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Sample records for earth movements geophysics

  1. Solid-Earth Geophysics in Latinamerica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urrutia-F, J.

    2003-12-01

    Geophysical research increasingly requires of multidisciplinary global approaches. This is particularly the case on Earth system science, where studies of our planet attempt to integrate phenomena from the inner core to surface, hydrosphere, atmosphere, and beyond the magnetosphere into our solar system. To accomplish this, studies span wide ranges of spatial and temporal scales. Increasing understanding of how deeply interrelated are the Earth components and processes, the potential global impact of human activities, and view of our planet as a spaceship journeying in the solar system and galaxy emphasize the need of international cooperation. New tools are being developed to investigate the planet at different scales, with high spatial-temporal resolution, and we say - Earth scientists (particularly from highly-developed countries) do conduct global research. In this context, what is the situation in developing countries? Do all studies in foreign countries classify as international research? - Foreign countries to some of us are the home and study areas for other researchers. What are the conditions, facilities, projects and views of those other researchers? We attempt to examine some of these questions from an inside analysis and some examples in solid Earth geophysics from a Latinamerican country. How is the situation, size of research community, education and training, facilities, economic support, major problems, participation in international programs, and bilateral and multinational collaboration? What are the perspectives for future development within the region and in an international context? International research collaboration has an immense potential and is clearly needed for study of our planet. Understanding it in terms of unselfish cooperation in equal terms with fellow researchers is yet a major challenge to make the most of that potential.

  2. Evidence for a critical Earth: the New Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crampin, Stuart; Gao, Yuan

    2015-04-01

    Phenomena that are critical-systems verging on criticality with 'butterfly wings' sensitivity are common - the weather, climate change; stellar radiation; the New York Stock Exchange; population explosions; population collapses; the life cycle of fruit-flies; and many more. It must be expected that the Earth, an archetypal complex heterogeneous interactive phenomena, is a critical-system, hence there is a New Geophysics imposing fundamentally new properties on conventional sub-critical geophysics. We shall show that, despite shear waves and shear-wave splitting (SWS) being observationally neglected, azimuthally-varying stress-aligned SWS is nearly universally observed throughout the Earth's crust and uppermost ~400km of the mantle. Caused by stress-aligned fluid-saturated microcracks (intergranular films of hydrolysed melt in the mantle), the microcracks are so closely-spaced that they verge on failure in fracturing and earthquakes. Phenomena that verge on failure in this way are critical-systems which impose a range of fundamental-new properties on conventional sub-critical geophysics including: self-similarity; monitorability; calculability; predictability; controllability; universality; and butterfly wings' sensitivity. We shall show how these phenomena have been consistently observed along millions of source-to-receiver ray paths confirming the New Geophysics. New Geophysics helps to explain many otherwise inexplicable observations including a number of geophysical conundrums such as the Gutenberg-Richter relationship which is used to describe the behaviour of conventional classic geophysics despite being massively non-linear. The great advantage of the critical Earth is that, unlike other critical-systems, the progress towards criticality can be monitored at almost any point within the deep interior of the material, by analysing observations of seismic SWS. This gives an unrivalled understanding of the detailed behaviour of a particular critical-system. This

  3. Geophysics of an Oceanic Ice Shell on Snowball Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaidos, E. J.

    2000-01-01

    Kirschvink proposed Precambrian low-latitude glaciation could result in an albedo-driven catastrophic runaway to a "Snowball Earth" state in which pack ice up to 1 km thick covered the world ocean. The geophysical state of an ice crust on a Snowball Earth is examined.

  4. Progress in geophysical aspects of the rotation of the earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambeck, K.

    1978-01-01

    The geophysical causes and consequences of the Earth's rotation are reviewed. Specific topics covered include: (1) the motion of the rotation axis in space, precession and nutation; (2) the motion of the rotation axis relative to the Earth, polar motion; and (3) the rate of rotation about this axis, or changes in the length of day. Secular decrease in obliquity and evolution of the Earth-Moon system are also discussed.

  5. PREFACE: Padjadjaran Earth Dialogues: International Symposium on Geophysical Issues, PEDISGI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosandi, Y.; Urbassek, H. M.; Yamanaka, H.

    2016-01-01

    This issue of IOP Conference Series: Earth and Environmental Science contains selected papers presented at the Padjadjaran Earth Dialogues: International Symposium on Geophysical Issues, PEDISGI. The meeting was held from June 8 to 10, 2015, at the Bale-Sawala of Universitas Padjadjaran in Jatinangor, Indonesia. The PEDISGI is a symposium to accommodate communication between researchers, in particular geophysicists and related scientists, and to enable sharing of knowledge and research findings concerning local and global geophysical issues. The symposium was attended by 126 participants and 64 contributors from Indonesian universities and the neighbouring countries in four categories, viz. Theoretical and Computational Geophysics, Environmental Geophysics, Geophysical Explorations, and Geophysical Instrumentations and Methods. The symposium was accompanied by a dialog, discussing a chosen topic regarding environmental and geological problems of relevance for the Indonesian archipelago and the surrounding regions. For this first event the topic was ''The formation of Bandung-Basin between myths and facts: Exemplary cultural, geological and geophysical study on the evolution of the earth surface'', presented by invited speakers and local experts. This activity was aimed at extending our knowledge on this particular subject, which may have global impact. This topic was augmented by theoretical background lectures on the earth's surface formation, presented by the invited speakers of the symposium. The meeting would not have been successful without the assistance of the local organizing committee. We want to specially thank Irwan A. Dharmawan for managing the programme, Anggie Susilawati and Mia U. Hasanah for the conference administration, and Dini Fitriani for financial management. We also thank the National Geographic Indonesia for its support via the Business to Business Collaboration Program. The conference photograph can be viewed in the PDF.

  6. Geophysics-based method of locating a stationary earth object

    DOEpatents

    Daily, Michael R.; Rohde, Steven B.; Novak, James L.

    2008-05-20

    A geophysics-based method for determining the position of a stationary earth object uses the periodic changes in the gravity vector of the earth caused by the sun- and moon-orbits. Because the local gravity field is highly irregular over a global scale, a model of local tidal accelerations can be compared to actual accelerometer measurements to determine the latitude and longitude of the stationary object.

  7. Exploring the geophysical signatures of microbial processes in the earth

    SciTech Connect

    Slater, L.; Atekwana, E.; Brantley, S.; Gorby, Y.; Hubbard, S. S.; Knight, R.; Morgan, D.; Revil, A.; Rossbach, S.; Yee, N.

    2009-05-15

    AGU Chapman Conference on Biogeophysics; Portland, Maine, 13-16 October 2008; Geophysical methods have the potential to detect and characterize microbial growth and activity in subsurface environments over different spatial and temporal scales. Recognition of this potential has resulted in the development of a new subdiscipline in geophysics called 'biogeophysics,' a rapidly evolving Earth science discipline that integrates environmental microbiology, geomicrobiology, biogeochemistry, and geophysics to investigate interactions that occur between the biosphere (microorganisms and their products) and the geosphere. Biogeophysics research performed over the past decade has confirmed the potential for geophysical techniques to detect microbes, microbial growth/biofilm formation, and microbe-mineral interactions. The unique characteristics of geophysical data sets (e.g., noninvasive data acquisition, spatially continuous properties retrieved) present opportunities to explore geomicrobial processes outside of the laboratory, at unique spatial scales unachievable with microbiological techniques, and possibly in remote environments such as the deep ocean. In response to this opportunity, AGU hosted a Chapman Conference with a mission to bring together geophysicists, biophysicists, geochemists, geomicrobiologists, and environmental microbiologists conducting multidisciplinary research with potential impact on biogeophysics in order to define the current state of the science, identify the critical questions facing the community, and generate a road map for establishing biogeophysics as a critical subdiscipline of Earth science research. For more information on the conference, see http://www.agu.org/meetings/chapman/2008/fcall/.

  8. Studies in geophysics: The Earth's electrical environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The Earth is electrified. Between the surface and the outer reaches of the atmosphere, there is a global circuit that is maintained by worldwide thunderstorm activity and by upper atmospheric dynamo processes. The highest voltages approach a billion volts and are generated within thunderclouds, where lightning is a visual display of the cloud's electrical nature. The largest currents in the circuit, approaching a million amperes, are associated with the aurora. Because there have been significant advances in understanding many of the component parts of the global electric circuit (lightning, cloud electrification, electrical processes in specific atmospheric regions, and telluric currents), a principal research challenge is to understand how these components interact to shape the global circuit. Increased basic understanding in this field has many potential practical applications, including lightning protection, the design of advanced aircraft and spacecraft, and improvements in weather prediction.

  9. The Environmental Movement: Beyond Earth Day.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Beth

    1995-01-01

    This collection of articles looks at the history of Earth Day and the future of the environmental movement and environmental organizations. Examines reasons environmental organizations are losing support while the public remains committed to the environment. (LZ)

  10. Movement of the 2011 Off the Pacific Coast of Tohoku Earthquake Detected by VERA Geophysical Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jike, T.; Manabe, S.; Tamura, Y.; Shizugami, M.

    2012-12-01

    The VERA project is carrying out daily GPS observations in parallel with geodetic VLBI observations, in order to monitor motion of the position of the VERA antenna stations. And continuous measurement of gravity is performed as co-location or a station of GGP in Kamioka mine and Mizusawa. These geophysical observations caught co-seismic or post-seismic phenomena, crustal movement, change of the atmospheric pressure by tsunami, post-seismic creeping, and free oscillation of the Earth, accompanying the 2011 off the Pacific coast of Tohoku Earthquake.

  11. The solid earth: An introduction to global geophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, C.M.R.

    1990-01-01

    This book addresses major topics to be presented in a modern overview course. These topics include terrestrial seismology, gravity, earth's magnetic field and paleomagnetism, radiometric age dating, and heat flow. All are related throughout to the structure and dynamics of the interior of the earth, plate tectonics (including the geometry of tectonics on a sphere), and the nature of the continental and into such aspects as reflection coefficients and Zoeppritz equations, velocity analysis, migration, and Fresnel zone limitation on resolution. Appendices treat the elastic wave equations, inversion of earthquake time-distance curves, and a glossary of geological and geophysical terms. After noting that the book is intended for both geologists and physicists, as well as those marrying the disciplines into geophysics, the author adds that most geophysicists look for oil.

  12. The Earth surface slide movement at Soledad

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, A.

    1986-11-01

    The Earth surface slide movement at Soledad is a mountain-slide type of movement. Estimations of the thickness of the layer which is moving range between 10 and 100 m. There is no proof that the movement is water induced, but it could be influenced by the water household. The slope of the slide area is H: D = 1: 2. The height difference in the moving area studied, according to this paper, is 1 km. The actual rate of movement is about 12 cm/yr.

  13. Geophysical Monitoring of Geodynamic Processes of Earth Crust of Central Armenia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pashayan, R.

    2012-12-01

    At present methods of monitoring are widely used and implemented in the different fields of science to receive non stop information about the observed object in time. The method of geophysical monitoring of earth crust is developed in Garny Geophysical Observatory. It is based on the abilities of geophysical and hydrogeological indicators to react to the changes of stressedly deformative state of earth crust. The study of variations of magnetic observations connected with the deformation processes which took place during the preparation of earthquake source or of other tectonic movements will significantly increase the informational and effective character of monitoring. The changes of hydrogeological indicators depending on the deformation of water-bearing rocks are defined by the parameters of deformational fields and by the elastic and filtration characters of rocks. Methodological means of monitoring are brought to the signal appearing which reflects the deformation of rock massive. The methods of noise elimination and singling out 'deformational signals' allow to delete or mention the trend, to compensate the influence of variations on atmospheric pressure on time rows of geophysical rows and underground water level, to allocate earth tide induced fluctuations of level. But not all the noise may be deleted by calculation. The following is included in the group of non-controlled noise: the influence of infiltration on atmospheric precipitations, effects of certain technogenic influences. Deformation indicators may be not only the deflection of geophysical indicators from certain phone values but also the parametres of variations of these indicators. There exists data on the changes of parameters of barometric effectiveness and saw tooth fluctuations of underground water level before seismic events. In some cases the noise which hinders the appearance of deformational signal may itself carry useful information. Method of geophysical monitoring of earth crust was

  14. Geophysics: The Earth in Space. A Guide for High School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Geophysical Union, Washington, DC.

    Geophysics is the application of physics, chemistry, and mathematics to the problems and processes of the earth, from its innermost core to its outermost environs in space. Fields within geophysics include the atmospheric sciences; geodesy; geomagnetism and paleomagnetism; hydrology; oceanography; planetology; seismology; solar-planetary…

  15. Geophysical Techniques for Monitoring CO2 Movement During Sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Erika Gasperikova; G. Michael Hoversten

    2005-11-15

    The relative merits of the seismic, gravity, and electromagnetic (EM) geophysical techniques are examined as monitoring tools for geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). This work does not represent an exhaustive study, but rather demonstrates the capabilities of a number of geophysical techniques for two synthetic modeling scenarios. The first scenario represents combined CO{sub 2} enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and sequestration in a producing oil field, the Schrader Bluff field on the north slope of Alaska, USA. EOR/sequestration projects in general and Schrader Bluff in particular represent relatively thin injection intervals with multiple fluid components (oil, hydrocarbon gas, brine, and CO{sub 2}). This model represents the most difficult end member of a complex spectrum of possible sequestration scenarios. The time-lapse performance of seismic, gravity, and EM techniques are considered for the Schrader Bluff model. The second scenario is a gas field that in general resembles conditions of Rio Vista reservoir in the Sacramento Basin of California. Surface gravity, and seismic measurements are considered for this model.

  16. Recent movements of the earth crust: Composite geodynamic test areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulanzhe, Iu. D.; Lilienberg, D. A.; Setunskaia, L. E.; Enman, S. V.

    This collection of papers summarizes studies of recent crustal movements on a number of test areas in the USSR in the framework of International Research Project No. 9, dealing with crustal movements in Central and Eastern Europe and Cuba. Particular papers are presented on the interpretation of movements in the Black Sea region in the light of plate tectonics; dynamic types of morphological structures of plains and low-mountain relief in Central Asia and Kazakhstan in vertical movements; horizontal movements and tectonic zoning of the earth surface on the southern Iakutsk geodynamic test area; the manifestation of crustal movements in mining regions; and movements on geodynamic test grounds in the Tiumen region.

  17. Geophysical tomography for imaging water movement in welded tuff

    SciTech Connect

    Daily, W.D.; Ramirez, A.L.

    1986-09-01

    Alterant tomography has been evaluated for its ability to delineate in-situ water flow paths in a fractured welded-tuff rock mass. The evaluation involved a field experiment in which tomographs of electromagnetic attenuation factor (or attenuation rate) at 300 MHz were made before, during, and after the introduction to the rock of two different water-based tracers: a plain water and dye solution, and salt water and dye. Alterant tomographs were constructed by subtracting, cell by cell, the attenuation factors derived from measurements before each tracer was added to the rock mass from the attenuation factors derived after each tracer was added. The alterant tomographs were compared with other evidence of water movement in the rock: borescope logs of fractures, and post experiment cores used to locate the dye tracer on the fractured surfaces. These comparisons indicate that alterant tomography is suitable for mapping water flow through fractures and that it may be useful in inferring which of the fractures are hydrologically connected in the image plane. The technique appears to be sensitive enough to delineate flow through a single fracture and to define fractures with a spatial resolution of about 10 cm on an imaging scale of a few meters. 9 refs., 3 figs.

  18. Prospect of Continuous VLBI Measurement of Earth Rotation in Monitoring Geophysical Fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Benjamin F.; Ma, Chopo; Clark, Thomas

    1998-01-01

    Large-scale mass transports in the geophysical fluids of the Earth system excite Earth's rotational variations in both length-of-day and polar motion. The excitation process is via the conservation of angular momentum. Therefore Earth rotation observations contain information about the integrated angular momentum (consisting of both the mass term and the motion term) of the geophysical fluids, which include atmosphere, hydrosphere, mantle, and the outer and inner cores. Such global information is often important and otherwise unattainable depending on the nature of the mass transport, its magnitude and time scale. The last few years have seen great advances in VLBI measurement of Earth rotation in precision and temporal resolution. These advances have opened new. areas in geophysical fluid studies, such as oceanic tidal angular momentum, atmospheric tides, Earth librations, and rapid atmospheric angular momentum fluctuations. Precision of 10 microseconds in UTI and 200 microarcseconds in polar motion can now be achieved on hourly basis. Building upon this heritage, the multi-network geodetic VLBI project, Continuous Observation of the Rotation of the Earth (CORE), promises to further these studies and to make possible studies on elusive but tell-tale geophysical processes such as oscillatory modes in the core and in the atmosphere. Currently the early phase of CORE is underway. Within a few years into the new mellinnium, the upcoming space gravity missions (such as GRACE) will measure the temporal variations in Earth's gravitational field, thus providing complementary information to that from Earth rotation study for a better understanding of global geophysical fluid processes.

  19. At quadrennial geophysics fest, earth scientists think globally

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, R.A.

    1995-07-28

    This article focuses on two areas of current research interest from the International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics meeting in July 1995. The first is the possible long and unlikely seeming change of connections. Linked are the warm surface of the tropical Pacific Ocean, the atmosphere at the midlatitudes in the Southern Hemisphere and the icy stratosphere over Antarctica where the warming of the sea surface 15 years ago may have set the stage for the Antarctic ozone hole. The second major research research reviewed concerned increases in ultraviolet light. Surface radiation in the DNA-damaging region of the spectrum is increasing by as much as 12% per decade at high latitudes.

  20. Geophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carr, M. H.; Cassen, P.

    1976-01-01

    Four areas of investigation, each dealing with the measurement of a particular geophysical property, are discussed. These properties are the gravity field, seismicity, magnetism, and heat flow. All are strongly affected by conditions, past or present, in the planetary interior; their measurement is the primary source of information about planetary interiors.

  1. Emergent Models for Teaching Geology and Geophysics Using Google Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Paor, D. G.; Whitmeyer, S. J.; Gobert, J.

    2008-12-01

    A significant limitation of Google Earth is that, whereas maps draped over the terrain may be made semi- transparent, the terrain itself is always opaque. It is not possible to see into the earth's interior - a region of particular interest to geologists and geophysicists. Furthermore, learning difficulties undoubtedly result for students because internal features of the Earth are not visible to them. At Fall AGU 2007, we showed how blocks of the earth's sub-surface could be made to emerge from the Google Earth terrain model so as to reveal crustal cross sections using either hand-drawn sketches or real data from geoseismic transects. We have refined these models to include surface topography on the tops of blocks and have produced a set of emergent cross sections representing various tectonic settings, including divergent and convergent margins, deep mantle plumes, and paleo-tectonic reconstructions. Comparing our models with typical sketches from textbooks reveals large disparities between cartoon representations of plate tectonics and real geometries from present plate configurations. Key discrepancies include substantial vertical exaggeration in cartoon models and mostly non-orthogonal collisional plate boundaries in the real world. These differences likely hinder understanding and lead to persistent misconceptions for students. With the support of the NSF CCLI program, we plan to recruit a cohort of instructors at 2- and 4-year colleges to participate in workshops in which sub-surface sketchup models will be generated in hands-on demonstrations. Participants will test the effectiveness of emergent models as learning objects in real classroom settings and compare the relative merits of Google Earth illustrations based on spatially-accurate research data versus cartoon representations of geological structures.

  2. Investigation of novel geophysical techniques for monitoring CO2 movement during sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Hoversten, G. Michael; Gasperikova, Erika

    2003-10-31

    Cost effective monitoring of reservoir fluid movement during CO{sub 2} sequestration is a necessary part of a practical geologic sequestration strategy. Current petroleum industry seismic techniques are well developed for monitoring production in petroleum reservoirs. The cost of time-lapse seismic monitoring can be born because the cost to benefit ratio is small in the production of profit making hydrocarbon. However, the cost of seismic monitoring techniques is more difficult to justify in an environment of sequestration where the process produces no direct profit. For this reasons other geophysical techniques, which might provide sufficient monitoring resolution at a significantly lower cost, need to be considered. In order to evaluate alternative geophysical monitoring techniques we have undertaken a series of numerical simulations of CO{sub 2} sequestration scenarios. These scenarios have included existing projects (Sleipner in the North Sea), future planned projects (GeoSeq Liberty test in South Texas and Schrader Bluff in Alaska) as well as hypothetical models based on generic geologic settings potentially attractive for CO{sub 2} sequestration. In addition, we have done considerable work on geophysical monitoring of CO{sub 2} injection into existing oil and gas fields, including a model study of the Weyburn CO{sub 2} project in Canada and the Chevron Lost Hills CO{sub 2} pilot in Southern California (Hoversten et al. 2003). Although we are specifically interested in considering ''novel'' geophysical techniques for monitoring we have chosen to include more traditional seismic techniques as a bench mark so that any quantitative results derived for non-seismic techniques can be directly compared to the industry standard seismic results. This approach will put all of our finding for ''novel'' techniques in the context of the seismic method and allow a quantitative analysis of the cost/benefit ratios of the newly considered methods compared to the traditional

  3. Analysing the Orbital Movement and Trajectory of LEO (Low Earth Orbit) Satellite Relative to Earth Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohra, Nafeesa; de Meer, Hermann; Memon, Aftab. A.

    Next generation of wireless Internet scenarios include LEOs (Low Earth Orbit Satellites). Lower altitudes of LEO constellations could allow global coverage while offering: low end-to-end propagation delay, low power consumption, and effective frequency usage both for the users and the satellite network. LEOs rotate asynchronously to the earth rotation. Fast movement of LEOs makes it necessary to include efficient mobility management. In past few years mobility patterns have been proposed by considering the full earth coverage constellation whereby, the rotation of earth was often assumed too negligible to be taken into account. The prime objective of this study is to provide facts and figures that show LEOs traverse relative to the rotation of earth. In order to analyse the orbital movement and trajectory of LEOs relative to earth rotation mathematical analysis have been done and justification have been made through equations.

  4. Expanding Earth and declining gravity: a chapter in the recent history of geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kragh, H.

    2015-05-01

    Although speculative ideas of an expanding Earth can be found before World War II, it was only in the 1950s and 1960s that the theory attracted serious attention among a minority of earth scientists. While some of the proponents of the expanding Earth adopted an empiricist attitude by disregarding the physical cause of the assumed expansion, others argued that the cause, either fully or in part, was of cosmological origin. They referred to the possibility that the gravitational constant was slowly decreasing in time, as first suggested by P. Dirac in 1937. As a result of a stronger gravitation in the past, the ancient Earth would have been smaller than today. The gravitational argument for an expanding Earth was proposed by P. Jordan and L. Egyed in the 1950s and during the next 2 decades it was discussed by several physicists, astronomers and earth scientists. Among those who for a period felt attracted by "gravitational expansionism" were A. Holmes, J. Tuzo Wilson and F. Hoyle. The paper examines the idea of a varying gravitational constant and its impact on geophysics in the period from about 1955 to the mid-1970s.

  5. 7 CFR 330.302 - Domestic movements of earth (including soil), stone, etc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Domestic movements of earth (including soil), stone...; GENERAL; PLANT PESTS; SOIL, STONE, AND QUARRY PRODUCTS; GARBAGE Movement of Soil, Stone, And Quarry Products § 330.302 Domestic movements of earth (including soil), stone, etc. The interstate movement...

  6. 7 CFR 330.302 - Domestic movements of earth (including soil), stone, etc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Domestic movements of earth (including soil), stone...; GENERAL; PLANT PESTS; SOIL, STONE, AND QUARRY PRODUCTS; GARBAGE Movement of Soil, Stone, And Quarry Products § 330.302 Domestic movements of earth (including soil), stone, etc. The interstate movement...

  7. 7 CFR 330.302 - Domestic movements of earth (including soil), stone, etc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Domestic movements of earth (including soil), stone...; GENERAL; PLANT PESTS; SOIL, STONE, AND QUARRY PRODUCTS; GARBAGE Movement of Soil, Stone, And Quarry Products § 330.302 Domestic movements of earth (including soil), stone, etc. The interstate movement...

  8. 7 CFR 330.302 - Domestic movements of earth (including soil), stone, etc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Domestic movements of earth (including soil), stone...; GENERAL; PLANT PESTS; SOIL, STONE, AND QUARRY PRODUCTS; GARBAGE Movement of Soil, Stone, And Quarry Products § 330.302 Domestic movements of earth (including soil), stone, etc. The interstate movement...

  9. 7 CFR 330.302 - Domestic movements of earth (including soil), stone, etc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Domestic movements of earth (including soil), stone...; GENERAL; PLANT PESTS; SOIL, STONE, AND QUARRY PRODUCTS; GARBAGE Movement of Soil, Stone, And Quarry Products § 330.302 Domestic movements of earth (including soil), stone, etc. The interstate movement...

  10. Halogen and phosphorus storage in the earth. [elemental spatial distribution from geochemical, geophysical, and cosmochemical factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. V.

    1981-01-01

    Chemical analyses of surface reservoirs, coupled with compositions for interior zones inferred from geophysical and geochemical data have been used to obtain a range of estimates of the bulk composition of the earth. It is suggested that (1) apatite with 3 wt% Fe, up to 1 wt% Cl, and 0.003 wt% Br is the principal mineral reservoir for halogens, and mica is a subsidiary reservoir; (2) apatite with 18 wt% P is the principal store of P in the upper mantle and perhaps lower mantle, but accounts for only one-twentieth of P in the earth; and (3) the remaining P is in a reservoir inaccessible to magmatism, and may amount to a maximum of 0.7 wt% in the core.

  11. American Geophysical Union Education and Public Outreach Programs: Empowering Future Earth and Space Scientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamec, B. H.; Asher, P.

    2012-08-01

    The American Geophysical Union (AGU) is an international non-profit scientific association with more than 60,000 members, working on a broad spectrum of scientific topics that span all of the Earth and space sciences. AGU's educational programs capitalize on the intrinsic allure of the Earth and space sciences, and their fundamental relevance to daily life. Through education- and career-focused events at annual AGU meetings, national conferences on science education reform, professional development workshops for teachers, special programs for pre-college and post-secondary students, awards for science educators, and printed and electronic resources, AGU offers an array of opportunities that expose students, teachers, and life-long learners to the freshest, most accurate scientific knowledge and the excitement of discovery.

  12. Carbonatite: A Geophysical investigation of a rare earth element terrane, eastern Mojave Desert, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denton, K. M.; Ponce, D. A.; Miller, D. M.; MacPherson-Krutsky, C. C.

    2013-12-01

    Geophysical investigations reveal gravity and magnetic anomalies related to a Proterozoic carbonatite terrane in the eastern Mojave Desert, host to one of the largest rare earth element carbonatite deposits in the world. The deposit is located near Mountain Pass, California and occurs in a north-northwest trending fault-bounded block that extends along the eastern parts of the Clarke Mountain Range, Mescal Range, and Ivanpah Mountains. This Early to Middle Proterozoic block is composed of a 1.7 Ga metamorphic complex of gneiss and schist intruded by a 1.4 Ga suite of ultrapotassic alkaline intrusive rocks that includes carbonatite. The intrusive suite (oldest to youngest) includes shonkinite, mesosyenite, syenite, quartz syenite, potassic granite, carbonatite, and late shonkinite dikes which are spatially and temporally associated with carbonatite intrusions and dikes. Regional geophysical data reveal that the carbonatite deposit occurs along a gravity high and the northeast edge of a prominent magnetic high with an amplitude of about 200 nanoteslas. More than 1400 gravity stations and over 200 physical property samples were collected to augment existing geophysical data and will be used to determine the geophysical and geologic setting that provide an improved structural interpretation of the eastern Mojave Desert carbonatite terrane. Physical properties of representative rock types in the area include carbonatite ore, syenite, shonkinite, gneiss, granite, and dolomite. Carbonatite intrusions typically have distinctive gravity, magnetic, and radiometric signatures because these deposits are relatively dense, contain magnetite, and are enriched in thorium or uranium. However, our results show that the main carbonatite body is essentially nonmagnetic. Thus, it is unlikely that carbonatite rocks are the source of the magnetic high associated with the Clark Mountain and Mescal Ranges. Instead, we suggest that weakly to moderately magnetic intrusive rocks or

  13. Discover Our Earth: Web-Based Geophysical Data in the Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, A.; Seber, D.; Danowski, D.; Brindisi, C.

    2002-12-01

    Discover Our Earth is a web-based system designed for classroom use, allowing access and display of geospatial data sets . It is an education and outreach module built as part of Cornell University's Geoscience Information System, originally constructed as a tool for geophysical research (http://atlas.geo.cornell.edu). Discover Our Earth has been used in university, high school and middle school classrooms. Working with real data is a powerful tool for helping students learn scientific principles, content, and the processes of scientific inquiry. In order to give students access to data that is otherwise difficult to work with, Discover Our Earth is comprised of several elements. The central component is a Java applet called QUEST (Quick Use Earth Study Tool). QUEST allows students to query and display data from three data sets selected from the 100+ housed within the Information System. Any attribute of earthquake, volcano, or topographic data can be selected and displayed, and multiple data sets can be overlain on each other, or on assorted background images (such as a geographic base map, age of the sea floor etc). Each image is saved in the QUEST history window, allowing students to compare multiple selections, or to animate a series of images as a "filmstrip." In order to help students better understand their results, the QUEST applet is supported by several other components. There are guides for both teacher and student. The student guide gives step-by-step instructions for a series of problems, and suggests others that will help students answer questions of local and global interest. The teacher guide provides background material, context, and answers to the student exercises. There are animations and 3-D visualizations that allow students to better interpret their maps. Additionally, there are interactive experiments on topics such as continental drift, isostasy, viscosity, that allow students to explore the physics that underlie the processes they are

  14. Observation of the Earth's nutation by the VLBI: how accurate is the geophysical signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gattano, César; Lambert, Sébastien B.; Bizouard, Christian

    2016-09-01

    We compare nutation time series determined by several International VLBI Service for geodesy and astrometry (IVS) analysis centers. These series were made available through the International Earth Rotation and Reference Systems Service (IERS). We adjust the amplitudes of the main nutations, including the free motion associated with the free core nutation (FCN). Then, we discuss the results in terms of physics of the Earth's interior. We find consistent FCN signals in all of the time series, and we provide corrections to IAU 2000A series for a number of nutation terms with realistic errors. It appears that the analysis configuration or the software packages used by each analysis center introduce an error comparable to the amplitude of the prominent corrections. We show that the inconsistencies between series have significant consequences on our understanding of the Earth's deep interior, especially for the free inner core resonance: they induce an uncertainty on the FCN period of about 0.5 day, and on the free inner core nutation (FICN) period of more than 1000 days, comparable to the estimated period itself. Though the FCN parameters are not so much affected, a 100 % error shows up for the FICN parameters and prevents from geophysical conclusions.

  15. Development, Deployment, and Assessment of Dynamic Geological and Geophysical Models Using the Google Earth APP and API: Implications for Undergraduate Education in the Earth and Planetary Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Paor, D. G.; Whitmeyer, S. J.; Gobert, J.

    2009-12-01

    We previously reported on innovative techniques for presenting data on virtual globes such as Google Earth using emergent Collada models that reveal subsurface geology and geophysics. We here present several new and enhanced models and linked lesson plans to aid deployment in undergraduate geoscience courses, along with preliminary results from our assessment of their effectiveness. The new Collada models are created with Google SketchUp, Bonzai3D, and MeshLab software, and are grouped to cover (i) small scale field mapping areas; (ii) regional scale studies of the North Atlantic Ocean Basin, the Appalachian Orogen, and the Pacific Ring of Fire; and (iii) global scale studies of terrestrial planets, moons, and asteroids. Enhancements include emergent block models with three-dimensional surface topography; models that conserve structural orientation data; interactive virtual specimens; models that animate plate movements on the virtual globe; exploded 3-D views of planetary mantles and cores; and server-generated dynamic KML. We tested volunteer students and professors using Silverback monitoring software, think-aloud verbalizations, and questionnaires designed to assess their understanding of the underlying geo-scientific phenomena. With the aid of a cohort of instructors across the U.S., we are continuing to assess areas in which users encounter difficulties with both the software and geoscientific concepts. Preliminary results suggest that it is easy to overestimate the computer expertise of novice users even when they are content knowledge experts (i.e., instructors), and that a detailed introduction to virtual globe manipulation is essential before moving on to geoscience applications. Tasks that seem trivial to developers may present barriers to non-technical users and technicalities that challenge instructors may block adoption in the classroom. We have developed new models using the Google Earth API which permits enhanced interaction and dynamic feedback and

  16. Integrating Diverse Geophysical and Geological Data to Construct Multi-Dimensional Earth Models: The Open Earth Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baru, C.; Keller, R.; Wallet, B.; Crosby, C.; Moreland, J.; Nadeau, D.

    2008-12-01

    Currently, many large geoscientific efforts (e.g., EarthScope, Continental Dynamics, and GeoSwath) have emphasized that a crucial need in advancing our understanding of the structure and evolution of the continents is high-resolution, 3-D models of lithospheric structure. In addition, the geoscience community recognizes that our ultimate goal is the addition of the dimension of time to make the problem 4-D. Adding the dimension of time is a complex problem that is strongly dependent on the integration of a variety of geological data into our analyses (e.g., geochronology, paleontology, stratigraphy, pressure-time histories, structural geology, paleogeography, etc.). The geoscience community also recognizes that solutions to the scientific and societal questions that they seek to answer require innovative integration of many types of data so that many physical properties (x, y, z, P-wave velocity, S-wave velocity, density, electrical conductivity, etc.) are measured and included in 3-D models. The problem is, therefore, truly multidimensional in nature. We are developing an Open Earth Framework (OEF) as an open data model for integration of such multidimensional Earth Sciences data. In our work and interactions with the community on building and visualizing complex earth models, several issues have emerged on which there is consensus. First of all, integration efforts should work from the surface down because we have the most data there (e.g., geologic maps, remote sensing data such as LIDAR and ASTER, digital elevation models, gravity and magnetic measurements, etc.) and because the complex conditions near surface always have a potential to mask deeper features. Secondly since we cannot expect uniform coverage of a variety of high-resolution data in anything but special circumstances, a data integration effort should first establish a regional context using lower resolution (and usually wide coverage) data and then proceed to modeling the data sets with the highest

  17. On Earth's Mantle Constitution and Structure from Joint Analysis of Geophysical and Laboratory-Based Data: An Example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Amir

    2016-01-01

    Determining Earth's structure is a fundamental goal of Earth science, and geophysical methods play a prominent role in investigating Earth's interior. Geochemical, cosmochemical, and petrological analyses of terrestrial samples and meteoritic material provide equally important insights. Complementary information comes from high-pressure mineral physics and chemistry, i.e., use of sophisticated experimental techniques and numerical methods that are capable of attaining or simulating physical properties at very high pressures and temperatures, thereby allowing recovered samples from Earth's crust and mantle to be analyzed in the laboratory or simulated computationally at the conditions that prevail in Earth's mantle and core. This is particularly important given that the vast bulk of Earth's interior is geochemically unsampled. This paper describes a quantitative approach that combines data and results from mineral physics, petrological analyses of mantle minerals, and geophysical inverse calculations, in order to map geophysical data directly for mantle composition (major element chemistry and water content) and thermal state. We illustrate the methodology by inverting a set of long-period electromagnetic response functions beneath six geomagnetic stations that cover a range of geological settings for major element chemistry, water content, and thermal state of the mantle. The results indicate that interior structure and constitution of the mantle can be well-retrieved given a specific set of measurements describing (1) the conductivity of mantle minerals, (2) the partitioning behavior of water between major upper mantle and transition-zone minerals, and (3) the ability of nominally anhydrous minerals to store water in their crystal structures. Specifically, upper mantle water contents determined here bracket the ranges obtained from analyses of natural samples, whereas transition-zone water concentration is an order-of-magnitude greater than that of the upper

  18. Research Opportunities in Solid Earth Science (RESESS): Broadening Participation in Geology and Geophysics (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksson, S. C.; Hubenthal, M.

    2009-12-01

    RESESS is a multi-year, paid, summer research internship program designed for students from underrepresented groups. The students receive extensive mentoring in science research and communication and become part of a community that provides ongoing support. This has been possible in the initial 5 years of the program through collaboration with Significant Opportunities in Atmospheric Research and Science (SOARS), where solid earth students have been an integral part of the SOARS cohort, benefiting from social as well as educational interactions. 11 students have taken part in RESESS for at least one year and of these, four students have graduated in geoscience and entered graduate programs in geophysics and one was recently awarded an NSF graduate fellowship. Students have presented over 20 posters at national science meetings, and one has co-authored a peer-reviewed article. 23 scientists have mentored students over the past 5 years and 17 percent of these mentors are from underrepresented groups in science; 19 other scientists and university/science consortia staff have mentored students in written and verbal presentations and supported their integration into the local communities. Mentorship over a period of years is one important hallmark of this program as students have benefited from the support of UNAVCO, IRIS, USGS, and university scientists and staff during the summer, academic year, and at professional meetings such as AGU, GSA, NABGG, and SACNAS as well as consortia and project science workshops (UNAVCO, IRIS, and EarthScope). One goal of the project has been to educate the scientific community on the benefits of mentoring undergraduate students from underrepresented groups in STEM fields. Increasingly, scientists are approaching RESESS to include this program in their implementation of broader impacts. RESESS has been funded by NSF for the next five years with plans to expand the number of students, geographic and scientific diversity, and sources of

  19. Assessing vulnerability to vegetation growth on earth dikes using geophysical investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mary, Benjamin; Saracco, Ginette; Peyras, Laurent; Vennetier, Michel; Mériaux, Patrice

    2015-04-01

    The Mediterranean Basin is prone to a plethora of natural hazards including floods. Vegetation growth in hydraulic earth structures, such as flood protections or channel levees and dams, may induce several degradation mechanisms leading to a risk of failure. Typically, trees' rooting generates two types of risks: internal erosion from root development in earth embankments, and external erosion (slopes and crest) which is often related to trees uprooting. To better assess how woody vegetation can compromise levee integrity, we designed a methodology using acoustical and complex electrical tomography as non destructives methods to spot dangerous roots in the embankment. Our work has been first initiated during laboratory experiments; we performed soundings in controlled conditions to determine both acoustical and electrical intrinsic behavior of our root samples. By comparison with soil samples we expected to point out specific signatures that would be useful for the roots anomaly identification in real conditions. Measurements were repeated on several samples to ensure statistical interpretation. With help of an ultrasonic transmission device, we identified significant relative velocity differences of compressional waves propagation between soil and root samples. We also studied spectral properties using wavelet processing method as an additional parameter of root distinction with the surrounding soil. In the case of electrical soundings, complex resistivity was measured and we computed resistivity spectra. Amplitude of resistivity term showed us that root material behaves as an insulator compared to the soil. With the phase resistivity term information, root can also be seen as an electric power capacitance and reveals maximum polarization effect located around 1Hz. Then, as experimental device for the field measurements, we selected a 320 cm high poplar (Populus) planted in a homogeneous loamy-clayed soil, which is the same soil used in laboratory experiment to

  20. Geophysical disturbance environment during the NASA/MPE barium release at 5 earth radii on September 21, 1971.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, T. N.; Stanley, G. M.; Boyd, J. S.

    1973-01-01

    The geophysical disturbance environment was quiet during the NASA/MPE barium release at 5 earth radii on September 21, 1971. At the time of the release, the magnetosphere was in the late recovery phase of a principal magnetic storm, the provisional Dst value was -13 gammas, and the local horizontal disturbance at Great Whale River was near zero. Riometer and other observations indicated low-level widespread precipitation of high-energy electrons at Great Whale River before, during, and after the release. Cloudy sky at this station prevented optical observation of aurora. No magnetic or ionospheric effects attributable to the barium release were detected at Great Whale River.

  1. Geophysical expression of a buried niobium and rare earth element deposit: the Elk Creek carbonatite, Nebraska, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Drenth, Benjamin J.

    2014-01-01

    The lower Paleozoic Elk Creek carbonatite is a 6–8-km-diameter intrusive complex buried under 200 m of sedimentary rocks in southeastern Nebraska. It hosts the largest known niobium deposit in the U.S. and a rare earth element (REE) deposit. The carbonatite is composed of several lithologies, the relations of which are poorly understood. Niobium mineralization is most enriched within a magnetite beforsite (MB) unit, and REE oxides are most concentrated in a barite beforsite unit. The carbonatite intrudes Proterozoic country rocks. Efforts to explore the carbonatite have used geophysical data and drilling. A high-resolution airborne gravity gradient and magnetic survey was flown over the carbonatite in 2012. The carbonatite is associated with a roughly annular vertical gravity gradient high and a subdued central low and a central magnetic high surrounded by magnetic field values lower than those over the country rocks. Geophysical, borehole, and physical property data are combined for an interpretation of these signatures. The carbonatite is denser than the country rocks, explaining the gravity gradient high. Most carbonatite lithologies have weaker magnetic susceptibilities than those of the country rocks, explaining why the carbonatite does not produce a magnetic high at its margin. The primary source of the central magnetic high is interpreted to be mafic rocks that are strongly magnetized and are present in large volumes. MB is very dense (mean density 3200  kg/m3) and strongly magnetized (median 0.073 magnetic susceptibility), producing a gravity gradient high and contributing to the aeromagnetic high. Barite beforsite has physical properties similar to most of the carbonatite volume, making it a poor geophysical target. Geophysical anomalies indicate the presence of dense and strongly magnetized rocks at depths below existing boreholes, either a large volume of MB or another unknown lithology.

  2. Earth's rotation variations effect the earthquake triggering and lithospheric plates movement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrihansky, Lubor

    2013-04-01

    The first group of scientists claims that the headline stated above is quite absurd because the Earth's rotation variations exert the pressure only ~1 Pa on the lithosphere. The second group claims that the despinning of the axial Earth's rotation only influences not determines the plate motion and earthquake triggering. However the third possibility is correct. The Earth's rotation variations cause the earthquake triggering and the plate movement as many observations can prove. Comparison with neighboring planets shows that Mars has no plate movement owing to the absence of large tidal forming body and Venus has slow rotation and negligible flattening. It is not true that tidal forces acting on the Earth are insufficient. Tidal forces acting on the Earth's flattening cause sufficient northward directing torques acting on plates comparable in magnitudes with the seismic moments. The westward movement of plates is evident but its calculation is more difficult and it is necessary to suppose that both the acceleration and deceleration of the Earth's rotation cause the westward lithosphere movement. Many statistics prove the coincidence of earthquakes with semidiurnal tides as result of mid-ocean ridges formation owing to the material fatigue and by loading of waters in subduction zones. Coincidence of earthquakes with LOD variations extremes resulting in Earth moment of inertia changes owing to the tidal deformation and other coincidences with factors influencing the Earth's rotation as 8.45 years Moon perigee rotation and 18.63 years nodal variation present next proofs. The last confirmation follows from the earthquake repetitions in 19 years Metonic cycle. But claims that the plate movement is caused by the mantle convection or by inhomogenities in the mantle or even by the Earth's expansions are easily disprovable conjectures.

  3. Human vertical eye movement responses to earth horizontal pitch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wall, C. 3rd; Petropoulos, A. E.

    1993-01-01

    The vertical eye movements in humans produced in response to head-over-heels constant velocity pitch rotation about a horizontal axis resemble those from other species. At 60 degrees/s these are persistent and tend to have non-reversing slow components that are compensatory to the direction of rotation. In most, but not all subjects, the slow component velocity was well characterized by a rapid build-up followed by an exponential decay to a non-zero baseline. Super-imposed was a cyclic or modulation component whose frequency corresponded to the time for one revolution and whose maximum amplitude occurred during a specific head orientation. All response components (exponential decay, baseline and modulation) were larger during pitch backward compared to pitch forward runs. Decay time constants were shorter during the backward runs, thus, unlike left to right yaw axis rotation, pitch responses display significant asymmetries between paired forward and backward runs.

  4. World Data Center a for Solid Earth Geophysics, Directory of Data Sources for Lithospheric Investigations. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Meyers, H.; Shebalin, P.

    1988-08-01

    Directory of Data Sources for Lithospheric Investigations, Volume I, presents information to the scientific community on data holdings and data availability all over the world. Each entry includes the title of the institution or data center, a very general description of existing data, person to contact, geographic area covered by the data, and availability of information. Data output is also listed (for example, publications, magnetic tapes, microfilms, microfiche, listings, CD-ROMs, PC diskettes, maps, etc.). The publication is a convenient tool to simplify first contacts with institutions. Volume I includes information about geophysical data repositories for the following fields: earthquake seismology, exploration and deep seismic sounding, gravity, magnetics, paleomagnetism, recent crustal movements, volcanoes, geothermics, and deep drilling. Volume II, in preparation, will describe repositories of geological data.

  5. Geophysical expression of a buried niobium and rare earth element deposit: the Elk Creek carbonatite, Nebraska, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drenth, B.; Phillips, J. D.; Kass, A.; Krahenbuhl, R. A.

    2014-12-01

    The lower Paleozoic Elk Creek carbonatite is a 6-8 kilometer diameter intrusive complex buried under 200 meters of sedimentary rocks in southeastern Nebraska. It hosts the largest known niobium deposit in the U.S. and a rare earth element (REE) deposit. The carbonatite is composed of several lithologies, the relations of which are poorly understood. Niobium mineralization is most enriched within a magnetite beforsite unit, and REE oxides are concentrated in a barite beforsite unit. The carbonatite intrudes Proterozoic country rocks. A high-resolution airborne gravity gradient and magnetic survey was flown over the carbonatite in 2012. The carbonatite is associated with an annular vertical gravity gradient high with a subdued central low, and a central magnetic high surrounded by magnetic field values lower than those over the country rocks. Geophysical, borehole, and physical property data are combined for an interpretation of these signatures. The carbonatite is denser than the country rocks, explaining the gravity gradient high. Most carbonatite lithologies have weaker magnetic susceptibilities than those of the country rocks, explaining why the carbonatite produces a magnetic low at its margin. The primary source of the central magnetic high is interpreted to be mafic rocks that are strongly magnetized and are present in large volumes. Magnetite beforsite is very dense (mean density 3200 kg/m3) and strongly magnetized (median 0.073 SI magnetic susceptibility), producing a gravity gradient high and contributing to the aeromagnetic high. Barite beforsite has physical properties similar to most of the carbonatite volume, making it a poor geophysical target. Geophysical anomalies indicate the presence of dense and strongly magnetized rocks at depths below existing boreholes, either a large volume of magnetite beforsite or another unknown lithology. Studies are underway to investigate possible effects of alteration and magnetic remanence, and to better constrain the

  6. Validation of Earth orientation parameters (EOP), geophysical excitation functions ( EF) and the second degree gravity field coefficients (GFC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiker, A.; Schmidt, M.

    2012-04-01

    The project P9 of the research group "Earth rotation and geophysical processes" aims at the combined analysis and validation of Earth rotation observations and models (see Göttl et al. EGU 2012 poster). The EOP, EF and GFC are linked by the Earth tensor of inertia. This link is used for a sophisticated mutual validation. A least squares adjustment model which estimate the unknown tensor of inertia was developed for this purpose. Additionally variance and covariance components are estimated. The results of the adjustment model are the residuals for each data series and the adjusted tensor of inertia. It is assumed that the residuals contain the inconsistencies between the various time series. A thorough analysis of the residuals in the time and frequency domain reveals the systematic effects within the residuals. The adjusted variance and covariance components allow to check the standard deviations and in some cases the correlations given by the data centers. We present the results obtained from the combined analysis of IERS EOP, two different atmospheric and oceanic excitation functions (NCEP/ECCO from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and ERAInterim/OMCT from the GeoForschungsZentrum (GFZ) Potsdam) and six different gravity field solutions (five GRACE solutions and one SLR solution).

  7. Interannual Variations in Earth's Low-Degree Gravity Field and the Connections With Geophysical/Climatic Changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Benjamin F.; Cox, Christopher M.

    2004-01-01

    Long-wavelength time-variable gravity recently derived from satellite laser ranging (SLR) analysis have focused to a large extent on the effects of the recent (since 1998) large anomalous change in J2, or the Earth's oblateness, and the potential causes. However, it is relatively more difficult to determine whether there are corresponding signals in the shorter wavelength zonal harmonics from the existing SLR-derived time variable gravity results, although it appears that geophysical fluid mass transport is being observed. For example, the recovered J3 time series shows remarkable agreement with NCEP-derived estimates of atmospheric gravity variations. Likewise, some of the non-zonal spherical harmonic components have significant interannual signal that appears to be related to mass transport. The non-zonal degree-2 components show reasonable temporal correlation with atmospheric signals, as well as climatic effects such as El Nino Southern Oscillation. We will present recent updates on the J2 evolution, as well as a look at other low-degree components of the interannual variations of gravity, complete through degree 4. We will examine the possible geophysical and climatic causes of these low-degree time-variable gravity related to oceanic and hydrological mass transports, for example some anomalous but prominent signals found in the extratropic Pacific ocean related to the Pacific Decadal Oscillation.

  8. Tracing sediment movement on semi-arid watershed using Rare Earth Elements 1988

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A multi-tracer method employing rare earth elements (REE) was used to determine sediment yield and to track sediment movement in a small semiarid watershed. A 0.33 ha watershed near Tombstone, AZ was divided into five morphological units, each tagged with one of five REE oxides. Relative contributi...

  9. Movement of the Earth pole and the seismic activity in 2001-2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, Aleksey; Zabbarova, Regina; Lapaeva, Valentina; Nefedyev, Yuri

    2014-05-01

    The relationship between the parameters which characterize the movement of the Earth pole and seismic activity are considered. The correlation of the considered parameters is studied. The discussions about the relationship of poles movement and irregularity in speed of Earth rotation with seismic activity were actively performed in 60- 70th years of last century. Mainly, the influence of seismicity on pole movement was considered in this works. In particular, the question about excitation of a pole by earthquakes chandler's fluctuations was studied. An interest in the similar researches continues till now. The chandler's movements investigations and their relation with rotation of the Earth and seismicity were proceeded. The correlation between appearance of earthquakes and abnormal evasion of time and latitude for the observatories located near an epicenter was also discussed. What changes in position of the Earth pole do occur as a result of the strongest earthquakes? To answer on this question it is necessary to study variations of "an average pole", where the basic periodic components in movement of a pole having amplitude 0.1"-0.3" are accepted. To perform the analysis of the pole co-ordinates (X and Y) the International service of the Earth rotation for 1995-2012 have been considered. Linear Orlov-Saharov transformation has been applied to an exception of the periodic movement. On the basis of this positions changes of an average pole (aperiodicity displacement and long periodical variations of an axis of rotation in a Earth body) have been calculated with an interval of 0.1 years. Was found the changes of position of an average pole of the Earth was preceded the most considerable seismic events of the beginning of 21 century. As a whole, the increase of seismic activity has begun after 2002 only. For example, there were 2 strong earthquakes with magnitude 7 and more (Salvador, India) in 2001 , 2 earthquakes (Tajikistan, Taiwan) occurred in 2002, and 5

  10. Spatial coding of eye movements relative to perceived earth and head orientations during static roll tilt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, S. J.; Paloski, W. H.; Reschke, M. F.

    1998-01-01

    This purpose of this study was to examine the spatial coding of eye movements during static roll tilt (up to +/-45 degrees) relative to perceived earth and head orientations. Binocular videographic recordings obtained in darkness from eight subjects allowed us to quantify the mean deviations in gaze trajectories along both horizontal and vertical coordinates relative to the true earth and head orientations. We found that both variability and curvature of gaze trajectories increased with roll tilt. The trajectories of eye movements made along the perceived earth-horizontal (PEH) were more accurate than movements along the perceived head-horizontal (PHH). The trajectories of both PEH and PHH saccades tended to deviate in the same direction as the head tilt. The deviations in gaze trajectories along the perceived earth-vertical (PEV) and perceived head-vertical (PHV) were both similar to the PHH orientation, except that saccades along the PEV deviated in the opposite direction relative to the head tilt. The magnitude of deviations along the PEV, PHH, and PHV corresponded to perceptual overestimations of roll tilt obtained from verbal reports. Both PEV gaze trajectories and perceptual estimates of tilt orientation were different following clockwise rather than counterclockwise tilt rotation; however, the PEH gaze trajectories were less affected by the direction of tilt rotation. Our results suggest that errors in gaze trajectories along PEV and perceived head orientations increase during roll tilt in a similar way to perceptual errors of tilt orientation. Although PEH and PEV gaze trajectories became nonorthogonal during roll tilt, we conclude that the spatial coding of eye movements during roll tilt is overall more accurate for the perceived earth reference frame than for the perceived head reference frame.

  11. Spatial coding of eye movements relative to perceived earth and head orientations during static roll tilt.

    PubMed

    Wood, S J; Paloski, W H; Reschke, M F

    1998-07-01

    This purpose of this study was to examine the spatial coding of eye movements during static roll tilt (up to +/-45 degrees) relative to perceived earth and head orientations. Binocular videographic recordings obtained in darkness from eight subjects allowed us to quantify the mean deviations in gaze trajectories along both horizontal and vertical coordinates relative to the true earth and head orientations. We found that both variability and curvature of gaze trajectories increased with roll tilt. The trajectories of eye movements made along the perceived earth-horizontal (PEH) were more accurate than movements along the perceived head-horizontal (PHH). The trajectories of both PEH and PHH saccades tended to deviate in the same direction as the head tilt. The deviations in gaze trajectories along the perceived earth-vertical (PEV) and perceived head-vertical (PHV) were both similar to the PHH orientation, except that saccades along the PEV deviated in the opposite direction relative to the head tilt. The magnitude of deviations along the PEV, PHH, and PHV corresponded to perceptual overestimations of roll tilt obtained from verbal reports. Both PEV gaze trajectories and perceptual estimates of tilt orientation were different following clockwise rather than counterclockwise tilt rotation; however, the PEH gaze trajectories were less affected by the direction of tilt rotation. Our results suggest that errors in gaze trajectories along PEV and perceived head orientations increase during roll tilt in a similar way to perceptual errors of tilt orientation. Although PEH and PEV gaze trajectories became nonorthogonal during roll tilt, we conclude that the spatial coding of eye movements during roll tilt is overall more accurate for the perceived earth reference frame than for the perceived head reference frame.

  12. Infrasound as a Geophysical Probe Using Earth as a Venus Analog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komjathy, Attila; Cutts, James; Pauken, Michael; Kedar, Sharon; Smrekar, Suzanne

    2016-10-01

    JPL is in a process of developing an instrument to measure seismic activity on Venus by detecting infrasonic waves in the atmosphere. The overall objective of this research is to demonstrate the feasibility of using sensitive barometers to detect infrasonic signals from seismic and explosive activity on Venus from a balloon platform. Because of Venus' dense atmosphere, seismic signatures from even small quakes (magnitude ~3) are effectively coupled into the atmosphere. The seismic signals are known to couple about 60 times more efficiently into the atmosphere on Venus than on Earth. It was found that almost no attenuation below 80 km on Venus for frequency less than 1Hz. Whereas wind noise is a major source of background noise for terrestrial infrasonic arrays, it is expected that a balloon platform, which drifts with winds will be capable of very sensitive measurements with low noise.In our research we will demonstrate and apply techniques for discriminating upward propagating waves from a seismic event by making measurements with two or more infrasonic sensors using very sensitive barometers on a tether deployed from the balloon in a series of earth-based tests. We will first demonstrate and validate the technique using an artificial infrasound source in a deployment from a hot air balloon on Earth and then extend it with longer duration flights in the troposphere and stratosphere.We will report results on the first flight experiment that will focus on using the barometer instruments on a tethered helium-filled balloon. The balloon flight will be conducted in the vicinity of a known seismic source generated by a seismic hammer. Earlier tests conducted by Sandia National Laboratory demonstrated that this is a highly reproducible source of seismic and acoustic energy using infrasound sensors. The results of the experiments are intended to validate the two-barometer signal processing approach using a well-characterized point signal source.

  13. Deep Interior: Spacecraft Initiatives for Near-Earth Object Geophysical Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asphaug, E.; Belton, M.; Huebner, W.; Kakuda, R.; Yeomans, D.

    2002-12-01

    Near-Earth objects (NEOs) represent a superlative sampling of protoplanetary materials from throughout the solar system. They also have come to focus in recent years as potential natural disasters in need of careful assessment - not only the determination of NEO populations and detailed orbits, but also an understanding of how they are put together, and how they will behave during the course of energetic surface operations (from penetrometry to human visitation to diversion). We describe a concept for a robust multiple-rendezvous science mission to three representative near-Earth objects including a dormant or extinct comet nucleus. Key features include solar electric propulsion, autonomous navigation, stereogrammetric imaging, plus dual-wavelength radio tomography from orbit and small cratering science experiments for material and dynamical studies. The cratering experiments (conducted by instrumented blast payloads) will serve as precursors to future landed seismic investigations, and will enable the construction of realistic simulation environments for lowering the risk of future landed NEO missions. Mission science goals include: (1) definitive test of the rubble pile hypothesis for asteroids, (2) definitive test of the mantling hypothesis for comets, and whether primitive materials inhabit their interior, and (3) definitive study of the depth and mobility of regolith. This mission can be delivered for under the NASA Discovery cost cap. Significant payload margins allow for the addition of auxiliary landed instruments (penetrometer/seismometer) at each NEO visited, in which case the existing cratering experiments would serve as seismic signals. This combination of multiple wavelength radar tomography and seismic analysis would be an especially powerful probe of NEO interiors.

  14. Changes in the manner of tectonic movements under the Earth's evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmin, M. I.; Yarmolyuk, V. V.

    2016-08-01

    Variations in the O, Sr, Nd, and Hf isotopic compositions in rocks of various ages, minerals, and mantle temperature in the geological history are considered. Two periods in the Earth's history are studied: the beginning of the formation of the planet until the turn of (3.4) 2.7-2.5 Ga and the tectonic movement period in the last 2 Ga, and also the transitional period within 2.7-2.0 Ga.

  15. The importance of a multidisciplinary approach for solid earth geophysics in Seafloor Observatories data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Embriaco, Davide; De Caro, Mariagrazia; De Santis, Angelo; Etiope, Giuseppe; Frugoni, Francesco; Giovanetti, Gabriele; Lo Bue, Nadia; Marinaro, Giuditta; Monna, Stephen; Montuori, Caterina; Sgroi, Tiziana; Beranzoli, Laura; Favali, Paolo

    2016-04-01

    Continuous time-series in deep ocean waters are the basis for an original approach in ocean exploration. The observation of phenomena variability over time is key to understanding many Earth processes, among which: hydrothermal systems, active tectonics, and ecosystem life cycles. Geo-hazards at sea have often been studied with a single-parameter approach on a short time-scale, but it is now becoming clear that to understand these phenomena and, specifically, to identify precursors to very energetic events, such as mega-earthquakes, tsunamis and volcanic eruptions, continuous long-term multiparameter monitoring is strongly needed. In fact, given a signal of interest, by using several sensors recording simultaneously it is possible to identify the contribution of different sources to this signal, and to be less prone to false associations. In Europe, large cabled systems with marine sensors are being developed for near real-time and real-time long-term monitoring of ocean processes within the EMSO (European Multidisciplinary Seafloor and water column Observatory www.emso-eu.org) Research Infrastructure. Obtaining good quality long-term multiparameter data from sensors on-board seafloor observatories, which are the base of a multidisciplinary approach, is a challenging task. We describe the main steps we have taken to retrieve good quality multiparametric data acquired by GEOSTAR class seafloor observatories, both standalone and cabled, deployed at various sites offshore European coast during the last decade. Starting from this data we show the application of a multidisciplinary approach with some examples coming from experiments in EMSO sites.

  16. Using the Earth as a guide to martian mass movement processes: From form to process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanza, N.; Newsom, H. E.; Osterloo, M. M.; Okubo, C. H.

    2011-12-01

    The discovery of gully features on Mars has led to renewed interest in hillslope processes on that planet, in particular mass movement and the morphologies that it produces. Mass movement is a collection of gravity-driven processes that act to move materials down a hillslope. Here, we examine how mass movements on hillslopes may be expected to differ on Earth and Mars as the result of gravity differences between these planets. Downslope movement of unconsolidated materials is generally controlled by the bulk shear strength of these materials. Although the relationship between gravity and shear strength is largely dependent on variables that are independent of gravity, the lower gravity on Mars is expected to produce some systematic changes in mass movement behaviors that may in turn create morphological features that are observably different from their terrestrial counterparts. After scaling for gravity and modifying empirically derived relationships, we may expect the following differences on martian hillslopes when compared to their terrestrial counterparts: ==On Mars, hillslopes may have steeper angles of repose in fine grained (< ~2 mm) materials, even when dry. No change in angle of repose is expected for larger particles; ==An increase in soil moisture content (e.g., excess pore pressure) is expected to weaken unconsolidated slope materials more on Mars for a particular regolith type, which in turn may produce --An increase in creep rates for a given pore pressure, and --An increase in effectiveness of frost heave to transport materials downslope; ==Processes triggered by saturation may occur at lower pore pressures on Mars; --A smaller amount of fluid is needed to achieve failure; ==Shorter runout lengths are expected for rapid mass movements; ==On Mars, overland flow will exert a proportionally lower shear stress on slope materials; --In cohesive materials, the same volume of water will detach sediments of smaller sizes. On Earth, mass movement processes

  17. "Green earth, women's power, human liberation": women in peasant movements in India.

    PubMed

    Omvedt, G

    1992-01-01

    The experience of 2 peasant women's movements in India's state of Maharashtra--Stri Mukti Sangharsh and Shetkari Mahila Aghadi--highlights the potential power of women in resisting capitalist exploitation of peasant and forest-dwelling communities. The former organization is the women's branch of a movement that is resisting the ecological destruction and displacement of peasants and tribal people resulting from development projects such as dam construction; the latter addresses the demand for fair prices for agricultural produce and inequities created by a market economy. Both are mass-based, self-financed people's movements unconnected with any political party. Although women are under-represented in the formal decision-making bodies of the parent organizations, they are struggling to become a central force in the development of alternative technology and agriculture. In 1990, Stri Mukti Sangharsh activists devised a new slogan--green earth, women's power, human liberation--summarizing this process. Similarly, Shetkari Mahila Aghadi calls upon women to monopolize political power and runs all-women panels in district council elections. These campaigns have challenged women's exclusion from ownership of land in spite of laws granting property rights and placed the issues of women's health and nutrition on the political agenda. Moreover, peasant women have played a leading role in the current experimentation with energy-recycling, regenerative, low-input agricultural development. Together, these developments may provide Indian women with the power to recover their former centrality in agricultural decision-making and production.

  18. WEST COAST REGIONAL CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP - REPORT ON GEOPHYSICAL TECHNIQUES FOR MONITORING CO2 MOVEMENT DURING SEQUESTRATION

    SciTech Connect

    Gasperikova, Erika; Gasperikova, Erika; Hoversten, G. Michael

    2005-10-01

    The relative merits of the seismic, gravity, and electromagnetic (EM) geophysical techniques are examined as monitoring tools for geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. This work does not represent an exhaustive study, but rather demonstrates the capabilities of a number of geophysical techniques on two synthetic modeling scenarios. The first scenario represents combined CO{sub 2} enhance oil recovery (EOR) and sequestration in a producing oil field, the Schrader Bluff field on the north slope of Alaska, USA. EOR/sequestration projects in general and Schrader Bluff in particular represent relatively thin injection intervals with multiple fluid components (oil, hydrocarbon gas, brine, and CO{sub 2}). This model represents the most difficult end member of a complex spectrum of possible sequestration scenarios. The time-lapse performance of seismic, gravity, and EM techniques are considered for the Schrader Bluff model. The second scenario is a gas field that in general resembles conditions of Rio Vista reservoir in the Sacramento Basin of California. Surface gravity, and seismic measurements are considered for this model.

  19. Resources for Computational Geophysics Courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keers, Henk; Rondenay, Stéphane; Harlap, Yaël.; Nordmo, Ivar

    2014-09-01

    An important skill that students in solid Earth physics need to acquire is the ability to write computer programs that can be used for the processing, analysis, and modeling of geophysical data and phenomena. Therefore, this skill (which we call "computational geophysics") is a core part of any undergraduate geophysics curriculum. In this Forum, we share our personal experience in teaching such a course.

