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Sample records for earth metal ions

  1. ION EXCHANGE IN FUSED SALTS. II. THE DISTRIBUTION OF ALKALI METAL AND ALKALINE EARTH IONS BETWEEN CHABAZITE AND FUSED LINO3, NANO3, AND KNO3,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    ION EXCHANGE, SALTS ), (*ALKALI METALS, ION EXCHANGE), (*ALKALINE EARTH METALS, ION EXCHANGE), (*NITRATES, ION EXCHANGE), SODIUM , CALCIUM, POTASSIUM...BARIUM, RUBIDIUM, CESIUM, LITHIUM COMPOUNDS, SODIUM COMPOUNDS, POTASSIUM COMPOUNDS, DISTRIBUTION, MINERALS, IONS

  2. Ab initio study of NMR shielding of alkali earth metal ions in water complexes and magnetic moments of alkali earth metal nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antušek, Andrej; Rodziewicz, Pawel; Keḑziera, Dariusz; Kaczmarek-Keḑziera, Anna; Jaszuński, Michał

    2013-11-01

    Ab initio calculations of NMR shielding constants of alkali earth metal ions in the series of water clusters are presented. The shielding constants for systems modeling the structure of the solvation layer of these ions are determined by adding to the coupled cluster singles-and-doubles (CCSD) results the calculated relativistic corrections. The relative magnitude of the dynamical effects, estimated for a typical solvated ion from Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics, is very small. The computed shielding constants are used next to obtain new values of the nuclear magnetic dipole moments of alkali earth metal nuclei.

  3. Application of Freeze-Dried Powders of Genetically Engineered Microbial Strains as Adsorbents for Rare Earth Metal Ions.

    PubMed

    Moriwaki, Hiroshi; Masuda, Reiko; Yamazaki, Yuki; Horiuchi, Kaoru; Miyashita, Mari; Kasahara, Jun; Tanaka, Tatsuhito; Yamamoto, Hiroki

    2016-10-12

    The adsorption behaviors of the rare earth metal ions onto freeze-dried powders of genetically engineered microbial strains were compared. Cell powders obtained from four kinds of strains, Bacillus subtilis 168 wild type (WT), lipoteichoic acid-defective (ΔLTA), wall teichoic acid-defective (ΔWTA), and cell wall hydrolases-defective (EFKYOJLp) strains, were used as an adsorbent of the rare earth metal ions at pH 3. The adsorption ability of the rare earth metal ions was in the order of EFKYOJLp > WT > ΔLTA > ΔWTA. The order was the same as the order of the phosphorus quantity of the strains. This result indicates that the main adsorption sites for the ions are the phosphate groups and the teichoic acids, LTA and WTA, that contribute to the adsorption of the rare earth metal ions onto the cell walls. The contribution of WTA was clearly greater than that of LTA. Each microbial powder was added to a solution containing 16 kinds of rare earth metal ions, and the removals (%) of each rare earth metal ion were obtained. The scandium ion showed the highest removal (%), while that of the lanthanum ion was the lowest for all the microbial powders. Differences in the distribution coefficients between the kinds of lanthanide ions by the EFKYOJLp and ΔWTA powders were greater than those of the other strains. Therefore, the EFKYOJLp and ΔWTA powders could be applicable for the selective extraction of the lanthanide ions. The ΔLTA powder coagulated by mixing with a rare earth metal ion, although no sedimentation of the WT or ΔWTA powder with a rare earth metal ion was observed under the same conditions. The EFKYOJLp powder was also coagulated, but its flocculating activity was lower than that of ΔLTA. The ΔLTA and EFKYOJLp powders have a long shape compared to those of the WT or ΔWTA strain. The shapes of the cells will play an important role in the sedimentation of the microbial powders with rare earth metal ions. As the results, three kinds of the genetically

  4. Coherent spectroscopy of rare-earth-metal-ion-doped whispering-gallery-mode resonators

    SciTech Connect

    McAuslan, D. L.; Korystov, D.; Longdell, J. J.

    2011-06-15

    We perform an investigation into the properties of Pr{sup 3+}:Y{sub 2}SiO{sub 5} whispering-gallery-mode resonators as a first step toward achieving the strong coupling regime of cavity QED with rare-earth-metal-ion-doped crystals. Direct measurement of cavity QED parameters are made using photon echoes, giving good agreement with theoretical predictions. By comparing the ions at the surface of the resonator to those in the center, it is determined that the physical process of making the resonator does not negatively affect the properties of the ions. Coupling between the ions and resonator is analyzed through the observation of optical bistability and normal-mode splitting.

  5. Bond-length distributions for ions bonded to oxygen: alkali and alkaline-earth metals

    PubMed Central

    Gagné, Olivier Charles; Hawthorne, Frank Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Bond-length distributions have been examined for 55 configurations of alkali-metal ions and 29 configurations of alkaline-earth-metal ions bonded to oxygen, for 4859 coordination polyhedra and 38 594 bond distances (alkali metals), and for 3038 coordination polyhedra and 24 487 bond distances (alkaline-earth metals). Bond lengths generally show a positively skewed Gaussian distribution that originates from the variation in Born repulsion and Coulomb attraction as a function of interatomic distance. The skewness and kurtosis of these distributions generally decrease with increasing coordination number of the central cation, a result of decreasing Born repulsion with increasing coordination number. We confirm the following minimum coordination numbers: [3]Li+, [3]Na+, [4]K+, [4]Rb+, [6]Cs+, [3]Be2+, [4]Mg2+, [6]Ca2+, [6]Sr2+ and [6]Ba2+, but note that some reported examples are the result of extensive dynamic and/or positional short-range disorder and are not ordered arrangements. Some distributions of bond lengths are distinctly multi-modal. This is commonly due to the occurrence of large numbers of structure refinements of a particular structure type in which a particular cation is always present, leading to an over-representation of a specific range of bond lengths. Outliers in the distributions of mean bond lengths are often associated with anomalous values of atomic displacement of the constituent cations and/or anions. For a sample of [6]Na+, the ratio U eq(Na)/U eq(bonded anions) is partially correlated with 〈[6]Na+—O2−〉 (R 2 = 0.57), suggesting that the mean bond length is correlated with vibrational/displacement characteristics of the constituent ions for a fixed coordination number. Mean bond lengths also show a weak correlation with bond-length distortion from the mean value in general, although some coordination numbers show the widest variation in mean bond length for zero distortion, e.g. Li+ in [4]- and [6]-coordination, Na+ in [4]- and [6

  6. Sol-gel-derived hybrid materials multi-doped with rare-earth metal ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelazowska, E.; Rysiakiewicz-Pasek, E.; Borczuch-Laczka, M.; Cholewa-Kowalska, K.

    2012-06-01

    Four different hybrid organic-inorganic materials based on TiO2-SiO2 matrices with organic additives and doped with rare-earth metal ions (III) from the group of europium, cerium, terbium, neodymium, dysprosium and samarium, were synthesized by sol-gel method. Tetraethyl orthosilicate, titanium (IV) isopropoxide and organic compounds, such as butyl acrylate, butyl methacrylate, ethyl acetoacetate, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate, ethyl acetate, propylene carbonate, organic solvents and certain inorganic salts were used in the synthesis. The inorganic part of the sols, which were used in the synthesis of all the hybrid materials, was prepared separately and then the organic parts were added. The materials obtained were aged for three weeks at room temperature and then heated in an electric oven for three hours at temperatures of 80 °C-150 °C. Scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDX); X-ray diffraction (XRD); Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (KBr technique); 29Si magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance; and fluorescence spectroscopy were used for the examination of morphology, microstructure and luminescence properties, respectively. Photoluminescence properties with relatively intense narrow emission lines of Tb, Eu, Dy, Nd, Sm respectively to the RE-ions doping, were observed for all the hybrid materials.

  7. Self-propelled droplets for extracting rare-earth metal ions.

    PubMed

    Ban, Takahiko; Tani, Kentaro; Nakata, Hiroki; Okano, Yasunori

    2014-09-07

    We have developed self-propelled droplets having the abilities to detect a chemical gradient, to move toward a higher concentration of a specific metal ion (particularly the dysprosium ion), and to extract it. Such abilities rely on the high surface activity of di(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid (DEHPA) in response to pH and the affinity of DEHPA for the dysprosium ion. We used two external stimuli as chemical signals to control droplet motion: a pH signal to induce motility and metal ions to induce directional sensing. The oil droplets loaded with DEHPA spontaneously move around beyond the threshold of pH even in a homogeneous pH field. In the presence of a gel block containing metal ions, the droplets show directional sensing and their motility is biased toward higher concentrations. The metal ions investigated can be arranged in decreasing order of directional sensing as Dy(3+)≫ Nd(3+) > Y(3+) > Gd(3+). Furthermore, the analysis of components by using an atomic absorption spectrophotometer reveals that the metal ions can be extracted from the environmental media to the interiors of the droplets. This system may offer alternative self-propelled nano/microscale machines to bubble thrust engines powered by asymmetrical catalysts.

  8. Rare-earth neutral metal injection into an electron beam ion trap plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Magee, E. W. Beiersdorfer, P.; Brown, G. V.; Hell, N.

    2014-11-15

    We have designed and implemented a neutral metal vapor injector on the SuperEBIT high-energy electron beam ion trap at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. A horizontally directed vapor of a europium metal is created using a thermal evaporation technique. The metal vapor is then spatially collimated prior to injection into the trap. The source's form and quantity constraints are significantly reduced making plasmas out of metal with vapor pressures ≤10{sup −7} Torr at ≥1000 °C more obtainable. A long pulsed or constant feed metal vapor injection method adds new flexibility by varying the timing of injection and rate of material being introduced into the trap.

  9. Indirect ultraviolet detection of alkaline earth metal ions using an imidazolium ionic liquid as an ultraviolet absorption reagent in ion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong-Qiang; Yu, Hong

    2017-02-20

    A convenient and versatile method was developed for the separation and detection of alkaline earth metal ions by ion chromatography with indirect UV detection. The chromatographic separation of Mg(2+) , Ca(2+) , and Sr(2+) was performed on a carboxylic acid base cation exchange column using imidazolium ionic liquid/acid as the mobile phase, in which the imidazolium ionic liquid acted as an UV-absorption reagent. The effects of imidazolium ionic liquids, detection wavelength, acids in the mobile phase, and column temperature on the retention of Mg(2+) , Ca(2+) , and Sr(2+) were investigated. The main factors influencing the separation and detection were the background UV absorption reagent and the concentration of hydrogen ion in ion chromatography with indirect UV detection. The successful separation and detection of Mg(2+) , Ca(2+) , and Sr(2+) within 14 min were achieved using the selected chromatographic conditions, and the detection limits (S/N = 3) were 0.06, 0.12, and 0.23 mg/L, respectively. A new separation and detection method of alkaline earth metal ions by ion chromatography with indirect UV detection was developed, and the application range of ionic liquids was expanded.

  10. The effect of alkaline earth metal ion dopants on photocatalytic water splitting by NaTaO(3) powder.

    PubMed

    Iwase, Akihide; Kato, Hideki; Kudo, Akihiko

    2009-01-01

    Alkaline earth metal ions (Ca, Sr, and Ba) are doped into a NaTaO(3) photocatalyst, yielding fine particles and surface structures with nanometer-scale "steps." The formation of the surface nanostep structure depends on the amount of doped Sr and Ba. The photocatalytic water splitting over NaTaO(3) is enhanced: NaTaO(3) doped with 0.5 and 1.0 mol % of Sr shows high activities for photocatalytic water splitting without loading of a co-catalyst, and the photocatalytic activity is further improved by loading with a NiO co-catalyst.

  11. Dispersion coefficients for the interactions of the alkali-metal and alkaline-earth-metal ions and inert-gas atoms with a graphene layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Kiranpreet; Arora, Bindiya; Sahoo, B. K.

    2015-09-01

    Largely motivated by a number of applications, the van der Waals dispersion coefficients C3 of the alkali-metal ions Li+,Na+,K+, and Rb+, the alkaline-earth-metal ions Ca+,Sr+,Ba+, and Ra+, and the inert-gas atoms He, Ne, Ar, and Kr with a graphene layer are determined precisely within the framework of the Dirac model. For these calculations, we evaluate the dynamic polarizabilities of the above atomic systems very accurately by evaluating the transition matrix elements employing relativistic many-body methods and using the experimental values of the excitation energies. The dispersion coefficients are given as functions of the separation distance of an atomic system from the graphene layer and the ambiance temperature during the interactions. For easy extraction of these coefficients, we give a logistic fit to the functional forms of the dispersion coefficients in terms of the separation distances at room temperature.

  12. Synthesis and structure of some nano-sized rare-earth metal ions doped potassium hexacyanoferrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayan, Himanshu; Alemu, Hailemichael; Nketsa, Pusetso F.; Manatha, Toka J.; Madhavi Thakurdesai, And

    2015-05-01

    Rare-earth ions doped potassium hexacyanoferrates (KR-HCF); with the general formula KRFe(CN)6 · 3H2 O [with, R≡Y, Gd and Yb] nanoparticles were synthesized through precipitation. Characterization was done through particle-size analyzer, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier Transform infra-red (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopy, and powder X-ray diffraction (XRD). The XRD data was analyzed on FullProf Software Suite program and the unit-cell structure and lattice parameters of KR-HCF samples were determined from scratch and refined further. All the three KR-HCF nanoparticles seem to crystallize in the orthorhombic primitive PMMM space-group. Reasonably good agreement was found with the previously reported lattice constants of KGd-HCF and KYb-HCF orthorhombic single-crystals, except that they assume different space-groups. The observed dissimilarity of space-groups may be attributed to the different time scales involved in the synthesis process. Moreover, the crystal structure of KYFe(CN)6 · 3H2 O nanoparticles is being reported for the very first time.

  13. One-electron Initiated Two-electron Oxidation of Water by Aluminum Porphyrins with Earth's Most Abundant Metal Ion.

    PubMed

    Kuttassery, Fazalurahman; Mathew, Siby; Sagawa, Shogo; Remello, Sebastian Nybin; Thomas, Arun; Yamamoto, Daisuke; Onuki, Satomi; Nabetani, Yu; Tachibana, Hiroshi; Inoue, Haruo

    2017-03-20

    We report here a new molecular catalyst for efficient water splitting, aluminum porphyrins (tetra-methylpyridiniumylporphyrinatealuminum: AlTMPyP), containing the Earth's most abundant metal as the central ion. One-electron oxidation of the aluminum porphyrin initiates the two-electron oxidation of water to form hydrogen peroxide as the primary reaction product with the lowest known overpotential (97 mV). The aluminum-peroxo complex was clearly detected by a cold-spray ionization mass-spectrometry in HRMS mode and the structure of the intermediate was further confirmed using laser-Raman spectroscopy, indicating the hydroperoxy complex of AlTMPyP to be the key intermediate in the reaction. The two-electron oxidation of water to form hydrogen peroxide was essentially quantitative, with a Faradaic efficiency of 99%. The catalytic reaction was found to be highly efficient, with a turnover frequency up to ~ 2 × 10⁴ s¯¹. A reaction mechanism is proposed involving oxygen-oxygen bond formation by the attack of a hydroxide ion on the oxyl-radical-like axial ligand oxygen atom in the one-electron-oxidized form of AlTMPyP(O¯)₂, followed by a second electron transfer to the electrode.

  14. Parity nonconservation in Fr-like actinide and Cs-like rare-earth-metal ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, B. M.; Dzuba, V. A.; Flambaum, V. V.

    2013-07-01

    Parity-nonconservation (PNC) amplitudes are calculated for the 7s-6d3/2 transitions of the francium isoelectronic sequence (Fr, Ra+, Ac2+, Th3+, Pa4+, U5+, and Np6+) and for the 6s-5d3/2 transitions of the cesium isoelectronic sequence (Cs, Ba+, La2+, Ce3+, and Pr4+). We show in particular that isotopes of La2+, Ac2+, and Th3+ ions have strong potential in the search for new physics beyond the standard model: The PNC amplitudes are large, the calculations are accurate, and the nuclei are practically stable. In addition, 232Th3+ ions have recently been trapped and cooled [Campbell , Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.102.233004 102, 233004 (2009)]. We also extend previous works by calculating the s-s PNC transitions in Ra+ and Ba+ and provide calculations of several energy levels, and electric dipole and quadrupole transition amplitudes for the Fr-like actinide ions.

  15. Hyperpolarizabilities of alkaline-earth metal ions Be+, Mg+, and Ca+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Dong; Zhang, Yong-Hui; Li, Cheng-Bin; Gao, Ke-Lin; Shi, Ting-Yun

    2016-09-01

    The knowledge of the hyperpolarizabilities of atoms and ions is helpful for the analysis of the high order effects of the frequency shifts in precision spectroscopy experiments. Liu et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 223001 (2015)] proposed to establish all-optical trapped ion clocks using laser at the magic wavelength for clock transition. To evaluate the high-order frequency shifts in this new scheme of optical clocks, hyperpolarizabilities are needed, but absent. Using the finite field method based on the B-spline basis set and model potentials, we calculated the electric-field-dependent energy shifts of the ground and low-lying excited states in Be+, Mg+, and Ca+ in the field strength range of 0.0-6×10-5 a.u.. The scalar and tensor polarizabilities ( α 0, α 2) and hyperpolarizabilities ( γ 0, γ 2, γ 4) were deduced. The results of the hyperpolarizabilities for Be+ showed good agreement with the values in literature, implying that the present method can be applied for the effective estimation of the atomic hyperpolarizabilities, which are rarely reported but needed in experiments. The feasibility of optical trapping of Ca+ is discussed, and the contributions of hyperpolarizabilities to the transition frequency shift for Ca+ in the optical dipole trap are estimated using quasi-electrostatic approximation.

  16. Structural diversity in binuclear complexes of alkaline earth metal ions with 4,6-diacetylresorcinol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shebl, Magdy; Khalil, Saied M. E.; Taha, A.; Mahdi, M. A. N.

    2012-11-01

    A new series of binuclear and mixed-ligand complexes with the general formula: [M 2(LO)yClz]; where M = Mg(II), Ca(II), Sr(II) and Ba(II); H2L = 4,6-diacetylresorcinol, the secondary ligand L' = acetylacetone (acac), 8-hydroxyquinoline (8-HQ) or 2,2'-bipyridyl (Bipy), n = 0-2, m = 1, 2, x = 0, 1, 2, 4, y = 0, 2, 4, 5 and z = 0-2; have been synthesized. They have been characterized by the analytical and spectral methods (IR, 1H NMR and mass) as well as TGA and molar conductivity measurements. The spectroscopic and conductance data suggested that the H2L ligand behaves as a neutral, monobasic or dibasic tetradentate ligand, depending on the basicity of the secondary ligand, through the two phenolic and two carbonyl groups. Binuclear octahedral geometry has been assigned to all of the prepared complexes in various molar ratios 2:2; 2:2:2; 1:2:1 and 1:2:4 (L:M:L'). Molecular orbital calculations were performed for the ligands and their complexes using Hyperchem 7.52 program on the bases of PM3 level and the results were correlated with the experimental data. The ligand and some of its alkaline metal(II) complexes showed antibacterial activity towards some of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, yeast (Candida albicans) and fungus (Aspergillus fumigatus).

  17. Antibacterial, Antifungal and Nematicidal Activities of Rare Earth Ions.

    PubMed

    Wakabayashi, Tokumitsu; Ymamoto, Ayumi; Kazaana, Akira; Nakano, Yuta; Nojiri, Yui; Kashiwazaki, Moeko

    2016-12-01

    Despite the name, rare earth elements are relatively abundant in soil. Therefore, these elements might interact with biosphere during the history of life. In this study, we have examined the effect of rare earth ions on the growth of bacteria, fungi and soil nematode. All rare earth ions, except radioactive promethium that we have not tested, showed antibacterial and antifungal activities comparable to that of copper ions, which is widely used as antibacterial metals in our daily life. Rare earth ions also have nematicidal activities as they strongly perturb the embryonic development of the nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans. Interestingly, the nematicidal activity increased with increasing atomic number of lanthanide ions. Since the rare earth ions did not show high toxicity to the human lymphoblastoid cell line or even stimulate the growth of the cultured cells at 1 mM, it raised the possibility that we can substitute rare earth elements for the antibacterial metals usually used because of their safety.

  18. Metal Ions in Unusual Valency States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sellers, Robin M.

    1981-01-01

    Discusses reactivity of metal ions with the primary products of water radiolysis, hyper-reduced metal ions, zero-valent metal ions, unstable divalent ions from the reduction of bivalent ions, hyper-oxidized metal ions, and metal complexes. (CS)

  19. Low pressure ion chromatography with a low cost paired emitter-detector diode based detector for the determination of alkaline earth metals in water samples.

    PubMed

    Barron, Leon; Nesterenko, Pavel N; Diamond, Dermot; O'Toole, Martina; Lau, King Tong; Paull, Brett

    2006-09-01

    The use of a low pressure ion chromatograph based upon short (25 mm x 4.6 mm) surfactant coated monolithic columns and a low cost paired emitter-detector diode (PEDD) based detector, for the determination of alkaline earth metals in aqueous matrices is presented. The system was applied to the separation of magnesium, calcium, strontium and barium in less than 7min using a 0.15M KCl mobile phase at pH 3, with post-column reaction detection at 570 nm using o-cresolphthalein complexone. A comparison of the performance of the PEDD detector with a standard laboratory absorbance detector is shown, with limits of detection for magnesium and calcium using the low cost PEDD detector equal to 0.16 and 0.23 mg L(-1), respectively. Finally, the developed system was used for the determination of calcium and magnesium in a commercial spring water sample.

  20. Magnetomigration of rare-earth ions in inhomogeneous magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Franczak, Agnieszka; Binnemans, Koen; Jan Fransaer

    2016-10-05

    The effects of external inhomogenous (gradient) magnetic fields on the movement of the rare-earth ions: Dy(3+), Gd(3+) and Y(3+), in initially homogeneous aqueous solutions have been investigated. Differences in the migration of rare-earth ions in gradient magnetic fields were observed, depending on the magnetic character of the ions: paramagnetic ions of Dy(3+) and Gd(3+) move towards regions of the sample where the magnetic field gradient is the strongest, while diamagnetic ions of Y(3+) move in the opposite direction. It has been showed that the low magnetic field gradients, such the ones generated by permanent magnets, are sufficient to observe the magnetomigration effects of the ions in solution. The present work clearly establishes the behavior of magnetically different ions in initially homogeneous aqueous solutions exposed to magnetic field gradients. To this avail, a methodology for measuring the local concentration differences of metal ions in liquid samples was developed.

  1. Bioavailability of Metal Ions and Evolutionary Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Hong Enriquez, Rolando P.; Do, Trang N.

    2012-01-01

    The evolution of life on earth has been a long process that began nearly 3.5 × 109 years ago. In their initial moments, evolution was mainly influenced by anaerobic environments; with the rise of O2 and the corresponding change in bioavailability of metal ions, new mechanisms of survival were created. Here we review the relationships between ancient atmospheric conditions, metal ion bioavailability and adaptation of metals homeostasis during early evolution. A general picture linking geochemistry, biochemistry and homeostasis is supported by the reviewed literature and is further illustrated in this report using simple database searches. PMID:25371266

  2. Coordination chemistry of the alkaline earth metal ions with Zwitterionic forms of the Schift bases. X-Ray studies and other spectroscopic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajmir-Riahi, H. A.; Lotfipoor, M.

    The non-ionized forms of tetradentate Schiff bases NN'-ethylenebis(salicylideneimine), H 2L and NN'-propane-1,3-diylbis(salicylideneimine), H 2L' react with hydrated alkaline earth halide and nitrate to give complexes of the type: M(H 2L)Cl 2· nH 2O [M = Mg(II), Ca(II), Sr(II); n = 0-4], M(H 2L) 2Cl 2 [M = Ca(II), Sr(II), M(H 2L) nBr 2 [M = Ca(II), Sr(II); n = 2, 3 and Mg 2(H 2L) 3Br 4], M(H 2L) nI 2 [M = Mg(II), Ca(II), Sr(II), Ba(II); n = 2, 3)], M(H 2L) n(NO 3) 2 and M(H 2L') n(NO 1) 2[M = Mg(II), Ca(II); n = 1, 2)]. Because of distinct spectral similarities with structurally known Ca(H 2L')(NO 3) 2 compound, the Schiff bases are coordinated through the negatively charged phenolic oxygen atoms and not the nitrogen atoms of the azomethine groups, which carry the protons transferred from phenolic groups on complexation. Halide and nitrate are coordinated to the central metal ion except in 2:1 nitrato complexes where the presence of both ionic and coordinated nitrate groups are evident and also in 3:1 halide complexes where the presence of non-coordinated halide cannot be excluded. X-Ray powder photographs showed no marked similarities between Ca(H 2L')(NO 3) 2 and Mg(H 2L')(NO 3) 2 while there are some isomorphic features between the same types of halide complexes. Infrared spectra and other structural information revealed the polymeric nature of the complexes. Therefore the coordination numbers exhibited by the alkaline earth metal cations would be 4, 6 or 8 in these series of Schiff base complexes.

  3. {sup 1}H and {sup 23}Na MAS NMR spectroscopy of cationic species in CO{sub 2} selective alkaline earth metal porous silicoaluminophosphates prepared via liquid and solid state ion exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Arevalo-Hidalgo, Ana G.; Dugar, Sneha; Fu, Riqiang; Hernandez-Maldonado, Arturo J.

    2012-07-15

    The location of extraframework cations in Sr{sup 2+} and Ba{sup 2+} ion-exchanged SAPO-34 was estimated by means of {sup 1}H and {sup 23}Na MAS NMR spectroscopy and spectral deconvolution. Incorporation of the alkaline earth metal cations onto the SAPO framework was achieved via liquid state ion exchange, coupled partial detemplation/solid-state ion exchange, and combination of both techniques. MAS NMR revealed that the level of ion exchange was limited by the presence of protons and sodium cations near hexagonal prisms (site SI), which are relatively difficult to exchange with the alkaline earth metal due to steric and charge repulsion criteria. In addition, the presence of ammonium cations in the supercages facilitated the exchange of otherwise tenacious hydrogen as corroborated by unit cell compositional data as well as enhanced CO{sub 2} adsorption at low partial pressures. The extraframework ammonium species were produced from partial detemplation of the structure-directing agent employed for the SAPO-34 synthesis, tetraethylammonium. - Graphical abstract: MAS NMR was used to elucidate the position the cationic species in alkaline earth metal exchanged silicoaluminophosphates. These species played a significant role during the ion exchange process and, therefore, the materials ultimate CO{sub 2} adsorption performance. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Location of extraframework Sr{sup 2+} or Ba{sup 2+} cations was estimated by means of {sup 1}H and {sup 23}Na MAS NMR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Level of Sr{sup 2+} or Ba{sup 2+} ion exchange was limited by the presence of protons and sodium cations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Presence of ammonium cations in the supercages facilitated the exchange. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sr{sup 2+} and Ba{sup 2+} ion exchanged SAPOs are outstanding CO{sub 2} adsorbents.

  4. Metal sulfide and rare-earth phosphate nanostructures and methods of making same

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Stanislaus; Zhang, Fen

    2016-06-28

    The present invention provides a method of producing a crystalline rare earth phosphate nanostructure. The method comprising: providing a rare earth metal precursor solution and providing a phosphate precursor solution; placing a porous membrane between the metal precursor solution and the phosphate precursor solution, wherein metal cations of the metal precursor solution and phosphate ions of the phosphate precursor solution react, thereby producing a crystalline rare earth metal phosphate nanostructure.

  5. Adsorption of Ni(II) and Cd(II) from water by novel chelating sponge and the effect of alkali-earth metal ions on the adsorption.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Cheng; Wang, Jinnan; Yang, Xin; Li, Aimin; Philippe, Corvini

    2014-01-15

    Novel chelating sponge (PVA-M-H) was prepared with polyvinyl alcohol by graft polymerization and nucleophilic substitution. E.A, SEM, FT-IR, (13)CNMR, and XPS analyses were used to characterize PVA-M-H. The equilibrium adsorption capacities of PVA-M-H for Ni(II) and Cd(II) were 65.39 and 125.11mgg(-1), respectively. Within the range of 278-308K, the adsorption enthalpy changes of Ni(II) and Cd(II) on PVA-M-H were about 36.39-37.72kJmol(-1), and the free energy were about -13.27 to -1.7kJmol(-1). Both pseudo-first- and -second-order equations fit the adsorption kinetic curves well, and the initial adsorption rates of Ni(II) and Cd(II) onto PVA-M-H were 17.83 and 34.81mg (gmin)(-1), respectively. Although the presence of alkali-earth metal ions in solution decreased Ni(II) and Cd(II) removal, PVA-M-H still retained more than 60 and 80% of its adsorption capacity even as the concentration of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) was up to 10mmolL(-1), respectively. Both 0.1M HCl and 0.1M EDTA solution could desorb Ni(II) and Cd(II) from PVA-M-H effectively, and the adsorption capacity of PVA-M-H for Ni(II) and Cd(II) could still maintain more than 90% level without any obvious decrease at the fifth cycle.

  6. Rare Earth Metals: Resourcefulness and Recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shijie

    2013-10-01

    When we appreciate the digital revolution carried over from the twentieth century with mobile communication and the Internet, and when we enjoy our high-tech lifestyle filled with iDevices, hybrid cars, wind turbines, and solar cells in this new century, we should also appreciate that all of these advanced products depend on rare earth metals to function. Although there are only 136,000 tons of annual worldwide demand, (Cho, Rare Earth Metals, Will We Have Enough?)1 rare earth metals are becoming such hot commodities on international markets, due to not only to their increasing uses, including in most critical military hardware, but also to Chinese growth, which accounts for 95% of global rare earth metal production. Hence, the 2013 technical calendar topic, planned by the TMS/Hydrometallurgy and Electrometallurgy Committee, is particularly relevant, with four articles (including this commentary) contributed to the JOM October Issue discussing rare earth metals' resourcefulness and recovery.

  7. Recycling of rare earth metals from rare earth-transition metal alloy scrap by liquid metal extraction

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, T.W.; Schmidt, F.A.

    1995-08-01

    A method is described for treating rare earth metal-bearing scrap, waste or other material (e.g. Nd--Fe--B or Dy--Tb--Fe scrap) to recover the rare earth metal comprising melting the rare earth metal-bearing material, melting a Group IIA metal extractant, such as Mg, Ca, or Ba, in which the rare earth is soluble in the molten state, and contacting the melted material and melted extractant at a temperature and for a time effective to extract the rare earth from the melted material into the melted extractant. The rare earth metal is separated from the extractant metal by vacuum sublimation or distillation. 2 figs.

  8. Recycling of rare earth metals from rare earth-transition metal alloy scrap by liquid metal extraction

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, Timothy W.; Schmidt, Frederick A.

    1995-08-01

    Method of treating rare earth metal-bearing scrap, waste or other material (e.g. Nd--Fe--B or Dy--Tb--Fe scrap) to recover the rare earth metal comprising melting the rare earth metal-bearing material, melting a Group IIA metal extractant, such as Mg, Ca, or Ba, in which the rare earth is soluble in the molten state, and contacting the melted material and melted extractant at a temperature and for a time effective to extract the rare earth from the melted material into the melted extractant. The rare earth metal is separated from the extractant metal by vacuum sublimation or distillation.

  9. Alkaline earth metal catalysts for asymmetric reactions.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Shū; Yamashita, Yasuhiro

    2011-01-18

    The group 2 alkaline earth metals calcium (Ca), strontium (Sr), and barium (Ba) are among the most common elements on Earth, abundant in both the sea and the Earth's crust. Although they are familiar in our daily lives, their application to organic synthesis has, so far, been limited. Some particularly useful properties of these elements include (i) low electronegativity, (ii) a stable oxidation state of +2, meaning that they can potentially form two covalent bonds with anions, and (iii) the ability to occupy a variety of coordination sites due to their large ionic radius. Furthermore, the alkaline earth metals, found between the group 1 and group 3 elements, show mild but significant Lewis acidity, which can be harnessed to control coordinative molecules via a Lewis acid-base interaction. Taken together, these characteristics make the metals Ca, Sr, and Ba very promising components of highly functionalized acid-base catalysts. In this Account, we describe the development of chiral alkaline earth metal catalysts for asymmetric carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions. Recently prepared chiral alkaline earth metal complexes have shown high diastereo- and enantioselectivities in fundamental and important chemical transformations. We chose chiral bisoxazoline (Box) derivatives bearing a methylene tether as a ligand for chiral modification. These molecules are very useful because they can covalently coordinate to alkaline earth metals in a bidentate fashion through deprotonation of the tether portion. It was found that chiral calcium-Box complexes could successfully promote catalytic asymmetric 1,4-addition and [3 + 2] cycloaddition reactions with high diastereo- and enantioselectivities. Both the calcium-Box complexes and chiral strontium-bis-sulfonamide and chiral barium-BINOLate complexes could catalyze asymmetric 1,4-addition reactions with high enantioselectivities. Furthermore, we designed a calcium-neutral coordinative ligand complex as a new type of chiral alkaline

  10. Metal ion-containing epoxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoakley, D. M.; St.clair, A. K.

    1982-01-01

    A variety of metallic and organometallic complexes to be used as potential additives for an epoxy used by the aerospace industry as a composite matrix resin were investigated. A total of 9 complexes were screened for compatibility and for their ability to accelerate or inhibit the cure of a highly crosslinkable epoxy resin. Methods for combining the metallic complexes with the resin were investigated, gel times recorded, and cure exotherms studied by differential scanning calorimetry. Glass transition temperatures of cured metal ion containing epoxy castings were determined by thermomechanical analysis. Thermal stabilities of the castings were determined by thermogravimetric analysis. Mechanical strength and stiffness of these doped epoxies were also measured.

  11. Alkali metal and alkali earth metal gadolinium halide scintillators

    DOEpatents

    Bourret-Courchesne, Edith; Derenzo, Stephen E.; Parms, Shameka; Porter-Chapman, Yetta D.; Wiggins, Latoria K.

    2016-08-02

    The present invention provides for a composition comprising an inorganic scintillator comprising a gadolinium halide, optionally cerium-doped, having the formula A.sub.nGdX.sub.m:Ce; wherein A is nothing, an alkali metal, such as Li or Na, or an alkali earth metal, such as Ba; X is F, Br, Cl, or I; n is an integer from 1 to 2; m is an integer from 4 to 7; and the molar percent of cerium is 0% to 100%. The gadolinium halides or alkali earth metal gadolinium halides are scintillators and produce a bright luminescence upon irradiation by a suitable radiation.

  12. Binding to Redox-Inactive Alkali and Alkaline Earth Metal Ions Strongly Deactivates the C-H Bonds of Tertiary Amides toward Hydrogen Atom Transfer to Reactive Oxygen Centered Radicals.

    PubMed

    Salamone, Michela; Carboni, Giulia; Mangiacapra, Livia; Bietti, Massimo

    2015-09-18

    The effect of alkali and alkaline earth metal ions on the reactions of the cumyloxyl radical (CumO(•)) with N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) and N,N-dimethylacetamide (DMA) was studied by laser flash photolysis. In acetonitrile, a >2 order of magnitude decrease in the rate constant for hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) from the C-H bonds of these substrates (kH) was measured after addition of Li(+). This behavior was explained in terms of a strong interaction between Li(+) and the oxygen atom of both DMF and DMA that increases the extent of positive charge on the amide, leading to C-H bond deactivation toward HAT to the electrophilic radical CumO(•). Similar effects were observed after addition of Ca(2+), which was shown to strongly bind up to four equivalents of the amide substrates. With Mg(2+), weak C-H deactivation was observed for the first two substrate equivalents followed by stronger deactivation for two additional equivalents. No C-H deactivation was observed in DMSO after addition of Li(+) and Mg(2+). These results point toward the important role played by metal ion Lewis acidity and solvent Lewis basicity, indicating that C-H deactivation can be modulated by varying the nature of the metal cation and solvent and allowing for careful control over the HAT reactivity of amide substrates.

  13. Catalysis using hydrous metal oxide ion exchangers

    DOEpatents

    Dosch, R.G.; Stephens, H.P.; Stohl, F.V.

    1983-07-21

    In a process which is catalyzed by a catalyst comprising an active metal on a carrier, said metal being active as a catalyst for the process, an improvement is provided wherein the catalyst is a hydrous, alkali metal or alkaline earth metal titanate, zirconate, niobate or tantalate wherein alkali or alkaline earth metal cations have been exchanged with a catalytically effective amount of cations of said metal.

  14. Catalysis using hydrous metal oxide ion exchanges

    DOEpatents

    Dosch, Robert G.; Stephens, Howard P.; Stohl, Frances V.

    1985-01-01

    In a process which is catalyzed by a catalyst comprising an active metal on a carrier, said metal being active as a catalyst for the process, an improvement is provided wherein the catalyst is a hydrous, alkali metal or alkaline earth metal titanate, zirconate, niobate or tantalate wherein alkali or alkaline earth metal cations have been exchanged with a catalytically effective amount of cations of said metal.

  15. Synthesis, characterization and cytotoxicity of rare earth metal ion complexes of N,N‧-bis-(2-thiophenecarboxaldimine)-3,3‧-diaminobenzidene, Schiff base ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakir, Mohammad; Abbasi, Ambreen; Faraz, Mohammad; Sherwani, Asif

    2015-12-01

    Lanthanide complexes of La3+, Pr3+, Nd3+, Gd3+, Er3+ of general formula [Ln2 L(H2O)4(NO3)4](NO3)2·2H2O have been synthesized from Schiff base, N,N‧-bis-(2-thiophenecarboxaldimine)-3,3‧-diaminobenzidene. The complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductance, UV-Vis, fluorescence, FT-IR,1H NMR, mass spectroscopy, EDX, SEM and thermal analysis. FT-IR spectral data suggested that ligand coordinate with metal ions through azomethine nitrogen and uncondensed amino group. Molar conductance data revealed 1:2 electrolytic nature of complexes. From the analytical data, the stoichiometry of the complexes was found to be 1:2 (ligand:metal). Thephysico-chemical data suggested eight coordination number for Ln(III)Schiffbase complexes. SEM analysis shows morphological changes in the surfaces of complexes as compared to free ligand. Thermal decomposition profiles were consistent with proposed formulations. The anticancer activity of the complexes and theSchiffbase ligand has been studied towards human cervical cancer celllines (HeLa) and human breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7) and it was found that complexes exhibited greater activity than theSchiffbase.

  16. Alkaline Earth Metal Zirconate Perovskites MZrO3 (M=Ba(2+), Sr(2+), Ca(2+)) Derived from Molecular Precursors and Doped with Eu(3+) Ions.

    PubMed

    Drąg-Jarząbek, Anna; John, Łukasz; Petrus, Rafał; Kosińska-Klähn, Magdalena; Sobota, Piotr

    2016-03-24

    The effect of alkaline earth metal alkoxides on the protonation of zirconocene dichloride was investigated. This approach enabled the design of compounds with preset molecular structures for generating high-purity binary metal oxide perovskites MZrO3 (M=Ba(2+), Sr(2+), Ca(2+)). Single-source molecular precursors [Ba4 Zr2 (μ6 -O)(μ3 ,η(2)-OR)8 (OR)2(η(2) -HOR)2 (HOR)2 Cl4], [Sr4 Zr2 (μ6 -O)(μ3 ,η(2)-OR)8 (OR)2 (HOR)4 Cl4], [Ca4 Zr2 (μ6-O)(μ3 ,η(2)-OR)8 (OR)2 Cl4], and [Ca6 Zr2 (μ2 ,η(2)-OR)12 (μ-Cl)2 (η(2) -HOR)4 Cl6 ]⋅8 CH2 Cl2 were prepared via elimination of the cyclopentadienyl ring from Cp2 ZrCl2 as CpH in the presence of M(OR)2 and alcohol ROH (ROH=CH3OCH2 CH2OH) as a source of protons. The resulting complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, IR and NMR spectroscopy, and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The compounds were then thermally decomposed to MCl2 /MZrO3 mixtures. Leaching of MCl2 from the raw powder with deionized water produced highly pure perovskite-like oxide particles of 40-80 nm in size. Luminescence studies on Eu(3+)-doped MZrO3 revealed that the perovskites are attractive host lattices for potential applications in display technology.

  17. Mechanistic Enzyme Models: Pyridoxal and Metal Ions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, S. E.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Background information, procedures, and results are presented for experiments on the pyridoxal/metal ion model system. These experiments illustrate catalysis through Schiff's base formation between aldehydes/ketones and primary amines, catalysis by metal ions, and the predictable manner in which metal ions inhibit or catalyze reactions. (JN)

  18. Reversible photodeposition and dissolution of metal ions

    DOEpatents

    Foster, Nancy S.; Koval, Carl A.; Noble, Richard D.

    1994-01-01

    A cyclic photocatalytic process for treating waste water containing metal and organic contaminants. In one embodiment of the method, metal ions are photoreduced onto the photocatalyst and the metal concentrated by resolubilization in a smaller volume. In another embodiment of the method, contaminant organics are first oxidized, then metal ions removed by photoreductive deposition. The present invention allows the photocatalyst to be recycled until nearly complete removal of metal ions and organic contaminants is achieved.

  19. Synthesis, structure and reactivity of rare-earth metal complexes containing anionic phosphorus ligands.

    PubMed

    Li, Tianshu; Kaercher, Sabrina; Roesky, Peter W

    2014-01-07

    A comprehensive review of structurally characterized rare-earth metal complexes containing anionic phosphorus ligands is presented. Since rare-earth elements form hard ions and phosphorus is considered as a soft ligand, the rare-earth metal phosphorus coordination is regarded as a less favorite combination. Three classes of phosphorus ligands, (1) the monoanionic organophosphide ligands (PR2(-)) bearing one negative charge on the phosphorus atom; (2) the dianionic phosphinidene (PR(2-)) and P(3-) ligands; and (3) the pure inorganic polyphosphide ligands (Pn(x-)), are included here. Particular attention has been paid to the synthesis, structure, and reactivity of the rare-earth metal phosphides.

  20. A set of alkali and alkaline-earth coordination polymers based on the ligand 2-(1H-benzotriazol-1-yl) acetic acid: Effects the radius of metal ions on structures and properties

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jin-Hua; Tang, Gui-Mei; Qin, Ting-Xiao; Yan, Shi-Chen; Wang, Yong-Tao; Cui, Yue-Zhi; Weng Ng, Seik

    2014-11-15

    Four new metal coordination complexes, namely, [Na(BTA)]{sub n} (1), [K{sub 2}(BTA){sub 2}(μ{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O)]{sub n} (2), and [M(BTA){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]{sub n} (M=Ca(II) and Sr(II) for 3 and 4, respectively) [BTA=2-(1H-benzotriazol-1-yl) acetic anion], have been obtained under hydrothermal condition, by reacting the different alkali and alkaline-earth metal hydroxides with HBTA. Complexes 1–4 were structurally characterized by X-ray single-crystal diffraction, EA, IR, PXRD, and thermogravimetry analysis (TGA). These complexes display low-dimensional features displaying various two-dimensional (2D) and one-dimensional (1D) coordination motifs. Complex 1 displays a 2D layer with the thickness of 1.5 nm and possesses a topologic structure of a 11 nodal net with Schläfli symbol of (3{sup 18}). Complex 2 also shows a thick 2D sheet and its topologic structure is a 9 nodes with Schläfli symbol of (3{sup 11}×4{sup 2}). Complexes 3 and 4 possess a 1D linear chain and further stack via hydrogen bonding interactions to generate a three-dimensional supramolecular architecture. These results suggest that both the coordination preferences of the metal ions and the versatile nature of this flexible ligand play a critical role in the final structures. The luminescent spectra show strong emission intensities in complexes 1–4, which display violet photoluminescence. Additionally, ferroelectric, dielectric and nonlinear optic (NLO) second-harmonic generation (SHG) properties of 2 are discussed in detail. - Graphical abstract: A set of alkali and alkaline-earth metal coordination polymers were hydrothermally synthesized by 2-(1H-benzotriazol-1-yl)acetic acid, displaying interesting topologic motifs from two-dimension to one-dimension and specific physical properties. - Highlights: • Alkali and alkaline-earth metal coordination polymers have been obtained. • The ligand 2-(1H-benzotriazol-1-yl)acetic acid has been adopted. • The two-dimensional and one

  1. Enhanced Laser Cooling of Rare-Earth-Ion-Doped Composite Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, You-Hua; Zhong, Biao; Ji, Xian-Ming; Yin, Jian-Ping

    2008-10-01

    We predict enhanced laser cooling performance of rare-earth-ions-doped glasses containing nanometre-sized ul-traBne particles, which can be achieved by the enhancement of local Geld around rare earth ions, owing to the surface plasma resonance of small metallic particles. The influence of energy transfer between ions and the particle is theoretically discussed. Depending on the particle size and the ion emission quantum efficiency, the enhancement of the absorption is predicted. It is concluded that the absorption are greatly enhanced in these composite materials, the cooling power is increased as compared to the bulk material.

  2. Liquid metal ion source and alloy

    DOEpatents

    Clark, Jr., William M.; Utlaut, Mark W.; Behrens, Robert G.; Szklarz, Eugene G.; Storms, Edmund K.; Santandrea, Robert P.; Swanson, Lynwood W.

    1988-10-04

    A liquid metal ion source and alloy, wherein the species to be emitted from the ion source is contained in a congruently vaporizing alloy. In one embodiment, the liquid metal ion source acts as a source of arsenic, and in a source alloy the arsenic is combined with palladium, preferably in a liquid alloy having a range of compositions from about 24 to about 33 atomic percent arsenic. Such an alloy may be readily prepared by a combustion synthesis technique. Liquid metal ion sources thus prepared produce arsenic ions for implantation, have long lifetimes, and are highly stable in operation.

  3. Hydrated metal ions in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Martin K

    2007-01-01

    Studying metal ion solvation, especially hydration, in the gas phase has developed into a field that is dominated by a tight interaction between experiment and theory. Since the studied species carry charge, mass spectrometry is an indispensable tool in all experiments. Whereas gas-phase coordination chemistry and reactions of bare metal ions are reasonably well understood, systems containing a larger number of solvent molecules are still difficult to understand. This review focuses on the rich chemistry of hydrated metal ions in the gas phase, covering coordination chemistry, charge separation in multiply charged systems, as well as intracluster and ion-molecule reactions. Key ideas of metal ion solvation in the gas phase are illustrated with rare-gas solvated metal ions.

  4. Instability of some divalent rare earth ions and photochromic effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egranov, A. V.; Sizova, T. Yu.; Shendrik, R. Yu.; Smirnova, N. A.

    2016-03-01

    It was shown that the divalent rare earth ions (La, Ce, Gd, Tb, Lu, and Y) in cubic sites in alkaline earth fluorides are unstable with respect to electron autodetachment since its d1(eg) ground state is located in the conduction band which is consistent with the general tendency of these ions in various compounds. The localization of doubly degenerate d1(eg) level in the conduction band creates a configuration instability around the divalent rare earth ion that leading to the formation of anion vacancy in the nearest neighborhood, as was reported in the previous paper [A. Egranov, T. Sizova, Configurational instability at the excited impurity ions in alkaline earth fluorites, J. Phys. Chem. Solids 74 (2013) 530-534]. Thus, the formation of the stable divalent ions as La, Ce, Gd, Tb, Lu, and Y (PC+ centers) in CaF2 and SrF2 crystals during x-ray irradiation occurs via the formation of charged anion vacancies near divalent ions (Re2+va), which lower the ground state of the divalent ion relative to the conductivity band. Photochromic effect occurs under thermally or optically stimulated electron transition from the divalent rare earth ion to the neighboring anion vacancy and reverse under ultraviolet light irradiation. It is shown that the optical absorption of the PC+ centers due to d → d and d → f transitions of the divalent rare-earth ion.

  5. Correlations in rare-earth transition-metal permanent magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Skomski, R. Manchanda, P.; Kashyap, A.

    2015-05-07

    It is investigated how electron-electron correlations affect the intrinsic properties of rare-earth transition-metal magnets. Focusing on orbital moment and anisotropy, we perform model calculations for 3d-4f alloys and density-functional theory (DFT) calculations for NdCo{sub 5}. On an independent-electron level, the use of a single Slater determinant with broken spin symmetry introduces Hund's rule correlations, which govern the behavior of rare-earth ions and of alloys described by the local spin density approximation (LSDA) and LSDA + U approximations to DFT. By contrast, rare-earth ions in intermetallics involve configuration interactions between two or more Slater determinants and lead to phenomena such as spin-charge distribution. Analyzing DFT as a Legendre transformation and using Bethe's crystal-field theory, we show that the corresponding density functionals are very different from familiar LSDA-type expressions and outline the effect of spin-charge separation on the magnetocrystalline anisotropy.

  6. Pseudo ribbon metal ion beam source

    SciTech Connect

    Stepanov, Igor B. Ryabchikov, Alexander I.; Sivin, Denis O.; Verigin, Dan A.

    2014-02-15

    The paper describes high broad metal ion source based on dc macroparticle filtered vacuum arc plasma generation with the dc ion-beam extraction. The possibility of formation of pseudo ribbon beam of metal ions with the parameters: ion beam length 0.6 m, ion current up to 0.2 A, accelerating voltage 40 kV, and ion energy up to 160 kV has been demonstrated. The pseudo ribbon ion beam is formed from dc vacuum arc plasma. The results of investigation of the vacuum arc evaporator ion-emission properties are presented. The influence of magnetic field strength near the cathode surface on the arc spot movement and ion-emission properties of vacuum-arc discharge for different cathode materials are determined. It was shown that vacuum-arc discharge stability can be reached when the magnetic field strength ranges from 40 to 70 G on the cathode surface.

  7. Separation of metal ions from aqueous solutions

    DOEpatents

    Almon, Amy C.

    1994-01-01

    A process and apparatus for quantitatively and selectively separating metal ions from mixtures thereof in aqueous solution. The apparatus includes, in combination, a horizontal electrochemical flow cell containing flow bulk electrolyte solution and an aqueous, metal ion-containing solution, the cell containing a metal mesh working electrode, a counter electrode positioned downstream from the working electrode, an independent variable power supply/potentiostat positioned outside of the flow cell and connected to the electrodes, and optionally a detector such as a chromatographic detector, positioned outside the flow cell. This apparatus and its operation has significant application where trace amounts of metal ions are to be separated.

  8. METHOD OF MAKING ALLOYS OF SECOND RARE EARTH SERIES METALS

    DOEpatents

    Baker, R.D.; Hayward, B.R.

    1963-01-01

    >This invention relates to a process for alloying the second rare earth series metals with Mo, Nb, or Zr. A halide of the rare earth metal is mixed with about 1 to 20 at.% of an oxide of Mo, Nb, or Zr. Iodine and an alkali or alkaline earth metal are added, and the resulting mixture is heated in an inert atmosphere to 350 deg C. (AEC)

  9. Metal enhanced fluorescence in rare earth doped plasmonic core-shell nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Derom, S; Berthelot, A; Pillonnet, A; Benamara, O; Jurdyc, A M; Girard, C; Colas des Francs, G

    2013-12-13

    We theoretically and numerically investigate metal enhanced fluorescence of plasmonic core-shell nanoparticles doped with rare earth (RE) ions. Particle shape and size are engineered to maximize the average enhancement factor (AEF) of the overall doped shell. We show that the highest enhancement (11 in the visible and 7 in the near-infrared) is achieved by tuning either the dipolar or the quadrupolar particle resonance to the rare earth ion's excitation wavelength. Additionally, the calculated AEFs are compared to experimental data reported in the literature, obtained in similar conditions (plasmon mediated enhancement) or when a metal-RE energy transfer mechanism is involved.

  10. Different Adsorption Behavior of Rare Earth and Metallic Ion Complexes on Langmuir Mono layers Probed by Sum-Frequency Generation Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Woongmo; Vaknin, David; Kim, Doseok

    2013-02-25

    Adsorption behavior of counterions under a Langmuir monolayer was investigated by sum-frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy. By comparing SFG spectra of arachidic acid (AA) Langmuir monolayer/water interface with and without added salt, it was found that the simple trivalent cation La3+ adsorbed on AA monolayer only when the carboxylic headgroups are charged (deprotonated), implying that counterion adsorption is induced by Coulomb interaction. On the other hand, metal hydroxide complex Fe(OH)3 adsorbed even on a charge-neutral AA monolayer, indicating that the adsorption of iron hydroxide is due to chemical interaction such as covalent or hydrogen bonding to the headgroup of the molecules at the monolayer.

  11. [Metal ions restrain the elimination of 4-tert-octylphenol by delta-MnO2].

    PubMed

    Li, Fei-Li; Mou, Hua-Qian

    2013-06-01

    The effect of metal ions on elimination of 4-t-OP by synthetic delta-MnO2 suspension at pH 4.0 was studied. Experiments indicated that the removal of 4-t-OP by delta-MnO2 achieved 100% at reaction time of 150 min. However, the removal of 4-t-OP by delta-MnO2 was restrained when metal ions were added, and the higher concentration of metal ion was, the stronger the inhibition produced. Additionally, there were apparent differences among the inhibitory effect of the tested metal ions. Firstly, Pb2+ and Mn2+ had the strongest effect at pH 4.0, followed by the transition metal ions, then the alkaline earth ions, while the alkali metal ions had little influence on the removal of 4-t-OP by delta-MnO2. Also comparing the adsorption results of metal ions by delta-MnO2, Pb2+ showed the greatest attraction with delta-MnO2, and among the other metal ions, transition metal ions were adsorbed a little more strongly on delta-MnO2 than alkaline earth metal ions. Consequences showed that the inhibitory effects of metal ions were due to their occupying reactive sites on delta-MnO2 surface, which competed with 4-t-OP. Moreover, the dissimilar suppressions were contributed by the different adsorption capacities, surface structure change of MnO2 and the difference of free metal ion percentage in solution as well as metal ions radii.

  12. Efficient separation of transition metals from rare earths by an undiluted phosphonium thiocyanate ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Rout, Alok; Binnemans, Koen

    2016-06-21

    The ionic liquid trihexyl(tetradecyl)phosphonium thiocyanate has been used for the extraction of the transition metal ions Co(ii), Ni(ii), Zn(ii), and the rare-earth ions La(iii), Sm(iii) and Eu(iii) from aqueous solutions containing nitrate or chloride salts. The transition metal ions showed a high affinity for the ionic liquid phase and were efficiently extracted, while the extraction efficiency of the rare-earth ions was low. This difference in extraction behavior enabled separation of the pairs Co(ii)/Sm(iii), Ni(ii)/La(iii) and Zn(ii)/Eu(iii). These separations are relevant for the recycling of rare earths and transition metals from samarium cobalt permanent magnets, nickel metal hydride batteries and lamp phosphors, respectively. The extraction of metal ions from a chloride or nitrate solution with a thiocyanate ionic liquid is an example of "split-anion extraction", where different anions are present in the aqueous and ionic liquid phase. Close to 100% loading was possible for Co(ii) and Zn(ii) up to a concentration of 40 g L(-1) of the transition metal salt in the initial aqueous feed solution, whereas the extraction efficiency for Ni(ii) gradually decreased with increase in the initial feed concentration. Stripping of Co(ii), Zn(ii) and Ni(ii) from the loaded ionic liquid phase was possible by a 15 wt% NH3 solution. The ionic liquid could reused after extraction and stripping.

  13. Gyroscopic g factor of rare earth metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogata, Y.; Chudo, H.; Ono, M.; Harii, K.; Matsuo, M.; Maekawa, S.; Saitoh, E.

    2017-02-01

    We develop the in situ magnetization measurement apparatus for observing the Barnett effect consisting of a fluxgate sensor, a high speed rotor with frequencies of up to 1.5 kHz, and a magnetic shield at room temperature. The effective magnetic field (Barnett field) in a sample arising from rotation magnetizes the sample and is proportional to the rotational frequency. The gyroscopic g factor, g ' , of rare earth metals, in particular, Gd, Tb, and Dy, was estimated to be 2.00 ± 0.08, 1.53 ± 0.17, and 1.15 ± 0.32, respectively, from the slopes of the rotation dependence of the Barnett field. This study provides a technique to determine the g ' factor even in samples where the spectroscopic method may not be available.

  14. Metal ion substrate inhibition of ferrochelatase.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Gregory A; Sampson, Matthew P; Ferreira, Gloria C

    2008-08-29

    Ferrochelatase catalyzes the insertion of ferrous iron into protoporphyrin IX to form heme. Robust kinetic analyses of the reaction mechanism are complicated by the instability of ferrous iron in aqueous solution, particularly at alkaline pH values. At pH 7.00 the half-life for spontaneous oxidation of ferrous ion is approximately 2 min in the absence of metal complexing additives, which is sufficient for direct comparisons of alternative metal ion substrates with iron. These analyses reveal that purified recombinant ferrochelatase from both murine and yeast sources inserts not only ferrous iron but also divalent cobalt, zinc, nickel, and copper into protoporphyrin IX to form the corresponding metalloporphyrins but with considerable mechanistic variability. Ferrous iron is the preferred metal ion substrate in terms of apparent k(cat) and is also the only metal ion substrate not subject to severe substrate inhibition. Substrate inhibition occurs in the order Cu(2+) > Zn(2+) > Co(2+) > Ni(2+) and can be alleviated by the addition of metal complexing agents such as beta-mercaptoethanol or imidazole to the reaction buffer. These data indicate the presence of two catalytically significant metal ion binding sites that may coordinately regulate a selective processivity for the various potential metal ion substrates.

  15. Effect of alkaline-earth ions on the dynamics of alkali ions in bismuthate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, A.; Ghosh, A.

    2005-12-01

    The effect of alkaline earth ions on the dynamics of Li+ ions in bismuthate glasses has been studied in the temperature range 353-503K and in the frequency range 10Hz-2MHz . The dc conductivity increases and activation energy decreases with the increase of a particular alkaline earth content for the glasses with a fixed alkali content. The increased modification of the network due to the increase in alkaline earth content in the compositions is responsible for the increasing conductivity. Also the compositions with smaller alkaline earth ions were found to exhibit higher conductivity. Although the conductivity increases with the decrease of ionic radii of alkaline earth ions, the activation energy shows a maximum for the Sr ion. The electric modulus and the conductivity formalisms have been employed to study the relaxation dynamics of charge carriers in these glasses. The alkali ions were observed to change their dynamics with the change of the alkaline earth ions. The same anomalous trend for activation energy for the conductivity relaxation frequency and the hopping frequency was also observed for glasses containing SrO. It was also observed that the mobile lithium ion concentrations are independent of nature of alkaline earth ions in these glasses.

  16. Metal Ion Modeling Using Classical Mechanics.

    PubMed

    Li, Pengfei; Merz, Kenneth M

    2017-02-08

    Metal ions play significant roles in numerous fields including chemistry, geochemistry, biochemistry, and materials science. With computational tools increasingly becoming important in chemical research, methods have emerged to effectively face the challenge of modeling metal ions in the gas, aqueous, and solid phases. Herein, we review both quantum and classical modeling strategies for metal ion-containing systems that have been developed over the past few decades. This Review focuses on classical metal ion modeling based on unpolarized models (including the nonbonded, bonded, cationic dummy atom, and combined models), polarizable models (e.g., the fluctuating charge, Drude oscillator, and the induced dipole models), the angular overlap model, and valence bond-based models. Quantum mechanical studies of metal ion-containing systems at the semiempirical, ab initio, and density functional levels of theory are reviewed as well with a particular focus on how these methods inform classical modeling efforts. Finally, conclusions and future prospects and directions are offered that will further enhance the classical modeling of metal ion-containing systems.

  17. Metal Ion Modeling Using Classical Mechanics

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Metal ions play significant roles in numerous fields including chemistry, geochemistry, biochemistry, and materials science. With computational tools increasingly becoming important in chemical research, methods have emerged to effectively face the challenge of modeling metal ions in the gas, aqueous, and solid phases. Herein, we review both quantum and classical modeling strategies for metal ion-containing systems that have been developed over the past few decades. This Review focuses on classical metal ion modeling based on unpolarized models (including the nonbonded, bonded, cationic dummy atom, and combined models), polarizable models (e.g., the fluctuating charge, Drude oscillator, and the induced dipole models), the angular overlap model, and valence bond-based models. Quantum mechanical studies of metal ion-containing systems at the semiempirical, ab initio, and density functional levels of theory are reviewed as well with a particular focus on how these methods inform classical modeling efforts. Finally, conclusions and future prospects and directions are offered that will further enhance the classical modeling of metal ion-containing systems. PMID:28045509

  18. ION EXCHANGE SOFTENING: EFFECTS ON METAL CONCENTRATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A corrosion control pipe loop study to evaluate the effect of ion exchange water softening on metal leaching from household plumbing materials was conducted on two different water qualities having different pH's and hardness levels. The results showed that removing hardness ions ...

  19. Bioinorganic Chemistry of the Alkali Metal Ions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngsam; Nguyen, Thuy-Tien T; Churchill, David G

    2016-01-01

    The common Group 1 alkali metals are indeed ubiquitous on earth, in the oceans and in biological systems. In this introductory chapter, concepts involving aqueous chemistry and aspects of general coordination chemistry and oxygen atom donor chemistry are introduced. Also, there are nuclear isotopes of importance. A general discussion of Group 1 begins from the prevalence of the ions, and from a comparison of their ionic radii and ionization energies. While oxygen and water molecule binding have the most relevance to biology and in forming a detailed understanding between the elements, there is a wide range of basic chemistry that is potentially important, especially with respect to biological chelation and synthetic multi-dentate ligand design. The elements are widely distributed in life forms, in the terrestrial environment and in the oceans. The details about the workings in animal, as well as plant life are presented in this volume. Important biometallic aspects of human health and medicine are introduced as well. Seeing as the elements are widely present in biology, various particular endogenous molecules and enzymatic systems can be studied. Sodium and potassium are by far the most important and central elements for consideration. Aspects of lithium, rubidium, cesium and francium chemistry are also included; they help in making important comparisons related to the coordination chemistry of Na(+) and K(+). Physical methods are also introduced.

  20. Metal-ion recycle technology for metal electroplating waste waters

    SciTech Connect

    Sauer, N.N.; Smith, B.F.

    1993-06-01

    As a result of a collaboration with Boeing Aerospace, the authors have begun a program to identify suitable treatments or to develop new treatments for electroplating baths. The target baths are mixed-metal or alloy baths that are being integrated into the Boeing electroplating complex. These baths, which are designed to replace highly toxic chromium and cadmium baths, contain mixtures of two metals, either nickel-tungsten, nickel-zinc, or zinc-tin. This report reviews the literature and details currently available on emerging technologies that could affect recovery of metals from electroplating baths under development by Boeing Aerospace. This literature survey summarizes technologies relevant to the recovery of metals from electroplating processes. The authors expanded the scope to investigate single metal ion recovery technologies that could be applied to metal ion recovery from alloy baths. This review clearly showed that the electroplating industry has traditionally relied on precipitation and more recently on electrowinning as its waste treatment methods. Despite the almost ubiquitous use of precipitation to remove contaminant metal ions from waste electroplating baths and rinse waters, this technology is clearly no longer feasible for the electroplating industry for several reasons. First, disposal of unstabilized sludge is no longer allowed by law. Second, these methods are no longer adequate as metal-removal techniques because they cannot meet stringent new metal discharge limits. Third, precious resources are being wasted or discarded because these methods do not readily permit recovery of the target metal ions. As a result, emerging technologies for metal recovery are beginning to see application to electroplating waste recycle. This report summarizes current research in these areas. Included are descriptions of various membrane technologies, such as reverse osmosis and ultrafiltration, ion exchange and chelating polymer technology, and electrodialysis.

  1. Recent developments in the field of organic heterobimetallic compounds of the alkaline-earth metals.

    PubMed

    Westerhausen, Matthias

    2006-10-28

    Heterobimetallic compounds of the alkaline-earth metals show a wide structural variety with strongly differing reactivity patterns. The combination of magnesium and alkali metal amides yields cyclic molecules with an extreme high reactivity which often are considered as "inverse crowns" with the metal atoms as coordination sites for Lewis bases. In other metallates of the alkaline-earth metals an activation of alkyl groups succeeds. In alkaline-earth metal zincates an inverse coordination of the type M(2)[(mu-R)(2)ZnR](2) is observed and the alkyl groups are in bridging positions between zinc and the s-block metals thus forming a very reactive M-C-Zn three-center-two-electron bond. Furthermore, the metals of the carbon group form alkaline-earth metal-silicon, -germanium and -tin bonds or, in the presence of very strong Lewis bases, even solvent-separated ion pairs. For electronegative substituents at tin an inverse coordination mode such as M[(mu-R)(2)SnR](2) is observed.

  2. Metal vapor arc ion plating

    DOEpatents

    Bertram, L.A.; Fisher, R.W.; Mattox, D.M.; Zanner, F.J.

    1986-09-09

    A method and apparatus for ion plating are described. The apparatus uses more negative than a first electrode voltage in a vacuum arc remelt system to attract low energy ions from the anode electrode to the article to be plated. 2 figs.

  3. Computational Design of Metal Ion Sequestering Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, Benjamin P.; Rapko, Brian M.

