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Sample records for earth moon sun

  1. EARTH, MOON, SUN, AND CV ACCRETION DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, M. M.

    2009-11-01

    Net tidal torque by the secondary on a misaligned accretion disk, like the net tidal torque by the Moon and the Sun on the equatorial bulge of the spinning and tilted Earth, is suggested by others to be a source to retrograde precession in non-magnetic, accreting cataclysmic variable (CV) dwarf novae (DN) systems that show negative superhumps in their light curves. We investigate this idea in this work. We generate a generic theoretical expression for retrograde precession in spinning disks that are misaligned with the orbital plane. Our generic theoretical expression matches that which describes the retrograde precession of Earths'more » equinoxes. By making appropriate assumptions, we reduce our generic theoretical expression to those generated by others, or to those used by others, to describe retrograde precession in protostellar, protoplanetary, X-ray binary, non-magnetic CV DN, quasar, and black hole systems. We find that spinning, tilted CV DN systems cannot be described by a precessing ring or by a precessing rigid disk. We find that differential rotation and effects on the disk by the accretion stream must be addressed. Our analysis indicates that the best description of a retrogradely precessing spinning, tilted, CV DN accretion disk is a differentially rotating, tilted disk with an attached rotating, tilted ring located near the innermost disk annuli. In agreement with the observations and numerical simulations by others, we find that our numerically simulated CV DN accretion disks retrogradely precess as a unit. Our final, reduced expression for retrograde precession agrees well with our numerical simulation results and with selective observational systems that seem to have main-sequence secondaries. Our results suggest that a major source to retrograde precession is tidal torques like that by the Moon and the Sun on the Earth. In addition, these tidal torques should be common to a variety of systems where one member is spinning and tilted, regardless

  2. Tidal effects on Earth, Planets, Sun by far visiting moons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fargion, Daniele

    2016-07-01

    The Earth has been formed by a huge mini-planet collision forming our Earth surface and our Moon today. Such a central collision hit was statistically rare. A much probable skimming or nearby encounter by other moons or planets had to occur. Indeed Recent observations suggest that many planetary-mass objects may be present in the outer solar system between the Kuiper belt and the Oort cloud. Gravitational perturbations may occasionally bring them into the inner solar system. Their passage near Earth could have generated gigantic tidal waves, large volcanic eruptions, sea regressions, large meteoritic impacts and drastic changes in global climate. They could have caused the major biological mass extinctions in the past in the geological records. For instance a ten times a terrestrial radius nearby impact scattering by a peripherical encounter by a small moon-like object will force huge tidal waves (hundred meter height), able to lead to huge tsunami and Earth-quake. Moreover the historical cumulative planet hits in larger and wider planets as Juppiter, Saturn, Uranus will leave a trace, as observed, in their tilted spin axis. Finally a large fraction of counter rotating moons in our solar system probe and test such a visiting mini-planet captur origination. In addition the Earth day duration variability in the early past did show a rare discountinuity, very probably indebt to such a visiting planet crossing event. These far planets in rare trajectory to our Sun may, in thousands event capture, also explain sudden historical and recent temperature changes.

  3. Observed tidal braking in the earth/moon/sun system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christodoulidis, D. C.; Smith, D. E.; Williamson, R. G.; Klosko, S. M.

    1987-01-01

    The low degree and order terms in the spherical harmonic model of the tidal potential were observed through the perturbations which are induced on near-earth satellite orbital motions. Evaluations of tracking observations from 17 satellites and a GEM-T1 geopotential model were used in the tidal recovery which was made in the presence of over 600 long-wavelength coefficients from 32 major and minor tides. Wahr's earth tidal model was used as a basis for the recovery of the ocean tidal terms. Using this tidal model, the secular change in the moon's mean motion due to tidal dissipation was found to be -25.27 + or - 0.61 arcsec/century squared. The estimation of lunar acceleration agreed with that observed from lunar laser ranging techniques (-24.9 + or - 1.0 arcsec/century squared), with the corresponding tidal braking of earth's rotation being -5.98 + or - 0.22 x 10 to the minus 22 rad/second squared. If the nontidal braking of the earth due to the observed secular change in the earth's second zonal harmonic is considered, satellite techniques yield a total value of the secular change of the earth's rotation rate of -4.69 + or - 0.36 x 10 to the minus 22 rad/second squared.

  4. Observed tidal braking in the earth/moon/sun system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christodoulidis, D. C.; Smith, D. E.; Williamson, R. G.; Klosko, S. M.

    1988-01-01

    The low degree and order terms in the spherical harmonic model of the tidal potential were observed through the perturbations which are induced on near-earth satellite orbital motions. Evaluations of tracking observations from 17 satellites and a GEM-T1 geopotential model were used in the tidal recovery which was made in the presence of over 600 long-wavelength coefficients from 32 major and minor tides. Wahr's earth tidal model was used as a basis for the recovery of the ocean tidal terms. Using this tidal model, the secular change in the moon's mean motion due to tidal dissipation was found to be -25.27 + or - 0.61 arcsec/century-squared. The estimation of lunar acceleration agreed with that observed from lunar laser ranging techniques (-24.9 + or - 1.0 arcsec/century-squared), with the corresponding tidal braking of earth's rotation being -5.98 + or - 0.22 X 10 to the -22 rad/second-squared. If the nontidal braking of the earth due to the observed secular change in the earth's second zonal harmonic is considered, satellite techniques yield a total value of the secular change in the earth's rotation rate of -4.69 + or - 0.36 X 10 to the -22 rad/second-squared.

  5. Martian Moon Blocks Sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This animation shows the transit of Mars' moon Phobos across the Sun. It is made up of images taken by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity on the morning of the 45th martian day, or sol, of its mission. This observation will help refine our knowledge of the orbit and position of Phobos. Other spacecraft may be able to take better images of Phobos using this new information. This event is similar to solar eclipses seen on Earth in which our Moon passes in front of the Sun. The images were taken by the rover's panoramic camera.

  6. Visualizing Sun-Earth-Moon Relationships through Hands-On Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, Abby

    2013-04-01

    "Tell me and I forget, teach me and I may remember, involve me and I learn." -Benjamin Franklin Understanding the spatial relationships between the sun, Earth and Moon is fundamental to any basic earth science education. Since both of the following concepts involve shadows on three-dimensional spheres, seeing them on paper is not often conducive to understanding. In the first activity, students use five Styrofoam balls painted to look like the sun and the four positions of the earth in each season. Students position the Earth-balls in their correct order around the sun and translate what they are seeing onto paper. In the second activity, students hold up a Styrofoam ball painted half white, half black. A picture of the sun is projected at the front of the classroom. They move the ball around their heads as if they were the Earth, keeping the lit side of the moon always facing the sun. They then draw the phases of the moon as they see them.

  7. Children's Concepts of the Shape and Size of the Earth, Sun and Moon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryce, T. G. K.; Blown, E. J.

    2013-01-01

    Children's understandings of the shape and relative sizes of the Earth, Sun and Moon have been extensively researched and in a variety of ways. Much is known about the confusions which arise as young people try to grasp ideas about the world and our neighbouring celestial bodies. Despite this, there remain uncertainties about the conceptual models…

  8. 7th Class Students' Opinions on Sun, Earth and Moon System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aydin, Suleyman

    2017-01-01

    This study is conducted to detect the students' perceptions on Sun, Moon and Earth (SME) system and define the 7th grade students' attitudes on the subject. In the study, since it was aimed to detect and evaluate the students' perceptions on some basic astronomical concepts without changing the natural conditions, a descriptive approach was…

  9. "Earth, Sun and Moon": Computer Assisted Instruction in Secondary School Science--Achievement and Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ercan, Orhan; Bilen, Kadir; Ural, Evrim

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of a web-based teaching method on students' academic achievement and attitudes in the elementary education fifth grade Science and Technology unit, "System of Earth, Sun and Moon". The study was a quasi-experimental study with experimental and control groups comprising 54 fifth grade students attending…

  10. Transfer to the Collinear Libration Point L3 in the Sun-Earth+Moon System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, Xi-yun; Tang, Jing-shi; Liu, Lin

    2007-01-01

    The collinear libration point L3 of the sun-earth+moon system is an ideal place for some space missions. Although there has been a great amount of work concerning the applications of the other two collinear libration points L1 and L2, little work has been done about the point L3. In this paper, the dynamics of the libration points was briefly introduced first. Then a way to transfer the spacecraft to the collinear libration point L3 via the invariant manifolds of the other two collinear libration points was proposed. Theoretical works under the model of circular restricted three-body problem were done. For the sun-earth+moon system, this model is a good approximation. The results obtained are useful when a transfer trajectory under the real solar system is designed.

  11. Sun, Moon and Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolvankar, V. G.

    2013-12-01

    During a study conducted to find the effect of Earth tides on the occurrence of earthquakes, for small areas [typically 1000km X1000km] of high-seismicity regions, it was noticed that the Sun's position in terms of universal time [GMT] shows links to the sum of EMD [longitude of earthquake location - longitude of Moon's foot print on earth] and SEM [Sun-Earth-Moon angle]. This paper provides the details of this relationship after studying earthquake data for over forty high-seismicity regions of the world. It was found that over 98% of the earthquakes for these different regions, examined for the period 1973-2008, show a direct relationship between the Sun's position [GMT] and [EMD+SEM]. As the time changes from 00-24 hours, the factor [EMD+SEM] changes through 360 degree, and plotting these two variables for earthquakes from different small regions reveals a simple 45 degree straight-line relationship between them. This relationship was tested for all earthquakes and earthquake sequences for magnitude 2.0 and above. This study conclusively proves how Sun and the Moon govern all earthquakes. Fig. 12 [A+B]. The left-hand figure provides a 24-hour plot for forty consecutive days including the main event (00:58:23 on 26.12.2004, Lat.+3.30, Long+95.980, Mb 9.0, EQ count 376). The right-hand figure provides an earthquake plot for (EMD+SEM) vs GMT timings for the same data. All the 376 events including the main event faithfully follow the straight-line curve.

  12. Children's Concepts of the Shape and Size of the Earth, Sun and Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryce, T. G. K.; Blown, E. J.

    2013-02-01

    Children's understandings of the shape and relative sizes of the Earth, Sun and Moon have been extensively researched and in a variety of ways. Much is known about the confusions which arise as young people try to grasp ideas about the world and our neighbouring celestial bodies. Despite this, there remain uncertainties about the conceptual models which young people use and how they theorise in the process of acquiring more scientific conceptions. In this article, the relevant published research is reviewed critically and in-depth in order to frame a series of investigations using semi-structured interviews carried out with 248 participants aged 3-18 years from China and New Zealand. Analysis of qualitative and quantitative data concerning the reasoning of these subjects (involving cognitive categorisations and their rank ordering) confirmed that (a) concepts of Earth shape and size are embedded in a 'super-concept' or 'Earth notion' embracing ideas of physical shape, 'ground' and 'sky', habitation of and identity with Earth; (b) conceptual development is similar in cultures where teachers hold a scientific world view and (c) children's concepts of shape and size of the Earth, Sun and Moon can be usefully explored within an ethnological approach using multi-media interviews combined with observational astronomy. For these young people, concepts of the shape and size of the Moon and Sun were closely correlated with their Earth notion concepts and there were few differences between the cultures despite their contrasts. Analysis of the statistical data used Kolmogorov-Smirnov Two-Sample Tests with hypotheses confirmed at K-S alpha level 0.05; rs : p < 0.01.

  13. Relationship between seismic status of Earth and relative position of bodies in sun-earth-moon system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulanin, N. V.

    1985-03-01

    The time spectrum of variations in seismicity is quite broad. There are seismic seasons, as well as multiannual variations. The range of characteristic times of variation from days to about one year is studied. Seismic activity as a function of the position of the moon relative to the Earth and the direction toward the Sun is studied. The moments of strong earthquakes, over 5.8 on the Richter scale, between 1968 and June 1980 are plotted in time coordinates relating them to the relative positions of the three bodies in the sun-earth-moon system. Methods of mathematical statistics are applied to the points produced, indicating at least 99% probability that the distribution was not random. a periodicity of the earth's seismic state of 413 days is observed.

  14. Utilization of multi-body trajectories in the Sun-Earth-Moon system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farquhar, R. W.

    1980-01-01

    An overview of three uncommon trajectory concepts for space missions in the Sun-Earth-Moon System is presented. One concept uses a special class of libration-point orbits called 'halo orbits.' It is shown that members of this orbit family are advantageous for monitoring the solar wind input to the Earth's magnetosphere, and could also be used to establish a continuous communications link between the Earth and the far side of the Moon. The second concept employs pretzel-like trajectories to explore the Earth's geomagnetic tail. These trajectories are formed by using the Moon to carry out a prescribed sequence of gravity-assist maneuvers. Finally, there is the 'boomerang' trajectory technique for multiple-encounter missions to comets and asteroids. In this plan, Earth-swingby maneuvers are used to retarget the original spacecraft trajectory. The boomerang method could be used to produce a triple-encounter sequence which includes flybys of comets Halley and Tempel-2 as well as the asteroid Geographos.

  15. Spacecraft Maneuvering at the Sun/Earth-Moon L2 Libration Point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahid, Kamran

    Spacecraft formation flying in the vicinity of the Sun/Earth-Moon libration points offers many promising possibilities for space exploration. The concept of formation flying involves the distribution of the functionality of a single spacecraft among several smaller, cooperative spacecraft. The libration points are locations relative to two large orbiting bodies where a third body with relatively small mass can remain stationary relative to the two larger bodies. The most significant perturbation experienced by a spacecraft at the libration point is effect of solar radiation pressure. This thesis presents the development of nonlinear control techniques for maneuvering control at the Sun-Earth/Moon L2 libration point. A new thruster based formation control technique is presented. We also consider a leader/follower formation architecture, and examine the station keeping control of the leader spacecraft and the formation control of the follower spacecraft using solar radiation pressure. Reference trajectories of the leader spacecraft, halo and Lissajous orbits, are determined using a numerical technique in order to take into account all major gravitational perturbations. The nonlinear controllers are developed based on Lyapunov analysis, including non-adaptive and adaptive designs. Thruster based and solar radiation pressure based control laws for spacecraft maneuvering at the Sun-Earth/Moon libration point are developed. Higher order sliding mode control is utilized to address the non-affine structure of the solar sail control inputs. The reduced input solar radiation pressure problem is properly addressed as an underactuated control problem. The development of adaptive control for solar sail equipped spacecraft is an innovation and represents and advancement in solar sailing control technology. Controller performance is evaluated in a high fidelity ephemeris model to reflect a realistic simulated space environment. The numerical results demonstrate the effectiveness

  16. Optimal design of near-Earth asteroid sample-return trajectories in the Sun-Earth-Moon system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Shengmao; Zhu, Zhengfan; Peng, Chao; Ma, Jian; Zhu, Xiaolong; Gao, Yang

    2016-08-01

    In the 6th edition of the Chinese Space Trajectory Design Competition held in 2014, a near-Earth asteroid sample-return trajectory design problem was released, in which the motion of the spacecraft is modeled in multi-body dynamics, considering the gravitational forces of the Sun, Earth, and Moon. It is proposed that an electric-propulsion spacecraft initially parking in a circular 200-km-altitude low Earth orbit is expected to rendezvous with an asteroid and carry as much sample as possible back to the Earth in a 10-year time frame. The team from the Technology and Engineering Center for Space Utilization, Chinese Academy of Sciences has reported a solution with an asteroid sample mass of 328 tons, which is ranked first in the competition. In this article, we will present our design and optimization methods, primarily including overall analysis, target selection, escape from and capture by the Earth-Moon system, and optimization of impulsive and low-thrust trajectories that are modeled in multi-body dynamics. The orbital resonance concept and lunar gravity assists are considered key techniques employed for trajectory design. The reported solution, preliminarily revealing the feasibility of returning a hundreds-of-tons asteroid or asteroid sample, envisions future space missions relating to near-Earth asteroid exploration.

  17. Earth Moon

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-06-08

    NASA Galileo spacecraft took this image of Earth moon on December 7, 1992 on its way to explore the Jupiter system in 1995-97. The distinct bright ray crater at the bottom of the image is the Tycho impact basin. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00405

  18. Spacecraft formation keeping near the libration points of the Sun-Earth/Moon system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchand, Belinda G.

    Multi-spacecraft formations, evolving near the vicinity of the libration points of the Sun-Earth/Moon system, have drawn increased interest for a variety of applications. This is particularly true for space based interferometry missions such as Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) and the Micro Arcsecond X-Ray Imaging Mission (MAXIM). Recent studies in formation flight have focused, primarily, on the control of formations that evolve in the immediate vicinity of the Earth. However, the unique dynamical structure near the libration points requires that the effectiveness and feasibility of these methods be re-examined. The present study is divided into two main topics. First, a dynamical systems approach is employed to develop a better understanding of the natural uncontrolled formation dynamics in this region of space. The focus is formations that evolve near halo orbits and Lissajous trajectories, near the L1 and L2 libration points of the Sun-Earth/Moon system. This leads to the development of a Floquet controller designed to simplify the process of identifying naturally existing formations as well as the associated stable manifolds for deployment. The initial analysis is presented in the Circular Restricted Three-Body Problem, but the results are later transitioned into the more complete Ephemeris model. The next subject of interest in this investigation is non-natural formations. That is, formations that are not consistent with the natural dynamical flow near the libration points. Mathematically, precise formation keeping of a given nominal configuration requires continuous control. Hence, a detailed analysis is presented to contrast the effectiveness and issues associated with linear optimal control and feedback linearization methods. Of course, continuous operation of the thrusters, may not represent a feasible option for a particular mission. If discrete formation keeping is implemented, however, the formation keeping goal will be subject to increased tracking

  19. Earth Eclipses the Sun

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-02-21

    Several times a day for a few days the Earth completely blocked the Sun for about an hour due to NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory's orbital path (Feb. 15, 2017). The edge of the Earth is not crisp, but kind of fuzzy due to Earth's atmosphere. This frame from a video shows the ending of one such eclipse over -- just seven minutes. The sun is shown in a wavelength of extreme ultraviolet light. These eclipses re-occur about every six months. The Moon blocks SDO's view of the sun on occasion as well. Movies are available at http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21461

  20. Teaching Future Teachers Basic Astronomy Concepts--Sun-Earth-Moon Relative Movements--at a Time of Reform in Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trumper, Ricardo

    2006-01-01

    In view of students' alternative conceptions about basic concepts in astronomy, we conducted a series of constructivist activities with future elementary and junior high school teachers aimed at changing their conceptions about the cause of seasonal changes, and of several characteristics of the Sun-Earth-Moon relative movements like Moon phases,…

  1. 3D Visualization in Elementary Education Astronomy: Teaching Urban Second Graders about the Sun, Earth, and Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isik-Ercan, Zeynep; Kim, Beomjin; Nowak, Jeffrey

    This research-in-progress hypothesizes that urban second graders can have an early understanding about the shape of Sun, Moon, and Earth, how day and night happens, and how Moon appears to change its shape by using three dimensional stereoscopic vision. The 3D stereoscopic vision system might be an effective way to teach subjects like astronomy that explains relationships among objects in space. Currently, Indiana state standards for science teaching do not suggest the teaching of these astronomical concepts explicitly before fourth grade. Yet, we expect our findings to indicate that students can learn these concepts earlier in their educational lives with the implementation of such technologies. We also project that these technologies could revolutionize when these concepts could be taught to children and expand the ways we think about children's cognitive capacities in understanding scientific concepts.

  2. The Sun and Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, Natchimuthuk

    2012-01-01

    Thus the Sun forms the basis for life on Earth via the black body radiation it emits. The Sun also emits mass in the form of the solar wind and the coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Mass emission also occurs in the form of solar energetic particles (SEPs), which happens during CMEs and solar flares. Both the mass and electromagnetic energy output of the Sun vary over a wide range of time scales, thus introducing disturbances on the space environment that extends from the Sun through the entire heliosphere including the magnetospheres and ionospheres of planets and moons of the solar system. Although our habitat is located in the neutral atmosphere of Earth, we are intimately connected to the non-neutral space environment starting from the ionosphere to the magnetosphere and to the vast interplanetary space. The variability of the solar mass emissions results in the interaction between the solar wind plasma and the magnetospheric plasma leading to huge disturbances in the geospace. The Sun ionizes our atmosphere and creates the ionosphere. The ionosphere can be severely disturbed by the transient energy input from solar flares and the solar wind during geomagnetic storms. The complex interplay between Earth's magnetic field and the solar magnetic field carried by the solar wind presents varying conditions that are both beneficial and hazardous to life on earth. This seminar presents some of the key aspects of this Sun-Earth connection that we have learned since the birth of space science as a scientific discipline some half a century ago.

  3. The Earth & Moon

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-06-04

    During its flight, NASA’s Galileo spacecraft returned images of the Earth and Moon. Separate images of the Earth and Moon were combined to generate this view. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00342

  4. Student Mastery of the Sun-Earth-Moon System in a Flipped Classroom of Pre-service Elementary Education Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Kristine

    2014-01-01

    One of the current trends in pedagogy at all levels(K-college) is the so-called ‘flipped classroom’, in which students prepare for a class meeting through self-study of the material. It is based on a rejection of the classic model of the faculty member as the ‘sage on the stage’ instead, responsibility for learning shifts to the individual student. The faculty member takes on the role of learning facilitator or mentor, and focuses the students’ learning by crafting and administering timely formative assessments (in multiple formats and applied multiple times) that aid both students and the faculty member in tracking the students’ mastery of the learning outcomes. In a flipped, freshman-only, section of SCI 111 Elementary Earth-Physical Sciences (a required introductory science course for pre-service elementary school teachers) the students learned through a combination of individual and group hands-on in-class activities, technology (including PowerPoint presentations and short videos viewed prior to attending class), in-class worksheets, and in-class discussions. Students self-differentiated in how they interacted with the available teaching materials, deciding which activities to spend the most time on based on their individual needs (based on an online quiz taken the night before the class period, and their personal self-confidence with the material). Available in-class activities and worksheets were developed by the faculty member based on student scores on the online quiz as well as personal messages submitted through the course management system the night before the class meeting. While this placed a significant burden on the faculty member in terms of course preparation, it allowed for just-in-time teaching to take place. This poster describes the results of student mastery of content centered on the sun-earth-moon system (specifically seasons, moon phases, and eclipses) as compared to traditional classroom sections.

  5. Earth and Moon as viewed from Mars

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-05-22

    This is the first image of Earth ever taken from another planet that actually shows our home as a planetary disk. Because Earth and the Moon are closer to the Sun than Mars, they exhibit phases, just as the Moon, Venus, & Mercury do when viewed from Earth

  6. "We Put on the Glasses and Moon Comes Closer!" Urban Second Graders Exploring the Earth, the Sun and Moon through 3D Technologies in a Science and Literacy Unit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isik-Ercan, Zeynep; Zeynep Inan, Hatice; Nowak, Jeffrey A.; Kim, Beomjin

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative case study describes (a) the ways 3D visualization, coupled with other science and literacy experiences, supported young children's first exploration of the Earth-Sun-Moon system and (b) the perspectives of classroom teachers and children on using 3D visualization. We created three interactive 3D software modules that simulate day…

  7. A Sun-Earth-Moon Activity to Develop Student Understanding of Lunar Phases and Frames of Reference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashmann, Scott

    2012-01-01

    The Moon is an ever-present subject of observation, and it is a recurring topic in the science curriculum from kindergarten's basic observations through graduate courses' mathematical analyses of its orbit. How do students come to comprehend Earth's nearest neighbor? What is needed for them to understand the lunar phases and other phenomena and…

  8. Crescent Earth and Moon

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-08-29

    This picture of a crescent-shaped Earth and Moon, the first of its kind ever taken by a spacecraft, was recorded Sept. 18, 1977, by NASA Voyager 1 when it was 7.25 million miles 11.66 million kilometers from Earth. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00013

  9. NASA's SDO Shows Moon Transiting the Sun

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-12-08

    On Nov. 22, 2014 from 5:29 to 6:04 p.m. EST., the moon partially obscured the view of the sun from NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory. This phenomenon, which is called a lunar transit, could only be seen from SDO's point of view. In 2014, SDO captured four such transits -- including its longest ever recorded, which occurred on Jan. 30, and lasted two and a half hours. SDO imagery during a lunar transit always shows a crisp horizon on the moon -- a reflection of the fact that the moon has no atmosphere around it to distort the light from the sun. The horizon is so clear in these images that mountains and valleys in the terrain can be seen. Credit: NASA/SDO NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  10. Earth - Moon Conjunction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    On December 16, 1992, 8 days after its encounter with Earth, the Galileo spacecraft looked back from a distance of about 6.2 million kilometers (3.9 million miles) to capture this remarkable view of the Moon in orbit about Earth. The composite photograph was constructed from images taken through visible (violet, red) and near-infrared (1.0-micron) filters. The Moon is in the foreground; its orbital path is from left to right. Brightly colored Earth contrasts strongly with the Moon, which reacts only about one-third as much sunlight as our world. To improve the visibility of both bodies, contrast and color have been computer enhanced. At the bottom of Earth's disk, Antarctica is visible through clouds. The Moon's far side can also be seen. The shadowy indentation in the Moon's dawn terminator--the boundary between its dark and lit sides--is the South Pole-Aitken Basin, one of the largest and oldest lunar impact features. This feature was studied extensively by Galileo during the first Earth flyby in December 1990.

  11. Crescent Earth and Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    This picture of a crescent-shaped Earth and Moon -- the first of its kind ever taken by a spacecraft -- was recorded Sept. 18, 1977, by NASA's Voyager 1 when it was 7.25 million miles (11.66 million kilometers) from Earth. The Moon is at the top of the picture and beyond the Earth as viewed by Voyager. In the picture are eastern Asia, the western Pacific Ocean and part of the Arctic. Voyager 1 was directly above Mt. Everest (on the night side of the planet at 25 degrees north latitude) when the picture was taken. The photo was made from three images taken through color filters, then processed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Image Processing Lab. Because the Earth is many times brighter than the Moon, the Moon was artificially brightened by a factor of three relative to the Earth by computer enhancement so that both bodies would show clearly in the print. Voyager 2 was launched Aug. 20, 1977, followed by Voyager 1 on Sept. 5, 1977, en route to encounters at Jupiter in 1979 and Saturn in 1980 and 1981. JPL manages the Voyager mission for NASA's Office of Space Science.

  12. Topography of Earth's moon

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-10-07

    Topography of Earth's moon generated from data collected by the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter, aboard NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, with the gravity anomalies bordering the Procellarum region superimposed in blue. The border structures are shown using gravity gradients calculated with data from NASA's Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) mission. These gravity anomalies are interpreted as ancient lava-flooded rift zones buried beneath the volcanic plains (or maria) on the nearside of the Moon. Launched as GRAIL A and GRAIL B in September 2011, the probes, renamed Ebb and Flow, operated in a nearly circular orbit near the poles of the moon at an altitude of about 34 miles (55 kilometers) until their mission ended in December 2012. The distance between the twin probes changed slightly as they flew over areas of greater and lesser gravity caused by visible features, such as mountains and craters, and by masses hidden beneath the lunar surface. The twin spacecraft flew in a nearly circular orbit until the end of the mission on Dec. 17, 2012, when the probes intentionally were sent into the moon's surface. NASA later named the impact site in honor of late astronaut Sally K. Ride, who was America's first woman in space and a member of the GRAIL mission team. GRAIL's prime and extended science missions generated the highest-resolution gravity field map of any celestial body. The map will provide a better understanding of how Earth and other rocky planets in the solar system formed and evolved. The GRAIL mission was managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, California, for NASA's Science Mission Directorate in Washington. The mission was part of the Discovery Program managed at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. GRAIL was built by Lockheed Martin Space Systems in Denver. For more information about GRAIL, please visit grail.nasa.gov. Credit: NASA/Colorado School of Mines/MIT/GSFC/Scientific Visualization

  13. Precession of the Earth-Moon System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urbassek, Herbert M.

    2009-01-01

    The precession rate of the Earth-Moon system by the gravitational influence of the Sun is derived. Attention is focussed on a physically transparent but complete presentation accessible to first- or second-year physics students. Both a shortcut and a full analysis are given, which allows the inclusion of this material as an example of the physics…

  14. `We put on the glasses and Moon comes closer!' Urban Second Graders Exploring the Earth, the Sun and Moon Through 3D Technologies in a Science and Literacy Unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isik-Ercan, Zeynep; Zeynep Inan, Hatice; Nowak, Jeffrey A.; Kim, Beomjin

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative case study describes (a) the ways 3D visualization, coupled with other science and literacy experiences, supported young children's first exploration of the Earth-Sun-Moon system and (b) the perspectives of classroom teachers and children on using 3D visualization. We created three interactive 3D software modules that simulate day and night, Moon phases and seasons. These modules were used in a science and literacy unit for 35 second graders at an urban elementary school in Midwestern USA. Data included pre- and post-interviews, audio-taped lessons and classroom observations. Post-interviews demonstrated that children's knowledge of the shapes and the movements of the Earth and Moon, alternation of day and night, the occurrence of the seasons, and Moon's changing appearance increased. Second graders reported that they enjoyed expanding their knowledge through hands-on experiences; through its reality effect, 3D visualization enabled them to observe the space objects that move in the virtual space. The teachers noted that 3D visualization stimulated children's interest in space and that using 3D visualization in combination with other teaching methods-literacy experiences, videos and photos, simulations, discussions, and presentations-supported student learning. The teachers and the students still experienced challenges using 3D visualization due to technical problems with 3D vision and time constraints. We conclude that 3D visualization offers hands-on experiences for challenging science concepts and may support young children's ability to view phenomena that would typically be observed through direct, long-term observations in outer space. Results imply a reconsideration of assumed capabilities of young children to understand astronomical phenomena.

  15. Earth and Moon as viewed from Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-368, 22 May 2003

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Globe diagram illustrates the Earth's orientation as viewed from Mars (North and South America were in view).

    Earth/Moon: This is the first image of Earth ever taken from another planet that actually shows our home as a planetary disk. Because Earth and the Moon are closer to the Sun than Mars, they exhibit phases, just as the Moon, Venus, and Mercury do when viewed from Earth. As seen from Mars by MGS on 8 May 2003 at 13:00 GMT (6:00 AM PDT), Earth and the Moon appeared in the evening sky. The MOC Earth/Moon image has been specially processed to allow both Earth (with an apparent magnitude of -2.5) and the much darker Moon (with an apparent magnitude of +0.9) to be visible together. The bright area at the top of the image of Earth is cloud cover over central and eastern North America. Below that, a darker area includes Central America and the Gulf of Mexico. The bright feature near the center-right of the crescent Earth consists of clouds over northern South America. The image also shows the Earth-facing hemisphere of the Moon, since the Moon was on the far side of Earth as viewed from Mars. The slightly lighter tone of the lower portion of the image of the Moon results from the large and conspicuous ray system associated with the crater Tycho.

    A note about the coloring process: The MGS MOC high resolution camera only takes grayscale (black-and-white) images. To 'colorize' the image, a Mariner 10 Earth/Moon image taken in 1973 was used to color the MOC Earth and Moon picture. The procedure used was as follows: the Mariner 10 image was converted from 24-bit color to 8-bit color using a JPEG to GIF conversion program. The 8-bit color image was converted to 8-bit grayscale and an associated lookup table mapping each gray value of the image to a red-green-blue color triplet (RGB). Each color triplet was root-sum-squared (RSS), and sorted in increasing RSS

  16. Sun-Earth Day

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Michael Sandras, a member of the Pontchartrain Astronomical Society, explains his solar telescope to students of Second Street in Bay St. Louis, Hancock County and Nicholson elementary schools in StenniSphere's Millennium Hall on April 10. The students participated in several hands-on activities at Stennis Space Center's Sun-Earth Day celebration.

  17. Sun-Earth Day

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-04-11

    Michael Sandras, a member of the Pontchartrain Astronomical Society, explains his solar telescope to students of Second Street in Bay St. Louis, Hancock County and Nicholson elementary schools in StenniSphere's Millennium Hall on April 10. The students participated in several hands-on activities at Stennis Space Center's Sun-Earth Day celebration.

  18. Configuration and Dynamics of the Earth-Sun-Moon System: An Investigation into Conceptions of Deaf and Hearing Pupils.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roald, Ingvild; Mikalsen, Oyvind

    2001-01-01

    Reports and analyzes the day and night cycle, the seasons, and the phases of the moon as seen by Norwegian deaf pupils aged 7, 9, 11, and 17 years, and by hearing Norwegian pupils 9 years old. Among the 9-year-olds there was no difference in the inner coherence of the conceptions between deaf pupils. (Author/SAH)

  19. Program For Tracking The Sun From The Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, Warren K.; Spires, Dustin S.

    1995-01-01

    SUNTRACKER program computes azimuth and elevation angles of Sun, as viewed from given position on Moon, during time defined by user. Program gets selenographic (moon-centered) position of Sun at given Julian date, then converts selenographic position of Sun into azimuth and elevation at given position on Moon. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  20. Moon and Sun shadowing effect in the MACRO detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrosio, M.; Antolini, R.; Baldini, A.; Barbarino, G. C.; Barish, B. C.; Battistoni, G.; Becherini, Y.; Bellotti, R.; Bemporad, C.; Bernardini, P.; Bilokon, H.; Bower, C.; Brigida, M.; Bussino, S.; Cafagna, F.; Calicchio, M.; Campana, D.; Carboni, M.; Caruso, R.; Cecchini, S.; Cei, F.; Chiarella, V.; Chiarusi, T.; Choudhary, B. C.; Coutu, S.; Cozzi, M.; De Cataldo, G.; Dekhissi, H.; De Marzo, C.; De Mitri, I.; Derkaoui, J.; De Vincenzi, M.; Di Credico, A.; Erriquez, O.; Favuzzi, C.; Forti, C.; Fusco, P.; Giacomelli, G.; Giannini, G.; Giglietto, N.; Giorgini, M.; Grassi, M.; Grillo, A.; Gustavino, C.; Habig, A.; Hanson, K.; Heinz, R.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katsavounidis, I.; Kearns, E.; Kim, H.; Kumar, A.; Kyriazopoulou, S.; Lamanna, E.; Lane, C.; Levin, D. S.; Lipari, P.; Longley, N. P.; Longo, M. J.; Loparco, F.; Maaroufi, F.; Mancarella, G.; Mandrioli, G.; Manzoor, S.; Margiotta, A.; Marini, A.; Martello, D.; Marzari-Chiesa, A.; Mazziotta, M. N.; Michael, D. G.; Monacelli, P.; Montaruli, T.; Monteno, M.; Mufson, S.; Musser, J.; Nicolò, D.; Nolty, R.; Orth, C.; Osteria, G.; Palamara, O.; Patrizii, L.; Pazzi, R.; Peck, C. W.; Perrone, L.; Petrera, S.; Popa, V.; Rainò, A.; Reynoldson, J.; Ronga, F.; Satriano, C.; Scapparone, E.; Scholberg, K.; Sioli, M.; Sirri, G.; Sitta, M.; Spinelli, P.; Spinetti, M.; Spurio, M.; Steinberg, R.; Stone, J. L.; Sulak, L. R.; Surdo, A.; Tarlè, G.; Togo, V.; Vakili, M.; Walter, C. W.; Webb, R.

    2003-11-01

    Using data collected by the MACRO experiment from 1989 to the end of its operations in 2000, we have studied in the underground muon flux the shadowing effects due to both the Moon and the Sun. We have observed the shadow cast by the Moon at its apparent position with a significance of 6.5 σ. The Moon shadowing effect has been used to verify the pointing capability of the detector and to determine the instrument resolution for the search of muon excesses from any direction of the celestial sphere. The dependence of the effect on the geomagnetic field is clearly shown by splitting the data sample in day and night observations. The Sun shadow, observed with a significance of 4.6 σ is displaced by about 0.6° from its apparent position. In this case however the explanation resides in the configuration of the Solar and Interplanetary Magnetic Fields, which affect the propagation of cosmic ray particles between the Sun, and the Earth. The displacement of the Sun shadow with respect to the real Sun position has been used to establish an upper limit on the antimatter flux in cosmic rays of about 48% at 68% c.l. and primary energies of about 20 TeV.

  1. NASA Sun Earth

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-12-08

    CME blast and subsequent impact at Earth -- This illustration shows a CME blasting off the Sun’s surface in the direction of Ea CME blast and subsequent impact at Earth -- This illustration shows a CME blasting off the Sun’s surface in the direction of Earth. This left portion is composed of an EIT 304 image superimposed on a LASCO C2 coronagraph. Two to four days later, the CME cloud is shown striking and beginning to be mostly deflected around the Earth’s magnetosphere. The blue paths emanating from the Earth’s poles represent some of its magnetic field lines. The magnetic cloud of plasma can extend to 30 million miles wide by the time it reaches earth. These storms, which occur frequently, can disrupt communications and navigational equipment, damage satellites, and even cause blackouts. (Objects in the illustration are not drawn to scale.) Credit: NASA/GSFC/SOHO/ESA To learn more go to the SOHO website: sohowww.nascom.nasa.gov/home.html To learn more about NASA's Sun Earth Day go here: sunearthday.nasa.gov/2010/index.php

  2. A study of the influence of the sun on optimal two-impulse Earth-to-Moon trajectories with moderate time of flight in the three-body and four-body models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filho, Luiz Arthur Gagg; da Silva Fernandes, Sandro

    2017-05-01

    In this work, a study about the influence of the Sun on optimal two-impulse Earth-to-Moon trajectories for interior transfers with moderate time of flight is presented considering the three-body and the four-body models. The optimization criterion is the total characteristic velocity which represents the fuel consumption of an infinite thrust propulsion system. The optimization problem has been formulated using the classic planar circular restricted three-body problem (PCR3BP) and the planar bi-circular restricted four-body problem (PBR4BP), and, it consists of transferring a spacecraft from a circular low Earth orbit (LEO) to a circular low Moon orbit (LMO) with minimum fuel consumption. The Sequential Gradient Restoration Algorithm (SGRA) is applied to determine the optimal solutions. Numerical results are presented for several final altitudes of a clockwise or a counterclockwise circular low Moon orbit considering a specified altitude of a counterclockwise circular low Earth orbit. Two types of analysis are performed: in the first one, the initial position of the Sun is taken as a parameter and the major parameters describing the optimal trajectories are obtained by solving an optimization problem of one degree of freedom. In the second analysis, an optimization problem with two degrees of freedom is considered and the initial position of the Sun is taken as an additional unknown.

  3. The Early Years: The Earth-Sun System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashbrook, Peggy

    2015-01-01

    We all experience firsthand many of the phenomena caused by Earth's Place in the Universe (Next Generation Science Standard 5-ESS1; NGSS Lead States 2013) and the relative motion of the Earth, Sun, and Moon. Young children can investigate phenomena such as changes in times of sunrise and sunset (number of daylight hours), Moon phases, seasonal…

  4. Earth Eclipses the Sun

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-12-08

    Twice a year, NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, has an eclipse season — a weeks-long period in which Earth blocks SDO’s view of the sun for part of each day. This footage captured by SDO on Feb. 15, 2017, shows one such eclipse. Earth’s edge appears fuzzy, rather than crisp, because the sun’s light is able to shine through Earth’s atmosphere in some places. These images were captured in wavelengths of extreme ultraviolet light, which is typically invisible to our eyes, but is colorized here in gold. Credit: NASA/Goddard/SDO NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  5. Earth-moon system: Dynamics and parameter estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breedlove, W. J., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    A theoretical development of the equations of motion governing the earth-moon system is presented. The earth and moon were treated as finite rigid bodies and a mutual potential was utilized. The sun and remaining planets were treated as particles. Relativistic, non-rigid, and dissipative effects were not included. The translational and rotational motion of the earth and moon were derived in a fully coupled set of equations. Euler parameters were used to model the rotational motions. The mathematical model is intended for use with data analysis software to estimate physical parameters of the earth-moon system using primarily LURE type data. Two program listings are included. Program ANEAMO computes the translational/rotational motion of the earth and moon from analytical solutions. Program RIGEM numerically integrates the fully coupled motions as described above.

  6. Galileo's Earth-Moon portrait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simarski, Lynn Teo

    Research reported at an AGU session on Galileo's Earth/Moon flyby refined the spacecraft's distinctive portrait of the Earth-Moon system. The Galileo team presented dramatic new views of the Earth and Moon taken last December. Andrew P. Ingersoll showed a color movie of the rotating Earth, made through spectral filters with which Galileo viewed the Earth almost continuously for 25 hours.Galileo also made finely tuned observations of vegetation and clouds, using three very closely spaced spectral wavelengths in the near-infrared, explained W. Reid Thompson. In the resulting images, Argentinian grassland and Brazilian rain forest are clearly distinguished, demonstrating the applicability of this technique for routine monitoring of deforestation, shifts in vegetation due to climate, and other phenomena. Thompson suggested that this capability could be used on the Earth Observing System. One of the spectral bands may also have potential for monitoring cloud condensation, as it appears to differentiate actively condensing, vapor-heavy clouds from higher and drier clouds.

  7. Sun-Earth Day, 2001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Mitzi L.; Mortfield, P.; Hathaway, D. H.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    To promote awareness of the Sun-Earth connection, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, in collaboration with the Stanford SOLAR Center, sponsored a one-day Sun-Earth Day event on April 27, 2001. Although "celebrated" on only one day, teachers and students from across the nation, prepared for over a month in advance. Workshops were held in March to train teachers. Students performed experiments, results of which were shared through video clips and an internet web cast. Our poster includes highlights from student experiments (grades 2 - 12), lessons learned from the teacher workshops and the event itself, and plans for Sun-Earth Day 2002.

  8. A 3-D Virtual Reality Model of the Sun and the Moon for E-Learning at Elementary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sun, Koun-Tem; Lin, Ching-Ling; Wang, Sheng-Min

    2010-01-01

    The relative positions of the sun, moon, and earth, their movements, and their relationships are abstract and difficult to understand astronomical concepts in elementary school science. This study proposes a three-dimensional (3-D) virtual reality (VR) model named the "Sun and Moon System." This e-learning resource was designed by…

  9. The ancient sun: Fossil record in the earth, moon and meteorites; Proceedings of the Conference, Boulder, CO, October 16-19, 1979

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepin, R. O. (Editor); Eddy, J. A.; Merrill, R. B.

    1980-01-01

    Papers are presented concerning theories of solar variability and their consequences for luminosity, particle emission and magnetic field changes within the past 4.5 billion years, and on the records of such solar behavior in lunar, meteoritic and terrestrial materials. Specific topics include the neutrino luminosity of the sun, the relation of sunspots to the terrestrial climate of the past 100 years, solar modulation of galactic cosmic rays, the historical record of solar activity, C-14 variations in terrestrial and marine reservoirs, and solar particle fluxes as indicated by track, thermoluminescence and solar wind measurements in lunar rocks. Attention is also given to the spin-down of the solar interior through circulation currents and fluid instabilities, grain surface exposure models in planetary regoliths, rare gases in the solar wind, nitrogen isotopic variations in the lunar regolith, the influence of solar UV radiation on climate, and the pre-main sequence evolution of the sun and evidence of the primordial solar wind in the electromagnetic induction heating of the asteroids and moon.

  10. Earth After the Moon Forming Impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahnle, Kevin

    2006-01-01

    The Hadean Earth is widely and enduringly pictured as a world of exuberant volcanism, exploding meteors, huge craters, infernal heat, and billowing sulfurous steams; i.e., a world of fire and brimstone punctuated with blows to the head. In the background the Moon looms gigantic in the sky. The popular image has given it a name that celebrates our mythic roots. A hot early Earth is an inevitable consequence of accretion. The Moon-forming impact ensured that Earth as we know it emerged from a fog of silicate vapor. The impact separated the volatiles from the silicates. It took -100 years to condense and rain out the bulk of the vaporized silicates, although relatively volatile elements may have remained present in the atmosphere throughout the magma ocena stage. The magma ocean lasted approx. 2 Myr, its lifetime prolonged by tidal heating and thermal blanketing by a thick (CO2-rich steam atmosphere. Water oceans condensed quickly after the mantle solidified, but for some 10-100 Myr the surface would have stayed warm (approx. 500 K) until the CO2 was removed into the mantle. Thereafter the faint young Sun suggests that a lifeless Earth would always have been evolving toward a bitterly cold ice world, but the cooling trend was frequently interrupted by volcanic or impact induced thaws.

  11. Earth after the Moon-forming Impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahnle, K. J.

    2006-01-01

    The Hadean Earth is widely and enduringly pictured as a world of exuberant volcanism, exploding meteors, huge craters, infernal heat, and billowing sulfurous steams; i.e., a world of fire and brimstone punctuated with blows to the head. In the background the Moon looms gigantic in the sky. The popular image has given it a name that celebrates our mythic roots. A hot early Earth is an inevitable consequence of accretion. The Moon-forming impact ensured that Earth as we know it emerged from a fog of silicate vapor. The impact separated the volatiles from the silicates. It took approx. 100 years to condense and rain out the bulk of the vaporized silicates, although relatively volatile elements may have remained present in the atmosphere throughout the magma ocena stage. The magma ocean lasted approx. 2 Myr, its lifetime prolonged by tidal heating and thermal blanketing by a thick CO2-rich steam atmosphere. Water oceans condensed quickly after the mantle solidified, but for some 10-100 Myr the surface would have stayed warm (approx. 500 K) until the CO2 was removed into the mantle. Thereafter the faint young Sun suggests that a lifeless Earth would always have been evolving toward a bitterly cold ice world, but the cooling trend was fiequently interrupted by volcanic or impact induced thaws. A cartoon history of water, temperature, and carbon dioxide in the aftermath of the moon-formining-impact is shown. How long it stays hot depends on how long it takes to scrub the C02 out of the atmosphere.

  12. Direct and indirect capture of near-Earth asteroids in the Earth-Moon system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Minghu; McInnes, Colin; Ceriotti, Matteo

    2017-09-01

    Near-Earth asteroids have attracted attention for both scientific and commercial mission applications. Due to the fact that the Earth-Moon L1 and L2 points are candidates for gateway stations for lunar exploration, and an ideal location for space science, capturing asteroids and inserting them into periodic orbits around these points is of significant interest for the future. In this paper, we define a new type of lunar asteroid capture, termed direct capture. In this capture strategy, the candidate asteroid leaves its heliocentric orbit after an initial impulse, with its dynamics modeled using the Sun-Earth-Moon restricted four-body problem until its insertion, with a second impulse, onto the L2 stable manifold in the Earth-Moon circular restricted three-body problem. A Lambert arc in the Sun-asteroid two-body problem is used as an initial guess and a differential corrector used to generate the transfer trajectory from the asteroid's initial obit to the stable manifold associated with Earth-Moon L2 point. Results show that the direct asteroid capture strategy needs a shorter flight time compared to an indirect asteroid capture, which couples capture in the Sun-Earth circular restricted three-body problem and subsequent transfer to the Earth-Moon circular restricted three-body problem. Finally, the direct and indirect asteroid capture strategies are also applied to consider capture of asteroids at the triangular libration points in the Earth-Moon system.

  13. Visualizing the Earth and Moon Relationship via Scaled Drawings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fidler, Chuck; Dotger, Sharon

    2009-01-01

    Students' difficulties with accurately conceptualizing the relationships among the Earth, Moon, and Sun are well documented. Any teacher who has seen the film "A Private Universe" (Schneps and Sadler 1988) will remember the challenge the interviewees experienced when trying to explain their understanding of this phenomenon. This paper describes a…

  14. A Development of the astronomical teaching materials which raise a student's time and and space concept by using of movement of the Moon, the Earth and the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taketa, I.; Matsumoto, I.

    2013-12-01

    In recent years, such as a return of the asteroid probe in 2010 "Hayabusa", a gold ring solar eclipse in 2012, and solar Face passage of Venus in 2012, there were many astronomical phenomena which pull a not only child but also citizen's interest, and they were greatly reported by the media in Japan. Thus, it is thought that the interest and concern about the universe of a child and a citizen are increasing. However, the earth science contents of a subject, such as the universe in school education are fields that it make comparatively poor at a teacher. So, this research aimed at the Development of the new space education teaching material which is easy to treat the teacher who has consciousness weak to the astronomical field at schools, and raise a child's time and space concepts. We did this research using the following Methods. 1) We carried out the questionnaire to the primary teacher of the Matsue city, and performed the opinion poll to a teacher's astronomical field. 2) We considered the subject on the education of the astronomical teaching materials used now. 3) As mentioned above 1) and 2), We developed the teaching materials which the waxing and waning of the moon based on the acquired content.

  15. Clementine Images of Earth and Moon

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-06-12

    During its flight and lunar orbit, NASA’s Clementine spacecraft returned images of the planet Earth and the Moon. This collection of UVVIS camera Clementine images shows the Earth from the Moon and 3 images of the Earth. The image on the left shows the Earth as seen across the lunar north pole; the large crater in the foreground is Plaskett. The Earth actually appeared about twice as far above the lunar horizon as shown. The top right image shows the Earth as viewed by the UVVIS camera while Clementine was in transit to the Moon; swirling white cloud patterns indicate storms. The two views of southeastern Africa were acquired by the UVVIS camera while Clementine was in low Earth orbit early in the mission. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00432

  16. Clementine Images of Earth and Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    During its flight and lunar orbit, the Clementine spacecraft returned images of the planet Earth and the Moon. This collection of UVVIS camera Clementine images shows the Earth from the Moon and 3 images of the Earth.

    The image on the left shows the Earth as seen across the lunar north pole; the large crater in the foreground is Plaskett. The Earth actually appeared about twice as far above the lunar horizon as shown. The top right image shows the Earth as viewed by the UVVIS camera while Clementine was in transit to the Moon; swirling white cloud patterns indicate storms. The two views of southeastern Africa were acquired by the UVVIS camera while Clementine was in low Earth orbit early in the mission

  17. Rings Around the Sun and Moon: Coronae and Diffraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowley, Les; Laven, Philip; Vollmer, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Atmospheric optical effects can teach much about physics and especially optics. Coronae--coloured rings around the sun or moon--are large-scale consequences of diffraction, which is often thought of as only a small effect confined to the laboratory. We describe coronae, how they are formed and experiments that can be conducted on ones in the sky.…

  18. The Moon's Moment in the Sun - Extending Public Engagement after the Total Solar Eclipse with International Observe the Moon Night

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bleacher, L.; Jones, A. P.; Wasser, M. L.; Petro, N. E.; Wright, E. T.; Ladd, D.; Keller, J. W.

    2017-12-01

    2017 presented an amazing opportunity to engage the public in learning about lunar and space science, the motions of the Earth-Moon-Sun system, and NASA's fleet of space missions, beginning with the 2017 total solar eclipse on 21 August and continuing with International Observe the Moon Night (InOMN) on 28 October. On 21 August 2017, everyone in the continental United States had the opportunity to witness a solar eclipse, weather permitting, in total or partial form. The path of totality, in which the Sun was completely obscured from view by the Moon, stretched from Oregon to South Carolina. The Education and Communication Team of NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) worked to highlight the Moon, the "central player" in the total solar eclipse, in a variety of ways for the public. Efforts included collaborating with Minor League Baseball teams to host eclipse-viewing events along the path of totality, communicating the Moon's role in the eclipse through public engagement products, communicating about InOMN as an experiential opportunity beyond the eclipse, and more. InOMN is an annual event, during which everyone on Earth is invited to observe and learn about the Moon and its connection to planetary science, and to share personal and community connections we all have to the Moon [2, 3, 4 and references therein]. For viewers across the United States, the total solar eclipse of 21 August provided an exciting opportunity to watch a New Moon cross in front of the Sun, casting the viewer in shadow and providing amazing views of the solar corona. The public observed the Moon in a different part of its orbit, when reflected sunlight revealed a fascinating lunar landscape - and extended their excitement for space science - by participating in InOMN on 28 October. With InOMN taking place barely two months after the total solar eclipse, it offered an opportunity to sustain and grow public interest in lunar and space science generated by the eclipse. We will report on

  19. Tube dynamics and low energy Earth-Moon transfers in the 4-body system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onozaki, Kaori; Yoshimura, Hiroaki; Ross, Shane D.

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, we show a low energy Earth-Moon transfer in the context of the Sun-Earth-Moon-spacecraft 4-body system. We consider the 4-body system as the coupled system of the Sun-Earth-spacecraft 3-body system perturbed by the Moon (which we call the Moon-perturbed system) and the Earth-Moon-spacecraft 3-body system perturbed by the Sun (which we call the Sun-perturbed system). In both perturbed systems, analogs of the stable and unstable manifolds are computed numerically by using the notion of Lagrangian coherent structures, wherein the stable and unstable manifolds play the role of separating orbits into transit and non-transit orbits. We obtain a family of non-transit orbits departing from a low Earth orbit in the Moon-perturbed system, and a family of transit orbits arriving into a low lunar orbit in the Sun-perturbed system. Finally, we show that we can construct a low energy transfer from the Earth to the Moon by choosing appropriate trajectories from both families and patching these trajectories with a maneuver.

  20. Crescent-shaped Earth and Moon

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-05-15

    This picture of a crescent-shaped Earth and Moon -- the first of its kind ever taken by a spacecraft -- was recorded Sept. 18, 1977, by NASA Voyager 1 when it was 7.25 million miles 11.66 million kilometers from Earth.

  1. Making the Moon from a fast-spinning Earth: a giant impact followed by resonant despinning.

    PubMed

    Ćuk, Matija; Stewart, Sarah T

    2012-11-23

    A common origin for the Moon and Earth is required by their identical isotopic composition. However, simulations of the current giant impact hypothesis for Moon formation find that most lunar material originated from the impactor, which should have had a different isotopic signature. Previous Moon-formation studies assumed that the angular momentum after the impact was similar to that of the present day; however, Earth-mass planets are expected to have higher spin rates at the end of accretion. Here, we show that typical last giant impacts onto a fast-spinning proto-Earth can produce a Moon-forming disk derived primarily from Earth's mantle. Furthermore, we find that a faster-spinning early Earth-Moon system can lose angular momentum and reach the present state through an orbital resonance between the Sun and Moon.

  2. A Cross-Cultural Investigation of Children's Conceptions about the Earth, the Sun and the Moon: Greek and American Data. Technical Report No. 497.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vosniadou, Stella; Brewer, William F.

    This document reports the results of a cross-cultural study on children's knowledge about the shape, gravity, movement, and location of the Earth and about the day/night cycle. The subjects of the study were elementary school students from Greece (N=90) and the United States (N=60). The results of the study showed that the children in both samples…

  3. Examples of the nonlinear dynamics of ballistic capture and escape in the earth-moon system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belbruno, Edward A.

    1990-01-01

    An example of a trajectory is given which is initially captured in an elliptic resonant orbit about the earth and then ballistically escapes the earth-moon system. This is demonstrated by a numerical example in three-dimensions using a planetary ephemeris. Another example shows a mechanism of how an elliptic orbit about the earth can increase its energy by performing a complex nonlinear transition to an elliptic orbit of a larger semi-major axis. Capture is also considered. An application of ballistic capture at the moon via an unstable periodic orbit using the four-body sun-earth-moon-S/C interaction is described.

  4. Crescent-shaped Earth and Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    This picture of a crescent-shaped Earth and Moon -- the first of its kind ever taken by a spacecraft -- was recorded Sept. 18, 1977, by NASA's Voyager 1 when it was 7.25 million miles (11.66 million kilometers) from Earth. The Moon is at the top of the picture and beyond the Earth as viewed by Voyager. In the picture are eastern Asia, the western Pacific Ocean and part of the Arctic. Voyager 1 was directly above Mt. Everest (on the night side of the planet at 25 degrees north latitude) when the picture was taken. The photo was made from three images taken through color filters, then processed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Image Processing Lab. Because the Earth is many times brighter than the Moon, the Moon was artificially brightened by a factor of three relative to the Earth by computer enhancement so that both bodies would show clearly in the print. Voyager 2 was launched Aug. 20, 1977, followed by Voyager 1 on Sept. 5, 1977, en route to encounters at Jupiter in 1979 and Saturn in 1980 and 1981. JPL manages the Voyager mission for NASA.

  5. Cosmic acceleration of Earth and the Moon by dark matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nordtvedt, Kenneth L.

    1994-01-01

    In order to test the hypothesis that the gravitational interaction between our Galaxy's dark matter and the ordinary matter in Earth and the Moon might not fulfill the equivalence principle (universality of free fall), we consider the pertinent perturbation of the lunar orbit -- a sidereal month period range oscillation resulting from a spatially fixed polarization of the orbit. Lunar laser ranging (LLR) data can measure this sidereal perturbation to an accuracy equal to or better than its existing measurement of the synodic month period range oscillation amplitude (+/- 3 cm) which has been used for testing whether Earth and the Moon accelerate at equal rates toward the Sun. Because of the slow precession rate of the Moon's perigree (8.9 yr period), the lunar orbit is particularly sensitive to a cosmic acceleration; the LLR fit of the orbit places an upper limit of 10(exp -13) cm/sq. s for any cosmic differential acceleration between Earth (Fe) and the Moon (silicates). This is 10(exp -5) of the total galactic acceleration of the solar system, of which, it has been suggested, a large portion is produced by dark matter.

  6. Small asteroids temporarily captured in the Earth-Moon system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedicke, Robert; Bolin, Bryce; Bottke, William F.; Chyba, Monique; Fedorets, Grigori; Granvik, Mikael; Patterson, Geoff

    2016-01-01

    We present an update on our work on understanding the population of natural objects that are temporarily captured in the Earth-Moon system like the 2-3 meter diameter, 2006 RH120, that was discovered by the Catalina Sky Survey. We use the term `minimoon' to refer to objects that are gravitationally bound to the Earth-Moon system, make at least one revolution around the barycenter in a co-rotating frame relative to the Earth-Sun axis, and are within 3 Earth Hill-sphere radii. There are one or two 1 to 2 meter diameter minimoons in the steady state population at any time, and about a dozen larger than 50 cm diameter. `Drifters' are also bound to the Earth-Moon system but make less than one revolution about the barycenter. The combined population of minimoons and drifters provide a new opportunity for scientific exploration of small asteroids and testing concepts for in-situ resource utilization. These objects provide interesting challenges for rendezvous missions because of their limited lifetime and complicated trajectories. Furthermore, they are difficult to detect because they are small, available for a limited time period, and move quickly across the sky.

  7. Small asteroids temporarily captured in the Earth-Moon system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedicke, Robert; Bolin, Bryce; Bottke, William F.; Chyba, Monique; Fedorets, Grigori; Granvik, Mikael; Patterson, Geoff

    2015-08-01

    We will present an update on our work on understanding the population of natural objects that are temporarily captured in the Earth-Moon system, such as the 2-3 meter diameter 2006 RH120 that was discovered by the Catalina Sky Survey. We use the term 'minimoon' to refer to objects that are gravitationally bound to the Earth-Moon system, make at least one revolution around the barycenter in a co-rotating frame relative to the Earth-Sun axis, and are within 3 Earth Hill-sphere radii. There are one or two 1 to 2 meter diameter minimoons in the steady state population at any time, and about a dozen larger than 50 cm diameter. `Drifters' are also bound to the Earth-Moon system but make less than one revolution about the barycenter. The combined population of minimoons and drifters provide a new opportunity for scientific exploration of small asteroids and testing concepts for in-situ resource utilization. These objects provide interesting challenges for rendezvous missions because of their limited lifetime and complicated trajectories. Furthermore, they are difficult to detect because they are small, available for a limited time period, and move quickly across the sky.

  8. Short-term capture of the Earth-Moon system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Yi; de Ruiter, Anton

    2018-06-01

    In this paper, the short-term capture (STC) of an asteroid in the Earth-Moon system is proposed and investigated. First, the space condition of STC is analysed and five subsets of the feasible region are defined and discussed. Then, the time condition of STC is studied by parameter scanning in the Sun-Earth-Moon-asteroid restricted four-body problem. Numerical results indicate that there is a clear association between the distributions of the time probability of STC and the five subsets. Next, the influence of the Jacobi constant on STC is examined using the space and time probabilities of STC. Combining the space and time probabilities of STC, we propose a STC index to evaluate the probability of STC comprehensively. Finally, three potential STC asteroids are found and analysed.

  9. From a Million Miles Away, NASA Camera Shows Moon Crossing Face of Earth

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-08-05

    This animation still image shows the far side of the moon, illuminated by the sun, as it crosses between the DISCOVR spacecraft's Earth Polychromatic Imaging Camera (EPIC) camera and telescope, and the Earth - one million miles away. Credits: NASA/NOAA A NASA camera aboard the Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) satellite captured a unique view of the moon as it moved in front of the sunlit side of Earth last month. The series of test images shows the fully illuminated “dark side” of the moon that is never visible from Earth. The images were captured by NASA’s Earth Polychromatic Imaging Camera (EPIC), a four megapixel CCD camera and telescope on the DSCOVR satellite orbiting 1 million miles from Earth. From its position between the sun and Earth, DSCOVR conducts its primary mission of real-time solar wind monitoring for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

  10. Keeping a Spacecraft on the Sun-Earth Line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roithmayr, Carlos M.; Kay-Bunnell, Linda

    2005-01-01

    Measurements of Earth's atmosphere as it occults sunlight can be obtained advantageously from a spacecraft placed in the proximity of the Sun-Earth Lagrange point L2. Maintaining the condition of continuous solar occultation by all parts of the atmospheric disk requires that the displacement of the spacecraft perpendicular to the Sun-Earth line remains less than 200 km. However, the gravitational force exerted by the Earth s moon must be negated by propulsion in order to meet this rather tight constraint. We provide an estimate of propulsive force needed to keep the spacecraft coincident with L2, as well as estimates of velocity increments needed to maintain various trajectories in the close vicinity of L2.

  11. Tidal Friction in the Earth-Moon System and Laplace Planes: Darwin Redux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubincam, David P.

    2015-01-01

    The dynamical evolution of the Earth-Moon system due to tidal friction is treated here. George H. Darwin used Laplace planes (also called proper planes) in his study of tidal evolution. The Laplace plane approach is adapted here to the formalisms of W.M. Kaula and P. Goldreich. Like Darwin, the approach assumes a three-body problem: Earth, Moon, and Sun, where the Moon and Sun are point-masses. The tidal potential is written in terms of the Laplace plane angles. The resulting secular equations of motion can be easily integrated numerically assuming the Moon is in a circular orbit about the Earth and the Earth is in a circular orbit about the Sun. For Earth-Moon distances greater than 10 Earth radii, the Earth's approximate tidal response can be characterized with a single parameter, which is a ratio: a Love number times the sine of a lag angle divided by another such product. For low parameter values it can be shown that Darwin's low-viscosity molten Earth, M. Ross's and G. Schubert's model of an Earth near melting, and Goldreich's equal tidal lag angles must all give similar histories. For higher parameter values, as perhaps has been the case at times with the ocean tides, the Earth's obliquity may have decreased slightly instead of increased once the Moon's orbit evolved further than 50 Earth radii from the Earth, with possible implications for climate. This is contrast to the other tidal friction models mentioned, which have the obliquity always increasing with time. As for the Moon, its orbit is presently tilted to its Laplace plane by 5.2deg. The equations do not allow the Moon to evolve out of its Laplace plane by tidal friction alone, so that if it was originally in its Laplace plane, the tilt arose with the addition of other mechanisms, such as resonance passages.

  12. Earth and Moon as Seen from Mars

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-03-03

    The High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment HiRISE camera would make a great backyard telescope for viewing Mars, and we can also use it at Mars to view other planets. This is an image of Earth and the moon, acquired on October 3, 2007.

  13. The Sun: Source of the Earth's Energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Barbara J.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Sun is the primary source of the Earth's energy. However, due to the complexity in the way the energy affects Earth, the various solar sources of the energy, and the variation exhibited by the Sun it is difficult to understand and predict the Earth's response to solar drivers. In addition to visible light the radiant energy of the Sun can exhibit variation in nearly all wavelengths, which can vary over nearly all timescales. Depending on the wavelength of the incident radiation the light can deposit energy in a wide variety or locations and drive processes from below Earth's surface to interplanetary space. Other sources of energy impacting Earth include energetic particles, magnetic fields, and mass and flow variations in the solar wind. Many of these variable energetic processes cannot be coupled and recent results continue to demonstrate that the complex dynamics of the Sun can have a great range of measurable impacts on Earth.

  14. Curiosity Mars Rover First Image of Earth and Earth Moon

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-02-06

    The two bodies in this portion of an evening-sky view by NASA Mars rover Curiosity are Earth and Earth moon. The rover Mast Camera Mastcam imaged them in the twilight sky of Curiosity 529th Martian day, or sol Jan. 31, 2014.