  20. Fundamentals of Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowrie, William

    1997-10-01

    This unique textbook presents a comprehensive overview of the fundamental principles of geophysics. Unlike most geophysics textbooks, it combines both the applied and theoretical aspects to the subject. The author explains complex geophysical concepts using abundant diagrams, a simplified mathematical treatment, and easy-to-follow equations. After placing the Earth in the context of the solar system, he describes each major branch of geophysics: gravitation, seismology, dating, thermal and electrical properties, geomagnetism, paleomagnetism and geodynamics. Each chapter begins with a summary of the basic physical principles, and a brief account of each topic's historical evolution. The book will satisfy the needs of intermediate-level earth science students from a variety of backgrounds, while at the same time preparing geophysics majors for continued study at a higher level.

  1. Crisp clustering of airborne geophysical data from the Alto Ligonha pegmatite field, northeastern Mozambique, to predict zones of increased rare earth element potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberle, Detlef G.; Daudi, Elias X. F.; Muiuane, Elônio A.; Nyabeze, Peter; Pontavida, Alfredo M.

    2012-01-01

    The National Geology Directorate of Mozambique (DNG) and Maputo-based Eduardo-Mondlane University (UEM) entered a joint venture with the South African Council for Geoscience (CGS) to conduct a case study over the meso-Proterozoic Alto Ligonha pegmatite field in the Zambézia Province of northeastern Mozambique to support the local exploration and mining sectors. Rare-metal minerals, i.e. tantalum and niobium, as well as rare-earth minerals have been mined in the Alto Ligonha pegmatite field since decades, but due to the civil war (1977-1992) production nearly ceased. The Government now strives to promote mining in the region as contribution to poverty alleviation. This study was undertaken to facilitate the extraction of geological information from the high resolution airborne magnetic and radiometric data sets recently acquired through a World Bank funded survey and mapping project. The aim was to generate a value-added map from the airborne geophysical data that is easier to read and use by the exploration and mining industries than mere airborne geophysical grid data or maps. As a first step towards clustering, thorium (Th) and potassium (K) concentrations were determined from the airborne geophysical data as well as apparent magnetic susceptibility and first vertical magnetic gradient data. These four datasets were projected onto a 100 m spaced regular grid to assemble 850,000 four-element (multivariate) sample vectors over the study area. Classification of the sample vectors using crisp clustering based upon the Euclidian distance between sample and class centre provided a (pseudo-) geology map or value-added map, respectively, displaying the spatial distribution of six different classes in the study area. To learn the quality of sample allocation, the degree of membership of each sample vector was determined using a-posterior discriminant analysis. Geophysical ground truth control was essential to allocate geology/geophysical attributes to the six classes

  2. Studies on different geophysical and extra-terrestrial events within the Earth-ionosphere cavity in terms of ULF/ELF/VLF radio waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanfui, Minu; Haldar, D. K.; Biswas, Debasish

    2016-10-01

    The space between the two spherical conducting shells, Earth surface and the lower boundary of the ionosphere, behaves as a spherical cavity in which some electromagnetic signals can propagate a long distance and is called Earth-ionosphere waveguide. Through this waveguide ultra low frequency (ULF), extremely low frequency (ELF) and very low frequency (VLF) signals can propagate efficiently with low attenuation. Resonances which occur for ELF waves due to round-the-world propagation interfering with 2n π phase difference are called Schumann resonances. Lightnings are the main sources of energy continuously producing these electromagnetic radiations from the troposphere. Some fixed frequency signals are also transmitted through the waveguide from different stations for navigation purposes. The intensity and phase of these signals at a particular position depend on the waveguide characteristics which are highly influenced by different natural events. Thus the signatures of different geophysical and extra-terrestrial events may be investigated by studying these signals through proper monitoring of the time series data using suitable techniques. In this article, we provide a review on ULF, ELF and VLF signals within the waveguide in terms of different geophysical and extra-terrestrial events like lightning, earthquakes, Leonid meteor shower, solar flares, solar eclipse, geomagnetic storms, and TLEs etc.

  3. Interaction of Students' Academic Background and Support Levels in a Resource-Based Learning Environment on Earth's Movement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    So, Wing Mui Winnie; Kong, Siu Cheung

    2010-01-01

    This research aims to study how a resource-based learning environment (RBLE) helps primary students develop better understanding of the Earth's movement. One objective of the study is to establish an RBLE by creating authentic contexts, selecting appropriate resources, designing relevant tools and adopting necessary scaffolds. The other objective…

  4. Environmental and Engineering Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Prem V.

    1997-12-01

    Geophysical imaging methods provide solutions to a wide variety of environmental and engineering problems: protection of soil and groundwater from contamination; disposal of chemical and nuclear waste; geotechnical site testing; landslide and ground subsidence hazard detection; location of archaeological artifacts. This book comprehensively describes the theory, data acquisition and interpretation of all of the principal techniques of geophysical surveying: gravity, magnetic, seismic, self-potential, resistivity, induced polarization, electromagnetic, ground-probing radar, radioactivity, geothermal, and geophysical borehole logging. Each chapter is supported by a large number of richly illustrated case histories. This book will prove to be a valuable textbook for senior undergraduates and postgraduates in environmental and applied geophysics, a supplementary course book for students of geology, engineering geophysics, civil and mining engineering, and a reference work for professional earth scientists, engineers and town planners.

  5. International Symposium on Airborne Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogi, Toru; Ito, Hisatoshi; Kaieda, Hideshi; Kusunoki, Kenichiro; Saltus, Richard W.; Fitterman, David V.; Okuma, Shigeo; Nakatsuka, Tadashi

    2006-05-01

    Airborne geophysics can be defined as the measurement of Earth properties from sensors in the sky. The airborne measurement platform is usually a traditional fixed-wing airplane or helicopter, but could also include lighter-than-air craft, unmanned drones, or other specialty craft. The earliest history of airborne geophysics includes kite and hot-air balloon experiments. However, modern airborne geophysics dates from the mid-1940s when military submarine-hunting magnetometers were first used to map variations in the Earth's magnetic field. The current gamut of airborne geophysical techniques spans a broad range, including potential fields (both gravity and magnetics), electromagnetics (EM), radiometrics, spectral imaging, and thermal imaging.

  6. Research concerning the geophysical causes and measurement accuracies related to the irregularities in the rotation of the earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Currie, D. G.

    1978-01-01

    The primary objective of this effort consisted of a detailed study of the history of the motion of the moon. Several analyses were developed which are related to the determination of the effect of various refractive phenomena on the accuracy of measurements made through the earth's atmosphere.

  7. A Survey of the Utility of Satellite Magnetometer Data for Application to Solid-earth Geophysical and Geological Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A survey of potential users of low altitude satellite magnetic measurements for solid-earth and geological studies was conducted. The principal objectives of this survey were to: document the utility and application of the data and resultant products obtained from such a satellite mission, and establish a users committee for the proposed low altitude vector magnetometer satellite.

  8. Gravity and perceptual stability during translational head movement on earth and in microgravity.

    PubMed

    Jaekl, P; Zikovitz, D C; Jenkin, M R; Jenkin, H L; Zacher, J E; Harris, L R

    2005-01-01

    We measured the amount of visual movement judged consistent with translational head movement under normal and microgravity conditions. Subjects wore a virtual reality helmet in which the ratio of the movement of the world to the movement of the head (visual gain) was variable. Using the method of adjustment under normal gravity 10 subjects adjusted the visual gain until the visual world appeared stable during head movements that were either parallel or orthogonal to gravity. Using the method of constant stimuli under normal gravity, seven subjects moved their heads and judged whether the virtual world appeared to move "with" or "against" their movement for several visual gains. One subject repeated the constant stimuli judgements in microgravity during parabolic flight. The accuracy of judgements appeared unaffected by the direction or absence of gravity. Only the variability appeared affected by the absence of gravity. These results are discussed in relation to discomfort during head movements in microgravity.

  9. Effects of the Depth-Dependent Grain Size on the Evolution of Earth's Mantle: Linking Mantle Rheology and Geophysical Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glisovic, P.; Forte, A. M.

    2014-12-01

    The effects of the grain size variations on the viscosity are comparable to that of temperature and pressure. A detailed depth-profile of the grain size in the mantle is, however, unknown. To explore the possible depth-dependence of grain size, we use models of coupled core-mantle evolution that include the dynamic effect of surface tectonic plates. We developed an algorithm for modelling: 1) the surface yield stress in a dynamically consistent manner, and 2) the diffusion creep, that is based on the following ingredients: vacancy diffusion in perovskite, depth-dependent grain size, temperature and pressure. This algorithm is able to provide a fit to a wide set of geodynamical observations. Time-dependent convection simulations reveal that the thermal evolution of the mantle is very sensitive to depth-variations in the grain size. We also explore the important feedbacks of thermal convection on the evolution of Earth's mantle rheology.

  10. Core Angular Momentum and the IERS Sub-Centers Activity for Monitoring Global Geophysical Fluids. Part 1; Core Angular Momentum and Earth Rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, Xia-Dong; Chao, Benjamin (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The part of the grant was to use recordings of seismic waves travelling through the earth's core (PKP waves) to study the inner core rotation and constraints on possible density anomalies in the fluid core. The shapes and relative arrival times of such waves associated with a common source were used to reduce the uncertainties in source location and excitation and the effect of unknown mantle structure. The major effort of the project is to assemble historical seismograms with long observing base lines. We have found original paper records of SSI earthquakes at COL between 1951 and 1966 in a warehouse of the U.S. Geological Survey office in Golden, Colorado, extending the previous measurements at COL by Song and Richards [1996] further back 15 years. Also in Alaska, the University of Alaska, Fairbanks Geophysical Institute (UAFGI) has been operating the Alaskan Seismic Network with over 100 stations since the late 1960s. Virtually complete archives of seismograms are still available at UAFGI. Unfortunately, most of the archives are in microchip form (develocorders), for which the use of waveforms is impossible. Paper seismograms (helicorders) are available for a limited number of stations, and digital recordings of analog signals started around 1989. Of the paper records obtained, stations at Gilmore Dome (GLM, very close to COL), Yukon (FYU), McKinley (MCK), and Sheep Creek Mountain (SCM) have the most complete continuous recordings.

  11. Deep mantle structure as a reference frame for movements in and on the Earth.

    PubMed

    Torsvik, Trond H; van der Voo, Rob; Doubrovine, Pavel V; Burke, Kevin; Steinberger, Bernhard; Ashwal, Lewis D; Trønnes, Reidar G; Webb, Susan J; Bull, Abigail L

    2014-06-17

    Earth's residual geoid is dominated by a degree-2 mode, with elevated regions above large low shear-wave velocity provinces on the core-mantle boundary beneath Africa and the Pacific. The edges of these deep mantle bodies, when projected radially to the Earth's surface, correlate with the reconstructed positions of large igneous provinces and kimberlites since Pangea formed about 320 million years ago. Using this surface-to-core-mantle boundary correlation to locate continents in longitude and a novel iterative approach for defining a paleomagnetic reference frame corrected for true polar wander, we have developed a model for absolute plate motion back to earliest Paleozoic time (540 Ma). For the Paleozoic, we have identified six phases of slow, oscillatory true polar wander during which the Earth's axis of minimum moment of inertia was similar to that of Mesozoic times. The rates of Paleozoic true polar wander (<1°/My) are compatible with those in the Mesozoic, but absolute plate velocities are, on average, twice as high. Our reconstructions generate geologically plausible scenarios, with large igneous provinces and kimberlites sourced from the margins of the large low shear-wave velocity provinces, as in Mesozoic and Cenozoic times. This absolute kinematic model suggests that a degree-2 convection mode within the Earth's mantle may have operated throughout the entire Phanerozoic.

  12. Exploration Geophysics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savit, Carl H.

    1978-01-01

    Expansion of activity and confirmation of new technological directions characterized several fields of exploration geophysics in 1977. Advances in seismic-reflection exploration have been especially important. (Author/MA)

  13. Exploration Geophysics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espey, H. R.

    1977-01-01

    Describes geophysical techniques such as seismic, gravity, and magnetic surveys of offshare acreage, and land-data gathering from a three-dimensional representation made from closely spaced seismic lines. (MLH)

  14. Agricultural Geophysics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The four geophysical methods predominantly used for agricultural purposes are resistivity, electromagnetic induction, ground penetrating radar (GPR), and time domain reflectometry (TDR). Resistivity and electromagnetic induction methods are typically employed to map lateral variations of apparent so...

  15. Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carr, M. H.

    1984-01-01

    The following aspects of the planet Earth are discussed: plate tectonics, the interior of the planet, the formation of the Earth, and the evolution of the atmosphere and hydrosphere. The Earth's crust, mantle, and core are examined along with the bulk composition of the planet.

  16. Reports on crustal movements and deformations. [bibliography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, S. C.; Peck, T.

    1983-01-01

    This Catalog of Reports on Crustal Movements and Deformation is a structured bibliography of scientific papers on the movements of the Earth crust. The catalog summarizes by various subjects papers containing data on the movement of the Earth's surface due to tectonic processes. In preparing the catalog we have included studies of tectonic plate motions, spreading and convergence, microplate rotation, regional crustal deformation strain accumulation and deformations associated with the earthquake cycle, and fault motion. We have also included several papers dealing with models of tectonic plate motion and with crustal stress. Papers which discuss tectonic and geologic history but which do not present rates of movements or deformations and papers which are primarily theoretical analyses have been excluded from the catalog. An index of authors cross-referenced to their publications also appears in the catalog. The catalog covers articles appearing in reviewed technical journals during the years 1970-1981. Although there are citations from about twenty journals most of the items come from the following publications: Journal of Geophysical Research, Tectonophysics, Geological Society of America Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America, Nature, Science, Geophysical Journal of the Royal Astronomical Society, Earth and Planetary Science Letters, and Geology.

  17. Teaching Future Teachers Basic Astronomy Concepts--Sun-Earth-Moon Relative Movements--at a Time of Reform in Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trumper, Ricardo

    2006-01-01

    In view of students' alternative conceptions about basic concepts in astronomy, we conducted a series of constructivist activities with future elementary and junior high school teachers aimed at changing their conceptions about the cause of seasonal changes, and of several characteristics of the Sun-Earth-Moon relative movements like Moon phases,…

  18. A systematic review of the health impacts of mass Earth movements (landslides).

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Iain T R; Petley, Dave N; Williams, Richard; Murray, Virginia

    2015-04-30

    Background. Mass ground movements (commonly referred to as 'landslides') are common natural hazards that can have significant economic, social and health impacts. They occur as single events, or as clusters, and are often part of 'disaster' chains, occurring secondary to, or acting as the precursor of other disaster events. Whilst there is a large body of literature on the engineering and geological aspects of landslides, the mortality and morbidity caused by landslides is less well documented. As far as we are aware, this is the first systematic review to examine the health impacts of landslides. Methods. The MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, SCOPUS databases and the Cochrane library were systematically searched to identify articles which considered the health impacts of landslides. Case studies, case series, primary research and systematic reviews were included. News reports, editorials and non-systematic reviews were excluded. Only articles in English were considered. The references of retrieved papers were searched to identify additional articles. Findings. 913 abstracts were reviewed and 143 full text articles selected for review. A total of 27 papers reporting research studies were included in the review (25 from initial search, 1 from review of references and 1 from personal correspondence). We found a limited number of studies on the physical health consequences of landslides. Only one study provided detail of the causes of mortality and morbidity in relation a landslide event. Landslides cause significant mental health impacts, in particular the prevalence of PTSD may be higher after landslides than other types of disaster, though these studies tend to be older with only 3 papers published in the last 5 years, with 2 being published 20 years ago, and diagnostic criteria have changed since they were produced. Discussion. We were disappointed at the small number of relevant studies, and the generally poor documentation of the health impacts of landslides. Mental

  19. A Systematic Review of the Health Impacts of Mass Earth Movements (Landslides)

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Iain T R; Petley, Dave N.; Williams, Richard; Murray, Virginia

    2015-01-01

    Background. Mass ground movements (commonly referred to as ‘landslides’) are common natural hazards that can have significant economic, social and health impacts. They occur as single events, or as clusters, and are often part of ‘disaster’ chains, occurring secondary to, or acting as the precursor of other disaster events. Whilst there is a large body of literature on the engineering and geological aspects of landslides, the mortality and morbidity caused by landslides is less well documented. As far as we are aware, this is the first systematic review to examine the health impacts of landslides. Methods. The MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, SCOPUS databases and the Cochrane library were systematically searched to identify articles which considered the health impacts of landslides. Case studies, case series, primary research and systematic reviews were included. News reports, editorials and non-systematic reviews were excluded. Only articles in English were considered. The references of retrieved papers were searched to identify additional articles. Findings. 913 abstracts were reviewed and 143 full text articles selected for review. A total of 27 papers reporting research studies were included in the review (25 from initial search, 1 from review of references and 1 from personal correspondence). We found a limited number of studies on the physical health consequences of landslides. Only one study provided detail of the causes of mortality and morbidity in relation a landslide event. Landslides cause significant mental health impacts, in particular the prevalence of PTSD may be higher after landslides than other types of disaster, though these studies tend to be older with only 3 papers published in the last 5 years, with 2 being published 20 years ago, and diagnostic criteria have changed since they were produced. Discussion. We were disappointed at the small number of relevant studies, and the generally poor documentation of the health impacts of landslides

  20. Meteorological and earth observation remote sensing data for mass movement preparedness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchroithner, Manfred F.

    One of the major problems of the efficient synergetic use of remote sensing data for natural disaster mitigation is the fusion of various meteo- and geodata sets of significantly different spatial resolution. On the other hand, different morphological types of mass movements are based on alternate concepts i.e. of generation which, again has to be initially reflected in differing methodological approaches. The unifying idea and stronghold, however, of the presented approach is the precipitation parameters which trigger the debris flows. Albeit, frequently there are no relevant precipitation climatic data available. Despite significant drawbacks in the integration of Landsat and/or SPOT data sound hazard zonation maps can be generated. For a test area in the French Alps it has been shown that remote sensing data can be used to predict potential debris flow events. High temporal frequency remote sensing data from the Meteosat series of satellites allow the identification of cloud clusters most likely to result in intense rainfall which are, in turn, likely to initiate debris flow activity. Video evidence, field observations and an empirical debris flow model linked to an instantaneous rain gauge were used to ascertain the exact times of debris flow initiation. Due to the high spatial and temporal variability of rainfall in mountainous regions and the large areas vulnerable to debris flows compared to the coverages of these observations, there are, however, restrictions on the use of these data for large regions to provide early warning of debris flow events operationally. Additionally, the possible timeliness of warnings using such observations is restricted to the relatively short interval between the onset of the triggering phenomena and the hazard event. The remote sensing techniques developed in this study, allow warning of potential debris flow events to be derived before the triggering phenomenon occurs, by attempting to recognise the evolution if intense rain

  1. A systematic review of the health impacts of mass Earth movements (landslides).

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Iain T R; Petley, Dave N; Williams, Richard; Murray, Virginia

    2015-01-01

    Background. Mass ground movements (commonly referred to as 'landslides') are common natural hazards that can have significant economic, social and health impacts. They occur as single events, or as clusters, and are often part of 'disaster' chains, occurring secondary to, or acting as the precursor of other disaster events. Whilst there is a large body of literature on the engineering and geological aspects of landslides, the mortality and morbidity caused by landslides is less well documented. As far as we are aware, this is the first systematic review to examine the health impacts of landslides. Methods. The MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, SCOPUS databases and the Cochrane library were systematically searched to identify articles which considered the health impacts of landslides. Case studies, case series, primary research and systematic reviews were included. News reports, editorials and non-systematic reviews were excluded. Only articles in English were considered. The references of retrieved papers were searched to identify additional articles. Findings. 913 abstracts were reviewed and 143 full text articles selected for review. A total of 27 papers reporting research studies were included in the review (25 from initial search, 1 from review of references and 1 from personal correspondence). We found a limited number of studies on the physical health consequences of landslides. Only one study provided detail of the causes of mortality and morbidity in relation a landslide event. Landslides cause significant mental health impacts, in particular the prevalence of PTSD may be higher after landslides than other types of disaster, though these studies tend to be older with only 3 papers published in the last 5 years, with 2 being published 20 years ago, and diagnostic criteria have changed since they were produced. Discussion. We were disappointed at the small number of relevant studies, and the generally poor documentation of the health impacts of landslides. Mental

  2. Applied geophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Dohr, G.

    1981-01-01

    This book discusses techniques which play a predominant role in petroleum and natural gas exploration. Particular emphasis has been placed on modern seismics which today claims over 90% of man-power and financial resources in exploration. The processing of geophysical data is the most important factor in applied physics and emphasis is placed on it in the discussion of exploration problems. Chapter titles include: refraction seismics; reflection seismics; seismic field techniques; digital seismics-electronic data processing; digital seismics-practical application; recent developments, special seismic procedures; gravitational methods; magnetic methods; geoelectric methods; well-logging; and miscellaneous methods in applied geophysics (thermal methods, radioactive dating, natural radioactivity surveys, and surface detection of gas. (DMC)

  3. On the influence of the surface and body tides on the motion of a satellite. [earth geophysical aspects of orbit perturbations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musen, P.

    1973-01-01

    Some geophysical aspects of the tidal perturbations in the motion of artificial satellites are investigated and a system of formulas is developed that is convenient for computation of the tidal effects in the elements using a step-by-step numerical integration.

  4. Terrestrial Planet Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, R. J.

    2008-12-01

    Terrestrial planet geophysics beyond our home sphere had its start arguably in the early 1960s, with Keith Runcorn contending that the second-degree shape of the Moon is due to convection and Mariner 2 flying past Venus and detecting no planetary magnetic field. Within a decade, in situ surface geophysical measurements were carried out on the Moon with the Apollo program, portions of the lunar magnetic and gravity fields were mapped, and Jack Lorell and his colleagues at JPL were producing spherical harmonic gravity field models for Mars using tracking data from Mariner 9, the first spacecraft to orbit another planet. Moreover, Mariner 10 discovered a planetary magnetic field at Mercury, and a young Sean Solomon was using geological evidence of surface contraction to constrain the thermal evolution of the innermost planet. In situ geophysical experiments (such as seismic networks) were essentially never carried out after Apollo, although they were sometimes planned just beyond the believability horizon in planetary mission queues. Over the last three decades, the discipline of terrestrial planet geophysics has matured, making the most out of orbital magnetic and gravity field data, altimetric measurements of surface topography, and the integration of geochemical information. Powerful constraints are provided by tectonic and volcanic information gleaned from surface images, and the engagement of geologists in geophysical exercises is actually quite useful. Accompanying these endeavors, modeling techniques, largely adopted from the Earth Science community, have become increasingly sophisticated and have been greatly enhanced by the dramatic increase in computing power over the last two decades. The future looks bright with exciting new data sets emerging from the MESSENGER mission to Mercury, the promise of the GRAIL gravity mission to the Moon, and the re-emergence of Venus as a worthy target for exploration. Who knows? With the unflagging optimism and persistence

  5. Strategies for improving the resolution of electrical and electromagnetic geophysical measurements for three-dimensional inverse modeling of CO2 movement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Commer, M.; Kowalsky, M. B.; Dafflon, B.; Wu, Y.; Hubbard, S. S.

    2013-12-01

    Geologic carbon sequestration is being evaluated as a means to mitigate the effects of greenhouse gas emissions. Efforts are underway to identify adequate reservoirs and to evaluate the behavior of injected CO2 over time; time-lapse geophysical methods are considered effective tools for these purposes. Pilot studies have shown that the invasion of CO2 into a background pore fluid can alter the electrical resistivity, with increases from CO2 in the super-critical or gaseous phase, and decreases from CO2 dissolved in groundwater (especially when calcite dissolution is occurring). Because of their sensitivity to resistivity changes, electrical and electromagnetic (EM) methods have been used in such studies for indirectly assessing CO2 saturation changes. While the electrical resistance tomography (ERT) method is a well-established technique for both crosswell and surface applications, its usefulness is limited by the relatively low-resolution information it provides. Controlled-source EM methods, including both frequency-domain and time-domain (transient EM) methods, can offer improved resolution. We report on three studies that aim to maximize the information content of electrical and electromagnetic measurements in inverse modeling applications that target the monitoring of resistivity changes due to CO2 migration and/or leakage. The first study considers a three-dimensional crosswell data set collected at an analogue site used for investigating CO2 distribution and geochemical reactivity within a shallow formation. We invert both resistance and phase data using a gradient-weighting method for descent-based inversion algorithms. This method essentially steers the search direction in the model space using low-cost non-linear conjugate gradient methods towards the more computationally expensive Gauss-Newton direction. The second study involves ERT data that were collected at the SECARB Cranfield site near Natchez, Mississippi, at depths exceeding 3000 m. We employ a

  6. Sustainable urban development and geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lanbo; Chan, L. S.

    2007-09-01

    The new millennium has seen a fresh wave of world economic development especially in the Asian-Pacific region. This has contributed to further rapid urban expansion, creating shortages of energy and resources, degradation of the environment, and changes to climatic patterns. Large-scale, new urbanization is mostly seen in developing countries but urban sprawl is also a major social problem for developed nations. Urbanization has been accelerating at a tremendous rate. According to data collected by the United Nations [1], 50 years ago less than 30% of the world population lived in cities. Now, more than 50% are living in urban settings which occupy only about 1% of the Earth's surface. During the period from 1950 to 1995, the number of cities with a population higher than one million increased from 83 to 325. By 2025 it is estimated that more than 60% of 8.3 billion people (the projected world population [1]) will be city dwellers. Urbanization and urban sprawl can affect our living quality both positively and negatively. In recent years geophysics has found significant and new applications in highly urbanized settings. Such applications are conducive to the understanding of the changes and impacts on the physical environment and play a role in developing sustainable urban infrastructure systems. We would like to refer to this field of study as 'urban geophysics'. Urban geophysics is not simply the application of geophysical exploration in the cities. Urbanization has brought about major changes to the geophysical fields of cities, including those associated with electricity, magnetism, electromagnetism and heat. An example is the increased use of electromagnetic waves in wireless communication, transportation, office automation, and computer equipment. How such an increased intensity of electromagnetic radiation affects the behaviour of charged particles in the atmosphere, the equilibrium of ecological systems, or human health, are new research frontiers to be

  7. Indian Geophysical Union celebrates 25th anniversary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Indian Geophysical Union under its president A.P. Mitra, director-general of the Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, is holding the seminar “Advances in Geophysical Research in India” at its 25th annual convention February 1-3 at the National Geophysical Research Institute (NGRI) in Hyderabad. Broad disciplines covered in the seminar are solid Earth geophysics, physics of the oceans, atmospheric sciences, solar-terrestrial relations, space sciences and planetology, and instrumentation. An international symposium on structure and dynamics of the Indian lithosphere is also part of the convention program.

  8. SAGE celebrates 25 years of learning geophysics by doing geophysics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jiracek, G.R.; Baldridge, W.S.; Sussman, A.J.; Biehler, S.; Braile, L.W.; Ferguson, J.F.; Gilpin, B.E.; McPhee, D.K.; Pellerin, L.

    2008-01-01

    The increasing world demand and record-high costs for energy and mineral resources, along with the attendant environmental and climate concerns, have escalated the need for trained geophysicists to unprecedented levels. This is not only a national need; it's a critical global need. As Earth scientists and educators we must seriously ask if our geophysics pipeline can adequately address this crisis. One program that has helped to answer this question in the affirmative for 25 years is SAGE (Summer of Applied Geophysical Experience). SAGE continues to develop with new faculty, new collaborations, and additional ways to support student participation during and after SAGE. ?? 2008 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  9. Serious games for Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardo, Valerio; Rubbia, Giuliana

    2015-04-01

    Childhood stage is indispensable in the education of human beings and especially critical to arise scientific interest in children. We discuss the participatory design of a didactic videogame, i.e. a "serious" game to teach geophysics and Earth sciences to high and low-school students. Geophysics is the application of the laws and techniques of physics to uncover knowledge about the earth's dynamic processes and subsurface structure. It explores phenomena such as earthquakes, volcanoes, tsunamis to improve our understanding of the earth's physical processes and our ability to predict reoccurrences. Effective mitigation of risks from catastrophic geologic hazards requires knowledge and understanding of local geology and geologic processes. Scientific outreach can be defined as discourse activity, whose main objective is to communicate some knowledge previously produced in scientific contexts to a non-expert massive audience. One of the difficulties science educators need to overcome is to explain specific concepts from a given discipline in a language simple and understandable for their audience. Digital games today play a large role in young people's lives. Games are directly connected to the life of today's adolescents. Therefore, digital games should be included and broached as a subject in the classroom. The ardor and enthusiasm that digital games evoke in teenagers has indeed brought many researchers, school leaders and teachers to the question "how video games" can be used to engage young people and support their learning inside the classroom. Additionally, studies have shown that digital games can enhance various skills such as the ability to concentrate, stamina, tactical aptness, anticipatory thinking, orientation in virtual spaces, and deductive reasoning. Thus, videogames become an effective didactic mechanism and should have a place in the classroom. The project aims to explore the potentials of entertainment technologies in educational processes

  10. Continental crust: a geophysical approach

    SciTech Connect

    Meissner, R.

    1986-01-01

    This book develops an integrated and balanced picture of present knowledge of the continental crust. Crust and lithosphere are first defined, and the formation of crusts as a general planetary phenomenon is described. The background and methods of geophysical studies of the earth's crust and the collection of related geophysical parameters are examined. Creep and friction experiments and the various methods of radiometric age dating are addressed, and geophysical and geological investigations of the crustal structure in various age provinces of the continents are studied. Specific tectonic structures such as rifts, continental margins, and geothermal areas are discussed. Finally, an attempt is made to give a comprehensive view of the evolution of the continental crust and to collect and develop arguments for crustal accretion and recycling. 647 references.

  11. Studies in geophysics: Active tectonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Active tectonics is defined within the study as tectonic movements that are expected to occur within a future time span of concern to society. Such movements and their associated hazards include earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, and land subsidence and emergence. The entire range of geology, geophysics, and geodesy is, to some extent, pertinent to this topic. The needs for useful forecasts of tectonic activity, so that actions may be taken to mitigate hazards, call for special attention to ongoing tectonic activity. Further progress in understanding active tectonics depends on continued research. Particularly important is improvement in the accuracy of dating techniques for recent geologic materials.

  12. Geophysics of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, R. A.

    1979-01-01

    A physical model of Mars is presented on the basis of light-scattering observations of the Martian atmosphere and surface and interior data obtained from observations of the geopotential field. A general description of the atmosphere is presented, with attention given to the circulation and the various cloud types, and data and questions on the blue haze-clearing effect and the seasonal darkening wave are summarized and the Mie scattering model developed to explain these observations is presented. The appearance of the planet from earth and spacecraft through Mariner 9 is considered, and attention is given to the preparation of topographical contour maps, the canal problem and large-scale lineaments observed from Mariner 9, the gravity field and shape of the planet and the application of Runcorn's geoid/convection theory to Mars. Finally, a summary of Viking results is presented and their application to the understanding of Martian geophysics is discussed.

  13. Geophysical Sounding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, E.

    1998-01-01

    Of the many geophysical remote-sensing techniques available today, a few are suitable for the water ice-rich, layered material expected at the north martian ice cap. Radio echo sounding has been used for several decades to determine ice thickness and internal structure. Selection of operating frequency is a tradeoff between signal attenuation (which typically increases with frequency and ice temperature) and resolution (which is proportional to wavelength). Antenna configuration and size will be additional considerations for a mission to Mars. Several configurations for ice-penetrating radar systems are discussed: these include orbiter-borne sounders, sounding antennas trailed by balloons and penetrators, and lander-borne systems. Lander-borne systems could include short-wave systems capable of resolving fine structure and layering in the upper meters beneath the lander. Spread-spectrum and deconvolution techniques can be used to increase the depth capability of a radar system. If soundings over several locations are available (e.g., with balloons, rovers, or panning short-wave systems), then it will be easier to resolve internal layering, variations in basal reflection coefficient (from which material properties may be inferred), and the geometry of nonhorizontal features. Sonic sounding has a long history in oil and gas exploration. It is, however, unlikely that large explosive charges, or even swept-frequency techniques such as Vibroseis, would be suitable for a Polar lander -- these systems are capable of penetrating several kilometers of material at frequencies of 10-200 Hz, but the energy required to generate the sound waves is large and potentially destructive. The use of audio-frequency and ultrasonic sound generated by piezoelectric crystals is discussed as a possible method to explore layering and fine features in the upper meters of the ice cap. Appropriate choice of transducer(s) will permit operation over a range of fixed or modulated frequencies

  14. Recommended reference figures for geophysics and geodesy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khan, M. A.; Okeefe, J. A.

    1973-01-01

    Specific reference figures are recommended for consistent use in geophysics and geodesy. The selection of appropriate reference figure for geophysical studies suggests a relationship between the Antarctic negative gravity anomaly and the great shrinkage of the Antarctic ice cap about 4-5 million years ago. The depression of the south polar regions relative to the north polar regions makes the Southern Hemisphere flatter than the Northern Hemisphere, thus producing the third harmonic (pear-shaped) contribution to the earth's figure.

  15. Sustainable urban development and geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lanbo; Chan, L. S.

    2007-09-01

    The new millennium has seen a fresh wave of world economic development especially in the Asian-Pacific region. This has contributed to further rapid urban expansion, creating shortages of energy and resources, degradation of the environment, and changes to climatic patterns. Large-scale, new urbanization is mostly seen in developing countries but urban sprawl is also a major social problem for developed nations. Urbanization has been accelerating at a tremendous rate. According to data collected by the United Nations [1], 50 years ago less than 30% of the world population lived in cities. Now, more than 50% are living in urban settings which occupy only about 1% of the Earth's surface. During the period from 1950 to 1995, the number of cities with a population higher than one million increased from 83 to 325. By 2025 it is estimated that more than 60% of 8.3 billion people (the projected world population [1]) will be city dwellers. Urbanization and urban sprawl can affect our living quality both positively and negatively. In recent years geophysics has found significant and new applications in highly urbanized settings. Such applications are conducive to the understanding of the changes and impacts on the physical environment and play a role in developing sustainable urban infrastructure systems. We would like to refer to this field of study as 'urban geophysics'. Urban geophysics is not simply the application of geophysical exploration in the cities. Urbanization has brought about major changes to the geophysical fields of cities, including those associated with electricity, magnetism, electromagnetism and heat. An example is the increased use of electromagnetic waves in wireless communication, transportation, office automation, and computer equipment. How such an increased intensity of electromagnetic radiation affects the behaviour of charged particles in the atmosphere, the equilibrium of ecological systems, or human health, are new research frontiers to be

  16. Great Lakes Climate and Water Movement. Earth Systems - Education Activities for Great Lakes Schools (ES-EAGLS).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Heidi, Ed.; Sheaffer, Amy L., Ed.

    This activity book is part of a series designed to take a concept or idea from the existing school curriculum and develop it in the context of the Great Lakes using teaching approaches and materials appropriate for students in middle and high school. The theme of this book is Great Lakes climate and water movement. Students learn about land-sea…

  17. 15 CFR 950.5 - National Geophysical and Solar-Terrestrial Data Center (NGSDC).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...-A (Solid-Earth Geophysics, Solar Terrestrial Physics, and Glaciology). (a) Geophysical and solar... geological data, including data on heat flow, cores, samples, and sediments. (2) Solar-Terrestrial...

  18. Indoor vs Outdoor Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebermann, R. C.

    2009-05-01

    Research in mineral physics is essential for interpreting observational data from many other disciplines in the Earth Sciences, from geodynamics to seismology to geochemistry to petrology to geomagnetism to planetary science, and extending also to materials science and climate studies. The field of high-pressure mineral physics is highly interdisciplinary. Mineral physicists do not always study minerals nor use only physics; they study the science of materials which comprise the Earth and other planets and employ the concepts and techniques from chemistry, physics, materials science, and even biology. Observations from geochemistry and geophysics studies lead to the development of petrologic, seismic and geodynamical models of the Earth's deep interior. The goal of mineral physics is to interpret such models in terms of variations of pressure, temperature, mineralogy/crystallography, and/or chemical composition with depth. The discovery in 2004 of the post-perovskite phase of MgSiO3 at pressures in excess of 120 GPa and high temperatures has led to an explosion of both complimentary experimental and theoretical work in mineral physics and remarkable synergy between mineral physics and the disciplines of seismology, geodynamics and geochemistry. Similarly, the observation of high-spin to low-spin transitions in Fe-bearing minerals at high pressures has important implications for the lower mantle of the Earth. We focus in this talk on the use of experimental physical acoustics to conduct "indoor seismology" experiments to measure sound wave velocities of minerals under the pressure and temperature conditions of the Earth's mantle. This field of research has a long history dating back at least to the studies of Francis Birch in the 1950s. The techniques include ultrasonic interferometry, resonant ultrasound spectroscopy, and Brillouin spectroscopy. Many of these physical acoustic experiments are now performed in conjunction with synchrotron X-radiation sources at

  19. Developing a curricular module for introductory geophysics or structural geology courses to quantify crustal strain using EarthScope PBO GPS velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cronin, V. S.; Resor, P. G.; Hammond, W. C.; Kreemer, C. W.; Olds, S. E.; Pratt-Sitaula, B.; West, N. W.

    2012-12-01

    A group from several UNAVCO-member institutions that are engaged in EarthScope research is developing resources that introduce geoscience majors to one important use of GPS geodesy: measuring the current infinitesimal strain rate of the crust. These resources will be tested during the 2012-13 academic year, and will be accessible from the Science Education Resource Center (SERC), UNAVCO and EarthScope websites. Location and velocity data (and their associated uncertainties) from the EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) website are used to solve a perfectly constrained problem involving the infinitesimal strain of a triangle defined by three PBO GPS sites. Simple physical models made of inexpensive materials are used to build student intuition about homogeneous strain of a continuum. Introductory exercises with vector-field maps are used to help students understand reference frames and visualize how GPS velocity vectors can indicate crustal strain. The meanings of "extension" and "stretch" are developed through illustrations showing the simultaneous deformation of a triangle with a circle inscribed within it. A strain primer, intended to supplement textbook material, is provided for students to develop needed background. Supplemental material about vectors, vector dot products, matrix mathematics, determinants, and computation of the eigensystem of a symmetric square matrix help support students who have gaps in their mathematical background. Students compute site velocities and uncertainties from PBO data, insert data into one of three strain calculators (open-source code in MatLab, Mathematica, and an Excel spreadsheet), and learn to interpret the output. A complete algorithm and worked example are also provided so that capable students can develop their own code to solve the problem. Strain calculator output includes the mean translation velocity vector, the rotational velocity, the relative magnitudes and directions of the horizontal infinitesimal strain

  20. Air-depolyable geophysics package

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, S.L.; Harben, P.E.

    1993-11-01

    We are using Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s (LLNL`s) diverse expertise to develop a geophysical monitoring system that can survive being dropped into place by a helicopter or airplane. Such an air-deployable system could significantly decrease the time and effort needed to set up such instruments in remote locations following a major earthquake or volcanic eruption. Most currently available geophysical monitoring and survey systems, such as seismic monitoring stations, use sensitive, fragile instrumentation that requires personnel trained and experienced in data acquisition and field setup. Rapid deployment of such equipment can be difficult or impossible. Recent developments in low-power electronics, new materials, and sensors that are resistant to severe impacts have made it possible to develop low-cost geophysical monitoring packages for rapid deployment missions. Our strategy was to focus on low-cost battery-powered systems that would have a relatively long (several months) operational lifetime. We concentrated on the conceptual design and engineering of a single-component seismic system that could survive an air-deployment into an earth material, such as alluvium. Actual implementation of such a system is a goal of future work on this concept. For this project, we drew on LLNL`s Earth Sciences Department, Radio Shop, Plastics Shop, and Weapons Program. The military has had several programs to develop air-deployed and cannon-deployed seismometers. Recently, a sonobuoy manufacturer has offered an air-deployable geophone designed to make relatively soft landings.

  1. Demonstrations in Introductory Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schramm, K. A.; Stein, S.; van der Lee, S.; Swafford, L.; Klosko, E.; Delaughter, J.; Wysession, M.

    2005-12-01

    Geophysical concepts are challenging to teach at introductory levels, because students need to understand both the underlying physics and its geological application. To address this, our introductory courses include class demonstrations and experiments to demonstrate underlying physical principles and their geological applications. Demonstrations and experiments have several advantages over computer simulations. First, computer simulations "work" even if the basic principle is wrong. In contrast, simple demonstrations show that a principle is physically correct, rather than a product of computer graphics. Second, many students are unfamiliar with once-standard experiments demonstrating ideas of classical physics used in geophysics. Demonstrations are chosen that we consider stimulating, relevant, inexpensive, and easy to conduct in a non-lab classroom. These come in several groups. Many deal with aspects of seismic waves, using springs, light beams, and other methods such as talking from outside the room to illustrate the frequency dependence of diffraction (hearing but not seeing around a corner). Others deal with heat and mass transfer, such as illustrating fractional crystallization with apple juice and the surface/volume effect in planetary evolution with ice. Plate motions are illustrated with paper cutouts showing effects like motion on transform faults and how the Euler vector geometry changes a plate boundary from spreading, to strike-slip, to convergence along the Pacific-North America boundary from the Gulf of California to Alaska. Radioactive decay is simulated by having the class rise and sit down as a result of coin flips (one tail versus two gives different decay rates and hence half lives). This sessions' goal of exchanging information about demonstrations is an excellent idea: some of ours are described on http://www.earth.nwu.edu/people/seth/202.

  2. Earth Observing System, Introduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Much is known about the Earth, but the unifying concepts are still only beginning to be established. An exposition of the key issues in Earth science is neither simple or concise. From the scientific questions at hand there are many interconnections among them and the view of the Earth as a system is essential to their solution. The Earth science goals for the 1990's are presented for the following areas: hydrologic cycle; biogeochemical cycles; climatological processes; geophysical processes; oceanography; and solid earth.

  3. Handbook of Agricultural Geophysics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Geophysical methods continue to show great promise for use in agriculture. The term “agricultural geophysics” denotes a subdiscipline of geophysics that is focused only on agricultural applications. The Handbook of Agricultural Geophysics was compiled to include a comprehensive overview of the geoph...

  4. More on South American geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomnitz, Cinna

    As an addendum to J. Urrutia Fucugauchi's (Eos, 63, June 8, 1982, p. 529) excellent analysis of why things go wrong in Latin American geophysics, I submit that funds in whatever form are not the only answer. In Mexico over the past decade there has been a reasonable availability of funds, yet no dramatic increase in the quality or quantity of geophysical research was detected. Graduate scholarships have even gone begging for applicants in the earth sciences!Leadership is the big problem. National plans and forecasts for science and technology continue to ignore this central fact. They want to generate hundreds, nay thousands, of middle-level scientists while providing no incentive for excellence. As others have found out long before us, this approach is doomed from the start.

  5. Earth Rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickey, Jean O.

    1995-01-01

    The study of the Earth's rotation in space (encompassing Universal Time (UT1), length of day, polar motion, and the phenomena of precession and nutation) addresses the complex nature of Earth orientation changes, the mechanisms of excitation of these changes and their geophysical implications in a broad variety of areas. In the absence of internal sources of energy or interactions with astronomical objects, the Earth would move as a rigid body with its various parts (the crust, mantle, inner and outer cores, atmosphere and oceans) rotating together at a constant fixed rate. In reality, the world is considerably more complicated, as is schematically illustrated. The rotation rate of the Earth's crust is not constant, but exhibits complicated fluctuations in speed amounting to several parts in 10(exp 8) [corresponding to a variation of several milliseconds (ms) in the Length Of the Day (LOD) and about one part in 10(exp 6) in the orientation of the rotation axis relative to the solid Earth's axis of figure (polar motion). These changes occur over a broad spectrum of time scales, ranging from hours to centuries and longer, reflecting the fact that they are produced by a wide variety of geophysical and astronomical processes. Geodetic observations of Earth rotation changes thus provide insights into the geophysical processes illustrated, which are often difficult to obtain by other means. In addition, these measurements are required for engineering purposes. Theoretical studies of Earth rotation variations are based on the application of Euler's dynamical equations to the problem of finding the response of slightly deformable solid Earth to variety of surface and internal stresses.

  6. Geophysical interpretation of U, Th, and rare earth element mineralization of the Bokan Mountain peralkaline granite complex, Prince of Wales Island, southeast Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCafferty, Anne E.; Stoeser, Douglas B.; Van Gosen, Bradley S.

    2014-01-01

    A prospectivity map for rare earth element (REE) mineralization at the Bokan Mountain peralkaline granite complex, Prince of Wales Island, southeastern Alaska, was calculated from high-resolution airborne gamma-ray data. The map displays areas with similar radioelement concentrations as those over the Dotson REE-vein-dike system, which is characterized by moderately high %K, eU, and eTh (%K, percent potassium; eU, equivalent parts per million uranium; and eTh, equivalent parts per million thorium). Gamma-ray concentrations of rocks that share a similar range as those over the Dotson zone are inferred to locate high concentrations of REE-bearing minerals. An approximately 1300-m-long prospective tract corresponds to shallowly exposed locations of the Dotson zone. Prospective areas of REE mineralization also occur in continuous swaths along the outer edge of the pluton, over known but undeveloped REE occurrences, and within discrete regions in the older Paleozoic country rocks. Detailed mineralogical examinations of samples from the Dotson zone provide a means to understand the possible causes of the airborne Th and U anomalies and their relation to REE minerals. Thorium is sited primarily in thorite. Uranium also occurs in thorite and in a complex suite of ±Ti±Nb±Y oxide minerals, which include fergusonite, polycrase, and aeschynite. These oxides, along with Y-silicates, are the chief heavy REE (HREE)-bearing minerals. Hence, the eU anomalies, in particular, may indicate other occurrences of similar HREE-enrichment. Uranium and Th chemistry along the Dotson zone showed elevated U and total REEs east of the Camp Creek fault, which suggested the potential for increased HREEs based on their association with U-oxide minerals. A uranium prospectivity map, based on signatures present over the Ross-Adams mine area, was characterized by extremely high radioelement values. Known uranium deposits were identified in the U-prospectivity map, but the largest tract occurs

  7. Geophysical monitoring using 3D joint inversion of multi-modal geophysical data with Gramian constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, M. S.; Gribenko, A.; Wilson, G. A.

    2012-12-01

    Geophysical monitoring of reservoir fluids and rock properties is relevant to oil and gas production, carbon sequestration, and enhanced geothermal systems. Different geophysical fields provide information about different physical properties of the earth. Multiple geophysical surveys spanning gravity, magnetic, electromagnetic, seismic, and thermal methods are often interpreted to infer geology from models of different physical properties. In many cases, the various geophysical data are complimentary, making it natural to consider a formal mathematical framework for their joint inversion to a shared earth model. We introduce a new approach to the 3D joint inversion of multiple geophysical datasets using Gramian spaces of model parameters and Gramian constraints, computed as determinants of the corresponding Gram matrices of the multimodal model parameters and/or their attributes. The basic underlying idea of this approach is that the Gramian provides a measure of correlation between the model parameters. By imposing an additional requirement of the minimum of the Gramian, we arrive at the solution of the joint multimodal inverse problem with the enhanced correlation between the different model parameters and/or their attributes. We demonstrate that this new approach is a generalized technique that can be applied to the simultaneous joint inversion of any number and combination of geophysical datasets. Our approach includes as special cases those extant methods based on correlations and/or structural constraints of different physical properties. We illustrate this approach by a model study of reservoir monitoring using different geophysical data.

  8. Earth-Fissure Movements Associated with Fluctuations in Ground-Water Levels near the Picacho Mountains, South-Central Arizona, 1980-84

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carpenter, M.C.

    1993-01-01

    The Picacho earth fissure transects subsiding alluvial sediments near the east periphery of the Picacho basin in south-central Arizona. The basin has undergone land subsidence of as much as 3.8 meters since the 1930's owing to compaction of the aquifer system in response to ground-water-Ievel declines that have exceeded 100 meters. The fissure, which extends generally north-south for 15 kilometers, exhibits horizontal tensile failure and as much as 0.6 meter of normal dip-slip movement at the land surface. The west side of the fissure is down thrown. The fissure was observed as early as 1927 and is the longest earth fissure in Arizona. Vertical and horizontal displacements were monitored along a line normal to the fissure. The survey line extends from a bedrock outcrop in the Picacho Mountains on the east, past an observation well near the fissure, to a point 1,422 meters to the west. From May 1980 to May 1984, the downthrown west side of the fissure subsided 167+-1.8 millimeters and moved 18+-1.5 millimeters westward into the basin. Concurrently, the relatively upthrown east side subsided 148+-1.8 millimeters and moved 14+-1.5 millimeters westward. Dislocation modeling of deformation along the survey line near the fissure indicates that dip-slip movement has occurred along a vertical fault surface that extends from the land surface to a depth of about 300 meters. Slip was 9 millimeters from May to December 1980 and also 9 millimeters from March to November 1981. Continuous measurements were made of horizontal movement across the fissure using a buried invar-wire horizontal extensometer, while water-level fluctuations were continuously monitored in four piezometers nested in two observation wells. The range of horizontal movement was 4.620 millimeters, and the range of water-level fluctuation in the nearest piezometer in the deep alluvium was 9.05 meters. The maximum annual opening of the fissure during the study period was 3.740 millimeters from March to October

  9. The 1990 Western Pacific Geophysics meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The 1990 Western Pacific Geophysics Meeting was held in Kanazawa, Japan from 15-21 Aug. 1990. This was the first meeting of a new series of meetings for the American Geophysical Union, and it proved to be very successful in terms of the scientific program and attendance, which included over 1,000 participants. The intent of this meeting was an effort on the part of the American Geophysical Union (AGU) and several Japanese geophysical societies to gather individual Earth and space scientists at a major scientific meeting to focus on geophysical problems being studied in the western Pacific rim. The meeting was organized along the lines of a typical AGU annual meeting with some invited talks, many contributed talks, poster sessions, and with emphasis on presentations and informal discussions. The program committee consisted of scientists from both the U.S. and Japan. This meeting provided ample opportunities for U.S. and Japanese scientists to get to know each other and their works on a one-to-one basis. It was also a valuable opportunity for students studying geophysics to get together and interact with each other and with scientists from both the U.S. and Japan. There were 939 abstracts submitted to the conference and a total of 102 sessions designed as a result of the abstracts received. The topics of interest are as follows: space geodetic and observatory measurements for earthquake and tectonic studies; gravity, sea level, and vertical motion; variations in earth rotation and earth dynamics; sedimentary magnetism; global processes and precipitation; subsurface contaminant transport; U.S. Western Pacific Rim initiatives in hydrology; shelf and coastal circulation; tectonics, magmatism, and hydrothermal processes; earthquake prediction and hazard assessment; seismic wave propagation in realistic media; and dynamics and structure of plate boundaries and of the Earth's deep interior.

  10. The 1990 Western Pacific Geophysics meeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The 1990 Western Pacific Geophysics Meeting was held in Kanazawa, Japan from 15-21 Aug. 1990. This was the first meeting of a new series of meetings for the American Geophysical Union, and it proved to be very successful in terms of the scientific program and attendance, which included over 1,000 participants. The intent of this meeting was an effort on the part of the American Geophysical Union (AGU) and several Japanese geophysical societies to gather individual Earth and space scientists at a major scientific meeting to focus on geophysical problems being studied in the western Pacific rim. The meeting was organized along the lines of a typical AGU annual meeting with some invited talks, many contributed talks, poster sessions, and with emphasis on presentations and informal discussions. The program committee consisted of scientists from both the U.S. and Japan. This meeting provided ample opportunities for U.S. and Japanese scientists to get to know each other and their works on a one-to-one basis. It was also a valuable opportunity for students studying geophysics to get together and interact with each other and with scientists from both the U.S. and Japan. There were 939 abstracts submitted to the conference and a total of 102 sessions designed as a result of the abstracts received. The topics of interest are as follows: space geodetic and observatory measurements for earthquake and tectonic studies; gravity, sea level, and vertical motion; variations in earth rotation and earth dynamics; sedimentary magnetism; global processes and precipitation; subsurface contaminant transport; U.S. Western Pacific Rim initiatives in hydrology; shelf and coastal circulation; tectonics, magmatism, and hydrothermal processes; earthquake prediction and hazard assessment; seismic wave propagation in realistic media; and dynamics and structure of plate boundaries and of the Earth's deep interior.

  11. Mass Transport in Global Geophysical Fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, B. F.

    1999-01-01

    Mass transports occurring in the atmosphere-hydrosphere-solid Earth-core system (the "global geophysical fluids") are important geophysical phenomena. They occur on all temporal and spatial scales. Examples include air mass and ocean circulations, tides, hydrological water redistribution, mantle processes such as post-glacial rebound, earthquakes and tectonic motions, and core geodynamo activities. With only a few exceptions on the Earth surface, the temporal history and spatial pattern of such mass transport are often not amenable to direct observations. Space geodesy techniques, however, have the capability of monitoring certain direct consequences of the mass transport, including Earth's rotation variations, gravitational field variations, and the geocenter motion. These techniques include the very-long-baseline interferometry, satellite laser ranging and Doppler tracking, and the Global Positioning System, all entail global observational networks. While considerable advances have been made in observing and understanding of the dynamics of Earth's rotation, only the lowest-degree gravitational variations have been observed and limited knowledge of geocenter motion obtained. New space missions, projects and initiatives promise to further improve the measurements and hence our knowledge about the global mass transports. The latter contributes to our understanding and modeling capability of the geophysical processes that produce and regulate the mass transports, as well as the solid Earth's response to such changes in constraining the modeling of Earth's mechanical properties.

  12. EDITORIAL: The interface between geophysics and engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-03-01

    Journal of Geophysics and Engineering (JGE) aims to publicize and promote research and developments in geophysics and in related areas of engineering. As stated in the journal scope, JGE is positioned to bridge the gap between earth physics and geo-engineering, where it reflects a growing trend in both industry and academia. JGE covers those aspects of engineering that bear closely on geophysics or on the targets and problems that geophysics addresses. Typically this will be engineering focused on the subsurface, particularly petroleum engineering, rock mechanics, geophysical software engineering, drilling technology, remote sensing, instrumentation and sensor design. There is a trend, visible throughout academia, for rapid expansion in cross-disciplinary, multi-disciplinary and inter-disciplinary working. Many of the most important and exciting problems and advances are being made at the boundaries between traditional subject areas and, increasingly, techniques from one discipline are finding applications in others. There is a corresponding increasing requirement for researchers to be aware of developments in adjacent areas and for papers published in one area to be readily accessible, both in terms of location and language, to those in others. One such area that is expanding rapidly is that at the interface between geophysics and engineering. There are three principal developments. Geophysics, and especially applied geophysics, is increasingly constrained by the limits of technology, particularly computing technology. Consequently, major advances in geophysics are often predicated upon major developments in engineering and many research geophysicists are working in multi-disciplinary teams with engineers. Engineering problems relevant to the sub-surface are increasingly looking to advances in geophysics to provide part of the solution. Engineering systems, for example, for tunnel boring or petroleum reservoir management, are using high-resolution geophysical

  13. The physics of the earth's core: An introduction

    SciTech Connect

    Melchior, P.

    1986-01-01

    This book is a reference text providing information on physical topics of recent developments in internal geophysics. The text summarizes papers covering theoretical geophysics. Basic formulae, definitions and theorems are not explained in detail due to the limited space. The contents include applications to geodesy, geophysics, astronomy, astrophysics, geophysics and planetary physics. The formal contents include: The Earth's model; Thermodynamics; Hydrodynamics; Geomagnetism; Geophysical implications in the Earth's core.

  14. Fiber optic geophysical sensors

    DOEpatents

    Homuth, Emil F.

    1991-01-01

    A fiber optic geophysical sensor in which laser light is passed through a sensor interferometer in contact with a geophysical event, and a reference interferometer not in contact with the geophysical event but in the same general environment as the sensor interferometer. In one embodiment, a single tunable laser provides the laser light. In another embodiment, separate tunable lasers are used for the sensor and reference interferometers. The invention can find such uses as monitoring for earthquakes, and the weighing of objects.

  15. Monitoring Global Geophysical Fluids by Space Geodesy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Benjamin F.; Dehant, V.; Gross, R. S.; Ray, R. D.; Salstein, D. A.; Watkins, M.

    1999-01-01

    Since its establishment on 1/1/1998 by the International Earth Rotation Service, the Coordinating Center for Monitoring Global Geophysical Fluids (MGGF) and its seven Special Bureaus have engaged in an effort to support and facilitate the understanding of the geophysical fluids in global geodynamics research. Mass transports in the atmosphere-hydrosphere-solid Earth-core system (the "global geophysical fluids") will cause the following geodynamic effects on a broad time scale: (1) variations in the solid Earth's rotation (in length-of-day and polar motion/nutation) via the conservation of angular momentum and effected by torques at the fluid-solid Earth interface; (2) changes in the global gravitational field according to Newton's gravitational law; and (3) motion in the center of mass of the solid Earth relative to that of the whole Earth ("geocenter") via the conservation of linear momentum. These minute signals have become observable by space geodetic techniques, primarily VLBI, SLR, GPS, and DORIS, with ever increasing precision/accuracy and temporal/spatial resolution. Each of the seven Special Bureaus within MGGF is responsible for calculations related to a specific Earth component or aspect -- Atmosphere, Ocean, Hydrology, Ocean Tides, Mantle, Core, and Gravity/Geocenter. Angular momenta and torques, gravitational coefficients, and geocenter shift will be computed for geophysical fluids based on global observational data, and from state-of-the-art models, some of which assimilate such data. The computed quantities, algorithm and data formats are standardized. The results are archived and made available to the scientific research community. This paper reports the status of the MGGF activities and current results.

  16. Non-Seismic Geophysical Approaches to Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Hoversten, G.M.; Gasperikova, Erika

    2004-09-01

    This chapter considers the application of a number of different geophysical techniques for monitoring geologic sequestration of CO2. The relative merits of the seismic, gravity, electromagnetic (EM) and streaming potential (SP) geophysical techniques as monitoring tools are examined. An example of tilt measurements illustrates another potential monitoring technique, although it has not been studied to the extent of other techniques in this chapter. This work does not represent an exhaustive study, but rather demonstrates the capabilities of a number of geophysical techniques on two synthetic modeling scenarios. The first scenario represents combined CO2 enhance oil recovery (EOR) and sequestration in a producing oil field, the Schrader Bluff field on the north slope of Alaska, USA. The second scenario is of a pilot DOE CO2 sequestration experiment scheduled for summer 2004 in the Frio Brine Formation in South Texas, USA. Numerical flow simulations of the CO2 injection process for each case were converted to geophysical models using petrophysical models developed from well log data. These coupled flow simulation geophysical models allow comparrison of the performance of monitoring techniques over time on realistic 3D models by generating simulated responses at different times during the CO2 injection process. These time-lapse measurements are used to produce time-lapse changes in geophysical measurements that can be related to the movement of CO2 within the injection interval.

  17. Problems of Geophysics that Inspired Fractal Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandelbrot, B. B.

    2001-12-01

    Fractal geometry arose when the speaker used then esoteric mathematics and the concept of invariance as a tool to understand diverse ``down-to-earth'' practical needs. The first step consisted in using discontinuous functions to represent the variation of speculative prices. The next several steps consisted in introducing infinite-range (global) dependence to handle data from geophysics, beginning with hydrology (and also again in finance). This talk will detail the speaker's debt and gratitude toward several specialists from diverse areas of geophysics who had the greatest impact on fractal geometry in its formative period.

  18. Earth and ocean modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knezovich, F. M.

    1976-01-01

    A modular structured system of computer programs is presented utilizing earth and ocean dynamical data keyed to finitely defined parameters. The model is an assemblage of mathematical algorithms with an inherent capability of maturation with progressive improvements in observational data frequencies, accuracies and scopes. The Eom in its present state is a first-order approach to a geophysical model of the earth's dynamics.

  19. Geophysics in INSPIRE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sőrés, László

    2013-04-01

    INSPIRE is a European directive to harmonize spatial data in Europe. Its' aim is to establish a transparent, multidisciplinary network of environmental information by using international standards and OGC web services. Spatial data themes defined in the annex of the directive cover 34 domains that are closely bundled to environment and spatial information. According to the INSPIRE roadmap all data providers must setup discovery, viewing and download services and restructure data stores to provide spatial data as defined by the underlying specifications by 2014 December 1. More than 3000 institutions are going to be involved in the progress. During the data specification process geophysics as an inevitable source of geo information was introduced to Annex II Geology. Within the Geology theme Geophysics is divided into core and extended model. The core model contains specifications for legally binding data provisioning and is going to be part of the Implementation Rules of the INSPIRE directives. To minimize the work load of obligatory data transformations the scope of the core model is very limited and simple. It covers the most essential geophysical feature types that are relevant in economic and environmental context. To fully support the use cases identified by the stake holders the extended model was developed. It contains a wide range of spatial object types for geophysical measurements, processed and interpreted results, and wrapper classes to help data providers in using the Observation and Measurements (O&M) standard for geophysical data exchange. Instead of introducing the traditional concept of "geophysical methods" at a high structural level the data model classifies measurements and geophysical models based on their spatial characteristics. Measurements are classified as geophysical station (point), geophysical profile (curve) and geophysical swath (surface). Generic classes for processing results and interpretation models are curve model (1D), surface

  20. The Physics of Heavy Oils: Implications for Recovery and Geophysical Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Douglas

    2007-03-01

    Our capacity to find and produce conventional light petroleum oils are unable to keep pace with the growth in the growing global demand for energy. With the breakpoint between petroleum production and consumption imminent, a good deal of recent efforts have focused on developing the `heavy' hydrocarbon reserves. Such resources include the extensive heavy oil deposits of Venezuela, the bitumen resources of Canada, and even the solid kerogens (oil shale) of the United States. Capital investments, in particular, have been large in Canada's oil sands due in part to the extensive nature of the resource and already in excess of 30% of Canada's production comes from heavier hydrocarbon deposits. The larger input costs associated with such projects, however, requires that the production be monitored more fully; and this necessitates that both the oils and the porous media which hold them be understood. Geophysical `time-lapse' monitoring seeks to better constrain the areal distribution and movements of fluids in the subsurface by examining the changes in a geophysical response such as seismic reflectivity, micro-gravity variations, or electrical conductivity that arise during production. For example, a changed geophysical seismic character directly depends on relies on variations in the longitudinal and transverse wave speeds and attenuation and mass densities of the materials in the earth. These are controlled by a number of extrinsic conditions such as temperature, fluid pressure, confining stress, and fluid phase and saturation state. Understanding the geophysical signature over a given reservoir requires that the behavior of the porous rock physical properties be well understood and a variety of measurements are being made in laboratories. In current practice, the interpretation of the geophysical field responses is assisted by combined modeling of fluid flow and seismic wave fields. The least understood link in this process, however, is the lack of knowledge on rock

  1. Electromagnetic geophysical observation with controlled source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachay, Olga; Khachay, Oleg

    2016-04-01

    In the paper the new theoretical and methodical approaches are examined for detailed investigations of the structure and state of the geological medium, and its behavior as a dynamic system in reaction to external man-made influences. To solve this problem it is necessary to use geophysical methods that have sufficient resolution and that are built on more complicated models than layered or layered-block models. One of these methods is the electromagnetic induction frequency-geometrical method with controlled sources. Here we consider new approaches using this method for monitoring rock shock media by means of natural experiments and interpretation of the practical results. That method can be used by oil production in mines, where the same events of non stability can occur. The key ideas of twenty first century geophysics from the point of view of geologist academician A.N. Dmitrievskiy [Dmitrievskiy, 2009] are as follows. "The geophysics of the twenty first century is an understanding that the Earth is a self-developing, self-supporting geo-cybernetic system, in which the role of the driving mechanism is played by the field gradients; the evolution of geological processes is a continuous chain of transformations and the interaction of geophysical fields in the litho- hydro- and atmosphere. The use of geophysical principles of a hierarchical quantum of geophysical space, non-linear effects, and the effects of reradiating geophysical fields will allow the creation of a new geophysics. The research, in which earlier only pure geophysical processes and technologies were considered, nowadays tends to include into consideration geophysical-chemical processes and technologies. This transformation will allow us to solve the problems of forecasting geo-objects and geo-processes in previously unavailable geological-technological conditions." The results obtained allow us to make the following conclusions, according to the key ideas of academician A.N. Dmitrievskiy: the rock

  2. Geophysical Institute biennial report 1995--1996

    SciTech Connect

    1998-06-01

    The mission of the Geophysical Institute is to understand the basic physical processes governing Earth, especially as they occur in, or are relevant to the Arctic; to train graduate and undergraduate students to play leading roles in tomorrow`s society; to solve applied geophysical problems and develop resource-oriented technology of importance to the state and the nation; and to satisfy the intellectual and technological needs of fellow Alaskans through public service. The variety of subjects studied by the faculty, research staff members, and graduate students at the Geophysical Institute include auroral physics and chemistry, arctic haze, ice fog, atmospheric dynamics, ozone, Alaska weather patterns, regional meteorology and climatology, global climate change, cloud physics and radiation, permafrost, glaciers, sea ice, remote sensing, geothermal energy, tectonics, volcanoes and earthquakes. Summaries are presented of the projects undertaken by the Institute in these fields.

