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Sample records for earth metal chlorides

  1. Effects of pH on frog gustatory responses to chloride salts of alkali-metal and alkali-earth-metal.

    PubMed

    Kumai, T; Nomura, H

    1980-01-01

    The pH effects on frog gustatory responses to alkali-metal and alkali-earth-metal chloride salts were examined using single fungi-form papilla preparations. Responses to 0.1-0.5 M NaCl were clearly dependent upon the pH of the stimulating solutions. The responses increased as the pH decreased from 6.5 to 4.5 and were almost completely suppressed at pH's above 6.5. There was no significant difference in the pH dependency of the response among alkali-metal chlorides. HCl solutions elicited only a poor response under conditions in which the water response was suppressed by the simultaneous presence of a low NaCl concentration. Responses to alkali-earth-metal chlorides varied in their pH dependency. Response to CaCl2 was slightly affected by pH changes from 4.5 to 9.0, response to SrCl2 was considerably suppressed in the alkaline region, and responses to BaCl2 and MgCl2 were strongly suppressed at pH's above 6.5. BeCl2 solutions showed less marked stimulating effects over the pH range tested. The differences in pH dependency described above suggest the existence of two kinds of receptor sites, one being pH-insensitive sites responsible for the calcium response and the other pH-sensitive sites responsible for the sodium response. A cross-adaptation test appeared to support this possibility. Assuming that the pH effect mentioned is related to changes in the state of ionization of the receptor molecule, the pKa of the ionizable group responsible for the sodium response was determined to be approximately 5.5.

  2. Oxidation behavior of Cr(III) during thermal treatment of chromium hydroxide in the presence of alkali and alkaline earth metal chlorides.

    PubMed

    Mao, Linqiang; Gao, Bingying; Deng, Ning; Liu, Lu; Cui, Hao

    2016-02-01

    The oxidation behavior of Cr(III) during the thermal treatment of chromium hydroxide in the presence of alkali and alkaline earth metal chlorides (NaCl, KCl, MgCl2, and CaCl2) was investigated. The amounts of Cr(III) oxidized at various temperatures and heating times were determined, and the Cr-containing species in the residues were characterized. During the transformation of chromium hydroxide to Cr2O3 at 300 °C approximately 5% of the Cr(III) was oxidized to form intermediate compounds containing Cr(VI) (i.e., CrO3), but these intermediates were reduced to Cr2O3 when the temperature was above 400 °C. Alkali and alkaline earth metals significantly promoted the oxidation of Cr(III) during the thermal drying process. Two pathways were involved in the influences the alkali and alkaline earth metals had on the formation of Cr(VI). In pathway I, the alkali and alkaline earth metals were found to act as electron transfer agents and to interfere with the dehydration process, causing more intermediate Cr(VI)-containing compounds (which were identified as being CrO3 and Cr5O12) to be formed. The reduction of intermediate compounds to Cr2O3 was also found to be hindered in pathway I. In pathway II, the alkali and alkaline earth metals were found to contribute to the oxidation of Cr(III) to form chromates. The results showed that the presence of alkali and alkaline earth metals significantly increases the degree to which Cr(III) is oxidized during the thermal drying of chromium-containing sludge. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Catalytic conversion of cellulose to levulinic acid by metal chlorides.

    PubMed

    Peng, Lincai; Lin, Lu; Zhang, Junhua; Zhuang, Junping; Zhang, Beixiao; Gong, Yan

    2010-08-02

    The catalytic performance of various metal chlorides in the conversion of cellulose to levulinic acid in liquid water at high temperatures was investigated. The effects of reaction parameters on the yield of levulinic acid were also explored. The results showed that alkali and alkaline earth metal chlorides were not effective in conversion of cellulose, while transition metal chlorides, especially CrCl(3), FeCl(3) and CuCl(2) and a group IIIA metal chloride (AlCl(3)), exhibited high catalytic activity. The catalytic performance was correlated with the acidity of the reaction system due to the addition of the metal chlorides, but more dependent on the type of metal chloride. Among those metal chlorides, chromium chloride was found to be exceptionally effective for the conversion of cellulose to levulinic acid, affording an optimum yield of 67 mol % after a reaction time of 180 min, at 200 degrees C, with a catalyst dosage of 0.02 M and substrate concentration of 50 wt %. Chromium metal, most of which was present in its oxide form in the solid sample and only a small part in solution as Cr3+ ion, can be easily separated from the resulting product mixture and recycled. Finally, a plausible reaction scheme for the chromium chloride catalyzed conversion of cellulose in water was proposed.

  4. Metal chloride cathode for a battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugga, Ratnakumar V. (Inventor); Distefano, Salvador (Inventor); Bankston, C. Perry (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A method of fabricating a rechargeable battery is disclosed which includes a positive electrode which contains a chloride of a selected metal when the electrode is in its active state. The improvement comprises fabricating the positive electrode by: providing a porous matrix composed of a metal; providing a solution of the chloride of the selected metal; and impregnating the matrix with the chloride from the solution.

  5. Fabrication Of Metal Chloride Cathodes By Sintering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugga, Ratnakumar V.; Di Stefano, Salvador; Bankston, C. Perry

    1992-01-01

    Transition-metal chloride cathodes for use in high-temperature rechargeable sodium batteries prepared by sintering transition-metal powders mixed with sodium chloride. Need for difficult and dangerous chlorination process eliminated. Proportions of transition metal and sodium chloride in mixture adjusted to suit specific requirements. Cathodes integral to sodium/metal-chloride batteries, which have advantages over sodium/sulfur batteries including energy densities, increased safety, reduced material and thermal-management problems, and ease of operation and assembly. Being evaluated for supplying electrical power during peak demand and electric vehicles.

  6. Sodium-metal chloride batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratnakumar, B. V.; Attia, A. I.; Halpert, G.

    1992-01-01

    It was concluded that rapid development in the technology of sodium metal chloride batteries has been achieved in the last decade mainly due to the: expertise available with sodium sulfur system; safety; and flexibility in design and fabrication. Long cycle lives of over 1000 and high energy densities of approx. 100 Wh/kg have been demonstrated in both Na/FeCl2 and Na/NiCl2 cells. Optimization of porous cathode and solid electrolyte geometries are essential for further enhancing the battery performance. Fundamental studies confirm the capabilities of these systems. Nickel dichloride emerges as the candidate cathode material for high power density applications such as electric vehicle and space.

  7. Apparatus and method for making metal chloride salt product

    DOEpatents

    Miller, William E [Naperville, IL; Tomczuk, Zygmunt [Homer Glen, IL; Richmann, Michael K [Carlsbad, NM

    2007-05-15

    A method of producing metal chlorides is disclosed in which chlorine gas is introduced into liquid Cd. CdCl.sub.2 salt is floating on the liquid Cd and as more liquid CdCl.sub.2 is formed it separates from the liquid Cd metal and dissolves in the salt. The salt with the CdCl.sub.2 dissolved therein contacts a metal which reacts with CdCl.sub.2 to form a metal chloride, forming a mixture of metal chloride and CdCl.sub.2. After separation of bulk Cd from the salt, by gravitational means, the metal chloride is obtained by distillation which removes CdCl.sub.2 and any Cd dissolved in the metal chloride.

  8. Making Positive Electrodes For Sodium/Metal Chloride Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugga, Ratnakumar V.; Distefano, Salvador; Bankston, C. Perry

    1992-01-01

    High coulombic yields provided by sodium/metal chloride battery in which cathode formed by impregnating sintered nickel plaque with saturated solution of nickel chloride. Charge/discharge cycling of nickel chloride electrode results in very little loss of capacity. Used in spacecraft, electric land vehicles, and other applications in which high-energy-density power systems required.

  9. Molybdenum In Cathodes Of Sodium/Metal Chloride Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugga, Ratnakumar V.; Attia, Alan I.; Halpert, Gerald

    1992-01-01

    Cyclic voltammetric curves of molybdenum wire in NaAlCl4 melt indicate molybdenum chloride useful as cathode material in rechargeable sodium/metal chloride electrochemical cells. Batteries used in electric vehicles, for electric-power load leveling, and other applications involving high energy and power densities.

  10. VOLATILE CHLORIDE PROCESS FOR THE RECOVERY OF METAL VALUES

    DOEpatents

    Hanley, W.R.

    1959-01-01

    A process is presented for recovering uranium, iron, and aluminum from centain shale type ores which contain uranium in minute quantities. The ore is heated wiih a chlorinating agent. such as chlorine, to form a volatilized stream of metal chlorides. The chloride stream is then passed through granular alumina which preferentially absorbs the volatile uranium chloride and from which the uranium may later be recovered. The remaining volatilized chlorides, chiefly those of iron and aluminum, are further treated to recover chlorine gas for recycle, and to recover ferric oxide and aluminum oxide as valuable by-products.

  11. A reactive distillation process for the treatment of LiCl-KCl eutectic waste salt containing rare earth chlorides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eun, H. C.; Choi, J. H.; Kim, N. Y.; Lee, T. K.; Han, S. Y.; Lee, K. R.; Park, H. S.; Ahn, D. H.

    2016-11-01

    The pyrochemical process, which recovers useful resources (U/TRU metals) from used nuclear fuel using an electrochemical method, generates LiCl-KCl eutectic waste salt containing radioactive rare earth chlorides (RECl3). It is necessary to develop a simple process for the treatment of LiCl-KCl eutectic waste salt in a hot-cell facility. For this reason, a reactive distillation process using a chemical agent was achieved as a method to separate rare earths from the LiCl-KCl waste salt. Before conducting the reactive distillation, thermodynamic equilibrium behaviors of the reactions between rare earth (Nd, La, Ce, Pr) chlorides and the chemical agent (K2CO3) were predicted using software. The addition of the chemical agent was determined to separate the rare earth chlorides into an oxide form using these equilibrium results. In the reactive distillation test, the rare earth chlorides in LiCl-KCl eutectic salt were decontaminated at a decontamination factor (DF) of more than 5000, and were mainly converted into oxide (Nd2O3, CeO2, La2O3, Pr2O3) or oxychloride (LaOCl, PrOCl) forms. The LiCl-KCl was purified into a form with a very low concentration (<1 ppm) for the rare earth chlorides.

  12. Sodium-metal chloride battery research at JPL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratnakumar, B. V.; Attia, A. I.; Halpert, G.

    1991-01-01

    Sodium metal chloride batteries have certain distinct advantages over sodium sulfur batteries such as increased safety, inherent overcharge capability and lower operation temperatures. Two systems, i.e., Na/FeCl2 and Na/NiCl2 were developed extensively elsewhere and evaluated for various applications including electric vehicles and space. Their performance has been very encouraging and prompted a detailed fundamental study of these cathodes here at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. A brief review of our studies on these new cathode materials is presented here. The initial efforts focussed on the methods of fabrication of the electrodes and their electrochemical characterization. Subsequent studies were aimed at establishing the reaction mechanism, determining the kinetics and identifying the rate limiting processes in the reduction of metal chloride cathodes. Nickel chloride emerged from these studies as the most promising candidate material and was taken up for further detailed study on its passivation - a rate limiting process - under different experimental conditions. Also, the feasibility of using copper chloride, which is expected to have higher energy density, has been assessed. Based on the criteria established from the voltammetric response of FeCl2, NiCl2, and CuCl2, several other transition metal chlorides were screened. Of these, molybdenum and cobalt chlorides appear promising.

  13. Testing Metal Chlorides For Use In Sodium-Cell Cathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugga, Ratnakumar V.; Attia, Alan I.; Halpert, Gerald

    1992-01-01

    Cyclic voltammetric curves of transition-metal wires in molten NaAlCl4 electrolyte used to eliminate suitability of transition metals as cathodes in sodium cells. Cyclic voltammetry used in conjunction with measurement of galvanostatic polarization curves determines whether given metal chloride suitable as cathode material in such cell. Cells useful in such high-energy-density and high-power-density applications as leveling loads on electric-power plants, supplying power to electric ground vehicles, and aerospace applications.

  14. Xenopus laevis oocyte maturation is affected by metal chlorides.

    PubMed

    Marin, Matthieu; Slaby, Sylvain; Marchand, Guillaume; Demuynck, Sylvain; Friscourt, Noémie; Gelaude, Armance; Lemière, Sébastien; Bodart, Jean-François

    2015-08-01

    Few studies have been conducted using Xenopus laevis germ cells as oocytes, though these cells offer many advantages allowing both electrophysiological studies and morphological examination. Our aim was to investigate the effects of metal (cadmium, lead, cobalt and zinc) exposures using cell biology approaches. First, cell survival was evaluated with both phenotypical and electrophysiological approaches. Secondly, the effect of metals on oocyte maturation was assessed with morphological observations and electrophysiological recordings. From survival experiments, our results showed that metal chlorides did not affect cell morphology but strongly depolarized X. laevis oocyte resting potential. In addition, cadmium chloride was able to inhibit progesterone-induced oocyte maturation. By contrast, zinc, but also to a lesser extent cadmium, cobalt and lead, were able to enhance spontaneous oocyte maturation in the absence of progesterone stimulation. Finally, electrophysiological recordings revealed that some metal chlorides (lead, cadmium) exposures could disturb calcium signaling in X. laevis oocyte by modifying calcium-activated chloride currents. Our results demonstrated the high sensitivity of X. laevis oocytes toward exogenous metals such as lead and cadmium. In addition, the cellular events recorded might have a predictive value of effects occurring later on the ability of oocytes to be fertilized. Together, these results suggest a potential use of this cellular lab model as a tool for ecotoxicological assessment of contaminated fresh waters. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Alternate cathodes for sodium-metal chloride batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratnakumar, B. V.; Attia, A. I.; Halpert, G.

    1991-01-01

    Various metal chlorides were tested as possible cathode materials for sodium-metal batteries (in addition to Fe and Ni chlorides, which have been already developed to a stage of commercialization), using an electrochemical cell consisting of a pyrex tube, heated to 250 C, with the metal wire as working electrode, concentric Ni foil as counterelectrode, and high-purity Al as reference electrode. In particular, the aim of this study was to identify metal chlorides insoluble even in neutral melts, possible at the interface during overcharge, in order to eliminate the failure mode of the cell through a cationic exchange of the dissolved metal ions with sodium beta-double-prime alumina solid electrolyte. Results indicate that Mo and Co are likely alternatives to FeCl2 and NiCl2 cathodes in sodium batteries. The open circuit voltages of Na/CoCl(x) and Na/MoCl(x) cells at 250 C would be 2.55 V and 2.64 V, respectively.

  16. Rare Earth Metals: Resourcefulness and Recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shijie

    2013-10-01

    When we appreciate the digital revolution carried over from the twentieth century with mobile communication and the Internet, and when we enjoy our high-tech lifestyle filled with iDevices, hybrid cars, wind turbines, and solar cells in this new century, we should also appreciate that all of these advanced products depend on rare earth metals to function. Although there are only 136,000 tons of annual worldwide demand, (Cho, Rare Earth Metals, Will We Have Enough?)1 rare earth metals are becoming such hot commodities on international markets, due to not only to their increasing uses, including in most critical military hardware, but also to Chinese growth, which accounts for 95% of global rare earth metal production. Hence, the 2013 technical calendar topic, planned by the TMS/Hydrometallurgy and Electrometallurgy Committee, is particularly relevant, with four articles (including this commentary) contributed to the JOM October Issue discussing rare earth metals' resourcefulness and recovery.

  17. Recycling of rare earth metals from rare earth-transition metal alloy scrap by liquid metal extraction

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, T.W.; Schmidt, F.A.

    1995-08-01

    A method is described for treating rare earth metal-bearing scrap, waste or other material (e.g. Nd--Fe--B or Dy--Tb--Fe scrap) to recover the rare earth metal comprising melting the rare earth metal-bearing material, melting a Group IIA metal extractant, such as Mg, Ca, or Ba, in which the rare earth is soluble in the molten state, and contacting the melted material and melted extractant at a temperature and for a time effective to extract the rare earth from the melted material into the melted extractant. The rare earth metal is separated from the extractant metal by vacuum sublimation or distillation. 2 figs.

  18. Recycling of rare earth metals from rare earth-transition metal alloy scrap by liquid metal extraction

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, Timothy W.; Schmidt, Frederick A.

    1995-08-01

    Method of treating rare earth metal-bearing scrap, waste or other material (e.g. Nd--Fe--B or Dy--Tb--Fe scrap) to recover the rare earth metal comprising melting the rare earth metal-bearing material, melting a Group IIA metal extractant, such as Mg, Ca, or Ba, in which the rare earth is soluble in the molten state, and contacting the melted material and melted extractant at a temperature and for a time effective to extract the rare earth from the melted material into the melted extractant. The rare earth metal is separated from the extractant metal by vacuum sublimation or distillation.

  19. Recovering heavy rare earth metals from magnet scrap

    SciT

    Ott, Ryan T.; McCallum, Ralph W.; Jones, Lawrence L.

    A method of treating rare earth metal-bearing permanent magnet scrap, waste or other material in a manner to recover the heavy rare earth metal content separately from the light rare earth metal content. The heavy rare earth metal content can be recovered either as a heavy rare earth metal-enriched iron based alloy or as a heavy rare earth metal based alloy.

  20. PCDD/F catalysis by metal chlorides and oxides.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mengmei; Yang, Jie; Buekens, Alfons; Olie, Kees; Li, Xiaodong

    2016-09-01

    Model fly ash (MFA) samples were composed of silica, sodium chloride, and activated carbon, and doped with metal (0.1 wt% Cu, Cr, Ni, Zn and Cd) chloride or oxide. Each sample was de novo tested at 350 °C for 1 h, in a flow of gas (N2, N2 + 10% O2, +21% O2 or +10% H2) to investigate the effect of metal catalyst and gas composition on PCDD/F formation. Total PCDD/F yield rises rapidly with oxygen content, while the addition of hydrogen inhibits the formation and chlorination of PCDD/F. The amount of PCDD on average rises linearly with the oxygen concentration, while that of PCDF follows a reaction order of about 1/2; thus the PCDF to PCDD ratio drops when more oxygen becomes available. Some samples do not follow this trend. Chlorides are much more active than oxides, yet there are marked differences between individual metals. Principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to study the signatures from all samples, showing their unique specificity and diversity. Each catalyst shows a different signature within its individual homologue groups, demonstrating that these signatures are not thermodynamically controlled. Average congener patterns do not vary considerably with oxygen content changing from oxidising (air) to reducing (nitrogen, hydrogen). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Transition-Metal-Free Alkynylation of Aryl Chlorides

    PubMed Central

    Truong, Thanh; Daugulis, Olafs

    2011-01-01

    Two sets of conditions have been developed for a base-mediated, transition-metal-free alkynylation of aryl chlorides that proceeds via benzyne intermediates. The first set of conditions involves the use of TMPLi base in a pentane/THF mixture at 25 °C. The second set involves use of a metal alkoxide base in dioxane at elevated temperature. Reasonable functional group tolerance has been observed. Fluoro, trifluoromethyl, silyl, cyano, and alcohol functionalities are compatible with the reaction conditions. PMID:21786825

  2. Evaporation behavior of lithium, potassium, uranium and rare earth chlorides in pyroprocessing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Junhyuk; Kim, Tackjin; Park, Sungbin; Kim, Gha-Young; Kim, Sihyoung; Lee, Sungjai

    2017-12-01

    The evaporation behaviors of Li, K, U, and rare earth (RE) chlorides were examined for the cathode process in pyroprocessing. The evaporation temperatures of the chlorides were evaluated in vacuum by measuring the weight decrease. In addition, an evaporation test up to 1473 K of the cathode process using a surrogate mixture of uranium and chlorides was conducted. It was found that LiCl evaporated more readily than the other chlorides. The weight of LiCl was rapidly decreased at temperatures above 981 K, while that of KCl was decreased above 1035 K, indicating the evaporation. UCl3 evaporated at temperatures above 1103 K. RE chlorides showed a similar evaporation behavior, evaporating first at 1158 K then rapidly evaporating at temperatures above 1230 K. Thus, the order of evaporation with increasing temperature was found to be LiCl < KCl < UCl3 < RE chlorides, with different RE chlorides evaporating at similar temperature. The surrogate test confirmed the observed evaporation trend of the chlorides during the cathode process, and revealed that the contamination of uranium remains by the back-reaction of RE chlorides is negligible.

  3. Metal Fluorides, Metal Chlorides and Halogenated Metal Oxides as Lewis Acidic Heterogeneous Catalysts. Providing Some Context for Nanostructured Metal Fluorides.

    PubMed

    Lennon, David; Winfield, John M

    2017-01-28

    Aspects of the chemistry of selected metal fluorides, which are pertinent to their real or potential use as Lewis acidic, heterogeneous catalysts, are reviewed. Particular attention is paid to β-aluminum trifluoride, aluminum chlorofluoride and aluminas γ and η, whose surfaces become partially fluorinated or chlorinated, through pre-treatment with halogenating reagents or during a catalytic reaction. In these cases, direct comparisons with nanostructured metal fluorides are possible. In the second part of the review, attention is directed to iron(III) and copper(II) metal chlorides, whose Lewis acidity and potential redox function have had important catalytic implications in large-scale chlorohydrocarbons chemistry. Recent work, which highlights the complexity of reactions that can occur in the presence of supported copper(II) chloride as an oxychlorination catalyst, is featured. Although direct comparisons with nanostructured fluorides are not currently possible, the work could be relevant to possible future catalytic developments in nanostructured materials.

  4. High-temperature corrosion of metals in the salt and metallic melts containing rare earths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpov, V. V.; Abramov, A. V.; Zhilyakov, A. Yu.; Belikov, S. V.; Volkovich, V. A.; Polovov, I. B.; Rebrin, O. I.

    2016-09-01

    A complex of independent methods was employed to study the corrosion resistance of molybdenum, zirconium, tantalum and tungsten in chloride, chloride-fluoride and fluoride-oxide melts based on LiCl, CaCl2, NaCl- KCl, LiF, and containing rare earths. Tests were conducted for 30 h at 750-1050 °C. The metals showed excellent corrosion resistance in fused chlorides (the corrosion rates were below 0.0005 g/(m2 h). Despite the presence of chemically active fluoride ions in the chloride-fluoride melts, the metals studied also showed very low corrosion rates, except molybdenum, for which the rate of corrosion was 0,8 g/(m2 h). The corrosion resistance of tantalum was considerably reduced in the fluoride-oxide melts; the corrosion rate was over 1 g/(m2 h) corresponding to the 8-th grade of stability and placing tantalum to the group of "low stability" materials.

  5. Rare earth metal-containing ionic liquids

    DOE PAGES

    Prodius, Denis; Mudring, Anja-Verena

    2018-03-07

    As an innovative tool, ionic liquids (ILs) are widely employed as an alternative, smart, reaction media (vs. traditional solvents) offering interesting technology solutions for dissolving, processing and recycling of metal-containing materials. The costly mining and refining of rare earths (RE), combined with increasing demand for high-tech and energy-related applications around the world, urgently requires effective approaches to improve the efficiency of rare earth separation and recovery. In this context, ionic liquids appear as an attractive technology solution. Finally, this paper addresses the structural and coordination chemistry of ionic liquids comprising rare earth metals with the aim to add to understandingmore » prospects of ionic liquids in the chemistry of rare earths.« less

  6. Rare earth metal-containing ionic liquids

    SciT

    Prodius, Denis; Mudring, Anja-Verena

    As an innovative tool, ionic liquids (ILs) are widely employed as an alternative, smart, reaction media (vs. traditional solvents) offering interesting technology solutions for dissolving, processing and recycling of metal-containing materials. The costly mining and refining of rare earths (RE), combined with increasing demand for high-tech and energy-related applications around the world, urgently requires effective approaches to improve the efficiency of rare earth separation and recovery. In this context, ionic liquids appear as an attractive technology solution. Finally, this paper addresses the structural and coordination chemistry of ionic liquids comprising rare earth metals with the aim to add to understandingmore » prospects of ionic liquids in the chemistry of rare earths.« less

  7. Alkali metal and alkali earth metal gadolinium halide scintillators

    DOEpatents

    Bourret-Courchesne, Edith; Derenzo, Stephen E.; Parms, Shameka; Porter-Chapman, Yetta D.; Wiggins, Latoria K.

    2016-08-02

    The present invention provides for a composition comprising an inorganic scintillator comprising a gadolinium halide, optionally cerium-doped, having the formula A.sub.nGdX.sub.m:Ce; wherein A is nothing, an alkali metal, such as Li or Na, or an alkali earth metal, such as Ba; X is F, Br, Cl, or I; n is an integer from 1 to 2; m is an integer from 4 to 7; and the molar percent of cerium is 0% to 100%. The gadolinium halides or alkali earth metal gadolinium halides are scintillators and produce a bright luminescence upon irradiation by a suitable radiation.

  8. Thermophysical properties of liquid rare earth metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakor, P. B.; Sonvane, Y. A.; Patel, H. P.; Jani, A. R.

    2013-06-01

    The thermodynamical properties like long wavelength limit S(0), iso-thermal compressibility (χT), thermal expansion coefficient (αV), thermal pressure coefficient (γV), specific heat at constant volume (CV) and specific heat at constant pressure (CP) are calculated for liquid rare earth metals. Our newly constructed parameter free model potential is used to describe the electron ion interaction due to Sarkar et al (S) local field correction function. Lastly, we conclude that our newly constructed model potential is capable to explain the thermophysical properties of liquid rare earth metals.

  9. Role of metal oxides in the thermal degradation of poly(vinyl chloride)

    SciT

    Gupta, M.C.; Viswanath, S.G.

    Thermal degradation of poly(vinyl chloride) has been studied in the presence of metal oxides by a thermogravimetric method. It follows a two-step mechanism. In the first step chlorine free radical is formed as in the case of pure PVC, and in the second step chlorine free radical replaces oxygen from metal oxide to form metal chloride and oxygen free radical. Subsequently, the oxygen free radical abstracts hydrogen from PVC. Formation of metal chloride is the rate-controlling step. The metal chlorides formed during the thermal degradation either volatilize or decompose simultaneously to lower metallic chlorides depending on the boiling point ormore » the volatilization temperature.« less

  10. Progress and recent developments in sodium-metal chloride batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratnakumar, B. V.; Attia, A. I.; Halpert, G.

    1991-01-01

    Significant strides have been made in the development of high-temperature rechargeable sodium batteries utilizing transition metal chloride cathodes in the last decade, mainly due to the expertise available on Na/S batteries. These systems have already performed attractively in the various feasibility studies and have an excellent safety record. Despite the encouraging figures obtained for specific energies, certain design changes such as modifying the geometry of the beta alumina electrolyte and optimization of the porous cathodes for enhanced electrolyte flow need to be made to achieve high power densities required in applications such as electric vehicles and space. The chemistry of MCl2 cathodes, electrode fabrication, and design options are discussed, and performance data are examined.

  11. Manipulation of a Schlenk Line: Preparation of Tetrahydrofuran Complexes of Transition-Metal Chlorides

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Craig M.; Curran, Kelly A.

    2007-01-01

    Before taking an inorganic laboratory course few students have experience handling air-sensitive materials using Schlenk techniques. This exercise introduces them to techniques they will employ in later syntheses. The procedure involves the formation of anhydrous tetrahydrofuran complexes of transition-metal chlorides from metal-chloride hydrates;…

  12. Effects of Rare Earth Metals on Steel Microstructures

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Fei; Zhang, Jian; Chen, Hao-Long; Su, Yen-Hsun; Kuo, Chia-Liang; Su, Yen-Hao; Chen, Shin-Hau; Lin, Kuan-Ju; Hsieh, Ping-Hung; Hwang, Weng-Sing

    2016-01-01

    Rare earth metals are used in semiconductors, solar cells and catalysts. This review focuses on the background of oxide metallurgy technologies, the chemical and physical properties of rare earth (RE) metals, the background of oxide metallurgy, the functions of RE metals in steelmaking, and the influences of RE metals on steel microstructures. Future prospects for RE metal applications in steelmaking are also presented. PMID:28773545

  13. Controlled Acceleration and Inhibition of Bergman Cyclization by Metal Chlorides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, Benjamin P.; Millar, Susan P.; Broene, Richard D.; Buchwald, Stephen L.

    1995-08-01

    The Bergman cyclization has been the subject of renewed interest with the discovery of naturally occurring enediyne-based antitumor agents that cleave DNA by means of an aromatic diradical. These natural substrates have a means to trigger this cycloaromatization process. Control of this reaction by substrate modification would allow aromatic diradicals to be generated selectively. In the studies presented here it is disclosed that the Bergman cyclization of 1,2-bis(diphenyl phosphinoethynyl)benzene was accelerated by a factor of >30,000 by the addition of palladium(II) chloride or platinum(II) chloride and was inhibited by the addition of mercury(II) chloride.

  14. METHOD OF MAKING ALLOYS OF SECOND RARE EARTH SERIES METALS

    DOEpatents

    Baker, R.D.; Hayward, B.R.

    1963-01-01

    >This invention relates to a process for alloying the second rare earth series metals with Mo, Nb, or Zr. A halide of the rare earth metal is mixed with about 1 to 20 at.% of an oxide of Mo, Nb, or Zr. Iodine and an alkali or alkaline earth metal are added, and the resulting mixture is heated in an inert atmosphere to 350 deg C. (AEC)

  15. Effects of Cations on Corrosion of Inconel 625 in Molten Chloride Salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ming; Ma, Hongfang; Wang, Mingjing; Wang, Zhihua; Sharif, Adel

    2016-04-01

    Hot corrosion of Inconel 625 in sodium chloride, potassium chloride, magnesium chloride, calcium chloride and their mixtures with different compositions is conducted at 900°C to investigate the effects of cations in chloride salts on corrosion behavior of the alloy. XRD, SEM/EDS were used to analyze the compositions, phases, and morphologies of the corrosion products. The results showed that Inconel 625 suffers more severe corrosion in alkaline earth metal chloride molten salts than alkaline metal chloride molten salts. For corrosion in mixture salts, the corrosion rate increased with increasing alkaline earth metal chloride salt content in the mixture. Cations in the chloride molten salts mainly affect the thermal and chemical properties of the salts such as vapor pressure and hydroscopicities, which can affect the basicity of the molten salt. Corrosion of Inconel 625 in alkaline earth metal chloride salts is accelerated with increasing basicity.

  16. View of Sodium Chloride inserted onto blueberry jelly within a metal loop on Expedition Six

    2003-03-15

    ISS006-E-39282 (15 March 2003) --- A view of sodium chloride inserted onto blueberry jelly within a 50-millimeter (mm) metal loop was photographed by an Expedition Six crewmember. The water in the sodium chloride solution evaporates as it leaves larger three-dimensional crystals while the blueberry jelly hardens. The experiment took place in the Destiny laboratory on the International Space Station (ISS).

  17. Method of electrode fabrication and an electrode for metal chloride battery

    DOEpatents

    Bloom, I.D.; Nelson, P.A.; Vissers, D.R.

    1993-03-16

    A method of fabricating an electrode for use in a metal chloride battery and an electrode are provided. The electrode has relatively larger and more uniform pores than those found in typical electrodes. The fabrication method includes the steps of mixing sodium chloride particles selected from a predetermined size range with metal particles selected from a predetermined size range, and then rigidifying the mixture. The electrode exhibits lower resistivity values of approximately 0.5 [Omega]cm[sup 2] than those resistivity values of approximately 1.0-1.5 [Omega]cm[sup 2] exhibited by currently available electrodes.

  18. Method of electrode fabrication and an electrode for metal chloride battery

    DOEpatents

    Bloom, Ira D.; Nelson, Paul A.; Vissers, Donald R.

    1993-01-01

    A method of fabricating an electrode for use in a metal chloride battery and an electrode are provided. The electrode has relatively larger and more uniform pores than those found in typical electrodes. The fabrication method includes the steps of mixing sodium chloride particles selected from a predetermined size range with metal particles selected from a predetermined size range, and then rigidifying the mixture. The electrode exhibits lower resistivity values of approximately 0.5 .OMEGA.cm.sup.2 than those resistivity values of approximately 1.0-1.5 .OMEGA.cm.sup.2 exhibited by currently available electrodes.

  19. Adsorption properties of cationic rhodamine B dye onto metals chloride-activated castor bean residue carbons.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Lee Lin; Zaini, Muhammad Abbas Ahmad

    2017-02-01

    This work was aimed to evaluate the feasibility of castor bean residue based activated carbons prepared through metals chloride activation. The activated carbons were characterized for textural properties and surface chemistry, and the adsorption data of rhodamine B were established to investigate the removal performance. Zinc chloride-activated carbon with specific surface area of 395 m 2 /g displayed a higher adsorption capacity of 175 mg/g. Magnesium chloride and iron(III) chloride are less toxic and promising agents for composite chemical activation. The adsorption data obeyed Langmuir isotherm and pseudo-second-order kinetics model. The rate-limiting step in the adsorption of rhodamine B is film diffusion. The positive values of enthalpy and entropy indicate that the adsorption is endothermic and spontaneous at high temperature.

  20. Sliding of poly(vinyl chloride) on metals studied by Auger electron spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepper, S. V.

    1974-01-01

    The sliding of polyvinyl chloride on nickel, iron and S-Monel has been studied by Auger electron spectroscopy. Polymer was not transferred to the metals, rather shear appeared to take place at the interface. The metal was progressively chlorinated as the polymer made multiple passes on the surface. The thickness of this chlorine film was the order of one atomic layer. Electron-induced desorption studies indicate that the chlorine is chemisorbed to the metal. These results are interpreted as evidence for mechanically induced and/or thermal degradation of the polymer during sliding. Degradation products of HCl and Cl2 which chemisorb to the metal are evolved near the interface.

  1. Near-Earth asteroids: Metals occurrence, extraction, and fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westfall, Richard

    1991-01-01

    Near-earth asteroids occur in three principle types of orbits: Amor, Apollo, and Aten. Amor asteroids make relatively close (within 0.3 AU) approaches to the earth's orbit, but do not actually overlap it. Apollo asteroids spend most of their time outside the earth's orbital path, but at some point of close approach to the sun, they cross the orbit of the earth. Aten asteroids are those whose orbits remain inside the earth's path for the majority of their time, with semi-major axes less than 0.1 AU. Near-earth orbit asteroids include: stones, stony-irons, irons, carbonaceous, and super-carbonaceous. Metals within these asteroids include: iron, nickel, cobalt, the platinum group, aluminum, titanium, and others. Focus is on the extraction of ferrous and platinum group metals from the stony-iron asteroids, and the iron asteroids. Extraction of the metal fraction can be accomplished through the use of tunnel-boring-machines (TBM) in the case of the stony-irons. The metals within the story-iron asteroids occur as dispersed granules, which can be separated from the stony fraction through magnetic and gaseous digestion separation techniques. The metal asteroids are processes by drilling and gaseous digestion or by gaseous digestion alone. Manufacturing of structures, housings, framing networks, pressure vessels, mirrors, and other products is accomplished through the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of metal coating on advanced composites and on the inside of contour-defining inflatables (CDI). Metal coatings on advanced composites provide: resistance to degradation in the hostile environments of space; superior optical properties; superior heat dissipation; service as wear coatings; and service as evidential coatings. Metal coatings on the inside of CDI produce metal load-bearing products. Fibers such as graphite, kevlar, glass, ceramic, metal, etc., can be incorporated in the metal coatings on the inside of CDI producing metal matrix products which exhibit high strength

  2. Near-Earth asteroids: Metals occurrence, extraction, and fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westfall, Richard

    Near-earth asteroids occur in three principle types of orbits: Amor, Apollo, and Aten. Amor asteroids make relatively close (within 0.3 AU) approaches to the earth's orbit, but do not actually overlap it. Apollo asteroids spend most of their time outside the earth's orbital path, but at some point of close approach to the sun, they cross the orbit of the earth. Aten asteroids are those whose orbits remain inside the earth's path for the majority of their time, with semi-major axes less than 0.1 AU. Near-earth orbit asteroids include: stones, stony-irons, irons, carbonaceous, and super-carbonaceous. Metals within these asteroids include: iron, nickel, cobalt, the platinum group, aluminum, titanium, and others. Focus is on the extraction of ferrous and platinum group metals from the stony-iron asteroids, and the iron asteroids. Extraction of the metal fraction can be accomplished through the use of tunnel-boring-machines (TBM) in the case of the stony-irons. The metals within the story-iron asteroids occur as dispersed granules, which can be separated from the stony fraction through magnetic and gaseous digestion separation techniques. The metal asteroids are processes by drilling and gaseous digestion or by gaseous digestion alone. Manufacturing of structures, housings, framing networks, pressure vessels, mirrors, and other products is accomplished through the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of metal coating on advanced composites and on the inside of contour-defining inflatables (CDI). Metal coatings on advanced composites provide: resistance to degradation in the hostile environments of space; superior optical properties; superior heat dissipation; service as wear coatings; and service as evidential coatings. Metal coatings on the inside of CDI produce metal load-bearing products. Fibers such as graphite, kevlar, glass, ceramic, metal, etc., can be incorporated in the metal coatings on the inside of CDI producing metal matrix products which exhibit high strength

  3. A Review of Sodium-Metal Chloride Battery Activity At JPL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratnakumar, B. V.; Attia, A. I.; Halpert, G.

    1991-01-01

    Following the disclosures by Coetzer et al. on the use of transition metal chlorides in chloroaluminates as alternate cathodes to sulfur in rechargeable sodium batteries, several laboratories, including the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, focused their attention on these systems. These systems have certain distinct advantages over sodium-sulfur batteries such as increased safety, inherent overcharge capability, and lower operating temperatures. Two systems, i.e., Na/FeCl2 and NaNiCl2, were developed extensively and evaluated in various applications including electric vehicles and space. Their performance has been very encouraging and warrants a detailed fundamental study on these cathodes. At the Jet Propulsion Laboratory a program was initiated two years back to understand the electrochemical behavior of FeCl2 and NiCl2, and to identify and evaluate other transition metal chlorides of promise. The initial efforts focused on the methods of fabrication of the electrodes and their electrochemical characterization. Subsequent studies were aimed at establishing the reaction mechanism, determining the kinetics, and identifying the rate-limiting processes in te reduction of metal chloride cathodes. Nickel chloride emerged form these studies as the most promising candidate material and was taken up for further detailed study on its passivation- a rate limiting process-under different experimental conditions. Also, the feasibility of using copper chloride, which is expected to have a higher energy density, has been assessed. On the basis of the criteria established from the voltammetric response of FeCl2, NiCl2, and CuCl2, several other transition metal chlorides were screened. Of these, molybdenum and cobalt appear promising.

  4. Production of aluminum metal by electrolysis of aluminum sulfide

    DOEpatents

    Minh, N.Q.; Loutfy, R.O.; Yao, N.P.

    1982-04-01

    Metallic aluminum may be produced by the electrolysis of Al/sub 2/S/sub 3/ at 700 to 800/sup 0/C in a chloride melt composed of one or more alkali metal chlorides, and one or more alkaline earth metal chlorides and/or aluminum chloride to provide improved operating characteristics of the process.

  5. Production of aluminum metal by electrolysis of aluminum sulfide

    DOEpatents

    Minh, Nguyen Q.; Loutfy, Raouf O.; Yao, Neng-Ping

    1984-01-01

    Production of metallic aluminum by the electrolysis of Al.sub.2 S.sub.3 at 700.degree.-800.degree. C. in a chloride melt composed of one or more alkali metal chlorides, and one or more alkaline earth metal chlorides and/or aluminum chloride to provide improved operating characteristics of the process.

  6. View of Sodium Chloride inserted onto blueberry jelly within a metal loop on Expedition Six

    2003-03-14

    ISS006-E-39258 (14 March 2003) --- A close up view of sodium chloride inserted onto blueberry jelly within a 50-millimeter (mm) metal loop was photographed by an Expedition Six crewmember. The experiment took place in the Destiny laboratory on the International Space Station (ISS).

  7. View of Sodium Chloride inserted onto blueberry jelly within a metal loop on Expedition Six

    2003-03-14

    ISS006-E-39254 (14 March 2003) --- A view of sodium chloride inserted onto blueberry jelly within a 50-millimeter (mm) metal loop was photographed by an Expedition Six crewmember. The experiment took place in the Destiny laboratory on the International Space Station (ISS).

  8. Effect of metal chloride solutions on coloration and biaxial flexural strength of yttria-stabilized zirconia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Gye-Jeong; Lee, Kwangmin; Lee, Doh-Jae; Lim, Hyun-Pil; Yun, Kwi-Dug; Ban, Jae-Sam; Lee, Kyung-Ku; Fisher, John G.; Park, Sang-Won

    2012-10-01

    The effect of three kinds of transition metal dopants on the color and biaxial flexural strength of zirconia ceramics for dental applications was evaluated. Presintered zirconia discs were colored through immersion in aqueous chromium, molybdenum and vanadium chloride solutions and then sintered at 1450 °C. The color of the doped specimens was measured using a digital spectrophotometer. For biaxial flexural strength measurements, specimens infiltrated with 0.3 wt% of each aqueous chloride solution were used. Uncolored discs were used as a control. Zirconia specimens infiltrated with chromium, molybdenum and vanadium chloride solutions were dark brown, light yellow and dark yellow, respectively. CIE L*, a*, and b* values of all the chromium-doped specimens and the specimens infiltrated with 0.1 wt% molybdenum chloride solution were in the range of values for natural teeth. The biaxial flexural strengths of the three kinds of metal chloride groups were similar to the uncolored group. These results suggest that chromium and molybdenum dopants can be used as colorants to fabricate tooth colored zirconia ceramic restorations.

  9. Crystallographic phases in heavy rare earth metals under megabar pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samudrala, G. K.; Vohra, Y. K.

    2012-07-01

    Experiments aimed at understanding the crystallographic phases of heavy rare earth metals were carried out in a diamond anvil cell at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory. Heavy rare earth metals dysprosium (Dy), holmium (Ho), erbium (Er) and thulium (Tm) were compressed to multi-megabar pressures. The rare earth crystal sequence hcp→Sm-type→dhcp→distorted-fcc (dfcc) is observed in all four elements. Upon further compression, a structural transformation to a monoclinic C2/m phase has been observed. We summarize the results from these experiments and present Rietveld structural refinements on high pressure phases for the specific case of dysprosium.

  10. Syntheses and structures of alkaline earth metal bis(diphenylamides).

    PubMed

    Gärtner, Martin; Fischer, Reinald; Langer, Jens; Görls, Helmar; Walther, Dirk; Westerhausen, Matthias

    2007-06-11

    Various preparative procedures are employed in order to synthesize alkaline earth metal bis(diphenylamides) such as (i) metalation of HNPh2 with the alkaline earth metal M, (ii) metalation of HNPh2 with MPh2, (iii) metathesis reaction of MI2 with KNPh2, (iv) metalation of HNPh2 with PhMI in THF, and (v) metathesis reaction of PhMI with KNPh2 followed by a dismutation reaction yielding MPh2 and M(NPh2)2. The magnesium compounds [(diox)MgPh2]infinity (1) and (thf)2Mg(NPh2)2 (2) show tetracoordinate metal atoms, whereas in (dme)2Ca(NPh2)2 (3), (thf)4Sr(NPh2)2 (4), and (thf)4Ba(NPh2)2 (5) the metals are 6-fold coordinated. Additional agostic interactions between an ipso-carbon of one of the phenyl groups of the amide ligand and the alkaline earth metal atom lead to unsymmetric coordination of the NPh2 anions with two strongly different M-N-C angles in 3-5.

  11. Uranium chloride extraction of transuranium elements from LWR fuel

    DOEpatents

    Miller, William E.; Ackerman, John P.; Battles, James E.; Johnson, Terry R.; Pierce, R. Dean

    1992-01-01

    A process of separating transuranium actinide values from uranium values present in spent nuclear oxide fuels containing rare earth and noble metal fission products as well as other fission products is disclosed. The oxide fuel is reduced with Ca metal in the presence of Ca chloride and a U-Fe alloy which is liquid at about 800.degree. C. to dissolve uranium metal and the noble metal fission product metals and transuranium actinide metals and rare earth fission product metals leaving Ca chloride having CaO and fission products of alkali metals and the alkali earth metals and iodine dissolved therein. The Ca chloride and CaO and the fission products contained therein are separated from the U-Fe alloy and the metal values dissolved therein. The U-Fe alloy having dissolved therein reduced metals from the spent nuclear fuel is contacted with a mixture of one or more alkali metal or alkaline earth metal halides selected from the class consisting of alkali metal or alkaline earth metal and Fe or U halide or a combination thereof to transfer transuranium actinide metals and rare earth metals to the halide salt leaving the uranium and some noble metal fission products in the U-Fe alloy and thereafter separating the halide salt and the transuranium metals dissolved therein from the U-Fe alloy and the metals dissolved therein.

  12. Uranium chloride extraction of transuranium elements from LWR fuel

    DOEpatents

    Miller, W.E.; Ackerman, J.P.; Battles, J.E.; Johnson, T.R.; Pierce, R.D.

    1992-08-25

    A process of separating transuranium actinide values from uranium values present in spent nuclear oxide fuels containing rare earth and noble metal fission products as well as other fission products is disclosed. The oxide fuel is reduced with Ca metal in the presence of Ca chloride and a U-Fe alloy which is liquid at about 800 C to dissolve uranium metal and the noble metal fission product metals and transuranium actinide metals and rare earth fission product metals leaving Ca chloride having CaO and fission products of alkali metals and the alkali earth metals and iodine dissolved therein. The Ca chloride and CaO and the fission products contained therein are separated from the U-Fe alloy and the metal values dissolved therein. The U-Fe alloy having dissolved therein reduced metals from the spent nuclear fuel is contacted with a mixture of one or more alkali metal or alkaline earth metal halides selected from the class consisting of alkali metal or alkaline earth metal and Fe or U halide or a combination thereof to transfer transuranium actinide metals and rare earth metals to the halide salt leaving the uranium and some noble metal fission products in the U-Fe alloy and thereafter separating the halide salt and the transuranium metals dissolved therein from the U-Fe alloy and the metals dissolved therein. 1 figure.

  13. Method for treating rare earth-transition metal scrap

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, F.A.; Peterson, D.T.; Wheelock, J.T.; Jones, L.L.

    1992-12-29

    Rare earth-transition metal (e.g., iron) scrap (e.g., Nd-Fe-B scrap) is flux (slag) remelted to reduce tramp non-metallic impurities, such as oxygen and nitrogen, and metallic impurities, such as Li, Na, Al, etc., picked up by the scrap from previous fabrication operations. The tramp impurities are reduced to concentrations acceptable for reuse of the treated alloy in the manufacture of end-use articles, such as permanent magnets. The scrap is electroslag or inductoslag melted using a rare earth fluoride-bearing flux of CaF[sub 2], CaCl[sub 2] or mixtures thereof or the slag resulting from practice of the thermite reduction process to make a rare earth-iron alloy. 3 figs.

  14. Method for treating rare earth-transition metal scrap

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, Frederick A.; Peterson, David T.; Wheelock, John T.; Jones, Lawrence L.

    1992-12-29

    Rare earth-transition metal (e.g., iron) scrap (e.g., Nd-Fe-B scrap) is flux (slag) remelted to reduce tramp non-metallic impurities, such as oxygen and nitrogen, and metallic impurities, such as Li, Na, Al, etc., picked up by the scrap from previous fabrication operations. The tramp impurities are reduced to concentrations acceptable for reuse of the treated alloy in the manufacture of end-use articles, such as permanent magnets. The scrap is electroslag or inductoslag melted using a prefused, rare earth fluoride-bearing flux of CaF.sub.2, CaCl.sub.2 or mixtures thereof or the slag resulting from practice of the thermite reduction process to make a rare earth-iron alloy.

  15. Rare-Earth Metals and Their Applications in Aviation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-08-01

    metals are not as common as iron and steel which are visible everywhere, yet they are not unfamiliar to us. We often encounter them in everyday life...the flint of a lighter. It is an alloy of rare-earth metal and iron . It contains about 30% iron and the remainder is a composite rare-earth alloy...used to manufacture the detonators of bullets and shells as well as the pyrophoric alloys of firing devices. This type of alloy has a 49.5% content of

  16. Charge-separated and molecular heterobimetallic rare earth-rare earth and alkaline earth-rare earth aryloxo complexes featuring intramolecular metal-pi-arene interactions.

    PubMed

    Deacon, Glen B; Junk, Peter C; Moxey, Graeme J; Ruhlandt-Senge, Karin; St Prix, Courtney; Zuniga, Maria F

    2009-01-01

    Treatment of a rare earth metal (Ln) and a potential divalent rare earth metal (Ln') or an alkaline earth metal (Ae) with 2,6-diphenylphenol (HOdpp) at elevated temperatures (200-250 degrees C) afforded heterobimetallic aryloxo complexes, which were structurally characterised. A charge-separated species [(Ln'/Ae)(2)(Odpp)(3)][Ln(Odpp)(4)] was obtained for a range of metals, demonstrating the similarities between the chemistry of the divalent rare earth metals and the alkaline earth metals. The [(Ln'/Ae)(2)(Odpp)(3)](+) cation in the heterobimetallic structures is unusual in that it consists solely of bridging aryloxide ligands. A molecular heterobimetallic species [AeEu(Odpp)(4)] (Ae = Ca, Sr, Ba) was obtained by treating an alkaline earth metal and Eu metal with HOdpp at elevated temperatures. Similarly, [BaSr(Odpp)(4)] was prepared by treating Ba metal and Sr metal with HOdpp. Treatment of [Ba(2)(Odpp)(4)] with [Mg(Odpp)(2)(thf)(2)] in toluene afforded [Ba(2)(Odpp)(3)][Mg(Odpp)(3)(thf)]. Analogous solution-based syntheses were not possible for [(Ln'/Ae)(2)(Odpp)(3)][Ln(Odpp)(4)] complexes, for which the free-metal route was essential. As a result of the absence of additional donor ligands, the crystal structures of the heterobimetallic complexes feature extensive pi-Ph-metal interactions involving the pendant phenyl groups of the Odpp ligands, thus enabling the large electropositive metal atoms to attain coordination saturation. The charge-separated heterobimetallic species were purified by extraction with toluene/thf mixtures at ambient temperature (Ba-containing compounds) or by extraction with toluene under pressure above the boiling point of the solvent (other products). In donor solvents, heterobimetallic complexes other than those containing barium were found to fragment into homometallic species.

  17. Crown Ether Complexes of Alkali-Metal Chlorides from SO2.

    PubMed

    Reuter, Kirsten; Rudel, Stefan S; Buchner, Magnus R; Kraus, Florian; von Hänisch, Carsten

    2017-07-18

    The structures of alkali-metal chloride SO 2 solvates (Li-Cs) in conjunction with 12-crown-4 or 1,2-disila-12-crown-4 show strong discrepancies, despite the structural similarity of the ligands. Both types of crown ethers form 1:1 complexes with LiCl to give [Li(1,2-disila-12-crown-4)(SO 2 Cl)] (1) and [Li(12-crown-4)Cl]⋅4 SO 2 (2). However, 1,2-disila-12-crown-4 proved unable to coordinate cations too large for the cavity diameter, for example, by the formation of sandwich-type complexes. As a result, 12-crown-4 reacts exclusively with the heavier alkali-metal chlorides NaCl, KCl and RbCl. Compounds [Na(12-crown-4) 2 ]Cl⋅4 SO 2 (3) and [M(12-crown-4) 2 (SO 2 )]Cl⋅4 SO 2 (4: M=K; 5: M=Rb) all showed S-coordination to the chloride ions through four SO 2 molecules. Compounds 4 and 5 additionally exhibit the first crystallographically confirmed non-bridging O,O'-coordination mode of SO 2 . Unexpectedly, the disila-crown ether supports the dissolution of RbCl and CsCl in the solvent and gives the homoleptic SO 2 -solvated alkali-metal chlorides [MCl⋅3 SO 2 ] (6: M=Rb; 7: M=Cs), which incorporate bridging μ-O,O'-coordinating moieties and the unprecedented side-on O,O'-coordination mode. All compounds were characterised by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The crown ether complexes were additionally studied by using NMR spectroscopy, and the presence of SO 2 at ambient temperature was revealed by IR spectroscopy of the neat compounds. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Effect of chloride contamination in MON-1 propellant on crack growth properties of metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moran, C. M.; Toth, L. R.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of a high level of chloride content (800 ppm) in MON-1 propellant on the crack growth properties of seven materials was investigated. Sustained load tests were conducted at 49 C (120 F) temperature with thin gauge tensile specimens having a semi-elliptical surface flaw. Alloys included aluminum 1100, 3003, 5086 and 6061; corrosion resistant steel types A286 and 347; and titanium 6Al-4V. The configurations tested with precracked flaws exposed to MON-1 were: parent or base metal, center weld, and heat affected zone. It was concluded that this chloride level in MON-1 does not affect the stress corrosion, crack growth properties of these alloys after 1000 hour exposure duration under high stresses.

  19. Complexes of metal chlorides with proton donors — promising polyfunctional catalysts for electrophilic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minsker, Karl S.; Ivanova, S. R.; Biglova, Raisa Z.

    1995-05-01

    The Bronsted acids formed as a result of the interaction of aluminium chlorides with Group I and II metal chlorides in the presence of proton-donating compounds are promising polyfunctional catalysts for electrophilic processes (polymerisation, depolymerisation and degradation of macromolecules, alkylation, desulfurisation, and hydrogenation). The factor determing the electrophilic activity and selectivity of the action of the catalysts is their acidity. This makes it possible to predict the direction of the changes in the activity and selectivity of the catalyst in specific chemical processes in conformity with the opposite variation rule: with increase in the acidity of the electrophilic catalyst, their activity increases but the selectivity of their action diminishes. The bibliography includes 72 references.

  20. Shear bond strength between resin cement and colored zirconia made with metal chlorides.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ga-Hyun; Park, Sang-Won; Lee, Kwangmin; Oh, Gye-Jeong; Lim, Hyun-Pil

    2015-06-01

    Although the application of zirconia in esthetic prostheses has increased, the shear bond strength (SBS) between colored zirconia and resin cement has not been investigated. The purpose of this study was to compare the SBS between resin cement and colored zirconia made with metal chlorides. Sixty-four zirconia specimens were divided into 2 groups: one in which the specimens were bonded with resin cement, including 4-META (4-methacryloxyethyl trimellitic anhydride), and one in which the specimens were bonded with resin cement (SEcure, Sun Medical) after being processed with zirconia primer (Zirconia Liner), including 4-META. Each group was then divided into 4 subgroups depending on the coloring liquid. The subgroups were noncolored (control), commercial coloring liquid VITA In-Ceram 2000 YZ LL1, aqueous chromium chloride solution 0.1 wt%, and aqueous molybdenum chloride solution 0.1 wt%. Composite resin cylinders (Filtek Z250, 3M ESPE) were fabricated and bonded to the surface of the zirconia specimen with resin cement (SEcure). All specimens were stored in 37°C distilled water for 24 hours, and the SBS was measured with a universal testing machine. All data were analyzed statistically with 2-way ANOVA and tested post hoc with the Tukey test (α=.05). Significant differences were observed among the SBS values of the colored zirconia depending on the coloring liquid (P<.001) and whether they were processed with zirconia primer (P<.001). The SBS between colored zirconia and resin cement was significantly higher than that of noncolored zirconia and resin cement in groups processed with zirconia primer (P<.05). Colored zirconia immersed in aqueous molybdenum chloride solution showed a significantly higher SBS. Coloring liquid enhanced the SBS between resin cement and zirconia processed with zirconia primer. In particular, colored zirconia immersed in aqueous molybdenum chloride solution showed the highest SBS. Copyright © 2015 Editorial Council for the Journal of

  1. Metal-Organic Synthetic Transporters (MOST): Efficient Chloride and Antibiotic Transmembrane Transporters.

    PubMed

    Kempf, Julie; Schmitzer, Andreea R

    2017-05-05

    We present the synthesis of two functionalized 2,4,7-triphenylbenzimidazole ligands and demonstrate the formation of their respective metal assemblies in phospholipid membranes. Anion transport experiments demonstrate the formation of metal-organic synthetic transporters (MOST) directly in phospholipid membranes. The formation of MOST in phospholipid membranes results in efficient architectures for chloride transport. We also demonstrate the insertion of these ligands and the formation of their metal-organic assemblies in bacterial membranes; the use of MOST makes the membranes of resistant bacteria more permeable to antibiotics. We also demonstrate that a combination of MOST with tetracycline lowers the sensitivity of resistant bacteria to tetracycline by 60-fold. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Vibrational frequencies of transition metal chloride and oxo compounds using effective core potential analytic second derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, Thomas V.; Martin, Richard L.; Hay, P. Jeffrey; Rappé, Anthony K.

    1995-06-01

    The application of analytic second derivative techniques to quantum chemical calculations using effective core potentials is discussed. Using a recent implementation of these techniques, the vibrational frequencies of transition metal compounds are calculated including the chlorides TiCl4, ZrCl4, and HfCl4, the oxochlorides CrO2Cl2, MoO2Cl2, WO2Cl2, and VOCl3, and the oxide OsO4. Results are compared to previous calculations and with experimental results.

  3. Metallic conductivity and air stability in copper chloride intercalated carbon fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshima, H.; Woollam, J. A.; Yavrouian, A.

    1982-12-01

    Carbon-copper chloride intercalation compounds have been obtained by using variously graphitized carbon fibers as host materials. The resultant conductors are air stable, thermally stable to 450 K, have electrical resistivities as low as 12.9 microohm cm at room temperature, and have metallic conductivity temperature dependencies. These intercalated fibers have tensile strengths of 160000 psi, and Young's moduli of 25 x 10 to the 6th psi. For aerospace use, 1/(resistivity x density) is a figure of merit. On this basis, a reduction in resistivity by a factor of two will make this conductor competitive with copper.

  4. Rare earth-transition metal scrap treatment method

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, Frederick A.; Peterson, David T.; Wheelock, John T.; Jones, Lawrence L.; Lincoln, Lanny P.

    1992-02-11

    Rare earth-transition metal (e.g. iron) scrap (e.g. Nd-Fe-B scrap) is melted to reduce the levels of tramp oxygen and nitrogen impurities therein. The tramp impurities are reduced in the melt by virtue of the reaction of the tramp impurities and the rare earth to form dross on the melt. The purified melt is separated from the dross for reuse. The oxygen and nitrogen of the melt are reduced to levels acceptable for reuse of the treated alloy in the manufacture of end-use articles, such as permanent magnets.

  5. Rare earth-transition metal scrap treatment method

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, F.A.; Peterson, D.T.; Wheelock, J.T.; Jones, L.L.; Lincoln, L.P.

    1992-02-11

    Rare earth-transition metal (e.g. iron) scrap (e.g. Nd-Fe-B scrap) is melted to reduce the levels of tramp oxygen and nitrogen impurities therein. The tramp impurities are reduced in the melt by virtue of the reaction of the tramp impurities and the rare earth to form dross on the melt. The purified melt is separated from the dross for reuse. The oxygen and nitrogen of the melt are reduced to levels acceptable for reuse of the treated alloy in the manufacture of end-use articles, such as permanent magnets. 3 figs.

  6. Dynamical Correlation In Some Liquid Alkaline Earth Metals Near Melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakore, B. Y.; Suthar, P. H.; Khambholja, S. G.; Gajjar, P. N.; Jani, A. R.

    2010-12-01

    The study of dynamical variables: velocity autocorrelation function (VACF) and power spectrum of liquid alkaline earth metals (Ca, Sr, and Ba) have been presented based on the static harmonic well approximation. The effective interatomic potential for liquid metals is computed using our well recognized model potential with the exchange correlation functions due to Hartree, Taylor, Ichimaru and Utsumi, Farid et al. and Sarkar et al. It is observed that the VACF computed using Sarkar et al. gives the good agreement with available molecular dynamics simulation (MD) results [Phys Rev. B 62, 14818 (2000)]. The shoulder of the power spectrum depends upon the type of local field correlation function used.

  7. 40 CFR 421.270 - Applicability: Description of the primary rare earth metals subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... primary rare earth metals subcategory. 421.270 Section 421.270 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Primary Rare Earth Metals Subcategory § 421.270 Applicability: Description of the primary rare earth metals subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges resulting from the...

  8. 40 CFR 721.4668 - Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4668 Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions. (a... hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions (PMN P-94-1557) is subject to reporting under...

  9. 40 CFR 721.4668 - Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4668 Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions. (a... hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions (PMN P-94-1557) is subject to reporting under...

  10. 40 CFR 421.270 - Applicability: Description of the primary rare earth metals subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... primary rare earth metals subcategory. 421.270 Section 421.270 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Primary Rare Earth Metals Subcategory § 421.270 Applicability: Description of the primary rare earth metals subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges resulting from the...

  11. 40 CFR 721.4668 - Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4668 Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions. (a... hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions (PMN P-94-1557) is subject to reporting under...

  12. 40 CFR 421.270 - Applicability: Description of the primary rare earth metals subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... primary rare earth metals subcategory. 421.270 Section 421.270 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Primary Rare Earth Metals Subcategory § 421.270 Applicability: Description of the primary rare earth metals subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges resulting from the...

  13. 40 CFR 721.4668 - Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4668 Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions. (a... hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions (PMN P-94-1557) is subject to reporting under...

  14. 40 CFR 421.270 - Applicability: Description of the primary rare earth metals subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... primary rare earth metals subcategory. 421.270 Section 421.270 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Primary Rare Earth Metals Subcategory § 421.270 Applicability: Description of the primary rare earth metals subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges resulting from the...

  15. 40 CFR 421.270 - Applicability: Description of the primary rare earth metals subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... primary rare earth metals subcategory. 421.270 Section 421.270 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Primary Rare Earth Metals Subcategory § 421.270 Applicability: Description of the primary rare earth metals subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges resulting from the...

  16. 40 CFR 721.4668 - Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4668 Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions. (a... hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions (PMN P-94-1557) is subject to reporting under...

  17. Metal Based Synthetic Strategies and the Examination of Structure Determining Factors in Alkaline Earth Metal Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Yuriko

    Last decades have witnessed a large expansion of the organometallic heavier alkaline earth metal species. However, continued growth of this promising area of chemistry has been slowed by severe restrictions and limitations in viable synthetic methodologies leading to difficulties in preparing and characterizing the target compounds. There is clearly a need for the further development of synthetic methodologies and detailed structure function analysis that will promote the further advancement of organoalkaline earth metal chemistry in applications as diverse as materials chemistry and catalysis. This thesis work greatly extends the synthetic options currently available towards organoalkaline earth metal species by introducing redox transmetallation protolysis (RTP), a reaction based on the readily available Ph3Bi as a non-toxic transmetallation agent. Based on a straightforward one-pot procedure and work-up, Ph3Bi based RTP presents a powerful synthetic alternative for the facile preparation of a large variety of heavy alkaline earth metal compounds. The second part of the thesis explores the effect of secondary non covalent interactions on the coordination chemistry as well as thermal properties of a series of novel alkali, alkaline earth, rare earth as well as heterobimetallic alkali/alkaline earth fluoroalkoxides. These compounds showcase the significance of non-covalent M···F-C and agostic interactions on metal stabilization and structural features, providing critical input on ligand design for the design of advanced metal organic vapor deposition (MOCVD) precursor materials. This work also showcases the impact of M···F-C interactions over M---co-ligand coordination, a critical precursor design element as well.

  18. Pentadienyl chemistry of the heavy alkaline-earth metals revisited.

    PubMed

    Reiners, Matthias; Fecker, Ann Christin; Freytag, Matthias; Jones, Peter G; Walter, Marc D

    2014-05-14

    Open-metallocenes of the heavy alkaline-earth metals [(η(5)-Pdl')2M(thf)n] (M = Ca (1), Sr (2), n = 1; M = Ba (3), n = 2; Pdl' = 2,4-tBu2C5H5) are readily prepared by salt-metathesis between MI2 and KPdl' and characterized by NMR spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction studies.

  19. Metal sulfide and rare-earth phosphate nanostructures and methods of making same

    DOEpatents

    Wong, Stanislaus; Zhang, Fen

    2016-06-28

    The present invention provides a method of producing a crystalline rare earth phosphate nanostructure. The method comprising: providing a rare earth metal precursor solution and providing a phosphate precursor solution; placing a porous membrane between the metal precursor solution and the phosphate precursor solution, wherein metal cations of the metal precursor solution and phosphate ions of the phosphate precursor solution react, thereby producing a crystalline rare earth metal phosphate nanostructure.

  20. The use of ionic liquids based on choline chloride for metal deposition: A green alternative?

    PubMed

    Haerens, Kurt; Matthijs, Edward; Chmielarz, Andrzej; Van der Bruggen, Bart

    2009-08-01

    Ionic liquids are studied intensively for different applications. They tend to be denoted as "green solvents", largely because of their low vapour pressure. In recent years toxicity and biotoxicity of ionic liquids have also been investigated, which proved that not all of these are "green". In this paper the use of ionic liquids based on choline chloride and ethylene glycol in electrochemistry is discussed in the context of their use as green solvents. Due to their low toxicity and ready biodegradability, these deep eutectic solvents are promising for the electrodeposition of metals. The influence of the use of these liquids as metal deposition baths on the waste water is investigated. Drag-out was found to be the most influencing parameter on the environmental impact of the process, as it is three times higher compared to classical solutions due to the higher viscosity of the ionic liquid. There are no major changes needed in the rinsing configuration of classic electroplating plants, and ion exchange to remove the metal out of the waste water was not hindered by the presence of the ionic liquid. The formation of by-products during the deposition of metals has to be further investigated and evaluated in consideration of the environmental impact.

  1. An optimal method for phosphorylation of rare earth chlorides in LiCl-KCl eutectic based waste salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eun, H. C.; Kim, J. H.; Cho, Y. Z.; Choi, J. H.; Lee, T. K.; Park, H. S.; Park, G. I.

