Science.gov

Sample records for earth quadrupolar effects

  1. Quadrupolar Kondo effect in uranium heavy-electron materials?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, D. L.

    1987-01-01

    The possibility of an electric quadrupole Kondo effect for a non-Kramers doublet on a uranium (U) ion is a cubic metallic host is demonstrated by model calculations showing a Kondo upturn in the resistivity, universal quenching of the quadrupolar moment, and a heavy-electron anomaly in the electronic specific heat. With inclusion of excited crystal-field levels, some of the unusual magnetic-response data in the heavy-electron superconductor UBe13 may be understood. Structural phase transitions at unprecedented low temperatures may occur in U-based heavy-electron materials.

  2. Quadrupolar and anisotropy effects on dephasing in two-electron spin qubits in GaAs

    PubMed Central

    Botzem, Tim; McNeil, Robert P. G.; Mol, Jan-Michael; Schuh, Dieter; Bougeard, Dominique; Bluhm, Hendrik

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the decoherence of electron spins in semiconductors due to their interaction with nuclear spins is of fundamental interest as they realize the central spin model and of practical importance for using them as qubits. Interesting effects arise from the quadrupolar interaction of nuclear spins with electric field gradients, which have been shown to suppress diffusive nuclear spin dynamics and might thus enhance electron spin coherence. Here we show experimentally that for gate-defined GaAs quantum dots, quadrupolar broadening of the nuclear Larmor precession reduces electron spin coherence by causing faster decorrelation of transverse nuclear fields. However, this effect disappears for appropriate field directions. Furthermore, we observe an additional modulation of coherence attributed to an anisotropic electronic g-tensor. These results complete our understanding of dephasing in gated quantum dots and point to mitigation strategies. They may also help to unravel unexplained behaviour in self-assembled quantum dots and III–V nanowires. PMID:27079269

  3. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of quadrupolar nuclei and dipolar field effects

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, Jeffry Todd

    2004-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical research conducted in two areas in the field of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is presented: (1) studies of the coherent quantum-mechanical control of the angular momentum dynamics of quadrupolar (spin I > 1/2) nuclei and its application to the determination of molecular structure; and (2) applications of the long-range nuclear dipolar field to novel NMR detection methodologies.The dissertation is organized into six chapters. The first two chapters and associated appendices are intended to be pedagogical and include an introduction to the quantum mechanical theory of pulsed NMR spectroscopy and the time dependent theory of quantum mechanics. The third chapter describes investigations of the solid-state multiple-quantum magic angle spinning (MQMAS) NMR experiment applied to I = 5/2 quadrupolar nuclei. This work reports the use of rotary resonance-matched radiofrequency irradiation for sensitivity enhancement of the I = 5/2 MQMAS experiment. These experiments exhibited certain selective line narrowing effects which were investigated theoretically.The fourth chapter extends the discussion of multiple quantum spectroscopy of quadrupolar nuclei to a mostly theoretical study of the feasibility of enhancing the resolution of nitrogen-14 NMR of large biomolecules in solution via double-quantum spectroscopy. The fifth chapter continues to extend the principles of multiple quantum NMR spectroscopy of quadrupolar nuclei to make analogies between experiments in NMR/nuclear quadrupolar resonance (NQR) and experiments in atomic/molecular optics (AMO). These analogies are made through the Hamiltonian and density operator formalism of angular momentum dynamics in the presence of electric and magnetic fields.The sixth chapter investigates the use of the macroscopic nuclear dipolar field to encode the NMR spectrum of an analyte nucleus indirectly in the magnetization of a sensor nucleus. This technique could potentially serve as an

  4. Interaction of Strain and Nuclear Spins in Silicon: Quadrupolar Effects on Ionized Donors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franke, David P.; Hrubesch, Florian M.; Künzl, Markus; Becker, Hans-Werner; Itoh, Kohei M.; Stutzmann, Martin; Hoehne, Felix; Dreher, Lukas; Brandt, Martin S.

    2015-07-01

    The nuclear spins of ionized donors in silicon have become an interesting quantum resource due to their very long coherence times. Their perfect isolation, however, comes at a price, since the absence of the donor electron makes the nuclear spin difficult to control. We demonstrate that the quadrupolar interaction allows us to effectively tune the nuclear magnetic resonance of ionized arsenic donors in silicon via strain and determine the two nonzero elements of the S tensor linking strain and electric field gradients in this material to S11=1.5 ×1022 V /m2 and S44=6 ×1022 V /m2 . We find a stronger benefit of dynamical decoupling on the coherence properties of transitions subject to first-order quadrupole shifts than on those subject to only second-order shifts and discuss applications of quadrupole physics including mechanical driving of magnetic resonance, cooling of mechanical resonators, and strain-mediated spin coupling.

  5. Quadrupolar Effect on Two Layered Thin Film Antiferroelectric Smectic Liquid Crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Lum, Chia-Yuee; Ong, Lye-Hock; Cepic, Mojca

    2011-03-30

    Within the framework of the discrete Landau phenomenological model, the free energy of an antiferroelectric smectic liquid crystal is analyzed. This model considers the interactions between the liquid crystal molecules within the nearest and the next nearest layers. Electrostatic quadrupolar interaction up to the nearest layers is included. This quadrupolar term, b{sub q{xi}}???{sub i{center_dot}{xi}}???{sub i+1}{sup 2} is positive, thus favouring a perpendicular orientation in the adjacent layer respectively. We show how quadrupolar interaction can affects the planar regions of the phase diagram of a two layered thin antiferroelectric smectic liquid crystal film.

  6. The combined effect of quadrupolar and dipolar interactions on the excitation and evolution of triple quantum coherences in ⁷Li solid state magic angle spinning NMR.

    PubMed

    Eliav, Uzi; Goldbourt, Amir

    2013-05-01

    Magic-angle spinning triple-quantum NMR spectra of lithium-7 provide enhanced spectral dispersion for the inherent low chemical shift range of this nucleus, while maintaining linewidths, which are free of any quadrupolar broadening to first order. Since the quadrupolar interaction of (7)Li is very small, in the order of the radio frequency nutation frequencies and only moderately larger than the spinning rates, such spectra are also only marginally affected by the second order quadrupolar interaction under large magnetic fields. In the current study we demonstrate that the existence of two and more proximate (7)Li spins, as encountered in many materials, affects both excitation and evolution of triple-quantum coherences due to the combined effect of quadrupolar and homonuclear dipolar interactions. We show that the generation of (7)Li triple-quantum coherences using two π/2 pulses separated by one-half rotor period is superior in such cases to a single pulse excitation since the excitation time is shorter; thus the maximum signal is only marginally affected by the homonuclear dipolar couplings. When the quadrupolar-dipolar cross terms dominate the spectra, single- and triple-quantum lineshapes are very similar and therefore a true gain in dispersion is maintained in the latter spectrum. The effects of quadrupolar-dipolar cross terms are experimentally demonstrated by comparing a natural abundance and a (6)Li-diluted samples of lithium acetate, resulting in the possibility of efficient excitation of triple quantum coherences over longer periods of time, and in longer life times of triple-quantum coherences.

  7. Earth's magnetic field enabled scalar coupling relaxation of 13C nuclei bound to fast-relaxing quadrupolar 14N in amide groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiavazza, Enrico; Kubala, Eugen; Gringeri, Concetta V.; Düwel, Stephan; Durst, Markus; Schulte, Rolf F.; Menzel, Marion I.

    2013-02-01

    Scalar coupling relaxation, which is usually only associated with closely resonant nuclei (e.g., 79Br-13C), can be a very effective relaxation mechanism. While working on hyperpolarized [5-13C]glutamine, fast liquid-state polarization decay during transfer to the MRI scanner was observed. This behavior could hypothetically be explained by substantial T1 shortening due to a scalar coupling contribution (type II) to the relaxation caused by the fast-relaxing quadrupolar 14N adjacent to the 13C nucleus in the amide group. This contribution is only effective in low magnetic fields (i.e., less than 800 μT) and prevents the use of molecules bearing the 13C-amide group as hyperpolarized MRS/MRI probes. In the present work, this hypothesis is explored both theoretically and experimentally. The results show that high hyperpolarization levels can be retained using either a 15N-labeled amide or by applying a magnetic field during transfer of the sample from the polarizer to the MRI scanner.

  8. Quadrupolar effects on nuclear spins of neutral arsenic donors in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franke, David P.; Pflüger, Moritz P. D.; Mortemousque, Pierre-André; Itoh, Kohei M.; Brandt, Martin S.

    2016-04-01

    We present electrically detected electron nuclear double resonance measurements of the nuclear spins of ionized and neutral arsenic donors in strained silicon. In addition to a reduction of the hyperfine coupling, we find significant quadrupole interactions of the nuclear spin of the neutral donors of the order of 10 kHz. By comparing these to the quadrupole shifts due to crystal fields measured for the ionized donors, we identify the effect of the additional electron on the electric field gradient at the nucleus. This extra component is expected to be caused by the coupling to electric field gradients created due to changes in the electron wave function under strain.

  9. Resonant spectra of quadrupolar anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fossez, K.; Mao, Xingze; Nazarewicz, W.; Michel, N.; Garrett, W. R.; Płoszajczak, M.

    2016-09-01

    In quadrupole-bound anions, an extra electron is attached at a sufficiently large quadrupole moment of a neutral molecule, which is lacking a permanent dipole moment. The nature of the bound states and low-lying resonances of such anions is of interest for understanding the threshold behavior of open quantum systems in general. In this work, we investigate the properties of quadrupolar anions as halo systems, the formation of rotational bands, and the transition from a subcritical to supercritical electric quadrupole moment. We solve the electron-plus-rotor problem using a nonadiabatic coupled-channel formalism by employing the Berggren ensemble, which explicitly contains bound states, narrow resonances, and the scattering continuum. The rotor is treated as a linear triad of point charges with zero monopole and dipole moments and nonzero quadrupole moment. We demonstrate that binding energies and radii of quadrupolar anions strictly follow the scaling laws for two-body halo systems. Contrary to the case of dipolar anions, ground-state band of quadrupolar anions smoothly extend into the continuum, and many rotational bands could be identified above the detachment threshold. We study the evolution of a bound state of an anion as it dives into the continuum at a critical quadrupole moment and we show that the associated critical exponent is α =2 . Everything considered, quadrupolar anions represent a perfect laboratory for the studies of marginally bound open quantum systems.

  10. Converse effect of pressure on the quadrupolar and magnetic transition in Ce3Pd20Si6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larrea J., J.; Strydom, A. M.; Martelli, V.; Prokofiev, A.; Lorenzer, K.-A.; Rønnow, H. M.; Paschen, S.

    2016-03-01

    The heavy fermion compound Ce3Pd20Si6 displays unconventional quantum criticality as the lower of two consecutive phase transitions is fully suppressed by magnetic field. Here we report on the effects of pressure as an additional tuning parameter. Specific heat and electrical resistivity measurements reveal a converse effect of pressure on the two transitions, leading to the merging of both transitions at 6.2 kbars. The field-induced quantum criticality is robust under pressure tuning. We rationalize our findings within an extended version of the global phase diagram for antiferromagnetic heavy fermion quantum criticality.

  11. Understanding Earth's Albedo Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fidler, Chuck

    2012-01-01

    Earth and space science in the middle school classroom are composed of intricately intertwined sets of conceptual systems (AAAS 1993; NRC 1996). Some systems of study, such as the water and rock cycles, are quite explicit and often found as stand-alone middle school science units. Other phenomena are not so apparent, yet they play an extremely…

  12. Probing Quadrupolar Nuclei by Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy: Recent Advances

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, Christian; Pruski, Marek

    2011-06-08

    Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of quadrupolar nuclei has recently undergone remarkable development of capabilities for obtaining structural and dynamic information at the molecular level. This review summarizes the key achievements attained during the last couple of decades in solid-state NMR of both integer spin and half-integer spin quadrupolar nuclei. We provide a concise description of the first- and second-order quadrupolar interactions, and their effect on the static and magic angle spinning (MAS) spectra. Methods are explained for efficient excitation of single- and multiple-quantum coherences, and acquisition of spectra under low- and high-resolution conditions. Most of all, we present a coherent, comparative description of the high-resolution methods for half-integer quadrupolar nuclei, including double rotation (DOR), dynamic angle spinning (DAS), multiple-quantum magic angle spinning (MQMAS), and satellite transition magic angle spinning (STMAS). Also highlighted are methods for processing and analysis of the spectra. Finally, we review methods for probing the heteronuclear and homonuclear correlations between the quadrupolar nuclei and their quadrupolar or spin-1/2 neighbors.

  13. Additional boundary condition for electric quadrupolar continua derived from Maxwell's differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaghjian, A. D.; Silveirinha, M. G.

    2016-08-01

    Electric quadrupolar continua satisfying a physically reasonable constitutive relation supports both an evanescent and a propagating eigenmode. Thus, three interface boundary conditions, two plus an "additional boundary condition" (ABC), are required to obtain a unique solution to a plane wave incident from free space upon an electric quadrupolar half-space. By generalizing the constitutive relation to hold within the transition layer between the free space and the quadrupolar continuum, we derive these three boundary conditions directly from Maxwell's differential equations. The three boundary conditions are used to determine the unique solution to the boundary value problem of an electric quadrupolar slab. Numerical computations show that for long wavelengths, two previous boundary conditions, derived under the assumption that the electric quadrupolarization contains negligible effective delta functions in the transition layer, produce an accurate solution by neglecting the evanescent eigenmode, that is, by assuming it decays within the transition layer. It appears that the general method used to derive the electric quadrupolar ABC can be applied to obtain the boundary conditions for any other realizable constitutive relation in a Maxwellian multipole continuum.

  14. Local polarization distribution in quadrupolar glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadić, B.; Pirc, R.; Blinc, R.

    1997-01-01

    We consider the semimicroscopic symmetry-adapted random-bond-random-field model of quadrupolar glasses such as NaCN:KCN and KBr:KCN, assuming strong lattice anisotropy which restricts the equilibrium orientations of the CN molecules to a set of discrete directions along the cubic <100> axes. Applying the replica theory of orientational glasses, we calculate the probability distribution W(p1,p2) for the two independent components of local quadrupolar polarization p1 and p2 in the replica-symmetric quadrupolar glass phase. The reduced distributions W2(p2)≡∫W(p1,p2)dp1 and W1(p1)≡∫W(p2,p1)dp2 are shown to be related to the quadrupole-perturbed NMR line shape I(ν) of the 14N nucleus.

  15. Simple model for coupled magnetic and quadrupolar instabilities in uranium heavy-fermion materials

    SciTech Connect

    Libero, V.L. ); Cox, D.L. )

    1993-08-01

    We present a mean-field calculation of the phase diagram of a simple model of localized moments, in the hexagonal uranium heavy-fermion compounds. The model considers a non-Kramers quadrupolar doublet ground state magnetically coupled with a singlet excited state, favoring in-plane van Vleck magnetism, as has been conjectured for UPt[sub 3]. The Hamiltonian that defines the model is Heisenberg-like in both magnetic and quadrupolar moments. No Kondo-effect physics is included in the calculations. Among our main results are (i) for zero intersite quadrupolar coupling, the magnetic order is achieved by a first-order transition above a critical intersite magnetic coupling value, which becomes second order at higher coupling strengths (ii) for finite intersite quadrupolar coupling, at temperatures below a second-order quadrupolar ordering transition, the minimal magnetic coupling value is increased, but (a) the magnetic ordering temperature is enhanced above this value, and (b) the ordering of first- and second-order transitions in the phase diagram is reversed. By considering the general structure of the Ginsburg-Landau free energy, we argue that the Kondo effect will not modify the shape of the phase diagram, but will modify the quantitative values at which transitions occur.

  16. Resonant Auger for the detection of quadrupolar transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Danger, J.; Le Fevre, P.; Chandesris, D.; Magnan, H.; Jupille, J.; Bourgeois, S.; Eickhoff, T.; Drube, W.

    2003-01-24

    Quadrupolar transitions can play an important role in X-ray absorption spectroscopy, especially when it is used for magnetic measurements, like in X-ray Magnetic Circular Dichroism or Resonant Magnetic Scattering. We show here that resonantly excited Ti KL2,3L2,3 Auger spectra of TiO2 (110) carry a clear signature of quadrupolar transitions from the 1s to localized eg and t2g d-like states. The quadrupolar nature of the observed additional spectator lines are clearly demonstrated by their angular dependence, and their intensity is used to locate and quantify the quadrupolar transitions in the absorption spectrum.

  17. Theoretical study of homonuclear J coupling between quadrupolar spins: single-crystal, DOR, and J-resolved NMR.

    PubMed

    Perras, Frédéric A; Bryce, David L

    2014-05-01

    The theory describing homonuclear indirect nuclear spin-spin coupling (J) interactions between pairs of quadrupolar nuclei is outlined and supported by numerical calculations. The expected first-order multiplets for pairs of magnetically equivalent (A2), chemically equivalent (AA'), and non-equivalent (AX) quadrupolar nuclei are given. The various spectral changeovers from one first-order multiplet to another are investigated with numerical simulations using the SIMPSON program and the various thresholds defining each situation are given. The effects of chemical equivalence, as well as quadrupolar coupling, chemical shift differences, and dipolar coupling on double-rotation (DOR) and J-resolved NMR experiments for measuring homonuclear J coupling constants are investigated. The simulated J coupling multiplets under DOR conditions largely resemble the ideal multiplets predicted for single crystals, and a characteristic multiplet is expected for each of the A2, AA', and AX cases. The simulations demonstrate that it should be straightforward to distinguish between magnetic inequivalence and equivalence using J-resolved NMR, as was speculated previously. Additionally, it is shown that the second-order quadrupolar-dipolar cross-term does not affect the splittings in J-resolved experiments. Overall, the homonuclear J-resolved experiment for half-integer quadrupolar nuclei is demonstrated to be robust with respect to the effects of first- and second-order quadrupolar coupling, dipolar coupling, and chemical shift differences.

  18. Field-induced quadrupolar quantum criticality in PrV2Al20

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimura, Yasuyuki; Tsujimoto, Masaki; Zeng, Bin; Balicas, Luis; Sakai, Akito; Nakatsuji, Satoru

    2015-06-01

    PrV2Al20 is a heavy-fermion superconductor based on the cubic Γ3 doublet that exhibits nonmagnetic quadrupolar ordering below ˜0.6 K. Our magnetotransport study on PrV2Al20 reveals field-induced quadrupolar quantum criticality at μ0Hc˜11 T applied along the [111] direction. Near the critical field μ0Hc required to suppress the quadrupolar state, we find a marked enhancement of the resistivity ρ (H ,T ) , a divergent quasiparticle effective mass and concomitant non-Fermi-liquid (NFL) behavior [i.e., ρ (T ) ∝Tn with n ≤0.5 ]. We also observe the Shubnikov-de Haas effect above μ0Hc , indicating effective mass enhancement or m*/m0˜10 . This reveals the competition between the nonmagnetic Kondo effect and the intersite quadrupolar coupling which leads to pronounced NFL behavior in an extensive region of T and μ0H emerging from the quantum-critical point.

  19. Quadrupolar Spin Orders in FeSe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhentao; Nevidomskyy, Andriy

    Motivated by the absence of long-range magnetic order and the strong spin fluctuations observed in the Fe-based superconductor FeSe, we study spin-1 model on a square lattice up to next-nearest neighbor Heisenberg and biquadratic spin exchanges. The zero-temperature variational phase diagram gives the conventional antiferromagnetic order and also more exotic quadrupolar spin phases. These quadrupolar phases do not host long-range magnetic order and preserve time-reversal symmetry, but break the spin SU(2) symmetry. In particular, we observe a robust ferroquadrupolar order (FQ) in immediate proximity to the columnar AFM phase. We envision that FeSe may be positioned within the FQ phase close to the phase boundary. Using the flavor-wave technique, we calculate the structure factor inside the FQ phase and find a Goldstone mode emerging from Q = (0 , 0) , which however bears zero spectral weight at ω = 0 due to time reversal symmetry. At the same time, we observe strong spin fluctuations near (π , 0) / (0 , π) , which agrees with the recent neutron scattering experiments. Further, we calculate the higher order interactions between the (π , 0) and (0 , π) spin fluctuations inside the FQ phase, which may shed light on the C4 symmetry breaking in the nematic phase of FeSe.

  20. The polarized interface between quadrupolar insulators: Maxwell stress tensor, surface tension, and potential.

    PubMed

    Slavchov, Radomir I; Dimitrova, Iglika M; Ivanov, Tzanko

    2015-10-21

    The quadrupolar Maxwell electrostatic equations predict several qualitatively different results compared to Poisson's classical equation in their description of the properties of a dielectric interface. All interfaces between dielectrics possess surface dipole moment which results in a measurable surface potential jump. The surface dipole moment is conjugated to the bulk quadrupole moment density (the quadrupolarization) similarly to Gauss's relation between surface charge and bulk polarization. However, the classical macroscopic Maxwell equations completely neglect the quadrupolarization of the medium. Therefore, the electrostatic potential distribution near an interface of intrinsic dipole moment can be correctly described only within the quadrupolar macroscopic equations of electrostatics. They predict that near the polarized interface a diffuse dipole layer exists, which bears many similarities to the diffuse charge layer near a charged surface, in agreement with existing molecular dynamics simulation data. It turns out that when the quadrupole terms are kept in the multipole expansion of the laws of electrostatics, the solutions for the potential and the electric field are continuous functions at the surface. A well-defined surface electric field exists, interacting with the adsorbed dipoles. This allows for a macroscopic description of the surface dipole-surface dipole and the surface dipole-bulk quadrupole interactions. They are shown to have considerable contribution to the interfacial tension-of the order of tens of mN/m! To evaluate it, the Maxwell stress tensor in quadrupolar medium is deduced, including the electric field gradient action on the quadrupoles, as well as quadrupolar image force and quadrupolar electrostriction. The dependence of the interfacial tension on the external normal electric field (the dielectrocapillary curve) is predicted and the dielectric susceptibility of the dipolar double layer is related to the quadrupolarizabilities of

  1. The polarized interface between quadrupolar insulators: Maxwell stress tensor, surface tension, and potential.

    PubMed

    Slavchov, Radomir I; Dimitrova, Iglika M; Ivanov, Tzanko

    2015-10-21

    The quadrupolar Maxwell electrostatic equations predict several qualitatively different results compared to Poisson's classical equation in their description of the properties of a dielectric interface. All interfaces between dielectrics possess surface dipole moment which results in a measurable surface potential jump. The surface dipole moment is conjugated to the bulk quadrupole moment density (the quadrupolarization) similarly to Gauss's relation between surface charge and bulk polarization. However, the classical macroscopic Maxwell equations completely neglect the quadrupolarization of the medium. Therefore, the electrostatic potential distribution near an interface of intrinsic dipole moment can be correctly described only within the quadrupolar macroscopic equations of electrostatics. They predict that near the polarized interface a diffuse dipole layer exists, which bears many similarities to the diffuse charge layer near a charged surface, in agreement with existing molecular dynamics simulation data. It turns out that when the quadrupole terms are kept in the multipole expansion of the laws of electrostatics, the solutions for the potential and the electric field are continuous functions at the surface. A well-defined surface electric field exists, interacting with the adsorbed dipoles. This allows for a macroscopic description of the surface dipole-surface dipole and the surface dipole-bulk quadrupole interactions. They are shown to have considerable contribution to the interfacial tension-of the order of tens of mN/m! To evaluate it, the Maxwell stress tensor in quadrupolar medium is deduced, including the electric field gradient action on the quadrupoles, as well as quadrupolar image force and quadrupolar electrostriction. The dependence of the interfacial tension on the external normal electric field (the dielectrocapillary curve) is predicted and the dielectric susceptibility of the dipolar double layer is related to the quadrupolarizabilities of

  2. The polarized interface between quadrupolar insulators: Maxwell stress tensor, surface tension, and potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slavchov, Radomir I.; Dimitrova, Iglika M.; Ivanov, Tzanko

    2015-10-01

    The quadrupolar Maxwell electrostatic equations predict several qualitatively different results compared to Poisson's classical equation in their description of the properties of a dielectric interface. All interfaces between dielectrics possess surface dipole moment which results in a measurable surface potential jump. The surface dipole moment is conjugated to the bulk quadrupole moment density (the quadrupolarization) similarly to Gauss's relation between surface charge and bulk polarization. However, the classical macroscopic Maxwell equations completely neglect the quadrupolarization of the medium. Therefore, the electrostatic potential distribution near an interface of intrinsic dipole moment can be correctly described only within the quadrupolar macroscopic equations of electrostatics. They predict that near the polarized interface a diffuse dipole layer exists, which bears many similarities to the diffuse charge layer near a charged surface, in agreement with existing molecular dynamics simulation data. It turns out that when the quadrupole terms are kept in the multipole expansion of the laws of electrostatics, the solutions for the potential and the electric field are continuous functions at the surface. A well-defined surface electric field exists, interacting with the adsorbed dipoles. This allows for a macroscopic description of the surface dipole-surface dipole and the surface dipole-bulk quadrupole interactions. They are shown to have considerable contribution to the interfacial tension—of the order of tens of mN/m! To evaluate it, the Maxwell stress tensor in quadrupolar medium is deduced, including the electric field gradient action on the quadrupoles, as well as quadrupolar image force and quadrupolar electrostriction. The dependence of the interfacial tension on the external normal electric field (the dielectrocapillary curve) is predicted and the dielectric susceptibility of the dipolar double layer is related to the quadrupolarizabilities of

  3. Dynamic-angle spinning and double rotation of quadrupolar nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, K.T. California Univ., Berkeley, CA . Dept. of Chemistry)

    1991-07-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of quadrupolar nuclei is complicated by the coupling of the electric quadrupole moment of the nucleus to local variations in the electric field. The quadrupolar interaction is a useful source of information about local molecular structure in solids, but it tends to broaden resonance lines causing crowding and overlap in NMR spectra. Magic- angle spinning, which is routinely used to produce high resolution spectra of spin-{1/2} nuclei like carbon-13 and silicon-29, is incapable of fully narrowing resonances from quadrupolar nuclei when anisotropic second-order quadrupolar interactions are present. Two new sample-spinning techniques are introduced here that completely average the second-order quadrupolar coupling. Narrow resonance lines are obtained and individual resonances from distinct nuclear sites are identified. In dynamic-angle spinning (DAS) a rotor containing a powdered sample is reoriented between discrete angles with respect to high magnetic field. Evolution under anisotropic interactions at the different angles cancels, leaving only the isotropic evolution of the spin system. In the second technique, double rotation (DOR), a small rotor spins within a larger rotor so that the sample traces out a complicated trajectory in space. The relative orientation of the rotors and the orientation of the larger rotor within the magnetic field are selected to average both first- and second-order anisotropic broadening. The theory of quadrupolar interactions, coherent averaging theory, and motional narrowing by sample reorientation are reviewed with emphasis on the chemical shift anisotropy and second-order quadrupolar interactions experienced by half-odd integer spin quadrupolar nuclei. The DAS and DOR techniques are introduced and illustrated with application to common quadrupolar systems such as sodium-23 and oxygen-17 nuclei in solids.

  4. On the microscopic fluctuations driving the NMR relaxation of quadrupolar ions in water.

    PubMed

    Carof, Antoine; Salanne, Mathieu; Charpentier, Thibault; Rotenberg, Benjamin

    2015-11-21

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) relaxation is sensitive to the local structure and dynamics around the probed nuclei. The Electric Field Gradient (EFG) is the key microscopic quantity to understand the NMR relaxation of quadrupolar ions, such as (7)Li(+), (23)Na(+), (25)Mg(2+), (35)Cl(-), (39)K(+), or (133)Cs(+). Using molecular dynamics simulations, we investigate the statistical and dynamical properties of the EFG experienced by alkaline, alkaline Earth, and chloride ions at infinite dilution in water. Specifically, we analyze the effect of the ionic charge and size on the distribution of the EFG tensor and on the multi-step decay of its auto-correlation function. The main contribution to the NMR relaxation time arises from the slowest mode, with a characteristic time on the picosecond time scale. The first solvation shell of the ion plays a dominant role in the fluctuations of the EFG, all the more that the ion radius is small and its charge is large. We propose an analysis based on a simplified charge distribution around the ion, which demonstrates that the auto-correlation of the EFG, hence the NMR relaxation time, reflects primarily the collective translational motion of water molecules in the first solvation shell of the cations. Our findings provide a microscopic route to the quantitative interpretation of NMR relaxation measurements and open the way to the design of improved analytical theories for NMR relaxation for small ionic solutes, which should focus on water density fluctuations around the ion. PMID:26590539

  5. Sympathetic solar eruptions in quadrupolar magnetic configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torok, T.; Titov, V. S.; Panasenco, O.

    2014-12-01

    Observations by SDO/AIA have renewed the interest in sympathetic solareruptions, i.e., of eruptions that occur simultaneously (or in shortsuccession) at different source regions in the corona. Recently, Toroket al. (2011) developed an idealized numerical model for the triggermechanisms of sympathetic eruptions in so-called pseudo-streamers, whichconsist of a tri-polar magnetic configuration with a parasitic polarityin their center. Here we extend the work by Torok et al. by investigating sympathetic eruptions in (the topologically somewhat more complex) quadrupolar configurations, using MHD simulations. We consider both symmetric and asymmetric initial configurations that contain two or three flux ropes within the quadrupole. We find, differentto Torok et al. (2011), that magnetic reconnection induced by a firsteruption cannot just trigger, but also prevent subsequent eruptions. In addition, a (relatively modest) asymmetry of the configuration may fully suppress the occurrence of successive full eruptions, i.e., of coronal mass ejections. We discuss the implications of these results for our understanding of sympathetic eruptions.

  6. High-resolution multiple quantum MAS NMR spectroscopy of half-integer quadrupolar nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Gang; Rovnyank, David; Sun, Boqin; Griffin, Robert G.

    1996-02-01

    We demonstrate the utility of a two-pulse sequence in obtaining high-resolution solid state NMR spectra of half-integer quadrupolar nuclei with magic-angle-spinning (MAS). The experiment, which utilizes multiple/single-quantum correlation, was first described in a different form by Frydman and Harwood [J. Am. Chem. Soc. 117 (1995) 5367] and yields high-resolution isotropic NMR spectra where shifts are determined by the sum of resonance offset (chemical shift) and second-order quadrupolar effects. The two-pulse sequence described here is shown to provide a higher and more uniform excitation of multiple-quantum coherence than the three-pulse sequence used previously.

  7. High-Resolution NMR of Quadrupolar Nuclei in the Solid State

    SciTech Connect

    Gann, Sheryl Lee

    1995-11-30

    This dissertation describes recent developments in solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), for the most part involving the use of dynamic-angle spinning (DAS) NMR to study quadrupolar nuclei. Chapter 1 introduces some of the basic concepts and theory that will be referred to in later chapters, such as the density operator, product operators, rotations, coherence transfer pathways, phase cycling, and the various nuclear spin interactions, including the quadrupolar interaction. Chapter 2 describes the theory behind motional averaging experiments, including DAS, which is a technique where a sample is spun sequentially about two axis oriented at different angles with respect to the external magnetic field such that the chemical shift and quadrupolar anisotropy are averaged to zero. Work done on various rubidium-87 salts is presented as a demonstration of DAS. Chapter 3 explains how to remove sidebands from DAS and magic-angle spinning (MAS) experiments, which result from the time-dependence of the Hamiltonian under sample spinning conditions, using rotor-synchronized {pi}-pulses. Data from these experiments, known as DAH-180 and MAH-180, respectively, are presented for both rubidium and lead salts. In addition, the applicability of this technique to double rotation (DOR) experiments is discussed. Chapter 4 concerns the addition of cross-polarization to DAS (CPDAS). The theory behind spin locking and cross polarizing quadrupolar nuclei is explained and a method of avoiding the resulting problems by performing cross polarization at 0{sup o} (parallel) with respect to the magnetic field is presented. Experimental results are shown for a sodium-23 compound, sodium pyruvate, and for oxygen-17 labeled L-akmine. In Chapter 5, a method for broadening the Hartmann-Hahn matching condition under MAS, called variable effective field cross-polarization (VEFCI?), is presented, along with experimental work on adamantane and polycarbonate.

  8. Second harmonic generation from small gold metallic particles: From the dipolar to the quadrupolar response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nappa, J.; Russier-Antoine, I.; Benichou, E.; Jonin, Ch.; Brevet, P. F.

    2006-11-01

    Hyper Raleigh scattering, a common technique to investigate the second harmonic light scattered from a liquid suspension of molecular compounds and to determine their quadratic hyperpolarizability, has been used for aqueous suspensions of gold nanoparticles, the diameter of which ranges from 20 up to 150nm. The hyper Rayleigh signal intensity was recorded as a function of the angle of polarization of the incident fundamental wave. For the particles with a diameter smaller than 50nm, the response is dominated by the dipolar contribution arising from the deviation of the particle shape from that of a perfect sphere. For larger diameter particles, retardation effects in the interaction of the electromagnetic fields with the particles cannot be neglected any longer and the response deviates from the pure dipolar response, exhibiting a strong quadrupolar contribution. It is then shown that in order to quantify the relative magnitude of these two dipolar and quadrupolar contributions, a weighting parameter ζV which equals unity for a pure quadrupolar contribution and vanishes for a pure dipolar response, can be introduced.

  9. Solution deuterium NMR quadrupolar relaxation study of heme mobility in myoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.D.; La Mar, G.N.; Smith, K.M.; Parish, D.W.; Langry, K.C. )

    1989-01-18

    NMR spectroscopy has been used to monitor the quadrupolar relaxation and motional dynamics of {sup 2}H selectively incorporated into skeletal and side chain positions of the heme in sperm whale myoglobin. The hyperfine shifts of the heme resonances in paramagnetic states of myoglobin allow resolution of the signals of interest, and paramagnetic contributions to the observed line widths are shown to be insignificant. The {sup 2}H line widths for the skeletal positions of deuterohemin-reconstituted myoglobin yield a correlation time identical with that of overall protein tumbling (9 ns at 30{degree}C) and hence reflect an immobile heme group. The {sup 2}H NMR line widths of heme methyl groups exhibit motional narrowing indicative of very rapid internal rotation. Hence the methyl rotation is effectively decoupled from the overall protein tumbling, and the residual quadrupolar line width can be used directly to determine the protein tumbling rate. The {sup 2}H NMR lines from heme vinyl groups were found narrower than those from the heme skeleton. However, the range of quadrupolar coupling constants for sp{sup 2} hybridized C-{sup 2}H bonds does not permit an unequivocal interpretation in terms of mobility. 48 refs., 4 figs.

  10. Kn 26, a new quadrupolar planetary nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, M. A.; Miranda, L. F.; Ramos-Larios, G.; Vázquez, R.

    2013-03-01

    Once classified as an emission line source, the planetary nebula (PN) nature of the source Kn 26 has only recently been recognized in digital sky surveys. To investigate the spectral properties and spatio-kinematical structure of Kn 26, we have obtained high spatial-resolution optical and near-IR narrow-band images, high-dispersion long-slit echelle spectra, and intermediate-resolution spectroscopic observations. The new data reveal an hourglass morphology typical of bipolar PNe. A detailed analysis of its morphology and kinematics discloses the presence of a second pair of bipolar lobes, making Kn 26 a new member of the subclass of quadrupolar PNe. The time lapse between the ejection of the two pairs of bipolar lobes is much shorter than their dynamical ages, implying a rapid change in the preferential direction of the central engine. The chemical composition of Kn 26 is particularly unusual among PNe, with a low N/O ratio (as for type II PNe) and a high helium abundance (as for type I PNe), although not atypical among symbiotic stars. Such an anomalous chemical composition may have resulted from the curtailment of the time in the asymptotic giant branch by the evolution of the progenitor star through a common envelope phase. Based on observations made with the Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT) and the William Herschel Telescope (WHT) on the island of La Palma in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC), the 2.1-m telescope of the Observatorio Astronómico Nacional at the Sierra de San Pedro Mártir (OAN-SPM), and the 1.5-m telescope at the Observatorio de Sierra Nevada (OSN), Granada, Spain. NOT is operated jointly by Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden. WHT is operated by the Isaac Newton Group. The 2.1-m telescope at the OAN-SPM is a national facility operated by the Instituto de Astronomía of the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México. The 1.5-m telescope at the OSN is operated by the

  11. Quantitative structure parameters from the NMR spectroscopy of quadrupolar nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Perras, Frederic A.

    2015-12-15

    Here, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is one of the most important characterization tools in chemistry, however, 3/4 of the NMR active nuclei are underutilized due to their quadrupolar nature. This short review centers on the development of methods that use solid-state NMR of quadrupolar nuclei for obtaining quantitative structural information. Namely, techniques using dipolar recoupling as well as the resolution afforded by double-rotation are presented for the measurement of spin–spin coupling between quadrupoles, enabling the measurement of internuclear distances and connectivities.

  12. Geometrical Quadrupolar Frustration in DyB4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanuki, Ryuta; Sato, Gou; Suzuki, Kazuya; Ishihara, Masaki; Yanagisawa, Tatsuya; Nemoto, Yuichi; Goto, Terutaka

    2005-08-01

    Physical properties of DyB4 have been studied by magnetization, specific heat, and ultrasonic measurements. The magnetic entropy change and ultrasonic properties in intermediate phase II indicate that the degeneracy of internal degrees of freedom is not fully lifted in spite of the formation of magnetic order. The ultrasonic attenuation and huge softening of C44 in phase II suggest the existence of electric-quadrupolar (orbital) fluctuations of 4 f-electrons. These unusual properties originate from a geometrical quadrupolar frustration.

  13. On the microscopic fluctuations driving the NMR relaxation of quadrupolar ions in water

    SciTech Connect

    Carof, Antoine; Salanne, Mathieu; Rotenberg, Benjamin; Charpentier, Thibault

    2015-11-21

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) relaxation is sensitive to the local structure and dynamics around the probed nuclei. The Electric Field Gradient (EFG) is the key microscopic quantity to understand the NMR relaxation of quadrupolar ions, such as {sup 7}Li{sup +}, {sup 23}Na{sup +}, {sup 25}Mg{sup 2+}, {sup 35}Cl{sup −}, {sup 39}K{sup +}, or {sup 133}Cs{sup +}. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we investigate the statistical and dynamical properties of the EFG experienced by alkaline, alkaline Earth, and chloride ions at infinite dilution in water. Specifically, we analyze the effect of the ionic charge and size on the distribution of the EFG tensor and on the multi-step decay of its auto-correlation function. The main contribution to the NMR relaxation time arises from the slowest mode, with a characteristic time on the picosecond time scale. The first solvation shell of the ion plays a dominant role in the fluctuations of the EFG, all the more that the ion radius is small and its charge is large. We propose an analysis based on a simplified charge distribution around the ion, which demonstrates that the auto-correlation of the EFG, hence the NMR relaxation time, reflects primarily the collective translational motion of water molecules in the first solvation shell of the cations. Our findings provide a microscopic route to the quantitative interpretation of NMR relaxation measurements and open the way to the design of improved analytical theories for NMR relaxation for small ionic solutes, which should focus on water density fluctuations around the ion.

  14. Effects of T2-relaxation in MAS NMR spectra of the satellite transitions for quadrupolar nuclei: a 27Al MAS and single-crystal NMR study of alum KAl(SO 4) 2 · 12H 2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Morten Daugaard; Jakobsen, Hans J.; Skibsted, Jørgen

    2005-04-01

    Asymmetries in the manifold of spinning sidebands (ssbs) from the satellite transitions have been observed in variable-temperature 27Al MAS NMR spectra of alum (KAl(SO 4) 2 · 12H 2O), recorded in the temperature range from -76 to 92 °C. The asymmetries decrease with increasing temperature and reflect the fact that the ssbs exhibit systematically different linewidths for different spectral regions of the manifold. From spin-echo 27Al NMR experiments on a single-crystal of alum, it is demonstrated that these variations in linewidth originate from differences in transverse ( T2) relaxation times for the two inner ( m = 1/2 ↔ m = 3/2 and m = -1/2 ↔ m = -3/2) and correspondingly for the two outer ( m = 3/2 ↔ m = 5/2 and m = -3/2 ↔ m = -5/2) satellite transitions. T2 relaxation times in the range 0.5-3.5 ms are observed for the individual satellite transitions at -50 °C and 7.05 T, whereas the corresponding T1 relaxation times, determined from similar saturation-recovery 27Al NMR experiments, are almost constant ( T1 = 0.07-0.10 s) for the individual satellite transitions. The variation in T2 values for the individual 27Al satellite transitions for alum is justified by a simple theoretical approach which considers the cross-correlation of the local fluctuating fields from the quadrupolar coupling and the heteronuclear ( 27Al- 1H) dipolar interaction on the T2 relaxation times for the individual transitions. This approach and the observed differences in T2 values indicate that a single random motional process modulates both the quadrupolar and heteronuclear dipolar interactions for 27Al in alum at low temperatures.

  15. Quadrupolar, Triple [Delta]-Function Potential in One Dimension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patil, S. H.

    2009-01-01

    The energy and parity eigenstates for quadrupolar, triple [delta]-function potential are analysed. Using the analytical solutions in specific domains, simple expressions are obtained for even- and odd-parity bound-state energies. The Heisenberg uncertainty product is observed to have a minimum for a specific strength of the potential. The…

  16. Separation of quadrupolar and chemical/paramagnetic shift interactions in two-dimensional 2H (I=1) nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonijevic, Sasa; Wimperis, Stephen

    2005-01-01

    A novel two-dimensional 2H (spin I=1) nuclear magnetic resonance technique is introduced for determination of both quadrupole and chemical/paramagnetic shift tensors and their relative orientation. The new method is based upon the well-known quadrupolar-echo experiment and is designed to refocus the quadrupolar interaction at the end of the t1 evolution period while retaining the modulation introduced by the shift interaction. As a result, a projection of the resulting two-dimensional spectrum onto its F1 dimension yields a shift anisotropy powder lineshape free from any quadrupolar broadening. The chemical/paramagnetic shifts appear in both F1 and F2 dimensions and are thus spread along a +1 frequency gradient; hence, a projection orthogonal to this gradient yields the pure quadrupolar powder lineshape, free from all shift interaction effects. The relative orientation of the quadrupole and shift tensors can be obtained by analysis of the full two-dimensional correlation lineshape. Unlike the well-known double-quantum experiment, the new method is, in principle, equally effective for all values of the quadrupolar splitting, including zero. The properties of the new technique are demonstrated using computer simulation and methods for the extraction of quadrupole and shift tensor parameters are described. The new technique is applied to (diamagnetic) benzoic acid-d1 (C6H5CO2D) and (paramagnetic) copper(II) chloride dihydrate-d4 (CuCl2ṡ2D2O).

  17. Separation of quadrupolar and chemical/paramagnetic shift interactions in two-dimensional 2H (I=1) nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Antonijevic, Sasa; Wimperis, Stephen

    2005-01-22

    A novel two-dimensional (2)H (spin I=1) nuclear magnetic resonance technique is introduced for determination of both quadrupole and chemical/paramagnetic shift tensors and their relative orientation. The new method is based upon the well-known quadrupolar-echo experiment and is designed to refocus the quadrupolar interaction at the end of the t(1) evolution period while retaining the modulation introduced by the shift interaction. As a result, a projection of the resulting two-dimensional spectrum onto its F(1) dimension yields a shift anisotropy powder lineshape free from any quadrupolar broadening. The chemical/paramagnetic shifts appear in both F(1) and F(2) dimensions and are thus spread along a +1 frequency gradient; hence, a projection orthogonal to this gradient yields the pure quadrupolar powder lineshape, free from all shift interaction effects. The relative orientation of the quadrupole and shift tensors can be obtained by analysis of the full two-dimensional correlation lineshape. Unlike the well-known double-quantum experiment, the new method is, in principle, equally effective for all values of the quadrupolar splitting, including zero. The properties of the new technique are demonstrated using computer simulation and methods for the extraction of quadrupole and shift tensor parameters are described. The new technique is applied to (diamagnetic) benzoic acid-d(1) (C(6)H(5)CO(2)D) and (paramagnetic) copper(II) chloride dihydrate-d(4) (CuCl(2).2D(2)O). PMID:15740253

  18. Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance of quadrupolar systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shuanhu

    1997-09-17

    This dissertation describes two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance theory and experiments which have been developed to study quadruples in the solid state. The technique of multiple-quantum magic-angle spinning (MQMAS) is extensively reviewed and expanded upon in this thesis. Specifically, MQMAS is first compared with another technique, dynamic-angle spinning (DAS). The similarity between the two techniques allows us to extend much of the DAS work to the MQMAS case. Application of MQMAS to a series of aluminum containing materials is then presented. The superior resolution enhancement through MQMAS is exploited to detect the five- and six-coordinated aluminum in many aluminosilicate glasses. Combining the MQMAS method with other experiments, such as HETCOR, greatly expands the possibility of the use of MQMAS to study a large range of problems and is demonstrated in Chapter 5. Finally, the technique switching-angle spinning (SAS) is applied to quadrupolar nuclei to fully characterize a quadrupolar spin system in which all of the 8 NMR parameters are accurately determined. This dissertation is meant to demonstrate that with the combination of two-dimensional NMR concepts and new advanced spinning technologies, a series of multiple-dimensional NMR techniques can be designed to allow a detailed study of quadrupolar nuclei in the solid state.

  19. Population transfer HMQC for half-integer quadrupolar nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Qiang; Xu, Jun; Feng, Ningdong; Deng, Feng E-mail: jean-paul.amoureux@univ-lille1.fr; Li, Yixuan; Trébosc, Julien; Lafon, Olivier; Hu, Bingwen; Chen, Qun; Amoureux, Jean-Paul E-mail: jean-paul.amoureux@univ-lille1.fr

    2015-03-07

    This work presents a detailed analysis of a recently proposed nuclear magnetic resonance method [Wang et al., Chem. Commun. 49(59), 6653-6655 (2013)] for accelerating heteronuclear coherence transfers involving half-integer spin quadrupolar nuclei by manipulating their satellite transitions. This method, called Population Transfer Heteronuclear Multiple Quantum Correlation (PT-HMQC), is investigated in details by combining theoretical analyses, numerical simulations, and experimental investigations. We find that compared to instant inversion or instant saturation, continuous saturation is the most practical strategy to accelerate coherence transfers on half-integer quadrupolar nuclei. We further demonstrate that this strategy is efficient to enhance the sensitivity of J-mediated heteronuclear correlation experiments between two half-integer quadrupolar isotopes (e.g., {sup 27}Al-{sup 17}O). In this case, the build-up is strongly affected by relaxation for small T{sub 2}′ and J coupling values, and shortening the mixing time makes a huge signal enhancement. Moreover, this concept of population transfer can also be applied to dipolar-mediated HMQC experiments. Indeed, on the AlPO{sub 4}-14 sample, one still observes experimentally a 2-fold shortening of the optimum mixing time albeit with no significant signal gain in the {sup 31}P-({sup 27}Al) experiments.

  20. A model of the Earth's Dole effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Georg; Cuntz, Matthias; Weber, Christine; Ciais, Philippe; Friedlingstein, Pierre; Heimann, Martin; Jouzel, Jean; Kaduk, JöRg; Maier-Reimer, Ernst; Seibt, Ulrike; Six, Katharina

    2004-03-01

    The Earth's Dole effect describes the isotopic 18O/16O-enrichment of atmospheric oxygen with respect to ocean water, amounting under today's conditions to 23.5‰. We have developed a model of the Earth's Dole effect by combining the results of three-dimensional models of the oceanic and terrestrial carbon and oxygen cycles with results of atmospheric general circulation models (AGCMs) with built-in water isotope diagnostics. We obtain a range from 22.4‰ to 23.3‰ for the isotopic enrichment of atmospheric oxygen. We estimate a stronger contribution to the global Dole effect by the terrestrial relative to the marine biosphere in contrast to previous studies. This is primarily caused by a modeled high leaf water enrichment of 5-6‰. Leaf water enrichment rises by ˜1‰ to 6-7‰ when we use it to fit the observed 23.5‰ of the global Dole effect. The present model is designed to be utilized in forthcoming paleo studies allowing a quantitative analysis of long-term observations from polar ice cores.

  1. Full quadrupolar tensor determination by NMR using a micro-crystal spinning at the magic angle.

    PubMed

    Vasa, Suresh Kumar; van Eck, Ernst R H; Janssen, J W G; Kentgens, Arno P M

    2010-05-14

    An implementation of rotor-synchronised Magic Angle Spinning (MAS) NMR is presented to determine the quadrupolar coupling tensor values from a single crystal study for half-integer quadrupolar nuclei. Using a microcoil based probehead for studying micro crystals with superior sensitivity, we successfully determine the full quadrupolar tensor of (23)Na using a micro crystal of dimensions 210 x 210 x 700 mum of NaNO(3) as a model system. A two step simulation procedure is used to obtain the orientation of the quadrupolar tensor information from the experimental spectra and is verified by XRD analysis.

  2. Molecular engineering of nanoscale quadrupolar chromophores for two-photon absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porres, Laurent; Mongin, Olivier; Blanchard-Desce, Mireille H.; Ventelon, Lionel; Barzoukas, Marguerite; Moreaux, Laurent; Pons, Thomas; Mertz, Jerome

    2003-02-01

    Our aim has been the design of optimized NLO-phores with very high two-photon absorption (TPA) cross-sections (s2) in the red-NIR region, while maintaining high linear transparency and high fluorescence quantum yield. Our molecular engineering strategy is based on the push-push or pull-pull functionalization of semi-rigid nanoscale conjugated systems. The central building blocks were selected as rigid units that may assist quadrupolar intramolecular charge transfer by acting either as a (weak) donor or acceptor core. Quadrupolar molecules derived either from a phenyl unit, a rigidified biphenyl moiety or a fused bithiophene unit have been considered. Conjugated oligomers made of phenylene-vinylene and/or phenylene-ethynylene units were selected as connecting spacers between the core and the electroactive end groups to ensure effective electronic conjugation while maintaining suitable transparency/fluorescence. The TPA cross-sections were determined by investigating the two-photon-excited fluorescence properties using a Ti:sapphire laser delivering fs pulses. Both the nature of the end groups and of the core moiety play an important role in determining the TPA spectra. In addition, by adjusting the length and nature of the conjugated extensor, both amplification and spectral tuning of TPA cross-sections can be achieved. As a result, push-push fluorophores which demonstrate giant TPA cross-sections (up to 3000 GM) in the visible red, high fluorescence quantum yields and good transparency in the visible range have been obtained.

  3. A spherical cavity model for quadrupolar dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrova, Iglika M.; Slavchov, Radomir I.; Ivanov, Tzanko; Mosbach, Sebastian

    2016-03-01

    The dielectric properties of a fluid composed of molecules possessing both dipole and quadrupole moments are studied based on a model of the Onsager type (molecule in the centre of a spherical cavity). The dielectric permittivity ɛ and the macroscopic quadrupole polarizability αQ of the fluid are related to the basic molecular characteristics (molecular dipole, polarizability, quadrupole, quadrupolarizability). The effect of αQ is to increase the reaction field, to bring forth reaction field gradient, to decrease the cavity field, and to bring forth cavity field gradient. The effects from the quadrupole terms are significant in the case of small cavity size in a non-polar liquid. The quadrupoles in the medium are shown to have a small but measurable effect on the dielectric permittivity of several liquids (Ar, Kr, Xe, CH4, N2, CO2, CS2, C6H6, H2O, CH3OH). The theory is used to calculate the macroscopic quadrupolarizabilities of these fluids as functions of pressure and temperature. The cavity radii are also determined for these liquids, and it is shown that they are functions of density only. This extension of Onsager's theory will be important for non-polar solutions (fuel, crude oil, liquid CO2), especially at increased pressures.

  4. Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carr, M. H.

    1984-01-01

    The following aspects of the planet Earth are discussed: plate tectonics, the interior of the planet, the formation of the Earth, and the evolution of the atmosphere and hydrosphere. The Earth's crust, mantle, and core are examined along with the bulk composition of the planet.

  5. On the relationship between quadrupolar magnetic field and collisionless reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Smets, R. Belmont, G.; Aunai, N.; Boniface, C.

    2014-06-15

    Using hybrid simulations, we investigate the onset of fast reconnection between two cylindrical magnetic shells initially close to each other. This initial state mimics the plasma structure in High Energy Density Plasmas induced by a laser-target interaction and the associated self-generated magnetic field. We clearly observe that the classical quadrupolar structure of the out-of-plane magnetic field appears prior to the reconnection onset. Furthermore, a parametric study reveals that, with a non-coplanar initial magnetic topology, the reconnection onset is delayed and possibly suppressed. The relation between the out-of-plane magnetic field and the out-of-plane electric field is discussed.

  6. Earth radiation pressure effects on satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knocke, P. C.; Ries, J. C.; Tapley, B. D.

    1988-01-01

    A diffuse-earth radiation force model is presented, which includes a latitudinally varying representation of the shortwave and longwave radiation of the terrestrial sphere. Applications to various earth satellites indicate that this force, in particular the shortwave component, can materially affect the recovery of estimated parameters. Earth radiation pressure cannot explain the anomalous deceleration of LAGEOS, but can produce significant along track accelerations on satellites with highly eccentric orbits. Analyses of GEOS-1 tracking data confirm this result.

  7. SCAM-STMAS: satellite-transition MAS NMR of quadrupolar nuclei with self-compensation for magic-angle misset.

    PubMed

    Ashbrook, Sharon E; Wimperis, Stephen

    2003-06-01

    , such as third-order quadrupolar effects or second-order quadrupole-CSA cross-terms, are present. Finally, we show that the sensitivity of the experiment can be improved through the use of amplitude-modulated pulses.

  8. Structure and orientational ordering in a fluid of elongated quadrupolar molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Ram Chandra

    2013-01-01

    A second-order density-functional theory is used to study the effect of quadrupolar interactions on the isotropic-nematic transition in a system of fluids of elongated molecules interacting via the Gay-Berne potential. The direct pair-correlation functions of the coexisting isotropic fluid that enter in the theory as input information are obtained by solving the Ornstein-Zernike equation using the Percus-Yevick integral equation theory in the (reduced) temperature range of 1.6≤T∗≤3.0 for different densities, temperatures and quadrupole moments. Using the harmonic coefficients of the direct pair-correlation functions, isotropic-nematic phase coexistence and thermodynamic parameters have been calculated. The theoretical results have been compared with the available computer simulation results.

  9. Quadrupolar relaxation of hyperpolarized krypton-83 as a probe for surfaces.

    PubMed

    Stupic, Karl F; Cleveland, Zackary I; Pavlovskaya, Galina E; Meersmann, Thomas

    2006-02-01

    This work reports the first systematic study of relaxation experienced by the hyperpolarized (hp) noble gas isotope (83)Kr (I=9/2) in contact with surfaces. The spin-lattice relaxation of (83)Kr is found to depend strongly on the chemical composition of the surfaces in the vicinity of the gas. This effect is caused by quadrupolar interactions during brief periods of surface adsorption that are the dominating source of longitudinal spin relaxation in the (83)Kr atoms. Simple model systems of closest packed glass beads with uniform but variable bead sizes are used for the relaxation measurements. The observed relaxation rates depend strongly on the chemical treatment of the glass surfaces and on the surface to volume ratio. Hp (83)Kr NMR relaxation measurements of porous polymers with pore sizes of 70-250 microm demonstrate the potential use of this new technique for material sciences applications.

  10. [Biological effects of rare earth elements and their action mechanisms].

    PubMed

    He, Yuejun; Xue, Li

    2005-10-01

    This paper reviewed the effects of rare earth elements on plant root development, biomass, quality, and resistance against stress. Applying appropriate amount of rare earth elements could not only promote seed germination and root development, increase plant biomass, but also improve harvest quality and plant resistance against stress. The plant uptake characteristics of rare earth elements, as well as their contents, distribution, existing forms, and cytolocalization in plants were discussed, with the focus on the effects of rare earth elements on photosynthesis and chlorophyll formation, nutrient uptake, relationships between rare earth elements and calcium, and action mechanisms of rare earth elements on cell membrane and enzymes. Rare earth elements could enhance chlorophyll content and improve photosynthetic rate, and thus, could increase plant biomass. When an appropriate amount of rare earth elements was applied, the uptake of nutrients by plant and their transformation and utilization were promoted. Rare earth elements could replace calcium ion to participate in enzymatic reactions, maintain the osmosis and stability of cell membrane, promote the protection function of cell membrane, and enhance the plant resistance capability against stress. In the end, further researches on rare earth elements were suggested.

  11. Effects of spraying rare earths on contents of rare Earth elements and effective components in tea.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dongfeng; Wang, Changhong; Ye, Sheng; Qi, Hongtao; Zhao, Guiwen

    2003-11-01

    Rare earth (RE) fertilizer is widely applied in China to increase the yield and the quality of crops including tea. However, the effects of spraying RE fertilizer on the contents of rare earth elements (REE) and effective components in tea are unknown. The results from basin and field experiments show that the values of the REE concentrations in new shoots of tea plants and the concentration of REE in the soil (REE/REEs) either from control basins or from treatment basins were smaller than those in other parts of tea plant and similar between control and treatment. The longer the interval between spraying RE fertilizer and picking the shoots of tea plants, the less the effects from spraying. About 80% summation operator REE (the sum of the concentrations of 15 REE) in tea, whether it came from spraying or not, was insoluble in the infusion. About 10% the soluble REE of summation operator REE in tea infusion was bound to polysaccharide, and the amount of REE bound polysaccharide decreased over time. At least a 25 day safety interval is needed between spraying and picking if the microelement fertilizer is used, in order to enhance tea output and to ensure tea safety. PMID:14582968

  12. Early intense cratering: Effects on growth of earth's crust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, William K.

    1988-01-01

    The disrupting effects of early intense meteorite bombardment on Earth's protocrustal evolution is discussed. The author emphasized that one should not consider the Earth's impact history as a discrete phase separate from an early crust forming event, and also that the end of the impacts was not a singular event that destroyed all previously formed crust.

  13. Effect of the earth's ellipticity on the lunar tidal potential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahlen, F. A.

    1993-01-01

    The earth's orbital acceleration about the moon is influenced by its ellipticity. In this paper it shown that the ellipticity affects tidal gravity by contributing directly to the lunar tide-generating potential (in addition to effecting the elastic-gravitational response of the solid earth and oceans to this potential).

  14. Site-selective QPASS for the isolation of large quadrupolar coupling environments.

    PubMed

    Smith, Luis J; Seith, Christopher

    2006-03-01

    Spectral editing of high spinning rate quadrupolar powder patterns observed using the QPASS experiment was achieved through the coupling of QPASS with the selective pi/2-RAPT enhancement sequence. The resulting pi/2-RAPT-QPASS sequence yields spectra that are dominated by the powder patterns form sites with large quadrupolar couplings thus reducing the overlap of patterns from multiple sites of different symmetry in a material. The 93Nb isotropic chemical shifts and quadrupolar coupling parameters were determined for the two niobium crystallographic sites in the layered KCa2Nb3O10. The asymmetric surface site in the structure was selectively enhanced and easily fit to second-order quadrupolar powder pattern with this method. PMID:16337417

  15. Determination of nuclear quadrupolar parameters using singularities in field-swept NMR patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichijo, Naoki; Takeda, Kazuyuki; Yamada, Kazuhiko; Takegoshi, K.

    2016-10-01

    We propose a simple data-analysis scheme to determine the coupling constant and the asymmetry parameter of nuclear quadrupolar interactions in field-swept nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) for static powder samples. This approach correlates the quadrupolar parameters to the positions of the singularities, which can readily be found out as sharp peaks in the field-swept pattern. Moreover, the parameters can be determined without quantitative acquisition and elaborate calculation of the overall profile of the pattern. Since both experimental and computational efforts are significantly reduced, the approach presented in this work will enhance the power of the field-swept NMR for yet unexplored quadrupolar nuclei. We demonstrate this approach in 33S in α-S8 and 35Cl in chloranil. The accuracy of the obtained quadrupolar parameters is also discussed.

  16. DFT-D study of 14N nuclear quadrupolar interactions in tetra-n-alkyl ammonium halide crystals.

    PubMed

    Dib, Eddy; Alonso, Bruno; Mineva, Tzonka

    2014-05-15

    The density functional theory-based method with periodic boundary conditions and addition of a pair-wised empirical correction for the London dispersion energy (DFT-D) was used to study the NMR quadrupolar interaction (coupling constant CQ and asymmetry parameter ηQ) of (14)N nuclei in a homologous series of tetra-n-alkylammonium halides (C(x)H(2x+1))4N(+)X(-) (x = 1-4), (X = Br, I). These (14)N quadrupolar properties are particularly challenging for the DFT-D computations because of their very high sensitivity to tiny geometrical changes, being negligible for other spectral property calculations as, for example, NMR (14)N chemical shift. In addition, the polarization effect of the halide anions in the considered crystal mesophases combines with interactions of van der Waals type between cations and anions. Comparing experimental and theoretical results, the performance of PBE-D functional is preferred over that of B3LYP-D. The results demonstrated a good transferability of the empirical parameters in the London dispersion formula for crystals with two or more carbons per alkyl group in the cations, whereas the empirical corrections in the tetramethylammonium halides appeared to be inappropriate for the quadrupolar interaction calculation. This is attributed to the enhanced cation-anion attraction, which causes a strong polarization at the nitrogen site. Our results demonstrated that the (14)N CQ and ηQ are predominantly affected by the molecular structures of the cations, adapted to the symmetry of the anion arrangements. The long-range polarization effect of the surrounding anions at the target nitrogen site becomes more important for cells with lower spatial symmetry. PMID:24758512

  17. DFT-D study of 14N nuclear quadrupolar interactions in tetra-n-alkyl ammonium halide crystals.

    PubMed

    Dib, Eddy; Alonso, Bruno; Mineva, Tzonka

    2014-05-15

    The density functional theory-based method with periodic boundary conditions and addition of a pair-wised empirical correction for the London dispersion energy (DFT-D) was used to study the NMR quadrupolar interaction (coupling constant CQ and asymmetry parameter ηQ) of (14)N nuclei in a homologous series of tetra-n-alkylammonium halides (C(x)H(2x+1))4N(+)X(-) (x = 1-4), (X = Br, I). These (14)N quadrupolar properties are particularly challenging for the DFT-D computations because of their very high sensitivity to tiny geometrical changes, being negligible for other spectral property calculations as, for example, NMR (14)N chemical shift. In addition, the polarization effect of the halide anions in the considered crystal mesophases combines with interactions of van der Waals type between cations and anions. Comparing experimental and theoretical results, the performance of PBE-D functional is preferred over that of B3LYP-D. The results demonstrated a good transferability of the empirical parameters in the London dispersion formula for crystals with two or more carbons per alkyl group in the cations, whereas the empirical corrections in the tetramethylammonium halides appeared to be inappropriate for the quadrupolar interaction calculation. This is attributed to the enhanced cation-anion attraction, which causes a strong polarization at the nitrogen site. Our results demonstrated that the (14)N CQ and ηQ are predominantly affected by the molecular structures of the cations, adapted to the symmetry of the anion arrangements. The long-range polarization effect of the surrounding anions at the target nitrogen site becomes more important for cells with lower spatial symmetry.

  18. Exotic Quadrupolar Phenomena in Non-Kramers Doublet Systems — The Cases of PrT2Zn20 (T = Ir, Rh) and PrT2Al20 (T = V, Ti) —

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onimaru, Takahiro; Kusunose, Hiroaki

    2016-08-01

    This paper reviews experimental evidence and the related theoretical background on exotic phenomena arising from local quadrupolar degrees of freedom. Recent extensive studies on praseodymium-based cubic systems, PrT2X20, have revealed that the active quadrupoles in the non-Kramers doublet ground state play a vital role in exhibiting quadrupole orders and superconductivity with underlying peculiar normal paramagnetic electronic states. We focus on four prototype compounds of PrT2X20 (T = Ir, Rh, X = Zn; T = V, Ti, X = Al). Detailed comprehensive comparisons of these compounds have revealed a universal feature of the non-Fermi liquid state emerging from a lattice quadrupolar Kondo effect, and the commonality and individuality of the quadrupolar and superconducting phases. It may be possible to develop a new class of heavy-fermion systems beyond the classic view of heavy fermions on the basis of a concrete understanding of these phenomena.

  19. Detrimental Effects of Extreme Solar Activity on Life on Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Airapetian, Vladimir; Glocer, Alex; Jackman, Charles

    2015-07-01

    Solar Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs), the most energetic eruptions in the Solar System, represent large-scale disturbances forming with the solar corona and are associated with solar flares and Solar Energetic Particles (SEP) events. Current Kepler data from solar-like stars suggest that the frequency of occurrence of energetic flares and associated CMEs from the Sun can be as high as 1 per 1500 years. What effects would CME and associated SEPs have on Earth's habitability? We have performed a three-dimensional time-dependent global magnetohydrodynamic simulation of the magnetic interaction of such a CME cloud with the Earth's magnetosphere. We calculated the global structure of the perturbed magnetosphere and derive the latitude of the open-closed magnetic field boundary. We used a 2D GSFC atmospheric code to calculate the efficiency of ozone depletion in the Earth's atmosphere due to SEP events and its effects on our society and life on Earth.

  20. Greenhouse effects: earth's climate in transition

    SciTech Connect

    Shepard, M.; Hakkarinen, C.; Hansen, A.; Spencer, D.

    1986-06-01

    Many experts are predicting significant change in the earth's climate during the next 50 years as theories of global warming gain broad acceptance in the scientific community. The consequences of accumulating greenhouse gases in the atmosphere may turn out to be the greatest environmental problem of modern times. One of the key uncertainties in projecting temperature change centers on the question of how much of the carbon dioxide (CO/sub 2/) released to the atmosphere will remain there. Scientists do not yet agree on how the CO/sub 2/ is apportioned among the plants and oceans, how much CO/sub 2/ these reservoirs can hold, or how long they can hold it. Climatologists link hundreds of mathematical equations and temperature measurements to develop their climate models, which are limited by their ability to predict regional changes accurately. There is no consensus on whether there is a need to focus on research or on developing an appropriate response. 12 references, 6 figures.

  1. Effect of equinoctial precession on geosynchronous earth satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurfil, P.

    The long-periodic effects of the equinoctial precession on geosynchronous Earth orbit satellites are investigated. The equations of motion in a reference frame that coprecesses with the Earth are developed, and the resulting variational equations are derived using mean classical orbital elements. The Earth gravitational model includes the J_2 and J_3 zonal harmonics, which induce the equinoctial precession due to the lunisolar gravitational torque. It is shown that the ever-growing lifetime and mass of geosynchronous Earth orbit satellites render the equinoctial precession a significant factor, which should be taken into account during mission design, as it affects north-south stationkeeping maneuvers. The equilibria of the variational equations including the zonal harmonics and the equinoctial precession are investigated and a class of stable frozen orbits which are equinoctial precession invariant is derived.

  2. Radiation shelter effectiveness beyond the earth magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shurshakov, V. A.; Benghin, V. V.; Kolomensky, A. V.; Petrov, V. M.

    Solar energetic particles (SEP) and galactic cosmic rays are known to be the sources of radiation hazard for missions beyond the Earth magnetosphere. An additionally shielded compartment of the mission spacecraft, called usually the radiation shelter, is considered as an important part of the radiation safety system. The shielding of the radiation shelter must be at least a few times higher than that of the remaining compartments. The mission crewmembers are supposed to stay in the radiation shelter for relatively short time of less than a day or two during SEP events only. A job-oriented radiation monitoring system (RMS) should be used on board the Martian mission spacecraft to provide the crew with necessary prediction information concerning the onset of a large SEP event. The information should be obtained independently of the ground-based support services and, hence, should be derived from online measurements of the dynamics of soft X-rays and charged energetic particles using the RMS sensors. As a result, the signal for the spacecrew members to go to the shelter gets somewhat delayed with respect to the SEP event onset, so that they appear to stay outside the shelter for some time during the event. The dependence of the crew-received dose on the SEP event prediction lag has been analyzed in terms of the standard SEP dynamics model for a typical 500-day Martian mission scenario. The Martian mission dose simulations have demonstrated a high efficiency of the radiation shelter despite the unavoidable lag of the RMS prediction signal.

  3. Forbush Effects on the Martian Surface and Earth's Poles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posner, A.; Guo, J.; Heber, B.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.; Zeitlin, C.; Zheng, Y.; MacNeice, P. J.; Odstrcil, D.; Rastaetter, L.; Steigies, C. T.; Andrews, J. P.; Appel, J. K.; Beaujean, R.; Berger, L.; Boettcher, S. I.; Brinza, D. E.; Bullock, M.; Burmeister, S.; Cucinotta, F.; Dresing, N.; Drews, C.; Ehresmann, B.; Epperly, M. E.; Hassler, D.; Herbst, K.; Kim, M. H. Y.; Kohler, J.; Kühl, P.; Lohf, H.; Martin-Garcia, C.; Müller-Mellin, R.; Neal, K.; Rafkin, S. C.; Reitz, G.; Smith, K. D.; Tyler, Y.; weigle, G., II

    2015-12-01

    We analyzed MSL/RAD observation of Forbush effects on the surface of Mars over a full Mars year from landing through the Mars opposition period in 2014. For the extended Mars opposition phase we compared the observed Forbush effects with those identified at Earth's south pole utilizing observations of the South Pole neutron monitor. Identification of the drivers of Forbush effects, recurrent and transient solar wind structures in the inner heliosphere, is aided by WSA-ENLIL simulations. We show that a remarkable correlations of count rates of (secondary) cosmic rays at Mars' surface and at the Earth's south pole is established for a minimum duration of 6 months around the Mars opposition, in particular when time shifted with propagation and/or corotation delays of the drivers of cosmic ray decreases in the solar wind. Moreover, the magnitude of Forbush effects on Mars is larger statistically than the equivalent near Earth's poles.

  4. Population and coherence transfer induced by double frequency sweeps in half-integer quadrupolar spin systems.

    PubMed

    Iuga, D; Schäfer, H; Verhagen, R; Kentgens, A P

    2000-12-01

    We have recently shown that the sensitivity of single- and multiple-quantum NMR experiments of half-integer (N/2) quadrupolar nuclei can be increased significantly by introducing so-called double frequency sweeps (DFS) in various pulse schemes. These sweeps consist of two sidebands generated by an amplitude modulation of the RF carrier. Using a time-dependent amplitude modulation the sidebands can be swept through a certain frequency range. Inspired by the work of Vega and Naor (J. Chem. Phys. 75, 75 (1981)), this is used to manipulate +/-(m - 1) <--> +/-m (3/2 < or = m < or = N/2) satellite transitions in half-integer spin systems simultaneously. For (23)Na (I = 3/2) and (27)Al (I = 5/2) spins in single crystals it proved possible to transfer the populations of the outer +/-m spin levels to the inner +/-1/2 spin levels. A detailed analysis shows that the efficiency of this process is a function of the adiabaticity with which the various spin transitions are passed during the sweep. In powders these sweep parameters have to be optimized to satisfy the appropriate conditions for a maximum of spins in the powder distribution. The effects of sweep rate, sweep range, and RF field strength are investigated both numerically and experimentally. Using a DFS as a preparation period leads to significantly enhanced central transition powder spectra under both static and MAS conditions, compared to single pulse excitation. DFSs prove to be very efficient tools not only for population transfer, but also for coherence transfer. This can be exploited for the multiple- to single-quantum transfer in MQMAS experiments. It is demonstrated, theoretically and experimentally, that DFSs are capable of transferring both quintuple-quantum and triple-quantum coherence into single-quantum coherence in I = 5/2 spin systems. This leads to a significant enhancement in signal-to-noise ratio and strongly reduces the RF power requirement compared to pulsed MQMAS experiments, thus extending their

  5. Instability of some divalent rare earth ions and photochromic effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egranov, A. V.; Sizova, T. Yu.; Shendrik, R. Yu.; Smirnova, N. A.