  3. High temperature geophysical instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Hardee, H.C.

    1988-06-01

    The instrumentation development program was to proceed in parallel with scientific research and was driven by the needs of researchers. The development of these instruments has therefore included numerous geophysical field tests, many of which have resulted in the publication of scientific articles. This paper is a brief summary of some of the major geophysical instruments that have been developed and tested under the High Temperature Geophysics Program. These instruments are briefly described and references are given for further detailed information and for scientific papers that have resulted from the use of these instruments. 9 refs., 14 figs.

  4. Fiber optic geophysical sensors

    DOEpatents

    Homuth, E.F.

    1991-03-19

    A fiber optic geophysical sensor is described in which laser light is passed through a sensor interferometer in contact with a geophysical event, and a reference interferometer not in contact with the geophysical event but in the same general environment as the sensor interferometer. In one embodiment, a single tunable laser provides the laser light. In another embodiment, separate tunable lasers are used for the sensor and reference interferometers. The invention can find such uses as monitoring for earthquakes, and the weighing of objects. 2 figures.

  5. Hydrosphere, Atmosphere, Lithosphere, Biosphere: A Global Geophysical Union

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milly, P.

    2009-05-01

    Water moves freely among the major spheres of the earth system, and, in so doing, it unites them. The atmosphere is driven, moistened and clouded by water in its changing phases, with ubiquitous climatic consequences. The biosphere's organisms depend on the "universal solvent" for access to and internal transport of nutrients, so much so that water availability defines the very geography of photosynthesis and life. The lithosphere is variously loaded, inflated, lubricated and eroded by water, with geodynamic consequences of all sorts. The ever-changing gravitational pull of earth's wandering waters is felt even in the exosphere. The movement of water among the spheres is partially regulated by, and has enormous consequences for, the anthroposphere. The influence of the hydrosphere on the other spheres creates interesting opportunities (indeed, necessities) for hydrologists to play with puzzles and problems beyond their own traditional sphere. In the experience of the speaker, the American Geophysical Union has been a playground that promotes such play, and the future promises more interdisciplinary fun; we have nothing to fear but spheres by themselves.

  6. Looking into the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mussett, Alan E.; Aftab Khan, M.

    2000-10-01

    Looking into the Earth comprehensively describes the principles and applications of both "global" and "exploration" geophysics on all scales. It forms an introduction to geophysics for geologists, civil engineers, environmental scientists, and field archaeologists. The book is organized into two parts: Part 1 describes the geophysical methods, while Part 2 illustrates their use in a number of extended case histories. Mussett and Khan introduce mathematical and physical principles at an elementary level, and then develop them as necessary. Student questions and exercises are included at the end of each chapter. Written for introductory and intermediate level courses in geology, earth science, environmental science, and engineering, this is also an excellent introductory textbook in geophysics.

  7. Looking Forward to the electronic Geophysical Year

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamide, Y.; Baker, D. N.; Thompson, B.; Barton, C.; Kihn, E.

    2004-12-01

    During the International Geophysical Year (1957-1958), member countries established many new capabilities pursuing the major IGY objectives of collecting geophysical data as widely as possible and providing free access to these data for all scientists around the globe. A key achievement of the IGY was the establishment of a worldwide system of data centers and physical observatories. The worldwide scientific community has now endorsed and is promoting an electronic Geophysical Year (eGY) initiative. The proposed eGY concept would both commemorate the 50th anniversary of the IGY in 2007-2008 and would provide a forward impetus to geophysics in the 21st century, similar to that provide by the IGY fifty years ago. The eGY concept advocates the establishment of a series of virtual geophysical observatories now being deployed in cyberspace. We discuss plans to aggregate measurements into a readily accessible database along with analysis, visualization, and display tools that will make information available and useful to the scientific community, to the user community, and to the general public. We are examining the possibilities for near-realtime acquisition of data and utilization of forecast tools in order to provide users with advanced space weather capabilities. This program will provide powerful tools for education and public outreach concerning the connected Sun-Earth System.

  8. Magnetic field of the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Aleksey

    2013-04-01

    The magnetic field of the Earth has global meaning for a life on the Earth. The world geophysical science explains: - occurrence of a magnetic field of the Earth it is transformation of kinetic energy of movements of the fused iron in the liquid core of Earth - into the magnetic energy; - the warming up of a kernel of the Earth occurs due to radioactive disintegration of elements, with excretion of thermal energy. The world science does not define the reasons: - drift of a magnetic dipole on 0,2 a year to the West; - drift of lithospheric slabs and continents. The author offers: an alternative variant existing in a world science the theories "Geodynamo" - it is the theory « the Magnetic field of the Earth », created on the basis of physical laws. Education of a magnetic field of the Earth occurs at moving the electric charge located in a liquid kernel, at rotation of the Earth. At calculation of a magnetic field is used law the Bio Savara for a ring electric current: dB = . Magnetic induction in a kernel of the Earth: B = 2,58 Gs. According to the law of electromagnetic induction the Faradey, rotation of a iron kernel of the Earth in magnetic field causes occurrence of an electric field Emf which moves electrons from the center of a kernel towards the mantle. So of arise the radial electric currents. The magnetic field amplifies the iron of mantle and a kernel of the Earth. As a result of action of a radial electric field the electrons will flow from the center of a kernel in a layer of an electric charge. The central part of a kernel represents the field with a positive electric charge, which creates inverse magnetic field Binv and Emfinv When ?mfinv = ?mf ; ?inv = B, there will be an inversion a magnetic field of the Earth. It is a fact: drift of a magnetic dipole of the Earth in the western direction approximately 0,2 longitude, into a year. Radial electric currents a actions with the basic magnetic field of a Earth - it turn a kernel. It coincides with laws

  9. Sensitivity analysis and application in exploration geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, R.

    2013-12-01

    In exploration geophysics, the usual way of dealing with geophysical data is to form an Earth model describing underground structure in the area of investigation. The resolved model, however, is based on the inversion of survey data which is unavoidable contaminated by various noises and is sampled in a limited number of observation sites. Furthermore, due to the inherent non-unique weakness of inverse geophysical problem, the result is ambiguous. And it is not clear that which part of model features is well-resolved by the data. Therefore the interpretation of the result is intractable. We applied a sensitivity analysis to address this problem in magnetotelluric(MT). The sensitivity, also named Jacobian matrix or the sensitivity matrix, is comprised of the partial derivatives of the data with respect to the model parameters. In practical inversion, the matrix can be calculated by direct modeling of the theoretical response for the given model perturbation, or by the application of perturbation approach and reciprocity theory. We now acquired visualized sensitivity plot by calculating the sensitivity matrix and the solution is therefore under investigation that the less-resolved part is indicated and should not be considered in interpretation, while the well-resolved parameters can relatively be convincing. The sensitivity analysis is hereby a necessary and helpful tool for increasing the reliability of inverse models. Another main problem of exploration geophysics is about the design strategies of joint geophysical survey, i.e. gravity, magnetic & electromagnetic method. Since geophysical methods are based on the linear or nonlinear relationship between observed data and subsurface parameters, an appropriate design scheme which provides maximum information content within a restricted budget is quite difficult. Here we firstly studied sensitivity of different geophysical methods by mapping the spatial distribution of different survey sensitivity with respect to the

  10. Earth materials and earth dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, K; Shankland, T.

    2000-11-01

    In the project ''Earth Materials and Earth Dynamics'' we linked fundamental and exploratory, experimental, theoretical, and computational research programs to shed light on the current and past states of the dynamic Earth. Our objective was to combine different geological, geochemical, geophysical, and materials science analyses with numerical techniques to illuminate active processes in the Earth. These processes include fluid-rock interactions that form and modify the lithosphere, non-linear wave attenuations in rocks that drive plate tectonics and perturb the earth's surface, dynamic recrystallization of olivine that deforms the upper mantle, development of texture in high-pressure olivine polymorphs that create anisotropic velocity regions in the convecting upper mantle and transition zone, and the intense chemical reactions between the mantle and core. We measured physical properties such as texture and nonlinear elasticity, equation of states at simultaneous pressures and temperatures, magnetic spins and bonding, chemical permeability, and thermal-chemical feedback to better characterize earth materials. We artificially generated seismic waves, numerically modeled fluid flow and transport in rock systems and modified polycrystal plasticity theory to interpret measured physical properties and integrate them into our understanding of the Earth. This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL).

  11. Geophysical and atmospheric evolution of habitable planets.

    PubMed

    Lammer, Helmut; Selsis, Frank; Chassefière, Eric; Breuer, Doris; Griessmeier, Jean-Mathias; Kulikov, Yuri N; Erkaev, Nikolai V; Khodachenko, Maxim L; Biernat, Helfried K; Leblanc, Francois; Kallio, Esa; Lundin, Richard; Westall, Frances; Bauer, Siegfried J; Beichman, Charles; Danchi, William; Eiroa, Carlos; Fridlund, Malcolm; Gröller, Hannes; Hanslmeier, Arnold; Hausleitner, Walter; Henning, Thomas; Herbst, Tom; Kaltenegger, Lisa; Léger, Alain; Leitzinger, Martin; Lichtenegger, Herbert I M; Liseau, René; Lunine, Jonathan; Motschmann, Uwe; Odert, Petra; Paresce, Francesco; Parnell, John; Penny, Alan; Quirrenbach, Andreas; Rauer, Heike; Röttgering, Huub; Schneider, Jean; Spohn, Tilman; Stadelmann, Anja; Stangl, Günter; Stam, Daphne; Tinetti, Giovanna; White, Glenn J

    2010-01-01

    The evolution of Earth-like habitable planets is a complex process that depends on the geodynamical and geophysical environments. In particular, it is necessary that plate tectonics remain active over billions of years. These geophysically active environments are strongly coupled to a planet's host star parameters, such as mass, luminosity and activity, orbit location of the habitable zone, and the planet's initial water inventory. Depending on the host star's radiation and particle flux evolution, the composition in the thermosphere, and the availability of an active magnetic dynamo, the atmospheres of Earth-like planets within their habitable zones are differently affected due to thermal and nonthermal escape processes. For some planets, strong atmospheric escape could even effect the stability of the atmosphere. PMID:20307182

  12. Symposium links geophysical structure and process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aki, Keiiti

    The Jeffreys Symposium at the International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics meeting in Vienna (August 11-24 presented a wonderful symphony of 19 maestros performing throughout the whole spectrum of Earth and planetary sciences. The symposium was well-received by the audience and ended with a standing ovation to Lady Jeffreys, who listened to all presentations with keen interest.B. Bolt opened the symposium with “Jeffreys and the Earth,” a paper that succinctly reviewed Jeffreys' overwhelming work, based largely on his mastery of simple representations to produce mathematical models of complicated structures and processes. A model simple enough for the application of principles of mathematical physics, and yet capable of capturing the essence of the subject phenomenon, is essential to successful geophysics.

  13. Geophysical and atmospheric evolution of habitable planets.

    PubMed

    Lammer, Helmut; Selsis, Frank; Chassefière, Eric; Breuer, Doris; Griessmeier, Jean-Mathias; Kulikov, Yuri N; Erkaev, Nikolai V; Khodachenko, Maxim L; Biernat, Helfried K; Leblanc, Francois; Kallio, Esa; Lundin, Richard; Westall, Frances; Bauer, Siegfried J; Beichman, Charles; Danchi, William; Eiroa, Carlos; Fridlund, Malcolm; Gröller, Hannes; Hanslmeier, Arnold; Hausleitner, Walter; Henning, Thomas; Herbst, Tom; Kaltenegger, Lisa; Léger, Alain; Leitzinger, Martin; Lichtenegger, Herbert I M; Liseau, René; Lunine, Jonathan; Motschmann, Uwe; Odert, Petra; Paresce, Francesco; Parnell, John; Penny, Alan; Quirrenbach, Andreas; Rauer, Heike; Röttgering, Huub; Schneider, Jean; Spohn, Tilman; Stadelmann, Anja; Stangl, Günter; Stam, Daphne; Tinetti, Giovanna; White, Glenn J

    2010-01-01

    The evolution of Earth-like habitable planets is a complex process that depends on the geodynamical and geophysical environments. In particular, it is necessary that plate tectonics remain active over billions of years. These geophysically active environments are strongly coupled to a planet's host star parameters, such as mass, luminosity and activity, orbit location of the habitable zone, and the planet's initial water inventory. Depending on the host star's radiation and particle flux evolution, the composition in the thermosphere, and the availability of an active magnetic dynamo, the atmospheres of Earth-like planets within their habitable zones are differently affected due to thermal and nonthermal escape processes. For some planets, strong atmospheric escape could even effect the stability of the atmosphere.

  14. Looking into the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mussett, Alan E.; Aftab Khan, M.; Button, Illustrated By Sue

    2000-12-01

    Looking Into the Earth comprehensively describes the principles and applications of both `global' and `exploration' geophysics on all scales. It forms an introduction to geophysics suitable for those who do not necessarily intend to become professional geophysicists, including geologists, civil engineers, environmental scientists, and field archaeologists. The book is organised into two parts: Part 1 describes the geophysical methods, while Part 2 illustrates their use in a number of extended case histories. Mathematical and physical principles are introduced at an elementary level, and then developed as necessary. Student questions and exercises are included at the end of each chapter. The book is aimed primarily at introductory and intermediate university students taking courses in geology, earth science, environmental science, and engineering. It will also form an excellent introductory textbook in geophysics departments, and will help practising geologists, archaeologists and engineers understand what geophysics can offer their work. Accessible to students with little background in maths and physics Covers both global and applied geophysics Well illustrated and contains many student exercises and case studies Written by experienced teachers of geophysics

  15. Fractals in geology and geophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turcotte, Donald L.

    1989-01-01

    The definition of a fractal distribution is that the number of objects N with a characteristic size greater than r scales with the relation N of about r exp -D. The frequency-size distributions for islands, earthquakes, fragments, ore deposits, and oil fields often satisfy this relation. This application illustrates a fundamental aspect of fractal distributions, scale invariance. The requirement of an object to define a scale in photograhs of many geological features is one indication of the wide applicability of scale invariance to geological problems; scale invariance can lead to fractal clustering. Geophysical spectra can also be related to fractals; these are self-affine fractals rather than self-similar fractals. Examples include the earth's topography and geoid.

  16. Strainmeters and tiltmeters in geophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goulty, N. R.

    1976-01-01

    Several types of sensitive strainmeters and tiltmeters have been developed, and it is now becoming clear which geophysical applications are most suitable for these instruments. In general, strainmeters and tiltmeters are used for observing ground deformation at periods of minutes to days. Small-scale lateral inhomogeneities at the instrument sites distort signals by a few percent, although the effects of large structures can be calculated. In earth tide work these lateral inhomogeneities and unknown ocean loading signals prevent accurate values of the regional tide from being obtained. This limits tidal investigations to looking for temporal variations, possibly associated with pre-earthquake dilatancy, and spatial variations caused by gross elasticity contrasts in the local geological structure. Strainmeters and tiltmeters are well suited for observing long-period seismic waves, seismic slip events on faults and volcano tumescence, where small site-induced distortions in the measured signals are seldom important.

  17. Global Geophysical Fluids Center of IERS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Benjamin F.; Dehant, V.; Gross, R. S.; Ray, R. D.; Salstein, D. A.; Watkins, M.; Wilson, C. R.

    2000-01-01

    The Global Geophysical Fluids Center (GGFC) and its seven Special Bureaus (SB, for Atmosphere, Oceans, Tides, Hydrology, Mantle, Core and Gravity/Geocenter) were establishes by the International Earth Rotation Service in 1998, to support global geodynamic research. Mass transports in the geophysical fluids of the Earth system will cause observable geodynamic effects on a broad time scale.These include (1) variations in the solid Earth's rotation (in length-of-day and polar motion/nutation) via the conservation of angular momentum and effected by torques at the fluid-solid Earth interface; (2) changes in the global gravitational field according to Newton's gravitational law; and (3) motion in the center of mass of the solid Earth relative to that of the whole Earth ("geocenter") via the conservation of linear momentum. These minute signals have become observable by space geodetic techniques, primarily VLBI, SLR, GPS, and DORIS, and new exciting data will be available by space gravity, altimetry, SAR, and magnetic missions. In this sense the precise space geodetic techniques have become effective means of remote sensing of global mass transports. The GGFC and its SBs have the responsibility of supporting, facilitating, and providing services to the worldwide research community in the related research areas. We compute, analyze, compare, archive, and disseminate the time series of the angular momenta and the related torques, gravitational coefficients, and geocenter shift for all geophysical fluids, based on global observational data, and/or products from state-of-the-art models some of which assimilate such data. The computed quantities, algorithm and data formats are standardized. This paper reviews our activities, reports the status, and looks forward into the future.

  18. Surface exploration geophysics applied to the moon

    SciTech Connect

    Ander, M.E.

    1984-01-01

    With the advent of a permanent lunar base, the desire to explore the lunar near-surface for both scientific and economic purposes will arise. Applications of exploration geophysical methods to the earth's subsurface are highly developed. This paper briefly addresses some aspects of applying this technology to near surface lunar exploration. It is noted that both the manner of application of some techniques, as well as their traditional hierarchy as assigned on earth, should be altered for lunar exploration. In particular, electromagnetic techniques may replace seismic techniques as the primary tool for evaluating near-surface structure.

  19. Geophysical Methods: an Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, A.; Goldstein, N. E.; Lee, K. H.; Majer, E. L.; Morrison, H. F.; Myer, L.

    1992-01-01

    Geophysics is expected to have a major role in lunar resource assessment when manned systems return to the Moon. Geophysical measurements made from a lunar rover will contribute to a number of key studies: estimating regolith thickness, detection of possible large-diameter lava tubes within maria basalts, detection of possible subsurface ice in polar regions, detection of conductive minerals that formed directly from a melt (orthomagmatic sulfides of Cu, Ni, Co), and mapping lunar geology beneath the regolith. The techniques that can be used are dictated both by objectives and by our abilities to adapt current technology to lunar conditions. Instrument size, weight, power requirements, and freedom from orientation errors are factors we have considered. Among the geophysical methods we believe to be appropriate for a lunar resource assessment are magnetics, including gradiometry, time-domain magnetic induction, ground-penetrating radar, seismic reflection, and gravimetry.

  20. Information Theory and the Earth's Density Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubincam, D. P.

    1979-01-01

    An argument for using the information theory approach as an inference technique in solid earth geophysics. A spherically symmetric density distribution is derived as an example of the method. A simple model of the earth plus knowledge of its mass and moment of inertia lead to a density distribution which was surprisingly close to the optimum distribution. Future directions for the information theory approach in solid earth geophysics as well as its strengths and weaknesses are discussed.

  1. Information theory and the earth's density distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubincam, D. P.

    1978-01-01

    The present paper argues for using the information theory approach as an inference technique in solid earth geophysics. A spherically symmetric density distribution is derived as an example of the method. A simple model of the earth plus knowledge of its mass and moment of inertia leads to a density distribution. Future directions for the information theory approach in solid earth geophysics as well as its strengths and weaknesses are discussed.

  2. Ninety Years of International Cooperation in Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail-Zadeh, A.; Beer, T.

    2009-05-01

    Because applicable physical, chemical, and mathematical studies of the Earth system must be both interdisciplinary and international, the International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics (IUGG) was formed in 1919 as an non-governmental, non-profit organization dedicated to advancing, promoting, and communicating knowledge of the Earth system, its space environment, and the dynamical processes causing change. The Union brings together eight International Associations that address different disciplines of Earth sciences. Through these Associations, IUGG promotes and enables studies in the geosciences by providing a framework for collaborative research and information exchange, by organizing international scientific assemblies worldwide, and via research publications. Resolutions passed by assemblies of IUGG and its International Associations set geophysical standards and promote issues of science policy on which national members agree. IUGG has initiated and/or vigorously supported collaborative international efforts that have led to highly productive worldwide interdisciplinary research programs, such as the International Geophysical Year and subsequent International Years (IPY, IYPE, eGY, and IHY), International Lithosphere Programme, World Climate Research Programme, Geosphere-Biosphere Programme, and Integrated Research on Risk Disaster. IUGG is inherently involved in the projects and programs related to climate change, global warming, and related environmental impacts. One major contribution has been the creation, through the International Council for Science (ICSU), of the World Data Centers and the Federation of Astronomical and Geophysical Data Analysis Services. These are being transformed to the ICSU World Data System, from which the data gathered during the major programs and data products will be available to researchers everywhere. IUGG cooperates with UNESCO, WMO, and some other U.N. and non-governmental organizations in the study of natural catastrophes

  3. An Emerging Role for Geophysics in Watershed Hydrologic Investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, R.; Robinson, D.

    2005-12-01

    There is growing recognition of the challenges we face, in many parts of the world, in finding and maintaining clean sources of water for human consumption and agricultural use, while balancing the needs of the natural world. Watershed hydrologic investigations can be used to develop an improved understanding of the controls on the quantity, movement and quality of water, thus enhancing our ability to better protect and manage our water resources. Geophysical methods can play a central role in these investigations. CUAHSI (Consortium of Universities for the Advancement of Hydrologic Sciences) is developing, with the support of the National Science Foundation, a Hydrologic Measurement Facility (HMF), which contains a Geophysics Module. Through the HMF-Geophysics Module our objective is to determine how best to utilize geophysical instrumentation and engage geophysical expertise in addressing key challenges in watershed-scale characterization. We approach the development of HMF-Geophysics with the following questions: 1) What are the parameters that need to be measured in order to adequately describe the quantity, movement and quality of water, and at what spatial and temporal scale do these parameters need to be measured? 2) What can we measure with our geophysical instruments and methodologies, and what are the relevant spatial and temporal scales? 3) Given the answers to 1) and 2) above, what can we do today with geophysics that integrates with hydrological monitoring and modeling approaches, and provides a significant advancement over other forms of measurement? 4) What are the critical research needs in advancing the use of geophysics for watershed hydrologic investigations? When we consider the state-of-the-science in the use of geophysics for all near-surface applications, we identify four cross-cutting areas of research activity that complement the goals of HMF-Geophysics. One area of research is focused on improving the accuracy of our estimates of

  4. Geophysical investigations in Jordan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kovach, R.L.; Andreasen, G.E.; Gettings, M.E.; El-Kaysi, K.

    1990-01-01

    A number of geophysical investigations have been undertaken in the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan to provide data for understanding the tectonic framework, the pattern of seismicity, earthquake hazards and geothermal resources of the country. Both the historical seismic record and the observed recent seismicity point to the dominance of the Dead Sea Rift as the main locus of seismic activity but significant branching trends and gaps in the seismicity pattern are also seen. A wide variety of focal plane solutions are observed emphasizing the complex pattern of fault activity in the vicinity of the rift zone. Geophysical investigations directed towards the geothermal assessment of the prominent thermal springs of Zerga Ma'in and Zara are not supportive of the presence of a crustal magmatic source. ?? 1990.

  5. Magnetic field of the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Aleksey

    2013-04-01

    The magnetic field of the Earth has global meaning for a life on the Earth. The world geophysical science explains: - occurrence of a magnetic field of the Earth it is transformation of kinetic energy of movements of the fused iron in the liquid core of Earth - into the magnetic energy; - the warming up of a kernel of the Earth occurs due to radioactive disintegration of elements, with excretion of thermal energy. The world science does not define the reasons: - drift of a magnetic dipole on 0,2 a year to the West; - drift of lithospheric slabs and continents. The author offers: an alternative variant existing in a world science the theories "Geodynamo" - it is the theory « the Magnetic field of the Earth », created on the basis of physical laws. Education of a magnetic field of the Earth occurs at moving the electric charge located in a liquid kernel, at rotation of the Earth. At calculation of a magnetic field is used law the Bio Savara for a ring electric current: dB = . Magnetic induction in a kernel of the Earth: B = 2,58 Gs. According to the law of electromagnetic induction the Faradey, rotation of a iron kernel of the Earth in magnetic field causes occurrence of an electric field Emf which moves electrons from the center of a kernel towards the mantle. So of arise the radial electric currents. The magnetic field amplifies the iron of mantle and a kernel of the Earth. As a result of action of a radial electric field the electrons will flow from the center of a kernel in a layer of an electric charge. The central part of a kernel represents the field with a positive electric charge, which creates inverse magnetic field Binv and Emfinv When ?mfinv = ?mf ; ?inv = B, there will be an inversion a magnetic field of the Earth. It is a fact: drift of a magnetic dipole of the Earth in the western direction approximately 0,2 longitude, into a year. Radial electric currents a actions with the basic magnetic field of a Earth - it turn a kernel. It coincides with laws

  6. Crustal movement and plate motion as observed by GPS baseline ranging - trial to make teaching materials for middle- and high-school earth science education by teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, T.

    2009-12-01

    Japanese government established the system for renewing educational personnel certificates in 2007 and mandated the adoption of it in April 2009 (cf. “2007 White Paper on Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology”, available at http://www.mext.go.jp/english/). The new system shows that the valid period for each regular certificate after the renewal system adoption (April 1, 2009) is until the end of the fiscal year after ten years from satisfying the qualifications required for the certificate. Only persons who have attended over 30 hours and passed the examination in the certificate renewal courses before the expiration of the valid period can renew their certificate which is valid for next ten years. The purpose of this system is for teachers to acquire the latest knowledge and skills. Certificate renewal courses authorized by Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan are offered by universities. Attendees will choose based on their specialty and awareness of issues from the various courses with education curriculums and. To renew their certificates, they should include (1) items regarding the latest trends and issues in education (12 hours) and (2) items regarding their speciality and other educational enhancement (three 6-hours course: total 18 hours). In 2008, before the adoption, provisional certificate renewal courses were offered for trial by more than 100 universities. The author offered a 6-hour course titled by “Development of teaching materials for school pupils to make understand the dynamic motion of the earth - utilising the results of the GPS ranging”. This course was targeted mainly for science teachers of middle- and high-schools. The goal of this course was for the attendees to understand the role of GPS ranging for the direct observation of the crustal movement and plate motion, and to produce the teaching materials possibly used in the classrooms. The offering of this course is aiming finally at

  7. COUPLED GEOPHYSICAL-HYDROLOGICAL MODELING OF A CONTROLLED NAPL SPILL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Past studies have shown reasonable sensitivity of geophysical data for detecting or monitoring the movement of non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) in the subsurface. However, heterogeneity in subsurface properties and in NAPL distribution commonly results in non-unique data

    ...

  8. Asteroid Surface Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdoch, N.; Sánchez, P.; Schwartz, S. R.; Miyamoto, H.

    The regolith-covered surfaces of asteroids preserve records of geophysical processes that have occurred both at their surfaces and sometimes also in their interiors. As a result of the unique microgravity environment that these bodies possess, a complex and varied geophysics has given birth to fascinating features that we are just now beginning to understand. The processes that formed such features were first hypothesized through detailed spacecraft observations and have been further studied using theoretical, numerical, and experimental methods that often combine several scientific disciplines. These multiple approaches are now merging toward a further understanding of the geophysical states of the surfaces of asteroids. In this chapter we provide a concise summary of what the scientific community has learned so far about the surfaces of these small planetary bodies and the processes that have shaped them. We also discuss the state of the art in terms of experimental techniques and numerical simulations that are currently being used to investigate regolith processes occurring on small-body surfaces and that are contributing to the interpretation of observations and the design of future space missions.

  9. Learning to Map the Earth and Planets using a Google Earth - based Multi-student Game

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Paor, D. G.; Wild, S. C.; Dordevic, M.

    2011-12-01

    We report on progress in developing an interactive geological and geophysical mapping game employing the Google Earth, Google Moon, and Goole Mars virtual globes. Working in groups of four, students represent themselves on the Google Earth surface by selecting an avatar. One of the group drives to each field stop in a model vehicle using game-like controls. When they arrive at a field stop and get out of their field vehicle, students can control their own avatars' movements independently and can communicate with one another by text message. They are geo-fenced and receive automatic messages if they wander off target. Individual movements are logged and stored in a MySQL database for later analysis. Students collaborate on mapping decisions and submit a report to their instructor through a Javascript interface to the Google Earth API. Unlike real mapping, students are not restricted by geographic access and can engage in comparative mapping on different planets. Using newly developed techniques, they can also explore and map the sub-surface down to the core-mantle boundary. Virtual specimens created with a 3D scanner, Gigapan images of outcrops, and COLLADA models of mantle structures such as subducted lithospheric slabs all contribute to an engaging learning experience.

  10. Common interests bind AGU and geophysical groups around the globe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEntee, Christine

    2012-02-01

    In continuation of our work to strengthen alliances with key organizations in the Earth and space science community, AGU president Michael McPhaden, president-elect Carol Finn, and I held a series of meetings with leaders from other science societies during the 2011 Fall Meeting. Over the course of 2 days we met with leaders from the Geophysical Society of America, European Geosciences Union, Japan Geosciences Union, Ethiopian Geophysical Union, Asia Oceania Geosciences Society, Chinese Geophysical Society, and Asociación Latinoamericana de Geofísica Espacial. This gave us a valued opportunity to discuss the common interests and challenges we all face and to learn from each other's experience. The meetings allowed AGU to strengthen existing cooperative agreements and reach new levels of understanding between us and other societies. Additionally, we met with representatives from the Korean Ocean Research and Development Institute to discuss their intention to establish a geophysical union modeled after AGU.

  11. Time-reversal methods in geophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Larmat, Carene S.; Guyer, Robert A.; Johnson, Paul A.

    2010-08-15

    Before the 20th century there were few seismometers. So Earth's dynamic geophysical processes were poorly understood. Today the potential for understanding those processes is enormous: The number of seismic instruments is continually increasing, their data are easily stored and shared, and computing power grows exponentially. As a result, seismologists are rapidly discovering new kinds of seismic signals in the frequency range 0.001-100 Hz, as well as relatively large nonseismic displacements, monitored by the global positioning system, occurring over days or weeks.

  12. Large natural geophysical events: planetary planning

    SciTech Connect

    Knox, J.B.; Smith, J.V.

    1984-09-01

    Geological and geophysical data suggest that during the evolution of the earth and its species, that there have been many mass extinctions due to large impacts from comets and large asteroids, and major volcanic events. Today, technology has developed to the stage where we can begin to consider protective measures for the planet. Evidence of the ecological disruption and frequency of these major events is presented. Surveillance and warning systems are most critical to develop wherein sufficient lead times for warnings exist so that appropriate interventions could be designed. The long term research undergirding these warning systems, implementation, and proof testing is rich in opportunities for collaboration for peace.

  13. Geophysical wave tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chaoguang

    2000-11-01

    This study is concerned with geophysical wave tomography techniques that include advanced diffraction tomography, traveltime calculation techniques and simultaneous attenuation and velocity tomography approaches. We propose the source independent approximation, the Modified Quasi-Linear approximation and develop a fast and accurate diffraction tomography algorithm that uses this approximation. Since the Modified Quasi-Linear approximation accounts for the scattering fields within scatterers, this tomography algorithm produces better image quality than conventional Born approximation tomography algorithm does with or without the presence of multiple scatterers and can be used to reconstruct images of high contrast objects. Since iteration is not required, this algorithm is efficient. We improve the finite difference traveltime calculation algorithm proposed by Vidale (1990). The bucket theory is utilized in order to enhance the sorting efficiency, which accounts for about ten percent computing time improvement for large velocity models. Snell's law is employed to solve the causality problem analytically, which enables the modified algorithm to compute traveltimes accurately and rapidly for high velocity contrast media. We also develop two simultaneous attenuation and velocity tomography approaches, which use traveltimes and amplitude spectra of the observed data, and discuss some of their applications. One approach is processing geophysical data that come from one single survey and the other deals with the repeated survey cases. These approaches are nonlinear and therefore more accurate than linear tomography. A linear system for wave propagation and constant-Q media are assumed in order to develop the tomography algorithms. These approaches not only produce attenuation and velocity images at the same time but also can be used to infer the physical rock properties, such as the dielectric permittivity, the electric conductivity, and the porosity. A crosshole radar

  14. Rapid geophysical surveyor

    SciTech Connect

    Roybal, L.G.; Carpenter, G.S.; Josten, N.E.

    1993-01-01

    The Rapid Geophysical Surveyor (RGS) is a system designed to rapidly and economically collect closely-spaced geophysical data used for characterization of Department of Energy (DOE) waste sites. Geophysical surveys of waste sites are an important first step in the remediation and closure of these sites; especially older sties where historical records are inaccurate and survey benchmarks have changed due to refinements in coordinate controls and datum changes. Closely-spaced data are required to adequately differentiate pits, trenches, and soil vault rows whose edges may be only a few feet from each other. A prototype vehicle designed to collect magnetic field data was built at the Idaho national Engineering Laboratory (INEL) during the summer of 1992. The RGS was one of several projects funded by the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) program. This vehicle was demonstrated at the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) within the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) on the INEL in September of 1992. Magnetic data were collected over two areas in the SDA, with a total survey area of about 1.7 acres. Data were collected at a nominal density of 2 1/2 inches along survey lines spaced 1 foot apart. Over 350,000 data points were collected over a 6 day period corresponding to about 185 man-days using conventional ground survey techniques. This report documents the design and demonstration of the RGS concept including the presentation of magnetic data collected at the SDA. The surveys were able to show pit and trench boundaries and determine details of their spatial orientation never before achieved.

  15. Rapid geophysical surveyor

    SciTech Connect

    Roybal, L.G.; Carpenter, G.S.; Josten, N.E.

    1993-07-01

    The Rapid Geophysical Surveyor (RGS) is a system designed to rapidly and economically collect closely-spaced geophysical data used for characterization of Department of Energy (DOE) waste sites. Geophysical surveys of waste sites are an important first step in the remediation and closure of these sites; especially older sties where historical records are inaccurate and survey benchmarks have changed due to refinements in coordinate controls and datum changes. Closely-spaced data are required to adequately differentiate pits, trenches, and soil vault rows whose edges may be only a few feet from each other. A prototype vehicle designed to collect magnetic field data was built at the Idaho national Engineering Laboratory (INEL) during the summer of 1992. The RGS was one of several projects funded by the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) program. This vehicle was demonstrated at the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) within the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) on the INEL in September of 1992. Magnetic data were collected over two areas in the SDA, with a total survey area of about 1.7 acres. Data were collected at a nominal density of 2 1/2 inches along survey lines spaced 1 foot apart. Over 350,000 data points were collected over a 6 day period corresponding to about 185 man-days using conventional ground survey techniques. This report documents the design and demonstration of the RGS concept including the presentation of magnetic data collected at the SDA. The surveys were able to show pit and trench boundaries and determine details of their spatial orientation never before achieved.

  16. Geophysical fluid dynamics: whence, whither and why?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallis, Geoffrey K.

    2016-08-01

    This article discusses the role of geophysical fluid dynamics (GFD) in understanding the natural environment, and in particular the dynamics of atmospheres and oceans on Earth and elsewhere. GFD, as usually understood, is a branch of the geosciences that deals with fluid dynamics and that, by tradition, seeks to extract the bare essence of a phenomenon, omitting detail where possible. The geosciences in general deal with complex interacting systems and in some ways resemble condensed matter physics or aspects of biology, where we seek explanations of phenomena at a higher level than simply directly calculating the interactions of all the constituent parts. That is, we try to develop theories or make simple models of the behaviour of the system as a whole. However, these days in many geophysical systems of interest, we can also obtain information for how the system behaves by almost direct numerical simulation from the governing equations. The numerical model itself then explicitly predicts the emergent phenomena-the Gulf Stream, for example-something that is still usually impossible in biology or condensed matter physics. Such simulations, as manifested, for example, in complicated general circulation models, have in some ways been extremely successful and one may reasonably now ask whether understanding a complex geophysical system is necessary for predicting it. In what follows we discuss such issues and the roles that GFD has played in the past and will play in the future.

  17. Geophysical fluid dynamics: whence, whither and why?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses the role of geophysical fluid dynamics (GFD) in understanding the natural environment, and in particular the dynamics of atmospheres and oceans on Earth and elsewhere. GFD, as usually understood, is a branch of the geosciences that deals with fluid dynamics and that, by tradition, seeks to extract the bare essence of a phenomenon, omitting detail where possible. The geosciences in general deal with complex interacting systems and in some ways resemble condensed matter physics or aspects of biology, where we seek explanations of phenomena at a higher level than simply directly calculating the interactions of all the constituent parts. That is, we try to develop theories or make simple models of the behaviour of the system as a whole. However, these days in many geophysical systems of interest, we can also obtain information for how the system behaves by almost direct numerical simulation from the governing equations. The numerical model itself then explicitly predicts the emergent phenomena—the Gulf Stream, for example—something that is still usually impossible in biology or condensed matter physics. Such simulations, as manifested, for example, in complicated general circulation models, have in some ways been extremely successful and one may reasonably now ask whether understanding a complex geophysical system is necessary for predicting it. In what follows we discuss such issues and the roles that GFD has played in the past and will play in the future.

  18. Geophysical fluid dynamics: whence, whither and why?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses the role of geophysical fluid dynamics (GFD) in understanding the natural environment, and in particular the dynamics of atmospheres and oceans on Earth and elsewhere. GFD, as usually understood, is a branch of the geosciences that deals with fluid dynamics and that, by tradition, seeks to extract the bare essence of a phenomenon, omitting detail where possible. The geosciences in general deal with complex interacting systems and in some ways resemble condensed matter physics or aspects of biology, where we seek explanations of phenomena at a higher level than simply directly calculating the interactions of all the constituent parts. That is, we try to develop theories or make simple models of the behaviour of the system as a whole. However, these days in many geophysical systems of interest, we can also obtain information for how the system behaves by almost direct numerical simulation from the governing equations. The numerical model itself then explicitly predicts the emergent phenomena—the Gulf Stream, for example—something that is still usually impossible in biology or condensed matter physics. Such simulations, as manifested, for example, in complicated general circulation models, have in some ways been extremely successful and one may reasonably now ask whether understanding a complex geophysical system is necessary for predicting it. In what follows we discuss such issues and the roles that GFD has played in the past and will play in the future. PMID:27616918

  19. Geophysical methods for road construction and maintenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasul, Hedi; Karlson, Caroline; Jamali, Imran; Earon, Robert; Olofsson, Bo

    2015-04-01

    Infrastructure, such as road transportation, is a vital in civilized societies; which need to be constructed and maintained regularly. A large part of the project cost is attributed to subsurface conditions, where unsatisfactory conditions could increase either the geotechnical stabilization measures needed or the design cost itself. A way to collect information of the subsurface and existing installations which can lead to measures reducing the project cost and damage is to use geophysical methods during planning, construction and maintenance phases. The moisture in road layers is an important factor, which will affect the bearing capacity of the construction as well as the maintenances. Moisture in the road is a key factor for a well-functioning road. On the other hand the excessive moisture is the main reason of road failure and problems. From a hydrological point of view geophysical methods could help road planners identify the water table, geological strata, pollution arising from the road and the movement of the pollution before, during and after construction. Geophysical methods also allow road planners to collect valuable data for a large area without intrusive investigations such as with boreholes, i.e. minimizing the environmental stresses and costs. However, it is important to specify the investigation site and to choose the most appropriate geophysical method based on the site chosen and the objective of the investigation. Currently, numerous construction and rehabilitation projects are taking places around the world. Many of these projects are focused on infrastructural development, comprising both new projects and expansion of the existing infrastructural network. Geophysical methods can benefit these projects greatly during all phases. During the construction phase Ground Penetrating radar (GPR) is very useful in combination with Electrical Resistivity (ER) for detecting soil water content and base course compaction. However, ER and Electromagnetic

  20. Movement Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... want them to. If you have a movement disorder, you experience these kinds of impaired movement. Dyskinesia ... and is a common symptom of many movement disorders. Tremors are a type of dyskinesia. Nerve diseases ...

  1. Geophysics in Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fucugauchi, J. Urrutia

    The 1986 Annual Meeting of the Union Geofisica Mexicana (UGM) was held in Morelia, Michoacan, Mexico, during November 9-15, 1986. This annual meeting provides an opportunity for the presentation and discussion of new observations, data, interpretations, etc., in the various research areas of geophysics. It is also intended to bring together geophysicists from government institutions, industry, universities, and research centers, along with researchers from other countries. Since a substantial amount of the geophysical data that is gathered in Mexico remains unpublished or is published in internal reports of restricted circulation, it is important to have such a forum for local and foreign researchers. Many U.S. research groups are presently carrying out studies in Mexico (in seismology, tectonics, economic geology, volcanology, etc.), but their participation in these annual meetings has been very limited. Thus, in addition to giving a brief account of the meeting, we would like to encourage future participation by AGU members and also to announce the availability of material published from the meetings (abstracts with program and a proceedings volume).

  2. A Directory of Societies in Earth Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geotimes, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Lists the titles and addresses of approximately 450 domestic and foreign organizations which deal with earth science fields, including geology, paleontology, mining, and geophysics. Also listed are U.S. state geological surveys. (WB)

  3. Sampling functions for geophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giacaglia, G. E. O.; Lunquist, C. A.

    1972-01-01

    A set of spherical sampling functions is defined such that they are related to spherical-harmonic functions in the same way that the sampling functions of information theory are related to sine and cosine functions. An orderly distribution of (N + 1) squared sampling points on a sphere is given, for which the (N + 1) squared spherical sampling functions span the same linear manifold as do the spherical-harmonic functions through degree N. The transformations between the spherical sampling functions and the spherical-harmonic functions are given by recurrence relations. The spherical sampling functions of two arguments are extended to three arguments and to nonspherical reference surfaces. Typical applications of this formalism to geophysical topics are sketched.

  4. Characterising landslide processes using a combined remote sensing and geophysical surveying approach: examples from north east England, UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boon, David P.; Chambers, Jonathan E.; Wilby, Philip R.; Grebby, Stephen

    2015-04-01

    The combination of remote sensing, geophysics (electrical resistivity tomography (ERT)) and terrain analysis was applied to characterise landslide processes in northern England. Two different landslide types commonly found on the Jurassic Escarpment slopes in the Cleveland Basin were initially studied: (i) relict, large deep-seated bedrock landslides and (ii) recent, small shallow rotational slides with active earth flows. Interpretation of landslide architectures was supported by detailed surface geomorphological and geological mapping data. When calibrated with borehole control, interpretation of the geophysical ERT data allowed determination of mass movement deposit volumes, movement styles and failure mechanisms, and provided an improved understanding of the depth, geometry and geological factors controlling development and mechanical properties of primary shear surfaces. This new understanding was then used to develop algorithms to perform surface roughness analyses, using a range of DTMs with different spatial resolutions (0.25-5m) derived from airborne LiDAR, airborne radar and photogrammetry. The algorithm was subsequently applied across the region to perform semi-automated landslide recognition, in order to help verify and enhance the regional landslide inventory. A variety of landslide types and other geological features were distinguishable through this surface roughness mapping approach. The combined geophysical and remote sensing approach to landslide characterisation has improved our understanding of the extent and nature of the landslide hazard across the region. This approach is valid for hazard research and civil engineering purposes elsewhere, provided that the DTMs and baseline geological data are available at an appropriate resolution and penetration of vegetation can be achieved.

  5. 3D stochastic geophysical inversion for contact surface geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lelièvre, Peter; Farquharson, Colin; Bijani, Rodrigo

    2015-04-01

    Geologists' interpretations about the Earth typically involve distinct rock units with contacts (interfaces) between them. As such, 3D geological Earth models typically comprise wireframe contact surfaces of tessellated triangles or other polygonal planar facets. In contrast, standard minimum-structure geophysical inversions are performed on meshes of space-filling cells (typically prisms or tetrahedra) and recover smoothly varying physical property distributions that are inconsistent with typical geological interpretations. There are several approaches through which mesh-based geophysical inversion can help recover models with some of the desired characteristics. However, a more effective strategy is to consider a fundamentally different type of inversion that works directly with models that comprise surfaces representing contacts between rock units. We are researching such an approach, our goal being to perform geophysical forward and inverse modelling directly with 3D geological models of any complexity. Geological and geophysical models should be specified using the same parameterization such that they are, in essence, the same Earth model. We parameterize the wireframe contact surfaces in a 3D model as the coordinates of the nodes (facet vertices). The physical properties of each rock unit in a model remain fixed while the geophysical inversion controls the position of the contact surfaces via the control nodes, perturbing the surfaces as required to fit the geophysical data responses. This is essentially a "geometry inversion", which can be used to recover the unknown geometry of a target body or to investigate the viability of a proposed Earth model. We apply global optimization strategies to solve the inverse problem, including stochastic sampling to obtain statistical information regarding the likelihood of particular features in the model, helping to assess the viability of a proposed model. Jointly inverting multiple types of geophysical data is simple

  6. Notes on the history of geophysics in the Ottoman Empire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozcep, F.; Ozcep, T.

    2014-09-01

    In Anatolia, the history of geophysical sciences may go back to antiquity (600 BC), namely the period when Thales lived in Magnesia (Asia Minor). In the modern sense, geophysics started with geomagnetic works in the 1600s. The period between 1600 and 1800 includes the measurement of magnetic declination, inclination and magnetic field strength. Before these years, there is a little information, such as how to use a compass, in the Kitab-i Bahriye (the Book of Navigation) of Piri Reis, who is one of the most important mariners of the Ottoman Empire. However, this may not mean that magnetic declination was generally understood. The first scientific book relating to geophysics is the book Fuyuzat-i Miknatissiye that was translated by Ibrahim Müteferrika and printed in 1731. The subject of this book is earth's magnetism. There is also information concerning geophysics in the book Cihannuma (Universal Geography) that was written by Katip Celebi and in the book Marifetname written by Ibrahim Hakki Erzurumlu, but these books are only partly geophysical books. In Istanbul the year 1868 is one of the most important for geophysical sciences because an observatory called Rasathane-i Amire was installed in the Pera region of this city. At this observatory the first systematic geophysical observations such as meteorological, seismological and even gravimetrical were made. There have been meteorological records in Anatolia since 1839. These are records of atmospheric temperature, pressure and humidity. In the Ottoman Empire, the science of geophysics is considered as one of the natural sciences along with astronomy, mineralogy, geology, etc., and these sciences are included as a part of physics and chemistry.

  7. Development of Geophysical Ideas and Institutions in Ottoman Empire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozcep, Ferhat; Ozcep, Tazegul

    2015-04-01

    In Anatolia, the history of geophysical sciences may go back to antiquity (600 BC), namely the period when Thales lived in Magnesia (Asia Minor). In the modern sense, geophysics started with geomagnetic works in the 1600s. The period between 1600 and 1800 includes the measurement of magnetic declination, inclination and magnetic field strength. Before these years, there is a little information, such as how to use a compass, in the Kitab-i Bahriye (the Book of Navigation) of Piri Reis, who is one of the most important mariners of the Ottoman Empire. However, this may not mean that magnetic declination was generally understood. The first scientific book relating to geophysics is the book Fuyuzat-i Miknatissiye that was translated by Ibrahim Müteferrika and printed in 1731. The subject of this book is earth's magnetism. There is also information concerning geophysics in the book Cihannuma (Universal Geography) that was written by Katip Celebi and in the book Marifetname written by Ibrahim Hakki Erzurumlu, but these books are only partly geophysical books. In Istanbul the year 1868 is one of the most important for geophysical sciences because an observatory called Rasathane-i Amire was installed in the Pera region of this city. At this observatory the first systematic geophysical observations such as meteorological, seismological and even gravimetrical were made. There have been meteorological records in Anatolia since 1839. These are records of atmospheric temperature, pressure and humidity. In the Ottoman Empire, the science of geophysics is considered as one of the natural sciences along with astronomy, mineralogy, geology, etc., and these sciences are included as a part of physics and chemistry.

  8. Prediction of Geophysical Flow Mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cagnoli, B.; Piersanti, A.

    2014-12-01

    The prediction of the mobility of geophysical flows to assess their hazards is one of the main research goals in the earth sciences. Our laboratory experiments and numerical simulations are carried out to understand the effects of grain size and flow volume on the mobility of the centre of mass of dry granular flows of angular rock fragments that have pyroclastic flows and rock avalanches as counterpart in nature. We focus on the centre of mass because it provides information about the intrinsic ability of a flow to dissipate more or less energy as a function of its own features. We show that the grain size and flow volume effects can be expressed by a linear relationship between scaling parameters where the finer the grain size or the smaller the flow volume, the more mobile the centre of mass of the granular flow. The grain size effect is the result of the decrease of particle agitation per unit of flow mass, and thus, the decrease of energy dissipation per unit of travel distance, as grain size decreases. In this sense, flows with different grain sizes are like cars with engines with different fuel efficiencies. The volume effect is the result of the fact that the deposit accretes backward during its formation on a slope change (either gradual or abrupt). We adopt for the numerical simulations a 3D discrete element modeling which confirms the grain size and flow volume effects shown by the laboratory experiments. This confirmation is obtained without prior fine tuning of the parameter values to get the desired output. The numerical simulations reveal also that the larger the initial compaction of the granular mass before release, the more mobile the flow. This behaviour must be taken into account to prevent misinterpretation of laboratory and field data. Discrete element modeling predicts the correct effects of grain size and flow volume because it takes into consideration particle interactions that are responsible for the energy dissipated by the flows.

  9. 3D geophysical inversion for contact surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lelièvre, Peter; Farquharson, Colin

    2014-05-01

    Geologists' interpretations about the Earth typically involve distinct rock units with contacts (interfaces) between them. In contrast, standard minimum-structure volumetric inversions (performed on meshes of space-filling cells) recover smooth models inconsistent with such interpretations. There are several approaches through which geophysical inversion can help recover models with the desired characteristics. Some authors have developed iterative strategies in which several volumetric inversions are performed with regularization parameters changing to achieve sharper interfaces at automatically determined locations. Another approach is to redesign the regularization to be consistent with the desired model characteristics, e.g. L1-like norms or compactness measures. A few researchers have taken approaches that limit the recovered values to lie within particular ranges, resulting in sharp discontinuities; these include binary inversion, level set methods and clustering strategies. In most of the approaches mentioned above, the model parameterization considers the physical properties in each of the many space-filling cells within the volume of interest. The exception are level set methods, in which a higher dimensional function is parameterized and the contact surface is determined from the zero-level of that function. However, even level-set methods rely on an underlying volumetric mesh. We are researching a fundamentally different type of inversion that parameterizes the Earth in terms of the contact surfaces between rock units. 3D geological Earth models typically comprise wireframe surfaces of tessellated triangles or other polygonal planar facets. This wireframe representation allows for flexible and efficient generation of complicated geological structures. Therefore, a natural approach for representing a geophysical model in an inversion is to parameterize the wireframe contact surfaces as the coordinates of the nodes (facet vertices). The geological and

  10. Space Geodesy Monitoring Mass Transport in Global Geophysical Fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Benjamin F.

    2004-01-01

    Mass transports occurring in the atmosphere-hydrosphere-cryosphere-solid Earth-core system (the 'global geophysical fluids') are important geophysical phenomena. They occur on all temporal and spatial scales. Examples include air mass and ocean circulations, oceanic and solid tides, hydrological water and idsnow redistribution, mantle processes such as post-glacial rebound, earthquakes and tectonic motions, and core geodynamo activities. The temporal history and spatial pattern of such mass transport are often not amenable to direct observations. Space geodesy techniques, however, have proven to be an effective tool in monitorihg certain direct consequences of the mass transport, including Earth's rotation variations, gravitational field variations, and the geocenter motion. Considerable advances have been made in recent years in observing and understanding of these geodynamic effects. This paper will use several prominent examples to illustrate the triumphs in research over the past years under a 'Moore's law' in space geodesy. New space missions and projects promise to further advance our knowledge about the global mass transports. The latter contributes to our understanding of the geophysical processes that produce and regulate the mass transports, as well as of the solid Earth's response to such changes in terms of Earth's mechanical properties.

  11. Jesuit Geophysical Observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udias, Agustin; Stauder, William

    Jesuits have had ah interest in observing and explaining geophysical phenomena since this religious order, the Society of Jesus, was founded by Ignatius of Loyola in 1540. Three principal factors contributed to this interest: their educational work in colleges and universities, their missionary endeavors to remote lands where they observed interesting and often as yet undocumented natural phenomena, and a network of communication that brought research of other Jesuits readily to their awareness.One of the first and most important Jesuit colleges was the Roman College (today the Gregorian University) founded in 1551 in Rome, which served as a model for many other universities throughout the world. By 1572, Christopher Clavius (1537-1612), professor of mathematics at the Roman College, had already initiated an important tradition of Jesuit research by emphasizing applied mathematics and insisting on the need of serious study of mathematics in the program of studies in the humanities. In 1547 he directed a publication of Euclid's work with commentaries, and published several treatises on mathematics, including Arithmetica Practica [1585], Gnomonicae [1581], and Geometrica Practica [1606]. Clavius was also a Copernican and supported his friend Galileo when he announced the discovery of the satellites of Jupiter.

  12. A ``model`` geophysics program

    SciTech Connect

    Nyquist, J.E.

    1994-03-01

    In 1993, I tested a radio-controlled airplane designed by Jim Walker of Brigham Young University for low-elevation aerial photography. Model-air photography retains most of the advantages of standard aerial photography --- the photographs can be used to detect lineaments, to map roads and buildings, and to construct stereo pairs to measure topography --- and it is far less expensive. Proven applications on the Oak Ridge Reservation include: updating older aerial records to document new construction; using repeated overflights of the same area to capture seasonal changes in vegetation and the effects of major storms; and detecting waste trench boundaries from the color and character of the overlying grass. Aerial photography is only one of many possible applications of radio-controlled aircraft. Currently, I am funded by the Department of Energy`s Office of Technology Development to review the state of the art in microavionics, both military and civilian, to determine ways this emerging technology can be used for environmental site characterization. Being particularly interested in geophysical applications, I am also collaborating with electrical engineers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to design a model plane that will carry a 3-component flux-gate magnetometer and a global positioning system, which I hope to test in the spring of 1994.

  13. Joint inversion of geophysical and hydrological data for improvedsubsurface characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Kowalsky, Michael B.; Chen, Jinsong; Hubbard, Susan S.

    2006-04-03

    Understanding fluid distribution and movement in the subsurface is critical for a variety of subsurface applications, such as remediation of environmental contaminants, sequestration of nuclear waste and CO2, intrusion of saline water into fresh water aquifers, and the production of oil and gas. It is well recognized that characterizing the properties that control fluids in the subsurface with the accuracy and spatial coverage needed to parameterize flow and transport models is challenging using conventional borehole data alone. Integration of conventional borehole data with more spatially extensive geophysical data (obtained from the surface, between boreholes, and from surface to boreholes) shows promise for providing quantitative information about subsurface properties and processes. Typically, estimation of subsurface properties involves a two-step procedure in which geophysical data are first inverted and then integrated with direct measurements and petrophysical relationship information to estimate hydrological parameters. However, errors inherent to geophysical data acquisition and inversion approaches and errors associated with petrophysical relationships can decrease the value of geophysical data in the estimation procedure. In this paper, we illustrate using two examples how joint inversion approaches, or simultaneous inversion of geophysical and hydrological data, offer great potential for overcoming some of these limitations.

  14. Bowel Movement

    MedlinePlus

    A bowel movement is the last stop in the movement of food through your digestive tract. Your stool passes out ... rectum and anus. Another name for stool is feces. It is made of what is left after ...

  15. Magnetic airborne survey - geophysical flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Barros Camara, Erick; Nei Pereira Guimarães, Suze

    2016-06-01

    This paper provides a technical review process in the area of airborne acquisition of geophysical data, with emphasis for magnetometry. In summary, it addresses the calibration processes of geophysical equipment as well as the aircraft to minimize possible errors in measurements. The corrections used in data processing and filtering are demonstrated with the same results as well as the evolution of these techniques in Brazil and worldwide.

  16. Monitoring Vadose Zone Desiccation with Geophysical Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Truex, Michael J.; Johnson, Timothy C.; Strickland, Christopher E.; Peterson, John E.; Hubbard, Susan S.

    2013-05-01

    Soil desiccation was recently field tested as a potential vadose zone remediation technology. Desiccation removes water from the vadose zone and significantly decreases the aqueous-phase permeability of the desiccated zone, thereby decreasing movement of moisture and contaminants. The 2-D and 3-D distribution of moisture content reduction over time provides valuable information for desiccation operations and for determining when treatment goals have been reached. This type of information can be obtained through use of geophysical methods. Neutron moisture logging, cross-hole electrical resistivity tomography, and cross-hole ground penetrating radar approaches were evaluated with respect to their ability to provide effective spatial and temporal monitoring of desiccation during a treatability study conducted in the vadose zone of the DOE Hanford Site in WA.

  17. Planetary Geophysics and Tectonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuber, Maria

    2005-01-01

    The broad objective of this work is to improve understanding of the internal structures and thermal and stress histories of the solid planets by combining results from analytical and computational modeling, and geophysical data analysis of gravity, topography and tectonic surface structures. During the past year we performed two quite independent studies in the attempt to explain the Mariner 10 magnetic observations of Mercury. In the first we revisited the possibility of crustal remanence by studying the conditions under which one could break symmetry inherent in Runcorn's model of a uniformly magnetized shell to produce a remanent signal with a dipolar form. In the second we applied a thin shell dynamo model to evaluate the range of intensity/structure for which such a planetary configuration can produce a dipole field consistent with Mariner 10 results. In the next full proposal cycle we will: (1) develop numerical and analytical and models of thin shell dynamos to address the possible nature of Mercury s present-day magnetic field and the demise of Mars magnetic field; (2) study the effect of degree-1 mantle convection on a core dynamo as relevant to the early magnetic field of Mars; (3) develop models of how the deep mantles of terrestrial planets are perturbed by large impacts and address the consequences for mantle evolution; (4) study the structure, compensation, state of stress, and viscous relaxation of lunar basins, and address implications for the Moon s state of stress and thermal history by modeling and gravity/topography analysis; and (5) use a three-dimensional viscous relaxation model for a planet with generalized vertical viscosity distribution to study the degree-two components of the Moon's topography and gravity fields to constrain the primordial stress state and spatial heterogeneity of the crust and mantle.

  18. A Development of the astronomical teaching materials which raise a student's time and and space concept by using of movement of the Moon, the Earth and the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taketa, I.; Matsumoto, I.

    2013-12-01

    In recent years, such as a return of the asteroid probe in 2010 "Hayabusa", a gold ring solar eclipse in 2012, and solar Face passage of Venus in 2012, there were many astronomical phenomena which pull a not only child but also citizen's interest, and they were greatly reported by the media in Japan. Thus, it is thought that the interest and concern about the universe of a child and a citizen are increasing. However, the earth science contents of a subject, such as the universe in school education are fields that it make comparatively poor at a teacher. So, this research aimed at the Development of the new space education teaching material which is easy to treat the teacher who has consciousness weak to the astronomical field at schools, and raise a child's time and space concepts. We did this research using the following Methods. 1) We carried out the questionnaire to the primary teacher of the Matsue city, and performed the opinion poll to a teacher's astronomical field. 2) We considered the subject on the education of the astronomical teaching materials used now. 3) As mentioned above 1) and 2), We developed the teaching materials which the waxing and waning of the moon based on the acquired content.

  19. SIAM conference on inverse problems: Geophysical applications. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    This conference was the second in a series devoted to a particular area of inverse problems. The theme of this series is to discuss problems of major scientific importance in a specific area from a mathematical perspective. The theme of this symposium was geophysical applications. In putting together the program we tried to include a wide range of mathematical scientists and to interpret geophysics in as broad a sense as possible. Our speaker came from industry, government laboratories, and diverse departments in academia. We managed to attract a geographically diverse audience with participation from five continents. There were talks devoted to seismology, hydrology, determination of the earth`s interior on a global scale as well as oceanographic and atmospheric inverse problems.

  20. Unleashing Geophysics Data with Modern Formats and Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ip, Alex; Brodie, Ross C.; Druken, Kelsey; Bastrakova, Irina; Evans, Ben; Kemp, Carina; Richardson, Murray; Trenham, Claire; Wang, Jingbo; Wyborn, Lesley

    2016-04-01

    Geoscience Australia (GA) is the national steward of large volumes of geophysical data extending over the entire Australasian region and spanning many decades. The volume and variety of data which must be managed, coupled with the increasing need to support machine-to-machine data access, mean that the old "click-and-ship" model delivering data as downloadable files for local analysis is rapidly becoming unviable - a "big data" problem not unique to geophysics. The Australian Government, through the Research Data Services (RDS) Project, recently funded the Australian National Computational Infrastructure (NCI) to organize a wide range of Earth Systems data from diverse collections including geoscience, geophysics, environment, climate, weather, and water resources onto a single High Performance Data (HPD) Node. This platform, which now contains over 10 petabytes of data, is called the National Environmental Research Data Interoperability Platform (NERDIP), and is designed to facilitate broad user access, maximise reuse, and enable integration. GA has contributed several hundred terabytes of geophysical data to the NERDIP. Historically, geophysical datasets have been stored in a range of formats, with metadata of varying quality and accessibility, and without standardised vocabularies. This has made it extremely difficult to aggregate original data from multiple surveys (particularly un-gridded geophysics point/line data) into standard formats suited to High Performance Computing (HPC) environments. To address this, it was decided to use the NERDIP-preferred Hierarchical Data Format (HDF) 5, which is a proven, standard, open, self-describing and high-performance format supported by extensive software tools, libraries and data services. The Network Common Data Form (NetCDF) 4 API facilitates the use of data in HDF5, whilst the NetCDF Climate & Forecasting conventions (NetCDF-CF) further constrain NetCDF4/HDF5 data so as to provide greater inherent interoperability

  1. Geophysical imaging using trans-dimensional trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, Rhys; Sambridge, Malcolm

    2015-11-01

    In geophysical inversion, inferences of Earth's properties from sparse data involve a trade-off between model complexity and the spatial resolving power. A recent Markov chain Monte Carlo (McMC) technique formalized by Green, the so-called trans-dimensional samplers, allows us to sample between these trade-offs and to parsimoniously arbitrate between the varying complexity of candidate models. Here we present a novel framework using trans-dimensional sampling over tree structures. This new class of McMC sampler can be applied to 1-D, 2-D and 3-D Cartesian and spherical geometries. In addition, the basis functions used by the algorithm are flexible and can include more advanced parametrizations such as wavelets, both in Cartesian and Spherical geometries, to permit Bayesian multiscale analysis. This new framework offers greater flexibility, performance and efficiency for geophysical imaging problems than previous sampling algorithms. Thereby increasing the range of applications and in particular allowing extension to trans-dimensional imaging in 3-D. Examples are presented of its application to 2-D seismic and 3-D teleseismic tomography including estimation of uncertainty.