    2006-06-01

    Organic ligands that exhibit a high degree of metal ion recognition are essential precursors for developing separation processes and sensors for metal ions. Since the beginning of the nuclear era, much research has focused on discovering ligands that target specific radionuclides. Members of the Group 1A and 2A cations (e.g., Cs, Sr, Ra) and the f-block metals (actinides and lanthanides) are of primary concern to DOE. Although there has been some success in identifying ligand architectures that exhibit a degree of metal ion recognition, the ability to control binding affinity and selectivity remains a significant challenge. The traditional approach for discovering such ligands has involved lengthy programs of organic synthesis and testing that, in the absence of reliable methods for screening compounds before synthesis, have resulted in much wasted research effort.

  4. Computational Design of Metal Ion Sequestering Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, Benjamin P.; Rapko, Brian M.

    2005-06-15

    Organic ligands that exhibit a high degree of metal ion recognition are essential precursors for developing separation processes and sensors for metal ions. Since the beginning of the nuclear era, much research has focused on discovering ligands that target specific radionuclides. Members of the Group 1A and 2A cations (e.g., Cs, Sr, Ra) and the f-block metals (actinides and lanthanides) are of primary concern to DOE. Although there has been some success in identifying ligand architectures that exhibit a degree of metal ion recognition, the ability to control binding affinity and selectivity remains a significant challenge. The traditional approach for discovering such ligands has involved lengthy programs of organic synthesis and testing that, in the absence of reliable methods for screening compounds before synthesis, have resulted in much wasted research effort.

  5. Biogenic oxygen from Earth transported to the Moon by a wind of magnetospheric ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terada, Kentaro; Yokota, Shoichiro; Saito, Yoshifumi; Kitamura, Naritoshi; Asamura, Kazushi; Nishino, Masaki N.

    2017-01-01

    For five days of each lunar orbit, the Moon is shielded from solar wind bombardment by the Earth's magnetosphere, which is filled with terrestrial ions. Although the possibility of the presence of terrestrial nitrogen and noble gases in lunar soil has been discussed based on their isotopic composition 1 , complicated oxygen isotope fractionation in lunar metal 2,3 (particularly the provenance of a 16O-poor component) re­mains an enigma 4,5 . Here, we report observations from the Japanese spacecraft Kaguya of significant numbers of 1-10 keV O+ ions, seen only when the Moon was in the Earth's plasma sheet. Considering the penetration depth into metal of O+ ions with such energy, and the 16O-poor mass-independent fractionation of the Earth's upper atmosphere 6 , we conclude that biogenic terrestrial oxygen has been transported to the Moon by the Earth wind (at least 2.6 × 104 ions cm‑2 s‑1) and implanted into the surface of the lunar regolith, at around tens of nanometres in depth 3,4 . We suggest the possibility that the Earth's atmosphere of billions of years ago may be preserved on the present-day lunar surface.

  6. Separation of metal ions in nitrate solution by ultrasonic atomization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Masanori; Ikeno, Masayuki; Fujii, Toshitaka

    2004-11-01

    In the ultrasonic atomization of metal nitrate solutions, the molar ratio of metal ions is changed between solution and mist. Small molar metal ions tend to be transferred to mist by ultrasonic wave acceleration, while large molar ions tend to remain in solution. As a result, metal ions can be separated by ultrasonic atomization. We show experimental data and propose a conceptual mechanism for the ultrasonic separation of metal ions.

  7. Separation of metal ions in nitrate solution by ultrasonic atomization.

    PubMed

    Sato, Masanori; Ikeno, Masayuki; Fujii, Toshitaka

    2004-11-15

    In the ultrasonic atomization of metal nitrate solutions, the molar ratio of metal ions is changed between solution and mist. Small molar metal ions tend to be transferred to mist by ultrasonic wave acceleration, while large molar ions tend to remain in solution. As a result, metal ions can be separated by ultrasonic atomization. We show experimental data and propose a conceptual mechanism for the ultrasonic separation of metal ions.

  8. Computational Design of Metal Ion Sequestering Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, Benjamin P.; Rapko, Brian M.

    2004-06-15

    Organic ligands that exhibit a high degree of metal ion recognition are essential precursors for developing separation processes and sensors for metal ions. Since the beginning of the nuclear era, much research has focused on discovering ligands that target specific radionuclides. Members of the Group 1A and 2A cations (e.g., Cs, Sr, Ra) and the f-block metals (actinides and lanthanides) are of primary concern to DOE. Although there has been some success in identifying ligand architectures that exhibit a degree of metal ion recognition, the ability to control binding affinity and selectivity remains a significant challenge. The traditional approach for discovering such ligands has involved lengthy programs of organic synthesis and testing that, in the absence of reliable methods for screening compounds before synthesis, have resulted in much wasted research effort. This project seeks to enhance and strengthen the traditional approach through computer-aided design of new and improved host molecules. Accurate electronic structure calculations are coupled with experimental data to provide fundamental information about ligand structure and the nature of metal-donor group interactions (design criteria). This fundamental information then is used in a molecular mechanics model (MM) that helps us rapidly screen proposed ligand architectures and select the best members from a set of potential candidates. By using combinatorial methods, molecule building software has been developed that generates large numbers of candidate architectures for a given set of donor groups. The specific goals of this project are: further understand the structural and energetic aspects of individual donor group- metal ion interactions and incorporate this information within the MM framework; further develop and evaluate approaches for correlating ligand structure with reactivity toward metal ions, in other words, screening capability; use molecule structure building software to generate large

  9. Computational Design of Metal Ion Sequestering Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, Benjamin P.; Dixon, David A.; Rapko, Brian M.

    2003-06-01

    Organic ligands that exhibit a high degree of metal ion recognition are essential precursors for developing separation processes and sensors for metal ions. Since the beginning of the nuclear era, much research has focused on discovering ligands that target specific radionuclides. Members of the Group 1A and 2A cations (e.g., Cs, Sr, Ra) and the f-block metals (actinides and lanthanides) are of primary concern to DOE. Although there has been some success in identifying ligand architectures that exhibit a degree of metal ion recognition, the ability to control binding affinity and selectivity remains a significant challenge. The traditional approach for discovering such ligands has involved lengthy programs of organic synthesis and testing that, in the absence of reliable methods for screening compounds before synthesis, have resulted in much wasted research effort. This project seeks to enhance and strengthen the traditional approach through computer-aided design of new and improved host molecules. Accurate electronic structure calculations are coupled with experimental data to provide fundamental information about ligand structure and the nature of metal-donor group interactions (design criteria). This fundamental information then is used in a molecular mechanics model (MM3) that helps us rapidly screen proposed ligand architectures and select the best members from a set of potential candidates. By using combinatorial methods, molecule building software has been developed that generates large numbers of candidate architectures for a given set of donor groups. The specific goals of this project are: (1) further understand the structural and energetic aspects of individual donor group-metal ion interactions and incorporate this information within the MM3 framework; (2) further develop and evaluate approaches for correlating ligand structure with reactivity toward metal ions, in other words, screening capability; (3) use molecule structure building software to

  10. Computational Design of Metal Ion Sequestering Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, Benjamin P.; Dixon, David A.; Rapko, Brian M.

    2002-06-01

    Organic ligands that exhibit a high degree of metal ion recognition are essential precursors for developing separation processes and sensors for metal ions. Since the beginning of the nuclear era, much research has focused on discovering ligands that target specific radionuclides. Members of the Group 1A and 2A cations (e.g., Cs, Sr, Ra) and the f-block metals (actinides and lanthanides) are of primary concern to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Although there has been some success in identifying ligand architectures that exhibit a degree of metal ion recognition, the ability to control binding affinity and selectivity remains a significant challenge. The traditional approach for discovering such ligands has involved lengthy programs of organic synthesis and testing that, in the absence of reliable methods for screening compounds before synthesis, have resulted in much wasted research effort. This project seeks to enhance and strengthen the traditional approach through computer-aided design of new and improved host molecules. Accurate electronic structure calculations are coupled with experimental data to provide fundamental information about ligand structure and the nature of metal-donor group interactions (design criteria). This fundamental information then is used in a molecular mechanics model (MM3) that helps us rapidly screen proposed ligand architectures and select the best members from a set of potential candidates. By using combinatorial methods, molecule building software has been developed that generates large numbers of candidate architectures for a given set of donor groups. The specific objectives of this project are as follows: (1) Further understand the structural and energetic aspects of individual donor group- metal ion interactions and incorporate this information within the framework of MM3. (2) Further develop and evaluate approaches for correlating ligand structure with reactivity toward metal ions, in other words, screening capability. (3

  11. Computational Design of Metal Ion Sequestering Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, Benjamin P.; Rapko, Brian M.

    2005-06-15

    Organic ligands that exhibit a high degree of metal ion recognition are essential precursors for developing separation processes and sensors for metal ions. Since the beginning of the nuclear era, much research has focused on discovering ligands that target specific radionuclides. Members of the Group 1A and 2A cations (e.g., Cs, Sr, Ra) and the f-block metals (actinides and lanthanides) are of primary concern to DOE. Although there has been some success in identifying ligand architectures that exhibit a degree of metal ion recognition, the ability to control binding affinity and selectivity remains a significant challenge. The traditional approach for discovering such ligands has involved lengthy programs of organic synthesis and testing that, in the absence of reliable methods for screening compounds before synthesis, have resulted in much wasted research effort. This project seeks to enhance and strengthen the traditional approach through computer-aided design of new and improved host molecules. Accurate electronic structure calculations are coupled with experimental data to provide fundamental information about ligand structure and the nature of metal-donor group interactions (design criteria). This fundamental information then is used in a molecular mechanics model (MM) that helps us rapidly screen proposed ligand architectures and select the best members from a set of potential candidates. By using combinatorial methods, molecule building software has been developed that generates large numbers of candidate architectures for a given set of donor groups. The specific goals of this project are: • further understand the structural and energetic aspects of individual donor group- metal ion interactions and incorporate this information within the MM framework • further develop and evaluate approaches for correlating ligand structure with reactivity toward metal ions, in other words, screening capability • use molecule structure building software to generate

  12. Distribution of thermal oxygen ions in the near earth magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, W.; Cao, J.

    2013-12-01

    Based on eleven years of Cluster particle observations, we investigate the distribution of thermal oxygen ions in the near earth magnetosphere with full spatial coverage between 4 to 20 Re. Averaged oxygen ion fluxes are calculated for three energy ranges (E1: 25-136eV; E2: 136eV-3keV; E3 3-35keV) based on measurements from CIS instrument. In a preliminary analysis, we found that oxygen ions of E1 energy are observed mostly in the Polar Regions flowing toward the nightside with average speed of ~20 km/s at 5 Re. They are accelerated to E2 energy range before they arrive at plasmasheet. Clear dawn-dusk asymmetry is observed in the plasmasheet for oxygen ions of the E1 and E2 energy that they are distributed beyond 10 Re on the duskside and beyond 15 Re on the dawnside, suggesting the transportation from ionosphere to plasmasheet is asymmetric for dawn and dusk sides. These oxygen ions are further accelerated in the plasmasheet to E3 energy range and are transported toward the Earth, while they drift westward. These oxygen ions finally reach the dayside, and then either return to the ionosphere or escape from the dayside magnetopause to magnetosheeth. This study provides background knowledge on complete distribution of thermal oxygen ions in the near earth magnetosphere for the modelling and simulation studies on ionosphere-magnetosphere coupling.

  13. Earth's polar cap ionization patches lead to ion upflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q. H.; Zong, Q.; Lockwood, M. M.; Liang, J.; Zhang, B.; Moen, J. I.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, Y.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.; Thomas, E. G.; Liu, R.; Dunlop, M. W.; Yang, H. G.; Hu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lester, M.

    2014-12-01

    The Earth constantly losses matter through ions escaping from the polar ionosphere. This makes the ionosphere as an important source of plasma for the magnetosphere and could modulate atmospheric isotope abundances on geological timescales, depending on what fraction of the upflowing ions subsequently return to the ionosphere and what fraction are ejected into interplanetary space. It has been proposed that the magnetosphere is dynamically modulated by the presence of the ionospheric ions, particularly heavy ions O+, during magnetic substorms and storms. The origin and formation mechanism of ionospheric ion upflow is, however, poorly understood, particularly under disturbed space weather conditions. We report simultaneous direct observations of ion upflow and a patch of ionization at the center of the polar cap region during a geomagnetic storm. Our observations indicate enhanced fluxes of upwelling O+ ions originate from the patch and were accelerated by the enhanced ambipolar electric field. This enhancement is caused by soft electron precipitations. Polar cap patches therefore provide an important source of upwelling ions for accelerations mechanisms at greater altitudes which can eject the ions. These observations give new insight into the processes of ionosphere-magnetosphere coupling and the potential loss of terrestrial water dissociation products into space which, although extremely slow in the case of Earth, may be significant for other planets and moons.

  14. Near-Earth asteroids: Metals occurrence, extraction, and fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westfall, Richard

    Near-earth asteroids occur in three principle types of orbits: Amor, Apollo, and Aten. Amor asteroids make relatively close (within 0.3 AU) approaches to the earth's orbit, but do not actually overlap it. Apollo asteroids spend most of their time outside the earth's orbital path, but at some point of close approach to the sun, they cross the orbit of the earth. Aten asteroids are those whose orbits remain inside the earth's path for the majority of their time, with semi-major axes less than 0.1 AU. Near-earth orbit asteroids include: stones, stony-irons, irons, carbonaceous, and super-carbonaceous. Metals within these asteroids include: iron, nickel, cobalt, the platinum group, aluminum, titanium, and others. Focus is on the extraction of ferrous and platinum group metals from the stony-iron asteroids, and the iron asteroids. Extraction of the metal fraction can be accomplished through the use of tunnel-boring-machines (TBM) in the case of the stony-irons. The metals within the story-iron asteroids occur as dispersed granules, which can be separated from the stony fraction through magnetic and gaseous digestion separation techniques. The metal asteroids are processes by drilling and gaseous digestion or by gaseous digestion alone. Manufacturing of structures, housings, framing networks, pressure vessels, mirrors, and other products is accomplished through the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of metal coating on advanced composites and on the inside of contour-defining inflatables (CDI). Metal coatings on advanced composites provide: resistance to degradation in the hostile environments of space; superior optical properties; superior heat dissipation; service as wear coatings; and service as evidential coatings. Metal coatings on the inside of CDI produce metal load-bearing products. Fibers such as graphite, kevlar, glass, ceramic, metal, etc., can be incorporated in the metal coatings on the inside of CDI producing metal matrix products which exhibit high strength

  15. Near-Earth asteroids: Metals occurrence, extraction, and fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westfall, Richard

    1991-01-01

    Near-earth asteroids occur in three principle types of orbits: Amor, Apollo, and Aten. Amor asteroids make relatively close (within 0.3 AU) approaches to the earth's orbit, but do not actually overlap it. Apollo asteroids spend most of their time outside the earth's orbital path, but at some point of close approach to the sun, they cross the orbit of the earth. Aten asteroids are those whose orbits remain inside the earth's path for the majority of their time, with semi-major axes less than 0.1 AU. Near-earth orbit asteroids include: stones, stony-irons, irons, carbonaceous, and super-carbonaceous. Metals within these asteroids include: iron, nickel, cobalt, the platinum group, aluminum, titanium, and others. Focus is on the extraction of ferrous and platinum group metals from the stony-iron asteroids, and the iron asteroids. Extraction of the metal fraction can be accomplished through the use of tunnel-boring-machines (TBM) in the case of the stony-irons. The metals within the story-iron asteroids occur as dispersed granules, which can be separated from the stony fraction through magnetic and gaseous digestion separation techniques. The metal asteroids are processes by drilling and gaseous digestion or by gaseous digestion alone. Manufacturing of structures, housings, framing networks, pressure vessels, mirrors, and other products is accomplished through the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of metal coating on advanced composites and on the inside of contour-defining inflatables (CDI). Metal coatings on advanced composites provide: resistance to degradation in the hostile environments of space; superior optical properties; superior heat dissipation; service as wear coatings; and service as evidential coatings. Metal coatings on the inside of CDI produce metal load-bearing products. Fibers such as graphite, kevlar, glass, ceramic, metal, etc., can be incorporated in the metal coatings on the inside of CDI producing metal matrix products which exhibit high strength

  16. Solar heavy ion Heinrich fluence spectrum at low earth orbit.

    PubMed

    Croley, D R; Spitale, G C

    1998-01-01

    Solar heavy ions from the JPL Solar Heavy Ion Model have been transported into low earth orbit using the Schulz cutoff criterion for L-shell access by ions of a specific charge to mass ratio. The NASA Brouwer orbit generator was used to get L values along the orbit at 60 second time intervals. Heavy ion fluences of ions 2 < or = Z < or = 92 have been determined for the LET range 1 to 130 MeV-cm2/mg by 60, 120 or 250 mils of aluminum over a period of 24 hours in a 425 km circular orbit inclined 51 degrees. The ion fluence is time dependent in the sense that the position of the spacecraft in the orbit at the flare onset time fixes the relationship between particle flux and spacecraft passage through high L-values where particles have access to the spacecraft.

  17. New Proton-Ionizable, Calixarene-Based Ligands for Selective Metal Ion Separations

    SciTech Connect

    Bartsch, Richard A.

    2012-06-04

    The project objective was the discovery of new ligands for performing metal ion separations. The research effort entailed the preparation of new metal ion complexing agents and polymers and their evaluation in metal ion separation processes of solvent extraction, synthetic liquid membrane transport, and sorption. Structural variations in acyclic, cyclic, and bicyclic organic ligands were used to probe their influence upon the efficiency and selectivity with which metal ion separations can be performed. A unifying feature of the ligand structures is the presence of one (or more) side arm with a pendent acidic function. When a metal ion is complexed within the central cavity of the ligand, ionization of the side arm(s) produces the requisite anion(s) for formation of an overall electroneutral complex. This markedly enhances extraction/transport efficiency for separations in which movement of aqueous phase anions of chloride, nitrate, or sulfate into an organic medium would be required. Through systematic structural variations, new ligands have been developed for efficient and selective separations of monovalent metal ions (e.g., alkali metal, silver, and thallium cations) and of divalent metal ion species (e.g., alkaline earth metal, lead, and mercury cations). Research results obtained in these fundamental investigations provide important insight for the design and development of ligands suitable for practical metal ion separation applications.

  18. Metal ion separations by supported liquid membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Gyves, J. de; San Miguel, E.R. de

    1999-06-01

    Carrier-mediated transport through supported liquid membranes is currently recognized as a potentially valuable technology for selective separation and concentration of toxic and valuable metal ions. In this paper, a review of the fundamental aspects concerning metal ion transport and the influencing factors are surveyed in terms of data modeling, membrane efficiency (permeability, selectivity, stability), and data acquisition and evaluation. An account of the information reviewed demonstrates the need for critical reflection on system performances in order to accomplish scaling up operations. On the same basis, an attempt to outline some future trends in the field is presented.

  19. Multiheteromacrocycles that Complex Metal Ions. Sixth Progress Report, 1 May 1979-30 April 1980

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Cram, D. J.

    1980-01-15

    Objective is to design synthesize, and evaluate cyclic and polycyclic host organic compounds for their abilities to complex and lipophilize guest metal ions, their complexes, and their clusters. Host organic compounds consist of strategically placed solvating, coordinating, and ion-pairing sites tied together by covalent bonds through hydrocarbon units around cavities shaped to be occupied by guest metal ions or by metal ions plus their ligands. Specificity in complexation is sought by matching the following properties of host and guest: cavity and metal ion sizes; geometric arrangements of binding sites; number of binding sites; character of binding sites; and valences. During this period, hemispherands based on an aryloxy or cyclic urea unit, spherands based on aryloxyl units only, and their complexes with alkali metals and alkaline earths were investigated. An attempt to separate {sup 6}Li and {sup 7}Li by gel permeation chromatography of lithiospherium chloride failed. (DLC)

  20. Effect of metal ions on positron annihilation characteristics in metal ion containing epoxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; St. Clair, A. K.; Stoakley, D. M.; Holt, W. H.; Mock, W., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    In the course of developing improved moisture-resistant epoxy resins, two different types of epoxy resins containing variable mole ratios of chromium ions per polymer repeat unit were developed. Positron annihilation characteristics have been investigated in these resins as a function of their metal ion content. In both cases, the presence of metal ions reduces the lifetime as well as the intensity of the long life component. The long life component intensity reduction is considerably more pronounced than the lifetime reduction. These results have been discussed in terms of increased unpaired electron density at Ps formation sites due to the presence of chromium ions in the matrix.

  1. Chitosan Hydrogel Structure Modulated by Metal Ions

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Jingyi; Wang, Zhengke; Hu, Qiaoling

    2016-01-01

    As one of the most important polysaccharide, chitosan (CS) has generated a great deal of interest for its desirable properties and wide applications. In the utilization of CS materials, hydrogel is a major and vital branch. CS has the ability to coordinate with many metal ions by a chelation mechanism. While most researchers focused on the applications of complexes between CS and metal ions, the complexes can also influence gelation process and structure of CS hydrogel. In the present work, such influence was studied with different metal ions, revealing two different kinds of mechanisms. Strong affinity between CS and metal ions leads to structural transition from orientation to multi-layers, while weak affinity leads to composite gel with in-situ formed inorganic particles. The study gave a better understanding of the gelation mechanism and provided strategies for the modulation of hydrogel morphology, which benefited the design of new CS-based materials with hierarchical structure and facilitated the utilization of polysaccharide resources. PMID:27777398

  2. Chitosan Hydrogel Structure Modulated by Metal Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Jingyi; Wang, Zhengke; Hu, Qiaoling

    2016-10-01

    As one of the most important polysaccharide, chitosan (CS) has generated a great deal of interest for its desirable properties and wide applications. In the utilization of CS materials, hydrogel is a major and vital branch. CS has the ability to coordinate with many metal ions by a chelation mechanism. While most researchers focused on the applications of complexes between CS and metal ions, the complexes can also influence gelation process and structure of CS hydrogel. In the present work, such influence was studied with different metal ions, revealing two different kinds of mechanisms. Strong affinity between CS and metal ions leads to structural transition from orientation to multi-layers, while weak affinity leads to composite gel with in-situ formed inorganic particles. The study gave a better understanding of the gelation mechanism and provided strategies for the modulation of hydrogel morphology, which benefited the design of new CS-based materials with hierarchical structure and facilitated the utilization of polysaccharide resources.

  3. IMMUNOASSAYS FOR METAL IONS. (R824029)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Antibodies that recognize chelated forms of metal ions have been used to construct immunoassays for Cd(II), Hg(II), Pb(II), and Ni(II). In this paper, the format of these immunoassays is described and the binding properties of three monoclonal antibodies direc...

  4. Structure of a piperidine-modified calix[4]arene derivative and spectral resolution of its interaction with rare earth metals with chemometric methods.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Wang, Xiaoya; Wang, Yanmei

    2013-03-15

    A piperidine-modified calix[4]arene derivative was synthesized and its structure was confirmed with X-ray diffraction data. UV-visible spectroscopy was used to study its molecular recognition of rare earth ions. The results revealed the calix[4]arene derivative could separate tight metal picrate ion pairs by complexation with the rare earth metal ions in tetrahydrofuran. Resolution of the UV-visible spectra with chemometric methods revealed that the derivative and the rare earth ions Eu(3+), Dy(3+), and Tb(3+) formed ML(2) complexes with stability constants of 10(8.26), 10(8.29), and 10(7.41) respectively.

  5. Material Removes Heavy Metal Ions From Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philipp, Warren H., Jr.; Street, Kenneth W.; Hill, Carol; Savino, Joseph M.

    1995-01-01

    New high capacity ion-exchange polymer material removes toxic metal cations from contaminated water. Offers several advantages. High sensitivities for such heavy metals as lead, cadmium, and copper and capable of reducing concentrations in aqueous solutions to parts-per-billion range. Removes cations even when calcium present. Material made into variety of forms, such as thin films, coatings, pellets, and fibers. As result, adapted to many applications to purify contaminated water, usually hard wherever found, whether in wastewater-treatment systems, lakes, ponds, industrial plants, or homes. Another important feature that adsorbed metals easily reclaimed by either destructive or nondestructive process. Other tests show ion-exchange polymer made inexpensively; easy to use; strong, flexible, not easily torn; and chemically stable in storage, in aqueous solutions, and in acidic or basic solution.

  6. 40 CFR 421.270 - Applicability: Description of the primary rare earth metals subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... primary rare earth metals subcategory. 421.270 Section 421.270 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Primary Rare Earth Metals Subcategory § 421.270 Applicability: Description of the primary rare... production of rare earth metals and mischmetal by primary rare earth metals facilities......

  7. Selective extraction and recovery of rare earth metals from phosphor powders in waste fluorescent lamps using an ionic liquid system.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Kubota, Fukiko; Baba, Yuzo; Kamiya, Noriho; Goto, Masahiro

    2013-06-15

    The recycling of rare earth metals from phosphor powders in waste fluorescent lamps by solvent extraction using ionic liquids was studied. Acid leaching of rare earth metals from the waste phosphor powder was examined first. Yttrium (Y) and europium (Eu) dissolved readily in the acid solution; however, the leaching of other rare earth metals required substantial energy input. Ionization of target rare earth metals from the waste phosphor powders into the leach solution was critical for their successful recovery. As a high temperature was required for the complete leaching of all rare earth metals, ionic liquids, for which vapor pressure is negligible, were used as an alternative extracting phase to the conventional organic diluent. An extractant, N, N-dioctyldiglycol amic acid (DODGAA), which was recently developed, showed a high affinity for rare earth metal ions in liquid-liquid extraction although a conventional commercial phosphonic extractant did not. An effective recovery of the rare earth metals, Y, Eu, La and Ce, from the metal impurities, Fe, Al and Zn, was achieved from the acidic leach solution of phosphor powders using an ionic liquid containing DODGAA as novel extractant system.

  8. Influence of metal ion complexation on the metastable fragmentation of DNA hexamers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piekarczyk, Andreas; Bald, Ilko; Flosadóttir, Helga D.; Ómarsson, Benedikt; Lafosse, Anne; Ingólfsson, Oddur

    2014-06-01

    Here, we study the metastable decay of 5'-d(TTGCTT) in the presence of 0-6 alkaline metal ions (Li+, Na+, K+, Rb+) and 0-3 alkaline earth metal ions (Mg2+ and Ca2 +), which replace the corresponding number of protons in the oligonucleotide. We find that all ions studied here stabilize the oligonucleotide with respect to simple 3'-C-O backbone cleavage, but at the same time these metal ions promote a central oligonucleotide deletion accompanied by a concomitant recombination of the terminal d(TT) groups. We find that the quenching of the 3'-C-O backbone cleavage is not ion specific, since it is due to the removal of the phosphate protons upon replacement with the respective metal ions. The central nucleotide deletion competes with the 3'-C-O backbone cleavage channels and is thus promoted through the replacement of the exchangeable protons against metal ions. However, with increasing positive charge density of the metal ions the yield of the central nucleotide deletion further increases. We attribute this effect to the necessity of sufficient proximity of the terminal d(TT) group to allow for their recombination on this reaction path. Hence, the formation of a reactive conformer is mediated by the metal ions.

  9. The role of metal ion-ligand interactions during divalent metal ion adsorption.

    PubMed

    Eldridge, Daniel S; Crawford, Russell J; Harding, Ian H

    2015-09-15

    A suite of seven different divalent metal ions (Ca(II), Cd(II), Cu(II), Mg(II), Ni(II), Pb(II), Zn(II)) was adsorbed from solution onto two Fe2O3 samples, quartz SiO2 and three different amphoteric polystyrene latices (containing amine and carboxyl functional groups). For the metal oxides, a high correlation was observed between the pH at which 50% of the metal was removed from solution (pH50) and the first hydrolysis constant for the metal ion (pK1). For the polystyrene latices, a much higher correlation was observed between the pH50 and pKc (equilibrium constant describing metal-carboxyl affinity) as opposed to pK1. These observations provide evidence of a strong relationship that exists between a metal's affinity for a particular ligand in solution and for that metal ion's affinity for the same ligand present as part of an adsorbing surface. The isoelectric point of the amphoteric latex surface can be increased by decreasing the carboxyl content of the latex surface. For all 7 metal ions, this resulted in a substantial decrease, for any given pH, in adsorption. We suggest that this may be partly due to the decreased carboxyl content, but is dominantly attributable to the presence of less favorable electrostatic conditions. This, in turn, demonstrates that electrostatics play a controlling role in metal ion adsorption onto amphoteric latex surfaces and, in addition to the nature of the metal ion, also controls the pH at which adsorption takes place.

  10. Ion irradiation effects on metallic nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Kluth, P.; Johannessen, B.; Giulian, R.; Schnohr, C.S.; Foran, G.J.; Cookson, D.J.; Byrne, A.P.; Ridgway, M.C.

    2008-04-02

    We have investigated structural and morphological properties of metallic nanocrystals (NCs) exposed to ion irradiation. NCs were characterized by transmission electron microscopy in combination with advanced synchrotron-based analytical techniques, in particular X-ray absorption spectroscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering. A number of different effects were observed depending on the irradiation conditions. At energies where nuclear stopping is predominant, structural disorder/amorphization followed by inverse Ostwald ripening/dissolution due to ion beam mixing was observed for Au and Cu NCs embedded in SiO{sub 2}. The ion-irradiation-induced crystalline to amorphous transition in the NCs, which cannot be achieved in the corresponding bulk metals, was attributed to their initially higher structural energy as compared to bulk material and possibly preferential nucleation of the amorphous phase at the NC/SiO{sub 2} interface. At very high irradiation energies (swift heavy ion irradiation), where the energy loss is nearly entirely due to electronic stopping, a size-dependent shape transformation of the NCs from spheres to rod like shapes was apparent in Au NCs. Our preliminary results are in good agreement with considerations on melting of the NCs in the ion track as one mechanism involved in the shape transformation.

  11. Origins of energetic ions in the Earth's magnetosheath

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This final report describes activities under NASA contract NAS5-31213 to Lockheed Missiles and Space Company. The report covers the entire contract period from 8 May 1991 to 7 Jun. 1994. This is a contract under the NASA Guest Investigator Program for the analysis and interpretation of the combined scientific data from the Hot Plasma Composition Experiment (HPCE) and the Charge Energy Mass (CHEM) spectrometer on the AMPTE/Charge Composition Explorer (CCE) spacecraft. These combined data sets have been used to survey the energetic ion environment in the earth's magnetosheath to determine the origins and relative strengths of the energetic ion populations found there.

  12. Origins of energetic ions in the Earth's magnetosheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1994-06-01

    This final report describes activities under NASA contract NAS5-31213 to Lockheed Missiles and Space Company. The report covers the entire contract period from 8 May 1991 to 7 Jun. 1994. This is a contract under the NASA Guest Investigator Program for the analysis and interpretation of the combined scientific data from the Hot Plasma Composition Experiment (HPCE) and the Charge Energy Mass (CHEM) spectrometer on the AMPTE/Charge Composition Explorer (CCE) spacecraft. These combined data sets have been used to survey the energetic ion environment in the earth's magnetosheath to determine the origins and relative strengths of the energetic ion populations found there.

  13. Method for treating rare earth-transition metal scrap

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, Frederick A.; Peterson, David T.; Wheelock, John T.; Jones, Lawrence L.

    1992-12-29

    Rare earth-transition metal (e.g., iron) scrap (e.g., Nd-Fe-B scrap) is flux (slag) remelted to reduce tramp non-metallic impurities, such as oxygen and nitrogen, and metallic impurities, such as Li, Na, Al, etc., picked up by the scrap from previous fabrication operations. The tramp impurities are reduced to concentrations acceptable for reuse of the treated alloy in the manufacture of end-use articles, such as permanent magnets. The scrap is electroslag or inductoslag melted using a prefused, rare earth fluoride-bearing flux of CaF.sub.2, CaCl.sub.2 or mixtures thereof or the slag resulting from practice of the thermite reduction process to make a rare earth-iron alloy.

  14. Method for treating rare earth-transition metal scrap

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, F.A.; Peterson, D.T.; Wheelock, J.T.; Jones, L.L.

    1992-12-29

    Rare earth-transition metal (e.g., iron) scrap (e.g., Nd-Fe-B scrap) is flux (slag) remelted to reduce tramp non-metallic impurities, such as oxygen and nitrogen, and metallic impurities, such as Li, Na, Al, etc., picked up by the scrap from previous fabrication operations. The tramp impurities are reduced to concentrations acceptable for reuse of the treated alloy in the manufacture of end-use articles, such as permanent magnets. The scrap is electroslag or inductoslag melted using a rare earth fluoride-bearing flux of CaF[sub 2], CaCl[sub 2] or mixtures thereof or the slag resulting from practice of the thermite reduction process to make a rare earth-iron alloy. 3 figs.

  15. Charge-separated and molecular heterobimetallic rare earth-rare earth and alkaline earth-rare earth aryloxo complexes featuring intramolecular metal-pi-arene interactions.

    PubMed

    Deacon, Glen B; Junk, Peter C; Moxey, Graeme J; Ruhlandt-Senge, Karin; St Prix, Courtney; Zuniga, Maria F

    2009-01-01

    Treatment of a rare earth metal (Ln) and a potential divalent rare earth metal (Ln') or an alkaline earth metal (Ae) with 2,6-diphenylphenol (HOdpp) at elevated temperatures (200-250 degrees C) afforded heterobimetallic aryloxo complexes, which were structurally characterised. A charge-separated species [(Ln'/Ae)(2)(Odpp)(3)][Ln(Odpp)(4)] was obtained for a range of metals, demonstrating the similarities between the chemistry of the divalent rare earth metals and the alkaline earth metals. The [(Ln'/Ae)(2)(Odpp)(3)](+) cation in the heterobimetallic structures is unusual in that it consists solely of bridging aryloxide ligands. A molecular heterobimetallic species [AeEu(Odpp)(4)] (Ae = Ca, Sr, Ba) was obtained by treating an alkaline earth metal and Eu metal with HOdpp at elevated temperatures. Similarly, [BaSr(Odpp)(4)] was prepared by treating Ba metal and Sr metal with HOdpp. Treatment of [Ba(2)(Odpp)(4)] with [Mg(Odpp)(2)(thf)(2)] in toluene afforded [Ba(2)(Odpp)(3)][Mg(Odpp)(3)(thf)]. Analogous solution-based syntheses were not possible for [(Ln'/Ae)(2)(Odpp)(3)][Ln(Odpp)(4)] complexes, for which the free-metal route was essential. As a result of the absence of additional donor ligands, the crystal structures of the heterobimetallic complexes feature extensive pi-Ph-metal interactions involving the pendant phenyl groups of the Odpp ligands, thus enabling the large electropositive metal atoms to attain coordination saturation. The charge-separated heterobimetallic species were purified by extraction with toluene/thf mixtures at ambient temperature (Ba-containing compounds) or by extraction with toluene under pressure above the boiling point of the solvent (other products). In donor solvents, heterobimetallic complexes other than those containing barium were found to fragment into homometallic species.

  16. Distribution coefficients of rare earth ions in cubic zirconium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romer, H.; Luther, K.-D.; Assmus, W.

    1994-08-01

    Cubic zirconium dioxide crystals are grown with the skull melting technique. The effective distribution coefficients for Nd(exp 3+), Sm(exp 3+) and Er(sup 3+) as dopants are determined experimentally as a function of the crystal growth velocity. With the Burton-Prim-Slichter theory, the equilibrium distribution coefficients can be calculated. The distribution coefficients of all other trivalent rare earth ions can be estimated by applying the correlation towards the ionic radii.

  17. Interplay of metal ions and urease

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Eric L.; Flugga, Nicholas; Boer, Jodi L.; Mulrooney, Scott B.; Hausinger, Robert P.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Urease, the first enzyme to be crystallized, contains a dinuclear nickel metallocenter that catalyzes the decomposition of urea to produce ammonia, a reaction of great agricultural and medical importance. Several mechanisms of urease catalysis have been proposed on the basis of enzyme crystal structures, model complexes, and computational efforts, but the precise steps in catalysis and the requirement of nickel versus other metals remain unclear. Purified bacterial urease is partially activated via incubation with carbon dioxide plus nickel ions; however, in vitro activation also has been achieved with manganese and cobalt. In vivo activation of most ureases requires accessory proteins that function as nickel metallochaperones and GTP-dependent molecular chaperones or play other roles in the maturation process. In addition, some microorganisms control their levels of urease by metal ion-dependent regulatory mechanisms. PMID:20046957

  18. Fluorescence enhancement of photoswitchable metal ion sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sylvia, Georgina; Heng, Sabrina; Abell, Andrew D.

    2016-12-01

    Spiropyran-based fluorescence sensors are an ideal target for intracellular metal ion sensing, due to their biocompatibility, red emission frequency and photo-controlled reversible analyte binding for continuous signal monitoring. However, increasing the brightness of spiropyran-based sensors would extend their sensing capability for live-cell imaging. In this work we look to enhance the fluorescence of spiropyran-based sensors, by incorporating an additional fluorophore into the sensor design. We report a 5-membered monoazacrown bearing spiropyran with metal ion specificity, modified to incorporate the pyrene fluorophore. The effect of N-indole pyrene modification on the behavior of the spiropyran molecule is explored, with absorbance and fluorescence emission characterization. This first generation sensor provides an insight into fluorescence-enhancement of spiropyran molecules.

  19. Rare earth metal trifluoromethanesulfonates catalyzed benzyl-etherification.

    PubMed

    Kawada, Atsushi; Yasuda, Kayo; Abe, Hitoshi; Harayama, Takashi

    2002-03-01

    Rare earth metal trifluoromethanesulfonates [rare earth metal triflate, RE(OTf)3] were found to be efficient catalyst for benzyl-etherification. In the presence of a catalytic amount of RE(OTf)3, condensation of benzyl alcohols and aliphatic alcohols proceeded smoothly to afford the benzyl ethers. The condensation between benzyl alcohols and thiols also proceeded, and thio ethers were obtained in good yield. In these reactions, RE(OTf)3 could be recovered easily after the reactions were completed and could be reused without loss of activity.

  20. Trace metal and rare earth content of black precipitation events

    SciTech Connect

    Landsberger, S. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering); Davies, T.D. . School of Environmental Sciences); Tranter, M. )

    1990-01-01

    The authors have used the techniques of non-destructive neutron activation analysis to determine trace metal and rare earth content of black precipitation events occurring in the Cairngorm Mountains in remote areas of Scotland. Thirty-one elements were determined in the particulate matter of snowpack cores that were sliced into sections. An additional analysis was performed for a black acidic snow event. Based on these results and on wind trajectories, increased loadings of many of the heavy metals and rare earth elements appeared to have originated from central Europe. Enrichment factor calculations show anthropogenic emissions for indium, arsenic, zinc, and selenium.

  1. Effects of metal ion adduction on the gas-phase conformations of protein ions.

    PubMed

    Flick, Tawnya G; Merenbloom, Samuel I; Williams, Evan R

    2013-11-01

    Changes in protein ion conformation as a result of nonspecific adduction of metal ions to the protein during electrospray ionization (ESI) from aqueous solutions were investigated using traveling wave ion mobility spectrometry (TWIMS). For all proteins examined, protein cations (and in most cases anions) with nonspecific metal ion adducts are more compact than the fully protonated (or deprotonated) ions with the same charge state. Compaction of protein cations upon nonspecific metal ion binding is most significant for intermediate charge state ions, and there is a greater reduction in collisional cross section with increasing number of metal ion adducts and increasing ion valency, consistent with an electrostatic interaction between the ions and the protein. Protein cations with the greatest number of adducted metal ions are no more compact than the lowest protonated ions formed from aqueous solutions. These results show that smaller collisional cross sections for metal-attached protein ions are not a good indicator of a specific metal-protein interaction in solution because nonspecific metal ion adduction also results in smaller gaseous protein cation cross sections. In contrast, the collisional cross section of α-lactalbumin, which specifically binds one Ca(2+), is larger for the holo-form compared with the apo-form, in agreement with solution-phase measurements. Because compaction of protein cations occurs when metal ion adduction is nonspecific, elongation of a protein cation may be a more reliable indicator that a specific metal ion-protein interaction occurs in solution.

  2. Metal hydrides for lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Oumellal, Y; Rougier, A; Nazri, G A; Tarascon, J-M; Aymard, L

    2008-11-01

    Classical electrodes for Li-ion technology operate via an insertion/de-insertion process. Recently, conversion electrodes have shown the capability of greater capacity, but have so far suffered from a marked hysteresis in voltage between charge and discharge, leading to poor energy efficiency and voltages. Here, we present the electrochemical reactivity of MgH(2) with Li that constitutes the first use of a metal-hydride electrode for Li-ion batteries. The MgH(2) electrode shows a large, reversible capacity of 1,480 mAh g(-1) at an average voltage of 0.5 V versus Li(+)/Li(o) which is suitable for the negative electrode. In addition, it shows the lowest polarization for conversion electrodes. The electrochemical reaction results in formation of a composite containing Mg embedded in a LiH matrix, which on charging converts back to MgH(2). Furthermore, the reaction is not specific to MgH(2), as other metal or intermetallic hydrides show similar reactivity towards Li. Equally promising, the reaction produces nanosized Mg and MgH(2), which show enhanced hydrogen sorption/desorption kinetics. We hope that such findings can pave the way for designing nanoscale active metal elements with applications in hydrogen storage and lithium-ion batteries.

  3. Large gem diamonds from metallic liquid in Earth's deep mantle.

    PubMed

    Smith, Evan M; Shirey, Steven B; Nestola, Fabrizio; Bullock, Emma S; Wang, Jianhua; Richardson, Stephen H; Wang, Wuyi

    2016-12-16

    The redox state of Earth's convecting mantle, masked by the lithospheric plates and basaltic magmatism of plate tectonics, is a key unknown in the evolutionary history of our planet. Here we report that large, exceptional gem diamonds like the Cullinan, Constellation, and Koh-i-Noor carry direct evidence of crystallization from a redox-sensitive metallic liquid phase in the deep mantle. These sublithospheric diamonds contain inclusions of solidified iron-nickel-carbon-sulfur melt, accompanied by a thin fluid layer of methane ± hydrogen, and sometimes majoritic garnet or former calcium silicate perovskite. The metal-dominated mineral assemblages and reduced volatiles in large gem diamonds indicate formation under metal-saturated conditions. We verify previous predictions that Earth has highly reducing deep mantle regions capable of precipitating a metallic iron phase that contains dissolved carbon and hydrogen.

  4. Metal assisted focused-ion beam nanopatterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannegulla, Akash; Cheng, Li-Jing

    2016-09-01

    Focused-ion beam milling is a versatile technique for maskless nanofabrication. However, the nonuniform ion beam profile and material redeposition tend to disfigure the surface morphology near the milling areas and degrade the fidelity of nanoscale pattern transfer, limiting the applicability of the technique. The ion-beam induced damage can deteriorate the performance of photonic devices and hinders the precision of template fabrication for nanoimprint lithography. To solve the issue, we present a metal assisted focused-ion beam (MAFIB) process in which a removable sacrificial aluminum layer is utilized to protect the working material. The new technique ensures smooth surfaces and fine milling edges; in addition, it permits direct formation of v-shaped grooves with tunable angles on dielectric substrates or metal films, silver for instance, which are rarely achieved by using traditional nanolithography followed by anisotropic etching processes. MAFIB was successfully demonstrated to directly create nanopatterns on different types of substrates with high fidelity and reproducibility. The technique provides the capability and flexibility necessary to fabricate nanophotonic devices and nanoimprint templates.

  5. On the Metal Ion Selectivity of Oxoacid Extractants

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, Benjamin; Chagnes, Alexandre; Cote, Gerard

    2013-01-01

    Relationships between metal chelate stability, ligand basicity, and metal ion acidity are reviewed and the general applicability is illustrated by linear correlations between aqueous stability constants and ligand pKa values for 35 metals with 26 ligands. The results confirm that most individual ligands of this type exhibit a stability ordering that correlates with the Lewis acidity of the metal ion. It is concluded that the general metal ion selectivity exhibited by liquid-liquid oxoacid extractants such as carboxylic acids, -diketones, and alkylphosphoric acids reflects the intrinsic affinity of the metal ion for the negative oxygen donor ligand.

  6. Liquid metal ion source assembly for external ion injection into an electron string ion source (ESIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segal, M. J.; Bark, R. A.; Thomae, R.; Donets, E. E.; Donets, E. D.; Boytsov, A.; Ponkin, D.; Ramsdorf, A.

    2016-02-01

    An assembly for a commercial Ga+ liquid metal ion source in combination with an ion transportation and focusing system, a pulse high-voltage quadrupole deflector, and a beam diagnostics system has been constructed in the framework of the iThemba LABS (Cape Town, South Africa)—JINR (Dubna, Russia) collaboration. First, results on Ga+ ion beam commissioning will be presented. Outlook of further experiments for measurements of charge breeding efficiency in the electron string ion source with the use of external injection of Ga+ and Au+ ion beams will be reported as well.

  7. Liquid metal ion source assembly for external ion injection into an electron string ion source (ESIS)

    SciTech Connect

    Segal, M. J.; Bark, R. A.; Thomae, R.; Donets, E. E.; Donets, E. D.; Boytsov, A.; Ponkin, D.; Ramsdorf, A.

    2016-02-15

    An assembly for a commercial Ga{sup +} liquid metal ion source in combination with an ion transportation and focusing system, a pulse high-voltage quadrupole deflector, and a beam diagnostics system has been constructed in the framework of the iThemba LABS (Cape Town, South Africa)—JINR (Dubna, Russia) collaboration. First, results on Ga{sup +} ion beam commissioning will be presented. Outlook of further experiments for measurements of charge breeding efficiency in the electron string ion source with the use of external injection of Ga{sup +} and Au{sup +} ion beams will be reported as well.

  8. Transparent monolithic metal ion containing nanophase aerogels

    SciTech Connect

    Risen, W. M., Jr.; Hu, X.; Ji, S.; Littrell, K.

    1999-12-01

    The formation of monolithic and transparent transition metal containing aerogels has been achieved through cooperative interactions of high molecular weight functionalized carbohydrates and silica precursors, which strongly influence the kinetics of gelation. After initial gelation, subsequent modification of the ligating character of the system, coordination of the group VIII metal ions, and supercritical extraction afford the aerogels. The structures at the nanophase level have been probed by photon and electron transmission and neutron scattering techniques to help elucidate the basis for structural integrity together with the small entity sizes that permit transparency in the visible range. They also help with understanding the chemical reactivities of the metal-containing sites in these very high surface area materials. These results are discussed in connection with new reaction studies.

  9. Ion acoustic solitons in Earth's upward current region

    SciTech Connect

    Main, D. S.; Scholz, C.; Newman, D. L.; Ergun, R. E.

    2012-07-15

    The formation and evolution of ion acoustic solitons in Earth's auroral upward current region are studied using one- and two-dimensional (2D) electrostatic particle-in-cell simulations. The one-dimensional simulations are confined to processes that occur in the auroral cavity and include four plasma populations: hot electrons, H{sup +} and O{sup +} anti-earthward ion beams, and a hot H{sup +} background population. Ion acoustic solitons are found to form for auroral-cavity ion beams consistent with acceleration through double-layer (DL) potentials measured by FAST. A simplified one-dimensional model simulation is then presented in order to isolate the mechanisms that lead to the formation of the ion acoustic soliton. Results of a two-dimensional simulation, which include both the ionosphere and the auroral cavity, separated by a low-altitude DL, are then presented in order to confirm that the soliton forms in a more realistic 2D geometry. The 2D simulation is initialized with a U-shaped potential structure that mimics the inferred shape of the low altitude transition region based on observations. In this simulation, a soliton localized perpendicular to the geomagnetic field is observed to form and reside next to the DL. Finally, the 2D simulation results are compared with FAST data and it is found that certain aspects of the data can be explained by assuming the presence of an ion acoustic soliton.

  10. Metal ion binding to iron oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponthieu, M.; Juillot, F.; Hiemstra, T.; van Riemsdijk, W. H.; Benedetti, M. F.

    2006-06-01

    The biogeochemistry of trace elements (TE) is largely dependent upon their interaction with heterogeneous ligands including metal oxides and hydrous oxides of iron. The modeling of TE interactions with iron oxides has been pursued using a variety of chemical models. The objective of this work is to show that it is possible to model the adsorption of protons and TE on a crystallized oxide (i.e., goethite) and on an amorphous oxide (HFO) in an identical way. Here, we use the CD-MUSIC approach in combination with valuable and reliable surface spectroscopy information about the nature of surface complexes of the TE. The other objective of this work is to obtain generic parameters to describe the binding of the following elements (Cd, Co, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn) onto both iron oxides for the CD-MUSIC approach. The results show that a consistent description of proton and metal ion binding is possible for goethite and HFO with the same set of model parameters. In general a good prediction of almost all the collected experimental data sets corresponding to metal ion binding to HFO is obtained. Moreover, dominant surface species are in agreement with the recently published surface complexes derived from X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) data. Until more detailed information on the structure of the two iron oxides is available, the present option seems a reasonable approximation and can be used to describe complex geochemical systems. To improve our understanding and modeling of multi-component systems we need more data obtained at much lower metal ion to iron oxide ratios in order to be able to account eventually for sites that are not always characterized in spectroscopic studies.

  11. Thin Films of the Rare-Earth Metals,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    A vacuum thermal method of producing thin films (1-10 mu m) of rare earth metals (Sm, Dy, Tn, and Yb) is described and its efficiency is compared with...existing methods (which are briefly reviewed). A very effective method of obtaining the thin films in question is by reducing the corresponding

  12. High-temperature corrosion of metals in the salt and metallic melts containing rare earths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpov, V. V.; Abramov, A. V.; Zhilyakov, A. Yu.; Belikov, S. V.; Volkovich, V. A.; Polovov, I. B.; Rebrin, O. I.

    2016-09-01

    A complex of independent methods was employed to study the corrosion resistance of molybdenum, zirconium, tantalum and tungsten in chloride, chloride-fluoride and fluoride-oxide melts based on LiCl, CaCl2, NaCl- KCl, LiF, and containing rare earths. Tests were conducted for 30 h at 750-1050 °C. The metals showed excellent corrosion resistance in fused chlorides (the corrosion rates were below 0.0005 g/(m2 h). Despite the presence of chemically active fluoride ions in the chloride-fluoride melts, the metals studied also showed very low corrosion rates, except molybdenum, for which the rate of corrosion was 0,8 g/(m2 h). The corrosion resistance of tantalum was considerably reduced in the fluoride-oxide melts; the corrosion rate was over 1 g/(m2 h) corresponding to the 8-th grade of stability and placing tantalum to the group of "low stability" materials.

  13. Rational Design of Metal Ion Sequestering Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2000-09-30

    The discriminate bonding of metal ions is a challenge to the synthetic chemist and a phenomenon of considerable practical importance.1 An important feature of many technical applications is the specific or preferential binding of a single metal ion in the presence of many metals. Examples range from large-volume uses (e.g. ferric EDTA as a plant food, calcium complexing agents as water softeners or anticaking formulations) to very high technology applications (technetium complexation in radiopharmaceuticals, synthetic metalloenzymes). We are interested in efficient and discriminate binding of actinides for waste stream remediation. Actinides represent a major and long-lived contaminant in nuclear waste. While the separation of actinides from other radioactive components of waste, such as Sr and Cs, is relatively well established, the separation of actinides from each other and in complex solutions (e.g. those found in tank wastes) is not as well resolved. The challenge of designing metal-specific (actinide) ligands is facilitated by examples from nature. Bacteria synthesize Fe(III)-specific ligands, called siderophores, to sequester Fe(III) from the environment and return it to the cell. The similarities between Fe(III) and Pu(IV) (their charge-to-size ratios and acidity), make the siderophores prototypical for designing actinide-specific ligands. The chelating groups present in siderophores are usually hydroxamic acids and catecholamides. We have developed derivatives of these natural products which have improved properties. The catechol derivatives are the 2,3-dihydroxyterephthalamides (TAMs), and 3,4-dihydroxysulfonamides (SFAMs), and the hydroxamic acid derivatives are three isomers of hydroxypyridinones, 1,2- HOPO, 3,2-HOPO, and 3,4-HOPO. All of these ligands are attached to molecular backbones by amides and a very important feature of HOPO and CAM ligands is a strong hydrogen bonds formed between the amide proton and the adjacent phenolic oxygen in the metal

  14. Laser materials based on transition metal ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moncorgé, Richard

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to review the spectroscopic properties of the main laser materials based on transition metal ions which lead to noticeable laser performance at room temperature and, for very few cases, because of unique properties, when they are operated at cryogenic temperatures. The description also includes the materials which are currently being used as saturable absorbers for passive-Q-switching of a variety of other near- and mid-infrared solid state lasers. A substantial part of the article is devoted first to the description of the energy levels and of the absorption and emission transitions of the transition metal ions in various types of environments by using the well-known Tanabe-Sugano diagrams. It is shown in particular how these diagrams can be used along with other theoretical considerations to understand and describe the spectroscopic properties of ions sitting in crystal field environments of near-octahedral or near-tetrahedral symmetry. The second part is then dedicated to the description (positions and intensities) of the main absorption and emission features which characterize the different types of materials.

  15. How do metal ions direct ribozyme folding?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denesyuk, Natalia A.; Thirumalai, D.

    2015-10-01

    Ribozymes, which carry out phosphoryl-transfer reactions, often require Mg2+ ions for catalytic activity. The correct folding of the active site and ribozyme tertiary structure is also regulated by metal ions in a manner that is not fully understood. Here we employ coarse-grained molecular simulations to show that individual structural elements of the group I ribozyme from the bacterium Azoarcus form spontaneously in the unfolded ribozyme even at very low Mg2+ concentrations, and are transiently stabilized by the coordination of Mg2+ ions to specific nucleotides. However, competition for scarce Mg2+ and topological constraints that arise from chain connectivity prevent the complete folding of the ribozyme. A much higher Mg2+ concentration is required for complete folding of the ribozyme and stabilization of the active site. When Mg2+ is replaced by Ca2+ the ribozyme folds, but the active site remains unstable. Our results suggest that group I ribozymes utilize the same interactions with specific metal ligands for both structural stability and chemical activity.

  16. Accumulation of metal ions by pectinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deiana, S.; Deiana, L.; Palma, A.; Premoli, A.; Senette, C.

    2009-04-01

    The knowledge of the mechanisms which regulate the interactions of metal ions with partially methyl esterified linear polymers of α-1,4 linked D-galacturonic acid units (pectinates), well represented in the root inner and outer apoplasm, is of great relevance to understand the processes which control their accumulation at the soil-root interface as well as their mobilization by plant metabolites. Accumulation of a metal by pectinates can be affected by the presence of other metals so that competition or distribution could be expected depending on the similar or different affinity of the metal ions towards the binding sites, mainly represented by the carboxylate groups. In order to better understand the mechanism of accumulation in the apoplasm of several metal ions, the sorption of Cd(II), Zn(II), Cu(II), Pb(II) and Cr(III) by a Ca-polygalacturonate gel, used as model of the soil-root interface, with a degree of esterification of 18% (PGAE1) and 65% (PGAE2) was studied at pH 3.0, 4.0, 5.0 and 6.0 in the presence of CaCl2 2.5 mM.. The results show that sorption increases with increasing both the initial metal concentration and pH. A similar sorption trend was evidenced for Cu(II) and Pb(II) and for Zn(II) and Cd(II), indicating that the mechanism of sorption for these two ionic couples is quite different. As an example, at pH 6.0 and an initial metal concentration equal to 2.0 mM, the amount of Cu(II) and Pb(II) sorbed was about 1.98 mg-1 of PGAE1 while that of Cd(II) and Zn(II) was about 1.2 mg-1. Cr(III) showed a rather different sorption trend and a much higher amount (2.8 mg-1of PGAE1 at pH 6.0) was recorded. The higher affinity of Cr(III) for the polysaccharidic matrix is attributable to the formation of Cr(III) polynuclear species in solution, as shown by the distribution diagrams obtained through the MEDUSA software. On the basis of these findings, the following affinity towards the PGAE1 can be assessed: Cr(III) > Cu(II) ? Pb(II) > Zn (II) ? Cd

  17. Substrate Profile and Metal-ion Selectivity of Human Divalent Metal-ion Transporter-1*

    PubMed Central

    Illing, Anthony C.; Shawki, Ali; Cunningham, Christopher L.; Mackenzie, Bryan

    2012-01-01

    Divalent metal-ion transporter-1 (DMT1) is a H+-coupled metal-ion transporter that plays essential roles in iron homeostasis. DMT1 exhibits reactivity (based on evoked currents) with a broad range of metal ions; however, direct measurement of transport is lacking for many of its potential substrates. We performed a comprehensive substrate-profile analysis for human DMT1 expressed in RNA-injected Xenopus oocytes by using radiotracer assays and the continuous measurement of transport by fluorescence with the metal-sensitive PhenGreen SK fluorophore. We provide validation for the use of PhenGreen SK fluorescence quenching as a reporter of cellular metal-ion uptake. We determined metal-ion selectivity under fixed conditions using the voltage clamp. Radiotracer and continuous measurement of transport by fluorescence assays revealed that DMT1 mediates the transport of several metal ions that were ranked in selectivity by using the ratio Imax/K0.5 (determined from evoked currents at −70 mV): Cd2+ > Fe2+ > Co2+, Mn2+ ≫ Zn2+, Ni2+, VO2+. DMT1 expression did not stimulate the transport of Cr2+, Cr3+, Cu+, Cu2+, Fe3+, Ga3+, Hg2+, or VO+. 55Fe2+ transport was competitively inhibited by Co2+ and Mn2+. Zn2+ only weakly inhibited 55Fe2+ transport. Our data reveal that DMT1 selects Fe2+ over its other physiological substrates and provides a basis for predicting the contribution of DMT1 to intestinal, nasal, and pulmonary absorption of metal ions and their cellular uptake in other tissues. Whereas DMT1 is a likely route of entry for the toxic heavy metal cadmium, and may serve the metabolism of cobalt, manganese, and vanadium, we predict that DMT1 should contribute little if at all to the absorption or uptake of zinc. The conclusion in previous reports that copper is a substrate of DMT1 is not supported. PMID:22736759

  18. Antifungal Properties of Electrically Generated Metallic Ions

    PubMed Central

    Berger, T. J.; Spadaro, J. A.; Bierman, Richard; Chapin, S. E.; Becker, R. O.

    1976-01-01

    A qualitative and quantitative investigation was undertaken to study the susceptibility of unicellular eucaryotic organisms (yeasts) to metallic cations generated by low levels of direct current. Results were characteristic of effects obtained previously using clinical and standard bacteria test organisms. The present study demonstrated that anodic silver (Ag+) at low direct currents had inhibitory and fungicidal properties. Broth dilution susceptibility tests were made on several species of Candida and one species of Torulopsis. Growth in all isolates was inhibited by concentrations of electrically generated silver ions between 0.5 and 4.7 μg/ml, and silver exhibited fungicidal properties at concentrations as low as 1.9 μg/ml. The inhibitory and fungicidal concentrations of electrically generated silver ions are lower than those reported for other silver compounds. Images PMID:1034467

  19. Systems and methods for producing metal clusters; functionalized surfaces; and droplets including solvated metal ions

    DOEpatents

    Cooks, Robert Graham; Li, Anyin; Luo, Qingjie

    2017-01-24

    The invention generally relates to systems and methods for producing metal clusters; functionalized surfaces; and droplets including solvated metal ions. In certain aspects, the invention provides methods that involve providing a metal and a solvent. The methods additionally involve applying voltage to the solvated metal to thereby produce solvent droplets including ions of the metal containing compound, and directing the solvent droplets including the metal ions to a target. In certain embodiments, once at the target, the metal ions can react directly or catalyze reactions.

  20. Yeast metallothionein function in metal ion detoxification.

    PubMed

    Ecker, D J; Butt, T R; Sternberg, E J; Neeper, M P; Debouck, C; Gorman, J A; Crooke, S T

    1986-12-25

    A genetic approach was taken to test the function of yeast metallothionein in metal ion detoxification. A yeast strain was constructed in which the metallothionein locus was deleted (cup1 delta). The cup1 delta strain was complemented with normal or mutant metallothionein genes under normal or constitutive regulatory control on high copy episomal plasmids. Metal resistance of the cup1 delta strain with and without the metallothionein-expressing vectors was analyzed. The normally regulated metallothionein gene conferred resistance only to copper (1000-fold); constitutively expressed metallothionein conferred resistance to both copper (500-fold) and cadmium (1000-fold), but not to mercury, zinc, silver, cobalt, nickel, gold, platinum, lanthanum, uranium, or tin. Two mutant versions of the metallothionein gene were constructed and tested for their ability to confer metal resistance in the cup1 delta background. The first had a deletion of a highly conserved amino acid sequence (Lys-Lys-Ser-Cys-Cys-Ser). The second was a hybrid gene consisting of the sequences coding for the first 20 amino acids of the yeast protein fused to the monkey metallothionein gene. Expression of these genes under the CUP1 promoter provided significant protection from copper, but none of the other metals tested. These results demonstrate that there is significant flexibility in the structural requirements for metallothionein to function in copper detoxification and that yeast metallothionein is also capable of detoxifying cadmium under conditions of constitutive expression.

  1. Structures and energetics of complexation of metal ions with ammonia, water, and benzene: A computational study.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Bhaskar; Neela, Y Indra; Narahari Sastry, G

    2016-04-30

    Quantum chemical calculations have been performed at CCSD(T)/def2-TZVP level to investigate the strength and nature of interactions of ammonia (NH3 ), water (H2 O), and benzene (C6 H6 ) with various metal ions and validated with the available experimental results. For all the considered metal ions, a preference for C6 H6 is observed for dicationic ions whereas the monocationic ions prefer to bind with NH3 . Density Functional Theory-Symmetry Adapted Perturbation Theory (DFT-SAPT) analysis has been employed at PBE0AC/def2-TZVP level on these complexes (closed shell), to understand the various energy terms contributing to binding energy (BE). The DFT-SAPT result shows that for the metal ion complexes with H2 O electrostatic component is the major contributor to the BE whereas, for C6 H6 complexes polarization component is dominant, except in the case of alkali metal ion complexes. However, in case of NH3 complexes, electrostatic component is dominant for s-block metal ions, whereas, for the d and p-block metal ion complexes both electrostatic and polarization components are important. The geometry (M(+) -N and M(+) -O distance for NH3 and H2 O complexes respectively, and cation-π distance for C6 H6 complexes) for the alkali and alkaline earth metal ion complexes increases down the group. Natural population analysis performed on NH3 , H2 O, and C6 H6 complexes shows that the charge transfer to metal ions is higher in case of C6 H6 complexes.

  2. Rare earth-transition metal scrap treatment method

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, F.A.; Peterson, D.T.; Wheelock, J.T.; Jones, L.L.; Lincoln, L.P.

    1992-02-11

    Rare earth-transition metal (e.g. iron) scrap (e.g. Nd-Fe-B scrap) is melted to reduce the levels of tramp oxygen and nitrogen impurities therein. The tramp impurities are reduced in the melt by virtue of the reaction of the tramp impurities and the rare earth to form dross on the melt. The purified melt is separated from the dross for reuse. The oxygen and nitrogen of the melt are reduced to levels acceptable for reuse of the treated alloy in the manufacture of end-use articles, such as permanent magnets. 3 figs.

  3. Rare earth-transition metal scrap treatment method

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, Frederick A.; Peterson, David T.; Wheelock, John T.; Jones, Lawrence L.; Lincoln, Lanny P.

    1992-02-11

    Rare earth-transition metal (e.g. iron) scrap (e.g. Nd-Fe-B scrap) is melted to reduce the levels of tramp oxygen and nitrogen impurities therein. The tramp impurities are reduced in the melt by virtue of the reaction of the tramp impurities and the rare earth to form dross on the melt. The purified melt is separated from the dross for reuse. The oxygen and nitrogen of the melt are reduced to levels acceptable for reuse of the treated alloy in the manufacture of end-use articles, such as permanent magnets.

  4. Metal-ion rescue revisited: biochemical detection of site-bound metal ions important for RNA folding.

    PubMed

    Frederiksen, John K; Li, Nan-Sheng; Das, Rhiju; Herschlag, Daniel; Piccirilli, Joseph A

    2012-06-01

    Within the three-dimensional architectures of RNA molecules, divalent metal ions populate specific locations, shedding their water molecules to form chelates. These interactions help the RNA adopt and maintain specific conformations and frequently make essential contributions to function. Defining the locations of these site-bound metal ions remains challenging despite the growing database of RNA structures. Metal-ion rescue experiments have provided a powerful approach to identify and distinguish catalytic metal ions within RNA active sites, but the ability of such experiments to identify metal ions that contribute to tertiary structure acquisition and structural stability is less developed and has been challenged. Herein, we use the well-defined P4-P6 RNA domain of the Tetrahymena group I intron to reevaluate prior evidence against the discriminatory power of metal-ion rescue experiments and to advance thermodynamic descriptions necessary for interpreting these experiments. The approach successfully identifies ligands within the RNA that occupy the inner coordination sphere of divalent metal ions and distinguishes them from ligands that occupy the outer coordination sphere. Our results underscore the importance of obtaining complete folding isotherms and establishing and evaluating thermodynamic models in order to draw conclusions from metal-ion rescue experiments. These results establish metal-ion rescue as a rigorous tool for identifying and dissecting energetically important metal-ion interactions in RNAs that are noncatalytic but critical for RNA tertiary structure.