    2016-03-01

    It was shown that the divalent rare earth ions (La, Ce, Gd, Tb, Lu, and Y) in cubic sites in alkaline earth fluorides are unstable with respect to electron autodetachment since its d1(eg) ground state is located in the conduction band which is consistent with the general tendency of these ions in various compounds. The localization of doubly degenerate d1(eg) level in the conduction band creates a configuration instability around the divalent rare earth ion that leading to the formation of anion vacancy in the nearest neighborhood, as was reported in the previous paper [A. Egranov, T. Sizova, Configurational instability at the excited impurity ions in alkaline earth fluorites, J. Phys. Chem. Solids 74 (2013) 530-534]. Thus, the formation of the stable divalent ions as La, Ce, Gd, Tb, Lu, and Y (PC+ centers) in CaF2 and SrF2 crystals during x-ray irradiation occurs via the formation of charged anion vacancies near divalent ions (Re2+va), which lower the ground state of the divalent ion relative to the conductivity band. Photochromic effect occurs under thermally or optically stimulated electron transition from the divalent rare earth ion to the neighboring anion vacancy and reverse under ultraviolet light irradiation. It is shown that the optical absorption of the PC+ centers due to d → d and d → f transitions of the divalent rare-earth ion.

  6. NMR quadrupolar system described as Bose-Einstein-condensate-like system

    SciTech Connect

    Auccaise, R.; Oliveira, I. S.; Sarthour, R. S.; Teles, J.; Bonagamba, T. J.; Azevedo, E. R. de

    2009-04-14

    This paper presents a description of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of quadrupolar systems using the Holstein-Primakoff (HP) formalism and its analogy with a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) system. Two nuclear spin systems constituted of quadrupolar nuclei I=3/2 ({sup 23}Na) and I=7/2 ({sup 133}Cs) in lyotropic liquid crystals were used for experimental demonstrations. Specifically, we derived the conditions necessary for accomplishing the analogy, executed the proper experiments, and compared with quantum mechanical prediction for a Bose system. The NMR description in the HP representation could be applied in the future as a workbench for BEC-like systems, where the statistical properties may be obtained using the intermediate statistic, first established by Gentile. The description can be applied for any quadrupolar systems, including new developed solid-state NMR GaAS nanodevices.

  7. PRESTO polarization transfer to quadrupolar nuclei: Implications for dynamic nuclear polarization

    DOE PAGES

    Perras, Frederic A.; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Pruski, Marek

    2015-08-04

    In this study, we show both experimentally and numerically on a series of model systems that in experiments involving transfer of magnetization from 1H to the quadrupolar nuclei under magic-angle-spinning (MAS), the PRESTO technique consistently outperforms traditionally used cross polarization (CP), affording more quantitative intensities, improved lineshapes, better overall sensitivity, and straightforward optimization. This advantage derives from the fact that PRESTO circumvents the convoluted and uncooperative spin dynamics during the CP transfer under MAS, by replacing the spin-locking of quadrupolar nuclei with a single central transition selective 90° pulse and using a symmetry-based recoupling sequence in the 1H channel. Thismore » is important in the context of dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) NMR of quadrupolar nuclei, where the efficient transfer of enhanced 1H polarization is desired to obtain the highest sensitivity.« less

  8. PRESTO polarization transfer to quadrupolar nuclei: Implications for dynamic nuclear polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Perras, Frederic A.; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Pruski, Marek

    2015-08-04

    In this study, we show both experimentally and numerically on a series of model systems that in experiments involving transfer of magnetization from 1H to the quadrupolar nuclei under magic-angle-spinning (MAS), the PRESTO technique consistently outperforms traditionally used cross polarization (CP), affording more quantitative intensities, improved lineshapes, better overall sensitivity, and straightforward optimization. This advantage derives from the fact that PRESTO circumvents the convoluted and uncooperative spin dynamics during the CP transfer under MAS, by replacing the spin-locking of quadrupolar nuclei with a single central transition selective 90° pulse and using a symmetry-based recoupling sequence in the 1H channel. This is important in the context of dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) NMR of quadrupolar nuclei, where the efficient transfer of enhanced 1H polarization is desired to obtain the highest sensitivity.

  9. Cloud feedback - A stabilizing effect for the early earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossow, W. B.; Weinreich, S. K.; Henderson-Sellers, A.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of variations in cloud cover, optical properties, and fractional distribution with altitude on the mean surface temperature of a model of the early earth has been investigated. In all cases examined, cloud-climate feedbacks result in temperatures greater than those in models with no cloud feedbacks. If the model of hydrospheric feedback effects is correct, then cloud feedbacks are as important to the climate as changes in solar luminosity and atmospheric composition during the earth's atmospheric evolution. In particular, the early earth need not become completely ice-covered if strong negative cloud feedbacks occur. However, until a proper understanding of cloud feedbacks is available, conclusions regarding conditions in the early atmosphere must remain in doubt.

  10. Energy landscapes of ion clusters in isotropic quadrupolar and octupolar traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvo, F.; Yurtsever, E.; Wales, D. J.

    2012-01-01

    The energy landscapes of ion clouds confined in isotropic quadrupolar and octupolar traps are characterized for several representative cluster sizes. All clusters exhibit stable multishell structures that belong to separate funnels. Quadrupolar confinement leads to more homogeneous clusters and denser distributions of isomers than octupolar confinement. Statistical analysis of the transition states indicates that the barriers associated with intrashell motion are lower but more asymmetric and more cooperative compared to intershell motion. The relaxation between low-energy funnels with different arrangements of shells mostly exhibits Arrhenius kinetics, with a weak variation of the activation energy at higher temperatures.

  11. Energy landscapes of ion clusters in isotropic quadrupolar and octupolar traps.

    PubMed

    Calvo, F; Yurtsever, E; Wales, D J

    2012-01-14

    The energy landscapes of ion clouds confined in isotropic quadrupolar and octupolar traps are characterized for several representative cluster sizes. All clusters exhibit stable multishell structures that belong to separate funnels. Quadrupolar confinement leads to more homogeneous clusters and denser distributions of isomers than octupolar confinement. Statistical analysis of the transition states indicates that the barriers associated with intrashell motion are lower but more asymmetric and more cooperative compared to intershell motion. The relaxation between low-energy funnels with different arrangements of shells mostly exhibits Arrhenius kinetics, with a weak variation of the activation energy at higher temperatures.

  12. The effects of general relativity on near-earth satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ries, J. C.; Watkins, M. M.; Tapley, B. D.; Huang, C.

    1990-01-01

    Whether one uses a solar system barycentric frame or a geocentric frame when including the general theory of relativity in orbit determination for near-earth satellites, the results should be equivalent to some limiting accuracy. The purpose of this paper is to clarify the effects of relativity in each frame and to demonstrate their equivalence through the analysis of three years of laser tracking data taken on the Lageos satellite. It is demonstrated that the simpler formulation in the geocentric frame is adequate for the purpose of near-earth satellite orbit determination. A correction to the conventional barycentric equations of motion is shown to be required.

  13. The Runaway Greenhouse Effect on Earth and other Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rabbette, Maura; Pilewskie, Peter; McKay, Christopher; Young, Robert

    2001-01-01

    Water vapor is an efficient absorber of outgoing longwave infrared radiation on Earth and is the primary greenhouse gas. Since evaporation increases with increasing sea surface temperature, and the increase in water vapor further increases greenhouse warming, there is a positive feedback. The runaway greenhouse effect occurs if this feedback continues unchecked until all the water has left the surface and enters the atmosphere. For Mars and the Earth the runaway greenhouse was halted when water vapor became saturated with respect to ice or liquid water respectively. However, Venus is considered to be an example of a planet where the runaway greenhouse effect did occur, and it has been speculated that if the solar luminosity were to increase above a certain limit, it would also occur on the Earth. Satellite data acquired during the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) under clear sky conditions shows that as the sea surface temperature (SST) increases, the rate of outgoing infrared radiation at the top of the atmosphere also increases, as expected. Over the pacific warm pool where the SST exceeds 300 K the outgoing radiation emitted to space actually decreases with increasing SST, leading to a potentially unstable system. This behavior is a signature of the runaway greenhouse effect on Earth. However, the SST never exceeds 303K, thus the system has a natural cap which stops the runaway. According to Stefan-Boltzmann's law the amount of heat energy radiated by the Earth's surface is proportional to (T(sup 4)). However, if the planet has a substantial atmosphere, it can absorb all infrared radiation from the lower surface before the radiation penetrates into outer space. Thus, an instrument in space looking at the planet does not detect radiation from the surface. The radiation it sees comes from some level higher up. For the earth#s atmosphere the effective temperature (T(sub e)) has a value of 255 K corresponding to the middle troposphere, above most of the

  14. Low-earth-orbit effects on strength of glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiedlocher, David E.; Tucker, Dennis S.; Nichols, Ron; Kinser, Donald L.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of a 5.8-y exposure to low-earth-orbit environment upon the mechanical properties of five commercial glasses and a low-expansion-coefficient glass-ceramic have been examined. The radiation components of the earth-orbit environment did not degrade the mechanical strength of the samples examined within the limits of experimental error. Statistical problems arising from the low frequency of micrometeorite or space debris impacts upon the samples precluded statistically valid measurement of impacted sample strengths. Upper bounds for the magnitude of the impact event damage upon the strengths for impacted samples have been determined.

  15. A review of ionospheric effects on Earth-space propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klobuchar, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    A short description is given of each ionospheric total electron content (TEC) effect upon radio waves, along with a representative value of the magnitude of each of these effects under normal ionospheric conditions. A discussion is given of the important characteristics of average ionospheric TEC behavior and the temporal and spatial variability of TEC. Radio waves undergo several effects when they pass through the Earth's ionosphere. One of the most important of these effects is a retardation, or group delay, on the modulation or information carried on the radio wave that is due to its encounter with the free, thermal electrons in the Earth's ionosphere. Other effects the ionosphere has on radio waves include: radio frequency (RF) carrier phase advance; Doppler shift of the RF carrier of the radio wave; Faraday rotation of the plane of polarization of linearly polarized waves; angular refraction or bending of the radio wave path as it travels through the ionosphere; and amplitude and phase scintillations.

  16. Dynamic ocean-tide effects on Earth's rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickman, S. R.

    1993-01-01

    This article develops 'broad-band' Liouville equations which are capable of determining the effects on the rotation of the Earth of a periodic excitation even at frequencies as high as semi-diurnal; these equations are then used to predict the rotational effects of altimetric, numerical and 32-constituent spherical harmonic ocean-tide models. The rotational model includes a frequency-dependent decoupled core, the effects of which are especially marked near retrograde diurnal frequencies; and a fully dynamic oceanic response, whose effects appear to be minor despite significant frequency dependence. The model also includes solid-earth effects which are frequency dependent as the result of both anelasticity at long periods and the fluid-core resonance at nearly diurnal periods. The effects of both tidal inertia and relative angular momentum on Earth rotation (polar motion, length of day, 'nutation' and Universal Time) are presented for 32 long- and short-period ocean tides determined as solutions to the author's spherical harmonic tide theory. The lengthening of the Chandler wobble period by the pole tide is also re-computed using the author's full theory. Additionally, using the spherical harmonic theory, tidal currents and their effects on rotation are determined for available numerical and altimetric tide height models. For all models, we find that the effects of tidal currents are at least as important as those of tide height for diurnal and semi-diurnal constituents.

  17. Effects of megascale eruptions on Earth and Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thordarson, T.; Rampino, M.; Keszthelyi, L.P.; Self, S.

    2009-01-01

    Volcanic features are common on geologically active earthlike planets. Megascale or "super" eruptions involving >1000 Gt of magma have occurred on both Earth and Mars in the geologically recent past, introducing prodigious volumes of ash and volcanic gases into the atmosphere. Here we discuss felsic (explosive) and mafi c (flood lava) supereruptions and their potential atmospheric and environmental effects on both planets. On Earth, felsic supereruptions recur on average about every 100-200,000 years and our present knowledge of the 73.5 ka Toba eruption implies that such events can have the potential to be catastrophic to human civilization. A future eruption of this type may require an unprecedented response from humankind to assure the continuation of civilization as we know it. Mafi c supereruptions have resulted in atmospheric injection of volcanic gases (especially SO2) and may have played a part in punctuating the history of life on Earth. The contrast between the more sustained effects of flood basalt eruptions (decades to centuries) and the near-instantaneous effects of large impacts (months to years) is worthy of more detailed study than has been completed to date. Products of mafi c supereruptions, signifi cantly larger than known from the geologic record on Earth, are well preserved on Mars. The volatile emissions from these eruptions most likely had global dispersal, but the effects may not have been outside what Mars endures even in the absence of volcanic eruptions. This is testament to the extreme variability of the current Martian atmosphere: situations that would be considered catastrophic on Earth are the norm on Mars. ?? 2009 The Geological Society of America.

  18. Understanding and prediction of electronic-structure-driven physical behaviors in rare-earth compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paudyal, Durga; Pathak, Arjun K.; Pecharsky, V. K.; Gschneidner, K. A., Jr.

    2013-10-01

    Rare-earth materials, due to their unique magnetic properties, are important for fundamental and technological applications such as advanced magnetic sensors, magnetic data storage, magnetic cooling and permanent magnets. For an understanding of the physical behaviors of these materials, first principles techniques are one of the best theoretical tools to explore the electronic structure and evaluate exchange interactions. However, first principles calculations of the crystal field splitting due to intra-site electron-electron correlations and the crystal environment in the presence of exchange splitting in rare-earth materials are rarely carried out despite the importance of these effects. Here we consider rare-earth dialuminides as model systems and show that the low temperature anomalies observed in these systems are due to the variation of both exchange and crystal field splitting leading to anomalous intra-site correlated-4f and itinerant-5d electronic states near the Fermi level. From calculations supported by experiments we uncover that HoAl2 is unique among rare-earth dialuminides, in that it undergoes a cubic to orthorhombic distortion leading to a spin reorientation. Calculations of a much more extended family of mixed rare-earth dialuminides reveal an additional degree of complexity: the effective quadrupolar moment of the lanthanides changes sign as a function of lanthanide concentration, leading to a change in the sign of the anisotropy constant. At this point the quadrupolar interactions are effectively reduced to zero, giving rise to lattice instability and leading to new phenomena. This study shows a clear picture that accurate evaluation of the exchange, crystal field splitting and shape of the charge densities allows one to understand, predict and control the physical behaviors of rare-earth materials.

  19. Understanding and prediction of electronic-structure-driven physical behaviors in rare-earth compounds.

    PubMed

    Paudyal, Durga; Pathak, Arjun K; Pecharsky, V K; Gschneidner, K A

    2013-10-01

    Rare-earth materials, due to their unique magnetic properties, are important for fundamental and technological applications such as advanced magnetic sensors, magnetic data storage, magnetic cooling and permanent magnets. For an understanding of the physical behaviors of these materials, first principles techniques are one of the best theoretical tools to explore the electronic structure and evaluate exchange interactions. However, first principles calculations of the crystal field splitting due to intra-site electron-electron correlations and the crystal environment in the presence of exchange splitting in rare-earth materials are rarely carried out despite the importance of these effects. Here we consider rare-earth dialuminides as model systems and show that the low temperature anomalies observed in these systems are due to the variation of both exchange and crystal field splitting leading to anomalous intra-site correlated-4f and itinerant-5d electronic states near the Fermi level. From calculations supported by experiments we uncover that HoAl2 is unique among rare-earth dialuminides, in that it undergoes a cubic to orthorhombic distortion leading to a spin reorientation. Calculations of a much more extended family of mixed rare-earth dialuminides reveal an additional degree of complexity: the effective quadrupolar moment of the lanthanides changes sign as a function of lanthanide concentration, leading to a change in the sign of the anisotropy constant. At this point the quadrupolar interactions are effectively reduced to zero, giving rise to lattice instability and leading to new phenomena. This study shows a clear picture that accurate evaluation of the exchange, crystal field splitting and shape of the charge densities allows one to understand, predict and control the physical behaviors of rare-earth materials.

  20. Effects of Long Period Ocean Tides on the Earth's Rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, Richard S.; Chao, Ben F.; Desai, Shailen D.

    1996-01-01

    The spectra of polar motion excitation functions exhibit enhanced power in the fortnightly tidal band. This enhanced power is attributed to ocean tidal excitation. Ocean tide models predict polar motion excitation effects that differ with each other, and with observations, by factors as large as 2-3. There is a need for inproved models for the effect of long-period ocean tides on Earth's rotation.

  1. High resolution heteronuclear correlation NMR spectroscopy between quadrupolar nuclei and protons in the solid state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldbourt, A.; Vinogradov, E.; Goobes, G.; Vega, S.

    2004-08-01

    A high resolution two-dimensional solid state NMR experiment is presented that correlates half-integer quadrupolar spins with protons. In this experiment the quadrupolar nuclei evolve during t1 under a split-t1, FAM-enhanced MQMAS pulse scheme. After each t1 period ending at the MQMAS echo position, single quantum magnetization is transferred, via a cross polarization process in the mixing time, from the quadrupolar nuclei to the protons. High-resolution proton signals are then detected in the t2 time domain during wPMLG5* homonuclear decoupling. The experiment has been demonstrated on a powder sample of sodium citrate and 23Na- 1H 2D correlation spectra have been obtained. From the HETCOR spectra and the regular MQMAS spectrum, the three crystallographically inequivalent Na + sites in the asymmetric unit were assigned. This MQMAS- wPMLG HETCOR pulse sequence can be used for spectral editing of half-integer quadrupolar nuclei coupled to protons.

  2. Earth Impact Effects Program: Estimating the Regional Environmental Consequences of Impacts On Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, G. S.; Melosh, H. J.; Marcus, R. A.

    2009-12-01

    The Earth Impact Effects Program (www.lpl.arizona.edu/impacteffects) is a popular web-based calculator for estimating the regional environmental consequences of a comet or asteroid impact on Earth. It is widely used, both by inquisitive members of the public as an educational device and by scientists as a simple research tool. It applies a variety of scaling laws, based on theory, nuclear explosion test data, observations from terrestrial and extraterrestrial craters and the results of small-scale impact experiments and numerical modelling, to quantify the principal hazards that might affect the people, buildings and landscape in the vicinity of an impact. The program requires six inputs: impactor diameter, impactor density, impact velocity prior to atmospheric entry, impact angle, and the target type (sedimentary rock, crystalline rock, or a water layer above rock), as well as the distance from the impact at which the environmental effects are to be calculated. The program includes simple algorithms for estimating the fate of the impactor during atmospheric traverse, the thermal radiation emitted by the impact plume (fireball) and the intensity of seismic shaking. The program also approximates various dimensions of the impact crater and ejecta deposit, as well as estimating the severity of the air blast in both crater-forming and airburst impacts. We illustrate the strengths and limitations of the program by comparing its predictions (where possible) against known impacts, such as Carancas, Peru (2007); Tunguska, Siberia (1908); Barringer (Meteor) crater, Arizona (ca 49 ka). These tests demonstrate that, while adequate for large impactors, the simple approximation of atmospheric entry in the original program does not properly account for the disruption and dispersal of small impactors as they traverse Earth's atmosphere. We describe recent improvements to the calculator to better describe atmospheric entry of small meteors; the consequences of oceanic impacts; and

  3. The effects of the solid inner core and nonhydrostatic structure on the earth's forced nutations and earth tides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Vries, Dan; Wahr, John M.

    1991-01-01

    This paper computes the effects of the solid inner core (IC) on the forced nutations and earth tides, and on certain of the earth's rotational normal modes. The theoretical results are extended to include the effects of a solid IC and of nonhydrostatic structure. The presence of the IC is responsible for a new, almost diurnal, prograde normal mode which involves a relative rotation between the IC and fluid outer core about an equatorial axis. It is shown that the small size of the IC's effects on both nutations and tides is a consequence of the fact that the IC's moments of inertia are less than 1/1000 of the entire earth's.

  4. Radiative effects of the ozone layer on Snowball Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Y.; Yang, J.

    2011-12-01

    Geochemical and geological evidence suggested that atmospheric oxygen rose from about 2% to about 10% of the present atmospheric level over the period of 750-580 million years ago when several nearly global glaciations or Snowball Earth events formed. The increase in oxygen would lead to an increase in ozone concentration in the atmosphere. Since ozone is a greenhouse gas, changes in ozone concentration would alter surface temperatures. Thus, ozone changes would have important influences on Snowball Earth formation or deglaciation. Previous works for either the initiation or the deglaciation of the hard Snowball Earth have not taken the radiative effects of the ozone layer into account. Here, we study this issue by carrying out simulations using an atmospheric general circulation model with various ozone concentrations and spatial distributions. Simulation results show that as O3 concentration is uniformly reduced from 100% to 50%, the global-mean surface temperature is decreased by approximately 1 K, and the largest decrease is located at the subpolar region, with values up to 3 K. As ozone concentration is reduced, the ozone layer is lowered, and weak ozone transport from the tropics to higher latitudes, surface temperature is decreased by approximately 1 K in the tropics and by about 6 K in polar regions. These results suggest that simulations with the present-day ozone concentration and spatial distributions would overestimate (underestimate) the CO2 threshold required to initiate (terminate) the Snowball Earth.

  5. Earth matter effect on active-sterile neutrino oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acero, Mario A.; Aguilar-Arevalo, Alexis A.; D'Olivo, J. C.

    2011-08-01

    Oscillations between active and sterile neutrinos remain as an open possibility to explain some experimental observations. In a four-neutrino mixing scheme, we use the Magnus expansion of the evolution operator to study the evolution of neutrino flavor amplitudes within the Earth. We apply this formalism to calculate the transition probabilities from active to sterile neutrinos taking into account the matter effect for a varying terrestrial density.

  6. Magnetostatic Effects in the Nucleation of Rare Earth Ferromagnetic Phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durfee, C. S.; Flynn, C. P.

    2001-07-01

    It has been reported that superheating, supercooling, and explosive kinetics coupled to other degrees of freedom occur at the ferromagnetic transitions of Er and Dy, and that metastable phases occur during the transition kinetics of Er. We explain these observations in terms of magnetostatic energy, which requires highly eccentric nuclei in the homogeneous nucleation of magnetic transitions in heavy rare earths. The magnetostatics favor transitions through ferrimagnetic intermediaries. The unusual kinetics derive from effective spin lattice relaxation.

  7. Magnetostatic Effects in the Nucleation of Rare Earth Ferromagnetic Phases

    SciTech Connect

    Durfee, C. S.; Flynn, C. P.

    2001-07-30

    It has been reported that superheating, supercooling, and explosive kinetics coupled to other degrees of freedom occur at the ferromagnetic transitions of Er and Dy, and that metastable phases occur during the transition kinetics of Er. We explain these observations in terms of magnetostatic energy, which requires highly eccentric nuclei in the homogeneous nucleation of magnetic transitions in heavy rare earths. The magnetostatics favor transitions through ferrimagnetic intermediaries. The unusual kinetics derive from effective spin lattice relaxation.

  8. On the tidal effects in the motion of earth satellites and the love parameters of the earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musen, P.; Estes, R.

    1972-01-01

    The tidal effects in the motion of artificial satellites are studied to determine the elastic properties of the earth as they are observed from extraterrestrial space. Considering Love numbers, the disturbing potential is obtained as the analytical continuation of the tidal potential from the surface of the earth into-outer space, with parameters which characterize the earth's elastic response to tidal attraction by the moon and the sun. It is concluded that the tidal effects represent a superposition of a large number of periodic terms, and the rotation of the lunar orbital plane produces a term of 18 years period in tidal perturbations of the ascending node of the satellite's orbit.

  9. Anomalous Hall Effect in a Feromagnetic Rare-Earth Cobalite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samoilov, A. V.; Yeh, N. C.; Vasquez, R. P.

    1996-01-01

    Rare-Earth manganites and cobalites with the perovskite structure have been a subject of great recent interest because their electrical resistance changes significantly when a magnetic field is applied...we have studied the Hall effect in thin film La(sub 0.5)Ca(sub 0.5)CoO(sub 3) material and have obtained convincing evidence fo the so called anomalous Hall effect, typical for magnetic metals...Our results suggest that near the ferromagnetic ordering temperature, the dominant electron scattering mechanism is the spin fluctuation.

  10. Indirect measurement of N-14 quadrupolar coupling for NH3 intercalated in potassium graphite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsang, T.; Fronko, R. M.; Resing, H. A.

    1987-01-01

    A method for indirect measurement of the nuclear quadrupolar coupling was developed and applied to NH3 molecules in the graphite intercalation compound K(NH3)4.3C24, which has a layered structure with alternating carbon and intercalant layers. Three triplets were observed in the H-1 NMR spectra of the compound. The value of the N-14 quadrupolar coupling constant of NH3 (3.7 MHz), determined indirectly from the H-1 NMR spectra, was intermediate between the gas value of 4.1 MHz and the solid-state value of 3.2 MHz. The method was also used to deduce the (H-1)-(H-1) and (N-14)-(H-1) dipolar interactions, the H-1 chemical shifts, and the molecular orientations and motions of NH3.

  11. Magnus Effect on a Spinning Satellite in Low Earth Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramjatan, Sahadeo; Fitz-Coy, Norman; Yew, Alvin Garwai

    2016-01-01

    A spinning body in a flow field generates an aerodynamic lift or Magnus effect that displaces the body in a direction normal to the freestream flow. Earth orbiting satellites with substantial body rotation in appreciable atmospheric densities may generate a Magnus force to perturb orbital dynamics. We investigate the feasibility of using this effect for spacecraft at a perigee of 80km using the Systems Tool Kit (STK). Results show that for a satellite of reasonable properties, the Magnus effect doubles the amount of time in orbit. Orbital decay was greatly mitigated for satellites spinning at 10000 and 15000RPM. This study demonstrates that the Magnus effect has the potential to sustain a spacecraft's orbit at a low perigee altitude and could also serve as an orbital maneuver capability.

  12. Fundamental measure density functional theory study of liquid-vapor interface of dipolar and quadrupolar fluids.

    PubMed

    Warshavsky, V B; Zeng, X C

    2013-10-01

    We have studied interfacial structure and properties of liquid-vapor interfaces of dipolar fluids and quadrupolar fluids, respectively, using the classical density functional theory (DFT). Towards this end, we employ the fundamental measure DFT for a reference hard-sphere (HS) part of free energy and the modified mean field approximation for the correlation function of dipolar or quadrupolar fluid. At low temperatures we find that both the liquid-vapor interfacial density profile and orientational order parameter profile exhibit weakly damped oscillatory decay into the bulk liquid. At high temperatures the decay of interfacial density and order parameter profiles is entirely monotonic. The scaled temperature τ = 1 - T/T(c) that separates the two qualitatively different interfacial structures is in the range 0.10-0.15. At a given (dimensionless) temperature, increasing the dipolar or quadrupolar moment enhances the density oscillations. Application of an electric field (normal to the interface) will damp the oscillations. Likewise, at the given temperature, increasing the strength of any multipolar moment also increases the surface tensions while increasing the strength of the applied electric field will reduce the surface tensions. The results are compared with those based on the local-density approximations (LDA) for the reference HS part of free energy as well as with results of numerical experiments.

  13. Fate of Earth Microbes on Mars: UV Radiation Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cockell, Charles

    2000-01-01

    A radiative transfer model is used to quantitatively investigate aspects of the martian ultraviolet radiation environment. Biological action spectra for DNA inactivation are used to estimate biologically effective irradiances for the martian surface under cloudless skies. Although the present-day martian UV flux is similar to early earth and thus may not be a limitation to life in the evolutionary context, it is a constraint to an unadapted biota and will rapidly kill spacecraft-borne microbes not covered by a martian dust layer. Here calculations for loss of microbial viability on the Pathfinder and Polar lander spacecraft are presented and the effects of martian dust on loss of viability are discussed. Details of the radiative transfer model are presented.

  14. Fate of Earth Microbes on Mars -- UV Radiation Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cockell, Charles

    2000-01-01

    A radiative transfer model is used to quantitatively investigate aspects of the martian ultraviolet radiation environment. Biological action spectra for DNA inactivation are used to estimate biologically effective irradiances for the martian surface under cloudless skies. Although the present-day martian UV flux is similar to early earth and thus may not be a limitation to life in the evolutionary context, it is a constraint to an unadapted biota and will rapidly kill spacecraft-borne microbes not covered by a martian dust layer. Here calculations for loss of microbial viability on the Pathfinder and Polar lander spacecraft are presented and the effects of martian dust on loss of viability are discussed. Details of the radiative transfer model are presented.

  15. Accretion-driven gravitational radiation from nonrotating compact objects: Infalling quadrupolar shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagar, Alessandro; Díaz, Guillermo; Pons, José A.; Font, José A.

    2004-06-01

    This paper reports results from numerical simulations of the gravitational radiation emitted from non-rotating compact objects (both neutron stars and Schwarzschild black holes) as a result of the accretion of matter. We adopt a hybrid procedure in which we evolve numerically, and assuming axisymmetry, the linearized equations describing metric and fluid perturbations coupled to a fully nonlinear hydrodynamics code that calculates the motion of the accreting matter. The initial matter distribution, which is initially at rest, is shaped in the form of extended quadrupolar shells of either dust or obeying a perfect fluid equation of state. Self-gravity of the accreting layers of fluid is neglected, as well as radiation reaction effects. We use this idealized setup in order to understand the qualitative features appearing in the energy spectrum of the gravitational wave emission from compact stars or black holes, subject to accretion processes involving extended objects. A comparison for the case of point-like particles falling radially onto black holes is also provided. Our results show that, when the central object is a black hole, the spectrum is far from having only one clear, monochromatic peak at the frequency of the fundamental quasi-normal mode. On the contrary, it shows a complex pattern, with distinctive interference fringes produced by the interaction between the infalling matter and the underlying perturbed spacetime, in close agreement with results for point-like particles. Remarkably, most of the energy is emitted at frequencies lower than that of the fundamental mode of the black hole. Similar results are obtained for extended shells accreting onto neutron stars, but in this case the contribution of the stellar fundamental mode stands clearly in the energy spectrum. Our analysis illustrates that the gravitational wave signal driven by accretion onto compact objects is influenced more by the details and dynamics of the process, and the external

  16. Effects of Fe spin transition in the Earth's lower mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speziale, S.; Lee, V. E.; Clark, S. M.; Pasternak, M. P.; Jeanloz, R.

    2005-12-01

    Knowing the properties of the Earth's lower-mantle minerals is crucial for interpreting seismological and other geophysical observations, and hence understanding the constitution, state and evolution of this region that makes up the bulk of our planet's interior. The behavior of Fe, the most abundant transition element, is especially important at deep-Earth conditions, with past work predicting that it should collapse in size due to a transition from high-spin (HS) to low-spin (LS) configurations at mantle pressures. Recent experimental observations of the Fe spin transition in both (Mg,Fe)SiO3-perovskite and ferropericlase (Mg,Fe)O at high-pressure impact our understanding of the stability, chemical partitioning and transport properties of the two most abundant minerals of the Earth's mantle. We focus on the structural and density effect of the high-spin to low-spin transition in ferropericlase (Mg1-x,Fex)O by performing high-pressure x-ray diffraction experiments on compositions (x < 0.25) relevant to the lower mantle. We obtain high-resolution measurements by simultaneously monitoring the unit-cell volumes of our target sample along with those of a different composition of (Mg,Fe)O that shows the spin transition at higher pressures. Our new results, compared with previous Mossbauer data on a large range of (Mg,Fe)O compositions, confirm that the transition is gradual with pressure at room temperature, and it involves an overall 3 ± 1% volume decrease over a pressure range starting at 40 GPa and extending up to as much as 80 GPa. By combining our results with those of independent studies of comparable compositions [Lin et al., Science, 2005], we infer a 6 ± 1% increase of the bulk sound velocity, which could cause visible seismic anomalies in regions of the lower mantle. In addition to the change in density at the spin transition, more fundamental issues emerge from our and other groups' results. The coexistence of HSFe and LSFe species poses questions about

  17. Effect of rare-earth chromites on sintering of magnesia

    SciTech Connect

    Kashcheev, I.D.

    1994-09-01

    The effect of neodymium, cerium, lanthanum, and ytrrium chromites, added in amounts of not more than 8%, on the sintering of magnesia in air and in vacuum has been studied. On addition of rare-earth chromites, the initial magnesia is sintered to a density of 0.98. By their sintering action, these chromites fall into the following sequence: neodymium chromite-lanthanum chromite-yttrium chromite-cerium chromite. The highest density (0.98-0.99) and the lowest porosity (1-2%) are obtained on addition of 2% of neodymium chromite to magnesia. The process of sintering of magnesia is accompanied by an increase in the size of periclase crystals from 12 to 38-56 {mu}m.

  18. Effects of the Rare Earth Cerium on Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Sobek, Joseph M.; Talburt, Dwight E.

    1968-01-01

    The rare earth cerium was found to bind rapidly to Escherichia coli. Cerium inhibited oxygen uptake in the presence of glucose as well as the endogenous respiration of glucose-grown cells. For a cell concentration of 4 mg per ml, maximal inhibition was obtained at 120 μg per ml. Greater concentrations did not increase the inhibitory effect. Cerium inhibited 14CO2 evolution and 14C uptake from uniformly labeled glucose. Marked changes in the distribution of 14C incorporated into different chemical fractions of the cell were noted. The most striking changes occurred in the alcohol- and alcohol ether-soluble fractions, in which the 14C activity was increased 5- to 20-fold in the presence of cerium. PMID:4866102

  19. Lunar effects on close encounters of hungaria asteroids and near-Earth asteroids with the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazso, A.; Galiazzo, M.

    2012-12-01

    The Earth is target to many celestial objects, among them Near Earth Asteroids (NEA) play a significant role. Different dynamical groups have been found, the source of these asteroids is mainly the main belt and, in particular the Hungaria group. We carry out a statistical investigation by numerical integration of the motion of real asteroids and their hypothetical clones in a simplified dynamical model of the solar system up to 100 My. In a first part we present integrations of existing Hungaria asteroids to determine which of them could become NEAs. Then the influence of the Moon on the orbits of these NEAs is investigated. The main goal is to find the frequency of close encounters and deflection angles due to them, possible impacts and the strength of deflection by the Moon.

  20. Oxidation Effects in Rare Earth Doped Topological Insulator Thin Films.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, A I; van der Laan, G; Harrison, S E; Cibin, G; Hesjedal, T

    2016-01-01

    The breaking of time-reversal symmetry (TRS) in topological insulators is a prerequisite for unlocking their exotic properties and for observing the quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE). The incorporation of dopants which exhibit magnetic long-range order is the most promising approach for TRS-breaking. REBiTe3, wherein 50% of the Bi is substitutionally replaced by a RE atom (RE = Gd, Dy, and Ho), is a predicted QAHE system. Despite the low solubility of REs in bulk crystals of a few %, highly doped thin films have been demonstrated, which are free of secondary phases and of high crystalline quality. Here we study the effects of exposure to atmosphere of rare earth-doped Bi2(Se, Te)3 thin films using x-ray absorption spectroscopy. We demonstrate that these RE dopants are all trivalent and effectively substitute for Bi(3+) in the Bi2(Se, Te)3 matrix. We find an unexpected high degree of sample oxidation for the most highly doped samples, which is not restricted to the surface of the films. In the low-doping limit, the RE-doped films mostly show surface oxidation, which can be prevented by surface passivation, encapsulation, or in-situ cleaving to recover the topological surface state. PMID:26956771

  1. Mixed alkaline earth effect in the compressibility of aluminosilicate glasses.

    PubMed

    Smedskjaer, Morten M; Rzoska, Sylwester J; Bockowski, Michal; Mauro, John C

    2014-02-01

    The mixed modifier effect (MME) in oxide glasses manifests itself as a non-additive variation in certain properties when one modifier oxide species is substituted by another one at constant total modifier content. However, the structural and topological origins of the MME are still under debate. This study provides new insights into the MME by investigating the effect of isostatic compression on density and hardness of mixed MgO/CaO sodium aluminosilicate glasses. This is done using a specially designed setup allowing isostatic compression of bulk glass samples up to 1 GPa at elevated temperature. A mixed alkaline earth effect is found in the compressibility and relative change of hardness, viz., a local maximum of density as a function of Mg/Ca ratio appears following compression, whereas a local minimum of hardness in the uncompressed glasses nearly disappears after compression. Moreover, the densification of these glasses is found to occur at temperatures much below the glass transition temperature, indicating that a non-viscous mechanism is at play. This is further supported by the fact that density relaxes in a stretched exponential manner upon subsequent annealing at ambient pressure with an exponent of ∼0.62. This is close to the Phillips value of 3/5 for relaxation in three dimensions when both short- and long-range interactions are activated.

  2. Oxidation Effects in Rare Earth Doped Topological Insulator Thin Films

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa, A. I.; van der Laan, G.; Harrison, S. E.; Cibin, G.; Hesjedal, T.

    2016-01-01

    The breaking of time-reversal symmetry (TRS) in topological insulators is a prerequisite for unlocking their exotic properties and for observing the quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE). The incorporation of dopants which exhibit magnetic long-range order is the most promising approach for TRS-breaking. REBiTe3, wherein 50% of the Bi is substitutionally replaced by a RE atom (RE = Gd, Dy, and Ho), is a predicted QAHE system. Despite the low solubility of REs in bulk crystals of a few %, highly doped thin films have been demonstrated, which are free of secondary phases and of high crystalline quality. Here we study the effects of exposure to atmosphere of rare earth-doped Bi2(Se, Te)3 thin films using x-ray absorption spectroscopy. We demonstrate that these RE dopants are all trivalent and effectively substitute for Bi3+ in the Bi2(Se, Te)3 matrix. We find an unexpected high degree of sample oxidation for the most highly doped samples, which is not restricted to the surface of the films. In the low-doping limit, the RE-doped films mostly show surface oxidation, which can be prevented by surface passivation, encapsulation, or in-situ cleaving to recover the topological surface state. PMID:26956771

  3. A Conduction Cooled High Temperature Superconductor Quadrupolar Superferric Magnet, Design and Construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrin, I.; Morega, A. M.; Nedelcu, A.; Morega, M.; Neamtu, J.

    2014-05-01

    The paper presents the prototype of an YBCO superferric quadrupolar magnet for high gradient magnetic field generation, design and construction. The temperature of the superconducting coil has to be kept within safe limits or the HTS would exit the superconductive state. Of particular concern is the "warm" beam tube that passes through the magnet. Cryogenic conduction cooling with a closed cycle G-M Cooler may ensure the removal of the ambient heat influx. Numerical simulation results on the magnetic field and heat transfer problems are then discussed. The computational domain is abstracted out of the CAD design of the system. The design solution is presented and compared with the numerical simulations results.

  4. Magnetic dipolar and quadrupolar transitions in two-electron atoms under exponential-cosine-screened Coulomb potential

    SciTech Connect

    Modesto-Costa, Lucas; Canuto, Sylvio; Mukherjee, Prasanta K.

    2015-03-15

    A detailed investigation of the magnetic dipolar and quadrupolar excitation energies and transition probabilities of helium isoelectronic He, Be{sup 2+}, C{sup 4+}, and O{sup 6+} have been performed under exponential cosine screened Coulomb potential generated in a plasma environment. The low-lying excited states 1s{sup 2}:{sup 1}S{sup e} → 1sns:{sup 3}S{sup e}{sub 0}, and 1snp:{sup 3}P{sup o}{sub 2} (n = 2, 3, 4, and 5) are considered. The variational time-dependent coupled Hartree-Fock scheme has been used. The effect of the confinement produced by the potential on the structural properties is investigated for increasing coupling strength of the plasma. It is noted that there is a gradual destabilization of the energy of the system with the reduction of the ionization potential and the number of excited states. The effect of the screening enhancement on the excitation energies and transition probabilities has also been investigated and the results compared with those available for the free systems and under the simple screened Coulomb potential.

  5. Laboratory simulation of Low Earth Orbit (LEO) atomic oxygen effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caledonia, George E.; Krech, Robert H.; Oakes, David B.

    1994-01-01

    A pulsed fast oxygen atom source has been used extensively over the last 7 years to investigate the effects of ambient oxygen atoms impacting materials placed in low Earth orbit. In this period, we irradiated well over 2000 material samples with 8 km/s oxygen atoms generated in our source. Typical irradiance level is 3 x 10(exp 20) O atoms/sq cm although some materials have been irradiated to fluence levels as high as 6 x 10(exp 21) O atoms/sq cm. The operating principles and characteristics of our source are reviewed along with diagnostic and handling procedures appropriate to material testing. Representative data is presented on the velocity dependence of oxygen atom erosion rates (the PSI source provides oxygen atoms tunable over the velocity range of 5 to 12 km/s) as well as the dependence on material temperature. Specific examples of non-linear oxidative effects related to surface contamination and test duration are also be provided.

  6. Effects of the low Earth orbital environment on spacecraft materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leger, L. J.

    1986-01-01

    It is evident from space flights during the last three years that the low Earth orbital (LEO) environment interacts with spacecraft surfaces in significant ways. One manifestation of these interactions is recession of, in particular, organic-polymer-based surfaces presumably due to oxidation by atomic oxygen, the major component of the LEO environment. Three experiments have been conducted on Space Shuttle flights 5, 8 and 41-G to measure reaction rates and the effects of various parameters on reaction rates. Surface recession on these flights indicates reaction efficiencies approximately 3 x 10(-24) cu cm/atoms for unfilled organic polymers. Of the metals, silver and osmium are very reactive. Effects on spacecraft or experiment surfaces can be evaluated using the derived reaction efficiencies and a definition of the total exposure to atomic oxygen. This exposure is obtained using an ambient density model, solar activity data and spacecraft parameters of altitude, attitude and operational date. Oxygen flux on a given surface is obtained from the ambient density and spacecraft velocity and can then be integrated to provide the total exposure or fluence. Such information can be generated using simple computational programs and can be converted to various formats. Overall, the extent of damage is strongly dependent on the type of surface and total exposure time.

  7. 5f delocalization-induced suppression of quadrupolar order in U(Pd1-xPtx)₃

    DOE PAGES

    Walker, H. C.; Le, M. D.; McEwen, K. A.; Bleckmann, M.; Süllow, S.; Mazzoli, C.; Wilkins, S. B.; Fort, D.

    2011-12-27

    We present bulk magnetic and transport measurements and x-ray resonant scattering measurements on U(Pd1-xPtx)₃ for x=0.005 and 0.01, which demonstrate the high sensitivity of the quadrupolar order in the canonical antiferroquadrupolar ordered system UPd₃ to doping with platinum. Bulk measurements for x=0.005 reveal behavior similar to that seen in UPd₃, albeit at a lower temperature, and x-ray resonant scattering provides evidence of quadrupolar order described by the Qxy order parameter. In contrast, bulk measurements reveal only an indistinct transition in x=0.01, consistent with the observation of short-range quadrupolar order in our x-ray resonant scattering results.

  8. A study of isotropic-nematic transition of quadrupolar Gay-Berne fluid using density-functional theory approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Ram Chandra; Ram, Jokhan

    2011-11-01

    The effects of quadrupole moments on the isotropic-nematic (IN) phase transitions are studied using the density-functional theory (DFT) for a Gay-Berne (GB) fluid for a range of length-to-breadth parameters ? in the reduced temperature range ? . The pair-correlation functions of the isotropic phase, which enter into the DFT as input parameters are found by solving the Percus-Yevick integral equation theory. The method used involves an expansion of angle-dependent functions appearing in the integral equations in terms of spherical harmonics and the harmonic coefficients are obtained by an iterative algorithm. All the terms of harmonic coefficients which involve l indices up to less than or equal to 6 are considered. The numerical accuracy of the results depends on the number of spherical harmonic coefficients considered for each orientation-dependent function. As the length-to-breadth ratio of quadrupolar GB molecules is increased, the IN transition is seen to move to lower density (and pressure) at a given temperature. It has been observed that the DFT is good to study the IN transitions in such fluids. The theoretical results have also been compared with the computer simulation results wherever they are available.

  9. A NON-RADIAL ERUPTION IN A QUADRUPOLAR MAGNETIC CONFIGURATION WITH A CORONAL NULL

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Xudong; Hoeksema, J. Todd; Liu Yang; Hayashi, Keiji; Chen Qingrong

    2012-10-01

    We report one of the several homologous non-radial eruptions from NOAA active region (AR) 11158 that are strongly modulated by the local magnetic field as observed with the Solar Dynamic Observatory. A small bipole emerged in the sunspot complex and subsequently created a quadrupolar flux system. Nonlinear force-free field extrapolation from vector magnetograms reveals its energetic nature: the fast-shearing bipole accumulated {approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 31} erg free energy (10% of AR total) over just one day despite its relatively small magnetic flux (5% of AR total). During the eruption, the ejected plasma followed a highly inclined trajectory, over 60 Degree-Sign with respect to the radial direction, forming a jet-like, inverted-Y-shaped structure in its wake. Field extrapolation suggests complicated magnetic connectivity with a coronal null point, which is favorable of reconnection between different flux components in the quadrupolar system. Indeed, multiple pairs of flare ribbons brightened simultaneously, and coronal reconnection signatures appeared near the inferred null. Part of the magnetic setting resembles that of a blowout-type jet; the observed inverted-Y structure likely outlines the open field lines along the separatrix surface. Owing to the asymmetrical photospheric flux distribution, the confining magnetic pressure decreases much faster horizontally than upward. This special field geometry likely guided the non-radial eruption during its initial stage.

  10. Volume dependence of landslide effective friction on Earth and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangeney, A.; Lucas, A.; Ampuero, J. P.

    2012-12-01

    One of the ultimate goals in landslides hazard assessment is to predict their maximum extension along the slope (runout distance) and their velocity. Despite the great amount of work already devoted to this issue, main questions are still open on the physical processes at work in these granular flows at the natural scale. In particular, field observations show that some landslides may travel over unexpectedly long distances, suggesting a very low mean dissipation during their flow. On the other hand, numerical simulation of real landslides often necessitates the assumption of very small friction coefficient to reproduce the extension of their deposits. Field observations show that the so-called Heim coefficient (i. e. the ratio between the difference of the height of the initial mass and that of the deposit, and the traveling distance) decreases with increasing volume, for landslides observed on Earth and on other planets. Whether this coefficient represents an estimate of the mean effective friction during the flow is still a controversial issue. We show here, using analytical and numerical solutions of granular flows over sloping beds and field observations, that the Heim ratio does not represent the effective friction coefficient. We propose another way to estimate this coefficient from field data. Using this new method, we show that the friction coefficient indeed decreases with increasing volume, but in a different way than that predicted by the Heim coefficient. Numerical simulation of natural landslides on real topography corroborates the volume dependence of the effective friction coefficient. These simulations are used to investigate different processes that may be at the origin of this mean friction weakening with increasing volume.

  11. Effects of differentiation on the geodynamics of the early Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piccolo, Andrea; Kaus, Boris; White, Richard; Johnson, Tim

    2016-04-01

    Archean geodynamic processes are not well understood, but there is general agreement that the mantle potential temperature was higher than present, and that as a consequence significant amounts of melt were produced both in the mantle and any overlying crust. This has likely resulted in crustal differentiation. An early attempt to model the geodynamic effects of differentiation was made by Johnson et al. (2014), who used numerical modeling to investigate the crust production and recycling in conjunction with representative phase diagrams (based on the inferred chemical composition of the primary melt in accordance with the Archean temperature field). The results of the simulations show that the base of the over-thickened primary basaltic crust becomes gravitational unstable due to the mineral assemblage changes. This instability leads to the dripping of dense material into the mantle, which causes an asthenospheric return flow, local partial melting and new primary crust generation that is rapidly recycled in to mantle. Whereas they gave important insights, the previous simulations were simplified in a number of aspects: 1) the rheology employed was viscous, and both elasticity and pressure-dependent plasticity were not considered; 2) extracted mantle melts were 100% transformed into volcanic rocks, whereas on the present day Earth only about 20-30% are volcanic and the remainder is plutonic; 3) the effect of a free surface was not studied in a systematic manner. In order to better understand how these simplifications affect the geodynamic models, we here present additional simulations to study the effects of each of these parameters. Johnson, T.E., Brown, M., Kaus, B., and VanTongeren, J.A., 2014, Delamination and recycling of Archaean crust caused by gravitational instabilities: Nature Geoscience, v. 7, no. 1, p. 47-52, doi: 10.1038/NGEO2019.

  12. Earth curvature and atmospheric refraction effects on radar signal propagation.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2013-01-01

    The earth isnt flat, and radar beams dont travel straight. This becomes more noticeable as range increases, particularly at shallow depression/grazing angles. This report explores models for characterizing this behavior.

  13. Atmospheric effects on measurements of distance to Earth artificial satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kablak, N.; Klimyk, V.; Shvalagin, I.; Kablak, U.

    2005-06-01

    This paper is devoted to the problem of accuracy increasing in allowing for Earth's atmosphere influences on results of daily ranging observations of the Earth artificial satellites (ASE). Atmosphere delays and their spatial-timely variations for spherical-symmetrical and nonspherical models of atmosphere were determined radiosounding data gathered during a year in Ukraine region using, developed valuing and analysis of models reductions to over of atmosphere, which recommended of IERS for processing distance-ranging observations of the Earth artificial satellites. Investigated and improved models of reductions to over of the atmosphere on the basis of discovered regional and local peculiarity's of influence atmosphere on the laser and radio ranging observations of the Earth artificial satellites.

  14. Effects of simulated rare earth recycling wastewaters on biological nitrification

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, Yoshiko; Barnes, Joni; Eslamimanesh, Ali; Lencka, Malgorzata M.; Anderko, Andrzej; Riman, Richard E.; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2015-07-16

    Current efforts to increase domestic availability of rare-earth element (REE) supplies by recycling and expanded ore processing efforts will result in increased generation of associated wastewaters. In some cases disposal to a sewage treatment plant may be favored but plant performance must be maintained. To assess the potential effects of such wastewaters on biological wastewater treatment, model nitrifying organisms Nitrosomonas europaea and Nitrobacter winogradskyi were exposed to simulated wastewaters containing varying levels of yttrium or europium (10, 50 and 100 ppm), and the REE extractant tributyl phosphate (TBP, at 0.1 g/L). Y and Eu additions above 10 ppm inhibited N. europaea activity, even when initially virtually all of the REE was insoluble. The provision of TBP together with Eu increased inhibition of nitrite production by the N. europaea, although TBP alone did not substantially alter nitrifying activity N. winogradskyi was more sensitive to the stimulated wastewaters, with even 10 ppm Eu or Y inducing significant inhibition, and a complete shutdown of nitrifying activity occurred in the presence of the TBP. To analyze the availability of REEs in aqueous solutions, REE solubility has been calculated using the previously developed MSE (Mixed-Solvent Electrolyte) thermodynamic model. The model calculations reveal a strong pH dependence of solubility, which is typically controlled by the precipitation of REE hydroxides but may also be influenced by the formation of a phosphate phase.

  15. Effects of Simulated Rare Earth Recycling Wastewaters on Biological Nitrification.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Yoshiko; Barnes, Joni; Eslamimanesh, Ali; Lencka, Malgorzata M; Anderko, Andrzej; Riman, Richard E; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2015-08-18

    Increasing rare earth element (REE) supplies by recycling and expanded ore processing will result in generation of new wastewaters. In some cases, disposal to a sewage treatment plant may be favored, but plant performance must be maintained. To assess the potential effects of such wastewaters on biological treatment, model nitrifying organisms Nitrosomonas europaea and Nitrobacter winogradskyi were exposed to simulated wastewaters containing varying levels of yttrium or europium (10, 50, and 100 ppm), and the extractant tributyl phosphate (TBP, at 0.1 g/L). Y and Eu additions at 50 and 100 ppm inhibited N. europaea, even when virtually all of the REE was insoluble. Provision of TBP with Eu increased N. europaea inhibition, although TBP alone did not substantially alter activity. For N. winogradskyi cultures, Eu or Y additions at all tested levels induced significant inhibition, and nitrification shut down completely with TBP addition. REE solubility was calculated using the previously developed MSE (Mixed-Solvent Electrolyte) thermodynamic model. The model calculations reveal a strong pH dependence of solubility, typically controlled by the precipitation of REE hydroxides but also likely affected by the formation of unknown phosphate phases, which determined aqueous concentrations experienced by the microorganisms. PMID:26132866

  16. Effects of simulated rare earth recycling wastewaters on biological nitrification

    DOE PAGES

    Fujita, Yoshiko; Barnes, Joni; Eslamimanesh, Ali; Lencka, Malgorzata M.; Anderko, Andrzej; Riman, Richard E.; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2015-07-16

    Current efforts to increase domestic availability of rare-earth element (REE) supplies by recycling and expanded ore processing efforts will result in increased generation of associated wastewaters. In some cases disposal to a sewage treatment plant may be favored but plant performance must be maintained. To assess the potential effects of such wastewaters on biological wastewater treatment, model nitrifying organisms Nitrosomonas europaea and Nitrobacter winogradskyi were exposed to simulated wastewaters containing varying levels of yttrium or europium (10, 50 and 100 ppm), and the REE extractant tributyl phosphate (TBP, at 0.1 g/L). Y and Eu additions above 10 ppm inhibited N.more » europaea activity, even when initially virtually all of the REE was insoluble. The provision of TBP together with Eu increased inhibition of nitrite production by the N. europaea, although TBP alone did not substantially alter nitrifying activity N. winogradskyi was more sensitive to the stimulated wastewaters, with even 10 ppm Eu or Y inducing significant inhibition, and a complete shutdown of nitrifying activity occurred in the presence of the TBP. To analyze the availability of REEs in aqueous solutions, REE solubility has been calculated using the previously developed MSE (Mixed-Solvent Electrolyte) thermodynamic model. The model calculations reveal a strong pH dependence of solubility, which is typically controlled by the precipitation of REE hydroxides but may also be influenced by the formation of a phosphate phase.« less

  17. Effects of Simulated Rare Earth Recycling Wastewaters on Biological Nitrification.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Yoshiko; Barnes, Joni; Eslamimanesh, Ali; Lencka, Malgorzata M; Anderko, Andrzej; Riman, Richard E; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2015-08-18

    Increasing rare earth element (REE) supplies by recycling and expanded ore processing will result in generation of new wastewaters. In some cases, disposal to a sewage treatment plant may be favored, but plant performance must be maintained. To assess the potential effects of such wastewaters on biological treatment, model nitrifying organisms Nitrosomonas europaea and Nitrobacter winogradskyi were exposed to simulated wastewaters containing varying levels of yttrium or europium (10, 50, and 100 ppm), and the extractant tributyl phosphate (TBP, at 0.1 g/L). Y and Eu additions at 50 and 100 ppm inhibited N. europaea, even when virtually all of the REE was insoluble. Provision of TBP with Eu increased N. europaea inhibition, although TBP alone did not substantially alter activity. For N. winogradskyi cultures, Eu or Y additions at all tested levels induced significant inhibition, and nitrification shut down completely with TBP addition. REE solubility was calculated using the previously developed MSE (Mixed-Solvent Electrolyte) thermodynamic model. The model calculations reveal a strong pH dependence of solubility, typically controlled by the precipitation of REE hydroxides but also likely affected by the formation of unknown phosphate phases, which determined aqueous concentrations experienced by the microorganisms.

  18. Observations and Effects of Dipolarization Fronts Observed in Earth's Magnetotail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, Melvyn L.

    2011-01-01

    Dipolarization fronts in Earth's magnetotail are characterized by sharp jumps in magnetic field, a drop in density, and often follow earthward fast plasma flow. They are commonly detected near the equatorial plane of Earth s tail plasma sheet. Sometimes, but not always, dipolarization fronts are associated with global substorms and auroral brightenings. Both Cluster, THEMIS, and other spacecraft have detected dipolarization fronts in a variety of locations in the magnetotail. Using multi-spacecraft analyses together with simulations, we have investigated the propagation and evolution of some dipolarization events. We have also investigated the acceleration of electrons and ions that results from such magnetic-field changes. In some situations, the velocities of fast earthward flows are comparable to the Alfven speed, indicating that the flow bursts might have been generated by bursty reconnection that occurred tailward of the spacecraft. Based on multi-spacecraft timing analysis, dipolarization fronts are found to propagate mainly earthward at 160-335 km/s and have thicknesses of 900-1500 km, which corresponds to the ion inertial length or gyroradius scale. Following the passage of dipolarization fronts, significant fluctuations are observed in the x and y components of the magnetic field. These peaks in the magnetic field come approximately 1-2 minutes after passage of the dipolarization front. These Bx and By fluctuations propagate primarily dawnward and earthward. Field-aligned electron beams are observed coincident with those magnetic field fluctuations. Non-Maxwellian electron and ion distributions are observed that are associated with the dipolarization that may be unstable to a range of electrostatic and/or whistler instabilities. Enhanced electrostatic broadband noise at frequencies below and near the lower-hybrid frequency is also observed at or very close to these fronts. This broadband noise is thought to play a role in further energizing the particles

  19. Effects of Low Earth Orbit on Docking Seal Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imka, Emily C.; Asmar, Olivia C.; deGroh, Henry C., III; Banks, Bruce A.

    2014-01-01

    Spacecraft docking seals are typically made of silicone elastomers. When such seals are exposed to low Earth orbit (LEO) conditions, they can suffer damage from ultraviolet (UV) radiation and atomic oxygen (AO, or monoatomic oxygen, the predominant oxygen species in LEO). An experiment flew on the International Space Station (ISS) to measure the effects of LEO on seal materials S0383-70 and ELA-SA-401 and various mating counterface materials which included anodized aluminum. Samples flown in different orientations received different amounts of UV and AO. The hypotheses were that most of the damage would be from UV, and 10 days or more of exposure in LEO would badly damage the seals. Eighteen seals were exposed for 543 days in ram (windward), zenith (away from Earth), or wake (leeward) orientations, and 15 control samples (not flown) provided undamaged baseline leakage. To determine post-flight leak rates, each of the 33 seals were placed in an O-ring groove of a leak test fixture and pressure tested over time. Resistance temperature detectors (RTDs), pressure transducers, and LabVIEW (National Instruments) programs were used to measure and analyze the temperature and pressure and calculate leakage. Average leakage of control samples was 2.6 x 10(exp -7) lbs/day. LEO exposure did not considerably damage ELA-SA-401. The S0383-70 flight samples leaked at least 10 times more than ELA-SA-401 in all cases except one, demonstrating that ELA-SA-401 may be a more suitable sealing material in LEO. AO caused greater damage than UV; samples in ram orientation (receiving an AO fluence of 4.3 x 10(exp 21) atoms/(sq cm) and in wake (2.9x 10(exp 20) atoms/(sq cm)) leaked more than those in zenith orientation (1.58 x 10(exp 20) atoms/(sq cm)), whereas variations in UV exposure did not seem to affect the samples. Exposure to LEO did less damage to the seals than hypothesized, and the data did not support the conjecture that UV causes more damage than AO.

  20. Comparison of relativistic effects in barycentric and Earth-centered coordinates and implications for determination of GM for Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashby, Neil

    1987-01-01

    The results of an investigation of relativistic effects which have an influence on the determination of GM sub E (M sub E is the mass of the Earth, G is the Newtonian gravitaional constant) are summarized. The detailed arguments and derivations are discussed. The Parametrized Post-Newtonian (PPN) coordinates; Eddington-Clark (EC) coordinates; a coordinate system based on barycentric dynamical time (TBC coordinates); and Local Inertial coordinates are discussed.

  1. From Order to Chaos in Earth Satellite Orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gkolias, Ioannis; Daquin, Jérôme; Gachet, Fabien; Rosengren, Aaron J.

    2016-11-01

    We consider Earth satellite orbits in the range of semimajor axes where the perturbing effects of Earth’s oblateness and lunisolar gravity are of comparable order. This range covers the medium-Earth orbits (MEO) of the Global Navigation Satellite Systems and the geosynchronous orbits (GEO) of the communication satellites. We recall a secular and quadrupolar model, based on the Milankovitch vector formulation of perturbation theory, which governs the long-term orbital evolution subject to the predominant gravitational interactions. We study the global dynamics of this two-and-a-half degrees-of-freedom Hamiltonian system by means of the fast Lyapunov indicator (FLI), used in a statistical sense. Specifically, we characterize the degree of chaoticity of the action space using angle-averaged normalized FLI maps, thereby overcoming the angle dependencies of the conventional stability maps. Emphasis is placed upon the phase-space structures near secular resonances, which are of primary importance to the space debris community. We confirm and quantify the transition from order to chaos in MEO, stemming from the critical inclinations and find that highly inclined GEO orbits are particularly unstable. Despite their reputed normality, Earth satellite orbits can possess an extraordinarily rich spectrum of dynamical behaviors and, from a mathematical perspective, have all the complications that make them very interesting candidates for testing the modern tools of chaos theory.

  2. [Physiological effects of rare earth elements and their application in traditional Chinese medicine].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jie; Guo, Lanping; Xiao, Wenjuan; Geng, Yanling; Wang, Xiao; Shi, Xin'gang; Dan, Staerk

    2012-08-01

    The process in the studies on physiological effects of rare earth elements in plants and their action mechanisms were summarized in the aspects of seed germination, photosynthesis, mineral metabolism and stress resistance. And the applications of rare earth elements in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) in recent years were also overviewed, which will provide reference for further development and application of rare earth elements in TCM.

  3. ISS Charging Hazards and Low Earth Orbit Space Weather Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minow, Joseph; Parker, L.; Coffey, V.; Wright K.; Koontz, S.; Edwards, D.

    2008-01-01

    Current collection by high voltage solar arrays on the International Space Station (ISS) drives the vehicle to negative floating potentials in the low Earth orbit daytime plasma environment. Pre-flight predictions of ISS floating potentials Phi greater than |-100 V| suggested a risk for degradation of dielectric thermal control coatings on surfaces in the U.S. sector due to arcing and an electrical shock hazard to astronauts during extravehicular activity (EVA). However, hazard studies conducted by the ISS program have demonstrated that the thermal control material degradation risk is effectively mitigated during the lifetime of the ISS vehicle by a sufficiently large ion collection area present on the vehicle to balance current collection by the solar arrays. To date, crew risk during EVA has been mitigated by operating one of two plasma contactors during EVA to control the vehicle potential within Phi less than or equal to |-40 V| with a backup process requiring reorientation of the solar arrays into a configuration which places the current collection surfaces into wake. This operation minimizes current collection by the solar arrays should the plasma contactors fail. This paper presents an analysis of F-region electron density and temperature variations at low and midlatitudes generated by space weather events to determine what range of conditions represent charging threats to ISS. We first use historical ionospheric plasma measurements from spacecraft operating at altitudes relevant to the 51.6 degree inclination ISS orbit to provide an extensive database of F-region plasma conditions over a variety of solar cycle conditions. Then, the statistical results from the historical data are compared to more recent in-situ measurements from the Floating Potential Measurement Unit (FPMU) operating on ISS in a campaign mode since its installation in August, 2006.

  4. Solar rotation effects on the thermospheres of Mars and Earth.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Jeffrey M; Bruinsma, Sean; Lemoine, Frank G

    2006-06-01

    The responses of Earth's and Mars' thermospheres to the quasi-periodic (27-day) variation of solar flux due to solar rotation were measured contemporaneously, revealing that this response is twice as large for Earth as for Mars. Per typical 20-unit change in 10.7-centimeter radio flux (used as a proxy for extreme ultraviolet flux) reaching each planet, we found temperature changes of 42.0 +/- 8.0 kelvin and 19.2 +/- 3.6 kelvin for Earth and Mars, respectively. Existing data for Venus indicate values of 3.6 +/- 0.6 kelvin. Our observational result constrains comparative planetary thermosphere simulations and may help resolve existing uncertainties in thermal balance processes, particularly CO2 cooling.

  5. COLORS OF A SECOND EARTH. II. EFFECTS OF CLOUDS ON PHOTOMETRIC CHARACTERIZATION OF EARTH-LIKE EXOPLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, Yuka; Suto, Yasushi; Turner, Edwin L.; Kawahara, Hajime; Fukuda, Satoru; Nakajima, Teruyuki; Livengood, Timothy A.

    2011-09-10

    As a test bed for future investigations of directly imaged terrestrial exoplanets, we present the recovery of the surface components of the Earth from multi-band diurnal light curves obtained with the EPOXI spacecraft. We find that the presence and longitudinal distribution of ocean, soil, and vegetation are reasonably well reproduced by fitting the observed color variations with a simplified model composed of a priori known albedo spectra of ocean, soil, vegetation, snow, and clouds. The effect of atmosphere, including clouds, on light scattered from surface components is modeled using a radiative transfer code. The required noise levels for future observations of exoplanets are also determined. Our model-dependent approach allows us to infer the presence of major elements of the planet (in the case of the Earth, clouds, and ocean) with observations having signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) {approx}> 10 in most cases and with high confidence if S/N {approx}> 20. In addition, S/N {approx}> 100 enables us to detect the presence of components other than ocean and clouds in a fairly model-independent way. Degradation of our inversion procedure produced by cloud cover is also quantified. While cloud cover significantly dilutes the magnitude of color variations compared with the cloudless case, the pattern of color changes remains. Therefore, the possibility of investigating surface features through light-curve fitting remains even for exoplanets with cloud cover similar to Earth's.

  6. Best Mitigation Paths To Effectively Reduce Earth's Orbital Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiegman, Bruce M.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews some ways to reduce the problem posed by debris in orbit around the Earth. It reviews the orbital debris environment, the near-term needs to minimize the Kessler syndrome, also known as collisional cascading, a survey of active orbital debris mitigation strategies, the best paths to actively remove orbital debris, and technologies that are required for active debris mitigation.

  7. Tidal effects on Earth, Planets, Sun by far visiting moons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fargion, Daniele

    2016-07-01

    The Earth has been formed by a huge mini-planet collision forming our Earth surface and our Moon today. Such a central collision hit was statistically rare. A much probable skimming or nearby encounter by other moons or planets had to occur. Indeed Recent observations suggest that many planetary-mass objects may be present in the outer solar system between the Kuiper belt and the Oort cloud. Gravitational perturbations may occasionally bring them into the inner solar system. Their passage near Earth could have generated gigantic tidal waves, large volcanic eruptions, sea regressions, large meteoritic impacts and drastic changes in global climate. They could have caused the major biological mass extinctions in the past in the geological records. For instance a ten times a terrestrial radius nearby impact scattering by a peripherical encounter by a small moon-like object will force huge tidal waves (hundred meter height), able to lead to huge tsunami and Earth-quake. Moreover the historical cumulative planet hits in larger and wider planets as Juppiter, Saturn, Uranus will leave a trace, as observed, in their tilted spin axis. Finally a large fraction of counter rotating moons in our solar system probe and test such a visiting mini-planet captur origination. In addition the Earth day duration variability in the early past did show a rare discountinuity, very probably indebt to such a visiting planet crossing event. These far planets in rare trajectory to our Sun may, in thousands event capture, also explain sudden historical and recent temperature changes.

  8. Pulmonary MRI contrast using Surface Quadrupolar Relaxation (SQUARE) of hyperpolarized (83)Kr.

    PubMed

    Six, Joseph S; Hughes-Riley, Theodore; Lilburn, David M L; Dorkes, Alan C; Stupic, Karl F; Shaw, Dominick E; Morris, Peter G; Hall, Ian P; Pavlovskaya, Galina E; Meersmann, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Hyperpolarized (83)Kr has previously been demonstrated to enable MRI contrast that is sensitive to the chemical composition of the surface in a porous model system. Methodological advances have lead to a substantial increase in the (83)Kr hyperpolarization and the resulting signal intensity. Using the improved methodology for spin exchange optical pumping of isotopically enriched (83)Kr, internal anatomical details of ex vivo rodent lung were resolved with hyperpolarized (83)Kr MRI after krypton inhalation. Different (83)Kr relaxation times were found between the main bronchi and the parenchymal regions in ex vivo rat lungs. The T1 weighted hyperpolarized (83)Kr MRI provided a first demonstration of surface quadrupolar relaxation (SQUARE) pulmonary MRI contrast. PMID:24144493

  9. Implementing SPAM into STMAS: A net sensitivity improvement in high-resolution NMR of quadrupolar nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amoureux, J. P.; Delevoye, L.; Fink, G.; Taulelle, F.; Flambard, A.; Montagne, L.

    2005-08-01

    Gan and Kwak recently introduced two new tools for high-resolution 2D NMR methods applied to quadrupolar nuclei: double-quantum filtering in STMAS (DQF-STMAS) and the soft-pulse added mixing (SPAM) idea. Double-quantum filtering suppresses all undesired signals in the STMAS method with limited loss in sensitivity. With SPAM, all pathways are added constructively after the second hard-pulse instead of using a single pathway as previously. Here, the sensitivity, advantages and drawbacks of DQF-STMAS are compared to 3QMAS. Additionally, SPAM can be included into DQF-STMAS method, resulting in a net sensitivity gain with respect to 3QMAS of ca. 10-15.

  10. Resonance excitation of ions stored in a quadrupole ion trap. Part IV. Theory of quadrupolar excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfred, Roland L.; Londry, Frank A.; March, Raymond E.

    1993-06-01

    A new theoretical treatment is presented for quadrupolar resonance excitation of ions stored in a quadrupole ion trap. When the ratio of the tickle voltage amplitude to that of the drive potential is small, the equation of ion motion can be expressed in the form of a perturbation series. Exact and approximate solutions to the first-order perturbation eqations are presented. Ion trajectories calculated from these solutions are compared with those calculated by numerical integration. The resonance conditions were found to correspond to a series of angular frequencies given by [omega]u,n = n + [beta]u - [infinity] < n < [infinity]. Some of these, [beta]z[Omega], (1 + [beta]z)[Omega](1 - [beta]z)[Omega] [beta],[Omega], had been observed previously in simulation studies.

  11. Pulmonary MRI contrast using Surface Quadrupolar Relaxation (SQUARE) of hyperpolarized (83)Kr.

    PubMed

    Six, Joseph S; Hughes-Riley, Theodore; Lilburn, David M L; Dorkes, Alan C; Stupic, Karl F; Shaw, Dominick E; Morris, Peter G; Hall, Ian P; Pavlovskaya, Galina E; Meersmann, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Hyperpolarized (83)Kr has previously been demonstrated to enable MRI contrast that is sensitive to the chemical composition of the surface in a porous model system. Methodological advances have lead to a substantial increase in the (83)Kr hyperpolarization and the resulting signal intensity. Using the improved methodology for spin exchange optical pumping of isotopically enriched (83)Kr, internal anatomical details of ex vivo rodent lung were resolved with hyperpolarized (83)Kr MRI after krypton inhalation. Different (83)Kr relaxation times were found between the main bronchi and the parenchymal regions in ex vivo rat lungs. The T1 weighted hyperpolarized (83)Kr MRI provided a first demonstration of surface quadrupolar relaxation (SQUARE) pulmonary MRI contrast.