  2. 1994 Geophysical images contest entries sought

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    As part of AGU's 75th Anniversary year, entries are sought for the 1994 Geophysical Images Contest. Over ninety photographs, computer graphics, posters, maps, slides, and videos were submitted in 1993. The winning images were displayed at the AGU Spring Meeting in Baltimore, and again at the Fall Meeting in San Francisco, along with the other images submitted.First place winner in the computer graphics section was “Western Mediterranean Sea Salinity Field,” submitted by Jacques Haus. Honorable Mentions went to Wei-jia Su for “A View of Whole Mantle Heterogeneity” and Toshiro Tanimoto, Paul Morin, David Yuen, and Yu-Shen Zhang for “Visualization of the Earth's Upper Mantle.”

  3. A study of the expected effects of latitude-dependent rotation rate on laboratory geophysical flow experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geisler, J. E.; Fowlis, W. W.

    1979-01-01

    Results of a theoretical model study of some of the expected effects of spherical geometry on laboratory simulations of the type of geophysical flow that dominates the general circulation of the earth's troposphere are reported.

  4. Integrated Geophysical Methods Applied to Geotechnical and Geohazard Engineering: From Qualitative to Quantitative Analysis and Interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, K.

    2014-12-01

    The Near-Surface is a region of day-to-day human activity on the earth. It is exposed to the natural phenomena which sometimes cause disasters. This presentation covers a broad spectrum of the geotechnical and geohazard ways of mitigating disaster and conserving the natural environment using geophysical methods and emphasizes the contribution of geophysics to such issues. The presentation focusses on the usefulness of geophysical surveys in providing information to mitigate disasters, rather than the theoretical details of a particular technique. Several techniques are introduced at the level of concept and application. Topics include various geohazard and geoenvironmental applications, such as for earthquake disaster mitigation, preventing floods triggered by tremendous rain, for environmental conservation and studying the effect of global warming. Among the geophysical techniques, the active and passive surface wave, refraction and resistivity methods are mainly highlighted. Together with the geophysical techniques, several related issues, such as performance-based design, standardization or regularization, internet access and databases are also discussed. The presentation discusses the application of geophysical methods to engineering investigations from non-uniqueness point of view and introduces the concepts of integrated and quantitative. Most geophysical analyses are essentially non-unique and it is very difficult to obtain unique and reliable engineering solutions from only one geophysical method (Fig. 1). The only practical way to improve the reliability of investigation is the joint use of several geophysical and geotechnical investigation methods, an integrated approach to geophysics. The result of a geophysical method is generally vague, here is a high-velocity layer, it may be bed rock, this low resistivity section may contain clayey soils. Such vague, qualitative and subjective interpretation is not worthwhile on general engineering design works

  5. A New Social Contract for Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malone, T. F.

    2002-12-01

    The Golden Age for geophysical research that followed the IGY set the stage for a new era of interaction among science, technology, and society. World population and the average economic productivity of individuals have both continued to grow exponentially during the past 50 years with the result that by the 1980s the demands of the human economy on the finite renewable resources of planet Earth were approximately equal to the natural regenerative capacities of planetary ecosystems. These demands are now "overshooting" those regenerative powers by about 20 per cent (1). The result could be a collapse in the life-supporting capacity of global ecosystems during coming decades, with tragic implications for civilized society. Novel modes of collaboration among all disciplines and all sectors of society are urgently needed to transform a potential catastrophe into the attractive vision that is now within reach as a result of rapidly expanding human knowledge, emerging technologies for sharing that knowledge (2), and the set of ethical principles for sustainable development contained in the Earth Charter (3). This prospect challenges geophysicists and scholars in all disciplines to forge a new and broadly based contract with society (4). 1. Wackernagel M. et al. 2002. "Tracking the ecological overshoot of the human economy." Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, Vol. 99, Issue 14, 9266-9271, July 9. 2. Malone T. and Yohe G. 2002. "Knowledge partnerships for a sustainable, equitable, and stable society." J. of Knowledge Management, Vol. 6, No. 4, October (in press). 3. www.earthcharter.org 4. Malone T. 1997. "Building on the legacies of the Intenational Geophysical Year." Transactions, AGU, Vol.78, No. 15, pp. 185-191.

  6. Geophysical weight loss diet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schatten, Kenneth

    1984-04-01

    Having for numerous reasons acquired a three digit kilogram mass, the author is experienced at the painful struggles that the gourmand must suffer to reduce weight, particularly if he/she enjoys reasonably large amounts of good food. To the avant-garde geophysicist, utilizing the following approach could be pleasurable, rewarding, and may even enable the accomplishment of what Ghengis Khan, Alexander the Great, Napolean, and Hitler could not!The basic approach is the full utilization of Newton's formula for the attraction of two massive bodies: F=GM1M2/r2, where G, is the gravitational constant; r, the distance between the two bodies; and M1 and M2, the masses of the two bodies. Although one usually chooses M1 to be the earth's mass ME and M2 to be the mass of a small object, this unnecessarily restricts the realm of phenomena. The less restrictive assumption is M1 + M2 = ME.

  7. The Expanding Marketplace for Applied Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, N.; Sirles, P.

    2012-12-01

    While the image of geophysics for the proverbial "layman" often seems limited to volcanoes and earthquakes, and to the geoscientist this image enlarges to include oil or minerals exploration and whole earth studies, there has been a steady increase in the application of geophysics into the realm of "daily life", such as real estate deals, highway infrastructure, and flood protection. This expansion of applications can be attributed to the improved economics from advances in equipment and interpretation. Traditional geophysical methods that at one time often only fit within the budgets of oil, gas, and minerals exploration programs can now be economically applied to much smaller scale needs like contaminant mapping, landfill delineation, and levee investigations. A real-world, economic example of this expanding marketplace is our company, which began very small and was aimed almost exclusively at the minerals exploration market. Most of our growth has been in the last 10 years, when we have expanded to five offices and a staff with almost 40 geoscientist degrees (21 in geophysics); much of this growth has been in the non-oil, non-minerals arenas. While much of our work still includes minerals exploration, other projects this year include wind-farm foundation studies, cavity detection above underground nuclear tests, landfill studies, acid mine drainage problems, and leaks in evaporation ponds. A methodology example of this expanding market is the induced polarization (IP) survey, once primarily used for minerals exploration, particularly large porphyry copper deposits, but now efficient enough to also use in environmental studies. The IP method has been particularly useful in delineating and characterizing old, poorly documented landfills, and recent research suggests it may also be useful in monitoring the accelerated biodegradation processes used in some cases to rehabilitate the sites. Compared to temperature monitoring systems, IP may be more useful in providing

  8. Geophysical subsurface imaging and interface identification.

    SciTech Connect

    Pendley, Kevin; Bochev, Pavel Blagoveston; Day, David Minot; Robinson, Allen Conrad; Weiss, Chester Joseph

    2005-09-01

    Electromagnetic induction is a classic geophysical exploration method designed for subsurface characterization--in particular, sensing the presence of geologic heterogeneities and fluids such as groundwater and hydrocarbons. Several approaches to the computational problems associated with predicting and interpreting electromagnetic phenomena in and around the earth are addressed herein. Publications resulting from the project include [31]. To obtain accurate and physically meaningful numerical simulations of natural phenomena, computational algorithms should operate in discrete settings that reflect the structure of governing mathematical models. In section 2, the extension of algebraic multigrid methods for the time domain eddy current equations to the frequency domain problem is discussed. Software was developed and is available in Trilinos ML package. In section 3 we consider finite element approximations of De Rham's complex. We describe how to develop a family of finite element spaces that forms an exact sequence on hexahedral grids. The ensuing family of non-affine finite elements is called a van Welij complex, after the work [37] of van Welij who first proposed a general method for developing tangentially and normally continuous vector fields on hexahedral elements. The use of this complex is illustrated for the eddy current equations and a conservation law problem. Software was developed and is available in the Ptenos finite element package. The more popular methods of geophysical inversion seek solutions to an unconstrained optimization problem by imposing stabilizing constraints in the form of smoothing operators on some enormous set of model parameters (i.e. ''over-parametrize and regularize''). In contrast we investigate an alternative approach whereby sharp jumps in material properties are preserved in the solution by choosing as model parameters a modest set of variables which describe an interface between adjacent regions in physical space. While

  9. An index of geophysical well logging in Virginia by the U.S. Geological Survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mulheren, M. Patrick; Larson, J.D.; Hopkins, Herbert T.

    1982-01-01

    Geophysical logs have been obtained in more than 170 wells in Virginia by the U.S. Geological Survey since 1968. These logs include natural gamma, electric, caliper, temperature, fluid conductivity, and fluid velocity. Most of the logs are for wells in the Coastal Plain Province of eastern Virginia. Geophysical logs aid in the interpretation of properties of earth materials, including the capacity to store and transmit water in the immediate vicinity of the well bore.

  10. Movement - uncontrolled or slow

    MedlinePlus

    Dystonia; Involuntary slow and twisting movements; Choreoathetosis; Leg and arm movements - uncontrollable; Arm and leg movements - uncontrollable; Slow involuntary movements of large muscle groups; Athetoid movements

  11. [Stereotypic movements].

    PubMed

    Fernández-Alvarez, E

    2003-02-01

    Stereotypic movements are repetitive patterns of movement with certain peculiar features that make them especially interesting. Their physiopathology and their relationship with the neurobehavioural disorders they are frequently associated with are unknown. In this paper our aim is to offer a simple analysis of their dominant characteristics, their differentiation from other processes and a hypothesis of the properties of stereotypic movements, which could all set the foundations for research work into their physiopathology.

  12. Object Storage for Geophysical Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habermann, T.; Readey, J.

    2015-12-01

    Object storage systems (such as Amazon S3 or Ceph) have been shown to be cost-effective and highly scalable for data repositories in the Petabyte range and larger. However traditionally data storage used for geophysical software systems has centered on file-based systems and libraries such as NetCDF and HDF5. In this session we'll discuss the advantages and challenges of moving to an object store-based model for geophysical data. We'll review a proposed model for a geophysical data service that provides an API-compatible library for traditional NetCDF and HDF5 applications while providing high scalability and performance. One further advantage of this approach is that any dataset or dataset selection can be referenced as a URI. By using versioning, the data the URI references can be guaranteed to be unmodified, thus enabling reproducibility of referenced data.

  13. Geophysics Fatally Flawed by False Fundamental Philosophy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, L. S.

    2004-05-01

    volcanoes, that enable planetary expansion the same way cranial sutures permit human skulls to grow to maturity. Expansion is shown by the Asian and Australian trenches, from Kamchatka to the Marianas, and from Samoa to the tip of Macquarie Ridge south of New Zealand, that are mirror images of the western coasts of North and South America. This is clear evidence neither the Atlantic nor the Pacific Ocean existed 250 Ma when Earth was much smaller. In just 250 Ma external accretion and internal core expansion increased Earth's diameter from 7640 km to 12,735 km and increased total surface area to 361,060,000 sq. km, the area occupied by today's oceans-oceans that did not exist 250 Ma when Earth was slightly larger than Mars is today \\(6787 km\\). The fallacy of the nebular hypothesis did not become apparent until after Oliver and Isacks introduced the concept of subduction in 1967. Subduction was based on the false assumption that Earth's diameter is constant and unchanging, and spawned the theory of Plate Tectonics that "revolutionized" geophysics in a short period of time-a "revolution" destined for failure. Evidence is presented showing all solar bodies originate as comets \\(fragments of supernovae explosions\\) captured by the Sun that become meteoroids or asteroids by external accretion of meteorites and dust from over 370 known meteor streams.\\(Terentjeva, 1964\\) Accreation replaces the nebular hypothesis and rejuvenates Carey's Earth Expansion theory that, unfortunately, was pushed aside by plate tectonics because it lacked a plausible mechanism. However, expansion carries an ultimate threat to Mankind's tenure on Earth and exploration of Mars as the future home of Mankind takes on added significance.

  14. A Unified Global Reference Frame of Vertical Crustal Movements by Satellite Laser Ranging.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xinhui; Wang, Ren; Sun, Fuping; Wang, Jinling

    2016-01-01

    Crustal movement is one of the main factors influencing the change of the Earth system, especially in its vertical direction, which affects people's daily life through the frequent occurrence of earthquakes, geological disasters, and so on. In order to get a better study and application of the vertical crustal movement,as well as its changes, the foundation and prerequisite areto devise and establish its reference frame; especially, a unified global reference frame is required. Since SLR (satellite laser ranging) is one of the most accurate space techniques for monitoring geocentric motion and can directly measure the ground station's geocentric coordinates and velocities relative to the centre of the Earth's mass, we proposed to take the vertical velocity of the SLR technique in the ITRF2008 framework as the reference frame of vertical crustal motion, which we defined as the SLR vertical reference frame (SVRF). The systematic bias between other velocity fields and the SVRF was resolved by using the GPS (Global Positioning System) and VLBI (very long baseline interferometry) velocity observations, and the unity of other velocity fields and SVRF was realized,as well. The results show that it is feasible and suitable to take the SVRF as a reference frame, which has both geophysical meanings and geodetic observations, so we recommend taking the SLR vertical velocity under ITRF2008 as the global reference frame of vertical crustal movement. PMID:26867197

  15. News and Views: CSR: the devil will be in the detail; MPs invite researchers to show off success; Earthquake movies reveal ground movements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-12-01

    The UK Government's Comprehensive Spending Review set out a distinctly tighter budget all round in October, but science funding as a whole was not as badly cut as some had feared. What this means for astronomy, planetary science and geophysics remains to be seen, as individual research council allocations have yet to be agreed. Early-career researchers with results to shout about have the opportunity to display and discuss their work at the House of Commons next year, as part of the SET for Britain event on 14 March. Seismology took a great step forward when international cooperation at the time of International Geophysical Year 1957/8 meant that earth movements resulting from quakes could be compared worldwide.

  16. Fiber Optic Geophysics Sensor Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grochowski, Lucjan

    1989-01-01

    The distributed optical sensor arrays are analysed in view of specific needs of 3-D seismic explorations methods. There are compared advantages and disadventages of arrays supported by the sensors which are modulated in intensity and phase. In these systems all-fiber optic structures and their compabilities with digital geophysic formats are discussed. It was shown that the arrays based on TDM systems with the intensity modulated sensors are economically and technically the best matched for geophysic systems supported by a large number of the sensors.

  17. Satellite gravity gradient grids for geophysics.

    PubMed

    Bouman, Johannes; Ebbing, Jörg; Fuchs, Martin; Sebera, Josef; Lieb, Verena; Szwillus, Wolfgang; Haagmans, Roger; Novak, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    The Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) satellite aimed at determining the Earth's mean gravity field. GOCE delivered gravity gradients containing directional information, which are complicated to use because of their error characteristics and because they are given in a rotating instrument frame indirectly related to the Earth. We compute gravity gradients in grids at 225 km and 255 km altitude above the reference ellipsoid corresponding to the GOCE nominal and lower orbit phases respectively, and find that the grids may contain additional high-frequency content compared with GOCE-based global models. We discuss the gradient sensitivity for crustal depth slices using a 3D lithospheric model of the North-East Atlantic region, which shows that the depth sensitivity differs from gradient to gradient. In addition, the relative signal power for the individual gradient component changes comparing the 225 km and 255 km grids, implying that using all components at different heights reduces parameter uncertainties in geophysical modelling. Furthermore, since gravity gradients contain complementary information to gravity, we foresee the use of the grids in a wide range of applications from lithospheric modelling to studies on dynamic topography, and glacial isostatic adjustment, to bedrock geometry determination under ice sheets.

  18. The Global Geophysical Fluids Center of IERS (and its Special Bureau for Mantle)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, B. F.

    2002-12-01

    The Global Geophysical Fluids Center (GGFC) was established by the International Earth Rotation Service (IERS) on IERS's 10th anniversary day January 1, 1998, in an effort to expand IERS's services to the scientific community. Under the GGFC, eight Special Bureaus (SB) have been selected, each to be responsible for research and data service activities pertaining to mass transports and related geophysical processes in specific components of the Earth system, or "global geophysical fluids," including the atmosphere, oceans, solid Earth, core, and geophysical processes of gravity, loading, tides and hydrological cycles. GGFC and the SBs have the responsibility of supporting, facilitating, and providing services to the worldwide research community, in areas related to the variations in Earth rotation, gravity field and geocenter that are caused by mass transport in the global geophysical fluids. These minute variations have been observed by various space geodetic techniques, as effective remote sensing tools, with ever increasing precision/accuracy and temporal/spatial resolution. The GGFC and SBs have organized dedicated workshops and special sessions at international conferences, published articles, and held regular business meetings. The SBs maintain individual website for data services and information exchanges. See URL bowie.gsfc.nasa.gov/ggfc/. In particular, the SB for Mantle focuses on large-scale mass redistributions that occur in the mantle in association with various dynamic processes, including seismic activities, the post-glacial rebound, and mantle convections.

  19. The Global Geophysical Fluids Center of IERS (and its Special Bureau for Mantle)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Benjamin F.

    2002-01-01

    The Global Geophysical Fluids Center (GGFC) was established by the International Earth Rotation Service (IERS) on IERS's 10th anniversary day January 1, 1998, in an effort to expand IERS's services to the scientific community. Under the GGFC, eight Special Bureaus (SB) have been selected, each to be responsible for research and data service activities pertaining to mass transports and related geophysical processes in specific components of the Earth system, or "global geophysical fluids," including the atmosphere, oceans, solid Earth, core, and geophysical processes of gravity, loading, tides and hydrological cycles. GGFC and the SBs have the responsibility of supporting, facilitating, and providing services to the worldwide research community, in areas related to the variations in Earth rotation, gravity field and geocenter that are caused by mass transport in the global geophysical fluids. These minute variations have been observed by various space geodetic techniques, as effective remote sensing tools, with ever increasing precision/accuracy and temporal/spatial resolution. The GGFC and SBs have organized dedicated workshops and special sessions at international conferences, published articles, and held regular business meetings. The SBs also maintain individual website for data services and information exchanges. See URL . In particular, the SB for Mantle focuses on large-scale mass redistributions that occur in the mantle in association with various dynamic processes, including seismic activities, the post-glacial rebound, and mantle convections.

  20. Guided earth boring tool

    SciTech Connect

    Mc Donald, W.J.; Pittard, G.T.; Maurer, W.C.; Wasson, M.R.; Herben, W.C.

    1987-09-22

    A controllable tool for drilling holes in the earth is described comprising a hollow elongated rigid supporting drill pipe having a forward end for entering the earth, means supporting the drill pipe for earth boring or piercing movement, including means for moving the drill pipe longitudinally for penetrating the earth, the drill pipe moving means being constructed to permit addition and removal of supporting drill pipe during earth penetrating operation, a boring mole supported on the forward end of the hollow low drill pipe comprising a cylindrical housing supported on and open to the forward end of the drill pipe, a first means on the front end for applying a boring force to the soil comprising an anvil having a striking surface inside the housing and a boring surface outside the housing, a second means comprising a reciprocally movable hammer positioned in the housing to apply a percussive force to the anvil striking surface for transmitting a percussive force to the boring force applying means, and means permitting introduction of air pressure supplied through the hollow pipe into the housing for operating the hammer and for discharging spent air from the housing to the hole being bored, and the tool being operable to penetrate the earth upon longitudinal movement of the drill rod by the longitudinal rod moving means and operation of the mole by reciprocal movement of the hammer.

  1. Earth Sciences annual report, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Younker, L.W.; Donohue, M.L.; Peterson, S.J.

    1988-12-01

    The Earth Sciences Department at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory conducts work in support of the Laboratory's energy, defense, and research programs. The Department is organized into ten groups. Five of these -- Nuclear Waste Management, Fossil Energy, Containment, Verification, and Research -- represent major programmatic activities within the Department. Five others -- Experimental Geophysics, Geomechanics, Geology/Geological Engineering, Geochemistry, and Seismology/Applied Geophysics -- are major disciplinary areas that support these and other laboratory programs. This report summarizes work carried out in 1987 by each group and contains a bibliography of their 1987 publications.

  2. BROADBAND DIGITAL GEOPHYSICAL TELEMETRY SYSTEM.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Seeley, Robert L.; Daniels, Jeffrey J.

    1984-01-01

    A system has been developed to simultaneously sample and transmit digital data from five remote geophysical data receiver stations to a control station that processes, displays, and stores the data. A microprocessor in each remote station receives commands from the control station over a single telemetry channel.

  3. Geophysical applications of satellite altimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Sandwell, D.T. )

    1991-01-01

    Publications related to geophysical applications of Seasat and Geosat altimetry are reviewed for the period 1987-1990. Problems discussed include geoid and gravity errors, regional geoid heights and gravity anomalies, local gravity field/flexure, plate tectonics, and gridded geoid heights/gravity anomalies. 99 refs.

  4. The Geophysical Revolution in Geology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Peter J.

    1980-01-01

    Discussed is the physicists' impact on the revolution in the earth sciences particularly involving the overthrow of the fixist notions in geology. Topics discussed include the mobile earth, the route to plate tectonics, radiometric dating, the earth's magnetic field, ocean floor spreading plate boundaries, infiltration of physics into geology and…

  5. A survey of the theory of the Earth's rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cannon, W. H.

    1981-01-01

    The theory of the Earth's rotation and the geophysical phenomena affecting it is examined. First principles are reviewed and the problem of polar motion and UT1 variations is formulated in considerable generality and detail. The effects of Earth deformations and the solid Earth tides are analyzed.

  6. Fault Zones from Top to Bottom: A Geophysical Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mooney, W.; Beroza, G.; Kind, R.

    2006-12-01

    Geophysical studies of the Earth's crust, including fault zones, have greatly developed over the past 80 years. Among the first methods to be employed, seismic refraction and reflection profiles were recorded in the North American Gulf Coast to detect salt domes which were known to trap hydrocarbons. Seismic methods continue to be the most important geophysical technique in use today due to the methods' relatively high accuracy, high resolution, and great depth of penetration. However, in the past decade, a much expanded repertoire of seismic and non-seismic techniques have been brought to bear on studies of the Earth's crust and uppermost mantle. Important insights have also been obtained using seismic tomography, measurements of seismic anisotropy, fault zone guided waves, borehole surveys, and geo-electrical, magnetic, and gravity methods. In this paper we briefly review recent geophysical progress in the study of the structure and internal properties of faults zones, from their surface exposures to their lower limit. We focus on the structure of faults within continental crystalline and competent sedimentary rock rather than within the overlying, poorly consolidated sedimentary rocks. We find that 1) The width of the fault damage zone is proportional to total fault offset, 2) Large strike-slip faults have vertical low-velocity, high-conductivity zones, 3) Anomalous fault zone properties undergo temporal "healing" after a large earthquake, and 4) Fault zones can either act as a fluid conduit or an impermeable barrier, depending on composition and history.

  7. GEOPHYSICS: Enhanced: A Strained Earth, Past and Present.

    PubMed

    Ramsay, J G

    2000-06-23

    Plate tectonics leads to deformation within converging or transforming plates, but the rates at which this happens are difficult to evaluate. In this Perspective, Ramsay highlights a new technique reported by Müller et al. for overcoming this problem in past and present mountain-building regions, which have particularly complex deformation patterns. PMID:17758905

  8. Geophysical Institute. Biennial report, 1993-1994

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-01

    The 1993-1994 Geophysical Institute Biennial Report was published in November 1995 by the Geophysical Institute of the University of Alaska Fairbanks. It contains an overview of the Geophysical Institute, the Director`s Note, and research presentations concerning the following subjects: Scientific Predictions, Space Physics, Atmospheric Sciences, Snow, Ice and Permafrost, Tectonics and Sedimentation, Seismology, Volcanology, Remote Sensing, and other projects.

  9. Geophysical Institute. Biennial report, 1993-1994

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-01

    The 1993-1994 Geophysical Institute Biennial Report was published in November 1995 by the Geophysical Institute of the University of Alaska Fairbanks. It contains an overview of the Geophysical Institute, the Director`s Note, and research presentations concerning the following subjects: scientific predictions, space physics, atmospheric sciences, snow, ice and permafrost, tectonics and sedimentation, seismology, volcanology, remote sensing, and other projects.

  10. Satellite-tracking and earth-dynamics research programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The activities and progress in the satellite tracking and earth dynamics research during the first half of calendar year 1975 are described. Satellite tracking network operations, satellite geodesy and geophysics programs, GEOS 3 project support, and atmospheric research are covered.

  11. Earth Sciences Division annual report 1981. [Lead abstract

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-09-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the 59 papers of the 1981 annual report of the Earth Sciences Division at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The general topics covered included nuclear waste isolation, geophysics and reservoir engineering, and geosciences. (KRM)

  12. Decadal variations in geophysical processes and asymmetries in the solar motion about the Solar System's barycentre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorenkov, Nikolay; Wilson, Ian; Khlystov, Anatoly

    2010-05-01

    transferred to the Sun, and then back from it to all of the other planets. In other words, the Sun acts as a re-transmitter of gravitational motion over all of the solar system. 2) Activization of similar physical processes should take place simultaneously on all bodies in the solar system. Support for the last conclusion comes from the investigation of link between the most severe droughts on the Earth and powerful dust storms on Mars (Khlystov, 1995). Ian Wilson et al. (2008) presented evidence that claimed that changes in the Sun's equatorial rotation rate are synchronized with changes in the Sun's orbital motion about the barycentre of the Solar System. This paper showed that the recent maximum asymmetries in the Solar motion about the barycentre have occurred in the years 1865, 1900, 1934, 1970 and 2007. These years closely match the points of inflection in the Earth's LOD. In addition, Ian Wilson (Sidorenkov and Wilson 2009) shows that, from 1700 to 2000 A.D., on every occasion where the Sun has experienced a maximum in the asymmetry of its motion about the centre-of-mass of the Solar System, the Earth has also experienced a significant deviation in its rotation rate (i.e. LOD) from that expected from the long-term trends. This fact indicates that the changes in the Earth's rotation rate are synchronized with a phenomenon that is linked to the changes in the solar motion about the barycentre of the Solar System. Thus from the empirical data, we argue that there is compelling evidence to support the idea that these correlations are due to the shared motion of the Sun and Earth about the barycentre of the Solar System. We show that asymmetries in this shared motion lead to the decadal fluctuations in the climatologically and geophysical processes, including long term changes in the Earth's rotation rate. REFERENCES 1. Khlystov A.I., V.P.Dolgachev, and L.M.Domozhilova (1992). Barycentric movement of the Sun and Solar-Terrestrial relations, Biophysics, vol. 37, No 3, 455

  13. The Emergence of Geophysics in Nineteenth Century Britain.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushner, David S.

    1990-01-01

    Three central interdisciplinary problems were crucial to the coalescence of a nascent community of scientists in Victorian Britain that was concerned specifically with questions about the nature and history of the earth as a physical body. These were (1) the structure of the earth and the thickness of its crust, (2) the age of the earth, and (3) the astronomical and physical causes of glacial epochs, or ice ages. This thesis concentrates on a particular interdisciplinary approach to these problems that explicitly sought to apply the techniques and methods of mathematical physics to the concerns of geology. The result was a new strand of applied mathematics and physics of the earth that was denominated 'physical geology' or 'terrestrial physics,' and eventually 'geophysics.' The thesis analyzes the mathematical foundations of this new strand and its evolving relationship with the parent disciplines, culminating in the transformation of the new field in the hands of Sir George Darwin, son of Charles, through his own brand of applied mathematics. The central historiographical aim is to analyze the dynamics of controversy and its role in the formation of the new discipline of geophysics. The origins of the field are traced to the researches of William Hopkins (c. 1840) on the phenomenon of precession to determine the thickness of the earth's crust. These are followed through to the 1860s research program of William Thomson (later Lord Kelvin) in terrestrial physics, wherein various concerns were tied together, notably the effective tidal rigidity of the earth and arguments to limit the earth's age, especially on the basis of tidal retardation. George Darwin's mathematical program, sparked by efforts to use polar wandering to explain glacial epochs, elaborated an entire theory of tidal evolution that explained the earth's physical history, including the obliquity of the ecliptic and the fissipartition of the moon. By the mid-1880s Darwin had bound together all three of

  14. Movement - uncoordinated

    MedlinePlus

    Lack of coordination; Loss of coordination; Coordination impairment; Ataxia; Clumsiness; Uncoordinated movement ... are passed through families (such as congenital cerebellar ataxia, Friedreich ataxia , ataxia - telangiectasia , or Wilson disease ) Multiple ...

  15. Psychogenic Movement

    MedlinePlus

    ... also look for marked improvement in symptoms following psychotherapy, use of a placebo (a medicine with no ... multi-therapy approach to treating psychogenic movement includes psychotherapy, placebo, or suggestion; antidepressants for symptoms related to ...

  16. Geophysical monitoring of a field-scale biostimulation pilot project.

    PubMed

    Lane, John W; Day-Lewis, Frederick D; Casey, Clifton C

    2006-01-01

    The USGS conducted a geophysical investigation in support of a U.S. Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Southern Division field-scale biostimulation pilot project at Anoka County Riverfront Park (ACP), down-gradient of the Naval Industrial Reserve Ordnance Plant, Fridley, Minnesota. The goal of the pilot project is to evaluate subsurface injection of vegetable oil emulsion (VOE) to stimulate microbial degradation of chlorinated hydrocarbons. To monitor the emplacement and movement of the VOE and changes in water chemistry resulting from VOE dissolution and/or enhanced biological activity, the USGS acquired cross-hole radar zero-offset profiles, travel-time tomograms, and borehole geophysical logs during five site visits over 1.5 years. Analysis of pre- and postinjection data sets using petrophysical models developed to estimate VOE saturation and changes in total dissolved solids provides insights into the spatial and temporal distribution of VOE and ground water with altered chemistry. Radar slowness-difference tomograms and zero-offset slowness profiles indicate that the VOE remained close to the injection wells, whereas radar attenuation profiles and electromagnetic induction logs indicate that bulk electrical conductivity increased down-gradient of the injection zone, diagnostic of changing water chemistry. Geophysical logs indicate that some screened intervals were located above or below zones of elevated dissolved solids; hence, the geophysical data provide a broader context for interpretation of water samples and evaluation of the biostimulation effort. Our results include (1) demonstration of field and data analysis methods for geophysical monitoring of VOE biostimulation and (2) site-specific insights into the spatial and temporal distributions of VOE at the ACP.

  17. Geophysical monitoring of a field-scale biostimulation pilot project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lane, J.W.; Day-Lewis, F. D.; Casey, C.C.

    2006-01-01

    The USGS conducted a geophysical investigation in support of a U.S. Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Southern Division field-scale biostimulation pilot project at Anoka County Riverfront Park (ACP), downgradient of the Naval Industrial Reserve Ordnance Plant, Fridley, Minnesota. The goal of the pilot project is to evaluate subsurface injection of vegetable oil emulsion (VOE) to stimulate microbial degradation of chlorinated hydrocarbons. To monitor the emplacement and movement of the VOE and changes in water chemistry resulting from VOE dissolution and/or enhanced biological activity, the USGS acquired cross-hole radar zero-offset profiles, traveltime tomograms, and borehole geophysical logs during five site visits over 1.5 years. Analysis of pre- and postinjection data sets using petrophysical models developed to estimate VOE saturation and changes in total dissolved solids provides insights into the spatial and temporal distribution of VOE and ground water with altered chemistry. Radar slowness-difference tomograms and zero-offset slowness profiles indicate that the VOE remained close to the injection wells, whereas radar attenuation profiles and electromagnetic induction logs indicate that bulk electrical conductivity increased downgradient of the injection zone, diagnostic of changing water chemistry. Geophysical logs indicate that some screened intervals were located above or below zones of elevated dissolved solids; hence, the geophysical data provide a broader context for interpretation of water samples and evaluation of the biostimulation effort. Our results include (1) demonstration of field and data analysis methods for geophysical monitoring of VOE biostimulation and (2) site-specific insights into the spatial and temporal distributions of VOE at the ACP. ?? 2006 National Ground Water Association.

  18. Relations of PC indices to further geophysical activity parameters.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stauning, P.

    2012-04-01

    The Polar Cap (PC) indices, PCN for the index values derived from Thule magnetic data and PCS derived from Vostok data, relate to the polar cap ionospheric plasma convection driven mainly by the interaction of the solar wind with the magnetosphere. Thus, the PC indices serve to monitor the input power from the solar wind which drives a range of geophysical disturbances such as magnetic storms and substorms, energization of the plasma trapped in the Earth's near space, auroral activity, and heating of the upper atmosphere. The presentation will demonstrate the relations between the PC indices and further parameters and indices used to describe geophysical activity such as polar cap potentials, auroral electrojet activity, Joule and particle heating of the upper atmosphere, mid-latitude magnetic variations, and ring current indices Dst, SYM-H and ASY-H.

  19. Alternative experiments using the geophysical fluid flow cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, J. E.

    1984-01-01

    This study addresses the possibility of doing large scale dynamics experiments using the Geophysical Fluid Flow Cell. In particular, cases where the forcing generates a statically stable stratification almost everywhere in the spherical shell are evaluated. This situation is typical of the Earth's atmosphere and oceans. By calculating the strongest meridional circulation expected in the spacelab experiments, and testing its stability using quasi-geostrophic stability theory, it is shown that strongly nonlinear baroclinic waves on a zonally symmetric modified thermal wind will not occur. The Geophysical Fluid Flow Cell does not have a deep enough fluid layer to permit useful studies of large scale planetary wave processes arising from instability. It is argued, however, that by introducing suitable meridional barriers, a significant contribution to the understanding of the oceanic thermocline problem could be made.

  20. NASA Earth Science Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komar, G.

    2004-12-01

    Many promising remote sensing technologies and systems of space-based observations will be bringing scientific data and observations to Earth scientists in the next 5 to 10 years. These include instruments such as passive and active microwave and optical sensors for measuring geophysical parameters of the atmosphere, the seas and the land masses. Also, advanced information systems will be storing, processing and transmitting data collected from spaced based sensors so that massive amounts of data will be available for scientists to analyze and include in their models. This talk will describe the direction NASA is taking in instrument and information system technology through its investments.

  1. NASA Earth Science Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komar, G.

    2007-12-01

    Many promising remote sensing technologies and systems of space-based observations will be bringing scientific data and observations to Earth scientists in the next 5 to 10 years. These include instruments such as passive and active microwave and optical sensors for measuring geophysical parameters of the atmosphere, the seas and the land masses. Also, advanced information systems will be storing, processing and transmitting data collected from spaced based sensors so that massive amounts of data will be available for scientists to analyze and include in their models. This talk will describe the direction NASA is taking in instrument and information system technology through its investments.

  2. Smith heads Reviews of Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    On January 1, Jim Smith began his term as editor-in-chief of Reviews of Geophysics. As editor-in-chief, he leads the board of editors in enhancing the journal's role as an integrating force in the geophysical sciences by providing timely overviews of current research and its trends. Smith is already beginning to fulfill the journal's role of providing review papers on topics of broad interest to Union members as well as the occasional definitive review paper on selected topics of narrower focus. Smith will lead the editorial board until December 31, 2000. Michael Coffey, Tommy Dickey, James Horwitz, Roelof Snieder, and Thomas Torgersen have been appointed as editors to serve with Smith. At least one more editor will be named to round out the disciplinary expertise on the board.

  3. New Geophysical Observatory in Uruguay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez Bettucci, L.; Nuñez, P.; Caraballo, R. R.; Ogando, R.

    2013-05-01

    In 2011 began the installation of the first geophysical observatory in Uruguay, with the aim of developing the Geosciences. The Astronomical and Geophysical Observatory Aiguá (OAGA) is located within the Cerro Catedral Tourist Farm (-34 ° 20 '0 .89 "S/-54 ° 42 '44.72" W, h: 270m). This has the distinction of being located in the center of the South Atlantic Magnetic Anomaly. Geologically is emplaced in a Neoproterozoic basement, in a region with scarce anthropogenic interference. The OAGA has, since 2012, with a GSM-90FD dIdD v7.0 and GSM-90F Overhauser, both of GEM Systems. In addition has a super-SID receiver provided by the Stanford University SOLAR Center, as a complement for educational purposes. Likewise the installation of a seismograph REF TEK-151-120A and VLF antenna is being done since the beginning of 2013.

  4. Geophysical investigations at Momotombo, Nicaragua

    SciTech Connect

    Cordon, U.J.; Zurflueh, E.G.

    1980-09-01

    The Momotombo geothermal field in Nicaragua was investigated in three exploration stages, using a number of geophysical techniques. Stage 1 of the investigations by Texas Instruments, Inc., (1970) located and delineated a potential geothermal field, with the dipole mapping surveys and electromagnetic soundings being most effective. Stage 2 of the investigations, performed in 1973 by the United Nations Development Program (UNDP), outlined the resistivity anomalies in the area west of the previously selected field; Schlumberger VES soundings and constant depth profiling (SCDP) proved most useful. During Stage 3 of the investigations, Electroconsult (ELC) performed 20 additional Schlumberger VES soundings as part of the 1975 plant feasibility studies. Results of these geophysical techniques are summarized and their effectiveness briefly discussed.

  5. Polar Misunderstandings: Earth's Dynamic Dynamo

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiSpezio, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses the movement of Earth's north and south poles. The Earth's poles may be a bit more complex and dynamic than what many students and teachers believe. With better understanding, offer them up as a rich landscape for higher-level critical analysis and subject integration. Possible curriculum tie-ins include magnets, Earth…

  6. Europa Geophysical Explorer Mission Concept Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, J. R.; Abelson, R. D.; Smythe, W.; Spilker, T. R.; Shirley, J. H.

    2005-12-01

    The Strategic Road Map for Solar System Exploration recommended in May 2005 that NASA implement the Europa Geophysical Explorer (EGE) as a Flagship mission early in the next decade. This supported the recommendations of the National Research Council's Solar System Decadal Survey and the priorities of the Outer Planets Assessment Group (OPAG). The Europa Geophysical Explorer would: (1) Characterize tidal deformations of the surface of Europa and surface geology, to confirm the presence of a subsurface ocean; (2) Measure the three-dimensional structure and distribution of subsurface water; and (3) Determine surface composition from orbit, and potentially, prebiotic chemistry, in situ. As the next step in Europa exploration, EGE would build on previous Europa Orbiter concepts, for example, the original Europa Orbiter and the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO). As well, a new set of draft Level One Requirements, provided by NASA sponsors, guided the concept development. These requirements included: (1) Earliest Launch: 2012; (2) Launch Vehicle: Delta IV Heavy or Atlas V; (3) Primary Propulsion: Chemical; (4) Power: Radioisotope Power System (RPS); (4) Orbital Mission: 30 days minimum to meet orbital science objectives; and (5) Earth Gravity Assists: Allowed. The previous studies and the new requirements contributed to the development of several scientifically capable and relatively mass-rich mission options. In particular, Earth-gravity assists (EGA) were allowed, resulting in an increased delivered mass. As well, there have been advances in radiation-hardened components and subsystems, due to the investments from the X-2000 technology program and JIMO. Finally, developments in radioisotope power systems (RPS) have added to the capability and reliability of the mission. Several potential mission options were explored using a variety of trade study methods, ranging from the work of the JPL EGE Team of scientists and engineers in partnership with the OPAG Europa Sub

  7. A review of integrated geophysical investigations from archaeological and cultural sites under encroaching urbanisation in İzmir, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drahor, Mahmut Göktuğ

    In the new millennium, globalisation, and with it urbanisation, has been expanding as a consequence of economic development throughout the world. Urbanisation is a major social problem, not only for developing countries but also for developed countries. Urbanisation also has a major impact on archaeological sites and cultural heritages in urbanised zones. Non-destructive investigation techniques, such as geophysics, which uses remote sensing, and is non-invasive, are of great importance in urban areas. We are now capable of solving urbanisation-related problems, and these techniques reduce the cost of projects at urbanised sites. Geophysics has increased the possibilities of new applications in determining intensive urbanisation effects in earth science. Geophysics deals with numerous physical variations such as electricity, electromagnetism, magnetics, acoustics, gravity and radioactivity. There are numerous ways geophysics can be applied in archaeological and cultural heritage studies. In addition the hazard mitigation, infrastructure investigation, waste management, water supply, urban gateways and other factors are documented by geophysics. In recent years, archaeological sites under the encroachment of urbanisation have been investigated on numerous occasions using non-invasive geophysical techniques, allowing parameters such as the depth, dimension and extension of targets to be clearly determined. The term “urban geophysics” has recently been seen in various references related to geophysics and other earth science studies. This study reviews the results of geophysical investigations carried out at important archaeological sites under encroaching urbanisation in the city of İzmir, Turkey.

  8. Use of natural gamma-ray geophysical logs for SWAT water table parameter estimation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Preliminary soil and sub-soil hydraulic parameter estimates needed for SWAT simulations to determine sub-surface water movement were collected using downhole geophysical measurements. Gamma-ray logs are useful for distingishing sandstone from shales by measuring natural-gamma radiation emitted from ...

  9. Rapid Geophysical Surveyor. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Roybal, L.G.; Carpenter, G.S.; Josten, N.E.

    1993-01-01

    The Rapid Geophysical Surveyor (RGS) is a system designed to rapidly and economically collect closely-spaced geophysical data used for characterization of US Department of Energy waste sites. Geophysical surveys of waste sites are an important first step in the remediation and closure of these sites; especially older sites where historical records are inaccurate and survey benchmarks have changed because of refinements in coordinate controls and datum changes. Closely-spaced data are required to adequately differentiate pits, trenches, and soil vault rows whose edges may be only a few feet from each other. A prototype vehicle designed to collect magnetic field data was built at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) during the summer of 1992. The RGS was funded by the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration program. This vehicle was demonstrated at the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) within the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the INEL in September 1992. Magnetic data were collected over two areas in the SDA, with a total survey area of about 1.7 acres. Data were collected at a nominal density of 2{1/2} in. along survey lines spaced 1-ft apart. Over 350,000 data points were collected over a 6 day period corresponding to about 185 worker-days using conventional ground survey techniques.

  10. Reports on crustal movements and deformations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, S. C.; Peck, T.

    1981-01-01

    Studies of tectonic plate motions, regional crustal deformations, strain accumulation and release, deformations associated with earthquakes and fault motion, and micro-plate motion, were collected and are summarized. To a limited extent, papers dealing with global models of current plate motions and crustal stress are included. The data base is restricted to articles appearing in reveiwed technical journals during the years 1970-1980. The major journals searched include: Journal of Geophysical Research (solid earth), Tectonophysics, Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America, Geological Society of America Bulletin, Geophysical Journal of the Royal Astronomical Society, and the Journal of Geology.

  11. Geophysical monitoring technology for CO2 sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jin-Feng; Li, Lin; Wang, Hao-Fan; Tan, Ming-You; Cui, Shi-Ling; Zhang, Yun-Yin; Qu, Zhi-Peng; Jia, Ling-Yun; Zhang, Shu-Hai

    2016-06-01

    Geophysical techniques play key roles in the measuring, monitoring, and verifying the safety of CO2 sequestration and in identifying the efficiency of CO2-enhanced oil recovery. Although geophysical monitoring techniques for CO2 sequestration have grown out of conventional oil and gas geophysical exploration techniques, it takes a long time to conduct geophysical monitoring, and there are many barriers and challenges. In this paper, with the initial objective of performing CO2 sequestration, we studied the geophysical tasks associated with evaluating geological storage sites and monitoring CO2 sequestration. Based on our review of the scope of geophysical monitoring techniques and our experience in domestic and international carbon capture and sequestration projects, we analyzed the inherent difficulties and our experiences in geophysical monitoring techniques, especially, with respect to 4D seismic acquisition, processing, and interpretation.

  12. SAGE (Summer of Applied Geophysical Experience): Learning Geophysics by Doing Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiracek, G. R.; Baldridge, W. S.; Biehler, S.; Braile, L. W.; Ferguson, J. F.; Gilpin, B. E.; Pellerin, L.

    2005-12-01

    SAGE, a field-based educational program in applied geophysical methods has been an REU site for 16 years and completed its 23rd year of operation in July 2005. SAGE teaches the major geophysical exploration methods (including seismics, gravity, magnetics, and electromagnetics) and applies them to the solution of specific local and regional geologic problems. These include delineating buried hazardous material; mapping archaeological sites; and studying the structure, tectonics, and water resources of the Rio Grande rift in New Mexico. Nearly 600 graduates, undergraduates, and professionals have attended SAGE since 1983. Since 1990 REU students have numbered 219 coming from dozens of different campuses. There have been 124 underrepresented REU students including 100 women, 14 Hispanics, 7 Native Americans, and 3 African Americans. Tracking of former REU students has revealed that 81% have gone on to graduate school. Keys to the success of SAGE are hands-on immersion in geophysics for one month and a partnership between academia, industry, and a federal laboratory. Successful approaches at SAGE include: 1) application of the latest equipment by all students; 2) continued updating of equipment, computers, and software by organizing universities and industry affiliates; 3) close ties with industry who provide supplemental instruction, furnish new equipment and software, and alert students to the current industry trends and job opportunities; 4) two-team, student data analysis structure that simultaneously addresses specific geophysical techniques and their integration; and 5) oral and written reports patterned after professional meetings and journals. An eight member, 'blue ribbon' advisory panel from academia, industry, and the federal government has been set up to maintain the vitality of SAGE by addressing such issues as funding, new faculty, organization, and vision. SAGE is open to students from any university (or organization) with backgrounds including

  13. Research and career opportunities in the geophysical sciences for physics students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyblade, Andrew

    2008-10-01

    The field of geophysics involves using most branches of physics to investigate the physical structure and process that characterize the solid and fluid parts of our planet. Major advances in geophysics have come about from physicists crossing disciplinary boundaries and using their skills and knowledge to address first-order problems about the nature and structure of our planet and how the planet has changed over time. Indeed, some of the largest scientific breakthroughs in geophysics have come from physicists. As a way to introduce students to the field of geophysics and to provide them with information about research and career opportunities in geophysics, this talk will focus on one area of geophysics, seismology. This is an area of geophysics that has not only been instrumental in advancing our understanding of solid Earth structure and processes, but one that also has an applied side used for oil, gas and mineral exploration, as well as for environmental work. Examples of research projects involving seismic wave propagation and tomographic imaging will be presented, along the short descriptions of career opportunities in industry, government and academic institutions. In collaboration with Solomon Bililign, North Carolina A&T State University.

  14. Notes on interpretation of geophysical data over areas of mineralization in Afghanistan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Drenth, Benjamin J.

    2011-01-01

    Afghanistan has the potential to contain substantial metallic mineral resources. Although valuable mineral deposits have been identified, much of the country's potential remains unknown. Geophysical surveys, particularly those conducted from airborne platforms, are a well-accepted and cost-effective method for obtaining information on the geological setting of a given area. This report summarizes interpretive findings from various geophysical surveys over selected mineral targets in Afghanistan, highlighting what existing data tell us. These interpretations are mainly qualitative in nature, because of the low resolution of available geophysical data. Geophysical data and simple interpretations are included for these six areas and deposit types: (1) Aynak: Sedimentary-hosted copper; (2) Zarkashan: Porphyry copper; (3) Kundalan: Porphyry copper; (4) Dusar Shaida: Volcanic-hosted massive sulphide; (5) Khanneshin: Carbonatite-hosted rare earth element; and (6) Chagai Hills: Porphyry copper.

  15. Geophysical Model Research and Results

    SciTech Connect

    Pasyanos, M; Walter, W; Tkalcic, H; Franz, G; Flanagan, M

    2004-07-07

    Geophysical models constitute an important component of calibration for nuclear explosion monitoring. We will focus on four major topics: (1) a priori geophysical models, (2) surface wave models, (3) receiver function derived profiles, and (4) stochastic geophysical models. The first, a priori models, can be used to predict a host of geophysical measurements, such as body wave travel times, and can be derived from direct regional studies or even by geophysical analogy. Use of these models is particularly important in aseismic regions or regions without seismic stations, where data of direct measurements might not exist. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has developed the Western Eurasia and North Africa (WENA) model which has been evaluated using a number of data sets, including travel times, surface waves, receiver functions, and waveform analysis (Pasyanos et al., 2004). We have joined this model with our Yellow Sea - Korean Peninsula (YSKP) model and the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) East Asia model to construct a model for all of Eurasia and North Africa. Secondly, we continue to improve upon our surface wave model by adding more paths. This has allowed us to expand the region to all of Eurasia and into Africa, increase the resolution of our model, and extend results to even shorter periods (7 sec). High-resolution models exist for the Middle East and the YSKP region. The surface wave results can be inverted either alone, or in conjunction with other data, to derive models of the crust and upper mantle structure. We are also using receiver functions, in joint inversions with the surface waves, to produce profiles directly under seismic stations throughout the region. In a collaborative project with Ammon, et al., they have been focusing on stations throughout western Eurasia and North Africa, while we have been focusing on LLNL deployments in the Middle East, including Kuwait, Jordan, and the United Arab Emirates. Finally, we have been

  16. Satellite gravity gradient grids for geophysics

    PubMed Central

    Bouman, Johannes; Ebbing, Jörg; Fuchs, Martin; Sebera, Josef; Lieb, Verena; Szwillus, Wolfgang; Haagmans, Roger; Novak, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    The Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) satellite aimed at determining the Earth’s mean gravity field. GOCE delivered gravity gradients containing directional information, which are complicated to use because of their error characteristics and because they are given in a rotating instrument frame indirectly related to the Earth. We compute gravity gradients in grids at 225 km and 255 km altitude above the reference ellipsoid corresponding to the GOCE nominal and lower orbit phases respectively, and find that the grids may contain additional high-frequency content compared with GOCE-based global models. We discuss the gradient sensitivity for crustal depth slices using a 3D lithospheric model of the North-East Atlantic region, which shows that the depth sensitivity differs from gradient to gradient. In addition, the relative signal power for the individual gradient component changes comparing the 225 km and 255 km grids, implying that using all components at different heights reduces parameter uncertainties in geophysical modelling. Furthermore, since gravity gradients contain complementary information to gravity, we foresee the use of the grids in a wide range of applications from lithospheric modelling to studies on dynamic topography, and glacial isostatic adjustment, to bedrock geometry determination under ice sheets. PMID:26864314

  17. Magnetotellurics as a multiscale geophysical exploration method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbonari, Rolando; D'Auria, Luca; Di Maio, Rosa; Petrillo, Zaccaria

    2016-04-01

    Magnetotellurics (MT) is a geophysical method based on the use of natural electromagnetic signals to define subsurface electrical resistivity structure through electromagnetic induction. MT waves are generated in the Earth's atmosphere and magnetosphere by a range of physical processes, such as magnetic storms, micropulsations, lightning activity. Since the underground MT wave propagation is of diffusive type, the longer is the wavelength (i.e. the lower the wave frequency) the deeper will be the propagation depth. Considering the frequency band commonly used in MT prospecting (10-4 Hz to 104 Hz), the investigation depth ranges from few hundred meters to hundreds of kilometers. This means that magnetotellurics is inherently a multiscale method and, thus, appropriate for applications at different scale ranging from aquifer system characterization to petroleum and geothermal research. In this perspective, the application of the Wavelet transform to the MT data analysis could represent an excellent tool to emphasize characteristics of the MT signal at different scales. In this note, the potentiality of such an approach is studied. In particular, we show that the use of a Discrete Wavelet (DW) decomposition of measured MT time-series data allows to retrieve robust information about the subsoil resistivity over a wide range of spatial (depth) scales, spanning up to 5 orders of magnitude. Furthermore, the application of DWs to MT data analysis has proven to be a flexible tool for advanced data processing (e.g. non-linear filtering, denoising and clustering).

  18. Application of borehole geophysics to water-resources investigations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keys, W.S.; MacCary, L.M.

    1971-01-01

    This manual is intended to be a guide for hydrologists using borehole geophysics in ground-water studies. The emphasis is on the application and interpretation of geophysical well logs, and not on the operation of a logger. It describes in detail those logging techniques that have been utilized within the Water Resources Division of the U.S. Geological Survey, and those used in petroleum investigations that have potential application to hydrologic problems. Most of the logs described can be made by commercial logging service companies, and many can be made with small water-well loggers. The general principles of each technique and the rules of log interpretation are the same, regardless of differences in instrumentation. Geophysical well logs can be interpreted to determine the lithology, geometry, resistivity, formation factor, bulk density, porosity, permeability, moisture content, and specific yield of water-bearing rocks, and to define the source, movement, and chemical and physical characteristics of ground water. Numerous examples of logs are used to illustrate applications and interpretation in various ground-water environments. The interrelations between various types of logs are emphasized, and the following aspects are described for each of the important logging techniques: Principles and applications, instrumentation, calibration and standardization, radius of investigation, and extraneous effects.

  19. Geophysical Model Applications for Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Pasyanos, M; Walter, W; Tkalcic, H; Franz, G; Gok, R; Rodgers, A

    2005-07-11

    Geophysical models constitute an important component of calibration for nuclear explosion monitoring. We will focus on four major topics and their applications: (1) surface wave models, (2) receiver function profiles, (3) regional tomography models, and (4) stochastic geophysical models. First, we continue to improve upon our surface wave model by adding more paths. This has allowed us to expand the region to all of Eurasia and into Africa, increase the resolution of our model, and extend results to even shorter periods (7 sec). High-resolution models exist for the Middle East and the YSKP region. The surface wave results can be inverted either alone, or in conjunction with other data, to derive models of the crust and upper mantle structure. One application of the group velocities is to construct phase-matched filters in combination with regional surface-wave magnitude formulas to improve the mb:Ms discriminant and extend it to smaller magnitude events. Next, we are using receiver functions, in joint inversions with the surface waves, to produce profiles directly under seismic stations throughout the region. In the past year, we have been focusing on deployments throughout the Middle East, including the Arabian Peninsula and Turkey. By assembling the results from many stations, we can see how regional seismic phases are affected by complicated upper mantle structure, including lithospheric thickness and anisotropy. The next geophysical model item, regional tomography models, can be used to predict regional travel times such as Pn and Sn. The times derived by the models can be used as a background model for empirical measurements or, where these don't exist, simply used as is. Finally, we have been exploring methodologies such as Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) to generate data-driven stochastic models. We have applied this technique to the YSKP region using surface wave dispersion data, body wave travel time data, receiver functions, and gravity data. The models

  20. Role of the Earth's rotation in global geodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlenkova, N.

    2009-04-01

    Role of the Earth's rotation in the global geodynamics. Pavlenkova N.I., Institute of Physics of the Earth of Russian Academy of Science, B.Grusinskaja 10, 123995, Moscow, ninapav@ifz.ru Geophysical studies show several regularities in Earth's structures which are not explained by the traditional global tectonics conceptions. (1) The surface of the Earth, as well as a surface of other planets, precisely shares on two hemispheres with a different relief and structure of an earth's crust: on the Pacific (oceanic) hemisphere with the lowered relief and a thin oceanic crust, and a continental hemisphere with prevalence of the raised relief and a thick continental crust. (2) There is a regular system of global lineaments and ring structures which are stretched on thousand kilometers, covering continents and oceans. As one of examples it is possible to result system of rift zones (mid-oceanic ridges), forming a ring around of the Antarctica with rift branches from it through everyone of 90 degrees. (3) Asymmetry with a relief of a day time surface when to each raised structure there corresponds the lowered surface on the opposite side of globe is observed. (4) The continental and oceanic mantles have different compositions and deep roots (>300 km) beneath the continents are prominent as regions with relatively high seismic velocities. There are regular connections between geological structures and deep mantle roots. (5) The classical lithosphere-asthenosphere model is not confirmed by seismic data. The asthenosphere can not be traced as a continuous layer, there are disconnected lenses (asthenolenses) even beneath mid-oceanic ridges. Significant horizontal movements of the lithosphere, as proposed by the global plate tectonics, would destroy all these regularities and crust-mantle interaction. To make an agreement between all observed data, the fluids-rotation hypothesis is proposed. The hypothesis supposes two main energy sources of the global tectonics: the

  1. Bringing a Bayesian Perspective to Large Dimensional Problems in Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duputel, Z.; Simons, M.; Jolivet, R.; Zaroli, C.; Rivera, L. A.; Ampuero, J. P.; Gombert, B.; Minson, S. E.

    2015-12-01

    The last decade has seen a substantial expansion of geophysical observations. Exploiting this wealth of data involves large ill-conditioned inverse problems requiring large numbers of uncertain parameters. A common approach in geophysics is to use some form of regularization that transforms the inversion into a well-conditioned optimization problem. While this approach is convenient and computationally inexpensive, the inherent non-uniqueness of our problems suggest that we should not simply search for a single optimal model, but rather attempt to describe the ensemble of plausible models that can fit the data and are consistent with prior information. This talk will present various applications of full Bayesian analysis techniques to large ill-posed inverse problems in geophysics. Despite significant computational cost, Bayesian sampling is a powerful tool to combine prior information, theoretical knowledge and data in order to address scientific problems probabilistically. We shall illustrate this by showing recent results for two types of problems: (1) the study of earthquakes sources and (2) imaging of the Earth interior. In particular, we will present different strategies that can be employed in order to achieve realistic uncertainty estimates.

  2. Bringing 3D Printing to Geophysical Science Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boghosian, A.; Turrin, M.; Porter, D. F.

    2014-12-01

    3D printing technology has been embraced by many technical fields, and is rapidly making its way into peoples' homes and schools. While there is a growing educational and hobbyist community engaged in the STEM focused technical and intellectual challenges associated with 3D printing, there is unrealized potential for the earth science community to use 3D printing to communicate scientific research to the public. Moreover, 3D printing offers scientists the opportunity to connect students and the public with novel visualizations of real data. As opposed to introducing terrestrial measurements through the use of colormaps and gradients, scientists can represent 3D concepts with 3D models, offering a more intuitive education tool. Furthermore, the tactile aspect of models make geophysical concepts accessible to a wide range of learning styles like kinesthetic or tactile, and learners including both visually impaired and color-blind students.We present a workflow whereby scientists, students, and the general public will be able to 3D print their own versions of geophysical datasets, even adding time through layering to include a 4th dimension, for a "4D" print. This will enable scientists with unique and expert insights into the data to easily create the tools they need to communicate their research. It will allow educators to quickly produce teaching aids for their students. Most importantly, it will enable the students themselves to translate the 2D representation of geophysical data into a 3D representation of that same data, reinforcing spatial reasoning.

  3. Lunar geophysics, geodesy, and dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. G.; Dickey, J. O.

    2002-01-01

    Experience with the dynamics and data analyses for earth and moon reveals both similarities and differences. Analysis of Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR) data provides information on the lunar orbit, rotation, solid-body tides, and retroreflector locations.

  4. A Unified Global Reference Frame of Vertical Crustal Movements by Satellite Laser Ranging

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xinhui; Wang, Ren; Sun, Fuping; Wang, Jinling

    2016-01-01

    Crustal movement is one of the main factors influencing the change of the Earth system, especially in its vertical direction, which affects people’s daily life through the frequent occurrence of earthquakes, geological disasters, and so on. In order to get a better study and application of the vertical crustal movement, as well as its changes, the foundation and prerequisite areto devise and establish its reference frame; especially, a unified global reference frame is required. Since SLR (satellite laser ranging) is one of the most accurate space techniques for monitoring geocentric motion and can directly measure the ground station’s geocentric coordinates and velocities relative to the centre of the Earth’s mass, we proposed to take the vertical velocity of the SLR technique in the ITRF2008 framework as the reference frame of vertical crustal motion, which we defined as the SLR vertical reference frame (SVRF). The systematic bias between other velocity fields and the SVRF was resolved by using the GPS (Global Positioning System) and VLBI (very long baseline interferometry) velocity observations, and the unity of other velocity fields and SVRF was realized, as well. The results show that it is feasible and suitable to take the SVRF as a reference frame, which has both geophysical meanings and geodetic observations, so we recommend taking the SLR vertical velocity under ITRF2008 as the global reference frame of vertical crustal movement. PMID:26867197

  5. Earth Rotation Dynamics: Review and Prospects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Benjamin F.

    2004-01-01

    Modem space geodetic measurement of Earth rotation variations, particularly by means of the VLBI technique, has over the years allowed studies of Earth rotation dynamics to advance in ever-increasing precision, accuracy, and temporal resolution. A review will be presented on our understanding of the geophysical and climatic causes, or "excitations", for length-of-day change, polar motion, and nutations. These excitations sources come from mass transports that constantly take place in the Earth system comprised of the atmosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere, lithosphere, mantle, and the cores. In this sense, together with other space geodetic measurements of time-variable gravity and geocenter motion, Earth rotation variations become a remote-sensing tool for the integral of all mass transports, providing valuable information about the latter on a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. Future prospects with respect to geophysical studies with even higher accuracy and resolution will be discussed.

  6. Geophysical characterization of subsurface barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Borns, D.J.

    1995-08-01

    An option for controlling contaminant migration from plumes and buried waste sites is to construct a subsurface barrier of a low-permeability material. The successful application of subsurface barriers requires processes to verify the emplacement and effectiveness of barrier and to monitor the performance of a barrier after emplacement. Non destructive and remote sensing techniques, such as geophysical methods, are possible technologies to address these needs. The changes in mechanical, hydrologic and chemical properties associated with the emplacement of an engineered barrier will affect geophysical properties such a seismic velocity, electrical conductivity, and dielectric constant. Also, the barrier, once emplaced and interacting with the in situ geologic system, may affect the paths along which electrical current flows in the subsurface. These changes in properties and processes facilitate the detection and monitoring of the barrier. The approaches to characterizing and monitoring engineered barriers can be divided between (1) methods that directly image the barrier using the contrasts in physical properties between the barrier and the host soil or rock and (2) methods that reflect flow processes around or through the barrier. For example, seismic methods that delineate the changes in density and stiffness associated with the barrier represents a direct imaging method. Electrical self potential methods and flow probes based on heat flow methods represent techniques that can delineate the flow path or flow processes around and through a barrier.

  7. SURFACE GEOPHYSICAL EXPLORATION - COMPENDIUM DOCUMENT

    SciTech Connect

    RUCKER DF; MYERS DA

    2011-10-04

    This report documents the evolution of the surface geophysical exploration (SGE) program and highlights some of the most recent successes in imaging conductive targets related to past leaks within and around Hanford's tank farms. While it is noted that the SGE program consists of multiple geophysical techniques designed to (1) locate near surface infrastructure that may interfere with (2) subsurface plume mapping, the report will focus primarily on electrical resistivity acquisition and processing for plume mapping. Due to the interferences from the near surface piping network, tanks, fences, wells, etc., the results of the three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of electrical resistivity was more representative of metal than the high ionic strength plumes. Since the first deployment, the focus of the SGE program has been to acquire and model the best electrical resistivity data that minimizes the influence of buried metal objects. Toward that goal, two significant advances have occurred: (1) using the infrastructure directly in the acquisition campaign and (2) placement of electrodes beneath the infrastructure. The direct use of infrastructure was successfully demonstrated at T farm by using wells as long electrodes (Rucker et al., 2010, 'Electrical-Resistivity Characterization of an Industrial Site Using Long Electrodes'). While the method was capable of finding targets related to past releases, a loss of vertical resolution was the trade-off. The burying of electrodes below the infrastructure helped to increase the vertical resolution, as long as a sufficient number of electrodes are available for the acquisition campaign.

  8. Environmental and Engineering Geophysical University at SAGEEP 2008: Geophysical Instruction for Non-Geophysicists

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey G. Paine

    2009-03-13

    The Environmental and Engineering Geophysical Society (EEGS), a nonprofit professional organization, conducted an educational series of seminars at the Symposium on the Application of Geophysics to Engineering and Environmental Problems (SAGEEP) in Philadelphia in April 2008. The purpose of these seminars, conducted under the name Environmental and Engineering Geophysical University (EEGU) over three days in parallel with the regular SAGEEP technical sessions, was to introduce nontraditional geophysical conference attendees to the appropriate use of geophysics in environmental and engineering projects. Five half-day, classroom-style sessions were led by recognized experts in the application of seismic, electrical, gravity, magnetics, and ground-penetrating radar methods. Classroom sessions were intended to educate regulators, environmental program managers, consultants, and students who are new to near-surface geophysics or are interested in learning how to incorporate appropriate geophysical approaches into characterization or remediation programs or evaluate the suitability of geophysical methods for general classes of environmental or engineering problems.

  9. Application of borehole geophysics to fracture identification and characterization in low porosity limestones and dolostones

    SciTech Connect

    Haase, C.S.; King, H.L.