  5. Predicting relative toxicity of metal ions to bacteria (Microtox{reg_sign}) using ion characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    McCloskey, J.T.; Newman, M.C.; Clark, S.B.

    1995-12-31

    The use of predictive effects models with metals has received little attention in toxicology. The purpose of this study was to predict the relative toxicity of individual metal ions and metal mixtures using ion characteristics. The concentration of metal resulting in a 50% reduction in light output (EC50) in marine bacteria (Vibrio fischeri) was determined for several metals using the Microtox{reg_sign} Toxicity Analyzer. Trends in metal toxicity were predicted by combining metal speciation calculations with empirical models based on metal ion characteristics. These trends were consistent for nine divalent metals (Ca{prime} Cd, Cu, Hg, Mg, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn) whether the media mimicked salt water (NaC, medium) or freshwater (NaNO{sub 3} medium). When expanding the study to include an additional 14 mono-, di-, and trivalent metal ions, ion characteristics were still useful for predicting the relative toxicity of metal ions to bacteria. The prediction of nonadditive toxic effects using metal mixtures was also possible based on ion characteristics. Overall, models based on ion characteristics show much promise for predicting the relative toxicity of metal ions using the Microtox{reg_sign} assay.

  6. Chemoselective single-site Earth-abundant metal catalysts at metal-organic framework nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manna, Kuntal; Ji, Pengfei; Lin, Zekai; Greene, Francis X.; Urban, Ania; Thacker, Nathan C.; Lin, Wenbin

    2016-08-01

    Earth-abundant metal catalysts are critically needed for sustainable chemical synthesis. Here we report a simple, cheap and effective strategy of producing novel earth-abundant metal catalysts at metal-organic framework (MOF) nodes for broad-scope organic transformations. The straightforward metalation of MOF secondary building units (SBUs) with cobalt and iron salts affords highly active and reusable single-site solid catalysts for a range of organic reactions, including chemoselective borylation, silylation and amination of benzylic C-H bonds, as well as hydrogenation and hydroboration of alkenes and ketones. Our structural, spectroscopic and kinetic studies suggest that chemoselective organic transformations occur on site-isolated, electron-deficient and coordinatively unsaturated metal centres at the SBUs via σ-bond metathesis pathways and as a result of the steric environment around the catalytic site. MOFs thus provide a novel platform for the development of highly active and affordable base metal catalysts for the sustainable synthesis of fine chemicals.

  7. Chemoselective single-site Earth-abundant metal catalysts at metal-organic framework nodes.

    PubMed

    Manna, Kuntal; Ji, Pengfei; Lin, Zekai; Greene, Francis X; Urban, Ania; Thacker, Nathan C; Lin, Wenbin

    2016-08-30

    Earth-abundant metal catalysts are critically needed for sustainable chemical synthesis. Here we report a simple, cheap and effective strategy of producing novel earth-abundant metal catalysts at metal-organic framework (MOF) nodes for broad-scope organic transformations. The straightforward metalation of MOF secondary building units (SBUs) with cobalt and iron salts affords highly active and reusable single-site solid catalysts for a range of organic reactions, including chemoselective borylation, silylation and amination of benzylic C-H bonds, as well as hydrogenation and hydroboration of alkenes and ketones. Our structural, spectroscopic and kinetic studies suggest that chemoselective organic transformations occur on site-isolated, electron-deficient and coordinatively unsaturated metal centres at the SBUs via σ-bond metathesis pathways and as a result of the steric environment around the catalytic site. MOFs thus provide a novel platform for the development of highly active and affordable base metal catalysts for the sustainable synthesis of fine chemicals.

  8. Behavior of metal ions in bioelectrochemical systems: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zhihao; Chang, Dingming; Ma, Jingxing; Huang, Guangtuan; Cai, Lankun; Zhang, Lehua

    2015-02-01

    Bioelectrochemical systems (BESs) have been focused on by many researchers to treat wastewater and recover energy or valuable chemicals from wastes. In BESs, metal ions play an important role in the conductivity of solution, reactors' internal resistance, power generation, chemical production and activity of microorganisms. Additionally, the metal ions are also involved in anodic or cathodic reaction processes directly or indirectly in BESs. This paper reviews the behavior of metal ions in BESs, including (1) increase of the conductivity of electrolyte and decrease of internal resistance, (2) transfer for desalination, (3) enhancement or inhibition of the biocatalysis in anode, (4) improvement of cathodic performance by metal ions through electron acceptance or catalysis in cathodic process and (5) behavior of metal ions on membranes. Moreover, the perspectives of BESs removing heavy metal ions in wastewater or solid waste are discussed to realize recovery, reduction and detoxification simultaneously.

  9. The spliceosome and its metal ions.

    PubMed

    Butcher, Samuel E

    2011-01-01

    The spliceosome is a massive complex of 5 RNAs and many proteins that associate to catalyze precursor messenger RNA splicing. The process of splicing involves two phosphoryl transfer reactions that result in intron excision and ligation of the flanking exons. Since it is required for normal protein production in eukaryotic cells, pre-mRNA splicing is an essential step in gene expression. Although high resolution structural views of the spliceosome do not yet exist, a growing body of evidence indicates that the spliceosome is a magnesium-dependent enzyme that utilizes catalytic metal ions to stabilize both transition states during the two phosphoryl transfer steps of splicing. A wealth of data also indicate that the core of the spliceosome is comprised of RNA, and suggest that the spliceosome may be a ribozyme. This chapter presents the evidence for metal ion catalysis by the spliceosome, draws comparisons to similar RNA enzymes, and discusses the future directions for research into the mechanism of pre-mRNA splicing.

  10. Separation of traces of metal ions from sodium matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korkisch, J.; Orlandini, K. A.

    1969-01-01

    Method for isolating metal ion traces from sodium matrices consists of two extractions and an ion exchange step. Extraction is accomplished by using 2-thenoyltrifluoracetone and dithizone followed by cation exchange.

  11. Optical methods for the detection of heavy metal ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uglov, A. N.; Bessmertnykh-Lemeune, A.; Guilard, R.; Averin, A. D.; Beletskaya, I. P.

    2014-03-01

    The review covers an important area of the modern chemistry, namely, the detection of heavy metal ions using optical molecular detectors. The role of this method in metal ion detection and the physicochemical grounds of operation of chemosensors are discussed, and examples of detection of most abundant heavy metal ions and synthetic approaches to molecular detectors are presented. The immobilization of molecular detectors on solid substrates for the design of analytical sensor devices is described. The bibliography includes 178 references.

  12. Plasma immersion ion implantation for reducing metal ion release

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz, C.; Garcia, J. A.; Maendl, S.; Pereiro, R.; Fernandez, B.; Rodriguez, R. J.

    2012-11-06

    Plasma immersion ion implantation of Nitrogen and Oxygen on CoCrMo alloys was carried out to improve the tribological and corrosion behaviors of these biomedical alloys. In order to optimize the implantation results we were carried experiments at different temperatures. Tribocorrosion tests in bovine serum were used to measure Co, Cr and Mo releasing by using Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry analysis after tests. Also, X-ray Diffraction analysis were employed in order to explain any obtained difference in wear rate and corrosion tests. Wear tests reveals important decreases in rate of more than one order of magnitude for the best treatment. Moreover decreases in metal release were found for all the implanted samples, preserving the same corrosion resistance of the unimplanted samples. Finally this paper gathers an analysis, in terms of implantation parameters and achieved properties for industrial implementation of these treatments.

  13. Plasma immersion ion implantation for reducing metal ion release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz, C.; García, J. A.; Mändl, S.; Pereiro, R.; Fernández, B.; Rodríguez, R. J.

    2012-11-01

    Plasma immersion ion implantation of Nitrogen and Oxygen on CoCrMo alloys was carried out to improve the tribological and corrosion behaviors of these biomedical alloys. In order to optimize the implantation results we were carried experiments at different temperatures. Tribocorrosion tests in bovine serum were used to measure Co, Cr and Mo releasing by using Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry analysis after tests. Also, X-ray Diffraction analysis were employed in order to explain any obtained difference in wear rate and corrosion tests. Wear tests reveals important decreases in rate of more than one order of magnitude for the best treatment. Moreover decreases in metal release were found for all the implanted samples, preserving the same corrosion resistance of the unimplanted samples. Finally this paper gathers an analysis, in terms of implantation parameters and achieved properties for industrial implementation of these treatments.

  14. Magnetism of perovskite cobaltites with Kramers rare-earth ions

    SciTech Connect

    Jirák, Z. Hejtmánek, J.; Knížek, K.; Novák, P.; Šantavá, E.; Fujishiro, H.

    2014-05-07

    The band-gap insulators RECoO{sub 3} (RE = Nd{sup 3+}, Sm{sup 3+}, and Dy{sup 3+}) with Co{sup 3+} ions stabilized in the non-magnetic low-spin state have been investigated by specific heat measurements. The experiments evidence an antiferromagnetic ordering of the rare earths with Néel temperature of T{sub N} = 1.25, 1.50, and 3.60 K for NdCoO{sub 3}, SmCoO{sub 3}, and DyCoO{sub 3}, respectively. With increasing external field, the lambda peak in specific heat, indicative of the transition, shifts to lower temperatures and vanishes for field of about 3 T. Starting from this point, a broader Schottky peak is formed, centered in 1 K range, and its position is moved to higher temperatures proportionally to applied field. The origin of the peak is in Zeeman splitting of the ground Kramers doublet, and the gradual shift with field defines effective g-factors for the rare-earth pseudospins in studied compounds. The results obtained are confronted with the calculations of crystal field splitting of the rare-earth multiplets.

  15. Specialties of distributions of alkaline-earth metals in coal

    SciTech Connect

    Fan Jinchuan; Fan Minqiang

    1997-12-31

    Four different ranks of coal have been sampled and separated into different density fractions by Float-Sink. The contents of some trace elements in each density fraction has been analyzed by ICAP. The analyzed data show that the alkaline-earth metals (Be, Sr, and Ba) have their special distributions in coal: Be and Sr may exist in the form of organic matter. Ba often has the highest content in the middle density fraction (1.4--1.5). The relative relationship between ash (or sulfur) and the trace element in a certain type of coal was obtained by using linear regression approach. Results show that there is no significant correlation between the contents of ash or sulfur and those of Be, Sr, and Ba. On the other hand, the linear regression was done among the trace elements of 17 types of coal. The results also show that there is no significant correlation between ash or sulfur and alkaline-earth metals.

  16. 40 CFR 721.4668 - Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4668 Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions. (a... hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions (PMN P-94-1557) is subject to reporting...

  17. 40 CFR 721.4668 - Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4668 Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions. (a... hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions (PMN P-94-1557) is subject to reporting...

  18. 40 CFR 721.4668 - Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4668 Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions. (a... hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions (PMN P-94-1557) is subject to reporting...

  19. 40 CFR 721.4668 - Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4668 Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions. (a... hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions (PMN P-94-1557) is subject to reporting...

  20. 40 CFR 721.4668 - Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4668 Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions. (a... hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions (PMN P-94-1557) is subject to reporting...

  1. Binding and selectivity of phenazino-18-crown-6-ether with alkali, alkaline earth and toxic metal species: A DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Nasarul; Chimni, Swapandeep Singh

    2017-02-01

    The interactions of phenazino-crown ether ligands with alkali, alkaline earth and selected toxic species were investigated using density functional theory modelling by employing B3PW91/6-311G ++ (d, p) level of theory. The complex stability was analysed in terms of binding energies, perturbation energies, position of highest molecular orbital and energy gap values. In general, the complexes formed by P18C6-1a ligand with metal cations were found to be more stable than those with P18C6-1b. Among alkali and alkaline earth metals complexes having highest stability was observed for the complex formed by P18C6-1a with Be2+. Computational calculations of P18C6 ligand with toxic metal ions reveals that the P18C6-Cr6+ metal complexes acquire envelop like geometry, leading to higher binding energy values. Comparing the binding energies of neutral and monocations of Ag and Hg, the former had higher value both in neutral as well as monocation state. Thus, the stability of metal complexes is determined not only by the ligand but also by the type of metal ion. In solvent systems the stability constants of metal complexes were found increasing with decreasing permittivity of the solvent. This reflects the inherited polar character of the protic solvents stabilises the cation, resulting in decrease of effective interaction of ligand with the metal ion.

  2. Steady-state superradiance with alkaline-earth-metal atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Meiser, D.; Holland, M. J.

    2010-03-15

    Alkaline-earth-metal-like atoms with ultranarrow transitions open the door to a new regime of cavity quantum electrodynamics. That regime is characterized by a critical photon number that is many orders of magnitude smaller than what can be achieved in conventional systems. We show that it is possible to achieve superradiance in steady state with such systems. We discuss the basic underlying mechanisms as well as the key experimental requirements.

  3. Isotopic fractionation of alkali earth metals during carbonate precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yotsuya, T.; Ohno, T.; Muramatsu, Y.; Shimoda, G.; Goto, K. T.

    2014-12-01

    The alkaline earth metals such as magnesium, calcium and strontium play an important role in a variety of geochemical and biological processes. The element ratios (Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca) in marine carbonates have been used as proxies for reconstruction of the past environment. Recently several studies suggested that the study for the isotopic fractionation of the alkaline earth metals in marine carbonates has a potentially significant influence in geochemical research fields (e.g. Eisenhauer et al., 2009). The aim of this study is to explore the influence of carbonate polymorphs (Calcite and Aragonite) and environmental factors (e.g., temperature, precipitation rate) on the level of isotopic fractionation of the alkaline earth metals. We also examined possible correlations between the level of isotopic fractionation of Ca and that of other alkaline earth metals during carbonate precipitation. In order to determine the isotope fractionation factor of Mg, Ca and Sr during carbonate precipitation, calcite and aragonite were synthesized from calcium bicarbonate solution in which the amount of magnesium was controlled based on Kitano method. Calcium carbonates were also prepared from the mixture of calcium chlorite and sodium hydrogen carbonate solutions. The isotope fractionation factors were measured by MC-ICPMS. Results suggested that the level of isotopic fractionation of Mg during carbonate precipitation was correlated with that of Sr and that the change of the carbonate crystal structure could make differences of isotopic fractionations of Mg and Ca, however no difference was found in the case of Sr. In this presentation, the possible mechanism will be discussed.

  4. Metal Based Synthetic Strategies and the Examination of Structure Determining Factors in Alkaline Earth Metal Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Yuriko

    Last decades have witnessed a large expansion of the organometallic heavier alkaline earth metal species. However, continued growth of this promising area of chemistry has been slowed by severe restrictions and limitations in viable synthetic methodologies leading to difficulties in preparing and characterizing the target compounds. There is clearly a need for the further development of synthetic methodologies and detailed structure function analysis that will promote the further advancement of organoalkaline earth metal chemistry in applications as diverse as materials chemistry and catalysis. This thesis work greatly extends the synthetic options currently available towards organoalkaline earth metal species by introducing redox transmetallation protolysis (RTP), a reaction based on the readily available Ph3Bi as a non-toxic transmetallation agent. Based on a straightforward one-pot procedure and work-up, Ph3Bi based RTP presents a powerful synthetic alternative for the facile preparation of a large variety of heavy alkaline earth metal compounds. The second part of the thesis explores the effect of secondary non covalent interactions on the coordination chemistry as well as thermal properties of a series of novel alkali, alkaline earth, rare earth as well as heterobimetallic alkali/alkaline earth fluoroalkoxides. These compounds showcase the significance of non-covalent M···F-C and agostic interactions on metal stabilization and structural features, providing critical input on ligand design for the design of advanced metal organic vapor deposition (MOCVD) precursor materials. This work also showcases the impact of M···F-C interactions over M---co-ligand coordination, a critical precursor design element as well.

  5. Origins of energetic ions in the Earth's magnetosheath

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuselter, S. A.; Shelley, E. G.; Klumpar, D. M.

    1992-01-01

    The analysis and interpretation of the combined scientific data from the Hot Plasma Composition Experiment (HPCE) and the Charge Energy Mass (CHEM) spectrometer on the Active Mesospheric Particle Tracer Experiment (AMPTE) Charge Composition Explorer (CCE) spacecraft are discussed. These combined data sets have and will be used to survey the energetic ion environment in the Earth's magnetosheath to determine the origins and relative strengths of the energetic ion populations found there. A computer code was developed to analyze and interpret the data sets. The focus of the first year was on the determination of the contribution of leaked magnetospheric protons to the total energetic proton population. Emphasis was placed on intervals when the AMPTE spacecraft was in the plasma depletion layer because it was argued that in this region, only the leaked population contributes to the energetic ion population. Manipulation of the CHEM data and comparison of the CHEM and HPCE data over their common energy range near the magnetopause also contributed directly to a second study of that region.

  6. Origins of energetic ions in the Earth's magnetosheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuselter, S. A.; Shelley, E. G.; Klumpar, D. M.

    1992-06-01

    The analysis and interpretation of the combined scientific data from the Hot Plasma Composition Experiment (HPCE) and the Charge Energy Mass (CHEM) spectrometer on the Active Mesospheric Particle Tracer Experiment (AMPTE) Charge Composition Explorer (CCE) spacecraft are discussed. These combined data sets have and will be used to survey the energetic ion environment in the Earth's magnetosheath to determine the origins and relative strengths of the energetic ion populations found there. A computer code was developed to analyze and interpret the data sets. The focus of the first year was on the determination of the contribution of leaked magnetospheric protons to the total energetic proton population. Emphasis was placed on intervals when the AMPTE spacecraft was in the plasma depletion layer because it was argued that in this region, only the leaked population contributes to the energetic ion population. Manipulation of the CHEM data and comparison of the CHEM and HPCE data over their common energy range near the magnetopause also contributed directly to a second study of that region.

  7. A biosystem for removal of metal ions from water

    SciTech Connect

    Kilbane, J.J. II.

    1990-01-01

    The presence of heavy metal ions in ground and surface waters constitutes a potential health risk and is an environmental concern. Moreover, processes for the recovery of valuable metal ions are of interest. Bioaccumulation or biosorption is not only a factor in assessing the environmental risk posed by metal ions; it can also be used as a means of decontamination. A biological system for the removal and recovery of metal ions from contaminated water is reported here. Exopolysaccharide-producing microorganisms, including a methanotrophic culture, are demonstrated to have superior metal binding ability, compared with other microbial cultures. This paper describes a biosorption process in which dried biomass obtained from exopolysaccharide-producing microorganisms is encapsulated in porous plastic beads and is used for metal ion binding and recovery. 22 refs., 13 figs.

  8. The Transport of Solar Ions Through the Earth's Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lennartsson, O. W.

    1999-01-01

    This report covers the initial phase of an investigation that was originally selected by NASA Headquarters for funding by a grant but was later transferred to NASA GSFC for continued funding under a new and separate contract. The principal objective of the investigation, led by Dr. O.W. Lennartsson, is to extract information about the solar origin plasma in Earth's magnetosphere, specifically about the entry and transport of this plasma, using energetic (10 eV/e to 18 keV/e) ion composition data from the Lockheed Plasma Composition Experiment on the NASA/ESA International Sun-Earth Explorer One (ISEE 1) satellite. These data were acquired many years ago, from November 1977 through March of 1982, but, because of subsequent failures of similar experiments on several other spacecraft, they are still the only substantial ion composition data available from Earth's magnetotail, beyond 10 R(sub E), in the critically important sub-kev to keV energy range. All of the Lockheed data now exist in a compacted scientific format, suitable for large-scale statistical investigations, which has been archived both at Lockheed Martin in Palo Alto and at the National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC) in Greenbelt. The completion of the archiving, by processing the remaining half of the data, was made possible by separate funding through a temporary NASA program for data restoration and was given priority over the data analysis by a no-cost extension of the subject grant. By chance, the period of performance coincided with an international study of source and loss processes of magnetospheric plasma, sponsored by the International Space Science Institute (ISSI) in Bern, Switzerland, for which Dr. Lennartsson was invited to serve as one of 12 co-chairs. This study meshed well with the continued analysis of the NASA/Lockheed ISEE ion composition data and provided a natural forum for a broader discussion of the results from this unique experiment. What follows is arranged, for the most

  9. The Transport of Solar Ions Through the Earth's Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lennartsson, O. W.

    1999-01-01

    This report covers the initial phase of an investigation that was originally selected by NASA Headquarters for funding by a grant but was later transferred to NASA GSFC for continued funding under a new and separate contract. The principal objective of the investigation, led by Dr. O.W. Lennartsson, is to extract information about the solar origin plasma in Earth's magnetosphere, specifically about the entry and transport of this plasma, using energetic (10 eV/e to 18 keV/e) ion composition data from the Lockheed Plasma Composition Experiment on the NASA/ESA International Sun-Earth Explorer One (ISEE 1) satellite. These data were acquired many years ago, from November 1977 through March of 1982, but, because of subsequent failures of similar experiments on several other spacecraft, they are still the only substantial ion composition data available from Earth's magnetotail, beyond 10 RE, in the critically important sub-kev to keV energy range. All of the Lockheed data now exist in a compacted scientific format, suitable for large-scale statistical investigations, which has been archived both at Lockheed Martin in Palo Alto and at the National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC) in Greenbelt. The completion of the archiving, by processing the remaining half of the data, was made possible by separate funding through a temporary NASA program for data restoration and was given priority over the data analysis by a no-cost extension of the subject grant. By chance, the period of performance coincided with an international study of source and loss processes of magnetospheric plasma, sponsored by the International Space Science Institute (ISSI) in Bern, Switzerland, for which Dr. Lennartsson was invited to serve as one of 12 co-chairs. This study meshed well with the continued analysis of the NASA/Lockheed ISEE ion composition data and provided a natural forum for a broader discussion of the results from this unique experiment. What follows is arranged, for the most part, in

  10. Dirac Node Lines in Pure Alkali Earth Metals.

    PubMed

    Li, Ronghan; Ma, Hui; Cheng, Xiyue; Wang, Shoulong; Li, Dianzhong; Zhang, Zhengyu; Li, Yiyi; Chen, Xing-Qiu

    2016-08-26

    Beryllium is a simple alkali earth metal, but has been the target of intensive studies for decades because of its unusual electron behavior at surfaces. The puzzling aspects include (i) severe deviations from the description of the nearly free-electron picture, (ii) an anomalously large electron-phonon coupling effect, and (iii) giant Friedel oscillations. The underlying origins for such anomalous surface electron behavior have been under active debate, but with no consensus. Here, by means of first-principles calculations, we discover that this pure metal system, surprisingly, harbors the Dirac node line (DNL) that in turn helps to rationalize many of the existing puzzles. The DNL is featured by a closed line consisting of linear band crossings, and its induced topological surface band agrees well with previous photoemission spectroscopy observations on the Be (0001) surface. We further reveal that each of the elemental alkali earth metals of Mg, Ca, and Sr also harbors the DNL and speculate that the fascinating topological property of the DNL might naturally exist in other elemental metals as well.

  11. Dirac Node Lines in Pure Alkali Earth Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ronghan; Ma, Hui; Cheng, Xiyue; Wang, Shoulong; Li, Dianzhong; Zhang, Zhengyu; Li, Yiyi; Chen, Xing-Qiu

    2016-08-01

    Beryllium is a simple alkali earth metal, but has been the target of intensive studies for decades because of its unusual electron behavior at surfaces. The puzzling aspects include (i) severe deviations from the description of the nearly free-electron picture, (ii) an anomalously large electron-phonon coupling effect, and (iii) giant Friedel oscillations. The underlying origins for such anomalous surface electron behavior have been under active debate, but with no consensus. Here, by means of first-principles calculations, we discover that this pure metal system, surprisingly, harbors the Dirac node line (DNL) that in turn helps to rationalize many of the existing puzzles. The DNL is featured by a closed line consisting of linear band crossings, and its induced topological surface band agrees well with previous photoemission spectroscopy observations on the Be (0001) surface. We further reveal that each of the elemental alkali earth metals of Mg, Ca, and Sr also harbors the DNL and speculate that the fascinating topological property of the DNL might naturally exist in other elemental metals as well.

  12. Shape-controlled syntheses of metal oxide nanoparticles by the introduction of rare-earth metals.

    PubMed

    Song, Hyo-Won; Kim, Na-Young; Park, Ji-Eun; Ko, Jae-Hyeon; Hickey, Robert J; Kim, Yong-Hyun; Park, So-Jung

    2017-02-23

    Here, we report the size- and shape-controlled synthesis of metal oxide nanoparticles through the introduction of rare-earth metals. The addition of gadolinium oleate in the synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles induced sphere-to-cube shape changes of nanoparticles and generated iron oxide nanocubes coated with gadolinium. Based on experimental investigations and density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we attribute the shape change to the facet-selective binding of undecomposed gadolinium oleates. While many previous studies on the shape-controlled syntheses of nanoparticles rely on the stabilization of specific crystal facets by anionic surfactants or their decomposition products, this study shows that the interaction between growing transition metal oxide nanoparticles and rare-earth metal complexes can be used as a robust new mechanism for shape-controlled syntheses. Indeed, we demonstrated that this approach was applicable to other transition metal oxide nanoparticles (i.e., manganese oxide and manganese ferrite) and rare earth metals (i.e., gadolinium, europium, and cerium). This study also demonstrates that the nature of metal-ligand bonding can play an important role in the shape control of nanoparticles.

  13. Alkaline earth metal doped tin oxide as a novel oxygen storage material

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Qiang; Yin, Shu; Yoshida, Mizuki; Wu, Xiaoyong; Liu, Bin; Miura, Akira; Takei, Takahiro; Kumada, Nobuhiro; Sato, Tsugio

    2015-09-15

    Alkaline earth metal doped tin oxide (SnO{sub 2}) hollow nanospheres with a diameter of 50 nm have been synthesized successfully via a facial solvothermal route in a very simple system composed of only ethanol, acetic acid, SnCl{sub 4}·5H{sub 2}O and A(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}·xH{sub 2}O (A = Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba). The synthesized undoped SnO{sub 2} and A-doped SnO{sub 2} hollow nanospheres were characterized by the oxygen storage capacity (OSC), X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and the Brunauer–Emmet–Teller (BET) technique. The OSC values of all samples were measured using thermogravimetric-differential thermal analysis. The incorporation of alkaline earth metal ion into tin oxide greatly enhanced the thermal stability and OSC. Especially, Ba-doped SnO{sub 2} hollow nanospheres calcined at 1000 °C for 20 h with a BET surface area of 61 m{sup 2} g{sup −1} exhibited the considerably high OSC of 457 μmol-O g{sup −1} and good thermal stability. Alkaline earth metal doped tin oxide has the potential to be a novel oxygen storage material.

  14. Spectroscopic detection of metals ions using a novel selective sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peralta-Domínguez, D.; Ramos-Ortiz, G.; Maldonado, J. L.; Rodriguez, M.; Meneses-Nava, M. A.; Barbosa-Garcia, O.; Santillan, R.; Farfan, N.

    2011-09-01

    Colorimetric chemosensors are simple, economical and practical optical approach for detecting toxic metal ions (Hg2+, Pb2+, Ni2+, etc.) in the environment. In this work, we present a simple but highly specific organic compound 4-chloro-2-((E)-((E)-3-(4-(dimethylamino)phenyl)allylidene)amino)phenol (L1) that acts as a colorimetric sensor for divalent metal ions in H2O. The mechanism of the interaction between L1 and various metal-ions has been established by UV-vis absorption and emission spectroscopic experiments that indicate favorable coordination of metal ions with L1 in different solvents. Experimental results indicate that the shape of the electronic transition band of L1 (receptor compound) changed after the interaction with divalent metal-ions, such as Hg2+, Pb2+, Mn2+, Co2+, Cu2+, and Ni2+ in aqueous solution. We found that L1 have a considerable selectivity for Ni2+ ions, even in presence of other metals ions when mixtures of DMSO/H2O as are used as solvents. L1, which has been targeted for sensing transition metal ions, exhibits binding-induced color changes from yellow to pink observed even by the naked eye in presence of Ni2+ ions.

  15. Metal interactions with voltage- and receptor-activated ion channels.

    PubMed Central

    Vijverberg, H P; Oortgiesen, M; Leinders, T; van Kleef, R G

    1994-01-01

    Effects of Pb and several other metal ions on various distinct types of voltage-, receptor- and Ca-activated ion channels have been investigated in cultured N1E-115 mouse neuroblastoma cells. Experiments were performed using the whole-cell voltage clamp and single-channel patch clamp techniques. External superfusion of nanomolar to submillimolar concentrations of Pb causes multiple effects on ion channels. Barium current through voltage-activated Ca channels is blocked by micromolar concentrations of Pb, whereas voltage-activated Na current appears insensitive. Neuronal type nicotinic acetylcholine receptor-activated ion current is blocked by nanomolar concentrations of Pb and this block is reversed at micromolar concentrations. Serotonin 5-HT3 receptor-activated ion current is much less sensitive to Pb. In addition, external superfusion with micromolar concentrations of Pb as well as of Cd and aluminum induces inward current, associated with the direct activation of nonselective cation channels by these metal ions. In excised inside-out membrane patches of neuroblastoma cells, micromolar concentrations of Ca activate small (SK) and big (BK) Ca-activated K channels. Internally applied Pb activates SK and BK channels more potently than Ca, whereas Cd is approximately equipotent to Pb with respect to SK channel activation, but fails to activate BK channels. The results show that metal ions cause distinct, selective effects on the various types of ion channels and that metal ion interaction sites of ion channels may be highly selective for particular metal ions. PMID:7531139

  16. Fluorescent carbon nanoparticles for the fluorescent detection of metal ions.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yongming; Zhang, Lianfeng; Zhang, Shushen; Yang, Yan; Chen, Xihan; Zhang, Mingchao

    2015-01-15

    Fluorescent carbon nanoparticles (F-CNPs) as a new kind of fluorescent nanoparticles, have recently attracted considerable research interest in a wide range of applications due to their low-cost and good biocompatibility. The fluorescent detection of metal ions is one of the most important applications. In this review, we first present the general detection mechanism of F-CNPs for the fluorescent detection of metal ions, including fluorescence turn-off, fluorescence turn-on, fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and ratiometric response. We then focus on the recent advances of F-CNPs in the fluorescent detection of metal ions, including Hg(2+), Cu(2+), Fe(3+), and other metal ions. Further, we discuss the research trends and future prospects of F-CNPs. We envision that more novel F-CNPs-based nanosensors with more accuracy and robustness will be widely used to assay and remove various metal ions, and there will be more practical applications in coming years.

  17. A self-sputtering ion source: A new approach to quiescent metal ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Oks, Efim M.; Anders, Andre

    2009-09-03

    A new metal ion source is presented based on sustained self-sputtering plasma in a magnetron discharge. Metals exhibiting high self-sputtering yield like Cu, Ag, Zn, and Bi can be used in a high-power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) discharge such that the plasma almost exclusively contains singly charged metal ions of the target material. The plasma and extracted ion beam are quiescent. The ion beams consist mostly of singly charged ions with a space-charge limited current density which reached about 10 mA/cm2 at an extraction voltage of 45 kV and a first gap spacing of 12 mm.

  18. DNA as sensors and imaging agents for metal ions.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Yu; Lu, Yi

    2014-02-17

    Increasing interest in detecting metal ions in many chemical and biomedical fields has created demands for developing sensors and imaging agents for metal ions with high sensitivity and selectivity. This review covers recent progress in DNA-based sensors and imaging agents for metal ions. Through both combinatorial selection and rational design, a number of metal-ion-dependent DNAzymes and metal-ion-binding DNA structures that can selectively recognize specific metal ions have been obtained. By attachment of these DNA molecules with signal reporters such as fluorophores, chromophores, electrochemical tags, and Raman tags, a number of DNA-based sensors for both diamagnetic and paramagnetic metal ions have been developed for fluorescent, colorimetric, electrochemical, and surface Raman detection. These sensors are highly sensitive (with a detection limit down to 11 ppt) and selective (with selectivity up to millions-fold) toward specific metal ions. In addition, through further development to simplify the operation, such as the use of "dipstick tests", portable fluorometers, computer-readable disks, and widely available glucose meters, these sensors have been applied for on-site and real-time environmental monitoring and point-of-care medical diagnostics. The use of these sensors for in situ cellular imaging has also been reported. The generality of the combinatorial selection to obtain DNAzymes for almost any metal ion in any oxidation state and the ease of modification of the DNA with different signal reporters make DNA an emerging and promising class of molecules for metal-ion sensing and imaging in many fields of applications.

  19. Alkaline and alkaline earth metal phosphate halides and phosphors

    DOEpatents

    Lyons, Robert Joseph; Setlur, Anant Achyut; Cleaver, Robert John

    2012-11-13

    Compounds, phosphor materials and apparatus related to nacaphite family of materials are presented. Potassium and rubidium based nacaphite family compounds and phosphors designed by doping divalent rare earth elements in the sites of alkaline earth metals in the nacaphite material families are descried. An apparatus comprising the phosphors based on the nacaphite family materials are presented herein. The compounds presented is of formula A.sub.2B.sub.1-yR.sub.yPO.sub.4X where the elements A, B, R, X and suffix y are defined such that A is potassium, rubidium, or a combination of potassium and rubidium and B is calcium, strontium, barium, or a combination of any of calcium, strontium and barium. X is fluorine, chlorine, or a combination of fluorine and chlorine, R is europium, samarium, ytterbium, or a combination of any of europium, samarium, and ytterbium, and y ranges from 0 to about 0.1.

  20. Alkali metal ion battery with bimetallic electrode

    DOEpatents

    Boysen, Dane A; Bradwell, David J; Jiang, Kai; Kim, Hojong; Ortiz, Luis A; Sadoway, Donald R; Tomaszowska, Alina A; Wei, Weifeng; Wang, Kangli

    2015-04-07

    Electrochemical cells having molten electrodes having an alkali metal provide receipt and delivery of power by transporting atoms of the alkali metal between electrode environments of disparate chemical potentials through an electrochemical pathway comprising a salt of the alkali metal. The chemical potential of the alkali metal is decreased when combined with one or more non-alkali metals, thus producing a voltage between an electrode comprising the molten the alkali metal and the electrode comprising the combined alkali/non-alkali metals.

  1. Separation of rare earths from transition metals by liquid-liquid extraction from a molten salt hydrate to an ionic liquid phase.

    PubMed

    Rout, Alok; Binnemans, Koen

    2014-02-28

    The solvent extraction of trivalent rare-earth ions and their separation from divalent transition metal ions using molten salt hydrates as the feed phase and an undiluted fluorine-free ionic liquid as the extracting phase were investigated in detail. The extractant was tricaprylmethylammonium nitrate, [A336][NO3], and the hydrated melt was calcium nitrate tetrahydrate, Ca(NO3)2·4H2O. The extraction behavior of rare-earth ions was studied for solutions of individual elements, as well as for mixtures of rare earths in the hydrated melt. The influence of different extraction parameters was investigated: the initial metal loading in the feed phase, percentage of water in the feed solution, equilibration time, and the type of hydrated melt. The extraction of rare earths from Ca(NO3)2·4H2O was compared with extraction from CaCl2·4H2O by [A336][Cl] (Aliquat 336). The nitrate system was found to be the better one. The extraction and separation of rare earths from the transition metals nickel, cobalt and zinc were also investigated. Remarkably high separation factors of rare-earth ions over transition metal ions were observed for extraction from Ca(NO3)2·4H2O by the [A336][NO3] extracting phase. Furthermore, rare-earth ions could be separated efficiently from transition metal ions, even in melts with very high concentrations of transition metal ions. Rare-earth oxides could be directly dissolved in the Ca(NO3)2·4H2O phase in the presence of small amounts of Al(NO3)3·9H2O or concentrated nitric acid. The efficiency of extraction after dissolving the rare-earth oxides in the hydrated nitrate melt was identical to extraction from solutions with rare-earth nitrates dissolved in the molten phase. The stripping of the rare-earth ions from the loaded ionic liquid phase and the reuse of the recycled ionic liquid were also investigated in detail.

  2. Structural resolution of 4-substituted proline diastereomers with ion mobility spectrometry via alkali metal ion cationization.

    PubMed

    Flick, Tawnya G; Campuzano, Iain D G; Bartberger, Michael D

    2015-03-17

    The chirality of substituents on an amino acid can significantly change its mode of binding to a metal ion, as shown here experimentally by traveling wave ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (TWIMS-MS) of different proline isomeric molecules complexed with alkali metal ions. Baseline separation of the cis- and trans- forms of both hydroxyproline and fluoroproline was achieved using TWIMS-MS via metal ion cationization (Li(+), Na(+), K(+), and Cs(+)). Density functional theory calculations indicate that differentiation of these diastereomers is a result of the stabilization of differing metal-complexed forms adopted by the diastereomers when cationized by an alkali metal cation, [M + X](+) where X = Li, Na, K, and Cs, versus the topologically similar structures of the protonated molecules, [M + H](+). Metal-cationized trans-proline variants exist in a linear salt-bridge form where the metal ion interacts with a deprotonated carboxylic acid and the proton is displaced onto the nitrogen atom of the pyrrolidine ring. In contrast, metal-cationized cis-proline variants adopt a compact structure where the carbonyl of the carboxylic acid, nitrogen atom, and if available, the hydroxyl and fluorine substituent solvate the metal ion. Experimentally, it was observed that the resolution between alkali metal-cationized cis- and trans-proline variants decreases as the size of the metal ion increases. Density functional theory demonstrates that this is due to the decreasing stability of the compact charge-solvated cis-proline structure with increased metal ion radius, likely a result of steric hindrance and/or weaker binding to the larger metal ion. Furthermore, the unique structures adopted by the alkali metal-cationized cis- and trans-proline variants results in these molecules having significantly different quantum mechanically calculated dipole moments, a factor that can be further exploited to improve the diastereomeric resolution when utilizing a drift gas with a

  3. Impregnated-electrode-type liquid metal ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, J.; Gotoh, Y.; Tsuji, H.; Takagi, T.

    We have developed an impregnated-electrode-type liquid metal ion source whose tip is a sintered-porous structure made of a refractory metal such as tungsten. By this structure the ratio of the liquid metal surface area facing the vacuum to the volume is low, which decreases useless metal evaporation from the surface. The maximum vapour pressure of the metal in operation for this ion source is 10 -1-10 0 Torr, which is 2-3 orders of magnitude higher than that for the needle type. Therefore, useful metal ions such as Ga +, Au +, Ag +, In +, Si 2+, Ge 2+, and Sb 2+ can be extracted from single element metals or alloys. The porous structure of the tip has also an effect on the positive control of the liquid metal flow rate to the tip head. Thus, a stable operation with a high current of a few hundreds of μA can be obtained together with a low current high brightness ion beam. Therefore, this ion source is suitable not only for microfocusing but also for a general use as a metal ion source.

  4. Preparation and structure of carbonated calcium hydroxyapatite substituted with heavy rare earth ions

    SciTech Connect

    Yasukawa, Akemi; Kandori, Kazuhiko; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Gotoh, Keiko

    2012-05-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LnCaHap solid solution particles were prepared using five types of heavy rare earth ions by a precipitation method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The length and the crystallinity of the LnCaHap particles first increased and then decreased with increasing Ln{sup 3+} contents. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A series of YCaHap solid solution particles formed with Y/(Y + Ca) = 0-0.10 were investigated using various methods in detail. -- Abstract: Calcium hydroxyapatite (CaHap) particles substituted five types of heavy rare earth ions (Ln: Y{sup 3+}, Gd{sup 3+}, Dy{sup 3+}, Er{sup 3+} and Yb{sup 3+}) were synthesized using a precipitation method and characterized using various means. These Ln ions strongly affected the crystal phases and the structures of the products. With increasing Ln/(Ln + Ca) in the starting solution ([X{sub Ln}]), the length and the crystallinity of the particles first increased and then decreased. The rare earth metal-calcium hydroxyapatite (LnCaHap) solid solution particles were obtained at [X{sub Y}] {<=} 0.10 for substituting Y system and at [X{sub Ln}] {<=} 0.01-0.03 for substituting the other Ln systems. LnPO{sub 4} was mixed with LnCaHap at higher [X{sub Ln}] for all Ln systems. A series of yttrium-calcium hydroxyapatite (YCaHap) solid solutions with [X{sub Y}] = 0-0.10 were investigated using XRD, TEM, ICP-AES, IR and TG-DTA in detail.

  5. Synthesis and luminescence of some rare earth metal complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bochkarev, Mikhail N.; Pushkarev, Anatoly P.

    2016-12-01

    In the present paper the synthesis, photoand electroluminescent properties of new rare earth metal complexes prepared and studied at the Razuvaev Institute of Organometallic Chemistry during the last decade are reviewed. The obtained compounds give luminescence in UV, visible and NIR regions. The substituted phenolates, naphtholates, mercaptobenzothiazolate, 8-oxyquinolinolate, polyfluorinated alcoholates and chalcogenophosphinates were used as ligands. The synthesis and structure of unusual three-nuclear sulfidenitride clusters of Nd and Dy are described. The new excitation mechanism of ytterbium phenolates and naphtholates, which includes the stage of reversible reduction of Yb to divalent state and oxidation of the ligands in the excitation process, is discussed.

  6. Reusable chelating resins concentrate metal ions from highly dilute solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauman, A. J.; Weetal, H. H.; Weliky, N.

    1966-01-01

    Column chromatographic method uses new metal chelating resins for recovering heavy-metal ions from highly dilute solutions. The absorbed heavy-metal cations may be removed from the chelating resins by acid or base washes. The resins are reusable after the washes are completed.

  7. Breast milk metal ion levels in a young and active patient with a metal-on-metal hip prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Nelis, Raymond; de Waal Malefijt, Jan; Gosens, Taco

    2013-01-01

    Metal-on-metal resurfacing arthroplasty of the hip has been used increasingly over the last 10 years in younger active patients. The dissolution of the metal wear particles results in measurable increases in cobalt and chromium ions in the serum and urine of patients with a metal-on-metal bearing. We measured the cobalt, chromium, and molybdenum ion levels in urine; serum; and breast milk in a young and active patient with a metal-on-metal hip prosthesis after a pathologic fracture of the femoral neck. Metal-on-metal hip prosthesis leads to increasing levels of molybdenum in breast milk in the short-term follow-up. There are no increasing levels of chromium and cobalt ions in breast milk. Besides the already known elevated concentrations in serum of chromium and cobalt after implantation of a metal-on-metal hip prosthesis, we found no increasing levels of chromium and cobalt in urine.

  8. Ion Beam Synthesis Of Metal - Silicon Carbide - Si Multilayer Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, J. K. N.; Tsang, W. M.; Stritzker, B.; Wong, S. P.

    2003-08-01

    High doses of Ti, Ni, Mo, or W ions were implanted at elevated temperatures either conventionally or using a MEVVA ion source into ion beam synthesized Si/SiC/Si or SiC/Si layer structures in order to create metallic layers contacting the SiC. The depth distribution of metal atoms and the formation of silicide and carbide phases as well as the formation of cavities at the lower SiC/Si interface are studied by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM). A brief survey of the effects ocurring in the ion beam metallization of SiC films is given and the benefit of using ion beams for metallization of thin films is elucidated.

  9. Metal ion sensing solution containing double crossover DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Byeongho; Dugasani, Sreekantha R.; Cho, Youngho; Oh, Juyeong; Kim, Chulki; Seo, Min Ah; Lee, Taikjin; Jhon, Young Miin; Woo, Deok Ha; Lee, Seok; Jun, Seong Chan; Park, Sung Ha; Kim, Jae Hun

    2015-07-01

    The current study describes metal ion sensing with double crossover DNAs (DX1 and DX2), artificially designed as a platform of doping. The sample for sensing is prepared by a facile annealing method to grow the DXs lattice on a silicon/silicon oxide. Adding and incubating metal ion solution with the sensor substrate into the micro-tube lead the optical property change. Photoluminescence (PL) is employed for detecting the concentration of metal ion in the specimen. We investigated PL emission for sensor application with the divalent copper. In the range from 400 to 650 nm, the PL features of samples provide significantly different peak positions with excitation and emission detection. Metal ions contribute to modify the optical characteristics of DX with structural and functional change, which results from the intercalation of them into hydrogen bonding positioned at the center of double helix. The PL intensity is decreased gradually after doping copper ion in the DX tile on the substrate.

  10. Ion acceleration to supra-thermal energies in the near-Earth magnetotail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elena, Kronberg

    2016-07-01

    We here present an analysis of ion composition measurements by the RAPID instruments onboard Cluster. We discuss the evidence for an acceleration of ions to energies above 100 keV in the near-Earth current sheet, in the vicinity of a possible near-Earth neutral line, and we investigate the physical details of such an acceleration. We present observations of tailward bulk flows in the near-Earth tail associated with plasmoid-like magnetic structures. These flows are superimposed by low-frequency magnetic and electric field fluctuations. Observations and modelling show that resonant interactions between ions and low-frequency electromagnetic fluctuations facilitate the ion energization inside plasmoids.

  11. Tungstate-ferrates of some alkali and alkaline-earth metals

    SciTech Connect

    Gruba, A.I.; Danileiko, L.A.; Moroz, Ya.A.; Zyats, M.N.

    1988-02-01

    Tungstate-ferrates of some alkali and alkaline-earth metals with the ratio Fe:W = 2:11, the iron ions in which are found in two types of coordination, tetrahedral and octahedral, were synthesized. The similarity of the IR spectra of the compounds obtained and known compounds with the anion structure of the Keggin type with the composition M/sub X/(XZW/sub 11/O/sub 40/H/sub m/) x nH/sub 2/O indicates that their heteropolyanions are isostructural. The thermal stability of the compounds studied and the structure of the products of thermolysis depend on the charge and radius of the extrasphere cation. When the ratio of the radii of the extrasphere cation of the alkali or alkaline-earth metal to the radius of the ion of the central 3d element, appearing in the coordination sphere of the heteropolytungstates, exceeds 1.6, the most likely products of thermolysis of heteropolycompounds are the compounds of the pyrochlore family and tungsten bronzes.

  12. Metal ion-induced lateral aggregation of filamentous viruses fd and M13.

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jay X; Janmey, Paul A; Lyubartsev, Alexander; Nordenskiöld, Lars

    2002-01-01

    We report a detailed comparison between calculations of inter-filament interactions based on Monte-Carlo simulations and experimental features of lateral aggregation of bacteriophages fd and M13 induced by a number of divalent metal ions. The general findings are consistent with the polyelectrolyte nature of the virus filaments and confirm that the solution electrostatics account for most of the experimental features observed. One particularly interesting discovery is resolubilization for bundles of either fd or M13 viruses when the concentration of the bundle-inducing metal ion Mg(2+) or Ca(2+) is increased to large (>100 mM) values. In the range of Mg(2+) or Ca(2+) concentrations where large bundles of the virus filaments are formed, the optimal attractive interaction energy between the virus filaments is estimated to be on the order of 0.01 kT per net charge on the virus surface when a recent analytical prediction to the experimentally defined conditions of resolubilization is applied. We also observed qualitatively distinct behavior between the alkali-earth metal ions and the divalent transition metal ions in their action on the charged viruses. The understanding of metal ions-induced reversible aggregation based on solution electrostatics may lead to potential applications in molecular biology and medicine. PMID:12080143

  13. Adhesive bonding of ion beam textured metals and fluoropolymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirtich, M. J.; Sovey, J. S.

    1978-01-01

    An electron bombardment argon ion source was used to ion etch various metals and fluoropolymers. The metal and fluoropolymers were exposed to (0.5 to 1.0) keV Ar ions at ion current densities of (0.2 to 1.5) mA/sq cm for various exposure times. The resulting surface texture is in the form of needles or spires whose vertical dimensions may range from tenths to hundreds of micrometers, depending on the selection of beam energy, ion current density, and etch time. The bonding of textured surfaces is accomplished by ion beam texturing mating pieces of either metals or fluoropolymers and applying a bonding agent which wets in and around the microscopic cone-like structures. After bonding, both tensile and shear strength measurements were made on the samples. Also tested, for comparison's sake, were untextured and chemically etched fluoropolymers. The results of these measurements are presented.

  14. Hydration process of alkaline-earth metal atoms in water clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okai, Nobuhiro; Ishikawa, Haruki; Fuke, Kiyokazu

    2005-10-01

    Ionization potentials (IPs) of water clusters containing alkaline-earth metal atoms are measured by a photoionization threshold method to examine the hydration process of the metal atoms in clusters. IPs of Mg(H 2O) n and Ca(H 2O) n are found to decrease with increasing n and become constant at 3.18 eV for n ⩾ 9 and n ⩾ 8, respectively. The observed constant IP agrees with an estimated photoelectric threshold (3.2 eV) of bulk ice. From the comparison with the results on the theoretical calculations as well as the IPs for alkali atom-water clusters, the anomalous size dependence of IPs is ascribed to the formation of an ion-pair state.

  15. Molten metal containment vessel with rare earth oxysulfide protective coating thereon and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Krikorian, Oscar H.; Curtis, Paul G.

    1992-01-01

    An improved molten metal containment vessel is disclosed in which wetting of the vessel's inner wall surfaces by molten metal is inhibited by coating at least the inner surfaces of the containment vessel with one or more rare earth oxysulfide or rare earth sulfide compounds to inhibit wetting and or adherence by the molten metal to the surfaces of the containment vessel.

  16. 40 CFR 421.270 - Applicability: Description of the primary rare earth metals subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... primary rare earth metals subcategory. 421.270 Section 421.270 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS NONFERROUS METALS MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Primary Rare Earth Metals Subcategory § 421.270 Applicability: Description of the primary...

  17. 40 CFR 421.270 - Applicability: Description of the primary rare earth metals subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... primary rare earth metals subcategory. 421.270 Section 421.270 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS NONFERROUS METALS MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Primary Rare Earth Metals Subcategory § 421.270 Applicability: Description of the primary...

  18. 40 CFR 421.270 - Applicability: Description of the primary rare earth metals subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... primary rare earth metals subcategory. 421.270 Section 421.270 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS NONFERROUS METALS MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Primary Rare Earth Metals Subcategory § 421.270 Applicability: Description of the primary...

  19. 40 CFR 421.270 - Applicability: Description of the primary rare earth metals subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... primary rare earth metals subcategory. 421.270 Section 421.270 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS NONFERROUS METALS MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Primary Rare Earth Metals Subcategory § 421.270 Applicability: Description of the primary...

  20. Progress in metal ion separation and preconcentration : an overview.

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, A. H.

    1998-05-19

    A brief historical perspective covering the most mature chemically-based metal ion separation methods is presented, as is a summary of the recommendations made in the 1987 National Research Council (NRC) report entitled ''Separation and Purification: Critical Needs and Opportunities''. A review of Progress in Metal Ion Separation and Preconcentration shows that advances are occurring in each area of need cited by the NRC. Following an explanation of the objectives and general organization of this book, the contents of each chapter are briefly summarized and some future research opportunities in metal ion separations are presented.

  1. An Animal Model Using Metallic Ions to Produce Autoimmune Nephritis.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Sandoval, Roxana; Luévano-Rodríguez, Nayeli; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Mayra; Pérez-Pérez, María Elena; Saldívar-Elias, Sergio; Gurrola-Carlos, Reinaldo; Avalos-Díaz, Esperanza; Bollain-y-Goytia, Juan José; Herrera-Esparza, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune nephritis triggered by metallic ions was assessed in a Long-Evans rat model. The parameters evaluated included antinuclear autoantibody production, kidney damage mediated by immune complexes detected by immunofluorescence, and renal function tested by retention of nitrogen waste products and proteinuria. To accomplish our goal, the animals were treated with the following ionic metals: HgCl2, CuSO4, AgNO3, and Pb(NO3)2. A group without ionic metals was used as the control. The results of the present investigation demonstrated that metallic ions triggered antinuclear antibody production in 60% of animals, some of them with anti-DNA specificity. Furthermore, all animals treated with heavy metals developed toxic glomerulonephritis with immune complex deposition along the mesangium and membranes. These phenomena were accompanied by proteinuria and increased concentrations of urea. Based on these results, we conclude that metallic ions may induce experimental autoimmune nephritis.

  2. Study of structural and spectroscopic behavior of Sm3+ ions in lead-zinc borate glasses containing alkali metal ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasi Kumar, M. V.; Babu, S.; Rajeswara Reddy, B.; Ratnakaram, Y. C.

    2017-02-01

    High luminescence behavior of rare earth inorganic glasses have a variety of uses in the industry. In the past few decades, rare earth ions with characteristic photonics applications are being hosted by heavy metal oxide glasses. Among the rare earth ions Sm3+ ion has features which make it apt for high density optical storage. The authors of the paper have experimented to synthesize Sm3+ doped glasses. In this regard a new series of borate glasses doped with 1 mol% Sm3+ ion are developed by using melt-quenching technique. XRD, FTIR, optical absorption, luminescence techniques are used to study the various characteristics of Sm3+ ion in the present glass matrices. The XRD spectra confirms the amorphous nature of glasses. Further, the researchers have used differential thermal analysis to study the glass transition temperature. The structural groups in the prepared glasses are studied using Fourier transform infrared spectra. From the measurement of its optical absorption, three phenomenological Judd-Ofelt intensity parameters (Ω2, Ω4 and Ω6) have been computed. Based on these Judd-Ofelt intensity parameters, radiative properties such as radiative probabilities (Arad), branching ratios (β), and radiative life time (τR) are calculated. The excitation spectra of Sm3+ doped lithium heavy metal borate glass matrix is recorded under the emission wavelength of 600 nm. The emission spectra are recorded under 404 nm excitation wavelength. From various emission transitions, 4G5/2 → 6H7/2 and 4G5/2 → 6H9/2 bands could be of interest for various applications. The decay profiles of 4G5/2 level exhibit single exponential nature in all the prepared glass matrices. The potassium glass matrix exhibits higher quantum efficiency than the other glass matrices. Finally, by going through these several spectroscopic characterizations, it is concluded that the prepared Sm3+ doped lead-zinc borate glasses might be useful for visible light applications.

  3. Rechargeable dual-metal-ion batteries for advanced energy storage.

    PubMed

    Yao, Hu-Rong; You, Ya; Yin, Ya-Xia; Wan, Li-Jun; Guo, Yu-Guo

    2016-04-14

    Energy storage devices are more important today than any time before in human history due to the increasing demand for clean and sustainable energy. Rechargeable batteries are emerging as the most efficient energy storage technology for a wide range of portable devices, grids and electronic vehicles. Future generations of batteries are required to have high gravimetric and volumetric energy, high power density, low price, long cycle life, high safety and low self-discharge properties. However, it is quite challenging to achieve the above properties simultaneously in state-of-the-art single metal ion batteries (e.g. Li-ion batteries, Na-ion batteries and Mg-ion batteries). In this contribution, hybrid-ion batteries in which various metal ions simultaneously engage to store energy are shown to provide a new perspective towards advanced energy storage: by connecting the respective advantages of different metal ion batteries they have recently attracted widespread attention due to their novel performances. The properties of hybrid-ion batteries are not simply the superposition of the performances of single ion batteries. To enable a distinct description, we only focus on dual-metal-ion batteries in this article, for which the design and the benefits are briefly discussed. We enumerate some new results about dual-metal-ion batteries and demonstrate the mechanism for improving performance based on knowledge from the literature and experiments. Although the search for hybrid-ion batteries is still at an early age, we believe that this strategy would be an excellent choice for breaking the inherent disadvantages of single ion batteries in the near future.

  4. Metal ion levels: how can they help us?

    PubMed

    Griffin, William L

    2014-04-01

    Ion levels have been shown to reliably predict abnormal function of the bearing surface with increased wear, but ion levels should not be used alone as a trigger for when to proceed with revision surgery with metal-metal articulations. Risk stratification strategies help determine which patients should be monitored more closely with serial ion levels, cross-sectional imaging with a MARS MRI, or proceed on to revision. Based on the current data available, an ion level greater than 4.5 ppb (Cr or Co) may serve as a threshold for when abnormal wear is occurring, and is suggested as a trigger for a MARS MRI scan.

  5. Proposal for laser cooling of rare-earth ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dulieu, Olivier; Hong, Ye; Wyart, Jean-François; Lepers, Maxence

    2016-05-01

    The efficiency of laser cooling relies on the existence of an almost closed optical-transition cycle in the energy spectrum of the considered species. In this respect, rare-earth elements exhibit many transitions which are likely to induce noticeable leaks from the cooling cycle. In this work, to determine whether laser cooling of singly ionized erbium Er+ is feasible, we have performed accurate electronic-structure calculations of energies and spontaneous-emission Einstein coefficients of Er+, using a combination of ab initio and least-squares-fitting techniques. We identify five weak closed transitions suitable for laser cooling, the broadest of which is in the kilohertz range. For the strongest transitions, by simulating the cascade dynamics of spontaneous emission, we show that repumping is necessary, and we discuss possible repumping schemes.We expect our detailed study on Er+ to give good insight into the laser cooling of neighboring ions such as Dy+. Supported by ``Agence Nationale de la Recherche'' (ANR), under the project COPOMOL (Contract No. ANR-13-IS04-0004-01).

  6. Silica-polyamine composite materials for heavy metal ion removal, recovery, and recycling. 2. Metal ion separations from mine wastewater and soft metal ion extraction efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, R.J.; Pang, D.; Beatty, S.T.; Rosenberg, E.

    1999-12-01

    Silica-polyamine composites have been synthesized which have metal ion capacities as high as 0.84 mmol/g for copper ions removed from aqueous solutions. In previous reports it has been demonstrated that these materials survive more than 3,000 cycles of metal ion extraction, elution, and regeneration with almost no loss of capacity (less than 10%). This paper describes two modified silica-polyamine composite materials and reveals the results of tests designed to determine the effectiveness of these materials for extracting and separating metal ions from actual mining wastewater samples. Using these materials, the concentration of copper, aluminum, and zinc in Berkeley Pit mine wastewater is reduced to below allowable discharge limits. The recovered copper and zinc solutions were greater than 90% pure, and metal ion concentration factors of over 20 for copper were realized. Further, the ability of one of these materials to decrease low levels of the soft metals cadmium, mercury, and lead from National Sanitation Foundation recommended challenge levels to below Environmental Protection Agency allowable limits is also reported.

  7. [Studies on rare earth ions complexation properties of tetranitrophenols-armed Aza-18-crown-6].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiang; Gao, Sheng-hua

    2008-12-01

    The synthesis of macrocyclic ligands appended with fluorescent or chromogenic chelators is a promising approach to developing metal--ion chemosensors because of the ion selectivity of macrocyclic ligands and the fluorescence or chromogenic response of the appended chelating groups. In the present paper, 1,10-dioxa-4,7,13,16-tetraaza-18-crown-6(L1) and 4,7,13,16-tetra(2-hydroxy-5-nitrobenzyl)-1, 10-dioxa-4,7,13,16-tetraaza-18-crown-6(L2) were synthesized and characterized via elemental analysis and 1H NMR spectrum. The complexation properties of L2 for H+, Ce3+, Nd3+, Sm3+, Eu3+, Gd3+, Tb3+, DY3+ and Yb3+ were studies by UV-Vis method in H2 -DMSO (earth ions were added to the solution, the absorption peak of L2 above 400 nm was shifted toward short wavelength, and absorption intensity was increased obviously in comparison with L2 alone. Thus the formation of the complex was verified, and it was formed at pH>7.0. The stability constants of the complexes obtained show that stability of the complexes depends upon the match between cavity dimension of L2 and size of the rare earth ions. There was a decrease in stability of complex with decreasing the radius of rare earth ion in the order of Ce3 +>Nd3+ >Sm3+ >Eu"3+>Gd3+ >Tb3+ >Dy3+ >Yb3+.

  8. Metal ion removal from aqueous solution using physic seed hull.

    PubMed

    Mohammad, Masita; Maitra, Saikat; Ahmad, Naveed; Bustam, Azmi; Sen, T K; Dutta, Binay K

    2010-07-15

    The potential of physic seed hull (PSH), Jantropha curcas L. as an adsorbent for the removal of Cd(2+) and Zn(2+) metal ions from aqueous solution has been investigated. It has been found that the amount of adsorption for both Cd(2+) and Zn(2+) increased with the increase in initial metal ions concentration, contact time, temperature, adsorbent dosage and the solution pH (in acidic range), but decreased with the increase in the particle size of the adsorbent. The adsorption process for both metal ions on PSH consists of three stages-a rapid initial adsorption followed by a period of slower uptake of metal ions and virtually no uptake at the final stage. The kinetics of metal ions adsorption on PSH followed a pseudo-second-order model. The adsorption equilibrium data were fitted in the three adsorption isotherms-Freundlich, Langmuir and Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherms. The data best fit in the Langmuir isotherm indication monolayer chemisorption of the metal ions. The adsorption capacity of PSH for both Zn(2+) and Cd(2+) was found to be comparable with other available adsorbents. About 36-47% of the adsorbed metal could be leached out of the loaded PSH using 0.1M HCl as the eluting medium.

  9. Metal sulfide and rare-earth phosphate nanostructures and methods of making same

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Stanislaus; Zhang, Fen

    2014-05-13

    The present invention provides a method of producing a crystalline metal sulfide nanostructure. The metal is a transitional metal or a Group IV metal. In the method, a porous membrane is placed between a metal precursor solution and a sulfur precursor solution. The metal cations of the metal precursor solution and sulfur ions of the sulfur precursor solution react, thereby producing a crystalline metal sulfide nanostructure.

  10. Molecular rare-earth-metal hydrides in non-cyclopentadienyl environments.

    PubMed

    Fegler, Waldemar; Venugopal, Ajay; Kramer, Mathias; Okuda, Jun

    2015-02-02

    Molecular hydrides of the rare-earth metals play an important role as homogeneous catalysts and as counterparts of solid-state interstitial hydrides. Structurally well-characterized non-metallocene-type hydride complexes allow the study of elementary reactions that occur at rare-earth-metal centers and of catalytic reactions involving bonds between rare-earth metals and hydrides. In addition to neutral hydrides, cationic derivatives have now become available.

  11. SEPARATION OF PLUTONYL IONS

    DOEpatents

    Connick, R.E.; McVey, Wm.H.

    1958-07-15

    A process is described for separating plutonyl ions from the acetate ions with which they are associated in certaln carrier precipitation methods of concentrating plutonium. The method consists in adding alkaline earth metal ions and subsequently alkalizing the solution, causing formation of an alkaltne earth plutonate precipitate. Barium hydroxide is used in a preferred embodiment since it provides alkaline earth metal ion and alkalizes the solution in one step forming insoluble barium platonate.

  12. Nucleic acid-metal ion interactions in the solid state.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Katsuyuki; Murayama, Kazutaka

    2012-01-01

    Metal ions play a key role in nucleic acid structure and activity. Elucidation of the rules that govern the binding of metal ions is therefore an essential step for better understanding of the nucleic acid functions. This review is as an update to a preceding one (Metal Ions Biol. Syst., 1996, 32, 91-134), in which we offered a general view of metal ion interactions with mono-, di-, tri-, and oligonucleotides in the solid state, based on their crystal structures reported before 1994. In this chapter, we survey all the crystal structures of metal ion complexes with nucleotides involving oligonucleotides reported after 1994 and we have tried to uncover new characteristic metal bonding patterns for mononucleotides and oligonucleotides with A-RNA and A/B/Z-DNA fragments that form duplexes. We do not cover quadruplexes, duplexes with metal-mediated base-pairs, tRNAs, rRNAs in ribosome, ribozymes, and nucleic acid-drug and -protein complexes. Factors that affect metal binding to mononucleotides and oligonucleotide duplexes are also dealt with.

  13. Predicting the relative toxicity of metal ions using ion characteristics: Microtox{reg_sign} bioluminescence assay

    SciTech Connect

    McCloskey, J.T.; Newman, M.C.; Clark, S.B.

    1996-10-01

    Quantitative structure-activity relationships have been used to predict the relative toxicity of organic compounds. Although not as common, ion characteristics have also proven useful for predicting the relative toxicity of metal ions. The purpose of this study was to determine if the relative toxicity of metal ions using the Microtox{reg_sign} bioassay was predictable using ion characteristics. Median effect concentrations (EC50s) were determined for 20 metals in a NaNO{sub 3} medium, which reflected freshwater speciation conditions, using the Microtox bacterial assay. The log of EC50 values was modeled using several ion characteristics, and Akaike`s Information Criterion was calculated to determine which ion characteristics provided the best fit. Whether modeling total ion or free ion EC50 values, the one variable which best modeled EC50s was the softness index, while a combination of {chi}{sub m}{sup 2}r ({chi}{sub m} = electronegativity, r = Pauling ionic radius) and {vert_bar}log K{sub OH}{vert_bar} was the best two-variable model. Other variables, including {Delta}E{sub 0} and {chi}{sub m}{sup 2}r (one-variable models) and (AN/{Delta}IP, {Delta}E{sub 0}) and ({chi}{sub m}{sup 2}r, Z{sup 2}/r) (two-variable models), also gave adequate fits. Modeling with speciated (free ion) versus unspeciated (total ion) EC50 values did not improve fits. Modeling mono-, di-, and trivalent metal ions separately improved the models. The authors conclude that ion characteristics can be used to predict the relative toxicity of metal ions whether in freshwater (NaNO{sub 3} medium) or saltwater (NaCl medium) speciation conditions and that this approach can be applied to metal ions varying widely in both valence and binding tendencies.

