Science.gov

Sample records for earth reentry breakup

  1. Inadvertent Earth Reentry Breakup Analysis for the New Horizons Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ling, Lisa M.; Salama, Ahmed; Ivanov, Mark; McRonald, Angus

    2007-01-01

    The New Horizons (NH) spacecraft was launched in January 2006 aboard an Atlas V launch vehicle, in a mission to explore Pluto, its moons, and other bodies in the Kuiper Belt. The NH spacecraft is powered by a Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) which encases multiple General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules. Thus, a pre-launch vehicle breakup analysis for an inadvertent atmospheric reentry in the event of a launch failure was required to assess aerospace nuclear safety and for launch contingency planning. This paper addresses potential accidental Earth reentries analyzed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) which may arise during the ascent to parking orbit, resulting in a suborbital reentry, as well as a departure from parking orbit, resulting in an orbital reentry.

  2. Evaluation of Reentry Breakup and Debris Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyman, R. L.

    2012-01-01

    Orbital missions launching from Cape Canaveral typically overfly Europe or African before achieving orbital insertion and pose a risk that must be evaluated as part of the overall mission casualty expectation. During the downrange overflight phase, the vehicle is well above the atmosphere and has achieved near orbital velocity, consequently a loss of thrust, loss of control or high altitude breakup will bring either the intact upper stage or smaller secondary debris fragments into the atmosphere and subject them to intense aerodynamic heating. In order to make reasonable risk estimates, it is necessary to first predict the reentry breakup characteristics and the survival of debris fragments. ACTA has developed the Coupled Aeroheating and Thermal Network Solver (CATNS) code to help range safety analysts evaluate reentry breakup and demise.

  3. ISS Update: ATV-3 ReEntry Breakup Recorder

    NASA Image and Video Library

    ISS Update Commentator Pat Ryan talks with Dr. William Ailor, Principal Investigator for the ReEntry Breakup Recorder (REBR) for The Aerospace Corporation. Ailor talks about capturing data as Europ...

  4. Radioactive satellites - Intact reentry and breakup by debris impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anz-Meador, P. D.; Potter, A. E., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    There is a substantial mass of radioactive material in nuclear reactors or radioisotope thermal generators (RTGs) in orbit about the earth. This paper examines the reentry of intact nuclear fuel cores and RTGs and the fragmentation and subsequent radioactive debris cloud deposition and evolution resulting from the impact of orbital debris upon an orbiting reactor, fuel core, or RTG. To assess the intact reentry, decay rates and a predicted decay date using historical and projected orbital decay data, are estimated. The current NASA debris environment model is utilized to estimate impact rates and debris cloud evolution of a fragmentation event. Results of these analyses are compared and concepts are tendered which would tend to minimize the radiological debris hazard to personnel and structures both on the earth's surface and in low earth orbit.

  5. Radioactive satellites - Intact reentry and breakup by debris impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anz-Meador, P. D.; Potter, A. E., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    There is a substantial mass of radioactive material in nuclear reactors or radioisotope thermal generators (RTGs) in orbit about the earth. This paper examines the reentry of intact nuclear fuel cores and RTGs and the fragmentation and subsequent radioactive debris cloud deposition and evolution resulting from the impact of orbital debris upon an orbiting reactor, fuel core, or RTG. To assess the intact reentry, decay rates and a predicted decay date using historical and projected orbital decay data, are estimated. The current NASA debris environment model is utilized to estimate impact rates and debris cloud evolution of a fragmentation event. Results of these analyses are compared and concepts are tendered which would tend to minimize the radiological debris hazard to personnel and structures both on the earth's surface and in low earth orbit.

  6. Reentry analysis for low Earth orbiting spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Lauri Kraft; Folta, David C.; Ross, Brian P.; Bouslog, Stanley A.

    1993-01-01

    As a result of recent National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Management Instruction (NMI), NASA spacecraft programs must limit orbital debris by design and/or by operational procedures. To fulfill this requirement, spacecraft may be required to be removed from their operational orbit after mission completion. Spacecraft disposal by atmospheric reentry is a means to accomplish this task. To assess the risk to man, an analysis must be done to determine which parts of the spacecraft are likely to survive a reentry of the Earth's atmosphere and where those parts will land. These issues are currently being examined for the Earth Observing System (EOS-AM1). The Johnson Space Center (JSC) Aeroscience Branch, supported by the Lockheed Engineering and Sciences Co., has developed a tool which permits the analysis of the thermal effects of reentry on individual spacecraft components to determine which components are expected to survive reentry. This paper presents an examination of the burnup and reentry of EOS-AM1 and describes a method for other spacecraft to use in analyzing similar reentry issues.

  7. ATV reentry

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-10-03

    ISS033-E-009232 (3 Oct. 2012) --- This still photo taken by the Expedition 33 crew members aboard the International Space Station shows evidence of the fiery plunge through Earth?s atmosphere and the destructive re-entry of the European Automated Transfer Vehicle-3 (ATV-3) spacecraft, also known as ?Edoardo Amaldi.? The end of the ATV took place over a remote swath of the Pacific Ocean where any surviving debris safely splashed down a short time later, at around 1:30 a.m. (GMT) on Oct. 3, thus concluding the highly successful ATV-3 mission. Aboard the craft during re-entry was the Re Entry Breakup Recorder (REBR), a spacecraft ?black box? designed to gather data on vehicle disintegration during re-entry in order to improve future spacecraft re-entry models.

  8. Thermochemical nonequilibrium issues for earth reentry of Mars mission vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitcheltree, R. A.; Gnoffo, P. A.

    1990-01-01

    The thermochemical environment about an axisymmetric 60-deg sphere-cone with a circular aft skirt is computed using the Langley Aerothermodynamic Upwind Relaxation Algorithm. Earth entry at 12 km/sec is examined at 70-km and 80-km altitude for two vehicle base radii of 2 m and 6 m. These four test cases bracket some proposed scenarios for earth reentry of a manned Mars mission aerobrake at this velocity. Thermochemical nonequilibrium results are examined for each case and compared with thermal equilibrium results produced by artificially accelerating vibrational relaxation rates and with equilibrium results produced by a viscous shock layer method.

  9. Estimation of debris dispersion due to a space vehicle breakup during reentry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyhanoglu, Mahmut; Alvarado, Juan

    2013-05-01

    This paper studies the problem of the estimation of the extent of the airspace containing falling debris due to a space vehicle breakup. A precise propagation of debris to the ground is not practical for many reasons. There is insufficient knowledge of the initial state vector, ambient wind conditions, and the key parameters including the ballistic coefficients. In addition, propagation of all debris pieces to the ground would require extensive computer time. In this paper, a covariance propagation method is introduced for the estimation of debris dispersion due to a space vehicle breakup. The falling debris is simulated, and the data are analyzed to derive the probability of debris evolution in different altitude layers over time. The concept of positional probability ellipsoids is employed for the visualization of the results. Through a case study, it is shown that while the results of the covariance propagation method are in close agreement with those of the Monte Carlo method, the covariance propagation method is much more computationally efficient than the Monte Carlo method.

  10. Reentry analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Biehl, F.A.

    1984-05-01

    This paper presents the criteria, previous nuclear experience in space, analysis techniques, and possible breakup enhancement devices applicable to an acceptable SP-100 reentry from space. Reactor operation in nuclear-safe orbit will minimize the radiological risk; the remaining safeguards criteria need to be defined. A simple analytical point mass reentry technique and a more comprehensive analysis method that considers vehicle dynamics and orbit insertion malfunctions are presented. Vehicle trajectory, attitude, and possible breakup enhancement devices will be integrated in the simulation as required to ensure an adequate representation of the reentry process.

  11. On Re-Entry Prediction of Near Earth Objects with Genetic Algorithm Using KS Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, R. K.; Anilkumar, A. K.; Xavier James Raj, M.; Sabarinath, A.

    2009-03-01

    The accurate orbit prediction of the near-Earth objects is an important requirement for the re-entry and the life time estimation. The method of Kustaanheimo and Stiefel (KS) total energy element equations is one of the powerful methods for orbit prediction. Recently, due to the reentries of large number of risk objects, which posses threat to the human life and property, a great concern is developed in the space scientific community. Consequently, the prediction of risk objects re-entry time and location has got much importance for the proper planning of mitigation strategies and hazard assessment. This paper discusses an integrated procedure for orbit life time prediction combining the KS elements and genetic algorithm (GA). The orbit prediction is carried out by numerically integrating the KS element equations. In this methodology, the ballistic coefficient is estimated from a set of observed orbital parameters in terms of the Two Line Elements (TLE) by minimizing the variance of the predicted re-entry time from different TLE using GA. A software, KSGEN, systematically developed in-house using KS elements and genetic algorithm is utilized for predicting the re-entry time of the risk objects. This software has been effectively used for the prediction of the re-entry time in the past seven re-entry exercise campaigns conducted by the Inter Agency Space Debris Coordination Committee (IADC). The predicted re-entry time matched quite well with the actual re-entry time for all the seven IADC re-entry campaigns. A detailed analysis is carried out with two case studies.

  12. A Genesis breakup and burnup analysis in off-nominal Earth return and atmospheric entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, Ahmed; Ling, Lisa; McRonald, Angus

    2005-01-01

    The Genesis project conducted a detailed breakup/burnup analysis before the Earth return to determine if any spacecraft component could survive and reach the ground intact in case of an off-nominal entry. In addition, an independent JPL team was chartered with the responsibility of analyzing several definitive breakup scenarios to verify the official project analysis. This paper presents the analysis and results of this independent team.

  13. The importance of momentum transfer in collision-induced breakups in low Earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, Robert C.; Lillie, Brian J.

    1991-01-01

    Although there is adequate information on larger objects in low Earth orbit, specifically those objects larger than about 10 cm in diameter, there is little direct information on objects from this size down to 1 mm. Yet, this is the sized regime where objects acting as projectiles represent the ability to seriously damage or destroy a functioning spacecraft if they collide with it. The observed consequences of known collisional breakups in orbit indicates no significant momentum transfer in the resulting debris cloud. The position taken in this paper is that this is an observational selection effect: what is seen in these events is an explosion-like breakup of the target structure arising from shock waves introduced into the structure by the collision, but one that occurs significantly after the collision processes are completed; the collision cloud, in which there is momentum transfer, consists of small, unobserved fragments. Preliminary computations of the contribution of one known collisional breakup, Solwind at 500 km in 1985, and Cosmos 1275 in 1981, assume no momentum transfer on breakup and indicate that these two events are the dominant contributors to the current millimeter and centimeter population. A different story would emerge if momentum transfer was taken into account. The topics covered include: (1) observation of on-orbit collisional breakups; (2) a model for momentum transfer; and (3) velocity space representation of breakup clouds.

  14. Snowball Earth ocean chemistry driven by extensive ridge volcanism during Rodinia breakup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gernon, T. M.; Hincks, T. K.; Tyrrell, T.; Rohling, E. J.; Palmer, M. R.

    2016-03-01

    During Neoproterozoic Snowball Earth glaciations, the oceans gained massive amounts of alkalinity, culminating in the deposition of massive cap carbonates on deglaciation. Changes in terrestrial runoff associated with both breakup of the Rodinia supercontinent and deglaciation can explain some, but not all of the requisite changes in ocean chemistry. Submarine volcanism along shallow ridges formed during supercontinent breakup results in the formation of large volumes of glassy hyaloclastite, which readily alters to palagonite. Here we estimate fluxes of calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, silica and bicarbonate associated with these shallow-ridge processes, and argue that extensive submarine volcanism during the breakup of Rodinia made an important contribution to changes in ocean chemistry during Snowball Earth glaciations. We use Monte Carlo simulations to show that widespread hyaloclastite alteration under near-global sea-ice cover could lead to Ca2+ and Mg2+ supersaturation over the course of the glaciation that is sufficient to explain the volume of cap carbonates deposited. Furthermore, our conservative estimates of phosphorus release are sufficient to explain the observed P:Fe ratios in sedimentary iron formations from this time. This large phosphorus release may have fuelled primary productivity, which in turn would have contributed to atmospheric O2 rises that followed Snowball Earth episodes.

  15. An Analysis of Recent Major Breakups in he Low Earth Orbit Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Jer-Chyi; Anz-Meador, P. D.

    2010-01-01

    Of the 190 known satellite breakups between 1961 and 2006, only one generated more than 500 cataloged fragments. The event was the explosion of the Pegasus Hydrazine Auxiliary Propulsion System in 1996, adding 713 fragments to the U.S. Satellite Catalog. Since the beginning of 2007; however, the near-Earth environment has been subjected to several major breakups, including the Fengyun-1C anti-satellite test and the explosion of Briz-M in 2007, the unusual breakup of Cosmos 2421 in 2008, and the collision between Iridium 33 and Cosmos 2251 in 2009. Combined, these events added more than 5000 large (> or equal 10 cm) fragments to the environment. Detailed analysis of the radar cross section measurements and orbit histories of the fragments from these major events reveals several unusual characteristics in their size and area-to-mass ratio distributions. The characteristics could be related to the material composition of the parent vehicles, the nature of the breakup, and the composition and physical property of the fragments. In addition, the majority of these fragments are expected to remain in orbit for at least decades. Their long-term impact to the environment is analyzed using the NASA orbital debris evolutionary model, LEGEND. Descriptions of these analyses and a summary are included in this paper.

  16. An Analysis of Recent Major Breakups in he Low Earth Orbit Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Jer-Chyi; Anz-Meador, P. D.

    2010-01-01

    Of the 190 known satellite breakups between 1961 and 2006, only one generated more than 500 cataloged fragments. The event was the explosion of the Pegasus Hydrazine Auxiliary Propulsion System in 1996, adding 713 fragments to the U.S. Satellite Catalog. Since the beginning of 2007; however, the near-Earth environment has been subjected to several major breakups, including the Fengyun-1C anti-satellite test and the explosion of Briz-M in 2007, the unusual breakup of Cosmos 2421 in 2008, and the collision between Iridium 33 and Cosmos 2251 in 2009. Combined, these events added more than 5000 large (> or equal 10 cm) fragments to the environment. Detailed analysis of the radar cross section measurements and orbit histories of the fragments from these major events reveals several unusual characteristics in their size and area-to-mass ratio distributions. The characteristics could be related to the material composition of the parent vehicles, the nature of the breakup, and the composition and physical property of the fragments. In addition, the majority of these fragments are expected to remain in orbit for at least decades. Their long-term impact to the environment is analyzed using the NASA orbital debris evolutionary model, LEGEND. Descriptions of these analyses and a summary are included in this paper.

  17. Atmospheric breakup of a small comet in the Earth's atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teterev, A. V.; Misychenko, N. I.; Rudak, L. V.; Romanov, G. S.; Smetannikov, A. S.; Nemchinov, I. V.

    1993-01-01

    The aerodynamic stresses can lead to the deformation and even to destruction of the meteoroids during their flight through the atmosphere. The pressure at the blunt nose of the cosmic body moving at very high speed through the dense layers of the atmosphere may be much larger than the tensile or the compressive strength of the body. So the usage of the hydrodynamics theory is validated. The estimates show that the transverse velocity of the substance of the body U is of the order of (rho(sub a)/rho(sub o))(sup 1/2)V where V is the velocity of the body and rho(sub o) is its density, rho(sub a) is the density of the atmosphere. The separation of the fragments is larger than the diameter of the body D if D is less than D(sub c) = 2H(square root of rho(sub a)/rho(sub o)), where H is the characteristic scale of the atmosphere. For an icy body one obtains U = 1/30(V) and critical diameter D(sub C) = 500 m. The process of the disintegration of the body is still not fully understood and so one can use the numerical simulation to investigate it. Such simulations where conducted for the Venusian atmosphere and the gaseous equation of state of the body was used. For the Earth atmosphere for the velocity V = 50 km/s the pressure at the blunt nose of the body is 25 kbar, and is of the order of bulk modulus of compressibility of the water or ice. The realistic EOS of water in tabular form was used. It was assumed that the initial shape of the body was spherical and the initial diameter D(sub o) of the body is 200 m and so it is smaller than the critical diameter D(sub C). The initial kinetic energy of the icy body is equivalent to the energy of the explosion 1200 Mt of TNT. The results of the simulation of the deformation of the body during its vertical flight through the atmosphere and during its impact into the ocean are presented.

  18. A Study on Earth Re-entry Capsules with Deployable Aerobrakes for Recoverable Microgravity Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carandente, Valerio; Savino, Raffaele; D'Oriano, Vera; Fortezza, Raimondo

    2015-06-01

    Deployable aerobrakes for Earth re-entry capsules may offer many advantages in the near future, including the opportunity to recover on Earth scientific payloads from the Space with reduced risks and costs with respect to conventional systems. Such capsules can be accommodated in the selected launcher in folded configuration optimizing the available volume and, when planned by the mission profile, the aerobrake can be deployed in order to increase the surface exposed to the hypersonic flow and therefore to reduce the ballistic parameter. This can offer as main advantage the opportunity to perform an aerodynamic de-orbit of the system without the need of a dedicated propulsive subsystem and an atmospheric re-entry with reduced aerothermal and mechanical loads making possible the use of relatively lightweight and cheap thermal protection system materials. To ensure the recovery of the capsule, the deployable surface can be modulated to obtain the aerodynamic control of the de-orbit trajectory in order to correctly target the capsule towards the selected landing site for post-flight analyses and operations. The main objective of the work is to present a number of feasible mission profiles for orbital platforms to/from Low Earth Orbit aimed in particular at scientific experiments in microgravity conditions. In addition, a suborbital scenario for a technological demonstrator, useful to experimentally verify the system applicability before the design of orbital missions, is also presented and discussed.

  19. Potential application of X-ray communication through a plasma sheath encountered during spacecraft reentry into earth's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Huan; Tang, Xiaobin; Hang, Shuang; Liu, Yunpeng; Chen, Da

    2017-03-01

    Rapid progress in exploiting X-ray science has fueled its potential application in communication networks as a carrier wave for transmitting information through a plasma sheath during spacecraft reentry into earth's atmosphere. In this study, we addressed the physical transmission process of X-rays in the reentry plasma sheath and near-earth space theoretically. The interactions between the X-rays and reentry plasma sheath were investigated through the theoretical Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin method, and the Monte Carlo simulation was employed to explore the transmission properties of X-rays in the near-earth space. The simulation results indicated that X-ray transmission was not influenced by the reentry plasma sheath compared with regular RF signals, and adopting various X-ray energies according to different spacecraft reentry altitudes is imperative when using X-ray uplink communication especially in the near-earth space. Additionally, the performance of the X-ray communication system was evaluated by applying the additive white Gaussian noise, Rayleigh fading channel, and plasma sheath channel. The Doppler shift, as a result of spacecraft velocity changes, was also calculated through the Matlab Simulink simulation, and various plasma sheath environments have no significant influence on X-ray communication owing to its exceedingly high carrier frequency.

  20. Collisional-radiative model in air for earth re-entry problems

    SciTech Connect

    Bultel, Arnaud; Cheron, Bruno G.; Bourdon, Anne; Motapon, Ousmanou; Schneider, Ioan F.

    2006-04-15

    A nonlinear time-dependent two-temperature collisional-radiative model for air plasma has been developed for pressures between 1 kPa and atmospheric pressure to be applied to the flow conditions of space vehicle re-entry into the Earth's atmosphere. The model consists of 13 species: N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, N, O, NO, N{sub 2}{sup +}, O{sub 2}{sup +}, N{sup +}, O{sup +}, NO{sup +}, O{sub 2}{sup -}, O{sup -} in their ground state and major electronic excited states and of electrons. Many elementary processes are considered given the temperatures involved (up to 10 000 K). Time scales to reach the final nonequilibrium or equilibrium steady states are derived. Then we apply our model to two typical re-entry situations and show that O{sub 2}{sup -} and O{sup -} play an important role during the ionization phase. Finally, a comparison with existing reduced kinetic mechanisms puts forward significant discrepancies for high velocity flows when the flow is in chemical nonequilibrium and smaller discrepancies when the flow is close to chemical equilibrium. This comparison illustrates the interest of using a time-dependent collisional-radiative model to validate reduced kinetic schemes for the relevant time scales of the flows studied.

  1. Assessment of the consequences of the Fengyun-1C breakup in low Earth orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardini, Carmen

    On 11 January 2007, the 880 kg (958 kg at launch) weather spacecraft Fengyun-1C, launched on 10 May 1999 into a sun-synchronous orbit with a CZ-4B booster from the Taiyuan Satellite Launch Center, was destroyed over central China as a result of the first successful Chinese anti-satellite weapon test. It was carried out with a direct ascent interception with a kinetic energy kill vehicle launched by an SC-19 missile, fired from a mobile ground platform close to the Xichang Satellite Launch Center. While the technical details of the test, probably the third attempt, and the characteristics of the weapon used remain shrouded in secrecy, the intentional breakup of the aging weather spacecraft, fully functional until 2005, produced a huge amount of debris in one of the orbital regimes already most affected by past fragmentation events. At present, the US Space Surveillance Network has identified about 2600 objects, typically larger than 10 cm, but the fragments larger than 1 cm may be more than 100,000. After two decades of substantial international progress in the field of orbital debris mitigation, in order to preserve the low Earth and geosynchronous environments for future space missions, the Fengyun-1C destruction represented a serious turnabout. In fact, it abruptly increased by approximately 20% the number of cataloged debris in orbit. To give a rough idea of the impact of this single event on the circumterrestrial environment, it is sufficient to realize that about 15 years of global space activity - including failures and accidental breakups - had been needed to increase, by a comparable amount, the number of cataloged debris in orbit to the level observed before the Chinese anti-satellite test. The purpose of this presentation is to assess the impact of the debris cloud generated by the Fengyun-1C breakup on the low Earth environment. The anti-satellite test was carried out at an altitude of about 863 km, spreading the cataloged fragments between 200 and 4000

  2. The breakup of a meteorite parent body and the delivery of meteorites to earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benoit, Paul H.; Sears, D. W. G.

    1992-01-01

    Whether many of the 10,000 meteorites collected in the Antarctic are unlike those falling elsewhere is contentious. The Antarctic H chondrites, one of the major classes of stony meteorites, include a number of individuals with higher induced thermoluminescence peak temperatures than observed among non-Antarctic H chondrites. The proportion of such individuals decreases with the mean terrestrial age of the meteorites at the various ice fields. These H chondrites have cosmic-ray exposure ages of about 8 million years, experienced little cosmic-ray shielding, and suffered rapid postmetamorphic cooling. Breakup of the H chondrite parent body, 8 million years ago, may have produced two types of material with different size distributions and thermal histories. The smaller objects reached earth more rapidly through more rapid orbital evolution.

  3. Benchmark Shock Tube Experiments for Radiative Heating Relevant to Earth Re-Entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandis, A. M.; Cruden, B. A.

    2017-01-01

    Detailed spectrally and spatially resolved radiance has been measured in the Electric Arc Shock Tube (EAST) facility for conditions relevant to high speed entry into a variety of atmospheres, including Earth, Venus, Titan, Mars and the Outer Planets. The tests that measured radiation relevant for Earth re-entry are the focus of this work and are taken from campaigns 47, 50, 52 and 57. These tests covered conditions from 8 km/s to 15.5 km/s at initial pressures ranging from 0.05 Torr to 1 Torr, of which shots at 0.1 and 0.2 Torr are analyzed in this paper. These conditions cover a range of points of interest for potential fight missions, including return from Low Earth Orbit, the Moon and Mars. The large volume of testing available from EAST is useful for statistical analysis of radiation data, but is problematic for identifying representative experiments for performing detailed analysis. Therefore, the intent of this paper is to select a subset of benchmark test data that can be considered for further detailed study. These benchmark shots are intended to provide more accessible data sets for future code validation studies and facility-to-facility comparisons. The shots that have been selected as benchmark data are the ones in closest agreement to a line of best fit through all of the EAST results, whilst also showing the best experimental characteristics, such as test time and convergence to equilibrium. The EAST data are presented in different formats for analysis. These data include the spectral radiance at equilibrium, the spatial dependence of radiance over defined wavelength ranges and the mean non-equilibrium spectral radiance (so-called 'spectral non-equilibrium metric'). All the information needed to simulate each experimental trace, including free-stream conditions, shock time of arrival (i.e. x-t) relation, and the spectral and spatial resolution functions, are provided.

  4. Novel Hybrid Ablative/Ceramic Heatshield for Earth Atmospheric Re-Entry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barcena, J.; Florez, S.; Perez, B.; Pinaud, G.; Bouilly, J.-M.; Fischer, W. P. P.; de Montburn, A.; Descomps, M.; Zuber, C.; Rotaermel, W.; Hald, H.; Pereira, C.; Mergia, K.; Triantou, K.; Marinou, A.; Vekinis, G.; Ionescu, G.; Ban, C.; Stefan, A.; Leroy, V.; Bernard, D.; Massuti, B.; Herdrich, G.

    2014-06-01

    Original approaches based on ablative materials and novel TPS solutions are required for space applications, where resistance to extreme oxidative environments and high temperatures are required. For future space exploration the demands for the thermal shield go beyond the current state-of-the-art. Therefore, the development of new thermal protection materials and systems at a reasonable mass budget is absolutely essential to ensure European non-dependence on corresponding restricted technologies. The three year long FP7 project HYDRA aims at the development of a novel thermal protection system through the integration of a low density ablative outer-shield on top of an advanced thermo-structural ceramic composite layer and will provide an innovative technology solution consistent with the capabilities of European technologies and material providers. This paper summarizes the current status of the scientific activities carried out after two years of progress in terms of design, integration and verification of a robust and lightweight thermal shield solution for atmospheric earth re-entry.

  5. Reentry response of the lightweight radioisotope heater unit resulting from a Cassini Venus-Venus-Earth-Jupiter gravity assist maneuver accident

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-01

    Reentry analyses consisting of ablation response, thermal response and thermal stress response have been conducted on the Lightweight Radioisotope Heater Unit (LWRHU) for Cassini/Venus-Venus-Earth-Jupiter-Gravity-Assist (VVEJGA) reentry conditions. Sequential ablation analyses of the LWRHU aeroshell, and the fuel pellet have been conducted in reentry regimes where the aeroshell has been deemed to fail. The failure criterion for ablation is generally assumed to be recession corresponding to 75% and 100% of the wall thickness. The 75% recession failure criteria allows for uncertainties that result mainly because of the high energies involved in the VVEJGA reentries compared to orbital decay reentries. Risk evaluations should consider the fact that for shallow flight paths the unit may disassemble at high-altitude as a result of ablation or may remain intact with a clad that had been molten. Within the limitations of the methodologies and assumptions of the analyses, the results indicate that: (1) For a side-on stable LWRHU reentry, aeroshell ablation failures occur for all reentry angles. (2)For a side-on spinning LWRHU reentry, aeroshell ablation failures are minimal. (3) For the tumbling LWRHU reentry, the aeroshell survives for most angles. (4) For the thermostructural analyses, using both a 1% and 5% allowable strain, all reentry angles and orientations examined resulted in small localized failures, but aeroshell breach is not predicted for any case. The analyses included in this report concentrate on VVEJGA reentry scenarios. Analyses reported previously have demonstrated that the LWRHU has adequate design margin to survive reentry from orbital decay scenarios and most injection scenarios at speeds up to escape speeds. The exception is a narrow range of flight path angles that produce multiple skip trajectories which may have excessive ablation.

  6. An Analysis of Recent Major Breakups in the Low Earth Orbit Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, J.-C.; Anz-Meador, P. D.

    2010-01-01

    Of the 4 recent major breakup events, the FY-1C ASAT test and the collision between Iridium 33 and Cosmos 2251 generated the most long-term impact to the environment. About half of the fragments will still remain in orbit at least 20 years after the breakup. The A/M distribution of the Cosmos 2251 fragments is well-described by the NASA Breakup Model. Satellites made of modern materials (such as Iridium 33), equipped with large solar panels, or covered with large MLI layers (such as FY-1C) may generated significant amount of high A/M fragments upon breakup.

  7. Planet Earth Set to Broil: Thermal Radiation from Chicxulub Ejecta Reentry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldin, T. J.; Melosh, H. J.

    2009-03-01

    We model the thermal radiation transfer due to the atmospheric reentry of hypervelocity Chicxulub impact ejecta. Self-shielding of downward radiation by the spherules limits the magnitude and duration of the thermal pulse at the Earth’s surface.

  8. Astronaut Thermal Exposure: Re-Entry After Low Earth Orbit Rescue Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillis, David B.; Hamilton, Douglas; Ilcus, Stana; Stepaniak, Phil; Son, Chang; Bue, Grant

    2009-01-01

    The STS-125 mission, launched May 11, 2009, is the final servicing mission to the Hubble Space Telescope. The repair mission's EVA tasks are described, including: installing a new wide field camera; installing the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph; repairing the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph; installing a new outer blanket layer; adding a Soft Capture and Rendezvous System for eventual controlled deorbit in about 2014; replacing the 'A' side Science Instrument Command and Data Handling module; repairing the Advanced Camera for surveys; and, replacing the rate sensor unit gyroscopes, fine guidance sensors and 3 batteries. Additionally, the Shuttle crew cabin thermal environment is described. A CFD model of per person CO2 demonstrates a discrepancy between crew breathing volume and general mid-deck levels of CO2. A follow-on CFD analysis of the mid-deck temperature distribution is provided. Procedural and engineering mitigation plans are presented to counteract thermal exposure upon reentry to the Earth atmosphere. Some of the procedures include: full cold soak the night prior to deorbit; modifying deck stowage to reduce interference with air flow; and early securing of avionics post-landing to reduce cabin thermal load prior to hatch opening. Engineering mitigation activities include modifying the location of the aft starboard ICUs, eliminating the X3 stack and eliminating ICU exhaust air directed onto astronauts; improved engineering data of ICU performance; and, verifying the adequacy of mid-deck temperature control using CFD models in addition to lumped parameter models. Post-mitigation CFD models of mid-deck temperature profiles and distribution are provided.

  9. The break-up of Rodinia, birth of Gondwana, true polar wander and the snowball Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, Paul F.

    A major global plate reorganisation occurred between ˜750 and ˜550 Ma. Gondwana was assembled following the dispersal of Rodinia, a supercontinent centred on Laurentia in existence since ˜1050 Ma. The reorganisation began when tectonic elements, later composing East Gondwana, rotated piecemeal away from the Pacific margin of Laurentia. These elements swept across the ancestral Pacific (Mozambique) Ocean that lay between Laurentia and the combined African cratons of Congo and Kalahari, which were loosely joined after ˜820 Ma. Simultaneously, the Adamastor (Brasilide) Ocean closed by subduction bordering the West Gondwana cratons, drawing virtually all of Gondwana together by ˜550 Ma. The final assembly of Gondwana occurred contemporaneously with the separation of Laurentia from West Gondwana. It has been postulated that the imprint of Rodinia's long-lived existence on lower mantleconvection produced a prolate ellipsoidal geoid figure. This could give rise to episodic inertial interchange true polar wander (IITPW), meaning that the entire silicate shell of the Earth (above the core-mantle boundary) rolled through 90° with respect to the diurnal spin axis in ˜15 Ma (equivalent to an apparent polar wander velocity of ˜66 cm a -1. Although empirical arguments for IITPW of Cambrian age appear to be flawed, evidence for an ultra-fast ( > 40 cm a -1) meridional component of apparent polar wander for Laurentia between 564 and 550 Ma suggests that IITPW might have occurred at that time. The break-up of Rodinia increased the continental margin area and preferential organic C burial globally, which is reflected by high δ 13C values in seawater proxies. The consequent drawdown of CO 2 is implicated in a succession of runaway ice-albedo catastrophes between ˜750 and ˜570 Ma, during each of which the oceans completely froze over. Each "snowball" Earth event must have lasted for millions of years because their terminations depended on extreme CO 2 levels, built up by

  10. Reentry response of the light weight radioisotope heater unit resulting from a Venus-Earth-Earth Gravity Assist maneuver accident

    SciTech Connect

    Hagan, J.C.

    1988-10-01

    Reentry analyses consisting of ablation response, thermal response and thermal stress response have been conducted on the Light Weight Radioisotope Heater Unit for Galileo/VEEGA reentry conditions. Sequential ablation analyses of the LWRHU aeroshell, the fuel clad, and the fuel pellet have been conducted in reentry regimes where the aeroshell has been deemed to fail. The failure criterion for ablation is assumed to be recession corresponding to 50% of the wall thickness (the design criterion recommended in the DOE Overall Safety Manual). Although the analyses have been carried far beyond this limit (as presented and discussed herein), JHU/APL endorses the position that failure may occur at the time that this recession is achieved or at lower altitudes within the heat pulse considering the uncertainties in the aerodynamic, thermodynamic, and thermo-structural analyses and modeling. These uncertainties result mainly because of the high energies involved in the VEEGA reentries compared to orbital decay reentries. Risk evaluations should consider the fact that for shallow flight paths the unit may disassemble at high-altitude as a result of ablation or may remain intact until it impacts with a clad that had been molten. 80 refs., 46 figs., 16 tabs.

  11. Aero-thermo-dynamic analysis of a low ballistic coefficient deployable capsule in Earth re-entry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuppardi, G.; Savino, R.; Mongelluzzo, G.

    2016-10-01

    The paper deals with a microsatellite and the related deployable recovery capsule. The aero-brake is folded at launch and deployed in space and is able to perform a de-orbiting controlled re-entry. This kind of capsule, with a flexible, high temperature resistant fabric, thanks to its lightness and modulating capability, can be an alternative to the current ;conventional; recovery capsules. The present authors already analyzed the trajectory and the aerodynamic behavior of low ballistic coefficient capsules during Earth re-entry and Mars entry. In previous studies, aerodynamic longitudinal stability analysis and evaluation of thermal and aerodynamic loads for a possible suborbital re-entry demonstrator were carried out in both continuum and rarefied regimes. The present study is aimed at providing preliminary information about thermal and aerodynamic loads and longitudinal stability for a similar deployable capsule, as well as information about the electronic composition of the plasma sheet and its possible influence on radio communications at the altitudes where GPS black-out could occur. Since the computer tests were carried out at high altitudes, therefore in rarefied flow fields, use of Direct Simulation Monte Carlo codes was mandatory. The computations involved both global aerodynamic quantities (drag and longitudinal moment coefficients) and local aerodynamic quantities (heat flux and pressure distributions along the capsule surface). The results verified that the capsule at high altitude (150 km) is self-stabilizing; it is stable around the nominal attitude or at zero angle of attack and unstable around the reverse attitude or at 180° angle of attack. The analysis also pointed out the presence of extra statically stable equilibrium trim points.

  12. Effect of simulated Earth reentry exposure on mechanical properties of several oxide dispersion strengthened and superalloy sheet materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittenberger, J. D.

    1977-01-01

    The effects of simulated multiple reentry into the earth's atmosphere on the mechanical properties of several high temperature metallic sheet materials were evaluated. The materials included five tin-gage (nominally 0.025- or 0.037-cm) oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys and two thin-gage (nominally 0.037-cm) superalloys. Multiple reentry conditions were simulated through cyclic Plasma Arc Tunnel (PAT) exposure. PAT exposure generally consisted of 100 cycles of 600 second duration at 1255, 1366, or 1477 K in a Mach 4.6 airstream with an impact pressure of nominally 800 N/m2. PAT exposure generally produced a uniform oxide scale, oxide pits or intergranular oxidation, Kirkendall porosity, and alloy depletion zones except for the aluminum-containing ODS alloys. Only a uniform oxide scale was formed on the aluminum-containing ODS alloys. PAT exposure did not significantly affect the mechanical properties of the thin-gage (nominally 0.025- or 0.037-cm) alloys evaluated. Thus it appears that the microstructural changes produced by Plasma Arc Tunnel exposure has little influence on mechanical properties.

  13. 'What on earth can this possibly mean'? French reentry courts and experts' risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Herzog-Evans, Martine

    2016-01-01

    Against the backdrop of ten years of punitive criminal justice policies, the number of cases in which risk assessments by psychiatrist experts are mandatory has considerably increased in France. Because of complex and deeply ingrained cultural factors, most experts and academics oppose the use of actuarial or other structured judgement tools, which they assimilate to these policy changes. Parallel to this, the reentry judges in charge of making release and other community sentence decisions have maintained a strong rehabilitative and desistance-focused culture. Drawing on interviews with these judges and experts, the author wanted to assess the judges' expectations of experts' reports, their opinion on actuarial tools, and how they perceived experts and their aptitude to assess risk. The study showed that French reentry judges manage to keep experts' conclusions at bay when they do not fit with their desistance goals, as they can draw upon their own expertise and that of probation services. They do not have much faith in the professionalism and methodology of experts, and would like them to better demonstrate how they reach their conclusions. Moreover, criminogenic needs assessment would be much more useful to them than static risk assessment, which raises the issue as to why this is not the French probation services' role. Reentry judges who never encountered a report which uses a structured tool are influenced by the French ideological debate; those who have read such reports are unanimously in favour of such tools. It thus seems clear that they would like experts to be more strongly guided by science, but are not yet fully aware of what this entails. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Comparison of ORSAT and SCARAB Reentry Analysis Tools for a Generic Satellite Test Case

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, Robert L.; Hill, Nicole M.; Rochelle, W. C.; Johnson, Nicholas L.; Lips, T.

    2010-01-01

    Reentry analysis is essential to understanding the consequences of the full life cycle of a spacecraft. Since reentry is a key factor in spacecraft development, NASA and ESA have separately developed tools to assess the survivability of objects during reentry. Criteria such as debris casualty area and impact energy are particularly important to understanding the risks posed to people on Earth. Therefore, NASA and ESA have undertaken a series of comparison studies of their respective reentry codes for verification and improvements in accuracy. The NASA Object Reentry Survival Analysis Tool (ORSAT) and the ESA Spacecraft Atmospheric Reentry and Aerothermal Breakup (SCARAB) reentry analysis tools serve as standard codes for reentry survivability assessment of satellites. These programs predict whether an object will demise during reentry and calculate the debris casualty area of objects determined to survive, establishing the reentry risk posed to the Earth's population by surviving debris. A series of test cases have been studied for comparison and the most recent uses "Testsat," a conceptual satellite composed of generic parts, defined to use numerous simple shapes and various materials for a better comparison of the predictions of these two codes. This study is an improvement on the others in this series because of increased consistency in modeling techniques and variables. The overall comparison demonstrated that the two codes arrive at similar results. Either most objects modeled resulted in close agreement between the two codes, or if the difference was significant, the variance could be explained as a case of semantics in the model definitions. This paper presents the main results of ORSAT and SCARAB for the Testsat case and discusses the sources of any discovered differences. Discussion of the results of previous comparisons is made for a summary of differences between the codes and lessons learned from this series of tests.

  15. Radiative Transfer in Earth Re-entry: Application to the Project Fire II Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamet, J.-M.; Babou, Y.; Riviere, Ph.; Soufiani, A.; Perrin, M.-Y.

    2006-11-01

    The aim of this paper is to contribute to the test case 6 by computing the radiative heat intensities at the stagnation point for four points of Fire II re-entry trajectory. The prescribed flow-fields provided in the test case booklet are used. The radiative heat flux computations are based on a line by line approach combined with the exhaustive database which has been developed previously [1, 2]. The previous benchmarking of air radiative properties on a LTE air plasma have shown the quality of this database [3]. Since then, the use of this database has been extended to non LTE applications. In addition to the radiation computations defined in test case 6, the spectral distribution of the different intensities is predicted on a wide spectral range from far UV to IR. This will be important for further flow/radiation coupling studies. Different modelling levels are tested: pure emission, absorption effects, and chemical nonequilibrium effects.

  16. The influence of a retarding rocket on the reentry trajectory of spacecraft to earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oren, Natan

    A computer simulation is examined which enables the influence of the earth's spinning atmosphere on the retarding rocket, lifting panels, and retarding parachute of a reentering spacecraft to be computed. The simulation is demonstrated in the case of a spherical satellite 1 m in diameter and weighing 200 kg that returns to earth from a circular reconnaissance orbit at 500 km above sea level.

  17. Technology and operational considerations for low-heat-rate trajectories. [of future winged earth reentry vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wurster, K. E.; Eldred, C. H.

    1979-01-01

    A broad parametric study which examines several critical aspects of low-heat-rate entry trajectories is performed. Low planform loadings associated with future winged earth-entry vehicles coupled with the potential application of metallic thermal protection systems (TPS) suggest that such trajectories are of particular interest. Studied are three heating conditions - reference, stagnation, and windward centerline, for both laminar and turbulent flow; configuration-related factors including planform loading and hypersonic angle of attack; and mission-related factors such as cross-range and orbit inclination. Results indicate benefits in the design of TPS to be gained by utilizing moderate angles of attack as opposed to high-lift coefficient, high angles of attack, during entry. An assessment of design and technology implications is made.

  18. Oblate-Earth Effects on the Calculation of Ec During Spacecraft Reentry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacon, John B.; Matney, Mark

    2017-01-01

    The bulge in the Earth at its equator has been shown to lead to a clustering of natural decays biased to occur towards the equator and away from the orbit's extreme latitudes. Such clustering must be considered when predicting the Expectation of Casualty (Ec) during a natural decay, because of the corresponding clustering of the human population in the lower latitudes. This study expands upon prior work, and formalizes in a single empirical equation the correction that must be made to the calculation of the average exposed population density as a result of this effect. The equation is represented as a function of ballistic number and inclination of the entering spacecraft over the credible range of ballistic numbers.

  19. Oblate-Earth Effects on the Calculation of Ec During Spacecraft Reentry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacon, John B.; Matney, Mark J.

    2017-01-01

    The bulge in the Earth at its equator has been shown to lead to a clustering of natural decays biased to occur towards the equator and away from the orbit's extreme latitudes. Such clustering must be considered when predicting the Expectation of Casualty (Ec) during a natural decay because of the clustering of the human population in the same lower latitudes. This study expands upon prior work, and formalizes the correction that must be made to the calculation of the average exposed population density as a result of this effect. Although a generic equation can be derived from this work to approximate the effects of gravitational and atmospheric perturbations on a final decay, such an equation averages certain important subtleties in achieving a best fit over all conditions. The authors recommend that direct simulation be used to calculate the true Ec for any specific entry as a more accurate method. A generic equation is provided, represented as a function of ballistic number and inclination of the entering spacecraft over the credible range of ballistic numbers.

  20. Infra-red and vibration tests of hybrid ablative/ceramic matrix technological breadboards for earth re-entry thermal protection systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barcena, Jorge; Garmendia, Iñaki; Triantou, Kostoula; Mergia, Konstatina; Perez, Beatriz; Florez, Sonia; Pinaud, Gregory; Bouilly, Jean-Marc; Fischer, Wolfgang P. P.

    2017-05-01

    A new thermal protection system for atmospheric earth re-entry is proposed. This concept combines the advantages of both reusable and ablative materials to establish a new hybrid concept with advanced capabilities. The solution consists of the design and the integration of a dual shield resulting on the overlapping of an external thin ablative layer with a Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) thermo-structural core. This low density ablative material covers the relatively small heat peak encountered during re-entry the CMC is not able to bear. On the other hand the big advantage of the CMC based TPS is of great benefit which can deal with the high integral heat for the bigger time period of the re-entry. To verify the solution a whole testing plan is envisaged, which as part of it includes thermal shock test by infra-red heating (heating flux up to 1 MW/m2) and vibration test under launcher conditions (Volna and Ariane 5). Sub-scale tile samples (100×100 mm2) representative of the whole system (dual ablator/ceramic layers, insulation, stand-offs) are specifically designed, assembled and tested (including the integration of thermocouples). Both the thermal and the vibration test are analysed numerically by simulation tools using Finite Element Models. The experimental results are in good agreement with the expected calculated parameters and moreover the solution is qualified according to the specified requirements.