  12. From bipolar to quadrupolar - The collimation processes of the Cepheus A outflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torrelles, Jose M.; Verdes-Montenegro, Lourdes; Ho, Paul T. P.; Rodriguez, Luis F.; Canto, Jorge

    1993-01-01

    Results of new K-band observations of the (1, 1) and (2, 2) ammonia lines toward Cepheus A are reported. The lines are mapped with approximately 2 arcsec of angular resolution and 0.3 km/s of velocity resolution. A sensitivity of 10 mJy has been achieved. The observations reveal details of the spatial and kinematics structure of the ambient high-density gas. It is suggested that the interstellar high-density gas is diverting and redirecting the outflow in the sense that the quadrupolar structure of the molecular outflow is produced by the interaction with the ammonia condensationss, with Cep A-1 and Cep A-3 splitting in two halves, respectively the blue- and redshifted lobes of an east-west bipolar molecular outflow.

  13. The Impenetrable Barrier Revisited - Anthroprogenic Effects on Earth's Radiation Belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, J. C.; Baker, D. N.; Erickson, P. J.; Albert, J.; Fennell, J. F.; Mishin, E. V.; Starks, M. J.; Jaynes, A. N.; Li, X.; Kanekal, S. G.; Kletzing, C.

    2015-12-01

    The Van Allen Probes are contributing significantly to the understanding of processes effecting Earth's radiation belts. It has been noted that the earthward extent of the outer zone highly-relativistic electrons encounters a nearly impenetrable barrier at a radial distance (L) near 2.8 RE inside of which they are not observed. Modeling suggests that this is the result of a balance between slow inward diffusion and hiss-induced precipitation. The large storm of 17 March 2015 afforded an excellent opportunity to investigate the impenetrable barrier using the full complement of sensors carried by the Van Allen Probes. The storm was marked by the rapid reappearance of strong fluxes of MeV electrons directly outside the barrier with the formation of very steep MeV flux gradients. In spite of the strong rapid recovery of MeV electron fluxes immediately outside the barrier, the sharpness and constancy of the gradient at the barrier is strongly suggestive of a previously unrecognized fast-acting and spatially localized mechanism responsible for the formation of such a well-defined feature during these dramatic circumstances. The Van Allen Probes regularly observe a magnetically confined bubble of VLF emissions of terrestrial origin filling the inner magnetosphere. Strongest signals are from US Navy VLF transmitters used for one-way communication to submarines. These signals largely are confined to the region of L space where their frequency is < ½ fce. The strong signal from station NAA at 24 kHz is confined to L < 2.8 where it encounters the ½ fce limit. During the event, the flux of MeV electrons decreased by 1000x across 0.5 RE outside L = 2.8 simultaneous with a 6 order of magnitude increase in the VLF wave intensity as the Probes entered the VLF bubble. The VLF transmitter frequencies are amplified at the point where they overlap natural chorus band near ½ fce suggestive of transmitter-induced triggered emissions. MeV radiation belt electrons encounter this

  14. Effect of Earth's rotation on thermal convection in the mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozoki, Tamas; Herein, Mátyás; Galsa, Attila

    2016-04-01

    Numerical model calculations have been carried out to study the effect of the centrifugal force on the thermal convection in the mantle. With the help of a simple dimensional analysis it can be shown that among the inertial forces generated by Earth's rotation, only the centrifugal force might have a detectable effect on the thermal convection in the mantle. A new non-dimensional parameter, RaCF was introduced to characterize the thermal buoyancy caused by the centrifugal force compared to the viscous force. Two-dimensional cylindrical shell geometry was applied with stationary value of angular velocity. The models started from the same non-rotated, quasi-stationary convection and 10 Gyr temporal evolution was observed. In the different models the magnitude of angular velocity varied from the recent value of Ω0 = 7.29E-5 1/s to the extreme value of 100 Ω0. The temporal and spatial variation of the surface heat flux (qs) and the root-mean-square velocity (vRMS) depending on the rotation velocity were investigated systematically in the model. Velocity was decomposed to tangential (vφ) and radial (vr) velocity to analyze the effect of the rotation on the flow system. The rotation arranges the convection to polar up- and equatorial downwellings, which structure is more peculiar at higher angular velocities and by the progress of time. Three main regimes can be identified based on the monitoring parameters (qs, vRMS). At low angular velocities (Ω = 0 - 4 Ω0) the convection pattern and the surface heat flux are slightly influenced by the centrifugal force. The most specific effect appears in the middle transitional regime (Ω = 4 - 15 Ω0) where the monotonic decrease of the heat flux separates from the unvarying average velocity. In this regime the constant vRMS is maintained by the enhanced tangential and reduced radial velocity component which is in accordance with the decrease in the number of plumes. vφ and vr shows an intensive decrease from the angular

  15. DFT 2H quadrupolar coupling constants of ruthenium complexes: a good probe of the coordination of hydrides in conjuction with experiments.

    PubMed

    del Rosal, Iker; Gutmann, Torsten; Maron, Laurent; Jolibois, Franck; Chaudret, Bruno; Walaszek, Bernadeta; Limbach, Hans-Heinrich; Poteau, Romuald; Buntkowsky, Gerd

    2009-07-21

    Transition metal (TM) hydrides are of great interest in chemistry because of their reactivity and their potential as catalysts for hydrogenation reactions. 2H solid-state NMR can be used in order to get information about the local environment of hydrogen atoms, and more particularly the coordination mode of hydrides in such complexes. In this work we will show that it is possible to establish at the level of density functional theory (DFT) a viable methodological strategy that allows the determination of 2H NMR parameters, namely the quadrupolar coupling constant (C(Q)) respectively the quadrupolar splitting (deltanuQ) and the asymmetry parameter (etaQ). The reliability of the method (B3PW91-DFT) and basis set effects have been first evaluated for simple organic compounds (benzene and fluorene). A good correlation between experimental and theoretical values is systematically obtained if the large basis set cc-pVTZ is used for the computations. 2H NMR properties of five mononuclear ruthenium complexes (namely Cp*RuD3(PPh3), Tp*RuD(THT)2, Tp*RuD(D2)(THT) and Tp*RuD(D2)2 and RuD2(D2)2(PCy3)2) which exhibit different ligands and hydrides involved in different coordination modes (terminal-H or eta2-H2), have been calculated and compared to previous experimental data. The results obtained are in excellent agreement with experiments. Although 2H NMR spectra are not always easy to analyze, assistance by quantum chemistry calculations allows unambiguous assignment of the signals of such spectra. As far as experiments can be achieved at very low temperatures in order to avoid dynamic effects, this hybrid theoretical/experimental tool may give useful insights in the context of the characterization of ruthenium surfaces or nanoparticles with solid-state NMR. PMID:19842483

  16. Site-resolved multiple-quantum filtered correlations and distance measurements by magic-angle spinning NMR: Theory and applications to spins with weak to vanishing quadrupolar couplings.

    PubMed

    Eliav, U; Haimovich, A; Goldbourt, A

    2016-01-14

    We discuss and analyze four magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR methods that can be used to measure internuclear distances and to obtain correlation spectra between a spin I = 1/2 and a half-integer spin S > 1/2 having a small quadrupolar coupling constant. Three of the methods are based on the heteronuclear multiple-quantum and single-quantum correlation experiments, that is, high rank tensors that involve the half spin and the quadrupolar spin are generated. Here, both zero and single-quantum coherence of the half spins are allowed and various coherence orders of the quadrupolar spin are generated, and filtered, via active recoupling of the dipolar interaction. As a result of generating coherence orders larger than one, the spectral resolution for the quadrupolar nucleus increases linearly with the coherence order. Since the formation of high rank tensors is independent of the existence of a finite quadrupolar interaction, these experiments are also suitable to materials in which there is high symmetry around the quadrupolar spin. A fourth experiment is based on the initial quadrupolar-driven excitation of symmetric high order coherences (up to p = 2S, where S is the spin number) and subsequently generating by the heteronuclear dipolar interaction higher rank (l + 1 or higher) tensors that involve also the half spins. Due to the nature of this technique, it also provides information on the relative orientations of the quadrupolar and dipolar interaction tensors. For the ideal case in which the pulses are sufficiently strong with respect to other interactions, we derive analytical expressions for all experiments as well as for the transferred echo double resonance experiment involving a quadrupolar spin. We show by comparison of the fitting of simulations and the analytical expressions to experimental data that the analytical expressions are sufficiently accurate to provide experimental (7)Li-(13)C distances in a complex of lithium, glycine, and water. Discussion

  17. The effect of the earth's rotation on ground water motion.

    PubMed

    Loáiciga, Hugo A

    2007-01-01

    The average pore velocity of ground water according to Darcy's law is a function of the fluid pressure gradient and the gravitational force (per unit volume of ground water) and of aquifer properties. There is also an acceleration exerted on ground water that arises from the Earth's rotation. The magnitude and direction of this rotation-induced force are determined in exact mathematical form in this article. It is calculated that the gravitational force is at least 300 times larger than the largest rotation-induced force anywhere on Earth, the latter force being maximal along the equator and approximately equal to 34 N/m(3) there. This compares with a gravitational force of approximately 10(4) N/m(3).

  18. Single Event Effects Testing For Low Earth Orbit Missions with Neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddell, Brandon; O'Neill, Pat; Bailey, Chuck; Nguyen, Kyson

    2015-01-01

    Neutrons can effectively be used to screen electronic parts intended to be used in Low Earth Orbit. This paper compares neutron with proton environments in spacecraft and discusses recent comparison testing.

  19. Nonequilibrium effects on shock-layer radiometry during earth entry.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, J. O.; Whiting, E. E.

    1973-01-01

    Radiative enhancement factors for the CN violet and N2(+) first negative band systems caused by nonequilibrium thermochemistry in the shock layer of a blunt-nosed vehicle during earth entry are reported. The results are based on radiometric measurements obtained with the aid of a combustion-driven shock tube. The technique of converting the shock-tube measurements into predictions of the enhancement factors for the blunt-body case is described, showing it to be useful for similar applications of other shock-tube measurements.

  20. Study of effects of space power satellites on life support functions of the earth's magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglas, M.; Laquey, R.; Deforest, S. E.; Lindsey, C.; Warshaw, H.

    1977-01-01

    The effects of the Satellite Solar Power System (SSPS) on the life support functions of the earth's magnetosphere were investigated. Topics considered include: (1) thruster effluent effects on the magnetosphere; (2) biological consequences of SSPS reflected light; (3) impact on earth bound astronomy; (4) catastrophic failure and debris; (5) satellite induced processes; and (6) microwave power transmission. Several impacts are identified and recommendations for further studies are provided.

  1. Chemical effects of large impacts on the Earth's primitive atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Fegley, B; Prinn, R G; Hartman, H; Watkins, G H

    1986-01-23

    Intense bombardment of the moon and terrestrial planets approximately 3.9-4.0 x 10(9) years ago could have caused the chemical reprocessing of the Earth's primitive atmosphere. In particular, the shock heating and rapid quenching caused by the impact of large bodies into the atmosphere could produce molecules such as HCN and H2CO4 which are important precursors for the abiotic synthesis of complex organic molecules. Here we model the production of HCN and H2CO by thermochemical equilibrium and chemical kinetic calculations of the composition of shocked air parcels for a wide range of temperatures, pressures and initial compositions. For atmospheres with C/O > or = 1, our results suggest that bolide impacts cause HCN volume mixing ratios of approximately 10(-3) to 10(-5) in the impact region and global average ratios of 10(-5) to 10(-12). The corresponding H2CO mixing ratios in the impact region are 10(-7) to 10(-9); no-global mixing can occur, however, as H2CO is rapidly destroyed or rained out of the atmosphere within days to hours. Rainout to the oceans of 3-15% of the HCN produced can provide approximately (3-14) x 10(11) mol HCN per year. This is somewhat larger than other predicted sources of HCN and H2CO on the primitive Earth.

  2. The effect of EarthPulse on learning of declarative knowledge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinney, Heather E.

    The purpose of this double-blind, bio-medical research study was to investigate the effect of EarthPulse, a brainwave entrainment and pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) device, on learning of declarative knowledge. Currently, PEMF research explores physiological and psychological effects but a gap exists in the potential effects of PEMF on learning. The study explored whether a relationship existed between receiving a thirty minute EarthPulse treatment on the "Entrain Up" setting and learning of declarative knowledge; whether the relationship remained over time; whether EarthPulse had an effect on sleep; and whether EarthPulse had an effect on attrition. Ninety-eight, randomly assigned, undergraduate students participated in this double-blind, experimental design study, of which 87 remained after attrition. After receiving a thirty minute EarthPulse or placebo treatment, experimental and control groups read identical passages and completed identical instruments to test learning and retention of declarative knowledge. Participants completed the same test in two intervals: an immediate (learning) and delayed (retention) posttest. Assumptions for normality and reliability were met. One-way ANOVA revealed no statistically significant effects on learning or retention at the 0.05 level. However, Chi square analysis revealed those who received the EarthPulse treatment were significantly less likely to fall asleep than those who received the control treatment (p=0.022) and very closely approached significance for attrition (p=0.051).

  3. Solar Energetic Particles and Their Near-Earth Effects in Cycle 24 So Far (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luhmann, J. G.; Randall, C. E.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Cohen, C. M.; Leske, R. A.; Jackman, C. H.; Jian, L.; Bain, H. M.; Li, Y.; Russell, C. T.; Odstrcil, D.

    2013-12-01

    Solar Energetic Particles were practically absent in the STEREO-era (STEREO started its prime mission in late 2006), with the exception of the significant events of December, 2006 at the end of cycle 23. The December 13, 2006 event included a GLE that affected Earth's polar middle atmosphere composition and the December 6, 2006 radio event had significant effects on GPS accuracy. Only weak impulsive events were then seen until late 2009 when the corona went through a brief dipolar phase. So far in cycle 24, the most impressive SEP event was seen on STEREO-A in July 2012, at a time when STEREO was far-removed from Earth's vicinity. Had that event impacted Earth what effects would it have produced? We compare the July 2012 SEP event with some other large events from the previously observed, much stronger solar cycles, and consider their relative effects on the Earth's upper atmosphere.

  4. The Effect of Rare Earth on the Structure and Performance of Laser Clad Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Ruiliang; Yu, Huijun; Chen, Chuanzhong; Dong, Qing

    Laser cladding is one kind of advanced surface modification technology and has the abroad prospect in making the wear-resistant coating on metal substrates. However, the application of laser cladding technology does not achieve the people's expectation in the practical production because of many defects such as cracks, pores and so on. The addiction of rare earth can effectively reduce the number of cracks in the clad coating and enhance the coating wear-resistance. In the paper, the effects of rare earth on metallurgical quality, microstructure, phase structure and wear-resistance are analyzed in turns. The preliminary discussion is also carried out on the effect mechanism of rare earth. At last, the development tendency of rare earth in the laser cladding has been briefly elaborated.

  5. NMR of group 2 element quadrupolar nuclei and some applications in materials science and biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaohua

    1999-11-01

    For many years, NMR has provided an easy access for chemists to perform structural and kinetic studies on a whole variety of systems. To a great extent, these investigations have been restricted to non-quadrupolar nuclei. The study of quadrupolar nuclei (I > 1/2) offers the potential to gain insight into important problems in material science and biology. In addition to the large quadrupole moment associated with the spin active nuclei of interest, several of the most interesting species also possess an extremely low natural abundance. My recent research focuses on 87Sr NMR, which has been cited by earlier workers as being limited to only ionic species. Several strontium-containing compounds have been synthesized and characterized by single crystal x-ray diffraction. 87Sr NMR signals were determined for these compounds in a series of aprotic polar solvents. The chemical shift variation was found to be consistent with linen free energy relationship, which can be very useful in helping to elucidate mechanism, in predicting reaction rates, and the extent of reaction at equilibrium, and in discovering under what conditions a change in mechanism occurs. Control over symmetry of the compound was found to be the key to obtain the good NMR signals. One application of the new technique that has been developed was in the area of material science. An observation relative to sol-gel derived ionic conductors (La0.8Sr0.2Co0.8Fe0.2O 3.2) was that films often formed cracks upon pyrolysis. By careful examination of the sol-gel process by 87Sr NMR, a model for the structure of the sol was developed. Through the relaxation rate study of the strontium sites, the polymerization mechanism was determined to be predominantly bimolecular within the concentration region studied. The kinetic study of the fast cation exchange between two strontium sites indicated that the inhomogeneity of the polymeric network lads to the film cracking during pyrolysis. As a consequence of understanding the

  6. 2H 2O quadrupolar splitting used to measure water exchange in erythrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuchel, Philip W.; Naumann, Christoph

    2008-05-01

    The 2H NMR resonance from HDO (D = 2H) in human red blood cells (RBCs) suspended in gelatin that was held stretched in a special apparatus was distinct from the two signals that were symmetrically arranged on either side of it, which were assigned to extracellular HDO. The large extracellular splitting is due to the interaction of the electric quadrupole moment of the 2H nuclei with the electric field gradient tensor of the stretched, partially aligned gelatin. Lack of resolved splitting of the intracellular resonance indicated greatly diminished or absent ordering of the HDO inside RBCs. The separate resonances enabled the application of a saturation transfer method to estimate the rate constants of transmembrane exchange of water in RBCs. However both the theory and the practical applications needed modifications because even in the absence of RBCs the HDO resonances were maximally suppressed when the saturating radio-frequency radiation was applied exactly at the central frequency between the two resonances of the quadrupolar HDO doublet. More statistically robust estimates of the exchange rate constants were obtained by applying two-dimensional exchange spectroscopy (2D EXSY), with back-transformation analysis. A monotonic dependence of the estimates of the efflux rate constants on the mixing time, tmix, used in the 2D EXSY experiment were seen. Extrapolation to tmix = 0, gave an estimate of the efflux rate constant at 15 °C of 31.5 ± 2.2 s -1 while at 25 °C it was ˜50 s -1. These values are close to, but less than, those estimated by an NMR relaxation-enhancement method that uses Mn 2+ doping of the extracellular medium. The basis for this difference is thought to include the high viscosity of the extracellular gel. At the abstract level of quantum mechanics we have used the quadrupolar Hamiltonian to provide chemical shift separation between signals from spin populations across cell membranes; this is the first time, to our knowledge, that this has been

  7. In vivo observation of quadrupolar splitting in (39)K magnetic resonance spectroscopy of human muscle tissue.

    PubMed

    Rösler, M B; Nagel, A M; Umathum, R; Bachert, P; Benkhedah, N

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this work was to explore the origin of oscillations of the T(*)2 decay curve of (39)K observed in studies of (39)K magnetic resonance imaging of the human thigh. In addition to their magnetic dipole moment, spin-3/2 nuclei possess an electric quadrupole moment. Its interaction with non-vanishing electrical field gradients leads to oscillations in the free induction decay and to splitting of the resonance. All measurements were performed on a 7T whole-body MRI scanner (MAGNETOM 7T, Siemens AG, Erlangen, Germany) with customer-built coils. According to the theory of quadrupolar splitting, a model with three Lorentzian-shaped peaks is appropriate for (39)K NMR spectra of the thigh and calf. The frequency shifts of the satellites depend on the angle between the calf and the static magnetic field. When the leg is oriented parallel to the static magnetic field, the satellites are shifted by about 200 Hz. In the thigh, rank-2 double quantum coherences arising from anisotropic quadrupolar interaction are observed by double-quantum filtration with magic-angle excitation. In addition to the spectra, an image of the thigh with a nominal resolution of (16 × 16 × 32) mm(3) was acquired with this filtering technique in 1:17 h. From the line width of the resonances, (39)K transverse relaxation time constants T(*)2, fast  = (0.51 ± 0.01) ms and T(*)2, slow  = (6.21 ± 0.05) ms for the head were determined. In the thigh, the left and right satellite, both corresponding to the short component of the transverse relaxation time constant, take the following values: T(*)2, fast  = (1.56 ± 0.03) ms and T(*)2, fast  = (1.42 ± 0.03) ms. The centre line, which corresponds to the slow component, is T(*)2, slow  = (9.67 ± 0.04) ms. The acquisition time of the spectra was approximately 10 min. Our results agree well with a non-vanishing electrical field gradient interacting with (39)K nuclei in the intracellular space of

  8. Solid-state NMR spectroscopy of the quadrupolar halogens: chlorine-35/37, bromine-79/81, and iodine-127.

    PubMed

    Bryce, David L; Sward, Gregory D

    2006-04-01

    A thorough review of 35/37Cl, 79/81Br, and 127I solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (SSNMR) data is presented. Isotropic chemical shifts (CS), quadrupolar coupling constants, and other available information on the magnitude and orientation of the CS and electric field gradient (EFG) tensors for chlorine, bromine, and iodine in diverse chemical compounds is tabulated on the basis of over 200 references. Our coverage is through July 2005. Special emphasis is placed on the information available from the study of powdered diamagnetic solids in high magnetic fields. Our survey indicates a recent notable increase in the number of applications of solid-state quadrupolar halogen NMR, particularly 35Cl NMR, as high magnetic fields have become more widely available to solid-state NMR spectroscopists. We conclude with an assessment of possible future directions for research involving 35/37Cl, 79/81Br, and 127I solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

  9. Low temperature solid-state NMR experiments of half-integer quadrupolar nuclides: caveats and data analysis.

    PubMed

    Lipton, Andrew S; Heck, Robert W; Sears, Jesse A; Ellis, Paul D

    2004-05-01

    Solid-state NMR spectroscopy of half-integer quadrupolar nuclides has received a lot of interest recently with the advent of new methodologies and higher magnetic fields. We present here the extension of our previous low temperature method to an 18.8T system. This new probe entailed a total redesign including a cross coil and variable capacitors that are operational at cryogenic temperatures. The limitations to sensitivity are also discussed; including a new diode network, the utilization of a cryogenic band pass filter, and the consequences of the RF profiles of the coil. Further, details of the spectroscopy of quadrupolar nuclei in a protein are discussed, such as the observation of the outer transitions and how to distinguish them from the desired +/-1/2 transition.

  10. Biological effects of high ultraviolet radiation on early earth--a theoretical evaluation.

    PubMed

    Cockell, C S

    1998-08-21

    The surface of early Earth was exposed to both UVC radiation (< 280 nm) and higher doses of UVB (280-315 nm) compared with the surface of present day Earth. The degree to which this radiation environment acted as a selection pressure on organisms and biological systems has rarely been theoretically examined with respect to the biologically effective irradiances that ancient organisms would receive. Here action spectra for DNA inactivation and isolated chloroplast inhibition are used to estimate biologically effective irradiances on archean Earth. Comparisons are made with present day Earth. The theoretical estimations on the UV radiation screening required to protect DNA on archean Earth compare well with field and laboratory observations on protection strategies found in present day microbial communities. They suggest that many physical and biological methods may have been effective and would have allowed for the radiation of life even under the high UV radiation regimes of archean Earth. Such strategies would also have provided effective reduction of photoinhibition by UV radiation. The data also suggest that the UV regime on the surface of Mars is not a life limiting factor per se, although other environmental factors such as desiccation and low temperatures may contribute towards the apparent lack of a surface biota.

  11. Discover Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, Colleen

    1998-01-01

    Discover Earth is a NASA-sponsored project for teachers of grades 5-12, designed to: (1) enhance understanding of the Earth as an integrated system; (2) enhance the interdisciplinary approach to science instruction; and (3) provide classroom materials that focus on those goals. Discover Earth is conducted by the Institute for Global Environmental Strategies in collaboration with Dr. Eric Barron, Director, Earth System Science Center, The Pennsylvania State University; and Dr. Robert Hudson, Chair, the Department of Meteorology, University of Maryland at College Park. The enclosed materials: (1) represent only part of the Discover Earth materials; (2) were developed by classroom teachers who are participating in the Discover Earth project; (3) utilize an investigative approach and on-line data; and (4) can be effectively adjusted to classrooms with greater/without technology access. The Discover Earth classroom materials focus on the Earth system and key issues of global climate change including topics such as the greenhouse effect, clouds and Earth's radiation balance, surface hydrology and land cover, and volcanoes and climate change. All the materials developed to date are available on line at (http://www.strategies.org) You are encouraged to submit comments and recommendations about these materials to the Discover Earth project manager, contact information is listed below. You are welcome to duplicate all these materials.

  12. Effect of rare earth substitution in cobalt ferrite bulk materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulai, G.; Diamandescu, L.; Dumitru, I.; Gurlui, S.; Feder, M.; Caltun, O. F.

    2015-09-01

    The study was focused on the influence of small amounts of rare earth (RE=La, Ce, Sm, Gd, Dy, Ho, Er, Yb) addition on the microstructure, phase content and magnetic properties of cobalt ferrite bulk materials. The X-Ray diffraction measurements confirmed the formation of the spinel structure but also the presence of secondary phases of RE oxides or orthoferrite in small percentages (up to 3%). Density measurements obtained by Archimedes method revealed a ~1 g cm-3 decrease for the RE doped cobalt ferrite samples compared with stoichiometric one. Both the Mössbauer and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrocopy analysis results confirmed the formation of the spinel phase. The saturation magnetization and coercive field values of the doped samples obtained by Vibrating Sample Magnetometry were close to those of the pure cobalt ferrite. For magnetostrictive property studies the samples were analyzed using the strain gauge method. Higher maximum magnetostriction coefficients were found for the Ho, Ce, Sm and Yb doped cobalt ferrite bulk materials as related to the stoichiometric CoFe2O4 sample. Moreover, improved strain derivative was observed for these samples but at higher magnetic fields due to the low increase of the coercive field values for doped samples.

  13. Modeling for IFOG Vibration Error Based on the Strain Distribution of Quadrupolar Fiber Coil.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhongxing; Zhang, Yonggang; Zhang, Yunhao

    2016-01-01

    Improving the performance of interferometric fiber optic gyroscope (IFOG) in harsh environment, especially in vibrational environment, is necessary for its practical applications. This paper presents a mathematical model for IFOG to theoretically compute the short-term rate errors caused by mechanical vibration. The computational procedures are mainly based on the strain distribution of quadrupolar fiber coil measured by stress analyzer. The definition of asymmetry of strain distribution (ASD) is given in the paper to evaluate the winding quality of the coil. The established model reveals that the high ASD and the variable fiber elastic modulus in large strain situation are two dominant reasons that give rise to nonreciprocity phase shift in IFOG under vibration. Furthermore, theoretical analysis and computational results indicate that vibration errors of both open-loop and closed-loop IFOG increase with the raise of vibrational amplitude, vibrational frequency and ASD. Finally, an estimation of vibration-induced IFOG errors in aircraft is done according to the proposed model. Our work is meaningful in designing IFOG coils to achieve a better anti-vibration performance. PMID:27455257

  14. Modeling for IFOG Vibration Error Based on the Strain Distribution of Quadrupolar Fiber Coil

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Zhongxing; Zhang, Yonggang; Zhang, Yunhao

    2016-01-01

    Improving the performance of interferometric fiber optic gyroscope (IFOG) in harsh environment, especially in vibrational environment, is necessary for its practical applications. This paper presents a mathematical model for IFOG to theoretically compute the short-term rate errors caused by mechanical vibration. The computational procedures are mainly based on the strain distribution of quadrupolar fiber coil measured by stress analyzer. The definition of asymmetry of strain distribution (ASD) is given in the paper to evaluate the winding quality of the coil. The established model reveals that the high ASD and the variable fiber elastic modulus in large strain situation are two dominant reasons that give rise to nonreciprocity phase shift in IFOG under vibration. Furthermore, theoretical analysis and computational results indicate that vibration errors of both open-loop and closed-loop IFOG increase with the raise of vibrational amplitude, vibrational frequency and ASD. Finally, an estimation of vibration-induced IFOG errors in aircraft is done according to the proposed model. Our work is meaningful in designing IFOG coils to achieve a better anti-vibration performance. PMID:27455257

  15. K-39 quadrupolar and chemical shift tensors for organic potassium complexes and diatomic molecules.

    PubMed

    Lee, Philip K; Chapman, Rebecca P; Zhang, Lei; Hu, Jiaxin; Barbour, Leonard J; Elliott, Elizabeth K; Gokel, George W; Bryce, David L

    2007-12-20

    Solid-state potassium-39 NMR spectra of two potassium complexes of crown-ether-based organic ligands (1.KI and 2) have been acquired at 11.75 and 21.1 T and interpreted to provide information on the 39K quadrupolar and chemical shift tensors. The analyses reveal a large potassium chemical shift tensor span of 75+/-20 ppm for 1.KI. This appears to be the first such measurement for potassium in an organic complex, thereby suggesting the utility of potassium chemical shift tensors for characterizing organic and biomolecular K+ binding environments. Compound 2 exhibits a cation-pi interaction between K+ and a phenyl group, and therefore, the 39K NMR tensors obtained for this compound must be partly representative of this interaction. Analyses of potassium-39 spin-rotation data for gaseous 39K19F and 39K35Cl available from molecular beam experiments performed by Cederberg and co-workers reveal the largest potassium CS tensor spans known to date, 84.39 and 141 ppm, respectively. Collectively, the results obtained highlight the potential of ultrahigh-field potassium-39 solid-state NMR spectroscopy and, in particular, the wide range of the anisotropy of the potassium CS tensor when organic and diatomic systems are considered.

  16. Effects of selective fusion on the thermal history of the earth's mantle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, W.H.K.

    1968-01-01

    A comparative study on the thermal history of the earth's mantle was made by numerical solutions of the heat equation including and excluding selective fusion of silicates. Selective fusion was approximated by melting in a multicomponent system and redistribution of radioactive elements. Effects of selective fusion on the thermal models are (1) lowering (by several hundred degrees centigrade) and stabilizing the internal temperature distribution, and (2) increasing the surface heat-flow. It was found that models with selective fusion gave results more compatible with observations of both present temperature and surface heat-flow. The results therefore suggest continuous differentiation of the earth's mantle throughout geologic time, and support the hypothesis that the earth's atmosphere, oceans, and crust have been accumulated throughout the earth's history by degassing and selective fusion of the mantle. ?? 1968.

  17. Effect of limb darkening on earth radiation incident on a spherical satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katzoff, S.; Smith, G. L.

    1974-01-01

    The thermal radiation from the earth incident on a spherical satellite depends on the angular distribution of earth-emitted radiation. An analysis is presented of this dependency, and calculated results are given, based on a published limb-darkening curve for the earth. The curve was determined from Tiros data, and is a statistical average over the entire globe between 75 deg latitude. The computed effect of limb darkening was 1.8 percent at 900 km altitude, 2.5 percent at 500 km altitude, and 3.0 percent at 300 km altitude. Below 300 km, it increased rapidly with decreasing altitude. Discussion is included of various other problems inherent in the use of orbiting spheres and stabilized flat plates to measure the heat radiated from the earth.

  18. Using the Earth as an Effective Model for Integrating Space Science Into Education Outreach Programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, P. A.; Allen, J.; Galindo, C.; McKay, G.; Obot, V.; Reiff, P.

    2005-05-01

    Our methods of teaching Earth and space science as two disciplines do not represent the spirit of earlier scientists such as Aristotle, da Vinci, and Galileo. We need to re-evaluate these methods and take advantage of the excitement created in the general public over the recent space science exploration programs. The information that we are obtaining from both the Mars missions and Cassini-Huygens focuses on interpreting geomorphology, mineral compositions and gas identification based on Earth as a baseline for data evaluation. This type of evaluation is an extension of Hutton's 18th century principle of Uniformitarianism, the present is the key to the past, or Earth is the key for understanding extraterrestrial bodies. Geomorphological examples are volcanic activity, meteoritic impacts, and evidence of water altering surface features. The Hawaiian, or shield, type volcanoes are analogues for Olympus Mons and the other volcanoes on Mars. Other examples include comparing sand dunes on Earth with possible Martian dunes, known stream patterns on Earth with potential stream patterns on Mars, and even comparing meteoritic impact features on Mars, the Earth, Moon and Mercury. All of these comparisons have been developed into inquiry-based activities and are available through NASA publications. Each of these activities is easily adapted to emphasize either Earth science or space science or both. Beyond geomorphology, solar storms are an excellent topic for integrating Earth and space science. Solar storms are traditionally part of space science studies, but most students do not understand their effect on Earth or the intense effects they could have on humans, whether traveling through space or exploring the surfaces of the Moon or Mars. Effects are not only limited to space travel and other planetary surfaces but also include Earth's magnetosphere, which in turn, affect radio transmission and potentially climate. Like geomorphology courses, there are extensive NASA

  19. Perceived Barriers and Strategies to Effective Online Earth and Space Science Instruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pottinger, James E.

    With the continual growth and demand of online courses, higher education institutions are attempting to meet the needs of today's learners by modifying and developing new student centered services and programs. As a result, faculty members are being forced into teaching online, including Earth and Space science faculty. Online Earth and Space science courses are different than typical online courses in that they need to incorporate an inquiry-based component to ensure students fully understand the course concepts and science principles in the Earth and Space sciences. Studies have addressed the barriers in other inquiry-based online science courses, including biology, physics, and chemistry. This holistic, multiple-case qualitative study investigated perceived barriers and strategies to effective online Earth and Space science instruction through in-depth interviews with six experienced post-secondary online science instructors. Data from this study was analyzed using a thematic analysis approach and revealed four common themes when teaching online Earth and Space science. A positive perception and philosophy of online teaching is essential, the instructor-student interaction is dynamic, course structure and design modification will occur, and online lab activities must make science operational and relevant. The findings in this study demonstrated that online Earth and Space science instructors need institutional support in the form of a strong faculty development program and support staff in order to be as effective as possible. From this study, instructors realize that the instructor-student relationship and course structure is paramount, especially when teaching online science with labs. A final understanding from this study was that online Earth and Space science lab activities must incorporate the use and application of scientific skills and knowledge. Recommendations for future research include (a) qualitative research conducted in specific areas within the

  20. The effects of mantle compressibility on mantle dynamics, magmatism and degassing for super-Earths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.; Zhong, S.

    2010-12-01

    The discovery of extra-solar planets, especially massive terrestrial super-Earths, prompts studies of surface and internal characteristics of super-Earths that may help characterize super-Earths and understand their surface environments and habitability. An important question is related to the formation and evolution of super-Earth’s atmosphere for which mantle degassing resulting from magmatism has important controls. Similar to terrestrial planets in our Solar system, volcanism and magmatism for super-Earths, as a form of heat release from planetary interiors, are likely controlled by the dynamics of mantle convection, and more specifically plate tectonic process and mantle upwelling plumes. However, compared with that for terrestrial planets in our Solar system, the dynamics of mantle convection for super-Earths due to their larger size and mass should be more dissipative and display larger compressibility effects. Using a radius scaling with mass for super-Earths by Valencia et al. [2007], it can be inferred that the mantle dissipation number Di for super-Earths with ~10 Earth’s mass may be 4 times larger than that for the Earth. This may lead to rapid cooling of mantle upwellings and warming of mantle downwellings for super-Earths, thus diminishing mantle buoyancy driving mantle convection. With the large dissipation number, we found that the excess temperature of mantle upwelling plumes may decrease by one order of magnitude as they ascend through the mantle, thus greatly reducing plume-related magmatism and degassing. Another important control on Super-Earth’s magmatism and degassing comes from their increased surface gravitational acceleration that for super-Earths with ~10 Earth’s mass may be three times larger than that at the Earth’s surface. This limits the melting to relatively shallow depths and within small depth ranges, thus posing additional difficulties for plume-related magmatism and degassing. This implies that degassing for super-Earths

  1. Effect of the shrinking dipole on solar-terrestrial energy input to the Earth's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPherron, R. L.

    2011-12-01

    The global average temperature of the Earth is rising rapidly. This rise is primarily attributed to the release of greenhouse gases as a result of human activity. However, it has been argued that changes in radiation from the Sun might play a role. Most energy input to the Earth is light in the visible spectrum. Our best measurements suggest this power input has been constant for the last 40 years (the space age) apart from a small 11-year variation due to the solar cycle of sunspot activity. Another possible energy input from the Sun is the solar wind. The supersonic solar wind carries the magnetic field of the Sun into the solar system. As it passes the Earth it can connect to the Earth's magnetic field whenever it is antiparallel t the Earth's field. This connection allows mass, momentum, and energy from the solar wind to enter the magnetosphere producing geomagnetic activity. Ultimately much of this energy is deposited at high latitudes in the form of particle precipitation (aurora) and heating by electrical currents. Although the energy input by this process is miniscule compared to that from visible radiation it might alter the absorption of visible radiation. Two other processes affected by the solar cycle are atmospheric entry of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar energetic protons (SEP). A weak solar magnetic field at sunspot minimum facilitates GCR entry which has been implicated in creation of clouds. Large coronal mass ejections and solar flares create SEP at solar maximum. All of these alternative energy inputs and their effects depend on the strength of the Earth's magnetic field. Currently the Earth's field is decreasing rapidly and conceivably might reverse polarity in 1000 years. In this paper we describe the changes in the Earth's magnetic field and how this might affect GCR, SEP, electrical heating, aurora, and radio propagation. Whether these effects are important in global climate change can only be determined by detailed physical models.

  2. The effect of SST emissions on the earth's ozone layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitten, R. C.; Turco, R. P.

    1974-01-01

    The work presented here is directed toward assessment of environmental effects of the supersonic transport (SST). The model used for the purpose includes vertical eddy transport and the photochemistry of the O-H-N system. It is found that the flight altitude has a pronounced effect on ozone depletion. The largest ozone reduction occurs for NO deposition above an altitude of 20 km.

  3. Effect of earth's precession on geosynchronous satellites under lunisolar perturbations and tesseral resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyanin, S.; Gurfil, P.

    2008-06-01

    In this study, we investigate the effect of Earth's precession on the orbital dynamics of geostationary satellites. Our astrodynamical model includes second-order zonal and tesseral harmonics, and lunisolar gravitation. We show that the equinoctial precession induces secular inclination growth and thus bares a non-negligible effect on north-south stationkeeping for long mission lifetimes.

  4. Effect of earth's precession on geosynchronous satellites under lunisolar perturbations and tesseral resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyanin, S.; Gurfil, P.

    2008-02-01

    In this study, we investigate the effect of Earth's precession on the orbital dynamics of geostationary satellites. Our astrodynamical model includes second-order zonal and tesseral harmonics, and lunisolar gravitation. We show that the equinoctial precession induces secular inclination growth and thus bares a non-negligible effect on north-south stationkeeping for long mission lifetimes.

  5. Titan's Greenhouse Effect And Climate: Lessons From The Earth's Cooler Cousin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nixon, Conor A.; Titan Climate White Paper Proposal Team

    2009-12-01

    We argue that continuing scientific study of Earth's `distant cousin’ Titan can provide a greater understanding and insight into the energy balance of our own planet's atmosphere. Titan's Earth-like properties have been recognized for some time, from the discovery of its atmosphere in 1907, through the Voyager 1 encounter in 1980 that showed Titan's atmosphere is mostly nitrogen gas with a surface pressure within a factor of two of terrestrial. Calculation shows that Titan's atmosphere causes `greenhouse’ warming of the surface, an effect similar to that seen on the Earth, Mars, and Venus. In the 1990s, direct imaging from the Earth by adaptive optics revealed that Titan's ubiquitous haze layer is slowly changing in apparent response to the seasons that occur due to the Saturn system's obliquity. The NASA Cassini mission that arrived in Saturnian orbit in 2004, and the ESA Huygens Titan probe of 2005, have returned a flood of new data regarding this intriguing world. For the first time, we are building a detailed picture of weather in the lower atmosphere, where condensable methane takes on the role played by water in the Earth's atmosphere, leading to methane rainfall, rivers and lakes. We examine parallels between the atmospheres of Earth and of Titan, including the possibilities for dramatic climate change. Extending the duration of the Cassini spacecraft mission during the next decade will provide part of the needed picture, but in addition we urge planning for a future new mission focused on Titan's climate, and other measures.

  6. Climatic effects due to halogenated compounds in the earth's atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, W.-C.; Pinto, J. P.; Yung, Y. L.

    1980-01-01

    Using a one-dimensional radiative-convective model, a sensitivity study is performed of the effect of ozone depletion in the stratosphere on the surface temperature. There could be a cooling of the surface temperature by approximately 0.2 K due to chlorofluoromethane-induced ozone depletion at steady state (assuming 1973 release rates). This cooling reduces significantly the greenhouse effect due to the presence of chlorofluoromethanes. Carbon tetrafluoride has a strong nu sub 3 band at 7.8 microns, and the atmospheric greenhouse effect is shown to be 0.07 and 0.12 K/ppbv with and without taking into account overlap with CH4 and N2O bands. At concentrations higher than 1 ppbv, absorption by the nu sub 3 band starts to saturate and the greenhouse effect becomes less efficient.

  7. Effects of rare earth elements on telomerase activity and apoptosis of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Li; Dai, Yucheng; Yuan, Zhaokang; Li, Jie

    2007-04-01

    To study the effects of rare earth exposure on human telomerase and apoptosis of mononuclear cells from human peripheral blood (PBMNCs). The blood contents of 15 rare earth elements, including La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu, and Y, were measured by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. Telomeric repeat amplification protocol assay and flow cytometer analysis were carried out to analyze the telomerase activity and apoptosis of PBMNCs, respectively. The total content of rare earth elements in the blood showed significant differences between the exposed group and the control group. The rare earth exposure increased the telomerase activity and the percentages of cells in the S-phase and the G2/M phase in PBMNCs, but it had no effect on the apoptotic rate of PBMNCs. Under the exposure to lower concentrations of rare earth elements, the telomerase activity of PBMNCs in the exposed group was higher than that of the control group, and there was no effect on the apoptotic rate of PBMNCs, but promoted the diploid DNA replication and increased the percentages of G2/M- and S-phase cells.

  8. Plasma and magnetic field variations in the distant magnetotail associated with near-earth substorm effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, D. N.; Bame, S. J.; Mccomas, D. J.; Zwickl, R. D.; Slavin, J. A.; Smith, E. J.

    1987-01-01

    Examination of many individual event periods in the ISEE 3 deep-tail data set has suggested that magnetospheric substorms produce a characteristic pattern of effects in the distant magnetotail. During the growth, or tail-energy-storage phase of substorms, the magnetotail appears to grow diametrically in size, often by many earth radii. Subsequently, after the substorm expansive phase onset at earth, the distant tail undergoes a sequence of plasma, field, and energetic-particle variations as large-scale plasmoids move rapidly down the tail following their disconnection from the near-earth plasma sheet. ISEE 3 data are appropriate for the study of these effects since the spacecraft remained fixed within the nominal tail location for long periods. Using newly available auroral electrojet indices (AE and AL) and Geo particle data to time substorm onsets at earth, superposed epoch analyses of ISEE 3 and near-earth data prior to, and following, substorm expansive phase onsets have been performed. These analyses quantify and extend substantially the understanding of the deep-tail pattern of response to global substorm-induced dynamical effects.

  9. Removal of barometric pressure effects and earth tides from observed water levels.

    PubMed

    Toll, Nathanial J; Rasmussen, Todd C

    2007-01-01

    The effects of barometric pressure and earth tide changes are often observed in ground water level measurements. These disturbances can make aquifer test interpretation difficult by masking the small changes induced by aquifer testing at late times and great distances. A computer utility is now available that automatically removes the effects of barometric pressure and earth tides from water level observations using regression deconvolution. This procedure has been shown to remove more noise then traditional constant barometric efficiency techniques in both confined and unconfined aquifers. Instead of a single, instantaneous barometric efficiency, the procedure more correctly accounts for the lagged responses caused by barometric pressure and earth tide changes. Simultaneous measurements of water levels (or total heads) and nearby barometric pressures are required. As an additional option, the effects of earth tides can also be removed using theoretical earth tides. The program is demonstrated for two data sets collected at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, Carlsbad, New Mexico. The program is available free by request at http://www.hydrology.uga.edu/tools.html.

  10. [Effect of rare earth elements on the seedling ratio of crops].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z; Chang, J; Wang, C; Chai, S; Han, X; Li, R

    2001-06-01

    The effects of rare earth elements(REEs) on the relative seedling ratio of three crops(rice, rape and soybean) in three soil(red soil, yellow fluvo-aquic soil and yellow cinnamon soil) were studied according to OECD method, and the LC50 were obtained. Toxicity effect of REEs on rice was minimum among the crops tested. The toxicity on crops in yellow cinnamon soil was lower, whereas on soybean in yellow fluvo-aquic soil and on rape in red earth were higher.

  11. Thulium anomalies and rare earth element patterns in meteorites and Earth: Nebular fractionation and the nugget effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dauphas, Nicolas; Pourmand, Ali

    2015-08-01

    This study reports the bulk rare earth element (REEs, La-Lu) compositions of 41 chondrites, including 32 falls and 9 finds from carbonaceous (CI, CM, CO and CV), enstatite (EH and EL) and ordinary (H, L and LL) groups, as well as 2 enstatite achondrites (aubrite). The measurements were done in dynamic mode using multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometers (MC-ICPMS), allowing precise quantification of mono-isotopic REEs (Pr, Tb, Ho and Tm). The CI-chondrite-normalized REE patterns (LaN/LuN; a proxy for fractionation of light vs. heavy REEs) and Eu anomalies in ordinary and enstatite chondrites show more scatter in more metamorphosed (petrologic types 4-6) than in unequilibrated (types 1-3) chondrites. This is due to parent-body redistribution of the REEs in various carrier phases during metamorphism. A model is presented that predicts the dispersion of elemental and isotopic ratios due to the nugget effect when the analyzed sample mass is limited and elements are concentrated in minor grains. The dispersion in REE patterns of equilibrated ordinary chondrites is reproduced well by this model, considering that REEs are concentrated in 200 μm-size phosphates, which have high LaN/LuN ratios and negative Eu anomalies. Terrestrial rocks and samples from ordinary and enstatite chondrites display negative Tm anomalies of ∼-4.5% relative to CI chondrites. In contrast, CM, CO and CV (except Allende) show no significant Tm anomalies. Allende CV chondrite shows large excess Tm (∼+10%). These anomalies are similar to those found in group II refractory inclusions in meteorites but of much smaller magnitude. The presence of Tm anomalies in meteorites and terrestrial rocks suggests that either (i) the material in the inner part of the solar system was formed from a gas reservoir that had been depleted in refractory dust and carried positive Tm anomalies or (ii) CI chondrites are enriched in refractory dust and are not representative of solar composition for

  12. Formation of a White-Light Jet Within a Quadrupolar Magnetic Configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippov, Boris; Koutchmy, Serge; Tavabi, Ehsan

    2013-08-01

    We analyze multi-wavelength and multi-viewpoint observations of a large-scale event viewed on 7 April 2011, originating from an active-region complex. The activity leads to a white-light jet being formed in the outer corona. The topology and evolution of the coronal structures were imaged in high resolution using the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). In addition, large field-of-view images of the corona were obtained using the Sun Watcher using Active Pixel System detector and Image Processing (SWAP) telescope onboard the PRoject for Onboard Autonomy (PROBA2) microsatellite, providing evidence for the connectivity of the coronal structures with outer coronal features that were imaged with the Large Angle Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) C2 on the S olar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). The data sets reveal an Eiffel-tower type jet configuration extending into a narrow jet in the outer corona. The event starts from the growth of a dark area in the central part of the structure. The darkening was also observed in projection on the disk by the Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory-Ahead (STEREO-A) spacecraft from a different point of view. We assume that the dark volume in the corona descends from a coronal cavity of a flux rope that moved up higher in the corona but still failed to erupt. The quadrupolar magnetic configuration corresponds to a saddle-like shape of the dark volume and provides a possibility for the plasma to escape along the open field lines into the outer corona, forming the white-light jet.

  13. Effects of Solar Radiation Pressure on Earth Satellite Orbits.

    PubMed

    Parkinson, R W; Jones, H M; Shapiro, I I

    1960-03-25

    Calculations show that, at a mean altitude of 1000 miles, radiation pressure can displace the orbit of the 100-foot Echo balloon at rates up to 3.7 miles per day, the orbit of the 12-foot Beacon satellite at 0.7 mile per day. For certain resonant conditions this effect accumulates, drastically affecting the satellite's lifetime.

  14. The effect of rare earth elements on the texture and formability of asymmetrically rolled magnesium sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Alderman, Dr. Martyn; Cavin, Odis Burl; Davis, Dr. Bruce; Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Muth, Thomas R; Peter, William H; Randman, David; Watkins, Thomas R

    2011-01-01

    The lack of formability is a serious issue when considering magnesium alloys for various applications. Standard symmetric rolling introduces a strong basal texture that decreases the formability; however, asymmetric rolling has been put forward as a possible route to produce sheet with weaker texture and greater ductility. It has also been shown in recent work that weaker textures can be produced through the addition of rare earth elements to magnesium alloys. Therefore, this study has been carried out to investigate the effect of rare earth additions on the texture changes during asymmetric rolling. Two alloys have been used, AZ31B and ZEK100. The effect that the rare earth additions have on the texture of asymmetrically rolled sheet and the subsequent changes in formability will be discussed.

  15. Effects of dynamic long-period ocean tides on changes in earth's rotation rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nam, Young; Dickman, S. R.

    1990-01-01

    As a generalization of the zonal response coefficient first introduced by Agnew and Farrell (1978), the zonal response function kappa of the solid earth-ocean system is defined as the ratio, in the frequency domain, of the tidal change in earth's rotation rate to the tide-generating potential. Amplitudes and phases of kappa for the monthly, fortnightly, and nine-day lunar tides are estimated from 2 1/2 years of VLBI UT1 observations, corrected for atmospheric angular momentum effects using NMC wind and pressure series. Using the dynamic ocean tide model of Dickman (1988, 1989), amplitudes and phases of kappa for an elastic earth-ocean system are predicted. The predictions confirm earlier results which found that dynamic effects of the longer-period ocean tides reduce the amplitude of kappa by about 1 percent.

  16. Earth tides

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    Nineteen papers on gravity, tilt, and strain tides are compiled into this volume. Detailed chapters cover the calculation of the tidal forces and of the Earth's response to them, as well as actual observations of earth tides. Partial Contents: On Earth tides. The tidal forces: Tidal Forces. New Computations of the Tide-Generating Potential. Corrected Tables of Tidal Harmonics. The Theory of Tidal Deformations. Body Tides on an Elliptical, Rotating, Elastic and Oceanless Earth, Deformation of the Earth by Surface Loads. Gravimetric Tidal Loading Computed from Integrated Green's Functions. Tidal Friction in the Solid Earth. Loading Tides Versus Body Tides. Lunar Tidal Acceleration from Earth Satellite Orbit Analysis. Observations: gravity. Tidal Gravity in Britain: Tidal Loading and the Spatial Distribution of the Marine Tide. Tidal Loading along a Profile Europe-East Africa-South Asia-Australia and the Pacific Ocean. Detailed Gravity-Tide Spectrum between One and Four Cycles per Day. Observations: tilt and strain. Cavity and Topographic Effects in Tilt and Strain Measurement. Observations of Local Elastic Effects on Earth Tide Tilts and Strains.

  17. Effect of the Sun's gravity on the distribution and detection of dark matter near the Earth

    SciTech Connect

    Griest, K.

    1988-05-15

    The effect of the Sun's gravity on the distribution of dark-matter (DM) particles in the vicinity of the Earth is considered. The event rate in a cryogenic detector is found and the annual modulation of the signal due to this effect is compared to the annual modulation due to the relative velocities of the Sun and Earth. The effect is order 1% and probably too small to be seen experimentally. The effect of this distribution function on the capture rate of DM particles into the Earth is also considered. The rate could be suppressed for DM particles not well matched in mass to common elements in the Earth. Finally, the density of DM particles in bound orbits around the Sun is estimated and, contrary to earlier work, no way of generating an enhancement over ''equilibrium'' density is found; in fact, a general argument shows the density to be very nearly the ''equilibrium'' density. The inclusion of an ''equilibrium'' density of bound particles has negligible effect on direct detection, but removes the capture rate suppression.

  18. Hydrological Effects in the EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meertens, C.; Wahr, J.; Borsa, A.; Jackson, M.; Wahr, A.

    2008-12-01

    The dense network of 1,100 continuously operating GPS stations in the Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) is providing high quality position time series. Data are processed by PBO Analysis Centers at the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology and at Central Washington University. The results are combined by the Analysis Center Coordinator at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and are made available from the UNAVCO Data Center in Boulder. Analysis software of Langbein, 2008, was used to estimate secular trends and annual variations in the time series. The results were interpreted in terms of hydrological loading and poroelastic effects, from both natural and anthropogenic changes in water storage. The effects of monument stability were also considered. The density of PBO observations allows for the identification of spatial patterns that appear coherent over relatively broad areas. Vertical annual signals of 8-10 mm peak-to-peak amplitude are evident at stations in the mountains of northern and central California and southern Oregon showing peak uplift in October and are correlated to hydrological loading. The vertical elastic loading signal, calculated from the 0.25 by 0.25 degree community Noah land-surface model, fits the annual signal well and appears also to model the secular trends, although the time duration of ~3 years is still limited. In contrast to mountainous regions, stations in the valleys of California show greater spatial variability ranging from stations with almost no detectable annual signal to stations with very large, 20-30 mm, amplitudes with peak uplift in March. The vertical signals are temporally correlated to ground-water variations caused by pumping for agricultural irrigation and likely are caused by poroelastic effects in the sediments rather than loading. Annual vertical signals in southern California, where not obviously influenced from localized ground-water fluctuations, are small with ~2 mm amplitude and may be due to

  19. Effects of atmospheric breakup on crater field formation. [on earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Passey, Q. R.; Melosh, H. J.

    1980-01-01

    This paper investigates the physics of meteoroid breakup in the atmosphere and its implications for the observed features of strewn fields. There are several effects which cause dispersion of the meteoroid fragments: gravity, differential lift of the fragments, bow shock interaction just after breakup, centripetal separation by a rotating meteroid, and possibly a dynamical transverse separation resulting from the crushing deceleration in the atmosphere. Of these, it is shown that gravity alone can produce the common pattern in which the largest crater occurs at the downrange end of the scatter ellipse. The average lift-to-drag ratio of the tumbling fragments must be less than about 0.001, otherwise small fragments would produce small craters downrange of the main crater, and this is not generally observed. The cross-range dispersion is probably due to the combined effects of bow shock interaction, crushing deceleration, and possibly spinning of the meteoroid. A number of terrestrial strewn fields are discussed in the light of these ideas, which are formulated quantitatively for a range of meteoroid velocities, entry angles, and crushing strengths. It is found that when the crater size exceeds about 1 km, the separation between the fragments upon landing is a fraction of their own diameter, so that the crater formed by such a fragmented meteoroid is almost indistinguishable from that formed by a solid body of the same total mass and velocity.

  20. BETCO: A Computer Program for the Removal of Barometric and Earth Tide Effects From Water Levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toll, N.; Rasmussen, T. C.

    2005-12-01

    Barometric pressure effects in long-term water level measurements can mask drawdown responses to well tests and natural stimuli. Noise caused by barometric pressure and earth tide effects complicates analysis of pressure response data using diagnostic pressure derivative plots. A computer program has been developed to remove fluctuations in groundwater levels induced by changes in barometric pressure and earth tides. The program implements a regression deconvolution method to obtain a barometric response function and remove the barometric pressure and earth tide effects from the groundwater level data. Using the barometric response function yields a better residual or corrected head than using a constant barometric efficiency. The graphical response function can be used to diagnose aquifer type and well skin effects. A modification of the regression deconvolution has been implemented to simultaneously remove earth tide effects as well as barometric effects on water levels. The removal of the earth tide effects is provided as a beta feature. The software has been applied to 13 water level data sets at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in Carlsbad, NM. The results are compared to a constant barometric efficiency correction method. The freeware software is available as an install wizard for Windows XP and 2000. As of submission, all results output from BETCO are considered preliminary, please do not cite. The code is under continued development and will be qualified per the Sandia National Laboratories WIPP Software QA Plan requirements. This research is funded by WIPP programs administered by the Office of Environmental Management (EM) of the U.S. Department of Energy. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  1. Low Earth Orbit Environmental Effects on Space Tether Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finckernor, Miria M.; Gitlemeier, Keith A.; Hawk, Clark W.; Watts, Ed

    2005-01-01

    Atomic oxygen (AO) and ultraviolet (UV) radiation erode and embrittle most polymeric materials. This research was designed to test several different materials and coatings under consideration for their application to space tethers, for resistance to these effects. The samples were vacuum dehydrated, weighed and then exposed to various levels of AO or UV radiation at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. They were then re-weighed to determine mass loss due to atomic oxygen erosion, inspected for damage and tensile tested to determine strength loss. The experiments determined that the Photosil coating process, while affording some protection, damaged the tether materials worse than the AO exposure. TOR-LM also failed to fully protect the materials, especially from UV radiation. The POSS and nickel coatings did provide some protection to the tethers, which survived the entire test regime. M5 was tested, uncoated, and survived AO exposure, though its brittleness prevented any tensile testing.

  2. Imaging the earth's magnetosphere - Effects of plasma flow and temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrido, D. E.; Smith, R. W.; Swift, D. S.; Akasofu, S.-I.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of Doppler shifting on the line centers of the magnetospheric O(+) cross section are investigated, and the resulting structure of the scattering rate as a function of bulk density is explained. Whereas the Doppler shifting frequently results in a decrease of the scattering rate, it is demonstrated that for certain drift speeds the overlap of the cross section and the solar intensity profile can lead to an increased rate, thus enhancing the relative brightness of the image above that obtained when v(p) is zero. Simulated images of the magnetosphere are obtained which are used to show quantitively how the magnetospheric image responds to variations in plasma drift speed and temperature. Changes in the brightness of the magnetospheric images also depend on the variability of the solar flux at 83.4 nm. In regions where there are plasma drifts, the brightness in the image is governed by the structure of the scattering rate, assuming a fixed temperature.

  3. Two-Photon Absorption Properties of Proquinoidal D-A-D and A-D-A Quadrupolar Chromophores

    PubMed Central

    Susumu, Kimihiro; Fisher, Jonathan A. N.; Zheng, Jieru

    2011-01-01

    We report the synthesis, one- and two-photon absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence, and electrochemical properties of a series of quadrupolar molecules that feature proquinoidal π-aromatic acceptors. These quadrupolar molecules possess either donor-acceptor-donor (D–A–D) or acceptor-donor-acceptor (A–D–A) electronic motifs, and feature 4-N,N-dihexylaminophenyl, 4-dodecyloxyphenyl, 4-(N,N-dihexylamino)benzo[c][1,2,5]thiadiazolyl or 2,5-dioctyloxyphenyl electron donor moieties and benzo[c][1,2,5]thiadiazole (BTD) or 6,7-bis(3’,7’-dimethyloctyl)[1,2,5]thiadiazolo[3,4-g]quinoxaline (TDQ) electron acceptor units. These conjugated structures are highly emissive in nonpolar solvents and exhibit large spectral red-shifts of their respective lowest energy absorption bands relative to analogous reference compounds that incorporate phenylene components in place of BTD and TDQ moieties. BTD-based D-A-D and A-D-A chromophores exhibit increasing fluorescence emission red-shifts, and a concomitant decrease of the fluorescence quantum yield (Φf) with increasing solvent polarity; these data indicate that electronic excitation augments benzothiadiazole electron density via an internal charge transfer mechanism. The BTD- and TDQ-containing structures exhibit blue-shifted two-photon absorption (TPA) spectra relative to their corresponding one-photon absorption (OPA) spectra, and display high TPA cross-sections (>100 GM) within these spectral windows. D-A-D and A-D-A structures that feature more extensive conjugation within this series of compounds exhibit larger TPA cross-sections consistent with computational simulation. Factors governing TPA properties of these quadrupolar chromophores are discussed within the context of a three-state model. PMID:21568299

  4. Effects of dynamic long-period ocean tides on changes in Earth's rotation rate

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, Y.S.; Dickman, S.R. )

    1990-05-10

    As a generalization of the zonal response coefficient first introduced by Agnew and Farrell (1978), the authors define the zonal response function k of the solid earth-ocean system as the ratio, in the frequency domain, of the tidal change in Earth's rotation rate to the tide-generating potential. Amplitudes and phases of k for the monthly, fortnightly, and 9-day lunar tides are estimated from 2 1/2 years of very long baseline interferometry UTI observations (both 5-day and daily time series), corrected for atmospheric angular momentum effects using NMC wind and pressure series. Using the dynamic ocean tide model of Dickman (1988a, 1989a), the authors predict amplitudes and phases of k for an elastic earth-ocean system. The predictions confirm earlier results which found that dynamic effects of the longer-period ocean tides reduce the amplitude of k by about 1%. However, agreement with the observed k is best achieved for all three tides if the predicted tide amplitudes are combined with the much larger satellite-observed ocean tide phases; in these cases the dynamic tidal effects reduce k by up to 8%. Finally, comparison between the observed and predicted amplitudes of k implies that anelastic effects on Earth's rotation at periods less than fortnightly cannot exceed 2%.

  5. A Study of Students' Perceptions of the Organisation and Effectiveness of Fieldwork in Earth Sciences Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marques, Luis; Praia, Joao; Kempa, Richard

    2003-01-01

    This paper reports the findings of a preliminary evaluation of an in-service training programme designed for practising geology/earth science teachers in Portuguese high schools and intended to enhance the effectiveness of fieldwork activities organised by them for their students. Among the points particularly stressed during the in-service…

  6. Removal of earth's magnetic field effect on magnetoelastic resonance sensors by an antisymmetric bias field

    PubMed Central

    Bergmair, Bernhard; Huber, Thomas; Bruckner, Florian; Vogler, Christoph; Suess, Dieter

    2012-01-01

    Magnetoelastic sensors are used in a wide field of wireless sensing applications. The sensing element is a low-cost magnetostrictive ribbon whose resonant frequency depends on the measured quantity. The accuracy of magnetoelastic sensors is limited by the fact that the resonant frequency is also affected by the earth's magnetic field. In this paper we present a technique to minimize this effect by applying an antisymmetric magnetic bias field to the ribbon. The ribbon's response to external perturbation fields was measured and compared to a conventional sensor design. Our results show that the influence of the earth's magnetic field could be reduced by 77%. PMID:23565035

  7. Relativistic effects of the rotation of the earth on remote clock synchronization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhardt, V.

    1974-01-01

    A treatment is given of relativistic clock synchronization effects due to the rotation of the earth. Unlike other approaches, the point of view of an earth fixed coordinate system is used which offers insight to many problems. An attempt is made to give the reader an intuitive grasp of the subject as well as to provide formulae for his use. Specific applications to global timekeeping, navigation, VLBI, relativistic clock experiments, and satellite clock synchronization are discussed. The question of whether atomic clocks are ideal clocks is also treated.

  8. The effects of solar Reimers η on the final destinies of Venus, the Earth, and Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jianpo; Lin, Ling; Bai, Chunyan; Liu, Jinzhong

    2016-04-01

    Our Sun will lose sizable mass and expand enormously when it evolves to the red giant branch phase and the asymptotic giant branch phase. The loss of solar mass will push a planet outward. On the contrary, solar expansion will enhance tidal effects, and tidal force will drive a planet inward. Will our Sun finally engulf Venus, the Earth, and Mars? In the literature, one can find a large number of studies with different points of view. A key factor is that we do not know how much mass the Sun will lose at the late stages. The Reimers η can describe the efficiency of stellar mass-loss and greatly affect solar mass and solar radius at the late stages. In this work, we study how the final destinies of Venus, the Earth, and Mars can be depending on Reimers η chosen. In our calculation, the Reimers η varies from 0.00 to 0.75, with the minimum interval 0.0025. Our results show that Venus will be engulfed by the Sun and Mars will most probably survive finally. The fate of the Earth is uncertain. The Earth will finally be engulfed by the Sun while η <0.4600, and it will finally survive while η ≥ 0.4600. New observations indicate that the average Reimers η for solar-like stars is 0.477. This implies that Earth may survive finally.

  9. Spatial nonlinearities: Cascading effects in the earth system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, Debra P.C.; Pielke, R.A.; Bestelmeyer, B.T.; Allen, Craig D.; Munson-McGee, S.; Havstad, K. M.

    2006-01-01

    Nonlinear interactions and feedbacks associated with thresholds through time and across space are common features of biological, physical and materials systems. These spatial nonlinearities generate surprising behavior where dynamics at one scale cannot be easily predicted based on information obtained at finer or broader scales. These cascading effects often result in severe consequences for the environment and human welfare (i.e., catastrophes) that are expected to be particularly important under conditions of changes in climate and land use. In this chapter, we illustrate the usefulness of a general conceptual and mathematical framework for understanding and forecasting spatially nonlinear responses to global change. This framework includes cross-scale interactions, threshold behavior and feedback mechanisms. We focus on spatial nonlinearities produced by fine-scale processes that cascade through time and across space to influence broad spatial extents. Here we describe the spread of catastrophic events in the context of our cross-disciplinary framework using examples from biology (wildfires, desertification, infectious diseases) and engineering (structural failures) and discuss the consequences of applying these ideas to forecasting future dynamics under a changing global environment.

  10. 5f delocalization-induced suppression of quadrupolar order in U(Pd1-xPtx)₃

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, H. C.; Le, M. D.; McEwen, K. A.; Bleckmann, M.; Süllow, S.; Mazzoli, C.; Wilkins, S. B.; Fort, D.

    2011-12-27

    We present bulk magnetic and transport measurements and x-ray resonant scattering measurements on U(Pd1-xPtx)₃ for x=0.005 and 0.01, which demonstrate the high sensitivity of the quadrupolar order in the canonical antiferroquadrupolar ordered system UPd₃ to doping with platinum. Bulk measurements for x=0.005 reveal behavior similar to that seen in UPd₃, albeit at a lower temperature, and x-ray resonant scattering provides evidence of quadrupolar order described by the Qxy order parameter. In contrast, bulk measurements reveal only an indistinct transition in x=0.01, consistent with the observation of short-range quadrupolar order in our x-ray resonant scattering results.

  11. New Models of Water Delivery To Earth: The Effects of Ice Longevity and Collisional Water Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maindl, Thomas I.; Haghighipour, Nader

    2016-10-01

    It is widely accepted that the vast majority of Earth's water was delivered to its accretion zone by water-carrying planetesimals and planetary embryos from the outer regions of the asteroid belt while Earth was still forming. Modern simulations of the formation of terrestrial planets show this process with high resolution. However, their treatment of the actual delivery of water is still rudimentary assuming that a water-carrying object will maintain all its water content during its journey from its original orbit to the accretion zone of Earth. Models of the ice longevity have, however, shown that the water-ice may not stay intact, and asteroids and planetary embryos may lose some of their original water in form of ice sublimation during the dynamical evolution of these bodies. Also, collisions among these bodies while on their journey to Earth's accretion zone will result in the loss of large amounts of their water. These effects could be especially important during the formation of terrestrial planets as this process takes tens to hundreds of millions of years. We have developed a more accurate model in which the sublimation of ice during the process of the scattering of icy asteroids and planetary embryos into the accretion zone of Earth is taken into account. Our model includes two different modes of handling ice sublimation, one for sub-surface water and one for deeper ice. We also estimate water loss and retention during collisions which depends on the physical and dynamical parameters of the impacts. The results of our simulations put stringent constraints on the initial water distribution in the protoplanetary disk, the location of snowline, and the contribution of water from the primordial nebula to the final water budget of Earth. In this poster, we will present the results of our new simulations and discuss their implications for models of solar system formation and dynamics.

  12. The effects of core formation on the Pb- and Tl- isotopic composition of the silicate Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Bernard J.; Nielsen, Sune G.; Rehkämper, Mark; Halliday, Alex N.

    2008-05-01

    We have performed metal-silicate partitioning experiments at 2 GPa and 1650-2180 °C to investigate the behaviour of Pb and Tl during terrestrial core formation. The aim was to test the hypothesis that metal core formation followed by late sulphide addition to the core resulted in the concentrations and isotopic compositions of Pb and Tl in the silicate Earth. We investigated DPbmet/sil and DTLmet/sil as functions of the sulphur content of the metal and measured the equilibrium Tl isotope fractionation between the coexisting phases. Lead is moderately siderophile under the likely conditions (initially reducing [Wade, J., Wood, B.J., Core formation and the oxidation state of the Earth, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 236(2005) 78-95.]) of core segregation on Earth so that the μ( 238U/ 204Pb) of the bulk silicate Earth should have increased by a factor of 6.5 ( DPb ˜ 13) as the core separated. In the case of Tl, core segregation should have reduced the Tl concentration of the BSE by about 50%. Neither the Pb nor Tl isotopic compositions of the bulk silicate Earth can, however, be completely explained by S-free iron core formation. Thallium isotopes were found not to be significantly fractionated by metal or sulphide separation from silicate. Addition of sulphur to the metal greatly increases metal-silicate partition coefficients for both Pb and Tl. DPbmet/sil increases by a factor of 15 and DTLmet/sil by a factor of 45 as S increases from 0 to 35% in the metal phase. This means that extraction of sulphide from a molten mantle would result in DPbsulph/sil of ˜ 40 and DTLsulph/sil of ˜ 60. We used the latter results to calculate the effects of late sulphide extraction on the Pb and Tl isotopic compositions of the silicate Earth. For a bulk Earth with μ of 0.7 addition of 1.6% sulphide to the core 100-140 Myr after the beginning of the solar system is sufficient to displace the Pb-isotopic composition of the silicate Earth into the region indicated by estimates in the

  13. [Effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on the growth and rare earth elements uptake of soybean grown in rare earth mine tailings].

    PubMed

    Guo, Wei; Zhao, Ren-xin; Zhao, Wen-jing; Fu, Rui-ying; Guo, Jiang-yuan; Zhang, Jun

    2013-05-01

    A greenhouse pot experiment was conducted to investigate the influence of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi Glomus versiforme on the plant growth, nutrient uptake, C: N: P stoichiometric, uptake of heavy metals and rare earth elements by soybean (Glycine max) grown in rare earth mine tailings. The aim was to provide a basis for the revegetation of rare earth mine tailings. The results indicated that soybean had a high mycorrhizal colonization and symbiotic associations were successfully established with G. versiforme, with an average rate of approximately 67%. The colonization of G. versiforme significantly promoted the growth of soybean, increased P, K contents, and decreased C: N: P ratios, supporting the growth rate hypothesis. Inoculation with G. versiforme significantly decreased shoots and roots La, Ce, Pr and Nd concentrations of soybean compared to the control treatment. However, inoculation with G. versiforme had no significant effect on the heavy metal concentrations, except for significantly decreased shoot Fe and Cr concentrations and increased root Cd concentrations. The experiment demonstrates that AM fungi have a potential role for soybean to adapt the composite adversity of rare earth tailings and play a positive role in revegetation of rare earth mine tailings. Further studies on the role of AM fungi under natural conditions should be conducted.

  14. Precambrian climate: The effects of land area and earth's rotation rate

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, G.S. ); Marshall, H.G.; Kuhn, W.R. )

    1993-05-20

    The authors present results of model studies using general circulation models of climatic effects of variations in the rotation rate of the earth. These studies are of relevance for the Precambrian times, when the rotation period of the earth was considerably shorter. The authors include in their model studies a number of factors which were left out in previous studies. The rotation rate has a strong effect on atmospheric circulation, as evidenced in the theory of geostrophic turbulence, mid-latitude baroclinic instability, and the Hadley cell. One can expect the contraction of circulation patterns, both horizontally and vertically. This should also impact heat transport, though questions of mean temperature effects are more open, unless one allows cloud cover to vary. The authors put more realistic starting conditions into the model, and also allow clouds and hydrology to have a feedback role to see what impact rotation rates will have on global climate.

