials for lithium ion batteries. Herein, the feasibility of using Li2C2 as a cathode material was studied. The results show that at least half of the lithium can be extracted from Li2C2 and the reversible specific capacity reaches 700 mA h g(-1). The C≡C bond tends to rotate to form C4 (C≡C⋅⋅⋅C≡C) chains during lithium extraction, as indicated with the first-principles molecular dynamics (FPMD) simulation. The low electronic and ionic conductivity are believed to be responsible for the potential gap between charge and discharge, as is supported with density functional theory (DFT) calculations and Arrhenius fitting results. These findings illustrate the feasibility to use the alkali and alkaline earth metal carbides as high-capacity electrode materials for secondary batteries. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Engineering experimental program on the effects of near-space radiation on lithium doped solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The results of an experimental evaluation of the real-time degradation characteristics of lithium-diffused silicon solar cells are reported. A strontium-90 radioisotope was used for simulation of a typical earth-orbital electron environment. The experiment was performed in an ion pump vacuum chamber with samples maintained at -50, +20, +50, and +80 C. Samples were illuminated during the 6-month exposure run with solar cell 1-5 characteristics measured periodically in situ. This 6-month exposure corresponded to a 1 MeV equivalent fluence of approximately 10 to the 14th power electrons/sq cm. Several types of lithium cells were irradiatied and compared directly with conventional N/P cells. The best lithium cells compared favorably with N/P cells, particularly at the higher test temperatures. With a slight improvement of initial performance characteristics, lithium cells appear feasible for 5 to 10 year missions at synchronous altitude. Based on the reported results and those of other irradiation experiments, lithium cells would appear to be superior to N/P cells in proton-dominated earth-orbital environments. Another important conclusion of the effort was that illuminated/loaded cells degrade more rapidly than do dark/unloaded cells. The irradiation experiment provided data of high quality with a high degree of confidence because of the experimental and statistical analysis techniques utilized.

  16. A subsurface Fe-silicate weathering microbiome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napieralski, S. A.; Buss, H. L.; Roden, E. E.

    2017-12-01

    Traditional models of microbially mediated weathering of primary Fe-bearing minerals often invoke organic ligands (e.g. siderophores) used for nutrient acquisition. However, it is well known that the oxidation of Fe(II) governs the overall rate of Fe-silicate mineral dissolution. Recent work has demonstrated the ability of lithtrophic iron oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) to grow via the oxidation of structural Fe(II) in biotite as a source of metabolic energy with evidence suggesting a direct enzymatic attack on the mineral surface. This process necessitates the involvement of dedicated outer membrane proteins that interact with insoluble mineral phases in a process known as extracellular electron transfer (EET). To investigate the potential role FeOB in a terrestrial subsurface weathering system, samples were obtained from the bedrock-saprolite interface (785 cm depth) within the Rio Icacos Watershed of the Luquillo Mountains in Puerto Rico. Prior geochemical evidence suggests the flux of Fe(II) from the weathering bedrock supports a robust lithotrophic microbial community at depth. Current work confirms the activity of microorganism in situ, with a marked increase in ATP near the bedrock-saprolite interface. Regolith recovered from the interface was used as inoculum to establish enrichment cultures with powderized Fe(II)-bearing minerals serving as the sole energy source. Monitoring of the Fe(II)/Fe(total) ratio and ATP generation suggests growth of microorganisms coupled to the oxidation of mineral bound Fe(II). Analysis of 16S rRNA gene and shotgun metagenomic libraries from in situ and enrichment culture samples lends further support to FeOB involvement in the weathering process. Multiple metagenomic bins related to known FeOB, including Betaproteobacteria genera, contain homologs to model EET systems, including Cyc2 and MtoAB. Our approach combining geochemistry and metagenomics with ongoing microbiological and genomic characterization of novel isolates obtained

  17. High-Temperature Thermal Diffusivity Measurements of Silicate Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pertermann, M.; Hofmeister, A. M.; Whittington, A. G.; Spera, F. J.; Zayac, J.