  1. Reentry Experiment SAT-X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, Maurice; Kuhns, Casey; Honda, Motoaki; Shiely, Robert; Adamson, Aaron; Aken, Jordan; Walch, Robert; Galovich, Cynthia; Semak, Matthew

    2011-10-01

    The challenge of reentering the Earth's atmosphere is not new. For years, NASA has successfully designed vessels that have endured the harsh process of reentry. However, in most cases, this is made possible only through the act of over-engineering; designing to withstand conditions far beyond what is expected to be encountered. Though this method has been effective, there would be benefit in knowing more precisely what to expect upon atmospheric reentry. The University of Northern Colorado Reentry Experiment SAT-X project, launched from Wallops Island, Virginia on July 21, 2011, was designed to shed light on the reentry process by collecting motion data for a capsule ejected from a rocket. Moreover, a secondary objective was to test the capability of the prototype capsule to serve as a platform for future reentry experiments. The mission and preliminary results from the launch will be described.

  2. Small reentry vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudmeijer, K. J.

    1987-12-01

    The design and potential applications of a small modular unguided reentry vehicle (SMURV) being developed for ESA are discussed. The first studies of the SMURV concept in the Spacemail program (for transporting small payloads from the Space Shuttle to earth) are recalled; the steps in a typical Spacemail operation are listed and briefly characterized; and the smaller version of SMURV (40 kg instead of 120 kg) developed for a Space Station Spacemail project (requiring 1000-1500 SMURVs) is described. This SMURV configuration comprises a detachable propulsion module and a reentry module (containing the parachute system and the recovery module). Consideration is given to a SMURV-type vehicle to return microgravity processing samples from the ESA Interim Flight Opportunity spacecraft, the technological challenges posed by SMURV design, and SMURV applications to the Comet Nucleus Sample Return and Cassini Titan Lander missions. Diagrams and drawings are provided.

  3. The Breakup

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lum, Lydia

    2011-01-01

    This article reports on the breakup between Texas Southmost College (TSC) and the upper-division University of Texas at Brownsville (UTB). The split marks the official end of an unusual 20-year partnership between TSC and the University of Texas System that, for the first time, ushered four-year university education into overwhelmingly Latino…

  4. Novel Hybrid Ablative/Ceramic Layered Composite for Earth Re-entry Thermal Protection: Microstructural and Mechanical Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triantou, K.; Mergia, K.; Marinou, A.; Vekinis, G.; Barcena, J.; Florez, S.; Perez, B.; Pinaud, G.; Bouilly, J.-M.; Fischer, W. P. P.

    2015-04-01

    In view of spacecraft re-entry applications into planetary atmospheres, hybrid thermal protection systems based on layered composites of ablative materials and ceramic matrix composites are investigated. Joints of ASTERM™ lightweight ablative material with Cf/SiC (SICARBON™) were fabricated using commercial high temperature inorganic adhesives. Sound joints without defects are produced and very good bonding of the adhesive with both base materials is observed. Mechanical shear tests under ambient conditions and in liquid nitrogen show that mechanical failure always takes place inside the ablative material with no decohesion of the interface of the adhesive layer with the bonded materials. Surface treatment of the ablative surface prior to bonding enhances both the shear strength and the ultimate shear strain by up to about 60%.

  5. UARS Re-Entry Prediction and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stansbery, Eugene G.; Johnson, N. L.

    2012-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) deployed the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) from the Space Shuttle payload bay during the STS-48 mission in September, 1991. The 5700 kg satellite was decommissioned in December, 2005 and was maneuvered into a lower altitude orbit to shorten its on-orbit lifetime to reduce the probability of a debris producing accidental collision. The satellite reentered the Earth s atmosphere over the Pacific Ocean on September 24, 2011. Analysis by NASA s Orbital Debris Program Office using the ORSAT software predicted that approximately two dozen fragments from UARS would survive reentry to reach the ground. This presentation will discuss the reentry predictions made in the days prior to the reentry and compare the UARS reentry with other historical reentries. It will also present the results of the ORSAT analysis showing predicted surviving reentry objects

  6. 14 CFR 435.35 - Acceptable reentry risk for reentry of a reentry vehicle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Acceptable reentry risk for reentry of a reentry vehicle. To obtain safety approval for reentry, an applicant must demonstrate that risk for the proposed reentry, when assessed in combination with launch of the... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Acceptable reentry risk for reentry of...

  7. Pico Reentry Probes: Affordable Options for Reentry Measurements and Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ailor, William H.; Kapoor, Vinod B.; Allen, Gay A., Jr.; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj; Arnold, James O.; Rasky, Daniel J.

    2005-01-01

    It is generally very costly to perform in-space and atmospheric entry experiments. This paper presents a new platform - the Pico Reentry Probe (PREP) - that we believe will make targeted flight-tests and planetary atmospheric probe science missions considerably more affordable. Small, lightweight, self-contained, it is designed as a "launch and forget" system, suitable for experiments that require no ongoing communication with the ground. It contains a data recorder, battery, transmitter, and user-customized instrumentation. Data recorded during reentry or space operations is returned at end-of-mission via transmission to Iridium satellites (in the case of earth-based operations) or a similar orbiting communication system for planetary missions. This paper discusses possible applications of this concept for Earth and Martian atmospheric entry science. Two well-known heritage aerodynamic shapes are considered as candidates for PREP: the shape developed for the Planetary Atmospheric Experiment Test (PAET) and that for the Deep Space II Mars Probe.

  8. Surviving Atmospheric Spacecraft Breakup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szewczyk, Nathaniel J.; Conley, Catharine A.

    2003-01-01

    In essence, to survival a spacecraft breakup an animal must not experience a lethal event. Much as with surviving aircraft breakup, dissipation of lethal forces via breakup of the craft around the organism is likely to greatly increase the odds of survival. As spacecraft can travel higher and faster than aircraft, it is often assumed that spacecraft breakup is not a survivable event. Similarly, the belief that aircraft breakup or crashes are not survivable events is still prevalent in the general population. As those of us involved in search and rescue know, it is possible to survive both aircraft breakup and crashes. Here we make the first report of an animal, C. elegans, surviving atmospheric breakup of the spacecraft supporting it and discuss both the lethal events these animals had to escape and the implications implied for search and rescue following spacecraft breakup.

  9. 14 CFR 435.35 - Acceptable reentry risk for reentry of a reentry vehicle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Acceptable reentry risk for reentry of a reentry vehicle. 435.35 Section 435.35 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING REENTRY OF A REENTRY VEHICLE OTHER THAN A...

  10. 14 CFR 431.7 - Payload and payload reentry determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Payload and payload reentry determinations. 431.7 Section 431.7 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION... payload reentry determination is required to reenter a payload to Earth on an RLV unless the proposed...

  11. 14 CFR 435.7 - Payload reentry determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Payload reentry determination. 435.7 Section 435.7 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... transport a payload to Earth on a reentry vehicle unless the proposed payload is exempt from payload review...

  12. 14 CFR 435.7 - Payload reentry determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Payload reentry determination. 435.7 Section 435.7 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... transport a payload to Earth on a reentry vehicle unless the proposed payload is exempt from payload review...

  13. Reentry safety for the Topaz II Space Reactor: Issues and analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Connell, L.W.; Trost, L.C.

    1994-03-01

    This report documents the reentry safety analyses conducted for the TOPAZ II Nuclear Electric Propulsion Space Test Program (NEPSTP). Scoping calculations were performed on the reentry aerothermal breakup and ground footprint of reactor core debris. The calculations were used to assess the risks associated with radiologically cold reentry accidents and to determine if constraints should be placed on the core configuration for such accidents. Three risk factors were considered: inadvertent criticality upon reentry impact, atmospheric dispersal of U-235 fuel, and the Special Nuclear Material Safeguards risks. Results indicate that the risks associated with cold reentry are very low regardless of the core configuration. Core configuration constraints were therefore not established for radiologically cold reentry accidents.

  14. JHU/APL Breakup Analysis Tool (APLbat) for the New Horizons Radiological Contingency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lear, Matthew; McGrath, Brian; Takashima, Naruhisa; Heyler, Gene

    2007-01-01

    The New Horizons spacecraft will be the first to study Pluto and its largest moon Charon. It launched on 19 January 2006 and will encounter Pluto in 2015. The long duration of the flight, the great distance from the Sun, and the low temperatures in the Pluto-Kuiper Belt necessitate the use of a Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) for heating and electricity. RTGs provide heat and electricity through the radioactive decay of plutonium dioxide (PuO2) fuel pellets. The pellets are contained in protective shells called the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules. As the New Horizons Pluto-Kuiper Belt mission-implementing organization. The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) was responsible for determining the Earth impact footprint of the GPHS modules in the event of an orbital or suborbital re-entry accident during launch. The JHU/APL-developed computer program, APL Breakup Analysis Tool (APLbat), takes estimates of uncertainty in the initial vehicle (spacecraft) position and motion and, using a design-of-experiments approach and a six-degree-of-freedom dynamics model, simulates the continued motion of the vehicle, predicts its breakup as it re-enters the atmosphere, and produces a most probable elliptical Earth impact footprint for the GPHS modules.

  15. Surviving atmospheric spacecraft breakup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szewczyk, Nathaniel J.; McLamb, William

    2005-01-01

    Spacecraft travel higher and faster than aircraft, making breakup potentially less survivable. As with aircraft breakup, the dissipation of lethal forces via spacecraft breakup around an organism is likely to greatly increase the odds of survival. By employing a knowledge of space and aviation physiology, comparative physiology, and search-and-rescue techniques, we were able to correctly predict and execute the recovery of live animals following the breakup of the space shuttle Columbia. In this study, we make what is, to our knowledge, the first report of an animal, Caenorhabditis elegans, surviving the atmospheric breakup of the spacecraft that was supporting it and discuss both the lethal events these animals had to escape and the implications for search and rescue following spacecraft breakup.

  16. System specification for the reusable reentry satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The RRS design shall provide a relatively inexpensive method of access to micro and fractional gravity space environments for an extended period of time, with eventual intact recovery on the surface of the Earth. This specification establishes the performance, design, development, and test requirements for the Reusable Reentry Satellite (RRS) system.

  17. Aerodynamic Droplet Breakup.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-05-24

    3 I SURFACE TENSION VARIATIONS ... ........ 9 I VISCOUS EFFECTS ..................... 11 WEBER NUMBER EFFECT .i. . . . . ...... 11 SU MlARY...AVMA X = 100 m/s) ...................... .8 4 SURFACE TENSION EFFECTS ON DROPLET BREAKUP .... ........ 10 5 VISCOSITY EFFECTS ON DROPLET BREAKUP...studied. The primary goal of this initial phase was to examine the effect of liquid properties (viscosity and surface tension ) on the breakup mechanism

  18. Structures for Reentry Heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Roger A.; Swann, Robert T.

    1960-01-01

    The basic structural approaches for dealing with reentry heating of manned vehicles are summarized. The weight and development status of both radiative and ablative shields are given and the application of these shields to various vehicles is indicated.

  19. Simulation of the ATV Re-Entry Obsrvations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastida Virgili, B.; Krag, H.; Lips, T.; De Pasquale, E.

    2010-09-01

    The first ATV was launched on 9th March 2008 and, after a successful mission, the last phase was a controlled destructive re-entry on 29th September 2008, shortly after 13:30 UTC, in which the remains of the ATV and its load fell into the South Pacific Ocean. In order to better understand the re-entry processes, an insitu optical observation campaign was launched to record and analyze the ATV controlled re-entry with several instruments on board of two airplanes and also from the ISS. This observation campaign was successful and triggered several different still-ongoing studies on the extraction and analysis of data to draw conclusions on the adequacy of the re-entry break-up and explosion models used for the safety analysis of the ATV re-entry. This paper addresses the validation process for ESA’s model for re-entry survivability and on-ground risk assessment for explosive re-entry events using the observation data. The underlying rationale is to improve the models for the benefit of planning and execution of future controlled re-entries and in risk calculation in case of uncontrolled ones. The re-entry trajectory of the ATV, the explosive event and the trajectories of the fragments are simulated with the existing ESA tools and the EVOLVE explosion model. Additional software has been developed to simulate airborne sensor field of view(FOV) crossings based on the aircraft trajectories, attitude profile, sensor mounts and FOVs. Sensor performance and object radiation are modeled in order to generate synthetic images for the different sensors in the ISS and the two airplanes. These synthetic images and synthetic videos are compared with the available reentry observations of the ATV. This paper will present the software and techniques to generate synthetic imagery. It will give results of the comparison between the simulated and the real trajectories and fragmentation and explain the subsequent validation process of the ESA re-entry tools and the potential

  20. Airborne re-entry observation experiment SLIT: UV spectroscopy during STARDUST and ATV1 re-entry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löhle, Stefan; Wernitz, Ricarda; Herdrich, Georg; Fertig, Markus; Röser, Hans-Peter; Ritter, Heiko

    2011-09-01

    Emission spectra during re-entry have been measured in 2006 for the STARDUST capsule and in 2008 for the ATV1 "Jules Verne" re-entry. This paper summarizes the approach to design the airborne UV spectroscopic setup and its modifications with respect to the missions. For the STARDUST mission, results of data analysis of data presented in 2008 are given while for the ATV1 observation first spectra of the main disruption are exemplary presented. The surface radiation during the STARDUST re-entry is used to estimate convective and radiative heat flux using different analytical models. A first look at the spectroscopic footprint of ATV1 shows that during the first explosive event, a severe break-up of the main ATV1 structure occurs. However, a correlation with an explosion of fuel could not be observed.

  1. Lay-out of a re-usable re-entry vehicle required in a future European low earth orbit scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uebelhack, H. T.; Fave, J.

    1984-10-01

    The design concept of a reusable unmanned semiballistic-reentry spacecraft to provide raw materials and return processed materials from a European automated space production facility in LEO is presented and illustrated with drawings, diagrams, graphs, and tables of parameters. A typical mission scenario includes Ariane launch; rendezvous and docking for sample exchange; center-of-mass trimming by adjustment of the load after dedocking; updating of inertial systems; deorbiting to a ballistic arc by means of four 400-N thrusters; atmospheric flight from 100-km altitude at path angle 4 deg, lift/drag ratio 0.2, and maximum deceleration 5 g; and final deceleration and landing using three-stage drogue and main-parachutes, an air-bag system, and landing gears.

  2. Breakup Characteristics of Nanocylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, Harinath; Tiwari, Anupam; Mukhopadhyay, Saumyadip; Abraham, John

    2008-11-01

    Liquid breakup at the macroscale has been studied extensively for over a hundred years, but breakup at the nanoscale has only recently attracted attention. The focus of the present work is on the breakup of liquid nanocylinders. Nanocylinders are encountered in several engineering applications and biological systems, e.g. printing on micro-circuitry, precision manufacturing, Golgi apparatus. Breakup at the nanoscale is primarily through the Rayleigh capillary mechanism since the Reynolds numbers are low. The specific research question we address is: does the breakup-time of liquid cylinders at the nanolevel follow the classical scaling relationships derived for capillary breakup at the macrolevel. A coarse-grained molecular dynamics approach is employed for the studies. We will show that for changes in cylinder radius, the scaling holds; but, when viscosity and surface tension are varied, the scaling does not hold. Possible reasons, attributed primarily to the origin of the instability that leads to the breakup, are discussed. Comparisons of other outcomes at the two levels will also be presented.

  3. Spacecraft Orbital Debris Reentry: Aerothermal Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rochelle, Wm. C.; Kinsey, Robin E.; Reid, Ethan A.; Reynolds, Robert C.; Johnson, Nicholas L.

    1997-01-01

    In the past 40 years, thousands of objects have been placed in Earth orbit and are being tracked. Space hardware reentry survivability must be evaluated to assess risks to human life and property on the ground. The objective of this paper is to present results of a study to determine altitude of demise (burn-up) or survivability of reentering objects. Two NASA/JSC computer codes - Object Reentry Survival Analysis Tool (ORSAT) and Miniature ORSAT (MORSAT) were used to determine trajectories, aerodynamic aerothermal environment, and thermal response of selected spacecraft components. The methodology of the two codes is presented, along with results of a parametric study of reentering objects modeled as spheres and cylinders. Parameters varied included mass, diameter, wall thickness, ballistic coefficient, length, type of material, and mode of tumbling/spinning. Two fragments of a spent Delta second stage undergoing orbital decay, stainless steel cylindrical propellant tank and titanium pressurization sphere, were evaluated with ORSAT and found to survive entry, as did the actual objects. Also, orbital decay reentry predictions of the Japanese Advanced Earth Observing Satellite (ADEOS) aluminum and nickel box-type components and the Russian COSMOS 954 satellite beryllium cylinders were made with MORSAT. These objects were also shown to survive reentry.

  4. Analysis Of The ATV1 Re-Entry Using Near-UV Spectroscopic Data From The ESA/NASA Multi-Instrument Aircraft Observation Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohle, Stefan; Marynowski, Thomas; Knapp, Andreas; Wernitz, Ricarda; Lips, Tobias

    2011-05-01

    The first Automated Transfer Vehicle (ATV1) named Jules Verne was launched in March 2009 to carry over seven tons of experiments, fuel, water, food and other supplies to the International Space Station (ISS) orbiting at about 350 km. Attached to the ISS, it served as an extension to the space station, giving extra space for the six astronauts and cosmonauts who will ultimately form the permanent ISS Crew. On September 29, 2009, a controlled de-orbit maneuver lead the spacecraft to enter the Earth's atmosphere over the south pacific ocean. The following destructive re-entry was observed by two aircraft equipped with a wide variety of imaging and spectroscopic instruments. In this paper, we present quantitative results from the near-UV spectroscopic measurements acquired aboard an experimental DC-8 aircraft operated by NASA. The wavelength range of observation allows a determination of temperatures from radiation and the investigation of atomic radiation with respect to the identification of the destructive process. Furthermore, the excitation temperatures of chromium give an insight into the explosive events occurring during re-entry. Analysing the continuum of the measured spectra, the Planck radiation temperature is fitted to the data. These temperatures indicate that most of the radiating parts are titanium alloys, i.e. the outer structure of ATV1. All results within this paper are compared to a simulated break-up scenario and related to basic results from other experimenters which allows drawing an overall scenario for this destructive re-entry.

  5. The Secret of Guided Missile Re-Entry,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-06-25

    near vacuum. The success of guided missile re-entry writes a shining page in modern aerospace history! Starting with Meteors The meteor is a re-entry...Only a small portion survives and hits the earth’s surface as a meteorite . A meteor burns during its re-entry; then, what is the destiny of the...warhead of an intercontinental guided missile during its high speed re-entry? Will it be destroyed like the meteor ? This is indeed a big problem in the

  6. Project Re-Entry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tri-County Opportunities Industrialization Center, Inc., Harrisburg, PA.

    Project Re-Entry was a follow-up study of the status of more than 5,000 former students of the Tri-County Opportunities Industrialization Center (OIC) in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, who either never completed the entire General Educational Development (GED) test battery or completed the entire GED battery but still lacked enough points to earn a GED…

  7. First-Order Simulation of Strewn Debris Fields Accompanying Exoatmospheric Re-entry Vehicle Fragmentation by Hypervelocity Impact

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-09-01

    1961). 21. Passey, Quinn R., H.J. Melosh , Effects of Atmospheric Breakup on Crater Field Formation, Icarus 42, 211-253 (1980). 22. CRC Handbook...ORDER SIMULATION OF STREWN DEBRIS FIELDS ACCO:MPANYING EXOATMOSPHERIC RE-ENTRY VEillCLE FRAGMENTATION BY HYPERVELOCITY IMPACT by Dr. Gregory W...STREWN DEBRIS FIELDS ACCOMPANYING EXOATMOSPHERIC RE-ENTRY VEHICLE FRAGMENTATION BY HYPERVELOCITY IMPACT by Dr. Gregory W. Frank Recommended By

  8. Description of Jet Breakup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papageorgiou, Demetrios T.

    1996-01-01

    In this article we review recent results on the breakup of cylindrical jets of a Newtonian fluid. Capillary forces provide the main driving mechanism and our interest is in the description of the flow as the jet pinches to form drops. The approach is to describe such topological singularities by constructing local (in time and space) similarity solutions from the governing equations. This is described for breakup according to the Euler, Stokes or Navier-Stokes equations. It is found that slender jet theories can be applied when viscosity is present, but for inviscid jets the local shape of the jet at breakup is most likely of a non-slender geometry. Systems of one-dimensional models of the governing equations are solved numerically in order to illustrate these differences.

  9. Artificial satellite break-ups. I - Soviet ocean surveillance satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, N. L.

    1983-02-01

    An analysis of the breakup patterns of eight Soviet Kosmos series ocean surveillance satellites is presented. It is noted that half of the 4700 objects presently detected in earth orbit are shards from destroyed objects. The locations and heading of each Soviet satellite breakup were tracked by the Naval Space Survelliance System. All events in the eastern hemisphere occurred in the ascending phase, while western hemisphere breakups happened in the descending phase. Gabbard (1971) diagrams of altitude vs. period are plotted as a function of a fragment's orbital period. The diagrams have been incorporated into a NASA computer program to backtrack along the fragments' paths to determine the pattern of the breakup. Although objects have been projected to have separated from some of the satellites before breakup, a discussion of the evidence leads to the conclusion that even though the satellites may have exploded no purpose can yet be discerned for the actions.

  10. Flight Performance of the Inflatable Reentry Vehicle Experiment 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dillman, Robert; DiNonno, John; Bodkin, Richard; Gsell, Valerie; Miller, Nathanael; Olds, Aaron; Bruce, Walter

    2013-01-01

    The Inflatable Reentry Vehicle Experiment 3 (IRVE-3) launched July 23, 2012, from NASA Wallops Flight Facility (WFF) on a Black Brant XI suborbital sounding rocket and successfully performed its mission, demonstrating the survivability of a hypersonic inflatable aerodynamic decelerator (HIAD) in the reentry heating environment and also illustrating the effect of an offset center of gravity on the HIAD's lift-to-drag ratio. IRVE-3 was a follow-on to 2009's IRVE-II mission, which demonstrated exo-atmospheric inflation, reentry survivability - without significant heating - and the aerodynamic stability of a HIAD down to subsonic flight conditions. NASA Langley Research Center is leading the development of HIAD technology for use on future interplanetary and Earth reentry missions.

  11. Reusable Reentry Satellite (RRS): Configuration trade study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The overall Reusable Reentry Satellite (RRS) Phase B Study objective is to design a relatively inexpensive satellite to access space for extended periods of time, with eventual recovery of experiments on Earth. The expected principal use for such a system is research on the effects of variable gravity (0-1.5 g) and radiation on small animals, plants, lower life forms, tissue samples, and materials processes. The RRS will be capable of: (1) being launched by a variety of expendable launch vehicles; (2) operating in low earth orbit as a free flying unmanned laboratory; and (3) executing independent atmospheric reentry and soft landing. The RRS will be designed to be refurbished and reused up to three times a year for a period of 10 years. The information provided in this report describes the process involved in the evolution of the RRS overall configuration. This process considered reentry aerodynamics, aerothermodynamics, internal equipment layout, and vehicle mass properties. This report delineates the baseline design decisions that were used to initiate the RRS design effort. As a result, there will be deviations between this report and the RRS Final Report. In those instances, the RRS Final Report shall be considered to be the definitive reference.

  12. Modeling of drop breakup in the bag breakup regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.; Chang, S.; Wu, H.; Xu, J.

    2014-04-01

    Several analytic models for predicting the drop deformation and breakup have been developed over the last three decades, but modeling drop breakup in the bag-type regime is less reported. In this Letter, a breakup model has been proposed to predict the drop deformation length and breakup time in the bag-type breakup regime in a more accurate manner. In the present model, the drop deformation which is approximately as the displacement of the centre of mass (c. m.) along the axis located at the centre of the drop, and the movement of c. m. is obtained by solving the pressure balance equation. The effects of the drop deformation on the drop external aerodynamic force are considered in this model. Drop breakup occurs when the deformation length reaches the maximum value and the maximum deformation length is a function of Weber number. The performance and applicability of the proposed breakup model are tested against the published experimental data.

  13. Analysis of reentry into the White Sands Missile Range (WSMR) for the LifeSat mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hametz, M.; Roszman, L.; Snow, F.; Cooley, J.

    1993-01-01

    This study investigates the reentry of the LifeSat vehicles into the WSMR. The LifeSat mission consists of two reusable reentry satellites, each carrying a removable payload module, which scientists will use to study long-term effects of microgravity, Van Allen belt radiation, and galactic cosmic rays on living organisms. A series of missions is planned for both low-Earth circular orbits and highly elliptic orbits. To recover the payload module with the specimens intact, a soft parachute landing and recovery at the WSMR is planned. This analysis examines operational issues surrounding the reentry scenario to assess the feasibility of the reentry.

  14. The X-37 Demonstrator Re-Entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Pictured is an artist's concept of the X-37 Demonstrator re-entry. After being launched from the cargo bay of a Shuttle as a secondary payload, the X-37 remains on-orbit up to 21 days performing a variety of experiments before re-entering the Earth's atmosphere and landing. These vehicles supported the Agency's goal of dramatically reducing the cost of access to space in attempt to define the future of space transportation. The X-37 program was discontinued in 2003.

  15. GOCE Re-Entry Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastida, B.; Flohrer, T.; Lemmens, S.; Krag, H.

    2015-03-01

    Every year ESA, through the Space Debris Office, participates to an Inter-Agency Space Debris Coordination Committee (IADC) Re-entry Test Campaign.. For the campaign of 2013, ESA’s proposal to select GOCE's re-entry was accepted. The campaign opened on the 21st October 2013 after fuel depletion of the drag-compensating ion propulsion. GOCE was expected to enter into a phase of attitude-controlled fine-pointing mode (FPM) until the attitude controllers would be unable to cope with the atmospheric torques and then the satellite would enter in a phase of fully uncontrolled flight. In this paper, we present the evolution of ESA’s daily predictions on the re-entry epoch using different sources of orbital information. The uncertainties on the spacecraft operability (i.e. the physical limits of the attitude controller) led to a non-standard re-entry scenario were different attitudes had to be considered (instead of the commonly assumed random tumbling mode case that is used whenever no information on the physical properties of a re-entering object is available). A daily assessment of the status, in coordination with the flight control team, was required and implied a continuous update on the predicted failure point of the attitude controller. This in turn imposed the need for considering an asymmetric re-entry window. These operation-bound uncertainties were simulated to predict the attitude evolution after failure at different altitudes and their effects evaluated to be taken into account for the re-entry predictions. We present ESA’s re-entry prediction activities for GOCE, internally, and within the IADC, and address specific technical aspects and challenges for re-entry predictions, which are related to the expected and occurred attitude of GOCE during the final re-entry phase.

  16. Payload vehicle aerodynamic reentry analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Donald

    An approach for analyzing the dynamic behavior of a cone-cylinder payload vehicle during reentry to insure proper deployment of the parachute system and recovery of the payload is presented. This analysis includes the study of an aerodynamic device that is useful in extending vehicle axial rotation through the maximum dynamic pressure region. Attention is given to vehicle configuration and reentry trajectory, the derivation of pitch static aerodynamics, the derivation of the pitch damping coefficient, pitching moment modeling, aerodynamic roll device modeling, and payload vehicle reentry dynamics. It is shown that the vehicle dynamics at parachute deployment are well within the design limit of the recovery system, thus ensuring successful payload recovery.

  17. Application of the V-Gamma map to vehicle breakup analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, Ahmed; McRonald, Angus; Ahmadi, Reza; LIng, Lisa; Accad, Elie; Kim, Alex

    2003-01-01

    The V-Gamma map consists of all possible pairs of speed and flight path angle at atmospheric entry interface for accidental Earth reentries resulting from steady misaligned burns, incomplete burns, or no burn.

  18. History of satellite break-ups in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabbard, J.

    1985-01-01

    By 28 June 1961 the 1st Aerospace Control Squadron had cataloged 115 Earth orbiting satellites from data supplied by a rather diverse collection of radar and optical sensors. On 29 June 1961, the Able Star rocket of the 1961 Omicron launch exploded causing a quantum jump in the number of Earth orbiting objects. Since that time there have been 69 Earth orbiting satellites break up in space whose debris remained in orbit long enough for orbital elements to be developed. A list of the 69 breakups is provided. The debris from some of the lower altitude breakups has all decayed. Among the 69 breakups, 44 have cataloged debris remaining in orbit. As of 1 July 1982, the size of the cataloged orbiting population was exactly 4700. Forty-nine percent of these objects are fragments of the forty-four breakups. For each breakup the various orbits of its debris represent a family of orbits that are related in characteristics due to their common impulse launch. A few examples are shown of how the families are oriented in space.

  19. History of satellite break-ups in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabbard, J.

    1985-01-01

    By 28 June 1961 the 1st Aerospace Control Squadron had cataloged 115 Earth orbiting satellites from data supplied by a rather diverse collection of radar and optical sensors. On 29 June 1961, the Able Star rocket of the 1961 Omicron launch exploded causing a quantum jump in the number of Earth orbiting objects. Since that time there have been 69 Earth orbiting satellites break up in space whose debris remained in orbit long enough for orbital elements to be developed. A list of the 69 breakups is provided. The debris from some of the lower altitude breakups has all decayed. Among the 69 breakups, 44 have cataloged debris remaining in orbit. As of 1 July 1982, the size of the cataloged orbiting population was exactly 4700. Forty-nine percent of these objects are fragments of the forty-four breakups. For each breakup the various orbits of its debris represent a family of orbits that are related in characteristics due to their common impulse launch. A few examples are shown of how the families are oriented in space.

  20. Re-entry Experiment Launch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    On August 10, 2009, NASA successfully launched the Inflatable Re-entry Vehicle Experiment (IRVE) and proved that spacecraft can use inflatable heat shields to reduce speed and provide protection du...

  1. Sensitivity analysis and probabilistic re-entry modeling for debris using high dimensional model representation based uncertainty treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Piyush M.; Kubicek, Martin; Minisci, Edmondo; Vasile, Massimiliano

    2017-01-01

    Well-known tools developed for satellite and debris re-entry perform break-up and trajectory simulations in a deterministic sense and do not perform any uncertainty treatment. The treatment of uncertainties associated with the re-entry of a space object requires a probabilistic approach. A Monte Carlo campaign is the intuitive approach to performing a probabilistic analysis, however, it is computationally very expensive. In this work, we use a recently developed approach based on a new derivation of the high dimensional model representation method for implementing a computationally efficient probabilistic analysis approach for re-entry. Both aleatoric and epistemic uncertainties that affect aerodynamic trajectory and ground impact location are considered. The method is applicable to both controlled and un-controlled re-entry scenarios. The resulting ground impact distributions are far from the typically used Gaussian or ellipsoid distributions.

  2. Scarab -a Multi-Disciplinary Code for Destruction Analysis of Space-Craft during Re-Entry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koppenwallner, G.; Fritsche, B.; Lips, T.; Klinkrad, H.

    2005-02-01

    The uncontrolled, destructive re-entry of satellites and the related ground risk due to fragments reaching the ground have become of increased interest during the past years. The software system SCARAB (Spacecraft Atmospheric Re-entry and Aerothermal Break-up) is designed to calculate the destruction of a spacecraft during re-entry. Development of this code system started in 1995 and was conducted by HTG within the frame of various ESOC contracts with ITAM in Novosibirsk as continuous partner. The modular software system provide modules for satellite modelling and re-entry analysis The analysis modules combine aerodynamic/aero-thermal loads, 6-D flight dynamic, heat conduction, destruction by melting or fracture and the fragment tracking till ground impact SCARAB has been applied to many projects like ARIANE 5, ATV, ROSAT, Beppo SAX and Terrasar.

  3. Reentry and atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Atienza, Felipe; Jalife, José

    2007-03-01

    The mechanisms of human atrial fibrillation (AF) are poorly understood. Experimental studies have demonstrated that cholinergic AF in the sheep heart is maintained by high-frequency reentrant sources (drivers) that result in a consistent left-to-right frequency gradient. More recently, clinical studies have confirmed the existence of a hierarchical organization in the rate of activation of different regions in the atria of patients with paroxysmal and chronic AF. Although maximal dominant-frequency sites were found to play a crucial role in the maintenance of AF in some patients, whether AF drivers in humans are focal or reentrant and whether changes in driver activity alter spatial frequency gradients are unclear. To test the hypothesis that localized functional reentry maintains AF in humans, we determined the effects of adenosine infusion on local dominant frequency at different sites of both atria. In patients with paroxysmal AF, adenosine infusion increases local dominant frequencies, particularly at the pulmonary vein-left atrial junction region, amplifying a left-to-right frequency gradient. In patients with chronic AF, dominant frequency is significantly higher than in patients with paroxysmal AF in all atrial regions surveyed, with the highest adenosine increase of frequencies outside the pulmonary vein region. Adenosine-induced driver acceleration is strongly suggestive of a reentrant mechanism in both groups of AF patients.

  4. Simulation of a typical reentry vehicle TPS local flow features and material response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titov, E. V.; Levin, D. A.

    2011-05-01

    Statistical BGK/DSMC and continuum N-S simulations of a typical vehicle reentry flow were performed taking into account local flow features. The local surface features were known to cause problems during the Apollo era Earth atmosphere reentry Ref. [1] and therefore require close attention as the shapes and design details of the new reentry vehicles tend to build on the Apollo reentry capsules. The TPS thermal response to the high energy reentry flow in cracks and compression pad areas is important to understand to predict the TPS degradation due to the chemical and thermal ablation. The TPS study presented in this article includes the stagnation area micro crack and compression pads which disturb the flow and cause local augmentation of heat flux, which in turn, results in higher recession rates.

  5. Current reduction in a pseudo-breakup event: THEMIS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Z. H.; Pu, Z. Y.; Owen, C. J.; Fu, S. Y.; Chu, X. N.; Liu, J.; Angelopoulos, V.; Rae, I. J.; Yue, C.; Zhou, X.-Z.; Zong, Q.-G.; Cao, X.; Shi, Q. Q.; Forsyth, C.; Du, A. M.

    2014-10-01

    Pseudo-breakup events are thought to be generated by the same physical processes as substorms. This paper reports on the cross-tail current reduction in an isolated pseudo-breakup observed by three of the THEMIS probes (THEMIS A (THA), THEMIS D (THD), and THEMIS E (THE)) on 22 March 2010. During this pseudo-breakup, several localized auroral intensifications were seen by ground-based observatories. Using the unique spatial configuration of the three THEMIS probes, we have estimated the inertial and diamagnetic currents in the near-Earth plasma sheet associated with flow braking and diversion. We found the diamagnetic current to be the major contributor to the current reduction in this pseudo-breakup event. During flow braking, the plasma pressure was reinforced, and a weak electrojet and an auroral intensification appeared. After flow braking/diversion, the electrojet was enhanced, and a new auroral intensification was seen. The peak current intensity of the electrojet estimated from ground-based magnetometers, ~0.7 × 105 A, was about 1 order of magnitude lower than that in a typical substorm. We suggest that this pseudo-breakup event involved two dynamical processes: a current-reduction associated with plasma compression ahead of the earthward flow and a current-disruption related to the flow braking/diversion. Both processes are closely connected to the fundamental interaction between fast flows, the near-Earth ambient plasma, and the magnetic field.

  6. Satellite Re-entry Modeling and Uncertainty Quantification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horsley, M.

    2012-09-01

    LEO trajectory modeling is a fundamental aerospace capability and has applications in many areas of aerospace, such as maneuver planning, sensor scheduling, re-entry prediction, collision avoidance, risk analysis, and formation flying. Somewhat surprisingly, modeling the trajectory of an object in low Earth orbit is still a challenging task. This is primarily due to the large uncertainty in the upper atmospheric density, about 15-20% (1-sigma) for most thermosphere models. Other contributions come from our inability to precisely model future solar and geomagnetic activities, the potentially unknown shape, material construction and attitude history of the satellite, and intermittent, noisy tracking data. Current methods to predict a satellite's re-entry trajectory typically involve making a single prediction, with the uncertainty dealt with in an ad-hoc manner, usually based on past experience. However, due to the extreme speed of a LEO satellite, even small uncertainties in the re-entry time translate into a very large uncertainty in the location of the re-entry event. Currently, most methods simply update the re-entry estimate on a regular basis. This results in a wide range of estimates that are literally spread over the entire globe. With no understanding of the underlying distribution of potential impact points, the sequence of impact points predicted by the current methodology are largely useless until just a few hours before re-entry. This paper will discuss the development of a set of the High Performance Computing (HPC)-based capabilities to support near real-time quantification of the uncertainty inherent in uncontrolled satellite re-entries. An appropriate management of the uncertainties is essential for a rigorous treatment of the re-entry/LEO trajectory problem. The development of HPC-based tools for re-entry analysis is important as it will allow a rigorous and robust approach to risk assessment by decision makers in an operational setting. Uncertainty

  7. Lunar Return Reentry Thermal Analysis of a Generic Crew Exploration Vehicle Wall Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.; Tran, Van T.; Bowles, Jeff

    2007-01-01

    Thermostructural analysis was performed on generic crew exploration vehicle (GCEV) heat shielded wall structures subjected to reentry heating rates based on five potential lunar return reentry trajectories. The GCEV windward outer wall is fabricated with a graphite/epoxy composite honeycomb sandwich panel and the inner wall with an aluminum honeycomb sandwich panel. The outer wall is protected with an ablative Avcoat-5026-39H/CG thermal protection system (TPS). A virtual ablation method (a graphical approximation) developed earlier was further extended, and was used to estimate the ablation periods, ablation heat loads, and the TPS recession layer depths. It was found that up to 83 95 percent of the total reentry heat load was dissipated in the TPS ablation process, leaving a small amount (3-15 percent) of the remaining total reentry heat load to heat the virgin TPS and maintain the TPS surface at the ablation temperature, 1,200 F. The GCEV stagnation point TPS recession layer depths were estimated to be in the range of 0.280-0.910 in, and the allowable minimum stagnation point TPS thicknesses that could maintain the substructural composite sandwich wall at the limit temperature of 300 F were found to be in the range of 0.767-1.538 in. Based on results from the present analyses, the lunar return abort ballistic reentry was found to be quite attractive because it required less TPS weight than the lunar return direct, the lunar return skipping, or the low Earth orbit guided reentry, and only 11.6 percent more TPS weight than the low Earth orbit ballistic reentry that will encounter a considerable weight penalty to obtain the Earth orbit. The analysis also showed that the TPS weight required for the lunar return skipping reentry was much more than the TPS weight necessary for any of the other reentry trajectories considered.

  8. Trajectory Design and Control for the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory Re-Entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoge, Susan; Vaughn, Frank J., Jr.

    2001-01-01

    The Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) controlled re-entry operation was successfully conducted in June of 2000. The surviving parts of the spacecraft landed in the Pacific Ocean within the nominal impact target zone. The design of the maneuvers to control the trajectory to accomplish this re-entry presented several challenges. These challenges included the timing and duration of the maneuvers, propellant management, post-maneuver state determination, collision avoidance with other spacecraft, accounting for the break-up of the spacecraft into several pieces with a wide range of ballistic coefficients, and ensuring that the impact footprint would remain within the desired impact target zone in the event of contingencies. This paper presents the initial re-entry trajectory design and traces the evolution of that design into the maneuver sequence used for the re-entry. The paper also discusses the spacecraft systems and operational constraints imposed on the trajectory design and the required modifications to the initial design based on those constraints. Data from the reentry operation are also presented.

  9. Trajectory Design and Control for the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory Re-Entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoge, Susan; Vaughn, Frank; Bauer, Frank H. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) controlled re-entry operation was successfully conducted in June of 2000. The surviving parts of the spacecraft landed in the Pacific Ocean within the predicted footprint. The design of the maneuvers to control the trajectory to accomplish this re-entry presented several challenges. These challenges included timing and duration of the maneuvers, fuel management, post maneuver position knowledge, collision avoidance with other spacecraft, accounting for the break-up of the spacecraft into several pieces with a wide range of ballistic coefficients, and ensuring that the impact footprint would remain within the desired landing area in the event of contingencies. This paper presents the initial re-entry trajectory design and the evolution of the design into the maneuver sequence used for the re-entry. The paper discusses the constraints on the trajectory design, the modifications made to the initial design and the reasons behind these modifications. Data from the re-entry operation are presented.

  10. Secondary breakup of coal water slurry drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hui; Liu, Hai-Feng; Xu, Jian-Liang; Li, Wei-Feng

    2011-11-01

    To investigate secondary atomization of coal water slurry (CWS), deformation and breakup of eight kinds of CWS drops are presented using high speed digital camera. Based on morphology, deformation and breakup regimes of CWS drops can be termed some different modes: deformation, multimode breakup (including two sub-modes: hole breakup and tensile breakup), and shear breakup. Correlations on the ranges of breakup modes are also obtained. The conventional Weber number and Ohnesorge number are found to be insufficient to classify all breakup modes of CWS drops, so two other non-dimensional numbers based on rheology of CWS are suggested to use in the deformation and breakup regime map. Finally, total breakup time is studied and correlated, which increases with Ohnesorge number.

  11. An Analysis of Ablation-Shield Requirements for Manned Reentry Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Leonard

    1960-01-01

    The problem of sublimation of material and accumulation of heat in an ablation shield is analyzed and the results are applied to the reentry of manned vehicles into the earth's atmosphere. The parameters which control the amount of sublimation and the temperature distribution within the ablation shield are determined and presented in a manner useful for engineering calculation. It is shown that the total mass loss from the shield during reentry and the insulation requirements may be given very simply in terms of the maximum deceleration of the vehicle or the total reentry time.