    2013-11-01

    A study on an optimal method for the phosphorylation of rare earth chlorides in LiCl-KCl eutectic waste salt generated the pyrochemical process of spent nuclear fuel was performed. A reactor with a pitched four blade impeller was designed to create a homogeneous mixing zone in LiCl-KCl eutectic salt. A phosphorylation test of NdCl3 in the salt was carried out by changing the operation conditions (operation temperature, stirring rate, agent injection amount). Based on the results of the test, a proper operation condition (450 °C, 300 rpm, 1 eq. of phosphorylation agent) for over a 0.99 conversion ratio of NdCl3 to NdPO4 was determined. Under this condition, multi-component rare earth (La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Y) chlorides were effectively converted into phosphate forms. It was confirmed that the existing regeneration process of LiCl-KCl eutectic waste salt can be greatly improved and simplified through these phosphorylation test results.

  2. Wet extraction of heavy metals and chloride from MSWI and straw combustion fly ashes

    SciT

    Aguiar del Toro, M.; Calmano, W.; Ecke, H.

    2009-09-15

    Fly ash residues from combustion often do not meet the criteria neither for reuse as construction materials nor landfilling as non-hazardous waste, mainly because of the high concentration of heavy metals and chlorides. This work aimed to technically evaluate an innovative wet treatment process for the extraction of chloride (Cl{sup -}), cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), lead (Pb) and zinc (Zn) from fly ashes from a municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) plant and from a straw combustion (SC) facility. Factors investigated were liquid/solid (L/S) ratio, full carbonation (CO{sub 2} treatment), influence of pH and leaching time, using a two-level full factorialmore » design. The most significant factor for all responses was low pH, followed by L/S ratio. Multiple linear regression models describing the variation in extraction data had R{sup 2} values ranging from 58% to 98%. An optimization of the element extraction models was performed and a set of treatment conditions is suggested.« less

  3. PCDD/F-isomers signature - Effect of metal chlorides and oxides.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mengmei; Buekens, Alfons; Olie, Kees; Li, Xiaodong

    2017-10-01

    A recent paper presented the results from de novo tests, involving 11 distinct catalytic systems (oxides and chlorides of Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, and Zn, as well as a blank sample). Their PCDD and PCDF formation activity was shown. This paper further assesses their isomer signature, with special emphasis on those congeners associated with chlorophenol precursor routes, and on 2,3,7,8- and 1,9-substituted congeners. Each metal catalyst generates a significantly different signature, also affected by the presence or absence of oxygen in the reaction atmosphere. Oxide and chloride catalysts supply distinctive signatures, suggesting singly weighted pathways. Quite a large number of data was handled, so that throughout this analysis special attention was given to testing and developing an appropriate methodology, allowing appropriate correlation analysis and statistical data treatment. The large tables resulting relate to the 11 catalytic systems, studied at 3 levels of oxygen concentration, with 94 PCDD/F-congeners considered individually. They constitute an extensive reference data bank for confronting novel experimental data with this vast data set. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Solubility of some alkali and alkaline earth chlorides in water at moderate temperatures

    Clynne, M.A.; Potter, R.W.

    1979-01-01

    Solubilities for the binary systems, salt-H2O, of the chlorides of lithium, rubidium, cesium, magnesium, calcium, strontium, and barium from near 0??C to the saturated boiling point are reported. The experimental data and coefficients of an equation for a smoothed curve describing each system are listed in the tables. The data are improvements on those previously reported in the literature, having a precision on the average of ??0.09%.

  5. Effect of some metal chlorides on the transformation of pyrite to pyrrhotite

    SciT

    Shiley, R.H.; Konopka, K.L.; Hinckley, C.C.

    1982-08-01

    Samples of the iron-sulfide mineral pyrrhotite were prepared using a procedure designed to closely model the pyrite-to-pyrrhotite conversion that occurs during coal-conversion processing. Pyrite mixed with graphite converts to mixtures of monoclinic and hexagonal pyrrhotite when heated at 500C for 4.5 hours, and an iron-rich pyrrhotite (Fe10S11) forms at 600 to 700C. In addition to temperature effects, the pyrrhotites formed from pyrite in graphite are also dependent on additives or impurities in the form of metal salts. The pyrrhotites used in this study were prepared in the presence of selected transition metal chlorides: PdCl2, NiCl2, CoCl2, ZnCl2, MoCl5, and ZrCl4.more » When these metal salts were used, pyrrhotites with an increased number of iron vacancies were produced. For example, in the presence of ZrCl4 at temperatures as high as 700C, a pyrrhotite was produced that exhibited Moessbauer magnetic-splitting values characteristic of pyrrhotite with a high number of iron vacancies (iron-poor). These pyrrhotites were then converted to troilite at 400C in the presence of CO and H2; and this troilite is an active catalyst for the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis, alkene hydrogenation, the Boudouard reaction, the water-gas shift reaction, and the hydrodesulfurization of organic sulfur compounds.« less

  6. Metal Chloride Induced Formation of Porous Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) Films: Morphology, Thermal Properties and Crystallinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, W. L.; Yaakob, N. N.; Zainal Abidin, A.; Abu Bakar, M.; Abu Bakar, N. H. H.

    2016-06-01

    Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) films with highly porous structures were synthesized using a one phase system comprising of metal chloride/methanol/PHB/chloroform (MCl2/CH3OH/PHB/CHCl3). SEM analyses confirmed that the MCl2 (where M = Cu2+ or Ni2+) induced porous structures with pore sizes ranging from 0.3 - 2.0 μm. The average pore size increased with the increasing MCl2 content. There existed weak physical interactions between the PHB chains and MCl2 as revealed by FTIR and NMR spectroscopies. The residue of MCl2 in the porous PHB film does not exert significant influence on the thermal stability of PHB. Nevertheless, the crystallinity of the prepared film is enhanced, as MCl2 acts as the nucleation sites to promote the growth of spherullites.

  7. Alkaline and alkaline earth metal phosphate halides and phosphors

    DOEpatents

    Lyons, Robert Joseph; Setlur, Anant Achyut; Cleaver, Robert John

    2012-11-13

    Compounds, phosphor materials and apparatus related to nacaphite family of materials are presented. Potassium and rubidium based nacaphite family compounds and phosphors designed by doping divalent rare earth elements in the sites of alkaline earth metals in the nacaphite material families are descried. An apparatus comprising the phosphors based on the nacaphite family materials are presented herein. The compounds presented is of formula A.sub.2B.sub.1-yR.sub.yPO.sub.4X where the elements A, B, R, X and suffix y are defined such that A is potassium, rubidium, or a combination of potassium and rubidium and B is calcium, strontium, barium, or a combination of any of calcium, strontium and barium. X is fluorine, chlorine, or a combination of fluorine and chlorine, R is europium, samarium, ytterbium, or a combination of any of europium, samarium, and ytterbium, and y ranges from 0 to about 0.1.

  8. Metallic rare-earth silicide nanowires on silicon surfaces.

    PubMed

    Dähne, Mario; Wanke, Martina

    2013-01-09

    The formation, atomic structure, and electronic properties of self-assembled rare-earth silicide nanowires on silicon surfaces were studied by scanning tunneling microscopy and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. Metallic dysprosium and erbium silicide nanowires were observed on both the Si(001) and Si(557) surfaces. It was found that they consist of hexagonal rare-earth disilicides for both surface orientations. On Si(001), the nanowires are characterized by a one-dimensional band structure, while the electronic dispersion is two-dimensional for the nanowires formed on Si(557). This behavior is explained by the different orientations of the hexagonal c axis of the silicide leading to different conditions for the carrier confinement. By considering this carrier confinement it is demonstrated how the one-dimensional band structure of the nanowires on Si(001) can be derived from the two-dimensional one of the silicide monolayer on Si(111).

  9. Rare earth element and rare metal inventory of central Asia

    Mihalasky, Mark J.; Tucker, Robert D.; Renaud, Karine; Verstraeten, Ingrid M.

    2018-03-06

    Rare earth elements (REE), with their unique physical and chemical properties, are an essential part of modern living. REE have enabled development and manufacture of high-performance materials, processes, and electronic technologies commonly used today in computing and communications, clean energy and transportation, medical treatment and health care, glass and ceramics, aerospace and defense, and metallurgy and chemical refining. Central Asia is an emerging REE and rare metals (RM) producing region. A newly compiled inventory of REE-RM-bearing mineral occurrences and delineation of areas-of-interest indicate this region may have considerable undiscovered resources.

  10. Reductive mineralization of cellulose with vanadium, iron and tungsten chlorides and access to MxOy metal oxides and MxOy/C metal oxide/carbon composites.

    PubMed

    Henry, Aurélien; Hesemann, Peter; Alauzun, Johan G; Boury, Bruno

    2017-10-15

    M x O y and M x O y /C composites (M=V, Fe and W) were obtained by mineralization of cellulose with several metal chlorides. Cellulose was used both as a templating agent and as an oxygen and a carbon source. Soluble chloride molecules (VOCl 3 and WCl 6 ) and a poorly soluble ionic chloride compound (FeCl 3 ) were chosen as metal oxide precursors. In a first time, primary metal oxide/cellulose composites were obtained via a thermal treatment by reacting urea impregnated filter paper with the corresponding metal chlorides in an autoclave at 150°C after 3days. After either pyrolysis or calcination steps of these intermediate materials, interesting metal oxides with various morphologies were obtained (V 2 O 5, V 2 O 3 , Fe 3 O 4 , WO 3, H 0.23 WO 3 ), composites (V 2 O 3 /C) as well as carbides (hexagonal W 2 C and WC, Fe 3 C) This result highlight the reductive role that can play cellulose during the pyrolysis step that allows to tune the composition of M x O y /C composites. The materials were characterized by FTIR, Raman, TGA, XRD and SEM. This study highlights that cellulose can be used for a convenient preparation of a variety of highly demanded M x O y and M x O y /C composites with original shapes and morphologies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Overexpression of afsR and Optimization of Metal Chloride to Improve Lomofungin Production in Streptomyces lomondensis S015.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Wang, Huasheng; Hu, Hongbo; Peng, Huasong; Zhang, Xuehong

    2015-05-01

    As a global regulatory gene in Streptomyces, afsR can activate the biosynthesis of many secondary metabolites. The effect of afsR on the biosynthesis of a phenazine metabolite, lomofungin, was studied in Streptomyces lomondensis S015. There was a 2.5-fold increase of lomofungin production in the afsR-overexpressing strain of S. lomondensis S015 N1 compared with the wild-type strain. Meanwhile, the transcription levels of afsR and two important genes involved in the biosynthesis of lomofungin (i.e., phzC and phzE) were significantly upregulated in S. lomondensis S015 N1. The optimization of metal chlorides was investigated to further increase the production of lomofungin in the afsR-overexpressing strain. The addition of different metal chlorides to S. lomondensis S015 N1 cultivations showed that CaCl2, FeCl2, and MnCl2 led to an increase in lomofungin biosynthesis. The optimum concentrations of these metal chlorides were obtained using response surface methodology. CaCl2 (0.04 mM), FeCl2 (0.33 mM), and MnCl2 (0.38 mM) gave a maximum lomofungin production titer of 318.0 ± 10.7 mg/l, which was a 4.1-fold increase compared with that of S. lomondensis S015 N1 without the addition of a metal chloride. This work demonstrates that the biosynthesis of phenazine metabolites can be induced by afsR. The results also indicate that metal chlorides addition might be a simple and useful strategy for improving the production of other phenazine metabolites in Streptomyces.

  12. Molten metal containment vessel with rare earth oxysulfide protective coating thereon and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Krikorian, Oscar H.; Curtis, Paul G.

    1992-01-01

    An improved molten metal containment vessel is disclosed in which wetting of the vessel's inner wall surfaces by molten metal is inhibited by coating at least the inner surfaces of the containment vessel with one or more rare earth oxysulfide or rare earth sulfide compounds to inhibit wetting and or adherence by the molten metal to the surfaces of the containment vessel.

  13. Stabilization of molten salt materials using metal chlorides for solar thermal storage.

    PubMed

    Dunlop, T O; Jarvis, D J; Voice, W E; Sullivan, J H

    2018-05-29

    The effect of a variety of metal-chlorides additions on the melting behavior and thermal stability of commercially available salts was investigated. Ternary salts comprised of KNO 3, NaNO 2, and NaNO 3 were produced with additions of a variety of chlorides (KCl, LiCl, CaCl 2 , ZnCl 2 , NaCl and MgCl 2 ). Thermogravimetric analysis and weight loss experiments showed that the quaternary salt containing a 5 wt% addition of LiCl and KCl led to an increase in short term thermal stability compared to the ternary control salts. These additions allowed the salts to remain stable up to a temperature of 630 °C. Long term weight loss experiments showed an upper stability increase of 50 °C. A 5 wt% LiCl addition resulted in a weight loss of only 25% after 30 hours in comparison to a 61% loss for control ternary salts. Calorimetry showed that LiCl additions allow partial melting at 80 °C, in comparison to the 142 °C of ternary salts. This drop in melting point, combined with increased stability, provided a molten working range increase of almost 100 °C in total, in comparison to the control ternary salts. XRD analysis showed the oxidation effect of decomposing salts and the additional phase created with LiCl additions to allow melting point changes to occur.

  14. Temporal Stability of Metal-Chloride-Doped Chemical-Vapour-Deposited Graphene.

    PubMed

    Kang, Moon H; Milne, William I; Cole, Matthew T

    2016-08-18

    Graphene has proven to be a promising material for transparent flexible electronics. In this study, we report the development of a transfer and doping scheme of large-area chemical vapour deposited (CVD) graphene. A technique to transfer the as-grown material onto mechanically flexible and optically transparent polymeric substrates using an ultraviolet adhesive (UVA) is outlined, along with the temporal stability of the sheet resistance and optical transparency following chemical doping with various metal chlorides (Mx Cly The sheet resistance (RS ) and 550 nm optical transparency (%T550 ) of the transferred un-doped graphene was 3.5 kΩ sq(-1) (±0.2 kΩ sq(-1) ) and 84.1 % (±2.9 %), respectively. Doping with AuCl3 showed a notable reduction in RS by some 71.4 % (to 0.93 kΩ sq(-1) ) with a corresponding %T550 of 77.0 %. After 200 h exposure to air at standard temperature and pressure, the increase in RS was found to be negligible (ΔRS AuCl3 =0.06 kΩ sq(-1) ), indicating that, of the considered Mx Cly species, AuCl3 doping offered the highest degree of time stability under ambient conditions. There appears a tendency of increasing RS with time for the remaining metal chlorides studied. We attribute the observed temporal shift to desorption of molecular dopants. We find that desorption was most significant in RhCl3 -doped samples whereas, in contrast, after 200 h in ambient conditions, AuCl3 -doped graphene showed only marginal desorption. The results of this study demonstrate that chemical doping of UVA-transferred graphene is a promising means for enhancing large-area CVD graphene in order to realise a viable platform for next-generation optically transparent and mechanically flexible electronics. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Fluorescent probes and bioimaging: alkali metals, alkaline earth metals and pH.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jun; Hu, Ying; Yoon, Juyoung

    2015-07-21

    All living species and life forms have an absolute requirement for bio-functional metals and acid-base equilibrium chemistry owing to the critical roles they play in biological processes. Hence, a great need exists for efficient methods to detect and monitor biometals and acids. In the last few years, great attention has been paid to the development of organic molecule based fluorescent chemosensors. The availability of new synthetic fluorescent probes has made fluorescence microscopy an indispensable tool for tracing biologically important molecules and in the area of clinical diagnostics. This review highlights the recent advances that have been made in the design and bioimaging applications of fluorescent probes for alkali metals and alkaline earth metal cations, including lithium, sodium and potassium, magnesium and calcium, and for pH determination within biological systems.

  16. Chemical Reduction of SIM MOX in Molten Lithium Chloride Using Lithium Metal Reductant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Tetsuya; Usami, Tsuyoshi; Kurata, Masaki; Inoue, Tadashi; Sims, Howard E.; Jenkins, Jan A.

    2007-09-01

    A simulated spent oxide fuel in a sintered pellet form, which contained the twelve elements U, Pu, Am, Np, Cm, Ce, Nd, Sm, Ba, Zr,Mo, and Pd, was reduced with Li metal in a molten LiCl bath at 923 K. More than 90% of U and Pu were reduced to metal to form a porous alloy without significant change in the Pu/U ratio. Small fractions of Pu were also combined with Pd to form stable alloys. In the gap of the porous U-Pu alloy, the aggregation of the rare-earth (RE) oxide was observed. Some amount of the RE elements and the actinoides leached from the pellet. The leaching ratio of Am to the initially loaded amount was only several percent, which was far from about 80% obtained in the previous ones on simple MOX including U, Pu, and Am. The difference suggests that a large part of Am existed in the RE oxide rather than in the U-Pu alloy. The detection of the RE elements and actinoides in the molten LiCl bath seemed to indicate that they dissolved into the molten LiCl bath containing the oxide ion, which is the by-product of the reduction, as solubility of RE elements was measured in the molten LiCl-Li2O previously.

  17. Rare-earth metal prices in the USA ca. 1960 to 1994

    Hedrick, James B.

    1997-01-01

    Rare-earth metal prices were compiled from the late 1950s and early 1960s through 1994. Although commercial demand for rare-earth metals began in 1908, as the alloy mischmetal, commercial quantities of a wide range of individual rare-earth metals were not available until the late 1950s. The discovery of a large, high-grade rare-earth deposit at Mountain Pass. CA, USA, in 1949, was significant because it led to the production of commercial quantities or rare-earth elements that reduced prices and encouraged wider application of the materials. The availability of ore from Mountain Pass, and other large rare-earth deposits, especially those in Australia and China, has provided the world with abundant resources for rare-earth metal production. This availability, coupled with improved technology from Government and private-sector metallurgical research, has resulted in substantial decreases in rare-earth metal prices since the late 1950s and early 1960s. Price series for the individual rare-earth metals (except promethium) are quoted on a kilogram basis from the late 1950s and early 1960s through 1994. Prices are given in US dollars on an actual and constant dollar basis. Industrial and economic factors affecting prices during this time period are examined.

  18. Rare-earth metal prices in the USA ca. 1960 to 1994

    Hedrick, J.B.

    1997-01-01

    Rare-earth metal prices were compiled from the late 1950s and early 1960s through 1994. Although commercial demand for rare-earth metals began in 1908, as the alloy mischmetal, commercial quantities of a wide range of individual rare-earth metals were not available until the late 1950s. The discovery of a large, high-grade rare-earth deposit at Mountain Pass, CA, USA, in 1949, was significant because it led to the production of commercial quantities of rare-earth elements that reduced prices and encouraged wider application of the materials. The availability of ore from Mountain Pass, and other large rare-earth deposits, especially those in Australia and China, has provided the world with abundant resources for rare-earth metal production. This availability, coupled with improved technology from Government and private-sector metallurgical research, has resulted in substantial decreases in rare-earth metal prices since the late 1950s and early 1960s. Price series for the individual rare-earth metals (except promethium) are quoted on a kilogram basis from the late 1950s and early 1960s through 1994. Prices are given in US dollars on an actual and constant dollar basis. Industrial and economic factors affecting prices during this time period are examined.

  19. Distribution of chloride, pH, resistivity, and sulfate levels in backfill for mechanically-stabilized earth walls and implications for corrosion testing : [summary].

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2015-04-01

    Road construction projects often require mechanically stabilized earth (MSE), earthwork : construction in which soil is retained by walls and reinforced with wire mesh, metal strips, : and structural geosynthetics (geotextile or geogrid). The fill so...

  20. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopic Study on Eu 2+ and Sr 2+ Using Liquid Metal Cathodes in Molten Chlorides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumiya, Masahiko; Takagi, Ryuzo

    2000-08-01

    For the pyrochemical reprocessing of spent metallic nuclear fuels in molten salt baths it is important to investigate the behavior of the electrochemically negative elements Eu and Sr, which are significant fission products. Voltammetric and chronopotentiometric studies have shown that the reduction of Eu 2+ and Sr 2+ on liquid Pb cathodes in molten chloride baths at 1073 K follows the alloy formation reaction: Eu 2+ + 2e- + 3Pb → EuPb 3 and Sr 2+ + 2e- + 3Pb → SrPb 3 . In the present work these alloy formation reactions were studiedby electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Analysis of the spectra showed that the electronic exchange of Eu 2+ /Eu and Sr 2+ /Sr is quasi-re-versible. Moreover, the experimental results allowed the determination of the kinetic parameters of EU 2+ /EU and Sr 2+ /Sr, the diffusion coefficients of these species in molten chloride baths, and also the diffusion layer thickness.

  1. Direct chemical reduction of neptunium oxide to neptunium metal using calcium and calcium chloride

    DOE PAGES

    Squires, Leah N.; Lessing, Paul

    2016-01-13

    A process of direct reduction of neptunium oxide to neptunium metal using calcium metal as the reducing agent is discussed. After reduction of the oxide to metal, the metal is separated by density from the other components of the reaction mixture and can easily removed upon cooling. Furthermore, the direct reduction technique consistently produces high purity (98%–99% pure) neptunium metal.

  2. When VSEPR Fails: Experimental and Theoretical Investigations of the Behavior of Alkaline-Earth-Metal Acetylides

    PubMed Central

    Guino-o, Marites A.; Alexander, Jacob S.; McKee, Michael L.; Hope, Håkon; Englich, Ulrich B.

    2014-01-01

    The synthesis, structural, and spectral characterization as well as a theoretical study of a family of alkaline-earth-metal acetylides provides insights into synthetic access and the structural and bonding characteristics of this group of highly reactive compounds. Based on our earlier communication that reported unusual geometry for a family of triphenylsilyl-substituted alkaline-earth-metal acetylides, we herein present our studies on an expanded family of target derivatives, providing experimental and theoretical data to offer new insights into the intensively debated theme of structural chemistry in heavy alkaline-earth-metal chemistry. PMID:19844925

  3. Catalysts Based on Earth-Abundant Metals for Visible Light-Driven Water Oxidation Reaction.

    PubMed

    Lin, Junqi; Han, Qing; Ding, Yong

    2018-06-04

    Exploration of water oxidation catalyst (WOC) with excellent performance is the key for the overall water splitting reaction, which is a feasible strategy to convert solar energy to chemical energy. Although some compounds composed of noble metals, mainly Ru and Ir, have been reported to catalyze water oxidation with high efficiency, catalysts based on low-cost and earth-abundant transition metals are essential for realizing economical and large-scale light-driven water splitting. Various WOCs containing earth-abundant metals (mainly Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu) have been utilized for visible light-driven water oxidation in recent years. In this Personal Account, we summarize our recent developments in WOCs based on earth-abundant transition metals including polyoxometalates (POMs), metal oxides or bimetal oxides, and metal complexes containing multidentate ligand scaffolds for visible light-driven water oxidation reaction. © 2018 The Chemical Society of Japan & Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Process optimization and kinetics for leaching of rare earth metals from the spent Ni-metal hydride batteries.

    PubMed

    Meshram, Pratima; Pandey, B D; Mankhand, T R

    2016-05-01

    Nickel-metal hydride batteries (Ni-MH) contain not only the base metals, but valuable rare earth metals (REMs) viz. La, Sm, Nd, Pr and Ce as well. In view of the importance of resource recycling and assured supply of the contained metals in such wastes, the present study has focussed on the leaching of the rare earth metals from the spent Ni-MH batteries. The conditions for the leaching of REMs from the spent batteries were optimized as: 2M H2SO4, 348K temperature and 120min of time at a pulp density (PD) of 100g/L. Under this condition, the leaching of 98.1% Nd, 98.4% Sm, 95.5% Pr and 89.4% Ce was achieved. Besides the rare earth metals, more than 90% of base metals (Ni, Co, Mn and Zn) were also leached out in this condition. Kinetic data for the dissolution of all the rare earth metals showed the best fit to the chemical control shrinking core model. The leaching of metals followed the mechanism involving the chemical reaction proceeding on the surface of particles by the lixiviant, which was corroborated by the XRD phase analysis and SEM-EDS studies. The activation energy of 7.6, 6.3, 11.3 and 13.5kJ/mol was acquired for the leaching of neodymium, samarium, praseodymium and cerium, respectively in the temperature range 305-348K. From the leach liquor, the mixed rare earth metals were precipitated at pH∼1.8 and the precipitated REMs was analyzed by XRD and SEM studies to determine the phases and the morphological features. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Wetting of a Charged Surface of Glassy Carbon by Molten Alkali-Metal Chlorides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanov, V. P.

    2018-03-01

    Values of the contact angle of wetting of a surface of glassy carbon by molten chlorides of lithium, sodium, potassium, and cesium are measured by the meniscus weight method to determine the common factors of wettability of solid surfaces by ionic melts upon a change in the salt phase composition and a jump in electric potential. It is found that with a potential shift in the positive direction the shape of the curve of the contact angle's dependence on the potential varies upon substitution of one salt by another: the angle of wetting shrinks monotonously in lithium chloride but remains constant in molten cesium chloride. This phenomenon is explained by the hypothesis that the nature of the halide anion adsorption on the positively charged surface of an electrode is chemical and not electrostatic. It is shown that the adsorption process is accompanied by charge transfer through the interface, with covalent bonding between the adsorbent and adsorbate.

  6. Changes in the IR Spectra of Aqueous Solutions of Alkali Metal Chlorides during Crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koroleva, A. V.; Matveev, V. K.; Koroleva, L. A.; Pentin, Yu. A.

    2018-02-01

    The IR spectra of aqueous solutions of sodium chloride and rubidium chloride with the same concentration of 0.1 M upon freezing are studied in the middle IR region. The changes that occur in the absorption bands of the bending ν2, compound ν2 + νL, and stretching (ν1, 2ν2, and ν3) vibrations of water molecules with gradual crystallization of the solutions are studied. The obtained spectra of crystallized solutions are compared to the IR spectrum of ice Ih. Analysis allows conclusions about the structure of the investigated frozen crystallized solutions.

  7. Mapping the Galvanic Corrosion of Three Coupled Metal Alloys Using Coupled Multielectrode Array: Influence of Chloride Ion Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Duan, JinZhuo; Cao, Ning

    2018-01-01

    The galvanic corrosion behavior of three metal alloys commonly used in water desalination plants was investigated using coupled multielectrode arrays consisting of aluminum-brass (HAl77-2), titanium alloy (TA2), and 316L stainless steel (316L SS). The three electrode types were coupled galvanically and arranged in different geometric configurations. Their corrosion behavior was characterized as a function of the chloride concentration. The potential and current distributions of the three-electrode coupling systems display electrochemical inhomogeneity. Generally, the aluminum-brass wires are anodic versus the titanium alloy and stainless steel. The titanium alloy acts as a primary cathode, and the 316L SS acts as a secondary cathode. The corrosion rate of aluminum-brass depends on the concentration of chloride ion, with a maximum corrosion rate at a chloride concentration of 2.3 wt %. In terms of geometrical arrangements, when the anodic HAl77-2 wires are located on the edge and are connected to the 316L SS wires in the coupling system, the main anodic area enlarges, especially in the area adjacent to the 316L SS wires. When the HAl77-2 wires are located between (in the middle of) the two other types of wires, the corrosion rates are higher than the corrosion rates observed from the other two geometrical arrangements. PMID:29677150

  8. Mapping the Galvanic Corrosion of Three Coupled Metal Alloys Using Coupled Multielectrode Array: Influence of Chloride Ion Concentration.

    PubMed

    Ju, Hong; Duan, JinZhuo; Yang, Yuanfeng; Cao, Ning; Li, Yan

    2018-04-20

    The galvanic corrosion behavior of three metal alloys commonly used in water desalination plants was investigated using coupled multielectrode arrays consisting of aluminum-brass (HAl77-2), titanium alloy (TA2), and 316L stainless steel (316L SS). The three electrode types were coupled galvanically and arranged in different geometric configurations. Their corrosion behavior was characterized as a function of the chloride concentration. The potential and current distributions of the three-electrode coupling systems display electrochemical inhomogeneity. Generally, the aluminum-brass wires are anodic versus the titanium alloy and stainless steel. The titanium alloy acts as a primary cathode, and the 316L SS acts as a secondary cathode. The corrosion rate of aluminum-brass depends on the concentration of chloride ion, with a maximum corrosion rate at a chloride concentration of 2.3 wt %. In terms of geometrical arrangements, when the anodic HAl77-2 wires are located on the edge and are connected to the 316L SS wires in the coupling system, the main anodic area enlarges, especially in the area adjacent to the 316L SS wires. When the HAl77-2 wires are located between (in the middle of) the two other types of wires, the corrosion rates are higher than the corrosion rates observed from the other two geometrical arrangements.

  9. Structural and Dynamical Properties of Alkaline Earth Metal Halides in Supercritical Water: Effect of Ion Size and Concentration.

    PubMed

    Keshri, Sonanki; Tembe, B L

    2017-11-22

    Constant temperature-constant pressure molecular dynamics simulations have been performed for aqueous alkaline earth metal chloride [M 2+ -Cl - (M = Mg, Ca, Sr, and Ba)] solutions over a wide range of concentrations (0.27-5.55 m) in supercritical (SC) and ambient conditions to investigate their structural and dynamical properties. A strong influence of the salt concentration is observed on the ion-ion pair correlation functions in both ambient and SC conditions. In SC conditions, significant clustering is observed in the 0.27 m solution, whereas the reverse situation is observed at room temperature and this is also supported by the residence times of the clusters. The concentration and ion size (cation size) seem to have opposite effects on the average number of hydrogen bonds. The simulation results show that the self-diffusion coefficients of water, cations, and the chloride ion increase with increasing temperature, whereas they decrease with increasing salt concentration. The cluster size distribution shows a strong density dependence in both ambient and SC conditions. In SC conditions, cluster sizes display a near-Gaussian distribution, whereas the distribution decays monotonically in ambient conditions.

  10. Process for preparing higher oxides of the alkali and alkaline earth metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadhukhan, P.; Bell, A. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    High purity inorganic higher oxides of the alkali and alkaline earth metals are prepared by subjecting the hydroxide of the alkali and alkaline earth metal to a radio frequency discharge sustained in oxygen. The process is particulary adaptable to the production of high purity potassium superoxide by subjecting potassium hydroxide to glow discharge sustained in oxygen under the pressure of about 0.75 to 1.00 torr.

  11. High Pressure Phase Transformations in Heavy Rare Earth Metals and Connections to Actinide Crystal Structures

    SciT

    Vohra, Yogesh K.; Sangala, Bagvanth Reddy; Stemshorn, Andrew K.

    2008-07-01

    High-pressure studies have been performed on heavy rare earth metals Terbium (Tb) to 155 GPa and Holmium (Ho) to 134 GPa in a diamond anvil cell at room temperature. The following crystal structure sequence was observed in both metals hcp {yields} Sm-type {yields} dhcp {yields} distorted fcc (hR-24) {yields} monoclinic (C2/m) with increasing pressure. The last transformation to a low symmetry monoclinic phase is accompanied by a volume collapse of 5 % for Tb at 51 GPa and a volume collapse of 3 % for Ho at 103 GPa. This volume collapse under high pressure is reminiscent of f-shell delocalizationmore » in light rare earth metal Cerium (Ce), Praseodymium (Pr), and heavy actinide metals Americium (Am) and Curium (Cm). The orthorhombic Pnma phase that has been reported in Am and Cm after f-shell delocalization is not observed in heavy rare earth metals under high pressures. (authors)« less

  12. Exploration of Metal Chloride Uptake for Improved Performance Characteristics of PbSe Quantum Dot Solar Cells

    SciT

    Marshall, Ashley R.; Young, Matthew R.; Nozik, Arthur J.

    2015-08-06

    We explored the uptake of metal chloride salts with +1 to +3 metals of Na+, K+, Zn2+, Cd2+, Sn2+, Cu2+, and In3+ by PbSe QD solar cells. We also compared CdCl2 to Cd acetate and Cd nitrate treatments. PbSe QD solar cells fabricated with a CdCl2 treatment are stable for more than 270 days stored in air. We studied how temperature and immersion times affect optoelectronic properties and photovoltaic cell performance. Uptake of Cd2+ and Zn2+ increase open circuit voltage, whereas In3+ and K+ increase the photocurrent without influencing the spectral response or first exciton peak position. Using the mostmore » beneficial treatments we varied the bandgap of PbSe QD solar cells from 0.78 to 1.3 eV and find the improved VOC is more prevalent for lower bandgap QD solar cells.« less

  13. Metal-free Synthesis of Ynones from Acyl Chlorides and Potassium Alkynyltrifluoroborate Salts

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Cassandra L.; Bolshan, Yuri

    2015-01-01

    Ynones are a valuable functional group and building block in organic synthesis. Ynones serve as a precursor to many important organic functional groups and scaffolds. Traditional methods for the preparation of ynones are associated with drawbacks including harsh conditions, multiple purification steps, and the presence of unwanted byproducts. An alternative method for the straightforward preparation of ynones from acyl chlorides and potassium alkynyltrifluoroborate salts is described herein. The adoption of organotrifluoroborate salts as an alternative to organometallic reagents for the formation of new carbon-carbon bonds has a number of advantages. Potassium organotrifluoroborate salts are shelf stable, have good functional group tolerance, low toxicity, and a wide variety are straightforward to prepare. The title reaction proceeds rapidly at ambient temperature in the presence of a Lewis acid without the exclusion of air and moisture. Fair to excellent yields may be obtained via reaction of various aryl and alkyl acid chlorides with alkynyltrifluoroborate salts in the presence of boron trichloride. PMID:25742169

  14. Optical amplifier operating at 1.3 microns useful for telecommunications and based on dysprosium-doped metal chloride host materials

    DOEpatents

    Page, R.H.; Schaffers, K.I.; Payne, S.A.; Krupke, W.F.; Beach, R.J.

    1997-12-02

    Dysprosium-doped metal chloride materials offer laser properties advantageous for use as optical amplifiers in the 1.3 {micro}m telecommunications fiber optic network. The upper laser level is characterized by a millisecond lifetime, the host material possesses a moderately low refractive index, and the gain peak occurs near 1.31 {micro}m. Related halide materials, including bromides and iodides, are also useful. The Dy{sup 3+}-doped metal chlorides can be pumped with laser diodes and yield 1.3 {micro}m signal gain levels significantly beyond those currently available. 9 figs.

  15. Optical amplifier operating at 1.3 microns useful for telecommunications and based on dysprosium-doped metal chloride host materials

    DOEpatents

    Page, Ralph H.; Schaffers, Kathleen I.; Payne, Stephen A.; Krupke, William F.; Beach, Raymond J.

    1997-01-01

    Dysprosium-doped metal chloride materials offer laser properties advantageous for use as optical amplifiers in the 1.3 .mu.m telecommunications fiber optic network. The upper laser level is characterized by a millisecond lifetime, the host material possesses a moderately low refractive index, and the gain peak occurs near 1.31 .mu.m. Related halide materials, including bromides and iodides, are also useful. The Dy.sup.3+ -doped metal chlorides can be pumped with laser diodes and yield 1.3 .mu.m signal gain levels significantly beyond those currently available.

  16. Yttrium and rare earth stabilized fast reactor metal fuel

    DOEpatents

    Guon, Jerold; Grantham, LeRoy F.; Specht, Eugene R.

    1992-01-01

    To increase the operating temperature of a reactor, the melting point and mechanical properties of the fuel must be increased. For an actinide-rich fuel, yttrium, lanthanum and/or rare earth elements can be added, as stabilizers, to uranium and plutonium and/or a mixture of other actinides to raise the melting point of the fuel and improve its mechanical properties. Since only about 1% of the actinide fuel may be yttrium, lanthanum, or a rare earth element, the neutron penalty is low, the reactor core size can be reduced, the fuel can be burned efficiently, reprocessing requirements are reduced, and the nuclear waste disposal volumes reduced. A further advantage occurs when yttrium, lanthanum, and/or other rare earth elements are exposed to radiation in a reactor, they produce only short half life radioisotopes, which reduce nuclear waste disposal problems through much shorter assured-isolation requirements.

  17. Environmental Defects And Economic Impact On Global Market Of Rare Earth Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charalampides, G.; Vatalis, K.; Karayannis, V.; Baklavaridis, A.

    2016-11-01

    Rare earth elements include the 14 lanthanides as well as lanthanium and often yttrium. Actually, most of them are not very rare and occur widely dispersed in a variety of rocks. Rare earth metals are vital to some of the world's faster growing industries: catalysts, Nd-magnets, ceramics, glass, metallurgy, battery alloys, electronics and phosphors. Worldwide, the main countries for distribution of rare earths deposits include China, USA, Russia, Brasil, India, Australia, Greenland and Malaysia. The mining and processing of rare earth metals usually result in significant environmental defects. Many deposits are associated with high concentrations of radioactive elements such as uranium and thorium, which requires separate treatment and disposal. The accumulation of rare earth elements in soils has occurred due to pollution caused by the exploitation of rare earth resources and the wide use of rare earths as fertilizers in agriculture. This accumulation has a toxic effect on the soil microfauna community. However, there are large differences in market prices due to the degree of purity determined by the specifications in the applications. The main focus of this article is to overview Rare Earth Metals’ overall impact on global economy and their environmental defects on soils during processing techniques and as they are used as fertilizers.

  18. In-situ imaging of chloride ions at the metal/solution interface by scanning combination microelectrodes

    SciT

    Lin, C.J.; Du, R.G.; Nguyen, T.

    2000-01-01

    Combination solid silver-silver chloride (Ag-AgCl) and liquid membrane Cl{sup {minus}} ion-selective microelectrodes were designed and constructed. These microelectrodes, which had a micrometer-sized tip, contained two compartments: one served as the reference electrode and the other as the Cl{sup {minus}} ion-selective electrode. The microelectrodes were used to map in-situ Cl{sup {minus}} ion distribution in several localized corrosion systems. When used with a computerized scanning stage, the microelectrodes provided information on the distribution of Cl{sup {minus}} ions near the metal/electrolyte interface. Cl{sup {minus}} ions were observed migrating toward and accumulating near the anodic region forming a Cl{sup {minus}}ion-rich island on the metalmore » surface. Scanning combination Cl{sup {minus}} ion-selective microelectrodes may provide a useful tool for mechanistic studies of localized corrosion.« less

  19. Galvanic reduction of uranium(III) chloride from LiCl-KCl eutectic salt using gadolinium metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagri, Prashant; Zhang, Chao; Simpson, Michael F.

    2017-09-01

    The drawdown of actinides is an important unit operation to enable the recycling of electrorefiner salt and minimization of waste. A new method for the drawdown of actinide chlorides from LiCl-KCl molten salt has been demonstrated here. Using the galvanic interaction between the Gd/Gd(III) and U/U(III) redox reactions, it is shown that UCl3 concentration in eutectic LiCl-KCl can be reduced from 8.06 wt.% (1.39 mol %) to 0.72 wt.% (0.12 mol %) in about an hour via plating U metal onto a steel basket. This is a simple process for returning actinides to the electrorefiner and minimizing their loss to the salt waste stream.

  20. Synthesis, characterization and metal adsorption properties of the new ion exchanger polymer 3-n-propyl(4-methylpyridinium) silsesquioxane chloride.

    PubMed

    Magosso, H A; Panteleimonov, A V; Kholin, Y V; Gushikem, Y

    2006-11-01

    The preparation and anion exchange properties of 3-n-propyl(4-methylpyridinium) silsesquioxane chloride polymer are described. This new polymer was prepared by the sol-gel processing method and is designated as SiPic+Cl-. It is insoluble in water and showed an anion exchange capacity of 1.46x10(-3) mol g-1. The adsorption isotherms of ZnCl2, CdCl2 and HgCl2 were determined from aqueous solutions and the adsorption equilibria simulations fit the model of fixed bidentate centers with the absence of lateral interactions and energetic heterogeneity between them. The metal ions diffuse into the solid solution interface and are dominantly present as MCl2-(4) species for Zn(II), MCl(2-)4 and MCl-3 species for Cd(II) and MCl-3 species for Hg(II).

  1. The Effect of Rare-Earth Metals on Cast Steels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1954-04-01

    as the 1-inch section is also illustrated in Figure 23 and consists of tempered bainite and tempered martensite. Both of the control steels (AE-1...section Tempered bainite and tempered martensite 4 inch section Figure 23 Microstructure ol the Mn-Cr-Mo base control steels . Etched with... bainite 4-inch Section Figure 25—Microstructures of the MnCr-Mo + Rare Earths f B cast steels . Etched with picral, SOOX - .1 €. Figure 26

  2. Voltage Control of Rare-Earth Magnetic Moments at the Magnetic-Insulator-Metal Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leon, Alejandro O.; Cahaya, Adam B.; Bauer, Gerrit E. W.

    2018-01-01

    The large spin-orbit interaction in the lanthanides implies a strong coupling between their internal charge and spin degrees of freedom. We formulate the coupling between the voltage and the local magnetic moments of rare-earth atoms with a partially filled 4 f shell at the interface between an insulator and a metal. The rare-earth-mediated torques allow the power-efficient control of spintronic devices by electric-field-induced ferromagnetic resonance and magnetization switching.

  3. Low frequency vibrational spectra and the nature of metal-oxygen bond of alkaline earth metal acetylacetonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakheri, Hamideh; Tayyari, Sayyed Faramarz; Heravi, Mohammad Momen; Morsali, Ali

    2017-12-01

    Theoretical quantum chemistry calculations were used to assign the observed vibrational band frequencies of Be, Mg, Ca, Sr, and Ba acetylacetonates complexes. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations have been carried out at the B3LYP level, using LanL2DZ, def2SVP, and mixed, GenECP, (def2SVP for metal ions and 6-311++G** for all other atoms) basis sets. The B3LYP level, with mixed basis sets, was utilized for calculations of vibrational frequencies, IR intensity, and Raman activity. Analysis of the vibrational spectra indicates that there are several bands which could almost be assigned mainly to the metal-oxygen vibrations. The strongest Raman band in this region could be used as a measure of the stability of the complex. The effects of central metal on the bond orders and charge distributions in alkaline earth metal acetylacetonates were studied by the Natural Bond Orbital (NBO) method for fully optimized compounds. Optimization were performed at the B3LYP/6-311++G** level for the lighter alkaline earth metal complexes (Be, Mg, and Ca acetylacetonates) while the B3LYP level, using LanL2DZ (extrabasis, d and f on oxygen and metal atoms), def2SVP and mixed (def2SVP on metal ions and 6-311++G** for all other atoms) basis sets for all understudy complexes. Calculations indicate that the covalence nature of metal-oxygen bonds considerably decreases from Be to Ba complexes. The nature of metal-oxygen bond was further studied by using Atoms In Molecules (AIM) analysis. The topological parameters, Wiberg bond orders, natural charges of O and metal ions, and also some vibrational band frequencies were correlated with the stability constants of understudy complexes.

  4. Rare-earth metal halogenide encapsulation-induced modifications in Raman spectra of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharlamova, M. V.

    2015-01-01

    In the present work, a detailed Raman spectroscopy investigation on the single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) filled with praseodymium chloride, terbium chloride and thulium chloride was performed. The salts were incorporated inside the SWCNTs by a capillary filling method using melts, and the high-resolution transmission electron microscopy data proved the high filling degree of the nanotube channels. A thorough analysis of the radial breathing mode and G-band of the Raman spectra of the pristine and filled SWCNTs showed that the encapsulated salts cause acceptor doping of the host nanotubes, and the doping efficiency depends on the compound. The incorporated thulium chloride has the strongest doping effect on the SWCNTs, whereas praseodymium chloride has the weakest effect. It was found that the encapsulated salts modify more significantly the electronic structure of metallic nanotubes than semiconducting SWCNTs.

  5. Trivalent Rare-Earth-Metal Bis(trimethylsilyl)amide Halide Complexes by Targeted Oxidations.

    PubMed

    Bienfait, André M; Wolf, Benjamin M; Törnroos, Karl W; Anwander, Reiner

    2018-05-07

    In contrast to previously applied salt metathesis protocols the targeted rare-earth-metal compounds Ln[N(SiMe 3 ) 2 ] 2 (halogenido) were accessed by oxidation of Ln(II) silylamide precursors. Treatment of Sm[N(SiMe 3 ) 3 ] 2 (thf) 2 with 0.5 equiv of C 2 Cl 6 or 0.25 equiv of TeBr 4 in thf and crystallization thereof gave [Sm{N(SiMe 3 ) 2 } 2 (μ-X)(thf)] 2 (X = Cl, Br). A similar reaction/crystallization procedure performed with 0.5 equiv of 1,2-diiodoethane gave monomeric Sm[N(SiMe 3 ) 2 ] 2 I(thf) 2 . Switching to Yb[N(SiMe 3 ) 2 ] 2 (thf) 2 , the aforementioned oxidants generated monomeric five-coordinate complexes Yb[N(SiMe 3 ) 2 ] 2 X(thf) 2 (X = Cl, Br, I). The reaction of Eu[N(SiMe 3 ) 2 ] 2 (thf) 2 with 0.5 equiv of C 2 Cl 6 in thf yielded the separated ion pair [Eu{N(SiMe 3 ) 2 } 3 Cl][(thf) 5 Eu(μ-Cl) 2 Eu(thf) 5 ]. Performing the chlorination in n-hexane led to oxidation followed by rapid disproportionation into EuCl 3 (thf) x and Eu[N(SiMe 3 ) 2 ] 3 . The bromination reaction did not afford crystalline material, while the iodination gave crystals of divalent EuI 2 (thf) 5 . Use of trityl chloride (Ph 3 CCl) as the oxidant in thf accomplished the Eu(III) species [Eu{N(SiMe 3 ) 2 } 2 (μ-Cl)(thf)] 2 . In situ oxidation of putative [Tm{N(SiMe 3 ) 2 } 2 (thf) x ] using 0.5 equiv of C 2 Cl 6 in thf followed by crystallization from n-hexane led to the formation of a mixture of [Tm{N(SiMe 3 ) 2 } 2 (μ-Cl)(thf)] 2 and Tm[N(SiMe 3 ) 2 ] 3 . Switching the oxidant to 0.5 equiv of 1,2-diiodoethane and crystallizing from thf repeatedly afforded the bis-halogenated complex Tm[N(SiMe 3 ) 2 ]I 2 (thf) 3 .

  6. New technology of extracting the amount of rare earth metals from the red mud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martoyan, G. A.; Karamyan, G. G.; Vardan, G. A.

    2016-01-01

    The paper outlined the environmental and economic problems associated with red mud - the waste generated in processing of bauxite ore for aluminum production. The chemical analysis of red mud has identified a number of useful elements including rare earth metals. The electromembrane technology of red mud processing with extraction of valuable elements is described. A possible scheme of separation of these metals through electrolysis is also given.

  7. Effect of layer number and metal-chloride dopant on multiple layers of graphene/porous Si solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Dong Hee; Kim, Jong Min; Jang, Chan Wook; Kim, Ju Hwan; Kim, Sung; Choi, Suk-Ho

    2018-03-01

    Porous silicon (PSi) is an attractive building block for Si-based solar cells due to its low reflectance. Here, PSi is prepared by metal-assisted chemical etching of a Si wafer on which Au nanoparticles are formed by sputtering for 5 s. The layer number (Ln) of graphene is varied to optimize multiple layers of graphene/PSi Schottky junction solar cells because the sheet resistance, work function, transmittance, and reflectance of graphene strongly depend on Ln. At Ln = 2, the best condition for the highest power conversion efficiency (PCE), various metal chlorides are employed as dopants for graphene. The PCE is maximally enhanced to 9.15% by doping the graphene with RhCl3 and is reduced by only 20% of its original value (absolutely from 9.15% to 7.23%) during 10 days in air. These results are very meaningful in that even a single doping for graphene can be effective for achieving high PCE from graphene/PSi solar cells by controlling Ln.

  8. Sub-Chronic Oral Exposure to Iridium (III) Chloride Hydrate in Female Wistar Rats: Distribution and Excretion of the Metal

    PubMed Central

    Iavicoli, Ivo; Fontana, Luca; Bergamaschi, Antonio; Conti, Marcelo Enrique; Pino, Anna; Mattei, Daniela; Bocca, Beatrice; Alimonti, Alessandro

    2012-01-01

    Iridium tissue distribution and excretion in female Wistar rats following oral exposure to iridium (III) chloride hydrate in drinking water (from 1 to 1000 ng/ml) in a sub-chronic oral study were determined. Samples of urine, feces, blood and organs (kidneys, liver, lung, spleen and brain) were collected at the end of exposure. The most prominent fractions of iridium were retained in kidney and spleen; smaller amounts were found in lungs, liver and brain. Iridium brain levels were lower than those observed in other tissues but this finding can support the hypothesis of iridium capability to cross the blood brain barrier. The iridium kidney levels rose significantly with the administered dose. At the highest dose, important amounts of the metal were found in serum, urine and feces. Iridium was predominantly excreted via feces with a significant linear correlation with the ingested dose, which is likely due to low intestinal absorption of the metal. However, at the higher doses iridium was also eliminated through urine. These findings may be useful to help in the understanding of the adverse health effects, particularly on the immune system, of iridium dispersed in the environment as well as in identifying appropriate biological indices of iridium exposure. PMID:22942873

  9. Flight Engineer Donald R. Pettit looks closely at Sodium Chloride within a 50-millimeter metal loop

    2003-03-12

    ISS006-E-39142 (12 March 2003) --- Astronaut Donald R. Pettit, Expedition Six NASA ISS science officer, looks closely at a water bubble within a 50-millimeter metal loop. The experiment took place in the Destiny laboratory on the International Space Station (ISS).

  10. Aluminum/alkaline earth metal composites and method for producing

    DOEpatents

    Russell, Alan M; Anderson, Iver E; Kim, Hyong J; Freichs, Andrew E

    2014-02-11

    A composite is provided having an electrically conducting Al matrix and elongated filaments comprising Ca and/or Sr and/or Ba disposed in the matrix and extending along a longitudinal axis of the composite. The filaments initially comprise Ca and/or Sr and/or Ba metal or allow and then may be reacted with the Al matrix to form a strengthening intermetallic compound comprising Al and Ca and/or Sr and/or Ba. The composite is useful as a long-distance, high voltage power transmission conductor.

  11. Pore-Environment Engineering with Multiple Metal Sites in Rare-Earth Porphyrinic Metal-Organic Frameworks.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liangliang; Yuan, Shuai; Feng, Liang; Guo, Bingbing; Qin, Jun-Sheng; Xu, Ben; Lollar, Christina; Sun, Daofeng; Zhou, Hong-Cai

    2018-04-23

    Multi-component metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) with precisely controlled pore environments are highly desired owing to their potential applications in gas adsorption, separation, cooperative catalysis, and biomimetics. A series of multi-component MOFs, namely PCN-900(RE), were constructed from a combination of tetratopic porphyrinic linkers, linear linkers, and rare-earth hexanuclear clusters (RE 6 ) under the guidance of thermodynamics. These MOFs exhibit high surface areas (up to 2523 cm 2  g -1 ) and unlimited tunability by modification of metal nodes and/or linker components. Post-synthetic exchange of linear linkers and metalation of two organic linkers were realized, allowing the incorporation of a wide range of functional moieties. Two different metal sites were sequentially placed on the linear linker and the tetratopic porphyrinic linker, respectively, giving rise to an ideal platform for heterogeneous catalysis. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Rare earth zirconium oxide buffer layers on metal substrates

    DOEpatents

    Williams, Robert K.; Paranthaman, Mariappan; Chirayil, Thomas G.; Lee, Dominic F.; Goyal, Amit; Feenstra, Roeland

    2001-01-01

    A laminate article comprises a substrate and a biaxially textured (RE.sub.x A.sub.(1-x)).sub.2 O.sub.2-(x/2) buffer layer over the substrate, wherein 0metal-organic decomposition. The laminate article can include a layer of YBCO over the (RE.sub.x A.sub.(1-x)).sub.2 O.sub.2-(x/2) buffer layer. A layer of CeO.sub.2 between the YBCO layer and the (RE.sub.x A.sub.(1-x)).sub.2 O.sub.2-(x/2) buffer layer can also be include. Further included can be a layer of YSZ between the CeO.sub.2 layer and the (RE.sub.x A.sub.(1-x)).sub.2 O.sub.2-(x/2) buffer layer. The substrate can be a biaxially textured metal, such as nickel. A method of forming the laminate article is also disclosed.

  13. Composite nanoparticles containing rare earth metal and methods of preparation thereof

    SciT

    Kandapallil, Binil Itty Ipe; Krishnan, Lakshmi; Johnson, Francis

    The present invention is directed to composite nanoparticles comprising a metal, a rare earth element, and, optionally, a complexing ligand. The invention is also directed to composite nanoparticles having a core-shell structure and to processes for preparation of composite nanoparticles of the invention.

  14. Adsorption Behavior of Rare Earth Metal Cations in the Interlayer Space of γ-ZrP.

    PubMed

    Takei, Takahiro; Iidzuka, Kiyoaki; Miura, Akira; Yanagida, Sayaka; Kumada, Nobuhiro; Magome, Eisuke; Moriyoshi, Chikako; Kuroiwa, Yoshihiro

    2016-10-04

    Adsorption competencies of rare earth metal cations in γ-zirconium phosphate were examined by ICP, synchrotron X-ray diffraction (SXRD), and ab initio simulation. The adsorption amounts are around 0.06-0.10 per zirconium phosphate. From the SXRD patterns of the adsorbed samples, the basal spacing estimated by c sin β increased linearly with an increasing ionic radius of rare earth metal cation, though a and b lattice constants show no change. These SXRD patterns can be classified into four groups that have different super lattices. The four superlattices have multiplicities of x131, x241, and x221 for the xabc axis, and the location of the rare earth metal cation in the original unit cell changes depending on the superlattice cell. In the x131 superlattice, Yb and Er occupied the site near the zirconium phosphate layer, though La and Ce in the x221 superlattice remained in the center position between the phosphate sheet. For the ab initio simulation of γ-ZrP with the typical rare earth metal cations (Tb, Eu, Dy, and La), the results of simulation show a similar tendency of the position estimated by SXRD refinements.

  15. Experimentally determined Si isotope fractionation between silicate and Fe metal and implications for Earth's core formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahar, Anat; Ziegler, Karen; Young, Edward D.; Ricolleau, Angele; Schauble, Edwin A.; Fei, Yingwei

    2009-10-01

    Stable isotope fractionation amongst phases comprising terrestrial planets and asteroids can be used to elucidate planet-forming processes. To date, the composition of the Earth's core remains largely unknown though cosmochemical and geophysical evidence indicates that elements lighter than iron and nickel must reside there. Silicon is often cited as a light element that could explain the seismic properties of the core. The amount of silicon in the core, if any, can be deduced from the difference in 30Si/ 28Si between meteorites and terrestrial rocks if the Si isotope fractionation between silicate and Fe-rich metal is known. Recent studies (e.g., [Georg R.B., Halliday A.N., Schauble E.A., Reynolds B.C., 2007. Silicon in the Earth's core. Nature 447 (31), 1102-1106.]; [Fitoussi, C., Bourdon, B., Kleine, T., Oberli, F., Reynolds, B. C., 2009. Si isotope systematics of meteorites and terrestrial peridotites: implications for Mg/Si fractionation in the solar nebula and for Si in the Earth's core. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 287, 77-85.]) showing (sometimes subtle) differences between 30Si/ 28Si in meteorites and terrestrial rocks suggest that Si missing from terrestrial rocks might be in the core. However, any conclusion based on Earth-meteorite comparisons depends on the veracity of the 30Si/ 28Si fractionation factor between silicates and metals at appropriate conditions. Here we present the first direct experimental evidence that silicon isotopes are not distributed uniformly between iron metal and rock when equilibrated at high temperatures. High-precision measurements of the silicon isotope ratios in iron-silicon alloy and silicate equilibrated at 1 GPa and 1800 °C show that Si in silicate has higher 30Si/ 28Si than Si in metal, by at least 2.0‰. These findings provide an experimental foundation for using isotope ratios of silicon as indicators of terrestrial planet formation processes. They imply that if Si isotope equilibrium existed during segregation of Earth

  16. Genotoxicity of two heavy metal compounds: lead nitrate and cobalt chloride in Polychaete Perinereis cultrifera.

    PubMed

    Singh, Nisha; Bhagat, Jacky; Ingole, Baban S

    2017-07-01

    The present study explores the in vivo and in vitro genotoxic effects of lead nitrate, [Pb(NO 3 ) 2 ] a recognized environmental pollutant and cobalt chloride (CoCl 2 ), an emerging environmental pollutant in polychaete Perinereis cultrifera using comet assay. Despite widespread occurrence and extensive industrial applications, no previous published reports on genotoxicity of these compounds are available in polychaete as detected by comet assay. Polychaetes were exposed in vivo to Pb(NO 3 ) 2 (0, 100, 500, and 1000 μg/l) and CoCl 2 (0, 100, 300, and 500 μg/l) for 5 days. At 100 μg/l Pb(NO 3 ) 2 concentration, tail DNA (TDNA) values in coelomocytes were increase by 1.16, 1.43, and 1.55-fold after day 1, day 3, and day 5, whereas, OTM showed 1.12, 2.33, and 2.10-fold increase in in vivo. Pb(NO 3 ) 2 showed a concentration and time-dependent genotoxicity whereas CoCl 2 showed a concentration-dependent genotoxicity in in vivo. A concentration-dependent increase in DNA damage was observed in in vitro studies for Pb(NO 3 ) 2 and CoCl 2 . DNA damage at 500 μg/L showed almost threefold increase in TDNA and approximately fourfold increase in OTM as compared to control in in vitro. Our studies suggest that Pb(NO 3 ) 2 and CoCl 2 have potential to cause genotoxic damage, with Pb(NO 3 ) 2 being more genotoxic in polychaete and should be used more carefully in industrial and other activities. Graphical abstract.

  17. Determination of Thermodynamic Properties of Alkaline Earth-liquid Metal Alloys Using the Electromotive Force Technique

    PubMed Central

    Nigl, Thomas P.; Smith, Nathan D.; Lichtenstein, Timothy; Gesualdi, Jarrod; Kumar, Kuldeep; Kim, Hojong

    2017-01-01

    A novel electrochemical cell based on a CaF2 solid-state electrolyte has been developed to measure the electromotive force (emf) of binary alkaline earth-liquid metal alloys as functions of both composition and temperature in order to acquire thermodynamic data. The cell consists of a chemically stable solid-state CaF2-AF2 electrolyte (where A is the alkaline-earth element such as Ca, Sr, or Ba), with binary A-B alloy (where B is the liquid metal such as Bi or Sb) working electrodes, and a pure A metal reference electrode. Emf data are collected over a temperature range of 723 K to 1,123 K in 25 K increments for multiple alloy compositions per experiment and the results are analyzed to yield activity values, phase transition temperatures, and partial molar entropies/enthalpies for each composition. PMID:29155770

  18. Effect of rare earth metal on the spin-orbit torque in magnetic heterostructures

    SciT

    Ueda, Kohei; Pai, Chi-Feng; Tan, Aik Jun

    2016-06-06

    We report the effect of the rare earth metal Gd on current-induced spin-orbit torques (SOTs) in perpendicularly magnetized Pt/Co/Gd heterostructures, characterized using harmonic measurements and spin-torque ferromagnetic resonance (ST-FMR). By varying the Gd metal layer thickness from 0 nm to 8 nm, harmonic measurements reveal a significant enhancement of the effective fields generated from the Slonczewski-like and field-like torques. ST-FMR measurements confirm an enhanced effective spin Hall angle and show a corresponding increase in the magnetic damping constant with increasing Gd thickness. These results suggest that Gd plays an active role in generating SOTs in these heterostructures. Our finding may lead tomore » spin-orbitronics device application such as non-volatile magnetic random access memory, based on rare earth metals.« less

  19. Asymmetric Catalysis with bis(hydroxyphenyl)diamides/rare-earth metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Kumagai, Naoya; Shibasaki, Masakatsu

    2013-01-02

    A series of asymmetric catalysts composed of conformationally flexible amide-based chiral ligands and rare-earth metals was developed for proton-transfer catalysis. These ligands derived from amino acids provide an intriguing chiral platform for the formation of asymmetric catalysts upon complexation with rare-earth metals. The scope of this arsenal of catalysts was further broadened by the development of heterobimetallic catalytic systems. The cooperative function of hydrogen bonding and metal coordination resulted in intriguing substrate specificity and stereocontrol, and the dynamic nature of the catalysts led to a switch of their function. Herein, we summarize our recent exploration of this class of catalysts. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Selective extraction and recovery of rare earth metals from phosphor powders in waste fluorescent lamps using an ionic liquid system.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Kubota, Fukiko; Baba, Yuzo; Kamiya, Noriho; Goto, Masahiro

    2013-06-15

    The recycling of rare earth metals from phosphor powders in waste fluorescent lamps by solvent extraction using ionic liquids was studied. Acid leaching of rare earth metals from the waste phosphor powder was examined first. Yttrium (Y) and europium (Eu) dissolved readily in the acid solution; however, the leaching of other rare earth metals required substantial energy input. Ionization of target rare earth metals from the waste phosphor powders into the leach solution was critical for their successful recovery. As a high temperature was required for the complete leaching of all rare earth metals, ionic liquids, for which vapor pressure is negligible, were used as an alternative extracting phase to the conventional organic diluent. An extractant, N, N-dioctyldiglycol amic acid (DODGAA), which was recently developed, showed a high affinity for rare earth metal ions in liquid-liquid extraction although a conventional commercial phosphonic extractant did not. An effective recovery of the rare earth metals, Y, Eu, La and Ce, from the metal impurities, Fe, Al and Zn, was achieved from the acidic leach solution of phosphor powders using an ionic liquid containing DODGAA as novel extractant system. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. High pressure phase transitions in the rare earth metal erbium to 151 GPa.

    PubMed

    Samudrala, Gopi K; Thomas, Sarah A; Montgomery, Jeffrey M; Vohra, Yogesh K

    2011-08-10

    High pressure x-ray diffraction studies have been performed on the heavy rare earth metal erbium (Er) in a diamond anvil cell at room temperature to a pressure of 151 GPa and Er has been compressed to 40% of its initial volume. The rare earth crystal structure sequence hcp → Sm type → dhcp → distorted fcc (hcp: hexagonal close packed; fcc: face centered cubic; dhcp: double hcp) is observed in Er below 58 GPa. We have carried out Rietveld refinement of crystal structures in the pressure range between 58 GPa and 151 GPa. We have examined various crystal structures that have been proposed for the distorted fcc (dfcc) phase and the post-dfcc phase in rare earth metals. We find that the hexagonal hR 24 structure is the best fit between 58 and 118 GPa. Above 118 GPa, a structural transformation from hR 24 phase to a monoclinic C 2/m phase is observed with a volume change of - 1.9%. We have also established a clear trend for the pressure at which a post-dfcc phase is formed in rare earth metals and show that there is a monotonic increase in this pressure with the filling of 4f shell.

  2. High pressure phase transitions in the rare earth metal erbium to 151 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samudrala, Gopi K.; Thomas, Sarah A.; Montgomery, Jeffrey M.; Vohra, Yogesh K.

    2011-08-01

    High pressure x-ray diffraction studies have been performed on the heavy rare earth metal erbium (Er) in a diamond anvil cell at room temperature to a pressure of 151 GPa and Er has been compressed to 40% of its initial volume. The rare earth crystal structure sequence {hcp} \\to {Sm}~ {type} \\to {dhcp} \\to {distorted} fcc (hcp: hexagonal close packed; fcc: face centered cubic; dhcp: double hcp) is observed in Er below 58 GPa. We have carried out Rietveld refinement of crystal structures in the pressure range between 58 GPa and 151 GPa. We have examined various crystal structures that have been proposed for the distorted fcc (dfcc) phase and the post-dfcc phase in rare earth metals. We find that the hexagonal hR 24 structure is the best fit between 58 and 118 GPa. Above 118 GPa, a structural transformation from hR 24 phase to a monoclinic C 2/m phase is observed with a volume change of - 1.9%. We have also established a clear trend for the pressure at which a post-dfcc phase is formed in rare earth metals and show that there is a monotonic increase in this pressure with the filling of 4f shell.

  3. The corrosion behavior of technetium metal exposed to aqueous sulfate and chloride solutions

    DOE PAGES

    Kolman, David Gary; Goff, George Scott; Cisneros, Michael Ruben; ...

    2017-04-19

    Here, metal waste forms are being studied as possible disposal forms for technetium and other fission products from spent nuclear fuel. As an initial step in assessing the viability of waste forms, technetium corrosion and passivity behavior was assessed across a broad pH spectrum (pH –1 to pH 13). Measurements indicate that the open circuit potential falls into the region of Tc +7 stability, more noble than the region of presumed passivity. Potentiodynamic polarization tests indicate that the Tc samples are not passive. Both electrochemical results and visual inspection suggest the presence of a nonprotective film. The corrosion rate ismore » relatively independent of pH and low, as measured by linear polarization resistance. No evidence of passivity was observed in the Tc +4 region of the potential-pH diagram following in-situ abrasion, suggesting that Tc does not passivate, regardless of potential.« less

  4. The corrosion behavior of technetium metal exposed to aqueous sulfate and chloride solutions

    SciT

    Kolman, David Gary; Goff, George Scott; Cisneros, Michael Ruben

    Here, metal waste forms are being studied as possible disposal forms for technetium and other fission products from spent nuclear fuel. As an initial step in assessing the viability of waste forms, technetium corrosion and passivity behavior was assessed across a broad pH spectrum (pH –1 to pH 13). Measurements indicate that the open circuit potential falls into the region of Tc +7 stability, more noble than the region of presumed passivity. Potentiodynamic polarization tests indicate that the Tc samples are not passive. Both electrochemical results and visual inspection suggest the presence of a nonprotective film. The corrosion rate ismore » relatively independent of pH and low, as measured by linear polarization resistance. No evidence of passivity was observed in the Tc +4 region of the potential-pH diagram following in-situ abrasion, suggesting that Tc does not passivate, regardless of potential.« less

  5. Adsorption of alkali and alkaline earth metal atoms and dimers on monolayer germanium carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gökçe, Aytaç Gürhan; Ersan, Fatih

    2017-01-01

    First-principles plane wave calculations have been performed to study the adsorption of alkali and alkaline earth metals on monolayer germanium carbide (GeC). We found that the favourable adsorption sites on GeC sheet for single alkali and alkaline earth adatoms are generally different from graphene or germanene. Among them, Mg, Na and their dimers have weakly bounded to GeC due to their closed valence electron shells, so they may have high mobility on GeC. Two different levels of adatom coverage (? and ?) have been investigated and we concluded that different electronic structures and magnetic moments for both coverages owing to alkali and alkaline earth atoms have long range electrostatic interactions. Lithium atom prefers to adsorbed on hollow site similar to other group-IV monolayers and the adsorption results in metallisation of GeC instead of semiconducting behaviour. Na and K adsorption can induce 1 ? total magnetic moment on GeC structures and they have shown semiconductor property which may have potential use in spintronic devices. We also showed that alkali or alkaline earth metal atoms can form dimer on GeC sheet. Calculated adsorption energies suggest that clustering of alkali and alkaline earth atoms is energetically favourable. All dimer adsorbed GeC systems have nonmagnetic semiconductor property with varying band gaps from 0.391 to 1.311 eV which are very suitable values for various device applications.