  15. Low earth orbit environmental effects on the Space Station photovoltaic power generation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahra, H. K.

    1988-01-01

    A summary of the low earth orbital environment, its impact on the photovoltaic power systems of the Space Station and the solutions implemented to resolve the environmental concerns or issues are described. Low earth orbital environment (LEO) presents several concerns to the photovoltaic power systems of the Space Station. These concerns include atomic oxygen interaction with the polymeric substrate of the solar arrays, ionized environment effects on the array operating voltage, the effects of the meteoroids and debris impacts and penetration through the different layers of the solar cells and their circuits, and the high energy particle and radiation effects on the overall solar array performance. Potential solutions to some of the degrading environmental interactions that will provide the photovoltaic power system of the Space Station with the desired life are also summarized.

  16. Effect of rare earth metal on the spin-orbit torque in magnetic heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, Kohei; Pai, Chi-Feng; Tan, Aik Jun; Mann, Maxwell; Beach, Geoffrey S. D.

    2016-06-01

    We report the effect of the rare earth metal Gd on current-induced spin-orbit torques (SOTs) in perpendicularly magnetized Pt/Co/Gd heterostructures, characterized using harmonic measurements and spin-torque ferromagnetic resonance (ST-FMR). By varying the Gd metal layer thickness from 0 nm to 8 nm, harmonic measurements reveal a significant enhancement of the effective fields generated from the Slonczewski-like and field-like torques. ST-FMR measurements confirm an enhanced effective spin Hall angle and show a corresponding increase in the magnetic damping constant with increasing Gd thickness. These results suggest that Gd plays an active role in generating SOTs in these heterostructures. Our finding may lead to spin-orbitronics device application such as non-volatile magnetic random access memory, based on rare earth metals.

  17. Low Earth orbit environmental effects on the space station photovoltaic power generation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahra, Henry K.

    1987-01-01

    A summary of the Low Earth Orbital Environment, its impact on the Photovoltaic Power systems of the space station and the solutions implemented to resolve the environmental concerns or issues are described. Low Earth Orbital Environment (LEO) presents several concerns to the Photovoltaic power systems of the space station. These concerns include atomic oxygen interaction with the polymeric substrate of the solar arrays, ionized environment effects on the array operating voltage, the effects of the meteoroids and debris impacts and penetration through the different layers of the solar cells and their circuits, and the high energy particle and radiation effects on the overall solar array performance. Potential solutions to some of the degrading environmental interactions that will provide the photovoltaic power system of the space station with the desired life are also summarized.

  18. The effects of refraction on transit transmission spectroscopy: application to Earth-like exoplanets

    SciTech Connect

    Misra, Amit; Meadows, Victoria; Crisp, Dave

    2014-09-01

    We quantify the effects of refraction in transit transmission spectroscopy on spectral absorption features and on temporal variations that could be used to obtain altitude-dependent spectra for planets orbiting stars of different stellar types. We validate our model against altitude-dependent transmission spectra of the Earth from ATMOS and against lunar eclipse spectra from Pallé et al. We perform detectability studies to show the potential effects of refraction on hypothetical observations of Earth analogs with the James Webb Space Telescope NIRSPEC. Due to refraction, there will be a maximum tangent pressure level that can be probed during transit for each given planet-star system. We show that because of refraction, for an Earth-analog planet orbiting in the habitable zone of a Sun-like star only the top 0.3 bars of the atmosphere can be probed, leading to a decrease in the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of absorption features by 60%, while for an Earth-analog planet orbiting in the habitable zone of an M5V star it is possible to probe almost the entire atmosphere with minimal decreases in S/N. We also show that refraction can result in temporal variations in the transit transmission spectrum which may provide a way to obtain altitude-dependent spectra of exoplanet atmospheres. Additionally, the variations prior to ingress and subsequent to egress provide a way to probe pressures greater than the maximum tangent pressure that can be probed during transit. Therefore, probing the maximum range of atmospheric altitudes, and in particular the near-surface environment of an Earth-analog exoplanet, will require looking at out-of-transit refracted light in addition to the in-transit spectrum.

  19. Co-Seismic Mass Dislocation and Its Effect on Earth's Rotation and Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Benjamin F.

    1999-01-01

    Mantle processes often involve large-scale mass transport, ranging from mantle convection, tectonic motions, glacial isostatic adjustment, to tides, atmospheric and oceanic loadings, volcanism and seismicity. On very short time scale of less than an hour, co-seismic event, apart from the "shaking" that is the earthquake, leaves behind permanent (step-function-like) dislocations in the crust and mantle. This redistribution of mass changes the Earth's inertia tensor (and hence Earth's rotation in both length-of-day and polar motion), and the gravity field (in terms of spherical harmonic Stokes coefficients). The question is whether these effects are large enough to be of any significance. In this paper we report updated calculation results. The calculation uses the normal mode summation scheme, applied to 15,814 major earthquakes that occurred during 1976-1998, according to source mechanism solutions given by the Harvard Central Moment Tensor catalog. Compared to the truly large ones earlier in the century, the earthquakes we study are individually all too small to have left any discernible signature in geodetic records of Earth rotation or global gravity field. However, their collective effects continue to exhibit an extremely strong statistical tendencies. For example, earthquakes conspire to decrease J(sub 2) and J(sub 22) while shortening LOD, resulting in a rounder and more compact Earth. Strong tendency is also seen in the earthquakes trying to "nudge" the Earth rotation pole towards about 140 degree E, roughly opposite to the observed polar drift direction. The geophysical significance and implications will be further studied.

  20. Co-Seismic Mass Displacement and its Effect on Earth's Rotation and Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, B. F.; Gross, R. S.

    2004-01-01

    Mantle processes often involve large-scale mass transport, ranging from mantle convection, tectonic motions, glacial isostatic adjustment, to tides, atmospheric and oceanic loadings, volcanism and seismicity. On very short time scale of less than an hour, co-seismic event, apart from the "shaking" that is the earthquake, leaves behind permanent (step-function-like) displacements in the crust and mantle. This redistribution of mass changes the Earth's inertia tensor (and hence Earth's rotation in both length-of-day and polar motion), and the gravity field. The question is whether these effects are large enough to be of any significance. In this paper we report updated calculation results based on Chao & Gross. The calculation uses the normal mode summation scheme, applied to over twenty thousand major earthquakes that occurred during 1976-2002, according to source mechanism solutions given by the Harvard Centroid Moment Tensor catalog. Compared to the truly large ones earlier in the century, the earthquakes we study are individually all too small to have left any discernible signature in geodetic records of Earth rotation or global gravity field. However, their collective effects continue to exhibit an extremely strong statistical tendencies, conspiring to decrease J2 and J22 while shortening LOD, resulting in a rounder and more compact Earth. Strong tendency is also seen in the earthquakes trying to "nudge" the Earth rotation pole towards approx. 140 deg.E, roughly opposite to the observed polar drift direction. Currently, the Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) is measuring the time-variable gravity to high degree and order with unprecedented accuracy. Our results show that great earthquakes such as the 1960 Chilean or 1964 Alaskan events cause gravitational field changes that are large enough to be detected by GRACE.

  1. Co-Seismic Mass Dislocation and its Effect on Earth's Rotation and Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, B. F.; Gross, R. S.

    2002-01-01

    Mantle processes often involve large-scale mass transport, ranging from mantle convection, tectonic motions, glacial isostatic adjustment, to tides, atmospheric and oceanic loadings, volcanism and seismicity. On very short time scale of less than an hour, co-seismic event, apart from the shaking that is the earthquake, leaves behind permanent (step-function-like) dislocations in the crust and mantle. This redistribution of mass changes the Earth's inertia tensor (and hence Earth's rotation in both length-of-day and polar motion), and the gravity field (in terms of spherical harmonic Stokes coefficients). The question is whether these effects are large enough to be of any significance. In this paper we report updated calculation results based on Chao & Gross (1987). The calculation uses the normal mode summation scheme, applied to nearly twenty thousand major earthquakes that occurred during 1976-2002, according to source mechanism solutions given by the Harvard Central Moment Tensor catalog. Compared to the truly large ones earlier in the century, the earthquakes we study are individually all too small to have left any discernible signature in geodetic records of Earth rotation or global gravity field. However, their collective effects continue to exhibit an extremely strong statistical tendencies. For example, earthquakes conspire to decrease J2 and J22 while shortening LOD, resulting in a rounder and more compact Earth. Strong tendency is also seen in the earthquakes trying to nudge the Earth rotation pole towards approximately 140 degrees E, roughly opposite to the observed polar drift direction. The geophysical significance and implications will be further studied.

  2. DLESE Data Services - Facilitating Effective Use of Earth System Science Data in Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledley, T. S.; Domenico, B.; Taber, M.; Dahlman, L.

    2003-12-01

    DLESE Data Services will work, in coordination with the other DLESE Core Service activities, toward DLESE's mission 'To improve the quality, quantity, and efficiency of teaching and learning about the Earth system' by facilitating the development and effective use of educational materials that make use of Earth system science datasets and data access and analysis tools. The currently planned major activities of DLESE Data Services are 1. To conduct a needs assessment for data and data analysis tools in the educational community 2. To identify existing educational modules utilizing data and data access and analysis tools for cataloging in DLESE 3. To organize and run DLESE Data Services Workshops in which we will bring together a wide range of Earth science data providers, developers of data access and analysis/exploration tools, with curriculum developers and educators to improve the use of Earth science data in education. Each of these activities and the benefits and opportunities they make available to the community will be described in more detail during the presentation.

  3. Effect of Earth and Mars departure delays on human missions to Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desai, Prasun N.; Tartabini, Paul V.

    1993-01-01

    This study determines the impact on the initial mass in low-Earth orbit (IMLEO) for delaying departure from Mars and Earth by 5, 15, and 30 days, once a nominal mission to Mars has been selected. Additionally, the use of a deep space maneuver (DSM) is attempted to alleviate the IMLEO penalties. Three different classes of missions are analyzed using chemical and nuclear thermal propulsion systems in the 2000-2025 time-frame: opposition, conjunction, and fast-transfer conjunction. The results indicate that Mars and Earth delays can lead to large IMLEO penalties. Opposition and fast-transfer conjunction class missions have the highest IMLEO penalties, upwards of 432.4 mt and 1977.3 mt, respectively. Conjunction class missions, on the other hand, tend to be insensitive to Mars and Earth delays having IMLEO penalties under 103.5 mt. As expected, nuclear thermal propulsion had significantly lower IMLEO penalties as compared to chemical propulsion. The use of a DSM is found not to have a significant impact on reducing the IMLEO penalties. Through this investigation, the effect of off-nominal departure conditions on the overall mission (i.e., IMLEO) can be gained, enabling mission designers to incorporate the influence of off-nominal departure conditions of the interplanetary trajectory in the overall conceptual design process of a Mars transfer vehicle.

  4. Earth remote sensing as an effective tool for the development of advanced innovative educational technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayorova, Vera; Mayorov, Kirill

    2009-11-01

    Current educational system is facing a contradiction between the fundamentality of engineering education and the necessity of applied learning extension, which requires new methods of training to combine both academic and practical knowledge in balance. As a result there are a number of innovations being developed and implemented into the process of education aimed at optimizing the quality of the entire educational system. Among a wide range of innovative educational technologies there is an especially important subset of educational technologies which involve learning through hands-on scientific and technical projects. The purpose of this paper is to describe the implementation of educational technologies based on small satellites development as well as the usage of Earth remote sensing data acquired from these satellites. The increase in public attention to the education through Earth remote sensing is based on the concern that although there is a great progress in the development of new methods of Earth imagery and remote sensing data acquisition there is still a big question remaining open on practical applications of this kind of data. It is important to develop the new way of thinking for the new generation of people so they understand that they are the masters of their own planet and they are responsible for its state. They should desire and should be able to use a powerful set of tools based on modern and perspective Earth remote sensing. For example NASA sponsors "Classroom of the Future" project. The Universities Space Research Association in United States provides a mechanism through which US universities can cooperate effectively with one another, with the government, and with other organizations to further space science and technology, and to promote education in these areas. It also aims at understanding the Earth as a system and promoting the role of humankind in the destiny of their own planet. The Association has founded a Journal of Earth System

  5. Spectral Characteristic of Tholin Produced from Possible Early Earth Atmospheres and its Role in Antigreenhouse Effect on Early Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khare, B. N.; Imanaka, H.; Wilhite, P.; McKay, C.; Bakes, E.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Arakawa, E. T.

    2003-01-01

    We have produced organic material simulating a methane photochemical haze in a CO2- rich atmosphere of the early Earth by irradiating gas mixtures in an inductively coupled cold plasma chamber with pressure approx. 0.25 mbar at 100 W total power. The flow rate was 24 cm3 min. We added progressively higher levels of CH, by combining gas mixtures of N2/CH4 (9/1) and N2/CO2 (9/1) to change the ratio of CH4/CO2. Tholin was accumulated for 5 hours in each experiment; the onset of tholin formation is in the range CH4/CO2 = 0.5 to 1. As the mixing ratio of CH, is increased, the production rate of the brownish tholin film increases. IR spectra showed the C-H and N-H bands similar to that of Titan tholin and closely resemble Titan tholin made at 0.13 mbar pressure. A decrease in the CH bonds on decreasing CH4/CO2 is noted. Ether bands (-(2-O-C) were tentatively detected, but no detectable carbonyl (C=O) band was found. The absorption in the UV region for the early Earth tholin is found to be substantially greater than the Titan tholin. Quantitative values of the optical constants of early Earth tholin are currently being measured.

  6. Possible Effect of the Earth's Inertial Induction on the Orbital Decay of LAGEOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Ujjal; Kar, Samanwita; Ghosh, Amitabha

    2016-09-01

    The theory of velocity dependent inertial induction, based upon extended Mach's principle, has been able to generate many interesting results related to celestial mechanics and cosmological problems. Because of the extremely minute magnitude of the effect its presence can be detected through the motion of accurately observed bodies like Earth satellites. LAGEOS I and II are medium altitude satellites with nearly circular orbits. The motions of these satellites are accurately recorded and the past data of a few decades help to test many theories including the general theory of relativity. Therefore, it is hoped that the effect of the Earth's inertial induction can have any detectable effect on the motion of these satellites. It is established that the semi-major axis of LAGEOS I is decreasing at the rate of 1.3 mm/d. As the atmospheric drag is negligible at that altitude, a proper explanation of the secular change has been wanting, and, therefore, this paper examines the effect of the Earth's inertial induction effect on LAGEOS I. Past researches have established that Yarkovsky thermal drag, charged and neutral particle drag might be the possible mechanisms for this orbital decay. Inertial induction is found to generate a perturbing force that results in 0.33 mm/d decay of the semi major axis. Some other changes are also predicted and the phenomenon also helps to explain the observed changes in the orbits of a few other satellites. The results indicate the feasibility of the theory of inertial induction i.e. the dynamic gravitation phenomenon of the Earth on its satellites as a possible partial cause for orbital decay.

  7. Thermal evolution of the earth - Effects of volatile exchange between atmosphere and interior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgovern, Patrick J.; Schubert, Gerald

    1989-01-01

    The thermal history of the earth is investigated using a parameterized model of mantle convection, that includes the effects of volatile exchange between the mantle and the surface reservoir and the softening of the mantle by the dissolved volatiles. The mantle degassing rate is taken to be directly proportional to the rate of seafloor spreading which depends on the mantle heat flow. It is shown that the dependence of the mantle viscosity on the volatile content has important effects on the thermal evolution of planetary interiors and the evolution of planetary atmospheres. Degassing is compensated by an increase in temperature, while regassing is compensated by a decrease in temperature. Reasonable degassing scenarios can account for an early rapid formation of the earth's atmosphere inferred from noble gas abundances.

  8. Effects of inherent alkali and alkaline earth metallic species on biomass pyrolysis at different temperatures.

    PubMed

    Hu, Song; Jiang, Long; Wang, Yi; Su, Sheng; Sun, Lushi; Xu, Boyang; He, Limo; Xiang, Jun

    2015-09-01

    This work aimed to investigate effects of inherent alkali and alkaline earth metallic species (AAEMs) on biomass pyrolysis at different temperatures. The yield of CO, H2 and C2H4 was increased and that of CO2 was suppressed with increasing temperature. Increasing temperature could also promote depolymerization and aromatization reactions of active tars, forming heavier polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, leading to decrease of tar yields and species diversity. Diverse performance of inherent AAEMs at different temperatures significantly affected the distribution of pyrolysis products. The presence of inherent AAEMs promoted water-gas shift reaction, and enhanced the yield of H2 and CO2. Additionally, inherent AAEMs not only promoted breakage and decarboxylation/decarbonylation reaction of thermally labile hetero atoms of the tar but also enhanced thermal decomposing of heavier aromatics. Inherent AAEMs could also significantly enhance the decomposition of levoglucosan, and alkaline earth metals showed greater effect than alkali metals.

  9. Effects of inherent alkali and alkaline earth metallic species on biomass pyrolysis at different temperatures.

    PubMed

    Hu, Song; Jiang, Long; Wang, Yi; Su, Sheng; Sun, Lushi; Xu, Boyang; He, Limo; Xiang, Jun

    2015-09-01

    This work aimed to investigate effects of inherent alkali and alkaline earth metallic species (AAEMs) on biomass pyrolysis at different temperatures. The yield of CO, H2 and C2H4 was increased and that of CO2 was suppressed with increasing temperature. Increasing temperature could also promote depolymerization and aromatization reactions of active tars, forming heavier polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, leading to decrease of tar yields and species diversity. Diverse performance of inherent AAEMs at different temperatures significantly affected the distribution of pyrolysis products. The presence of inherent AAEMs promoted water-gas shift reaction, and enhanced the yield of H2 and CO2. Additionally, inherent AAEMs not only promoted breakage and decarboxylation/decarbonylation reaction of thermally labile hetero atoms of the tar but also enhanced thermal decomposing of heavier aromatics. Inherent AAEMs could also significantly enhance the decomposition of levoglucosan, and alkaline earth metals showed greater effect than alkali metals. PMID:26005925

  10. Rotational Spectrum of Dichloromethane-Ne: Internal Dynamics and Cl Quadrupolar Hyperfine Effects.

    PubMed

    Favero, Laura B; Maris, Assimo; Paltrinieri, Laura; Caminati, Walther

    2015-12-10

    The rotational spectra of three isotopologues, CH2(35)Cl2···(20)Ne, CH2(35)Cl(37)Cl···(20)Ne, and CH2(35)Cl2···(22)Ne, of the complex dichloromethane-neon have been assigned and measured by molecular beam Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy. The corresponding tunnelling splittings-due to the motion of Ne from above to below the ClCCl plane-have been determined as ΔE0+0- = 6.8900(5), 6.6630(4), and 6.3724(7) MHz, respectively. From these data the barrier to planarity has been obtained, B2 = 68.7 cm(-1). In addition, the structure and the (35)Cl (or (37)Cl) quadrupole coupling constants have been determined.

  11. Rotational Spectrum of Dichloromethane-Ne: Internal Dynamics and Cl Quadrupolar Hyperfine Effects.

    PubMed

    Favero, Laura B; Maris, Assimo; Paltrinieri, Laura; Caminati, Walther

    2015-12-10

    The rotational spectra of three isotopologues, CH2(35)Cl2···(20)Ne, CH2(35)Cl(37)Cl···(20)Ne, and CH2(35)Cl2···(22)Ne, of the complex dichloromethane-neon have been assigned and measured by molecular beam Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy. The corresponding tunnelling splittings-due to the motion of Ne from above to below the ClCCl plane-have been determined as ΔE0+0- = 6.8900(5), 6.6630(4), and 6.3724(7) MHz, respectively. From these data the barrier to planarity has been obtained, B2 = 68.7 cm(-1). In addition, the structure and the (35)Cl (or (37)Cl) quadrupole coupling constants have been determined. PMID:26566085

  12. Preliminary Results on the Gravitational Slingshot Effect and the Population of Hyperbolic Meteoroids at Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiegert, P. A.

    2011-01-01

    Interstellar meteoroids, solid particles arriving from outside our Solar System, are not easily distinguished from local meteoroids. A velocity above the escape velocity of the Sun is often used as an indicator of a possible interstellar origin. We demonstrate that the gravitational slingshot effect, resulting from the passage of local meteoroid near a planet, can produce hyperbolic meteoroids at the Earth s orbit with excess velocities comparable to those expected of interstellar meteoroids.

  13. Effect of UV Radiation on the Spectral Fingerprints of Earth-like Planets Orbiting M Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rugheimer, S.; Kaltenegger, L.; Segura, A.; Linsky, J.; Mohanty, S.

    2015-08-01

    We model the atmospheres and spectra of Earth-like planets orbiting the entire grid of M dwarfs for active and inactive stellar models with Teff = 2300 K to Teff = 3800 K and for six observed MUSCLES M dwarfs with UV radiation data. We set the Earth-like planets at the 1 AU equivalent distance and show spectra from the visible to IR (0.4-20 μm) to compare detectability of features in different wavelength ranges with the James Webb Space Telescope and other future ground- and spaced-based missions to characterize exo-Earths. We focus on the effect of UV activity levels on detectable atmospheric features that indicate habitability on Earth, namely, H2O, O3, CH4, N2O, and CH3Cl. To observe signatures of life—O2/O3 in combination with reducing species like CH4—we find that early and active M dwarfs are the best targets of the M star grid for future telescopes. The O2 spectral feature at 0.76 μm is increasingly difficult to detect in reflected light of later M dwarfs owing to low stellar flux in that wavelength region. N2O, another biosignature detectable in the IR, builds up to observable concentrations in our planetary models around M dwarfs with low UV flux. CH3Cl could become detectable, depending on the depth of the overlapping N2O feature. We present a spectral database of Earth-like planets around cool stars for directly imaged planets as a framework for interpreting future light curves, direct imaging, and secondary eclipse measurements of the atmospheres of terrestrial planets in the habitable zone to design and assess future telescope capabilities.

  14. The Role of Stereo Projection in Developing an Effective Concluding Earth Science Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkby, K. C.; Morin, P. J.; Finley, F.

    2003-12-01

    Remarkably few students enrolled in introductory earth science courses have any intention of continuing in earth science, and for most students, these classes are often the last science course they will take in their academic careers. These students would be better served, if the course was instead designed to be a 'concluding' science course. One that explicitly provided students with the knowledge they need to become more informed citizens in the global community. The University of Minnesota is attempting to develop a national model of an effective 'concluding' earth science course by integrating three essential approaches: use of regional case studies to increase student comprehension; a comprehensive evaluation of students' prior knowledge, misconceptions and post-instructional knowledge that is woven throughout the project; and, an ambitious use of 'GeoWall' stereo projection systems to facilitate the students' use of maps and data sets and level the classroom playing field with regard to spatial conceptualization. In every discipline there are some critical skills or assessments that serve as conscious or unconscious 'gate-keepers' for progress in that field. In earth science, map interpretation is probably the critical restriction curtailing students' ability to access and explore course concepts. So much of our discipline's information is encoded in maps, that students who are not innately predisposed to understanding maps find it difficult to understand much of the course content and methodology. GeoWall stereo projection systems can reduce the efficiency of this 'gate-keeping' process, allowing students of diverse backgrounds and abilities to understand map data and succeed in the course. In doing so, these systems will not only help increase students' scientific literacy, but may also greatly increase the diversity of students who do go on to consider earth science as a potential career.

  15. EFFECT OF UV RADIATION ON THE SPECTRAL FINGERPRINTS OF EARTH-LIKE PLANETS ORBITING M STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Rugheimer, S.; Kaltenegger, L.; Segura, A.; Linsky, J.; Mohanty, S.

    2015-08-10

    We model the atmospheres and spectra of Earth-like planets orbiting the entire grid of M dwarfs for active and inactive stellar models with T{sub eff} = 2300 K to T{sub eff} = 3800 K and for six observed MUSCLES M dwarfs with UV radiation data. We set the Earth-like planets at the 1 AU equivalent distance and show spectra from the visible to IR (0.4–20 μm) to compare detectability of features in different wavelength ranges with the James Webb Space Telescope and other future ground- and spaced-based missions to characterize exo-Earths. We focus on the effect of UV activity levels on detectable atmospheric features that indicate habitability on Earth, namely, H{sub 2}O, O{sub 3}, CH{sub 4}, N{sub 2}O, and CH{sub 3}Cl. To observe signatures of life—O{sub 2}/O{sub 3} in combination with reducing species like CH{sub 4}—we find that early and active M dwarfs are the best targets of the M star grid for future telescopes. The O{sub 2} spectral feature at 0.76 μm is increasingly difficult to detect in reflected light of later M dwarfs owing to low stellar flux in that wavelength region. N{sub 2}O, another biosignature detectable in the IR, builds up to observable concentrations in our planetary models around M dwarfs with low UV flux. CH{sub 3}Cl could become detectable, depending on the depth of the overlapping N{sub 2}O feature. We present a spectral database of Earth-like planets around cool stars for directly imaged planets as a framework for interpreting future light curves, direct imaging, and secondary eclipse measurements of the atmospheres of terrestrial planets in the habitable zone to design and assess future telescope capabilities.

  16. On the average temperature of airless spherical bodies and the magnitude of Earth's atmospheric thermal effect.

    PubMed

    Volokin, Den; ReLlez, Lark

    2014-01-01

    The presence of atmosphere can appreciably warm a planet's surface above the temperature of an airless environment. Known as a natural Greenhouse Effect (GE), this near-surface Atmospheric Thermal Enhancement (ATE) as named herein is presently entirely attributed to the absorption of up-welling long-wave radiation by greenhouse gases. Often quoted as 33 K for Earth, GE is estimated as a difference between planet's observed mean surface temperature and an effective radiating temperature calculated from the globally averaged absorbed solar flux using the Stefan-Boltzmann (SB) radiation law. This approach equates a planet's average temperature in the absence of greenhouse gases or atmosphere to an effective emission temperature assuming ATE ≡ GE. The SB law is also routinely employed to estimating the mean temperatures of airless bodies. We demonstrate that this formula as applied to spherical objects is mathematically incorrect owing to Hölder's inequality between integrals and leads to biased results such as a significant underestimation of Earth's ATE. We derive a new expression for the mean physical temperature of airless bodies based on an analytic integration of the SB law over a sphere that accounts for effects of regolith heat storage and cosmic background radiation on nighttime temperatures. Upon verifying our model against Moon surface temperature data provided by the NASA Diviner Lunar Radiometer Experiment, we propose it as a new analytic standard for evaluating the thermal environment of airless bodies. Physical evidence is presented that Earth's ATE should be assessed against the temperature of an equivalent airless body such as the Moon rather than a hypothetical atmosphere devoid of greenhouse gases. Employing the new temperature formula we show that Earth's total ATE is ~90 K, not 33 K, and that ATE = GE + TE, where GE is the thermal effect of greenhouse gases, while TE > 15 K is a thermodynamic enhancement independent of the

  17. On the average temperature of airless spherical bodies and the magnitude of Earth's atmospheric thermal effect.

    PubMed

    Volokin, Den; ReLlez, Lark

    2014-01-01

    The presence of atmosphere can appreciably warm a planet's surface above the temperature of an airless environment. Known as a natural Greenhouse Effect (GE), this near-surface Atmospheric Thermal Enhancement (ATE) as named herein is presently entirely attributed to the absorption of up-welling long-wave radiation by greenhouse gases. Often quoted as 33 K for Earth, GE is estimated as a difference between planet's observed mean surface temperature and an effective radiating temperature calculated from the globally averaged absorbed solar flux using the Stefan-Boltzmann (SB) radiation law. This approach equates a planet's average temperature in the absence of greenhouse gases or atmosphere to an effective emission temperature assuming ATE ≡ GE. The SB law is also routinely employed to estimating the mean temperatures of airless bodies. We demonstrate that this formula as applied to spherical objects is mathematically incorrect owing to Hölder's inequality between integrals and leads to biased results such as a significant underestimation of Earth's ATE. We derive a new expression for the mean physical temperature of airless bodies based on an analytic integration of the SB law over a sphere that accounts for effects of regolith heat storage and cosmic background radiation on nighttime temperatures. Upon verifying our model against Moon surface temperature data provided by the NASA Diviner Lunar Radiometer Experiment, we propose it as a new analytic standard for evaluating the thermal environment of airless bodies. Physical evidence is presented that Earth's ATE should be assessed against the temperature of an equivalent airless body such as the Moon rather than a hypothetical atmosphere devoid of greenhouse gases. Employing the new temperature formula we show that Earth's total ATE is ~90 K, not 33 K, and that ATE = GE + TE, where GE is the thermal effect of greenhouse gases, while TE > 15 K is a thermodynamic enhancement independent of the

  18. Efficient rotational echo double resonance recoupling of a spin-1/2 and a quadrupolar spin at high spinning rates and weak irradiation fields.

    PubMed

    Nimerovsky, Evgeny; Goldbourt, Amir

    2010-09-01

    A modification of the rotational echo (adiabatic passage) double resonance experiments, which allows recoupling of the dipolar interaction between a spin-1/2 and a half integer quadrupolar spin is proposed. We demonstrate efficient and uniform recoupling at high spinning rates (nu(r)), low radio-frequency (RF) irradiation fields (nu(1)), and high values of the quadrupolar interaction (nu(q)) that correspond to values of alpha=nu(1)(2)/nu(q)nu(r), the adiabaticity parameter, which are down to less than 10% of the traditional adiabaticity limit for a spin-5/2 (alpha=0.55). The low-alpha rotational echo double resonance curve is obtained when the pulse on the quadrupolar nucleus is extended to full two rotor periods and beyond. For protons (spin-1/2) and aluminum (spin-5/2) species in the zeolite SAPO-42, a dephasing curve, which is significantly better than the regular REAPDOR experiment (pulse length of one-third of the rotor period) is obtained for a spinning rate of 13 kHz and RF fields down to 10 and even 6 kHz. Under these conditions, alpha is estimated to be approximately 0.05 based on an average quadrupolar coupling in zeolites. Extensive simulations support our observations suggesting the method to be robust under a large range of experimental values.

  19. The Earth rotation and revolution effect on the daily and annual variation of sporadic meteor echo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnishi, Kouji; Hattori, Shinobu; Nishimura, Osamu; Ishikawa, Toshiyuki; Aoki, Yoshie; Iijima, Yukiko; Kobayashi, Aya; Maegawa, Kimio; Abe, Shinsuke

    2001-11-01

    The Earth rotation and revolution will affect the daily and annual variation of sporadic meteor echo. We try to investigate such effect using Ham-band Radio Observation (HRO). Our system is constructed with paired two-element loop antennas (F/B ratio is 10 dB) at Nagano, Japan using the beacon signals at 53.750 MHz, 50W from Sabae, Fukui, Japan. The direction of one of this paired antenna was West toward Sagae and the other was East, so that this system could be roughly detected the direction of the reflected radio echoes. Using this system, (1) The total echo rose from midnight with the peak coming at about 6:00 and decreasing to the noon. This is well known daily variation due to the Earth rotation. (2) The peak echoes time by Eastward antenna and by Westward antennas was different; Westward was at 3:00 and Eastward was at 10:00. This daily variation is interpreted as the effect of the Earth rotation and revolution and the specular reflection property of forward meteor scattering observation.

  20. Compact High Current Rare-Earth Emitter Hollow Cathode for Hall Effect Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofer, Richard R. (Inventor); Goebel, Dan M. (Inventor); Watkins, Ronnie M. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    An apparatus and method for achieving an efficient central cathode in a Hall effect thruster is disclosed. A hollow insert disposed inside the end of a hollow conductive cathode comprises a rare-earth element and energized to emit electrons from an inner surface. The cathode employs an end opening having an area at least as large as the internal cross sectional area of the rare earth insert to enhance throughput from the cathode end. In addition, the cathode employs a high aspect ratio geometry based on the cathode length to width which mitigates heat transfer from the end. A gas flow through the cathode and insert may be impinged by the emitted electrons to yield a plasma. One or more optional auxiliary gas feeds may also be employed between the cathode and keeper wall and external to the keeper near the outlet.

  1. Seismic effects on the rotational dynamics of the earth and its gravitational field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanchez, B. V.

    1976-01-01

    The effects of earthquakes on the rotational motion of the earth were studied. The connection between the fault parameters and the corresponding changes in the moments and products of inertia were analytically developed. The reciprocal theorem of elasticity and Volterra's formula were applied as well as the displacement and stress fields for the second degree static response of the earth model being used. The numerical results of the investigation yield the magnitude and direction of the pole shift as well as the change in the length of the day. The changes in the second degree coefficients of the geopotential were computed. Source parameters corresponding to the Alaskan earthquake on March 28, 1964 were used to generate numerical results.

  2. Laser-Induced Kondo Effect in Ultracold Alkaline-Earth Fermions.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Masaya; Kawakami, Norio

    2015-10-16

    We demonstrate that laser excitations can coherently induce a novel Kondo effect in ultracold atoms in optical lattices. Using a model of alkaline-earth fermions with two orbitals, it is shown that the optically coupled two internal states are dynamically entangled to form the Kondo-singlet state, overcoming the heating effect due to the irradiation. Furthermore, a lack of SU(N) symmetry in the optical coupling provides a peculiar feature in the Kondo effect, which results in spin-selective renormalization of effective masses. We also discuss the effects of interorbital exchange interactions, and reveal that they induce novel crossover or reentrant behavior of the Kondo effect owing to control of the coupling anisotropy. The laser-induced Kondo effect is highly controllable by tuning the laser strength and the frequency, and thus offers a versatile platform to study the Kondo physics using ultracold atoms.

  3. Solar and terrestrial physics. [effects of solar activities on earth environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The effects of solar radiation on the near space and biomental earth, the upper atmosphere, and the magnetosphere are discussed. Data obtained from the OSO satellites pertaining to the solar cycle variation of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation are analyzed. The effects of solar cycle variation of the characteristics of the solar wind are examined. The fluid mechanics of shock waves and the specific relationship to the characteristics of solar shock waves are investigated. The solar and corpuscular heating of the upper atmosphere is reported based on the findings of the AEROS and NATE experiments. Seasonal variations of the upper atmosphere composition are plotted based on OGO-6 mass spectrometer data.

  4. Effects on optical systems from interactions with oxygen atoms in low earth orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, P. N.; Swann, J. T.; Gregory, J. C.

    1986-01-01

    Modifications of material surface properties due to interactions with ambient atomic oxygen have been observed on surfaces facing the orbital direction in low earth orbits. Some effects are very damaging to surface optical properties while some are more subtle and even beneficial. Most combustible materials are heavily etched, and some coatings, such as silver and osmium, are seriously degraded or removed as volatile oxides. The growth of oxide films on metals and semiconductors considered stable in dry air was measured. Material removal, surface roughness, reflectance, and optical densities are reported. Effects of temperature, contamination, and overcoatings are noted.

  5. Efficient symmetry-based homonuclear dipolar recoupling of quadrupolar spins: double-quantum NMR correlations in amorphous solids.

    PubMed

    Lo, Andy Y H; Edén, Mattias

    2008-11-28

    We report novel symmetry-based pulse sequences for exciting double-quantum (2Q) coherences between the central transitions of half-integer spin quadrupolar nuclei in the NMR of rotating solids. Compared to previous 2Q-recoupling techniques, numerical simulations and 23Na and 27Al NMR experiments on Na2SO4 and the open-framework aluminophosphate AlPO-CJ19 verify that the new dipolar recoupling schemes display higher robustness to both radio-frequency field inhomogeneity and to spreads in resonance frequencies. These advances allowed for the first demonstration of 2Q-recoupling in an amorphous solid for revealing its intermediate-range structural features, in the context of mapping 27Al-27Al connectivities between the aluminium polyhedra (AlO4, AlO5 and AlO6) of a lanthanum aluminate glass (La0.18Al0.82O1.5).

  6. Two-dimensional MAS NMR correlation protocols involving double-quantum filtering of quadrupolar spin-pairs.

    PubMed

    Edén, Mattias

    2010-05-01

    Three two-dimensional (2D) NMR homonuclear correlation techniques invoking double-quantum (2Q) filtration of the central transitions of half-integer spins are evaluated numerically and experimentally. They correlate directly detected single-quantum (1Q) coherences in the t(2) domain with either of 1Q, two-spin 2Q or single-spin multiple-quantum coherence-evolutions in the indirect (t(1)) dimension. We employ experimental (23)Na and (27)Al NMR on sodium sulfite and the natural mineral sillimanite (SiAl(2)O(5)), in conjunction with simulated 2D spectra from pairs of dipolar-recoupled spins-3/2 and 5/2 at different external magnetic fields, to compare the correlation strategies from the viewpoints of 2D spectral resolution, signal sensitivity, implementational aspects and their relative merits for establishing internuclear proximities and quadrupolar tensor orientations. PMID:20202872

  7. Two-dimensional MAS NMR correlation protocols involving double-quantum filtering of quadrupolar spin-pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edén, Mattias

    2010-05-01

    Three two-dimensional (2D) NMR homonuclear correlation techniques invoking double-quantum (2Q) filtration of the central transitions of half-integer spins are evaluated numerically and experimentally. They correlate directly detected single-quantum (1Q) coherences in the t2 domain with either of 1Q, two-spin 2Q or single-spin multiple-quantum coherence-evolutions in the indirect (t1) dimension. We employ experimental 23Na and 27Al NMR on sodium sulfite and the natural mineral sillimanite (SiAl2O5), in conjunction with simulated 2D spectra from pairs of dipolar-recoupled spins-3/2 and 5/2 at different external magnetic fields, to compare the correlation strategies from the viewpoints of 2D spectral resolution, signal sensitivity, implementational aspects and their relative merits for establishing internuclear proximities and quadrupolar tensor orientations.

  8. Formation of a twisted synclinic structure by an antiferroelectric liquid crystal material with strong quadrupolar interlayer coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parry-Jones, Lesley; Elston, Steve

    2003-04-01

    Following the work of Rudquist et al. [J. Mater. Chem. 9, 1257 (1999)], the thresholdless mode exhibited by some devices filled with some antiferroelectric liquid crystal materials is widely accepted to be due to the formation of a twisted synclinic structure in the device. In this work, we consider under what circumstances this structure forms in preference to the expected anticlinic structure. We show that a strong polar interaction at the surfaces is a necessary but not sufficient condition, and that a strong quadrupolar component of the interlayer interaction is also required. Examination of the stability of the possible ground states reveals a simple explanation for the frequency and temperature dependent electro-optical properties that are observed experimentally, including priming.

  9. On the Effects of the Evolution of Microbial Mats and Land Plants on the Earth as a Planet. Photometric and Spectroscopic Light Curves of Paleo-Earths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanromá, E.; Pallé, E.; García Munõz, A.

    2013-04-01

    Understanding the spectral and photometric variability of the Earth and the rest of the solar system planets has become of utmost importance for the future characterization of rocky exoplanets. As this is not only interesting at present times but also along the planetary evolution, we studied the effect that the evolution of microbial mats and plants over land has had on the way our planet looks from afar. As life evolved, continental surfaces changed gradually and non-uniformly from deserts through microbial mats to land plants, modifying the reflective properties of the ground and most likely the distribution of moisture and cloudiness. Here, we used a radiative transfer model of the Earth, together with geological paleo-records of the continental distribution and a reconstructed cloud distribution, to simulate the visible and near-IR radiation reflected by our planet as a function of Earth's rotation. We found that the evolution from deserts to microbial mats and to land plants produces detectable changes in the globally averaged Earth's reflectance. The variability of each surface type is located in different bands and can induce reflectance changes of up to 40% in period of hours. We conclude that by using photometric observations of an Earth-like planet at different photometric bands it would be possible to discriminate between different surface types. While recent literature proposes the red-edge feature of vegetation near 0.7 μm as a signature for land plants, observations in near-IR bands can be equally or even better suited for this purpose.

  10. ON THE EFFECTS OF THE EVOLUTION OF MICROBIAL MATS AND LAND PLANTS ON THE EARTH AS A PLANET. PHOTOMETRIC AND SPECTROSCOPIC LIGHT CURVES OF PALEO-EARTHS

    SciTech Connect

    Sanroma, E.; Palle, E.; Garcia Munoz, A.

    2013-04-01

    Understanding the spectral and photometric variability of the Earth and the rest of the solar system planets has become of utmost importance for the future characterization of rocky exoplanets. As this is not only interesting at present times but also along the planetary evolution, we studied the effect that the evolution of microbial mats and plants over land has had on the way our planet looks from afar. As life evolved, continental surfaces changed gradually and non-uniformly from deserts through microbial mats to land plants, modifying the reflective properties of the ground and most likely the distribution of moisture and cloudiness. Here, we used a radiative transfer model of the Earth, together with geological paleo-records of the continental distribution and a reconstructed cloud distribution, to simulate the visible and near-IR radiation reflected by our planet as a function of Earth's rotation. We found that the evolution from deserts to microbial mats and to land plants produces detectable changes in the globally averaged Earth's reflectance. The variability of each surface type is located in different bands and can induce reflectance changes of up to 40% in period of hours. We conclude that by using photometric observations of an Earth-like planet at different photometric bands it would be possible to discriminate between different surface types. While recent literature proposes the red-edge feature of vegetation near 0.7 {mu}m as a signature for land plants, observations in near-IR bands can be equally or even better suited for this purpose.

  11. Effectiveness of GeoWall Visualization Technology for Conceptualization of the Sun-Earth-Moon System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, N. E.; Gray, C.; Mitchell, E. J.

    2004-12-01

    One persistent difficulty many introductory astronomy students face is the lack of a 3-dimensional mental model of the Earth-Moon system. Students without such a mental model can have a very hard time conceptualizing the geometric relationships that cause the cycle of lunar phases. The GeoWall is a recently developed and affordable projection mechanism for three-dimensional stereo visualization which is becoming a popular tool in classrooms and research labs. We present results from a study using a 3-D GeoWall with a simulated sunlit Earth-Moon system on undergraduate students' ability to understand the origins of lunar phases. We test students exposed to only in-class instruction, some with a laboratory exercise using the GeoWall Earth-Moon simulation, some students who were exposed to both, and some with an alternate activity involving lunar observations. Students are given pre and post tests using the a diagnostic test called the Lunar Phase Concept Inventory (LPCI). We discuss the effectiveness of this technology as a teaching tool for lunar phases.

  12. Displacements of the earth's surface due to atmospheric loading - Effects of gravity and baseline measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Dam, T. M.; Wahr, J. M.

    1987-01-01

    Atmospheric mass loads and deforms the earth's crust. By performing a convolution sum between daily, global barometric pressure data and mass loading Green's functions, the time dependent effects of atmospheric loading, including those associated with short-term synoptic storms, on surface point positioning measurements and surface gravity observations are estimated. The response for both an oceanless earth and an earth with an inverted barometer ocean is calculated. Load responses for near-coastal stations are significantly affected by the inclusion of an inverted barometer ocean. Peak-to-peak vertical displacements are frequently 15-20 mm with accompanying gravity perturbations of 3-6 micro Gal. Baseline changes can be as large as 20 mm or more. The perturbations are largest at higher latitudes and during winter months. These amplitudes are consistent with the results of Rabbel and Zschau (1985), who modeled synoptic pressure disturbances as Gaussian functions of radius around a central point. Deformation can be adequately computed using real pressure data from points within about 1000 km of the station. Knowledge of local pressure, alone, is not sufficient. Rabbel and Zschau's hypothesized corrections for these displacements, which use local pressure and the regionally averaged pressure, prove accurate at points well inland but are, in general, inadequate within a few hundred kilometers of the coast.

  13. Effect of Phase Transitions on Compressional-Wave Velocites in the Earth Mantle

    SciTech Connect

    Li,L.; Weidner, D.

    2008-01-01

    The velocities of seismic waves in the Earth are governed by the response of the constituent mineral assemblage to perturbations in pressure and stress. The effective bulk modulus is significantly lowered if the pressure of the seismic wave drives a volume-reducing phase transformation. A comparison between the amount of time required by phase transitions to reach equilibrium and the sampling period thus becomes crucial in defining the softening and attenuation of compressional waves within such a two-phase zone3. These phenomena are difficult to assess experimentally, however, because data at conditions appropriate to the Earth's deep interior are required. Here we present synchrotron-based experimental data that demonstrate softening of the bulk modulus within the two-phase loop of olivine-ringwoodite on a timescale of 100 s. If the amplitude of the pressure perturbation and the grain size are scaled to those expected in the Earth, the compressional-wave velocities within the discontinuities at 410, 520 and, possibly, 660 km are likely to be significantly lower than otherwise expected. The generalization of these observations to aluminium-controlled phase transitions raises the possibility of large velocity perturbations throughout the upper 1,000 km of the mantle.

  14. Sunlight effects on the 3D polar current system determined from low Earth orbit measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laundal, Karl M.; Finlay, Christopher C.; Olsen, Nils

    2016-08-01

    Interaction between the solar wind and the Earth's magnetosphere is associated with large-scale currents in the ionosphere at polar latitudes that flow along magnetic field lines (Birkeland currents) and horizontally. These current systems are tightly linked, but their global behaviors are rarely analyzed together. In this paper, we present estimates of the average global Birkeland currents and horizontal ionospheric currents from the same set of magnetic field measurements. The magnetic field measurements, from the low Earth orbiting Swarm and CHAMP satellites, are used to co-estimate poloidal and toroidal parts of the magnetic disturbance field, represented in magnetic apex coordinates. The use of apex coordinates reduces effects of longitudinal and hemispheric variations in the Earth's main field. We present global currents from both hemispheres during different sunlight conditions. The results show that the Birkeland currents vary with the conductivity, which depends most strongly on solar EUV emissions on the dayside and on particle precipitation at pre-midnight magnetic local times. In sunlight, the horizontal equivalent current flows in two cells, resembling an opposite ionospheric convection pattern, which implies that it is dominated by Hall currents. By combining the Birkeland current maps and the equivalent current, we are able to calculate the total horizontal current, without any assumptions about the conductivity. We show that the total horizontal current is close to zero in the polar cap when it is dark. That implies that the equivalent current, which is sensed by ground magnetometers, is largely canceled by the horizontal closure of the Birkeland currents.

  15. High-Accuracy Ring Laser Gyroscopes: Earth Rotation Rate and Relativistic Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beverini, N.; Di Virgilio, A.; Belfi, J.; Ortolan, A.; Schreiber, K. U.; Gebauer, A.; Klügel, T.

    2016-06-01

    The Gross Ring G is a square ring laser gyroscope, built as a monolithic Zerodur structure with 4 m length on all sides. It has demonstrated that a large ring laser provides a sensitivity high enough to measure the rotational rate of the Earth with a high precision of ΔΩE < 10-8. It is possible to show that further improvement in accuracy could allow the observation of the metric frame dragging, produced by the Earth rotating mass (Lense-Thirring effect), as predicted by General Relativity. Furthermore, it can provide a local measurement of the Earth rotational rate with a sensitivity near to that provided by the international system IERS. The GINGER project is intending to take this level of sensitivity further and to improve the accuracy and the long-term stability. A monolithic structure similar to the G ring laser is not available for GINGER. Therefore the preliminary goal is the demonstration of the feasibility of a larger gyroscope structure, where the mechanical stability is obtained through an active control of the geometry. A prototype moderate size gyroscope (GP-2) has been set up in Pisa in order to test this active control of the ring geometry, while a second structure (GINGERino) has been installed inside the Gran Sasso underground laboratory in order to investigate the properties of a deep underground laboratory in view of an installation of a future GINGER apparatus. The preliminary data on these two latter instruments are presented.

  16. The Effect of Future Thermal Sea Level Changes on the Excitation of Earth Orientation Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landerer, F. W.; Jungclaus, J.; Marotzke, J.

    2008-12-01

    We present a mechanism by which steric sea level rise leads to changes of the Earth's orientation parameters, e.g., polar motion (PM) and length-of-day (LOD) on decadal to centennial timescales. Steric sea level change is commonly considered unable to excite changes in Earth's orientation parameters. We show, however, that a causal link exists since thermal sea level rise leads to horizontal mass redistribution within ocean basins and hence to ocean bottom pressure changes. The projected changes of ocean angular momentum in the 21st and 22nd century are derived from simulations with the coupled climate models ECHAM5/MPI-OM and GFDL-CM2.1, forced with the IPCC-A1B emission scenario. The net effect is a mass transfer from the southern to the northern hemisphere, and also a net movement of mass closer towards Earth's axis of rotation. This, in turn, leads to a small negative LOD trend of about -0.002 ms per 10 millimeter of steric sea level rise. For polar motion, we project that ocean warming excits a movement of about 1.7 milli-arcseconds per 10 millimeter of steric sea level rise, nearly linearly polarized towards 150 degrees West. Because steric sea level rise was too small over the last 50 years, this mechanism cannot account for unexplained observed decadal fluctuations of PM and LOD during this period. However, as ocean warming and steric sea level rise are expected to accelerate in the decades to come, we conjecture that steric sea level rise could contribute increasingly more to Earth orientation variations in the near future.

  17. Necessity of using heterogeneous ellipsoidal Earth model with terrain to calculate co-seismic effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Huihong; Zhang, Bei; Zhang, Huai; Huang, Luyuan; Qu, Wulin; Shi, Yaolin

    2016-04-01

    Co-seismic deformation and stress changes, which reflect the elasticity of the earth, are very important in the earthquake dynamics, and also to other issues, such as the evaluation of the seismic risk, fracture process and triggering of earthquake. Lots of scholars have researched the dislocation theory and co-seismic deformation and obtained the half-space homogeneous model, half-space stratified model, spherical stratified model, and so on. Especially, models of Okada (1992) and Wang (2003, 2006) are widely applied in the research of calculating co-seismic and post-seismic effects. However, since both semi-infinite space model and layered model do not take the role of the earth curvature or heterogeneity or topography into consideration, there are large errors in calculating the co-seismic displacement of a great earthquake in its impacted area. Meanwhile, the computational methods of calculating the co-seismic strain and stress are different between spherical model and plane model. Here, we adopted the finite element method which could well deal with the complex characteristics (such as anisotropy, discontinuities) of rock and different conditions. We use the mash adaptive technique to automatically encrypt the mesh at the fault and adopt the equivalent volume force replace the dislocation source, which can avoid the difficulty in handling discontinuity surface with conventional (Zhang et al., 2015). We constructed an earth model that included earth's layered structure and curvature, the upper boundary was set as a free surface and the core-mantle boundary was set under buoyancy forces. Firstly, based on the precision requirement, we take a testing model - - a strike-slip fault (the length of fault is 500km and the width is 50km, and the slippage is 10m) for example. Because of the curvature of the Earth, some errors certainly occur in plane coordinates just as previous studies (Dong et al., 2014; Sun et al., 2012). However, we also found that: 1) the co

  18. Effect of Irregularities in the Earth's Rotation on Relativistic Shifts in Frequency and Time of Earthbound Atomic Clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fateev, V. F.; Kopeikin, S. M.; Pasynok, S. L., S. L.

    2015-10-01

    The effect of irregularities in the earth's rotation (precession and nutation of the earth's axis of rotation, oscillations in the modulus of the angular velocity, periodic deviations in the line of the poles, and the angular momentum of the globe) on the frequency and time of high-stability atomic clocks are examined in terms of the theory of relativity. It is shown that the relative shift in frequency and time owing to these effects can exceed 5×10-16.

  19. Loss of Water in Early Earth's Atmosphere and Its Effects on Habitability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Airapetian, Vladimir; Glocer, Alex; Khazanov, George

    2015-08-01

    The short wavelength emission from the Sun has a profound impact on the Earth’s atmosphere. High energy photons ionize the atmosphere and produce photoelectrons. This process provides a major contribution to the acceleration of atmospheric ions due to the vertical separation of ions and electrons, and the formation of the resulting ambipolar electric field. Observations and theory suggest that even a relatively small fraction of super-thermal electrons (photoelectrons) produced due to photoionization can drive the ”polar wind” that is responsible for the transport of ionospheric constituents to the Earth’s magnetosphere.The young Sun was a magnetically active star generating powerful radiative output from its chromosphere, transition region and corona which was a few hundred times greater than that observed today. What effects would the photoionization processes due to the X-ray-UV solar flux from early Sun have on the loss of water from the early Earth?We use the Fokker-Plank code coupled with 1D hydrodynamic code to model the effect of intensive short-wavelength (X-rays to UV band) emission from the young Sun (3.8 and 4.4 Ga) on Earth's atmosphere. Our simulations include the photoionization processes of the Earth’s atmosphere forming a population of photoelectrons (E<600 eV), the kinetic effects of their propagation associated and their contribution in ionosphere - magnetosphere energy redistribution. Our coupled simulations show that the ambipolar electric field can drag atmospheric ions of oxygen and hydrogen to the magnetosphere and produce significant mass loss that can affect the loss of water from the early Earth in the first half a billion years. This process became less efficient in the next 0.2-0.3 Ga that could have provided a window of opportunity for origin of life.

  20. Effects of the observed J2 variations on the Earth's precession and nutation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrándiz, José M.; Baenas, Tomás; Belda, Santiago

    2016-04-01

    The Earth's oblateness parameter J2 is closely related to the dynamical ellipticity H, which factorizes the main components of the precession and the different nutation terms. In most theoretical approaches to the Earth's rotation, with IAU2000 nutation theory among them, H is assumed to be constant. The precession model IAU2006 supposes H to have a conventional linear variation, based on the J2 time series derived mainly from satellite laser ranging (SLR) data for decades, which gives rise to an additional quadratic term of the precession in longitude and some corrections of the nutation terms. The time evolution of J2 is, however, too complex to be well approximated by a simple linear model. The effect of more general models including periodic terms and closer to the observed time series, although still unable to reproduce a significant part of the signal, has been seldom investigated. In this work we address the problem of deriving the effect of the observed J2 variations without resorting to such simplified models. The Hamiltonian approach to the Earth rotation is extended to allow the McCullagh's term of the potential to depend on a time-varying oblateness. An analytical solution is derived by means of a suitable perturbation method in the case of the time series provided by the Center for Space Research (CSR) of the University of Texas, which results in non-negligible contributions to the precession-nutation angles. The presentation focuses on the main effects on the longitude of the equator; a noticeable non-linear trend is superimposed to the linear main precession term, along with some periodic and decadal variations.

  1. Systematic effect of the Galactic aberration on the ICRS realization and the Earth orientation parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jia-Cheng; Capitaine, Nicole; Lambert, Sébastien; Malkin, Zinovy; Zhu, Zi

    2012-08-01

    The curvature of the motion of the solar system barycenter (SSB) around the Galactic center induces an aberration effect vary ing linearly with time that can be called "Galactic aberration". This results in a systematic dipole pattern of the apparent proper motions of the ensemble of distant extragalactic objects which defines the International Celestial Reference System (ICRS). The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of the Galactic aberration on the ICRS realization and on the Earth orientation parameters (EOP) referred to the ICRS. We first compute theoretically the global rotation of the ICRS resulting from the Galactic aberration effect and then evaluate the corresponding influence on the EOP using CIO based ICRS - to - ITRS coordinate transformation. Based on the ICRF and ICRF2 catalogs, we evaluate this effect over short and long time intervals. We have demonstrated that the effects of the Galactic aberration strongly depend on the distribution of the sources that are used to realize the celestial reference system. According to the realistic distribution of the defining sources of the ICRF and ICRF2, the amplitudes of the systematic effect on the coordinates of the Celestial intermediate pole (CIP) are up to 50 and 5 microarcseconds, respectively after one century from J2000.0 while the effects on the Earth Rotation Angle (ERA) are of several tens of microarcseconds. The Galactic aberration effect cannot be neglected with the improving precision in modern astrometry and the increasing length of the available VLBI observation time series. More radio sources, especially in the southern hemisphere should be observed to make more homogeneous distribution of the defining sources in the ICRF in order to minimize that effect.

  2. The influence of earth tides on earth's coordinates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincente, R. O.

    1978-01-01

    The importance of the Earth's tides on Earth coordinates were examined for the following reasons: (1) the precision for obtaining the Earth's coordinates shows that the effects of Earth tides appear on the values obtained for the coordinates; (2) the possibility of determining the values of the Earth tides; and (3) the consideration of theoretical models that can compute the values of Earth tides. The astronomical and geodetic coordinates of a point at the Earth's surface are described.

  3. Effects of clouds on the Earth radiation budget; Seasonal and inter-annual patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhuria, Harbans L.

    1992-01-01

    Seasonal and regional variations of clouds and their effects on the climatological parameters were studied. The climatological parameters surface temperature, solar insulation, short-wave absorbed, long wave emitted, and net radiation were considered. The data of climatological parameters consisted of about 20 parameters of Earth radiation budget and clouds of 2070 target areas which covered the globe. It consisted of daily and monthly averages of each parameter for each target area for the period, Jun. 1979 - May 1980. Cloud forcing and black body temperature at the top of the atmosphere were calculated. Interactions of clouds, cloud forcing, black body temperature, and the climatological parameters were investigated and analyzed.

  4. The effect of the low Earth orbit environment on space solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinker, David J.; Hickey, John R.; Brasted, Donald K.

    1990-01-01

    The results of a space flight experiment designed to provide reference cell standards for photovoltaic measurements as well as to investigate the solar spectrum and the effect of long-term exposure of solar cells to the space environment are presented. This experiment, the Advanced Photovoltaic Experiment (APEX), was launched into low Earth orbit as part of the Long Duration Exposure Facility in 1984 and retrieved 69 months later. APEX contained over 150 solar cells of a wide variety of materials, designs and coverglasses. Data on cell performance was recorded for the first year-on-orbit.

  5. Large Superconducting Spin Valve Effect and Ultrasmall Exchange Splitting in Epitaxial Rare-Earth-Niobium Trilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Yuanzhou; Halász, Gábor B.; Robinson, J. W. A.; Blamire, M. G.

    2015-08-01

    Epitaxial Ho /Nb /Ho and Dy /Nb /Dy superconducting spin valves show a reversible change in the zero-field critical temperature (Δ Tc 0 ) of ˜400 mK and an infinite magnetoresistance on changing the relative magnetization of the Ho or Dy layers. Unlike transition-metal superconducting spin valves, which show much smaller Δ Tc 0 values, our results can be quantitatively modeled. However, the fits require an extraordinarily low induced exchange splitting which is dramatically lower than known values for rare-earth Fermi-level electrons, implying that new models for the magnetic proximity effect may be required.

  6. Effective and responsible teaching of climate change in Earth Science-related disciplines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Z. P.; Greenhough, B. J.

    2009-04-01

    topic to cover within the Earth Science-related curricula due to wide-ranging, and sometimes polarised, existing attitudes of students and levels of existing partial and sometimes flawed knowledge in addition to the troublesome concepts that need to be grasped. These issues highlight the responsibility and challenge inherent in teaching the subject of climate change and the importance of consideration of integrating sustainability issues with the core science of climate change. The talk will include a discussion of strategies and resources for the effective teaching of climate change topics for a range of levels and discipline backgrounds.

  7. In hot water: effects of temperature-dependent interiors on the radii of water-rich super-Earths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Scott W.; Madhusudhan, Nikku

    2016-05-01

    Observational advancements are leading to increasingly precise measurements of super-Earth masses and radii. Such measurements are used in internal structure models to constrain interior compositions of super-Earths. It is now critically important to quantify the effect of various model assumptions on the predicted radii. In particular, models often neglect thermal effects, a choice justified by noting that the thermal expansion of a solid Earth-like planet is small. However, the thermal effects for water-rich interiors may be significant. We have systematically explored the extent to which thermal effects can influence the radii of water-rich super-Earths over a wide range of masses, surface temperatures, surface pressures and water mass fractions. We developed temperature-dependent internal structure models of water-rich super-Earths that include a comprehensive temperature-dependent water equation of state. We found that thermal effects induce significant changes in their radii. For example, for super-Earths with 10 per cent water by mass, the radius increases by up to 0.5 R⊕ when the surface temperature is increased from 300 to 1000 K, assuming a surface pressure of 100 bar and an adiabatic temperature gradient in the water layer. The increase is even larger at lower surface pressures and/or higher surface temperatures, while changing the water fraction makes only a marginal difference. These effects are comparable to current super-Earth radial measurement errors, which can be better than 0.1 R⊕. It is therefore important to ensure that the thermal behaviour of water is taken into account when interpreting super-Earth radii using internal structure models.

  8. Effect of Long-Period Ocean Tides on the Earth's Polar Motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, R. S.; Chao, B. F.; Desai, S. D.

    1997-01-01

    The second-degree zonal tide raising potential is symmetric about the polar axis and hence can excite the Earth's polar motion only through its action upon nonaxisymmetric features of the Earth such as the oceans.

  9. On the effect of ocean tides and tesseral harmonics on spacecraft flybys of the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acedo, L.

    2016-09-01

    The so-called flyby anomaly has encouraged several authors to analyze in detail the minor perturbative contributions to the trajectory of spacecraft performing a flyby manoeuvre. This anomaly consist of an unexplained increase or decrease of the asymptotic velocity of the spacecraft after a flyby of the Earth in the range of a few mm per second. Some order of magnitude estimations have been performed in recent years to dismiss many possible conventional effects as the source of such an anomaly but no explanation has been found yet. In this paper we perform a study of the perturbation induced by ocean tides in a flybying spacecraft by considering the time dependence of the location of the high tide as the Moon follows its orbit. We show that this effect implies a change of the spacecraft velocity of a few micrometers per second. We also consider the coupling of tesseral harmonics inhomogeneities and the rotation of the Earth and its impact of the spacecraft outgoing velocity. Significant corrections to the observed asymptotic velocities are found in this case but neither their sign nor their magnitude coincide with the anomalies. So, we can also rule this out as a conventional explanation.

  10. Near-Earth Magnetic Field Effects of Large-Scale Magnetospheric Currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lühr, Hermann; Xiong, Chao; Olsen, Nils; Le, Guan

    2016-07-01

    Magnetospheric currents play an important role in the electrodynamics of near-Earth space. This has been the topic of many space science studies. Here we focus on the magnetic fields they cause close to Earth. Their contribution to the geomagnetic field is the second largest after the core field. Significant progress in interpreting the magnetic fields from the different sources has been achieved thanks to magnetic satellite missions like Ørsted, CHAMP and now Swarm. Of particular interest for this article is a proper representation of the magnetospheric ring current effect. Uncertainties in modelling its effect still produce the largest residuals between observations and present-day geomagnetic field models. A lot of progress has been achieved so far, but there are still open issues like the characteristics of the partial ring current. Other currents discussed are those flowing in the magnetospheric tail. Also their magnetic contribution at LEO orbits is non-negligible. Treating them as an independent source is a more recent development, which has cured some of the problems in geomagnetic field modelling. Unfortunately there is no index available for characterising the tail current intensity. Here we propose an approach that may help to properly quantify the magnetic contribution from the tail current for geomagnetic field modelling. Some open questions that require further investigation are mentioned at the end.

  11. Near-Earth Magnetic Field Effects of Large-Scale Magnetospheric Currents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luehr, Hermann; Xiong, Chao; Olsen, Nils; Le, Guan

    2016-01-01

    Magnetospheric currents play an important role in the electrodynamics of near- Earth space. This has been the topic of many space science studies. Here we focus on the magnetic fields they cause close to Earth. Their contribution to the geomagnetic field is the second largest after the core field. Significant progress in interpreting the magnetic fields from the different sources has been achieved thanks to magnetic satellite missions like Ørsted, CHAMP and now Swarm. Of particular interest for this article is a proper representation of the magnetospheric ring current effect. Uncertainties in modelling its effect still produce the largest residuals between observations and present-day geomagnetic field models. A lot of progress has been achieved so far, but there are still open issues like the characteristics of the partial ring current. Other currents discussed are those flowing in the magnetospheric tail. Also their magnetic contribution at LEO orbits is non-negligible. Treating them as an independent source is a more recent development, which has cured some of the problems in geomagnetic field modelling. Unfortunately there is no index available for characterizing the tail current intensity. Here we propose an approach that may help to properly quantify the magnetic contribution from the tail current for geomagnetic field modelling. Some open questions that require further investigation are mentioned at the end.

  12. Metal enhanced fluorescence in rare earth doped plasmonic core-shell nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Derom, S; Berthelot, A; Pillonnet, A; Benamara, O; Jurdyc, A M; Girard, C; Colas des Francs, G

    2013-12-13

    We theoretically and numerically investigate metal enhanced fluorescence of plasmonic core-shell nanoparticles doped with rare earth (RE) ions. Particle shape and size are engineered to maximize the average enhancement factor (AEF) of the overall doped shell. We show that the highest enhancement (11 in the visible and 7 in the near-infrared) is achieved by tuning either the dipolar or the quadrupolar particle resonance to the rare earth ion's excitation wavelength. Additionally, the calculated AEFs are compared to experimental data reported in the literature, obtained in similar conditions (plasmon mediated enhancement) or when a metal-RE energy transfer mechanism is involved.

  13. Quantum effects on Lagrangian points and displaced periodic orbits in the Earth-Moon system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battista, Emmanuele; Dell'Agnello, Simone; Esposito, Giampiero; Simo, Jules

    2015-04-01

    Recent work in the literature has shown that the one-loop long distance quantum corrections to the Newtonian potential imply tiny but observable effects in the restricted three-body problem of celestial mechanics; i.e., at the Lagrangian libration points of stable equilibrium, the planetoid is not exactly at an equal distance from the two bodies of large mass, but the Newtonian values of its coordinates are changed by a few millimeters in the Earth-Moon system. First, we assess such a theoretical calculation by exploiting the full theory of the quintic equation, i.e., its reduction to Bring-Jerrard form and the resulting expression of roots in terms of generalized hypergeometric functions. By performing the numerical analysis of the exact formulas for the roots, we confirm and slightly improve the theoretical evaluation of quantum corrected coordinates of Lagrangian libration points of stable equilibrium. Second, we prove in detail that for collinear Lagrangian points the quantum corrections are also of the same order of magnitude in the Earth-Moon system. Third, we discuss the prospects of measuring, with the help of laser ranging, the above departure from the equilateral triangle picture, which is a challenging task. On the other hand, a modern version of the planetoid is the solar sail, and much progress has been made, in recent years, on the displaced periodic orbits of solar sails at all libration points, both stable and unstable. Therefore, the present paper investigates, eventually, a restricted three-body problem involving Earth, the Moon, and a solar sail. By taking into account the one-loop quantum corrections to the Newtonian potential, displaced periodic orbits of the solar sail at libration points are again found to exist.

  14. The effect of the Earth's oblateness on the Moon's physical libration in latitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondratyev, B. P.

    2013-05-01

    The Moon's physical libration in latitude generated by gravitational forces caused by the Earth's oblateness has been examined by a vector analytical method. Libration oscillations are described by a close set of five linear inhomogeneous differential equations, the dispersion equation has five roots, one of which is zero. A complete solution is obtained. It is revealed that the Earth's oblateness: a) has little effect on the instantaneous axis of Moon's rotation, but causes an oscillatory rotation of the body of the Moon with an amplitude of 0.072″ and pulsation period of 16.88 Julian years; b) causes small nutations of poles of the orbit and of the ecliptic along tight spirals, which occupy a disk with a cut in a center and with radius of 0.072″. Perturbations caused by the spherical Earth generate: a) physical librations in latitude with an amplitude of 34.275″; b) nutational motion for centers of small spiral nutations of orbit (ecliptic) pole over ellipses with semi-major axes of 113.850″ (85.158″) and the first pole rotates round the second one along a circle with radius of 28.691″; c) nutation of the Moon's celestial pole over an ellipse with a semi-major axis of 45.04″ and with an axes ratio of about 0.004 with a period of T = 27.212 days. The principal ellipse's axis is directed tangentially with respect to the precession circumference, along which the celestial pole moves nonuniformly nearly in one dimension. In contrast to the accepted concept, the latitude does not change while the Moon's poles of rotation move. The dynamical reason for the inclination of the Moon's mean equator with respect to the ecliptic is oblateness of the body of the Moon.

  15. Effective Integration of the World-Wide Web in Earth Science Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herbert, Bruce; Bednarz, Sarah; Boyd, Tom; Blake, Sally; Harder, Vicki; Sutter, Marilyn

    The earth sciences is an evolving set of disciplines encompassing more than 30 specialties; however, earth scientists continue to be trained within the traditional disciplinary structure. Earth science education should focus not only on student acquisition and retention of factual knowledge, but also on the development of higher-order skills…

  16. Non-Spherical Source-Surface Model of the Corona and Heliosphere for a Quadrupolar Main Field of the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, M.

    2008-05-01

    Different methods of modeling the coronal and heliospheric magnetic field are conveniently visualized and intercompared by applying them to ideally axisymmetric field models. Thus, for example, a dipolar main B field with its moment parallel to the Sun's rotation axis leads to a flat heliospheric current sheet. More general solar main B fields (still axisymmetric about the solar rotation axis for simplicity) typically lead to cone-shaped current sheets beyond the source surface (and presumably also in MHD models). As in the dipolar case [Schulz et al., Solar Phys., 60, 83-104, 1978], such conical current sheets can be made realistically thin by taking the source surface to be non-spherical in a way that reflects the underlying structure of the Sun's main B field. A source surface that seems to work well in this respect [Schulz, Ann. Geophysicae, 15, 1379-1387, 1997] is a surface of constant F = (1/r)kB, where B is the scalar strength of the Sun's main magnetic field and k (~ 1.4) is a shape parameter. This construction tends to flatten the source surface in regions where B is relatively weak. Thus, for example, the source surface for a dipolar B field is shaped somewhat like a Rugby football, whereas the source surface for an axisymmetric quadrupolar B field is similarly elongated but somewhat flattened (as if stuffed into a pair of co-axial cones) at mid-latitudes. A linear combination of co-axial dipolar and quadrupolar B fields generates a somewhat apple-shaped source surface. If the region surrounded by the source surface is regarded as current-free, then the source surface itself should be (as nearly as possible) an equipotential surface for the corresponding magnetic scalar potential (expanded, for example, in spherical harmonics). More generally, the mean-square tangential component of the coronal magnetic field over the source surface should be minimized with respect to any adjustable parameters of the field model. The solar wind should then flow not quite

  17. Proceedings of the NASA Workshop on Atomic Oxygen Effects. [low earth orbital environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinza, David E. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    A workshop was held to address the scientific issues concerning the effects of atomic oxygen on materials in the low Earth orbital (LEO) environment. The program included 18 invited speakers plus contributed posters covering topics such as LEO spaceflight experiments, interaction mechanisms, and atomic oxygen source development. Discussion sessions were also held to organize a test program to evaluate atomic oxygen exposure facilities. The key issues raised in the workshop were: (1) the need to develop a reliable predictive model of the effects of long-term exposure of materials to the LEO environment; (2) the ability of ground-based exposure facilities to provide useful data for development of durable materials; and (3) accurate determination of the composition of the LEO environment. These proceedings include the invited papers, the abstracts for the contributed posters, and an account of the test program discussion sessions.

  18. Low Earth orbital atomic oxygen and ultraviolet radiation effects on polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dever, Joyce A.