  12. Simulated Reentry Heating by Torching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, Gale A.

    2008-01-01

    The two first order reentry heating parameters are peak heating flux (W/cm2) and peak heat load (kJ/cm2). Peak heating flux (and deceleration, gs) is higher for a ballistic reentry and peak heat load is higher for a lifting reentry. Manned vehicle reentries are generally lifting reentries at nominal 1-5 gs so that personnel will not be crushed by high deceleration force. A few off-nominal manned reentries have experienced 8 or more gs with corresponding high heating flux (but below nominal heat load). The Shuttle Orbiter reentries provide about an order of magnitude difference in peak heating flux at mid-bottom (TPS tiles, approximately 6 W/cm2 or 5 BTU/ft2- sec) and leading edge (RCC, approximately 60 W/cm2 or 50 BTU/ft2- sec). Orion lunar return and Mars sample lander are of the same order of magnitude as orbiter leading edge peak heat loads. Flight temperature measurements are available for some orbiter TPS tile and RCC locations. Return-to-Flight on-orbit tile-repair-candidate-material-heating performance was evaluated by matching propane torch heating of candidate-materials temperatures at several depths to orbiter TPS tile flight-temperatures. Char and ash characteristics, heat expansion, and temperature histories at several depths of the cure-in-place ablator were some of the TPS repair material performance characteristics measured. The final char surface was above the initial surface for the primary candidate (silicone based) material, in contrast to a receded surface for the Apollo-type ablative heat shield material. Candidate TPS materials for Orion CEV (LEO and lunar return), and for Mars sample lander are now being evaluated. Torching of a candidate ablator material, PICA, was performed to match the ablation experienced by the STARDUST PICA heat shield. Torching showed that the carbon fiberform skeleton in a sample of PICA was inhomogeneous in that sample, and allowed measurements (of the clumps and voids) of the inhomogeneity. Additional reentry

  13. An Empirical Study of Reentry Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pickering, Glenn S.; Galvin-Schaefers, Kate

    1988-01-01

    Compared 76 reentry working women with 78 career women. Found reentry women held lower-level jobs and scored lower on measures of assertiveness and autonomy than did career women. Reentry women did not score lower on self-esteem measures or dominance measures, and did not score higher than career women on either conflict or need for achievement…

  14. Correctional Practitioners on Reentry: A Missed Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunnison, Elaine; Helfgott, Jacqueline B.; Wilhelm, Cecilie

    2015-01-01

    Much of the literature on reentry of formerly incarcerated individuals revolves around discussions of failures they incur during reintegration or the identification of needs and challenges that they have during reentry from the perspective of community corrections officers. The present research fills a gap in the reentry literature by examining…

  15. Understanding Columbia's Reentry Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, Thomas H.

    2004-01-01

    Soon after the Space Shuttle Columbia accident occurred last year, a group of CFD analysts from NASA centers and private industry was organized to help determine the cause of the accident. This group was under the direction of the Applied Aeroscience and CFD Branch of the Aeroscience and Flight Mechanics Division at the Johnson Space Center. For external flow simulations, noncommercial CFD codes that specialize in hypersonic or high Mach number flows were used. These tools were used to determine heating rates, pressures, and temperatures for a large number of vehicle damage scenarios. Lockheed Martin Space Operations was called upon to provide CFD support in the area of internal flows within the shuttle wing cavity, and or these simulations, FLUENT 6.1 was chosen. Two large-scale, simplified models were run to understand the flow patterns once a breach of the internal wing cavity was initiated. The results were primarily used to visualize flow patterns within the wing cavity. The first CFD model included the entire left wing without the wheel. well cavity. The purpose of the first model, which did not include the reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) cavity along the wing leading edge, was to visualize the flow field within the wing cavity immediately after the leading edge spar breach, This model assumed that the flow coming into the wing cavity was nom1 to the spar. It included all o f the primary vents that allow for flow between the main cavities of the wing. A six-inch diameter hole was modeled in the spar at the approximate location where the spar breach was judged to have occurred, which was between RCC panels 8 and 9. The results of the modeling showed that at this location, the high temperature, high velocity gas stream entering the wing cavity impinged on the outboard wheel well cavity. Instrumentation in the Shuttle wheel well cavity registered abnormal temperatures during reentry, so the FLUENT results helped support the conclusion of the accident

  16. Understanding Columbia's Reentry Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    Soon after the Space Shuttle Columbia accident occurred last year, a group of CFD analysts from NASA centers and private industry was organized to help determine the cause of the accident. This group was under the direction of the Applied Aeroscience and CFD Branch of the Aeroscience and Flight Mechanics Division at the Johnson Space Center. For external flow simulations, noncommercia2 CFD codes that specialize in hypersonic or high Mach number flows were used. These tools were used to determine heating rates, pressures, and temperatures for a large number of vehicle damage scenarios. Lockheed Martin Space Operations was called upon to provide CFD support in the area of internal flows within the shuttle wing cavity, and for these simulations, FLUENT 6.1 was chosen. Two large-scale, simplified models were m to understand the flow patterns once a breach of the internal wing cavity was initiated. The results were primarily used to visualize flow patterns within the wing cavity. The first CFD model included the entire lee wing without the wheel well cavity. The purpose of the first model, which did not include the reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) cavity along the wing leading edge, was to visualize the flow field within the wing cavity immediately after the leading edge spar breach, This model assumed that the flow coming into the wing cavity was normal to the spar. It included all of the primary vents that allow for flow between the main cavities of the wing. A six-inch diameter hole was modeled in the spar at the approximate location where the spar breach was judged to have occurred, which was between RCC panels 8 and 9. The results of the modeling showed that at this location, the high temperature, high velocity gas stream entering the wing cavity impinged on the outboard wheel well cavity. Instrumentation in the Shuttle wheel well cavity registered abnormal temperatures during reentry, so the FLUENT results helped support the conclusion of the accident investigation

  17. Statistical Issues for Uncontrolled Reentry Hazards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matney, Mark

    2008-01-01

    A number of statistical tools have been developed over the years for assessing the risk of reentering objects to human populations. These tools make use of the characteristics (e.g., mass, shape, size) of debris that are predicted by aerothermal models to survive reentry. The statistical tools use this information to compute the probability that one or more of the surviving debris might hit a person on the ground and cause one or more casualties. The statistical portion of the analysis relies on a number of assumptions about how the debris footprint and the human population are distributed in latitude and longitude, and how to use that information to arrive at realistic risk numbers. This inevitably involves assumptions that simplify the problem and make it tractable, but it is often difficult to test the accuracy and applicability of these assumptions. This paper looks at a number of these theoretical assumptions, examining the mathematical basis for the hazard calculations, and outlining the conditions under which the simplifying assumptions hold. In addition, this paper will also outline some new tools for assessing ground hazard risk in useful ways. Also, this study is able to make use of a database of known uncontrolled reentry locations measured by the United States Department of Defense. By using data from objects that were in orbit more than 30 days before reentry, sufficient time is allowed for the orbital parameters to be randomized in the way the models are designed to compute. The predicted ground footprint distributions of these objects are based on the theory that their orbits behave basically like simple Kepler orbits. However, there are a number of factors - including the effects of gravitational harmonics, the effects of the Earth's equatorial bulge on the atmosphere, and the rotation of the Earth and atmosphere - that could cause them to diverge from simple Kepler orbit behavior and change the ground footprints. The measured latitude and longitude

  18. A design method for constellation of lifting reentry vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Yu; Kun, Liu

    2017-03-01

    As the reachable domain of a single lifting reentry vehicle is not large enough to cover the whole globe in a short time, which is disadvantageous to responsive operation, it is of great significance to study on how to construct a constellation of several lifting reentry vehicles to responsively reach any point of the globe. This paper addresses a design method for such a constellation. Firstly, an approach for calculating the reachable domain of a single lifting reentry vehicle is given, using the combination of Gauss Pseudospectral Method and SQP method. Based on that, the entire reachable domain taking the limit of responsive time into consideration is simplified reasonably to reduce the complexity of the problem. Secondly, a Streets-of-Coverage (SOC) method is used to design the constellation and the parameters of the constellation are optimized through simple analysis and comparison. Lastly, a point coverage simulation method is utilized to verify the correctness of the optimization result. The verified result shows that 6 lifting reentry vehicles whose maximum lift-to-drag ratio is 1.7 can reach nearly any point on the earth's surface between -50° and 50° in less than 90 minutes.

  19. Reentry Vehicle Flight Controls Design Guidelines: Dynamic Inversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ito, Daigoro; Georgie, Jennifer; Valasek, John; Ward, Donald T.

    2002-01-01

    This report addresses issues in developing a flight control design for vehicles operating across a broad flight regime and with highly nonlinear physical descriptions of motion. Specifically it addresses the need for reentry vehicles that could operate through reentry from space to controlled touchdown on Earth. The latter part of controlled descent is achieved by parachute or paraglider - or by all automatic or a human-controlled landing similar to that of the Orbiter. Since this report addresses the specific needs of human-carrying (not necessarily piloted) reentry vehicles, it deals with highly nonlinear equations of motion, and then-generated control systems must be robust across a very wide range of physics. Thus, this report deals almost exclusively with some form of dynamic inversion (DI). Two vital aspects of control theory - noninteracting control laws and the transformation of nonlinear systems into equivalent linear systems - are embodied in DI. Though there is no doubt that the mathematical tools and underlying theory are widely available, there are open issues as to the practicality of using DI as the only or primary design approach for reentry articles. This report provides a set of guidelines that can be used to determine the practical usefulness of the technique.

  20. Inclusive breakup of Borromean nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussein, M. S.; Carlson, B. V.; Frederico, T.

    2017-06-01

    We derive the inclusive breakup cross section of a three-fragment projectile nuclei, a = b + x 1 +x 2, in the spectator model. The resulting four-body cross section for observing b, is composed of the elastic breakup cross section which contains information about the correlation between the two participant fragments, and the inclusive non-elastic breakup cross section. This latter cross section is found to be a non-trivial four-body generalization of the Austern formula [1], which is proportional to a matrix element of the form, . The new feature here is the three-body absorption, represented by the imaginary potential, W 3b . We analyze this type of absorption and supply ideas of how to calculate its contribution.

  1. Near Term Effects from Satellite Break-Ups on Manned Space Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Theall, J. R.; Matney, M. J.

    2000-01-01

    Since 1961, almost 160 satellite break-ups have occurred on-orbit, and have been the major contributor to the growth of the orbital debris population. When a satellite breaks up, the debris exists in a relatively concentrated form, orbiting in a loose cloud with the parent body until orbital perturbations disperse the cloud into the average background. Manned space activities, which usually take place in low Earth orbit at altitudes less than 500 km, have been continuous for the past I I years while Mir was inhabited and promise to be again continuous when the International Space Station becomes permanently manned. This paper surveys historical breakups over the last I I years to determine the number that affect altitudes lower than 500 km. Selected breakup are analyzed using NASA's Satellite Breakup Risk Assessment Model (SBRAM) to determine the specific short term risk from those breakups to manned missions.

  2. Near Term Effects from Satellite Break-Ups on Manned Space Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Theall, J. R.; Matney, M. J.

    2000-01-01

    Since 1961, almost 160 satellite break-ups have occurred on-orbit, and have been the major contributor to the growth of the orbital debris population. When a satellite breaks up, the debris exists in a relatively concentrated form, orbiting in a loose cloud with the parent body until orbital perturbations disperse the cloud into the average background. Manned space activities, which usually take place in low Earth orbit at altitudes less than 500 km, have been continuous for the past I I years while Mir was inhabited and promise to be again continuous when the International Space Station becomes permanently manned. This paper surveys historical breakups over the last I I years to determine the number that affect altitudes lower than 500 km. Selected breakup are analyzed using NASA's Satellite Breakup Risk Assessment Model (SBRAM) to determine the specific short term risk from those breakups to manned missions.

  3. Test Cases for Reentry Survivability Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ailor, W.; Hallman, W.; Steckel, G.; Weaver, M.

    2012-01-01

    One approved approach for minimizing the long-term hazards posed by space debris is to reenter space hardware into the atmosphere at end-of-mission or to place hardware in an orbit with a relatively short lifetime. Selection of a short lifetime orbit vice a deorbited reentry into a safe area depends on predictions of the hazards posed by random reentry of the object. If the object is left in orbit, what is the casualty expectation associated with its eventual reentry? Clearly, having high confidence in reentry hazard prediction tools is important to this decision-making process and the final choice can have significant mission and cost impacts. This paper describes a set of test cases that can be used to validate reentry hazard models. The test cases were assembled from reentry cases where "known" and tracked objects reentered the atmosphere and debris from the reentries was subsequently found on the ground and was analyzed. The test cases include best estimates of the state, mass properties, and physical description of each object prior to reentry, the wind profile through which the debris fell (for one case), and the impact location and physical description of each surviving object. The report also summarizes results of metallurgical analyses conducted on surviving debris, which places limits on the maximum temperatures reached during reentry. Details on a specific reentry are included as an example.

  4. Incarceration, Prisoner Reentry, and Communities

    PubMed Central

    Morenoff, Jeffrey D.; Harding, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Since the mid-1970s the United States has experienced an enormous rise in incarceration and accompanying increases in returning prisoners and in post-release community correctional supervision. Poor urban communities are disproportionately impacted by these phenomena. This review focuses on two complementary questions regarding incarceration, prisoner reentry, and communities:(1) whether and how mass incarceration has affected the social and economic structure of American communities, and (2) how residential neighborhoods affect the social and economic reintegration of returning prisoners. These two questions can be seen as part of a dynamic process involving a pernicious “feedback” loop, in which mass incarceration undermines the structure and social organization of some communities, thus creating more criminogenic environments for returning prisoners and further diminishing their prospects for successful reentry and reintegration. PMID:25400321

  5. Incarceration, Prisoner Reentry, and Communities.

    PubMed

    Morenoff, Jeffrey D; Harding, David J

    2014-07-01

    Since the mid-1970s the United States has experienced an enormous rise in incarceration and accompanying increases in returning prisoners and in post-release community correctional supervision. Poor urban communities are disproportionately impacted by these phenomena. This review focuses on two complementary questions regarding incarceration, prisoner reentry, and communities:(1) whether and how mass incarceration has affected the social and economic structure of American communities, and (2) how residential neighborhoods affect the social and economic reintegration of returning prisoners. These two questions can be seen as part of a dynamic process involving a pernicious "feedback" loop, in which mass incarceration undermines the structure and social organization of some communities, thus creating more criminogenic environments for returning prisoners and further diminishing their prospects for successful reentry and reintegration.

  6. Reentry Motion and Aerodynamics of the MUSES-C Sample Return Capsule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Nobuaki; Yamada, Tetsuya; Hiraki, Koju; Inatani, Yoshifumi

    The Hayabusa spacecraft (MUSES-C) carries a small capsule for bringing asteroid samples back to the earth. The initial spin rate of the reentry capsule together with the flight path angle of the reentry trajectory is a key parameter for the aerodynamic motion during the reentry flight. The initial spin rate is given by the spin-release mechanism attached between the capsule and the mother spacecraft, and the flight path angle can be modified by adjusting the earth approach orbit. To determine the desired values of both parameters, the attitude motion during atmospheric flight must be clarified, and angles of attack at the maximum dynamic pressure and the parachute deployment must be assessed. In previous studies, to characterize the aerodynamic effects of the reentry capsule, several wind-tunnel tests were conducted using the ISAS high-speed flow test facilities. In addition to the ground test data, the aerodynamic properties in hypersonic flows were analyzed numerically. Moreover, these data were made more accurate using the results of balloon drop tests. This paper summarized the aerodynamic properties of the reentry capsule and simulates the attitude motion of the full-configuration capsule during atmospheric flight in three dimensions with six degrees of freedom. The results show the best conditions for the initial spin rates and flight path angles of the reentry trajectory.

  7. Fusion and Breakup of Weakly Bound Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Gomes, P. R. S.; Lubian, J.; Padron, I.; Crema, E.; Chamon, L. C.; Hussein, M. S.; Canto, L. F.

    2006-08-14

    We discuss the influence of the breakup process of weakly bound nuclei on the fusion cross section. The complete fusion for heavy targets is found to be suppressed due to the incomplete fusion following the breakup, whereas this effect is negligible for light targets. The total fusion cross sections for stable projectiles are not affected by the breakup process, whereas it is suppressed for halo projectiles. The non capture breakup is the dominant process at sub-barrier energies.

  8. Recent developments in Coulomb breakup calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Capel, P.

    2008-05-12

    The theory of reactions applied to Coulomb breakup of loosely-bound projectiles is reviewed. Both the Continuum Discretized Coupled Channel (CDCC) and time-dependent models are described. Recent results about sensitivity of breakup calculations to the projectile wave function are reviewed. Analyses of the extraction of radiative-capture cross section from Coulomb breakup measurements are presented. Current developments in breakup theory are also mentioned.

  9. Re-entry residency training

    PubMed Central

    Jamieson, Jean L.; Webber, Eric M.; Sivertz, Kristin S.

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To identify and quantify the reasons general practitioners and family physicians consider retraining and their reasons for not pursuing further training. DESIGN Population-based mailed survey. SETTING British Columbia. PARTICIPANTS Family physicians and general practitioners identified by the College of Physicians and Surgeons of British Columbia. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Practising physicians’ level of awareness of the University of British Columbia’s re-entry training program, the number and demographic characteristics of those who had considered retraining, their specialties of interest, and the barriers and possible inducements to retraining. RESULTS Only half of the survey respondents were aware of the re-entry training program at the University of British Columbia. A small but substantial number of practising general practitioners and family physicians were interested in taking specialty training from the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada. While several training programs were particularly popular (ie, anesthesia and psychiatry—18.5% of respondents for each), almost every specialty training program was mentioned. Physicians identified the length and hours of training, financial issues, family issues, and the need for relocation as obstacles to retraining. The availability of part-time training, regional training, and return-of-service financial assistance were all identified as potential inducements. CONCLUSION To meet the needs of practising physicians, re-entry training programs will need to consider flexibility, where feasible, with regard to choice of specialty, intensity, and location of postgraduate training. PMID:20547505

  10. Impacts, tillites, and the breakup of Gondwanaland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oberbeck, Verne R.; Marshall, John R.; Aggarwal, Hans

    1993-01-01

    Mathematical analysis demonstrates that substantial impact crater deposits should have been produced during the last 2 Gy of Earth's history. Textures of impact deposits are shown to resemble textures of tillites and diamictites of Precambrian and younger ages. The calculated thickness distribution for impact crater deposits produced during 2 Gy is similar to that of tillites and diamictites of 2 Ga or younger. We suggest, therefore, that some tillites/diamictites could be of impact origin. Extensive tillite/diamictite deposits predated continental flood basalts on the interior of Gondwanaland. Significantly, other investigators have already associated impact cratering with flood basalt volcanism and continental rifting. Thus, it is proposed that the breakup of Gondwanaland could have been initiated by crustal fracturing from impacts.

  11. Genesis Reentry Observations and Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suggs, R. M.; Swift, W. R.

    2005-01-01

    The Genesis spacecraft reentry represented a unique opportunity to observe a "calibrated meteor" from northern Nevada. Knowing its speed, mass, composition, and precise trajectory made it a good subject to test some of the algorithms used to determine meteoroid mass from observed brightness. It was also a good test of an inexpensive set of cameras that could be deployed to observe future shuttle reentries. The utility of consumer-grade video cameras was evident during the STS-107 accident investigation, and the Genesis reentry gave us the opportunity to specify and test commercially available cameras that could be used during future reentries. This Technical Memorandum describes the video observations and their analysis, compares the results with a simple photometric model, describes the forward scatter radar experiment, and lists lessons learned from the expedition and implications for the Stardust reentry in January 2006 as well as future shuttle reentries.

  12. Preventing re-entry to foster care.

    PubMed

    Carnochan, Sarah; Rizik-Baer, Daniel; Austin, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    Re-entry to foster care generally refers to circumstances in which children who have been discharged from foster care to be reunified with their family of origin, adopted, or provided kinship guardianship are returned to foster care. In the context of the federal performance measurement system, re-entry refers specifically to a return to foster care following an unsuccessful reunification. The federal Children and Family Services Review measures re-entry to foster care with a single indicator, called the permanency of reunification indicator, one of four indicators comprising the reunification composite measure. This review focuses on research related to the re-entry indicator, including the characteristics of children, caregivers and families, as well as case and child welfare services that are associated with a higher or lower risk of re-entry to foster care. Promising post-reunification services designed to prevent re-entry to foster care are described.

  13. Reentry survival analysis of tumbling metallic hollow cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sim, Hyung-seok; Kim, Kyu-hong

    2011-09-01

    The survival of orbital debris reentering the Earth's atmosphere is considered. The numerical approach of NASA's Object Reentry Survival Analysis Tool (ORSAT) is reviewed, and a new equation accounting for reradiation heat loss of hollow cylindrical objects is presented. Based on these, a code called Survivability Analysis Program for Atmospheric Reentry (SAPAR) has been developed, and the new equation for reradiation heat loss is validated. Using this equation in conjunction with the formulation used in ORSAT, a comparative case study on the Delta-II second stage cylindrical tank is given, demonstrating that the analysis using the proposed equation is in good agreement with the actual recovered object when a practical value for thermal emissivity is used. A detailed explanation of the revised formulation is given, and additional simulation results are presented. Finally, discussions are made to address the applicability of the proposed equation to be incorporated in future survival analyses of orbital debris.

  14. Reentry control of a low-lift maneuverable spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roenneke, Axel J.; Well, Klaus H.

    1992-08-01

    Commercial operation of space laboratories will rely on small, unmanned reentry capsules to retrieve experimental products independent from Shuttle services. An example for such a concept is the Space Mail system studied by the ESA. This paper presents a trajectory control system based on linear state feedback to guide and control the reentry glide of low-lifting capsules. A technique to design a time-varying controller is derived and applied. Simulation results of spatial flights over a rotating earth show that the designed controller effectively responds to entry condition offsets on several reference trajectories. Also, the controller is capable of tolerating modified vehicle parameters as well as atmospheric disturbances, and the same controller gain functions are successfully applied to different reference trajectories.

  15. 14 CFR 435.3 - Types of reentry licenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... authorizes a licensee to reenter one model or type of reentry vehicle, other than an RLV, to a reentry site... authorized parameters, including trajectories, transporting specified classes of payloads to any reentry site...

  16. Analytical and experimental heat transfer and flow-field prediction on a rectangular reentry module

    SciTech Connect

    Laganelli, A.L.

    1980-02-05

    A General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) has been designed for the purpose of supplying power to a radioisotope thermal generator intended for interplanetary missions. The baseline configuration, nominally 2 in. x 4 in. x 4 in. with sharp edges and corners, is required to survive accidental earth reentry as well as terminal impact velocities. Several problems have been identified relative to survival criteria during reentry. This paper is concerned with the flow field and reentry heating for a broad face-on or side-on reentry orientation. Moreover, the analysis considers convective heat transfer in the absence of roughness or ablation effects during the supersonic/hypersonic regime of reentry. The anaytical results are compared with wind tunnel data. From these studies it was concluded that heat transfer distributions for non-circular shapes ca be obtained for reentry conditions using wind tunnel data for the surface distributions and a stagnation value based on a reference sphere condition. The distributions obtained at a fixed Mach number (M > 1) appear valid over an extended range of Mach numbers. The above required definition of a proper velocity gradient, and definition of an area aspect ratio. Flowfield predictions (inviscid) using the CM2DT program provide a proper definition of pressure and shock characteristics for non-similar (viscous) solutions. (LCL)

  17. Heat source reentry vehicle design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, R. L.

    1971-01-01

    The design details are presented of a flight-type heat source reentry vehicle and heat exchanger compatible with the isotope Brayton power conversion system. The reference reentry vehicle and heat exchanger were modified, orbital and superorbital capability was assessed, and a complete set of detail design layout drawings were provided.

  18. Thermal Protection Materials for Reentry Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Sylvia M.; Stackpoole, Mairead; Gusman, Mike; Loehman, Ron; Kotula, Paul; Ellerby, Donald; Arnold, James; Wercinski, Paul; Reuthers, James; Kontinos, Dean

    2001-01-01

    Thermal protection materials and systems (IRS) are used to protect spacecraft during reentry into Earth's atmosphere or entry into planetary atmospheres. As such, these materials are subject to severe environments with high heat fluxes and rapid heating. Catalytic effects can increase the temperatures substantially. These materials are also subject to impact damage from micrometeorites or other debris during ascent, orbit, and descent, and thus must be able to withstand damage and to function following damage. Thermal protection materials and coatings used in reusable launch vehicles will be reviewed, including the needs and directions for new materials to enable new missions that require faster turnaround and much greater reusability. The role of ablative materials for use in high heat flux environments, especially for non-reusable applications and upcoming planetary missions, will be discussed. New thermal protection system materials may enable the use of sharp nose caps and leading edges on future reusable space transportation vehicles. Vehicles employing this new technology would have significant increases in maneuverability and out-of-orbit cross range compared to current vehicles, leading to increased mission safety in the event of the need to abort during ascent or from orbit. Ultrahigh temperature ceramics, a family of materials based on HfB2 and ZrB2 with SiC, will be discussed. The development, mechanical and thermal properties, and uses of these materials will be reviewed.

  19. Reentry thermal protection from Pioneer F RTG insulation material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vorreiter, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    Ablation tests were performed on the insulation material used in the Pioneer F radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) in the Ames Arc-Heated Planetary-Gas Wind Tunnel. Test results indicate that the material, trade name Min-K 1301, should experience little ablation for heat transfer rates below 40 BTU/sq ft-sec. If the current design were to be changed so that the various pieces of Min-K were fastened or interlocked together the total amount of heat delivered to the RTG heat source during an earth orbital decay reentry would be reduced by at least 22.7%.

  20. Reentry Breakup and Survivability Characteristics of the Vehicle Atmospheric Survivability Project (VASP) Vehicles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-08-05

    Atmospheric Entry of Large Meteors and Its Application to the Tunguska Event ," The Journal of Geophysical Research 101 (El 0), pp. 23207-23212, 1996...4. Lyne, J. E. and Tauber, M. E., "The Tunguska Event ," Nature 375(6533), pp.638-639, 1995. 5. Lyne, J. E., Tauber, M. E., and Fought, R. M., "A...Italy, July 15-17, 1996. 6. Lyne, J. E. and Tauber, M. E., "An Analysis of the Tunguska Event ," AIAA Paper 95-3477, presented at the 1995 AIAA

  1. Art Concept - Apollo VIII - Command Module (CM) - Re-Entry Orientation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1968-01-01

    S68-55292 (August 1968) --- A North American Rockwell Corporation artist's concept depicting the Apollo Command Module (CM), oriented in a blunt-end-forward attitude, re-entering Earth's atmosphere after returning from a lunar landing mission. Note the change in color caused by the extremely high temperatures encountered upon re-entry.

  2. Anatomy of an Asteroid Breakup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-05-01

    A team of scientists has observed the breakup of an asteroid as it orbits the Sun. In a new study, they reveal what theyve learned from their ground- and space-based observations of this disintegration.These Hubble images show the fragments of R3 in higher resolution over the span of October 2013 to February 2014. [Jewitt et al. 2017]Observations of DisintegrationActive asteroids are objects that move on asteroid-like orbits while displaying comet-like behavior. The cause of their activity can vary ranging from outgassing as the asteroid heats up in its solar approach, to expelled debris from a collision, to the entire asteroid flying apart because its spinning too fast.Led by David Jewitt (University of California at Los Angeles), a team of scientists has analyzed observations of the disintegrating asteroid P/2013 R3. The observations span two years and were made by a number of telescopes, including Hubble, Keck (in Hawaii), Magellan (in Chile), and the Very Large Telescope (in Chile).A schematic diagram of the different fragments of R3 and how they relate to each other. Black numbers estimate the fragment separation velocities; red numbers estimate the separation date. [Jewitt et al. 2017]Jewitt and collaborators then used these observations and a bit of modeling to understand what asteroid R3 was like originally, what its pieces are doing now, and what caused it to break up.Cause of the BreakupThe team found that P/2013 R3 broke up into at least 13 pieces, the biggest of which was likely no more than 100-200 meters in size. The original asteroid was probably less than 400 m in radius.By measuring the velocities of the fragments in the various observations, Jewitt and collaborators were able to work backward to determine when each piece broke off. They found that the fragmentation process was spread out over the span of roughly 5 months suggesting that the asteroids breakup wasnt impact-related (otherwise the fragmentation would likely have been all at once

  3. Follow-up investigations of GPHS motion during heat pulse intervals of reentries from gravity-assist trajectories

    SciTech Connect

    Sharbaugh, R.C.

    1992-03-23

    Motion studies of the General Purpose Heat Source Module, GPHS, which were conducted in the heat pulse intervals associated with entries from earth gravity assist trajectories. The APL six-degree-of-freedom reentry program designated TMAGRA6C was used. The objectives of the studies were to (1) determine whether the GPHS module entering the earth's atmosphere from an earth-gravity-assist trajectory has a preferred orientation during the heat pulse of reentry, (2) determine the effect of magnus force on the roll rate and angle of attack of the GPHS during an EGA entry, (3) determine the effect of the magnitude of pitch and roll damping on the GPHS motion.

  4. Atomization, drop size, and penetration for cross-stream water injection at high-altitude reentry conditions with application to the RAM C-1 and C-3 flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gooderum, P. B.; Bushnell, D. M.

    1972-01-01

    Atomization, drop size, and penetration data are presented for cross stream water injection at conditions simulating high altitude reentry (low Weber number, high static temperature, high Knudsen number, and low static pressure). These results are applied to the RAM C-1 and C-3 flights. Two primary breakup modes are considered, vapor pressure or flashing and aerodynamic atomization. Results are given for breakup boundaries and mean drop size for each of these atomization mechanisms. Both standard and flight orifice geometries are investigated. The data were obtained in both a static environment and in conventional aerodynamic facilities at Mach numbers of 4.5 and 8. The high temperature aspects of reentry were simulated in a Mach 5.5 cyanogen-oxygen tunnel with total temperature of 4500 K.

  5. Reusable Reentry Satellite (RRS) system design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Reusable Reentry Satellite (RRS) is intended to provide investigators in several biological disciplines with a relatively inexpensive method to access space for up to 60 days with eventual recovery on Earth. The RRS will permit totally intact, relatively soft, recovery of the vehicle, system refurbishment, and reflight with new and varied payloads. The RRS is to be capable of three reflights per year over a 10-year program lifetime. The RRS vehicle will have a large and readily accessible volume near the vehicle center of gravity for the Payload Module (PM) containing the experiment hardware. The vehicle is configured to permit the experimenter late access to the PM prior to launch and rapid access following recovery. The RRS will operate in one of two modes: (1) as a free-flying spacecraft in orbit, and will be allowed to drift in attitude to provide an acceleration environment of less than 10(exp -5) g. the acceleration environment during orbital trim maneuvers will be less than 10(exp -3) g; and (2) as an artificial gravity system which spins at controlled rates to provide an artificial gravity of up to 1.5 Earth g. The RRS system will be designed to be rugged, easily maintained, and economically refurbishable for the next flight. Some systems may be designed to be replaced rather than refurbished, if cost effective and capable of meeting the specified turnaround time. The minimum time between recovery and reflight will be approximately 60 days. The PMs will be designed to be relatively autonomous, with experiments that require few commands and limited telemetry. Mass data storage will be accommodated in the PM. The hardware development and implementation phase is currently expected to start in 1991 with a first launch in late 1993.

  6. Revised Capillary Breakup Rheometer Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Louise; Schultz, William; Solomon, Michael

    2014-11-01

    Rather than integrate the one-dimensional equation of motion for a capillary breakup rheometer, we take the axial derivative of that equation. This avoids the determination of the axial force with all of its complications and correction factors. The resulting evolutionary equation that involves either two or four derivatives of the capillary radius as a function of the axial coordinate determines the ratio of elongational viscosity to surface tension coefficient. We examine several silicone and olive oils to show the accuracy of the method for Newtonian fluids. We will discuss our surface tension measurement techniques and briefly describe measurements of viscoelastic materials, including saliva.

  7. Breakup Densities of Hot Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viola, V. E.; Kwiatkowski, K.; Natowitz, J. B.; Yennello, S. J.

    2004-09-01

    Breakup densities of hot 197Au-like residues have been deduced from the systematic trends of Coulomb parameters required to fit intermediate-mass-fragment kinetic-energy spectra. The results indicate emission from nuclei near normal nuclear density below an excitation energy E*/A≲2 MeV, followed by a gradual decrease to a near-constant value of ρ/ρ0˜0.3 for E*/A≳5 MeV. Temperatures derived from these data with a density-dependent Fermi-gas model yield a nuclear caloric curve that is generally consistent with those derived from isotope ratios.

  8. STS-30 deorbit and reentry ground track

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Rockwell International (RI) supplied artist concept titled 'STS-30 Deorbit and Reentry Track' shows Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, deorbit and reentry ground track. Ground track and map portray OV-104's deorbit over Madagascar, atmospheric reentry maneuvers, approach to the California coast, and landing at Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB), California. the transport trailer of the Payload Environmental Transportation System (PETS). Magellan, destined for unprecedented studies of Venusian topographic features, will be deployed by the crew of NASA's STS-30 mission in April 1989. View provided by KSC with alternate number KSC-88PC-1086.

  9. Breakup of diminutive Rayleigh jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hoeve, Wim; Gekle, Stephan; Snoeijer, Jacco H.; Versluis, Michel; Brenner, Michael P.; Lohse, Detlef

    2010-12-01

    Discharging a liquid from a nozzle at sufficient large velocity leads to a continuous jet that due to capillary forces breaks up into droplets. Here we investigate the formation of microdroplets from the breakup of micron-sized jets with ultra high-speed imaging. The diminutive size of the jet implies a fast breakup time scale τc=√ρr3/γ of the order of 100 ns, and requires imaging at 14×106 frames/s. We directly compare these experiments with a numerical lubrication approximation model that incorporates inertia, surface tension, and viscosity [J. Eggers and T. F. Dupont, J. Fluid Mech. 262, 205 (1994); X. D. Shi, M. P. Brenner, and S. R. Nagel, Science 265, 219 (1994)]. The lubrication model allows to efficiently explore the parameter space to investigate the effect of jet velocity and liquid viscosity on the formation of satellite droplets. In the phase diagram, we identify regions where the formation of satellite droplets is suppressed. We compare the shape of the droplet at pinch-off between the lubrication approximation model and a boundary-integral calculation, showing deviations at the final moment of the pinch-off. In spite of this discrepancy, the results on pinch-off times and droplet and satellite droplet velocity obtained from the lubrication approximation agree with the high-speed imaging results.

  10. Antimisting fuel breakup and flammability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parikh, P.; Fleeter, R.; Sarohia, V.

    1983-01-01

    The breakup behavior and flammability of antimisting turbine fuels subjected to aerodynamic shear are investigated. Fuels tested were Jet A containing 0.3% FM-9 polymer at various levels of degradation ranging from virgin AMK to neat Jet A. The misting behavior of the fuels was quantified by droplet size distribution measurements. A technique based on high resolution laser photography and digital image processing of photographic records for rapid determination of droplet size distribution was developed. The flammability of flowing droplet-air mixtures was quantified by direct measurements of temperature rise in a flame established in the wake of a continuous ignition source. The temperature rise measurements were correlated with droplet size measurements. The flame anchoring phenomenon associated with the breakup of a liquid fuel in the wake of bluff body was shown to be important in the context of a survivable crash scenario. A pass/fail criterion for flammability testing of antimisting fuels, based on this flame-anchoring phenomenon, was proposed. The role of various ignition sources and their intensity in ignition and post-ignition behavior of antimisting fuels was also investigated.

  11. Re-Entry Point Targeting for LEO Spacecraft using Aerodynamic Drag

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omar, Sanny; Bevilacqua, Riccardo; Fineberg, Laurence; Treptow, Justin; Johnson, Yusef; Clark, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Most Low Earth Orbit (LEO) spacecraft do not have thrusters and re-enter atmosphere in random locations at uncertain times. Objects pose a risk to persons, property, or other satellites. Has become a larger concern with the recent increase in small satellites. Working on a NASA funded project to design a retractable drag device to expedite de-orbit and target a re-entry location through modulation of the drag area. Will be discussing the re-entry point targeting algorithm here.

  12. Earth

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-01-30

    Behold one of the more detailed images of the Earth yet created. This Blue Marble Earth montage shown above -- created from photographs taken by the Visible/Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument on board the new Suomi NPP satellite -- shows many stunning details of our home planet. The Suomi NPP satellite was launched last October and renamed last week after Verner Suomi, commonly deemed the father of satellite meteorology. The composite was created from the data collected during four orbits of the robotic satellite taken earlier this month and digitally projected onto the globe. Many features of North America and the Western Hemisphere are particularly visible on a high resolution version of the image. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA18033

  13. High-fidelity modeling and impact footprint prediction for vehicle breakup analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Lisa

    For decades, vehicle breakup analysis had been performed for space missions that used nuclear heater or power units in order to assess aerospace nuclear safety for potential launch failures leading to inadvertent atmospheric reentry. Such pre-launch risk analysis is imperative to assess possible environmental impacts, obtain launch approval, and for launch contingency planning. In order to accurately perform a vehicle breakup analysis, the analysis tool should include a trajectory propagation algorithm coupled with thermal and structural analyses and influences. Since such a software tool was not available commercially or in the public domain, a basic analysis tool was developed by Dr. Angus McRonald prior to this study. This legacy software consisted of low-fidelity modeling and had the capability to predict vehicle breakup, but did not predict the surface impact point of the nuclear component. Thus the main thrust of this study was to develop and verify the additional dynamics modeling and capabilities for the analysis tool with the objectives to (1) have the capability to predict impact point and footprint, (2) increase the fidelity in the prediction of vehicle breakup, and (3) reduce the effort and time required to complete an analysis. The new functions developed for predicting the impact point and footprint included 3-degrees-of-freedom trajectory propagation, the generation of non-arbitrary entry conditions, sensitivity analysis, and the calculation of impact footprint. The functions to increase the fidelity in the prediction of vehicle breakup included a panel code to calculate the hypersonic aerodynamic coefficients for an arbitrary-shaped body and the modeling of local winds. The function to reduce the effort and time required to complete an analysis included the calculation of node failure criteria. The derivation and development of these new functions are presented in this dissertation, and examples are given to demonstrate the new capabilities and the

  14. Exclusive breakup measurements for {sup 9}Be

    SciTech Connect

    Fulton, B.R.; Cowin, R.L.; Woolliscroft, R.J.; Clarke, N.M.; Donadille, L.; Freer, M.; Leask, P.J.; Singer, S.M.; Nicoli, M.P.; Benoit, B.; Hanappe, F.; Ninane, A.; Orr, N.A.; Tillier, J.; Stuttge, L.

    2004-10-01

    The first exclusive breakup measurements for the nucleus {sup 9}Be are presented. Breakup via several discrete states is observed following scattering off {sup 12}C and {sup 208}Pb. The results support the prediction of a recent microscopic cluster calculation for a strong n+{sup 8}Be(2{sup +}) state component in the second excited state.

  15. Torque equilibrium attitude control for Skylab reentry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaese, J. R.; Kennel, H. F.

    1979-01-01

    All the available torque equilibrium attitudes (most were useless from the standpoint of lack of electrical power) and the equilibrium seeking method are presented, as well as the actual successful application during the 3 weeks prior to Skylab reentry.

  16. Observations of auroral fading before breakup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellinen, R. J.; Heikkila, W. J.

    1978-01-01

    The onset of auroral breakup was studied by using a variety of instruments with time resolution of some tens of second. Rapid sequences of all-sky photographs, and fast meridian scans by photometers, show that breakup is usually preceded by moderate brightening, followed by fading of the auroral brightness lasting one or two minutes, before the actual breakup itself. This optical activity is closely correlated with the development of auroral radar echoes. Data from a magnetometer network provide some indication of a correlated response by the local auroral and ionospheric currents. Riometer recordings show a slow decrease in ionspheric radio wave absorption over a period of about ten minutes prior to breakup, with the largest decrease essentially to quiet-time values in the region of auroral fading and subsequent breakup.

  17. Droplet Breakup in Expansion-contraction Microchannels

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Pingan; Kong, Tiantian; Lei, Leyan; Tian, Xiaowei; Kang, Zhanxiao; Wang, Liqiu

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the influences of expansion-contraction microchannels on droplet breakup in capillary microfluidic devices. With variations in channel dimension, local shear stresses at the injection nozzle and focusing orifice vary, significantly impacting flow behavior including droplet breakup locations and breakup modes. We observe transition of droplet breakup location from focusing orifice to injection nozzle, and three distinct types of recently-reported tip-multi-breaking modes. By balancing local shear stresses and interfacial tension effects, we determine the critical condition for breakup location transition, and characterize the tip-multi-breaking mode quantitatively. In addition, we identify the mechanism responsible for the periodic oscillation of inner fluid tip in tip-multi-breaking mode. Our results offer fundamental understanding of two-phase flow behaviors in expansion-contraction microstructures, and would benefit droplet generation, manipulation and design of microfluidic devices. PMID:26899018

  18. Droplet Breakup in Expansion-contraction Microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Pingan; Kong, Tiantian; Lei, Leyan; Tian, Xiaowei; Kang, Zhanxiao; Wang, Liqiu

    2016-02-01

    We investigate the influences of expansion-contraction microchannels on droplet breakup in capillary microfluidic devices. With variations in channel dimension, local shear stresses at the injection nozzle and focusing orifice vary, significantly impacting flow behavior including droplet breakup locations and breakup modes. We observe transition of droplet breakup location from focusing orifice to injection nozzle, and three distinct types of recently-reported tip-multi-breaking modes. By balancing local shear stresses and interfacial tension effects, we determine the critical condition for breakup location transition, and characterize the tip-multi-breaking mode quantitatively. In addition, we identify the mechanism responsible for the periodic oscillation of inner fluid tip in tip-multi-breaking mode. Our results offer fundamental understanding of two-phase flow behaviors in expansion-contraction microstructures, and would benefit droplet generation, manipulation and design of microfluidic devices.

  19. Statistical Issues for Uncontrolled Reentry Hazards Empirical Tests of the Predicted Footprint for Uncontrolled Satellite Reentry Hazards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matney, Mark

    2011-01-01

    A number of statistical tools have been developed over the years for assessing the risk of reentering objects to human populations. These tools make use of the characteristics (e.g., mass, material, shape, size) of debris that are predicted by aerothermal models to survive reentry. The statistical tools use this information to compute the probability that one or more of the surviving debris might hit a person on the ground and cause one or more casualties. The statistical portion of the analysis relies on a number of assumptions about how the debris footprint and the human population are distributed in latitude and longitude, and how to use that information to arrive at realistic risk numbers. Because this information is used in making policy and engineering decisions, it is important that these assumptions be tested using empirical data. This study uses the latest database of known uncontrolled reentry locations measured by the United States Department of Defense. The predicted ground footprint distributions of these objects are based on the theory that their orbits behave basically like simple Kepler orbits. However, there are a number of factors in the final stages of reentry - including the effects of gravitational harmonics, the effects of the Earth s equatorial bulge on the atmosphere, and the rotation of the Earth and atmosphere - that could cause them to diverge from simple Kepler orbit behavior and possibly change the probability of reentering over a given location. In this paper, the measured latitude and longitude distributions of these objects are directly compared with the predicted distributions, providing a fundamental empirical test of the model assumptions.

  20. Statistical Issues for Uncontrolled Reentry Hazards - Empirical Tests of the Predicted Footprint for Uncontrolled Satellite Reentry Hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matney, M.

    2012-01-01

    A number of statistical tools have been developed over the years for assessing the risk of reentering objects to human populations. These tools make use of the characteristics (e.g., mass, material, shape, size) of debris that are predicted by aerothermal models to survive reentry. The statistical tools use this information to compute the probability that one or more of the surviving debris might hit a person on the ground and cause one or more casualties. The statistical portion of the analysis relies on a number of assumptions about how the debris footprint and the human population are distributed in latitude and longitude, and how to use that information to arrive at realistic risk numbers. Because this information is used in making policy and engineering decisions, it is important that these assumptions be tested using empirical data. This study uses the latest database of known uncontrolled reentry locations measured by the United States Department of Defense. The predicted ground footprint distributions of these objects are based on the theory that their orbits behave basically like simple Kepler orbits. However, there are a number of factors in the final stages of reentry - including the effects of gravitational harmonics, the effects of the Earth's equatorial bulge on the atmosphere, and the rotation of the Earth and atmosphere - that could cause them to diverge from simple Kepler orbit behavior and possibly change the probability of reentering over a given location. In this paper, the measured latitude and longitude distributions of these objects are directly compared with the predicted distributions, providing a fundamental empirical test of the model assumptions.

  1. Characterization of the breakup of the Pegasus rocket body 1994-029B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matney, Mark; Settecerri, Tom; Johnson, Nicholas; Stansbery, Eugene

    1997-01-01

    The breakup of a Pegasus hydrazine auxiliary propulsion system in June 1996, officially recognized as the worst satellite breakup in terms of cataloged debris, is considered. The fragmentation event is analyzed and it is discussed how these debris contribute to the current and future near earth space environment. The low altitude of the breakup and the large range of ejection velocities present concerns for other earth orbiting space vehicles, especially the Space Shuttle and the Hubble Space Telescope. In addition to orbit data collected by the U.S. Space Surveillance Network, observations were conducted with ground-based radar observatories. These observations show that the overabundance of debris is not limited to the trackable population, but also extends down to debris with sizes of less than 1 cm. Attempts to detect the debris with optical sensors were less successful.

  2. Well engineering for re-entry operations

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-01

    Oil and gas operators are constantly looking at their existing assets for ways to increase their value. Several operators consider a re-entry program as the principle leveraging technology in strategic acquisitions. Much of the current re-entry operations effort targets the longer reach sidetrack and multilateral well markets. The key to this effort, whether it involves coiled tubing drilling, short radius drilling or multilateral well technologies, is re-entry well engineering. The engineer evaluating a re-entry prospect must apply significant levels of reservoir engineering, rock mechanics, completion engineering and drilling engineering to properly design the well and develop successful procedures. Re-entry drilling means that the operator is working with proven or probable reserves. Completion design and engineering are the most important aspects of well design once the target has been selected. Ultimately, the completion design selected will dictate the type of re-entry program: slot recovery, drilling out below the current casing shoe, or section milling and whipstock sidetracking. It can also dictate the principle aspects of the drilling program. The acceptable wellbore inclination build rates (dogleg severity), wellbore length, and drilling fluid selection are commonly influenced and even dictated by the completion design. These factors are discussed.