  6. Phosphates behaviours in conversion of FP chlorides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amamoto, I.; Kofuji, H.; Myochin, M.; Takasaki, Y.; Terai, T.

    2009-06-01

    The spent electrolyte of the pyroprocessing by metal electrorefining method should be considered for recycling after removal of fission products (FP) such as, alkali metals (AL), alkaline earth metals (ALE), and/or rare earth elements (REE), to reduce the volume of high-level radioactive waste. Among the various methods suggested for this purpose is precipitation by converting FP from chlorides to phosphates. Authors have been carrying out the theoretical analysis and experiment showing the behaviours of phosphate precipitates so as to estimate the feasibility of this method. From acquired results, it was found that AL except lithium and ALE are unlikely to form phosphate precipitates. However their conversion behaviours including REE were compatible with the theoretical analysis; in the case of LaPO 4 as one of the REE precipitates, submicron-size particles could be observed while that of Li 3PO 4 was larger; the precipitates were apt to grow larger at higher temperature; etc.

  7. Recovery of Platinum Group Metals from Spent Catalysts Using Iron Chloride Vapor Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taninouchi, Yu-ki; Okabe, Toru H.

    2018-05-01

    The recovery of platinum group metals (PGMs) from spent automobile catalysts is a difficult process because of their relatively low contents in the scrap. In this study, to improve the efficiency of the existing recycling techniques, a novel physical concentration method involving treatment with FeCl2 vapor has been examined. The reactions occurring between typical catalyst components and FeCl2 vapor are discussed from the thermodynamic point of view, and the validity of the proposed technique was experimentally verified. The obtained results indicate that the vapor treatment at around 1200 K (927 °C) can effectively alloy PGMs (Pt, Pd, and Rh) with Fe, resulting in the formation of a ferromagnetic alloy. It was also confirmed that cordierite and alumina (the major catalyst components) remained unreacted after the vapor treatment, while ceria species were converted into oxychlorides. The samples simulating the automobile catalyst were also subjected to magnetic separation after the treatment with FeCl2 vapor; as a result, PGMs were successfully extracted and concentrated in the form of a magnetic powder. Thus, the FeCl2 vapor treatment followed by magnetic separation can be utilized for recovering PGMs directly from spent catalysts as an effective pretreatment for the currently used recycling methods.

  8. Metal accumulation and nephron heterogeneity in mercuric chloride-induced acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Wilks, M F; Gregg, N J; Bach, P H

    1994-01-01

    The present study was designed to assess the effects of mercury on glomerular integrity during the early phase of acute renal failure. The silver amplification method showed distribution of mercury in midcortical and juxtamedullary glomeruli and on the brush border of the S2 segment of the proximal tubule 15 min after treatment. At 30 min, there was a decrease in glomerular staining and increased mercury in the proximal tubule. After 3 hr, mercury was no longer detectable in glomeruli but was widespread in the lumen of the proximal tubule. By 24 hr, mercury was prominent in all proximal tubular segments throughout the cortex. The presence of mercury in glomeruli was not related to hemodynamic changes, as there was no evidence for blood redistribution toward juxtamedullary glomeruli as assessed by the filling of the microvascular system with Monastral Blue B. The reduced activity of horseradish peroxidase (administered i.v. 90 sec and 10 min before sacrifice) in juxtamedullary glomeruli 30 min after mercury administration suggests a decreased uptake of horseradish peroxidase or an increased glomerular protein filtration. These data support glomerular filtration as the predominant excretory route for mercury, highlight the marked nephron heterogeneity in the distribution of this metal, and show that impairment of glomerular integrity occurs before necrosis of the proximal tubules and acute renal failure.

  9. Controlled synthesis of racemic indenyl rare-earth metal complexes via the cooperation between the intramolecular coordination of donor atoms and a bridge.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shuangliu; Wu, Zhangshuan; Zhou, Lingmin; Wang, Shaowu; Zhang, Lijun; Zhu, Xiancui; Wei, Yun; Zhai, Jinhua; Wu, Jie

    2013-06-03

    The reactions of Me2Si(C9H6CH2CH2-DG)2 (DG = NMe2 (1), CH2NMe2 (2), OMe (3), and N(CH2CH2)2O (4)) with [(Me3Si)2N]3RE(μ-Cl)Li(THF)3 in toluene afforded a series of racemic divalent rare-earth metal complexes: {η(5):η(1):η(5):η(1)-Me2Si(C9H5CH2CH2-DG)2}RE (DG = NMe2, RE = Yb (6) and Eu (7); DG = CH2NMe2, RE = Yb (8), Eu (9), and Sm (10); DG = OMe, RE = Yb (11) and Eu (12); DG = N(CH2CH2)2O, RE = Yb (13) and Eu (14)). Similarly, the racemic divalent rare-earth metal complexes {η(5):η(1):η(5):η(1)-Me2Si(C9H5CH2CH2CH2NMe2)(C9H5CH2CH2OMe)}RE (RE = Yb (15) and Eu (16)) were also obtained. The reaction of Me2Si(C9H5CH2CH2OMe)2Li2 with NdCl3 gave a racemic dimeric neodymium chloride {η(5):η(1):η(5)-Me2Si(C9H5CH2CH2OMe)2NdCl}2 (17), whereas the reaction of Me2Si(C9H5CH2CH2NMe2)2Li2 with SmCl3 afforded a racemic dinuclear samarium chloride bridged by lithium chloride {η(5):η(1):η(5):η(1)-Me2Si(C9H5CH2CH2NMe2)2SmCl}2(μ-LiCl) (18). Further reaction of complex 18 with LiCH2SiMe3 provided an unexpected rare-earth metal alkyl complex {η(5):η(1):η(5):η(1):σ-Me2Si(C9H5CH2CH2NMe2)[(C9H5CH2CH2N(CH2)Me]}Sm (19) through the activation of an sp(3) C-H bond α-adjacent to the nitrogen atom. Complexes 19 and {η(5):η(1):η(5):η(1):σ-Me2Si(C9H5CH2CH2NMe2)[(C9H5CH2CH2N(CH2)Me]}Y (20) were also obtained by one-pot reactions of Me2Si(C9H5CH2CH2NMe2)2Li2 with RECl3 followed by treatment with LiCH2SiMe3. All compounds were fully characterized by spectroscopic methods and elemental analysis. Complexes 6-10 and 14-20 were further characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. All of the prepared rare-earth metal complexes were racemic, suggesting that racemic organo rare-earth metal complexes could be controllably synthesized by the cooperation between a bridge and the intramolecular coordination of donor atoms.

  10. Rare earth element recycling from waste nickel-metal hydride batteries.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiuli; Zhang, Junwei; Fang, Xihui

    2014-08-30

    With an increase in number of waste nickel-metal hydride batteries, and because of the importance of rare earth elements, the recycling of rare earth elements is becoming increasingly important. In this paper, we investigate the effects of temperature, hydrochloric acid concentration, and leaching time to optimize leaching conditions and determine leach kinetics. The results indicate that an increase in temperature, hydrochloric acid concentration, and leaching time enhance the leaching rate of rare earth elements. A maximum rare earth elements recovery of 95.16% was achieved at optimal leaching conditions of 70°C, solid/liquid ratio of 1:10, 20% hydrochloric acid concentration, -74μm particle size, and 100min leaching time. The experimental data were best fitted by a chemical reaction-controlled model. The activation energy was 43.98kJ/mol and the reaction order for hydrochloric acid concentration was 0.64. The kinetic equation for the leaching process was found to be: 1-(1-x)(1/3)=A/ρr0[HCl](0.64)exp-439,8008.314Tt. After leaching and filtration, by adding saturated oxalic solution to the filtrate, rare earth element oxalates were obtained. After removing impurities by adding ammonia, filtering, washing with dilute hydrochloric acid, and calcining at 810°C, a final product of 99% pure rare earth oxides was obtained. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Characterization of metal binding sites onto biochar using rare earth elements as a fingerprint.

    PubMed

    Pourret, Olivier; Houben, David

    2018-02-01

    The ability of biochar to immobilize metals relies on the amount of functional groups at its surface but the contribution of each functional groups (e.g. carboxylic, phenolic) to metal bonding is poorly known. Using a new approach based on previous works on rare earth element (REE) interactions with humic substances, we aim at elucidating the relative contribution of these binding sites to metal sorption under various conditions (i.e. pH and ionic strengths, IS). Using batch experiments, REE sorption onto biochar was analyzed from pH 3 to 9 and IS 10 -1 mol/L to 10 -3 mol/L. Rare earth element patterns show a Middle REE (MREE) downward concavity at acidic pH and low ionic strength. These patterns are in good agreement with existing datasets quantifying REE binding with humic substances. Indeed, the MREE downward concavity displayed by REE-biochar complexation pattern compares well with REE patterns with various organic compounds. This similarity in the REE complexation pattern shapes suggests that carboxylic groups are the main binding sites of REE in biochar. Overall, our results indicate that the strength of the metal bonding with biochar increases when pH and IS increase, suggesting that biochar is more efficient for long-term metal immobilization at near neutral pH and high ionic strength.

  12. Chemoselective single-site Earth-abundant metal catalysts at metal–organic framework nodes

    PubMed Central

    Manna, Kuntal; Ji, Pengfei; Lin, Zekai; Greene, Francis X.; Urban, Ania; Thacker, Nathan C.; Lin, Wenbin

    2016-01-01

    Earth-abundant metal catalysts are critically needed for sustainable chemical synthesis. Here we report a simple, cheap and effective strategy of producing novel earth-abundant metal catalysts at metal–organic framework (MOF) nodes for broad-scope organic transformations. The straightforward metalation of MOF secondary building units (SBUs) with cobalt and iron salts affords highly active and reusable single-site solid catalysts for a range of organic reactions, including chemoselective borylation, silylation and amination of benzylic C–H bonds, as well as hydrogenation and hydroboration of alkenes and ketones. Our structural, spectroscopic and kinetic studies suggest that chemoselective organic transformations occur on site-isolated, electron-deficient and coordinatively unsaturated metal centres at the SBUs via σ-bond metathesis pathways and as a result of the steric environment around the catalytic site. MOFs thus provide a novel platform for the development of highly active and affordable base metal catalysts for the sustainable synthesis of fine chemicals. PMID:27574182

  13. Chemoselective single-site Earth-abundant metal catalysts at metal–organic framework nodes

    SciT

    Manna, Kuntal; Ji, Pengfei; Lin, Zekai

    2016-08-30

    Earth-abundant metal catalysts are critically needed for sustainable chemical synthesis. Here we report a simple, cheap and effective strategy of producing novel earth-abundant metal catalysts at metal–organic framework (MOF) nodes for broad-scope organic transformations. The straightforward metalation of MOF secondary building units (SBUs) with cobalt and iron salts affords highly active and reusable single-site solid catalysts for a range of organic reactions, including chemoselective borylation, silylation and amination of benzylic C–H bonds, as well as hydrogenation and hydroboration of alkenes and ketones. Our structural, spectroscopic and kinetic studies suggest that chemoselective organic transformations occur on site-isolated, electron-deficient and coordinatively unsaturatedmore » metal centres at the SBUs via σ-bond metathesis pathways and as a result of the steric environment around the catalytic site. MOFs thus provide a novel platform for the development of highly active and affordable base metal catalysts for the sustainable synthesis of fine chemicals.« less

  14. Lattice vibrations and electronic transitions in the rare-earth metals: yttrium, gadolinium and lutetium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olijnyk, Helmut

    2005-01-01

    Lattice vibrations in high-pressure phases of Y, Gd and Lu were studied by Raman spectroscopy. The observed phonon frequencies decrease towards the transitions to the dhcp and fcc phases. There is evidence that the entire structural sequence {\\mathrm {hcp \\to Sm\\mbox {-}type \\to dhcp \\to fcc}} under pressure for the individual regular rare-earth metals and along the lanthanide series at ambient pressure involve softening of certain acoustic and optical phonon modes and of the elastic shear modulus C44. Comparison is made to transitions between close-packed lattices in other metals, and possible correlations to s-d electron transfer are discussed.

  15. Lattice vibrations and electronic transitions in the rare-earth metals: yttrium, gadolinium and lutetium.

    PubMed

    Olijnyk, Helmut

    2005-01-12

    Lattice vibrations in high-pressure phases of Y, Gd and Lu were studied by Raman spectroscopy. The observed phonon frequencies decrease towards the transitions to the dhcp and fcc phases. There is evidence that the entire structural sequence [Formula: see text] under pressure for the individual regular rare-earth metals and along the lanthanide series at ambient pressure involve softening of certain acoustic and optical phonon modes and of the elastic shear modulus C(44). Comparison is made to transitions between close-packed lattices in other metals, and possible correlations to s-d electron transfer are discussed.

  16. An easy access to nanocrystalline alkaline earth metal fluorides - just by shaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreger, M.; Scholz, G.; Kemnitz, E.

    2012-04-01

    High energy ball milling as fast, direct and solvent free method allows an easy access to nanocrystalline alkaline earth metal fluorides MF2 (M: Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba). Comparable metal sources (acetates, carbonates, hydroxides, alkoxides) were used for the reaction with NH4F as fluorinating agent. Even very simple manual shaking experiments between NH4F and the corresponding hydroxides in the stoichiometric ratio (M:F = 1:2, M: Ca, Sr, Ba) give phase pure fluorides. Moreover, comparable classical thermal reactions in closed crucibles at higher temperatures provide phase pure crystalline fluorides in nearly all cases as well.

  17. Solvation structures and dynamics of alkaline earth metal halides in supercritical water: A molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keshri, Sonanki; Mandal, Ratnamala; Tembe, B. L.

    2016-09-01

    Constrained molecular dynamics simulations of alkaline earth metal halides have been carried out to investigate their structural and dynamical properties in supercritical water. Potentials of mean force (PMFs) for all the alkaline earth metal halides in supercritical water have been computed. Contact ion pairs (CIPs) are found to be more stable than all other configurations of the ion pairs except for MgI2 where solvent shared ion pair (SShIP) is more stable than the CIP. There is hardly any difference in the PMFs between the M2+ (M = Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba) and the X- (X = F, Cl, Br, I) ions whether the second X- ion is present in the first coordination shell of the M2+ ion or not. The solvent molecules in the solvation shells diffuse at a much slower rate compared to the bulk. Orientational distribution functions of solvent molecules are sharper for smaller ions.

  18. Neutron Diffraction Studies of Some Rare Earth-Transition Metal Deuterides.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-05-01

    RD-A168 M NEUTRON DIFFRACTION STUDIES OF SONE RARE EARTH-TRANSITION METAL DEUTERIDES(U) MISSOURI UNIV-ROLLR MATERIALS RESEARCH CENTER N J JAMES MY 86...REPORT William J. James OTtO -il May 1986 ZLECTEJU U. S. Army Research Office DAAG29-83-K-01 59 ".;’ Graduate Center for Materials Research ...9. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME AND ADDRESS 10. PROGRAM ELEMENT, PROJECT. TASK AREA & WORK UNIT NUMBERS 2* Graduate Center for Materials Research

  19. Formation of an integrated holding company to produce rare-earth metal articles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanov, S. V.; Grishaev, S. I.

    2013-12-01

    The possibility of formation of a Russian holding company for the production of rare-earth metal articles under conditions of its increasing demand on the world market is considered. It is reasonable to ensure stable business operation on the market under conditions of state-private partnership after the fraction of soled products is determined and supported by the competitive advantages of Russian products.

  20. Ground-state properties of rare-earth metals: an evaluation of density-functional theory.

    PubMed

    Söderlind, Per; Turchi, P E A; Landa, A; Lordi, V

    2014-10-15

    The rare-earth metals have important technological applications due to their magnetic properties, but are scarce and expensive. Development of high-performance magnetic materials with less rare-earth content is desired, but theoretical modeling is hampered by complexities of the rare earths electronic structure. The existence of correlated (atomic-like) 4f electrons in the vicinity of the valence band makes any first-principles theory challenging. Here, we apply and evaluate the efficacy of density-functional theory for the series of lanthanides (rare earths), investigating the influence of the electron exchange and correlation functional, spin-orbit interaction, and orbital polarization. As a reference, the results are compared with those of the so-called 'standard model' of the lanthanides in which electrons are constrained to occupy 4f core states with no hybridization with the valence electrons. Some comparisons are also made with models designed for strong electron correlations. Our results suggest that spin-orbit coupling and orbital polarization are important, particularly for the magnitude of the magnetic moments, and that calculated equilibrium volumes, bulk moduli, and magnetic moments show correct trends overall. However, the precision of the calculated properties is not at the level of that found for simpler metals in the Periodic Table of Elements, and the electronic structures do not accurately reproduce x-ray photoemission spectra.

  1. Alkaline earth metal doped tin oxide as a novel oxygen storage material

    SciT

    Dong, Qiang, E-mail: dong@tagen.tohoku.ac.jp; Yin, Shu; Yoshida, Mizuki

    2015-09-15

    Alkaline earth metal doped tin oxide (SnO{sub 2}) hollow nanospheres with a diameter of 50 nm have been synthesized successfully via a facial solvothermal route in a very simple system composed of only ethanol, acetic acid, SnCl{sub 4}·5H{sub 2}O and A(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}·xH{sub 2}O (A = Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba). The synthesized undoped SnO{sub 2} and A-doped SnO{sub 2} hollow nanospheres were characterized by the oxygen storage capacity (OSC), X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and the Brunauer–Emmet–Teller (BET) technique. The OSC values of all samples were measured using thermogravimetric-differential thermal analysis. The incorporation of alkaline earth metal ion into tinmore » oxide greatly enhanced the thermal stability and OSC. Especially, Ba-doped SnO{sub 2} hollow nanospheres calcined at 1000 °C for 20 h with a BET surface area of 61 m{sup 2} g{sup −1} exhibited the considerably high OSC of 457 μmol-O g{sup −1} and good thermal stability. Alkaline earth metal doped tin oxide has the potential to be a novel oxygen storage material.« less

  2. Metal-silicate Partitioning and Its Role in Core Formation and Composition on Super-Earths

    SciT

    Schaefer, Laura; Petaev, M. I.; Sasselov, Dimitar D.

    We use a thermodynamic framework for silicate-metal partitioning to determine the possible compositions of metallic cores on super-Earths. We compare results using literature values of the partition coefficients of Si and Ni, as well as new partition coefficients calculated using results from laser shock-induced melting of powdered metal-dunite targets at pressures up to 276 GPa, which approaches those found within the deep mantles of super-Earths. We find that larger planets may have little to no light elements in their cores because the Si partition coefficient decreases at high pressures. The planet mass at which this occurs will depend on themore » metal-silicate equilibration depth. We also extrapolate the equations of state (EOS) of FeO and FeSi alloys to high pressures, and present mass–radius diagrams using self-consistent planet compositions assuming equilibrated mantles and cores. We confirm the results of previous studies that the distribution of elements between mantle and core will not be detectable from mass and radius measurements alone. While observations may be insensitive to interior structure, further modeling is sensitive to compositionally dependent properties, such as mantle viscosity and core freeze-out properties. We therefore emphasize the need for additional high pressure measurements of partitioning as well as EOSs, and highlight the utility of the Sandia Z-facilities for this type of work.« less

  3. Rare earth elements and critical metal content of extracted landfilled material and potential recovery opportunities.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Gutiérrez, Silvia C; Coulon, Frédéric; Jiang, Ying; Wagland, Stuart

    2015-08-01

    Rare earth elements (REEs), Platinum group metals (PGMs) and other critical metals currently attract significant interest due to the high risks of supply shortage and substantial impact on the economy. Their uses in many applications have made them present in municipal solid waste (MSW) and in commercial and industrial waste (C&I), since several industrial processes produce by-products with high content of these metals. With over 4000 landfills in the UK alone, the aim of this study was to assess the existence of these critical metals within landfills. Samples collected from four closed landfills in UK were subjected to a two-step acid digestion to extract 27 metals of interest. Concentrations across the four landfill sites were 58±6mgkg(-1) for REEs comprising 44±8mgkg(-1) for light REEs, 11±2mgkg(-1) for heavy REEs and 3±1mgkg(-1) for Scandium (Sc) and 3±1.0mgkg(-1) of PGMs. Compared to the typical concentration in ores, these concentrations are too low to achieve a commercially viable extraction. However, content of other highly valuable metals (Al and Cu) was found in concentrations equating to a combined value across the four landfills of around $400 million, which increases the economic viability of landfill mining. Presence of critical metals will mainly depend on the type of waste that was buried but the recovery of these metals through landfill mining is possible and is economically feasible only if additional materials (plastics, paper, metallic items and other) are also recovered for reprocessing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Investigation into the role of sodium chloride deposited on oxide and metal substrates in the initiation of hot corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birks, N.

    1983-01-01

    Sodium chloride is deposited on the surface of alumina substrates and exposed to air containing 1% SO2 at temperatures between 500 C and 700 C. In all cases the sodium chloride was converted to sodium sulfate. The volatilization of sodium chloride from the original salt particles was responsible for the development of a uniform coating of sodium sulfate on the alumina substrate. At temperatures above 625 C, a liquid NaCl-Na2SO4 autectic was formed on the substrate. The mechanisms for these reactions are given. One of the main roles of NaCl in low temperature hot corrosion lies in enabling a corrosive liquid to form.

  5. Thermodynamic Investigation of the Reduction-Distillation Process for Rare Earth Metals Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Judge, W. D.; Azimi, G.

    2017-10-01

    Owing to their high vapor pressure, the four rare earth metals samarium, europium, thulium, and ytterbium are produced by reduction-distillation whereby their oxides are reduced with metallic lanthanum in vacuo, and the produced metal is subsequently vaporized off. Here, we performed a thorough thermodynamic investigation to establish a fundamental understanding of the reduction-distillation process. Thermodynamic functions including vapor pressures, Gibbs free energies, and enthalpies of reaction were calculated and compared with available experimental data. Furthermore, the kinetics of the process was explored and theoretical evaporation rates were calculated from thermodynamic data. The thermodynamic model developed in this work can help optimize processing conditions to maximize the yield and improve the overall process.

  6. How Does Boiling in the Earth's Crust Influence Metal Speciation and Transport?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kam, K.; Lemke, K.

    2014-12-01

    The presence of large quantities of precious metals, such as gold and copper, near the Earth's surface (upper crust) is commonly attributed to transport in aqueous solution and precipitation upon variations in temperature and pressure. As a consequence, gold exploration is closely linked to solution chemistry, i.e. hydrothermal processes involving aqueous fluids with densities of around unity. However, as crustal fluids buoyantly ascend, boiling produces a coexisting low-density aqueous liquid with fundamentally different physical and chemical properties, and a, most importantly, a high affinity for coinage metals (Heinrich et al., Econ Geol., 1992, 87, 1566). From recent experimental studies of Au (Hurtig and Williams-Jones, 2014, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta,, 127, 304), we know that metal speciation in this low-density phase differs fundamentally from that observed in bulk solution, clearly, with important implications for Au, and metal speciation in general, transport and ore concentrations processes (these processes would also be operable in industrial geothermal plants given the quite special solvent properties of steam). In brief, this study focuses on the speciation of select metal halides in bulk solution as well as in water vapor, and is driven by our need to understand the solvent properties of around 2.0x109 cubic kilometers of free water (or 2,500 times as much water as stored in all lakes and rivers) present in the Earth's crust. The scope of this study has particular applications in the geothermal and oil industries, as both deal with high temperature low-density aqueous fluids. Understanding how metal halide species behave upon boiling can also provide insight into how metals, such as copper and silver, coat turbine equipment and steam piping in geothermal plants, ultimately rendering these components inoperable. This study will also provide preliminary results from mass spectrometric experiments of transition metal halides, and will be augmented with

  7. The Effect of Alkaline Earth Metal on the Cesium Loading of Ionsiv(R) IE-910 and IE-911

    SciT

    Fondeur, F.F.

    2001-01-16

    This study investigated the effect of variances in alkaline earth metal concentrations on cesium loading of IONSIV(R) IE-911. The study focused on Savannah River Site (SRS) ''average'' solution with varying amounts of calcium, barium and magnesium.

  8. Heterogeneous Delivery of Silicate and Metal to the Earth via Large Planetesimals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchi, S.; Canup, R. M.; Walker, R. J.

    2017-12-01

    Earth's mantle abundances of at least some highly siderophile elements, (HSE; Re, Os, Ir, Ru, Pt, Rh, Pd, and Au), are much higher than would result from metal-silicate equilibration during terrestrial core formation, and can be better explained as a result of late accretion of a minimum of 0.5% Earth's masses after core formation was complete. Traditional models assume that HSEs delivered by late projectiles completely mixed and chemically equilibrated with the Earth's mantle. This appears likely for undifferentiated, well-mixed projectiles, or for relatively small, differentiated projectiles. However several arguments suggest that late projectiles may have been large (> 1500 km in diameter) and differentiated, and in this case, portions of the projectile's core may merge with the Earth's core, rather than being mixed into the Earth's mantle. We investigate projectile mixing with a suite of SPH simulations of differentiated planetesimal colliding with the Earth. A range of outcomes emerge from our simulations suggesting that for large impactors (>1500 km), the delivery of HSE to the Earth's mantle may be disproportionate with the overall delivery of mass. For impacts with impact angles < 45° , between ˜ 20% to 80% of the impactor's core may merge directly with the Earth's core; while for impact angle > 60°, most of the impactor core escapes for moderate impact speeds. An implication is that the late accreted mass inferred from terrestrial HSE abundances may be a substantial underestimate, by a factor 2-5. In addition, partial mixing of projectiles result in an enrichment in mantle vs core material delivered to the bulk silicate Earth, implying substantial compositional variations in the accreted mass. Such variations could produce initially localized domains in Earth's mantle with distinct, mass independent isotopic signatures, given the isotopic variability resulting from nucleosynthetic heterogeneities among genetically diverse meteorites. In general we find

  9. Alkali or alkaline earth metal promoted catalyst and a process for methanol synthesis using alkali or alkaline earth metals as promoters

    DOEpatents

    Tierney, J.W.; Wender, I.; Palekar, V.M.

    1995-01-31

    The present invention relates to a novel route for the synthesis of methanol, and more specifically to the production of methanol by contacting synthesis gas under relatively mild conditions in a slurry phase with a heterogeneous catalyst comprising reduced copper chromite impregnated with an alkali or alkaline earth metal. There is thus no need to add a separate alkali or alkaline earth compound. The present invention allows the synthesis of methanol to occur in the temperature range of approximately 100--160 C and the pressure range of 40--65 atm. The process produces methanol with up to 90% syngas conversion per pass and up to 95% methanol selectivity. The only major by-product is a small amount of easily separated methyl formate. Very small amounts of water, carbon dioxide and dimethyl ether are also produced. The present catalyst combination also is capable of tolerating fluctuations in the H[sub 2]/CO ratio without major deleterious effect on the reaction rate. Furthermore, carbon dioxide and water are also tolerated without substantial catalyst deactivation.

  10. Alkali or alkaline earth metal promoted catalyst and a process for methanol synthesis using alkali or alkaline earth metals as promoters

    DOEpatents

    Tierney, John W.; Wender, Irving; Palekar, Vishwesh M.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention relates to a novel route for the synthesis of methanol, and more specifically to the production of methanol by contacting synthesis gas under relatively mild conditions in a slurry phase with a heterogeneous catalyst comprising reduced copper chromite impregnated with an alkali or alkaline earth metal. There is thus no need to add a separate alkali or alkaline earth compound. The present invention allows the synthesis of methanol to occur in the temperature range of approximately 100.degree.-160.degree. C. and the pressure range of 40-65 atm. The process produces methanol with up to 90% syngas conversion per pass and up to 95% methanol selectivity. The only major by-product is a small amount of easily separated methyl formate. Very small amounts of water, carbon dioxide and dimethyl ether are also produced. The present catalyst combination also is capable of tolerating fluctuations in the H.sub.2 /CO ratio without major deleterious effect on the reaction rate. Furthermore, carbon dioxide and water are also tolerated without substantial catalyst deactivation.

  11. Electrical Conductivity of Molten DyCl3-NaCl and DyCl3-KCl Systems: An Approach to Structural Interpretations of Rare Earth Chloride Melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwadate, Yasuhiko; Ohkubo, Takahiro

    2017-11-01

    Electrical conductivities (κs) of molten DyCl3-NaCl and DyCl3-KCl systems were estimated by measuring the impedances of each mixture melt at any temperature and/or frequency. The molar volumes (Vms) were measured by dilatometry and represented as a polynomial empirical equation of temperature and composition. Due to both the properties, the molar conductivities (Λms) were calculated and their temperature and/or composition dependences were discussed from the standpoint of structural features as well. The κs increased curvilinearly with increasing temperature across the whole composition ranges. This trend was also applied to the Λms which was fitted by an Arrhenius-type equation. The relationship of Λms with melt composition was studied and the Λms were found to decrease with increasing composition of DyCl3. These findings were interpreted based on the results of structural science so far reported, and finally, the relationship between Λms and the structures of pure rare earth chloride melts was discussed.

  12. Hydrometallurgical separation of rare earth elements, cobalt and nickel from spent nickel-metal-hydride batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Luiz Eduardo Oliveira Carmo; Mansur, Marcelo Borges

    The separation of rare earth elements, cobalt and nickel from NiMH battery residues is evaluated in this paper. Analysis of the internal content of the NiMH batteries shows that nickel is the main metal present in the residue (around 50% in weight), as well as potassium (2.2-10.9%), cobalt (5.1-5.5%), rare earth elements (15.3-29.0%) and cadmium (2.8%). The presence of cadmium reveals that some Ni-Cd batteries are possibly labeled as NiMH ones. The leaching of nickel and cobalt from the NiMH battery powder with sulfuric acid is efficient; operating variables temperature and concentration of H 2O 2 has no significant effect for the conditions studied. A mixture of rare earth elements is separated by precipitation with NaOH. Finally, solvent extraction with D2EHPA (di-2-ethylhexyl phosphoric acid) followed by Cyanex 272 (bis-2,4,4-trimethylpentyl phosphinic acid) can separate cadmium, cobalt and nickel from the leach liquor. The effect of the main operating variables of both leaching and solvent extraction steps are discussed aiming to maximize metal separation for recycling purposes.

  13. High-pressure phase transitions in rare earth metal thulium to 195 GPa.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Jeffrey M; Samudrala, Gopi K; Tsoi, Georgiy M; Vohra, Yogesh K

    2011-04-20

    We have performed image plate x-ray diffraction studies on a heavy rare earth metal, thulium (Tm), in a diamond anvil cell to a pressure of 195 GPa and volume compression V/V₀ = 0.38 at room temperature. The rare earth crystal structure sequence, hcp →Sm-type→ dhcp →fcc → distorted fcc, is observed in Tm below 70 GPa with the exception of a pure fcc phase. The focus of our study is on the ultrahigh-pressure phase transition and Rietveld refinement of crystal structures in the pressure range between 70 and 195 GPa. The hexagonal hR-24 phase is seen to describe the distorted fcc phase between 70 and 124 GPa. Above 124 ± 4 GPa, a structural transformation from hR 24 phase to a monoclinic C 2/m phase is observed with a volume change of -1.5%. The equation of state data shows rapid stiffening above the phase transition at 124 GPa and is indicative of participation of f-electrons in bonding. We compare the behavior of Tm to other heavy rare-earths and heavy actinide metals under extreme conditions of pressure.

  14. High-pressure phase transitions in rare earth metal thulium to 195 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, Jeffrey M.; Samudrala, Gopi K.; Tsoi, Georgiy M.; Vohra, Yogesh K.

    2011-04-01

    We have performed image plate x-ray diffraction studies on a heavy rare earth metal, thulium (Tm), in a diamond anvil cell to a pressure of 195 GPa and volume compression V/Vo = 0.38 at room temperature. The rare earth crystal structure sequence, {hcp}\\to {Sm {-}type} \\to {dhcp} \\to {fcc} \\to distorted fcc, is observed in Tm below 70 GPa with the exception of a pure fcc phase. The focus of our study is on the ultrahigh-pressure phase transition and Rietveld refinement of crystal structures in the pressure range between 70 and 195 GPa. The hexagonal hR- 24 phase is seen to describe the distorted fcc phase between 70 and 124 GPa. Above 124 ± 4 GPa, a structural transformation from hR 24 phase to a monoclinic C 2/m phase is observed with a volume change of - 1.5%. The equation of state data shows rapid stiffening above the phase transition at 124 GPa and is indicative of participation of f-electrons in bonding. We compare the behavior of Tm to other heavy rare-earths and heavy actinide metals under extreme conditions of pressure.

  15. Polyoxometalate electrocatalysts based on earth-abundant metals for efficient water oxidation in acidic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blasco-Ahicart, Marta; Soriano-López, Joaquín; Carbó, Jorge J.; Poblet, Josep M.; Galan-Mascaros, J. R.

    2018-01-01

    Water splitting is a promising approach to the efficient and cost-effective production of renewable fuels, but water oxidation remains a bottleneck in its technological development because it largely relies on noble-metal catalysts. Although inexpensive transition-metal oxides are competitive water oxidation catalysts in alkaline media, they cannot compete with noble metals in acidic media, in which hydrogen production is easier and faster. Here, we report a water oxidation catalyst based on earth-abundant metals that performs well in acidic conditions. Specifically, we report the enhanced catalytic activity of insoluble salts of polyoxometalates with caesium or barium counter-cations for oxygen evolution. In particular, the barium salt of a cobalt-phosphotungstate polyanion outperforms the state-of-the-art IrO2 catalyst even at pH < 1, with an overpotential of 189 mV at 1 mA cm-2. In addition, we find that a carbon-paste conducting support with a hydrocarbon binder can improve the stability of metal-oxide catalysts in acidic media by providing a hydrophobic environment.

  16. High-pressure metallization of FeO and implications for the earth's core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knittle, Elise; Jeanloz, Raymond

    1986-01-01

    The phase diagram of FeO has been experimentally determined to pressures of 155 GPa and temperatures of 4000 K using shock-wave and diamond-cell techniques. A metallic phase of FeO is observed at pressures greater than 70 GPa and temperatures exceeding 1000 K. The metallization of FeO at high pressures implies that oxygen can be present as the light alloying element of the earth's outer core, in accord with the geochemical predictions of Ringwood (1977 and 1979). The high pressures necessary for this metallization suggest that the core has acquired its composition well after the initial stages of the earth's accretion. Direct experimental observations at elevated pressures and temperatures indicate that core-forming alloy can react chemically with oxides such as those forming the mantle. The core and mantle may never have reached complete chemical equilibrium, however. If this is the case, the core-mantle boundary is likely to be a zone of active chemical reactions.

  17. Bond-length distributions for ions bonded to oxygen: alkali and alkaline-earth metals.

    PubMed

    Gagné, Olivier Charles; Hawthorne, Frank Christopher

    2016-08-01

    Bond-length distributions have been examined for 55 configurations of alkali-metal ions and 29 configurations of alkaline-earth-metal ions bonded to oxygen, for 4859 coordination polyhedra and 38 594 bond distances (alkali metals), and for 3038 coordination polyhedra and 24 487 bond distances (alkaline-earth metals). Bond lengths generally show a positively skewed Gaussian distribution that originates from the variation in Born repulsion and Coulomb attraction as a function of interatomic distance. The skewness and kurtosis of these distributions generally decrease with increasing coordination number of the central cation, a result of decreasing Born repulsion with increasing coordination number. We confirm the following minimum coordination numbers: ([3])Li(+), ([3])Na(+), ([4])K(+), ([4])Rb(+), ([6])Cs(+), ([3])Be(2+), ([4])Mg(2+), ([6])Ca(2+), ([6])Sr(2+) and ([6])Ba(2+), but note that some reported examples are the result of extensive dynamic and/or positional short-range disorder and are not ordered arrangements. Some distributions of bond lengths are distinctly multi-modal. This is commonly due to the occurrence of large numbers of structure refinements of a particular structure type in which a particular cation is always present, leading to an over-representation of a specific range of bond lengths. Outliers in the distributions of mean bond lengths are often associated with anomalous values of atomic displacement of the constituent cations and/or anions. For a sample of ([6])Na(+), the ratio Ueq(Na)/Ueq(bonded anions) is partially correlated with 〈([6])Na(+)-O(2-)〉 (R(2) = 0.57), suggesting that the mean bond length is correlated with vibrational/displacement characteristics of the constituent ions for a fixed coordination number. Mean bond lengths also show a weak correlation with bond-length distortion from the mean value in general, although some coordination numbers show the widest variation in mean bond length for zero distortion, e.g. Li(+) in

  18. Application of Freeze-Dried Powders of Genetically Engineered Microbial Strains as Adsorbents for Rare Earth Metal Ions.

    PubMed

    Moriwaki, Hiroshi; Masuda, Reiko; Yamazaki, Yuki; Horiuchi, Kaoru; Miyashita, Mari; Kasahara, Jun; Tanaka, Tatsuhito; Yamamoto, Hiroki

    2016-10-12

    The adsorption behaviors of the rare earth metal ions onto freeze-dried powders of genetically engineered microbial strains were compared. Cell powders obtained from four kinds of strains, Bacillus subtilis 168 wild type (WT), lipoteichoic acid-defective (ΔLTA), wall teichoic acid-defective (ΔWTA), and cell wall hydrolases-defective (EFKYOJLp) strains, were used as an adsorbent of the rare earth metal ions at pH 3. The adsorption ability of the rare earth metal ions was in the order of EFKYOJLp > WT > ΔLTA > ΔWTA. The order was the same as the order of the phosphorus quantity of the strains. This result indicates that the main adsorption sites for the ions are the phosphate groups and the teichoic acids, LTA and WTA, that contribute to the adsorption of the rare earth metal ions onto the cell walls. The contribution of WTA was clearly greater than that of LTA. Each microbial powder was added to a solution containing 16 kinds of rare earth metal ions, and the removals (%) of each rare earth metal ion were obtained. The scandium ion showed the highest removal (%), while that of the lanthanum ion was the lowest for all the microbial powders. Differences in the distribution coefficients between the kinds of lanthanide ions by the EFKYOJLp and ΔWTA powders were greater than those of the other strains. Therefore, the EFKYOJLp and ΔWTA powders could be applicable for the selective extraction of the lanthanide ions. The ΔLTA powder coagulated by mixing with a rare earth metal ion, although no sedimentation of the WT or ΔWTA powder with a rare earth metal ion was observed under the same conditions. The EFKYOJLp powder was also coagulated, but its flocculating activity was lower than that of ΔLTA. The ΔLTA and EFKYOJLp powders have a long shape compared to those of the WT or ΔWTA strain. The shapes of the cells will play an important role in the sedimentation of the microbial powders with rare earth metal ions. As the results, three kinds of the genetically

  19. Kinetics of the mechanochemical synthesis of alkaline-earth metal amides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garroni, Sebastiano; Takacs, Laszlo; Leng, Haiyan; Delogu, Francesco

    2014-07-01

    A phenomenological framework is developed to model the kinetics of the formation of alkaline-earth metal amides by the ball milling induced reaction of their hydrides with gaseous ammonia. It is shown that the exponential character of the kinetic curves is modulated by the increase of the total volume of the powder inside the reactor due to the substantially larger molar volume of the products compared to the reactants. It is claimed that the volume of powder effectively processed during each collision connects the transformation rate to the physical and chemical processes underlying the mechanochemical transformations.

  20. Liquefaction process for solid carbonaceous materials containing alkaline earth metal humates

    DOEpatents

    Epperly, William R.; Deane, Barry C.; Brunson, Roy J.

    1982-01-01

    An improved liquefaction process wherein wall scale and particulate agglomeration during the liquefaction of solid carbonaceous materials containing alkaline earth metal humates is reduced and/or eliminated by subjecting the solid carbonaceous materials to controlled cyclic cavitation during liquefaction. It is important that the solid carbonaceous material be slurried in a suitable solvent or diluent during liquefaction. The cyclic cavitation may be imparted via pressure cycling, cyclic agitation and the like. When pressure cycling or the like is employed an amplitude equivalent to at least 25 psia is required to effectively remove scale from the liquefaction vessel walls.

  1. Processing of Phosphorus Slag with Recovery of Rare Earth Metals and Obtaining Silicon Containing Cake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karshigina, Zaure; Abisheva, Zinesh; Bochevskaya, Yelena; Akcil, Ata; Sharipova, Aynash; Sargelova, Elmira

    2016-10-01

    The present research is devoted to the processing of slag generating during the yellow phosphorus production. In this paper are presented studies on leaching of phosphorus production slag by nitric acid with recovery of rare earth metals (REMs) into solution. REMs recovery into the solution achieved 98 % during the leaching process with using 7.5 mol/L of HNO3, liquid-to-solid ratio is 2.6:1, temperature is 60°C, process duration is 1 hour and stirrer speed is 500 rpm. Behaviour during the leaching of associated components such as calcium, aluminium, and iron was studied. After the leaching cake contains ∼⃒75-85 % of SiO2 and it might be useful for obtaining of precipitated silicon dioxide. With the purpose of separation from the impurities, recovery and concentrating of REMs, the obtained solution after leaching was subjected to extraction processing methods. The influence of ratio of organic and aqueous phases (O: A) on the extraction of rare earth metals by tributyl phosphate (TBP) with concentrations from 20 up to 100 % was studied. The REMs extraction with increasing TBP concentration under changes O:A ratio from 1:20 down to 1:1 into the organic phase from the solutions after nitric acid leaching increased from 22.2 up to 99.3%. The duration effect of REMs extraction process was studied by tributyl phosphate. It is revealed that with increasing of duration of the extraction process from 10 to 30 minutes REMs recovery into the organic phase almost did not changed. The behaviour of iron in the extraction process by TBP was studied. It was found that such accompanying components as calcium and aluminium by tributyl phosphate didn't extracted. To construct isotherm of REMs extraction of by tributyl phosphate was used variable volume method. It was calculated three-step extraction is needed for REMs recovery from the solutions after nitric acid leaching of phosphorus production slag. The process of the three-steps counter current extraction of rare earth

  2. Hyperfine structure of 2Σ molecules containing alkaline-earth-metal atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldegunde, Jesus; Hutson, Jeremy M.

    2018-04-01

    Ultracold molecules with both electron spin and an electric dipole moment offer new possibilities in quantum science. We use density-functional theory to calculate hyperfine coupling constants for a selection of molecules important in this area, including RbSr, LiYb, RbYb, CaF, and SrF. We find substantial hyperfine coupling constants for the fermionic isotopes of the alkaline-earth-metal and Yb atoms. We discuss the hyperfine level patterns and Zeeman splittings expected for these molecules. The results will be important both to experiments aimed at forming ultracold open-shell molecules and to their applications.

  3. Hybridization wave as the cause of the metal-insulator transition in rare earth nickelates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyowon; Marianetti, Chris A.; Millis, Andrew J.

    2012-02-01

    The metal-insulator transition driven by varying rare earth (Re) ion in ReNiO3 has been a longstanding challenge to materials theory. Experimental evidence suggesting charge order is seemingly incompatible with the strong Mott-Hubbard correlations characteristic of transition metals. We present density functional, Hartree-Fock and Dynamical Mean field calculations showing that the origin of the insulating phase is a hybridization wave, in which a two sublattice ordering of the oxygen breathing mode produces two Ni sites with almost identical Ni d-charge densities but very different magnetic moments and other properties. The high temperature crystal structure associated with smaller Re ions such as Lu is shown to be more susceptible to the distortion than the high temperature structure associated with larger Re ions such as La.

  4. Anomalous positive flatband voltage shifts in metal gate stacks containing rare-earth oxide capping layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caraveo-Frescas, J. A.; Hedhili, M. N.; Wang, H.; Schwingenschlögl, U.; Alshareef, H. N.

    2012-03-01

    It is shown that the well-known negative flatband voltage (VFB) shift, induced by rare-earth oxide capping in metal gate stacks, can be completely reversed in the absence of the silicon overlayer. Using TaN metal gates and Gd2O3-doped dielectric, we measure a ˜350 mV negative shift with the Si overlayer present and a ˜110 mV positive shift with the Si overlayer removed. This effect is correlated to a positive change in the average electrostatic potential at the TaN/dielectric interface which originates from an interfacial dipole. The dipole is created by the replacement of interfacial oxygen atoms in the HfO2 lattice with nitrogen atoms from TaN.

  5. Computational Studies of Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Metal Oxides in Li-Ion Batteries and Earth's Lower Mantle Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shenzhen

    Metal oxide materials are ubiquitous in nature and in our daily lives. For example, the Earth's mantle layer that makes up about 80% of our Earth's volume is composed of metal oxide materials, the cathode materials in the lithium-ion batteries that provide power for most of our mobile electronic devices are composed of metal oxides, the chemical components of the passivation layers on many kinds of metal materials that protect the metal from further corrosion are metal oxides. This thesis is composed of two major topics about the metal oxide materials in nature. The first topic is about our computational study of the iron chemistry in the Earth's lower mantle metal oxide materials, i.e. the bridgmanite (Fe-bearing MgSiO3 where iron is the substitution impurity element) and the ferropericlase (Fe-bearing MgO where iron is the substitution impurity element). The second topic is about our multiscale modeling works for understanding the nanoscale kinetic and thermodynamic properties of the metal oxide cathode interfaces in Li-ion batteries, including the intrinsic cathode interfaces (intergrowth of multiple types of cathode materials, compositional gradient cathode materials, etc.), the cathode/coating interface systems and the cathode/electrolyte interface systems. This thesis uses models based on density functional theory quantum mechanical calculations to explore the underlying physics behind several types of metal oxide materials existing in the interior of the Earth or used in the applications of lithium-ion batteries. The exploration of this physics can help us better understand the geochemical and seismic properties of our Earth and inspire us to engineer the next generation of electrochemical technologies.

  6. The adsorption kinetics of metal ions onto different microalgae and siliceous earth.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, D; Müller, A; Csögör, Z; Frimmel, F H; Posten, C

    2001-03-01

    In the present work the adsorption kinetics of the six metal ions aluminum, zinc, mercury, lead, copper, and cadmium onto living microalgae were measured. The freshwater green microalga Scenedesmus subspicatus, the brackish water diatom Cyclotella cryptica, the seawater diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum, and the seawater red alga Porphyridium purpureum were the subject of investigation. In most cases the adsorption rate of the metals could be well described by using the equation of the Langmuir adsorption rate expression. Inverse parameter estimation allowed the determination of the rate constants of the adsorption process and the maximum metal content of the algae. The highest values for the rate constant were obtained for Porphyridium purpureum followed by Phaeodactylum tricornutum. High values for the maximum content were obtained for Cyclotella cryptica and Scenedesmus subspicatus. The maximum rate constant was 24.21 h-1 for the adsorption of Hg to Porphyridium purpureum whereas the maximum metal content (0.243 g g-1) was obtained for Zn on Cyclotella cryptica. A comparison of these values with those obtained for the mineral siliceous earth exhibiting low maximum content and high adsorption rates reveals that the mechanism of adsorption onto the algae is a mixture of adsorption and accumulation.

  7. Alkaline earth metal complexes of a phosphine-borane-stabilized carbanion: synthesis, structures, and stabilities.

    PubMed

    Izod, Keith; Wills, Corinne; Clegg, William; Harrington, Ross W

    2007-05-14

    The reaction between either MgI2 or CaI2 and 2 equiv of [(Me3Si)2{Me2(H3B)P}C]K (2) in toluene gives the corresponding organo-alkaline earth metal compounds [(Me3Si)2{Me2(H3B)P}C]2M in moderate to good yields [M = Mg (3), Ca (4)]. Compound 3 crystallizes solvent-free, whereas X-ray quality crystals of 4 could not be obtained in the absence of coordinating solvents; crystallization of 4 from cold methylcyclohexane/THF gives the solvate [(Me3Si)2{Me2(H3B)P}C]2Ca(THF)4 (4a). The corresponding heavier alkaline earth metal complexes [(Me3Si)2{Me2(H3B)P}C]2M(THF)5 [M = Sr (7), Ba (8)] are obtained from the reaction between MI2 and 2 equiv of 2 in THF, followed by recrystallization from cold methylcyclohexane/THF. Compound 3 degrades over a period of several weeks at room-temperature both in the solid state and in toluene solution to give the free phosphine-borane (Me3Si)2{Me2(H3B)P}CH (5) as the sole phosphorus-containing product. In addition, compounds 3, 4, and 4a react rapidly with THF in toluene solution, yielding 5 as the sole phosphorus-containing product; in contrast, compounds 7 and 8 are stable toward this solvent.

  8. Earth

    2012-01-30

    Behold one of the more detailed images of the Earth yet created. This Blue Marble Earth montage shown above -- created from photographs taken by the Visible/Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument on board the new Suomi NPP satellite -- shows many stunning details of our home planet. The Suomi NPP satellite was launched last October and renamed last week after Verner Suomi, commonly deemed the father of satellite meteorology. The composite was created from the data collected during four orbits of the robotic satellite taken earlier this month and digitally projected onto the globe. Many features of North America and the Western Hemisphere are particularly visible on a high resolution version of the image. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA18033

  9. Rare-earth metal oxide doped transparent mesoporous silica plates under non-aqueous condition as a potential UV sensor.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Joon; Park, Sung Soo; Lee, Sang Hyun; Hong, Sang-Hyun; Ha, Chang-Sik

    2013-11-01

    Transparent mesoporous silica plates doped with rare-earth metal oxide were prepared using solvent-evaporation method based on the self-organization between structure-directing agent and silicate in a non-aqueous solvent. A triblock copolymer, Pluronic (F127 or P123), was used as the structure-directing agent, while tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) was used as a silica source. The pore diameter and the surface area of the mesoporous silica plate prepared with the optimized conditions were ca 40 A and 600 m2 g(-1), respectively, for both structure-directing agent. Rare-earth metal oxides (Eu, Tb, Tm oxide) in mesochannel were formed via one-step synthetic route based on the preparation method of a silica plate. Optical properties of rare-earth metal oxide-doped mesoporous silica plates were investigated by UV irradiation and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. Under the exitation wavelength of 254 nm, the doped mesoporous silica plates emitted red, green and blue for Eu, Tb and Tm oxides, respectively. Rare-earth metal oxide-doped mesoporous silica plates showed enhanced PL intensity compared to that of the bulk rare-earth metal oxide.

  10. 21 CFR 184.1845 - Stannous chloride (anhydrous and dihydrated).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .... Anhydrous stannous chloride (SnCl2, CAS Reg. No. 7772-99-8) is the chloride salt of metallic tin. It is prepared by reacting molten tin with either chlorine or gaseous tin tetrachloride. Dihydrated stannous chloride (SnCl2·2H2O, CAS Reg. No. 10025-0969-091) is the chloride salt of metallic tin that contains two...

  11. 21 CFR 184.1845 - Stannous chloride (anhydrous and dihydrated).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    .... Anhydrous stannous chloride (SnCl2, CAS Reg. No. 7772-99-8) is the chloride salt of metallic tin. It is prepared by reacting molten tin with either chlorine or gaseous tin tetrachloride. Dihydrated stannous chloride (SnCl2·2H2O, CAS Reg. No. 10025-69-1) is the chloride salt of metallic tin that contains two...

  12. 21 CFR 184.1845 - Stannous chloride (anhydrous and dihydrated).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    .... Anhydrous stannous chloride (SnCl2, CAS Reg. No. 7772-99-8) is the chloride salt of metallic tin. It is prepared by reacting molten tin with either chlorine or gaseous tin tetrachloride. Dihydrated stannous chloride (SnCl2·2H2O, CAS Reg. No. 10025-0969-091) is the chloride salt of metallic tin that contains two...

  13. 21 CFR 184.1845 - Stannous chloride (anhydrous and dihydrated).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    .... Anhydrous stannous chloride (SnCl2, CAS Reg. No. 7772-99-8) is the chloride salt of metallic tin. It is prepared by reacting molten tin with either chlorine or gaseous tin tetrachloride. Dihydrated stannous chloride (SnCl2·2H2O, CAS Reg. No. 10025-69-1) is the chloride salt of metallic tin that contains two...

  14. Alkali and alkaline earth metal salts of tetrazolone: structurally interesting and excellently thermostable.

    PubMed

    He, Piao; Wu, Le; Wu, Jin-Ting; Yin, Xin; Gozin, Michael; Zhang, Jian-Guo

    2017-07-04

    Tetrazolone (5-oxotetrazole) was synthesized by a moderate strategy through three steps (addition, cyclization and catalytic hydrogenation) avoiding the unstable intermediate diazonium, as reported during the previous preparation. Alkali and alkaline earth metal salts with lithium (1), sodium (2), potassium (3), rubidium (4) caesium (5), magnesium (6), calcium (7), strontium (8) and barium (9) were prepared and fully characterized using elemental analysis, IR and NMR spectroscopy, DSC and TG analysis. All metal salts were characterized via single-crystal X-ray diffraction. They crystallize in common space groups with high densities ranging from 1.479 (1) to 3.060 g cm -3 (5). Furthermore, the crystal structures of 7, 8 and 9 reveal interesting porous energetic coordination polymers with strong hydrogen bond interactions. All new salts have good thermal stabilities with decomposition temperature between 215.0 °C (4) and 328.2 °C (7), significantly higher than that of the reported nitrogen-rich salt neutral tetrazolone. The sensitivities towards impact and friction were tested using standard methods, and all the tetrazolone-based compounds investigated can be classified into insensitive. The flame test of these metal salts supports their potential use as perchlorate-free pyrotechnics or eco-friendly insensitive energetic materials.

  15. Theoretical study of the alkaline-earth metal superoxides BeO2 through SrO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Partridge, Harry; Sodupe, Mariona; Langhoff, Stephen R.

    1992-01-01

    Three competing bonding mechanisms have been identified for the alkaline-earth metal superoxides: these result in a change in the optimal structure and ground state as the alkaline-earth metal becomes heavier. For example, BeO2 has a linear 3Sigma(-)g ground-state structure, whereas both CaO2 and SrO2 have C(2v)1A1 structures. For MgO2, the theoretical calculations are less definitive, as the 3A2 C(2v) structure is computed to lie only about 3 kcal/mol above the 3Sigma(-)g linear structure. The bond dissociation energies for the alkaline-earth metal superoxides have been computed using extensive Gaussian basis sets and treating electron correlation at the modified coupled-pair functional or coupled-cluster singles and doubles level with a perturbational estimate of the triple excitations.

  16. Recovery of Rare Earths, Precious Metals and Other Critical Materials from Geothermal Waters with Advanced Sorbent Structures

    DOE Data Explorer

    Pamela M. Kinsey

    2015-09-30

    The work evaluates, develops and demonstrates flexible, scalable mineral extraction technology for geothermal brines based upon solid phase sorbent materials with a specific focus upon rare earth elements (REEs). The selected organic and inorganic sorbent materials demonstrated high performance for collection of trace REEs, precious and valuable metals. The nanostructured materials typically performed better than commercially available sorbents. Data contains organic and inorganic sorbent removal efficiency, Sharkey Hot Springs (Idaho) water chemsitry analysis, and rare earth removal efficiency from select sorbents.

  17. First-principles study on interlayer state in alkali and alkaline earth metal atoms intercalated bilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Tomoaki; Saito, Riichiro

    2017-11-01

    Energetics and electronic structures of alkali metal (Li, Na, K, Rb, and Cs) and alkaline earth metal (Be, Mg, Ca, Sr, and Ba) atoms intercalated bilayer graphene are systematically investigated using first-principles calculations based on density functional theory. Formation of alkali and alkaline earth metal atoms intercalated bilayer graphene is exothermic except for Be and Mg. The interlayer state between two graphene layers is occupied for K, Rb, Cs, Ca, Sr, and Ba. We find that the energetic position of the interlayer states between bilayer graphene monotonically shifts downward with increasing of interlayer distance. The interlayer distances of more than 4.5 Å and 4.0 Å, respectively, are necessary for the occupation of the interlayer state in bilayer graphene for alkali and alkaline earth metal atoms, which is almost independent of the intercalant metal species. We discuss the relevance to occurrence of superconductivity for the metal intercalated bilayer graphene in terms of the occupation of the interlayer state and the phonon frequency of metal ions.

  18. Calculating the Magnetic Anisotropy of Rare-Earth-Transition-Metal Ferrimagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patrick, Christopher E.; Kumar, Santosh; Balakrishnan, Geetha; Edwards, Rachel S.; Lees, Martin R.; Petit, Leon; Staunton, Julie B.

    2018-03-01

    Magnetocrystalline anisotropy, the microscopic origin of permanent magnetism, is often explained in terms of ferromagnets. However, the best performing permanent magnets based on rare earths and transition metals (RE-TM) are in fact ferrimagnets, consisting of a number of magnetic sublattices. Here we show how a naive calculation of the magnetocrystalline anisotropy of the classic RE-TM ferrimagnet GdCo5 gives numbers that are too large at 0 K and exhibit the wrong temperature dependence. We solve this problem by introducing a first-principles approach to calculate temperature-dependent magnetization versus field (FPMVB) curves, mirroring the experiments actually used to determine the anisotropy. We pair our calculations with measurements on a recently grown single crystal of GdCo5 , and find excellent agreement. The FPMVB approach demonstrates a new level of sophistication in the use of first-principles calculations to understand RE-TM magnets.

  19. Cluster synthesis and direct ordering of rare-earth transition-metal nanomagnets.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, Balamurugan; Skomski, Ralph; Li, Xingzhong; Valloppilly, Shah R; Shield, Jeffrey E; Hadjipanayis, George C; Sellmyer, David J

    2011-04-13

    Rare-earth transition-metal (R-TM) alloys show superior permanent magnetic properties in the bulk, but the synthesis and application of R-TM nanoparticles remains a challenge due to the requirement of high-temperature annealing above about 800 °C for alloy formation and subsequent crystalline ordering. Here we report a single-step method to produce highly ordered R-TM nanoparticles such as YCo(5) and Y(2)Co(17), without high-temperature thermal annealing by employing a cluster-deposition system and investigate their structural and magnetic properties. The direct ordering is highly desirable to create and assemble R-TM nanoparticle building blocks for future permanent-magnet and other significant applications.

  20. Spin-Orbit Qubits of Rare-Earth-Metal Ions in Axially Symmetric Crystal Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertaina, S.; Shim, J. H.; Gambarelli, S.; Malkin, B. Z.; Barbara, B.

    2009-11-01

    Contrary to the well-known spin qubits, rare-earth-metal qubits are characterized by a strong influence of crystal field due to large spin-orbit coupling. At low temperature and in the presence of resonance microwaves, it is the magnetic moment of the crystal-field ground state which nutates (for several μs) and the Rabi frequency ΩR is anisotropic. Here, we present a study of the variations of ΩR(H→0) with the magnitude and direction of the static magnetic field H→0 for the odd Er167 isotope in a single crystal CaWO4:Er3+. The hyperfine interactions split the ΩR(H→0) curve into eight different curves which are fitted numerically and described analytically. These “spin-orbit qubits” should allow detailed studies of decoherence mechanisms which become relevant at high temperature and open new ways for qubit addressing using properly oriented magnetic fields.

  1. Spin-orbit qubits of rare-earth-metal ions in axially symmetric crystal fields.

    PubMed

    Bertaina, S; Shim, J H; Gambarelli, S; Malkin, B Z; Barbara, B

    2009-11-27

    Contrary to the well-known spin qubits, rare-earth-metal qubits are characterized by a strong influence of crystal field due to large spin-orbit coupling. At low temperature and in the presence of resonance microwaves, it is the magnetic moment of the crystal-field ground state which nutates (for several micros) and the Rabi frequency Omega(R) is anisotropic. Here, we present a study of the variations of Omega(R)(H(0)) with the magnitude and direction of the static magnetic field H(0) for the odd 167Er isotope in a single crystal CaWO(4):Er(3+). The hyperfine interactions split the Omega(R)(H(0)) curve into eight different curves which are fitted numerically and described analytically. These "spin-orbit qubits" should allow detailed studies of decoherence mechanisms which become relevant at high temperature and open new ways for qubit addressing using properly oriented magnetic fields.

  2. Coercivity of domain wall motion in thin films of amorphous rare earth-transition metal alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mansuripur, M.; Giles, R. C.; Patterson, G.

    1991-01-01

    Computer simulations of a two dimensional lattice of magnetic dipoles are performed on the Connection Machine. The lattice is a discrete model for thin films of amorphous rare-earth transition metal alloys, which have application as the storage media in erasable optical data storage systems. In these simulations, the dipoles follow the dynamic Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation under the influence of an effective field arising from local anisotropy, near-neighbor exchange, classical dipole-dipole interactions, and an externally applied field. Various sources of coercivity, such as defects and/or inhomogeneities in the lattice, are introduced and the subsequent motion of domain walls in response to external fields is investigated.

  3. Prolonged QT Syndrome and Seizure Secondary to Alkaline Earth Metal Deficiency: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    McKinney, A; Keegan, B C

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. Alkaline earth metal deficiency is recognized as a cause of both seizure and long QT syndrome. Their deficiency can have significant repercussions on the function of cells, tissues, and organs of the body. An understanding of the role of electrolytes allows an appreciation of the significance of depleted levels on cell function. Case Report. A 65-year-old lady was admitted with symptoms of chest discomfort, vomiting, increased stoma output, and dizziness. Two days following admission she suffered a tonic-clonic seizure. ECG review demonstrated a prolonged QTc interval, raising the possibility of an underlying Torsades de Pointes as the precipitant. This was attributed to electrolyte disturbance arising as a result of multiple aetiologies. Discussion. This paper highlights the multisystem effects of electrolyte disturbance, with emphasis upon its role in precipitating cardiac arrhythmia and neurological symptoms.

  4. Calculating the Magnetic Anisotropy of Rare-Earth-Transition-Metal Ferrimagnets.

    PubMed

    Patrick, Christopher E; Kumar, Santosh; Balakrishnan, Geetha; Edwards, Rachel S; Lees, Martin R; Petit, Leon; Staunton, Julie B

    2018-03-02

    Magnetocrystalline anisotropy, the microscopic origin of permanent magnetism, is often explained in terms of ferromagnets. However, the best performing permanent magnets based on rare earths and transition metals (RE-TM) are in fact ferrimagnets, consisting of a number of magnetic sublattices. Here we show how a naive calculation of the magnetocrystalline anisotropy of the classic RE-TM ferrimagnet GdCo_{5} gives numbers that are too large at 0 K and exhibit the wrong temperature dependence. We solve this problem by introducing a first-principles approach to calculate temperature-dependent magnetization versus field (FPMVB) curves, mirroring the experiments actually used to determine the anisotropy. We pair our calculations with measurements on a recently grown single crystal of GdCo_{5}, and find excellent agreement. The FPMVB approach demonstrates a new level of sophistication in the use of first-principles calculations to understand RE-TM magnets.

  5. Enantioselective Reduction of Ketones Catalyzed by Rare-Earth Metals Complexed with Phenoxy Modified Chiral Prolinols.

    PubMed

    Song, Peng; Lu, Chengrong; Fei, Zenghui; Zhao, Bei; Yao, Yingming

    2018-06-01

    Enantioselective reduction of ketones and α,β-unsaturated ketones by pinacolborane (HBpin) has been well-established by using chiral rare-earth metal catalysts with phenoxy modified prolinols. A number of highly optically active alcohols were obtained from reduction of simple ketones catalyzed by ytterbium complex 1 [L 4 Yb(L 4 H)] (H 2 L 4 = ( S)-2- tert-butyl-6-((2-(hydroxydiphenylmethyl)pyrrolidin-1-yl)methyl)phenol). Moreover, α,β-unsaturated ketones were selectively reduced to a wide range of chiral allylic alcohols with excellent yields, high enantioselectivity, and complete chemoselectivity, catalyzed by a single component chiral ytterbium complex 2 [L 1 Yb(L 1 H)] (H 2 L 1 = ( S)-2,4-di- tert-butyl-6-((2-(hydroxydiphenylmethyl)pyrrolidin-1-yl)methyl)phenol).

  6. Binary rare earth element-Ni/Co metallic glasses with distinct β-relaxation behaviors

    SciT

    Zhu, Z. G.; Wang, Z.; Wang, W. H., E-mail: whw@iphy.ac.cn

    2015-10-21

    We report the formation of a series of rare earth element (RE)-Ni/Co binary metallic glasses (MGs) with unusual distinct β-relaxation peak compared with that of most of the reported MGs which usually exhibit as an excess wing or a shoulder. The β-relaxation behavior of RE-Ni/Co MGs is sensitive to the composition and the atomic radii of the RE and can be tuned through changing the fraction of RE-Ni (or Co) atomic pairs. The novel RE-Ni/Co MGs with distinct β-relaxation can serve as model system to investigate the nature of the β-relaxation as well as its relations with other physical andmore » mechanical properties of MGs.« less

  7. Coordination Polymerization of Renewable 3-Methylenecyclopentene with Rare-Earth-Metal Precursors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Li, Shihui; Wang, Meiyan; Cui, Dongmei

    2017-04-10

    Coordination polymerization of renewable 3-methylenecyclopentene has been investigated for the first time using rare-earth metal-based precursors bearing various bulky ligands. All the prepared complexes catalyze controllable polymerization of 3-methylenecyclopentene into high molecular weight polymers, of which the NPN- and NSN-tridentate non-Cp ligated lutetium-based catalytic systems exhibited extremely high activities up to 11 520 kg/(mol Lu ⋅h) in a dilute toluene solution (3.2 g/100 mL) at room temperature. The resultant polymers have pure 1,4-regioregularity (>99 %) and tailorable number average molecular weights (1-20×10 4 ) with narrow molecular weight distributions (polydispersity index (PDI)=1.45-1.79). DFT simulations were employed to study the polymerization mechanism and stereoregularity control. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. The Organism/Organic Exposure to Orbital Stresses (O/OREOS) satellite: radiation exposure in low-earth orbit and supporting laboratory studies of iron tetraphenylporphyrin chloride.