    1991-01-01

    Because atomic oxygen and solar ultraviolet radiation present in the low earth orbital (LEO) environment can alter the chemistry of polymers resulting in degradation, their effects and mechanisms of degradation must be determined in order to determine the long term durability of polymeric surfaces to be exposed on missions such as Space Station Freedom. The effects of atomic oxygen on polymers which contain protective coatings must also be explored, since unique damage mechanisms can occur in areas where the protective coatings has failed. Mechanisms can be determined by utilizing results from previous LEO missions, by performing ground based LEO simulation tests and analysis, and by carrying out focussed space experiments. A survey is presented of the interactions and possible damage mechanisms for environmental atomic oxygen and UV radiation exposure of polymers commonly used in LEO.

  19. Colossal magnetodielectric effect in DyMn2O5: Electromagnons or rare earth?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sushkov, Andrei; Drew, Dennis; Kant, Christian; Shuvaev, Alexey; Pimenov, Andrei; Zvyagin, Sergei; Lorenz, Bernd; Cheong, Sang-Wook

    2012-02-01

    We report on the results of spectroscopic studies of the excitations responsible for the colossal magnetodielectric effect in DyMn2O5 [1]. On one hand, many RMn2O5 compounds have electromagnons capable of inducing large steps in the dielectric constant. On the other hand, rare earth ions can posses electric dipole moments and also can produce dielectric anomalies. Both types of excitations are expected in the experimentally difficult low energy range 0.1-1 meV. We use high frequency dielectric, Fourier transform and back-wave oscillator spectroscopies in combination with low temperature and magnetic field up to 9 T to clarify the origin of the dielectric anomaly in DyMn2O5. [1] N. Hur, S. Park, P. A. Sharma, S. Guha, and S-W. Cheong, Colossal Magnetodielectric Effects in DyMn2O5, PRL 93, 107207 (2004).

  20. The effects of low earth orbit atomic oxygen on the properties of Polytetrafluoroethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooshangi, Zhila; Hossein Feghhi, Seyed Amir; Saeedzadeh, Rezgar

    2016-02-01

    Polymers are widely used in space systems as the structural materials. The low earth orbit (LEO) space environment includes hazards such as atomic oxygen. Exposure of polymeric materials to atomic oxygen results in destructive effects on the chemical, electrical, thermal, optical and mechanical properties as well as surface degradation. In the present work, the effects of atomic oxygen on the mechanical, thermal, and optical properties of Polytetrafluoroethylene film have been investigated. The atomic oxygen density was calculated by SPENVIS tool. After the atomic oxygen exposure by using radio-frequency (RF) plasma source, the appearance of the samples changed, and the mass of the samples reduced because of outgassing. The results of thermal analysis showed that atomic oxygen flux does not affect thermal degradation of samples regarding TGA diagrams. By increasing the atomic oxygen flux, the amount of absorbance increased showing that atomic oxygen had damaged the surface of Polytetrafluoroethylene, and it had oxidized the surface of the polymer.

  1. Excitonic effects in the optical properties of alkaline earth chalcogenides from first-principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nejatipour, Hajar; Dadsetani, Mehrdad

    2015-08-01

    This paper studies excitonic effects in the optical properties of alkaline earth chalcogenides (AECs) by solving the equation of motion of the two-particle Green function, the Bethe-Salpeter equation (BSE). On the basis of quasi-particle states obtained by the GW approximation, (BSE + GW), the solution of BSE improves agreement with experiments. In these compounds, the main excitonic structures were reproduced appropriately. In the optical absorption spectra of AECs, the main excitonic structures originate in the direct transitions at X and Γ symmetry points, as confirmed by the experiments. In addition to real and imaginary parts of the dielectric functions, excitonic effects were studied in the electron energy loss functions of AECs. Moreover, the G0W0 approximation was used in order to determine the energy band gaps of AECs. This showed that except for MgO and BaO, the other AECs under study have indirect band gaps from Γ to X.

  2. Effect of metallic nanoparticle fillers on the thermal conductivity of diatomaceous earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diallo, Mouhamad S.; Srinivasan, Srilok; Chang, Boyce; Ghosh, Suvojit; Balasubramanian, Ganesh

    2016-10-01

    Thermal conductivity of solid nanoparticles (aluminum) in a nanoporous solid matrix (diatomaceous earth) is examined to understand the effect of conductive fillers on the thermal properties of a porous material. We find that thermal conductivity is strongly dependent on load applied to prepare the mixture compacts, while porosity is influenced by the composition of the mixture. The addition of nanoparticles contributes to limited increases in thermal conductivity of the mixture by (1) increasing contact area between the mixture constituents and (2) reduction of porosity that leads to enhanced solid-gas coupling contribution. Thermal conductivity increases exponentially with external gas pressures due to the coupling effect between the solid particles and the entrapped air.

  3. Earth2Class workshops for teachers: effective model linking researchers, educators, and students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passow, M. J.; Assumpcao, C. M.; Baggio, F. D.

    2011-12-01

    The Earth2Class Workshops for Teachers at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University (E2C) provide a successful model for disseminating scientific research to teachers and students. E2C takes a multifaceted approach to sharing cutting-edge discoveries, including monthly workshops that bring investigators together with classroom educator and their students, archived versions of the workshops and other educational resources accessible at www.earth2class.org, and active promotion of opportunities for teachers and students to engage directly with research scientists. The wide array of exploration conducted at LDEO have been showcased in more than 115 Saturday workshops since 1998, enabling more than 75 scientists to share their findings directly with over 250 middle and high school teachers and students. Each workshop features an introductory slideshow to provide background knowledge of the theme, the scientist(s)' presentation, and discussion of classroom applications. E2C website resources attract an average of more than 400,000 hits per month during the school year, extending the reach of the program to those unable to attend the workshops in Palisades, NY. E2C has come to be viewed at LDEO as a valid, effective venue to provide broader outreach, and several funded grants have included an E2C workshop in their proposals. Lamont scientists have easily been able to draw on E2C to connect with classroom teachers for a variety of research projects, including "River Summer," "A Day in the Life of the Hudson River," and "Data Puzzles." E2C teachers have assisted scientists during the annual Lamont Open House, which draws about 4,000 visitors. During the last two years, E2C has also co-organized the International Student and Teacher Exchange Program (ISTEP.) ISTEP has brought together high school students from New York City, Singapore, and the Netherlands to conduct field studies about water and soil chemistry, tree rings and forest diversity, and

  4. Effects of rare earth oxide nanoparticles on root elongation of plants.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yuhui; Kuang, Linglin; He, Xiao; Bai, Wei; Ding, Yayun; Zhang, Zhiyong; Zhao, Yuliang; Chai, Zhifang

    2010-01-01

    The phytotoxicity of four rare earth oxide nanoparticles, nano-CeO(2), nano-La(2)O(3), nano-Gd(2)O(3) and nano-Yb(2)O(3) on seven higher plant species (radish, rape, tomato, lettuce, wheat, cabbage, and cucumber) were investigated in the present study by means of root elongation experiments. Their effects on root growth varied greatly between different nanoparticles and plant species. A suspension of 2000 mg L(-1) nano-CeO(2) had no effect on the root elongation of six plants, except lettuce. On the contrary, 2000 mg L(-1) suspensions of nano-La(2)O(3), nano-Gd(2)O(3) and nano-Yb(2)O(3) severely inhibited the root elongation of all the seven species. Inhibitory effects of nano-La(2)O(3), nano-Gd(2)O(3), and nano-Yb(2)O(3) also differed in the different growth process of plants. For wheat, the inhibition mainly took place during the seed incubation process, while lettuce and rape were inhibited on both seed soaking and incubation process. The fifty percent inhibitory concentrations (IC(50)) for rape were about 40 mg L(-1) of nano-La(2)O(3), 20mg L(-1) of nano-Gd(2)O(3), and 70 mg L(-1) of nano-Yb(2)O(3), respectively. In the concentration ranges used in this study, the RE(3+) ion released from the nanoparticles had negligible effects on the root elongation. These results are helpful in understanding phytotoxicity of rare earth oxide nanoparticles.

  5. Effects of rare earth oxide nanoparticles on root elongation of plants.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yuhui; Kuang, Linglin; He, Xiao; Bai, Wei; Ding, Yayun; Zhang, Zhiyong; Zhao, Yuliang; Chai, Zhifang

    2010-01-01

    The phytotoxicity of four rare earth oxide nanoparticles, nano-CeO(2), nano-La(2)O(3), nano-Gd(2)O(3) and nano-Yb(2)O(3) on seven higher plant species (radish, rape, tomato, lettuce, wheat, cabbage, and cucumber) were investigated in the present study by means of root elongation experiments. Their effects on root growth varied greatly between different nanoparticles and plant species. A suspension of 2000 mg L(-1) nano-CeO(2) had no effect on the root elongation of six plants, except lettuce. On the contrary, 2000 mg L(-1) suspensions of nano-La(2)O(3), nano-Gd(2)O(3) and nano-Yb(2)O(3) severely inhibited the root elongation of all the seven species. Inhibitory effects of nano-La(2)O(3), nano-Gd(2)O(3), and nano-Yb(2)O(3) also differed in the different growth process of plants. For wheat, the inhibition mainly took place during the seed incubation process, while lettuce and rape were inhibited on both seed soaking and incubation process. The fifty percent inhibitory concentrations (IC(50)) for rape were about 40 mg L(-1) of nano-La(2)O(3), 20mg L(-1) of nano-Gd(2)O(3), and 70 mg L(-1) of nano-Yb(2)O(3), respectively. In the concentration ranges used in this study, the RE(3+) ion released from the nanoparticles had negligible effects on the root elongation. These results are helpful in understanding phytotoxicity of rare earth oxide nanoparticles. PMID:19897228

  6. The Effect of Low Earth Orbit Atomic Oxygen Exposure on Phenylphosphine Oxide-Containing Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W.

    2000-01-01

    Thin films of phenylphosphine oxide-containing polymers were exposed to low Earth orbit aboard a space shuttle flight (STS-85) as part of flight experiment designated Evaluation of Space Environment and Effects on Materials (ESEM). This flight experiment was a cooperative effort between the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) and the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA). The thin film samples described herein were part of an atomic oxygen exposure experiment (AOE) and were exposed to primarily atomic oxygen (1 X 1019 atoms/cm2). The thin film samples consisted of three phosphine oxide containing polymers (arylene ether, benzimidazole and imide). Based on post-flight analyses using atomic force microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and weight loss data, it was found that atomic oxygen exposure of these materials efficiently produces a phosphate layer at the surface of the samples. This layer provides a barrier towards further attack by AO. Consequently, these materials do not exhibit linear erosion rates which is in contrast with most organic polymers. Qualitatively, the results obtained from these analyses compare favorably with those obtained from samples exposed to atomic oxygen and or oxygen plasma in ground based exposure experiments. The results of the low Earth orbit atomic oxygen exposure on these materials will be compared with those of ground based exposure to AO.

  7. North-South Asymmetries in Earth's Magnetic Field - Effects on High-Latitude Geospace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laundal, K. M.; Cnossen, I.; Milan, S. E.; Haaland, S. E.; Coxon, J.; Pedatella, N. M.; Förster, M.; Reistad, J. P.

    2016-07-01

    The solar-wind magnetosphere interaction primarily occurs at altitudes where the dipole component of Earth's magnetic field is dominating. The disturbances that are created in this interaction propagate along magnetic field lines and interact with the ionosphere-thermosphere system. At ionospheric altitudes, the Earth's field deviates significantly from a dipole. North-South asymmetries in the magnetic field imply that the magnetosphere-ionosphere-thermosphere (M-I-T) coupling is different in the two hemispheres. In this paper we review the primary differences in the magnetic field at polar latitudes, and the consequences that these have for the M-I-T coupling. We focus on two interhemispheric differences which are thought to have the strongest effects: 1) A difference in the offset between magnetic and geographic poles in the Northern and Southern Hemispheres, and 2) differences in the magnetic field strength at magnetically conjugate regions. These asymmetries lead to differences in plasma convection, neutral winds, total electron content, ion outflow, ionospheric currents and auroral precipitation.

  8. Systematic effect of the Galactic aberration on the ICRS realization and the Earth orientation parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J.-C.; Capitaine, N.; Lambert, S. B.; Malkin, Z.; Zhu, Z.

    2012-12-01

    Context. The curvature of the motion of the solar system barycenter around the Galactic center induces an aberration effect varying linearly with time. It can be called the "Galactic aberration" and is also known as the "secular aberration (drift)" or "aberration in proper motions". This results in a systematic dipole pattern of the apparent proper motions of an ensemble of distant extragalactic objects, which are used to define the International Celestial Reference System (ICRS). Aims: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of the Galactic aberration on the ICRS realization and on the Earth orientation parameters (EOP), which refer to the ICRS. Methods: We first computed the global rotation of the celestial reference system resulting from the Galactic aberration effect on the apparent proper motions of the ensemble of extragalactic objects that realize this system. Then we evaluated the influence of the Galactic aberration on the EOP using CIO based ICRS-to-ITRS coordinate transformation. Numerical evaluations of the effect were performed with the ICRF1 and ICRF2 catalogs over short and long time intervals. Results: We show that the effect of the Galactic aberration strongly depends on the distribution of the sources that are used to realize the ICRS. According to different distributions of sources (of the ICRF1 and ICRF2 catalogs) the amplitude of the apparent rotation of the ICRS is included between about 0.2 and 1 microarcsecond per year (μas yr-1). We show that this rotation has no component around the axis pointing to the Galactic center and has an zero amplitude in the case of uniform distribution of sources. The effect on the coordinates of the Celestial intermediate pole (CIP) is included between about 1 to 100 μas after one century from J2000.0, while the effects on the Earth rotation angle (ERA) are from 4 to several tens of μas after one century. Conclusions: We demonstrate that the Galactic aberration is responsible for a variation

  9. Investigating the effect of lateral viscosity variations in the Earth's mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Farrell, K. A.; Lithgow-Bertelloni, C. R.

    2015-12-01

    Seismic tomography can be used to investigate radial viscosity variations on instantaneous flow models by predicting the global geoid and comparing with the observed geoid. This method is one of many that has been used to constrain viscosity structure in the Earth's mantle in the last few decades. Using the 3D mantle convection model, Stag-YY (e.g., Hernlund and Tackley, 2008), we are further able to explore the effect of lateral variations in viscosity in addition to the radial variations. Examining over 50 tomographic models we found notable differences by comparing a synthetically produced geoid with the observed geoid. Comparing S- and P-wave tomographic models, the S-wave models provided a better fit to the observed geoid. Using this large suite of 50 tomographic models, we have been able to constrain the radial viscosity structure of the Earth. We found that two types of viscosity profiles yielded equally good fits. A viscosity profile with a low transition zone viscosity and a lower mantle viscosity equal to the upper mantle, or a profile with a large lower mantle viscosity and a transition zone viscosity similar to the upper mantle. Using the set of radial viscosity profiles that gave the best fit to the observed geoid, we can explore a range of lateral viscosity variations and see how they affect the different types of tomographic models. Improving on previous studies of lateral viscosity variations (e.g. Ghosh, Becker and Zhong, 2010), we systematically explore a large range of tomographic models and density-velocity conversion factors. We explore which type of tomographic model (S- or P- wave) is more strongly affected by lateral viscosity variations, as well as the effect on isotropic and anisotropic models. We constrain the strength of lateral viscosity variations necessary to produce a high correlation between observed and predicted geoid anomalies. We will discuss the wavelength of flow that is most affected by the lateral viscosity variations

  10. Solar Irradiance Changes And Photobiological Effects At Earth's Surface Following Astrophysical Ionizing Radiation Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Brian; Neale, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Astrophysical ionizing radiation events have been recognized as a potential threat to life on Earth for decades. Although there is some direct biological damage on the surface from redistributed radiation several studies have indicated that the greatest long term threat is from ozone depletion and subsequent heightened solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation. It is known that organisms exposed to this irradiation experience harmful effects such as sunburn and even direct damage to DNA, proteins, or other cellular structures. Simulations of the atmospheric effects of a variety of events (such as supernovae, gamma-ray bursts, and solar proton events) have been previously published, along with estimates of biological damage at Earth's surface. In the present work, we employed a radiative transfer model to expand and improve calculations of surface-level irradiance and biological impacts following an ionizing radiation event. We considered changes in surface-level UVB, UVA, and photosynthetically active radiation (visible light). Using biological weighting functions we have considered a wide range of effects, including: erythema and skin cancer in humans; inhibition of photosynthesis in the diatom Phaeodactylum sp. and dinoflagellate Prorocentrum micans inhibition of carbon fixation in Antarctic phytoplankton; inhibition of growth of oat (Avena sativa L. cv. Otana) seedlings; and cataracts. We found that past work overestimated UVB irradiance, but that relative estimates for increase in exposure to DNA damaging radiation are still similar to our improved calculations. We also found that the intensity of biologically damaging radiation varies widely with organism and specific impact considered; these results have implications for biosphere-level damage following astrophysical ionizing radiation events. When considering changes in surface-level visible light irradiance, we found that, contrary to previous assumptions, a decrease in irradiance is only present for a short time in

  11. Quadrupolar susceptibility of LiTmF4 crystal and the nature of forbidden 3H6(Γ2)-3F2(Γ2) transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altshuler, N. S.; Larionov, Alexander L.; Rodionova, M. P.; Stolov, A. L.

    2002-07-01

    The narrow low intensity line with maximum at (lambda) -1 equals 15104 cm-1 and width (delta) equals 0.7 cm-1 at T equals 4.2 K have been detected in absorption spectrum of regular LiTmF4 crystal. The observed line belongs to transition form ground state 3H6((Gamma) 2) to lowest level (Gamma) 2 of 3F2 term of Tm3+(4f12) ion. The perturbation, which induces (Gamma) 2 - (Gamma) 2 transition, does not break S4 symmetry of Tm3+ sites. The perturbation of this kind is the interaction of Tm3+ 4f-electrons with electric field, created by quadrupolar moments of lattice ions, which are induced, int urn, by incident electromagnetic wave. To calculate the components of the quadrupolar moment tensors for ions in LiTmF4 single crystal, we have formulated and solved the system of self-consistent linear equations. We take into account interactions between all induced dipolar and quadrupolar moments and their interactions with electric fields of incident wave. The calculated transition probailities per second are in qualitative accordance with experimental data.

  12. Health effects and toxicity mechanisms of rare earth elements-Knowledge gaps and research prospects.

    PubMed

    Pagano, Giovanni; Guida, Marco; Tommasi, Franca; Oral, Rahime

    2015-05-01

    In the recent decades, rare earth elements (REE) have undergone a steady spread in several industrial and medical applications, and in agriculture. Relatively scarce information has been acquired to date on REE-associated biological effects, from studies of bioaccumulation and of bioassays on animal, plant and models; a few case reports have focused on human health effects following occupational REE exposures, in the present lack of epidemiological studies of occupationally exposed groups. The literature is mostly confined to reports on few REE, namely cerium and lanthanum, whereas substantial information gaps persist on the health effects of other REE. An established action mechanism in REE-associated health effects relates to modulating oxidative stress, analogous to the recognized redox mechanisms observed for other transition elements. Adverse outcomes of REE exposures include a number of endpoints, such as growth inhibition, cytogenetic effects, and organ-specific toxicity. An apparent controversy regarding REE-associated health effects relates to opposed data pointing to either favorable or adverse effects of REE exposures. Several studies have demonstrated that REE, like a number of other xenobiotics, follow hormetic concentration-related trends, implying stimulatory or protective effects at low levels, then adverse effects at higher concentrations. Another major role for REE-associated effects should be focused on pH-dependent REE speciation and hence toxicity. Few reports have demonstrated that environmental acidification enhances REE toxicity; these data may assume particular relevance in REE-polluted acidic soils and in REE mining areas characterized by concomitant REE and acid pollution. The likely environmental threats arising from REE exposures deserve a new line of research efforts.

  13. Health Effects of Alkaline Diet and Water, Reduction of Digestive-tract Bacterial Load, and Earthing.

    PubMed

    Mousa, Haider Abdul-Lateef

    2016-04-01

    In the article, the author discusses the issue of chronic, low-grade acidosis that is thought to be brought about primarily by 2 factors: (1) advancing age, with a consequent decline in renal function; and (2) diet. An acid-forming diet can induce low-grade metabolic acidosis, which causes very small decreases in blood pH and plasma bicarbonate (HCO3-) that remain within the range considered to be normal. However, if the duration of the acidosis is prolonged or chronically present, even a low degree of acidosis can become significant. This article reviews supporting evidence in the literature that has shown that consumption of abundant alkaline-forming foods can result in improvement in bone mineral density (BMD) and muscle mass, protection from chronic illnesses, reduced tumor-cell invasion and metastasis, and effective excretion of toxins from the body. In addition, a large number of studies showing the benefits of alkaline water (mineral water) have revealed that people consuming water with a high level of total dissolved solids (TDS) (ie, with a high mineral content) have shown a lower incidence of coronary heart disease (CHD), cardiovascular disease (CVD), and cancer and lower total mortality rates. Consumption of alkaline water also may prevent osteoporosis and protect pancreatic beta cells with its antioxidant effects. In addition, this article discusses the literature that shows that reducing digestive-tract bacterial load can play an important role in increasing blood alkalinity toward the normal upper limit. That change occurs through good oral hygiene, flossing of teeth, perfect chewing of food, and bowel evacuation as soon as possible. Finally, the author reviews the literature that shows that earthing (ie, the direct contact of the human body with the earth) can supply a current of plentiful electrons. Earthing has been shown to reduce acute and chronic inflammation, blood glucose in patients with diabetes, red blood cell (RBC) aggregation, and blood

  14. Health Effects of Alkaline Diet and Water, Reduction of Digestive-tract Bacterial Load, and Earthing.

    PubMed

    Mousa, Haider Abdul-Lateef

    2016-04-01

    In the article, the author discusses the issue of chronic, low-grade acidosis that is thought to be brought about primarily by 2 factors: (1) advancing age, with a consequent decline in renal function; and (2) diet. An acid-forming diet can induce low-grade metabolic acidosis, which causes very small decreases in blood pH and plasma bicarbonate (HCO3-) that remain within the range considered to be normal. However, if the duration of the acidosis is prolonged or chronically present, even a low degree of acidosis can become significant. This article reviews supporting evidence in the literature that has shown that consumption of abundant alkaline-forming foods can result in improvement in bone mineral density (BMD) and muscle mass, protection from chronic illnesses, reduced tumor-cell invasion and metastasis, and effective excretion of toxins from the body. In addition, a large number of studies showing the benefits of alkaline water (mineral water) have revealed that people consuming water with a high level of total dissolved solids (TDS) (ie, with a high mineral content) have shown a lower incidence of coronary heart disease (CHD), cardiovascular disease (CVD), and cancer and lower total mortality rates. Consumption of alkaline water also may prevent osteoporosis and protect pancreatic beta cells with its antioxidant effects. In addition, this article discusses the literature that shows that reducing digestive-tract bacterial load can play an important role in increasing blood alkalinity toward the normal upper limit. That change occurs through good oral hygiene, flossing of teeth, perfect chewing of food, and bowel evacuation as soon as possible. Finally, the author reviews the literature that shows that earthing (ie, the direct contact of the human body with the earth) can supply a current of plentiful electrons. Earthing has been shown to reduce acute and chronic inflammation, blood glucose in patients with diabetes, red blood cell (RBC) aggregation, and blood

  15. Effects of low Earth orbit environment on the Long Duration Exposure Facility thermal control coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sampair, Thomas R.; Berrios, William M.

    1992-01-01

    One of the benefits of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) was the opportunity to study the before and after effects of low earth orbit space environment on the spacecraft thermal control coatings. Since the LDEF's thermal control was totally passive by design, the selection of the external surface absorptivity to emissivity ratio (alpha/epsilon) and the ability for the coating to retain the alpha/epsilon over time was an important consideration in the thermal design of the LDEF. The primary surface coating chosen for the LDEF structure was clear chromic anodized aluminum with an average design alpha/epsilon of 0.32/0.16. External surface absorptivity (alpha) and emissivity (epsilon) were measured on all intercostals, longerons, tray mounting flanges, thermal control panels, and a limited number of experiment surface coatings after the experiment trays were removed from the LDEF structure. All surface alpha/epsilon measurements were made using portable hand held infrared and solar spectrum reflectometers. The absorptivity measurements were taken with a Devices and Services SSR-ER version 5.0 solar spectra reflectometer which has a stated uncertainty of +/- 0.01, and all normal emissivity measurements were made using the Gier Dunkle DB-100 infrared reflectometer also with a stated uncertainty of +/- 0.01. Both instruments were calibrated in the laboratory by LaRC instrumentation personnel before being used in the field at KSC. A combined total of 733 measurements were taken on the anodized aluminum hardware which included the structure (intercostals, longerons, and center ring), earth and space end thermal control panels, and experiment tray mounting flanges. The facility thermal control coatings measured in this survey cover 33 percent of the total exposed LDEF surface area. To correlate low earth orbit environmental effects on the anodized coatings, measurements were taken in both exposed and unexposed surfaces and compared to quality assurance (QA

  16. Relationship between microstructure and efficiency of lithium silicate scintillating glasses: The effect of alkaline earths

    SciTech Connect

    Bliss, M.; Craig, R.A.; Sunberg, D.S.; Weber, M.J.

    1996-12-31

    Lithium silicate glasses containing Ce{sup 3+} are known to be scintillators. Glasses in this family in which the Li is enriched ({sup 6}Li) are used as neutron detectors. The addition of Mg to this glass is known to increase the scintillation efficiency. We have found that substituting other alkaline earths results in a monotonic decrease of the scintillation efficiency with increasing atomic number. The total variation in scintillation efficiency from Mg to Ba is nearly a factor of 3. Prior experiments with this glass family show small differences in Raman and fluorescence spectra; evidence from thermoluminescence experiments indicates that the scintillation efficiency is most strongly correlated with structural effects in the neighborhood of the Ce{sup 3+} activator ion. The results of low-temperature studies of fluorescence and thermoluminescence of these glasses will be reported.

  17. Giant extrinsic spin Hall effect due to rare-earth impurities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, T.; Kontani, H.

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the extrinsic spin Hall effect (SHE) in the electron gas model due to magnetic impurities, by focusing on Ce- and Yb-impurities. In the dilute limit, the skew scattering term dominates the side jump term. For Ce-impurities, the spin Hall angle αSH due to skew scattering is given by -8πδ2/7, where δ2 (Lt1) is the phase shift for the d (l=2) partial wave. Since αSH reaches O(10-1) if δ2gsim0.03, considerably large SHE is expected to emerge in metals with rare-earth impurities. The present study provides a highly efficient way to generate a spin current.

  18. Energetic interplanetary nucleon flux anisotropies - The effect of earth's bow shock and magnetosheath on sunward flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christon, S. P.

    1982-01-01

    Attention is given to the combined, average effects of the bow shock and magnetosheath on the diffusive flow of interplanetary nuclei. The observations presented show that differences between 'connected' and 'unconnected' data subsets are apparent from the beginning of the analysis. Through an investigation of the mean unconnected diffusive anisotropy (those fluxes least affected by the earth's bow shock and magnetosheath) it is confirmed that the cross-field transport of MeV energy nuclei in interplanetary space is statistically significant and in the direction expected from the large-scale particle flux gradients. The direction of particle flow relative to the IMF is then used to show that nucleon flow characteristics on connected IMF differ from those on unconnected IMF. A scenario for producing this difference is then presented. It is concluded that the inclusion of the bow shock connected information biases measurements of the flux anisotropies of MeV energy H.

  19. Compensation for effects of ambient temperature on rare-earth doped fiber optic thermometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamovsky, G.; Sotomayor, J. L.; Krasowski, M. J.; Eustace, J. G.

    1990-01-01

    Variations in ambient temperature have a negative effect on the performance of any fiber optic sensing system. A change in ambient temperature may alter the design parameters of fiber optic cables, connectors, sources, detectors, and other fiber optic components and eventually the performance of the entire system. The thermal stability of components is especially important in a system which employs intensity modulated sensors. Several referencing schemes have been developed to account for the variable losses that occur within the system. However, none of these conventional compensating techniques can be used to stabilize the thermal drift of the light source in a system based on the spectral properties of the sensor material. The compensation for changes in ambient temperature becomes especially important in fiber optic thermometers doped with rare earths. Different approaches to solving this problem are searched and analyzed.

  20. Compensation for effects of ambient temperature on rare-earth doped fiber optic thermometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamovsky, G.; Sotomayor, J. L.; Krasowski, M. J.; Eustace, J. G.

    1989-01-01

    Variations in ambient temperature have a negative effect on the performance of any fiber optic sensing system. A change in ambient temperature may alter the design parameters of fiber optic cables, connectors, sources, detectors, and other fiber optic components and eventually the performance of the entire system. The thermal stability of components is especially important in a system which employs intensity modulated sensors. Several referencing schemes have been developed to account for the variable losses that occur within the system. However, none of these conventional compensating techniques can be used to stabilize the thermal drift of the light source in a system based on the spectral properties of the sensor material. The compensation for changes in ambient temperature becomes especially important in fiber optic thermometers doped with rare earths. Different approaches to solving this problem are searched and analyzed.

  1. Ammonia photolysis and the greenhouse effect in the primordial atmosphere of the earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, W. R.; Atreya, S. K.

    1979-01-01

    Photochemical calculations indicate that in the prebiotic atmosphere of earth ammonia would have been irreversibly converted to N2 in less than 40 years if the ammonia surface mixing ratio were no more than 0.0001. However, if a continuous outgassing of ammonia were maintained, radiative-equilibrium calculations indicate that a surface mixing ratio of ammonia of 0.0001 or greater would provide a sufficient greenhouse effect to keep the surface temperature above freezing. With a 0.0001 mixing ratio of ammonia, 60% to 70% of the present-day solar luminosity would be adequate to maintain surface temperatures above freezing. A lower limit to the time constant for accumulation of an amount of nitrogen equivalent to the present day value is 10 my if the outgassing were such as to provide a continuous surface mixing ratio of ammonia of at least 0.00001.

  2. Sheath effects observed on a 10 meter high voltage panel in simulated low earth orbit plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccox, J. E.; Konradi, A.

    1979-01-01

    A large (1m x 10m) flat surface of conductive material was biased to high voltage (+ or - 3000 V) to simulate the behavior of a large solar array in low earth orbit. The model array was operated in a plasma environment of 1,000 to 1,000,000/cu cm, with sufficient free space around it for the resulting plasma sheaths to develop unimpeded for 5-10 meters into the surrounding plasma. Measurements of the resulting sheath thickness were obtained. The observed thickness varied approximately as V to the 3/4 power and N to the 1/2 power. This effect appears to limit total current leakage from the test array until sheath dimensions exceed about 1 meter. Total leakage current was also measured with the array.

  3. Large Superconducting Spin Valve Effect and Ultrasmall Exchange Splitting in Epitaxial Rare-Earth-Niobium Trilayers.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yuanzhou; Halász, Gábor B; Robinson, J W A; Blamire, M G

    2015-08-01

    Epitaxial Ho/Nb/Ho and Dy/Nb/Dy superconducting spin valves show a reversible change in the zero-field critical temperature (ΔT(c0)) of ∼400  mK and an infinite magnetoresistance on changing the relative magnetization of the Ho or Dy layers. Unlike transition-metal superconducting spin valves, which show much smaller ΔT(c0) values, our results can be quantitatively modeled. However, the fits require an extraordinarily low induced exchange splitting which is dramatically lower than known values for rare-earth Fermi-level electrons, implying that new models for the magnetic proximity effect may be required. PMID:26296128

  4. Direct solar and earth-albedo radiation pressure effects on the orbit of Pageos 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zerbini, S.

    1980-01-01

    The orbit of the Pageos 1 balloon satellite was analyzed for the effects of direct solar and albedo radiation pressure. Anomalous behavior occurred in the orbital acceleration near the end of the 2nd year of the satellite's lifetime which may have resulted from the change in its shape; the shape has become slightly oblate, spinning about a minor axis and precessing about the direction of the sun. The near-earth micrometeoroid particle flux was estimated to be 5 x 10 to the -8th/sq cm/s by analyzing the balloon inflation process with sublimating compounds and the resulting variation of the satellite mass due to the leakage through the holes produced by micrometeoroid bombardment.

  5. Pulse FT NMR of non-equilibrium states of half-integer spin quadrupolar nuclei in single crystals.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Thomas T; Harris, Kristopher J; Wasylishen, Roderick E

    2010-02-01

    For quadrupolar nuclei with spin quantum numbers equal to 3/2, 5/2 and 7/2, the intensities of the NMR transitions in a single crystal are examined as a function of the rf excitation flip angle. Single-quantum NMR intensities are calculated using density matrix theory beginning under various non-equilibrium conditions and are compared with those determined experimentally. As a representative spin-3/2 system, the flip-angle dependence of the (23)Na NMR intensities of a single crystal of NaNO(3) was investigated beginning with the inversion of the populations associated with one of the satellite transitions. Subsequently, the populations of both satellite transitions were inverted using highly frequency-selective hyperbolic secant pulses. Calculated and experimental intensities are in good agreement. As an example of a spin-5/2 system, the flip-angle dependence of the (27)Al NMR transition intensities was determined using a single crystal of sapphire, Al(2)O(3), starting under different nuclear spin population conditions. The experimental trends mimicked those predicted by the density matrix calculations but the agreement was not as good as for the spin-3/2 case. Some SIMPSON simulations were also carried out to confirm the results generated by our density matrix calculations. The theoretical flip-angle behavior of the NMR transition intensities obtained from a spin-7/2 spin system is also discussed.

  6. Solar irradiance changes and photobiological effects at earth's surface following astrophysical ionizing radiation events.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Brian C; Neale, Patrick J; Snyder, Brock R

    2015-03-01

    Astrophysical ionizing radiation events have been recognized as a potential threat to life on Earth, primarily through depletion of stratospheric ozone and subsequent increase in surface-level solar ultraviolet radiation. Simulations of the atmospheric effects of a variety of events (such as supernovae, gamma-ray bursts, and solar proton events) have been previously published, along with estimates of biological damage at Earth's surface. In this work, we employed the Tropospheric Ultraviolet and Visible (TUV) radiative transfer model to expand and improve calculations of surface-level irradiance and biological impacts following an ionizing radiation event. We considered changes in surface-level UVB, UVA, and photosynthetically active radiation (visible light) for clear-sky conditions and fixed aerosol parameter values. We also considered a wide range of biological effects on organisms ranging from humans to phytoplankton. We found that past work overestimated UVB irradiance but that relative estimates for increase in exposure to DNA-damaging radiation are still similar to our improved calculations. We also found that the intensity of biologically damaging radiation varies widely with organism and specific impact considered; these results have implications for biosphere-level damage following astrophysical ionizing radiation events. When considering changes in surface-level visible light irradiance, we found that, contrary to previous assumptions, a decrease in irradiance is only present for a short time in very limited geographical areas; instead we found a net increase for most of the modeled time-space region. This result has implications for proposed climate changes associated with ionizing radiation events.

  7. Solar irradiance changes and photobiological effects at earth's surface following astrophysical ionizing radiation events.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Brian C; Neale, Patrick J; Snyder, Brock R

    2015-03-01

    Astrophysical ionizing radiation events have been recognized as a potential threat to life on Earth, primarily through depletion of stratospheric ozone and subsequent increase in surface-level solar ultraviolet radiation. Simulations of the atmospheric effects of a variety of events (such as supernovae, gamma-ray bursts, and solar proton events) have been previously published, along with estimates of biological damage at Earth's surface. In this work, we employed the Tropospheric Ultraviolet and Visible (TUV) radiative transfer model to expand and improve calculations of surface-level irradiance and biological impacts following an ionizing radiation event. We considered changes in surface-level UVB, UVA, and photosynthetically active radiation (visible light) for clear-sky conditions and fixed aerosol parameter values. We also considered a wide range of biological effects on organisms ranging from humans to phytoplankton. We found that past work overestimated UVB irradiance but that relative estimates for increase in exposure to DNA-damaging radiation are still similar to our improved calculations. We also found that the intensity of biologically damaging radiation varies widely with organism and specific impact considered; these results have implications for biosphere-level damage following astrophysical ionizing radiation events. When considering changes in surface-level visible light irradiance, we found that, contrary to previous assumptions, a decrease in irradiance is only present for a short time in very limited geographical areas; instead we found a net increase for most of the modeled time-space region. This result has implications for proposed climate changes associated with ionizing radiation events. PMID:25692406

  8. The Effect of Teaching Strategies Using Models on Preservice Elementary Teachers' Conceptions about Earth-Sun-Moon Relationships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callison, Priscilla L.; Wright, Emmett L.

    This study investigated the effect of three specific hands-on teaching strategies on the attainment and alteration of preservice elementary teachers' conceptions about earth-sun-moon relationships. The subjects (n=76) were enrolled in an elementary school science methods course. The descriptive nature of this study explored: (1) the effect of two…

  9. Semi analytical model for the effective grain size profile in the mantle of the Earth: partitioning between diffusion and dislocation creep through the Earth's history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozel, A. B.; Golabek, G.; Thielmann, M.; Tackley, P.

    2015-12-01

    We present a semi analytical model of mantle convection able to predict the grain size profile of the present day Earth. Grain size evolution has been studied with increasing interest over the last decades but its behavior in both mantle and lithosphere remains largely misunderstood due to its non-linearity. Several recent studies suggest that it might play a fundamental role in localization of deformation in the lithosphere but we focus here on the mantle in which we also observe important processes.We propose a 1D compressible thermal convection model based on the equality of advective heat flux and the integral of viscous dissipation in the whole domain. Imposing mass conservation, our model is able to predict all rheological parameters able to produce both present day average surface velocity and lower mantle viscosity. Composite rheologies involving dislocation creep and grain size dependent diffusion creep are considered. The effect of phase transitions on the grain size is also explicitely taken into account. We present the family of solutions for the activation volume and the viscosity jump at the 660 discontinuity according to any initial choice of activation energy. The scaling laws for rheological parameters obtained are compared to self-consistent evolutionary simulations of mantle convection in 2D spherical annulus geometry considering composite rheologies. The transition between diffusion and dislocation creep due to the cooling of the Earth is illustrated in a set of numerical simulations starting from the physical conditions of the Archean.

  10. The Effects of Solar Variability on Earth's Climate: A Workshop Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2012-01-01

    varbility and Earth s climate is multifaceted and that some components are understood better than others. According to two presenters on paleoclimate, there is a need to study the idiosyncrasies of each key proxy record. Yet they also emphasized that there may be an emerging pattern of paleoclimate change coincident with periods of solar activity and inactivity, but only on long timescales of multiple decades to millennia. Several speakers discussed the effects of particle events and cosmic-ray variability. These are all areas of exciting fundamental research; however, they have not yet led to conclusive evidence for significant related climate effects. The key problem of attribution of climate variability on the timescales of the Little Ice Age and the Maunder Minimum were directly addressed in several presentations. Several workshop participants remarked that the combination of solar, paleoclimatic, and climate modeling research has the potential to dramatically improve the credibility of these attribution studies.

  11. Effect of post-perovskite rheology on the thermal evolution of the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benešová, Nina; Čížková, Hana

    2016-02-01

    Secular cooling of the Earth mantle is a complex process affected by many factors. Here we present the results of a modelling study focused on efficiency of cooling in the presence of rheologically distinct post-perovskite. We evaluate combined effects of variable thermal expansivity and diffusivity, initial thermal condition and heat source model and concentrate on the effects of rheologically weak post-perovskite. Cooling of the core is included in the model-core is assumed to be an isothermal heat reservoir with temperature controlled by heat flux through core-mantle boundary. Our 2D axisymmetric convection model has pressure, temperature and phase dependent viscosity and includes the effects of an endothermic phase transition at 660 km depth and an exothermic perovskite-post-perovskite phase transition in the lowermost mantle. In agreement with previous studies we conclude that depth-dependent material parameters tend to delay secular cooling. Presence of the weak post-perovskite on the other hand significantly enhances core cooling and its effect on core temperature is opposite and comparable in magnitude.

  12. Preliminary evaluation of effects of best management practices in the Black Earth Creek, Wisconsin, priority watershed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walker, J.F.; Graczyk, D.J.; Olem, H.

    1993-01-01

    Nonpoint-source contamination accounts for a substantial part of the water quality problems in many watersheds. The Wisconsin Nonpoint Source Water Pollution Abatement Program provides matching money for voluntary implementation of various best management practices (BMPs). The effectiveness of BMPs on a drainage-basin scale has not been adequately assessed in Wisconsin by use of data collected before and after BMP implementation. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, monitored water quality in the Black Earth Creek watershed in southern Wisconsin from October 1984 through September 1986 (pre-BMP conditions). BMP implementation began during the summer of 1989 and is planned to continue through 1993. Data collection resumed in fall 1989 and is intended to provide information during the transitional period of BMP implementation (1990-93) and 2 years of post-BMP conditions (1994-95). Preliminary results presented for two subbasins in toe Black Earth Creek watershed (Brewery and Garfoot Creeks) are based on data collected during pre-BMP conditions and the first 3 years of the transitional period. The analysis includes the use of regressions to control for natural variability in the data and, hence, enhance the ability to detect changes. Data collected to date (1992) indicate statistically significant differences in storm mass transport of suspended sediment and ammonia nitrogen at Brewery Creek. The central tendency of the regression residuals has decreased with the implementation of BMPs; hence, the improvement in water quality in the Brewery Creek watershed is likely a result of BMP implementation. Differences in storm mass transport at Garfoot Creek were not detected, primarily because of an insufficient number of storms in the transitional period. As practice implementation continues, the additional data will be used to determine the level of management which results in significant improvements in water

  13. Effect of hydrocarbon adsorption on the wettability of rare earth oxide ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preston, Daniel J.; Miljkovic, Nenad; Sack, Jean; Enright, Ryan; Queeney, John; Wang, Evelyn N.

    2014-07-01

    Vapor condensation is routinely used as an effective means of transferring heat, with dropwise condensation exhibiting a 5 - 7x heat transfer improvement compared to filmwise condensation. However, state-of-the-art techniques to promote dropwise condensation rely on functional hydrophobic coatings, which are often not robust and therefore undesirable for industrial implementation. Natural surface contamination due to hydrocarbon adsorption, particularly on noble metals, has been explored as an alternative approach to realize stable dropwise condensing surfaces. While noble metals are prohibitively expensive, the recent discovery of robust rare earth oxide (REO) hydrophobicity has generated interest for dropwise condensation applications due to material costs approaching 1% of gold; however, the underlying mechanism of REO hydrophobicity remains under debate. In this work, we show through careful experiments and modeling that REO hydrophobicity occurs due to the same hydrocarbon adsorption mechanism seen previously on noble metals. To investigate adsorption dynamics, we studied holmia and ceria REOs, along with control samples of gold and silica, via X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and dynamic time-resolved contact angle measurements. The contact angle and surface carbon percent started at ≈0 on in-situ argon-plasma-cleaned samples and increased asymptotically over time after exposure to laboratory air, with the rare earth oxides displaying hydrophobic (>90°) advancing contact angle behavior at long times (>4 days). The results indicate that REOs are in fact hydrophilic when clean and become hydrophobic due to hydrocarbon adsorption. Furthermore, this study provides insight into how REOs can be used to promote stable dropwise condensation, which is important for the development of enhanced phase change surfaces.

  14. Effect of hydrocarbon adsorption on the wettability of rare earth oxide ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Preston, Daniel J.; Miljkovic, Nenad; Sack, Jean; Queeney, John; Wang, Evelyn N.; Enright, Ryan

    2014-07-07

    Vapor condensation is routinely used as an effective means of transferring heat, with dropwise condensation exhibiting a 5 − 7x heat transfer improvement compared to filmwise condensation. However, state-of-the-art techniques to promote dropwise condensation rely on functional hydrophobic coatings, which are often not robust and therefore undesirable for industrial implementation. Natural surface contamination due to hydrocarbon adsorption, particularly on noble metals, has been explored as an alternative approach to realize stable dropwise condensing surfaces. While noble metals are prohibitively expensive, the recent discovery of robust rare earth oxide (REO) hydrophobicity has generated interest for dropwise condensation applications due to material costs approaching 1% of gold; however, the underlying mechanism of REO hydrophobicity remains under debate. In this work, we show through careful experiments and modeling that REO hydrophobicity occurs due to the same hydrocarbon adsorption mechanism seen previously on noble metals. To investigate adsorption dynamics, we studied holmia and ceria REOs, along with control samples of gold and silica, via X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and dynamic time-resolved contact angle measurements. The contact angle and surface carbon percent started at ≈0 on in-situ argon-plasma-cleaned samples and increased asymptotically over time after exposure to laboratory air, with the rare earth oxides displaying hydrophobic (>90°) advancing contact angle behavior at long times (>4 days). The results indicate that REOs are in fact hydrophilic when clean and become hydrophobic due to hydrocarbon adsorption. Furthermore, this study provides insight into how REOs can be used to promote stable dropwise condensation, which is important for the development of enhanced phase change surfaces.

  15. DataStreme Earth's Climate System: Building a Climate Literate Society through Effective Partnerships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brey, J. A.; Geer, I. W.; Weinbeck, R. S.; Mills, E. W.; Nugnes, K. A.; Stimach, A. E.

    2015-12-01

    Effective partnerships are key to increasing climate and overall environmental literacy. Financial support from NSF, NASA, and NOAA has allowed the American Meteorological Society (AMS) to offer DataStreme courses for almost 20 years. DataStreme Atmosphere, Ocean, and Earth's Climate System (ECS) are offered each fall and spring semester by Local Implementation Teams (LITs) across the country in coordination with AMS Education Program scientists and educators who develop instructional materials, provide logistical support to the LITs, and administer the project. A long-standing partnership with State University of New York's The College at Brockport gives teachers the opportunity to receive 3 tuition-free graduate credits upon successful completion of each DataStreme course and construction of a Plan of Action for educational peer-training. DataStreme ECS investigates the fundamental science of Earth's climate system, explores humans' impact on it, and identifies actions needed in response to climate change. The course provides participants with the knowledge to make informed climate decisions. In fact, according to a recent three-year study conducted by AMS, 98% of DataStreme ECS participants reported an increase in environmental literacy as a result of the course. DataStreme Atmosphere, Ocean, and ECS content has been improved because of AMS partnerships with NOAA and NASA. Specifically, hundreds of NASA and NOAA scientists and faculty from numerous institutions both domestic and abroad have contributed and reviewed DataStreme ECS content. Additional collaborations with Consortium for Ocean Leadership and the U.S. Ice Drilling Program greatly improved the course's paleoclimate content. Looking ahead, the Climate Resilience Toolkit from NOAA's Climate Program Office will further bolster the course this fall. These partnerships have resulted in a powerful, content-rich climate science course for K-12 teachers, building the foundation to a climate literate society.

  16. K-20 educator collaboration effective at conveying EarthScope science to middle school teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratt-Sitaula, B.; Butler, R. F.; Whitman, J. M.; Granshaw, F. D.; Groom, R.; Hedeen, C.; Magura, B.; Thompson, D.; Johnson, J. A.

    2010-12-01

    Teachers on the Leading Edge (TOTLE) program has developed an innovative model for middle school teacher professional development workshops that has proven effective at improving teacher knowledge of Pacific Northwest plate margin hazards and EarthScope science as well as leading to high rates of subsequent curriculum implementation. The key elements which appear to have led to the successes are: 1) facilitation team with broad content and educator expertise from K-12 master teachers and community college instructors to university and research scientists; 2) regional team format which encourages development of learning communities to continue past the workshop end; and 3) extensive “kit” of teaching materials for easy transfer to the classroom. The 1-week workshops were conducted during the summers of 2008-2010 and included 35 Pacific Northwest middle school teachers and 5 community college (or similar) regional team leaders each year. Content sessions and field trips were conducted by geoscientists from universities and research institutions (USGS, IRIS, UNAVCO, etc.). Teaching implementation sessions were conducted by K-12 master Earth science teachers. Approximately 10% of workshop costs were devoted to teaching material “kits” for all participants. Teacher confidence on workshop content topics increased on a 4-point scale (1 = “not at all confident”; 4 = “very confident”) from 2.7 to 3.2 to 3.7 on pre, immediately-post, and 8-month follow up surveys, respectively. Teacher performance on a content test improved an average of 19% after the workshop. Greater than 75% of teachers implemented at least 6 of the curricular elements in the year following the workshop. More concrete linking of the most complex topics (Ex. Cascadia GPS) to simpler elements led to improved implementation of those difficult curricular topics between 2008 and 2009 (Ex. from 28% to 40% implementation).

  17. Cost-effective and robust mitigation of space debris in low earth orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, R.; Martin, C. E.

    2004-01-01

    For the wide acceptance of space debris mitigation measures throughout government agencies and industry, their cost-effectiveness must be demonstrated. The selected measures must not only be effective at controlling the future growth of the debris population, but they should also aim to minimise the collision risk to spacecraft at a minimal cost of implementation. Furthermore, the selected measures must be sufficiently robust to retain their effectiveness if unexpected increases in space activity were to occur. In this paper, clear criteria are established in order to assess numerous different Low Earth Orbit (LEO) debris mitigation scenarios for their cost-effectiveness and robustness. The ESA DELTA debris model is used to provide long-term debris environment projections for these scenarios as an input to the effectiveness/robustness element. Manoeuvre requirements for the different post-mission disposal scenarios are calculated in order to define the cost-related element. A 25-year post-mission lifetime de-orbit policy, combined with explosion prevention and mission-related object limitation, was found to be the most cost-effective solution to the space debris problem in LEO. This package would also be robust enough to retain its effectiveness even after a significant increase in future launch traffic. It was found that the re-orbiting of space systems above the LEO region would not lead to significant collision activity there over the next century. However, above-LEO disposal should be used sparingly because the disposal region could become unstable after a limited number of localised explosion or collision-induced breakup events due to a lack of air drag to remove the resulting fragments.

  18. Quadrupolar interaction of ^57Fe in compounds RENi_2B_2C: Experimental and Theoretical Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Zhi; Guenzburger, Diana; Sanchez, D. R. S.; Bud'Ko, S. L.; Fontes, Magda B.; Baggia-Saitovitch, E. M.; Ellis, D. E.

    1996-03-01

    ^57Fe Mössbauer spectra were taken with the RE(Ni_0.99^57Fe_0.01)_2B_2C (RE=Tb, Dy, Ho, Er) samples in a variable temperature helium crysostat to study the interplay between superconductivity and magnetism in the RENi_2B_2C (RE=Dy, Ho, Er, Tm) compounds. The rare earth dependent quadrupole splitting (QS) from ^57Fe Mössbauer spectra decreases with the lanthanide contraction^footnotetext^The lanthanide contraction causes an increase in the ratio c/a along the RE series. from QS=0.27mm/s for TbNi_2B_2C to QS=0.14mm/s for ErNi_2B_2C. Self-consistent frist-principles electronic structure calculation[1] were performed for clusters with 71 atoms (Fe-12RE-14Ni-32B-12C), which were embedded in the charge denisity of several shells of neighbours in the crystal, representing the doped compounds RE(Ni_0.93Fe_0.07)_2B_2C (RE=Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, and Er). The quadrupole splitting was obtained with the nuclear quadrupole moment Q=0.16b of ^57Fe[2]. The calculated results are in good agreement with experiment. The theoretical results give negative signs for all the QS values; which have not been determined by experiment, except for the compounds with Tb and Ho, for which they are negative. REFERENCES D.E. Ellis, Int. J. Quant. Chem. Suppl. 2, 35(1968); D.E. Ellis and G.S. Painter, Phys. Rev. B, 2, 2887(1970). Ohilipp Dufek, Peter Blaha and K. Schwarz, Phys. Rev. Lett. 75, 3545(1995).

  19. Bidirectional Spectral Reflectance of Earth Resources: Influence of Scene Complexity and Atmospheric Effects on Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diner, D. J.

    1984-01-01

    Practical methods for remote sensing when scene complexity and atmospheric effects modify intrinsic reflective properties are developed. The radiation history from ground to space of light reflected from individual leaves is initially multiply scattered within the crop canopy, whose geometry provides a controlling influence, then scattered and attenuated as a result of transmission through the Earth's atmosphere. The experimental and theoretical tools for studying these effects quantitatively are under development. A new radiative transfer code which uses Fourier transforms to solve the 3-D equation of transfer was developed. The initial version permits inhomogeneous non-Lambertian surfaces but assumes horizontal uniformity for the atmosphere. The computational results are in excellent agreement with Monte Carlo calculations. Laboratory apparatus to study the variation of spectral reflectance of individual leaves as a function of illumination incidence angle and reflection angle was used. These data can then be used in models to determine canopy scattering effects. Stress tests by observing leaf reflectance at 0.9 microns as a function of time following clipping from the stem was performed. A reflectance increase due to loss of water has been observed.

  20. The effect of clouds on the earth's solar and infrared radiation budgets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, G. F.; Wu, M.-L. C.; Johnson, W. T.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of global cloudiness on the solar and infrared components of the earth's radiation balance is studied in general circulation model experiments. A wintertime simulation is conducted in which the cloud radiative transfer calculations use realistic cloud optical properties and are fully interactive with model-generated cloudiness. This simulation is compared to others in which the clouds are alternatively non-interactive with respect to the solar or thermal radiation calculations. Other cloud processes (formation, latent heat release, precipitation, vertical mixing) were accurately simulated in these experiments. It is concluded that on a global basis clouds increase the global radiation balance by 40 W/sq m by absorbing longwave radiation, but decrease it by 56 W/sq m by reflecting solar radiation to space. The net cloud effect is therefore a reduction of the radiation balance by 16 W/sq m, and is dominated by the cloud albedo effect. Changes in cloud frequency and distribution and in atmospheric and land temperatures are also reported for the control and for the non-interactive simulations. In general, removal of the clouds' infrared absorption cools the atmosphere and causes additional cloudiness to occur, while removal of the clouds' solar radiative properties warms the atmosphere and causes fewer clouds to form. It is suggested that layered clouds and convective clouds over water enter the climate system as positive feedback components, while convective clouds over land enter as negative components.

  1. Effects of rare earth elements on the distribution of mineral elements and heavy metals in horseradish.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lihong; Huang, Xiaohua; Zhou, Qing

    2008-09-01

    In order to investigate the effects of rare earth elements (REEs) on horseradish, the distribution of the mineral elements and heavy metals in different organs of horseradish have been studied by using inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). Meanwhile, three variable major parameters, namely the concentration of REEs, the type of REEs, and the growth stage of plant were chosen. The results indicated that the test REEs, Ce(III) and Tb(III), could be accumulated in leaves, stems and roots of horseradish. In addition, we found that the content of mineral elements was increased in horseradish treated with 20mgl(-1) of Ce(III), but not those with the 20mgl(-1) of Tb(III). Moreover, the content of mineral elements in horseradish was decreased with the increasing concentration of REEs (100, 300mgl(-1)). Furthermore, we found that there were the opposite effects on the content of the heavy metals in horseradish treated with REEs. Finally, we found that the effect of REEs on the accumulation of REEs, and the content of mineral elements or heavy metals of horseradish during vigorous growth stage, no matter positive or negative, was more obvious than that of the other growth stages. These results demonstrated that the distribution behaviors of mineral elements and heavy metals in horseradish can be affected by the type and concentration of REEs, and the growth period of plant.

  2. Perceived Barriers and Strategies to Effective Online Earth and Space Science Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pottinger, James E.

    2012-01-01

    With the continual growth and demand of online courses, higher education institutions are attempting to meet the needs of today's learners by modifying and developing new student centered services and programs. As a result, faculty members are being forced into teaching online, including Earth and Space science faculty. Online Earth and Space…

  3. Effect of the addition of low rare earth elements (lanthanum, neodymium, cerium) on the biodegradation and biocompatibility of magnesium.

    PubMed

    Willbold, Elmar; Gu, Xuenan; Albert, Devon; Kalla, Katharina; Bobe, Katharina; Brauneis, Maria; Janning, Carla; Nellesen, Jens; Czayka, Wolfgang; Tillmann, Wolfgang; Zheng, Yufeng; Witte, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Rare earth elements are promising alloying element candidates for magnesium alloys used as biodegradable devices in biomedical applications. Rare earth elements have significant effects on the high temperature strength as well as the creep resistance of alloys and they improve magnesium corrosion resistance. We focused on lanthanum, neodymium and cerium to produce magnesium alloys with commonly used rare earth element concentrations. We showed that low concentrations of rare earth elements do not promote bone growth inside a 750 μm broad area around the implant. However, increased bone growth was observed at a greater distance from the degrading alloys. Clinically and histologically, the alloys and their corrosion products caused no systematic or local cytotoxicological effects. Using microtomography and in vitro experiments, we could show that the magnesium-rare earth element alloys showed low corrosion rates, both in in vitro and in vivo. The lanthanum- and cerium-containing alloys degraded at comparable rates, whereas the neodymium-containing alloy showed the lowest corrosion rates.

  4. Effect of the addition of low rare earth elements (lanthanum, neodymium, cerium) on the biodegradation and biocompatibility of magnesium.

    PubMed

    Willbold, Elmar; Gu, Xuenan; Albert, Devon; Kalla, Katharina; Bobe, Katharina; Brauneis, Maria; Janning, Carla; Nellesen, Jens; Czayka, Wolfgang; Tillmann, Wolfgang; Zheng, Yufeng; Witte, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Rare earth elements are promising alloying element candidates for magnesium alloys used as biodegradable devices in biomedical applications. Rare earth elements have significant effects on the high temperature strength as well as the creep resistance of alloys and they improve magnesium corrosion resistance. We focused on lanthanum, neodymium and cerium to produce magnesium alloys with commonly used rare earth element concentrations. We showed that low concentrations of rare earth elements do not promote bone growth inside a 750 μm broad area around the implant. However, increased bone growth was observed at a greater distance from the degrading alloys. Clinically and histologically, the alloys and their corrosion products caused no systematic or local cytotoxicological effects. Using microtomography and in vitro experiments, we could show that the magnesium-rare earth element alloys showed low corrosion rates, both in in vitro and in vivo. The lanthanum- and cerium-containing alloys degraded at comparable rates, whereas the neodymium-containing alloy showed the lowest corrosion rates. PMID:25278442

  5. Uptake and effect of rare earth elements on gene expression in Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b.

    PubMed

    Gu, Wenyu; Farhan Ul Haque, Muhammad; DiSpirito, Alan A; Semrau, Jeremy D

    2016-07-01

    It is well known that Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b has two forms of methane monooxygenase (MMO) responsible for the initial conversion of methane to methanol, a cytoplasmic (soluble) methane monooxygenase and a membrane-associated (particulate) methane monooxygenase, and that copper strongly regulates expression of these alternative forms of MMO. More recently, it has been discovered that M. trichosporium OB3b has multiple types of the methanol dehydrogenase (MeDH), i.e. the Mxa-type MeDH (Mxa-MeDH) and Xox-type MeDH (Xox-MeDH), and the expression of these two forms is regulated by the availability of the rare earth element (REE), cerium. Here, we extend these studies and show that lanthanum, praseodymium, neodymium and samarium also regulate expression of alternative forms of MeDH. The effect of these REEs on MeDH expression, however, was only observed in the absence of copper. Further, a mutant of M. trichosporium OB3b, where the Mxa-MeDH was knocked out, was able to grow in the presence of lanthanum, praseodymium and neodymium, but was not able to grow in the presence of samarium. Collectively, these data suggest that multiple levels of gene regulation by metals exist in M. trichosporium OB3b, but that copper overrides the effect of other metals by an as yet unknown mechanism. PMID:27190151

  6. The Effects of Solar Maximum on the Earth's Satellite Population and Space Situational Awareness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Nicholas L.

    2012-01-01

    The rapidly approaching maximum of Solar Cycle 24 will have wide-ranging effects not only on the number and distribution of resident space objects, but also on vital aspects of space situational awareness, including conjunction assessment processes. The best known consequence of high solar activity is an increase in the density of the thermosphere, which, in turn, increases drag on the vast majority of objects in low Earth orbit. The most prominent evidence of this is seen in a dramatic increase in space object reentries. Due to the massive amounts of new debris created by the fragmentations of Fengyun-1C, Cosmos 2251 and Iridium 33 during the recent period of Solar Minimum, this effect might reach epic levels. However, space surveillance systems are also affected, both directly and indirectly, historically leading to an increase in the number of lost satellites and in the routine accuracy of the calculation of their orbits. Thus, at a time when more objects are drifting through regions containing exceptionally high-value assets, such as the International Space Station and remote sensing satellites, their position uncertainties increase. In other words, as the possibility of damaging and catastrophic collisions increases, our ability to protect space systems is degraded. Potential countermeasures include adjustments to space surveillance techniques and the resetting of collision avoidance maneuver thresholds.

  7. Uptake and effect of rare earth elements on gene expression in Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b.

    PubMed

    Gu, Wenyu; Farhan Ul Haque, Muhammad; DiSpirito, Alan A; Semrau, Jeremy D

    2016-07-01

    It is well known that Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b has two forms of methane monooxygenase (MMO) responsible for the initial conversion of methane to methanol, a cytoplasmic (soluble) methane monooxygenase and a membrane-associated (particulate) methane monooxygenase, and that copper strongly regulates expression of these alternative forms of MMO. More recently, it has been discovered that M. trichosporium OB3b has multiple types of the methanol dehydrogenase (MeDH), i.e. the Mxa-type MeDH (Mxa-MeDH) and Xox-type MeDH (Xox-MeDH), and the expression of these two forms is regulated by the availability of the rare earth element (REE), cerium. Here, we extend these studies and show that lanthanum, praseodymium, neodymium and samarium also regulate expression of alternative forms of MeDH. The effect of these REEs on MeDH expression, however, was only observed in the absence of copper. Further, a mutant of M. trichosporium OB3b, where the Mxa-MeDH was knocked out, was able to grow in the presence of lanthanum, praseodymium and neodymium, but was not able to grow in the presence of samarium. Collectively, these data suggest that multiple levels of gene regulation by metals exist in M. trichosporium OB3b, but that copper overrides the effect of other metals by an as yet unknown mechanism.

  8. Evaluation of Low Earth Orbit Environmental Effects on International Space Station Thermal Control Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dever, Joyce A.; Rutledge, Sharon K.; Hasegawa, Mark M.; Reed, Charles K.

    1998-01-01

    Samples of International Space Station (ISS) thermal control coatings were exposed to simulated low Earth orbit (LEO) environmental conditions to determine effects on optical properties. In one test, samples of the white paint coating Z-93P were coated with outgassed products from Tefzel(R) (ethylene tetrafluoroethylene copolymer) power cable insulation as-may occur on ISS. These samples were then exposed, along with an uncontaminated Z-93P witness sample, to vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation to determine solar absorptance degradation. The Z-93P samples coated with Tefzel(R) outgassing products experienced greater increases in solar absorptance than witness samples not coated with Tefzel(R) outgassing products. In another test, samples of second surface silvered Teflon(R) FEP (fluorinated ethylene propylene), SiO. (where x=2)-coated silvered Teflon(R) FEP, and Z-93P witness samples were exposed to the combined environments of atomic oxygen and VLTV radiation to determine optical properties changes due to these simulated ISS environmental effects. This test verified the durability of these materials in the absence of contaminants.

  9. Research on Earth's rotation and the effect of atmospheric pressure on vertical deformation and sea level variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wahr, John

    1993-01-01

    The work done under NASA grant NAG5-485 included modelling the deformation of the earth caused by variations in atmospheric pressure. The amount of deformation near coasts is sensitive to the nature of the oceanic response to the pressure. The PSMSL (Permanent Service for Mean Sea Level) data suggest the response is inverted barometer at periods greater than a couple months. Green's functions were constructed to describe the perturbation of the geoid caused by atmospheric and oceanic loading and by the accompanying load-induced deformation. It was found that perturbation of up to 2 cm are possible. Ice mass balance data was used for continental glaciers to look at the glacial contributions to time-dependent changes in polar motion, the lod, the earth's gravitational field, the position of the earth's center-of-mass, and global sea level. It was found that there can be lateral, non-hydrostatic structure inside the fluid core caused by gravitational forcing from the mantle, from the inner core, or from topography at the core/mantle or inner core/outer core boundaries. The nutational and tidal response of a non-hydrostatic earth with a solid inner core was modeled. Monthly, global tide gauge data from PSMSL was used to look at the 18.6-year ocean tide, the 14-month pole tide, the oceanic response to pressure, the linear trend and inter-annual variability in the earth's gravity field, the global sea level rise, and the effects of post glacial rebound. The effects of mantle anelasticity on nutations, earth tides, and tidal variation in the lod was modeled. Results of this model can be used with Crustal Dynamics observations to look at the anelastic dissipation and dispersion at tidal periods. The effects of surface topography on various components of crustal deformation was also modeled, and numerical models were developed of post glacial rebound.

  10. Research on Earth's rotation and the effect of atmospheric pressure on vertical deformation and sea level variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahr, John

    1993-03-01

    The work done under NASA grant NAG5-485 included modelling the deformation of the earth caused by variations in atmospheric pressure. The amount of deformation near coasts is sensitive to the nature of the oceanic response to the pressure. The PSMSL (Permanent Service for Mean Sea Level) data suggest the response is inverted barometer at periods greater than a couple months. Green's functions were constructed to describe the perturbation of the geoid caused by atmospheric and oceanic loading and by the accompanying load-induced deformation. It was found that perturbation of up to 2 cm are possible. Ice mass balance data was used for continental glaciers to look at the glacial contributions to time-dependent changes in polar motion, the lod, the earth's gravitational field, the position of the earth's center-of-mass, and global sea level. It was found that there can be lateral, non-hydrostatic structure inside the fluid core caused by gravitational forcing from the mantle, from the inner core, or from topography at the core/mantle or inner core/outer core boundaries. The nutational and tidal response of a non-hydrostatic earth with a solid inner core was modeled. Monthly, global tide gauge data from PSMSL was used to look at the 18.6-year ocean tide, the 14-month pole tide, the oceanic response to pressure, the linear trend and inter-annual variability in the earth's gravity field, the global sea level rise, and the effects of post glacial rebound. The effects of mantle anelasticity on nutations, earth tides, and tidal variation in the lod was modeled. Results of this model can be used with Crustal Dynamics observations to look at the anelastic dissipation and dispersion at tidal periods. The effects of surface topography on various components of crustal deformation was also modeled, and numerical models were developed of post glacial rebound.

  11. Gravity effects on sediment sorting: limitations of models developed on Earth for Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, N. J.; Kuhn, B.; Gartmann, A.

    2015-10-01

    Most studies on surface processes on planetary bodies assume that the use of empirical models developed for Earth is possible if the mathematical equations include all the relevant factors, such as gravity, viscosity and the density of water and sediment. However, most models for sediment transport on Earth are at least semi-empirical, using coefficients to link observed sediment movement to controlling factors such as flow velocity, slope and channel dimensions. However, using roughness and drag coefficients, as well as parameters describing incipient motion of particles, observed on Earth on another planet, violates, strictly speaking, the boundary conditions set for their application by fluid dynamics because the coefficienst describe a flow condition, not a particle property. Reduced gravity affects the flow around a settling partcile or over the bed of a watercourse, therefore data and models from Earth do not apply to another planet. Comparing observations from reduced gravity experiments and model results obtained on Earth confirm the significance of this error, e.g. by underestimating settling velocities of sandy particles by 10 to 50% for Mars when using models from Earth. In this study, the relevance of this error is examined by simulating the sorting of sediment deposited from water flowing on Mars. The results indicate that sorting on Mars is less pronounced than models calibrated on Earth suggest. This has implications for the selection of landing sites and,more importantly, the identification of strata potentially bearing traces of past life during rover missions on Mars. try, 2001

  12. Gravity effects on sediment sorting: limitations of models developed on Earth for Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, Nikolaus J.; Kuhn, Brigitte; Gartmann, Andres

    2015-04-01

    Most studies on surface processes on planetary bodies assume that the use of empirical models developed for Earth is possible if the mathematical equations include all the relevant factors, such as gravity, viscosity and the density of water and sediment. However, most models for sediment transport on Earth are at least semi-empirical, using coefficients to link observed sediment movement to controlling factors such as flow velocity, slope and channel dimensions. However, using roughness and drag coefficients, as well as parameters describing incipient motion of particles, observed on Earth on another planet, violates, strictly speaking, the boundary conditions set for their application by fluid dynamics because the coefficienst describe a flow condition, not a particle property. Reduced gravity affects the flow around a settling partcile or over the bed of a watercourse, therefore data and models from Earth do not apply to another planet. Comparing observations from reduced gravity experiments and model results obtained on Earth confirm the significance of this error, e.g. by underestimating settling velocities of sandy particles by 10 to 50% for Mars when using models from Earth. In this study, the relevance of this error is examined by simulating the sorting of sediment deposited from water flowing on Mars. The results indicate that sorting on Mars is less pronounced than models calibrated on Earth suggest. This has implications for the selection of landing sites and, more importantly, the identification of strata potentially bearing traces of past life during rover missions on Mars.

  13. Deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance of specifically labeled native collagen. Investigation of protein molecular dynamics using the quadrupolar echo technique.

    PubMed Central

    Jelinski, L W; Sullivan, C E; Batchelder, L S; Torchia, D A

    1980-01-01

    Collagen was labeled with [3,3,3-d3]alanine and with [d10]leucine via tissue culture. 2H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra were obtained of collagen in solution and as fibrils using the quadrupolar echo technique. The 2H NMR data for [3,3,3-d3]alanine-labeled collagen fibrils were analyzed in terms of a model for motion in which the molecule is considered to jump between two sites, separated azimuthally by an angle 2 delta, in a time which is rapid compared with the residence time in both sites. The data suggest that the molecule undergoes reorientation over an angle, 2 delta, of approximately 30 degrees in the fibrils, and that the average angle between the alanine C alpha--C beta bond axis and the long axis of the helix is approximately 75 degrees. Reorientation is possibly segmental. The T2 for [3,3,3-d3]alanine-labeled collagen fibrils was estimated to be 105 mus. The 2H NMR data for the methyl groups of [d10]leucine-labeled collagen were analyzed qualitatively. These data established that for collagen in solution and as fibrils, rotation occurs about the leucine side-chain bonds, in addition to threefold methyl rotation and reorientation of the peptide backbone. The T2 for the methyl groups of leucine-labeled collagen is estimated to be approximately 130 mus. Taken together, these data provide strong evidence that both polypeptide backbone reorientation and amino acid side-chain motion occur in collagen molecules in the fibrils. Stabilizing interactions that determine fibril structure must therefore depend upon at least two sets of contacts in any given local region. PMID:7248459

  14. Deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance of specifically labeled native collagen: investigation of protein molecular dynamics using quadrupolar echo technique

    SciTech Connect

    Jelinski, L.W.; Sullivan, C.E.; Batchelder, L.S.; Torchia, D.A.