  3. Ongoing Capabilities and Developments of Re-Entry Plasma Ground Tests at EADS-ASTRIUM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jullien, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    During re-entry, spacecrafts are subjected to extreme thermal loads. On mars, they may go through dust storms. These external heat loads are leading the design of re-entry vehicles or are affecting it for spacecraft facing solid propellant jet stream. Sizing the Thermal Protection System require a good knowledge of such solicitations and means to model and reproduce them on earth. Through its work on European projects, ASTRIUM has developed the full range of competences to deal with such issues. For instance, we have designed and tested the heat-shield of the Huygens probe which landed on Titan. In particular, our plasma generators aim to reproduce a wide variety of re-entry conditions. Heat loads are generated by the huge speed of the probes. Such conditions cannot be fully reproduced. Ground tests focus on reproducing local aerothermal loads by using slower but hotter flows. Our inductive plasma torch enables to test little samples at low TRL. Amongst the arc-jets, one was design to test architecture design of ISS crew return system and others fit more severe re-entry such as sample returns or Venus re-entry. The last developments aimed in testing samples in seeded flows. First step was to design and test the seeding device. Special diagnostics characterizing the resulting flow enabled us to fit it to the requirements.

  4. Ongoing Capabilities and Developments of Re-Entry Plasma Ground Tests at EADS-ASTRIUM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jullien, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    During re-entry, spacecrafts are subjected to extreme thermal loads. On mars, they may go through dust storms. These external heat loads are leading the design of re-entry vehicles or are affecting it for spacecraft facing solid propellant jet stream. Sizing the Thermal Protection System require a good knowledge of such solicitations and means to model and reproduce them on earth. Through its work on European projects, ASTRIUM has developed the full range of competences to deal with such issues. For instance, we have designed and tested the heat-shield of the Huygens probe which landed on Titan. In particular, our plasma generators aim to reproduce a wide variety of re-entry conditions. Heat loads are generated by the huge speed of the probes. Such conditions cannot be fully reproduced. Ground tests focus on reproducing local aerothermal loads by using slower but hotter flows. Our inductive plasma torch enables to test little samples at low TRL. Amongst the arc-jets, one was design to test architecture design of ISS crew return system and others fit more severe re-entry such as sample returns or Venus re-entry. The last developments aimed in testing samples in seeded flows. First step was to design and test the seeding device. Special diagnostics characterizing the resulting flow enabled us to fit it to the requirements.

  5. Mid-Air Retrieval of Heavy, Earth-Returning Space Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, John W.; Brierly, Gregory T.; Cruz, Josue; Lowry, Allen; Fogleman, Lynn; Johnson, Brian; Peterson, Kristina; Gibson, Ian; Neave, Matthew D.; Streetman, Brett; Moran, Bradley A.

    2016-01-01

    This subject technology has the potential to reduce cost for many Earth returning missions, both Government and commercial, including reentry vehicles, launch assets, and scientific experiments using balloons.

  6. Invariant Coordinates in Breakup Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skwira-Chalot, I.; Ciepał, I.; Kistryn, St.; Kozela, A.; Parol, W.; Stephan, E.

    2017-03-01

    Systematic experimental studies of few-nucleon systems expose various dynamical ingredients which play an important role in correct description of observables, such as three-nucleon force, Coulomb force and relativistic effects. A large set of existing experimental data for ^1H(d, p p)n reaction allows for systematic investigations of these dynamical effects, which vary with energy and appear with different strength in certain observables and phase space regions. Moreover, systematic comparisons with exact theoretical calculations, done in variables related to the system dynamics in a possibly direct ways is a very important tool to verify and improve the existing description of the nucleon interaction. Examples of experimental data for a breakup reaction, transformed to the variables based on Lorentz-invariants are compared with modern theoretical calculations.

  7. Breakup Densities of Hot Nuclei.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viola, Vic

    2006-04-01

    Breakup densities of hot ^197Au-like residues have been deduced from the systematic trends of Coulomb parameters required to fit intermediate-mass-fragment kinetic-energy spectra. The results indicate emission from nuclei near normal nuclear density below an excitation energy E*/A .3ex<˜x 2 MeV, followed by a gradual decrease to a near-constant value of ρ/ρ0˜ 3 for E*/A .3ex>˜x 5 MeV. Temperatures derived from these data with a density-dependent Fermi-gas model yield a nuclear caloric curve that is generally consistent with those derived from isotope ratios.

  8. Women offenders and reentry issues.

    PubMed

    Taylor, S D

    1996-01-01

    Women parallel men in their profile of physical disease, psychosocial configuration, addictive patterns, and criminal deviance. For women offenders in particular, the prison environment reinforces a victim role that originated in childhood and adolescence. In addition, such settings discourage both emotional expression (except for aggression) and responsibility, since basic needs such as food, lodging, and clothing are provided. Incarcerated women have significant treatment issues, including the lack of social and vocational role definition, psychological dependence and psychic craving, poorly developed social skills, and conflicts in social, family, and intimate relationships. This article describes the unique psychoeducational and skills-training needs of women offenders as they adjust to community living, and outlines specific treatment interventions that have proven to effect successful patient outcomes. Case studies are used to illustrate the reentry experiences of three women offenders with distinct backgrounds. One example illustrates how a woman who had been involved in the criminal justice system for 24 years overcame her addiction and self-confidence issues. A second case study profiles an offender with three children who had experienced sexual trauma during her childhood and adult years. A third case reports on an African-American woman whose crack-cocaine addiction resulted in the birth of a drug-exposed son. The treatment model tested in all three cases emphasized the practical and often overlooked treatment issues of incarcerated women.

  9. Phenomenological model for light-projectile breakup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalbach, C.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Projectile breakup can make a large contribution to reactions induced by projectiles with mass numbers 2, 3, and 4, yet there is no global model for it and no clear agreement on the details of the reaction mechanism. Purpose: This project aims to develop a phenomenological model for light-projectile breakup that can guide the development of detailed theories and provide a useful tool for applied calculations. Method: An extensive database of double-differential cross sections for the breakup of deuterons, 3He ions, and α particles was assembled from the literature and analyzed in a consistent way. Results: Global systematics for the centroid energies, peak widths, and angular distributions of the breakup peaks have been extracted from the data. The dominant mechanism appears to be absorptive breakup, where the unobserved projectile fragment fuses with the target nucleus during the initial interaction. The global target-mass-number and incident-energy dependencies of the absorptive breakup cross section have also been determined, along with channel-specific normalization constants. Conclusions: Results from the model generally agree with the original data after subtraction of a reasonable underlying continuum. Absorptive breakup can account for as much as 50%-60% of the total reaction cross section.

  10. Coronas-F Orbit Monitoring and Re-Entry Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivanov, N. M.; Kolyuka, Yu. F.; Afanasieva, T. I.; Gridchina, T. A.

    2007-01-01

    Russian scientific satellite CORONAS-F was launched on July, 31, 2001. The object was inserted in near-circular orbit with the inclination 82.5deg and a mean altitude approx. 520 km. Due to the upper atmosphere drag CORONAS-F was permanently descended and as a result on December, 6, 2005 it has finished the earth-orbital flight, having lifetime in space approx. 4.5 years. The satellite structural features and its flight attitude control led to the significant variations of its ballistic coefficient during the flight. It was a cause of some specific difficulties in the fulfillment of the ballistic and navigation support of this space vehicle flight. Besides the main mission objective CORONAS-F also has been selected by the Inter-Agency Space Debris Coordination Committee (IADC) as a target object for the next regular international re-entry test campaign on a program of surveillance and re-entry prediction for the hazard space objects within their de-orbiting phases. Spacecraft (S/C) CORONAS-F kept its working state right up to the end of the flight - down to the atmosphere entry. This fact enabled to realization of the additional research experiments, concerning with an estimation of the atmospheric density within the low earth orbits (LEO) of the artificial satellites, and made possible to continue track the S/C during final phase of its flight by means of Russian regular command & tracking system, used for it control. Thus there appeared a unique possibility of using for tracking S/C at its de-orbiting phase not only passive radar facilities, belonging to the space surveillance systems and traditionally used for support of the IADC re-entry test campaigns, but also more precise active trajectory radio-tracking facilities from the ground control complex (GCC) applied for this object. Under the corresponding decision of the Russian side such capability of additional high-precise tracking control of the CORONAS-F flight in this period of time has been implemented

  11. Application of numerical methods to extend capabilities for optimal rocket guidance: report on reentry guidance of shuttle orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Analytical models are presented for optimal trajectories and reentry guidance of the space shuttle orbiter. Major emphasis is placed on the development of a "footprint', which refers to a set of reachable destination positions attainable by the shuttle at a specified terminal altitude. An unconstrained reentry footprint was calculated for a shuttle vehicle which enters the earth's atmosphere at 93 km initial altitude after a deboost from a near earth orbit. The method of computation is briefly described, and graphs are presented which illustrate the footprint and the variation of state and control variables along it. The effects of constraints and of variations in initial state upon the footprint are discussed.

  12. Design of Breakup Ice Control Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-01

    ER D C/ CR R EL T R -0 6 -7 Design of Breakup Ice Control Structures Andrew M. Tuthill and James H. Lever March 2006 C ol d R eg...March 2006 Design of Breakup Ice Control Structures Andrew M. Tuthill and James H. Lever Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory U.S. Army...ice control structure (ICS) is to retain a breakup ice run upstream of a traditional ice jam problem area and thereby miti- gate ice-jam flooding

  13. Reentry Thermal Analysis of a Generic Crew Exploration Vehicle Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.; Gong, Leslie; Quinn, Robert D.

    2007-01-01

    Comparative studies were performed on the heat-shielding characteristics of honeycomb-core sandwich panels fabricated with different materials for possible use as wall panels for the proposed crew exploration vehicle. Graphite/epoxy sandwich panel was found to outperform aluminum sandwich panel under the same geometry due to superior heat-shielding qualities and lower material density. Also, representative reentry heat-transfer analysis was performed on the windward wall structures of a generic crew exploration vehicle. The Apollo low Earth orbit reentry trajectory was used to calculate the reentry heating rates. The generic crew exploration vehicle has a graphite/epoxy composite honeycomb sandwich exterior wall and an aluminum honeycomb sandwich interior wall, and is protected with the Apollo thermal protection system ablative material. In the thermal analysis computer program used, the TPS ablation effect was not yet included; however, the results from the nonablation heat-transfer analyses were used to develop a "virtual ablation" method to estimate the ablation heat loads and the thermal protection system recession thicknesses. Depending on the severity of the heating-rate time history, the virtual ablation period was found to last for 87 to 107 seconds and the ablation heat load was estimated to be in the range of 86 to 88 percent of the total heat load for the ablation time period. The thermal protection system recession thickness was estimated to be in the range of 0.08 to 0.11 inches. For the crew exploration vehicle zero-tilt and 18-degree-tilt stagnation points, thermal protection system thicknesses of h = {0.717, 0.733} inches were found to be adequate to keep the substructural composite sandwich temperature below the limit of 300 F.

  14. Optimization of Observation Strategy to Improve Re-entry Prediction of Objects in HEO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasotto, M.; Di Mauro, G.; Massari, M.; Di Lizia, P.; Armellin, R.; Funke, Q.; Flohrer, T.

    2016-09-01

    During the last decade the number of space debris moving on high elliptical orbit (HEO) has grown fast. Many of these resident space objects (RSO) consist of medium and large spent upper stages of launch vehicles, whose atmosphere re-entry might violate on-ground casualty risk constraints. Increasing the accuracy of re-entry predictions for this class of RSO is therefore a key issue to limit the hazards on the Earth assets. Traditional computational methods are mainly based on the exploitation of Two Line Elements (TLEs), provided by the United States Strategic Command (USSTRATCOM) and currently the only public data source available for these kind of analyses. TLE data however, are characterized by low accuracies, and in general come without any uncertainty information, thus limiting the achievable precision of the re-entry estimates. Better results on the other hand, can be obtained through the exploitation of observational data provided by one or more Earth sensors. Despite the benefits, this approach introduces a whole new set of complexities, mainly related with the design of proper observation campaigns. This paper presents a method based on evolutionary algorithms, for the optimization of observation strategies. The effectiveness of the proposed approach is demonstrated through dedicated examples, in which re-entry predictions, attainable with existing and ideal sensor architectures, are compared with corresponding results derived from TLE data.

  15. German experiments developed for reentry missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auweter-Kurtz, M.; Hald, H.; Koppenwallner, G.; Speckmann, H.-D.

    1996-01-01

    For the development of reentry technology it is essential that the knowledge gained from ground test facilities and numerical methods is tested and broadened in real reentry flights. The first of such projects was the space reentry capsule EXPRESS, which was designed as a German—Japanese enterprise for both microgravity research and reentry experiments. The capsule was built by the Russian company DB Saljut as part of the Khrunichev State Research and Production Space Center and modified by DASA. The capsule was launched from Kagoshima by a Japanese M-3 SII rocket in January 1995. Due to a failure of the rocket, the nominal orbital altitude could not be reached, which led to an early reentry of the capsule in Ghana after two and a half orbits. In the stagnation region of the reentry module an experiment was planned with a fibre reinforced ceramic tile of 300 mm in diameter integrated in the ablative heat shield. This experiment, called "CETEX", was designed by the German Aerospace Research Establishment (DLR) in Stuttgart. The aim of CETEX is to qualify lightweight fibre reinforced ceramics and related structural concepts in terms of heat shield applications for space vehicles as well as to compare the erosion behaviour shown in flight experiments and ground tests. An integral part of the CETEX experiment is the PYREX experiment of the University of Stuttgart. With PYREX a pyrometer shall be qualified, which is designed for high precision temperature measurement of heat shield materials made of fibre reinforced ceramic compounds during the reentry phase of space vehicles and probes. A third German experiment, RAFLEX, projected by Hyperschall Technologie Göttingen (HTG), was also integrated in the CETEX tile. RAFLEX is designed for the measurement of dynamic and static pressures and heat transfer at various positions on the EXPRESS capsule. Two small SiC tubes are fed through the CETEX tile for the RAFLEX and RTEX experiments. RTEX is a Japanese spectroscopy

  16. Measuring Public Support for Prisoner Reentry Options.

    PubMed

    Garland, Brett; Wodahl, Eric; Cota, Lisa

    2016-09-01

    Few topics have been discussed more extensively or feverishly within correctional academic and professional circles in the past few decades than prisoner reentry. Although program and policy evaluations have been conducted, a lack of public support for prisoner reentry initiatives could undermine the sustainability of prisoner reentry as a large-scale movement. Interestingly, no multivariate, explanatory analyses of the correlates of support for prisoner reentry policies could be found in the literature. This omission is due in part to the absence of clear psychometric measures to assess support. The current study examines the data obtained from a sample of residents in a Midwestern state to determine the dimensionality of support for prisoner reentry interventions using both exploratory factor analysis (EFA) and ordinary least squares (OLS) regression. Specifically, our expectation is that the following three-factor structure will be identified: (a) support for transitional programs aimed at building skills and knowledge to handle the obstacles of the prison-to-community transitional process, (b) support for post-release transitional housing units, and (c) opposition to denying offenders housing opportunities. Our results support a three-factor model. The implications of these findings for future research are discussed.

  17. Negative Emotions and Behaviors are Markers of Breakup Distress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, Tiffany; Diego, Miguel; Pelaez, Martha; Deeds, Osvelia; Delgado, Jeanette

    2013-01-01

    Method: University students who experienced a recent romantic breakup were given several self-report measures and were then divided into high versus low breakup distress groups. Results: The high breakup distress versus the low breakup distress groups had higher scores on negative emotions scales including depression, anxiety and anger and…

  18. Negative Emotions and Behaviors are Markers of Breakup Distress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, Tiffany; Diego, Miguel; Pelaez, Martha; Deeds, Osvelia; Delgado, Jeanette

    2013-01-01

    Method: University students who experienced a recent romantic breakup were given several self-report measures and were then divided into high versus low breakup distress groups. Results: The high breakup distress versus the low breakup distress groups had higher scores on negative emotions scales including depression, anxiety and anger and…

  19. Intrusive Thoughts: A Primary Variable in Breakup Distress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, Tiffany; Diego, Miguel; Pelaez, Martha; Deeds, Osvelia; Delgado, Jeannette

    2013-01-01

    University students who were high versus low on breakup distress scores were given self-report measures to assess their intrusive thoughts about the romantic breakup and their somatic symptoms that followed the breakup as well as their extracurricular activities and social support that might alleviate their breakup distress. In a regression…

  20. Intrusive Thoughts: A Primary Variable in Breakup Distress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, Tiffany; Diego, Miguel; Pelaez, Martha; Deeds, Osvelia; Delgado, Jeannette

    2013-01-01

    University students who were high versus low on breakup distress scores were given self-report measures to assess their intrusive thoughts about the romantic breakup and their somatic symptoms that followed the breakup as well as their extracurricular activities and social support that might alleviate their breakup distress. In a regression…

  1. Atomic and molecular data for spacecraft re-entry plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celiberto, R.; Armenise, I.; Cacciatore, M.; Capitelli, M.; Esposito, F.; Gamallo, P.; Janev, R. K.; Laganà, A.; Laporta, V.; Laricchiuta, A.; Lombardi, A.; Rutigliano, M.; Sayós, R.; Tennyson, J.; Wadehra, J. M.

    2016-06-01

    The modeling of atmospheric gas, interacting with the space vehicles in re-entry conditions in planetary exploration missions, requires a large set of scattering data for all those elementary processes occurring in the system. A fundamental aspect of re-entry problems is represented by the strong non-equilibrium conditions met in the atmospheric plasma close to the surface of the thermal shield, where numerous interconnected relaxation processes determine the evolution of the gaseous system towards equilibrium conditions. A central role is played by the vibrational exchanges of energy, so that collisional processes involving vibrationally excited molecules assume a particular importance. In the present paper, theoretical calculations of complete sets of vibrationally state-resolved cross sections and rate coefficients are reviewed, focusing on the relevant classes of collisional processes: resonant and non-resonant electron-impact excitation of molecules, atom-diatom and molecule-molecule collisions as well as gas-surface interaction. In particular, collisional processes involving atomic and molecular species, relevant to Earth (N2, O2, NO), Mars (CO2, CO, N2) and Jupiter (H2, He) atmospheres are considered.

  2. Effects of APD Dispersion on Atrial Reentry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigmond, Edward; Kuo, Samuel; Trayanova, Natalia

    2002-03-01

    Atrial fibrillation is the most common cardiac arrhythmia with dispersion of refractoriness being postulated as a mechanism promoting its formation. The distribution of action potential duration (APD) over the atria, however, remains unmapped under both normal and pathological conditions. The purpose of this computer study was to investigate how APD heterogenity interacts with morphological barriers to produce reentry. Reentries were first initiated in a 2D sheet of atrial tissue. The effects of incorporating APD heterogeneity and periodic boundary conditions, to better mimic physiological conditions, on reentry were ascertained. Analysis was extended to a morphologically realistic 3D model wherein several APD distributions were simulated. Comparisons between the 2D and 3D models demonstrated that the sheet behaviour was insufficient to capture the complex behaviour. Regional differences in APD, aided by anatomical barriers, were found to affect the formation and stabilization of reentrant circuits, as well as lead to the fractionation of wavefronts.

  3. Pesticide reentry problems and relationships to CSEPP

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, J.D.

    1995-06-01

    Federal and state agencies have almost 50 years experience with the {open_quotes}Reentry Problem{close_quotes} which is the toxic effects to fieldworkers caused by exposure to pesticide residues applied to agricultural areas. The most common means to avoid these effects is to establish {open_quotes}Reentry Intervals{close_quotes}. Unfortunately, such an interval is not feasible if a chemical warfare agent is inadvertently released. Use of a {open_quotes}Reentry Level{close_quotes} is preferred for such a case. This use requires that an analytical method be established that will be fast, specific, and sensitive. Ideally, it could be used on-site in the field. An enzyme linked immuno specific assay or a similar procedure may be the best solution to these limitations.

  4. On the breakup of viscous liquid threads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papageorgiou, Demetrios T.

    1995-01-01

    A one-dimensional model evolution equation is used to describe the nonlinear dynamics that can lead to the breakup of a cylindrical thread of Newtonian fluid when capillary forces drive the motion. The model is derived from the Stokes equations by use of rational asymptotic expansions and under a slender jet approximation. The equations are solved numerically and the jet radius is found to vanish after a finite time yielding breakup. The slender jet approximation is valid throughout the evolution leading to pinching. The model admits self-similar pinching solutions which yield symmetric shapes at breakup. These solutions are shown to be the ones selected by the initial boundary value problem, for general initial conditions. Further more, the terminal state of the model equation is shown to be identical to that predicted by a theory which looks for singular pinching solutions directly from the Stokes equations without invoking the slender jet approximation throughout the evolution. It is shown quantitatively, therefore, that the one-dimensional model gives a consistent terminal state with the jet shape being locally symmetric at breakup. The asymptotic expansion scheme is also extended to include unsteady and inerticial forces in the momentum equations to derive an evolution system modelling the breakup of Navier-Stokes jets. The model is employed in extensive simulations to compute breakup times for different initial conditions; satellite drop formation is also supported by the model and the dependence of satellite drop volumes on initial conditions is studied.

  5. Application of the FADS system on the Re-entry Module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhen, Huang

    2016-07-01

    The aerodynamic model for Flush Air Data Sensing System (FADS) is built based on the surface pressure distribution obtained through the pressure orifices laid on specific positions of the surface,and the flight parameters,such as angle of attack,angle of side-slip,Mach number,free-stream static pressure and dynamic pressure are inferred from the aerodynamic model.The flush air data sensing system (FADS) has been used on several flight tests of aircraft and re-entry vehicle,such as,X-15,space shuttle,F-14,X-33,X-43A and so on. This paper discusses the application of the FADS on the re-entry module with blunt body to obtain high-precision aerodynamic parameters.First of all,a basic theory and operating principle of the FADS is shown.Then,the applications of the FADS on typical aircrafts and re-entry vehicles are described.Thirdly,the application mode on the re-entry module with blunt body is discussed in detail,including aerodynamic simulation,pressure distribution,trajectory reconstruction and the hardware shoule be used,such as flush air data sensing system(FADS),inertial navigation system (INS),data acquisition system,data storage system.Finally,ablunt module re-entry flight test from low earth orbit (LEO) is planned to obtain aerodynamic parameters and amend the aerodynamic model with this FADS system data.The results show that FADS system can be applied widely in re-entry module with blunt bodies.

  6. The Energy Interaction Model: A promising new methodology for projecting GPHS-RTG cladding failures, release amounts & respirable release fractions for postulated pre-launch, launch, and post-reentry earth impact accidents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, James R.; Sholtis, Joseph A.; McCulloch, William H.

    1998-01-01

    Safety analyses and evaluations must be scrutable, defensible, and credible. This is particularly true when nuclear systems are involved, with their attendant potential for releases of radioactive materials (source terms) to the unrestricted environment. Analytical projections of General Purpose Heat Source Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (GPHS-RTG) source terms, for safety analyses conducted to date, have relied upon generic data correlations using a single parameter of cladding damage, termed ``distortion.'' However, distortion is not an unequivocal measure of cladding insult, failure, or release. Furthermore, the analytical foundation, applicability, and broad use of distortion are argumentative and, thus, somewhat troublesome. In an attempt to avoid the complications associated with the use of distortion, a new methodology, referred to as the Energy Interaction Model (EIM), has been preliminarily developed. This new methodology is based upon the physical principles of energy and energy exchange during mechanical interactions. Specifically, the EIM considers the energy imparted to GPHS-RTG components (bare fueled clads, GPHS modules, and full GPHS-RTGs) when exposed to mechanical threats (blast/overpressure, shrapnel and fragment impacts, and Earth surface impacts) posed by the full range of potential accidents. Expected forms are developed for equations intended to project cladding failure probabilities, the number of cladding failures expected, release amounts, and the fraction released as respirable particles. The coefficients of the equations developed are then set to fit the GPHS-RTG test data, ensuring good agreement with the experimental database. This assured, fitted agreement with the test database, along with the foundation of the EIM in first principles, provides confidence in the model's projections beyond the available database. In summary, the newly developed EIM methodology is described and discussed. The conclusions reached are that the EIM

  7. Inferences Concerning the Magnetospheric Source Region for Auroral Breakup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, L. R.

    1992-01-01

    It is argued that the magnetospheric source region for auroral arc breakup and substorm initiation is along boundary plasma sheet (BPS) magnetic field lines. This source region lies beyond a distinct central plasma sheet (CPS) region and sufficiently far from the Earth that energetic ion motion violates the guiding center approximation (i.e., is chaotic). The source region is not constrained to any particular range of distances from the Earth, and substorm initiation may be possible over a wide range of distances from near synchronous orbit to the distant tail. It is also argued that the layer of low-energy electrons and velocity dispersed ion beams observed at low altitudes on Aureol 3 is not a different region from the region of auroral arcs. Both comprise the BPS. The two regions occasionally appear distinct at low altitudes because of the effects of arc field-aligned potential drops on precipitating particles.

  8. 14 CFR 435.13 - Transfer of a reentry license.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Transfer of a reentry license. 435.13 Section 435.13 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING REENTRY OF A REENTRY VEHICLE OTHER THAN A REUSABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE (RLV) General § 435.13 Transfer of a...

  9. 14 CFR 435.13 - Transfer of a reentry license.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Transfer of a reentry license. 435.13 Section 435.13 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING REENTRY OF A REENTRY VEHICLE OTHER THAN A REUSABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE (RLV) General § 435.13 Transfer of a...

  10. The {ital Energy Interaction Model}: A promising new methodology for projecting GPHS-RTG cladding failures, release amounts & respirable release fractions for postulated pre-launch, launch, and post-reentry earth impact accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, J.R.; Sholtis, J.A. Jr.; McCulloch, W.H.

    1998-01-01

    Safety analyses and evaluations must be scrutable, defensible, and credible. This is particularly true when nuclear systems are involved, with their attendant potential for releases of radioactive materials (source terms) to the unrestricted environment. Analytical projections of General Purpose Heat Source Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (GPHS-RTG) source terms, for safety analyses conducted to date, have relied upon generic data correlations using a single parameter of cladding damage, termed {open_quotes}distortion.{close_quotes} However, distortion is not an unequivocal measure of cladding insult, failure, or release. Furthermore, the analytical foundation, applicability, and broad use of distortion are argumentative and, thus, somewhat troublesome. In an attempt to avoid the complications associated with the use of distortion, a new methodology, referred to as the {ital Energy Interaction Model (EIM)}, has been preliminarily developed. This new methodology is based upon the physical principles of energy and energy exchange during mechanical interactions. Specifically, the {ital EIM} considers the energy imparted to GPHS-RTG components (bare fueled clads, GPHS modules, and full GPHS-RTGs) when exposed to mechanical threats (blast/overpressure, shrapnel and fragment impacts, and Earth surface impacts) posed by the full range of potential accidents. Expected forms are developed for equations intended to project cladding failure probabilities, the number of cladding failures expected, release amounts, and the fraction released as respirable particles. The coefficients of the equations developed are then set to fit the GPHS-RTG test data, ensuring good agreement with the experimental database. This assured, fitted agreement with the test database, along with the foundation of the {ital EIM} in first principles, provides confidence in the model{close_quote}s projections beyond the available database. In summary, the newly developed {ital EIM} methodology is

  11. Measuring the spectral emissivity of thermal protection materials during atmospheric reentry simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marble, Elizabeth

    1996-01-01

    Hypersonic spacecraft reentering the earth's atmosphere encounter extreme heat due to atmospheric friction. Thermal Protection System (TPS) materials shield the craft from this searing heat, which can reach temperatures of 2900 F. Various thermophysical and optical properties of TPS materials are tested at the Johnson Space Center Atmospheric Reentry Materials and Structures Evaluation Facility, which has the capability to simulate critical environmental conditions associated with entry into the earth's atmosphere. Emissivity is an optical property that determines how well a material will reradiate incident heat back into the atmosphere upon reentry, thus protecting the spacecraft from the intense frictional heat. This report describes a method of measuring TPS emissivities using the SR5000 Scanning Spectroradiometer, and includes system characteristics, sample data, and operational procedures developed for arc-jet applications.

  12. Assessment of the Breakup of the Antarctic Polar Vortex in Two New Chemistry-Climate Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurwitz, M. M.; Newman, P. A.; Oman, L. D.; Li, F.; Morgenstern, O.; Braesicke, P.; Pyle, J. A.

    2010-01-01

    Successful simulation of the breakup of the Antarctic polar vortex depends on the representation of tropospheric stationary waves at Southern Hemisphere middle latitudes. This paper assesses the vortex breakup in two new chemistry-climate models (CCMs). The stratospheric version of the UK Chemistry and Aerosols model is able to reproduce the observed timing of the vortex breakup. Version 2 of the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS V2) model is typical of CCMs in that the Antarctic polar vortex breaks up too late; at 10 hPa, the mean transition to easterlies at 60 S is delayed by 12-13 days as compared with the ERA-40 and National Centers for Environmental Prediction reanalyses. The two models' skill in simulating planetary wave driving during the October-November period accounts for differences in their simulation of the vortex breakup, with GEOS V2 unable to simulate the magnitude and tilt of geopotential height anomalies in the troposphere and thus underestimating the wave driving. In the GEOS V2 CCM the delayed breakup of the Antarctic vortex biases polar temperatures and trace gas distributions in the upper stratosphere in November and December.

  13. Assessment of the Breakup of the Antarctic Polar Vortex in Two New Chemistry-Climate Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurwitz, M. M.; Newman, P. A.; Oman, L. D.; Li, F.; Morgenstern, O.; Braesicke, P.; Pyle, J. A.

    2010-01-01

    Successful simulation of the breakup of the Antarctic polar vortex depends on the representation of tropospheric stationary waves at Southern Hemisphere middle latitudes. This paper assesses the vortex breakup in two new chemistry-climate models (CCMs). The stratospheric version of the UK Chemistry and Aerosols model is able to reproduce the observed timing of the vortex breakup. Version 2 of the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS V2) model is typical of CCMs in that the Antarctic polar vortex breaks up too late; at 10 hPa, the mean transition to easterlies at 60 S is delayed by 12-13 days as compared with the ERA-40 and National Centers for Environmental Prediction reanalyses. The two models' skill in simulating planetary wave driving during the October-November period accounts for differences in their simulation of the vortex breakup, with GEOS V2 unable to simulate the magnitude and tilt of geopotential height anomalies in the troposphere and thus underestimating the wave driving. In the GEOS V2 CCM the delayed breakup of the Antarctic vortex biases polar temperatures and trace gas distributions in the upper stratosphere in November and December.

  14. Assessment of the ATV-1 Re-Entry Observation Campaign for Future Re-Entry Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lips, T.; Lohle, S.; Marynowsky, T.; Rees, D.; Stenbeak-Nielsen, H. C.; Beks, M. L.; Hatton, J.

    2010-09-01

    This paper summarizes the midterm results of the currently ongoing ESA study “Assessment of the ATV-1 Reentry Observation Campaign for Future Re-entry Missions”. The primary objective of this study is to investigate the data obtained during a joint ESA/NASA airborne observation campaign of the destructive re-entry of ATV-1 Jules Verne which occurred on September 29, 2008. The presented results are focused on spectroscopic fragment characterization(material identification), frame-by-frame fragment tracking(manual and automatic) for various video recordings, 3D triangulation of the tracked fragments, and fragment propagation until complete demise or ground impact, including the actual size and location of the ATV-1 debris footprint. Fragment propagation analyses comprise also the derivation of aerodynamic fragment properties and potential delta velocities. These parameters are of high importance for the re-entry safety analysis for ATV-2 Johannes Kepler.

  15. Aerodynamic design of a re-entry capsule for high-speed manned re-entry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bingyan; Zhan, Huiling; Zhou, Weijiang

    2015-01-01

    Aerodynamic configuration of the capsule for manned re-entry at the second cosmic speed requires a relatively higher lift-to-drag ratio compared to the configuration for manned re-entry at the first cosmic speed. The present capsule configurations with high lift-to-drag ratio, for instance, the Apollo and the Orion, have secondary statically stable trim points, which is highly undesirable since it would cause disastrous result once the vehicle flies at the secondary trim point during re-entry. In the present study, effective design methodology for improving the monostability characteristics of re-entry capsules without compromising the lift-to-drag ratio is revealed based on flow field characteristics analysis. As a result, aerodynamic configuration design of a capsule with high lift-to-drag ratio and monostable characteristics is proposed. And the aerodynamic characteristics of the capsule ranging from subsonic to hypersonic speed are predicted by numerical simulations.

  16. DEBRISK, a Tool for Re-Entry Risk Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omaly, P.; Spel, M.

    2012-01-01

    An act of French parliament, adopted in 2008, imposes satellite constructors to evaluate the end-of-life operations in order to assure the risk mitigation of their satellites. One important element in this evaluation is the estimation of the mass and impact energy of the satellite debris after atmospheric re-entry. For this purpose, CNES has developed the tool DEBRISK which allows the operator to simulate the re-entry phase and to study the demise altitudes or impact energy of the individual fragments of the original satellite. DEBRISK is based on the so called object based approach. Using this approach, a breakup altitude is assumed where the satellite disintegrates due to the pressure loads. This altitude is typically around 78 km. After breakup, the satellite structure is modelled by a parent-child approach, where each child has its birth criterion. In the simplest approach the child is born after demise of the parent object. This could be the case of an object A containing an object B which is in the interior of object A and thus not exposed to the atmosphere. Each object is defined by: - its shape, attitude and dimensions, - the material along with their physical properties - the state and velocity vectors. The shape, attitude and dimensions define the aerodynamic drag of the object which is input to the 3DOF trajectory modelling. The aerodynamic mass used in the equation of motion is defined as the sum of the object's own mass and the mass of the object's offspring. A new born object inherits the state vector of the parent object. The shape, attitude and dimensions also define the heating rates experienced by the object. The heating rate is integrated in time up to the point where the melting temperature is reached. The mass of melted material is computed from the excess heat and the material properties. After each step the amount of ablated material is determined using the lumped mass approach and is peeled off from the object, updating mass and shape of the

  17. School Reentry Following Traumatic Brain Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deidrick, Kathleen K. M.; Farmer, Janet E.

    2005-01-01

    Successful school reentry following traumatic brain injury (TBI) is critical to recovery. Physical, cognitive, behavioral, academic, and social problems can affect a child's school performance after a TBI. However, early intervention has the potential to improve child academic outcomes and promote effective coping with any persistent changes in…

  18. Reusable Reentry Satellite (RRS): Launch tradeoff study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    A goal of the Phase B study is to define the launch system interfaces for the reusable reentry satellite (RRS) program. The focus of the launch tradeoff study, documented in this report, is to determine which expendable launch vehicles (ELV's) are best suited for the RRS application by understanding the impact of all viable launch systems on RRS design and operation.

  19. Estimation of Decayed Satellite Reentry Trajectories

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-12-08

    dynamics, and require continuous partial derivatives of the f(x) term. The reentry problem has uncertain true dynamics, does not provide an exact ... linearization , and does not have continuous partial derivatives for the true dynamics due to vehicle fragmentation, although the estimator dynamics model does

  20. Prisoner Reentry Programming: Who Recidivates and when?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Severson, Margaret E.; Bruns, Kimberly; Veeh, Christopher; Lee, Jaehoon

    2011-01-01

    This article provides the results of a multi-year evaluation of one state's prison reentry program and its impact on the success of offender participants as measured by certain recidivism outcomes, defined here as yielding a positive urinalysis, returning to prison, and having a new conviction. Using propensity score matching, the recidivism…

  1. Career Indecision in Reentry and Undergraduate Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slaney, Fiona MacKinnon

    1986-01-01

    Examined career indecision in 300 reentry and undergraduate women. Results indicated that there were no differences in career indecision in undergraduate women in any of the age groups 17 to 22 years, 30 to 34 years, or 40 to 44 years. (Author/BL)

  2. Challenges associated with reentry maxillary sinus augmentation.

    PubMed

    Mardinger, Ofer; Moses, Ofer; Chaushu, Gavriel; Manor, Yifat; Tulchinsky, Ze'ev; Nissan, Joseph

    2010-09-01

    This study was a retrospective assessment of reentry sinus augmentation compared with sinus augmentation performed for the first time. There were 38 subjects who required sinus augmentation. The study group (17 patients, 21 sinuses) included subjects following failure of a previous sinus augmentation procedure that required reentry augmentation. The control group (21 patients, 21 sinuses) included subjects in which sinus augmentation was performed for the first time. Patients' medical files were reviewed. A preformed questionnaire was used to collect data regarding demographic parameters, medical and dental health history, habits, and intra- and postoperative data. Operative challenges in the study group included adhesions of the buccal flap to the Schneiderian membrane (62%, 13/21, P<.001), bony fenestration of the lateral wall with adhesions (71%, 15/21, P<.001), limited mobility of a clinical fibrotic Schneiderian membrane (71%, 15/21, P<.001), and increased incidence of membrane perforations (47%, 10/21, versus 9.5%, 2/21, P=.03). In the control group the Schneiderian membrane was thin and flexible. Sinus augmentation succeeded in all cases of both groups. Implant failure was significantly higher in the study group (11% versus 0%, P<.001). Clinical success of reentry sinus augmentation is predictable despite its complexity. Clinicians should be aware of anatomical changes caused by previous failure of this procedure. Patients should be informed about the lower success rate of implants when reentry sinus augmentation is required. Copyright (c) 2010 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Structural Considerations of Inflatable Reentry Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, Robert W.; Brooks, George W.; McComb, Harvey G., Jr.

    1960-01-01

    The state of the design art for inflated structures applicable to reentry vehicles is discussed. Included are material properties, calculations of buckling and collapse loads, and calculations of deflections and vibration frequencies. A new theory for the analysis of inflated plates is presented and compared with experiment.

  4. Prisoner Reentry Programming: Who Recidivates and when?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Severson, Margaret E.; Bruns, Kimberly; Veeh, Christopher; Lee, Jaehoon

    2011-01-01

    This article provides the results of a multi-year evaluation of one state's prison reentry program and its impact on the success of offender participants as measured by certain recidivism outcomes, defined here as yielding a positive urinalysis, returning to prison, and having a new conviction. Using propensity score matching, the recidivism…

  5. Optimal reentry prediction of space objects from LEO using RSM and GA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutyalarao, M.; Raj, M. Xavier James

    2012-07-01

    The accurate estimation of the orbital life time (OLT) of decaying near-Earth objects is of considerable importance for the prediction of risk object re-entry time and hazard assessment as well as for mitigation strategies. Recently, due to the reentries of large number of risk objects, which poses threat to the human life and property, a great concern is developed in the space scientific community all over the World. The evolution of objects in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) is determined by a complex interplay of the perturbing forces, mainly due to atmospheric drag and Earth gravity. These orbits are mostly in low eccentric (eccentricity < 0.2) and have variations in perigee and apogee altitudes due to perturbations during a revolution. The changes in the perigee and apogee altitudes of these orbits are mainly due to the gravitational perturbations of the Earth and the atmospheric density. It has become necessary to use extremely complex force models to match with the present operational requirements and observational techniques. Further the re-entry time of the objects in such orbits is sensitive to the initial conditions. In this paper the problem of predicting re-entry time is attempted as an optimal estimation problem. It is known that the errors are more in eccentricity for the observations based on two line elements (TLEs). Thus two parameters, initial eccentricity and ballistic coefficient, are chosen for optimal estimation. These two parameters are computed with response surface method (RSM) using a genetic algorithm (GA) for the selected time zones, based on rough linear variation of response parameter, the mean semi-major axis during orbit evolution. Error minimization between the observed and predicted mean Semi-major axis is achieved by the application of an optimization algorithm such as Genetic Algorithm (GA). The basic feature of the present approach is that the model and measurement errors are accountable in terms of adjusting the ballistic coefficient

  6. Memory effects, transient growth, and wave breakup in a model of paced atrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garzón, Alejandro; Grigoriev, Roman O.

    2017-09-01

    The mechanisms underlying cardiac fibrillation have been investigated for over a century, but we are still finding surprising results that change our view of this phenomenon. The present study focuses on the transition from normal rhythm to spiral wave chaos associated with a gradual increase in the pacing rate. While some of our findings are consistent with existing experimental, numerical, and theoretical studies of this problem, one result appears to contradict the accepted picture. Specifically we show that, in a two-dimensional model of paced homogeneous atrial tissue, transition from discordant alternans to conduction block, wave breakup, reentry, and spiral wave chaos is associated with the transient growth of finite amplitude disturbances rather than a conventional instability. It is mathematically very similar to subcritical, or bypass, transition from laminar fluid flow to turbulence, which allows many of the tools developed in the context of fluid turbulence to be used for improving our understanding of cardiac arrhythmias.

  7. Airborne Observation of the Hayabusa Sample Return Capsule Re-Entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grinstead, Jay H.; Jenniskens, Peter M.; Cassell, Alan M.; Albers, Jim; Winterm Michael

    2011-01-01

    The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) recently completed their Hayabusa asteroid exploration mission. Launched in 2003, Hayabusa made contact with, and retrieved a sample from, the near-Earth asteroid Itokawa in 2005. The sample return capsule (SRC) re-entered over the Woomera Test Range (WTR) in southern Australia on June 13, 2010, at approximately 11:21 pm local time (09:51 UTC). The SRC re-entry velocity was 12.2 km/s, making it the second-fastest Earth return velocity behind NASA s Stardust sample return capsule re-entry in 2006. From a space technology development perspective, Hayabusa s re-entry functioned as a rare flight experiment of an entry vehicle and its thermal protection system. In collaboration with the SETI Institute, NASA deployed its DC-8 airborne laboratory and a team of international researchers to Australia to observe the re-entry of the SRC. The use of an airborne platform enables observation above most clouds and weather and greatly diminishes atmospheric absorption of the optical signals. The DC-8 s flight path was engineered and flown to provide a view of the spacecraft that bracketed the heat pulse to the capsule. A suite of imaging instruments on board the DC-8 successfully recorded the luminous portion of the re-entry event. For approximately 70 seconds, the spectroscopic and radiometric instruments acquired images and spectra of the capsule, its wake, and destructive re-entry of the spacecraft bus. Figure 1 shows a perspective view of the WTR, the SRC re-entry trajectory, and the flight path of the DC-8. The SRC was jettisoned from the spacecraft bus approximately 3 hours prior to entry interface. Due to thruster failures on the spacecraft, it could not be diverted from the entry path and followed the trajectory of the SRC, where it burned up in the atmosphere between approximately 100 and 50 km altitude. Fortuitously, the separation distance between the spacecraft and SRC was sufficient to clearly resolve the SRC from the

  8. Empirical Accuracies of U.S. Space Surveillance Network Reentry Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Nicholas L.

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Space Surveillance Network (SSN) issues formal satellite reentry predictions for objects which have the potential for generating debris which could pose a hazard to people or property on Earth. These prognostications, known as Tracking and Impact Prediction (TIP) messages, are nominally distributed at daily intervals beginning four days prior to the anticipated reentry and several times during the final 24 hours in orbit. The accuracy of these messages depends on the nature of the satellite s orbit, the characteristics of the space vehicle, solar activity, and many other factors. Despite the many influences on the time and the location of reentry, a useful assessment of the accuracies of TIP messages can be derived and compared with the official accuracies included with each TIP message. This paper summarizes the results of a study of numerous uncontrolled reentries of spacecraft and rocket bodies from nearly circular orbits over a span of several years. Insights are provided into the empirical accuracies and utility of SSN TIP messages.

  9. Empircal accuracies of U.S. space surveillance network reentry predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Nicholas L.

    The U.S. Space Surveillance Network (SSN) issues formal satellite reentry predictions for objects which have the potential for generating debris which could pose a hazard to people or property on Earth. These prognostications, known as Tracking and Impact Prediction (TIP) messages, are nominally distributed at daily intervals beginning four days prior to the anticipated reentry and several times during the final 24 hours in orbit. The accuracy of these messages depends on the nature of the satellite's orbit, the characteristics of the space vehicle, solar activity, and many other factors. Despite the many influences on the time and the location of reentry, a useful assessment of the accuracies of TIP messages can be derived and compared with the official accuracies included with each TIP message. This paper summarizes the results of a study of numerous uncontrolled reentries of spacecraft and rocket bodies from nearly circular orbits over a span of several years. Insights are provided into the empirical accuracies and utility of SSN TIP messages.