    1986-01-01

    Geophysical logging was conducted in exploratory core holes drilled for geohydrological investigations at three sites used for waste disposal on the US Department of Energy's Oak Ridge Reservation. Geophysical log response was calibrated to borehole geology using the drill core. Subsequently, the logs were used to identify fractures and fractured zones and to characterize the hydrologic activity of such zones. Results of the study were used to identify zones of ground water movement and to select targets for subsequent piezometer and monitoring well installation. Neutron porosity, long- and short-normal resistivity, and density logs exhibit anomalies only adjacent to pervasively fractured zones and rarely exhibit anomalies adjacent to individual fractures, suggesting that such logs have insufficient resolution to detect individual fractures. Spontaneous potential, single point resistance, acoustic velocity, and acoustic variable density logs, however, typically exhibit anomalies adjacent to both individual fractures and fracture zones. Correlation is excellent between fracture density logs prepared from the examination of drill core and fractures identified by the analysis of a suite of geophysical logs that have differing spatial resolution characteristics. Results of the study demonstrate the importance of (1) calibrating geophysical log response to drill core from a site, and (2) running a comprehensive suite of geophysical logs that can evaluate both large- and small-scale rock features. Once geophysical log responses to site-specific geological features have been established, logs provide a means of identifying fracture zones and discriminating between hydrologically active and inactive fracture zones. 9 figs.

  10. A tool for Exploring Geophysical Data: The VGEE-IDV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandya, R. E.; Murray, D.

    2002-12-01

    heart of the VGEE is the visualization environment. The visualization environment is a customized version of the Integrated Data Viewer, or IDV, a platform-independent software package being developed by Unidata for display and analysis of geophysical data. In addition to the learner-centered functionality mentioned above, this environment allows the ability to locate and analyze remote data sets, including both archived and real-time data. As such, the tool represents a road toward creating a "data web" where educational users can browse and use data in a seamless way. While our discussion of the VGEE will highlight its use in specific curricula; we will point towards the development of the next generation data web in the Digital Library for Earth Science Education (DLESE). Our discussion will also summarize the data gathered while using the VGEE in an entry-level geoscience laboratory course.

  11. Earth and planetary sciences

    SciTech Connect

    Wetherill, G.W.; Drake, C.L.

    1980-07-04

    The earth is a dynamic body. The major surface manifestation of this dynamism has been fragmentation of the earth's outer shell and subsequent relative movement of the pieces on a large scale. Evidence for continental movement came from studies of geomagnetism. As the sea floor spreads and new crust is formed, it is magnetized with the polarity of the field at the time of its formation. The plate tectonics model explains the history, nature, and topography of the oceanic crust. When a lithospheric plate surmounted by continental crust collides with an oceanic lithosphere, it is the denser oceanic lithosphere that is subducted. Hence the ancient oceans have vanished and the knowledge of ancient earth will require deciphering the complex continental geological record. Geochemical investigation shows that the source region of continental rocks is not simply the depleted mantle that is characteristic of the source region of basalts produced at the oceanic ridges. The driving force of plate tectonics is convection within the earth, but much remains to be learned about the convection and interior of the earth. A brief discussion of planetary exploration is given. (SC)

  12. Press conference bring excitement of geophysical research to the public

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leifert, Harvey

    “A Flare to Remember.” “Starbucks for Starfish.” “Earth's Rotation Slows for El Niño.” What do these catchy headlines have in common? They all resulted from presentations at AGU's Spring Meeting in Boston, Mass. Yes, geophysical science can be big news when presented in a way that is interesting to general audiences.Proof? Well, the “Flare to Remember” headline (in the Dallas Morning News) reported the discovery, via the SOHO spacecraft, that a solar flare had produced, deep inside the Sun, seismic disturbances of a magnitude never experienced on Earth. Researchers Valentina Zharkova of Glasgow University and Alexander Kosovichev of Stanford gave media representatives a preview of their session, supported by visual aids, in the AGU press briefing room.

  13. Earth Sciences Division annual report 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-06-01

    This Annual Report presents summaries of selected representative research activities from Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory grouped according to the principal disciplines of the Earth Sciences Division: Reservoir Engineering and Hydrology, Geology and Geochemistry, and Geophysics and Geomechanics. We are proud to be able to bring you this report, which we hope will convey not only a description of the Division's scientific activities but also a sense of the enthusiasm and excitement present today in the Earth Sciences.

  14. Geophysical Exploration Technologies for the Deep Lithosphere Research: An Education Materials for High School Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, H.; Xu, C.; Luo, S.; Chen, H.; Qin, R.

    2012-12-01

    The science of Geophysics applies the principles of physics to study of the earth. Geophysical exploration technologies include the earthquake seismology, the seismic reflection and refraction methods, the gravity method, the magnetic method and the magnetotelluric method, which are used to measure the interior material distribution, their structure and the tectonics in the lithosphere of the earth. Part of the research project in SinoProbe-02-06 is to develop suitable education materials for carton movies targeting the high school students and public. The carton movies include five parts. The first part includes the structures of the earth's interior and variation in their physical properties that include density, p-wave, s-wave and so on, which are the fundamentals of the geophysical exploration technologies. The second part includes the seismology that uses the propagation of elastic waves through the earth to study the structure and the material distribution of the earth interior. It can be divided into earthquake seismology and artifice seismics commonly using reflection and refraction. The third part includes the magnetic method. Earth's magnetic field (also known as the geomagnetic field)extends from the Earth's inner core to where it meets the solar wind, a stream of energetic particles emanating from the Sun. The aim of magnetic survey is to investigate subsurface geology on the basis of anomalies in the Earth's magnetic field resulting from the magnetic properties of the underlying rocks. The magnetic method in the lithosphere attempts to use magnetic disturbance to analyse the regional geological structure and the magnetic boundaries of the crust. The fourth part includes the gravity method. A gravity anomaly results from the inhomogeneous distribution of density of the Earth. Usually gravity anomalies contain superposed anomalies from several sources. The long wave length anomalies due to deep density contrasts are called regional anomalies. They are

  15. The measurement of Earth rotation on a deformable Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cannon, W. H.

    1980-01-01

    Until recently, the methods of geodetic positioning on the Earth were limited to a precision of roughly one part in 10 to the 6th power. At this level of precision, the Earth can be regarded as a rigid body since the largest departure of the Earth from rigidity is manifested in the strains of the Earth tides which are of the order of one part in 10 to the 7th power. Long baseline interferometry is expected to routinely provide global positioning to a precision of one part in 10 to the 8th power or better. At this level of precision, all parts of the Earth's surface must be regarded as being, at least potentially, in continual motion relative to the geocenter as a result of a variety of geophysical effects. The general implications of this phenomenon for the theory of the Earth's rotation is discussed. Particular attention is given to the question of the measurement of the 'Earth's rotation vector' on a deformable Earth.

  16. Geophysical Corrections and Modeling for ICESat-2 Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robbins, J. W.; Neumann, T.; Markus, T.

    2014-12-01

    NASA's ICESat-2 mission to measure and monitor the heights of ice sheets, sea ice, glaciers, oceans and planetary vegetation is scheduled for launch in 2017. Fundamentally different than the ICESat full waveform lidar (called GLAS); the primary instrument on ICESat-2 is the photon-counting ATLAS instrument. While the primary measurement of the mission is the photon range from the satellite to the Earth's surface, most science applications require converting range into height with respect to a reference ellipsoid. The science-directed data products require systematic removal of various geophysical signals to enhance their scientific utility. We have made assessments of various present-day models of ocean tides, earth tides, atmosphere-ocean interactions, pole tides and ocean loading, among other geophysical phenomena. We present a description and evaluation of models that presently constitute leading choices, as well as an assessment of the relevant spatial and temporal scales for each correction. Our goal is to produce a set of state-of-the-art corrections that will be applied to the ICESat-2 Level 2A data product (which provides latitude, longitude, and elevation for each photon recorded by ATLAS). A design criterion is that these corrections be easily removed for investigations involving improvements to the correction modeling, itself; or for cases when an investigator desires that a different model be applied.

  17. Stovetop Earth Pecan Pie

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robin, C. M.

    2005-12-01

    Many fluid mechanical experiments with direct applications to Earth Science are performed with sugary syrups using conceptually straightforward procedures. Corn syrup has indeed proven to be a godsend for those studying convection and related non-linear phenomena. In addition, however, it gives experimentalists a deep physical intuition for the interior workings of hot planets. The basic concepts behind plate tectonics and mantle convection are not difficult; indeed, although they may not be aware of it, most students probably have a basic intuitive understanding of fluid mechanics gained in their daily life. However, the large size and long time scale of geophysical processes may be quite intimidating to young students. Even a simple geophysical experiment requires a complicated array of coolers, heaters and measuring and recording equipment. It is of interest to introduce students to the geodynamical concepts that can be visualized in a high-tech lab using familiar processes and equipment. Using a homemade apparatus and grocery store supplies, I propose using a 'Stove-top Earth pecan pie' to introduce simple geodynamic concepts to middle- and high-school students. The initially cold syrup heats up and the pecans begin to float (continent formation), the syrup begins to convect (mantle convection), and convection slows down after the heat is removed (secular cooling). Even Wilson cycles can be simulated by moving the pan to one side or the other of the stovetop or heating element. The activity formally introduces students to convection and its application to the earth, and makes them think about plate motion, heat transfer, scaling, and experimental procedures. As an added bonus, they can eat their experiments after recess!

  18. Earth & Space Science PhDs, Class of 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claudy, Nicholas; Henly, Megan; Migdalski, Chet

    This study documents the employment patterns and demographic characteristics of recent PhDs in earth and space science. It summarizes the latest annual survey of recent earth and space science PhDs conducted by the American Geological Institute, the American Geophysical Union, and the Statistical Research Center of the American Institute of…

  19. Advances in borehole geophysics for hydrology

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, P.H.

    1982-01-01

    Borehole geophysical methods provide vital subsurface information on rock properties, fluid movement, and the condition of engineered borehole structures. Within the first category, salient advances include the continuing improvement of the borehole televiewer, refinement of the electrical conductivity dipmeter for fracture characterization, and the development of a gigahertz-frequency electromagnetic propagation tool for water saturation measurements. The exploration of the rock mass between boreholes remains a challenging problem with high potential; promising methods are now incorporating high-density spatial sampling and sophisticated data processing. Flow-rate measurement methods appear adequate for all but low-flow situations. At low rates the tagging method seems the most attractive. The current exploitation of neutron-activation techniques for tagging means that the wellbore fluid itself is tagged, thereby eliminating the mixing of an alien fluid into the wellbore. Another method uses the acoustic noise generated by flow through constrictions and in and behind casing to detect and locate flaws in the production system. With the advent of field-recorded digital data, the interpretation of logs from sedimentary sequences is now reaching a sophisticated level with the aid of computer processing and the application of statistical methods. Lagging behind are interpretive schemes for the low-porosity, fracture-controlled igneous and metamorphic rocks encountered in the geothermal reservoirs and in potential waste-storage sites. Progress is being made on the general problem of fracture detection by use of electrical and acoustical techniques, but the reliable definition of permeability continues to be an elusive goal.

  20. Satellite Relaying of Geophysical Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allenby, R. J.

    1977-01-01

    Data Collection Platforms (DCPs) for transmitting surface data to an orbiting satellite for relaying to a central data distribution center are being used in a number of geophysical applications. "Off-the-shelf" DCP's, transmitting through Landsat or GOES satellites, are fully capable of relaying data from low-data-rate instruments, such as tiltmeters or tide gauges. In cooperation with the Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory, Goddard has successfully installed DCP systems on a tide gauge and tiltmeter array on Anegada, British Virgin Islands. Because of the high-data-rate requirements, a practical relay system capable of handling seismic information is not yet available. Such a system could become the basis of an operational hazard prediction system for reducing losses due to major natural catastrophies such as earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, landslides or tsunamis.

  1. Goddard Geophysical and Astronomical Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Figueroa, Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    This report summarizes the technical parameters and the technical staff of the VLBI system at the fundamental station GGAO. It also gives an overview about the VLBI activities during the report year. The Goddard Geophysical and Astronomical Observatory (GGAO) consists of a 5-meter radio telescope for VLBI, a new 12-meter radio telescope for VLBI2010 development, a 1-meter reference antenna for microwave holography development, an SLR site that includes MOBLAS-7, the NGSLR development system, and a 48" telescope for developmental two-color Satellite Laser Ranging, a GPS timing and development lab, a DORIS system, meteorological sensors, and a hydrogen maser. In addition, we are a fiducial IGS site with several IGS/IGSX receivers. GGAO is located on the east coast of the United States in Maryland. It is approximately 15 miles NNE of Washington, D.C. in Greenbelt, Maryland.

  2. Agricultural Geophysics: Past, present, and future

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Geophysical methods are becoming an increasingly valuable tool for agricultural applications. Agricultural geophysics investigations are commonly (although certainly not always) focused on delineating small- and/or large-scale objects/features within the soil profile (~ 0 to 2 m depth) over very lar...

  3. Remote sensing-a geophysical perspective.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watson, K.

    1985-01-01

    In this review of developments in the field of remote sensing from a geophysical perspective, the subject is limited to the electromagnetic spectrum from 0.4 mu m to 25cm. Three broad energy categories are covered: solar reflected, thermal infrared, and microwave.-from Authorremote sensing electromagnetic spectrum solar reflected thermal infrared microwave geophysics

  4. Geophysical and astronomical models applied in the analysis of very long baseline interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, C.; Ryan, J. W.; Schupler, B. R.

    1980-01-01

    Very long baseline interferometry presents an opportunity to measure at the centimeter level such geodetic parameters as baseline length and instantaneous pole position. In order to achieve such precision, the geophysical and astronomical models used in data analysis must be as accurate as possible. The Mark-3 interactive data analysis system includes a number of refinements beyond conventional practice in modeling precession, nutation, diurnal polar motion, UT1, solid Earth tides, relativistic light deflection, and reduction to solar system barycentric coordinates. The algorithms and their effects on the recovered geodetic, geophysical, and astrometric parameters are discussed.

  5. Agricultural geophysics: Past/present accomplishments and future advancements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Geophysical methods have become an increasingly valuable tool for application within a variety of agroecosystems. Agricultural geophysics measurements are obtained at a wide range of scales and often exhibit significant variability both temporally and spatially. The three geophysical methods predomi...

  6. Deep Interior: The first comprehensive geophysical investigation of an asteroid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asphaug, E.; Belton, M.; Klaasen, K.; McFadden, L.; Ostro, S.; Safaeinili, A.; Scheeres, D.; Sunshine, J.; Yeomans, D.

    Near-Earth Objects (NEOs) come closer to Earth than any other celestial body, and their compositions are represented on Earth by thousands of well-studied meteorites. Yet we understand neither their origin, evolution, nor their geophysical behavior. These secrets are locked up in their unexplored interiors. Goal 1 of the NASA Strategic Plan emphasizes the requirement to catalogue and understand NEOs down to 1 km diameter. Goal 4 urges us to understand natural processes at work in the low gravity environment. Goal 5 expresses the need to explore the solar system and to learn how planets originated and evolved. In response to the NASA Strategic Plan we are proposing a NASA Discovery mission whose primary science objective is to greatly advance the realization of these Goals by conducting the first investigation of the global geophysics of an asteroid. Radio reflection data from 5 km orbit about a 1 km NEO will provide a tomographic 3D image of electromagnetic properties. Mechanical properties will be examined in the simplest possible way, using explosions to initiate seismic cratering events and to expose diverse interior units for spectroscopic analysis. Deep Interior is the lowest-risk, lowest cost path towards attaining the required characterization of NEOs. It breaks new ground for future missions to asteroids and comets and facilitates the design of reliable NEO technologies. Our science goals are as follows, and the techniques (radio science, imaging, IR spectroscopy, active surface science) will be described at this meeting: Asteroid Interiors. Radio, gravity, and seismology experiments give a complete first picture of an asteroid's deep interior, resolving inclusions, voids and unit boundaries at ˜ 30 m scales, and determining global and regional mechanical properties. Surface Geophysics. Blast experiments explore the structure and mechanics of the upper meters, demonstrate microgravity cratering, trigger natural geomorphic events, and expose subsurface

  7. Exploring Space, Exploring Earth: New Understanding of the Earth from Space Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowman, Paul D., Jr.

    2002-08-01

    This book describes the impact of space flight on geology and geophysics, beginning with a foreword by Neil Armstrong, which illustrates how the exploration of space has lead us to a far deeper understanding of our own planet. Direct results from Earth-orbital missions include studies of Earth's gravity and magnetic fields. In contrast, the recognition of the economic and biological significance of impact craters on Earth is an indirect consequence of the study of the geology of other planets. The final chapter presents a new theory for the tectonic evolution of the Earth based on comparative planetology and the Gaia concept.

  8. Earth Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brewer, Tom

    1970-01-01

    Reviews some of the more concerted, large-scale efforts in the earth resources areas" in order to help the computer community obtain insights into the activities it can jointly particpate in withthe earth resources community." (Author)

  9. PreAnalyseExtended: A graphical tool for (geophysical) time series analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebauer, André

    2016-04-01

    Time depending records of different geophysical and geodetic measurement systems require screening and post-processing, often combining the primary observable with additional measurement quantities from other external sensors or geophysical models. The ring laser 'G' located at the Geodetic Observatory Wettzell for example observes rotational ground motions depending on the sensor orientation. Hence tilt effects need to be corrected from the raw measurements of rotation. While the local tilt is taken from an independent time series of an auxiliary sensor, solid Earth tides and polar motion are corrected based on appropriate models. PreAnalyseExtended is a powerful software tool that combines the screening and processing of geophysical measurements of a variety of input sensors with a unique set of at least seven fully included models. This talk provides an introduction the important features of this open source tool.

  10. Calibration and Confirmation in Geophysical Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werndl, Charlotte

    2016-04-01

    For policy decisions the best geophysical models are needed. To evaluate geophysical models, it is essential that the best available methods for confirmation are used. A hotly debated issue on confirmation in climate science (as well as in philosophy) is the requirement of use-novelty (i.e. that data can only confirm models if they have not already been used before. This talk investigates the issue of use-novelty and double-counting for geophysical models. We will see that the conclusions depend on the framework of confirmation and that it is not clear that use-novelty is a valid requirement and that double-counting is illegitimate.

  11. Geophysical aspects of remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, K.

    1971-01-01

    Results obtained through the NASA Earth Resources Aircraft Program at Mill Creek, Oklahoma, provide a case history example of the application of remote sensing to the identification of geologic rock units. Thermal infrared images are interpreted by means of a sequence of models of increasing complexity. The roles of various parameters are examined: rock properties (thermal inertia, albedo, emissivity), site location (latitude), season (sun's declination), atmospheric effects (cloud cover, transmission, air temperature), and topographic orientation (slope, azimuth). The results obtained at this site also illustrate the development of an important application of remote sensing in geologic identification. Relatively pure limestones and dolomites of the Mill Creek test area can be differentiated in nighttime infrared images, and facies changes between them can be detected along and across strike. The predominance on the earth's surface of sedimentary rocks, of which limestone and dolomite are major members, indicates the importance of this discrimination.

  12. Commerce geophysical lineament - Its source, geometry, and relation to the Reelfoot rift and New Madrid seismic zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langenheim, V.E.; Hildenbrand, T.G.

    1997-01-01

    The Commerce geophysical lineament is a northeast-trending magnetic and gravity feature that extends from central Arkansas to southern Illinois over a distance of ???400 km. It is parallel to the trend of the Reelfoot graben, but offset ???40 km to the northwest of the western margin of the rift floor. Modeling indicates that the source of the aeromagnetic and gravity anomalies is probably a mafic dike swarm. The age of the source of the Commerce geophysical lineament is not known, but the linearity and trend of the anomalies suggest a relationship with the Reelfoot rift, which has undergone episodic igneous activity. The Commerce geophysical lineament coincides with several topographic lineaments, movement on associated faults at least as young as Quaternary, and intrusions of various ages. Several earthquakes (Mb > 3) coincide with the Commerce geophysical lineament, but the diversity of associated focal mechanisms and the variety of surface structural features along the length of the Commerce geophysical lineament obscure its relation to the release of present-day strain. With the available seismicity data, it is difficult to attribute individual earthquakes to a specific structural lineament such as the Commerce geophysical lineament. However, the close correspondence between Quaternary faulting and present-day seismicity along the Commerce geophysical lineament is intriguing and warrants further study.

  13. Clay-Motion: Modeling Our Dynamic Earth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borrello, Murray C.

    1994-01-01

    Provides easy to teach and understand laboratory exercises for three fundamental concepts (plate movement, rock mechanics, and geologic time) that are often left out of the geology and Earth science curriculum. (ZWH)

  14. Earth Day Plus 20, and Counting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, Bil

    1990-01-01

    Presents a historical perspective of the environmental movement in the United States, beginning with Earth Day, 1970. Profiles "environmentalists" and describes environmental activities, achievements with environmental reform, turning points, and proenvironmental legislation from 1970-90. (MCO)

  15. Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Outreach Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aurnou, J. M.; Schwarz, J. W.; Noguez, G.

    2012-12-01

    Here we will present high definition films of laboratory experiments demonstrating basic fluid motions similar to those occurring in atmospheres and oceans. In these experiments, we use water to simulate the fluid dynamics of both the liquid (oceans) and gaseous (atmospheric) envelopes. To simulate the spinning of the earth, we carry out the experiments on a rotating table. For each experiment, we begin by looking at our system first without the effects of rotation. Then, we include rotation to see how the behavior of the fluid changes due to the Coriolis accelerations. Our hope is that by viewing these experiments one will develop a sense for how fluids behave both in rotating and non-rotating systems. By noting the differences between the experiments, it should then be possible to establish a basis to think about large-scale fluid motions that exist in Earth's oceans and atmospheres as well as on planets other than Earth.Plan view image of vortices in a rotating tank of fluid. Movies of such flows make accessible the often difficult to comprehend fluid dynamical processes that occur in planetary atmospheres and oceans.

  16. Tabletop Models for Electrical and Electromagnetic Geophysics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Charles T.

    2002-01-01

    Details the use of tabletop models that demonstrate concepts in direct current electrical resistivity, self-potential, and electromagnetic geophysical models. Explains how data profiles of the models are obtained. (DDR)

  17. Physicist + Geologist points to Geophysics Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Julian, Glenn M.; Stueber, Alan M.

    1974-01-01

    A two-quarter introductory course in geophysics at the advanced undergraduate/beginning graduate level is described. An outline of course content is provided, and mechanics of instruction are discussed. (DT)

  18. Geophysical imaging of root-zone, trunk, and moisture heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Attia Al Hagrey, Said

    2007-01-01

    The most significant biotic and abiotic stress agents of water extremity, salinity, and infection lead to wood decay and modifications of moisture and ion content, and density. This strongly influences the (di-)electrical and mechanical properties and justifies the application of geophysical imaging techniques. These are less invasive and have high resolution in contrast to classical methods of destructive, single-point measurements for inspecting stresses in trees and soils. This review presents some in situ and in vivo applications of electric, radar, and seismic methods for studying water status and movement in soils, roots, and tree trunks. The electrical properties of a root-zone are a consequence of their moisture content. Electrical imaging discriminates resistive, woody roots from conductive, soft roots. Both types are recognized by low radar velocities and high attenuation. Single roots can generate diffraction hyperbolas in radargrams. Pedophysical relationships of water content to electrical resistivity and radar velocity are established by diverse infiltration experiments in the field, laboratory, and in the full-scale 'GeoModel' at Kiel University. Subsurface moisture distributions are derived from geophysical attribute models. The ring electrode technique around trunks images the growth ring structure of concentric resistivity, which is inversely proportional to the fluid content. Healthy trees show a central high resistivity within the dry heartwood that strongly decreases towards the peripheral wet sapwood. Observed structural deviations are caused by infection, decay, shooting, or predominant light and/or wind directions. Seismic trunk tomography also differentiates between decayed and healthy woods.

  19. Discover Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, Colleen

    1998-01-01

    Discover Earth is a NASA-sponsored project for teachers of grades 5-12, designed to: (1) enhance understanding of the Earth as an integrated system; (2) enhance the interdisciplinary approach to science instruction; and (3) provide classroom materials that focus on those goals. Discover Earth is conducted by the Institute for Global Environmental Strategies in collaboration with Dr. Eric Barron, Director, Earth System Science Center, The Pennsylvania State University; and Dr. Robert Hudson, Chair, the Department of Meteorology, University of Maryland at College Park. The enclosed materials: (1) represent only part of the Discover Earth materials; (2) were developed by classroom teachers who are participating in the Discover Earth project; (3) utilize an investigative approach and on-line data; and (4) can be effectively adjusted to classrooms with greater/without technology access. The Discover Earth classroom materials focus on the Earth system and key issues of global climate change including topics such as the greenhouse effect, clouds and Earth's radiation balance, surface hydrology and land cover, and volcanoes and climate change. All the materials developed to date are available on line at (http://www.strategies.org) You are encouraged to submit comments and recommendations about these materials to the Discover Earth project manager, contact information is listed below. You are welcome to duplicate all these materials.

  20. The remote sensing needs of Arctic geophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, W. J.

    1970-01-01

    The application of remote sensors for obtaining geophysical information of the Arctic regions is discussed. Two significant requirements are to acquire sequential, synoptic imagery of the Arctic Ocean during all weather and seasons and to measure the strains in the sea ice canopy and the heterogeneous character of the air and water stresses acting on the canopy. The acquisition of geophysical data by side looking radar and microwave sensors in military aircraft is described.

  1. Studies in geophysics groundwater contamination by Geophysics Study Committee

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    The book cites the massive application of chemicals to the land and the possibility of groundwater contamination and the extent of contamination on the natural scale. Movement by microscopic and macroscopic processes is discussed together with a description of chemical processes involved. This is followed by description of shallow land disposal of municipal waste and deep well injection. Several specific examples are then described and discussed. For example, the section on the Love Canal discusses a modeling system and recommendations for receiving the problem. Each section includes an abstract and a comprehensive set of references. It is well written, comprehensive and a valuable addition to the library of anyone working on the environmental problems of groundwater contamination.

  2. Geophysical applications for levee assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chlaib, Hussein Khalefa

    Levees are important engineering structures that build along the rivers to protect the human lives and shield the communities as well as agriculture lands from the high water level events. Animal burrows, subsurface cavities, and low density (high permeability) zones are weakness features within the levee body that increase its risk of failure. To prevent such failure, continuous monitoring of the structure integrity and early detection of the weakness features must be conducted. Application of Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) and Capacitively Coupled Resistivity (CCR) methods were found to be very effective in assessing the levees and detect zones of weakness within the levee body. GPR was implemented using multi-frequency antennas (200, 400, and 900 MHz) with survey cart/wheel and survey vehicle. The (CCR) method was applied by using a single transmitter and three receivers. Studying the capability and the effectiveness of these methods in levee monitoring, subsurface weakness feature detection, and studying the structure integrity of levees were the main tasks of this dissertation. A set of laboratory experiments was conducted at the Geophysics Laboratory of the University of Arkansas at Little Rock (UALR) to analyze the polarity change in GPR signals in the presence of subsurface voids and water-filled cavities. Also three full scale field expeditions at the Big Dam Bridge (BDB) Levee, Lollie Levee, and Helena Levee in Arkansas were conducted using the GPR technique. This technique was effective in detecting empty, water, and clay filled cavities as well as small scale animal burrows (small rodents). The geophysical work at BDB and Lollie Levees expressed intensive subsurface anomalies which might decrease their integrity while the Helena Levee shows less subsurface anomalies. The compaction of levee material is a key factor affecting piping phenomenon. The structural integrity of the levee partially depends on the density/compaction of the soil layers. A

  3. Geophysical observations at cavity collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jousset, Philippe; Bazargan-Sabet, Behrooz; Lebert, François; Bernardie, Séverine; Gourry, Jean-Christophe

    2010-05-01

    In Lorraine region (France) salt layers at about 200 meters depth are exploited by Solvay using solution mining methodology which consists in extracting the salt by dissolution, collapsing the cavern overburden during the exploitation phase and finally reclaiming the landscape by creating a water area. In this process, one of the main challenges for the exploiting company is to control the initial 120-m diameter collapse so as to minimize possible damages. In order to detect potential precursors and understand processes associated with such collapses, a wide series of monitoring techniques including micro seismics, broad-band seismology, hydro-acoustic, electromagnetism, gas probing, automatic leveling, continuous GPS, continuous gravity and borehole extensometry was set-up in the frame of an in-situ study carried out by the "Research Group for the Impact and Safety of Underground Works" (GISOS, France). Equipments were set-up well before the final collapse, giving a unique opportunity to analyze a great deal of information prior to and during the collapse process which has been successfully achieved on February the 13th, 2009 by controlling the cavity internal pressure. In this work, we present the results of data recorded by a network of 3 broadband seismometers, 2 accelerometers, 2 tilt-meters and a continuously gravity meter. We relate the variations of the brine pumping rate with the evolutions of the induced geophysical signals and finally we propose a first mechanical model for describing the controlled collapse. Beyond the studied case, extrapolation of the results obtained might contribute to the understanding of uncontrolled cavity collapses, such as pit-craters or calderas at volcanoes.

  4. Geophysics of Small Planetary Bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asphaug, Erik I.

    1998-01-01

    As a SETI Institute PI from 1996-1998, Erik Asphaug studied impact and tidal physics and other geophysical processes associated with small (low-gravity) planetary bodies. This work included: a numerical impact simulation linking basaltic achondrite meteorites to asteroid 4 Vesta (Asphaug 1997), which laid the groundwork for an ongoing study of Martian meteorite ejection; cratering and catastrophic evolution of small bodies (with implications for their internal structure; Asphaug et al. 1996); genesis of grooved and degraded terrains in response to impact; maturation of regolith (Asphaug et al. 1997a); and the variation of crater outcome with impact angle, speed, and target structure. Research of impacts into porous, layered and prefractured targets (Asphaug et al. 1997b, 1998a) showed how shape, rheology and structure dramatically affects sizes and velocities of ejecta, and the survivability and impact-modification of comets and asteroids (Asphaug et al. 1998a). As an affiliate of the Galileo SSI Team, the PI studied problems related to cratering, tectonics, and regolith evolution, including an estimate of the impactor flux around Jupiter and the effect of impact on local and regional tectonics (Asphaug et al. 1998b). Other research included tidal breakup modeling (Asphaug and Benz 1996; Schenk et al. 1996), which is leading to a general understanding of the role of tides in planetesimal evolution. As a Guest Computational Investigator for NASA's BPCC/ESS supercomputer testbed, helped graft SPH3D onto an existing tree code tuned for the massively parallel Cray T3E (Olson and Asphaug, in preparation), obtaining a factor xIO00 speedup in code execution time (on 512 cpus). Runs which once took months are now completed in hours.

  5. Multiple Geophysical Observations by a newly developed multi-component borehole instrument at the Continental Deep Drilling Site of the CCSD, Donghai, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, J.; Zhao, Z.; Ishii, H.; Yamauchi, T.

    2004-12-01

    Multiple Geophysical Observations by a newly developed multi-component borehole instrument at the Continental Deep Drilling Site of the CCSD, Donghai, China Jiren Xu1 (+86-10-68992879; xujiren@ccsd.org.cn) Zhixin Zhao1 (+86-10-68999734; zhaozhixin@ccsd.org.cn) Hiroshi Ishii2 (+81-0572-67-3105; ishii@tries.gr.jp Tsuneo Yamauchi3 (+81-052-789-3045; yamauchi@seis.nagoya-u.ac.jp) 1 Institute of Geology, Chinese Academy of Geological Sciences, China 2 Tono Research Institute of Earthquake Science (TRIES), Japan 3 Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Nagoya University, Japan The Chinese Continental Scientific Drilling (CCSD) site is located in the Donghai area of the Dabie-Sulu belt, which is the largest UHPM belt in the world. The drilling of the main borehole with 5000m will finish in next year. Three satellite boreholes, PP1, PP2 and PP3 were drilled and various surveys have been performed in the Donghai area about 6 years ago. We are going to install a newly developed Multi-component Instrument for borehole observations in main hole near the large Tanlu fault, and establish a long-term underground observation laboratory, which is the first noiseless one in China. The seismic activity and various geophysical fields, viz. strain, geomagnetism, geothermy, tilt, pore pressure etc. will be investigated. Data from the underground laboratory will be open to scientific, engineering and public services. We will measure the initial stress in various depths of the borehole by overcoring method using a new developed wireless intelligent type strainmeter of in-situ stress. Establishing a long-term noiseless underground observation laboratory at deep borehole and investigating crustal movement in East China are important for observing the physical conditions of the earth¡_s interior and solving many social problems, such as resources, disasters and environment. Multiple geophysical observations and the study in deep borehole will speed up and develop the study on tectonics

  6. Moving Beyond IGY: An Electronic Geophysical Year (eGY) Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, D. N.; Barton, C. E.; Rodger, A. S.; Thompson, B. J.; Fraser, B.; Papitashvili, V.

    2003-12-01

    , etc.) and international cyber infrastructure. Moreover, the International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics (IUGG) has supported the eGY concept, which can smoothly be incorporated into various existing `'International Year'' initiatives - such as the International Polar Year, International Heliophysical Year, or International Year of the Planet Earth.

  7. Seismic fracture anisotropy in the Earth's crust: An overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leary, Peter C.; Crampin, Stuart; McEvilly, Thomas V.

    1990-07-01

    Fluid-filled fractures and microcracks are the most stress sensitive component of crustal rock and often determine the pathways and volume of crustal fluid movement. If we are to comprehend the role of fractures and fluids in tectonic processes, to formulate an accurate hypothesis for phenomena precursory to catastrophic seismic failure, or to monitor hydrocarbon and geothermal reservoirs for the presence or absence of major fluid pathways, we must understand how seismic waves interact with the fracture, crack, and microcrack structures within the rock mass. A salient feature of fracture-related rock structure is the effective seismic anisotropy of aligned fractures and microcracks. With the advent of large-volume digital seismic data sets it is feasible to use polarized shear waves to explore the anisotropic fracture properties of the crust. Crustal fracture structures which may be monitored by polarized shear waves range in dimensions from the 10-100 km scale of crustal stress orientation and preseismic stress buildup, through the 100-1000 m scale of fluid reservoir structure and characterization, and the 1-10 scale of mining and geoengineering rock strain monitoring, to millimeter and micrometer or possibly smaller fluid-filled inclusions determining the elastic response of the intact rock mass. To focus developments in seismic anisotropic studies of crustal fracture phenomena, the American Geophysical Union and the Society of Exploration Geophysicists sponsored a Chapman Conference on Seismic Anisotropy in the Earth's Crust, held May 31 to June 4, 1988, at the Lawrence-Berkeley Laboratory of the University of California. This was the Third International Workshop on Seismic Anisotropy (3IWSA). Nineteen conference papers are presented in this special section of the Journal of Geophysical Research.

  8. Identification of Uncertainties in the Geometry of Geophysical Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadopoulos, Dimitris; Herty, Michael; Rath, Volker; Behr, Marek

    2010-05-01

    A shape optimization method is used to reconstruct the unknown shape of geophysical layers from temperature measurements by the use of adjoint fields and level sets. The identification of the shape of the geophysical layers by temperature measurements is necessary for the efficient use of geothermal energy. Temperature is measured along thin vertical regions inside the domain, representing the boreholes. The method of speed is used to calculate the shape sensitivities, and the continuous adjoint approach is followed for the computation of the shape derivatives. Both the direct, and the adjoint problem are solved with a finite element method. The unknown shape is described with the help of the level set function; the advantage of the shape function is that no mesh movement or re-meshing is necessary but an additional Hamilton-Jacobi equation has to be solved. This equation is integrated in an artificial time, where the velocity represents the movement in the direction of the normal vector of the interface. The solution of the Hamilton-Jacobi equation is performed with essentially non-oscillatory (ENO) and weighted ENO (WENO) schemes. For large optimization steps re-initialization of the level set function is also necessary, in order to keep the magnitude of the level set function near unity, as well as to smooth the level set function. The dependence of the objective function and the quality of the recovered shape is studied with respect to the number, the position and the width of the boreholes. These studies represent a first step in the developments of corresponding methods for multiphysics investigations, e.g., in geothermal reservoirs, where multiphase fluid flow is an important component. The necessary generalizations of our method remain a challenging task for the future.

  9. Tamara Shapiro Ledley Receives 2013 Excellence in Geophysical Education Award: Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledley, Tamara Shapiro

    2014-01-01

    The meaning of "interdisciplinary" has evolved over my career. When I started my science research career, it meant bridging atmospheric and ocean science and embracing the science of the Earth system and its interacting components. Thus, I found a home at AGU submitting science abstracts to atmospheric science, oceanography, or hydrology sessions. In fact, my first research paper appeared in Journal of Geophysical Research (JGR)-Atmospheres, and a letter to the editor and response appeared in JGR-Oceans. It also meant getting scientists in these disciplines talking to each other. I organized a seminar series at Rice University under the umbrella of an Earth Systems Institute that included the Departments of Space Physics and Astronomy, Geology and Geophysics, Biology, and Hydrology. I also began working with Dr. Patricia Reiff, a space physicist with a passion for science education.

  10. Distributed visualization of gridded geophysical data: the Carbon Data Explorer, version 0.2.3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endsley, K. A.; Billmire, M. G.

    2016-01-01

    Due to the proliferation of geophysical models, particularly climate models, the increasing resolution of their spatiotemporal estimates of Earth system processes, and the desire to easily share results with collaborators, there is a genuine need for tools to manage, aggregate, visualize, and share data sets. We present a new, web-based software tool - the Carbon Data Explorer - that provides these capabilities for gridded geophysical data sets. While originally developed for visualizing carbon flux, this tool can accommodate any time-varying, spatially explicit scientific data set, particularly NASA Earth system science level III products. In addition, the tool's open-source licensing and web presence facilitate distributed scientific visualization, comparison with other data sets and uncertainty estimates, and data publishing and distribution.

  11. 77 FR 19242 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Low-Energy Marine Geophysical Survey...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-30

    ...NMFS has received an application from Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory (L-DEO), a part of Columbia University, for an Incidental Harassment Authorization (IHA) to take marine mammals, by harassment, incidental to conducting a low-energy marine geophysical survey in the central Pacific Ocean, May through June, 2012. Pursuant to the Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA), NMFS is requesting......

  12. Peace Education, ESD and the Earth Charter: Interconnections and Synergies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toh, Swee-Hin; Cawagas, Virginia Floresca

    2010-01-01

    This article provides a review of how the values and principles of the Earth Charter initiative relate to two specific innovative movements of educational transformation, namely peace education and education for sustainable development (ESD). The interconnections and synergies between these movements and the Earth Charter are highlighted.…

  13. Earth Science Information System (ESIS)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1982-01-01

    The Earth Science Information System (ESIS) was developed in 1981 by the U.S. Geological Survey's Office of the Data Administrator. ESIS serves as a comprehensive data management facility designed to support the coordination, integration, and standardization of scientific, technical, and bibliographic data of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). ESIS provides, through an online interactive computer system, referral to information about USGS data bases, data elements which are fields in the records of data bases, and systems. The data bases contain information about many subjects from several scientific disciplines such as: geology, geophysics, geochemistry, hydrology, cartography, oceanography, geography, minerals exploration and conservation, and satellite data sensing.

  14. Geophysical Investigation of Oldoinyo Lengai

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheiber, S. E.; Webb, S. J.; Dirks, P. H.

    2006-12-01

    Oldoinyo Lengai, which means "Mountain of God" in Maasai, is a 2886 m high stratovolcano situated in Northern Tanzania, next to one of the large fault scarps that defines the western edge of the East African Rift Valley. Lengai is the only volcano in the world that erupts natrocarbonatite lava and has been in a state of near-eruption since 1983. A large amount of work has been done in terms of the geology and petrology of this unique volcano, but very little has been done in terms of geophysics. A research team from the University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa will be conducting a gravity and differential GPS survey on Lengai during December 2006 and January 2007. Seismic monitoring of the volcano will also take place for the duration of the survey using vertical 1 Hz geophones. A gravity profile collected over the volcano by the British Schools Exploring Society in 2004 shows a negative anomaly of approximately 185 mGals. This is after a terrain correction is applied to the data using 1:50000 digitized maps and a vertical prism formula. A single seismometer, with a frequency of 1Hz and then 0.033 Hz, was set up on the volcano in 2001 and 2002 by a graduate student from the University of Washington. A few local volcanotectonic (VT) events were recorded; however the research team was unable to conclude whether the events were from Lengai or the nearby rift. A sustained non-harmonic tremor signal with a fairly broad spectral peak was also observed, but no very long-period (VLP) signals. The gravity and DGPS data collected during the 2006/2007 survey will be processed and used as a baseline for future measurements on the volcano. The data will also be modeled in an attempt to determine the size and position of the magma chamber. These gravity data will be compared with the profile collected in 2004 in an attempt to see whether there have been any large subsurface mass changes over the past two years, or the extent of weathering. Recorded seismicity will be used

  15. ORBSIM- ESTIMATING GEOPHYSICAL MODEL PARAMETERS FROM PLANETARY GRAVITY DATA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sjogren, W. L.

    1994-01-01

    The ORBSIM program was developed for the accurate extraction of geophysical model parameters from Doppler radio tracking data acquired from orbiting planetary spacecraft. The model of the proposed planetary structure is used in a numerical integration of the spacecraft along simulated trajectories around the primary body. Using line of sight (LOS) Doppler residuals, ORBSIM applies fast and efficient modelling and optimization procedures which avoid the traditional complex dynamic reduction of data. ORBSIM produces quantitative geophysical results such as size, depth, and mass. ORBSIM has been used extensively to investigate topographic features on the Moon, Mars, and Venus. The program has proven particulary suitable for modelling gravitational anomalies and mascons. The basic observable for spacecraft-based gravity data is the Doppler frequency shift of a transponded radio signal. The time derivative of this signal carries information regarding the gravity field acting on the spacecraft in the LOS direction (the LOS direction being the path between the spacecraft and the receiving station, either Earth or another satellite). There are many dynamic factors taken into account: earth rotation, solar radiation, acceleration from planetary bodies, tracking station time and location adjustments, etc. The actual trajectories of the spacecraft are simulated using least squares fitted to conic motion. The theoretical Doppler readings from the simulated orbits are compared to actual Doppler observations and another least squares adjustment is made. ORBSIM has three modes of operation: trajectory simulation, optimization, and gravity modelling. In all cases, an initial gravity model of curved and/or flat disks, harmonics, and/or a force table are required input. ORBSIM is written in FORTRAN 77 for batch execution and has been implemented on a DEC VAX 11/780 computer operating under VMS. This program was released in 1985.

  16. The geophysical environment of Bennu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheeres, D. J.; Hesar, S. G.; Tardivel, S.; Hirabayashi, M.; Farnocchia, D.; McMahon, J. W.; Chesley, S. R.; Barnouin, O.; Binzel, R. P.; Bottke, W. F.; Daly, M. G.; Emery, J. P.; Hergenrother, C. W.; Lauretta, D. S.; Marshall, J. R.; Michel, P.; Nolan, M. C.; Walsh, K. J.

    2016-09-01

    An analysis of the surface and interior state of Asteroid (101955) Bennu, the target asteroid of the OSIRIS-REx sample return mission, is given using models based on Earth-based observations of this body. These observations have enabled models of its shape, spin state, mass and surface properties to be developed. Based on these data the range of surface and interior states possible for this body are evaluated, assuming a uniform mass distribution. These products include the geopotential, surface slopes, near-surface dynamical environment, interior stress states and other quantities of interest. In addition, competing theories for its current shape are reviewed along with the relevant planned OSIRIS-REx measurements.

  17. Using Grand Challenges For Innovative Teaching in Structural Geology, Geophysics, and Tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDaris, J. R.; Tewksbury, B. J.; Wysession, M. E.

    2012-12-01

    An innovative approach to teaching involves using the "Big Ideas" or "Grand Challenges" of a field, as determined by the research community in that area, as the basis for classroom activities. There have been several recent efforts in the areas of structural geology, tectonics, and geophysics to determine these Grand Challenges, including the areas of seismology ("Seismological Grand Challenges in Understanding Earth's Dynamic Systems"), mineral physics ("Unlocking the Building Blocks of the Planet"), EarthScope-related science ("Unlocking the Secrets of the North American Continent: An EarthScope Science Plan for 2010-2020"), and structural geology and tectonics (at the Structural Geology and Tectonics Forum held at Williams College in June, 2012). These research community efforts produced frameworks of the essential information for their fields with the aim of guiding future research. An integral part of this, however, is training the next generation of scientists, and using these Big Ideas as the basis for course structures and activities is a powerful way to make this happen. When activities, labs, and homeworks are drawn from relevant and cutting-edge research topics, students can find the material more fascinating and engaging, and can develop a better sense of the dynamic process of scientific discovery. Many creative ideas for incorporating the Grand Challenges of structural geology, tectonics, and geophysics in the classroom were developed at a Cutting Edge workshop on "Teaching Structural Geology, Geophysics, and Tectonics in the 21st Century" held at the University of Tennessee in July, 2012.

  18. The Environmental Geophysics Web Site and Geophysical Decision Support System (GDSS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This product provides assistance to project managers, remedial project managers, stakeholders, and anyone interested in on-site investigations or environmental geophysics. The APM is the beta version of the new U.S. EPA Environmental Geophysics Web Site which includes the Geophys...

  19. Earth tides

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    Nineteen papers on gravity, tilt, and strain tides are compiled into this volume. Detailed chapters cover the calculation of the tidal forces and of the Earth's response to them, as well as actual observations of earth tides. Partial Contents: On Earth tides. The tidal forces: Tidal Forces. New Computations of the Tide-Generating Potential. Corrected Tables of Tidal Harmonics. The Theory of Tidal Deformations. Body Tides on an Elliptical, Rotating, Elastic and Oceanless Earth, Deformation of the Earth by Surface Loads. Gravimetric Tidal Loading Computed from Integrated Green's Functions. Tidal Friction in the Solid Earth. Loading Tides Versus Body Tides. Lunar Tidal Acceleration from Earth Satellite Orbit Analysis. Observations: gravity. Tidal Gravity in Britain: Tidal Loading and the Spatial Distribution of the Marine Tide. Tidal Loading along a Profile Europe-East Africa-South Asia-Australia and the Pacific Ocean. Detailed Gravity-Tide Spectrum between One and Four Cycles per Day. Observations: tilt and strain. Cavity and Topographic Effects in Tilt and Strain Measurement. Observations of Local Elastic Effects on Earth Tide Tilts and Strains.

  20. Russian Meteorological and Geophysical Rockets of New Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yushkov, V.; Gvozdev, Yu.; Lykov, A.; Shershakov, V.; Ivanov, V.; Pozin, A.; Afanasenkov, A.; Savenkov, Yu.; Kuznetsov, V.

    2015-09-01

    To study the process in the middle and upper atmosphere, ionosphere and near-Earth space, as well as to monitor the geophysical environment in Russian Federal Service for Hydrology and Environmental Monitoring (ROSHYDROMET) the development of new generation of meteorological and geophysical rockets has been completed. The modern geophysical research rocket system MR-30 was created in Research and Production Association RPA "Typhoon". The basis of the complex MR-30 is a new geophysical sounding rocket MN-300 with solid propellant, Rocket launch takes place at an angle of 70º to 90º from the launcher, which is a farm with a guide rail type required for imparting initial rotation rocket. The Rocket is spin stabilized with a spin rate between 5 and 7 Hz. Launch weight is 1564 kg, and the mass of the payload of 50 to 150 kg. MR-300 is capable of lifting up to 300 km, while the area of dispersion points for booster falling is an ellipse with parameters 37x 60 km. The payload of the rocket MN-300 consists of two sections: a sealed, located below the instrument compartment, and not sealed, under the fairing. Block of scientific equipment is formed on the platform in a modular layout. This makes it possible to solve a wide range of tasks and conduct research and testing technologies using a unique environment of space, as well as to conduct technological experiments testing and research systems and spacecraft equipment. New Russian rocket system MERA (MEteorological Rocket for Atmospheric Research) belongs to so called "dart" technique that provide lifting of small scientific payload up to altitude 100 km and descending with parachute. It was developed at Central Aerological Observatory jointly with State Unitary Enterprise Instrument Design Bureau. The booster provides a very rapid acceleration to about Mach 5. After the burning phase of the buster the dart is separated and continues ballistic flight for about 2 minutes. The dart carries the instrument payload+ parachute

  1. Altimeter crossover methods for precision orbit determination and the mapping of geophysical parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shum, C. K.; Schutz, B. E.; Tapley, B. D.; Zhang, B. H.

    1990-01-01

    Accurate orbit determination and the recovery of geophysical parameters are presently attempted via methodologies which use differenced height measurements at the points where the ground tracks of the altimetric satellite orbits intersect. Such 'crossover measurements' could significantly improve the earth's gravity field model. Attention is given to a novel technique employing crossover measurements from two satellites carrying altimeter instruments; this method can observe zonal harmonics of the earth's geopotential which are weakly observed through single-satellite crossovers. This dual-satellite crossover technique will be applicable to data from such future oceanographic satellites as ERS-1.

  2. Global gravity field models and their use for geophysical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pail, R.

    2015-12-01

    During the last decade, the successful operation of the dedicated satellite missions GOCE and GRACE have revolutionized our picture of the Earth's gravity field. They delivered static global gravity field maps with high and homogeneous accuracy for spatial length-scales down to 70-80 km. The current satellite-only models of the fifth generation including GOCE data have reached accuracies of about 2 cm in geoid height and less than 0.7 mGal in gravity anomalies at 100 km spatial half-wavelength. However, the spatial resolution of gravity models derived from satellite data is limited. Since precise knowledge of the Earth's gravity field structure with very high resolution is essential in solid Earth applications such as lithospheric modelling, geological interpretation and exploration geophysics, satellite-only models are complemented by combined gravity field models, which contain very high-resolution gravity field information obtained by terrestrial gravity measurements over continents, and satellite altimetry over the oceans. To further increase the spatial resolution beyond 10-20 km, measured terrestrial and satellite data can also be augmented by high-resolution gravity field signals synthesized from topographic models. In this contribution an overview of the construction of satellite-only and combined global gravity field models is given. The specific characteristics of the individual input data and the resulting models will be assessed, and their impact for geophysical modelling will be discussed. On the basis of selected case studies, commission and omission errors and thus the contribution and impact of satellite gravity data on gravity field applications will be quantified, and the benefit of current satellite gravity data shall be investigated and demonstrated. Future gravity field missions beyond GRACE Follow-On will provide global gravity field information with further increased accuracy, spatial and temporal resolution. In an international initiative

  3. Earth observing satellite: Understanding the Earth as a system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soffen, Gerald

    1990-01-01

    There is now a plan for global studies which include two very large efforts. One is the International Geosphere/Biosphere Program (IGBP) sponsored by the International Council of Scientific Unions. The other initiative is Mission to Planet Earth, an unbrella program for doing three kinds of space missions. The major one is the Earth Observation Satellite (EOS). EOS is large polar orbiting satellites with heavy payloads. Two will be placed in orbit by NASA, one by the Japanese and one or two by ESA. The overall mission measurement objectives of EOS are summarized: (1) the global distribution of energy input to and energy output from the Earth; (2) the structure, state variables, composition, and dynamics of the atmosphere from the ground to the mesopause; (3) the physical and biological structure, state, composition, and dynamics of the land surface, including terrestrial and inland water ecosystems; (4) the rates, important sources and sinks, and key components and processes of the Earth's biogeochemical cycles; (5) the circulation, surface temperature, wind stress, sea state, and the biological activity of the oceans; (6) the extent, type, state, elevation, roughness, and dynamics of glaciers, ice sheets, snow and sea ice, and the liquid equivalent of snow in the global cryosphere; (7) the global rates, amounts, and distribution of precipitation; and (8) the dynamic motions of the Earth (geophysics) as a whole, including both rotational dynamics and the kinematic motions of the tectonic plates.

  4. What can earth tide measurements tell us about ocean tides or earth structure?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, T. F.

    1978-01-01

    Current experimental problems in Earth tides are reviewed using comparisons of tidal gravity and tilt measurements in Europe with loading calculations are examples. The limitations of present day instrumentation and installation techniques are shown as well as some of the ways in which they can be improved. Many of the geophysical and oceanographic investigations that are possible with Earth tide measurements are discussed with emphasis on the percentage accuracies required in the measurements in order to obtain new information about Earth or its oceans.

  5. An Introduction to Geophysical Exploration: Third Edition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatham, Robert H.

    Finding a modern textbook that covers all aspects of exploration geophysics is difficult, but An Introduction to Geophysical Exploration certainly fills the bill. Appropriate for an introductory course addressing a range of techniques the book's breadth is demonstrated by comprehensive inclusion of non-seismic exploration methods. In fact, half of the book is devoted to non-seismic methods, providing students with a permanent reference to these infrequently applied exploration methods.This book came to my attention while I was ordering textbooks for a course in exploration geophysics only to find that the text of my choice was out of print. I quickly substituted An Introduction to Geophysical Exploration, and it has served the class well, including senior-level undergraduates and first-year graduate students in both soft-rock geology and geophysics. The material is comprehensive and well organized. The non-seismic topics include not only chapters on potential fields— one each on gravity and magnetic methods— but also chapters on electrical and electromagnetic methods, including ground-penetrating radar (GPR). Short chapters on radiometric surveying and borehole logging are also provided.

  6. Understanding the lithosphere in complex tectonic scenarios by integrating geophysical data: The Pyrenees case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campanyà, Joan; Fullea, Javier; Ledo, Juanjo; Queralt, Pilar; Marcuello, Alex; Liesa, Montserrat; Muñoz, Josep Anton

    2016-04-01

    Tectonic processes dominate the development of the outermost layer of the Earth over a timescale of millions of years. The locations where these processes take place provide a great opportunity for Earth scientists to study and understand the dynamics and properties of the lithosphere. The Pyrenees are a particular case of continental collision formed as a result of the collision between the Iberian and European plates, which caused the subduction of the Iberian lower crust below the European crust. Large amounts of geophysical data have been acquired in the area providing spectacular images of lithospheric subduction beneath the Western and Central Pyrenees, confirming the occurrence of this generally well-understood process. The Eastern Pyrenees, however, are a most puzzling part of the orogen and the geodynamical evolution of this area cannot be understood without the influence of the Neogene Mediterranean rifting, following the continental collision. The complexity of this area and the controversy of the geophysical results set in debate concepts well recognized in the other parts of the Pyrenees such as the subduction of the Iberian lower crust and the depth of the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary. The aims of this study are to characterise major tectonic and geophysical variations along the Pyrenean mountain range at a lithospheric-scale and constrain the causes of the observed lateral variations. A preliminary model of the lithospheric configuration and dynamics, based on magnetotelluric geophysical results, has been developed and constrained using independent and available geophysical, geological and geochemical data. Computational petrology methods, using Litmod, were used for integrated modelling of all data.

  7. First Paleomagnetic Map of the Easternmost Mediterranean Derived from Combined Geophysical-Geological Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eppelbaum, Lev; Katz, Youri

    2014-05-01

    paleotectonic criteria for oil and gas discovery in this region. Extensive geological-geophysical investigations have been carried out in this region, and a significant number of deep boreholes have been drilled. However integrated estimation of the deep structure of the hydrocarbon host deposits and their space-time evolution in terms of the modern geodynamics (first of all, plate tectonics: Ben-Avraham and Ginzburg, 1990; Robertson, 1998; Ben-Avraham et al., 2002, 2006; Jimenez-Munt et al., 2003; Le Pichon and Kreemer, 2010), are comparatively recent (Eppelbaum and Katz, 2011, 2012a; Eppelbaum et al., 2012, 2014). We elucidate this geodynamic relationship by examining the structural floors within the following tectonic-geophysical zones: (1) regions of development of continental crust of the Nubian, Arabian and Sinai plates, (2) remaining oceanic crust of the eastern Mediterranean, and (3) the thinned continental crust of the terrane belt. A series of new gravity and magnetic maps developed by employing satellite and airborne data (as well their transformations) accompanied by tectonic schemes were constructed (Eppelbaum and Katz, 2011; Eppelbaum et al., 2012a, 2012b, 2014). These new maps are crucial to a better understanding of the dynamics of hydrocarbon basin formation within the continental and shelf depressions, as well as the deep depressions of the easternmost Mediterranean where gas deposits in zones of oceanic crust evolution have only recently (April 2013) begun to be exploited. Careful attention should be paid to the blocks of oceanic (basaltic) crust with reverse magnetization that were discovered (Ben-Avraham et al., 2002; Eppelbaum, 2006). This issue was very briefly (Eppelbaum and Katz, 2012a) explained as paleomagnetic Kiama zone of inverse polarity and demands separate consideration. An integrated magnetic-gravity-seismic analysis conducted along three interpretation profiles unambiguously indicates the presence of blocks of the Earth's crust with reverse

  8. Introduction to Rheology and Application to Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ancey, C.

    This chapter gives an overview of the major current issues in rheology through a series of different problems of particular relevance to geophysics. For each topic considered here, we will outline the key elements and point the reader to ward the most helpful references and authoritative works. The reader is also referred to available books introducing rheology [1, 2] for a more complete presentation and to the tutorial written by Middleton and Wilcock on mechanical and rheological app lications in geophysics [3]. This chapter will focus on materials encountered by geophysicists (mud, snow, magma, etc.), although in most cases we will consider only suspensions of particles within an interstitial fluid without loss of generality. Other complex fluids such as polymeric liquids are rarely encountered in geophysics.

  9. Negligible Risk for Epidemics after Geophysical Disasters

    PubMed Central

    Floret, Nathalie; Viel, Jean-François; Mauny, Frédéric; Hoen, Bruno

    2006-01-01

    After geophysical disasters (i.e., earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, tsunamis), media reports almost always stress the risk for epidemics; whether this risk is genuine has been debated. We analyzed the medical literature and data from humanitarian agencies and the World Health Organization from 1985 to 2004. Of >600 geophysical disasters recorded, we found only 3 reported outbreaks related to these disasters: 1 of measles after the eruption of Pinatubo in Philippines, 1 of coccidioidomycosis after an earthquake in California, and 1 of Plasmodium vivax malaria in Costa Rica related to an earthquake and heavy rainfall. Even though the humanitarian response may play a role in preventing epidemics, our results lend support to the epidemiologic evidence that short-term risk for epidemics after a geophysical disaster is very low. PMID:16704799

  10. Tamara Shapiro Ledley Receives 2013 Excellence in Geophysical Education Award: Citation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiff, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    It gives me great pleasure to cite Tamara Shapiro Ledley for the AGU Excellence in Geophysical Education Award "for her outstanding sustained leadership in Earth systems and climate change education." Tamara has shown an ongoing commitment to bridging the scientific and educational communities to make geophysical science knowledge and data accessible and usable to teachers and students and by extension to all citizens. She works extensively with both the scientific and educational communities. She began her educational work in 1990 as the leader for weather and climate in my Teacher Research program at Rice University. She continued as the lead for atmospheric sciences in our projects Earth Today and Museums Teaching Planet Earth, which introduced her to the Earth Science Information Partners (ESIP Federation). She has served many roles at ESIP, including creating the Standing Committee for Education and serving as vice president. ESIP recognized her many accomplishments with its President's Award in 2012. At TERC her education and outreach efforts have blossomed. She was the lead author of the "Earth as a System" investigation of the GLOBE Teacher's Guide. She was a member of the original Digital Library for Earth System Education (DLESE) Data Access Working Group in 2001, where the idea for a cookbook-like resource to facilitate the use of Earth science data by teachers and students resulted in her leading the development of the "Earth Exploration Toolbook" (EET), which allows teachers to easily access and use real scientific data in the classroom. Her efforts were recognized with the EET being awarded Science Magazine's Science Prize for Online Research in Education in 2011.

  11. Integrated Approaches On Archaeo-Geophysical Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucukdemirci, M.; Piro, S.; Zamuner, D.; Ozer, E.

    2015-12-01

    Key words: Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR), Magnetometry, Geophysical Data Integration, Principal Component Analyse (PCA), Aizanoi Archaeological Site An application of geophysical integration methods which often appealed are divided into two classes as qualitative and quantitative approaches. This work focused on the application of quantitative integration approaches, which involve the mathematical and statistical integration techniques, on the archaeo-geophysical data obtained in Aizanoi Archaeological Site,Turkey. Two geophysical methods were applied as Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) and Magnetometry for archaeological prospection on the selected archaeological site. After basic data processing of each geophysical method, the mathematical approaches of Sums and Products and the statistical approach of Principal Component Analysis (PCA) have been applied for the integration. These integration approches were first tested on synthetic digital images before application to field data. Then the same approaches were applied to 2D magnetic maps and 2D GPR time slices which were obtained on the same unit grids in the archaeological site. Initially, the geophysical data were examined individually by referencing with archeological maps and informations obtained from archaeologists and some important structures as possible walls, roads and relics were determined. The results of all integration approaches provided very important and different details about the anomalies related to archaeological features. By using all those applications, integrated images can provide complementary informations as well about the archaeological relics under the ground. Acknowledgements The authors would like to thanks to Scientific and Technological Research Council of Turkey (TUBITAK), Fellowship for Visiting Scientists Programme for their support, Istanbul University Scientific Research Project Fund, (Project.No:12302) and archaeologist team of Aizanoi Archaeological site for their support

  12. Geophysical variables and human health and behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoilova, I.; Dimitrova, S.

    2008-02-01

    The increasing number of papers during the last years reveals an existence of effect of geophysical factors on human health. The subject of this paper is to present some results obtained confirming this effect and short review of some scientific opinions about mechanisms, according to which geomagnetic field (GMF) variations could influence on human. We have investigated the influence of geomagnetic disturbances on physiological parameters of healthy people as well as the relationship with dynamic of myocardial infarction. Although there are objective difficulties, investigations in that field will be extremely useful for protecting man from harmful effects of geophysical factors.

  13. Measuring Orientation Of The Earth With GPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freedman, Adam P.

    1992-01-01

    Report discusses feasibility of using Global Positioning System (GPS) to resolve short-term fluctuations (days or hours) in locations of points on crust of Earth to within centimeters or millimeters. With full constellation of satellites and ground receiving stations, system provides rapid (within 12 hours) determinations of variations in orientation. Measurements used to enhance precision of spacecraft navigation and in geophysical and meteorological studies of daily exchanges of angular momentum among fluid core, crust and mantle, oceans, and atmosphere.

  14. Teaching Creative Movement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Exiner, Johanna; Lloyd, Phyllis

    This guide to creative movement, relevant to all age groups, opens with a discussion of historical and present trends in movement and dance. Chapters treat (a) the body--body awareness, body activities, and relationships; (b) principles of movement--space, force, time, dynamics, and fluency; (c) topics within the sphere of movement, from the world…

  15. Discover Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Discover Earth is a NASA-funded project for teachers of grades 5-12 who want to expand their knowledge of the Earth system, and prepare to become master teachers who promote Earth system science in their own schools, counties, and throughout their state. Participants from the following states are invited to apply: Connecticut, Delaware, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Washington, DC. Teachers selected for the project participate in a two-week summer workshop conducted at the University of Maryland, College Park; develop classroom-ready materials during the workshop for broad dissemination; conduct a minimum of two peer training activities during the coming school year; and participate in other enrichment/education opportunities as available and desired. Discover Earth is a team effort that utilizes expertise from a range of contributors, and balances science content with hands-on classroom applications.

  16. Discover Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, Colleen

    1996-01-01

    Discover Earth is a NASA-funded project for teachers of grades 5-12 who want to expand their knowledge of the Earth system, and prepare to become master teachers who promote Earth system science in their own schools, counties, and throughout their state. Participants from the following states are invited to apply: Connecticut, Delaware, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Washington, DC. Teachers selected for the project participate in a two-week summer workshop conducted at the University of Maryland, College Park; develop classroom-ready materials during the workshop for broad dissemination; conduct a minimum of two peer training activities during the coming school year; and participate in other enrichment/education opportunities as available and desired. Discover Earth is a team effort that utilizes expertise from a range of contributors, and balances science content with hands-on classroom applications.