  15. On the Sun, Earth, and Clocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Easton, D.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses motions of the sun and earth in relation to the accuracy of clocks. Effect of eccentricity of the earth's orbit, efect of inclination of the earth's axis, and combination of these two effects are considered. The accuracy of sundials is also discussed. (DH)

  16. Forming a Moon with an Earth-like composition via a giant impact.

    PubMed

    Canup, Robin M

    2012-11-23

    In the giant impact theory, the Moon formed from debris ejected into an Earth-orbiting disk by the collision of a large planet with the early Earth. Prior impact simulations predict that much of the disk material originates from the colliding planet. However, Earth and the Moon have essentially identical oxygen isotope compositions. This has been a challenge for the impact theory, because the impactor's composition would have likely differed from that of Earth. We simulated impacts involving larger impactors than previously considered. We show that these can produce a disk with the same composition as the planet's mantle, consistent with Earth-Moon compositional similarities. Such impacts require subsequent removal of angular momentum from the Earth-Moon system through a resonance with the Sun as recently proposed.

  17. Tidal-friction theory of the earth-moon system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyttleton, R. A.

    1980-01-01

    Serious errors contained in Jeffreys' (1952, 1959, 1970, 1976) discussion of tidal friction in the earth-moon system are identified and their consequences are discussed. A direct solution of the dynamical tidal equations for the couple from the earth acting upon the moon and the couple from the earth acting upon the sun, which were left unsolved by Jeffreys, is found to be incompatible with observations and the predictions of linear or quadratic friction theory, due to his failure to take into account the possible change of the moment of inertia of the earth with time in the derivation of the dynamical equations. Consideration of this factor leads to the conclusion that the earth must be contracting at a rate of 14.7 x 10 to the -11th/year, which can be accounted for only by the Ramsey theory, in which the terrestrial core is considered as a phase change rather than a change in chemical composition. Implications of this value for the rates of changes in day length and lunar distance are also indicated.

  18. Stationkeeping of the First Earth-Moon Libration Orbiters: The ARTEMIS Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Folta, David; Woodard, Mark; Cosgrove, D.

    2011-01-01

    Libration point orbits near collinear locations are inherently unstable and must be controlled. For Acceleration Reconnection and Turbulence and Electrodynamics of the Moon's Interaction with the Sun (ARTEMIS) Earth-Moon Lissajous orbit operations, stationkeeping is challenging because of short time scales, large orbital eccentricity of the secondary, and solar gravitational and radiation pressure perturbations. ARTEMIS is the first NASA mission continuously controlled at both Earth-Moon L1 and L2 locations and uses a balance of optimization, spacecraft implementation and constraints, and multi-body dynamics. Stationkeeping results are compared to pre-mission research including mode directions.

  19. Tourism climate and thermal comfort in Sun Moon Lake, Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tzu-Ping; Matzarakis, Andreas

    2008-03-01

    Bioclimate conditions at Sun Moon Lake, one of Taiwan's most popular tourist destinations, are presented. Existing tourism-related climate is typically based on mean monthly conditions of air temperature and precipitation and excludes the thermal perception of tourists. This study presents a relatively more detailed analysis of tourism climate by using a modified thermal comfort range for both Taiwan and Western/Middle European conditions, presented by frequency analysis of 10-day intervals. Furthermore, an integrated approach (climate tourism information scheme) is applied to present the frequencies of each facet under particular criteria for each 10-day interval, generating a time-series of climate data with temporal resolution for tourists and tourism authorities.

  20. Tourism climate and thermal comfort in Sun Moon Lake, Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Tzu-Ping; Matzarakis, Andreas

    2008-03-01

    Bioclimate conditions at Sun Moon Lake, one of Taiwan’s most popular tourist destinations, are presented. Existing tourism-related climate is typically based on mean monthly conditions of air temperature and precipitation and excludes the thermal perception of tourists. This study presents a relatively more detailed analysis of tourism climate by using a modified thermal comfort range for both Taiwan and Western/Middle European conditions, presented by frequency analysis of 10-day intervals. Furthermore, an integrated approach (climate tourism information scheme) is applied to present the frequencies of each facet under particular criteria for each 10-day interval, generating a time-series of climate data with temporal resolution for tourists and tourism authorities.

  1. Water: Communicator In Moon-Earth Relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Joan S.

    The Moon's myriad effects upon Earth have been objects of fascination, and subjects for literary works and scientific speculation throughout history. Although many of Moon's influences upon Earth involve water, tidal movement is clearly the most readily associated effect. While very obvious, it however represents only one of a multitude of ways in which lunar forces effect this planet, and all life upon it. Much less apparent, though essential for all of life, is the wide spectrum of subtle fluctuating influences upon the water in the cells of living systems. Water's capacity to respond to extremely subtle changes in physical influences (such as gravitational fields), as associated with Moon phases (N.B. also with planetary constellations and sunspot activity), enables it to communicate such inputs to living systems. The periodicity of changes in natural systems has been of interest to man throughout history. However, only in more recent times has insight into water's behaviour led to its being recognised as a link between the periodicities seen in abiotic (Moon and other planetary) systems and biotic systems. Particular attention has long been paid to systematic fluctuations in agriculture and forestry: Different growth patterns are observed in connection with the Moon phases (and zodiac constellations) at planting time; different characteristics (e.g., fire resistance, pliability, firmness, etc.) of wood are seen in trees harvested at different phases and constellations. . The usefulness of such correlations has influenced planting and harvesting patterns in more traditional-oriented agriculture and forestry. Its acceptance by science has, however, been long in coming. The case similar, as regards physiological fluctuations observed in the medical field. A documented case in point is the correlation between the Moon-phase and risk of hemorrhage during surgery: This is one of many observations on periodicity in body functions, which deserve more research attention

  2. World cup soccer players tend to be born with sun and moon in adjacent zodiacal signs

    PubMed Central

    Verhulst, J

    2000-01-01

    The ecliptic elongation of the moon with respect to the sun does not show uniform distribution on the birth dates of the 704 soccer players selected for the 1998 World Cup. However, a uniform distribution is expected on astronomical grounds. The World Cup players show a very pronounced tendency (p = 0.00001) to be born on days when the sun and moon are in adjacent zodiacal signs. Key Words: soccer; World Cup; astrology; moon PMID:11131239

  3. Moon-based Earth Observation for Large Scale Geoscience Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Huadong; Liu, Guang; Ding, Yixing

    2016-07-01

    The capability of Earth observation for large-global-scale natural phenomena needs to be improved and new observing platform are expected. We have studied the concept of Moon as an Earth observation in these years. Comparing with manmade satellite platform, Moon-based Earth observation can obtain multi-spherical, full-band, active and passive information,which is of following advantages: large observation range, variable view angle, long-term continuous observation, extra-long life cycle, with the characteristics of longevity ,consistency, integrity, stability and uniqueness. Moon-based Earth observation is suitable for monitoring the large scale geoscience phenomena including large scale atmosphere change, large scale ocean change,large scale land surface dynamic change,solid earth dynamic change,etc. For the purpose of establishing a Moon-based Earth observation platform, we already have a plan to study the five aspects as follows: mechanism and models of moon-based observing earth sciences macroscopic phenomena; sensors' parameters optimization and methods of moon-based Earth observation; site selection and environment of moon-based Earth observation; Moon-based Earth observation platform; and Moon-based Earth observation fundamental scientific framework.

  4. Unique Moon Formation Model: Two Impacts of Earth and After Moon's Birth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Y.

    2018-04-01

    The Moon rocks are mixed with two impact-processes of Earth's impact breccias and airless Moon's impact breccias; discussed voids-rich texture and crust-like composition. The present model might be explained as cave-rich interior on the airless-and waterless Moon.

  5. Optimal ballistically captured Earth-Moon transfers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricord Griesemer, Paul; Ocampo, Cesar; Cooley, D. S.

    2012-07-01

    The optimality of a low-energy Earth-Moon transfer terminating in ballistic capture is examined for the first time using primer vector theory. An optimal control problem is formed with the following free variables: the location, time, and magnitude of the transfer insertion burn, and the transfer time. A constraint is placed on the initial state of the spacecraft to bind it to a given initial orbit around a first body, and on the final state of the spacecraft to limit its Keplerian energy with respect to a second body. Optimal transfers in the system are shown to meet certain conditions placed on the primer vector and its time derivative. A two point boundary value problem containing these necessary conditions is created for use in targeting optimal transfers. The two point boundary value problem is then applied to the ballistic lunar capture problem, and an optimal trajectory is shown. Additionally, the problem is then modified to fix the time of transfer, allowing for optimal multi-impulse transfers. The tradeoff between transfer time and fuel cost is shown for Earth-Moon ballistic lunar capture transfers.

  6. View of earth during return from moon taken from Apollo 8 spacecraft

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1968-12-24

    AS8-15-2561 (21-27 Dec. 1968) --- View of Earth as photographed by the Apollo 8 astronauts on their return trip from the moon. Note that the terminator is straighter than on the outbound pictures. The terminator crosses Australia. India is visible. The sun reflection is within the Indian Ocean.

  7. Calibration View of Earth and the Moon by Mars Color Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    and the Moon can be seen in the same frame. The Sun was coming from the left, so Earth and the Moon are seen in a quarter phase. Earth is on the left. The Moon appears briefly on the right. The Moon fades in and out; the Moon is only one pixel in size, and its fading is an artifact of the size and configuration of the light-sensitive pixels of the camera's charge-coupled device (CCD) detector.

  8. Evidence for magma oceans on asteroids, the moon, and Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, G. Jeffrey; Norman, Marc D.

    1992-01-01

    There are sound theoretical reasons to suspect that the terrestrial planets melted when they formed. For Earth, the reasons stem largely from the hypothesis that the moon formed as a result of the impact of a Mars-sized planetesimal with the still accreting Earth. Such a monumental event would have led to widespread heating of the Earth and the materials from which the moon was made. In addition, formation of a dense atmosphere on the Earth (and possibly the Moon) would have led to retention of accretional heat and, thus, widespread melting. In other words, contemporary theory suggests that the primitive Moon and terrestrial planets had magma oceans.

  9. Tectonomagmatic evolution of the Earth and Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharkov, E. V.; Bogatikov, O. A.

    2010-03-01

    The Earth and Moon evolved following a similar scenario. The formation of their protocrusts started with upward crystallization of global magmatic oceans. As a result of this process, easily fusible components accumulated in the course of fractional crystallization of melt migrating toward the surface. The protocrusts (granitic in the Earth and anorthositic in the Moon) are retained in ancient continents. The tectonomagmatic activity at the early stage of planet evolution was related to the ascent of mantle plume of the first generation composed of mantle material depleted due to the formation of protocrusts. The regions of extension, rise, and denudation were formed in the Earth above the diffluent heads of such superplumes (Archean granite-greenstone domains and Paleoproterozoic cratons), whereas granulite belts as regions of compression, subsidence, and sedimentation arose above descending mantle flows. The situation may be described in terms of plume tectonics. Gentle uplifts and basins ( thalassoids) in lunar continents are probable analogues of these structural elements in the Moon. The period of 2.3-2.0 Ga ago was a turning point in the tectonomagmatic evolution of the Earth, when geochemically enriched Fe-Ti picrites and basalts typical of Phanerozoic within-plate magmatism became widespread. The environmental setting on the Earth’s surface changed at that time, as well. Plate tectonics, currently operating on a global scale, started to develop about ˜2 Ga ago. This turn was related to the origination of thermochemical mantle plumes of the second generation at the interface of the liquid Fe-Ni core and silicate mantle. A similar turning point in the lunar evolution probably occurred 4.2-3.9 Ga ago and completed with the formation of large depressions ( seas) with thinned crust and vigorous basaltic magmatism. Such a sequence of events suggests that qualitatively new material previously retained in the planets’ cores was involved in tectonomagmatic

  10. Teaching About the Sun-Earth Connection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poland, Arthur I.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This talk will be about the Sun: how it changes with time, its magnetic cycle, flares, and the solar wind. The solar wind and what space is like between the Sun and Earth will be presented. Also, the Earth, its magnetic field, how the solar wind interacts with the Earth, Aurora, and how these affect human systems will be discussed. These interactions dictate how we build our systems in space (communications satellites, GPS, etc), and some of our ground systems (power grids). Some simple classroom activities will be presented that can be done using new data from space that is available daily on the internet, and how you can use the internet to get space questions answered within about 1 day. Finally, some career opportunities for jobs related to space for the future will be discussed.

  11. Sun-Earth Scientists and Native Americans Collaborate on Sun-Earth Day

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, C. Y.; Lopez, R. E.; Hawkins, I.

    2004-12-01

    Sun-Earth Connection scientists have established partnerships with several minority professional societies to reach out to the blacks, Hispanics and Native American students. Working with NSBP, SACNAS, AISES and NSHP, SEC scientists were able to speak in their board meetings and national conferences, to network with minority scientists, and to engage them in Sun-Earth Day. Through these opportunities and programs, scientists have introduced NASA research results as well indigenous views of science. They also serve as role models in various communities. Since the theme for Sun-Earth Day 2005 is Ancient Observatories: Timeless Knowledge, scientists and education specialists are hopeful to excite many with diverse backgrounds. Sun-Earth Day is a highly visible annual program since 2001 that touches millions of students and the general public. Interviews, classroom activities and other education resources are available on the web at sunearthday.nasa.gov.

  12. Sun-Earth Day: Exposing the Public to Sun-Earth Connection Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thieman, J. R.; Lewis, E.; Cline, T.

    2001-12-01

    The year 2001 marked the first observance of Sun-Earth Day as an event to celebrate the strong interconnection of the life we have on Earth and the dependence of it on the dynamic influence of the Sun. The science of the Sun-Earth Connection has grown dramatically with new satellite and ground-based studies of the Sun and the Sun's extended "atmosphere" in which we live. Space weather is becoming a more common concept that people know can affect their lives. An understanding of the importance of the Sun's dynamic behavior and how this shapes the solar system and especially the Earth is the aim of Sun-Earth Day. The first Sun-Earth event actually took place over two days, April 27 and 28, 2001, in order to accommodate all the events which were planned both in the classroom on Friday the 27th and in more informal settings on Saturday the 28th. The Sun-Earth Connection Education Forum (SECEF) organized the creation of ten thousand packets of educational materials about Sun-Earth Day and distributed them mostly to teachers who were trained to use them in the classroom. Many packets, however, went to science centers, museums, and planetariums as resource materials for programs associated with Sun-Earth Day. Over a hundred scientists used the event as an opportunity to communicate their love of science to audiences in these informal settings. Sun-Earth Day was also greatly assisted by the Amateur Astronomical Society which used the event as a theme for their annual promotion of astronomy in programs given around the country. The Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), a satellite mission jointly sponsored by NASA and the European Space Agency (ESA), used Sun-Earth Day in conjunction with the fifth anniversary celebration of SOHO as a basis for many programs and events, especially a large number of happenings in Europe. These included observing parties, art exhibits, demonstrations, etc. Examples of some of the innovative ways that Sun-Earth Day was brought into people

  13. Sun, the Earth, and Near-Earth Space: A Guide to the Sun-Earth System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eddy, John A.

    2010-01-01

    In a world of warmth and light and living things we soon forget that we are surrounded by a vast universe that is cold and dark and deadly dangerous, just beyond our door. On a starry night, when we look out into the darkness that lies around us, the view can be misleading in yet another way: for the brightness and sheer number of stars, and their chance groupings into familiar constellations, make them seem much nearer to each other, and to us, that in truth they are. And every one of them--each twinkling, like a diamond in the sky--is a white-hot sun, much like our own. The nearest stars in our own galaxy--the Milky Way-- are more than a million times further away from us than our star, the Sun. We could make a telephone call to the Moon and expect to wait but a few seconds between pieces of a conversation, or but a few hours in calling any planet in our solar system.

  14. Alkali element constraints on Earth-Moon relations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, M. D.; Drake, M. J.; Jones, J. H.

    1994-01-01

    Given their range of volatilities, alkali elements are potential tracers of temperature-dependent processes during planetary accretion and formation of the Earth-Moon system. Under the giant impact hypothesis, no direct connection between the composition of the Moon and the Earth is required, and proto-lunar material does not necessarily experience high temperatures. Models calling for multiple collisions with smaller planetesimals derive proto-lunar materials mainly from the Earth's mantle and explicitly invoke vaporization, shock melting and volatility-related fractionation. Na/K, K/Rb, and Rb/Cs should all increase in response to thermal volatization, so theories which derive the Moon substantially from Earth's mantle predict these ratios will be higher in the Moon than in the primitive mantle of the Earth. Despite the overall depletion of volatile elements in the Moon, its Na/K and K/Rb are equal to or less than those of Earth. A new model presented here for the composition of Earth's continental crust, a major repository of the alkali elements, suggests the Rb/Cs of the Moon is also less than that of Earth. Fractionation of the alkali elements between Earth and Moon are in the opposite sense to predictions based on the relative volatilities of these elements, if the Moon formed by high-T processing of Earth's mantle. Earth, rather than the Moon, appears to carry a signature of volatility-related fractionation in the alkali elements. This may reflect an early episode of intense heating on Earth with the Moon's alkali budget accreting from cooler material.

  15. The skylight gradient of luminance helps sandhoppers in sun and moon identification.

    PubMed

    Ugolini, Alberto; Galanti, Giuditta; Mercatelli, Luca

    2012-08-15

    To return to the ecologically optimal zone of the beach, the sandhopper Talitrus saltator (Montagu) maintains a constant sea-land direction based on the sun and moon compasses. In this study, we investigated the role of the skylight gradient of luminance in sun and moon identification under natural and artificial conditions of illumination. Clock-shifted (inverted) sandhoppers tested under the sun (during their subjective night) and under the full moon (during their subjective day) exhibit orientation in accordance with correct identification of the sun and the moon at night. Tested in artificial conditions of illumination at night without the artificial gradient of luminance, the artificial astronomical cue is identified as the moon even when the conditions of illumination allow sun compass orientation during the day. When the artificial gradient of luminance is added, the artificial astronomical cue is identified as the sun. The role of the sky gradient of luminance in sun and moon identification is discussed on the basis of present and past findings.

  16. Formation of the Lunar Fossil Bulges and Its Implication for the Early Earth and Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Chuan; Zhong, Shijie; Phillips, Roger

    2018-02-01

    First recognized by Laplace over two centuries ago, the Moon's present tidal-rotational bulges are significantly larger than hydrostatic predictions. They are likely relics of a former hydrostatic state when the Moon was closer to the Earth and had larger bulges, and they were established when stresses in a thickening lunar lithosphere could maintain the bulges against hydrostatic adjustment. We formulate the first dynamically self-consistent model of this process and show that bulge formation is controlled by the relative timing of lithosphere thickening and lunar orbit recession. Viable solutions indicate that lunar bulge formation was a geologically slow process lasting several hundred million years, that the process was complete about 4 Ga when the Moon-Earth distance was less than 32 Earth radii, and that the Earth in Hadean was significantly less dissipative to lunar tides than during the last 4 Gyr, possibly implying a frozen hydrosphere due to the fainter young Sun.

  17. Access to Mars from Earth-Moon Libration Point Orbits:. [Manifold and Direct Options

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kakoi, Masaki; Howell, Kathleen C.; Folta, David

    2014-01-01

    This investigation is focused specifically on transfers from Earth-Moon L(sub 1)/L(sub 2) libration point orbits to Mars. Initially, the analysis is based in the circular restricted three-body problem to utilize the framework of the invariant manifolds. Various departure scenarios are compared, including arcs that leverage manifolds associated with the Sun-Earth L(sub 2) orbits as well as non-manifold trajectories. For the manifold options, ballistic transfers from Earth-Moon L(sub 2) libration point orbits to Sun-Earth L(sub 1)/L(sub 2) halo orbits are first computed. This autonomous procedure applies to both departure and arrival between the Earth-Moon and Sun-Earth systems. Departure times in the lunar cycle, amplitudes and types of libration point orbits, manifold selection, and the orientation/location of the surface of section all contribute to produce a variety of options. As the destination planet, the ephemeris position for Mars is employed throughout the analysis. The complete transfer is transitioned to the ephemeris model after the initial design phase. Results for multiple departure/arrival scenarios are compared.

  18. Solar System Portrait - View of the Sun, Earth and Venus

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-09-13

    shade. From Voyager's great distance both Earth and Venus are mere points of light, less than the size of a picture element even in the narrow-angle camera. Earth was a crescent only 0.12 pixel in size. Coincidentally, Earth lies right in the center of one of the scattered light rays resulting from taking the image so close to the sun. Detailed analysis also suggests that Voyager detected the moon as well, but it is too faint to be seen without special processing. Venus was only 0.11 pixel in diameter. The faint colored structure in both planetary frames results from sunlight scattered in the optics. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00450

  19. Solar System Portrait - View of the Sun, Earth and Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    shade. From Voyager's great distance both Earth and Venus are mere points of light, less than the size of a picture element even in the narrow-angle camera. Earth was a crescent only 0.12 pixel in size. Coincidentally, Earth lies right in the center of one of the scattered light rays resulting from taking the image so close to the sun. Detailed analysis also suggests that Voyager detected the moon as well, but it is too faint to be seen without special processing. Venus was only 0.11 pixel in diameter. The faint colored structure in both planetary frames results from sunlight scattered in the optics.

  20. From a Million Miles Away, NASA Camera Shows Moon Crossing Face of Earth

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-08-05

    This animation shows images of the far side of the moon, illuminated by the sun, as it crosses between the DISCOVR spacecraft's Earth Polychromatic Imaging Camera (EPIC) camera and telescope, and the Earth - one million miles away. Credits: NASA/NOAA A NASA camera aboard the Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) satellite captured a unique view of the moon as it moved in front of the sunlit side of Earth last month. The series of test images shows the fully illuminated “dark side” of the moon that is never visible from Earth. The images were captured by NASA’s Earth Polychromatic Imaging Camera (EPIC), a four megapixel CCD camera and telescope on the DSCOVR satellite orbiting 1 million miles from Earth. From its position between the sun and Earth, DSCOVR conducts its primary mission of real-time solar wind monitoring for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Read more: www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard/from-a-million-miles-away-na... NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  1. From a Million Miles Away, NASA Camera Shows Moon Crossing Face of Earth

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-12-08

    This animation still image shows the far side of the moon, illuminated by the sun, as it crosses between the DISCOVR spacecraft's Earth Polychromatic Imaging Camera (EPIC) camera and telescope, and the Earth - one million miles away. Credits: NASA/NOAA A NASA camera aboard the Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) satellite captured a unique view of the moon as it moved in front of the sunlit side of Earth last month. The series of test images shows the fully illuminated “dark side” of the moon that is never visible from Earth. The images were captured by NASA’s Earth Polychromatic Imaging Camera (EPIC), a four megapixel CCD camera and telescope on the DSCOVR satellite orbiting 1 million miles from Earth. From its position between the sun and Earth, DSCOVR conducts its primary mission of real-time solar wind monitoring for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Read more: www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard/from-a-million-miles-away-na... NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  2. The earth and the moon /Harold Jeffreys Lecture/.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Press, F.

    1971-01-01

    The internal structures of the earth and the moon are compared in the light of the latest extensive data on the earth structure, mobility of the earth outer layers, and the properties of lunar crust. The Monte Carlo method is applied to develop an earth model by a stepwise process beginning with a random distribution of two elastic velocities and the density as a function of de pth. Lunar seismic, magnetic, and rock analysis data are used to infer the properties of the moon. The marked planetological contrast between the earth and the moon is shown to consist in that the earth is highly differentiated and still undergoes a large-scale differentiation, while the moon has lost its volatiles in its early history and has a cold dynamically inactive shell which has been without basic changes for three billion years.

  3. Time-optimal control of the spacecraft trajectories in the Earth-Moon system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starinova, O. L.; Fain, M. K.; Materova, I. L.

    2017-01-01

    This paper outlines the multiparametric optimization of the L1-L2 and L2-L1 missions in the Earth-Moon system using electric propulsion. The optimal control laws are obtained using the Fedorenko successful linearization method to estimate the derivatives and the gradient method to optimize the control laws. The study of the transfers is based on the restricted circular three-body problem. The mathematical model of the missions is described within the barycentric system of coordinates. The optimization criterion is the total flight time. The perturbation from the Earth, the Moon and the Sun are taking into account. The impact of the shaded areas, induced by the Earth and the Moon, is also accounted. As the results of the optimization we obtained optimal control laws, corresponding trajectories and minimal total flight times.

  4. Optimal Low Energy Earth-Moon Transfers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griesemer, Paul Ricord; Ocampo, Cesar; Cooley, D. S.

    2010-01-01

    The optimality of a low-energy Earth-Moon transfer is examined for the first time using primer vector theory. An optimal control problem is formed with the following free variables: the location, time, and magnitude of the transfer insertion burn, and the transfer time. A constraint is placed on the initial state of the spacecraft to bind it to a given initial orbit around a first body, and on the final state of the spacecraft to limit its Keplerian energy with respect to a second body. Optimal transfers in the system are shown to meet certain conditions placed on the primer vector and its time derivative. A two point boundary value problem containing these necessary conditions is created for use in targeting optimal transfers. The two point boundary value problem is then applied to the ballistic lunar capture problem, and an optimal trajectory is shown. Additionally, the ballistic lunar capture trajectory is examined to determine whether one or more additional impulses may improve on the cost of the transfer.

  5. Simple transfer calibration method for a Cimel Sun-Moon photometer: calculating lunar calibration coefficients from Sun calibration constants.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhengqiang; Li, Kaitao; Li, Donghui; Yang, Jiuchun; Xu, Hua; Goloub, Philippe; Victori, Stephane

    2016-09-20

    The Cimel new technologies allow both daytime and nighttime aerosol optical depth (AOD) measurements. Although the daytime AOD calibration protocols are well established, accurate and simple nighttime calibration is still a challenging task. Standard lunar-Langley and intercomparison calibration methods both require specific conditions in terms of atmospheric stability and site condition. Additionally, the lunar irradiance model also has some known limits on its uncertainty. This paper presents a simple calibration method that transfers the direct-Sun calibration constant, V0,Sun, to the lunar irradiance calibration coefficient, CMoon. Our approach is a pure calculation method, independent of site limits, e.g., Moon phase. The method is also not affected by the lunar irradiance model limitations, which is the largest error source of traditional calibration methods. Besides, this new transfer calibration approach is easy to use in the field since CMoon can be obtained directly once V0,Sun is known. Error analysis suggests that the average uncertainty of CMoon over the 440-1640 nm bands obtained with the transfer method is 2.4%-2.8%, depending on the V0,Sun approach (Langley or intercomparison), which is comparable with that of lunar-Langley approach, theoretically. In this paper, the Sun-Moon transfer and the Langley methods are compared based on site measurements in Beijing, and the day-night measurement continuity and performance are analyzed.

  6. The Earth, the Moon and Conservation of Momentum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunt, Marjorie; Brunt, Geoff

    2013-01-01

    We consider the application of both conservation of momentum and Newton's laws to the Moon in an assumed circular orbit about the Earth. The inadequacy of some texts in applying Newton's laws is considered.

  7. The Sun: the Earth light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berrilli, Francesco; Giovannelli, Luca; Del Moro, Dario; Piazzesi, Roberto; Catena, Liu` Maria; Amicucci, Giordano; Vittorio, Nicola

    2015-04-01

    We have implemented at Department of Physics of University of Rome Tor Vergata a project called "The Sun: the Earth light source". The project obtained the official endorsement from the IAU Executive Committee Working Group for the International Year of Light. The project, specifically designed for high school students, is focused on the "scientific" study of Sun light by means of a complete acquisition system based on "on the shelf" appropriately CMOS low-cost sensor with free control s/w and self-assembled telescopes. The project (hereafter stage) plan is based on a course of two weeks (60 hours in total). The course contains 20 hours of theoretical lectures, necessary to learn basics about Sun, optics, telescopes and image sensors, and 40 hours of laboratory. During the course, scientists and astronomers share with high schools students, work activities in real research laboratories. High schools teachers are intensely involved in the project. Their role is to share activities with university teachers and realize outreach actions in the home institutions. Simultaneously, they are introduced to innovative teaching methods and the project in this way is regarded as a professional development course. Sun light analysis and Sun-Earth connection through light are the main scientific topics of this project. The laboratory section of the stage is executed in two phases (weeks): First phase aims are the realization of a keplerian telescope and low-cost acquisition system. During this week students are introduced to astronomical techniques used to safety collect and acquire solar light; Second phase aims is the realization of a low-cost instrument to analyse sunlight extracting information about the solar spectrum, solar irradiance and Sun-Earth connection. The proposed stage has been already tested in Italy reached the fifth edition in 2014. Since 2010, the project has been a cornerstone outreach program of the University of Rome Tor Vergata, the Italian Ministry of

  8. Significance of specific force models in two applications: Solar sails to sun-earth L4/L5 and grail data analysis suggesting lava tubes and buried craters on the moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sood, Rohan

    presence beyond Earth, sub-surface empty lava tubes on other worlds form ideal candidates for creating a permanent habitation environment safe from cosmic radiation, micrometeorite impacts and temperature extremes. In addition, gravitational analysis has also revealed large buried craters under thick piles of mare basalt, shedding light on Moon's dynamic and hostile past. In this work, gravity mapping observations from NASA's Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) are employed to detect the presence of potential empty lava tubes and large impact craters buried beneath the lunar maria.

  9. Unique Non-Keplerian Orbit Vantage Locations for Sun-Earth Connection and Earth Science Vision Roadmaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Folta, David; Young, Corissa; Ross, Adam

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to determine the feasibility of attaining and maintaining unique non-Keplerian orbit vantage locations in the Earth/Moon environment in order to obtain continuous scientific measurements. The principal difficulty associated with obtaining continuous measurements is the temporal nature of astrodynamics, i.e., classical orbits. This investigation demonstrates advanced trajectory designs to meet demanding science requirements which cannot be met following traditional orbital mechanic logic. Examples of continuous observer missions addressed include Earth pole-sitters and unique vertical libration orbits that address Sun-Earth Connection and Earth Science Vision roadmaps.

  10. Non-rocket Earth-Moon transport system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolonkin, Alexander

    2003-06-01

    This paper proposes a new transportation system for travel between Earth and Moon. This transportation system uses mechanical energy transfer and requires only minimal energy, using an engine located on Earth. A cable directly connects a pole of the Earth through a drive station to the lunar surface_ The equation for an optimal equal stress cable for complex gravitational field of Earth-Moon has been derived that allows significantly lower cable masses. The required strength could be provided by cables constructed of carbon nanotubes or carbon whiskers. Some of the constraints on such a system are discussed.

  11. Fuel optimization for low-thrust Earth-Moon transfer via indirect optimal control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Palau, Daniel; Epenoy, Richard

    2018-02-01

    The problem of designing low-energy transfers between the Earth and the Moon has attracted recently a major interest from the scientific community. In this paper, an indirect optimal control approach is used to determine minimum-fuel low-thrust transfers between a low Earth orbit and a Lunar orbit in the Sun-Earth-Moon Bicircular Restricted Four-Body Problem. First, the optimal control problem is formulated and its necessary optimality conditions are derived from Pontryagin's Maximum Principle. Then, two different solution methods are proposed to overcome the numerical difficulties arising from the huge sensitivity of the problem's state and costate equations. The first one consists in the use of continuation techniques. The second one is based on a massive exploration of the set of unknown variables appearing in the optimality conditions. The dimension of the search space is reduced by considering adapted variables leading to a reduction of the computational time. The trajectories found are classified in several families according to their shape, transfer duration and fuel expenditure. Finally, an analysis based on the dynamical structure provided by the invariant manifolds of the two underlying Circular Restricted Three-Body Problems, Earth-Moon and Sun-Earth is presented leading to a physical interpretation of the different families of trajectories.

  12. Field chronobiology of a molluscan bivalve: how the moon and sun cycles interact to drive oyster activity rhythms.

    PubMed

    Tran, Damien; Nadau, Arnaud; Durrieu, Gilles; Ciret, Pierre; Parisot, Jean-Paul; Massabuau, Jean-Charles

    2011-05-01

    The present study reports new insights into the complexity of environmental drivers in aquatic animals. The focus of this study was to determine the main forces that drive mollusc bivalve behavior in situ. To answer this question, the authors continuously studied the valve movements of permanently immersed oysters, Crassostrea gigas, during a 1-year-long in situ study. Valve behavior was monitored with a specially build valvometer, which allows continuously recording of up to 16 bivalves at high frequency (10 Hz). The results highlight a strong relationship between the rhythms of valve behavior and the complex association of the sun-earth-moon orbital positions. Permanently immersed C. gigas follows a robust and strong behavior primarily driven by the tidal cycle. The intensity of this tidal driving force is modulated by the neap-spring tides (i.e., synodic moon cycle), which themselves depend of the earth-moon distance (i.e., anomalistic moon cycle). Light is a significant driver of the oysters' biological rhythm, although its power is limited by the tides, which remain the predominant driver. More globally, depending where in the world the bivalves reside, the results suggest their biological rhythms should vary according to the relative importance of the solar cycle and different lunar cycles associated with tide generation. These results highlight the high plasticity of these oysters to adapt to their changing environment.

  13. Earth and Its Moon, as Seen From Mars

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-01-06

    This composite image of Earth and its moon, as seen from Mars, combines the best Earth image with the best moon image from four sets of images acquired on Nov. 20, 2016, by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Each was separately processed prior to combining them so that the moon is bright enough to see. The moon is much darker than Earth and would barely be visible at the same brightness scale as Earth. The combined view retains the correct sizes and positions of the two bodies relative to each other. HiRISE takes images in three wavelength bands: infrared, red, and blue-green. These are displayed here as red, green, and blue, respectively. This is similar to Landsat images in which vegetation appears red. The reddish feature in the middle of the Earth image is Australia. Southeast Asia appears as the reddish area (due to vegetation) near the top; Antarctica is the bright blob at bottom-left. Other bright areas are clouds. These images were acquired for calibration of HiRISE data, since the spectral reflectance of the Moon's near side is very well known. When the component images were taken, Mars was about 127 million miles (205 million kilometers) from Earth. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21260

  14. Lunar Flight Study Series: Volume 6. A Study of Geometrical and Terminal Characteristics of Earth-Moon Transits Embedded in the Earth-Moon Plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lisle, B. J.

    1963-01-01

    This report represents the results of a study of coplanar earth-moon transits. The study was initiated to provide information concerning coplanar geometrical characteristics of earth-moon trnasits. The geometrical aspects of transit behavior are related to variations injection conditions. The model of the earth-moon system used in this investigation is the Jacobian model of the restricted three body problem. All transits considered in this study are restricted to the moon-earth plane (MEP).

  15. CISM: Modeling the Sun-Earth Connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, W. J.; Team, T. C.

    2003-12-01

    The Center for Integrated SpaceWeather Modeling (CISM), an NSF Science and Technology Center that is a consortium of ten institutions headed by Boston University, has as its primary goal the development of a series of ever improving versions of a comprehensive physics-based simulation model that describes the space environment from the Sun to the Earth. CISM will do this by coupling existing models of components of the system. In this paper we review our progress to date and summarize our plans. We discuss results of initial coupling of MHD models of the corona and solar wind, and of a global magnetospheric MHD model with a global ionosphere/thermosphere model, a radiation belt model, and a ring current particle model. Coupling the SAIC coronal MHD model and the U Colorado/SEC solar wind MHD codes allows us to track CMEs from the base of the corona to 1 AU. The results show how shocks form and develop in the heliosphere, and how the CME flattens into a pancake shape by the time it reaches earth. Coupling the Lyon/Fedder/Mobarry global MHD model with the Rice Convection Model and the NCAR TIE-GCM/TING model allows full dynamic coupling between the magnetosphere, the ionosphere/thermosphere, and the hot plasma in the inner magnetosphere. Including the Dartmouth radiation belt model shows how the radiation belts evolve in a realistic magnetosphere.

  16. Cosmic Influence on the Sun-Earth Environment

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Saumitra

    2008-01-01

    SOHO satellite data reveals geophysical changes before sudden changes in the Earth's Sun-Earth environment. The influence of extragalactic changes on the Sun as well as the Sun-Earth environment seems to be both periodic and episodic. The periodic changes in terms of solar maxima and minima occur every 11 years, whereas the episodic changes can happen at any time. Episodic changes can be monitored by cosmic ray detectors as a sudden increase or decrease of activity. During these solar and cosmic anomaly periods the environment of the Earth is affected. The Star-Sun-Earth connection has the potential to influence the thermosphere, atmosphere, ionosphere and lithosphere. Initial correlation of the cosmic and Sun-Earth connection has shown the possibility of predicting earthquakes, sudden changes in atmospheric temperatures and erratic rainfall/snowfall patterns. PMID:27873955

  17. Visualizing Moon Data and Imagery with Google Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss-Malik, M.; Scharff, T.; Nefian, A.; Moratto, Z.; Kolb, E.; Lundy, M.; Hancher, M.; Gorelick, N.; Broxton, M.; Beyer, R. A.

    2009-12-01

    There is a vast store of planetary geospatial data that has been collected by NASA but is difficult to access and visualize. Virtual globes have revolutionized the way we visualize and understand the Earth, but other planetary bodies including Mars and the Moon can be visualized in similar ways. Extraterrestrial virtual globes are poised to revolutionize planetary science, bring an exciting new dimension to science education, and allow ordinary users to explore imagery being sent back to Earth by planetary science satellites. The original Google Moon Web site was a limited series of maps and Apollo content. The new Moon in Google Earth feature provides a similar virtual planet experience for the Moon as we have for the Earth and Mars. We incorporated existing Clementine and Lunar Orbiter imagery for the basemaps and a combination of Kaguya LALT topography and some terrain created from Apollo Metric and Panoramic images. We also have information about the Apollo landings and other robotic landers on the surface, as well as historic maps and charts, and guided tours. Some of the first-released LROC imagery of the Apollo landing sites has been put in place, and we look forward to incorporating more data as it is released from LRO, Chandraayan-1, and Kaguya. These capabilities have obvious public outreach and education benefits, but the potential benefits of allowing planetary scientists to rapidly explore these large and varied data collections — in geological context and within a single user interface — are also becoming evident. Because anyone can produce additional KML content for use in Google Earth, scientists can customize the environment to their needs as well as publish their own processed data and results for others to use. Many scientists and organizations have begun to do this already, resulting in a useful and growing collection of planetary-science-oriented Google Earth layers. Screen shot of Moon in Google Earth, a freely downloadable application for

  18. Comments on 'The origin of the earth-moon system'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savic, P.; Teleki, G.

    1986-10-01

    A new hypothesis for the origin of the earth-moon system is developed on the basis of Savic's (1961) theory of the origin of rotation of celestial bodies. According to the theory, the cooling off and contraction due to gravitational attraction on vast particle systems, with the pushing out of electrons from atom shells, results in the continually increasing density of a planet; the expulsion of electrons causes formation of a magnetic field by which a rotational motion is brought about. It is argued that these conditions are consistent with the formation of the earth and the moon from a unique protoplanet which, in course of the rotation, has taken shape of a large Jacobi ellipsoid. New condensation forming along the edge of the ellipsoid led to the creation of the dual earth-moon system.

  19. Earth radiation balance and climate: Why the Moon is the wrong place to observe the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandel, Robert S.

    1994-06-01

    Increasing 'greenhouse' gases in the Earth's atmosphere will perturb the Earth's radiation balance, forcing climate change over coming decades. Climate sensitivity depends critically on cloud-radiation feedback: its evaluation requires continual observation of changing patterns of Earth radiation balance and cloud cover. The Moon is the wrong place for such observations, with many disadvantages compared to an observation system combining platforms in low polar, intermediate-inclination and geostationary orbits. From the Moon, active observations are infeasible; thermal infrared observations require very large instruments to reach spatial resolutions obtained at much lower cost from geostationary or lower orbits. The Earth's polar zones are never well observed from the Moon; other zones are invisible more than half the time. The monthly illumination cycle leads to further bias in radiation budget determinations. The Earth will be a pretty sight from the Earth-side of the Moon, but serious Earth observations will be made elsewhere.

  20. An Earth-Moon System Trajectory Design Reference Catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Folta, David; Bosanac, Natasha; Guzzetti, Davide; Howell, Kathleen C.

    2014-01-01

    As demonstrated by ongoing concept designs and the recent ARTEMIS mission, there is, currently, significant interest in exploiting three-body dynamics in the design of trajectories for both robotic and human missions within the Earth-Moon system. The concept of an interactive and 'dynamic' catalog of potential solutions in the Earth-Moon system is explored within this paper and analyzed as a framework to guide trajectory design. Characterizing and compiling periodic and quasi-periodic solutions that exist in the circular restricted three-body problem may offer faster and more efficient strategies for orbit design, while also delivering innovative mission design parameters for further examination.

  1. Earth and Moon as viewed by Mariner 10

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Mariner 10 was launched on November 3, 1973, 12:45 am PST, from Cape Canaveral on an Atlas/Centaur rocket (a reconditioned Intercontinental Ballistic Missile - ICBM). Within 12 hours of launch the twin cameras were turned on and several hundred pictures of both the Earth and the Moon were acquired over the following days.

    The Earth and Moon were imaged by Mariner 10 from 2.6 million km while completing the first ever Earth-Moon encounter by a spacecraft capable of returning high resolution digital color image data. These images have been combined at right to illustrate the relative sizes of the two bodies. From this particular viewpoint the Earth appears to be a water planet!

    The Mariner 10 mission is managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory for NASA's Office of Space Science, explored Venus in February 1974 on the way to three encounters with Mercury-in March and September 1974 and in March 1975. The spacecraft took more than 7,000 photos of Mercury, Venus, the Earth and the Moon.

    Image Credit: NASA/JPL/Northwestern University

  2. Early differentiation of the Earth and the Moon.

    PubMed

    Bourdon, Bernard; Touboul, Mathieu; Caro, Guillaume; Kleine, Thorsten

    2008-11-28

    We examine the implications of new 182W and 142Nd data for Mars and the Moon for the early evolution of the Earth. The similarity of 182W in the terrestrial and lunar mantles and their apparently differing Hf/W ratios indicate that the Moon-forming giant impact most probably took place more than 60Ma after the formation of calcium-aluminium-rich inclusions (4.568Gyr). This is not inconsistent with the apparent U-Pb age of the Earth. The new 142Nd data for Martian meteorites show that Mars probably has a super-chondritic Sm/Nd that could coincide with that of the Earth and the Moon. If this is interpreted by an early mantle differentiation event, this requires a buried enriched reservoir for the three objects. This is highly unlikely. For the Earth, we show, based on new mass-balance calculations for Nd isotopes, that the presence of a hidden reservoir is difficult to reconcile with the combined 142Nd-143Nd systematics of the Earth's mantle. We argue that a likely possibility is that the missing component was lost during or prior to accretion. Furthermore, the 142Nd data for the Moon that were used to argue for the solidification of the magma ocean at ca 200Myr are reinterpreted. Cumulate overturn, magma mixing and melting following lunar magma ocean crystallization at 50-100Myr could have yielded the 200Myr model age.

  3. Our Battered Moon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Damonte, Kathleen

    2004-01-01

    Most people have probably heard the tale about the Moon being made out of Swiss cheese because, on Earth, the Moon looks like it is full of holes. Those holes are actually impact craters, circular depressions that formed when objects, such as rocks that orbit the Sun, smashed into the surface of the Moon. The activity described in this article,…

  4. Modeling the Sun-Earth Connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, W. J.

    2003-04-01

    Space weather is caused by a series of interconnected events, beginning at the Sun and ending in the near-Earth space environment. Our ability to predict conditions and events in space depends on our understanding of these connections, and more importantly, our ability to predict details, such as the orientation of the magnetic field within a CME that is on its way to Earth. One approach to both improved understanding and prediction is through the use of models, particularly computer simulation models. Although models of the space environment are not yet good enough for this approach to be quantitative, things are changing. Models of components of the system the magnetosphere or the Sun’s corona, for example are now approaching a point where the biggest uncertainties in the model results are due to uncertainties in boundary conditions or in interactions with neighboring regions. Thus the time is ripe for the models to be joined into one large model that can deal with the complex couplings between the components of the system. In this talk we will review efforts to do this being undertaken by the new NSF Science and Technology Center, the Center for Integrated Space Weather Modeling, a consortium of ten institutions headed by Boston University. We will discuss results of initial efforts to couple MHD models of the corona and solar wind, and to couple a global magnetospheric MHD model with a global ionosphere/thermosphere model and a ring current particle model. Coupling the SAIC coronal MHD model and the U Colorado/SEC solar wind MHD codes allows us to track CMEs from the base of the corona to 1 AU. The results show how shocks form and develop in the heliosphere, and how the CME flattens into a pancake shape by the time it reaches earth. Coupling the Lyon/Fedder/Mobarry global MHD model with the Rice Convection Model and the NCAR TIE-GCM/TING model allows full dynamic coupling between the magnetosphere, the ionosphere/thermosphere, and the hot plasma in the inner

  5. Earthlike planets: Surfaces of Mercury, Venus, earth, moon, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, B.; Malin, M. C.; Greeley, R.

    1981-01-01

    The surfaces of the earth and the other terrestrial planets of the inner solar system are reviewed in light of the results of recent planetary explorations. Past and current views of the origin of the earth, moon, Mercury, Venus and Mars are discussed, and the surface features characteristic of the moon, Mercury, Mars and Venus are outlined. Mechanisms for the modification of planetary surfaces by external factors and from within the planet are examined, including surface cycles, meteoritic impact, gravity, wind, plate tectonics, volcanism and crustal deformation. The origin and evolution of the moon are discussed on the basis of the Apollo results, and current knowledge of Mercury and Mars is examined in detail. Finally, the middle periods in the history of the terrestrial planets are compared, and future prospects for the exploration of the inner planets as well as other rocky bodies in the solar system are discussed.

  6. Servicing and Deployment of National Resources in Sun-Earth Libration Point Orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Folta, David C.; Beckman, Mark; Mar, Greg C.; Mesarch, Michael; Cooley, Steven; Leete, Steven J.

    2002-01-01

    Spacecraft travel between the Sun-Earth system, the Earth-Moon system, and beyond has received extensive attention recently. The existence of a connection between unstable regions enables mission designers to envision scenarios of multiple spacecraft traveling cheaply from system to system, rendezvousing, servicing, and refueling along the way. This paper presents examples of transfers between the Sun-Earth and Earth-Moon systems using a true ephemeris and perturbation model. It shows the (Delta)V costs associated with these transfers, including the costs to reach the staging region from the Earth. It explores both impulsive and low thrust transfer trajectories. Additionally, analysis that looks specifically at the use of nuclear power in libration point orbits and the issues associated with them such as inadvertent Earth return is addressed. Statistical analysis of Earth returns and the design of biased orbits to prevent any possible return are discussed. Lastly, the idea of rendezvous between spacecraft in libration point orbits using impulsive maneuvers is addressed.

  7. A Survey Of Earth-Moon Libration Orbits: Stationkeeping Strategies And Intra-Orbit Transfers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Folta, David; Vaughn, Frank

    2004-01-01

    Cislunar space is a readily accessible region that may well develop into a prime staging area in the effort to colonize space near Earth or to colonize the Moon. While there have been statements made by various NASA programs regarding placement of resources in orbit about the Earth-Moon Lagrangian locations, there is no survey of the total cost associated with attaining and maintaining these unique orbits in an operational fashion. Transfer trajectories between these orbits required for assembly, servicing, and positioning of these resources have not been extensively investigated. These orbits are dynamically similar to those used for the Sun-Earth missions, but differences in governing gravitational ratios and perturbation sources result in unique characteristics. We implement numerical computations using high fidelity models and linear and nonlinear targeting techniques to compute the various maneuver (Delta)V and temporal costs associated with orbits about each of the Earth-Moon Lagrangian locations (L1, L2, L3, L4, and L5). From a dynamical system standpoint, we speak to the nature of these orbits and their stability. We address the cost of transfers between each pair of Lagrangian locations.

  8. A Perspective On The Earth From The Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, David R.

    ``What was most significant about the lunar voyage was not that men set foot on the Moon, but that they set eye on the Earth''. This statement, by Mr. Norman Cousins, Editor of the Saturday Review, summarizes the most significant aspect of the first departure of humans from the environment in which they were born, and in which they must survive. Looking back at the Earth from the Moon, the view is both splendid and overwhelming. This small blue ball in the vastness of black space, dotted with millions of marvellous stars, is an oasis that we must understand and protect. For, if one searches the heavens, one will find no other island for life as we understand it. If we humans do not protect and nurture this environment, it will disappear - just as quickly as the Earth will disappear from behind an outstretched thumb of a man on the Moon. Everything that has meaning disappears: science, history, music, poetry, art, literature, all of it on this small, fragile, and precious little spot out there in the vastness of the universe. From the Moon, we see many new and fascinating visions of the Earth. These views change not only our perspective of the Earth but our value system as well. As an example, from the Earth, we see the Moon track across the sky from horizon to horizon, always the same face, always the same features. But from the Moon, we see the Earth at the same point in the sky, day after day, but always turning, showing us new faces and changing features as the hours pass. We become aware of how much the physical features of the Earth are interrelated. And in a sense, we can ``see the future'' as the Earth turns in our view. From the Moon we see the Earth as a ``whole'' - we see no borders, we see no boundaries, we see all humankind together and interrelated on this single small sphere. This perspective from the Moon makes us realize that the Earth is dynamic and alive and evolving for the human presence - and we realize that if we care not for the life of the

  9. Not So Rare Earth? New Developments in Understanding the Origin of the Earth and Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Righter, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    A widely accepted model for the origin of the Earth and Moon has been a somewhat specific giant impact scenario involving an impactor to proto-Earth mass ratio of 3:7, occurring 50-60 Ma after T(sub 0), when the Earth was only half accreted, with the majority of Earth's water then accreted after the main stage of growth, perhaps from comets. There have been many changes to this specific scenario, due to advances in isotopic and trace element geochemistry, more detailed, improved, and realistic giant impact and terrestrial planet accretion modeling, and consideration of terrestrial water sources other than high D/H comets. The current scenario is that the Earth accreted faster and differentiated quickly, the Moon-forming impact could have been mid to late in the accretion process, and water may have been present during accretion. These new developments have broadened the range of conditions required to make an Earth-Moon system, and suggests there may be many new fruitful avenues of research. There are also some classic and unresolved problems such as the significance of the identical O isotopic composition of the Earth and Moon, the depletion of volatiles on the lunar mantle relative to Earth's, the relative contribution of the impactor and proto-Earth to the Moon's mass, and the timing of Earth's possible atmospheric loss relative to the giant impact.

  10. Main Difference with Formed Process of the Moon and Earth Minerals and Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, T.; Miura, Y.

    2018-04-01

    Minerals show large and global distribution on Earth system, but small and local formation on the Moon. Fluid water is formed as same size and distribution on Earth and the Moon based on their body-systems.

  11. Contingency study for the third international Sun-Earth Explorer (ISEE-3) satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunham, D. W.

    1979-01-01

    The third satellite of the international Sun-Earth Explorer program was inserted into a periodic halo orbit about L sub 1, the collinear libration point between the Sun and the Earth-Moon barycenter. A plan is presented that was developed to enable insertion into the halo orbit in case there was a large underperformance of the Delta second or third stage during the maneuver to insert the spacecraft into the transfer trajectory. After one orbit of the Earth, a maneuver would be performed near perigee to increase the energy of the orbit. A relatively small second maneuver would put the spacecraft in a transfer trajectory to the halo orbit, into which it could be inserted for a total cost within the fuel budget. Overburns (hot transfer trajectory insertions) were also studied.

  12. Stochastic late accretion to Earth, the Moon, and Mars.

    PubMed

    Bottke, William F; Walker, Richard J; Day, James M D; Nesvorny, David; Elkins-Tanton, Linda

    2010-12-10

    Core formation should have stripped the terrestrial, lunar, and martian mantles of highly siderophile elements (HSEs). Instead, each world has disparate, yet elevated HSE abundances. Late accretion may offer a solution, provided that ≥0.5% Earth masses of broadly chondritic planetesimals reach Earth's mantle and that ~10 and ~1200 times less mass goes to Mars and the Moon, respectively. We show that leftover planetesimal populations dominated by massive projectiles can explain these additions, with our inferred size distribution matching those derived from the inner asteroid belt, ancient martian impact basins, and planetary accretion models. The largest late terrestrial impactors, at 2500 to 3000 kilometers in diameter, potentially modified Earth's obliquity by ~10°, whereas those for the Moon, at ~250 to 300 kilometers, may have delivered water to its mantle.

  13. Observation of shadowing of ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays by the Moon and the Sun

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandreas, D.E.; Allen, R.C.; Berley, D.

    1991-03-01

    Data from an extensive air shower detector of ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays shows shadowing of the cosmic-ray flux by the Moon and the Sun with significance of 4.9 standard deviations. This is the first observation of such shadowing. The effect has been used to determine that the angular resolution of the detector is 0.75{degree} {sub {minus}0.90{degree}}{sup +0.13{degree}}.

  14. Non-rocket Earth-Moon transportation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolonkin, A.

    Author suggests and researches one of his methods of flights to outer Space, described in book "Non Rocket Flights in Space", which is prepared and offered for publication. In given report the method and facilities named "Bolonkin Transport System" (BTS) for delivering of payload and people to Moon and back is presented. BTS can be used also for free trip to outer Space up at altitude 60,000 km and more. BTS can be applying as a trust system for atmospheric supersonic aircrafts, and as a free energy source. This method uses, in general, the rotary and kinetic energy of the Moon. The manuscript contains the theory and results of computation of special Project. This project uses three cables (main and two for driving of loads) from artificial material: fiber, whiskers, nanotubes, with the specific tensile strength (ratio the tensile stress to density) k=/=4*10^7 or more. The nanotubes with same and better parameters are received in scientific laboratories. Theoretical limit of nanotubes SWNT is about k=100*10^7. The upper end of the cable is connected to the Moon. The lower end of the cable is connected to an aircraft (or buoy), which flies (i.e. glides or slides) in Earth atmosphere along the planet's surface. The aircraft (and Moon) has devices, which allows the length of cables to be changed. The device would consists of a spool, motor, brake, transmission, and controller. The facility could have devices for delivering people and payloads t o the Moon and back using the suggested Transport System. The delivery devices include: containers, cables, motors, brakes, and controllers. If the aircraft is small and the cable is strong the motion of the Moon can be used to move the airplane. For example (see enclosed project), if the airplane weighs 15 tons and has an aerodynamic ratio (the lift force to the drag force) equal 5, a thrust of 3000 kg would be enough for the aircraft to fly for infinity without requiring any fuel. The aircraft could use a small turbine engine

  15. Accretion of Moon and Earth and the emergence of life.

    PubMed

    Arrhenius, G; Lepland, A

    2000-08-15

    The discrepancy between the impact records on the Earth and Moon in the time period, 4.0-3.5 Ga calls for a re-evaluation of the cause and localization of the late lunar bombardment. As one possible explanation, we propose that the time coverage in the ancient rock record is sufficiently fragmentary, so that the effects of giant, sterilizing impacts throughout the inner solar system, caused by marauding asteroids, could have escaped detection in terrestrial and Martian records. Alternatively, the lunar impact record may reflect collisions of the receding Moon with a series of small, original satellites of the Earth and their debris in the time period about 4.0-3.5 Ga. The effects on Earth of such encounters could have been comparatively small. The location of these tellurian moonlets has been estimated to have been in the region around 40 Earth radii. Calculations presented here, indicate that this is the region that the Moon would traverse at 4.0-3.5 Ga, when the heavy and declining lunar bombardment took place. The ultimate time limit for the emergence of life on Earth is determined by the effects of planetary accretion--existing models offer a variety of scenarios, ranging from low average surface temperature at slow accretion of the mantle, to complete melting of the planet followed by protracted cooling. The choice of accretion model affects the habitability of the planet by dictating the early evolution of the atmosphere and hydrosphere. Further exploration of the sedimentary record on Earth and Mars, and of the chemical composition of impact-generated ejecta on the Moon, may determine the choice between the different interpretations of the late lunar bombardment and cast additional light on the time and conditions for the emergence of life.

  16. Accretion of Moon and Earth and the emergence of life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arrhenius, G.; Lepland, A.

    2000-01-01

    The discrepancy between the impact records on the Earth and Moon in the time period, 4.0-3.5 Ga calls for a re-evaluation of the cause and localization of the late lunar bombardment. As one possible explanation, we propose that the time coverage in the ancient rock record is sufficiently fragmentary, so that the effects of giant, sterilizing impacts throughout the inner solar system, caused by marauding asteroids, could have escaped detection in terrestrial and Martian records. Alternatively, the lunar impact record may reflect collisions of the receding Moon with a series of small, original satellites of the Earth and their debris in the time period about 4.0-3.5 Ga. The effects on Earth of such encounters could have been comparatively small. The location of these tellurian moonlets has been estimated to have been in the region around 40 Earth radii. Calculations presented here, indicate that this is the region that the Moon would traverse at 4.0-3.5 Ga, when the heavy and declining lunar bombardment took place. The ultimate time limit for the emergence of life on Earth is determined by the effects of planetary accretion--existing models offer a variety of scenarios, ranging from low average surface temperature at slow accretion of the mantle, to complete melting of the planet followed by protracted cooling. The choice of accretion model affects the habitability of the planet by dictating the early evolution of the atmosphere and hydrosphere. Further exploration of the sedimentary record on Earth and Mars, and of the chemical composition of impact-generated ejecta on the Moon, may determine the choice between the different interpretations of the late lunar bombardment and cast additional light on the time and conditions for the emergence of life.

  17. Earth-Moon Libration Point Orbit Stationkeeping: Theory, Modeling and Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Folta, David C.; Pavlak, Thomas A.; Haapala, Amanda F.; Howell, Kathleen C.; Woodard, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    Collinear Earth-Moon libration points have emerged as locations with immediate applications. These libration point orbits are inherently unstable and must be maintained regularly which constrains operations and maneuver locations. Stationkeeping is challenging due to relatively short time scales for divergence effects of large orbital eccentricity of the secondary body, and third-body perturbations. Using the Acceleration Reconnection and Turbulence and Electrodynamics of the Moon's Interaction with the Sun (ARTEMIS) mission orbit as a platform, the fundamental behavior of the trajectories is explored using Poincare maps in the circular restricted three-body problem. Operational stationkeeping results obtained using the Optimal Continuation Strategy are presented and compared to orbit stability information generated from mode analysis based in dynamical systems theory.

  18. Isotopic evolution of the protoplanetary disk and the building blocks of Earth and the Moon.

    PubMed

    Schiller, Martin; Bizzarro, Martin; Fernandes, Vera Assis

    2018-03-21

    Nucleosynthetic isotope variability among Solar System objects is often used to probe the genetic relationship between meteorite groups and the rocky planets (Mercury, Venus, Earth and Mars), which, in turn, may provide insights into the building blocks of the Earth-Moon system. Using this approach, it has been inferred that no primitive meteorite matches the terrestrial composition and the protoplanetary disk material from which Earth and the Moon accreted is therefore largely unconstrained. This conclusion, however, is based on the assumption that the observed nucleosynthetic variability of inner-Solar-System objects predominantly reflects spatial heterogeneity. Here we use the isotopic composition of the refractory element calcium to show that the nucleosynthetic variability in the inner Solar System primarily reflects a rapid change in the mass-independent calcium isotope composition of protoplanetary disk solids associated with early mass accretion to the proto-Sun. We measure the mass-independent 48 Ca/ 44 Ca ratios of samples originating from the parent bodies of ureilite and angrite meteorites, as well as from Vesta, Mars and Earth, and find that they are positively correlated with the masses of their parent asteroids and planets, which are a proxy of their accretion timescales. This correlation implies a secular evolution of the bulk calcium isotope composition of the protoplanetary disk in the terrestrial planet-forming region. Individual chondrules from ordinary chondrites formed within one million years of the collapse of the proto-Sun reveal the full range of inner-Solar-System mass-independent 48 Ca/ 44 Ca ratios, indicating a rapid change in the composition of the material of the protoplanetary disk. We infer that this secular evolution reflects admixing of pristine outer-Solar-System material into the thermally processed inner protoplanetary disk associated with the accretion of mass to the proto-Sun. The identical calcium isotope composition of

  19. A near-earth optical communications terminal with a corevolving planetary sun shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerr, E. L.

    1989-01-01

    The umbra of a planet may serve as a sun shield for a space-based optical communications terminal or for a space-based astronomical observatory. An orbit that keeps the terminal or observatory within the umbra is desirable. There is a corevolution point behind every planet. A small body stabilized at the planet corevolution point will revolve about the sun at the same angular velocity as the planet, always keeping the planet between itself and the sun. This corevolution point is within the umbra of Mars but beyond the end of the umbra for Mercury, Venus, and earth. The Mars corevolution point is an ideal location for an astronomical observatory. There, Mars obstruct less than 0.00024 percent of the sky at any time, and it shades the observatory completely from the sun. At the earth corevolution point, between 51 and 84 percent of the solar disk area is blocked, as is up to 92 percent of the sunlight. This provides a reduction from 3 dB to 11 dB in sunlight that could interfere with optical communications if scattered directly into the detectors. The variations is caused by revolution of the earth about the earth-moon barycenter.

  20. A near-earth optical communications terminal with a corevolving planetary sun shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerr, E. L.

    1987-01-01

    The umbra of a planet may serve as a sun shield for a space based optical communications terminal or for a space based astronomical observatory. An orbit that keeps the terminal or observatory within the umbra is desirable. There is a corevolution point behind every planet. A small body stabilized at the planet corevolution point will revolve about the sun at the same angular velocity as the planet, always keeping the planet between itself and the sun. This corevolution point is within the umbra of Mars but beyond the end of the umbra for Mercury, Venus, and earth. The Mars corevolution point is an ideal location for an astronomical observatory. There Mars obstruct less than 0.00024 percent of the sky at any time, and it shades the observatory completely from the sun. At the earth corevolution point, between 51 and 84 percent of the solar disk area is blocked, as is up to 92 percent of the sunlight. This provides a reduction from 3 dB to 11 dB in sunlight that could interfere with optical communications if scattered directly into the detectors. The variations is caused by revolution of the earth about the earth-moon barycenter.

  1. Isotopic evolution of the protoplanetary disk and the building blocks of Earth and the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiller, Martin; Bizzarro, Martin; Fernandes, Vera Assis

    2018-03-01

    Nucleosynthetic isotope variability among Solar System objects is often used to probe the genetic relationship between meteorite groups and the rocky planets (Mercury, Venus, Earth and Mars), which, in turn, may provide insights into the building blocks of the Earth–Moon system. Using this approach, it has been inferred that no primitive meteorite matches the terrestrial composition and the protoplanetary disk material from which Earth and the Moon accreted is therefore largely unconstrained. This conclusion, however, is based on the assumption that the observed nucleosynthetic variability of inner-Solar-System objects predominantly reflects spatial heterogeneity. Here we use the isotopic composition of the refractory element calcium to show that the nucleosynthetic variability in the inner Solar System primarily reflects a rapid change in the mass-independent calcium isotope composition of protoplanetary disk solids associated with early mass accretion to the proto-Sun. We measure the mass-independent 48Ca/44Ca ratios of samples originating from the parent bodies of ureilite and angrite meteorites, as well as from Vesta, Mars and Earth, and find that they are positively correlated with the masses of their parent asteroids and planets, which are a proxy of their accretion timescales. This correlation implies a secular evolution of the bulk calcium isotope composition of the protoplanetary disk in the terrestrial planet-forming region. Individual chondrules from ordinary chondrites formed within one million years of the collapse of the proto-Sun reveal the full range of inner-Solar-System mass-independent 48Ca/44Ca ratios, indicating a rapid change in the composition of the material of the protoplanetary disk. We infer that this secular evolution reflects admixing of pristine outer-Solar-System material into the thermally processed inner protoplanetary disk associated with the accretion of mass to the proto-Sun. The identical calcium isotope composition of Earth

  2. Sun-Earth Day - Teaching Heliophysics Through Education Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thieman, J.; Cline, T.; Lewis, E.

    2010-01-01

    Sun-Earth Day (SED) is an Education and Outreach program supported by the U.S, National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The intent of the program is to teach students and the general public about Heliophysics (the science of the study of the Sun, how it varies, and how solar dynamics affect the rest of the solar system, especially the Earth). The program was begun ten years ago. Each year since that time a particular day has been designated as "Sun-Earth Day ,,. Usually the day of the spring equinox (March 20 or 21) is Sun-Earth Day, but other days have been used as well. Each year a theme is chosen relating to Heliophysics and events reflecting that theme are planned not only for Sun-Earth Day, but for the entire year. From the very beginning educational technology was emphasized in the events in order to effectively reach wide audiences with the SED message. The main approach has been to have a "webcast" related to each year's theme, often from a location that supports the theme as well. For example, a webcast took place from the Mayan pyramids at Chichen Itza, Mexico to highlight the theme of "Ancient Observatories, Timeless Knowledge". Webcasts were not the only technology employed, however. Many of the themes centered on the dynamic nature of the Sun and the effects that solar storms can have on interplanetary space and in our day-to-day life on Earth. Activities for tracking when solar storms happen and how they affect the Earth were developed and brought together in an educational package called Space Weather Action Centers. This project is explained in more detail in another presentation in this session being given by Norma Teresinha Oliveira Reis. Recent Sun-Earth Days have utilized "social networking" technologies to reach widespread groups on the internet. Podcasts, Vodcasts, Facebook, Twitter, and Second Life are the types of network technologies being employed now. The NASA Distance learning Network is another method for bringing Sun-Earth

  3. Design of optimal impulse transfers from the Sun-Earth libration point to asteroid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yamin; Qiao, Dong; Cui, Pingyuan

    2015-07-01

    The lunar probe, Chang'E-2, is the first one to successfully achieve both the transfer to Sun-Earth libration point orbit and the flyby of near-Earth asteroid Toutatis. This paper, taking the Chang'E-2's asteroid flyby mission as an example, provides a method to design low-energy transfers from the libration point orbit to an asteroid. The method includes the analysis of transfer families and the design of optimal impulse transfers. Firstly, the one-impulse transfers are constructed by correcting the initial guesses, which are obtained by perturbing in the direction of unstable eigenvector. Secondly, the optimality of one-impulse transfers is analyzed and the optimal impulse transfers are built by using the primer vector theory. After optimization, the transfer families, including the slow and the fast transfers, are refined to be continuous and lower-cost transfers. The method proposed in this paper can be also used for designing transfers from an arbitrary Sun-Earth libration point orbit to a near-Earth asteroid in the Sun-Earth-Moon system.