  10. Current Status on Radiation Modeling for the Hayabusa Re-entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winter, Michael W.; McDaniel, Ryan D.; Chen, Yih-Kang; Liu, Yen; Saunders, David

    2011-01-01

    On June 13, 2010 the Japanese Hayabusa capsule performed its reentry into the Earths atmosphere over Australia after a seven year journey to the asteroid Itokawa. The reentry was studied by numerous imaging and spectroscopic instruments onboard NASA's DC-8 Airborne Laboratory and from three sites on the ground, in order to measure surface and plasma radiation generated by the Hayabusa Sample Return Capsule (SRC). Post flight, the flow solutions were recomputed to include the whole flow field around the capsule at 11 points along the reentry trajectory using updated trajectory information. Again, material response was taken into account to obtain most reliable surface temperature information. These data will be used to compute thermal radiation of the glowing heat shield and plasma radiation by the shock/post-shock layer system to support analysis of the experimental observation data. For this purpose, lines of sight data are being extracted from the flow field volume grids and plasma radiation will be computed using NEQAIR [4] which is a line-by-line spectroscopic code with one-dimensional transport of radiation intensity. The procedures being used were already successfully applied to the analysis of the observation of the Stardust reentry [5].

  11. Empirical Accuracies of U.S. Space Surveillance Network Reentry Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Nicholas L.

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Space Surveillance Network (SSN) issues formal satellite reentry predictions for objects which have the potential for generating debris which could pose a hazard to people or property on Earth. These prognostications, known as Tracking and Impact Prediction (TIP) messages, are nominally distributed at daily intervals beginning four days prior to the anticipated reentry and several times during the final 24 hours in orbit. The accuracy of these messages depends on the nature of the satellite s orbit, the characteristics of the space vehicle, solar activity, and many other factors. Despite the many influences on the time and the location of reentry, a useful assessment of the accuracies of TIP messages can be derived and compared with the official accuracies included with each TIP message. This paper summarizes the results of a study of numerous uncontrolled reentries of spacecraft and rocket bodies from nearly circular orbits over a span of several years. Insights are provided into the empirical accuracies and utility of SSN TIP messages.

  12. Fault linkage and continental breakup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cresswell, Derren; Lymer, Gaël; Reston, Tim; Stevenson, Carl; Bull, Jonathan; Sawyer, Dale; Morgan, Julia

    2017-04-01

    The magma-poor rifted margin off the west coast of Galicia (NW Spain) has provided some of the key observations in the development of models describing the final stages of rifting and continental breakup. In 2013, we collected a 68 x 20 km 3D seismic survey across the Galicia margin, NE Atlantic. Processing through to 3D Pre-stack Time Migration (12.5 m bin-size) and 3D depth conversion reveals the key structures, including an underlying detachment fault (the S detachment), and the intra-block and inter-block faults. These data reveal multiple phases of faulting, which overlap spatially and temporally, have thinned the crust to between zero and a few km thickness, producing 'basement windows' where crustal basement has been completely pulled apart and sediments lie directly on the mantle. Two approximately N-S trending fault systems are observed: 1) a margin proximal system of two linked faults that are the upward extension (breakaway faults) of the S; in the south they form one surface that splays northward to form two faults with an intervening fault block. These faults were thus demonstrably active at one time rather than sequentially. 2) An oceanward relay structure that shows clear along strike linkage. Faults within the relay trend NE-SW and heavily dissect the basement. The main block bounding faults can be traced from the S detachment through the basement into, and heavily deforming, the syn-rift sediments where they die out, suggesting that the faults propagated up from the S detachment surface. Analysis of the fault heaves and associated maps at different structural levels show complementary fault systems. The pattern of faulting suggests a variation in main tectonic transport direction moving oceanward. This might be interpreted as a temporal change during sequential faulting, however the transfer of extension between faults and the lateral variability of fault blocks suggests that many of the faults across the 3D volume were active at least in part

  13. Deformed halo nuclei probed by breakup reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Takashi

    2013-07-01

    Breakup reactions play important roles in elucidating the structures near the drip lines, such as nuclear halo. The recent experimental results using the Coulomb and nuclear breakup reactions for the neutron-drip-line nuclei at the new-generation RI beam facility, RIBF at RIKEN, are presented. Focuses are put on the results on the newly found halo nucleus 31Ne, which is intriguing also in that this nucleus is in the island-of-inversion and thus could be strongly deformed. The results on other Ne/Mg/Si neutron rich isotopes ranging from N=20 towards N=28 are also briefly reported. The first breakup experiments using SAMURAI facility at RIBF and future perspectives are also presented.

  14. Catastrophic drop breakup in electric field.

    PubMed

    Raut, Janhavi S; Akella, Sathish; Singh, Amitkumar; Naik, Vijay M

    2009-05-05

    We report novel observations revealing the catastrophic breakup of water drops containing surfactant molecules, which are suspended in oil and subjected to an electric field of strength approximately 10(5) V/m. The observed breakup was distinctly different from the gradual end pinch-off or tip-streaming modes reported earlier in the literature. There was no observable characteristic deformation of the drop prior to breakup. The time scales involved in the breakup and the resultant droplet sizes were much smaller in the phenomenon observed by us. We hypothesize that this mode of drop breakup is obtained by the combined effect of an external electric field that imposes tensile stresses on the surface of the drop, and characteristic stress-strain behavior for tensile deformation exhibited by the liquid drop in the presence of a suitable surfactant, which not only lowers the interfacial tension (and hence the cohesive strength) of the drop but also simultaneously renders the interface nonductile or brittle at high enough concentration. We have identified the relevant thermodynamic parameter, viz., the sum of interfacial tension, sigma, and the Gibbs elasticity, epsilon, which plays a decisive role in determining the mode of drop breakup. The parameter (epsilon + sigma) represents the internal restoration stress of a liquid drop opposing rapid, short-time-scale perturbations or local deformations in the drop shape under the influence of external impulses or stresses. A thermodynamic "state" diagram of (epsilon + sigma) versus interfacial area per surfactant molecule adsorbed at the drop interface shows a "maximum" at a critical transition concentration (ctc). Below this concentration of the surfactant, the drop undergoes tip streaming or pinch off. Above this concentration, the drop may undergo catastrophic disintegration if the external stress is high enough to overcome the ultimate cohesive strength of the drop's interface.

  15. Reentry guidance for Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Causey, W.; Sohoni, V.

    1973-01-01

    An explicit guidance scheme is outlined which provides the appropriate energy management in order for the shuttle orbiter to reach any location within the required footprint. Considering the orbiter as entering the earth's atmosphere, expressions for the downrange, crossrange, and the time of the termination of the entry phase as functions of the control variables are developed. Performing an order-of-magnitude analysis of the terms in these expressions, only dominant terms are retained. Analytical expressions for the elements of the sensitivity matrix which represents the partial derivatives of the desired range with respect to control variables are formulated. Using the Gauss-Jordan inversion technique, the required change in guidance commands as a function of the deviations in the downrange and crossrange are explicitly computed.

  16. Reentry guidance for Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Causey, W.; Sohoni, V.

    1973-01-01

    An explicit guidance scheme is outlined which provides the appropriate energy management in order for the shuttle orbiter to reach any location within the required footprint. Considering the orbiter as entering the earth's atmosphere, expressions for the downrange, crossrange, and the time of the termination of the entry phase as functions of the control variables are developed. Performing an order-of-magnitude analysis of the terms in these expressions, only dominant terms are retained. Analytical expressions for the elements of the sensitivity matrix which represents the partial derivatives of the desired range with respect to control variables are formulated. Using the Gauss-Jordan inversion technique, the required change in guidance commands as a function of the deviations in the downrange and crossrange are explicitly computed.

  17. Microprocessor applications in reentry vehicle testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downing, W. D., Jr.; Winn, B. D.; Pruett, J. P.

    A system to test the Minuteman MK-12 reentry vehicle is being developed by Southwest Research Institute for use at Kelly AFB. The system will use several microprocessors to monitor and direct the test functions, control the flight environment equipment and measure reentry vehicle performance. Data acquired during the test are used for reliability scoring. The new system is intended to replace the original system which has been in operation sicne 1968. This paper will provide a description of each microprocessor system and its associated peripherals and software. Emphasis will be given to and distribution of critical tasks among processors and development of fault tolerant software in order to increase system reliability. Testing has been conducted for several years, revealing many areas that need improvement. Some of the problems encountered, and the solutions to those problems, will be discussed.

  18. Reentry vehicle flight testing and recovery techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigali, D. J.; Sterk, M. W.; Randmaa, J.

    1980-07-01

    A technique to soft-recover high ballistic coefficient reentry vehicles from ICBM reentry conditions has been developed and demonstrated. To date, two different types of vehicles have been soft-recovered, utilizing the mass jettison, parachute recovery technique described herein. The fabrication and assembly of two additional RVs of different designs are presently underway in preparation for flight test. A technique to allow an increase in the severity of the environment from which an RV can be recovered is presently being analyzed and ground-tested with plans to flight-test it within two years. Descriptions of all of these vehicles and a summary of the flight-test results are presented.

  19. Inclusive Proton Emission Spectra from Deuteron Breakup Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, B. V.; Capote, R.; Sin, M.

    2016-05-01

    We present calculations of deuteron elastic and nonelastic breakup cross sections and angular distributions at deuteron energies below 100 MeV obtained using the post-form DWBA approximation. The elastic breakup cross section was extensively studied in the past. Very few calculations of nonelastic breakup have been performed, however. We compare two forms of the elastic DWBA breakup amplitude but conclude that neither provides a correct description of the inclusive proton emission cross section.

  20. On the driving forces of the Pangea breakup and northward drift of the Indian subcontinent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Masaki; Hamano, Yozo

    2015-04-01

    During the breakup of the supercontinent Pangea, the Indian subcontinent became isolated from the southern part of Pangea, called Gondwanaland, at around 130 Ma, moved northwards, and eventually collided with Eurasia to form the Himalayas at around 40-50 Ma. The reason why the Indian subcontinent moved at such a high speed of up to c. 20 cm/yr remains a controversial issue in geodynamics. Here, numerical simulation of 3-D spherical mantle convection with an Earth-like Rayleigh number is reported, considering the assembly of highly viscous continental blocks with the configuration of Pangea, to determine the geodynamic mechanisms of the Pangea breakup, the subsequent continental drift, and the high-speed northward drift of the Indian subcontinent. Our numerical simulations approximately reproduced the process of continental drift from the breakup of Pangea at 200 Ma to the present-day continental distribution. These simulations revealed that a major factor in the northward drift of the Indian subcontinent was the large-scale cold mantle downwelling that developed spontaneously in the North Tethys Ocean, attributed to the overall shape of Pangea. The strong lateral mantle flow caused by the high-temperature anomaly beneath Pangea, due to the thermal insulation effect, enhanced the acceleration of the Indian subcontinent during the early stage of the Pangea breakup. The large-scale hot upwelling plumes from the lower mantle, initially located under Africa, might have contributed to the formation of the large-scale cold mantle downwelling in the North Tethys Ocean. References: [1] Yoshida, M., Effects of various lithospheric yield stresses and different mantle-heating modes on the breakup of the Pangea supercontinent, Geophys. Res. Lett., 41(9), 3060-3067, doi:10.1002/2014GL060023, 2014. [2] Yoshida, M. and Y. Hamano, Pangea breakup and northward drift of the Indian subcontinent reproduced by a numerical model of mantle convection, Submitted to Scientific Reports, 2015

  1. Precise Orbit Determination of the GOCE Re-Entry Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gini, Francesco; Otten, Michiel; Springer, Tim; Enderle, Werner; Lemmens, Stijn; Flohrer, Tim

    2015-03-01

    During the last days of the GOCE mission, after the GOCE spacecraft ran out of fuel, it slowly decayed before finally re-entering the atmosphere on the 11th November 2013. As an integrated part of the AOCS, GOCE carried a GPS receiver that was in operations during the re-entry phase. This feature provided a unique opportunity for Precise Orbit Determination (POD) analysis. As part of the activities carried out by the Navigation Support Office (HSO-GN) at ESOC, precise ephemerides of the GOCE satellite have been reconstructed for the entire re-entry phase based on the available GPS observations of the onboard LAGRANGE receiver. All the data available from the moment the thruster was switched off on the 21st of October 2013 to the last available telemetry downlink on the 10th November 2013 have been processed, for a total of 21 daily arcs. For this period a dedicated processing sequence has been defined and implemented within the ESA/ESOC NAvigation Package for Earth Observation Satellites (NAPEOS) software. The computed results show a post-fit RMS of the GPS undifferenced carrier phase residuals (ionospheric-free linear combination) between 6 and 14 mm for the first 16 days which then progressively increases up to about 80 mm for the last available days. An orbit comparison with the Precise Science Orbits (PSO) generated at the Astronomical Institute of the University of Bern (AIUB, Bern, Switzerland) shows an average difference around 9 cm for the first 8 daily arcs and progressively increasing up to 17 cm for the following days. During this reentry phase (21st of October - 10th November 2013) a substantial drop in the GOCE altitude is observed, starting from about 230 km to 130 km where the last GPS measurements were taken. During this orbital decay an increment of a factor of 100 in the aerodynamic acceleration profile is observed. In order to limit the mis-modelling of the non-gravitational forces (radiation pressure and aerodynamic effects) the newly developed

  2. Space debris characterization in support of a satellite breakup model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fortson, Bryan H.; Winter, James E.; Allahdadi, Firooz A.

    1992-01-01

    The Space Kinetic Impact and Debris Branch began an ambitious program to construct a fully analytical model of the breakup of a satellite under hypervelocity impact. In order to provide empirical data with which to substantiate the model, debris from hypervelocity experiments conducted in a controlled laboratory environment were characterized to provide information of its mass, velocity, and ballistic coefficient distributions. Data on the debris were collected in one master data file, and a simple FORTRAN program allows users to describe the debris from any subset of these experiments that may be of interest to them. A statistical analysis was performed, allowing users to determine the precision of the velocity measurements for the data. Attempts are being made to include and correlate other laboratory data, as well as those data obtained from the explosion or collision of spacecraft in low earth orbit.

  3. Nanojets: Electrification, Energetics, Dynamics, Stability and Breakup

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-31

    20/2007 FINAL 02/15/2004-12/31/2006 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Nanojets: Electrification , Energetics, Dynamics, Stability and Breakup...NUMBER finclude area code)UUU64 404.894.3368 Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8/98) Prescribed by ANSI SId. Z39.18 FINAL REPORT Nanojets: Electrification

  4. Breakup branches of Borromean beryllium-9

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R. Freer, M.; Wheldon, C.; Curtis, N.; Ashwood, N. I.; Barr, M.; Kokalova, Tz.; Malcolm, J. D.; Ziman, V. A.; Almaraz-Calderon, S.; Aprahamian, A.; Bucher, B.; Couder, M.; Fang, X.; Jung, F.; Lu, W.; Roberts, A.; Tan, W. P.; Copp, P.; Lesher, S. R.; and others

    2015-10-15

    The breakup reaction {sup 9}Be({sup 4}He, 3α)n was measured using an array of four double-sided silicon strip detectors at beam energies of 22 and 26 MeV. Excited states in {sup 9}Be up to 12 MeV were populated and reconstructed through the measurement of the charged reaction products. It is proposed that limits on the spins and parities of the states can be derived from the way that they decay. Various breakup paths for excited states in {sup 9}Be have been explored including the {sup 8}Be{sub g.s.} + n, {sup 8}Be{sub 2{sup +}} + n and {sup 5}He{sub g.s.} + {sup 4}He channels. By imposing the condition that the breakup proceeded via the {sup 8}Be ground state, clean excitation spectra for {sup 9}Be were reconstructed. The remaining two breakup channels were found to possess strongly-overlapping kinematic signatures and more sophisticated methods (referenced) are required to completely disentangle these other possibilities. Emphasis is placed on the development of the experimental analysis and the usefulness of Monte-Carlo simulations for this purpose.

  5. Droplet breakup dynamics of weakly viscoelastic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Kristin; Walker, Travis

    2016-11-01

    The addition of macromolecules to solvent, even in dilute quantities, can alter a fluid's response in an extensional flow. For low-viscosity fluids, the presence of elasticity may not be apparent when measured using a standard rotational rheometer, yet it may still alter the response of a fluid when undergoing an extensional deformation, especially at small length scales where elastic effects are enhanced. Applications such as microfluidics necessitate investigating the dynamics of fluids with elastic properties that are not pronounced at large length scales. In the present work, a microfluidic cross-slot configuration is used to study the effects of elasticity on droplet breakup. Droplet breakup and the subsequent iterated-stretching - where beads form along a filament connecting two primary droplets - were observed for a variety of material and flow conditions. We present a relationship on the modes of bead formation and how and when these modes will form based on key parameters such as the properties of the outer continuous-phase fluid. The results are vital not only for simulating the droplet breakup of weakly viscoelastic fluids but also for understanding how the droplet breakup event can be used for characterizing the extensional properties of weakly-viscoelastic fluids.

  6. Breakup branches of Borromean beryllium-9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, R.; Freer, M.; Wheldon, C.; Curtis, N.; Almaraz-Calderon, S.; Aprahamian, A.; Ashwood, N. I.; Barr, M.; Bucher, B.; Copp, P.; Couder, M.; Fang, X.; Goldring, G.; Jung, F.; Kokalova, Tz.; Lesher, S. R.; Lu, W.; Malcolm, J. D.; Roberts, A.; Tan, W. P.; Ziman, V. A.

    2015-10-01

    The breakup reaction 9Be(4He, 3α)n was measured using an array of four double-sided silicon strip detectors at beam energies of 22 and 26 MeV. Excited states in 9Be up to 12 MeV were populated and reconstructed through the measurement of the charged reaction products. It is proposed that limits on the spins and parities of the states can be derived from the way that they decay. Various breakup paths for excited states in 9Be have been explored including the 8Beg.s. + n, 8Be2+ + n and 5Heg.s. + 4He channels. By imposing the condition that the breakup proceeded via the 8Be ground state, clean excitation spectra for 9Be were reconstructed. The remaining two breakup channels were found to possess strongly-overlapping kinematic signatures and more sophisticated methods (referenced) are required to completely disentangle these other possibilities. Emphasis is placed on the development of the experimental analysis and the usefulness of Monte-Carlo simulations for this purpose.

  7. Supercontinent break-up: Causes and consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z. X.

    2014-12-01

    Supercontinent break-up has most commonly been linked to plume or superplume events, and/or supercontinent thermal insulation, but precise mechanisms are yet to be worked out. Even less know is if and what roles other factors may play. Key factors likely include gravitational force due to the continental superswell driven by both the lower-mantle superplume and continental thermal insulation, mental convention driven by the superplume and individual plumes atop the superplume, assisted by thermal/magmatic weakening of the supercontinent interior (both plume heat and thermal insulation heat). In addition, circum-supercontinent slab downwelling may not only drive the formation of the antipodal superplumes (thus the break-up of the supercontinent), the likely roll-back of the subduction system would also create extension within the supercontinent, facilitating supercontinent break-up. Consequences of supercontinent break-up include long-term sea-level rise, climatic changes due to changes in ocean circulation pattern and carbon cycle, and biodiversification. It has long been demonstrated that the existence of the supercontinent Pangea corresponds to a long-term sea-level drop, whereas the break-up of the supercontinent corresponds to a long-term sea-level rise (170 m higher than it is today). A recent analysis of Neoproterozoic sedimentary facies illustrates that the time of Neoproterozoic supercontinent Rodinia corresponds to a low in the percentage of deep marine facies occurrence, whereas the time of Rodinia break-up corresponds to a significantly higher percentage of deep marine facies occurrence. The long-tern sea-level drop during supercontinent times were likely caused by both plume/superplume dynamic topography and an older mean age of the oceanic crust, whereas long-tern sea-level rise during supercontinent break-up (720-580 Ma for Rodinia and Late Jurassic-Cretaceous for Pangea) likely corresponds to an younger mean age of the oceanic crust, massive plume

  8. Impact of tidal density variability on orbital and reentry predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, J. M.; Forbes, J. M.; Born, G. H.

    2012-12-01

    Since the first satellites entered Earth orbit in the late 1950's and early 1960's, the influences of solar and geomagnetic variability on the satellite drag environment have been studied, and parameterized in empirical density models with increasing sophistication. However, only within the past 5 years has the realization emerged that "troposphere weather" contributes significantly to the "space weather" of the thermosphere, especially during solar minimum conditions. Much of the attendant variability is attributable to upward-propagating solar tides excited by latent heating due to deep tropical convection, and solar radiation absorption primarily by water vapor and ozone in the stratosphere and mesosphere, respectively. We know that this tidal spectrum significantly modifies the orbital (>200 km) and reentry (60-150 km) drag environments, and that these tidal components induce longitude variability not yet emulated in empirical density models. Yet, current requirements for improvements in orbital prediction make clear that further refinements to density models are needed. In this paper, the operational consequences of longitude-dependent tides are quantitatively assessed through a series of orbital and reentry predictions. We find that in-track prediction differences incurred by tidal effects are typically of order 200 ± 100 m for satellites in 400-km circular orbits and 15 ± 10 km for satellites in 200-km circular orbits for a 24-hour prediction. For an initial 200-km circular orbit, surface impact differences of order 15° ± 15° latitude are incurred. For operational problems with similar accuracy needs, a density model that includes a climatological representation of longitude-dependent tides should significantly reduce errors due to this source.

  9. Reusable Reentry Satellite (RRS) system design study: System cost estimates document

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1991-02-01

    The Reusable Reentry Satellite (RRS) program was initiated to provide life science investigators relatively inexpensive, frequent access to space for extended periods of time with eventual satellite recovery on earth. The RRS will provide an on-orbit laboratory for research on biological and material processes, be launched from a number of expendable launch vehicles, and operate in Low-Altitude Earth Orbit (LEO) as a free-flying unmanned laboratory. SAIC's design will provide independent atmospheric reentry and soft landing in the continental U.S., orbit for a maximum of 60 days, and will sustain three flights per year for 10 years. The Reusable Reentry Vehicle (RRV) will be 3-axis stabilized with artificial gravity up to 1.5g's, be rugged and easily maintainable, and have a modular design to accommodate a satellite bus and separate modular payloads (e.g., rodent module, general biological module, ESA microgravity botany facility, general botany module). The purpose of this System Cost Estimate Document is to provide a Life Cycle Cost Estimate (LCCE) for a NASA RRS Program using SAIC's RRS design. The estimate includes development, procurement, and 10 years of operations and support (O&S) costs for NASA's RRS program. The estimate does not include costs for other agencies which may track or interface with the RRS program (e.g., Air Force tracking agencies or individual RRS experimenters involved with special payload modules (PM's)). The life cycle cost estimate extends over the 10 year operation and support period FY99-2008.

  10. Reusable Reentry Satellite (RRS) system design study: System cost estimates document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Reusable Reentry Satellite (RRS) program was initiated to provide life science investigators relatively inexpensive, frequent access to space for extended periods of time with eventual satellite recovery on earth. The RRS will provide an on-orbit laboratory for research on biological and material processes, be launched from a number of expendable launch vehicles, and operate in Low-Altitude Earth Orbit (LEO) as a free-flying unmanned laboratory. SAIC's design will provide independent atmospheric reentry and soft landing in the continental U.S., orbit for a maximum of 60 days, and will sustain three flights per year for 10 years. The Reusable Reentry Vehicle (RRV) will be 3-axis stabilized with artificial gravity up to 1.5g's, be rugged and easily maintainable, and have a modular design to accommodate a satellite bus and separate modular payloads (e.g., rodent module, general biological module, ESA microgravity botany facility, general botany module). The purpose of this System Cost Estimate Document is to provide a Life Cycle Cost Estimate (LCCE) for a NASA RRS Program using SAIC's RRS design. The estimate includes development, procurement, and 10 years of operations and support (O&S) costs for NASA's RRS program. The estimate does not include costs for other agencies which may track or interface with the RRS program (e.g., Air Force tracking agencies or individual RRS experimenters involved with special payload modules (PM's)). The life cycle cost estimate extends over the 10 year operation and support period FY99-2008.

  11. Study and Development of a Sub-Orbital Re-Entry Demonstrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savino, R.

    The Italian and European Space Agencies are supporting a research programme, developed in Campania region by a cluster of industries, research institutes and universities, on a low-cost re-entry capsule, able to return payloads from the ISS to Earth and/or to perform short-duration scientific missions in Low Earth Orbit (LEO). The ballistic capsule is characterized by a deployable, disposable "umbrella-like" heat shield that allows relatively small dimensions at launch and a sufficient exposed surface area in re-entry conditions, reducing the ballistic coefficient and leading to acceptable heat fluxes, mechanical loads and final descent velocity. ESA is supporting a preliminary study to develop a flight demonstrator of the capsule to be embarked as a secondary payload onboard a sub-orbital sounding rocket. The deployable thermal protection system concept may be applied to future science and robotic exploration mission requiring planetary entry and, possibly also to missions in the framework of Human Space flight, requiring planetary entry or re-entry. The technology offers also an interesting potential for aerobraking, aerocapture and for de-orbiting. This paper summarizes the results of these activities, which are being more and more refined as the work proceeds, including the definition and analysis of the mission scenario, the aerodynamic, aerothermodynamic, mechanical and structural analyses and the technical definition of avionics, instrumentation and main subsystems.

  12. Airborne Observation of the Hayabusa Sample Return Capsule Re-Entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grinstead, Jay H.; Jenniskens, Peter; Cassell, Alan M.; Albers, James; Winter, Michael W.

    2011-01-01

    NASA Ames Research Center and the SETI Institute collaborated on an effort to observe the Earth re-entry of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's Hayabusa sample return capsule. Hayabusa was an asteroid exploration mission that retrieved a sample from the near-Earth asteroid Itokawa. Its sample return capsule re-entered over the Woomera Prohibited Area in southern Australia on June 13, 2010. Being only the third sample return mission following NASA's Genesis and Stardust missions, Hayabusa's return was a rare opportunity to collect aerothermal data from an atmospheric entry capsule returning at superorbital speeds. NASA deployed its DC-8 airborne laboratory and a team of international researchers to Australia for the re-entry. For approximately 70 seconds, spectroscopic and radiometric imaging instruments acquired images and spectra of the capsule, its wake, and destructive re-entry of the spacecraft bus. Once calibrated, spectra of the capsule will be interpreted to yield data for comparison with and validation of high fidelity and engineering simulation tools used for design and development of future atmospheric entry system technologies. A brief summary of the Hayabusa mission, the preflight preparations and observation mission planning, mission execution, and preliminary spectral data are documented.

  13. Analysis of the inadvertent reentry of the Cassini Spacecraft{close_quote}s Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators

    SciTech Connect

    Tobery, E.W.; Bhutta, B.A.

    1999-01-01

    A rigorous multi-discipline approach has been developed to compute the aero/thermal/structural response of the Cassini Spacecraft{close_quote}s G{underscore}eneral P{underscore}urpose H{underscore}eat S{underscore}ource (GPHS) modules in the unlikely event of accidental reentry of the spacecraft during its Earth gravity-assist maneuver. A new r{underscore}eacting, a{underscore}blating, c{underscore}hemical e{underscore}quilibrium/nonequilibrium with r{underscore}adiation (RACER) full Navier-Stokes code is applied, along with an in-depth, transient-heating code, a nonlinear structural analysis code, and a six-degree-of-freedom flight-dynamics code. Attention is focused on the GPHS modules that would breakaway from the R{underscore}adioisotope T{underscore}hermoelectric G{underscore}enerators (RTGs) at high altitude. In addition, detailed analyses are performed to determine the survival/failure of the Graphite Impact Shells that would be released if the GPHS fails. The reentry velocity of the GPHS module (20 km/sec) is higher than any previously analyzed Earth reentry trajectory. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  14. 14 CFR 433.5 - Operational restrictions on a reentry site.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LICENSE TO OPERATE A REENTRY SITE § 433.5 Operational restrictions on a reentry site. A license to operate a reentry site authorizes the licensee to offer use of the site to support reentry of a reentry vehicle for which the three-sigma footprint of the vehicle...

  15. EV13 Genesis Reentry Observations and Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swift, Wesley R.; Suggs, Robert M.

    2006-01-01

    The Genesis spacecraft reentry represented a unique opportunity to observe a "calibrated meteor" from northern Nevada. Knowing its speed, mass, composition, and precise trajectory made it a good subject to test some of the algorithms used to determine meteoroid mass from observed brightness. It was also a good test of an inexpensive set of cameras which could be deployed to observe future shuttle reentries. The utility of consumer grade video cameras was evident during the STS-107 accident investigation and the Genesis reentry gave us the opportunity to specify and test commercially available cameras which could be used during future reentries. This report describes the video observations and their analysis, compares the results with a simple photometric model, describes the forward scatter radar experiment, and lists lessons learned from the expedition and implications for the Stardust reentry in January 2006 as well as future shuttle reentries.

  16. Worldwide growth market forecast for re-entry drilling

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-01

    Operators worldwide hail re-entry drilling as the fastest growing development technique in the business. With re-entry technology advancing on a number of fronts, the only question seems to be which re-entry technique is best to get optimum well productivity. Discussions now address how best to proceed: traditional re-entry (RED), coiled tubing drilling (CTD) or short radius (SRD). New technology is definitely fueling a methodology shift in favor of coiled tubing drilling and short radius drilling. Petroleum Engineer International explored the booming re-entry business with operators from the North Sea and North American markets. The paper contains the operators` thoughts on re-entry drilling.

  17. Relational vulnerabilities of incarcerated and reentry mothers: therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Few-Demo, April L; Arditti, Joyce A

    2014-11-01

    A qualitative study involving a follow-up interview with 10 incarcerated and reentry mothers in rural southwest and central Virginia was conducted to explore the influence that women's close relationships have on their reentry experiences with their families. The Vulnerability Conceptual Model (VCM) was used to sensitize an examination of how incarcerated and reentry mothers negotiate relational vulnerabilities in the context of varying situational vulnerability. Grounded theory analysis revealed three themes that characterized relational vulnerabilities. Given our focus on close relationships and the potential of the VCM to identify opportunities for resilience and vulnerability, we highlighted the influence of ambiguous and ambivalent relationships and unresolved loss and grief due to relationship dissolution or the death of a parent, sibling, child, or intimate partner in the reentry process. The data revealed two types of reentry mothers with divergent trajectories for social reintegration. Implications of these types for therapeutic treatment approaches for reentry women are discussed. © The Author(s) 2013.

  18. Earth's Magnetotail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPherron, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    Earth's magnetic tail (magnetotail) was discovered 50 years ago by the first spacecraft to fly downstream of Earth. The magnetotail is a complex structure created by the solar wind. The tail is in fact a very dynamic structure with many internal processes and rapid changes. The magnetospheric substorm is the name given to the collection of phenomena that occur throughout the magnetosphere at the time of an expansion of the aurora and westward electrojet near midnight. Convection bays are characterized by continuous southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). Sawtooth events occur during stronger driving where it appears that no steady state is possible. Pseudo breakups tend to occur in the growth phase of substorms and precede its main onset. The phenomenon named poleward boundary intensification (PBI) is a brightening of aurora at the poleward edge of the auroral oval.

  19. Entrainment instability and vertical motion as causes of stratocumulus breakup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, C. J.; Pearson, R., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Entrainment instability is thought to be a cause of stratocumulus breakup. At the interface between the cloud and the overlying air, mixtures may form which are negatively buoyant because of cloud droplet evaporation. Quantities devised to predict breakup are obtained from aircraft observations and are tested against cloud observations from satellite. Often, the parameters indicate that breakup should occur but the clouds remain, sometimes for several days. One possible explanation for breakup is vertical motion from passing synoptic cyclones. Several cases suggest that breakup is associated with the downward vertical motion from the cold air advected behind an eastward moving cyclone.

  20. Simulation for Prediction of Entry Article Demise (SPEAD): An Analysis Tool for Spacecraft Safety Analysis and Ascent/Reentry Risk Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ling, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    For the purpose of performing safety analysis and risk assessment for a potential off-nominal atmospheric reentry resulting in vehicle breakup, a synthesis of trajectory propagation coupled with thermal analysis and the evaluation of node failure is required to predict the sequence of events, the timeline, and the progressive demise of spacecraft components. To provide this capability, the Simulation for Prediction of Entry Article Demise (SPEAD) analysis tool was developed. The software and methodology have been validated against actual flights, telemetry data, and validated software, and safety/risk analyses were performed for various programs using SPEAD. This report discusses the capabilities, modeling, validation, and application of the SPEAD analysis tool.

  1. DebriSat- A Planned Laboratory-Based Satellite Impact Experiment for Breakup Fragment Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liou, J.-C.; Clark, S.; Fitz-Coy, N.; Huynh, T.; Opiela, J.; Polk, M.; Roebuck, B.; Rushing, R.; Sorge, M.; Werremeyer, M.

    2013-08-01

    The goal of the DebriSat project is to characterize fragments generated by a hypervelocity collision involving a modern satellite in low Earth orbit (LEO). The DebriSat project will update and expand upon the information obtained in the 1992 Satellite Orbital Debris Characterization Impact Test (SOCIT), which characterized the breakup of a 1960s U.S. Navy Transit satellite. There are three phases to this project: the design and fabrication of DebriSat - an engineering model representing a modern, 60-cm/50-kg LEO satellite; performance of a laboratory-based hypervelocity impact to catastrophically break up the satellite; and characterization of the properties of breakup fragments down to 2 mm in size. The data obtained, including fragment size, area-to-mass ratio, density, shape, material composition, optical properties, and radar cross-section distributions, will be used to supplement the DoD and NASA satellite breakup models to better describe the breakup outcome of a modern satellite.

  2. DebriSat - A Planned Laboratory-Based Satellite Impact Experiment for Breakup Fragment Characterizations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Jer-Chyi; Clark, S.; Fitz-Coy, N.; Huynh, T.; Opiela, J.; Polk, M.; Roebuck, B.; Rushing, R.; Sorge, M.; Werremeyer, M.

    2013-01-01

    The goal of the DebriSat project is to characterize fragments generated by a hypervelocity collision involving a modern satellite in low Earth orbit (LEO). The DebriSat project will update and expand upon the information obtained in the 1992 Satellite Orbital Debris Characterization Impact Test (SOCIT), which characterized the breakup of a 1960 s US Navy Transit satellite. There are three phases to this project: the design and fabrication of DebriSat - an engineering model representing a modern, 60-cm/50-kg class LEO satellite; conduction of a laboratory-based hypervelocity impact to catastrophically break up the satellite; and characterization of the properties of breakup fragments down to 2 mm in size. The data obtained, including fragment size, area-to-mass ratio, density, shape, material composition, optical properties, and radar cross-section distributions, will be used to supplement the DoD s and NASA s satellite breakup models to better describe the breakup outcome of a modern satellite.

  3. Characterization of the 2012-044C Briz-M Upper Stage Breakup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matney, M. J.; Hamilton, J.; Horstman, M.; Papanyan, V.

    2013-01-01

    On 6 August, 2012, Russia launched two commercial satellites aboard a Proton rocket, and attempted to place them in geosynchronous orbit using a Briz-M upper stage (2012-044C, SSN 38746). Unfortunately, the upper stage failed early in its burn and was left stranded in an elliptical orbit with a perigee in low Earth orbit (LEO). Because the stage failed with much of its fuel on board, it was deemed a significant breakup risk. These fears were confirmed when it broke up 16 October, creating a large cloud of debris with perigees below that of the International Space Station. The debris cloud was tracked by the US Space Surveillance Network (SSN), which can reliably detect and track objects down to about 10 cm in size. Because of the unusual geometry of the breakup, there was an opportunity for NASA Orbital Debris Program Office to use specialized radar assets to characterize the extent of the debris cloud in sizes smaller than the standard debris tracked by the SSN. This paper will describe the observation campaign to measure the small particle distributions of this cloud, and presents the results of the analysis of the data. We shall compare the data to the modelled size distribution, number, and shape of the cloud, and what implications this may have for future breakup debris models. We shall conclude the paper with a discussion how this measurement process can be improved for future breakups.

  4. Ice breakup: Observations of the acoustic signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waddell, S. R.; Farmer, D. M.

    1988-03-01

    We describe observations of ambient sound beneath landfast ice in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago and interpret its evolution over the period June-August in terms of ice cracking and disintegration. The data were recorded on six bands between 50 and 14,500 Hz for the period April 2 to August 7, 1986, in Dolphin and Union Strait. The frequency dependence of the attenuation of sound in water allows separation of distant and local noise sources. In conjunction with satellite imagery and meteorological data, it is shown that strong signals in the acoustic time series are associated with major breakup events. The acoustic signal can provide predictive information about ice conditions and the approach of breakup.

  5. Coupled map lattice model of jet breakup

    SciTech Connect

    Minich, R W; Schwartz, A J; Baker, E L

    2001-01-25

    An alternative approach is described to evaluate the statistical nature of the breakup of shaped charge liners. Experimental data from ductile and brittle copper jets are analyzed in terms of velocity gradient, deviation of {Delta}V from linearity, R/S analysis, and the Hurst exponent within the coupled map lattice model. One-dimensional simulations containing 600 zones of equal mass and using distinctly different force-displacement curves are generated to simulate ductile and brittle behavior. A particle separates from the stretching jet when an element of material reaches the failure criterion. A simple model of a stretching rod using brittle, semi-brittle, and ductile force-displacement curves is in agreement with the experimental results for the Hurst exponent and the phase portraits and indicates that breakup is a correlated phenomenon.

  6. Reentry Works: The Implementation and Effectiveness of a Serious and Violent Offender Reentry Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouffard, Jeffrey A.; Bergeron, Lindsey E.

    2006-01-01

    Spurred by large increases in prison populations and other recent sentencing and correctional trends, the federal government has supported the development and implementation of Serious and Violent Offender Reentry Initiatives (SVORI) nationwide. While existing research demonstrates the effectiveness of the separate components of these programs…

  7. Reentry Works: The Implementation and Effectiveness of a Serious and Violent Offender Reentry Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouffard, Jeffrey A.; Bergeron, Lindsey E.

    2006-01-01

    Spurred by large increases in prison populations and other recent sentencing and correctional trends, the federal government has supported the development and implementation of Serious and Violent Offender Reentry Initiatives (SVORI) nationwide. While existing research demonstrates the effectiveness of the separate components of these programs…

  8. Fear of Success and Achievement Anxiety in Reentry Versus Non-Reentry Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Pamela; And Others

    Women who reenter college after years of work or family responsibilities were compared to women with similar backgrounds who do not reenter school on measures of fear of success and achievement anxiety. A questionnaire designed to determine reentry status, age, socioeconomic standing, facilitating and debilitating anxiety, and fear of success was…

  9. Breakup of Pack Ice, Antarctic Ice Shelf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Breakup of Pack Ice along the periphery of the Antarctic Ice Shelf (53.5S, 3.0E) produced this mosaic of ice floes off the Antarctic Ice Shelf. Strong offshore winds, probably associated with strong katabatic downdrafts from the interior of the continent, are seen peeling off the edges of the ice shelf into long filamets of sea ice, icebergs, bergy bits and growlers to flow northward into the South Atlantic Ocean. 53.5S, 3.0E

  10. Galileo: Earth avoidance study report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, R. T.

    1988-01-01

    The 1989 Galileo mission to Jupiter is based on a VEEGA (Venus Earth Earth-Gravity Assist) trajectory which uses two flybys of Earth and one of Venus to achieve the necessary energy and shaping to reach Jupiter. These encounters are needed because the Centaur upper stage is not now being used on this mission. Since the Galileo spacecraft uses radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) for electrical power, the question arises as to whether there is any chance of an inadvertent atmospheric entry of the spacecraft during either of the two Earth flybys. A study was performed which determined the necessary actions, in both spacecraft and trajectory design as well as in operations, to insure that the probability of such reentry is made very small, and to provide a quantitative assessment of the probability of reentry.

  11. Kiernan reentry measurements system on Kwajalein atoll

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, K.R.; Austin, M.E.; Frediani, D.J.; Knittel, G.H.; Mrstik, A.V.

    1989-01-01

    The Kiernan Reentry Measurements System (KREMS), located on Kwajalein Atoll in the Pacific, is the United States' most sophisticated and important research and development radar site. Consisting of four one-of-a-kind instrumentation radars, KREMS has played a major role for the past 25 years in the collection of data associated with ICBM testing. Furthermore, it has served as an important space-surveillance facility that provides an early U.S. view of many Soviet and Chinese satellite launches. Finally, the system is slated to play a key role in Strategic Defense Initiative experiments.

  12. Landing Energy Dissipation for Manned Reentry Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Loyd. L.

    1960-01-01

    The film shows experimental investigations to determine the landing-energy-dissipation characteristics for several types of landing gear for manned reentry vehicles. The landing vehicles are considered in two categories: those having essentially vertical-descent paths, the parachute-supported vehicles, and those having essentially horizontal paths, the lifting vehicles. The energy-dissipation devices include crushable materials such as foamed plastics and honeycomb for internal application in couch-support systems, yielding metal elements as part of the structure of capsules or as alternates for oleos in landing-gear struts, inflatable bags, braking rockets, and shaped surfaces for water impact.

  13. Automated Re-Entry System using FNPEG

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Wyatt R.; Lu, Ping; Stachowiak, Susan J.

    2017-01-01

    This paper discusses the implementation and simulated performance of the FNPEG (Fully Numerical Predictor-corrector Entry Guidance) algorithm into GNC FSW (Guidance, Navigation, and Control Flight Software) for use in an autonomous re-entry vehicle. A few modifications to FNPEG are discussed that result in computational savings -- a change to the state propagator, and a modification to cross-range lateral logic. Finally, some Monte Carlo results are presented using a representative vehicle in both a high-fidelity 6-DOF (degree-of-freedom) sim as well as in a 3-DOF sim for independent validation.

  14. Nonlinear and adaptive estimation in reentry.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jazwinski, A. H.

    1972-01-01

    The problem of real-time estimation of a lifting reentry vehicle trajectory of the shuttle orbiter type is considered. Simulations feature large position and velocity uncertainties at radar acquisition and realistic model errors in lift, drag and other model parameters. Radar tracking and accelerometer data are simulated. Significant nonlinearities are found to exist on spacecraft acquisition. An iterated nonlinear filter is shown to perform optimally during the radar acquisition phase. An adaptive filter is shown to track time-varying model errors, such as errors in the lift and drag coefficients, down to the noise level. Such real-time model tracking (identification) is frequently required for guidance and control implementation.

  15. Beam Breakup Effects in Dielectric Based Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Schoessow, P.; Kanareykin, A.; Jing, C.; Kustov, A.; Altmark, A.; Power, J. G.; Gai, W.

    2009-01-22

    The dynamics of the beam in structure-based wakefield accelerators leads to beam stability issues not ordinarily found in other machines. In particular, the high current drive beam in an efficient wakefield accelerator loses a large fraction of its energy in the decelerator structure, resulting in physical emittance growth, increased energy spread, and the possibility of head-tail instability for an off axis beam, all of which can lead to severe reduction of beam intensity. Beam breakup (BBU) effects resulting from parasitic wakefields provide a potentially serious limitation to the performance of dielectric structure based wakefield accelerators as well. We report on experimental and numerical investigation of BBU and its mitigation. The experimental program focuses on BBU measurements at the AWA facility in a number of high gradient and high transformer ratio wakefield devices. New pickup-based beam diagnostics will provide methods for studying parasitic wakefields that are currently unavailable. The numerical part of this research is based on a particle-Green's function beam breakup code we are developing that allows rapid, efficient simulation of beam breakup effects in advanced linear accelerators. The goal of this work is to be able to compare the results of detailed experimental measurements with the accurate numerical results and to design an external FODO channel for the control of the beam in the presence of strong transverse wakefields.