  14. Distributions of rare earths and heavy metals in field-grown maize after application of rare earth-containing fertilizer.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xingkai; Zhu, Wangzhao; Wang, Zijian; Witkamp, Geert-Jan

    2002-07-03

    Rare earths are widely applied in Chinese agriculture to improve crop nutrition through the use of fertilizers, yet little is known of their accumulation in field-grown crops. We have studied the distribution of 16 rare earths (Sc, Y and 14 lanthanide elements) in field-grown maize and the concentration of heavy metals in the grains after application of rare earth-containing fertilizer. When maize entered the vigorous vegetation growth stage (e.g. early stem-elongation stage), rare earth-containing fertilizer was applied to the soil with irrigation water. At 10 days after application of the rare earths, significantly dose-dependent accumulative effects of individual rare earth concentrations in the roots and the plant tops of maize were observed, with the exception of Sc and Lu. At the level of 2 kg rare earths ha(-1), accumulative concentrations of most light rare earths (e.g. La, Ce, Pr and Nd) and Gd in the plant tops were much larger than those in the control. Concentrations of individual rare earths in a field-grown maize after application of rare earths decreased in the order of root>leaf>stem>grain. During the maize growth period, selective accumulation of individual rare earths (e.g. La, Ce) in the roots seemed to be in dynamic equilibrium, and the distribution of these elements in the plant tops was variable. At a dosage of less than 10 kg rare earths ha(-1), no apparent accumulative concentrations of individual rare earths appeared in the maize grains. Under the experimental conditions, application of rare earth-containing fertilizer did not induce an increase in the concentrations of heavy metals in the grains. We conclude that the present dosage of rare earths (<0.23 kg ha(-1) year(-1)) currently applied in China can hardly affect the safety of maize grains in arable soil, even over a long period.

  15. Ion plating seals microcracks or porous metal components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, T.; Buckley, D. H.; Brainard, W. A.

    1972-01-01

    Description of ion plating process is given. Advantage of this process is that any plating metal or alloy can be selected, whereas, for conventional welding, material selection is limited by compatability.

  16. Extracting metal ions with diphosphonic acid, or derivative thereof

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, Earl P.; Gatrone, Ralph C.; Nash, Kenneth L.

    1994-01-01

    Thermodynamically-unstable complexing agents which are diphosphonic acids and diphosphonic acid derivatives (or sulphur containing analogs), like carboxyhydroxymethanediphosphonic acid and vinylidene-1,1-diphosphonic acid, are capable of complexing with metal ions, and especially metal ions in the II, III, IV, V and VI oxidation states, to form stable, water-soluble metal ion complexes in moderately alkaline to highly-acidic media. However, the complexing agents can be decomposed, under mild conditions, into non-organic compounds which, for many purposes are environmentally-nondamaging compounds thereby degrading the complex and releasing the metal ion for disposal or recovery. Uses for such complexing agents as well as methods for their manufacture are also described.

  17. Extracting metal ions with diphosphonic acid, or derivative thereof

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Gatrone, R.C.; Nash, K.L.

    1994-07-26

    Thermodynamically-unstable complexing agents which are diphosphonic acids and diphosphonic acid derivatives (or sulfur containing analogs), like carboxyhydroxymethanediphosphonic acid and vinylidene-1,1-diphosphonic acid, are capable of complexing with metal ions, and especially metal ions in the II, III, IV, V and VI oxidation states, to form stable, water-soluble metal ion complexes in moderately alkaline to highly-acidic media. However, the complexing agents can be decomposed, under mild conditions, into non-organic compounds which, for many purposes are environmentally-nondamaging compounds thereby degrading the complex and releasing the metal ion for disposal or recovery. Uses for such complexing agents as well as methods for their manufacture are also described. 1 fig.

  18. Ion exchange extraction of heavy metals from wastewater sludges.

    PubMed

    Al-Enezi, G; Hamoda, M F; Fawzi, N

    2004-01-01

    Heavy metals are common contaminants of some industrial wastewater. They find their way to municipal wastewaters due to industrial discharges into the sewerage system or through household chemicals. The most common heavy metals found in wastewaters are lead, copper, nickel, cadmium, zinc, mercury, arsenic, and chromium. Such metals are toxic and pose serious threats to the environment and public health. In recent years, the ion exchange process has been increasingly used for the removal of heavy metals or the recovery of precious metals. It is a versatile separation process with the potential for broad applications in the water and wastewater treatment field. This article summarizes the results obtained from a laboratory study on the removal of heavy metals from municipal wastewater sludges obtained from Ardhiya plant in Kuwait. Data on heavy metal content of the wastewater and sludge samples collected from the plant are presented. The results obtained from laboratory experiments using a commercially available ion exchange resin to remove heavy metals from sludge were discussed. A technique was developed to solubilize such heavy metals from the sludge for subsequent treatment by the ion exchange process. The results showed high efficiency of extraction, almost 99.9%, of heavy metals in the concentration range bound in wastewater effluents and sludges. Selective removal of heavy metals from a contaminated wastewater/sludge combines the benefits of being economically prudent and providing the possibility of reuse/recycle of the treated wastewater effluents and sludges.

  19. Metallic glass as a temperature sensor during ion plating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Spalvins, T.; Buckley, D. H.

    1985-01-01

    The temperature of the interface and/or a superficial layer of a substrate during ion plating was investigated using a metallic glass of the composition Fe67Co18B14Si1 as the substrate and as the temperature sensor. Transmission electron microscopy and diffraction studies determined the microstructure of the ion-plated gold film and the substrate. Results indicate that crystallization occurs not only in the film, but also in the substrate. The grain size of crystals formed during ion plating was 6 to 60 nm in the gold film and 8 to 100 nm in the substrate at a depth of 10 to 15 micrometers from the ion-plated interface. The temperature rise of the substrate during ion plating was approximately 500 C. Discontinuous changes in metallurgical microstructure, and physical, chemical, and mechanical properties during the amorphous to crystalline transition in metallic glasses make metallic glasses extremely useful materials for temperature sensor applications in coating processes.

  20. Metallic glass as a temperature sensor during ion plating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Spalvins, T.; Buckley, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    The temperature of the interface and/or a superficial layer of a substrate during ion plating was investigated using a metallic glass of the composition Fe67Co18B14Si1 as the substrate and as the temperature sensor. Transmission electron microscopy and diffraction studies determined the microstructure of the ion-plated gold film and the substrate. Results indicate that crystallization occurs not only in the film, but also in the substrate. The grain size of crystals formed during ion plating was 6 to 60 nm in the gold film and 8 to 100 nm in the substrate at a depth of 10 to 15 micrometers from the ion-plated interface. The temperature rise of the substrate during ion plating was approximately 500 C. Discontinuous changes in metallurgical microstructure, and physical, chemical, and mechanical properties during the amorphous to crystalline transition in metallic glasses make metallic glasses extremely useful materials for temperature sensor applications in coating processes.

  1. An Engineered Palette of Metal Ion Quenchable Fluorescent Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiaozhen; Strub, Marie-Paule; Barnard, Travis J.; Noinaj, Nicholas; Piszczek, Grzegorz; Buchanan, Susan K.; Taraska, Justin W.

    2014-01-01

    Many fluorescent proteins have been created to act as genetically encoded biosensors. With these sensors, changes in fluorescence report on chemical states in living cells. Transition metal ions such as copper, nickel, and zinc are crucial in many physiological and pathophysiological pathways. Here, we engineered a spectral series of optimized transition metal ion-binding fluorescent proteins that respond to metals with large changes in fluorescence intensity. These proteins can act as metal biosensors or imaging probes whose fluorescence can be tuned by metals. Each protein is uniquely modulated by four different metals (Cu2+, Ni2+, Co2+, and Zn2+). Crystallography revealed the geometry and location of metal binding to the engineered sites. When attached to the extracellular terminal of a membrane protein VAMP2, dimeric pairs of the sensors could be used in cells as ratiometric probes for transition metal ions. Thus, these engineered fluorescent proteins act as sensitive transition metal ion-responsive genetically encoded probes that span the visible spectrum. PMID:24752441

  2. Smart textile device using ion polymer metal compound.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Taro; Ihara, Tadashi

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a smart textile device that detects angular displacement of attached surface using ion polymer metal compound. The device was composed of ion polymer metal compound (IPMC) which was fabricated from Nafion resin by heat-press and chemical gold plating. The generated voltage from IPMC was measured as a function of bending angle. Fabricated IPMC device was weaved into a cotton cloth and multidirectional movements were detected.

  3. An optical dosimeter for monitoring heavy metal ions in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignani, Anna G.; Regan, Fiona; Leamy, D.; Mencaglia, A. A.; Ciaccheri, L.

    2005-05-01

    This work presents an optochemical dosimeter for determining and discriminating nickel, copper, and cobalt ions in water that can be used as an early warning system for water pollution. An inexpensive fiber optic spectrophotometer monitors the sensor's spectral behavior under exposure to water solutions of heavy metal ions in the 1-10 mg/l concentration range. The Principal Component Analysis (PCA) method quantitatively determines the heavy metals and discriminates their type and combination.

  4. Frictional and morphological characteristics of ion plated soft, metallic films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, T.; Buzek, B.

    1981-01-01

    Ion plated metallic films in contrast to films applied by other deposition techniques offer a lower friction coefficient, longer endurance lives and exhibit a gradual increase in friction coefficient after the film has been worn off. The friction coefficients of metallic films are affected by the degree of adherence, thickness and nucleation and growth characteristics during ion plating lead to a fine, continuous crystalline structure, which contributes to a lower friction coefficient.

  5. Isothermal Titration Calorimetry Measurements of Metal Ions Binding to Proteins.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Colette F; Carpenter, Margaret C; Croteau, Molly L; Wilcox, Dean E

    2016-01-01

    ITC measurements involving metal ions are susceptible to a number of competing reactions (oxidation, precipitation, and hydrolysis) and coupled reactions involving the buffer and protons. Stabilization and delivery of the metal ion as a well-defined and well-characterized complex with the buffer, or a specific ligand, can suppress undesired solution chemistry and, depending on the stability of the metal complex, allow accurate measurements of higher affinity protein-binding sites. This requires, however, knowledge of the thermodynamics of formation of the metal complex and accounting for its contribution to the experimentally measured values (KITC and ΔHITC) through a post hoc analysis that provides the condition-independent binding thermodynamics (K, ΔG(o), ΔH, ΔS, and ΔCP). This analysis also quantifies the number of protons that are displaced when the metal ion binds to the protein.

  6. Metal ion implantation for large scale surface modification

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, I.G.

    1992-10-01

    Intense energetic beams of metal ions can be produced by using a metal vapor vacuum arc as the plasma discharge from which the ion beam is formed. We have developed a number of ion sources of this kind and have built a metal ion implantation facility which can produce repetitively pulsed ion beams with mean ion energy up to several hundred key, pulsed beam current of more than an ampere, and time averaged current of several tens of milliamperes delivered onto a downstream target. We've also done some preliminary work on scaling up this technology to very large size. For example, a 50-cm diameter (2000 cm[sup 2]) set of beam formation electrodes was used to produce a pulsed titanium beam with ion current over 7 amperes at a mean ion energy of 100 key. Separately, a dc embodiment has been used to produce a dc titanium ion beam with current over 600 mA, power supply limited in this work, and up to 6 amperes of dc plasma ion current was maintained for over an hour. In a related program we've developed a plasma immersion method for applying thin metallic and compound films in which the added species is atomically mixed to the substrate. By adding a gas flow to the process, well-bonded compound films can also be formed; metallic films and multilayers as well as oxides and nitrides with mixed transition zones some hundreds of angstroms thick have been synthesized. Here we outline these parallel metal-plasma-based research programs and describe the hardware that we've developed and some of the surface modification research that we've done with it.

  7. Production of negative hydrogen ions on metal grids

    SciTech Connect

    Oohara, W.; Maetani, Y.; Takeda, Takashi; Takeda, Toshiaki; Yokoyama, H.; Kawata, K.

    2015-03-15

    Negative hydrogen ions are produced on a nickel grid with positive-ion irradiation. In order to investigate the production mechanism, a copper grid without the chemisorption of hydrogen atoms and positive helium ions without negative ionization are used for comparison. Positive hydrogen ions reflected on the metal surface obtain two electrons from the surface and become negatively ionized. It is found that the production yield of negative ions by desorption ionization of chemisorbed hydrogen atoms seems to be small, and the production is a minor mechanism.

  8. Synthesis and catalytic activity of heterogeneous rare-earth metal catalysts coordinated with multitopic Schiff-base ligands.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yilin; Wu, Guangming; Cen, Dinghai; Chen, Yaofeng; Wang, Limin

    2012-08-28

    Four multitopic Schiff-base ligand precursors were synthesized via condensation of 4,4'-diol-3,3'-diformyl-1,1'-diphenyl or 1,3,5-tris(4-hydroxy-5-formylphenyl)benzene with 2,6-diisopropylaniline or 2,6-dimethylaniline. Amine elimination reactions of Ln[N(SiMe(3))(2)](3) (Ln = La, Nd, Sm or Y) with these multitopic ligand precursors gave ten heterogeneous rare-earth metal catalysts. These heterogeneous rare-earth metal catalysts are active for intramolecular hydroalkoxylation of alkynols, and the catalytic activities are influenced by the ligand and metal ion. The recycling experiment on the most active heterogeneous catalyst showed the catalyst has a good reusability.

  9. Selective transformations of cyclopentadienyl ligands of transition-metal and rare-earth metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ruiting; Zhou, Xigeng

    2013-04-21

    Cyclopentadienyl and substituted cyclopentadienyl ligands are observed in a wide range of organometallic complexes. In addition to serving as ancillary ligands, these ligands have come into their own as intermediates in organometallic reactions, and shown many unique reaction modes involving ring C-H, C-C and C=C bond cleavages. This feature article summarizes the progressive development of cyclopentadienyl-based reactions of metallocene complexes of transition metals and rare-earth metals, with the aim of further developing the fundamental modes of reactivity of such systems together with their synthetic applications.

  10. Potentiometric and spectroscopic study of the interaction of 3d transition metal ions with inositol hexakisphosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veiga, Nicolás; Macho, Israel; Gómez, Kerman; González, Gabriel; Kremer, Carlos; Torres, Julia

    2015-10-01

    Among myo-inositol phosphates, the most abundant in nature is the myo-inositol hexakisphosphate, InsP6. Although it is known to be vital to cell functioning, the biochemical research into its metabolism needs chemical and structural analysis of all the protonation, complexation and precipitation processes that it undergoes in the biological media. In view of its high negative charge at physiological level, our group has been leading a thorough research into the InsP6 chemical and structural behavior in the presence of the alkali and alkaline earth metal ions essential for life. The aim of this article is to extend these studies, dealing with the chemical and structural features of the InsP6 interaction with biologically relevant 3d transition metal ions (Fe(II), Fe(III), Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II)), in a non-interacting medium and under simulated physiological conditions. The metal-complex stability constants were determined by potentiometry, showing under ligand-excess conditions the formation of mononuclear species in different protonation states. Under metal ion excess, polymetallic species were detected for Fe(II), Fe(III), Zn(II) and Cu(II). Additionally, the 31P NMR and UV-vis spectroscopic studies provided interesting structural aspects of the strong metal ion-InsP6 interaction.

  11. Hematein chelates of unusual metal ions for tinctorial histochemistry.

    PubMed

    Smith, A A

    2010-02-01

    Hematoxylin is oxidized easily to hematein, an excellent stain for metal ions. If it already is bound to a substrate, the metal ion becomes a mordant linking the dye to the substrate. Metal ions added to hematein in solution are chelated by the hematein to form a lake. Most of these chelates stain animal tissues. They usually are bound to the tissue by a combination of hydrogen bonding of the hematein and ionic bonding of the metal ion. When binding of the lake to the tissue occurs by way of the metal ion, the metal ion is a mordant. Mordant staining often is specific. Chromium hematoxylin binds to strong acids; it can be made selective for protein-bound sulfonic acids. Zirconyl hematoxylin is selective for acidic mucins. Mucihematein can be made selective for all acidic mucins or for sulfomucins alone. Bismuth hematoxylin appears to be selective for the guanido group of arginine and there is some evidence that the bonding is covalent. Although it is not a histochemical stain, copper-chrome hematoxylin is an excellent stain for organelles with double membranes, i.e., mitochondria and nuclei.

  12. Implantation of nitrogen, carbon, and phosphorus ions into metals

    SciTech Connect

    Guseva, M.I.; Gordeeva, G.V.

    1987-01-01

    The application of ion implantation for alloying offers a unique opportunity to modify the chemical composition, phase constitution, and microstructure of the surface layers of metals. The authors studied ion implantation of nitrogen and carbon into the surface layers of metallic targets. The phase composition of the implanted layers obtained on the Kh18N10T stainless steel, the refractory molybdenum alloy TsM-6, niobium, and nickel was determined according to the conventional method of recording the x-ray diffraction pattern of the specimens using monochromatic FeK/sub alpha/-radiation on a DRON-2,0 diffractometer. The targets were bombarded at room temperature in an ILU-3 ion accelerator. The implantation of metalloid ions was also conducted with the targets being bombarded with 100-keV phosphorus ions and 40-keV carbon ions.

  13. Rare-Earth Metal Postmetallocene Catalysts with Chelating Amido Ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tianshu; Jenter, Jelena; Roesky, Peter W.

    This review deals with the synthesis and the catalytic application of noncyclopentadienyl complexes of the rare-earth elements. The main topics of the review are amido metal complexes with chelating bidentate ligands, which show the most similarities to cyclopentadienyl ligands. Benzamidinates and guanidinates will be reviewed in a separate contribution within this book. Beside the synthesis of the complexes, the broad potential of these compounds in homogeneous catalysis is demonstrated. Most of the reviewed catalytic transformations are either C-C multiple bond transformation such as the hydroamination and hydrosilylation or polymerization reaction of polar and nonpolar monomers. In this area, butadiene and isoprene, ethylene, as well as lactides and lactones were mostly used as monomers.

  14. Sonochemical synthesis of mesoporous transition metal and rare earth oxides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanqin; Yin, Lunxiang; Gedanken, Arahon

    2002-11-01

    Straight-extended layered mesostructures based on transItion metal (Fe, Cr) and rare earth (Y, Ce, La, Sm, Er) oxides are synthesized by sonication for 3 h. After a longer period of sonication (6 h), hexagonal mesostructures based on Y- and Er-oxides are obtained. The surface areas of the Y-based hexagonal mesophases before and after extraction are 46.5, 256 m2/g, respectively. For Er-based hexagonal mesophases, the surface areas before and after extraction are 157 and 225 m2/g. The pore sizes after extraction are 5.0 and 2.2 nm for Y- and Er-based mesophases, respectively. Hexagonal mesostructures are also obtained for Zr-based material after sonication for 3 h and the hexagonal structure is still maintained after calcinations at 400 degrees C for 4 h, although the surface area is only 35 m2/g.

  15. Quantum ion-acoustic wave oscillations in metallic nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Moradi, Afshin

    2015-05-15

    The low-frequency electrostatic waves in metallic nanowires are studied using the quantum hydrodynamic model, in which the electron and ion components of the system are regarded as a two-species quantum plasma system. The Poisson equation as well as appropriate quantum boundary conditions give the analytical expressions of dispersion relations of the surface and bulk quantum ion-acoustic wave oscillations.

  16. The DNA-binding and bioactivity of rare earth metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li; Wang, Bochu; Tan, Jun; Zhu, Liancai

    2013-08-01

    Recently more and more attention is paid to the rare earth metal complexes, because the properties of the rare earth metals are similar to those of the transition metals such as the similar atomic and the ionic radius. A large number of rare metal complexes were synthesized, and their bioactivities were also studied. This review highlights recent researches on the interaction of some rare earth metal complexes with DNA, analyzes how the configuration of the complexes influences the binding affinity, and focuses on the pharmacological activities of the complexes, such as anticancer, antibacterial, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-virus.

  17. Synthesis, characterization and reactivity of heteroleptic rare earth metal bis(phenolate) complexes.

    PubMed

    Qi, Ruipeng; Liu, Bao; Xu, Xiaoping; Yang, Zijian; Yao, Yingming; Zhang, Yong; Shen, Qi

    2008-10-07

    The synthesis, characterization and reactivity of heteroleptic rare earth metal complexes supported by the carbon-bridged bis(phenolate) ligand 2,2'-methylene-bis(6-tert-butyl-4-methyl-phenoxo) (MBMP2-) are described. Reaction of (C5H5)3Ln(THF) with MBMPH2 in a 1:1.5 molar ratio in THF at 50 degrees C produced the heteroleptic rare earth metal bis(phenolate) complexes (C5H5)Ln(MBMP)(THF)n (Ln=La, n=3 (); Ln=Yb (), Y (), n=2) in nearly quantitative yields. The residual C5H5- groups in complexes to can be substituted by the bridged bis(phenolate) ligands at elevated temperature to give the neutral rare earth metal bis(phenolate) complexes, and the ionic radii have a profound effect on the structures of the final products. Complex reacted with MBMPH2 in a 1:0.5 molar ratio in toluene at 80 degrees C to produce a dinuclear complex (MBMP)La(THF)(micro-MBMP)2La(THF)2 () in good isolated yield; whereas complexes and reacted with MBMPH2 under the same conditions to give (MBMP)Ln(MBMPH)(THF)2 (Ln=Yb (), Y ()) as the final products, in which one hydroxyl group of the phenol is coordinated to the rare earth metal in a neutral fashion. The reactivity of complexes and with some metal alkyls was explored. Reaction of complex with 1 equiv. of AlEt3 in toluene at room temperature afforded unexpected ligand redistributed products, and a discrete ion pair ytterbium complex [(MBMP)Yb(THF)2(DME)][(MBMP)2Yb(THF)2] () was isolated in moderate yield. Furthermore, reaction of complex with 1 equiv. of ZnEt2 in toluene gave a ligand redistributed complex [(micro-MBMP)Zn(THF)]2 () in reasonable isolated yield. Similar reaction of complex with ZnEt2 also afforded complex ; whereas the reaction of complex with 1 equiv. of n-BuLi in THF afforded the heterodimetallic complex [(THF)Yb(MBMP)2Li(THF)2] (). All of these complexes were well characterized by elemental analyses, IR spectra, and single-crystal structure determination, in the cases of complexes , and -.

  18. Oligomeric rare-earth metal cluster complexes with endohedral transition metal atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, Simon; Zimmermann, Sina; Brühmann, Matthias; Meyer, Eva; Rustige, Christian; Wolberg, Marike; Daub, Kathrin; Bell, Thomas; Meyer, Gerd

    2014-11-15

    Comproportionation reactions of rare-earth metal trihalides (RX{sub 3}) with the respective rare-earth metals (R) and transition metals (T) led to the formation of 22 oligomeric R cluster halides encapsulating T, in 19 cases for the first time. The structures of these compounds were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction and are composed of trimers ((T{sub 3}R{sub 11})X{sub 15}-type, P6{sub 3}/m), tetramers ((T{sub 4}R{sub 16})X{sub 28}(R{sub 4}) (P-43m), (T{sub 4}R{sub 16})X{sub 20} (P4{sub 2}/nnm), (T{sub 4}R{sub 16})X{sub 24}(RX{sub 3}){sub 4} (I4{sub 1}/a) and (T{sub 4}R{sub 16})X{sub 23} (C2/m) types of structure) and pentamers ((Ru{sub 5}La{sub 14}){sub 2}Br{sub 39}, Cc) of (TR{sub r}){sub n} (n=2–5) clusters. These oligomers are further enveloped by inner (X{sup i}) as well as outer (X{sup a}) halido ligands, which possess diverse functionalities and interconnect like oligomers through i–i, i–a and/or a–i bridges. The general features of the crystal structures for these new compounds are discussed and compared to literature entries as well as different structure types with oligomeric T centered R clusters. Dimers and tetramers originating from the aggregation of (TR{sub 6}) octahedra via common edges are more frequent than trimers and pentamers, in which the (TR{sub r}) clusters share common faces. - Graphical abstract: Rare earth-metal cluster complexes with endohedral transition metal atoms (TR{sub 6}) may connect via common edges or faces to form dimers, trimers, tetramers and pentamers of which the tetramers are the most prolific. Packing effects and electron counts play an important role. - Highlights: • Rare-earth metal cluster complexes encapsulate transition metal atoms. • Oligomers are built via connection of octahedral clusters via common edges or faces. • Dimers through pentamers with closed structures are known. • Tetramers including a tetrahedron of endohedral atoms are the most prolific.

  19. Structural Metals in the Group I Intron: A Ribozyme with a Multiple Metal Ion Core

    SciTech Connect

    Stahley,M.; Adams, P.; Wang, J.; Strobel, S.

    2007-01-01

    Metal ions play key roles in the folding and function for many structured RNAs, including group I introns. We determined the X-ray crystal structure of the Azoarcus bacterial group I intron in complex with its 5' and 3' exons. In addition to 222 nucleotides of RNA, the model includes 18 Mg2+ and K+ ions. Five of the metals bind within 12 Angstroms of the scissile phosphate and coordinate the majority of the oxygen atoms biochemically implicated in conserved metal-RNA interactions. The metals are buried deep within the structure and form a multiple metal ion core that is critical to group I intron structure and function. Eight metal ions bind in other conserved regions of the intron structure, and the remaining five interact with peripheral structural elements. Each of the 18 metals mediates tertiary interactions, facilitates local bends in the sugar-phosphate backbone or binds in the major groove of helices. The group I intron has a rich history of biochemical efforts aimed to identify RNA-metal ion interactions. The structural data are correlated to the biochemical results to further understand the role of metal ions in group I intron structure and function.

  20. Solvent extraction of rare-earth metals by carboxylic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Preez, A.C. du; Preston, J.S.

    1992-04-01

    The solvent extraction of the trivalent lanthanides and yttrium from nitrate media by solutions of carboxylic acids in xylene has been studied. Commercially available carboxylic acids such as Versatic 10 and naphthenic acids were used, as well as model compounds of known structure, such as 2-ethylhexanoic and 3-cyclohexylpropanoic acids. In a few cases, extraction of the metals from sulphate and chloride solutions was also investigated. The dependence of the extraction properties of the carboxylic acids on the atomic number of the lanthanide shows a definite relationship to the steric bulk of the carboxylic acid molecule quantified by means of the steric parameter, E{sub s}{prime} of the substituent alkyl group. The stoichiometries of the extracted complexes for representative light (La), middle (Gd) and heavy (Lu) rare-earth metals were investigated by the slope-analysis technique for a sterically hindered acid (Versatic 10 acid; -E{prime}{sub s} = 3.83) and an acid with low steric hindrance (3-cyclohexylpropanoic acid; -E{prime}{sub s} = 0.28). 14 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Removal of metal ions from aqueous solution

    DOEpatents

    Jackson, Paul J.; Delhaize, Emmanuel; Robinson, Nigel J.; Unkefer, Clifford J.; Furlong, Clement

    1990-11-13

    A method of removing heavy metals from aqueous solution, a composition of matter used in effecting said removal, and apparatus used in effecting said removal. One or more of the polypeptides, poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines, is immobilized on an inert material in particulate form. Upon contact with an aqueous solution containing heavy metals, the polypeptides sequester the metals, removing them from the solution. There is selectivity of poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines having a particular number of monomer repeat unit for particular metals. The polypeptides are easily regenerated by contact with a small amount of an organic acid, so that they can be used again to remove heayv metals from solution. This also results in the removal of the metals from the column in a concentrated form.

  2. Removal of metal ions from aqueous solution

    DOEpatents

    Jackson, Paul J.; Delhaize, Emmanuel; Robinson, Nigel J.; Unkefer, Clifford J.; Furlong, Clement

    1990-01-01

    A method of removing heavy metals from aqueous solution, a composition of matter used in effecting said removal, and apparatus used in effecting said removal. One or more of the polypeptides, poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines, is immobilized on an inert material in particulate form. Upon contact with an aqueous solution containing heavy metals, the polypeptides sequester the metals, removing them from the solution. There is selectivity of poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines having a particular number of monomer repeat units for particular metals. The polypeptides are easily regenerated by contact with a small amount of an organic acid, so that they can be used again to remove heavy metals from solution. This also results in the removal of the metals from the column in a concentrated form.

  3. Comparative study of metal and non-metal ion implantation in polymers: Optical and electrical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resta, V.; Quarta, G.; Farella, I.; Maruccio, L.; Cola, A.; Calcagnile, L.

    2014-07-01

    The implantation of 1 MeV metal (63Cu+, 107Ag+, 197Au+) and non-metal (4He+, 12C+) ions in a polycarbonate (PC) matrix has been studied in order to evaluate the role of ion species in the modification of optical and electrical properties of the polymer. When the ion fluence is above ∼1 × 1013 ions cm-2, the threshold for latent tracks overlapping is overcome and π-bonded carbon clusters grow and aggregate forming a network of conjugated Cdbnd C bonds. For fluences around 1 × 1017 ions cm-2, the aggregation phenomena induce the formation of amorphous carbon and/or graphite like structures. At the same time, nucleation of metal nanoparticles (NPs) from implanted species can take place when the supersaturation threshold is overcome. The optical absorption of the samples increases in the visible range and the optical band gap redshifts from 3.40 eV up to 0.70 eV mostly due to the carbonization process and the formation of C0x clusters and cluster aggregates. Specific structures in the extinction spectra are observed when metal ions are selected in contrast to the non-metal ion implanted PC, thus revealing the possible presence of noble metal based NPs interstitial to the C0x cluster network. The corresponding electrical resistance decreases much more when metal ions are implanted with at least a factor of 2 orders of magnitude difference than the non-metal ions based samples. An absolute value of ∼107 Ω/sq has been measured for implantation with metals at doses higher than 5 × 1016 ions cm-2, being 1017 Ω/sq the corresponding sheet resistance for pristine PC.

  4. Means for obtaining a metal ion beam from a heavy-ion cyclotron source

    DOEpatents

    Hudson, E.D.; Mallory, M.L.

    1975-08-01

    A description is given of a modification to a cyclotron ion source used in producing a high intensity metal ion beam. A small amount of an inert support gas maintains the usual plasma arc, except that it is necessary for the support gas to have a heavy mass, e.g., xenon or krypton as opposed to neon. A plate, fabricated from the metal (or anything that can be sputtered) to be ionized, is mounted on the back wall of the ion source arc chamber and is bombarded by returning energetic low-charged gas ions that fail to cross the initial accelerating gap between the ion source and the accelerating electrode. Some of the atoms that are dislodged from the plate by the returning gas ions become ionized and are extracted as a useful beam of heavy ions. (auth)

  5. Neutralization by Metal Ions of the Toxicity of Sodium Selenide

    PubMed Central

    Dauplais, Marc; Lazard, Myriam; Blanquet, Sylvain; Plateau, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Inert metal-selenide colloids are found in animals. They are believed to afford cross-protection against the toxicities of both metals and selenocompounds. Here, the toxicities of metal salt and sodium selenide mixtures were systematically studied using the death rate of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells as an indicator. In parallel, the abilities of these mixtures to produce colloids were assessed. Studied metal cations could be classified in three groups: (i) metal ions that protect cells against selenium toxicity and form insoluble colloids with selenide (Ag+, Cd2+, Cu2+, Hg2+, Pb2+ and Zn2+), (ii) metal ions which protect cells by producing insoluble metal-selenide complexes and by catalyzing hydrogen selenide oxidation in the presence of dioxygen (Co2+ and Ni2+) and, finally, (iii) metal ions which do not afford protection and do not interact (Ca2+, Mg2+, Mn2+) or weakly interact (Fe2+) with selenide under the assayed conditions. When occurring, the insoluble complexes formed from divalent metal ions and selenide contained equimolar amounts of metal and selenium atoms. With the monovalent silver ion, the complex contained two silver atoms per selenium atom. Next, because selenides are compounds prone to oxidation, the stabilities of the above colloids were evaluated under oxidizing conditions. 5,5'-dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid) (DTNB), the reduction of which can be optically followed, was used to promote selenide oxidation. Complexes with cadmium, copper, lead, mercury or silver resisted dissolution by DTNB treatment over several hours. With nickel and cobalt, partial oxidation by DTNB occurred. On the other hand, when starting from ZnSe or FeSe complexes, full decompositions were obtained within a few tens of minutes. The above properties possibly explain why ZnSe and FeSe nanoparticles were not detected in animals exposed to selenocompounds. PMID:23342137

  6. Optical studies of ion-beam synthesized metal alloy nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magudapathy, P.; Srivatsava, S. K.; Gangopadhyay, P.; Amirthapandian, S.; Sairam, T. N.; Panigrahi, B. K.

    2015-06-01

    AuxAg1-x alloy nanoparticles with tunable surface plasmon resonance (SPR) have been synthesized on a silica glass substrate. A small Au foil on an Ag foil is irradiated as target substrates such that ion beam falls on both Ag foil and Au foils. Silica slides are kept at an angle ˜45° with respect to the metallic foils. While irradiating the metallic foils with 100 keV Ar+ ions, sputtered Au and Ag atoms get deposited on the silica-glass. In this configuration the foils have been irradiated by Ar+ ions to various fluences at room temperature and the sputtered species are collected on silica slides. Formation of AuxAg1-x nanoparticles has been confirmed from the optical absorption measurements. With respect to the exposure area of Au and Ag foils to the ion beam, the SPR peak position varies from 450 to 500 nm. Green photoluminescence has been observed from these alloy metal nanoparticles.

  7. Hall transport of divalent metal ion modified DNA lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Dugasani, Sreekantha Reddy; Lee, Keun Woo; Yoo, Sanghyun; Gnapareddy, Bramaramba; Bashar, Saima; Park, Sung Ha; Kim, Si Joon; Jung, Joohye; Jung, Tae Soo; Kim, Hyun Jae

    2015-06-29

    We investigate the Hall transport characteristics of double-crossover divalent metal ion (Cu{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, and Co{sup 2+})-modified DNA (M-DNA) lattices grown on silica via substrate-assisted growth. The electronic characteristics of the M-DNA lattices are investigated by varying the concentration of the metal ions and then conducting Hall measurements, including resistivity, Hall mobility, carrier concentration, and magneto resistance. The tendency of the resistivity and Hall mobility was to initially decrease as the ion concentration increased, until reaching the saturation concentration (C{sub s}) of each metal ion, and then to increase as the ion concentration increased further. On the other hand, the carrier concentration revealed the opposite tendency as the resistivity and Hall mobility. The specific binding (≤C{sub s}) and the nonspecific aggregates (>C{sub s}) of the ions into the DNA lattices were significantly affected by the Hall characteristics. The numerical ranges of the Hall parameters revealed that the M-DNA lattices with metal ions had semiconductor-like characteristics. Consequently, the distinct characteristics of the electrical transport through M-DNA lattices will provide useful information on the practical use of such structures in physical devices and chemical sensors.

  8. A vacuum spark ion source: High charge state metal ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Yushkov, G. Yu. Nikolaev, A. G.; Frolova, V. P.; Oks, E. M.

    2016-02-15

    High ion charge state is often important in ion beam physics, among other reasons for the very practical purpose that it leads to proportionately higher ion beam energy for fixed accelerating voltage. The ion charge state of metal ion beams can be increased by replacing a vacuum arc ion source by a vacuum spark ion source. Since the voltage between anode and cathode remains high in a spark discharge compared to the vacuum arc, higher metal ion charge states are generated which can then be extracted as an ion beam. The use of a spark of pulse duration less than 10 μs and with current up to 10 kA allows the production of ion beams with current of several amperes at a pulse repetition rate of up to 5 pps. We have demonstrated the formation of high charge state heavy ions (bismuth) of up to 15 + and a mean ion charge state of more than 10 +. The physics and techniques of our vacuum spark ion source are described.

  9. A vacuum spark ion source: High charge state metal ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yushkov, G. Yu.; Nikolaev, A. G.; Oks, E. M.; Frolova, V. P.

    2016-02-01

    High ion charge state is often important in ion beam physics, among other reasons for the very practical purpose that it leads to proportionately higher ion beam energy for fixed accelerating voltage. The ion charge state of metal ion beams can be increased by replacing a vacuum arc ion source by a vacuum spark ion source. Since the voltage between anode and cathode remains high in a spark discharge compared to the vacuum arc, higher metal ion charge states are generated which can then be extracted as an ion beam. The use of a spark of pulse duration less than 10 μs and with current up to 10 kA allows the production of ion beams with current of several amperes at a pulse repetition rate of up to 5 pps. We have demonstrated the formation of high charge state heavy ions (bismuth) of up to 15 + and a mean ion charge state of more than 10 +. The physics and techniques of our vacuum spark ion source are described.

  10. Tris(pyrazolyl)methanides of the alkaline earth metals: influence of the substitution pattern on stability and degradation.

    PubMed

    Müller, Christoph; Koch, Alexander; Görls, Helmar; Krieck, Sven; Westerhausen, Matthias

    2015-01-20

    Trispyrazolylmethanides commonly act as strong tridentate bases toward metal ions. This expected coordination behavior has been observed for tris(3,4,5-trimethylpyrazolyl)methane (1a), which yields the alkaline-earth-metal bis[tris(3,4,5-trimethylpyrazolyl)methanides] of magnesium (1b), calcium (1c), strontium (1d), and barium (1e) via deprotonation of 1a with dibutylmagnesium and [Ae{N(SiMe3)2}2] (Ae = Mg, Ca, Sr, and Ba, respectively). Barium complex 1e degrades during recrystallization that was attempted from aromatic hydrocarbons and ethers. In these scorpionate complexes, the metal ions are embedded in distorted octahedral coordination spheres. Contrarily, tris(3-thienylpyrazolyl)methane (2a) exhibits a strikingly different reactivity. Dibutylmagnesium is unable to deprotonate 2a, whereas [Ae{N(SiMe3)2}2] (Ae = Ca, Sr, and Ba) smoothly metalates 2a. However, the primary alkaline-earth-metal bis[tris(3-thienylpyrazolyl)methanides] of Ca (2c), Sr (2d), and Ba (2e) represent intermediates and degrade under the formation of the alkaline-earth-metal bis(3-thienylpyrazolates) of calcium (3c), strontium (3d), and barium (3e) and the elimination of tetrakis(3-thienylpyrazolyl)ethene (4). To isolate crystalline compounds, 3-thienylpyrazole has been metalated, and the corresponding derivatives [(HPz(Tp))4Mg(Pz(Tp))2] (3b), dinuclear [(tmeda)Ca(Pz(Tp))2]2 (3c), mononuclear [(pmdeta)Sr(Pz(Tp))2] (3d), and [(hmteta)Ba(Pz(Tp))2] (3e) have been structurally characterized. Regardless of the applied stoichiometry, magnesiation of thienylpyrazole 3a with dibutylmagnesium yields [(HPz(Tp))4Mg(Pz(Tp))2] (3b), which is stabilized in the solid state by intramolecular N-H···N···H-N hydrogen bridges. The degradation of [Ae{C(Pz(R))3}2] (R = Ph and Tp) has been studied by quantum chemical methods, the results of which propose an intermediate complex of the nature [{(Pz(R))2C}2Ca{Pz(R)}2]; thereafter, the singlet carbenes ([:C(Pz(R))2]) dimerize in the vicinity of the alkaline

  11. On the origins of energetic ions in the earth's dayside magnetosheath

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuselier, S. A.; Klumpar, D. M.; Shelley, E. G.

    1991-01-01

    Energetic ion events in the earth's dayside subsolar magnetosheath (0900 - 1300 Local Time) are surveyed using data from the AMPTE/CCE Hot Plasma Composition Experiment. Ion species carrying the signature of their origin O(+) and energetic He(2+) are used to distinguish between magnetospheric and solar wind origins for the energetic ion events. The results of this survey indicate that the majority of energetic (10-17 keV/e) H(+) and He(2+) ions observed in the dayside magnetosheath are accelerated from the solar wind population. The energetic He(2+) to H(+) density ratio in the magnetosheath is consistent with that predicted from first-order Fermi acceleration of solar wind ions in the turbulent regions upstream and downstream from the earth's quasi-parallel bow shock. The simultaneous occurrence of both energetic He(2+) and magnetospheric O(+) indicates that, on occasion, both Fermi acceleration of solar wind ions and leakage of magnetospheric ions occurs in the dayside magnetosheath.

  12. Ionospheric ions in the near earth geomagnetic tail plasma lobes

    SciTech Connect

    Orsini, S.; Candidi, M.; Balsiger, H.; Ghielmetti, A.

    1982-02-01

    By comparing data from the plasma experiment on ISEE-2 from the ion composition experiment on ISEE-1, composition and plasma properties of tailward flowing ions in the magnetotail lobes are assessed, in the 50 eV/Z to 11 keV/Z energy range. This population consists mainly of singly charged oxygen ions, with H/sup +/ ions contributing in general less than 10%, flowing roughly along magnetic field lines. Hence, it is concluded that these ions are of mainly ionospheric origin. They are detected only during magnetically disturbed periods. Estimates of the E/sub z/ electric field components in the lobes are given.

  13. Recent advances in tailoring the aggregation of heavier alkaline earth metal halides, alkoxides and aryloxides from non-aqueous solvents.

    PubMed

    Fromm, Katharina M

    2006-11-21

    This overview on one of the subjects treated in our group deals with the synthesis and study of low-dimensional polymer and molecular solid state structures formed with alkaline earth metal ions in non-aqueous solvents. We have chosen several synthetic approaches in order to obtain such compounds. The first concept deals with the "cutting out" of structural fragments from a solid state structure of a binary compound, which will be explained with reference to BaI2. Depending on the size and concentration of oxygen donor ligands, used as chemical scissors on BaI2, three-, two-, one- and zero-dimensional derived adducts of BaI2 are obtained, comparable to a structural genealogy tree for BaI2. A second part deals with the supramolecular approach for the synthesis of low dimensional polymeric compounds based on alkaline earth metal iodides, obtained by the combination of metal ion coordination with hydrogen bonding between the cationic complexes and their anions. Certain circumstances allow rules to be established for the prediction of the dimensionality of a given compound, contributing to the fundamental problem of structure prediction in crystal engineering. A third section describes a synthetic approach for generating pure alkaline earth metal cage compounds as well as alkali and alkaline earth mixed metal clusters. A first step deals with different molecular solvated alkaline earth metal iodides which are investigated as a function of the ligand size in non-aqueous solvents. These are then reacted with some alkali metal compound in order to partially or totally eliminate alkali iodide and to form the targeted clusters. These unique structures of ligand stabilized metal halide, hydroxide and/or alkoxide and aryloxide aggregates are of interest as potential precursors for oxide materials and as catalysts. Approaches to two synthetic methods of the latter, sol-gel and (MO)CVD (metal-organic chemical vapour deposition), are investigated with some of our compounds. (D

  14. Ion-Plated Soft Metallic Films Reduce Friction and Wear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, T.

    1986-01-01

    Ion plating is ion-assisted or glow-discharge surface-deposition technique. In this process, ions or energetic atoms transfer energy, momentum, and charge to substrate and deposited surface film. Process controlled to modify physical characteristics of surface, subsurface chemical conditions, and surface and subsurface microstructures as well. Ion plating with such soft, thin metallic films as gold, silver, or lead has great potential for producing self-contained lubricating surfaces. Such films reduce friction, wear, and corrosion on sliding or rotating mechanical surfaces used in wide range of environments.

  15. Ion-chromatographic behavior of alkali metal cations and ammonium ion on zirconium-adsorbing silica gel.

    PubMed

    Ohta, K; Morikawa, H; Tanaka, K; Uwamino, Y; Furukawa, M; Sando, M

    2000-07-07

    The preparation and evaluation of zirconium-adsorbing silica gel (Zr-Silica) as an ion-exchange stationary phase in ion chromatography for inorganic anions and cations was carried out. The Zr-Silica was prepared by the reaction of silanol groups on the surface of the silica gel with zirconium butoxide (Zr(OCH2CH2CH2CH3)4) in ethanol. The ion-exchange characteristics of the Zr-Silica were evaluated using 10 mM tartaric acid at pH 2.5 as eluent. The Zr-Silica was found to act as a cation-exchanger under the eluent conditions. The retention behavior of alkali and alkaline earth metal cations was then investigated. The Zr-Silica column was proved to be suitable for the simultaneous separation of alkali metal cations and ammonium ion. Excellent separation of the cations on a 15 cm Zr-Silica column was achieved in 25 min using 10 mM tartaric acid as eluent.

  16. Metal-ion-mediated assemblies of thiazole orange with cucurbit[7]uril: a photophysical study.

    PubMed

    Shinde, Meenakshi N; Dutta Choudhury, Sharmistha; Barooah, Nilotpal; Pal, Haridas; Bhasikuttan, Achikanath C; Mohanty, Jyotirmayee

    2015-03-05

    The formation of molecular superstructures by metal-ion-mediated noncovalent self-assembly has been demonstrated using the macrocycle, cucurbit[7]uril (CB7), and the dye, thiazole orange (TO), as building blocks. Interestingly, the association of these molecular building blocks can be tuned by the chemical environment, leading to self-assembled structures of different stoichiometries, which is supported by absorption, fluorescence, (1)H NMR, and AFM measurements. Most importantly, the self-assembly process of the CB7/TO/metal ion system is observed to be remarkably different for alkali (Na(+)) and alkaline earth (Ca(2+)) metal ions. Fluorescence enhancement is observed in the presence of Ca(2+) ions, which is attributed to the formation of short dimeric structures composed of two 1:1 CB7-TO complexes. Solution turbidity is detected in the presence of Na(+) ions, which is proposed to be due to the formation of extended structures by the assembly of many 1:1 CB7-TO complexes.

  17. Humic colloid-borne natural polyvalent metal ions: dissociation experiment.

    PubMed

    Geckeis, H; Rabung, Th; Ngo Manh, T; Kim, J I; Beck, H P

    2002-07-01

    The natural association nature of the humic colloid-borne trace elements is investigated. Rare earth elements (REE) Th and U are chosen as naturally occurring representatives and chemical homologues for actinides of different oxidation states present in nuclear waste. Tri- and tetravalent elements in two investigated Gorleben groundwaters (Gohy-532 and -2227) almost exclusively occur as humic or fulvic colloid-borne species. Their desorption behavior from colloids is examined in the unperturbed groundwater (pH approximately 8) under anaerobic conditions (Ar/1% CO2) by addition of a chelating cation exchanger resin. Particularly, the dissociation process of naturally occurring Eu(III) in the groundwater is compared with the Eu(III) desorption from its humate complex prepared with purified Aldrich humic acid in a buffered aqueous solution at pH approximately 8. The Eu(III) dissociation from the groundwater colloids is found to be considerably slower than found for the humate complex synthesized in the laboratory. This suggests that under natural aquatic conditions the Eu(III) binding in colloids is chemically different from the simple humate complexation as observed in the laboratory experiment. The colloid characterization bythe size exclusion chromatography (SEC) and the flow field-flow fractionation (FFFF) indicates that natural colloid-borne trace elements are found predominantly in colloids of larger size (>15 nm in size), while Eu(III) in its humate complex is found mainly in colloids of hydrodynamic diameters <5 nm. The slower desorption kinetics and the larger colloid size suggest that the polyvalent metal ion binding in natural humic colloids is associated to polynucleation with other co-present trace metal ions. Radiotracer experiments reveal that isotopic equilibria with the naturally colloid-borne trace elements are not attained within a period of more than 100 days, indicating irreversible binding of at least a part of colloid-borne polyvalent trace

  18. Metal ion complexation by ionizable crown ethers. Final report, January 1, 1988--June 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Bartsch, R.A.

    1994-12-31

    During the report period a variety of new lipophilic ionizable crown ethers with pendent proton-ionizable groups has been synthesized. The ligands possess one or more ionizable group (carboxylic acid, phosphonic acid monoethyl ester, para-nitrophenol, phosphonic acid) attached to crown ether, monoazacrown ether or diazacrown ether frameworks. These novel chelating agents have either pendent or inward-facing proton-ionizable groups. Such lipophilic proton-ionizable crown ethers are designed for use in multiphase metal ion separations (solvent extraction, liquid membrane transport). In addition a series of proton-ionizable crown ethers without lipophilic groups was prepared to study how structural variations within the ligand influence metal ion complexation in homogeneous media as assessed by NMR spectroscopy or titration calorimetry. A third class of new metal ion-complexing agents is a series of lipophilic acyclic polyether dicarboxylic acids. Competitive solvent extractions of alkali metal and alkaline earth cations and of the mixed species have been conducted to reveal the influence of ring size, nature and attachment site of the lipophilic group, sidearm length, and proton-ionizable group identity and location upon the selectivity and efficiency of metal ion complexation. In addition to such studies of structural variation within the lipophilic proton-ionizable crown ether, the effect of changing the organic solvent and variation of the stripping conditions have been assessed. The influence of structural variations within lipophilic acyclic polyether dicarboxylic acids upon competitive solvent extraction of alkaline earth cations has been probed. Also a new chromogenic, di-ionizable crown ether with extremely high selectivity for Hg{sup 2+} has been discovered.

  19. Removal of heavy metal ions from wastewaters: a review.

    PubMed

    Fu, Fenglian; Wang, Qi

    2011-03-01

    Heavy metal pollution has become one of the most serious environmental problems today. The treatment of heavy metals is of special concern due to their recalcitrance and persistence in the environment. In recent years, various methods for heavy metal removal from wastewater have been extensively studied. This paper reviews the current methods that have been used to treat heavy metal wastewater and evaluates these techniques. These technologies include chemical precipitation, ion-exchange, adsorption, membrane filtration, coagulation-flocculation, flotation and electrochemical methods. About 185 published studies (1988-2010) are reviewed in this paper. It is evident from the literature survey articles that ion-exchange, adsorption and membrane filtration are the most frequently studied for the treatment of heavy metal wastewater.

  20. Alkaline earth metal cation exchange: effect of mobile counterion and dissolved organic matter.

    PubMed

    Indarawis, Katrina; Boyer, Treavor H

    2012-04-17

    The goal of this research was to provide an improved understanding of the interactions between alkaline earth metals and DOM under conditions that are encountered during drinking water treatment with particular focus on cation exchange. Both magnetically enhanced and nonmagnetic cation exchange resins were converted to Na, Mg, Ca, Sr, and Ba mobile counterion forms as a novel approach to investigate the exchange behavior between the cations and the interactions between the cations and DOM. The results show that cation exchange is a robust process for removal of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) considering competition with cations on the resin surface and presence of DOM. DOM was actively involved during the cation exchange process through complexation, adsorption, and coprecipitation reactions. In addition to advancing the understanding of ion exchange processes for water treatment, the results of this work are applicable to membrane pretreatment to minimize fouling, treatment of membrane concentrate, and precipitative softening.

  1. Acylpyrazolones: Synthesis, self-assembly and lanthanide metal ion separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jun

    The central hypothesis that nanoscale self-assemblies can provide excellent metal ion recognition has been substantiated by employing acylpyrazolones and trivalent lanthanide metal ions as model systems. Several novel acylpyrazolones and their amphiphilic analogs have been designed, synthesized, and characterized. Their lanthanide metal ion recognition efficacies have been demonstrated through baseline separations of a mixture of light, middle, and heavy lanthanide metal ions by employing them in the aqueous mobile phase of high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with octadecylsilanized silica (ODS) as the stationary phase. The complex separation mechanism is influenced by the structures of acylpyrazolone and amphiphilic moieties, and spontaneous self-assembly of the ligand in the aqueous and on the stationary phases. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies of the ligand self-assemblies in the aqueous phase in the absence and presence of lanthanide metal ions reveal spherical, dendritic, and linear (nanofibers, nanorods, and nanotubes) nanoscale structures. Such structures have also been observed when chloromethylated acylpyrazolones are stimulated to self-assemble by a base in nonaqueous solvents and when silica nanoparticles derivatized with them spontaneously self-assemble in aqueous and nonaqueous solvents.

  2. Solvent effects and alkali metal ion catalysis in phosphodiester hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Tagle, Paola; Vargas-Zúñiga, Idania; Taran, Olga; Yatsimirsky, Anatoly K

    2006-12-22

    The kinetics of the alkaline hydrolysis of bis(p-nitrophenyl) phosphate (BNPP) have been studied in aqueous DMSO, dioxane, and MeCN. In all solvent mixtures the reaction rate steadily decreases to half of its value in pure water in the range of 0-70 vol % of organic cosolvent and sharply increases in mixtures with lower water content. Correlations based on different scales of solvent empirical parameters failed to describe the solvent effect in this system, but it can be satisfactorily treated in terms of a simplified stepwise solvent-exchange model. Alkali metal ions catalyze the BNPP hydrolysis but do not affect the rate of hydrolysis of neutral phosphotriester p-nitrophenyl diphenyl phosphate in DMSO-rich mixtures. The catalytic activity decreases in the order Li+ > Na+ > K+ > Rb+ > Cs+. For all cations except Na+, the reaction rate is first-order in metal ion. With Na+, both first- and second-order kinetics in metal ions are observed. Binding constants of cations to the dianionic transition state of BNPP alkaline hydrolysis are of the same order of magnitude and show a similar trend as their binding constants to p-nitrophenyl phosphate dianion employed as a transition-state model. The appearance of alkali metal ion catalysis in a medium, which solvates metal ions stronger than water, is attributed to the increased affinity of cations to dianions, which undergo a strong destabilization in the presence of an aprotic dipolar cosolvent.

  3. Process for modifying the metal ion sorption capacity of a medium

    DOEpatents

    Lundquist, Susan H.

    2002-01-01

    A process for modifying a medium is disclosed that includes treating a medium having a metal ion sorption capacity with a solution that includes: A) an agent capable of forming a complex with metal ions; and B) ions selected from the group consisting of sodium ions, potassium ions, magnesium ions, and combinations thereof, to create a medium having an increased capacity to sorb metal ions relative to the untreated medium.

  4. Rare-earth metal prices in the USA ca. 1960 to 1994

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hedrick, J.B.

    1997-01-01

    Rare-earth metal prices were compiled from the late 1950s and early 1960s through 1994. Although commercial demand for rare-earth metals began in 1908, as the alloy mischmetal, commercial quantities of a wide range of individual rare-earth metals were not available until the late 1950s. The discovery of a large, high-grade rare-earth deposit at Mountain Pass, CA, USA, in 1949, was significant because it led to the production of commercial quantities of rare-earth elements that reduced prices and encouraged wider application of the materials. The availability of ore from Mountain Pass, and other large rare-earth deposits, especially those in Australia and China, has provided the world with abundant resources for rare-earth metal production. This availability, coupled with improved technology from Government and private-sector metallurgical research, has resulted in substantial decreases in rare-earth metal prices since the late 1950s and early 1960s. Price series for the individual rare-earth metals (except promethium) are quoted on a kilogram basis from the late 1950s and early 1960s through 1994. Prices are given in US dollars on an actual and constant dollar basis. Industrial and economic factors affecting prices during this time period are examined.

  5. Rare-earth metal prices in the USA ca. 1960 to 1994

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hedrick, James B.

    1997-01-01

    Rare-earth metal prices were compiled from the late 1950s and early 1960s through 1994. Although commercial demand for rare-earth metals began in 1908, as the alloy mischmetal, commercial quantities of a wide range of individual rare-earth metals were not available until the late 1950s. The discovery of a large, high-grade rare-earth deposit at Mountain Pass. CA, USA, in 1949, was significant because it led to the production of commercial quantities or rare-earth elements that reduced prices and encouraged wider application of the materials. The availability of ore from Mountain Pass, and other large rare-earth deposits, especially those in Australia and China, has provided the world with abundant resources for rare-earth metal production. This availability, coupled with improved technology from Government and private-sector metallurgical research, has resulted in substantial decreases in rare-earth metal prices since the late 1950s and early 1960s. Price series for the individual rare-earth metals (except promethium) are quoted on a kilogram basis from the late 1950s and early 1960s through 1994. Prices are given in US dollars on an actual and constant dollar basis. Industrial and economic factors affecting prices during this time period are examined.

  6. Release characteristics of alkali and alkaline earth metallic species during biomass pyrolysis and steam gasification process.

    PubMed

    Long, Jiang; Song, Hu; Jun, Xiang; Sheng, Su; Lun-Shi, Sun; Kai, Xu; Yao, Yao

    2012-07-01

    Investigating the release characteristics of alkali and alkaline earth metallic species (AAEMs) is of potential interest because of AAEM's possible useful service as catalysts in biomass thermal conversion. In this study, three kinds of typical Chinese biomass were selected to pyrolyse and their chars were subsequently steam gasified in a designed quartz fixed-bed reactor to investigate the release characteristics of alkali and alkaline earth metallic species (AAEMs). The results indicate that 53-76% of alkali metal and 27-40% of alkaline earth metal release in pyrolysis process, as well as 12-34% of alkali metal and 12-16% of alkaline earth metal evaporate in char gasification process, and temperature is not the only factor to impact AAEMs emission. The releasing characteristics of AAEMs during pyrolysis and char gasification process of three kinds of biomass were discussed in this paper.

  7. Membranes Remove Metal Ions Fron Industrial Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, W. P. L.; May, C.

    1983-01-01

    Use of membrane films affords convenient and economical alternative for removing and recovering metal cations present in low concentrations from large quantities of liquid solutions. Possible applications of membrane films include use in analytical chemistry for determination of small amounts of toxic metallic impurities in lakes, streams, and municipal effluents. Also suitable for use as absorber of certain pollutant gases and odors present in confined areas.

  8. Immunologic mechanisms in hypersensitivity reactions to metal ions: an overview.

    PubMed

    Büdinger, L; Hertl, M

    2000-02-01

    Metal ions such as Ni2+, Co2+, Cu2+, or Cr3+ are haptens with a high immunogenic potential, as contact dermatitis caused by ionic metals occurs in about 10-15% of the human population. Since alloys containing Ni2+, Co2+, and Cr3+ are components of implants in replacement surgery, dentures, orthodontic wires, and various other devices, adverse reactions to metal ions create serious problems in practical medicine as incompatibility reactions to metal-containing biomaterials. On the other hand, contact dermatitis to metal ions such as Ni2+ is a well-established model for studying the molecular mechanisms involved in the recognition of haptens by the immune system. Although many investigations have been performed to elucidate the molecular interactions causing contact hypersensitivity in man, many aspects remain to be clarified. This review will focus on the experimental data accumulated so far on the immunologic mechanisms responsible for the recognition of metal ions by T cells and eliciting adverse immune reactions causing contact dermatitis.

  9. Our Understanding of Ion Outflows from Earth and Remaining Challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yau, A. W.

    2015-12-01

    The discovery of energetic ion beams and conics by Shelley et al. and transversely accelerated ions by Klumpar in the 1970's heralded the extensive satellite, rocket, and radar observations of ion outflows over the past four decades. This body of observation has shaped our contemporary view on ion outflows and their important role in magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling. The variety of ion outflows may be categorized into thermal and suprathermal outflows. Both categories of outflows are strongly influenced by solar EUV irradiance and solar wind energy input, and the state of the magnetosphere, ionosphere, thermosphere, and (at times) plasmasphere. Several important challenges remain in our quest for a fully quantitative, multi-scale understanding of ion outflows. These include the detection of the lowest-energy ions in the tenuous sunlit magnetosphere; the influence of these hidden ions in the magnetosphere; ion transit between low and high altitudes at quiet times; the role of microscale processes; the simultaneous monitoring of different outflow populations and their circulation and redistributions in the magnetosphere; the influence of solar energy input, the thermosphere and the plasmasphere on outflow composition, characteristics, and variability; and the effects of this variability on the coupling between thermal and suprathermal outflows and on the overall magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling.

  10. TOPICAL REVIEW: Ferromagnetic nitride-based semiconductors doped with transition metals and rare earths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonanni, A.

    2007-09-01

    This review summarizes the state-of-the-art in the search for room temperature ferromagnetic semiconductors based on transition-metal- and rare-earth-doped nitrides. The major methods of synthesis are reported, together with an overview of the magnetic, structural, electrical and optical characterization of the materials systems, where available. The controversial experimental results concerning the actual value of the apparent Curie temperature in magnetically doped nitrides are highlighted, the inadequacy of standard characterization methods alone and the necessity of a possibly exhaustive structural investigation of the systems are proven and underlined. Furthermore, the dependence on the fabrication parameters of the magnetic ions incorporation into the semiconductor matrix is discussed, with special attention to the fundamental concepts of solubility limit and spinodal decomposition. It is argued that high-temperature ferromagnetic features in magnetically doped nitrides result from the presence of nanoscale regions containing a high concentration of the magnetic constituents. Various functionalities of these multicomponent systems are listed. Moreover, we give an extensive overview on the properties of single magnetic-impurity states in the nitride host. The understanding of this limit is crucial when considering the most recent suggestions for the control of the magnetic ion distribution—and consequently of the magnetic response—through the Fermi level engineering as well as to indicate roads for achieving high-temperature ferromagnetism in the systems containing a uniform distribution of magnetic ions.

  11. Oligomeric rare-earth metal cluster complexes with endohedral transition metal atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinberg, Simon; Zimmermann, Sina; Brühmann, Matthias; Meyer, Eva; Rustige, Christian; Wolberg, Marike; Daub, Kathrin; Bell, Thomas; Meyer, Gerd

    2014-11-01

    Comproportionation reactions of rare-earth metal trihalides (RX3) with the respective rare-earth metals (R) and transition metals (T) led to the formation of 22 oligomeric R cluster halides encapsulating T, in 19 cases for the first time. The structures of these compounds were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction and are composed of trimers ({T3R11}X15-type, P63/m), tetramers ({T4R16}X28{R4} (P-43m), {T4R16}X20 (P42/nnm), {T4R16}X24(RX3)4 (I41/a) and {T4R16}X23 (C2/m) types of structure) and pentamers ({Ru5La14}2Br39, Cc) of {TRr}n (n=2-5) clusters. These oligomers are further enveloped by inner (Xi) as well as outer (Xa) halido ligands, which possess diverse functionalities and interconnect like oligomers through i-i, i-a and/or a-i bridges. The general features of the crystal structures for these new compounds are discussed and compared to literature entries as well as different structure types with oligomeric T centered R clusters. Dimers and tetramers originating from the aggregation of {TR6} octahedra via common edges are more frequent than trimers and pentamers, in which the {TRr} clusters share common faces.

  12. Magnetic Behaviour Of Some Oxide Glasses Doped With Rare Earth Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pop, L.; Culea, E.; Bosca, M.

    2007-04-01

    Magnetic susceptibility data from Er3+ and Nd3+ ions embedded in some Bi2O3 - PbO glasses are reported for the 80-300 K temperature range. The temperature dependence of reciprocal magnetic susceptibility permitted to discuss the nature of complex interactions between rare earth ions localized in lead bismuthate glass matrices.

  13. Temperature dependent mobility measurements of alkali earth ions in superfluid helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putlitz, Gisbert Zu; Baumann, I.; Foerste, M.; Jungmann, K.; Riediger, O.; Tabbert, B.; Wiebe, J.; Zühlke, C.

    1998-05-01

    Mobility measurements of impurity ions in superfluid helium are reported. Alkali earth ions were produced with a laser sputtering technique and were drawn inside the liquid by an electric field. The experiments were carried out in the temperature region from 1.27 up to 1.66 K. The temperature dependence of the mobility of Be^+-ions (measured here for the first time) differs from that of the other alkali earth ions Mg^+, Ca^+, Sr^+ and Ba^+, but behaves similar to that of He^+ (M. Foerste, H. Günther, O. Riediger, J. Wiebe, G. zu Putlitz, Z. Phys. B) 104, 317 (1997). Theories of Atkins (A. Atkins, Phys. Rev.) 116, 1339 (1959) and Cole (M.W. Cole, R.A. Bachmann Phys. Rev. B) 15, 1388 (1977) predict a different defect structure for He^+ and the alkali earth ions: the helium ion is assumed to form a snowball like structure whereas for the alkali earth ions a bubble structure is assumed. If the temperature dependence is a characteristic feature for the different structures, then it seems likely that the Be^+ ion builds a snowball like structure.

  14. Rare-earth-doped bifunctional alkaline-earth metal fluoride nanocrystals via a facile microwave-assisted process.

    PubMed

    Pang, Min; Liu, Dapeng; Lei, Yongqian; Song, Shuyan; Feng, Jing; Fan, Weiqiang; Zhang, Hongjie

    2011-06-20

    Rare-earth-doped magnetic-optic bifunctional alkaline-earth metal fluoride nanocrystals have been successfully synthesized via a facile microwave-assisted process. The as-prepared nanocrystals were monodisperse and could form stable colloidal solutions in polar solvents, such as water and ethanol. They show bright-green fluorescence emisson. Furthermore, Gd(3+)-doped ones exhibit paramagnetic behavior at room temperature and superparamagnetic behavior at 2 K.