  17. Movement disorders and sleep.

    PubMed

    Driver-Dunckley, Erika D; Adler, Charles H

    2012-11-01

    This article summarizes what is currently known about sleep disturbances in several movement disorders including Parkinson disease, essential tremor, parkinsonism, dystonia, Huntington disease, myoclonus, and ataxias. There is an association between movement disorders and sleep. In some cases the prevalence of sleep disorders is much higher in patients with movement disorder, such as rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder in Parkinson disease. In other cases, sleep difficulties worsen the involuntary movements. In many cases the medications used to treat patients with movement disorder disturb sleep or cause daytime sleepiness. The importance of discussing sleep issues in patients with movement disorders cannot be underestimated.

  18. GETMAG - A New Geophysical Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, P.; Clark, D.; Bick, M.; Binks, R.; Du, J.; Foley, C.; Gnanarajan, S.; Leslie, K.; Sullivan, P.; Thorn, B.; Tilbrook, D.

    2004-05-01

    CSIRO is developing a new instrument for mineral exploration. The instrument, GETMAG, measures the magnetic gradient tensor and the components of the magnetic field. The sensors are high temperature superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs), or HTSs. The acronym is largely historical and stands for Glass Earth Tensor Magnetic Airborne Gradiometer. The GETMAG instument measures magnetic gradients via a novel application of high temperature superconducting tape flip-chipped onto a SQUID sensor. A gradiometer structure incorporating two opposing pick-up loops is patterned onto a tape. Due to the spatial separation of these loops, a magnetic gradient will produce a Meissner shielding current in the tape. The current is magnetically coupled to the SQUID sensor thus providing a direct measurement of the magnetic gradient. The tape is rotated to detect all gradients orthogonal to the axis of rotation. Three rotating tape systems are required to measure the full tensor. The gradients in combination with the TMI yield better resolution for magnetic surveys. Direction to individual sources and their magnetic moments (reduced according to distance) can be determined directly from the tensor. Results from test surveys, where the GETMAG system was rotated manually, show that the gradient can be measured to an accuracy of a few nT/m. It is estimated that improving the mechanical structure, spinning the system at about 600 rpm and using an improved data extraction algorithm can reduce this noise figure by two orders of magnitude. The vector components at this stage are very inaccurate since most of the development undertaken to date has been aimed at measuring the gradients. The systems operate better as gradiometers than as magnetometers and will not challenge total field instruments such as proton precession or alkali-vapour magnetometers as scalar instruments. The GETMAG concept has wide ranging applications in mineral exploration, environmental studies, ordnance

  19. Evaluation of borehole geophysical logs at the Sharon Steel Farrell Works Superfund site, Mercer County, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McAuley, Steven D.

    2004-01-01

    On April 14?15, 2003, geophysical logging was conducted in five open-borehole wells in and adjacent to the Sharon Steel Farrell Works Superfund Site, Mercer County, Pa. Geophysical-logging tools used included caliper, natural gamma, single-point resistance, fluid temperature, and heatpulse flowmeter. The logs were used to determine casing depth, locate subsurface fractures, identify water-bearing fractures, and identify and measure direction and rate of vertical flow within the borehole. The results of the geophysical logging were used to determine the placement of borehole screens, which allows monitoring of water levels and sampling of water-bearing zones so that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency can conduct an investigation of contaminant movement in the fractured bedrock. Water-bearing zones were identified in three of five boreholes at depths ranging from 46 to 119 feet below land surface. Borehole MR-3310 (MW03D) showed upward vertical flow from 71 to 74 feet below land surface to a receiving zone at 63-68 feet below land surface, permitting potential movement of ground water, and possibly contaminants, from deep to shallow zones. No vertical flow was measured in the other four boreholes.

  20. Basic research and data analysis for the earth and ocean physics applications program and for the National Geodetic Satellite Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Data analysis and supporting research in connection with the following objectives are discussed: (1) provide a precise and accurate geometric description of the earth's surface, (2) provide a precise and accurate mathematical description of the earth's gravitational field, and (3) determine time variations of the geometry of the ocean surface, the solid earth, the gravity field and other geophysical parameters.

  1. Geophysical Hazards and Preventive Disaster Management of Extreme Natural Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail-Zadeh, A.; Takeuchi, K.

    2007-12-01

    Geophysical hazard is potentially damaging natural event and/or phenomenon, which may cause the loss of life or injury, property damage, social and economic disruption, or environmental degradation. Extreme natural hazards are a key manifestation of the complex hierarchical nonlinear Earth system. An understanding, accurate modeling and forecasting of the extreme hazards are most important scientific challenges. Several recent extreme natural events (e.g., 2004 Great Indian Ocean Earthquake and Tsunami and the 2005 violent Katrina hurricane) demonstrated strong coupling between solid Earth and ocean, and ocean and atmosphere. These events resulted in great humanitarian tragedies because of a weak preventive disaster management. The less often natural events occur (and the extreme events are rare by definition), the more often the disaster managers postpone the preparedness to the events. The tendency to reduce the funding for preventive disaster management of natural catastrophes is seldom follows the rules of responsible stewardship for future generations neither in developing countries nor in highly developed economies where it must be considered next to malfeasance. Protecting human life and property against earthquake disasters requires an uninterrupted chain of tasks: from (i) understanding of physics of the events, analysis and monitoring, through (ii) interpretation, modeling, hazard assessment, and prediction, to (iii) public awareness, preparedness, and preventive disaster management.

  2. Invariant-tori-like Lagrangian coherent structures in geophysical flows.

    PubMed

    Beron-Vera, Francisco J; Olascoaga, María J; Brown, Michael G; Koçak, Huseyin; Rypina, Irina I

    2010-03-01

    The term "Lagrangian coherent structure" (LCS) is normally used to describe numerically detected structures whose properties are similar to those of stable and unstable manifolds of hyperbolic trajectories. The latter structures are invariant curves, i.e., material curves of fluid that serve as transport barriers. In this paper we use the term LCS to describe a different type of structure whose properties are similar to those of invariant tori in certain classes of two-dimensional incompressible flows. Like stable and unstable manifolds, invariant tori are invariant curves that serve as transport barriers. There are many differences, however, between traditional LCSs and invariant-tori-like LCSs. These differences are discussed with an emphasis on numerical techniques that can be used to identify invariant-tori-like LCSs. Structures of this type are often present in geophysical flows where zonal jets are present. A prime example of an invariant-torus-like LCS is the transport barrier near the core of the polar night jet in the Earth's lower and middle stratospheres in the austral winter and early spring; this is the barrier that traps ozone-depleted air inside the ozone hole. This example is investigated using both a simple analytically prescribed flow and a velocity field produced by a general circulation model of the Earth's atmosphere. PMID:20370304

  3. Archaeological Geophysics in Israel: Past, Present and Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eppelbaum, L. V.

    2009-04-01

    localization of archaeological targets: An introduction. Geoinformatics, 11, No.1, 19-28. Eppelbaum, L.V., 2005. Multilevel observations of magnetic field at archaeological sites as additional interpreting tool. Proceed. of the 6th Conference of Archaeological Prospection, Roma, Italy, 4 pp. Eppelbaum, L.V., 2007a. Localization of Ring Structures in Earth's Environments. Proceed. of the 7th Conference of Archaeological Prospection. Nitra, Slovakia, 145-148. Eppelbaum, L.V., 2007b. Revealing of subterranean karst using modern analysis of potential and quasi-potential fields. Proceed. of the Symp. on the Application of Geophysics to Engineering and Environmental Problems, Denver, USA, 797-810. Eppelbaum, L.V., 2008a. Remote operated vehicle geophysical survey using magnetic and VLF methods: proposed schemes for data processing and interpretation. Proceed. of the Symp. on the Application of Geophysics to Engineering and Environmental Problems, Philadelphia, USA, 938-963. Eppelbaum, L.V., 2008b. On the application of near-surface temperature investigations for delineation of archaeological targets. Trans. of the 1st International Workshop on Advances in Remote Sensing for Archaeology and Cultural Heritage Management, Rome, Italy, 179-183. Eppelbaum, L.V., 2009. Application of microgravity at archaeological sites in Israel: some estimation derived from 3D modeling and quantitative analysis of gravity field. Proceed. of the Symp. on the Application of Geophysics to Engineering and Environmental Problems, Denver, USA, 10 pp. Eppelbaum, L. and Ben-Avraham, Z., 2002. On the development of 4D geophysical Data Base of archaeological sites in Israel. Trans. of the Conf. of the Israel Geol. Soc. Ann. Meet., MaHagan - Lake Kinneret, Israel, p.21. Eppelbaum, L., Ben-Avraham, Z., and Itkis, S., 2003a. Ancient Roman Remains in Israel provide a challenge for physical-archaeological modeling techniques. First Break, 21 (2), 51-61. Eppelbaum, L.V., Ben-Avraham, Z., and Itkis, S.E., 2003b

  4. A case for catastrophic early degassing of the earth.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fanale, F. P.

    1971-01-01

    Evidence is given for the occurrence in early earth history of massive escape of volatiles from the interior of the earth to its surface, which must have had catastrophic proportions. The mechanism and time of this event are inferred from the abundances and distribution of volatiles in the atmosphere, hydrosphere and crust, and from meteorite studies, and geophysical and astronomical observations. This event is linked to the melting of the earth during accretion which resulted in the concentration of U, Th, K and Pb in the outermost portion of the earth and in virtually complete expulsion of nonradiogenic Ar, Ne and Kr from its interior.

  5. Aristoteles - An ESA mission to study the earth's gravity field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambeck, K.

    In preparing for its first Solid-Earth Program, ESA has studied a satellite concept for a mission dedicated to the precise determination of the earth's geopotential (gravitational and magnetic) fields. Data from such a mission are expected to make substantial contributions to a number of research and applications fields in solid-earth geophysics, oceanography and global-change monitoring. The impact of a high-resolution gravity-field mission on studies of the various earth-science problems is assessed. The current state of our knowledge in this area is discussed and the ability of low-orbit satellite gradiometry to contribute to their solution is demonstrated.

  6. Laser ranging contributions to monitoring and interpreting Earth orientation changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, R. S.

    2002-01-01

    The groundwork for a new field in the geophysical sciences - space geodesy - was laid in the 1960s with the development of satellite and lunar laser ranging systems, along with the development of very long baseline interferometry systems, for the purpose of studying crustal plate motion and deformation, the Earth's gravitational field, and Earth orientation changes. The availability of accurate, routine determinations of the Earth orientation parameters (EOPs) afforded by the launch of the LAser GEOdynamics Satellite (LAGEOS) on May 4, 1976, and the subsequent numerous studies of the LAGEOS observations, has led to a greater understanding of the causes of the observed changes in the Earth's orientation.

  7. Satellite-tracking and Earth dynamics research programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The major focus for operations during this period was the preliminary MERIT Campaign and its intensive tracking of LAGEOS for polar motion and Earth rotation studies. The data acquired from LAGEOS were used for other geophysical investigations, including studies of crustal dynamics, and Earth and ocean tides, and for the general development of precision orbit determination. The network performed regular tracking of several other retroreflector satellites including GEOS-1, GEOS-3, BE-C, and Starlette for refined determinations of station coordinates and Earth's gravity field and for studies of solid Earth dynamics.

  8. Using Geophysical Data in the Texas High School Course, Geology, Meteorology, and Oceanography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellins, K.; Olson, H.; Pulliam, J.; Schott, M. J.

    2002-12-01

    Science educators working directly with scientists to develop inquiry-based instructional materials in Earth science yield some of the best results. The TEXTEAMS (Texas Teachers Empowered for Achievement in Mathematics and Science) Leadership Training for the Texas high school science course, Geology, Meteorology and Oceanography (GMO) is one example of a successful program that provides high-quality training to master teachers using geophysical data collected by scientists at The University of Texas Institute for Geophysics (UTIG). TEXTEAMS is a certification program of professional development and leadership training sponsored by the National Science Foundation that is part of the Texas Statewide Systemic Initiative. UTIG scientists teamed with science educators at the Charles A. Dana Center for Mathematics and Science Education at UT and the Texas Education Agency to develop inquiry-based instructional materials for eight GMO modules. Our learning activities help students and teachers understand how Earth scientists interpret the natural world and test their hypotheses, and provide opportunities for the use of technology in classroom science learning; they are aligned with national and state teaching standards. Examples of TEXTEAMS GMO learning activities that use geophysical data. 1. Neotectonics: radiocarbon dates and elevation above current sea level of raised coral reefs in the New Georgia Islands are used to calculate rates of tectonic uplift and as a basis for the development of a conceptual model to explain the pattern of uplift that emerges from the data. 2. Large Igneous Provinces:geophysical logging data collected on ODP Leg 183 (Kerguelen Plateau) are analyzed to identify the transition from sediment to basement rock. 3. The Search for Black Gold: petroleum exploration requires the integration of geology, geophysics, petrophysics and geochemistry. Knowledge gained in previous GMO modules is combined with fundamental knowledge about economics to

  9. Fiber-Optic Sensors For Geophysical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, C.; Zarobila, C.; Rand, J.; Lampman, R.

    1989-02-01

    A review of the performance of various geophysical sensors is given. Included in the discussion are acoustic towed arrays, several types of phase-modulated and intensity-modulated seismometers, and a fiber-optic magnetometer. The presentation is in the form of a brief overview stressing concepts and recent progress. Theoretical derivations and engineering design are left to the references.

  10. Sedimentological analysis using geophysical well logs

    SciTech Connect

    Izotova, T.S. )

    1993-09-01

    The application of geophysical well logs in sedimentology and stratigraphic prospecting holds great promise in solving a number of geological problems. A suite of logs provides data on a wide range of rock properties: vertical and lateral variation of resistivity, natural polarization, natural and induced radioactivity, shear strength, and acoustic properties. Each of these properties is controlled by the depositional environment of the sediments and their later diagenesis. The attention of geologists and geophysicists is drawn to new techniques in the interpretation of geophysical well logs for exploration, appraisal, and development of oil and gas fields. The relationship between geophysical logs and depositional environments is explored. Bulk composition, rock structure, and texture and facies variation can be quantified by electric log parameters. Also, the possibility of using logs to demonstrate long- and short-period sedimentary cycles is demonstrated. Methods of sedimentological analysis using geophysical well logs are demonstrated. The importance of a genetic approach in the interpretation of geological sequences and paleogeological reconstructions is emphasized using examples taken from oil and gas prospecting operations in the Ukraine.

  11. Digital geologic and geophysical data of Bangladesh

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Persits, Feliks M.; Wandrey, C.J.; Milici, R.C.; Manwar, Abdullah

    1997-01-01

    The data set for these maps includes arcs, polygons, and labels that outline and describe the general geologic age and geophysical fields of Bangladesh. Political boundaries are provided to show the general location of administrative regions and state boundaries. Major base topographic data like cities, rivers, etc. were derived from the same paper map source as the geology.

  12. Estimating Geophysical Parameters From Gravity Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sjogren, William L.; Wimberly, Ravenel N.

    1988-01-01

    ORBSIM program developed for accurate extraction of parameters of geophysical models from Doppler-radio-tracking data acquired from orbiting planetary spacecraft. Model of proposed planetary structure used in numerical integration along simulated trajectories of spacecraft around primary body. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  13. The interior of the Earth, an elementary description

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robertson, Eugene C.

    1966-01-01

    Evidence on the structure and composition of the earth's interior comes from (1) observations of surface rocks, (2) geophysical data from earthquakes, flow of heat from the interior, the magnetic field, and gravity, (3) laboratory experiments on surface rocks and minerals, and (4) comparison of the earth with other planets, the sun, stars, and meteorites. The major structural components in the earth that are separated by sharp discontinuities are the crust, the mantle, and the core. The crust forms a very thin surface skin, the mantle is a thick shell that extends half the radius down into the earth, and the core occupies the central part. The crust and upper mantle are known to vary in physical and chemical characteristics, both horizontally and vertically; the lower mantle and core are generally assumed to be uniform because their diagnostic geophysical phenomena are masked by the physical properties of the upper layers.

  14. Earth: Earth Science and Health

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maynard, Nancy G.

    2001-01-01

    A major new NASA initiative on environmental change and health has been established to promote the application of Earth science remote sensing data, information, observations, and technologies to issues of human health. NASA's Earth Sciences suite of Earth observing instruments are now providing improved observations science, data, and advanced technologies about the Earth's land, atmosphere, and oceans. These new space-based resources are being combined with other agency and university resources, data integration and fusion technologies, geographic information systems (GIS), and the spectrum of tools available from the public health community, making it possible to better understand how the environment and climate are linked to specific diseases, to improve outbreak prediction, and to minimize disease risk. This presentation is an overview of NASA's tools, capabilities, and research advances in this initiative.

  15. Decadal variations in geophysical processes and asymmetries in the solar motion about the Solar System's barycentre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorenkov, Nikolay; Wilson, Ian; Khlystov, Anatoly

    2010-05-01

    It is well known that many geophysical processes vary on inter-annual to decadal timescales. These variations are usually attributed to terrestrial causes that include: the Earth's core-mantle coupling, the effects of internal driven stochastic oscillations in the climatic system, the effects of the global conveyer belt in World Ocean and so on. However, we contend that the empirical evidences and facts demand that this generally accepted assumption should be revised and modified. We find that the observed changes in the specific mass of the Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets closely correspond to the specific mass variations that are needed to explain the "decadal-long" fluctuations in LOD (Sidorenkov, 2009). Since the mass of the ice sheets in Antarctic and Greenland depend on long-term climate variations, it is reasonable to assume that the decadal fluctuations in the Earth's rotation may also correlate with the fluctuations in the major climatic indices. Following this line of reasoning, we have found that the atmospheric circulation regimes and the ten-year running mean of the anomalies of the Northern Hemisphere air temperature are well correlated with the changes in the Earth's rotation rate. Stanislav Perov and Nikolay Sidorenkov (2009) found also significant correlation between fluctuations in the Earth's rotational rate and activity of the India monsoon. Ian Wilson (2009) found a relationship between the deviation of the Earth's LOD from its long-term trend and the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO). Whenever there are large deviations in the Earth's LOD from its long--term trend, the PDO index transitions to its positive phase. Note that the observed changes in the LOD precede those in the anomalies of the precipitation in India monsoon and in the PDO by about eight years. Ian Wilson shows that the times when Solar/Lunar tides had their greatest impact upon the Earth are closely synchronized with the times of greatest asymmetry in the Solar Inertial

  16. Satellite tracking and earth dynamics research programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The SAO laser site in Arequipa continued routine operations throughout the reporting period except for the months of March and April when upgrading was underway. The laser in Orroral Valley was operational through March. Together with the cooperating stations in Wettzell, Grasse, Kootwikj, San Fernando, Helwan, and Metsahove the laser stations obtained a total of 37,099 quick-look observations on 978 passes of BE-C, Starlette, and LAGEOS. The Network continued to track LAGEOS at highest priority for polar motion and Earth rotation studies, and for other geophysical investigations, including crustal dynamics, Earth and ocean tides, and the general development of precision orbit determination. The Network performed regular tracking of BE-C and Starlette for refined determinations of station coordinate and the Earth's gravity field and for studies of solid earth dynamics. Monthly statistics of the passes and points are given by station and by satellite.

  17. Geophysical Constraints on Sediment Dispersal Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnstone, Elizabeth Anne Carruthers

    Geophysical and geological approaches were employed to understand sediment dispersal systems and their response to various forcing functions (i.e., sea level fluctuations, tectonic deformation, sediment supply, and climate change). Two end member marine environments were studied; one with high precipitation and sediment discharge (Gulf of Papua, Papua New Guinea) and the other with low precipitation and sediment discharge (Oceanside Littoral Cell). The high-sedimentation rate in the Gulf of Papua (GoP) yields high-fidelity records of Earth history. As part of the NSF Margins Source-to-Sink (S2S) program, we acquired CHIRP and core data across the GoP continental shelf that complemented onshore and offshore research in the region. CHIRP seismic data imaged three Holocene sedimentary lobes. The older Central lobe is downlapped by two younger lobes to the north and south. Sediment analysis showed that the older Central lobe has an elemental signature similar to the younger Northern lobe with both sourced from the Purari River watershed and lobe migration appears to be climatically controlled. The Southern lobe has elemental signatures more consistent with the Fly River watershed. Our results suggest the northern rivers began depositing sediments on the shelf during the Holocene sea level rise in the central region of the GoP and migrated abruptly north at ~2 kybp. Conversely, during the early Holocene transgression, sediments in the Fly drainage system were sequestered onshore infilling accommodation created in the large low-relief coastal plain during the sea level rise. Upon infilling the onshore accommodation, the Fly River delivered sediment to the ocean and formed the Southern lobe. Such differences in onshore storage capacity may introduce a lag between low-gradient rivers (Type I) with a large coastal plain versus high-gradient river systems (Type II) with small coastal plains. The second study site is in the sediment-starved Oceanside Littoral Cell (OCL) of

  18. Geophysical Signitures From Hydrocarbon Contaminated Aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbas, M.; Jardani, A.

    2015-12-01

    The task of delineating the contamination plumes as well as studying their impact on the soil and groundwater biogeochemical properties is needed to support the remediation efforts and plans. Geophysical methods including electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), induced polarization (IP), ground penetrating radar (GPR), and self-potential (SP) have been previously used to characterize contaminant plumes and investigate their impact on soil and groundwater properties (Atekwana et al., 2002, 2004; Benson et al., 1997; Campbell et al., 1996; Cassidy et al., 2001; Revil et al., 2003; Werkema et al., 2000). Our objective was to: estimate the hydrocarbon contamination extent in a contaminated site in northern France, and to adverse the effects of the oil spill on the groundwater properties. We aim to find a good combination of non-intrusive and low cost methods which we can use to follow the bio-remediation process, which is planned to proceed next year. We used four geophysical methods including electrical resistivity tomography, IP, GPR, and SP. The geophysical data was compared to geochemical ones obtained from 30 boreholes installed in the site during the geophysical surveys. Our results have shown: low electrical resistivity values; high chargeability values; negative SP anomalies; and attenuated GPR reflections coincident with groundwater contamination. Laboratory and field geochemical measurements have demonstrated increased groundwater electrical conductivity and increased microbial activity associated with hydrocarbon contamination of groundwater. Our study results support the conductive model suggested by studies such as Sauck (2000) and Atekwana et al., (2004), who suggest that biological alterations of hydrocarbon contamination can substantially modify the chemical and physical properties of the subsurface, producing a dramatic shift in the geo-electrical signature from resistive to conductive. The next stage of the research will include time lapse borehole

  19. Geophysical monitoring in a hydrocarbon reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caffagni, Enrico; Bokelmann, Goetz

    2016-04-01

    Extraction of hydrocarbons from reservoirs demands ever-increasing technological effort, and there is need for geophysical monitoring to better understand phenomena occurring within the reservoir. Significant deformation processes happen when man-made stimulation is performed, in combination with effects deriving from the existing natural conditions such as stress regime in situ or pre-existing fracturing. Keeping track of such changes in the reservoir is important, on one hand for improving recovery of hydrocarbons, and on the other hand to assure a safe and proper mode of operation. Monitoring becomes particularly important when hydraulic-fracturing (HF) is used, especially in the form of the much-discussed "fracking". HF is a sophisticated technique that is widely applied in low-porosity geological formations to enhance the production of natural hydrocarbons. In principle, similar HF techniques have been applied in Europe for a long time in conventional reservoirs, and they will probably be intensified in the near future; this suggests an increasing demand in technological development, also for updating and adapting the existing monitoring techniques in applied geophysics. We review currently available geophysical techniques for reservoir monitoring, which appear in the different fields of analysis in reservoirs. First, the properties of the hydrocarbon reservoir are identified; here we consider geophysical monitoring exclusively. The second step is to define the quantities that can be monitored, associated to the properties. We then describe the geophysical monitoring techniques including the oldest ones, namely those in practical usage from 40-50 years ago, and the most recent developments in technology, within distinct groups, according to the application field of analysis in reservoir. This work is performed as part of the FracRisk consortium (www.fracrisk.eu); this project, funded by the Horizon2020 research programme, aims at helping minimize the

  20. Geophysical Technologies to Image Old Mine Works

    SciTech Connect

    Kanaan Hanna; Jim Pfeiffer

    2007-01-15

    ZapataEngineering, Blackhawk Division performed geophysical void detection demonstrations for the US Department of Labor Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA). The objective was to advance current state-of-practices of geophysical technologies for detecting underground mine voids. The presence of old mine works above, adjacent, or below an active mine presents major health and safety hazards to miners who have inadvertently cut into locations with such features. In addition, the presence of abandoned mines or voids beneath roadways and highway structures may greatly impact the performance of the transportation infrastructure in terms of cost and public safety. Roads constructed over abandoned mines are subject to potential differential settlement, subsidence, sinkholes, and/or catastrophic collapse. Thus, there is a need to utilize geophysical imaging technologies to accurately locate old mine works. Several surface and borehole geophysical imaging methods and mapping techniques were employed at a known abandoned coal mine in eastern Illinois to investigate which method best map the location and extent of old works. These methods included: 1) high-resolution seismic (HRS) using compressional P-wave (HRPW) and S-wave (HRSW) reflection collected with 3-D techniques; 2) crosshole seismic tomography (XHT); 3) guided waves; 4) reverse vertical seismic profiling (RVSP); and 5) borehole sonar mapping. In addition, several exploration borings were drilled to confirm the presence of the imaged mine voids. The results indicated that the RVSP is the most viable method to accurately detect the subsurface voids with horizontal accuracy of two to five feet. This method was then applied at several other locations in Colorado with various topographic, geologic, and cultural settings for the same purpose. This paper presents the significant results obtained from the geophysical investigations in Illinois.

  1. Geophysics applications in critical zone science: emerging topics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Geophysical studies have resulted in remarkable advances in characterization of critical zone. The geophysics applications uncover the relationships between structure and function in subsurface as they seek to define subsurface structural units with individual properties of retention and trans...

  2. Geophysical characterisation of a rockslide in an alpine region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godio, A.; de Bacco, G.; Strobbia, C.

    2003-04-01

    The rock slope stability analysis requires the geomechanical characterisation of the different geological units that may be affected by the instability, and hence the required investigation depth depends on the mechanism of the movement and on its scale. A joint application of laboratory test and in situ extensive geophysical investigation has been used for the geological and geotechnical characterisation of a site with heavy slope and interested by recent events of landslide in the overburden and rockslide. An existing road is going to be substituted by a tunnel, and so both the shallow detritical overburden and the rock mass has to be investigated. The geophysical survey has been planned taking into account the difficult logistical condition of the area; the accessibility also conditioned the positioning of the boreholes. Two horizontal boreholes, each 50 m long, were drilled along the designed tunnel line, and two vertical boreholes, 30m of depth, were realised in order to take samples to test for the estimate of the mechanical properties of the rock mass. They also provided direct punctual information on the thickness of the overburden and allowed to calibrate the geophysical results. The horizontal ones have been used for borehole seismic and for ultrasonic logging; in the vertical ones inclinometers have been installed to monitor the movements. The stratigraphic evidence showed the presence of shallow layer of low-consolidated materials and a hard gneissic bedrock around 20 m deep. Laboratory measurements on samples allowed the determination of the high-strain mechanical behaviour and the dynamic low-strain elastic moduli (P and S wave ultrasonic pulse test). These data are compared with the results of the in situ characterisation: the geophysical investigation had to answer a series of questions about the geometry and the properties of the detritical overburden, the inhomogeneities and the fracture distribution of the rock mass, the eventual presence of

  3. A German Geophysics School Project First steps to bring geophysical topics to schoolclasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, S.

    2002-12-01

    In Germany Geophysics is a science with almost none or a bad reputation. People do not know to distinguish between Geophysics, Geography and Geology. In order to change the public view on Geosciences, a,School Project Geophysics' is going to be created at the Institute of Meteorology and Geophysics, Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, Frankfurt, which will offer geophysical ideas, methodes and scientific results to schoolclasses. After researches like PISA or TIMSS (third international Math and Nature-Science test) new concepts in education will be required. Interdisciplinary tasks are demanded by national and international commissions.\\The,School Project Geophysics' will be created to bring geophysical themes and results of scientific research into schools. One Day- or one Week-Workshops will help to publish geophysical contents in close cooperation with Physics - and Geography - teachers.\\Hands-on experiments (for advanced pupils) like refraction-Seismics or Magnetic measurements will lead students closer to scientific work and will help to establish personal interests in Earthsciences. Working with personally produced datasets will show the basics of inversion theory and point out the difficulties in creating models. Boundaries of data interpretation (the plurality of variables needed) will teach the school children to see scientific and statistic predictions and declarations more criticaly. Animations and Videos will present global examples (for example of volcanoes or Earthquakes) and lead over to regional sites. Excursions to these sites will help to show fieldwork methods and its problems and will convince to take a different look on topography and landscapes.\\All necessary utilities (Animations, Videos, Pictures and foils) will be offered to teachers in an online-data base which will be installed and managed by the project. Teachers and pupils might get easily into contact with Scientists to discuss geoscientific items. Further on extensions to geographic

  4. Geophysical surveys at the Oitti DNAPL spill site, southern Finland

    SciTech Connect

    Peltoniemi, M.; Laine, E.; Haenninen, P.; Mellett, J.S.; Silvennoinen, H.

    1996-11-01

    In the 1950`s and 1960`s about 10,000 liters of dry cleaning solvents from a dry cleaning establishment near the town center at Oitti, southern Finland were disposed of in a well and in pits. The groundwater was found to be contaminated in 1992 when a regional groundwater quality survey was done in the region. Among the solvents are trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene. Although the major part of the total amount of solvents were deposited in a condensed form into a landfill, the storage sites at the dry cleaning establishment became injection wells by default, because of the permeable nature of the underlying strata (porous sand and gravel, typical of the glacial esker formation overlying the area). The groundwater has been found to be contaminated within a total area of several square kilometres and the amount of polluted groundwater in the esker formation is estimated to be 8 million cubic meters. The main water supply well for the town became contaminated and had to be closed because of high levels of tri- and tetrachloroethylene. Since 1992, the spill site and the whole esker area have been subject to diverse studies aiming at the delineation of the polluted area and at the planning of the remediation methods. In 1995 it was decided to perform geophysical surveys at the site, with two main objectives in mind: first, to delineate the unknown bedrock topography underlying the esker formation, and secondly, to map variations in the groundwater depth in the vicinity of the establishment. The main geophysical methods applied were ground penetrating radar and seismic refraction sounding. Earth resistivity sounding and inductive sounding (EM31) techniques were also applied. On the basis of seismic refraction surveys the depth to bedrock surface could be determined on the flanks of the esker and results from the ground penetrating radar surveys gave information about the groundwater depth and overburden quality variations on and around the spill site.

  5. Human responses to the geophysical daily, annual and lunar cycles.

    PubMed

    Foster, Russell G; Roenneberg, Till

    2008-09-01

    Collectively the daily, seasonal, lunar and tidal geophysical cycles regulate much of the temporal biology of life on Earth. The increasing isolation of human societies from these geophysical cycles, as a result of improved living conditions, high-quality nutrition and 24/7 working practices, have led many to believe that human biology functions independently of them. Yet recent studies have highlighted the dominant role that our circadian clock plays in the organisation of 24 hour patterns of behaviour and physiology. Preferred wake and sleep times are to a large extent driven by an endogenous temporal program that uses sunlight as an entraining cue. The alarm clock can drive human activity rhythms but has little direct effect on our endogenous 24 hour physiology. In many situations, our biology and our society appear to be in serious opposition, and the damaging consequences to our health under these circumstances are increasingly recognised. The seasons dominate the lives of non-equatorial species, and until recently, they also had a marked influence on much of human biology. Despite human isolation from seasonal changes in temperature, food and photoperiod in the industrialised nations, the seasons still appear to have a small, but significant, impact upon when individuals are born and many aspects of health. The seasonal changes that modulate our biology, and how these factors might interact with the social and metabolic status of the individual to drive seasonal effects, are still poorly understood. Lunar cycles had, and continue to have, an influence upon human culture, though despite a persistent belief that our mental health and other behaviours are modulated by the phase of the moon, there is no solid evidence that human biology is in any way regulated by the lunar cycle.

  6. Methodology of Detailed Geophysical Examination of the Areas of World Recognized Religious and Cultural Artifacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eppelbaum, Lev

    2010-05-01

    It is obvious that noninvasive geophysical methods are the main interpreting tools at the areas of world recognized religious and cultural artifacts. Usually in these areas any excavations, drilling and infrastructure activity are forbidden or very strongly limited. According to field experience and results of numerous modeling (Eppelbaum, 1999, 2000, 2009a, 2009b; Eppelbaum and Itkis, 2001, 2003; Eppelbaum et al., 2000, 2001a, 2001b, 2003a, 2006a, 2006b, 2007, 2010, Itkis et al., 2003; Neishtadt et al., 2006), a set of applied geophysical methods may include the following types of surveys: (1) magnetic, (3) GPR (ground penetration radar), (3) gravity, (4) electromagnetic VLF (very low frequency), (5) ER (electric resistivity), (6) SP (self-potential), (7) IP (induced polarization), (8) SE (seismoelectric), and (9) NST (near-surface temperature). As it was shown in (Eppelbaum, 2005), interpretation ambiguity may be sufficiently reduced not only by integrated analysis of several geophysical methods, but also by the way of multilevel observations of geophysical fields. Magnetic, gravity and VLF measurements may be performed at different levels over the earth's surface (0.1 - 3 m), ER, SP and SE observations may be obtained with different depth of electrodes grounding (0.1 - 1 m), and NST sensor may be located at a depth of 0.8 - 2.5 m. GPR method usually allows measuring electromagnetic fields at various frequencies (with corresponding changing of the investigation depth and other parameters). Influence of some typical noise factors to geophysical investigations at archaeological sites was investigated in (Eppelbaum and Khesin, 2001). In many cases various constructions and walls are in the nearest vicinity of the examined artifacts. These constructions can be also utilized for carrying out geophysical measurements (magnetic, gravity and VLF) at different levels. Application of the modern ROV (remote operated vehicles) with registration of magnetic and VLF fields at

  7. Spectral structure of Earth rotation parameter series (SHA).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yuanlan; Zhu, Wenyao

    Using the Marple algorithm of AR spectrum, the authors have analysed the spectral structure of ERP(SHA) series. Some main periodical terms of both polar motion and Earth rotation have been derived well from this series. This shows that the ERP(SHA) series can be reliably applied to astronomical and geophysical researches.

  8. Geophysical Characterization of the Salna Sinking Zone, Garhwal Himalaya, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sastry, Rambhatla G.; Mondal, Suman K.

    2013-01-01

    Infrastructure and communication facilities are repeatedly affected by ground deformation in Gharwal Himalaya, India; for effective remediation measures, a thorough understanding of the real reasons for these movements is needed. In this regard, we undertook an integrated geophysical and geotechnical study of the Salna sinking zone close to the Main Central Thrust in Garhwal Himalaya. Our geophysical data include eight combined electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) and induced polarization imaging (IPI) profiles spanning 144-600 m, with 3-10 m electrode separation in the Wenner-Schlumberger configuration, and five micro-gravity profiles with 10-30 m station spacing covering the study region. The ERT sections clearly outline the heterogeneity in the subsurface lithology. Further, the ERT, IPI, and shaliness (shaleyness) sections infer the absence of clayey horizons and slip surfaces at depth. However, the Bouguer gravity analysis has revealed the existence of several faults in the subsurface, much beyond the reach of the majority of ERT sections. These inferred vertical to subvertical faults run parallel to the existing major lineaments and tectonic elements of the study region. The crisscross network of inferred faults has divided the entire study region into several blocks in the subsurface. Our studies stress that the sinking of the Salna village area is presently taking place along these inferred vertical to subvertical faults. The Chamoli earthquake in March 1999 probably triggered seismically induced ground movements in this region. The absence of few gravity-inferred faults in shallow ERT sections may hint at blind faults, which could serve as future source(s) for geohazards in the study region. Soil samples at two sites of study region were studied in a geotechnical laboratory. These, along with stability studies along four slope sections, have indicated the critical state of the study region. Thus, our integrated studies emphasize the crucial role of

  9. Digital Earth - A sustainable Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahavir

    2014-02-01

    All life, particularly human, cannot be sustainable, unless complimented with shelter, poverty reduction, provision of basic infrastructure and services, equal opportunities and social justice. Yet, in the context of cities, it is believed that they can accommodate more and more people, endlessly, regardless to their carrying capacity and increasing ecological footprint. The 'inclusion', for bringing more and more people in the purview of development is often limited to social and economic inclusion rather than spatial and ecological inclusion. Economic investment decisions are also not always supported with spatial planning decisions. Most planning for a sustainable Earth, be at a level of rural settlement, city, region, national or Global, fail on the capacity and capability fronts. In India, for example, out of some 8,000 towns and cities, Master Plans exist for only about 1,800. A chapter on sustainability or environment is neither statutorily compulsory nor a norm for these Master Plans. Geospatial technologies including Remote Sensing, GIS, Indian National Spatial Data Infrastructure (NSDI), Indian National Urban Information Systems (NUIS), Indian Environmental Information System (ENVIS), and Indian National GIS (NGIS), etc. have potential to map, analyse, visualize and take sustainable developmental decisions based on participatory social, economic and social inclusion. Sustainable Earth, at all scales, is a logical and natural outcome of a digitally mapped, conceived and planned Earth. Digital Earth, in fact, itself offers a platform to dovetail the ecological, social and economic considerations in transforming it into a sustainable Earth.

  10. Mechanical obstacles to the movement of continent-bearing plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowman, P. D., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Selected geophysical problems associated with the concept of continental drift as an incidental corollary of plate movement are discussed. The problems include the absence of a suitable plate-driving mechanism for plates with continental leading edges, the absence of the low-velocity zone under shields, and continental roots of 400 to 700 km depths. It is shown that if continental drift occurs, it must use mechanisms not now understood, or that it may not occur at all, plate movement being confined to ocean basins.

  11. Eye Movement Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... t work properly. There are many kinds of eye movement disorders. Two common ones are Strabismus - a disorder ... of the eyes, sometimes called "dancing eyes" Some eye movement disorders are present at birth. Others develop over ...

  12. Movement - unpredictable or jerky

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pregnancy (chorea gravidarum) Stroke Systemic lupus erythematosus Tardive dyskinesia (a condition that can be caused by medicines ... uncontrolled); Hyperkinetic movements References Jankovic J, Lang AE. Movement disorders. In: Daroff RB, Fenichel GM, Jankovic J, Mazziotta ...

  13. Tectonic Plate Movement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landalf, Helen

    1998-01-01

    Presents an activity that employs movement to enable students to understand concepts related to plate tectonics. Argues that movement brings topics to life in a concrete way and helps children retain knowledge. (DDR)

  14. Earth Algebra.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaufele, Christopher; Zumoff, Nancy

    Earth Algebra is an entry level college algebra course that incorporates the spirit of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) Curriculum and Evaluation Standards for School Mathematics at the college level. The context of the course places mathematics at the center of one of the major current concerns of the world. Through…

  15. Rare earths

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gambogi, J.

    2013-01-01

    Global mine production of rare earths was estimated to have declined slightly in 2012 relative to 2011 (Fig. 1). Production in China was estimated to have decreased to 95 from 105 kt (104,700 from 115,700 st) in 2011, while new mine production in the United States and Australia increased.

  16. Think Earth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niedermeyer, Fred; Ice, Kay

    1992-01-01

    Describes a series of environmental education instructional units for grades K-6 developed by the Think Earth Consortium that cover topics such as conservation, pollution control, and waste reduction. Provides testimony from one sixth-grade teacher that field tested the second-grade unit. (MDH)

  17. The Earth's Plamasphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, D. L.

    2015-01-01

    The Earth's plasmasphere is an inner part of the magneteosphere. It is located just outside the upper ionosphere located in Earth's atmosphere. It is a region of dense, cold plasma that surrounds the Earth. Although plasma is found throughout the magnetosphere, the plasmasphere usually contains the coldest plasma. Here's how it works: The upper reaches of our planet's atmosphere are exposed to ultraviolet light from the Sun, and they are ionized with electrons that are freed from neutral atmospheric particles. The results are electrically charged negative and positive particles. The negative particles are electrons, and the positive particles are now called ions (formerly atoms and molecules). If the density of these particles is low enough, this electrically charged gas behaves differently than it would if it were neutral. Now this gas is called plasma. The atmospheric gas density becomes low enough to support the conditions for a plasma around earth at about 90 kilometers above Earth's surface. The electrons in plasma gain more energy, and they are very low in mass. They move along Earth's magnetic field lines and their increased energy is enough to escape Earth's gravity. Because electrons are very light, they don't have to gain too much kinetic energy from the Sun's ultraviolet light before gravity loses its grip on them. Gravity is not all that holds them back, however. As more and more electrons begin to escape outward, they leave behind a growing net positive electric charge in the ionosphere and create a growing net negative electric charge above the ionosphere; an electric field begins to develop (the Pannekoek-Rosseland E-field). Thus, these different interacting charges result in a positively charged ionosphere and negatively charged region of space above it. Very quickly this resulting electric field opposed upward movement of the electrons out of the ionosphere. The electrons still have this increased energy, however, so the electric field doesn't just

  18. Review of geophysical characterization methods used at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    GV Last; DG Horton

    2000-03-23

    This paper presents a review of geophysical methods used at Hanford in two parts: (1) shallow surface-based geophysical methods and (2) borehole geophysical methods. This review was not intended to be ``all encompassing'' but should represent the vast majority (>90% complete) of geophysical work conducted onsite and aimed at hazardous waste investigations in the vadose zone and/or uppermost groundwater aquifers. This review did not cover geophysical methods aimed at large-scale geologic structures or seismicity and, in particular, did not include those efforts conducted in support of the Basalt Waste Isolation Program. This review focused primarily on the more recent efforts.

  19. Sessions on history of space and geophysics spark interest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, Wilfried

    Three sessions at international conferences were held in 1997 to discuss the history of space and geophysics and its different disciplines. The first session was held during the Assembly of the German Geophysical Society in March in Potsdam, Germany. Topics included the theory of relativity and gravitation in geophysics; work by Albert Abraham Michelson, Leon Foucault, and Ernst Mach; work by Hermann von Helmholtz; and the physical application and geophysical evidence of Werner Heisenberg's research. Also included were discussions relevant to the history of geophysics, aeronomy, meteor astronomy, and geodetical research, including developments in instrumentation during the last few decades.

  20. Earth meandering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asadiyan, H.; Zamani, A.

    2009-04-01

    In this paper we try to put away current Global Tectonic Model to look the tectonic evolution of the earth from new point of view. Our new dynamic model is based on study of river meandering (RM) which infer new concept as Earth meandering(EM). In a universal gravitational field if we consider a clockwise spiral galaxy model rotate above Ninety East Ridge (geotectonic axis GA), this system with applying torsion field (likes geomagnetic field) in side direction from Rocky Mt. (west geotectonic pole WGP) to Tibetan plateau TP (east geotectonic pole EGP),it seems that pulled mass from WGP and pushed it in EGP due to it's rolling dynamics. According to this idea we see in topographic map that North America and Green land like a tongue pulled from Pacific mouth toward TP. Actually this system rolled or meander the earth over itself fractaly from small scale to big scale and what we see in the river meandering and Earth meandering are two faces of one coin. River transport water and sediments from high elevation to lower elevation and also in EM, mass transport from high altitude-Rocky Mt. to lower altitude Himalaya Mt. along 'S' shape geodetic line-optimum path which connect points from high altitude to lower altitude as kind of Euler Elastica(EE). These curves are responsible for mass spreading (source) and mass concentration (sink). In this regard, tiltness of earth spin axis plays an important role, 'S' are part of sigmoidal shape which formed due to intersection of Earth rolling with the Earth glob and actual feature of transform fault and river meandering. Longitudinal profile in mature rivers as a part of 'S' curve also is a kind of EE. 'S' which bound the whole earth is named S-1(S order 1) and cube corresponding to this which represent Earth fracturing in global scale named C-1(cube order 1 or side vergence cube SVC), C-1 is a biggest cycle of spiral polygon, so it is not completely closed and it has separation about diameter of C-7. Inside SVC we introduce cone

  1. Emerging Identity through Movement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowen, Betty

    Movement is one of the primary ways in which the young child finds out about his world. Experiences in movement help the young child to develop a healthy sense of identity. Through movement, children: (1) learn, as infants, to distinguish themselves from the outside world; (2) find out what they can do and how they can affect their environment;…

  2. Linking Literacy and Movement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pica, Rae

    2010-01-01

    There are many links between literacy and movement. Movement and language are both forms of communication and self-expression. Rhythm is an essential component of both language and movement. While people may think of rhythm primarily in musical terms, there is a rhythm to words and sentences as well. Individuals develop an internal rhythm when…

  3. [The "Participatory" Movement].

    PubMed

    Rossi, M J

    2001-01-01

    This study reports the trajectory of the Participatory Movement (MP), which was created in opposition to the policies carried out by the Brazilian Association of Nursing (ABEn). This article, written by the first president elected of the "participatory" movement, presents the principles of the movement, its organization, the struggle for leadership, and the work developed in the first administration.

  4. The geophysical impact of the Aristoteles mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Allen Joel; Klingele, E.; Sabadini, R.; Tinti, S.; Zerbini, Suzanna

    1991-12-01

    The importance of a precise, high resolution gradiometric and magnetometric mission in some topics of geophysical interest is stressed. Ways in which the planned Aristoteles mission can allow the geophysical community to improve the knowledge and the physical understanding of several important geodynamical processes involving the coupled system consisting of the lithosphere, asthenosphere and upper mantle are discussed. Particular attention is devoted to the inversion of anomalous density structures in collision and subduction zones by means of the joint use of gradiometric and seismic tomographic data. Some modeling efforts accomplished to study the capability of the mission to invert the rheological parameters of the lithosphere and upper mantle through the gravimetric signals of internal and surface density anomalies are described.

  5. Compression scheme for geophysical electromagnetic inversions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abubakar, A.

    2014-12-01

    We have developed a model-compression scheme for improving the efficiency of the regularized Gauss-Newton inversion algorithm for geophysical electromagnetic applications. In this scheme, the unknown model parameters (the conductivity/resistivity distribution) are represented in terms of a basis such as Fourier and wavelet (Haar and Daubechies). By applying a truncation criterion, the model may then be approximated by a reduced number of basis functions, which is usually much less than the number of the model parameters. Further, because the geophysical electromagnetic measurements have low resolution, it is sufficient for inversion to only keep the low-spatial frequency part of the image. This model-compression scheme accelerates the computational time and also reduces the memory usage of the Gauss-Newton method. We are able to significantly reduce the algorithm computational complexity without compromising the quality of the inverted models.

  6. The Geophysical Fluid Flow Cell Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, J. E.; Ohlsen, D.; Kittleman, S.; Borhani, N.; Leslie, F.; Miller, T.

    1999-01-01

    The Geophysical Fluid Flow Cell (GFFC) experiment performed visualizations of thermal convection in a rotating differentially heated spherical shell of fluid. In these experiments dielectric polarization forces are used to generate a radially directed buoyancy force. This enables the laboratory simulation of a number of geophysically and astrophysically important situations in which sphericity and rotation both impose strong constraints on global scale fluid motions. During USML-2 a large set of experiments with spherically symmetric heating were carried out. These enabled the determination of critical points for the transition to various forms of nonaxisymmetric convection and, for highly turbulent flows, the transition latitudes separating the different modes of motion. This paper presents a first analysis of these experiments as well as data on the general performance of the instrument during the USML-2 flight.

  7. International Cooperation in Geophysics to Benefit Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail-Zadeh, Alik; Beer, Tom

    2009-12-01

    Humanity's existence depends on the bounties of the Earth, oceans, and atmosphere, yet often these elements turn against citizens of this planet. Each year earthquakes, drought, storms, volcanoes, disturbances in the Earth's magnetic field, and other natural hazards affect communities in ways that range from inconvenient to massively destructive. Studies of the Earth and its environment in space help scientists to anticipate and warn of such natural disasters and help keep people out of harm's way. Studies that reveal the secrets of the Earth's natural resources can improve the quality of life for Earth's growing populations. And scientific understanding of the Earth's processes can help to reduce humanity's destructive impact on the environment and help promote sustainable management of its resources.

  8. Geophysical and Chemical Weathering Signatures Across the Deep Weathered-Unweathered Granite Boundary of the Calhoun Critical Zone Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, D., Jr.; Bacon, A. R.; Brantley, S. L.; Holbrook, W. S.

    2015-12-01

    To understand the relationship between geophysical measurements and chemical weathering at Earth's surface, we combine comprehensive chemical and physical analyses of a 70-m granite weathering profile in the Southern Piedmont in the southeastern United States. The research site is in the uplands of the Calhoun Critical Zone Observatory and is similar to many geomorphically stable, ancient, and highly-weathered Ultisol soils of the region. Surface and downhole geophysical analyses suggest significant physical changes to depths of about 40 m, where geophysical properties are consistent with competent and unweathered granite. At this depth, surface refraction velocities increase to >4.5 km/s; variations in downhole sonic velocities decrease by more than two-fold; and deviations in the downhole caliper log sharply decrease as well. Forty meters depth is also the depth of initiation of plagioclase feldspar weathering, as inferred from bulk geochemical measurement of the full 70-m deep core. Specifically, element-depth profiles, cast as mass transfer coefficient profiles using Ti and Zr as immobile elements, document inferred loss of plagioclase in the depth interval between 15 and 40-m depth. Plagioclase feldspar is the most abundant of the highly reactive minerals in the granite. Such a wide reaction front is characteristic of weathering granites. Some loss of K is observed at these depths but most K loss, as well as Mg loss, occurs at shallower depths. Nearby geophysical profiles and 3D stress models have been interpreted as showing that seismic velocities decrease at 40 m depth due to opening of fractures as rock is exhumed toward the surface. Given our interpretations of both the geochemical and geophysical data, we infer that the onset of chemical weathering of feldspar coincides with the opening of these fractures. The data highlight the ability of geochemistry and geophysics to complement each other and enrich our understanding of Earth's Critical Zone.

  9. Eye Movements of Flatfish for Different Gravity Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwata, Kaori; Takabayashi, Akira; Imada, Hideki; Miyachi, Ei-Ichi

    On Earth, gravity sensation plays a basic role for all of physiological phenomena in every creature. In microgravity, loss of gravity input causes many functional disorders in animals and humans. During adaptation to microgravity, otolith-mediated response such as eye movements would alter. Flatfish provide a natural model for the study of adaptive changes in the vestibuloocular reflex. During metamorphosis, vestibular and oculomotor coordinate of flatfish displaced 90 degrees about the longitudinal body axis. Therefore, it is expected that microgravity induce the sensory mismatch in adult flatfish. In this study, we analyzed the eye movements of normal and otolith removed flatfish for body tilting and the eye movements of normal flatfish during microgravity produced by parabolic aircraft flight. The fish was fixed on the tilting table controlled by computer. The eye movements for body tilting along the different body axis were video-recorded. The vertical and torsional eye rotations were analyzed frame by frame. In normal flatfish, torsional eye movements were larger for head up or head down tilting than leftward or rightward tilting. On the other hand, vertical eye movements were larger for leftward or rightward tilting than head up or head down tilting. After removal of left side utlicular otolith, the vertical eye movement for 180 degrees body tilting disappeared. For the changes of gravity, vertical eye movements were observed. These results suggested that eye movements of flatfish adapted to Earth's gravity condition and sacculus and lagena might play important role for otolith-ocular eye movements.

  10. Geophysical methods for monitoring infiltration in soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coquet, Yves; Pessel, Marc; Saintenoy, Albane

    2015-04-01

    Geophysics provides useful tools for monitoring water infiltration in soil essentially because they are non-invasive and have a good time-resolution. We present some results obtained on different soils using two geophysical techniques: electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) and ground-penetrating radar (GPR). Infiltration in a loamy soil was monitored using a 2D Wenner array set up under a tension disc infiltrometer. A good imaging of the infiltration bulb below the infiltrometer could be achieved provided a sufficient resistivity contrast between the wet and the dry soil zones. ERT data could be used to invert soil hydraulic properties. However, we found that the information provided by the ERT could be of limited importance in regard to the information provided by the infiltration rate dynamics if the ERT spatial resolution is not small enough to capture the details of the infiltration front at the limit between the wet and dry soil zones. GPR was found to be a good tool to monitor the progression of the infiltration front in a sandy soil. By combining a water transport simulation model (HYDRUS-1D), a method for transforming water content into dielectric permittivity values (CRIM), and an electromagnetic wave propagation model (GprMax), the Mualem-van Genuchten hydraulic parameters could be retrieved from radargrams obtained under constant or falling head infiltration experiments. Both ERT and GPR methods have pros and cons. Time and spatial resolutions are of prime importance to achieve a sufficient sensitivity to all soil hydraulic parameters. Two exploration fields are suggested: the combination of different geophysical methods to explore infiltration in heterogeneous soils, and the development of integrated infiltrometers that allow geophysical measurements while monitoring water infiltration rate in soil.

  11. Geophysical Fluid Flow Cell (GFFC) Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    These simulations of atmospheric flow use the same experimental parameters but started with slightly different initial conditions in the model. The simulations were part of data analysis for the Geophysical Fluid Flow Cell (GFFC), a planet in a test tube apparatus flown on Spacelab to mimic the atmospheres on gas giant planets and stars. (Credit: Dr. Tim Miller of Global Hydrology and Climate Center at the Marshall Space Flight Center)

  12. Geophysics smorgasbord was spread in Baltimore.

    PubMed

    Kerr, R A

    1987-06-12

    Geophysicists specializing in everything from atmospheric science to volcanology converged on Baltimore for the spring meeting of the American Geophysical Union held 18 to 21 May. The range of fare was huge, but here is a sampler: two high-energy phenomena-nuclear testing and the less frequent cratering by large impacts-and an imperceptibly slow process-the motion of the tectonic plates. PMID:17793225

  13. Geophysical studies of the Lassen KGRA, California

    SciTech Connect

    Christopherson, K.R.

    1980-09-01

    During the summer of 1979, the US Geological Survey conducted a geophysical study of the Lassen Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA) in northern California. As part of the USGS work, audio-magnetotelluric (AMT) and magnetotelluric (MT) soundings were made in this area, along with E-field ratio telluric and self-potential traverses. Data obtained with the four techniques used correlated quite well and delineated two major areas of low resistivities within the KGRA.

  14. Geophysical investigation, Salmon Site, Lamar County, Mississippi

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-01

    Geophysical surveys were conducted in 1992 and 1993 on 21 sites at the Salmon Site (SS) located in Lamar County, Mississippi. The studies are part of the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) being conducted by IT Corporation for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). During the 1960s, two nuclear devices and two chemical tests were detonated 826 meters (in) (2710 feet [ft]) below the ground surface in the salt dome underlying the SS. These tests were part of the Vela Uniform Program conducted to improve the United States capability to detect, identify, and locate underground nuclear detonations. The RI/FS is being conducted to determine if any contamination is migrating from the underground shot cavity in the salt dome and if there is any residual contamination in the near surface mud and debris disposal pits used during the testing activities. The objective of the surface geophysical surveys was to locate buried debris, disposal pits, and abandoned mud pits that may be present at the site. This information will then be used to identify the locations for test pits, cone penetrometer tests, and drill hole/monitor well installation. The disposal pits were used during the operation of the test site in the 1960s. Vertical magnetic gradient (magnetic gradient), electromagnetic (EM) conductivity, and ground-penetrating radar (GPR) surveys were used to accomplish these objectives. A description of the equipment used and a theoretical discussion of the geophysical methods are presented Appendix A. Because of the large number of figures relative to the number of pages of text, the geophysical grid-location maps, the contour maps of the magnetic-gradient data, the contour maps of the EM conductivity data, and the GPR traverse location maps are located in Appendix B, Tabs I through 22. In addition, selected GPR records are located in Appendix C.

  15. Geophysical Signatures of Adjoining Lithospheric Domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gradmann, S.; Kaiser, J.

    2014-12-01

    Lithospheres of different age have distinctly different characteristics regarding their composition, thermal and density structure. Major differences exist between cratons and the Phanerozoic domains and mobile belts. We here investigate how the lateral transition from one lithospheric domain to another is reflected in the geophysical signatures, the seismic velocities, gravity, topography and geoid. We combine geophysical-petrological forward modeling with a comparison to worldwide occurrences of adjoining lithospheric domains. Three distinctly different mantle types (Archean, Proterozoic, Phanerozoic) are used to calculate the geophysical signatures of a range of possible lateral transition zones. The mantle types are characterized by their different elemental composition, from which stable mineral phases and bulk physical properties are derived. Usually, older SCLM (sub-lithospheric mantle) is more depleted in heavier minerals and thereby lighter, but this effect is mainly counterbalanced by the increased density caused by long-term thermal cooling. At the edges of cratons, changes in the thermal structure affect this balance. A range of models is tested for the effects of lateral variations in the crustal and SCLM structure (thickness, smoothness of thickness changes) and mantle compositions. Abrupt changes in composition and lithosphere thickness generally cause distinct topographic lows or ridges. In the real world, these may be offset by respective adjustments in Moho depth, crustal structure or sediment infill. Gradual variations in lithosphere thickness, however, only show minor geophysical signatures. A possible expression of adjoining lithospheric domains is the Scandinavian Mountain Belt in Norway at the edge of Proterozoic Baltica. Although many of the present-day topographic features are unlikely to have existed since the Precambrian, the evolution of the cratons (rejuvenation of the craton edges) may have assisted in shaping the present

  16. Geophysical mapping of solution and collapse sinkholes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufmann, Georg

    2014-12-01

    Karst rocks such as limestone, dolomite, anhydrite, gypsum, or salt can be dissolved physically by water or chemically by water enriched with carbon dioxide. The dissolution is driven by water flowing through the karst aquifer and either occurs along fractures and bedding partings in telogenetic rocks, or within the primary interconnected pore space in eogenetic rocks. The enlargement of either fractures or pores by dissolution creates a large secondary porosity typical of soluble rocks, which is often very heterogenously distributed and results in preferential flow paths in the sub-surface, with cavities as large-scale end members of the sub-surface voids. Once the sub-surface voids enlarged by dissolution grow to a certain size, the overburden rock can become unstable and voids and caves can collapse. Depending on the type of overburden, the collapse initiated at depth may propagate towards the surface and finally results at the surface as collapse sinkholes and tiangkengs on the very large scale. We present results from geophysical surveys over existing karst structures based on gravimetric, electrical, and geomagnetical methods. We have chosen two types of sinkholes, solution and collapse sinkholes, to capture and compare the geophysical signals resulting from these karst structures. We compare and discuss our geophysical survey results with simplified theoretical models describing the evolution of the karst structure, and we derive three-dimensional structural models of the current situation for the different locations with our numerical tool PREDICTOR.

  17. Geophysical mapping of solution and collapse dolines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufmann, Georg

    2014-05-01

    Karst rocks such as limestone, dolomite, anhydrite, gypsum, or salt can be dissolved physically by water or chemically by water enriched with carbon dioxide. The dissolution driven by water flowing through the karst aquifer either occurs along fractures and bedding partings in telogenetic rocks, or within the primary interconnected pore space in eogenetic rocks. The enlargement of either fractures or pores by dissolution creates a large secondary porosity typical for karst rocks, which is often very heterogenously distributed and results in preferential flow pathes in the sub-surface, with cavities as large-scale end members of the sub-surface voids. Once the sub-surface voids enlarged by dissolution grow to a certain size, the overburden rock can become instable and voids and caves can collapse. Depending of the type of overburden, the collapse initiated at depth propagates towards the surface and finally results in a collapse structure, such as collapse dolines, sinkholes, and tiangkengs on the very large scale. We present results from geophysical surveys over existing karst structures based on gravimetric, electrical, and geomagnetical methods. We have chosen two types of dolines, solution and collapse dolines, to capture and compare the geophysical signals resulting from these karst structures. We compare and discuss our geophysical survey results with simplified theoretical models describing the evolution of the karst structure and three-dimensional structural models for the current situation derived for the different locations.

  18. Using geophysics to characterize levee stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalton, Laura M.

    Shallow slough slides have occurred along the river side slope of Mississippi River Levees for over sixty years. Shallow slough slides also occur along smaller levees that protect tributaries of the Mississippi River. This investigation takes place along a section of the Coldwater River Levee, a tributary levee of the Mississippi River. Field observation, soil samples, and geophysical data were collected at two field sites located on the border of Tate and Tunica County, MS. The first site consists of a developed shallow slough slide that had occurred that has not yet been repaired and the second site is a potential slide area. Electromagnetic induction and electrical resistivity tomography were the geophysical methods used to define subsurface conditions that make a levee vulnerable to failure. These electrical methods are sensitive to the electrical conductivity of the soil and therefore depend upon: soil moisture, clay content, pore size distribution as well as larger scale structures at depth such as cracks and fissures. These same physical properties of the soil are also important to assessing the vulnerability of a levee to slough slides. Soil tests and field observations were also implemented in this investigation to describe and classify the soil composition of the levee material. The problem of slough slide occurrence can potentially be reduced if vulnerabilities are located with the help of geophysical techniques.

  19. Cloud computing for geophysical applications (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhizhin, M.; Kihn, E. A.; Mishin, D.; Medvedev, D.; Weigel, R. S.

    2010-12-01

    Cloud computing offers a scalable on-demand resource allocation model to evolving needs in data intensive geophysical applications, where computational needs in CPU and storage can vary over time depending on modeling or field campaign. Separate, sometimes incompatible cloud platforms and services are already available from major computing vendors (Amazon AWS, Microsoft Azure, Google Apps Engine), government agencies (NASA Nebulae) and Open Source community (Eucalyptus). Multiple cloud platforms with layered virtualization patterns (hardware-platform- software-data-or-everything as a service) provide a feature-rich environment and encourage experimentation with distributed data modeling, processing and storage. However, application and especially database development in the Cloud is different from the desktop and the compute cluster. In this presentation we will review scientific cloud applications relevant to geophysical research and present our results in building software components and cloud services for a virtual geophysical data center. We will discuss in depth economy, scalability and reliability of the distributed array and image data stores, synchronous and asynchronous RESTful services to access and model georefernced data, virtual observatory services for metadata management, and data visualization for web applications in Cloud.

  20. Polarimetric Remote Sensing of Geophysical Medium Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nghiem, S. V.; Yueh, S. H.; Kwok, R.; Nguyen, D. T.

    1993-01-01

    Polarimetric remote sensing of structures in geophysical media is studied in this paper based on their symmetry properties. Orientations of spheroidal scatterers described by spherical, uniform, planophile, plagiothile, erectophile, and extremophile distributions are considered to derive their polarimetric backscattering characteristics. These distributions can be identified from the observed scattering coefficients by comparison with theoretical symmetry calculations. A new parameter is defined to study scattering structures in geophysical media. Experimental observations from polarimetric data acquired by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory airborne synthetic aperture radar over forests, sea ice, and sea surface are presented to illustrate the use of symmetry properties. For forests, the coniferous forest in Mount Shasta area and mixed forests neir Presque Isle show evidence of the centrical symmetry at C band. In sea ice from the Beaufort Sea, multiyear sea ice has a cross-polarized ratio e close to e(sub 0), calculated from symmetry, due to the randomness in the scattering structure. For first-year sea ice, e is much smaller than e(sub 0) as a result of preferential alignment of the columnar structure of the ice. From polarimetric data of a sea surface in the Bering sea, it is observed that e and e(sub 0) are increasing with incident angle and e is greater than e(sub 0) at L band because of the directional feature of sea surface waves. Use of symmetry properties of geophysical media for polarimetric radar calibration is also suggested.