  16. Capillary breakup of fluid threads within confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Guoqing; Xue, Chundong; Chen, Xiaodong

    2016-11-01

    Fluid thread breakup is a widespread phenomenon in nature, industry, and daily life. Driven by surface tension (or capillarity) at low flow-rate condition, the breakup scenario is usually called capillary instability or Plateau-Rayleigh instability. Fluid thread deforms under confinement of ambient fluid to form a fluid neck. Thinning of the neck at low flow-rate condition is quasistatic until the interface becomes unstable and collapses to breakup. Underlying mechanisms and universalities of both the stable and unstable thinning remain, however, unclear and even contradictory. Here we conduct new numerical and experimental studies to show that confined interfaces are not only stabilized but also destabilized by capillarity at low flow-rate condition. Capillary stabilization is attributed to confinement-determined internal pressure that is higher than capillary pressure along the neck. Two origins of capillary destabilization are identified: one is confinement-induced gradient of capillary pressure along the interface; the other is the competition between local capillary pressure and internal pressure. This work was supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11402274, 11272321, and 11572334).

  17. Reconciling Coulomb breakup and neutron radiative capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capel, P.; Nollet, Y.

    2017-07-01

    The Coulomb-breakup method to extract the cross section for neutron radiative capture at astrophysical energies is analyzed in detail. In particular, its sensitivity to the description of the neutron-core continuum is ascertained. We consider the case of 14C(n ,γ )15C for which both the radiative capture at low energy and the Coulomb breakup of 15C into 14C+n on Pb at 68 MeV/nucleon have been measured with accuracy. We confirm the direct proportionality of the cross section for both reactions to the square of the asymptotic normalization constant of 15C observed by Summers and Nunes [Phys. Rev. C 78, 011601(R) (2008), 10.1103/PhysRevC.78.011601], but we also show that the 14C-n continuum plays a significant role in the calculations. Fortunately, the method proposed by Summers and Nunes can be improved to absorb that continuum dependence. We show that a more precise radiative-capture cross section can be extracted selecting the breakup data at forward angles and low 14C-n relative energies.

  18. Ice multiplication by mechanical breakup and lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Vaughan; Yano, Jun-Ichi

    2016-04-01

    Laboratory studies have proven the existence of several pathways for fragmentation of ice. One of these is the rime-splintering of graupel or hail in the -3 to -8 degC region (the Hallett-Mossop process). In some clouds, however, the cloud-base is too cold for this process to be active. Instead, breakup can occur by fragmentation of ice mechanically in re-bounding collisions between crystals, snow, graupel or hail. A new theoretical formulation of this mechanical breakup process of multiplication is presented for these types of ice. A numerical scheme is derived by simulation of published laboratory experiments. The role of such breakup in clouds is quantified by 3D simulations with a cloud-resolving aerosol-cloud model with emulated bin microphysics, detailed treatment of ice morphology and 7 chemical species of aerosol. Graupel-graupel collisions are predicted to produce copious numbers of ice crystals in the cold-base convective cloud simulated over Kansas. Implications for lightning from such multiplication, also simulated numerically, are discussed.

  19. The Beam Break-Up Numerical Simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Travish, G.A.

    1989-11-01

    Beam Break-Up (BBU) is a severe constraint in accelerator design, limiting beam current and quality. The control of BBU has become the focus of much research in the design of the next generation collider, recirculating and linear induction accelerators and advanced accelerators. Determining the effect on BBU of modifications to cavities, the focusing elements or the beam is frequently beyond the ability of current analytic models. A computer code was written to address this problem. The Beam Break-Up Numerical Simulator (BBUNS) was designed to numerically solve for beam break-up (BBU) due to an arbitrary transverse wakefield. BBUNS was developed to be as user friendly as possible on the Cray computer series. The user is able to control all aspects of input and output by using a single command file. In addition, the wakefield is specified by the user and read in as a table. The program can model energy variations along and within the beam, focusing magnetic field profiles can be specified, and the graphical output can be tailored. In this note we discuss BBUNS, its structure and application. Included are detailed instructions, examples and a sample session of BBUNS. This program is available for distribution. 50 refs., 18 figs., 5 tabs.

  20. Marine particle aggregate breakup in turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rau, Matthew; Ackleson, Steven; Smith, Geoffrey

    2016-11-01

    The dynamics of marine particle aggregate formation and breakup due to turbulence is studied experimentally. Aggregates of clay particles, initially in a quiescent aggregation tank, are subjected to fully developed turbulent pipe flow at Reynolds numbers of up to 25,000. This flow arrangement simulates the exposure of marine aggregates in coastal waters to a sudden turbulent event. Particle size distributions are measured by in-situ sampling of the small-angle forward volume scattering function and the volume concentration of the suspended particulate matter is quantified through light attenuation measurements. Results are compared to measurements conducted under laminar and turbulent flow conditions. At low shear rates, larger sized particles indicate that aggregation initially governs the particle dynamics. Breakup is observed when large aggregates are exposed to the highest levels of shear in the experiment. Models describing the aggregation and breakup rates of marine particles due to turbulence are evaluated with the population balance equation and results from the simulation and experiment are compared. Additional model development will more accurately describe aggregation dynamics for remote sensing applications in turbulent marine environments.

  1. Flow bursts, breakup arc, and substorm current wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haerendel, Gerhard

    2015-04-01

    Energy liberated by the reconnection process in the near-Earth tail is transported via flow bursts toward the dipolar magnetosphere during substorms. The breakup arc is a manifestation of the arrival of the bursts under flow braking and energy deposition. Its structure and behavior is analyzed on the basis of five striking spatial, temporal, and energetic properties, qualitatively and in part also quantitatively. A key element is the formation of stop layers. They are thin layers, of the width of an ion gyro radius, in which the magnetic field makes a transition from tail to near-dipolar magnetosphere configurations and in which the kinetic energy of fast flows is converted into electromagnetic energy of kinetic Alfvén waves. The flows arise from the relaxation of the strong magnetic shear stresses in the leading part of the flow bursts. The bright narrow arcs of less than 10 km width inside the broad poleward expanding breakup arc, Alfvénic in nature and visually characterized by erratic short-lived rays, are seen as traces of the stop layers. The gaps between two narrow and highly structured arcs are filled with more diffuse emissions. They are attributed to the relaxation of the less strained magnetic field of the flow bursts. Eastward flows along the arcs are linked to the shrinking gaps between two successive arcs and the entry of auroral streamers into the dipolar magnetosphere in the midnight sector. Flow braking in the stop layers forms multiple pairs of narrow balanced currents and cannot be behind the formation of the substorm current wedge. Instead, its origin is attributed to the force exerted by the dipolarized magnetic field of the flow bursts on the high-beta plasma, after the high magnetic shears have relaxed and the fast flows and stop layer process have subsided, in other words, to the "dying flow bursts."

  2. Reentry in Ohio Corrections: A Catalyst for Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkinson, Reginald A.; Rhine, Edward E.; Henderson-Hurley, Martha

    2006-01-01

    In 2002, the Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction (DRC) published The Ohio Plan for Productive Offender Reentry and Recidivism Reduction. The document listed forty-four recommendations designed to contribute significantly to the development of a reentry transition system that providing a seamless service and program delivery beginning…

  3. Reentry and Renegotiating Motherhood: Maternal Identity and Success on Parole

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Marilyn; Bloom, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    Parenting women emerging from prison on parole face numerous challenges to their successful reentry into the community. Along with finding housing, employment, and satisfying the conditions of their supervision, parenting women must also reassume their roles as mothers. This article adds to the literature on reentry by placing women's maternal…

  4. Reentry Planning for Mentally Disordered Inmates: A Social Investment Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolff, Nancy; Bjerklie, J. R.; Maschi, Tina

    2005-01-01

    Correctional facilities are under increasing pressure to respond to the treatment needs of mentally disordered offenders during their incarceration and to arrange for treatment post release through reentry planning. This paper constructs cost estimates for three different reentry investments using data on the population (n = 2715) of male mentally…

  5. Reentry and Renegotiating Motherhood: Maternal Identity and Success on Parole

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Marilyn; Bloom, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    Parenting women emerging from prison on parole face numerous challenges to their successful reentry into the community. Along with finding housing, employment, and satisfying the conditions of their supervision, parenting women must also reassume their roles as mothers. This article adds to the literature on reentry by placing women's maternal…

  6. 14 CFR 431.7 - Payload and payload reentry determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Payload and payload reentry determinations. 431.7 Section 431.7 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH AND REENTRY OF A REUSABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE (RLV...

  7. Reentry Planning for Mentally Disordered Inmates: A Social Investment Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolff, Nancy; Bjerklie, J. R.; Maschi, Tina

    2005-01-01

    Correctional facilities are under increasing pressure to respond to the treatment needs of mentally disordered offenders during their incarceration and to arrange for treatment post release through reentry planning. This paper constructs cost estimates for three different reentry investments using data on the population (n = 2715) of male mentally…

  8. Re-Entry: Managing Cross-Cultural Transitions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adler, Nancy J.

    1981-01-01

    Studied the re-entry process of corporate and governmental employees (N=200) returning to Canada after working overseas. Research found re-entry into the original culture was a more difficult transition than moving to the foreign culture. Home-country managers tended to exhibit xenophobia in assessing the potential and actual effectiveness of…

  9. The International Association of Reentry: Mission and Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkinson, Reginald A.; Rhine, Edward E.

    2005-01-01

    There is a growing national movement in corrections embracing offender reentry. In a very brief period of time, innovative and ambitious initiatives have been launched at all levels of government and by untold groups and community organizations to build more effective responses to the myriad of challenges presented by reentry. The International…

  10. Loaded cavity-backed slot (LCBS) antennas for Reentry Vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Sena, M.D.

    1992-09-01

    This report describes the linearly-polarized, loaded cavity-backed slot (LCBS) antenna developed for Reentry Vehicles (RVs) and the development process used by the Antenna Development Department. It includes typical antenna engineering design considerations or requirements, fabrication/assembly process, and performance characteristics. Antenna design theory is reduced to the basic concepts useful in designing LCBS antennas for reentry vehicles.

  11. Gender Differences and Offender Reentry: A Review of the Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spjeldnes, Solveig; Goodkind, Sara

    2009-01-01

    Historically, men have been incarcerated at rates far greater than women. As a result, reentry and reintegration programs have focused mainly on men's needs. The Second Chance Act of 2007 authorized funding for offender reentry programs and research on special populations--including about women and parents acknowledging the importance of…

  12. An Evaluation Guide for College Women's Re-entry Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mezirow, Jack; Rose, Amy D.

    Since 1970, over 300 community colleges have established re-entry programs designed especially for women who are either continuing their education or entering the job market after an extended hiatus. Re-entry programs vary in scope and in the nature of services provided, with some offering specific skills on vocational training, and others…

  13. Gender Differences and Offender Reentry: A Review of the Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spjeldnes, Solveig; Goodkind, Sara

    2009-01-01

    Historically, men have been incarcerated at rates far greater than women. As a result, reentry and reintegration programs have focused mainly on men's needs. The Second Chance Act of 2007 authorized funding for offender reentry programs and research on special populations--including about women and parents acknowledging the importance of…

  14. Reentry thermal testing of light-weight radioisotope heater units

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, D.E.; Starzynski, J.S.

    1982-03-01

    Two Light-Weight Radioisotope Heater Units (LWRHU) were exposed to thermal ramps simulating atmospheric reentry. The helium release rates were measured during each test and modeled after simple diffusion theory. The reentry pulses did not result in swelling of the claddings or degradation of fuel pellets.

  15. DebriSat - A Planned Laboratory-Based Satellite Impact Experiment for Breakup Fragment Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, J.-C.; Fitz-Coy, N.; Werremeyer, M.; Huynh, T.; Voelker, M.; Opiela, J.

    2012-01-01

    DebriSat is a planned laboratory ]based satellite hypervelocity impact experiment. The goal of the project is to characterize the orbital debris that would be generated by a hypervelocity collision involving a modern satellite in low Earth orbit (LEO). The DebriSat project will update and expand upon the information obtained in the 1992 Satellite Orbital Debris Characterization Impact Test (SOCIT), which characterized the breakup of a 1960 's US Navy Transit satellite. There are three phases to this project: the design and fabrication of an engineering model representing a modern, 50-cm/50-kg class LEO satellite known as DebriSat; conduction of a laboratory-based hypervelocity impact to catastrophically break up the satellite; and characterization of the properties of breakup fragments down to 2 mm in size. The data obtained, including fragment size, area ]to ]mass ratio, density, shape, material composition, optical properties, and radar cross ]section distributions, will be used to supplement the DoD fs and NASA fs satellite breakup models to better describe the breakup outcome of a modern satellite. Updated breakup models will improve mission planning, environmental models, and event response. The DebriSat project is sponsored by the Air Force fs Space and Missile Systems Center and the NASA Orbital Debris Program Office. The design and fabrication of DebriSat is led by University of Florida with subject matter experts f support from The Aerospace Corporation. The major milestones of the project include the complete fabrication of DebriSat by September 2013, the hypervelocity impact of DebriSat at the Air Force fs Arnold Engineering Development Complex in early 2014, and fragment characterization and data analyses in late 2014.

  16. TRMM Re-Entry Planning: Attitude Determination and Control During Thruster Modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeWeese, Keith

    2005-01-01

    The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) spacecraft has been undergoing design for a controlled re-entry to Earth. During simulation of the re-entry plan, there was evidence of errors in the attitude determination algorithms during thruster modes. These errors affected the bum efficiency, and thus planning, during re-entry. During thruster modes, the spacecraft attitude is controlled off of integrated Gyro Error Angles that were designed to closely follow the nominal spacecraft pointing frame (Tip Frame). These angles, however, were not exactly mapped to the Tip Frame from the Body Frame. Additionally, in the initial formulation of the thruster mode attitude determination algorithms, several assumptions and approximations were made to conserve processor speed. These errors became noticeable and significant when simulating bums of much longer duration (-10 times) than had been produced in flight. A solution is proposed that uses attitude determination information from a propagated extended Kalman filter that already exists in the TRMM thruster modes. This attitude information is then used to rotate the Gyro Error Angles into the Tip Frame. An error analysis is presented that compares the two formulations. The new algorithm is tested using the TRMM High-Fidelity Simulator and verified with the TRMM Software Testing and Training Facility. Simulation results for both configurations are also presented.

  17. Analytical Predictions of Thermal Stress in the Stardust PICA Heatshield Under Reentry Flight Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Squire, Thomas; Milos, Frank; Agrawal, Parul

    2009-01-01

    We performed finite element analyses on a model of the Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA) heatshield from the Stardust sample return capsule (SRC) to predict the thermal stresses in the PICA material during reentry. The heatshield on the Stardust SRC was a 0.83 m sphere cone, fabricated from a single piece of 5.82 cm-thick PICA. The heatshield performed successfully during Earth reentry of the SRC in January 2006. Material response analyses of the full, axisymmetric PICA heatshield were run using the Two-Dimensional Implicit Ablation, Pyrolysis, and Thermal Response Program (TITAN). Peak surface temperatures were predicted to be 3385K, while the temperature at the PICA backface remained at the estimated initial cold-soak temperature of 278K. Surface recession and temperature distribution results from TITAN, at several points in the reentry trajectory, were mapped onto an axisymmetric finite element model of the heatshield. We used the finite element model to predict the thermal stresses in the PICA from differential thermal expansion. The predicted peak compressive stress in the PICA heatshield was 1.38 MPa. Although this level of stress exceeded the chosen design limit for compressive stresses in PICA tiles for the design of the Orion crew exploration vehicle heatshield, the Stardust heatshield exhibited no obvious mechanical failures from thermal stress. The analyses of the Stardust heatshield were used to assess and adjust the level of conservatism in the finite element analyses in support of the Orion heatshield design.

  18. Analytical Predictions of Thermal Stress in the Stardust PICA Heatshield Under Reentry Flight Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Squire, Thomas; Milos, Frank; Agrawal, Parul

    2009-01-01

    We performed finite element analyses on a model of the Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA) heatshield from the Stardust sample return capsule (SRC) to predict the thermal stresses in the PICA material during reentry. The heatshield on the Stardust SRC was a 0.83 m sphere cone, fabricated from a single piece of 5.82 cm-thick PICA. The heatshield performed successfully during Earth reentry of the SRC in January 2006. Material response analyses of the full, axisymmetric PICA heatshield were run using the Two-Dimensional Implicit Ablation, Pyrolysis, and Thermal Response Program (TITAN). Peak surface temperatures were predicted to be 3385K, while the temperature at the PICA backface remained at the estimated initial cold-soak temperature of 278K. Surface recession and temperature distribution results from TITAN, at several points in the reentry trajectory, were mapped onto an axisymmetric finite element model of the heatshield. We used the finite element model to predict the thermal stresses in the PICA from differential thermal expansion. The predicted peak compressive stress in the PICA heatshield was 1.38 MPa. Although this level of stress exceeded the chosen design limit for compressive stresses in PICA tiles for the design of the Orion crew exploration vehicle heatshield, the Stardust heatshield exhibited no obvious mechanical failures from thermal stress. The analyses of the Stardust heatshield were used to assess and adjust the level of conservatism in the finite element analyses in support of the Orion heatshield design.

  19. A constant gain Kalman filter approach for the prediction of re-entry of risk objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anilkumar, A. K.; Ananthasayanam, M. R.; Subba Rao, P. V.

    2007-11-01

    The accurate estimation of the predicted re-entry time of decaying space debris objects is very important for proper planning of mitigation strategies and hazard assessment. This paper highlights the implementation strategies adopted for the online re-entry prediction using Kalman filter approach with constant gains with the states being the semi-major axis, eccentricity and ballistic coefficient and using the measurements of the apogee height and perigee height derived from the Two Line Elements provided by agencies like USSPACECOM. Only a very simple model is utilised for the orbit propagation and a basic feature of the present approach is that any unmodellable state and measurement errors can be accounted for by adjusting the Kalman gains which are chosen based on a suitable cost function. In this paper we provide the details of validating this approach by utilising three re-entries of debris objects, namely, US Sat. No. 25947, SROSS-C2 Satellite and COSMOS 1043 rocket body. These three objects re-entered the Earth's atmosphere on 4th March 2000, 12th July 2001 and 19th January 2002, respectively.

  20. Spectroscopic Observation of the Re-Entry Capsule of HAYABUSA Spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnishi, Kouji; Watanabe, Jun-Ichi; Sato, Mikiya; Ohkawa, Takuya; Ebizuka, Noboru

    2011-10-01

    We performed low-resolution spectroscopic observations of the capsule of the HAYABUSA spacecraft during re-entry into the Earth's atmosphere on 2010 June 13 UT as an artificial meteor. We obtained the photometric magnitude of the HAYABUSA capsule using zeroth-order spectra. The efficiency of the zeroth-order spectra was too low for us to measure the magnitude of the capsule without any saturation at all times. The altitude at the maximal flux of the capsule was at around 56 km (13h52m19s.81 UT), which is almost similar to the case GENESIS, i.e., the maximal flux at around 55 km. We examined the change in the spectrum shape of the capsule as a function of its altitude, and investigated the emission from the shock layer and the blackbody radiation from the surface of the capsule. It is found that the shock-layer emission was dominant, and/or on the same order of the blackbody radiation at the early phase of re-entry; also, the emission from blackbody radiation was dominant during the last phase of re-entry. We measured the surface temperature of the capsule along the trajectory; during the last phase before dark flight, we found that the blackbody temperature of the capsule was 3100 ± 300 K at an altitude of around 50 km, and 2400 ± 300 K at an altitude of around 40 km.

  1. Statistical Issues for Calculating Reentry Hazards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacon, John B.; Matney, Mark

    2016-01-01

    A number of statistical tools have been developed over the years for assessing the risk of reentering object to human populations. These tools make use of the characteristics (e.g., mass, shape, size) of debris that are predicted by aerothermal models to survive reentry. This information, combined with information on the expected ground path of the reentry, is used to compute the probability that one or more of the surviving debris might hit a person on the ground and cause one or more casualties. The statistical portion of this analysis relies on a number of assumptions about how the debris footprint and the human population are distributed in latitude and longitude, and how to use that information to arrive at realistic risk numbers. This inevitably involves assumptions that simplify the problem and make it tractable, but it is often difficult to test the accuracy and applicability of these assumptions. This paper builds on previous IAASS work to re-examine one of these theoretical assumptions.. This study employs empirical and theoretical information to test the assumption of a fully random decay along the argument of latitude of the final orbit, and makes recommendations how to improve the accuracy of this calculation in the future.

  2. Orbit re-entry experiment vehicle development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Masataka; Yamawaki, Kouji; Akimoto, Toshio; Murakami, Atsushi; Inaba, Motoyuki; Kaneko, Yutaka; Shimoda, Takayuki; Ishii, Yasuo; Izumi, Tatsushi; Kawano, Isao

    1992-08-01

    An overview of the Orbital Re-entry Experiment (OREX) vehicle development, including detail design, analyses on the overall system, guidance and control, propulsion, and data acquisition systems is presented. The outline of the experiment vehicle is shown. OREX flight is analyzed and the splash down point variance ellipse is shown. Vehicle body aerodynamic characteristics were analyzed and validated by supersonic wind tunnel and dynamically balanced wind tunnel tests. Analyses on onboard equipment environmental resistance, controllability from on orbit to re-entry phases and navigation and guidance of the space plane were conducted. It was confirmed that there was no problem on the guidance and control system. Review on the propellant volume and analyses on the propulsion system performance, propulsion system heat exchanger performance, and thruster and piping system temperature were conducted and possibility of hard starting of the 150 N hydrazine thruster was noticed. RF (Radio Frequency) link analyses were conducted around Tanegashima, Ogasawara, and the splash down area and prospect of continuously acquiring good link margin for 300 seconds was obtained. Semi unitized structure of truncated cone shape with main body made of aluminum alloy, which has application record for rockets, laid with skin, stringers, and frames was employed for the structure. Data acquisition systems for tracking and operation, including those at Tanegashima, Ogasawara, Christmas, down range ship, and airplane tracking stations were studied.

  3. Statistical Issues for Calculating Reentry Hazards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matney, Mark; Bacon, John

    2016-01-01

    A number of statistical tools have been developed over the years for assessing the risk of reentering object to human populations. These tools make use of the characteristics (e.g., mass, shape, size) of debris that are predicted by aerothermal models to survive reentry. This information, combined with information on the expected ground path of the reentry, is used to compute the probability that one or more of the surviving debris might hit a person on the ground and cause one or more casualties. The statistical portion of this analysis relies on a number of assumptions about how the debris footprint and the human population are distributed in latitude and longitude, and how to use that information to arrive at realistic risk numbers. This inevitably involves assumptions that simplify the problem and make it tractable, but it is often difficult to test the accuracy and applicability of these assumptions. This paper builds on previous IAASS work to re-examine many of these theoretical assumptions, including the mathematical basis for the hazard calculations, and outlining the conditions under which the simplifying assumptions hold. This study also employs empirical and theoretical information to test these assumptions, and makes recommendations how to improve the accuracy of these calculations in the future.

  4. Asteroid breakup linked to the Great Ordovician Biodiversification Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, Birger; Harper, David A. T.; Peucker-Ehrenbrink, Bernhard; Stouge, Svend; Alwmark, Carl; Cronholm, Anders; Bergström, Stig M.; Tassinari, Mario; Xiaofeng, Wang

    2008-01-01

    The rise and diversification of shelled invertebrate life in the early Phanerozoic eon occurred in two major stages. During the first stage (termed as the Cambrian explosion), a large number of new phyla appeared over a short time interval ~540Myrago. Biodiversity at the family, genus and species level, however, remained low until the second stage marked by the Great Ordovician Biodiversification Event in the Middle Ordovician period. Although this event represents the most intense phase of species radiation during the Palaeozoic era and led to irreversible changes in the biological make-up of Earth's seafloors, the causes of this event remain elusive. Here, we show that the onset of the major phase of biodiversification ~470Myrago coincides with the disruption in the asteroid belt of the L-chondrite parent body-the largest documented asteroid breakup event during the past few billion years. The precise coincidence between these two events is established by bed-by-bed records of extraterrestrial chromite, osmium isotopes and invertebrate fossils in Middle Ordovician strata in Baltoscandia and China. We argue that frequent impacts on Earth of kilometre-sized asteroids-supported by abundant Middle Ordovician fossil meteorites and impact craters-accelerated the biodiversification process.

  5. The break-up of continents and the formation of new ocean basins.

    PubMed

    Minshull, T A

    2002-12-15

    Rifted continental margins are the product of stretching, thinning and ultimate break-up of a continental plate into smaller fragments, and the rocks lying beneath them store a record of this rifting process. Earth scientists can read this record by careful sampling and with remote geophysical techniques. These experimental studies have been complemented by theoretical analyses of continental extension and associated magmatism. Some rifted margins show evidence for extensive volcanic activity and uplift during rifting; at these margins, the record of the final stages of rifting is removed by erosion and obscured by the thick volcanic cover. Other margins were underwater throughout their formation and showed rather little volcanic activity; here the ongoing deposition of sediment provides a clearer record. During the last decade, vast areas of exhumed mantle rocks have been discovered at such margins between continental and oceanic crust. This observation conflicts with the well-established idea that the mantle melts to produce new crust when it is brought close to the Earth's surface. In contrast to the steeply dipping faults commonly seen in zones of extension within continental interiors, faults with very shallow dips play a key role in the deformation immediately preceding continental break-up. Future progress in the study of continental break-up will depend on studies of pairs of margins which were once joined and on the development of computer models which can handle rigorously the complex transition from distributed continental deformation to sea-floor spreading focused at a mid-ocean ridge.

  6. Sharing Remote and Local Information for Tracking Spring Breakup in the Mackenzie Delta and Beaufort Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, D. L.; Whalen, D.; Fraser, P.

    2015-12-01

    The Mackenzie Delta is the second largest on the Arctic Ocean, covering 13 000 km2. The annual flood regime in the delta is dominated by the spring snowmelt freshet and associated ice breakup, as water from the south arrives in the ice-covered delta and spreads over bottomfast and adjacent floating sea ice at the delta front. The complex processes of water-ice interaction, flow partitioning, and overbank flooding to replenish waters in 43 000 delta lakes threaten community, transportation, subsistence, and energy infrastructure in the delta. The annual breakup season is a time of rejuvenation, excitement, and anxiety for delta residents and stakeholders. To track the progress of breakup and meet the need for knowledge dissemination to the local communities, a Mackenzie-Beaufort breakup newsletter has been produced by Natural Resources Canada on a quasi-daily basis during the May-June spring flood season for 10 years, and distributed to an e-mail list that grew to over 300 subscribers. This provides near real-time tracking of water levels and breakup using on-line gauges (Environment Canada), daily MODIS satellite imagery (NASA), Landsat imagery (USGS) and intermittent radar imagery (various sources). In earlier years, information was also supplied from field programs operating in the delta during breakup, but changing priorities and funding have reduced the number of outside researchers present during these critical weeks. Meanwhile the number of local contributors has grown, providing observations and photographs to share with the local, regional and global readership. In this way the newsletter evolved into a two-way communication tool and community portal. The newsletter is a chronicle of each breakup season and a key resource for territorial and municipal managers, subsistence organizations, and emergency response agencies, with routine requests for specific imagery in areas of concern. With the completion of 10 years under the present model, we are exploring

  7. Evaluating and Addressing Potential Hazards of Fuel Tanks Surviving Atmospheric Reentry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, R. L.; Johnson, N. L.

    2012-01-01

    In order to ensure reentering spacecraft do not pose an undue risk to the Earth's population, it is important to design satellites and rocket bodies with end-of-life considerations in mind. In addition to the possible consequences of deorbiting a vehicle, consideration must be given to the possible risks associated with a vehicle failing to become operational or to reach its intended orbit. Based on recovered space debris and numerous reentry survivability analyses, fuel tanks are of particular concern in both of these considerations. Most spacecraft utilize some type of fuel tank as part of their propulsion systems. These fuel tanks are most often constructed using stainless steel or titanium and are filled with potentially hazardous substances such as hydrazine and nitrogen tetroxide. For a vehicle that has reached its scheduled end-of mission, the contents of the tanks are typically depleted. In this scenario, the likely survival of a stainless steel or titanium tank during reentry poses a risk to people and property due to the high melting point and large heat-of-ablation of these materials. If a large portion of the fuel is not depleted prior to reentry, there is the added risk of a hazardous substance being released when the tank impacts the ground. This paper presents a discussion of proactive methods that have been utilized by NASA satellite projects to address the risks associated with fuel tanks reentering the atmosphere. In particular, it will address the design of a demiseable fuel tank, as well as the evaluation of fuel tank designs, which are selected based on whether they burst during reentry.

  8. Evaluating and Addressing Potential Hazards of Fuel Tanks Surviving Atmospheric Reentry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, Robert L.; Johnson, Nicholas L.

    2011-01-01

    In order to ensure reentering spacecraft do not pose an undue risk to the Earth's population it is important to design satellites and rocket bodies with end of life considerations in mind. In addition to considering the possible consequences of deorbiting a vehicle, consideration must also be given to the possible risks associated with a vehicle failing to become operational or reach its intended orbit. Based on recovered space debris and numerous reentry survivability analyses, fuel tanks are of particular concern in both of these considerations. Most spacecraft utilize some type of fuel tank as part of their propulsion system. These fuel tanks are most often constructed using stainless steel or titanium and are filled with potentially hazardous substances such as hydrazine and nitrogen tetroxide. For a vehicle which has reached its scheduled end of mission the contents of the tanks are typically depleted. In this scenario the use of stainless steel and titanium results in the tanks posing a risk to people and property do to the high melting point and large heat of ablation of these materials leading to likely survival of the tank during reentry. If a large portion of the fuel is not depleted prior to reentry, there is the added risk of hazardous substance being released when the tank impact the ground. This paper presents a discussion of proactive methods which have been utilized by NASA satellite projects to address the risks associated with fuel tanks reentering the atmosphere. In particular it will address the design of a demiseable fuel tank as well as the evaluation of off the shelf designs which are selected to burst during reentry.

  9. Prediction of electron concentration reductions in re-entry flow fields due to electrophilic liquid and water injection.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pergament, H. S.; Mikatarian, R. R.; Kurzius, S. C.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of an analytical model which leads to predictions of reductions in electron concentrations in reentry flow fields due to the injection of electrophilic liquids and water. The processes incorporated into the model are: penetration and breakup of the liquid jet, droplet acceleration and vaporization, expansion of the liquid spray due to droplet vaporization, electrophilic vapor diffusion, heterogeneous and homogeneous charged species recombination kinetics and homogeneous electron attachment kinetics. Spray boundary calculations are shown to be in good agreement with photographic observations of water and Freon E-3 sprays in wind tunnel tests of a scale model RAM C-III flight vehicle. Fixed-bias electrostatic probe data taken during the RAM C-III flight are interpreted in terms of effective jet penetration distances - which are shown to be consistent with calculations using the present model.

  10. The Break-up and Drifting of the Continental Plates in 2D Models of Convecting Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dal Zilio, L.; Faccenda, M.; Capitanio, F. A.

    2014-12-01

    Since the early theory of Wegener, the break-up and drift of continents have been controversial and hotly debated topics. To assist the interpretation of the break-up and drift mechanisms and its relation with mantle circulation patterns, we carried out a 2D numerical modelling of the dynamics of these processes. Different regimes of upper plate deformation are studied as consequence of stress coupling with convection patterns. Subduction of the oceanic plate and induced mantle flow propagate basal tractions to the upper plate. This mantle drag forces (FMD) can be subdivided in two types: (1) active mantle drag occurring when the flow drives plate motion (FAD), and (2) passive mantle drag (FPD), when the asthenosphere resists plate motion. The active traction generated by the convective cell is counterbalanced by passive mantle viscous drag away from it and therefore tension is generated within the continental plate. The shear stress profiles indicate that break-up conditions are met where the gradient of the basal shear stress is maximised, however the break-up location varies largely depending on the convection style primarily controlled by slab stagnation on the transition zone, avalanching through or subduction in the lower mantle. We found good correspondence between our models and the evolution of convergent margins on Earth, giving precious insights into the break-up and drifting mechanisms of some continental plates, such as the North and South American plates, Calabria and the Japan Arc.

  11. Re-entry aerodynamics derived from space debris trajectory analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowther, R.

    1992-05-01

    This paper considers the technique of orbital analysis as a means of determining the ill-defined gas-surface interaction between spacecraft and atmospheric molecules in low earth orbit. The interaction is a major uncertainty in trajectory predictions for a body moving within an atmosphere. The rate of change of the orbital period of a debris object, the uncontrolled Salyut 7/Kosmos 1686 space station, is analyzed in order to determine the free molecular drag coefficient. The results are compared with theoretical values for the drag coefficient calculated using a complex representation of the vehicle configuration and motion and applying the Monte Carlo Test Particle method. Results suggest a nature of re-emission very close to the classical diffuse, totally accommodated case was occurring at the surface of the debris object as it approached re-entry. However, the determined drag coefficient and therefore the derived interaction are found to be very sensitive to the neutral density and therefore the atmospheric model used in the analysis.

  12. An Overview of JAXA's Ground-Observation Activities for HAYABUSA Reentry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Kazuhisa; Yamamoto, Masa-Yuki; Abe, Shinsuke; Ishihara, Yoshiaki; Iiyama, Ohmi; Kakinami, Yoshihiro; Hiramatsu, Yoshihiro; Furumoto, Muneyoshi; Takayanagi, Hiroki; Suzuki, Toshiyuki; Yanagisawa, Toshifumi; Kurosaki, Hirohisa; Shoemaker, Michael; Ueda, Masayoshi; Shiba, Yasuo; Suzuki, Masaharu

    2011-10-01

    On 2010 June 13, the HAYABUSA asteroid explorer returned to Earth and underwent a super-orbital atmospheric reentry. In order to recover the sample return capsule and to take ground-based measurements, the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency organized a ground-observation team and performed optical tracking of the capsule, spectroscopy of the fireball, and measurements of infrasounds and shock waves generated by the fireball. In this article, an overview of the ground-based observation is presented, and an outline of the preliminary results derived from observations is reported.

  13. Magnetic field applied to thermochemical non-equilibrium reentry flows in 2D - five species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sávio de Góes Maciel, Edisson

    2015-07-01

    In this work, a study involving magnetic field actuation over reentry flows in thermochemical non-equilibrium is performed. The Euler and Navier-Stokes equations are studied. The proposed numerical algorithm is centred and second-order accurate. The hypersonic flow around a blunt body is simulated. Three time integration methods are tested. The reactive simulations involve Earth atmosphere of five species. The work of Gaitonde is the reference to couple the fluid dynamics and Maxwell equations of electromagnetism. The results have indicated that the Maciel scheme, using the Mavriplis dissipation model, yields the best prediction of the stagnation pressure.

  14. Re-Entry Mission Analysis of the Advanced Re-entry Vehicle (ARV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonetti, D.; Haya Ramos, R.; Strauch, H.; Bottacini, M.

    2011-08-01

    This paper presents the results of the DEIMOS Space S.L.U. Re-entry Mission Analysis activities obtained in the frame of the Phase A up to PRR milestone of the Advanced Re-entry Vehicle (ARV) ESA project leaded by ASTRIUM. Results presented show how the trajectory and the vehicle design are strictly related and how a feasible and robust solution can be efficiently obtained by considering since the beginning several constraints limiting the design. The process implemented combines the design of key vehicle and trajectory parameters. Once the vehicle design parameters and the conditions at the EIP are fixed, the Mission Analysis is completed by the definition of the optimal trajectory from the deorbiting to the EIP that allow the correct targeting of the EIP conditions but also a safe separation of the different modules and the correct targeting of the desired landing site.

  15. Re-Entry Mission Analysis Of The Advanced Re-Entry Vehicle (ARV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonetti, Davide; Haya Ramos, Rodrigo; Strauch, Hans; Bottacini, Massimiliano

    2011-05-01

    This paper presents the results of the DEIMOS Space S.L.U. Re-entry Mission Analysis activities obtained in the frame of the Phase A up to PRR milestone of the Advanced Re-entry Vehicle (ARV) ESA project leaded by ASTRIUM. Results presented show how the trajectory and the vehicle design are strictly related and how a feasible and robust solution can be efficiently obtained by considering since the beginning several constraints limiting the design. The process implemented combines the design of key vehicle and trajectory parameters. Once the vehicle design parameters and the conditions at the EIP are fixed, the Mission Analysis is completed by the definition of the optimal trajectory from the de- orbiting to the EIP that allow the correct targeting of the EIP conditions but also a safe separation of the different modules and the correct targeting of the desired landing site.

  16. Hayabusa Re-Entry: Trajectory Analysis and Observation Mission Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassell, Alan M.; Winter, Michael W.; Allen, Gary A.; Grinstead, Jay H.; Antimisiaris, Manny E.; Albers, James; Jenniskens, Peter

    2011-01-01

    On June 13th, 2010, the Hayabusa sample return capsule successfully re-entered Earth s atmosphere over the Woomera Prohibited Area in southern Australia in its quest to return fragments from the asteroid 1998 SF36 Itokawa . The sample return capsule entered at a super-orbital velocity of 12.04 km/sec (inertial), making it the second fastest human-made object to traverse the atmosphere. The NASA DC-8 airborne observatory was utilized as an instrument platform to record the luminous portion of the sample return capsule re-entry (60 sec) with a variety of on-board spectroscopic imaging instruments. The predicted sample return capsule s entry state information at 200 km altitude was propagated through the atmosphere to generate aerothermodynamic and trajectory data used for initial observation flight path design and planning. The DC- 8 flight path was designed by considering safety, optimal sample return capsule viewing geometry and aircraft capabilities in concert with key aerothermodynamic events along the predicted trajectory. Subsequent entry state vector updates provided by the Deep Space Network team at NASA s Jet Propulsion Laboratory were analyzed after the planned trajectory correction maneuvers to further refine the DC-8 observation flight path. Primary and alternate observation flight paths were generated during the mission planning phase which required coordination with Australian authorities for pre-mission approval. The final observation flight path was chosen based upon trade-offs between optimal viewing requirements, ground based observer locations (to facilitate post-flight trajectory reconstruction), predicted weather in the Woomera Prohibited Area and constraints imposed by flight path filing deadlines. To facilitate sample return capsule tracking by the instrument operators, a series of two racetrack flight path patterns were performed prior to the observation leg so the instruments could be pointed towards the region in the star background where

  17. Satellites in the inviscid breakup of bubbles.

    PubMed

    Gordillo, J M; Fontelos, M A

    2007-04-06

    In this Letter, we stress the essential role played by gas inertia in the breakup of gas bubbles. Our results reveal that, whenever the gas to liquid density ratio Lambda=rhog/rhol is different from zero, tiny satellite bubbles may be formed as a result of the large gas velocities that are reached close to pinch-off. Moreover, we provide a closed expression for the characteristic satellite diameter, which decreases when decreasing Lambda and which shows order of magnitude agreement with the micron-sized satellite bubbles observed experimentally.

  18. Elastic Coulomb breakup of 34Na

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, G.; Shubhchintak, Chatterjee, R.

    2016-08-01

    Background: 34Na is conjectured to play an important role in the production of seed nuclei in the alternate r -process paths involving light neutron rich nuclei very near the β -stability line, and as such, it is important to know its ground state properties and structure to calculate rates of the reactions it might be involved in, in the stellar plasma. Found in the region of `island of inversion', its ground state might not be in agreement with normal shell model predictions. Purpose: The aim of this paper is to study the elastic Coulomb breakup of 34Na on 208Pb to give us a core of 33Na with a neutron and in the process we try and investigate the one neutron separation energy and the ground state configuration of 34Na. Method: A fully quantum mechanical Coulomb breakup theory within the architecture of post-form finite range distorted wave Born approximation extended to include the effects of deformation is used to research the elastic Coulomb breakup of 34Na on 208Pb at 100 MeV/u. The triple differential cross section calculated for the breakup is integrated over the desired components to find the total cross-section, momentum, and angular distributions as well as the average momenta, along with the energy-angular distributions. Results: The total one neutron removal cross section is calculated to test the possible ground state configurations of 34Na. The average momentum results along with energy-angular calculations indicate 34Na to have a halo structure. The parallel momentum distributions with narrow full widths at half-maxima signify the same. Conclusion: We have attempted to analyze the possible ground state configurations of 34Na and in congruity with the patterns in the `island of inversion' conclude that even without deformation, 34Na should be a neutron halo with a predominant contribution to its ground state most probably coming from 33Na(3 /2+)⊗ 2 p3 /2ν configuration. We also surmise that it would certainly be useful and rewarding to test our

  19. Thermoacoustic environments to simulate reentry conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayerdoerfer, Gerhard

    1994-01-01

    Aerothermal environments as encountered during the reentry of spaceplanes or during the cruise of hypersonic aircrafts represent complex loading conditions for the external structures of those vehicles. In order to shield against the aerodynamic heating a special Thermal Protection System (TPS) is required which is designed as a light weight structure to reduce the weight penalty. TPS is therefore vulnerable to vibroacoustic fatigue caused by the pressure fluctuations of the environment. Because of the complex interactions between the loading forces and the resulting structural response which make an analytical treatment difficult and in order to provide means for fatigue testing IABG has designed and built a thermoacoustic facility which recently became operational. The facility is capable to produce surface temperatures up to 1.300 C at sound pressure levels up to 160 dB. This paper describes the design of the facility, some operational test work it also deals with problems associated with the facility instrumentation.

  20. Model for the anisotropic reentry of albedo

    SciTech Connect

    Koenig, P.J.

    1981-02-01

    The trajectory-tracing technique was used to obtain the angles of incidence, and hence 'intensities,' of negatively charged 0.88-GV particles reentrant at Palestine, Texas. Splash albedo trajectories were traced from the conjugate point, and also from Palestine itself, for those trajectories that were unable to complete a full gyration before reentry into the shadow cone at Palestine. Both isotropic and anisotropic ejection configurations were used at these two locations. These simulations predict a north-south anisotropy (hence also a zenithal anisotropy) for reentrant albedo, with a dearth of trajectories incident from the south. The anisotropy is large enough to explain experimentally determined north-south anisotropies for lower-energy particles, as observed by other groups in the Northern Hemisphere. The results are in agreement with measurements and simulations previously obtained in the Southern Hemisphere.

  1. Phugoid oscillations in optimal reentry trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinh, N. X.; Chern, J. S.; Lin, C. F.

    A major problem with operations of lifting reentry vehicle having an aft center-of-gravity location due to large engine mass at the rear is the required hypersonic trim to fight the desired trajectory. This condition is most severe for lifting maneuvers. As a first step toward analyzing this problem, this paper considers the lift requirement for some basic maneuvers in the plane of a great circle. Considerations are given to optimal lift control for achieving the maximization of either the final altitude, speed or range. For the maximum-range problem, phugoid oscillation along an optimal trajectory is less severe as compared to a glide with maximum lift-to-drag ratio. An explicit formula for the number of oscillations for an entry from orbital speed is proposed.

  2. Rising above Reality: The Voices of Reentry Black Mothers and Their Daughters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sealey-Ruiz, Yolanda

    2007-01-01

    This article examines the following three themes present in the educational narratives of a group of Black reentry (returning to college) mothers: (a) reentry as a response to a critical moment, (b) reentry as a strategy for coping with challenges, and (c) reentry as a practical step toward getting their daughters into college. Cursory reviews of…

  3. Research on Aeroheating of Hypersonic Reentry Vehicle Base Flow Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xuguo, Qin; Yongtao, Shui; Yonghai, Wang; Gang, Chen; Qiang, Li

    2017-09-01

    The structure of the base flow of a hypersonic reentry vehicle and the resulting base pressure and heat transfer have been studied by numerical study. The compressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved by the finite-volume method. SST k-ω turbulence model is used, and comparisons are made with flight test. Attention was focused on assessing the effects of angle of attack and Mach number. It was found that angle of attack can significantly alter the wake flow structure and reentry vehicle base pressure and heating distributions. The results of the simulation may provide a theoretical basis for the design of the thermal protection system of hypersonic reentry vehicles.

  4. Breakup of particle clumps on liquid surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurupatham, S.; Hossain, M.; Dalal, B.; Fischer, I.; Singh, P.; Joseph, D.