  4. Moon Phase as a Context for Teaching Scale Factor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Ann; Dickerson, Daniel; Hopkins, Sara

    2007-01-01

    The Sun and the Moon are our most visible neighbors in space, yet their distance and size relative to the Earth are often misunderstood. Science textbooks fuel this misconception because they regularly depict linear images of Moon phases without respect to the actual sizes of the Sun, Earth, and Moon, nor their correlated distances from one…

  5. Supporting a Deep Space Gateway with Free-Return Earth-Moon Periodic Orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genova, A. L.; Dunham, D. W.; Hardgrove, C.

    2018-02-01

    Earth-Moon periodic orbits travel between the Earth and Moon via free-return circumlunar segments and can host a station that can provide architecture support to other nodes near the Moon and Mars while enabling science return from cislunar space.

  6. Observation in the MINOS far detector of the shadowing of cosmic rays by the sun and moon

    SciTech Connect

    Jaffe, D.E.; Bishai, M.; Diwan, M.V.

    2010-10-10

    The shadowing of cosmic ray primaries by the moon and sun was observed by the MINOS far detector at a depth of 2070 mwe using 83.54 million cosmic ray muons accumulated over 1857.91 live-days. The shadow of the moon was detected at the 5.6 {sigma} level and the shadow of the sun at the 3.8 {sigma} level using a log-likelihood search in celestial coordinates. The moon shadow was used to quantify the absolute astrophysical pointing of the detector to be 0.17 {+-} 0.12{sup o}. Hints of interplanetary magnetic field effects were observed in both the sun and moon shadow.

  7. Observation in the MINOS far detector of the shadowing of cosmic rays by the sun and moon

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, P.; /Fermilab; Andreopoulos, C.

    2010-08-01

    The shadowing of cosmic ray primaries by the the moon and sun was observed by the MINOS far detector at a depth of 2070 mwe using 83.54 million cosmic ray muons accumulated over 1857.91 live-days. The shadow of the moon was detected at the 5.6 {sigma} level and the shadow of the sun at the 3.8 {sigma} level using a log-likelihood search in celestial coordinates. The moon shadow was used to quantify the absolute astrophysical pointing of the detector to be 0.17 {+-} 0.12{sup o}. Hints of Interplanetary Magnetic Field effects were observed in both the sun and moon shadow.

  8. Galileo Earth/Moon News Conference. Part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) video release (Part 1 of 2) begins with a presentation given by William J. O'Neil (Galileo Project Manager) describing the status and position of the Galileo spacecraft 7 days prior to the Galileo Earth-2 flyby. Slides are presented including diagrams of the Galileo spacecraft trajectory, trajectory correction maneuvers, and the Venus and asteroid flybys. Torrence Johnson (Galileo Project Scientist) follows Mr. O'Neil with an explanation of the Earth/Moon science activities that will be undertaken during the second Galileo/Earth encounter. These activities include remote sensing, magnetospheric and plasma measurements, and images taken directly from Galileo of the Earth and Moon. Dr. Joseph Veverka (Galileo Imaging Team, Cornell University) then gives a brief presentation of the data collected by the first Galileo/Gaspra asteroid flyby. Images sampled from the 57 photographs taken of Gaspra are presented along with discussions of Gaspra's morphology, shape and size, and surface features. These presentations are followed by a question and answer period given for the benefit of scientific journalists whose subjects include overall Galileo spacecraft health, verification of the Gaspra images timeframe, and the condition of certain scientific spacecraft instruments. Part 2 of this video can be retrieved by using Report No. NONP-NASA-VT-2000001078.

  9. Lunar ephemeris selenographic coordinates of the earth and sun for 1975 and 1976

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartung, A. D.

    1972-01-01

    Ephemeris data are presented for 1975 and 1976 to provide a time history of lunar coordinates and related geometric information. A Manned Spacecraft Center modification of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory ephemeris tape was used to calculate and plot coordinates of the earth, moon, and sun. The ephemeris is referenced to the mean vernal equinox at the nearest beginning of a Besselian year. Therefore the reference equinox changes from one year to the next between 30 June and 1 July. The apparent discontinuity in the data is not noticeable in the graphical presentation, but can be observed in the digital output. The mean equator of epoch is used in all cases.

  10. Properties of an Earth-like planet orbiting a Sun-like star: Earth observed by the EPOXI mission.

    PubMed

    Livengood, Timothy A; Deming, L Drake; A'hearn, Michael F; Charbonneau, David; Hewagama, Tilak; Lisse, Carey M; McFadden, Lucy A; Meadows, Victoria S; Robinson, Tyler D; Seager, Sara; Wellnitz, Dennis D

    2011-11-01

    NASA's EPOXI mission observed the disc-integrated Earth and Moon to test techniques for reconnoitering extrasolar terrestrial planets, using the Deep Impact flyby spacecraft to observe Earth at the beginning and end of Northern Hemisphere spring, 2008, from a range of ∼1/6 to 1/3 AU. These observations furnish high-precision and high-cadence empirical photometry and spectroscopy of Earth, suitable as "ground truth" for numerically simulating realistic observational scenarios for an Earth-like exoplanet with finite signal-to-noise ratio. Earth was observed at near-equatorial sub-spacecraft latitude on 18-19 March, 28-29 May, and 4-5 June (UT), in the range of 372-4540 nm wavelength with low visible resolving power (λ/Δλ=5-13) and moderate IR resolving power (λ/Δλ=215-730). Spectrophotometry in seven filters yields light curves at ∼372-948 nm filter-averaged wavelength, modulated by Earth's rotation with peak-to-peak amplitude of ≤20%. The spatially resolved Sun glint is a minor contributor to disc-integrated reflectance. Spectroscopy at 1100-4540 nm reveals gaseous water and carbon dioxide, with minor features of molecular oxygen, methane, and nitrous oxide. One-day changes in global cloud cover resulted in differences between the light curve beginning and end of ≤5%. The light curve of a lunar transit of Earth on 29 May is color-dependent due to the Moon's red spectrum partially occulting Earth's relatively blue spectrum. The "vegetation red edge" spectral contrast observed between two long-wavelength visible/near-IR bands is ambiguous, not clearly distinguishing between the verdant Earth diluted by cloud cover versus the desolate mineral regolith of the Moon. Spectrophotometry in at least one other comparison band at short wavelength is required to distinguish between Earth-like and Moon-like surfaces in reconnaissance observations. However, measurements at 850 nm alone, the high-reflectance side of the red edge, could be sufficient to

  11. The Sun/Earth System and Space Weather

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poland, Arthur I.; Fox, Nicola; Lucid, Shannon

    2003-01-01

    Solar variability and solar activity are now seen as significant drivers with respect to the Earth and human technology systems. Observations over the last 10 years have significantly advanced our understanding of causes and effects in the Sun/Earth system. On a practical level the interactions between the Sun and Earth dictate how we build our systems in space (communications satellites, GPS, etc), and some of our ground systems (power grids). This talk will be about the Sun/Earth system: how it changes with time, its magnetic interactions, flares, the solar wind, and how the Sun effects human systems. Data will be presented from some current spacecraft which show, for example, how we are able to currently give warnings to the scientific community, the Government and industry about space storms and how this data has improved our physical understanding of processes on the Sun and in the magnetosphere. The scientific advances provided by our current spacecraft has led to a new program in NASA to develop a 'Space Weather' system called 'Living With a Star'. The current plan for the 'Living With a Star' program will also be presented.

  12. The Real Reasons for Seasons--Sun-Earth Connections: Unraveling Misconceptions about the Earth and Sun. Grades 6-8. Teacher's Guide. LHS GEMS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gould, Alan; Willard, Carolyn; Pompea, Stephen

    This guide is aimed at helping students arrive at a clear understanding of seasons as they investigate the connections between the sun and the earth. Activities include: (1) "Name the Season"; (2) "Sun-Earth Survey"; (3) "Trip to the Sun"; (4) "What Shape is Earth's Orbit?"; (5) "Temperatures around the…

  13. Development of the earth-moon system with implications for the geology of the early earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. V.

    1976-01-01

    Established facts regarding the basic features of the earth and the moon are reviewed, and some important problems involving the moon are discussed (extent of melting, time of crustal differentiation and nature of bombardment, bulk chemical composition, and nature and source of mare basins), with attention given to the various existing theories concerning these problems. Models of the development of the earth-moon system from the solar nebula are examined, with particular attention focused on those that use the concept of capture with disintegration. Impact processes in the early crust of the earth are briefly considered, with attention paid to Green's (1972) suggestion that Archaean greenstone belts may be the terrestrial equivalent of lunar maria.

  14. STS-32 view of the moon setting over the Earth's limb

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    STS-32 crew took this view of the moon setting over the Earth's limb. Near the center is a semi-vortex in the clouds - a storm system in the early stages of formation. The moon's image is distorted due to refraction through the Earth's atmosphere. The near side of the moon is visible showing the vast area of the moon's western seas (Mare Occidental), Apollo landing sites: Apollo 14 at Fra Mauro and Apollo 16 at Central Highlands near Descartes.

  15. STS-32 view of the moon setting over the Earth's limb

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1990-01-20

    STS-32 crew took this view of the moon setting over the Earth's limb. Near the center is a semi-vortex in the clouds - a storm system in the early stages of formation. The moon's image is distorted due to refraction through the Earth's atmosphere. The near side of the moon is visible showing the vast area of the moon's western seas (Mare Occidental), Apollo landing sites: Apollo 14 at Fra Mauro and Apollo 16 at Central Highlands near Descartes.

  16. A possible space VLBI constellation utilizing the stable orbits around the TLPs in the Earth-Moon system.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bin; Tang, Jingshi; Hou, Xiyun

    2016-07-01

    Current studies indicate that there are stable orbits around but far away from the triangular libration points .Two special quasi-periodic orbits around each triangular libration points L4 , L5 in the Earth-Moon sys-tem perturbed by Sun are gain , and the stable orbits discussed in this work are ideal places for space colonies because no orbit control is needed. These stable orbits can also be used as nominal orbits for space VLBI (Very Long Baseline Interferometry) stations. The two stations can also form baselines with stations on the Earth and the Moon, or with stations located around another TLP. Due to the long distance between the stations, the observation precision can be greatly enhanced compared with the VLBI stations on the Earth. Such a VLBI constellation not only can advance the radio astronomy, but also can be used as a navigation system for human activities in the Earth-Moon system and even in the solar system. This paper will focus on the navigation constellation coverage issues, and the orbit determination accuracy problems within the Earth-Moon sys-tem and interplanetary space.

  17. Dust: A major environmental hazard on the earth's moon

    SciTech Connect

    Heiken, G.; Vaniman, D.; Lehnert, B.

    1990-01-01

    On the Earth's Moon, obvious hazards to humans and machines are created by extreme temperature fluctuations, low gravity, and the virtual absence of any atmosphere. The most important other environmental factor is ionizing radiation. Less obvious environmental hazards that must be considered before establishing a manned presence on the lunar surface are the hazards from micrometeoroid bombardment, the nuisance of electro-statically-charged lunar dust, and an alien visual environment without familiar clues. Before man can establish lunar bases and lunar mining operations, and continue the exploration of that planet, we must develop a means of mitigating these hazards. 4 refs.

  18. The sun,the planets and life on Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claudia, Tacu Cristina

    2017-04-01

    We all knowthat Earth,our planet,it's not alone in the Universe.We will discover together a few of its secrets: 0 The influence of the sun on our planet is very important.It provides us thelight ,the warnith and the enery without whice life on Earth wouldn't be possible. 0 Thank to the Sun and the endless spinning of our planet around its own axe and, at the same time around this star,we receive as a gift the day,the night,the seasons. 0In our Solar System there are other spheres appart from the Sun and planets -the asteroids ,wandering pieces of stone.It is said that many milions of years ago it they made a lot of plants and animals disappear. If I have arisen your curiosity,let's go!

  19. Energy Transfer in the Earth-Sun System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lui, A. T. Y.; Kamide, Y.

    2007-02-01

    Conference on Earth-Sun System Exploration: Energy Transfer; Kailua-Kona, Hawaii, USA, 16-20 January 2006; The goal of this conference, which was supported by several agencies and organizations, was to provide a forum for physicists engaged in the Earth-Sun system as well as in laboratory experiments to discuss and exchange knowledge and ideas on physical processes involving energy transfer. The motivation of the conference stemmed from the following realization: Space assets form an important fabric of our society, performing functions such as television broadcasting, cell- phone communication, navigation, and remote monitoring of tropospheric weather. There is increasing awareness of how much our daily activities can be adversely affected by space disturbances stretching all the way back to the Sun. In some of these energetic phenomena, energy in various forms can propagate long distances from the solar surface to the interplanetary medium and eventually to the Earth's immediate space environment, namely, its magnetosphere, ionosphere, and thermosphere. In addition, transformation of energy can take place in these space disturbances, allowing charged-particle energy to be transformed to electromagnetic energy or vice versa. In- depth understanding of energy transformation and transmission in the Earth-Sun system will foster the identification of physical processes responsible for space disturbances and the prediction of their occurrences and effects. Participants came from 15 countries.

  20. Space tourism: from earth orbit to the moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, P.

    Travel to and from the lunar surface has been known to be feasible since it was first achieved 34 years ago. Since that time there has been enormous progress in related engineering fields such as rocket propulsion, materials and avionics, and about 1 billion has been spent on lunar science and engineering research. Consequently there are no fundamental technical problems facing the development of lunar tourism - only business and investment problems. The outstanding problem is to reduce the cost of launch to low Earth orbit. Recently there has been major progress towards overturning the myth that launch costs are high because of physical limits. Several "X Prize" competitor vehicles currently in test-flight are expected to be able to perform sub-orbital flights at approximately 1/1,000 of the cost of Alan Shepard's similar flight in 1961. This activity could have started 30 years ago if space agencies had had economic rather than political objectives. A further encouraging factor is that the demand for space tourism seems potentially limitless. Starting with sub-orbital flights and growing through orbital activities, travel to the Moon will offer further unique attractions. In every human culture there is immense interest in the Moon arising from millennia of myths. In addition, bird-like flying sports, first described by Robert Heinlein, will become another powerful demand factor. Roundtrips of 1 to 2 weeks are very convenient for travel companies; and the radiation environment will permit visitors several days of surface activity without significant health risks. The paper also discusses economic aspects of lunar tourism, including the benefits it will have for those on Earth. Lunar economic development based on tourism will have much in common with economic development on Earth based on tourism: starting from the fact that many people spontaneously wish to visit popular places, companies in the tourism industry invest to sell a growing range of services to ever

  1. V, Cr, and Mn in the Earth, Moon, EPB, and SPB and the origin of the Moon: Experimental studies

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, M.J.; Capobianco, C.J.; Newsom, H.E.

    1989-08-01

    The abundances of V, Cr, and Mn inferred for the mantles of the Earth and Moon decrease in that order and are similar, but are distinct from those inferred for the mantles of the Eucrite Parent Body (EPB) and Shergottite Parent Body (SPB). This similarity between Earth and Moon has been used to suggest that the Moon is derived substantially or entirely from Earth mantle material following terrestrial core formation. To test this hypothesis, the authors have determined the partitioning of V, Cr, and Mn between solid iron metal, S-rich metallic liquid, and synthetic basaltic silicate liquid at 1,260{degree}C andmore » one bar pressure. The sequence of compatibility in the metallic phases is Cr > V > Mn at high oxygen fugacity and V > Cr > Mn at low oxygen fugacities. Solubilities in liquid metal always exceed solubilities in solid metal. These partition coefficients suggest that the abundances of V, Cr, and Mn do not reflect core formation in the Earth. Rather, they are consistent with the relative volatilities of these elements. The similarity in the depletion patterns of V, Cr, and Mn inferred for the mantles of the Earth and Moon is a necessary, but not sufficient, condition for the Moon to have been derived wholly or in part from the Earth's mantle.« less

  2. The 3D Visualization of Slope Terrain in Sun Moon Lake.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, F.; Gwo-shyn, S.; Pei-Kun, L.

    2015-12-01

    By doing topographical surveys in a reservoir, we can calculate siltation volume in the period of two measurements. It becomes basic requirement to provide more precise siltation value especially when the differential GPS positioning method and the multi-beams echo sounders have been prevailed; however, there are two problems making the result become challenging when doing the siltation-survey in reservoir. They are both relative with the difficulty in keeping survey accuracy to the area of side slope around the boundary of reservoir. Firstly, the efficiency or accuracy of horizontal positioning using the DGPS may decrease because of the satellite-blocking effect when the surveying ship nears the bank especially in the canyon type of reservoir. Secondly, measurement can only be acquired in the area covered by water using the echo sounder, such that the measuring data of side slope area above water surface are lack to decrease the accuracy or seriously affect the calculation of reservoir water volume. This research is to hold the terrain accuracy when measuring the reservoir side slope and the Sun Moon Lake Reservoir in central Taiwan is chosen as the experimental location. Sun Moon Lake is the most popular place for tourists in Taiwan and also the most important reservoir of the electricity facilities. Furthermore, it owns the biggest pumped-storage hydroelectricity in Asia. The water in the lake is self-contained, and its water supply has been input through two underground tunnels, such that a deposit fan is formed when the muds were settled down from the silty water of the Cho-Shui Shi. Three kinds of survey are conducted in this experiment. First, a close-range photogrammetry, around the border of the Sun Moon Lake is made, or it takes shoots along the bank using a camera linked with a computer running the software Pix4D. The result can provide the DTM data to the side slope above the water level. Second, the bathymetrical data can be obtained by sweeping the

  3. Successful Heliophysical Programs Emphasizing the Relation of Earth and the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, P. A.; Reiff, P.; Sumners, C.; McKay, G. A.

    2007-05-01

    Heliophysical is defined as the interconnectedness of the entire solar-heliospheric-planetary system. Our goals are to introduce easily accessible programs that introduce the Sun and other solar system processes to the public. The programs emphasize the impact of these processes on Earth and its inhabitants over geological time. These types of programs are important as these topics as generally taught as a secondary concept rather than an integrated approach. Space Weather is an excellent mechanism for integrating Earth and space science. Heliophysics, which includes Space Weather, is traditionally part of space science studies, but most students do not understand the effect of the Sun's atmosphere on Earth or the intense effects energetic particles can have on humans, whether traveling through space or exploring the surfaces of the Moon or Mars. Effects are not only limited to space travel and other planetary surfaces but also include effects on Earth's magnetosphere which, in turn, affect radio transmission, GPS accuracy, and on occasion spacecraft loss and terrestrial power outages. Meteoritic impacts are another topic. Impacts on planetary bodies without strong plate tectonic activities provide ample evidence of their occurrence over geological time. As an analog, impacts have also had an extensive record on Earth, but plate tectonics have been responsible for obliterating most of the evidence. We have developed effective and engaging venues for teaching heliophysics, via the internet, CD-Rom's, museum kiosks, and planetarium shows. We have organized workshops for teachers; "NASA Days" and "Sally Ride Festivals" for students, and "Sun-Earth Day" events for the public. Our goals are both to increase k-16 and public literacy on heliophysical processes and to inspire the next generation to enhance the workforce. We will be offering examples of these programs, as well as distributing CD's and DVD's of some of the creative works.

  4. Magnificent CME Erupts on the Sun with Earth to Scale

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-12-08

    On August 31, 2012 a long filament of solar material that had been hovering in the sun's atmosphere, the corona, erupted out into space at 4:36 p.m. EDT. The coronal mass ejection, or CME, traveled at over 900 miles per second. The CME did not travel directly toward Earth, but did connect with Earth's magnetic environment, or magnetosphere, causing aurora to appear on the night of Monday, September 3. The image above includes an image of Earth to show the size of the CME compared to the size of Earth. Credit: NASA/GSFC/SDO NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  5. Late proterozoic and paleozoic tides, retreat of the moon, and rotation of the earth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sonett, C.P.; Kvale, E.P.; Zakharian, A.; Chan, M.A.; Demko, T.M.

    1996-01-01

    The tidal rhythmites in the Proterozoic Big Cottonwood Formation (Utah, United States), the Neoproterozoic Elatina Formation of the Flinders Range (southern Australia), and the Lower Pennsylvanian Pottsville Formation (Alabama, United States) and Mansfield Formation (Indiana, United States) indicate that the rate of retreat of the lunar orbit is d??/dt k2 sin(2??) (where ?? is the Earth-moon radius vector, k2 is the tidal Love number, and ?? is the tidal lag angle) and that this rate has been approximately constant since the late Precambrian. When the contribution to tidal friction from the sun is taken into account, these data imply that the length of the terrestrial day 900 million years ago was -18 hours.

  6. Periodic orbits of solar sail equipped with reflectance control device in Earth-Moon system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Jianping; Gao, Chen; Zhang, Junhua

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, families of Lyapunov and halo orbits are presented with a solar sail equipped with a reflectance control device in the Earth-Moon system. System dynamical model is established considering solar sail acceleration, and four solar sail steering laws and two initial Sun-sail configurations are introduced. The initial natural periodic orbits with suitable periods are firstly identified. Subsequently, families of solar sail Lyapunov and halo orbits around the L1 and L2 points are designed with fixed solar sail characteristic acceleration and varying reflectivity rate and pitching angle by the combination of the modified differential correction method and continuation approach. The linear stabilities of solar sail periodic orbits are investigated, and a nonlinear sliding model controller is designed for station keeping. In addition, orbit transfer between the same family of solar sail orbits is investigated preliminarily to showcase reflectance control device solar sail maneuver capability.

  7. Teaching Chemistry Using From the Earth to the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goll, James G.; Mundinger, Stacie L.

    2003-03-01

    The space program and media based on it have provided fascinating examples that can be used to expore chemical principles. The HBO series From the Earth to the Moon and a documentary Moonshot provide examples for teaching chemical principles from the Apollo missions. A docking problem between two spacecrafts occurred during the Apollo 14 mission. This situation can be used to discuss the conditions necessary for a chemical reaction. A catastrophic fire on Apollo 1 can be used to illustrate the influence of different conditions on the rate of a reaction. Lightning striking Apollo 12 during liftoff showed the consequence of adding ions to solution. The landing of Apollo 12, which touched down only 535 feet from Surveyor 3, can be used to teach accuracy and absolute and relative error. The astronauts of Apollo 15 discovered a sample of the primordial lunar crust, and during Apollo 17, astronauts discovered orange dust on the moon. These discoveries can be used to demonstrate the importance of trained observation skills and analytical thinking.

  8. A suggested trajectory for a Venus-sun, earth-sun Lagrange points mission, Vela

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bender, D. F.

    1979-01-01

    The possibility is suggested of investigating the existence of small, as-yet undiscovered, asteroids orbiting in the solar system near the earth-sun or Venus-sun stable Lagrange points by means of a spacecraft which traverses these regions. The type of trajectory suggested lies in the ecliptic plane and has a period of 5/6 years and a perihelion at the Venus orbital distance. The regions in which stable orbits associated with the earth and with Venus may lie are estimated to be a thin and tadpole-shaped area extending from 35 deg to 100 deg from the planet. Crossings of the regions by the trajectory are described, and the requirements for detecting the presence of 1 km sized asteroids are presented and shown to be attainable.

  9. Calibration View of Earth and the Moon by Mars Color Imager

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-08-22

    Three days after the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Aug. 12, 2005, launch, the spacecraft was pointed toward Earth and the Mars Color Imager camera was powered up to acquire a suite of images of Earth and the Moon.

  10. Integrating Research of the Sun-Earth System

    DOE PAGES

    Jordanova, Vania K.; Borovsky, Joseph E.; Jordanov, Valentin T.

    2017-05-02

    Understanding the complex interactions between the magnetic fields of the Sun and Earth remains an important challenge to space physics research. Processes that occur near the Sun at tens of thousands of kilometers from the Earth can generate geomagnetic storms that affect the entire magnetosphere, down to the upper atmosphere. These storms also threaten the ever more sophisticated technologies that we place into the space environment to sustain us, for example, GPS, the satellites we rely on to monitor our weather, and relays that guide our radio transmissions. Increasingly, we need to develop space weather models that can provide timelymore » and accurate predictions so that we can safeguard our society and the infrastructure we depend on.« less

  11. Integrating Research of the Sun-Earth System

    SciTech Connect

    Jordanova, Vania K.; Borovsky, Joseph E.; Jordanov, Valentin T.

    Understanding the complex interactions between the magnetic fields of the Sun and Earth remains an important challenge to space physics research. Processes that occur near the Sun at tens of thousands of kilometers from the Earth can generate geomagnetic storms that affect the entire magnetosphere, down to the upper atmosphere. These storms also threaten the ever more sophisticated technologies that we place into the space environment to sustain us, for example, GPS, the satellites we rely on to monitor our weather, and relays that guide our radio transmissions. Increasingly, we need to develop space weather models that can provide timelymore » and accurate predictions so that we can safeguard our society and the infrastructure we depend on.« less

  12. Comparing the Atmospheres of Mercury and the Earth's Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Thomas H.; Killen, Rosemary M.; Hurley, Dana M.

    2012-01-01

    The exospheres of Mercury and the Earth's Moon are fundamentally similar, but the differences that do exist between them can help us to develop a better understanding of the processes at work on the two bodies that produce and remove volatiles. The major differences are derived from (1) the different compositions of the two surfaces, (2) the different particle and field em'ironments above the surface of each body (particularly the presence of intrinsic magnetic field of Mercury), and (3) the larger flux of interplanetary dust incident at the orbit of Mercury. The first difference, surface composition, is the most intractable problem, but the most challenging part of that problem, the composition of the Hermean regolith, may be at least partially addressed as the MESSENGER mission completes work over the next year. Much progress has been made with respect to exploring the second difference above--spacecraft such as Helios, Ulysses, WIND, and ACE have measured the solar wind and its composition both in Earth orbit and at distances encompassing the orbit of Mercury. While our knowledge of the solar wind is incomplete, again it is far more detailed than a simple 1/R(sup 2) law would predict. Another problem is that of the flux of charged particles to the surfaces. While Mercury's magnetosphere is the subject of current study with MESSENGER, the influx of charged particles on the Moon has gone beyond a cos (psi) picture, where psi is the solar zenith angle. We know that the influx of ions at the Moon is affected by magnetic anomalies, by craters, and by surface charging. The third external difference is the differing flux of interplanetary dust incident on the two surfaces. In this talk we will consider: (1) the species that one can compare now for these two exospheres (Na, K, and He); (2) the species that you might be able to compare with future measurements (Ca and Mg); arid (3) how intensive ground-based observations of the easiest lunar species to observe from the

  13. New Moon

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-12-08

    New Moon. By the modern definition, New Moon occurs when the Moon and Sun are at the same geocentric ecliptic longitude. The part of the Moon facing us is completely in shadow then. Pictured here is the traditional New Moon, the earliest visible waxing crescent, which signals the start of a new month in many lunar and lunisolar calendars. This marks the first time that accurate shadows at this level of detail are possible in such a computer simulation. The shadows are based on the global elevation map being developed from measurements by the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) aboard the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO). LOLA has already taken more than 10 times as many elevation measurements as all previous missions combined. The Moon always keeps the same face to us, but not exactly the same face. Because of the tilt and shape of its orbit, we see the Moon from slightly different angles over the course of a month. When a month is compressed into 12 seconds, as it is in this animation, our changing view of the Moon makes it look like it's wobbling. This wobble is called libration. The word comes from the Latin for "balance scale" (as does the name of the zodiac constellation Libra) and refers to the way such a scale tips up and down on alternating sides. The sub-Earth point gives the amount of libration in longitude and latitude. The sub-Earth point is also the apparent center of the Moon's disk and the location on the Moon where the Earth is directly overhead. The Moon is subject to other motions as well. It appears to roll back and forth around the sub-Earth point. The roll angle is given by the position angle of the axis, which is the angle of the Moon's north pole relative to celestial north. The Moon also approaches and recedes from us, appearing to grow and shrink. The two extremes, called perigee (near) and apogee (far), differ by more than 10%. The most noticed monthly variation in the Moon's appearance is the cycle of phases, caused by the changing

  14. Challenges in Modeling the Sun-Earth System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spann, James

    2004-01-01

    The transfer of mass, energy and momentum through the coupled Sun-Earth system spans a wide range of scales in time and space. While profound advances have been made in modeling isolated regions of the Sun-Earth system, minimal progress has been achieved in modeling the end-to-end system. Currently, end-to-end modeling of the Sun-Earth system is a major goal of the National Space Weather and NASA Living With a Star (LWS) programs. The uncertainty in the underlying physics responsible for coupling contiguous regions of the Sun-Earth system is recognized as a significant barrier to progress. Our limited understanding of the underlying coupling physics is illustrated by the following example questions: how does the propagation of a typical CME/solar flare influence the measured properties of the solar wind at 1 AU? How does the solar wind compel the dynamic response of the Earth's magnetosphere? How is variability in the ionosphere-thermosphere system coupled to magnetospheric variations? Why do these and related important questions remain unanswered? What are the primary problems that need to be resolved to enable significant progress in comprehensive modeling of the Sun-Earth system? Which model/technique improvements are required and what new data coverage is required to enable full model advances? This poster opens the discussion for how these and other important questions can be addressed. A workshop scheduled for October 8-22, 2004 in Huntsville, Alabama, will be a forum for identifying ana exploring promising new directions and approaches for characterizing and understanding the system. To focus the discussion, the workshop will emphasize the genesis, evolution, propagation and interaction of high-speed solar wind streamers or CME/flares with geospace and the subsequent response of geospace from its outer reaches in the magnetosphere to the lower edge of the ionosphere-mesosphere-thermosphere. Particular emphasis will be placed on modeling the coupling aspects

  15. Data-driven Applications for the Sun-Earth System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondrashov, D. A.

    2016-12-01

    Advances in observational and data mining techniques allow extracting information from the large volume of Sun-Earth observational data that can be assimilated into first principles physical models. However, equations governing Sun-Earth phenomena are typically nonlinear, complex, and high-dimensional. The high computational demand of solving the full governing equations over a large range of scales precludes the use of a variety of useful assimilative tools that rely on applied mathematical and statistical techniques for quantifying uncertainty and predictability. Effective use of such tools requires the development of computationally efficient methods to facilitate fusion of data with models. This presentation will provide an overview of various existing as well as newly developed data-driven techniques adopted from atmospheric and oceanic sciences that proved to be useful for space physics applications, such as computationally efficient implementation of Kalman Filter in radiation belts modeling, solar wind gap-filling by Singular Spectrum Analysis, and low-rank procedure for assimilation of low-altitude ionospheric magnetic perturbations into the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry (LFM) global magnetospheric model. Reduced-order non-Markovian inverse modeling and novel data-adaptive decompositions of Sun-Earth datasets will be also demonstrated.

  16. Titan under a red giant sun: a new kind of "habitable" moon.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, R D; Lunine, J I; McKay, C P

    1997-11-15

    We explore the response of Titan's surface and massive atmosphere to the change in solar spectrum and intensity as the sun evolves into a red giant. Titan's surface temperature is insensitive to insolation increases as the haze-laden atmosphere "puffs up" and blocks more sunlight. However, we find a window of several hundred Myr exists, roughly 6 Gyr from now, when liquid water-ammonia can form oceans on the surface and react with the abundant organic compounds there. The window opens due to a drop in haze production as the ultraviolet flux from the reddening sun plummets. The duration of such a window exceeds the time necessary for life to have begun on Earth. Similar environments, with approximately 200K water-ammonia oceans warmed by methane greenhouses under red stars, are an alternative to the approximately 30OK water-CO2 environments considered the classic "habitable" planet.

  17. Sun, Earth and man: The need to know. The quest for knowledge of Sun-Earth relations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stafford, E. P.

    1982-01-01

    Solar physics and the effects of emanations from the Sun on communications and Earth's weather and climate are discussed. Scientific interest in the solar system from the old Stone Age to the present is reviewed with particular emphasis on the objectives sought and information obtained by Explorer satellites, Pioneer satellites, Skylab, Helios, ISEE, the solar maximum mission, and the Dynamics Explorer. The goals of missions planned for the 1980's are discussed including those using space shuttle, Spacelab, the Solar Mesosphere Explorer, the solar optical telescope, the upper atmosphere research satellite, and the solar probe. The objectives of the international solar polar mission and of the Origin of Plasma in Earth's Neighborhood mission are also delineated. Other missions being considered are reviewed and the prospect of taming the fusion process to provide clean, harmless electrical energy like that obtained from the Sun is entertained.

  18. ScienceCast 29: Did Earth Have Two Moons?

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-22

    Did our planet once have two moons? Some researchers say so. Moreover, the missing satellite might still be up there--splattered across the far side of the Moon. NASA's GRAIL mission could help confirm or refute the "two moon" hypothesis.

  19. New Moon

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-12-08

    New Moon. By the modern definition, New Moon occurs when the Moon and Sun are at the same geocentric ecliptic longitude. The part of the Moon facing us is completely in shadow then. Pictured here is the traditional New Moon, the earliest visible waxing crescent, which signals the start of a new month in many lunar and lunisolar calendars. NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) has been in orbit around the Moon since the summer of 2009. Its laser altimeter (LOLA) and camera (LROC) are recording the rugged, airless lunar terrain in exceptional detail, making it possible to visualize the Moon with unprecedented fidelity. This is especially evident in the long shadows cast near the terminator, or day-night line. The pummeled, craggy landscape thrown into high relief at the terminator would be impossible to recreate in the computer without global terrain maps like those from LRO. To download, learn more about this visualization, or to see what the Moon will look like at any hour in 2015, visit svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/goto?4236 NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  20. Preliminary Design Considerations for Access and Operations in Earth-Moon L1/L2 Orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Folta, David C.; Pavlak, Thomas A.; Haapala, Amanda F.; Howell, Kathleen C.

    2013-01-01

    Within the context of manned spaceflight activities, Earth-Moon libration point orbits could support lunar surface operations and serve as staging areas for future missions to near-Earth asteroids and Mars. This investigation examines preliminary design considerations including Earth-Moon L1/L2 libration point orbit selection, transfers, and stationkeeping costs associated with maintaining a spacecraft in the vicinity of L1 or L2 for a specified duration. Existing tools in multi-body trajectory design, dynamical systems theory, and orbit maintenance are leveraged in this analysis to explore end-to-end concepts for manned missions to Earth-Moon libration points.

  1. Numerical Study of Solar Storms from the Sun to Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xueshang; Jiang, Chaowei; Zhou, Yufen

    2017-04-01

    As solar storms are sweeping the Earth, adverse changes occur in geospace environment. How human can mitigate and avoid destructive damages caused by solar storms becomes an important frontier issue that we must face in the high-tech times. It is of both scientific significance to understand the dynamic process during solar storm's propagation in interplanetary space and realistic value to conduct physics-based numerical researches on the three-dimensional process of solar storms in interplanetary space with the aid of powerful computing capacity to predict the arrival times, intensities, and probable geoeffectiveness of solar storms at the Earth. So far, numerical studies based on magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) have gone through the transition from the initial qualitative principle researches to systematic quantitative studies on concrete events and numerical predictions. Numerical modeling community has a common goal to develop an end-to-end physics-based modeling system for forecasting the Sun-Earth relationship. It is hoped that the transition of these models to operational use depends on the availability of computational resources at reasonable cost and that the models' prediction capabilities may be improved by incorporating the observational findings and constraints into physics-based models, combining the observations, empirical models and MHD simulations in organic ways. In this talk, we briefly focus on our recent progress in using solar observations to produce realistic magnetic configurations of CMEs as they leave the Sun, and coupling data-driven simulations of CMEs to heliospheric simulations that then propagate the CME configuration to 1AU, and outlook the important numerical issues and their possible solutions in numerical space weather modeling from the Sun to Earth for future research.

  2. Detection to the DepositFan Occurring in the Sun Moon Lake Using Geophysical Sonar Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mimi, L.

    2014-12-01

    Located in central Taiwan, the Sun Moon Lake is an U-shaped basin with the waters capacity for 138.68 × 106m³. The water is input through two underground tunnels from the Wu-Jie dam in the upstream of the Zhuo-shui river. Although the Wu-Jie dam has been trying to keep the tunnels transporting clean water into the lake, the water is still mixed with muds. The silty water brings the deposits accumulating outwards from positions of the tunnel outlets resulting in a deposit fan formed in the lake. To monitor how the fan is accumulated is then very important in terms of environmental issue, tourism and electric power resources. Institute of Oceanography, National Taiwan University therefore conducted projects to use the multi-beam echo sounders to collect bathymetric data, and used the Chirp sub-bottom profiler to explore silted pattern inside the deposit fan. With these data, underwater topographic maps were plotted to observe the shape and internal structure of the fan. Moreover, two sets of data obtained in 2006 and 2012 were used to estimate the siltation magnitude and pattern in the six years period.The multi-beam sounder is Resons Seabat 9001s model; it collects 60 values in each of the swaths positioned by the DGPS method.The sub-bottom profiler is the EdgeTech 3100P Chirp Sonar, its acoustic wave frequency is in 2 ~ 16kHz. The data give the siltation amount in the Sun Moon Lake was around 3× 106 m³, which gives annual siltation rate at 5× 105 m³. The leading edge of the deposit fan has been expanded westwards 2 km from the water outlet since the tunnel was built 70 years ago; however, outside the deposit fan, the siltation shows insignificant amount on the water bottom.In the past few years the siltation mainly occurs outside in the east side of lake, more closer to the water outlets, the terrain had been increased from 744 m to 746 m (748.5 meters is stranded level of the lake).Observing sub-bottom profiler data, we can clearly see the location of the

  3. Cosmic Rays Variation Before Changes in Sun-Earth Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, S.

    2011-12-01

    Influence of cosmic rays variations on the Sun-Earth Environment has been observed before the changes in the atmospheric temperature, outbreak of influenza, cyclone, earthquake and tsunami. It has been recorded by Sun Observatory Heleospheric Observatory (SOHO) satellite data. Before the earthquake and tsunami the planetary indices (Kp) and Electron flux (E-flux) shows sudden changes followed by the atmospheric perturbations including very high temperature rise to sudden fall resulting snowfall in high altitude and rainfall in tropical areas. The active fault zones shows sudden faulting after the sudden drop in cosmic ray intensity and rise in Kp and E-flux. Besides the geo-environment the extraterrestrial influence on outbreak of H1N1 influenza has also been recorded based on the Mexico Cosmic ray data and its correlation with SOHO records. Distant stars have the potential to influence the heliophysical parameters by showering cosmic rays.

  4. Sun-to-Earth Analysis of a Major Solar Eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patsourakos, Spiros

    During the interval of 7-10 March 2012, Earth's space environment experienced a barrage of space weather phenomena. Early during 7 March 2012, the biggest proton event of 2012 took place, while on 8 March 2012, an interplanetary shock and coronal mass ejection (CME) arrived at 1 AU. This sequence trigerred the biggest geomagnetic storm of cycle 24 so far. The solar source of these activities was a pair of homologous, eruptive X-class flares associated with two ultra-fast CMEs. The two eruptions originated from NOAA active region 11429 during the early hours of 7 March 2012 and within an hour from each other. Using satellite data from a flotilla of solar, heliospheric and magnetospheric missions and monitors, we perform a synergistic Sun-to-Earth study of various observational aspects of the event sequences. We will present an attempt to formulate a cohesive scenario which couples the eruption initiation, interplanetary propagation, and geospace consequences. Our main focus is on building a framework that starting from solar and near-Sun estimates of the magnetic and dynamic content and properties of the Earth-directed CME assess in advance the subsequent geomagnetic response expected, once the associated interplanetary CME reaches 1 AU. This research has been co-financed by the European Union (European Social Fund - ESF) and Greek national funds through the Operational Program "Education and Lifelong Learning" of the National Strategic Reference Framework (NSRF) - Research Funding Program: Thales. Investing in knowledge society through the European Social Fund.

  5. Lunar ephemeris and selenographic coordinates of the earth and sun for 1979 and 1980

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartung, A. D.

    1972-01-01

    Ephemeris data are presented in sections for each month for 1979 and 1980 to provide a time history of lunar coordinates and related geometric information. A NASA Manned Spacecraft Center modification of an ephemeris tape was used to calculate and plot coordinates of the earth, moon, and sun. The ephemeris is referenced to the mean vernal equinox at the nearest beginning of a Besselian year. Therefore, the reference equinox changes from one year to the next between 30 June and 1 July. The apparent discontinuity in the data is not noticeable in the graphical presentation, but can be observed in the digital output. The mean equator of epoch is used in all cases. The computer program used to compute and plot the ephemeris data is described in the appendix.

  6. Lunar ephemeris and selenographic coordinates of the earth and sun for 1971 and 1972

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartung, A. D.

    1972-01-01

    Ephemeris data are presented for each month of 1971 and 1972 to provide a time history of lunar coordinates and related geometric information. A NASA Manned Spacecraft Center modification of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory ephemeris tape was used to calculate and plot coordinates of the earth, moon, and sun. The ephemeris is referenced to the mean vernal equinox at the nearest beginning of a Besselian year. Therefore, the reference equinox changes from one year to the next between 30 June and 1 July. The apparent discontinuity in the data is not noticeable in the graphical presentation, but can be observed in the digital output. The mean equator of epoch is used in all cases. The computer program used to compute and plot the ephemeris data is described.

  7. Lunar ephemeris and selenographic coordinates of the earth and sun for 1983 and 1984

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartung, A. D.

    1972-01-01

    Ephemeris data are presented in sections for each month for 1983 and 1984 to provide a time history of lunar coordinates and related geometric information. A NASA Manned Spacecraft Center modification of an ephemeris tape was used to calculate and plot coordinates of the earth, moon, and sun. The ephemeris is referenced to the mean vernal equinox at the nearest beginning of a Besselian year. Therefore, the reference equinox changes from one year to the next between 30 June and 1 July. The apparent discontinuity in the data is not noticeable in the graphical presentation, but can be observed in the digital output. The mean equator of epoch is used in all cases. The computer program used to compute and plot the ephemeris data is described in the appendix.

  8. Lunar ephemeris and selenographic coordinates of the earth and sun for 1977 and 1978

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartung, A. D.

    1972-01-01

    Ephemeris data are presented in sections for each month for 1977 and 1978 to provide a time history of lunar coordinates and related geometric information. A NASA Manned Spacecraft Center modification of an ephmeris tape was used to calculate and plot coordinates of the earth, moon, and sun. The ephemeris is referenced to the mean vernal equinox at the nearest beginning of a Besselian year. Therefore, the reference equinox changes from one year to the next between June 30 and July 1. The apparent discontinuity in the data is not noticeable in the graphical presentation, but can be observed in the digital output. The mean equator of epoch is used in all cases. The computer program used to compute and plot the ephemeris data is described in the appendix.

  9. Lunar ephemeris and selenographic coordinates of the earth and sun for 1973 and 1974

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartung, A. D.

    1972-01-01

    Ephemeris data are presented for each month of 1973 and 1974 to provide a time history of lunar coordinates and related geometric information. A NASA Manned Spacecraft Center modification of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory ephemeris tape was used to calculate and plot coordinates of the earth, moon, and sun. The ephemeris is referenced to the mean vernal equinox at the nearest beginning of a Besselian year. Therefore, the reference equinox changes from one year to the next between 30 June and 1 July. The apparent discontinuity in the data is not noticeable in the graphical presentation, but can be observed in the digital output. The mean equator of epoch is used in all cases. The computer program used to compute and plot the ephemeris data is described.

  10. Lunar ephemeris and selenographic coordinates of the earth and sun for 1981 and 1982

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartung, A. D.

    1972-01-01

    Ephemeris data are presented in sections for each month for 1981 and 1982 to provide a time history of lunar coordinates and related geometric information. A NASA Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC) modification of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory ephemeris tape was used to calculate and plot coordinates of the earth, moon, and sun. The ephemeris is referenced to the mean vernal equinox at the nearest beginning of a Besselian year. Therefore, the reference equinox changes from one year to the next between June 30 and July 1. The apparent discontinuity in the data is not noticeable in the graphical presentation, but can be observed in the digital output. The mean equator of epoch is used in all cases. For 1966 to 1970, the same type of data presentation has been prepared in informal MSC documents. The data for 1971 to 1980 and 1983 and 1984 are presented. The computer program used to compute and plot the ephemeris data is described.

  11. UV photography of the earth and the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The fundamental aim of this experiment was the acquisition of ultraviolet photographs of the earth and the moon that could be used to interpret similar imagery of Mars and Venus. Venus shows no markings whatever when viewed in visible light, a phenomenon that is in keeping with its immensely thick atmosphere and perpetual cloud cover, but in the near ultraviolet, the planet exhibits low contrast markings which vary in position and appearance with time. Mars posed just the opposite problem from Venus at wavelengths below 4500 A, Mars shows very little detail, sometimes none at all, whereas at longer wavelengths, the surface is clearly visible. Occasionally observers have reported that this obscuration has lifted and the ground has become visible at the shorter wavelengths as well. Such events have been labeled blue clearings and led to the suggestion that the ultraviolet obscuration was caused by an atmospheric haze. Mariner 6 and 7 observations of Mars failed to find such a haze and lent support to the alternative view that ascribed the absence of detail on UV photographs to a simple lack of contrast between Martian surface features at these wavelengths.

  12. Sun-Earth Connection EPO's with Multiple Uses and Audiences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, S. Q.; Johnson, R. M.; Russell, R.; Lu, G.; Richmond, A.; Maute, A.; Haller, D.; Conery, C.; Bintner, G.; Kiessling, D.; Hughes, W. J.

    2005-05-01

    The three-year life of an EPO grant can be a journey guided by clear goals and enriched by collaborative and outreach opportunities connecting Space sciences to Earth sciences for both K-12 and public audiences. This point is illustrated by two EPO projects funded by NASA Sun-Earth Connection research grants to the High Altitude Observatory (HAO) at the National Center for Atmospheric Research. They are entering their final year coordinated by the Office of Education and Outreach at University Corporation for Atmospheric Research. The content focus of both projects is well aligned with HAO's research mission and the expertise of our scientists, addressing solar dynamics, space weather, and the impacts of solar events on the magnetosphere, as well as societies inhabiting Earth's surface. The first project (Gang Lu, PI) develops presentation resources, inquiry activities, and tips that will help HAO scientists be better prepared to visit K-12 classrooms. Unexpectedly, the simultaneous development of a Teachers' Guide to NCAR's new Climate Discovery exhibit, which takes an Earth system approach to climate and global change, has created a niche for this EPO resource to be revised and repurposed for a needed unit in the guide about the exhibit's graphic panels on Sun-Earth connections. The second project (Art Richmond, PI) engages two high school "Teachers in Residence" to develop resources they can utilize with their students. Excited by exceptional educational graphics and animations in the new Physics of the Aurora: Earth Systems module co-produced by HAO and the COMET Program for advanced undergraduate courses, they chose to adapt appropriate sections of the module to enrich Earth science and math concepts addressed in their 9th and 10th grade astronomy and general physics classes. Simultaneously, the Windows to the Universe web site, which continuously updates space science content and is now developing a new Space Weather section with support from the Center for

  13. The Dynamical Evolution of the Earth-Moon Progenitors. 1; Motivation and Methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissuer, Jack; Rivera, E.; Duncan, M. J.; Levison, H. F.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The Giant Impact Hypothesis was introduced in the mid-1970's after consideration of results from the Apollo Moon missions. This hypothesis best explains the similarity in elemental proportions in lunar and terrestrial rocks, the depletion of lunar volatiles, the lack of lunar iron. and the large angular momentum in the Earth-Moon system. Comparison between the radiometric ages of inclusions in the most primitive meteorites and those of inclusions in the oldest lunar rocks and the differentiation age of Earth suggests that the Earth-Moon system formed about 100 Myr after the oldest meteorites. In addition, the age of the famous Martian meteorite ALH84001 and an early solidification time estimated from the Martian crust, suggest that the inner Solar System was fairly clear of large bodies about 10 Myr after the oldest meteorites formed. Thus, the 'standard model' suggests that for a period of several tens of millions of years the terrestrial planet region had few. if any, lunar-sized bodies and there were five terrestrial planets, Mercury, Venus, the two progenitors of the Earth-Moon system, and Mars. To simulate the dynamics of the Solar System before the hypothesized Moon-forming impact, we are integrating the Solar System with the Earth-Moon system replaced by two bodies in heliocentric orbits between Venus and Mars. The total (orbital) angular momentum of the Earth-Moon progenitors is that of the present Earth-Moon system, and their total mass is that of the Earth-Moon system. We are looking at ranges in mass ratio and initial values for eccentricity, inclination. and semi-major axis. We are using the SYMBA integrator to integrate these systems until a collision occurs or a time of 200 Myr elapses. Results are presented in a companion paper.

  14. Aqueous Alteration of Basalts: Earth, Moon, and Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ming, Douglas W.

    2007-01-01

    The geologic processes responsible for aqueous alteration of basaltic materials on Mars are modeled beginning with our knowledge of analog processes on Earth, i.e., characterization of elemental and mineralogical compositions of terrestrial environments where the alteration and weathering pathways related to aqueous activity are better understood. A key ingredient to successful modeling of aqueous processes on Mars is identification of phases that have formed by those processes. The purpose of this paper is to describe what is known about the elemental and mineralogical composition of aqueous alteration products of basaltic materials on Mars and their implications for specific aqueous environments based upon our knowledge of terrestrial systems. Although aqueous alteration has not occurred on the Moon, it is crucial to understand the behaviors of basaltic materials exposed to aqueous environments in support of human exploration to the Moon over the next two decades. Several methods or indices have been used to evaluate the extent of basalt alteration/weathering based upon measurements made at Mars by the Mars Exploration Rover (MER) Moessbauer and Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometers. The Mineralogical Alteration Index (MAI) is based upon the percentage of total Fe (Fe(sub T)) present as Fe(3+) in alteration products (Morris et al., 2006). A second method is the evaluation of compositional trends to determine the extent to which elements have been removed from the host rock and the likely formation of secondary phases (Nesbitt and Young, 1992; Ming et al., 2007). Most of the basalts that have been altered by aqueous processes at the two MER landing sites in Gusev crater and on Meridiani Planum have not undergone extensive leaching in an open hydrolytic system with the exception of an outcrop in the Columbia Hills. The extent of aqueous alteration however ranges from relatively unaltered to pervasively altered materials. Several experimental studies have focused upon

  15. Stationkeeping of Lissajous Trajectories in the Earth-Moon System with Applications to ARTEMIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Folta, D. C.; Pavlak, T. A.; Howell, K. C.; Woodard, M. A.; Woodfork, D. W.

    2010-01-01

    In the last few decades, several missions have successfully exploited trajectories near the.Sun-Earth L1 and L2 libration points. Recently, the collinear libration points in the Earth-Moon system have emerged as locations with immediate application. Most libration point orbits, in any system, are inherently unstable. and must be controlled. To this end, several stationkeeping strategies are considered for application to ARTEMIS. Two approaches are examined to investigate the stationkeeping problem in this regime and the specific options. available for ARTEMIS given the mission and vehicle constraints. (I) A baseline orbit-targeting approach controls the vehicle to remain near a nominal trajectory; a related global optimum search method searches all possible maneuver angles to determine an optimal angle and magnitude; and (2) an orbit continuation method, with various formulations determines maneuver locations and minimizes costs. Initial results indicate that consistent stationkeeping costs can be achieved with both approaches and the costs are reasonable. These methods are then applied to Lissajous trajectories representing a baseline ARTEMIS libration orbit trajectory.

  16. Galileo view of Moon orbiting the Earth taken from 3.9 million miles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Eight days after its encounter with the Earth, the Galileo spacecraft was able to look back and capture this remarkable view of the Moon in orbit about the Earth, taken from a distance of about 6.2 million kilometers (3.9 million miles). The picture was constructed from images taken through the violet, red, and 1.0-micron infrared filters. The Moon is in the foreground, moving from left to right. The brightly-colored Earth contrasts strongly with the Moon, which reflects only about one-third as much sunlight as the Earth. Contrast and color have been computer-enhanced for both objects to improve visibility. Antarctica is visible through clouds (bottom). The Moon's far side is seen; the shadowy indentation in the dawn terminator is the south-Pole/Aitken Basin, one of the largest and oldest lunar impact features. Alternate Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) number is P-41508.

  17. The Dynamical Evolution of the Earth-Moon Progenitors. 1; Motivation and Methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, J. J.; Rivera, E.; Duncan, M. J.; Levison, H. F.

    1998-01-01

    The giant impact hypothesis was introduced in the mid-1970s after consideration of results from the Apollo missions. This hypothesis best explains the similarity in elemental proportions in lunar and terrestrial rocks, the depletion of lunar volatiles, the lack of lunar Fe, and the large angular momentum in the Earth-Moon system. Comparison between the radiometric ages of inclusions in the most primitive meteorites and in the oldest lunar rocks and the differentiation age of Earth suggests that the Earth-Moon system formed about100 m.y. after the oldest meteorites. In addition, the age of the famous martian meteorite ALH 84001 and an early Martian solidification time obtained by Lee and Halliday suggest that the inner solar system was fairly clear of large bodies about 10 m.y. after the oldest meteorites formed. Thus, the "standard model" suggests that for several tens of millions of years, the terrestrial planet region had few, if any, lunar-sized bodies, and there were five terrestrial planets: Mercury, Venus, the two progenitors of the Earth-Moon system, and Mars. To simulate the dynamics of the solar system before the hypothesized Moon-forming impact, we are integrating the solar system with the Earth-Moon system replaced by two bodies in heliocentric orbits between Venus and Mars. The total (orbital) angular momentum of the Earth-Moon progenitors is that of the present Earth-Moon system, and their total mass is that of the Earth-Moon System. We are looking at ranges in mass ratio and initial values for eccentricity, inclination, and semimajor axis. We are using the SYMBA integrator to integrate these systems until a collision occurs or a time of 200 m.y. elapses. Results are presented in a companion abstract, (also presented at this meeting).

  18. Mapping magnetic field lines between the Sun and Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, B.; Cairns, Iver H.; Gosling, J. T.; Steward, G.; Francis, M.; Neudegg, D.; Schulte in den Bäumen, H.; Player, P. R.; Milne, A. R.

    2016-02-01

    Magnetic field topologies between the Sun and Earth are important for the connectivity to Earth of solar suprathermal particles, e.g., solar energetic particles and beam electrons in type III solar radio bursts. An approach is developed for mapping large-scale magnetic field lines near the solar equatorial plane, using near-Earth observations and a solar wind model with nonzero azimuthal magnetic field at the source surface. Unlike Parker's spiral model, which restricts the in-ecliptic angle ΦB in the Geocentric Solar Ecliptic coordinates to (90°-180°, 270°-360°) and so is unable to predict field configurations for the other ΦB values frequently observed in the solar wind, our approach can account for all the observed ΦB values. A set of predicted maps shows that near both minimal and maximal solar activity the field lines are typically open and that loops with both ends either connected to or disconnected from the Sun are relatively rare. The open field lines, nonetheless, often do not closely follow the Parker spiral, being less or more tightly wound, or strongly azimuthally or radially oriented, or inverted. The time-varying classes, e.g., bidirectional electrons, of suprathermal electron pitch angle distributions (PADs) at 1 AU are predicted from the mapped field line configurations and compared with Wind observations for two solar rotations, one each near solar minimum and solar maximum. PAD predictions by our approach agree quantitatively (≈90%) with the PAD observations and outperform (by ≈20%) PAD predictions using Parker's model.

  19. STEREO-IMPACT E/PO at NASA's Sun-Earth Day Event: Participation in Total Eclipse 2006 Webcast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, N.; Peticolas, L. M.; Mendez, B. J.; Luhmann, J. G.; Higdon, R.

    2006-05-01

    The Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) is planned for launch in late Summer 2006. STEREO will study the Sun with two spacecraft in orbit around the Sun moving on opposite sides of Earth. The primary science goal is to understand the nature of Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs). This presentation will focus on one of the informal education efforts of our E/PO program for the IMPACT instrument suite aboard STEREO. We will share our participation in NASA's Sun-Earth Day event which is scheduled to coincide with a total solar eclipse in March and is titled In a Different Light. We will show how this live eclipse Webcast, which reaches thousands of science center attendees, can inspire the public to observe, understand and be part of the Sun-Earth-Moon system. We will present video clips of STEREO-IMPACT team members Janet Luhmann and Nahide Craig participating in the Exploratorium's live Webcast of the 2006 solar eclipse on location from Side, Turkey, and the experiences and remarks of the other STEREO scientist from the path of totality from Africa.

  20. Solar sail trajectory design in the Earth-Moon circular restricted three body problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Ashwati

    The quest to explore the Moon has helped resolve scientific questions, has spurred leaps in technology development, and has revealed Earth's celestial companion to be a gateway to other destinations. With a renewed focus on returning to the Moon in this decade, alternatives to chemical propulsion systems are becoming attractive methods to efficiently use scarce resources and support extended mission durations. Thus, an investigation is conducted to develop a general framework, that facilitates propellant-free Earth-Moon transfers by exploiting sail dynamics in combination with advantageous transfer options offered in the Earth-Moon circular restricted multi-body dynamical model. Both periodic orbits in the vicinity of the Earth-Moon libration points, and lunar-centric long-term capture orbits are incorporated as target destinations to demonstrate the applicability of the general framework to varied design scanarios, each incorporating a variety of complexities and challenges. The transfers are comprised of three phases - a spiral Earth escape, a transit period, and, finally, the capture into a desirable orbit in the vicinity of the Moon. The Earth-escape phase consists of spiral trajectories constructed using three different sail steering strategies - locally optimal, on/off and velocity tangent. In the case of the Earth-libration point transfers, naturally occurring flow structures (e.g., invariant manifolds) arising from the mutual gravitational interaction of the Earth and Moon are exploited to link an Earth departure spiral with a destination orbit. In contrast, sail steering alone is employed to establish a link between the Earth-escape phase and capture orbits about the Moon due to a lack of applicable natural structures for the required connection. Metrics associated with the transfers including flight-time and the influence of operational constraints, such as occultation events, are investigated to determine the available capabilities for Earth-Moon

  1. Observation duration analysis for Earth surface features from a Moon-based platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Hanlin; Guo, Huadong; Liu, Guang; Ren, Yuanzhen

    2018-07-01

    Earth System Science is a discipline that performs holistic and comprehensive research on various components of the Earth. One of a key issue for the Earth monitoring and observation is to enhance the observation duration, the time intervals during which the Earth surface features can be observed by sensors. In this work, we propose to utilise the Moon as an Earth observation platform. Thanks to the long distance between the Earth and the Moon, and the vast space on the lunar surface which is suitable for sensor installation, this Earth observation platform could have large spatial coverage, long temporal duration, and could perform multi-layer detection of the Earth. The line of sight between a proposed Moon-based platform and the Earth will change with different lunar surface positions; therefore, in this work, the position of the lunar surface was divided into four regions, including one full observation region and three incomplete observation regions. As existing methods are not able to perform global-scale observations, a Boolean matrix method was established to calculate the necessary observation durations from a Moon-based platform. Based on Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) ephemerides and Earth Orientation Parameters (EOP), a formula was developed to describe the geometrical relationship between the Moon-based platform and Earth surface features in the unified spatial coordinate system and the unified time system. In addition, we compared the observation geometries at different positions on the lunar surface and two parameters that are vital to observation duration calculations were considered. Finally, an analysis method was developed. We found that the observation duration of a given Earth surface feature shows little difference regardless of sensor position within the full observation region. However, the observation duration for sensors in the incomplete observation regions is reduced by at least half. In summary, our results demonstrate the suitability

  2. Tidal evolution of the Moon from a high-obliquity, high-angular-momentum Earth.

    PubMed

    Ćuk, Matija; Hamilton, Douglas P; Lock, Simon J; Stewart, Sarah T

    2016-11-17

    In the giant-impact hypothesis for lunar origin, the Moon accreted from an equatorial circum-terrestrial disk; however, the current lunar orbital inclination of five degrees requires a subsequent dynamical process that is still unclear. In addition, the giant-impact theory has been challenged by the Moon's unexpectedly Earth-like isotopic composition. Here we show that tidal dissipation due to lunar obliquity was an important effect during the Moon's tidal evolution, and the lunar inclination in the past must have been very large, defying theoretical explanations. We present a tidal evolution model starting with the Moon in an equatorial orbit around an initially fast-spinning, high-obliquity Earth, which is a probable outcome of giant impacts. Using numerical modelling, we show that the solar perturbations on the Moon's orbit naturally induce a large lunar inclination and remove angular momentum from the Earth-Moon system. Our tidal evolution model supports recent high-angular-momentum, giant-impact scenarios to explain the Moon's isotopic composition and provides a new pathway to reach Earth's climatically favourable low obliquity.

  3. Sun-earth environment study to understand earthquake prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, S.

    2007-05-01

    Earthquake prediction is possible by looking into the location of active sunspots before it harbours energy towards earth. Earth is a restless planet the restlessness turns deadly occasionally. Of all natural hazards, earthquakes are the most feared. For centuries scientists working in seismically active regions have noted premonitory signals. Changes in thermosphere, Ionosphere, atmosphere and hydrosphere are noted before the changes in geosphere. The historical records talk of changes of the water level in wells, of strange weather, of ground-hugging fog, of unusual behaviour of animals (due to change in magnetic field of the earth) that seem to feel the approach of a major earthquake. With the advent of modern science and technology the understanding of these pre-earthquake signals has become stronger enough to develop a methodology of earthquake prediction. A correlation of earth directed coronal mass ejection (CME) from the active sunspots has been possible to develop as a precursor of the earthquake. Occasional local magnetic field and planetary indices (Kp values) changes in the lower atmosphere that is accompanied by the formation of haze and a reduction of moisture in the air. Large patches, often tens to hundreds of thousands of square kilometres in size, seen in night-time infrared satellite images where the land surface temperature seems to fluctuate rapidly. Perturbations in the ionosphere at 90 - 120 km altitude have been observed before the occurrence of earthquakes. These changes affect the transmission of radio waves and a radio black out has been observed due to CME. Another heliophysical parameter Electron flux (Eflux) has been monitored before the occurrence of the earthquakes. More than hundreds of case studies show that before the occurrence of the earthquakes the atmospheric temperature increases and suddenly drops before the occurrence of the earthquakes. These changes are being monitored by using Sun Observatory Heliospheric observatory

  4. Results of the Compensated Earth-Moon-Earth Retroreflector Laser Link (CEMERLL) Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, K. E.; Leatherman, P. R.; Cleis, R.; Spinhirne, J.; Fugate, R. Q.

    1997-01-01

    Adaptive optics techniques can be used to realize a robust low bit-error-rate link by mitigating the atmosphere-induced signal fades in optical communications links between ground-based transmitters and deep-space probes. Phase I of the Compensated Earth-Moon-Earth Retroreflector Laser Link (CEMERLL) experiment demonstrated the first propagation of an atmosphere-compensated laser beam to the lunar retroreflectors. A 1.06-micron Nd:YAG laser beam was propagated through the full aperture of the 1.5-m telescope at the Starfire Optical Range (SOR), Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico, to the Apollo 15 retroreflector array at Hadley Rille. Laser guide-star adaptive optics were used to compensate turbulence-induced aberrations across the transmitter's 1.5-m aperture. A 3.5-m telescope, also located at the SOR, was used as a receiver for detecting the return signals. JPL-supplied Chebyshev polynomials of the retroreflector locations were used to develop tracking algorithms for the telescopes. At times we observed in excess of 100 photons returned from a single pulse when the outgoing beam from the 1.5-m telescope was corrected by the adaptive optics system. No returns were detected when the outgoing beam was uncompensated. The experiment was conducted from March through September 1994, during the first or last quarter of the Moon.