  1. Mathematical Methods for Geophysics and Space Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, William I.

    2016-05-01

    Graduate students in the natural sciences - including not only geophysics and space physics but also atmospheric and planetary physics, ocean sciences, and astronomy - need a broad-based mathematical toolbox to facilitate their research. In addition, they need to survey a wider array of mathematical methods that, while outside their particular areas of expertise, are important in related ones. While it is unrealistic to expect them to develop an encyclopedic knowledge of all the methods that are out there, they need to know how and where to obtain reliable and effective insights into these broader areas. Here at last is a graduate textbook that provides these students with the mathematical skills they need to succeed in today's highly interdisciplinary research environment. This authoritative and accessible book covers everything from the elements of vector and tensor analysis to ordinary differential equations, special functions, and chaos and fractals. Other topics include integral transforms, complex analysis, and inverse theory; partial differential equations of mathematical geophysics; probability, statistics, and computational methods; and much more. Proven in the classroom, Mathematical Methods for Geophysics and Space Physics features numerous exercises throughout as well as suggestions for further reading. * Provides an authoritative and accessible introduction to the subject * Covers vector and tensor analysis, ordinary differential equations, integrals and approximations, Fourier transforms, diffusion and dispersion, sound waves and perturbation theory, randomness in data, and a host of other topics * Features numerous exercises throughout * Ideal for students and researchers alike * An online illustration package is available to professors

  2. Polarimetric remote sensing of geophysical medium structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nghiem, S. V.; Yueh, S. H.; Kwok, R.; Nguyen, D. T.

    1993-11-01

    Polarimetric remote sensing of structures in geophysical media is studied in this paper based on their symmetry properties. Orientations of spheroidal scatterers described by spherical, uniform, planophile, plagiothile, erectophile, and extremophile distributions are considered to derive their polarimetric backscattering characteristics. These distributions can be identified from the observed scattering coefficients by comparison with theoretical symmetry calculations. A new parameter is defined to study scattering structures in geophysical media. Experimental observations from polarimetric data acquired by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory airborne synthetic aperture radar over forests, sea ice, and sea surface are presented to illustrate the use of symmetry properties. For forests, the coniferous forest in Mount Shasta area and mixed forests near Presque Isle show evidence of the centrical symmetry at C band. In sea ice from the Beaufort Sea, multiyear sea ice has a cross-polarized ratio e close to e0, calculated from symmetry, due to the randomness in the scattering structure. For first-year sea ice, e is much smaller than e0 as a result of preferential alignment of the columnar structure of the ice. From polarimetric data of a sea surface in the Bering sea, it is observed that e and e0 are increasing with incident angle and e is greater than e0 at L band because of the directional feature of sea surface waves. Use of symmetry properties of geophysical media for polarimetric radar calibration is also suggested.

  3. NASA'S Earth Science Data Stewardship Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowe, Dawn R.; Murphy, Kevin J.; Ramapriyan, Hampapuram

    2015-01-01

    NASA has been collecting Earth observation data for over 50 years using instruments on board satellites, aircraft and ground-based systems. With the inception of the Earth Observing System (EOS) Program in 1990, NASA established the Earth Science Data and Information System (ESDIS) Project and initiated development of the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS). A set of Distributed Active Archive Centers (DAACs) was established at locations based on science discipline expertise. Today, EOSDIS consists of 12 DAACs and 12 Science Investigator-led Processing Systems (SIPS), processing data from the EOS missions, as well as the Suomi National Polar Orbiting Partnership mission, and other satellite and airborne missions. The DAACs archive and distribute the vast majority of data from NASA’s Earth science missions, with data holdings exceeding 12 petabytes The data held by EOSDIS are available to all users consistent with NASA’s free and open data policy, which has been in effect since 1990. The EOSDIS archives consist of raw instrument data counts (level 0 data), as well as higher level standard products (e.g., geophysical parameters, products mapped to standard spatio-temporal grids, results of Earth system models using multi-instrument observations, and long time series of Earth System Data Records resulting from multiple satellite observations of a given type of phenomenon). EOSDIS data stewardship responsibilities include ensuring that the data and information content are reliable, of high quality, easily accessible, and usable for as long as they are considered to be of value.

  4. Cosmic Influence on the Sun-Earth Environment

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Saumitra

    2008-01-01

    SOHO satellite data reveals geophysical changes before sudden changes in the Earth's Sun-Earth environment. The influence of extragalactic changes on the Sun as well as the Sun-Earth environment seems to be both periodic and episodic. The periodic changes in terms of solar maxima and minima occur every 11 years, whereas the episodic changes can happen at any time. Episodic changes can be monitored by cosmic ray detectors as a sudden increase or decrease of activity. During these solar and cosmic anomaly periods the environment of the Earth is affected. The Star-Sun-Earth connection has the potential to influence the thermosphere, atmosphere, ionosphere and lithosphere. Initial correlation of the cosmic and Sun-Earth connection has shown the possibility of predicting earthquakes, sudden changes in atmospheric temperatures and erratic rainfall/snowfall patterns.

  5. Final Report DOE Contract No. DE-FG36-04G014294 ICEKAP 2004: A Collaborative Joint Geophysical Imaging Project at Krafla and IDDP P.E. Malin, S.A. Onacha, E. Shalev Division of Earth and Ocean Sciences Nicholas School of the Environment Duke University Durham, NC 27708

    SciTech Connect

    Malin, Peter E.; Shalev, Eylon; Onacha, Stepthen A.

    2006-12-15

    In this final report, we discuss both theoretical and applied research resulting from our DOE project, ICEKAP 2004: A Collaborative Joint Geophysical Imaging Project at Krafla and IDDP. The abstract below begins with a general discussion of the problem we addressed: the location and characterization of “blind” geothermal resources using microearthquake and magnetotelluric measurements. The abstract then describes the scientific results and their application to the Krafla geothermal area in Iceland. The text following this abstract presents the full discussion of this work, in the form of the PhD thesis of Stephen A. Onacha. The work presented here was awarded the “Best Geophysics Paper” at the 2005 Geothermal Resources Council meeting, Reno. This study presents the modeling of buried fault zones using microearthquake and electrical resistivity data based on the assumptions that fluid-filled fractures cause electrical and seismic anisotropy and polarization. In this study, joint imaging of electrical and seismic data is used to characterize the fracture porosity of the fracture zones. P-wave velocity models are generated from resistivity data and used in locating microearthquakes. Fracture porosity controls fluid circulation in the hydrothermal systems and the intersections of fracture zones close to the heat source form important upwelling zones for hydrothermal fluids. High fracture porosity sites occur along fault terminations, fault-intersection areas and fault traces. Hydrothermal fault zone imaging using resistivity and microearthquake data combines high-resolution multi-station seismic and electromagnetic data to locate rock fractures and the likely presence fluids in high temperature hydrothermal systems. The depths and locations of structural features and fracture porosity common in both the MT and MEQ data is incorporated into a joint imaging scheme to constrain resistivity, seismic velocities, and locations of fracture systems. The imaging of the

  6. Earth Sciences report, 1989--1990

    SciTech Connect

    Younker, L.W.; Peterson, S.J.; Price, M.E.

    1991-03-01

    The Earth Sciences Department at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) conducts work in support of the Laboratory's energy, defense, environmental, and basic research programs. The Department comprises more than 100 professional scientific personnel spanning a variety of subdisciplines: geology, seismology, physics, geophysics, geochemistry, geohydrology, chemical engineering, and mechanical engineering. Resident technical support groups add significant additional technical expertise, including Containment Engineering, Computations, Electronic Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Chemistry and Materials Science, and Technical Information. In total, approximately 180 professional scientists and engineers are housed in the Earth Sciences Department, making it one of the largest geo-science research groups in the nation. Previous Earth Sciences reports have presented an outline of the technical capabilities and accomplishments of the groups within the Department. In this FY 89/90 Report, we have chosen instead to present twelve of our projects in full-length technical articles. This Overview introduces those articles and highlights other significant research performed during this period.

  7. A Geophysical Study of Fissures in Pahrump, Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsch, A. C.; McEwan, M. J.; Howley, R. A.; Mehling, J. B.; Snelson, C. M.; Drohan, P.

    2004-12-01

    Earth fissures are surface expressions of deep fracturing subsidence systems caused by groundwater withdrawl greater than aquifer recharge. This type of subsidence is most common in arid environments of the south western U.S. such as, Las Vegas, NV, Phoenix, AZ, and areas in New Mexico. In addition, fissures have recently been identified in the Pahrump Valley in southwestern Nevada just west of Las Vegas. The city of Pahrump has experienced an increase in population and economic growth. This growth has lead to a higher demand in the use of the areas natural resources. One major concern is groundwater pumping and over-watering of the land surface. Pahrump has experienced significant differential subsidence within the valley causing significant structural damage to infrastructure. This differential subsidence is most readily identified by its surface expression as fissures. Earth fissures are not only shallow surface features but can be 10's of meters deep and 100's of meters long. These ground failures can be exacerbated by faults at depth, shallow bedrock, and/or differential compaction. However, the most significant cause is from groundwater withdrawl. Several geophysical methods were performed on the fissures to better understand their subsurface expression, trend, and ultimately their affect on the city of Pahrump. Seismic refraction, reflection, ground penetrating radar (GPR), and gravity measurements were performed on the fissures and surrounding area including local faults. Our initial studies show the fissures propagating for long distances, in a variety of shapes, and trending in a north-south direction. Initial GPR studies show high fissure reflections at approximately 1 and 1.5 meters along with general slumping features below these reflections. Fissures are an unmitigatable problem. Our results will help identify fissures in the area that do not have a surface expression as well as mapping the current fissures and their extent. These results can be used

  8. Psychogenic Movement Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Morgante, Francesca; Edwards, Mark J.; Espay, Alberto J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of Review This review describes the main clinical features of psychogenic (functional) movement disorders and reports recent advances in diagnosis, pathophysiology, and treatment. Recent Findings The terminology and definition of patients with psychogenic movement disorders remain subjects of controversy; the term “functional” has been used more frequently in the literature in recent years regarding the neurobiological substrate underpinning these disorders. Correct diagnosis of psychogenic movement disorders should rely not on the exclusion of organic disorders or the sole presence of psychological factors but on the observation or elicitation of clinical features related to the specific movement disorder (ie, a positive or inclusionary rather than exclusionary diagnosis). Sudden onset, spontaneous remissions, and variability over time or during clinical examination are useful “red flags” suggestive of a psychogenic movement disorder. Imaging studies have demonstrated impaired connectivity between limbic and motor areas involved in movement programming and hypoactivity of a brain region that compares expected data with actual sensory data occurring during voluntary movement. Treatment of psychogenic movement disorders begins with ensuring the patient’s acceptance of the diagnosis during the initial debriefing and includes nonpharmacologic (cognitive-behavioral therapy, physiotherapy) and pharmacologic options. Summary Psychogenic movement disorders represent a challenging disorder for neurologists to diagnose and treat. Recent advances have increased understanding of the neurobiological mechanism of psychogenic movement disorders. Treatment with cognitive strategies and physical rehabilitation can benefit some patients. As short duration of disease correlates with better prognosis, early diagnosis and initiation of treatment are critical. PMID:24092294

  9. The winter dance of the Earth's pole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, S. B.; Bizouard, C.; Dehant, V.

    2006-06-01

    During the 2005-2006 winter season, loops of amplitude around 10 cm or below were detected in the Earth's polar motion, which was running very slowly due to a cancellation of the two main oscillations. After cross-checking with the latest meteorological data, their origins were found in several continental-scale high or low pressure systems, especially on Northern America and Europe, helped by similar pheonomenon over Southern Pacific. This paper is a short version of the work of Lambert et al. (2006), published in Geophysical Research Letters, on which a press release has been issued on 26 June 2006 by the American Geophysical Union. See this paper and references therein for more details.

  10. Online Analysis Enhances Use of NASA Earth Science Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acker, James G.; Leptoukh, Gregory

    2007-01-01

    Giovanni, the Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center (GES DISC) Interactive Online Visualization and Analysis Infrastructure, has provided researchers with advanced capabilities to perform data exploration and analysis with observational data from NASA Earth observation satellites. In the past 5-10 years, examining geophysical events and processes with remote-sensing data required a multistep process of data discovery, data acquisition, data management, and ultimately data analysis. Giovanni accelerates this process by enabling basic visualization and analysis directly on the World Wide Web. In the last two years, Giovanni has added new data acquisition functions and expanded analysis options to increase its usefulness to the Earth science research community.

  11. Orientation and movement in unusual force environments.

    PubMed

    Lackner, J R

    1993-05-01

    A manned space mission to Mars might take as long as 1 year each way. Consequently, artificial gravity is being considered as a way of preventing the debilitating effects of long-duration exposure to microgravity on the human body. The present article discusses some of the problems associated with adapting to the rotation levels that might be used to generate artificial gravity. It also describes how exposure to background-force levels greater or less than the 1-G force of Earth gravity affects orientation and movement control. The primary emphasis of the article is that human movement and orientation control are dynamically adapted to the 1-G force background of Earth and that accommodation to altered force levels or to rotating environments requires a wide range of adaptive changes. PMID:11537188

  12. Geophysical Information from Advanced Sounder Infrared Spectral Radiance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larar, Allen M.; Zhou, Daniel K.; Liu, Xu; Smith, William L.

    2012-01-01

    Advanced satellite sensors are tasked with improving global observations of the Earth's atmosphere, clouds, and surface to enable enhancements in weather prediction, climate monitoring capability, and environmental change detection. Satisfying this type of improvement for inferred geophysical information from these observations requires optimal usage of data from current systems as well as enhancements to future sensors. This presentation addresses the information content present in infrared spectral radiance from advanced atmospheric sounders with an emphasis on knowledge of thermodynamic state and trace species. Results of trade-off studies conducted to evaluate the impact of spectral resolution, spectral coverage, instrument noise, and a priori knowledge on remote sensing system information content will be discussed. A focus is placed on information achievable from the Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS) on the NASA EOS Aqua satellite in orbit since 2002, the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) aboard MetOp-A since 2006, and the Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) instrument aboard the NPP and JPSS series of satellites which began 28 October 2011.

  13. Geophysical site characterization methods -- the ``divining rods`` of the future

    SciTech Connect

    Fieber, L.L.

    1997-12-31

    Have you ever wished that you could use a ``divining rod`` to quickly and reliably define the magnitude of environmental impacts in soil or water? To the uninitiated, such ideas seem like a farfetched script from a star trek episode where a guy named Spock is walking around with a device called a tri-quarter. In realty, such approaches to site characterization have been used in the petroleum and mineral exploration industries for decades. These techniques are so reliable that they are widely used in the medical field today. Consider the value of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Ultrasound. Using the principles of electromagnetics, resistivity, seismology, and gravity, explorationists have successfully measured minute differences in the properties of earth materials. Using these differences, called anomalies, scientists can predict actual conditions with little or no sampling or analysis and with striking repeatability. This paper provides a plain English description of some common geophysical methods in use today. The general principles and specific applications of several methods will be described. The obvious and not-so-obvious limitations of those methods will be examined in detail.

  14. The application of geophysical methods to archaeological prospection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linford, Neil

    2006-07-01

    The aim of this review is to combine the almost universal fascination we share for our past with the comparatively recent, in archaeological terms, application of geophysical prospection methods. For their success, each of these methods relies upon a physical contrast to exist between the buried archaeological feature and the properties of the surrounding subsoil. Understanding the archaeological origin of such physical contrasts, in terms of density, thermal conductivity, electrical resistance, magnetic or dielectric properties, remains fundamental to an appreciation of the discipline. This review provides a broad introduction to the subject area acknowledging the historical development of the discipline and discusses each of the major techniques in turn: earth resistance, magnetic and electromagnetic methods (including ground penetrating radar), together with an appreciation of more esoteric approaches, such as the use of micro-gravity survey to detect buried chambers and voids. The physical principles and field instrumentation involved for the acquisition of data with each method are considered and fully illustrated with case histories of results from the English Heritage archives.

  15. Global Bathymetric Prediction For Ocean Modeling and Marine Geophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandwell, David T.; Smith, Walter H. F.; Sichoix, Lydie; Frey, Herbert V. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We proposed to construct a complete bathymetric map of the oceans at a 3-10 km resolution by combining all of the available depth soundings collected over the past 30 years with high resolution marine gravity information provided by the Geosat, ERS-1/2, and Topex/Poseidon altimeters. Detailed bathymetry is essential for understanding physical oceanography and marine geophysics. Currents and tides are controlled by the overall shapes of the ocean basins as well as the smaller sharp ocean ridges and seamounts. Because erosion rates are low in the deep oceans, detailed bathymetry reveals the mantle convection patterns, the plate boundaries, the cooling/subsidence of the oceanic lithosphere, the oceanic plateaus, and the distribution of off-ridge volcanoes. We proposed to: (1) Accumulate all available depth soundings collected over the past 30 years; (2) Use the short wavelength (< 160 km) satellite gravity information to interpolate between sparse ship soundings; (3) Improve the resolution of the marine gravity field using enhanced estimates along repeat altimeter profiles together with the dense altimeter measurements; (4) Refine/improve bathymetric predictions using the improved resolution gravity field and also by investigating computer-intensive methods for bathymetric prediction such as inverse theory; and (5) Produce a 'Globe of the Earth' similar to the globe of Venus prepared by the NASA Magellan investigation. This will also include the best available digital land data.

  16. Search For Earthquake Precursors In The Data of Multidisciplinary Monitoring of Geophysical and Biological Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorin, A. Ya.

    Short-term variations in the set of geophysical and biological parameters that moni- tored at the Garm research site for a long time are considered in relation to an earth- quake with M=5.3. We used day average data of electrical resistivity, electrtotelluric field, electrochemical potential, water conductivity and hour average data of electrical activity of weak electrical fishes. All the geoelectrical parameters monitored directly in the epicentral zone are found to change within two weeks before the earthquake. No changes were revealed at an epicentral distance of 16 km. This work was supported by Russian Found of Basic Research, grant No. 01-05-65503.

  17. Applications of the POCS inversion method to interpolating topography and other geophysical fields. [Projection Onto Convex Sets

    SciTech Connect

    Menke, W. )

    1991-03-01

    The author applies the method of Projection Onto Convex Sets (POCS) to the problem of solving geophysical inverse problems. The advantage of this iterative method is its flexibility in handling non-linear equality and inequality constraints, including constraints on the spectrum of unknown functions. He gives examples of using POCS to interpolate topographic profiles, topographic maps, and the physical properties of the earth between well logs.

  18. [Sleep related movement disorders].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Keisuke; Miyamoto, Masayuki; Miyamoto, Tomoyuki; Hirata, Koichi

    2015-06-01

    Sleep related movement disorders (SRMD) are characterized by simple, stereotyped movements occur during sleep, with the exception of restless legs syndrome (RLS). RLS has the following essential features; an urge to move the legs usually accompanied by uncomfortable sensation in the legs, improvement of symptoms after movement (non-stereotypical movements, such as walking and stretching, to reduce symptoms), and symptoms occur or worsen during periods of rest and in the evening and night. However, RLS is closely associated with periodic limb movement, which shows typical stererotyped limb movements. In the International Classification of Sleep Disorders, 3rd edition, sleep disturbances or daytime symptoms are prerequiste for a diagnosis of SRMD. We here review diagnosis and treatment of SRMD.

  19. Congenital mirror movements.

    PubMed Central

    Schott, G D; Wyke, M A

    1981-01-01

    In this report are described seven patients assessed clinically and neuropsychologically in whom mirror movements affecting predominantly the hands occurred as a congenital disorder. These mirror movements, representing a specific type of abnormal synkinesia, may arise as a hereditary condition, in the presence of a recognisable underlying neurological abnormality, and sporadically, and the seven patients provide more or less satisfactory examples of each of these three groups. Despite the apparent uniformity of the disorder, the heterogeneity and variability may be marked, examples in some of our patients including the pronounced increase in tone that developed with arm movement, and the capacity for modulation of the associated movement by alteration of neck position and bio-feedback. Various possible mechanisms are considered; these include impaired cerebral inhibition of unwanted movements, and functioning of abnormal motor pathways. Emphasis has been placed on the putative role of the direct, crossed corticomotoneurone pathways and on the unilateral and bilateral cerebral events that precede movement. PMID:7288446

  20. [Sleep related movement disorders].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Keisuke; Miyamoto, Masayuki; Miyamoto, Tomoyuki; Hirata, Koichi

    2015-06-01

    Sleep related movement disorders (SRMD) are characterized by simple, stereotyped movements occur during sleep, with the exception of restless legs syndrome (RLS). RLS has the following essential features; an urge to move the legs usually accompanied by uncomfortable sensation in the legs, improvement of symptoms after movement (non-stereotypical movements, such as walking and stretching, to reduce symptoms), and symptoms occur or worsen during periods of rest and in the evening and night. However, RLS is closely associated with periodic limb movement, which shows typical stererotyped limb movements. In the International Classification of Sleep Disorders, 3rd edition, sleep disturbances or daytime symptoms are prerequiste for a diagnosis of SRMD. We here review diagnosis and treatment of SRMD. PMID:26065126

  1. Applications of geophysical methods to volcano monitoring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wynn, Jeff; Dzurisin, Daniel; Finn, Carol A.; Kauahikaua, James P.; Lahusen, Richard G.

    2006-01-01

    The array of geophysical technologies used in volcano hazards studies - some developed originally only for volcano monitoring - ranges from satellite remote sensing including InSAR to leveling and EDM surveys, campaign and telemetered GPS networks, electronic tiltmeters and strainmeters, airborne magnetic and electromagnetic surveys, short-period and broadband seismic monitoring, even microphones tuned for infrasound. They include virtually every method used in resource exploration except large-scale seismic reflection. By “geophysical ” we include both active and passive methods as well as geodetic technologies. Volcano monitoring incorporates telemetry to handle high-bandwith cameras and broadband seismometers. Critical geophysical targets include the flux of magma in shallow reservoir and lava-tube systems, changes in active hydrothermal systems, volcanic edifice stability, and lahars. Since the eruption of Mount St. Helens in Washington State in 1980, and the eruption at Pu’u O’o in Hawai’i beginning in 1983 and still continuing, dramatic advances have occurred in monitoring technology such as “crisis GIS” and lahar modeling, InSAR interferograms, as well as gas emission geochemistry sampling, and hazards mapping and eruption predictions. The on-going eruption of Mount St. Helens has led to new monitoring technologies, including advances in broadband Wi-Fi and satellite telemetry as well as new instrumentation. Assessment of the gap between adequate monitoring and threat at the 169 potentially dangerous Holocene volcanoes shows where populations are dangerously exposed to volcanic catastrophes in the United States and its territories . This paper focuses primarily on Hawai’ian volcanoes and the northern Pacific and Cascades volcanoes. The US Geological Survey, the US National Park System, and the University of Utah cooperate in a program to monitor the huge Yellowstone volcanic system, and a separate observatory monitors the restive Long Valley

  2. Geophysical - new technology, lower cost gearing search

    SciTech Connect

    Heitman, L.B.

    1985-12-01

    Seismic companies will remain competitive only if they reduce costs and at the same time increase the technological capabilities of their products. Overcapacity and lower prices plague geophysical films. Several key improvements in offshore seismic data collection were made during 1985, e.g., wide-tow seismic source arrays that improve the signal-to-noise ratio of the data by reducing various unwanted noise compounds have become standard and seismic source levels have also been increased by a wider variety of air and water gun offering. These improvement in data collection are discussed.

  3. Hamiltonian approach to internal geophysical waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantin, Adrian; Ivanov, Rossen; Iulian Martin, Calin

    2015-04-01

    We study the interaction between two-dimensional surface water waves and internal waves in a flow consisting of a lower layer with an impermeable flat bed and an overlying layer with a free surface. Both layers have constant density and in each the flow is of constant vorticity, driven by gravity and the Coriolis force. This system arises as a simplified model of the coupling of surface and internal geophysical waves. By examining the governing equations of the system we provide a Hamiltonian formulation. This allows for linear and nonlinear approximations.

  4. Field studies in geophysical diffraction tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Witten, A.J.; Stevens, S.S.; King, W.C.; Ursic, J.R.

    1992-07-01

    Geophysical diffraction tomography (GDT) is a quantitative, high- resolution technique for subsurface imaging. This method has been used in a number of shallow applications to image buried waste, trenches, soil strata, tunnels, synthetic magma chambers, and the buried skeletal remains of seismosaurus, the longest dinosaur ever discovered. The theory associated with the GDT inversion and implementing software have been developed for acoustic and scalar electromagnetic waves for bistatic and monostatic measurements in cross-borehole, offset vertical seismic profiling and reflection geometries. This paper presents an overview of some signal processing algorithms, a description of the instrumentation used in field studies, and selected imaging results.

  5. Field studies in geophysical diffraction tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Witten, A.J.; Stevens, S.S. ); King, W.C. . Dept. of Geography and Environmental Engineering); Ursic, J.R. . Region V)

    1992-01-01

    Geophysical diffraction tomography (GDT) is a quantitative, high- resolution technique for subsurface imaging. This method has been used in a number of shallow applications to image buried waste, trenches, soil strata, tunnels, synthetic magma chambers, and the buried skeletal remains of seismosaurus, the longest dinosaur ever discovered. The theory associated with the GDT inversion and implementing software have been developed for acoustic and scalar electromagnetic waves for bistatic and monostatic measurements in cross-borehole, offset vertical seismic profiling and reflection geometries. This paper presents an overview of some signal processing algorithms, a description of the instrumentation used in field studies, and selected imaging results.

  6. Lake Ontario geological and geophysical data sources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hutchinson, Deborah R.; Wold, Richard J.

    1979-01-01

    A bibliography of various geological and geophysical data sources was compiled as part of an overall effort to evaluate the status of research on the Great Lakes.  We hope that such a summary will be a catalyst for additional work and be an aid in planning future work.  Our presentation has two forms: maps showing the locations of the different data types and a bibliography which lists the references from the maps and additional relevant papers.  The charts shown in this map summarize the data source for Lake Ontario.

  7. Cosmic Rays at Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grieder, P. K. F.

    In 1912 Victor Franz Hess made the revolutionary discovery that ionizing radiation is incident upon the Earth from outer space. He showed with ground-based and balloon-borne detectors that the intensity of the radiation did not change significantly between day and night. Consequently, the sun could not be regarded as the sources of this radiation and the question of its origin remained unanswered. Today, almost one hundred years later the question of the origin of the cosmic radiation still remains a mystery. Hess' discovery has given an enormous impetus to large areas of science, in particular to physics, and has played a major role in the formation of our current understanding of universal evolution. For example, the development of new fields of research such as elementary particle physics, modern astrophysics and cosmology are direct consequences of this discovery. Over the years the field of cosmic ray research has evolved in various directions: Firstly, the field of particle physics that was initiated by the discovery of many so-called elementary particles in the cosmic radiation. There is a strong trend from the accelerator physics community to reenter the field of cosmic ray physics, now under the name of astroparticle physics. Secondly, an important branch of cosmic ray physics that has rapidly evolved in conjunction with space exploration concerns the low energy portion of the cosmic ray spectrum. Thirdly, the branch of research that is concerned with the origin, acceleration and propagation of the cosmic radiation represents a great challenge for astrophysics, astronomy and cosmology. Presently very popular fields of research have rapidly evolved, such as high-energy gamma ray and neutrino astronomy. In addition, high-energy neutrino astronomy may soon initiate as a likely spin-off neutrino tomography of the Earth and thus open a unique new branch of geophysical research of the interior of the Earth. Finally, of considerable interest are the biological

  8. The mathematics of movement

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, D.H.

    1999-01-01

    Review of: Quantitative Analysis of Movement: Measuring and Modeling Population Redistribution in Animals and Plants. Peter Turchin. 1998. Sinauer Associates, Sunderland, MA. 306 pages. $38.95 (paper).

  9. A fractured rock geophysical toolbox method selection tool

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Day-Lewis, F. D.; Johnson, C.D.; Slater, L.D.; Robinson, J.L.; Williams, J.H.; Boyden, C.L.; Werkema, D.D.; Lane, J.W.

    2016-01-01

    Geophysical technologies have the potential to improve site characterization and monitoring in fractured rock, but the appropriate and effective application of geophysics at a particular site strongly depends on project goals (e.g., identifying discrete fractures) and site characteristics (e.g., lithology). No method works at every site or for every goal. New approaches are needed to identify a set of geophysical methods appropriate to specific project goals and site conditions while considering budget constraints. To this end, we present the Excel-based Fractured-Rock Geophysical Toolbox Method Selection Tool (FRGT-MST). We envision the FRGT-MST (1) equipping remediation professionals with a tool to understand what is likely to be realistic and cost-effective when contracting geophysical services, and (2) reducing applications of geophysics with unrealistic objectives or where methods are likely to fail.

  10. Geophysical evaluation of the Success Dam foundation, Porterville, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunter, L.E.; Powers, M.H.; Haines, S.; Asch, T.; Burton, B.L.; Serafini, D.C.

    2006-01-01

    Success Dam is a zonedearth fill embankment located near Porterville, CA. Studies of Success Dam by the recent Dam Safety Assurance Program (DSAP) have demonstrated the potential for seismic instability and large deformation of the dam due to relatively low levels of earthquake shaking. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers conducted several phases of investigations to determine the properties of the dam and its underlying foundation. Detailed engineering studies have been applied using a large number of analytical techniques to estimate the response of the dam and foundation system when subjected to earthquake loading. Although a large amount of data have been acquired, most are 'point' data from borings and results have to be extrapolated between the borings. Geophysical techniques were applied to image the subsurface to provide a better understanding of the spatial distribution of key units that potentially impact the stability. Geophysical investigations employing seismic refraction tomography, direct current (DC) resistivity, audio magnetotellurics (AMT) and self-potential (SP) were conducted across the location of the foundation of a new dam proposed to replace the existing one. Depth to bedrock and the occurrence of beds potentially susceptible to liquefaction were the focus of the investigations. Seismic refraction tomography offers a deep investigation of the foundation region and looks at compressional and shear properties of the material. Whereas resistivity surveys determines conductivity relationships in the shallow subsurface and can produce a relatively high-resolution image of geological units with different electrical properties. AMT was applied because it has the potential to look considerably deeper than the other methods, is useful for confirming depth to bedrock, and can be useful in identifying deep seated faults. SP is a passive electrical method that measures the electrical streaming potential in the subsurface that responds to the movement of

  11. Creation of unification RS and geophysical data in Central Kyzylkum-Western Uzbekistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorova, Elena

    2014-05-01

    In the report describes the state of the art of remote sensing and geophysical studies- seismic, magnetic data on the covered Mz-Kz deposits area of Central Kyzylkum. The complex data interpretation includes three steps: (i) creation geophysical data base in ArcGIS 10.1 software; (ii) processing RS data and Erdas Imagine 9.2 software (indication method, PCA analysis and etc.); (iii) integration geophysical and RS data in to ArcGIS&RS model. Materials of seismic and magnetic studies were used for the identification of anomalous objects and their heterogeneities in deep horizons of the consolidated crust as the basis for further correlation with RS data observed on the Earth's surface. As results of collaboration between GIS and RS data analysis the new prospect areas were extracted from the study areas. Were revealed the geological structures in 3-D model, associated with mineralization, lineaments and ring structures. The complex analysis of model allowed proposing new potential ore areas for statement of prospecting work. As example, we present results of correlation between Tamdy ring structure and high velocity object on the deep 4 km, which in the which also link with large gold deposit Muruntau in Central Kyzylkum.

  12. Geophysical controls of chemical disequilibria in Europa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vance, S. D.; Hand, K. P.; Pappalardo, R. T.

    2016-05-01

    The ocean in Jupiter's moon Europa may have redox balance similar to Earth's. On Earth, low-temperature hydration of crustal olivine produces substantial hydrogen, comparable to any potential flux from volcanic activity. Here we compare hydrogen and oxygen production rates of the Earth system with fluxes to Europa's ocean. Even without volcanic hydrothermal activity, water-rock alteration in Europa causes hydrogen fluxes 10 times smaller than Earth's. Europa's ocean may have become reducing for a brief epoch, for example, after a thermal-orbital resonance ˜2 Gyr after accretion. Estimated oxidant flux to Europa's ocean is comparable to estimated hydrogen fluxes. Europa's ice delivers oxidants to its ocean at the upper end of these estimates if its ice is geologically active, as evidence of geologic activity and subduction implies.

  13. Geologic and Geophysical Framework of the Santa Rosa 7.5' Quadrangle, Sonoma County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McLaughlin, R.J.; Langenheim, V.E.; Sarna-Wojcicki, A. M.; Fleck, R.J.; McPhee, D.K.; Roberts, C.W.; McCabe, C.A.; Wan, Elmira

    2008-01-01

    The geologic and geophysical maps of Santa Rosa 7.5? quadrangle and accompanying structure sections portray the sedimentary and volcanic stratigraphy and crustal structure of the Santa Rosa 7.5? quadrangle and provide a context for interpreting the evolution of volcanism and active faulting in this region. The quadrangle is located in the California Coast Ranges north of San Francisco Bay and is traversed by the active Rodgers Creek, Healdsburg and Maacama Fault Zones. The geologic and geophysical data presented in this report, are substantial improvements over previous geologic and geophysical maps of the Santa Rosa area, allowing us to address important geologic issues. First, the geologic mapping is integrated with gravity and magnetic data, allowing us to depict the thicknesses of Cenozoic deposits, the depth and configuration of the Mesozoic basement surface, and the geometry of fault structures beneath this region to depths of several kilometers. This information has important implications for constraining the geometries of major active faults and for understanding and predicting the distribution and intensity of damage from ground shaking during earthquakes. Secondly, the geologic map and the accompanying description of the area describe in detail the distribution, geometry and complexity of faulting associated with the Rodgers Creek, Healdsburg and Bennett Valley Fault Zones and associated faults in the Santa Rosa quadrangle. The timing of fault movements is constrained by new 40Ar/39Ar ages and tephrochronologic correlations. These new data provide a better understanding of the stratigraphy of the extensive sedimentary and volcanic cover in the area and, in particular, clarify the formational affinities of Pliocene and Pleistocene nonmarine sedimentary units in the map area. Thirdly, the geophysics, particularly gravity data, indicate the locations of thick sections of sedimentary and volcanic fill within ground water basins of the Santa Rosa plain and

  14. Geochemical constraints on Earth's core composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siebert, Julien

    2016-04-01

    The density of the core as measured from seismic-wave velocities is lower (by 10-15%) than that of pure iron, and therefore the core must also contain some light elements. Geophysical and cosmochemical constraints indicate that obvious candidates for these light elements include silicon, oxygen, and sulfur. These elements have been studied extensively for the past 30 years but a joint solution fulfilling all the requirements imposed by cosmochemistry and geochemistry, seismology, and models of Earth's accretion and core formation is still a highly controversial subject. Here are presented new experimental data in geochemistry used to place constraints on Earth's core composition. Metal-silicate partitioning experiments were performed at pressures and temperatures directly similar to those that prevailed in a deep magma ocean in the early Earth. The results show that core formation can reconcile the observed concentrations of siderophile elements in the silicate mantle with geophysical constraints on light elements in the core. Partitioning results also lead to a core containing less than 1 wt.% of sulfur, inconsistent with a S-rich layer to account for the observed structure of the outer core. Additionally, isotopic fractionations in core formation experiments are presented. This experimental tool merging the fields of experimental petrology and isotope geochemistry represents a promising approach, providing new independent constraints on the nature of light elements in the core.

  15. An introduction to electrical resistivity in geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, Rhett

    2001-09-01

    Physicists are finding that the skills they have learned in their training may be applied to areas beyond traditional physics topics. One such field is that of geophysics. This paper presents the electrical resistivity component of an undergraduate geophysics course at Radford University. It is taught from a physics perspective, yet the application of the theory to the real world is the overriding goal. The concepts involved in electrical resistivity studies are first discussed in a general sense, and then they are studied through the application of the relevant electromagnetic theory. Since geology majors comprise the bulk of the students in this class, the math used is only that which is typically required of geology majors. The final results are given in a form that practicing geophysicists may use in the field. A method is presented for constructing an inexpensive apparatus for measuring electrical resistivity in both a tabletop laboratory setting and in the field. This apparatus is truly "plug and play" since its assembly and use requires only the most basic knowledge of electronics. This apparatus is tested in a tabletop laboratory setting as well as in two field surveys.

  16. New perspectives on superparameterization for geophysical turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Majda, Andrew J.; Grooms, Ian

    2014-08-15

    This is a research expository paper regarding superparameterization, a class of multi-scale numerical methods designed to cope with the intermittent multi-scale effects of inhomogeneous geophysical turbulence where energy often inverse-cascades from the unresolved scales to the large scales through the effects of waves, jets, vortices, and latent heat release from moist processes. Original as well as sparse space–time superparameterization algorithms are discussed for the important case of moist atmospheric convection including the role of multi-scale asymptotic methods in providing self-consistent constraints on superparameterization algorithms and related deterministic and stochastic multi-cloud parameterizations. Test models for the statistical numerical analysis of superparameterization algorithms are discussed both to elucidate the performance of the basic algorithms and to test their potential role in efficient multi-scale data assimilation. The very recent development of grid-free seamless stochastic superparameterization methods for geophysical turbulence appropriate for “eddy-permitting” mesoscale ocean turbulence is presented here including a general formulation and illustrative applications to two-layer quasigeostrophic turbulence, and another difficult test case involving one-dimensional models of dispersive wave turbulence. This last test case has randomly generated solitons as coherent structures which collapse and radiate wave energy back to the larger scales, resulting in strong direct and inverse turbulent energy cascades.

  17. Integrated Software Framework for Geophysical Data Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chubak, G. D.; Morozov, I. B.

    2005-12-01

    An integrated software framework for geophysical data processing was designed by extending a seismic processing system developed previously. Unlike other systems, the new processing monitor is essentially content-agnostic, supports structured multicomponent seismic data streams, multidimensional data objects, and employs a unique backpropagation execution logic. This results in an unusual flexibility of processing, allowing the system to handle nearly any geophysical data. The core package includes nearly 190 tools for seismic, travel-time, and potential-field processing, interfaces to popular graphics and other packages (such as Seismic Unix and GMT). The system also offers an extensive processing environment, including: 1) a modern and feature-rich Graphical User Interface allowing submission of processing jobs and interaction with them during run time, 2) parallel processing capabilities, including load distribution on Beowulf clusters or local area networks; 3) web service operation allowing submission of complex processing jobs to shared remote servers; 4) automated software update service for code distribution to multiple systems, 5) automated online documentation, and 6) software development utilities. The core package was used in several areas of seismology (shallow, reflection, crustal wide-angle, and teleseismic) and in 3D potential-field processing. As a first example of its application, the new web service component (http://seisweb.usask.ca/SIA/ws.php).was used to build a library of processing examples, ranging from simple (UTM coordinate transformations or calculation of great-arc distances) to more complex (such as synthetic seismic modeling).

  18. Efficient stochastic superparameterization for geophysical turbulence

    PubMed Central

    Grooms, Ian; Majda, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    Efficient computation of geophysical turbulence, such as occurs in the atmosphere and ocean, is a formidable challenge for the following reasons: the complex combination of waves, jets, and vortices; significant energetic backscatter from unresolved small scales to resolved large scales; a lack of dynamical scale separation between large and small scales; and small-scale instabilities, conditional on the large scales, which do not saturate. Nevertheless, efficient methods are needed to allow large ensemble simulations of sufficient size to provide meaningful quantifications of uncertainty in future predictions and past reanalyses through data assimilation and filtering. Here, a class of efficient stochastic superparameterization algorithms is introduced. In contrast to conventional superparameterization, the method here (i) does not require the simulation of nonlinear eddy dynamics on periodic embedded domains, (ii) includes a better representation of unresolved small-scale instabilities, and (iii) allows efficient representation of a much wider range of unresolved scales. The simplest algorithm implemented here radically improves efficiency by representing small-scale eddies at and below the limit of computational resolution by a suitable one-dimensional stochastic model of random-direction plane waves. In contrast to heterogeneous multiscale methods, the methods developed here do not require strong scale separation or conditional equilibration of local statistics. The simplest algorithm introduced here shows excellent performance on a difficult test suite of prototype problems for geophysical turbulence with waves, jets, and vortices, with a speedup of several orders of magnitude compared with direct simulation. PMID:23487800

  19. The Continental Crust: A Geophysical Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Nikolas I.

    Nearly 80 years ago, Yugoslavian seismologist Andrija Mohorovicic recognized, while studying a Balkan earthquake, that velocities of seismic waves increase abruptly at a few tens of kilometers depth , giving rise to the seismological definition of the crust. Since that discovery, many studies concerned with the nature of both the continental and oceanic crusts have appeared in the geophysical literature.Recently, interest in the continental crust has cascaded. This is largely because of an infusion of new data obtained from major reflection programs such as the Consortium for Continental Reflection Profiling (COCORP) and British Institutions Reflection Profiling Syndicate (BIRPS) and increased resolution of refraction studies. In addition, deep continental drilling programs are n ow in fashion. The Continental Crust: A Geophysical Approach is a summary of present knowledge of the continental crust. Meissner has succeeded in writing a book suited to many different readers, from the interested undergraduate to the professional. The book is well documented , with pertinent figures and a complete and up-to-date reference list.

  20. Minimax approach to inverse problems of geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balk, P. I.; Dolgal, A. S.; Balk, T. V.; Khristenko, L. A.

    2016-03-01

    A new approach is suggested for solving the inverse problems that arise in the different fields of applied geophysics (gravity, magnetic, and electrical prospecting, geothermy) and require assessing the spatial region occupied by the anomaly-generating masses in the presence of different types of a priori information. The interpretation which provides the maximum guaranteed proximity of the model field sources to the real perturbing object is treated as the best interpretation. In some fields of science (game theory, economics, operations research), the decision-making principle that lies in minimizing the probable losses which cannot be prevented if the situation develops by the worst-case scenario is referred to as minimax. The minimax criterion of choice is interesting as, instead of being confined to the indirect (and sometimes doubtful) signs of the "optimal" solution, it relies on the actual properties of the information in the results of a particular interpretation. In the hierarchy of the approaches to the solution of the inverse problems of geophysics ordered by the volume and quality of the retrieved information about the sources of the field, the minimax approach should take special place.

  1. Using Geophysical Data to Improve Science Literacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Vink, G. E.

    2002-12-01

    Although relatively few students will become professional geoscientists (i.e. producers of scientific information), essentially every student is a future consumer of scientific information. Government agencies, environmental organizations, businesses, and special interest groups use scientific arguments to set policy, create legislation, and develop international agreements. Often, decisions must be made even though the data are incomplete, ambiguous, or contradictory. In addition, such decisions frequently have severe social, economic, and political consequences. At Princeton University, we have developed courses designed to make students sophisticated consumers of scientific information. The courses are among the most popular and top rated courses in the University. Through a series of actual case studies that use geophysical data, students learn how to make decisions using scientific information in concert with engineering, economic, political, and social considerations. For each issue, they analyze the scientific arguments, evaluate the geophysical data upon which they are based, and determine the scientific credibility, political feasibility, and economic consequences of the various options. The class's actions are then compared against those of the actual decision-makers, and the accuracy of their predictions is evaluated against the outcome. Students gain first-hand experience with concepts such as valid inference, representative sampling, boundary values, and data discrimination.

  2. Direct Statistical Simulation of Geophysical Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marston, Brad; Chini, Greg; Tobias, Steve

    2015-11-01

    Statistics of models of geophysical and astrophysical fluids may be directly accessed by solving the equations of motion for the statistics themselves as proposed by Lorenz nearly 50 years ago. Motivated by the desire to capture seamlessly multiscale physics we introduce a new approach to such Direct Statistical Simulation (DSS) based upon separating eddies by length scale. Discarding triads that involve only small-scale waves, the equations of motion generalize the quasi-linear approximation (GQL) and are able to accurately reproduce the low-order statistics of a stochastically-driven barotropic jet. Furthermore the two-point statistics of high wavenumber modes close and thus generalize second-order cumulant expansions (CE2) that employ zonal averaging. This GCE2 approach is tested on two-layer primitive equations. Comparison to statistics accumulated from numerical simulation finds GCE2 to be quantitatively accurate. DSS thus leads to new insight into important processes in geophysical and astrophysical flows. Supported in part by NSF DMR-1306806 and NSF CCF-1048701.

  3. Adaptive mesh refinement and adjoint methods in geophysics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burstedde, Carsten

    2013-04-01

    It is an ongoing challenge to increase the resolution that can be achieved by numerical geophysics simulations. This applies to considering sub-kilometer mesh spacings in global-scale mantle convection simulations as well as to using frequencies up to 1 Hz in seismic wave propagation simulations. One central issue is the numerical cost, since for three-dimensional space discretizations, possibly combined with time stepping schemes, a doubling of resolution can lead to an increase in storage requirements and run time by factors between 8 and 16. A related challenge lies in the fact that an increase in resolution also increases the dimensionality of the model space that is needed to fully parametrize the physical properties of the simulated object (a.k.a. earth). Systems that exhibit a multiscale structure in space are candidates for employing adaptive mesh refinement, which varies the resolution locally. An example that we found well suited is the mantle, where plate boundaries and fault zones require a resolution on the km scale, while deeper area can be treated with 50 or 100 km mesh spacings. This approach effectively reduces the number of computational variables by several orders of magnitude. While in this case it is possible to derive the local adaptation pattern from known physical parameters, it is often unclear what are the most suitable criteria for adaptation. We will present the goal-oriented error estimation procedure, where such criteria are derived from an objective functional that represents the observables to be computed most accurately. Even though this approach is well studied, it is rarely used in the geophysics community. A related strategy to make finer resolution manageable is to design methods that automate the inference of model parameters. Tweaking more than a handful of numbers and judging the quality of the simulation by adhoc comparisons to known facts and observations is a tedious task and fundamentally limited by the turnaround times

  4. Geophysical mapping of variations in soil moisture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioane, Dumitru; Scradeanu, Daniel; Chitea, Florina; Garbacea, George

    2010-05-01

    The geophysical investigation of soil characteristics is a matter of great actuality for agricultural, hydrogeological, geotechnical or archaeological purposes. The geophysical mapping of soil quality is subject of a recently started scientific project in Romania: "Soil investigation and monitoring techniques - modern tools for implementing the precision agriculture in Romania - CNCSIS 998/2009". One of the first studied soil parameter is moisture content, in irrigated or non-irrigated agricultural areas. The geophysical techniques employed in two areas located within the Romanian Plain, Prahova and Buzau counties, are the following: - electromagnetic (EM), using the EM38B (Geonics) conductivity meter for getting areal distribution of electric conductivity and magnetic susceptibility; - electric resistivity tomography (ERT), using the SuperSting (AGI) multi-electrode instrument for getting in-depth distribution of electric resistivity. The electric conductivity mapping was carried out on irrigated cultivated land in a vegetable farm in the Buzau county, the distribution of conductivity being closely related to the soil water content due to irrigation works. The soil profile is represented by a chernozem with the following structure: Am (0 - 40 cm), Bt (40-150 cm), Bt/C (150-170 cm), C (starting at 170 cm). The electromagnetic measurements showed large variations of this geophysical parameter within different cultivated sectors, ranging from 40 mS/m to 85 mS/m. The close association between conductivity and water content in this area is illustrated by such geophysical measurements on profiles situated at ca 50 m on non-irrigated land, displaying a mean value of 15 mS/m. This low conductivity is due to quite long time interval, of about three weeks, without precipitations. The ERT measurements using multi-electrode acquisition systems for 2D and 3D results, showed by means of electric resistivity variations, the penetration of water along the cultivated rows from the

  5. Digital Underground (Shh. It's really Applied Geophysics!)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAdoo, B. G.

    2003-12-01

    Digital Underground (Geology/Physics 241) at Vassar College is an applied geophysics course designed for a liberal arts curriculum, and has nothing to do with Shock G and Tupac Shakur. Applied geophysics courses have a history of using geophysical methods on environmental contamination-type applications (underground storage tanks, leach fields, etc.). Inspired in large part by the Keck Geology Consortium project run by Franklin and Marshall College geophysicist (Robert Sternberg) and archaeologist (James Delle) in an old slave village in Jamaica in 1999, this class examines the history of slavery in New York's Hudson Valley region by way of its forgotten African-American graveyards. This multidisciplinary approach to an issue draws students from across the curriculum- we have had our compliments of geologists and physicists, along with students from sociology, environmental studies, history, and Africana studies. The name of the class and content are designed to attract a non-traditional student of geophysics.- The project-based nature of the class appeals to student yearning for an out-of-classroom experience. The uncontrolled nature of the class demonstrates the complications that occur in real-word situations. The class has in the past broken itself into two teams- a surveying team and an archival research team. Archival research is done (usually by the social scientists in the class) to add a human dimension to the geophysical. The surveying equipment used in delineating these forgotten graveyards includes a Total Station surveyor, an electrical resistivity meter, a magnetometer, and a ground penetrating radar. All students must have a rudimentary understanding of the physics behind the equipment (to the level of where they can explain it to the general public), and the methods used by those studying the archives. This is a project-based class, where the instructor acts as a project manager, and the students make the decisions regarding the survey itself. Every

  6. Tides and lake-level variations in the great Patagonian lakes: Observations, modelling and geophysical implications.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marderwald, Eric; Richter, Andreas; Horwath, Martin; Hormaechea, Jose Luis; Groh, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    In Patagonia, the glacial-isostatic adjustment (GIA) to past ice-mass changes (Ivins & James 2004; Klemann et al. 2007) is of particular interest in the context of the determination of the complex regional rheology related to plate subduction in a triple-junction constellation. To further complicate the situation, GIA is overlaid with load deformation not only due to present ice mass changes but also due to water-level changes in the lakes surrounding the icefields and the ocean surrounding Patagonia. These elastic deformations affect the determination of glacial-isostatic uplift rates from GPS observations (Dietrich et al. 2010; Lange et al. 2014). Observations of lake tides and their comparison with the theoretical tidal signal have been used previously to validate predictions of ocean tidal loading and have revealed regional deviations from conventional global elastic earth models (Richter et al. 2009). In this work we investigate the tides and lake-level variations in Lago Argentino, Lago Viedma, Lago San Martín/O'Higgins and Lago Buenos Aires/General Carrera. This allows us to test, among other things, the validity of tidal loading models. We present pressure tide-gauge records from two sites in Lago Argentino extending over 2.5 years (Richter et al. 2015). These observations are complemented by lake-level records provided by the Argentine National Hydrometeorological Network. Based on these lake-level time series the principal processes affecting the lake level are identified and quantified. Lake-level changes reflecting variations in lake volume are dominated by a seasonal cycle exceeding 1 m in amplitude. Lake-volume changes occur in addition with a daily period in response to melt water influx from surrounding glaciers. In Lago Argentino sporadic lake-volume jumps are caused by bursting of the ice dam of Perito Moreno glacier. Water movements in these lakes are dominated by surface seiches reaching 20 cm in amplitude. A harmonic tidal analysis of the lake

  7. Tides and lake-level variations in the great Patagonian lakes: Observations, modelling and geophysical implications.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marderwald, Eric; Richter, Andreas; Horwath, Martin; Hormaechea, Jose Luis; Groh, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    In Patagonia, the glacial-isostatic adjustment (GIA) to past ice-mass changes (Ivins & James 2004; Klemann et al. 2007) is of particular interest in the context of the determination of the complex regional rheology related to plate subduction in a triple-junction constellation. To further complicate the situation, GIA is overlaid with load deformation not only due to present ice mass changes but also due to water-level changes in the lakes surrounding the icefields and the ocean surrounding Patagonia. These elastic deformations affect the determination of glacial-isostatic uplift rates from GPS observations (Dietrich et al. 2010; Lange et al. 2014). Observations of lake tides and their comparison with the theoretical tidal signal have been used previously to validate predictions of ocean tidal loading and have revealed regional deviations from conventional global elastic earth models (Richter et al. 2009). In this work we investigate the tides and lake-level variations in Lago Argentino, Lago Viedma, Lago San Martín/O'Higgins and Lago Buenos Aires/General Carrera. This allows us to test, among other things, the validity of tidal loading models. We present pressure tide-gauge records from two sites in Lago Argentino extending over 2.5 years (Richter et al. 2015). These observations are complemented by lake-level records provided by the Argentine National Hydrometeorological Network. Based on these lake-level time series the principal processes affecting the lake level are identified and quantified. Lake-level changes reflecting variations in lake volume are dominated by a seasonal cycle exceeding 1 m in amplitude. Lake-volume changes occur in addition with a daily period in response to melt water influx from surrounding glaciers. In Lago Argentino sporadic lake-volume jumps are caused by bursting of the ice dam of Perito Moreno glacier. Water movements in these lakes are dominated by surface seiches reaching 20 cm in amplitude. A harmonic tidal analysis of the lake

  8. Earth Science Education in Sudan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullatif, Osman M.; Farwa, Abdalla G.

    1999-05-01

    This paper describes Earth Science Education in Sudan, with particular emphasis on the University of Khartoum. The first geological department in Sudan was founded in 1958 in the University of Khartoum. In the 1980s, six more geological departments have been added in the newer universities. The types of courses offered include Diploma, B.Sc. (General), B.Sc. (Honours), M.Sc. and Ph.D. The Geology programmes are strongly supported by field work training and mapping. Final-year students follow specialised training in one of the following topics: hydrogeology, geophysics, economic geology, sedimentology and engineering geology. A graduation report, written in the final year, represents 30-40% of the total marks. The final assessment and grading are decided with the help of internal and external examiners. Entry into the Geology programmes is based on merit and performance. The number of students who graduate with Honours and become geologists is between 20% to 40% of the initial intake at the beginning of the second year. Employment opportunities are limited and are found mainly in the Government's geological offices, the universities and research centres, and private companies. The Department of Geology at the University of Khartoum has long-standing internal and external links with outside partners. This has been manifested in the training of staff members, the donation of teaching materials and laboratory facilities. The chief problems currently facing Earth Science Education in Sudan are underfunding, poor equipment, laboratory facilities and logistics. Other problems include a shortage of staff, absence of research, lack of supervision and emigration of staff members. Urgent measures are needed to assess and evaluate the status of Earth Science Education in terms of objectives, needs and difficulties encountered. Earth Science Education is expected to contribute significantly to the exploitation of mineral resources and socio-economic development in the Sudan.

  9. Randomness Of Amoeba Movements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashiguchi, S.; Khadijah, Siti; Kuwajima, T.; Ohki, M.; Tacano, M.; Sikula, J.

    2005-11-01

    Movements of amoebas were automatically traced using the difference between two successive frames of the microscopic movie. It was observed that the movements were almost random in that the directions and the magnitudes of the successive two steps are not correlated, and that the distance from the origin was proportional to the square root of the step number.

  10. The Human Potential Movement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tamashiro, Roy T.

    The advent of the human potential movement has generated the expectation that educators unleash the intellectual, emotional, physical, and spiritual talents of students. This movement is characterized by its focus on (1) the person as a total being, (2) the needs and concerns of students, (3) phenomenology, (4) personal values and goals, and (5)…

  11. [Dance/Movement Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenichel, Emily, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    This newsletter theme issue focuses on dance, play, and movement therapy for infants and toddlers with disabilities. Individual articles are: "Join My Dance: The Unique Movement Style of Each Infant and Toddler Can Invite Communication, Expression and Intervention" (Suzi Tortora); "Dynamic Play Therapy: An Integrated Expressive Arts Approach to…

  12. 85 Engaging Movement Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weikart, Phyllis S.; Carlton, Elizabeth B.

    This book presents activities to keep K-6 students moving in a variety of ways as they learn. The movement experiences are planned around key curriculum concepts in movement and music as well as in academic curriculum areas. The experiences develop students' basic timing, language abilities, vocabulary, concentration, planning skills, and…

  13. National CARES Mentoring Movement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Martin L.

    2013-01-01

    Harsh and cruel experiences have led many of our young to believe that they are alone in the world and that no one cares. In this article, Martin L Mitchell introduces us to the "National CARES Mentoring Movement" founded by Susan L.Taylor. This movement provides young people with role models who help shape their positive development.…

  14. New Antarctic gravity anomaly grid for enhanced geodetic and geophysical studies in Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheinert, M.; Ferraccioli, F.; Schwabe, J.; Bell, R.; Studinger, M.; Damaske, D.; Jokat, W.; Aleshkova, N.; Jordan, T.; Leitchenkov, G.; Blankenship, D. D.; Damiani, T. M.; Young, D.; Cochran, J. R.; Richter, T. D.

    2016-01-01

    Gravity surveying is challenging in Antarctica because of its hostile environment and inaccessibility. Nevertheless, many ground-based, airborne, and shipborne gravity campaigns have been completed by the geophysical and geodetic communities since the 1980s. We present the first modern Antarctic-wide gravity data compilation derived from 13 million data points covering an area of 10 million km2, which corresponds to 73% coverage of the continent. The remove-compute-restore technique was applied for gridding, which facilitated leveling of the different gravity data sets with respect to an Earth gravity model derived from satellite data alone. The resulting free-air and Bouguer gravity anomaly grids of 10 km resolution are publicly available. These grids will enable new high-resolution combined Earth gravity models to be derived and represent a major step forward toward solving the geodetic polar data gap problem. They provide a new tool to investigate continental-scale lithospheric structure and geological evolution of Antarctica.

  15. Geophysical investigations of the Stuoragurra postglacial fault, Finnmark, northern Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olesen, Odleiv; Henkel, Herbert; Lile, Ole Bernt; Mauring, Eirik; Rønning, Jan Steinar

    1992-08-01

    Processed images of aeromagnetic, gravimetric and topographical data and geological maps combined with VLF ground measurements have been interpreted in mapping the main fault structures along the Mierujav'ri-Sværholt Fault Zone (MSFZ) in Finnmark, northern Norway. The 230 km long MSFZ is situated in the extensive Proterozoic terrain of Finnmark. Proterozoic albite diabases, which cause characteristic magnetic anomalies in the Masi area, have intruded along the MSFZ. A system of duplexes can be delineated along the MSFZ from the geophysical images. These interpretations have been followed up in the till-covered area with electromagnetic measurements and confirm the existence of the faults interpreted from the geophysical images. The postglacial Stuoragurra Fault (SF) lies within the MSFZ. It is a southeasterly dipping reverse fault and can be traced fairly continuously for 80 km in the Masi-Iešjav'ri area. Detailed geophysical investigations and drilling have been carried out in the Fidnajåkka area 10 km to the south of Masi. A ca. 1 m thick layer of fault gouge detected in the drillholes is thought to represent the actual fault surface. Resistivity measurements reveal low-resistivity zones in the hanging-wall block as well as in the foot-wall block of the SF. These low-resistivity zones lie within a several hundred metre wide belt and are interpreted to be due to fracturing of the quartzites along the regional MSFZ. Within the Fidnajåkka area, however, the resistivity of the hanging-wall block of the SF is typically lower than in the foot-wall, indicating more intense fracturing in the hanging-wall. Vertical electrical soundings show a low-resistivity layer at depth in the eastern hanging-wall block, which corroborates other evidence that the fault dips to the southeast. The refraction seismic data reveal low seismic velocities along the SF which are interpreted to be caused by faulted and fractured bedrock. Detailed topographical data proved very useful for

  16. Multi-sensor geophysical constraints on crustal melt in the central Andes: the PLUTONS project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pritchard, M. E.; Comeau, M. J.; West, M. E.; Christensen, D. H.; Mcfarlin, H. L.; Farrell, A. K.; Del Potro, R.; Gottsmann, J.; McNutt, S. R.; Michelfelder, G.; Diez, M.; Elliott, J.; Henderson, S. T.; Keyson, L.; Delgado, F.; Unsworth, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    The central Andes is a key global location to quantify storage, transport, and volumes of magma in the Earth's crust as it is home to the world's largest zone of partial melt (the Altiplano-Puna Magma or Mush Body, APMB) as well as the more recently documented Southern Puna Magma Body (SPMB). We describe results from the recently completed international PLUTONS project that focused inter-disciplinary study on two sites of large-scale surface uplift that presumably represent ongoing magmatic intrusions in the mid to upper crust - Uturuncu, Bolivia (in the center of the APMB) and Lazufre on the Chile-Argentina border (on the edge of the SPMB). In particular, a suite of geophysical techniques (seismology, gravity, surface deformation, and electro-magnetic methods) have been used to infer the current subsurface distribution and quantity of partial melts in combination with geochemical and lab studies on samples from the area. Both Uturuncu and Lazufre show separate geophysical anomalies in the upper and mid/lower crust (e.g., low seismic velocity, low resistivity, etc.) indicating multiple distinct reservoirs of magma and/or hydrothermal fluids with different properties. The characteristics of the geophysical anomalies differ somewhat depending on the technique used - reflecting the different sensitivity of each method to subsurface melt of different compositions, connectivity, and volatile content. For example, the depth to the top of the APMB is shallower in a joint ambient noise tomography and receiver function analysis compared to a 3D magnetotelluric inversion. One possibility is that the seismic methods are detecting brines above the APMB that do not have a large electromagnetic signature. Comparison of the geophysical measurements with laboratory experiments at the APMB indicate a minimum of 4-25% melt averaged over the region is needed -- higher melt volumes are permitted by the gravity and MT data and may exist in small regions. However, bulk melt values above

  17. National Geological and Geophysical Data Preservation Program: Successes and Lessons Learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adrian, B. M.

    2014-12-01

    The United States Geological Survey (USGS) is widely recognized in the earth science community as possessing extensive collections of geologic and geophysical materials gathered by its research personnel. Since the USGS was established in 1879, hundreds of thousands of samples have been gathered in collections that range from localized, geographically-based assemblages to ones that are national or international in scope. These materials include, but are not limited to, rock and mineral specimens; fossils; drill cores and cuttings; geochemical standards; and soil, sediment, and geochemical samples. The USGS National Geological and Geophysical Data Preservation Program (NGGDPP) was established with the passage of the Energy Policy Act of 2005. Since its implementation, the USGS NGGDPP has taken an active role in providing opportunities to inventory, archive and preserve geologic and geophysical samples, and to make these samples and ancillary data discoverable on the Internet. Preserving endangered geoscience collections is more cost effective than recollecting this information. Preserving these collections, however, is only one part of the process - there also needs to be a means to facilitate open discovery and access to the physical objects and the ancillary digital records. The NGGDPP has celebrated successes such as the development of the USGS Geologic Collections Management System (GCMS), a master catalog and collections management plan, and the implementation and advancement of the National Digital Catalog, a digital inventory and catalog of geological and geophysical data and collections held by the USGS and State geological surveys. Over this period of time there has been many lessons learned. With the successes and lessons learned, NGGDPP is poised to take on challenges the future may bring.

  18. Sparsity: a ubiquitous but unexplored property of geophysical signals for multi-scale modeling and reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fouofula-Georgiou, E.; Ebtehaj, A. M.

    2012-04-01

    Sparsity: a ubiquitous but unexplored property of geophysical signals for multi-scale modeling and reconstruction Efi Foufoula-Georgiou and Ardeshir Mohammad Ebtehaj Department of Civil Engineering and National Center for Earth-surface Dynamics University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55414 Many geophysical processes exhibit variability over a wide range of scales. Yet, in numerical modeling or remote sensing observations not all of this variability is explicitly resolved due to limitations in computational resources or sensor configurations. As a result, sub-grid scale parameterizations and downscaling/upscaling representations are essential. Such representations take advantage of scale invariance which has been theoretically or empirically documented in a wide range of geophysical processes, including precipitation, soil moisture, and topography. Here we present a new direction in the field of multi-scale analysis and reconstruction. It capitalizes on the fact that most geophysical signals are naturally redundant, due to spatial dependence and coherence over a range of scales, and thus when projected onto an appropriate space (e.g, Fourier or wavelet) only a few representation coefficients are non-zero -- this property is called sparsity. The sparsity can serve as a priori knowledge to properly regularize the otherwise ill-posed inverse problem of creating information at scales smaller than resolved, which is at the heart of sub-grid scale and downscaling parameterizations. The same property of sparsity is also shown to play a revolutionary role in revisiting the problem of optimal estimation of non-Gaussian processes. Theoretical concepts are borrowed from the new field of compressive sampling and super-resolution and the merits of the methodology are demonstrated using examples from precipitation downscaling, multi-scale data fusion and data assimilation.