    1980-10-01

    Collagen was labeled with )3,3,3-d/sub 3/) alanine and with (d/sub 10/) eucine via tissue culture. /sup 2/H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra were obtained of collagen in solution and as fibrils using the quadrupolar echo techniqe. The /sup 2/H NMR data for (3,3,3-d/sub 3/)alanine-labeled collagen fibrils were analyzed in terms of a model for motion in which the molecule is considered to ump between two sites, separated azimuthally by an angle 2delta, in a time which is rapid compared with the residence time in both sites. The data suggest that the molecule undergoes reorientation over an angle, 2 delta, of approx. 30/sup 0/ in the fibrils, and that the average angle between the alanine C/sup ..cap alpha../-C/sup ..beta../ bond axis and the long axis of the helix is approx. 75/sup 0/. Reorientation is possibly segmental. The T/sub 2/ for (3,3,3-d/sub 3/)alanine-labeled collagen fibrils was estimated to be 105 ..mu..s. The /sup 2/H NMR data for the methyl groups of (d/sub 10/)leucine-labeled collagen were analyzed qualitatively. These data established that for collagen in solution and as fibrils, rotation occurs about the leucine side-chain bonds, in addition to threefold methyl rotation and reorientation of the peptide backbone. The T/sub 2/ for the methyl groups of leucine-labeled collagen is estimated to be approx. 130 ..mu..s. Taken together, these data provide strong evidence that both polypeptide backbone reorientation and amino acid side-chain motion occur in collagen molecules in the fibrils. Stabilizing interactions that determine fibril structure must therefore depend upon at least two sets of contacts in any given local region.

  15. Earth's rotation variations effect the earthquake triggering and lithospheric plates movement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrihansky, Lubor

    2013-04-01

    The first group of scientists claims that the headline stated above is quite absurd because the Earth's rotation variations exert the pressure only ~1 Pa on the lithosphere. The second group claims that the despinning of the axial Earth's rotation only influences not determines the plate motion and earthquake triggering. However the third possibility is correct. The Earth's rotation variations cause the earthquake triggering and the plate movement as many observations can prove. Comparison with neighboring planets shows that Mars has no plate movement owing to the absence of large tidal forming body and Venus has slow rotation and negligible flattening. It is not true that tidal forces acting on the Earth are insufficient. Tidal forces acting on the Earth's flattening cause sufficient northward directing torques acting on plates comparable in magnitudes with the seismic moments. The westward movement of plates is evident but its calculation is more difficult and it is necessary to suppose that both the acceleration and deceleration of the Earth's rotation cause the westward lithosphere movement. Many statistics prove the coincidence of earthquakes with semidiurnal tides as result of mid-ocean ridges formation owing to the material fatigue and by loading of waters in subduction zones. Coincidence of earthquakes with LOD variations extremes resulting in Earth moment of inertia changes owing to the tidal deformation and other coincidences with factors influencing the Earth's rotation as 8.45 years Moon perigee rotation and 18.63 years nodal variation present next proofs. The last confirmation follows from the earthquake repetitions in 19 years Metonic cycle. But claims that the plate movement is caused by the mantle convection or by inhomogenities in the mantle or even by the Earth's expansions are easily disprovable conjectures.

  16. Rare earth elements (REEs): effects on germination and growth of selected crop and native plant species.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Philippe J; Carpenter, David; Boutin, Céline; Allison, Jane E

    2014-02-01

    The phytotoxicity of rare earth elements (REEs) is still poorly understood. The exposure-response relationships of three native Canadian plant species (common milkweed, Asclepias syriaca L., showy ticktrefoil, Desmodium canadense (L.) DC. and switchgrass, Panicum virgatum L.) and two commonly used crop species (radish, Raphanus sativus L., and tomato, Solanum lycopersicum L.) to the REEs lanthanum (La), yttrium (Y) and cerium (Ce) were tested. In separate experiments, seven to eight doses of each element were added to the soil prior to sowing seeds. Effects of REE dose on germination were established through measures of total percent germination and speed of germination; effects on growth were established through determination of above ground biomass. Ce was also tested at two pH levels and plant tissue analysis was conducted on pooled samples. Effects on germination were mostly observed with Ce at low pH. However, effects on growth were more pronounced, with detectable inhibition concentrations causing 10% and 25% reductions in biomass for the two native forb species (A. syriaca and D. canadense) with all REEs and on all species tested with Ce in both soil pH treatments. Concentration of Ce in aboveground biomass was lower than root Ce content, and followed the dose-response trend. From values measured in natural soils around the world, our results continue to support the notion that REEs are of limited toxicity and not considered extremely hazardous to the environment. However, in areas where REE contamination is likely, the slow accumulation of these elements in the environment could become problematic.

  17. Rare earth elements (REEs): effects on germination and growth of selected crop and native plant species.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Philippe J; Carpenter, David; Boutin, Céline; Allison, Jane E

    2014-02-01

    The phytotoxicity of rare earth elements (REEs) is still poorly understood. The exposure-response relationships of three native Canadian plant species (common milkweed, Asclepias syriaca L., showy ticktrefoil, Desmodium canadense (L.) DC. and switchgrass, Panicum virgatum L.) and two commonly used crop species (radish, Raphanus sativus L., and tomato, Solanum lycopersicum L.) to the REEs lanthanum (La), yttrium (Y) and cerium (Ce) were tested. In separate experiments, seven to eight doses of each element were added to the soil prior to sowing seeds. Effects of REE dose on germination were established through measures of total percent germination and speed of germination; effects on growth were established through determination of above ground biomass. Ce was also tested at two pH levels and plant tissue analysis was conducted on pooled samples. Effects on germination were mostly observed with Ce at low pH. However, effects on growth were more pronounced, with detectable inhibition concentrations causing 10% and 25% reductions in biomass for the two native forb species (A. syriaca and D. canadense) with all REEs and on all species tested with Ce in both soil pH treatments. Concentration of Ce in aboveground biomass was lower than root Ce content, and followed the dose-response trend. From values measured in natural soils around the world, our results continue to support the notion that REEs are of limited toxicity and not considered extremely hazardous to the environment. However, in areas where REE contamination is likely, the slow accumulation of these elements in the environment could become problematic. PMID:23978671

  18. The effect of Mars surface and Phobos propellant production on Earth launch mass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babb, Gus R.; Stump, William R.

    1986-01-01

    Fuel and oxidizer produced on the surface of Mars and on the Martian Moon Phobos can reduce the cumulative mass of fuel and oxidizer which must be launched to low Earth orbit for Mars exploration missions. A scenario in which ten conjunction class trajectory missions over a twenty year period land a surface base and propellant production facilities on the Martian surface and on Phobos was examined. Production of oxygen on Phobos provides the greatest benefit. If all the propellant for Mars operations and Earth return is produced at Phobos and on Mars, a 30% reduction in cumulative low Earth orbit mass can be achieved at the end of the 20 year period.

  19. (abstract) Effect of Long Period Ocean Tides on the Earth's Rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, R. S.; Chao, B. F.; Desai, S.

    1996-01-01

    The second-degree zonal tide raising potential, which is responsible for tidal changes in the Earth's rotation rate and length-of-day, is symmetric about the polar axis and hence can excite the Earth's polar motion only through its action upon nonaxisymmetric features of the Earth such as the oceans. Ocean tidal excitation of polar motion in the diurnal and semidiurnal tidal bands has been previously detected and extensively examined. Here, the detection of ocean tidal excitation of polar motion in the long-period tidal band, specifically at the Mf' (13.63-day) and Mf (13.66-day) tidal frequencies, is reported.

  20. Study of the effect of cloud inhomogeneity on the earth radiation budget experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Phillip J.

    1988-01-01

    The Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) is the most recent and probably the most intensive mission designed to gather precise measurements of the Earth's radiation components. The data obtained from ERBE is of great importance for future climatological studies. A statistical study reveals that the ERBE scanner data are highly correlated and that instantaneous measurements corresponding to neighboring pixels contain almost the same information. Analyzing only a fraction of the data set when sampling is suggested and applications of this strategy are given in the calculation of the albedo of the Earth and of the cloud-forcing over ocean.

  1. The effect on Earth's surface temperature from variations in rotation rate, continent formation, solar luminosity, and carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, W R; Walker, J C; Marshall, H G

    1989-08-20

    Proposed evolutionary histories of solar luminosity, atmospheric carbon dioxide amounts, Earth rotation rate, and continent formation have been used to generate a time evolution of Earth's surface temperature. While speculative because of uncertainties in the input parameters, such a study does help to prioritize the areas of most concern to paleoclimatic research while illustrating the relationships and mutual dependencies. The mean temperature averages about 5 K higher than today over most of geologic time; the overall variation is less than 15 K. The evolution of Earth's rotation rate makes a significant contribution to the surface temperature distribution as late as 0.5 b.y. ago. While there is little change in equatorial temperatures, polar temperatures decrease, being some 15 K lower 3.5 b.y. ago than with present day rotation. The effect of continent growth on albedo is of secondary importance.

  2. The effect of mantle internal heating and pressure-weakening on surface dynamics: implications for Super-Earths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, C.; Lowman, J. P.; Hansen, U.

    2011-12-01

    The quest of habitability of other planets has led to intensive investigations of the planets' surface dynamics. In this context Super-Earths (a new class of exoplanets) have become of special interest in the past decade. Scalings to their increased size compared to the Earth suggest an increase in convective stresses (mobility) but also in plate resistance. The latter is fundamentally determined by the mantle viscosity, which depends on temperature, stress and pressure. We conduct a systematic 2D study on parameters affecting the surface behaviour of mantle convection with strongly variable viscosity. For example, it is assumed that super-sized planets will have higher Rayleigh numbers and non-dimensional heating rates. Additionally, the viscosity will be affected by the increased temperature and pressure of super-sized planets. In particular, a pressure-weakening effect has been discussed as a consequence of the high pressures in Super-Earths. The main focus of our work considers the response of surface motion to the mantle's internal heating rate. Increasing the non-dimensional heating rates leads to the formation of a strong stagnant lid because the mantle heating effects thermally activated viscosity. Not even the surface weakening effect of a high pressure-dependent viscosity is sufficient to mobilise the surface. We find that plate resistance increases which leads to a reduced surface mobility on Super-Earths.

  3. The effect of mantle internal heating and pressure-weakening on surface dynamics: implications for Super-Earths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, C.; Lowman, J. P.; Hansen, U.

    2012-04-01

    The quest of habitability of other planets has led to intensive investigations of the planets' surface dynamics. In this context Super-Earths (a new class of exoplanets) have become of special interest in the past decade. Scalings to their increased size compared to the Earth suggest an increase in convective stresses (mobility) but also in plate resistance. The latter is fundamentally determined by the mantle viscosity, which depends on temperature, stress and pressure. We conduct a systematic 2D study on parameters affecting the surface behaviour of mantle convection with strongly variable viscosity. For example, it is assumed that super-sized planets will have higher Rayleigh numbers and non-dimensional heating rates. Additionally, the viscosity will be affected by the increased temperature and pressure of super-sized planets. In particular, a pressure-weakening effect has been discussed as a consequence of the high pressures in Super-Earths. The main focus of our work considers the response of surface motion to the mantle's internal heating rate. Increasing the non-dimensional heating rates leads to the formation of a strong stagnant lid because the mantle heating effects thermally activated viscosity. Not even the surface weakening effect of a high pressure-dependent viscosity is sufficient to mobilise the surface. We find that plate resistance increases which leads to a reduced surface mobility on Super-Earths.

  4. Understanding the Cause-Effect Chain from Sun to Earth of Geo-Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, D. F.

    2015-12-01

    A new 5-year (2014-2018) SCOSTEP program Variability of the Sun and Its Terrestrial Impact (VarSITI) focuses on the current period of low solar activity and its consequences at Earth. ISEST (International Study of Earth-affecting Solar Transients) is the VarSITI project whose goal is to understand the origin, evolution and propagation of solar transients (CMEs, flares, CIRs) through the space between the Sun and Earth, with the goal of improving the prediction capability for space weather. ISEST provides textbook cases to the community, and its Working Group 4 on Campaign Events is studying less well understood events, such as so-called stealth and problem CMEs. We highlight several case studies of recent Sun-Earth events for which there was a problem in forecasting the geoactivity, but we now understand what happened.

  5. Titan is to Earth's Hydrological Cycle what Venus is to its Greenhouse Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, R. D.

    2012-06-01

    Titan serves as an extreme extrapolation of Earth's possible present trend toward more violent rainstorms interspersed by long droughts, much as Venus has acted as a bogeyman to illustrate the perils of enhanced greenhouse warming.

  6. Effect of Aerosol Variation on Radiance in the Earth's Atmosphere-Ocean System.

    PubMed

    Plass, G N; Kattawar, G W

    1972-07-01

    The reflected and transmitted radiance is calculated for a realistic model of the atmosphere-ocean system. Multiple scattering to all orders as well as anisotropic scattering from aerosols are taken into account by a Monte Carlo technique. The probability for reflection or refraction at the ocean surface is calculated for each photon. Scattering and absorption by water molecules (Rayleigh) and by hydrosols (Mie) are taken into account within the ocean. The radiance is calculated for a normal aerosol distribution as well as for a three and ten times normal distribution. Calculations are also made for an aerosol layer near the earth as well as for one in the stratosphere. The upward radiance at the top of the atmosphere depends strongly on the total number of aerosols but not on their spatial distribution. Variations in the ozone amount also have little effect on the upward radiance. The calculations are made at the following wavelengths: 0.7 micro, 0.9 micro, 1.67 micro. The radiance above and below the ocean surface as well as the flux at various levels are also discussed.

  7. The effects of solar wind on galactic cosmic ray flux at Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ihongo, G. D.; Wang, C. H.-T.

    2016-01-01

    The amount of solar wind produced continuously by the sun is not constant due to changes in solar activity. This unsteady nature of the solar wind seems to be responsible for galactic cosmic ray flux modulation, hence the flux of incoming galactic cosmic rays observed at the top of the Earth's atmosphere varies with the solar wind reflecting the solar activity. The aforementioned reasons have lead to attempts by several researchers to study correlations between galactic cosmic rays and the solar wind. However, most of the correlation studies carried out by authors earlier are based on the analyses of observational data from neutron monitors. In this context, we study the effects of solar wind on galactic cosmic ray flux observed at r ≈ 1 AU, using a theoretical approach and found that the solar wind causes significant decreases in galactic cosmic ray flux at r ≈1 AU. A short time variation of the calculated flux is also checked and the result is reflected by exposing a negative correlation of the solar wind with the corresponding galactic cosmic ray flux. This means that the higher the solar wind the lower the galactic cosmic rays flux and vice-versa. To obtain a better understanding, the calculated flux and its short time variation at 1 AU are compared to data that shows a good fit to the model making it possible to establish a statistically significant negative correlation of -0.988±0.001 between solar wind variation and galactic cosmic rays flux variation theoretically.

  8. Solar Effects of Low-Earth Orbit objects in ORDEM 3.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vavrin, A. B.; Anz-Meador, P.; Kelley, R. L.

    2014-01-01

    Variances in atmospheric density are directly related to the variances in solar flux intensity between 11- year solar cycles. The Orbital Debris Engineering Model (ORDEM 3.0) uses a solar flux table as input for calculating orbital lifetime of intact and debris objects in Low-Earth Orbit. Long term projections in solar flux activity developed by the NASA Orbital Debris Program Office (ODPO) extend the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Space Environment Center (NOAA/SEC) daily historical flux values with a 5-year projection. For purposes of programmatic scheduling, the Q2 2009 solar flux table was chosen for ORDEM 3.0. Current solar flux activity shows that the current solar cycle has entered a period of lower solar flux intensity than previously forecasted in 2009. This results in a deviation of the true orbital debris environment propagation in ORDEM 3.0. In this paper, we present updated orbital debris populations in LEO using the latest solar flux values. We discuss the effects on recent breakup events such as the FY-1C anti-satellite test and the Iridium 33 / Cosmos 2251 accidental collision. Justifications for chosen solar flux tables are discussed.

  9. Mixed alkali effect on the spectroscopic properties of alkali-alkaline earth oxide borate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivas, G.; Ramesh, B.; Shareefuddin, Md.; Chary, M. N.; Sayanna, R.

    2016-05-01

    The mixed alkali and alkaline earth oxide borate glass with the composition xK2O - (25-x) Li2O-12.5BaO-12.5MgO-50B2O3 (x = 0, 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25mol %) and doped with 1mol% CuO were prepared by the melt quenching technique. From the optical absorption spectra the optical band gap, electronic polarizability(α02-), interaction parameter (A), theoretical and experimental optical basicity (Λ) values were evaluated. From the Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectral data the number of spins (N) and susceptibility (χ) were evaluated. The values of (α02-), and (Λ) increases with increasing of K2O content and electronic polarizability and interaction parameter show opposite behaviuor which may be due to the creation of non-bridging oxygens and expansion of borate network. The reciprocal of susceptibility (1/χ) and spin concentration (N) as a function of K2O content, varied nonlinearly which may be due to creation of non-bridging oxygens in the present glass system. This may be attributed to mixed alkali effect (MAE).

  10. Open top culverts as an alternative drainage system to minimize ecological effects in earth roads.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, Jose L.; Elorrieta, Jose; Robredo, Jose C.; García, Ricardo; García, Fernando; Gimenez, Martin C.

    2013-04-01

    During the last fifteen years a research team from School of Forestry at the Technical University of Madrid (Spain) has developed several competitive research projects regarding forest roads and open top culverts. A first approach was established with a prototype of 7 meters length in a hydraulic channel at the laboratory determining main parameters of different open top culverts in relation to different sizes of gravels and the self washing properties relationship with different slopes up to 8 %. The curves obtained may help to properly install these drainage systems avoiding maintenance costs. In addition more targeted pilot studies were developed in different forest earth roads in center and north Spain. The construction of the stations under study was financed by the U.P.M and the R&D National Plan. The main outcomes relates the low variation of humidity in a 20 m. wide range at both sides of the open top culverts and several considerations relating the angle of installation, the spacing of such drainage systems and the benefits against rilling along the roads. Also the erosion produced downhill was established and some construction methods to avoid adverse ecological effects. The diffusion of results includes congresses and a small booklet with a great acceptance in forestry services. Also a patent (ES 2 262 437) of an advanced model has been registered.

  11. A study of students' perceptions of the organisation and effectiveness of fieldwork in earth sciences education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, Luis; Praia, Joa¨O.; Kempa, Richard

    2003-02-01

    This paper reports the findings of a preliminary evaluation of an in-service training programme designed for practising geology/earth science teachers in Portuguese high schools and intended to enhance the effectiveness of fieldwork activities organised by them for their students. Among the points particularly stressed during the in-service training were that students should be adequately prepared for fieldwork through classroom-based activities prior to the fieldwork itself and that to arrive at the maximum educational benefit for the students, they should be involved in collaborative group-based investigation. The findings, derived from an enquiry among students following their exposure to fieldwork, revealed that in both these aspects teachers failed to put theory into practice, probably as the result of a lack of confidence to implement novel procedures. On the positive side, the students reported that they enjoyed the social interaction with other students that the fieldwork made possible and the opportunity to work independently of the teachers.

  12. Effect of knowledge integration activities on students' perception of the earth's crust as a cyclic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kali, Yael; Orion, Nir; Eylon, Bat-Sheva

    2003-08-01

    Systems thinking is regarded as a high-order thinking skill required in scientific, technological, and everyday domains. However, little is known about systems thinking in the context of science education. In the current research, students' understanding of the rock cycle system after a learning program was characterized, and the effect of a concluding knowledge integration activity on their systems thinking was studied. Answers to an open-ended test were interpreted using a systems thinking continuum, ranging from a completely static view of the system to an understanding of the system's cyclic nature. A meaningful improvement in students' views of the rock cycle toward the higher side of the systems thinking continuum was found after the knowledge integration activity. Students became more aware of the dynamic and cyclic nature of the rock cycle, and their ability to construct sequences of processes representing material transformation in relatively large chunks significantly improved. Success of the knowledge integration activity stresses the importance of postknowledge acquisition activities, which engage students in a dual process of differentiation of their knowledge and reintegration in a systems context. We suggest including such activities in curricula involving systems-based contents, particularly in earth science, in which systems thinking can bring about environmental literacy.

  13. A mathematical characterization of vegetation effect on microwave remote sensing from the Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choe, Y.; Tsang, L.

    1983-01-01

    In passive microwave remote sensing of the earth, a theoretical model that utilizes the radiative transfer equations was developed to account for the volume scattering effects of the vegetation canopy. Vegetation canopies such as alfalfa, sorghum, and corn are simulated by a layer of ellipsoidal scatterers and cylindrical structures. The ellipsoidal scatterers represent the leaves of vegetation and are randomly positioned and oriented. The orientation of ellipsoids is characterized by a probability density function of Eulerian angles of rotation. The cylindrical structures represent the stalks of vegetation and their radii are assumed to be much smaller than their lengths. The underlying soil is represented by a half-space medium with a homogeneous permittivity and uniform temperature profile. The radiative transfer quations are solved by a numerical method using a Gaussian quadrature formula to compute both the vertical and horizontal polarized brightness temperature as a function of observation angle. The theory was applied to the interpretation of experimental data obtained from sorghum covered fields near College Station, Texas.

  14. Effects of DeOrbitSail as applied to Lifetime predictions of Low Earth Orbit Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afful, Andoh; Opperman, Ben; Steyn, Herman

    2016-07-01

    Orbit lifetime prediction is an important component of satellite mission design and post-launch space operations. Throughout its lifetime in space, a spacecraft is exposed to risk of collision with orbital debris or operational satellites. This risk is especially high within the Low Earth Orbit (LEO) region where the highest density of space debris is accumulated. This paper investigates orbital decay of some LEO micro-satellites and accelerating orbit decay by using a deorbitsail. The Semi-Analytical Liu Theory (SALT) and the Satellite Toolkit was employed to determine the mean elements and expressions for the time rates of change. Test cases of observed decayed satellites (Iridium-85 and Starshine-1) are used to evaluate the predicted theory. Results for the test cases indicated that the theory fitted observational data well within acceptable limits. Orbit decay progress of the SUNSAT micro-satellite was analysed using relevant orbital parameters derived from historic Two Line Element (TLE) sets and comparing with decay and lifetime prediction models. This paper also explored the deorbit date and time for a 1U CubeSat (ZACUBE-01). The use of solar sails as devices to speed up the deorbiting of LEO satellites is considered. In a drag sail mode, the deorbitsail technique significantly increases the effective cross-sectional area of a satellite, subsequently increasing atmospheric drag and accelerating orbit decay. The concept proposed in this study introduced a very useful technique of orbit decay as well as deorbiting of spacecraft.

  15. [Effect of the atmospheric ozone layer on the biologically active ultraviolet radiation on the earth's surface].

    PubMed

    Schulze, R; Kasten, F

    1975-08-01

    Based on measurements of the spectral irradiation intensity of UV-B global radiation by Bener (1960) and on the curve of spectral skin erythema effects newly measured by Urbach and Berger (1972), the biologically active UV-radiation at earth's surface has been calculated as a function of sun's altitude and atmospheric ozone content in so-called "Biological Units": BE = mWh cm-2 times erythema efficacy. On the basis of these data, the total daily, monthly, and yearly amounts of biologically active UV-radiation have been determined for the different geographical latitudes and various ozone contents. Approximately two thirds of BU hit the equatorial zone from 35 degrees south to 35 degrees north. Provided that the stratospheric ozone layer would be reduced by ten per cent from the exhaust gases of supersonic planes flying at high-altitude, an increase of BU would result amounting to 18% at the equator, to 19% in middle latitudes, and to 22% at the poles.

  16. On the possibility of a 'cuckoo-effect' in the earth-moon system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauwels, T.

    In this paper an investigation is made of the possibility that the moon could have depleted the earth satellite system of all natural satellites by a combination of orbit-orbit resonances and tidal evolution. Simulations show that for a satellite closer than 150 earth radii, avoiding all resonances is definitely impossible, but it can be captured in a stable resonant orbit as well as in a resonant orbit leading to a close approach to the moon.

  17. The Earth's radiation budget and its relation to atmospheric hydrology: 2. Observations of cloud effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, Graeme L.; Greenwald, Thomas J.

    1991-08-01

    This paper describes an observational study of the relationship between the cloudy sky components of the Earth's radiation budget (ERB) and space/time coincident observations of the sea surface temperature, microwave-derived cloud liquid water and cloud cover. The study uses two ERB data sets; Nimbus 7 narrow field-of-view, broadband scanning radiometer data from June 1979 to May 1980 and the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment broadband scanning data from March 1985 to February 1986. Cloud fluxes are derived from the ERB fluxes and estimates of the clear sky fluxes are described in a related paper. A new method that extends the cloud forcing analysis of ERB data is also introduced to estimate the cloud albedo. The zonally and seasonally averaged cloud flux components of the ERB are within 6 W m-2 for the two data sets. The general gross features of the global distributions of these fluxes also reproduce those reported in recent studies with the largest differences in mid-to-high latitude regions characterized by persistent cloud cover where the estimation of Nimbus 7 clear sky fluxes is suspect. A quantitative assessment of the impact of clouds on the greenhouse effect is given in terms of the greenhouse parameter introduced in a related study. This impact is significant, especially for deep convective clouds that form over the warmest waters of the oceans. It is also shown how the greenhouse effect of clouds increases as the liquid water path (LWP) of clouds increases in a manner analogous to that observed for water vapor. This increase is in direct contrast to many recent model studies of cloud feedback that ignore this influence. Cloud albedo data are grouped in categories corresponding to ranges of solar zenith angle. Albedos and longwave fluxes for the latitudinal ranges of these categories suggest that brighter, colder clouds exist over tropical land masses in comparison to tropical oceanic regions and vice versa for middle and high latitudes. While

  18. The Effect of Nickel on the Seismic Wave Belocities of Iron at the Pressure Conditions of the Earth's Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martorell Masip, B.; Vocadlo, L.; Brodholt, J. P.; Wood, I.

    2011-12-01

    Understanding the physical properties of the Earth's core is a key step in the study of the evolution and dynamics of our planet. For much of the last century, based on studies of meteorites [1], it was believed that Earth's core was predominantly a mixture of iron and nickel. More specifically, the Earth's inner core is a solid Fe-Ni alloy at high temperature (T, 6000 K) and high pressure (P, 360 GPa). Furthermore, to account for the lower than expected density in the Earth's core, it has been suggested that light elements must also be present [2]. While the effect of light elements on the properties of iron have been the subject of an extensive literature [3-6], the effect of nickel on the properties of iron has often been overlooked; this is due to the expectation, based on their proximity in the periodic table, that the properties of Ni are sufficiently similar to those of iron that the presence of nickel can be neglected. Although recent research using high P-T experiments and theoretical studies of Fe-Ni alloys has been performed in order to establish whether nickel affects the physical properties of iron, the results have been inconclusive and sometimes contradictory [7-11]. Here we present a DFT study of the athermal elastic properties of solid Fe-Ni alloys at core pressures using the GGA. We have calculated the equation of state (EoS) for Fe-Ni alloys at several compositions for bcc, fcc and hcp structures, and fitted the results to Birch-Murnaghan 3rd order equations of state. We have also calculated the elastic constants for each structure at 360 GPa and evaluated the seismic wave velocities. Our results show that the effect of small amounts of Ni is significant (-1.9% in vp and -4.0% in vs for hcp structure of Fe93.25-Ni6.75 alloy), and therefore nickel must be taken into account if a detailed model of the Earth's inner core is to be constructed. Other aspects of the influence of nickel, such as its effect on the high P-T phase diagram and melting curve

  19. Space environmental effects on LDEF low Earth orbit exposed graphite reinforced polymer matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, Pete

    1992-01-01

    The Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) was deployed on April 7, 1984 in low earth orbit (LEO) at an altitude of 482 kilometers. On board experiments experienced the harsh LEO environment including atomic oxygen (AO), ultraviolet radiation (UV), and thermal cycling. During the 5.8 year mission, the LDEF orbit decayed to 340 kilometers where significantly higher AO concentrations exist. LDEF was retrieved on January 12, 1990 from this orbit. One experiment on board LDEF was M0003, Space Effects on Spacecraft Materials. As a subset of M0003 nearly 500 samples of polymer, metal, and glass matrix composites were flown as the Advanced Composites Experiment M0003-10. The Advanced Composites Experiment is a joint effort between government and industry with the Aerospace Corporation serving as the experiment integrator. A portion of the graphite reinforced polymer matrix composites were furnished by the Boeing Defense and Space Group, Seattle, Washington. Test results and discussions for the Boeing portion of M0003-10 are presented. Experiment and specimen location on the LDEF are presented along with a quantitative summary of the pertinent exposure conditions. Matrix materials selected for the test were epoxy, polysulfone, and polyimide. These composite materials were selected due to their suitability for high performance structural capability in spacecraft applications. Graphite reinforced polymer matrix composites offer higher strength to weight ratios along with excellent dimensional stability. The Boeing space exposed and corresponding ground control composite specimens were subjected to post flight mechanical, chemical, and physical testing in order to determine any changes in critical properties and performance characteristics. Among the more significant findings are the erosive effect of atomic oxygen on leading edge exposed specimens and microcracking in non-unidirectionally reinforced flight specimens.

  20. Effect of Rare Earth Ions on the Properties of Composites Composed of Ethylene Vinyl Acetate Copolymer and Layered Double Hydroxides

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lili; Li, Bin; Zhao, Xiaohong; Chen, Chunxia; Cao, Jingjing

    2012-01-01

    Background The study on the rare earth (RE)-doped layered double hydroxides (LDHs) has received considerable attention due to their potential applications in catalysts. However, the use of RE-doped LDHs as polymer halogen-free flame retardants was seldom investigated. Furthermore, the effect of rare earth elements on the hydrophobicity of LDHs materials and the compatibility of LDHs/polymer composite has seldom been reported. Methodology/Principal Findings The stearate sodium surface modified Ni-containing LDHs and RE-doped Ni-containing LDHs were rapidly synthesized by a coprecipitation method coupled with the microwave hydrothermal treatment. The influences of trace amounts of rare earth ions La, Ce and Nd on the amount of water molecules, the crystallinity, the morphology, the hydrophobicity of modified Ni-containing LDHs and the adsorption of modifier in the surface of LDHs were investigated by TGA, XRD, TEM, contact angle and IR, respectively. Moreover, the effects of the rare earth ions on the interfacial compatibility, the flame retardancy and the mechanical properties of ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer (EVA)/LDHs composites were also explored in detail. Conclusions/Significance S-Ni0.1MgAl-La displayed more uniform dispersion and better interfacial compatibility in EVA matrix compared with other LDHs. Furthermore, the S-Ni0.1MgAl-La/EVA composite showed the best fire retardancy and mechanical properties in all composites. PMID:22693627

  1. Path-integral Monte Carlo study of asymmetric quantum quadrupolar rotors with fourth-order propagators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sungjin; Shin, Hyeondeok; Kwon, Yongkyung

    2012-08-01

    The recently-proposed fourth-order propagator based on the multi-product expansion has been applied to path-integral Monte Carlo calculations for asymmetric quantum quadruploar rotors fixed at face-centered cubic lattice sites. The rotors are observed to undergo an orientational orderdisorder phase transition at a low temperature when the electric quadrupole-quadrupole interaction is strong enough. At intermediate interaction strength, a further decrease of temperature after the first transition to the ordered phase results in a reentrant transition back to the disordered phase. The theoretical phase diagram of these asymmetric rotors determined by using fourth-order path-integral Monte Carlo calculations is found to be in good quantitative agreement with the experimental one for solid hydrogen deuteride. This leads us to conclude that the fourth-order propagator can be effectively implemented for an accurate path-integral Monte Carlo calculation of a quantum many-body system with rotational degrees of freedom.

  2. Cost-effective and robust mitigation of space debris in low earth orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, R.; Martin, C.

    It is predicted that the space debris population in low Earth orbit (LEO) will continue to grow and in an exponential manner in the long-term due to an increasing rate of collisions between large objects, unless internationally-accepted space debris mitigation measures are adopted soon. Such measures are aimed at avoiding the future generation of space debris objects and primarily need to be effective in preventing significant long-term growth in the debris population, even in the potential scenario of an increase in future space activity. It is also important that mitigation measures can limit future debris population levels, and therefore the underlying collision risk to space missions, to the lowest extent possible. However, for their wide acceptance, the cost of implementation associated with mitigation measures needs to be minimised as far as possible. Generally, a lower collision risk will cost more to achieve and vice versa, so it is necessary to strike a balance between cost and risk in order to find a cost-effective set of mitigation measures. In this paper, clear criteria are established in order to assess the cost-effectiveness of space debris mitigation measures. A full cost-risk-benefit trade-off analysis of numerous mitigation scenarios is presented. These scenarios consider explosion prevention and post-mission disposal of space systems, including de-orbiting to limited lifetime orbits and re-orbiting above the LEO region. The ESA DELTA model is used to provide long-term debris environment projections for these scenarios as input to the benefit and risk parts of the trade-off analysis. Manoeuvre requirements for the different post-mission disposal scenarios were also calculated in order to define the cost-related element. A 25-year post-mission lifetime de-orbit policy, combined with explosion prevention and mission-related object limitation, was found to be the most cost-effective solution to the space debris problem in LEO. This package would also

  3. Earth Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brewer, Tom

    1970-01-01

    Reviews some of the more concerted, large-scale efforts in the earth resources areas" in order to help the computer community obtain insights into the activities it can jointly particpate in withthe earth resources community." (Author)

  4. The Effects of Abrupt Wind Shears in the Solar Wind on the Earth's Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovsky, J.; Boudouridis, A.; Birn, J.; Denton, M.

    2014-12-01

    The solar wind is filled sudden velocity shears. The shears take the form of vorticity layers co-located with current sheets. The velocity vector makes its change in a few seconds. For shear layers with vector velocity changes greater than 50 km/s, an average of 12 shear layers pass the Earth per day. Global magnetospheric MHD simulations with four different simulation codes have been performed at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) to examine the reaction of the Earth to the solar-wind velocity shears. All 4 simulation codes predict comet-like disconnections of the magnetotail, the magnetosheath, and the bow shock on the flanks as a shear layer passes the Earth. The simulation codes also predict sudden changes in the cross-polar-cap potential and ionospheric Joule dissipation as the shear layers pass the Earth. A data-analysis research effort is underway to look for signatures of the Earth's reaction to abrupt wind shear events; preliminary results of that effort will be discussed.

  5. Solar Radiation and Near-Earth Asteroids: Thermophysical Modeling and New Measurements of the Yarkovsky Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nugent, Carolyn Rosemary

    This dissertation examines the influence of solar radiation on near-Earth asteroids (NEAs); it investigates thermal properties and examines changes to orbits caused by the process of anisotropic re-radiation of sunlight called the Yarkovsky effect. For the first portion of this dissertation, we used geometric albedos pV and diameters derived from the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), as well as geometric albedos and diameters from the literature, to produce more accurate diurnal Yarkovsky drift predictions for 540 NEAs out of the current sample of ˜8800 known objects. These predictions are intended to assist observers, and should enable future Yarkovsky detections. The second portion of this dissertation introduces a new method for detecting the Yarkovsky drift. We identified and quantified semi-major axis drifts in NEAs by performing orbital fits to optical and radar astrometry of all numbered NEAs. We discuss a subset of 54 NEAs that exhibit some of the most reliable and strongest drift rates. Our selection criteria include a Yarkovsky sensitivity metric that quantifies the detectability of semi-major axis drift in any given data set, a signal-to-noise metric, and orbital coverage requirements. In 42 cases, the observed drifts (˜ 10-3 AU/Myr) agree well with numerical estimates of Yarkovsky drifts. This agreement suggests that the Yarkovsky effect is the dominant non-gravitational process affecting these orbits, and allows us to derive constraints on asteroid physical properties. We define the Yarkovsky efficiency fY as the ratio of the change in orbital energy to incident solar radiation energy, and we find that typical Yarkovsky efficiencies are ˜10-5. The final portion of this dissertation describes the development of and results from a detailed thermal model of potentially hazardous asteroid (29075) 1950 DA. This model combines radar-derived shape models of the object and fourteen 12 micron observations by the WISE spacecraft. The observations

  6. Cyclic Deformation Behavior of a Rare-Earth Containing Extruded Magnesium Alloy: Effect of Heat Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirza, F. A.; Chen, D. L.; Li, D. J.; Zeng, X. Q.

    2015-03-01

    The present study was aimed at evaluating strain-controlled cyclic deformation behavior of a rare-earth (RE) element containing Mg-10Gd-3Y-0.5Zr (GW103K) alloy in different states (as-extruded, peak-aged (T5), and solution-treated and peak-aged (T6)). The addition of RE elements led to an effective grain refinement and weak texture in the as-extruded alloy. While heat treatment resulted in a grain growth modestly in the T5 state and significantly in the T6 state, a high density of nano-sized and bamboo-leaf/plate-shaped β' (Mg7(Gd,Y)) precipitates was observed to distribute uniformly in the α-Mg matrix. The yield strength and ultimate tensile strength, as well as the maximum and minimum peak stresses during cyclic deformation in the T5 and T6 states were significantly higher than those in the as-extruded state. Unlike RE-free extruded Mg alloys, symmetrical hysteresis loops in tension and compression and cyclic stabilization were present in the GW103K alloy in different states. The fatigue life of this alloy in the three conditions, which could be well described by the Coffin-Manson law and Basquin's equation, was equivalent within the experimental scatter and was longer than that of RE-free extruded Mg alloys. This was predominantly attributed to the presence of the relatively weak texture and the suppression of twinning activities stemming from the fine grain sizes and especially RE-containing β' precipitates. Fatigue crack was observed to initiate from the specimen surface in all the three alloy states and the initiation site contained some cleavage-like facets after T6 heat treatment. Crack propagation was characterized mainly by the characteristic fatigue striations.

  7. The effect of Low Earth Orbit exposure on some experimental fluorine and silicon-containing polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W.; Young, Philip R.; Kalil, Carol G.; Chang, Alice C.; Siochi, Emilie J.

    1994-01-01

    Several experimental fluorine and silicon-containing polymers in film form were exposed to low Earth orbit (LEO) on a Space Shuttle flight experiment (STS-46, Evaluation of Oxygen Interaction with Materials, EOIM-3). The environmental parameters of primary concern were atomic oxygen (AO) and ultraviolet (UV) radiation. The materials were exposed to 2.3 plus or minus 0.1 x 10(exp 20) oxygen atoms/sq cm and 30.6 UV sun hours during the flight. In some cases, the samples were exposed at ambient, 120 C and 200 C. The effects of exposure on these materials were assessed utilizing a variety of characterization techniques including optical, scanning electron (SEM) and scanning tunneling (STM) microscopy, UV-visible (UV-VIS) transmission, diffuse reflectance infrared (DR-FTIR), x-ray photoelectron (XPS) spectroscopy, and in a few cases, gel permeation chromatography (GPC). In addition, weight losses of the films, presumably due to AO erosion, were measured. The fluorine-containing polymers exhibited significant AO erosion and exposed films were diffuse or 'frosted' in appearance and consequently displayed dramatic reductions in optical transmission. The silicon-containing films exhibited minimum AO erosion and the optical transmission of exposed films was essentially unchanged. The silicon near the exposed surface in the films was converted to silicate/silicon oxide upon AO exposure which subsequently provided protection for the underlying material. The silicon-containing epoxies are potentially useful as AO resistant coatings and matrix resins as they are readily processed into carbon fiber reinforced composites and cured via electron radiation.

  8. Earth survey applications division: Research leading to the effective use of space technology in applications relating to the Earth's surface and interior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, L. (Editor)

    1980-01-01

    Accomplishments and future plans are described for the following areas: (1) geology - geobotanical indicators and geopotential data; (2) modeling magnetic fields; (3) modeling the structure, composition, and evolution of the Earth's crust; (4) global and regional motions of the Earth's crust and earthquake occurrence; (5) modeling geopotential from satellite tracking data; (6) modeling the Earth's gravity field; (7) global Earth dynamics; (8) sea surface topography, ocean dynamics; and geophysical interpretation; (9) land cover and land use; (10) physical and remote sensing attributes important in detecting, measuring, and monitoring agricultural crops; (11) prelaunch studies using LANDSAT D; (12) the multispectral linear array; (13) the aircraft linear array pushbroom radiometer; and (14) the spaceborne laser ranging system.

  9. Tidal dissipation in the lunar magma ocean and its effect on the early evolution of the Earth-Moon system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Erinna M. A.; Nimmo, Francis

    2016-09-01

    The present-day inclination of the Moon reflects the entire history of its thermal and orbital evolution. The Moon likely possessed a global magma ocean following the Moon-forming impact. In this work, we develop a coupled thermal-orbital evolution model that takes into account obliquity tidal heating in the lunar magma ocean. Dissipation in the magma ocean is so effective that it results in rapid inclination damping at semi-major axes beyond about 20 Earth radii (RE), because of the increase in lunar obliquity as the so-called Cassini state transition at ≈30 RE is approached. There is thus a "speed limit" on how fast the Moon can evolve outwards while maintaining its inclination: if it reaches 20 RE before the magma ocean solidifies, any early lunar inclination cannot be maintained. We find that for magma ocean lifetimes of 10 Myr or more, the Earth's tidal quality factor Q must have been >300 to maintain primordial inclination, implying an early Earth 1-2 orders of magnitude less dissipative than at present. On the other hand, if tidal dissipation on the early Earth was stronger, our model implies rapid damping of the lunar inclination and requires subsequent late excitation of the lunar orbit after the crystallization of the lunar magma ocean.

  10. Expected first-order effects of a notional equatorial ring on Earth's night sky: a geometric consideration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hancock, L. O.

    2013-12-01

    : a schema of ring effects on the southern sky: (i) extinction of extra-terrestrial light between celestial equator and horizon; (ii) brightening of extra-terrestrial light via light-through-dust effects near the southern horizon; and (iii) reflection of sunlight from celestial equator to horizon. These effects would be modulated by season (due to ring self-shadowing) and hour of the night (because of Earth's shadow). We suggest that the expected effects are not "missing" at all - similar effects are well known to observers but are taken to be fully accounted for by skyglow, airglow and light pollution, qualitatively similar phenomena that certainly exist. We conclude that ground-based observers' non-identification of an equatorial ring is not a counter-indicator of a ring's existence. As far as this consideration goes, the question of an Earth ring system is open.

  11. A New Framework for Effective and Efficient Global Sensitivity Analysis of Earth and Environmental Systems Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razavi, Saman; Gupta, Hoshin

    2015-04-01

    Earth and Environmental Systems (EES) models are essential components of research, development, and decision-making in science and engineering disciplines. With continuous advances in understanding and computing power, such models are becoming more complex with increasingly more factors to be specified (model parameters, forcings, boundary conditions, etc.). To facilitate better understanding of the role and importance of different factors in producing the model responses, the procedure known as 'Sensitivity Analysis' (SA) can be very helpful. Despite the availability of a large body of literature on the development and application of various SA approaches, two issues continue to pose major challenges: (1) Ambiguous Definition of Sensitivity - Different SA methods are based in different philosophies and theoretical definitions of sensitivity, and can result in different, even conflicting, assessments of the underlying sensitivities for a given problem, (2) Computational Cost - The cost of carrying out SA can be large, even excessive, for high-dimensional problems and/or computationally intensive models. In this presentation, we propose a new approach to sensitivity analysis that addresses the dual aspects of 'effectiveness' and 'efficiency'. By effective, we mean achieving an assessment that is both meaningful and clearly reflective of the objective of the analysis (the first challenge above), while by efficiency we mean achieving statistically robust results with minimal computational cost (the second challenge above). Based on this approach, we develop a 'global' sensitivity analysis framework that efficiently generates a newly-defined set of sensitivity indices that characterize a range of important properties of metric 'response surfaces' encountered when performing SA on EES models. Further, we show how this framework embraces, and is consistent with, a spectrum of different concepts regarding 'sensitivity', and that commonly-used SA approaches (e.g., Sobol

  12. Fast amplitude-modulated pulse trains with frequency sweep (SW-FAM) in static NMR of half-integer spin quadrupolar nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bräuniger, Thomas; Hempel, Günter; Madhu, P. K.

    2006-07-01

    In solid-state NMR of quadrupolar nuclei with half-integer spin I, fast amplitude-modulated (FAM) pulse trains have been utilised to enhance the intensity of the central-transition signal, by transferring spin population from the satellite transitions. In this paper, the signal-enhancement performance of the recently introduced SW-FAM pulse train with swept modulation frequency [T. Bräuniger, K. Ramaswamy, P.K. Madhu, Enhancement of the central-transition signal in static and magic-angle-spinning NMR of quadrupolar nuclei by frequency-swept fast amplitude-modulated pulses, Chem. Phys. Lett. 383 (2004) 403-410] is explored in more detail for static spectra. It is shown that by sweeping the modulation frequencies linearly over the pulse pairs (SW (1/τ)-FAM), the shape of the frequency distribution is improved in comparison to the original pulse scheme (SW (τ)-FAM). For static spectra of 27Al (I = 5/2), better signal-enhancement performance is found for the SW (1/τ)-FAM sequence, as demonstrated both by experiments and numerical simulations.

  13. Quantum spin liquid and electric quadrupolar states of single crystal Tb2+xTi2-xO7+y

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakita, M.; Taniguchi, T.; Edamoto, H.; Takatsu, H.; Kadowaki, H.

    2016-02-01

    The ground states of the frustrated pyrochlore oxide Tb2+xTi2-xO7+y, sensitively depending on the small off-stoichiometry parameter x, have been studied by specific heat measurements using well characterized samples. Single crystal Tb2+xTi2-xO7+y boules grown by the standard floating zone technique are shown to exhibit concentration (x) gradient. This off-stoichiometry parameter is determined by precisely measuring the lattice constant of small samples cut from a crystal boule. Specific heat shows that the phase boundary of the electric quadrupolar state has a dome structure in the x-T phase diagram with the highest Tc ≃ 0.5 K at about x = 0.01. This phase diagram suggests that the putative U(1) quantum spin-liquid state of Tb2+xTi2-xO7+y exists in the range x < xc ≃ -0.0025, which is separated from the quadrupolar state via a first-order phase-transition line x = xc.

  14. Effect of general relativity on a near-Earth satellite in the geocentric and barycentric reference frames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ries, J. C.; Huang, C.; Watkins, M. M.

    1988-01-01

    Whether one uses a solar-system barycentric frame or a geocentric frame when including the general theory of relativity in orbit determinations for near-Earth satellites, the results should be equivalent to some limiting accuracy. The purpose of this paper is to clarify the effects of relativity in each frame and to demonstrate their equivalence through the analysis of real laser-tracking data. A correction to the conventional barycentric equations of motion is shown to be required.

  15. Investigation of the effect of atmospheric dust on the determination of total ozone from the earth's ultraviolet reflectivity measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dave, J. V.

    1977-01-01

    Results are presented on the effect of atmospheric aerosols on the value of total ozone, in an atmospheric column of the terrestrial atmosphere, estimated from the simulated measurements of the ultraviolet radiation back scattered by the earth atmosphere models. Simulated measurements were used in five (configuration of the BUV experiment of Nimbus-4 satellite), and in six (configuration of the TOMS section of the SBUV/TOMS experiment on Nimbus-G) narrow spectral regions in the ultraviolet part of the spectrum.

  16. Earth Science Activities: A Guide to Effective Elementary School Science Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanis, Ira B.; Yasso, Warren E.

    The primary emphasis of this book is on new or revised earth science activities that promote concept development rather than mere verification of concepts learned by passive means. Chapter 2 describes philosophies, strategies, methods, and techniques to guide preservice and inservice teachers, school building administrators, and curriculum…

  17. Effects of atmospheric aerosols on scattering reflected visible light from earth resource features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noll, K. E.; Tschantz, B. A.; Davis, W. T.

    1972-01-01

    The vertical variations in atmospheric light attenuation under ambient conditions were identified, and a method through which aerial photographs of earth features might be corrected to yield quantitative information about the actual features was provided. A theoretical equation was developed based on the Bouguer-Lambert extinction law and basic photographic theory.

  18. An Effect of Technology Based Inquiry Approach on the Learning of "Earth, Sun, & Moon" Subject

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turkmen, Hakan

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate what affect a technology based inquiry approach (TBIA) had on 5th grade primary students' understanding of earth, sun, and moon concept in a science and technology course and how this changed their academic achievements. This study was carried out in a 5th grade elementary science and technology course…

  19. Ion Composition and Energization in the Earth's Inner Magnetosphere and the Effects on Ring Current Buildup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keika, K.; Kistler, L. M.; Brandt, P. C.

    2014-12-01

    In-situ observations and modeling work have confirmed that singly-charged oxygen ions, O+, which are of Earth's ionospheric origin, are heated/accelerated up to >100 keV in the magnetosphere. The energetic O+ population makes a significant contribution to the plasma pressure in the Earth's inner magnetosphere during magnetic storms, although under quiet conditions H+ dominates the plasma pressure. The pressure enhancements, which we term energization, are caused by adiabatic heating through earthward transport of source population in the plasma sheet, local acceleration in the inner magnetosphere and near-Earth plasma sheet, and enhanced ion supply from the topside ionosphere. The key issues regarding stronger O+ energization than H+ are non-adiabatic local acceleration, responsible for increase in O+ temperature, and more significant O+ supply than H+, responsible for increase in O+ density. Although several acceleration mechanisms and O+ supply processes have been proposed, it remains an open question what mechanism(s)/process(es) play the dominant role in stronger O+ energization. In this paper we summarize important spacecraft observations including those from Van Allen Probes, introduces the proposed mechanisms/processes that generate O+-rich energetic plasma population, and outlines possible scenarios of O+ pressure abundance in the Earth's inner magnetosphere.

  20. Effect of earth as an additional stimulus on the behaviour of confined piglets.

    PubMed

    Appleby, M C; Wood-Gush, D G

    1988-08-01

    Groups of 8 piglets were housed in flat-deck cages with slatted floors. Experimental cages were provided with a trough of sterilized earth, and the behaviour of focal individuals was recorded for comparison with controls. This replaced an earlier study, with which some of the results were combined. Records were analysed for frequencies and duration of certain activities, and first order sequence analysis was carried out. Experimental piglets rooted in earth for 4 to 8% of observations and also fed for longer. They spent less time sitting or lying. Aggression was reduced and there was a trend for experimental piglets to chew each other less. These differences suggested conditions were more favourable in experimental pens than control pens. However, there were few differences in first order behavioural transitions. Use of earth was not involved in sequences with activities such as feeding, drinking or lying as expected. It seems likely that in these circumstances earth did not act as a stimulus relevant to behavioural organization, but in some other way, with interest declining over time.

  1. The Effect of the Conceptual Change Oriented Instruction through Cooperative Learning on 4th Grade Students' Understanding of Earth and Sky Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Celikten, Oksan; Ipekcioglu, Sevgi; Ertepinar, Hamide; Geban, Omer

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness of the conceptual change oriented instruction through cooperative learning (CCICL) and traditional science instruction (TI) on 4th grade students' understanding of earth and sky concepts and their attitudes toward earth and sky concepts. In this study, 56 fourth grade students from the…

  2. Introducing Earth's Orbital Eccentricity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oostra, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Most students know that planetary orbits, including Earth's, are elliptical; that is Kepler's first law, and it is found in many science textbooks. But quite a few are mistaken about the details, thinking that the orbit is very eccentric, or that this effect is somehow responsible for the seasons. In fact, the Earth's orbital eccentricity is…

  3. Effect of EMIC Waves on the Lifetime of Energetic Electrons in the Earth's Inner Radiation Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, X.; Papadopoulos, K.; Sharma, A. S.; Demekhov, A.

    2008-12-01

    The stably trapped electrons in the inner radiation belt have lifetimes of years and energies higher than a few hundred keV. These energetic electrons can have serious effects on the way spacecrafts and satellites operate and cause significant hazards to low Earth orbit (LEO) satellites. For mitigating these hazards it is necessary to investigate ways for reducing the electron life times, for example, through pitch angle scattering by waves. For these waves, the gyro-resoance condition yields the minimum wavelength requirement for given particle energy and local magnetic field. For example, at the magnetic equator at L = 2 the waves resonant with 1 MeV electrons should have wavelengths less than 10 km. Low frequency Electromagnetic Ion-Cyclotron (EMIC) waves occur in three bands with frequencies below the hydrogen, helium, and oxygen ion gyro-frequencies, respectively. At frequencies close to the ion gyro-frequencies, the EMIC waves can have wavelength short enough to gyro-resonate with energetic electrons, which can lead to significant changes in the lifetimes of electrons in the inner ration belt. However at these altitudes the amplitudes of naturally excited EMIC waves do not yield significant scattering of the energetic electrons and artificial sources are needed. In order to define the characteristics of such sources we investigated the lifetime of inner belt energetic electrons subject to pitch angle scattering with EMIC waves. The resonant wave characteristics are obtained using the global core plasma model (GCPM). The lifetimes of the electrons in the presence of these waves are computed using the pitch angle diffusion coefficient for broadband waves. For several hundred Watts of broadband EMIC waves in the shell volume enclosed by magnetic field lines at L = 2.0 with width dL = 0.1, the lifetime of 1 MeV electrons can be reduced to a few months. This is a considerable reduction compared to the average life times of about years and have important

  4. Effect of chemical pressure, misfit strain and hydrostatic pressure on structural and magnetic behaviors of rare-earth orthochromates.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hong Jian; Ren, Wei; Chen, Xiang Ming; Bellaiche, L

    2013-09-25

    First-principles calculations are performed to investigate structural and magnetic behaviors of rare-earth orthochromates as a function of 'chemical' pressure (that is, the rare-earth ionic radius), epitaxial misfit strain and hydrostatic pressure. From a structural point of view, (i) 'chemical' pressure significantly modifies antipolar displacements, Cr-O-Cr bond angles and the resulting oxygen octahedral tiltings; (ii) hydrostatic pressure mostly changes Cr-O bond lengths; and (iii) misfit strain affects all these quantities. The correlations between magnetic properties (Néel temperature and weak ferromagnetic moments) and unit cell volume are similar when varying the misfit strain or hydrostatic pressure, but differ from those associated with the 'chemical' pressure. Origins of such effects are also discussed.

  5. Ice911: Developing an Effective Response to Climate Change in Earth's Cryosphere using High Albedo Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, L. A.; Wadhams, P.; Root, T.; Chetty, S.; Kammen, D. M.; Venkatesh, S.; van der Heide, D.; Baum, E.

    2012-12-01

    material and deployment approach. Small deployments were once again made on a California mountain lake, using granular biodegradable food-grade materials or glass-based materials placed in large-mesh containers. The deployments successfully shielded underlying snow and ice from melting, and remained stable in the face of the strong winds in the area. It may also be possible to select materials that are readily incorporated in new ice as it forms in the winter season. Young, or thin, ice tends to have a relatively low albedo, and the higher albedo of ice so formed with these materials incorporated could be advantageous in retaining young or thin ice. We speculate that once a critical amount of ice (or snow, permafrost, etc.) is preserved, the balance may be tipped back sufficiently to slow the overall melting rate of the cryosphere, and further intervention may not be required. Localized albedo modification options such as the one being studied in this work may act to preserve ice, glaciers, permafrost and seasonal snow areas, and perhaps aid natural ice formation processes, enhance the preservation of threatened species, ensure more predictable availability of drinking water, and perhaps bring about a reduction in the Ice-Albedo Feedback Effect, thus slowing some of the effects of climate change in the earth's icy regions and beyond.

  6. Effect of spacer layer on the magnetization dynamics of permalloy/rare-earth/permalloy trilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Chen Yin, Yuli; Zhang, Dong; Jiang, Sheng; Yue, Jinjin; Zhai, Ya; Du, Jun; Zhai, Hongru

    2015-05-07

    The permalloy/rare-earth/permalloy trilayers with different types (Gd and Nd) and thicknesses of spacer layer are investigated using frequency dependence of ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) measurements at room temperature, which shows different behaviors with different rare earth spacer layers. By fitting the frequency dependence of the FMR resonance field and linewidth, we find that the in-plane uniaxial anisotropy retains its value for all samples, the perpendicular anisotropy remains almost unchanged for different thickness of Gd layer but the values are tailored by different thicknesses of Nd layer. The Gilbert damping is almost unchanged with different thicknesses of Gd; however, the Gilbert damping is significantly enhanced from 8.4×10{sup −3} to 20.1×10{sup −3} with 6 nm of Nd and then flatten out when the Nd thickness rises above 6 nm.

  7. The effect of error in theoretical Earth tide on calibration of borehole strainmeters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langbein, John

    2010-01-01

    Since the installation of borehole strainmeters into the ground locally distorts the strain in the rock, these strainmeters require calibration from a known source which typically is the Earth tide. Consequently, the accuracy of the observed strain changes from borehole strainmeters depends upon the calibration derived from modeling the Earth tide. Previous work from the mid-1970s, which is replicated here, demonstrate that the theoretical tide can differ by 30% from the tide observed at surface-mounted, long-baseline strainmeters. In spite of possible inaccurate tidal models, many of the 74 borehole strainmeters installed since 2005 can be “calibrated”. However, inaccurate tidal models affect the amplitude and phase of observed transient strain changes which needs to be considered along with the precision of the data from the inherent drift of these borehole instruments. In particular, the error from inaccurate tidal model dominates the error budget in the observation of impulsive, sub-daily, strain-transients.

  8. Dynamics of an artificial satellite in an earth-fixed reference frame - Effects of polar motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farinella, P.; Milani, A.; Nobili, A. M.; Sacerdote, F.

    Since such polar motions as precession, lunisolar nutation and free nutation introduce small, apparent forces in earth satellite equations of motion in earth-fixed reference frames, attention is given to the possibility of (1) integrating the orbit in such frames when tracking data are used for geophysical applications, and (2) determining a set of unknown parameters which describe long-period polar wandering from orbital data. It is shown that accuracy limits depend on the precision and geometry of the available range data, with the laser ranging method used in the LASSO system carried by the SIRIO 2 satellite equalling the performance of traditional methods, and more advanced laser ranging surpassing those accuracies.

  9. Uderstanding Snowball Earth Deglaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbot, D. S.

    2012-12-01

    Earth, a normally clement planet comfortably in its star's habitable zone, suffered global or nearly global glaciation at least twice during the Neoproterozoic era (at about 635 and 710 million years ago). Viewed in the context of planetary evolution, these pan-global glaciations (Snowball Earth events) were extremely rapid, lasting only a few million years. The dramatic effect of the Snowball Earth events on the development of the planet can be seen through their link to rises in atmospheric oxygen and evolutionary innovations. These potential catastrophes on an otherwise clement planet can be used to gain insight into planetary habitability more generally. Since Earth is not currently a Snowball, a sound deglaciation mechanism is crucial for the viability of the Snowball Earth hypothesis. The traditional deglaciation mechanism is a massive build up of CO2 due to reduced weathering during Snowball Earth events until tropical surface temperatures reach the melting point. Once initiated, such a deglaciation might happen on a timescale of only dozens of thousands of years and would thrust Earth from the coldest climate in its history to the warmest. Therefore embedded in Snowball Earth events is an even more rapid and dramatic environmental change. Early global climate model simulations raised doubt about whether Snowball Earth deglaciation could be achieved at a CO2 concentration low enough to be consistent with geochemical data, which represented a potential challenge to the Snowball Earth hypothesis. Over the past few years dust and clouds have emerged as the essential missing additional processes that would allow Snowball Earth deglaciation at a low enough CO2 concentration. I will discuss the dust and cloud mechanisms and the modeling behind these ideas. This effort is critical for the broader implications of Snowball Earth events because understanding the specific deglaciation mechanism determines whether similar processes could happen on other planets.

  10. Effects of Energetic Solar Emissions on the Earth-Ionosphere Cavity of Schumann Resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sátori, Gabriella; Williams, Earle; Price, Colin; Boldi, Robert; Koloskov, Alexander; Yampolski, Yuri; Guha, Anirban; Barta, Veronika

    2016-07-01

    Schumann resonances (SR) are the electromagnetic oscillations of the spherical cavity bounded by the electrically conductive Earth and the conductive but dissipative lower ionosphere (Schumann in Z Naturforsch A 7:6627-6628, 1952). Energetic emissions from the Sun can exert a varied influence on the various parameters of the Earth's SR: modal frequencies, amplitudes and dissipation parameters. The SR response at multiple receiving stations is considered for two extraordinary solar events from Solar Cycle 23: the Bastille Day event (July 14, 2000) and the Halloween event (October/November 2003). Distinct differences are noted in the ionospheric depths of penetration for X-radiation and solar protons with correspondingly distinct signs of the frequency response. The preferential impact of the protons in the magnetically unshielded polar regions leads to a marked anisotropic frequency response in the two magnetic field components. The general immunity of SR amplitudes to these extreme external perturbations serves to remind us that the amplitude parameter is largely controlled by lightning activity within the Earth-ionosphere cavity.

  11. Prediction of rain effects on earth-space communication links operating in the 10 to 35 GHz frequency range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stutzman, Warren L.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reviews the effects of precipitation on earth-space communication links operating the 10 to 35 GHz frequency range. Emphasis is on the quantitative prediction of rain attenuation and depolarization. Discussions center on the models developed at Virginia Tech. Comments on other models are included as well as literature references to key works. Also included is the system level modeling for dual polarized communication systems with techniques for calculating antenna and propagation medium effects. Simple models for the calculation of average annual attenuation and cross-polarization discrimination (XPD) are presented. Calculation of worst month statistics are also presented.

  12. Space radiation analysis: Radiation effects and particle interaction outside the Earth's magnetosphere using GRAS and GEANT4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Lisandro M.; Kingston, Jennifer

    2012-03-01

    In order to explore the Moon and Mars it is necessary to investigate the hazards due to the space environment and especially ionizing radiation. According to previous papers, much information has been presented in radiation analysis inside the Earth's magnetosphere, but much of this work was not directly relevant to the interplanetary medium. This work intends to explore the effect of radiation on humans inside structures such as the ISS and provide a detailed analysis of galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) and solar proton events (SPEs) using SPENVIS (Space Environment Effects and Information System) and CREME96 data files for particle flux outside the Earth's magnetosphere. The simulation was conducted using GRAS, a European Space Agency (ESA) software based on GEANT4. Dose and equivalent dose have been calculated as well as secondary particle effects and GCR energy spectrum. The calculated total dose effects and equivalent dose indicate the risk and effects that space radiation could have on the crew, these values are calculated using two different types of structures, the ISS and the TransHab modules. Final results indicate the amounts of radiation expected to be absorbed by the astronauts during long duration interplanetary flights; this denotes importance of radiation shielding and the use of proper materials to reduce the effects.

  13. Environmental effects of large impacts on the earth; relation to extinction mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okeefe, John D.; Ahrens, Thomas J.; Koschny, Detlef

    1988-01-01

    Since Alvarez et al., discovered a worldwide approx. cm-thick layer of fine sediments laden with platinum group elements in approximately chondritic proportions exactly at the Cretaceous-Tertiary (C-T) boundary, and proposed bolide-impact as triggering mass extinctions, many have studied this hypothesis and the layer itself with its associated spherules and shocked quartz. At issue is whether the mass extinctions, and this horizon has an impact versus volcanic origin. A critical feature of the Alvarez hypothesis is the suggestion that the bolide or possibly a shower of objects delivered to the earth approx. 0.6 x 10 to the 18th power g of material which resulted in aerosol-sized ejecta such that global insolation was drastically reduced for significant periods. Such an event would lower temperatures on continents and halt photosynthesis in the upper 200 m of th eocean. The latter would strangle the marine food chain and thus produce the major marine faunal extinctions which mark the C-T boundary. Crucial issues examined include: What are the dynamics of atmospheric flow occurring upon impact of a large bolide with the earth; What is the size distributions of the very fine impact ejecta and how do these compare to the models of ejecta which are used to model the earth's radiative thermal balance. The flow field due to passage of a 10 km diameter bolide through an exponential atmosphere and the interaction of the gas flow and bolide with the solid ear was calculated. The CO2 released upon impact onto shallow marine carbonate sections was modeled and found that the mass of CO2 released exceeds the present 10 to the 18th power g CO2 budget of the earth's atmosphere by several times. Using the calculations of Kasting and Toon it was found that to compute the temperature rise of the earth's surface as a function of CO2 content, it was found that sudden and prolonged global increases are induced from impact of 20 to 50 km radius projectiles and propose that sudden

  14. The Effects of Solar Variability on Earth's Climate: A Workshop Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2012-01-01

    Solar irradiance, the flux of the Sun s output directed toward Earth, is Earth s main energy source.1 The Sun itself varies on several timescales over billions of years its luminosity increases as it evolves on the main sequence toward becoming a red giant; about every 11 years its sunspot activity cycles; and within just minutes flares can erupt and release massive amounts of energy. Most of the fluctuations from tens to thousands of years are associated with changes in the solar magnetic field. The focus of the National Research Council's September 2011 workshop on solar variability and Earth's climate, and of this summary report, is mainly magnetically driven variability and its possible connection with Earth's climate variations in the past 10,000 years. Even small variations in the amount or distribution of energy received at Earth can have a major influence on Earth's climate when they persist for decades. However, no satellite measurements have indicated that solar output and variability have contributed in a significant way to the increase in global mean temperature in the last 50 years. Locally, however, correlations between solar activity and variations in average weather may stand out beyond the global trend; such has been argued to be the case for the El Nino-Southern Oscillation, even in the present day. A key area of inquiry deals with establishing a unified record of the solar output and solar-modified particles that extends from the present to the prescientific past. The workshop focused attention on the need for a better understanding of the links between indices of solar activity such as cosmogenic isotopes and solar irradiance. A number of presentations focused on the timescale of the solar cycle and of the satellite record, and on the problem of extending this record back in time. Highlights included a report of progress on pyroheliometer calibration, leading to greater confidence in the time history and future stability of total solar

  15. Effects of RAM Exposure on a Low Earth Orbit BroadBand Radiometer (BBR): CERES Experience and Implications for EarthCARE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthews, Grant; Priestley, Kory; Thomas, Susan; Hess, Pil; Cooper, Denise; Walikainen, Dale

    2007-01-01

    In order to best detect real changes in the Earth's climate system it is estimated that space based instrumentation measuring the global Earth Radiation Budget (ERB) must remain calibrated with a stability of 0.3% per decade. This level of stability is beyond the specified accuracy of existing ERB programs such as the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES, using three broadband radiometric scanning channels: the shortwave (SW 0.3 - 5?m), total (0.3 - >100 micron), and window (8 - 12 micron)). When in low earth orbit, it has been shown that optical response to blue-UV radiance can be reduced significantly (> 3%) due to UV hardened contaminants deposited on the surface of the optics. Evidence suggests that exposure of telescope optics to the forward looking ram direction is the primary cause of this contamination build up. With typical onboard calibration lamps emitting very low energy in the blue-UV region, this darkening is not directly measurable using standard internal calibration techniques. This paper describes a study using a model of ram exposure induced contaminant deposition and darkening, in conjunction standard established in-flight vicarious and internal calibration techniques to derive the spectral shape of the darkening to which a broadband instrument is subjected. The results of the model when applied to the CERES instruments are shown. These findings are of great importance to the EarthCARE project, whose BBR uses one broadband telescope permanently looking forward at 45 degrees, with continual exposure to the ram direction. Specific attention may therefore be needed in the design of BBR optics and on-board calibration in order to prevent or compensate for the spectral darkening seen in the CERES project.

  16. Formation of Close-in Super-Earths by Giant Impacts: Effects of Initial Eccentricities and Inclinations of Protoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Yuji; Kokubo, Eiichiro

    2015-12-01

    Recent exoplanet observations are revealing the eccentricity and inclination distributions of exoplanets. Most of observed super-Earths have small eccentricities ~ 0.01 - 0.1 and small inclinations ~ 0.03 rad (e.g., Fabrycky et al., 2014). These distributions are results of their formation processes. N-body simulations have been used to investigate accretion of close-in super-Earths (e.g., Hansen & Murray 2012, Ogihara et al. 2015). Hansen & Murray (2013) showed that the averaged eccentricity of close-in super-Earths formed through giant impacts in gas-free and no planetesimal environment is around 0.1. In the giant impact stage, the eccentricities and inclinations are pumped up by gravitational scattering and damped by collisions. Matsumoto et al. (2015) found that the eccentricity damping rate by a collision depends on the eccentricity and inclination and thus affects the eccentricity and inclination of planets. We investigate the effect of initial eccentricities and inclinations of protoplanets on eccentricities and inclinations of planets. We perform N-body simulations with systematically changing initial eccentricities and inclinations of protoplanets independently. We find that the eccentricities and inclinations of planets barely depend on the initial eccentricities of protoplanets although the collision timescale is changed. This means that initial eccentricities of protoplanets are well relaxed through scattering and collisions. On the other hand, the initial inclinations of protoplanets affect the inclination of planets since they are not relaxed during the giant impact stage. Since the collisional timescale increases with inclinations, protoplanets with high inclinations tend to interact longer until they collide with each other. As a result, planets get large eccentricities, and the number of planets becomes small. The observed eccentricities and inclinations of super-Earths can be reproduced by giant impacts of protoplanets with inclinations ~ 10-3 -10

  17. Complex Effects of Alumina/Silica on Ferric/Ferrous Iron in Earth's Lower Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorfman, S. M.; Potapkin, V.; Kupenko, I.; Chumakov, A. I.; Nabiei, F.; Magrez, A.; Dubrovinsky, L. S.; McCammon, C. A.; Gillet, P.

    2014-12-01

    The electronic states of Fe in silicates are key to the chemistry, physical properties and dynamics of Earth's mantle. In the lower mantle's dominant phase, perovskite-structured (Mg,Fe)SiO3, recently named bridgmanite, and its deep lower mantle polymorph, post-perovskite, Fe can occupy either cation site and multiple valence and spin states. In addition, studies of Fe2+-bearing starting materials at lower mantle conditions have observed oxidation to Fe3+ in the synthesized silicate, either by a disproportionation, Fe2+ = Fe3+ + Fe metal, or possibly reduction of the high-pressure cell. The incorporation of Al in lower mantle silicates has been observed to promote higher Fe3+/ΣFe. Due to this complexity, electronic states of Fe in lower mantle silicates are controversial. We used energy-domain synchrotron Mössbauer spectroscopy at ESRF beamline ID18 to examine spin and valence states of bridgmanite and post-perovskite synthesized from Fe2+-rich compositions with and without Al. 57Fe-enriched starting materials (Mg0.5Fe0.5)SiO3 pyroxene and Fe2.8Al2.2Si3.0O12 almandine-composition glass were pressurized in an NaCl medium in the laser-heated diamond anvil cell to up to 170 GPa. Bridgmanite was synthesized at 75-99 GPa and 2000-2500 K. Post-perovskite was synthesized at 149-160 GPa and 2500-3000 K. The observed quadrupole splitting (QS) and center shift (CS) are consistent with dominant Fe2+ for all compositions and do not show higher Fe3+/ΣFe with higher Al-content. The dominant doublet at lower mantle pressures exhibits QS=3.6-4.2 mm/s and CS=0.9-1.1 mm/s, similar to previous observations of high or intermediate spin Fe2+. A second high-spin Fe2+ doublet is observed at QS=2.2-3.3 mm/s and CS=0.8-1.2 mm/s. A minor high-spin Fe3+ doublet is fit to QS~1.2 mm/s and CS=0.3-0.5 mm/s. For the Al-bearing bridgmanite, ambient spectra before and after synthesis contain no more than ~10% Fe3+/ΣFe, indicating no disproportionation or oxidation of Fe2+. In contrast, previous

  18. Introducing Earth's Orbital Eccentricity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oostra, Benjamin

    2015-12-01

    Most students know that planetary orbits, including Earth's, are elliptical; that is Kepler's first law, and it is found in many science textbooks. But quite a few are mistaken about the details, thinking that the orbit is very eccentric, or that this effect is somehow responsible for the seasons. In fact, the Earth's orbital eccentricity is small, and its only effect on the seasons is their unequal durations. Here I show a pleasant way to guide students to the actual value of Earth's orbital eccentricity, starting from the durations of the four seasons. The date of perihelion is also found.