    PubMed

    Cook, Amanda M; Mattioda, Andrew L; Ricco, Antonio J; Quinn, Richard C; Elsaesser, Andreas; Ehrenfreund, Pascale; Ricca, Alessandra; Jones, Nykola C; Hoffmann, Søren V

    2014-02-01

    We report results from the exposure of the metalloporphyrin iron tetraphenylporphyrin chloride (FeTPPCl) to the outer space environment, measured in situ aboard the Organism/Organic Exposure to Orbital Stresses nanosatellite. FeTPPCl was exposed for a period of 17 months (3700 h of direct solar exposure), which included broad-spectrum solar radiation (∼122 nm to the near infrared). Motivated by the potential role of metalloporphyrins as molecular biomarkers, the exposure of thin-film samples of FeTPPCl to the space environment in low-Earth orbit was monitored in situ via ultraviolet/visible spectroscopy and reported telemetrically. The space data were complemented by laboratory exposure experiments that used a high-fidelity solar simulator covering the spectral range of the spaceflight measurements. We found that thin-film samples of FeTPPCl that were in contact with a humid headspace gas (0.8-2.3% relative humidity) were particularly susceptible to destruction upon irradiation, degrading up to 10 times faster than identical thin films in contact with dry headspace gases; this degradation may also be related to the presence of oxides of nitrogen in those cells. In the companion terrestrial experiments, simulated solar exposure of FeTPPCl films in contact with either Ar or CO2:O2:Ar (10:0.01:1000) headspace gas resulted in growth of a band in the films' infrared spectra at 1961 cm(-1). We concluded that the most likely carriers of this band are allene (C3H4) and chloropropadiene (C3H3Cl), putative molecular fragments of the destruction of the porphyrin ring. The thin films studied in space and in solar simulator-based experiments show qualitatively similar spectral evolution as a function of contacting gaseous species but display significant differences in the time dependence of those changes. The relevance of our findings to planetary science, biomarker research, and the photostability of organic materials in astrobiologically relevant environments is

  9. Vinyl Chloride

    Cancer.gov

    Learn about vinyl chloride, which can raise the risk of a rare form of liver cancer, as well as brain and lung cancers, and leukemia and lymphoma. Vinyl chloride is used primarily to make PVC, a substance used in products such as pipes.

  10. Metal/Silicate Partitioning, Melt Speciation, Accretion, and Core Formation in the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, M. J.; Hillgren, V. J.; Dearo, J. A.; Capobianco, C. J.

    1993-07-01

    Core formation in terrestrial planets was concomitant with accretion. Siderophile and chalcophile element signatures in the mantles of planets are the result of these processes. For Earth, abundances of most siderophile and chalcophile elements are elevated relative to predictions from simple metal/silicate equilibria at low pressures [1]. This observation has led to three hypotheses for how these abundances were established: heterogeneous accretion [2], inefficient core formation [3], and metal/silicate equilibria at magma ocean pressures and temperatures [4]. Knowledge of speciation of siderophile elements in silicate melts in equilibrium with metal may help distinguish between these hypotheses. But there is some uncertainty regarding speciation. For example, Ni and Co have been reported to be present as 1+ or zero valence species in silicate melts at redox states appropriate to planetary accretion, rather than the expected 2+ state [5-7]. Independent metal/silicate partitioning experiments by three members of this group using two different experimental designs on both synthetic and natural compositions do not show evidence for Ni and Co in valence states other than 2+ over a wide range of redox states. For example, solid metal/silicate melt partition coefficients for Ni at 1260 degrees C obtained by VJH from experiments investigating the partitioning of Ni, Co, Mo, W, and P are indistinguishable from those obtained by JAD in similar experiments investigating the partitioning of Ni, Ge, and Sn. Both datasets define a line with the equation: log D(Ni) = - 0.54log fO2 - 3.14 with r^2 > 0.995. (Note that fO2 was calculated in both studies from thermodynamic data and phase compositions. A small, systematic offset from the true fO2 as measured by a solid electrolyte cell affects both equations similarly, but does not diminish their close agreement.) The valence of Ni in the silicate melt is obtained by multiplying the slope of the line by -4, indicating divalent Ni in

  11. Extraction of trivalent rare-earth metal nitrates by solutions of tributyl phosphate and diisooctylmethylphosphonate in kerosene

    SciT

    Pyartman, A.K.; Puzikov, E.A.; Kopyrin, A.A.

    1995-01-01

    Isotherms of extraction of trivalent rare-earth metal nitrates in the series lanthanum-lutetium, yttrium by 0.5-2.5 M solutions of tri-n-buty1 phosphate and diisooctyl methylphosphonate in kerosene at 298.15 K, pH 2 are presented. The influence of the ionic strength of aqueous phase and extractant concentration on the concentration extraction constants in the case of formation of metal(III) trisolvates in organic phase is given by equation.

  12. Thermodynamic Considerations of Direct Oxygen Removal from Titanium by Utilizing the Deoxidation Capability of Rare Earth Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okabe, Toru H.; Zheng, Chenyi; Taninouchi, Yu-ki

    2018-06-01

    Oxygen removal from metallic Ti is extremely difficult and, currently, there is no commercial process for effectively deoxidizing Ti or its alloys. The oxygen concentration in Ti scraps is normally higher than that in virgin metals such as in Ti sponges produced by the Kroll process. When scraps are remelted with virgin metals for producing primary ingots of Ti or its alloys, the amount of scrap that can be used is limited owing to the accumulation of oxygen impurities. Future demands of an increase in Ti production and of mitigating environmental impacts require that the amount of scrap recycled as a feed material of Ti ingots should also increase. Therefore, it is important to develop methods for removing oxygen directly from Ti scraps. In this study, we evaluated the deoxidation limit for β-Ti using Y or light rare earth metals (La, Ce, Pr, or Nd) as a deoxidant. Thermodynamic considerations suggest that extra-low-oxygen Ti, with an oxygen concentration of 100 mass ppm or less can be obtained using a molten salt equilibrating with rare earth metals. The results presented herein also indicate that methods based on molten salt electrolysis for producing rare earth metals can be utilized for effectively and directly deoxidizing Ti scraps.

  13. Alkali and alkaline earth metallic (AAEM) species leaching and Cu(II) sorption by biochar.

    PubMed

    Li, Mi; Lou, Zhenjun; Wang, Yang; Liu, Qiang; Zhang, Yaping; Zhou, Jizhi; Qian, Guangren

    2015-01-01

    Alkali and alkaline earth metallic (AAEM) species water leaching and Cu(II) sorption by biochar prepared from two invasive plants, Spartina alterniflora (SA) and water hyacinth (WH), were explored in this work. Significant amounts of Na and K can be released (maximum leaching for Na 59.0 mg g(-1) and K 79.9 mg g(-1)) from SA and WH biochar when they are exposed to contact with water. Cu(II) removal by biochar is highly related with pyrolysis temperature and environmental pH with 600-700 °C and pH of 6 showing best performance (29.4 and 28.2 mg g(-1) for SA and WH biochar). Cu(II) sorption exerts negligible influence on Na/K/Mg leaching but clearly promotes the release of Ca. Biochars from these two plant species provide multiple benefits, including nutrient release (K), heavy metal immobilization as well as promoting the aggregation of soil particles (Ca) for soil amelioration. AAEM and Cu(II) equilibrium concentrations in sorption were analyzed by positive matrix factorization (PMF) to examine the factors underlying the leaching and sorption behavior of biochar. The identified factors can provide insightful understanding on experimental phenomena. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Roles of Cationic and Elemental Calcium in the Electro-Reduction of Solid Metal Oxides in Molten Calcium Chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Guohong; Jiang, Kai; Ma, Meng; Wang, Dihua; Jin, Xianbo; Chen, George Z.

    2007-06-01

    Previous work, mainly from this research group, is re-visited on electrochemical reduction of solid metal oxides, in the form of compacted powder, in molten CaCl2, aiming at further understanding of the roles of cationic and elemental calcium. The discussion focuses on six aspects: 1.) debate on two mechanisms proposed in the literature, i. e. electro-metallothermic reduction and electro-reduction (or electro-deoxidation), for the electrolytic removal of oxygen from solid metals or metal oxides in molten CaCl2; 2.) novel metallic cavity working electrodes for electrochemical investigations of compacted metal oxide powders in high temperature molten salts assisted by a quartz sealed Ag/AgCl reference electrode (650 ºC- 950 ºC); 3.) influence of elemental calcium on the background current observed during electrolysis of solid metal oxides in molten CaCl2; 4.) electrochemical insertion/ inclusion of cationic calcium into solid metal oxides; 5.) typical features of cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry (potentiostatic electrolysis) of metal oxide powders in molten CaCl2; and 6.) some kinetic considerations on the electrolytic removal of oxygen.

  15. Unambiguously identifying spin states of transition-metal ions in the Earth (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, H.

    2010-12-01

    The spin state of a transition-metal ion in crystalline solids, defined by the number of unpaired electrons in the ion’s incomplete 3d shell, may vary with many factors, such as temperature, pressure, strain, and the local atomic configuration, to name a few. Such a phenomenon, known as spin-state crossover, plays a crucial role in spintronic materials. Recently, the pressure-induced spin-state crossover in iron-bearing minerals has been recognized to affect the minerals’ structural and elastic properties. However, the detailed mechanism of such crossover in iron-bearing magnesium silicate perovskite, the most abundant mineral in the Earth, remains unclear. A significant part of this confusion arises from the difficulty in reliably extracting the spin state from experiments. For the same reason, the thermally-induced spin-state crossover in lanthanum cobaltite (LaCoO3) has been controversial for more than four decades. In this talk, I will discuss how first-principle calculations can help clarifying these long-standing controversies. In addition to the total energy, equation of state, and elastic properties of each spin state, first-principle calculations also predict the electric field gradient (EFG) at the nucleus of each transition-metal ion. Our calculations showed that the nuclear EFG, a quantity that can be measured via Mössbauer or nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, depends primarily on the spin state, irrespective of the concentration or configuration of transition-metal ions. Such robustness makes EFG a unique fingerprint to identify the spin state. The combination of first-principle calculations and Mössbauer/NMR spectroscopy can therefore be a reliable and efficient approach in tackling spin-state crossover problems in the Earth. This work was primarily supported by the MRSEC Program of NSF under Awards Number DMR-0212302 and DMR-0819885, and partially supported by NSF under ATM-0428774 (V-Lab), EAR-1019853, and EAR-0810272. The

  16. Silylation of C-H bonds in aromatic heterocycles by an Earth-abundant metal catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toutov, Anton A.; Liu, Wen-Bo; Betz, Kerry N.; Fedorov, Alexey; Stoltz, Brian M.; Grubbs, Robert H.

    2015-02-01

    Heteroaromatic compounds containing carbon-silicon (C-Si) bonds are of great interest in the fields of organic electronics and photonics, drug discovery, nuclear medicine and complex molecule synthesis, because these compounds have very useful physicochemical properties. Many of the methods now used to construct heteroaromatic C-Si bonds involve stoichiometric reactions between heteroaryl organometallic species and silicon electrophiles or direct, transition-metal-catalysed intermolecular carbon-hydrogen (C-H) silylation using rhodium or iridium complexes in the presence of excess hydrogen acceptors. Both approaches are useful, but their limitations include functional group incompatibility, narrow scope of application, high cost and low availability of the catalysts, and unproven scalability. For this reason, a new and general catalytic approach to heteroaromatic C-Si bond construction that avoids such limitations is highly desirable. Here we report an example of cross-dehydrogenative heteroaromatic C-H functionalization catalysed by an Earth-abundant alkali metal species. We found that readily available and inexpensive potassium tert-butoxide catalyses the direct silylation of aromatic heterocycles with hydrosilanes, furnishing heteroarylsilanes in a single step. The silylation proceeds under mild conditions, in the absence of hydrogen acceptors, ligands or additives, and is scalable to greater than 100 grams under optionally solvent-free conditions. Substrate classes that are difficult to activate with precious metal catalysts are silylated in good yield and with excellent regioselectivity. The derived heteroarylsilane products readily engage in versatile transformations enabling new synthetic strategies for heteroaromatic elaboration, and are useful in their own right in pharmaceutical and materials science applications.

  17. Theoretical Study of pKa Values for Trivalent Rare-Earth Metal Cations in Aqueous Solution.

    PubMed

    Yu, Donghai; Du, Ruobing; Xiao, Ji-Chang; Xu, Shengming; Rong, Chunying; Liu, Shubin

    2018-01-18

    Molecular acidity of trivalent rare-earth metal cations in aqueous solution is an important factor dedicated to the efficiency of their extraction and separation processes. In this work, the aqueous acidity of these metal ions has been quantitatively investigated using a few theoretical approaches. Our computational results expressed in terms of pK a values agree well with the tetrad effect of trivalent rare-earth ions extensively reported in the extraction and separation of these elements. Strong linear relationships have been observed between the acidity and quantum electronic descriptors such as the molecular electrostatic potential on the acidic nucleus and the sum of the valence natural atomic orbitals energies of the dissociating proton. Making use of the predicted pK a values, we have also predicted the major ionic forms of these species in the aqueous environment with different pH values, which can be employed to rationalize the behavior difference of different rare-earth metal cations during the extraction process. Our present results should provide needed insights not only for the qualitatively understanding about the extraction and separation between yttrium and lanthanide elements but also for the prediction of novel and more efficient rare-earth metal extractants in the future.

  18. Metal sulfide and rare-earth phosphate nanostructures and methods of making same

    DOEpatents

    Wong, Stanislaus; Zhang, Fen

    2014-05-13

    The present invention provides a method of producing a crystalline metal sulfide nanostructure. The metal is a transitional metal or a Group IV metal. In the method, a porous membrane is placed between a metal precursor solution and a sulfur precursor solution. The metal cations of the metal precursor solution and sulfur ions of the sulfur precursor solution react, thereby producing a crystalline metal sulfide nanostructure.

  19. Investigation of the resistance of several new metallic reinforcing bars to chloride-induced corrosion in concrete.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2003-01-01

    The Virginia Department of Transportation recently initiated a search for metallic reinforcing bars that are not only more durable and corrosion resistant than the epoxy-coated bars currently used, but also economical. In the last few years, several ...

  20. Blending Non-Group-3 Transition Metal and Rare-Earth Metal into a C80 Fullerene Cage with D5h Symmetry.

    PubMed

    Wei, Tao; Jin, Fei; Guan, Runnan; Huang, Jing; Chen, Muqing; Li, Qunxiang; Yang, Shangfeng

    2018-02-11

    Rare-earth metals have been mostly entrapped into fullerene cages to form endohedral clusterfullerenes, whereas non-Group-3 transition metals that can form clusterfullerenes are limited to titanium (Ti) and vanadium (V), and both are exclusively entrapped within an I h -C 80 cage. Non-Group-3 transition-metal-containing endohedral fullerenes based on a C 80 cage with D 5h symmetry, V x Sc 3-x N@D 5h -C 80 (x=1, 2), have now been synthesized, which exhibit two variable cluster compositions. The molecular structure of VSc 2 N@D 5h -C 80 was unambiguously determined by X-ray crystallography. According to a comparative study with the reported Ti- and V-containing clusterfullerenes based on a I h -C 80 cage and the analogous D 5h -C 80 -based metal nitride clusterfullerenes containing rare-earth metals only, the decisive role of the non-Group-3 transition metal on the formation of the corresponding D 5h -C 80 -based clusterfullerenes is unraveled. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Characterization of the Unusual Product from the Reaction between Cobalt(II) Chloride, Ethane-1,2-diamine, and Hydrochloric Acid: An Undergraduate Project Involving an Unknown Metal Complex.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Neil F.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the need for student research-type chemistry projects based upon "unknown" metal complexes. Describes an experiment involving the product from the reaction between cobalt(II) chloride, ethane-1,2-diamine (en) and concentrated hydrochloric acid. Outlines the preparation of the cobalt complex, along with procedure, results and…

  2. Production of anhydrous aluminum chloride composition

    DOEpatents

    Vandergrift, G.F. III; Krumpelt, M.; Horwitz, E.P.

    1981-10-08

    A process is described for producing an anhydrous aluminum chloride composition from a water-based aluminous material such as a slurry of aluminum hydroxide in a multistage extraction process in which the aluminum ion is first extracted into an organic liquid containing an acidic extractant and then extracted from the organic phase into an alkali metal chloride or chlorides to form a melt containing a mixture of chlorides of alkali metal and aluminum. In the process, the organic liquid may be recycled. In addition, the process advantageously includes an electrolysis cell for producing metallic aluminum and the alkali metal chloride or chlorides may be recycled for extraction of the aluminum from the organic phase.

  3. Behavior and Distribution of Heavy Metals Including Rare Earth Elements, Thorium, and Uranium in Sludge from Industry Water Treatment Plant and Recovery Method of Metals by Biosurfactants Application

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Lidi; Kano, Naoki; Sato, Yuichi; Li, Chong; Zhang, Shuang; Imaizumi, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    In order to investigate the behavior, distribution, and characteristics of heavy metals including rare earth elements (REEs), thorium (Th), and uranium (U) in sludge, the total and fractional concentrations of these elements in sludge collected from an industry water treatment plant were determined and compared with those in natural soil. In addition, the removal/recovery process of heavy metals (Pb, Cr, and Ni) from the polluted sludge was studied with biosurfactant (saponin and sophorolipid) elution by batch and column experiments to evaluate the efficiency of biosurfactant for the removal of heavy metals. Consequently, the following matters have been largely clarified. (1) Heavy metallic elements in sludge have generally larger concentrations and exist as more unstable fraction than those in natural soil. (2) Nonionic saponin including carboxyl group is more efficient than sophorolipid for the removal of heavy metals in polluted sludge. Saponin has selectivity for the mobilization of heavy metals and mainly reacts with heavy metals in F3 (the fraction bound to carbonates) and F5 (the fraction bound to Fe-Mn oxides). (3) The recovery efficiency of heavy metals (Pb, Ni, and Cr) reached about 90–100% using a precipitation method with alkaline solution. PMID:22693485

  4. Alkali-earth metal bridges formed in biofilm matrices regulate the uptake of fluoroquinolone antibiotics and protect against bacterial apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Kang, Fuxing; Wang, Qian; Shou, Weijun; Collins, Chris D; Gao, Yanzheng

    2017-01-01

    Bacterially extracellular biofilms play a critical role in relieving toxicity of fluoroquinolone antibiotic (FQA) pollutants, yet it is unclear whether antibiotic attack may be defused by a bacterial one-two punch strategy associated with metal-reinforced detoxification efficiency. Our findings help to assign functions to specific structural features of biofilms, as they strongly imply a molecularly regulated mechanism by which freely accessed alkali-earth metals in natural waters affect the cellular uptake of FQAs at the water-biofilm interface. Specifically, formation of alkali-earth-metal (Ca 2+ or Mg 2+ ) bridge between modeling ciprofloxacin and biofilms of Escherichia coli regulates the trans-biofilm transport rate of FQAs towards cells (135-nm-thick biofilm). As the addition of Ca 2+ and Mg 2+ (0-3.5 mmol/L, CIP: 1.25 μmol/L), the transport rates were reduced to 52.4% and 63.0%, respectively. Computational chemistry analysis further demonstrated a deprotonated carboxyl in the tryptophan residues of biofilms acted as a major bridge site, of which one side is a metal and the other is a metal girder jointly connected to the carboxyl and carbonyl of a FQA. The bacterial growth rate depends on the bridging energy at anchoring site, which underlines the environmental importance of metal bridge formed in biofilm matrices in bacterially antibiotic resistance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Leaching Behavior of Slags from AN Old Lead Smelter in Chihuahua, Mexico: Metals, Chlorides, Nitrates, Sulfates and Tds Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espejel-Garcia, D.; Wenglas-Lara, G.; Villalobos-Aragon, A.; Espejel-Garcia, V. V.

    2013-05-01

    Waste materials (such as, smelter slags, waste glass, tires, plastics, rubbish, ashes, etc.), have a large potential to substitute natural materials, reducing costs, especially for the construction industry. Smelter slags are resistant and have better compression strength values in comparison to natural aggregates, and generally are far beyond of what the standard ratios need to qualify a material as a good one for construction. But this material has a big problem within it: the existence of toxic elements and compounds in high concentrations, which means that water and soil contamination can be present after water infiltrates through this material; so we perform leaching experiments to characterize and measure the possible contamination under controlled conditions. To perform the slags-leaching experiments, we used an EA-NEN-7375-2004 tank test standard from Netherlands. This test was selected because to our knowledge it is the only one which allows the use of coarse material, as the one utilized in construction. The leaching experiments sampling was performed at different times: 6, 24, 168 and 360 hours, to compare the leachate concentration at the two different pH's values (5 and 8) selected to simulate real conditions. For the leaching experiments, the slags were mixed with natural road base material (gravel-sands from volcanic rocks) at different proportions of 30% and 50%. In order to understand the slags' leaching behavior, other experiments were carried out with the pure material, for both (slags and natural aggregates). After analyses by ICP-OES , the slags from this smelter in Chihuahua contain Pb (0.5 - 4 wt.%), Zn (15-35 wt.%) and As (0.6 wt.%), as well such as: bicarbonates, chlorides, nitrates, sulfates, Mg, K, Na, Ca and TDS. Based on the results of the leaching analyses, via atomic absorption technique, we conclude that Pb and As concentrations are provided by the slags, meanwhile, the bicarbonates, chlorides, Na and Ca are contributed by the road

  6. Sol-gel-derived hybrid materials multi-doped with rare-earth metal ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelazowska, E.; Rysiakiewicz-Pasek, E.; Borczuch-Laczka, M.; Cholewa-Kowalska, K.

    2012-06-01

    Four different hybrid organic-inorganic materials based on TiO2-SiO2 matrices with organic additives and doped with rare-earth metal ions (III) from the group of europium, cerium, terbium, neodymium, dysprosium and samarium, were synthesized by sol-gel method. Tetraethyl orthosilicate, titanium (IV) isopropoxide and organic compounds, such as butyl acrylate, butyl methacrylate, ethyl acetoacetate, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate, ethyl acetate, propylene carbonate, organic solvents and certain inorganic salts were used in the synthesis. The inorganic part of the sols, which were used in the synthesis of all the hybrid materials, was prepared separately and then the organic parts were added. The materials obtained were aged for three weeks at room temperature and then heated in an electric oven for three hours at temperatures of 80 °C-150 °C. Scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDX); X-ray diffraction (XRD); Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (KBr technique); 29Si magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance; and fluorescence spectroscopy were used for the examination of morphology, microstructure and luminescence properties, respectively. Photoluminescence properties with relatively intense narrow emission lines of Tb, Eu, Dy, Nd, Sm respectively to the RE-ions doping, were observed for all the hybrid materials.

  7. Magnetic ordering temperatures in rare earth metal dysprosium under ultrahigh pressures

    SciT

    Samudrala, Gopi K.; Tsoi, Georgiy M.; Weir, Samuel T.

    Magnetic ordering temperatures in heavy rare earth metal Dysprosium (Dy) have been studied using an ultrasensitive electrical transport measurement technique in a designer diamond anvil cell to extreme conditions of pressure to 69 GPa and temperature to 10 K. Previous studies using magnetic susceptibility measurements at high pressures were only able to track magnetic ordering temperature till 7 GPa in the hexagonal close packed ( hcp) phase of Dy. Our studies indicate that the magnetic ordering temperature shows an abrupt drop of 80 K at the hcp-Sm phase transition followed by a gradual decrease that continues till 17 GPa. Thismore » is followed by a rapid increase in the magnetic ordering temperatures in the double hexagonal close packed phase and finally leveling off in the distorted face centered cubic phase of Dy. Lastly, our studies reaffirm that 4f-shell remain localized in Dy and there is no loss of magnetic moment or 4f-shell delocalization for pressures up to 69 GPa.« less

  8. Alkaline earth metal and samarium co-doped ceria as efficient electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Amjad; Raza, Rizwan; Kaleem Ullah, M.; Rafique, Asia; Wang, Baoyuan; Zhu, Bin

    2018-01-01

    Co-doped ceramic electrolytes M0.1Sm0.1Ce0.8O2-δ (M = Ba, Ca, Mg, and Sr) were synthesized via co-precipitation. The focus of this study was to highlight the effects of alkaline earth metals in doped ceria on the microstructure, densification, conductivity, and performance. The ionic conductivity comparisons of prepared electrolytes in the air atmosphere were studied. It has been observed that Ca0.1Sm0.1Ce0.8O2-δ shows the highest conductivity of 0.124 Scm-1 at 650 °C and a lower activation energy of 0.48 eV. The cell shows a maximum power density of 630 mW cm-2 at 650 °C using hydrogen fuel. The enhancement in conductivity and performance was due to increasing the oxygen vacancies in the ceria lattice with the increasing dopant concentration. The bandgap was calculated from UV-Vis data, which shows a red shift when compared with pure ceria. The average crystallite size is in the range of 37-49 nm. DFT was used to analyze the co-doping structure, and the calculated lattice parameter was compared with the experimental lattice parameter.

  9. Effect of patch borders on coercivity in amorphous rare earth-transition metal thin films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, G.; Fu, H.; Giles, R. C.; Mansuripur, M.

    1991-01-01

    The coercivity at the micron scale is a very important property of magneto-optical media. It is a key factor that determines the magnetic domain wall movement and domain reversal. How the coercivity is influenced by a special type of patch borders is discussed. Patch formation is a general phenomenon in growth processes of amorphous rare earth transition metal thin films. Different patches may stem from different seeds and the patch borders are formed when they merge. Though little is known about the exact properties of the borders, we may expect that the exchange interaction at the patch border is weaker than that within a patch, since there is usually a spatial gap between two patches. Computer simulations were performed on a 2-D hexagonal lattice consisting of 37 complete patches with random shape and size. From the series of simulations we may conclude that the domain in the patch with borders of 30 percent exchange strength can expand most easily to the whole lattice, because the exchange strength can expand most easily to the whole lattice, because the exchange strength of the border is not too high to prevent the domain from growing within the patch and it is not too low to prevent the domain from expanding beyond the patch.

  10. Filament wound metal lined propellant tanks for future Earth-to-orbit transports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macconochie, Ian O.; Davis, Robert B.; Freeman, William T., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    For future Earth-to-orbit transport vehicles, reusability and lighter weights are sought for the main propellant tanks. To achieve this, a filament wound tank with a metal liner and an intermediate layer of foam-filled honeycomb is proposed. A hydrogen tank is used as an example. To accommodate mismatches in the expansion of liner and overwrap a design is proposed wherin the liner is configured so that the extension of the liner under pressure matches the expected contraction of the same liner due to the presence of a cryogen. In operation, the liner is pressurized at a rate such that the pressure strain matches the contraction due to decrease in temperature. As an alternate approach, compressive pre-stress is placed in the liner such that it will not separate from the overwrap. A finite element program is used to show stresses in the liner and overwrap for various tank pressures for the pre-stressed liner concept. A fracture mechanics analysis is made of the liners to determine tank life. The tank concept shown has a similar weight to the Shuttle external hydrogen tank, but the filament wound tank is expected to be reusable. Integration of the propellant tanks into a future transport vehicle is discussed.

  11. Magnetic ordering temperatures in rare earth metal dysprosium under ultrahigh pressures

    DOE PAGES

    Samudrala, Gopi K.; Tsoi, Georgiy M.; Weir, Samuel T.; ...

    2014-04-03

    Magnetic ordering temperatures in heavy rare earth metal Dysprosium (Dy) have been studied using an ultrasensitive electrical transport measurement technique in a designer diamond anvil cell to extreme conditions of pressure to 69 GPa and temperature to 10 K. Previous studies using magnetic susceptibility measurements at high pressures were only able to track magnetic ordering temperature till 7 GPa in the hexagonal close packed ( hcp) phase of Dy. Our studies indicate that the magnetic ordering temperature shows an abrupt drop of 80 K at the hcp-Sm phase transition followed by a gradual decrease that continues till 17 GPa. Thismore » is followed by a rapid increase in the magnetic ordering temperatures in the double hexagonal close packed phase and finally leveling off in the distorted face centered cubic phase of Dy. Lastly, our studies reaffirm that 4f-shell remain localized in Dy and there is no loss of magnetic moment or 4f-shell delocalization for pressures up to 69 GPa.« less

  12. Particle size dependence of alkali and alkaline earth metal enrichment in marine aerosols from Bermuda

    SciT

    Hoffman, E.J.; Hoffman, G.L.; Duce, R.A.

    1980-10-20

    Three cascade impactor samples were collected from a 20-m-high tower on the southeastern coast of Bermuda. These samples were analyzed for Na, K, Ca, Mg, and Fe by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. When the alkali-alkakine earth metal concentrations are corrected for a soil-derived component, utilizing the atmospheric Fe concentrations, Mg, Ca, and Na are found to be present in the same relative abundances as in seawater for all particle sizes sampled. Potassium also shows no deviation from a bulk seawater composition for particles with radii greater than approx.0.5 ..mu..m. However, excess K above that expected from either a bulk seawater ormore » soil source is observed on particles with radii less than approx.0.5 ..mu..m. While oceanic chemical fractionation processes during bubble bursting may be responsible for this excess small particle K, it is most likely due to long-range transport of K-rich particles of terrestrial vegetative origin.« less

  13. Distribution of rare-earth (Y, La, Ce) and other heavy metals in the profiles of the podzolic soil group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vodyanitskii, Yu. N.; Goryachkin, S. V.; Savichev, A. T.

    2011-05-01

    Along with Fe and Al, many heavy metals (Mn, Cr, Zn, Cu, and Ni) show a markedly pronounced eluvial-illuvial redistribution in the profiles of soils of the podzolic group. The intensity of the redistribution of the bulk forms of these metals is comparable with that of Fe and exceeds that of Al. Although the podzolic soils are depleted of rare-earth metals, the latter respond readily to soil podzolization. The inactive participation of Al is explained by an insignificant portion of the active reaction-capable fraction. Podzolization does not influence the profile distribution of Sr and Ba. The leaching degree of heavy metals such as Mn, Cr, Zn, Ni, and Zr is noticeably higher in the sandy podzols than in the loamy podzolic soils. Leaching of heavy metals from the podzolic horizons is of geochemical importance, whereas the depletion of metals participating in plant nutrition and biota development is of ecological importance. The leaching of heavy metals is related to the destruction of clay particles in the heavy-textured podzolic soils; the effect of the soil acidity on the leaching of heavy metals is less significant.

  14. Adsorption of benzyldimethylhexadecylammonium chloride at the hydrophobic silica-water interface studied by total internal reflection Raman spectroscopy: effects of silica surface properties and metal salt addition.

    PubMed

    Grenoble, Zlata; Baldelli, Steven

    2013-08-29

    The adsorption of the cationic surfactant benzyldimethylhexadecylammonium (BDMHA(+)) chloride was studied at an octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS)-monolayer-modified silica-water interface by Raman spectroscopy in total internal reflection (TIR) geometry. The present study demonstrates the capabilities of this spectroscopic technique to evaluate thermodynamic and kinetic BDMHA(+)Cl(-) adsorption properties at the hydrophobic silica surface. The surface coverage of BDMHA(+) decreased by 50% at the hydrophobic OTS-silica surface relative to the surface coverage on bare silica; the dominating driving mechanisms for surfactant adsorption were identified as hydrophobic effects and head group charge screening by the electrolyte counterions. Addition of magnesium metal salt (MgCl2) to the aqueous solution (∼ neutral pH) lowered the surface coverage and moderately increased the Langmuir adsorption constants relative to those of the pure surfactant. These trends were previously observed at the hydrophilic, negatively charged silica surface but with a smaller change in the Gibbs free energy of adsorption at the hydrophobic silica surface. The hydrophobic OTS-silica surface properties resulted in shorter times for the surfactant to reach steady-state adsorption conditions compared to the slow adsorption kinetics previously seen with the surfactant at the hydrophilic surface. Adsorption isotherms, based on Raman signal intensities from spectral analysis, were developed according to the Langmuir adsorption model for the pure surfactant at the OTS-silica-water interface; the modified Langmuir model was applied to the surfactant adsorption in the presence of 5, 10, 50, and 100 mM magnesium chloride. Spectral analysis of the Raman scattering intensities and geometric considerations suggests a hemimicelle-type surface aggregate as the most likely surfactant structure at the OTS-silica surface. The different kinetics observed at the hydrophilic versus the hydrophobic silica surface

  15. Synthesis of phosphinoferrocene amides and thioamides from carbamoyl chlorides and the structural chemistry of Group 11 metal complexes with these mixed-donor ligands.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Tiago A; Solařová, Hana; Císařová, Ivana; Uhlík, Filip; Štícha, Martin; Štěpnička, Petr

    2015-02-21

    The reaction of in situ generated 1'-(diphenylphosphino)-1-lithioferrocene with carbamoyl chlorides, ClC(E)NMe2, affords the corresponding (thio)amides, Ph2PfcC(E)NMe2 (E = O (), S (); fc = ferrocene-1,1'-diyl). These compounds as well as their analogues, Ph2PfcC(O)NHMe () and Ph2PfcC(O)NH2 (), prepared from 1'-(diphenylphosphino)ferrocene-1-carboxylic acid (Hdpf) were studied as ligands for the Group 11 metal ions. In the reactions with [Cu(MeCN)4][BF4], the amides give rise to bis-chelate complexes of the type [Cu(L-κ(2)O,P)2][BF4]. Similar products, [Ag(L-κ(2)O,P)2]ClO4, are obtained from silver(i) perchlorate and , or . In contrast, the reaction of AgClO4 with produces a unique molecular dimer [Ag()(ClO4-κO)]2, where the metal centres are bridged by the sulfur atoms of the P,S-chelating thioamides. The reactions of with [AuCl(tht)] (tht = tetrahydrothiophene) afford the expected gold(i)-phosphine complexes, [AuCl(L-κP)], containing uncoordinated (thio)amide moieties. Hemilabile coordination of the phosphinoamide ligands in complexes with the soft Group 11 metal ions is established by the crystal structure of a solvento complex, [Cu(-κ(2)O,P)(-κP)(CHCl3-κCl)][BF4], which was isolated serendipitously during an attempted crystallisation of [Cu(-κ(2)O,P)2][BF4]. All of the compounds are characterised by spectroscopic methods, and the structures of several representatives of both the free phosphinoamides and their complexes are determined by X-ray diffraction analysis and further studied by DFT calculations and cyclic voltammetry.

  16. Enrichment of rare earth metal ions by the highly selective adsorption of phytate intercalated layered double hydroxide.

    PubMed

    Jin, Cheng; Liu, Huimin; Kong, Xianggui; Yan, Hong; Lei, Xiaodong

    2018-02-27

    Phytate intercalated MgAl layered double hydroxide (MgAl-LDH) was prepared by an anion exchange method with the precursor NO 3 - containing MgAl-LDH. The final as-synthesized product [Mg 0.69 Al 0.31 (OH) 2 ] (phytateNa 6 ) 0.05 (NO 3 ) 0.01 ·mH 2 O (phytate-LDH) has highly selective adsorption ability for some metal ions and can be used to enrich rare earth metal ions in mixed solution, such as Pr 3+ and Ce 3+ from a mixed solution of them with Pb 2+ and Co 2+ . At first, phytate-LDH has good adsorption performance for these ions in single metal ion solutions. At low concentration (below 10 mg L -1 ), all the capture rates of the four metal ions were more than 97%, for highly toxic Pb 2+ it was even up to nearly 100%, and a high capture rate (99.87%) was maintained for Pb 2+ at a high concentration (100 mg L -1 ). When all the four metal ions are co-existing in aqueous solution, the selectivity order is Pb 2+ ≫ Pr 3+ ≈ Ce 3+ > Co 2+ . In a solution containing mixtures of the three metal ions of Pr 3+ , Ce 3+ , and Co 2+ , the selectivity order is Pr 3+ ≈ Ce 3+ ≫ Co 2+ , and in a solution containing mixtures of Pr 3+ with Co 2+ and Ce 3+ with Co 2+ , the selectivity orders are Pr 3+ ≫ Co 2+ and Ce 3+ ≫ Co 2+ , respectively. The high selectivity and adsorption capacities for Pb 2+ , Co 2+ , Pr 3+ , and Ce 3+ result in the efficient removal of Pb 2+ and enrichment of the rare earth metal ions Pr 3+ and Ce 3+ by phytate-LDH. Based on the elemental analysis, it is found that the difference of the adsorption capacities is mainly due to the different coordination number of them with phytate-LDH. With molecular simulation, we believe that the adsorption selectivity is due to the difference of the binding energy between the metal ion and phytate-LDH. Therefore, the phytate-LDH is promising for the enrichment and/or purification of the rare earth metal ions and removal of toxic metal ions from waste water.

  17. Distribution behavior of uranium, neptunium, rare-earth elements ( Y, La, Ce, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd) and alkaline-earth metals (Sr,Ba) between molten LiClKCI eutectic salt and liquid cadmium or bismuth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurata, M.; Sakamura, Y.; Hijikata, T.; Kinoshita, K.

    1995-12-01

    Distribution coefficients of uranium neptunium, eight rare-earth elements (Y, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu and Gd) and two alkaline-earth metals (Sr and Ba) between molten LiCl-KCI eutectic salt and either liquid cadmium or bismuth were measured at 773 K. Separation factors of trivalent rare-earth elements to uranium or neptunium in the LiCl-KCl/Bi system were by one or two orders of magnitude larger than those in the LiCl-KCl/Cd system. On the contrary, the separation factors of alkaline-earth metals and divalent rare-earth elements to trivalent rare-earth elements were by one or two orders of magnitude smaller in the LiCl-KCl/Bi system.

  18. Super earth interiors and validity of Birch's Law for ultra-high pressure metals and ionic solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ware, Lucas Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Super Earths, recently detected by the Kepler Mission, expand the ensemble of known terrestrial planets beyond our Solar System's limited group. Birch's Law and velocity-density systematics have been crucial in constraining our knowledge of the composition of Earth's mantle and core. Recently published static diamond anvil cell experimental measurements of sound velocities in iron, a key deep element in most super Earth models, are inconsistent with each other with regard to the validity of Birch's Law. We examine the range of validity of Birch's Law for several metallic elements, including iron, and ionic solids shocked with a two-stage light gas gun into the ultra-high pressure, temperature fluid state and make comparisons to the recent static data.

  19. A miniature single element effusion cell for the vacuum deposition of transition-metal and rare-earth elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, V. G.; Koon, N. C.

    1997-08-01

    A miniature single element effusion cell has been fabricated and tested that allows for the high-vacuum deposition of a variety of transition-metal and rare-earth elements. The cell is designed to operate under high-vacuum conditions, ≈10-9 Torr, with low power demands, <200 W. The virtues of this evaporator are the simplicity of design and ease of fabrication, assembly, maintenance, and operation.

  20. 21 CFR 184.1845 - Stannous chloride (anhydrous and dihydrated).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    .... 7772-99-8) is the chloride salt of metallic tin. It is prepared by reacting molten tin with either chlorine or gaseous tin tetrachloride. Dihydrated stannous chloride (SnCl2·2H2O, CAS Reg. No. 10025-69-1) is the chloride salt of metallic tin that contains two molecules of water. It is prepared from...

  1. Dual Functionalization of White Phosphorus: Formation, Characterization, and Reactivity of Rare-Earth-Metal Cyclo-P3 Complexes.

    PubMed

    Du, Shanshan; Yin, Jianhao; Chi, Yue; Xu, Ling; Zhang, Wen-Xiong

    2017-12-11

    The [3+1] fragmentation reaction of rare-earth metallacyclopentadienes 1 a-c with 0.5 equivalents of P 4 affords a series of rare-earth metal cyclo-P 3 complexes 2 a-c and a phospholyl anion 3. 2 a-c demonstrate an unusual η 3 coordination mode with one P-P bond featuring partial π-bonding character. 2 a-c are the first cyclo-P 3 complexes of rare-earth metals, and also the first organo-substituted polyphosphides in the category of Group 3 and f-block elements. Rare-earth metallacyclopentadienes play a dual role in the combination of aromatization and Diels-Alder reaction. Compounds 2 a-c can coordinate to one or two [W(CO) 5 ] units, yielding 4 a-c or 5 c, respectively. Furthermore, oxidation of 2 a with p-benzoquinone produces its corresponding phospholyllithium and regenerated P 4 . © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. A mini-review on rare earth metal-doped TiO2 for photocatalytic remediation of wastewater.

    PubMed

    Saqib, Najm Us; Adnan, Rohana; Shah, Irfan

    2016-08-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) has been considered a useful material for the treatment of wastewater due to its non-toxic character, chemical stability and excellent electrical and optical properties which contribute in its wide range of applications, particularly in environmental remediation technology. However, the wide band gap of TiO2 photocatalyst (anatase phase, 3.20 eV) limits its photocatalytic activity to the ultraviolet region of light. Besides that, the electron-hole pair recombination has been found to reduce the efficiency of the photocatalyst. To overcome these problems, tailoring of TiO2 surface with rare earth metals to improve its surface, optical and photocatalytic properties has been investigated by many researchers. The surface modifications with rare earth metals proved to enhance the efficiency of TiO2 photocatalyts by way of reducing the band gap by shifting the working wavelength to the visible region and inhibiting the anatase-to-rutile phase transformations. This review paper summarises the attempts on modification of TiO2 using rare earth metals describing their effect on the photocatalytic activities of the modified TiO2 photocatalyst.

  3. Mepiquat chloride

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Mepiquat chloride ; CASRN 24307 - 26 - 4 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogen

  4. Methyl chloride

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Methyl chloride ; CASRN 74 - 87 - 3 ( 07 / 17 / 2001 ) Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for

  5. Acetyl chloride

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Acetyl chloride ; CASRN 75 - 36 - 5 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Ef

  6. Vinyl chloride

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    EPA / 635R - 00 / 004 TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW OF VINYL CHLORIDE ( CAS No . 75 - 01 - 4 ) In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk Information System ( IRIS ) May 2000 U.S . Environmental Protection Agency Washington , DC DISCLAIMER This document has been reviewed in accordance w

  7. Benzyl chloride

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Benzyl chloride ; CASRN 100 - 44 - 7 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic E

  8. Allyl chloride

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Allyl chloride ; CASRN 107 - 05 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Ef

  9. Ethyl chloride

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Ethyl chloride ; CASRN 75 - 00 - 3 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Eff

  10. Hydrogen chloride

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Hydrogen chloride ; CASRN 7647 - 01 - 0 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogeni

  11. Methylene Chloride.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Jennan A

    2018-02-01

    Methylene chloride is an industrial solvent used in commercial paint strippers and degreasing agents. This chemical is widely used in consumer products, yet without appropriate protections, exposure may lead to death. Already banned in some countries, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently proposed limiting its use in the United States.

  12. Accumulation of alkaline earth metals by the green macroalga Bryopsis maxima.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Shigekazu; Aizawa, Kyoko; Nakamura, Saki; Nakayama, Katsumi; Fujisaki, Shingo; Watanabe, Soichiro; Satoh, Hiroyuki

    2015-04-01

    Twenty-five days after the disaster at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in 2011, we collected samples of the green macroalga Bryopsis maxima from the Pacific coast of Japan. Bryopsis maxima is a unicellular, multinuclear, siphonous green macroalga. Radiation analysis revealed that B. maxima emitted remarkably high gamma radiation of (131)I, (134)Cs, (137)Cs, and (140)Ba as fission products of (235)U. Interestingly, B. maxima contained naturally occurring radionuclides derived from (226)Ra and (228)Ra. Analysis of element content revealed that B. maxima accumulates many ocean elements, especially high quantities of the alkaline earth metals Sr (15.9 g per dry-kg) and Ba (3.79 g per dry-kg), whereas Ca content (12.5 g per dry-kg) was lower than that of Sr and only 61 % of the mean content of 70 Japanese seaweed species. Time-course analysis determined the rate of radioactive (85)Sr incorporation into thalli to be approximately 0.13 g Sr per dry-kg of thallus per day. Subcellular fractionation of B. maxima cells showed that most of the (85)Sr was localized in the soluble fraction, predominantly in the vacuole or cytosol. Given that (85)Sr radioactivity was permeable through a dialysis membrane, the (85)Sr was considered to be a form of inorganic ion and/or bound with a small molecule. Precipitation analysis with sodium sulfate showed that more than 70% of the Sr did not precipitate as SrSO4, indicating that a proportion of the Sr may bind with small molecules in B. maxima.

  13. Materials flow analysis of neodymium, status of rare earth metal in the Republic of Korea.

    PubMed

    Swain, Basudev; Kang, Leeseung; Mishra, Chinmayee; Ahn, JoongWoo; Hong, Hyun Seon

    2015-11-01

    Materials flow analysis of neodymium, status of rare earth elements (REEs) in the Republic of Korea has been investigated. Information from various resources like the Korean Ministry of Environment, Korea international trade association, United Nations Commodity Trade Statistics Database and from individual industry were collected and analyzed for materials flow analysis of neodymium. Demand of neodymium in the Republic of Korea for the year 2010 was 409.5 tons out of which the majority of neodymium, i.e., 68.41% was consumed by domestic electronics industry followed by medical appliances manufacturing (13.36%). The Republic Korea is one of the biggest consumer and leading exporter of these industrial products, absolutely depends on import of neodymium, as the country is lacking natural resources. The Republic of Korea has imported 325.9 tons of neodymium permanent magnet and 79.5 tons of neodymium containing equipment parts mainly for electronics, medical appliances, and heavy/light vehicles manufacturing industry. Out of which 95.4 tons of neodymium permanent magnet get exported as an intermediate product and 140.6 tons of neodymium in the form of consumable products get exported. Worldwide the neodymium is at the high end of supply chain critical metal because of increasing demand, scarcity and irreplaceable for technological application. To bring back the neodymium to supply stream the recycling of end of life neodymium-bearing waste can be a feasible option. Out of total domestic consumption, only 21.9 tons of neodymium have been collected and subsequently recycled. From material flow analysis, the requirement for an efficient recycling system and element-wise material flow management for these REEs in the Republic of Korea were realized and recommended. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Distribution of chloride, pH, resistivity, and sulfate levels in backfill for mechanically-stabilized earth walls and implications for corrosion testing.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2015-05-01

    The ultimate goals of this research were to improve quality, speed completion, and reduce risk in mechanically-stabilized : earth (MSE) wall projects. Research objectives were to assure (1) that variability in the corrosion properties of soil (pH, : ...

  15. Production of chlorine from chloride salts

    DOEpatents

    Rohrmann, Charles A.

    1981-01-01

    A process for converting chloride salts and sulfuric acid to sulfate salts and elemental chlorine is disclosed. A chloride salt and sulfuric acid are combined in a furnace where they react to produce a sulfate salt and hydrogen chloride. Hydrogen chloride from the furnace contacts a molten salt mixture containing an oxygen compound of vanadium, an alkali metal sulfate and an alkali metal pyrosulfate to recover elemental chlorine. In the absence of an oxygen-bearing gas during the contacting, the vanadium is reduced, but is regenerated to its active higher valence state by separately contacting the molten salt mixture with an oxygen-bearing gas.

  16. Highly efficient hydrophosphonylation of aldehydes and unactivated ketones catalyzed by methylene-linked pyrrolyl rare earth metal amido complexes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shuangliu; Wu, Zhangshuan; Rong, Jiewei; Wang, Shaowu; Yang, Gaosheng; Zhu, Xiancui; Zhang, Lijun

    2012-02-27

    A series of rare earth metal amido complexes bearing methylene-linked pyrrolyl-amido ligands were prepared through silylamine elimination reactions and displayed high catalytic activities in hydrophosphonylations of aldehydes and unactivated ketones under solvent-free conditions for liquid substrates. Treatment of [(Me(3)Si)(2)N](3)Ln(μ-Cl)Li(THF)(3) with 2-(2,6-Me(2)C(6)H(3)NHCH(2))C(4)H(3)NH (1, 1 equiv) in toluene afforded the corresponding trivalent rare earth metal amides of formula {(μ-η(5):η(1)):η(1)-2-[(2,6-Me(2)C(6)H(3))NCH(2)](C(4)H(3)N)LnN(SiMe(3))(2)}(2) [Ln=Y (2), Nd (3), Sm (4), Dy (5), Yb (6)] in moderate to good yields. All compounds were fully characterized by spectroscopic methods and elemental analyses. The yttrium complex was also characterized by (1)H NMR spectroscopic analyses. The structures of complexes 2, 3, 4, and 6 were determined by single-crystal X-ray analyses. Study of the catalytic activities of the complexes showed that these rare earth metal amido complexes were excellent catalysts for hydrophosphonylations of aldehydes and unactivated ketones. The catalyzed reactions between diethyl phosphite and aldehydes in the presence of the rare earth metal amido complexes (0.1 mol%) afforded the products in high yields (up to 99%) at room temperature in short times of 5 to 10 min. Furthermore, the catalytic addition of diethyl phosphite to unactivated ketones also afforded the products in high yields of up to 99% with employment of low loadings (0.1 to 0.5 mol%) of the rare earth metal amido complexes at room temperature in short times of 20 min. The system works well for a wide range of unactivated aliphatic, aromatic or heteroaromatic ketones, especially for substituted benzophenones, giving the corresponding α-hydroxy diaryl phosphonates in moderate to high yields. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Inert Reassessment Document for Cerous Chloride

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The rare earth chlorides have a wide variety of scientific applications. They a re used in superconductors, lasers, magnets, catalytic converters, fertilizes, supper alloys, cigarette lighters and as catalysts in the production of petroleum products.

  18. Labile rhizosphere soil solution fraction for prediction of bioavailability of heavy metals and rare earth elements to plants.

    PubMed

    Shan, Xiao-Quan; Wang, Zhongwen; Wang, Weisheng; Zhang, Shuzhen; Wen, Bei

    2003-02-01

    A labile rhizosphere soil solution fraction has been recommended to predict the bioavailability of heavy metals and rare earth elements to plants. This method used moist rhizosphere soil in combination with a mixture of 0.01 mol L(-1) of low-molecular-weight organic acids (LMWOAs) as extractant. The extracted soil solutions were fractionated into two colloidal fractions of <0.45 microm (F(3)) and <0.2 microm (F(2)), and one truly dissolved fraction including free metal ions and inorganic and organic complexes (fractionmetals and rare earth elements in F(2) and F(3) were quite similar. However, the mean concentrations of Cr, Ni, Zn, Cu, Pb, Cd, La, Ce, Pr, and Nd in F(lrss) accounted for 79.9%, 91.3%, 90.8%, 60.1%, 77.5%, 75.3%, 81.2%, 77.2%, 80.3%, and 79.5%, respectively, of their concentrations in F(2). In contrast, there were no differences in the extractable metal concentrations between the three fractions while the first step of the method recommended by the European Community of Reference (BCR), where 0.1 mol L(-1) acetic acid was used as an extractant. The single correlation analysis was made between metal concentrations in the different fractions of soil solutions and their concentrations in wheat. If the first step of BCR method was used there was no good correlation between heavy metals in soil pools and that in wheat shoots and roots. When LMWAOs were used a good correlation was obtained between the concentrations of heavy metals in soil pools and that in wheat roots, which followed a general order of r(1 kD, LMWOAs) >r(0.2 microm, LMWOAs) approximately r(0.45 microm, LMWOAs). In the case of rare earth elements the good correlation was obtained for both the wheat roots and shoots. Generally, the correlation coefficients

  19. Tunable magnetic and magnetocaloric properties in heavy rare-earth based metallic glasses through the substitution of similar elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Huiyan; Li, Ran; Zhang, Leilei; Zhang, Tao

    2014-04-01

    The influence of interchangeable substitution of similar heavy rare-earth-elements (HRE), i.e., Gd-Ho, Gd-Er, and Ho-Er, on the magnetic and magnetocaloric properties of HRE55Al27.5Co17.5 metallic glasses was evaluated. The magnetic transition temperature (TC) can be tuned in a wide temperature range from 8 K to 93 K by adjusting the substitutional concentration in the resulting metallic glasses. A roughly linear correlation between peak value of magnetic entropy change (|ΔSMpk|) and TC-2/3 was obtained in the three systems. This kind of substitutional adjustment provides a useful method for designing desirable candidates in metallic glasses with high magnetic entropy change, large magnetic cooling efficiency, and tunable TC for magnetic refrigerant in nitrogen and hydrogen liquefaction temperature ranges.

  20. Comparison of the DiSCmini aerosol monitor to a handheld condensation particle counter and a scanning mobility particle sizer for submicrometer sodium chloride and metal aerosols

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Jessica B.; Park, Jae Hong; Peters, Thomas M.

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the robust, lightweight DiSCmini (DM) aerosol monitor for its ability to measure the concentration and mean diameter of submicrometer aerosols. Tests were conducted with monodispersed and polydispersed aerosols composed of two particle types (sodium chloride, NaCl, and spark generated metal particles, which simulate particles found in welding fume) at three different steady-state concentration ranges (Low, <103; Medium, 103–104; and High, >104 particles/cm3). Particle number concentration, lung deposited surface area (LDSA) concentration, and mean size measured with the DM were compared to those measured with reference instruments, a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) and a handheld condensation particle counter (CPC). Particle number concentrations measured with the DM were within 21% of those measured by reference instruments for polydisperse aerosols. Poorer agreement was observed for monodispersed aerosols (±35% for most tests and +130% for 300-nm NaCl). LDSA concentrations measured by the DM were 96% to 155% of those estimated with the SMPS. The geometric mean diameters measured with the DM were within 30% of those measured with the SMPS for monodispersed aerosols and within 25% for polydispersed aerosols (except for the case when the aerosol contained a substantial number of particles larger than 300 nm). The accuracy of the DM is reasonable for particles smaller than 300 nm but caution should be exercised when particles larger than 300 nm are present. PMID:23473056

  1. Comparative study of mono- and dinuclear complexes of late 3d-metal chlorides with N,N-dimethylformamide in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Duchácková, Lucie; Roithová, Jana; Milko, Petr; Zabka, Jan; Tsierkezos, Nikos; Schröder, Detlef

    2011-02-07

    Mono- and binuclear complexes of N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) with chlorides of the divalent, late 3d metals M = Co, Ni, Cu, and Zn are investigated by means of electrospray ionization (ESI). Specifically, ESI leads to monocations of the type [(DMF)(n)MCl](+) and [(DMF)(n)M(2)Cl(3)](+), of which the species with n = 2 and 3 were selected for in-depth studies. The latter include collision-induced dissociation experiments, gas-phase infrared spectroscopy, and calculations using density functional theory. The mononuclear complexes [(DMF)(n)MCl](+) almost exclusively lose neutral DMF upon collisional activation with the notable exception of the copper complex, for which also a reduction from Cu(II) to Cu(I) concomitant with the release of atomic chlorine is observed. For the dinuclear clusters, there exists a competition between loss of a DMF ligand and cluster degradation via loss of neutral MCl(2) with decreasing cluster stability from cobalt to zinc. For the specific case of [(DMF)(n)ZnCl](+) and [(DMF)(n)Zn(2)Cl(3)](+), ion-mobility mass spectrometry indicates the existence of two isomeric cluster ions in the case of [(DMF)(2)Zn(2)Cl(3)](+) which corroborates parallel theoretical predictions.

  2. Reactivity of lithium n-butyl amidinates towards group 14 metal(II) chlorides providing series of hetero- and homoleptic tetrylenes.

    PubMed

    Chlupatý, Tomáš; Padělková, Zdeňka; Lyčka, Antonín; Brus, Jiří; Růžička, Aleš

    2012-04-28

    The new class of homo- and heteroleptic n-butyl-N,N'-disubstituted amidinato group 14 metal(II) complexes were prepared by salt elimination from starting lithium amidinates and metal(II) chlorides both in stoichiometric ratio 2:1 and 1:1, respectively. The target amidinates contain less bulky isopropyl or cyclohexyl as well as a sterically demanding aromatic substituent. Desired 1:1 Pb(II) complexes are not accessible by the described procedure. Ligand transfer from Pb to Sn is taking place if homoleptic Pb(II) compounds are reacted with SnCl(2). Prepared tetrylenes were characterized by (1)H, (13)C, (119)Sn and (207)Pb NMR spectroscopy in C(6)D(6) or THF-d(8). X-Ray diffraction studies of one heteroleptic Ge(II) monomeric where the coordination polyhedron of the three coordinated germanium atoms is a trigonal pyramid, two different dimeric structures of heteroleptic Sn(II) complexes, one amidine hydroiodide byproduct and the oxidation product of the heteroleptic chloro Sn(II) amidinate as a tetranuclear species with two Sn(IV) and two Sn(II) atoms in central Sn(2)O(2) planar ring were performed on appropriate single crystals. The dimer of one of the heteroleptic stannylenes reveals a new type of monomeric units connection, weak Sn-Cl contact and an interaction of the tin atom with delocalized N-C(C)-N system of the amidinato ligand of the second molecule. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012

  3. Equilibrium distribution of rare earth elements between molten KCl-LiCl eutectic salt and liquid cadmium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakata, Masahiro; Kurata, Masaki; Hijikata, Takatoshi; Inoue, Tadashi

    1991-11-01

    Distribution experiments for several rare earth elements (La, Ce, Pr, Nd and Y) between molten KCl-LiCl eutectic salt and liquid Cd were carried out at 450, 500 and 600°C. The material balance of rare earth elements after reaching the equilibrium and their distribution and chemical states in a Cd sample frozen after the experiment were examined. The results suggested the formation of solid intermetallic compounds at the lower concentrations of rare earth metals dissolved in liquid Cd than those solubilities measured in the binary alloy system. The distribution coefficients of rare earth elements between two phases (mole fraction in the Cd phase divided by mole fraction in the salt phase) were determined at each temperature. These distribution coefficients were explained satisfactorily by using the activity coefficients of chlorides and metals in salt and Cd. Both the activity coefficients of metal and chloride caused a much smaller distribution coefficient of Y relative to those of other elements.

  4. Lunar oxygen and metal for use in near-Earth space: Magma electrolysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colson, Russell O.; Haskin, Larry A.

    1990-01-01

    Because it is energetically easier to get material from the Moon to Earth orbit than from the Earth itself, the Moon is a potentially valuable source of materials for use in space. The unique conditions on the Moon, such as vacuum, absence of many reagents common on the Earth, and the presence of very nontraditional ores suggest that a unique and nontraditional process for extracting materials from the ores may prove the most practical. With this in mind, an investigation of unfluxed silicate electrolysis as a method for extracting oxygen, iron, and silicon from lunar regolith was initiated and is discussed. The advantages of the process include simplicity of concept, absence of need to supply reagents from Earth, and low power and mass requirements for the processing plant. Disadvantages include the need for uninterrupted high temperature and the highly corrosive nature of the high-temperature silicate melts which has made identifying suitable electrode and container materials difficult.

  5. Hyporheic Microbial Biofilms as Indicators of Heavy and Rare Earth Metals in the Clark Fork Basin, Montana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnhart, E. P.; Hornberger, M.; Hwang, C.; Dror, I.; Bouskill, N.; Short, T.; Cain, D.; Fields, M. W.

    2016-12-01

    The ability to effectively monitor the impact of hard rock mining activities on rivers and streams is a growing concern given the large number of active and abandoned mines in the western United States. One such example, the Clark Fork Basin (CFB), western Montana, was extensively mined for copper in the early 20th century: it is now one of largest U.S. EPA superfund sites. Microbial biofilms are at the base of the lotic food chain and may provide a useful biomonitoring tool for the assessment of metal toxicity due to their environmental ubiquity, rapidity of response to environmental perturbation, and importance in determining metal mobility. Hyporheic microbial biofilms from the CFB were sampled in 2014, concurrent with the USGS National Research Programs (NRP) long-term site monitoring of metals in bed sediment and aquatic benthic insects. Integration of the DNA sequencing results from the hyporheic biofilms with the sediment and insect metal concentrations correlated several bacterial phyla with metal contamination. For example, the genus Lysobacter was strongly associated with copper (Cu) bioaccumulation in the aquatic insect Hydropsyche. These results support previous studies identifying Lysobacter as a bacterial genus that is resistant to Cu ions. Our analysis is the first to indicate that specific microorganisms can act as biomarkers of Cu contamination in rivers. Moreover, our work demonstrates that changes at the microbial community level in the hyporheic zone can be coupled to observed perturbations across higher trophic levels. In 2015, extensive remediation occurred at several of the sites sampled in 2014, providing an excellent opportunity to revisit the sites and examine the temporal variability of identified biomarkers and the short-term effectiveness of remediation. In addition, samples were analyzed for rare earth metals, of which little is known, and could provide additional insight into other metals that change the microbial community structure.

  6. More arrows in the quiver: new pathways and old problems with heavy alkaline earth metal diphenylmethanides.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Jacob S; Ruhlandt-Senge, Karin

    2004-03-05

    Progress in the field of sigma-bonded alkaline earth organometallics has been handicapped by numerous complications, such as high reactivity, low solubility, and the limited availability of suitable starting materials. Here we present two synthetic methods, hydrocarbon elimination and desilylation, as alternative routes into this chemistry. A novel barium diphenylmethanide was prepared using these routes delineating that both methods provide a powerful, versatile synthetic access route to an extended library of organometallic alkaline earth derivatives.

  7. Dialkylimidazolium Chlorides

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    Force Systems Command U. S. Air Force Academy, Colorado 80840 I7 *i iL•- r.•r -i- ABSTRACT A- A - i The synthesis of a homologous series of 1 -methyl...Chemical Co. and was vacuum distilled from BaO before use. The 1 - chloropropane and 1 -chlorobutane were obtained from the Aldrich Chemical Co. and were used...23.52% Cl, 1.84% 0. l-Methvl-3-propylimidazolium chloride. 1 -Methylimidazole (10.1 g, 0.123 mol) and l- chloropropane (12.7 g, 0.161 mol) were mixed in

  8. The composition of Earth's core from equations of state, metal-silicate partitioning, and core formation modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Rebecca; Campbell, Andrew; Ciesla, Fred

    2016-04-01

    The Earth accreted in a series of increasingly large and violent collisions. Simultaneously, the metallic core segregated from the silicate mantle, acquiring its modern composition through high pressure (P), high temperature (T) partitioning reactions. Here we present a model that couples these aspects of early planetary evolution, building on recent accretion simulations and metal-silicate partitioning experiments, constrained by density measurements of Fe-rich alloys. Previously, the equations of state of FeO, Fe-9Si, Fe-16Si, and FeSi were measured to megabar pressures and several thousand K using a laser-heated diamond anvil cell. With these equations of state, we determined that the core's density can be reproduced through the addition of 11.3 +/- 0.6 wt% silicon or 8.1 +/- 1.1 wt% oxygen to an Fe-Ni alloy (Fischer et al., 2011, 2014). Metal-silicate partitioning experiments of Ni, Co, V, Cr, Si, and O have been performed in a diamond anvil cell to 100 GPa and 5700 K, allowing the effects of P, T, and composition on the partitioning behaviors of these elements to be parameterized (Fischer et al., 2015; Siebert et al., 2012). Here we apply those experimental results to model Earth's core formation, using N-body simulations to describe the delivery, masses, and original locations of planetary building blocks (Fischer and Ciesla, 2014). As planets accrete, their core and mantle compositions are modified by high P-T reactions with each collision (Rubie et al., 2011). For partial equilibration of the mantle at 55% of the evolving core-mantle boundary pressure and the liquidus temperature, we find that the core contains 5.4 wt% Si and 1.9 wt% O. This composition is consistent with the seismologically-inferred density of Earth's core, based on comparisons to our equations of state, and indicate that the core cannot contain more than ~2 wt% S or C. Earth analogues experience 1.2 +/- 0.2 log units of oxidation during accretion, due to both the effects of high P

  9. A Liquid Chromatography Detector for Transition and Rare-Earth Metal Ions Based on a Cupric Ion-Selective Electrode

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-05-01

    RARE-EARTH METAL IONS BASED ON A CUPRIC ION-SELECTIVE ELECTRODE By - 4 R. CAMERON DOREY TECHNICAL REPORT FJSRL-TR-81-0005 MAY 1981 Approved for public...FORM . REPORT NUMBER 12. GOVT ACCESSION NO. 3. RECIPIENT’S CATALOG NUMBER FJSRL-TR-81-0005BO CO ENGO 4 . TITLE (and Subtitle) 5. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD...common anions, including halide ions, is shown, and the advantages and limitations of the system are discussed. II ’ 4 UNCLASSIFIED SECURITY

  10. Nickel(0)-Catalyzed Inert C-O Bond Functionalization: Organo Rare-Earth Metal Complex as the Coupling Partner.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xiangqian; Yang, Fanzhi; Cai, Guilong; Meng, Qingwei; Li, Xiaofang

    2018-02-02

    An organo rare-earth metal complex has been employed as a highly efficient nucleophile in Ni(0)-catalyzed C-O bond functionalization. The optimized catalytic system which consists of Ni(cod) 2 , PCy 3 , and t-BuONa could smoothly convert 1 equiv of naphthyl ethers to alkylated naphthalene analogues with 0.4 equiv of Ln(CH 2 SiMe 3 ) 3 (THF) 2 , delivering good to excellent yields. The reaction system could also activate the ArCH 2 -O bond with mild base.