  5. Global Cooperation in the Science of Sun-Earth Connection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, Natchimuthuk; Davila, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    The international space science community had recognized the importance of space weather more than a decade ago, which resulted in a number of international collaborative activities such as the International Space Weather Initiative (ISWI), the Climate and Weather of the Sun Earth System (CAWSES) by SCOSTEP and the International Living with a Star (ILWS) program. These programs have brought scientists together to tackle the scientific issues related to short and long term variability of the Sun and the consequences in the heliosphere. The ISWI program is a continuation of the successful International Heliophysical Year (IHY) 2007 program in focusing on science, observatory deployment, and outreach. The IHY/ISWI observatory deployment has not only filled voids in data coverage, but also inducted young scientists from developing countries into the scientific community. The ISWI schools and UN workshops are the primary venues for interaction and information exchange among scientists from developing and developed countries that lead to collaborative efforts in space weather. This paper presents a summary of ISWI activities that promote space weather science via complementary approaches in international scientific collaborations, capacity building, and public outreach.

  6. Multi-sun-synchronous (MSS) orbits for earth observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulivieri, Carlo; Anselmo, Luciano

    1992-08-01

    A case study is outlined for a remote-sensing mission at low and middle latitudes based on multi-sun-synchronous (MSS) orbits. The scenario involves the use of small payloads in low-earth posigrade orbits that would overfly the Mediterranean region. A 600-kg spacecraft is considered in an orbit that is 571 km in altitude and at an inclination of 42.5 deg. The orbit is analyzed in terms of mission characteristics, and two years of operation is shown to be feasible with a fuel-consumption rate of less than three kg/yr of hydrazine. The mission could be based on the use of a Scout solid-propellant rockets into an MSS orbit, and only a limited number of ground stations are required for good data collection. A remote-sensing mission at low/middle latitudes is shown to be efficient in terms of both revisit frequency, fuel consumption, and data acquisition.

  7. Circumlunar Free-Return Cycler Orbits for a Manned Earth-Moon Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Genova, Anthony L.; Aldrin, Buzz

    2015-01-01

    Multiple free-return circumlunar cycler orbits were designed to allow regular travel between the Earth and Moon by a manned space station. The presented cycler orbits contain circumlunar free-return "figure-8" segments and yield lunar encounters every month. Smaller space "taxi" vehicles can rendezvous with (and depart from) the cycling Earth-Moon space station to enter lunar orbit (and/or land on the lunar surface), return to Earth, or reach destinations including Earth-Moon L1 and L2 halo orbits, near-Earth objects (NEOs), Venus, and Mars. To assess the practicality of the selected orbits, relevant cycler characteristics (including (Delta)V maintenance requirements) are presented and compared.

  8. Properties of the moon, Mars, Martian satellites, and near-earth asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Jeffrey G.

    1989-01-01

    Environments and surface properties of the moon, Mars, Martian satellites, and near-earth asteroids are discussed. Topics include gravity, atmospheres, surface properties, surface compositions, seismicity, radiation environment, degradation, use of robotics, and environmental impacts. Gravity fields vary from large fractions of the earth's field such as 1/3 on Mars and 1/6 on the moon to smaller fractions of 0.0004 g on an asteroid 1 km in diameter. Spectral data and the analogy with meteor compositions suggest that near-earth asteroids may contain many resources such as water-rich carbonaceous materials and iron-rich metallic bodies. It is concluded that future mining and materials processing operations from extraterrestrial bodies require an investment now in both (1) missions to the moon, Mars, Phobos, Deimos, and near-earth asteroids and (2) earth-based laboratory research in materials and processing.

  9. A primordial origin for the compositional similarity between the Earth and the Moon.

    PubMed

    Mastrobuono-Battisti, Alessandra; Perets, Hagai B; Raymond, Sean N

    2015-04-09

    Most of the properties of the Earth-Moon system can be explained by a collision between a planetary embryo (giant impactor) and the growing Earth late in the accretion process. Simulations show that most of the material that eventually aggregates to form the Moon originates from the impactor. However, analysis of the terrestrial and lunar isotopic compositions show them to be highly similar. In contrast, the compositions of other Solar System bodies are significantly different from those of the Earth and Moon, suggesting that different Solar System bodies have distinct compositions. This challenges the giant impact scenario, because the Moon-forming impactor must then also be thought to have a composition different from that of the proto-Earth. Here we track the feeding zones of growing planets in a suite of simulations of planetary accretion, to measure the composition of Moon-forming impactors. We find that different planets formed in the same simulation have distinct compositions, but the compositions of giant impactors are statistically more similar to the planets they impact. A large fraction of planet-impactor pairs have almost identical compositions. Thus, the similarity in composition between the Earth and Moon could be a natural consequence of a late giant impact.

  10. Non-Rocket Earth-Moon Transport System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolonkin, Alexander

    2002-01-01

    This paper proposes a new method and transportation system to travel to the Moon. This transportation system uses a mechanical energy transfer and requires only minimal energy so that it provides a 'Free Trip' into space. The method uses the rotary and kinetic energy of the Moon. This paper presents the theory and results of computations for the project provided Free Trips (without rockets and spend a big energy) to the Moon for six thousand people annually. The project uses artificial materials like nanotubes and whiskers that have a ratio of tensile strength to density equal 4 million meters. In the future, nanotubes will be produced that can reach a specific stress up 100 millions meter and will significantly improve the parameters of suggested project. The author is prepared to discuss the problems with serious organizations that want to research and develop these innovations.

  11. Full Moon

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-12-08

    Full Moon. Rises at sunset, high in the sky around midnight. Visible all night. This marks the first time that accurate shadows at this level of detail are possible in such a computer simulation. The shadows are based on the global elevation map being developed from measurements by the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) aboard the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO). LOLA has already taken more than 10 times as many elevation measurements as all previous missions combined. The Moon always keeps the same face to us, but not exactly the same face. Because of the tilt and shape of its orbit, we see the Moon from slightly different angles over the course of a month. When a month is compressed into 12 seconds, as it is in this animation, our changing view of the Moon makes it look like it's wobbling. This wobble is called libration. The word comes from the Latin for "balance scale" (as does the name of the zodiac constellation Libra) and refers to the way such a scale tips up and down on alternating sides. The sub-Earth point gives the amount of libration in longitude and latitude. The sub-Earth point is also the apparent center of the Moon's disk and the location on the Moon where the Earth is directly overhead. The Moon is subject to other motions as well. It appears to roll back and forth around the sub-Earth point. The roll angle is given by the position angle of the axis, which is the angle of the Moon's north pole relative to celestial north. The Moon also approaches and recedes from us, appearing to grow and shrink. The two extremes, called perigee (near) and apogee (far), differ by more than 10%. The most noticed monthly variation in the Moon's appearance is the cycle of phases, caused by the changing angle of the Sun as the Moon orbits the Earth. The cycle begins with the waxing (growing) crescent Moon visible in the west just after sunset. By first quarter, the Moon is high in the sky at sunset and sets around midnight. The full Moon rises at sunset and is

  12. Orbit Determination of Spacecraft in Earth-Moon L1 and L2 Libration Point Orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodard, Mark; Cosgrove, Daniel; Morinelli, Patrick; Marchese, Jeff; Owens, Brandon; Folta, David

    2011-01-01

    measurements that would be needed to meet the required orbit determination accuracies. Analysts used the Orbit Determination Error Analysis System (ODEAS) to perform covariance analyses using various tracking data schedules. From this analysis, it was determined that 3.5 hours of DSN TRK-2-34 range and Doppler tracking data every other day would suffice to meet the predictive orbit knowledge accuracies in the Lissajous region. The results of this analysis are presented. Both GTDS and ODTK have high-fidelity environmental orbit force models that allow for very accurate orbit estimation in the lunar Lissajous regime. These models include solar radiation pressure, Earth and Moon gravity models, third body gravitational effects from the Sun, and to a lesser extent third body gravitational effects from Jupiter, Venus, Saturn, and Mars. Increased position and velocity uncertainties following each maneuver, due to small execution performance errors, requires that several days of post-maneuver tracking data be processed to converge on an accurate post-maneuver orbit solution. The effects of maneuvers on orbit determination accuracy will be presented, including a comparison of the batch least squares technique to the extended Kalman filter/smoother technique. We will present the maneuver calibration results derived from processing post-maneuver tracking data. A dominant error in the orbit estimation process is the uncertainty in solar radiation pressure and the resultant force on the spacecraft. An estimation of this value can include many related factors, such as the uncertainty in spacecraft reflectivity and surface area which is a function of spacecraft orientation (spin-axis attitude), uncertainty in spacecraft wet mass, and potential seasonal variability due to the changing direction of the Sun line relative to the Earth-Moon Lissajous reference frame. In addition, each spacecraft occasionally enters into Earth or Moon penumbra or umbra and these shadow crossings reduche solar

  13. The Earth and Moon As Seen by 2001 Mars Odyssey Thermal Emission Imaging System

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-05-01

    NASA Mars Odyssey spacecraft took this portrait of the Earth and its companion Moon. It was taken at a distance of 3,563,735 kilometers more than 2 million miles on April 19, 2001 as the 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft left the Earth.

  14. SMART-1 leaves Earth on a long journey to the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-09-01

    The European Space Agency’s SMART-1 was one of three payloads on Ariane Flight 162. The generic Ariane-5 lifted off from the Guiana Space Centre, Europe’s spaceport at Kourou, French Guiana, at 2014 hrs local time (2314 hrs GMT) on 27 September (01:14 Central European Summer time on 28 September). 42 minutes after launch, SMART-1 as last of the three satellites had been successfully released into a geostationary transfer orbit (654 x 35 885 km, inclined at 7 degrees to the Equator). While the other two satellites are due to manoeuvre towards geostationary orbit, the 367 kg SMART-1 will begin a much longer journey to a target ten times more distant than the geostationary orbit: the Moon. “Europe can be proud”, said ESA Director General Jean-Jacques Dordain, after witnessing the launch from ESA’s ESOC space operations centre in Darmstadt, Germany, “we have set course for the Moon again. And this is only the beginning: we are preparing to reach much further”. The spacecraft has deployed its solar arrays and is currently undergoing initial checkout of its systems under control from ESA/ESOC. This checkout will continue until 4 October and will include with the initial firing of SMART-1’s innovative ion engine. By ion drive to the Moon “Science and technology go hand in hand in this exciting mission to the Moon. The Earth and Moon have over 4 thousand million years of shared history, so knowing the Moon better will help scientists in Europe and all over the world to better understand our planet and will give them valuable new hints on how to better safeguard it” said ESA Director of Science David Southwood, following the launch from Kourou. As the first mission in the new series of Small Missions for Advanced Research in Technology, SMART-1 is mainly designed to demonstrate innovative and key technologies for future deep space science missions. The first technology to be demonstrated on SMART-1 will be Solar Electric Primary Propulsion (SEPP), a

  15. Earth-moon system: Dynamics and parameter estimation; numerical considerations and program documentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breedlove, W. J., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Major activities included coding and verifying equations of motion for the earth-moon system. Some attention was also given to numerical integration methods and parameter estimation methods. Existing analytical theories such as Brown's lunar theory, Eckhardt's theory for lunar rotation, and Newcomb's theory for the rotation of the earth were coded and verified. These theories serve as checks for the numerical integration. Laser ranging data for the period January 1969 - December 1975 was collected and stored on tape. The main goal of this research is the development of software to enable physical parameters of the earth-moon system to be estimated making use of data available from the Lunar Laser Ranging Experiment and the Very Long Base Interferometry experiment of project Apollo. A more specific goal is to develop software for the estimation of certain physical parameters of the moon such as inertia ratios, and the third and fourth harmonic gravity coefficients.

  16. Tungsten isotope evidence for post-giant impact equilibration of the Earth and Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruijer, T.; Kleine, T.; Fischer-Gödde, M.

    2015-12-01

    The Moon is thought to have formed by re-accretion of material ejected by a giant impact on Earth [e.g., 1]. This model, at least in its classical form, predicts an isotopic difference between the Earth and Moon, because the Moon would largely consist of impactor material. Yet Earth and Moon show an unexpected isotopic similarity for many elements [e.g., 2]. Here we use variations in 182W—the decay-product of short-lived 182Hf (t1/2~9 Myr)—between the Moon and the bulk silicate Earth (BSE) to shed new light on this issue. We precisely determined the lunar 182W value by analysing KREEP-rich samples with MC-ICPMS and a new approach for quantifying cosmogenic 182W variations using Hf isotopes [6]. We find that the Moon shows a 27±4 ppm 182W excess over the modern BSE, in excellent agreement with [7]. This excess agrees with the predicted 182W change resulting from disproportional late accretion to the Earth and Moon after Earth's core had fully formed [6,7]. Thus, the pre-late-veneer BSE and the Moon were indistinguishable in 182W. However, the giant impact itself should have caused a notable Earth-Moon 182W difference by (1) changing the ɛ182W of the proto-Earth mantle by adding impactor mantle and core material, both carrying distinct 182W anomalies, and (2) by supplying W-rich but 182W-depleted impactor core material into the lunar accretion disk [6]. Thus, the Earth-Moon 182W homogeneity is an unexpected outcome of the giant impact. Unlike for Ti and O isotopes, the 182W homogeneity cannot be explained by accretion of impactor and proto-Earth from a homogeneous inner disk reservoir [3] or by making the Moon fully from proto-Earth mantle [4,5]. Thus, the 182W results require an efficient post-impact isotopic equilibration of the BSE and the Moon, but the mechanism for this has yet to be explored. One option is that Earth's mantle and its vapour atmosphere remained connected with the lunar accretion disk just after the giant impact [8]. [1] Canup R

  17. Creating an isotopically similar Earth-Moon system with correct angular momentum from a giant impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyatt, Bryant M.; Petz, Jonathan M.; Sumpter, William J.; Turner, Ty R.; Smith, Edward L.; Fain, Baylor G.; Hutyra, Taylor J.; Cook, Scott A.; Gresham, John H.; Hibbs, Michael F.; Goderya, Shaukat N.

    2018-04-01

    The giant impact hypothesis is the dominant theory explaining the formation of our Moon. However, the inability to produce an isotopically similar Earth-Moon system with correct angular momentum has cast a shadow on its validity. Computer-generated impacts have been successful in producing virtual systems that possess many of the observed physical properties. However, addressing the isotopic similarities between the Earth and Moon coupled with correct angular momentum has proven to be challenging. Equilibration and evection resonance have been proposed as means of reconciling the models. In the summer of 2013, the Royal Society called a meeting solely to discuss the formation of the Moon. In this meeting, evection resonance and equilibration were both questioned as viable means of removing the deficiencies from giant impact models. The main concerns were that models were multi-staged and too complex. We present here initial impact conditions that produce an isotopically similar Earth-Moon system with correct angular momentum. This is done in a single-staged simulation. The initial parameters are straightforward and the results evolve solely from the impact. This was accomplished by colliding two roughly half-Earth-sized impactors, rotating in approximately the same plane in a high-energy, off-centered impact, where both impactors spin into the collision.

  18. Time and Energy, Exploring Trajectory Options Between Nodes in Earth-Moon Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, Roland; Condon, Gerald; Williams, Jacob

    2012-01-01

    The Global Exploration Roadmap (GER) was released by the International Space Exploration Coordination Group (ISECG) in September of 2011. It describes mission scenarios that begin with the International Space Station and utilize it to demonstrate necessary technologies and capabilities prior to deployment of systems into Earth-Moon space. Deployment of these systems is an intermediate step in preparation for more complex deep space missions to near-Earth asteroids and eventually Mars. In one of the scenarios described in the GER, "Asteroid Next", there are activities that occur in Earth-Moon space at one of the Earth-Moon Lagrange (libration) points. In this regard, the authors examine the possible role of an intermediate staging point in an effort to illuminate potential trajectory options for conducting missions in Earth-Moon space of increasing duration, ultimately leading to deep space missions. This paper will describe several options for transits between Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and the libration points, transits between libration points, and transits between the libration points and interplanetary trajectories. The solution space provided will be constrained by selected orbital mechanics design techniques and physical characteristics of hardware to be used in both crewed missions and uncrewed missions. The relationships between time and energy required to transfer hardware between these locations will provide a better understanding of the potential trade-offs mission planners could consider in the development of capabilities, individual missions, and mission series in the context of the ISECG GER.

  19. Long Term Missions at the Sun-Earth Libration Point L1: ACE, SOHO, and WIND

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Craig E.

    2011-01-01

    achieves this using thrusters oriented in line with the solar direction. WIND achieves the delta-V via pulsing radial thrusters when aligned with the Sun. ACE uses axial thrusters to apply delta-V with a component that is 94% or more aligned with the ACE-Sun line. Sunward thrust adds energy to the orbit preventing decay back toward Earth. Thrust directed anti-Sunward takes energy out of the L1 orbit, thereby preventing escape from the Earth-Moon system into independent heliocentric orbit. Libration point orbit stationkeeping delta-V costs grow exponentially with time elapsed from the last maneuver performed. The doubling time constant is approximately 16 days. For the sake of fuel conservation, and for limiting the absolute magnitude of propulsion performance errors, stationkeeping maneuvers should be performed before the delta-V grows too large; for our purposes 'too large' is considered to be greater than 0.5 m/sec. In practice, the typical interval between burns for this trio is about three months, and the typical delta-V is much smaller than 0.5 m/sec. Typical annual stationkeeping costs have been around 1.0 m/sec for ACE and WIND, and much less than that for SOHO. All three spacecraft have ample fuel remaining; barring contingencies all three could, in principle, be maintained at L1 for decades to come. This paper will review the L1 orbits and the mission history of ACE, WIND, and SOHO, and describe the stationkeeping techniques and orbit maneuver experience. The Lissajous phase control that was practiced for ACE during the period from 1999 to 2001 will also be briefly discussed. The final section will consider the future of these ongoing missions.

  20. Chromium isotopic homogeneity between the Moon, the Earth, and enstatite chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mougel, Bérengère; Moynier, Frédéric; Göpel, Christa

    2018-01-01

    Among the elements exhibiting non-mass dependent isotopic variations in meteorites, chromium (Cr) has been central in arguing for an isotopic homogeneity between the Earth and the Moon, thus questioning physical models of Moon formation. However, the Cr isotopic composition of the Moon relies on two samples only, which define an average value that is slightly different from the terrestrial standard. Here, by determining the Cr isotopic composition of 17 lunar, 9 terrestrial and 5 enstatite chondrite samples, we re-assess the isotopic similarity between these different planetary bodies, and provide the first robust estimate for the Moon. In average, terrestrial and enstatite samples show similar ε54Cr. On the other hand, lunar samples show variables excesses of 53Cr and 54Cr compared to terrestrial and enstatite chondrites samples with correlated ε53Cr and ε54Cr (per 10,000 deviation of the 53Cr/52Cr and 54Cr/52Cr ratios normalized to the 50Cr/52Cr ratio from the NIST SRM 3112a Cr standard). Unlike previous suggestions, we show for the first time that cosmic irradiation can affect significantly the Cr isotopic composition of lunar materials. Moreover, we also suggest that rather than spallation reactions, neutron capture effects are the dominant process controlling the Cr isotope composition of lunar igneous rocks. This is supported by the correlation between ε53Cr and ε54Cr, and 150Sm/152Sm ratios. After correction of these effects, the average ε54Cr of the Moon is indistinguishable from the terrestrial and enstatite chondrite materials reinforcing the idea of an Earth-Moon-enstatite chondrite system homogeneity. This is compatible with the most recent scenarios of Moon formation suggesting an efficient physical homogenization after a high-energy impact on a fast spinning Earth, and/or with an impactor originating from the same reservoir in the inner proto-planetary disk as the Earth and enstatite chondrites and having similar composition.

  1. Simulating the Liaison Navigation Concept in a Geo + Earth-Moon Halo Constellation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujimoto, K.; Leonard, J. M.; McGranaghan, R. M.; Parker, J. S.; Anderson, R. L.; Born, G. H.

    2012-01-01

    Linked Autonomous Interplanetary Satellite Orbit Navigation, or LiAISON, is a novel satellite navigation technique where relative radiometric measurements between two or more spacecraft in a constellation are processed to obtain the absolute state of all spacecraft. The method leverages the asymmetry of the gravity field that the constellation exists in. This paper takes a step forward in developing a high fidelity navigation simulation for the LiAISON concept in an Earth-Moon constellation. In particular, we aim to process two-way Doppler measurements between a satellite in GEO orbit and another in a halo orbit about the Earth-Moon L1 point.

  2. Tidal dissipation in the Earth and Moon from lunar laser ranging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoder, C. F.; Williams, J. G.; Dickey, J. O.; Newhall, X. X.

    1984-01-01

    The evolution of the Moon's orbit which is governed by tidal dissipation in the Earth while the evolution of its spin is controlled by its own internal dissipation is discussed. Lunar laser ranging data from August 1969 through May 1982 yields the values of both of these parameters. It is suggested that if the Moon was orbited the Earth since its formation, this must be an anomalously high value presumably due to changes in dissipation in the oceans due to continental drift. The explanation that the dissipation occurs at the interface between the mantle and a liquid core of shell is preferred.

  3. A Free-Return Earth-Moon Cycler Orbit for an Interplanetary Cruise Ship

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Genova, Anthony L.; Aldrin, Buzz

    2015-01-01

    A periodic circumlunar orbit is presented that can be used by an interplanetary cruise ship for regular travel between Earth and the Moon. This Earth-Moon cycler orbit was revealed by introducing solar gravity and modest phasing maneuvers (average of 39 m/s per month) which yields close-Earth encounters every 7 or 10 days. Lunar encounters occur every 26 days and offer the chance for a smaller craft to depart the cycler and enter lunar orbit, or head for a Lagrange point (e.g., EM-L2 halo orbit), distant retrograde orbit (DRO), or interplanetary destination such as a near-Earth object (NEO) or Mars. Additionally, return-to-Earth abort options are available from many points along the cycling trajectory.

  4. Coupling of the Matched Gravity and Electromagnetic Fields of the Sun with Jupiter and its Moons Together in Nearest Portion of Jupiter's Orbit to the Sun as the Main Cause of the Peak of Approximately 11 Yearly Solar Cycles and Hazards from Solar Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gholibeigian, Kazem; Gholibeigian, Hassan

    2016-04-01

    On March 13, 1989 the entire province of Quebec Blackout by solar storm during solar cycle 22. The solar storm of 1859, also known as the Carrington event, was a powerful geomagnetic solar storm during solar cycle 10. The solar storm of 2012 during solar cycle 24 was of similar magnitude, but it passed Earth's orbit without striking the plane. All of these solar storms occurred in the peak of 11 yearly solar cycles. In this way, the White House in its project which is focusing on hazards from solar system, in a new strategy and action plan to increase protection from damaging solar emissions, should focus on coupling of the matched Gravity and Electromagnetic Fields)GEFs) of the Sun with Jupiter and its moons together. On the other hand, in solar system, the Jupiter's gravity has largest effect to the Sun's core and its dislocation, because the gravity force between the Jupiter and the Sun is 11.834 times, In addition overlapping of the solar cycles with the Jupiter's orbit period is 11.856 years. These observable factors lead us to the effect of the Jupiter and Sun gravity fields coupling as the main cause of the approximately 11 years duration for solar cycles. Its peak in each cycle is when the Jupiter is in nearest portion to the Sun in its orbit. In this way, the other planets in their coupling with Sun help to the variations and strengthening solar cycles. [Gholibeigian, 7/24/2015http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGU]. In other words, the both matched GEFs are generating by the large scale forced convection system inside the stars and planets [Gholibeigian et. al, AGU Fall Meeting 2015]. These two fields are couple and strengthening each other. The Jupiter with its 67 moons generate the largest coupled and matched GEFs in its core and consequently strongest effect on the Sun's core. Generation and coupling of the Jupiter's GEFs with its moons like Europa, Io and Ganymede make this planet of thousands of times brighter and many times bigger than Earth as the

  5. Using the Moon as a Tool for Discovery-Oriented Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cummins, Robert Hays; Ritger, Scott David; Myers, Christopher Adam

    1992-01-01

    Students test the hypothesis that the moon revolves east to west around the earth, determine by observation approximately how many degrees the moon revolves per night, and develop a scale model of the earth-sun-moon system in this laboratory exercise. Students are actively involved in the scientific process and are introduced to the importance of…

  6. Highly siderophile elements in Earth's mantle as a clock for the Moon-forming impact.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Seth A; Morbidelli, Alessandro; Raymond, Sean N; O'Brien, David P; Walsh, Kevin J; Rubie, David C

    2014-04-03

    According to the generally accepted scenario, the last giant impact on Earth formed the Moon and initiated the final phase of core formation by melting Earth's mantle. A key goal of geochemistry is to date this event, but different ages have been proposed. Some argue for an early Moon-forming event, approximately 30 million years (Myr) after the condensation of the first solids in the Solar System, whereas others claim a date later than 50 Myr (and possibly as late as around 100 Myr) after condensation. Here we show that a Moon-forming event at 40 Myr after condensation, or earlier, is ruled out at a 99.9 per cent confidence level. We use a large number of N-body simulations to demonstrate a relationship between the time of the last giant impact on an Earth-like planet and the amount of mass subsequently added during the era known as Late Accretion. As the last giant impact is delayed, the late-accreted mass decreases in a predictable fashion. This relationship exists within both the classical scenario and the Grand Tack scenario of terrestrial planet formation, and holds across a wide range of disk conditions. The concentration of highly siderophile elements (HSEs) in Earth's mantle constrains the mass of chondritic material added to Earth during Late Accretion. Using HSE abundance measurements, we determine a Moon-formation age of 95 ± 32 Myr after condensation. The possibility exists that some late projectiles were differentiated and left an incomplete HSE record in Earth's mantle. Even in this case, various isotopic constraints strongly suggest that the late-accreted mass did not exceed 1 per cent of Earth's mass, and so the HSE clock still robustly limits the timing of the Moon-forming event to significantly later than 40 Myr after condensation.

  7. The Moon as a 100% Isolation Barrier for Earth During Exobiological Examination of Solar System Sample Return Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiGregorio, B. E.

    2018-04-01

    The only 100% guarantee of protecting Earth's biosphere from a hazardous back contamination event is to use the Moon as a sample return examination facility to qualify samples for eventual return to Earth.

  8. The effect of the Earth's oblateness on the Moon's physical libration in latitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondratyev, B. P.

    2013-05-01

    The Moon's physical libration in latitude generated by gravitational forces caused by the Earth's oblateness has been examined by a vector analytical method. Libration oscillations are described by a close set of five linear inhomogeneous differential equations, the dispersion equation has five roots, one of which is zero. A complete solution is obtained. It is revealed that the Earth's oblateness: a) has little effect on the instantaneous axis of Moon's rotation, but causes an oscillatory rotation of the body of the Moon with an amplitude of 0.072″ and pulsation period of 16.88 Julian years; b) causes small nutations of poles of the orbit and of the ecliptic along tight spirals, which occupy a disk with a cut in a center and with radius of 0.072″. Perturbations caused by the spherical Earth generate: a) physical librations in latitude with an amplitude of 34.275″; b) nutational motion for centers of small spiral nutations of orbit (ecliptic) pole over ellipses with semi-major axes of 113.850″ (85.158″) and the first pole rotates round the second one along a circle with radius of 28.691″; c) nutation of the Moon's celestial pole over an ellipse with a semi-major axis of 45.04″ and with an axes ratio of about 0.004 with a period of T = 27.212 days. The principal ellipse's axis is directed tangentially with respect to the precession circumference, along which the celestial pole moves nonuniformly nearly in one dimension. In contrast to the accepted concept, the latitude does not change while the Moon's poles of rotation move. The dynamical reason for the inclination of the Moon's mean equator with respect to the ecliptic is oblateness of the body of the Moon.

  9. The Earth and Moon As Seen by 2001 Mars Odyssey's Thermal Emission Imaging System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    2001 Mars Odyssey's Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) took this portrait of the Earth and its companion Moon, using the infrared camera, one of two cameras in the instrument. It was taken at a distance of 3,563,735 kilometers (more than 2 million miles) on April 19, 2001 as the 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft left the Earth. From this distance and perspective the camera was able to acquire an image that directly shows the true distance from the Earth to the Moon. The Earth's diameter is about 12,750 km, and the distance from the Earth to the Moon is about 385,000 km, corresponding to 30 Earth diameters. The dark region seen on Earth in the infrared temperature image is the cold south pole, with a temperature of minus 50 degrees Celsius (minus 58 degrees Fahrenheit). The small bright region above it is warm Australia. This image was acquired using the 9.1 um infrared filter, one of nine filters that the instrument will use to map the mineral composition and temperature of the martian surface. From this great distance, each picture element (pixel) in the image corresponds to a region 900 by 900 kilometers or greater in size or about size of the state of Texas. Once Odyssey reaches Mars orbit each infrared pixel will cover a region only 100 by 100 meters on the surface, about the size of a major league baseball field.

  10. Formation and growth of embryos of the Earth-Moon system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ipatov, Sergei I.

    2016-07-01

    Galimov and Krivtsov [1] made computer simulations of the formation of the embryos of the Earth and the Moon as a result of contraction of a rarefied condensation. The angular momentum needed for such contraction could not be acquired during formation of the condensation from a protoplanetary disk. Using the formulas presented in [2], we obtained that the angular momentum of the present Earth-Moon system could be acquired at a collision of two rarefied condensations with a total mass not smaller than 0.1M_{e}, where M_{e} is the Earth mass. In principle, the angular momentum of the condensation needed for formation of the Earth-Moon system could be acquired by accumulation only of small objects, but for such model, the parental condensations of Venus and Mars could also get the angular momentum that was enough for formation of large satellites. Probably, the condensations that contracted and formed the embryos of the terrestrial planets other than the Earth did not collide with massive condensations, and therefore they did not get a large enough angular momentum needed to form massive satellites. The embryos formed as a result of contraction of the condensation grew by accumulation of solid planetesimals. The mass of the rarefied condensation that was a parent for the embryos of the Earth and the Moon could be relatively small (0.02M_{e} or even less), if we take into account the growth of the angular momentum of the embryos at the time when they accumulated planetesimals. There could be also the second main collision of the parental rarefied condensation with another condensation, at which the radius of the Earth's embryo condensation was smaller than the semi-major axis of the orbit of the Moon's embryo. The second main collision (or a series of similar collisions) could change the tilt of the Earth to its present value. For large enough eccentricities of planetesimals, the effective radii of proto-Earth and proto-Moon were proportional to r (where r is the

  11. Measuring Earth's Radiation Budget from the Vicinity of the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swartz, W. H.; Lorentz, S. R.; Erlandson, R. E.; Cahalan, R. F.; Huang, P. M.

    2018-02-01

    We propose to measure Earth's radiation budget (integrated total and solar-reflected shortwave) using broadband radiometers and other technology demonstrated in space. The instrument is compact, autonomous, and has modest resource requirements.

  12. The equilibrium of atmospheric sodium. [in atmospheres of Earth, Io, Mercury and Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunten, Donald M.

    1992-01-01

    We now have four examples of planetary objects with detectable sodium (and potassium) in their atmospheres: Earth, Io, Mercury and the moon. After a summary of the observational data, this survey discusses proposed sources and sinks. It appears that Io's surface material is rich in frozen SO2, but with around 1 percent of some sodium compound. The Io plasma torus contains ions of S, O and Na, also with at least one molecular ion containing Na. In turn, impact by these ions probably sustains the torus, as well as an extended neutral corona. A primary source for the Earth, Mercury and the moon is meteoroidal bombardment; at Mercury and perhaps the moon it may be supplemented by degassing of atoms from the regolith. Photoionization is important everywhere, although hot electrons are dominant at Io.

  13. The energetics of cycling on Earth, Moon and Mars.

    PubMed

    Lazzer, Stefano; Plaino, Luca; Antonutto, Guglielmo

    2011-03-01

    From 1885, technological improvements, such as the use of special metal alloys and the application of aerodynamics principles, have transformed the bicycle from a human powered heavy transport system to an efficient, often expensive, object used to move not only in our crowded cities, but also in leisure activities and in sports. In this paper, the concepts of mechanical work and efficiency of cycling together with the corresponding metabolic expenditure are discussed. The effects of altitude and aerodynamic improvements on sports performances are also analysed. A section is dedicated to the analysis of the maximal cycling performances. Finally, since during the next decades the return of Man on the Moon and, why not, a mission to Mars can be realistically hypothesised, a section is dedicated to cycling-based facilities, such as man powered short radius centrifuges, to be used to prevent cardiovascular and skeletal muscle deconditioning otherwise occurring during long-term exposure to microgravity.

  14. Galileo view of Moon orbiting the Earth taken from 3.9 million miles

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1992-12-16

    Eight days after its encounter with the Earth, the Galileo spacecraft was able to look back and capture this remarkable view of the Moon in orbit about the Earth, taken from a distance of about 6.2 million kilometers (3.9 million miles). The picture was constructed from images taken through the violet, red, and 1.0-micron infrared filters. The Moon is in the foreground, moving from left to right. The brightly-colored Earth contrasts strongly with the Moon, which reflects only about one-third as much sunlight as the Earth. Contrast and color have been computer-enhanced for both objects to improve visibility. Antarctica is visible through clouds (bottom). The Moon's far side is seen; the shadowy indentation in the dawn terminator is the south-Pole/Aitken Basin, one of the largest and oldest lunar impact features. Alternate Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) number is P-41508. View appears in the Space News Roundup v32 n1 p1, 01-11-93.

  15. View of Moon over Earth limb taken by the Expedition 37 crew.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-10-19

    ISS037-E-017169 (19 Oct. 2013) --- The European Space Agency's fourth Automated Transfer Vehicle (ATV-4), also known as the Albert Einstein, is seen in the foreground of an image featuring the home planet and its moon as photographed by one of Expedition 37 crew members aboard the Earth-orbiting International Space Station.

  16. Lunar Flight Study Series: Volume 4. Preliminary Investigation of the Astronautics of Earth - Moon Transits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braud, Nolan J.

    1963-01-01

    Preliminary information on flight profiles, velocity budgets and launch windows for Apollo and Support Vehicle flights is presented in this report. A newly conceived method of establishing a flight mechanical classification of the earth-moon transits is discussed. The results are empirical and are designed to contribute to the mission mode selection.

  17. Diagrammatic Representational Constraints of Spatial Scale in Earth-Moon System Astronomy Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Roger S.; Grundstrom, Erika D.

    2011-01-01

    Given that astronomy heavily relies on visual representations it is especially likely for individuals to assume that instructional materials, such as visual representations of the Earth-Moon system (EMS), would be relatively accurate. However, in our research, we found that images in middle-school textbooks and educational webpages were commonly…

  18. Juno Approach to the Earth-Moon System

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-12-10

    This frame from a movie was captured by a star tracker camera on NASA Jupiter-bound Juno spacecraft. It was taken over several days as Juno approached Earth for a close flyby that would send the spacecraft onward to the giant planet.

  19. Earth-Mars transfers through Moon Distant Retrograde Orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conte, Davide; Di Carlo, Marilena; Ho, Koki; Spencer, David B.; Vasile, Massimiliano

    2018-02-01

    This paper focuses on the trajectory design which is relevant for missions that would exploit the use of asteroid mining in stable cis-lunar orbits to facilitate deep space missions, specifically human Mars exploration. Assuming that a refueling "gas station" is present at a given lunar Distant Retrograde Orbit (DRO), ways of departing from the Earth to Mars via that DRO are analyzed. Thus, the analysis and results presented in this paper add a new cis-lunar departure orbit for Earth-Mars missions. Porkchop plots depicting the required C3 at launch, v∞ at arrival, Time of Flight (TOF), and total Δ V for various DRO departure and Mars arrival dates are created and compared with results obtained for low Δ V Low Earth Orbit (LEO) to Mars trajectories. The results show that propellant-optimal trajectories from LEO to Mars through a DRO have higher overall mission Δ V due to the additional stop at the DRO. However, they have lower Initial Mass in LEO (IMLEO) and thus lower gear ratio as well as lower TOF than direct LEO to Mars transfers. This results in a lower overall spacecraft dry mass that needs to be launched into space from Earth's surface.

  20. Characteristics of the Earth's orbit by observations of the setting Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sclar, N.

    2000-07-01

    Measurements of the setting Sun were carried out over a period of 16 months at Aliso Pier in Laguna Beach, CA, USA. The measurements are treated with simple analyses to provide good estimates of the obliquity of the ecliptic, and the eccentricity, velocities and radii of the Earth's elliptical orbit about the Sun.

  1. Geochemical arguments for an Earth-like Moon-forming impactor

    PubMed Central

    Dauphas, Nicolas; Burkhardt, Christoph; Warren, Paul H.; Fang-Zhen, Teng

    2014-01-01

    Geochemical evidence suggests that the material accreted by the Earth did not change in nature during Earth's accretion, presumably because the inner protoplanetary disc had uniform isotopic composition similar to enstatite chondrites, aubrites and ungrouped achondrite NWA 5363/5400. Enstatite meteorites and the Earth were derived from the same nebular reservoir but diverged in their chemical evolutions, so no chondrite sample in meteorite collections is representative of the Earth's building blocks. The similarity in isotopic composition (Δ17O, ε50Ti and ε54Cr) between lunar and terrestrial rocks is explained by the fact that the Moon-forming impactor came from the same region of the disc as other Earth-forming embryos, and therefore was similar in isotopic composition to the Earth. The heavy δ30Si values of the silicate Earth and the Moon relative to known chondrites may be due to fractionation in the solar nebula/protoplanetary disc rather than partitioning of silicon in Earth's core. An inversion method is presented to calculate the Hf/W ratios and ε182W values of the proto-Earth and impactor mantles for a given Moon-forming impact scenario. The similarity in tungsten isotopic composition between lunar and terrestrial rocks is a coincidence that can be explained in a canonical giant impact scenario if an early formed embryo (two-stage model age of 10–20 Myr) collided with the proto-Earth formed over a more protracted accretion history (two-stage model age of 30–40 Myr). PMID:25114316

  2. Geochemical arguments for an Earth-like Moon-forming impactor.

    PubMed

    Dauphas, Nicolas; Burkhardt, Christoph; Warren, Paul H; Fang-Zhen, Teng

    2014-09-13

    Geochemical evidence suggests that the material accreted by the Earth did not change in nature during Earth's accretion, presumably because the inner protoplanetary disc had uniform isotopic composition similar to enstatite chondrites, aubrites and ungrouped achondrite NWA 5363/5400. Enstatite meteorites and the Earth were derived from the same nebular reservoir but diverged in their chemical evolutions, so no chondrite sample in meteorite collections is representative of the Earth's building blocks. The similarity in isotopic composition (Δ(17)O, ε(50)Ti and ε(54)Cr) between lunar and terrestrial rocks is explained by the fact that the Moon-forming impactor came from the same region of the disc as other Earth-forming embryos, and therefore was similar in isotopic composition to the Earth. The heavy δ(30)Si values of the silicate Earth and the Moon relative to known chondrites may be due to fractionation in the solar nebula/protoplanetary disc rather than partitioning of silicon in Earth's core. An inversion method is presented to calculate the Hf/W ratios and ε(182)W values of the proto-Earth and impactor mantles for a given Moon-forming impact scenario. The similarity in tungsten isotopic composition between lunar and terrestrial rocks is a coincidence that can be explained in a canonical giant impact scenario if an early formed embryo (two-stage model age of 10-20 Myr) collided with the proto-Earth formed over a more protracted accretion history (two-stage model age of 30-40 Myr). © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  3. Sun-Earth Day WEBCAST - NASA TV; Host Paul Mortfield, Astronomer Stanford Solar Center and visiting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Sun-Earth Day WEBCAST - NASA TV; Host Paul Mortfield, Astronomer Stanford Solar Center and visiting students from San Francisco Bay Area Schools Documentation Technology Branch Video communications van (code-JIT)

  4. New insight into Earth's weather through studies of Sun's magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Solar Vector Magnetograph is used to predict solar flares, and other activities associated with sun spots. This research provides new understanding about weather on the Earth, and solar-related conditions in orbit.

  5. The Motion of a Satellite of the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lass, Harry

    1960-01-01

    The motion of a satellite of the Moon depends on the potential field due to the Moon as well as the gravitational effects of the Earth and Sun. If one chooses a frame of reference attached to the Moon, it can be shown that the force field resulting from the Sun can be neglected when compared with the perturbing field of the Moon resulting from its oblateness. The effect of the Earth's field on the satellite is of the some order of magnitude as the Moon's perturbing field and must be included in an analysis of the motion of a satellite of the Moon. We will assume that the distance between Earth and Moon remains constant, and we will consider satellite orbits of small eccentricity. It will be shown that a nearly circular polar orbit will digress less than 1 deg from a polar orbit and that the change in eccentricity is less than a factor of e in one year.

  6. The Dynamical Evolution of the Earth-Moon Progenitors. 2; Results and Interpretation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivera, E.; Lissauer, J. J.; Duncan, M. J.; Levison, H. F.

    1998-01-01

    Substantial evidence indicates that the Earth-Moon system formed about 100 m.y. after the oldest meteorites and that the inner solar system had five terrestrial planets for several tens of millions of years before the hypothesized Moon-forming impact. We present and discuss some results from a series of N-body integrations in which the mass ratio of the Earth-Moon progenitors is 8:1 or 1:1. We want to know if it is plausible to have the Earth-Moon progenitors collide between 8 m.y. and 200 m.y. after the other planets had formed and to have the resulting system look "similar" to the solar system. If a collision occurs, the integrations tell us which two bodies collide and the time of the collision. We also determine the angular momentum deficit (AMD) of the resulting terrestrial planets. Additionally, we calculate several parameters of the collision. We use the AMD of the terrestrial planets to compare the resulting system to our own. The AMD or a planet is the difference between its orbital angular momentum and its orbital angular momentum if it were in a circular orbit with zero inclination.

  7. Variation of Lunar Sodium During Passage of the Moon through the Earth's Magnetotail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potter, Andrew E.; Killen, Rosemary M.; Morgan, Thomas H.

    2000-01-01

    We measured sodium emission above the lunar equator over a range of lunar altitudes from 100 to 4000 km. The measurements were repeated approximately every 24 hours from June 7 to 16, 1998, covering the period during which the Moon passed through the Earth's magnetotail. Sodium temperatures derived from the altitude dependence of emission intensity ranged from 1200 to 2900 K. This result supports the view that photodesorption is a primary source of sodium in the exosphere since the most probable temperature of sodium form this source is in this range. Passage of the Moon through the Earth's magnetotail (where solar wind is essentially absent) affected the sodium density, such that it was higher before the Moon entered the Earth's magnetotail than after the Moon left it. This suggests that the solar wind plays a role in production of lunar sodium. We propose that its function is to mobilize sodium and bring it to the surface, where photodesorption can eject it into the exosphere. A two-step process such as this could help to explain the latitude dependence of sodium density, which varies as the second or higher power of cosine latitude.

  8. Biogenic oxygen from Earth transported to the Moon by a wind of magnetospheric ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terada, Kentaro; Yokota, Shoichiro; Saito, Yoshifumi; Kitamura, Naritoshi; Asamura, Kazushi; Nishino, Masaki N.

    2017-01-01

    For five days of each lunar orbit, the Moon is shielded from solar wind bombardment by the Earth's magnetosphere, which is filled with terrestrial ions. Although the possibility of the presence of terrestrial nitrogen and noble gases in lunar soil has been discussed based on their isotopic composition 1 , complicated oxygen isotope fractionation in lunar metal 2,3 (particularly the provenance of a 16O-poor component) re­mains an enigma 4,5 . Here, we report observations from the Japanese spacecraft Kaguya of significant numbers of 1-10 keV O+ ions, seen only when the Moon was in the Earth's plasma sheet. Considering the penetration depth into metal of O+ ions with such energy, and the 16O-poor mass-independent fractionation of the Earth's upper atmosphere 6 , we conclude that biogenic terrestrial oxygen has been transported to the Moon by the Earth wind (at least 2.6 × 104 ions cm-2 s-1) and implanted into the surface of the lunar regolith, at around tens of nanometres in depth 3,4 . We suggest the possibility that the Earth's atmosphere of billions of years ago may be preserved on the present-day lunar surface.

  9. DSCOVR/EPIC Images and Science: A New Way to View the Entire Sunlit Earth From A Sun-Earth Lagrange-1 Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, J. R.; Marshak, A.; Szabo, A.

    2015-12-01

    The DSCOVR mission was launched into a Sun-Earth Lagrange-1 orbit 1.5 million kilometers from earth in February 2015 onboard a SpaceX Falcon-9 rocket. The solar wind and earth science instruments were tested during the 4.5 month journey to L-1. The first data were obtained during the June-July commissioning phase, which included the first moderate resolution (10 km) color images of the entire sunlit earth, color images of the Moon, and scientific data from 10 narrow band filters (317.5, 325, 340, 388, 443, 551, 680, 687.75, 764, and 779.5 nm). Three of these filters were used to construct the color images (443, 551, 680 nm) based on the average eye response histogram of the sunlit earth. This talk will discuss some of the issues involved in deriving science quality data for global ozone, the aerosol index (dust, smoke, and volcanic ash), cloud amounts and reflectivity, and cloud height (measured from the O2 A- and B-bands). As with most new satellites, the science data are preliminary.

  10. The fate of the earth in the red giant envelope of the sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, J.

    1987-01-01

    The effect on the earth of entering the red giant envelope of the future sun is studied. Employing a 30-zone red giant model, the earth orbital decay timescale, neglecting ablation/vaporization, is determined to be of the order of 200 years, rendering earth survival impossible. The effects of ablation/vaporization processes are found to increase the ballistic coefficient of earth, thereby setting the 200-year decay timescale as an upper limit.

  11. Earth to Moon Transfers - Direct vs Via Libration Points (L1, L2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Condon, Gerald L.; Wilson, Sam

    2002-01-01

    Recommend Direct Remote Ocean Area impact disposal for caseswithout hazardous (e.g., radioactive) material on LTV kickstage Controlled Earth contact. Relatively small disposal AV. Avoids close encounter with Moon. Trajectories can be very sensitive to initial conditions (at disposalmaneuver).V to correct for errors is small. Recommend Heliocentric Orbit disposal for cases with hazardousmaterial on LTV kickstage. No Earth or Lunar disposal issues (e.g.. impact location, debris footprint,litter). Relatively low disposal AV cost. Further study required to determine possibility of re-contact with Earth.

  12. Observing Coronal Mass Ejections from the Sun-Earth L5 Point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Davila, J. M.; St Cyr, O. C.

    2013-12-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are the most energetic phenomenon in the heliosphere and are known to be responsible for severe space weather. Most of the current knowledge on CMEs accumulated over the past few decades has been derived from observations made from the Sun-Earth line, which is not the ideal vantage point to observe Earth-affecting CMEs (Gopalswamy et al., 2011a,b). The STEREO mission viewed CMEs from points away from the Sun-Earth line and demonstrated the importance of such observations in understanding the three-dimensional structure of CMEs and their true kinematics. In this paper, we show that it is advantageous to observe CMEs from the Sun-Earth L5 point in studying CMEs that affect Earth. In particular, these observations are important in identifying that part of the CME that is likely to arrive at Earth. L5 observations are critical for several aspects of CME studies such as: (i) they can also provide near-Sun space speed of CMEs, which is an important input for modeling Earth-arriving CMEs, (ii) backside and frontside CMEs can be readily distinguished even without inner coronal imagers, and (iii) preceding CMEs in the path of Earth-affecting CMEs can be identified for a better estimate of the travel time, which may not be possible from the Sun-Earth line. We also discuss how the L5 vantage point compares with the Sun-Earth L4 point for observing Earth-affecting CMEs. References Gopalswamy, N., Davila, J. M., St. Cyr, O. C., Sittler, E. C., Auchère, F., Duvall, T. L., Hoeksema, J. T., Maksimovic, M., MacDowall, R. J., Szabo, A., Collier, M. R. (2011a), Earth-Affecting Solar Causes Observatory (EASCO): A potential International Living with a Star Mission from Sun-Earth L5 JASTP 73, 658-663, DOI: 10.1016/j.jastp.2011.01.013 Gopalswamy, N., Davila, J. M., Auchère, F., Schou, J., Korendyke, C. M. Shih, A., Johnston, J. C., MacDowall, R. J., Maksimovic, M., Sittler, E., et al. (2011b), Earth-Affecting Solar Causes Observatory (EASCO): a mission at

  13. The Earth-Moon system as a typical binary in the Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ipatov, S.

    2014-07-01

    primaries with d<100 km can be explained by other models (not by contraction of RPPs). [5] noted that the giant impact concept, which is a popular model of the Moon formation, has several weaknesses. In particular, they calculated formation of the Earth-Moon system from a rarefied protoplanet which mass equaled to the mass of the Earth-Moon system. Using the formulas presented in [2], we obtained that the ratio r_K=K_{EM}/K_{s2} of the angular momentum K_{EM} of the Earth-Moon system to the angular momentum K_{s2} at a typical collision of two identical RPPs - Hill spheres, which masses m_2 are equal to 0.5\\cdot1.0123M_E and heliocentric orbits are circular, is about 0.0335. As K_{s2} ∝ (m_2)^{3/5} [2], then K_{s2}=K_{EM} at 2 m_2=0.0335^{3/5}\\cdot 1.0123M_E=0.13M_E. For circular heliocentric orbits, the maximum value of K_{s2} is greater by a factor of 0.6^{-1} than the above typical value. In this case, r_K=0.02 and 0.02^{3/5}=0.096. Therefore, the angular momentum of the Earth-Moon system can be acquired at a collision of two RPPs with a total mass not smaller than the mass of Mars. We suppose that solid proto-Earth and proto-Moon (with masses m_{Eo} and m_{Mo}) could be formed from a RPP (e.g., according to the models of contraction of a RPP [3,5]). Let us consider the model of the growth of proto-Earth and proto-Moon to the present masses of the Earth and the Moon (M_E and 0.0123M_E, respectively) by accumulation of smaller planetesimals for the case when the effective radii of proto-Earth and proto-Moon are proportional to r (where r is a radius of a considered object). Such proportionality can be considered for large enough eccentricities of planetesimals. In this case, r_{Mo}=m_{Mo}/M_E = [ (0.0123)^{-2/3} - k + k \\cdot (m_{Eo}/M_E)^{-2/3})]^{-3/2}, where k=(k_d)^{-2/3}, and k_d is the ratio of the density of the growing Moon to that of the growing Earth (k_d=0.6 for the present Earth and Moon). For r_{Eo}=m_{Eo}/M_E=0.1, we have r_{Mo}=0.0094 at k=1 and r

  14. Improved pointing information for SCIAMACHY from in-flight measurements of the viewing directions towards sun and moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bramstedt, Klaus; Stone, Thomas C.; Gottwald, Manfred; Noël, Stefan; Bovensmann, Heinrich; Burrows, John P.

    2017-07-01

    The SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY (SCIAMACHY) on Envisat (2002-2012) performed nadir, limb, solar/lunar occultation and various monitoring measurements. The pointing information of the instrument is determined by the attitude information of the Envisat platform with its star trackers together with the encoder readouts of both the azimuth and the elevation scanner of SCIAMACHY. In this work, we present additional sources of attitude information from the SCIAMACHY measurements itself. The basic principle is the same as used by the star tracker: we measure the viewing direction towards celestial objects, i.e. sun and moon, to detect possible mispointings. In sun over limb port observations, we utilise the vertical scans over the solar disk. In horizontal direction, SCIAMACHY's sun follower device (SFD) is used to adjust the viewing direction. Moon over limb port measurements use for both the vertical and the horizontal direction the adjustment by the SFD. The viewing direction is steered towards the intensity centroid of the illuminated part of the lunar disk. We use reference images from the USGS Robotic Lunar Observatory (ROLO) to take into account the inhomogeneous surface and the variations by lunar libration and phase to parameterise the location of the intensity centroid from the observation geometry. Solar observations through SCIAMACHY's so-called sub-solar port (with a viewing direction closely to zenith) also use the SFD in the vertical direction. In the horizontal direction the geometry of the port defines the viewing direction. Using these three type of measurements, we fit improved mispointing parameters by minimising the pointing offsets in elevation and azimuth. The geolocation of all retrieved products will benefit from this; the tangent heights are especially improved. The altitudes assigned to SCIAMACHY's solar occultation measurements are changed in the range of -130 to -330 m, the lunar occultation

  15. An analysis of the moon's surface using reflected illumination from the earth during a waning crescent lunar phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammond, Ernest C., Jr.; Linton-Petza, Maggie

    1989-01-01

    There have been many articles written concerning the lunar after-glow, the spectacular reflection from the moon's surface, and the possible observation of luminescence on the dark side of the moon. The researcher, using a 600 mm cassegrain telescope lense and Kodak 400 ASA T-Max film, photographed the crescent moon whose dark side was clearly visible by the reflected light from earth. The film was digitized to a Perkin-Elmer 1010M microdensitometer for enhancement and enlargement. The resulting pictures indicate a completely different land pattern formation than observed during a full moon. An attempt is made to analyze the observed structures and to compare them to the pictures observed during the normal full moon. There are boundaries on the digitized dark section of the moon that can be identified with structures seen during the normal full moon. But, these variations do change considerably under enhancement.

  16. Long term evolution of distant retrograde orbits in the Earth-Moon system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezrouk, Collin; Parker, Jeffrey S.

    2017-09-01

    This work studies the evolution of several Distant Retrograde Orbits (DROs) of varying size in the Earth-Moon system over durations up to tens of millennia. This analysis is relevant for missions requiring a completely hands off, long duration quarantine orbit, such as a Mars Sample Return mission or the Asteroid Redirect Mission. Four DROs are selected from four stable size regions and are propagated for up to 30,000 years with an integrator that uses extended precision arithmetic techniques and a high fidelity dynamical model. The evolution of the orbit's size, shape, orientation, period, out-of-plane amplitude, and Jacobi constant are tracked. It has been found that small DROs, with minor axis amplitudes of approximately 45,000 km or less decay in size and period largely due to the Moon's solid tides. Larger DROs (62,000 km and up) are more influenced by the gravity of bodies external to the Earth-Moon system, and remain bound to the Moon for significantly less time.

  17. Sun-Earth Days- "Have a Solar Blast"- Educational Outreach on a National Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortfield, P.; Lewis, E. M.; Cline, T.; Thieman, J. R.

    2001-05-01

    Sun-Earth Days was an Educational Outreach on a Massive Scale. This was NASA's first-ever "Sun-Earth Days," April 27-28, 2001, developed to share information and excitement about our star and its electric connection to Earth. For the year 2001, NASA's Sun-Earth Connection missions and The Astronomical League partnered to sponsor this educational and entertaining event in the context of National Astronomy Day and Week. As part of NASA's Sun-Earth Connection Education Forum's Sun-Earth Day events, a webcast was hosted by EPO team at Stanford SOLAR Center in collaboration with Astronomy Day and Project Astro. Prior to the webcast NASA Centers and the Educator Resource Centers conducted training workshops to aid 4000 teachers in their participation in the interactive webcast. The webcast involved 35,000 students from across the country and allowed students an opportunity to present results from a variety of solar activities and interact with fellow students. NASA Scientists were on hand to field questions, and had the opportunity to tell viewers why they chose their exciting careers. Webcasts are a great way to reach and interact with a large audience of educators and students who wish to incorporate the science of the Sun into their curriculum. Sun-Earth Days was on the Web, with a single website of information, featuring excellent classroom activities and ideas, selections of the best background reading on the science, links to our many spacecraft and science missions, and some pointers to raw science data and imagery on the web. Sun-Earth Days kits were assembled and packaged through NASA's CORE, a distribution facility in Ohio and mailed to each of the NASA Centers and 25 Educator Resource Centers who participated in a training workshop for educators. Over 4000 educators attended workshops through the NASA network to learn about the Sun. " An Event Near You", portion of the website, listed the events within the USA that linked scientists with educators and created

  18. Formation of the Lunar Fossil Bulges and its Implication for the Early Earth and Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, C.; Zhong, S.; Phillips, R. J.

    2017-12-01

    First recognized by Laplace more than two centuries ago, the lunar gravitational and shape anomalies associated with rotational and tidal bulges are significantly larger than predicted from the hydrostatic theory. The harmonic degree-2 gravitational coefficients of the Moon, C20 and C22 (measuring the size of the rotational and tidal bulges), are 17 and 14 times of their hydrostatic counterparts, respectively, after removal of the effect from large impact basins. The bulges are commonly considered as remnant hydrostatic features, "frozen-in" when the Moon was closer to the Earth, experiencing larger tidal-rotational forces. The extant hypothesis is that as the Moon cooled and migrated outwards, a strong outer layer (lithosphere) thickened and reached a stress state that supported the bulges, which no longer tracked the hydrostatic ellipticity. However, this process is poorly understood and an appropriate dynamical model has not been engaged. Here we present the first dynamically self-consistent model of lunar bulge formation that couples a lunar interior thermal evolution model to the tidal-rotational forcing of the Moon. The forcing magnitude decreases with time as the Moon despins on the receding orbit, while the recession rate is controlled by the Earth's tidal dissipation factor Q. Assuming a viscoelastic rheology, the cooling of the Moon is described by a model with high viscosity lithosphere thickening with time. While conventional methods are not suitable for models with time-dependent viscoelastic structure, a semi-analytical method has been developed to address this problem. We show that the bulge formation is controlled by the relative timing of lithosphere thickening and lunar orbit recession. Based on our calculations, we conclude that the development of the fossil bulges may have taken as long as 400 million years after the formation of lunar lithosphere and was complete when the lunar orbit semi-major axis, a, was 32 Earth's radius, RE. We find a

  19. The Formation of the Earth-Moon System and the Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.; Young, Richard E. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    An overview of current theories of star and planet formation, with emphasis on terrestrial planet accretion and the formation of the Earth-Moon system is presented. These models are based upon observations of the Solar System and of young stars and their environments. They predict that rocky planets should form around most single stars, although it is possible that in some cases such planets are lost to orbital decay within the protoplanetary disk. The frequency of formation of gas giant planets is more difficult to predict theoretically. Terrestrial planets are believed to grow via pairwise accretion until the spacing of planetary orbits becomes large enough that the configuration is stable for the age of the system. Giant impacts during the final stages of growth can produce large planetary satellites, such as Earth's Moon. Giant planets begin their growth like terrestrial planets, but they become massive enough that they are able to accumulate substantial amounts of gas before the protoplanetary disk dissipates.

  20. Trajectory Optimization for Crewed Missions to an Earth-Moon L2 Halo Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowling, Jennifer

    Baseline trajectories to an Earth-Moon L2 halo orbit and round trip trajectories for crewed missions have been created in support of an advanced Orion mission concept. Various transfer durations and orbit insertion locations have been evaluated. The trajectories often include a deterministic mid-course maneuver that decreases the overall change in velocity in the trajectory. This paper presents the application of primer vector theory to study the existence, location, and magnitude of the mid-course maneuver in order to understand how to build an optimal round trip trajectory to an Earth-Moon L2 halo orbit. The lessons learned about when to add mid-course maneuvers can be applied to other mission designs.

  1. An Alternative view of Earth's Tectonics : The Moon's explosive origin out of SE Asia.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, P. F.

    2017-12-01

    A lunar birth scar is typically considered untenable, under the standard paradigm (GTS-4.6-0 Ga, Giant Impact/Plate Tectonics), since it would have been erased by a combination of Wilson recycling, and erosion. This paradigm, while supported by robust, absolute dating, is still provisional, and, like all scientifc paradigms, is nonetheless open to refutation. It cannot, a priori, rule out such a scar. If empirical evidence were to be discovered, in favor of a lunar birthmark, it would have profound implications for the standard view. Coleman (2015) proposed an alternative paradigm based on an internal explosion of Proto-Earth (PE) that ejected the Moon into orbit and left coeval global signatures, such as; ocean-continent antipodality, the global geoid, origin of water, continents, trenches, fault lines, LIPs, hotspots, seamount chains, from the high TP shock/seismic waves. The abrupt deceleration also led to inertial effects of PE's crustal layers, possibly explaining subduction/obduction and fold and thrust fold belts. One major, first order, line of evidence is the actual fission signature ( 4000+ km long) where the Moon was explosively thrust tangentially (to the core) through ductile mantle (see Fig B) to escape into orbit. The proposed path, (locus Moon's center) is from (0°, 78.5°E) (Fig A), near present day India, to (+14.4°, 119°E) out of SE Asia (See Fig C). Possible evidence in favor of this path (but not limited to) include: the Indian Geoid Anomaly Low ( Moon's exhumation?), the Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau (generated by the Moon's NE collisional movement and temporary hole and mantle rebound), SE Asia with many minor plates and back arc basins ( the Moon's exit zone), the East African Rifts (EARs) form a NE-directed pull apart region (explained as a set explosive crustal fragments or "plates") moving towards this relic unconsolidated Asian sink hole (See Fig D). The existence of a fossilised lunar birth points to a recent Earth-Moon, since

  2. A Quantitative Geochemical Target for Modeling the Formation of the Earth and Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyce, Jeremy W.; Barnes, Jessica J.; McCubbin, Francis M.

    2017-01-01

    The past decade has been one of geochemical, isotopic, and computational advances that are bringing the laboratory measurements and computational modeling neighborhoods of the Earth-Moon community to ever closer proximity. We are now however in the position to become even better neighbors: modelers can generate testable hypthotheses for geochemists; and geochemists can provide quantitive targets for modelers. Here we present a robust example of the latter based on Cl isotope measurements of mare basalts.

  3. Navigation Design and Analysis for the Orion Earth-Moon Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DSouza, Christopher; Zanetti, Renato

    2014-01-01

    This paper details the design of the cislunar optical navigation system being proposed for the Orion Earth-Moon (EM) missions. In particular, it presents the mathematics of the navigation filter. The unmodeled accelerations and their characterization are detailed. It also presents the analysis that has been performed to understand the performance of the proposed system, with particular attention paid to entry flight path angle constraints and the delta-V performance.

  4. Mars is the Earth's Only Nearby Early Life Analog, but the Moon is on the Path to Get There

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, H. H.

    2017-02-01

    Mars provides a geological integration of the early solar system impacts recorded by the Moon and the contemporaneous water-rich pre-biotic period on Earth. Consideration of human missions to Mars needs to include a return to the Moon to stay.

  5. Low-Latency Lunar Surface Telerobotics from Earth-Moon Libration Points

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lester, Daniel; Thronson, Harley

    2011-01-01

    Concepts for a long-duration habitat at Earth-Moon LI or L2 have been advanced for a number of purposes. We propose here that such a facility could also have an important role for low-latency telerobotic control of lunar surface equipment, both for lunar science and development. With distances of about 60,000 km from the lunar surface, such sites offer light-time limited two-way control latencies of order 400 ms, making telerobotic control for those sites close to real time as perceived by a human operator. We point out that even for transcontinental teleoperated surgical procedures, which require operational precision and highly dexterous manipulation, control latencies of this order are considered adequate. Terrestrial telerobots that are used routinely for mining and manufacturing also involve control latencies of order several hundred milliseconds. For this reason, an Earth-Moon LI or L2 control node could build on the technology and experience base of commercially proven terrestrial ventures. A lunar libration-point telerobotic node could demonstrate exploration strategies that would eventually be used on Mars, and many other less hospitable destinations in the solar system. Libration-point telepresence for the Moon contrasts with lunar telerobotic control from the Earth, for which two-way control latencies are at least six times longer. For control latencies that long, telerobotic control efforts are of the "move-and-wait" variety, which is cognitively inferior to near real-time control.

  6. Volatiles in the Earth and Moon: Constraints on planetary formation and evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parai, Rita

    The volatile inventories of the Earth and Moon reflect unique histories of volatile acquisition and loss in the early Solar System. The terrestrial volatile inventory was established after the giant impact phase of accretion, and the planet subsequently settled into a regime of long-term volatile exchange between the mantle and surface reservoirs in association with plate tectonics. Therefore, volatiles in the Earth and Moon shed light on a diverse array of processes that shaped planetary bodies in the Solar System as they evolved to their present-day states. Here we investigate new constraints on volatile depletion in the early Solar System, early outgassing of the terrestrial mantle, and the long-term evolution of the deep Earth volatile budget. We develop a Monte Carlo model of long-term water exchange between the mantle and surface reservoirs. Previous estimates of the deep Earth return flux of water are up to an order of magnitude too large, and incorporation of recycled slabs on average rehydrates the upper mantle but dehydrates the plume source. We find evidence for heterogeneous recycling of atmospheric argon and xenon into the upper mantle from noble gases in Southwest Indian Ridge basalts. Xenon isotope systematics indicate that xenon budgets of mid-ocean ridge and plume-related mantle sources are dominated by recycled atmospheric xenon, though the two sources have experienced different degrees of degassing. Differences between the mid-ocean ridge and plume sources were initiated within the first 100 million years of Earth history, and the two sources have never subsequently been homogenized. New high-precision xenon isotopic data contribute to an emerging portrait of two mantle reservoirs with distinct histories of outgassing and incorporation of recycled material in association with plate tectonics. Xenon isotopes indicate that the Moon likely formed within ˜70 million years of the start of the Solar System. To further investigate early Solar System

  7. Our Place in Space: Exploring the Earth-Moon System and Beyond with NASA's CINDI E/PO Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urquhart, M. L.; Hairston, M. R.