  15. METHOD OF SEPARATING RARE EARTHS BY ION EXCHANGE

    DOEpatents

    Spedding, F.H.; Powell, J.E.

    1960-10-18

    A process is given for separating yttrium and rare earth values having atomic numbers of from 57 through 60 and 68 through 71 from an aqueous solution whose pH value can range from 1 to 9. All rare earths and yttrium are first adsorbed on a cation exchange resin, and they are then eluted with a solution of N-hydroxyethylethylenediaminetriacetic acid (HEDTA) in the order of decreasing atomic number, yttrium behaving like element 61; the effluents are collected in fractions. The HEDTA is recovered by elution with ammonia solution and the resin is regenerated with sulfuric acid. Rare earths are precipitated from the various effluents with oxalic acid, and each supernatant is passed over cation exchange resin for adsorption of HEDTA and nonprecipitated rare earths: the oxalic acid is not retained by the resin.

  16. Reducing hazardous heavy metal ions using mangium bark waste.

    PubMed

    Khabibi, Jauhar; Syafii, Wasrin; Sari, Rita Kartika

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the characteristics of mangium bark and its biosorbent ability to reduce heavy metal ions in standard solutions and wastewater and to assess changes in bark characteristics after heavy metal absorption. The experiments were conducted to determine heavy metal absorption from solutions of heavy metals alone and in mixtures as well as from wastewater. The results show that mangium bark can absorb heavy metals. Absorption percentages and capacities from single heavy metal solutions showed that Cu(2+) > Ni(2+) > Pb(2+) > Hg(2+), while those from mixture solutions showed that Hg(2+) > Cu(2+) > Pb(2+) > Ni(2+). Wastewater from gold mining only contained Cu, with an absorption percentage and capacity of 42.87 % and 0.75 mg/g, respectively. The highest absorption percentage and capacity of 92.77 % and 5.18 mg/g, respectively, were found for Hg(2+) in a mixture solution and Cu(2+) in single-metal solution. The Cu(2+) absorption process in a single-metal solution changed the biosorbent characteristics of the mangium bark, yielding a decreased crystalline fraction; changed transmittance on hydroxyl, carboxyl, and carbonyl groups; and increased the presence of Cu. In conclusion, mangium bark biosorbent can reduce hazardous heavy metal ions in both standard solutions and wastewater.

  17. Low coefficient of thermal expansion polyimides containing metal ion additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoakley, D. M.; St. Clair, A. K.

    1992-01-01

    Polyimides have become widely used as high performance polymers as a result of their excellent thermal stability and toughness. However, lowering their coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) would increase their usefulness for aerospace and electronic applications where dimensional stability is a requirement. The incorporation of metal ion-containing additives into polyimides, resulting in significantly lowered CTE's, has been studied. Various metal ion additives have been added to both polyamic acid resins and soluble polyimide solutions in the concentration range of 4-23 weight percent. The incorporation of these metal ions has resulted in reductions in the CTE's of the control polyimides of 12 percent to over 100 percent depending on the choice of additive and its concentration.

  18. Metal ion modulated electron transfer in photosynthetic proteins.

    SciTech Connect

    Utschig, L. M.; Thurnauer, M. C.; Chemistry

    2004-07-01

    Photosynthetic purple bacterial reaction center (RC) proteins are ideal native systems for addressing basic questions regarding the nature of biological electron transfer because both the protein structure and the electron-transfer reactions are well-characterized. Metal ion binding to the RC can affect primary photochemistry and provides a probe for understanding the involvement of local protein environments in electron transfer. The RC has two distinct transition metal ion binding sites, the well-known non-heme Fe{sup 2+} site buried in the protein interior and a recently discovered Zn{sup 2+} site located on the surface of the protein. Fe{sup 2+} removal and Zn{sup 2+} binding systematically affect different electron-transfer steps in the RC. Factors involved in the metal ion alteration of RC electron transfer may provide a paradigm for other biological systems involved in electron transfer.

  19. Ion exchange properties of novel hydrous metal oxide materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, T.J.; McLaughlin, L.I.

    1996-12-31

    Hydrous metal oxide (HMO) materials are inorganic ion exchangers which have many desirable characteristics for catalyst support applications, including high cation exchange capacity, anion exchange capability, high surface area, ease of adjustment of acidity and basicity, bulk or thin film preparation, and similar chemistry for preparation of various transition metal oxides. Cation exchange capacity is engineered into these materials through the uniform incorporation of alkali cations via manipulation of alkoxide chemistry. Specific examples of the effects of Na stoichiometry and the addition of SiO{sub 2} to hydrous titanium oxide (HTO) on ion exchange behavior will be given. Acid titration and cationic metal precursor complex exchange will be used to characterize the ion exchange behavior of these novel materials.

  20. A study of the formation and dynamics of the Earth's plasma sheet using ion composition data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lennartsson, O. W.

    1994-01-01

    Over two years of data from the Lockheed Plasma Composition Experiment on the ISEE 1 spacecraft, covering ion energies between 100 eV/e and about 16 keV/e, have been analyzed in an attempt to extract new information about three geophysical issues: (1) solar wind penetration of the Earth's magnetic tail; (2) relationship between plasma sheet and tail lobe ion composition; and (3) possible effects of heavy terrestrial ions on plasma sheet stability.

  1. Nondestructive photon detection using a single rare-earth ion coupled to a photonic cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Chris; Zhong, Tian; Faraon, Andrei; Simon, Christoph

    2016-10-01

    We study the possibility of using single rare-earth ions coupled to a photonic cavity with high cooperativity for performing nondestructive measurements of photons, which would be useful for global quantum networks and photonic quantum computing. We calculate the achievable fidelity as a function of the parameters of the rare-earth ion and photonic cavity, which include the ion's optical and spin dephasing rates, the cavity linewidth, the single-photon coupling to the cavity, and the detection efficiency. We suggest a promising experimental realization using current state-of-the-art technology in Nd:YVO4.

  2. Experimental determination of the partitioning of gallium between solid iron metal and synthetic basaltic melt Electron and ion microprobe study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, M. J.; Newsom, H. E.; Reed, S. J. B.; Enright, M. C.

    1984-01-01

    The distribution of Ga between solid Fe metal and synthetic basaltic melt is investigated experimentally at temperatures of 1190 and 1330 C, and over a narrow range of oxygen fugacities. Metal-silicate reversal experiments were conducted, indicating a close approach to equilibrium. The analysis of the partitioned products was performed using electron and ion microprobes. At one bar total pressure, the solid metal/silicate melt partition coefficient D(Ga) is used to evaluate metal-silicate fractionation processes in the earth, moon, and Eucrite Parent Body (EPB). It is found that the depletion of Ga abundances in the EPB is due to the extraction of Ga into a metallic core. Likewise, the depletion of Ga in the lunar mantle is consistent with the extraction of Ga into a smaller lunar core if Ga was originally present in a subchondritic concentration. The relatively high Ga abundances in the earth's mantle are discussed, with reference to several theoretical models.

  3. Synthesis and structural characterization of amido scorpionate rare earth metals complexes.

    PubMed

    Márquez-Segovia, Isabel; Lara-Sánchez, Agustín; Otero, Antonio; Fernández-Baeza, Juan; Castro-Osma, José Antonio; Sánchez-Barba, Luis F; Rodríguez, Ana M

    2014-07-07

    The reactivity of hybrid scorpionate/cyclopentadienyl ligands in the form of the protio derivatives as a mixture of two regioisomers, namely bpzcpH [1-{2,2-bis(3,5-dimethylpyrazol-1-yl)-1,1-diphenylethyl}-1,3-cyclopentadiene and 2-{2,2-bis(3,5-dimethylpyrazol-1-yl)-1,1-diphenylethyl}-1,3-cyclopentadiene] and bpztcpH [1-{2,2-bis(3,5-dimethylpyrazol-1-yl)-1-tert-butylethyl}-1,3-cyclopentadiene and 2-{2,2-bis(3,5-dimethylpyrazol-1-yl)-1-tert-butylethyl}-1,3-cyclopentadiene], with the tris(silylamide) precursors [M{N(SiHMe2)2}3(thf)x] of rare earth metals (including the group 3 metals scandium and yttrium) is related to the atomic radii of the metal centres. The reaction with the precursor containing the smallest ion, [Sc{N(SiHMe2)2}3(thf)], did not proceed even heating at reflux temperature in toluene. The reaction with the precursors that contain a medium-sized metal ion, i.e., [M{N(SiHMe2)2}3(thf)2] (M = Y, Lu), proceeded only at high temperature and gave good yields of the silylenediamide-containing derivatives [M{κ(2)-NN-Me2Si(NSiHMe2)2}(bpzcp)] (M = Y , Lu ) and [M{κ(2)-NN-Me2Si(NSiHMe2)2}(bpztcp)] (M = Y , Lu ) by an double activation of Si-H and Si-N bonds. However, the reaction with the precursors that contained the largest metal ions, i.e., [M{N(SiHMe2)2}3(thf)2] (M = Nd, Sm), proceeded rapidly at room temperature to afford the bis(silylamide) complexes [M{N(SiHMe2)2}2(bpzcp)] (M = Nd , Sm ) and [M{N(SiHMe2)2}2(bpztcp)] (M = Nd , Sm ). Additionally, the alkyl heteroscorpionate yttrium and lutetium complexes [M(CH2SiMe3)2(NNCp)] (M = Y, Lu) reacted with an excess of HN(SiHMe2)2 to give the mixed alkyl/amide derivatives [M{N(SiHMe2)2}(CH2SiMe3)(bpzcp)] (M = Y , Lu ) and [M{N(SiHMe2)2}(CH2SiMe3)(bpztcp)] (M = Y , Lu ). The structures of the complexes were determined by spectroscopic methods and the X-ray crystal structures of , and were also established.

  4. Reactions of fourth-period metal ions (Ca + - Zn + ) with O2: Metal-oxide ion bond energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Ellen R.; Elkind, J. L.; Clemmer, D. E.; Georgiadis, R.; Loh, S. K.; Aristov, N.; Sunderlin, L. S.; Armentrout, P. B.

    1990-08-01

    Reactions of Ca+, Zn+ and all first-row atomic transition metal ions with O2 are studied using guided ion beam techniques. While reactions of the ground states of Sc+, Ti+, and V+ are exothermic, the remaining metal ions react with O2 in endothermic processes. Analyses of these endothermic reactions provide new determinations of the M+-O bond energies for these eight elements. Source conditions are varied such that the contributions of excited states of the metal ions can be explicitly considered for Mn+, Co+, Ni+, and Cu+. Results (in eV) at 0 K are D0(Ca+-O)= 3.57±0.05, D0(Cr+-O)=3.72±0.12, D0(Mn+-O)=2.95±0.13, D0(Fe+-O)=3.53±0.06 (reported previously), D0(Co+-O)=3.32±0.06, D0(Ni+-O) =2.74±0.07, D0(Cu+-O)=1.62±0.15, and D0(Zn+-O)=1.65±0.12. These values along with literature data for neutral metal oxide bond energies and ionization energies are critically evaluated. Periodic trends in the ionic metal oxide bond energies are compared with those of the neutral metal oxides and those of other related molecules.

  5. Comet encke: meteor metallic ion identification by mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, R A; Aikin, A C

    1973-04-20

    Metal ions including 23(+) (Na(+)), 24(+) (Mg(+)) 28(+) (Si(+)), 39(+) (K(+)), 40(+) (Ca(+)), 45(+) (Sc(+)), 52(+) Cr(+)). 56(+) (Fe(+)), and 58(+) (Ni(+)) have been detected in the upper atmosphere during the period of the Beta Taurids meteor shower. The abundances of these ions relative to Si(+) show, agreement in most instances with abundances in chondrites. A notable exception is 45(+), which, if it is Sc(+), is 100 times more abundant than neutral scandium found in chondrites.

  6. Comet Encke: Meteor metallic ion identification by mass spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, R. A.; Aikin, A. C.

    1972-01-01

    Metal ions including Na-40(+), Mg-24(+), Si-28(+), K-39(+), Ca-40(+), Sc-45(+), Cr-52(+), Fe-56(+), and Ni-58(+) were detected in the upper atmosphere during the beta Taurids meteor shower. Abundances of these ions relative to Si(+) show agreement in most instances with chondrites. A notable exception is 45(+), which is Sc(+), is 100 times more abundant than neutral scandium found in chondrites.

  7. Adsorbent for metal ions and method of making and using

    DOEpatents

    White, Lloyd R.; Lundquist, Susan H.

    2000-01-01

    A method comprises the step of spray-drying a solution or slurry comprising (alkali metal or ammonium) (metal) hexacyanoferrate particles in a liquid, to provide monodisperse, substantially spherical particles in a yield of at least 70 percent of theoretical yield and having a particle size in the range of 1 to 500 micrometers, said particles being active towards Cs ions. The particles, which can be of a single salt or a combination of salts, can be used free flowing, in columns or beds, or entrapped in a nonwoven, fibrous web or matrix or a cast porous membrane, to selectively remove Cs ions from aqueous solutions.

  8. Adsorbent for metal ions and method of making and using

    DOEpatents

    White, Lloyd R.; Lundquist, Susan H.

    1999-01-01

    A method comprises the step of spray-drying a solution or slurry comprising (alkali metal or ammonium) (metal) hexacyanoferrate particles in a liquid, to provide monodisperse, substantially spherical particles in a yield of at least 70 percent of theoretical yield and having a particle size in the range of 1 to 500 micrometers, said particles being active towards Cs ions. The particles, which can be of a single salt or a combination of salts, can be used free flowing, in columns or beds, or entrapped in a nonwoven, fibrous web or matrix or a cast porous membrane, to selectively remove Cs ions from aqueous solutions.

  9. Adsorbent for metal ions and method of making and using

    DOEpatents

    White, L.R.; Lundquist, S.H.

    1999-08-10

    A method comprises the step of spray-drying a solution or slurry comprising (alkali metal or ammonium) (metal) hexacyanoferrate particles in a liquid, to provide monodisperse, substantially spherical particles in a yield of at least 70 percent of theoretical yield and having a particle size in the range of 1 to 500 micrometers, said particles being active towards Cs ions. The particles, which can be of a single salt or a combination of salts, can be used free flowing, in columns or beds, or entrapped in a nonwoven, fibrous web or matrix or a cast porous membrane, to selectively remove Cs ions from aqueous solutions. 2 figs.

  10. Determination of metal ions in biological purification of waste waters

    SciTech Connect

    Tikhomirova, L.N.; Spiridonova, N.N.; Mandzhgaladze, I.D.

    1994-12-01

    Chromium, nickel, copper, zinc, and manganese were determined in active sludge extracted for utilization from sewage purification works in biological purification of waste waters. The measurements were carried out by the atomic absorption method and with Merck colorimetric kits for rapid determination of metal ions. The results obtained by the rapid colorimetric method agree fairly well with those obtained by the atomic absorption method, which makes it possible to recommend rapid colorimetric methods for routine analysis of biological objects for the content of ions of heavy metals.

  11. Smart responsive microcapsules capable of recognizing heavy metal ions.

    PubMed

    Pi, Shuo-Wei; Ju, Xiao-Jie; Wu, Han-Guang; Xie, Rui; Chu, Liang-Yin

    2010-09-15

    Smart responsive microcapsules capable of recognizing heavy metal ions are successfully prepared with oil-in-water-in-oil double emulsions as templates for polymerization in this study. The microcapsules are featured with thin poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-benzo-18-crown-6-acrylamide) (P(NIPAM-co-BCAm)) membranes, and they can selectively recognize special heavy metal ions such as barium(II) or lead(II) ions very well due to the "host-guest" complexation between the BCAm receptors and barium(II) or lead(II) ions. The stable BCAm/Ba(2+) or BCAm/Pb(2+) complexes in the P(NIPAM-co-BCAm) membrane cause a positive shift of the volume phase transition temperature of the crosslinked P(NIPAM-co-BCAm) hydrogel to a higher temperature, and the repulsion among the charged BCAm/Ba(2+) or BCAm/Pb(2+) complexes and the osmotic pressure within the P(NIPAM-co-BCAm) membranes result in the swelling of microcapsules. Induced by recognizing barium(II) or lead(II) ions, the prepared microcapsules with P(NIPAM-co-BCAm) membranes exhibit isothermal and significant swelling not only in outer and inner diameters but also in the membrane thickness. The proposed microcapsules in this study are highly attractive for developing smart sensors and/or carriers for detection and/or elimination of heavy metal ions.

  12. Existence of efficient divalent metal ion-catalyzed and inefficient divalent metal ion-independent channels in reactions catalyzed by a hammerhead ribozyme

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jing-Min; Zhou, De-Min; Takagi, Yasuomi; Kasai, Yasuhiro; Inoue, Atsushi; Baba, Tadashi; Taira, Kazunari

    2002-01-01

    The hammerhead ribozyme is generally accepted as a well characterized metalloenzyme. However, the precise nature of the interactions of the RNA with metal ions remains to be fully defined. Examination of metal ion-catalyzed hammerhead reactions at limited concentrations of metal ions is useful for evaluation of the role of metal ions, as demonstrated in this study. At concentrations of Mn2+ ions from 0.3 to 3 mM, addition of the ribozyme to the reaction mixture under single-turnover conditions enhances the reaction with the product reaching a fixed maximum level. Further addition of the ribozyme inhibits the reaction, demonstrating that a certain number of divalent metal ions is required for proper folding and also for catalysis. At extremely high concentrations, monovalent ions, such as Na+ ions, can also serve as cofactors in hammerhead ribozyme-catalyzed reactions. However, the catalytic efficiency of monovalent ions is extremely low and, thus, high concentrations are required. Furthermore, addition of monovalent ions to divalent metal ion-catalyzed hammerhead reactions inhibits the divalent metal ion-catalyzed reactions, suggesting that the more desirable divalent metal ion–ribozyme complexes are converted to less desirable monovalent metal ion–ribozyme complexes via removal of divalent metal ions, which serve as a structural support in the ribozyme complex. Even though two channels appear to exist, namely an efficient divalent metal ion-catalyzed channel and an inefficient monovalent metal ion-catalyzed channel, it is clear that, under physiological conditions, hammerhead ribozymes are metalloenzymes that act via the significantly more efficient divalent metal ion-dependent channel. Moreover, the observed kinetic data are consistent with Lilley’s and DeRose’s two-phase folding model that was based on ground state structure analyses. PMID:12034824

  13. DUHOCAMIS: a dual hollow cathode ion source for metal ion beams.

    PubMed

    Zhao, W J; Müller, M W O; Janik, J; Liu, K X; Ren, X T

    2008-02-01

    In this paper we describe a novel ion source named DUHOCAMIS for multiply charged metal ion beams. This ion source is derived from the hot cathode Penning ion gauge ion source (JINR, Dubna, 1957). A notable characteristic is the modified Penning geometry in the form of a hollow sputter electrode, coaxially positioned in a compact bottle-magnetic field along the central magnetic line of force. The interaction of the discharge geometry with the inhomogeneous but symmetrical magnetic field enables this device to be operated as hollow cathode discharge and Penning discharge as well. The main features of the ion source are the very high metal ion efficiency (up to 25%), good operational reproducibility, flexible and efficient operations for low charged as well as highly charged ions, compact setup, and easy maintenance. For light ions, e.g., up to titanium, well-collimated beams in the range of several tens of milliamperes of pulsed ion current (1 ms, 10/s) have been reliably performed in long time runs.

  14. Metal-Ion Additives Reduce Thermal Expansion Of Polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoakley, Diane M.; St. Clair, Anne K.; Emerson, Burt R., Jr.; Willis, George L.

    1994-01-01

    Polyimides widely used as high-performance polymers because of their excellent thermal stability and toughness. However, their coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE's) greater than those of metals, ceramics, and glasses. Decreasing CTE's of polyimides increase usefulness for aerospace and electronics applications in which dimensional stability required. Additives containing metal ions reduce coefficients of thermal expansion of polyimides. Reductions range from 11 to over 100 percent.

  15. Removal and recovery of toxic metal ions from aqueous waste sites using polymer pendant ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Fish, D.

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of this project is to investigate the use of polymer pendant ligand technology to remove and recover toxic metal ions from DOE aqueous waste sites. Polymer pendant lgiands are organic ligands, anchored to crosslinked, modified divinylbenzene-polystyrene beads, that can selectively complex metal ions. The metal ion removal step usually occurs through a complexation or ion exchange phenomena, thus recovery of the metal ions and reuse of the beads is readily accomplished.

  16. Metal ions and RNA folding: a highly charged topic with a dynamic future.

    PubMed

    Woodson, Sarah A

    2005-04-01

    Metal ions are required to stabilize RNA tertiary structure and to begin the folding process. How different metal ions enable RNAs to fold depends on the electrostatic potential of the RNA and correlated fluctuations in the positions of the ions themselves. Theoretical models, fluorescence spectroscopy, small angle scattering and structural biology reveal that metal ions alter the RNA dynamics and folding transition states. Specifically coordinated divalent metal ions mediate conformational rearrangements within ribozyme active sites.

  17. Heavy metal ions are potent inhibitors of protein folding

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Sandeep K.; Goloubinoff, Pierre; Christen, Philipp

    2008-07-25

    Environmental and occupational exposure to heavy metals such as cadmium, mercury and lead results in severe health hazards including prenatal and developmental defects. The deleterious effects of heavy metal ions have hitherto been attributed to their interactions with specific, particularly susceptible native proteins. Here, we report an as yet undescribed mode of heavy metal toxicity. Cd{sup 2+}, Hg{sup 2+} and Pb{sup 2+} proved to inhibit very efficiently the spontaneous refolding of chemically denatured proteins by forming high-affinity multidentate complexes with thiol and other functional groups (IC{sub 50} in the nanomolar range). With similar efficacy, the heavy metal ions inhibited the chaperone-assisted refolding of chemically denatured and heat-denatured proteins. Thus, the toxic effects of heavy metal ions may result as well from their interaction with the more readily accessible functional groups of proteins in nascent and other non-native form. The toxic scope of heavy metals seems to be substantially larger than assumed so far.

  18. How do energetic ions damage metallic surfaces?

    DOE PAGES

    Osetskiy, Yury N.; Calder, Andrew F.; Stoller, Roger E.

    2015-02-20

    Surface modification under bombardment by energetic ions observed under different conditions in structural and functional materials and can be either unavoidable effect of the conditions or targeted modification to enhance materials properties. Understanding basic mechanisms is necessary for predicting properties changes. The mechanisms activated during ion irradiation are of atomic scale and atomic scale modeling is the most suitable tool to study these processes. In this paper we present results of an extensive simulation program aimed at developing an understanding of primary surface damage in iron by energetic particles. We simulated 25 keV self-ion bombardment of Fe thin films withmore » (100) and (110) surfaces at room temperature. A large number of simulations, ~400, were carried out allow a statistically significant treatment of the results. The particular mechanism of surface damage depends on how the destructive supersonic shock wave generated by the displacement cascade interacts with the free surface. Three basic scenarios were observed, with the limiting cases being damage created far below the surface with little or no impact on the surface itself, and extensive direct surface damage on the timescale of a few picoseconds. In some instances, formation of large <100> vacancy loops beneath the free surface was observed, which may explain some earlier experimental observations.« less

  19. How do energetic ions damage metallic surfaces?

    SciTech Connect

    Osetskiy, Yury N.; Calder, Andrew F.; Stoller, Roger E.

    2015-02-20

    Surface modification under bombardment by energetic ions observed under different conditions in structural and functional materials and can be either unavoidable effect of the conditions or targeted modification to enhance materials properties. Understanding basic mechanisms is necessary for predicting properties changes. The mechanisms activated during ion irradiation are of atomic scale and atomic scale modeling is the most suitable tool to study these processes. In this paper we present results of an extensive simulation program aimed at developing an understanding of primary surface damage in iron by energetic particles. We simulated 25 keV self-ion bombardment of Fe thin films with (100) and (110) surfaces at room temperature. A large number of simulations, ~400, were carried out allow a statistically significant treatment of the results. The particular mechanism of surface damage depends on how the destructive supersonic shock wave generated by the displacement cascade interacts with the free surface. Three basic scenarios were observed, with the limiting cases being damage created far below the surface with little or no impact on the surface itself, and extensive direct surface damage on the timescale of a few picoseconds. In some instances, formation of large <100> vacancy loops beneath the free surface was observed, which may explain some earlier experimental observations.

  20. Adsorption characteristics of metal ions on chitosan chemically modified by D-galactose

    SciTech Connect

    Kondo, Kazuo; Sumi, Hisaharu; Matsumoto, Michiaki

    1996-07-01

    The adsorption characteristics of metal ions on chitosan chemically modified by D-galactose were examined. The pH dependency on the distribution ratio was found to be affected by the valency of the metal ion, and the apparent adsorption equilibrium constants of the metal ions were determined. The order of adsorption of the metal ions is Ga > In > Nd > Eu for the trivalent metal ions and Cu > Ni > Co for the divalent metal ions. It is believed that amino and hydroxyl groups in the chitosan act as a chelating ligand.

  1. Detection of singly ionized energetic lunar pick-up ions upstream of earth's bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilchenbach, M.; Hovestadt, D.; Klecker, B.; Moebius, E.

    1992-01-01

    Singly ionized suprathermal ions upstream of the earth's bow shock have been detected by using the time-of-flight spectrometer SULEICA on the AMPTE/IRM satellite. The data were collected between August and December 1985. The flux of the ions in the mass range between 23 and 37 amu is highly anisotropic towards the earth. The ions are observed with a period of about 29 days around new moon (+/- 3 days). The correlation of the energy of the ions with the solar wind speed and the interplanetary magnetic field orientation indicates the relation to the pick-up process. We conclude that the source of these pick-up ions is the moon. We argue that due to the impinging solar wind, atoms are sputtered off the lunar surface, ionized in the sputtering process or by ensuing photoionization and picked up by the solar wind.

  2. Metal ion bombardment of onion skin cell wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangyuenyongpipat, S.; Vilaithong, T.; Yu, L. D.; Verdaguer, A.; Ratera, I.; Ogletree, D. F.; Monteiro, O. R.; Brown, I. G.

    2005-01-01

    Ion bombardment of living cellular material is a novel subfield of ion beam surface modification that is receiving growing attention from the ion beam and biological communities. Although it has been demonstrated that the technique is sound, in that an adequate fraction of the living cells can survive both the vacuum environment and energetic ion bombardment, there remains much uncertainty about the process details. Here we report on our observations of onion skin cells that were subjected to ion implantation, and propose some possible physical models that tend to support the experimental results. The ion beams used were metallic (Mg, Ti, Fe, Ni, Cu), mean ion energy was typically 30 keV, and the implantation fluence was in the range 1014-1016 ions/cm2. The cells were viewed using Atomic Force Microscopy, revealing the formation of microcrater-like structures due to ion bombardment. The implantation depth profile was measured with Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and compared to the results of the TRIM, T-DYN and PROFILE computer codes.

  3. Metal ion bombardment of onion skin cell wall

    SciTech Connect

    Sangyuenyongpipat, S.; Vilaithong, T.; Yu, L.D.; Verdaguer, A.; Ratera, I.; Ogletree, D.F.; Monteiro, O.R.; Brown, I.G.

    2004-05-10

    Ion bombardment of living cellular material is a novel subfield of ion beam surface modification that is receiving growing attention from the ion beam and biological communities. Although it has been demonstrated that the technique is sound, in that an adequate fraction of the living cells can survive both the vacuum environment and energetic ion bombardment, there remains much uncertainty about the process details. Here we report on our observations of onion skin cells that were subjected to ion implantation, and propose some possible physical models that tend to support the experimental results. The ion beams used were metallic (Mg, Ti, Fe, Ni, Cu), mean ion energy was typically 30keV, and the implantation fluence was in the range 1014 1016 ions/cm2. The cells were viewed using Atomic Force Microscopy, revealing the formation of microcrater-like structures due to ion bombardment. The implantation depth profile was measured with Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and compared to the results of the TRIM, T-DYN and PROFILE computer codes.

  4. Current and prospective applications of metal ion-protein binding.

    PubMed

    Ueda, E K M; Gout, P W; Morganti, L

    2003-02-21

    Since immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography (IMAC) was first introduced, several variants of this method and many other metal affinity-based techniques have been devised. IMAC quickly established itself as a highly reliable purification procedure, showing rapid expansion in the number of preparative and analytical applications while not remaining confined to protein separation. It was soon applied to protein refolding (matrix-assisted refolding), evaluation of protein folding status, protein surface topography studies and biosensor development. In this review, applications in protein processing are described of IMAC as well as other metal affinity-based technologies.

  5. Uptake of Metal Ions by Rhizopus arrhizus Biomass

    PubMed Central

    Tobin, J. M.; Cooper, D. G.; Neufeld, R. J.

    1984-01-01

    Rhizopus arrhizus biomass was found to absorb a variety of different metal cations and anions but did not absorb alkali metal ions. The amount of uptake of the cations was directly related to ionic radii of La3+, Mn2+, Cu2+, Zn2+, Cd2+, Ba2+, Hg2+, Pb2+, UO22+, and Ag+. The uptake of all the cations is consistent with absorption of the metals by sites in the biomass containing phosphate, carboxylate, and other functional groups. The uptake of the molybdate and vanadate anions was strongly pH dependent, and it is proposed that the uptake mechanism involves electrostatic attraction to positively charged functional groups. PMID:16346521

  6. Global single ion effects within the Earth's plasma sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothwell, Paul L.; Yates, G. Kenneth

    Two global properties of single ion motion in the magnetotail are examined. The first effect is caused by the magnetic field in the plasma sheet directing boundary ions to the neutral sheet. Exact solutions to the Lorentz equation indicate that these ions can have sufficient energy to trigger the ion tearing mode if Bo/aBz > 6.0, where Bo is the tail lobe magnetic field, Bz is the magnetic field in the north-south direction and `a' is a parameter related to the growth of the ion tearing instability. It is found that this effect occurs at a lower energy for oxygen than for protons. The second global property is related to the thinning or expansion of the plasma sheet. The results indicate that in the absence of reconnection the plasma sheet adiabatically maintains equilibruim by allowing plasma and magnetic flux to cross the boundaries. The presence of reconnection modifies the flow across the boundaries as well as the spatial distribution of the induced electric field.

  7. Global single ion effects within the earth's plasma sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothwell, P. L.; Yates, G. K.

    Two global properties of single-ion motion in the magnetotail are examined. The first effect is caused by the magnetic field in the plasma sheet directing boundary ions to the neutral sheet. Exact solutions to the Lorentz equation indicate that these ions can have sufficient energy to trigger the ion tearing mode if B0/aBz is greater than 6.0, where B0 is the tail-lobe magnetic field, Bz is the magnetic field in the north-south direction, and a is a parameter related to the growth of the ion tearing instability. It is found that this effect occurs at a lower energy for oxygen than for protons. The second global property is related to the thinning or expansion of the plasma sheet. In the absence of reconnection, the plasma sheet adiabatically maintains equilibrium by allowing plasma and magnetic flux to cross the boundaries. The presence of reconnection modifies the flow across the boundaries as well as the spatial distribution of the induced electric field.

  8. Architectural design criteria for f-block metal ion sequestering agents. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, B.P.; Dixon, D.A.; Roundhill, D.M.; Rogers, R.D.; Paine, R.T.; Raymond, K.N.

    1998-12-31

    'The objective of this project is to provide a means to optimize ligand architecture for f-block metal recognition. The authors strategy builds on an innovative and successful molecular modeling approach in developing polyether ligand design criteria for the alkali and alkaline earth cations. The hypothesis underlying this proposal is that differences in metal ion binding with multidentate ligands bearing the same number and type of donor groups are primarily attributable to intramolecular steric factors. They propose quantifying these steric factors through the application of molecular mechanics models. The research involves close integration of theoretical and experimental chemistry. The experimental work entails synthesizing novel ligands and experimentally determining structures and binding constants for metal ion complexation by series of ligands in which architecture is systematically varied. The theoretical work entails using electronic structure calculations to parameterize a molecular mechanics force field for a range of metal ions and ligand types. The resulting molecular mechanics force field will be used to predict low energy structures for unidentate, bidentate, and multidentate ligands and their metal complexes through conformational searches. Results will be analyzed to assess the relative importance of several steric factors including optimal M-L length, optimal geometry at the metal center, optimal geometry at the donor atoms (complementarity), and conformation prior to binding (preorganization). An accurate set of criteria for the design of ligand architecture will be obtained from these results. These criteria will enable researchers to target ligand structures for synthesis and thereby dramatically reduce the time and cost associated with metal-specific ligand development.'

  9. Principles Governing Metal Ion Selectivity in Ion Channel Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Carmay

    2014-03-01

    Our research interests are to (i) unravel the principles governing biological processes and use them to identify novel drug targets and guide drug design, and (ii) develop new methods for studying macromolecular interactions. This talk will provide an overview of our work in these two areas and an example of how our studies have helped to unravel the principles underlying the conversion of Ca2+-selective to Na+-selective channels. Ion selectivity of four-domain voltage-gated Ca2+(Cav) and sodium (Nav) channels, which is controlled by the selectivity filter (SF, the narrowest region of an open pore), is crucial for electrical signaling. Over billions of years of evolution, mutation of the Glu from domain II/III in the EEEE/DEEA SF of Ca2+-selective Cav channels to Lys made these channels Na+-selective. This talk will delineate the physical principles why Lys is sufficient for Na+/Ca2+selectivity and why the DEKA SF is more Na+-selective than the DKEA one.

  10. Quadrupole ion trap studies of the structure and reactivity of transition metal ion pair complexes

    PubMed

    Vachet; Callahan

    2000-03-01

    Ion pairs are common species observed in the electrospray mass spectra of transition metal coordination complexes. To understand the nature of these ion pairs, a systematic study of the gas-phase chemistry of these species using ion-molecule reactions and collision-induced dissociation (CID) was carried out. Ion pair complexes of the type MLnX+ (where M is Mn(II), Fe(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) or Zn(II), L is 1,10-phenanthroline, 2,2'-bipyridine, ethylenediamine, diethylenetriamine or 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane and X is Cl-, NO3-, acetylacetonate, ClO4-, acetate or SCN-) were studied. Ion-molecule reactions can distinguish whether the counterion in an ion pair is an inner- or outer-sphere ligand and can determine the coordination mode of the counterion. In addition, CID and ion-molecule reactions reveal some interesting chemistry of these complexes and unique coordination modes for some of the anions studied here were inferred from the ion-molecule reactions. For example, the thiocyanate ion is found to coordinate in a bidentate fashion in Zn(II) and Ni(II) complexes, contrasting behavior typically observed in solution. Also, certain Co(II) and Fe(II) ion pair complexes undergo oxidation reactions in which species such as dioxygen and nitric oxide from the counterions ClO4- and NO3- are transferred to the Co(II) and Fe(II) complexes, showing the inherent affinity of these metals for these molecules. These complexes were also studied by ion-molecule reactions and CID. Dioxygen in complexes formed by CID is demonstrated to be bidentate, suggesting the formation of a peroxo ligand with concurrent oxidation of the metal.

  11. Host Materials for Transition-Metal Ions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-01

    BeA1204 (Chrysoberyl, Cr:BeA204 - Alexandrite ) ..................... 90 15.1 Crystallographic Data on BeA 204 ............................ 9 0 15.2 X...Chrysoberyl, Cr:BeA1 2 04 = Alexandrite ) 15.1 Crystallographic Data on BeA204 Orthorhombic D 16 (Pnma), 62, Z = 4 Orthorhomb__ D2h Ion Site Symmetry x...Stimulated Emission from Alexandrite (BeAl 1204 :Cr 3 +) Sov. J. Quantum Electron. 8 (1978), 671. 2. C. F. Cline, R. C. Morris, M. Dutoit, and P. J

  12. Precipitation of alkylbenzene sulfonates with metal ions

    SciTech Connect

    Peacock, J.M.; Matijevic, E.

    1980-10-01

    The precipitation domains of P-(1-methylnonyl)benzene sulfonate ions with Li/sup +/, Na/sup +/, K/sup +/, Ca/sup 2 +/, Mg/sup 2 +/, Al/sup 3 +/, and La/sup 3 +/ and of Ca/sup 2 +/-P-(hexyloctyl)benzene sulfonate have been determined at constant pH and 25 C. The linear solubility boundaries reverse their slope at the critical micellar concentration of the surfactant. A semiquantitative interpretation of the data is offered. The properties of the solids formed also are described. 18 references.

  13. Neutralization by metal ions of the toxicity of sodium selenide.

    PubMed

    Dauplais, Marc; Lazard, Myriam; Blanquet, Sylvain; Plateau, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Inert metal-selenide colloids are found in animals. They are believed to afford cross-protection against the toxicities of both metals and selenocompounds. Here, the toxicities of metal salt and sodium selenide mixtures were systematically studied using the death rate of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells as an indicator. In parallel, the abilities of these mixtures to produce colloids were assessed. Studied metal cations could be classified in three groups: (i) metal ions that protect cells against selenium toxicity and form insoluble colloids with selenide (Ag⁺, Cd²⁺, Cu²⁺, Hg²⁺, Pb²⁺ and Zn²⁺), (ii) metal ions which protect cells by producing insoluble metal-selenide complexes and by catalyzing hydrogen selenide oxidation in the presence of dioxygen (Co²⁺ and Ni²⁺) and, finally, (iii) metal ions which do not afford protection and do not interact (Ca²⁺, Mg²⁺, Mn²⁺) or weakly interact (Fe²⁺) with selenide under the assayed conditions. When occurring, the insoluble complexes formed from divalent metal ions and selenide contained equimolar amounts of metal and selenium atoms. With the monovalent silver ion, the complex contained two silver atoms per selenium atom. Next, because selenides are compounds prone to oxidation, the stabilities of the above colloids were evaluated under oxidizing conditions. 5,5'-dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid) (DTNB), the reduction of which can be optically followed, was used to promote selenide oxidation. Complexes with cadmium, copper, lead, mercury or silver resisted dissolution by DTNB treatment over several hours. With nickel and cobalt, partial oxidation by DTNB occurred. On the other hand, when starting from ZnSe or FeSe complexes, full decompositions were obtained within a few tens of minutes. The above properties possibly explain why ZnSe and FeSe nanoparticles were not detected in animals exposed to selenocompounds.

  14. Electropositive bivalent metallic ion unsaturated polyester complexed polymer concrete

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, T.; Kukacka, L.E.; Horn, W.H.

    1981-11-04

    Quick setting polymer concrete compositions which are mixtures of unsaturated polyesters and crosslinking monomers together with appropriate initiators and promoters in association with aggregate which may be wet and a source of bivalent metallic ions which will set to polymer concrete with excellent structural properties.

  15. Electropositive bivalent metallic ion unsaturated polyester complexed polymer concrete

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, T.; Kukacka, L.E.; Horn, W.H.

    1983-05-13

    Quick setting polymer concrete compositions are described which are mixtures of unsaturated polyesters and crosslinking monomers together with appropriate initiators and promoters in association with aggregate which may be wet and a source of bivalent metallic ions which will set to polymer concrete with excellent structural properties.

  16. Electropositive bivalent metallic ion unsaturated polyester complexed polymer concrete

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, Toshifumi; Kukacka, Lawrence E.; Horn, William H.

    1985-01-01

    Quick setting polymer concrete compositions with excellent structural properties are disclosed; these polymer concrete compositions are mixtures of unsaturated polyesters and crosslinking monomers together with appropriate initiators and promoters in association with aggregate, which may be wet, and with a source of bivalent metallic ions.

  17. Energization of Ions in near-Earth current sheet disruptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taktakishvili, A.; Lopez, R. E.; Goodrich, C. C.

    1995-01-01

    In this study we examine observations made by AMPTE/CCE of energetic ion bursts during seven substorm periods when the satellite was located near the neutral sheet, and CCE observed the disruption cross-tail current in situ. We compare ion observations to analytic calculations of particle acceleration. We find that the acceleration region size, which we assume to be essentially the current disruption region, to be on the order of 1 R(sub E). Events exhibiting weak acceleration had either relatively small acceleration regions (apparently associated with pseudobreakup activity on the ground) or relatively small changes in the local magnetic field (suggesting that the magnitude of the local current disruption region was limited). These results add additional support for the view that the particle bursts observed during turbulent current sheet disruptions are due to inductive acceleration of ions.

  18. Broad-beam, high current, metal ion implantation facility

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, I.G.; Dickinson, M.R.; Galvin, J.E.; Godechot, X.; MacGill, R.A.

    1990-07-01

    We have developed a high current metal ion implantation facility with which high current beams of virtually all the solid metals of the Periodic Table can be produced. The facility makes use of a metal vapor vacuum arc ion source which is operated in a pulsed mode, with pulse width 0.25 ms and repetition rate up to 100 pps. Beam extraction voltage is up to 100 kV, corresponding to an ion energy of up to several hundred keV because of the ion charge state multiplicity; beam current is up to several Amperes peak and around 10 mA time averaged delivered onto target. Implantation is done in a broad-beam mode, with a direct line-of-sight from ion source to target. Here we describe the facility and some of the implants that have been carried out using it, including the seeding' of silicon wafers prior to CVD with titanium, palladium or tungsten, the formation of buried iridium silicide layers, and actinide (uranium and thorium) doping of III-V compounds. 16 refs., 6 figs.

  19. Relativistic Effect on Multiplet Terms of Rare Earth Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Shinichi; Saito, Riichiro; Kimura, Tadamasa; Yabushita, Satoshi

    1994-02-01

    Ab initio Spin-Orbit Configuration Interaction (SOCI) calculations for the trivalent lanthanide group ions are presented for the special purpose to investigate the relativistic SO effects on their multiplet terms. The effective nuclear charges (Z eff's) for one-body spin-orbit Hamiltonian are calculated by an atomic Dirac-Slater Xα equation and applied to the lanthanide ions. The relativistic effects of core electrons can easily be included in the reduction of Z eff and the multiplet levels shift up to 200 cm-1 by the reduction. The multiplet energies obtained by the present method are in good agreement with experimental values.

  20. Magnetic Exchange Interaction between Rare-Earth and Mn Ions in Multiferroic Hexagonal Manganites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talbayev, D.; Laforge, A. D.; Trugman, S. A.; Hur, N.; Taylor, A. J.; Averitt, R. D.; Basov, D. N.

    2008-12-01

    We report a study of magnetic dynamics in multiferroic hexagonal manganite HoMnO3 by far-infrared spectroscopy. The low-temperature magnetic excitation spectrum of HoMnO3 consists of magnetic-dipole transitions of Ho ions within the crystal-field split J=8 manifold and of the triangular antiferromagnetic resonance of Mn ions. We determine the effective spin Hamiltonian for the Ho ion ground state. The magnetic-field splitting of the Mn antiferromagnetic resonance allows us to measure the magnetic exchange coupling between the rare-earth and Mn ions.

  1. Charge state distribution of anomalous oxygen ions in low Earth orbit during solar quiescence.

    PubMed

    Marenny, A M; Guertzen, G P; Nymmik, R A

    1990-01-01

    A new method of evaluating the charge state distribution of cosmic ray heavy ions, using a measured ratio of particle fluxes observed in two different satellite orbits passing through the Earth's magnetosphere, is described. The measurements of heavy ions were performed simultaneously on the Cosmos 1882 (orbital inclination 82 degrees) and Cosmos 1887 (inclination 62.3 degrees) satellites during September-October 1987. Solid state nuclear track detector stacks were used for the registration of C, N, O and heavier ions. After comparing the data of the two experiments with theoretical calculations, the charge state of galactic and anomalous heavy ions was derived.

  2. Magnetic exchange interaction between rare-earth and Mn ions in multiferroic hexagonal manganites

    SciTech Connect

    Talbayev, Diyar; Trugman, Stuart A; Taylor, Antoinette J; Averitt, Richard D; Namjung, Hur; Andrew, Laforge D; Dimitri, Basov N

    2008-01-01

    The authors report a study of magnetic dynamics in multiferroic hexagonal manganite HoMnO{sub 3} by far-infrared spectroscopy. Low-temperature magnetic excitation spectrum of HoMnO{sub 3} consists of magnetic-dipole transitions of Ho ions within the crystal-field split J = 8 manifold and of the triangular antiferromagnetic resonance of Mn ions. They determine the effective spin Hamiltonian for the Ho ion ground state. The magnetic-field splitting of the Mn antiferromagnetic resonance allows us to measure the magnetic exchange coupling between the rare-earth and Mn ions.

  3. Soda-fuel metallurgy: Metal ions for carbon neutral CO2 and H2O reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neelameggham, Neale R.

    2009-04-01

    The role of minerals in biomass formation is understood only to a limited extent. When the term “photosynthesis—CO2 and H2O reduction of sugars, using solar energy”—is used, one normally thinks of chlorophyll as a compound containing magnesium. Alkali and alkaline earth metals present in leaf cells in the form of ions are equally essential in this solar energy bioconversion coupled with nitrogen fixation. Application of some of these principles can lead to artificial carbon-neutral processes on an industrial scale close to the concentrated CO2 emission sources.

  4. Investigation of metal ion accumulation in Euglena gracilis by fluorescence methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, H.; Ren, Q. G.; Mi, Y.; Shi, X. F.; Yao, H. Y.; Jin, C. Z.; Huang, Y. Y.; He, W.; Zhang, J.; Liu, B.

    2002-04-01

    Single cell synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (SXRF) microprobe measurements as well as X-ray absorption near edge structure experiments have been done at Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility on Euglena Gracilis cells. Concentrations of the metal ions Mn 2+, Nd 3+, Ce 3+ and other trace elements, such as Ca, Fe, Zn, etc. have been measured both by single cell SXRF and bulk PIXE technique. It was found that the content of Ca, Fe and Zn was lower after the uptake of rare earths or Mn by the cells, while the valence states of Mn 2+, Ce 3+ and Nd 3+ were unaltered. The results related to cytochemistry are also discussed.

  5. Selective quenching of benzimidazole derivatives by Cu2+ metal ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayabharathi, J.; Thanikachalam, V.; Jayamoorthy, K.; Sathishkumar, R.

    2012-11-01

    It is a very big challenge to develop a Cu2+ selective fluorescent sensor with the ability to exclude the interference of some metal ions such as Fe3+, Mg2+, Ag+, K+ and Na+. Herein, we report a fluorescence quenching of some benzimidazole derivatives (1-6) with Cu2+ metal ion. These benzimidazole derivatives have been shown to bind copper ions resulting in quenching of its fluorescence. The response to Cu2+ is rapid, selective and reversible upon addition of a copper chelator. These benzimidazole derivatives were characterized by 1H, 13C NMR mass and elemental analysis. XRD analysis was carried out for 1-(4-methylbenzyl)-2-p-tolyl-1H-benzo[d]imidazole.

  6. [Spectroscopic studies on transition metal ions in colored diamonds].

    PubMed

    Meng, Yu-Fei; Peng, Ming-Sheng

    2004-07-01

    Transition metals like nickel, cobalt and iron have been often used as solvent catalysts in high pressure high temperature (HPHT) synthesis of diamond, and nickel and cobalt ions have been found in diamond lattice. Available studies indicated that nickel and cobalt ions could enter the lattice as interstitial or substitutional impurities and form complexes with nitrogen. Polarized microscopy, SEM-EDS, EPR, PL and FTIR have been used in this study to investigate six fancy color natural and synthetic diamonds in order to determine the spectroscopic characteristics and the existing forms of transition metal ions in colored diamond lattice. Cobalt-related optical centers were first found in natural chameleon diamonds, and some new nickel and cobalt-related optical and EPR centers have also been detected in these diamond samples.

  7. Liquid metal ion source and alloy for ion emission of multiple ionic species

    DOEpatents

    Clark, Jr., William M.; Utlaut, Mark W.; Wysocki, Joseph A.; Storms, Edmund K.; Szklarz, Eugene G.; Behrens, Robert G.; Swanson, Lynwood W.; Bell, Anthony E.

    1987-06-02

    A liquid metal ion source and alloy for the simultaneous ion evaporation of arsenic and boron, arsenic and phosphorus, or arsenic, boron and phosphorus. The ionic species to be evaporated are contained in palladium-arsenic-boron and palladium-arsenic-boron-phosphorus alloys. The ion source, including an emitter means such as a needle emitter and a source means such as U-shaped heater element, is preferably constructed of rhenium and tungsten, both of which are readily fabricated. The ion sources emit continuous beams of ions having sufficiently high currents of the desired species to be useful in ion implantation of semiconductor wafers for preparing integrated circuit devices. The sources are stable in operation, experience little corrosion during operation, and have long operating lifetimes.

  8. Metal negative ion beam extraction from a radio frequency ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Kanda, S.; Yamada, N.; Kasuya, T.; Romero, C. F. P.; Wada, M.

    2015-04-08

    A metal ion source of magnetron magnetic field geometry has been designed and operated with a Cu hollow target. Radio frequency power at 13.56 MHz is directly supplied to the hollow target to maintain plasma discharge and induce self-bias to the target for sputtering. The extraction of positive and negative Cu ion beams have been tested. The ion beam current ratio of Cu{sup +} to Ar{sup +} has reached up to 140% when Ar was used as the discharge support gas. Cu{sup −} ion beam was observed at 50 W RF discharge power and at a higher Ar gas pressure in the ion source. Improvement of poor RF power matching and suppression of electron current is indispensable for a stable Cu{sup −} ion beam production from the source.

  9. Thermodynamic stability of perovskites and related compounds in some alkaline earth-transition metal-oxygen systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokokawa, Harumi; Sakai, Natsuko; Kawada, Tatsuya; Dokiya, Masayuki

    1991-09-01

    The thermodynamic properties of some alkaline earth ( A)-transition metal ( M) perovskites and K 2NiF 4 compounds have been collected, analyzed, and utilized to examine their stabilities by constructing the chemical potential diagrams of a log [ {a(A)}/{a(M)}] vs log P(O 2) plot. A thermodynamic analysis was performed on the dissociation reaction of K 2NiF 4 compounds ( A2MO 4) into perovskites ( AMO 3) and alkaline earth oxides ( AO) using empirical correlations between stabilization energy and tolerance factor. It has been found that the softness of calcium ions, which shrink markedly with decreasing coordination number from 12 to 9, makes the calcium K 2NiF 4 compounds (Ca 2MO 4) relatively less stable with increasing radius of the transition metal ions, r( M4+). This destabilization related to the coordination-number-dependent radii implies that when compared with the strontium perovskites, the calcium analogous perovskites may have a smaller number of oxygen vacancies, because the formation of oxygen vacancies should be accompanied with a decrease in coordination number of A-site ions.

  10. Heavy water reactions with alkaline-earth metal dications in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feil, Stefan; Koyanagi, Greg K.; Bohme, Diethard K.

    2009-02-01

    Room temperature rate coefficients and product distributions are reported for the reactions initiated in D2O with dications of the alkaline-earth metals Mg, Ca, Sr and Ba. The measurements were performed with a selected-ion flow tube (SIFT) tandem mass spectrometer and electrospray ionization (ESI). Mg2+ reacts with water by a fast electron transfer leading to charge separation with a rate coefficient of 1.4 × 10-9 cm3 molecule-1 s-1. Ca2+ reacts with D2O in a first step to form the adduct Ca2+(D2O), with an effective bimolecular rate coefficient of 2.3 × 10-11 cm3 molecule-1 s-1, which then undergoes rapid charge separation by deuteron transfer to form CaOD+ and D3O+ in a second step with k = 7.9 × 10-10 cm3 molecule-1 s-1. The CaOD+ ion reacts further by clustering up to five more D2O molecules. Sr2+ clusters up to eight D2O molecules and Ba2+ up to seven D2O molecules, with the first addition of D2O being rate determining in each case and the last addition being distinctly slower, as might be expected from a transition in the occupation of the added water molecules from an inner to an outer hydration shell.

  11. Stable alkali metal ion intercalation compounds as optimized metal oxide nanowire cathodes for lithium batteries.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yunlong; Han, Chunhua; Yang, Junwei; Su, Jie; Xu, Xiaoming; Li, Shuo; Xu, Lin; Fang, Ruopian; Jiang, Hong; Zou, Xiaodong; Song, Bo; Mai, Liqiang; Zhang, Qingjie

    2015-03-11

    Intercalation of ions in electrode materials has been explored to improve the rate capability in lithium batteries and supercapacitors, due to the enhanced diffusion of Li(+) or electrolyte cations. Here, we describe a synergistic effect between crystal structure and intercalated ion by experimental characterization and ab initio calculations, based on more than 20 nanomaterials: five typical cathode materials together with their alkali metal ion intercalation compounds A-M-O (A = Li, Na, K, Rb; M = V, Mo, Co, Mn, Fe-P). Our focus on nanowires is motivated by general enhancements afforded by nanoscale structures that better sustain lattice distortions associated with charge/discharge cycles. We show that preintercalation of alkali metal ions in V-O and Mo-O yields substantial improvement in the Li ion charge/discharge cycling and rate, compared to A-Co-O, A-Mn-O, and A-Fe-P-O. Diffraction and modeling studies reveal that preintercalation with K and Rb ions yields a more stable interlayer expansion, which prevents destructive collapse of layers and allow Li ions to diffuse more freely. This study demonstrates that appropriate alkali metal ion intercalation in admissible structure can overcome the limitation of cyclability as well as rate capability of cathode materials, besides, the preintercalation strategy provides an effective method to enlarge diffusion channel at the technical level, and more generally, it suggests that the optimized design of stable intercalation compounds could lead to substantial improvements for applications in energy storage.

  12. Method for removing metal ions from solution with titanate sorbents

    DOEpatents

    Lundquist, Susan H.; White, Lloyd R.

    1999-01-01

    A method for removing metal ions from solution comprises the steps of providing titanate particles by spray-drying a solution or slurry comprising sorbent titanates having a particle size up to 20 micrometers, optionally in the presence of polymer free of cellulose functionality as binder, said sorbent being active towards heavy metals from Periodic Table (CAS version) Groups IA, IIA, IB, IIB, IIIB, and VIII, to provide monodisperse, substantially spherical particles in a yield of at least 70 percent of theoretical yield and having a particle size distribution in the range of 1 to 500 micrometers. The particles can be used free flowing in columns or beds, or entrapped in a nonwoven, fibrous web or matrix or a cast porous membrane, to selectively remove metal ions from aqueous or organic liquid.

  13. Process optimization and kinetics for leaching of rare earth metals from the spent Ni-metal hydride batteries.

    PubMed

    Meshram, Pratima; Pandey, B D; Mankhand, T R

    2016-05-01

    Nickel-metal hydride batteries (Ni-MH) contain not only the base metals, but valuable rare earth metals (REMs) viz. La, Sm, Nd, Pr and Ce as well. In view of the importance of resource recycling and assured supply of the contained metals in such wastes, the present study has focussed on the leaching of the rare earth metals from the spent Ni-MH batteries. The conditions for the leaching of REMs from the spent batteries were optimized as: 2M H2SO4, 348K temperature and 120min of time at a pulp density (PD) of 100g/L. Under this condition, the leaching of 98.1% Nd, 98.4% Sm, 95.5% Pr and 89.4% Ce was achieved. Besides the rare earth metals, more than 90% of base metals (Ni, Co, Mn and Zn) were also leached out in this condition. Kinetic data for the dissolution of all the rare earth metals showed the best fit to the chemical control shrinking core model. The leaching of metals followed the mechanism involving the chemical reaction proceeding on the surface of particles by the lixiviant, which was corroborated by the XRD phase analysis and SEM-EDS studies. The activation energy of 7.6, 6.3, 11.3 and 13.5kJ/mol was acquired for the leaching of neodymium, samarium, praseodymium and cerium, respectively in the temperature range 305-348K. From the leach liquor, the mixed rare earth metals were precipitated at pH∼1.8 and the precipitated REMs was analyzed by XRD and SEM studies to determine the phases and the morphological features.

  14. Novel luminescent hybrids by incorporating rare earth β-diketonates into polymers through ion pairing with an imidazolium counter ion.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiu-Ping; Yan, Bing

    2013-09-01

    A series of luminescent polymers are synthesized by incorporating rare earth complex units into polymer matrices. Firstly, we functionalize the selected polymer matrices with the imidazolium moieties, and then introduce the rare earth tetrakis(β-diketonate) complexes into polymer matrices through a mild anion exchange method. The resulting materials are characterized by FTIR, XRD, EDAX, SEM, thermogravimetric analysis, luminescence excitation spectra and emission spectra, luminescence lifetime measurements and diffuse reflectance UV-Vis spectra. The photoluminescence measurements indicate that all these rare earth complex functionalized polymers exhibit a characteristic luminescence emission originating from the corresponding rare earth ions. Among the hybrids, the europium tetrakis(TTA) complex functionalized polymers show remarkable luminescence quantum yields and relatively long (5)D0 lifetimes at room temperature.

  15. Chitosan removes toxic heavy metal ions from cigarette mainstream smoke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wen; Xu, Ying; Wang, Dongfeng; Zhou, Shilu

    2013-09-01

    This study investigated the removal of heavy metal ions from cigarette mainstream smoke using chitosan. Chitosan of various deacetylation degrees and molecular weights were manually added to cigarette filters in different dosages. The mainstream smoke particulate matter was collected by a Cambridge filter pad, digested by a microwave digestor, and then analyzed for contents of heavy metal ions, including As(III/V), Pb(II), Cd(II), Cr(III/VI) and Ni(II), by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). The results showed that chitosan had a removal effect on Pb(II), Cd(II), Cr(III/VI) and Ni(II). Of these, the percent removal of Ni(II) was elevated with an increasing dosage of chitosan. Chitosan of a high deace tylation degree exhibited good binding performance toward Cd(II), Cr(III/VI) and Ni(II), though with poor efficiency for Pb(II). Except As(III/V), all the tested metal ions showed similar tendencies in the growing contents with an increasing chitosan molecular weight. Nonetheless, the percent removal of Cr(III/VI) peaked with a chitosan molecular weight of 200 kDa, followed by a dramatic decrease with an increasing chitosan molecular weight. Generally, chitosan had different removal effects on four out of five tested metal ions, and the percent removal of Cd(II), Pb(II), Cr(III/VI) and Ni(II) was approximately 55%, 45%, 50%, and 16%, respectively. In a word, chitosan used in cigarette filter can remove toxic heavy metal ions in the mainstream smoke, improve cigarette safety, and reduce the harm to smokers.

  16. Metal ion influence on eumelanin fluorescence and structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutter, Jens-Uwe; Birch, David J. S.

    2014-06-01

    Melanin has long been thought to have an unworkably weak and complex fluorescence, but here we study its intrinsic fluorescence in order to demonstrate how metal ions can be used to control the rate of formation, constituents and structure of eumelanin formed from the well-known laboratory auto-oxidation of 3,4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine (L-DOPA). The effect on eumelanin absorption and fluorescence of a range of solvated metal ions is reported including Cu, Zn, Ni, Na and K. Monovalent cations and Zn have little effect, but the effect of transition metal cations can be considerable. For example, at pH 10, copper ions are shown to accelerate the onset of eumelanin formation, but not the rate of formation once it commences, and simplify the usual complex structure and intrinsic fluorescence of eumelanin in a way that is consistent with an increased abundance of 5,5-dihydroxyindole-2-carboxylic acid (DHICA). The presence of a dominant 6 ns fluorescence decay time at 480 nm, when excited at 450 nm describes a distinct photophysical species, which we tentatively assign to small oligomers. Copper is well-known to normally quench fluorescence, but increasing amounts of copper surprisingly leads to an increase in the fluorescence decay time of eumelanin, while reducing the fluorescence intensity, suggesting copper modification of the excited state. Such results have bearing on diverse areas. The most accepted morphology for melanin is that of a graphite-like sheet structure, and one which readily binds metal ions, an interaction that is thought to have an important, though as yet unclear bearing on several areas of medicine including neurology. There is also increasing interest in bio-mimicry by preparing and labelling sheet structures with metal ions for new electronic and photonic materials.

  17. Ion beam sputter-deposited thin film coatings for protection of spacecraft polymers in low Earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, B. A.; Mirtich, M. J.; Rutledge, S. K.; Swec, D. M.; Nahra, H. K.

    1985-01-01

    Ion beam sputter-deposited thin films of Al2O3, SiO2, and a codeposited mixture of predominantly SiO2 with small amounts of a fluoropolymer were evaluated both in laboratory plasma ashing tests and in space on board shuttle flight STS-8 for effectiveness in preventing oxidation of polyimide Kapton. Measurements of mass loss and optical performance of coated and uncoated polyimide samples exposed to the low Earth orbital environment are presented. Optical techniques were used to measure loss rates of protective films exposed to atomic oxygen. Results of the analysis of the space flight exposed samples indicate that thin film metal oxide coatings are very effective in protecting the polyimide. Metal oxide coatings with a small amount of fluoropolymer codeposited have the additional benefit of great flexibility.

  18. Ion beam sputter-deposited thin film coatings for protection of spacecraft polymers in low earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, B. A.; Mirtich, M. J.; Rutledge, S. K.; Swec, D. M.; Nahra, H. K.

    1985-01-01

    Ion beam sputter-deposited thin films at Al2O3, SiO2, and a codeposited mixture of predominantly SiO2 with small amounts of fluoropolymer were evaluated both in laboratory plasma ashing tests and in space on board Shuttle flight STS-8 for effectiveness in preventing oxidation of polyimide Kapton. Measurements of mass loss and optical performance of coated and uncoated polyimide samples exposed to the low earth orbital environment are presented. Optical techniques were used to measure loss rates of protective films exposed to atomic oxygen. Results of the analysis of the space flight exposed samples indicate that thin film metal oxide coatings are very effective in protecting the polyimide. Metal oxide coatings with a small amount of fluoropolymer codeposited have the additional benefit of great flexibility.

  19. Transport toward earth of ions sputtered from the moon's surface by the solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cladis, J. B.; Francis, W. E.; Vondrak, R. R.

    1994-01-01

    The transport of typical ions from the surface of the Moon to the vicinity of Earth was calculated using a test particle approach. It was assumed that the ions were sputtered from the surface by the solar wind, with fluxes in the range determined experimentally by Elphic et al. (1991), and were accelerated initially to 10 eV by the potential of the Moon on its sunlit side. Si(+) and Ca(+) ions were selected for this transport analysis because their masses are within two prominent ion mass groups that have high sputtering yields. In the solar wind the ion trajectories were traced in the following superimposed fields: (1) a steady magnetic field B0 at an angle of 45 deg to the solar wind velocity VSW, (2) the motional electric field Ezero = -V(sub SW x B0, and (3) turbulent magnetic and electric fields generated by hydromagnetic waves with a k-space power spectrum of absolute value of k-5/3 propagating along both directions of the magnetic field B0. Interactions with Earth's bow shock and magnetosphere were included. Case histories of the ions were recorded in the XGSM, YGSM plane and in various planes perpendicular to the E0 x B0 drift direction of the ions between the Moon and Earth. The number density, energy and angular distributions, and directional and omnidirectional fluxes of the ions were constructed from the case histories. It was found that the diffusion of the ions increases rapidly as the amplitude of the turbulence delta Brms increases beyond the value 0.04 B0. Recent measurements of lunar ions upstream of the bow shock by Hilchenbach et al. (1992) generally confirm the predicted behavior of the ions.

  20. ‘Pseudotumour’ invading the proximal femur with normal metal ions following metal on metal hip resurfacing

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Harry; Sugand, Kapil; Ali, Ibrahim; Smith, Jay

    2015-01-01

    A 75-year-old woman who had undergone hybrid metal-on-metal hip resurfacing 8 years earlier underwent revision arthroplasty because of hip, groin and lateral thigh pain. The main differential was aseptic loosening; however, serum cobalt and chromium levels were normal. Multiple imaging modalities revealed a periprosthetic, cystic soft tissue mass adjacent to the proximal femur. A large ‘pseudotumour’ with proximal femoral invasion was found at revision arthroplasty. We report the first finding of a ‘pseudotumour’ invading the proximal femur with normal metal ions following metal on metal hip resurfacing. PMID:25670783

  1. Solution NMR refinement of a metal ion bound protein using metal ion inclusive restrained molecular dynamics methods.

    PubMed

    Chakravorty, Dhruva K; Wang, Bing; Lee, Chul Won; Guerra, Alfredo J; Giedroc, David P; Merz, Kenneth M

    2013-06-01

    Correctly calculating the structure of metal coordination sites in a protein during the process of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structure determination and refinement continues to be a challenging task. In this study, we present an accurate and convenient means by which to include metal ions in the NMR structure determination process using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations constrained by NMR-derived data to obtain a realistic and physically viable description of the metal binding site(s). This method provides the framework to accurately portray the metal ions and its binding residues in a pseudo-bond or dummy-cation like approach, and is validated by quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) MD calculations constrained by NMR-derived data. To illustrate this approach, we refine the zinc coordination complex structure of the zinc sensing transcriptional repressor protein Staphylococcus aureus CzrA, generating over 130 ns of MD and QM/MM MD NMR-data compliant sampling. In addition to refining the first coordination shell structure of the Zn(II) ion, this protocol benefits from being performed in a periodically replicated solvation environment including long-range electrostatics. We determine that unrestrained (not based on NMR data) MD simulations correlated to the NMR data in a time-averaged ensemble. The accurate solution structure ensemble of the metal-bound protein accurately describes the role of conformational sampling in allosteric regulation of DNA binding by zinc and serves to validate our previous unrestrained MD simulations of CzrA. This methodology has potentially broad applicability in the structure determination of metal ion bound proteins, protein folding and metal template protein-design studies.