    2005-12-01

    Transport of heat in geologically relevant materials is of great interest because of its key role in heat transport, magmatism and volcanic activity on Earth. To better understand the thermal properties of magmatic materials at high temperatures, we measured the thermal diffusivity of four synthetic end-member silicate glasses with the following compositions: albite (NaAlSi3O8), orthoclase (KAlSi3O8), anorthite (CaAl2Si2O8), and diopside (CaMgSi2O6). Thermal diffusivity measurements were conducted with the laser-flash technique and data were acquired from room temperature to a maximum temperature near 1100°C, depending on the glass transition temperature. The presence of sub-mm sized bubbles in one of the orthoclase samples had no discernable effect on measured diffusivities. At room temperature, the three feldspar-type glasses have thermal diffusivity (D) values of 0.58-0.61 mm2/s, whereas the diopside glass has 0.52 mm2/s. With increasing temperature, D decreases by 5-10% (relative) for all samples and becomes virtually constant at intermediate temperatures. At higher temperatures, the anorthite and diopside glasses exhibit significant drops in thermal diffusivity over a 50-100°C interval, correlating with previously published heat capacity changes near the glass transition for these compositions. For anorthite, D (in mm2/s) decreases from 0.48 at 750-860°C to 0.36 at 975-1075°C; for diopside, D changes from 0.42 at 630-750°C to 0.30 at 850-910°C, corresponding to relative drops of 24 and 29%, respectively. Albite and orthoclase glasses do not exhibit this change and also lack significant changes in heat capacity near the glass transition. Instead, D is constant at 400-800°C for albite, and for orthoclase values go through a minimum at 500-600°C before increasing slightly towards 1100°C but it never exceeds the room temperature D. Our data on thermal diffusivity correlate closely with other thermophysical properties. Thus, at least in case of simple

  18. Insights into Silicate and Oxide Melt Structure from Amorphous, Non-Glass-Forming Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stebbins, J. F.

    2015-12-01

    Many silicate and oxide liquids of interest in the Earth sciences and in technology cannot readily be quenched to glasses, either because of low silica contents (and hence low viscosity at the melting point and accompanying liquid 'fragility') or because of liquid-liquid unmixing at high temperature. Although in-situ, high temperature structural tools have been in use for decades and are rapidly developing, many methods are still most informative for glass samples quenched to ambient pressure and temperature, e.g. high-resolution solid-state NMR. Amorphous oxides, including alumina and silicate compositions, have widespread technological applications. These are generally deposited by a variety of high-energy sputtering methods, as films of thicknesses of 10's to 100's of nm. Using Al-27, Si-29, and O-17 NMR, we have recently shown that for such films, very similar short-range structure is seen in materials made by very different kinetic pathways, such as sol-gel synthesis vs. ion-beam sputtering. This path-independent structure suggests that these materials pass through transient equilibrium states during their formation, probably that of deeply supercooled liquids just above glass transition temperatures. In the HfO2-SiO2 and ZrO2-SiO2 systems, for example, samples have well-resolved O-17 NMR spectra, allowing quantitation of O sites with only Hf(Zr) neighbors (so-called "free" oxide ions), with mixed Hf(Zr) and Si neighbors, and Si only. The observed oxygen speciation agrees well with a simple thermodynamic model of one of the most fundamental equilibria in silicate systems, namely the reaction of bridging (Si-O-Si) and "free" (e.g. OHf3 and OHf4) oxide ions to produce "non-bridging" oxygens (e.g. Si-OHf2). This new approach to sampling such structural equilibria in compositions far outside the range of normal glass-forming liquids may provide new insights into more geological compositions as well, as well as in more general models of silicate melt chemistry.

  19. Digital Earth - A sustainable Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahavir

    2014-02-01

    All life, particularly human, cannot be sustainable, unless complimented with shelter, poverty reduction, provision of basic infrastructure and services, equal opportunities and social justice. Yet, in the context of cities, it is believed that they can accommodate more and more people, endlessly, regardless to their carrying capacity and increasing ecological footprint. The 'inclusion', for bringing more and more people in the purview of development is often limited to social and economic inclusion rather than spatial and ecological inclusion. Economic investment decisions are also not always supported with spatial planning decisions. Most planning for a sustainable Earth, be at a level of rural settlement, city, region, national or Global, fail on the capacity and capability fronts. In India, for example, out of some 8,000 towns and cities, Master Plans exist for only about 1,800. A chapter on sustainability or environment is neither statutorily compulsory nor a norm for these Master Plans. Geospatial technologies including Remote Sensing, GIS, Indian National Spatial Data Infrastructure (NSDI), Indian National Urban Information Systems (NUIS), Indian Environmental Information System (ENVIS), and Indian National GIS (NGIS), etc. have potential to map, analyse, visualize and take sustainable developmental decisions based on participatory social, economic and social inclusion. Sustainable Earth, at all scales, is a logical and natural outcome of a digitally mapped, conceived and planned Earth. Digital Earth, in fact, itself offers a platform to dovetail the ecological, social and economic considerations in transforming it into a sustainable Earth.