  11. Effect of Destined High-Pressure Torsion on the Structure and Mechanical Properties of Rare Earth-Based Metallic Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, W.; Cheng, H.; Jiang, X.; Wu, M. L.; Li, G.

    2018-03-01

    Changes in the atomic structure and mechanical properties of rare earth-based metallic glasses caused by destined high-pressure torsion (HPT) were studied by X-ray diffraction synchrotron radiation and nanoindentation. Results showed that destined HPT improved nanohardness and wear resistance, which indicated the significant contributions of this technique. The diffraction patterns showed that the contents of pairs between solvent and solute atoms with a large negative mixing enthalpy increased, whereas those of pairs between solvent atoms and between solute atoms decreased after destined HPT. Thus, the process was improved by increasing the proportion of high-intensity pairs between solvent and solute atoms.

  12. Catalytic asymmetric ring-opening of meso-aziridines with malonates under heterodinuclear rare earth metal Schiff base catalysis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yingjie; Lin, Luqing; Kanai, Motomu; Matsunaga, Shigeki; Shibasaki, Masakatsu

    2011-04-20

    Catalytic asymmetric ring-opening of meso-aziridines with malonates is described. The combined use of two rare earth metal sources with different properties promoted the desired ring-opening reaction. A 1:1:1 mixture of a heterobimetallic La(O-iPr)(3)/Yb(OTf)(3)/Schiff base 1a (0.25-10 mol %) efficiently promoted the reaction of five-, six-, and seven-membered ring cyclic meso-aziridines as well as acyclic meso-aziridines with dimethyl, diethyl, and dibenzyl malonates, giving chiral cyclic and acyclic γ-amino esters in 99-63% yield and >99.5-97% ee.

  13. Electronic and structural properties of Lu under pressure: Relation to structural phases of the rare-earth metals

    SciT

    Min, B.I.; Oguchi, T.; Jansen, H.J.F.

    1986-07-15

    Ground-state electronic and structural properties of Lu under pressure are investigated with use of the self-consistent all-electron total-energy linear muffin-tin orbital band-structure method within a local-density-functional approximation. Pressure-induced structural transitions are found to occur in the following sequence: hcp--(Sm-type)--dhcp--fcc, which is the same as that observed in the crystal structures of the trivalent rare-earth metals with decreasing atomic number. This structural transition is correlated with the increase in the number of d-italic electrons under pressure.

  14. Process for synthesis of beryllium chloride dietherate

    DOEpatents

    Bergeron, Charles; Bullard, John E.; Morgan, Evan

    1991-01-01

    A low temperature method of producing beryllium chloride dietherate through the addition of hydrogen chloride gas to a mixture of beryllium metal in ether in a reaction vessel is described. A reflux condenser provides an exit for hydrogen produced form the reaction. A distillation condenser later replaces the reflux condenser for purifying the resultant product.

  15. Regio- and Stereochemical Control in Ocimene Polymerization by Half-Sandwich Rare-Earth Metal Dialkyl Complexes.

    PubMed

    Peng, Deqian; Du, Gaixia; Zhang, Pengfei; Yao, Bo; Li, Xiaofang; Zhang, Shaowen

    2016-06-01

    The polymerization of ocimene has been first achieved by half-sandwich rare-earth metal dialkyl complexes in combination with activator and Al(i) Bu3 . The regio- and stereoselectivity in the ocimene polymerization can be controlled by tuning the cyclopentadienyl ligand and the central metal of the complex. The chiral cyclopentadienyl-ligated Sc complex 1 prepares syndiotactic cis-1,4-polyocimene (cis-1,4-selectivity up to 100%, rrrr = 100%), while the corresponding Lu, Y, and Dy complexes 2-4 and the achiral pentamethylcyclopentadienyl Sc, Lu, and Y complexes 5-7 afford isotactic trans-1,2-polyocimenes (trans-1,2-selectivity up to 100%, mm = 100%). © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. PREPARATION OF ANHYDROUS CERIUM CHLORIDE, URANIUM BROMIDE OR PLUTONIUM FLUORIDE

    DOEpatents

    Marmon, K.M.; Wichers, E.

    1961-05-01

    A process is given for preparing anhydrous metal halides and converting metal oxalates to anhydrous metal halides which are free from oxyhalides. In accordance with one embodiment of the invention, cerous chloride is prepared by passing hydrogen chloride gas over hydrated cerous oxalate below lOO deg C until no more gas is absorbed and then continuing the treatmert at higher temperatures.

  17. Structure of complexes between aluminum chloride and other chlorides, 2: Alkali-(chloroaluminates). Gaseous complexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hargittai, M.

    1980-01-01

    The structural chemistry of complexes between aluminum chloride and other metal chlorides is important both for practice and theory. Condensed-phase as well as vapor-phase complexes are of interest. Structural information on such complexes is reviewed. The first emphasis is given to the molten state because of its practical importance. Aluminum chloride forms volatile complexes with other metal chlorides and these vapor-phase complexes are dealt with in the second part. Finally, the variations in molecular shape and geometrical parameters are summarized.

  18. Reaction of metals in lower earth orbit during Space Shuttle flight 41-G

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fromhold, A. T., Jr.; Daneshvar, K.; Whitaker, A. F.; Little, S. A.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of ambient space environment on metals were studied by exposing specimens of Cu, Ag, Au, Ni, Cr, Al, Pt, and Pd on flight 41-G (STS-17). Data obtained by ellipsometry (ELL), Rutherford backscattering (RBS), and proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) before and after flight are summarized. Although the effects of space environment were most pronounced for silver, there were significant changes in the surface properties of the majority of the other metals. The surface optical constants proved to be the most sensitive measure of surface changes. These changes are attributed to the interaction of the metals with atomic oxygen.

  19. Use of modified diatomaceous earth for removal and recovery of viruses in water.

    PubMed Central

    Farrah, S R; Preston, D R; Toranzos, G A; Girard, M; Erdos, G A; Vasuhdivan, V

    1991-01-01

    Diatomaceous earth was modified by in situ precipitation of metallic hydroxides. Modification decreased the negative charge on the diatomaceous earth and increased its ability to adsorb viruses in water. Electrostatic interactions were more important than hydrophobic interactions in virus adsorption to modified diatomaceous earth. Filters containing diatomaceous earth modified by in situ precipitation of a combination of ferric chloride and aluminum chloride adsorbed greater than 80% of enteroviruses (poliovirus 1, echovirus 5, and coxsackievirus B5) and coliphage MS2 present in tap water at ambient pH (7.8 to 8.3), even after filtration of 100 liters of tap water. Viruses adsorbed to the filters could be recovered by mixing the modified diatomaceous earth with 3% beef extract plus 1 M NaCl (pH 9). Images PMID:1768124

  20. Separation of Pr and Nd from La in chloride solution by extraction with a mixture of Cyanex 272 and Alamine 336

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Jeon, Ho Seok; Lee, Man Seung

    2015-09-01

    The possibility of separation of Pr and Nd from La in a chloride leaching solution of monazite sand has been investigated by using a binary mixture of Cyanex 272 (bis(2,4,4-trimethylpentyl) phosphinic acid) and Alamine 336 (tri-octyl/decyl amine). The binary mixture showed synergism on the extraction of the three metals and led to an increase in the separation factor between Pr/Nd and La compared to Cyanex 272 alone. Although the addition of chloride ion into aqueous increased the extraction of the metals, this addition had negative effect on the separation of Nd/Pr and La. McCabe-Thiele diagrams for the extraction of Pr and Nd with the binary mixture were constructed. Stripping of metals from the loaded organic phase was achieved with 0.7 M HCl. The difference in the solvent extraction of the rare earth elements from chloride solution between the binary mixture and saponified extractants was also discussed.

  1. RARE-EARTH METAL FISSION PRODUCTS FROM LIQUID U-Bi

    DOEpatents

    Wiswall, R.H.

    1960-05-10

    Fission product metals can be removed from solution in liquid bismuth without removal of an appreciable quantity of uranium by contacting the liquid metal solution with fused halides, as for example, the halides of sodium, potassium, and lithium and by adding to the contacted phases a quantity of a halide which is unstable relative to the halides of the fission products, a specific unstable halide being MgCl/sub 3/.

  2. Effect of metal cation replacement on the electronic structure of metalorganic halide perovskites: Replacement of lead with alkaline-earth metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pazoki, Meysam; Jacobsson, T. Jesper; Hagfeldt, Anders; Boschloo, Gerrit; Edvinsson, Tomas

    2016-04-01

    Organic and inorganic lead halogen perovskites, and in particular, C H3N H3Pb I3 , have during the last years emerged as a class of highly efficient solar cell materials. Herein we introduce metalorganic halogen perovskite materials for energy-relevant applications based on alkaline-earth metals. Based on the classical notion of Goldschmidt's rules and quantum mechanical considerations, the three alkaline-earth metals, Ca, Sr, and Ba, are shown to be able to exchange lead in the perovskite structure. The three alkaline-earth perovskites, C H3N H3Ca I3,C H3N H3Sr I3 , and C H3N H3Ba I3 , as well as the reference compound, C H3N H3Pb I3 , are in this paper investigated with density functional theory (DFT) calculations, which predict these compounds to exist as stable perovskite materials, and their electronic properties are explored. A detailed analysis of the projected molecular orbital density of states and electronic band structure from DFT calculations were used for interpretation of the band-gap variations in these materials and for estimation of the effective masses of the electrons and holes. Neglecting spin-orbit effects, the band gap of MACa I3,MASr I3 , and MABa I3 were estimated to be 2.95, 3.6, and 3.3 eV, respectively, showing the relative change expected for metal cation exchange. The shifts in the conduction band (CB) edges for the alkaline-earth perovskites were quantified using scalar relativistic DFT calculations and tight-binding analysis, and were compared to the situation in the more extensively studied lead halide perovskite, C H3N H3Pb I3 , where the change in the work function of the metal is the single most important factor in tuning the CB edge and band gap. The results show that alkaline-earth-based organometallic perovskites will not work as an efficient light absorber in photovoltaic applications but instead could be applicable as charge-selective contact materials. The rather high CB edge and the wide band gap together with the large

  3. Removal of chloride from MSWI fly ash.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Sheng; Chang, Fang-Chih; Shen, Yun-Hwei; Tsai, Min-Shing; Ko, Chun-Han

    2012-10-30

    The high levels of alkali chloride and soluble metal salts present in MSWI fly ash is worth noting for their impact on the environment. In addition, the recycling or reuse of fly ash has become an issue because of limited landfill space. The chloride content in fly ash limits its application as basis for construction materials. Water-soluble chlorides such as potassium chloride (KCl), sodium chloride (NaCl), and calcium chloride hydrate (CaCl(2) · 2H(2)O) in fly ash are easily washed away. However, calcium chloride hydroxide (Ca(OH)Cl) might not be easy to leach away at room temperature. The roasting and washing-flushing processes were applied to remove chloride content in this study. Additionally, air and CO(2) were introduced into the washing process to neutralize the hazardous nature of chlorides. In comparison with the water flushing process, the roasting process is more efficient in reducing the process of solid-liquid separation and drying for the reuse of Cl-removed fly ash particles. In several roasting experiments, the removal of chloride content from fly ash at 1050°C for 3h showed the best results (83% chloride removal efficiency). At a solid to liquid ratio of 1:10 the water-flushing process can almost totally remove water-soluble chloride (97% chloride removal efficiency). Analyses of mineralogical change also prove the efficiency of the fly ash roasting and washing mechanisms for chloride removal. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Separation of rare earths from transition metals by liquid-liquid extraction from a molten salt hydrate to an ionic liquid phase.

    PubMed

    Rout, Alok; Binnemans, Koen

    2014-02-28

    The solvent extraction of trivalent rare-earth ions and their separation from divalent transition metal ions using molten salt hydrates as the feed phase and an undiluted fluorine-free ionic liquid as the extracting phase were investigated in detail. The extractant was tricaprylmethylammonium nitrate, [A336][NO3], and the hydrated melt was calcium nitrate tetrahydrate, Ca(NO3)2·4H2O. The extraction behavior of rare-earth ions was studied for solutions of individual elements, as well as for mixtures of rare earths in the hydrated melt. The influence of different extraction parameters was investigated: the initial metal loading in the feed phase, percentage of water in the feed solution, equilibration time, and the type of hydrated melt. The extraction of rare earths from Ca(NO3)2·4H2O was compared with extraction from CaCl2·4H2O by [A336][Cl] (Aliquat 336). The nitrate system was found to be the better one. The extraction and separation of rare earths from the transition metals nickel, cobalt and zinc were also investigated. Remarkably high separation factors of rare-earth ions over transition metal ions were observed for extraction from Ca(NO3)2·4H2O by the [A336][NO3] extracting phase. Furthermore, rare-earth ions could be separated efficiently from transition metal ions, even in melts with very high concentrations of transition metal ions. Rare-earth oxides could be directly dissolved in the Ca(NO3)2·4H2O phase in the presence of small amounts of Al(NO3)3·9H2O or concentrated nitric acid. The efficiency of extraction after dissolving the rare-earth oxides in the hydrated nitrate melt was identical to extraction from solutions with rare-earth nitrates dissolved in the molten phase. The stripping of the rare-earth ions from the loaded ionic liquid phase and the reuse of the recycled ionic liquid were also investigated in detail.

  5. Rare Earth Doped GaN Laser Structures Using Metal Modulated Epitaxy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-30

    from Eu-doped GaN,” Appl. Phys. Lett., vol. 75, pp. 1189–1191, 1999. 24. D. S . Lee and A. J. Steckl, “Room-temperature-grown rare- earth -doped GaN...luminescent thin films,” Appl. Phys. Lett., vol. 79, pp. 1962–1964,2001. 25. D. S . Lee and A. J. Steckl, “Lateral color integration on rare- earth doped... s . 0.259nm/ s =1.14E13cm-2/ s =1 ML/ s .Our plasma source was optimized to work at 1.5 sccm and 230 W RF power and it provides a growth rate of 0.8 ML/ s

  6. Lunar oxygen and metal for use in near-earth space - Magma electrolysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colson, Russell O.; Haskin, Larry A.

    1990-01-01

    The unique conditions on the moon, such as vacuum, absence of many reagents common on the earth, and presence of very nontraditional 'ores', suggest that a unique and nontraditional process for extracting materials from the ores may prove the most practical. An investigation has begun into unfluxed silicate electrolysis as a method for extracting oxygen, Fe, and Si from lunar regolith. The advantages of the process include simplicity of concept, absence of need to supply reagents from the earth, and low power and mass requirements for the processing plant. Disadvantages include the need for uninterrupted high temperature and the highly corrosive nature of the high-temperature silicate melts, which has made identifying suitable electrode and container materials difficult.

  7. Magnetocaloric effect in heavy rare-earth elements doped Fe-based bulk metallic glasses with tunable Curie temperature

    SciT

    Li, Jiawei; Huo, Juntao; Chang, Chuntao, E-mail: ctchang@nimte.ac.cn, E-mail: dujun@nimte.ac.cn

    2014-08-14

    The effects of heavy rare earth (RE) additions on the Curie temperature (T{sub C}) and magnetocaloric effect of the Fe-RE-B-Nb (RE = Gd, Dy and Ho) bulk metallic glasses were studied. The type of dopping RE element and its concentration can easily tune T{sub C} in a large temperature range of 120 K without significantly decreasing the magnetic entropy change (ΔS{sub M}) and refrigerant capacity (RC) of the alloys. The observed values of ΔS{sub M} and RC of these alloys compare favorably with those of recently reported Fe-based metallic glasses with enhanced RC compared to Gd{sub 5}Ge{sub 1.9}Si{sub 2}Fe{sub 0.1}. The tunable T{submore » C} and large glass-forming ability of these RE doped Fe-based bulk metallic glasses can be used in a wide temperature range with the final required shapes.« less

  8. Method for the regeneration of spent molten zinc chloride

    DOEpatents

    Zielke, Clyde W.; Rosenhoover, William A.

    1981-01-01

    In a process for regenerating spent molten zinc chloride which has been used in the hydrocracking of coal or ash-containing polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbonaceous materials derived therefrom and which contains zinc chloride, zinc oxide, zinc oxide complexes and ash-containing carbonaceous residue, by incinerating the spent molten zinc chloride to vaporize the zinc chloride for subsequent condensation to produce a purified molten zinc chloride: an improvement comprising the use of clay in the incineration zone to suppress the vaporization of metals other than zinc. Optionally water is used in conjunction with the clay to further suppress the vaporization of metals other than zinc.

  9. The Electronic Structure and Optical Properties of Anatase TiO₂ with Rare Earth Metal Dopants from First-Principles Calculations.

    PubMed

    Xie, Kefeng; Jia, Qiangqiang; Wang, Yizhe; Zhang, Wenxue; Xu, Jingcheng

    2018-01-24

    The electronic and optical properties of the rare earth metal atom-doped anatase TiO₂ have been investigated systematically via density functional theory calculations. The results show that TiO₂ doped by Ce or Pr is the optimal choice because of its small band gap and strong optical absorption. Rare earth metal atom doping induces several impurity states that tune the location of valence and conduction bands and an obvious lattice distortion that should reduce the probability of electron-hole recombination. This effect of band change originates from the 4 f electrons of the rare earth metal atoms, which leads to an improved visible light absorption. This finding indicates that the electronic structure of anatase TiO₂ is tuned by the introduction of impurity atoms.

  10. The Electronic Structure and Optical Properties of Anatase TiO2 with Rare Earth Metal Dopants from First-Principles Calculations

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Kefeng; Jia, Qiangqiang; Wang, Yizhe; Zhang, Wenxue; Xu, Jingcheng

    2018-01-01

    The electronic and optical properties of the rare earth metal atom-doped anatase TiO2 have been investigated systematically via density functional theory calculations. The results show that TiO2 doped by Ce or Pr is the optimal choice because of its small band gap and strong optical absorption. Rare earth metal atom doping induces several impurity states that tune the location of valence and conduction bands and an obvious lattice distortion that should reduce the probability of electron–hole recombination. This effect of band change originates from the 4f electrons of the rare earth metal atoms, which leads to an improved visible light absorption. This finding indicates that the electronic structure of anatase TiO2 is tuned by the introduction of impurity atoms. PMID:29364161

  11. Production of anhydrous aluminum chloride composition and process for electrolysis thereof

    DOEpatents

    Vandegrift, George F.; Krumpelt, Michael; Horwitz, E. Philip

    1983-01-01

    A process for producing an anhydrous aluminum chloride composition from a water-based aluminous material such as a slurry of aluminum hydroxide in a multistage extraction process in which the aluminum ion is first extracted into an organic liquid containing an acidic extractant and then extracted from the organic phase into an alkali metal chloride or chlorides to form a melt containing a mixture of chlorides of alkali metal and aluminum. In the process, the organic liquid may be recycled. In addition, the process advantageously includes an electrolysis cell for producing metallic aluminum and the alkali metal chloride or chlorides may be recycled for extraction of the aluminum from the organic phase.

  12. Alkaline-earth metal carboxylates characterized by 43Ca and 87Sr solid-state NMR: impact of metal-amine bonding.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Kevin M N; Xu, Yang; Leclerc, Matthew C; Bryce, David L

    2014-01-06

    A series of calcium and strontium complexes featuring aryl carboxylate ligands has been prepared and characterized by alkaline-earth ((43)Ca and (87)Sr) solid-state NMR experiments in a magnetic field of 21.1 T. In the 11 compounds studied as part of this work, a range of coordination motifs are observed including nitrogen atom binding to Ca(2+) and Sr(2+), a binding mode which has not been investigated previously by (43)Ca or (87)Sr solid-state NMR. (43)Ca isotopic enrichment has enabled the full characterization of the (43)Ca electric field gradient (EFG) and chemical shift tensors of the two calcium sites in calcium p-aminosalicylate (Ca(pams)), where both NMR interactions are affected by the presence of a nitrogen atom in the first coordination sphere of one of the metal sites. The (43)Ca isotropic chemical shift is sensitive to the Ca-N distance as exemplified by the NMR parameters of a second form of Ca(pams) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Studies of the strontium analogue, Sr(pams), confirm a similar sensitivity of the (87)Sr EFG tensor to the presence or absence of nitrogen in the first coordination sphere. To our knowledge, this is the first systematic (87)Sr NMR study of strontium complexes featuring organic ligands. The |CQ((87)Sr)| values are found to be sensitive to the coordination number about Sr(2+). In general, this work has also established a larger data set of reliable experimental |CQ((43)Ca)| values which correlate well with those obtained using gauge-including projector-augmented-wave (GIPAW) DFT calculations. It is found that the use of a recently recommended quadrupole moment for (43)Ca, -44.4 mbarn, improves the agreement with experimental values. This contribution lays the groundwork for the interpretation of (43)Ca and (87)Sr NMR spectra of more challenging systems, particularly where nitrogen-alkaline earth metal bonding is occurring.

  13. Molecular electrocatalysts for oxidation of hydrogen using earth-abundant metals: shoving protons around with proton relays.

    PubMed

    Bullock, R Morris; Helm, Monte L

    2015-07-21

    Sustainable, carbon-neutral energy is needed to supplant the worldwide reliance on fossil fuels in order to address the persistent problem of increasing emissions of CO2. Solar and wind energy are intermittent, highlighting the need to develop energy storage on a huge scale. Electrocatalysts provide a way to convert between electrical energy generated by renewable energy sources and chemical energy in the form of chemical bonds. Oxidation of hydrogen to give two electrons and two protons is carried out in fuel cells, but the typical catalyst is platinum, a precious metal of low earth abundance and high cost. In nature, hydrogenases based on iron or iron/nickel reversibly oxidize hydrogen with remarkable efficiencies and rates. Functional models of these enzymes have been synthesized with the goal of achieving electrocatalytic H2 oxidation using inexpensive, earth-abundant metals along with a key feature identified in the [FeFe]-hydrogenase: an amine base positioned near the metal. The diphosphine ligands P(R)2N(R')2 (1,5-diaza-3,7-diphosphacyclooctane with alkyl or aryl groups on the P and N atoms) are used as ligands in Ni, Fe, and Mn complexes. The pendant amines facilitate binding and heterolytic cleavage of H2, placing the hydride on the metal and the proton on the amine. The pendant amines also serve as proton relays, accelerating intramolecular and intermolecular proton transfers. Electrochemical oxidations and deprotonations by an exogeneous amine base lead to catalytic cycles for oxidation of H2 (1 atm) at room temperature for catalysts derived from [Ni(P(Cy)2N(R')2)2](2+), Cp(C6F5)Fe(P(tBu)2N(Bn)2)H, and MnH(P(Ph)2N(Bn)2)(bppm)(CO) [bppm = (PAr(F)2)2CH2]. In the oxidation of H2 catalyzed by [Ni(P(Cy)2N(R')2)2](2+), the initial product observed experimentally is a Ni(0) complex in which two of the pendant amines are protonated. Two different pathways can occur from this intermediate; deprotonation followed by oxidation occurs with a lower overpotential than

  14. PRODUCTION OF PLUTONIUM METAL

    DOEpatents

    Lyon, W.L.; Moore, R.H.

    1961-01-17

    A process is given for producing plutonium metal by the reduction of plutonium chloride, dissolved in alkali metal chloride plus or minus aluminum chloride, with magnesium or a magnesium-aluminum alloy at between 700 and 800 deg C and separating the plutonium or plutonium-aluminum alloy formed from the salt.

  15. Antimony film sensor for sensitive rare earth metal analysis in environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Makombe, Martin; van der Horst, Charlton; Silwana, Bongiwe; Iwuoha, Emmanuel; Somerset, Vernon

    2016-07-02

    A sensor for the adsorptive stripping voltammetric determination of rare earth elements has been developed. The electrochemical procedure is based on the oxidation of the rare earth elements complexed with alizarin complexone at a glassy carbon electrode that was in situ modified with an antimony film, during an anodic scan from -0.2 V to 1.1 V (vs. Ag/AgCl) and deposition potential of -0.1 V (vs. Ag/AgCl). The factors influencing the adsorptive stripping capability were optimised, including the complexing agent concentration, plating concentration of antimony and deposition time. The detection of rare earth elements (La, Ce and Pr) were realised in 0.08 M sodium acetate (pH = 5.8) solution as supporting electrolyte, with 2 × 10(-6) M alizarin complexone and 1.0 mg L(-1) antimony solution. Under the optimised conditions, a deposition time of 360 s was obtained and a linear response was observed between 1 and 25 µg L(-1). The reproducibility of the voltammetric measurements was found to be within 5.0% RSD for 12 replicate measurements of cerium(III) concentration of 5 µg L(-1) using the same electrode surface. The detection limits obtained using stripping analysis was 0.06, 0.42 and 0.71 μg L(-1) for Ce(III), La(III) and Pr(III), respectively. The developed sensor has been successfully applied for the determination of cerium, lanthanum and praseodymium in municipal tap water samples.

  16. Occupational asthma due to soft corrosive soldering fluxes containing zinc chloride and ammonium chloride.

    PubMed Central

    Weir, D C; Robertson, A S; Jones, S; Burge, P S

    1989-01-01

    Two cases of occupational asthma due to soft corrosive soldering fluxes used in metal jointing are described in which the diagnosis was based on work related deterioration in daily peak expiratory flow rate and positive responses in bronchial provocation tests. Both fluxes contained ammonium chloride and zinc chloride. Occupational asthma provoked by these agents has not previously been reported. PMID:2705153

  17. Heterobimetallic transition metal/rare earth metal bifunctional catalysis: a Cu/Sm/Schiff base complex for syn-selective catalytic asymmetric nitro-Mannich reaction.

    PubMed

    Handa, Shinya; Gnanadesikan, Vijay; Matsunaga, Shigeki; Shibasaki, Masakatsu

    2010-04-07

    The full details of a catalytic asymmetric syn-selective nitro-Mannich reaction promoted by heterobimetallic Cu/Sm/dinucleating Schiff base complexes are described, demonstrating the effectiveness of the heterobimetallic transition metal/rare earth metal bifunctional catalysis. The first-generation system prepared from Cu(OAc)(2)/Sm(O-iPr)(3)/Schiff base 1a = 1:1:1 with an achiral phenol additive was partially successful for achieving the syn-selective catalytic asymmetric nitro-Mannich reaction. The substrate scope and limitations of the first-generation system remained problematic. After mechanistic studies on the catalyst prepared from Sm(O-iPr)(3), we reoptimized the catalyst preparation method, and a catalyst derived from Sm(5)O(O-iPr)(13) showed broader substrate generality as well as higher reactivity and stereoselectivity compared to Sm(O-iPr)(3). The optimal system with Sm(5)O(O-iPr)(13) was applicable to various aromatic, heteroaromatic, and isomerizable aliphatic N-Boc imines, giving products in 66-99% ee and syn/anti = >20:1-13:1. Catalytic asymmetric synthesis of nemonapride is also demonstrated using the catalyst derived from Sm(5)O(O-iPr)(13).

  18. Versatile reactivities of rare-earth metal dialkyl complexes supported by a neutral pyrrolyl-functionalized β-diketiminato ligand.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiancui; Li, Yang; Guo, Dianjun; Wang, Shaowu; Wei, Yun; Zhou, Shuangliu

    2018-03-12

    Herein, rare-earth metal dialkyl complexes supported by a neutral pyrrolyl-functionalized β-diketiminato ligand with the formula LRE(CH 2 SiMe 3 ) 2 (thf) (RE = Y (1a), Dy (1b), Er (1c), Yb (1d); L = MeC(NDipp)CHC(Me)NCH 2 CH 2 NC 4 H 2 -2,5-Me 2 , Dipp = 2,6- i Pr 2 C 6 H 3 ) were synthesized via the reactions of the β-diketimine HL with the rare-earth metal trialkyl complexes RE(CH 2 SiMe 3 ) 3 (thf) 2 in high yields. The reactivities of 1 with pyridine derivatives, unsaturated substrates, and elemental sulfur were investigated, and some interesting chemical transformations were observed. Ligand exchange and activation of sp 2 and sp 3 C-H bonds occurred during the reactions with pyridine derivatives to afford different types of mononuclear rare-earth metal pyridyl complexes, namely, LEr(CH 2 SiMe 3 ) 2 (η 1 -NC 5 H 4 ) (2c), LRE(η 3 -CH 2 -2-NC 5 H 2 -4,6-Me 2 ) 2 (RE = Y (3a), Er (3c)), and LRE(CH 2 SiMe 3 )(η 2 -(C,N)-2-(2-C 6 H 4 NC 5 H 4 )) (RE = Er (4c), Yb = (4d)). Similarly, activation of the sp C-H bond occurred during the reaction of phenylacetylene with 1c to produce the dinuclear erbium alkynyl complex [LEr(CH 2 SiMe 3 )(μ-C[triple bond, length as m-dash]CPh)] 2 (5c). The mixed amidinate-β-diketiminato ytterbium complex LYb[(Dipp)NC(CH 2 SiMe 3 )N(Dipp)](CH 2 SiMe 3 ) (6d) was obtained by the insertion of bis(2,6-diisopropylphenyl)carbodiimide into a Yb-alkyl bond, as well as via the direct alkane elimination of a CH 2 SiMe 3 moiety with bis(2,6-diisopropylphenyl)formamidine to afford the erbium complex LEr(DippNCHNDipp)(CH 2 SiMe 3 ) (7c). A rare sp 2 C-H bond oxidation of the β-diketiminato backbone with elemental sulfur insertion was detected to provide the unprecedented dinuclear rare-earth metal thiolate complexes (LRE) 2 (μ-SCH 2 SiMe 3 ) 2 (μ-SCC(Me)(NDipp)C(Me)NCH 2 CH 2 NC 4 H 2 Me 2 -2,5) (RE = Y (8a), Er (8c)) in the reactions of S 8 with 1a and 1c, respectively. The molecular structures of the complexes 1-8 were determined by

  19. Optical probes for the detection of protons, and alkali and alkaline earth metal cations.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Graham R C; Sahoo, Suban K; Kamila, Sukanta; Singh, Narinder; Kaur, Navneet; Hyland, Barry W; Callan, John F

    2015-07-07

    Luminescent sensors and switches continue to play a key role in shaping our understanding of key biochemical processes, assist in the diagnosis of disease and contribute to the design of new drugs and therapies. Similarly, their contribution to the environment cannot be understated as they offer a portable means to undertake field testing for hazardous chemicals and pollutants such as heavy metals. From a physiological perspective, the Group I and II metal ions are among the most important in the periodic table with blood plasma levels of H(+), Na(+) and Ca(2+) being indicators of several possible disease states. In this review, we examine the progress that has been made in the development of luminescent probes for Group I and Group II ions as well as protons. The potential applications of these probes and the mechanism involved in controlling their luminescent response upon analyte binding will also be discussed.

  20. Understanding the microcrystal tests of three related phenethylamines: the ortho-metallated (±)-amphetamine formed with gold(III) chloride, and the tetrachloridoaurate(III) salts of (+)-methamphetamine and (±)-ephedrine.

    PubMed

    Wood, Matthew R; Lalancette, Roger A

    2013-04-01

    The ortho-metallation product of the reaction of (±)-amphetamine with gold(III) chloride, [D,L-2-(2-aminopropyl)phenyl-κ(2)N,C(1)]dichloridogold(III), [Au(C9H12N)Cl2], and the two salts resulting from crystallization of (+)-methamphetamine with gold(III) chloride, D-methyl(1-phenylpropan-2-yl)azanium tetrachloridoaurate(III), (C10H16N)[AuCl4], and of (±)-ephedrine with gold(III) chloride, D,L-(1-hydroxy-1-phenylpropan-2-yl)(methyl)azanium tetrachloridoaurate(III), (C10H16NO)[AuCl4], have different structures. The first makes a bidentate complex directly with a dichloridogold(III) group, forming a six-membered ring structure; the second and third each form a salt with [AuCl4](-) (each has two formula units in the asymmetric unit). The organic components are all members of the same class of stimulants that are prevalent in illicit drug use. These structures are important contributions to the understanding of the microcrystal tests for these drugs that have been employed for well over 100 years.

  1. Surface shift of the occupied and unoccupied 4f levels of the rare-earth metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldén, M.; Johansson, B.; Skriver, H. L.

    1995-02-01

    The surface energy shifts of the occupied and unoccupied 4f levels for the lanthanide metals have been calculated from first principles by means of a Green's-function technique within the tight-binding linear muffin-tin orbitals method. We use the concept of complete screening to identify the occupied and unoccupied 4f energy level shifts as the surface segregation energy of a 4fn-1 and 4fn+1 impurity atom, respectively, in a 4fn host metal. The calculations include both initial- and final-state effects and give values that are considerably lower than those measured on polycrystalline samples as well as those found in previous initial-state model calculations. The present theory agrees well with very recent high-resolution, single-crystal film measurements for Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, and Lu. We furthermore utilize the unique possibility offered by the lanthanide metals to clarify the roles played by the initial and the different final states of the core-excitation process, permitted by the fact that the so-called initial-state effect is identical upon 4f removal and 4f addition. Surface energy and work function calculations are also reported.

  2. Design of ternary alkaline-earth metal Sn(II) oxides with potential good p-type conductivity

    DOE PAGES

    Du, Mao -Hua; Singh, David J.; Zhang, Lijun; ...

    2016-04-19

    Oxides with good p-type conductivity have been long sought after to achieve high performance all-oxide optoelectronic devices. Divalent Sn(II) based oxides are promising candidates because of their rather dispersive upper valence bands caused by the Sn-5s/O-2p anti-bonding hybridization. There are so far few known Sn(II) oxides being p-type conductive suitable for device applications. Here, we present via first-principles global optimization structure searches a material design study for a hitherto unexplored Sn(II)-based system, ternary alkaline-earth metal Sn(II) oxides in the stoichiometry of MSn 2O 3 (M = Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba). We identify two stable compounds of SrSn 2O 3 andmore » BaSn 2O 3, which can be stabilized by Sn-rich conditions in phase stability diagrams. Their structures follow the Zintl behaviour and consist of basic structural motifs of SnO 3 tetrahedra. Unexpectedly they show distinct electronic properties with band gaps ranging from 1.90 (BaSn 2O 3) to 3.15 (SrSn 2O 3) eV, and hole effective masses ranging from 0.87 (BaSn 2O 3) to above 6.0 (SrSn 2O 3) m0. Further exploration of metastable phases indicates a wide tunability of electronic properties controlled by the details of the bonding between the basic structural motifs. Lastly, this suggests further exploration of alkaline-earth metal Sn(II) oxides for potential applications requiring good p-type conductivity such as transparent conductors and photovoltaic absorbers.« less

  3. Synthesis, structure, and catalytic activity of novel trinuclear rare-earth metal amido complexes incorporating μ-η5:η1 bonding indolyl and μ3-oxo groups.

    PubMed

    Yang, Song; Zhu, Xiancui; Zhou, Shuangliu; Wang, Shaowu; Feng, Zhijun; Wei, Yun; Miao, Hui; Guo, Liping; Wang, Fenhua; Zhang, Guangchao; Gu, Xiaoxia; Mu, Xiaolong

    2014-02-14

    The reactions of different pyrrolyl-functionalized indoles with rare-earth metal(III) amides [(Me3Si)2N]3RE(III)(μ-Cl)Li(THF)3 (RE = Yb, Er, Dy, Eu, Y) produced different kinds of rare-earth metal amido complexes. Reactions of N-((1H-pyrrol-2-yl)methylene)-2-(1H-indol-3-yl)ethanamine with rare-earth metal amides [(Me3Si)2N]3RE(III)(μ-Cl)Li(THF)3 (RE = Yb, Er, Dy, Eu, Y) in toluene or THF at temperatures of 75-80 °C afforded the novel trinuclear rare-earth metal amido complexes incorporating the indolyl ligand in μ-η(5):η(1) bonding modes and a μ3-O group, which is believed to originate from cleavage of the THF ring based on experimental results. Reactions of 2-(1H-indol-3-yl)-N-((1-methyl-1H-pyrrol-2-yl)methylene)ethanamine with rare-earth metal(III) amides [(Me3Si)2N]3RE(III)(μ-Cl)Li(THF)3 (RE = Yb, Dy) produced mononuclear ytterbium and dysprosium amides having the indolyl ligand in an η(1) bonding fashion. The results indicate that substituents not only have an influence on reactivity, but also have an influence on the bonding of the indolyl ligands with metals. The catalytic activities of the novel lanthanide amido complexes for the hydrophosphonylation of both aromatic and aliphatic aldehydes and ketones were explored. The results indicate that these complexes display a high catalytic activity for the C-P bond formation under mild conditions when using low catalyst loadings (0.1 mol% for aldehydes and ketones). Thus, it provides a potential way to prepare α-hydroxy phosphonates.

  4. Rare earth gas laser

    DOEpatents

    Krupke, W.F.

    1975-10-31

    A high energy gas laser with light output in the infrared or visible region of the spectrum is described. Laser action is obtained by generating vapors of rare earth halides, particularly neodymium iodide or, to a lesser extent, neodymium bromide, and disposing the rare earth vapor medium in a resonant cavity at elevated temperatures; e.g., approximately 1200/sup 0/ to 1400/sup 0/K. A particularly preferred gaseous medium is one involving a complex of aluminum chloride and neodymium chloride, which exhibits tremendously enhanced vapor pressure compared to the rare earth halides per se, and provides comparable increases in stored energy densities.

  5. Site specific physics in RT5 (R = rare earths and T = transition metals) materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paudyal, Durga

    Most of RT5 compounds form in hexagonal CaCu5-type structure with three non-equivalent sites: R (1a), T (2c), and T (3g). R atoms sit in the middle of the T (2c) hexagonal layers. Advanced density functional theory calculations including on-site electron correlation and spin orbit coupling show crystal field split localized R 4f states, which are responsible for the large part of the magnetic anisotropy exhibited by these systems. In addition, the hexagonal T (2c) layers help enhancing the magnetic anisotropy. Partially quenched R 4f orbital moment is the origin of magnetic anisotropy which also helps enhancing magnetic moment. The interchange of T sites by other transition metals and the partial substitution of R atoms by transition metals could optimize needed magnetic moment and magnetic anisotropy by forming a complex geometry structure favoring permanent magnetic properties. This research is supported by the Critical Materials Institute, an Energy Innovation Hub funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Advanced Manufacturing office.

  6. Effect of rare-earth doping on the thermoelectric and electrical transport properties of the transition metal pentatelluride hafnium pentatelluride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowhorn, Nathan Dane

    The transition metal pentatellurides HfTe5 and ZrTe5 have been observed to possess interesting electrical transport properties. High thermopower and low resistivity values result in high thermoelectric power factors. In addition, they possess anomalous transport behavior. The temperature dependence of the resistivity is semimetallic except for a large resistive peak as a function of temperature at around 75 K for HfTe5 and 145 K for ZrTe5. At a temperature corresponding to this peak, the thermopower crosses zero as it moves from large positive values to large negative values. This behavior has been found to be extremely sensitive to changes in the energetics of the system through influences such as magnetic field, stress, pressure, microwave radiation, and substitutional doping. This behavior has yet to be fully explained. Previous doping studies have shown profound and varied effects on the anomalous transport behavior. In this study we investigate the effect on the electrical resistivity, thermopower, and magnetoresistance of doping HfTe5 with rare-earth elements. We have grown single crystals of nominal Hf0.75RE 0.25Te5 where RE = Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Gd, Tb, Dy, and Ho. Electrical resistivity and thermopower data from about 10 K to room temperature are presented and discussed in terms of the thermoelectric properties. Doping with rare-earth elements of increasing atomic number leads to a systematic suppression of the anomalous transport behavior. Rare-earth doping also leads to an enhancement of the thermoelectric power factor over that of previously studied pentatellurides and the commonly used thermoelectric material Bi2Te3. For nominal Hf0.75Nd0.25Te5 and Hf0.75 Sm0.25Te5, values more than a factor of 2 larger than that Bi2Te3 are observed. In addition, suppression of the anomalous transport behavior leads to a suppression of the large magnetoresistive effect observed in the parent compounds. Rare-earth doping of HfTe5 has a profound impact on the anomalous

  7. Coordination chemistry of vitamin C. Part I. Interaction of L-ascorbic acid with alkaline earth metal ions in the crystalline solid and aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Tajmir-Riahi, H A

    1990-10-01

    The interaction of L-ascorbic acid with alkaline earth metal ions has been investigated in aqueous solution at pH 6-7. The solid salts of the type Mg(L-ascorbate)2.4H2O, Ca(L-ascorbate)2.2H2O, Sr(L-ascorbate)2.2H2O and Ba(L-ascorbate)2.2H2O were isolated and characterized by means of 13C NMR and FT-IR spectroscopy. Spectroscopic and other evidence suggested that in aqueous solution, the binding of the alkaline earth metal ions is through the O-3 atom of the ascorbate anion, while in the solid state the binding of the Mg(II) is different from those of the other alkaline earth metal ion salts. The Mg(II) ion binds to the O-3, O-1 atom of the two ascorbate anions and to two H2O molecules, while the eight-coordination around the Ca(II), Sr(II), and Ba(II) ions would be completed by the coordination of three acid anions, through O-5, O-6 of the first, O-3, O-5, O-6 of the second and O-1 of the third anion as well as to two H2O molecules. The structural properties of the alkaline earth metal-ascorbate salts are different in the solid and aqueous solution.

  8. Promoting effect of alkaline earth metal doping on catalytic activity of HC and NOx conversion over Pd-only three-way catalyst.

    PubMed

    Yang, Linyan; Lin, Siyu; Yang, Xue; Fang, Weimin; Zhou, Renxian

    2014-08-30

    The influence of alkaline earth metal (M=Mg, Ca, Sr and Ba) promoter on the structural/textural properties of Ce0.67Zr0.33O2 (designated as CZ) and the catalytic behavior of its supported Pd-only three-way catalyst (Pd/CZM) have been investigated. The results show that the modification with alkaline earth metal obviously improves the catalytic activity for hydrocarbon (HC) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) conversion, especially the introduction of Ba. Furthermore, the operation window of the promoted catalysts has also been widened. The doping of alkaline earth metal leads to the formation of more homogeneous Ce-Zr-M ternary solid solution with higher surface area and smaller crystallite size, and the corresponding Pd/CZM catalysts present improved reducibility of PdO species. The modification with Ca, Sr and Ba improves the thermal aging resistance, especially Ba. DRIFTS results reveal that the doping of alkaline earth metal enhances the oxygen and electron transfer ability and favors the dissociation of NO, which promotes the activation and storage capacity of the acidic atoms like NOx, and leads to enhanced catalytic activity performance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Europium-activated phosphors containing oxides of rare-earth and group-IIIB metals and method of making the same

    DOEpatents

    Comanzo, Holly Ann; Setlur, Anant Achyut; Srivastava, Alok Mani

    2006-04-04

    Europium-activated phosphors comprise oxides of at least a rare-earth metal selected from the group consisting of gadolinium, yttrium, lanthanum, and combinations thereof and at least a Group-IIIB metal selected from the group consisting of aluminum, gallium, indium, and combinations thereof. A method for making such phosphors comprises adding at least a halide of at least one of the selected Group-IIIB metals in a starting mixture. The method further comprises firing the starting mixture in an oxygen-containing atmosphere. The phosphors produced by such a method exhibit improved absorption in the UV wavelength range and improved quantum efficiency.

  10. Europium-activated phosphors containing oxides of rare-earth and group-IIIB metals and method of making the same

    DOEpatents

    Comanzo, Holly Ann; Setlur, Anant Achyut; Srivastava, Alok Mani; Manivannan, Venkatesan

    2004-07-13

    Europium-activated phosphors comprise oxides of at least a rare-earth metal selected from the group consisting of gadolinium, yttrium, lanthanum, and combinations thereof and at least a Group-IIIB metal selected from the group consisting of aluminum, gallium, indium, and combinations thereof. A method for making such phosphors comprises adding at least a halide of at least one of the selected Group-IIIB metals in a starting mixture. The method further comprises firing the starting mixture in an oxygen-containing atmosphere. The phosphors produced by such a method exhibit improved absorption in the UV wavelength range and improved quantum efficiency.

  11. Metal Amorphous Nanocomposite Soft Magnetic Material-Enabled High Power Density, Rare Earth Free Rotational Machines [Metal Amorphous Nanocomposite (MANC) Soft Magnetic Material (SMM) Enabled High Power Density, Rare Earth Free Rotational Machines

    SciT

    Simizu, Satoru; Ohodnicki, Paul R.; McHenry, Michael E.

    Metal amorphous nanocomposites (MANCs) are promising soft magnetic materials (SMMs) for power electronic applications offering low power loss at high frequency and maintaining a relatively high flux density. While applications in certain motor designs have been recently modeled, their widespread application awaits scaled manufacturing of MANC materials and proliferation of new higher speed motor designs. A hybrid motor design based on permanent magnets and doubly salient stator and rotor is reported here to develop a compact (a factor of 10 smaller than currently possible in Si steels), high-speed (>1 kHz, electrical), high-power (>2.5 kW) motor by incorporating low loss (<10more » W/kg at 1 kHz) MANCs such as recently reported Fe-Ni-based alloys. A feature of this motor design is flux focusing from the permanent magnet allowing use of lower energy permanent magnet chosen from among non-rare earth containing compositions and attractive due to constraints posed by rare earth criticality. A 2-D finite element analysis model reported here indicates that a 2.5 kW hybrid motor may be built with a permanent magnet with a 0.4 T remanence at a rotor speed of 6000 rpm. At a magnetic switching frequency of 1.4 kHz, the core loss may be limited to <3 W by selecting an appropriate MANC SMM. The projected efficiency exceeds 96% not including power loss in the controller. Under full load conditions, the flux density distributions for the SMM stay predominantly <1.3 T, the saturation magnetization of optimized FeNi-based MANC alloys. As a result, the maximum demagnetizing field in the permanent magnet is less than 2.2 × 10 5 A/m sustainable, for example, with a high-grade hard ferrite magnet.« less

  12. Metal Amorphous Nanocomposite Soft Magnetic Material-Enabled High Power Density, Rare Earth Free Rotational Machines [Metal Amorphous Nanocomposite (MANC) Soft Magnetic Material (SMM) Enabled High Power Density, Rare Earth Free Rotational Machines

    DOE PAGES

    Simizu, Satoru; Ohodnicki, Paul R.; McHenry, Michael E.

    2018-02-27

    Metal amorphous nanocomposites (MANCs) are promising soft magnetic materials (SMMs) for power electronic applications offering low power loss at high frequency and maintaining a relatively high flux density. While applications in certain motor designs have been recently modeled, their widespread application awaits scaled manufacturing of MANC materials and proliferation of new higher speed motor designs. A hybrid motor design based on permanent magnets and doubly salient stator and rotor is reported here to develop a compact (a factor of 10 smaller than currently possible in Si steels), high-speed (>1 kHz, electrical), high-power (>2.5 kW) motor by incorporating low loss (<10more » W/kg at 1 kHz) MANCs such as recently reported Fe-Ni-based alloys. A feature of this motor design is flux focusing from the permanent magnet allowing use of lower energy permanent magnet chosen from among non-rare earth containing compositions and attractive due to constraints posed by rare earth criticality. A 2-D finite element analysis model reported here indicates that a 2.5 kW hybrid motor may be built with a permanent magnet with a 0.4 T remanence at a rotor speed of 6000 rpm. At a magnetic switching frequency of 1.4 kHz, the core loss may be limited to <3 W by selecting an appropriate MANC SMM. The projected efficiency exceeds 96% not including power loss in the controller. Under full load conditions, the flux density distributions for the SMM stay predominantly <1.3 T, the saturation magnetization of optimized FeNi-based MANC alloys. As a result, the maximum demagnetizing field in the permanent magnet is less than 2.2 × 10 5 A/m sustainable, for example, with a high-grade hard ferrite magnet.« less

  13. Deep Structure of the Earth and Concentration of Metals in the Lithosphere: A Geodynamic Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Patrick T.; Kutina, J.; Pei, R.

    2004-01-01

    A discussion of and introduction to satellite-altitude geopotential fields studies and their interpretation with emphasis on results from metalliferous regions will be given. The magnetic and gravimetric measurements from satellite altitudes show heterogeneity in deeper parts of the lithosphere. These patterns of magnetic anomalies do not only reveal the largest iron ore deposits such as Kiruna, Sweden and Kursk, Russia, but also linear features indicating structural discontinuities. Changes of magnetic amplitude of these patterns are caused by intersecting transverse fractures localizing magmatism and concentration of metals. The role of trans-regional mantle-rooted structural discontinuities in the concentration of metals will be discussed and a new type of mineral prognosis map will be presented. Deep-rooted structural discontinuities, defined by combination of geological and geophysical criteria, with spacing of several hundred kilometers, reveal a quite uniform pattern in the deeper parts of the lithosphere. As these structures provide favorable pathways for the ascent of heat, magmas and ore-forming fluids, their recognition is of crucial importance and can be used in the compilation of a new type of mineral prognosis map. Examples are shown from the United States, Canada, China, Burma, South America, Europe and Australia. The European example includes a pattern of east west trending structural discontinuities or belts and their junction with the NW-trending Tornqvist-Teisseyre Line. The Upper Silesian-Cracovian Zn-Pb district occurs along one of the latitudinal belts. Leslaw Teper of the University of Silesia has been invited to show the fractures in crystalline basement beneath the sediments hosting the Zn-Pb ores.

  14. A geological reconnaissance of electrical and electronic waste as a source for rare earth metals.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Sandra R; Wäger, Patrick A; Widmer, Rolf; Williams, Ian D

    2015-11-01

    The mining of material resources requires knowledge about geogenic and anthropogenic deposits, in particular on the location of the deposits with the comparatively highest concentration of raw materials. In this study, we develop a framework that allows the establishment of analogies between geological and anthropogenic processes. These analogies were applied to three selected products containing rare earth elements (REE) in order to identify the most concentrated deposits in the anthropogenic cycle. The three identified anthropogenic deposits were characterised according to criteria such as "host rock", "REE mineralisation" and "age of mineralisation", i.e. regarding their "geological" setting. The results of this characterisation demonstrated that anthropogenic deposits have both a higher concentration of REE and a longer mine life than the evaluated geogenic deposit (Mount Weld, Australia). The results were further evaluated by comparison with the geological knowledge category of the United Nations Framework Classification for Fossil Energy and Mineral Reserves and Resources 2009 (UNFC-2009) to determine the confidence level in the deposit quantities. The application of our approach to the three selected cases shows a potential for recovery of REE in anthropogenic deposits; however, further exploration of both potential and limitations is required. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. A volatile topic: Parsing out the details of Earth's formation through experimental metal-silicate partitioning of volatile and moderately volatile elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahan, B. M.; Siebert, J.; Blanchard, I.; Badro, J.; Sossi, P.; Moynier, F.

    2017-12-01

    Volatile and moderately volatile elements display different volatilities and siderophilities, as well as varying sensitivity to thermodynamic controls (X, P, T, fO2) during metal-silicate differentiation. The experimental determination of the metal-silicate partitioning of these elements permits us to evaluate processes controlling the distribution of these elements in Earth. In this work, we have combined metal-silicate partitioning data and results for S, Sn, Zn and Cu, and input these characterizations into Earth formation models. Model parameters such as source material, timing of volatile delivery, fO2 path, and degree of impactor equilibration were varied to encompass an array of possible formation scenarios. These models were then assessed to discern plausible sets of conditions that can produce current observed element-to-element ratios (e.g. S/Zn) in the Earth's present-day mantle, while also satisfying current estimates on the S content of the core, at no more than 2 wt%. The results of our models indicate two modes of accretion that can maintain chondritic element-to-element ratios for the bulk Earth and can arrive at present-day mantle abundances of these elements. The first mode requires the late addition of Earth's entire inventory of these elements (assuming a CI-chondritic composition) and late-stage accretion that is marked by partial equilibration of large impactors. The second, possibly more intuitive mode, requires that Earth accreted - at least initially - from volatile poor material preferentially depleted in S relative to Sn, Zn, and Cu. From a chemical standpoint, this source material is most similar to type I chondrule rich (and S poor) materials (Hewins and Herzberg, 1996; Mahan et al., 2017; Amsellem et al., 2017), such as the metal-bearing carbonaceous chondrites.

  16. Experimental investigation of the partitioning of phosphorus between metal and silicate phases - Implications for the earth, moon and eucrite parent body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newsom, H. E.; Drake, M. J.

    1983-01-01

    An experimental study is reported of the partitioning of Phosphorus between solid metal and basaltic silicate liquid as a function of temperature and oxygen fugacity and of the implications for the earth, moon and eucrite parent body (EPB). The relationship established between the partition coefficient and the fugacity is given at 1190 C by log D(P) = -1.12 log fO2 - 15.95 and by log D(P) = -1.53 log fO2 17.73 at 1300 C. The partition coefficient D(P) was determined, and it is found to be consistent with a valence state of 5 for P in the molten silicate. Using the determined coefficient the low P/La ratios of the earth, moon, and eucrites relative to C1 chondrites can be explained. The lowering of the P/La ratio in the eucrites relative to Cl chondrite by a factor of 40 can be explained by partitioning P into 20-25 wt% sulfur-bearing metallic liquid corresponding to 5-25% of the total metal plus silicate system. The low P/La and W/La ratios in the moon may be explained by the partitioning of P and W into metal during formation of a small core by separation of liquid metal from silicate at low degrees of partial melting of the silicates. These observations are consistent with independent formation of the moon and the earth.

  17. IUPAC-NIST Solubility Data Series. 100. Rare Earth Metal Fluorides in Water and Aqueous Systems. Part 1. Scandium Group (Sc, Y, La)

    SciT

    Mioduski, Tomasz; Gumiński, Cezary, E-mail: cegie@chem.uw.edu.pl; Zeng, Dewen, E-mail: dewen-zeng@hotmail.com

    2014-03-15

    This work presents an assessment of solubility data for rare earth metal fluorides (generally of trivalent metals and of CeF{sub 4}) in water and in aqueous ternary systems. Compilations of all available experimental data are introduced for each rare earth metal fluoride with a corresponding critical evaluation. Every such evaluation contains a collection of all solubility results in water, a selection of suggested solubility data, and a brief discussion of the multicomponent systems. Because the ternary systems were seldom studied more than once, no critical evaluations of such data were possible. Only simple fluorides (no complexes or binary salts) aremore » treated as the input substances in this report. The literature has been covered through the end of 2013.« less

  18. Environmentally Friendly Economical Sequestration of Rare Earth Metals from Geothermal Waters

    SciT

    Stull, Dean P.

    The purpose of this work was to complete a proof of concept study to apply and validate a novel method developed by Tusaar for the capture and recovery of rare earth elements (known as REEs) and other critical and valuable elements from geothermal waters produced from deep within the earth. Geothermal water provides heat for power production at many geothermal power plants in the western United States. The target elements, the REEs, are vital to modern day electronics, batteries, motors, automobiles and many other consumer favorites and necessities. Currently there are no domestic sources of REEs while domestic and internationalmore » demand for the products they are used in continues to rise. Many of the REEs are considered “strategically” important. A secure supply of REEs in the USA would benefit consumers and the country at large. A new method to recover these REEs from geothermal waters used at existing geothermal power plants around the country is a high priority and would benefit consumers and the USA. The result of this project was the successful development and demonstration of an integrated process for removal and recovery of the REEs from synthetic geothermal brines on a small laboratory scale. The work included preparation of model geothermal brines to test, selection of the most effective proprietary sorbent media to capture the REEs and testing of the media under a variety of potential operating conditions. Geothermal brines are generally very high in salt content and contain a wide range of elements and anions associated with the rock layers from which they are produced. Processing the geothermal water is difficult because it is corrosive and the dissolved minerals in the water precipitate easily once the temperature and pressure change. No commercial technologies have been shown to be effective or robust enough under these geothermal brine conditions to be commercially viable for removal of REEs. Technologies including ion exchange

  19. Structural diversity in binuclear complexes of alkaline earth metal ions with 4,6-diacetylresorcinol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shebl, Magdy; Khalil, Saied M. E.; Taha, A.; Mahdi, M. A. N.

    2012-11-01

    A new series of binuclear and mixed-ligand complexes with the general formula: [M 2(LO)yClz]; where M = Mg(II), Ca(II), Sr(II) and Ba(II); H2L = 4,6-diacetylresorcinol, the secondary ligand L' = acetylacetone (acac), 8-hydroxyquinoline (8-HQ) or 2,2'-bipyridyl (Bipy), n = 0-2, m = 1, 2, x = 0, 1, 2, 4, y = 0, 2, 4, 5 and z = 0-2; have been synthesized. They have been characterized by the analytical and spectral methods (IR, 1H NMR and mass) as well as TGA and molar conductivity measurements. The spectroscopic and conductance data suggested that the H2L ligand behaves as a neutral, monobasic or dibasic tetradentate ligand, depending on the basicity of the secondary ligand, through the two phenolic and two carbonyl groups. Binuclear octahedral geometry has been assigned to all of the prepared complexes in various molar ratios 2:2; 2:2:2; 1:2:1 and 1:2:4 (L:M:L'). Molecular orbital calculations were performed for the ligands and their complexes using Hyperchem 7.52 program on the bases of PM3 level and the results were correlated with the experimental data. The ligand and some of its alkaline metal(II) complexes showed antibacterial activity towards some of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, yeast (Candida albicans) and fungus (Aspergillus fumigatus).

  20. Method for the production of uranium chloride salt

    DOEpatents

    Westphal, Brian R.; Mariani, Robert D.

    2013-07-02

    A method for the production of UCl.sub.3 salt without the use of hazardous chemicals or multiple apparatuses for synthesis and purification is provided. Uranium metal is combined in a reaction vessel with a metal chloride and a eutectic salt- and heated to a first temperature under vacuum conditions to promote reaction of the uranium metal with the metal chloride for the production of a UCl.sub.3 salt. After the reaction has run substantially to completion, the furnace is heated to a second temperature under vacuum conditions. The second temperature is sufficiently high to selectively vaporize the chloride salts and distill them into a condenser region.

  1. Anomalies in Trace Metal and Rare-Earth Loads below a Waste-Water Treatment Plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antweiler, R.; Writer, J. H.; Murphy, S.

    2013-12-01

    The changes in chemical loads were examined for 54 inorganic elements and compounds in a 5.4-km reach of Boulder Creek, Colorado downstream of a waste water treatment plant (WWTP) outfall. Elements were partitioned into three categories: those showing a decrease in loading downstream, those showing an increase, and those which were conservative, at least over the length of the study reach. Dissolved loads which declined - generally indicative of in-stream loss via precipitation or sorption - were typically rapid (occurring largely before the first sampling site, 2.3 km downstream); elements showing this behavior were Bi, Cr, Cs, Ga, Ge, Hg, Se and Sn. These results were as expected before the experiment was performed. However, a large group (28 elements, including all the rare-earth elements, REE, except Gd) exhibited dissolved load increases indicating in-stream gains. These gains may be due to particulate matter dissolving or disaggregating, or that desorption is occurring below the WWTP. As with the in-stream loss group, the processes tended to be rapid, typically occurring before the first sampling site. Whole-water samples collected concurrently also had a large group of elements which showed an increase in load downstream of the WWTP. Among these were most of the group which had increases in the dissolved load, including all the REE (except Gd). Because whole-water samples include both dissolved and suspended particulates within them, increases in loads cannot be accounted for by invoking desorption or disaggregation mechanisms; thus, the only source for these increases is from the bed load of the stream. Further, the difference between the whole-water and dissolved loads is a measure of the particulate load, and calculations show that not only did the dissolved and whole-water loads increase, but so did the particulate loads. This implies that at the time of sampling the bed sediment was supplying a significant contribution to the suspended load. In general

  2. Neutron diffraction studies of some rare earth-transition metal deuterides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, W. J.

    1984-04-01

    Neutron diffraction studies of the ternary alloy system Y6(Fel-xMnx)23 reveal that the unusual magnetic behavior upon substitution of Mn or Fe into the end members, is a consequence of atomic ordering wherein there is strong site preference of Mn for the f sub 2 sites and of Fe for the f sub 1 sites. In the Mn-rich compositions, Fe is found to have no spontaneous moments. Therefore, the long range magnetic ordering arises solely from Mn-Mn interactions. Upon substitution of Mn into the Fe-rich ternaries, the Fe moments are considerably reduced. Neutron diffraction studies of Y6Mn23D23 show that a transition occurs below 180K from a fcc structure to a primitive tetragonal structure, space group P4/mmm with the onset of antiferromagnetic ordering. The Mn moments are directed along the c-axis. The transition probably results from atomic ordering of the D atoms at low temperature which induces c axis magnetic ordering. The question of the appropriate space group of LaNi4.5Al0.5D4.5, P6/mmm or P3/m has been resolved by a careful refinement and analysis of neutron diffraction data. The preferred space group is P6/mmm. Neutron powder diffraction and thermal magnetization measurements on small single crystals of ErNi3, ErCo3, and ErFe3 (space group R3m) show that the magnetocrystalline properties are a consequence of competing local site anisotropies between the two non-equivalent crystallographic sites of Er and two of the three non-equivalent sites of the 3d-transition metal.

  3. Empirical links between trace metal cycling and marine microbial ecology during a large perturbation to Earth's carbon cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, Jeremy D.; Reinhard, Christopher T.; Rohrssen, Megan; Love, Gordon D.; Lyons, Timothy W.

    2016-09-01

    Understanding the global redox state of the oceans and its cause-and-effect relationship with periods of widespread organic-carbon deposition is vital to interpretations of Earth's climatic and biotic feedbacks during periods of expanded oceanic oxygen deficiency. Here, we present a compilation of new and published data from an organic-rich locality within the proto-North Atlantic Ocean during the Cenomanian-Turonian boundary event that shows a dramatic drawdown of redox-sensitive trace elements. Iron geochemistry independently suggests euxinic deposition (i.e., anoxic and sulfidic bottom waters) for the entire section, thus confirming its potential as an archive of global marine metal inventories. In particular, depleted molybdenum (Mo) and vanadium (V) concentrations effectively record the global expansion of euxinic and oxygen-deficient but non-sulfidic waters, respectively. The V drawdown precedes the OAE, fingerprinting an expansion of oxygen deficiency prior to an expansion of euxinia. Molybdenum drawdown, in contrast, is delayed with respect to V and coincides with the onset of OAE2. Parallel lipid biomarker analyses provide evidence for significant and progressive reorganization of marine microbial ecology during the OAE in this region of the proto-North Atlantic, with the smallest relative eukaryotic contributions to total primary production occurring during metal-depleted intervals. This relationship may be related to decreasing supplies of enzymatically important trace elements. Similarly, box modeling suggests that oceanic drawdown of Mo may have approached levels capable of affecting marine nitrogen fixation. Predictions of possible nitrogen stress on eukaryotic production, locally and globally, are consistent with the low observed levels of Mo and a rise in 2-methylhopane index values during the peak of the OAE. At the same time, the environmental challenge presented by low dissolved oxygen and euxinia coincides with increased turnover rates of

  4. CALCIUM CHLORIDE PLANT LOOKING EAST. CALCIUM CHLORIDE BUILDING IN CENTER, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CALCIUM CHLORIDE PLANT LOOKING EAST. CALCIUM CHLORIDE BUILDING IN CENTER, CALCIUM CHLORIDE STORAGE BUILDING ON RIGHT WITH SA (SODA ASH) BUILDING IN RIGHT BACKGROUND. - Solvay Process Company, Calcium Chloride Plant, Between Willis & Milton Avenues, Solvay, Onondaga County, NY

  5. Mercuric chloride poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002474.htm Mercuric chloride poisoning To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Mercuric chloride is a very poisonous form of mercury. It ...

  6. Chloride test - blood

    MedlinePlus

    Serum chloride test ... A greater-than-normal level of chloride is called hyperchloremia. It may be due to: Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors (used to treat glaucoma) Diarrhea Metabolic acidosis Respiratory alkalosis (compensated) Renal ...

  7. Hydrogen storage property of alkali and alkaline-earth metal atoms decorated C24 fullerene: A DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yafei; Cheng, Xinlu

    2018-04-01

    The hydrogen storage behavior of alkali and alkaline-earth metal (AM = Li, Na, K, Mg, Ca) atoms decorated C24 fullerene was investigated by using density functional theory (DFT) study. Our results indicate that the AM atoms prefer to adsorb atop the center of tetragon of C24 fullerene with the largest binding energy than other possible adsorption sites. Moreover, the hydrogen storage gravimetric density of 24H2/6Li/C24, 24H2/6Na/C24 and 36H2/6Ca/C24 configurations reaches up to 12.7 wt%, 10.1 wt% and 12 wt%, higher than the year 2020 target from the US department of energy (DOE). Also, the average adsorption energies of H2 molecules of the 24H2/6Li/C24, 24H2/6Na/C24 and 36H2/6Ca/C24 configurations are -0.198 eV/H2, -0.164 eV/H2 and -0.138 eV/H2, locate the desirable range under the physical adsorption at near ambient conditions. These findings will have important implications on designing new hydrogen storage materials in the future.

  8. Rapid enrichment of rare-earth metals by carboxymethyl cellulose-based open-cellular hydrogel adsorbent from HIPEs template.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yongfeng; Wang, Wenbo; Zheng, Yian; Wang, Feng; Wang, Aiqin

    2016-04-20

    A series of monolithic open-cellular hydrogel adsorbents based on carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) were prepared through high internal phase emulsions (HIPEs) and used to enrich the rare-earth metals La(3+) and Ce(3+). The changes of pore structure, and the effects of pH, contact time, initial concentration on the adsorption performance were systematically studied. The results show that the as-prepared monolithic hydrogel adsorbents possess good open-cellular framework structure and have fast adsorption kinetics and high adsorption capacity for La(3+) and Ce(3+). The involved adsorption system can reach equilibrium within 30min and the maximal adsorption capacity is determined to be 384.62mg/g for La(3+) and 333.33mg/g for Ce(3+). Moreover, these porous hydrogel adsorbents show an excellent adsorptive reusability for La(3+) and Ce(3+) through five adsorption-desorption cycles. Such a pore hierarchy structure makes this monolithic open-cellular hydrogel adsorbent be an effective adsorbent for effective enrichment of La(3+) and Ce(3+) from aqueous solution. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Distortion and Targeting Errors from Strong Rare Earth Metal Magnetic Dental Implant Requiring Revision.