    2011-11-01

    In this talk we describe the mechanism by which clumps of some powdered materials breakup and disperse on a liquid surface to form a monolayer of particles. We show that a clump breaks up because when particles on its outer periphery come in contact with the liquid surface they are pulled into the interface by the vertical component of capillary force overcoming the cohesive forces which keep them attached, and then these particles move away from the clump. In some cases, the clump itself is broken into smaller pieces and then these smaller pieces break apart by the aforementioned mechanism. The newly-adsorbed particles move away from the clump, and each other, because when particles are adsorbed on a liquid surface they cause a flow on the interface away from themselves. This flow may also cause particles newly-exposed on the outer periphery of the clump to break away. Since millimeter-sized clumps can breakup and spread on a liquid surface within a few seconds, their behavior appears to be similar to that of some liquid drops which can spontaneously disperse on solid surfaces.

  5. Breakup and atomization of a stretching crown.

    PubMed

    Roisman, Ilia V; Gambaryan-Roisman, Tatiana; Kyriopoulos, Olympia; Stephan, Peter; Tropea, Cam

    2007-08-01

    This study is devoted to experimental and theoretical investigation of splash produced by spray impact onto a smooth, rigid target under microgravity conditions. In particular, the formation of a film by the deposited liquid, the propagation and breakup of uprising sheets created by drop impacts, and the creation of secondary droplets have been observed. Three scenarios of splash have been identified during the experiments: (i) cusp formation and jetting due to the rim transverse instability, (ii) sheet destruction and the consequent rapid axisymmetric capillary breakup of a free rim, and (iii) the rim merging. Experimental data for various geometrical parameters of splash have been collected. Next, in order to predict the typical length scales of the interjet distance, a linear stability analysis of the rim in relation to transverse disturbances has been performed. The influence of the sheet stretching has been investigated and shown to be significant. The experimentally measured average values of the interjet distances agree well with the theoretical predictions. The sheet stretching is responsible for the appearance of the relatively long interjet distances.

  6. Breakup and atomization of a stretching crown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roisman, Ilia V.; Gambaryan-Roisman, Tatiana; Kyriopoulos, Olympia; Stephan, Peter; Tropea, Cam

    2007-08-01

    This study is devoted to experimental and theoretical investigation of splash produced by spray impact onto a smooth, rigid target under microgravity conditions. In particular, the formation of a film by the deposited liquid, the propagation and breakup of uprising sheets created by drop impacts, and the creation of secondary droplets have been observed. Three scenarios of splash have been identified during the experiments: (i) cusp formation and jetting due to the rim transverse instability, (ii) sheet destruction and the consequent rapid axisymmetric capillary breakup of a free rim, and (iii) the rim merging. Experimental data for various geometrical parameters of splash have been collected. Next, in order to predict the typical length scales of the interjet distance, a linear stability analysis of the rim in relation to transverse disturbances has been performed. The influence of the sheet stretching has been investigated and shown to be significant. The experimentally measured average values of the interjet distances agree well with the theoretical predictions. The sheet stretching is responsible for the appearance of the relatively long interjet distances.

  7. Dynamics of jet breakup induced by perturbation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shum, Ho Cheung; Li, Jingmei; Mak, Sze Yi

    2014-11-01

    We study the breakup of jet to form droplets, as induced by controlled perturbation, in a microchannel. Controlled mechanical perturbation is introduced to the tubing through which the jet phase is injected into the device, which is monitored under high-speed optical imaging. We measure the frequency of droplet formation and the sizes of the droplets as the frequency and amplitude of the perturbation is varied. Droplets can be induced to form at the perturbation frequency only above a critical frequency and amplitude. In this manner, the droplet size can be precisely controlled. The amplitude needed to induce breakup decreases as the interfacial tension of the system is lowered. Moreover, by selectively varying the wettability of the inner wall of the channel, double emulsion droplets can be generated in one step by applying large-amplitude perturbation of the jet phase. Our work demonstrates the potential of using controlled perturbation to generate droplets with tunable size and shapes, with implications on new designs of liquid dispensing nozzles.

  8. Bubble breakup phenomena in a venturi tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Akiko

    2005-11-01

    Microbubble has distinguished characteristics of large surface area to unit volume and small buoyancy, and it has advantages in many engineering fields. Recently microbubble generators with low energy and high performance are required to wide applications. In the present study, we propose one new effective technique to generate tiny bubbles with less than 200 μm diameter utilizing venturi tube under high void fraction condition. The objective of the present study is to elucidate the mechanism of bubble breakup phenomena in the venturi tube and to clarify the effects of parameters which are necessary to realize an optimum system experimentally. Experiment was conducted with void fraction of 4% and variation of liquid velocity from 9 to 26 m/s at the throat. Under low velocity condition, bubbles which were observed with a high speed camera parted gradually in a wide region. On the contrary under high velocity condition, bubbles expanded after passing through the throat and shrank rapidly. Since the speed of sound in gas-liquid system is extremely lower than that of single-phase flow, the bubble breakup phenomenon in the venturi tube is explained as the supersonic flow in a Laval nozzle. By rapid pressure recovery in diverging area, expanding bubbles collapse violently. The tiny bubbles are generated due to the surface instability of shrinking bubbles.

  9. Follow-up investigations of GPHS motion during heat pulse intervals of reentries from gravity-assist trajectories. Aerospace Nuclear Safety Program

    SciTech Connect

    Sharbaugh, R.C.

    1992-03-23

    Motion studies of the General Purpose Heat Source Module, GPHS, which were conducted in the heat pulse intervals associated with entries from earth gravity assist trajectories. The APL six-degree-of-freedom reentry program designated TMAGRA6C was used. The objectives of the studies were to (1) determine whether the GPHS module entering the earth`s atmosphere from an earth-gravity-assist trajectory has a preferred orientation during the heat pulse of reentry, (2) determine the effect of magnus force on the roll rate and angle of attack of the GPHS during an EGA entry, (3) determine the effect of the magnitude of pitch and roll damping on the GPHS motion.

  10. Empirical Tests of the Predicted Footprint for Uncontrolled Satellite Reentry Hazards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matney, Mark

    2011-01-01

    A number of statistical tools have been developed over the years for assessing the risk of reentering object to human populations. These tools make use of the characteristics (e.g., mass, material, shape, size) of debris that are predicted by aerothermal models to survive reentry. The statistical tools use this information to compute the probability that one or more of the surviving debris might hit a person on the ground and cause one or more casualties. The statistical portion of the analysis relies on a number of assumptions about how the debris footprint and the human population are distributed in latitude and longitude, and how to use that information to arrive at realistic risk numbers. Because this information is used in making policy and engineering decisions, it is important that these assumptions be tested using empirical data. This study uses the latest database of known uncontrolled reentry locations measured by the United States Department of Defense. The predicted ground footprint distributions of these objects are based on the theory that their orbits behave basically like simple Kepler orbits. However, there are a number of factors in the final stages of reentry - including the effects of gravitational harmonics, the effects of the Earth s equatorial bulge on the atmosphere, and the rotation of the Earth and atmosphere - that could cause them to diverge from simple Kepler orbit behavior and possibly change the probability of reentering over a given location. In this paper, the measured latitude and longitude distributions of these objects are directly compared with the predicted distributions, providing a fundamental empirical test of the model assumptions.

  11. Modeling of Turbulence Effects on Liquid Jet Atomization and Breakup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, Huu P.; Chen, C. P.

    2005-01-01

    Recent experimental investigations and physical modeling studies have indicated that turbulence behaviors within a liquid jet have considerable effects on the atomization process. This study aims to model the turbulence effect in the atomization process of a cylindrical liquid jet. Two widely used models, the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability of Reitz (blob model) and the Taylor-Analogy-Breakup (TAB) secondary droplet breakup by O Rourke et al, are further extended to include turbulence effects. In the primary breakup model, the level of the turbulence effect on the liquid breakup depends on the characteristic scales and the initial flow conditions. For the secondary breakup, an additional turbulence force acted on parent drops is modeled and integrated into the TAB governing equation. The drop size formed from this breakup regime is estimated based on the energy balance before and after the breakup occurrence. This paper describes theoretical development of the current models, called "T-blob" and "T-TAB", for primary and secondary breakup respectivety. Several assessment studies are also presented in this paper.

  12. Breakup channels for C12 triple-α continuum states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diget, C. Aa.; Barker, F. C.; Borge, M. J. G.; Boutami, R.; Dendooven, P.; Eronen, T.; Fox, S. P.; Fulton, B. R.; Fynbo, H. O. U.; Huikari, J.; Hyldegaard, S.; Jeppesen, H. B.; Jokinen, A.; Jonson, B.; Kankainen, A.; Moore, I.; Nieminen, A.; Nyman, G.; Penttilä, H.; Pucknell, V. F. E.; Riisager, K.; Rinta-Antila, S.; Tengblad, O.; Wang, Y.; Wilhelmsen, K.; Äystö, J.

    2009-09-01

    The triple-α-particle breakup of states in the triple-α continuum of C12 has been investigated by way of coincident detection of all three α particles of the breakup. The states have been fed in the β decay of N12 and B12, and the α particles measured using a setup that covers all of the triple-α phase space. Contributions from the breakup through the Be8(0+) ground state as well as other channels—interpreted as breakup through excited energies in Be8—have been identified. Spins and parities of C12 triple-α continuum states are deduced from the measured phase-space distributions for breakup through Be8 above the ground state by comparison to a fully symmetrized sequential R-matrix description of the breakup. At around 10 MeV in C12, the breakup is found to be dominated by 0+ strength breaking up through the ghost of the Be8(0+) ground state with L=0 angular momentum between the first emitted α particle and the intermediate Be8 nucleus. For C12 energies above the 12.7 MeV 1+ state, however, L=2 breakup of a C12 2+ state through the Be8(2+) excited state dominates. Furthermore, the possibility of a 2+ excited state in the 9-12 MeV region of C12 is investigated.

  13. Breakup Effects on University Students' Perceived Academic Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, Tiffany; Diego, Miguel; Pelaez, Martha; Deeds, Osvelia; Delgado, Jeannette

    2012-01-01

    The Problem: Problems that might be expected to affect perceived academic performance were studied in a sample of 283 university students. Results: Breakup Distress Scale scores, less time since the breakup and no new relationship contributed to 16% of the variance on perceived academic performance. Variables that were related to academic…

  14. 24 CFR 982.315 - Family break-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Family break-up. 982.315 Section... SECTION 8 TENANT BASED ASSISTANCE: HOUSING CHOICE VOUCHER PROGRAM Leasing a Unit § 982.315 Family break-up. (a) The PHA has discretion to determine which members of an assisted family continue to receive...

  15. Surviving the breakup: the DNA damage checkpoint.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Jacob C; Haber, James E

    2006-01-01

    In response to even a single chromosomal double-strand DNA break, cells enact the DNA damage checkpoint. This checkpoint triggers cell cycle arrest, providing time for the cell to repair damaged chromosomes before entering mitosis. This mechanism helps prevent the segregation of damaged or mutated chromosomes and thus promotes genomic stability. Recent work has elucidated the molecular mechanisms underlying several critical steps in checkpoint activation, notably the recruitment of the upstream checkpoint kinases of the ATM and ATR families to different damaged DNA structures and the molecular events through which these kinases activate their effectors. Chromatin modification has emerged as one important component of checkpoint activation and maintenance. Following DNA repair, the checkpoint pathway is inactivated in a process termed recovery. A related but genetically distinct process, adaptation, controls cell cycle re-entry in the face of unrepairable damage.

  16. Intermediate Experimental Vehicle (IXV): Avionics and Software of the ESA Reentry Demonstrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malucchi, Giovanni; Dussy, Stephane; Camuffo, Fabrizio

    2012-08-01

    The IXV project is conceived as a technology platform that would perform the step forward with respect to the Atmospheric Reentry Demonstrator (ARD), by increasing the system maneuverability and verifying the critical technology performances against a wider re- entry corridor.The main objective is to design, develop and to perform an in-flight verification of an autonomous lifting and aerodynamically controlled (by a combined use of thrusters and aerodynamic surfaces) reentry system.The project also includes the verification and experimentation of a set of critical reentry technologies and disciplines:Thermal Protection System (TPS), for verification and characterization of thermal protection technologies in representative operational environment;Aerodynamics - Aerthermodynamics (AED-A TD), for understanding and validation of aerodynamics and aerothermodyamics phenomena with improvement of design tools;Guidance, Navigation and Control (GNC), for verification of guidance, navigation and control techniques in representative operational environment (i.e. reentry from Low Earth Orbit);Flight dynamics, to update and validate the vehicle model during actual flight, focused on stability and control derivatives.The above activities are being performed through the implementation of a strict system design-to-cost approach with a proto-flight model development philosophy.In 2008 and 2009, the IXV project activities reached the successful completion of the project Phase-B, including the System PDR, and early project Phase-C.In 2010, following a re-organization of the industrial consortium, the IXV project successfully completed a design consolidation leading to an optimization of the technical baseline including the GNC, avionics (i.e. power, data handling, radio frequency and telemetry), measurement sensors, hot and cold composite structures, thermal protections and control, with significant improvements of the main system budgets.The project has successfully closed the

  17. Public Risk Criteria and Rationale for Commercial Launch and Reentry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilde, P. D.

    2012-01-01

    This paper summarizes the rationale for risk criteria intended to protect the public during commercial spaceflight, including launch, reentry, and suborbital missions. The recommended approach includes: (1) safety goals to guide periodic updates of the quantitative collective risk limits if warranted based on the quantity of launch and reentry missions; the demonstrated safety record and benefits provided; technological capabilities and maturity of the industry; and contemporary attitudes about the risks from commercial space transportation; (2) separate limits on the risks from each type of mission with explicit definitions of the extent of launch and reentry missions; and (3) quantitative risk limits consistent with the safety goals. For current conditions, the author's recommends (a) maximum of 1E-6 probability of casualty per-mission (b) a maximum of 100E-6 expected casualties per-mission, and (c) equal per-mission risk limits for orbital and suborbital launches, as well as controlled and uncontrolled reentries.

  18. Critical role of inhomogeneities in pacing termination of cardiac reentry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Sitabhra; Stein, Kenneth M.; Christini, David J.

    2002-09-01

    Reentry around nonconducting ventricular scar tissue, a cause of lethal arrhythmias, is typically treated by rapid electrical stimulation from an implantable cardioverter defibrillator. However, the dynamical mechanisms of termination (success and failure) are poorly understood. To elucidate such mechanisms, we study the dynamics of pacing in one- and two-dimensional models of anatomical reentry. In a crucial realistic difference from previous studies of such systems, we have placed the pacing site away from the reentry circuit. Our model-independent results suggest that with such off-circuit pacing, the existence of inhomogeneity in the reentry circuit is essential for successful termination of tachycardia under certain conditions. Considering the critical role of such inhomogeneities may lead to more effective pacing algorithms.

  19. 38 CFR 21.8022 - Entry and reentry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...: 38 U.S.C. 1151 note, 1804, 1811, 1811 note, 1812, 1814) (b) Reentry. If an eligible child interrupts or ends pursuit of a vocational training program and VA subsequently allows the child to reenter...

  20. Reentry trajectory optimization based on a multistage pseudospectral method.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jiang; Zhou, Rui; Jin, Xuelian

    2014-01-01

    Of the many direct numerical methods, the pseudospectral method serves as an effective tool to solve the reentry trajectory optimization for hypersonic vehicles. However, the traditional pseudospectral method is time-consuming due to large number of discretization points. For the purpose of autonomous and adaptive reentry guidance, the research herein presents a multistage trajectory control strategy based on the pseudospectral method, capable of dealing with the unexpected situations in reentry flight. The strategy typically includes two subproblems: the trajectory estimation and trajectory refining. In each processing stage, the proposed method generates a specified range of trajectory with the transition of the flight state. The full glide trajectory consists of several optimal trajectory sequences. The newly focused geographic constraints in actual flight are discussed thereafter. Numerical examples of free-space flight, target transition flight, and threat avoidance flight are used to show the feasible application of multistage pseudospectral method in reentry trajectory optimization.

  1. Reentry Trajectory Optimization Based on a Multistage Pseudospectral Method

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Rui; Jin, Xuelian

    2014-01-01

    Of the many direct numerical methods, the pseudospectral method serves as an effective tool to solve the reentry trajectory optimization for hypersonic vehicles. However, the traditional pseudospectral method is time-consuming due to large number of discretization points. For the purpose of autonomous and adaptive reentry guidance, the research herein presents a multistage trajectory control strategy based on the pseudospectral method, capable of dealing with the unexpected situations in reentry flight. The strategy typically includes two subproblems: the trajectory estimation and trajectory refining. In each processing stage, the proposed method generates a specified range of trajectory with the transition of the flight state. The full glide trajectory consists of several optimal trajectory sequences. The newly focused geographic constraints in actual flight are discussed thereafter. Numerical examples of free-space flight, target transition flight, and threat avoidance flight are used to show the feasible application of multistage pseudospectral method in reentry trajectory optimization. PMID:24574929

  2. Critical role of inhomogeneities in pacing termination of cardiac reentry.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Sitabhra; Stein, Kenneth M.; Christini, David J.

    2002-09-01

    Reentry around nonconducting ventricular scar tissue, a cause of lethal arrhythmias, is typically treated by rapid electrical stimulation from an implantable cardioverter defibrillator. However, the dynamical mechanisms of termination (success and failure) are poorly understood. To elucidate such mechanisms, we study the dynamics of pacing in one- and two-dimensional models of anatomical reentry. In a crucial realistic difference from previous studies of such systems, we have placed the pacing site away from the reentry circuit. Our model-independent results suggest that with such off-circuit pacing, the existence of inhomogeneity in the reentry circuit is essential for successful termination of tachycardia under certain conditions. Considering the critical role of such inhomogeneities may lead to more effective pacing algorithms. (c) 2002 American Institute of Physics.

  3. 40 CFR 161.390 - Reentry protection data requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... could cause adverse effects on persons entering treated sites. In the last situation, reentry intervals... oncogenic effects or other adverse effects as evidenced by subchronic, chronic, and reproduction studies... tasks that would cause substantial exposure to residues sorbed to soil....

  4. Breakup of free liquid jets influenced by external mechanical vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lad, V. N.; Murthy, Z. V. P.

    2017-02-01

    The breakup of liquid jets has been studied with various test liquids using externally imposed mechanical vibrations. Images of the jets were captured by a high speed camera up to the speed of 1000 frames per second, and analyzed to obtain the profile of the jet and breakup length. The dynamics of the jets have also been studied to understand the effects of additives—a surfactant and polymer—incorporating externally imposed mechanical vibrations. Different types of breakup modes have been explored with respect to the Weber number and Ohnesorge number. The introduction of mechanical vibrations have caused jet breakup with separated droplets at a comparatively lower Weber number. The region of jet breakup by neck formation at constant jet velocities also contracted due to mechanical vibrations.

  5. Decrease in oceanic crustal thickness since the breakup of Pangaea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Avendonk, Harm J. A.; Davis, Joshua K.; Harding, Jennifer L.; Lawver, Lawrence A.

    2017-01-01

    Earth's mantle has cooled by 6-11 °C every 100 million years since the Archaean, 2.5 billion years ago. In more recent times, the surface heat loss that led to this temperature drop may have been enhanced by plate-tectonic processes, such as continental breakup, the continuous creation of oceanic lithosphere at mid-ocean ridges and subduction at deep-sea trenches. Here we use a compilation of marine seismic refraction data from ocean basins globally to analyse changes in the thickness of oceanic crust over time. We find that oceanic crust formed in the mid-Jurassic, about 170 million years ago, is 1.7 km thicker on average than crust produced along the present-day mid-ocean ridge system. If a higher mantle temperature is the cause of thicker Jurassic ocean crust, the upper mantle may have cooled by 15-20 °C per 100 million years over this time period. The difference between this and the long-term mantle cooling rate indeed suggests that modern plate tectonics coincide with greater mantle heat loss. We also find that the increase of ocean crustal thickness with plate age is stronger in the Indian and Atlantic oceans compared with the Pacific Ocean. This observation supports the idea that upper mantle temperature in the Jurassic was higher in the wake of the fragmented supercontinent Pangaea due to the effect of continental insulation.

  6. Cost Modeling Techniques for Design Maturity. [of reentry vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruhland, E. W.

    1974-01-01

    Cost modeling techniques and factors which either add to or subtract from these estimates are examined. The most important factors for increasing costs are interfacing subsystems, subsystem design and software maturity. Cost decrease depends on hardware, software, and support equipment availability. A cost modeling analysis for reentry shield and aerodynamic decelerator subsystems of a reentry vehicle is presented. Integration problems for the subsystems are also discussed.

  7. Reusable Reentry Satellite (RRS): Telemetry, Tracking, and Command (TT/C) Coverage Tradeoff Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Reusable Reentry Satellite (RRS) Telemetry, Tracking & Command (TT&C) Coverage Tradeoff Study described herein was performed during Part 1 of the RRS Phase B contract. This report is one of several that describes the results of various trade studies performed to arrive at a recommended design for the RRS satellite system. The overall RRS Phase B Study objective is to design a relatively inexpensive satellite to access space for extended periods of time, with eventual recovery of experiments on Earth. The RRS will be capable of: (1) being launched by a variety of expendable launch vehicles; (2) operating in low earth orbit as a free flying unmanned laboratory; and (3) executing an independent atmospheric reentry and soft landing. The RRS will be designed to be refurbished and reused up to three times a year for a period of 10 years. The expected principal use for such a system is research on the effects of variable gravity (0 to 1.5 g) and radiation on small animals, plants, lower life forms, tissue samples, and materials processes. This Summary Report provides a description of the RRS Telemetry, Tracking & Command Analysis performed to study the ground station coverage available to meet RRS requirements. Concepts were considered that used off-the-shelf technology, had generous margins of capability, and high reliability, were easily maintained, cost effective, and were compatible with existing support networks. From this study, a recommended RRS TT&C configuration will be developed.

  8. Structural Analysis and Testing of the Inflatable Re-entry Vehicle Experiment (IRVE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindell, Michael C.; Hughes, Stephen J.; Dixon, Megan; Wiley, Cliff E.

    2006-01-01

    The Inflatable Re-entry Vehicle Experiment (IRVE) is a 3.0 meter, 60 degree half-angle sphere cone, inflatable aeroshell experiment designed to demonstrate various aspects of inflatable technology during Earth re-entry. IRVE will be launched on a Terrier-Improved Orion sounding rocket from NASA s Wallops Flight Facility in the fall of 2006 to an altitude of approximately 164 kilometers and re-enter the Earth s atmosphere. The experiment will demonstrate exo-atmospheric inflation, inflatable structure leak performance throughout the flight regime, structural integrity under aerodynamic pressure and associated deceleration loads, thermal protection system performance, and aerodynamic stability. Structural integrity and dynamic response of the inflatable will be monitored with photogrammetric measurements of the leeward side of the aeroshell during flight. Aerodynamic stability and drag performance will be verified with on-board inertial measurements and radar tracking from multiple ground radar stations. In addition to demonstrating inflatable technology, IRVE will help validate structural, aerothermal, and trajectory modeling and analysis techniques for the inflatable aeroshell system. This paper discusses the structural analysis and testing of the IRVE inflatable structure. Equations are presented for calculating fabric loads in sphere cone aeroshells, and finite element results are presented which validate the equations. Fabric material properties and testing are discussed along with aeroshell fabrication techniques. Stiffness and dynamics tests conducted on a small-scale development unit and a full-scale prototype unit are presented along with correlated finite element models to predict the in-flight fundamental mod

  9. Preliminary reentry safety assessment of the General Purpose Heat Source module for the Cassini mission: Aerospace Nuclear Safety Program

    SciTech Connect

    Conn, D.W.; Brenza, P.T.

    1993-04-01

    As asked by the U. S. Department of Energy/Office of Special Applications, and in support of the Environmental Impact Statement for the Cassini mission, The Johns Hopkins University/Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) has conducted preliminary one-dimensional ablation and thermal analyses of the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS). The predicted earth entry conditions provided by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) for a Cassini Venus-Venus-Earth-Jupiter Gravity Assist (VVEJGA) trajectory were used as initial conditions. The results of this study which constitute the initial reentry analysis assessment leading to the Cassini Updated Safety, Analysis Report (USAR) are discussed in this document.

  10. Water Landing Characteristics of a Reentry Capsule

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1958-01-01

    Water Landing Characteristics of a Reentry Capsule. Experimental and theoretical investigations have been made to determine the water-landing characteristics of a conical-shaped reentry capsule having a segment of a sphere as the bottom. For the experimental portion of the investigation, a 1/12-scale model capsule and a full-scale capsule were tested for nominal flight paths of 65 deg and 90 deg (vertical), a range of contact attitudes from -30 deg to 30 deg, and a full-scale vertical velocity of 30 feet per second at contact. Accelerations were measured by accelerometers installed at the centers of gravity of the model and full-scale capsules. For the model test the accelerations were measured along the X-axis (roll) and Z-axis (yaw) and for the full-scale test they were measured along the X-axis (roll), Y-axis (pitch), and Z-axis (yaw). Motions and displacements of the capsules that occurred after contact were determined from high-speed motion pictures. The theoretical investigation was conducted to determine the accelerations that might occur along the X-axis when the capsule contacted the water from a 90 deg flight path at a 0 deg attitude. Assuming a rigid body, computations were made from equations obtained by utilizing the principle of the conservation of momentum. The agreement among data obtained from the model test, the full-scale test, and the theory was very good. The accelerations along the X-axis, for a vertical flight path and 0 deg attitude, were in the order of 40g. For a 65 deg flight path and 0 deg attitude, the accelerations along the X-axis were in the order of 50g. Changes in contact attitude, in either the positive or negative direction from 0 deg attitude, considerably reduced the magnitude of the accelerations measured along the X-axis. Accelerations measured along the Y- and Z-axes were relatively small at all test conditions. [Entire movie available on DVD from CASI as Doc ID 20070030955. Contact help@sti.nasa.gov

  11. Electrohydrodynamic (EHD) stimulation of jet breakup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crowley, J. M.

    1982-01-01

    Electrohydrodynamic (EHD) excitation of liquid jets offers an alternative to piezoelectric excitation without the complex frequency response caused by piezoelectric and mechanical resonances. In an EHD exciter, an electrode near the nozzle applies an alternating Coulomb force to the jet surface, generating a disturbance which grows until a drop breaks off downstream. This interaction is modelled quite well by a linear, long wave model of the jet together with a cylindrical electric field. The breakup length, measured on a 33 micrometer jet, agrees quite well with that predicted by the theory, and increases with the square of the applied voltage, as expected. In addition, the frequency response is very smooth, with pronounced nulls occurring only at frequencies related to the time which the jet spends inside the exciter.

  12. Team formation and breakup in multiagent systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Venkatesh Guru

    The goal of this dissertation is to pose and solve problems involving team formation and breakup in two specific multiagent domains: formation travel and space-based interferometric observatories. The methodology employed comprises elements drawn from control theory, scheduling theory and artificial intelligence (AI). The original contribution of the work comprises three elements. The first contribution, the partitioned state-space approach is a technique for formulating and solving co-ordinated motion problem using calculus of variations techniques. The approach is applied to obtain optimal two-agent formation travel trajectories on graphs. The second contribution is the class of MixTeam algorithms, a class of team dispatchers that extends classical dispatching by accommodating team formation and breakup and exploration/exploitation learning. The algorithms are applied to observation scheduling and constellation geometry design for interferometric space telescopes. The use of feedback control for team scheduling is also demonstrated with these algorithms. The third contribution is the analysis of the optimality properties of greedy, or myopic, decision-making for a simple class of team dispatching problems. This analysis represents a first step towards the complete analysis of complex team schedulers such as the MixTeam algorithms. The contributions represent an extension to the literature on team dynamics in control theory. The broad conclusions that emerge from this research are that greedy or myopic decision-making strategies for teams perform well when specific parameters in the domain are weakly affected by an agent's actions, and that intelligent systems require a closer integration of domain knowledge in decision-making functions.

  13. The Characteristics and Consequences of the Break-up of the Fengyun-1C Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Nicholas L.; Stansbery, Eugene; Liou, Jer-chyi; Horstman, Matt; Stokeley, Christopher; Whitlock, David

    2007-01-01

    The intentional break-up of the Fengyun-1C spacecraft on 11 January 2007 via hypervelocity collision with a ballistic object created the most severe artificial debris cloud in Earth orbit since the beginning of space exploration. More than 900 debris on the order of 10 cm or greater in size have been identified by the U.S. Space Surveillance Network (SSN). The majority of these debris reside in long-lived orbits. The NASA Orbital Debris Program Office has conducted a thorough examination of the nature of the Fengyun-1C debris cloud, using SSN data for larger debris and special Haystack radar observations for smaller debris. These data have been compared with the NASA standard satellite break-up model for collisions, and the results are presented in this paper. The orbital longevity of the debris have also been evaluated for both small and large debris. The consequent long-term spatial density effects on the low Earth orbit (LEO) regime are then described. Finally, collision probabilities between the Fengyun-1C debris cloud and the resident space object population of 1 January 2007 have been calculated. The potential effect on the growth of the near-Earth satellite population is presented.

  14. Landing Energy Dissipation for Manned Reentry Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Lloyd J., Jr.

    1960-01-01

    Analytical and experimental investigations have been made to determine the landing-energy-dissipation characteristics for several types of landing gear for manned reentry vehicles. The landing vehicles are considered in two categories: those having essentially vertical-descent paths, the parachute-supported vehicles, and those having essentially horizontal paths, the lifting vehicles. The energy-dissipation devices discussed are crushable materials such as foamed plastics and honeycomb for internal application in couch-support systems, yielding metal elements as part of the structure of capsules or as alternates for oleos in landing-gear struts, inflatable bags, braking rockets, and shaped surfaces for water impact. It appears feasible to readily evaluate landing-gear systems for internal or external application in hard-surface or water landings by using computational procedures and free-body landing techniques with dynamic models. The systems investigated have shown very interesting energy-dissipation characteristics over a considerable range of landing parameters. Acceptable gear can be developed along lines similar to those presented if stroke requirements and human-tolerance limits are considered.

  15. Early breakup of Gondwana: constraints from global plate motion models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seton, Maria; Zahirovic, Sabin; Williams, Simon; Whittaker, Joanne; Gibbons, Ana; Muller, Dietmar; Brune, Sascha; Heine, Christian

    2015-04-01

    Supercontinent break-up and amalgamation is a fundamental Earth cycle, contributing to long-term sea-level fluctuations, species diversity and extinction events, long-term greenhouse-icehouse cycles and changes in the long-wavelength density structure of the mantle. The most recent and best-constrained example involves the fragmentation of Gondwana, starting with rifting between Africa/Madagascar and Antarctica in the Early Jurassic and ending with the separation of the Lord Howe microcontinental blocks east of Australia in the Late Cretaceous. Although the first order configuration of Gondwana within modern reconstructions appears similar to that first proposed by Wegener a century ago, recent studies utilising a wealth of new geophysical and geological data provide a much more detailed picture of relative plate motions both during rifting and subsequent seafloor spreading. We present our latest global plate motion model that includes extensive, new regional analyses. These include: South Atlantic rifting, which started at 150 Ma and propagated into cratonic Africa by 145 Ma (Heine et al., 2013); rifting and early seafloor spreading between Australia, India and Antarctica, which reconciles the fit between Broken Ridge-Kergulean Plateau and the eastern Tasman region (Whittaker et al., 2013); rifting of continental material from northeastern Gondwana and its accretion onto Eurasia and SE Asia including a new model of microcontinent formation and early seafloor spreading in the eastern Indian Ocean (Gibbons et al., 2012; 2013; in review; Williams et al., 2013; Zahirovic et al., 2014); and a new model for the isolation of Zealandia east of Australia, with rifting initiating at 100 Ma until the start of seafloor spreading in the Tasman Sea at ~85 Ma (Williams et al., in prep). Using these reconstructions within the open-source GPlates software, accompanied by a set of evolving plates and plate boundaries, we can explore the factors that govern the behavior of plate

  16. Assessment Of The Aerodynamic And Aerothermodynamic Performance Of The USV-3 High-Lift Re-Entry Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezzella, Giuseppe; Richiello, Camillo; Russo, Gennaro

    2011-05-01

    This paper deals with the aerodynamic and aerothermodynamic trade-off analysis carried out with the aim to design a hypersonic flying test bed (FTB), namely USV3. Such vehicle will have to be launched with a small expendable launcher and shall re-enter the Earth atmosphere allowing to perform several experiments on critical re-entry phenomena. The demonstrator under study is a re-entry space glider characterized by a relatively simple vehicle architecture able to validate hypersonic aerothermodynamic design database and passenger experiments, including thermal shield and hot structures. Then, a summary review of the aerodynamic characteristics of two FTB concepts, compliant with a phase-A design level, has been provided hereinafter. Indeed, several design results, based both on engineering approach and computational fluid dynamics, are reported and discussed in the paper.

  17. Aerodynamic effects on primary breakup of turbulent liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, P.-K.; Faeth, G. M.

    1993-01-01

    An experimental study of primary breakup of turbulent liquids is described, emphasizing liquid/gas density ratios less than 500 where aerodynamics effects are important. The experiments involved multiphase mixing layers along round water jets (3.6 and 6.2 mm dia.) injected at various velocities into still helium, air and Freon 12 at pressures of 1 and 2 atm. with fully-developed turbulent pipe flow at the jet exit. Pulsed shadowgraph photography and holography were used to find conditions at the onset of breakup as well as drop properties as a function of distance from the jet exit. Two main aerodynamic effects were observed, as follows: (1) enhanced primary breakup near the onset of breakup, and (2) merged primary and secondary breakup when the Rayleigh breakup times of ligaments formed by turbulent fluctuations were longer than the secondary breakup times of similar sized drops. The predictions of phenomenological theories based on these ideas were in good agreement with the measurements.

  18. Signatures of Pseudo-breakup, Breakup of a Full Substorm Onset, and Poleward Border Intensifications Compared.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voronkov, I.; Donovan, E. F.; Samson, J. C.

    2001-12-01

    For several exceptional events, we use ground-based and in-situ data to compare the ionospheric, geostationary, and mid-tail signatures of the pseudo-breakup, breakup, and poleward border intensifications (PBIs). In doing so, we utilize CANOPUS magnetometer and multi-wavelength photometer and All-sky imager data, as well as field measurements provided by the GOES 8, GOES 9, and Geotail spacecraft. We have identified a set of distinguishable signatures of each process. Pseudo-breakup consists of two distinct stages: near-linear arc intensification corresponding to the ``explosive growth phase" at geostationary orbit, and poleward vortex expansion that starts simultaneously with explosive onset of short period pulsations (Pi1, Pi2) and dipolarization observed at geostationary orbit. It can be accompanied by local perturbations of the equatorward part of the electron precipitation region and by formation of the substorm-like local current system but neither by optical signatures of the lobe flux reconnection nor by perturbations in the mid-tail. It typically saturates near the equatorward border of the electron precipitation region producing a mushroom-like auroral structure. Breakup starts with the same two-stage initial scenario of the arc intensification and vortex evolution but it rapidly expands poleward and is accompanied by optical signatures of reconnection onset, namely the aurora develops into a cell-like structure of the size compatible with the whole auroral zone width. This occurs at the time when mid-tail disruption signatures are observed. Full onset launches a second, more global, larger Pi2 burst. Finally, we show an example of PBIs observed as long period pulses of electron precipitation at the poleward border of auroral region, followed by the high-latitude proton aurora. The commencement of PBI coincided with bursty bulk flows and pulses of plasma energization in the mid-tail. Observed features are discussed with respect to recent ideas claiming

  19. Trends of ice breakup date in south-central Ontario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Congsheng; Yao, Huaxia

    2015-09-01

    Large-scale ice phenology studies have revealed overall patterns of later freeze, earlier breakup, and shorter duration of ice in the Northern Hemisphere. However, there have been few studies regarding the trends, including their spatial patterns, in ice phenology for individual waterbodies on a local or small regional scale, although the coherence of ice phenology has been shown to decline rapidly in the first few hundred kilometers. In this study, we extracted trends, analyzed affecting factors, and investigated relevant spatial patterns for ice breakup date time series at 10 locations with record length ≥90 years in south-central Ontario, Canada. Wavelet methods, including the multiresolution analysis (MRA) method for nonlinear trend extraction and the wavelet coherence (WTC) method for identifying the teleconnections between large-scale climate modes and ice breakup date, are proved to be effective in ice phenology analysis. Using MRA method, the overall trend of ice breakup date time series (1905-1991) varied from earlier ice breakup to later ice breakup, then to earlier breakup again from south to north in south-central Ontario. Ice breakup date is closely correlated with air temperature during certain winter/spring months, as well as the last day with snow on the ground and number of snow-on-ground days. The influences of solar activity and Pacific North American on ice breakup were comparatively uniform across south-central Ontario, while those of El Niño-Southern Oscillation, North Atlantic Oscillation, and Arctic Oscillation on ice phenology changed with distance of 50-100 km in the north-south direction.

  20. New description of four-body break-up reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, T.; Kato, K.; Yahiro, M.

    2011-06-28

    We present a new method of smoothing discrete breakup cross sections calculated by the method of continuum-discretized coupled-channels. In the four-body breakup reaction of {sup 12}C({sup 6}He, nn{sup 4}He) at E{sub in} = 229.8 MeV, the continuous breakup cross section is evaluated as a function of the excitation energy of {sup 6}He. Convergence of the cross section with respect to extending the modelspace is also confirmed.

  1. Automatic assessment of tear film break-up dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ramos, L; Barreira, N; Pena-Verdeal, H; Giráldez, M J

    2014-01-01

    Dry eye syndrome is a common disorder of the tear film which affects a remarkable percentage of the population. The Break-Up Time (BUT) is a clinical test used for the diagnosis of this disease, which computes the time the first tear film break-up appears. This work describes a fully automatic methodology to compute the BUT measurement and evaluate the break-up dynamics until the final blink. This analysis provides useful additional information for the assessment of tear film stability.

  2. NASA Team Captures Hayabusa Spacecraft Reentry

    NASA Image and Video Library

    A group of astronomers from NASA, the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and other organizations had a front row seat to observe the Hayabusa spacecraft's fiery plunge into Earth's atmospher...

  3. The Spectrum of Satellite Breakup and Fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finkleman, D.

    The objective of this paper is to expose the spectrum of satellite breakup physics and is implications for debris production and observables. Satellite response to the debris environment generally emphasizes small scale hypervelocity impact or the interaction of intense, coherent radiation with satellite surfaces or internals. There are empirical correlations of fragment size distributions based on arena tests and extremely rare observations of breakups in space. Klinkrad describes well research on material response to hypervelocity impact such as the ballistic limit for various materials and shielding walls. Smirnov, et. al., report well the phenomenology of breakups under the influence of nonuniform internal loading of monolithic bodies, such as pressurized tanks. They set forth the transformation of elastic energy into fragment kinetic energy. They establish a sound physical framework for bounding the number of fragments. We took advantage of these works in our previous papers. There is not much research into the response of nonuniform structures to hypervelocity collisions with similarly massive and complex objects. This work generally employs complex hydrodynamic and finite element computation that is not well suited to real time, operational assessment of the consequences of such encounters. We hope to diminish the void between the extremes of microscopic impact and complex hydrocodes. Our previous reports employed the framework established by Chobotov and Spencer, fundamentally equilibrium, Newtonian approach. We now explore the spectrum of interactions and debris evolutions possible with realistic combinations of these theories. The spectrum encompasses Newtonian, semi-elastic energy and momentum transfer through little or no momentum exchange and from virtually all of the mass of the colliders being involved through fractional mass involvement. We observe that the more Newtonian outcomes do not agree well with sparse observations of the few collisions that

  4. Water Landing Characteristics of a Reentry Capsule

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1958-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical investigations have been made to determine the water-landing characteristics of a conical-shaped reentry capsule having a segment of a sphere as the bottom. For the experimental portion of the investigation, a 1/12-scale model capsule and a full-scale capsule were tested for nominal flight paths of 65 deg and 90 deg (vertical), a range of contact attitudes from -30 deg to 30 deg, and a full-scale vertical velocity of 30 feet per second at contact. Accelerations were measured by accelerometers installed at the centers of gravity of the model and full-scale capsules. For the model test the accelerations were measured along the X-axis (roll) and Z-axis (yaw) and for the full-scale test they were measured along the X-axis (roll), Y-axis (pitch), and Z-axis (yaw). Motions and displacements of the capsules that occurred after contact were determined from high-speed motion pictures. The theoretical investigation was conducted to determine the accelerations that might occur along the X-axis when the capsule contacted the water from a 90 deg flight path at a 0 deg attitude. Assuming a rigid body, computations were made from equations obtained by utilizing the principle of the conservation of momentum. The agreement among data obtained from the model test, the full-scale test, and the theory was very good. The accelerations along the X-axis, for a vertical flight path and 0 deg attitude, were in the order of 40g. For a 65 deg flight path and 0 deg attitude, the accelerations along the X-axis were in the order of 50g. Changes in contact attitude, in either the positive or negative direction from 0 deg attitude, considerably reduced the magnitude of the accelerations measured along the X-axis. Accelerations measured along the Y- and Z-axes were relatively small at all test conditions.

  5. Satellite reentry predictions for the Italian civil protection authorities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anselmo, Luciano; Pardini, Carmen

    2013-06-01

    In just 5 months, from September 2011 to January 2012, three campaigns of reentry predictions were carried out in support of the Italian civil protection authorities. The satellites involved were UARS, ROSAT and Fobos-Grunt, which received widespread attention for the marginal risk on the ground associated with their uncontrolled reentry. From the technical point of view, the three reentry campaigns offered the occasion to compare some semi-empirical thermospheric density models under varying solar and geomagnetic activity conditions, dealing with spacecraft characterized by quite different configurations, shapes, masses and attitude control. However, what made the experience substantially different from usual reentry test campaigns was the strict interaction with the civil protection community and the public. In fact, in order to provide understandable and unambiguous information useful for civil protection planning and applications, the nominal reentry time predictions were of no use, while a particular care was devoted to the definition of appropriate reentry uncertainty windows. The attention of the civil protection authorities was focused, of course, on the Italian territory, so the relevant question for any planning was the following: given a certain uncertainty window, where and when a fragment might have crossed the national airspace and hit the ground? In order to meet this demand, during the last 3-4 days of satellite residual lifetime, reentries where simulated over Italy to obtain quite accurate ground tracks, debris swaths and air space crossing time windows associated with the critical passes over the national territory still included in the current uncertainty window. This information was updated, if needed, but remained relatively stable and accurate until the reentry, not much affected by the actual trajectory evolution due to the varying air drag. In other words, it was easy to understand for people not familiar with orbital dynamics, unambiguous

  6. Reentry to Pediatric Residency After Global Health Experiences.

    PubMed

    Balmer, Dorene F; Marton, Stephanie; Gillespie, Susan L; Schutze, Gordon E; Gill, Anne

    2015-10-01

    Although nonphysician reentry transitions have been characterized in literature, little is known about the reentry physicians in general, or residents in particular. We conducted a qualitative study to explore pediatric residents' reentry, using reverse culture shock as a conceptual framework. Eighteen pediatric residents who completed global health experiences in Africa (9 categorical residents with 1-month elective, 9 global child health residents with 12-month training) participated in interviews that included a card-sort to solicit emotional responses consistent with the conceptual framework. Data in the form of interview transcripts were coded and analyzed according to principles of grounded theory. All pediatric residents, despite variable time abroad, reported a range of emotional responses on reentry to residency. Global child health residents felt disconnection and frustration more intensely than categorical residents, whereas categorical residents felt invigoration more intensely than global child health residents. Although residents met with program leadership after their return, no resident described these meetings as a formal debriefing, and few described a deliberate strategy for processing emotions on reentry. Consistent with reverse culture shock, pediatric residents felt a range of emotions as they move toward a steady state of acculturating back into their residency program. Residency programs might consider creating safety nets to help cultivate support for residents when they reenter training. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  7. New description of the four-body breakup reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Takuma; Kato, Kiyoshi; Yahiro, Masanobu

    2010-11-15

    We present a novel method of smoothing discrete breakup cross sections calculated by the method of continuum-discretized coupled channels. The smoothing method based on the complex scaling method is tested with success for a {sup 58}Ni(d,pn) reaction at 80 MeV as an example of three-body breakup reactions and applied to a {sup 12}C({sup 6}He,nn {sup 4}He) reaction at 229.8 MeV as an example of four-body breakup reactions. Fast convergence of the breakup cross section with respect to extending the model space is confirmed. The method is also applied to {sup 12}C({sup 6}He,nn {sup 4}He) and {sup 208}Pb({sup 6}He,nn {sup 4}He) reactions at 240 MeV/A and compared with the experimental data.