  2. Rare-Earth Metals and Their Applications in Aviation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-08-01

    promethium , samarium, europium, gadolinium, terbium, dysprosium, holmium, erbium, thulium, ytterbium, lutetium, scandium and yttrium. Based on the...yttrium. Aside from these, promethium is an artifical element, it has radioactivity and is almost non-existent in the earth’s crust. The term "rate-earth

  3. [Rare-earth metals as a factor in mutagenicity].

    PubMed

    Solovykh, G N; Golinskaia, L V; Kanunikova, E A

    2012-01-01

    Both the regions of the Orenburg Region area and individual examined streams and reservoirs were shown to be characterized by a varying load index for rare earth elements. The total level of rare earth elements was directly correlated with different types of mutations.

  4. Spectroscopic in situ examination of interactions of rare earth ions with humic substances.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yao; Fabbricino, Massimiliano; Benedetti, Marc F; Korshin, Gregory V

    2015-01-01

    This study utilized the methods of fluorescence quenching and differential absorbance to probe in situ the extent and the nature of the interactions between rare earth ions (REIs) and humic substances. Experiments were conducted with the standard Suwannee river humic acid (SRHA) in the presence of varying amount of lanthanum, europium and terbium. The data of differential absorbance showed that the mechanism of SRHA-metal complexation was largely the same for all the examined REIs. In all cases several discrete bands whose properties were discerned via numerical decomposition of the differential spectra absorbance were observed. Their nature was examined based on the comparison of the experimental data and those of NICA-Donnan modeling carried out for Eu³⁺. The observed effects suggested that the changes of SRHA absorbance induced by REIs binding are likely to be caused by a bathochromic shift of the absorbance bands associated with such chromophores. The intensity of the Gaussian band with a maximum at 387 nm was observed to be proportional to the total concentration of SRHA-bound REIs. The data obtained in this study demonstrate the existence of complex yet quantifiable changes of the spectroscopic properties of humic species in the presence of REIs and their utility to quantify modes of interactions in such systems.

  5. Process for preparing higher oxides of the alkali and alkaline earth metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadhukhan, P.; Bell, A. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    High purity inorganic higher oxides of the alkali and alkaline earth metals are prepared by subjecting the hydroxide of the alkali and alkaline earth metal to a radio frequency discharge sustained in oxygen. The process is particulary adaptable to the production of high purity potassium superoxide by subjecting potassium hydroxide to glow discharge sustained in oxygen under the pressure of about 0.75 to 1.00 torr.

  6. Production yield of rare-earth ions implanted into an optical crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Kornher, Thomas Xia, Kangwei; Kolesov, Roman; Reuter, Rolf; Villa, Bruno; Wrachtrup, Jörg; Kukharchyk, Nadezhda; Wieck, Andreas D.; Siyushev, Petr; Stöhr, Rainer; Schreck, Matthias; Becker, Hans-Werner

    2016-02-01

    Rare-earth (RE) ions doped into desired locations of optical crystals might enable a range of novel integrated photonic devices for quantum applications. With this aim, we have investigated the production yield of cerium and praseodymium by means of ion implantation. As a measure, the collected fluorescence intensity from both implanted samples and single centers was used. With a tailored annealing procedure for cerium, a yield up to 53% was estimated. Praseodymium yield amounts up to 91%. Such high implantation yield indicates a feasibility of creation of nanopatterned rare-earth doping and suggests strong potential of RE species for on-chip photonic devices.

  7. Development of a four-zone carousel process packed with metal ion-imprinted polymer for continuous separation of copper ions from manganese ions, cobalt ions, and the constituent metal ions of the buffer solution used as eluent.

    PubMed

    Jo, Se-Hee; Park, Chanhun; Yi, Sung Chul; Kim, Dukjoon; Mun, Sungyong

    2011-08-19

    A three-zone carousel process, in which Cu(II)-imprinted polymer (Cu-MIP) and a buffer solution were employed as adsorbent and eluent respectively, has been developed previously for continuous separation of Cu²⁺ (product) from Mn²⁺ and Co²⁺ (impurities). Although this process was reported to be successful in the aforementioned separation task, the way of using a buffer solution as eluent made it inevitable that the product stream included the buffer-related metal ions (i.e., the constituent metal ions of the buffer solution) as well as copper ions. For a more perfect recovery of copper ions, it would be necessary to improve the previous carousel process such that it can remove the buffer-related metal ions from copper ions while maintaining the previous function of separating copper ions from the other 2 impure heavy-metal ions. This improvement was made in this study by proposing a four-zone carousel process based on the following strategy: (1) the addition of one more zone for performing the two-step re-equilibration tasks and (2) the use of water as the eluent of the washing step in the separation zone. The operating conditions of such a proposed process were determined on the basis of the data from a series of single-column experiments. Under the determined operating conditions, 3 runs of carousel experiments were carried out. The results of these experiments revealed that the feed-loading time was a key parameter affecting the performance of the proposed process. Consequently, the continuous separation of copper ions from both the impure heavy-metal ions and the buffer-related metal ions could be achieved with a purity of 91.9% and a yield of 92.8% by using the proposed carousel process based on a properly chosen feed-loading time.

  8. The recent development of efficient Earth-abundant transition-metal nanocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong; Astruc, Didier

    2017-02-06

    Whereas noble metal compounds have long been central in catalysis, Earth-abundant metal-based catalysts have in the same time remained undeveloped. Yet the efficacy of Earth-abundant metal catalysts was already shown at the very beginning of the 20th century with the Fe-catalyzed Haber-Bosch process of ammonia synthesis and later in the Fischer-Tropsch reaction. Nanoscience has revolutionized the world of catalysis since it was observed that very small Au nanoparticles (NPs) and other noble metal NPs are extraordinarily efficient. Therefore the development of Earth-abundant metals NPs is more recent, but it has appeared necessary due to their "greenness". This review highlights catalysis by NPs of Earth-abundant transition metals that include Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, early transition metals (Ti, V, Cr, Zr, Nb and W) and their nanocomposites with emphasis on basic principles and literature reported during the last 5 years. A very large spectrum of catalytic reactions has been successfully disclosed, and catalysis has been examined for each metal starting with zero-valent metal NPs followed by oxides and other nanocomposites. The last section highlights the catalytic activities of bi- and trimetallic NPs. Indeed this later family is very promising and simultaneously benefits from increased stability, efficiency and selectivity, compared to monometallic NPs, due to synergistic substrate activation.

  9. Ion flow ripples in the Earth's plasma sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Spiegeleer, Alexandre; Hamrin, Maria; Pitkänen, Timo; Norqvist, Patrik; Mann, Ingrid

    2016-04-01

    For a long time, magnetotail flows were considered rather smooth and laminar, and primarily dominated by a simple convection flow pattern. However, in the early 90's, high speed bursty bulk flows (BBFs) were discovered and found to commonly perturb the underlying convection flows. In addition, there are other disturbances complicating the magnetotail flow pattern. Instabilities such as the Kelvin-Helmholz instability and the kink instability can cause different types of magnetic field oscillations, such as field line resonances. It is expected that ions will follow these oscillations if the typical time and length scales are larger than the gyroperiod and gyroradius of the ions. Though low-velocity sloshing and ripple disturbances of the average magnetotail convection flows have been observed, their connection with magnetic field oscillations is not fully understood. Furthermore, when studying BFFs, these "Ion Flow Ripples" (IFRs) are often neglected, dismissed as noise or can even erroneously be identified as BBFs. It is therefore of utter importance to find out and understand the role of IFRs in magnetotail dynamics. In a statistical investigation, we use several years of Cluster plasma sheet data to study the low-speed flows in the magnetotail. We investigate different types of IFRs, study their occurrence, and discuss their possible causes.

  10. Liquid metal alloy ion sources—An alternative for focussed ion beam technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bischoff, Lothar; Mazarov, Paul; Bruchhaus, Lars; Gierak, Jacques

    2016-06-01

    Today, Focused Ion Beam (FIB) processing is nearly exclusively based on gallium Liquid Metal Ion Sources (LMIS). But, many applications in the μm- or nm range could benefit from ion species other than gallium: local ion implantation, ion beam mixing, ion beam synthesis, or Focused Ion Beam Lithography (IBL). Therefore, Liquid Metal Alloy Ion Sources (LMAIS) represent a promising alternative to expand the remarkable application fields for FIB. Especially, the IBL process shows potential advantages over, e.g., electron beam or other lithography techniques: direct, resistless, and three-dimensional patterning, enabling a simultaneous in-situ process control by cross-sectioning and inspection. Taking additionally into account that the used ion species influences significantly the physical and chemical nature of the resulting nanostructures—in particular, the electrical, optical, magnetic, and mechanic properties leading to a large potential application area which can be tuned by choosing a well suited LMAIS. Nearly half of the elements of the periodic table are recently available in the FIB technology as a result of continuous research in this area during the last forty years. Key features of a LMAIS are long life-time, high brightness, and stable ion current. Recent developments could make these sources feasible for nano patterning issues as an alternative technology more in research than in industry. The authors will review existing LMAIS, LMIS other than Ga, and binary and ternary alloys. These physical properties as well as the fabrication technology and prospective domains for modern FIB applications will similarly be reviewed. Other emerging ion sources will be also presented and their performances discussed.

  11. Optical studies of ion-beam synthesized metal alloy nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Magudapathy, P. Srivatsava, S. K.; Gangopadhyay, P.; Amirthapandian, S.; Sairam, T. N.; Panigrahi, B. K.

    2015-06-24

    Au{sub x}Ag{sub 1-x} alloy nanoparticles with tunable surface plasmon resonance (SPR) have been synthesized on a silica glass substrate. A small Au foil on an Ag foil is irradiated as target substrates such that ion beam falls on both Ag foil and Au foils. Silica slides are kept at an angle ∼45° with respect to the metallic foils. While irradiating the metallic foils with 100 keV Ar{sup +} ions, sputtered Au and Ag atoms get deposited on the silica-glass. In this configuration the foils have been irradiated by Ar{sup +} ions to various fluences at room temperature and the sputtered species are collected on silica slides. Formation of Au{sub x}Ag{sub 1-x} nanoparticles has been confirmed from the optical absorption measurements. With respect to the exposure area of Au and Ag foils to the ion beam, the SPR peak position varies from 450 to 500 nm. Green photoluminescence has been observed from these alloy metal nanoparticles.

  12. Peptide immobilisation on porous silicon surface for metal ions detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sam, Sabrina S.; Chazalviel, Jean-Noël Jn; Gouget-Laemmel, Anne Chantal Ac; Ozanam, François F.; Etcheberry, Arnaud A.; Gabouze, Nour-Eddine N.

    2011-06-01

    In this work, a Glycyl-Histidyl-Glycyl-Histidine (GlyHisGlyHis) peptide is covalently anchored to the porous silicon PSi surface using a multi-step reaction scheme compatible with the mild conditions required for preserving the probe activity. In a first step, alkene precursors are grafted onto the hydrogenated PSi surface using the hydrosilylation route, allowing for the formation of a carboxyl-terminated monolayer which is activated by reaction with N-hydroxysuccinimide in the presence of a peptide-coupling carbodiimide N-ethyl- N'-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-carbodiimide and subsequently reacted with the amino linker of the peptide to form a covalent amide bond. Infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy are used to investigate the different steps of functionalization. The property of peptides to form stable complexes with metal ions is exploited to achieve metal-ion recognition by the peptide-modified PSi-based biosensor. An electrochemical study of the GlyHisGlyHis-modified PSi electrode is achieved in the presence of copper ions. The recorded cyclic voltammograms show a quasi-irreversible process corresponding to the Cu(II)/Cu(I) couple. The kinetic factors (the heterogeneous rate constant and the transfer coefficient) and the stability constant of the complex formed on the porous silicon surface are determined. These results demonstrate the potential role of peptides grafted on porous silicon in developing strategies for simple and fast detection of metal ions in solution.

  13. Peptide immobilisation on porous silicon surface for metal ions detection.

    PubMed

    Sam, Sabrina S; Chazalviel, Jean-Noël Jn; Gouget-Laemmel, Anne Chantal Ac; Ozanam, François F; Etcheberry, Arnaud A; Gabouze, Nour-Eddine N

    2011-06-06

    In this work, a Glycyl-Histidyl-Glycyl-Histidine (GlyHisGlyHis) peptide is covalently anchored to the porous silicon PSi surface using a multi-step reaction scheme compatible with the mild conditions required for preserving the probe activity. In a first step, alkene precursors are grafted onto the hydrogenated PSi surface using the hydrosilylation route, allowing for the formation of a carboxyl-terminated monolayer which is activated by reaction with N-hydroxysuccinimide in the presence of a peptide-coupling carbodiimide N-ethyl-N'-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-carbodiimide and subsequently reacted with the amino linker of the peptide to form a covalent amide bond. Infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy are used to investigate the different steps of functionalization.The property of peptides to form stable complexes with metal ions is exploited to achieve metal-ion recognition by the peptide-modified PSi-based biosensor. An electrochemical study of the GlyHisGlyHis-modified PSi electrode is achieved in the presence of copper ions. The recorded cyclic voltammograms show a quasi-irreversible process corresponding to the Cu(II)/Cu(I) couple. The kinetic factors (the heterogeneous rate constant and the transfer coefficient) and the stability constant of the complex formed on the porous silicon surface are determined. These results demonstrate the potential role of peptides grafted on porous silicon in developing strategies for simple and fast detection of metal ions in solution.

  14. Peptide immobilisation on porous silicon surface for metal ions detection

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    In this work, a Glycyl-Histidyl-Glycyl-Histidine (GlyHisGlyHis) peptide is covalently anchored to the porous silicon PSi surface using a multi-step reaction scheme compatible with the mild conditions required for preserving the probe activity. In a first step, alkene precursors are grafted onto the hydrogenated PSi surface using the hydrosilylation route, allowing for the formation of a carboxyl-terminated monolayer which is activated by reaction with N-hydroxysuccinimide in the presence of a peptide-coupling carbodiimide N-ethyl-N'-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-carbodiimide and subsequently reacted with the amino linker of the peptide to form a covalent amide bond. Infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy are used to investigate the different steps of functionalization. The property of peptides to form stable complexes with metal ions is exploited to achieve metal-ion recognition by the peptide-modified PSi-based biosensor. An electrochemical study of the GlyHisGlyHis-modified PSi electrode is achieved in the presence of copper ions. The recorded cyclic voltammograms show a quasi-irreversible process corresponding to the Cu(II)/Cu(I) couple. The kinetic factors (the heterogeneous rate constant and the transfer coefficient) and the stability constant of the complex formed on the porous silicon surface are determined. These results demonstrate the potential role of peptides grafted on porous silicon in developing strategies for simple and fast detection of metal ions in solution. PMID:21711937

  15. Ion reflection and transmission during reconnection at the earth's subsolar magnetopause

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuselier, S. A.; Klumpar, D. M.; Shelley, E. G.

    1991-01-01

    Composition measurements in an accelerated flow event at the earth's dayside magnetopause show evidence for reflection and transmission of magnetospheric and magnetosheath ion species. Furthermore, a single velocity transformation approximately tangent to the magnetopause surface orders the individual transmitted and reflected ion distributions on both sides of the magnetopause into field-aligned flow at V(A), the local Alfven speed. These observations provide strong evidence for a kinetic description of magnetic reconnection at the magnetopause.

  16. Minerals yearbook, 1988. Rare-earth minerals and metals

    SciTech Connect

    Hedrick, J.B.; Templeton, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    Domestic production of rare-earth concentrates decreased in 1988. Foreign sources of processed rare earths obtained a slightly larger share of the U.S. market, while domestic exports saw a marked increase compared to 1987 levels. Rare earths were used in high-technology applications such as laser crystals, high-strength permanent magnets, optical fibers, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners, and high-temperature superconductors. Topics discussed in the report include domestic data coverage, legislation and government programs, environmental issues, domestic production, consumption and uses, stocks, prices, foreign trade, world capacity, world review--Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, Egypt, Greenland, Japan, Madagascar, Malaysia, Mozambique, Sri Lanka, Thailand--and technology.

  17. Low energy ion beam assisted growth of metal multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Junjie

    Vapor deposited metal multilayers have attracted a great deal of interest in recent years because they offer extraordinary strength, hardness, heat resistance, and unexpected new properties like high reflectivity and spin-dependent conductivity. The giant magnetoresistance effects discovered in Fe/Cr artificial superstructures in 1988 stimulated a large number of studies on the electronic transport properties of spintronic materials because of their important applications in highly sensitive magnetic sensors, nonvolatile random access memories, and the data storage industry in general. Magnetic multilayers allow exploitation of unique micromagnetic, magnetooptic, and magnetoelectronic phenomena that cannot be realized using conventional materials. For example, if ferromagnetic layers (such as CoFe) with a thicknesses of 5-7 nm are separated by a non-magnetic spacer (such as Cu or AlOx) of an appropriate thickness (1-3 nm), they can exhibit large changes in their electrical resistance when a magnetic field is applied. These changes are caused mainly by spin-dependent conduction electron scattering at magnetic multilayer interfaces. Many experimental and theoretical works have sought to promote a basic understanding of the effect of atomic structure in thin film multilayers upon spin dependent transport. It has been found that interfacial imperfections, such as interfacial roughness and interlayer mixing, dramatically reduce the properties exploited for spintronic applications. A combination of computer modeling and experiments has been used to discover more effective ways to control the interfacial structures of metal multilayers. Earlier atomic simulations had indicated that it is very important to control adatom energy during deposition in order to improve interface properties. Based on these ideas, this dissertation has investigated the effects of low energy ion assistance during metal multilayer deposition. Using molecular dynamics modeling, the effects of ion

  18. Ion Implantation Effects on the Metal-Semiconductor Interfaces.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yapsir, Andrie Setiawan

    1988-12-01

    In this thesis, the effects of ion implantation on metal-semiconductor interfaces are studied. Hydrogen ions have been used as the implanted species. The implantation is carried out on Al/n-Si Schottky contacts. Electrical characterizations, deep level transient spectroscopy measurements, and the ^{15}N hydrogen profiling technique have been used to study the effects of ion implantation. It is demonstrated that the defect centers in the depletion region created by hydrogen implantation have more likely negative or possibly neutral signatures, rather than a positive signature as has been previously speculated. These negatively charged centers compensate for the positive donor resulting in a widening of the depletion region and reduction in the capacitance of the metal-semiconductor contacts. The tendency of hydrogen to passivate its own damage which results in the recovery of electronic transport across the metal-semiconductor junction upon low temperature heat treatment is also demonstrated. In connection with the behavior of hydrogen in silicon, in the second part of this thesis, detailed theoretical calculations on the hydrogen passivation of defects in silicon are carried out. A particular type of defect, namely, a substitutional sulfur in silicon, is chosen and is studied using the modified intermediate neglect of differential overlap (MINDO/3) molecular orbital method. It is found that the sulfur center can be passivated using one or two hydrogen atoms. The calculations indicate that the most stable positions of the hydrogen atoms are between the sulfur and its silicon neighbors. The hydrogens bond to the nearest silicon atoms and only weakly interact with the sulfur. Thermochemistry considerations predict that a single hydrogen passivates the sulfur center, provided these centers are in abundance in the silicon. Hydrogen ion implantation has also been carried out on Schottky contacts having a large difference in metal work function, Ti/p-Si and Pt

  19. Polymer filtration systems for dilute metal ion recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, B.F.; Robison, T.W.; Jarvinen, G.D.

    1998-12-01

    Scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory have developed a metal recovery system that meets the global treatment demands for all kinds of industrial and metal-processing streams. The Polymer Filtration (PF) System--a process that is easily operated and robust--offers metal-finishing businesses a convenient and inexpensive way to recover and recycle metal ions in-house, thus reducing materials costs, waste removal costs, and industrial liability. As a valuable economic and environmental asset, the PF System has been named a winner of a 1995 R and D 100 Award. These awards are presented annually by R and D Magazine to the one hundred most significant technical innovations of the year. The PF System is based on the use of water-soluble metal-binding polymers and on advanced ultrafiltration membranes. Customers for this technology will receive new soluble polymers, especially formulated for their waste stream, and the complete PF processing unit: a reaction reservoir, pumps, plumbing, controls, and the advanced ultrafiltration membranes, all in a skid mounted frame. Metal-bearing waste water is treated in the reaction reservoir, where the polymer binds with the metal ions under balanced acid/base conditions. The reservoir fluid is then pumped through the ultrafiltration system--a cartridge packed with ultrafiltration membranes shaped in hollow fibers. As the fluid travels inside the fiber, water and other small molecules--simple salts such as calcium and sodium, for example--pass through the porous membrane walls of the fibers and are discharged through the outlet as permeate. The polymer-bound metal, which is too large to pass through the pores, is both purified and concentrated inside the hollow fibers and is returned to the fluid reservoir for further waste water treatment.

  20. Direct experimental evidence for the Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida interaction in rare-earth metals.

    PubMed

    Hindmarch, A T; Hickey, B J

    2003-09-12

    We show that the ferromagnetic heavy rare-earth (RE) metals show a transport spin polarization at the Fermi level in the majority spin, whereas in ferromagnetic light rare earths it is in the minority spin. The sign of the polarization is in agreement with what is expected due to the Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida (RKKY) coupling formalism. We show that magnetotransport measurements on magnetic multilayer samples containing magnetic REs provide a unique opportunity to verify the RKKY coupling scheme in pure rare-earth metals, allowing us to probe both the sign and temperature dependence of the spin-density oscillation.

  1. Ion beam mixing of metal/fluoropolymer interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennis, D. L.; Giedd, R. E.; Wang, Y. Q.; Glass, G. A.

    1999-06-01

    Ion beam mixing of metals and polymers with very low dielectric constants such as Teflon can provide many applications in the area of electronic materials. This work is a study of the "mixing" effect of 50 keV nitrogen implanted thin metal layers on Teflon PTFE (polytetrafluoroethylene) substrates. RBS analysis shows that the distribution of thin layers of copper and chromium (approximately 300-400 Å thick) through the implant layer of the Teflon depends on the reactivity of the metal. As the implant fluence is increased, the distribution of metal atoms in the polymer matrix becomes concentrated over smaller ranges near the bottom of the implant layer. In situ RGA analysis during the implantation shows the liberation of an abundance of fluorine in many different forms. This is supported by results from a NRA experiment that shows the non-uniform concentration profile of fluorine throughout the implant layer. During the implantation process, the fluorine is released through the incident ion track leaving a carbon and metal rich region near the surface of the implant layer. The fluorine density increases with depth through the implant layer making a smooth transition to the undamaged bulk Teflon below. Low dielectric materials with highly conductive surfaces, such as this one, may provide an opportunity for a broad range of new microelectronic applications.

  2. Metal Ion Toxins and Brain Aquaporin-4 Expression: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Ximenes-da-Silva, Adriana

    2016-01-01

    Metal ions such as iron, zinc, and manganese are essential to metabolic functions, protein synthesis, neurotransmission, and antioxidant neuroprotective mechanisms. Conversely, non-essential metals such as mercury and lead are sources of human intoxication due to occupational activities or environmental contamination. Essential or non-essential metal accumulation in the central nervous system (CNS) results in changes in blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability, as well as triggering microglia activation and astrocyte reactivity and changing water transport through the cells, which could result in brain swelling. Aquaporin-4 is the main water channel in the CNS, is expressed in astrocyte foot processes in brain capillaries and along the circumventricular epithelium in the ventricles, and has important physiological functions in maintaining brain osmotic homeostasis and supporting brain excitability through regulation of the extracellular space. Some evidence has pointed to a role of AQP4 during metal intoxication in the brain, where it may act in a dual form as a neuroprotector or a mediator of the development of oxidative stress in neurons and astrocytes, resulting in brain swelling and neuronal damage. This mini-review presents the way some metal ions affect changes in AQP4 expression in the CNS and discuss the ways in which water transport in brain cells can be involved in brain damage. PMID:27313504

  3. Effect of ion implantation on the tribology of metal-on-metal hip prostheses.

    PubMed

    Bowsher, John G; Hussain, Azad; Williams, Paul; Nevelos, Jim; Shelton, Julia C

    2004-12-01

    Nitrogen ion implantation (which considerably hardens the surface of the bearing) may represent one possible method of reducing the wear of metal-on-metal (MOM) hip bearings. Currently there are no ion-implanted MOM bearings used clinically. Therefore a physiological hip simulator test was undertaken using standard test conditions, and the results compared to previous studies using the same methods. N2-ion implantation of high carbon cast Co-Cr-Mo-on-Co-Cr-Mo hip prostheses increased wear by 2-fold during the aggressive running-in phase compared to untreated bearing surfaces, plus showing no wear reductions during steady-state conditions. Although 2 specimens were considered in the current study, it would appear that ion implantation has no clinical benefit for MOM.

  4. Interaction of metal ions with biomolecular ligands: how accurate are calculated free energies associated with metal ion complexation?

    PubMed

    Gutten, Ondrej; Beššeová, Ivana; Rulíšek, Lubomír

    2011-10-20

    To address fundamental questions in bioinorganic chemistry, such as metal ion selectivity, accurate computational protocols for both the gas-phase association of metal-ligand complexes and solvation/desolvation energies of the species involved are needed. In this work, we attempt to critically evaluate the performance of the ab initio and DFT electronic structure methods available and recent solvation models in calculations of the energetics associated with metal ion complexation. On the example of five model complexes ([M(II)(CH(3)S)(H(2)O)](+), [M(II)(H(2)O)(2)(H(2)S)(NH(3))](2+), [M(II)(CH(3)S)(NH(3))(H(2)O)(CH(3)COO)], [M(II)(H(2)O)(3)(SH)(CH(3)COO)(Im)], [M(II)(H(2)S)(H(2)O)(CH(3)COO)(PhOH)(Im)](+) in typical coordination geometries) and four metal ions (Fe(2+), Cu(2+), Zn(2+), and Cd(2+); representing open- and closed-shell and the first- and second-row transition metal elements), we provide reference values for the gas-phase complexation energies, as presumably obtained using the CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVTZ method, and compare them with cheaper methods, such as DFT and RI-MP2, that can be used for large-scale calculations. We also discuss two possible definitions of interaction energies underlying the theoretically predicted metal-ion selectivity and the effect of geometry optimization on these values. Finally, popular solvation models, such as COSMO-RS and SMD, are used to demonstrate whether quantum chemical calculations can provide the overall free enthalpy (ΔG) changes in the range of the expected experimental values for the model complexes or match the experimental stability constants in the case of three complexes for which the experimental data exist. The data presented highlight several intricacies in the theoretical predictions of the experimental stability constants: the covalent character of some metal-ligand bonds (e.g., Cu(II)-thiolate) causing larger errors in the gas-phase complexation energies, inaccuracies in the treatment of solvation of the

  5. Statistical evaluation of biogeochemical variables affecting spatiotemporal distributions of multiple free metal ion concentrationsin an urban estuary

    EPA Science Inventory

    Free metal ion concentrations have been recognized as a better indicator of metal bioavailability in aquatic environments than total dissolved metal concentrations. However, our understanding of the determinants of free ion concentrations, especially in a metal mixture, is limite...

  6. The Corrosion Protection of Metals by Ion Vapor Deposited Aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, M. D.

    1993-01-01

    A study of the corrosion protection of substrate metals by ion vapor deposited aluminum (IVD Al) coats has been carried out. Corrosion protection by both anodized and unanodized IVD Al coats has been investigated. Base metals included in the study were 2219-T87 Al, 7075-T6 Al, Titanium-6 Al-4 Vanadium (Ti-6Al-4V), 4130 steel, D6AC steel, and 4340 steel. Results reveal that the anodized IVD Al coats provide excellent corrosion protection, but good protection is also achieved by IVD Al coats that have not been anodized.

  7. Ab Initio Calculations Applied to Problems in Metal Ion Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Partridge, Harry; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Electronic structure calculations can provide accurate spectroscopic data (such as molecular structures) vibrational frequencies, binding energies, etc.) that have been very useful in explaining trends in experimental data and in identifying incorrect experimental measurements. In addition, ab initio calculations. have given considerable insight into the many interactions that make the chemistry of transition metal systems so diverse. In this review we focus on cases where calculations and experiment have been used to solve interesting chemical problems involving metal ions. The examples include cases where theory was used to differentiate between disparate experimental values and cases where theory was used to explain unexpected experimental results.

  8. The corrosion protection of metals by ion vapor deposited aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Danford, M.D.

    1993-10-01

    A study of the corrosion protection of substrate metals by ion vapor deposited aluminum (IVD Al) coats has been carried out. Corrosion protection by both anodized and unanodized IVD Al coats has been investigated. Base metals included in the study were 2219-T87 Al, 7075-T6 Al, Titanium-6 Al-4 Vanadium (Ti-6Al-4V), 4130 steel, D6AC steel, and 4340 steel. Results reveal that the anodized IVD Al coats provide excellent corrosion protection, but good protection is also achieved by IVD Al coats that have not been anodized.

  9. On-line collection/concentration and determination of transition and rare-earth metals in water samples using Multi-Auto-Pret system coupled with inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Katarina, Rosi Ketrin; Oshima, Mitsuko; Motomizu, Shoji

    2009-05-15

    On-line preconcentration and determination of transition and rare-earth metals in water samples was performed using a Multi-Auto-Pret system coupled with inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). The Multi-Auto-Pret AES system proposed here consists of three Auto-Pret systems with mini-columns that can be used for the preconcentration of trace metals sequentially or simultaneously, and can reduce analysis time to one-third and running cost of argon gas and labor. A newly synthesized chelating resin, ethylenediamine-N,N,N'-triacetate-type chitosan (EDTriA-type chitosan), was employed in the Multi-Auto-Pret system for the collection of trace metals prior to their measurement by ICP-AES. The proposed resin showed very good adsorption ability for transition and rare-earth metal ions without any interference from alkali and alkaline-earth metal ions in an acidic media. For the best result, pH 5 was adopted for the collection of metal ions. Only 5 mL of samples could be used for the determination of transition metals, while 20 mL of samples was necessary for the determination of rare-earth metals. Metal ions adsorbed on the resin were eluted using 1.5 M nitric acid, and were measured by ICP-AES. The proposed method was evaluated by the analysis of SLRS-4 river water reference materials for trace metals. Good agreement with certified and reference values was obtained for most of the metals examined; it indicates that the proposed method using the newly synthesized resin could be favorably used for the determination of transition and rare-earth metals in water samples by ICP-AES.

  10. Selective extraction of metal ions with polymeric extractants by ion exchange/redox

    DOEpatents

    Alexandratos, Spiro D.

    1987-01-01

    The specification discloses a method for the extraction of metal ions having a reduction potential of above about +0.3 from an aqueous solution. The method includes contacting the aqueous solution with a polymeric extractant having primary phosphinic acid groups, secondary phosphine oxide groups, or both phosphinic acid and phosphine oxide groups.

  11. Optical spectra of triply-charged rare-earth ions in polycrystalline corundum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplyanskiĭ, A. A.; Kulinkin, A. B.; Kutsenko, A. B.; Feofilov, S. P.; Zakharchenya, R. I.; Vasilevskaya, T. N.

    1998-08-01

    Solid samples of polycrystalline corundum α-Al2O3 activated by triply-charged rare-earth ions RE3+ (R=Eu3+, Er3+, Pr3+) were synthesized by the sol-gel technology. Characteristic narrow-line optical absorption and luminescence spectra produced by intraconfigurational 4 f-4 f transitions in RE3+ ions have been measured. RE3+ ions have been established to form one dominant type of optical centers in the corundum matrix, and the energy diagram of Eu3+ and Er3+ Stark levels in corundum has been determined.

  12. Novel polymerization catalysts and hydride clusters from rare-earth metal dialkyls.

    PubMed

    Nishiura, Masayoshi; Hou, Zhaomin

    2010-04-01

    This Review gives an overview on recent progress in the synthesis and chemistry of rare-earth metal dialkyl complexes bearing monoanionic ancillary ligands, with an emphasis on novel polymerization catalysts. These structurally well-defined and highly reactive compounds are prepared either by alkane elimination reactions between trialkyl rare-earth complexes and acidic neutral ligands, or by the metathetical reactions of rare-earth trihalides with the alkali metal salts of the corresponding ligands. On treatment with an appropriate borate compound, the dialkyl complexes are converted into the corresponding cationic monoalkyl species, which serve as excellent catalysts for the polymerization and copolymerization of a variety of olefins to yield a series of new polymer materials that exhibit novel properties. Alternatively, hydrogenation of the dialkyl rare-earth complexes with H(2) affords a new class of rare-earth polyhydride complexes with unique features in terms of both their structure and reactivity.

  13. Performance and Comparison of Lithium-Ion Batteries Under Low-Earth-Orbit Mission Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Concha M.; Smart, Marshall C.; Bugga, Ratnakumar V.; Manzo, Michelle A.; Miller, Thomas B.; Gitzendanner, Rob

    2007-01-01

    The performance of two 28 V, 25 Ah lithium-ion batteries is being evaluated under low-Earth-orbit mission profiles for satellite and orbiter applications. The batteries are undergoing life testing and have achieved over 12,000 cycles to 40 percent depth-of-discharge.

  14. Asymmetric Catalysis with bis(hydroxyphenyl)diamides/rare-earth metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Kumagai, Naoya; Shibasaki, Masakatsu

    2013-01-02

    A series of asymmetric catalysts composed of conformationally flexible amide-based chiral ligands and rare-earth metals was developed for proton-transfer catalysis. These ligands derived from amino acids provide an intriguing chiral platform for the formation of asymmetric catalysts upon complexation with rare-earth metals. The scope of this arsenal of catalysts was further broadened by the development of heterobimetallic catalytic systems. The cooperative function of hydrogen bonding and metal coordination resulted in intriguing substrate specificity and stereocontrol, and the dynamic nature of the catalysts led to a switch of their function. Herein, we summarize our recent exploration of this class of catalysts.

  15. Photoelectric properties in metal ion modified DNA nanostructure.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Atul; Dugasani, Sreekantha Reddy; Jang Ah Kim; Kim; Sung Ha Park; Taesung Kim

    2015-08-01

    Due to specific or as designed self-assembly, DNA nanostructures gaining popularity in various nanoscale electronic applications. Herein, a novel divalent metal ion-DNA complex known as M-DNA have been investigated for its photoelectric characteristics. The increased conductivity of M-DNA thin films is attributed to the metal ion electrical and optical properties. The gate voltage effect along with illumination on the conductivity of M-DNA demonstrates that M-DNA can be used as an active element of a field-effect transistor. The Zn DNA shows maximum conductivity of 300μS/cm at 480 nm light illumination suggest that M-DNA can be utilized in nano-opto-electronics and bio-sensing applications.

  16. Thermodynamic analysis of metal ion-induced protein assembly.

    PubMed

    Herr, Andrew B; Conrady, Deborah G

    2011-01-01

    A large number of biological systems are regulated by metal ion-induced protein assembly. This phenomenon can play a critical role in governing protein function and triggering downstream biological responses. We discuss the basic thermodynamic principles of linked equilibria that pertain to metal ion-induced dimerization and describe experimental approaches useful for studying such systems. The most informative techniques for studying these systems are sedimentation velocity and sedimentation equilibrium analytical ultracentrifugation, although a wide range of other spectroscopic, chromatographic, or qualitative approaches can provide a wealth of useful information. These experimental procedures are illustrated with examples from two systems currently under study: zinc-induced assembly of a staphylococcal protein responsible for intercellular adhesion in bacterial biofilms and calcium-induced dimerization of a human nucleotidase.

  17. Photochromic Terbium Phosphonates with Photomodulated Luminescence and Metal Ion Sensitive Detection.

    PubMed

    Yang, Weiting; Tian, Hong-Rui; Li, Jian-Ping; Hui, Yuan-Feng; He, Xiang; Li, Jiyang; Dang, Song; Xie, Zhigang; Sun, Zhong-Ming

    2016-10-17

    Rational selection and modification of rare earth metal centers and photoactive organic linkers enables designable multiphotofunctionality to come to fruition in new hybrid coordination polymer materials. By using a viologen-functionalized diphosphonate linker, two terbium phosphonate compounds (Tb-1 and Tb-2) have been constructed, which display reversible photochromic reactions in response to UV light and soft X-ray irradiation. In addition, the photo-induced electron-transfer reaction can modulate the luminescent emission to thus realize photoluminescence switching behavior. Furthermore, both terbium phosphonates can serve as highly sensitive sensors to probe Cu(2+) in solution through their luminescence. Thus, they represent the first photochromic examples of lanthanide phosphonate-based materials with photomodulated luminescence and sensitive detection of metal ions.

  18. Metal Ions: Supporting Actors in the Playbook of Small Ribozymes

    PubMed Central

    Johnson-Buck, Alexander E.; McDowell, Sarah E.; Walter, Nils G.

    2012-01-01

    Since the 1980s, several small RNA motifs capable of chemical catalysis have been discovered. These small ribozymes, composed of between approximately 40 and 200 nucleotides, have been found to play vital roles in the replication of subviral and viral pathogens, gene regulation in prokaryotes, and have recently been discovered in noncoding eukaryotic RNAs. All of the known natural small ribozymes – the hairpin, hammerhead, hepatitis delta virus, Varkud satellite, and glmS ribozymes – catalyze the same self-cleavage reaction as RNAse A, resulting in two products, one bearing a 2′–3′ cyclic phosphate and the other a 5′-hydroxyl group. Although originally thought to be obligate metalloenzymes like the group I and II self-splicing introns, the small ribozymes are now known to support catalysis in a wide variety of cations that appear to be only indirectly involved in catalysis. Nevertheless, under physiologic conditions, metal ions are essential for the proper folding and function of the small ribozymes, the most effective of these being magnesium. Metal ions contribute to catalysis in the small ribozymes primarily by stabilizing the catalytically active conformation, but in some cases also by activating RNA functional groups for catalysis, directly participating in catalytic acid-base chemistry, and perhaps by neutralizing the developing negative charge of the transition state. Although interactions between the small ribozymes and cations are relatively nonspecific, ribozyme activity is quite sensitive to the types and concentrations of metal ions present in solution, suggesting a close evolutionary relationship between cellular metal ion homeostasis and cation requirements of catalytic RNAs, and perhaps RNA in general. PMID:22010272

  19. Lithium metal doped electrodes for lithium-ion rechargeable chemistry

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Gao; Battaglia, Vince; Wang, Lei

    2016-09-13

    An embodiment of the invention combines the superior performance of a polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) or polyethyleneoxide (POE) binder, the strong binding force of a styrene-butadiene (SBR) binder, and a source of lithium ions in the form of solid lithium metal powder (SLMP) to form an electrode system that has improved performance as compared to PVDF/SBR binder based electrodes. This invention will provide a new way to achieve improved results at a much reduced cost.

  20. Structure and ionic diffusion of alkaline-earth ions in mixed cation glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Konstantinou, Konstantinos; Sushko, Petr; Duffy, Dorothy M.

    2015-08-15

    A series of mixed cation silicate glasses of the composition A2O – 2MO – 4SiO2, with A=Li,Na,K and M=Ca,Sr,Ba has been investigated by means of molecular dynamics simulations in order to understand the effect of the nature of the cations on the mobility of the alkaline-earth ions within the glass network. The size of the alkaline-earth cation was found to affect the inter-atomic distances, the coordination number distributions and the bond angle distributions , whereas the medium-range order was almost unaffected by the type of the cation. All the alkaline-earth cations contribute to lower vibrational frequencies but it is observed that that there is a shift to smaller frequencies and the vibrational density of states distribution gets narrower as the size of the alkaline-earth increases. The results from our modeling for the ionic diffusion of the alkaline-earth cations are in a qualitative agreement with the experimental observations in that there is a distinct correlation between the activation energy for diffusion of alkaline earth-ions and the cation radii ratio. An asymmetrical linear behavior in the diffusion activation energy with increasing size difference is observed. The results can be described on the basis of a theoretical model that relates the diffusion activation energy to the electrostatic interactions of the cations with the oxygens and the elastic deformation of the silicate network.

  1. Yttrium and rare earth stabilized fast reactor metal fuel

    DOEpatents

    Guon, Jerold; Grantham, LeRoy F.; Specht, Eugene R.

    1992-01-01

    To increase the operating temperature of a reactor, the melting point and mechanical properties of the fuel must be increased. For an actinide-rich fuel, yttrium, lanthanum and/or rare earth elements can be added, as stabilizers, to uranium and plutonium and/or a mixture of other actinides to raise the melting point of the fuel and improve its mechanical properties. Since only about 1% of the actinide fuel may be yttrium, lanthanum, or a rare earth element, the neutron penalty is low, the reactor core size can be reduced, the fuel can be burned efficiently, reprocessing requirements are reduced, and the nuclear waste disposal volumes reduced. A further advantage occurs when yttrium, lanthanum, and/or other rare earth elements are exposed to radiation in a reactor, they produce only short half life radioisotopes, which reduce nuclear waste disposal problems through much shorter assured-isolation requirements.

  2. Superhydrogels of nanotubes capable of capturing heavy-metal ions.

    PubMed

    Song, Shasha; Wang, Haiqiao; Song, Aixin; Hao, Jingcheng

    2014-01-01

    Self-assembly regulated by hydrogen bonds was successfully achieved in the system of lithocholic acid (LCA) mixed with three organic amines, ethanolamine (EA), diethanolamine (DEA), and triethanolamine (TEA), in aqueous solutions. The mixtures of DEA/LCA exhibit supergelation capability and the hydrogels consist of plenty of network nanotubes with uniform diameters of about 60 nm determined by cryogenic TEM. Interestingly, the sample with the same concentration in a system of EA and LCA is a birefringent solution, in which spherical vesicles and can be transformed into nanotubes as the amount of LCA increases. The formation of hydrogels could be driven by the delicate balance of diverse noncovalent interactions, including electrostatic interactions, hydrophobic interactions, steric effects, van der Waals forces, and mainly hydrogen bonds. The mechanism of self-assembly from spherical bilayer vesicles into nanotubes was proposed. The dried hydrogels with nanotubes were explored to exhibit the excellent capability for capturing heavy-metal ions, for example, Cu(2+), Co(2+), Ni(2+), Pb(2+), and Hg(2+). The superhydrogels of nanotubes from the self-assembly of low-molecular-weight gelators mainly regulated by hydrogen bonds used for the removal of heavy-metal ions is simple, green, and high efficiency, and provide a strategic approach to removing heavy-metal ions from industrial sewage.

  3. The role of transition metal ions chemistry on multiphase chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deguillaume, L.; Leriche, M.; Monod, A.; Chaumerliac, N.

    2003-04-01

    A modelling study of the role of transition metal ions chemistry on cloud chemistry is presented. First, new developments of the Model of Multiphase Cloud Chemistry (M2C2) are described: the transition metal ions reactivity and variable photolysis in the aqueous phase. Secondly, three summertime scenarios describing urban, remote and marine conditions are simulated. First, comparisons between results from M2C2 and from CAPRAM2.3 models for the same scenarios (Herrmann et al., 2000) show a good agreement between the two models with respect to their different chemical mechanisms. Secondly, chemical regimes in cloud are analysed to understand the role of transition metal ions chemistry on cloud chemistry. This study focuses on HOx chemistry, which afterwards influences the sulphur and the VOCs chemistry in droplets. The ratio of Fe(II)/Fe(III) exhibits a diurnal variation with values in agreement with the few measurements of Fe speciation available. In the polluted case, sensitivity tests with and without TMI chemistry, show an enhancement of OH concentration in the aqueous phase when TMI chemistry is considered. This implies a more important oxidation of VOCs in droplets, which produces the HO2 radical, the hydrogen peroxide precursor. In fact, the HO2 radical is mainly converted into hydrogen peroxide by reactions between HO2/O2- radicals with Fe(II). This production of hydrogen peroxide leads to a rapid conversion of S(IV) into S(VI) at the beginning of the simulation.

  4. Enhancement of hypersensitive transitions of rare-earth ions in the near field of nanoobjects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pukhov, K. K.; Sekatskii, S. K.

    2014-05-01

    The change of intensities of optical transitions of atoms, molecules, and their ions in the near field of nanoobjects is of interest for researchers from both basic and applied points of view. The concept of a near field was used as early as the 1960s to study the mechanisms of hypersensitive transitions of rare-earth (RE) ions. In this work, it is once more emphasized that, precisely for these transitions, changes in characteristics under the action of local properties of the medium are especially strong and, correspondingly, these transitions are especially promising for use. The Judd method for the calculation of the intensities of hypersensitive transitions of RE ions taking into account the inhomogeneous ligand field is extended to RE ions in the near field of nanoobjects. A simple analytical expression for the Judd-Ofelt intensity parameter Ω2 for RE ions in the field of spherical nanoparticles of a subwavelength size is derived.

  5. Measuring and Imaging Metal Ions With Fluorescence-Based Biosensors: Speciation, Selectivity, Kinetics, and Other Issues.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Richard B; Fierke, Carol A

    2017-01-01

    Fluorescence-based biosensors have shown themselves to be a powerful tool for the study of a variety of chemical species in biological systems, notably including metal ions. This chapter provides an overview of several important issues in using such sensors to study metallobiochemistry. These issues include selectivity for the analyte over potential interferents, including those that do not themselves induce a signal, the different forms in which metal ions are found (speciation), the utility of metal ion buffers, and the importance of kinetics in studying metal ion binding reactions. Finally, the chapter briefly discusses some of the issues in understanding whole-organism distribution of metal ions and its control.

  6. Ion-exchange behavior of alkali metals on treated carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Mohiuddin, G.; Hata, W.Y.; Tolan, J.S.

    1983-01-01

    The ion-exchange behavior of trace quantities of the alkali-metal ions sodium and cesium, on activated carbon impregnated with zirconium phosphate (referred to here as ZrP), was studied. Impregnated carbon had twice as much ion-exchange activity as unimpregnated, oxidized carbon, and 10 times as much as commercial activated carbons. The distribution coefficient of sodium increased with increasing pH; the distribution coefficient of cesium decreased with increasing pH. Sodium and cesium were separated with an electrolytic solution of 0.1 M HCl. Preliminary studies indicated that 0.2 M potassium and cesium can also be separated. Distribution coefficients of the supported ZrP were determined by the elution technique and agreed within 20% of the values for pure ZrP calculated from the literature.

  7. Template-directed synthesis of oligoguanylic acids - Metal ion catalysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridson, P. K.; Fakhrai, H.; Lohrmann, R.; Orgel, L. E.; Van Roode, M.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of Zn(2+), Pb(2+) and other metal ions on the efficiency and stereo-selectivity of the template-directed oligomerization of guanosine 5'-phosphorimidazolide are investigated. Reactions were run in the presence of a polyC template in a 2,6-lutidine buffer, and products analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography on an RPC-5 column. The presence of the Pb(2+) ion is found to lead to the formation of 2'-5' linked oligomers up to the 40-mer, while Zn(2+) favors the formation of predominantly 3'-5' linked oligomers up to the 35-mer. When amounts of uracil, cytidine or adenosine 5'-phosphorimidazole equal to those of the guanosine derivative are included in the reaction mixture, the incorrect base is incorporated into the oligomer about 10% of the time with a Pb(2+) catalyst, but less than 0.5% of the time with Zn(2+). The Sn(2+), Sb(3+) and Bi(3+) ions are also found to promote the formation of 2'-5' oligomers, although not as effectively as Pb(2+), while no metal ions other than Zn(2+) promote the formation of the 3'-5' oligomers. The results may be important for the understanding of the evolution of nucleic acid replication in the absence of enzymes.

  8. Ab initio calculations on the positive ions of the alkaline-earth oxides, fluorides, and hydroxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Partridge, H.; Langhoff, S. R.; Bauschlicher, C. W., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Theoretical dissociation energies are presented for the alkaline-earth fluoride, hydroxide, and oxide positive ions that are considered to be accurate to 0.1-0.2 eV. The r(e) for the positive ions are found to be consistently shorter than the corresponding neutrals by 0.07 + or -0.02 A. The bonding in the ground states is demonstrated to be of predominantly M + 2 X - character. The a 3 Pi and A 1 Pi are found to lie considerably above the X 1 Sigma + ground states of the alkaline-earth fluoride and hydroxide positive ions. The overall agreement of the theoretical ionization potentials with the available experimental appearance potentials is satisfactory; these values should represent the most accurate and consistent set available.

  9. Coupling of a locally implanted rare-earth ion ensemble to a superconducting micro-resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Wisby, I. Tzalenchuk, A. Ya.; Graaf, S. E. de; Adamyan, A.; Kubatkin, S. E.; Gwilliam, R.; Meeson, P. J.; Lindström, T.

    2014-09-08

    We demonstrate the coupling of rare-earth ions locally implanted in a substrate (Gd{sup 3+} in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) to a superconducting NbN lumped-element micro-resonator. The hybrid device is fabricated by a controlled ion implantation of rare-earth ions in well-defined micron-sized areas, aligned to lithographically defined micro-resonators. The technique does not degrade the internal quality factor of the resonators which remain above 10{sup 5}. Using microwave absorption spectroscopy, we observe electron-spin resonances in good agreement with numerical modelling and extract corresponding coupling rates of the order of 1 MHz and spin linewidths of 50–65 MHz.

  10. In situ observations of suprathermal ion acceleration in the near-Earth jet braking region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Retinò, Alessandro; Khotyaintsev, Yuri; Vaivads, Andris; Le Contel, Olivier; Fu, Huishan; Zieger, Bertalan; Elena, Kronberg

    2014-05-01

    Plasma jet fronts and braking regions are sites of substantial particle acceleration in planetary magnetospheres and are considered to play a major role in other distant environments such as the solar corona and astrophysical jets. Jet fronts are the boundaries separating ambient from jetting plasma (e.g. due to reconnection) while jet braking regions is where jets are eventually stopped/diverted. A number of recent in situ observations in the Earth's magnetotail have allowed studying in detail electron acceleration mechanisms at jet fronts/braking region therein. Yet, observations of suprathermal ion acceleration are scarce. Here we show Cluster spacecraft observations of suprathermal ions up to ~ 1 MeV (about 10 times the thermal energy) in the near-Earth jet braking region. Observations indicate that ions are trapped between large-scale oppositely-directed jets and accelerated therein by strong electric fields.

  11. Plasmonics for the study of metal ion-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Grasso, Giuseppe; Spoto, Giuseppe

    2013-02-01

    The study of metal-protein interactions is an expanding field of research investigated by bioinorganic chemists as it has wide applications in biological systems. Very recently, it has been reported that it is possible to study metal-protein interactions by immobilizing biomolecules on metal surfaces and applying experimental approaches based on plasmonics which have usually been used to investigate protein-protein interactions. This is possible because the electronic structure of metals generates plasmons whose properties can be exploited to obtain information from biomolecules that interact not only with other molecules but also with ions in solution. One major challenge of such approaches is to immobilize the protein to be studied on a metal surface with preserved native structure. This review reports and discusses all the works that deal with such an expanding new field of application of plasmonics with specific attention to surface plasmon resonance, highlighting the advantages and drawbacks of such approaches in comparison with other experimental techniques traditionally used to study metal-protein interactions.

  12. Molecular designs for controlling the local environments around metal ions.

    PubMed

    Cook, Sarah A; Borovik, A S

    2015-08-18

    -oxyl radical. We therefore probed the amount of spin density on the oxido ligand of our complexes using EPR spectroscopy in conjunction with oxygen-17 labeling. Our findings showed that there is a significant amount of spin on the oxido ligand, yet the M-oxo bonds are best described as highly covalent and there is no indication that an oxyl radical is formed. These results offer the intriguing possibility that high-spin M-oxo complexes are involved in O-O bond formation in biology. Ligand redesign to incorporate H-bond accepting units (sulfonamido groups) simultaneously provided a metal ion binding pocket, adjacent H-bond acceptors, and an auxiliary binding site for a second metal ion. These properties allowed us to isolate a series of heterobimetallic complexes of Fe(III) and Mn(III) in which a group II metal ion was coordinated within the secondary coordination sphere. Examination of the influence of the second metal ion on the electron transfer properties of the primary metal center revealed unexpected similarities between Ca(II) and Sr(II) ions, a result with relevance to the OEC. In addition, the presence of a second metal ion was found to prevent intramolecular oxidation of the ligand with an O atom transfer reagent.

  13. Structures and physical properties of gaseous metal cationized biological ions.

    PubMed

    Burt, Michael B; Fridgen, Travis D

    2012-01-01

    Metal chelation can alter the activity of free biomolecules by modifying their structures or stabilizing higher energy tautomers. In recent years, mass spectrometric techniques have been used to investigate the effects of metal complexation with proteins, nucleobases and nucleotides, where small conformational changes can have significant physiological consequences. In particular, infrared multiple photon dissociation spectroscopy has emerged as an important tool for determining the structure and reactivity of gas-phase ions. Unlike other mass spectrometric approaches, this method is able to directly resolve structural isomers using characteristic vibrational signatures. Other activation and dissociation methods, such as blackbody infrared radiative dissociation or collision-induced dissociation can also reveal information about the thermochemistry and dissociative pathways of these biological ions. This information can then be used to provide information about the structures of the ionic complexes under study. In this article, we review the use of gas-phase techniques in characterizing metal-bound biomolecules. Particular attention will be given to our own contributions, which detail the ability of metal cations to disrupt nucleobase pairs, direct the self-assembly of nucleobase clusters and stabilize non-canonical isomers of amino acids.

  14. Note: An ion source for alkali metal implantation beneath graphene and hexagonal boron nitride monolayers on transition metals

    SciTech Connect

    Lima, L. H. de; Cun, H. Y.; Hemmi, A.; Kälin, T.; Greber, T.

    2013-12-15

    The construction of an alkali-metal ion source is presented. It allows the acceleration of rubidium ions to an energy that enables the penetration through monolayers of graphene and hexagonal boron nitride. Rb atoms are sublimated from an alkali-metal dispenser. The ionization is obtained by surface ionization and desorption from a hot high work function surface. The ion current is easily controlled by the temperature of ionizer. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy measurements confirm ion implantation.

  15. Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry: From Cluster Ions to Toxic metal Ions in Biology

    SciTech Connect

    Lentz, Nicholas B.

    2007-01-01

    This dissertation focused on using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry to study cluster ions and toxic metal ions in biology. In Chapter 2, it was shown that primary, secondary and quarternary amines exhibit different clustering characteristics under identical instrument conditions. Carbon chain length also played a role in cluster ion formation. In Chapters 3 and 4, the effects of solvent types/ratios and various instrumental parameters on cluster ion formation were examined. It was found that instrument interface design also plays a critical role in the cluster ion distribution seen in the mass spectrum. In Chapter 5, ESI-MS was used to investigate toxic metal binding to the [Gln11]-amyloid β-protein fragment (1-16). Pb and Cd bound stronger than Zn, even in the presence of excess Zn. Hg bound weaker than Zn. There are endless options for future work on cluster ions. Any molecule that is poorly ionized in positive ion mode can potentially show an increase in ionization efficiency if an appropriate anion is used to produce a net negative charge. It is possible that drug protein or drug/DNA complexes can also be stabilized by adding counter-ions. This would preserve the solution characteristics of the complex in the gas phase. Once in the gas phase, CID could determine the drug binding location on the biomolecule. There are many research projects regarding toxic metals in biology that have yet to be investigated or even discovered. This is an area of research with an almost endless future because of the changing dynamics of biological systems. What is deemed safe today may show toxic effects in the future. Evolutionary changes in protein structures may render them more susceptible to toxic metal binding. As the understanding of toxicity evolves, so does the demand for new toxic metal research. New instrumentation designs and software make it possible to perform research that could not be done in the past. What was undetectable yesterday will

  16. Measurement of binding constants of poly(ethylenimine) with metal ions and metal chelates in aqueous media by ultrafiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Juang, R.S.; Chen, M.N.

    1996-06-01

    Equilibrium constants for the binding of poly(ethylenimine) (PEI) with metal ions and metal chelates of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and nitrilotriacetic acid in the aqueous sulfate solutions were determined by batch ultrafiltration (UF) in the pH range of 3.0--3.8. The average coordination number of PEI groups interacting with one metal ion and metal chelate was also obtained by varying the initial concentration ratio of PEI to metal ion. A simple chemical equilibrium model proposed in this work enabled the authors to satisfactorily predict the rejection coefficient of UF of metal ions and metal chelates in the presence of PEI. Also, the effect of the formation of soluble hydroxy complexes of metal chelates on their retention was emphasized.

  17. MRI findings following metal on metal hip arthroplasty and their relationship with metal ion levels and acetabular inclination angles.

    PubMed

    Fox, Ciara M; Bergin, Karen M; Kelly, Gabrielle E; McCoy, Gerry F; Ryan, Anthony G; Quinlan, John F

    2014-08-01

    Following the global recall of all ASR metal on metal hip products, our aim was to correlate MRI findings with acetabular inclination angles and metal ion levels in patients with these implants. Both cobalt and chromium levels were significantly higher in the presence of a periprosthetic fluid collection. There was no association between the presence of a periprosthetic mass, bone marrow oedema, trochanteric bursitis or greater levels of abductor muscle destruction for cobalt or chromium. There was no association between the level of periprosthetic tissue reaction and the acetabular inclination angle with any of the pathologies identified on MRI. The relationship between MRI pathology, metal ion levels and acetabular inclination angles in patients with ASR implants remains unclear adding to the complexity of managing patients.

  18. Chemoselective single-site Earth-abundant metal catalysts at metal–organic framework nodes

    SciTech Connect

    Manna, Kuntal; Ji, Pengfei; Lin, Zekai; Greene, Francis X.; Urban, Ania; Thacker, Nathan C.; Lin, Wenbin

    2016-08-30

    Earth-abundant metal catalysts are critically needed for sustainable chemical synthesis. Here we report a simple, cheap and effective strategy of producing novel earth-abundant metal catalysts at metal–organic framework (MOF) nodes for broad-scope organic transformations. The straightforward metalation of MOF secondary building units (SBUs) with cobalt and iron salts affords highly active and reusable single-site solid catalysts for a range of organic reactions, including chemoselective borylation, silylation and amination of benzylic C–H bonds, as well as hydrogenation and hydroboration of alkenes and ketones. Our structural, spectroscopic and kinetic studies suggest that chemoselective organic transformations occur on site-isolated, electron-deficient and coordinatively unsaturated metal centres at the SBUs via σ-bond metathesis pathways and as a result of the steric environment around the catalytic site. MOFs thus provide a novel platform for the development of highly active and affordable base metal catalysts for the sustainable synthesis of fine chemicals.

  19. IUPAC-NIST Solubility Data Series. 79. Alkali and Alkaline Earth Metal Pseudohalides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hála, Jiri

    2004-03-01

    This volume presents solubility data of azides, cyanides, cyanates, and thiocyanates of alkali metals, alkaline earth metals, and ammonium. Covered are binary and ternary systems in all solvents. No solubility data have been found for some of the compounds of alkali metals, alkaline metals, and ammonium. These include beryllium and magnesium azides, lithium, rubidium cesium, ammonium, and alkaline earth cyanates and cyanides, and beryllium thiocyanate. Likewise, no solubility data seem to exist for selenocyanates of the mentioned metals and ammonium. The literature has been covered up to the middle of 2001, and there was a great effort to have the literature survey as complete as possible. The few documents which remained unavailable to the editor, and could not be included in the volume, are listed in the Appendix. For some compounds it was not possible to show the Chemical Abstracts registry numbers since these have not been assigned. For this reason, the registry number index is incomplete.

  20. Proton and heavy ion acceleration by stochastic fluctuations in the Earth's magnetotail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catapano, Filomena; Zimbardo, Gaetano; Perri, Silvia; Greco, Antonella; Artemyev, Anton V.

    2016-10-01

    Spacecraft observations show that energetic ions are found in the Earth's magnetotail, with energies ranging from tens of keV to a few hundreds of keV. In this paper we carry out test particle simulations in which protons and other ion species are injected in the Vlasov magnetic field configurations obtained by Catapano et al. (2015). These configurations represent solutions of a generalized Harris model, which well describes the observed profiles in the magnetotail. In addition, three-dimensional time-dependent stochastic electromagnetic perturbations are included in the simulation box, so that the ion acceleration process is studied while varying the equilibrium magnetic field profile and the ion species. We find that proton energies of the order of 100 keV are reached with simulation parameters typical of the Earth's magnetotail. By changing the ion mass and charge, we can study the acceleration of heavy ions such as He+ + and O+, and it is found that energies of the order of 100-200 keV are reached in a few seconds for He+ + , and about 100 keV for O+.

  1. Sputtering of metals at ion-electron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martynenko, Yu. V.; Korshunov, S. N.; Skorlupkin, I. D.

    2014-02-01

    It has been found that, in contrast to the commonly accepted opinion, simultaneous irradiation by 15-keV Ar+ ions and 2.5-keV electrons at temperatures above 0.5 T m ( T m is the melting temperature) induces much larger sputtering of metallic copper, nickel, and steel than irradiation only by Ar+ ions. The effect increases with the temperature. At T = 0.7 T m, the sputtering coefficients in the case of ion-electron irradiation are more than twice as large as the sputtering coefficients in the case of irradiation by Ar+ ions. The experiments on the sublimation of copper show that the sublimation rate in the case of the heating of a sample by an electron beam is higher than that in the case of heating in an electric vacuum oven. The revealed effects are explained by the electron-induced excitation of adatoms (atoms stuck over the surface, which appear owing to ion bombardment). Excited adatoms have a smaller binding energy with the surface and are sputtered more easily.

  2. Radiation damage from single heavy ion impacts on metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Donnelly, S.E.; Birtcher, R.C.

    1998-06-01

    The effects of single ion impacts on the surfaces of films of Au, Ag, In and Pb have been studied using in-situ transmission electron microscopy. On all of these materials, individual ion impacts produce surface craters, in some cases, with associated expelled material. The cratering efficiency scales with the density of the irradiated metal. For very thin Au foils ({approx} 20--50 nm), in some cases individual ions are seen to punch small holes completely through the foil. Continued irradiation results in a thickening of the foil. The process giving rise to crater and hole formation and other changes observed in the thin foils has been found to be due to pulsed localized flow--i.e. melting and flow due to the thermal spikes arising from individual ion impacts. Experiments carried out on thin films of silver sandwiched between SiO{sub 2} layers have indicated that pulsed localized flow also occurs in this system and contributes to the formation of Ag nanoclusters in SiO{sub 2}--a system of interest for its non-linear optical properties. Calculation indicates that, when ion-induced, collision cascades occur near surfaces (within {approx} 5 nm) with energy densities sufficient to cause melting, craters are formed. Crater formation occurs as a result of the explosive outflow of material from the hot molten core of the cascade. Processes occurring in the sandwiched layer are less well understood.

  3. A new N-hydroxyethyliminodiacetic acid modified core-shell silica phase for chelation ion chromatography of alkaline earth, transition and rare earth elements.

    PubMed

    McGillicuddy, Nicola; Nesterenko, Ekaterina P; Nesterenko, Pavel N; Stack, Elaine M; Omamogho, Jesse O; Glennon, Jeremy D; Paull, Brett

    2013-12-20

    Bare core-shell silica (1.7μm) has been modified with iminodiacetic acid functional groups via standard silane chemistry, forming a new N-hydroxyethyliminodiacetic acid (HEIDA) functionalised core-shell stationary phase. The column was applied in high-performance chelation ion chromatography and evaluated for the retention of alkaline earth, transition and heavy metal cations. The influence of nitric acid eluent concentration, addition of complexing agent dipicolinic acid, eluent pH and column temperature on the column performance was investigated. The efficiencies obtained for transition and heavy metal cations (and resultant separations) were comparable or better than those previously obtained for alternative fully porous silica based chelation stationary phases, and a similarly modified monolithic silica column, ranging from ∼15 to 56μm HETP. Increasing the ionic strength of the eluent with the addition of KNO3 (0.75M) and increasing the column temperature (70°C) facilitated the isocratic separation of a mixture of 14 lanthanides and yttrium in under 12min, with HETP averaging 18μm (7μm for Ce(III)).

  4. Optical metal-organic framework sensor for selective discrimination of some toxic metal ions in water.

    PubMed

    Shahat, Ahmed; Hassan, Hassan M A; Azzazy, Hassan M E

    2013-09-02

    This paper reports the development of a facile and effective approach, based on the use of Zr-based metal-organic frameworks (UiO-66) sensor with micropores geometry, shape and particle morphology for the visual detection and removal of ultra-traces of some toxic metal ions such as Bi(III), Zn(II), Pb(II), Hg(II) and Cd(II). UiO-66 was used as selective carriers for accommodating hydrophobic chromophore probes such as dithizone (DZ) without coupling agent for sensitive and selective discrimination of trace level of toxic analytes. The developed UiO-66 sensor was utilized for the detection of ultra-traces of some toxic metal ions with the naked eye. The new sensor displays high sensitivity and selectivity of a wide range of detectable metals analytes up to 10(-10) mol dm(-3) in solution, in a rapid analyte uptake response (seconds). The developed sensor is stable, cost effective, easy to prepare, and would be useful for rapid detection and removal of ultra-traces of toxic metal ions in water samples.