  20. The carbonate-silicate cycle and CO2/climate feedbacks on tidally locked terrestrial planets.

    PubMed

    Edson, Adam R; Kasting, James F; Pollard, David; Lee, Sukyoung; Bannon, Peter R

    2012-06-01

    Atmospheric gaseous constituents play an important role in determining the surface temperatures and habitability of a planet. Using a global climate model and a parameterization of the carbonate-silicate cycle, we explored the effect of the location of the substellar point on the atmospheric CO(2) concentration and temperatures of a tidally locked terrestrial planet, using the present Earth continental distribution as an example. We found that the substellar point's location relative to the continents is an important factor in determining weathering and the equilibrium atmospheric CO(2) level. Placing the substellar point over the Atlantic Ocean results in an atmospheric CO(2) concentration of 7 ppmv and a global mean surface air temperature of 247 K, making ∼30% of the planet's surface habitable, whereas placing it over the Pacific Ocean results in a CO(2) concentration of 60,311 ppmv and a global temperature of 282 K, making ∼55% of the surface habitable.

  1. Heterogeneous Nucleation of Protein Crystals on Fluorinated Layered Silicate

    PubMed Central

    Ino, Keita; Udagawa, Itsumi; Iwabata, Kazuki; Takakusagi, Yoichi; Kubota, Munehiro; Kurosaka, Keiichi; Arai, Kazuhito; Seki, Yasutaka; Nogawa, Masaya; Tsunoda, Tatsuo; Mizukami, Fujio; Taguchi, Hayao; Sakaguchi, Kengo

    2011-01-01

    Here, we describe an improved system for protein crystallization based on heterogeneous nucleation using fluorinated layered silicate. In addition, we also investigated the mechanism of nucleation on the silicate surface. Crystallization of lysozyme using silicates with different chemical compositions indicated that fluorosilicates promoted nucleation whereas the silicates without fluorine did not. The use of synthesized saponites for lysozyme crystallization confirmed that the substitution of hydroxyl groups contained in the lamellae structure for fluorine atoms is responsible for the nucleation-inducing property of the nucleant. Crystallization of twelve proteins with a wide range of pI values revealed that the nucleation promoting effect of the saponites tended to increase with increased substitution rate. Furthermore, the saponite with the highest fluorine content promoted nucleation in all the test proteins regardless of their overall net charge. Adsorption experiments of proteins on the saponites confirmed that the density of adsorbed molecules increased according to the substitution rate, thereby explaining the heterogeneous nucleation on the silicate surface. PMID:21818343

  2. Earth Observation

    2014-08-10

    ISS040-E-091158 (10 Aug. 2014) --- One of the Expedition 40 crew members 225 nautical miles above Earth onboard the International Space Station used a 200mm lens to record this image of Hawke's Bay, New Zealand on Aug. 10, 2014. Napier and the bay area's most populous area are at bottom center of the frame.

  3. Earth Observation

    2013-06-13

    ISS036-E-007619 (13 June 2013) --- To a crew member aboard the International Space Station, the home planet is seen from many different angles and perspectives, as evdenced by this Expedition 36 image of Earth's atmophere partially obscured by one of the orbital outpost's solar panels.

  4. Think Earth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niedermeyer, Fred; Ice, Kay

    1992-01-01

    Describes a series of environmental education instructional units for grades K-6 developed by the Think Earth Consortium that cover topics such as conservation, pollution control, and waste reduction. Provides testimony from one sixth-grade teacher that field tested the second-grade unit. (MDH)

  5. Earth Observation

    2014-09-01

    Earth Observation taken during a night pass by the Expedition 40 crew aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Folder lists this as: New Zealand Aurora night pass. Docked Soyuz and Progress spacecraft are visible. On crewmember's Flickr page - The Moon, about to dive into a glowing ocean of green᥿9.

  6. Earth Observation

    2013-07-21

    Earth observation taken during night pass by an Expedition 36 crew member on board the International Space Station (ISS). Per Twitter message this is labeled as : Tehran, Iran. Lights along the coast of the Caspian Sea visible through clouds. July 21.