    PubMed

    Seong-Cheol, Park; Chong Sik, Lee; Seok Min, Kim; Eu Jene, Choi; Do Hee, Lee; Jung Kyo, Lee

    2016-12-22

    Recently, the use of magnetic dental implants has been re-popularized with the introduction of strong rare earth metal, for example, neodymium, magnets. Unrecognized magnetic dental implants can cause critical magnetic resonance image distortions. We report a case involving surgical failure caused by a magnetic dental implant. A 62-year-old man underwent deep brain stimulation for medically insufficiently controlled Parkinson's disease. Stereotactic magnetic resonance imaging performed for the first deep brain stimulation showed that the overdenture was removed. However, a dental implant remained and contained a neodymium magnet, which was unrecognized at the time of imaging; the magnet caused localized non-linear distortions that were the largest around the dental magnets. In the magnetic field, the subthalamic area was distorted by a 4.6 mm right shift and counter clockwise rotation. However, distortions were visually subtle in the operation field and small for distant stereotactic markers, with approximately 1-2 mm distortions. The surgeon considered the distortion to be normal asymmetry or variation. Stereotactic marker distortion was calculated to be in the acceptable range in the surgical planning software. Targeting errors, approximately 5 mm on the right side and 2 mm on the left side, occurred postoperatively. Both leads were revised after the removal of dental magnets. Dental magnets may cause surgical failures and should be checked and removed before stereotactic surgery. Our findings should be considered when reviewing surgical precautions and making distortion-detection algorithm improvements.

  10. Solvent-free mechanochemical synthesis and magnetic properties of rare-earth based metal-organic frameworks

    DOE PAGES

    Singh, N. K.; Gupta, S.; Pecharsky, V. K.; ...

    2016-11-17

    Mechanical milling of benzene 1,3,5-tricarboxylic acid [C 6H 3(COOH) 3], both with the single and mixed rare earth carbonates [R 2(CO 3) 3·xH 2O; R = Gd, Tb and Dy], leads to the formation of metal-organic frameworks [R{C 6H 3(COO) 3}] that adopt MIL-78 type structure. M(T) data of the investigated MOFs do not show any apparent onset of long range magnetic ordering down to 2 K. The M(H) data for Gd{C 6H 3(COO) 3}collected at 2 K show deviations from the magnetization behavior expected for non-interacting Gd 3+ ions. For the Gd based MOF the temperature dependence of themore » isothermal magnetic entropy change (i.e. magnetocaloric effect, ΔS M) exhibits a monotonous increase with decreasing temperature and at T = 3.5 K it reaches 34.1 J kg $-$1K $-$1 for a field change (ΔH) of 50 kOe. Finally, for the same ΔH the maximum values of ΔS M for R = Tb and Dy are 5.5 J kg $-$1K $-$1 and 8.5 J kg $-$1K $-$1 at 9.5 K and 4.5 K, respectively.« less

  11. Fabrication of novel metal ion imprinted xanthan gum-layered double hydroxide nanocomposite for adsorption of rare earth elements.

    PubMed

    Iftekhar, Sidra; Srivastava, Varsha; Hammouda, Samia Ben; Sillanpää, Mika

    2018-08-15

    The work focus to enhance the properties of xanthan gum (XG) by anchoring metal ions (Fe, Zr) and encapsulating inorganic matrix (M@XG-ZA). The fabricated nanocomposite was characterized by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), surface area (BET) and zeta potential analysis. The adsorption of Sc, Nd, Tm and Yb was investigated after screening of synthesized materials in detail to understand the influence of pH, contact time, temperature and initial REE (rare earth element) concentration both in single and multicomponent system via batch adsorption. The adsorption mechanism was verified by FTIR, SEM and elemental mapping. The SEM images of Zr@XG-ZA demonstrate scutes structure, which disappeared after adsorption of REEs. The maximum adsorption capacities were 132.30, 14.01, 18.15 and 25.73 mg/g for Sc, Nd, Tm and Yb, respectively. The adsorption efficiency over Zr@XG-ZA in multicomponent system was higher than single system and the REEs followed the order: Sc > Yb > Tm > Nd. The Zr@XG-ZA demonstrate good adsorption behavior for REEs up to five cycles and then it can be used as photocatalyst for the degradation of tetracycline. Thus, the work adds a new insight to design and preparation of efficient bifunctional adsorbents from sustainable materials for water purification. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A novel fluorescent probe (dtpa-bis(cytosine)) for detection of Eu(III) in rare earth metal ions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Ren, Peipei; Liu, Guanhong; Song, Youtao; Bu, Naishun; Wang, Jun

    2018-03-15

    In this paper, a novel fluorescent probe, dtpa-bis(cytosine), was designed and synthesized for detecting europium (Eu 3+ ) ion. Upon addition of Eu 3+ ions into the dtpa-bis(cytosine) solution, the fluorescence intensity can strongly be enhanced. Conversely, adding other rare earth metal ions, such as Y 3+ , Ce 3+ , Pr 3+ , Nd 3+ , Sm 3+ , Gd 3+ , Tb 3+ , Dy 3+ , Ho 3+ , Er 3+ , Yb 3+ and Lu 3+ , into dtpa-bis(cytosine) solution, the fluorescence intensity is decreased slightly. Some parameters affecting the fluorescence intensity of dtpa-bis(cytosine) solution in the presence of Eu 3+ ions were investigated, including solution pH value, Eu 3+ ion concentration and interfering substances. The detection mechanism of Eu 3+ ion using dtpa-bis(cytosine) as fluorescent probe was proposed. Under optimum conditions, the fluorescence emission intensities of Eu III -dtpa-bis(cytosine) at 375nm in the concentration range of 0.50×10 -5 mol∙L -1 -5.00×10 -5 mol∙L -1 of Eu 3+ ion display a better linear relationship. The limit of detection (LOD) was determined as 8.65×10 -7 mol∙L -1 and the corresponding correlation coefficient (R 2 ) of the linear equation is 0.9807. It is wished that the proposed method could be applied for sensitively and selectively detecting Eu 3+ ion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Relationship between domestic smoking and metals and rare earth elements concentration in indoor PM2.5.

    PubMed

    Drago, Gaspare; Perrino, Cinzia; Canepari, Silvia; Ruggieri, Silvia; L'Abbate, Luca; Longo, Valeria; Colombo, Paolo; Frasca, Daniele; Balzan, Martin; Cuttitta, Giuseppina; Scaccianoce, Gianluca; Piva, Giuseppe; Bucchieri, Salvatore; Melis, Mario; Viegi, Giovanni; Cibella, Fabio; Balzan, Martin; Bilocca, David; Borg, Charles; Montefort, Stephen; Zammit, Christopher; Bucchieri, Salvatore; Cibella, Fabio; Colombo, Paolo; Cuttitta, Giuseppina; Drago, Gaspare; Ferrante, Giuliana; L'Abbate, Luca; Grutta, Stefania La; Longo, Valeria; Melis, Mario R; Ruggieri, Silvia; Viegi, Giovanni; Minardi, Remo; Piva, Giuseppe; Ristagno, Rosaria; Rizzo, Gianfranco; Scaccianoce, Gianluca

    2018-04-16

    Cigarette smoke is the main source of indoor chemical and toxic elements. Cadmium (Cd), Thallium (Tl), Lead (Pb) and Antimony (Sb) are important contributors to smoke-related health risks. Data on the association between Rare Earth Elements (REE) Cerium (Ce) and Lanthanum (La) and domestic smoking are scanty. To evaluate the relationship between cigarette smoke, indoor levels of PM 2.5 and heavy metals, 73 children were investigated by parental questionnaire and skin prick tests. The houses of residence of 41 "cases" and 32 "controls" (children with and without respiratory symptoms, respectively) were evaluated by 48-h PM 2.5 indoor/outdoor monitoring. PM 2.5 mass concentration was determined by gravimetry; the extracted and mineralized fractions of elements (As, Cd, Ce, La, Mn, Pb, Sb, Sr, Tl) were evaluated by ICP-MS. PM 2.5 and Ce, La, Cd, and Tl indoor concentrations were higher in smoker dwellings. When corrected for confounding factors, PM 2.5 , Ce, La, Cd, and Tl were associated with more likely presence of respiratory symptoms in adolescents. We found that: i) indoor smoking is associated with increased levels of PM 2.5 , Ce, La, Cd, and Tl and ii) the latter with increased presence of respiratory symptoms in children. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A novel fluorescent probe (dtpa-bis(cytosine)) for detection of Eu(III) in rare earth metal ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fan; Ren, Peipei; Liu, Guanhong; Song, Youtao; Bu, Naishun; Wang, Jun

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, a novel fluorescent probe, dtpa-bis(cytosine), was designed and synthesized for detecting europium (Eu3 +) ion. Upon addition of Eu3 + ions into the dtpa-bis(cytosine) solution, the fluorescence intensity can strongly be enhanced. Conversely, adding other rare earth metal ions, such as Y3 +, Ce3 +, Pr3 +, Nd3 +, Sm3 +, Gd3 +, Tb3 +, Dy3 +, Ho3 +, Er3 +, Yb3 + and Lu3 +, into dtpa-bis(cytosine) solution, the fluorescence intensity is decreased slightly. Some parameters affecting the fluorescence intensity of dtpa-bis(cytosine) solution in the presence of Eu3 + ions were investigated, including solution pH value, Eu3 + ion concentration and interfering substances. The detection mechanism of Eu3 + ion using dtpa-bis(cytosine) as fluorescent probe was proposed. Under optimum conditions, the fluorescence emission intensities of EuIII-dtpa-bis(cytosine) at 375 nm in the concentration range of 0.50 × 10- 5 mol • L- 1-5.00 × 10- 5 mol • L- 1 of Eu3 + ion display a better linear relationship. The limit of detection (LOD) was determined as 8.65 × 10- 7 mol • L- 1 and the corresponding correlation coefficient (R2) of the linear equation is 0.9807. It is wished that the proposed method could be applied for sensitively and selectively detecting Eu3 + ion.

  15. Effect of alkaline earth metals on the liquid-phase hydrogenation of hydroquinone over Ru-based catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hongwei; Ji, Dong; Li, Yu; Liang, Yalan; Li, Gui Xian

    2015-12-01

    A series of Ru-based catalysts modified by alkaline earth metals were prepared by the impregnation-precipitation method and characterized using transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, ICP optical emission spectroscopy, Infrared Spectroscopy of adsorbed pyridine analysis and surface area analysis. The performance of the catalysts was measured via liquid-phase hydroquinone hydrogenation reaction. Results show that the Ru-Sr/NaY catalyst has the best activity and selectivity among those Ru-based catalysts. The conversion of hydroquinone and the selectivity to 1,4-cyclohexanediol reached up to 99.6% and 89.6% at optimum reaction condition (700 r/min, 423 K and 5 MPa pressure of H2 in 3 h). This may be attributed to the fact that the right amount of Strontium is beneficial to the good dispersion of the ruthenium nanoclusters on the surface of NaY and modify the acidic properties of the catalyst. Moreover, IR of adsorbed pyridine analysis suggested the proper ratio of L/B acid of the catalysts played an important role in the performance of the hydroquinone hydrogenation reaction.

  16. Magnetic coupling at rare earth ferromagnet/transition metal ferromagnet interfaces: A comprehensive study of Gd/Ni.

    PubMed

    Higgs, T D C; Bonetti, S; Ohldag, H; Banerjee, N; Wang, X L; Rosenberg, A J; Cai, Z; Zhao, J H; Moler, K A; Robinson, J W A

    2016-07-22

    Thin film magnetic heterostructures with competing interfacial coupling and Zeeman energy provide a fertile ground to study phase transition between different equilibrium states as a function of external magnetic field and temperature. A rare-earth (RE)/transition metal (TM) ferromagnetic multilayer is a classic example where the magnetic state is determined by a competition between the Zeeman energy and antiferromagnetic interfacial exchange coupling energy. Technologically, such structures offer the possibility to engineer the macroscopic magnetic response by tuning the microscopic interactions between the layers. We have performed an exhaustive study of nickel/gadolinium as a model system for understanding RE/TM multilayers using the element-specific measurement technique x-ray magnetic circular dichroism, and determined the full magnetic state diagrams as a function of temperature and magnetic layer thickness. We compare our results to a modified Stoner-Wohlfarth-based model and provide evidence of a thickness-dependent transition to a magnetic fan state which is critical in understanding magnetoresistance effects in RE/TM systems. The results provide important insight for spintronics and superconducting spintronics where engineering tunable magnetic inhomogeneity is key for certain applications.

  17. Magnetic coupling at rare earth ferromagnet/transition metal ferromagnet interfaces: A comprehensive study of Gd/Ni

    DOE PAGES

    Higgs, T. D. C.; Bonetti, S.; Ohldag, H.; ...

    2016-07-22

    Thin film magnetic heterostructures with competing interfacial coupling and Zeeman energy provide a fertile ground to study phase transition between different equilibrium states as a function of external magnetic field and temperature. A rare-earth (RE)/transition metal (TM) ferromagnetic multilayer is a classic example where the magnetic state is determined by a competition between the Zeeman energy and antiferromagnetic interfacial exchange coupling energy. Technologically, such structures offer the possibility to engineer the macroscopic magnetic response by tuning the microscopic interactions between the layers. We have performed an exhaustive study of nickel/gadolinium as a model system for understanding RE/TM multilayers using themore » element-specific measurement technique x-ray magnetic circular dichroism, and determined the full magnetic state diagrams as a function of temperature and magnetic layer thickness. We compare our results to a modified Stoner-Wohlfarth-based model and provide evidence of a thickness-dependent transition to a magnetic fan state which is critical in understanding magnetoresistance effects in RE/TM systems. In conclusion, the results provide important insight for spintronics and superconducting spintronics where engineering tunable magnetic inhomogeneity is key for certain applications.« less

  18. Magnetic coupling at rare earth ferromagnet/transition metal ferromagnet interfaces: A comprehensive study of Gd/Ni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgs, T. D. C.; Bonetti, S.; Ohldag, H.; Banerjee, N.; Wang, X. L.; Rosenberg, A. J.; Cai, Z.; Zhao, J. H.; Moler, K. A.; Robinson, J. W. A.

    2016-07-01

    Thin film magnetic heterostructures with competing interfacial coupling and Zeeman energy provide a fertile ground to study phase transition between different equilibrium states as a function of external magnetic field and temperature. A rare-earth (RE)/transition metal (TM) ferromagnetic multilayer is a classic example where the magnetic state is determined by a competition between the Zeeman energy and antiferromagnetic interfacial exchange coupling energy. Technologically, such structures offer the possibility to engineer the macroscopic magnetic response by tuning the microscopic interactions between the layers. We have performed an exhaustive study of nickel/gadolinium as a model system for understanding RE/TM multilayers using the element-specific measurement technique x-ray magnetic circular dichroism, and determined the full magnetic state diagrams as a function of temperature and magnetic layer thickness. We compare our results to a modified Stoner-Wohlfarth-based model and provide evidence of a thickness-dependent transition to a magnetic fan state which is critical in understanding magnetoresistance effects in RE/TM systems. The results provide important insight for spintronics and superconducting spintronics where engineering tunable magnetic inhomogeneity is key for certain applications.

  19. Synergetic effect of alkaline earth metal oxides and iron oxides on the degradation of hexachlorobenzene and its degradation pathway.

    PubMed

    Su, Guijin; Liu, Yexuan; Huang, Linyan; Shi, Yali; Zhang, Aiqian; Zhang, Lixia; Liu, Wenbin; Gao, Lirong; Zheng, Minghui

    2013-01-01

    The degradation of hexachlorobenzene (HCB) was carried out over physical mixtures of a series of alkaline earth metal oxides (MO: M=Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba) and iron oxides with different crystal types (Fe(x)O(y):Fe(2)O(3) or Fe(3)O(4)) at 300°C. These physical mixtures all showed a synergetic effect toward the degradation of HCB. A range of degradation products were identified by various methods, including tri- to penta-chlorobenzenes by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS), tri- to penta-chlorophenols, tetrachlorocatechol (TCC) and tetrachlorohydroquinone (TCHQ) by GC-MS after derivatization, and formic and acetic acids by ion chromatography. Two degradation pathways, hydrodechlorination and oxidative degradation, appear to occur competitively. However, more sequential chlorinated benzene and phenol congeners were formed over mixed MO/Fe(3)O(4) than over mixed MO/Fe(2)O(3) under the same conditions. The oxidative reaction dominated over mixed MO/Fe(2)O(3) and was promoted as the major reaction by the synergetic effect, while both the oxidative and hydrodechlorination reactions were important over mixed MO/Fe(3)O(4), and both pathways are remarkably promoted by the synergetic effect. The enhanced hydrodechlorination may be attributed to free electrons generated by the transformation of Fe(3)O(4) into Fe(2)O(3), and hydrogen provided by water adsorbed on the MO. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. One Electron-Initiated Two-Electron Oxidation of Water by Aluminum Porphyrins with Earth's Most Abundant Metal.

    PubMed

    Kuttassery, Fazalurahman; Mathew, Siby; Sagawa, Shogo; Remello, Sebastian Nybin; Thomas, Arun; Yamamoto, Daisuke; Onuki, Satomi; Nabetani, Yu; Tachibana, Hiroshi; Inoue, Haruo

    2017-05-09

    We report herein a new molecular catalyst for efficient water splitting, aluminum porphyrins (tetra-methylpyridiniumylporphyrinatealuminum: AlTMPyP), containing earth's most abundant metal as the central ion. One-electron oxidation of the aluminum porphyrin initiates the two-electron oxidation of water to form hydrogen peroxide as the primary reaction product with the lowest known overpotential (97 mV). The aluminum-peroxo complex was detected by a cold-spray ionization mass-spectrometry in high-resolution MS (HRMS) mode and the structure of the intermediate species was further confirmed using laser Raman spectroscopy, indicating the hydroperoxy complex of AlTMPyP to be the key intermediate in the reaction. The two-electron oxidation of water to form hydrogen peroxide was essentially quantitative, with a Faradaic efficiency of 99 %. The catalytic reaction was found to be highly efficient, with a turnover frequency up to ∼2×10 4  s -1 . A reaction mechanism is proposed involving oxygen-oxygen bond formation by the attack of a hydroxide ion on the oxyl-radical-like axial ligand oxygen atom in the one-electron-oxidized form of AlTMPyP(O - ) 2 , followed by a second electron transfer to the electrode. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Structure–Reactivity Studies, Characterization, and Transformation of Intermediates by Lithium Chloride in the Direct Insertion of Alkyl and Aryl Iodides to Metallic Zinc Powder

    SciT

    Feng, Chao; Easter, Quinn T.; Blum, Suzanne A.

    Employment of fluorophore-tagged alkyl and aryl iodides permitted detection of persistent surface intermediates during their direct insertion to commercially available zinc powder. The sensitivity of this subensemble microscopy technique enabled structure–reactivity studies in the formation of intermediates that are present in quantities sufficiently low as to have been undetected previously by traditional ensemble analytical techniques. In these surface intermediates we transformed them using lithium chloride, which lead to the assignment of the mechanistic role of lithium chloride as changing the rate-determining step in the reaction by lowering the barrier for solubilization of these otherwise persistent surface organometallic intermediates. The temperaturemore » dependence/qualitative barrier of the direct insertion step was determined independently from the solubilization step and from the barrier for the overall reaction. Detection of these zinc surface intermediates at the single-molecule level, i.e., of individual surface organometallic species, has been achieved for the first time. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) measurements of the elemental composition of the surface of the zinc powder determined that lithium chloride does not clean the surface of the oxides; instead, pretreatment of the surface with TMSCl effects partial removal of surface oxides after the 2 h pretreatment time previously reported in the empirically optimized synthetic procedure. The current limitations of this microscopy approach are also determined and discussed with respect to the addition of solid reagents during in operando imaging. Characterization of the resulting soluble fluorophore-tagged organozinc/LiCl complex by 1H NMR spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and fluorescence spectroscopy provided insight into its solution dynamics and chemical exchange processes.« less

  2. Structure–Reactivity Studies, Characterization, and Transformation of Intermediates by Lithium Chloride in the Direct Insertion of Alkyl and Aryl Iodides to Metallic Zinc Powder

    DOE PAGES

    Feng, Chao; Easter, Quinn T.; Blum, Suzanne A.

    2017-02-03

    Employment of fluorophore-tagged alkyl and aryl iodides permitted detection of persistent surface intermediates during their direct insertion to commercially available zinc powder. The sensitivity of this subensemble microscopy technique enabled structure–reactivity studies in the formation of intermediates that are present in quantities sufficiently low as to have been undetected previously by traditional ensemble analytical techniques. In these surface intermediates we transformed them using lithium chloride, which lead to the assignment of the mechanistic role of lithium chloride as changing the rate-determining step in the reaction by lowering the barrier for solubilization of these otherwise persistent surface organometallic intermediates. The temperaturemore » dependence/qualitative barrier of the direct insertion step was determined independently from the solubilization step and from the barrier for the overall reaction. Detection of these zinc surface intermediates at the single-molecule level, i.e., of individual surface organometallic species, has been achieved for the first time. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) measurements of the elemental composition of the surface of the zinc powder determined that lithium chloride does not clean the surface of the oxides; instead, pretreatment of the surface with TMSCl effects partial removal of surface oxides after the 2 h pretreatment time previously reported in the empirically optimized synthetic procedure. The current limitations of this microscopy approach are also determined and discussed with respect to the addition of solid reagents during in operando imaging. Characterization of the resulting soluble fluorophore-tagged organozinc/LiCl complex by 1H NMR spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and fluorescence spectroscopy provided insight into its solution dynamics and chemical exchange processes.« less

  3. Utility of Lithium in Rare-Earth Metal Reduction Reactions to Form Nontraditional Ln2+ Complexes and Unusual [Li(2.2.2-cryptand)]1+ Cations.

    PubMed

    Huh, Daniel N; Darago, Lucy E; Ziller, Joseph W; Evans, William J

    2018-02-19

    The utility of lithium compared to other alkali metals in generating Ln 2+ rare-earth metal complexes via reduction of Ln 3+ precursors in reactions abbreviated as LnA 3 /M (Ln = rare-earth metal; A = anionic ligand; M = alkali metal) is described. Lithium reduction of Cp' 3 Ln (Cp' = C 5 H 4 SiMe 3 ; Ln = Y, Tb, Dy, Ho) under Ar in the presence of 2.2.2-cryptand (crypt) forms new examples of crystallographically characterizable Ln 2+ complexes of these metals, [Li(crypt)][Cp' 3 Ln]. In each complex, lithium is found in an N 2 O 4 donor atom coordination geometry that is unusual for the cryptand ligand. Magnetic susceptibility data on these new examples of nontraditional divalent lanthanide complexes are consistent with 4f n 5d 1 electronic configurations. The Dy and Ho complexes have exceptionally high single-ion magnetic moments, 11.35 and 11.67 μ B , respectively. Lithium reduction of Cp' 3 Y under N 2 at -35 °C forms the Y 2+ complex (Cp' 3 Y) 1- , which reduces dinitrogen upon warming to room temperature to generate the (N 2 ) 2- complex [Cp' 2 Y(THF)] 2 (μ-η 2 :η 2 -N 2 ). These results provide insight on the factors that lead to reduced dinitrogen complexes and/or stable divalent lanthanide complexes as a function of the specific reducing agent and conditions.

  4. Tutorial on the Role of Cyclopentadienyl Ligands in the Discovery of Molecular Complexes of the Rare-Earth and Actinide Metals in New Oxidation States

    DOE PAGES

    Evans, William J.

    2016-09-15

    A fundamental aspect of any element is the range of oxidation states accessible for useful chemistry. This tutorial describes the recent expansion of the number of oxidation states available to the rare-earth and actinide metals in molecular complexes that has resulted through organometallic chemistry involving the cyclopentadienyl ligand. These discoveries demonstrate that the cyclopentadienyl ligand, which has been a key component in the development of organometallic chemistry since the seminal discovery of ferrocene in the 1950s, continues to contribute to the advancement of science. Lastly, we present background information on the rare-earth and actinide elements, as well as the sequencemore » of events that led to these unexpected developments in the oxidation state chemistry of these metals.« less

  5. Tutorial on the Role of Cyclopentadienyl Ligands in the Discovery of Molecular Complexes of the Rare-Earth and Actinide Metals in New Oxidation States

    SciT

    Evans, William J.

    A fundamental aspect of any element is the range of oxidation states accessible for useful chemistry. This tutorial describes the recent expansion of the number of oxidation states available to the rare-earth and actinide metals in molecular complexes that has resulted through organometallic chemistry involving the cyclopentadienyl ligand. These discoveries demonstrate that the cyclopentadienyl ligand, which has been a key component in the development of organometallic chemistry since the seminal discovery of ferrocene in the 1950s, continues to contribute to the advancement of science. Lastly, we present background information on the rare-earth and actinide elements, as well as the sequencemore » of events that led to these unexpected developments in the oxidation state chemistry of these metals.« less

  6. K2-111 b - a short period super-Earth transiting a metal poor, evolved old star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fridlund, Malcolm; Gaidos, Eric; Barragán, Oscar; Persson, Carina M.; Gandolfi, Davide; Cabrera, Juan; Hirano, Teruyuki; Kuzuhara, Masayuki; Csizmadia, Sz.; Nowak, Grzegorz; Endl, Michael; Grziwa, Sascha; Korth, Judith; Pfaff, Jeremias; Bitsch, Bertram; Johansen, Anders; Mustill, Alexander J.; Davies, Melvyn B.; Deeg, Hans J.; Palle, Enric; Cochran, William D.; Eigmüller, Philipp; Erikson, Anders; Guenther, Eike; Hatzes, Artie P.; Kiilerich, Amanda; Kudo, Tomoyuki; MacQueen, Phillip; Narita, Norio; Nespral, David; Pätzold, Martin; Prieto-Arranz, Jorge; Rauer, Heike; Van Eylen, Vincent

    2017-07-01

    Context. From a light curve acquired through the K2 space mission, the star K2-111(EPIC 210894022) has been identified as possibly orbited by a transiting planet. Aims: Our aim is to confirm the planetary nature of the object and derive its fundamental parameters. Methods: We analyse the light curve variations during the planetary transit using packages developed specifically for exoplanetary transits. Reconnaissance spectroscopy and radial velocity observations have been obtained using three separate telescope and spectrograph combinations. The spectroscopic synthesis package SME has been used to derive the stellar photospheric parameters that were used as input to various stellar evolutionary tracks in order to derive the parameters of the system. The planetary transit was also validated to occur on the assumed host star through adaptive imaging and statistical analysis. Results: The star is found to be located in the background of the Hyades cluster at a distance at least 4 times further away from Earth than the cluster itself. The spectrum and the space velocities of K2-111 strongly suggest it to be a member of the thick disk population. The co-added high-resolution spectra show that that it is a metal poor ([Fe/H] = - 0.53 ± 0.05 dex) and α-rich somewhat evolved solar-like star of spectral type G3. We find Teff = 5730 ± 50 K, log g⋆ = 4.15 ± 0.1 cgs, and derive a radius of R⋆ = 1.3 ± 0.1 R⊙ and a mass of M⋆ = 0.88 ± 0.02 M⊙. The currently available radial velocity data confirms a super-Earth class planet with a mass of 8.6 ± 3.9 M⊕ and a radius of 1.9 ± 0.2 R⊕. A second more massive object with a period longer than about 120 days is indicated by a long-term radial velocity drift. Conclusions: The radial velocity detection together with the imaging confirms with a high level of significance that the transit signature is caused by a planet orbiting the star K2-111. This planet is also confirmed in the radial velocity data. A second more

  7. Effect of Rare Earth Elements (Er, Ho) on Semi-Metallic Materials (ScN) in an Applied Electric Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Hyunjung; Park, Yeonjoon; King, Glen C.; Lee, Kunik; Choi, Sang H.

    2012-01-01

    The development of materials and fabrication technology for field-controlled spectrally active optics is essential for applications such as membrane optics, filters for LIDARs, windows for sensors, telescopes, spectroscopes, cameras and flat-panel displays. The dopants of rare earth elements, in a host of optical systems, create a number of absorption and emission band structures and can easily be incorporated into many high quality crystalline and amorphous hosts. In wide band-gap semiconductors like ScN, the existing deep levels can capture or emit the mobile charges, and can be ionized with the loss or capture of the carriers which are the fundamental basis of concept for smart optic materials. The band gap shrinkage or splitting with dopants supports the possibility of this concept. In the present work, a semi-metallic material (ScN) was doped with rare earth elements (Er, Ho) and tested under an applied electric field to characterize spectral and refractive index shifts by either Stark or Zeeman Effect. These effects can be verified using the UV-Vis spectroscopy, the Hall Effect measurement and the ellipsometric spectroscopy. The optical band gaps of ScN doped with Er and doped with Ho were experimentally estimated as 2.33eV and 2.24eV ( 0.2eV) respectively. This is less than that of undoped ScN (2.5 0.2eV). The red-shifted absorption onset is a direct evidence for the decrease of band gap energy (Eg), and the broadening of valence band states is attributable to the doping cases. A decrease in refractive index with an applied field was observed as a small shift in absorption coefficient using a variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometer. In the presence of an electric field, mobile carriers are redistributed within the space charge region (SCR) to produce this electro-refractive effect. The shift in refractive index is also affected by the density and location of deep potential wells within the SCR. In addition, the microstructure change was observed by a TEM

  8. New stable ternary alkaline-earth metal Pb(II) oxides: Ca / Sr / BaPb 2 O 3 and BaPbO 2

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Yuwei; Zhang, Lijun; Singh, David J.

    2017-10-16

    The different but related chemical behaviors of Pb(II) oxides compared to Sn(II) oxides, and the existence of known alkali/alkali-earth metal Sn(II) ternary phases, suggest that there should be additional ternary Pb(II) oxide phases. Here, we report structure searches on the ternary alkaline-earth metal Pb(II) oxides leading to four new phases. These are two ternary Pb(II) oxides, SrPb 2O 3 and BaPb 2O 3, which have larger chemical potential stability ranges compared with the corresponding Sn(II) oxides, and additionally two other ternary Pb(II) oxides, CaPb 2O 3 and BaPbO 2, for which there are no corresponding Sn(II) oxides. Those Pb(II) oxidesmore » are stabilized by Pb-rich conditions. These structures follow the Zintl behavior and consist of basic structural motifs of (PbO 3) 4- anionic units separated and stabilized by the alkaline-earth metal ions. They show wide band gaps ranging from 2.86 to 3.12 eV, and two compounds (CaPb 2O 3 and SrPb 2O 3) show rather light hole effective masses (around 2m 0). The valence band maxima of these compounds have a Pb-6s/O-2p antibonding character, which may lead to p-type defect (or doping) tolerant behavior. This then suggests alkaline-earth metal Pb(II) oxides may be potential p-type transparent conducting oxides.« less

  9. New stable ternary alkaline-earth metal Pb(II) oxides: Ca / Sr / BaPb 2 O 3 and BaPbO 2

    SciT

    Li, Yuwei; Zhang, Lijun; Singh, David J.

    The different but related chemical behaviors of Pb(II) oxides compared to Sn(II) oxides, and the existence of known alkali/alkali-earth metal Sn(II) ternary phases, suggest that there should be additional ternary Pb(II) oxide phases. Here, we report structure searches on the ternary alkaline-earth metal Pb(II) oxides leading to four new phases. These are two ternary Pb(II) oxides, SrPb 2O 3 and BaPb 2O 3, which have larger chemical potential stability ranges compared with the corresponding Sn(II) oxides, and additionally two other ternary Pb(II) oxides, CaPb 2O 3 and BaPbO 2, for which there are no corresponding Sn(II) oxides. Those Pb(II) oxidesmore » are stabilized by Pb-rich conditions. These structures follow the Zintl behavior and consist of basic structural motifs of (PbO 3) 4- anionic units separated and stabilized by the alkaline-earth metal ions. They show wide band gaps ranging from 2.86 to 3.12 eV, and two compounds (CaPb 2O 3 and SrPb 2O 3) show rather light hole effective masses (around 2m 0). The valence band maxima of these compounds have a Pb-6s/O-2p antibonding character, which may lead to p-type defect (or doping) tolerant behavior. This then suggests alkaline-earth metal Pb(II) oxides may be potential p-type transparent conducting oxides.« less

  10. Mechanistic characterization of chloride interferences in electrothermal atomization systems

    Shekiro, J.M.; Skogerboe, R.K.; Taylor, Howard E.

    1988-01-01

    A computer-controlled spectrometer with a photodiode array detector has been used for wavelength and temperature resolved characterization of the vapor produced by an electrothermal atomizer. The system has been used to study the chloride matrix interference on the atomic absorption spectrometric determination of manganese and copper. The suppression of manganese and copper atom populations by matrix chlorides such as those of calcium and magnesium is due to the gas-phase formation of an analyte chloride species followed by the diffusion of significant fractions of these species from the atom cell prior to completion of the atomization process. The analyte chloride species cannot be formed when matrix chlorides with metal-chloride bond dissociation energies above those of the analyte chlorides are the principal entitles present. The results indicate that multiple wavelength spectrometry used to obtain temperature-resolved spectra is a viable tool in the mechanistic characterization of interference effects observed with electrothermal atomization systems. ?? 1988 American Chemical Society.

  11. Monitoring of photoluminescence decay by alkali and alkaline earth metal cations using a photoluminescent bolaamphiphile self-assembly as an optical probe.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sunhyung; Kwak, Jinyoung; Lee, Sang-Yup

    2014-05-01

    Photoluminescence (PL) decay induced by the displacement of an ionic fluorescence component, Tb(3+), with alkali and alkaline earth metal cations was investigated using photoluminescent spherical self-assemblies as optical probes. The photoluminescent spherical self-assembly was prepared by the self-organization of a tyrosine-containing bolaamphiphile molecule with a photosensitizer and Tb(3+) ion. The lanthanide ion, Tb(3+), electrically bound to the carboxyl group of the bolaamphiphile molecule, was displaced by alkali and alkaline earth metal cations that had stronger electrophilicity. The PL of the self-assembly decayed remarkably due to the substitution of lanthanide ions with alkali and alkaline earth metal cations. The PL decay showed a positive correlation with cation concentration and was sensitive to the cation valency. Generally, the PL decay was enhanced by the electrophilicity of the cations. However, Ca(2+) showed greater PL decay than Mg(2+) because Ca(2+) could create various complexes with the carboxyl groups of the bolaamphiphile molecule. Microscopic and spectroscopic investigations were conducted to study the photon energy transfer and displacement of Tb(3+) by the cation exchange. This study demonstrated that the PL decay by the displacement of the ionic fluorescent compound was applied to the detection of various cations in aqueous media and is applicable to the development of future optical sensors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. REVIEWS OF TOPICAL PROBLEMS: Universal viscosity growth in metallic melts at megabar pressures: the vitreous state of the Earth's inner core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brazhkin, Vadim V.; Lyapin, A. G.

    2000-05-01

    Experimental data on and theoretical models for the viscosity of various types of liquids and melts under pressure are reviewed. Experimentally, the least studied melts are those of metals, whose viscosity is considered to be virtually constant along the melting curve. The authors' new approach to the viscosity of melts involves the measurement of the grain size in solidified samples. Measurements on liquid metals at pressures up to 10 GPa using this method show, contrary to the empirical approach, that the melt viscosity grows considerably along the melting curves. Based on the experimental data and on the critical analysis of current theories, a hypothesis of a universal viscosity behavior is introduced for liquids under pressure. Extrapolating the liquid iron results to the pressures and temperatures at the Earth's core reveals that the Earth's outer core is a very viscous melt with viscosity values ranging from 102 Pa s to 1011 Pa s depending on the depth. The Earth's inner core is presumably an ultraviscous (>1011 Pa s) glass-like liquid — in disagreement with the current idea of a crystalline inner core. The notion of the highly viscous interior of celestial bodies sheds light on many mysteries of planetary geophysics and astronomy. From the analysis of the pressure variation of the melting and glass-transition temperatures, an entirely new concept of a stable metallic vitreous state arises, calling for further experimental and theoretical study.

  13. Comparison of influence of incorporated 3d-, 4d- and 4f-metal chlorides on electronic properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharlamova, M. V.

    2013-06-01

    In the present work, the channels of single-walled carbon nanotubes were filled with melts of ZnCl2, CdCl2, and TbCl3 by a capillary method with subsequent slow cooling. The detailed study of electronic structure of filled nanotubes was performed using Raman, optical absorption, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The obtained data are in mutual agreement and it proves that the filling of carbon nanotube channels with all these salts leads to the charge transfer from nanotube walls to the incorporated compounds, thus acceptor doping of nanotubes takes place. It was found out that encapsulated terbium chloride has the largest influence on the electronic properties of carbon nanotubes.

  14. From Bifunctional to Trifunctional (Tricomponent Nucleophile-Transition Metal-Lewis Acid) Catalysis: The Catalytic, Enantioselective α-Fluorination of Acid Chlorides

    PubMed Central

    Erb, Jeremy; Paull, Daniel H.; Dudding, Travis; Belding, Lee

    2012-01-01

    We report in full detail our studies on the catalytic, asymmetric α-fluorination of acid chlorides, a practical method that produces an array of α-fluorocarboxylic acid derivatives in which improved yield and virtually complete enantioselectivity are controlled through electrophilic fluorination of a ketene enolate intermediate. We discovered, for the first time, that a third catalyst, a Lewis acidic lithium salt, could be introduced into a dually-activated system to amplify yields of aliphatic products, primarily through activation of the fluorinating agent. Through our mechanistic studies (based on kinetic data, isotopic labeling, spectroscopic measurements, and theoretical calculations) we were able to utilize our understanding of this “trifunctional” reaction to optimize the conditions and obtain new products in good yield and excellent enantioselectivity. PMID:21513338

  15. Biosorption of metal and salt tolerant microbial isolates from a former uranium mining area. Their impact on changes in rare earth element patterns in acid mine drainage.

    PubMed

    Haferburg, Götz; Merten, Dirk; Büchel, Georg; Kothe, Erika

    2007-12-01

    The concentration of metals in microbial habitats influenced by mining operations can reach enormous values. Worldwide, much emphasis is placed on the research of resistance and biosorptive capacities of microorganisms suitable for bioremediation purposes. Using a collection of isolates from a former uranium mining area in Eastern Thuringia, Germany, this study presents three Gram-positive bacterial strains with distinct metal tolerances. These strains were identified as members of the genera Bacillus, Micrococcus and Streptomyces. Acid mine drainage (AMD) originating from the same mining area is characterized by high metal concentrations of a broad range of elements and a very low pH. AMD was analyzed and used as incubation solution. The sorption of rare earth elements (REE), aluminum, cobalt, copper, manganese, nickel, strontium, and uranium through selected strains was studied during a time course of four weeks. Biosorption was investigated after one hour, one week and four weeks by analyzing the concentrations of metals in supernatant and biomass. Additionally, dead biomass was investigated after four weeks of incubation. The maximum of metal removal was reached after one week. Up to 80% of both Al and Cu, and more than 60% of U was shown to be removed from the solution. High concentrations of metals could be bound to the biomass, as for example 2.2 mg/g U. The strains could survive four weeks of incubation. Distinct and different patterns of rare earth elements of the inoculated and non-inoculated AMD water were observed. Changes in REE patterns hint at different binding types of heavy metals regarding incubation time and metabolic activity of the cells. (c) 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Quest for highly connected metal-organic framework platforms: rare-earth polynuclear clusters versatility meets net topology needs.

    PubMed

    Alezi, Dalal; Peedikakkal, Abdul Malik P; Weseliński, Łukasz J; Guillerm, Vincent; Belmabkhout, Youssef; Cairns, Amy J; Chen, Zhijie; Wojtas, Łukasz; Eddaoudi, Mohamed

    2015-04-29

    Gaining control over the assembly of highly porous rare-earth (RE) based metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) remains challenging. Here we report the latest discoveries on our continuous quest for highly connected nets. The topological exploration based on the noncompatibility of a 12-connected RE polynuclear carboxylate-based cluster, points of extension matching the 12 vertices of the cuboctahedron (cuo), with 3-connected organic ligands led to the discovery of two fascinating and highly connected minimal edge-transitive nets, pek and aea. The reduced symmetry of the employed triangular tricarboxylate ligand, as compared to the prototype highly symmetrical 1,3,5-benzene(tris)benzoic acid guided the concurrent occurrence of nonanuclear [RE9(μ3-OH)12(μ3-O)2(O2C-)12] and hexanuclear [RE6(OH)8(O2C-)8] carboxylate-based clusters as 12-connected and 8-connected molecular building blocks in the structure of a 3-periodic pek-MOF based on a novel (3,8,12)-c trinodal net. The use of a tricarboxylate ligand with modified angles between carboxylate moieties led to the formation of a second MOF containing solely nonanuclear clusters and exhibiting once more a novel and a highly connected (3,12,12)-c trinodal net with aea topology. Notably, it is the first time that RE-MOFs with double six-membered ring (d6R) secondary building units are isolated, representing therefore a critical step forward toward the design of novel and highly coordinated materials using the supermolecular building layer approach while considering the d6Rs as building pillars. Lastly, the potential of these new MOFs for gas separation/storage was investigated by performing gas adsorption studies of various probe gas molecules over a wide range of pressures. Noticeably, pek-MOF-1 showed excellent volumetric CO2 and CH4 uptakes at high pressures.

  17. Body burden of toxic metals and rare earth elements in non-smokers, cigarette smokers and electronic cigarette users.

    PubMed

    Badea, Mihaela; Luzardo, Octavio P; González-Antuña, Ana; Zumbado, Manuel; Rogozea, Liliana; Floroian, Laura; Alexandrescu, Dana; Moga, Marius; Gaman, Laura; Radoi, Mariana; Boada, Luis D; Henríquez-Hernández, Luis Alberto

    2018-06-13

    Smoking is considered an important source for inorganic elements, most of them toxic for human health. During the last years, there has been a significant increase in the use of e-cigarettes, although the role of them as source of inorganic elements has not been well established. A cross-sectional study including a total of 150 subjects from Brasov (Romania), divided into three groups (non-smokers, cigarette smokers and electronic cigarettes smokers) were recruited to disclose the role of smoking on the human exposure to inorganic elements. Concentration of 42 elements, including trace elements, elements in the ATSDR's priority pollutant list and rare earth elements (REE) were measured by ICP-MS in the blood serum of participants. Cigarette smokers showed the highest levels of copper, molybdenum, zinc, antimony, and strontium. Electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) users presented the highest concentrations of selenium, silver, and vanadium. Beryllium, europium and lanthanides were detected more frequently among e-cigarette users (20.6%, 23.5%, and 14.7%) than in cigarette smokers (1.7%, 19.0%, and 12.1%, respectively); and the number of detected REE was also higher among e-cigarette users (11.8% of them showed more than 10 different elements). Serum levels of cerium and erbium increased as the duration of the use of e-cigarettes was longer. We have found that smoking is mainly a source of heavy metals while the use of e-cigarettes is a potential source of REE. However, these elements were detected at low concentrations. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Origin of low sodium capacity in graphite and generally weak substrate binding of Na and Mg among alkali and alkaline earth metals.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuanyue; Merinov, Boris V; Goddard, William A

    2016-04-05

    It is well known that graphite has a low capacity for Na but a high capacity for other alkali metals. The growing interest in alternative cation batteries beyond Li makes it particularly important to elucidate the origin of this behavior, which is not well understood. In examining this question, we find a quite general phenomenon: among the alkali and alkaline earth metals, Na and Mg generally have the weakest chemical binding to a given substrate, compared with the other elements in the same column of the periodic table. We demonstrate this with quantum mechanics calculations for a wide range of substrate materials (not limited to C) covering a variety of structures and chemical compositions. The phenomenon arises from the competition between trends in the ionization energy and the ion-substrate coupling, down the columns of the periodic table. Consequently, the cathodic voltage for Na and Mg is expected to be lower than those for other metals in the same column. This generality provides a basis for analyzing the binding of alkali and alkaline earth metal atoms over a broad range of systems.

  19. Fatal barium chloride poisoning: four cases report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Ananda, Sunnassee; Shaohua, Zhu; Liang, Liu

    2013-06-01

    Barium is an alkaline earth metal which has a variety of uses including in the manufacturing industry and in medicine. However, adverse health effects and fatalities occur due to absorption of soluble barium compounds, notably the chloride, nitrate, and hydroxide, which are toxic to humans. Although rare, accidental and suicidal modes of poisoning are sporadically reported in the literature.We describe 4 cases of poisoning due to barium chloride in China. In witnessed cases, severe gastrointestinal symptoms, hypokalemia leading to muscle weakness, cardiac arrhythmias, and respiratory failure were noted. Autopsy showed some nonspecific but common findings, such as subendocardial hemorrhage in the ventricles, visceral petechiae, and fatty changes in the liver. Interestingly, microscopic examination showed degenerative changes and amorphous, flocculent foamy materials in the renal tubules. Toxicology was relevant for barium in blood and tissues. Three of the cases were accidental and 1 homicidal in nature. A round-up of relevant literature on fatal barium compounds poisoning is also provided. Forensic pathologists should be aware of the clinical presentations of barium compound poisoning and especially look for any evidence of hypokalemia. Still, postmortem toxicological and histological studies are essential for an accurate identification of the cause of death.

  20. Fluid Bed Dehydration of Magnesium Chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adham, K.; Lee, C.; O'Keefe, K.

    Molten salt electrolysis of MgCl2 is commonly used for the production of magnesium metal. However, the electrolysis feed must be completely dry with minimum oxygen content. Therefore, complete dehydration of the MgCl2 brine or the hydrated prill is a required process, which is very challenging because of the ease of thermal degradation due to hydrolysis of magnesium chloride.

  1. Heavy metal staining, a comparative assessment of gadolinium chloride and osmium tetroxide for inner ear labyrinthine contrast enhancement using X-ray microtomography.

    PubMed

    Wong, Christopher C; Curthoys, Ian S; O'Leary, Stephen J; Jones, Allan S

    2013-01-01

    The use of both gadolinium chloride (GdCl(3)) and osmium tetroxide (OsO(4)) allowed for the visualization of the membranous labyrinth and other intralabyrinthine structures, at different intensities, as compared with the control sample. This initial comparison shows the advantages of GdCl(3) in radiological assessments and OsO(4) in more detailed anatomical studies and pathways of labyrinthine pathogenesis using X-ray microtomography (microCT). To assess an improved OsO(4) staining protocol and compare the staining affinities against GdCl(3). Guinea pig temporal bones were stained with either GdCl(3) (2% w/v) for 7 days or OsO(4) (2% w/v) for 3 days, and scanned in a microCT system. The post-scanned datasets were then assessed in a 3D rendering program. The enhanced soft tissue contrast as presented in the temporal bones stained with either GdCl(3) or OsO(4) allowed for the membranous labyrinth to be visualized throughout the whole specimen. GdCl(3)-stained specimens presented more defined contours of the bone profile in the radiographs, while OsO(4)-stained specimens provided more anatomical detail of individual intralabyrinthine structures, hence allowing spatial relationships to be visualized with ease in a 3D rendering context and 2D axial slice images.

  2. Recycling of Rare Earth Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Tom; Bertau, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Any development of an effective process for rare earth (RE) recycling has become more and more challenging, especially in recent years. Since 2011, when commodity prices of REs had met their all-time maximum, prices have dropped rapidly by more than 90 %. An economic process able to offset these fluctuations has to take unconventional methods into account beside well-known strategies like acid/basic leaching or solvent extraction. The solid-state chlorination provides such an unconventional method for mobilizing RE elements from waste streams. Instead of hydrochloric acid this kind of chlorination decomposes NH4Cl thermally to release up to 400 °C hot HCl gas. After cooling the resulting solid metal chlorides may be easily dissolved in pH-adjusted water. Without producing strongly acidic wastes and with NH4Cl as cheap source for hydrogen chloride, solid-state chlorination provides various advantages in terms of costs and disposal. In the course of the SepSELSA project this method was examined, adjusted and optimized for RE recycling from fluorescent lamp scraps as well as Fe14Nd2B magnets. Thereby many surprising influences and trends required various analytic methods to examine the reasons and special mechanisms behind them.

  3. Laboratory calibration and field testing of the Chemcatcher-Metal for trace levels of rare earth elements in estuarine waters.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Jördis; Pröfrock, Daniel; Paschke, Albrecht; Broekaert, Jose A C; Prange, Andreas

    2015-10-01

    Little knowledge is available about water concentrations of rare earth elements (REEs) in the marine environment. The direct measurement of REEs in coastal waters is a challenging task due to their ultra-low concentrations as well as the high salt content in the water samples. To quantify these elements at environmental concentrations (pg L(-1) to low ng L(-1)) in coastal waters, current analytical techniques are generally expensive and time consuming, and require complex chemical preconcentration procedures. Therefore, an integrative passive sampler was tested as a more economic alternative sampling approach for REE analysis. We used a Chemcatcher-Metal passive sampler consisting of a 3M Empore Chelating Disk as the receiving phase, as well as a cellulose acetate membrane as the diffusion-limiting layer. The effect of water turbulence and temperature on the uptake rates of REEs was analyzed during 14-day calibration experiments by a flow-through exposure tank system. The sampling rates were in the range of 0.42 mL h(-1) (13 °C; 0.25 m s(-1)) to 4.01 mL h(-1) (13 °C; 1 m s(-1)). Similar results were obtained for the different REEs under investigation. The water turbulence was the most important influence on uptake. The uptake rates were appropriate to ascertain time-weighted average concentrations of REEs during a field experiment in the Elbe Estuary near Cuxhaven Harbor (exposure time 4 weeks). REE concentrations were determined to be in the range 0.2 to 13.8 ng L(-1), where the highest concentrations were found for neodymium and samarium. In comparison, most of the spot samples measured along the Chemcatcher samples had REE concentrations below the limit of detection, in particular due to necessary dilution to minimize the analytical problems that arise with the high salt content in marine water samples. This study was among the first efforts to measure REE levels in the field using a passive sampling approach. Our results suggest that passive samplers could be

  4. Gas phase reactions of doubly charged alkaline earth and transition metal(II)-ligand complexes generated by electrospray ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Martin; Leary, Julie A.

    1997-03-01

    Doubly charged metal(II)-complexes of [alpha] 1-3, [alpha] 1-6 mannotriose and the conserved trimannosyl core pentasaccharide as well as doubly charged complexes of Co(II), Mn(II), Ca(II) and Sr(II) with acetonitrile generated by electrospray ionization were studied by low energy collision induced dissociation (CID). Two main fragmentation pathways were observed for the metal(II)-oligosaccharide complexes. Regardless of the coordinating metal, loss of a neutral dehydrohexose residue (162 Da) from the doubly charged precursor ion is observed, forming a doubly charged product ion. However, if the oligosaccharide is coordinated to Co(II) or Mn(II), loss of a dehydroxyhexose cation is also observed. Investigation of the low mass region of the mass spectra of the metal coordinated oligosaccharides revealed intense signals corresponding to [metal(II) + (CH3CN)n2+ (where n = 1-6) species which were being formed by the metal(II) ions and the acetonitrile present in the sample. Analysis of these metal(II)-acetonitrile complexes provided further insight into the processes occurring upon low energy CID of doubly charged metal complexes. The metal(II)-acetonitrile system showed neutral loss and ligand cleavage as observed with the oligosaccharide complexes, as well as a series of six different dissociation mechanisms, most notable among them reduction from [metal(II) + (CH3CN)n2+ to the bare [metal(I)]+ species by electron transfer. Depending on the metal and collision gas chosen, one observes electron transfer from the ligand to the metal, electron transfer from the collision gas to the metal, proton transfer between ligands, heterolytic cleavage of the ligands, reactive collisions and loss of neutral ligands.

  5. The volatilization of heavy metals during co-combustion of food waste and polyvinyl chloride in air and carbon dioxide/oxygen atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Ke, Chuncheng; Ma, Xiaoqian; Tang, Yuting; Zheng, Weihua; Wu, Zhendong

    2017-11-01

    The volatilization of three heavy metals (Cd, Cr and Zn) during food waste and PVC and their blending combustion in N 2 /O 2 or CO 2 /O 2 atmosphere in a lab-scale tubular furnace was investigated. The concentration of heavy metals in combustion ash was decreased with the increment of furnace temperature in most cases. The replacement of 80N 2 /20O 2 by 80CO 2 /20O 2 decreased the volatilization rate of Cd and Cr, but increased Zn. The increased amount of PVC added into food waste led to less content of Zn in combustion ash, 5% PVC added into food waste decreased the volatilization rate of Cr but 15% PVC added led to the higher volatilization. The volatilization rate of Zn in 70CO 2 /30O 2 was significantly lower than in 85CO 2 /15O 2 or 80CO 2 /20O 2 . The result contributes to the understanding of heavy metal volatilization during incineration and emission control of MSW oxy-fuel combustion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. GROWTH AND CHARACTERIZATION OF SINGLE CRYSTALS OF RARE EARTH COMPOUNDS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    SINGLE CRYSTALS, CRYSTAL GROWTH), (*CRYSTAL GROWTH, SINGLE CRYSTALS), (*RARE EARTH COMPOUNDS, SINGLE CRYSTALS), EPITAXIAL GROWTH, SODIUM COMPOUNDS, CHLORIDES, VAPOR PLATING, ELECTROSTATIC FIELDS, ENERGY, ATOMIC PROPERTIES , BONDING

  7. Influence of rare earth content on Mm-based AB 5 metal hydride alloys for Ni-MH batteries-An X-ray fluorescence study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ananth, M. V.; Raju, M.; Manimaran, K.; Balachandran, G.; Nair, Lekshmi M.

    AB 5-type MH alloys with Mm (Misch metal) as the A part (with varied rare earth contents in Mm) were investigated for rare earth by XRF analysis and battery performance by life cycle tests with an objective of understanding the influence of rare earth content on electrochemical hydrogen storage. The La/Ce ratio was found to vary from 0.51 to 18.73. The capacity output varied between 179 and 266 mAh g -1. The results show that the La/Ce ratio has a strong influence on the performance, with the best performance realized with samples having an La/Ce ratio of around 12. La enhancement facilitates easy activation due to refinement in grain size and interstitial dimensions. Also, an orderly influence on crystalline structure could be seen. The study demonstrates that the rare earth content is an essential factor in determining the maximum capacity output because of its influence on crystal orientation as well as an increase in the radius of the interstitials, lattice constants and cell volumes.

  8. Dehydrogenation of secondary amines: synthesis, and characterization of rare-earth metal complexes incorporating imino- or amido-functionalized pyrrolyl ligands.

    PubMed

    Li, Qinghai; Zhou, Shuangliu; Wang, Shaowu; Zhu, Xiancui; Zhang, Lijun; Feng, Zhijun; Guo, Liping; Wang, Fenhua; Wei, Yun

    2013-02-28

    The dehydrogenation of pyrrolyl-functionalized secondary amines initiated by rare-earth metal amides was systematically studied. Reactions of the rare-earth metal amides [(Me(3)Si)(2)N](3)RE(μ-Cl)Li(THF)(3) with pyrrolyl-functionalized secondary amines 2-(t)BuNHCH(2)-5-R-C(4)H(2)NH (R = H (1), R = (t)Bu (2)) led to dehydrogenation of the secondary amines with isolation of imino-functionalized pyrrolyl rare-earth metal complexes [2-(t)BuN=CH-5-R-C(4)H(2)N](2)REN(SiMe(3))(2) (R = H, RE = Y (3a), Dy (3b), Yb (3c), Eu (3d); R = (t)Bu, RE = Y (4a), Dy (4b), Er (4c)). The mixed ligands erbium complex [2-(t)BuNCH(2)-5-(t)Bu-C(4)H(2)N]Er[2-(t)BuN=CH-5-(t)BuC(4)H(2)N](2)ClLi(2)(THF) (4c') was isolated in a short reaction time for the synthesis of complex 4c. Reaction of the deuterated pyrrolyl-functionalized secondary amine 2-((t)BuNHCHD)C(4)H(3)NH with yttrium amide [(Me(3)Si)(2)N](3)Y(μ-Cl)Li(THF)(3) further proved that pyrrolyl-amino ligands were transferred to pyrrolyl-imino ligands. Treatment of 2-((t)BuNHCH(2))C(4)H(3)NH (1) with excess (Me(3)Si)(2)NLi gave the only pyrrole deprotonated product {[η(5):η(2):η(1)-2-((t)BuNHCH(2))C(4)H(3)N]Li(2)N(SiMe(3))(2)}(2) (5), indicating that LiN(SiMe(3))(2) could not dehydrogenate the secondary amines to imines and rare-earth metal ions had a decisive effect on the dehydrogenation. The reaction of the rare-earth metal amides [(Me(3)Si)(2)N](3)RE(μ-Cl)Li(THF)(3) with 1 equiv. of more bulky pyrrolyl-functionalized secondary amine 2-[(2,6-(i)Pr(2)C(6)H(3))NHCH(2)](C(4)H(3)NH) (6) in toluene afforded the only amine and pyrrole deprotonated dinuclear rare-earth metal amido complexes {(μ-η(5):η(1)):η(1)-2-[(2,6-(i)Pr(2)C(6)H(3))NCH(2)]C(4)H(3)N]LnN(SiMe(3))(2)}(2) (RE = Nd (7a), Sm (7b), Er (7c)), no dehydrogenation of secondary amine to imine products were observed. On the basis of experimental results, a plausible mechanism for the dehydrogenation of secondary amines to imines was proposed.

  9. Fate and transport of trace metals and rare earth elements in the Snake River, an AMD/ARD-impacted watershed. Montezuma, Colorado USA.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKnight, D. M.; Rue, G.

    2017-12-01

    Recent research in Snake River Watershed, located near the historic boomtown of Montezuma and adjacent the Continental Divide in the Colorado Rocky Mountains, has revealed the distinctive occurrence of rare earth elements (REE) at high concentrations. Here the weathering of the mineralized lithology naturally generates acid rock drainage (ARD) in addition to drainage recieved from abandoned mine adits throughout the area, results in aqueous REE concentrations three orders of magnitude higher than in most major rivers. The dominant mechanism responsible for this enrichment; their dissolution from secondary and accessory mineral stocks, abundant in REEs, promoted by the low pH waters generated from geochemical weathering of disseminated sulfide minerals. While REEs behave conservatively in acidic conditions, as well as in the presence of stabilizing ligands such as sulfate, downstream circumneutral inputs from pristine streams and a rising pH are resulting in observed fractional losses of heavy rare earth elements as well as partitioning towards colloidal and solid phases. These finding in combination with the established role of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in binding with both trace metals and REEs, suggest that competitive interactions, complexation, and scavenging are likely contributing to these proportional losses. However, outstanding questions yet remain regarding the effects of an increasing flux of trace metals as well as REEs from the Snake River Watershed into Dillon Reservoir, a major drinking water supply for the City of Denver, in part due to hydroclimatological drivers that are enhancing geochemical weathering and reducing groundwater recharge in alpine areas across the Colorado Rockies. Based on these findings also we seek to broaden this body of work to further investigate the behavior of rare earth elements (REE) in other aquatic environment as well the influence of trace metals, DOM, and pH in altering their reactivity and subsequent watershed

  10. Chloride flux in phagocytes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guoshun

    2016-09-01

    Phagocytes, such as neutrophils and macrophages, engulf microbes into phagosomes and launch chemical attacks to kill and degrade them. Such a critical innate immune function necessitates ion participation. Chloride, the most abundant anion in the human body, is an indispensable constituent of the myeloperoxidase (MPO)-H2 O2 -halide system that produces the potent microbicide hypochlorous acid (HOCl). It also serves as a balancing ion to set membrane potentials, optimize cytosolic and phagosomal pH, and regulate phagosomal enzymatic activities. Deficient supply of this anion to or defective attainment of this anion by phagocytes is linked to innate immune defects. However, how phagocytes acquire chloride from their residing environment especially when they are deployed to epithelium-lined lumens, and how chloride is intracellularly transported to phagosomes remain largely unknown. This review article will provide an overview of chloride protein carriers, potential mechanisms for phagocytic chloride preservation and acquisition, intracellular chloride supply to phagosomes for oxidant production, and methods to measure chloride levels in phagocytes and their phagosomes. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Experimental investigation of anaerobic nitrogen fixation rates with varying pressure, temperature and metal concentration with application to the atmospheric evolution of early Earth and Mars.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Prateek

    2012-07-01

    The atmosphere of the early Earth is thought to have been significantly different than the modern composition of 21% O2 and 78% N2, yet the planet has been clearly established as hosting microbial life as far back as 3.8 billion years ago. As such, constraining the atmospheric composition of the early Earth is fundamental to establishing a database of habitable atmospheric compositions. A similar argument can be made for the planet Mars, where nitrates have been hypothesized to exist in the subsurface. During the early period on Mars when liquid water was likely more abundant, life may have developed to take advantage of available nitrates and a biologically-driven Martian nitrogen cycle could have evolved. Early Earth atmospheric composition has been investigated numerically, but only recently has the common assumption of a pN2 different than modern been investigated. Nonetheless, these latest attempts fail to take into account a key atmospheric parameter: life. On modern Earth, nitrogen is cycled vigorously by biology. The nitrogen cycle likely operated on the early Earth, but probably differed in the metabolic processes responsible, dominantly due to the lack of abundant oxygen which stabilizes oxidized forms of N that drive de-nitrification today. Recent advances in evolutionary genomics suggest that microbial pathways that are relatively uncommon today (i.e. vanadium and iron-based nitrogen fixation) probably played important roles in the early N cycle. We quantitatively investigate in the laboratory the effects of variable pressure, temperature and metal concentration on the rates of anoxic nitrogen fixation, as possible inputs for future models investigating atmospheric evolution, and better understand the evolution of the nitrogen cycle on Earth. A common anaerobic methanogenic archaeal species with i) a fully sequenced genome, ii) all three nitrogenases (molybdenum, vanadium and iron-based) and iii) the ability to be genetically manipulated will be used as

  12. Cysteine-Functionalized Chitosan Magnetic Nano-Based Particles for the Recovery of Light and Heavy Rare Earth Metals: Uptake Kinetics and Sorption Isotherms

    PubMed Central

    Galhoum, Ahmed A.; Mafhouz, Mohammad G.; Abdel-Rehem, Sayed T.; Gomaa, Nabawia A.; Atia, Asem A.; Vincent, Thierry; Guibal, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Cysteine-functionalized chitosan magnetic nano-based particles were synthesized for the sorption of light and heavy rare earth (RE) metal ions (La(III), Nd(III) and Yb(III)). The structural, surface, and magnetic properties of nano-sized sorbent were investigated by elemental analysis, FTIR, XRD, TEM and VSM (vibrating sample magnetometry). Experimental data show that the pseudo second-order rate equation fits the kinetic profiles well, while sorption isotherms are described by the Langmuir model. Thermodynamic constants (ΔG°, ΔH°) demonstrate the spontaneous and endothermic nature of sorption. Yb(III) (heavy RE) was selectively sorbed while light RE metal ions La(III) and Nd(III) were concentrated/enriched in the solution. Cationic species RE(III) in aqueous solution can be adsorbed by the combination of chelating and anion-exchange mechanisms. The sorbent can be efficiently regenerated using acidified thiourea. PMID:28347004

  13. Tuning bad metal and non-Fermi liquid behavior in a Mott material: Rare-earth nickelate thin films

    PubMed Central

    Mikheev, Evgeny; Hauser, Adam J.; Himmetoglu, Burak; Moreno, Nelson E.; Janotti, Anderson; Van de Walle, Chris G.; Stemmer, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Resistances that exceed the Mott-Ioffe-Regel limit (known as bad metal behavior) and non-Fermi liquid behavior are ubiquitous features of the normal state of many strongly correlated materials. We establish the conditions that lead to bad metal and non-Fermi liquid phases in NdNiO3, which exhibits a prototype bandwidth-controlled metal-insulator transition. We show that resistance saturation is determined by the magnitude of Ni eg orbital splitting, which can be tuned by strain in epitaxial films, causing the appearance of bad metal behavior under certain conditions. The results shed light on the nature of a crossover to a non-Fermi liquid metal phase and provide a predictive criterion for Anderson localization. They elucidate a seemingly complex phase behavior as a function of film strain and confinement and provide guidelines for orbital engineering and novel devices. PMID:26601140

  14. Separation of Ce and La from Synthetic Chloride Leach Solution of Monazite Sand by Precipitation and Solvent Extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banda, Raju; Jeon, Ho Seok; Lee, Man Seung

    2014-12-01

    Precipitation and solvent extraction experiments have been performed to recover light rare earths from simulated monazite sand chloride leach solutions. Precipitation conditions were obtained to recover Ce by adding NaClO as an oxidant. Among some cationic extractants (PC 88A, D2EHPA, Cyanex 272, LIX 63), PC 88A showed the best performance to separate La from the resulting chloride solution. Furthermore, the mixture of PC 88A with other solvating (TBP, TOPO) and amine extractants (Alamine 336, Aliquat 336) was tested to increase the separation factor of La from Pr and Nd. The use of mixed extractants greatly enhanced the separation of La from the two other metals. McCabe-Thiele diagrams for the extraction of Pr and Nd with the PC 88A/Alamine 336 mixture were constructed.

  15. Mechanochemical synthesis, structure and properties of lead containing alkaline earth metal fluoride solid solutions MxPb1-xF2 (M = Ca, Sr, Ba)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heise, M.; Scholz, G.; Düvel, A.; Heitjans, P.; Kemnitz, E.