    2010-12-01

    Where does space begin? How far is the Moon? How far is Mars? How does our dynamic star, the Sun, affect its family of planets? All of these questions relate to exploration of our Solar System, and are also part of the Education/Public Outreach (E/PO) Program for NASA’s CINDI project, a space weather mission of opportunity. The Coupled Ion Neutral Dynamics Investigation has been flying aboard the US Air Force Communication/Navigation Outage Forecast System (C/NOFS) satellite in the upper atmosphere of the Earth since April 2008. The Earth’s ionosphere, the part of the atmosphere CINDI studies, is also in space. The CINDI E/PO program uses this fact in lessons designed to help students in middle schools and introductory astronomy classes develop a sense of their place in space. In the activity "How High is Space?" students’ start by building an 8-page scale model of the Earth’s atmosphere with 100 km/page. The peak of Mount Everest, commercial airplanes, and the tops of thunderheads all appear at the bottom of the first page of the model, with astronaut altitude -where space begins- at the top of the same sheet of paper. In "Where Would CINDI Be?" the idea of scale is further developed by modeling the Earth-Moon system to scale first in size, then in distance, using half of standard containers of play dough. With a lowest altitude of about 400 km, similar to that of the International Space Station and orbiting Space Shuttle, CINDI is close to the Earth when compared with the nearly thousand times greater distance to the Moon. Comparing and combining the atmosphere and Earth-Moon system models help reinforce ideas of scale and build student understanding of how far away the Moon actually is. These scale models have also been adapted for use in Family Science Nights, and to include the planet Mars. In this presentation, we will show how we use CINDI’s scale modeling activities and others from our broader space sciences E/PO program in formal and informal

  8. Sun-Earth Day: Growth and Impact of NASA E/PO Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, I.; Thieman, J.

    2004-12-01

    Over the past six years, the NASA Sun-Earth Connection Education Forum has sponsored and coordinated education public outreach events to highlight NASA Sun-Earth Connection research and discoveries. Our strategy involves using celestial phenomena, such as total solar eclipses and the Transit of Venus to celebrate Sun-Earth Day, a popular Education and Public Outreach international program. Sun-Earth Day also focuses attention on Equinoxes and Solstices to engage K-12 schools and the general public in space science activities, demonstrations, and interactions with space scientists. In collaboration with partners that include the Exploratorium, Maryland Science Center, NASA Connect, Sun-Earth Connection missions, Ideum, and others, we produce webcasts, other multi-media, and print resources for use by school and informal educators nation-wide. We provide training and professional development to K-12 educators, museum personnel, amateur astronomers, Girl Scout leaders, etc., so they can implement their own outreach programs taking advantage of our resources. A coordinated approach promotes multiple programs occurring each year under a common theme. We will report lessons learned from several years of experience, and strategies for growth and sustainability. We will also share our plans for "Ancient Observatories - Timeless Knowledge" our theme for Sun-Earth Day 2005, which will feature solar alignments at ancient sites that mark the equinoxes and/or solstices. The video and webcast programming will feature several sites including: Chaco Canyon (New Mexico), Hovenweep (Utah), and Chichen Itza (Mexico). Many of these sites present unique opportunities to develop authentic cultural connections to Native Americans, highlighting the importance of the Sun across the ages.

  9. Image is NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center's aircraft hangar that houses the jets and other aircraft with the eclipsed moon overhead during Jan. 31 Super Blue Blood Moon.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2018-01-31

    California's NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center photographer Carla Thomas takes photos on January 31 of the rare opportunity to capture a supermoon, a blue moon and a lunar eclipse at the same time. A supermoon occurs when the Moon is closer to Earth in its orbit and appearing 14 percent brighter than usual. As the second full moon of the month, this moon is also commonly known as a blue moon, though it will not be blue in appearance. The super blue moon passed through Earth's shadow and took on a reddish tint, known as a blood moon. This total lunar eclipse occurs when the Sun, Earth, and a full moon form a near-perfect lineup in space. The Moon passes directly behind the Earth into its umbra (shadow).

  10. NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center's communications facility with radar dish and the eclipsed moon overhead during Jan. 31 Super Blue Blood Moon.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2018-01-31

    California's NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center photographer Carla Thomas takes photos on January 31 of the rare opportunity to capture a supermoon, a blue moon and a lunar eclipse at the same time. A supermoon occurs when the Moon is closer to Earth in its orbit and appearing 14 percent brighter than usual. As the second full moon of the month, this moon is also commonly known as a blue moon, though it will not be blue in appearance. The super blue moon passed through Earth's shadow and took on a reddish tint, known as a blood moon. This total lunar eclipse occurs when the Sun, Earth, and a full moon form a near-perfect lineup in space. The Moon passes directly behind the Earth into its umbra (shadow).

  11. Searching for and characterising extrasolar Earth-like planets and moons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Jean

    2002-10-01

    The physical bases of the detection and characterisation of extrasolar Earth-like planets and moons in the reflected light and thermal emission regimes are reviewed. They both have their advantages and disadvantages, including artefacts, in the determination of planet physical parameters (mass, size, albedo, surface and atmospheric conditions etc.). After a short panorama of detection methods and the first findings, new perspectives for these different aspects are also presented. Finally brief account of the ground based programmes and space-based projects and their potentialities for Earth-like planets is made and discussed.

  12. Signals from the planets, via the Sun to the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solheim, J.-E.

    2013-12-01

    The best method for identification of planetary forcing of the Earth's climate is to investigate periodic variations in climate time series. Some natural frequencies in the Earth climate system seem to be synchronized to planetary cycles, and amplified to a level of detection. The response by the Earth depends on location, and in global averaged series, some planetary signals may be below detection. Comparing sea level rise with sunspot variations, we find phase variations, and even a phase reversal. A periodogram of the global temperature shows that the Earth amplifies other periods than observed in sunspots. A particular case is that the Earth amplifies the 22 yr Hale period, and not the 11 yr Schwabe period. This may be explained by alternating peak or plateau appearance of cosmic ray counts. Among longer periods, the Earth amplifies the 60 yr planetary period and keeps the phase during centennials. The recent global warming may be interpreted as a rising branch of a millennium cycle, identified in ice cores and sediments and also recorded in history. This cycle peaks in the second half of this century, and then a 500 yr cooling trend will start. An expected solar grand minimum due to a 200 yr cycle will introduce additional cooling in the first part of this century.

  13. The Moon: A 100% Isolation Barrier for Earth During Exobiological Examination of Solar System Sample Return Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiGregorio, B. E.

    2018-02-01

    The only 100% guarantee of protecting our planet's biosphere from a back contamination event is to use the Moon as a sample return examination facility to qualify samples for eventual return to Earth.

  14. HABITABILITY OF EARTH-MASS PLANETS AND MOONS IN THE KEPLER-16 SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Quarles, B.; Musielak, Z. E.; Cuntz, M., E-mail: billyq@uta.edu, E-mail: zmusielak@uta.edu, E-mail: cuntz@uta.edu

    2012-05-01

    We demonstrate that habitable Earth-mass planets and moons can exist in the Kepler-16 system, known to host a Saturn-mass planet around a stellar binary, by investigating their orbital stability in the standard and extended habitable zone (HZ). We find that Earth-mass planets in satellite-like (S-type) orbits are possible within the standard HZ in direct vicinity of Kepler-16b, thus constituting habitable exomoons. However, Earth-mass planets cannot exist in planetary-like (P-type) orbits around the two stellar components within the standard HZ. Yet, P-type Earth-mass planets can exist superior to the Saturnian planet in the extended HZ pertaining to considerably enhanced back-warming inmore » the planetary atmosphere if facilitated. We briefly discuss the potential detectability of such habitable Earth-mass moons and planets positioned in satellite and planetary orbits, respectively. The range of inferior and superior P-type orbits in the HZ is between 0.657-0.71 AU and 0.95-1.02 AU, respectively.« less

  15. The iodine-plutonium-xenon age of the Moon-Earth system revisited.

    PubMed

    Avice, G; Marty, B

    2014-09-13

    Iodine-plutonium-xenon isotope systematics have been used to re-evaluate time constraints on the early evolution of the Earth-atmosphere system and, by inference, on the Moon-forming event. Two extinct radionuclides ((129)I, T1/2=15.6 Ma and (244)Pu, T1/2=80 Ma) have produced radiogenic (129)Xe and fissiogenic (131-136)Xe, respectively, within the Earth, the related isotope fingerprints of which are seen in the compositions of mantle and atmospheric Xe. Recent studies of Archaean rocks suggest that xenon atoms have been lost from the Earth's atmosphere and isotopically fractionated during long periods of geological time, until at least the end of the Archaean eon. Here, we build a model that takes into account these results. Correction for Xe loss permits the computation of new closure ages for the Earth's atmosphere that are in agreement with those computed for mantle Xe. The corrected Xe formation interval for the Earth-atmosphere system is [Formula: see text] Ma after the beginning of Solar System formation. This time interval may represent a lower limit for the age of the Moon-forming impact. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  16. Does The Sun Rotate Around The Earth Or Does The Earth Rotate Around the Sun? An Important Key to Evaluating Science Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isobe, S.

    2006-08-01

    The Japan Spaceguard Association, Tokyo, Japan Sciences are continuously developing. This is a good situation for the sciences, but when one tries to teach scientific results, it is hard to decide which levels of science should be taught in schools. The point to evaluate is not only the quality of scientific accuracy, but also the method with which school students of different scientific abilities study scientific results. In astronomy, an important question, which is "Does the Sun rotate around the Earth or does the Earth rotate around the Sun?" can be used to evaluate student abilities. Scientifically, it is obvious that the latter choice is the better answer, but it is not so obvious for the lower-grade students and also for the lower-ability students even in the higher grades. If one sees daily the sky without scientific knowledge, one has an impression of "the Sun rotates around the Earth," and for his rest of his life he will not see any problem. If one wants to be a scientist, though, he should know that "the Earth rotates around the Sun" before reaching university level. If he will become a physical scientist, he should understand that it is not correct to say "the Earth rotates around the Sun," but he should know that the Earth rotates around the center of gravity of the solar system. A similar type of question is "has the Earth the shape of a sphere, or a pear, or a geoid?" There are many teachers with varying ranges of students who do not understand the proper level of science instruction. When students of lower capacity are instructed to understand concepts with the higher degrees of sophistication, they can easily lose their interest in the sciences. This happens in many countries, especially in Japan, where there are many different types of people with different jobs. We, as educators, should appreciate that the students can be interested in any given scientific idea, no matter what level of sophistication it is.

  17. Sounds of space: listening to the Sun-Earth connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, N.; Mendez, B.; Luhmann, J.; Sircar, I.

    2003-04-01

    NASA's STEREO/IMPACT Mission includes an Education and Public Outreach component that seeks to offer national programs for broad audiences highlighting the mission's solar and geo-space research. In an effort to make observations of the Sun more accessible and exciting for a general audience, we look for alternative ways to represent the data. Scientists most often represent data visually in images, graphs, and movies. However, any data can also be represented as sound audible to the human ear, a process known as sonification. We will present our plans for an exciting prototype program that converts the science results of solar energetic particle data to sound. We plan to make sounds, imagery, and data available to the public through the World Wide Web where they may create their own sonifications, as well as integrate this effort to a science museum kiosk format. The kiosk station would include information on the STEREO mission and monitors showing images of the Sun from each of STEREO's two satellites. Our goal is to incorporate 3D goggles and a headset into the kiosk, allowing visitors to see the current or archived images in 3D and hear stereo sounds resulting from sonification of the corresponding data. Ultimately, we hope to collaborate with composers and create musical works inspired by these sounds and related solar images.

  18. Mini-Magnetospheres at the Moon in the Solar Wind and the Earth's Plasma Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Y.; Futaana, Y.; Barabash, S. V.; Wieser, M.; Wurz, P.; Bhardwaj, A.; Asamura, K.; Saito, Y.; Yokota, S.; Tsunakawa, H.; Machida, S.

    2014-12-01

    Lunar mini-magnetospheres are formed as a consequence of solar-wind interaction with remanent crustal magnetization on the Moon. A variety of plasma and field perturbations have been observed in a vicinity of the lunar magnetic anomalies, including electron energization, ion reflection/deflection, magnetic field enhancements, electrostatic and electromagnetic wave activities, and low-altitude ion deceleration and electron acceleration. Recent Chandrayaan-1 observations of the backscattered energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) from the Moon in the solar wind revealed upward ENA flux depletion (and thus depletion of the proton flux impinging on the lunar surface) in association with strongly magnetized regions. These ENA observations demonstrate that the lunar surface is shielded from the solar wind protons by the crustal magnetic fields. On the other hand, when the Moon was located in the Earth's plasma sheet, no significant depletion of the backscattered ENA flux was observed above the large and strong magnetic anomaly. It suggests less effective magnetic shielding of the surface from the plasma sheet protons than from the solar wind protons. We conduct test-particle simulations showing that protons with a broad velocity distribution are more likely to reach a strongly magnetized surface than those with a beam-like velocity distribution. The ENA observations together with the simulation results suggest that the lunar crustal magnetic fields are no longer capable of standing off the ambient plasma when the Moon is immersed in the hot magnetospheric plasma.

  19. Chaotic Dynamics in a Low-Energy Transfer Strategy to the Equilateral Equilibrium Points in the Earth-Moon System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar, F. J. T.; Macau, E. E. N.; Winter, O. C.

    In the frame of the equilateral equilibrium points exploration, numerous future space missions will require maximization of payload mass, simultaneously achieving reasonable transfer times. To fulfill this request, low-energy non-Keplerian orbits could be used to reach L4 and L5 in the Earth-Moon system instead of high energetic transfers. Previous studies have shown that chaos in physical systems like the restricted three-body Earth-Moon-particle problem can be used to direct a chaotic trajectory to a target that has been previously considered. In this work, we propose to transfer a spacecraft from a circular Earth Orbit in the chaotic region to the equilateral equilibrium points L4 and L5 in the Earth-Moon system, exploiting the chaotic region that connects the Earth with the Moon and changing the trajectory of the spacecraft (relative to the Earth) by using a gravity assist maneuver with the Moon. Choosing a sequence of small perturbations, the time of flight is reduced and the spacecraft is guided to a proper trajectory so that it uses the Moon's gravitational force to finally arrive at a desired target. In this study, the desired target will be an orbit about the Lagrangian equilibrium points L4 or L5. This strategy is not only more efficient with respect to thrust requirement, but also its time transfer is comparable to other known transfer techniques based on time optimization.

  20. Thermal and orbital analysis of Earth monitoring Sun-synchronous space experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Killough, Brian D.

    1990-01-01

    The fundamentals of an Earth monitoring Sun-synchronous orbit are presented. A Sun-synchronous Orbit Analysis Program (SOAP) was developed to calculate orbital parameters for an entire year. The output from this program provides the required input data for the TRASYS thermal radiation computer code, which in turn computes the infrared, solar and Earth albedo heat fluxes incident on a space experiment. Direct incident heat fluxes can be used as input to a generalized thermal analyzer program to size radiators and predict instrument operating temperatures. The SOAP computer code and its application to the thermal analysis methodology presented, should prove useful to the thermal engineer during the design phases of Earth monitoring Sun-synchronous space experiments.

  1. Attitude estimation from magnetometer and earth-albedo-corrected coarse sun sensor measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appel, Pontus

    2005-01-01

    For full 3-axes attitude determination the magnetic field vector and the Sun vector can be used. A Coarse Sun Sensor consisting of six solar cells placed on each of the six outer surfaces of the satellite is used for Sun vector determination. This robust and low cost setup is sensitive to surrounding light sources as it sees the whole sky. To compensate for the largest error source, the Earth, an albedo model is developed. The total albedo light vector has contributions from the Earth surface which is illuminated by the Sun and visible from the satellite. Depending on the reflectivity of the Earth surface, the satellite's position and the Sun's position the albedo light changes. This cannot be calculated analytically and hence a numerical model is developed. For on-board computer use the Earth albedo model consisting of data tables is transferred into polynomial functions in order to save memory space. For an absolute worst case the attitude determination error can be held below 2∘. In a nominal case it is better than 1∘.

  2. HUBBLE SHOOTS THE MOON

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    In a change of venue from peering at the distant universe, NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has taken a look at Earth's closest neighbor in space, the Moon. Hubble was aimed at one of the Moon's most dramatic and photogenic targets, the 58 mile-wide (93 km) impact crater Copernicus. The image was taken while the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) was aimed at a different part of the moon to measure the colors of sunlight reflected off the Moon. Hubble cannot look at the Sun directly and so must use reflected light to make measurements of the Sun's spectrum. Once calibrated by measuring the Sun's spectrum, the STIS can be used to study how the planets both absorb and reflect sunlight. (upper left) The Moon is so close to Earth that Hubble would need to take a mosaic of 130 pictures to cover the entire disk. This ground-based picture from Lick Observatory shows the area covered in Hubble's photomosaic with the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2.. (center) Hubble's crisp bird's-eye view clearly shows the ray pattern of bright dust ejected out of the crater over one billion years ago, when an asteroid larger than a mile across slammed into the Moon. Hubble can resolve features as small as 600 feet across in the terraced walls of the crater, and the hummock-like blanket of material blasted out by the meteor impact. (lower right) A close-up view of Copernicus' terraced walls. Hubble can resolve features as small as 280 feet across. Credit: John Caldwell (York University, Ontario), Alex Storrs (STScI), and NASA

  3. First decadal lunar results from the Moon and Earth Radiation Budget Experiment.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Grant

    2018-03-01

    A need to gain more confidence in computer model predictions of coming climate change has resulted in greater analysis of the quality of orbital Earth radiation budget (ERB) measurements being used today to constrain, validate, and hence improve such simulations. These studies conclude from time series analysis that for around a quarter of a century, no existing satellite ERB climate data record is of a sufficient standard to partition changes to the Earth from those of un-tracked and changing artificial instrumentation effects. This led to the creation of the Moon and Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (MERBE), which instead takes existing decades old climate data to a higher calibration standard using thousands of scans of Earth's Moon. The Terra and Aqua satellite ERB climate records have been completely regenerated using signal-processing improvements, combined with a substantial increase in precision from more comprehensive in-flight spectral characterization techniques. This study now builds on previous Optical Society of America work by describing new Moon measurements derived using accurate analytical mapping of telescope spatial response. That then allows a factor of three reduction in measurement noise along with an order of magnitude increase in the number of retrieved independent lunar results. Given decadal length device longevity and the use of solar and thermal lunar radiance models to normalize the improved ERB results to the International System of Units traceable radiance scale of the "MERBE Watt," the same established environmental time series analysis techniques are applied to MERBE data. They evaluate it to perhaps be of sufficient quality to immediately begin narrowing the largest of climate prediction uncertainties. It also shows that if such Terra/Aqua ERB devices can operate into the 2020s, it could become possible to halve these same uncertainties decades sooner than would be possible with existing or even planned new observing systems.

  4. Dynamical reference frames in the planetary and earth-moon systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Standish, E. M.; Williams, G.

    1990-01-01

    Estimates of the accuracies of the ephemerides are reviewed using data for planetary and lunar systems to determine the efficacy of the inherent dynamical reference frame. The varied observational data are listed and given with special attention given to ephemeris improvements. The importance of ranging data is discussed with respect to the inner four planets and the moon, and the discrepancy of 1 arcsec/century between mean motions determined by optical observations versus ranging data is addressed. The Viking mission data provide inertial mean motions for the earth and Mars of 0.003 arcsec/century which will deteriorate to 0.01 arcsec after about 10 years. Uncertainties for other planets and the moon are found to correspond to approximately the same level of degradation. In general the data measurements and error estimates are improving the ephemerides, although refitting the data cannot account for changes in mean motion.

  5. MERI: an ultra-long-baseline Moon-Earth radio interferometer.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, J. O.

    Radiofrequency aperture synthesis, pioneered by Ryle and his colleagues at Cambridge in the 1960's, has evolved to ever longer baselines and larger arrays in recent years. The limiting resolution at a given frequency for modern ground-based very-long-baseline interferometry is simply determined by the physical diameter of the Earth. A second-generation, totally space-based VLB network was proposed recently by a group at the Naval Research Laboratory. The next logical extension of space-based VLBI would be a station or stations on the Moon. The Moon could serve as an outpost or even the primary correlator station for an extended array of space-based antennas.

  6. Motion of the Earth as viewed from the moon and the Y-suspended pendulum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowell, A. D.

    1981-05-01

    In the early nineteeth century, James Dean, the first Professor of Mathematics and Natural Philosophy at the University of Vermont, published a paper describing the effects of the librations of the moon on the apparent motion of the Earth in the sky of the moon. He noted that this motion could be simulated by the motion of a Y-suspended pendulum. Within a short time, Nathaniel Bowditch, the self-taught mathematician, navigator, and actuary, published a complete analysis of the two-dimensional oscillator, including derivations and drawings of the mathematical curves usually known as Lissajous figures, some forty years before their description by J. A. Lissajous. This paper gives an account of the contributions of Dean and Bowditch to this problem.

  7. Challenges to modeling the Sun-Earth System: A Workshop Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spann, James F.

    2006-01-01

    This special issue of the Journal of' Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics is a compilation of 23 papers presented at The 2004 Huntsville Modeling Workshop: Challenges to Modeling thc San-Earth System held in Huntsville, AB on October 18-22, 2004. The title of the workshop appropriately captures the theme of what was presented and discussed by the 120 participants. Currently, end-to-end modeling of the Sun-Earth system is a major goal of the National Space Weather and NASA living with a star (LWS) programs. While profound advances have been made in modeling isolated regions of the Sun-Earth system, minimal progress has been achieved in modeling the end-to-end system. The transfer of mass, energy and momentum through the coupled Sun-Earth system spans a wide range of scales inn time and space. The uncertainty in the underlying physics responsible for coupling contiguous regions of the Sun-Earth system is recognized as a significant barrier to progress

  8. First simultaneous detection of terrestrial ionospheric molecular ions in the Earth's inner magnetosphere and at the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dandouras, Iannis; Poppe, Andrew R.; Fillingim, Matt O.; Kistler, Lynn M.; Mouikis, Christopher G.; Rème, Henri

    2017-04-01

    Heavy molecular ions escaping from a planetary atmosphere can contribute to the long-term evolution of its composition. The ARTEMIS (Acceleration, Reconnection, Turbulence, and Electrodynamics of the Moon's Interaction with the Sun) spacecraft has recently observed outflowing molecular ions at lunar distances in the terrestrial magnetotail (Poppe et al., 2016). Backward particle tracing indicated that these ions should originate from the terrestrial inner magnetosphere. Here we have examined Cluster data acquired by the CIS-CODIF (Cluster Ion Spectrometry-Composition Distribution Function) ion mass spectrometer, obtained in the terrestrial magnetosphere. An event was selected where the orbital conditions were favourable and the Cluster spacecraft were in the high-latitude inner magnetosphere a few hours before the ARTEMIS molecular ion detection. Analysis shows that the CIS-CODIF instrument detected a series of energetic ion species, including not only O+ but also a group of molecular ions around 30 amu. Given the 5-7 m/Δm mass resolution of the instrument, these could include N2+, NO+, or O2+. These ions were detected by Cluster about 14 hours before the ARTEMIS observation in the lunar environment, a time which is compatible with the transfer to lunar distances. The event was during an active period followed by a northward rotation of the IMF. Although energetic heavy molecular ions have been detected in the storm time magnetosphere in the past (e.g. Klecker et al., 1986; Christon et al., 1994), this event constitutes the first coordinated observation in the Earth's inner magnetosphere and at the Moon. Additional events of coordinated outflowing molecular ion observations are currently under analysis. Future missions, as the proposed ESCAPE mission, should investigate in detail the mechanisms of molecular ion acceleration and escape, their link to the solar and magnetospheric activity, and their role in the magnetospheric dynamics and in the long-term evolution

  9. Converting the ISS to an Earth-Moon Transport System Using Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Paniagua, John; Maise, George; Powell, James

    2008-01-21

    Using Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP), the International Space Station (ISS) can be placed into a cyclic orbit between the Earth and the Moon for 2-way transport of personnel and supplies to a permanent Moon Base. The ISS cycler orbit apogees 470,000 km from Earth, with a period of 13.66 days. Once a month, the ISS would pass close to the Moon, enabling 2-way transport between it and the surface using a lunar shuttle craft. The lunar shuttle craft would land at a desired location on the surface during a flyby and return to the ISS during a later flyby. Atmore » Earth perigee 7 days later at 500 km altitude, there would be 2-way transport between it and Earth's surface using an Earth shuttle craft. The docking Earth shuttle would remain attached to the ISS as it traveled towards the Moon, while personnel and supplies transferred to a lunar shuttle spacecraft that would detach and land at the lunar base when the ISS swung around the Moon. The reverse process would be carried out to return personnel and materials from the Moon to the Earth. The orbital mechanics for the ISS cycle are described in detail. Based on the full-up mass of 400 metric tons for the ISS, an ISP of 900 seconds, and a delta V burn of 3.3 km/sec to establish the orbit, 200 metric tons of liquid H-2 propellant would be required. The 200 metric tons could be stored in 3 tanks, each 8 meters in diameter and 20 meters in length. An assembly of 3 MITEE NTP engines would be used, providing redundancy if an engine were to fail. Two different MITEE design options are described. Option 1 is an 18,000 Newton, 100 MW engine with a thrust to weight ratio of 6.6/1; Option 2 is a 180,000 Newton, 1000 MW engine with a thrust to weight ratio of 23/1. Burn times to establish the orbit are {approx}1 hour for the large 3 engine assembly, and 10 hours for the small 3 engine assembly. Both engines would use W-UO2 cermet fuel at {approx}2750 K which has demonstrated the capability to operate for at least 50 hours in

  10. Impacts and tectonism in Earth and moon history of the past 3800 million years

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stothers, Richard B.

    1992-01-01

    The moon's surface, unlike the Earth's, displays a comparatively clear record of its past bombardment history for the last 3800 Myr, the time since active lunar tectonism under the massive premare bombardment ended. From Baldwin's (1987) tabulation of estimated ages for a representative sample of large lunar craters younger than 3800 Ma, six major cratering episodes can be discerned. These six bombardment episodes, which must have affected the Earth too, appear to match in time the six major episodes of orogenic tectonism on Earth, despite typical resolution errors of +/- 100 Myr and the great uncertainties of the two chronologies. Since more highly resolved events during the Cenozoic and Mesozoic Eras suggest the same correlation, it is possible that large impacts have influenced plate tectonics and other aspects of geologic history, perhaps by triggering flood basalt eruptions.

  11. The Sun to the Earth - and Beyond: A Decadal Research Strategy in Solar and Space Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The sun is the source of energy for life on earth and is the strongest modulator of the human physical environment. In fact, the Sun's influence extends throughout the solar system, both through photons, which provide heat, light, and ionization, and through the continuous outflow of a magnetized, supersonic ionized gas known as the solar wind. While the accomplishments of the past decade have answered important questions about the physics of the Sun, the interplanetary medium, and the space environments of Earth and other solar system bodies, they have also highlighted other questions, some of which are long-standing and fundamental. The Sun to the Earth--and Beyond organizes these questions in terms of five challenges that are expected to be the focus of scientific investigations in solar and space physics during the coming decade and beyond. While the accomplishments of the past decades have answered important questions about the physics of the Sun, the interplanetary medium, and the space environments of Earth and other solar system bodies, they have also highlighted other questions, some of which are long-standing and fundamental. This report organizes these questions in terms of five challenges that are expected to be the focus of scientific investigations in solar and space physics during the coming decade and beyond: Challenge 1: Understanding the structure and dynamics of the Sun's interior, the generation of solar magnetic fields, the origin of the solar cycle, the causes of solar activity, and the structure and dynamics of the corona. Challenge 2: Understanding heliospheric structure, the distribution of magnetic fields and matter throughout the solar system, and the interaction of the solar atmosphere with the local interstellar medium. Challenge 3: Understanding the space environments of Earth and other solar system bodies and their dynamical response to external and internal influences. Challenge 4: Understanding the basic physical principles manifest

  12. Dynamical Sequestration of the Moon-Forming Impactor in Co-Orbital Resonance with Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kortenkamp, Stephen J.; Hartmann, William J.

    2015-11-01

    Recent concerns about the giant impact hypothesis for the origin of the moon, and an associated “isotope crisis” are assuaged if the impactor was a local object that formed near Earth and the impact occurred relatively late. We investigated a scenario that may meet these criteria, with the moon-forming impactor originating in 1:1 co-orbital resonance with Earth. Using N-body numerical simulations we explored the dynamical consequences of placing Mars-mass companions in various co-orbital configurations with a proto-Earth having 90% of its current mass. We modeled configurations that include the four terrestrial planets as well as configurations that also include the four giant planets. In both the 4- and 8-planet models we found that a single additional Mars-mass companion typically remains a stable co-orbital of Earth for the entire 250 million year (Myr) duration of our simulations (33 of 34 simulations). In an effort to destabilize such a system we carried out an additional 45 simulations that included a second Mars-mass co-orbital companion. Even with two Mars-mass companions sharing Earth’s orbit most of these models (28) also remained stable for the entire 250 Myr duration of the simulations. Of the 17 two-companion models that eventually became unstable 12 impacts were observed between Earth and an escaping co-orbital companion. The average delay we observed for an impact of a Mars-mass companion with Earth was 101 Myr, and the longest delay was 221 Myr. Several of the stable simulations involved unusual 3-planet co-orbital configurations that could exhibit interesting observational signatures in plantetary transit surveys.

  13. NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center’s communications facility with radar dish and antennas is shown having the eclipsed moon overhead during Jan. 31 Super Blue Blood Moon.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2018-01-31

    California’s NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center’s photographer Carla Thomas takes photos on January 31 of the rare opportunity to capture a supermoon, a blue moon and a lunar eclipse at the same time. A supermoon occurs when the Moon is closer to Earth in its orbit and appearing 14 percent brighter than usual. As the second full moon of the month, this moon is also commonly known as a blue moon, though it will not be blue in appearance. The super blue moon passed through Earth’s shadow and took on a reddish tint, known as a blood moon. This total lunar eclipse occurs when the Sun, Earth, and a full moon form a near-perfect lineup in space. The Moon passes directly behind the Earth into its umbra (shadow).

  14. Science in Exploration: From the Moon to Mars and Back Home to Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garvin, James B.

    2007-01-01

    NASA is embarking on a grand journey of exploration that naturally integrates the past successes of the Apollo missions to the Moon, as well as robotic science missions to Mars, to Planet Earth, and to the broader Universe. The US Vision for Space Exporation (VSE) boldly lays out a plan for human and robotic reconnaissance of the accessible Universe, starting with the surface of the Moon, and later embracing the surface of Mars. Sustained human and robotic access to the Moon and Mars will enable a new era of scientific investigation of our planetary neighbors, tied to driving scientific questions that pertain to the evolution and destiny of our home planet, but which also can be related to the search habitable worlds across the nearby Universe. The Apollo missions provide a vital legacy for what can be learned from the Moon, and NASA is now poised to recapture the lunar frontier starting with the flight of the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) in late 2008. LRO will provide a new scientific context from which joint human and robotic exploration will ensue, guided by objectives some of which are focused on the grandest scientific challenges imaginable : Where did we come from? Are we alone? and Where are we going? The Moon will serve as an essential stepping stone for sustained human access and exploration of deep space and as a training ground while robotic missions with ever increasing complexity probe the wonders of Mars. As we speak, an armada of spacecraft are actively investigating the red planet both from orbit (NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter and Mars Odyssey Orbiter, plus ESA's Mars Express) and from the surface (NASA's twin Mars Exploration Rovers, and in 2008 NASA's Phoenix polar lander). The dramatically changing views of Mars as a potentially habitable world, with its own flavor of global climate change and unique climate records, provides a new vantage point from which to observe and question the workings of our own planet Earth. By 2010 NASA will

  15. Simulation of Earth-Moon-Mars Environments for the Assessment of Organ Doses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, M. Y.; Schwadron, N. A.; Townsend, L.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2010-12-01

    Space radiation environments for historically large solar particle events (SPE) and galactic cosmic rays (GCR) at solar minimum and solar maximum are simulated in order to characterize exposures to radio-sensitive organs for missions to low-Earth orbit (LEO), moon, and Mars. Primary and secondary particles for SPE and GCR are transported through the respective atmosphere of Earth or Mars, space vehicle, and astronaut’s body tissues using the HZETRN/QMSFRG computer code. In LEO, exposures are reduced compared to deep space because particles are deflected by the Earth’s magnetic field and absorbed by the solid body of the Earth. Geomagnetic transmission function as a function of altitude was applied for the particle flux of charged particles, and the shift of the organ exposures to higher velocity or lower stopping powers compared to those in deep space was analyzed. In the transport through Mars atmosphere, a vertical distribution of atmospheric thickness was calculated from the temperature and pressure data of Mars Global Surveyor, and the directional cosine distribution was implemented to describe the spherically distributed atmospheric distance along the slant path at each altitude. The resultant directional shielding by Mars atmosphere at solar minimum and solar maximum was used for the particle flux simulation at various altitudes on the Martian surface. Finally, atmospheric shielding was coupled with vehicle and body shielding for organ dose estimates. We made predictions of radiation dose equivalents and evaluated acute symptoms at LEO, moon, and Mars at solar minimum and solar maximum.

  16. How to use the Sun-Earth Lagrange points for fundamental physics and navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tartaglia, A.; Lorenzini, E. C.; Lucchesi, D.; Pucacco, G.; Ruggiero, M. L.; Valko, P.

    2018-01-01

    We illustrate the proposal, nicknamed LAGRANGE, to use spacecraft, located at the Sun-Earth Lagrange points, as a physical reference frame. Performing time of flight measurements of electromagnetic signals traveling on closed paths between the points, we show that it would be possible: (a) to refine gravitational time delay knowledge due both to the Sun and the Earth; (b) to detect the gravito-magnetic frame dragging of the Sun, so deducing information about the interior of the star; (c) to check the possible existence of a galactic gravitomagnetic field, which would imply a revision of the properties of a dark matter halo; (d) to set up a relativistic positioning and navigation system at the scale of the inner solar system. The paper presents estimated values for the relevant quantities and discusses the feasibility of the project analyzing the behavior of the space devices close to the Lagrange points.

  17. Comparative Planetary Mineralogy: Basaltic Plagioclase from Earth, Moon, Mars and 4 Vesta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karner, J. M.; Papike, J. J.; Shearer, C. K.

    2003-01-01

    Major, minor and trace element analysis of silicates has allowed for the study of planetary basalts in a comparative planetary mineralogy context. We continue this initiative by exploring the chemistry of plagioclase feldspar in basalts from the Earth, Moon, Mars and 4 Vesta. This paper presents new data on plagioclase from six terrestrial basalt suites including Keweenawan, Island Arc, Hawaiian, Columbia Plateau, Taos Plateau, and Ocean Floor; six lunar basalt suites including Apollo 11 Low K, Apollo 12 Ilmenite, Apollo 12 Olivine, Apollo 12 Pigeonite, Apollo 15 Olivine, and Apollo 15 Pigeonite; two basaltic martian meteorites, Shergotty and QUE 94201; and one unequilibrated eucrite, Pasamonte.

  18. Sources of Extraterrestrial Rare Earth Elements:To the Moon and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLeod, C. L.; Krekeler, M. P. S.

    2017-08-01

    The resource budget of Earth is limited. Rare-earth elements (REEs) are used across the world by society on a daily basis yet several of these elements have <2500 years of reserves left, based on current demand, mining operations, and technologies. With an increasing population, exploration of potential extraterrestrial REE resources is inevitable, with the Earth's Moon being a logical first target. Following lunar differentiation at 4.50-4.45 Ga, a late-stage (after 99% solidification) residual liquid enriched in Potassium (K), Rare-earth elements (REE), and Phosphorus (P), (or "KREEP") formed. Today, the KREEP-rich region underlies the Oceanus Procellarum and Imbrium Basin region on the lunar near-side (the Procellarum KREEP Terrain, PKT) and has been tentatively estimated at preserving 2.2 × 10^8 km^3 of KREEP-rich lithologies. The majority of lunar samples (Apollo, Luna, or meteoritic samples) contain REE-bearing minerals as trace phases, e.g., apatite and/or merrillite, with merrillite potentially contributing up to 3% of the PKT. Other lunar REE-bearing lunar phases include monazite, yittrobetafite (up to 94,500 ppm yttrium), and tranquillityite (up to 4.6 wt % yttrium, up to 0.25 wt % neodymium), however, lunar sample REE abundances are low compared to terrestrial ores. At present, there is no geological, mineralogical, or chemical evidence to support REEs being present on the Moon in concentrations that would permit their classification as ores. However, the PKT region has not yet been mapped at high resolution, and certainly has the potential to yield higher REE concentrations at local scales (<10s of kms). Future lunar exploration and mapping efforts may therefore reveal new REE deposits. Beyond the Moon, Mars and other extraterrestrial materials are host to REEs in apatite, chevkinite-perrierite, merrillite, whitlockite, and xenotime. These phases are relatively minor components of the meteorites studied to date, constituting <0.6% of the total sample

  19. I-Pu-Xe dating and the relative ages of the earth and moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swindle, T. D.; Caffee, M. W.; Hohenberg, C. M.; Taylor, S. R.

    1986-01-01

    The ages of the earth and moon as determined by various chronometric systems are discussed with primary emphasis placed on the development of an I-Pu-Xe chronometer. Data on excess fission xenon are reviewed with attention given to the strengths and weaknesses of the assumptions required for lunar I-Pu-Xe chronometry. Using I-Pu-Xe dating, it is estimated that the retention of excess fission xenon in lunar samples began no more than 63 + or - 42 m.y. after the time of primitive meteorite formation.

  20. A flat array large telescope concept for use on the moon, earth, and in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodgate, Bruce E.

    1991-01-01

    An astronomical optical telescope concept is described which can provide very large collecting areas, of order 1000 sq m. This is an order of magnitude larger than the new generation of telescopes now being designed and built. Multiple gimballed flat mirrors direct the beams from a celestial source into a single telescope of the same aperture as each flat mirror. Multiple images of the same source are formed at the telescope focal plane. A beam combiner collects these images and superimposes them into a single image, onto a detector or spectrograph aperture. This telescope could be used on the earth, the moon, or in space.

  1. Correlations and linkages between the sun and the earth's atmosphere: Needed measurements and observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kellogg, W. W.

    1975-01-01

    A study was conducted to identify the sequence of processes that lead from some change in solar input to the earth to a change in tropospheric circulation and weather. Topics discussed include: inputs from the sun, the solar wind, and the magnetosphere; bremsstrahlung, ionizing radiation, cirrus clouds, thunderstorms, wave propagation, and gravity waves.

  2. Neutrino measurements from the Sun and Earth: Results from Borexino

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellini, G.; Benziger, J.; Bick, D.; Bonfini, G.; Bravo, D.; Caccianiga, B.; Cadonati, L.; Calaprice, F.; Caminata, A.; Cavalcante, P.; Chavarria, A.; Chepurnov, A.; D'Angelo, D.; Davini, S.; Derbin, A.; Empl, A.; Etenko, A.; Fomenko, K.; Franco, D.; Gabriele, F.; Galbiati, C.; Gazzana, S.; Ghiano, C.; Giammarchi, M.; Göger-Neff, M.; Goretti, A.; Gromov, M.; Hagner, C.; Hungerford, E.; Ianni, Aldo; Ianni, Andrea; Kobychev, V.; Korablev, D.; Korga, G.; Kryn, D.; Laubenstein, M.; Lehnert, B.; Lewke, T.; Litvinovich, E.; Lombardi, F.; Lombardi, P.; Ludhova, L.; Lukyanchenko, G.; Machulin, I.; Manecki, S.; Maneschg, W.; Marcocci, S.; Meindl, Q.; Meroni, E.; Meyer, M.; Miramonti, L.; Misiaszek, M.; Montuschi, M.; Mosteiro, P.; Muratova, V.; Oberauer, L.; Obolensky, M.; Ortica, F.; Otis, K.; Pallavicini, M.; Papp, L.; Perasso, L.; Pocar, A.; Ranucci, G.; Razeto, A.; Re, A.; Romani, A.; Rossi, N.; Saldanha, R.; Salvo, C.; Schönert, S.; Simgen, H.; Skorokhvatov, M.; Smirnov, O.; Sotnikov, A.; Sukhotin, S.; Suvorov, Y.; Tartaglia, R.; Testera, G.; Vignaud, D.; Vogelaar, R. B.; von Feilitzsch, F.; Wang, H.; Winter, J.; Wojcik, M.; Wright, A.; Wurm, M.; Zaimidoroga, O.; Zavatarelli, S.; Zuber, K.; Zuzel, G.

    2015-07-01

    Important neutrino results came recently from Borexino, a massive, calorimetric liquid scintillator detector installed at the underground Gran Sasso Laboratory. With its unprecedented radiopurity levels achieved in the core of the detection medium, it is the only experiment in operation able to study in real time solar neutrino interactions in the challenging sub-MeV energy region. The recently achieved breakthrough observation of the fundamental pp flux, the precise measurement of the 7Be solar neutrino flux, and the results concerning the pep, 8B and CNO fluxes, together with their physics implications, are described in this work. Moreover, the detector has also provided a clean detection of terrestrial neutrinos, from which they emerge as a new probe of the interior of the Earth.

  3. Fast accretion of the earth with a late moon-forming giant impact.

    PubMed

    Yu, Gang; Jacobsen, Stein B

    2011-10-25

    Constraints on the formation history of the Earth are critical for understanding of planet formation processes. (182)Hf-(182)W chronometry of terrestrial rocks points to accretion of Earth in approximately 30 Myr after the formation of the solar system, immediately followed by the Moon-forming giant impact (MGI). Nevertheless, some N-body simulations and (182)Hf-(182)W and (87)Rb-(87)Sr chronology of some lunar rocks have been used to argue for a later formation of the Moon at 52 to > 100 Myr. This discrepancy is often explained by metal-silicate disequilibrium during giant impacts. Here we describe a model of the (182)W isotopic evolution of the accreting Earth, including constraints from partitioning of refractory siderophile elements (Ni, Co, W, V, and Nb) during core formation, which can explain the discrepancy. Our modeling shows that the concentrations of the siderophile elements of the mantle are consistent with high-pressure metal-silicate equilibration in a terrestrial magma ocean. Our analysis shows that the timing of the MGI is inversely correlated with the time scale of the main accretion stage of the Earth. Specifically, the earliest time the MGI could have taken place right at approximately 30 Myr, corresponds to the end of main-stage accretion at approximately 30 Myr. A late MGI (> 52 Myr) requires the main stage of the Earth's accretion to be completed rapidly in < 10.7 ± 2.5 Myr. These are the two end member solutions and a continuum of solutions exists in between these extremes.

  4. [The reasons for the «space» of gerontology: the impact of the movements of the Earth and Moon on the performance of the human environment].

    PubMed

    Shapovalov, S N

    2016-01-01

    For future gerontological research specific interest are the research results obtained at the junction of Geophysics, astronomy, and biology, and existing links pointing to indicators of living objects with cosmophysical factors. The paper presents data on basic astronomical factors, potentially on a regular basis may cause gravitational effects on the biosphere as a living environment. Among these factors are movement of the Earth and Moon described is known in astronomy equations: the equation of the equinoxes, equation of time, as well as major perturbations from the Sun (evection, variation and annual inequality) inferred from the theory of lunar motion. Based on the amount of major perturbations from the Sun, the so-called λD-functions that are carried out to study the relationship between fluctuations of the so-called «computer time», the energy of solar radiation in the range of 605-607 nm, and the concentration of hemoglobin and red blood cells with major perturbations from the Sun. The resulting conclusion about the universal nature of the impact of the movements of the Moon and the Earth on the biosphere. The tables for the period from 01.01.2015 to 31.12.2016, with the calculated values λD functions that are potentially important for analyzing their association with temporal changes of various indicators of the body. The regularities obtained in the comparison of changes in various biomarkers with the course of values λD functions from tables, can be predictive in the study of the functioning of humans and the biosphere for astronomical periods. The research was carried out in Antarctica, where excluded the influence of artificial electromagnetic fields, st. Vostok (1998-1999) and st. Novolazarevskaya (2003-2004).

  5. Geochemical evidence for the formation of the Moon by impact induced fission of the proto-Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waenke, H.; Dreibus, G.

    1984-01-01

    Geochemical evidence is discussed which advocates the theory that the Moon was formed by impact induced fission of the Earth. The Earth's mantle exhibits a number of geochemical peculiarities which make our planet a unique object in the solar system. Terrestrial basalts are compared with those from the Eucrite parent body and the Shergotty parent body. Also the Moon's composition is very close to the Earth's in all details except the lower FeO content which is explained. Evidence is discussed for the plausible physical process of formation of the Moon by impact induced fission. Also the theory that impact induced fission occurred at the moment at which accretion of the Earth was not totally complete is briefly discussed.

  6. Orbit Determination Error Analysis Results for the Triana Sun-Earth L2 Libration Point Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marr, G.

    2003-01-01

    Using the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's Orbit Determination Error Analysis System (ODEAS), orbit determination error analysis results are presented for all phases of the Triana Sun-Earth L1 libration point mission and for the science data collection phase of a future Sun-Earth L2 libration point mission. The Triana spacecraft was nominally to be released by the Space Shuttle in a low Earth orbit, and this analysis focuses on that scenario. From the release orbit a transfer trajectory insertion (TTI) maneuver performed using a solid stage would increase the velocity be approximately 3.1 km/sec sending Triana on a direct trajectory to its mission orbit. The Triana mission orbit is a Sun-Earth L1 Lissajous orbit with a Sun-Earth-vehicle (SEV) angle between 4.0 and 15.0 degrees, which would be achieved after a Lissajous orbit insertion (LOI) maneuver at approximately launch plus 6 months. Because Triana was to be launched by the Space Shuttle, TTI could potentially occur over a 16 orbit range from low Earth orbit. This analysis was performed assuming TTI was performed from a low Earth orbit with an inclination of 28.5 degrees and assuming support from a combination of three Deep Space Network (DSN) stations, Goldstone, Canberra, and Madrid and four commercial Universal Space Network (USN) stations, Alaska, Hawaii, Perth, and Santiago. These ground stations would provide coherent two-way range and range rate tracking data usable for orbit determination. Larger range and range rate errors were assumed for the USN stations. Nominally, DSN support would end at TTI+144 hours assuming there were no USN problems. Post-TTI coverage for a range of TTI longitudes for a given nominal trajectory case were analyzed. The orbit determination error analysis after the first correction maneuver would be generally applicable to any libration point mission utilizing a direct trajectory.

  7. Navigating the Return Trip from the Moon Using Earth-Based Ground Tracking and GPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Kevin; Carpenter, Russell; Moreau, Michael C.; Lee, Taesul; Holt, Gregg N.

    2009-01-01

    NASA s Constellation Program is planning a human return to the Moon late in the next decade. From a navigation perspective, one of the most critical phases of a lunar mission is the series of burns performed to leave lunar orbit, insert onto a trans-Earth trajectory, and target a precise re-entry corridor in the Earth s atmosphere. A study was conducted to examine sensitivity of the navigation performance during this phase of the mission to the type and availability of tracking data from Earth-based ground stations, and the sensitivity to key error sources. This study also investigated whether GPS measurements could be used to augment Earth-based tracking data, and how far from the Earth GPS measurements would be useful. The ability to track and utilize weak GPS signals transmitted across the limb of the Earth is highly dependent on the configuration and sensitivity of the GPS receiver being used. For this study three GPS configurations were considered: a "standard" GPS receiver with zero dB antenna gain, a "weak signal" GPS receiver with zero dB antenna gain, and a "weak signal" GPS receiver with an Earth-pointing direction antenna (providing 10 dB additional gain). The analysis indicates that with proper selection and configuration of the GPS receiver on the Orion spacecraft, GPS can potentially improve navigation performance during the critical final phases of flight prior to Earth atmospheric entry interface, and may reduce reliance on two-way range tracking from Earth-based ground stations.

  8. Prevalence of Earth-size planets orbiting Sun-like stars.

    PubMed

    Petigura, Erik A; Howard, Andrew W; Marcy, Geoffrey W

    2013-11-26

    Determining whether Earth-like planets are common or rare looms as a touchstone in the question of life in the universe. We searched for Earth-size planets that cross in front of their host stars by examining the brightness measurements of 42,000 stars from National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Kepler mission. We found 603 planets, including 10 that are Earth size ( ) and receive comparable levels of stellar energy to that of Earth (1 - 2 R[Symbol: see text] ). We account for Kepler's imperfect detectability of such planets by injecting synthetic planet-caused dimmings into the Kepler brightness measurements and recording the fraction detected. We find that 11 ± 4% of Sun-like stars harbor an Earth-size planet receiving between one and four times the stellar intensity as Earth. We also find that the occurrence of Earth-size planets is constant with increasing orbital period (P), within equal intervals of logP up to ~200 d. Extrapolating, one finds 5.7(-2.2)(+1.7)% of Sun-like stars harbor an Earth-size planet with orbital periods of 200-400 d.

  9. Prevalence of Earth-size planets orbiting Sun-like stars

    PubMed Central

    Petigura, Erik A.; Howard, Andrew W.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.

    2013-01-01

    Determining whether Earth-like planets are common or rare looms as a touchstone in the question of life in the universe. We searched for Earth-size planets that cross in front of their host stars by examining the brightness measurements of 42,000 stars from National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s Kepler mission. We found 603 planets, including 10 that are Earth size () and receive comparable levels of stellar energy to that of Earth (). We account for Kepler’s imperfect detectability of such planets by injecting synthetic planet–caused dimmings into the Kepler brightness measurements and recording the fraction detected. We find that 11 ± 4% of Sun-like stars harbor an Earth-size planet receiving between one and four times the stellar intensity as Earth. We also find that the occurrence of Earth-size planets is constant with increasing orbital period (P), within equal intervals of logP up to ∼200 d. Extrapolating, one finds % of Sun-like stars harbor an Earth-size planet with orbital periods of 200–400 d. PMID:24191033

  10. Our Sun V: A Bright Young Sun Consistent with Helioseismology and Warm Temperatures on Ancient Earth and Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sackmann, I.-Juliana; Boothroyd, Arnold I.

    2001-01-01

    The relatively warm temperatures required on early Earth and Mars have been difficult to account for with warming from greenhouse gases. A slightly more massive young Sun would be brighter than predicted by the standard solar model, simultaneously resolving this problem for both Earth and Mars. We computed high-precision solar models with seven initial masses, from Mi = 1.01 to 1.07 solar mass - the latter being the maximum permitted if the early Earth is not to lose its water via a moist greenhouse effect. The relatively modest early mass loss that is required remains consistent with observational limits on mass loss from young stars and with estimates of the past solar wind obtained from lunar rocks. We considered three types of mass loss rates: (1) a reasonable choice of a simple exponential decline, (2) an extreme step-function case that gives the maximum effect consistent with observations, and (3) the radical case of a linear decline which is inconsistent with the solar wind mass loss estimates from lunar rocks. Our computations demonstrated that mass loss leaves a fingerprint oil the Sun's internal structure large enough to be detectable with helioseismic observations. All of our mass-losing solar models were consistent with the helioseismic observations; in fact, our preferred mass-losing cases were in marginally better agreement with the helioseismology than the standard solar model was, although this difference was smaller than the effects of other uncertainties in the input physics and in the solar composition. Mass loss has only a relatively minor effect on the predicted lithium depletion; the major portion of the solar lithium depletion must still be due to rotational mixing. Thus the modest mass loss cases considered here cannot be ruled out by observed lithium depletions. For the three mass loss types considered, the preferred initial masses were 1.07 solar mass for the exponential case and 1.04 solar mass for the step-function and linear cases; all

  11. Sun-Earth Connections: How the Sun Knocks Out My Cell Phone from 150 Million Kilometers Away

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ladbury, Raymond L.

    2014-01-01

    Large solar particle events (SPE) threaten many elements of critical infrastructure. A 2013 study by Lloyds of London and Atmospheric and Environmental Research recently found that if a worst-case solar event like the 1859 Carrington Event struck our planet now, it could result on $0.6-$2.36 trillion in damages to the economy. In March 2014, researchers Y. D. Liu et al. revealed that just such an event had narrowly missed Earth in July 2012. The event was observed by the STEREO A spacecraft. In this presentation, we examine how the sun can pack such a punch from 150 million km away, the threats such solar particle events pose, their mechanisms and the efforts NASA and other space agencies are carrying out to understand and mitigate such risks.

  12. The Sun-earth Imbalance radiometer for a direct measurement of the net heating of the earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewitte, Steven; Karatekin, Özgür; Chevalier, Andre; Clerbaux, Nicolas; Meftah, Mustapha; Irbah, Abdanour; Delabie, Tjorven

    2015-04-01

    It is accepted that the climate on earth is changing due to a radiative energy imbalance at the top of the atmosphere, up to now this radiation imbalance has not been measured directly. The measurement is challenging both in terms of space-time sampling of the radiative energy that is leaving the earth and in terms of accuracy. The incoming solar radiation and the outgoing terrestrial radiation are of nearly equal magnitude - of the order of 340 W/m² - resulting in a much smaller difference or imbalance of the order of 1 W/m². The only way to measure the imbalance with sufficient accuracy is to measure both the incoming solar and the outgoing terrestrial radiation with the same instrument. Based on our 30 year experience of measuring the Total Solar Irradiance with the Differential Absolute RADiometer (DIARAD) type of instrument and on our 10 year experience of measuring the Earth Radiation Budget with the Geostationary Earth Radiation Budget (GERB) instrument on Meteosat Second Generation, we propose an innovative constellation of Sun-earth IMBAlance (SIMBA) radiometer cubesats with the ultimate goal to measure the Sun-earth radiation imbalance. A first Simba In Orbit Demonstration satellite is scheduled for flight with QB50 in 2015. It is currently being developed as ESA's first cubesat through an ESA GSTP project. In this paper we will give an overview of the Simba science objectives and of the current satellite and payload development status.

  13. Designating Earth's Moon as a United Nations World Heritage Site - Permanently Protected from Commercial or Military Uses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, R. G.

    2002-01-01

    This paper proposes that Earth's Moon, in its entirety, be designated a United Nations World Heritage Site (WHS), permanently protected from any and all commercial or military utilization and reserved exclusively for scientific and aesthetic purposes. The paper discusses: 1) the extraordinary importance of the Moon for science, culture, and religion - past, present and future; 2) the history of proposals to exploit the Moon for commercial and military purposes and the shortcomings of this colonial, exploitation paradigm; and 3) the necessity, policy mechanisms, and political dynamics of designating the Moon as a World Heritage Site, permanently protected from commercial and/or military uses. The first part of the paper discusses the extraordinary importance of the Moon as it exists today - as a scientific laboratory, a source of beauty and inspiration throughout human evolution, a source for artistic expression, and as an object that is considered sacred by many cultures. Next, the paper traces the history of specific proposals for the exploitation of the Moon for commercial and/or military purposes - including plans by the U.S. Air Force in 1959 to detonate a nuclear explosion on the Moon, proposals to strip-mine the lunar regolith for helium-3 and rocket-fuel hydrogen; construction of solar power plants to transmit energy to Earth, and proposals to use the lunar surface as a billboard upon which to project commercial advertisements visible from Earth. The profound ethical, legal, and scientific shortcomings of this exploitation paradigm are described as an emerging Extraterrestrial Manifest Destiny that we have a collective obligation to challenge and constrain. The paper proposes that space exploration be infused with an ethical commitment to compassion, reverence, conservation, and non-interference to abiotic and biotic systems alike; as opposed to the expansion and extraterrestrial imposition of the colonization, exploitation, domination, and despoliation

  14. Core-Mantle Partitioning of Volatile Elements and the Origin of Volatile Elements in Earth and Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Righter, K.; Pando, K.; Danielson, L.; Nickodem, K.

    2014-01-01

    Depletions of siderophile elements in mantles have placed constraints on the conditions on core segregation and differentiation in bodies such as Earth, Earth's Moon, Mars, and asteroid 4 Vesta. Among the siderophile elements there are a sub-set that are also volatile (volatile siderophile elements or VSE; Ga, Ge, In, As, Sb, Sn, Bi, Zn, Cu, Cd), and thus can help to constrain the origin of volatile elements in these bodies, and in particular the Earth and Moon. One of the fundamental observations of the geochemistry of the Moon is the overall depletion of volatile elements relative to the Earth, but a satisfactory explanation has remained elusive. Hypotheses for Earth include addition during accretion and core formation and mobilized into the metallic core, multiple stage origin, or addition after the core formed. Any explanation for volatile elements in the Earth's mantle must also be linked to an explanation of these elements in the lunar mantle. New metal-silicate partitioning data will be applied to the origin of volatile elements in both the Earth and Moon, and will evaluate theories for exogenous versus endogenous origin of volatile elements.

  15. Fast accretion of the Earth with a late Moon-forming giant impact

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Gang; Jacobsen, Stein B.

    2011-01-01

    Constraints on the formation history of the Earth are critical for understanding of planet formation processes. 182Hf-182W chronometry of terrestrial rocks points to accretion of Earth in approximately 30 Myr after the formation of the solar system, immediately followed by the Moon-forming giant impact (MGI). Nevertheless, some N-body simulations and 182Hf-182W and 87Rb-87Sr chronology of some lunar rocks have been used to argue for a later formation of the Moon at 52 to > 100 Myr. This discrepancy is often explained by metal-silicate disequilibrium during giant impacts. Here we describe a model of the 182W isotopic evolution of the accreting Earth, including constraints from partitioning of refractory siderophile elements (Ni, Co, W, V, and Nb) during core formation, which can explain the discrepancy. Our modeling shows that the concentrations of the siderophile elements of the mantle are consistent with high-pressure metal-silicate equilibration in a terrestrial magma ocean. Our analysis shows that the timing of the MGI is inversely correlated with the time scale of the main accretion stage of the Earth. Specifically, the earliest time the MGI could have taken place right at approximately 30 Myr, corresponds to the end of main-stage accretion at approximately 30 Myr. A late MGI (> 52 Myr) requires the main stage of the Earth’s accretion to be completed rapidly in < 10.7 ± 2.5 Myr. These are the two end member solutions and a continuum of solutions exists in between these extremes. PMID:22006299

  16. Image is NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center’s mission support building with a composite of 16 images of the eclipsed moons overhead during Jan. 31 Super Blue Blood Moon.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2018-01-31

    California’s NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center photographer Ken Ulbrich takes photos of Super Blue Blood Moon eclipse making a time-lapse composition of the event on January 31. The total lunar eclipse provided a rare opportunity to capture a supermoon, a blue moon and a lunar eclipse at the same time. A supermoon occurs when the Moon is closer to Earth in its orbit and appearing 14 percent brighter than usual. As the second full moon of the month, this moon is also commonly known as a blue moon, though it will not be blue in appearance. The super blue moon passed through Earth’s shadow and took on a reddish tint, known as a blood moon. This total lunar eclipse occurs when the Sun, Earth, and a full moon form a near-perfect lineup in space. The Moon passes directly behind the Earth into its umbra (shadow).

  17. Perturbed Equations of Motion for Formation Flight Near the Sun-Earth L2 Point

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Segerman, Alan M.; Zedd, Michael F.

    2005-01-01

    This Memorandum Report consists of a compilation of three individual reports, of increasing complexity, describing investigations of formation flight of spacecraft in the vicinity of the L2 Sun-Earth 1ibration point. The individual reports form the following parts of this compilation: - Introduction to the relative motion of spacecraft about the Sun-Earth L2 Point - Linear and quadratic modelling and solution of the relative motion - Modelling the Perturbations - Elliptical Earth Orbit, Lunar Gravity, Solar Radiation Pressure, Thrusters. The three parts are self-contained, with somewhat, varying notation and terminology. After fair1y significant literature searches: this new work (of Parts 2 and 3) is deemed to be unique because it describes the primary perturbations to the description of relative motion between nearby spacecraft. The effect of the elliptical motion of the Earth about the Sun was verified to be the dominant perturbation to the circular restricted three body problem. Contributions due to lunar gravity and solar radiation pressure are seen to have much smaller effect.

  18. Dynamical sequestration of the Moon-forming impactor in co-orbital resonance with Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kortenkamp, Stephen J.; Hartmann, William K.

    2016-09-01

    Recent concerns about the giant impact hypothesis for the origin of the Moon, and an associated "isotope crisis" may be assuaged if the impactor was a local object that formed near Earth. We investigated a scenario that may meet this criterion, with protoplanets assumed to originate in 1:1 co-orbital resonance with Earth. Using N-body numerical simulations we explored the dynamical consequences of placing Mars-mass companions in various co-orbital configurations with a proto-Earth of 0.9 Earth-masses (M⊕). We modeled 162 different configurations, some with just the four terrestrial planets and others that included the four giant planets. In both the 4- and 8-planet models we found that a single Mars-mass companion typically remained a stable co-orbital of Earth for the entire 250 million year (Myr) duration of our simulations (59 of 68 unique simulations). In an effort to destabilize such a system we carried out an additional 94 simulations that included a second Mars-mass co-orbital companion. Even with two Mars-mass companions sharing Earth's orbit about two-thirds of these models (66) also remained stable for the entire 250 Myr duration of the simulations. Of the 28 2-companion models that eventually became unstable 24 impacts were observed between Earth and an escaping co-orbital companion. The average delay we observed for an impact of a Mars-mass companion with Earth was 102 Myr, and the longest delay was 221 Myr. In 40% of the 8-planet models that became unstable (10 out of 25) Earth collided with the nearly equal mass Venus to form a super-Earth (loosely defined here as mass ≥1.7 M⊕). These impacts were typically the final giant impact in the system and often occurred after Earth and/or Venus has accreted one or more of the other large objects. Several of the stable configurations involved unusual 3-planet hierarchical co-orbital systems.

  19. The focusing effect of P-wave in the Moon's and Earth's low-velocity core. Analytical solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatyanov, A. G.; Burmin, V. Yu

    2018-04-01

    The important aspect in the study of the structure of the interiors of planets is the question of the presence and state of core inside them. While for the Earth this task was solved long ago, the question of whether the core of the Moon is in a liquid or solid state up to the present is debatable up to present. If the core of the Moon is liquid, then the velocity of longitudinal waves in it should be lower than in the surrounding mantle. If the core is solid, then most likely, the velocity of longitudinal waves in it is higher than in the mantle. Numerical calculations of the wave field allow us to identify the criteria for drawing conclusions about the state of the lunar core. In this paper we consider the problem of constructing an analytical solution for wave fields in a layered sphere of arbitrary radius. A stable analytic solution is obtained for the wave fields of longitudinal waves in a three-layer sphere. Calculations of the total wave fields and rays for simplified models of the Earth and the Moon with real parameters are presented. The analytical solution and the ray pattern showed that the low-velocity cores of the Earth and the Moon possess the properties of a collecting lens. This leads to the emergence of a wave field focusing area. As a result, focused waves of considerable amplitude appear on the surface of the Earth and the Moon. In the Earth case, they appear before the first PKP-wave arrival. These are so-called "precursors", which continue in the subsequent arrivals of waves. At the same time, for the simplified model of the Earth, the maximum amplitude growth is observed in the 147-degree region. For the Moon model, the maximum amplitude growth is around 180°.

  20. On developing thermal cave detection techniques for earth, the moon and mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wynne, J. Judson; Titus, Timothy N.; Chong Diaz, Guillermo

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to (1) demonstrate the viability of detecting terrestrial caves at thermal-infrared wavelengths, (2) improve our understanding of terrestrial cave thermal behavior, (3) identify times of day when cave openings have the maximum thermal contrast with the surrounding surface regolith, and (4) further our understanding of how to detect caves on Earth, the Moon and Mars. We monitored the thermal behavior of two caves in the Atacama Desert of northern Chile. Through this work, we identified times when temperature contrasts between entrance and surface were greatest, thus enabling us to suggest optimal overflight times. The largest thermal contrast for both caves occurred during mid-day. One cave demonstrated thermal behavior at the entrance suggestive of cold-trapping, while the second cave demonstrated temperature shifts suggestive of airflow. We also collected thermograms without knowing optimal detection times; these images suggest both caves may also be detectable during off-peak times. We suggest cave detection using thermal remote sensing on Earth and other planetary objects will be limited by (1) capturing imagery in the appropriate thermal wavelength, (2) the size of cave entrance vs. the sensor's spatial resolution, (3) the viewing angle of the platform in relation to the slope trajectory of the cave entrance, (4) the strength of the thermal signal associated with the cave entrance, and (5) the time of day and season of thermal image capture. Through this and other studies, we will begin to identify the range of conditions under which caves are detectable in the thermal infrared and thus improve our detection capabilities of these features on Earth, the Moon and Mars. ?? 2008 Elsevier B.V.

  1. Discover Earth: Earth's Energy Budget or Can You Spare a Sun?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, Tom; Peters, Dale E.; Steeley, Jeanne

    1999-01-01

    Discover Earth is a NASA-sponsored project for teachers of grades 5-12, designed to: enhance understanding of the Earth as an integrated system enhance the interdisciplinary approach to science instruction, and provide classroom materials that focus on those goals. Discover Earth is conducted by the Institute for Global Environmental Strategies in collaboration with Dr. Eric Barron, Director, Earth System Science Center, The Pennsylvania State University; and Dr. Robert Hudson, Chair, the Department of Meteorology, University of Maryland at College Park.