  5. Molecular Designs for Controlling the Local Environments around Metal Ions

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Sarah A.; Borovik, A.S.

    2015-01-01

    of an Mn–oxyl radical. We therefore probed the amount of spin density on the oxido ligand of our complexes using EPR spectroscopy in conjunction with oxygen-17 labeling. Our findings showed that there is a significant amount of spin on the oxido ligand, yet the M–oxo bonds are best described as highly covalent and there is no indication that an oxyl radical is formed. These results offer the intriguing possibility that high spin M–oxo complexes are involved in O–O bond formation in biology. Ligand redesign to incorporate H-bond accepting units (sulfonamido groups) simultaneously provided a metal ion binding pocket, adjacent H-bond acceptors, and an auxiliary binding site for a second metal ion. These properties allowed us to isolate a series of heterobimetallic complexes of FeIII and MnIII in which a group II metal ion was coordinated within the secondary coordination sphere. Examination of the influence of the second metal ion on the electron transfer properties of the primary metal center revealed unexpected similarities between CaII and SrII ions—a result with relevance to the OEC. In addition, the presence of a second metal ion was found to prevent intramolecular oxidation of the ligand with an O-atom transfer reagent. PMID:26181849

  6. Environmental Defects And Economic Impact On Global Market Of Rare Earth Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charalampides, G.; Vatalis, K.; Karayannis, V.; Baklavaridis, A.

    2016-11-01

    Rare earth elements include the 14 lanthanides as well as lanthanium and often yttrium. Actually, most of them are not very rare and occur widely dispersed in a variety of rocks. Rare earth metals are vital to some of the world's faster growing industries: catalysts, Nd-magnets, ceramics, glass, metallurgy, battery alloys, electronics and phosphors. Worldwide, the main countries for distribution of rare earths deposits include China, USA, Russia, Brasil, India, Australia, Greenland and Malaysia. The mining and processing of rare earth metals usually result in significant environmental defects. Many deposits are associated with high concentrations of radioactive elements such as uranium and thorium, which requires separate treatment and disposal. The accumulation of rare earth elements in soils has occurred due to pollution caused by the exploitation of rare earth resources and the wide use of rare earths as fertilizers in agriculture. This accumulation has a toxic effect on the soil microfauna community. However, there are large differences in market prices due to the degree of purity determined by the specifications in the applications. The main focus of this article is to overview Rare Earth Metals’ overall impact on global economy and their environmental defects on soils during processing techniques and as they are used as fertilizers.

  7. Headgroup interactions and ion flotation efficiency in mixtures of a chelating surfactant, different foaming agents, and divalent metal ions.

    PubMed

    Svanedal, Ida; Boija, Susanne; Norgren, Magnus; Edlund, Håkan

    2014-06-10

    The correlation between interaction parameters and ion flotation efficiency in mixtures of chelating surfactant metal complexes and different foaming agents was investigated. We have recently shown that chelating surfactant 2-dodecyldiethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (4-C12-DTPA) forms strong coordination complexes with divalent metal ions, and this can be utilized in ion flotation. Interaction parameters for mixed micelles and mixed monolayer formation for Mg(2+) and Ni(2+) complexes with the chelating surfactant 4-C12-DTPA and different foaming agents were calculated by Rubingh's regular solution theory. Parameters for the calculations were extracted from surface tension measurements and NMR diffusometry. The effects of metal ion coordination on the interactions between 4-C12-DTPA and the foaming agents could be linked to a previously established difference in coordination chemistry between the examined metal ions. As can be expected from mixtures of amphoteric surfactants, the interactions were strongly pH-dependent. Strong correlation was found between interaction parameter β(σ) for mixed monolayer formation and the phase-transfer efficiency of Ni(2+) complexes with 4-C12-DTPA during flotation in a customized flotation cell. In a mixture of Cu(2+) and Zn(2+), the significant difference in conditional stability constants (log K) between the metal complexes was utilized to selectively recover the metal complex with the highest log K (Cu(2+)) by ion flotation. Flotation experiments in an excess concentration of metal ions confirmed the coordination of more than one metal ion to the headgroup of 4-C12-DTPA.

  8. Rare earth metal oxazoline complexes in asymmetric catalysis.

    PubMed

    Ward, Benjamin D; Gade, Lutz H

    2012-11-07

    Polydentate oxazolines have been employed as highly effective stereodirecting ligands for asymmetric catalysis with metals from across most of the periodic table. Despite their highly versatile coordination chemistry, the use of these ligands tends to be polarised towards late transition metals; their use with early transition metals and the f-elements is significantly less developed. This current article aims to review the coordination chemistry and catalytic applications of Group 3 and lanthanide complexes supported by ligands possessing oxazoline moieties. Oxazoline-containing ligands were first employed in molecular lanthanide catalysis as early as 1997, yet there is still a significant void in the chemical literature in this respect. The ligands generally employed include bis(oxazolinyl)methane ("BOX"), 2,6-bis(oxazolinyl)pyridine ("pybox"), 1,1,1-tris(oxazolinyl)ethane ("trisox"), and others. The complexes are employed in a wide-range of catalytic applications, especially in Lewis acid catalysis, but also in the stereospecific polymerisation of olefins.

  9. Barcoded materials based on photoluminescent hybrid system of lanthanide ions-doped metal organic framework and silica via ion exchange.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xiang; Yan, Bing

    2016-04-15

    A multicolored photoluminescent hybrid system based on lanthanide ions-doped metal organic frameworks/silica composite host has potential in display and barcode applications. By controlling the stoichiometry of the lanthanides via cation exchange, proportional various lanthanide ions are successfully introduced into metal organic frameworks, whose emission intensity is correspondingly proportional to its amount. The resulting luminescent barcodes depend on the lanthanide ions ratios and compositions. Subsequently, the lanthanide ions located in the channels of metal organic frameworks are protected from any interaction with the environment after the modification of silica on the surface. The optical and thermal stability of the hybrid materials are improved for technological application.

  10. The electron-transfer based interaction between transition metal ions and photoluminescent graphene quantum dots (GQDs): a platform for metal ion sensing.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hongduan; Liao, Lei; Xu, Xiao; Zou, Mingjian; Liu, Feng; Li, Na

    2013-12-15

    The electron-transfer based quenching effect of commonly encountered transition metal ions on the photoluminescence of grapheme quantum dots (GQDs) was for the first time investigated, and was found to be associated with electron configuration of the individual metal ion. Ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA), the metal ion chelator, can competitively interact with metal ions to recover the quenched photoluminescence of GQDs. Basically, metal ions with empty or completely filled d orbits could not quench the photoluminescence of GQDs, but this quenching effect was observed for the metal ions with partly filled d orbits. Based on the quenching-recovering strategy, a simple optical metal sensing platform was established by taking Ni(2+) as an example. Using the nickel ion-specific chelating reagent, dimethylglyoxime (DMG), to replace EDTA, a detection limit of 4.1 μM was obtained in standard solution. This proposed strategy does not need further functionalization of GQDs, facilitating the application for simple, fast and cost-effective screening of metal ions.

  11. Ion velocity distributions in the vicinity of the current sheet in Earth's distant magnetotail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, L. A.; Paterson, W. R.; Ackerson, K. L.; Kokubun, S.; Kivelson, M. G.; Yamamoto, T.; Fairfield, D. H.

    1994-01-01

    Observations of the three-dimensional velocity distributions of positive ions and electrons have been recently gained for the first time in Earth's distant magnetotail with the Galileo and Geotail spacecraft. For this brief discussion of these exciting results the focus is on the overall character of the ion velocity distributions during substorm activity. The ion velocity distributions within and near the magnetotail current sheet are not accurately described as convecting, isotropic Maxwellians. The observed velocity distributions are characterized by at least two robust types. The first type is similar to the 'lima bean'-shaped velocity distributions that are expected from the nonadiabatic acceleration of ions which execute Speiser-type trajectories in the current sheet. The second distribution is associated with the presence of cold ion beams that presumably also arise from the acceleration of plasma mantle ions in the electric and weak magnetic fields in the current sheet. The ion velocity distributions in a magnetic field structure that is similar to that for plasmoids are also examined. Again the velocity distributions are not Maxwellian but are indicative of nonadiabatic acceleration. An example of the pressure tensor within the plasmoid-like event is also presented because it is anticipated that the off-diagonal elements are important in a description of magnetotail dynamics. Thus our concept of magnetotail dynamics must advance from the present assumption of co-moving electron and ion Maxwellian distributions into reformulations in terms of global kinematical models and nonadiabatic particle motion.

  12. Maternal exposure to alkali, alkali earth, transition and other metals: Concentrations and predictors of exposure.

    PubMed

    Hinwood, A L; Stasinska, A; Callan, A C; Heyworth, J; Ramalingam, M; Boyce, M; McCafferty, P; Odland, J Ø

    2015-09-01

    Most studies of metals exposure focus on the heavy metals. There are many other metals (the transition, alkali and alkaline earth metals in particular) in common use in electronics, defense industries, emitted via combustion and which are naturally present in the environment, that have received limited attention in terms of human exposure. We analysed samples of whole blood (172), urine (173) and drinking water (172) for antimony, beryllium, bismuth, cesium, gallium, rubidium, silver, strontium, thallium, thorium and vanadium using ICPMS. In general most metals concentrations were low and below the analytical limit of detection with some high concentrations observed. Few factors examined in regression models were shown to influence biological metals concentrations and explained little of the variation. Further study is required to establish the source of metals exposures at the high end of the ranges of concentrations measured and the potential for any adverse health impacts in children.

  13. Influence of other rare earth ions on the optical refrigeration efficiency in Yb:YLF crystals.

    PubMed

    Di Lieto, Alberto; Sottile, Alberto; Volpi, Azzurra; Zhang, Zhonghan; Seletskiy, Denis V; Tonelli, Mauro

    2014-11-17

    We investigated the effect of rare earth impurities on the cooling efficiency of Yb³⁺:LiYF₄ (Yb:YLF). The refrigeration performance of two single crystals, doped with 5%-at. Yb and with identical history but with different amount of contaminations, have been compared by measuring the cooling efficiency curves. Spectroscopic and elemental analyses of the samples have been carried out to identify the contaminants, to quantify their concentrations and to understand their effect on the cooling efficiencies. A model of energy transfer processes between Yb and other rare earth ions is suggested, identifying Erbium and Holmium as elements that produce a detrimental effect on the cooling performance.

  14. Metal loading effect on rare earth element binding to humic acid: Experimental and modelling evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsac, Rémi; Davranche, Mélanie; Gruau, Gérard; Dia, Aline

    2010-03-01

    The effect of metal loading on the binding of rare earth elements (REE) to humic acid (HA) was studied by combining ultrafiltration and Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry techniques. REE-HA complexation experiments were performed at pH 3 for REE/C molar ratios ranging from ca 4 × 10 -4 to 2.7 × 10 -2. Results show that the relative amount of REE bound to HA strongly increases with decreasing REE/C. A middle-REE (MREE) downward concavity is shown by patterns at high metal loading, whereas patterns at low metal loading display a regular increase from La to Lu. Humic Ion Model VI modelling are close to the experimental data variations, provided that (i) the ΔLK 2 parameter (i.e. the Model VI parameter taken into account the presence of strong but low density binding sites) is allowed to increase regularly from La to Lu (from 1.1 to 2.1) and (ii) the published log KMA values (i.e. the REE-HA binding constants specific to Model VI) are slightly modified, in particular with respect to heavy REE. Modelling approach provided evidence that logKdREE patterns with varying REE/C likely arises because REE binding to HA occurs through two types of binding sites in different density: (i) a few strong sites that preferentially complex the heavy REE and thus control the logKdREE atterns at low REE/C; (ii) a larger amount of weaker binding sites that preferentially complex the middle-REE and thus control the logKdREE pattern at high REE/C. Hence, metal loading exerts a major effect on HA-mediated REE binding, which could explain the diversity of published conditional constants for REE binding with HA. A literature survey suggests that the few strong sites activated at low REE/C could be multidentate carboxylic sites, or perhaps N-, or P-functional groups. Finally, an examination of the literature field data proposed that the described loading effect could account for much of the variation in REE patterns observed in natural organic-rich waters (DOC > 5 mg L -1 and 4

  15. Selected metal ions protect Bacillus subtilis biofilms from erosion.

    PubMed

    Grumbein, S; Opitz, M; Lieleg, O

    2014-08-01

    Many problems caused by bacterial biofilms can be traced back to their high resilience towards chemical perturbations and their extraordinary sturdiness towards mechanical forces. However, the molecular mechanisms that link the mechanical properties of a biofilm with the ability of bacteria to survive in different chemical environments remain enigmatic. Here, we study the erosion stability of Bacillus subtilis (B. subtilis) biofilms in the presence of different chemical environments. We find that these biofilms can utilize the absorption of certain metal ions such as Cu(2+), Zn(2+), Fe(2+), Fe(3+) and Al(3+) into the biofilm matrix to avoid erosion by shear forces. Interestingly, many of these metal ions are toxic for planktonic B. subtilis bacteria. However, their toxic activity is suppressed when the ions are absorbed into the biofilm matrix. Our experiments clearly demonstrate that the biofilm matrix has to fulfill a dual function, i.e. regulating both the mechanical properties of the biofilm and providing a selective barrier towards toxic chemicals.

  16. Nonthermal ions and associated magnetic field behavior at a quasi-parallel earth's bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkinson, W. P.; Pardaens, A. K.; Schwartz, S. J.; Burgess, D.; Luehr, H.; Kessel, R. L.; Dunlop, M.; Farrugia, C. J.

    1993-01-01

    Attention is given to ion and magnetic field measurements at the earth's bow shock from the AMPTE-UKS and -IRM spacecraft, which were examined in high time resolution during a 45-min interval when the field remained closely aligned with the model bow shock normal. Dense ion beams were detected almost exclusively in the midst of short-duration periods of turbulent magnetic field wave activity. Many examples of propagation at large elevation angles relative to the ecliptic plane, which is inconsistent with reflection in the standard model shock configuration, were discovered. The associated waves are elliptically polarized and are preferentially left-handed in the observer's frame of reference, but are less confined to the maximum variance plane than other previously studied foreshock waves. The association of the wave activity with the ion beams suggests that the former may be triggered by an ion-driven instability, and possible candidates are discussed.

  17. Ions originating from the Moon surface / exosphere observed in the Earth's magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Y.; Yokota, S.; Nishino, M. N.; Yamamoto, T.; Uemura, K.; Tsunakawa, H.

    2012-04-01

    MAgnetic field and Plasma experiment - Plasma energy Angle and Composition Experiment (MAP-PACE) on Kaguya (SELENE) measured lunar plasmas in a polar orbit with an altitude of 100km, 50km, and in an elliptical orbit with perilune altitude as low as 10km. When Kaguya stayed in the Earth's magnetosphere, one of the MAP-PACE sensors IMA (Ion Mass Analyzer) detected ions from the Moon surface [Tanaka et al., GRL 36, L22106, 2009]. These ions were observed when the Moon was in the magnetospheric lobe, on the dayside of the Moon, especially when the solar zenith angle was below 40 degrees. IMA detected peaks for the heavy ions including C+, O+, Na+, K+, and Ar+ that indicated that these ions were originating from the Moon surface / exosphere. When these ions were discovered, they were considered to be accelerated by the potential difference between the lunar surface and Kaguya. Both the lunar surface and Kaguya were positively charged on the dayside of the Moon since photoelectron and electron currents are the major current sources and the photoelectron current dominates the current balance. Since the Debye length was larger than the spacecraft and much smaller than the Moon, it might be possible for the Moon surface to be positively charged to a higher potential than Kaguya. However, the recent detailed study on the ion flow direction with respect to the magnetic field revealed that the ion flow direction was mostly perpendicular to the magnetic field. It suggests that these ions were mostly accelerated by the convection electric field in the Earth's magnetotail. This hypothesis was proved by investigating an example that lobe cold ions were detected by another MAP-PACE ion sensor IEA while ions originating from the Moon surface / exosphere were detected by IMA. The ions originating from the Moon surface / exosphere also showed characteristic variation of the flux intensity that presumably related with the lunar surface structure or composition. Understanding the lunar

  18. Extraordinary rates of transition metal ion-mediated ribozyme catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Roychowdhury-Saha, Manami; Burke, Donald H.

    2006-01-01

    In pre-steady-state, fast-quench kinetic analysis, the tertiary-stabilized hammerhead ribozyme “RzB” cleaves its substrate RNA with maximal measured k obs values of ∼3000 min−1 in 1 mM Mn2+ and ∼780 min−1 in 1 mM Mg2+ at 37°C (pH 7.4). Apparent pKa for the catalytic general base is ∼7.8–8.5, independent of the corresponding metal hydrate pKa, suggesting potential involvement of a nucleobase as general base as suggested previously from nucleobase substitution studies. The pH-rate profile is bell-shaped for Cd2+, for which the general catalytic acid has a pKa of 7.3 ± 0.1. Simulations of the pH-rate relation suggest a pKa for the general catalytic acid to be ∼9.5 in Mn2+ and >9.5 in Mg2+. The acid pKa's follow the trend in the pKa of the hydrated metal ions but are displaced by ∼1–2 pH units in the presence of Cd2+ and Mn2+. One possible explanation for this trend is direct metal ion coordination with a nucleobase, which then acts as general acid. PMID:16912216

  19. New Catalytic DNA Biosensors for Radionuclides and Metal ions

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Yi

    2003-06-01

    The goals of the project are to develop new catalytic DNA biosensors for simultaneous detection and quantification of bioavailable radionuclides and metal ions, and apply the sensors for on-site, real-time assessment of concentration, speciation and stability of the individual contaminants during and after bioremediation. A negative selection strategy was tested and validated. In vitro selection was shown to yield highly active and specific transition metal ion-dependent catalytic DNA/RNA. A fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) study of in vitro selected DNA demonstrated that the trifluorophore labeled system is a simple and powerful tool in studying complex biomolecules structure and dynamics, and is capable of revealing new sophisticated structural changes. New fluorophore/quenchers in a single fluorosensor yielded improved signal to noise ratio in detection, identification and quantification of metal contaminants. Catalytic DNA fluorescent and colorimetric sensors were shown useful in sensing lead in lake water and in leaded paint. Project results were described in two papers and two patents, and won an international prize.

  20. New Catalytic DNA Biosensors for Radionuclides and Metal ions

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Yi

    2002-06-01

    The goals of the project are to develop new catalytic DNA biosensors for simultaneous detection and quantification of bioavailable radionuclides and metal ions, and apply the sensors for on-site, real-time assessment of concentration, speciation and stability of the individual contaminants during and after bioremediation. A negative selection strategy was tested and validated. In vitro selection was shown to yield highly active and specific transition metal ion-dependent catalytic DNA/RNA. A fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) study of in vitro selected DNA demonstrated that the trifluorophore labeled system is a simple and powerful tool in studying complex biomolecules structure and dynamics, and is capable of revealing new sophisticated structural changes. New fluorophore/quenchers in a single fluorosensor yielded improved signal to noise ratio in detection, identification and quantification of metal contaminants. Catalytic DNA fluorescent and colorimetric sensors were shown useful in sensing lead in lake water and in leaded paint. Project results were described in two papers and two patents, and won an international prize.

  1. No association between serum metal ions and implant fixation in large-head metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Søballe, Kjeld; Jakobsen, Stig Storgaard; Lorenzen, Nina Dyrberg; Mechlenburg, Inger; Stilling, Maiken

    2014-01-01

    Background The mechanism of failure of metal-on-metal (MoM) total hip arthroplasty (THA) has been related to a high rate of metal wear debris, which is partly generated from the head-trunnion interface. However, it is not known whether implant fixation is affected by metal wear debris. Patients and methods 49 cases of MoM THA in 41 patients (10 women) with a mean age of 52 (28–68) years were followed with stereoradiographs after surgery and at 1, 2, and 5 years to analyze implant migration by radiostereometric analysis (RSA). Patients also participated in a 5- to 7-year follow-up with measurement of serum metal ions, questionnaires (Oxford hip score (OHS) and Harris hip score (HHS)), and measurement of cup and stem positions and systemic bone mineral density. Results At 1–2 years, mean total translation (TT) was 0.04 mm (95% CI: –0.07 to 0.14; p = 0.5) for the stems; at 2–5 years, mean TT was 0.13 mm (95% CI: –0.25 to –0.01; p = 0.03), but within the precision limit of the method. For the cups, there was no statistically significant TT or total rotation (TR) at 1–2 and 2–5 years. At 2–5 years, we found 4 cups and 5 stems with TT migrations exceeding the precision limit of the method. There was an association between cup migration and total OHS < 40 (4 patients, 4 hips; p = 0.04), but there were no statistically significant associations between cup or stem migration and T-scores < –1 (n = 10), cup and stem positions, or elevated serum metal ion levels (> 7µg/L (4 patients, 6 hips)). Interpretation Most cups and stems were well-fixed at 1–5 years. However, at 2–5 years, 4 cups and 5 stems had TT migrations above the precision limits, but these patients had serum metal ion levels similar to those of patients without measurable migrations, and they were pain-free. Patients with serum metal ion levels > 7 µg/L had migrations similar to those in patients with serum metal ion levels < 7 µg/L. Metal wear debris does not appear to influence the

  2. Monitoring of photoluminescence decay by alkali and alkaline earth metal cations using a photoluminescent bolaamphiphile self-assembly as an optical probe.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sunhyung; Kwak, Jinyoung; Lee, Sang-Yup

    2014-05-01

    Photoluminescence (PL) decay induced by the displacement of an ionic fluorescence component, Tb(3+), with alkali and alkaline earth metal cations was investigated using photoluminescent spherical self-assemblies as optical probes. The photoluminescent spherical self-assembly was prepared by the self-organization of a tyrosine-containing bolaamphiphile molecule with a photosensitizer and Tb(3+) ion. The lanthanide ion, Tb(3+), electrically bound to the carboxyl group of the bolaamphiphile molecule, was displaced by alkali and alkaline earth metal cations that had stronger electrophilicity. The PL of the self-assembly decayed remarkably due to the substitution of lanthanide ions with alkali and alkaline earth metal cations. The PL decay showed a positive correlation with cation concentration and was sensitive to the cation valency. Generally, the PL decay was enhanced by the electrophilicity of the cations. However, Ca(2+) showed greater PL decay than Mg(2+) because Ca(2+) could create various complexes with the carboxyl groups of the bolaamphiphile molecule. Microscopic and spectroscopic investigations were conducted to study the photon energy transfer and displacement of Tb(3+) by the cation exchange. This study demonstrated that the PL decay by the displacement of the ionic fluorescent compound was applied to the detection of various cations in aqueous media and is applicable to the development of future optical sensors.

  3. Yttrium and rare earth stabilized fast reactor metal fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Guon, J.; Grantham, L.F.; Specht, E.R.

    1992-05-12

    This patent describes an improved metal alloy reactor fuel consisting essentially of uranium, plutonium, and at least one element from the group consisting of yttrium, lanthanum, cerium, praseodymium, neodymium, promethium, samarium, europium, gadolinium, terbium, dysprosium, holmium, erbium, thulium, ytterbium and lutetium.

  4. Ions from Different Sources in the near-Earth High-Latitude Magnetotail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koleva, R.; Semkova, J.; Fedorov, A.; Smirnov, V.

    2003-04-01

    We investigate the characteristics of the ion population in the near-Earth (distances from 5 Re to 10 Re) magnetotail region poleward of the exterior cusp and the auroral field lines. The study presented is based on data from the Low Energy Plasma Composition Experiment (AMEI-2) aboard the high-apogee INTERBALL-1 satellite. Characteristic features of the region are the low plasma density and the low electron energy. We discuss several cases of ion spectral and composition measurements, using He++ as a tracer of SW plasma and O+ as a tracer of ionospheric plasma. Ion fluxes exhibit complex structure bearing the history of ions origin and consecutive acceleration. Both Solar wind and ionospheric ions are present in this region. O+ beams are regularly observed, as expected, going away or towards the Earth, with energies up to about 2 keV/q. A small amount of isotropic, high-temperature plasma sheet ions is always present. But dominating is a He++ population with energies in the interval 1 - 2.5 keV/q, either isotropic in pitch angle or consisting of counter-flowing ions with wide pitch-angular distribution. We discuss the possible relation of these populations with the ion populations observed downtail in the lobes, the PSBL, the 'mixed region' at the dusk flunk as identified by Fuselier et al. on base of ISEE-1 and ISEE-2 (J. Geophys. Res., 1999) and the lobe-plasma transition layer, defined by WIND data by Wilbert et al, (J. Geophys. Res., 2001).

  5. Adsorption of Heavy Metal Ions from Aqueous Solutions by Bentonite Nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jing; Su, Guojun; Zhang, Xueping; Huang, Wen

    2016-08-01

    A series of bentonite nanocomposites have been synthesized by modifying bentonite with hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTMAB) and the common complexing agents, complexone (ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid, EDTA) or mercaptocomplexant (2-Mercaptobenzothiazole, MBT). These adsorbents are used to remove heavy metal ions (Cu(2+), Zn(2+), Mn(2+),Co(2+)). The Bent-CTMAB-MBT adsorbed metal ions are higher than Bent-CTMAB-EDTA under the same ion concentration in AAS. Compared with the single ion system, the adsorption of the mixed ion system of Cu(2+), Zn(2+), Mn(2+), Co(2+) had decreased differently. In the mixed system, the adsorption of Mn(2+) is significantly lower, but the adsorption of Cu(2+) was highest. The adsorption sequence of these four metal ions was Cu(2+) > Zn(2+) > Co(2+) > Mn(2+), and the selective adsorption was closely related to the hydration energy of heavy metal ions. We could remove more metal ions in different stages with the adsorption sequence.

  6. Measurements of the mobility of alkaline earth ions in liquid xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeng, S.-C.; Fairbank, W. M., Jr.; Miyajima, M.

    2009-02-01

    The mobility of alkaline earth ions, Mg+, Ca+, Sr+ and Ba+, in liquid xenon is measured for the first time. The mobility of Tl+ is also determined for comparison with a measurement by other researchers. The Atkins cluster model for positive ions in non-polar liquids, based on the electrostriction effect, gives general agreement with the magnitude of the mobility values. This is some evidence that the positive ions form a snowball rather than a bubble structure in liquid xenon. However, the temperature dependence of the mobility does not match well with the Atkins theory, so there are still open theoretical questions on the nature of the environment of alkaline earth ions in liquid xenon. The lower mobility of Mg+ and Ba+ may be explained by a better size match to interstitial and substitutional sites, respectively, in solid Xe. These measurements are motivated by the development of a new technique to search for neutrino masses through 0νββ decay of 136Xe. A key component of one version of the proposed experiment is tagging of 136Ba+ daughter ions in liquid 136Xe by laser-induced fluorescence.

  7. The Effect of Complex Formation upon the Redox Potentials of Metallic Ions. Cyclic Voltammetry Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ibanez, Jorge G.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes experiments in which students prepare in situ soluble complexes of metal ions with different ligands and observe and estimate the change in formal potential that the ion undergoes upon complexation. Discusses student formation and analysis of soluble complexes of two different metal ions with the same ligand. (CW)

  8. Transition metal dissolution, ion migration, electrocatalytic reduction and capacity loss in Lithium-ion full cells

    DOE PAGES

    Gilbert, James A.; Shkrob, Ilya A.; Abraham, Daniel P.

    2017-01-05

    Continuous operation of full cells with layered transition metal (TM) oxide positive electrodes (NCM523) leads to dissolution of TM ions and their migration and incorporation into the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) of the graphite-based negative electrode. These processes correlate with cell capacity fade and accelerate markedly as the upper cutoff voltage (UCV) exceeds 4.30 V. At voltages ≥ 4.4 V there is enhanced fracture of the oxide during cycling that creates new surfaces and causes increased solvent oxidation and TM dissolution. Despite this deterioration, cell capacity fade still mainly results from lithium loss in the negative electrode SEI. Among TMs,more » Mn content in the SEI shows a better correlation with cell capacity loss than Co and Ni contents. As Mn ions become incorporated into the SEI, the kinetics of lithium trapping change from power to linear at the higher UCVs, indicating a large effect of these ions on SEI growth and implicating (electro)catalytic reactions. Lastly, we estimate that each MnII ion deposited in the SEI causes trapping of ~102 additional Li+ ions thereby hastening the depletion of cyclable lithium ions. Using these results, we sketch a mechanism for cell capacity fade, emphasizing the conceptual picture over the chemical detail.« less

  9. Dispersive coupling between light and a rare-earth-ion-doped mechanical resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mølmer, Klaus; Le Coq, Yann; Seidelin, Signe

    2016-11-01

    By spectrally hole burning an inhomogeneously broadened ensemble of ions while applying a controlled perturbation, one can obtain spectral holes that are functionalized for maximum sensitivity to different perturbations. We propose to use such hole-burned structures for the dispersive optical interaction with rare-earth-ion dopants whose frequencies are sensitive to crystal strain due to the bending motion of a crystal cantilever. A quantitative analysis shows that good optical sensitivity to the bending motion is obtained if a magnetic-field gradient is applied across the crystal during hole burning and that the resulting optomechanical coupling strength is sufficient for observing quantum features such as zero-point vibrations.

  10. Excited state absorption in glasses activated with rare earth ions: Experiment and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piatkowski, Dawid; Mackowski, Sebastian

    2012-10-01

    We present semiempirical approach based on the Judd-Ofelt theory and apply it for modeling the spectral properties of fluoride glasses activated with the rare earth (RE) ions. This method provide a powerful tool for simulating both ground state absorption (GSA) and excited state absorption (ESA) spectra of RE ions, e.g. Nd3+, Ho3+, Er3+ and Tm3+ in the ZBLAN glass matrix. The results of theoretical calculations correspond to the experimentally measured data. We also demonstrate that the spectra obtained using the presented approach are applicable in the analysis of up-conversion excitation schemes in these optoelectronically relevant materials.

  11. Interactions of microorganisms with rare earth ions and their utilization for separation and environmental technology.

    PubMed

    Moriwaki, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Hiroki

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, rare earth elements (REEs) have been widely used in various modern technological devices and the global demand for REE has been increasing. The increased demand for REEs has led to environmental exposure or water pollution from rare earth metal mines and various commercial products. Therefore, the development of a safe technology for the separation and adsorption of REEs is very important from the perspective of green chemistry and environmental pollution. In this review, the application and mechanisms of microorganisms for the removal and extraction of REEs from aqueous solutions are described. In addition, the advantages in using microorganisms for REE adsorption and future studies on this topic are discussed.

  12. High current metal ion implantation to synthesize some conducting metal-silicides

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, B. X.; Gao, K. Y.

    1999-06-10

    High current metal-ion implantation by a metal vapor vacuum arc ion source was conducted to synthesize some conducting metal-silicides. It was found that C54-TiSi{sub 2}, ZrSi{sub 2}, NiSi{sub 2}, CoSi{sub 2}, {beta}-FeSi{sub 2}, NbSi{sub 2} and TaSi{sub 2} layers on Si wafers with good electric properties could be obtained directly after implantation. In comparison, the formation of some other silicides like {alpha}-FeSi{sub 2}, NbSi{sub 2}, TaSi{sub 2}, tetragonal-WSi{sub 2} and tetragonal-MoSi{sub 2} required an additional post-annealing to improve their crystallinity and thus their electric properties. Interestingly, the NiSi{sub 2} layers of superior electric properties were obtained at a selected Ni-ion current density of 35 {mu}A/cm{sup 2}. At this current, a beam heating raised the Si wafer to a specific temperature of 380 deg. C, at which the size difference between NiSi{sub 2} and Si lattices was nil. The resistivity of the NiSi{sub 2} layers so obtained was much lower than that of the Ni-disilicide formed by solid-state reaction at >750 deg. C. The formation mechanism of the above metal-silicides and the associated electric properties will also be discussed.

  13. Metal-organic frameworks for lithium ion batteries and supercapacitors

    SciTech Connect

    Ke, Fu-Sheng; Wu, Yu-Shan; Deng, Hexiang

    2015-03-15

    Porous materials have been widely used in batteries and supercapacitors attribute to their large internal surface area (usually 100–1000 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}) and porosity that can favor the electrochemical reaction, interfacial charge transport, and provide short diffusion paths for ions. As a new type of porous crystalline materials, metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have received huge attention in the past decade due to their unique properties, i.e. huge surface area (up to 7000 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}), high porosity, low density, controllable structure and tunable pore size. A wide range of applications including gas separation, storage, catalysis, and drug delivery benefit from the recent fast development of MOFs. However, their potential in electrochemical energy storage has not been fully revealed. Herein, the present mini review appraises recent and significant development of MOFs and MOF-derived materials for rechargeable lithium ion batteries and supercapacitors, to give a glimpse into these potential applications of MOFs. - Graphical abstract: MOFs with large surface area and high porosity can offer more reaction sites and charge carriers diffusion path. Thus MOFs are used as cathode, anode, electrolyte, matrix and precursor materials for lithium ion battery, and also as electrode and precursor materials for supercapacitors. - Highlights: • MOFs have potential in electrochemical area due to their high porosity and diversity. • We summarized and compared works on MOFs for lithium ion battery and supercapacitor. • We pointed out critical challenges and provided possible solutions for future study.

  14. Metallic atoms and ions in comets: Comet Halley 1986 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ibadov, S.

    1992-01-01

    The origin of metallic atoms and ions in the cometary comae is investigated theoretically. Two effects are revealed in the comas of bright comets: (1) the Na anomalous type effect is possible within the gas-dust jets of comet P/Halley 1986 3 due to cooling cometary dust by cryogenic gas flow from the nucleus; and (2) the production of ions of refractory elements (Fe(+), Si(+), etc.) at large heliocentric distances is possible in the comas of the Halley type dusty comets due to high-velocity impacts between cometary and zodiacal dust particles. Spectral observations of comets with high sensitivity and spatial resolution are important for studying both comets and interplanetary dust.

  15. Alloying of metal nanoparticles by ion-beam induced sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magudapathy, P.; Srivastava, S. K.; Gangopadhyay, P.; Amirthapandian, S.; Saravanan, K.; Das, A.; Panigrahi, B. K.

    2017-01-01

    Ion-beam sputtering technique has been utilized for controlled synthesis of metal alloy nanoparticles of compositions that can be tuned. Analysis of various experimental results reveals the formation of Ag-Cu alloy nanoparticles on a silica substrate. Surface-plasmon optical resonance positions and observed shifts of Ag Bragg angles in X-ray diffraction pattern particularly confirm formation of alloy nanoparticles on glass samples. Sputtering induced nano-alloying mechanism has been discussed and compared with thermal mixing of Ag and Cu thin films on glass substrates. Compositions and sizes of alloy nanoparticles formed during ion-beam induced sputtering are found to exceed far from the values of thermal mixing.

  16. Correlation between the limiting pH of metal ion solubility and total metal concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Apak, R.; Hizal, J.; Ustaer, C.

    1999-03-15

    As an alternative to species distribution diagrams (pM vs pH curves in aqueous solution) drawn for a fixed total metal concentration, this work has developed simple linear models for correlating the limiting pH of metal ion solubility -- in equilibrium with the least soluble amorphous metal hydroxide solid phase -- to the total metal concentration. Thus adsorptive metal removal processes in complex systems can be better designed once the limiting pH of heavy metal solubility (i.e., pH{sup *}) in such a complex environment can be envisaged by simple linear equations. pH{sup *} vs pM{sub t} (M{sub t} = total metal concentration that can exist in aqueous solution in equilibrium with M(OH){sub 2(s)}) linear curves for uranyl-hydroxide, uranyl-carbonate-hydroxide, and mercuric-chloride-hydroxide simple and mixed-ligand systems and cupric-carbonate-hydroxide complexes in equilibrium with mixed hydroxide solid phases may enable the experimental chemist to distinguish true adsorption (e.g., onto hydrous oxide sorbents) from bulk precipitation removal of the metal and to interpret some anomalous metal fixation data -- usually attributed to pure adsorption in the literature -- with precipitation if the pM{sub t} at the studied pH is lower than that tolerated by pH{sup *} vs pM{sub t} curves. This easily predictable pH{sup *} corresponding to a given pM{sub t} may aid the design of desorptive mobilization experiments for certain metals as well as their adsorptive removal with the purpose of simulating metal adsorption and desorption cycles in real complex environments with changing groundwater pH.

  17. Neutral atomic oxygen beam produced by ion charge exchange for Low Earth Orbital (LEO) simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce; Rutledge, Sharon; Brdar, Marko; Olen, Carl; Stidham, Curt

    1987-01-01

    A low energy neutral atomic oxygen beam system was designed and is currently being assembled at the Lewis Research Center. The system utilizes a 15 cm diameter Kaufman ion source to produce positive oxygen ions which are charge exchange neutralized to produce low energy (variable from 5 to 150 eV) oxygen atoms at a flux simulating real time low Earth orbital conditions. An electromagnet is used to direct only the singly charged oxygen ions from the ion source into the charge exchange cell. A retarding potential grid is used to slow down the oxygen ions to desired energies prior to their charge exchange. Cryogenically cooled diatomic oxygen gas in the charge exchange cell is then used to transfer charge to the oxygen ions to produce a neutral atomic oxygen beam. Remaining non-charge exchanged oxygen ions are then swept from the beam by electromagnetic or electrostatic deflection depending upon the desired experiment configuration. The resulting neutral oxygen beam of 5 to 10 cm in diameter impinges upon target materials within a sample holder fixture that can also provide for simultaneous heating and UV exposure during the atomic oxygen bombardment.

  18. A rare-earth-magnet ion trap for confining low-Z, bare nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewer, Samuel M.; Tan, Joseph N.

    2009-05-01

    Simplifications in the theory for Rydberg states of hydrogenlike ions allow a substantial improvement in the accuracy of predicted levels, which can yield information on the values of fundamental constants and test theory if they can be compared with precision frequency measurements.[1] We consider the trapping of bare nuclei (fully-stripped) to be used in making Rydberg states of one-electron ions with atomic number 1< Z < 11. Numerical simulation is used here to study ion confinement in a compact, Penning-style ion trap consisting of electrodes integrated with rare-earth permanent magnets, and to model the capture of charge-state-selected ions extracted from an electron beam ion trap (EBIT). An experimental apparatus adapted to the NIST EBIT will also be discussed. Reference: [1] U.D. Jentschura, P.J. Mohr, J.N. Tan, and B.J. Wundt, ``Fundamental constants and tests of theory in Rydberg states of hydrogenlike ions,'' Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 160404 (2008).

  19. Electrolyte materials containing highly dissociated metal ion salts

    DOEpatents

    Lee, H.S.; Geng, L.; Skotheim, T.A.

    1996-07-23

    The present invention relates to metal ion salts which can be used in electrolytes for producing electrochemical devices, including both primary and secondary batteries, photoelectrochemical cells and electrochromic displays. The salts have a low energy of dissociation and may be dissolved in a suitable polymer to produce a polymer solid electrolyte or in a polar aprotic liquid solvent to produce a liquid electrolyte. The anion of the salts may be covalently attached to polymer backbones to produce polymer solid electrolytes with exclusive cation conductivity. 2 figs.

  20. Electrolyte materials containing highly dissociated metal ion salts

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Hung-Sui; Geng, Lin; Skotheim, Terje A.

    1996-07-23

    The present invention relates to metal ion salts which can be used in electrolytes for producing electrochemical devices, including both primary and secondary batteries, photoelectrochemical cells and electrochromic displays. The salts have a low energy of dissociation and may be dissolved in a suitable polymer to produce a polymer solid electrolyte or in a polar aprotic liquid solvent to produce a liquid electrolyte. The anion of the salts may be covalently attached to polymer backbones to produce polymer solid electrolytes with exclusive cation conductivity.

  1. Theoretical study of transition-metal ions bound to benzene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Partridge, Harry; Langhoff, Stephen R.

    1992-01-01

    Theoretical binding energies are reported for all first-row and selected second-row transition metal ions (M+) bound to benzene. The calculations employ basis sets of at least double-zeta plus polarization quality and account for electron correlation using the modified coupled-pair functional method. While the bending is predominantly electrostatic, the binding energies are significantly increased by electron correlation, because the donation from the metal d orbitals to the benzene pi* orbitals is not well described at the self-consistent-field level. The uncertainties in the computed binding energies are estimated to be about 5 kcal/mol. Although the calculated and experimental binding energies generally agree to within their combined uncertainties, it is likely that the true binding energies lie in the lower portion of the experimental range. This is supported by the very good agreement between the theoretical and recent experimental binding energies for AgC6H6(+).

  2. Solid Phase Luminescence of Several Rare Earth Ions on Ion-Exchange Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanner, Stephen P.; Street, Kenneth W., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    The development and characterization of a novel ion-exchange film for solid-phase fluorometry and phosphorimetry is reported. This new cation-exchange material is suitable for spectroscopic applications in the ultraviolet and visible regions. It is advantageous because it, as a single entity, is easily recovered from solution and mounted in the spectrofluorometers. After preconcentration on the film, the luminescence intensity of lanthanide ions is several orders of magnitude greater than that of the corresponding solution, depending on the volume of solution and the amount of film. This procedure allows emission spectral measurements and determination of lanthanide ions at solution concentrations of < 5 (micro)g/L. The film may be stored for subsequent reuse or as a permanent record of the analysis. The major drawback to the use of the film is slow uptake of analyte due to diffusion limitations.

  3. NIR persistent luminescence of lanthanide ion-doped rare-earth oxycarbonates: the effect of dopants.

    PubMed

    Caratto, Valentina; Locardi, Federico; Costa, Giorgio Andrea; Masini, Roberto; Fasoli, Mauro; Panzeri, Laura; Martini, Marco; Bottinelli, Emanuela; Gianotti, Enrica; Miletto, Ivana

    2014-10-22

    A series of luminescent rare-earth ion-doped hexagonal II-type Gd oxycarbonate phosphors Gd2-xRExO2CO3 (RE = Eu(3+), Yb(3+), Dy(3+)) have been successfully synthesized by thermal decomposition of the corresponding mixed oxalates. The Yb(3+) doped Gd-oxycarbonate has evidenced a high persistent luminescence in the NIR region, that is independent from the temperature and makes this materials particular attractive as optical probes for bioimaging.

  4. Ion engine propelled Earth-Mars cycler with nuclear thermal propelled transfer vehicle, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Rudolf X.; Baker, Myles; Melko, Joseph

    1994-01-01

    The goal of this project was to perform a preliminary design of a long term, reusable transportation system between earth and Mars which would be capable of providing both artificial gravity and shelter from solar flare radiation. The heart of this system was assumed to be a Cycler spacecraft propelled by an ion propulsion system. The crew transfer vehicle was designed to be propelled by a nuclear-thermal propulsion system. Several Mars transportation system architectures and their associated space vehicles were designed.

  5. New technology of extracting the amount of rare earth metals from the red mud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martoyan, G. A.; Karamyan, G. G.; Vardan, G. A.

    2016-01-01

    The paper outlined the environmental and economic problems associated with red mud - the waste generated in processing of bauxite ore for aluminum production. The chemical analysis of red mud has identified a number of useful elements including rare earth metals. The electromembrane technology of red mud processing with extraction of valuable elements is described. A possible scheme of separation of these metals through electrolysis is also given.

  6. Laser polarization and phase control of up-conversion fluorescence in rare-earth ions

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yunhua; Zhang, Shian; Zhang, Hui; Ding, Jingxin; Jia, Tianqing; Qiu, Jianrong; Sun, Zhenrong

    2014-01-01

    We theoretically and experimentally demonstrate the up-conversion fluorescence control via resonance-mediated two-photon absorption in rare-earth ions by varying both the laser polarization and phase. We show that both the laser polarization and phase can control the up-conversion fluorescence, and the up-conversion fluorescence intensity is decreased when the laser polarization changes from linear through elliptical to circular. We also show that the laser polarization will affect the control efficiency of the up-conversion fluorescence by varying the laser phase, and the circular polarization will reduce the control efficiency. Furthermore, we suggest that the control efficiency by varying the laser polarization and the effect of the laser polarization on the control efficiency by varying the laser phase can be artificially manipulated by controlling the laser spectral bandwidth. This optical control method opens a new opportunity to control the up-conversion fluorescence of rare-earth ions, which may have significant impact on the related applications of rare-earth ions. PMID:25465401

  7. Energetics of alkali and alkaline earth ion-exchanged zeolite A

    DOE PAGES

    Sun, Hui; Wu, Di; Liu, Kefeng; ...

    2016-06-30

    Alkali and alkaline earth ion-exchanged zeolite A samples were synthesized in aqueous exchange media. They were thoroughly studied by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), electron microprobe (EMPA), thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry (TG-DSC), and high temperature oxide melt solution calorimetry. The hydration energetics and enthalpies of formation of these zeolite A materials from constituent oxides were determined. Specifically, the hydration level of zeolite A has a linear dependence on the average ionic potential (Z/r) of the cation, from 0.894 (Rb-A) to 1.317 per TO2 (Mg-A). The formation enthalpies from oxides (25 °C) range from –93.71 ± 1.77 (K-A) to –48.02more » ± 1.85 kJ/mol per TO2 (Li-A) for hydrated alkali ion-exchanged zeolite A, and from –47.99 ± 1.20 (Ba-A) to –26.41 ± 1.71 kJ/mol per TO2 (Mg-A) for hydrated alkaline earth ion-exchanged zeolite A. As a result, the formation enthalpy from oxides generally becomes less exothermic as Z/r increases, but a distinct difference in slope is observed between the alkali and the alkaline earth series.« less

  8. Energetics of alkali and alkaline earth ion-exchanged zeolite A

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Hui; Wu, Di; Liu, Kefeng; Guo, Xiaofeng; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2016-06-30

    Alkali and alkaline earth ion-exchanged zeolite A samples were synthesized in aqueous exchange media. They were thoroughly studied by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), electron microprobe (EMPA), thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry (TG-DSC), and high temperature oxide melt solution calorimetry. The hydration energetics and enthalpies of formation of these zeolite A materials from constituent oxides were determined. Specifically, the hydration level of zeolite A has a linear dependence on the average ionic potential (Z/r) of the cation, from 0.894 (Rb-A) to 1.317 per TO2 (Mg-A). The formation enthalpies from oxides (25 °C) range from –93.71 ± 1.77 (K-A) to –48.02 ± 1.85 kJ/mol per TO2 (Li-A) for hydrated alkali ion-exchanged zeolite A, and from –47.99 ± 1.20 (Ba-A) to –26.41 ± 1.71 kJ/mol per TO2 (Mg-A) for hydrated alkaline earth ion-exchanged zeolite A. As a result, the formation enthalpy from oxides generally becomes less exothermic as Z/r increases, but a distinct difference in slope is observed between the alkali and the alkaline earth series.

  9. The two faces of metal ions: From implants rejection to tissue repair/regeneration.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Daniel M; Santos, Susana G; Lamghari, Meriem; Barbosa, Mário A

    2016-04-01

    The paradigm of metallic ions as exclusive toxic agents is changing. During the last 60 years, knowledge about toxicological and immunological reactions to metal particles and ions has advanced considerably. Hip prostheses, namely metal-on-metal bearings, have prompted studies about excessive and prolonged exposure to prosthetic debris. In that context, the interactions of metal particles and ions with cells and tissues are mostly harmful, inducing immune responses that lead to osteolysis and implant failure. However, in the last decade, new strategies to promote immunomodulation and healing have emerged based on the unique properties of metallic ions. The atom-size and charge enable ions to interact with key macromolecules (e.g. proteins, nucleic acids) that affect cellular function. Moreover, these agents are inexpensive, stable and can be integrated in biomaterials, which may open new avenues for a novel generation of medical devices. Herein, orthopedic devices are discussed as models for adverse responses to metal ions, and debated together with the potential to use metal ions-based therapies, thus bridging the gap between unmet clinical needs and cutting-edge research. In summary, this review addresses the two "faces" of metallic ions, from pathological responses to innovative research strategies that use metal ions for regenerative medicine.

  10. Aluminum/alkaline earth metal composites and method for producing

    DOEpatents

    Russell, Alan M; Anderson, Iver E; Kim, Hyong J; Freichs, Andrew E

    2014-02-11

    A composite is provided having an electrically conducting Al matrix and elongated filaments comprising Ca and/or Sr and/or Ba disposed in the matrix and extending along a longitudinal axis of the composite. The filaments initially comprise Ca and/or Sr and/or Ba metal or allow and then may be reacted with the Al matrix to form a strengthening intermetallic compound comprising Al and Ca and/or Sr and/or Ba. The composite is useful as a long-distance, high voltage power transmission conductor.

  11. Mechanism of beta-purothionin antimicrobial peptide inhibition by metal ions: molecular dynamics simulation study.

    PubMed

    Oard, Svetlana; Karki, Bijaya

    2006-04-20

    Wheat beta-purothionin is a highly potent antimicrobial peptide which, however, is inactivated by metal ions. The key structural properties and mechanisms of inhibition of beta-purothionin were investigated for the first time using unconstrained molecular dynamics simulations in explicit water. A series of simulations were performed to determine effects of temperature and the metal ions. Analyses of the unconstrained simulations allowed the experimentally unavailable structural and dynamic details to be unambiguously examined. The global fold and the alpha1 helix of beta-purothionin are thermally stable and not affected by metal ions. In contrast, the alpha2 helix unfolds with shift of temperature from 300 K and in the presence of metal ions. The network of conserved residues including Arg30 and Lys5 is sensitive to environmental changes and triggers unfolding. Loop regions display high flexibility and elevated dynamics, but are affected by metal ions. Our study provides insights into the mechanism of metal ion-based inhibition.

  12. Rare-earth metal π-complexes of reduced arenes, alkenes, and alkynes: bonding, electronic structure, and comparison with actinides and other electropositive metals.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wenliang; Diaconescu, Paula L

    2015-09-21

    Rare-earth metal complexes of reduced π ligands are reviewed with an emphasis on their electronic structure and bonding interactions. This perspective discusses reduced carbocyclic and acyclic π ligands; in certain categories, when no example of a rare-earth metal complex is available, a closely related actinide analogue is discussed. In general, rare-earth metals have a lower tendency to form covalent interactions with π ligands compared to actinides, mainly uranium. Despite predominant ionic interactions in rare-earth chemistry, covalent bonds can be formed with reduced carbocyclic ligands, especially multiply reduced arenes.

  13. Rare earth zirconium oxide buffer layers on metal substrates

    DOEpatents

    Williams, Robert K.; Paranthaman, Mariappan; Chirayil, Thomas G.; Lee, Dominic F.; Goyal, Amit; Feenstra, Roeland

    2001-01-01

    A laminate article comprises a substrate and a biaxially textured (RE.sub.x A.sub.(1-x)).sub.2 O.sub.2-(x/2) buffer layer over the substrate, wherein 0metal-organic decomposition. The laminate article can include a layer of YBCO over the (RE.sub.x A.sub.(1-x)).sub.2 O.sub.2-(x/2) buffer layer. A layer of CeO.sub.2 between the YBCO layer and the (RE.sub.x A.sub.(1-x)).sub.2 O.sub.2-(x/2) buffer layer can also be include. Further included can be a layer of YSZ between the CeO.sub.2 layer and the (RE.sub.x A.sub.(1-x)).sub.2 O.sub.2-(x/2) buffer layer. The substrate can be a biaxially textured metal, such as nickel. A method of forming the laminate article is also disclosed.

  14. Structure of the alkali-metal-atom + strontium molecular ions: Towards photoassociation and formation of cold molecular ions

    SciTech Connect

    Aymar, M.; Dulieu, O.; Guerout, R.

    2011-08-14

    The potential energy curves, permanent and transition dipole moments, and the static dipolar polarizability, of molecular ions composed of one alkali-metal atom and a strontium ion are determined with a quantum chemistry approach. The molecular ions are treated as effective two-electron systems and are treated using effective core potentials including core polarization, large gaussian basis sets, and full configuration interaction. In the perspective of upcoming experiments aiming at merging cold atom and cold ion traps, possible paths for radiative charge exchange, photoassociation of a cold lithium or rubidium atom and a strontium ion are discussed, as well as the formation of stable molecular ions.

  15. Surface energetics of alkaline-earth metal oxides: Trends in stability and adsorption of small molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajdich, Michal; Nørskov, Jens K.; Vojvodic, Aleksandra

    2015-04-01

    We present a systematic theoretical investigation of the surface properties, stability, and reactivity of rocksalt type alkaline-earth metal oxides including MgO, CaO, SrO, and BaO. The accuracy of commonly used exchange-correlation density functionals (LDA, PBE, RPBE, PBEsol, BEEF-vdW, and hybrid HSE) and random-phase approximation (RPA) is evaluated and compared to existing experimental values. Calculated surface energies of the four most stable surface facets under vacuum conditions, the (100) surface, the metal and oxygen terminated octopolar (111), and the (110) surfaces, exhibit a monotonic increase in stability from MgO to BaO. On the MgO(100) surface, adsorption of CO, NO, and CH4 is characterized by physisorption while H2O chemisorbs, which is in agreement with experimental findings. We further use the on-top metal adsorption of CO and NO molecules to map out the surface energetics of each alkaline-earth metal oxide surface. The considered functionals all qualitatively predict similar adsorption energy trends. The ordering between the adsorption energies on different surface facets can be attributed to differences in the local geometrical surface structure and the electronic structure of the metal constituent of the alkaline-earth metal oxide. The striking observation that CO adsorption strength is weaker than NO adsorption on the (100) terraces as the period of the alkaline-earth metal in the oxide increases is analyzed in detail in terms of charge redistribution within the σ and π channels of adsorbates. Finally, we also present oxygen adsorption and oxygen vacancy formation energies in these oxide systems.

  16. Catalysis of Ugi four component coupling reactions by rare earth metal triflates.

    PubMed

    Okandeji, Babajide O; Gordon, Jonathan R; Sello, Jason K

    2008-07-18

    Substoichiometric quantities of scandium and ytterbium triflate increase the yield of Ugi four component coupling reactions of aromatic aldehydes 2- to 7-fold. These rare earth metal triflates enhance the reaction yields primarily via activation of the imine intermediate of this multicomponent reaction.

  17. Systematic studies of the mass spectrometric properties of alkaline earth metal cationized amino acids and peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Küjckelmann, Ulrich; Müller, Dietrich; Weber, Carsten

    1997-07-01

    The results of a systematic study of the gas phase interactions of α-amino acids and peptides (4-15 amino acids) with alkaline earth metals, observed with mass spectrometric techniques, are presented. Furthermore, a model for the cationization with calcium at the C-terminal amino acid arginine in rotaviral polypeptides is presented.

  18. Adsorption Behavior of Rare Earth Metal Cations in the Interlayer Space of γ-ZrP.

    PubMed

    Takei, Takahiro; Iidzuka, Kiyoaki; Miura, Akira; Yanagida, Sayaka; Kumada, Nobuhiro; Magome, Eisuke; Moriyoshi, Chikako; Kuroiwa, Yoshihiro

    2016-10-04

    Adsorption competencies of rare earth metal cations in γ-zirconium phosphate were examined by ICP, synchrotron X-ray diffraction (SXRD), and ab initio simulation. The adsorption amounts are around 0.06-0.10 per zirconium phosphate. From the SXRD patterns of the adsorbed samples, the basal spacing estimated by c sin β increased linearly with an increasing ionic radius of rare earth metal cation, though a and b lattice constants show no change. These SXRD patterns can be classified into four groups that have different super lattices. The four superlattices have multiplicities of x131, x241, and x221 for the xabc axis, and the location of the rare earth metal cation in the original unit cell changes depending on the superlattice cell. In the x131 superlattice, Yb and Er occupied the site near the zirconium phosphate layer, though La and Ce in the x221 superlattice remained in the center position between the phosphate sheet. For the ab initio simulation of γ-ZrP with the typical rare earth metal cations (Tb, Eu, Dy, and La), the results of simulation show a similar tendency of the position estimated by SXRD refinements.

  19. Triboelectrification-Enabled Self-Powered Detection and Removal of Heavy Metal Ions in Wastewater.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhaoling; Chen, Jun; Guo, Hengyu; Fan, Xing; Wen, Zhen; Yeh, Min-Hsin; Yu, Chongwen; Cao, Xia; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2016-04-20

    A fundamentally new working principle into the field of self-powered heavy-metal-ion detection and removal using the triboelectrification effect is introduced. The as-developed tribo-nanosensors can selectively detect common heavy metal ions. The water-driven triboelectric nanogenerator is taken as a sustainable power source for heavy-metal-ion removal by recycling the kinetic energy from flowing wastewater.

  20. State promotion and neutralization оf ions near metal surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinoviev, A. N.

    2011-05-01

    When a multiply charged ion with charge Z approaches the metal surface, a dipole is formed by the multiply charged ion and the charge induced in the metal. The states for such a dipole are promoted into continuum with decreasing ion-surface distance and cross the states formed from metal atom. The model proposed explains the dominant population of deep bound states in collisions considered.

  1. Evidence for solar wind origin of energetic heavy ions in the earth's radiation belt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hovestadt, D.; Klecker, B.; Scholer, M.; Gloeckler, G.; Ipavich, F. M.; Fan, C. Y.; Fisk, L. A.; Ogallagher, J. J.

    1978-01-01

    Analysis of data from our energetic ion composition experiment on ISEE-1 has revealed the presence of substantial fluxes of carbon, oxygen, and heavier ions above 400 keV/nucleon at L values between approximately 2.5 and 4 earth radii. The measured C/O ratio varies systematically from 1.3 at 450 keV/nucleon to 4.1 at 1.3 MeV/nucleon, and no iron is observed above 200 keV/nucleon. These results provide strong evidence for a solar wind origin for energetic ions in the outer radiation belt. The absence of iron and the increase of the carbon-to-oxygen ratio with energy suggest that the condition for the validity of the first adiabatic invariant may have a strong influence on the trapping of these particles.

  2. Optical spectroscopy of random deformations in elastically-anisotropic crystals containing rare-earth ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malkin, B. Z.; Baibekov, E. I.; Abishev, N. M.; Pytalev, D. S.; Popova, M. N.; Bettinelli, M.

    2016-12-01

    We present the results of studies of spectral effects in the optical high-resolution (0.01 cm-1) spectra of rare-earth ions in crystals caused by random deformations of a crystal lattice. Low-temperature polarized transmission spectra in a broad spectral range (5000-15000 cm-1) were taken for tetragonal single crystals ABO4 (A=Y, Lu; B=V, P) containing impurity Tm3+ ions with concentrations 0.2 and 1.0 at.%. A specific fine structure of singlet-doublet transitions in the Tm3+ ions was observed. We demonstrate a possibility to estimate a concentration of intrinsic lattice defects from the analysis of the measurement data, by making use of an analytical expression derived in the present work for the distribution function of random lattice strains induced by point defects in the elastically-anisotropic continuum.

  3. Ion conics and counterstreaming electrons generated by lower hybrid waves in the earth's magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Tom; Crew, Geoffrey B.; Retterrer, John M.; Jasperse, John R.

    1989-01-01

    The exotic phenomenon of energetic ion-conic and counterstreaming electron formation by lower hybrid waves along discrete auroral field lines in the earth magnetosphere is considered. Mean-particle calculations, plasma simulations, and analytical treatments of the acceleration processes are described. It is shown that, in the primary auroral electron-beam region, lower hybrid waves could be an efficient mechanism for the transverse heating of H (+) and O(+) ions of ionospheric origin, as well as for the field-aligned heating of the ambient electrons leading to coincident counterstreaming electron distributions. For O(+) ions to be energized by such a wave-particle interaction process, however, some sort of preheating mechanism is required.

  4. Half metallic ferromagnetism in alkaline-earth metal nitrides XN (X=Ca, Sr and Ba): A first principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palanichamy, R. Rajeswara; Priyanga, G. Sudha; Cinthia, A. Jemmy; Murugan, A.; Meenaatci, A. T. Asvini; Iyakutti, K.

    2013-11-01

    The structural, electronic, mechanical and magnetic properties of 3 alkaline-earth metal nitrides (XN: X=Ca, Sr, and Ba) are investigated by the first principles calculations based on density functional theory using the Vienna ab-initio simulation code. At ambient pressure all the 3 nitrides are stable in the ferromagnetic state with a cubic NaCl structure. The calculated lattice parameters are in good agreement with the available results. The electronic structure reveals that these materials are half metallic ferromagnets at normal pressure. A pressure-induced structural phase transition from NaCl (B1) to CsCl (B2) phase is observed in CaN, SrN and BaN. On further increasing the pressure, a half metallic to metallic transition is also observed in these nitrides. Ferromagnetism is quenched in all the 3 nitrides at high pressures.

  5. Interaction of calcium with the human divalent metal-ion transporter-1

    SciTech Connect

    Shawki, Ali; Mackenzie, Bryan

    2010-03-12

    Iron deficiency is the most prevalent micronutrient deficiency worldwide. Whereas dietary calcium is known to reduce the bioavailability of iron, the molecular basis of this interaction is not understood. We tested the hypothesis that divalent metal-ion transporter-1 (DMT1)-the principal or only mechanism by which nonheme iron is taken up at the intestinal brush border-is shared also by calcium. We expressed human DMT1 in RNA-injected Xenopus oocytes and examined its activity using radiotracer assays and the voltage clamp. DMT1 did not mediate {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+} uptake. Instead, we found that Ca{sup 2+} blocked the Fe{sup 2+}-evoked currents and inhibited {sup 55}Fe{sup 2+} uptake in a noncompetitive manner (K{sub i} {approx} 20 mM). The mechanism of inhibition was independent of voltage and did not involve intracellular Ca{sup 2+} signaling. The alkaline-earth metal ions Ba{sup 2+}, Sr{sup 2+}, and Mg{sup 2+} also inhibited DMT1-mediated iron-transport activity. We conclude that Ca{sup 2+} is a low-affinity noncompetitive inhibitor-but not a transported substrate-of DMT1, explaining in part the effect of high dietary calcium on iron bioavailability.

  6. Quasi-linear analysis of ion Weibel instability in the earth's neutral sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lui, Anthony T. Y.; Yoon, Peter H.; Chang, Chia-Lie

    1993-01-01

    A quasi-linear analysis of the ion Weibel instability (IWI) for waves with parallel propagation is carried out for parameters appropriate to the earth's neutral sheet during the substorm interval. For ion drift speed reaching sizable fraction of the ion thermal speed, unstable waves grow to a nonlinear regime in a time interval greater than an ion gyroperiod. The saturation level is attained with current density reduced to about 15-28 percent of its preactivity level. The unstable wave amplitude normalized to the initial ambient field is found to be in the range of 0.2-0.8. This is accompanied by ion heating along the magnetic field with the parallel temperature being enhanced by 25-90 percent. Thus, the IWI can provide nonadiabatic heating of ions in current disruptions during substorms. The associated anomalous resistivity is estimated to be about 1 x 10 exp -7 to 1 x 10 exp -6 s, which is about 11 to 12 orders of magnitude above the classical resistivity.

  7. Shifted homologous relationships between the transplutonium and early rare-earth metals

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, J.W.

    1984-01-01

    The physico-chemical properties of the late actinide metals americium through einsteinium are compared with their rare-earth counterparts. Localization of the 5f electrons beginning at americium signals the appearance of true rare-earth-like properties, but the homologous relationship is shifted to place americium below praseodymium, einsteinium then below europium. The comparison of crystal structure, phase transitions, vapor pressures and heats of vaporization reveals remarkable similarities, especially for Sm-Cf and Eu-Es, where the stability of the divalent metal becomes established and divalent chemistry then follows. There is of course a major perturbation at the half-filled shell at curium, and it may be argued that americium is the anomaly in the so-called second rare-earth series. However, the response of americium, berkelium and californium under pressure reveals the true perturbation to be a thermodynamic one, occurring at curium.

  8. Polaronic Transport in Phosphate Glasses Containing Transition Metal Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Mark

    The goal of this dissertation is to characterize the basic transport properties of phosphate glasses containing various amounts of TIs and to identify and explain any electronic phase transitions which may occur. The P2 O5-V2O5-WO3 (PVW) glass system will be analyzed to find the effect of TI concentration on conduction. In addition, the effect of the relative concentrations of network forming ions (SiO2 and P2O5) on transport will be studied in the P2O5-SiO2-Fe2O 3 (PSF) system. Also presented is a numerical study on a tight-binding model adapted for the purposes of modelling Gaussian traps, mimicking TI's, which are arranged in an extended network. The results of this project will contribute to the development of fundamental theories on the electronic transport in glasses containing mixtures of transition oxides as well as those containing multiple network formers without discernible phase separation. The present study on the PVW follows up on previous investigation into the effect on mixed transition ions in oxide glasses. Past research has focused on glasses containing transition metal ions from the 3d row. The inclusion of tungsten, a 5d transition metal, adds a layer of complexity through the mismatch of the energies of the orbitals contributing to localized states. The data have indicated that a transition reminiscent of a metal-insulator transition (MIT) occurs in this system as the concentration of tungsten increases. As opposed to some other MIT-like transitions found in phosphate glass systems, there seems to be no polaron to bipolaron conversion. Instead, the individual localization parameter for tungsten noticeably decreases dramatically at the transition point as well as the adiabaticity. Another distinctive feature of this project is the study of the PSF system, which contains two true network formers, phosphorous pentoxide (P2O 5) and silicon dioxide (SiO2). It is not usually possible to do a reliable investigation of the conduction properties of

  9. Metal ion sorption by untreated and chemically treated biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Kilbane, J.J.; Xie, J.