  7. Earth Observation

    2013-05-19

    ISS036-E-002224 (21 May 2013) --- The sun is captured in a "starburst" mode over Earth's horizon by one of the Expedition 36 crew members as the orbital outpost was above a point in southwestern Minnesota on May 21, 2013.

  8. Earth Algebra.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaufele, Christopher; Zumoff, Nancy

    Earth Algebra is an entry level college algebra course that incorporates the spirit of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) Curriculum and Evaluation Standards for School Mathematics at the college level. The context of the course places mathematics at the center of one of the major current concerns of the world. Through…

  9. Earth Science

    1993-03-29

    Small Expendable Deployer System (SEDS) is a tethered date collecting satellite and is intended to demonstrate a versatile and economical way of delivering smaller payloads to higher orbits or downward toward Earth's atmosphere. 19th Navstar Global Positioning System Satellite mission joined with previously launched satellites used for navigational purposes and geodite studies. These satellites are used commercially as well as by the military.

  10. Earth Observation

    2014-06-14

    ISS040-E-011868 (14 June 2014) --- The dark waters of the Salton Sea stand out against neighboring cultivation and desert sands in the middle of the Southern California desert, as photographed by one of the Expedition 40 crew members aboard the Earth-orbiting International Space Station on June 14, 2014.

  11. Earth Observation

    2013-08-03

    Earth observation taken during day pass by an Expedition 36 crew member on board the International Space Station (ISS). Per Twitter message: From southernmost point of orbit over the South Pacific- all clouds seemed to be leading to the South Pole.

  12. Earth Sky

    1965-12-16

    S65-63282 (16 Dec. 1965) --- Area of Indian Ocean, just east of the island of Madagascar, as seen from the Gemini-6 spacecraft during its 15th revolution of Earth. Land mass at top of picture is the Malagasy Republic (Madagascar). Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  13. Rare earths

    Gambogi, J.

    2013-01-01

    Global mine production of rare earths was estimated to have declined slightly in 2012 relative to 2011 (Fig. 1). Production in China was estimated to have decreased to 95 from 105 kt (104,700 from 115,700 st) in 2011, while new mine production in the United States and Australia increased.

  14. Earth Observation

    2013-07-04

    ISS036-E-015354 (4 July 2013) --- A number of Quebec, Canada wildfires near the Manicouagan Reservoir (seen at lower left) were recorded as part of a series of photographs taken and downlinked to Earth on July 4 by the Expedition 36 crew members aboard the International Space Station.

  15. Earth Observation

    2013-07-04

    ISS036-E-015355 (4 July 2013) --- A number of Quebec, Canada wildfires near the Manicouagan Reservoir (seen at bottom center) were recorded in a series of photographs taken and downlinked to Earth on July 4 by the Expedition 36 crew members aboard the International Space Station.

  16. Earth Observation

    2013-07-03

    ISS036-E-015292 (3 July 2013) --- A number of Quebec, Canada wildfires southeast of James Bay were recorded as part of a series of photographs taken and downlinked to Earth on July 3-4 by the Expedition 36 crew members aboard the International Space Station. This image was recorded on July 3.

  17. Earth Observation

    2013-07-04

    ISS036-E-015342 (4 July 2013) --- A number of Quebec, Canada wildfires southeast of James Bay were recorded as part of a series of photographs taken and downlinked to Earth on July 4 by the Expedition 36 crew members aboard the International Space Station.

  18. Earth Observation

    2013-07-04

    ISS036-E-015335 (4 July 2013) --- A number of Quebec, Canada wildfires southeast of James Bay were recorded as part of a series of photographs taken and downlinked to Earth on July 4 by the Expedition 36 crew members aboard the International Space Station.

  19. Earth Observation

    2014-06-12

    Earth Observation taken during a day pass by the Expedition 40 crew aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Folder lists this as: Moon, Japan, Kamchatka with a wild cloud. Part of the U.S. Lab and PMM are also visible.

  20. Earth Observation

    2013-08-29

    ISS036-E-038117 (29 Aug. 2013) --- One of the Expedition 36 crew members aboard the Earth-orbiting International Space Station photographed massive smoke plumes from the California wildfires. When this image was exposed on Aug. 29, the orbital outpost was approximately 220 miles above a point located at 38.6 degrees north latitude and 123.2 degrees west longitude.