  2. First simultaneous detection of terrestrial ionospheric molecular ions in the Earth's inner magnetosphere and at the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dandouras, I.; Poppe, A. R.; Fillingim, M. O.; Kistler, L. M.; Mouikis, C. G.; Rème, H.

    2017-09-01

    First coordinated observation of escaping heavy molecular ions in the Earth's inner magnetosphere and at the Moon. Quantifying the underlying escape mechanisms is important in order to understand the long-term (billion years scale) evolution of the atmospheric composition, and in particular the evolution of the N/O ratio, which is essential for habitability. Terrestrial heavy ions, transported to the Moon, suggest also that the Earth's atmosphere of billions of years ago may be preserved on the present-day lunar regolith.

  3. Orbit and size distributions for asteroids temporarily captured by the Earth-Moon system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorets, Grigori; Granvik, Mikael; Jedicke, Robert

    2017-03-01

    As a continuation of the work by Granvik et al. (2012), we expand the statistical treatment of Earth's temporarily-captured natural satellites from temporarily-captured orbiters (TCOs, i.e., objects which make at least one orbit around the Earth) to the newly redefined subpopulation of temporarily-captured flybys (TCFs). TCFs are objects that while being gravitationally bound fail to make a complete orbit around the Earth while on a geocentric orbit, but nevertheless approach the Earth within its Hill radius. We follow the trajectories of massless test asteroids through the Earth-Moon system and record the orbital characteristics of those that are temporarily captured. We then carry out a steady-state analysis utilizing the novel NEO population model by Granvik et al. (2016). We also investigate how an quadratic distribution at very small values of e⊙ and i⊙ affects the predicted population statistics of Earth's temporarily-captured natural satellites. The steady-state population in both cases (constant and quadratic number distributions inside the e and i bins) is predicted to contain a slightly reduced number of meter-sized asteroids compared to the values of the previous paper. For the combined TCO/TCF population, we find the largest body constantly present on a geocentric orbit to be on the order of 80 cm in diameter. In the phase space, where the capture is possible, the capture efficiency of TCOs and TCFs is O(10-6 -10-4) . We also find that kilometer-scale asteroids are captured once every 10 Myr.

  4. Do radioactive half-lives vary with the Earth-to-Sun distance?

    PubMed

    Hardy, J C; Goodwin, J R; Iacob, V E

    2012-09-01

    Recently, Jenkins, Fischbach and collaborators have claimed evidence that radionuclide half-lives vary systematically over a ±0.1% range as a function of the oscillating distance between the Earth and the Sun, based on multi-year activity measurements. We have avoided the time-dependent instabilities to which such measurements are susceptible by directly measuring the half-life of (198)Au (t(1/2)=2.695 d) on seven occasions spread out in time to cover the complete range of Earth-Sun distances. We observe no systematic oscillations in half-life and can set an upper limit on their amplitude of ±0.02%. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The Sun-Earth saddle point: characterization and opportunities to test general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topputo, Francesco; Dei Tos, Diogene A.; Rasotto, Mirco; Nakamiya, Masaki

    2018-04-01

    The saddle points are locations where the net gravitational accelerations balance. These regions are gathering more attention within the astrophysics community. Regions about the saddle points present clean, close-to-zero background acceleration environments where possible deviations from General Relativity can be tested and quantified. Their location suggests that flying through a saddle point can be accomplished by leveraging highly nonlinear orbits. In this paper, the geometrical and dynamical properties of the Sun-Earth saddle point are characterized. A systematic approach is devised to find ballistic orbits that experience one or multiple passages through this point. A parametric analysis is performed to consider spacecraft initially on L_{1,2} Lagrange point orbits. Sun-Earth saddle point ballistic fly-through trajectories are evaluated and classified for potential use. Results indicate an abundance of short-duration, regular solutions with a variety of characteristics.

  6. A Small Spacecraft Swarm Deployment and Stationkeeping Strategy for Sun-Earth L1 Halo Orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conn, Tracie R.; Bookbinder, Jay

    2018-01-01

    Spacecraft orbits about the Sun-Earth librarian point L1 have been of interest since the 1950s. An L1 halo orbit was first achieved with the International Sun-Earth Explorer-3 (ISEE-3) mission, and similar orbits around Sun-Earth L1 were achieved in the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE), Genesis, and Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) missions. With recent advancements in CubeSat technology, we envision that it will soon be feasible to deploy CubeSats at L1. As opposed to these prior missions where one large satellite orbited alone, a swarm of CubeSats at L1 would enable novel science data return, providing a topology for intersatellite measurements of heliophysics phenomena both spatially and temporally, at varying spatial scales.The purpose of this iPoster is to present a flight dynamics strategy for a swarm of numerous CubeSats orbiting Sun-Earth L1. The presented method is a coupled, two-part solution. First, we present a deployment strategy for the CubeSats that is optimized to produce prescribed, time-varying intersatellite baselines for the purposes of collecting magnetometer data as well as radiometric measurements from cross-links. Second, we employ a loose control strategy that was successfully applied to SOHO and ACE for minimized stationkeeping fuel expenditure. We emphasize that the presented solution is practical within the current state-of-the-art and heritage CubeSat technology, citing capabilities of CubeSat designs that will launch on the upcoming Exploration Mission 1 (EM-1) to lunar orbits and beyond. Within this iPoster, we present animations of the simulated deployment strategy and resulting spacecraft trajectories. Mission design parameters such as total delta-v required for long-term station keeping and minimummaximummean spacecraft separation distances are also presented.

  7. A Small Spacecraft Swarm Deployment and Stationkeeping Strategy for Sun-Earth L1 Halo Orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renea Conn, Tracie; Bookbinder, Jay

    2018-01-01

    Spacecraft orbits about the Sun-Earth librarian point L1 have been of interest since the 1950s. An L1 halo orbit was first achieved with the International Sun-Earth Explorer-3 (ISEE-3) mission, and similar orbits around Sun-Earth L1 were achieved in the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE), Genesis, and Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) missions. With recent advancements in CubeSat technology, we envision that it will soon be feasible to deploy CubeSats at L1. As opposed to these prior missions where one large satellite orbited alone, a swarm of CubeSats at L1 would enable novel science data return, providing a topology for intersatellite measurements of heliophysics phenomena both spatially and temporally, at varying spatial scales.The purpose of this iPoster is to present a flight dynamics strategy for a swarm of numerous CubeSats orbiting Sun-Earth L1. The presented method is a coupled, two-part solution. First, we present a deployment strategy for the CubeSats that is optimized to produce prescribed, time-varying intersatellite baselines for the purposes of collecting magnetometer data as well as radiometric measurements from cross-links. Second, we employ a loose control strategy that was successfully applied to SOHO and ACE for minimized stationkeeping propellant expenditure. We emphasize that the presented solution is practical within the current state-of-the-art and heritage CubeSat technology, citing capabilities of CubeSat designs that will launch on the upcoming Exploration Mission 1 (EM-1) to lunar orbits and beyond. Within this iPoster, we present animations of the simulated deployment strategy and resulting spacecraft trajectories. Mission design parameters such as total Δv required for long-term station keeping and minimum/maximum/mean spacecraft separation distances are also presented.

  8. An Exploration Of Fuel Optimal Two-impulse Transfers To Cyclers in the Earth-Moon System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseinisianaki, Saghar

    2011-12-01

    This research explores the optimum two-impulse transfers between a low Earth orbit and cycler orbits in the Earth-Moon circular restricted three-body framework, emphasizing the optimization strategy. Cyclers are those types of periodic orbits that meet both the Earth and the Moon periodically. A spacecraft on such trajectories are under the influence of both the Earth and the Moon gravitational fields. Cyclers have gained recent interest as baseline orbits for several Earth-Moon mission concepts, notably in relation to human exploration. In this thesis it is shown that a direct optimization starting from the classic lambert initial guess may not be adequate for these problems and propose a three-step optimization solver to improve the domain of convergence toward an optimal solution. The first step consists of finding feasible trajectories with a given transfer time. I employ Lambert's problem to provide initial guess to optimize the error in arrival position. This includes the analysis of the liability of Lambert's solution as an initial guess. Once a feasible trajectory is found, the velocity impulse is only a function of transfer time, departure, and arrival points' phases. The second step consists of the optimization of impulse over transfer time which results in the minimum impulse transfer for fixed end points. Finally, the third step is mapping the optimal solutions as the end points are varied.

  9. An Exploration Of Fuel Optimal Two-impulse Transfers To Cyclers in the Earth-Moon System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseinisianaki, Saghar

    This research explores the optimum two-impulse transfers between a low Earth orbit and cycler orbits in the Earth-Moon circular restricted three-body framework, emphasizing the optimization strategy. Cyclers are those types of periodic orbits that meet both the Earth and the Moon periodically. A spacecraft on such trajectories are under the influence of both the Earth and the Moon gravitational fields. Cyclers have gained recent interest as baseline orbits for several Earth-Moon mission concepts, notably in relation to human exploration. In this thesis it is shown that a direct optimization starting from the classic lambert initial guess may not be adequate for these problems and propose a three-step optimization solver to improve the domain of convergence toward an optimal solution. The first step consists of finding feasible trajectories with a given transfer time. I employ Lambert's problem to provide initial guess to optimize the error in arrival position. This includes the analysis of the liability of Lambert's solution as an initial guess. Once a feasible trajectory is found, the velocity impulse is only a function of transfer time, departure, and arrival points' phases. The second step consists of the optimization of impulse over transfer time which results in the minimum impulse transfer for fixed end points. Finally, the third step is mapping the optimal solutions as the end points are varied.

  10. Core-Mantle Partitioning of Volatile Elements and the Origin of Volatile Elements in Earth and Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Righter, Kevin; Pando, K.; Danielson, L.; Nickodem, K.

    2014-01-01

    Depletions of volatile siderophile elements (VSE; Ga, Ge, In, As, Sb, Sn, Bi, Zn, Cu, Cd) in mantles of Earth and Moon, constrain the origin of volatile elements in these bodies, and the overall depletion of volatile elements in Moon relative to Earth. A satisfactory explanation has remained elusive [1,2]. We examine the depletions of VSE in Earth and Moon and quantify the amount of depletion due to core formation and volatility of potential building blocks. We calculate the composition of the Earth's PUM during continuous accretion scenarios with constant and variable fO2. Results suggest that the VSE can be explained by a rather simple scenario of continuous accretion leading to a high PT metal-silicate equilibrium scenario that establishes the siderophile element content of Earth's PUM near the end of accretion [3]. Core formation models for the Moon explain most VSE, but calculated contents of In, Sn, and Zn (all with Tc < 750 K) are all still too high after core formation, and must therefore require an additional process to explain the depletions in the lunar mantle. We discuss possible processes including magmatic degassing, evaporation, condensation, and vapor-liquid fractionation in the lunar disk.

  11. Rubidium Isotope Composition of the Earth and the Moon: Evidence for the Origin of Volatile Loss During Planetary Accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pringle, E. A.; Moynier, F.

    2016-12-01

    The Earth-Moon system has a variety of chemical and isotopic characteristics that provide clues to understanding the mechanism of lunar formation. One important observation is the depletion in moderately volatile elements in the Moon compared to the Earth. This volatile element depletion may be a signature of volatile loss during the Moon-forming Giant Impact. Stable isotopes are powerful tracers of such a process, since volatile loss via evaporation enriches the residue in heavy isotopes. However, early studies searching for the fingerprint of volatile loss failed to find any resolvable variations [1]. Recent work has now revealed heavy isotope enrichments in the Moon relative to the Earth for the moderately volatile elements Zn [2,3] and K [4]. The purely lithophile nature of Rb (in contrast to the chalcophile/lithophile nature of Zn) and the higher volatility of Rb compared to K make Rb an ideal element with which to study the origin of lunar volatile element depletion. We have developed a new method for the high-precision measurement of Rb isotope ratios by MC-ICP-MS. The Rb isotope compositions of terrestrial rocks define a narrow range, indicating that Rb isotope fractionation during igneous differentiation is limited (<30 ppm/amu). There is a clear signature of Rb loss during evaporation in volatile-depleted achondrites and lunar rocks. In particular, eucrites are significantly enriched in 87Rb (up to several per mil) relative to chondrites. Similarly, lunar basalts are enriched in 87Rb compared to terrestrial basalts, by 200 ppm for 87Rb/85Rb. These data are the first measurements of a resolvable difference in Rb isotope composition between the Earth and the Moon. The variations in Rb isotope composition between the Earth and the Moon are consistent with Rb isotope fractionation due to evaporation. References: [1] Humayun & Clayton GCA 1995. [2] Paniello et al. Nature 2012. [3] Kato et al. Nat. Comm. 2015. [4] Wang and Jacobsen Nature in press.

  12. Earth-Moon Impacts at 300 Ma and 500 Ma Ago

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zellner, N. E. B.; Delano, J. W.; Swindle, T. D.; Barra, F.; Whittet, D. C. B.; Spudis, P. D.

    2005-01-01

    Impact events have played an important role in the evolution of planets and small bodies in the Solar System. Meteorites, lunar melt rocks, and lunar impact glasses provide important information about the geology of the parent body and the age of the impacting episodes. Over 2400 impact glasses from 4 Apollo regolith samples have been geochemically analyzed and a subset has been dated by the (40)Ar/(39)Ar method. New results, consistent with 2 break-ups in the Asteroid Belt, are presented here. Our previous study reported that (40)Ar/(39)Ar ages from 9 impact glasses showed that the Moon experienced significant impacts at approx. 800 Ma and at approx. 3800 Ma ago, somewhere in the vicinity of the Apollo 16 landing site. Additionally, reported on Apollo 12 samples with ages around 800 Ma, together implying global bombardment events. New data on 7 glasses from regolith sample 66041,127 show that the Moon also experienced impact events at approx. 300 Ma and > 500 Ma ago, which may coincide with the break-ups in the Asteroid Belt of the L- and H-chrondrite parent bodies. Since meteoritic evidence for these breakups has been found on Earth, it follows that evidence should be found in lunar samples as well. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  13. Dynamics of Orbits near 3:1 Resonance in the Earth-Moon System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dichmann, Donald J.; Lebois, Ryan; Carrico, John P., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    The Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) spacecraft is currently in a highly elliptical orbit around Earth with a period near 3:1 resonance with the Moon. Its orbit is oriented so that apogee does not approach the Moon. Simulations show this orbit to be remarkably stable over the next twenty years. This article examines the dynamics of such orbits in the Circular Restricted 3-Body Problem (CR3BP). We look at three types of periodic orbits, each exhibiting a type of symmetry of the CR3BP. For each of the orbit types, we assess the local stability using Floquet analysis. Although not all of the periodic solutions are stable in the mathematical sense, any divergence is so slow as to produce practical stability over several decades. We use Poincare maps with twenty-year propagations to assess the nonlinear stability of the orbits, where the perturbation magnitudes are related to the orbit uncertainty for the IBEX mission. Finally we show that these orbits belong to a family of orbits connected in a bifurcation diagram that exhibits exchange of stability. The analysis of these families of period orbits provides a valuable starting point for a mission orbit trade study.

  14. View of the Earth seen by the Apollo 17 crew traveling toward the moon

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1972-12-07

    AS17-148-22727 (7 Dec. 1972) --- This view of Earth was seen by the Apollo 17 crew as they traveled toward the moon on their NASA lunar landing mission. This outstanding trans-lunar coast photograph extends from the Mediterranean Sea area to the Antarctica south polar ice cap. This is the first time the Apollo trajectory made it possible to photograph the south polar ice cap. Note the heavy cloud cover in the Southern Hemisphere. Almost the entire coastline of Africa is clearly visible. The Arabian Peninsula can be seen at the northeastern edge of Africa. The large island off the coast of Africa is the Malagasy Republic. The Asian mainland is on the horizon toward the northeast. The Apollo 17 crew consisted of astronauts Eugene A. Cernan, mission commander; Ronald E. Evans, command module pilot; and Harrison H. Schmitt, lunar module pilot. While astronauts Cernan and Schmitt descended in the Lunar Module (LM) to explore the moon, astronaut Evans remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) in lunar orbit.

  15. Perturbed Equations of Motion for Formation Flight Near the Sun-Earth L2 Point

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luquette, Richard; Segerman, A. M.; Zedd, M. F.

    2005-01-01

    NASA is planning missions to the vicinity of the Sun-Earth L(sub 2) point, some involving a distributed system of telescope spacecraft, configured in a plane about a hub. Several sets of differential equations are written for the formation flight of such telescopes relative to the hub, with varying levels of fidelity. Effects are cast as additive perturbations to the circular restricted three-body problem, expanded in terms of the system distanced, to an accuracy of 10-20 m. These include Earth's orbital eccentricity, lunar motion, solar radiation pressure, and small thrusting forces. Simulations validating the expanded differential equations are presented.

  16. A Closer Earth and the Faint Young Sun Paradox: Modification of the Laws of Gravitation or Sun/Earth Mass Losses?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iorio, Lorenzo

    2013-10-01

    Given a solar luminosity LAr = 0:75L0 at the beginning of the Archean 3:8 Ga ago, where L0 is the present-day one, if the heliocentric distance, r, of the Earth was rAr = 0:956r0, the solar irradiance would have been as large as IAr = 0:82I0. It would have allowed for a liquid ocean on the terrestrial surface, which, otherwise, would have been frozen, contrary to the empirical evidence. By further assuming that some physical mechanism subsequently displaced the Earth towards its current distance in such a way that the irradiance stayed substantially constant over the entire Archean from 3:8 to 2:5 Ga ago, a relative recession per year as large as r_=r e3:4 × 10^11 a-1 would have been required. Although such a figure is roughly of the same order of magnitude of the value of the Hubble parameter 3:8 Ga ago HAr = 1:192H0 = 8:2 × 10^11 a-1, standard general relativity rules out cosmological explanations for the hypothesized Earth's recession rate. Instead, a class of modified theories of gravitation with nonminimal coupling between the matter and the metric naturally predicts a secular variation of the relative distance of a localized two-body system, thus yielding a potentially viable candidate to explain the putative recession of the Earth's orbit. Another competing mechanism of classical origin that could, in principle, allow for the desired effect is the mass loss, which either the Sun or the Earth itself may have experienced during the Archean. On the one hand, this implies that our planet should have lost 2% of its present mass in the form of eroded/evaporated hydrosphere. On the other hand, it is widely believed that the Sun could have lost mass at an enhanced rate, due to a stronger solar wind in the past for not more than v 0:2-0:3 Ga.

  17. View of the Earth seen by the Apollo 17 crew traveling toward the moon

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1972-12-07

    AS17-148-22742 (7-19 Dec. 1972) --- Most of Australia (center) and part of Antarctica are visible in this photo of a three-quarters Earth, recorded with a 70mm handheld Hasselblad camera using a 250mm lens. The three astronauts aboard the Command and Service Modules (CSM) were in the trans-lunar coast phase of the journey when one of them snapped this shot. While astronauts Eugene A. Cernan commander, and Harrison H. Schmitt, lunar module pilot, descended in the Lunar Module (LM) "Challenger" to explore the Taurus-Littrow region of the moon, astronaut Ronald E. Evans, command module pilot, remained with the CSM "America" in lunar orbit.

  18. Investigating Trojan Asteroids at the L4/L5 Sun-Earth Lagrange Points

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    John, K. K.; Graham, L. D.; Abell, P. A.

    2015-01-01

    Investigations of Earth's Trojan asteroids will have benefits for science, exploration, and resource utilization. By sending a small spacecraft to the Sun-Earth L4 or L5 Lagrange points to investigate near-Earth objects, Earth's Trojan population can be better understood. This could lead to future missions for larger precursor spacecraft as well as human missions. The presence of objects in the Sun-Earth L4 and L5 Lagrange points has long been suspected, and in 2010 NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) detected a 300 m object. To investigate these Earth Trojan asteroid objects, it is both essential and feasible to send spacecraft to these regions. By exploring a wide field area, a small spacecraft equipped with an IR camera could hunt for Trojan asteroids and other Earth co-orbiting objects at the L4 or L5 Lagrange points in the near-term. By surveying the region, a zeroth-order approximation of the number of objects could be obtained with some rough constraints on their diameters, which may lead to the identification of potential candidates for further study. This would serve as a precursor for additional future robotic and human exploration targets. Depending on the inclination of these potential objects, they could be used as proving areas for future missions in the sense that the delta-V's to get to these targets are relatively low as compared to other rendezvous missions. They can serve as platforms for extended operations in deep space while interacting with a natural object in microgravity. Theoretically, such low inclination Earth Trojan asteroids exist. By sending a spacecraft to L4 or L5, these likely and potentially accessible targets could be identified.

  19. Using GRIDVIEW to Better Understand the Early Bombardment History of the Moon, Mars and Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frey, Herbert

    2012-01-01

    ) on the Moon (Frey and Burgess, 2012, this meeting), with obvious implications for the early bombardment history of the Earth.

  20. Exploration Platform in the Earth-Moon Libration System Based on ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raftery, Michael; Derechin, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    International Space Station (ISS) industry partners have been working for the past two years on concepts using ISS development methods and residual assets to support a broad range of exploration missions. These concepts have matured along with planning details for NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) and Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) to allow serious consideration for a platform located in the Earth-Moon Libration (EML) system. This platform would provide a flexible basis for future exploration missions and would significantly reduce costs because it will enable re-use of expensive spacecraft and reduce the total number of launches needed to accomplish these missions. ISS provides a robust set of methods which can be used to test systems and capabilities needed for missions to the Moon, Mars, asteroids and other potential destinations. We will show how ISS can be used to reduce risk and improve operational flexibility for missions beyond low earth orbit through the development of a new Exploration Platform based in the EML system. The benefits of using the EML system as a gateway will be presented along with additional details of a lunar exploration mission concept. International cooperation is a critical enabler and ISS has already demonstrated successful management of a large multi-national technical endeavor. We will show how technology developed for ISS can be evolved and adapted to the new exploration challenge. New technology, such as electric propulsion and advanced life support systems can be tested and proven at ISS as part of an incremental development program. Finally, we will describe how the EML Platform could be built and deployed and how International access for crew and cargo could be provided.

  1. Surprise! The oft-ignored Moon might actually be important for changing the spins of asteroids during Earth flybys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuttle Keane, James; Siu, Hosea C.; Moskovitz, Nicholas A.; Binzel, Richard P.

    2015-11-01

    Analysis near-Earth asteroid archival data has revealed that asteroids with Earth MOIDs (minimum orbit intersection distance; a proxy for flyby distance) smaller than 1.0-1.5 lunar distances have a systematically larger dispersion in spin rate than more distant flybys (Siu, et al. 2015, DPS). While tidal torques during close encounters are expected to alter the spin states of asteroids (e.g. Scheeres et al. 2000, Icarus), there is no intrinsic reason to expect the observed sharp transition in spin rate distribution at 1.0-1.5 lunar distances, as tidal forces drop off smoothly with distance.While the Moon itself is too diminutive to directly alter the spin-states of asteroids, we show that its presence is enough to significantly affect asteroid encounter trajectories. Asteroids entering the Earth-Moon system are subject to three-body dynamics (due to the combined gravitational effects of the Earth and Moon). Depending on the flyby geometry, the Moon can act as a temporary sink for the asteroid's geocentric orbital energy. This allows some fraction of asteroids to have closer approaches with the Earth than expected when considering the Earth-Moon barycenter alone. In rare cases (~0.1%) this process enables the capture of temporary moons around the Earth (Granvik et al. 2012, Icarus). Asteroids that undergo these "enhanced" flybys can have both closer-than-expected encounter distances (resulting in more significant tidal perturbations), and repeated encounters with the Earth and Moon before leaving the system (resulting in the accumulation of multiple tidal interactions). By numerically solving the circular restricted three-body problem, we show that this process naturally produces a sharp transition in the asteroid population: asteroids with MOIDs less than 1.5 lunar distances can undergo these enhanced close approaches, possibly explaining the sharp transition in the dispersion of asteroid spin rates at this distance. Future work will investigate the efficiency of

  2. MoonBEAM: A Beyond Earth-Orbit Gamma-Ray Burst Detector for Gravitational-Wave Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hui, C. M.; Briggs, M. S.; Goldstein, A. M.; Jenke, P. A.; Kocevski, D.; Wilson-Hodge, C. A.

    2018-01-01

    Moon Burst Energetics All-sky Monitor (MoonBEAM) is a CubeSat concept of deploying gamma-ray detectors in cislunar space to improve localization precision for gamma-ray bursts by utilizing the light travel time difference between different orbits. We present here a gamma-ray SmallSat concept in Earth-Moon L3 halo orbit that is capable of rapid response and provide a timing baseline for localization improvement when partnered with an Earth-orbit instrument. Such an instrument would probe the extreme processes in cosmic collision of compact objects and facilitate multi-messenger time-domain astronomy to explore the end of stellar life cycles and black hole formations.

  3. Sun-Earth Day: Reaching the Education Audience by Informal Means

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thieman, J.; Lewis, E.; Cline, T.

    2010-01-01

    For ten years the Sun-Earth Day program has promoted Heliophysics education to ever larger audiences through events centered on attractive annual themes. What originally started out as a one day event quickly evolved into a series of programs and events that occur throughout the year culminating with a celebration on or near the Spring Equinox. The events are often formal broadcasts or webcasts seeking to convey the science behind the latest solar-terrestrial mission discoveries. This has been quite successful, but it is clear that the younger generation increasingly depends on social networking approaches and informal news transmission for learning what is happening in the world around them. For 2010, the Sun-Earth Day team put emphasis on using informal approaches to bring the theme to the audience. The main event, a webcast from the NASA booth at the National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) annual meeting by the NASA EDGE group, took a lighthearted and offbeat approach to interviewing scientists and educators about Heliophysics news. NASA EDGE programs are unscripted and unpredictable, and that represents a different approach to getting the message across. The webcast was supplemented by a number of social networking avenues. The Sun-Earth Day program explored a wide range of social media applications including Facebook, Twitter, NING, podcasting, iPhone apps, etc. Each of these offers unique and effective methods to promote Heliophysics content and mission related highlights. The facebook site was quite popular and message posting there told the Sun-Earth Day story piece by piece. The same could be said of twittering and the tweetup held at the NSTA site. Has all of this been effective? Results are still being gathered, but anecdotal responses from the world seem very positive. What other methods might be used in the future to bring the science to a personal hands-on, interactive experience? Outcomes: Participants will: (1) Be introduced to the Sun-Earth

  4. Optimal trajectories from the Earth-Moon L1 and L3 points to deflect hazardous asteroids and comets.

    PubMed

    Maccone, Claudio

    2004-05-01

    Software code named asteroff was recently created by the author to simulate the deflection of hazardous asteroids off of their collision course with the Earth. This code was both copyrighted and patented to avoid unauthorized use of ideas that could possibly be vital to construct a planetary defense system in the vicinity of the Earth. Having so said, the basic ideas and equations underlying the asteroff simulation code are openly described in this paper. A system of two space bases housing missiles is proposed to achieve the planetary defense of the Earth against dangerous asteroids and comets, collectively called impactors herein. We show that the layout of the Earth-Moon system with the five relevant Lagrangian (or libration) points in space leads naturally to only one, unmistakable location of these two space bases within the sphere of influence of the Earth. These locations are at the two Lagrangian points L(1) (between the Earth and the Moon) and L(3) (in the direction opposite to the Moon from the Earth). We show that placing missile bases at L(1) and L(3) would enable those missiles to deflect the trajectory of impactors by hitting them orthogonally to their impact trajectory toward the Earth, so as to maximize their deflection. We show that confocal conics are the best class of trajectories fulfilling this orthogonal deflection requirement. One additional remark is that the theory developed in this paper is just a beginning for a wider set of future research. In fact, we only develop the Keplerian analytical theory for the optimal planetary defense achievable from the Earth-Moon Lagrangian points L(1) and L(3). Much more sophisticated analytical refinements would be needed to: (1) take into account many perturbation forces of all kinds acting on both the impactors and missiles shot from L(1) and L(3); (2) add more (non-optimal) trajectories of missiles shot from either the Lagrangian points L(4) and L(5) of the Earth-Moon System or from the surface of the

  5. Alternative transfer to the Earth-Moon Lagrangian points L4 and L5 using lunar gravity assist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar, F. J. T.; Macau, E. E. N.; Winter, O. C.

    2014-02-01

    Lagrangian points L4 and L5 lie at 60° ahead of and behind the Moon in its orbit with respect to the Earth. Each one of them is a third point of an equilateral triangle with the base of the line defined by those two bodies. These Lagrangian points are stable for the Earth-Moon mass ratio. As so, these Lagrangian points represent remarkable positions to host astronomical observatories or space stations. However, this same distance characteristic may be a challenge for periodic servicing mission. This paper studies elliptic trajectories from an Earth circular parking orbit to reach the Moon's sphere of influence and apply a swing-by maneuver in order to re-direct the path of a spacecraft to a vicinity of the Lagrangian points L4 and L5. Once the geocentric transfer orbit and the initial impulsive thrust have been determined, the goal is to establish the angle at which the geocentric trajectory crosses the lunar sphere of influence in such a way that when the spacecraft leaves the Moon's gravitational field, its trajectory and velocity with respect to the Earth change in order to the spacecraft arrives at L4 and L5. In this work, the planar Circular Restricted Three Body Problem approximation is used and in order to avoid solving a two boundary problem, the patched-conic approximation is considered.

  6. Astronauts Capture Moon Illusion Photo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Many odd looking moon photos have been captured over the years by astronauts aboard the International Space Station. Even so, this photograph, taken by the crew over Russia on May 11, 2003, must have come as a surprise. The moon which is really a quarter of a million miles away, appears to be floating inside the Earth's atmosphere. The picture is tricky because of its uneven lighting. With the sun's elevation angle at only 6 degrees, night is falling on the left side of the image while it is still broad daylight on the right side. This gradient of sunlight is the key to the illusion.

  7. What's new on the moon?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    As a result of the Apollo program and other lunar probes, questions that remained unsolved during centuries of speculation and scientific study can now be answered concerning the composition, core, surface, age, and history of the moon. Data obtained from lunar samples and instruments on the lunar surface are being used to gain insight into the history of the earth and the other planets, planetary evolution, the development of planetary magnetic fields, the nature of the solar wind, and how the Sun operates. Projects suggested for using the moon to increase understanding of geophysics are described.

  8. Using Gravity Assists in the Earth-moon System as a Gateway to the Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McElrath, Timothy P.; Lantoine, Gregory; Landau, Damon; Grebow, Dan; Strange, Nathan; Wilson, Roby; Sims, Jon

    2012-01-01

    For spacecraft departing the Earth - Moon system, lunar flybys can significantly increase the hyperbolic escape energy (C3, in km (exp 2) /sec (exp 2) ) for a modest increase in flight time. Within approx 2 months, lunar flybys can produce a C3 of approx 2. Over 4 - 6 months, lunar flybys alone can increase the C3 to approx 4.5, or they can provide for additional periapsis burns to increase the C3 from approx 2 -3 to 10 or more, suitable for planetary missions. A lunar flyby departure can be followed by additional delta -V (such as that efficiently provided by a low thrust system, eg. Solar Electric Propulsion (SEP)) to raise the Earth - relative velocity (at a ratio of more than 2:1) before a subsequent Earth flyby, which redirects that velocity to a more distant target, all within not more than a year. This paper describes the applicability of lunar flybys for different flight times and propulsion systems, and illustrates this with instances of past usage and future possibilities. Examples discussed include ISEE-3, Nozomi, STEREO, 2018 Mars studies (which showed an 8% payload increase), and missions to Near Earth Objects (NEOs). In addition, the options for the achieving the initial lunar flyby are systematically discussed, with a view towards their practical use within a compact launch period. In particular, we show that launches to geosynchronous transfer orbit (GTO) as a secondary payload provide a feasible means of obtaining a lunar flyby for an acceptable cost, even for SEP systems that cannot easily deliver large delta-Vs at periapsis. Taken together, these results comprise a myriad of options for increasing the mission performance, by the efficient use of lunar flybys within an acceptable extension of the flight time.

  9. Using Gravity Assists in the Earth-moon System as a Gateway to the Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McElrath, Tim; Lantoine, Gregory; Landau, Damon; Grebow, Dan; Strange, Nathan; Wilson, Roby; Sims, Jon

    2012-01-01

    For spacecraft departing the Earth - Moon system, lunar flybys can significantly increase the hype rbolic escape energy (C3, in km 2 /sec 2 ) for a modest increase in flight time. Within 2 months, lunar flybys can produce a C3 of 2. Over 4 - 6 months, lunar flybys alone can increase the C3 to 4.5, or they can provide for additional periapsis burns to increase the C3 from 2 -3 to 10 or more, suitable for planetary missions. A lunar flyby departure can be followed by additional ? -V (such as that efficiently provided by a low thrust system, eg. Solar Electric Propulsion (SEP)) to raise the Earth - relative velocity (at a ratio of more than 2:1) before a subsequent Earth flyby, which redirects that velocity to a more di stant target, all within not much more than a year. This paper describes the applicability of lunar flybys for different flight times and propulsi on systems, and illustrates this with instances of past usage and future possibilities. Examples discussed i nclude ISEE - 3, Nozomi, STEREO, 2018 Mars studies (which showed an 8% payload increase), and missions to Near Earth Objects (NEOs). In addition, the options for the achieving the initial lunar flyby are systematically discussed, with a view towards their p ractical use with in a compact launch period. In particular, we show that launches to geosynchronous transfer orbit (GTO) as a secondary payload provide a feasible means of obtaining a lunar flyby for an acceptable cost, even for SEP systems that cannot ea sily deliver large ? - Vs at periapsis. Taken together, these results comprise a myriad of options for increasing the mission performance, by the efficient use of lunar flybys within an acceptable extension of the flight time.

  10. Exploring the Moon: A Teacher's Guide with Activities for Earth and Space Sciences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martel, Linda M. V. (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    The "Teacher's Guide" tells the story of the Moon's geological history and how scientists try to decipher the story. This background information may be useful reading for students as well. Key facts about the Moon appear on the "Moon ABCs" and "Rock ABCs" pages. These pages were named to emphasize the basic nature of the information. The "Progress in Lunar Science Chart" summarizes our knowledge about the Moon from 1959 to 1997.

  11. Celestial reference frames and the gauge freedom in the post-Newtonian mechanics of the Earth-Moon system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopeikin, Sergei; Xie, Yi

    2010-11-01

    We introduce the Jacobi coordinates adopted to the advanced theoretical analysis of the relativistic Celestial Mechanics of the Earth-Moon system. Theoretical derivation utilizes the relativistic resolutions on reference frames adopted by the International Astronomical Union (IAU) in 2000. The resolutions assume that the Solar System is isolated and space-time is asymptotically flat at infinity and the primary reference frame covers the entire space-time, has its origin at the Solar System barycenter (SSB) with spatial axes stretching up to infinity. The SSB frame is not rotating with respect to a set of distant quasars that are assumed to be at rest on the sky forming the International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF). The second reference frame has its origin at the Earth-Moon barycenter (EMB). The EMB frame is locally inertial and is not rotating dynamically in the sense that equation of motion of a test particle moving with respect to the EMB frame, does not contain the Coriolis and centripetal forces. Two other local frames—geocentric and selenocentric—have their origins at the center of mass of Earth and Moon respectively and do not rotate dynamically. Each local frame is subject to the geodetic precession both with respect to other local frames and with respect to the ICRF because of their relative motion with respect to each other. Theoretical advantage of the dynamically non-rotating local frames is in a more simple mathematical description of the metric tensor and relative equations of motion of the Moon with respect to Earth. Each local frame can be converted to kinematically non-rotating one after alignment with the axes of ICRF by applying the matrix of the relativistic precession as recommended by the IAU resolutions. The set of one global and three local frames is introduced in order to decouple physical effects of gravity from the gauge-dependent effects in the equations of relative motion of the Moon with respect to Earth.

  12. Apollo 15 impact melts, the age of Imbrium, and the Earth-Moon impact cataclysm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryder, Graham; Dalrymple, G. Brent

    1992-01-01

    The early impact history of the lunar surface is of critical importance in understanding the evolution of both the primitive Moon and the Earth, as well as the corresponding populations of planetesimals in Earth-crossing orbits. Two endmember hypotheses call for greatly dissimilar impact dynamics. One is a heavy continuous (declining) bombardment from about 4.5 Ga to 3.85 Ga. The other is that an intense but brief bombardment at about 3.85 +/- Ga was responsible for producing the visible lunar landforms and for the common 3.8-3.9 Ga ages of highland rocks. The Apennine Front, the main topographic ring of the Imbrium Basin, was sampled on the Apollo 15 mission. The Apollo 15 impact melts show a diversity of chemical compositions, indicating their origin in at least several different impact events. The few attempts at dating them have generally not produced convincing ages, despite their importance. Thus, we chose to investigate the ages of melt rock samples from the Apennine Front, because of their stratigraphic importance yet lack of previous age definition.

  13. Solar Electric Propulsion Vehicle Design Study for Cargo Transfer to Earth-moon L1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarver-Verhey, Timothy R.; Kerslake, Thomas W.; Rawlin, Vincent K.; Falck, Robert D.; Dudzinski, Leonard J.; Oleson, Steven R.

    2002-01-01

    A design study for a cargo transfer vehicle using solar electric propulsion was performed for NASA's Revolutionary Aerospace Systems Concepts program. Targeted for 2016, the solar electric propulsion (SEP) transfer vehicle is required to deliver a propellant supply module with a mass of approximately 36 metric tons from Low Earth Orbit to the first Earth-Moon libration point (LL1) within 270 days. Following an examination of propulsion and power technology options, a SEP transfer vehicle design was selected that incorporated large-area (approx. 2700 sq m) thin film solar arrays and a clustered engine configuration of eight 50 kW gridded ion thrusters mounted on an articulated boom. Refinement of the SEP vehicle design was performed iteratively to properly estimate the required xenon propellant load for the out-bound orbit transfer. The SEP vehicle performance, including the xenon propellant estimation, was verified via the SNAP trajectory code. Further efforts are underway to extend this system model to other orbit transfer missions.

  14. Lissajous Orbit Control for the Deep Space Climate Observatory Sun-Earth L1 Libration Point Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Craig; Case, Sarah; Reagoso, John

    2015-01-01

    DSCOVR Lissajous Orbit sized such that orbit track never extends beyond 15 degrees from Earth-Sun line (as seen from Earth). Requiring delta-V maneuvers, control orbit to obey a Solar Exclusion Zone (SEZ) cone of half-angle 4 degrees about the Earth-Sun line. Spacecraft should never be less than 4 degrees from solar center as seen from Earth. Following Lissajous Orbit Insertion (LOI), DSCOVR should be in an opening phase that just skirts the 4-degree SEZ. Maximizes time to the point where a closing Lissajous will require avoidance maneuvers to keep it out of the SEZ. Station keeping maneuvers should take no more than 15 minutes.

  15. Worlds Without Moons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-04-01

    of the six innermost TRAPPIST-1 planets. [Kane 2017]Challenge of Moons in Compact SystemsKane found that compact systems have a harder time supporting stable moons; the range of radii at which their moons can orbit is greatly reduced relative to spread-out systems like our own. As an example, Kane calculates that if the Earth were in a compact planetary system with a semimajor axis of 0.05 AU, its Hill radius would shrink from being 78.5 times to just 4.5 times its Roche radius greatly narrowing the region in which our Moon would be able to reside.Kane applied his models to the TRAPPIST-1 system as an example, demonstrating that its very unlikely that many if any of the systems seven planets would be able to retain a stable moon unless that moon were unreasonably dense.Is TRAPPIST-1 Really Moonless?Image of the Moon as it transits across the face of the Sun, as viewed from the Stereo-B spacecraft (which is in an Earth-trailing orbit). [NASA]How do these results fit with other observations of TRAPPIST-1? Kane uses our Moon as an example again: if we were watching a transit of the Earth and Moon in front of the Sun from a distance, the Moons transit depth would be 7.4% as deep as Earths. A transit of this depth in the TRAPPIST-1 system would have been detectable in Spitzer photometry of the system so the fact that we didnt see anything like this supports the idea that the TRAPPIST-1 planets dont have large moons.On the other hand, smaller moons (perhaps no more than 200300 km in radius) would have escaped detection. Future long-term monitoring of TRAPPIST-1 with observatories like the James Webb Space Telescope or 30-meter-class ground-based telescopes will help constrain this possibility, however.CitationStephen R. Kane 2017 ApJL 839 L19. doi:10.3847/2041-8213/aa6bf2

  16. Alternative Transfer to the Earth-Moon Lagrangian Points L4 and L5 Using Lunar Gravity assist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar, Francisco; Winter, Othon; Macau, Elbert; Bertachini de Almeida Prado, Antonio Fernando

    2012-07-01

    Lagrangian points L4 and L5 lie at 60 degrees ahead of and behind Moon in its orbit with respect to the Earth. Each one of them is a third point of an equilateral triangle with the base of the line defined by those two bodies. These Lagrangian points are stable for the Earth-Moon mass ratio. Because of their distance electromagnetic radiations from the Earth arrive on them substantially attenuated. As so, these Lagrangian points represent remarkable positions to host astronomical observatories. However, this same distance characteristic may be a challenge for periodic servicing mission. This paper studies transfer orbits in the planar restricted three-body problem. To avoid solving a two-boundary problem, the patched-conic approximation is used to find initial conditions to transfer a spacecraft between an Earth circular parking orbit and the Lagrangian points L4, L5 (in the Earth-Moon system), such that a swing-by maneuver is applied using the lunar gravity. We also found orbits that can be used to make a tour to the Lagrangian points L4, L5 based on the theorem of image trajectories. Keywords: Stable Lagrangian points, L4, L5, Three-Body problem, Patched Conic, Swing-by

  17. The problem of iron partition between Earth and Moon during simultaneous formation as a double planet system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassidy, W. A.

    1984-01-01

    A planetary model is described which requires fractional vapor/liquid condensation, planet accumulation during condensation, a late start for accumulation of the Moon, and volatile accretion to the surfaces of each planet only near the end of the accumulation process. In the model, initial accumulation of small objects is helped if the agglomerating particles are somewhat sticky. Assuming that growth proceeds through this range, agglomeration continues. If the reservoir of vapor is being preferentially depleted in iron by fractional condensation, an iron-rich planetary core forms. As the temperature decreases, condensing material becomes progressively richer in silicates and poorer in iron, forming the silicate-rich mantle of an already differentiated Earth. A second center of agglomeration successfully forms near the growing Earth after most of the iron in the reservoir has been used up. The bulk composition of the Moon then is similar to the outer mantle of the accumulating Earth.

  18. 60 Years of Studying the Earth-Sun System from Space: Explorer 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zurbuchen, T.

    2017-12-01

    The era of space-based observation of the Earth-Sun system initiated with the Explorer-1 satellite has revolutionized our knowledge of the Earth, Sun, and the processes that connect them. The space-based perspective has not only enabled us to achieve a fundamentally new understanding of our home planet and the star that sustains us, but it has allowed for significant improvements in predictive capability that serves to protect life, health, and property. NASA has played a leadership role in the United States in creating both the technology and science that has enabled and benefited from these new capabilities, and works closely with partner agencies and around the world to synergistically address these global challenges which are of sufficient magnitude that no one nation or organization can address on their own. Three areas are at the heart of NASA's comprehensive science program: Discovering the secrets of the universe, searching for life elsewhere, and safeguarding and improving life on Earth. Together, these tenets will help NASA lead on a civilization scale. In this talk, a review of these 60 years of advances, a status of current activities, and thoughts about their evolution into the future will be presented.

  19. The Prevalence of Earth-size Planets Orbiting Sun-like Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petigura, Erik; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Howard, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    In less than two decades since the discovery of the first planet orbiting another Sun-like star, the study of extrasolar planets has matured beyond individual discoveries to detailed characterization of the planet population as a whole. No mission has played more of a role in this paradigm shift than NASA's Kepler mission. Kepler photometry has shown that planets like Earth are common throughout the Milky Way Galaxy. Our group performed an independent search of Kepler photometry using our custom transit-finding pipeline, TERRA, and produced our own catalog of planet candidates. We conducted spectroscopic follow-up of their host stars in order to rule out false positive scenarios and to better constrain host star properties. We measured TERRA's sensitivity to planets of different sizes and orbital periods by injecting synthetic planets into raw Kepler photometry and measuring the recovery rate. Correcting for orbital tilt and survey completeness, we found that ~80% of GK stars harbor one or more planets within 1 AU and that ~22% of Sun-like stars harbor an Earth-size planet that receives similar levels of stellar radiation as Earth. I will present the latest results from our efforts to characterize the demographics of small planets revealed by Kepler.

  20. Oxygen isotopic evidence for accretion of Earth's water before a high-energy Moon-forming giant impact.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, Richard C; Barrat, Jean-Alix; Miller, Martin F; Anand, Mahesh; Dauphas, Nicolas; Franchi, Ian A; Sillard, Patrick; Starkey, Natalie A

    2018-03-01

    The Earth-Moon system likely formed as a result of a collision between two large planetary objects. Debate about their relative masses, the impact energy involved, and the extent of isotopic homogenization continues. We present the results of a high-precision oxygen isotope study of an extensive suite of lunar and terrestrial samples. We demonstrate that lunar rocks and terrestrial basalts show a 3 to 4 ppm (parts per million), statistically resolvable, difference in Δ 17 O. Taking aubrite meteorites as a candidate impactor material, we show that the giant impact scenario involved nearly complete mixing between the target and impactor. Alternatively, the degree of similarity between the Δ 17 O values of the impactor and the proto-Earth must have been significantly closer than that between Earth and aubrites. If the Earth-Moon system evolved from an initially highly vaporized and isotopically homogenized state, as indicated by recent dynamical models, then the terrestrial basalt-lunar oxygen isotope difference detected by our study may be a reflection of post-giant impact additions to Earth. On the basis of this assumption, our data indicate that post-giant impact additions to Earth could have contributed between 5 and 30% of Earth's water, depending on global water estimates. Consequently, our data indicate that the bulk of Earth's water was accreted before the giant impact and not later, as often proposed.

  1. Image shows January 31 Super Blue Blood Moon starting the lunar eclipse over NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center's mission support building located in California.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2018-01-31

    California's NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center photographer Carla Thomas takes photos on January 31 of the rare opportunity to capture a supermoon, a blue moon and a lunar eclipse at the same time. A supermoon occurs when the Moon is closer to Earth in its orbit and appearing 14 percent brighter than usual. As the second full moon of the month, this moon is also commonly known as a blue moon, though it will not be blue in appearance. The super blue moon passed through Earth's shadow and took on a reddish tint, known as a blood moon. This total lunar eclipse occurs when the Sun, Earth, and a full moon form a near-perfect lineup in space. The Moon passes directly behind the Earth into its umbra (shadow).

  2. NASA photographer captures Super Blue Blood Moon beginning its eclipse January 31 from NASA's Armstrong Flight Research Center on the West Coast.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2018-01-31

    California's NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center photographer Carla Thomas takes photos on January 31 of the rare opportunity to capture a supermoon, a blue moon and a lunar eclipse at the same time. A supermoon occurs when the Moon is closer to Earth in its orbit and appearing 14 percent brighter than usual. As the second full moon of the month, this moon is also commonly known as a blue moon, though it will not be blue in appearance. The super blue moon will pass through Earth's shadow and take on a reddish tint, known as a blood moon. This total lunar eclipse occurs when the Sun, Earth, and a full moon form a near-perfect lineup in space. The Moon passes directly behind the Earth into its umbra (shadow).

  3. Google Moon Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-19

    Michael Weiss-Malik, Product Manager for Moon in Google Earth, Google, Inc., speaks during a press conference, Monday, July 20, 2009, announcing the launch of Moon in Google Earth, an immersive 3D atlas of the Moon, accessible within Google Earth 5.0, Monday, July 20, 2009, at the Newseum in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  4. The Major Geoeffective Solar Eruptions of 2012 March 7: Comprehensive Sun-to-Earth Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patsourakos, S.; Georgoulis, M. K.; Vourlidas, A.; Nindos, A.; Sarris, T.; Anagnostopoulos, G.; Anastasiadis, A.; Chintzoglou, G.; Daglis, I. A.; Gontikakis, C.; Hatzigeorgiu, N.; Iliopoulos, A. C.; Katsavrias, C.; Kouloumvakos, A.; Moraitis, K.; Nieves-Chinchilla, T.; Pavlos, G.; Sarafopoulos, D.; Syntelis, P.; Tsironis, C.; Tziotziou, K.; Vogiatzis, I. I.; Balasis, G.; Georgiou, M.; Karakatsanis, L. P.; Malandraki, O. E.; Papadimitriou, C.; Odstrčil, D.; Pavlos, E. G.; Podlachikova, O.; Sandberg, I.; Turner, D. L.; Xenakis, M. N.; Sarris, E.; Tsinganos, K.; Vlahos, L.

    2016-01-01

    During the interval 2012 March 7-11 the geospace experienced a barrage of intense space weather phenomena including the second largest geomagnetic storm of solar cycle 24 so far. Significant ultra-low-frequency wave enhancements and relativistic-electron dropouts in the radiation belts, as well as strong energetic-electron injection events in the magnetosphere were observed. These phenomena were ultimately associated with two ultra-fast (>2000 km s-1) coronal mass ejections (CMEs), linked to two X-class flares launched on early 2012 March 7. Given that both powerful events originated from solar active region NOAA 11429 and their onsets were separated by less than an hour, the analysis of the two events and the determination of solar causes and geospace effects are rather challenging. Using satellite data from a flotilla of solar, heliospheric and magnetospheric missions a synergistic Sun-to-Earth study of diverse observational solar, interplanetary and magnetospheric data sets was performed. It was found that only the second CME was Earth-directed. Using a novel method, we estimated its near-Sun magnetic field at 13 R⊙ to be in the range [0.01, 0.16] G. Steep radial fall-offs of the near-Sun CME magnetic field are required to match the magnetic fields of the corresponding interplanetary CME (ICME) at 1 AU. Perturbed upstream solar-wind conditions, as resulting from the shock associated with the Earth-directed CME, offer a decent description of its kinematics. The magnetospheric compression caused by the arrival at 1 AU of the shock associated with the ICME was a key factor for radiation-belt dynamics.

  5. Determining the Evolution and Propagation of CME Flux Ropes from the Sun to Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmerio, E.; Kilpua, E.; Mierla, M.; Rodriguez, L.; Isavnin, A.; Zhukov, A.

    2017-12-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are the main drivers of space weather phenomena at the Earth. They form in the solar atmosphere as helical magnetic field structures known as flux ropes. The key parameter that defines the ability of a CME to drive geomagnetic storms is the North-South magnetic field component. One of the most significant problems in current long-term space weather forecasts is that there is no practical method to measure the magnetic structure of CMEs routinely in the corona. The magnetic structure of erupting flux ropes can however be inferred based on the properties of the CME's source region characteristics, e.g.filament details, coronal EUV arcades, X-ray/EUV sigmoids, taking into account nearby coronal and photospheric features. These proxies are useful for reconstructing the "instrinsic flux rope type" at the time of the eruption. However, the knowledge of the flux rope's magnetic structure at the Sun does not always imply a successful prediction of the magnetic structure at the Earth. This is because CMEs can change their orientation due to deflections, rotations, and deformations. We present here examples of CMEs for which we have determined their magnetic structure when launched from the Sun by using a synthesis of indirect proxies based on multiwavelength remote-sensing observations. When compared to their in situ counterparts, these CMEs present a different magnetic configuration, implying a high amount of rotation of their central axis during their propagation. We study the early evolution of these CMEs both on the solar disk and in coronagraph images though different techniques, e.g. forward modelling and tie-pointing technique. When possible, we study the CME structure in situ at other planets. We aim at determining where the rotation occurs and the rate of rotation during the CME evolution from the Sun to Earth, and possibly estimating the causes of such a high amount of rotation.

  6. THE MAJOR GEOEFFECTIVE SOLAR ERUPTIONS OF 2012 MARCH 7: COMPREHENSIVE SUN-TO-EARTH ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Patsourakos, S.; Nindos, A.; Kouloumvakos, A.

    During the interval 2012 March 7–11 the geospace experienced a barrage of intense space weather phenomena including the second largest geomagnetic storm of solar cycle 24 so far. Significant ultra-low-frequency wave enhancements and relativistic-electron dropouts in the radiation belts, as well as strong energetic-electron injection events in the magnetosphere were observed. These phenomena were ultimately associated with two ultra-fast (>2000 km s{sup −1}) coronal mass ejections (CMEs), linked to two X-class flares launched on early 2012 March 7. Given that both powerful events originated from solar active region NOAA 11429 and their onsets were separated by less than an hour,more » the analysis of the two events and the determination of solar causes and geospace effects are rather challenging. Using satellite data from a flotilla of solar, heliospheric and magnetospheric missions a synergistic Sun-to-Earth study of diverse observational solar, interplanetary and magnetospheric data sets was performed. It was found that only the second CME was Earth-directed. Using a novel method, we estimated its near-Sun magnetic field at 13 R{sub ⊙} to be in the range [0.01, 0.16] G. Steep radial fall-offs of the near-Sun CME magnetic field are required to match the magnetic fields of the corresponding interplanetary CME (ICME) at 1 AU. Perturbed upstream solar-wind conditions, as resulting from the shock associated with the Earth-directed CME, offer a decent description of its kinematics. The magnetospheric compression caused by the arrival at 1 AU of the shock associated with the ICME was a key factor for radiation-belt dynamics.« less

  7. Targeting Ballistic Lunar Capture Trajectories Using Periodic Orbits in the Sun-Earth CRTBP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooley, D.S.; Griesemer, Paul Ricord; Ocampo, Cesar

    2009-01-01

    A particular periodic orbit in the Earth-Sun circular restricted three body problem is shown to have the characteristics needed for a ballistic lunar capture transfer. An injection from a circular parking orbit into the periodic orbit serves as an initial guess for a targeting algorithm. By targeting appropriate parameters incrementally in increasingly complicated force models and using precise derivatives calculated from the state transition matrix, a reliable algorithm is produced. Ballistic lunar capture trajectories in restricted four body systems are shown to be able to be produced in a systematic way.

  8. The Impact of Stereo Display on Student Understanding of Phases of the Moon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cid, Ximena C.; Lopez, Ramon E.

    2010-01-01

    Understanding lunar phases requires three-dimensional information about the relative positions of the Moon, Earth, and Sun, thus using a stereo display in instruction might improve student comprehension of lunar phases or other topics in basic astronomy. We conducted a laboratory (15 sections) on phases of the Moon as part of the introductory…

  9. Image shows Trona Pinnacles near California's NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center during Jan. 31 Super Blue Blood Moon. Trona Pinnacles is an unusual geological feature of the state's Desert National Conservation.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-01-31

    NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center photographer Lauren Hughes takes photos of the Super Blue Blood Moon eclipse from California's Trona Pinnacles Desert National Conservation for the Jan. 31 of the total lunar eclipse that provided a rare opportunity to capture a supermoon, a blue moon and a lunar eclipse at the same time. A supermoon occurs when the Moon is closer to Earth in its orbit and appearing 14 percent brighter than usual. As the second full moon of the month, this moon is also commonly known as a blue moon, though it will not be blue in appearance. The super blue moon passed through Earth's shadow and took on a reddish tint, known as a blood moon. This total lunar eclipse occurs when the Sun, Earth, and a full moon form a near-perfect lineup in space. The Moon passes directly behind the Earth into its umbra (shadow).

  10. A fickle sun could be altering Earth`s climate after all

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, R.A.

    1995-08-01

    A long effort to link slight fluctuations in solar output with climate on Earth may finally be succeeding. A cycle of temperature changes in much of the middle and low atmosphere matches the 11 year sunspot cycle over much of the Northern Hemisphere. The findings were reported at the International Union of Geodesy and Gophysics meeting in Colorado. This article discusses the evidence and the modeling which has been done to reveal this possible connection. 1 fig.

  11. Flights between a neighborhoods of unstable libration points of Sun-Earth system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surkova, Valerya; Shmyrov, Vasily

    2018-05-01

    In this paper we study the problem of constructing impulse flights between neighborhoods of unstable collinear libration points of the Sun-Earth system [1]. Such maneuvering in near-Earth space may prove to be in demand in modern space navigation. For example, such a maneuvering was done by the space vehicle GENESIS. Three test points are chosen for the implementation of the impulse control, in order to move to a neighborhood of the libration point L2. It is shown that the earlier on the exit from the vicinity of the libration point L1 impulse control was realized, the sooner the neighborhood L2 was achieved. Separated from this problem, the problem of optimal control in the neighborhood of L2 was considered and a form of stabilizing control is presented.

  12. Periodic Trojan-type orbits in the earth-sun system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weissman, P. R.; Wetherill, G. W.

    1974-01-01

    Periodic orbits about the triangular equilibrium points are found for the planar restricted three-body problem using the earth-sun system. The maximum semimajor axis for tadpole orbits ranges from the infinitesimal orbit at 1.000 AU to the near-limiting orbit at 1.00285 AU. Horseshoe orbits are found for 1.0029 to 1.0080 AU, larger horseshoes being unstable because of close approaches to the earth. Using stability tests devised by Rabe (1961, 1962), the limit of stability for nonperiodic orbits is found to occur for maximum semimajor axes near 1.0020 AU. In addition, near-periodic tadpole orbits appear to be stable against perturbations by Jupiter and Venus for periods of at least 10,000 yr. The possibility that minor planets actually exist in such orbits is considered.

  13. Mass Flux in the Ancient Earth-Moon System and Benign Implications for the Origin of Life on Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryder, Graham

    2002-01-01

    The origin of life on Earth is commonly considered to have been negatively affected by intense impacting in the Hadean, with the potential for the repeated evaporation and sterilization of any ocean. The impact flux is based on scaling from the lunar crater density record, but that record has no tie to any absolute age determination for any identified stratigraphic unit older than approx. 3.9 Ga (Nectaris basin). The flux can be described in terms of mass accretion, and various independent means can be used to estimate the mass flux in different intervals. The critical interval is that between the end of essential crustal formation (approx. 4.4 Ga) and the oldest mare times (approx. 3.8 Ga). The masses of the basin-forming projectiles during Nectarian and early Imbrian times, when the last 15 of the approx.45 identified impact basins formed, can be reasonably estimated as minima. These in sum provide a minimum of 2 x 10(exp 21)g for the mass flux to the Moon during those times. If the interval was 80 million years (Nectaris 3.90 Ga, Orientale 3.82 Ga), then the flux was approx. 2 x 10(exp 13) g/yr over this period. This is higher by more than an order of magnitude than a flux curve that declines continuously and uniformly from lunar accretion to the rate inferred for the older mare plains. This rate cannot be extrapolated back increasingly into pre-Nectarian times, because the Moon would have added masses far in excess of itself in post-crust-formation time. Thus this episode was a distinct and cataclysmic set of events. There are approx. 30 pre-Nectarian basins, and they were probably part of the same cataclysm (starting at approx. 4.0 Ga?) because the crust is fairly intact, the meteoritic contamination of the pre-Nectarian crust is very low, impact melt rocks older than 3.92 Ga are virtually unknown, and ancient volcanic and plutonic rocks have survived this interval. The accretionary flux from approx. 4.4 to approx. 4.0 Ga was comparatively benign. When scaled

  14. Farewell to the Earth and the Moon -ESA's Mars Express successfully tests its instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-07-01

    The routine check-outs of Mars Express's instruments and of the Beagle-2 lander, performed during the last weeks, have been very successful. "As in all space missions little problems have arisen, but they have been carefully evaluated and solved. Mars Express continues on its way to Mars performing beautifully", comments Chicarro. The views of the Earth/Moon system were taken on 3 July 2003 by Mars Express's High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC), when the spacecraft was 8 million kilometres from Earth. The image taken shows true colours; the Pacific Ocean appears in blue, and the clouds near the Equator and in mid to northern latitudes in white to light grey. The image was processed by the Instrument Team at the Institute of Planetary Research of DLR, Berlin (Germany). It was built by combining a super resolution black and white HRSC snap-shot image of the Earth and the Moon with colour information obtained by the blue, green, and red sensors of the instrument. “The pictures and the information provided by the data prove the camera is working very well. They provide a good indication of what to expect once the spacecraft is in its orbit around Mars, at altitudes of only 250-300 kilometres: very high resolution images with brilliant true colour and in 3D,” says the Principal Investigator of the HRSC, Gerhard Neukum, of the Freie Universität of Berlin (Germany). This camera will be able to distinguish details of up to 2 metres on the Martian surface. Another striking demonstration of Mars Express's instruments high performance are the data taken by the OMEGA spectrometer. Once at Mars, this instrument will provide the best map of the molecular and mineralogical composition of the whole planet, with 5% of the planetary surface in high resolution. Minerals and other compounds such as water will be charted as never before. As the Red Planet is still too far away, the OMEGA team devised an ingenious test for their instrument: to detect the Earth’s surface

  15. Ultraviolet Observations of the Earth and Moon during the Juno Flyby

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladstone, R.; Versteeg, M. H.; Davis, M.; Greathouse, T. K.; Gerard, J. M.; Grodent, D. C.; Bonfond, B.

    2013-12-01

    We present the initial results from Juno-UVS observations of the Earth and Moon obtained during the flyby of the Juno spacecraft on 9 October 2013. Juno-UVS is an imaging spectrograph with a bandpass of 70<λ<205 nm. This wavelength range includes all important ultraviolet (UV) emissions from the H2 bands and the H Lyman series which are produced in Jupiter's auroras, and also the absorption signatures of aurorally-produced hydrocarbons. The Juno-UVS instrument consists of two separate sections: a dedicated telescope/spectrograph assembly and a vault electronics box. The telescope/spectrograph assembly contains a telescope which feeds a 0.15-m Rowland circle spectrograph. The telescope has a 4 x 4 cm2 input aperture and uses an off-axis parabolic (OAP) primary mirror. A flat scan mirror situated at the front end of the telescope (used to observe at up to ×30° perpendicular to the Juno spin plane) directs incoming light to the OAP. The light is focused onto the spectrograph entrance slit, which has a 'dog-bone' shape 7.2° long, in three sections of 0.2°, 0.025°, and 0.2° width (as projected onto the sky). Light entering the slit is dispersed by a toroidal grating which focuses UV light onto a curved microchannel plate cross delay line detector with a solar blind UV-sensitive CsI photocathode, which makes up the instrument's focal plane. Tantalum surrounds the detector assembly to shield it from high-energy electrons. The detector electronics are located behind the detector. All other electronics are located in a box inside Juno's spacecraft vault, including redundant low-voltage and high-voltage power supplies, command and data handling electronics, heater/actuator electronics, scan mirror electronics, and event processing electronics. The purpose of Juno-UVS is to remotely sense Jupiter's auroral morphology and brightness to provide context for in situ measurements by Juno's particle instruments. The recent Earth flyby provided an opportunity to: 1) use

  16. COMPARISON OF COSMIC-RAY ENVIRONMENTS ON EARTH, MOON, MARS AND IN SPACECARFT USING PHITS.

    PubMed

    Sato, Tatsuhiko; Nagamatsu, Aiko; Ueno, Haruka; Kataoka, Ryuho; Miyake, Shoko; Takeda, Kazuo; Niita, Koji

    2017-09-29

    Estimation of cosmic-ray doses is of great importance not only in aircrew and astronaut dosimetry but also in evaluation of background radiation exposure to public. We therefore calculated the cosmic-ray doses on Earth, Moon and Mars as well as inside spacecraft, using Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code System PHITS. The same cosmic-ray models and dose conversion coefficients were employed in the calculation to properly compare between the simulation results for different environments. It is quantitatively confirmed that the thickness of physical shielding including the atmosphere and soil of the planets is the most important parameter to determine the cosmic-ray doses and their dominant contributors. The comparison also suggests that higher solar activity significantly reduces the astronaut doses particularly for the interplanetary missions. The information obtained from this study is useful in the designs of the future space missions as well as accelerator-based experiments dedicated to cosmic-ray research. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Craters on Earth, Moon, and Mars: Multivariate classification and mode of origin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pike, R.J.

    1974-01-01

    Testing extraterrestrial craters and candidate terrestrial analogs for morphologic similitude is treated as a problem in numerical taxonomy. According to a principal-components solution and a cluster analysis, 402 representative craters on the Earth, the Moon, and Mars divide into two major classes of contrasting shapes and modes of origin. Craters of net accumulation of material (cratered lunar domes, Martian "calderas," and all terrestrial volcanoes except maars and tuff rings) group apart from craters of excavation (terrestrial meteorite impact and experimental explosion craters, typical Martian craters, and all other lunar craters). Maars and tuff rings belong to neither group but are transitional. The classification criteria are four independent attributes of topographic geometry derived from seven descriptive variables by the principal-components transformation. Morphometric differences between crater bowl and raised rim constitute the strongest of the four components. Although single topographic variables cannot confidently predict the genesis of individual extraterrestrial craters, multivariate statistical models constructed from several variables can distinguish consistently between large impact craters and volcanoes. ?? 1974.