  19. Development of the Estimation Service of the Earth's Surface Fluid Load Effects for Space Geodetic Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takiguchi, H.; Gotoh, T.; Otsubo, T.

    2010-12-01

    Temporal changes of surface loadings due to the mass redistribution of the fluid envelope of the Earth, i.e., the atmosphere, hydrosphere, and cryosphere, cause the Earth to deform and consequently change the coordinates of observation sites. The coordinate changes can be measured by space geodetic techniques such as VLBI and GPS. From the viewpoint of crustal movements, such displacements due to these noises should be eliminated. In 2006, for the reduction of these influences, we estimated the crustal displacements due to atmospheric loading (AL), non-tidal ocean loading (NTOL), continental water loading (CWL) and snow loading (SL) influences. And we showed that a combination of AL, NTOL, and CWL can eliminate about 20% of the annual signal in the GPS coordinate time series (Takiguchi et al., 2006). We also applied the correction to the data of 1997 Bungo channel slow slip event and confirmed that the loading correction can be well applied for the analysis of the slow slip event. In this study, we are developing the calculation service about the displacement of the Earth's surface loads for space geodetic techniques. Previous study, we showed the influences of several loads and the necessity to correct loads for precise geodetic analysis. However it is not easy to calculate the influences of loads. So, we are planning to develop the displacement database based on the web. This database runs as a service to calculate the load displacements at arbitrary time and arbitrary location by arbitrary users. This service can calculate the several loads such as AL, NTOL and CWL. We are also planning to provide the load corrected site coordinates about world wide GPS sites analyzed by the ‘concerto’ program version 4 for GPS developed by NICT. In the presentation, we will introduce the calculation service and the result of load correction analysis. This work was supported by JSPS KAKENHI (Grant-in-Aid for Young Scientists (B) 21740333).

  20. The Whole Earth Dialogue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Stephen H.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the trend toward more "earth-as-a-system" approaches in research and teaching about global science. Uses the "greenhouse effect" as a prototypical global change problem that requires interdisciplinary problem-solving approaches. (TW)

  1. Down to earth relativity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapiro, I. I.

    1978-01-01

    The basic concepts of the special and general theories of relativity are described. Simple examples are given to illustrate the effect of relativity on measurements of time and frequency in the near-earth environment.

  2. Issues and Effects of Atomic Oxygen Interactions With Silicone Contamination on Spacecraft in Low Earth Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce; Rutledge, Sharon; Sechkar, Edward; Stueber, Thomas; Snyder, Aaron; deGroh, Kim; Haytas, Christy; Brinker, David

    2000-01-01

    The continued presence and use of silicones on spacecraft in low Earth orbit (LEO) has been found to cause the deposition of contaminant films on surfaces which are also exposed to atomic oxygen. The composition and optical properties of the resulting SiO(x)- based (where x is near 2) contaminant films may be dependent upon the relative rates of arrival of atomic oxygen, silicone contaminant and hydrocarbons. This paper presents results of in-space silicone contamination tests, ground laboratory simulation tests and analytical modeling to identify controlling processes that affect contaminant characteristics.

  3. Effects of the post-perovskite phase change on the thermal evolution of the Earth's core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, T.; Tackley, P. J.

    2005-05-01

    The heat flow through the core-mantle boundary is a key quantity for understanding the thermal evolution of the Earth??s core, as the geodynamo is presumably strongly affected by the temporal variation of CMB heat flow. A major challenge is to understand how this heat flux can have remained high enough to power the geodynamo over geological history without resulting in larger-than-observed cooling of the core and growth of the inner core. This problem has been approached using various coupled models of mantle convection and core heat balance: (1) Simple isochemical models using parameterized mantle convection and core heat balance [Buffett, 2002; Labrosse, 2003; Nimmo et al., 2004] have too rapid core cooling hence a too large inner core, (2) models with a global layer of dense material above the CMB [McNamara and van Keken, 2000] have a CMB heat flow that is too low for the geodynamo to occur, but (3) with discontinuous chemical layering [Nakagawa and Tackley, 2004], viable evolution solutions are obtained, with the best scenarios requiring 100-200 ppm radioactive potassium in the core [Nakagawa et al., 2004]. Recently, using high pressure experiments and ab initio calculations, a new perovskite to post-perovskite phase change was discovered near the CMB [Murakami et al., 2004; Oganov and Ono, 2004]. Dynamically, such a phase change results in small-scale instabilities in lower thermal boundary layer and higher CMB heat flow [Nakagawa and Tackley, 2004]. Furthermore, if the CMB is in the perovskite stability field then a double-crossing of the phase boundary may occur [Hernlund et al., 2005]. As the core and mantle cool with time, the location and thickness of the layer of post-perovskite phase will change [Nakagawa and Tackley, 2005]. In this study, a coupled model of thermo-chemical mantle convection including the post-perovskite phase change and a global heat balance in the core based on the entropy variation is used to assess the CMB heat flow, thermo

  4. Low earth orbit environmental effects on osmium and related optical thin-film coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gull, T. R.; Herzig, H.; Osantowski, J. F.; Toft, A. R.

    1985-01-01

    A number of samples of optical thin film materials were flown on Shuttle flight STS-8 as part of an experiment to evaluate their interaction with residual atomic oxygen in low earth orbit. Osmium was selected because of its usefulness as a reflective optical coating for far-UV instruments and for confirmation of results from previous Shuttle flights in which such coatings disappeared. Reflectance data and photographic evidence are presented to support the hypothesis that the osmium disappearance is due to reaction with oxygen to form a volatile oxide. Platinum and iridium, which were included for comparison, fared much better.

  5. The effects of solidification and atomization on rare-earth alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Iver E.; Osborne, M. G.; Ellis, T. W.

    1996-03-01

    This article discusses the results of experiments involving the application of atomization techniques to the production of three selected rare-earth intermetallic (REI) materials. High-pressure gas atomization and centrifugal atomization into a rotating quench bath have been used to process the alloys. Rapid-solidification processing by atomization techniques is of great benefit since optimum performance of these REI materials demands chemical and structural homogeneity. The results demonstrate that such careful solidification microstructure control is required if the benefits of REI-alloy properties are to be realized with maximum processing efficiency.

  6. Enhancement of the central-transition signal in static and magic-angle-spinning NMR of quadrupolar nuclei by frequency-swept fast amplitude-modulated pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bräuniger, Thomas; Ramaswamy, Kannan; Madhu, P. K.

    2004-01-01

    We here report on using fast amplitude-modulated (FAM) pulse trains with constantly incremented pulse durations (SW-FAM) for signal enhancement in one-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of quadrupolar nuclei with half-integer spin. In such systems, a FAM pulse train leads to a redistribution of populations across the spin levels, which results in a substantial gain for the central-transition signal. Compared to fixed-duration FAM pulse trains, SW-FAM delivers about the same signal enhancement for spinning samples, but gives much better performance in the static case. This is demonstrated for several compounds, observing the nuclei 23Na ( I=3/2), 27Al ( I=5/2), and 45Sc ( I=7/2).

  7. Correlated observations of substorm effects in the near-earth region and the deep magnetotail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholer, M.; Baumjohann, W.; Baker, D. N.; Bame, S. J.; Gloeckler, G.; Ipavich, F. M.; Smith, E. J.; Tsurutani, B. T.

    1985-01-01

    Simultaneous observations of energetic particle measurements from the geosynchronous satellite 1982-019 and magnetic field, electron plasma, and energetic proton and electron measurements obtained with ISEE 3 in the deep tail are presented. The data are supplemented by ground magnetograms. A substorm occurred on March 22, 1983, close to 0300 UT as identified in the ground magnetograms and by a particle injection at geosynchronous orbit. About 10 min later, ISEE 3 observed (at a distance of approximately 130 RE in the deep tail) magnetic field, plasma, and energetic particle signatures consistent with the passage of a plasmoid. After the passage of the plasmoid the satellite enters shortly into a lobelike environment, in which an energetic proton beam is observed. High-resolution magnetic field data are indicative of small-scale structures in the postplasmoid plasma sheet. From the plasma sheet flow speed during the plasmoid's passage it is concluded that the 0300 UT substorm is responsible for its origin. This allows an approximate timing of the plasmoid release at a near-earth neutral line and of the plasma sheet recovery after substorm onset, and it indicates a close relationship between processes in the near-earth plasma sheet and the deep tail during substorms.

  8. Effect of rare earth ions on the properties of glycine phosphite single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senthilkumar, K.; Moorthy Babu, S.; Kumar, Binay; Bhagavannarayana, G.

    2013-01-01

    Optically transparent glycine phosphite (GPI) single crystals doped with rare earth metal ions (Ce, Nd and La) were grown from aqueous solution by employing the solvent evaporation and slow cooling methods. Co-ordination of dopants with GPI was confirmed by X-ray fluorescence spectroscopic analysis. Single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis was carried out to determine the lattice parameters and to analyze the structural morphology of GPI with dopants, which indicates that cell parameters of doped crystals were significantly varied with pure GPI. Crystalline perfection of doped GPI crystals was determined by high resolution X-ray diffraction analysis by means of full width at half maximum values. Influence of the dopants on the optical properties of the material was determined. Paraelectric to ferroelectric transition temperature (Tc) of doped GPI crystals were identified using differential scanning calorimetric measurements. Piezoelectric charge coefficient d33 was measured for pure and doped GPI crystals. Hysteresis (P-E) loop was traced for ferroelectric b-axis and (100) plane of pure and doped GPI crystals with different biasing field and ferroelectric parameters were calculated. Mechanical stability of crystals was determined by Vickers microhardness measurements; elastic stiffness constant 'C11' and yield strength 'σy' were calculated from hardness values. Mechanical and ferroelectric properties of doped crystals were improved with doping of rare earth metals.

  9. Effects of lateral resolution on the identification of volcanotectonic provinces on earth and Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arvidson, R. E.; Davies, G. F.

    1981-01-01

    In an attempt to learn what volcanotectonic features can still be discerned in continental and oceanic areas of the earth when topographic data are degraded to simulate the data sampled by the Pioneer-Venus altimeter, two digital topographic data sets (the 30-second continental U.S. altitude data and the 30 x 30 nautical mile bathymetry data for the North Pacific) were degraded and displayed in the same way as the altimeter data from Venus. The Appalachians were reduced to a gentle swell, with a wavelength of 300 km, and a height of 500 m. The Cordillera was seen as a broad swell, 2500 km wide, and about 2 km high. The east Pacific rise, east Pacific fractures, seamount chains, the Hawaiian swell, and most trenches were discernible in the degraded Pacific data; whereas rises, transforms, seamount chains, and trenches were not seen in the Venus data, even after corrections were made for the higher surface temperature and the absence of oceans on Venus. It was concluded that a plate tectonic regime, similar to earth's does not currently appear to exist on Venus. As shown by the Cordillera data, the Pioneer-Venus information is not of sufficiently high quality to discern whether the highlands of Venus preserve evidence for orogenic events related to plate tectonics.

  10. Risk assessment and late effects of radiation in low-earth orbits

    SciTech Connect

    Fry, R.J.M.

    1989-01-01

    The radiation dose rates in low-earth orbits are dependent on the altitude and orbital inclination. The doses to which the crews of space vehicles are exposed is governed by the duration of the mission and the shielding, and in low-earth orbit missions protons are the dominant particles encountered. The risk of concern with the low dose rates and the relatively low total doses of radiation that will be incurred on the space station is excess cancer. The National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements has recently recommended career dose-equivalent limits that take into account sex and age. The new recommendations for career limits range from 1.0 Sv to 4 Sv, depending on sex and on the age at the time of their first space mission, compared to a single career limit of 4.0 Sv previously used by NASA. Risk estimates for radiated-induced cancer are evolving and changes in the current guidance may be required in the next few years. 10 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  11. Effects of electron correlations on transport properties of iron at Earth's core conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Cohen, R E; Haule, K

    2015-01-29

    Earth's magnetic field has been thought to arise from thermal convection of molten iron alloy in the outer core, but recent density functional theory calculations have suggested that the conductivity of iron is too high to support thermal convection, resulting in the investigation of chemically driven convection. These calculations for resistivity were based on electron-phonon scattering. Here we apply self-consistent density functional theory plus dynamical mean-field theory (DFT + DMFT) to iron and find that at high temperatures electron-electron scattering is comparable to the electron-phonon scattering, bringing theory into agreement with experiments and solving the transport problem in Earth's core. The conventional thermal dynamo picture is safe. We find that electron-electron scattering of d electrons is important at high temperatures in transition metals, in contrast to textbook analyses since Mott, and that 4s electron contributions to transport are negligible, in contrast to numerous models used for over fifty years. The DFT+DMFT method should be applicable to other high-temperature systems where electron correlations are important.

  12. Effect of rare earth on the microstructures and properties of a low expansion superalloy.

    PubMed

    Wang, R M; Song, Y G; Han, Y F

    2002-01-01

    A new Fe-Ni-Co-Nb-Ti-Si superalloy containing trace additions of selective rare earths and having good combination of very low thermal expansion coefficient, high-resistance to stress accelerated grain boundary oxygen embrittlement and fairly good notch-bar rupture strength has been successfully developed. The resistance to oxidation for long time exposure at high-temperatures and the stress rupture life has been improved significantly with trace yttrium addition. The microstructures of the alloys have been studied by means of analytical electron microscopy, chemical and X-ray analysis techniques. The results reveal that the trace yttrium segregates in the strengthening phase with platelet morphology, and helps in transforming A(3)B type epsilon phase into A(5)B type H. The morphology and crystal structures of the grain boundary phases also change with selective additions of rare earth elements. Compared with those in the conventional alloy, the platelet precipitates in the yttrium-containing alloy densely segregate within the grains and along the grain boundaries with smaller size. The segregation of the platelet precipitates within the grains is helpful in improving the strength of the alloy. In addition, its precipitation along the grain boundaries can improve the resistance to stress accelerated grain boundary oxidation and stress rupture property of the alloy and thereby contribute to its temperature stability. PMID:12020705

  13. Handbook for the estimation of microwave propagation effects: Link calculations for earth-space paths (path loss and noise estimation)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crane, R. K.; Blood, D. W.

    1979-01-01

    A single model for a standard of comparison for other models when dealing with rain attenuation problems in system design and experimentation is proposed. Refinements to the Global Rain Production Model are incorporated. Path loss and noise estimation procedures as the basic input to systems design for earth-to-space microwave links operating at frequencies from 1 to 300 GHz are provided. Topics covered include gaseous absorption, attenuation by rain, ionospheric and tropospheric scintillation, low elevation angle effects, radome attenuation, diversity schemes, link calculation, and receiver noise emission by atmospheric gases, rain, and antenna contributions.

  14. Identifying Neutrino Mass Hierarchy at Extremely Small {theta}{sub 13} through Earth Matter Effects in a Supernova Signal

    SciTech Connect

    Dasgupta, Basudeb; Dighe, Amol; Mirizzi, Alessandro

    2008-10-24

    Collective neutrino flavor transformations deep inside a supernova are sensitive to the neutrino mass hierarchy even at extremely small values of {theta}{sub 13}. Exploiting this effect, we show that comparison of the antineutrino signals from a galactic supernova in two megaton class water Cherenkov detectors, one of which is shadowed by Earth, will enable us to distinguish between the hierarchies if sin{sup 2}{theta}{sub 13} < or approx. 10{sup -5}, where long baseline neutrino experiments would be ineffectual.

  15. [Effect of processes in the earth's crust on evolution of photosynthesis (as indicated by data on carbon isotopic composition)].

    PubMed

    Ivlev, A A

    2010-01-01

    A probable mechanism of effect of processes occurring in the Earth's crust on evolution of photosynthesis is considered. According to the hypothesis, this effect is realized through entrance to the Earth's atmosphere of carbon dioxide that stimulates photosynthesis. Supply of CO2 is irregular and is due to irregular movements of the Earth's crust plates. This is accompanied by destruction of carbonates and conversion of carbon of the organic matter to CO2 due to processes of reduction of sulfates. The CO2 content in atmosphere rises for relatively short orogenic periods, due to intensive crust plate movement, while for the subsequent long periods, called the geosynclinal ones, of the relatively slow plate movement, the CO2 content falls due to the higher rate of its consumption for photosynthesis. Owing to the carbon isotopic fractionation accompanying photosynthesis, regular isotopic differences appear between the atmospheric CO2 and the "living" matter (Relay's effect); these differences are then transformed to isotope differences of the carbonate and organic carbon. At the appearance in atmosphere of free oxygen--product of photosynthesis--in organisms there appears photorespiration that also is accompanied by fractionation of carbon isotopes, but with effect of opposite sign. This leads to enrichment of the photosynthesizing biomass with 13C isotope at the orogenic periods. As a result, the initially pronounced isotope differences of the carbonate and organic carbon decrease by the end of the geosyclinal periods. According to the proposed model, concentrations of CO2 and O2 are exchanged in the antiphase. They lead to alternation of periods of warning up and cooling off on the Earth. The former coincide with the orogenic periods, the latter appear at the end of geosyclinal periods when oxygen is accumulated in atmosphere, while organic substance in sediments. Accumulation of organic substance leads to formation of petroleum-maternal masses. To substantiate the

  16. [Effect of processes in the earth's crust on evolution of photosynthesis (as indicated by data on carbon isotopic composition)].

    PubMed

    Ivlev, A A

    2010-01-01

    A probable mechanism of effect of processes occurring in the Earth's crust on evolution of photosynthesis is considered. According to the hypothesis, this effect is realized through entrance to the Earth's atmosphere of carbon dioxide that stimulates photosynthesis. Supply of CO2 is irregular and is due to irregular movements of the Earth's crust plates. This is accompanied by destruction of carbonates and conversion of carbon of the organic matter to CO2 due to processes of reduction of sulfates. The CO2 content in atmosphere rises for relatively short orogenic periods, due to intensive crust plate movement, while for the subsequent long periods, called the geosynclinal ones, of the relatively slow plate movement, the CO2 content falls due to the higher rate of its consumption for photosynthesis. Owing to the carbon isotopic fractionation accompanying photosynthesis, regular isotopic differences appear between the atmospheric CO2 and the "living" matter (Relay's effect); these differences are then transformed to isotope differences of the carbonate and organic carbon. At the appearance in atmosphere of free oxygen--product of photosynthesis--in organisms there appears photorespiration that also is accompanied by fractionation of carbon isotopes, but with effect of opposite sign. This leads to enrichment of the photosynthesizing biomass with 13C isotope at the orogenic periods. As a result, the initially pronounced isotope differences of the carbonate and organic carbon decrease by the end of the geosyclinal periods. According to the proposed model, concentrations of CO2 and O2 are exchanged in the antiphase. They lead to alternation of periods of warning up and cooling off on the Earth. The former coincide with the orogenic periods, the latter appear at the end of geosyclinal periods when oxygen is accumulated in atmosphere, while organic substance in sediments. Accumulation of organic substance leads to formation of petroleum-maternal masses. To substantiate the

  17. Realistic Earth matter effects and a method to acquire information about small θ13 in the detection of supernova neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xin-Heng; Huang, Ming-Yang; Young, Bing-Lin

    2009-06-01

    In this paper, we first calculate the realistic Earth matter effects in the detection of type II supernova neutrinos at the Daya Bay reactor neutrino experiment which is currently under construction. It is found that the Earth matter effects depend on the neutrino incident angle θ, the neutrino mass hierarchy Δm312, the crossing probability at the high resonance region inside the supernova, PH, the neutrino temperature, Tα, and the pinching parameter in the neutrino spectrum, ηα. We also take into account the collective effects due to neutrino-neutrino interactions inside the supernova. With the expression for the dependence of PH on the neutrino mixing-angle θ13, we obtain the relations between θ13 and the event numbers for various reaction channels of supernova neutrinos. Using these relations, we propose a possible method to acquire information about θ13 smaller than 1.5°. Such a sensitivity cannot be achieved by the reactor neutrino deta at the Daya Bay experiment which has a sensitivity of the order of θ13˜3°. Furthermore, we apply this method to other neutrino experiments, i.e. Super-K, SNO, KamLAND, LVD, MinBooNE, Borexino, and Double-Chooz. We also study the energy spectra of the differential event numbers, dN/dE.

  18. Gravitomagnetic Phenomena due to Spin, Lense-Thirring Effect and its 1995-2000 Measurements with Earth Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciufolini, I.

    2001-07-01

    First, we briefly describe some of the general relativistic, gravitomagnetic, phenomena arising in the vicinities of a spinning body, due to its rotation, and some of the historical attempts to detect and measure gravitomagnetism and Lense-Thirring effect, including the LARES experiment, a phase-A space mission to measure "frame-dragging" with accuracy of less than 3% and to provide other basic tests of general relativity and gravitation. We then describe the method to measure the Lense-Thirring effect by analyzing the orbits of the two laser-ranged satellites LAGEOS and LAGEOS II; this method has provided the direct measurement of Earth's gravitomagnetism. We report on these 1995-2000 experimental evidences of the Lense-Thirring effect obtained by analyzing the nodes of LAGEOS and LAGEOS II and the perigee of LAGEOS II with the orbital programs GEODYN-SOLVE, using the Earth's Gravitational Models JGM-3 and EGM-96, and this new method. The first detection was obtained in 1995, the most accurate measurements were obtained in 1998-2000 using EGM-96, with accuracy of the order of 20%. Finally, we present our new, preliminary, result obtained by analyzing 5 years of data of the LAGEOS satellites.

  19. [Effect of treatments of hydrogen peroxide and sodium dithionite-citrate-bicarbonate on clay minerals of red earth sediments].

    PubMed

    Li, Rong-Biao; Hong, Han-Lie; Yin, Ke; Wang, Chao-Wen; Gao, Wen-Peng; Han, Wen; Wu, Qing-Feng

    2013-04-01

    As classical procedures for pretreatment of soil sediments, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and sodium dithionite-citrate-bicarbonate (DCB) treatment methods are very important in removing the organic matter and iron oxides acting as cementing agents in the soils. However, both of these methods have less been focused on the effect on the clay minerals when separating. Here, we report the comparable methods between H2O2 and DCB to reveal their effect on clay minerals in red earth sediments using X-ray diffraction (XRD). The XRD results suggested that mineral particles can be totally decentralized by either H2O2 or DCB method in the soils and high purity clay minerals can be obtained by separating quartz and other impurities from clay minerals effectively. However, the XRD data were distorted by the DCB treatment owning to the cation exchange between Na+ and interlayer cation. On the contrary, the authentic data can be obtained by H2O2 treatment. Therefore, the H2O2 treatment seems to be a more appropriate method to obtain authentic information of clay mineralogy when separating of clay minerals from red earth sediments.

  20. Discover Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Discover Earth is a NASA-funded project for teachers of grades 5-12 who want to expand their knowledge of the Earth system, and prepare to become master teachers who promote Earth system science in their own schools, counties, and throughout their state. Participants from the following states are invited to apply: Connecticut, Delaware, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Washington, DC. Teachers selected for the project participate in a two-week summer workshop conducted at the University of Maryland, College Park; develop classroom-ready materials during the workshop for broad dissemination; conduct a minimum of two peer training activities during the coming school year; and participate in other enrichment/education opportunities as available and desired. Discover Earth is a team effort that utilizes expertise from a range of contributors, and balances science content with hands-on classroom applications.

  1. Discover Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, Colleen

    1996-01-01

    Discover Earth is a NASA-funded project for teachers of grades 5-12 who want to expand their knowledge of the Earth system, and prepare to become master teachers who promote Earth system science in their own schools, counties, and throughout their state. Participants from the following states are invited to apply: Connecticut, Delaware, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Washington, DC. Teachers selected for the project participate in a two-week summer workshop conducted at the University of Maryland, College Park; develop classroom-ready materials during the workshop for broad dissemination; conduct a minimum of two peer training activities during the coming school year; and participate in other enrichment/education opportunities as available and desired. Discover Earth is a team effort that utilizes expertise from a range of contributors, and balances science content with hands-on classroom applications.

  2. Earth Rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickey, Jean O.

    1995-01-01

    The study of the Earth's rotation in space (encompassing Universal Time (UT1), length of day, polar motion, and the phenomena of precession and nutation) addresses the complex nature of Earth orientation changes, the mechanisms of excitation of these changes and their geophysical implications in a broad variety of areas. In the absence of internal sources of energy or interactions with astronomical objects, the Earth would move as a rigid body with its various parts (the crust, mantle, inner and outer cores, atmosphere and oceans) rotating together at a constant fixed rate. In reality, the world is considerably more complicated, as is schematically illustrated. The rotation rate of the Earth's crust is not constant, but exhibits complicated fluctuations in speed amounting to several parts in 10(exp 8) [corresponding to a variation of several milliseconds (ms) in the Length Of the Day (LOD) and about one part in 10(exp 6) in the orientation of the rotation axis relative to the solid Earth's axis of figure (polar motion). These changes occur over a broad spectrum of time scales, ranging from hours to centuries and longer, reflecting the fact that they are produced by a wide variety of geophysical and astronomical processes. Geodetic observations of Earth rotation changes thus provide insights into the geophysical processes illustrated, which are often difficult to obtain by other means. In addition, these measurements are required for engineering purposes. Theoretical studies of Earth rotation variations are based on the application of Euler's dynamical equations to the problem of finding the response of slightly deformable solid Earth to variety of surface and internal stresses.

  3. Earth materials and earth dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, K; Shankland, T.

    2000-11-01

    In the project ''Earth Materials and Earth Dynamics'' we linked fundamental and exploratory, experimental, theoretical, and computational research programs to shed light on the current and past states of the dynamic Earth. Our objective was to combine different geological, geochemical, geophysical, and materials science analyses with numerical techniques to illuminate active processes in the Earth. These processes include fluid-rock interactions that form and modify the lithosphere, non-linear wave attenuations in rocks that drive plate tectonics and perturb the earth's surface, dynamic recrystallization of olivine that deforms the upper mantle, development of texture in high-pressure olivine polymorphs that create anisotropic velocity regions in the convecting upper mantle and transition zone, and the intense chemical reactions between the mantle and core. We measured physical properties such as texture and nonlinear elasticity, equation of states at simultaneous pressures and temperatures, magnetic spins and bonding, chemical permeability, and thermal-chemical feedback to better characterize earth materials. We artificially generated seismic waves, numerically modeled fluid flow and transport in rock systems and modified polycrystal plasticity theory to interpret measured physical properties and integrate them into our understanding of the Earth. This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL).

  4. Effects of rare earth elements and REE-binding proteins on physiological responses in plants.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dongwu; Wang, Xue; Chen, Zhiwei

    2012-02-01

    Rare earth elements (REEs), which include 17 elements in the periodic table, share chemical properties related to a similar external electronic configuration. REEs enriched fertilizers have been used in China since the 1980s. REEs could enter the cell and cell organelles, influence plant growth, and mainly be bound with the biological macromolecules. REE-binding proteins have been found in some plants. In addition, the chlorophyll activities and photosynthetic rate can be regulated by REEs. REEs could promote the protective function of cell membrane and enhance the plant resistance capability to stress produced by environmental factors, and affect the plant physiological mechanism by regulating the Ca²⁺ level in the plant cells. The focus of present review is to describe how REEs and REE-binding proteins participate in the physiological responses in plants.

  5. Atomic oxygen effects on candidate coatings for long-term spacecraft in low earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lan, E. H.; Smith, Charles A.; Cross, J. B.

    1988-01-01

    Candidate atomic oxygen protective coatings for long-term low Earth orbit (LEO) spacecraft were evaluated using the Los Alamos National Laboratory O-atom exposure facility. The coatings studied include Teflon, Al2O3, SiO2, and SWS-V-10, a silicon material. Preliminary results indicate that sputtered PTFE Teflon (0.1 micrometers) has a fluence lifetime of 10 to the 19th power O-atoms/cm (2), and sputtered silicon dioxide (0.1 micrometers), aluminum oxide (0.1 micrometers), and SWS-V-10, a silicone, (4 micrometers) have fluence lifetimes of 10 to the 20th power to 10 to the 21st power O-atoms/cm (2). There are large variations in fluence lifetime data for these coatings.

  6. The effect of atomic oxygen on polysiloxane-polyimide for spacecraft applications in low Earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutledge, Sharon K.; Cooper, Jill M.; Olle, Raymond M.

    1991-01-01

    Polysiloxane-polyimide films are of interest as a replacement for polyimide Kapton in the Space Station Freedom solar array blanket. The blanket provides the structural support for the solar cells as well as providing transport of heat away from the back of the cells. Polyimide Kapton would be an ideal material to use; however, its high rate of degradation due to attack by atomic oxygen in low Earth orbit, at the altitudes Space Station Freedom will fly, is of such magnitude that if left unprotected, the blanket will undergo structural failure in much less than the desired 15 year operating life. Polysiloxane-polyimide is of interest as a replacement material because it should from its own protective silicon dioxide coating upon exposure to atomic oxygen. Mass, optical, and photomicrographic data obtained in the evaluation of the durability of polysiloxane-polyimide to an atomic oxygen environment are presented.

  7. Miniature interferometer terminals for earth surveying /MITES/ - Geodetic results and multipath effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Counselman, C. C., III

    Experiments which confirm theoretical predictions regarding the use of MITES terminals for measuring baseline vectors on the ground using interferometric observations of earth-orbiting satellites are presented. A set of five global positioning satellites (GPS) were observed by MITES antennas at 1.3 hour time intervals on each of two days, and it is found that this distribution facilitates the correct resolution of interferometer fringe ambiguities. In addition, experiments show that multipath interference does not pose significant problems at the centimeter level. MITES is still being developed using baseline lengths of up to 4,000 km, and a new system should demonstrate improved geodetic accuracy, and will probably require one hour observation intervals.

  8. Properties of metastable alkaline-earth-metal atoms calculated using an accurate effective core potential

    SciTech Connect

    Santra, Robin; Christ, Kevin V.; Greene, Chris H.

    2004-04-01

    The first three electronically excited states in the alkaline-earth-metal atoms magnesium, calcium, and strontium comprise the (nsnp){sup 3}P{sub J}{sup o}(J=0,1,2) fine-structure manifold. All three states are metastable and are of interest for optical atomic clocks as well as for cold-collision physics. An efficient technique--based on a physically motivated potential that models the presence of the ionic core--is employed to solve the Schroedinger equation for the two-electron valence shell. In this way, radiative lifetimes, laser-induced clock shifts, and long-range interaction parameters are calculated for metastable Mg, Ca, and Sr.

  9. The effects of atmospheric chemistry on radiation budget in the Community Earth Systems Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Y.; Czader, B.; Diao, L.; Rodriguez, J.; Jeong, G.

    2013-12-01

    The Community Earth Systems Model (CESM)-Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM) simulations were performed to study the impact of atmospheric chemistry on the radiation budget over the surface within a weather prediction time scale. The secondary goal is to get a simplified and optimized chemistry module for the short time period. Three different chemistry modules were utilized to represent tropospheric and stratospheric chemistry, which differ in how their reactions and species are represented: (1) simplified tropospheric and stratospheric chemistry (approximately 30 species), (2) simplified tropospheric chemistry and comprehensive stratospheric chemistry from the Model of Ozone and Related Chemical Tracers, version 3 (MOZART-3, approximately 60 species), and (3) comprehensive tropospheric and stratospheric chemistry (MOZART-4, approximately 120 species). Our results indicate the different details in chemistry treatment from these model components affect the surface temperature and impact the radiation budget.

  10. ALKALI/ AKALINE-EARTH CONTENT EFFECTS ON PROPERTIES OF HIGH-ALUMINA NUCLEAR WASTE GLASSES

    SciTech Connect

    McCloy, John S.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Windisch, Charles F.; Leslie, Clifford J.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Riley, Brian J.; Vienna, John D.

    2010-10-01

    A series of high alumina (>20 mass %) borosilicate glasses have been made and characterized based on the assumption that the primary modifier cation field strength plays a significant role in mediating glass structure of nuclear waste glasses. Any crystallization upon quenching or after heat treatment at 950 °C for 24 hours was identified and quantified by X-ray diffraction. Particular note was take of any aluminosilicates formed, such as those in the nepheline group (MAlSiO4 where M=K, Na, Li), as these remove multiple glass-formers from the network upon crystallization. The relative roles of potassium, sodium, lithium, calcium, and magnesium on glass structure and crystallization in high alumina glasses were explored using Raman and infrared vibrational spectroscopy. Strong evidence was found for the importance of 4 membered rings in glasses with 10 mol % alkaline earths (Ca, Mg).

  11. Alkaline earth metal cation exchange: effect of mobile counterion and dissolved organic matter.

    PubMed

    Indarawis, Katrina; Boyer, Treavor H

    2012-04-17

    The goal of this research was to provide an improved understanding of the interactions between alkaline earth metals and DOM under conditions that are encountered during drinking water treatment with particular focus on cation exchange. Both magnetically enhanced and nonmagnetic cation exchange resins were converted to Na, Mg, Ca, Sr, and Ba mobile counterion forms as a novel approach to investigate the exchange behavior between the cations and the interactions between the cations and DOM. The results show that cation exchange is a robust process for removal of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) considering competition with cations on the resin surface and presence of DOM. DOM was actively involved during the cation exchange process through complexation, adsorption, and coprecipitation reactions. In addition to advancing the understanding of ion exchange processes for water treatment, the results of this work are applicable to membrane pretreatment to minimize fouling, treatment of membrane concentrate, and precipitative softening.

  12. Effect of Composition and Impurities on the Phosphorescence of Green-Emitting Alkaline Earth Aluminate Phosphor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Doory; Kim, Han-Eol; Kim, Chang-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Recent improvements to SrAl2O4:Eu2+, Dy3+ phosphors have enabled the use of luminescent hosts with a stable crystal structure and high physical and chemical stability, thus overcoming the bottleneck in the applicability of ZnS:Cu phosphors. However, enhancement of afterglow lifetime and brightness in SrAl2O4:Eu2+, Dy3+ phosphors remains a challenging task. Here, we have improved the afterglow characteristics in terms of persistence time and brightness by a systematic investigation of the composition of Eu-doped alkaline earth aluminate SrAl2O4:Eu2+, Dy3+ crystals. We found that a Dy3+/Eu2+ ratio of ~2.4 and ~0.935 mol Eu2+ (per mol of SrAl2O4) gave the brightest and longest emissions (11% and 9% increase for each). Doping with Si4+ also resulted in a slight increase in brightness up to ~15%. Doping with alkali metal or alkaline earth metal significantly enhanced the phosphorescence intensity. In particular, doping with 0.005 mol Li+ (per mol of SrAl2O4) alone boosted the phosphorescence intensity to 239% of the initial value, as compared to that observed for the non-doped crystal, while doping with 0.01 mol Mg2+ and 0.005 mol Li+ (per 1 mol SrAl2O4) boosted the phosphorescence intensity up to 313% of the initial value. The results of this investigation are expected to act as a guideline for the synthesis of bright and long persistent phosphors, and facilitate the development of persistent phosphors with afterglow characteristics superior to those of conventional phosphors. PMID:26731086

  13. The effect of lunarlike satellites on the orbital infrared light curves of Earth-analog planets.

    PubMed

    Moskovitz, Nicholas A; Gaidos, Eric; Williams, Darren M

    2009-04-01

    We have investigated the influence of lunarlike satellites on the infrared orbital light curves of Earth-analog extrasolar planets. Such light curves will be obtained by NASA's Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) and ESA's Darwin missions as a consequence of repeat observations to confirm the companion status of a putative planet and determine its orbit. We used an energy balance model to calculate disk-averaged infrared (bolometric) fluxes from planet-satellite systems over a full orbital period (one year). The satellites are assumed to lack an atmosphere, have a low thermal inertia like that of the Moon, and span a range of plausible radii. The planets are assumed to have thermal and orbital properties that mimic those of Earth, while their obliquities and orbital longitudes of inferior conjunction remain free parameters. Even if the gross thermal properties of the planet can be independently constrained (e.g., via spectroscopy or visible-wavelength detection of specular glint from a surface ocean), only the largest (approximately Mars-sized) lunarlike satellites can be detected by light curve data from a TPF-like instrument (i.e., one that achieves a photometric signal-to-noise ratio of 10 to 20 at infrared wavelengths). Nondetection of a lunarlike satellite can obfuscate the interpretation of a given system's infrared light curve so that it may resemble a single planet with high obliquity, different orbital longitude of vernal equinox relative to inferior conjunction, and in some cases drastically different thermal characteristics. If the thermal properties of the planet are not independently established, then the presence of a lunarlike satellite cannot be inferred from infrared data, which would thus demonstrate that photometric light curves alone can only be used for preliminary study, and the addition of spectroscopic data will be necessary. PMID:19400731

  14. The effect of lunarlike satellites on the orbital infrared light curves of Earth-analog planets.

    PubMed

    Moskovitz, Nicholas A; Gaidos, Eric; Williams, Darren M

    2009-04-01

    We have investigated the influence of lunarlike satellites on the infrared orbital light curves of Earth-analog extrasolar planets. Such light curves will be obtained by NASA's Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) and ESA's Darwin missions as a consequence of repeat observations to confirm the companion status of a putative planet and determine its orbit. We used an energy balance model to calculate disk-averaged infrared (bolometric) fluxes from planet-satellite systems over a full orbital period (one year). The satellites are assumed to lack an atmosphere, have a low thermal inertia like that of the Moon, and span a range of plausible radii. The planets are assumed to have thermal and orbital properties that mimic those of Earth, while their obliquities and orbital longitudes of inferior conjunction remain free parameters. Even if the gross thermal properties of the planet can be independently constrained (e.g., via spectroscopy or visible-wavelength detection of specular glint from a surface ocean), only the largest (approximately Mars-sized) lunarlike satellites can be detected by light curve data from a TPF-like instrument (i.e., one that achieves a photometric signal-to-noise ratio of 10 to 20 at infrared wavelengths). Nondetection of a lunarlike satellite can obfuscate the interpretation of a given system's infrared light curve so that it may resemble a single planet with high obliquity, different orbital longitude of vernal equinox relative to inferior conjunction, and in some cases drastically different thermal characteristics. If the thermal properties of the planet are not independently established, then the presence of a lunarlike satellite cannot be inferred from infrared data, which would thus demonstrate that photometric light curves alone can only be used for preliminary study, and the addition of spectroscopic data will be necessary.

  15. Boiling Heat Transfer Mechanisms in Earth and Low Gravity: Boundary Condition and Heater Aspect Ratio Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jungho

    2004-01-01

    Boiling is a complex phenomenon where hydrodynamics, heat transfer, mass transfer, and interfacial phenomena are tightly interwoven. An understanding of boiling and critical heat flux in microgravity environments is of importance to space based hardware and processes such as heat exchange, cryogenic fuel storage and transportation, electronic cooling, and material processing due to the large amounts of heat that can be removed with relatively little increase in temperature. Although research in this area has been performed in the past four decades, the mechanisms by which heat is removed from surfaces in microgravity are still unclear. Recently, time and space resolved heat transfer data were obtained in both earth and low gravity environments using an array of microheaters varying in size between 100 microns to 700 microns. These heaters were operated in both constant temperature as well as constant heat flux mode. Heat transfer under nucleating bubbles in earth gravity were directly measured using a microheater array with 100 m resolution operated in constant temperature mode with low and high subcooled bulk liquid along with images from below and from the side. The individual bubble departure diameter and energy transfer were larger with low subcooling but the departure frequency increased at high subcooling, resulting in higher overall heat transfer. The bubble growth for both subcoolings was primarily due to energy transfer from the superheated liquid layer relatively little was due to wall heat transfer during the bubble growth process. Oscillating bubbles and sliding bubbles were also observed in highly subcooled boiling. Transient conduction and/or microconvection was the dominant heat transfer mechanism in the above cases. A transient conduction model was developed and compared with the experimental data with good agreement. Data was also obtained with the heater array operated in a constant heat flux mode and measuring the temperature distribution across

  16. Effect of Composition and Impurities on the Phosphorescence of Green-Emitting Alkaline Earth Aluminate Phosphor

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Doory; Kim, Han-Eol; Kim, Chang-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Recent improvements to SrAl2O4:Eu2+, Dy3+ phosphors have enabled the use of luminescent hosts with a stable crystal structure and high physical and chemical stability, thus overcoming the bottleneck in the applicability of ZnS:Cu phosphors. However, enhancement of afterglow lifetime and brightness in SrAl2O4:Eu2+, Dy3+ phosphors remains a challenging task. Here, we have improved the afterglow characteristics in terms of persistence time and brightness by a systematic investigation of the composition of Eu-doped alkaline earth aluminate SrAl2O4:Eu2+, Dy3+ crystals. We found that a Dy3+/Eu2+ ratio of ~2.4 and ~0.935 mol Eu2+ (per mol of SrAl2O4) gave the brightest and longest emissions (11% and 9% increase for each). Doping with Si4+ also resulted in a slight increase in brightness up to ~15%. Doping with alkali metal or alkaline earth metal significantly enhanced the phosphorescence intensity. In particular, doping with 0.005 mol Li+ (per mol of SrAl2O4) alone boosted the phosphorescence intensity to 239% of the initial value, as compared to that observed for the non-doped crystal, while doping with 0.01 mol Mg2+ and 0.005 mol Li+ (per 1 mol SrAl2O4) boosted the phosphorescence intensity up to 313% of the initial value. The results of this investigation are expected to act as a guideline for the synthesis of bright and long persistent phosphors, and facilitate the development of persistent phosphors with afterglow characteristics superior to those of conventional phosphors. PMID:26731086

  17. The effect of ocean tides on the earth's rotation as predicted by the results of an ocean tide model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, Richard S.

    1993-01-01

    The published ocean tidal angular momentum results of Seiler (1991) are used to predict the effects of the most important semidiurnal, diurnal, and long period ocean tides on the earth's rotation. The separate, as well as combined, effects of ocean tidal currents and sea level height changes on the length-of-day, UT1, and polar motion are computed. The predicted polar motion results reported here account for the presence of the free core nutation and are given in terms of the motion of the celestial ephemeris pole so that they can be compared directly to the results of observations. Outside the retrograde diurnal tidal band, the summed effect of the semidiurnal and diurnal ocean tides studied here predict peak-to-peak polar motion amplitudes as large as 2 mas. Within the retrograde diurnal tidal band, the resonant enhancement caused by the free core nutation leads to predicted polar motion amplitudes as large as 9 mas.

  18. Cloud Effects on Meridional Atmospheric Energy Budget Estimated from Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kato, Seiji; Rose, Fred G.; Rutan, David A.; Charlock, Thomas P.

    2008-01-01

    The zonal mean atmospheric cloud radiative effect, defined as the difference of the top-of-atmosphere (TOA) and surface cloud radiative effects, is estimated from three years of Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) data. The zonal mean shortwave effect is small, though it tends to be positive (warming). This indicates that clouds increase shortwave absorption in the atmosphere, especially in midlatitudes. The zonal mean atmospheric cloud radiative effect is, however, dominated by the longwave effect. The zonal mean longwave effect is positive in the tropics and decreases with latitude to negative values (cooling) in polar regions. The meridional gradient of cloud effect between midlatitude and polar regions exists even when uncertainties in the cloud effect on the surface enthalpy flux and in the modeled irradiances are taken into account. This indicates that clouds increase the rate of generation of mean zonal available potential energy. Because the atmospheric cooling effect in polar regions is predominately caused by low level clouds, which tend to be stationary, we postulate that the meridional and vertical gradients of cloud effect increase the rate of meridional energy transport by dynamics in the atmosphere from midlatitude to polar region, especially in fall and winter. Clouds then warm the surface in polar regions except in the Arctic in summer. Clouds, therefore, contribute in increasing the rate of meridional energy transport from midlatitude to polar regions through the atmosphere.

  19. Earth-moon Lagrangian points as a test bed for general relativity and effective field theories of gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battista, Emmanuele; Dell'Agnello, Simone; Esposito, Giampiero; Di Fiore, Luciano; Simo, Jules; Grado, Aniello

    2015-09-01

    We first analyze the restricted four-body problem consisting of the Earth, the Moon, and the Sun as the primaries and a spacecraft as the planetoid. This scheme allows us to take into account the solar perturbation in the description of the motion of a spacecraft in the vicinity of the stable Earth-Moon libration points L4 and L5 both in the classical regime and in the context of effective field theories of gravity. A vehicle initially placed at L4 or L5 will not remain near the respective points. In particular, in the classical case the vehicle moves on a trajectory about the libration points for at least 700 days before escaping. We show that this is true also if the modified long-distance Newtonian potential of effective gravity is employed. We also evaluate the impulse required to cancel out the perturbing force due to the Sun in order to force the spacecraft to stay precisely at L4 or L5. It turns out that this value is slightly modified with respect to the corresponding Newtonian one. In the second part of the paper, we first evaluate the location of all Lagrangian points in the Earth-Moon system within the framework of general relativity. For the points L4 and L5, the corrections of coordinates are of order a few millimeters and describe a tiny departure from the equilateral triangle. After that, we set up a scheme where the theory which is quantum corrected has as its classical counterpart the Einstein theory, instead of the Newtonian one. In other words, we deal with a theory involving quantum corrections to Einstein gravity, rather than to Newtonian gravity. By virtue of the effective-gravity correction to the long-distance form of the potential among two masses, all terms involving the ratio between the gravitational radius of the primary and its separation from the planetoid get modified. Within this framework, for the Lagrangian points of stable equilibrium, we find quantum corrections of order 2 mm, whereas for Lagrangian points of unstable

  20. Increasing UV-B radiation at the earth's surface and potential effects on aqueous mercury cycling and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Bonzongo, Jean Claude J; Donkor, Augustine K

    2003-09-01

    In the past two decades, a great deal of attention has been paid to the environmental fate of mercury (Hg), and this is exemplified by the growing number of international conferences devoted uniquely to Hg cycling and its impacts on ecosystem functions and life. This interest in the biogeochemistry of Hg has resulted in a significant improvement of our understanding of its impact on the environment and human health. However, both past and current research, have been primarily oriented toward the study of direct impact of anthropogenic activities on Hg cycling. Besides a few indirect effects such as the increase in Hg methylation observed in acid-rain impacted aquatic systems or the reported enhanced Hg bioaccumulation in newly flooded water reservoirs; changes in Hg transformations/fluxes that may be related to global change have received little attention. A case in point is the depletion of stratospheric ozone and the resulting increase in solar UV-radiation reaching the Earth. This review and critical discussion suggest that increasing UV-B radiation at earth's surface could have a significant and complex impact on Hg cycling including effects on Hg volatilization (photo-reduction), solubilization (photo-oxidation), methyl-Hg demethylation, and Hg methylation. Therefore, this paper is written to provoke discussions, and more importantly, to stimulate research on potential impacts of incoming solar UV-radiation on global Hg fluxes and any toxicity aspects of Hg that may become exacerbated by UV-radiation. PMID:12852978

  1. Increasing UV-B radiation at the earth's surface and potential effects on aqueous mercury cycling and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Bonzongo, Jean Claude J; Donkor, Augustine K

    2003-09-01

    In the past two decades, a great deal of attention has been paid to the environmental fate of mercury (Hg), and this is exemplified by the growing number of international conferences devoted uniquely to Hg cycling and its impacts on ecosystem functions and life. This interest in the biogeochemistry of Hg has resulted in a significant improvement of our understanding of its impact on the environment and human health. However, both past and current research, have been primarily oriented toward the study of direct impact of anthropogenic activities on Hg cycling. Besides a few indirect effects such as the increase in Hg methylation observed in acid-rain impacted aquatic systems or the reported enhanced Hg bioaccumulation in newly flooded water reservoirs; changes in Hg transformations/fluxes that may be related to global change have received little attention. A case in point is the depletion of stratospheric ozone and the resulting increase in solar UV-radiation reaching the Earth. This review and critical discussion suggest that increasing UV-B radiation at earth's surface could have a significant and complex impact on Hg cycling including effects on Hg volatilization (photo-reduction), solubilization (photo-oxidation), methyl-Hg demethylation, and Hg methylation. Therefore, this paper is written to provoke discussions, and more importantly, to stimulate research on potential impacts of incoming solar UV-radiation on global Hg fluxes and any toxicity aspects of Hg that may become exacerbated by UV-radiation.

  2. Tidal Locking Of The Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koohafkan, Michael

    2006-05-01

    The Moon's orbit and spin period are nearly synchronized, or tidally locked. Could the Moon's orbit and the Earth's spin eventually synchronize as well? The Moon's gravitational pull on the Earth produces tides in our oceans, and tidal friction gradually lengthens our days. Less obvious gravitational interactions between the Earth and Moon may also have effects on Earth's spin. The Earth is slightly distorted into an egg-like shape, and the torque exerted by the Moon on our equatorial bulge slowly changes the tilt of our spin axis. How do effects such as these change as the Moon drifts away from Earth? I will examine gravitational interactions between Earth and Moon to learn how they contribute to the deceleration of the Earth's rotation. My goal is to determine the amount of time it would take for the Earth's rotational speed to decelerate until the period of a single rotation matches the period of the Moon's orbit around Earth -- when the Earth is ``tidally locked'' with the Moon. I aim to derive a general mathematical expression for the rotational deceleration of the Earth due to Moon's gravitational influences.

  3. Earth: Earth Science and Health

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maynard, Nancy G.

    2001-01-01

    A major new NASA initiative on environmental change and health has been established to promote the application of Earth science remote sensing data, information, observations, and technologies to issues of human health. NASA's Earth Sciences suite of Earth observing instruments are now providing improved observations science, data, and advanced technologies about the Earth's land, atmosphere, and oceans. These new space-based resources are being combined with other agency and university resources, data integration and fusion technologies, geographic information systems (GIS), and the spectrum of tools available from the public health community, making it possible to better understand how the environment and climate are linked to specific diseases, to improve outbreak prediction, and to minimize disease risk. This presentation is an overview of NASA's tools, capabilities, and research advances in this initiative.

  4. The effects of cooperative learning methods on minority ninth graders in earth and space science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eshietedoho, Cobb G.

    This research was conducted using a quasi-experimental study design. The study took place at a local high school in the Miami-Dade County Public School System, the 4th largest school system in the nation. Students in the researcher's high school class were entering high school for the first time and were promoted into 9th grade at the end of the 2008--2009 school year. The observed problem that necessitated the study had been noticed during the writer's tenure at the school. The minority students, Blacks and Hispanics in particular, were underperforming in the researcher's earth science class when compared to their White and Asian American counterparts. The researcher conducted the study for the purpose of determining whether cooperative learning through active engagement techniques could enhance these students' achievement in earth and space science. The researcher used a cooperative learning technique in combination with technology integration, research activities, laboratory experimentation, and other aspects of group projects to engage students in a collaborative effort with the hope of enhancing their performance. The method involved grouping students using Kagan's numerical system. Students were placed in groups of 4, which included 1 high achiever, 2 average achievers, and 1 low achiever. The placement process utilized the incoming students' 8th-grade Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test science results. Placement was carried out after the researcher had the opportunity to observe the students so that groups did not contain friends and adversaries or all-male or all-female members. The premise for using this technique was to engage the students actively, help them become self-reliant, develop skills in teamwork, and work cooperatively to contribute equally to each other's success. A paired sample t test was conducted to evaluate the hypothesis that achievement scores from the posttest would be statistically more significant than the pretest. The test was

  5. Inclusion of electronic polarizability effect in high pressure structural properties of alloy of rare-earth antimonides

    SciTech Connect

    Yaduvanshi, Namrata Kapoor, Shilpa; Singh, Sadhna

    2015-05-15

    In the present paper, we have investigated the high-pressure structural phase transition of rare-earth antimonides (NdSb and DySb). We studied theoretically the structural properties of alloy of these compounds (NdSb and DySb) by using the three-body potential model with the effect of electronic polarizability (TBIPE{sub P}). These compounds exhibit first order crystallographic phase transition from NaCl (B{sub 1}) to CsCl (B{sub 2}) phase at 17.8 GPa and 22.6 GPa respectively. The study has been extended to mixed crystals and the effect of composition on transition pressure and volume change is investigated. The phase transition pressures and associated volume collapse obtained from present potential model (TBIPE{sub P}) show a good agreement with available experimental data.

  6. Effects of the Depth-Dependent Grain Size on the Evolution of Earth's Mantle: Linking Mantle Rheology and Geophysical Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glisovic, P.; Forte, A. M.

    2014-12-01

    The effects of the grain size variations on the viscosity are comparable to that of temperature and pressure. A detailed depth-profile of the grain size in the mantle is, however, unknown. To explore the possible depth-dependence of grain size, we use models of coupled core-mantle evolution that include the dynamic effect of surface tectonic plates. We developed an algorithm for modelling: 1) the surface yield stress in a dynamically consistent manner, and 2) the diffusion creep, that is based on the following ingredients: vacancy diffusion in perovskite, depth-dependent grain size, temperature and pressure. This algorithm is able to provide a fit to a wide set of geodynamical observations. Time-dependent convection simulations reveal that the thermal evolution of the mantle is very sensitive to depth-variations in the grain size. We also explore the important feedbacks of thermal convection on the evolution of Earth's mantle rheology.

  7. Effect of patch borders on coercivity in amorphous rare earth-transition metal thin films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, G.; Fu, H.; Giles, R. C.; Mansuripur, M.

    1991-01-01

    The coercivity at the micron scale is a very important property of magneto-optical media. It is a key factor that determines the magnetic domain wall movement and domain reversal. How the coercivity is influenced by a special type of patch borders is discussed. Patch formation is a general phenomenon in growth processes of amorphous rare earth transition metal thin films. Different patches may stem from different seeds and the patch borders are formed when they merge. Though little is known about the exact properties of the borders, we may expect that the exchange interaction at the patch border is weaker than that within a patch, since there is usually a spatial gap between two patches. Computer simulations were performed on a 2-D hexagonal lattice consisting of 37 complete patches with random shape and size. From the series of simulations we may conclude that the domain in the patch with borders of 30 percent exchange strength can expand most easily to the whole lattice, because the exchange strength can expand most easily to the whole lattice, because the exchange strength of the border is not too high to prevent the domain from growing within the patch and it is not too low to prevent the domain from expanding beyond the patch.

  8. Effect of long-term exposure to Low Earth Orbit (LEO) space environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimcik, D. G.

    1987-01-01

    Data obtained from components and materials from the Solar Maximum Mission satellite are presented and compared to data for similar materials obtained from the Advanced Composite Materials Exposure to Space Experiment (ACOMEX) flown on Shuttle mission STS-41G. In addition to evaluation of surface erosion and mass loss that may be of importance to very long-term missions, comparisons of solar absorptance and thermal emittance measurements for both long and short term exposures were made. Although the ratio of absorptance over emittance can be altered by proper choice of materials to ensure a proper operating environment for the spacecraft, once the thermal design is established, it is important that the material properties not change in order to maintain the operating environment for many payload and bus items such as electronics, batteries, fuel, etc. However, data presented show significant changes after short exposure in low Earth environment. Moreover, the measured changes are shown to differ according to the manner of exposure, i.e., normal or oblique, which also affects the resultant eroded surface morphology. These results identify constraints to be considered in development of flight experiments or laboratory testing.

  9. Effects of exogenous rare earth elements on phosphorus adsorption and desorption in different types of soils.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lingqing; Liang, Tao

    2014-05-01

    Phosphorus (P) is an important biogeochemical element and the environmental fate of P receives increasing attention. Through batch equilibration experiments, the adsorption and desorption of P in the absence and presence of exogeneous rare earth elements (REEs) were investigated in five types of agricultural soil samples collected from China. The results showed that the addition of different doses of REEs had influences on P adsorption processes in the soils, and there were differences in different soil types and different P concentrations of the P solutions. The amount of P adsorption tended to decline when the five types of soils were amended with low concentrations of REEs. The characteristics of P adsorption were more complicated when high concentrations of REEs were added to the different soils. Affected by the high concentrations of REEs, when the P concentration of the P solution added to soils was less than 20 mg L(-1), the rate of P adsorption tended to increase in all the five types of soils. However, when the P concentration of the P solution added to soil was greater than 30 mg L(-1), the rate of P adsorption tended to decrease. The Langmuir equation fitted P adsorption in all the five types of soils well. Compared with the control, when soil samples were amended with REEs, the P desorption rates of the five types of soils increased.

  10. Upconversion effective enhancement by producing various coordination surroundings of rare-Earth ions.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qingming; Yu, Han; Ma, En; Zhang, Xinqi; Cao, Wenbing; Yang, Chengang; Yu, Jianchang

    2015-03-16

    In this manuscript, we present a simple route to enhance upconversion (UC) emission by producing two different coordination sites of trivalent cations in a matrix material and adjusting crystal field asymmetry by Hf(4+) co-doping. A cubic phase, Y3.2Al0.32Yb0.4Er0.08F12, with these structural characteristics was synthesized successfully by introducing a small ion (Al(3+)) into YF3. X-ray diffraction (XRD), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray spectroscopy (XPS), and fluorescence spectrophotometry (FS) were employed for its crystalline structure and luminescent property analysis. As a result, the coordination environments of the rare-earth ions were varied more obviously than a hexagonal NaYF4 matrix with the same Hf(4+) co-doping concentration, with vertical comparison, UC luminescent intensities of cubic Y3.2Al0.32Yb0.4Er0.08F12 were largely enhanced (∼32-80 times greater than that of different band emissions), while the maximum enhancement of hexagonal NaYF4 was by a factor of ∼12. According to our experimental results, the mechanism has been demonstrated involving the crystalline structure, crystal field asymmetry, luminescence lifetime, hypersensitive transition, and so on. The study may be helpful for the design and fabrication of high-performance UC materials.

  11. Near Earth Objects and Cascading Effects from the Policy Perspective: Implications from Problem and Solution Definition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindquist, Eric

    2016-04-01

    The characterization of near-Earth-objects (NEOs) in regard to physical attributes and potential risk and impact factors presents a complex and complicates scientific and engineering challenge. The societal and policy risks and impacts are no less complex, yet are rarely considered in the same context as material properties or related factors. Further, NEO impacts are typically considered as discrete events, not as initial events in a dynamic cascading system. The objective of this contribution is to position the characterization of NEOs within the public policy process domain as a means to reflect on the science-policy nexus in regard to risks and multi-hazard impacts associated with these hazards. This will be accomplished through, first, a brief overview of the science-policy nexus, followed by a discussion of policy process frameworks, such as agenda setting and the multiple streams model, focusing events, and punctuated equilibrium, and their application and appropriateness to the problem of NEOs. How, too, for example, does NEO hazard and risk compare with other low probability, high risk, hazards in regard to public policy? Finally, we will reflect on the implications of alternative NEO "solutions" and the characterization of the NEO "problem," and the political and public acceptance of policy alternatives as a way to link NEO science and policy in the context of the overall NH9.12 panel.

  12. Pore-fluid effects on seismic waves in vertically fractured earth with orthotropic symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Berryman, J.G.

    2010-05-15

    For elastically noninteracting vertical-fracture sets at arbitrary orientation angles to each other, a detailed model is presented in which the resulting anisotropic fractured medium generally has orthorhombic symmetry overall. Some of the analysis methods and ideas of Schoenberg are emphasized, together with their connections to other similarly motivated and conceptually related methods by Sayers and Kachanov, among others. Examples show how parallel vertical-fracture sets having HTI (horizontal transversely isotropic) symmetry transform into orthotropic fractured media if some subsets of the vertical fractures are misaligned with the others, and then the fractured system can have VTI (vertical transversely isotropic) symmetry if all of the fractures are aligned randomly or half parallel and half perpendicular to a given vertical plane. An orthotropic example having vertical fractures in an otherwise VTI earth system (studied previously by Schoenberg and Helbig) is compared with the other examples treated and it is finally shown how fluids in the fractures affect the orthotropic poroelastic system response to seismic waves. The key result is that fracture-influence parameters are multiplied by a factor of (1-B), where 0 {le} B < 1 is Skempton's second coefficient for poroelastic media. Skempton's B coefficient is itself a measurable characteristic of fluid-saturated porous rocks, depending on porosity, solid moduli, and the pore-fluid bulk modulus. For heterogeneous porous media, connections between the present work and earlier related results of Brown and Korringa are also established.

  13. Review of magnetic properties and magnetocaloric effect in the intermetallic compounds of rare earth with low boiling point metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling-Wei, Li

    2016-03-01

    The magnetocaloric effect (MCE) in many rare earth (RE) based intermetallic compounds has been extensively investigated during the last two decades, not only due to their potential applications for magnetic refrigeration but also for better understanding of the fundamental problems of the materials. This paper reviews our recent progress on studying the magnetic properties and MCE in some binary or ternary intermetallic compounds of RE with low boiling point metal(s) (Zn, Mg, and Cd). Some of them exhibit promising MCE properties, which make them attractive for low temperature magnetic refrigeration. Characteristics of the magnetic transition, origin of large MCE, as well as the potential application of these compounds are thoroughly discussed. Additionally, a brief review of the magnetic and magnetocaloric properties in the quaternary rare earth nickel boroncarbides RENi2B2C superconductors is also presented. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11374081 and 11004044), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China (Grant Nos. N150905001, L1509006, and N140901001), the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science Postdoctoral Fellowships for Foreign Researchers (Grant No. P10060), and the Alexander von Humboldt (AvH) Foundation (Research stipend to L. Li).

  14. The effect of the charge exchange source on the velocity and 'temperature' distributions and their anisotropies in the earth's exosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, R. R., Jr.; Rohrbaugh, R. P.; Tinsley, B. A.

    1981-01-01

    The velocity distribution of atomic hydrogen in the earth's exosphere is calculated as a function of altitude and direction taking into account both the classic exobase source and the higher-altitude plasmaspheric charge exchange source. Calculations are performed on the basis of a Monte Carlo technique in which random ballistic trajectories of individual atoms are traced through a three-dimensional grid of audit zones, at which relative concentrations and momentum or energy fluxes are obtained. In the case of the classical exobase source alone, the slope of the velocity distribution is constant only for the upward radial velocity component and increases dramatically with altitude for the incoming radial and transverse velocity components, resulting in a temperature decrease. The charge exchange source, which produces the satellite hydrogen component and the hot ballistic and escape components of the exosphere, is found to enhance the wings of the velocity distributions, however this effect is not sufficient to overcome the temperature decreases at altitudes above one earth radius. The resulting global model of the hydrogen exosphere may be used as a realistic basis for radiative transfer calculations.

  15. The effect of the charge exchange source on the velocity and 'temperature' distributions and their anisotropies in the earth's exosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodges, R. R., Jr.; Rohrbaugh, R. P.; Tinsley, B. A.

    1981-08-01

    The velocity distribution of atomic hydrogen in the earth's exosphere is calculated as a function of altitude and direction taking into account both the classic exobase source and the higher-altitude plasmaspheric charge exchange source. Calculations are performed on the basis of a Monte Carlo technique in which random ballistic trajectories of individual atoms are traced through a three-dimensional grid of audit zones, at which relative concentrations and momentum or energy fluxes are obtained. In the case of the classical exobase source alone, the slope of the velocity distribution is constant only for the upward radial velocity component and increases dramatically with altitude for the incoming radial and transverse velocity components, resulting in a temperature decrease. The charge exchange source, which produces the satellite hydrogen component and the hot ballistic and escape components of the exosphere, is found to enhance the wings of the velocity distributions, however this effect is not sufficient to overcome the temperature decreases at altitudes above one earth radius. The resulting global model of the hydrogen exosphere may be used as a realistic basis for radiative transfer calculations.

  16. Effect of earthworms (Eisenia fetida) on the fractionation and bioavailability of rare earth elements in nine Chinese soils.

    PubMed

    Wen, Bei; Liu, Ying; Hu, Xiao-yu; Shan, Xiao-quan

    2006-05-01

    The effect of earthworm (Eisenia fetida) activity on soil pH, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), fraction distribution pattern and bioavailability of rare earth elements (REEs) Y, La, Ce, Pr and Nd in nine Chinese soils were investigated using pot experiments. A three-step extraction procedure recommended by the European Community (Standards, Measurements and Testing Programme) was used to fractionate REEs in soils into water soluble, exchangeable and carbonate bound (B1), Fe- and Mn-oxides bound (B2) and organic matter and sulfide bound (B3). Inoculated with earthworms, the soil pH, DOC and water-soluble rare earth elements fraction increased. A significant correlation was obtained between the increased DOC and the increased water-soluble REEs. REEs in fraction B1 increased after earthworm inoculation, while those in fraction B3 decreased. No significant differences were observed for REEs in fraction B2. The biomass and the concentrations of REEs in wheat shoots and roots increased after the treatment with earthworms. The results demonstrated that earthworm activity increased the mobility and bioavailability of REEs in soils. PMID:16289225

  17. Earth rotation: Solved and unsolved problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazenave, Anny

    The conference presents papers on reference systems and the observation of the earth's rotation parameters, historical and paleoobservations of the earth's rotation, short term atmospheric and oceanic effects, and mantle and core effects. Attention is given to celestial reference systems, polar motion and signal processing, observations of secular and decade changes in the earth's rotation, and tidal and nontidal acceleration of the earth's rotation. Other topics include high accuracy earth rotation and atmospheric angular momentum, ocean-atmosphere coupling and short term fluctuations of earth rotation, the influence of earthquakes on the polar motion, and the resonance effects of the earth's fluid core.

  18. The pressure-weakening effect in super-Earths: Consequences of a decrease in lower mantle viscosity on surface dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, C.; Finnenkötter, A.; Lowman, J. P.; Hansen, U.

    2011-11-01

    The quest to identify habitable planets has raised interest in the surface dynamics of terrestrial bodies. In this context super-Earths (a new class of exoplanets) have become of special interest in the past decade. Scalings to super-Earth sizes, when compared to the Earth, suggest changes to convective stresses and mantle temperatures which can cause either an increase in surface mobility or in plate resistance. Mantle viscosity, which depends on temperature, stress and pressure, plays a critical role in both cases. New mineralogical assumptions suggest that the viscosity in super-Earths acts differently than in the Earth, and what had been assumed for super-Earths. In planets larger than the Earth, pressure will become so high that pressure-weakening and a decrease of viscosity in the lowermost mantle results. We present a numerical convection study featuring this viscosity decrease and find that this leads to a reduction in surface mobility.

  19. Effects of X-ray flares on the aeronomy of Mars: Simultaneous measurements of ionospheric effects of X-ray flares on Earth and Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haider, Syed A.; Machado Santos, Angela; Abdu, Mangalathayil A.; Batista, Inez S.; Shah, Siddhi Y.; Thirupathaiah, P.

    2016-07-01

    MIRI: Validation and Testing Requirements We have studied X-ray aeronomy in the ionospheric E region of Mars during six X-ray flares that occurred on 28 March and 6 April, 2001; 17,18 March and 21 April, 2003 and 19 February, 2005 respectively. These flares were responded by the corresponding electron density profiles of Mars Global Surveyor (MGS). The time series of photoionization rate, photoelectron impact ionization rate, photoelectron flux, ion density, electron density and total Electron Content (TEC) are predicted for each flare day. The estimated production rate, flux and densities are increased by 1-2 orders of magnitude due to effects of these flares in the E region ionosphere of Mars. The normalized estimated TEC are compared with the normalized measured TEC of MGS profiles. At the peak flare time the normalized estimated and normalized measured TEC were enhanced by a factor of 5-10 and 2 respectively. The effects of these flares were also registered in the D region equatorial ionosphere of Earth at Fortaleza observatory. The flares of 6 April, 2001, 17 March and 21 April, 2003 also produced electron density enhancement in the E region ionosphere of Earth at College AK and Cachoeira Paulista observatories. The minimum frequency fmin, recorded in ionogram, increased by 100% (due to D region absorption) while the foE increased by 20%, in the Earth's ionosphere.

  20. Radiation Protection Effectiveness of Polymeric Based Shielding Materials at Low Earth Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badavi, Francis F.; Stewart-Sloan, Charlotte R.; Wilson, John W.; Adams, Daniel O.

    2008-01-01

    Correlations of limited ionizing radiation measurements onboard the Space Transportation System (STS; shuttle) and the International Space Station (ISS) with numerical simulations of charged particle transport through spacecraft structure have indicated that usage of hydrogen rich polymeric materials improves the radiation shielding performance of space structures as compared to the traditionally used aluminum alloys. We discuss herein the radiation shielding correlations between measurements on board STS-81 (Atlantis, 1997) using four polyethylene (PE) spheres of varying radii, and STS-89 (Endeavour, 1998) using aluminum alloy spheres; with numerical simulations of charged particle transport using the Langley Research Center (LaRC)-developed High charge (Z) and Energy TRaNsport (HZETRN) algorithm. In the simulations, the Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) component of the ionizing radiation environment at Low Earth Orbit (LEO) covering ions in the 1< or equals Z< or equals 28 range is represented by O'Neill's (2004) model. To compute the transmission coefficient for GCR ions at LEO, O'Neill's model is coupled with the angular dependent LaRC cutoff model. The trapped protons/electrons component of LEO environment is represented by a LaRC-developed time dependent procedure which couples the AP8min/AP8max, Deep River Neutron Monitor (DRNM) and F10.7 solar radio frequency measurements. The albedo neutron environment resulting from interaction of GCR ions with upper atmosphere is modeled through extrapolation of the Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation (AIR) measurements. With the validity of numerical simulations through correlation with PE and aluminum spheres measurements established, we further present results from the expansion of the simulations through the selection of high hydrogen content commercially available polymeric constituents such as PE foam core and Spectra fiber(Registered TradeMark) composite face sheet to assess their radiation shield properties as compared to

  1. Ion Temperatures in Earth's Inner Magnetosphere: Ring Current Dynamics, Transient Effects, and Data-Model Comparisons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elfritz, Justin G.

    Earth's magnetosphere is an inherently complex, strongly nonlinear system with intrinsic coupling between internal and external drivers. In general, magnetospheric systems can be understood as a balance between multiple regions which all exhibit unique plasma properties. The feedback processes between each region depend on geomagnetic activity levels and the preceding states of the solar wind and the respective magnetospheric regions. Of particular interest is understanding how ion temperatures evolve during geomagnetically active periods, and also understanding the space weather impacts of hot ion populations injected during such periods. Dynamic, spatiotemporally resolved ion temperature boundary conditions have been implemented into the Comprehensive Ring Current Model (CRCM); the temperatures are based on 2-D equatorial maps derived from remotely imaged energetic neutral atom (ENA) measurements. The high-speed-stream-driven event on 22 July 2009 and the coronal mass ejection-driven event on 30-31 October 2013 are simulated and compared against identical simulations using a statistically derived boundary condition model. This new method for establishing boundary conditions allows users to include event-specific observations associated with a dynamic plasma sheet. It is found that spatial and energy distributions in the storm-time ring current exhibit sensitive dependence on boundary conditions during these events. The coupling of boundary conditions to the time history of the convection electric field strength is found to play an important role in throttling the influence of the boundary plasma on the inner magnetosphere. Storm-time dusk-dawn asymmetries consistent with observational data are reproduced well when CRCM is provided with the event-specific boundary condition model. The dependence of average, global magnetospheric ion temperatures derived from ENA maps is also investigated as a function of various combinations of solar wind parameters, IMF

  2. Origin of “memory glass” effect in pressure-amorphized rare-earth molybdate single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Willinger, Elena; Sinitsyn, Vitaly; Khasanov, Salavat; Redkin, Boris; Shmurak, Semeon; Ponyatovsky, Eugeny

    2015-02-15

    The memory glass effect (MGE) describes the ability of some materials to recover the initial structure and crystallographic orientation after pressure-induced amorphization (PIA). In spite of numerous studies the nature and underlying mechanisms of this phenomenon are still not clear. Here we report investigations of MGE in β′-Eu{sub 2}(MoO{sub 4}){sub 3} single crystal samples subjected to high pressure amorphization. Using the XRD and TEM techniques we carried out detailed analysis of the structural state of high pressure treated single crystal samples as well as structural transformations due to subsequent annealing at atmospheric pressure. The structure of the sample has been found to be complex, mainly amorphous, however, the amorphous medium contains evenly distributed nanosize inclusions of a paracrystalline phase. The inclusions are highly correlated in orientation and act as “memory units” in the MGE. - Graphical abstract: Schematic representation of pressure-induced amorphization and “memory glass” effect in rare-earth molybdate single crystals. The XRD and TEM measurements have revealed the presence of the residual identically oriented paracrystalline nanodomains in the pressure-amorphized state. These domains preserve the information about initial structure and orientation of the sample. They act as memory units and crystalline seeds during transformation of the amorphous phase back to the starting single crystalline one. - Highlights: • Pressure-amorphized Eu{sub 2}(MoO4){sub 3} single crystals were studied ex-situ by XRD and TEM. • Tiny residual crystalline inclusions were found in amorphous matrix of sample. • The inclusions keep in memory the parent crystal structure and orientation. • The inclusions account for “memory glass” effect in rare-earth molibdates.