    2018-03-01

    The paper deals with the mechanochemical synthesis of lead containing alkaline earth metal fluoride solid solutions MxPb1-xF2 (M = Ca, Sr, Ba) by high-energy ball milling. Several metal precursors and fluorinating agents were tested for synthesizing M0.5Pb0.5F2. Metal acetates and ammonium fluoride as precursors show the most promising results and were therefore used for the formation of MxPb1-xF2 with different metal cationic ratios. The characterization of the local fluorine coordination and the crystal structure was performed by 19F MAS NMR spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Additional calculations of 19F chemical shifts using the superposition model allow a deeper insight into the local structure of the compounds. The fluoride ion conductivity was followed by temperature dependent DC conductivity measurements. Significantly higher conductivities were found in comparison with those of the corresponding binary fluorides. The highest values were observed for samples with high lead content M0.25Pb0.75F2, bearing in mind the much higher conductivity of PbF2 compared to MF2.

  16. Theoretical study of mixed MLaX(4) (M = Na, K, Cs; X = F, Cl, Br, I) rare earth/alkali metal halide complexes.

    PubMed

    Groen, Cornelis Petrus; Oskam, Ad; Kovács, Attila

    2003-02-10

    The structure, bonding, and vibrational properties of the mixed MLaX(4) (M = Na, K, Cs; X = F, Cl, Br, I) rare earth/alkali metal halide complexes have been studied using the MP2 method in conjunction with polarized triple-zeta valence basis sets and quasi-relativistic effective core potentials for the heavy atoms. From the three characteristic structures, possessing 1- (C(3)(v)), 2- (C(2)(v)), or 3-fold coordination (C(3)(v)) between the alkali metal and the bridging halide atoms, the bi- and tridentate forms are stable isomers with close dissociation energies. In general, for the complexes existing of lighter alkali metals and halogens, the bidentate structure corresponds to the global minimum of the potential energy surface, while the heavier analogues favor the tridentate structure. At experimentally relevant temperatures (T > 800 K), however, the isomerization entropy leads to a domination of the bidentate structures over the tridentate forms for all complexes. An important effect of the size of the alkali metal is manifested in the larger stabilities of the K and Cs complexes. The natural atomic charges are in agreement with strong electrostatic interactions in the title complexes. The marginal covalent contributions show a slight increasing trend in the heavier analogues. The calculated vibrational data indicate that infrared spectroscopy may be an effective tool for experimental investigation and characterization of MLaX(4) molecules.

  17. CALCIUM CHLORIDE PLANT LOOKING EAST. CALCIUM CHLORIDE BUILDING ON LEFT, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CALCIUM CHLORIDE PLANT LOOKING EAST. CALCIUM CHLORIDE BUILDING ON LEFT, CALCIUM CHLORIDE STORAGE BUILDING ON RIGHT OF CENTER WITH TOP OF SA (SODA ASH) BUILDING IN RIGHT BACKGROUND. - Solvay Process Company, Calcium Chloride Plant, Between Willis & Milton Avenues, Solvay, Onondaga County, NY

  18. Developments in the use of rare earth metal complexes as efficient catalysts for ring-opening polymerization of cyclic esters used in biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cota, Iuliana

    2017-04-01

    Biodegradable polymers represent a class of particularly useful materials for many biomedical and pharmaceutical applications. Among these types of polyesters, poly(ɛ-caprolactone) and polylactides are considered very promising for controlled drug delivery devices. These polymers are mainly produced by ring-opening polymerization of their respective cyclic esters, since this method allows a strict control of the molecular parameters (molecular weight and distribution) of the obtained polymers. The most widely used catalysts for ring-opening polymerization of cyclic esters are tin- and aluminium-based organometallic complexes; however since the contamination of the aliphatic polyesters by potentially toxic metallic residues is particularly of concern for biomedical applications, the possibility of replacing organometallic initiators by novel less toxic or more efficient organometallic complexes has been intensively studied. Thus, in the recent years, the use of highly reactive rare earth initiators/catalysts leading to lower polymer contamination has been developed. The use of rare earth complexes is considered a valuable strategy to decrease the polyester contamination by metallic residues and represents an attractive alternative to traditional organometallic complexes.

  19. Robust and Porous β-Diketiminate-Functionalized Metal–Organic Frameworks for Earth-Abundant-Metal-Catalyzed C–H Amination and Hydrogenation

    SciT

    Thacker, Nathan C.; Lin, Zekai; Zhang, Teng

    We have designed a strategy for postsynthesis installation of the β-diketiminate (NacNac) functionality in a metal–organic framework (MOF) of UiO-topology. Metalation of the NacNac-MOF (I) with earth-abundant metal salts afforded the desired MOF-supported NacNac-M complexes (M = Fe, Cu, and Co) with coordination environments established by detailed EXAFS studies. The NacNac-Fe-MOF catalyst, I•Fe(Me), efficiently catalyzed the challenging intramolecular sp 3 C–H amination of a series of alkyl azides to afford α-substituted pyrrolidines. The NacNac-Cu-MOF catalyst, I•Cu(THF), was effective in promoting the intermolecular sp 3 C–H amination of cyclohexene using unprotected anilines to provide access to secondary amines in excellent selectivity.more » Finally, the NacNac-Co-MOF catalyst, I•Co(H), was used to catalyze alkene hydrogenation with turnover numbers (TONs) as high as 700 000. All of the NacNac-M-MOF catalysts were more effective than their analogous homogeneous catalysts and could be recycled and reused without a noticeable decrease in yield. The NacNac-MOFs thus provide a novel platform for engineering recyclable earth-abundant-element-based single-site solid catalysts for many important organic transformations.« less

  20. Environmental impacts of heavy metals, rare earth elements and natural radionuclides in marine sediment from Ras Tanura, Saudi Arabia along the Arabian Gulf.

    PubMed

    El-Taher, Atef; Alshahri, Fatimh; Elsaman, Reda

    2018-02-01

    Ras Tanura city is one of the most important cities in Saudi Arabia because of the presence of the largest and oldest oil refinery in the Middle East which was began operations in September 1945. Also its contains gas plant and two ports. The concentration of natural radionuclides, heavy metals and rare earth elements were measured in marine sediment samples collected from Ras Tanura. The specific activities of 238 U, 226 Ra, 232 Th, 40 K and 137 Cs (Bq/kg) were measured using A hyper-pure Germanium detector (HPGe), and ranged from (20.4 ± 4.0-55.1 ± 9.9), (6.71 ± 0.7-46.1 ± 4.5), (3.51 ± 0.5-18.2 ± 1.5), (105 ± 4.4-492 ± 13) and from (0.33 ± 0.04-2.10 ± 0.4) for 238 U, 226 Ra, 232 Th, 40 K and 137 Cs respectively. Heavy metals and rare earth elements were measured using ICPE-9820 Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometer. Also the frequency distributions for all radioactive variables in sediment samples were analyzed. Finally the radiological hazards due to natural radionuclides in marine sediment were calculated to the public and it's diagramed by Surfer program in maps. Comparing with the international recommended values, its values found to be within the international level. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Indirect ultraviolet detection of alkaline earth metal ions using an imidazolium ionic liquid as an ultraviolet absorption reagent in ion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong-Qiang; Yu, Hong

    2017-04-01

    A convenient and versatile method was developed for the separation and detection of alkaline earth metal ions by ion chromatography with indirect UV detection. The chromatographic separation of Mg 2+ , Ca 2+ , and Sr 2+ was performed on a carboxylic acid base cation exchange column using imidazolium ionic liquid/acid as the mobile phase, in which the imidazolium ionic liquid acted as an UV-absorption reagent. The effects of imidazolium ionic liquids, detection wavelength, acids in the mobile phase, and column temperature on the retention of Mg 2+ , Ca 2+ , and Sr 2+ were investigated. The main factors influencing the separation and detection were the background UV absorption reagent and the concentration of hydrogen ion in ion chromatography with indirect UV detection. The successful separation and detection of Mg 2+ , Ca 2+ , and Sr 2+ within 14 min were achieved using the selected chromatographic conditions, and the detection limits (S/N = 3) were 0.06, 0.12, and 0.23 mg/L, respectively. A new separation and detection method of alkaline earth metal ions by ion chromatography with indirect UV detection was developed, and the application range of ionic liquids was expanded. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Levels of rare earth elements, heavy metals and uranium in a population living in Baiyun Obo, Inner Mongolia, China: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Hao, Zhe; Li, Yonghua; Li, Hairong; Wei, Binggan; Liao, Xiaoyong; Liang, Tao; Yu, Jiangping

    2015-06-01

    The Baiyun Obo deposit is the world's largest rare earth elements (REE) deposit. We aimed to investigate levels of REE, heavy metals (HMs) and uranium (U) based on morning urine samples in a population in Baiyun Obo and to assess the possible influence of rare earth mining processes on human exposure. In the mining area, elevated levels were found for the sum of the concentrations of light REE (LREE) and heavy REE (HREE) with mean values at 3.453 and 1.151 μg g(-1) creatinine, which were significantly higher than those in the control area. Concentrations of HMs and U in the population increased concomitantly with increasing REE levels. The results revealed that besides REE, HMs and U were produced with REE exploitation. Gender, age, educational level, alcohol and smoking habit were major factors contributing to inter-individual variation. Males were more exposed to these metals than females. Concentrations in people in the senior age group and those with only primary education were low. Drinking and smoking were associated with the levels of LREE, Cr, Cu, Cd and Pb in morning urine. Hence this study provides basic and useful information when addressing public and environmental health challenges in the areas where REE are mined and processed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Method for locating metallic nitride inclusions in metallic alloy ingots

    DOEpatents

    White, Jack C.; Traut, Davis E.; Oden, Laurance L.; Schmitt, Roman A.

    1992-01-01

    A method of determining the location and history of metallic nitride and/or oxynitride inclusions in metallic melts. The method includes the steps of labeling metallic nitride and/or oxynitride inclusions by making a coreduced metallic-hafnium sponge from a mixture of hafnium chloride and the chloride of a metal, reducing the mixed chlorides with magnesium, nitriding the hafnium-labeled metallic-hafnium sponge, and seeding the sponge to be melted with hafnium-labeled nitride inclusions. The ingots are neutron activated and the hafnium is located by radiometric means. Hafnium possesses exactly the proper metallurgical and radiochemical properties for this use.

  4. High mobilization of arsenic, metals and rare earth elements in seepage waters driven by respiration of old allochthonous organic carbon.

    PubMed

    Weiske, Arndt; Schaller, Jörg; Hegewald, Tilo; Machill, Susanne; Werner, Ingo; Dudel, E Gert

    2013-12-01

    Metal and metalloid mobilization processes within seepage water are of major concern in a range of water reservoir systems. The mobilization process of arsenic and heavy metals within a dam and sediments of a drinking water reservoir was investigated. Principle component analysis (PCA) on time series data of seepage water showed a clear positive correlation of arsenic with iron and DOC (dissolved organic carbon), and a negative correlation with nitrate due to respiratory processes. A relationship of reductive metal and metalloid mobilization with respiration of old carbon was shown. The system is influenced by sediment layers as well as a recent DOC input from degraded ombrotrophic peatbogs in the catchment area. The isotopic composition ((12)C, (13)C and (14)C) of DOC is altered along the path from basin to seepage water, but no significant changes in structural parameters (LC-OCD-OND, FT-IR) could be seen. DIC (dissolved inorganic carbon) in seepage water partly originates from respiratory processes, and a higher relationship of it with sediment carbon than with the DOC inventory of infiltrating water was found. This study revealed the interaction of respiratory processes with metal and metalloid mobilization in sediment water flows. In contrast to the presumption that emerging DOC via respiratory processes mainly controls arsenic and metal mobilization it could be shown that the presence of aged carbon compounds is essential. The findings emphasize the importance of aged organic carbon for DOC, DIC, arsenic and metal turnover.

  5. Advanced intermediate temperature sodium copper chloride battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Li-Ping; Liu, Xiao-Min; Zhang, Yi-Wei; Yang, Hui; Shen, Xiao-Dong

    2014-12-01

    Sodium metal chloride batteries, also called as ZEBRA batteries, possess many merits such as low cost, high energy density and high safety, but their high operation temperature (270-350 °C) may cause several issues and limit their applications. Therefore, decreasing the operation temperature is of great importance in order to broaden their usage. Using a room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) catholyte composed of sodium chloride buffered 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride-aluminum chloride and a dense β″-aluminates solid electrolyte film with 500 micron thickness, we report an intermediate temperature sodium copper chloride battery which can be operated at only 150 °C, therefore alleviating the corrosion issues, improving the material compatibilities and reducing the operating complexities associated with the conventional ZEBRA batteries. The RTIL presents a high ionic conductivity (0.247 S cm-1) at 150 °C and a wide electrochemical window (-2.6 to 2.18 vs. Al3+/Al). With the discharge plateau at 2.64 V toward sodium and the specific capacity of 285 mAh g-1, this intermediate temperature battery exhibits an energy density (750 mWh g-1) comparable to the conventional ZEBRA batteries (728-785 mWh g-1) and superior to commercialized Li-ion batteries (550-680 mWh g-1), making it very attractive for renewable energy integration and other grid related applications.

  6. Metal oxide films on metal

    DOEpatents

    Wu, Xin D.; Tiwari, Prabhat

    1995-01-01

    A structure including a thin film of a conductive alkaline earth metal oxide selected from the group consisting of strontium ruthenium trioxide, calcium ruthenium trioxide, barium ruthenium trioxide, lanthanum-strontium cobalt oxide or mixed alkaline earth ruthenium trioxides thereof upon a thin film of a noble metal such as platinum is provided.

  7. Doping of alkali, alkaline-earth, and transition metals in covalent-organic frameworks for enhancing CO2 capture by first-principles calculations and molecular simulations.

    PubMed

    Lan, Jianhui; Cao, Dapeng; Wang, Wenchuan; Smit, Berend

    2010-07-27

    We use the multiscale simulation approach, which combines the first-principles calculations and grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations, to comprehensively study the doping of a series of alkali (Li, Na, and K), alkaline-earth (Be, Mg, and Ca), and transition (Sc and Ti) metals in nanoporous covalent organic frameworks (COFs), and the effects of the doped metals on CO2 capture. The results indicate that, among all the metals studied, Li, Sc, and Ti can bind with COFs stably, while Be, Mg, and Ca cannot, because the binding of Be, Mg, and Ca with COFs is very weak. Furthermore, Li, Sc, and Ti can improve the uptakes of CO2 in COFs significantly. However, the binding energy of a CO2 molecule with Sc and Ti exceeds the lower limit of chemisorptions and, thus, suffers from the difficulty of desorption. By the comparative studies above, it is found that Li is the best surface modifier of COFs for CO2 capture among all the metals studied. Therefore, we further investigate the uptakes of CO2 in the Li-doped COFs. Our simulation results show that at 298 K and 1 bar, the excess CO2 uptakes of the Li-doped COF-102 and COF-105 reach 409 and 344 mg/g, which are about eight and four times those in the nondoped ones, respectively. As the pressure increases to 40 bar, the CO2 uptakes of the Li-doped COF-102 and COF-105 reach 1349 and 2266 mg/g at 298 K, respectively, which are among the reported highest scores to date. In summary, doping of metals in porous COFs provides an efficient approach for enhancing CO2 capture.

  8. Absorption spectroscopy of heavy alkaline earth metals Ba and Sr in rare gas matrices—CCSD(T) calculations and atomic site occupancies

    SciT

    Davis, Barry M.; McCaffrey, John G., E-mail: john.mccaffrey@nuim.ie

    2016-01-28

    Isolation of the heavier alkaline earth metals Ba and Sr in the solid rare gases (RGs) Ar, Kr, and Xe is analysed with absorption spectroscopy and interpreted partly with the assistance of ab initio calculations of the diatomic M ⋅ RG ground state interaction potentials. The y{sup 1}P←a{sup 1}S resonance transitions in the visible spectral region are used to compare the isolation conditions of these two metal atom systems and calcium. Complex absorption bands were recorded in all three metal atom systems even after extensive sample annealing. Coupled cluster calculations conducted on the ground states of the nine M ⋅more » RG diatomics (M = Ca, Sr, and Ba; RG = Ar, Kr, and Xe) at the coupled cluster single, double, and non-iterative triple level of theory revealed long bond lengths (>5 Å) and shallow bound regions (<130 cm{sup −1}). All of the M ⋅ RG diatomics have bond lengths considerably longer than those of the rare gas dimers, with the consequence that isolation of these metal atoms in a single substitutional site of the solid rare gas is unlikely, with the possible exception of Ca/Xe. The luminescence of metal dimer bands has been recorded for Ba and Sr revealing very different behaviours. Resonance fluorescence with a lifetime of 15 ns is observed for the lowest energy transition of Sr{sub 2} while this transition is quenched in Ba{sub 2}. This behaviour is consistent with the absence of vibrational structure on the dimer absorption band in Ba{sub 2} indicating lifetime broadening arising from efficient relaxation to low-lying molecular states. More extensive 2D excitation-emission data recorded for the complex site structures present on the absorption bands of the atomic Ba and Sr systems will be presented in future publications.« less

  9. Response of the Lattice across the Filling-Controlled Mott Metal-Insulator Transition of a Rare Earth Titanate

    SciT

    Kim, Honggyu; Marshall, Patrick B.; Ahadi, Kaveh

    The lattice response of a prototype Mott insulator, SmTiO 3, to hole doping is investigated with atomic-scale spatial resolution. SmTiO 3 films are doped with Sr on the Sm site with concentrations that span the insulating and metallic sides of the filling-controlled Mott metal-insulator transition (MIT). The GdFeO 3-type distortions are investigated using an atomic resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy technique that can resolve small lattice distortions with picometer precision. We show that these distortions are gradually and uniformly reduced as the Sr concentration is increased without any phase separation. Significant distortions persist into the metallic state. In conclusion, themore » results present a new picture of the physics of this prototype filling-controlled MIT, which is discussed.« less

  10. Response of the Lattice across the Filling-Controlled Mott Metal-Insulator Transition of a Rare Earth Titanate

    DOE PAGES

    Kim, Honggyu; Marshall, Patrick B.; Ahadi, Kaveh; ...

    2017-11-02

    The lattice response of a prototype Mott insulator, SmTiO 3, to hole doping is investigated with atomic-scale spatial resolution. SmTiO 3 films are doped with Sr on the Sm site with concentrations that span the insulating and metallic sides of the filling-controlled Mott metal-insulator transition (MIT). The GdFeO 3-type distortions are investigated using an atomic resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy technique that can resolve small lattice distortions with picometer precision. We show that these distortions are gradually and uniformly reduced as the Sr concentration is increased without any phase separation. Significant distortions persist into the metallic state. In conclusion, themore » results present a new picture of the physics of this prototype filling-controlled MIT, which is discussed.« less

  11. Source and path identification of metals pollution in a mining area by PMF and rare earth element patterns in road dust.

    PubMed

    Tian, Shuhan; Liang, Tao; Li, Kexin; Wang, Lingqing

    2018-08-15

    To better assess pollution and offer efficient protection for local residents, it is necessary to both conduct an exhaustive investigation into pollution levels and quantify its contributing sources and paths. As it is the biggest light rare earth element (REE) reserve in the world, Bayan Obo deposit releases large amounts of heavy metals into the surrounding environment. In this study, road dust from zones located at different distances to the mining area was collected and sieved using seven sizes. This allowed for subsequent analysis of size-dependent influences of mining activities. A receptor model was used to quantitatively assess mine contributions. REE distribution patterns and other REE parameters were compared with those in airborne particulates and the surrounding soil to analyze pollution paths. Results showed that 27 metals were rated as moderately to extremely polluted (2metals in residential area road dust originated directly from the mine. The provenance index (PI) calculated using the REE parameters confirmed this result. While the REE distribution pattern showed that airborne particulates may not be the path for mining-derived particles, they may be one for other sources. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. K2-155: A Bright Metal-poor M Dwarf with Three Transiting Super-Earths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano, Teruyuki; Dai, Fei; Livingston, John H.; Fujii, Yuka; Cochran, William D.; Endl, Michael; Gandolfi, Davide; Redfield, Seth; Winn, Joshua N.; Guenther, Eike W.; Prieto-Arranz, Jorge; Albrecht, Simon; Barragan, Oscar; Cabrera, Juan; Cauley, P. Wilson; Csizmadia, Szilard; Deeg, Hans; Eigmüller, Philipp; Erikson, Anders; Fridlund, Malcolm; Fukui, Akihiko; Grziwa, Sascha; Hatzes, Artie P.; Korth, Judith; Narita, Norio; Nespral, David; Niraula, Prajwal; Nowak, Grzegorz; Pätzold, Martin; Palle, Enric; Persson, Carina M.; Rauer, Heike; Ribas, Ignasi; Smith, Alexis M. S.; Van Eylen, Vincent

    2018-03-01

    We report on the discovery of three transiting super-Earths around K2-155 (EPIC 210897587), a relatively bright early M dwarf (V = 12.81 mag) observed during Campaign 13 of the NASA K2 mission. To characterize the system and validate the planet candidates, we conducted speckle imaging and high-dispersion optical spectroscopy, including radial velocity measurements. Based on the K2 light curve and the spectroscopic characterization of the host star, the planet sizes and orbital periods are {1.55}-0.17+0.20 {R}\\oplus and 6.34365 ± 0.00028 days for the inner planet; {1.95}-0.22+0.27 {R}\\oplus and 13.85402 ± 0.00088 days for the middle planet; and {1.64}-0.17+0.18 {R}\\oplus and 40.6835 ± 0.0031 days for the outer planet. The outer planet (K2-155d) is near the habitable zone, with an insolation 1.67 ± 0.38 times that of the Earth. The planet’s radius falls within the range between that of smaller rocky planets and larger gas-rich planets. To assess the habitability of this planet, we present a series of three-dimensional global climate simulations, assuming that K2-155d is tidally locked and has an Earth-like composition and atmosphere. We find that the planet can maintain a moderate surface temperature if the insolation proves to be smaller than ∼1.5 times that of the Earth. Doppler mass measurements, transit spectroscopy, and other follow-up observations should be rewarding, as K2-155 is one of the optically brightest M dwarfs known to harbor transiting planets.

  13. Di and trinuclear rare-earth metal complexes supported by 3-amido appended indolyl ligands: synthesis, characterization and catalytic activity towards isoprene 1,4-cis polymerization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guangchao; Deng, Baojia; Wang, Shaowu; Wei, Yun; Zhou, Shuangliu; Zhu, Xiancui; Huang, Zeming; Mu, Xiaolong

    2016-10-21

    Different di and trinuclear rare-earth metal complexes supported by 3-amido appended indolyl ligands were synthesized and their catalytic activities towards isoprene polymerization were investigated. Treatment of [RE(CH 2 SiMe 3 ) 3 (thf) 2 ] with 1 equiv. of 3-(CyN[double bond, length as m-dash]CH)C 8 H 5 NH in toluene or in THF afforded dinuclear rare-earth metal alkyl complexes having indolyl ligands in different hapticities with central metals {[η 2 :η 1 -μ-η 1 -3-(CyNCH(CH 2 SiMe 3 ))Ind]RE-(thf)(CH 2 SiMe 3 )} 2 (Cy = cyclohexyl, Ind = Indolyl, RE = Yb (1), Er (2), Y (3)) or {[η 1 -μ-η 1 -3-(CyNCH(CH 2 SiMe 3 ))Ind]RE-(thf) 2 (CH 2 SiMe 3 )} 2 (RE = Yb (4), Er (5), Y (6), Gd (7)), respectively. These two series of dinuclear complexes could be transferred to each other easily by only changing the solvents in the process. Reaction of [Er(CH 2 SiMe 3 ) 3 (thf) 2 ] with 1 equiv. of 3-t-butylaminomethylindole 3-( t BuNHCH 2 )C 8 H 5 NH in THF afforded the unexpected trinuclear erbium alkyl complex [η 2 :η 1 -μ-η 1 -3-( t BuNCH 2 )Ind] 4 Er 3 (thf) 5 (CH 2 SiMe 3 ) (8), which can also be prepared by reaction of 3 equiv. of [Er(CH 2 SiMe 3 ) 3 (thf) 2 ] with 4 equiv. of 3-( t BuNHCH 2 )C 8 H 5 NH in THF. Accordingly, complexes [η 2 :η 1 -μ-η 1 -3-( t BuNCH 2 )Ind] 4 RE 3 (thf) 5 (CH 2 SiMe 3 ) (RE = Y (9), Dy (10)) were prepared by reactions of 3 equiv. of [RE(CH 2 SiMe 3 ) 3 (thf) 2 ] with 4 equiv. of 3-( t BuNHCH 2 )C 8 H 5 NH in THF. Reactions of [RE(CH 2 SiMe 3 ) 3 (thf) 2 ] with 1 equiv. of 3-t-butylaminomethylindole 3-( t BuNHCH 2 )C 8 H 5 NH in THF, followed by treatment with 1 equiv. of [(2,6- i Pr 2 C 6 H 3 )N[double bond, length as m-dash]CHNH(C 6 H 3 i Pr 2 -2,6)] afforded, after workup, the dinuclear rare-earth metal complexes [η 1 -μ-η 1 :η 1 -3-( t BuNCH 2 )Ind][η 1 -μ-η 1 :η 3 -3-( t BuNCH 2 )Ind]RE 2 (thf)[(η 3 -2,6- i Pr 2 C 6 H 3 )NCHN(C 6 H 3 i Pr 2 -2,6)] 2 (RE = Er (11), Y (12)) having the indolyl ligands bonded with the

  14. Effect of H2O on metal-silicate partitioning of Ni, Co, V, Cr, Mn and Fe: Implications for the oxidation state of the Earth and Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clesi, V.; Bouhifd, M. A.; Bolfan-Casanova, N.; Manthilake, G.; Fabbrizio, A.; Andrault, D.

    2016-11-01

    This study investigates the metal-silicate partitioning of Ni, Co, V, Cr, Mn and Fe during core mantle differentiation of terrestrial planets under hydrous conditions. For this, we equilibrated a molten hydrous CI chondrite model composition with various Fe-rich alloys in the system Fe-C-Ni-Co-Si-S in a multi-anvil over a range of P, T, fO2 and water content (5-20 GPa, 2073-2500 K, from 1 to 5 log units below the iron-wüstite (IW) buffer and for XH2O varying from 500 ppm to 1.5 wt%). By comparing the present experiments with the available data sets on dry systems, we observes that the effect of water on the partition coefficients of moderately siderophile elements is only moderate. For example, for iron we observed a decrease in the partition coefficient of Fe (Dmet/silFe) from 9.5 to 4.3, with increasing water content of the silicate melt, from 0 to 1.44 wt%, respectively. The evolution of metal-silicate partition coefficients of Ni, Co, V, Cr, Mn and Fe are modelled based on sets of empirical parameters. These empirical models are then used to refine the process of core segregation during accretion of Mars and the Earth. It appears that the likely presence of 3.5 wt% water on Mars during the core-mantle segregation could account for ∼74% of the FeO content of the Martian mantle. In contrast, water does not play such an important role for the Earth; only 4-6% of the FeO content of its mantle could be due to the water-induced Fe-oxidation, for a likely initial water concentration of 1.8 wt%. Thus, in order to reproduce the present-day FeO content of 8 wt% in the mantle, the Earth could initially have been accreted from a large fraction (between 85% and 90%) of reducing bodies (similar to EH chondrites), with 10-15% of the Earth's mass likely made of more oxidized components that introduced the major part of water and FeO to the Earth. This high proportion of enstatite chondrites in the original constitution of the Earth is consistent with the 17O,48Ca,50Ti,62Ni

  15. Sodium chloride and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Huang, Y W

    1997-09-01

    The hypothesis that sodium chloride deficiency, and not its overuse, is prime cause of hypertension and arteriosclerosis is presented. In the author's home town--a farflung part of northern China--hypertension is a rare disease and arteriosclerosis is a virtually unknown condition. The average intake of sodium chloride for these people is > 30 g/day compared with the typical sodium chloride intake of 10-12 g per day in the USA. When the 10-12 g salt ingested is mixed with the average daily water intake (2100 ml), 0.47% to 0.57% saline mixture is produced, which is hypotonic to extracellular fluid in salt content. Thus sodium conservation becomes necessary. All the hormones and ions involved in sodium conservation are inducers of hypertension; these include aldosterone, angiotensin 11, glucocorticoids, catecholamine, and vasopression. Plus, potassium waste, induced under the influence of aldosterone excess, participates in the development of hypertension.

  16. IUPAC-NIST Solubility Data Series. 100. Rare Earth Metal Fluorides in Water and Aqueous Systems. Part 2. Light Lanthanides (Ce-Eu)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mioduski, Tomasz; Gumiński, Cezary; Zeng, Dewen

    2015-03-01

    This is the second part of the volume devoted to the evaluation of experimental solubility data for rare earth metal (REM) fluorides in water as well as in aqueous ternary and multicomponent systems. Fluorides of Ce, Pr, Nd, Pm, Sm, and Eu (so-called light lanthanides), as the main solutes, are covered in the present part, which has thorough coverage of the experimental literature through the end of 2012. The experimentally unknown solubility value for PmF3 in water was predicted by an interpolation of the solubility values for NdF3 and SmF3 at 298 K. General features of the systems, such as the nature of the equilibrium solid phases, solubility as a function of temperature, influence of ionic strength, pH, mixed solvent medium on the solubility, quality of the solubility results, and solubility as a function of REM atomic number, have already been presented in Part 1 of the volume.

  17. The luminescence and decay enhancement by variation in atomic size of alkaline earth metals in Pr3+ incorporated sodium lead borate glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenkennavar, Susheela K.; Madhu, A.; Eraiah, B.; Kokila, M. K.

    2018-05-01

    The glasses used for the present study are prepared by the melting and quenching techniques of composition 20Na2O-10PbO-10MO-60B2O3-xPr2O3 (where, M=Ba, Ca, Sr and x= 0.5 mol% of Pr3+). For different alkaline considered with same Pr3+ concemtartion incorporation on present work as resulted in interesting facts. Due to the effect of different atomic size, the luminescence and life time of glasses are affected. Only for calcium alkaline earth metal incorporated samples has proved to have highest intensity in emission and longer life time. The detailed studies of them have been reported for the better understanding.

  18. Low pressure ion chromatography with a low cost paired emitter-detector diode based detector for the determination of alkaline earth metals in water samples.

    PubMed

    Barron, Leon; Nesterenko, Pavel N; Diamond, Dermot; O'Toole, Martina; Lau, King Tong; Paull, Brett

    2006-09-01

    The use of a low pressure ion chromatograph based upon short (25 mm x 4.6 mm) surfactant coated monolithic columns and a low cost paired emitter-detector diode (PEDD) based detector, for the determination of alkaline earth metals in aqueous matrices is presented. The system was applied to the separation of magnesium, calcium, strontium and barium in less than 7min using a 0.15M KCl mobile phase at pH 3, with post-column reaction detection at 570 nm using o-cresolphthalein complexone. A comparison of the performance of the PEDD detector with a standard laboratory absorbance detector is shown, with limits of detection for magnesium and calcium using the low cost PEDD detector equal to 0.16 and 0.23 mg L(-1), respectively. Finally, the developed system was used for the determination of calcium and magnesium in a commercial spring water sample.

  19. Diversity, metal resistance and uranium sequestration abilities of bacteria from uranium ore deposit in deep earth stratum.

    PubMed

    Islam, Ekramul; Sar, Pinaki

    2016-05-01

    Metal resistance and uranium (U) sequestration abilities of bacteria residing in subsurface U ore was investigated using 122 pure culture strains isolated through enrichment. The cumulative frequencies of isolates resistant to each metal tested were as follows: As(V), 74%; Zn, 58%; Ni, 53%; Cd, 47%; Cr(VI), 41%; Co, 40%; Cu, 20%; and Hg, 4%. 16S rRNA gene analysis revealed that isolated bacteria belonged to 14 genera with abundance of Arthrobacter, Microbacterium, Acinetobacter and Stenotrophomonas. Cobalt did not interfere with the growth of most of the bacterial isolates belonging to different groups while U allowed growth of four different genera of which Stenotrophomonas and Microbacterium showed high U tolerance. Interestingly, tolerance to Ni, Zn, Cu, and Hg was observed only in Microbacterium, Arthrobacter, Paenibacillus¸ and Acinetobacter, respectively. However, Microbacterium was found to be dominant when isolated from other five different metal enrichments including U. Uranium removal study showed that 84% of the test bacteria could remove more than 50mgUg(-1) dry weight from 80 or 160mgL(-1) U within 48h. In general, Microbacterium, Arthrobacter and Acinetobacter could remove a higher amount of U. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) study of U exposed cells revealed that accumulated U sequestered mostly around the cell periphery. The study highlights that indigenous U ore deposit bacteria have the potential to interact with U, and thus could be applied for bioremediation of U contaminated sites or wastes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Atmospheric Methyl Chloride

    DOE Data Explorer

    Khalil, M. A. K. [Portland State Univ., Portland, OR (United States); Rasmussen, R. A. [Oregon Graduate Institute, Portland, OR (USA)

    1999-01-01

    This data set provides monthly average concentrations of atmospheric methyl chloride taken from seven locations distributed among the polar, middle, and tropical latitudes of both hemispheres. The seven primary sites include Pt. Barrow, Alaska; Cape Kumukahi and Mauna Loa, Hawaii; Cape Matatula, Samoa; Cape Grim, Tasmania; and the South Pole and Palmer Station, Antarctica. Concentration measurements from these seven sites cover a period of 16 years, extending from 1981-1997. Monthly data taken between 1987-1989 from 20 short-term sites and vertical distribution measured at various latitudes are also provided. Air samples were collected from various sites in stainless steel flasks and methyl chloride concentrations were measured using an Electron Capture Gas Chromatograph. Concentrations are reported as mixing ratios in dry air. The concentrations are determined by using a set of calibration standards that are referenced against a primary standard which is also used to establish the absolute concentration. The primary standards were prepared by the investigators in the absence of an available standard from a centralized location. The data are useful in global methyl chloride budget analyses and for determining the atmospheric distribution and trends of methyl chloride and estimating the total emissions at various latitudes.

  1. SOURCE ASSESSMENT: POLYVINYL CHLORIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report summarizes data on air emissions from the polyvinyl chloride (PVC) industry. PVC is manufactured by 20 companies at 35 plants. Each plant uses one or more of four possible polymerization processes: (1) suspension polymerization, (2) emulsion polymerization, (3) bulk p...

  2. SURFACE TREATMENT OF METALLIC URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Gray, A.G.; Schweikher, E.W.

    1958-05-27

    The treatment of metallic uranium to provide a surface to which adherent electroplates can be applied is described. Metallic uranium is subjected to an etchant treatment in aqueous concentrated hydrochloric acid, and the etched metal is then treated to dissolve the resulting black oxide and/or chloride film without destroying the etched metal surface. The oxide or chloride removal is effected by means of moderately concentrated nitric acid in 3 to 20 seconds.

  3. Tracing metal-silicate segregation and late veneer in the Earth and the ureilite parent body with palladium stable isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creech, J. B.; Moynier, F.; Bizzarro, M.

    2017-11-01

    Stable isotope studies of highly siderophile elements (HSE) have the potential to yield valuable insights into a range of geological processes. In particular, the strong partitioning of these elements into metal over silicates may lead to stable isotope fractionation during metal-silicate segregation, making them sensitive tracers of planetary differentiation processes. We present the first techniques for the precise determination of palladium stable isotopes by MC-ICPMS using a 106Pd-110Pd double-spike to correct for instrumental mass fractionation. Results are expressed as the per mil (‰) difference in the 106Pd/105Pd ratio (δ106Pd) relative to an in-house solution standard (Pd_IPGP) in the absence of a certified Pd isotopic standard. Repeated analyses of the Pd isotopic composition of the chondrite Allende demonstrate the external reproducibility of the technique of ±0.032‰ on δ106Pd. Using these techniques, we have analysed Pd stable isotopes from a range of terrestrial and extraterrestrial samples. We find that chondrites define a mean δ106Pdchondrite = -0.19 ± 0.05‰. Ureilites reveal a weak trend towards heavier δ106Pd with decreasing Pd content, similar to recent findings based on Pt stable isotopes (Creech et al., 2017), although fractionation of Pd isotopes is significantly less than for Pt, possibly related to its weaker metal-silicate partitioning behaviour and the limited field shift effect. Terrestrial mantle samples have a mean δ106Pdmantle = -0.182 ± 0.130‰, which is consistent with a late-veneer of chondritic material after core formation.

  4. Phase characteristics of rare earth elements in metallic fuel for a sodium-cooled fast reactor by injection casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuk, Seoung Woo; Kim, Ki Hwan; Kim, Jong Hwan; Song, Hoon; Oh, Seok Jin; Park, Jeong-Yong; Lee, Chan Bock; Youn, Young-Sang; Kim, Jong-Yun

    2017-04-01

    Uranium-zirconium-rare earth (U-Zr-RE) fuel slugs for a sodium-cooled fast reactor were manufactured using a modified injection casting method, and investigated with respect to their uniformity, distribution, composition, and phase behavior according to RE content. Nd, Ce, Pr, and La were chosen as four representative lanthanide elements because they are considered to be major RE components of fuel ingots after pyroprocessing. Immiscible layers were found on the top layers of the melt-residue commensurate with higher fuel slug RE content. Scanning electron microscopy-energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) data showed that RE elements in the melt-residue were distributed uniformly throughout the fuel slugs. RE element agglomeration did not contaminate the fuel slugs but strongly affected the RE content of the slugs.

  5. Study of the use of Metal-Oxide-Silicon (MOS) devices for particulate detection and monitoring in the earth's atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, A. D.; Monteith, L. K.; Wortman, J. J.; Mulligan, J. C.

    1974-01-01

    A metal-oxide-silicon (MOS) capacitor-type particulate sensor was evaluated for use in atmospheric measurements. An accelerator system was designed and tested for the purpose of providing the necessary energy to trigger the MOS-type sensor. The accelerator system and the MOS sensor were characterized as a function of particle size and velocity. Diamond particles were used as particulate sources in laboratory tests. Preliminary tests were performed in which the detector was mounted on an aircraft and flown in the vicinity of coal-fired electric generating plants.

  6. Hydration Energies and Structures of Alkaline Earth Metal Ions, M2+ (H2O)n, n = 5–7, M = Mg, Ca, Sr, and Ba

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Cruz, Sandra E.; Jockusch, Rebecca A.

    2005-01-01

    The evaporation of water from hydrated alkaline earth metal ions, produced by electrospray ionization, was studied in a Fourier transform mass spectrometer. Zero-pressure-limit dissociation rate constants for loss of a single water molecule from the hydrated divalent metal ions, M2+(H2O)n (M = Mg, Ca, and Sr for n = 5–7, and M = Ba for n = 4–7), are measured as a function of temperature using blackbody infrared radiative dissociation. From these values, zero-pressure-limit Arrhenius parameters are obtained. By modeling the dissociation kinetics using a master equation formalism, threshold dissociation energies (Eo) are determined. These reactions should have a negligible reverse activation barrier; therefore, Eo values should be approximately equal to the binding energy or hydration enthalpy at 0 K. For the hepta- and hexahydrated ions at low temperature, binding energies follow the trend expected on the basis of ionic radii: Mg > Ca > Sr > Ba. For the hexahydrated ions at high temperature, binding energies follow the order Ca > Mg > Sr > Ba. The same order is observed for the pentahydrated ions. Collisional dissociation experiments on the tetrahydrated species result in relative dissociation rates that directly correlate with the size of the metals. These results indicate the presence of two isomers for hexahydrated magnesium ions: a low-temperature isomer in which the six water molecules are located in the first solvation shell, and a high-temperature isomer with the most likely structure corresponding to four water molecules in the inner shell and two water molecules in the second shell. These results also indicate that the pentahydrated magnesium ions have a structure with four water molecules in the first solvation shell and one in the outer shell. The dissociation kinetics for the hexa- and pentahydrated clusters of Ca2+, Sr2+, and Ba2+ are consistent with structures in which all the water molecules are located in the first solvation shell. PMID:16429612

  7. Hydration energies and structures of alkaline earth metal ions, M2+(H2O)n, n = 5-7, M = Mg, Ca, Sr, and Ba.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Cruz, S E; Jockusch, R A; Williams, E R

    1999-09-29

    The evaporation of water from hydrated alkaline earth metal ions, produced by electrospray ionization, was studied in a Fourier transform mass spectrometer. Zero-pressure-limit dissociation rate constants for loss of a single water molecule from the hydrated divalent metal ions, M(2+)(H(2)O)(n) (M = Mg, Ca, and Sr for n = 5-7, and M = Ba for n = 4-7), are measured as a function of temperature using blackbody infrared radiative dissociation. From these values, zero-pressure-limit Arrhenius parameters are obtained. By modeling the dissociation kinetics using a master equation formalism, threshold dissociation energies (E(o)) are determined. These reactions should have a negligible reverse activation barrier; therefore, E(o) values should be approximately equal to the binding energy or hydration enthalpy at 0 K. For the hepta- and hexahydrated ions at low temperature, binding energies follow the trend expected on the basis of ionic radii: Mg > Ca > Sr > Ba. For the hexahydrated ions at high temperature, binding energies follow the order Ca > Mg > Sr > Ba. The same order is observed for the pentahydrated ions. Collisional dissociation experiments on the tetrahydrated species result in relative dissociation rates that directly correlate with the size of the metals. These results indicate the presence of two isomers for hexahydrated magnesium ions: a low-temperature isomer in which the six water molecules are located in the first solvation shell, and a high-temperature isomer with the most likely structure corresponding to four water molecules in the inner shell and two water molecules in the second shell. These results also indicate that the pentahydrated magnesium ions have a structure with four water molecules in the first solvation shell and one in the outer shell. The dissociation kinetics for the hexa- and pentahydrated clusters of Ca(2+), Sr(2+), and Ba(2+) are consistent with structures in which all the water molecules are located in the first solvation shell.

  8. Metal-silicate thermochemistry at high temperature - Magma oceans and the 'excess siderophile element' problem of the earth's upper mantle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capobianco, Christopher J.; Jones, John H.; Drake, Michael J.

    1993-01-01

    Low-temperature metal-silicate partition coefficients are extrapolated to magma ocean temperatures. If the low-temperature chemistry data is found to be applicable at high temperatures, an important assumption, then the results indicate that high temperature alone cannot account for the excess siderophile element problem of the upper mantle. For most elements, a rise in temperature will result in a modest increase in siderophile behavior if an iron-wuestite redox buffer is paralleled. However, long-range extrapolation of experimental data is hazardous when the data contains even modest experimental errors. For a given element, extrapolated high-temperature partition coefficients can differ by orders of magnitude, even when data from independent studies is consistent within quoted errors. In order to accurately assess siderophile element behavior in a magma ocean, it will be necessary to obtain direct experimental measurements for at least some of the siderophile elements.

  9. METAL PHTHALOCYANINES

    DOEpatents

    Frigerio, N.A.

    1962-03-27

    A process is given for preparing heavy metal phthalocyanines, sulfonated or not. The process comprises mixing an inorganic metal salt with dimethyl formamide or methyl sulfoxide; separating the metal complex formed from the solution; mixing the complex with an equimolar amount of sodium, potassium, lithium, magnesium, or beryllium sulfonated or unsulfonated phthalocyanine whereby heavy-metal phthalocyanine crystals are formed; and separating the crystals from the solution. Uranyl, thorium, lead, hafnium, and lanthanide rare earth phthalocyanines can be produced by the process. (AEC)

  10. Enhancing Kondo coupling in alkaline-earth-metal atomic gases with confinement-induced resonances in mixed dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yanting; Zhang, Ren; Zhang, Peng; Zhai, Hui

    2017-12-01

    The Kondo effect describes the spin-exchange interaction between localized impurities and itinerant fermions. The ultracold alkaline-earth atomic gas provides a natural platform for quantum simulation of the Kondo model, utilizing its long-lived clock state and the nuclear-spin exchange interaction between clock state and ground state. One of the key issue now is whether the Kondo temperature can be high enough to be reached in current experiments, for which we have proposed to use transverse confinement to confine atoms into a one-dimensional tube and to use the confinement-induced resonance to enhance Kondo coupling. In this work, we further consider the (1 +0 ) -dimensional scattering problem when the clock state is further confined by an axial harmonic confinement. We show that this axial confinement for the clock-state atoms not only plays a role for localizing them, but can also act as an additional control knob to reach the confinement-induced resonance. We show that, in the presence of both the transverse and the axial confinements, the confinement-induced resonance can be reached in the practical conditions and the Kondo effect can be attainable in this system.

  11. A Quick Reference on Chloride.

    PubMed

    Bohn, Andrea A; de Morais, Helio Autran

    2017-03-01

    Chloride is an essential element, playing important roles in digestion, muscular activity, regulation of body fluids, and acid-base balance. As the most abundant anion in extracellular fluid, chloride plays a major role in maintaining electroneutrality. Chloride is intrinsically linked to sodium in maintaining osmolality and fluid balance and has an inverse relationship with bicarbonate in maintaining acid-base balance. It is likely because of these close ties that chloride does not get the individual attention it deserves; we can use these facts to simplify and interpret changes in serum chloride concentrations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. PRODUCTION OF HAFNIUM METAL

    DOEpatents

    Elger, G.W.; Boubel, R.W.

    1963-01-01

    This patent deals with a process of producing pure Hf metal from oxygen- contaminated gaseous Hf chloride. The oxygen compounds in the chioride gas are halogenated by contacting the gas at elevated temperature with Cl/sub 2/ in the presence of C. The Hf chloride, still in gaseous form, is contacted with molten Mg whereby Hf metal is formed and condensed on the Mg. (AEC)

  13. Chloride channels as drug targets

    PubMed Central

    Verkman, Alan S.; Galietta, Luis J. V.

    2013-01-01

    Chloride channels represent a relatively under-explored target class for drug discovery as elucidation of their identity and physiological roles has lagged behind that of many other drug targets. Chloride channels are involved in a wide range of biological functions, including epithelial fluid secretion, cell-volume regulation, neuroexcitation, smooth-muscle contraction and acidification of intracellular organelles. Mutations in several chloride channels cause human diseases, including cystic fibrosis, macular degeneration, myotonia, kidney stones, renal salt wasting and hyperekplexia. Chloride-channel modulators have potential applications in the treatment of some of these disorders, as well as in secretory diarrhoeas, polycystic kidney disease, osteoporosis and hypertension. Modulators of GABAA (γ-aminobutyric acid A) receptor chloride channels are in clinical use and several small-molecule chloride-channel modulators are in preclinical development and clinical trials. Here, we discuss the broad opportunities that remain in chloride-channel-based drug discovery. PMID:19153558

  14. Vibronic transitions in the alkali-metal (Li, Na, K, Rb) - alkaline-earth-metal (Ca, Sr) series: A systematic analysis of de-excitation mechanisms based on the graphical mapping of Frank-Condon integrals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pototschnig, Johann V.; Meyer, Ralf; Hauser, Andreas W.; Ernst, Wolfgang E.

    2017-02-01

    Research on ultracold molecules has seen a growing interest recently in the context of high-resolution spectroscopy and quantum computation. After forming weakly bound molecules from atoms in cold collisions, the preparation of molecules in low vibrational levels of the ground state is experimentally challenging, and typically achieved by population transfer using excited electronic states. Accurate potential energy surfaces are needed for a correct description of processes such as the coherent de-excitation from the highest and therefore weakly bound vibrational levels in the electronic ground state via couplings to electronically excited states. This paper is dedicated to the vibrational analysis of potentially relevant electronically excited states in the alkali-metal (Li, Na, K, Rb)- alkaline-earth metal (Ca,Sr) diatomic series. Graphical maps of Frank-Condon overlap integrals are presented for all molecules of the group. By comparison to overlap graphics produced for idealized potential surfaces, we judge the usability of the selected states for future experiments on laser-enhanced molecular formation from mixtures of quantum degenerate gases.

  15. Molecular Catalysis of the Electrochemical and Photochemical Reduction of CO2 with Earth-Abundant Metal Complexes. Selective Production of CO vs HCOOH by Switching of the Metal Center.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lingjing; Guo, Zhenguo; Wei, Xi-Guang; Gallenkamp, Charlotte; Bonin, Julien; Anxolabéhère-Mallart, Elodie; Lau, Kai-Chung; Lau, Tai-Chu; Robert, Marc

    2015-09-02

    Molecular catalysis of carbon dioxide reduction using earth-abundant metal complexes as catalysts is a key challenge related to the production of useful products--the "solar fuels"--in which solar energy would be stored. A direct approach using sunlight energy as well as an indirect approach where sunlight is first converted into electricity could be used. A Co(II) complex and a Fe(III) complex, both bearing the same pentadentate N5 ligand (2,13-dimethyl-3,6,9,12,18-pentaazabicyclo[12.3.1]octadeca-1(18),2,12,14,16-pentaene), were synthesized, and their catalytic activity toward CO2 reduction was investigated. Carbon monoxide was formed with the cobalt complex, while formic acid was obtained with the iron-based catalyst, thus showing that the catalysis product can be switched by changing the metal center. Selective CO2 reduction occurs under electrochemical conditions as well as photochemical conditions when using a photosensitizer under visible light excitation (λ > 460 nm, solvent acetonitrile) with the Co catalyst. In the case of the Fe catalyst, selective HCOOH production occurs at low overpotential. Sustained catalytic activity over long periods of time and high turnover numbers were observed in both cases. A catalytic mechanism is suggested on the basis of experimental results and preliminary quantum chemistry calculations.

  16. Introducing Euro-Glo, a rare earth metal chelate with numerous applications for the fluorescent localization of myelin and amyloid plaques in brain tissue sections.

    PubMed

    Schmued, Larry; Raymick, James

    2017-03-01

    The vast majority of fluorochromes are organic in nature and none of the few existing chelates have been applied as histological tracers for localizing brain anatomy and pathology. In this study we have developed and characterized a Europium chelate with the ability to fluorescently label normal and pathological myelin in control and toxicant-exposed rats, as well as the amyloid plaques in aged AD/Tg mice. This study demonstrates how Euro-Glo can be used for the detailed labeling of both normal myelination in the control rat as well as myelin pathology in the kainic acid exposed rat. In addition, this study demonstrates how E-G will label the shell of amyloid plaques in an AD/Tg mouse model of Alzheimer's disease a red color, while the plaque core appears blue in color. The observed E-G staining pattern is compared with that of well characterized tracers specific for the localization of myelin (Black-Gold II), degenerating neurons (Fluoro-Jade C), A-beta aggregates (Amylo-Glo) and glycolipids (PAS). This study represents the first time a rare earth metal (REM) chelate has been used as a histochemical tracer in the brain. This novel tracer, Euro-Glo (E-G), exhibits numerous advantages over conventional organic fluorophores including high intensity emission, high resistance to fading, compatibility with multiple labeling protocols, high Stoke's shift value and an absence of bleed-through of the signal through other filters. Euro-Glo represents the first fluorescent metal chelate to be used as a histochemical tracer, specifically to localize normal and pathological myelin as well as amyloid plaques. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Novel condensation of Au-centered trigonal prisms in rare-earth-metal-rich tellurides: Er7Au2Te2 and Lu7Au2Te2.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Shalabh; Corbett, John D

    2010-07-14

    A new monoclinic structure occurs for Er(7)Au(2)Te(2) according to X-ray diffraction analysis of single crystals grown at 1200 degrees C: C2/m, Z = 4, a = 17.8310(9) A, b = 3.9819(5) A, c = 16.9089(9) A, beta = 104.361(4) degrees. The isostructural Lu(7)Au(2)Te(2) also exists according to X-ray powder pattern means, a = 17.536(4) A, b = 3.9719(4) A, c = 16.695(2) A, beta = 104.33(1) degrees. The structure contains zigzag chains of condensed, Au-centered tricapped trigonal prisms (TCTP) of Er along c that also share basal faces along b to generate puckered sheets. Further bi-face-capping Er atoms between these generate the three dimensional network along a, with tellurium in cavities outlined by augmented trigonal prismatic Er polyhedra. Bonding analysis via LMTO-DFT methods reveal very significant Er-Au bonding interactions, as quantified by their energy-weighted Hamilton overlap populations (-ICOHP), approximately 49% of the total for all interactions. These and similar Er-Te contributions sharply contrast with the small Er-Er population, only approximately 14% of the total in spite of the high proportion of Er-Er contacts. The strong polar bonding of Er to the electronegative Au and Te leaves Er relatively oxidized, with many of its 5d states falling above the Fermi level and empty. The contradiction with customary representations of structures that highlight rare-earth metal clusters is manifest. The large Er-Au Hamilton overlap population is in accord with the strong bonding between early and late transition metals first noted by Brewer in 1973. The relationship of this structure to the more distorted orthorhombic (Imm2) structure type of neighboring Dy(7)Ir(2)Te(2) is considered.

  18. Byproduct metals and rare-earth elements used in the production of light-emitting diodes—Overview of principal sources of supply and material requirements for selected markets

    Wilburn, David R.

    2012-01-01

    The use of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) is expanding because of environmental issues and the efficiency and cost savings achieved compared with use of traditional incandescent lighting. The longer life and reduced power consumption of some LEDs have led to annual energy savings, reduced maintenance costs, and lower emissions of carbon dioxide, sulfur dioxide, and nitrogen oxides from powerplants because of the resulting decrease in energy consumption required for lighting applications when LEDs are used to replace less-energy-efficient sources. Metals such as arsenic, gallium, indium, and the rare-earth elements (REEs) cerium, europium, gadolinium, lanthanum, terbium, and yttrium are important mineral materials used in LED semiconductor technology. Most of the world's supply of these materials is produced as byproducts from the production of aluminum, copper, lead, and zinc. Most of the rare earths required for LED production in 2011 came from China, and most LED production facilities were located in Asia. The LED manufacturing process is complex and is undergoing much change with the growth of the industry and the changes in demand patterns of associated commodities. In many respects, the continued growth of the LED industry, particularly in the general lighting sector, is tied to its ability to increase LED efficiency and color uniformity while decreasing the costs of producing, purchasing, and operating LEDs. Research is supported by governments of China, the European Union, Japan, the Republic of Korea, and the United States. Because of the volume of ongoing research in this sector, it is likely that the material requirements of future LEDs may be quite different than LEDs currently (2011) in use as industry attempts to cut costs by reducing material requirements of expensive heavy rare-earth phosphors and increasing the sizes of wafers for economies of scale. Improved LED performance will allow customers to reduce the number of LEDs in automotive, electronic

  19. 40 CFR 63.7507 - What are the health-based compliance alternatives for the hydrogen chloride (HCl) and total...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 14 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true What are the health-based compliance alternatives for the hydrogen chloride (HCl) and total selected metals (TSM) standards? 63.7507 Section 63.7507... the hydrogen chloride (HCl) and total selected metals (TSM) standards? (a) As an alternative to the...

  20. 40 CFR 63.7507 - What are the health-based compliance alternatives for the hydrogen chloride (HCl) and total...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What are the health-based compliance alternatives for the hydrogen chloride (HCl) and total selected metals (TSM) standards? 63.7507 Section 63.7507... the hydrogen chloride (HCl) and total selected metals (TSM) standards? (a) As an alternative to the...

  1. 40 CFR 63.7507 - What are the health-based compliance alternatives for the hydrogen chloride (HCl) and total...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What are the health-based compliance alternatives for the hydrogen chloride (HCl) and total selected metals (TSM) standards? 63.7507 Section 63.7507... the hydrogen chloride (HCl) and total selected metals (TSM) standards? (a) As an alternative to the...

  2. Molecular-dynamics simulations of alkaline-earth metal cations in water by atom-bond electronegativity equalization method fused into molecular mechanics.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhong-Zhi; Li, Xin

    2005-09-01

    Intermolecular potential for alkaline-earth metal (Be(2+), Mg(2+), and Ca(2+)) cations in water has been derived using the atom-bond electronegativity equalization method fused into molecular mechanics (ABEEM/MM), and it is consistent with what was previously applied to the hydration study of the monovalent cations. Parameters for the effective interaction between a cation and a water molecule were determined, reproducing the ab initio results. The static, dynamic, and thermodynamic properties of Be(2+)(aq), Mg(2+)(aq), and Ca(2+)(aq) were studied using these potential parameters. Be(2+) requires a more complicated form of the potential function than Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) in order to obtain better fits. Strong influences of the twofold charged cations on the structures of the hydration shells and some other properties of aqueous ionic solutions are discussed and compared with the results of a previous study of monovalent cations in water. At the same time, comparative study of the hydration properties of each cation is also discussed. This work demonstrates that ABEEM/MM provides a useful tool in the exploration of the hydration of double-charged cations in water.

  3. The Electronic Structures and Optical Properties of Alkaline-Earth Metals Doped Anatase TiO2: A Comparative Study of Screened Hybrid Functional and Generalized Gradient Approximation

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jin-Gang; Zhang, Cai-Rong; Gong, Ji-Jun; Wu, You-Zhi; Kou, Sheng-Zhong; Yang, Hua; Chen, Yu-Hong; Liu, Zi-Jiang; Chen, Hong-Shan

    2015-01-01

    Alkaline-earth metallic dopant can improve the performance of anatase TiO2 in photocatalysis and solar cells. Aiming to understand doping mechanisms, the dopant formation energies, electronic structures, and optical properties for Be, Mg, Ca, Sr, and Ba doped anatase TiO2 are investigated by using density functional theory calculations with the HSE06 and PBE functionals. By combining our results with those of previous studies, the HSE06 functional provides a better description of electronic structures. The calculated formation energies indicate that the substitution of a lattice Ti with an AEM atom is energetically favorable under O-rich growth conditions. The electronic structures suggest that, AEM dopants shift the valence bands (VBs) to higher energy, and the dopant-state energies for the cases of Ca, Sr, and Ba are quite higher than Fermi levels, while the Be and Mg dopants result into the spin polarized gap states near the top of VBs. The components of VBs and dopant-states support that the AEM dopants are active in inter-band transitions with lower energy excitations. As to optical properties, Ca/Sr/Ba are more effective than Be/Mg to enhance absorbance in visible region, but the Be/Mg are superior to Ca/Sr/Ba for the absorbance improvement in near-IR region. PMID:28793520

  4. The Electronic Structures and Optical Properties of Alkaline-Earth Metals Doped Anatase TiO2: A Comparative Study of Screened Hybrid Functional and Generalized Gradient Approximation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jin-Gang; Zhang, Cai-Rong; Gong, Ji-Jun; Wu, You-Zhi; Kou, Sheng-Zhong; Yang, Hua; Chen, Yu-Hong; Liu, Zi-Jiang; Chen, Hong-Shan

    2015-08-24

    Alkaline-earth metallic dopant can improve the performance of anatase TiO2 in photocatalysis and solar cells. Aiming to understand doping mechanisms, the dopant formation energies, electronic structures, and optical properties for Be, Mg, Ca, Sr, and Ba doped anatase TiO2 are investigated by using density functional theory calculations with the HSE06 and PBE functionals. By combining our results with those of previous studies, the HSE06 functional provides a better description of electronic structures. The calculated formation energies indicate that the substitution of a lattice Ti with an AEM atom is energetically favorable under O-rich growth conditions. The electronic structures suggest that, AEM dopants shift the valence bands (VBs) to higher energy, and the dopant-state energies for the cases of Ca, Sr, and Ba are quite higher than Fermi levels, while the Be and Mg dopants result into the spin polarized gap states near the top of VBs. The components of VBs and dopant-states support that the AEM dopants are active in inter-band transitions with lower energy excitations. As to optical properties, Ca/Sr/Ba are more effective than Be/Mg to enhance absorbance in visible region, but the Be/Mg are superior to Ca/Sr/Ba for the absorbance improvement in near-IR region.

  5. CO(2) capture properties of alkaline earth metal oxides and hydroxides: A combined density functional theory and lattice phonon dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Duan, Yuhua; Sorescu, Dan C

    2010-08-21

    By combining density functional theory and lattice phonon dynamics, the thermodynamic properties of CO(2) absorption/desorption reactions with alkaline earth metal oxides MO and hydroxides M(OH)(2) (where M=Be,Mg,Ca,Sr,Ba) are analyzed. The heats of reaction and the chemical potential changes of these solids upon CO(2) capture reactions have been calculated and used to evaluate the energy costs. Relative to CaO, a widely used system in practical applications, MgO and Mg(OH)(2) systems were found to be better candidates for CO(2) sorbent applications due to their lower operating temperatures (600-700 K). In the presence of H(2)O, MgCO(3) can be regenerated into Mg(OH)(2) at low temperatures or into MgO at high temperatures. This transition temperature depends not only on the CO(2) pressure but also on the H(2)O pressure. Based on our calculated results and by comparing with available experimental data, we propose a general computational search methodology which can be used as a general scheme for screening a large number of solids for use as CO(2) sorbents.

  6. Local magnetic moment formation at 119Sn Mössbauer impurity in RFe2 ( R=rare-earth metals) Laves phases compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira, A. L.; de Oliveira, N. A.; Troper, A.

    2010-05-01

    The purpose of the present work is to theoretically study the local magnetic moment formation and the systematics of the magnetic hyperfine fields at a non-magnetic s-p Mössbauer 119Sn impurity diluted on R sites ( R=rare-earth metals) of the cubic Laves phases intermetallic compounds RFe2. One considers that the magnetic hyperfine field has two contributions (i) the contribution from R ions, calculated via an extended Daniel-Friedel [J. Phys. Chem. Solids 24 (1963) 1601] model and (ii) the contribution from the induced magnetic moments arising from the Fe neighboring sites. We have in this case a two-center Blandin-Campbell-like [Phys. Rev. Lett. 31 (1973) 51; J. Magn. Magn. Mater. 1 (1975) 1] problem, where a magnetic 3d-element located at a distance from the 119Sn impurity gives an extra magnetization to a polarized electron gas which is strongly charge perturbed at the 119Sn impurity site. We also include in the model, the nearest-neighbor perturbation due to the translational invariance breaking introduced by the impurity. Our self-consistent total magnetic hyperfine field calculations are in a very good agreement with recent experimental data.

  7. Hydrogen and syngas production by catalytic gasification of algal biomass (Cladophora glomerata L.) using alkali and alkaline-earth metals compounds.

    PubMed

    Ebadi, Abdol Ghaffar; Hisoriev, Hikmat; Zarnegar, Mohammad; Ahmadi, Hamed

    2018-01-02

    The steam gasification of algal biomass (Cladophora glomerata L.) in presence of alkali and alkaline-earth metal compounds catalysts was studied to enhance the yield of syngas and reduce its tar content through cracking and reforming of condensable fractions. The commercial catalysts used include NaOH, KHCO 3 , Na 3 PO 4 and MgO. The gasification runs carried out with a research scale, biomass gasification unit, show that the NaOH has a strong potential for production of hydrogen, along with the added advantages of char converting and tar destruction, allowing enhancement of produced syngas caloric value. When the temperature increased from 700°C to 900°C, the tar content in the gas sharply decreased, while the hydrogen yield increased. Increasing steam/biomass ratio significantly increased hydrogen yield and tar destruction; however, the particle size in the range of 0.5-2.5 mm played a minor role in the process.

  8. Interplay of rare-earth and transition-metal subsystems in C u3Yb (SeO3) 2O2Cl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markina, M. M.; Zakharov, K. V.; Ovchenkov, E. A.; Berdonosov, P. S.; Dolgikh, V. A.; Kuznetsova, E. S.; Olenev, A. V.; Klimin, S. A.; Kashchenko, M. A.; Budkin, I. V.; Yatsyk, I. V.; Demidov, A. A.; Zvereva, E. A.; Vasiliev, A. N.

    2017-10-01

    We present the synthesis and the experimental and theoretical study of the new member of the francisite family, C u3Yb (SeO3) 2O2Cl . The compound reaches an antiferromagnetic order at TN=36.7 K and experiences first-order spin-reorientation transition to weakly ferromagnetic phase at TR=8.7 K evidenced in specific heat Cp and magnetic susceptibility χ measurements. Distinctly different magnetization loops in T earth and transition-metal subsystems. At low temperatures, the saturation magnetization Ms˜5.2 μB is reached in pulsed magnetic-field measurements. The electron spin resonance data reveal the complicated character of the absorption line attributed to response from both copper and ytterbium ions. Critical broadening of the linewidth at the phase transitions points to quasi-two-dimensional character of the magnetic correlations. The spectroscopy of Y b3 + ions evidences splitting of the lowest-energy Kramers doublet of 2F5 /2 excited multiplet at TR

  9. IUPAC-NIST Solubility Data Series. 100. Rare Earth Metal Fluorides in Water and Aqueous Systems. Part 3. Heavy Lanthanides (Gd–Lu)

    SciT

    Mioduski, Tomasz; Gumiński, Cezary, E-mail: cegie@chem.uw.edu.pl; Zeng, Dewen, E-mail: dewen-zeng@hotmail.com

    This is the third part of the volume devoted to solubility data for the rare earth metal (REM) fluorides in water and in aqueous ternary and multicomponent systems. It covers experimental results of trivalent fluorides of Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, and Lu (so-called heavy lanthanides), since no quantitative data on solubilities of TbF{sub 4} and YbF{sub 2} (the most stable compounds at these valencies) are available. The related literature has been covered through the end of 2014. Compilations of all available papers with the solubility data are introduced for each REM fluoride with a corresponding critical evaluation.more » Every such assessment contains a collection of all solubility results in aqueous solution, a selection of suggested solubility data, a solubility equation, and a brief discussion of the multicomponent systems. Only simple fluorides (no complexes or double salts) are treated as the input substances in this report. General features of the systems, such as nature of the equilibrium solid phases, solubility as a function of temperature, influence of ionic strength, solution pH, mixed solvent medium on the solubility, quality of the solubility results, and the solubility as a function of REM atomic number, have already been presented in Part 1 of the volume.« less

  10. IUPAC-NIST Solubility Data Series. 100. Rare Earth Metal Fluorides in Water and Aqueous Systems. Part 2. Light Lanthanides (Ce–Eu)

    SciT

    Mioduski, Tomasz; Gumiński, Cezary, E-mail: cegie@chem.uw.edu.pl; Zeng, Dewen, E-mail: dewen-zeng@hotmail.com

    This is the second part of the volume devoted to the evaluation of experimental solubility data for rare earth metal (REM) fluorides in water as well as in aqueous ternary and multicomponent systems. Fluorides of Ce, Pr, Nd, Pm, Sm, and Eu (so-called light lanthanides), as the main solutes, are covered in the present part, which has thorough coverage of the experimental literature through the end of 2012. The experimentally unknown solubility value for PmF{sub 3} in water was predicted by an interpolation of the solubility values for NdF{sub 3} and SmF{sub 3} at 298 K. General features of themore » systems, such as the nature of the equilibrium solid phases, solubility as a function of temperature, influence of ionic strength, pH, mixed solvent medium on the solubility, quality of the solubility results, and solubility as a function of REM atomic number, have already been presented in Part 1 of the volume.« less

  11. Chloride Transport in Heterogeneous Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, A.; Holt, R. M.

    2017-12-01

    The chloride mass balance (CMB) is a commonly-used method for estimating groundwater recharge. Observations of the vertical distribution of pore-water chloride are related to the groundwater infiltration rates (i.e. recharge rates). In CMB method, the chloride distribution is attributed mainly to the assumption of one dimensional piston flow. In many places, however, the vertical distribution of chloride will be influenced by heterogeneity, leading to horizontal movement of infiltrating waters. The impact of heterogeneity will be particularly important when recharge is locally focused. When recharge is focused in an area, horizontal movement of chloride-bearing waters, coupled with upward movement driven by evapotranspiration, may lead to chloride bulges that could be misinterpreted if the CMB method is used to estimate recharge. We numerically simulate chloride transport and evaluate the validity of the CMB method in highly heterogeneous systems. This simulation is conducted for the unsaturated zone of Ogallala, Antlers, and Gatuna (OAG) formations in Andrews County, Texas. A two dimensional finite element model will show the movement of chloride through heterogeneous systems. We expect to see chloride bulges not only close to the surface but also at depths characterized by horizontal or upward movement. A comparative study of focused recharge estimates in this study with available recharge data will be presented.