  18. Super-chondritic Sm/Nd ratios in Mars, the Earth and the Moon.

    PubMed

    Caro, Guillaume; Bourdon, Bernard; Halliday, Alex N; Quitté, Ghylaine

    2008-03-20

    Small isotopic differences in the atomic abundance of neodymium-142 (142Nd) in silicate rocks represent the time-averaged effect of decay of formerly live samarium-146 (146Sm) and provide constraints on the timescales and mechanisms by which planetary mantles first differentiated. This chronology, however, assumes that the composition of the total planet is identical to that of primitive undifferentiated meteorites called chondrites. The difference in the 142Nd/144Nd ratio between chondrites and terrestrial samples may therefore indicate very early isolation (<30 Myr from the formation of the Solar System) of the upper mantle or a slightly non-chondritic bulk Earth composition. Here we present high-precision 142Nd data for 16 martian meteorites and show that Mars also has a non-chondritic composition. Meteorites belonging to the shergottite subgroup define a planetary isochron yielding an age of differentiation of 40 +/- 18 Myr for the martian mantle. This isochron does not pass through the chondritic reference value (100 x epsilon(142)Nd = -21 +/- 3; 147Sm/144Nd = 0.1966). The Earth, Moon and Mars all seem to have accreted in a portion of the inner Solar System with approximately 5 per cent higher Sm/Nd ratios than material accreted in the asteroid belt. Such chemical heterogeneities may have arisen from sorting of nebular solids or from impact erosion of crustal reservoirs in planetary precursors. The 143Nd composition of the primitive mantle so defined by 142Nd is strikingly similar to the putative endmember component 'FOZO' characterized by high 3He/4He ratios.

  19. Searching for artificial equilibrium points to place satellites "above and below" L3 in the Sun-Earth system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Almeida, A. K., Jr.; Prado, A. F. B. A.; Sanchez, D. M.; Yokoyama, T.

    2017-10-01

    Regarding practical applications of L3 of the Sun-Earth system, there are few studies with the goal of placing a spacecraft at this point, or in orbit around it. One of the main problems in placing a spacecraft near this equilibrium point is the fact that it is located behind the Sun with respect to the Earth. The Sun would be blocking direct communication between the spacecraft and the Earth. The present research gives several options to solve this problem by using a solar sail to place one or two spacecraft above and/or below the Ecliptic plane. This sail could also be used for the mission itself, to collect energy or particles. By using an adequate size, location and attitude of the solar sail, the equilibrium point can be moved from its original location to allow communications between the spacecraft and the Earth. A preliminary study of a solar sail that uses this strategy is shown here.

  20. Sun Earth Day 2012, The Transit of Venus: From Mauna Kea to the World

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayo, Louis

    2012-10-01

    For 2012, NASA’s Sun Earth Day program ( http://sunearthday.nasa.gov/ and http://venustransit.nasa.gov/ ), now in its 13th year, featured the transit of Venus as well as other close celestial encounters. A NASA sponsored team of scientists, social media experts, telescope technicians, students, and the NASA EDGE webcasting team journeyed to the 14,000 foot summit of Mauna Kea in Hawaii to view and share with the world this wondrous last in a lifetime show. Fifteen NASA missions participated providing educational resources and science content. And when it was all over, it was the biggest education event NASA ever held, bigger than the Super Bowl, the last shuttle flight, or Prince William’s wedding. Over 600 million web hits, 7.7 million web streams, and an estimated 500 million to 1 billion people reached. This presentation will highlight this phenomenal education program, discuss best practices, and show how we are replicating the Sun Earth Day approach and methods for other event based education programs.

  1. SCOSTEP: Understanding the Climate and Weather of the Sun-Earth System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, Natchimuthuk

    2011-01-01

    The international solar-terrestrial physics community had recognized the importance of space weather more than a decade ago, which resulted in a number of international collaborative activities such as the Climate and Weather of the Sun Earth System (CAWSES) by the Scientific Committee on Solar Terrestrial Physics (SCOSTEP). The CAWSES program is the current major scientific program of SCOSTEP that will continue until the end of the year 2013. The CAWSES program has brought scientists from all over the world together to tackle the scientific issues behind the Sun-Earth connected system and explore ways of helping the human society. In addition to the vast array of space instruments, ground based instruments have been deployed, which not only filled voids in data coverage, but also inducted young scientists from developing countries into the scientific community. This paper presents a summary of CAWSES and other SCOSTEP activities that promote space weather science via complementary approaches in international scientific collaborations, capacity building, and public outreach.

  2. Prediction of CMEs and Type II Bursts from Sun to Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cairns, I. H.; Schmidt, J. M.; Gopalswamy, N.; van der Holst, B.

    2017-12-01

    Most major space weather events are due to fast CMEs and their shocks interacting with Earth's magnetosphere. SImilarly, type II solar radio bursts are well-known signatures of CMEs and their shocks moving through the corona and solar wind. The properties of the space weather events and the type II radio bursts depend sensitively on the CME velocity, shape, and evolution as functions of position and time, as well as on the magnetic field vector in the coronal and solar wind plasma, downstream of the CME shock, and inside the CME. We report simulations of CMEs and type II bursts from the Sun to Earth with the Space Weather Modelling Framework (2015 and 2016 versions), set up carefully using relevant data, and a kinetic radio emission theory. Excellent agreement between observations, simulations, and theory are found for the coronal (metric) type II burst of 7 September 2014 and associated CME, including the lack of radio emission in the solar wind beyond about 10 solar radii. Similarly, simulation of a CME and type II burst from the Sun to 1 AU over the period 29 November - 1 December 2013 yield excellent agreement for the radio burst from 10 MHz to 30 kHz for STEREO A and B and Wind, arrival of the CME at STEREO A within 1 hour reported time, deceleration of the CME in agreement with the Gopalswamy et al. [2011] observational analyses, and Bz rotations at STEREO A from upstream of the CME shock to within the CME. These results provide strong support for the type II theory and also that the Space WeatherModeling Framework can accurately predict the properties and evolution of CMEs and the interplanetary magnetic field and plasma from the Sun to 1 AU when sufficiently carefully initialized.

  3. Dynamics of the Final Stages of Terrestrial Planet Growth and the Formation of the Earth-Moon System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.; Rivera, Eugenio J.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    An overview of current theories of star and planet formation, with emphasis on terrestrial planet accretion and the formation of the Earth-Moon system is presented. These models predict that rocky planets should form around most single stars, although it is possible that in some cases such planets are lost to orbital decay within the protoplanetary disk. The frequency of formation of gas giant planets is more difficult to predict theoretically. Terrestrial planets are believed to grow via pairwise accretion until the spacing of planetary orbits becomes large enough that the configuration is stable for the age of the system. Giant impacts during the final stages of growth can produce large planetary satellites, such as Earth's Moon. Giant planets begin their growth like terrestrial planets, but they become massive enough that they are able to accumulate substantial amounts of gas before the protoplanetary disk dissipates.

  4. Prebiotic Chemistry and Atmospheric Warming of Early Earth by an Active Young Sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Airapetian, V. S.; Glocer, A.; Gronoff, G.; Hebrard, E.; Danchi, W.

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen is a critical ingredient of complex biological molecules. Molecular nitrogen, however, which was outgassed Into the Earth's early atmosphere, is relatively chemically inert and nitrogen fixation into more chemically reactive compounds requires high temperatures. Possible mechanisms of nitrogen fixation include lightning, atmospheric shock heating by meteorites, and solar ultraviolet radiation. Here we show that nitrogen fixation in the early terrestrial atmosphere can be explained by frequent and powerful coronal mass ejection events from the young Sun -- so-called superflares. Using magnetohydrodynamic simulations constrained by Kepler Space Telescope observations, we find that successive superflare ejections produce shocks that accelerate energetic particles, which would have compressed the early Earth's magnetosphere. The resulting extended polar cap openings provide pathways for energetic particles to penetrate into the atmosphere and, according to our atmospheric chemistry simulations, initiate reactions converting molecular nitrogen, carbon dioxide and methane to the potent greenhouse gas nitrous oxide as well as hydrogen cyanide, an essential compound for life. Furthermore, the destruction of N2, C02 and CH, suggests that these greenhouse gases cannot explain the stability of liquid water on the early Earth. Instead, we propose that the efficient formation of nitrous oxide could explain a warm early Earth.

  5. Habitability of super-Earth planets around other suns: models including Red Giant Branch evolution.

    PubMed

    von Bloh, W; Cuntz, M; Schröder, K-P; Bounama, C; Franck, S

    2009-01-01

    The unexpected diversity of exoplanets includes a growing number of super-Earth planets, i.e., exoplanets with masses of up to several Earth masses and a similar chemical and mineralogical composition as Earth. We present a thermal evolution model for a 10 Earth-mass planet orbiting a star like the Sun. Our model is based on the integrated system approach, which describes the photosynthetic biomass production and takes into account a variety of climatological, biogeochemical, and geodynamical processes. This allows us to identify a so-called photosynthesis-sustaining habitable zone (pHZ), as determined by the limits of biological productivity on the planetary surface. Our model considers solar evolution during the main-sequence stage and along the Red Giant Branch as described by the most recent solar model. We obtain a large set of solutions consistent with the principal possibility of life. The highest likelihood of habitability is found for "water worlds." Only mass-rich water worlds are able to realize pHZ-type habitability beyond the stellar main sequence on the Red Giant Branch.

  6. Archean Earth Atmosphere Fractal Haze Aggregates: Light Scattering Calculations and the Faint Young Sun Paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boness, D. A.; Terrell-Martinez, B.

    2010-12-01

    As part of an ongoing undergraduate research project of light scattering calculations involving fractal carbonaceous soot aggregates relevant to current anthropogenic and natural sources in Earth's atmosphere, we have read with interest a recent paper [E.T. Wolf and O.B Toon,Science 328, 1266 (2010)] claiming that the Faint Young Sun paradox discussed four decades ago by Carl Sagan and others can be resolved without invoking heavy CO2 concentrations as a greenhouse gas warming the early Earth enough to sustain liquid water and hence allow the origin of life. Wolf and Toon report that a Titan-like Archean Earth haze, with a fractal haze aggregate nature due to nitrogen-methane photochemistry at high altitudes, should block enough UV light to protect the warming greenhouse gas NH3 while allowing enough visible light to reach the surface of the Earth. To test this hypothesis, we have employed a rigorous T-Matrix arbitrary-particle light scattering technique, to avoid the simplifications inherent in Mie-sphere scattering, on haze fractal aggregates at UV and visible wavelenths of incident light. We generate these model aggregates using diffusion-limited cluster aggregation (DLCA) algorithms, which much more closely fit actual haze fractal aggregates than do diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) algorithms.

  7. The Greatest Shadow on Earth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Stephen; Wimmer, Jason; Towsey, Michael; Fahmi, Marco; Winslett, Greg; Dubler, Gabriel; Le Prou, Angela; Loose, David

    2014-01-01

    In a total solar eclipse, the Moon completely covers the Sun, casting a shadow several hundred km wide across the face of the Earth. This paper describes observations of the 14 November 2012 total eclipse of the Sun visible from north Queensland, Australia. The edge of the umbra was captured on video during totality, and this video is provided for…

  8. Titanium stable isotope investigation of magmatic processes on the Earth and Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millet, Marc-Alban; Dauphas, Nicolas; Greber, Nicolas D.; Burton, Kevin W.; Dale, Chris W.; Debret, Baptiste; Macpherson, Colin G.; Nowell, Geoffrey M.; Williams, Helen M.

    2016-09-01

    We present titanium stable isotope measurements of terrestrial magmatic samples and lunar mare basalts with the aims of constraining the composition of the lunar and terrestrial mantles and evaluating the potential of Ti stable isotopes for understanding magmatic processes. Relative to the OL-Ti isotope standard, the δ49Ti values of terrestrial samples vary from -0.05 to +0.55‰, whereas those of lunar mare basalts vary from -0.01 to +0.03‰ (the precisions of the double spike Ti isotope measurements are ca. ±0.02‰ at 95% confidence). The Ti stable isotope compositions of differentiated terrestrial magmas define a well-defined positive correlation with SiO2 content, which appears to result from the fractional crystallisation of Ti-bearing oxides with an inferred isotope fractionation factor of ΔTi49oxide-melt = - 0.23 ‰ ×106 /T2. Primitive terrestrial basalts show no resolvable Ti isotope variations and display similar values to mantle-derived samples (peridotite and serpentinites), indicating that partial melting does not fractionate Ti stable isotopes and that the Earth's mantle has a homogeneous δ49Ti composition of +0.005 ± 0.005 (95% c.i., n = 29). Eclogites also display similar Ti stable isotope compositions, suggesting that Ti is immobile during dehydration of subducted oceanic lithosphere. Lunar basalts have variable δ49Ti values; low-Ti mare basalts have δ49Ti values similar to that of the bulk silicate Earth (BSE) while high-Ti lunar basalts display small enrichment in the heavy Ti isotopes. This is best interpreted in terms of source heterogeneity resulting from Ti stable isotope fractionation associated with ilmenite-melt equilibrium during the generation of the mantle source of high-Ti lunar mare basalts. The similarity in δ49Ti between terrestrial samples and low-Ti lunar basalts provides strong evidence that the Earth and Moon have identical stable Ti isotope compositions.

  9. 2018's 2nd Blue Moon on March 31 | Astronomy Essentials | EarthSky

    Science.gov Websites

    Contact Us subscribe Search for: SEARCH Search search Tonight Brightest Stars Astronomy Essentials Moon subscribers and counting ... 2018's 2nd Blue Moon on March 31 By Bruce McClure and Deborah Byrd in Astronomy stacks of the Peridier Library at the University of Texas Astronomy Department in the late 1970s

  10. Orbit Determination (OD) Error Analysis Results for the Triana Sun-Earth L1 Libration Point Mission and for the Fourier Kelvin Stellar Interferometer (FKSI) Sun-Earth L2 Libration Point Mission Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marr, Greg C.

    2003-01-01

    The Triana spacecraft was designed to be launched by the Space Shuttle. The nominal Triana mission orbit will be a Sun-Earth L1 libration point orbit. Using the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's Orbit Determination Error Analysis System (ODEAS), orbit determination (OD) error analysis results are presented for all phases of the Triana mission from the first correction maneuver through approximately launch plus 6 months. Results are also presented for the science data collection phase of the Fourier Kelvin Stellar Interferometer Sun-Earth L2 libration point mission concept with momentum unloading thrust perturbations during the tracking arc. The Triana analysis includes extensive analysis of an initial short arc orbit determination solution and results using both Deep Space Network (DSN) and commercial Universal Space Network (USN) statistics. These results could be utilized in support of future Sun-Earth libration point missions.

  11. Moon - North Pole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This view of the north polar region of the Moon was obtained by Galileo's camera during the spacecraft's flyby of the Earth-Moon system on December 7 and 8, 1992. The north pole is to the lower right of the image. The view in the upper left is toward the horizon across the volcanic lava plains of Mare Imbrium. The prominent crater with the central peak is Pythagoras, an impact crater some 130 kilometers (80 miles) in diameter. The image was taken at a distance of 121,000 kilometers (75,000 miles) from the Moon through the violet filter of Galileo's imaging system. According to team scientists, the viewing geometry provided by the spacecraft's pass over the north pole and the low sun-angle illumination provide a unique opportunity to assess the geologic relationships among the smooth plains, cratered terrain and impact ejecta deposits in this region of the Moon. JPL manages the Galileo Project for NASA's Office of Space Science and Applications.

  12. ON SUN-TO-EARTH PROPAGATION OF CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS: II. SLOW EVENTS AND COMPARISON WITH OTHERS

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ying D.; Hu, Huidong; Wang, Chi

    As a follow-up study on Sun-to-Earth propagation of fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs), we examine the Sun-to-Earth characteristics of slow CMEs combining heliospheric imaging and in situ observations. Three events of particular interest, the 2010 June 16, 2011 March 25, and 2012 September 25 CMEs, are selected for this study. We compare slow CMEs with fast and intermediate-speed events, and obtain key results complementing the attempt of Liu et al. to create a general picture of CME Sun-to-Earth propagation: (1) the Sun-to-Earth propagation of a typical slow CME can be approximately described by two phases, a gradual acceleration out tomore » about 20–30 solar radii, followed by a nearly invariant speed around the average solar wind level; (2) comparison between different types of CMEs indicates that faster CMEs tend to accelerate and decelerate more rapidly and have shorter cessation distances for the acceleration and deceleration; (3) both intermediate-speed and slow CMEs would have speeds comparable to the average solar wind level before reaching 1 au; (4) slow CMEs have a high potential to interact with other solar wind structures in the Sun–Earth space due to their slow motion, providing critical ingredients to enhance space weather; and (5) the slow CMEs studied here lack strong magnetic fields at the Earth but tend to preserve a flux-rope structure with an axis generally perpendicular to the radial direction from the Sun. We also suggest a “best” strategy for the application of a triangulation concept in determining CME Sun-to-Earth kinematics, which helps to clarify confusions about CME geometry assumptions in the triangulation and to improve CME analysis and observations.« less

  13. Galileo imaging results from the second Earth-Moon flyby: Lunar Maria and related units

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, R.; Belton, M. J. S.; Head, J. W.; Mcewen, A. S.; Pieters, C. M.; Neukum, G.; Becker, T. L.; Fischer, E. M.; Kadel, S. D.; Robinson, M. S.

    1993-01-01

    The second flyby of the Earth-Moon System by Galileo occurred on December 7, 1992, on its trajectory toward Jupiter. The flyby took the spacecraft over the lunar north polar region from the dark farside and continued across the illuminated nearside. This provided the first opportunity to observe northern and northeastern limb regions with a modern, multispectral imaging system with high spatial resolution (up to 1.1 km/pixel). Scientific objectives included compositional assessment of previously uncharacterized mare regions, study of various light plains materials, and assessment of dark mantle deposits (DMD) and dark halo craters (DHC). Color composite images were prepared from ratios of Galileo SSI filter data (0.76/0.41 yields red; 0.76/0.99 yields green; 0.41/0.76 yields blue) and used for preliminary comparison of units. The 0.41/0.76 ratio has been empirically correlated to Ti content of mare soils (blue is relatively high, red is relatively low). The relative strengths of the ferrous one micron absorption in mafic minerals can be compared using the 0.76/0.99 ratio. In addition, relative ages of units analyzed spectrally were determined from crater statistics using Lunar Orbiter images following the techniques of Neukum et al. Mare deposits analyzed include Mare Humboldtianum, central and eastern Mare Frigoris, Mare Crisium and other deposits in the Crisium Basin, and isolated mare patches on the northeastern lunar limb. Preliminary results show a diversity of 0.41/0.76 micron signatures, implying a wide range of titanium contents. Some light plains units are similar to units found at the Apollo 16 site; others may be ancient mare materials. Dark mantle deposits (DMD) analyzed also are available.

  14. The moon tilt illusion.

    PubMed

    Schölkopf, B

    1998-01-01

    Besides the familiar moon illusion [e.g. Hershenson, 1989 The Moon Illusion (Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates)], wherein the moon appears bigger when it is close to the horizon, there is a less known illusion which causes the moon's illuminated side to appear turned away from the direction of the sun. An experiment documenting the effect is described, and a possible explanation is put forward.

  15. Using Google Earth to Assess Shade for Sun Protection in Urban Recreation Spaces: Methods and Results.

    PubMed

    Gage, R; Wilson, N; Signal, L; Barr, M; Mackay, C; Reeder, A; Thomson, G

    2018-05-16

    Shade in public spaces can lower the risk of and sun burning and skin cancer. However, existing methods of auditing shade require travel between sites, and sunny weather conditions. This study aimed to evaluate the feasibility of free computer software-Google Earth-for assessing shade in urban open spaces. A shade projection method was developed that uses Google Earth street view and aerial images to estimate shade at solar noon on the summer solstice, irrespective of the date of image capture. Three researchers used the method to separately estimate shade cover over pre-defined activity areas in a sample of 45 New Zealand urban open spaces, including 24 playgrounds, 12 beaches and 9 outdoor pools. Outcome measures included method accuracy (assessed by comparison with a subsample of field observations of 10 of the settings) and inter-rater reliability. Of the 164 activity areas identified in the 45 settings, most (83%) had no shade cover. The method identified most activity areas in playgrounds (85%) and beaches (93%) and was accurate for assessing shade over these areas (predictive values of 100%). Only 8% of activity areas at outdoor pools were identified, due to a lack of street view images. Reliability for shade cover estimates was excellent (intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.97, 95% CI 0.97-0.98). Google Earth appears to be a reasonably accurate and reliable and shade audit tool for playgrounds and beaches. The findings are relevant for programmes focused on supporting the development of healthy urban open spaces.

  16. The sun, moon and stars of the southern Levant at Gezer and Megiddo: Cultural astronomy in Chalcolithic/Early and Middle Bronze Ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Sara Lee

    Astronomical images are found on monumental structures and decorative art, and metaphorically in seasonal myths, and are documented by calendars. In Israel and the southern Levant, images of the sun, the moon, and the stars were common decorating motifs. They were found on walls, pottery, and seals and date to as early as the Chalcolithic period; for example, the wall painting of a star at Teleilat Ghassul (North 1961). This dissertation establishes that the people of the Levant were aware of the apparent movement of the sun, and this will be discussed in Chapter 4. They began recording through representation drawings, astronomical phenomena no later than the Chalcolithic/Early Bronze Age and continued to do so late into the Middle Bronze Age. The argument moves beyond the simple use of symbols to the use of images to represent constellations, with the focus on the constellation Leo in Chapter 5. Furthermore, the use of astronomy as a power and political tool is also suggested in Chapter 6. Nonetheless, the primary purpose that is addressed here is the tendency in Syro-Palestinian archaeology has been to attribute technological evidence found in the northern and southern Levant as diffused from Egypt or Assyria, particularly astronomy. This dissertation firmly establishes that astronomy was used in the southern Levant before any significant contact with the civilizations of Egypt or Assyria.

  17. Image shows Trona Pinnacles near California’s NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center during Jan. 31 Super Blue Blood Moon. Trona Pinnacles is an unusual geological feature of the state’s Desert National Conservation.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-01-31

    NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center photographer Lauren Hughes takes photos of the Super Blue Blood Moon eclipse from California’s Trona Pinnacles Desert National Conservation for the Jan. 31 of the total lunar eclipse that provided a rare opportunity to capture a supermoon, a blue moon and a lunar eclipse at the same time. A supermoon occurs when the Moon is closer to Earth in its orbit and appearing 14 percent brighter than usual. As the second full moon of the month, this moon is also commonly known as a blue moon, though it will not be blue in appearance. The super blue moon passed through Earth’s shadow and took on a reddish tint, known as a blood moon. This total lunar eclipse occurs when the Sun, Earth, and a full moon form a near-perfect lineup in space. The Moon passes directly behind the Earth into its umbra (shadow).

  18. Google Moon Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-19

    Andrew Chaikin, author of "A Man on the Moon" speaks during a press conference, Monday, July 20, 2009, announcing the launch of Moon in Google Earth, an immersive 3D atlas of the Moon, accessible within Google Earth 5.0, Monday, July 20, 2009, at the Newseum in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  19. Google Moon Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-19

    Apollo 11 astronaut Buzz Aldrin, the second man to walk on the Moon, speaks during a press conference, Monday, July 20, 2009, announcing the launch of Moon in Google Earth, an immersive 3D atlas of the Moon, accessible within Google Earth 5.0, Monday, July 20, 2009, at the Newseum in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  20. Google Moon Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-19

    Buzz Aldrin, the second man to walk on the moon, speaks during a press conference, Monday, July 20, 2009, announcing the launch of Moon in Google Earth, an immersive 3D atlas of the Moon, accessible within Google Earth 5.0, Monday, July 20, 2009, at the Newseum in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  1. Understanding the Sun-Earth Libration Point Orbit Formation Flying Challenges For WFIRST and Starshade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webster, Cassandra M.; Folta, David C.

    2017-01-01

    In order to fly an occulter in formation with a telescope at the Sun-Earth L2 (SEL2) Libration Point, one must have a detailed understanding of the dy-namics that govern the restricted three body system. For initial purposes, a linear approximation is satisfactory, but operations will require a high-fidelity modeling tool along with strategic targeting methods in order to be successful. This paper focuses on the challenging dynamics of the transfer trajectories to achieve the relative positioning of two spacecraft to fly in formation at SEL2, in our case, the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) and a proposed Starshade. By modeling the formation transfers using a high fidelity tool, an accurate V approximation can be made to as-sist with the development of the subsystem design required for a WFIRST and Starshade formation flight mission.

  2. Long Term Missions at the Sun-Earth Libration Point L1: ACE, SOHO, and WIND

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Craig E.

    2011-01-01

    Three heliophysics missions - the Solar Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE), and the Global Geoscience WIND - have been orbiting the Sun-Earth interior libration point L1 continuously since 1996, 1997, and 2004, respectively. ACE and WIND (both NASA missions) and SOHO (an ESA-NASA joint mission) are all operated from the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Flight Dynamics Facility. While ACE and SOHO have been dedicated libration point orbiters since their launches, WIND prior to 2004 flew a remarkable 10-year deep-space trajectory that featured 38 targeted lunar flybys. The L1 orbits and the mission histories of the three spacecraft are briefly reviewed, and the station-keeping techniques and orbit maneuver experience are discussed.

  3. Formation Flying Satellite Control Around the L2 Sun-Earth Libration Point

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Nicholas H.; Folta, David; Carpenter, Russell; Bauer, Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of a linear control algorithm for formations in the vicinity of the L2 sun-Earth libration point. The development of a simplified extended Kalman filter is included as well. Simulations are created for the analysis of the stationkeeping and various formation maneuvers of the Stellar Imager mission. The simulations provide tracking error, estimation error, and control effort results. For formation maneuvering, the formation spacecraft track to within 4 meters of their desired position and within 1.5 millimeters per second of their desired zero velocity. The filter, with few exceptions, keeps the estimation errors within their three-sigma values. Without noise, the controller performs extremely well, with the formation spacecraft tracking to within several micrometers. Each spacecraft uses around 1 to 2 grams of propellant per maneuver, depending on the circumstances.

  4. Solar radiation pressure application for orbital motion stabilization near the Sun-Earth collinear libration point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polyakhova, Elena; Shmyrov, Alexander; Shmyrov, Vasily

    2018-05-01

    Orbital maneuvering in a neighborhood of the collinear libration point L1 of Sun-Earth system has specific properties, primarily associated with the instability L1. For a long stay in this area of space the stabilization problem of orbital motion requires a solution. Numerical experiments have shown that for stabilization of motion it is requires very small control influence in comparison with the gravitational forces. On the other hand, the stabilization time is quite long - months, and possibly years. This makes it highly desirable to use solar pressure forces. In this paper we illustrate the solar sail possibilities for solving of stabilization problem in a neighborhood L1 with use of the model example.

  5. STS-56 Earth observation of a sun-glinted ocean along the coast of Somalia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    STS-56 Earth observation taken aboard Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, is of a sun-glinted ocean along the northeastern coast of Somalia. The small island of Xaafuun is connected to the mainland by a well-developed double tombolo-two sand bars. Between the two toombolos a lagoon is formed which gradually fills with sediment and becomes a flat sand bar. Better known double tombolos include those of Gibraltar, the now-partially submerged giant tombolos forming Adam's Bridge (Palk Strait) connecting Sri Lanka to India, Monte Argentario in Italy, and Long Island, New York. Such tombolos usually indicate a constant sediment source and a strong unidirectional or bi-directional (monsoonal) long shore current. In this case, sediment is provided by the plumes of the major African rivers debauching into the Mozambique Channel. The sediment is carried predominately to the northeast along the coast by the swiftly moving monsoonal Agulhas Current. Visible in this scene are internal waves, shear

  6. Sun-to-Earth Analysis of a Major Geoeffective Solar Eruption within the Framework of the

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patsourakos, S.; Vlahos, L.; Georgoulis, M.; Tziotziou, K.; Nindos, A.; Podladchikova, O.; Vourlidas, A.; Anastasiadis, A.; Sandberg, I.; Tsinganos, K.; Daglis, I.; Hillaris, A.; Preka-Papadema, P.; Sarris, M.; Sarris, T.

    2013-09-01

    Transient expulsions of gigantic clouds of solar coronal plasma into the interplanetary space in the form of Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) and sudden, intense flashes of electromagnetic radiation, solar flares, are well-established drivers of the variable Space Weather. Given the innate, intricate links and connections between the solar drivers and their geomagnetic effects, synergistic efforts assembling all pieces of the puzzle along the Sun-Earth line are required to advance our understanding of the physics of Space Weather. This is precisely the focal point of the Hellenic National Space Weather Research Network (HNSWRN) under the THALIS Programme. Within the HNSWRN framework, we present here the first results from a coordinated multi-instrument case study of a major solar eruption (X5.4 and X1.3 flares associated with two ultra-fast (>2000 km/s) CMEs) which were launched early on 7 March 2012 and triggered an intense geomagnetic storm (min Dst =-147 nT) approximately two days afterwards. Several elements of the associated phenomena, such as the flare and CME, EUV wave, WL shock, proton and electron event, interplanetary type II radio burst, ICME and magnetic cloud and their spatiotemporal relationships and connections are studied all way from Sun to Earth. To this end, we make use of satellite data from a flotilla of solar, heliospheric and magnetospheric missions and monitors (e.g., SDO, STEREO, WIND, ACE, Herschel, Planck and INTEGRAL). We also present our first steps toward formulating a cohesive physical scenario to explain the string of the observables and to assess the various physical mechanisms than enabled and gave rise to the significant geoeffectiveness of the eruption.

  7. The Moon as Its Own Planet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Struck, J. T.

    2018-04-01

    The Moon is large enough so that the Moon can be considered its own planet. The Moon can be seen as revolving around the Sun, sweeping out an area, being round, having the characteristics of being a planet.

  8. Modeling the effectiveness of shielding in the earth-moon-mars radiation environment using PREDICCS: five solar events in 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, Philip R.; Schwadron, Nathan A.; Townsend, Larry W.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.; Case, Anthony W.; Spence, Harlan E.; Wilson, Jody K.; Joyce, Colin J.

    2017-08-01

    Radiation in the form of solar energetic particles (SEPs) presents a severe risk to the short-term health of astronauts and the success of human exploration missions beyond Earth's protective shielding. Modeling how shielding mitigates the dose accumulated by astronauts is an essential step toward reducing these risks. PREDICCS (Predictions of radiation from REleASE, EMMREM, and Data Incorporating the CRaTER, COSTEP, and other SEP measurements) is an online tool for the near real-time prediction of radiation exposure at Earth, the Moon, and Mars behind various levels of shielding. We compare shielded dose rates from PREDICCS with dose rates from the Cosmic Ray Telescope for the Effects of Radiation (CRaTER) onboard the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) at the Moon and from the Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) during its cruise phase to Mars for five solar events in 2012 when Earth, MSL, and Mars were magnetically well connected. Calculations of the accumulated dose demonstrate a reasonable agreement between PREDICCS and RAD ranging from as little as 2% difference to 54%. We determine mathematical relationships between shielding levels and accumulated dose. Lastly, the gradient of accumulated dose between Earth and Mars shows that for the largest of the five solar events, lunar missions require aluminum shielding between 1.0 g cm-2 and 5.0 g cm-2 to prevent radiation exposure from exceeding the 30-day limits for lens and skin. The limits were not exceeded near Mars.

  9. Using NASA Space Imaging Technology to Teach Earth and Sun Topics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verner, E.; Bruhweiler, F. C.; Long, T.

    2011-12-01

    We teach an experimental college-level course, directed toward elementary education majors, emphasizing "hands-on" activities that can be easily applied to the elementary classroom. This course, Physics 240: "The Sun-Earth Connection" includes various ways to study selected topics in physics, earth science, and basic astronomy. Our lesson plans and EPO materials make extensive use of NASA imagery and cover topics about magnetism, the solar photospheric, chromospheric, coronal spectra, as well as earth science and climate. In addition we are developing and will cover topics on ecosystem structure, biomass and water on Earth. We strive to free the non-science undergraduate from the "fear of science" and replace it with the excitement of science such that these future teachers will carry this excitement to their future students. Hands-on experiments, computer simulations, analysis of real NASA data, and vigorous seminar discussions are blended in an inquiry-driven curriculum to instill confident understanding of basic physical science and modern, effective methods for teaching it. The course also demonstrates ways how scientific thinking and hands-on activities could be implemented in the classroom. We have designed this course to provide the non-science student a confident basic understanding of physical science and modern, effective methods for teaching it. Most of topics were selected using National Science Standards and National Mathematics Standards that are addressed in grades K-8. The course focuses on helping education majors: 1) Build knowledge of scientific concepts and processes; 2) Understand the measurable attributes of objects and the units and methods of measurements; 3) Conduct data analysis (collecting, organizing, presenting scientific data, and to predict the result); 4) Use hands-on approaches to teach science; 5) Be familiar with Internet science teaching resources. Here we share our experiences and challenges we face while teaching this course.

  10. Optimal Sunshade Configurations for Space-Based Geoengineering near the Sun-Earth L1 Point.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Joan-Pau; McInnes, Colin R

    2015-01-01

    Within the context of anthropogenic climate change, but also considering the Earth's natural climate variability, this paper explores the speculative possibility of large-scale active control of the Earth's radiative forcing. In particular, the paper revisits the concept of deploying a large sunshade or occulting disk at a static position near the Sun-Earth L1 Lagrange equilibrium point. Among the solar radiation management methods that have been proposed thus far, space-based concepts are generally seen as the least timely, albeit also as one of the most efficient. Large occulting structures could potentially offset all of the global mean temperature increase due to greenhouse gas emissions. This paper investigates optimal configurations of orbiting occulting disks that not only offset a global temperature increase, but also mitigate regional differences such as latitudinal and seasonal difference of monthly mean temperature. A globally resolved energy balance model is used to provide insights into the coupling between the motion of the occulting disks and the Earth's climate. This allows us to revise previous studies, but also, for the first time, to search for families of orbits that improve the efficiency of occulting disks at offsetting climate change on both global and regional scales. Although natural orbits exist near the L1 equilibrium point, their period does not match that required for geoengineering purposes, thus forced orbits were designed that require small changes to the disk attitude in order to control its motion. Finally, configurations of two occulting disks are presented which provide the same shading area as previously published studies, but achieve reductions of residual latitudinal and seasonal temperature changes.

  11. Current Moon - June 15, 2011

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-12-08

    Current moon as viewed on Wednesday, June 15, 2011, 19:00 UT (Phase 100%) This marks the first time that accurate shadows at this level of detail are possible in such a computer simulation. The shadows are based on the global elevation map being developed from measurements by the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) aboard the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO). LOLA has already taken more than 10 times as many elevation measurements as all previous missions combined. The Moon always keeps the same face to us, but not exactly the same face. Because of the tilt and shape of its orbit, we see the Moon from slightly different angles over the course of a month. When a month is compressed into 12 seconds, as it is in this animation, our changing view of the Moon makes it look like it's wobbling. This wobble is called libration. The word comes from the Latin for "balance scale" (as does the name of the zodiac constellation Libra) and refers to the way such a scale tips up and down on alternating sides. The sub-Earth point gives the amount of libration in longitude and latitude. The sub-Earth point is also the apparent center of the Moon's disk and the location on the Moon where the Earth is directly overhead. The Moon is subject to other motions as well. It appears to roll back and forth around the sub-Earth point. The roll angle is given by the position angle of the axis, which is the angle of the Moon's north pole relative to celestial north. The Moon also approaches and recedes from us, appearing to grow and shrink. The two extremes, called perigee (near) and apogee (far), differ by more than 10%. The most noticed monthly variation in the Moon's appearance is the cycle of phases, caused by the changing angle of the Sun as the Moon orbits the Earth. The cycle begins with the waxing (growing) crescent Moon visible in the west just after sunset. By first quarter, the Moon is high in the sky at sunset and sets around midnight. The full Moon rises at sunset and is high in

  12. A Case for Developing a Ground Based Replication of the Earth, Moon and Mars Spaceflight Infrastructure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradford, Robert N.; Best, Susan L.

    2006-01-01

    When the systems are developed and in place to provide the services needed to operate en route and on the Lunar and Martian surfaces, an Earth based replication will need to be in place for the safety and protection of mission success. The replication will entail all aspects of the flight configuration end to end but will not include any closed loop systems. This would replicate the infrastructure from Lunar and Martian robots, manned surface excursions, through man and unmanned terrestrial bases, through the various types of communication systems and technologies, manned and un-manned space vehicles (large and small), to Earth based systems and control centers. An Earth based replicated infrastructure will enable checkout and test of new technologies, hardware, software updates and upgrades and procedures without putting humans and missions at risk. Analysis of events, what ifs and trouble resolution could be played out on the ground to remove as much risk as possible from any type of proposed change to flight operational systems. With adequate detail, it is possible that failures could be predicted with a high probability and action taken to eliminate failures. A major factor in any mission to the Moon and to Mars is the complexity of systems, interfaces, processes, their limitations, associated risks and the factor of the unknown including the development by many contractors and NASA centers. The need to be able to introduce new technologies over the life of the program requires an end to end test bed to analyze and evaluate these technologies and what will happen when they are introduced into the flight system. The ability to analyze system behaviors end to end under varying conditions would enhance safety e.g. fault tolerances. This analysis along with the ability to mine data from the development environment (e.g. test data), flight ops and modeling/simulations data would provide a level of information not currently available to operations and astronauts. In

  13. Deep Space Transportation System Using the Sun-Earth L2 Point

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsumoto, Michihiro

    2007-01-01

    Recently, various kinds of planetary explorations have become more feasible, taking the advantage of low thrust propulsion means such as ion engines that have come into practical use. The field of space activity has now been expanded even to the rim of the outer solar system. In this context, the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) has started investigating a Deep Space Port built at the L2 Lagrange point in the Sun-Earth system. For the purpose of making the deep space port practically useful, there is a need to establish a method to making spaceship depart and return from/to the port. This paper first discusses the escape maneuvers originating from the L2 point under the restricted three-body problem. Impulsive maneuvers from the L2 point are extensively studied here, and using the results, optimal low-thrust escape strategies are synthesized. Furthermore, this paper proposes the optimal escape and acceleration maneuvers schemes using Electric Delta-V Earth Gravity Assist (EDVEGA) technique.

  14. "Tormenta Espacial" - Exploring The Sun-earth Connection With A Spanish-language Planetarium Show

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elteto, Attila; Salas, F.; Duncan, D.; Traub-Metlay, S.

    2007-10-01

    Reaching out to Spanish speakers is increasingly vital to workforce development and public support of space science projects. Building on a successful partnership with NASA's TIMED mission, LASP and Space Science Institute, Fiske Planetarium has translated its original planetarium show - "Space Storm” - into "Tormenta Espacial". This show explores the Sun-Earth connection and explains how solar activity affects technology and life on Earth. Solar scientists from NOAA's Space Environment Center and the University of Colorado at Boulder contributed to provide scientific accuracy. Show content and accompanying educational materials are aligned with state and national science standards. While designed for students in grades 6-8, this show has been positively evaluated by students from grades 4-10 and shown to the general public with favorable responses. Curricular materials extend the planetarium experience into the K-12 classroom so that students inspired and engaged by the show continue to see real-life applications and workplace opportunities. Fiske Planetarium offers both "Space Storm” and "Tormenta Espacial” to other planetariums at a minimal rate, including technical support for the life of the show. Thanks to a request from a planetarium in Belgium, a version of "Space Storm” is available with no spoken dialogue so that languages other than English or Spanish may be accommodated. Collaborative projects among planetariums, NASA missions (planned as well as active), research scientists and other parties keep EPO activities healthy and well-funded. Fiske Planetarium staff strive to develop and maintain partnerships throughout the EPO and informal education communities.

  15. Prebiotic chemistry and atmospheric warming of early Earth by an active young Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Airapetian, V. S.; Glocer, A.; Gronoff, G.; Hébrard, E.; Danchi, W.

    2016-06-01

    Nitrogen is a critical ingredient of complex biological molecules. Molecular nitrogen, however, which was outgassed into the Earth’s early atmosphere, is relatively chemically inert and nitrogen fixation into more chemically reactive compounds requires high temperatures. Possible mechanisms of nitrogen fixation include lightning, atmospheric shock heating by meteorites, and solar ultraviolet radiation. Here we show that nitrogen fixation in the early terrestrial atmosphere can be explained by frequent and powerful coronal mass ejection events from the young Sun--so-called superflares. Using magnetohydrodynamic simulations constrained by Kepler Space Telescope observations, we find that successive superflare ejections produce shocks that accelerate energetic particles, which would have compressed the early Earth’s magnetosphere. The resulting extended polar cap openings provide pathways for energetic particles to penetrate into the atmosphere and, according to our atmospheric chemistry simulations, initiate reactions converting molecular nitrogen, carbon dioxide and methane to the potent greenhouse gas nitrous oxide as well as hydrogen cyanide, an essential compound for life. Furthermore, the destruction of N2, CO2 and CH4 suggests that these greenhouse gases cannot explain the stability of liquid water on the early Earth. Instead, we propose that the efficient formation of nitrous oxide could explain a warm early Earth.

  16. Exploring Sun-Earth Connections: A Physical Science Program for (K-8)Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michels, D. J.; Pickert, S. M.; Thompson, J. L.; Montrose, C. J.

    2003-12-01

    An experimental, inquiry-based physical science curriculum for undergraduate, pre-service K-8 teachers is under development at the Catholic University of America in collaboration with the Solar Physics Branch of the Naval Research Laboratory and NASA's Sun-Earth Connection missions. This is a progress report. The current, stunningly successful exploratory phase in Sun-Earth Connection (SEC) physics, sparked by SOHO, Yohkoh, TRACE, and other International Solar Terrestrial Physics (ISTP) and Living With a Star (LWS) programs, has provided dynamic, visually intuitive data that can be used for teaching basic physical concepts such as the properties of gravitational and electromagnetic fields which are manifest in beautiful imagery of the astrophysical plasmas of the solar atmosphere and Earth's auroras. Through a team approach capitalizing on the combined expertise of the Catholic University's departments of Education and Physics and of NRL solar researchers deeply involved in SEC missions we have laid out a program that will teach non-science-major undergraduates a very limited number of physical science concepts but in such a way as to develop for each one both a formal understanding and an intuitive grasp that will instill confidence, spark interest and scientific curiosity and, ideally, inspire a habit of lifetime inquiry and professional growth. A three-semester sequence is planned. The first semester will be required of incoming Education freshmen. The second and third semesters will be of such a level as to satisfy the one-year science requirement for non-science majors in the College of Arts and Sciences. The approach as adopted will integrate physics content and educational methods, with each concept introduced through inquiry-based, hands-on investigation using methods and materials directly applicable to K-8 teaching situations (Exploration Phase). The topic is further developed through discussion, demonstration and lecture, introducing such mathematical

  17. NASA Sun-Earth Connections Theory Program: The Structure and Dynamics of the Solar Corona and Inner Heliosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikic, Zoran; Grebowsky, Joseph (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This report covers technical progress during the first quarter of the second year of NASA Sun-Earth Connections Theory Program (SECTP). SAIC and the University of California, Irvine (UCI) have conducted research into theoretical modeling of active regions, the solar corona, and the inner heliosphere, using the MHD model.

  18. Testing Models for the Origin of the Earth-Moon System with 142Nd/144Nd Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyung, E.; Jacobsen, S. B.; Zeng, L.

    2015-12-01

    The Sm-Nd system is widely used for tracking the differentiation and evolution of planetary silicate reservoirs, due to the well understood, strong Sm-Nd fractionation between melt and mantle minerals. The short-lived 146Sm-142Nd system with a half-life of 103 Ma or 68 Ma has been used to constrain early planetary differentiation events based on early Archean terrestrial rocks, lunar rocks and meteorites. Early Archean terrestrial rocks show significant variations in 142Nd/144Nd of about 30 ppm, demonstrating very early differentiation of the Earth's mantle and crust. In contrast, present day 142Nd/144Nd ratios of mantle-derived ocean island basalts and MORBs show almost no variation at the reported analytical precision level (2σ = ± 6 ppm), suggesting that such early variations have been erased with time due to crustal recycling and mantle mixing. The 142Nd/144Nd ratio of the lunar mantle has been reported to be offset from terrestrial standards by about -5 ppm, barely resolvable with the reported analytical uncertainties. Differences in the 142Nd/144Nd ratios between the bulk Earth and Moon may suggest early large scale silicate differentiation events on the Earth that predate the Giant Moon forming impact. To address this problem, we carry out new 142Nd/144Nd measurements of terrestrial rocks, and lunar rocks and meteorites with a TIMS (Isoprobe T) equipped with new Xact Faraday amplifiers provided by Isotopx. We find that the Xact amplifiers provide lower noise than the earlier generation preamplifiers and operate close to the theoretical thermodynamic noise limit calculated from the Johnson equation. So far we have been able to improve multidynamic measurements to be reproducible to within ± 2 ppm at the 2σ level, and with this precision we find no variations in a few young terrestrial rocks. Our next step is measurements of lunar rocks and E-chondrites. If these turn out to be identical to the modern Earth, then the Nd isotope system may tell the same

  19. Real-time control of optimal low-thrust transfer to the Sun-Earth L 1 halo orbit in the bicircular four-body problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmani, Majid; Büskens, Christof

    2011-11-01

    In this article, after describing a procedure to construct trajectories for a spacecraft in the four-body model, a method to correct the trajectory violations is presented. To construct the trajectories, periodic orbits as the solutions of the three-body problem are used. On the other hand, the bicircular model based on the Sun-Earth rotating frame governs the dynamics of the spacecraft and other bodies. A periodic orbit around the first libration-point L1 is the destination of the mission which is one of the equilibrium points in the Sun-Earth/Moon three-body problem. In the way to reach such a far destination, there are a lot of disturbances such as solar radiation and winds that make the plans untrustworthy. However, the solar radiation pressure is considered in the system dynamics. To prevail over these difficulties, considering the whole transfer problem as an optimal control problem makes the designer to be able to correct the unavoidable violations from the pre-designed trajectory and strategies. The optimal control problem is solved by a direct method, transcribing it into a nonlinear programming problem. This transcription gives an unperturbed optimal trajectory and its sensitivities with respect perturbations. Modeling these perturbations as parameters embedded in a parametric optimal control problem, one can take advantage of the parametric sensitivity analysis of nonlinear programming problem to recalculate the optimal trajectory with a very smaller amount of computation costs. This is obtained by evaluating a first-order Taylor expansion of the perturbed solution in an iterative process which is aimed to achieve an admissible solution. At the end, the numerical results show the applicability of the presented method.

  20. Low-Thrust Transfers from Distant Retrograde Orbits to L2 Halo Orbits in the Earth-Moon System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Nathan L.; Parker, Jeffrey S.; Hughes, Steven P.; Heiligers, Jennette

    2016-01-01

    Enable future missions Any mission to a DRO or halo orbit could benefit from the capability to transfer between these orbits Chemical propulsion could be used for these transfers, but at high propellant cost Fill gaps in knowledge A variety of transfers using SEP or solar sails have been studied for the Earth-Moon system Most results in literature study a single transfer This is a step toward understanding the wide array of types of transfers available in an N-body force model.

  1. John F. Kennedy, Jr., speaks to the media at KSC's HBO premiere 'From the Earth to the Moon.'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    John F. Kennedy, Jr., editor-in-chief of George Magazine, speaks with members of the national media at the Home Box Office (HBO) and Imagine Entertainment premiere of the 12-part miniseries 'From the Earth to the Moon' at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). The series was filmed in part on location at KSC and dramatizes the human aspects of NASA's efforts to launch Americans to the Moon. The miniseries highlights NASA's Apollo program and the events leading up to and including the six successful missions to the Moon. A special 500-seat theater was constructed next to the Apollo/Saturn V Center for the KSC premiere showing. Speakers at the event included KSC Director Roy Bridges (at right); Jeff Bewkes, chairman and CEO for HBO; and John F. Kennedy, Jr. Also attending the event, which featured the episode entitled '1968,' were Buzz Aldrin, Apollo 11 astronaut, and Al Worden, Apollo 15 astronaut. The original miniseries event, created for HBO by actor Tom Hanks and Imagine Entertainment, will premiere on HBO beginning April 5, 1998.

  2. John F. Kennedy, Jr., speaks to invited guests at KSC's HBO premiere 'From the Earth to the Moon.'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    John F. Kennedy, Jr., editor-in-chief of George Magazine, greets invited guests at the Home Box Office (HBO) and Imagine Entertainment premiere of the 12-part miniseries 'From the Earth to the Moon' at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). The series was filmed in part on location at KSC and dramatizes the human aspects of NASA's efforts to launch Americans to the Moon. The miniseries highlights NASA's Apollo program and the events leading up to and including the six successful missions to the Moon. A special 500- seat theater was constructed next to the Apollo/Saturn V Center for the KSC premiere showing. Speakers at the event included KSC Director Roy Bridges (at right); Jeff Bewkes, chairman and CEO for HBO; and John F. Kennedy, Jr. Also attending the event, which featured the episode entitled '1968,' were Buzz Aldrin, Apollo 11 astronaut, and Al Worden, Apollo 15 astronaut. The original miniseries event, created for HBO by actor Tom Hanks and Imagine Entertainment, will premiere on HBO beginning April 5, 1998.

  3. Low Energy Transfer to the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koon, W. S.; Lo, M. W.; Marsden, J. E.; Ross, S. D.

    In 1991, the Japanese Hiten mission used a low energy transfer with a ballistic capture at the Moon which required less Δ V than a standard Hohmann transfer. In this paper, we apply the dynamical systems techniques developed in our earlier work to reproduce systematically a Hiten-like mission. We approximate the Sun-Earth-Moon-spacecraft 4-body system as two 3-body systems. Using the invariant manifold structures of the Lagrange points of the 3-body systems, we are able to construct low energy transfer trajectories from the Earth which execute ballistic capture at the Moon. The techniques used in the design and construction of this trajectory may be applied in many situations.

  4. Exploring the Moon: A Teacher's Guide with Activities for Earth and Space Sciences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

    These materials have been designed for use with the upper elementary through high school levels especially, but not exclusively, with the Lunar Sample Disk. This book contains: information on the Lunar Sample Disk, a curriculum content matrix, a teacher's guide, Moon ABCs fact sheet, rock ABCs fact sheet, Progress in Lunar Science chart, 17…

  5. The Voyage of Exploration and Discovery: Earth-Moon, Mars and Beyond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esper, Jaime

    2005-01-01

    This viewgraph is a printout of a presentation which originally contained multimedia components. The presentation summarizes the accomplishments of the Cassini-Huygens mission, with numerous images and video clips of Saturn, its rings, and its moons. The presentation also summarizes a feasibility analysis of the Neptune-Triton Explorer (NExTEP).

  6. Exploring the Moon: A Teacher's Guide with Activities for Earth and Space Sciences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

    This educational guide concerns exploring the moon. Activities are divided into three units: Pre-Apollo, Learning from Apollo, and The Future. These correspond, at least roughly, to exercises that can be done before the Lunar Sample Disk (available from NASA) arrives to the school (Pre-Apollo), while it is there (Learning from Apollo), and after…

  7. Moon As Seen By NIMS

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-02-08

    These four images of the Moon are from data acquired by NASA Galileo spacecraft Near-Earth Mapping Spectrometer during Galileo December 1992 Earth/Moon flyby. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00231

  8. Heteroclinic, Homoclinic Connections Between the Sun-Earth Triangular Points and Quasi-Satellite Orbits for Solar Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Llanos, Pedro J.; Hintz, Gerald R.; Lo, Martin W.; Miller, James K.

    2013-01-01

    Investigation of new orbit geometries exhibits a very attractive behavior for a spacecraft to monitor space weather coming from the Sun. Several orbit transfer mechanisms are analyzed as potential alternatives to monitor solar activity such as a sub-solar orbit or quasi-satellite orbit and short and long heteroclinic and homoclinic connections between the triangular points L(sub 4) and L(sub 5) and the collinear point L(sub 3) of the Circular Restricted Three-Body Problem (CRTBP) in the Sun-Earth system.

  9. Sun/Earth: how to use solar and climatic energies today

    SciTech Connect

    Crowther, R.L.

    1976-01-01

    This book graphically presents many concepts that are cost-effective today for the utilization of free natural energy sources in homes and other buildings. All of the natural energy concepts presented are in a process of continuing development. Many of them are immediately economic and practical, while some are not. It takes the application of money to construct devices to harness natural energy or to construct energy efficient forms of architecture. In numerous cases operational energy is not required to employ the Sun, wind, water, and Earth as free anti-inflationary energy sources. In other cases a very small input of operationalmore » energy in comparison to the total energy output is required. All land and buildings are solar collectors. The problem is how to cost effectively make them efficient collectors of solar radiation in winter and how to use natural forms of energy to cool and ventilate them during summer and other seasons of the year. Regional and microclimatic conditions vary throughout the world. Topography and landscaping can play an important role in climatic control and climatic effect upon architecture. The examples presented for optimized energy conservation and solar active and passive systems are generic to most northern latitudes, but need modification or adaption to specific locations and climates. An annotated bibliography, containing additional reference, is included.« less

  10. Transients which are born on the way from the Sun to Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yermolaev, Yuri; Nikolaeva, Nadezhda; Lodkina, Irina; Yermolaev, Michael

    2016-07-01

    As well known only disturbed types of solar wind (SW) streams can contain the IMF component perpendicular to the ecliptic plane (in particular the southward IMF component) and be geoeffective. Such disturbed types are the following SW streams: interplanetary manifestation of coronal mass ejection (ICME) including magnetic cloud (MC) and Ejecta, Sheath - compression region before ICME and corotating interaction region (CIR) - compression region before high-speed stream (HSS) of solar wind. Role of solar transients, CME and ICME, in generation of geomagnetic disturbances and space weather prediction is intensively studied by many researchers. However transients Sheath and CIR which are born on the way from the Sun to Earth due to corresponding high speed piston (fast ICME for Sheath and HSS from coronal hole for CIR), are investigated less intensively, and their contribution to geoefficiency are underestimated. For example, on 19 December, 1980 the southward component of IMF Bz increased up to 30 nT and the compressed region Sheath before MC induced the strong magnetic storm with Dst ~ -250 nT. We present and discuss statistical data on Sheath and CIR geoeffectiveness. The work was supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research, project 16-02-00125 and by Program of Presidium of the Russian Academy of Sciences.

  11. The Sun-Earth connect 2: Modelling patterns of a fractal Sun in time and space using the fine structure constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Robert G. V.

    2017-02-01

    Self-similar matrices of the fine structure constant of solar electromagnetic force and its inverse, multiplied by the Carrington synodic rotation, have been previously shown to account for at least 98% of the top one hundred significant frequencies and periodicities observed in the ACRIM composite irradiance satellite measurement and the terrestrial 10.7cm Penticton Adjusted Daily Flux data sets. This self-similarity allows for the development of a time-space differential equation (DE) where the solutions define a solar model for transmissions through the core, radiative, tachocline, convective and coronal zones with some encouraging empirical and theoretical results. The DE assumes a fundamental complex oscillation in the solar core and that time at the tachocline is smeared with real and imaginary constructs. The resulting solutions simulate for tachocline transmission, the solar cycle where time-line trajectories either 'loop' as Hermite polynomials for an active Sun or 'tail' as complementary error functions for a passive Sun. Further, a mechanism that allows for the stable energy transmission through the tachocline is explored and the model predicts the initial exponential coronal heating from nanoflare supercharging. The twisting of the field at the tachocline is then described as a quaternion within which neutrinos can oscillate. The resulting fractal bubbles are simulated as a Julia Set which can then aggregate from nanoflares into solar flares and prominences. Empirical examples demonstrate that time and space fractals are important constructs in understanding the behaviour of the Sun, from the impact on climate and biological histories on Earth, to the fractal influence on the spatial distributions of the solar system. The research suggests that there is a fractal clock underpinning solar frequencies in packages defined by the fine structure constant, where magnetic flipping and irradiance fluctuations at phase changes, have periodically impacted on the

  12. Dynamics of tethered satellites in the vicinity of the Lagrangian point L2 of the Earth-Moon system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baião, M. F.; Stuchi, T. J.

    2017-08-01

    This paper analyzes the dynamical evolution of satellites formed by two masses connected by a cable— tethered satellites. We derive the Lagrangian equations of motion in the neighborhood of the collinear equilibrium points, especially for the L2 , of the restricted problem of three bodies. The rigid body configuration is expanded in Legendre polynomials up to fourth degree. We present some numerical simulations of the influence of the parameters such as cable length, mass ratio and initial conditions in the behavior of the tethered satellites. The equation for the collinear equilibrium point is derived and numerically solved. The evolution of the equilibria with the variation of the cable length as a parameter is studied. We also present a discussion of the linear stability around these equilibria. Based on this analysis calculate some unstable Lyapunov orbits associated to these equilibrium points. We found periodic orbits in which the tether travels parallel to itself without involving the angular motion. The numerical applications are focused on the Earth-Moon system. However, the general character of the equations allows applications to the L1 equilibrium and obviously to systems other than the Earth-Moon.

  13. Moons Around Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This series of 10 Hubble Space Telescope images captures several small moons orbiting Saturn. Hubble snapped the five pairs of images while the Earth was just above the ring plane and the Sun below it. The telescope captured a pair of images every 97 minutes as it circled the Earth. Moving out from Saturn, the visible rings are: the broad C Ring, the Cassini Division, and the narrow F Ring.

    The first pair of images shows the large, bright moon Dione, near the middle of the frames. Two smaller moons, Pandora (the brighter one closer to Saturn) and Prometheus, appear as if they're touching the F Ring. In the second frame, Mimas emerges from Saturn's shadow and appears to be chasing Prometheus.

    In the second image pair, Mimas has moved towards the tip of the F Ring. Rhea, another bright moon, has just emerged from behind Saturn. Prometheus, the closest moon to Saturn, has rounded the F Ring's tip and is approaching the planet. The slightly larger moon Epimetheus has appeared.

    The third image pair shows Epimetheus, as a tiny dot just beyond the tip of the F Ring. Prometheus is in the lower right corner. An elongated clump or arc of debris in the F ring is seen as a slight brightening on the far side of this thin ring.

    In the fourth image pair, Epimetheus, in the lower right corner, streaks towards Saturn. The long ring arc can be seen in both frames.

    The fifth image pair again captures Mimas, beyond the tip of the F Ring. The same ring arc is still visible.

    In addition to the satellites, a pair of stars can be seen passing behind the rings, appearing to move towards the lower left due to Saturn's motion across the sky.

    The images were taken Nov. 21, 1995 with Wide Field Planetary Camera-2.

    The Wide Field/Planetary Camera 2 was developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and managed by the Goddard Spaced Flight Center for NASA's Office of Space Science.

    This image and other images and data received from the Hubble Space Telescope are posted on

  14. Higher Flux from the Young Sun as an Explanation for Warm Temperatures for Early Earth and Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sackmann, I.-Juliana

    2001-01-01

    Observations indicate that the Earth was at least warm enough for liquid water to exist as far back as 4 Gyr ago, namely, as early as half a billion years after the formation of the Earth; in fact, there is evidence suggesting that Earth may have been even warmer then than it is now. These relatively warm temperatures required on early Earth are in apparent contradiction to the dimness of the early Sun predicted by the standard solar models. This problem has generally been explained by assuming that Earth's early atmosphere contained huge amounts of carbon dioxide (CO2), resulting in a large enough greenhouse effect to counteract the effect of a dimmer Sun. However, recent work places an upper limit of 0.04 bar on the partial pressure of CO2 in the period from 2.75 to 2.2 Gyr ago, based on the absence of siderite in paleosols; this casts doubt on the viability of a strong CO2 greenhouse effect on early Earth. The existence of liquid water on early Mars has been even more of a puzzle; even the maximum possible CO2 greenhouse effect cannot yield warm enough Martian surface temperatures. These problems can be resolved simultaneously for both Earth and Mars, if the early Sun was brighter than predicted by the standard solar models. This could be accomplished if the early Sun was slightly more massive than it is now, i.e., if the solar wind was considerably stronger in the past than at present. A slightly more massive young Sun would have left fingerprints on the internal structure of the present Sun. Today, helioseismic observations exist that can measure the internal structure of the Sun with very high precision. The task undertaken here was to compute solar models with the highest precision possible at this time, starting with slightly greater initial masses. These were evolved to the present solar age, where comparisons with the helioseismic observations could be made. Our computations also yielded the time evolution of the solar flux at the planets - a key input to

  15. The Moon's Origin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cadogan, Peter

    1983-01-01

    Presents findings and conclusions about the origin of the moon, favoring the capture hypothesis of lunar origin. Advantage of the hypothesis is that it allows the moon to have been formed elsewhere, specifically in a hotter part of the solar nebula, accounting for chemical differences between earth and moon. (JN)

  16. Super Moon Rises

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-03-19

    The full moon is seen as it rises near the National Mall, Saturday, March 19, 2011, in Washington. The full moon tonight is called a "Super Moon" since it is at its closest to Earth. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  17. Comparative Study of the December 28, 2015 - January 2, 2016 and April 7 - 11, 1997 Sun-Earth Connection Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berdichevsky, D. B.; Richardson, I. G.; Farrugia, C. J.

    2016-12-01

    A Sun-Earth connection event started on December 28, 2015 in association with a M1.8 X-ray flare, commencing at 1120 UT detected by the GOES Environmental satellites, and a partial halo coronal mass ejection (CME) observed from 1200 UT by the SOHO LASCO coronographs. SDO AIA observations indicate that this event was located at W11S22. The related interplanetary coronal mass ejection (ICME) drove an above average strength fast-forward interplanetary shock observed by the Wind spacecraft at the start of Dec 31. This shock also appears to have accelerated solar energetic particles; ACE/EPAM observations show that these energetic particles peaked at shock passage. The shock driver, i.e. the ICME, appears to have impacted the Earth's environment near 17 UT on December 31. This ICME seems to have included several substructures and possibly extended to around midday on January 2, 2016. The impact of the ICME produced lively auroras at low Earth latitudes in the Western-North hemisphere. The associated strong magnetic storm was due to the leading part of the ICME maintaining a southward-oriented magnetic field for several hours. The purpose of this study is to compare and contrast this event with the April 7-11, 1997 Sun-Earth connection event previously discussed by Berdichevsky et al. (1998) which included the passage of an ICME at Earth with a persistent northward, rather than southward, magnetic-field and produced an unusually long-lasting compression of the Earth's magnetosphere. Berdichevsky, D, J.-L. Bougeret, J.-P. Delaboudinière, N. Fox, M. Kaiser, R. Lepping, D. Michels, S. Plunkett, D. Reames, M. Reiner, I. Richardson, G. Rostoker, J. Steinberg, B. Thompson, and T. von Rosenvinge, Evidence for multiple ejecta: April 7-11, 1997, ISTP Sun-Earth connection event GRL, 25, 2473-6, 1998.

  18. Buoyancy-driven melt segregation in the earth's moon. I - Numerical results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delano, J. W.

    1990-01-01

    The densities of lunar mare magmas have been estimated at liquidus temperatures for pressures from 0 to 47 kbar (0.4 GPa; center of the moon) using a third-order Birch-Murnaghan equation and compositionally dependent parameters from Large and Carmichael (1987). Results on primary magmatic compositions represented by pristine volcanic glasses suggest that the density contrast between very-high-Ti melts and their liquidus olivines may approach zero at pressures of about 25 kbar (2.5 GPa). Since this is the pressure regime of the mantle source regions for these magmas, a compositional limit of eruptability for mare liquids may exist that is similar to the highest Ti melt yet observed among the lunar samples. Although the moon may have generated magmas having greater than 16.4 wt pct TiO2, those melts would probably not have reached the lunar surface due to their high densities, and may have even sunk deeper into the moon's interior as negatively buoyant diapirs. This process may have been important for assimilative interactions in the lunar mantle. The phenomenon of melt/solid density crossover may therefore occur not only in large terrestrial-type objects but also in small objects where, despite low pressures, the range of melt compositions is extreme.

  19. The Moon

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-12-08

    This composite image of the moon using Clementine data from 1994 is the view we are most likely to see when the moon is full. Credit: NASA To learn about NASA's LRO project go to: www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/LRO/main/index.html NASA Goddard Space Flight Center contributes to NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s endeavors by providing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Join us on Facebook

  20. Smart-1 Moon Impact Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ayala, Andres; Rigger, Ralf

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the operations to control the Moon impact of the 3-axis stabilized spacecraft SMART-1 in September 2006. SMART-1 was launched on 27/09/2003. It was the first ESA mission to use an Electric Propulsion (EP) engine as the main motor to spiral out of the Earth gravity field and reach a scientific moon orbit [1]. During September 2005 the last EP maneuvers were performed using the remaining Xenon, in order to compensate for the 3rd body perturbations of the Sun and Earth. These operations extended the mission for an additional year. Afterwards the EP performance became unpredictable and low, so that no meaningful operation for the moon impact could be done. To move the predicted impact point on the 16/8/2006 into visibility from Earth an alternative Delta-V strategy was designed. Due to their alignment, the attitude thrusters could not be used directly to generate the Delta-V, so this strategy was based on controlled angular momentum biasing. Firing along the velocity vector around apolune, the remaining Hydrazine left from the attitude control budget was used, to shift the impact to the required coordinates.