  3. The Effect of Microgravity on the Smallest Space Travelers: Bacterial Physiology and Virulence on Earth and in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pyle, Barry; Vasques, Marilyn; Aquilina, Rudy (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Since the first human flights outside of Earth's gravity, crew health and well-being have been major concerns. Exposure to microgravity during spaceflight is known to affect the human immune response, possibly making the crew members more vulnerable to infectious disease. In addition, biological experiments previously flown in space have shown that bacteria grow faster in microgravity than they do on Earth. The ability of certain antibiotics to control bacterial infections may also differ greatly in microgravity. It is therefore critical to understand how spaceflight and microgravity affect bacterial virulence, which is their ability to cause disease. By utilizing spaceflight hardware provided by the European Space Agency (ESA), Dr. Barry Pyle and his team at Montana State University, Bozeman, will be performing an experiment to study the effects of microgravity on the virulence of a common soil and water bacterium, Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Importantly, these bacteria have been detected in the water supplies of previous Space Shuttle flights. The experiment will examine the effects of microgravity exposure on bacterial growth and on the bacterium's ability to form a toxin called Exotoxin A. Another goal is to evaluate the effects of microgravity on the physiology of the bacteria by analyzing their ability to respire (produce energy), by studying the condition of the plasma membrane surrounding the cell, and by determining if specific enzymes remain active. Proteins produced by the bacteria will also be assayed to see if the normal functions of the bacteria are affected. In the context of human life support in spaceflight, the results of this experiment will offer guidance in providing the highest possible water quality for the Shuttle in order to limit the risk of infection to human occupants and to minimize water system and spacecraft deterioration.

  4. Digital Earth - A sustainable Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahavir

    2014-02-01

    All life, particularly human, cannot be sustainable, unless complimented with shelter, poverty reduction, provision of basic infrastructure and services, equal opportunities and social justice. Yet, in the context of cities, it is believed that they can accommodate more and more people, endlessly, regardless to their carrying capacity and increasing ecological footprint. The 'inclusion', for bringing more and more people in the purview of development is often limited to social and economic inclusion rather than spatial and ecological inclusion. Economic investment decisions are also not always supported with spatial planning decisions. Most planning for a sustainable Earth, be at a level of rural settlement, city, region, national or Global, fail on the capacity and capability fronts. In India, for example, out of some 8,000 towns and cities, Master Plans exist for only about 1,800. A chapter on sustainability or environment is neither statutorily compulsory nor a norm for these Master Plans. Geospatial technologies including Remote Sensing, GIS, Indian National Spatial Data Infrastructure (NSDI), Indian National Urban Information Systems (NUIS), Indian Environmental Information System (ENVIS), and Indian National GIS (NGIS), etc. have potential to map, analyse, visualize and take sustainable developmental decisions based on participatory social, economic and social inclusion. Sustainable Earth, at all scales, is a logical and natural outcome of a digitally mapped, conceived and planned Earth. Digital Earth, in fact, itself offers a platform to dovetail the ecological, social and economic considerations in transforming it into a sustainable Earth.

  5. Earth Algebra.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaufele, Christopher; Zumoff, Nancy

    Earth Algebra is an entry level college algebra course that incorporates the spirit of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) Curriculum and Evaluation Standards for School Mathematics at the college level. The context of the course places mathematics at the center of one of the major current concerns of the world. Through…

  6. Rare earths

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gambogi, J.

    2013-01-01

    Global mine production of rare earths was estimated to have declined slightly in 2012 relative to 2011 (Fig. 1). Production in China was estimated to have decreased to 95 from 105 kt (104,700 from 115,700 st) in 2011, while new mine production in the United States and Australia increased.

  7. Think Earth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niedermeyer, Fred; Ice, Kay

    1992-01-01

    Describes a series of environmental education instructional units for grades K-6 developed by the Think Earth Consortium that cover topics such as conservation, pollution control, and waste reduction. Provides testimony from one sixth-grade teacher that field tested the second-grade unit. (MDH)

  8. Effect Of The Radiation Pressure On Planetary Exospheres: Analytical Approach And Application To Earth, Mars and Hot Jupiters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beth, A.; Garnier, P.; Toublanc, D.; Dandouras, I. S.; Mazelle, C. X.

    2015-12-01

    The atomic Hydrogen is one of the most abundant species in many planetary exospheres, such as on Earth, on planets in the Solar System and on Hot Jupiters. Because the exosphere is a quasi-collisionless medium, the atomic Hydrogen can reach several planetary radii without collisions and its motion is only determined by external forces such as the gravity and the radiation pressure. However, the exosphere still remains a complex medium : 1) to model because, on one hand, this is a region of interaction between the interplanetary medium and the planetary atmosphere and, on another hand, the fluid approach is not appropriate and a kinetic should be used instead, 2) to observe because of the extremely low densities. Currently, the most used analytical model to determine the neutral density profiles is the well-known Chamberlain's one, which however includes only the gravity. We have developed an analytical model based on the previous work by Bishop and Chamberlain (1989) with a Hamiltonian approach, taking into account both the gravity and the radiation pressure. We extend their previous 1D model (density profiles on the Sun-planet axis only) into a 2D model depending on the distance from the planet and the zenith angle to derive density profiles (Beth et al. 2015b, in review). Moreover, we derived an analytical formula for the thermal escape to compare with the classical Jeans' escape flux. We thus show that the radiation pressure induces : Strong density asymmetries at high altitudes in the planetary exospheres, leading to the phenomenon of "geotail" at Earth, Natural existence of an external limit (or exopause) for the exosphere, whose location is analytically determined, Increase of the exospheric densities compared with Chamberlain profiles without radiation pressure (e.g. up to +150% at 5 Martian radius), Significant increase of the thermal escape flux (up to 30/35% for Earth/Mars today), until a "blow-off" regime with a constant escape flux for an extreme

  9. Diapirism on Venus and the Early Earth and The thermal effect of fluid flows in AECL's Tunnel Sealing Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robin, Catherine M. I.

    2010-12-01

    Flow instabilities occur at all scales in planetary systems. In this thesis we examine three cases of such instabilities, on three very different length scales. In the first part, we test the idea that Archean granite-greenstone belts (GGBs) form by crustal diapirism, or Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities. GGBs are characterized by large granitic domes (50-100 km in diameter) embedded in narrow keel-shaped greenstones. They are ubiquitous in Archean (> 2.5 Ga) terrains, but rare thereafter. We performed finite element calculations for a visco-elastic, temperature-dependent, non-Newtonian crust under conditions appropriate for the Archean, which show that dense low-viscosity volcanics overlying a felsic basement will overturn diapirically in as little as 10 Ma, displacing as much as 60 % of the volcanics to the lower crust. This surprisingly fast overturn rate suggests that diapiric overturn dominated crustal tectonics in the hot conditions of the Early Earth, becoming less important as the Earth cooled. Moreover, the deposition of large volumes of wet basaltic volcanics to the lower crust may provide the source for the formation of the distinctly Archean granitic rocks which dominate Earth's oldest continents. The second part examines the origin of Venusian coronae, circular volcanic features unique to Venus. Coronae are thought to result from small instabilities (diapirs) from the core-mantle boundary, which are typical of stagnant-lid convection. However, most young coronae are located in a region surrounded by long-lived hotspots, typical of a more active style of mantle convection. Using analogue experiments in corn syrup heated from below, we show that the co-existence of diapirs and long-lived mantle plumes are a direct consequence of the catastrophic overturn of the cold Venusian lithosphere thought to have occurred ˜ 700 Ma ago. In the last part we analyze the thermal effect of fluid flow through a full-scale experiment testing clay and concrete tunnel seals in

  10. Physico-chemical property of rare earths-effects on the energy regulation of photosystem II in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Xiaoqing, Liu; Hao, Huang; Chao, Liu; Min, Zhou; Fashui, Hong

    2009-08-01

    Photosystem II (PSII) from Arabidopsis thaliana treated by lanthanum (La(3+)), cerium (Ce(3+)), and neodymium (Nd(3+)) were isolated to investigate the effects of 4f electron characteristics and alternation valence of rare earth elements (REEs) on PSII function regulation comparatively. Results showed that REE treatment could induce the generous expression of LhcII b in A. thaliana and increase the content of light-harvesting complex II and its trimer on the thylakoid membrane significantly. Meanwhile, the light absorption in the red and blue region and fluorescence quantum yield near 683 nm were obviously increased; oxygen evolution rate was greatly improved too, suggesting that REEs could enhance the efficiency of light absorption, regulate excitation energy distribution from photosystem I (PSI) to PSII, and thus increase the activity of photochemical reaction and oxygen evolution accordingly. The efficiency order of the four treatments was Ce(3+) > Nd(3+) > La(3+) > control.

  11. The effect of the low Earth orbit environment on space solar cells: Results of the advanced photovoltaic experiment (S0014)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinker, David J.; Hickey, John R.

    1992-01-01

    The Advanced Photovoltaic Experiment (APEX), containing over 150 solar cells and sensors, was designed to generate laboratory reference standards as well as to explore the durability of a wide variety of space solar cells. Located on the leading edge of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF), APEX received the maximum possible dosage of atomic oxygen and ultraviolet radiation, as well as enormous numbers of impacts from micrometeoroids and debris. The effect of the low earth orbital (LEO) environment on the solar cells and materials of APEX will be discussed in this paper. The on-orbit performance of the solar cells, as well as a comparison of pre- and postflight laboratory performance measurements, will be presented.

  12. Global effects of transmitted shock wave propagation through the Earth's inner magnetosphere: First results from 3-D hybrid kinetic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipatov, A. S.; Sibeck, D. G.

    2016-09-01

    We use a new hybrid kinetic model to simulate the response of ring current, outer radiation belt, and plasmaspheric particle populations to impulsive interplanetary shocks. Since particle distributions attending the interplanetary shock waves and in the ring current and radiation belts are non-Maxwellian, wave-particle interactions play a crucial role in energy transport within the inner magnetosphere. Finite gyroradius effects become important in mass loading the shock waves with the background plasma in the presence of higher energy ring current and radiation belt ions and electrons. Initial results show that shocks cause strong deformations in the global structure of the ring current, radiation belt, and plasmasphere. The ion velocity distribution functions at the shock front, in the ring current, and in the radiation belt help us determine energy transport through the Earth's inner magnetosphere.

  13. The latitude dependence of the variance of zonally averaged quantities. [in polar meteorology with attention to geometrical effects of earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    North, G. R.; Bell, T. L.; Cahalan, R. F.; Moeng, F. J.

    1982-01-01

    Geometric characteristics of the spherical earth are shown to be responsible for the increase of variance with latitude of zonally averaged meteorological statistics. An analytic model is constructed to display the effect of a spherical geometry on zonal averages, employing a sphere labeled with radial unit vectors in a real, stochastic field expanded in complex spherical harmonics. The variance of a zonally averaged field is found to be expressible in terms of the spectrum of the vector field of the spherical harmonics. A maximum variance is then located at the poles, and the ratio of the variance to the zonally averaged grid-point variance, weighted by the cosine of the latitude, yields the zonal correlation typical of the latitude. An example is provided for the 500 mb level in the Northern Hemisphere compared to 15 years of data. Variance is determined to increase north of 60 deg latitude.

  14. Application of resistivity monitoring to evaluate cement grouting effect in earth filled dam

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jin-Mo; Yoon, Wang-Jung

    2015-03-10

    In this paper, we applied electrical resistivity monitoring method to evaluate the cement grouting effect. There are a lot of ways to evaluate cement grouting effect. In order to do this evaluation in a great safety, high efficiency, and lower cost, resistivity monitoring is found to be the most appropriate technique. In this paper we have selected a dam site from Korea to acquire resistivity monitoring data and compare the results of inversion to estimate the cement grouting effect.

  15. Capturing near-Earth asteroids around Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasnain, Zaki; Lamb, Christopher A.; Ross, Shane D.

    2012-12-01

    The list of detected near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) is constantly growing. NEAs are likely targets for resources to support space industrialization, as they may be the least expensive source of certain needed raw materials. The limited supply of precious metals and semiconducting elements on Earth may be supplemented or even replaced by the reserves floating in the form of asteroids around the solar system. Precious metals make up a significant fraction NEAs by mass, and even one metallic asteroid of ˜1km size and fair enrichment in platinum-group metals would contain twice the tonnage of such metals already harvested on Earth. There are ˜1000 NEAs with a diameter of greater than 1 km. Capturing these asteroids around the Earth would expand the mining industry into an entirely new dimension. Having such resources within easy reach in Earth's orbit could provide an off-world environmentally friendly remedy for impending terrestrial shortages, especially given the need for raw materials in developing nations. In this paper, we develop and implement a conceptually simple algorithm to determine trajectory characteristics necessary to move NEAs into capture orbits around the Earth. Altered trajectories of asteroids are calculated using an ephemeris model. Only asteroids of eccentricity less than 0.1 have been studied and the model is restricted to the ecliptic plane for simplicity. We constrain the time of retrieval to be 10 years or less, based on considerations of the time to return on investment. For the heliocentric phase, constant acceleration is assumed. The acceleration required for transporting these asteroids from their undisturbed orbits to the sphere of influence of the Earth is the primary output, along with the impulse or acceleration necessary to effect capture to a bound orbit once the Earth's sphere of influence is reached. The initial guess for the constant acceleration is provided by a new estimation method, similar in spirit to Edelbaum's. Based on the

  16. The Effects of Stratospheric Chemistry and Transport on the Isotopic Compositions of Long-Lived Gases Measured at Earth's Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanu, A. M.; Boering, K. A.

    2014-12-01

    The isotopic compositions of a number of long-lived gases in Earth's atmosphere, including those for carbon dioxide (δ18O, Δ17O, and Δ14C), nitrous oxide (δ15N, δ15Nα, and δ18O), methane (δ13C and δD), and molecular hydrogen (δD) undergo large changes in the stratosphere. These changes arise from the often unique photochemical isotope fractionation occurring there as well as the long residence times and mean ages of stratospheric air with respect to exchange with the troposphere of up to 5 years. Stratospheric air then returns to the troposphere and, in each case, can affect the isotopic composition of these gases measured at Earth's surface. In this work, we estimate the effect of stratospheric isotope fractionation on free tropospheric isotope compositions of CO2, N2O, CH4, and H2 on an annual and global mean basis. To do so, we calculate net isotope fluxes between the stratosphere and troposphere empirically from the correlation of the measured isotope compositions of these species with measured N2O mixing ratios on whole air samples collected in the stratosphere from stratospheric aircraft and balloons coupled with independent information on the global, annually-averaged loss rate of N2O. In each case, the effect is large enough to include in global models. In addition, we present arguments and evidence that deconvolving the stratospheric influence on surface measurements from source (or other) signals on higher spatial and temporal scales than 'global' and 'annually-averaged' is also necessary when using surface measurements of isotopic compositions to constrain the magnitudes and geographic distributions of the sources of these gases to the atmosphere.

  17. Earth meandering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asadiyan, H.; Zamani, A.

    2009-04-01

    In this paper we try to put away current Global Tectonic Model to look the tectonic evolution of the earth from new point of view. Our new dynamic model is based on study of river meandering (RM) which infer new concept as Earth meandering(EM). In a universal gravitational field if we consider a clockwise spiral galaxy model rotate above Ninety East Ridge (geotectonic axis GA), this system with applying torsion field (likes geomagnetic field) in side direction from Rocky Mt. (west geotectonic pole WGP) to Tibetan plateau TP (east geotectonic pole EGP),it seems that pulled mass from WGP and pushed it in EGP due to it's rolling dynamics. According to this idea we see in topographic map that North America and Green land like a tongue pulled from Pacific mouth toward TP. Actually this system rolled or meander the earth over itself fractaly from small scale to big scale and what we see in the river meandering and Earth meandering are two faces of one coin. River transport water and sediments from high elevation to lower elevation and also in EM, mass transport from high altitude-Rocky Mt. to lower altitude Himalaya Mt. along 'S' shape geodetic line-optimum path which connect points from high altitude to lower altitude as kind of Euler Elastica(EE). These curves are responsible for mass spreading (source) and mass concentration (sink). In this regard, tiltness of earth spin axis plays an important role, 'S' are part of sigmoidal shape which formed due to intersection of Earth rolling with the Earth glob and actual feature of transform fault and river meandering. Longitudinal profile in mature rivers as a part of 'S' curve also is a kind of EE. 'S' which bound the whole earth is named S-1(S order 1) and cube corresponding to this which represent Earth fracturing in global scale named C-1(cube order 1 or side vergence cube SVC), C-1 is a biggest cycle of spiral polygon, so it is not completely closed and it has separation about diameter of C-7. Inside SVC we introduce cone

  18. The definition of the low earth orbital environment and its effect on thermal control materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durcanin, J. T.; Chalmers, D. R.; Visentine, J. T.

    1987-01-01

    The LEO environment and its effects on thermal-control materials (TCMs) being evaluated for use in long-term-mission space structures such as the Space Station are characterized, summarizing the results of recent space and laboratory experiments. Factors examined include atomic oxygen (a serious problem out to 600-700 km), ionizing radiation, solar UV radiation, solid particles (manmade debris and micrometeoroids, a significant hazard out to about 1000 km), and synergistic effects. Numerical data on the expected intensity of these effects for the different Space Station components, the resistance of specific TCMs to the effects, and the effectiveness of protective coatings are compiled in extensive tables and illustrated with diagrams, graphs, and micrographs.

  19. Magnetoelastic effects in rare-earth vanadates YbVO{sub 4} and HoVO{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Kazei, Z. A. Chanieva, R. I.

    2006-02-15

    Magnetoelastic anomalies in the thermal expansion and Young modulus, as well as the {delta}E-effect in rare-earth vanadates RVO{sub 4} (R = Ho, Yb), are investigated experimentally and theoretically. A considerable softening of the Young modulus is observed for HoVO{sub 4} and YbVO{sub 4} at T < 70 K and T < 150 K, respectively; this effect is adequately described in the framework of the generalized susceptibility formalism. It is shown that the field dependences of the {delta}E-effect and their temperature variation in YbVO{sub 4} can also be described using this approach. To compare with experiment, the magnetoelastic contributions to the Young modulus of an isotropic polycrystal from various elastic modes have been averaged. For the Yb vanadate, considerable magnetoelastic anomalies in the thermal expansion along the tetragonal a and c axes have been discovered. The magnetoelastic contributions are used for determining completely symmetric magnetoelastic coefficients; the role of the completely symmetric quadrupole constant for magnetoelastic effects is analyzed.

  20. Simulation of the synergistic low Earth orbit effects of vacuum thermal cycling, vacuum UV radiation, and atomic oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dever, Joyce A.; Degroh, Kim K.; Stidham, Curtis R.; Stueber, Thomas J.; Dever, Therese M.; Rodriguez, Elvin; Terlep, Judith A.

    1992-01-01

    In order to assess the low Earth orbit (LEO) durability of candidate space materials, it is necessary to use ground laboratory facilities which provide LEO environmental effects. A facility combining vacuum thermal cycling and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation has been designed and constructed at NASA Lewis Research Center for this purpose. This facility can also be operated without the VUV lamps. An additional facility can be used to provide VUV exposure only. By utilizing these facilities, followed by atomic oxygen exposure in an RF plasma asher, the effects of the individual vacuum thermal cycling and VUV environments can be compared to the effect of the combined vacuum thermal cycling/VUV environment on the atomic oxygen durability of materials. The synergistic effects of simulated LEO environmental conditions on materials were evaluated by first exposing materials to vacuum thermal cycling, VUV, and vacuum thermal cycling/VUV environments followed by exposure to atomic oxygen in an RP plasma asher. Candidate space power materials such as atomic oxygen protected polyimides and solar concentrator mirrors were evaluated using these facilities. Characteristics of the Vacuum Thermal Cycling/VUV Exposure Facility which simulates the temperature sequences and solar ultraviolet radiation exposure that would be experienced by a spacecraft surface in LEO are discussed. Results of durability evaluations of some candidate space power materials to the simulated LEO environmental conditions will also be discussed. Such results have indicated that for some materials, atomic oxygen durability is affected by previous exposure to thermal cycling and/or VUV exposure.

  1. The Hohmann-Parker effect measured by the Mars Science Laboratory on the transfer from Earth to Mars: Consequences and opportunities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posner, A.; Odstrĉil, D.; MacNeice, P.; Rastaetter, L.; Zeitlin, C.; Heber, B.; Elliott, H.; Frahm, R. A.; Hayes, J. J. E.; von Rosenvinge, T. T.; Christian, E. R.; Andrews, J. P.; Beaujean, R.; Böttcher, S.; Brinza, D. E.; Bullock, M. A.; Burmeister, S.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Ehresmann, B.; Epperly, M.; Grinspoon, D.; Guo, J.; Hassler, D. M.; Kim, M.-H.; Köhler, J.; Kortmann, O.; Martin Garcia, C.; Müller-Mellin, R.; Neal, K.; Rafkin, S. C. R.; Reitz, G.; Seimetz, L.; Smith, K. D.; Tyler, Y.; Weigle, E.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.

    2013-12-01

    We show that a spacecraft launched from Earth towards Mars following a Hohmann minimum energy transfer trajectory has a strong tendency to remain well-connected magnetically to Earth, in the early phase of the transfer, or to Mars in the late phase, via the Parker spiral magnetic field. On the return trip, the spacecraft would remain reasonably well-connected magnetically first to Mars and later to Earth. Moreover, good magnetic connectivity occurs on all Hohmann transfers between neighboring planets in the inner solar system out to Mars. We call this hitherto unnamed circumstance the Hohmann-Parker effect. We show consequences of the effect by means of simultaneous cosmic radiation proxy observations made near Earth, near Mars, and at the Mars Science Laboratory on the transfer from Earth to Mars in 2011/2012. We support the observations with simulations of the large-scale magnetic field of the inner heliosphere during this period and compare the results with our predictions. The implications of the Hohmann-Parker effect are discussed.

  2. The Hohmann-Parker Effect and its Consequences Measured by the Mars Science Laboratory on the Transfer from Earth to Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posner, A.; Odstrcil, D.; MacNeice, P. J.; Rastaetter, L.; Zeitlin, C. J.; Elliott, H. A.; Frahm, R. A.; Hayes, J. J.; von Rosenvinge, T. T.; Christian, E. R.; Andrews, J.; Brinza, D.; Epperly, M. E.; Neal, K.; Seimetz, L.; Smith, K. D.; Tyler, Y.; Weigle, E.

    2013-12-01

    We show that a spacecraft launched from Earth towards Mars following a Hohmann minimum energy transfer trajectory has a strong tendency to remain well-connected magnetically to Earth, in the early phase of the transfer, or to Mars in the late phase, via the Parker spiral magnetic field. On the return trip, the spacecraft would remain reasonably well-connected first to Mars and later to Earth. Moreover, good magnetic connectivity occurs on all Hohmann transfers between neighboring planets in the inner solar system out to Mars. We call this hitherto unnamed circumstance the Hohmann-Parker effect. We show consequences of the effect by means of simultaneous cosmic radiation proxy observations made near Earth, near Mars, and at the Mars Science Laboratory on the transfer from Earth to Mars in 2011/2012. We support the observations with simulations of the large-scale magnetic field of the inner heliosphere during this period and compare the results with our predictions. The implications of the Hohmann-Parker effect are discussed. MSL RAD Science Team: R. Beaujean, S. Boettcher, M. Bullock, S. Burmeister, F. A. Cucinotta, B. Ehresmann, D. Grinspoon, J. Guo, D. M. Hassler, M.-H. Kim, J. Koehler, O. Kortmann, C. Martin-Garcia, S. C. R. Rafkin, G. Reitz, and R. F. Wimmer-Schweingruber SOHO EPHIN Science Team: B. Heber, R. Mueller-Mellin

  3. Effect of polynucleotides on the dimerization of glycine. [abiological protein synthesis in primitive earth conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizutani, H.; Ponnamperuma, C.

    1981-01-01

    Results from experiments to determine the effect of polynucleotides on abiological formation of peptide bonds are reported. The reaction between glycine molecules in an aqueous phase in the presence of a condensing agent was chosen as a model, with polyphosphates being selected as the condensing agent for biologically relevant peptide formation. Four types of polynucleotides were used: polygluanic acid (G), polyuridic acid (U), polyadenylic acid (A), and polycytidylic acid (C); the effects of small anions, acetate, chloride, and phosphate, were also studied. Procedures are given, including concentrations, pH, and incubation time, and the type of amino acid analyzer. The diglycine yields were, in order of most to least: G, C, A, U, and are diagrammed as a function of time; rate of formation followed the same order of magnitude as the final yields. Anion presence displayed no discernible effect. The results are taken to indicate that polynucleotides do have an effect on the formation of peptide bonds, an effect significant in the understanding of chemical evolution.

  4. Superposed epoch study of ICME sub-structures near Earth and their effects on Galactic cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masías-Meza, J. J.; Dasso, S.; Démoulin, P.; Rodriguez, L.; Janvier, M.

    2016-08-01

    Context. Interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) are the interplanetary manifestations of solar eruptions. The overtaken solar wind forms a sheath of compressed plasma at the front of ICMEs. Magnetic clouds (MCs) are a subset of ICMEs with specific properties (e.g. the presence of a flux rope). When ICMEs pass near Earth, ground observations indicate that the flux of Galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) decreases. Aims: The main aims of this paper are to find common plasma and magnetic properties of different ICME sub-structures and which ICME properties affect the flux of GCRs near Earth. Methods: We used a superposed epoch method applied to a large set of ICMEs observed in situ by the spacecraft ACE, between 1998 and 2006. We also applied a superposed epoch analysis on GCRs time series observed with the McMurdo neutron monitors. Results: We find that slow MCs at 1 AU have on average more massive sheaths. We conclude that this is because they are more effectively slowed down by drag during their travel from the Sun. Slow MCs also have a more symmetric magnetic field and sheaths expanding similarly as their following MC, while in contrast, fast MCs have an asymmetric magnetic profile and a sheath in compression. In all types of MCs, we find that the proton density and the temperature and the magnetic fluctuations can diffuse within the front of the MC due to 3D reconnection. Finally, we derive a quantitative model that describes the decrease in cosmic rays as a function of the amount of magnetic fluctuations and field strength. Conclusions: The obtained typical profiles of sheath, MC and GCR properties corresponding to slow, middle, and fast ICMEs, can be used for forecasting or modelling these events, and to better understand the transport of energetic particles in ICMEs. They are also useful for improving future operative space weather activities.

  5. Effect of Rare Earth Elements (Er, Ho) on Semi-Metallic Materials (ScN) in an Applied Electric Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Hyunjung; Park, Yeonjoon; King, Glen C.; Lee, Kunik; Choi, Sang H.

    2012-01-01

    The development of materials and fabrication technology for field-controlled spectrally active optics is essential for applications such as membrane optics, filters for LIDARs, windows for sensors, telescopes, spectroscopes, cameras and flat-panel displays. The dopants of rare earth elements, in a host of optical systems, create a number of absorption and emission band structures and can easily be incorporated into many high quality crystalline and amorphous hosts. In wide band-gap semiconductors like ScN, the existing deep levels can capture or emit the mobile charges, and can be ionized with the loss or capture of the carriers which are the fundamental basis of concept for smart optic materials. The band gap shrinkage or splitting with dopants supports the possibility of this concept. In the present work, a semi-metallic material (ScN) was doped with rare earth elements (Er, Ho) and tested under an applied electric field to characterize spectral and refractive index shifts by either Stark or Zeeman Effect. These effects can be verified using the UV-Vis spectroscopy, the Hall Effect measurement and the ellipsometric spectroscopy. The optical band gaps of ScN doped with Er and doped with Ho were experimentally estimated as 2.33eV and 2.24eV ( 0.2eV) respectively. This is less than that of undoped ScN (2.5 0.2eV). The red-shifted absorption onset is a direct evidence for the decrease of band gap energy (Eg), and the broadening of valence band states is attributable to the doping cases. A decrease in refractive index with an applied field was observed as a small shift in absorption coefficient using a variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometer. In the presence of an electric field, mobile carriers are redistributed within the space charge region (SCR) to produce this electro-refractive effect. The shift in refractive index is also affected by the density and location of deep potential wells within the SCR. In addition, the microstructure change was observed by a TEM

  6. Effect of rare earth elements (Er, Ho) on semi-metallic materials (ScN) in an applied electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyunjung; Park, Yeonjoon; King, Glen C.; Lee, Kunik; Choi, Sang H.

    2012-04-01

    The development of materials and fabrication technology for field-controlled spectrally active optics is essential for applications such as membrane optics, filters for LIDARs, windows for sensors, telescopes, spectroscopes, cameras and flat-panel displays. The dopants of rare earth elements, in a host of optical systems, create a number of absorption and emission band structures and can easily be incorporated into many high quality crystalline and amorphous hosts. In wide band-gap semiconductors like ScN, the existing deep levels can capture or emit the mobile charges, and can be ionized with the loss or capture of the carriers which are the fundamental basis of concept for smart optic materials. The band gap shrinkage or splitting with dopants supports the possibility of this concept. In the present work, a semi-metallic material (ScN) was doped with rare earth elements (Er, Ho) and tested under an applied electric field to characterize spectral and refractive index shifts by either Stark or Zeeman Effect. These effects can be verified using the UV-Vis spectroscopy, the Hall Effect measurement and the ellipsometric spectroscopy. The optical band gaps of ScN doped with Er and doped with Ho were experimentally estimated as 2.33eV and 2.24eV (+/-0.2eV) respectively. This is less than that of undoped ScN (2.5+/-0.2eV). The red-shifted absorption onset is a direct evidence for the decrease of band gap energy (Eg), and the broadening of valence band states is attributable to the doping cases. A decrease in refractive index with an applied field was observed as a small shift in absorption coefficient using a variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometer. In the presence of an electric field, mobile carriers are redistributed within the space charge region (SCR) to produce this electro-refractive effect. The shift in refractive index is also affected by the density and location of deep potential wells within the SCR. In addition, the microstructure change was observed by a

  7. The effect of gender on the attitudes of undergraduates toward young-earth creationism after enrollment in an origins course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinaja, Sean Stephen

    Many Christian students graduate from secondary schools and enter Christian colleges with worldviews that are unbiblical or contain unbiblical components, many of which stem from their beliefs regarding origins. Little research has been done to study the effect of gender on the role of a young-earth creationist (YEC) origins course in shaping students' worldview. Research has shown that males and females respond differently to science and religion instruction; because the origins discussion is an intersection of science and religion, the study of gender's effect in developing a Bible-based worldview is important so that Christian colleges might more effectively guide their students in developing that biblical worldview. The purpose of this causal-comparative study was to determine whether students' gender affected their YEC worldview components after enrollment in a YEC origins course while controlling for their pre-course worldviews. A sample of 315 residential students enrolled in a YEC origins course at a conservative Christian college in the Southeast completed the Creationist Worldview Scale before and after taking the course; the survey also contained a demographic questionnaire that collected information regarding students' gender, major, classification, ethnicity, and secondary schooling. The data were analyzed using a one way ANCOVA. There were no statistically significant differences between male and female students' posttest age scores or posttest science scores, but there was a significant difference between their posttest theology scores. Suggestions for further research are also included.

  8. Synergetic effect of alkaline earth metal oxides and iron oxides on the degradation of hexachlorobenzene and its degradation pathway.

    PubMed

    Su, Guijin; Liu, Yexuan; Huang, Linyan; Shi, Yali; Zhang, Aiqian; Zhang, Lixia; Liu, Wenbin; Gao, Lirong; Zheng, Minghui

    2013-01-01

    The degradation of hexachlorobenzene (HCB) was carried out over physical mixtures of a series of alkaline earth metal oxides (MO: M=Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba) and iron oxides with different crystal types (Fe(x)O(y):Fe(2)O(3) or Fe(3)O(4)) at 300°C. These physical mixtures all showed a synergetic effect toward the degradation of HCB. A range of degradation products were identified by various methods, including tri- to penta-chlorobenzenes by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS), tri- to penta-chlorophenols, tetrachlorocatechol (TCC) and tetrachlorohydroquinone (TCHQ) by GC-MS after derivatization, and formic and acetic acids by ion chromatography. Two degradation pathways, hydrodechlorination and oxidative degradation, appear to occur competitively. However, more sequential chlorinated benzene and phenol congeners were formed over mixed MO/Fe(3)O(4) than over mixed MO/Fe(2)O(3) under the same conditions. The oxidative reaction dominated over mixed MO/Fe(2)O(3) and was promoted as the major reaction by the synergetic effect, while both the oxidative and hydrodechlorination reactions were important over mixed MO/Fe(3)O(4), and both pathways are remarkably promoted by the synergetic effect. The enhanced hydrodechlorination may be attributed to free electrons generated by the transformation of Fe(3)O(4) into Fe(2)O(3), and hydrogen provided by water adsorbed on the MO.

  9. Effect of spent bleaching earth based bio organic fertilizer on growth, yield and quality of eggplants under field condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheong, K. Y.; Loh, S. K.; Salimon, J.

    2013-11-01

    Spent bleaching earth (SBE) is a solid waste generated from the bleaching process in palm oil industry. This solid waste is currently disposed directly in landfills without treatment, causing severe water and air pollution. Recently, dumping of SBE in landfills or public disposal sites has been prohibited in most countries. Meanwhile, high costs associated with the large area of land needed for storage of the residue has lead to the interest in regenerate SBE. Thus, a recent novel approach has been carried out on the utilization of SBE in agriculture as an alternative method for disposal. In this study, a field experiment was conducted at an experimental plot in Plant House National University Malaysia to evaluate the effect of SBE on the growth and quality of eggplant. Growth and quality parameters of eggplant including total fruit yield, total biomass, macronutrients concentration of leaf were studied through close monitoring and assessment. Field trials conducted showed that SBE is effective in promoting eggplant growth and nutrient uptake compared to the control treatment under field conditions. Therefore, with the proper and effective ways in handling SBE through conversion of SBE into beneficial bio organic fertilizer, this material which is a waste in the past will become an advantage in agriculture as a substitute for commercial fertilizers.

  10. Charged Particle Environments in Earth's Magnetosphere and their Effects on Space System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minow, Joseph I.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews information on space radiation environments important to magnetospheric missions including trapped radiation, solar particle events, cosmic rays, and solar winds. It also includes information about ion penetration of the magnetosphere, galactic cosmic rays, solar particle environments, CRRES internal discharge monitor, surface charging and radiation effects.

  11. Effect of Knowledge Integration Activities on Students' Perception of the Earth's Crust as a Cyclic System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kali, Yael; Orion, Nir; Eylon, Bat-Sheva

    2003-01-01

    Characterizes students' understanding of the rock cycle system. Examines effects of a knowledge integration activity on their system thinking. Interprets answers to an open-ended test using a systems thinking continuum ranging from a completely static view of the system to an understanding of the system's cyclic nature. Reports meaningful…

  12. Influence of quadrupolar interactions on the crystal packing of organic compounds: the pentafluorophenyl ester of a tricyclic α,β-unsaturated-γ-amino acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Enrique; Mahía, José; Maestro, Miguel A.; Herradón, Bernardo

    2002-10-01

    The single crystal X-ray diffraction structure of (-)-pentafluorophenyl( Z, S, S)-2-(6-oxo-1,3,4,6,11,11a-hexahydro-2 H-pyrido[1,2- b]isoquinolin-11-yliden)acetate ( 1) is reported. We have found that the crystal packing of the α,β-unsaturated-γ-amino acid derivative 1 is mainly determined by the interaction between the two aromatic rings, namely the benzenic type and the pentafluorinated ring. The crystal packing of 1 shows a herringbone (zig-zag) structure, that is quite typical of aromatic compound with intermolecular arene-arene interactions. The benzenic and the fluorinated phenyl rings in 1 are in a matched face-to-face arrangement. The origin of this interaction can be ascribed to a favourably quadrupolar interaction between both types of aromatic ring. The results reported in the present paper indicate that the pentafluorophenyl ester functionality can be a useful building block in crystal engineering.

  13. Observation of the Second-Order Quadrupolar Interaction as a Dominating NMR Relaxation Mechanism in Liquids: The Ultraslow Regime of Motion.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jiahui; Terskikh, Victor; Wu, Gang

    2016-09-01

    We report variable-temperature (VT) (17)O NMR spectra of [5-(17)O]-d-glucose in an aqueous solution and in glycerol at 14.1 and 21.1 T. The VT (17)O NMR data cover a wide range of motion for which the molecular rotational correlation time (τc) of glucose changes more than 5 orders of magnitude. The observed line width of the (17)O NMR signal for [5-(17)O]-d-glucose displays a maximum at ω0τc ≈ 1 and a minimum at ω0τc ≈ 150, where ω0 is the angular Larmor frequency of (17)O. Under the ultraslow motion condition (i.e., ω0τc > 150), the line width of the observed (17)O NMR signal increases drastically with τc, suggesting that the second-order quadrupolar interaction becomes the predominant relaxation mechanism. While this relaxation mechanism has long been predicted by theory, the current study reports the first experimental observation of such a phenomenon. The implications of this new relaxation mechanism on the spectral resolution limit in liquid-state NMR spectroscopy for half-integer spins are discussed. PMID:27525537

  14. Detection of Yarkovsky effect and solar radiation pressure on Near-Earth Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faggioli, Laura; Del Vigna, Alessio; Milani, Andrea; Spoto, Federica; Valsecchi, Giovanni B.

    2016-10-01

    The orbit of small-sized asteroids can be affected by non-gravitational perturbations. When this happens, non-gravitational forces need to be taken into account since they are as important as collisions and gravitational perturbations for the overall understanding of the asteroid orbital evolution.The Yarkovsky effect and the Solar Radiation Pressure (SRP) are non-gravitational perturbations that can be modelled knowing the physical properties of asteroids, and whose consequences of the motions can be measured from accurate astrometry.The knowledge of the physical properties of asteroids is usually not sufficient to produce the thermophysical models needed for the computation of the Yarkovsky acceleration. Nevertheless, it can often be measured as a semimajor axis drift if the astrometric dataset contains extremely accurate observations (e.g. radar data), or if the observations span a sufficiently long time interval.Farnocchia et al. 2013 list 21 NEAs with a measurable semimajor-axis drift. Since 2013, the number of asteroids for which it is possible to detect the Yarkovsky effect has grown. This is due to the increased quality and time span of the observations, and to new radar measurements that have since become available. We are able to detect the Yarkovsky effect for more than 40 NEAs, employing a high precision dynamical model, including the Newtonian attraction of 16 massive asteroids and the planetary relativistic terms, and a suitable astrometric data treatment. We present a list of objects with a significant detection of Yarkovksy effect and a value compatible with the Yarkovsky mechanism.The computed non-gravitational perturbations will be added to the web portal of the ESA SSA-NEO Coordination Centre, highlighting the fact that the orbit has been computed taking the Yarkovsky effect or the SRP into account. The inclusion of non-gravitational perturbations can also affect the results of the impact monitoring, as in the case of (410777) 2009 FD, (29075

  15. The effects of mantle and anelasticity on nutations, earth tides, and tidal variations in rotation rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wahr, John; Bergen, Zachary

    1986-01-01

    The paper models the effects of mantle anelasticity on luni-solar nutations, on tidal deformation, on tidal variations in rotation rate, and on the eigenfrequency of the free core nutation. The results can be used to invert observations to solve for the anelastic contributions to the shear and bulk moduli of the upper and lower mantle. Specific anelastic models are used to numerically estimate the effects of anelasticity on these geodetic observables. The nutation estimates are compared with observational results. Among the conclusions: (1) mantle anelasticity is likely to be the most important source of damping for the free core nutation; (2) present VLBI nutation results are, in principle, accurate enough to usefully bound anelasticity at diurnal periods. But the discrepancy between the VLBI observed nutations and the 1984 IAU nutation model cannot be explained by anelasticity and is not yet well enough understood to allow anelasticity to be determined from the data.

  16. Signature effects in some [ital N]=90 odd-[ital Z] rare-earth nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Rath, A.K.; Praharaj, C.R.; Khadkikar, S.B. Institute of Physics, Bhubaneswar 751005 )

    1993-05-01

    Using axially symmetric deformed configuration mixing and angular momentum projection techniques, we have studied the signature effects in the [pi][ital h][sub 11/2] bands of [sup 147]La, [sup 149]Pr, and [sup 151]Pm nuclei. Effects of rotation alignment on the signature splitting in energy and signature inversion in the [ital B]([ital E]2,[ital I][r arrow][ital I][minus]1) values are discussed. We find that transition from a strongly rotation-aligned limit to a weakly rotation-aligned (or more regular rotational behavior) regime or vice versa leads to signature inversion of the [ital B]([ital E]2) values.

  17. Effects of high altitude clouds on the earth's infrared radiation flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, W.-C.; Kaplan, L. D.

    1983-01-01

    Attention is given to the results of a study of cirrus cloud properties which employed the Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheric Sciences' general circulation model and concentrated on the effects of the nonblackness of high clouds on the IR radiation flux. Although the thermal radiation flux is very sensitive to the treatment of cirrus optical properties in the IR, a more realistic assessment will depend on better parameterizations for cirrus cloud formation, persistence, and dissipation.

  18. Cation effects in the oxidative coupling of methane on silica-supported binary alkali and alkaline earths

    SciTech Connect

    Voyatzis, R.; Moffat, J.B. )

    1993-07-01

    The oxidative coupling of methane has been investigated with a series of silica-supported binary oxide catalysts containing alkali or alkaline earths or combinations of the former and latter. The conversion of methane and the stability of the silica-supported binary alkali metal oxides were found to increase with decreasing cation mobility, while the selectivities and conversions observed with the binary alkaline earths increase with cation size. The selectivities and conversions of binary alkali/alkaline earths appear to depend upon the size of the alkali and alkaline earth cations, respectively. With small quantities of TCM (CCl[sub 4]) added continuously to the feedstream, catalysts containing small alkali and large alkaline earth cations produced the largest selectivities and conversions. 23 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Effect of composition, structure, and spin state on the thermal conductivity of the Earth's lower mantle

    SciTech Connect

    Goncharov, A F; Struzhkin, V V; Montoya, J A; Kharlamova, S; Kundargi, R; Siebert, J; Badro, J; Antonangeli, D; Ryerson, F J; Mao, W

    2010-07-23

    The change in electronic structure of iron at high pressures to spin-paired states in ferropericlase, silicate perovskite, and post-perovskite may have a profound influence on the thermal conductivity of the lower mantle. Here, we present optical absorption data for lower mantle minerals to assess the effect of composition (including iron oxidation state), structure, and iron spin state on radiative heat transfer. We confirm that the presence of ferric iron in ferropericlase strongly affects the optical properties, while the effect of the spin-pairing transition may be more secondary. We also show that post-perovskite exhibits larger optical absorption in the near infrared and visible spectral ranges than perovskite which may have a profound effect on the dynamics the lowermost mantle. We present preliminary results from measurements of the phonon thermal conductivity of perovskite at 125 GPa using a pulsed laser heating technique. The available data suggest a larger value than what previously estimated, although the uncertainty is large.

  20. The effect of depletion of the earth ozone layer on the human health condition.

    PubMed

    Jankowski, J; Cader, A B

    1997-01-01

    Development of economic human activity has caused many harmful side effects which constitute an important danger for the biological life of our planet. This review discusses some aspects of the atmospheric changes and their influence on UV radiation reaching a man. The ozone-layer depletion is the result of emissions to the atmosphere chemical substances containing chlorine and bromine. Ozone, which absorbs the solar ultraviolet radiation, is a basic bio-protective filter. Degradation of the atmospheric ozone layer leads to increase of UV-level in our environment. The harmful effects of UV-radiation on live organisms constitute a danger for health of the whole human population. There is no doubt that cumulative exposure to UV radiation is important in the aetiology of skin cancer. A strong cataractogenic effect of UV radiation has been also evidenced. It is also known that the increase of UV radiation may be capable of activating viruses and reduce immunological response. The recent and predicted increase in these menaces are discussed.

  1. Thermal evolution of the earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spohn, T.

    1984-01-01

    The earth's heat budget and models of the earth's thermal evolution are discussed. Sources of the planetary heat are considered and modes of heat transport are addressed, including conduction, convection, and chemical convection. Thermal and convectional models of the earth are covered, and models of thermal evolution are discussed in detail, including changes in the core, the influence of layered mantle convection on the thermal evolution, and the effect of chemical differentiation on the continents.

  2. Effects of density stratification on the frequencies of the inertial-gravity modes of the Earth's fluid core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyed-Mahmoud, B.; Moradi, A.; Kamruzzaman, M.; Naseri, H.

    2015-08-01

    The Earth's outer core is a rotating ellipsoidal shell of compressible, stratified and self-gravitating fluid. As such, in the treatment of geophysical problems a realistic model of this body needs to be considered. In this work, we consider compressible and stratified fluid core models with different stratification parameters, related to the local Brunt-Väisälä frequency, in order to study the effects of the core's density stratification on the frequencies of some of the inertial-gravity modes of this body. The inertial-gravity modes of the core are free oscillations with periods longer than 12 hr. Historically, an incompressible and homogeneous fluid is considered to study these modes and analytical solutions are known for the frequencies and the displacement eigenfunctions of a spherical model. We show that for a compressible and stratified spherical core model the effects of non-neutral density stratification may be significant, and the frequencies of these modes may change from model to model. For example, for a spherical core model the frequency of the spin-over mode, the (2, 1, 1) mode, is unaffected while that of the (4, 1, 1) mode is changed from -0.410 for the Poincaré core model to -0.434, -0.447 and -0.483 for core models with the stability parameter β = -0.001, -0.002 and -0.005, respectively, a maximum change of about 18 per cent when β = -0.005. Our results also show that for small stratification parameter, |β| ≤ 0.005, the frequency of an inertial-gravity mode is a nearly linear function of β but the slope of the line is different for different modes, and that the effects of density stratification on the frequency of a mode is likely related to its spatial structure, which remains the same in different Earth models. We also compute the frequencies of some of the modes of the `PREM' (spherical shell) core model and show that the frequencies of these modes may also be significantly affected by non-zero β.

  3. Effects of energy, momentum and particle transport in the near-earth solar terrestrial system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, P. B.; Basinska-Lewin, E. M.; Greenspan, M. E.; James, J. H.; Weimer, D. R.

    1990-06-01

    This work has included the scientific studies of high-latitude plasma irregularities and the physics of the aurora, engineering of space environmental sensors, and data processing services. Scientific studies were conducted in the areas of energy dissipation, magnetosphere-ionosphere interactions and ionospheric plasma. Design work has been done on a series of plasma instruments for the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP), the Combined Release and Radiation Effects Studies (CRRES), the Photovoltaic Array Space Power (PASP), the Interactions Measurements Payload for Shuttle (IMPS) and the NASA POLAR satellite program. Computer programs have been written to process RPA and Drift Meter data from the F8 and F9 DMSP satellites.

  4. [Electrophysiological and neurochemical analysis of the biological effects of disturbances of Earth's magnetic field].

    PubMed

    Agadzhanian, N A; Makarova, I I; Golovko, M Iu; D'iachkova, L Ia; Kanonidi, Kh D

    2002-01-01

    Geomagnetic effects on quantitative characteristics of alpha-rhythm were assessed by shifts in electroencephalograms recorded in 126 essentially healthy human subjects and changes in lipid metabolism in the cortex and white matter in 140 white rats. Indices of the geomagnetic activity were D, H and Z-components. The method of "epoch superposition" revealed an inconsistent alpha-rhythm depression and flattening out of the interhemispheric functional asymmetry against persistently high electrical activity in the right hemisphere, and biochemical asymmetry in consequence of different lipid transformation processes. Spotlighted were some nonspecific adaptive reactions to changes in the environment and stressful agents.

  5. The Effects of Geomagnetic Disturbances on Electrical Systems at the Earth's Surface - An Update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boteler, David; Pirjola, Risto; Nevanlinna, Heikki

    Gemagnetic disturbances continue to affect electrical systems on the ground after more than 150 years since the first systems were affected. An earlier review (Boteler et al, 1998) collected reports on all then-known effects from 1847 to 1992. In this paper we report on the effects observed since as well as fill in information about earlier events for which more information has been uncovered. Notable events during solar cycle 23 include November 6, 2001, when geomagnetically induced currents (GIC) in the New Zealand power systems caused ground current alarms and tripping of a static VAR compensator and transformer during a storm sudden commencement The transformer was subsequently found to be beyond repair and had to be replaced. The Halloween storm of Oct-Nov 2003 produced significant GIC in the Swedish power system resulting in a short blackout of the city of Malmo. There are also reports of damage to transformers in South Africa. Of historic events: there has been considerable interest in the characteristics of the August/September 1859 magnetic storms and further study of their impact on the telegraph system. Re-examination of the March 1989 storm has also provided new insights into the disturbance characteristsics that caused transformer overheating at several mid-latitude sites in North America. All these events are placed in context with solar activity and geomagnetic disturbances at the time and a combined timeline of events is presented covering the years 1847 to 2007.

  6. Analyses of On-orbit Determinations of the Clouds and the Earth Radiant Energy System (CERES) Thermistor Bolometer Sensor Zero-radiance Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Robert B., III; Thomas, Susan; Priestley, Kory J.; Barkstrom, Bruce R.; Paden, Jack; Pandey, Dhirendra K.; Smith, G. Louis; Al-hajjah, Aiman; Wilson, Robert S.

    1999-01-01

    The Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) missions were designed to measure broadband earth-reflected shortwave solar (0.3 micrometers to less than 5.0 micrometers) and earth-emitted longwave (5.0 micrometers to greater than 100 micrometers) radiances as well as earth-emitted narrow-band radiances in the water vapor window region between 8 micrometers and 12 micrometers. However, the CERES scanning thermistor bolometer sensor zero-radiance offsets were found to vary as much as 1.0 Wm (exp -2) sr (exp -1) with the scan angle measurement geometry due to gravitational forces and systematic electronic noise. To minimize the gravitational effects, the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Spacecraft CERES sensors' offsets were derived on-orbit as functions of scan elevation and azimuth angles from the January 7-8, 1998 radiometric observations of deep cold space, representative of a 3 K blackbody. In this paper, the TRMM/CERES six orbit data base of on-orbit derived offsets is presented and analyzed to define the sampling requirements for the CERES sensors located on the Earth Science Enterprise (ESE) Terra Spacecraft and on the Earth Observing System (EOS) Afternoon (PM-1) Spacecraft, scheduled for launches in 1999 and 2000, respectively. Analyses of the TRMM/CERES shortwave sensor earth radiance measurements indicate that offsets can be determined on-orbit at the plus or minus 0.02 Wm (exp -2) sr (exp -1) precision level. Offset measuring techniques and sampling requirements are discussed for the TRMM and ESE missions. Ground, pre-launch Terra CERES cross-track scan offsets are presented and described which were measured as a function of scan angle.

  7. Silver nanoparticles-enhanced rare earth co-luminescence effect of Tb(III)-Y(III)-dopamine system.

    PubMed

    Li, Huihui; Wu, Xia

    2015-06-01

    It was found that silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) could enhance co-luminescence effect of rare earths ions Tb(3+) and Y(3+). Based on this, a sensitive fluorescence detection method for the determination of dopamine (DA) was proposed. Moreover, the detection limit for DA was very low (down to nM). This is because DA can remarkably enhance the luminescence intensity of the Tb(3+) ion by Y(3+) in the colloidal solution of AgNPs, forming a new co-luminescence system. Furthermore, based on the metal enhanced fluorescence (MEF), AgNPs can sensitize the co-luminescence effect of the complex of Tb(3+)-Y(3+)-DA. In a neutral buffer solution (pH 7.50), the luminescence intensity of the system was linearly related to the concentration of DA in the range of 2.0-100 nM, with a limit of detection as low as 0.57 nM. The proposed method was applied for the determination of DA in dopamine hydrochloride injections and human serum samples with good accuracy and satisfactory recovery.

  8. Magnetocaloric effect in heavy rare-earth elements doped Fe-based bulk metallic glasses with tunable Curie temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jiawei; Huo, Juntao; Chang, Chuntao E-mail: dujun@nimte.ac.cn; Du, Juan E-mail: dujun@nimte.ac.cn; Man, Qikui; Wang, Xinmin; Li, Run-Wei; Law, Jiayan

    2014-08-14

    The effects of heavy rare earth (RE) additions on the Curie temperature (T{sub C}) and magnetocaloric effect of the Fe-RE-B-Nb (RE = Gd, Dy and Ho) bulk metallic glasses were studied. The type of dopping RE element and its concentration can easily tune T{sub C} in a large temperature range of 120 K without significantly decreasing the magnetic entropy change (ΔS{sub M}) and refrigerant capacity (RC) of the alloys. The observed values of ΔS{sub M} and RC of these alloys compare favorably with those of recently reported Fe-based metallic glasses with enhanced RC compared to Gd{sub 5}Ge{sub 1.9}Si{sub 2}Fe{sub 0.1}. The tunable T{sub C} and large glass-forming ability of these RE doped Fe-based bulk metallic glasses can be used in a wide temperature range with the final required shapes.

  9. Forest Management in Earth System Modelling: a Vertically Discretised Canopy Description for ORCHIDEE and Effects on European Climate Since 1750

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGrath, M.; Luyssaert, S.; Naudts, K.; Chen, Y.; Ryder, J.; Otto, J.; Valade, A.

    2015-12-01

    Forest management has the potential to impact surface physical characteristics to the same degree that changes in land cover do. The impacts of land cover changes on the global climate are well-known. Despite an increasingly detailed understanding of the potential for forest management to affect climate, none of the current generation of Earth system models account for forest management through their land surface modules. We addressed this gap by developing and reparameterizing the ORCHIDEE land surface model to simulate the biogeochemical and biophysical effects of forest management. Through vertical discretization of the forest canopy and corresponding modifications to the energy budget, radiation transfer, and carbon allocation, forest management can now be simulated much more realistically on the global scale. This model was used to explore the effect of forest management on European climate since 1750. Reparameterization was carried out to replace generic forest plant functional types with real tree species, covering the most dominant species across the continent. Historical forest management and land cover maps were created to run the simulations from 1600 until the present day. The model was coupled to the atmospheric model LMDz to explore differences in climate between 1750 and 2010 and attribute those differences to changes in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations and concurrent warming, land cover, species composition, and wood extraction. Although Europe's forest are considered a carbon sink in this century, our simulations show the modern forests are still experiencing carbon debt compared to their historical values.

  10. Effects of temperature-dependent molecular absorption coefficients on the thermal infrared remote sensing of the earth surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wan, Zhengming; Dozier, Jeff

    1992-01-01

    The effect of temperature-dependent molecular absorption coefficients on thermal infrared spectral signatures measured from satellite sensors is investigated by comparing results from the atmospheric transmission and radiance codes LOWTRAN and MODTRAN and the accurate multiple scattering radiative transfer model ATRAD for different atmospheric profiles. The sensors considered include the operational NOAA AVHRR and two research instruments planned for NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS): MODIS-N (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer-Nadir-Mode) and ASTER (Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer). The difference in band transmittance is as large as 6 percent for some thermal bands within atmospheric windows and more than 30 percent near the edges of these atmospheric windows. The effect of temperature-dependent molecular absorption coefficients on satellite measurements of sea-surface temperature can exceed 0.6 K. Quantitative comparison and factor analysis indicate that more accurate measurements of molecular absorption coefficients and better radiative transfer simulation methods are needed to achieve SST accuracy of 0.3 K, as required for global numerical models of climate, and to develop land-surface temperature algorithms at the 1-K accuracy level.

  11. The effects of Earth's magnetic field on 3-inch diameter photomultipliers used in KM3NeT neutrino telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giordano, V.; Aiello, S.; Leonora, E.; Randazzo, N.

    2016-04-01

    The KM3NeT neutrino telescope will be the largest underwater neutrino telescope and will be located in the abyss of the Mediterranean Sea. In neutrino telescopes the key element of the detector is the optical module and for KM3NeT it consists of 31 PMTs stored inside a transparent pressure-resistant glass sphere of 17-inch that serves as mechanical protection while ensuring good light transmission. Since the PMTs installed into an underwater neutrino telescope can change their orientation because of movements of the detector structure due to sea currents, the influence of Earth's magnetic field has been investigated. Magnetic shielding by means of a mu-metal cage is used to reduce magnetic effects and to make the response of the PMT sufficiently orientation independent. In order to quantify the effect on magnetic field, we compared measurements on variation of gain, transit time spread and detection efficiency for a 3-inch PMT in shielded and unshielded condition at 3 PMT inclinations. Data shows that variations are sufficiently low especially for timing properties.

  12. The Earth transiting the Sun as seen from Jupiter's moons: detection of an inverse Rossiter-McLaughlin effect produced by the opposition surge of the icy Europa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molaro, P.; Barbieri, M.; Monaco, L.; Zaggia, S.; Lovis, C.

    2015-10-01

    We report on a multiwavelength observational campaign which followed the Earth's transit on the Sun as seen from Jupiter on 2014 January 2014. Simultaneous observations of Jupiter's moons Europa and Ganymede obtained with high accuracy radial velocity planetary searcher (HARPS) from La Silla, Chile and HARPS-N from La Palma, Canary Islands were performed to measure the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect due to the Earth's passage using the same technique successfully adopted for the 2012 Venus Transit. The expected modulation in radial velocities was of ≈20 cm s-1 but an anomalous drift as large as ≈38 m s-1, i.e. more than two orders of magnitude higher and opposite in sign, was detected instead. The consistent behaviour of the two spectrographs rules out instrumental origin of the radial velocity drift and Birmingham Solar Oscillations Network observations rule out the possible dependence on the Sun's magnetic activity. We suggest that this anomaly is produced by the opposition surge on Europa's icy surface, which amplifies the intensity of the solar radiation from a portion of the solar surface centred around the crossing Earth which can then be observed as a sort of inverse Rossiter-McLaughlin effect. in fact, a simplified model of this effect can explain in detail most features of the observed radial velocity anomalies, namely the extensions before and after the transit, the small differences between the two observatories and the presence of a secondary peak closer to Earth passage. This phenomenon, observed here for the first time, should be observed every time similar Earth alignments occur with rocky bodies without atmospheres. We predict that it should be observed again during the next conjunction of Earth and Jupiter in 2026.

  13. Effect of rare earth dopants on the magnetic ordering of frustrated h-YMnO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Neetika; Das, A.; Prajapat, C. L.; Singh, M. R.

    2016-12-01

    In this report the combined effects of chemical pressure and R-Mn interaction on the structural and magnetic properties of frustrated h-YMnO3 have been investigated. Towards this, neutron powder diffraction and magnetization measurements were carried out on isostructural compounds Y1-xRxMnO3(R=Yb, Er, Tb, Ho; x≤0.2) with hexagonal structure (P63cm space group). The dopants are evenly distributed between the two Yttrium sites. The unit cell volume shows a linear increase with average A-site ionic radii, . The average apical a and planar p bond lengths are found to increase with . The tilting angle of the MnO5 polyhedron decreases linearly with increase in , whereas the buckling angle remains constant. No significant change in TN (within 10 K) is observed on doping. The temperature variation of the volume indicates an anomalous reduction in volume at TN which is found to be correlated with the square of the antiferromagnetic Mn moment. A spin reorientation behavior (evident from a change in the irreducible representation (IR) Γ3 to Γ4) is observed on decreasing from 1.019 Å (Y) to 1.012 Å (Yb) similar to that reported in external pressure studies on YMnO3. Additional interaction between the doped R and Mn influences the magnetic structure in the case of Ho and Tb doped samples. With Ho doping at Y site, the magnetic structure is described by IR Γ3 alone for 5 K≤T<35 K and a mixture of Γ3 and Γ4 for T≥35 K. However, in Tb doped sample, the magnetic structure is better described by Γ4Tb,Mn IR with additional moment on Tb. The frustration parameter, f reduces from 6 to 1 in the doped samples. A combination of chemical pressure effect and magnetic coupling between the magnetic R ion and Mn moments thus describes the magnetic structures and relieves the frustration effects inherent to the quasi-two dimensional Mn moment ordering.

  14. Effects of the equatorial ionosphere on L-band Earth-space transmissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Ernest K.; Flock, Warren L.

    1993-01-01

    Ionosphere scintillation can effect satellite telecommunication up to Ku-band. Nighttime scintillation can be attributed to large-scale inhomogeneity in the F-region of the ionosphere predominantly between heights of 200 and 600 km. Daytime scintillation has been attributed to sporadic E. It can be thought of as occurring in three belts: equatorial, high-latitude, and mid-latitude, in order of severity. Equatorial scintillation occurs between magnetic latitudes +/- 25 degrees, peaking near +/- 10 degrees. It commonly starts abruptly near 2000 local time and dies out shortly after midnight. There is a strong solar cycle dependence and a seasonal preference for the equinoxes, particularly the vernal one. Equatorial scintillation occurs more frequently on magnetically quiet than on magnetically disturbed days in most longitudes. At the peak of the sunspot cycle scintillation depths as great as 20 dB were observed at L-band.

  15. Environmental evolution: Effects of the origin and evolution of life on Planet Earth

    SciTech Connect

    Margulis, L.; Olendzenski, L.

    1992-01-01

    This book is a multiauthored textbook in planetary evolutionary biogeochemistry, emphasizing the major effects biota have had on the planetary environment and based on a long standing, one semister course at Boston University. A series of chapters described planetary atmospheres in the inner solar system, alternative views on the chemical origin of life, present-day microbial communities and the structures they build, the endosymbiotic origin of eukaryotic cells, and the fossil record of the late Precambrian. Four concluding chapters discuss the Phanerozoic, including the Gaia hypotheseis, plate tectonics, plant secondary compounds, and the role of chromosome fission in mammaliean evolution. A section on assignments, presentations, supplementary material, and background reading, and a comprehensive glossary are included.

  16. Metamagnetism-enhanced magnetocaloric effect in the rare earth intermetallic compound Ho5Ge4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nirmala, R.; Morozkin, A. V.; Rajivgandhi, R.; Nigam, A. K.; Quezado, S.; Malik, S. K.

    2016-11-01

    Magnetic and magnetocaloric properties of polycrystalline Ho5Ge4 (orthorhombic, Sm5Ge4-type, Space group Pnma, No. 62, oP36) compound have been studied. This compound orders antiferromagnetically at ~24 K (TN). From the magnetization vs field isotherms obtained close to the magnetic transition temperature, magnetocaloric effect (MCE) has been estimated. The isothermal magnetic entropy change (ΔSM) reaches a maximum value of ~-27 J/kg-K at ~30 K for a field change of 140 kOe. A metamagnetic transition is observed in the field dependent magnetization data at temperatures below 20 K, for critical fields above 20 kOe, giving rise to a ferromagnetic order and hence a large MCE. The magnetic moment value at 2.5 K is ~8μB/Ho3+ in 90 kOe field.

  17. Windsock memory COnditioned RAM (CO-RAM) pressure effect: Forced reconnection in the Earth's magnetotail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vörös, Z.; Facskó, G.; Khodachenko, M.; Honkonen, I.; Janhunen, P.; Palmroth, M.

    2014-08-01

    Magnetic reconnection (MR) is a key physical concept explaining the addition of magnetic flux to the magnetotail and closed flux lines back-motion to the dayside magnetosphere. This scenario elaborated by Dungey (1963) can explain many aspects of solar wind-magnetosphere interaction processes, including substorms. However, neither the Dungey model nor its numerous modifications were able to explain fully the onset conditions for MR in the tail. In this paper, we introduce new onset conditions for forced MR in the tail. We call our scenario the "windsock memory conditioned ram pressure effect." Our nonflux transfer-associated forcing is introduced by a combination of the large-scale windsock motions exhibiting memory effects and solar wind dynamic pressure actions on the nightside magnetopause during northward oriented interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). Using global MHD Grand Unified Magnetosphere Ionosphere Coupling Simulation version 4 simulation results, upstream data from Wind, magnetosheath data from Cluster 1 and distant tail data from the two-probe Acceleration, Reconnection, Turbulence and Electrodynamics of the Moon's Interaction with the Sun mission, we show that the simultaneous occurrence of vertical windsock motions of the magnetotail and enhanced solar wind dynamic pressure introduces strong nightside disturbances, including enhanced electric fields and persistent vertical cross-tail shear flows. These perturbations, associated with a stream interaction region in the solar wind, drive MR in the tail during episodes of northward oriented interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). We detect MR indirectly, observing plasmoids in the tail and ground-based signatures of earthward moving fast flows. We also consider the application to solar system planets and close-in exoplanets, where the proposed scenario can elucidate some new aspects of solar/stellar wind-magnetosphere interactions.

  18. The Effects of Modern-Day Cropland and Pasture Management on Vegetation Fire: An Earth System Modeling Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabin, S. S.; Malyshev, S.; Shevliakova, E.; Pacala, S. W.

    2014-12-01

    Fire is a major component of the global carbon cycle, with some estimates of the associated emissions reaching 2.5 PgC/yr. This and the other impacts of biomass burning have driven efforts to improve its simulation in Earth system models. Recent global fire models usually include both bioclimatic and anthropogenic drivers of fire, with the latter (via population density and sometimes economic status) serving to increase or suppress burned area. Some models have added the representation of fire used in deforestation and cropland management, the extent and seasonal timing of which may not be accounted for by the usual approach to anthropogenic influence. Human land use can also limit fire by fragmenting landscapes, but this process is not included in most global models. Moreover, although people often use fire to manage grazing lands for livestock, these practices have not been explicitly modeled (except as performed by pre-industrial societies). This could be important for regions such as sub-Saharan Africa, where the seasonality of pasture burning tends to differ from that of other lands, potentially influencing savanna-forest dynamics. Recent efforts elucidating the effects of cropland and pasture on fire regimes at regional scales provide insight into these processes. Using this new understanding, we have developed a fire model with structurally distinct modules for burning of croplands, pasture, and primary and secondary lands, as well as fire use for deforestation. Parameters for each are rigorously constrained using remote-sensing observations of burned area. This structure allows us to disentangle agricultural practices and fragmentation effects from the endogenous processes driving fire on non-agricultural land, resulting in a better ability to simulate how fire works at large scales. This is critical for modeling the future of fire and all the parts of the Earth system that it affects, including vegetation distributions, nutrient cycling, and biosphere

  19. Analysis of the effect of the radiation pressure on planetary exospheres : application to Earth, Mars, Titan and hot Jupiters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beth, Arnaud; Garnier, Philippe; Toublanc, Dominique; Mazelle, Christian; Dandouras, Iannis

    2015-04-01

    Because of rare collisions, the motion of light species (H, H2) in the planetary exospheres is essentially determined by the external forces: the gravitation from the planet and the radiation pressure, ... Currently, the only analytical model used to model exospheric neutral density profiles is the well-known Chamberlain model which takes into account only the gravity. In this work and in the same way as Chamberlain, we solve rigorously and analytically, based on the Hamiltonian mechanics and Liouville theorem, the additional effect of the radiation pressure in particular for hydrogen (the model works for any species sensitive to the radiation pressure) on the structure of the exosphere and on the density profiles of ballistic particles. This approach was initially developed by Bishop and Chamberlain (1989) only in the Sun-planet direction. We extend it here to the whole exosphere with a 2D model. Also, we determine analytically the escape flux on the dayside at SZA=0, which can be compared with the Jeans' escape flux. We thus show that the radiation pressure induces : 1. strong density asymmetries at high altitudes in the planetary exospheres, leading to the phenomenon of geotail at Earth for example 2. the natural existence of an external limit (or exopause) for the exosphere, whose location is analytically determined 3. an increase of the exospheric densities compared with Chamberlain profiles without radiation pressure (e.g. up to +150% at 5 Martian radius) 4. a significant increase of the thermal escape flux (up to 30/35% for Earth/Mars today), until a «blow-off » regime with a constant escape flux for an extreme radiation pressure. The influence of the radiation pressure on the escape flux may thus bring conditions on the size of primary atmospheres, because of a strong radiation pressure in the Sun's young years. Finally, we show that this model may be applied to exoplanets, in particular to the hot Jupiters that are also subject to additional effects

  20. Analytical Analysis of the Effect of the Radiation Pressure on Planetary Exospheres: Application to Earth, Mars, Titan and Hot Jupiters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beth, A.; Garnier, P.; Toublanc, D.; Dandouras, I. S.; Mazelle, C. X.

    2014-12-01

    Because of rare collisions, the motion of light species (H, H2) in the planetary exospheres is essentially determined by the external forces: the gravitation from the planet and the radiation pressure, ... Currently, the only analytical model used to model exospheric neutral density profiles is the well-known Chamberlain model which takes into account only the gravity. In this work and in the same way as Chamberlain, we solve rigorously and analytically, based on the Hamiltonian mechanics and Liouville theorem, the additional effect of the radiation pressure in particular for hydrogen (the model works for any species sensitive to the radiation pressure) on the structure of the exosphere and on the density profiles of ballistic particles. This approach was initially developed by Bishop and Chamberlain (1989) only in the Sun-planet direction. We extend it here to the whole exosphere with a 2D model. Also, we determine analytically the escape flux on the dayside at SZA=0, which can be compared with the Jeans' escape flux. We thus show that the radiation pressure induces : strong density asymmetries at high altitudes in the planetary exospheres, leading to the phenomenon of geotail at Earth for example the natural existence of an external limit (or exopause) for the exosphere, whose location is analytically determined an increase of the exospheric densities compared with Chamberlain profiles without radiation pressure (e.g. up to +150% at 5 Martian radius) a significant increase of the thermal escape flux (up to 30/35% for Earth/Mars today), until a «blow-off » regime with a constant escape flux for an extreme radiation pressure. The influence of the radiation pressure on the escape flux may thus bring conditions on the size of primary atmospheres, because of a strong radiation pressure in the Sun's young years. Finally, we show that this model may be applied to exoplanets, in particular to the hot Jupiters that are also subject to additional effects: centrifugal