  19. Methodology of Detailed Geophysical Examination of the Areas of World Recognized Religious and Cultural Artifacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eppelbaum, Lev

    2010-05-01

    It is obvious that noninvasive geophysical methods are the main interpreting tools at the areas of world recognized religious and cultural artifacts. Usually in these areas any excavations, drilling and infrastructure activity are forbidden or very strongly limited. According to field experience and results of numerous modeling (Eppelbaum, 1999, 2000, 2009a, 2009b; Eppelbaum and Itkis, 2001, 2003; Eppelbaum et al., 2000, 2001a, 2001b, 2003a, 2006a, 2006b, 2007, 2010, Itkis et al., 2003; Neishtadt et al., 2006), a set of applied geophysical methods may include the following types of surveys: (1) magnetic, (3) GPR (ground penetration radar), (3) gravity, (4) electromagnetic VLF (very low frequency), (5) ER (electric resistivity), (6) SP (self-potential), (7) IP (induced polarization), (8) SE (seismoelectric), and (9) NST (near-surface temperature). As it was shown in (Eppelbaum, 2005), interpretation ambiguity may be sufficiently reduced not only by integrated analysis of several geophysical methods, but also by the way of multilevel observations of geophysical fields. Magnetic, gravity and VLF measurements may be performed at different levels over the earth's surface (0.1 - 3 m), ER, SP and SE observations may be obtained with different depth of electrodes grounding (0.1 - 1 m), and NST sensor may be located at a depth of 0.8 - 2.5 m. GPR method usually allows measuring electromagnetic fields at various frequencies (with corresponding changing of the investigation depth and other parameters). Influence of some typical noise factors to geophysical investigations at archaeological sites was investigated in (Eppelbaum and Khesin, 2001). In many cases various constructions and walls are in the nearest vicinity of the examined artifacts. These constructions can be also utilized for carrying out geophysical measurements (magnetic, gravity and VLF) at different levels. Application of the modern ROV (remote operated vehicles) with registration of magnetic and VLF fields at

  20. EGS Richardson AGU Chapman NVAG3 Conference: Nonlinear Variability in Geophysics: scaling and multifractal processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schertzer, D.; Lovejoy, S.

    was followed by five days with 8 oral sessions and one poster session. Overall, there were 65 papers involving 74 authors. In general, the main topics covered are reflected in this special issue: geophysical turbulence, clouds and climate, hydrology and solid earth geophysics. In addition to AGU and EGS, the conference was supported by the International Science Foundation, the Centre Nationale de Recherche Scientifique, Meteo-France, the Department of Energy (US), the Commission of European Communities (DG XII), the Comite National Francais pour le Programme Hydrologique International, the Ministere de l'Enseignement Superieur et de la Recherche (France). We thank P. Hubert, Y. Kagan, Ph. Ladoy, A. Lazarev, S.S. Moiseev, R. Pierrehumbert, F. Schmitt and Y. Tessier, for help with the organization of the conference. However special thanks goes to A. Richter and the EGS office, B. Weaver and the AGU without whom this would have been impossible. We also thank the Institut d' Etudes Scientifiques de Cargese whose beautiful site was much appreciated, as well as the Bar des Amis whose ambiance stimulated so many discussions. 2. Tribute to L.F. Richardson With NVAG3, the European geophysical community paid tribute to Lewis Fry Richardson (1881-1953) on the 40th anniversary of his death. Richardson was one of the founding fathers of the idea of scaling and fractality, and his life reflects the European geophysical community and its history in many ways. Although many of Richardson's numerous, outstanding scientific contributions to geophysics have been recognized, perhaps his main contribution concerning the importance of scaling and cascades has still not received the attention it deserves. Richardson was the first not only to suggest numerical integration of the equations of motion of the atmosphere, but also to attempt to do so by hand, during the First World War. This work, as well as a presentation of a broad vision of future developments in the field, appeared in his

  1. Annual review of earth and planetary sciences. Volume 16

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetherill, George W.; Albee, Arden L.; Stehli, Francis G.

    Various papers on earth and planetary science topics are presented. The subjects addressed include: role and status of earth science field work; phase relations of prealuminous granitic rocks and their petrogenetic implications; chondritic meteorites and the solar nebula; volcanic winters; mass wasting on continental margins; earthquake ground motions; ore deposits as guides to geologic history of the earth; geology of high-level nuclear waste disposal; and tectonic evolution of the Caribbean. Also discussed are: the earth's rotation; the geophysics of a restless caldera (Long Valley, California); observations of cometary nuclei; geology of Venus; seismic stratigraphy; in situ-produced cosmogenic isotopes in terrestrial rocks; time variations of the earth's magnetic field; deep slabs, geochemical heterogeneity, and the large-scale structure of mantle convection; early proterozoic assembly and growth of Laurentia; concepts and methods of high-resolution event stratigraphy.

  2. Earth physics and phase transformations program: A concept and proposal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonavito, N. L.; Tanaka, T.

    1971-01-01

    A program to study the geophysical characteristics of the earth is presented as an integration of the different disciplines that constitute the earth sciences, through the foundation of a generalized geodynamic theory of earth physics. A program is considered for defining the physical constants of the earth's material which parametrize the hydrodynamic equation in the microscopic solid state behavior of the crystals of the lithosphere. In addition, in order to lay the foundation for a generalized theory in earth physics, specific research areas are considered, such as the nature of the kinetics of the phase transitions in mineral assemblages, the equilibrium thermodynamic properties of crystals which are major constituents of mineral assemblages, and the transport properties of pure crystals which are major constituents of mineral assemblages.

  3. The first Earth Resources Technology Satellite (ERTS-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nordberg, W.

    1973-01-01

    The first Earth Resources Technology Satellite (ERTS-1) makes images of the earth's surface in four portions of the electromagnetic spectrum with sufficient spatial resolution and with a minimum of geometric distortions, so that these images may be applied experimentally to the study of geophysical processes relating to earth resources, to the exploration and conservation of these resources, and to the assessments of environmental stresses. During the first six months of operation, ERTS-1 has imaged 6.5 million square kilometers of the earth's surface every day, covering most major land masses and coastal zones as well as both polar regions of this planet. These images as well as the results of their analyses are available to all people throughout the world. Scientific investigators of all countries have been invited to participate in the utilization of ERTS-1 observations. Many of them have already demonstrated the great efficiency, economy, and reliability of making earth surveys from space.

  4. Geophysical constraints on the water content of the lunar mantle and its implications for the origin of the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karato, Shun-ichiro

    2013-12-01

    Although the Moon was considered to be "dry", recent measurements of hydrogen content in some of the lunar samples showed a substantial amount of water comparable to the water content in the Earthʼs asthenosphere. However, the interpretation of these observations in terms of the distribution of water in the lunar interior is difficult because the composition of these rocks reflects a complicated history involving melting and crystallization. In this study, I analyze geophysically inferred properties to obtain constraints on the distribution of water (and temperature) in the lunar interior. The electrical conductivity inferred from electromagnetic induction observations and the geodetically or geophysically inferred Q are interpreted in terms of laboratory data and the theoretical models on the influence of water (hydrogen) on these properties. Both electrical conductivity and Q are controlled by defect-related processes that are sensitive to the water (hydrogen) content and temperature but less sensitive to the major element chemistry. After a correction for the influence of the major element chemistry constrained by geophysical observations and geochemical considerations, I estimate the temperature-water content combinations that are consistent with the geophysically inferred electrical conductivity and Q. I conclude that the lunar interior is cooler than Earth (at the same depth) but the water content of the lunar mantle is similar to that of Earthʼs asthenosphere. A possible model is presented to explain the not-so-dry Moon where a small degree of water loss during the Moon formation is attributed to the role of liquid phases that play an important role in the Moon-forming environment.

  5. The Gaias (Earth Mothers) of the Ecological/Conservation Movements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, Rosa M.; Biermann, Carol A.

    1999-01-01

    Describes the contributions of women who have served as role models in the fields of ecology and conservation. Women discussed include Ellen Richards, Maria Merian, Jane Colden, Mary Chase, Emma Braun, Ann Morgan, Rachel Carson, Eugenie Clark, Sylvia Earle, Wangari Maathai, Dian Fossey, Birute Galdikas, and Ruth Patrick. Contains 26 references.…

  6. Auxin and chloroplast movements.

    PubMed

    Eckstein, Aleksandra; Krzeszowiec, Weronika; Waligórski, Piotr; Gabryś, Halina

    2016-03-01

    Auxin is involved in a wide spectrum of physiological processes in plants, including responses controlled by the blue light photoreceptors phototropins: phototropic bending and stomatal movement. However, the role of auxin in phototropin-mediated chloroplast movements has never been studied. To address this question we searched for potential interactions between auxin and the chloroplast movement signaling pathway using different experimental approaches and two model plants, Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana tabacum. We observed that the disturbance of auxin homeostasis by shoot decapitation caused a decrease in chloroplast movement parameters, which could be rescued by exogenous auxin application. In several cases, the impairment of polar auxin transport, by chemical inhibitors or in auxin carrier mutants, had a similar negative effect on chloroplast movements. This inhibition was not correlated with changes in auxin levels. Chloroplast relocations were also affected by the antiauxin p-chlorophenoxyisobutyric acid and mutations in genes encoding some of the elements of the SCF(TIR1)-Aux/IAA auxin receptor complex. The observed changes in chloroplast movement parameters are not prominent, which points to a modulatory role of auxin in this process. Taken together, the obtained results suggest that auxin acts indirectly to regulate chloroplast movements, presumably by regulating gene expression via the SCF(TIR1)-Aux/IAA-ARF pathway. Auxin does not seem to be involved in controlling the expression of phototropins.

  7. Gravity effects on endogenous movements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnsson, Anders; Antonsen, Frank

    Gravity effects on endogenous movements A. Johnsson * and F. Antonsen *+ * Department of Physics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology,NO-7491, Trond-heim, Norway, E-mail: anders.johnsson@ntnu.no + Present address: Statoil Research Center Trondheim, NO-7005, Trondheim, Norway Circumnutations in stems/shoots exist in many plants and often consists of more or less regular helical movements around the plumb line under Earth conditions. Recent results on circumnu-tations of Arabidopsis in space (Johnsson et al. 2009) showed that minute amplitude oscilla-tions exist in weightlessness, but that centripetal acceleration (mimicking the gravity) amplified and/or created large amplitude oscillations. Fundamental mechanisms underlying these results will be discussed by modeling the plant tissue as a cylinder of cells coupled together. As a starting point we have modeled (Antonsen 1998) standing waves on a ring of biological cells, as first discussed in a classical paper (Turing 1952). If the coupled cells can change their water content, an `extension' wave could move around the ring. We have studied several, stacked rings of cells coupled into a cylinder that together represent a cylindrical plant tissue. Waves of extensions travelling around the cylinder could then represent the observable circumnutations. The coupling between cells can be due to cell-to-cell diffusion, or to transport via channels, and the coupling can be modeled to vary in both longitudinal and transversal direction of the cylinder. The results from ISS experiments indicate that this cylindrical model of coupled cells should be able to 1) show self-sustained oscillations without the impact of gravity (being en-dogenous) and 2) show how an environmental factor like gravity can amplify or generate the oscillatory movements. Gravity has been introduced in the model by a negative, time-delayed feed-back transport across the cylinder. This represents the physiological reactions to acceler

  8. Lunar composition - A geophysical and petrological synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, S.; Taylor, G. J.; Phillips, R. J.

    1988-06-01

    Lunar compositional constraints are derived on the basis of geophysical data (in particular, the lunar seismic model as revised by Nakamura) and petrological arguments. Only in the case of extreme assumptions can critical aspects of bulk lunar composition be demonstrated to be equivalent to the present-day terrestrial mantle; specifically, the moon has an Mg number that is too low and an alumina abundance that is too high. Over a broad range of crustal densities the presence of a metallic core at least 150 km in radius is necessary to reconcile the upper mantle lunar seismic model with mass and moment of inertia constraints. A significant seismic discontinuity at 500 km depth may mark the lowest extent of early lunar differentiation, possibly representing a transition between highly fractionated upper mantle and less fractionated, perhaps even primordial, middle/lower mantle.

  9. A Network of Geophysical Observatories for Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banerdt, W. Bruce; Christensen, Ulrich; Crisp, David; Dehant, Veronique; Delory, Greg; Lognonne, Philippe; Sotin, Christophe; Spohn, Tilman

    2005-01-01

    For the past 30 years there has been a strong consensus within the international scientific community in favor of sending a network of geophysical landers to Mars to characterize the near-surface weather and climate, determine the large-scale atmospheric dynamics and explore the interior structure and composition. Despite this scientific support, there has been an unbroken string of proposed missions over the past fifteen years which have failed for programmatic reasons to progress beyond the design stage (Mars Network Mission, MESUR, Marsnet, InterMarsnet, NetLander). In this presentation, we review the scientific rationale and technical requirements for such a mission, and discuss current activities aimed toward its implementation.

  10. Resources for History of Geophysics at AIP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Good, G. A.

    2012-12-01

    The history programs of the American Institute of Physics -- the Center for History of Physics and the Niels Bohr Library & Archives -- maintain a wide variety of research resources for the history of physics generally, and for the history of geophysics in particular. AIP has over 20,000 photographs online, nearly 1000 oral history interview transcripts, and much more. The International Catalog of Sources provides an online union catalog of manuscript collections held worldwide. An important collection of IUGG records is available onsite, as also is the recently accessioned collection of AGU papers. As the 2019 centenary of AGU approaches, these resources will be of interest to both AGU members and historians of science.;

  11. Geophysical couples” Discuss jobs, marriage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Some 90 participants attended an open forum, “Dual Career Couples: Challenges and Opportunities,” on December 9 at the AGU Fall 1991 Meeting in San Francisco. Several couples summarized their experiences in “geophysical marriages” while the audience contributed questions and comments.Being forced to live apart was a common complaint among the married panelists. One couple on the panel—Karen Prestegaard of the University of Maryland and Jim Luhr of the Smithsonian Institution's Department of Mineral Physics—have been able to live together only 2 years out of the last 10. Although employer guidelines do not officially prohibit hiring couples, Prestegaard and Luhr expressed frustration that many institutions not only will not do so, but also will not help the second partner find a job nearby.

  12. Interplay Between the Equatorial Geophysical Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sridharan, R.

    2006-11-01

    r_sridharanspl@yahoo.com With the sun as the main driving force, the Equatorial Ionosphere- thermosphere system supports a variety of Geophysical phenomena, essentially controlled by the neutral dynamical and electro dynamical processes that are peculiar to this region. All the neutral atmospheric parameters and the ionospheric parameters show a large variability like the diurnal, seasonal semi annual, annual, solar activity and those that are geomagnetic activity dependent. In addition, there is interplay between the ionized and the neutral atmospheric constituents. They manifest themselves as the Equatorial Electrojet (EEJ), Equatorial Ionization Anomaly (EIA), Equatorial Spread F (ESF), Equatorial Temperature and Wind Anomaly (ETWA). Recent studies have revealed that these phenomena, though apparently might show up as independent ones, are in reality interlinked. The interplay between these equatorial processes forms the theme for the present talk.

  13. The geology and geophysics of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saunders, R. S.

    1976-01-01

    The current state of knowledge concerning the regional geology and geophysics of Mars is summarized. Telescopic observations of the planet are reviewed, pre-Mariner models of its interior are discussed, and progress achieved with the Mariner flybys, especially that of Mariner 9, is noted. A map of the Martian geological provinces is presented to provide a summary of the surface geology and morphology. The contrast between the northern and southern hemispheres is pointed out, and the characteristic features of the surface are described in detail. The global topography of the planet is examined along with its gravitational field, gravity anomalies, and moment of inertia. The general sequence of events in Martian geological history is briefly outlined.

  14. Geophysical interpretation of Venus gravity data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reasenberg, R. D.

    1985-01-01

    The investigation of the subsurface mass distribution of Venus through the analysis of the data from Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO) is presented. The Doppler tracking data was used to map the gravitational potential, which was compared to the topographic data from the PVO radar (ORAD). In order to obtain an unbiased comparison, the topography obtained from the PVO-ORAD was filtered to introduce distortions which are the same as those of our gravity models. The last major software package that was required in order to determine the spectral admittance Z (lambda) was used. This package solves the forward problem: given the topography and its density, and assuming no compensation, find the resulting spacecraft acceleration along a given nominal trajectory. The filtered topography is obtained by processing these accelerations in the same way (i.e., with the same geophysical inverter) as the Doppler-rate data that we use to estimate the gravity maps.

  15. Geophysics could explain Ancient Maya Myth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruchez, Margaret Sabom

    According to Maya mythology, the splendor of the principal entity, the Feathered Serpent, is exalted at Lake Atitlán in southwestern Guatemala. A chance look at a phenomenon in the natural environment reveals the possible geophysical basis of this myth.More than poetic fancy, the flight of the Feathered Serpent could refer to the dissipation of a soliton wave formed in the 130-km2 caldera lake. In the myth, recounted in the sixteenth century document los anales de los caqchiqueles, the newly acceded leader of the Kaqchikel-speaking Maya tribe rises from the lake transformed as the Feathered Serpent [Recinos and Goetz, 1953, p. 76]. Residents claim a gigantic serpent, Xocomil, still lives in the waters.

  16. Geophysics Could Explain Ancient Maya Myth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabom Bruchez, Margaret

    2005-03-01

    According to Maya mythology, the splendor of the principal entity, the Feathered Serpent, is exalted at Lake Atitlán in southwestern Guatemala. A chance look at a phenomenon in the natural environment reveals the possible geophysical basis of this myth. More than poetic fancy, the flight of the Feathered Serpent could refer to the dissipation of a soliton wave formed in the 130-km2 caldera lake. In the myth, recounted in the sixteenth century document los anales de los caqchiqueles, the newly acceded leader of the Kaqchikel-speaking Maya tribe rises from the lake transformed as the Feathered Serpent [Recinos and Goetz, 1953, p. 76]. Residents claim a gigantic serpent, Xocomil, still lives in the waters.

  17. Software complex for geophysical data visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kryukov, Ilya A.; Tyugin, Dmitry Y.; Kurkin, Andrey A.; Kurkina, Oxana E.

    2013-04-01

    The effectiveness of current research in geophysics is largely determined by the degree of implementation of the procedure of data processing and visualization with the use of modern information technology. Realistic and informative visualization of the results of three-dimensional modeling of geophysical processes contributes significantly into the naturalness of physical modeling and detailed view of the phenomena. The main difficulty in this case is to interpret the results of the calculations: it is necessary to be able to observe the various parameters of the three-dimensional models, build sections on different planes to evaluate certain characteristics and make a rapid assessment. Programs for interpretation and visualization of simulations are spread all over the world, for example, software systems such as ParaView, Golden Software Surfer, Voxler, Flow Vision and others. However, it is not always possible to solve the problem of visualization with the help of a single software package. Preprocessing, data transfer between the packages and setting up a uniform visualization style can turn into a long and routine work. In addition to this, sometimes special display modes for specific data are required and existing products tend to have more common features and are not always fully applicable to certain special cases. Rendering of dynamic data may require scripting languages that does not relieve the user from writing code. Therefore, the task was to develop a new and original software complex for the visualization of simulation results. Let us briefly list of the primary features that are developed. Software complex is a graphical application with a convenient and simple user interface that displays the results of the simulation. Complex is also able to interactively manage the image, resize the image without loss of quality, apply a two-dimensional and three-dimensional regular grid, set the coordinate axes with data labels and perform slice of data. The

  18. Application of geophysical methods to agriculture: An overview

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Geophysical methods are becoming an increasingly valuable tool for agricultural applications. Agricultural geophysics investigations are commonly (although certainly not always) focused on delineating small- and/or large-scale objects/features within the soil profile (~ 0 to 2 m depth) over very lar...

  19. Introduction to the JEEG Agricultural Geophysics special issue

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent advancements such as the availability of personal computers, technologies to store/process large amounts of data, the GPS, and GIS have now made geophysical methods practical for agricultural use. Consequently, there has been a rapid expansion of agricultural geophysics research just over the...

  20. 43 CFR 3141.2-1 - Geophysical exploration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) LEASING IN SPECIAL TAR SAND AREAS Leasing in Special Tar Sand Areas § 3141.2-1 Geophysical exploration. Geophysical exploration in Special Tar Sand Areas shall be governed by part 3150 of this title. Information obtained under a permit shall...

  1. 43 CFR 3141.2-1 - Geophysical exploration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) LEASING IN SPECIAL TAR SAND AREAS Leasing in Special Tar Sand Areas § 3141.2-1 Geophysical exploration. Geophysical exploration in Special Tar Sand Areas shall be governed by part 3150 of this title. Information obtained under a permit shall...

  2. 43 CFR 3141.2-1 - Geophysical exploration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) LEASING IN SPECIAL TAR SAND AREAS Leasing in Special Tar Sand Areas § 3141.2-1 Geophysical exploration. Geophysical exploration in Special Tar Sand Areas shall be governed by part 3150 of this title. Information obtained under a permit shall...

  3. 43 CFR 3141.2-1 - Geophysical exploration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) LEASING IN SPECIAL TAR SAND AREAS Leasing in Special Tar Sand Areas § 3141.2-1 Geophysical exploration. Geophysical exploration in Special Tar Sand Areas shall be governed by part 3150 of this title. Information obtained under a permit shall...

  4. Kastens Receives 2009 Excellence in Geophysical Education Award

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manduca, Cathryn A.; Kastens, Kim Anne

    2009-07-01

    Kim Anne Kastens received the Excellence in Geophysical Education Award at the Joint Assembly, held 26 May 2009 in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. The award honors “a sustained commitment to excellence in geophysical education by a team, individual, or group.”

  5. GENERAL CONSIDERATIONS FOR GEOPHYSICAL METHODS APPLIED TO AGRICULTURE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Geophysics is the application of physical quantity measurement techniques to provide information on conditions or features beneath the earth’s surface. With the exception of borehole geophysical methods and soil probes like a cone penetrometer, these techniques are generally noninvasive with physica...

  6. Journal of Geophysical Research Publications: Community Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfirman, S. L.; Porter, A.

    2009-12-01

    Do earth science publications differ by subfield or gender? To figure this out we analyzed publications in JGR Atmosphere, Oceans, and Solid Earth for the year 2000. We assumed that the first author exerted controlling influence over publication characteristics and then we looked at the number of co-authors, number of institutions represented by co-author affiliations, page length of the article, number of references cited, number of subject categories represented in the cited references, number of times the article was cited, and the time between the date the article was submitted and the date when it was accepted for publication. We found that, within each field, there was remarkable similarity between the publications led by women and those led by men. Interesting differences showed up between subfields: for example, Solid Earth authors use more references than do authors publishing in Atmosphere or Oceans.

  7. Applied Geophysics Opportunities in the Petroleum Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olgaard, D. L.; Tikku, A.; Roberts, J. C.; Martinez, A.

    2012-12-01

    Meeting the increasing global demand for energy over the next several decades presents daunting challenges to engineers and scientists, including geoscientists of all disciplines. Many opportunities exist for geophysicists to find and produce oil and gas in a safe, environmentally responsible and affordable manner. Successful oil and gas exploration involves a 'Plates to Pores' approach that integrates multi-scale data from satellites, marine and land seismic and non-seismic field surveys, lab experiments, and even electron microscopy. The petroleum industry is at the forefront of using high performance computing to develop innovative methods to process and analyze large volumes of seismic data and perform realistic numerical modeling, such as finite element fluid flow and rock deformation simulations. Challenging and rewarding jobs in exploration, production and research exist for students with BS/BA, MS and PhD degrees. Geophysics students interested in careers in the petroleum industry should have a broad foundation in science, math and fundamental geosciences at the BS/BA level, as well as mastery of the scientific method, usually gained through thesis work at MS and PhD levels. Field geology or geophysics experience is also valuable. Other personal attributes typical for geoscientists to be successful in industry include a passion for solving complex geoscience problems, the flexibility to work on a variety of assignments throughout a career and skills such as teamwork, communication, integration and leadership. In this presentation we will give examples of research, exploration and production opportunities for geophysicists in petroleum companies and compare and contrast careers in academia vs. industry.

  8. SWEET- An Upper Level Ontology for Earth System Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raskin, R.

    2005-12-01

    The Semantic Web for Earth and Environmental Terminology (SWEET) provides a set of upper-level ontologies constituting a concept space of Earth system science. These ontologies can be used, mapped, or extended by developers of specialized domain ontologies. SWEET components are being adopted within a diverse range of applications, including: the Geosciences Network (GEON), the Marine Metadata Initiative (MMI), the Virtual Solar Terrestrial Observatory (VSTO), and the Earth Science Markup Language (ESML). SWEET includes 12 ontologies, decomposed into component parts that can be reassembled to meet the needs of user communities. For example, the Property ontology terms (e.g., temperature, pressure) can be associated with measurable (observable) quantities of a dataset. The Substance ontology provides representations of the substance in which a property is being measured (e.g., air, water, rock). The Earth Realm ontology provides representations for the environmental regions of the Earth (e.g., atmospheric boundary layer, ocean mixed layer). The Data and Service ontology enables representations of how data are captured, stored, and accessed. The Numerics ontology entries represent 2-D and 3-D objects or spatial/temporal entities and relations. The Human Activities ontology captures the human side or applications of Earth science. The Phenomena ontology describes major geophysical or geophysical-related events. All of the ontologies are written in the OWL-DL language to give domain specialists a starting vocabulary, over which layers, synonyms, or extensions can be applied.

  9. Expedited Site Characterization geophysics: Geophysical methods and tools for site characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, N.E.

    1994-03-01

    This report covers five classes of geophysical technologies: Magnetics; Electrical/electromagnetic; Seismic reflection; Gamma-ray spectrometry; and Metal-specific spectrometry. Except for radiometry, no other classes of geophysical tedmologies are specific for direct detection of the types of contaminants present at the selected sites. For each of the five classes covered, the report gives a general description of the methodology, its field use, and its general applicability to the ESC Project. In addition, the report gives a sample of the most promising instruments available for each class, including the following information: Hardware/software attributes; Purchase and rental costs; Survey rate and operating costs; and Other applicable information based on case history and field evaluations.

  10. Geophysics in the Affairs of Mankind—A Personalized History of Exploration Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, Jack

    This book is a second, and a somewhat modified and expanded, edition of an unusual and exceptionally informative volume; the same, main title was published in 1982 by a commercial publisher, and is currently out of print. The authorship is slightly different: L.C. (Lee) Lawyer, Charles C. Bates, and Robert B. Rice for the second edition, and Bates, Thomas F. Gaskell, and Rice for the first. Much of the excellent early history of—to quote from the subtitle—“exploration geophysics and its allied sciences of seismology and oceanography” that is found in the first edition has been left unchanged, or modified to update it through the 1990s. The section on exploration geophysics, in particular, has been significantly expanded and updated.

  11. When tsunamology and geophysics clash, throw geophysics in the trash (Sergey Soloviev Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Synolakis, Costas

    2014-05-01

    Tsunami science has evolved differently from research on other extreme natural hazards, primarily because of the unavailability, until recently, of instrumental recordings of tsunamis in the open ocean. Recordings and observations have catapulted tsunamology into a rapidly evolving high-interdisciplinary field spanning geology, geophysics, oceanography, coastal engineering, hydrodynamics and social science. I will discuss progress in tsunami geology and geophysics in the past thirty years, and describe the evolution of numerical codes and analytical results. I will describe field observations which, while counter-intuitive at first, they later helped explain complex dynamics and assisted us in improving tsunami hazard mitigation. While the grand science synthesis remains elusive, we are converging to where we can reduce tsunami-related fatalities and injuries by about one half in the next few years.

  12. The Australian Computational Earth Systems Simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mora, P.; Muhlhaus, H.; Lister, G.; Dyskin, A.; Place, D.; Appelbe, B.; Nimmervoll, N.; Abramson, D.

    2001-12-01

    Numerical simulation of the physics and dynamics of the entire earth system offers an outstanding opportunity for advancing earth system science and technology but represents a major challenge due to the range of scales and physical processes involved, as well as the magnitude of the software engineering effort required. However, new simulation and computer technologies are bringing this objective within reach. Under a special competitive national funding scheme to establish new Major National Research Facilities (MNRF), the Australian government together with a consortium of Universities and research institutions have funded construction of the Australian Computational Earth Systems Simulator (ACcESS). The Simulator or computational virtual earth will provide the research infrastructure to the Australian earth systems science community required for simulations of dynamical earth processes at scales ranging from microscopic to global. It will consist of thematic supercomputer infrastructure and an earth systems simulation software system. The Simulator models and software will be constructed over a five year period by a multi-disciplinary team of computational scientists, mathematicians, earth scientists, civil engineers and software engineers. The construction team will integrate numerical simulation models (3D discrete elements/lattice solid model, particle-in-cell large deformation finite-element method, stress reconstruction models, multi-scale continuum models etc) with geophysical, geological and tectonic models, through advanced software engineering and visualization technologies. When fully constructed, the Simulator aims to provide the software and hardware infrastructure needed to model solid earth phenomena including global scale dynamics and mineralisation processes, crustal scale processes including plate tectonics, mountain building, interacting fault system dynamics, and micro-scale processes that control the geological, physical and dynamic

  13. Paleoseismology: evidence of earth activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nováková, Lucie

    2016-07-01

    The paleoseismic research aims to document earth activity during earthquakes, such as displacements of fault, rupture location, distribution of slip or ground shaking intensity. The earthquakes are usually distributed on the plate boundaries causing big damages of life on the Earth. Four faults in North America, New Zealand and Europe with different behaviour, direction and sense of movement have been chosen to document the seismic activity within the world. The White Creek Fault, the Greendale Fault, the San Andreas Fault and the Paganica Fault have been responsible for the earthquakes of M > 6 in the last century. Figures in this paper show the evidence of the earthquakes that can be visible in the field.

  14. Surface Packages for Geophysical Exploration of Small Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheeres, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    The geophysical exploration of small rubble pile bodies is fundamentally important for understanding the mechanics of gravitationally bound aggregates. The mechanical and geotechnical properties of these bodies are not understood from an experimental perspective, and have only been studied theoretically and using numerical simulations. To carry out experiments in this environment requires the development and deployment of surface packages to the body surface to enable physical interactions and measurements. This talk will discuss how such experiments can be developed and used in the small body environment. It will particularly focuse on one approach that uses a combination of surface seismic sources and probes to measure the seismic properties of a rubble pile. The small body dynamical environment is particularly well suited for the deployment of such surface packages for exploration and scientific measurement purposes. This is mainly due to their meager gravity fields, which allow the delivery of complex instruments to the surface with impact speeds that are at most a meter per second — equivalent to dropping an object from less than a 5 cm height on Earth. Despite this seeming advantage, the delivery and mobility of such packages on the surface of a small body remains a challenging endeavor, and to date the delivery of surface packages to small bodies has had a mixed success rate. Issues that must be accounted for include the delivery trajectories for probes to the surface, motion on the surface of a small body, and interactions between a probe and a small body surface. Studies of all of these issues both theoretically and experimentally will be presented, along with proposed applications to achieve scientific goals on the surfaces of small bodies.

  15. Scientific Knowledge Discovery in Complex Semantic Networks of Geophysical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, P.

    2012-04-01

    The vast majority of explorations of the Earth's systems are limited in their ability to effectively explore the most important (often most difficult) problems because they are forced to interconnect at the data-element, or syntactic, level rather than at a higher scientific, or semantic, level. Recent successes in the application of complex network theory and algorithms to climate data, raise expectations that more general graph-based approaches offer the opportunity for new discoveries. In the past ~ 5 years in the natural sciences there has substantial progress in providing both specialists and non-specialists the ability to describe in machine readable form, geophysical quantities and relations among them in meaningful and natural ways, effectively breaking the prior syntax barrier. The corresponding open-world semantics and reasoning provide higher-level interconnections. That is, semantics provided around the data structures, using semantically-equipped tools, and semantically aware interfaces between science application components allowing for discovery at the knowledge level. More recently, formal semantic approaches to continuous and aggregate physical processes are beginning to show promise and are soon likely to be ready to apply to geoscientific systems. To illustrate these opportunities, this presentation presents two application examples featuring domain vocabulary (ontology) and property relations (named and typed edges in the graphs). First, a climate knowledge discovery pilot encoding and exploration of CMIP5 catalog information with the eventual goal to encode and explore CMIP5 data. Second, a multi-stakeholder knowledge network for integrated assessments in marine ecosystems, where the data is highly inter-disciplinary.

  16. Analysis of the geophysical data using a posteriori algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voskoboynikova, Gyulnara; Khairetdinov, Marat

    2016-04-01

    The problems of monitoring, prediction and prevention of extraordinary natural and technogenic events are priority of modern problems. These events include earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, the lunar-solar tides, landslides, falling celestial bodies, explosions utilized stockpiles of ammunition, numerous quarry explosion in open coal mines, provoking technogenic earthquakes. Monitoring is based on a number of successive stages, which include remote registration of the events responses, measurement of the main parameters as arrival times of seismic waves or the original waveforms. At the final stage the inverse problems associated with determining the geographic location and time of the registration event are solving. Therefore, improving the accuracy of the parameters estimation of the original records in the high noise is an important problem. As is known, the main measurement errors arise due to the influence of external noise, the difference between the real and model structures of the medium, imprecision of the time definition in the events epicenter, the instrumental errors. Therefore, posteriori algorithms more accurate in comparison with known algorithms are proposed and investigated. They are based on a combination of discrete optimization method and fractal approach for joint detection and estimation of the arrival times in the quasi-periodic waveforms sequence in problems of geophysical monitoring with improved accuracy. Existing today, alternative approaches to solving these problems does not provide the given accuracy. The proposed algorithms are considered for the tasks of vibration sounding of the Earth in times of lunar and solar tides, and for the problem of monitoring of the borehole seismic source location in trade drilling.

  17. DART: New Research Using Ensemble Data Assimilation in Geophysical Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Jeffrey; Raeder, Kevin; Hoar, Tim; Collins, Nancy; Romine, Glen; Barre, Jerome; Gaubert, Benjamin; Arellano, Ave; Wuerth, Stephanie

    2016-04-01

    The Data Assimilation Research Testbed (DART) is a community facility for ensemble data assimilation developed and supported by the National Center for Atmospheric Research. DART provides a comprehensive suite of software, documentation, examples and tutorials that can be used for ensemble data assimilation research, operations, and education. Scientists and software engineers from the Data Assimilation Research Section at NCAR are available to actively support DART users who want to use existing DART products or develop their own new applications. Current DART users range from university professors teaching data assimilation, to individual graduate students working with simple models, through national laboratories doing operational prediction with large state-of-the-art models. DART runs efficiently on many computational platforms ranging from laptops through thousands of cores on the newest supercomputers. This poster focuses on several recent research activities using DART with geophysical models: 1). Using CAM/DART to understand whether OCO-2 Total Precipitable Water observations can be useful in numerical weather prediction. 2). Impacts of the synergistic use of Infra-red CO retrievals (MOPITT, IASI) in CAMCHEM/DART assimilations. 3). Assimilation and Analysis of Observations of Amazonian Biomass Burning Emissions by MOPITT (aerosol optical depth), MODIS (carbon monoxide) and MISR (plume height). 4). Long term evaluation of the chemical response of MOPITT-CO assimilation in CAM-CHEM/DART OSSEs for satellite planning and emission inversion capabilities. 5). Improved forward observation operators for land models that have multiple land use/land cover segments in a single grid cell, enabling studies of the inherent variability in a single gridcell. Future enhancements are also discussed: 1). The CICE component of the Community Earth System Model will be added to the existing suite of components, which can be used for data assimilation. 2). Fully coupled

  18. Movement coordination during conversation.

    PubMed

    Latif, Nida; Barbosa, Adriano V; Vatikiotis-Bateson, Eric; Vatiokiotis-Bateson, Eric; Castelhano, Monica S; Munhall, K G

    2014-01-01

    Behavioral coordination and synchrony contribute to a common biological mechanism that maintains communication, cooperation and bonding within many social species, such as primates and birds. Similarly, human language and social systems may also be attuned to coordination to facilitate communication and the formation of relationships. Gross similarities in movement patterns and convergence in the acoustic properties of speech have already been demonstrated between interacting individuals. In the present studies, we investigated how coordinated movements contribute to observers' perception of affiliation (friends vs. strangers) between two conversing individuals. We used novel computational methods to quantify motor coordination and demonstrated that individuals familiar with each other coordinated their movements more frequently. Observers used coordination to judge affiliation between conversing pairs but only when the perceptual stimuli were restricted to head and face regions. These results suggest that observed movement coordination in humans might contribute to perceptual decisions based on availability of information to perceivers. PMID:25119189

  19. Movement Coordination during Conversation

    PubMed Central

    Latif, Nida; Barbosa, Adriano V.; Vatiokiotis-Bateson, Eric; Castelhano, Monica S.; Munhall, K. G.

    2014-01-01

    Behavioral coordination and synchrony contribute to a common biological mechanism that maintains communication, cooperation and bonding within many social species, such as primates and birds. Similarly, human language and social systems may also be attuned to coordination to facilitate communication and the formation of relationships. Gross similarities in movement patterns and convergence in the acoustic properties of speech have already been demonstrated between interacting individuals. In the present studies, we investigated how coordinated movements contribute to observers’ perception of affiliation (friends vs. strangers) between two conversing individuals. We used novel computational methods to quantify motor coordination and demonstrated that individuals familiar with each other coordinated their movements more frequently. Observers used coordination to judge affiliation between conversing pairs but only when the perceptual stimuli were restricted to head and face regions. These results suggest that observed movement coordination in humans might contribute to perceptual decisions based on availability of information to perceivers. PMID:25119189

  20. New Earth Science Data and Access Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moses, John F.; Weinstein, Beth E.; Farnham, Jennifer

    2004-01-01

    NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, working with its domestic and international partners, provides scientific data and analysis to improve life here on Earth. NASA provides science data products that cover a wide range of physical, geophysical, biochemical and other parameters, as well as services for interdisciplinary Earth science studies. Management and distribution of these products is administered through the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Distributed Active Archive Centers (DAACs), which all hold data within a different Earth science discipline. This paper will highlight selected EOS datasets and will focus on how these observations contribute to the improvement of essential services such as weather forecasting, climate prediction, air quality, and agricultural efficiency. Emphasis will be placed on new data products derived from instruments on board Terra, Aqua and ICESat as well as new regional data products and field campaigns. A variety of data tools and services are available to the user community. This paper will introduce primary and specialized DAAC-specific methods for finding, ordering and using these data products. Special sections will focus on orienting users unfamiliar with DAAC resources, HDF-EOS formatted data and the use of desktop research and application tools.

  1. The Geochemical Earth Reference Model (GERM)

    SciTech Connect

    Staudigel, H.; Albarede, F.; Shaw, H.; McDonough, B.; White, W.

    1996-12-01

    The Geochemical Earth Reference Model (GERM) initiative is a grass- roots effort with the goal of establishing a community consensus on a chemical characterization of the Earth, its major reservoirs, and the fluxes between them. Long term goal of GERM is a chemical reservoir characterization analogous to the geophysical effort of the Preliminary Reference Earth Model (PREM). Chemical fluxes between reservoirs are included into GERM to illuminate the long-term chemical evolution of the Earth and to characterize the Earth as a dynamic chemical system. In turn, these fluxes control geological processes and influence hydrosphere-atmosphere-climate dynamics. While these long-term goals are clearly the focus of GERM, the process of establishing GERM itself is just as important as its ultimate goal. The GERM initiative is developed in an open community discussion on the World Wide Web (GERM home page is at http://www-ep.es.llnl. gov/germ/germ-home.html) that is mediated by a series of editors with responsibilities for distinct reservoirs and fluxes. Beginning with the original workshop in Lyons (March 1996) GERM is continued to be developed on the Internet, punctuated by workshops and special sessions at professional meetings. It is planned to complete the first model by mid-1997, followed by a call for papers for a February 1998 GERM conference in La Jolla, California.

  2. Earth Observing System (EOS) advanced altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, C. L.; Walsh, E. J.

    1988-01-01

    In the post-TOPEX era, satellite radar altimeters will be developed with the capability of measuring the earth's surface topography over a wide swath of coverage, rather than just at the satellite's nadir. The identification of potential spacecraft flight missions in the future was studied. The best opportunity was found to be the Earth Observing System (EOS). It is felt that an instrument system that has a broad appeal to the earth sciences community stands a much better chance of being selected as an EOS instrument. Consequently, the Topography and Rain Radar Imager (TARRI) will be proposed as a system that has the capability to profile the Earth's topography regardless of the surface type. The horizontal and height resolutions of interest are obviously significantly different over land, ice, and water; but, the use of radar to provide an all-weather observation capability is applicable to the whole earth. The scientific guidance for the design and development of this instrument and the eventual scientific utilization of the data produced by the TARRI will be provided by seven science teams. The teams are formed around scientific disciplines and are titled: Geology/Geophysics, Hydrology/Rain, Oceanography, Ice/Snow, Geodesy/Orbit/Attitude, Cartography, and Surface Properties/Techniques.

  3. Earth Sciences Division annual report 1990

    SciTech Connect

    1991-06-01

    This Annual Report presents summaries of selected representative research activities grouped according to the principal disciplines of the Earth Sciences Division: Reservoir Engineering and Hydrogeology, Geology and Geochemistry, and Geophysics and Geomechanics. Much of the Division`s research deals with the physical and chemical properties and processes in the earth`s crust, from the partially saturated, low-temperature near-surface environment to the high-temperature environments characteristic of regions where magmatic-hydrothermal processes are active. Strengths in laboratory and field instrumentation, numerical modeling, and in situ measurement allow study of the transport of mass and heat through geologic media -- studies that now include the appropriate chemical reactions and the hydraulic-mechanical complexities of fractured rock systems. Of particular note are three major Division efforts addressing problems in the discovery and recovery of petroleum, the application of isotope geochemistry to the study of geodynamic processes and earth history, and the development of borehole methods for high-resolution imaging of the subsurface using seismic and electromagnetic waves. In 1989 a major DOE-wide effort was launched in the areas of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management. Many of the methods previously developed for and applied to deeper regions of the earth will in the coming years be turned toward process definition and characterization of the very shallow subsurface, where man-induced contaminants now intrude and where remedial action is required.

  4. Earth Observation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    For pipeline companies, mapping, facilities inventory, pipe inspections, environmental reporting, etc. is a monumental task. An Automated Mapping/Facilities Management/Geographic Information Systems (AM/FM/GIS) is the solution. However, this is costly and time consuming. James W. Sewall Company, an AM/FM/GIS consulting firm proposed an EOCAP project to Stennis Space Center (SSC) to develop a computerized system for storage and retrieval of digital aerial photography. This would provide its customer, Algonquin Gas Transmission Company, with an accurate inventory of rights-of-way locations and pipeline surroundings. The project took four years to complete and an important byproduct was SSC's Digital Aerial Rights-of-Way Monitoring System (DARMS). DARMS saves substantial time and money. EOCAP enabled Sewall to develop new products and expand its customer base. Algonquin now manages regulatory requirements more efficiently and accurately. EOCAP provides government co-funding to encourage private investment in and broader use of NASA remote sensing technology. Because changes on Earth's surface are accelerating, planners and resource managers must assess the consequences of change as quickly and accurately as possible. Pacific Meridian Resources and NASA's Stennis Space Center (SSC) developed a system for monitoring changes in land cover and use, which incorporated the latest change detection technologies. The goal of this EOCAP project was to tailor existing technologies to a system that could be commercialized. Landsat imagery enabled Pacific Meridian to identify areas that had sustained substantial vegetation loss. The project was successful and Pacific Meridian's annual revenues have substantially increased. EOCAP provides government co-funding to encourage private investment in and broader use of NASA remote sensing technology.

  5. Fluid movement and creativity.

    PubMed

    Slepian, Michael L; Ambady, Nalini

    2012-11-01

    Cognitive scientists describe creativity as fluid thought. Drawing from findings on gesture and embodied cognition, we hypothesized that the physical experience of fluidity, relative to nonfluidity, would lead to more fluid, creative thought. Across 3 experiments, fluid arm movement led to enhanced creativity in 3 domains: creative generation, cognitive flexibility, and remote associations. Alternative mechanisms such as enhanced mood and motivation were also examined. These results suggest that creativity can be influenced by certain types of physical movement.

  6. New Geophysical Techniques for Offshore Exploration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talwani, Manik

    1983-01-01

    New seismic techniques have been developed recently that borrow theory from academic institutions and technology from industry, allowing scientists to explore deeper into the earth with much greater precision than possible with older seismic methods. Several of these methods are discussed, including the seismic reflection common-depth-point…

  7. Recurrence analysis of the mass movement activity at Stambach (Austria) based on radiocarbon dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unkel, Ingmar; Ehret, Dominik; Rohn, Joachim

    2013-05-01

    The Stambach mass movement (Austria) is a large and deep-seated mass movement in the Austrian Alps. It consists of a complex and compound mass movement system. The latest major reactivation of the Stambach mass movement was initiated in 1982 by rock fall activity that triggered an earth flow, which transformed into a mud flow. Six sediment cores were taken along the entire earth flow body showing a complex mixture of rock fall blocks and earth flow material. Whenever the earth flow was active, numerous wooden remains were buried within the flow mass. Thirteen of these remains sampled from the sediment cores were radiocarbon dated. The results indicate that the first activation of the Stambach mass movement occurred at least around 9750-9900 cal BP, followed by at least three further events during the Holocene, around 6310-5650, 2320-1880, and 1600-1180 cal BP. Accumulation of toppled rock towers in the head area of the earth flow, followed by a sudden collapse and saturated, undrained loading of the earth flow body, is the main trigger for activating the earth flow. These long lasting preparatory processes make it difficult to determine certain recurrence intervals. However, our data show that the Stambach mass movement was (and most probably still can be) reactivated after more than 3000 years of dormancy.

  8. Geophysical parameters from the analysis of laser ranging to Starlette

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutz, B. E.; Shum, C. K.; Tapley, B. D.

    1992-01-01

    The results of geodynamic research from the analysis of satellite laser ranging data to Starlette are summarized. The time period of the investigation was from 15 Mar. 1986 to 31 Dec. 1991. As a result of the Starlette research, a comprehensive 16-year Starlette data set spanning the time period from 17 Mar. 1975 through 31 Dec. 1990, was produced. This data set represents the longest geophysical time series from any geodetic satellite and is invaluable for research in long-term geodynamics. A low degree and order ocean tide solution determined from Starlette has good overall agreement with other satellite and oceanographic tide solutions. The observed lunar deceleration is -24.7 +/- 0.6 arcsecond/century(exp 2), which agrees well with other studies. The estimated value of J2 is (-2.5 +/- 0.3) x 10(exp -11) yr(exp -1), assuming there are no variations in higher degree zonals and that the 18.6-year tide is fixed at an equilibrium value. The yearly fluctuations in the values for S(sub a) and S(sub sa) tides determined by the 16-year Starlette data are found to be associated with changes in the Earth's second degree zonal harmonic caused primarily by meteorological excitation. The mean values for the amplitude of S(sub a) and S(sub sa) variations in J2 are 32.3 x 10(exp -11) and 19.5 x 10(exp -11), respectively; while the rms about the mean values are 4.1 x 10(exp -11) and 6.3(10)(exp -11), respectively. The annual delta(J2) is in good agreement with the value obtained from the combined effects of air mass redistribution without the oceanic inverted-barometer effects and hydrological change. The annual delta(J3) values have much larger disagreements. Approximately 90 percent of the observed annual variation from Starlette is attributed to the meteorological mass redistribution occurring near the Earth's surface.

  9. Core formation and core composition from coupled geochemical and geophysical constraints.

    PubMed

    Badro, James; Brodholt, John P; Piet, Hélène; Siebert, Julien; Ryerson, Frederick J

    2015-10-01

    The formation of Earth's core left behind geophysical and geochemical signatures in both the core and mantle that remain to this day. Seismology requires that the core be lighter than pure iron and therefore must contain light elements, and the geochemistry of mantle-derived rocks reveals extensive siderophile element depletion and fractionation. Both features are inherited from metal-silicate differentiation in primitive Earth and depend upon the nature of physiochemical conditions that prevailed during core formation. To date, core formation models have only attempted to address the evolution of core and mantle compositional signatures separately, rather than seeking a joint solution. Here we combine experimental petrology, geochemistry, mineral physics and seismology to constrain a range of core formation conditions that satisfy both constraints. We find that core formation occurred in a hot (liquidus) yet moderately deep magma ocean not exceeding 1,800 km depth, under redox conditions more oxidized than present-day Earth. This new scenario, at odds with the current belief that core formation occurred under reducing conditions, proposes that Earth's magma ocean started oxidized and has become reduced through time, by oxygen incorporation into the core. This core formation model produces a core that contains 2.7-5% oxygen along with 2-3.6% silicon, with densities and velocities in accord with radial seismic models, and leaves behind a silicate mantle that matches the observed mantle abundances of nickel, cobalt, chromium, and vanadium. PMID:26392555

  10. Facilitating Joint Analysis of Data from Several Systems Using Geophysical Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plag, H.; Hammond, W. C.; Blewitt, G.

    2011-12-01

    The changes in Earth's geometry, gravity field, and rotation are observed with a portfolio of techniques spanning from point-geodetic methods to in situ and space-borne gravity sensors, and surface imaging methods for land, ice and ocean surfaces. Although the time-variability of Earth's geometry, gravity field, and rotation are caused by the same Earth system processes, this fundamental link between the different observations is not yet widely explored in geodesy for the analysis and interpretation of the geodetic observations. We will discuss how the use of a simple Earth system model can aid the joint analysis of GPS, InSAR and GRACE observations. Thus, we will consider the case of three observing systems sampling two geophysical parameters with different spatial and temporal resolution. Making best use of these observations requires a model that can assimilate the geodetic observations and propagate the state of the system model in a way consistent with the geodetic observations. Key issues to address include differences in the reference frames and modeling used for the different observation types.

  11. Core formation and core composition from coupled geochemical and geophysical constraints.

    PubMed

    Badro, James; Brodholt, John P; Piet, Hélène; Siebert, Julien; Ryerson, Frederick J

    2015-10-01

    The formation of Earth's core left behind geophysical and geochemical signatures in both the core and mantle that remain to this day. Seismology requires that the core be lighter than pure iron and therefore must contain light elements, and the geochemistry of mantle-derived rocks reveals extensive siderophile element depletion and fractionation. Both features are inherited from metal-silicate differentiation in primitive Earth and depend upon the nature of physiochemical conditions that prevailed during core formation. To date, core formation models have only attempted to address the evolution of core and mantle compositional signatures separately, rather than seeking a joint solution. Here we combine experimental petrology, geochemistry, mineral physics and seismology to constrain a range of core formation conditions that satisfy both constraints. We find that core formation occurred in a hot (liquidus) yet moderately deep magma ocean not exceeding 1,800 km depth, under redox conditions more oxidized than present-day Earth. This new scenario, at odds with the current belief that core formation occurred under reducing conditions, proposes that Earth's magma ocean started oxidized and has become reduced through time, by oxygen incorporation into the core. This core formation model produces a core that contains 2.7-5% oxygen along with 2-3.6% silicon, with densities and velocities in accord with radial seismic models, and leaves behind a silicate mantle that matches the observed mantle abundances of nickel, cobalt, chromium, and vanadium.

  12. Marine Geology and Geophysics Field Course Offered by The University of Texas Institute for Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, D.; Davis, M. B.; Allison, M. A.; Gulick, S. P.; Goff, J. A.; Saustrup, S.

    2012-12-01

    The University of Texas Institute for Geophysics, part of the Jackson School of Geosciences, annually offers an intensive three-week marine geology and geophysics field course during the spring-summer intersession. Now in year six, the course provides hands-on instruction and training for graduate and upper-level undergraduate students in data acquisition, processing, interpretation, and visualization. Techniques covered include high-resolution seismic reflection, CHIRP sub-bottom profiling, multibeam bathymetry, sidescan sonar, several types of sediment coring, grab sampling, and the sedimentology of resulting seabed samples (e.g., core description, grain size analysis, x-radiography, etc.). Students participate in an initial period of classroom instruction designed to communicate geological context of the field area (which changes each year) along with theoretical and technical background on each field method. The class then travels to the Gulf Coast for a week of at-sea field work. Our field sites at Port Aransas and Galveston, Texas, and Grand Isle, Louisiana, have provided ideal locations for students to investigate coastal and sedimentary processes of the Gulf Coast and continental shelf through application of geophysical techniques. In the field, students rotate between two research vessels: one vessel, the 22' aluminum-hulled R/V Lake Itasca, owned and operated by UTIG, is used principally for multibeam bathymetry, sidescan sonar, and sediment sampling; the other, NOAA's R/V Manta or the R/V Acadiana, operated by the Louisiana Universities Marine Consortium, and is used primarily for high-resolution seismic reflection, CHIRP sub-bottom profiling, multibeam bathymetry, gravity coring, and vibrocoring. While at sea, students assist with survey design, learn instrumentation set up, acquisition parameters, data quality control, and safe instrument deployment and retrieval. In teams of three, students work in onshore field labs preparing sediment samples for

  13. Magnetic monitoring of earth and space

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Love, Jeffrey J.

    2008-01-01

    For centuries, navigators of the world's oceans have been familiar with an effect of Earth's magnetic field: It imparts a directional preference to the needle of a compass. Although in some settings magnetic orientation remains important, the modern science of geomagnetism has emerged from its romantic nautical origins and developed into a subject of great depth and diversity. The geomagnetic field is used to explore the dynamics of Earth's interior and its surrounding space environment, and geomagnetic data are used for geophysical mapping, mineral exploration, risk mitigation, and other practical applications. A global distribution of ground-based magnetic observatories supports those pursuits by providing accurate records of the magnetic-field direction and intensity at fixed locations and over long periods of time.

  14. The Influence of Plate Motion History on Thermochemical Structures in Earth's Lower Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bull, A. L.; Torsvik, T. H.

    2012-12-01

    Understanding the first-order dynamical structure and temporal evolution of Earth's mantle is a fundamental goal in solid-earth geophysics. Recent tomographic observations reveal a lower mantle characterised by higher-than-average shear-wave speeds beneath Asia and encircling the Pacific, consistent with cold slabs of descending lithosphere beneath regions of ancient subduction, and lower-than-average shear-wave speeds in broad regional areas beneath Africa and the Central Pacific (LLSVPs). The LLSVPs, although not as easily understood from a dynamical perspective, are inferred to be broad upwelling centres between Mesozoic and Cenozoic subduction zones. Heterogeneous mantle models place these anomalies into the context of thermochemical piles, characterised by an anomalously dense component, with their location and geometry being controlled by the movement of subducting slabs. The origin and temporal evolution of the LLSVPs remain enigmatic. Recent numerical studies propose that the LLSVP beneath Africa formed as a result of return flow in the mantle due to circum-Pacific subduction beneath the Pangean supercontinent. In contrast, palaeomagnetic studies which show that 80% of Kimberlites from the last 540 million years erupted at locations on the present day margins of the LLSVPs, require the LLSVPs to have remained in their present positions for at least such a time period. In this work, we investigate the temporal evolution and possible long-term persistence of LLSVPs by integrating plate tectonics into numerical models of mantle dynamics. In the numerical models of McNamara and Zhong (2005) and Bull et al., (2009), a dense component in the lower mantle was focused into LLSVP-like structures beneath Africa and the Pacific due to the imposed subduction history. In both cases the calculations were carried out for 119 million years of model time and employed surface velocity boundary conditions consistent with 11 stages of plate history. In this work, we improve

  15. Ames Research Center SR&T program and earth observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poppoff, I. G.

    1972-01-01

    An overview is presented of the research activities in earth observations at Ames Research Center. Most of the tasks involve the use of research aircraft platforms. The program is also directed toward the use of the Illiac 4 computer for statistical analysis. Most tasks are weighted toward Pacific coast and Pacific basin problems with emphasis on water applications, air applications, animal migration studies, and geophysics.

  16. Geophysical survey at Tell Barri (Syria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florio, Giovanni; Cella, Federico; Pierobon, Raffaella; Castaldo, Raffaele; Castiello, Gabriella; Fedi, Maurizio

    2010-05-01

    A geophysical survey at the archaeological site of Tell Barri (Northeasterm Syria) was carried out. The Tell (Arab word for "hill") is 32 m high with a whole covered area of 37 hectares. The Tell, with its huge dimensions and with a great amount of pottery on the surface, is a precious area to study the regional history from IV mill. BC to Islamic and Medieval period. The geophysical study consisted in magnetic and electromagnetic measurements in the lower town area. The aim of this survey was to provide evidence of the presence of buried archaeological structures around an already excavated area. The wall structures in the Tell Barri are made by backed or crude clay bricks. The instrument used for the magnetic survey was an Overhauser-effect proton magnetometer (Gem GSM-19GF), in gradiometric configuration. The electromagnetic instrument used, Geonics Ltd. EM31, implements a Frequency Domain Electromagnetic Method (FDEM). It was used in vertical coils configuration, and this choice should grant a maximum theoretical investigation depth of about 6 m. Before starting the measurements on a larger scale, we conducted a magnetic and EM test profile on some already excavated, outcropping, baked bricks walls. Results were encouraging, because clear and strong magnetic and EM anomalies were recorded over the outcropping walls. However, in the survey area these structures are covered by 3 to 4 meters of clay material and the increased sensors-structures distance will reduce the anomalies amplitude. Moreover, the cover material is disseminated with bricks, basalt blocks and ceramics, all of which have relevant magnetic properties. After magnetic surveying some 50 m side square areas, we verified that unfortunately their effect resulted to be dominant with respect to the deeper wall structures, degrading too much the signal-to-noise ratio. The processing and analysis of magnetic data is however currently underway and will determine decisions about further use of this method

  17. National Geophysical Data Center Tsunami Data Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroker, K. J.; Dunbar, P. K.; Brocko, R.

    2008-12-01

    NOAA's National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) and co-located World Data Center for Geophysics and Marine Geology long-term tsunami data archive provides data and derived products essential for tsunami hazard assessment, forecast and warning, inundation modeling, preparedness, mitigation, education, and research. As a result of NOAA's efforts to strengthen its tsunami activities, the long-term tsunami data archive has grown from less than 5 gigabyte in 2004 to more than 2 terabytes in 2008. The types of data archived for tsunami research and operation activities have also expanded in fulfillment of the P.L. 109-424. The archive now consists of: global historical tsunami, significant earthquake and significant volcanic eruptions database; global tsunami deposits and proxies database; reference database; damage photos; coastal water-level data (i.e. digital tide gauge data and marigrams on microfiche); bottom pressure recorder (BPR) data as collected by Deep-ocean Assessment and Reporting of Tsunamis (DART) buoys. The tsunami data archive comes from a wide variety of data providers and sources. These include the NOAA Tsunami Warning Centers, NOAA National Data Buoy Center, NOAA National Ocean Service, IOC/NOAA International Tsunami Information Center, NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, U.S. Geological Survey, tsunami catalogs, reconnaissance reports, journal articles, newspaper articles, internet web pages, and email. NGDC has been active in the management of some of these data for more than 50 years while other data management efforts are more recent. These data are openly available, either directly on-line or by contacting NGDC. All of the NGDC tsunami and related databases are stored in a relational database management system. These data are accessible over the Web as tables, reports, and interactive maps. The maps provide integrated web-based GIS access to individual GIS layers including tsunami sources, tsunami effects, significant earthquakes

  18. Redesigning Curricula in Geology and Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparks, D. W.; Ewing, R. C.; Fowler, D.; Macik, M.; Marcantonio, F.; Miller, B.; Newman, J.; Olszewski, T.; Reece, R.; Rosser, S.

    2015-12-01

    In the summer of 2014, the Texas A&M Department of Geology and Geophysics partnered with the Texas A&M Center for Teaching Excellence to implement TAMU's curriculum revision process: a data-informed, faculty-driven, educational-developer-supported rebuilding of our degree programs and course offerings. The current curricula (B.S. and B.A. in Geology, B.S. in Geophysics) were put into place in 1997, following the merger of two separate departments. The needs and capabilities of the Department and the student body have changed significantly since that time: more than 50% turnover of the faculty, a rapidly-changing job climate for geologists and geophysicists, and a nearly five-fold increase in the undergraduate population to over 500 majors in Fall 2015. Surveys of former students, employers and faculty at other universities revealed more reasons to address the curriculum. Some of the most desired skills are also those at which our graduates feel and are perceived to be least prepared: oral communication and the ability to learn software packages (skills that are most challenging to teach with growing class sizes). The challenge facing the Department is to accommodate growing student numbers while maintaining strength in traditional instructor-intensive activities such as microscopy and field mapping, and also improving our graduates' non-geological skills (e.g., communication, software use, teamwork, problem-solving) to insulate them from volatility in the current job market. We formed the Curriculum Study Group, consisting of faculty, graduate students, advisors and curriculum experts, to gather and analyze data and define the knowledge and skill base a graduate of our department must have. In addition to conducting external surveys, this group interviewed current students and faculty to determine the strengths and weaknesses of our program. We developed program learning goals that were further specified into over fifty criteria. For each criteria we defined

  19. Integrated multidisciplinary processing and interpretation of geophysical data acquired on transects in Barents and Kara seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roslov, Yu. V.; Sakoulina, T. S.

    2003-04-01

    INTEGRATED MULTIDISCIPLINARY PROCESSING AND INTERPRETATION OF GEOPHYSICAL DATA ACQUIRED ON TRANSECTS IN BARENTS AND KARA SEAS Yu.V. Roslov (1), T.S. Sakoulina (1) (1 - SEVMORGEO State Geophysical Co., 36 Rosenstein St, 198095, St Petersburg, Russia, roslov @sevmorgeo.com) According to Russian arctic offshore transect program State Company Sevmorgeo in cooperation with other Russian state companies carry out multidisciplinary investigations on transects 1-AR and 2-AR in Barents and Kara Seas. Investigations include the following geophysical methods: 4C wide angle refraction/reflection profiling (WARRP), CDP seismic, airborn and/or marine gravity and magnetic. Three levels of the integration has been used on processing and interpretation stage. First, different approaches of kinematic inverse problem and tomographic reconstruction have been applied for kinematic parameters of 4C WARRP data processing. That has allowed extracting of maximum information from the data acquired. As a result stable P and S velocity models have been obtained. Second, dynamic WARRP image focused mainly on Moho boundary has been integrated with CDP image in order to improve the sedimentary layer structure. Third, seismic images have been proven with gravity and magnetic data reaching the model, which fits to observed potential fields. Also gravity and magnetic data successfully fill out information gap in the places where there is a lack of seismic data. Some original technologies of data processing have been developed in the framework of the project. Finally, within the range defined by the data processed the integrated geological-geophysical images the Kara-Barents Shelf Plate structure whole Earth crust thickness along transects 1-AR and 2-AR have been obtained. New geophysical data acquired have forced reviewing of our nderstanding of Barents region geological structure. First of all it concern to south and north Barents depressions. South Barents depression is well known as a geological

  20. A virtual radiation belt observatory: Looking forward to the electronic geophysical year

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, D. N.; Green, J. C.; Kroehl, H. W.; Kihn, E.; Virbo Team

    During the International Geophysical Year (1957-1958), member countries established many new capabilities pursuing the major IGY objectives of collecting geophysical data as widely as possible and providing free access to these data for all scientists around the globe. A key achievement of the IGY was the establishment of a worldwide system of data centers and physical observatories. The worldwide scientific community has now endorsed and is promoting an electronic Geophysical Year (eGY) initiative. The proposed eGY concept would both commemorate the 50th anniversary of the IGY in 2007-2008 and would provide a forward impetus to geophysics in the 21st century, similar to that provide by the IGY fifty years ago. The eGY concept advocates the establishment of a series of virtual geophysical observatories now being deployed in cyberspace. We are developing the concept of a Virtual Radiation Belt Observatory (ViRBO) that will bring together near-earth particle and field measurements acquired by NASA, NOAA, DoD, DOE, and other spacecraft. We discuss plans to aggregate these measurements into a readily accessible database along with analysis, visualization, and display tools that will make radiation belt information available and useful both to the scientific community and to the user community. We envision that data from the various agencies along with models being developed under the auspices of the National Science Foundation Center for Integrated Space Weather Modeling (CISM) will help us to provide an excellent `climatology' of the radiation belts over the past several decades. In particular, we would plan to use these data to drive physical models of the radiation belts to form a gridded database which would characterize particle and field properties on solar-cycle (11-year) time scales. ViRBO will also provide up-to-date specification of conditions for event analysis and anomaly resolution. We are even examining the possibilities for near-realtime acquisition of