    1992-12-31

    The metal-binding ability of biosorbents is well known; however, in comparison with commercial ion-exchange resins the capacity of biosorbents is low. The purpose of this research was to examine chemically modified biosorbents and biosorbents prepared from microorganisms isolated from extreme environments to determine if significant improvements in metal-binding capacity or biosorbents with unique capabilities could be produced. Chemical treatments examined included acid, alkali, carbon disulfide, phosphorus oxychloride, anhydrous formamide, sodium thiosulfate, sodium chloroacetic acid, and phenylsulfonate. Biosorbents were prepared from microorganisms isolated from pristine and acid mine drainage impacted sites and included heterotrophs, methanotrophs, algae, and sulfate reducers. Chemical modification with carbon disulfide, phosphorous oxychloride, and sodium thiosulfate yielded biosorbents with such as much as 74%, 133%, and 155% improvements, respectively, in metal-binding capacity, but the performance of these chemically modified biosorbents deteriorated upon repeated use. A culture isolated from an acid mine drainage impacted site, IGTM17, exhibits about 3-fold higher metal-binding capacity in comparison with other biosorbents examined in this study. IGTM17 also exhibits superior metal-binding ability at decreased pH or in the presence of interfering common cations in comparison with other biosorbents or some commercially available cation exchange resins. Some biosorbents, such as IGTM5, can bind anions. To our knowledge this is the first demonstration of the ability of biosorbents to bind anions. Moreover, preliminary data indicate that the chemical modification of biosorbents may be capable of imparting the ability to selectively bind certain anions. Further research is needed to optimize conditions for the chemical modification and stabilization of biosorbents.

  10. Investigation of the Transport of Solar Ions Through the Earth's Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lennartsson, O. W.

    2000-08-01

    The objective of this study has been to infer, by statistical means, the most probable mode of entry of solar wind plasma into Earth's magnetotail, using a particular set of archived data from the Lockheed Plasma Composition Experiment on the International Sun-Earth Explorer One (ISEE-1) satellite, jointly sponsored by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the European Space Agency (ESA) in the 1970's and 80's. Despite their considerable age, the Lockheed ISEE-1 data are still, at the time of this report, the only substantial ion composition data in the sub-keV to keV energy range available from the magnetotail beyond 9 RE, because of various technical problems with ion mass spectrometers on later missions, and are therefore a unique source of information about the mixing of solar and terrestrial origin plasmas in the tail, within the ISEE-1 apogee of almost 23 RE. The entire set of archived data used in this study, covering the 4.5 years of operation of the instrument and comprising not only tail measurements but also data from the inner magnetosphere as well as data from outside the magnetopause, is now available to the public via the WorldWideWeb at the address: http://cis.spasci.com/ISEE_ions The fundamental assumption of this and other studies of magnetosphere ion composition is that He++ and O+ ions are virtually certain "tags" of solar and terrestrial origins, respectively. This is an assumption with strong theoretical basis and it is corroborated by observational evidence, including the often substantial differences between the velocity distribution functions of those two species. The H+ ions can have a dual origin, in principle, but the close resemblance in the ISEE-1 data between the dynamics of H+ and He++ ions indicates a predominantly solar origin of the H+ ions in the tail, at least. By the same token, the usually minor He+ ions are probably almost entirely of terrestrial origin, because of their similarity to the O+ ions.

  11. Investigation of the Transport of Solar Ions Through the Earth's Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lennartsson, O. W.; Evans, David (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this study has been to infer, by statistical means, the most probable mode of entry of solar wind plasma into Earth's magnetotail, using a particular set of archived data from the Lockheed Plasma Composition Experiment on the International Sun-Earth Explorer One (ISEE-1) satellite, jointly sponsored by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the European Space Agency (ESA) in the 1970's and 80's. Despite their considerable age, the Lockheed ISEE-1 data are still, at the time of this report, the only substantial ion composition data in the sub-keV to keV energy range available from the magnetotail beyond 9 R(sub E), because of various technical problems with ion mass spectrometers on later missions, and are therefore a unique source of information about the mixing of solar and terrestrial origin plasmas in the tail, within the ISEE-1 apogee of almost 23 R(sub E). The entire set of archived data used in this study, covering the 4.5 years of operation of the instrument and comprising not only tail measurements but also data from the inner magnetosphere as well as data from outside the magnetopause, is now available to the public via the WorldWideWeb at the address: http://cis.spasci.com/ISEE_ions The fundamental assumption of this and other studies of magnetosphere ion composition is that He++ and O+ ions are virtually certain "tags" of solar and terrestrial origins, respectively. This is an assumption with strong theoretical basis and it is corroborated by observational evidence, including the often substantial differences between the velocity distribution functions of those two species. The H+ ions can have a dual origin, in principle, but the close resemblance in the ISEE-1 data between the dynamics of H+ and He++ ions indicates a predominantly solar origin of the H+ ions in the tail, at least. By the same token, the usually minor He+ ions are probably almost entirely of terrestrial origin, because of their similarity to the O

  12. Electrospray droplet exposure to organic vapors: metal ion removal from proteins and protein complexes.

    PubMed

    DeMuth, J Corinne; McLuckey, Scott A

    2015-01-20

    The exposure of aqueous nanoelectrospray droplets to various organic vapors can dramatically reduce sodium adduction on protein ions in positive ion mass spectra. Volatile alcohols, such as methanol, ethanol, and isopropanol lead to a significant reduction in sodium ion adduction but are not as effective as acetonitrile, acetone, and ethyl acetate. Organic vapor exposure in the negative ion mode, on the other hand, has essentially no effect on alkali ion adduction. Evidence is presented to suggest that the mechanism by which organic vapor exposure reduces alkali ion adduction in the positive mode involves the depletion of alkali metal ions via ion evaporation of metal ions solvated with organic molecules. The early generation of metal/organic cluster ions during the droplet desolvation process results in fewer metal ions available to condense on the protein ions formed via the charged residue mechanism. These effects are demonstrated with holomyoglobin ions to illustrate that the metal ion reduction takes place without detectable protein denaturation, which might be revealed by heme loss or an increase in charge state distribution. No evidence is observed for denaturation with exposure to any of the organic vapors evaluated in this work.

  13. Nanoparticles reduce nickel allergy by capturing metal ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vemula, Praveen Kumar; Anderson, R. Rox; Karp, Jeffrey M.

    2011-05-01

    Approximately 10% of the population in the USA suffer from nickel allergy, and many are unable to wear jewellery or handle coins and other objects that contain nickel. Many agents have been developed to reduce the penetration of nickel through skin, but few formulations are safe and effective. Here, we show that applying a thin layer of glycerine emollient containing nanoparticles of either calcium carbonate or calcium phosphate on an isolated piece of pig skin (in vitro) and on the skin of mice (in vivo) prevents the penetration of nickel ions into the skin. The nanoparticles capture nickel ions by cation exchange, and remain on the surface of the skin, allowing them to be removed by simple washing with water. Approximately 11-fold fewer nanoparticles by mass are required to achieve the same efficacy as the chelating agent ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid. Using nanoparticles with diameters smaller than 500 nm in topical creams may be an effective way to limit the exposure to metal ions that can cause skin irritation.

  14. Surface oxidation of metals by oxygen ion bombardment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alov, Nikolai V.

    2007-03-01

    Surface oxidation of molybdenum, tungsten, niobium and tantalum by low-energy oxygen ion beams is investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Oxygen ion bombardment of molybdenum and tungsten surfaces leads to the formation of thin oxide films containing metals in oxidation states 4+, 5+ and 6+. At the initial stage of irradiation, rapid surface oxidation of molybdenum and tungsten was observed. At higher fluences the oxidation reaches saturation and the surface composition remains almost unchanged with increasing fluence. Oxygen ion bombardment of niobium and tantalum surfaces leads to the formation of thin oxide films containing niobium and tantalum in oxidation states 2+, 4+ and 5+. At the initial stage of irradiation, again rapid surface oxidation of niobium and tantalum was observed. At higher fluences the population of Nb2+ and Nb4+, Ta2+ and Ta4+ reaches a maximum and then begins to decrease. The population of Nb5+ and Ta5+ continues to increase and finally the entire oxide films consists of only Nb5+ and Ta5+, respectively.

  15. Adsorption of metal ions by pecan shell-based granular activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Bansode, R R; Losso, J N; Marshall, W E; Rao, R M; Portier, R J

    2003-09-01

    The present investigation was undertaken to evaluate the adsorption effectiveness of pecan shell-based granular activated carbons (GACs) in removing metal ions (Cu(2+), Pb(2+), Zn(2+)) commonly found in municipal and industrial wastewater. Pecan shells were activated by phosphoric acid, steam or carbon dioxide activation methods. Metal ion adsorption of shell-based GACs was compared to the metal ion adsorption of a commercial carbon, namely, Calgon's Filtrasorb 200. Adsorption experiments were conducted using solutions containing all three metal ions in order to investigate the competitive effects of the metal ions as would occur in contaminated wastewater. The results obtained from this study showed that acid-activated pecan shell carbon adsorbed more lead ion and zinc ion than any of the other carbons, especially at carbon doses of 0.2-1.0%. However, steam-activated pecan shell carbon adsorbed more copper ion than the other carbons, particularly using carbon doses above 0.2%. In general, Filtrasorb 200 and carbon dioxide-activated pecan shell carbons were poor metal ion adsorbents. The results indicate that acid- and steam-activated pecan shell-based GACs are effective metal ion adsorbents and can potentially replace typical coal-based GACs in treatment of metal contaminated wastewater.

  16. Use of Divalent Metal Ions in the DNA Cleavage Reaction of Human Type II Topoisomerases†

    PubMed Central

    Deweese, Joseph E.; Burch, Amber M.; Burgin, Alex B.; Osheroff, Neil

    2009-01-01

    All type II topoisomerases require divalent metal ions in order to cleave and ligate DNA. In order to further elucidate the mechanistic basis for these critical enzyme-mediated events, the role of the metal ion in the DNA cleavage reaction of human topoisomerase IIβ was characterized and compared to that of topoisomerase IIα. The present study utilized divalent metal ions with varying thiophilicities in conjunction with DNA cleavage substrates that substituted a sulfur atom for the 3′-bridging oxygen or the non-bridging oxygens of the scissile phosphate. Based on time courses of DNA cleavage, cation titrations, and metal ion mixing experiments, we propose the following model for the use of divalent metal ions by human type II topoisomerases. First, both enzymes employ a two-metal-ion mechanism to support DNA cleavage. Second, an interaction between one divalent metal ion and the 3′-bridging atom of the scissile phosphate greatly enhances enzyme-mediated DNA cleavage, most likely by stabilizing the leaving 3′-oxygen. Third, there is an important interaction between a divalent second metal ion and a non-bridging atom of the scissile phosphate that stimulates DNA cleavage mediated by topoisomerase IIβ. If this interaction exists in topoisomerase IIα, its effects on DNA cleavage are equivocal. This last aspect of the model highlights a difference in metal ion utilization during DNA cleavage mediated by human topoisomerase IIα and IIβ. PMID:19222228

  17. Prostate cancer outcome and tissue levels of metal ions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sarafanov, A.G.; Todorov, T.I.; Centeno, J.A.; MacIas, V.; Gao, W.; Liang, W.-M.; Beam, C.; Gray, Michael A.; Kajdacsy-Balla, A.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND There are several studies examining prostate cancer and exposure to cadmium, iron, selenium, and zinc. Less data are available on the possible influence of these metal ions on prostate cancer outcome. This study measured levels of these ions in prostatectomy samples in order to examine possible associations between metal concentrations and disease outcome. METHODS We obtained formalin fixed paraffin embedded tissue blocks of prostatectomy samples of 40 patients with PSA recurrence, matched 1:1 (for year of surgery, race, age, Gleason grading, and pathology TNM classification) with tissue blocks from 40 patients without recurrence (n = 80). Case-control pairs were compared for the levels of metals in areas adjacent to tumors. Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was used for quantification of Cd, Fe, Zn, and Se. RESULTS Patients with biochemical (PSA) recurrence of disease had 12% lower median iron (95 ??g/g vs. 111 ??g/g; P = 0.04) and 21% lower zinc (279 ??g/g vs. 346 ??g/g; P = 0.04) concentrations in the normal-appearing tissue immediately adjacent to cancer areas. Differences in cadmium (0.489 ??g/g vs. 0.439 ??g/g; 4% higher) and selenium (1.68 ??g/g vs. 1.58 ??g/g; 5% higher) levels were not statistically significant in recurrence cases, when compared to non-recurrences (P = 0.40 and 0.21, respectively). CONCLUSIONS There is an association between low zinc and low iron prostate tissue levels and biochemical recurrence in prostate cancer. Whether these novel findings are a cause or effect of more aggressive tumors, or whether low zinc and iron prostatic levels raise implications for therapy, remains to be investigated. Copyright ?? 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Ligational behavior of Schiff bases towards transition metal ion and metalation effect on their antibacterial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devi, Jai; Batra, Nisha; Malhotra, Rajesh

    2012-11-01

    New Schiff bases pyrazine-2-carboxylicacid (phenyl-pyridin-2-yl-methylene)-hydrazide (Hpch-bp) HL1 and pyrazine-2-carboxylicacid (pyridin-2-ylmethylene)-hydrazide (Hpch-pc) HL2 derived from condensation of pyrazine carboxylic hydrazide (Hpch) with 2-benzoyl pyridine (bp) or pyridine 2-carbaldehyde (pc) and their transition metal complexes of type ML(1-2)2 have been synthesized, where M = Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II). Characterization of ligands and their metal complexes was carried out by elemental analysis, conductimetric studies, magnetic susceptibility, spectroscopic techniques (IR, UV-VIS, NMR, ESR, Mass) and thermogravimetric analysis. The physico-chemical studies revealed octahedral geometry or distorted octahedral geometry around metal ion. These azomethine Schiff base ligands acted as tridentate ? coordinating through carbonyl, azomethine and pyridine nitrogen present in the ligand. The thermodynamic and thermal properties of the complexes have been investigated and it was observed on the basis of these studies that thermal stability of complexes follows the order Mn < Zn < Cu < Co < Ni. The ligands and their complexes were tested for in vitro antibacterial activity at different concentrations against bacteria viz. Gram positive Bacillus subtilis, Micrococcus luteus and Gram negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas mendocina. A marked enhancement in biocidal activity of the ligands under similar experimental conditions was observed as a consequence of coordination with metal ions. The trend of growth inhibition in the complexes was found to be in the order: Cu > Mn > Ni > Co > Zn.

  19. Towards metals analysis using corona discharge ionization ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jafari, Mohammad T; Saraji, Mohammad; Sherafatmand, Hossein

    2016-02-25

    For the first time, the capability of corona discharge ionization ion mobility spectrometry (CD-IMS) in the determination of metal complex was evaluated. The extreme simplicity of dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) coupled to the high sensitivity of CD-IMS measurement could make this combination really useful for simple, rapid, and sensitive determination of metals in different samples. In this regard, mercury, as a model metal, was complexed with diethyldithiocarbamate (DEDTC), and then extracted into the carbon tetrachloride using DLLME. Some parameters affecting the extraction efficiency, including the type and volume of the extraction solvent, the type and volume of the disperser solvent, the concentration of the chelating agent, salt addition and, pH were exhaustively investigated. Under the optimized condition, the enrichment factor was obtained to be 142. The linear range of 0.035-10.0 μg mL(-1) with r(2) = 0.997 and the detection limit of 0.010 μg mL(-1) were obtained. The relative standard deviation values were calculated to be lower than 4% and 8% for intra-day and inter-day, respectively. Finally, the developed method was successfully applied for the extraction and determination of mercury in various real samples. The satisfactory results revealed the capability of the proposed method in trace analysis without tedious derivatization or hydride generation.

  20. Energy transfer mechanisms in heavy metal oxide glasses doped with lanthanide ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragin, Tomasz; Zmojda, Jacek; Kochanowicz, Marcin; Miluski, Piotr; Dorosz, Dominik

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, glasses based on bismuth, germanium, gallium and sodium oxides have been synthesized in terms of low phonon energy (724 cm-1) and high thermal stability (ΔT = 127°C). Synthesis process have been optimized using low vacuum conditions (approx. 60 mBar) to improve the transmittance in the mid-infrared region and decrease the content of hydroxide groups in the material structure. Glass doped with erbium ions has been pumped with high power diode (λexc = 980 nm) to obtain luminescence in the band of 2.7 μm as a result of Er3+: 4I11/2 -> 4I13/2 radiative transition. For analysis of emission properties and energy transfer mechanisms, glasses co-doped with Er3+/Ho3+, Er3+/Pr3+, Er3+/Nd3+ ions have been synthesized. Obtained results indicated energy transfer phenomenon between lanthanide ions and elements forming the glass matrix. This demonstrates that developed heavy metal oxide glass doped with optimal rare earth elements system is an attractive material for mid-infrared applications.

  1. Effects of inherent alkali and alkaline earth metallic species on biomass pyrolysis at different temperatures.

    PubMed

    Hu, Song; Jiang, Long; Wang, Yi; Su, Sheng; Sun, Lushi; Xu, Boyang; He, Limo; Xiang, Jun

    2015-09-01

    This work aimed to investigate effects of inherent alkali and alkaline earth metallic species (AAEMs) on biomass pyrolysis at different temperatures. The yield of CO, H2 and C2H4 was increased and that of CO2 was suppressed with increasing temperature. Increasing temperature could also promote depolymerization and aromatization reactions of active tars, forming heavier polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, leading to decrease of tar yields and species diversity. Diverse performance of inherent AAEMs at different temperatures significantly affected the distribution of pyrolysis products. The presence of inherent AAEMs promoted water-gas shift reaction, and enhanced the yield of H2 and CO2. Additionally, inherent AAEMs not only promoted breakage and decarboxylation/decarbonylation reaction of thermally labile hetero atoms of the tar but also enhanced thermal decomposing of heavier aromatics. Inherent AAEMs could also significantly enhance the decomposition of levoglucosan, and alkaline earth metals showed greater effect than alkali metals.

  2. Effect of rare earth metal on the spin-orbit torque in magnetic heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, Kohei; Pai, Chi-Feng; Tan, Aik Jun; Mann, Maxwell; Beach, Geoffrey S. D.

    2016-06-01

    We report the effect of the rare earth metal Gd on current-induced spin-orbit torques (SOTs) in perpendicularly magnetized Pt/Co/Gd heterostructures, characterized using harmonic measurements and spin-torque ferromagnetic resonance (ST-FMR). By varying the Gd metal layer thickness from 0 nm to 8 nm, harmonic measurements reveal a significant enhancement of the effective fields generated from the Slonczewski-like and field-like torques. ST-FMR measurements confirm an enhanced effective spin Hall angle and show a corresponding increase in the magnetic damping constant with increasing Gd thickness. These results suggest that Gd plays an active role in generating SOTs in these heterostructures. Our finding may lead to spin-orbitronics device application such as non-volatile magnetic random access memory, based on rare earth metals.

  3. Accumulation of alkaline earth metals by the green macroalga Bryopsis maxima.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Shigekazu; Aizawa, Kyoko; Nakamura, Saki; Nakayama, Katsumi; Fujisaki, Shingo; Watanabe, Soichiro; Satoh, Hiroyuki

    2015-04-01

    Twenty-five days after the disaster at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in 2011, we collected samples of the green macroalga Bryopsis maxima from the Pacific coast of Japan. Bryopsis maxima is a unicellular, multinuclear, siphonous green macroalga. Radiation analysis revealed that B. maxima emitted remarkably high gamma radiation of (131)I, (134)Cs, (137)Cs, and (140)Ba as fission products of (235)U. Interestingly, B. maxima contained naturally occurring radionuclides derived from (226)Ra and (228)Ra. Analysis of element content revealed that B. maxima accumulates many ocean elements, especially high quantities of the alkaline earth metals Sr (15.9 g per dry-kg) and Ba (3.79 g per dry-kg), whereas Ca content (12.5 g per dry-kg) was lower than that of Sr and only 61 % of the mean content of 70 Japanese seaweed species. Time-course analysis determined the rate of radioactive (85)Sr incorporation into thalli to be approximately 0.13 g Sr per dry-kg of thallus per day. Subcellular fractionation of B. maxima cells showed that most of the (85)Sr was localized in the soluble fraction, predominantly in the vacuole or cytosol. Given that (85)Sr radioactivity was permeable through a dialysis membrane, the (85)Sr was considered to be a form of inorganic ion and/or bound with a small molecule. Precipitation analysis with sodium sulfate showed that more than 70% of the Sr did not precipitate as SrSO4, indicating that a proportion of the Sr may bind with small molecules in B. maxima.

  4. NEW INSTRUMENTS AND METHODS OF MEASUREMENTS: Liquid-metal ion emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabovich, M. D.

    1983-05-01

    This article describes and discusses the fundamental laws of ion emission from liquid-metal tips in a strong electric field. The widespread views of a liquid-metal emitter as being the smoothed tip of a Taylor cone are examined critically. The instability of a liquid metal in an electric field is discussed, and in line with this, an alternative concept is given of a sharp-tipped electrohydrodynamic emitter. The prospects for applying liquid-metal ion emitters are noted.

  5. The t-matrix resistivity of liquid rare earth metals using pseudopotential

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatia, Kamaldeep G.; Bhatt, N. K.; Vyas, P. R.; Gohel, V. B.

    2015-06-24

    Present theoretical study of liquid metal resistivity of some trivalent (La,Ce,Gd) and divalent (Eu,Yb) rare earth metals using pseudopotential has been carried out employing Ziman’s weak scattering and transition matrix (t-matrix) approaches. Our computed results of liquid metal resistivity using t-matrix approach are better than resistivity computed using Ziman’s approach and are also in excellent agreement with experimental results and other theoretical findings. The present study confirms that for f-shell metals pseudopotential must be determined uniquely and t-matrix approach is more physical in comparison with Ziman’s nearly free electron approach. The present pseudopotential accounts s-p-d hybridization properly. Such success encourages us to study remaining liquid state properties of these metals.

  6. Measurement of Two-Photon Absorption Cross Section of Metal Ions by a Mass Sedimentation Approach

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zhuo-Chen; Chen, Qi-Dai; Han, Bing; Liu, Xue-Qing; Song, Jun-Feng; Sun, Hong-Bo

    2015-01-01

    The photo-reduction of metal ions in solution induced by femtosecond laser is an important and novel method for fabricating three-dimensional metal microstructures. However, the nonlinear absorption cross section of metal ions remains unknown because its measurement is difficult. In the present study, a method based on Two-Photon Excited Sedimentation (TPES) is proposed to measure the two-photon absorption cross section (TPACS) of metal ions in solution. The power-squared dependence of the amount of sediment on the excitation intensity was confirmed, revealing that 800 nm femtosecond laser induced reduction of metal ions was a two photon absorption process. We believe that the proposed method may be applied to measure the TPACS of several metal ions, thereby opening a new avenue towards future analysis of two-photon absorption materials. PMID:26657990

  7. Rational design of metal ion sequestering agents. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, K.N.

    1998-06-01

    'This project addresses fundamental issues and requirements in developing hazardous metal ion separation technologies needed in the treatment and disposal of radioactive and chemical toxic waste. It encompasses the synthesis of new agents, followed by their characterization and evaluation, with the aim to optimize their metal ion sequestering properties for use in applied technologies. This research is focused on the following key areas: (1) basic design and synthesis of new metal ion specific sequestering ligands; (2) structural and thermodynamic investigations of these ligands and their complexes formed with the targeted metal ions; and (3) development of sequestering agents and their incorporation into systems designed to be prototypes of inexpensive and highly effective materials for hazardous metal ion decontamination. Basic studies of the sequestration of relevant toxic metals are required in order to develop processes that will treat effluents sufficiently well to allow direct release into the environment and minimize the production of secondary wastes.'

  8. Some aspects of metallic ion chemistry and dynamics in the mesosphere and thermosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathews, J. D.

    1987-01-01

    The relationship between the formation of sporadic layers of metallic ion and the dumping of these ions into the upper mesosphere is discussed in terms of the tidal wind, classical (i.e., windshear) and other more complex, perhaps highly nonlinear layer formation mechanisms, and a possible circulation mechanism for these ions. Optical, incoherent scatter radar, rocket, and satellite derived evidence for various layer formation mechanisms and for the metallic ion circulation system is reviewed. The results of simple one dimensional numerical model calculations of sporadic E and intermediate layer formation are presented along with suggestions for more advanced models of intense or blanketing sporadic E. The flux of metallic ions dumped by the tidal wind system into the mesosphere is estimated and compared with estimates of total particle flux of meteoric origin. Possible effects of the metallic ion flux and of meteoric dust on D region ion chemistry are discussed.

  9. First-Principles Calculation of Solution Energy of Alkaline-Earth Metal Elements to BaTiO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriwake, Hiroki; Hirayama, Tsukasa; Ikuhara, Yuichi; Tanaka, Isao

    2007-10-01

    Quantitative analysis of the solution energy of alkaline-earth metal elements to perovskite-type BaTiO3 was carried out by a first-principles calculation combined with thermodynamics theory. The solution energies of neutral solute and a compensated solute with an oxygen vacancy were systematically calculated. They were obtained for two cation sites and four thermodynamical conditions with different chemical potentials of constituent atoms. Both Ca and Sr preferably occupy the Ba site of BaTiO3. On the other hand, Mg occupies the Ti site. This corresponds well to the widely accepted experimental findings regarding site preference. Moreover, under the condition of coexising BaO, CaO and BaTiO3, energy difference between the Ba-site solution and O-vacancy compensated Ti-site solution of Ca ions has been found to be smaller than that of Sr. Under this condition, the O-vacancy compensated Ti-site solution of Ca should be favorable compared with that of Sr. The same number of oxygen vacancies as Ca ions occupying Ti sites can be introduced. This also explains well experimental feature of the Ca-doped BaTiO3-based nonreducible multilayer ceramics capacitor (MLCC) materials regarding solution site of the Ca ion and abundance of O-vacancy.

  10. Metal Ions, Not Metal-Catalyzed Oxidative Stress, Cause Clay Leachate Antibacterial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Otto, Caitlin C.; Koehl, Jennifer L.; Solanky, Dipesh; Haydel, Shelley E.

    2014-01-01

    Aqueous leachates prepared from natural antibacterial clays, arbitrarily designated CB-L, release metal ions into suspension, have a low pH (3.4–5), generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) and H2O2, and have a high oxidation-reduction potential. To isolate the role of pH in the antibacterial activity of CB clay mixtures, we exposed three different strains of Escherichia coli O157:H7 to 10% clay suspensions. The clay suspension completely killed acid-sensitive and acid-tolerant E. coli O157:H7 strains, whereas incubation in a low-pH buffer resulted in a minimal decrease in viability, demonstrating that low pH alone does not mediate antibacterial activity. The prevailing hypothesis is that metal ions participate in redox cycling and produce ROS, leading to oxidative damage to macromolecules and resulting in cellular death. However, E. coli cells showed no increase in DNA or protein oxidative lesions and a slight increase in lipid peroxidation following exposure to the antibacterial leachate. Further, supplementation with numerous ROS scavengers eliminated lipid peroxidation, but did not rescue the cells from CB-L-mediated killing. In contrast, supplementing CB-L with EDTA, a broad-spectrum metal chelator, reduced killing. Finally, CB-L was equally lethal to cells in an anoxic environment as compared to the aerobic environment. Thus, ROS were not required for lethal activity and did not contribute to toxicity of CB-L. We conclude that clay-mediated killing was not due to oxidative damage, but rather, was due to toxicity associated directly with released metal ions. PMID:25502790

  11. Metal cation/anion adsorption on calcium carbonate: Implications to metal ion concentrations in groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Zachara, J.M.; Cowan, C.E.; Resch, C.T.

    1990-05-01

    This chapter evaluates the sorption behavior of metallic ions on specimen calcite as a basis for determining the importance of calcite relative to other subsurface sorbents, such as layer silicates and oxides, in controlling metal ion concentration in calcareous groundwaters. A review of the literature shows the sorption of both metallic cations and anions on calcite over ranges in pH and CO{sub 2} partial pressure to be consistent with a surface-exchange process where cations exchange with surface Ca and anions exchange with surface CO{sub 3}. A general surface-exchange model was developed to account for the effects of Ca and CO{sub 3} concentrations, pH, and calcite surface area on cation and anion sorption onto calcite. The model was applied to recently developed experimental sorption data of Zn and SeO{sub 3} on specimen calcite in equilibrium CaCO{sub 3}(aq) suspensions. The surface-exchange model was able to describe the effects of pH on both cation and anion sorption, and provided good predictions of the effects of variable CO{sub 2}(g) pressure on Zn sorption and of PO{sub 4} on SeO{sub 3} sorption. The surface-exchange model, combined with sorption constants for other phases, was used to calculate Cd sorption to a hypothetical aquifer material containing a mixture of sorbents. The sorbent concentrations were fixed to those expected in groundwater zones. The multi-sorbent calculation documented the importance of calcite as a sorbent for metallic ions in groundwater.93 refs., 18 figs., 5 tabs.

  12. Investigations into the Influence of Heavy Ions on EMIC Wave Propagation in the Earth's Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, S.; Kim, E. H.; Johnson, J.

    2015-12-01

    Geomagnetic pulsations in the Pc1 frequency range (0.2 to 5.0 Hz), which are known as electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves, are often observed at magnetically conjugate locations by spacecraft in the equatorial magnetosphere and ground-based stations. One difficulty in linking the propagation of detected radiation between these regions is the presence of stop bands near the heavy ion cyclotron resonance locations. Recent full wave calculations (Kim and Johnson, Full wave modeling of EMIC waves in the Earth's magnetosphere, 2015 AGU fall meeting) demonstrate how EMIC waves propagate to higher magnetic latitudes in an electron-proton-He+ plasma. However, while the heavy ion concentration can be large during the solar maximum and geomagnetic storms, they adopted a 5% He+ plasma. In this study, we explore the roles of heavy ion (He+ and O+) concentrations on the levels of EMIC wave energy that reach lower altitudes using a two-dimensional, finite element, full wave model. The Poynting flux and polarization of the emissions are used to monitor the propagation and absorption of wave energy, as well as mode coupling between left- and right-hand circularly polarized modes. Due to the increase in heavy ion populations in the magnetosphere, the consequences that geomagnetic storms have on EMIC wave propagation are also discussed.

  13. Shapes of Energetic Ion Spectra in Saturn's Magnetosphere Compared with those at Earth and Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, D. C.; Mitchell, D. G.; Krimigis, S. M.

    2013-12-01

    Saturn's magnetosphere contains suprathermal and energetic ions that originate from a number of plasma sources including Enceladus, Titan, Saturn's atmosphere and ionosphere and the solar wind, with internal sources dominating. Although different species originate at different locations, transport processes and acceleration during or after transport distribute the energetic ions throughout the magnetosphere out to the magnetopause. In principle, the shapes of the energy spectra of these ions contain information on acceleration processes. However, because outside of about 9 RS long-term average spectra of all species are quite good power laws, it is difficult to pick one energy parameter (e.g., energy/charge or energy/nucleon) as better organizing the spectra by, for example, maintaining constant abundance ratios from low to high energies. Inside of 9 RS there are energy-dependent losses that alter the spectra but aren't directly related to acceleration. Here, using data from the Cassini/CHEMS sensor, we investigate ion spectra over the energy per charge range 3-220 keV/e in more detail with better resolution in both space and time, looking for evidence of spectral differences among species based on charge (e.g., O+ vs. O++) or plasma source (e.g., O+ (Enceladus) vs. He++ (solar wind)). We will compare Saturn's ion spectra with those from the magnetospheres of Earth and Jupiter and discuss implications for acceleration processes.

  14. GYROSURFING ACCELERATION OF IONS IN FRONT OF EARTH's QUASI-PARALLEL BOW SHOCK

    SciTech Connect

    Kis, Arpad; Lemperger, Istvan; Wesztergom, Viktor; Agapitov, Oleksiy; Krasnoselskikh, Vladimir; Dandouras, Iannis E-mail: Kis.Arpad@csfk.mta.hu

    2013-07-01

    It is well known that shocks in space plasmas can accelerate particles to high energies. However, many details of the shock acceleration mechanism are still unknown. A critical element of shock acceleration is the injection problem; i.e., the presence of the so called seed particle population that is needed for the acceleration to work efficiently. In our case study, we present for the first time observational evidence of gyroresonant surfing acceleration in front of Earth's quasi-parallel bow shock resulting in the appearance of the long-suspected seed particle population. For our analysis, we use simultaneous multi-spacecraft measurements provided by the Cluster spacecraft ion (CIS), magnetic (FGM), and electric field and wave instrument (EFW) during a time period of large inter-spacecraft separation distance. The spacecraft were moving toward the bow shock and were situated in the foreshock region. The results show that the gyroresonance surfing acceleration takes place as a consequence of interaction between circularly polarized monochromatic (or quasi-monochromatic) transversal electromagnetic plasma waves and short large amplitude magnetic structures (SLAMSs). The magnetic mirror force of the SLAMS provides the resonant conditions for the ions trapped by the waves and results in the acceleration of ions. Since wave packets with circular polarization and different kinds of magnetic structures are very commonly observed in front of Earth's quasi-parallel bow shock, the gyroresonant surfing acceleration proves to be an important particle injection mechanism. We also show that seed ions are accelerated directly from the solar wind ion population.

  15. MeRNA: a Database of Metal Ion Binding Sites in RNAStructures

    SciTech Connect

    Stefan, Liliana R.; Zhang, Rui; Levitan, Aaron G.; Hendrix, DonnaF.; Brenner, Steven E.; Holbrook, Stephen R.

    2005-10-05

    Metal ions are essential for the folding of RNA into stable tertiary structures and for the catalytic activity of some RNA enzymes. To aid in the study of the roles of metal ions in RNA structural biology, we have created MeRNA (Metals in RNA), a comprehensive compilation of all metal binding sites identified in RNA three-dimensional structures available from the Protein Data Bank (PDB) and Nucleic Acid Database (NDB). Currently, our database contains information relating to binding of 9764 metal ions corresponding to 23 distinct elements; in 256 RNA structures. The metal ion locations were confirmed and ligands characterized using original literature references. MeRNA includes eight manually identified metal-ion binding motifs, which are described in the literature. MeRNA is searchable by PDB identifier, metal ion, method of structure determination, resolution and R-values for X-ray structure, and distance from metal to any RNA atom or to water. New structures with their respective binding motifs will be added to the database as they become available. The MeRNA database will further our understanding of the roles of metal ions in RNA folding and catalysis and have applications in structural and functional analysis, RNA design and engineering.

  16. Process for the displacement of cyanide ions from metal-cyanide complexes

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Barbara F.; Robinson, Thomas W.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention relates to water-soluble polymers and the use of such water-soluble polymers in a process for the displacement of the cyanide ions from the metal ions within metal-cyanide complexes. The process waste streams can include metal-cyanide containing electroplating waste streams, mining leach waste streams, mineral processing waste streams, and related metal-cyanide containing waste streams. The metal ions of interest are metals that give very strong complexes with cyanide, mostly iron, nickel, and copper. The physical separation of the water-soluble polymer-metal complex from the cyanide ions can be accomplished through the use of ultrafiltration. Once the metal-cyanide complex is disrupted, the freed cyanide ions can be recovered for reuse or destroyed using available oxidative processes rendering the cyanide nonhazardous. The metal ions are released from the polymer, using dilute acid, metal ion oxidation state adjustment, or competing chelating agents, and collected and recovered or disposed of by appropriate waste management techniques. The water-soluble polymer can then be recycled. Preferred water-soluble polymers include polyethyleneimine and polyethyleneimine having a catechol or hydroxamate group.

  17. Controlled Segmentation of Metal Nanowire Array by Block Copolymer Lithography and Reversible Ion Loading.

    PubMed

    Mun, Jeong Ho; Cha, Seung Keun; Kim, Ye Chan; Yun, Taeyeong; Choi, Young Joo; Jin, Hyeong Min; Lee, Jae Eun; Jeon, Hyun Uk; Kim, So Youn; Kim, Sang Ouk

    2017-02-20

    Spatial arrangement of 1D nanomaterials may offer enormous opportunities for advanced electronics and photonics. Moreover, morphological complexity and chemical diversity in the nanoscale components may lead to unique properties that are hardly anticipated in randomly distributed homogeneous nanostructures. Here, controlled chemical segmentation of metal nanowire arrays using block copolymer lithography and subsequent reversible metal ion loading are demonstrated. To impose chemical heterogeneity in the nanowires generated by block copolymer lithography, reversible ion loading method highly specific for one particular polymer block is introduced. Reversibility of the metal ion loading enables area-selective localized replacement of metal ions in the self-assembled patterns and creates segmented metal nanowire arrays with different metallic components. Further integration of this method with shear aligning process produces high aligned segmented metal nanowire array with desired local chemical compositions.

  18. Lithium-Ion Batteries Being Evaluated for Low-Earth-Orbit Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKissock, Barbara I.

    2005-01-01

    The performance characteristics and long-term cycle life of aerospace lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries in low-Earth-orbit applications are being investigated. A statistically designed test using Li-ion cells from various manufacturers began in September 2004 to study the effects of temperature, end-of-charge voltage, and depth-of-discharge operating conditions on the cycle life and performance of these cells. Performance degradation with cycling is being evaluated, and performance characteristics and failure modes are being modeled statistically. As technology improvements are incorporated into aerospace Li-ion cells, these new designs can be added to the test to evaluate the effect of the design changes on performance and life. Cells from Lithion and Saft have achieved over 2000 cycles under 10 different test condition combinations and are being evaluated. Cells from Mine Safety Appliances (MSA) and modules made up of commercial-off-the-shelf 18650 Li-ion cells connected in series/parallel combinations are scheduled to be added in the summer of 2005. The test conditions include temperatures of 10, 20, and 30 C, end-of-charge voltages of 3.85, 3.95, and 4.05 V, and depth-of-discharges from 20 to 40 percent. The low-Earth-orbit regime consists of a 55 min charge, at a constant-current rate that is 110 percent of the current required to fully recharge the cells in 55 min until the charge voltage limit is reached, and then at a constant voltage for the remaining charge time. Cells are discharged for 35 min at the current required for their particular depth-of-discharge condition. Cells are being evaluated in four-cell series strings with charge voltage limits being applied to individual cells by the use of charge-control units designed and produced at the NASA Glenn Research Center. These charge-control units clamp the individual cell voltages as each cell reaches its end-of-charge voltage limit, and they bypass the excess current from that cell, while allowing the full

  19. The Role of the Ion Microprobe in Solid-Earth Geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauri, E. H.

    2002-12-01

    Despite the early success of the electron microprobe in taking petrology to the micron scale, and the widespread use of mass spectrometers in geochemistry and geochronology, it was not until the mid-1970s that the ion microprobe came into its own as an in situ analytical tool in the Earth sciences. Despite this inauspicious beginning, secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) was widely advertised as a technology that would eventually eclipse thermal ion mass spectrometry (TIMS) in isotope geology. However this was not to happen. While various technical issues in SIMS such as interferences and matrix effects became increasingly clear, an appreciation grew for the complimentary abilities of SIMS and TIMS that, even with the advent of ICP-MS, continues to this day. Today the ion microprobe is capable of abundance measurements in the parts-per-billion range across nearly the entire periodic table, and SIMS stable isotope data quality is now routinely crossing the 1 per mil threshold, all at the micron scale. Much of this success is due to the existence of multi-user community facilities for SIMS research, and the substantial efforts of interested scientists to understand the fundamentals of sputtered ion formation and their application to geochemistry. Recent discoveries of evidence for the existence of ancient crust and oceans, the emergence of life on Earth, the large-scale cycling of surficial materials into the deep Earth, and illumination of fundamental high-pressure phenomena have all been made possible by SIMS, and these (and many more) discoveries owe a debt to the vision of creating and supporting multi-user community facilities for SIMS. The ion microprobe remains an expensive instrument to purchase and maintain, yet it is also exceedingly diverse in application. Major improvements in SIMS, indeed in all mass spectrometry, are visible on the near horizon. Yet the geochemical community cannot depend on commercial manufacturers alone to design and build the next

  20. Heterogeneous behavior of metalloproteins toward metal ion binding and selectivity: insights from molecular dynamics studies.

    PubMed

    Gogoi, Prerana; Chandravanshi, Monika; Mandal, Suraj Kumar; Srivastava, Ambuj; Kanaujia, Shankar Prasad

    2016-07-01

    About one-third of the existing proteins require metal ions as cofactors for their catalytic activities and structural complexities. While many of them bind only to a specific metal, others bind to multiple (different) metal ions. However, the exact mechanism of their metal preference has not been deduced to clarity. In this study, we used molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate whether a cognate metal (bound to the structure) can be replaced with other similar metal ions. We have chosen seven different proteins (phospholipase A2, sucrose phosphatase, pyrazinamidase, cysteine dioxygenase (CDO), plastocyanin, monoclonal anti-CD4 antibody Q425, and synaptotagmin 1 C2B domain) bound to seven different divalent metal ions (Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Zn(2+), Fe(2+), Cu(2+), Ba(2+), and Sr(2+), respectively). In total, 49 MD simulations each of 50 ns were performed and each trajectory was analyzed independently. Results demonstrate that in some cases, cognate metal ions can be exchanged with similar metal ions. On the contrary, some proteins show binding affinity specifically to their cognate metal ions. Surprisingly, two proteins CDO and plastocyanin which are known to bind Fe(2+) and Cu(2+), respectively, do not exhibit binding affinity to any metal ion. Furthermore, the study reveals that in some cases, the active site topology remains rigid even without cognate metals, whereas, some require them for their active site stability. Thus, it will be interesting to experimentally verify the accuracy of these observations obtained computationally. Moreover, the study can help in designing novel active sites for proteins to sequester metal ions particularly of toxic nature.

  1. Highly charged Ar{sup q+} ions interacting with metals

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Jijin; Zhang Jian; Gu Jiangang; Luo Xianwen; Hu Bitao

    2009-12-15

    Using computer simulation, alternative methods of the interaction of highly charged ions Ar{sup q+} with metals (Au, Ag) are used and verified in the present work. Based on the classical over-barrier model, we discussed the promotion loss and peeling off processes. The simulated total potential electron yields agree well with the experiment data in incident energy ranging from 100 eV to 5 keV and all charge states of Ar{sup q+}. Based on the TRIM code, we obtain the side-feeding rate as well as the motion and charge transfer of HCI below the surface. Some results, including the array of KL{sup x} x-ray satellite lines, the respective contribution of autoionization, and side-feeding to inner shells, and the filling rates and lifetime of inner shells for Ar agree well with experiment or theory.

  2. Highly Emissive Transition Metal Ion Doped Semiconducting Nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jana, Santanu; Srivastava, Bhupendra B.; Sarma, D. D.; Pradhan, Narayan

    2011-07-01

    Doped semiconductor nanocrystals (d-dots), specifically ones not containing heavy metal ions, have the potential to become a class of mainstream emissive materials. Mn- and Cu-doped ZnSe or ZnS d-dots can cover an emission window similar to that of the current workhorse of intrinsic quantum dot (q-dots) emitters, CdSe nanocrystals. We synthesized high quality stable Cu doped ZnSe in nonpolar as well as polar solvent. The emission intensity of these doped nanocrystals is found stable for months under UV irradiation, after different multifunctional ligand which is important for any biological detection. We have also synthesized the stable Mn doped ZnS in nonpolar solvent more than 50% QY.. The doped nanocrystals are characterized by TEM, XRD, EPR and ICP analysis.

  3. Predicted pressure-induced spin and electronic transition in double perovskite R2CoMnO6 (R = rare-earth ion).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hong Jian; Zhou, Haiyang; Chen, Xiang Ming; Bellaiche, L

    2015-06-10

    Specific first-principles calculations are performed to predict structural, magnetic and electronic properties of seven double perovskite R2CoMnO6 materials, with R being a rare-earth ion, under hydrostatic pressure. All these compounds are found to undergo a first-order transition from a high spin (HS) to low spin (LS) state at a critical pressure (whose value is dependent on the R ion). Such transition not only results in a significant volume collapse but also yields a dramatic change in electronic structure. More precisely, the HS-to-LS transition is accompanied by a transition from an insulator to a half-metallic state in the R2CoMnO6 compounds having the largest rare-earth ionic radius (i.e., Nd, Sm, Gd and Tb) while it induces a change from an insulator to a semiconductor having a narrow band gap for the smallest rare-earth ions (i.e., R = Dy, Ho and Er). Experiments are called for to confirm these predictions.

  4. Previously hidden low-energy ions: a better map of near-Earth space and the terrestrial mass balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    André, Mats

    2015-12-01

    This is a review of the mass balance of planet Earth, intended also for scientists not usually working with space physics or geophysics. The discussion includes both outflow of ions and neutrals from the ionosphere and upper atmosphere, and the inflow of meteoroids and larger objects. The focus is on ions with energies less than tens of eV originating from the ionosphere. Positive low-energy ions are complicated to detect onboard sunlit spacecraft at higher altitudes, which often become positively charged to several tens of volts. We have invented a technique to observe low-energy ions based on the detection of the wake behind a charged spacecraft in a supersonic ion flow. We find that low-energy ions usually dominate the ion density and the outward flux in large volumes in the magnetosphere. The global outflow is of the order of 1026 ions s-1. This is a significant fraction of the total number outflow of particles from Earth, and changes plasma processes in near-Earth space. We compare order of magnitude estimates of the mass outflow and inflow for planet Earth and find that they are similar, at around 1 kg s-1 (30 000 ton yr-1). We briefly discuss atmospheric and ionospheric outflow from other planets and the connection to evolution of extraterrestrial life.

  5. Phosphate glass core/silica clad fibres with a high concentration of active rare-earth ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egorova, O. N.; Galagan, B. I.; Denker, B. I.; Sverchkov, S. E.; Semjonov, S. L.

    2016-12-01

    We report a study of silica-clad composite optical fibres having a phosphate glass core doped with active rare-earth elements. The phosphate glass core allows a high concentration of active rare-earth ions to be obtained, and the silica cladding ensures high mechanical strength and facilitates fusion splicing of such fibres to silica fibres. Owing to the high concentration of active rare-earth ions, this type of fibre is potentially attractive for applications where a small cavity length and high lasing efficiency are needed.

  6. Frustrated Lewis Pair-Like Reactivity of Rare-Earth Metal Complexes: 1,4-Addition Reactions and Polymerizations of Conjugated Polar Alkenes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Pengfei; Yao, Yingming; Xu, Xin

    2017-01-26

    Three rare-earth aryloxide ion pairs {[L1REOAr](+) /[B(C6 F5 )4 ](-) ; L1=CH3 C(2,6-iPr2 C6 H3 N)CHC(CH3 )(NCH2 CH2 PPh2 ); RE=Sc, Y, Lu; Ar=2,6-tBu2 C6 H3 } were reported that feature rare-earth/phosphorus (RE/P) combinations exhibiting frustrated Lewis pair (FLP)-like 1,4-addition reactions towards conjugated carbonyl substrates (e.g., enone, ynone, and acrylic substrates). Furthermore, these RE/P complexes were found to be effective catalysts for the polymerization of conjugated polar alkene monomers. Mechanistic studies revealed that the rare-earth metal-catalyzed polymerizations were initiated by new FLP-type 1,4-additions rather than traditional and ubiquitous covalent RE-E (E=H, C, N, etc.) bond insertion or single-electron transfer.

  7. Photoluminescence properties of Jahn-Teller transition-metal ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanz-Ortiz, Marta N.; Rodríguez, Fernando

    2009-09-01

    This work investigates the influence of electron-phonon coupling associated with E ⊗e and T ⊗e Jahn-Teller (JT) effect in different transition-metal (TM) ions on de-excitation phenomena through nonradiative multiphonon relaxation, i.e., photoluminescence (PL) quenching. We developed a configurational curve model which is able to predict from the absorption spectrum whether a given JT-TM ion is PL or quenched. The prediction is made on the basis of an adapted Dexter-Klick-Russell parameter for JT systems, defined in terms of spectroscopic parameters through ΛJT=αΔeabs/Eabs, where Δeabs refers to the splitting of the parent octahedral Eg states by the JT distortion in E ⊗e (α =3/4) or T ⊗e (α =1/4), and Eabs is the energy of the first absorption band involving electronic transition between Eg and T2g. We show that PL in any JT-TM ion occurs whenever ΛJT<0.1 or is quenched if ΛJT>0.2. This result is noteworthy since it allows us to establish structural requirements for the JT-TM ion and the host crystal to be PL. Although PL properties of materials containing TM ions depend on a variety of structural factors such as the electronic configuration, the site symmetry, and the crystal field produced by neighboring atoms, the present model achieves this goal through a simple spectroscopic parameter: ΛJT. In this work we correlated the PL properties of different sixfold-coordinated JT systems such as Ti3+, Cu2+, Mn3+, Cr2+, Fe2+, Co3+, and Ni3+ in halides and oxides with ΛJT obtained from their respective absorption spectra. From this analysis we conclude that depending on the nature of the JT coupling and its strength, PL is either strongly favored or quenched in T ⊗e while it is mostly quenched in E ⊗e systems due to the larger JT distortion.

  8. The Role of Metals in the Reaction Catalyzed by Metal-Ion-Independent Bacillary RNase

    PubMed Central

    Ulyanova, Vera; Zelenikhin, Pavel; Kolpakov, Alexey; Blokhin, Dmitriy; Müller, Dieter; Klochkov, Vladimir; Ilinskaya, Olga

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular enzymes of intestinal microbiota are the key agents that affect functional activity of the body as they directly interact with epithelial and immune cells. Several species of the Bacillus genus, like Bacillus pumilus, a common producer of extracellular RNase binase, can populate the intestinal microbiome as a colonizing organism. Without involving metal ions as cofactors, binase depolymerizes RNA by cleaving the 3′,5′-phosphodiester bond and generates 2′,3′-cyclic guanosine phosphates in the first stage of a catalytic reaction. Maintained in the reaction mixture for more than one hour, such messengers can affect the human intestinal microflora and the human body. In the present study, we found that the rate of 2′,3′-cGMP was growing in the presence of transition metals that stabilized the RNA structure. At the same time, transition metal ions only marginally reduced the amount of 2′,3′-cGMP, blocking binase recognition sites of guanine at N7 of nucleophilic purine bases. PMID:28096759

  9. A possible new host mineral of large-ion elements in the Earth's deep interior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawai, K.; Tsuchiya, T.

    2015-12-01

    The radiogenic heat production as well as the secular cooling is essential in order to better understand the thermal history and dynamics in the Earth. Potassium is thought to be one of the important radioactive elements in the Earth's interior. Although these elements are concentrated in the continental and oceanic crusts due to chemical differentiations through partial melting at plate boundaries due to their large ion-radii, they have been considered to return into the deep mantle accompanied with subducting slab through time . However, since there are few studies on host minerals of potassium in the high P,T condition, it has yet to be clear how much and where host rocks of such radioactive elements exist in the Earth. Hence, it is important to understand the fate of the potassium-bearing phase subducted into the deep Earth's interior. Here we have studied the high-pressure stability and elasticity of KMg2Al5SiO12 hexagonal aluminous phase (K-Hex with three different size of cation cites, by means of the density functional computation method. Results indicate that the K-Hex phase remains mechanically stable up to 150 GPa and also energetically more stable than an isochemical form with the calcium-ferrite (K-CF) and calcium-titanate (K-CT) type structure with two different size of cation cites. In addition, when the spinel composition coexists with the K-hollandite (K-Hol) phase, which is ), which is considered to be able to host potassium the K-Hex phase becomes more stable than the K-Hol phase at pressures above ~27 GPa. These demonstrate that the Hex phase is substantially stable in the lower mantle, suggesting that it could be a potential host of potassium and other incompatible large-ion elements.

  10. Ion mobility studies of carbohydrates as group I adducts: isomer specific collisional cross section dependence on metal ion radius.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuting; Dodds, Eric D

    2013-10-15

    Carbohydrates play numerous critical roles in biological systems. Characterization of oligosaccharide structures is essential to a complete understanding of their functions in biological processes; nevertheless, their structural determination remains challenging in part due to isomerism. Ion mobility spectrometry provides the means to resolve gas phase ions on the basis of their shape-to-charge ratios, thus providing significant potential for separation and differentiation of carbohydrate isomers. Here, we report on the determination of collisional cross sections for four groups of isomeric carbohydrates (including five isomeric disaccharides, four isomeric trisaccharides, two isomeric pentasaccharides, and two isomeric hexasaccharides) as their group I metal ion adducts (i.e., [M + Li](+), [M + Na](+), [M + K](+), [M + Rb](+), and [M + Cs](+)). In all, 65 collisional cross sections were measured, the great majority of which have not been previously reported. As anticipated, the collisional cross sections of the carbohydrate metal ion adducts generally increase with increasing metal ion radius; however, the collisional cross sections were found to scale with the group I cation size in isomer specific manners. Such measurements are of substantial analytical value, as they illustrate how the selection of charge carrier influences carbohydrate ion mobility determinations. For example, certain pairs of isomeric carbohydrates assume unique collisional cross sections upon binding one metal ion, but not another. On the whole, these data suggest a role for the charge carrier as a probe of carbohydrate structure and thus have significant implications for the continued development and application of ion mobility spectrometry for the distinction and resolution of isomeric carbohydrates.

  11. Kinetic and equilibrium metal-ion-binding behaviour reflected in a metal-ion-dependent antigenic determinant in bovine prothrombin. Comparison with bovine prothrombin fragment 1.

    PubMed Central

    Madar, D A; Hall, T J; Hiskey, R G; Koehler, K A

    1981-01-01

    Rabbit anti-(bovine prothrombin fragment 1) antibodies were fractionated by using fragment-1 affinity chromatography in the absence of metal ions, and showed an absolute requirement for the presence of metal ions in their interactions with bovine fragment 1 or prothrombin. These antibodies were employed to evaluate both the rate constants for a protein conformation change and the equilibrium metal-ion binding to isolated bovine fragment 1 and intact prothrombin. The close similarity of the rates obtained for the conformation change in fragment 1 and those observed in prothrombin indicated that the same process is involved in both proteins and that the non-fragment-1 region of the prothrombin has essentially no effect on this process in the fragment-1 region. Equilibrium metal-ion-binding studies indicate that the details of the metal-ion-binding process in fragment 1 and prothrombin are essentially the same. We conclude that the metal-ion-binding behaviour of the fragment-1 domain of intact prothrombin is identical with that of isolated fragment 1. PMID:6171251

  12. Cooperative thermodynamic control of selectivity in the self-assembly of rare earth metal-ligand helices.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Amber M; Young, Michael C; Zhang, Xing; Julian, Ryan R; Hooley, Richard J

    2013-11-27

    Metal-selective self-assembly with rare-earth cations is possible with suitable rigid, symmetrical bis-tridentate ligands. Kinetically controlled formation is initially observed, with smaller cations preferentially incorporated. Over time, the more thermodynamically favorable complexes with larger metals are formed. This thermodynamic control is a cooperative supramolecular phenomenon and only occurs upon multiple-metal-based self-assembly: single-metal ML3 analogues do not show reversible selectivity. The selectivity is dependent on small variations in lanthanide ionic radius and occurs despite identical coordination-ligand coordination geometries and minor size differences in the rare-earth metals.

  13. Raman Spectroscopic Characterization of Rare Earth Ions Doped Bismuth-Based Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pop, L.; Culea, E.; Bosca, M.; Culea, M.

    2007-04-01

    The xReO(1-x)[3Bi2O3.PbO] glass systems with diferent rare earth ions (ReO = CeO2, Tb4O7) have been prepared and examined with the aim of determining their structural characteristics. Raman sprectroscopy and density measurements were used to characterize the samples. Raman spectroscopy data permitted to identify some of the structural units that built up the lead bismuthate vitreous network. Density data were used to calculate the Poisson's ratio in terms of the Makishima-Mackenzie model.

  14. Optical spectra of rare earth ions in Mg-Al spinnel crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gritsyna, V. T.; Kolner, V. B.; Damburg, N. A.; Mironova, N. A.; Skvortsova, V. N.

    1985-05-01

    X-ray luminescence and photoluminescence spectra have been obtained for MgO-nAl2O3 crystals doped with alkaline rare earth elements. The crystals were grown according to the Verneuil method. Transitions are presented in Tb3(+), Dy3(+), and Er(+), Er3(+) ions in nonstoichiometric crystals, and the parameters of the corresponding luminescence lines are given. Inhomogeneous broadening of the spectral lines is attributed to deformation of polyhedra due to cation mixing and defects of the nonstoichiometric crystal structure. The X-ray and photoluminescence spectra are of the crystals are reproduced in graphic form.

  15. Metal Ions Removal Using Nano Oxide Pyrolox™ Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gładysz-Płaska, A.; Skwarek, E.; Budnyak, T. M.; Kołodyńska, D.

    2017-02-01

    The paper presents the use of Pyrolox™ containing manganese nano oxides used for the removal of Cu(II), Zn(II), Cd(II), and Pb(II) as well as U(VI) ions. Their concentrations were analyzed using the atomic absorption spectrometer SpectrAA 240 FS (Varian) as well as UV-vis method. For this purpose the static kinetic and equilibrium studies were carried out using the batch technique. The effect of solution pH, shaking time, initial metal ion concentrations, sorbent dosage, and temperature was investigated. The equilibrium data were analyzed using the sorption isotherm models proposed by Freundlich, Langmuir-Freundlich, Temkin, and Dubinin-Radushkevich. The kinetic results showed that the pseudo second order kinetic model was found to correlate the experimental data well. The results indicate that adsorption of Cu(II), Zn(II), Cd(II), and Pb(II) as well as U(VI) ions is strongly dependent on pH. The value of pH 4-7 was optimal adsorption. The time to reach the equilibrium was found to be 24 h, and after this time, the sorption percentage reached about 70%. Kinetics of Cu(II), Zn(II), Cd(II), Pb(II), and U(VI) adsorption on the adsorbent can be described by the pseudo second order rate equation. Nitrogen adsorption/desorption, infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) measurements for adsorbent characterization were performed. Characteristic points of the double layer determined for the studied Pyrolox™ sample in 0.001 mol/dm3 NaCl solution are pHPZC = 4 and pHIEP < 2.

  16. Metal Ions Removal Using Nano Oxide Pyrolox™ Material.

    PubMed

    Gładysz-Płaska, A; Skwarek, E; Budnyak, T M; Kołodyńska, D

    2017-12-01

    The paper presents the use of Pyrolox™ containing manganese nano oxides used for the removal of Cu(II), Zn(II), Cd(II), and Pb(II) as well as U(VI) ions. Their concentrations were analyzed using the atomic absorption spectrometer SpectrAA 240 FS (Varian) as well as UV-vis method. For this purpose the static kinetic and equilibrium studies were carried out using the batch technique. The effect of solution pH, shaking time, initial metal ion concentrations, sorbent dosage, and temperature was investigated. The equilibrium data were analyzed using the sorption isotherm models proposed by Freundlich, Langmuir-Freundlich, Temkin, and Dubinin-Radushkevich. The kinetic results showed that the pseudo second order kinetic model was found to correlate the experimental data well. The results indicate that adsorption of Cu(II), Zn(II), Cd(II), and Pb(II) as well as U(VI) ions is strongly dependent on pH. The value of pH 4-7 was optimal adsorption. The time to reach the equilibrium was found to be 24 h, and after this time, the sorption percentage reached about 70%. Kinetics of Cu(II), Zn(II), Cd(II), Pb(II), and U(VI) adsorption on the adsorbent can be described by the pseudo second order rate equation. Nitrogen adsorption/desorption, infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) measurements for adsorbent characterization were performed. Characteristic points of the double layer determined for the studied Pyrolox™ sample in 0.001 mol/dm(3) NaCl solution are pHPZC = 4 and pHIEP < 2.

  17. Porous metal oxide microspheres from ion exchange resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picart, S.; Parant, P.; Caisso, M.; Remy, E.; Mokhtari, H.; Jobelin, I.; Bayle, J. P.; Martin, C. L.; Blanchart, P.; Ayral, A.; Delahaye, T.

    2015-07-01

    This study is devoted to the synthesis and the characterization of porous metal oxide microsphere from metal loaded ion exchange resin. Their application concerns the fabrication of uranium-americium oxide pellets using the powder-free process called Calcined Resin Microsphere Pelletization (CRMP). Those mixed oxide ceramics are one of the materials envisaged for americium transmutation in sodium fast neutron reactors. The advantage of such microsphere precursor compared to classical oxide powder is the diminution of the risk of fine dissemination which can be critical for the handling of highly radioactive powders such as americium based oxides and the improvement of flowability for the filling of compaction chamber. Those millimetric oxide microspheres incorporating uranium and americium were synthesized and characterizations showed a very porous microstructure very brittle in nature which occurred to be adapted to shaping by compaction. Studies allowed to determine an optimal heat treatment with calcination temperature comprised between 700-800 °C and temperature rate lower than 2 °C/min. Oxide Precursors were die-pressed into pellets and then sintered under air to form regular ceramic pellets of 95% of theoretical density (TD) and of homogeneous microstructure. This study validated thus the scientific feasibility of the CRMP process to prepare bearing americium target in a powder free manner.

  18. Reactions of metal ions at surfaces of hydrous iron oxide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hem, J.D.

    1977-01-01

    Cu, Ag and Cr concentrations in natural water may be lowered by mild chemical reduction involving ferric hydroxide-ferrous ion redox processes. V and Mo solubilities may be controlled by precipitation of ferrous vanadate or molybdate. Concentrations as low as 10-8.00 or 10-9.00 M are readily attainable for all these metals in oxygen-depleted systems that are relatively rich in Fe. Deposition of manganese oxides such as Mn3O4 can be catalyzed in oxygenated water by coupling to ferrous-ferric redox reactions. Once formed, these oxides may disproportionate, giving Mn4+ oxides. This reaction produces strongly oxidizing conditions at manganese oxide surfaces. The solubility of As is significantly influenced by ferric iron only at low pH. Spinel structures such as chromite or ferrites of Cu, Ni, and Zn, are very stable and if locally developed on ferric hydroxide surfaces could bring about solubilities much below 10-9.00 M for divalent metals near neutral pH. Solubilities calculated from thermodynamic data are shown graphically and compared with observed concentrations in some natural systems. ?? 1977.

  19. Analysis of Supercritical-Extracted Chelated Metal Ions From Mixed Organic-Inorganic Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinha, Mahadeva P. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    Organic and inorganic contaminants of an environmental sample are analyzed by the same GC-MS instrument by adding an oxidizing agent to the sample to oxidize metal or metal compounds to form metal ions. The metal ions are converted to chelate complexes and the chelate complexes are extracted into a supercritical fluid such as CO2. The metal chelate extract after flowing through a restrictor tube is directly injected into the ionization chamber of a mass spectrometer, preferably containing a refractory metal filament such as rhenium to fragment the complex to release metal ions which are detected. This provides a fast, economical method for the analysis of metal contaminants in a sample and can be automated. An organic extract of the sample in conventional or supercritical fluid solvents can be detected in the same mass spectrometer, preferably after separation in a supercritical fluid chromatograph.

  20. Rare earth element recycling from waste nickel-metal hydride batteries.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiuli; Zhang, Junwei; Fang, Xihui

    2014-08-30

    With an increase in number of waste nickel-metal hydride batteries, and because of the importance of rare earth elements, the recycling of rare earth elements is becoming increasingly important. In this paper, we investigate the effects of temperature, hydrochloric acid concentration, and leaching time to optimize leaching conditions and determine leach kinetics. The results indicate that an increase in temperature, hydrochloric acid concentration, and leaching time enhance the leaching rate of rare earth elements. A maximum rare earth elements recovery of 95.16% was achieved at optimal leaching conditions of 70°C, solid/liquid ratio of 1:10, 20% hydrochloric acid concentration, -74μm particle size, and 100min leaching time. The experimental data were best fitted by a chemical reaction-controlled model. The activation energy was 43.98kJ/mol and the reaction order for hydrochloric acid concentration was 0.64. The kinetic equation for the leaching process was found to be: 1-(1-x)(1/3)=A/ρr0[HCl](0.64)exp-439,8008.314Tt. After leaching and filtration, by adding saturated oxalic solution to the filtrate, rare earth element oxalates were obtained. After removing impurities by adding ammonia, filtering, washing with dilute hydrochloric acid, and calcining at 810°C, a final product of 99% pure rare earth oxides was obtained.