  12. Calcium phosphate stabilization of fly ash with chloride extraction.

    PubMed

    Nzihou, Ange; Sharrock, Patrick

    2002-01-01

    Municipal solid waste incinerator by products include fly ash and air pollution control residues. In order to transform these incinerator wastes into reusable mineral species, soluble alkali chlorides must be separated and toxic trace elements must be stabilized in insoluble form. We show that alkali chlorides can be extracted efficiently in an aqueous extraction step combining a calcium phosphate gel precipitation. In such a process, sodium and potassium chlorides are obtained free from calcium salts, and the trace metal ions are immobilized in the calcium phosphate matrix. Moderate calcination of the chemically treated fly ash leads to the formation of cristalline hydroxylapatite. Fly ash spiked with copper ions and treated by this process shows improved stability of metal ions. Leaching tests with water or EDTA reveal a significant drop in metal ion dissolution. Hydroxylapatite may trap toxic metals and also prevent their evaporation during thermal treatments. Incinerator fly ash together with air pollution control residues, treated by the combined chloride extraction and hydroxylapatite formation process may be considered safe to use as a mineral filler in value added products such as road base or cement blocks.

  13. Mixing rare earth elements with manures to control phosphorus loss in runoff and track manure fate

    Concern over the enrichment of agricultural runoff with phosphorus (P) from land applied livestock manures has prompted the development of manure amendments that minimize P solubility. We evaluated the effect of mixing two rare earth chlorides, lanthanum chloride and ytterbium chloride, with poultr...

  14. Multiheteromacrocycles that Complex Metal Ions. Sixth Progress Report, 1 May 1979-30 April 1980

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Cram, D. J.

    1980-01-15

    Objective is to design synthesize, and evaluate cyclic and polycyclic host organic compounds for their abilities to complex and lipophilize guest metal ions, their complexes, and their clusters. Host organic compounds consist of strategically placed solvating, coordinating, and ion-pairing sites tied together by covalent bonds through hydrocarbon units around cavities shaped to be occupied by guest metal ions or by metal ions plus their ligands. Specificity in complexation is sought by matching the following properties of host and guest: cavity and metal ion sizes; geometric arrangements of binding sites; number of binding sites; character of binding sites; and valences. During this period, hemispherands based on an aryloxy or cyclic urea unit, spherands based on aryloxyl units only, and their complexes with alkali metals and alkaline earths were investigated. An attempt to separate {sup 6}Li and {sup 7}Li by gel permeation chromatography of lithiospherium chloride failed. (DLC)

  15. Liquidus temperature and chemical durability of selected glasses to immobilize rare earth oxides waste

    SciT

    Mohd Fadzil, Syazwani Binti; Hrma, Pavel R.; Schweiger, Michael J.

    Pyroprocessing is a reprocessing method for managing and reusing used nuclear fuel (UNF) by dissolving it in an electrorefiner with a molten alkali or alkaline earth chloride salt mixture while avoiding wet reprocessing. Pyroprocessing UNF with a LiCl-KCl eutectic salt releases the fission products from the fuel and generates a variety of metallic and salt-based species, including rare earth (RE) chlorides. If the RE-chlorides are converted to oxides, borosilicate glass is a prime candidate for their immobilization because of its durability and ability to dissolve almost any RE waste component into the matrix at high loadings. Crystallization that occurs inmore » waste glasses as the waste loading increases may complicate glass processing and affect the product quality. This work compares three types of borosilicate glasses in terms of liquidus temperature (TL): the International Simple Glass designed by the International Working Group, sodium borosilicate glass developed by Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power, and the lanthanide aluminoborosilicate (LABS) glass established in the United States. The LABS glass allows the highest waste loadings (over 50 mass% RE2O3) while possessing an acceptable chemical durability.« less

  16. Liquidus temperature and chemical durability of selected glasses to immobilize rare earth oxides waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohd Fadzil, Syazwani; Hrma, Pavel; Schweiger, Michael J.; Riley, Brian J.

    2015-10-01

    Pyroprocessing is are processing method for managing and reusing used nuclear fuel (UNF) by dissolving it in an electrorefiner with a molten alkali or alkaline earth chloride salt mixture while avoiding wet reprocessing. Pyroprocessing UNF with a LiCl-KCl eutectic salt releases the fission products from the fuel and generates a variety of metallic and salt-based species, including rare earth (RE) chlorides. If the RE-chlorides are converted to oxides, borosilicate glass is a prime candidate for their immobilization because of its durability and ability to dissolve almost any RE waste component into the glass matrix at high loadings. Crystallization that occurs in waste glasses as the waste loading increases may complicate glass processing and affect the product quality. This work compares three types of borosilicate glasses in terms of liquidus temperature (TL): the International Simple Glass designed by the International Working Group, sodium borosilicate glass developed by Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power, and the lanthanide aluminoborosilicate (LABS) glass established in the United States. The LABS glass allows the highest waste loadings (over 50 mass% RE2O3) while possessing an acceptable chemical durability.

  17. Electrolytes comprising metal amide and metal chlorides for multivalent battery

    DOEpatents

    Liao, Chen; Zhang, Zhengcheng; Burrell, Anthony; Vaughey, John T.

    2017-03-21

    An electrolyte includes compounds of formula M.sup.1X.sub.n and M.sup.2Z.sub.m; and a solvent wherein M.sup.1 is Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba, Sc, Ti, Al, or Zn; M.sup.2 is Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba, Sc, Ti, Al, or Zn; X is a group forming a covalent bond with M.sup.1; Z is a halogen or pseudo-halogen; n is 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, or 6; and m is 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, or 6.

  18. [Progress on suxamethonium chloride analysis].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ming-Zhe; Cheng, Xiang-Wei; Chu, Jian-Xin

    2013-12-01

    Abstract: Suxamethonium chloride is a depolarizing muscle relaxant used in general anesthesia. In overdose, it causes adverse reactions such as bradycardia, arrhythmia, cardiac arrest, and death. The article reviews the progress on testing methods of suxamethonium chloride such as infrared spectroscopy, chemical color reaction, chemical titration, enzyme electrode, chromatography and mass spectrometry.

  19. Benzalkonium Chloride and Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, Paul L.; Kiland, Julie A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Glaucoma patients routinely take multiple medications, with multiple daily doses, for years or even decades. Benzalkonium chloride (BAK) is the most common preservative in glaucoma medications. BAK has been detected in the trabecular meshwork (TM), corneal endothelium, lens, and retina after topical drop installation and may accumulate in those tissues. There is evidence that BAK causes corneal and conjunctival toxicity, including cell loss, disruption of tight junctions, apoptosis and preapoptosis, cytoskeleton changes, and immunoinflammatory reactions. These same effects have been reported in cultured human TM cells exposed to concentrations of BAK found in common glaucoma drugs and in the TM of primary open-angle glaucoma donor eyes. It is possible that a relationship exists between chronic exposure to BAK and glaucoma. The hypothesis that BAK causes/worsens glaucoma is being tested experimentally in an animal model that closely reflects human physiology. PMID:24205938

  20. Investigating Heavy Metal Pollution in Mining Brownfield and Its Policy Implications: A Case Study of the Bayan Obo Rare Earth Mine, Inner Mongolia, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yuxue; Li, Haitao

    2016-04-01

    The rapid urbanization of China and associated demand for land resources necessitates remediation, redevelopment, and reclamation of contaminated soil. Before these measures are taken, a basic investigation and inventory of heavy metal (HM) pollution levels in contaminated soil is necessary for establishing and implementing the redevelopment plan. In the present study, to identify the policy implications of inventorying and mapping HM pollution of soil in brownfields throughout China, the Bayan Obo giant rare earth element (REE)-Nb-Fe ore deposit of Baotou in Inner Mongolia, China, which is the largest REE mineral deposit in the world, was taken as a case study. Soil samples from 24 sites in Bayan Obo mining area (MA) and 76 sites in mine tailing area (TA) were collected for determining contents of soil HMs (Cr, Cd, Pb, Cu, and Zn). The results showed that the average concentrations of Cr, Cd, Pb, Cu, and Zn in both MA and TA were all higher than their corresponding background values for Inner Mongolia but lower than the Class II criteria of the National Soil Quality Standards of China (GB 15618—1995). Enrichment factor (EF) analysis of the soil samples indicated that the soil in the brownfield sites was highly enriched with Cr, Cd, Pb, Cu, and Zn compared to the corresponding background values. In MA, the EF for Cd was the highest among the studied elements, while in TA, the EF for Cr (3.45) was the highest, closely followed by the EF for Cd (3.34). The potential ecological risk index (RI) indicated a moderate potential ecological risk from the studied HMs in MA and a low potential ecological risk in TA, and the results of RI also suggested that the soil was most heavily polluted by Cd. According to the spatial distribution maps of HM, contamination hot-spots were primarily located near mining-related high-pollution plants. Based on the results, policy recommendations are proposed related to brownfield management in urban planning.

  1. Investigating Heavy Metal Pollution in Mining Brownfield and Its Policy Implications: A Case Study of the Bayan Obo Rare Earth Mine, Inner Mongolia, China.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yuxue; Li, Haitao

    2016-04-01

    The rapid urbanization of China and associated demand for land resources necessitates remediation, redevelopment, and reclamation of contaminated soil. Before these measures are taken, a basic investigation and inventory of heavy metal (HM) pollution levels in contaminated soil is necessary for establishing and implementing the redevelopment plan. In the present study, to identify the policy implications of inventorying and mapping HM pollution of soil in brownfields throughout China, the Bayan Obo giant rare earth element (REE)-Nb-Fe ore deposit of Baotou in Inner Mongolia, China, which is the largest REE mineral deposit in the world, was taken as a case study. Soil samples from 24 sites in Bayan Obo mining area (MA) and 76 sites in mine tailing area (TA) were collected for determining contents of soil HMs (Cr, Cd, Pb, Cu, and Zn). The results showed that the average concentrations of Cr, Cd, Pb, Cu, and Zn in both MA and TA were all higher than their corresponding background values for Inner Mongolia but lower than the Class II criteria of the National Soil Quality Standards of China (GB 15618-1995). Enrichment factor (EF) analysis of the soil samples indicated that the soil in the brownfield sites was highly enriched with Cr, Cd, Pb, Cu, and Zn compared to the corresponding background values. In MA, the EF for Cd was the highest among the studied elements, while in TA, the EF for Cr (3.45) was the highest, closely followed by the EF for Cd (3.34). The potential ecological risk index (RI) indicated a moderate potential ecological risk from the studied HMs in MA and a low potential ecological risk in TA, and the results of RI also suggested that the soil was most heavily polluted by Cd. According to the spatial distribution maps of HM, contamination hot-spots were primarily located near mining-related high-pollution plants. Based on the results, policy recommendations are proposed related to brownfield management in urban planning.

  2. Blood levels of toxic metals and rare earth elements commonly found in e-waste may exert subtle effects on hemoglobin concentration in sub-Saharan immigrants.

    PubMed

    Henríquez-Hernández, Luis Alberto; Boada, Luis D; Carranza, Cristina; Pérez-Arellano, José Luis; González-Antuña, Ana; Camacho, María; Almeida-González, Maira; Zumbado, Manuel; Luzardo, Octavio P

    2017-12-01

    Pollution by heavy metals and more recently by rare earth elements (REE) and other minor elements (ME) has increased due in part to their high use in technological and electronic devices. This contamination can become very relevant in those sites where e-waste is improperly processed, as it is the case in many countries of the African continent. Exposure to some toxic elements has been associated to certain hematological disorders, specifically anemia. In this study, the concentrations of 48 elements (including REE and other ME) were determined by ICP-MS in whole blood samples of sub-Saharan immigrants with anemia (n=63) and without anemia (n=78). We found that the levels of Fe, Cr, Cu, Mn, Mo, and Se were significantly higher in the control group than in the anemia group, suggesting that anemia was mainly due to nutritional deficiencies. However, since other authors have suggested that in addition to nutritional deficiency, exposure to some elements may influence hemoglobin levels, we wanted to explore the role of a broad panel of toxic and "emerging" elements in hemoglobin deficiency. We found that the levels of Ag, As, Ba, Bi, Ce, Eu, Er, Ga, La, Nb, Nd, Pb, Pr, Sm, Sn, Ta, Th, Tl, U and V were higher in anemic participants than in controls. For most of these elements an inverse correlation with hemoglobin concentration was found. Some of them also correlated inversely with blood iron levels, pointing to the possibility that a higher rate of intestinal uptake of these could exist in relation to a nutritional deficiency of iron. However, the higher levels of Pb, and the group of REE and other ME in anemic participants were independent of iron levels, pointing to the possibility that these elements could play a role in the development of anemia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Electroluminescence color tuning between green and red from metal-oxide-semiconductor devices fabricated by spin-coating of rare-earth (terbium + europium) organic compounds on silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, Toshihiro; Hattori, Fumihiro; Iwata, Hideyuki; Ohzone, Takashi

    2018-04-01

    Color tunable electroluminescence (EL) from metal-oxide-semiconductor devices with the rare-earth elements Tb and Eu is reported. Organic compound liquid sources of (Tb + Ba) and Eu with various Eu/Tb ratios from 0.001 to 0.4 were spin-coated on an n+-Si substrate and annealed to form an oxide insulator layer. The EL spectra had only peaks corresponding to the intrashell Tb3+/Eu3+ transitions in the spectral range from green to red, and the intensity ratio of the peaks was appropriately tuned using the appropriate Eu/Tb ratios in liquid sources. Consequently, the EL emission colors linearly changed from yellowish green to yellowish orange and eventually to reddish orange on the CIE chromaticity diagram. The gate current +I G current also affected the EL colors for the medium-Eu/Tb-ratio device. The structure of the surface insulator films analyzed by cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) has four layers, namely, (Tb4O7 + Eu2O3), [Tb4O7 + Eu2O3 + (Tb/Eu/Ba)SiO x ], (Tb/Eu/Ba)SiO x , and SiO x -rich oxide. The EL mechanism proposed is that electrons injected from the Si substrate into the SiO x -rich oxide and Tb/Eu/Ba-silicate layers become hot electrons accelerated in a high electric field, and then these hot electrons excite Tb3+ and Eu3+ ions in the Tb4O7/Eu2O3 layers resulting in EL emission from Tb3+ and Eu3+ intrashell transitions.

  4. Rare-earth transition-metal gallium chalcogenides RE3MGaCh7 (M=Fe, Co, Ni; Ch=S, Se)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudyk, Brent W.; Stoyko, Stanislav S.; Oliynyk, Anton O.; Mar, Arthur

    2014-02-01

    Six series of quaternary rare-earth transition-metal chalcogenides RE3MGaCh7 (M=Fe, Co, Ni; Ch=S, Se), comprising 33 compounds in total, have been prepared by reactions of the elements at 1050 °C (for the sulphides) or 900 °C (for the selenides). They adopt noncentrosymmetric hexagonal structures (ordered Ce3Al1.67S7-type, space group P63, Z=2) with cell parameters in the ranges of a=9.5-10.2 Å and c=6.0-6.1 Å for the sulphides and a=10.0-10.5 Å and c=6.3-6.4 Å for the selenides as refined from powder X-ray diffraction data. Single-crystal structures were determined for five members of the sulphide series RE3FeGaS7 (RE=La, Pr, Tb) and RE3CoGaS7 (RE=La, Tb). The highly anisotropic crystal structures consist of one-dimensional chains of M-centred face-sharing octahedra and stacks of Ga-centred tetrahedra all pointing in the same direction. Magnetic measurements on the sulphides reveal paramagnetic behaviour in some cases and long-range antiferromagnetic behaviour with low Néel temperatures (15 K or lower) in others. Ga L-edge XANES spectra support the presence of highly cationic Ga tetrahedral centres with a tendency towards more covalent Ga-Ch character on proceeding from the sulphides to the selenides. Band structure calculations on La3FeGaS7 indicate that the electronic structure is dominated by Fe 3d-based states near the Fermi level.

  5. Production method for making rare earth compounds

    DOEpatents

    McCallum, R. William; Ellis, Timothy W.; Dennis, Kevin W.; Hofer, Robert J.; Branagan, Daniel J.

    1997-11-25

    A method of making a rare earth compound, such as a earth-transition metal permanent magnet compound, without the need for producing rare earth metal as a process step, comprises carbothermically reacting a rare earth oxide to form a rare earth carbide and heating the rare earth carbide, a compound-forming reactant (e.g. a transition metal and optional boron), and a carbide-forming element (e.g. a refractory metal) that forms a carbide that is more thermodynamically favorable than the rare earth carbide whereby the rare earth compound (e.g. Nd.sub.2 Fe.sub.14 B or LaNi.sub.5) and a carbide of the carbide-forming element are formed.

  6. Production method for making rare earth compounds

    DOEpatents

    McCallum, R.W.; Ellis, T.W.; Dennis, K.W.; Hofer, R.J.; Branagan, D.J.

    1997-11-25

    A method of making a rare earth compound, such as a earth-transition metal permanent magnet compound, without the need for producing rare earth metal as a process step, comprises carbothermically reacting a rare earth oxide to form a rare earth carbide and heating the rare earth carbide, a compound-forming reactant (e.g., a transition metal and optional boron), and a carbide-forming element (e.g., a refractory metal) that forms a carbide that is more thermodynamically favorable than the rare earth carbide whereby the rare earth compound (e.g., Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B or LaNi{sub 5}) and a carbide of the carbide-forming element are formed.

  7. Chloride: the queen of electrolytes?

    PubMed

    Berend, Kenrick; van Hulsteijn, Leonard Hendrik; Gans, Rijk O B

    2012-04-01

    Channelopathies, defined as diseases that are caused by mutations in genes encoding ion channels, are associated with a wide variety of symptoms and have been documented extensively over the past decade. In contrast, despite the important role of chloride in serum, textbooks in general do not allocate chapters exclusively on hypochloremia or hyperchloremia and information on chloride other than channelopathies is scattered in the literature. To systematically review the function of chloride in man, data for this review include searches of MEDLINE, PubMed, and references from relevant articles including the search terms "chloride," "HCl," "chloride channel" "acid-base," "acidosis," "alkalosis," "anion gap" "strong anion gap" "Stewart," "base excess" and "lactate." In addition, internal medicine, critical care, nephrology and gastroenterology textbooks were evaluated on topics pertaining the assessment and management of acid-base disorders, including reference lists from journals or textbooks. Chloride is, after sodium, the most abundant electrolyte in serum, with a key role in the regulation of body fluids, electrolyte balance, the preservation of electrical neutrality, acid-base status and it is an essential component for the assessment of many pathological conditions. When assessing serum electrolytes, abnormal chloride levels alone usually signify a more serious underlying metabolic disorder, such as metabolic acidosis or alkalosis. Chloride is an important component of diagnostic tests in a wide array of clinical situations. In these cases, chloride can be tested in sweat, serum, urine and feces. Abnormalities in chloride channel expression and function in many organs can cause a range of disorders. Copyright © 2011 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Washing bridges to reduce chloride : interim report.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2003-12-01

    Chloride ions are known to promote the corrosion of steel in reinforced concrete. This project was undertaken to investigate the efficacy of washing, to reduce chloride content and chloride ion uptake. The project consists of a laboratory and a field...

  9. Washing bridges to reduce chloride : final report.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2005-07-01

    Chloride ions are known to promote the corrosion of steel in reinforced concrete. This project was undertaken to investigate the efficacy of washing, to reduce existing chloride content and chloride ion uptake. The project consisted of a laboratory c...

  10. Dinuclear rare-earth metal alkyl complexes supported by indolyl ligands in μ-η(2) :η(1) :η(1) hapticities and their high catalytic activity for isoprene 1,4-cis-polymerization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guangchao; Wei, Yun; Guo, Liping; Zhu, Xiancui; Wang, Shaowu; Zhou, Shuangliu; Mu, Xiaolong

    2015-02-02

    Two series of new dinuclear rare-earth metal alkyl complexes supported by indolyl ligands in novel μ-η(2) :η(1) :η(1) hapticities are synthesized and characterized. Treatment of [RE(CH2 SiMe3 )3 (thf)2 ] with 1 equivalent of 3-(tBuN=CH)C8 H5 NH (L1 ) in THF gives the dinuclear rare-earth metal alkyl complexes trans-[(μ-η(2) :η(1) :η(1) -3-{tBuNCH(CH2 SiMe3 )}Ind)RE(thf)(CH2 SiMe3 )]2 (Ind=indolyl, RE=Y, Dy, or Yb) in good yields. In the process, the indole unit of L1 is deprotonated by the metal alkyl species and the imino C=N group is transferred to the amido group by alkyl CH2 SiMe3 insertion, affording a new dianionic ligand that bridges two metal alkyl units in μ-η(2) :η(1) :η(1) bonding modes, forming the dinuclear rare-earth metal alkyl complexes. When L1 is reduced to 3-(tBuNHCH2 )C8 H5 NH (L2 ), the reaction of [Yb(CH2 SiMe3 )3 (thf)2 ] with 1 equivalent of L2 in THF, interestingly, generated the trans-[(μ-η(2) :η(1) :η(1) -3-{tBuNCH2 }Ind)Yb(thf)(CH2 SiMe3 )]2 (major) and cis-[(μ-η(2) :η(1) :η(1) -3-{tBuNCH2 }Ind)Yb(thf)(CH2 SiMe3 )]2 (minor) complexes. The catalytic activities of these dinuclear rare-earth metal alkyl complexes for isoprene polymerization were investigated; the yttrium and dysprosium complexes exhibited high catalytic activities and high regio- and stereoselectivities for isoprene 1,4-cis-polymerization. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Lithium-Thionyl Chloride Battery.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-04-01

    EEEElhIhEEEEEE 1111 1 - MI(CRO( fy Hl ff1Sf UIIIUN Ift I IA I~t Research and Development Technical Report DELET - TR - 78 - 0563 - F Cq LITHIUM -THIONYL CHLORIDE...2b(1110) S. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED Lithium -Thionyl Chloride Battery -10/1/78 - 11/30/80 6. PNING ORG. REPORT NUMBER Z %A a.~as B.,OWRACT OR...block number) Inorganic Electrolyte battery, Thionyl Chloride, lithium , high rate D cell, high rate flat cylindrical cell, laser designator battery. C//i

  12. The effect of metal salts on the decomposition of sweet sorghum bagasse in flow-through liquid hot water.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qiang; Zhuang, Xinshu; Yuan, Zhenhong; Qi, Wei; Wang, Qiong; Tan, Xuesong

    2011-02-01

    The impact of the metal salts NaCl, KCl, CaCl(2), MgCl(2), FeCl(3), FeCl(2), and CuCl(2), particularly the latter, on the decomposition of hemicellulose and lignin from sweet sorghum bagasse in liquid hot water pretreatment processing was studied in an attempt to enhance the recovery of sugars. Transition metal chlorides significantly enhanced the hemicellulose removal compared to the alkaline earth metal chlorides and alkaline metal chlorides, contributing to the formation of a saccharide-metal cation intermediate complex. FeCl(2) greatly increased xylose degradation and about 60% xylan was converted into non-saccharide products. In contrast, an excellent total and monomeric xylose recovery was obtained after the CuCl(2) pretreatment. Most of the lignin was deposited on the surface of the residual solid with droplet morphologies after this pretreatment, and about 20% was degraded into monomeric products. The total recovery of sugars from sweet sorghum bagasse with 0.1% CuCl(2) solution pretreatment and 48 h enzymatic digestibility, reached 90.4%, which is superior to the recovery using hot water pretreatment only. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. PRODUCTION OF ACTINIDE METAL

    DOEpatents

    Knighton, J.B.

    1963-11-01

    A process of reducing actinide oxide to the metal with magnesium-zinc alloy in a flux of 5 mole% of magnesium fluoride and 95 mole% of magnesium chloride plus lithium, sodium, potassium, calcium, strontium, or barium chloride is presented. The flux contains at least 14 mole% of magnesium cation at 600-- 900 deg C in air. The formed magnesium-zinc-actinide alloy is separated from the magnesium-oxide-containing flux. (AEC)

  14. Earth Science in 1970

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geotimes, 1971

    1971-01-01

    Reviews advancements in earth science during 1970 in each of these areas: economic geology (fuels), economic geology (metals), economic geology (nonmetals), environmental geology, geochemistry, manpower, hydrology, mapping, marine geology, mineralogy, paleontology, plate tectonics, politics and geology, remote sensing, and seismology. (PR)

  15. Studies Update Vinyl Chloride Hazards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawls, Rebecca

    1980-01-01

    Extensive study affirms that vinyl chloride is a potent animal carcinogen. Epidemiological studies show elevated rates of human cancers in association with extended contact with the compound. (Author/RE)

  16. Superconductivity in Ternary Rare-Earth Transition Metal Silicides and Germanides with the SCANDIUM(5) COBALT(4) SILICON(10)-TYPE Structure.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, Linda Sue

    A systematic study of the superconducting and normal state properties of some ternary rare earth transition metal silicides and germanides of the Sc(,5)Co(,4)Si(,10) -type is reported in this work. Low temperature heat capacity measurements indicate the presence of a complicated phonon density of states in these structurally complex compounds. A better description of the phonon spectrum of the high T(,c) materials, Sc(,5)Rh(,4)Si(,10), Sc(,5)Ir(,4)Si(,10), and Y(,5)Os(,4)Ge(,10), given by a model proposed by Junod et al.('1), is presented and discussed. The large values of (DELTA)C/(gamma)(,n)T(,c) and the electron-phonon coupling constant for these high T(,c) compounds indicate that they are strong-coupled superconductors. Relative to other ternary superconductors, many of these materials have large Debye temperatures. The BSC theory does not seem to afford an adequate description of the supercon- ducting state in these compounds. DC electrical resistivity measurements on these compounds show resistivity behaviors deviating from those exhibited by simple metals. The (rho)(T) data for Y(,5)Ir(,4)Si(,10), Lu(,5)Rh(,4)Si(,10), Lu(,5)Ir(,4)Si(,10), and Y(,5)Os(,4)Ge(,10), indicate the presence of anomalies. Static molar magnetic susceptibility measurements performed on these compounds indicate (1) a small effective magnetic moment of 0.26(mu)(,B) on the Co atom and (2) anomalous behaviors in the Lu(,5)Rh(,4)Si(,10), Lu(,5)Ir(,4)Si(,10), Y(,5)Ir(,4)Si(,10), Lu(,5)Ir(,4)Ge(,10), and Y(,5)Rh(,4)Ge(,10) data. It is suggested that the same mechanism, namely, the forma- tion of a charge- or spin-density wave, is causing the anomalous behaviors in both the resistivity and susceptibility data. Lastly, upper critical magnetic field measurements were performed on Sc(,5)Co(,4)Si(,10), Sc(,5)Rh(,4)Si(,10), Sc(,5)Ir(,4)Si(,10), Lu(,5)Rh(,4)Si(,10), Lu(,5)Ir(,4)Si(,10), and Y(,5)Os(,4)Ge(,10). Relative to the other five samples, Y(,5)Os(,4)Ge(,10) exhibits very high values for (-d

  17. Chloride channels in stroke

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ya-ping; Zhang, Hao; Duan, Dayue Darrel

    2013-01-01

    Vascular remodeling of cerebral arterioles, including proliferation, migration, and apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), is the major cause of changes in the cross-sectional area and diameter of the arteries and sudden interruption of blood flow or hemorrhage in the brain, ie, stroke. Accumulating evidence strongly supports an important role for chloride (Cl−) channels in vascular remodeling and stroke. At least three Cl− channel genes are expressed in VSMCs: 1) the TMEM16A (or Ano1), which may encode the calcium-activated Cl− channels (CACCs); 2) the CLC-3 Cl− channel and Cl−/H+ antiporter, which is closely related to the volume-regulated Cl− channels (VRCCs); and 3) the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), which encodes the PKA- and PKC-activated Cl− channels. Activation of the CACCs by agonist-induced increase in intracellular Ca2+ causes membrane depolarization, vasoconstriction, and inhibition of VSMC proliferation. Activation of VRCCs by cell volume increase or membrane stretch promotes the production of reactive oxygen species, induces proliferation and inhibits apoptosis of VSMCs. Activation of CFTR inhibits oxidative stress and may prevent the development of hypertension. In addition, Cl− current mediated by gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor has also been implicated a role in ischemic neuron death. This review focuses on the functional roles of Cl− channels in the development of stroke and provides a perspective on the future directions for research and the potential to develop Cl− channels as new targets for the prevention and treatment of stroke. PMID:23103617

  18. Bioavailability of heavy metals, germanium and rare earth elements at Davidschacht dump-field in mine affected area of Freiberg (Saxony)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Midula, Pavol; Wiche, Oliver

    2016-04-01

    with the other elements from this group. High amounts of As, Cd, Pb in mould horizons were proved. The surprisingly highest concentrations were determined for As (in average 3328 mg kg-1). The results of the pH measurement indicates acid conditions (in average 4.86, min. 3.89) for whole mine heap. Due to the mobility of Cd and Pb in acid environment, a high mobility of Cd in mobile soil fractions (in average 0.58 mg kg-1) was found, that seems to be responsible for the Cd pollution of Freiberger Mulde river, situated near the dump-field in the East direction from the studied area. The Pb content was in the average 1513 mg kg-1. SE analyses shows, that only the minor amounts of these metals were accounted in fractions I - IV (As: 7.75 %, Pb: 5.48 %, Cd: 26.77 %). The total Ge content in soil samples was 2.7 mg.kg-1in average. The concentrations of Nd and Ce were 17.7 mg kg-1and 38.5 mg kg-1, which is even lower than the average Nd and Ce contents in the Earth crust. However, the concentration of Ge was roughly a factor of two higher, than this average showing a large pool of Ge that could be accessed by phytoextraction. The SE analyses shows, that the average in fractions I - IV is even much lower, than in the case of the above mentioned heavy metals in comparison with Ge (1.75 %), Nd (3.28 %) and Ce (3.12 %). The BCF calculated for plants shows, that the only element, which could be possibly used as the object of phytoaccumulation is Cd (the BCF > 1) in species Populus tremula (3.0, 1.7), Spirea douglasii (1.4, 2.2) and Tanacetum vulgare (3.2, 1.3) at the most sampling places. Since these species represent the natural occurring vegetation of the dump, the use of these species together with soil amendments enhancing the plant availability of elements in soil fractions hold promise for phytoextraction of economically valuable metalloids and consequently an in situ bioremediation of the dump field. This work was realised with the support of Christin Jahns on behalf of the

  19. PROCESS FOR SEPARATING AMERICIUM AND CURIUM FROM RARE EARTH ELEMENTS

    DOEpatents

    Baybarz, R.D.; Lloyd, M.H.

    1963-02-26

    This invention relates to methods of separating americium and curium values from rare earth values. In accordance with the invention americium, curium, and rare earth values are sorbed on an anion exchange resin. A major portion of the rare earth values are selectively stripped from the resin with a concentrated aqueous solution of lithium chloride, and americium, curium, and a minor portion of rare earth values are then stripped from the resin with a dilute aqueous solution of lithium chloride. The americium and curium values are further purified by increasing the concentration of lithium chloride in the solution to at least 8 molar and selectively extracting rare earth values from the resulting solution with a monoalkylphosphoric acid. (AEC)

  20. Regeneration of zinc chloride hydrocracking catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Zielke, Clyde W.

    1979-01-01

    Improved rate of recovery of zinc values from the solids which are carried over by the effluent vapors from the oxidative vapor phase regeneration of spent zinc chloride catalyst is achieved by treatment of the solids with both hydrogen chloride and calcium chloride to selectively and rapidly recover the zinc values as zinc chloride.

  1. 21 CFR 173.255 - Methylene chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Methylene chloride. 173.255 Section 173.255 Food... Related Substances § 173.255 Methylene chloride. Methylene chloride may be present in food under the... label of the hops extract identifies the presence of the methylene chloride and provides for the use of...

  2. 21 CFR 184.1622 - Potassium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Potassium chloride. 184.1622 Section 184.1622 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1622 Potassium chloride. (a) Potassium chloride (KCl, CAS Reg... levels not to exceed current good manufacturing practice. Potassium chloride may be used in infant...

  3. 21 CFR 184.1622 - Potassium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Potassium chloride. 184.1622 Section 184.1622 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1622 Potassium chloride. (a) Potassium chloride (KCl, CAS Reg... levels not to exceed current good manufacturing practice. Potassium chloride may be used in infant...

  4. 21 CFR 184.1622 - Potassium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Potassium chloride. 184.1622 Section 184.1622 Food... GRAS § 184.1622 Potassium chloride. (a) Potassium chloride (KCl, CAS Reg. No. 7447-40-7) is a white... manufacturing practice. Potassium chloride may be used in infant formula in accordance with section 412(g) of...

  5. 21 CFR 184.1138 - Ammonium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ammonium chloride. 184.1138 Section 184.1138 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1138 Ammonium chloride. (a) Ammonium chloride (NH4Cl, CAS Reg. No. 12125-02-9) is produced by the reaction of sodium chloride and an ammonium salt in solution. The...

  6. 21 CFR 173.375 - Cetylpyridinium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Cetylpyridinium chloride. 173.375 Section 173.375... CONSUMPTION Specific Usage Additives § 173.375 Cetylpyridinium chloride. Cetylpyridinium chloride (CAS Reg. No....1666 of this chapter, at a concentration of 1.5 times that of cetylpyridinium chloride. (c) The...

  7. Mechanism of sodium chloride in promoting reduction of high-magnesium low-nickel oxide ore.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shiwei; Wei, Yonggang; Li, Bo; Wang, Hua; Ma, Baozhong; Wang, Chengyan

    2016-07-04

    Sodium chloride has been proved that it is an effective promoter for the reduction of high-magnesium, low-nickel oxide ore. The aim of current work is to clarify the promotion behavior of sodium chloride in the roasting reduction process. The influence of moisture on the reduction of ore in the presence of sodium chloride is studied to get clear comprehension of promotion process. In the presence of moisture, the HCl is produced by pyrohydrolysis of sodium chloride for chlorinating nickel and iron oxides, moreover, interactions between metallic oxides and sodium chloride are also a way for chlorination at high temperature (>802 °C); subsequently, the metal chloride would be reduced by reductant. In the absence of moisture, the magnetic separation results show that the recoveries of iron and nickel have a significant increase; moreover, olivine structure would be destroyed gradually with the increase of roasting temperature in the action of sodium chloride, and the sodium chloride existed in high-magnesium, low-nickel oxide ore could make the NiO isolate from NiO-bearing minerals. The NiO reacts with Fe2O3 at high temperature to form NiFe2O4, which is conductive to the formation of Ni-Fe alloy during the reduction process.

  8. Mechanism of sodium chloride in promoting reduction of high-magnesium low-nickel oxide ore

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Shiwei; Wei, Yonggang; Li, Bo; Wang, Hua; Ma, Baozhong; Wang, Chengyan

    2016-01-01

    Sodium chloride has been proved that it is an effective promoter for the reduction of high-magnesium, low-nickel oxide ore. The aim of current work is to clarify the promotion behavior of sodium chloride in the roasting reduction process. The influence of moisture on the reduction of ore in the presence of sodium chloride is studied to get clear comprehension of promotion process. In the presence of moisture, the HCl is produced by pyrohydrolysis of sodium chloride for chlorinating nickel and iron oxides, moreover, interactions between metallic oxides and sodium chloride are also a way for chlorination at high temperature (>802 °C); subsequently, the metal chloride would be reduced by reductant. In the absence of moisture, the magnetic separation results show that the recoveries of iron and nickel have a significant increase; moreover, olivine structure would be destroyed gradually with the increase of roasting temperature in the action of sodium chloride, and the sodium chloride existed in high-magnesium, low-nickel oxide ore could make the NiO isolate from NiO-bearing minerals. The NiO reacts with Fe2O3 at high temperature to form NiFe2O4, which is conductive to the formation of Ni-Fe alloy during the reduction process. PMID:27374991

  9. Solvo-thermal synthesis of a unique alkaline earth-transition Ba-Cd micro-porous coordination framework as hetero-metallic luminescent sensor for Cu2+ and real-time detection of benzaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Bin; Ma, Dian Xue; Zhang, Hui Min; Meng, Xin; Qiu, Rong Rong; Ren, Rong; Wu, Jie; Wu, Xiang Xia; Huo, Jian Zhong; Liu, Yuan Yuan; Shi, Xue Fang

    2018-06-01

    In this work a unique hetero-metallic alkaline earth-transition Ba-Cd luminescent micro-porous metal-organic framework {[BaCd(μ6-tp)1.5(μ2-Cl)(H2O) (DMF)2]·0.75H2O}n (H2tp = terephthalic acid) (1) has been prepared under solvo-thermal conditions. In 1 infinite 1D {Ba-X-Cd} (X = O, Cl) inorganic chains are linked via these full de-pronated tp2- ligands forming a unique 3D I1O2 type micro-porous coordination framework. PXRD patterns of 1 have been determined confirming pure phases of 1. Luminescence investigations suggested that 1 exhibits highly selective and sensitive sensing for trace amounts of benzaldehyde in ethanol, which provides a facile method for real-time detection of benzaldehyde. Meanwhile 1 also exhibits highly selective and sensitive sensing for Cu2+ over other cations with high quenching efficiency Ksv value 1.15 × 104 L·mol-1. As far as we know, 1 represents the first example of alkaline earth-transition hetero-metallic Ba-Cd micro-porous coordination framework as bi-functional luminescent probes for Cu2+ and benzaldehyde.

  10. Solvo-thermal synthesis of a unique alkaline earth-transition Ba-Cd micro-porous coordination framework as hetero-metallic luminescent sensor for Cu2+ and real-time detection of benzaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Ding, Bin; Ma, Dian Xue; Zhang, Hui Min; Meng, Xin; Qiu, Rong Rong; Ren, Rong; Wu, Jie; Wu, Xiang Xia; Huo, Jian Zhong; Liu, Yuan Yuan; Shi, Xue Fang

    2018-06-15

    In this work a unique hetero-metallic alkaline earth-transition Ba-Cd luminescent micro-porous metal-organic framework {[BaCd(μ 6 -tp) 1.5 (μ 2 -Cl)(H 2 O) (DMF) 2 ]·0.75H 2 O} n (H 2 tp=terephthalic acid) (1) has been prepared under solvo-thermal conditions. In 1 infinite 1D {Ba-X-Cd} (X=O, Cl) inorganic chains are linked via these full de-pronated tp 2- ligands forming a unique 3D I 1 O 2 type micro-porous coordination framework. PXRD patterns of 1 have been determined confirming pure phases of 1. Luminescence investigations suggested that 1 exhibits highly selective and sensitive sensing for trace amounts of benzaldehyde in ethanol, which provides a facile method for real-time detection of benzaldehyde. Meanwhile 1 also exhibits highly selective and sensitive sensing for Cu 2+ over other cations with high quenching efficiency K sv value 1.15×10 4 L·mol -1 . As far as we know, 1 represents the first example of alkaline earth-transition hetero-metallic Ba-Cd micro-porous coordination framework as bi-functional luminescent probes for Cu 2+ and benzaldehyde. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. LEVELING METAL COATINGS

    DOEpatents

    Gage, H.A.

    1959-02-10

    A method is described for applying metallic coatings to a cylinder of uranium. An aluminum-silicon coat is applied by a process consisting of first cleaning the article by immersion for 5 minutes in 50% nitric acid at 65 C. The article then is dipped through a flux, prepared by adding 10% sodium fluoride to 90% of a flux comprising 53% potassium chloride, 42% lithium chloride, and 5% sodium chloride at 560 for 2 minutes and then directly into a molten metal bath comprising 99% aluminun and 12% silicon at 620 C for 3 minutes. While the coating is yet molten the article is transferred to a pair of steel rollers and rolled until the coating solidifies. By varying the composition of the flux other metals such as zinc, lead or the like may be coated on uranium in a similar manner.

  12. Earth Observation

    2014-06-01

    ISS040-E-006327 (1 June 2014) --- A portion of International Space Station solar array panels and Earth?s horizon are featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 40 crew member on the space station.

  13. 46 CFR 151.50-34 - Vinyl chloride (vinyl chloride monomer).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Vinyl chloride (vinyl chloride monomer). 151.50-34... chloride (vinyl chloride monomer). (a) Copper, aluminum, magnesium, mercury, silver, and their alloys shall... equipment that may come in contact with vinyl chloride liquid or vapor. (b) Valves, flanges, and pipe...

  14. 21 CFR 184.1297 - Ferric chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ferric chloride. 184.1297 Section 184.1297 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1297 Ferric chloride. (a) Ferric chloride (iron (III) chloride, FeC13, CAS Reg. No. 7705-08-0) may be prepared from iron and chlorine or from ferric oxide and hydrogen chloride...

  15. Surface speciation and interactions between adsorbed chloride and water on cerium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutherland-Harper, Sophie; Taylor, Robin; Hobbs, Jeff; Pimblott, Simon; Pattrick, Richard; Sarsfield, Mark; Denecke, Melissa; Livens, Francis; Kaltsoyannis, Nikolas; Arey, Bruce; Kovarik, Libor; Engelhard, Mark; Waters, John; Pearce, Carolyn

    2018-06-01

    Ceria particles with different specific surface areas (SSA) were contaminated with chloride and water, then heat treated at 500 and 900 °C to investigate sorption behaviour of these species on metal oxides. Results from x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and infrared spectroscopy showed chloride and water adsorption onto particles increased with surface area and that these species were mostly removed on heat treatment (from 6.3 to 0.8 at% Cl- on high SSA and from 1.4 to 0.4 at% on low SSA particles). X-ray diffraction revealed that chloride was not incorporated into the bulk ceria structure, but crystal size increased upon contamination. Ce LIII-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy confirmed that chloride was not present in the first co-ordination sphere around Ce(IV) ions, so was not bonded to Ce as chloride in the bulk structure. Sintering of contaminated high SSA particles occurred with heat treatment at 900 °C, and they resembled low SSA particles synthesised at this temperature. Physical chloride-particle interactions were investigated using electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray analysis, showing that chloride was homogeneously distributed on ceria and that reduction of porosity did not trap surface-sorbed chloride inside the particles as surface area was reduced during sintering. This has implications for stabilisation of chloride-contaminated PuO2 for long term storage.

  16. Mineral resource of the month: rare earth elements

    ,

    2011-01-01

    The article provides information on rare earth elements, which are group of 17 natural metallic elements. The rare earth elements are scandium, yttrium and lanthanides and classified into light rare earth elements (LREE) and heavy rate earth elements (HREE). The principal ores of the rare earth elements are identified. An overview of China's production of 97 percent of the rare earths in the world is provided. Commercial applications of rare earths are described.

  17. Study of phonon modes and elastic properties of Sc36Al24Co20Y20 and Gd36Al24Co20Y20 rare-earth bulk metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suthar, P. H.; Gajjar, P. N.; Thakore, B. Y.; Jani, A. R.

    2013-04-01

    A phonon modes and elastic properties of two different rare-earth based bulk metallic glasses Sc36Al24Co20Y20 and Gd36Al24Co20Y20 are computed using Hubbard-Beeby approach and our well established model potential. The local field correlation functions due to Hartree (H), Taylor (T), Ichimaru and Utsumi (IU), Farid et al (F) and Sarkar Sen et al (S) are employed to investigate the influence of the screening effects on the vibrational dynamics of Sc36Al24Co20Y20 and Gd36Al24Co20Y20 bulk metallic glasses. The results for bulk modulus BT, modulus of rigidity G, Poisson's ratio ξ, Young's modulus Y, Debye temperature ΘD, propagation velocity of elastic waves and dispersion curves are reported. The computed elastic properties are found to be in good agreement with experimental and other available data.

  18. A set of alkali and alkaline-earth coordination polymers based on the ligand 2-(1H-benzotriazol-1-yl) acetic acid: Effects the radius of metal ions on structures and properties

    SciT

    Wang, Jin-Hua; Tang, Gui-Mei, E-mail: meiguit@163.com; Qin, Ting-Xiao

    2014-11-15

    Four new metal coordination complexes, namely, [Na(BTA)]{sub n} (1), [K{sub 2}(BTA){sub 2}(μ{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O)]{sub n} (2), and [M(BTA){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]{sub n} (M=Ca(II) and Sr(II) for 3 and 4, respectively) [BTA=2-(1H-benzotriazol-1-yl) acetic anion], have been obtained under hydrothermal condition, by reacting the different alkali and alkaline-earth metal hydroxides with HBTA. Complexes 1–4 were structurally characterized by X-ray single-crystal diffraction, EA, IR, PXRD, and thermogravimetry analysis (TGA). These complexes display low-dimensional features displaying various two-dimensional (2D) and one-dimensional (1D) coordination motifs. Complex 1 displays a 2D layer with the thickness of 1.5 nm and possesses a topologic structure of a 11more » nodal net with Schläfli symbol of (3{sup 18}). Complex 2 also shows a thick 2D sheet and its topologic structure is a 9 nodes with Schläfli symbol of (3{sup 11}×4{sup 2}). Complexes 3 and 4 possess a 1D linear chain and further stack via hydrogen bonding interactions to generate a three-dimensional supramolecular architecture. These results suggest that both the coordination preferences of the metal ions and the versatile nature of this flexible ligand play a critical role in the final structures. The luminescent spectra show strong emission intensities in complexes 1–4, which display violet photoluminescence. Additionally, ferroelectric, dielectric and nonlinear optic (NLO) second-harmonic generation (SHG) properties of 2 are discussed in detail. - Graphical abstract: A set of alkali and alkaline-earth metal coordination polymers were hydrothermally synthesized by 2-(1H-benzotriazol-1-yl)acetic acid, displaying interesting topologic motifs from two-dimension to one-dimension and specific physical properties. - Highlights: • Alkali and alkaline-earth metal coordination polymers have been obtained. • The ligand 2-(1H-benzotriazol-1-yl)acetic acid has been adopted. • The two-dimensional and one

  19. Rare Earths; The Fraternal Fifteen (Rev.)

    SciT

    Gschneidner, Jr., Karl A.

    1966-01-01

    Rare earths are a set of 15 elements: lanthanum, cerium, praseodymium, neodymium, promethium, samarium, europium, gadolinium, terbium, dysprosium, holmium, erbium, thulium, ytterbium and lutetium. They are not rare and not earths; they are metals and quite abundant. They are studied to develop commercial products which are beneficial to mankind, and because some rare earths are important to fission products.

  20. Recurring Slope Lineae (RSL) and Chloride Hydrates within Mars Subsurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Y.; Wang, A.

    2012-12-01

    RSL is an important phenomenon revealed by HiRISE-MRO observations on Mars (McEwen et al., 2011). The RSL form and grow on some equator-facing slopes during warm seasons on Mars when temperature (T in afternoon) is in the range of ~250-300K. We hypothesize that chloride hydrates may exist in some areas within the subsurface of southern hemisphere on Mars, and the deliquescence of these chloride hydrates at elevated temperature may have produced large quantity of brine that caused the RSL observed by HiRISE team. This hypothesis is based on three lines of reasoning: (1) chlorine (Cl) is found to be broadly distributed on Mars (GRS-ODY) and has been detected in the chemistry of every surface samples during all Mars surface exploration missions (Vikings, Pathfinder, Spirit, Opportunity, and Phoenix). In addition, the existence of chlorides in martian southern hemisphere was suggested by a set of THEMIS-ODY data analyses (Osterloo et al., 2008, 2010). In terrestrial saline playas, large amounts of chlorides invariably appears in the precipitates from salty brines (Zheng et al., 2009, Wang et al., 2009), although the precipitation sequence of chlorides on Mars might be different from that on Earth (Tosca et al., 2008, McLennan et al., 2012). (2) A subsurface layer when enriched with ice, or hydrous sulfates or chloride hydrates (all have high thermal inertia) and covered by a dry layer of surface soils (very low thermal inertia) will be able to maintain a lower Tmax and a much smaller delta-T that are not affected by the large temperature variations at Mars surface during diurnal and seasonal cycles (Mellon, 2004). (3) Chloride hydrates (such as MgCl2.12H2O, FeCl2.6H2O, CaCL2.6H2O, etc) would form from Cl-bearing brine at low T; they would be stable in a large T range (beyond room T in lab) and their deliquescence would occur abruptly at elevated temperatures (Baumgartner & Bakker 2009, and many others). We have started a systematic laboratory investigation on the

  1. Lithium metal reduction of plutonium oxide to produce plutonium metal

    DOEpatents

    Coops, Melvin S.

    1992-01-01

    A method is described for the chemical reduction of plutonium oxides to plutonium metal by the use of pure lithium metal. Lithium metal is used to reduce plutonium oxide to alpha plutonium metal (alpha-Pu). The lithium oxide by-product is reclaimed by sublimation and converted to the chloride salt, and after electrolysis, is removed as lithium metal. Zinc may be used as a solvent metal to improve thermodynamics of the reduction reaction at lower temperatures. Lithium metal reduction enables plutonium oxide reduction without the production of huge quantities of CaO--CaCl.sub.2 residues normally produced in conventional direct oxide reduction processes.

  2. The Toxicological Geochemistry of Dusts, Soils, and Other Earth Materials: Insights From In Vitro Physiologically-based Geochemical Leach Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plumlee, G. S.; Ziegler, T. L.; Lamothe, P.; Meeker, G. P.; Sutley, S.

    2003-12-01

    Exposure to mineral dusts, soils, and other earth materials results in chemical reactions between the materials and different body fluids that include, depending upon the exposure route, lung fluids, gastrointestinal fluids, and perspiration. In vitro physiologically-based geochemical leach tests provide useful insights into these chemical reactions and their potential toxicological implications. We have conducted such leach tests on a variety of earth materials, including asbestos, volcanic ash, dusts from dry lake beds, mine wastes, wastes left from the roasting of mercury ores, mineral processing wastes, coal dusts and coal fly ash, various soils, and complex dusts generated by the World Trade Center collapse. Size-fractionated samples of earth materials that have been well-characterized mineralogically and chemically are reacted at body temperature (37 C) for periods from 2 hours up to multiple days with various proportions of simulated lung, gastric, intestinal, and/or plasma-based fluids. Results indicate that different earth materials may have quite different solubility and dissolution behavior in vivo, depending upon a) the mineralogic makeup of the material, and b) the exposure route. For example, biodurable minerals such as asbestos and volcanic ash particles, whose health effects result because they dissolve very slowly in vivo, bleed off low levels of trace metals into the simulated lung fluids; these include metals such as Fe and Cr that are suspected by health scientists of contributing to the generation of reactive oxygen species and resulting DNA damage in vivo. In contrast, dry lake bed dusts and concrete-rich dusts are highly alkaline and bioreactive, and cause substantial pH increases and other chemical changes in the simulated body fluids. Many of the earth materials tested contain a variety of metals that can be quite soluble (bioaccessible), depending upon the material and the simulated body fluid composition. For example, due to their acidic

  3. Discover Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, Colleen

    1998-01-01

    Discover Earth is a NASA-sponsored project for teachers of grades 5-12, designed to: (1) enhance understanding of the Earth as an integrated system; (2) enhance the interdisciplinary approach to science instruction; and (3) provide classroom materials that focus on those goals. Discover Earth is conducted by the Institute for Global Environmental Strategies in collaboration with Dr. Eric Barron, Director, Earth System Science Center, The Pennsylvania State University; and Dr. Robert Hudson, Chair, the Department of Meteorology, University of Maryland at College Park. The enclosed materials: (1) represent only part of the Discover Earth materials; (2) were developed by classroom teachers who are participating in the Discover Earth project; (3) utilize an investigative approach and on-line data; and (4) can be effectively adjusted to classrooms with greater/without technology access. The Discover Earth classroom materials focus on the Earth system and key issues of global climate change including topics such as the greenhouse effect, clouds and Earth's radiation balance, surface hydrology and land cover, and volcanoes and climate change. All the materials developed to date are available on line at (http://www.strategies.org) You are encouraged to submit comments and recommendations about these materials to the Discover Earth project manager, contact information is listed below. You are welcome to duplicate all these materials.

  4. Fragmentation of molecular tributyltin chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osmekhin, S.; Caló, A.; Kisand, V.; Nõmmiste, E.; Kotilainen, H.; Aksela, H.; Aksela, S.

    2008-06-01

    Fragmentation of tributyltin chloride (TBTCl) vapour has been studied experimentally by means of time-of-flight mass spectrometry at the photon energy range of 9-25 eV of synchrotron radiation, at 21.22 eV of HeI as well as with 500 eV electron beam excitation. Branching ratios of the tributyltin chloride fragments taken with HeI and synchrotron radiation have been presented first time. Calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) were carried out for TBTCl and the ionization energies obtained were used to predict the dissociation pathways creating the observed ions.

  5. Lubiprostone: a chloride channel activator.

    PubMed

    Lacy, Brian E; Levy, L Campbell

    2007-04-01

    In January 2006 the Food and Drug Administration approved lubiprostone for the treatment of chronic constipation in men and women aged 18 and over. Lubiprostone is categorized as a prostone, a bicyclic fatty acid metabolite of prostaglandin E1. Lubiprostone activates a specific chloride channel (ClC-2) in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract to enhance intestinal fluid secretion, which increases GI transit and improves symptoms of constipation. This article reviews the role of chloride channels in the GI tract, describes the structure, function, and pharmacokinetics of lubiprostone, and discusses clinically important data on this new medication.

  6. [An investigation of lanthanum and other metals levels in blood, urine and hair among residents in the rare earth mining area of a city in China].

    PubMed

    Bao, T M; Tian, Y; Wang, L X; Wu, T; Lu, L N; Ma, H Y; Wang, L

    2018-02-20

    Objective: To investigate the levels of lanthanum, cerium, praseodymium, and neodymium in the blood, urine, and hair samples from residents in the rare earth mining area of a city in China, and to provide a scientific basis for the control of rare earth pollution and the protection of population health. Methods: A total of 147 residents who had lived in the rare earth mining area of a city for a long time were selected as the exposure group, and 108 residents in Guyang County of this city who lived 91 km away from the rare earth mining area were selected as the control group. Blood, urine, and hair samples were collected from the residents in both groups. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry was used to determine the content of lanthanum, cerium, praseodymium, and neodymium in blood, urine, and hair samples. Results: In the exposure group, the median levels of lanthanum, cerium, praseodymium, and neodymium were 0.854, 1.724, 0.132, and 0.839 μg/L, respectively, in blood samples, 0.420, 0.920, 0.055, and 0.337 μg/L, respectively, in urine samples, and 0.052, 0.106, 0.012, and 0.045 μg/g, respectively, in hair samples. The exposure group had significantly higher levels of the four rare earth elements in blood, urine, and hair samples than the control group ( P <0.01) . Conclusion: The residents in the rare earth mining area of this city have higher content of lanthanum, cerium, praseodymium, and neodymium in blood, urine, and hair than those in the non-mining area; the content of cerium is highest, followed by lanthanum, neodymium, and praseodymium.

  7. Syntheses and crystal structures of the rare-earth metal(III) bromide ortho-oxidotungstates(VI) with the formula REBr[WO4] (RE = Y, Gd-Yb)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schustereit, Tanja; Schleid, Thomas; Hartenbach, Ingo

    2015-10-01

    The rare-earth metal(III) bromide ortho-oxidotungstates(VI) with the formula REBr[WO4] crystallize triclinically in space group P 1 bar (a = 689-693, b = 715-728, c = 1074-1107 pm, α = 103-106, β ≈ 108 and γ = 93-95°, Z = 4) for RE = Y, Gd-Yb. Their crystal structure is isotypic with the most examples of the formally analogous lanthanoid(III) bromide oxidomolybdates(VI) REBr[MoO4] with RE = Y, Pr, Nd, Sm, Gd-Lu. It contains two crystallographically different rare-earth metal(III) cations with coordination numbers of seven plus one for (RE1)3+ and seven for (RE2)3+. The (RE1)3+ cations are surrounded by three Br- and four plus one O2- anions forming distorted trigonal dodecahedra, while the (RE2)3+ cations exhibit a coordination environment of one Br- and six O2- anions in the shape of a monocapped trigonal prism. Furthermore, the structure contains two crystallographically independent, isolated tetrahedral [WO4]2- units. All these polyhedra are fused together to form 1 ∞ {REBr[WO4]} chains running along [012]. Since the title compounds, synthesized by solid-state reactions from the underlying binaries, emerge as pure phases according to X-ray powder diffractometry, spectroscopic and magnetic measurements were performed.

  8. Influences of alkaline earth metal substitution on the crystal structure and physical properties of magnetic RuSr1.9A0.1GdCu2O8 (A = Ca, Sr, and Ba) superconductors.

    PubMed

    Hur, Su Gil; Park, Dae Hoon; Hwang, Seong-Ju; Kim, Seung Joo; Lee, J H; Lee, Sang Young

    2005-11-24

    We have investigated the effect of alkaline earth metal substitution on the crystal structure and physical properties of magnetic superconductors RuSr(1.9)A(0.1)GdCu(2)O(8) (A = Ca, Sr, and Ba) in order to probe an interaction between the magnetic coupling of the RuO(2) layer and the superconductivity of the CuO(2) layer. X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopic analyses demonstrate that the isovalent substitution of Sr ions with Ca or Ba ions makes it possible to tune the interlayer distance between the CuO(2) and the RuO(2) layers. From the measurements of electrical resistance and magnetic susceptibility, it was found that, in contrast to negligible change of magnetization, both of the alkaline earth metal substitutions lead to a notable depression of zero-resistance temperature T(c) (DeltaT(c) approximately 17-19 K). On the basis of the absence of a systematic correlation between the T(c) and the interlayer distance/magnetization, we have concluded that the internal magnetic field of the RuO(2) layer has insignificant influence on the superconducting property of the CuO(2) layer in the ruthenocuprate.

  9. Effects of chloride ions on corrosion of ductile iron and carbon steel in soil environments.

    PubMed

    Song, Yarong; Jiang, Guangming; Chen, Ying; Zhao, Peng; Tian, Yimei

    2017-07-31

    Chloride is reported to play a significant role in corrosion reactions, products and kinetics of ferrous metals. To enhance the understanding of the effects of soil environments, especially the saline soils with high levels of chloride, on the corrosion of ductile iron and carbon steel, a 3-month corrosion test was carried out by exposing ferrous metals to soils of six chloride concentrations. The surface morphology, rust compositions and corrosion kinetics were comprehensively studied by visual observation, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-Ray diffraction (XRD), weight loss, pit depth measurement, linear polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements. It showed that chloride ions influenced the characteristics and compositions of rust layers by diverting and participating in corrosion reactions. α-FeOOH, γ-FeOOH and iron oxides were major corrosion products, while β-Fe 8 O 8 (OH) 8 Cl 1.35 rather than β-FeOOH was formed when high chloride concentrations were provided. Chloride also suppressed the decreasing of corrosion rates, whereas increased the difficulty in the diffusion process by thickening the rust layers and transforming the rust compositions. Carbon steel is more susceptible to chloride attacks than ductile iron. The corrosion kinetics of ductile iron and carbon steel corresponded with the probabilistic and bilinear model respectively.

  10. Phase Transformations and Metallization of Magnesium Oxide at High Pressure and Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McWilliams, R. Stewart; Spaulding, Dylan K.; Eggert, Jon H.; Celliers, Peter M.; Hicks, Damien G.; Smith, Raymond F.; Collins, Gilbert W.; Jeanloz, Raymond

    2012-12-01

    Magnesium oxide (MgO) is representative of the rocky materials comprising the mantles of terrestrial planets, such that its properties at high temperatures and pressures reflect the nature of planetary interiors. Shock-compression experiments on MgO to pressures of 1.4 terapascals (TPa) reveal a sequence of two phase transformations: from B1 (sodium chloride) to B2 (cesium chloride) crystal structures above 0.36 TPa, and from electrically insulating solid to metallic liquid above 0.60 TPa. The transitions exhibit large latent heats that are likely to affect the structure and evolution of super-Earths. Together with data on other oxide liquids, we conclude that magmas deep inside terrestrial planets can be electrically conductive, enabling magnetic field-producing dynamo action within oxide-rich regions and blurring the distinction between planetary mantles and cores.

  11. How Deep and Hot was Earth's Magma Ocean? Combined Experimental Datasets for the Metal-silicate Partitioning of 11 Siderophile Elements - Ni, Co, Mo, W, P, Mn, V, Cr, Ga, Cu and Pd

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Righter, Kevin

    2008-01-01

    Since approximately 1990 high pressure and temperature (PT) experiments on metal-silicate systems have showed that partition coefficients (D) for siderophile (iron-loving) elements are much different than those measured at low PT conditions. The high PT data have been used to argue for a magma ocean during growth of the early Earth. Initial conclusions were based on experiments and calculations for a small number of elements such as Ni and Co. However, for many elements only a limited number of experimental data were available then, and they only hinted at values of metal-silicate D's at high PT conditions. In the ensuing decades there have been hundreds of new experiments carried out and published on a wide range of siderophile elements. At the same time several different models have been advanced to explain the siderophile elements in the earth's mantle: a) intermediate depth magma ocean; 25-30 GPa, b) deep magma ocean; up to 50 GPa, and c) early reduced and later oxidized magma ocean. Some studies have drawn conclusions based on a small subset of siderophile elements, or a set of elements that provides little leverage on the big picture (like slightly siderophile elements), and no single study has attempted to quantitatively explain more than 5 elements at a time. The purpose of this abstract is to update the predictive expressions outlined by Righter et al. (1997) with new experimental data from the last decade, test the predictive ability of these expressions against independent datasets (there are more data now to do this properly), and to apply the resulting expressions to the siderophile element patterns in Earth's upper mantle. The predictive expressions have the form: lnD = alnfO2 + b/T + cP/T + d(1Xs) + e(1Xc) + SigmafiXi + g These expressions are guided by the thermodynamics of simple metal-oxide equilibria that control each element, include terms that mimic the activity coefficients of each element in the metal and silicate, and quantify the effect of

  12. Effect of chloride on ferrous iron oxidation by a Leptospirillum ferriphilum-dominated chemostat culture.

    PubMed

    Gahan, Chandra Sekhar; Sundkvist, Jan-Eric; Dopson, Mark; Sandström, Ake

    2010-06-15

    Biomining is the use of microorganisms to catalyze metal extraction from sulfide ores. However, the available water in some biomining environments has high chloride concentrations and therefore, chloride toxicity to ferrous oxidizing microorganisms has been investigated. Batch biooxidation of Fe(2+) by a Leptospirillum ferriphilum-dominated culture was completely inhibited by 12 g L(-1) chloride. In addition, the effects of chloride on oxidation kinetics in a Fe(2+) limited chemostat were studied. Results from the chemostat modeling suggest that the chloride toxicity was attributed to affects on the Fe(2+) oxidation system, pH homeostasis, and lowering of the proton motive force. Modeling showed a decrease in the maximum specific growth rate (micro(max)) and an increase in the substrate constant (K(s)) with increasing chloride concentrations, indicating an effect on the Fe(2+) oxidation system. The model proposes a lowered maintenance activity when the media was fed with 2-3 g L(-1) chloride with a concomitant drastic decrease in the true yield (Y(true)). This model helps to understand the influence of chloride on Fe(2+) biooxidation kinetics. 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. 21 CFR 582.1193 - Calcium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Additives § 582.1193 Calcium chloride. (a) Product. Calcium chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used in accordance with good manufacturing or feeding practice. ...

  14. 21 CFR 582.5622 - Potassium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5622 Potassium chloride. (a) Product. Potassium chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  15. 21 CFR 582.5252 - Choline chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5252 Choline chloride. (a) Product. Choline chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  16. 21 CFR 582.5446 - Manganese chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5446 Manganese chloride. (a) Product. Manganese chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  17. 21 CFR 582.5622 - Potassium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5622 Potassium chloride. (a) Product. Potassium chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  18. 21 CFR 582.5446 - Manganese chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5446 Manganese chloride. (a) Product. Manganese chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  19. 21 CFR 582.5622 - Potassium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5622 Potassium chloride. (a) Product. Potassium chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  20. 21 CFR 582.5252 - Choline chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5252 Choline chloride. (a) Product. Choline chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This...