  1. Moon Convention

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-03-23

    People with similar jobs or interests hold conventions and meetings, so why shouldn't moons? Pandora, Prometheus, and Pan -- seen here, from right to left -- also appear to be holding some sort of convention in this image. Some moons control the structure of nearby rings via gravitational "tugs." The cumulative effect of the moon's tugs on the ring particles can keep the rings' edges from spreading out as they are naturally inclined to do, much like shepherds control their flock. Pan is a prototypical shepherding moon, shaping and controlling the locations of the inner and outer edges of the Encke gap through a mechanism suggested in 1978 to explain the narrow Uranian rings. However, though Prometheus and Pandora have historically been called "the F ring shepherd moons" due to their close proximity to the ring, it has long been known that the standard shepherding mechanism that works so well for Pan does not apply to these two moons. The mechanism for keeping the F ring narrow, and the roles played -- if at all -- by Prometheus and Pandora in the F ring's configuration are not well understood. This is an ongoing topic for study by Cassini scientists. This view looks toward the sunlit side of the rings from about 29 degrees above the ringplane. The image was taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on Jan. 2, 2015. The view was obtained at a distance of approximately 1.6 million miles (2.6 million kilometers) from the rings and at a Sun-ring-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 86 degrees. Image scale is 10 miles (15 kilometers) per pixel. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/pia18306

  2. Optimal Sunshade Configurations for Space-Based Geoengineering near the Sun-Earth L1 Point

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, Joan-Pau; McInnes, Colin R.

    2015-01-01

    Within the context of anthropogenic climate change, but also considering the Earth’s natural climate variability, this paper explores the speculative possibility of large-scale active control of the Earth’s radiative forcing. In particular, the paper revisits the concept of deploying a large sunshade or occulting disk at a static position near the Sun-Earth L1 Lagrange equilibrium point. Among the solar radiation management methods that have been proposed thus far, space-based concepts are generally seen as the least timely, albeit also as one of the most efficient. Large occulting structures could potentially offset all of the global mean temperature increase due to greenhouse gas emissions. This paper investigates optimal configurations of orbiting occulting disks that not only offset a global temperature increase, but also mitigate regional differences such as latitudinal and seasonal difference of monthly mean temperature. A globally resolved energy balance model is used to provide insights into the coupling between the motion of the occulting disks and the Earth’s climate. This allows us to revise previous studies, but also, for the first time, to search for families of orbits that improve the efficiency of occulting disks at offsetting climate change on both global and regional scales. Although natural orbits exist near the L1 equilibrium point, their period does not match that required for geoengineering purposes, thus forced orbits were designed that require small changes to the disk attitude in order to control its motion. Finally, configurations of two occulting disks are presented which provide the same shading area as previously published studies, but achieve reductions of residual latitudinal and seasonal temperature changes. PMID:26309047

  3. Operational, Real-Time, Sun-to-Earth Interplanetary Shock Predictions During Solar Cycle 23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fry, C. D.; Dryer, M.; Sun, W.; Deehr, C. S.; Smith, Z.; Akasofu, S.

    2002-05-01

    We report on our progress in predicting interplanetary shock arrival time (SAT) in real-time, using three forecast models: the Hakamada-Akasofu-Fry (HAF) modified kinematic model, the Interplanetary Shock Propagation Model (ISPM) and the Shock Time of Arrival (STOA) model. These models are run concurrently to provide real-time predictions of the arrival time at Earth of interplanetary shocks caused by solar events. These "fearless forecasts" are the first, and presently only, publicly distributed predictions of SAT and are undergoing quantitative evaluation for operational utility and scientific benchmarking. All three models predict SAT, but the HAF model also provides a global view of the propagation of interplanetary shocks through the pre-existing, non-uniform heliospheric structure. This allows the forecaster to track the propagation of the shock and to differentiate between shocks caused by solar events and those associated with co-rotating interaction regions (CIRs). This study includes 173 events during the period February, 1997 to October, 2000. Shock predictions were compared with spacecraft observations at the L1 location to determine how well the models perform. Sixty-eight shocks were observed at L1 within 120 hours of an event. We concluded that 6 of these observed shocks were caused by CIRs, and the remainder were caused by solar events. The forecast skill of the models are presented in terms of RMS errors, contingency tables and skill scores commonly used by the weather forecasting community. The false alarm rate for HAF was higher than for ISPM or STOA but much lower than for predictions based upon empirical studies or climatology. Of the parameters used to characterize a shock source at the Sun, the initial speed of the coronal shock, as represented by the observed metric type II speed, has the largest influence on the predicted SAT. We also found that HAF model predictions based upon type II speed are generally better for shocks originating from

  4. Science 101: How Does the Motion of the Earth Affect Our View of the Sun?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Bill

    2014-01-01

    The question examined in this "Science 101" column was inspired by "Find Your School's Analemma" (in this issue). What causes the Sun's apparent position in the sky to trace a figure-eight pattern throughout one year? The analemma, or figure eight pattern that the Sun makes throughout the year, is due to two major…

  5. The Miniature Radio Frequency Instruments (Mini-RF) Global Observations of Earth's Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cahill, Joshua T. S.; Thomson, B. J.; Patterson, G. Wesley; Bussey, D. Benjamin J.; Neish, Catherine D.; Lopez, Norberto R.; Turner, F. Scott; Aldridge, T.; McAdam, M.; Meyer, H. M.; hide

    2014-01-01

    Radar provides a unique means to analyze the surface and subsurface physical properties of geologic deposits, including their wavelength-scale roughness, the relative depth of the deposits, and some limited compositional information. The NASA Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter's (LRO) Miniature Radio Frequency (Mini-RF) instrument has enabled these analyses on the Moon at a global scale. Mini-RF has accumulated 67% coverage of the lunar surface in S-band (12.6 cm) radar with a resolution of 30 m/pixel. Here we present new Mini-RF global orthorectified uncontrolled S-band maps of the Moon and use them for analysis of lunar surface physical properties. Reported here are readily apparent global- and regional-scale differences in lunar surface physical properties that suggest three distinct terranes, namely: a (1) Nearside Radar Dark Region; (2) Orientale basin and continuous ejecta; and the (3) Highlands Radar Bright Region. Integrating these observations with new data from LRO's Diviner Radiometer rock abundance maps, as well Clementine and Lunar Prospector derived compositional values show multiple distinct lunar surface terranes and sub-terranes based upon both physical and compositional surface properties. Previous geochemical investigations of the Moon suggested its crust is best divided into three to four basic crustal provinces or terranes (Feldspathic Highlands Terrane (-An and -Outer), Procellarum KREEP Terrane, and South Pole Aitken Terrane) that are distinct from one another. However, integration of these geochemical data sets with new geophysical data sets allows us to refine these terranes. The result shows a more complex view of these same crustal provinces and provides valuable scientific and hazard perspectives for future targeted human and robotic exploration.

  6. Four identical satellites investigating the Earth's turbulent relationship with the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1996-05-01

    Once in space, the four satellites will manoeuvre to an eccentric polar trajectory along which they will fly in tetrahedral formation for the next two years. They will take highly precise and, for the first time, three- dimensional measurements of the extraordinarily dynamic phenomena that occur where the solar wind meets the near- Earth environment. They will gather an unprecedented volume of very high- quality information on the magnetic storms, electric currents and particle accelerations that take place in the space surrounding our planet, which give rise to all manner of events, such as the aurorae in the polar regions, power cuts, breakdowns in telecommunication systems, or satellite malfunctions, and perhaps even changes in climate. The Cluster mission will also gather a host of fundamental information on the ionised gases whose behaviour physicists are trying to reproduce under laboratory conditions with the ultimate aim of generating thermonuclear energy. A cosmic battlefield The Sun's flames are lapping at the Earth's doorstep. In its constant state of effervescence/evaporation, it emits into space a wind charged with ions, electrons and protons which reach Earth at speeds of 1.5 to 3 million kph. Fortunately, our planet is armed with a natural shield against this onslaught: the magnetosphere, a distant magnetic, ionised extension of our atmosphere which slows and deflects the bulk of the stream of particles emitted by the Sun. This shield does not provide complete protection, however. Under constant buffeting from the interplanetary wind, the "fluid" magnetic screen is buckled, distorted and occasionally torn, causing small holes. When this happens, intense electric currents, magnetic storms and particle accelerations immediately develop. The overall interaction between the solar wind and the magnetosphere is so violent that the energy transferred can be as much as 1013 watts - equivalent to worldwide power consumption - and the currents induced run to

  7. Exploring the Moon: A teacher's guide with activities for Earth and space sciences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, G. Jeffrey; Martel, Linda M. V.; Bays, Brooks G., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    This guide contains educational materials designed for use in upper elementary through high schools with the Lunar Sample Disk. A set of thirty-six 35-mm slides complements the activities in this guidebook. The book contains: (1) information on the Lunar Sample Disk; (2) a curriculum content matrix; (3) a teacher's guide; (4) moon ABC's fact sheet; (5) rock ABC's fact sheet; (6) progress in Lunar Science chart; (7) seventeen activities; (8) a resource section for each unit; (9) a glossary; and (10) a list of NASA educational resources.

  8. CAWSES (Climate and Weather of the Sun-Earth System) Science: Progress thus far and the next steps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallamraju, D.; Kozyra, J.; Basu, S.

    Climate and Weather of the Sun Earth System CAWSES is the current program of Scientific Committee for Solar Terrestrial Physics SCOSTEP for 2004 - 2008 The main aim of CAWSES is to bring together scientists from various nations to address the coupled and global nature of the Sun-Earth System phenomena Towards that end CAWSES provides a platform for international cooperation in observations data analysis theory and modeling There has been active international participation thus far with endorsement of the national CAWSES programs in some countries and many scientists around the globe actively volunteering their time in this effort The CAWSES Science Steering Group has organized the CAWSES program into five Themes for better execution of its science Solar Influence on Climate Space Weather Science and Applications Atmospheric Coupling Processes Space Climatology and Capacity Building and Education CAWSES will cooperate with International programs that focus on the Sun-Earth system science and at the same time compliment the work of programs whose scope is beyond the realm of CAWSES This talk will briefly review the science goals of CAWSES provide salient results from different Themes with emphasis on those from the Space Weather Theme This talk will also indicate the next steps that are being planned in this program and solicit inputs from the community for the science efforts to be carried out in the future

  9. The Sun, Moon, Wind, and Biological Imperative–Shaping Contrasting Wintertime Migration and Foraging Strategies of Adult Male and Female Northern Fur Seals (Callorhinus ursinus)

    PubMed Central

    Sterling, Jeremy T; Springer, Alan M.; Iverson, Sara J.; Johnson, Shawn P.; Pelland, Noel A.; Johnson, Devin S.; Lea, Mary-Anne; Bond, Nicholas A.

    2014-01-01

    Adult male and female northern fur seals (Callorhinus ursinus) are sexually segregated in different regions of the North Pacific Ocean and Bering Sea during their winter migration. Explanations for this involve interplay between physiology, predator-prey dynamics, and ecosystem characteristics, however possible mechanisms lack empirical support. To investigate factors influencing the winter ecology of both sexes, we deployed five satellite-linked conductivity, temperature, and depth data loggers on adult males, and six satellite-linked depth data loggers and four satellite transmitters on adult females from St. Paul Island (Bering Sea, Alaska, USA) in October 2009. Males and females migrated to different regions of the North Pacific Ocean: males wintered in the Bering Sea and northern North Pacific Ocean, while females migrated to the Gulf of Alaska and California Current. Horizontal and vertical movement behaviors of both sexes were influenced by wind speed, season, light (sun and moon), and the ecosystem they occupied, although the expression of the behaviors differed between sexes. Male dive depths were aligned with the depth of the mixed layer during daylight periods and we suspect this was the case for females upon their arrival to the California Current. We suggest that females, because of their smaller size and physiological limitations, must avoid severe winters typical of the northern North Pacific Ocean and Bering Sea and migrate long distances to areas of more benign environmental conditions and where prey is shallower and more accessible. In contrast, males can better tolerate often extreme winter ocean conditions and exploit prey at depth because of their greater size and physiological capabilities. We believe these contrasting winter behaviors 1) are a consequence of evolutionary selection for large size in males, important to the acquisition and defense of territories against rivals during the breeding season, and 2) ease environmental

  10. The sun, moon, wind, and biological imperative-shaping contrasting wintertime migration and foraging strategies of adult male and female northern fur seals (Callorhinus ursinus).

    PubMed

    Sterling, Jeremy T; Springer, Alan M; Iverson, Sara J; Johnson, Shawn P; Pelland, Noel A; Johnson, Devin S; Lea, Mary-Anne; Bond, Nicholas A

    2014-01-01

    Adult male and female northern fur seals (Callorhinus ursinus) are sexually segregated in different regions of the North Pacific Ocean and Bering Sea during their winter migration. Explanations for this involve interplay between physiology, predator-prey dynamics, and ecosystem characteristics, however possible mechanisms lack empirical support. To investigate factors influencing the winter ecology of both sexes, we deployed five satellite-linked conductivity, temperature, and depth data loggers on adult males, and six satellite-linked depth data loggers and four satellite transmitters on adult females from St. Paul Island (Bering Sea, Alaska, USA) in October 2009. Males and females migrated to different regions of the North Pacific Ocean: males wintered in the Bering Sea and northern North Pacific Ocean, while females migrated to the Gulf of Alaska and California Current. Horizontal and vertical movement behaviors of both sexes were influenced by wind speed, season, light (sun and moon), and the ecosystem they occupied, although the expression of the behaviors differed between sexes. Male dive depths were aligned with the depth of the mixed layer during daylight periods and we suspect this was the case for females upon their arrival to the California Current. We suggest that females, because of their smaller size and physiological limitations, must avoid severe winters typical of the northern North Pacific Ocean and Bering Sea and migrate long distances to areas of more benign environmental conditions and where prey is shallower and more accessible. In contrast, males can better tolerate often extreme winter ocean conditions and exploit prey at depth because of their greater size and physiological capabilities. We believe these contrasting winter behaviors 1) are a consequence of evolutionary selection for large size in males, important to the acquisition and defense of territories against rivals during the breeding season, and 2) ease environmental

  11. Full moon and crime.

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, C P; Sharma, D

    1984-01-01

    The incidence of crimes reported to three police stations in different towns (one rural, one urban, one industrial) was studied to see if it varied with the day of the lunar cycle. The period of the study covered 1978-82. The incidence of crimes committed on full moon days was much higher than on all other days, new moon days, and seventh days after the full moon and new moon. A small peak in the incidence of crimes was observed on new moon days, but this was not significant when compared with crimes committed on other days. The incidence of crimes on equinox and solstice days did not differ significantly from those on other days, suggesting that the sun probably does not influence the incidence of crime. The increased incidence of crimes on full moon days may be due to "human tidal waves" caused by the gravitational pull of the moon. PMID:6440656

  12. Moon taken by Galileo after completing its first Earth Gravity Assist

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Galileo spacecraft images of the Moon were taken at (right photo) 6:47 pm Pacific Standard Time (PST), 12-08-90, and at (left photo) 9:35 am PST, 12-09-90, at a range of more than 350,000 miles. The picture on the right shows the dark Oceanus Procellarum in the upper center, with Mare Imbrium above it and the smaller circular Mare Humorum below. The Orientale Basin, with a small mare in its center, is on the lower left near the limb or edge. Between stretches the cratered highland terrain, with scattered bright young craters on highlands and maria alike. The picture at left shows the globe of the Moon rotated, putting Mare Imbrium on the eastern limb and moving the Orientale Basin almost to the center. The extent of the cratered highlands on the far side is very apparent. At lower left, near the limb, is the South-Pole-Aitken basin, similar to Orientale but very much older and some 1,200 miles in diameter. This feature was previously known as a large depression in the southern far side

  13. The moon-Earth system...As a vacuum gravity energy machine? A Hint about the Nature of Universal Gravity that May Have Been Overlooked

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masters, Roy

    2011-10-01

    We revisit the theories describing the moon raising the tides by virtue of pull gravity combined with the moon's centripetal angular momentum. We show that if gravity is considered as the attractive interaction between individual bodies, then a laboring moon doing work would have fallen to earth eons ago. Isaac Newton's laws of motion cannot work with pull gravity, but they do with Einstein's gravity as a property of the universe, which produces a continuous infusion of energy. In other words, the moon-Earth system becomes the first observable vacuum gravity energy machine. In other words the dynamics of what appears to be a closed system has been producing energy that continues raising the tides into perpetuity along with the force needed for the moon to escape the Earth's gravitational pull 4cm per year. All this is in defiance of Newton's first law which says ``If no force is added to a body it cannot accelerate.'' In this theory, a flowing space-time curves with three dimensions of force. A (flowing) spatial fabric bends around mass and displaces the inverse square field vanishing point property of matter with the appearance of a push-force square of the distance. In other words, the immeasurable universal gravity field appears as measurable local gravitation, concentrating universal gravitational pressure with the square of the distance from the very point was supposed to have disappeared. Needless to say such ``gravity'' necessitates a different beginning.

  14. Low-Thrust Transfers from Distant Retrograde Orbits to L2 Halo Orbits in the Earth-Moon System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Nathan L.; Parker, Jeffrey S.; Hughes, Steven P.; Heiligers, Jeannette

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a study of transfers between distant retrograde orbits (DROs) and L2 halo orbits in the Earth-Moon system that could be flown by a spacecraft with solar electric propulsion (SEP). Two collocation-based optimal control methods are used to optimize these highly-nonlinear transfers: Legendre pseudospectral and Hermite-Simpson. Transfers between DROs and halo orbits using low-thrust propulsion have not been studied previously. This paper offers a study of several families of trajectories, parameterized by the number of orbital revolutions in a synodic frame. Even with a poor initial guess, a method is described to reliably generate families of solutions. The circular restricted 3-body problem (CRTBP) is used throughout the paper so that the results are autonomous and simpler to understand.

  15. Google Moon Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-19

    Miles O'Brien, former chief science and tech correspondent for CNN, speaks during a press conference, Monday, July 20, 2009, announcing the launch of Moon in Google Earth, an immersive 3D atlas of the Moon, accessible within Google Earth 5.0, Monday, July 20, 2009, at the Newseum in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  16. Google Moon Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-19

    Tiffany Montague, Technical Program Manager for NASA and Google Lunar X PRIZE, Google, Inc., speaks during a press conference, Monday, July 20, 2009, announcing the launch of Moon in Google Earth, an immersive 3D atlas of the Moon, accessible within Google Earth 5.0, Monday, July 20, 2009, at the Newseum in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  17. Google Moon Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-19

    NASA Deputy Administrator Lori Garver, speaks during a press conference, Monday, July 20, 2009, announcing the launch of Moon in Google Earth, an immersive 3D atlas of the Moon, accessible within Google Earth 5.0, Monday, July 20, 2009, at the Newseum in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  18. Google Moon Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-19

    Brian McLendon, VP of Engineering, Google, Inc., speaks during a press conference, Monday, July 20, 2009, announcing the launch of Moon in Google Earth, an immersive 3D atlas of the Moon, accessible within Google Earth 5.0, Monday, July 20, 2009, at the Newseum in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  19. Google Moon Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-19

    Alan Eustace, Senior VP of Engineering and Research, Google, Inc., speaks during a press conference, Monday, July 20, 2009, announcing the launch of Moon in Google Earth, an immersive 3D atlas of the Moon, accessible within Google Earth 5.0, Monday, July 20, 2009, at the Newseum in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  20. Google Moon Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-19

    Yoshinori Yoshimura, a respresentative from the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), speaks during a press conference, Monday, July 20, 2009, announcing the launch of Moon in Google Earth, an immersive 3D atlas of the Moon, accessible within Google Earth 5.0, Monday, July 20, 2009, at the Newseum in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  1. Evolution of the earliest mantle caused by the magmatism-mantle upwelling feedback: Implications for the Moon and the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, M.

    2017-12-01

    The two most important agents that cause mantle evolution are magmatism and mantle convection. My earlier 2D numerical models of a coupled magmatism-mantle convection system show that these two agents strongly couple each other, when the Rayleigh number Ra is sufficiently high: magmatism induced by a mantle upwelling flow boosts the upwelling flow itself. The mantle convection enhanced by this positive feedback (the magmatism-mantle upwelling, or MMU, feedback) causes vigorous magmatism and, at the same time, strongly stirs the mantle. I explored how the MMU feedback influences the evolution of the earliest mantle that contains the magma ocean, based on a numerical model where the mantle is hot and its topmost 1/3 is partially molten at the beginning of the calculation: The evolution drastically changes its style, as Ra exceeds the threshold for onset of the MMU feedback, around 107. At Ra < 107, basaltic materials generated by the initial widespread magmatism accumulate in the deep mantle to form a layer; the basaltic layer is colder than the overlying shallow mantle. At Ra > 107, however, the mantle remains compositionally more homogeneous in spite of the widespread magmatism, and the deep mantle remains hotter than the shallow mantle, because of the strong convective stirring caused by the feedback. The threshold value suggests that the mantle of a planet larger than Mars evolves in a way substantially different from that in the Moon does. Indeed, in my earlier models, magmatism makes the early mantle compositionally stratified in the Moon, but the effects of strong convective stirring overwhelms that of magmatism to keep the mantle compositionally rather homogeneous in Venus and the Earth. The MMU feedback is likely to be a key to understanding why vestiges of the magma ocean are so scarce in the Earth.

  2. Young Children's Ideas about the Earth in Space.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharp, John G.

    1999-01-01

    Surveyed 7-year-olds' ideas about the Earth in space, focusing on their ideas about shape and their ability to represent and describe land masses or other surface features, Earth's size relative to the sun and moon, and its nature as a planet. Found that focusing on the Earth's shape and gravity alone has underestimated youngsters' learning…

  3. Tunable Light-Guide Image Processing Snapshot Spectrometer (TuLIPSS) for Earth and Moon Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkaczyk, T. S.; Alexander, D.; Luvall, J. C.; Wang, Y.; Dwight, J. G.; Pawlowsk, M. E.; Howell, B.; Tatum, P. F.; Stoian, R.-I.; Cheng, S.; Daou, A.

    2018-02-01

    A tunable light-guide image processing snapshot spectrometer (TuLIPSS) for Earth science research and observation is being developed through a NASA instrument incubator project with Rice University and Marshall Space Flight Center.

  4. Optimization of Return Trajectories for Orbital Transfer Vehicle between Earth and Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funase, Ryu; Tsuda, Yuichi; Kawaguchi, Jun'ichiro

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, optimum trajectories in Earth Transfer Orbit (ETO) for a lunar transportation system are proposed. This paper aims at improving the payload ratio of the reusable orbital transfer vehicle (OTV), which transports the payload from Low Earth Orbit (LEO) to Lunar Low Orbit (LLO) and returns to LEO. In ETO, we discuss ballistic flight using chemical propulsion, multi-impulse flight using electrical propulsion, and aero-assisted flight using aero-brake. The feasibility of the OTV is considered.

  5. Particle Radiation Sources, Propagation and Interactions in Deep Space, at Earth, the Moon, Mars, and Beyond: Examples of Radiation Interactions and Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwadron, Nathan A.; Cooper, John F.; Desai, Mihir; Downs, Cooper; Gorby, Matt; Jordan, Andrew P.; Joyce, Colin J.; Kozarev, Kamen; Linker, Jon A.; Mikíc, Zoran; Riley, Pete; Spence, Harlan E.; Török, Tibor; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Wilson, Jody K.; Zeitlin, Cary

    2017-11-01

    Particle radiation has significant effects for astronauts, satellites and planetary bodies throughout the Solar System. Acute space radiation hazards pose risks to human and robotic exploration. This radiation also naturally weathers the exposed surface regolith of the Moon, the two moons of Mars, and other airless bodies, and contributes to chemical evolution of planetary atmospheres at Earth, Mars, Venus, Titan, and Pluto. We provide a select review of recent areas of research covering the origin of SEPs from coronal mass ejections low in the corona, propagation of events through the solar system during the anomalously weak solar cycle 24 and important examples of radiation interactions for Earth, other planets and airless bodies such as the Moon.

  6. Earth to Moon Transfer: Direct vs Via Libration Points (L1, L2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Condon, Gerald L.; Wilson, Samuel W.

    2004-01-01

    For some three decades, the Apollo-style mission has served as a proven baseline technique for transporting flight crews to the Moon and back with expendable hardware. This approach provides an optimal design for expeditionary missions, emphasizing operational flexibility in terms of safely returning the crew in the event of a hardware failure. However, its application is limited essentially to low-latitude lunar sites, and it leaves much to be desired as a model for exploratory and evolutionary programs that employ reusable space-based hardware. This study compares the performance requirements for a lunar orbit rendezvous mission type with one using the cislunar libration point (L1) as a stopover and staging point for access to arbitrary sites on the lunar surface. For selected constraints and mission objectives, it contrasts the relative uniformity of performance cost when the L1 staging point is used with the wide variation of cost for the Apollo-style lunar orbit rendezvous.

  7. A SUPER-EARTH-SIZED PLANET ORBITING IN OR NEAR THE HABITABLE ZONE AROUND A SUN-LIKE STAR

    SciTech Connect

    Barclay, Thomas; Burke, Christopher J.; Howell, Steve B.

    We present the discovery of a super-Earth-sized planet in or near the habitable zone of a Sun-like star. The host is Kepler-69, a 13.7 mag G4V-type star. We detect two periodic sets of transit signals in the 3-year flux time series of Kepler-69, obtained with the Kepler spacecraft. Using the very high precision Kepler photometry, and follow-up observations, our confidence that these signals represent planetary transits is >99.3%. The inner planet, Kepler-69b, has a radius of 2.24{sup +0.44}{sub -0.29} R{sub Circled-Plus} and orbits the host star every 13.7 days. The outer planet, Kepler-69c, is a super-Earth-sized object with a radiusmore » of 1.7{sup +0.34}{sub -0.23} R{sub Circled-Plus} and an orbital period of 242.5 days. Assuming an Earth-like Bond albedo, Kepler-69c has an equilibrium temperature of 299 {+-} 19 K, which places the planet close to the habitable zone around the host star. This is the smallest planet found by Kepler to be orbiting in or near the habitable zone of a Sun-like star and represents an important step on the path to finding the first true Earth analog.« less

  8. Influence of Sun and Other Cosmic Factors on Environment of the Earth

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-07

    of the secondary cosmic rays (mostly muons , electrons, neutrons and gammas) can provide highly cost-effective information on the key characteristics...Coronal mass ejection (CME) from the Sun the impact on the Galactic Cosmic rays (GCR) will be observed. Particle detector is vital for measuring the...modulation effects the sun poses on the ambient population of the Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR). The known agents of these modulation effects are Solar Flares

  9. Flare-CME characteristics from Sun to Earth combining observations and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temmer, Manuela; Thalmann, Julia K.; Dissauer, Karin; Veronig, Astrid M.; Tschernitz, Johannes; Hinterreiter, Jürgen; Rodriguez, Luciano

    2017-04-01

    We analyze the well observed flare-CME event from October 1, 2011 (SOL2011-10-01T09:18) covering the complete chain of action - from Sun to Earth - for a better understanding of the dynamic evolution of the CME and its embedded magnetic field. We study in detail the solar surface and atmosphere from SDO and ground-based instruments associated to the flare-CME and also track the CME signature offlimb from combined EUV and white-light data with STEREO. By applying 3D reconstruction techniques (GCS, total mass) to stereoscopic STEREO-SoHO coronagraph data, we track the temporal and spatial evolution of the CME in interplanetary space and derive its geometry and 3D-mass. We combine the GCS and Lundquist model results to derive the axial flux and helicity of the MC from in situ measurements (Wind). This is compared to nonlinear force-free (NLFF) model results as well as to the reconnected magnetic flux derived from the flare ribbons (flare reconnection flux) and the magnetic flux encompassed by the associated dimming (dimming flux). We find that magnetic reconnection processes were already ongoing before the start of the impulsive flare phase, adding magnetic flux to the flux rope before its final eruption. The dimming flux increases by more than 25% after the end of the flare, indicating that magnetic flux is still added to the flux rope after eruption. Hence, the derived flare reconnection flux is most probably a lower limit for estimating the magnetic flux within the flux rope. We obtain that the magnetic helicity and axial magnetic flux are reduced in interplanetary space by ˜50% and 75%, respectively, possibly indicating to an erosion process. A mass increase of 10% for the CME is observed over the distance range from about 4-20 Rs. The temporal evolution of the CME associated core dimming regions supports the scenario that fast outflows might supply additional mass to the rear part of the CME.

  10. High-Performance Data Analysis Tools for Sun-Earth Connection Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messmer, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The data analysis tool of choice for many Sun-Earth Connection missions is the Interactive Data Language (IDL) by ITT VIS. The increasing amount of data produced by these missions and the increasing complexity of image processing algorithms requires access to higher computing power. Parallel computing is a cost-effective way to increase the speed of computation, but algorithms oftentimes have to be modified to take advantage of parallel systems. Enhancing IDL to work on clusters gives scientists access to increased performance in a familiar programming environment. The goal of this project was to enable IDL applications to benefit from both computing clusters as well as graphics processing units (GPUs) for accelerating data analysis tasks. The tool suite developed in this project enables scientists now to solve demanding data analysis problems in IDL that previously required specialized software, and it allows them to be solved orders of magnitude faster than on conventional PCs. The tool suite consists of three components: (1) TaskDL, a software tool that simplifies the creation and management of task farms, collections of tasks that can be processed independently and require only small amounts of data communication; (2) mpiDL, a tool that allows IDL developers to use the Message Passing Interface (MPI) inside IDL for problems that require large amounts of data to be exchanged among multiple processors; and (3) GPULib, a tool that simplifies the use of GPUs as mathematical coprocessors from within IDL. mpiDL is unique in its support for the full MPI standard and its support of a broad range of MPI implementations. GPULib is unique in enabling users to take advantage of an inexpensive piece of hardware, possibly already installed in their computer, and achieve orders of magnitude faster execution time for numerically complex algorithms. TaskDL enables the simple setup and management of task farms on compute clusters. The products developed in this project have the

  11. Occurrence and core-envelope structure of 1-4× Earth-size planets around Sun-like stars.

    PubMed

    Marcy, Geoffrey W; Weiss, Lauren M; Petigura, Erik A; Isaacson, Howard; Howard, Andrew W; Buchhave, Lars A

    2014-09-02

    Small planets, 1-4× the size of Earth, are extremely common around Sun-like stars, and surprisingly so, as they are missing in our solar system. Recent detections have yielded enough information about this class of exoplanets to begin characterizing their occurrence rates, orbits, masses, densities, and internal structures. The Kepler mission finds the smallest planets to be most common, as 26% of Sun-like stars have small, 1-2 R⊕ planets with orbital periods under 100 d, and 11% have 1-2 R⊕ planets that receive 1-4× the incident stellar flux that warms our Earth. These Earth-size planets are sprinkled uniformly with orbital distance (logarithmically) out to 0.4 the Earth-Sun distance, and probably beyond. Mass measurements for 33 transiting planets of 1-4 R⊕ show that the smallest of them, R < 1.5 R⊕, have the density expected for rocky planets. Their densities increase with increasing radius, likely caused by gravitational compression. Including solar system planets yields a relation: ρ = 2:32 + 3:19 R=R ⊕ [g cm(-3)]. Larger planets, in the radius range 1.5-4.0 R⊕, have densities that decline with increasing radius, revealing increasing amounts of low-density material (H and He or ices) in an envelope surrounding a rocky core, befitting the appellation ''mini-Neptunes.'' The gas giant planets occur preferentially around stars that are rich in heavy elements, while rocky planets occur around stars having a range of heavy element abundances. Defining habitable zones remains difficult, without benefit of either detections of life elsewhere or an understanding of life's biochemical origins.

  12. Science Enabled by the Ares V: A Large Monolithic Telescope Placed at the Second Sun-Earth Lagrange Point

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, Randall C.; Stahl, H. Philip

    2007-01-01

    The payload mass and volume capabilities of the planned Ares V launch vehicle provide the science community with unprecedented opportunities to place large science payloads into low earth orbit and beyond. One example, the outcome of a recent study conducted at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, is a large, monolithic telescope with a primary mirror diameter of 6.2 meters placed into a halo orbit about the second Sun-Earth Lagrange point, or L2, approximately 1.5 million kin beyond Earth's orbit. Operating in the visible and ultraviolet regions of the electromagnetic spectrum, such a large telescope would allow astronomers to detect bio-signatures and characterize the atmospheres of transiting exoplanets, provide high resolution imaging three or more times better than the Hubble Space Telescope and the James Webb Space Telescope, and observe the ultraviolet light from warm baryonic matter.

  13. Halo orbit transfer trajectory design using invariant manifold in the Sun-Earth system accounting radiation pressure and oblateness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Vineet K.; Kumar, Jai; Kushvah, Badam Singh

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we study the invariant manifold and its application in transfer trajectory problem from a low Earth parking orbit to the Sun-Earth L1 and L2-halo orbits with the inclusion of radiation pressure and oblateness. Invariant manifold of the halo orbit provides a natural entrance to travel the spacecraft in the solar system along some specific paths due to its strong hyperbolic character. In this regard, the halo orbits near both collinear Lagrangian points are computed first. The manifold's approximation near the nominal halo orbit is computed using the eigenvectors of the monodromy matrix. The obtained local approximation provides globalization of the manifold by applying backward time propagation to the governing equations of motion. The desired transfer trajectory well suited for the transfer is explored by looking at a possible intersection between the Earth's parking orbit of the spacecraft and the manifold.

  14. Is the Dark Side of the Moon Ever Illuminated by the Sun? (Breton Title: O Lado Escuro da Lua Nunca Apanha Sol?) El Lado Oscuro de la Luna Nunca Toma Sol?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovannini, Odilon; Pellenz, Daiana; Catelli, Francisco

    2014-07-01

    This work presents the elaboration of an answer to the question "Is the dark side of the moon ever illuminated by the sun?", in which issues related to the students' conceptions, how they arise, and the core elements that constitute a "good answer" are considered. These issues are initially elaborated from a literature review of the research in the field; then, and also based on this review, a didactic model that involves the relative motions of the Earth - Moon - Sun system is proposed. A description of the application of this model in a learning environment within middle school students is described. This work confirms the students' initial concepts described in the literature; on the other hand, the questions asked by students during the activity provide evidence that meaningful learning, at least to some degree, has occurred. Este trabalho apresenta a elaboração de uma resposta à pergunta "O lado escuro da Lua nunca apanha sol?" na qual são consideradas questões relacionadas às concepções iniciais dos alunos, de onde elas surgem e os elementos centrais que constituem uma "boa resposta". Essas questões são tratadas, inicialmente, a partir de uma revisão da literatura sobre pesquisas na área e, em seguida, também com base nessa revisão, um objeto modelo didático que envolve os movimentos relativos do sistema Terra - Lua - Sol é proposto. Uma descrição detalhada da aplicação deste modelo em um ambiente de aprendizagem com alunos do ensino fundamental é relatada. As concepções iniciais apresentadas na literatura se confirmam e os questionamentos feitos pelos estudantes por ocasião da aplicação do modelo fornecem indícios de que uma aprendizagem significativa, pelo menos em algum grau, ocorreu. El artículo se presenta el desarrollo de una respuesta a la pregunta "¿El lado oscuro de la luna nunca toma sol?", en la que se consideran algunas cuestiones vinculadas que se refieren a las concepciones iniciales de los estudiantes, dónde surgen

  15. View of Earth photographed by Apollo 15 on voyage to the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    This view of Earth was photographed by the Apollo 15 crewmen as they sped toward the fourth lunar landing. The spacecraft was between 25,000 and 30,000 nautical miles from Earth when this photo was made. The United States (note Florida), Central America and part of Canada can be seen at the left side of the picture, with South America at lower center. Spain and the northwest part of Africa can be seen at right. The Bahama Banks, unique geological feature, can be seen (different shade of blue) east of Florida. Also note large North Atlantic storm front moving over Greenland in upper center.

  16. The accelerations of the earth and moon from early astronomical observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muller, P. M.; Stephenson, F. R.

    1975-01-01

    An investigation has compiled a very large amount of data on central or near central solar eclipses as recorded in four principal ancient sources (Greek and Roman classics, medieval European chronicles, Chinese annals and astronomical treatises, and Late Babylonian astronomical texts) and applied careful data selectivity criteria and statistical methods to obtain reliable dates, magnitudes, and places of observation of the events, and thereby made estimates of the earth acceleration and lunar acceleration. The basic conclusion is that the lunar acceleration and both tidal and nontidal earth accelerations have been essentially constant during the period from 1375 B.C. to the present.

  17. Multispectral studies of selected crater- and basin-filling lunar Maria from Galileo Earth-Moon encounter 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, D. A.; Greeley, R.; Neukum, G.; Wagner, R.

    1993-01-01

    New visible and near-infrared multispectral data of the Moon were obtained by the Galileo spacecraft in December, 1990. These data were calibrated with Earth-based spectral observations of the nearside to compare compositional information to previously uncharacterized mare basalts filling craters and basins on the western near side and eastern far side. A Galileo-based spectral classification scheme, modified from the Earth-based scheme developed by Pieters, designates the different spectral classifications of mare basalt observed using the 0.41/0.56 micron reflectance ratio (titanium content), 0.56 micron reflectance values (albedo), and 0.76/0.99 micron reflectance ratio (absorption due to Fe(2+) in mafic minerals and glass). In addition, age determinations from crater counts and results of a linear spectral mixing model were used to assess the volcanic histories of specific regions of interest. These interpreted histories were related to models of mare basalt petrogenesis in an attempt to better understand the evolution of lunar volcanism.

  18. Multispectral studies of western limb and farside maria from Galileo Earth-Moon Encounter 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, David A.; Greeley, Ronald; Neukum, Gerhard; Wagner, Roland; Kadel, Steven D.

    1995-11-01

    New visible and near-infrared multispectral images of the Moon obtained by the Galileo solid-state imaging system, along with lunar orbiter images (for crater counts), and spectral mixing analyses were used to characterize western limb and eastern farside maria and determine compositional and age relationships in selected regions. Results indicate that (1) western limb mare deposits have less variability in titanium content (<2-7 wt% TiO2) and age (2.79-3.86 Ga) than areally extensive maria on the nearside; (2) areally extensive basin-filling maria generally have higher titanium contents than smaller, crater-filling mare patches and ponds; (3) ancient maria covered by highland material (cryptomaria) may be present in the Mendel-Rydberg and South Pole-Aitken basins; and (4) maria with compositional and age variations occur in the Grimaldi, Crüger, Mendel-Rydberg, and Apollo regions. No extensive high-titanium (>6 wt% TiO2) mare basalts were observed on the western limb and farside, which may reflect the inability of such denser magmas to penetrate the thicker farside crust.

  19. Moon taken by Galileo after completing its first Earth Gravity Assist

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Color image of the Moon was taken by Galileo spacecraft at 9:35 am Pacific Standard Time (PST), 12-09-90, at a range of about 350,000 miles. The color composite uses monochrome images taken through violet, red, and near-infrared filters. The concentric, circular Orientale basin, 600 miles across, is near the center; the near side is to the right, the far side to the left. At the upper right is the large, dark Oceanus Procellarum; below it is the smaller Mare Humorum. These, like the small dark Mare Orientale in the center of the basin, formed over 3 billion years ago as basaltic lava flows. At the lower left, among the southern cratered highlands of the far side, is the South-Pole-Aitken basin, similar to Orientale but twice as great in diameter and much older and more degraded by cratering and weathering. The cratered highlands of the near and far sides and the Maria are covered with scattered bright, young ray craters. Photo provided by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) with altern

  20. Interior of the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, Renee C.

    2013-01-01

    A variety of geophysical measurements made from Earth, from spacecraft in orbit around the Moon, and by astronauts on the lunar surface allow us to probe beyond the lunar surface to learn about its interior. Similarly to the Earth, the Moon is thought to consist of a distinct crust, mantle, and core. The crust is globally asymmetric in thickness, the mantle is largely homogeneous, and the core is probably layered, with evidence for molten material. This chapter will review a range of methods used to infer the Moon's internal structure, and briefly discuss the implications for the Moon's formation and evolution.

  1. A knowledge discovery approach to explore some Sun/Earth's climate relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pou, A.; Valdes, J.

    2009-09-01

    Recent developments in data driven modeling and analysis including computational intelligence techniques may throw new light on the exploration of possible solar activity/Earth's climate relationships. Here we present three different examples of methodologies under development and some preliminary results. a) Multivariate Time Series Model Mining (MVTSMM) analysis [1] and Genetic Programming were applied to Greenland's CRETE Site-E ice core Delta O18/16 values (1721-1983, one year interval sampling) and with sunspots activity (International Sunspots Number) during the same time span [2]. According to the results (1771 to 1933 period) indicated by the lag importance spectrum obtained with MVTSMM analysis, the sun's activity itself shows high internal variability and is inhomogeneous. The Dalton minimum, a low activity period usually considered to occur between 1790 and 1830, is shown to be a complex structure beginning about 1778 and ending in 1840. Apparently, the system entered a new state in 1912. In the joint analysis, the analytical tool uses extensively the solar activity data to explain the Delta O18/16 data, showing areas of stable patterns, lag drifts and abrupt pattern disruptions, indicating changes of state in the solar processes of several kinds at different times. b) A similar MVTSMM analysis was conducted on Central England Temperature (CET) and solar activity data using Group Sunspots Number (GSN) with a useful interpretive span of time from 1771 to 1916. The joint analysis involved large amounts of solar activity variables, except for the 1843-1862 and 1877-1889 periods where the discovered models used much less information from GSN data. As with the Crete-E/ISN analysis the lag importance spectrum of CET/GSN shows a number of clear discontinuities. A quarter of them are present in both (1778-1779, 1806, 1860-1862, 1912-1913). These experiments were designed for testing methodologies and not for specific hypothesis testing. However, it seems that

  2. Origin of the moon - Capture by gas drag of the earth's primordial atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakazawa, K.; Komuro, T.; Hayashi, C.

    1983-06-01

    The novel lunar formation scenario proposed is an extension of planetary formation process studies suggesting that the earth originated in a gaseous solar nebula. Attention is given to a series of dynamical processes in which a low energy planetesimal is trapped within the terrestrial Hill sphere under circumstances in which the primordial atmosphere's gas density gradually decreases. An unbound planetesimal entering the Hill sphere would have had to dissipate its kinetic energy and then come into a bound orbit, before escaping from the Hill sphere, without falling onto the earth's surface. The kinetic energy dissipation condition is considered through the calculation of the solar gravity and atmospheric gas drag effects on the planetesimal's orbital motion. The result obtained shows that a low energy planetesimal of less than lunar mass can be trapped in the Hill sphere with a high probability, if it enters at those stages before atmospheric density has decreased to about 1/50th of the initial value.

  3. Occurrence and core-envelope structure of 1–4× Earth-size planets around Sun-like stars

    PubMed Central

    Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Weiss, Lauren M.; Petigura, Erik A.; Isaacson, Howard; Howard, Andrew W.; Buchhave, Lars A.

    2014-01-01

    Small planets, 1–4× the size of Earth, are extremely common around Sun-like stars, and surprisingly so, as they are missing in our solar system. Recent detections have yielded enough information about this class of exoplanets to begin characterizing their occurrence rates, orbits, masses, densities, and internal structures. The Kepler mission finds the smallest planets to be most common, as 26% of Sun-like stars have small, 1–2 R⊕ planets with orbital periods under 100 d, and 11% have 1–2 R⊕ planets that receive 1–4× the incident stellar flux that warms our Earth. These Earth-size planets are sprinkled uniformly with orbital distance (logarithmically) out to 0.4 the Earth–Sun distance, and probably beyond. Mass measurements for 33 transiting planets of 1–4 R⊕ show that the smallest of them, R < 1.5 R⊕, have the density expected for rocky planets. Their densities increase with increasing radius, likely caused by gravitational compression. Including solar system planets yields a relation: ρ=2.32+3.19R/R⊕ [g cm−3]. Larger planets, in the radius range 1.5–4.0 R⊕, have densities that decline with increasing radius, revealing increasing amounts of low-density material (H and He or ices) in an envelope surrounding a rocky core, befitting the appellation ‘‘mini-Neptunes.’’ The gas giant planets occur preferentially around stars that are rich in heavy elements, while rocky planets occur around stars having a range of heavy element abundances. Defining habitable zones remains difficult, without benefit of either detections of life elsewhere or an understanding of life’s biochemical origins. PMID:24912169

  4. Experimental investigation of the partitioning of phosphorus between metal and silicate phases - Implications for the earth, moon and eucrite parent body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newsom, H. E.; Drake, M. J.

    1983-01-01

    An experimental study is reported of the partitioning of Phosphorus between solid metal and basaltic silicate liquid as a function of temperature and oxygen fugacity and of the implications for the earth, moon and eucrite parent body (EPB). The relationship established between the partition coefficient and the fugacity is given at 1190 C by log D(P) = -1.12 log fO2 - 15.95 and by log D(P) = -1.53 log fO2 17.73 at 1300 C. The partition coefficient D(P) was determined, and it is found to be consistent with a valence state of 5 for P in the molten silicate. Using the determined coefficient the low P/La ratios of the earth, moon, and eucrites relative to C1 chondrites can be explained. The lowering of the P/La ratio in the eucrites relative to Cl chondrite by a factor of 40 can be explained by partitioning P into 20-25 wt% sulfur-bearing metallic liquid corresponding to 5-25% of the total metal plus silicate system. The low P/La and W/La ratios in the moon may be explained by the partitioning of P and W into metal during formation of a small core by separation of liquid metal from silicate at low degrees of partial melting of the silicates. These observations are consistent with independent formation of the moon and the earth.

  5. Preliminary Planar Formation: Flight Dynamics Near Sun-Earth L2 Point

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Segerman, Alan M.; Zedd, Michael F.

    2003-01-01

    NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center is planning a series of missions in the vicinity of the Sun-Earth L2 libration point. Some of these projects will involve a distributed space system of telescope spacecraft acting together as a single telescope for high-resolution. The individual telescopes will be configured in a plane, surrounding a hub, where the telescope plane can be aimed toward various astronomical targets of interest. In preparation for these missions, it is necessary to develop an improved understanding of the dynamical behavior of objects in a planar configuration near L2. The classical circular restricted three body problem is taken as the basis for the analysis. At first order, the motion of such a telescope relative to the hub is described by a system of linear second order differential equations. These equations are identical to the circular restricted problem's linear equations describing the hub motion about L2. Therefore, the fundamental frequencies, both parallel to and normal to the ecliptic plane, are the same for the relative telescope motion as for the hub motion. To maintain the telescope plane for the duration necessary for the planned observations, a halo-type orbit of the telescopes about the hub is investigated. By using a halo orbit, the individual telescopes remain in approximately the same plane over the observation duration. For such an orbit, the fundamental periods parallel to and normal to the ecliptic plane are forced to be the same by careful selection of the initial conditions in order to adjust the higher order forces. The relative amplitudes of the resulting oscillations are associated with the orientation of the telescope plane relative to the ecliptic. As in the circular restricted problem, initial conditions for the linearized equations must be selected so as not to excite the convergent or divergent linear modes. In a higher order analysis, the telescope relative motion equations include the effects of the position of the

  6. Early Mission Maneuver Operations for the Deep Space Climate Observatory Sun-Earth L1 Libration Point Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Craig; Case, Sara; Reagoso, John; Webster, Cassandra

    2015-01-01

    The Deep Space Climate Observatory mission launched on February 11, 2015, and inserted onto a transfer trajectory toward a Lissajous orbit around the Sun-Earth L1 libration point. This paper presents an overview of the baseline transfer orbit and early mission maneuver operations leading up to the start of nominal science orbit operations. In particular, the analysis and performance of the spacecraft insertion, mid-course correction maneuvers, and the deep-space Lissajous orbit insertion maneuvers are discussed, com-paring the baseline orbit with actual mission results and highlighting mission and operations constraints..

  7. NASA Sun-Earth Connections Theory Program: The Structure and Dynamics of the Solar Corona and Inner Heliosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikic, Zoran; Grebowsky, Joseph M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This report covers technical progress during the fourth quarter of the second year of NASA Sun-Earth Connections Theory Program (SECTP) contract 'The Structure and Dynamics of the Solar Corona and Inner Heliosphere,' NAS5-99188, between NASA and Science Applications International Corporation, and covers the period May 16,2001 to August 15, 2001. Under this contract SAIC and the University of California, Irvine (UCI) have conducted research into theoretical modeling of active regions, the solar corona, and the inner heliosphere, using the MHD model.

  8. MOA-2011-BLG-262Lb: A sub-Earth-mass moon orbiting a gas giant primary or a high velocity planetary system in the galactic Bulge

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, D. P.; Batista, V.; Bond, I. A.

    2014-04-20

    We present the first microlensing candidate for a free-floating exoplanet-exomoon system, MOA-2011-BLG-262, with a primary lens mass of M {sub host} ∼ 4 Jupiter masses hosting a sub-Earth mass moon. The argument for an exomoon hinges on the system being relatively close to the Sun. The data constrain the product M{sub L} π{sub rel} where M{sub L} is the lens system mass and π{sub rel} is the lens-source relative parallax. If the lens system is nearby (large π{sub rel}), then M{sub L} is small (a few Jupiter masses) and the companion is a sub-Earth-mass exomoon. The best-fit solution has amore » large lens-source relative proper motion, μ{sub rel} = 19.6 ± 1.6 mas yr{sup –1}, which would rule out a distant lens system unless the source star has an unusually high proper motion. However, data from the OGLE collaboration nearly rule out a high source proper motion, so the exoplanet+exomoon model is the favored interpretation for the best fit model. However, there is an alternate solution that has a lower proper motion and fits the data almost as well. This solution is compatible with a distant (so stellar) host. A Bayesian analysis does not favor the exoplanet+exomoon interpretation, so Occam's razor favors a lens system in the bulge with host and companion masses of M{sub host}=0.12{sub −0.06}{sup +0.19} M{sub ⊙} and m{sub comp}=18{sub −10}{sup +28} M{sub ⊕}, at a projected separation of a{sub ⊥}=0.84{sub −0.14}{sup +0.25} AU. The existence of this degeneracy is an unlucky accident, so current microlensing experiments are in principle sensitive to exomoons. In some circumstances, it will be possible to definitively establish the mass of such lens systems through the microlensing parallax effect. Future experiments will be sensitive to less extreme exomoons.« less

  9. The Sodium Tail of the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matta, M.; Smith, S.; Baumgardner, J.; Wilson, J.; Martinis, C.; Mendillo, M.

    2009-01-01

    During the few days centered about new Moon, the lunar surface is optically hidden from Earth-based observers. However, the Moon still offers an observable: an extended sodium tail. The lunar sodium tail is the escaping "hot" component of a coma-like exosphere of sodium generated by photon-stimulated desorption, solar wind sputtering and meteoroid impact. Neutral sodium atoms escaping lunar gravity experience solar radiation pressure that drives them into the anti-solar direction forming a comet-like tail. During new Moon time, the geometry of the Sun, Moon and Earth is such that the anti-sunward sodium flux is perturbed by the terrestrial gravitational field resulting in its focusing into a dense core that extends beyond the Earth. An all-sky camera situated at the El Leoncito Observatory (CASLEO) in Argentina has been successfully imaging this tail through a sodium filter at each lunation since April 2006. This paper reports on the results of the brightness of the lunar sodium tail spanning 31 lunations between April 2006 and September 2008. Brightness variability trends are compared with both sporadic and shower meteor activity, solar wind proton energy flux and solar near ultra violet (NUV) patterns for possible correlations. Results suggest minimal variability in the brightness of the observed lunar sodium tail, generally uncorrelated with any single source, yet consistent with a multi-year period of minimal solar activity and non-intense meteoric fluxes.

  10. Moon-based visibility analysis for the observation of “The Belt and Road”

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    REN, Yuanzhen; GUO, Huadong; LIU, Guang; YE, Hanlin; DING, Yixing; RUAN, Zhixing; LV, Mingyang

    2016-11-01

    Aiming at promoting the economic prosperity and regional economic cooperation, the “Silk Road Economic Belt” and the “21st Century Maritime Silk Road” (hereinafter referred to as the Belt and Road) was raised. To get a better understanding of “the Belt and Road” whole region, considering the large-scale characteristic, the Moon platform is a good choice. In this paper, the ephemeris is taken as data source and the positions and attitudes of Sun, Earth and Moon are obtained based on the reference systems transformation. Then we construct a simplified observation model and calculate the spatial and angular visibility of the Moon platform for “the Belt and Road” region. It turns out that Moon-based observation of this region shows a good performance of spatial visibility and variable angular visibility, indicating the Moon being a new potential platform for large-scale Earth observation.

  11. Three Dimensional Orbital Stability About the Earth-Moon Equilateral Libration Points.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-01

    need to be rotated to the ecliptic . If e is the obliquity of the ecliptic , then the transformation matrix for this is: t F e, ’ C]u 11E -12 IF I) I...the use of the above transformation matrix. The frame for the analysis of the problem will be an Earth-centered ecliptic nonrotating rectangular system...The X-axis will point toward the vernal equinox and the Z-axis will be perpendicular to the ecliptic having the XY-plane coincident with the ecliptic

  12. Harvest Moon at NASA Goddard

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-12-08

    September's Harvest Moon as seen around NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. According to folklore, every full Moon has a special name. There's the Wolf Moon, the Snow Moon, the Worm Moon, the Sprouting Grass Moon, the Flower Moon, the Strawberry Moon, the Thunder Moon, the Sturgeon Moon, the Harvest Moon, the Hunter's Moon, the Beaver Moon, and the Long Night's Moon. Each name tells us something about the season or month in which the full Moon appears. This month's full Moon is the Harvest Moon. More about the Harvest Moon from NASA: Science 1.usa.gov/16lb1eZ Credit: NASA/Goddard/Debbie Mccallum NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  13. Harvest Moon at NASA Goddard

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-09-20

    September's Harvest Moon as seen around NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. According to folklore, every full Moon has a special name. There's the Wolf Moon, the Snow Moon, the Worm Moon, the Sprouting Grass Moon, the Flower Moon, the Strawberry Moon, the Thunder Moon, the Sturgeon Moon, the Harvest Moon, the Hunter's Moon, the Beaver Moon, and the Long Night's Moon. Each name tells us something about the season or month in which the full Moon appears. This month's full Moon is the Harvest Moon. More about the Harvest Moon from NASA: Science 1.usa.gov/16lb1eZ Credit: NASA/Goddard/Debbie Mccallum NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  14. Hypervelocity Impact Testing of Materials for Additive Construction: Applications on Earth, the Moon, and Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ordonez, Erick; Edmunson, Jennifer; Fiske, Michael; Christiansen, Eric; Miller, Josh; Davis, Bruce Alan; Read, Jon; Johnston, Mallory; Fikes, John

    2017-01-01

    Additive Construction is the process of building infrastructure such as habitats, garages, roads, berms, etcetera layer by layer (3D printing). The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) are pursuing additive construction to build structures using resources available in-situ. Using materials available in-situ reduces the cost of planetary missions and operations in theater. The NASA team is investigating multiple binders that can be produced on planetary surfaces, including the magnesium oxide-based Sorel cement; the components required to make Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC), the common cement used on Earth, have been found on Mars. The availability of OPC-based concrete on Earth drove the USACE to pursue additive construction for base housing and barriers for military operations. Planetary and military base structures must be capable of resisting micrometeoroid impacts with velocities ranging from 11 to 72km/s for particle sizes 200 micrometers or more (depending on protection requirements) as well as bullets and shrapnel with a velocity of 1.036km/s with projectiles 5.66mm diameter and 57.40mm in length, respectively.

  15. Models of the Origin of the Moon; Early History of Earth and Venus (The Role of Tidal Friction in the Formation of Structure of the Planets)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pechernikova, G. V.; Ruskol, E. L.

    2017-05-01

    An analytical review of the two contemporary models of the origin of the Earth-Moon system in the process of solid-body accretion is presented: socalled co-accretion model and as a result of a gigantic collision with a planetarysized body (i.e. a megaimpact model). The co-accretion model may be considered as a universal mechanism of the origin of planetary satellites, that accompanies the growth of planets. We consider the conditions of this process that secure the sufficient mass and angular momentum of the protolunar disk such as macroimpacts (collisions with the bodies of asteroidal size) into the mantle of the growing Earth, the role of an lunar embryo growing on the geocentric lunar orbit, its tidal interaction with the Earth. The most difficult remains the explanation of chemical composition of the Moon. Different scenarios of megaimpact are reviewed, in which the Earth's mantle is destroyed and the protosatellite disk is filled mainly by its fragments. There is evaluated amount of energy transferred to the Earth from the evolution of lunar orbit. It is an order of magnitude lower than three main sources of the Earth's interior heat, i.e. the heat of accretion, the energy of differentiation and the heat of radioactive sources. The tidal heating of the Venus's interiors could reach 1000K by slowing its axial initial rotation, in addition to three sources mentioned above in concern of the Earth.

  16. Modeling Hf-W Evolution for Earth, Moon and Mars in Grand Tack Accretion Simulations: The Isotopic Consequences of Rapid Accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zube, N.; Nimmo, F.; Jacobson, S. A.; Fischer, R. A.

    2017-12-01

    Short-lived isotopes, such as the decay of lithophile 182Hf into siderophile 182W with a half-life of 9 My, can provide constraints on the timescales of planetary core formation and accretion. Classical accretion scenarios have produced Hf-W isotopic outcomes like those measured presently on the Earth [2,3]. We examine Grand Tack accretion simulations [4,5] and determine the mantle equilibration conditions necessary to produce the observed tungsten isotopic anomaly. Additionally, we follow Hf-W evolution for pairs of bodies that experience a last giant impact fitting the conditions of Earth's Moon-forming collision. In this way, we determine the likelihood of producing the observed almost indistinguishable W isotope anomalies of the Earth and Moon mantles [6]. We model Hf-W evolution for growing planets in 141 N-body simulations during late accretion in the Grand Tack scenario. For each case, we vary the equilibration factor during collisions—the fraction of impactor core that experiences re-equilibration with the entire target mantle—in steps ranging from none (cores merging) to complete equilibration. For Earth-like and Mars-like surviving planets, we find that cases with a high equilibration factor (k > 0.8) and an intermediate (2:1 - 4:1) ratio of initial embryo mass to planetesimal mass were most frequently able to approximate the observed W measurements for Earth and Mars. The equilibration factor required is more restrictive than the one found for classical accretion scenarios [2,3] and may not be consistent with fluid-dynamical predictions [7]. Moons made of impactor material from Earth's last giant impact are only able to result in an Earth-Moon pair having sufficiently similar W anomalies with a likelihood of 8% or less across all simulations. This indicates that a scenario where the Moon isotopically equilibrated with the Earth's mantle after the impact [8] may be required to explain the measured values. [1] Kleine et al. 2009 [2] Nimmo et al. 2010

  17. MODELING THE INFRARED SPECTRUM OF THE EARTH-MOON SYSTEM: IMPLICATIONS FOR THE DETECTION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF EARTHLIKE EXTRASOLAR PLANETS AND THEIR MOONLIKE COMPANIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Tyler D., E-mail: robinson@astro.washington.edu

    2011-11-01

    The Moon maintains large surface temperatures on its illuminated hemisphere and can contribute significant amounts of flux to spatially unresolved thermal infrared (IR) observations of the Earth-Moon system, especially at wavelengths where Earth's atmosphere is absorbing. In this paper we investigate the effects of an unresolved companion on IR observations of Earthlike exoplanets. For an extrasolar twin Earth-Moon system observed at full phase at IR wavelengths, the Moon consistently comprises about 20% of the total signal, approaches 30% of the signal in the 9.6 {mu}m ozone band and the 15 {mu}m carbon dioxide band, makes up as much as 80%more » of the signal in the 6.3 {mu}m water band, and more than 90% of the signal in the 4.3 {mu}m carbon dioxide band. These excesses translate to inferred brightness temperatures for Earth that are too large by 20-40 K and demonstrate that the presence of undetected satellites can have significant impacts on the spectroscopic characterization of exoplanets. The thermal flux contribution from an airless companion depends strongly on phase, implying that observations of exoplanets should be taken when the star-planet-observer angle (i.e., phase angle) is as large as feasibly possible if contributions from companions are to be minimized. We show that, by differencing IR observations of an Earth twin with a companion taken at both gibbous and crescent phases, Moonlike satellites may be detectable by future exoplanet characterization missions for a wide range of system inclinations.« less

  18. Effect of gravity on terminal particle settling velocity on Moon, Mars and Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, Nikolaus J.

    2013-04-01

    Gravity has a non-linear effect on the settling velocity of sediment particles in liquids and gases due to the interdependence of settling velocity, drag and friction. However, StokeśLaw, the common way of estimating the terminal velocity of a particle moving in a gas of liquid assumes a linear relationship between terminal velocity and gravity. For terrestrial applications, this "error" is not relevant, but it may strongly influence the terminal velocity achieved by settling particles on Mars. False estimates of these settling velocities will, in turn, affect the interpretation of particle sizes observed in sedimentary rocks on Mars. Wrong interpretations may occur, for example, when the texture of sedimentary rocks is linked to the amount and hydraulics of runoff and thus ultimately the environmental conditions on Mars at the time of their formation. A good understanding of particle behaviour in liquids on Mars is therefore essential. In principle, the effect of lower gravity on settling velocity can also be achieved by reducing the difference in density between particle and gas or liquid. However, the use of such analogues simulating the lower gravity on Mars on Earth is creates other problems because the properties (i.e. viscosity) and interaction of the liquids and sediment (i.e. flow around the boundary layer between liquid and particle) differ from those of water and mineral particles. An alternative for measuring the actual settling velocities of particles under Martian gravity, on Earth, is offered by placing a settling tube on a reduced gravity flight and conduct settling tests within the 20 to 25 seconds of Martian gravity that can be simulated during such a flight. In this presentation we report the results of such a test conducted during a reduced gravity flight in November 2012. The results explore the strength of the non-linearity in the gravity-settling velocity relationship for terrestrial, lunar and Martian gravity.

  19. Earth--moon evolution: implications for the mechanism of the biological clock?

    PubMed

    Shweiki, D

    2001-04-01

    The geophysical characteristics of the planet Earth dictate the physiological traits of living organisms. Changes in the geophysical conditions over the course of geological time are responsible for major evolutionary changes in life emergence and evolvement. Calendar day length is one of earth's geophysical characteristics which is under a constant, if extremely small, progressive change. This enforces an adjustment of circadian rhythmicity throughout geological time. The calendar day has extended approximately 9 hours in the last 3.5 billion years. Two mechanisms for circadian-rhythm adjustment are suggested: a directional selection mechanism -- an endogenous -- oriented explanation regarding a genetic drift in the population's endogenous oscillation toward a lengthened daily cycle; and an exogenous calibration mechanism - a hypothesis on the existence of a geophysical responsive element which senses a geophysical stimuli and calibrates the inner cellular oscillation in accordance with the length of the calendar day. A distinguishing experiment between the two explanations is suggested and discussed. Circadian rhythm mechanism and the evolution of circadian rhythmicity are tightly connected. Circadian rhythms' evolutionary theories are discussed in light of their contribution to our understanding of the selective pressures being applied throughout geological time and of how, once the clock has been established, it maintains an ongoing adjustment to a continuous change in the length of day.I argue that the exogenous calibration mechanism combines with the endosymbiont coordination theory, together, present an explanation to the path by which the calendar day adjustment was acquired and maintained. This hypothesis suggests a role for gravity cyclic force and for cytoskeleton's components in calendar day adjustment mechanism and circadian rhythm entrainment. Copyright 2001 Harcourt Publishers Ltd.

  20. Using high resolution topography of the Earth and Moon to infer the "wetness" of slope processes on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conway, Susan; Balme, Matthew

    2015-04-01

    The present-day atmosphere of Mars is thin and dry; the surface environment experiences large temperature changes and is generally inhospitable to liquid water. However, we are coming to recognise that Mars has an extensive cryosphere, including polar caps, glaciers and ice-rich permafrost extending from the mid-latitudes to the poles. Recent work has highlighted the presence of landforms indicative of recent (<5 Ma) thaw and even liquid water flow, including, solifluction lobes, sorted patterned ground, and kilometre-scale gullies. Here we use metre-resolution topography of visually-analogous landforms on Earth and the Moon as "wet" and "dry" end-members for comparison to the slope-forms we find on Mars. We use hydrological analysis techniques to characterise the hillslopes in terms of upslope drainage area, local gradient and curvature, from which we derive a topographic fingerprint for each process. Our findings support the wet-interpretation of the martian landforms that was initially proposed based on planform morphology alone, but contested due to the lack of support from climate modelling.