  8. Using electric current to surpass the microstructure breakup limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Rongshan

    2017-01-01

    The elongated droplets and grains can break up into smaller ones. This process is driven by the interfacial free energy minimization, which gives rise to a breakup limit. We demonstrated in this work that the breakup limit can be overpassed drastically by using electric current to interfere. Electric current free energy is dependent on the microstructure configuration. The breakup causes the electric current free energy to reduce in some cases. This compensates the increment of interfacial free energy during breaking up and enables the processing to achieve finer microstructure. With engineering practical electric current parameters, our calculation revealed a significant increment of the obtainable number of particles, showing electric current a powerful microstructure refinement technology. The calculation is validated by our experiments on the breakup of Fe3C-plates in Fe matrix. Furthermore, there is a parameter range that electric current can drive spherical particles to split into smaller ones.

  9. {sup 17}F breakup reactions: a touchstone for indirect measurements

    SciTech Connect

    De Napoli, M.; Raciti, G.; Sfienti, C.; Capel, P.; Baye, D.; Descouvemont, P.; Sparenberg, J.-M.; Giacoppo, F.; Rapisarda, E.; Cardella, G.; Mazzocchi, C.

    2011-10-28

    An exclusive study of {sup 17}F breakup reactions has been performed at the FRIBs facility of the Laboratori Nazionali del Sud in Catania (Italy). The experiment has been performed with the aim of testing the accuracy of the Coulomb-breakup indirect technique used to infer radiative-capture cross sections at low energies. This technique has been used in the {sup 7}Be(p,{gamma}){sup 8}B case, but has never been tested. By measuring the breakup of {sup 17}F into {sup 16}O+p, and comparing the inferred cross section for {sup 16}O(p,{gamma}){sup 17}F to direct precise measurements, the influence of E2 transitions and higher-order effects, that are predicted to be significant in Coulomb-breakup reactions, can be evaluated. The first results and preliminary model comparison are reported.

  10. Investigation of the intermediate-energy deuteron breakup reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Divadeenam, M.; Ward, T.E.; Mustafa, M.G.; Udagawa, T.; Tamura, T.

    1989-01-01

    The Udagawa-Tamura formalism is employed to calculate the proton singles both in the bound and unbound regions. Both the Elastic-Breakup (EB) and the Breakup-Fusion (BF) processes are considered to calculate the doubly-differential cross section for light and intermediate mass nuclei. The calculated spectra for 25 and 56 MeV deuterons reproduce the experimental spectra very well except for the spectra at large angle and at low energies, of the outgoing particle. Contributions due to precompound and evaporation processes are estimated to supplement the spectral results based on the Elastic-Breakup and Breakup-Fusion mechanisms. An extension of the model calculations to higher deuteron energies is being made to test the (EB + BF) model limitations. 5 refs., 1 fig.

  11. Using electric current to surpass the microstructure breakup limit

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Rongshan

    2017-01-01

    The elongated droplets and grains can break up into smaller ones. This process is driven by the interfacial free energy minimization, which gives rise to a breakup limit. We demonstrated in this work that the breakup limit can be overpassed drastically by using electric current to interfere. Electric current free energy is dependent on the microstructure configuration. The breakup causes the electric current free energy to reduce in some cases. This compensates the increment of interfacial free energy during breaking up and enables the processing to achieve finer microstructure. With engineering practical electric current parameters, our calculation revealed a significant increment of the obtainable number of particles, showing electric current a powerful microstructure refinement technology. The calculation is validated by our experiments on the breakup of Fe3C-plates in Fe matrix. Furthermore, there is a parameter range that electric current can drive spherical particles to split into smaller ones. PMID:28120919

  12. Self-similar breakup of near-inviscid liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castrejon-Pita, Alfonso A.; Castrejon-Pita, J. Rafael; Lister, John R.; Hinch, E. John; Hutchings, Ian M.

    2012-11-01

    Experimental results are presented for the final stages of drop pinch-off and ligament breakup for different initial conditions. Water and ethanol were used as working fluids. High-speed imaging and image analysis were utilized in order to determine the contraction rate of the thinning neck and the shape of the liquid thread just before the breakup. Our results show that the geometry of the breakup of near-inviscid fluids is self-similar in the domain of simple dripping. We also demonstrate that, independently of the initial conditions, the necking of these liquids scales with τ 2 / 3, asymptotically giving a unique breakup angle of 18 . 0 +/- 0 .4° . Both observations are in complete agreement with previous theoretical predictions. The angle converges towards self similarity like τ 1 / 2, also as predicted. Project supported by the EPSRC-UK (EP/G029458/1 and EP/H018913/1) and Cambridge-KACST.

  13. Breakup of 87 MeV [sup 11]B

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfs, F.L.H.; White, C.A.; Bryan, D.C.; Freeman, C.G.; Herrick, D.M.; Kurz, K.L.; Mathews, D.H.; Perera, P.A.A.; Zanni, M.T. )

    1994-05-01

    A segmented focal plane detector has been used to study the breakup of 87 MeV [sup 11]B ions incident on a [sup 12]C target into [sup 4]He and [sup 7]Li fragments at relative energies between 0 and 4 MeV. The relative energy spectra are dominated by sequential breakup of the 9.28 MeV, 10.26+10.33 MeV, and 10.60 MeV excited states in [sup 11]B. The measured breakup yields decrease with increasing center-of-mass scattering angle, consistent with predictions made using single-step inelastic distorted wave Born approximation calculations. Applications of this technique to study the breakup of [sup 16]O at low relative energies will be discussed.

  14. Using electric current to surpass the microstructure breakup limit.

    PubMed

    Qin, Rongshan

    2017-01-25

    The elongated droplets and grains can break up into smaller ones. This process is driven by the interfacial free energy minimization, which gives rise to a breakup limit. We demonstrated in this work that the breakup limit can be overpassed drastically by using electric current to interfere. Electric current free energy is dependent on the microstructure configuration. The breakup causes the electric current free energy to reduce in some cases. This compensates the increment of interfacial free energy during breaking up and enables the processing to achieve finer microstructure. With engineering practical electric current parameters, our calculation revealed a significant increment of the obtainable number of particles, showing electric current a powerful microstructure refinement technology. The calculation is validated by our experiments on the breakup of Fe3C-plates in Fe matrix. Furthermore, there is a parameter range that electric current can drive spherical particles to split into smaller ones.

  15. Surfactant-laden drop jellyfish-breakup mode induced by the Marangoni effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hui; Zhang, Wen-Bin; Xu, Jian-Liang; Li, Wei-Feng; Liu, Hai-Feng

    2017-03-01

    Drop breakup is a familiar event in both nature and technology. In this study, we find that the bag breakup mode can be replaced by a new breakup mode: jellyfish breakup, when the surfactant concentration of a surfactant-laden drop is high. This new breakup mode has a morphology resembling a jellyfish with many long tentacles. This is due to the inhomogeneous distribution of surfactant in the process of drop deformation and breakup. The thin film of liquid can remain stable as a result of the Marangoni effect. Finally, we propose that the dimensionless surfactant concentration can serve as a criterion for breakup mechanisms.

  16. Analytical Description of the Breakup of Liquid Jets in Air

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-07-01

    Papageorgiou and Orellana (1993), referred to as PO, to describe breakup of jets of one fluid into another with different density, with or without...as a small parameter. As noted by Papageorgiou and Orellana , such an ansatz can be applied to flows which have initial conditions characterized by a...formation in capillary jet breakup. Phys. Fluids A, 2, 1141-1144. " Papageorgiou, D.T. and Orellana , 0. 1993 Pinching solutions of slender

  17. Aggregate breakup in a contracting nozzle.

    PubMed

    Soos, Miroslav; Ehrl, Lyonel; Bäbler, Matthäus U; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2010-01-05

    The breakup of dense aggregates in an extensional flow was investigated experimentally. The flow was realized by pumping the suspension containing the aggregates through a contracting nozzle. Variation of the cluster mass distribution during the breakage process was measured by small-angle light scattering. Because of the large size of primary particles and the dense aggregate structure image analysis was used to determine the shape and structure of the produced fragments. It was found, that neither aggregate structure, characterized by a fractal dimension d(f) = 2.7, nor shape, characterized by an average aspect ratio equal to 1.5, was affected by breakage. Several passes through the nozzle were required to reach the steady state. This is explained by the radial variation of the hydrodynamic stresses at the nozzle entrance, characterized through computational fluid dynamics, which implies that only the fraction of aggregates whose strength is smaller than the local hydrodynamic stress is broken during one pass through the nozzle. Scaling of the steady-state aggregate size as a function of the hydrodynamic stress was used to determine the aggregate strength.

  18. On the Eddy Break-Up coefficient

    SciTech Connect

    Brizuela, E.A.; Bilger, R.W.

    1996-01-01

    Advanced combustion models for turbulent reactive flow are still not at a stage where they are useful for engineering calculations of practical systems such as gas turbine combustors. State-of-the-art methods still use the Eddy Break-Up (EBU) model to give the fast chemistry limit to the reaction rate with a global kinetics formula being used to estimate the kinetically limited rates. While there must continue to be basic reservations about the general correctness of the EBU approach, it has recently been shown that the EBU limit does have a basis in theory for the nonpremixed case. The theoretical result of Bilger for the mixing-limited reaction rate shows that it is proportional to the probability density of the mixture being at stoichiometric. The EBU model, however, takes it as being proportional to the mass fraction of the deficient reactant, but this is in turn a property of the mixture fraction pdf (probability density function) under fast chemistry conditions. The theoretical result can be used to evaluate the correct value of the EBU coefficient, which is usually taken as a constant but with quite widely varying values. In this paper the authors evaluate this theoretical value for the EBU coefficient using two commonly adopted forms of the pdf. Recommendations are made with regard to the best values to use in practice.

  19. Timing and geometry of early Gondwana breakup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jokat, Wilfried; Boebel, Tobias; KöNig, Matthias; Meyer, Uwe

    2003-09-01

    The Mesozoic opening history of the Southern Ocean between South America, Africa, and Antarctica is one of the largest gaps in knowledge on the evolution of this region. Competing geodynamic models were published during the last two decades to explain the geophysical and geological observations. Here we report on aeromagnetic data collected along the East Antarctic coast during five seasons. These data provide new constraints on the timing and geometry of the early Gondwana breakup. In the Riiser-Larsen Sea/Mozambique Basin, the first oceanic crust between Africa and Antarctica formed around 155 Ma. In the west the Weddell Rift propagated from west to east with a velocity of 63 km/Myr between chrons M19N and M17N. At chron M14N, South America and Africa finally were split off the Antarctic continent. Stretching in the area of the South Atlantic started at the latest from 155 Myr onward. The different spreading velocities and directions of South America and Africa created at chron M9N the first oceanic crust in the South Atlantic. A new model indicates that the Karoo and Dronning Maud Land magmatism occurred well before any new ocean floor was created and therefore the first formation of new oceanic crust cannot directly be related to a plume interaction.

  20. Capillary breakup of armored liquid filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Jun; Lin, Fangye; Ji, Chen

    2017-06-01

    An armored liquid filament is a liquid column wherein particles reside on the liquid-air interface rather than in the bulk of the filament, as is true of a suspension filament. Herein, the capillary breakup of armored liquid filaments is studied using a high-speed camera, where the thinning process can be divided into three stages: the armored liquid stage, the transition stage, and the liquid stage. At the armored liquid stage, the thinning is approximately uniform along the filament. In the transition stage, local deformation occurs and thinning is accelerated owing to the large curvature along the filament. Finally, at the liquid stage, the thinning behavior is similar to that of particle-free filaments. The main focus in the present work is on the armored liquid stage, wherein the volume density of particles in the liquid filament remains nearly constant. In addition, the relative distances between particles in the axial direction on the filament do not change at this stage. By defining an effective surface tension γeff, a model is established to estimate the neck thinning process at this stage.

  1. An integrated approach for risk object re-entry predictions in terms of KS elements and genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, R. K.; Anil Kumar, A. K.; Xavier James Raj, M.

    The accurate estimation of the orbital lifetime of decaying near-Earth objects is of considerable importance for prediction of risk object re-entry time and proper planning of mitigation strategies and hazard assessment. It has become necessary to use extremely complex force models to match with the present operational requirements and observational techniques. The problem becomes all the more complicated in the near-Earth environment due to the fact that the object is influenced by the non-spherical effects of the Earth's gravitational field as well as the dissipative effects of the Earth's atmosphere. The database available for the re-entry time or orbital lifetime prediction of the debris objects is based on the set of Two Line Elements (TLEs) provided by the agencies like NORAD. These TLEs provide information regarding the orbital parameters together with rate of mean motion decay and an equivalent ballistic coefficient B*. The objects physical parameters like mass, area of cross section, shape and dimensions are not available accurately and the modelling of the atmosphere in which objects decay takes place is also uncertain. Besides, the tumbling effect of the body and gas molecular interaction, further makes the prediction of re-entry time a very complicated exercise. The method of the K-S total-energy element equations (Stiefel & Scheifele 1971) is a powerful method for numerical solution with respect to any type of perturbing forces, as the equations are less sensitive to round-off and truncation errors in the numerical algorithm. The equations are everywhere regular in contrast with the classical Newtonian equations, which are singular at the collision of the two bodies. The equations are smoothed for eccentric orbits because eccentric anomaly is the independent variable. Genetic Algorithms (Deb 1995) has received a great deal of attention regarding their potential as an optimisation technique for complex functions. This paper highlights the implementation

  2. Linking collisional and accretionary orogens during Rodinia assembly and breakup: Implications for models of supercontinent cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cawood, Peter A.; Strachan, Robin A.; Pisarevsky, Sergei A.; Gladkochub, Dmitry P.; Murphy, J. Brendan

    2016-09-01

    Periodic assembly and dispersal of continental fragments has been a characteristic of the solid Earth for much of its history. Geodynamic drivers of this cyclic activity are inferred to be either top-down processes related to near surface lithospheric stresses at plate boundaries or bottom-up processes related to mantle convection and, in particular, mantle plumes, or some combination of the two. Analysis of the geological history of Rodinian crustal blocks suggests that internal rifting and breakup of the supercontinent were linked to the initiation of subduction and development of accretionary orogens around its periphery. Thus, breakup was a top-down instigated process. The locus of convergence was initially around north-eastern and northern Laurentia in the early Neoproterozoic before extending to outboard of Amazonia and Africa, including Avalonia-Cadomia, and arcs outboard of Siberia and eastern to northern Baltica in the mid-Neoproterozoic (∼760 Ma). The duration of subduction around the periphery of Rodinia coincides with the interval of lithospheric extension within the supercontinent, including the opening of the proto-Pacific at ca. 760 Ma and the commencement of rifting in east Laurentia. Final development of passive margin successions around Laurentia, Baltica and Siberia was not completed until the late Neoproterozoic to early Paleozoic (ca. 570-530 Ma), which corresponds with the termination of convergent plate interactions that gave rise to Gondwana and the consequent relocation of subduction zones to the periphery of this supercontinent. The temporal link between external subduction and internal extension suggests that breakup was initiated by a top-down process driven by accretionary tectonics along the periphery of the supercontinent. Plume-related magmatism may be present at specific times and in specific places during breakup but is not the prime driving force. Comparison of the Rodinia record of continental assembly and dispersal with that

  3. Multiphase simulation of liquid jet breakup using smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourabdian, Majid; Omidvar, Pourya; Morad, Mohammad Reza

    This paper deals with numerical modeling of two-phase liquid jet breakup using the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method. Simulation of multiphase flows involving fluids with a high-density ratio causes large pressure gradients at the interface and subsequently divergence of numerical solutions. A modified procedure extended by Monaghan and Rafiee is employed to stabilize the sharp interface between the fluids. Various test cases such as Rayleigh-Taylor instability, two-phase still water and air bubble rising in water have been conducted, by which the capability of accurately capturing the physics of multiphase flows is verified. The results of these simulations are in a good agreement with analytical and previous numerical solutions. Finally, the simulation of the breakup process of liquid jet into surrounding air is accomplished. The whole numerical solutions are accomplished for both Wendland and cubic spline kernel functions and Wendland kernel function gave more accurate results. Length of liquid breakup in Rayleigh regime is calculated for various flow conditions such as different Reynolds and Weber numbers. The results of breakup length demonstrate in satisfactory agreement with the experimental correlation. Finally, impinging distance and breakup length of a simple multijet setup are analyzed. The two-jet multijet has a longer breakup length than a three-jet one.

  4. Coulomb and nuclear effects in breakup and reaction cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Descouvemont, P.; Canto, L. F.; Hussein, M. S.

    2017-01-01

    We use a three-body continuum discretized coupled channel (CDCC) model to investigate Coulomb and nuclear effects in breakup and reaction cross sections. The breakup of the projectile is simulated by a finite number of square integrable wave functions. First we show that the scattering matrices can be split in a nuclear term and in a Coulomb term. This decomposition is based on the Lippmann-Schwinger equation and requires the scattering wave functions. We present two different methods to separate both effects. Then, we apply this separation to breakup and reaction cross sections of 7Li+208Pb . For breakup, we investigate various aspects, such as the role of the α +t continuum, the angular-momentum distribution, and the balance between Coulomb and nuclear effects. We show that there is a large ambiguity in defining the Coulomb and nuclear breakup cross sections, since both techniques, although providing the same total breakup cross sections, strongly differ for the individual components. We suggest a third method which could be efficiently used to address convergence problems at large angular momentum. For reaction cross sections, interference effects are smaller, and the nuclear contribution is dominant above the Coulomb barrier. We also draw attention to different definitions of the reaction cross section which exist in the literature and which may induce small, but significant, differences in the numerical values.

  5. Breakup of rivulet falling over an inclined plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Rajesh; Galvin, Janine

    2016-11-01

    The multiscale modeling of solvent absorption in a structured packing is a complex problem. The local hydrodynamics in the packing, specifically existing flow regimes, is a key factor for overall efficiency. A single packing unit is made of corrugated sheets arranged perpendicularly to each other. In this effort, breakup of rivulet over an inclined plate is examined, which might be helpful to explain some fundamental aspects of this system. Rivulet breakup is a complex phenomenon dictated by many factors such as solvent physical properties, contact angle (γ) , inertia, plate inclination angle (θ) , etc. The multiphase flow simulations using the volume of fluid method were conducted considering these factors. Decreasing solvent flow rate results in the transition of flow regimes from a film to a rivulet and then to a droplet. Demarcation between a stable and an unstable flow regime that leads to breakup is presented in terms of the critical Weber number (Wecr) . Values of Weber number below Wecr correspond to breakup behavior and above to a stable rivulet. The impact of solvent properties is presented by the Kapitza number (Ka), which only depends on fluid properties. Variation of Wecr with Ka shows two trends depending on the Ka value of the solvent. Solvents with low Ka show a linear variation of Wecr with Ka whereas those with high Ka show a quadratic variation. The effect of plate inclination on the rivulet breakup reveals that Wecr decreases with increased θ value. In addition, higher values of γ promote breakup.

  6. The breakup of (16)O and its astrophysical implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryan, Diane Carol

    1998-07-01

    The feasibility of using the breakup of 16O to obtain information about the 12C(/alpha,/gamma)16O radiative capture reaction has been studied in a series of experiments performed at the Nuclear Structure Research Laboratory at the University of Rochester. The 16O breakup fragments-12C and 4He-were identified using a new focal-plane detector capable of identifying these fragments down to a relative energy of 50 keV. The relative energy spectra obtained from 16O breakup on a 58Ni target are dominated by sequential breakup from 9.85 MeV, and 10.36 MeV excited states in 16O. There is also some evidence of breakup at relative energies below 1 MeV. Interpretation of this low energy yield in terms of E2 Coulomb excitation leads to a value of SE2=346 keV b at Erel=0.828 MeV after making a correction for the contribution due to nuclear breakup. This suggests that the rate of the 12C(/alpha,/gamma)16O reaction at astrophysical energies is much higher than is presently accepted, which would have an enormous impact on stellar nucleosynthesis.

  7. Casualty Risk Assessment Controlled Re-Entry of EPS - Ariane 5ES - ATV Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnal, M.-H.; Laine, N.; Aussilhou, C.

    2012-01-01

    To fulfil its mission of compliance check to the French Space Operations Act, CNES has developed ELECTRA© tool in order to estimate casualty risk induced by a space activity (like rocket launch, controlled or un-controlled re-entry on Earth of a space object). This article describes the application of such a tool for the EPS controlled re-entry during the second Ariane 5E/S flight (Johannes Kepler mission has been launched in February 2011). EPS is the Ariane 5E/S upper composite which is de-orbited from a 260 km circular orbit after its main mission (release of the Automated Transfer Vehicle - ATV). After a brief description of the launcher, the ATV-mission and a description of all the failure cases taken into account in the mission design (which leads to "back-up scenarios" into the flight software program), the article will describe the steps which lead to the casualty risk assessment (in case of failure) with ELECTRA©. In particular, the presence on board of two propulsive means of de-orbiting (main engine of EPS, and 4 ACS longitudinal nozzles in case of main engine failure or exhaustion) leads to a low remaining casualty risk.

  8. Near-Optimal Re-Entry Trajectories for Reusable Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, H.-C.; Ardema, M. D.; Bowles, J. V.

    1997-01-01

    A near-optimal guidance law for the descent trajectory for earth orbit re-entry of a fully reusable single-stage-to-orbit pure rocket launch vehicle is derived. A methodology is developed to investigate using both bank angle and altitude as control variables and selecting parameters that maximize various performance functions. The method is based on the energy-state model of the aircraft equations of motion. The major task of this paper is to obtain optimal re-entry trajectories under a variety of performance goals: minimum time, minimum surface temperature, minimum heating, and maximum heading change; four classes of trajectories were investigated: no banking, optimal left turn banking, optimal right turn banking, and optimal bank chattering. The cost function is in general a weighted sum of all performance goals. In particular, the trade-off between minimizing heat load into the vehicle and maximizing cross range distance is investigated. The results show that the optimization methodology can be used to derive a wide variety of near-optimal trajectories.

  9. Predictions of cardiovascular responses during STS reentry using mathematical models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, J. I.; Srinivasan, R.

    1985-01-01

    The physiological adaptation to weightless exposure includes cardiovascular deconditioning arising in part from a loss of total circulating blood volume and resulting in a reduction of orthostatic tolerance. The crew of the Shuttle orbiter are less tolerant to acceleration forces in the head-to-foot direction during the reentry phase of the flight at a time they must function at a high level of performance. The factors that contribute to orthostatic intolerance during and following reentry and to predict the likelihood of impaired crew performance are evaluated. A computer simulation approach employing a mathematical model of the cardiovascular system is employed. It is shown that depending on the severity of blood volume loss, the reentry acceleration stress may be detrimental to physiologic function and may place the physiologic status of the crew near the borderline of some type of impairment. They are in agreement with conclusions from early ground-based experiments and from observations of early Shuttle flights.

  10. Re-Entry Predictions for Uncontrolled Satellites: Results and Challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardini, Carmen; Anselmo, Luciano

    2013-09-01

    Currently, approximately 70% of the re-entries of intact orbital objects are uncontrolled, corresponding to about 50% of the returning mass, i.e. ˜100 metric tons per year. On average, there is one spacecraft or rocket body uncontrolled re-entry every week, with an average mass around 2000 kg. Even though a detailed demise analysis is available only occasionally, in many cases the alert casualty expectancy threshold of 1:10,000 is probably violated.Re-entry predictions are affected by various sources of inevitable uncertainty and, in spite of decades of efforts, mean relative errors of 20% often occur. This means that even predictions issued 3 hours before re-entry may be affected by an along-track uncertainty of 40,000 km (corresponding to one orbital path), possibly halved during the last hour. However, specific methods and procedures have been developed to provide understandable and unambiguous information useful for civil protection planning and applications.

  11. Emittance of TD-NiCr after simulated reentry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, R. K.; Dicus, D. L.; Lisagor, W. B.

    1978-01-01

    The effects of simulated reentry heating on the emittance of TD-NiCr were investigated. Groups of specimens with three different preconditioning treatments were exposed to 6, 24, and 30 half-hour simulated reentry exposure cycles in a supersonic arc tunnel at each of three conditions intended to produce surface temperatures of 1255, 1365, and 1475 K. Emittance was determined at 1300 K on specimens which were preconditioned only and specimens after completion of reentry simulation exposure. Oxide morphology and chemistry were studied by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. A consistent relationship was established between oxide morphology and total normal emittance. Specimens with coarser textured oxides tended to have lower emittances than specimens with finer textured oxides.

  12. Pesticides re-entry dermal exposure of workers in greenhouses.

    PubMed

    Caffarelli, V; Conte, E; Correnti, A; Gatti, R; Musmeci, F; Morali, G; Spagnoli, G; Tranfo, G; Triolo, L; Vita, M; Zappa, G

    2004-01-01

    This research has the aim to evaluate the risk of pesticide dermal exposure for workers in greenhouses. We considered the following crops: tomato, cucumber and strawberry, largely spread in Bracciano lake district. The pesticides monitored were: tetradifon on strawberry: metalaxyl, azoxystrobin and fenarimol on cucumber; acrinathrin, azoxystrobin and chlorpyrifos ethyl on tomato. The dermal exposure was evaluated by Dislodgeable Foliar Residue (DFR) measurements employing transfer coefficients got from literature. For risk evaluation, we have compared the dermal exposures with Acceptable Operator Exposure Levels (AOEL). The re-entry time were obtained intercepting the dose decay curves with AOEL values. The re-entry times result higher than two days in the cases of chlorpyrifos on tomato (re-entry time: 3 days), azoxystrobin on tomato (4 days), and tetradifon on strawberry (8 days). The need of measuring specific transfer coefficients is pointed out.

  13. Maternal distress and women's reentry into family and community life.

    PubMed

    Arditti, Joyce; Few, April

    2008-09-01

    This paper advances conceptualization of maternal distress following incarceration. We utilized a multiple case study methodology based on interviews with 10 mothers who demonstrated various permutations of "the triple threat" (depression, domestic violence, and substance abuse; Arditti & Few, 2006). Findings suggest that depressive symptomology persisted and worsened for mothers in our study and that maternal distress was indicative not only of women's psychological state, but also a relational and situational construct that embodied women's core experience. Maternal distress was largely characterized by health challenges, dysfunctional intimate relationships, loss related trauma, guilt and worry over children, and economic inadequacy. Further, maternal distress seemed to be intensified by the punitive traumatic context of prison and lessened by rehabilitation opportunities as well as support by kin and probation officers after reentry. Recommendations for clinicians and professionals who work with reentry mothers center around the need to alleviate maternal distress and better address women's emotional and physical health needs during incarceration and reentry.

  14. Radiation and Ablation Cooling for Manned Reentry Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, L.

    1960-01-01

    The necessity of reducing heat transfer to reentry vehicles has led I to the consideration of both radiative and ablation shields. The paper reviews briefly the heating problems for manned vehicles and the means whereby ablation and radiation afford thermal protection. The principal energy disposal and weight parameters are then presented and their relation to the vehicle and trajectory parameters is discussed. A comparative analysis of three types of ablation shield is made and broad conclusions are drawn as to the type of shield most appropriate to manned reentry vehicles.

  15. Missile Aerodynamics for Ascent and Re-entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, Gaines L.; McCarter, James W.

    2012-01-01

    Aerodynamic force and moment equations are developed for 6-DOF missile simulations of both the ascent phase of flight and a tumbling re-entry. The missile coordinate frame (M frame) and a frame parallel to the M frame were used for formulating the aerodynamic equations. The missile configuration chosen as an example is a cylinder with fixed fins and a nose cone. The equations include both the static aerodynamic coefficients and the aerodynamic damping derivatives. The inclusion of aerodynamic damping is essential for simulating a tumbling re-entry. Appended information provides insight into aerodynamic damping.

  16. Vehicle/payload interface specification for the reusable reentry satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This document describes the common interface requirements between the Vehicle Segment and the Payload Segment of the Reusable Reentry Satellite (RRS) system. The system consists of a single transport vehicle design that provides a uniform, unidirectional payload gravitational environment which is selectable during on-orbit operations over the range of 10(exp -5) (microgravity) to 1.5 g's. The initial Reusable Reentry Vehicle/Payload Module (RRV/PM) integration and checkout will occur at the launch base unless otherwise agreed to in a mission-unique addendum to this specification. Pre-integration interface qualification shall be done using emulators as described.

  17. Aerothermodynamic performance and thermal protection design for blunt re-entry bodies at L/D = 0.3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caram, Jose M.; Kowal, T. J.

    1993-01-01

    Aerodynamic heating and thermal protection design analyses were performed for three blunt re-entry bodies at an L/D = 0.3 returning from low earth orbit. These configurations consisted of a scaled up Apollo command module, a Viking re-entry vehicle, and an Aeroassist Flight Experiment (AFE) aerobrake, each with a maximum diameter of 4.42 m. The aerothermodynamic analysis determined the equilibrium stagnation point heating rate and heat load for nominal and 3-sigma re-entry trajectories and the distribution of heating along the pitch and yaw planes for each of the vehicles at the time of highest heat flux. Using the predicted heating rates and heating distributions, a Thermal Protection System (TPS) design with flight certified materials was tailored for each of the configurations. Results indicated that the heating to the corner of the Viking aeroshell would exceed current limits of reusable tile material. Also, the maximum heating for the AFE would be 15 percent greater than the maximum heating for the Apollo flying the same trajectory. TPS designs showed no significant advantage in TPS weight between the different vehicles; however, heat-shield areal density comparisons showed the Apollo configuration to be the most efficient in terms of TPS weight.

  18. Orbit, reentry, and landing attachment for globes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritchard, E. B.

    1970-01-01

    Navigational device, invented to aid recovery of spacecraft from any orbit, also illustrates motions of satellites relative to earth and their entry-ranging requirements. Device rapidly and accurately defines lateral range requirements for spacecraft returning to any desired site without manual or computerized calculation of orbital equations of motion.

  19. Modeling of Turbulence Effects on Liquid Jet Atomization and Breakup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, Huu; Chen, C. P.

    2004-01-01

    Recent experimental investigations and physical modeling studies have indicated that turbulence behaviors within a liquid jet have considerable effects on the atomization process. For certain flow regimes, it has been observed that the liquid jet surface is highly turbulent. This turbulence characteristic plays a key role on the breakup of the liquid jet near to the injector exit. Other experiments also showed that the breakup length of the liquid core is sharply shortened as the liquid jet is changed from the laminar to the turbulent flow conditions. In the numerical and physical modeling arena, most of commonly used atomization models do not include the turbulence effect. Limited attempts have been made in modeling the turbulence phenomena on the liquid jet disintegration. The subject correlation and models treat the turbulence either as an only source or a primary driver in the breakup process. This study aims to model the turbulence effect in the atomization process of a cylindrical liquid jet. In the course of this study, two widely used models, Reitz's primary atomization (blob) and Taylor-Analogy-Break (TAB) secondary droplet breakup by O Rourke et al. are examined. Additional terms are derived and implemented appropriately into these two models to account for the turbulence effect on the atomization process. Since this enhancement effort is based on a framework of the two existing atomization models, it is appropriate to denote the two present models as T-blob and T-TAB for the primary and secondary atomization predictions, respectively. In the primary breakup model, the level of the turbulence effect on the liquid breakup depends on the characteristic time scales and the initial flow conditions. This treatment offers a balance of contributions of individual physical phenomena on the liquid breakup process. For the secondary breakup, an addition turbulence force acted on parent drops is modeled and integrated into the TAB governing equation. The drop size

  20. Simulation for Prediction of Entry Article Demise (SPEAD): an Analysis Tool for Spacecraft Safety Analysis and Ascent/Reentry Risk Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ling, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    For the purpose of performing safety analysis and risk assessment for a probable offnominal suborbital/orbital atmospheric reentry resulting in vehicle breakup, a synthesis of trajectory propagation coupled with thermal analysis and the evaluation of node failure is required to predict the sequence of events, the timeline, and the progressive demise of spacecraft components. To provide this capability, the Simulation for Prediction of Entry Article Demise (SPEAD) analysis tool was developed. This report discusses the capabilities, modeling, and validation of the SPEAD analysis tool. SPEAD is applicable for Earth or Mars, with the option for 3 or 6 degrees-of-freedom (DOF) trajectory propagation. The atmosphere and aerodynamics data are supplied in tables, for linear interpolation of up to 4 independent variables. The gravitation model can include up to 20 zonal harmonic coefficients. The modeling of a single motor is available and can be adapted to multiple motors. For thermal analysis, the aerodynamic radiative and free-molecular/continuum convective heating, black-body radiative cooling, conductive heat transfer between adjacent nodes, and node ablation are modeled. In a 6- DOF simulation, the local convective heating on a node is a function of Mach, angle-ofattack, and sideslip angle, and is dependent on 1) the location of the node in the spacecraft and its orientation to the flow modeled by an exposure factor, and 2) the geometries of the spacecraft and the node modeled by a heating factor and convective area. Node failure is evaluated using criteria based on melting temperature, reference heat load, g-load, or a combination of the above. The failure of a liquid propellant tank is evaluated based on burnout flux from nucleate boiling or excess internal pressure. Following a component failure, updates are made as needed to the spacecraft mass and aerodynamic properties, nodal exposure and heating factors, and nodal convective and conductive areas. This allows

  1. From the Classroom to the Community: Exploring the Role of Education during Incarceration and Reentry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brazzell, Diana; Crayton, Anna; Mukamal, Debbie A.; Solomon, Amy L.; Lindahl, Nicole

    2009-01-01

    Recognizing the pressing need to explore the issues surrounding education, incarceration, and reentry, the Prisoner Reentry Institute at John Jay College of Criminal Justice and the Urban Institute hosted the Reentry Roundtable on Education on March 31 and April 1, 2008, at John Jay College of Criminal Justice in New York City. The two-day…

  2. Adapting to Bad News: Lessons from the Harlem Parole Reentry Court

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Zachary K.

    2011-01-01

    The reentry court model was created to address the risks and needs of offenders returning to the community during the period immediately following release. While there is growing interest in reentry courts, research to date has been limited. This study utilized a quasi-experimental design, comparing reentry court participants with traditional…

  3. Adapting to Bad News: Lessons from the Harlem Parole Reentry Court

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Zachary K.

    2011-01-01

    The reentry court model was created to address the risks and needs of offenders returning to the community during the period immediately following release. While there is growing interest in reentry courts, research to date has been limited. This study utilized a quasi-experimental design, comparing reentry court participants with traditional…

  4. Exploring Inmate Reentry in a Local Jail Setting: Implications for Outreach, Service Use, and Recidivism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Michael D.; Saunders, Jessica; Fisher, Christopher; Mellow, Jeff

    2012-01-01

    Although prisoner reentry has taken center stage in correctional research and policy discussions, there has been little emphasis on reentry among jail populations. This paper examines a jail-based reentry program in New York City that begins while individuals are incarcerated and includes 90 days of postrelease services. This article explores…

  5. Physics-Based Modeling of Meteor Entry and Breakup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prabhu, Dinesh K.; Agrawal, Parul; Allen, Gary A., Jr.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Brandis, Aaron M.; Chen, Yih-Kanq; Jaffe, Richard L.; Palmer, Grant E.; Saunders, David A.; Stern, Eric C.; hide

    2015-01-01

    A new research effort at NASA Ames Research Center has been initiated in Planetary Defense, which integrates the disciplines of planetary science, atmospheric entry physics, and physics-based risk assessment. This paper describes work within the new program and is focused on meteor entry and breakup. Over the last six decades significant effort was expended in the US and in Europe to understand meteor entry including ablation, fragmentation and airburst (if any) for various types of meteors ranging from stony to iron spectral types. These efforts have produced primarily empirical mathematical models based on observations. Weaknesses of these models, apart from their empiricism, are reliance on idealized shapes (spheres, cylinders, etc.) and simplified models for thermal response of meteoritic materials to aerodynamic and radiative heating. Furthermore, the fragmentation and energy release of meteors (airburst) is poorly understood. On the other hand, flight of human-made atmospheric entry capsules is well understood. The capsules and their requisite heat shields are designed and margined to survive entry. However, the highest speed Earth entry for capsules is 13 kms (Stardust). Furthermore, Earth entry capsules have never exceeded diameters of 5 m, nor have their peak aerothermal environments exceeded 0.3 atm and 1 kWcm2. The aims of the current work are: (i) to define the aerothermal environments for objects with entry velocities from 13 to 20 kms; (ii) to explore various hypotheses of fragmentation and airburst of stony meteors in the near term; (iii) to explore the possibility of performing relevant ground-based tests to verify candidate hypotheses; and (iv) to quantify the energy released in airbursts. The results of the new simulations will be used to anchor said risk assessment analyses.With these aims in mind, state-of-the-art entry capsule design tools are being extended for meteor entries. We describe: (i) applications of current simulation tools to

  6. Physics-Based Modeling of Meteor Entry and Breakup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prabhu, Dinesh K.; Agrawal, Parul; Allen, Gary A.; Brandis, Aaron M.; Chen, Yih-Kanq; Jaffe, Richard L.; Saunders, David A.; Stern, Eric C.; Tauber, Michael E.; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj

    2015-01-01

    A new research effort at NASA Ames Research Center has been initiated in Planetary Defense, which integrates the disciplines of planetary science, atmospheric entry physics, and physics-based risk assessment. This paper describes work within the new program and is focused on meteor entry and breakup. Over the last six decades significant effort was expended in the US and in Europe to understand meteor entry including ablation, fragmentation and airburst (if any) for various types of meteors ranging from stony to iron spectral types. These efforts have produced primarily empirical mathematical models based on observations. Weaknesses of these models, apart from their empiricism, are reliance on idealized shapes (spheres, cylinders, etc.) and simplified models for thermal response of meteoritic materials to aerodynamic and radiative heating. Furthermore, the fragmentation and energy release of meteors (airburst) is poorly understood. On the other hand, flight of human-made atmospheric entry capsules is well understood. The capsules and their requisite heatshields are designed and margined to survive entry. However, the highest speed Earth entry for capsules is less than 13 km/s (Stardust). Furthermore, Earth entry capsules have never exceeded diameters of 5 m, nor have their peak aerothermal environments exceeded 0.3 atm and 1 kW/cm2. The aims of the current work are: (i) to define the aerothermal environments for objects with entry velocities from 13 to greater than 20 km/s; (ii) to explore various hypotheses of fragmentation and airburst of stony meteors in the near term; (iii) to explore the possibility of performing relevant ground-based tests to verify candidate hypotheses; and (iv) to quantify the energy released in airbursts. The results of the new simulations will be used to anchor said risk assessment analyses. With these aims in mind, state-of-the-art entry capsule design tools are being extended for meteor entries. We describe: (i) applications of current

  7. Physics-Based Modeling of Meteor Entry and Breakup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prabhu, Dinesh K.; Agrawal, Parul; Allen, Gary A., Jr.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Brandis, Aaron M.; Chen, Yih-Kang; Jaffe, Richard L.; Palmer, Grant E.; Saunders, David A.; Stern, Eric C.; hide

    2015-01-01

    A new research effort at NASA Ames Research Center has been initiated in Planetary Defense, which integrates the disciplines of planetary science, atmospheric entry physics, and physics-based risk assessment. This paper describes work within the new program and is focused on meteor entry and breakup.Over the last six decades significant effort was expended in the US and in Europe to understand meteor entry including ablation, fragmentation and airburst (if any) for various types of meteors ranging from stony to iron spectral types. These efforts have produced primarily empirical mathematical models based on observations. Weaknesses of these models, apart from their empiricism, are reliance on idealized shapes (spheres, cylinders, etc.) and simplified models for thermal response of meteoritic materials to aerodynamic and radiative heating. Furthermore, the fragmentation and energy release of meteors (airburst) is poorly understood.On the other hand, flight of human-made atmospheric entry capsules is well understood. The capsules and their requisite heatshields are designed and margined to survive entry. However, the highest speed Earth entry for capsules is 13 kms (Stardust). Furthermore, Earth entry capsules have never exceeded diameters of 5 m, nor have their peak aerothermal environments exceeded 0.3 atm and 1 kW/sq cm. The aims of the current work are: (i) to define the aerothermal environments for objects with entry velocities from 13 to 20 kms; (ii) to explore various hypotheses of fragmentation and airburst of stony meteors in the near term; (iii) to explore the possibility of performing relevant ground-based tests to verify candidate hypotheses; and (iv) to quantify the energy released in airbursts. The results of the new simulations will be used to anchor said risk assessment analyses. With these aims in mind, state-of-the-art entry capsule design tools are being extended for meteor entries. We describe: (i) applications of current simulation tools to

  8. Tear breakup dynamics: a technique for quantifying tear film instability.

    PubMed

    Begley, Carolyn G; Himebaugh, Nikole; Renner, Debra; Liu, Haixia; Chalmers, Robin; Simpson, Trefford; Varikooty, Jalaiah

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a novel, quantitative measurement of tear film breakup dynamics (TBUD) to study the phenomenon of tear breakup in dry eye and control subjects and its impact on dry eye symptoms. Ten control and 10 dry eye subjects completed the Dry Eye (DEQ) and other questionnaires. After the instillation of sodium fluorescein, subjects kept the tested eye open for as long as possible, similar to a staring contest, while tear film breakup was videotaped (S-TBUD). The maximum blink interval (MBI) and tear breakup time (TBUT) were measured from digital movies by a masked observer. Individual frames of movies were converted to gray-scale images, maps of relative tear film fluorescence were generated, and the total area of tear breakup (AB) of the exposed cornea was quantified. On average, dry eye subjects demonstrated a higher AB and shorter TBUT and MBI, but only the AB was significantly different (p = 0.023). Subjects most often used the descriptors stinging and burning to describe their sensations during staring trials. The AB showed a high correlation between eyes and with some DEQ symptom measures. These methods allow objective quantification and tracking of the phenomenon of tear breakup. Our results suggest that tear breakup stresses the corneal surface, resulting in stimulation of underlying nociceptors. The tear film of dry eye subjects was less stable than controls. They had a larger AB measured from the last video frame before MBI (i.e., just before blinking) than did controls. This perhaps reflects adaptation to the repeated stress of tear instability in dry eye.

  9. Breakup of Droplets in an Accelerating Gas Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickerson, R. A.; Coultas, T. A.

    1966-01-01

    A study of droplet breakup phenomena by an accelerating gas flow is described. The phenomena are similar to what propellant droplets experience when exposed to accelerating combustion gas flow in a rocket engine combustion zone. Groups of several dozen droplets in the 100-10 750-micron-diameter range were injected into a flowing inert gas in a transparent rectangular nozzle. Motion photography of the behavior of the droplets at various locations in the accelerating gas flow has supplied quantitative and qualitative data on the breakup phenomena which occur under conditions similar to those found in large rocket engine combustors. A blowgun injection device, used to inject very small amounts of liquid at velocities of several hundred feet per second into a moving gas stream, is described. The injection device was used to inject small amounts of liquid RP-1 and water into the gas stream at a velocity essentially equal to the gas velocity where the group of droplets was allowed to stabilize its formation in a constant area section before entering the convergent section of the transparent nozzle. Favorable comparison with the work of previous investigators who have used nonaccelerating gas flow is found with the data obtained from this study with accelerating gas flow. The criterion for the conditions of minimum severity required to produce shear-type droplet breakup in an accelerating gas flow is found to agree well with the criterion previously established at Rocketdyne for breakup in nonaccelerating flow. An extension of the theory of capillary surface wave effects during droplet breakup is also presented. Capillary surface waves propagating in the surface of the droplet, according to classical hydrodynamical laws, are considered. The waves propagate tangentially over the surface of the droplet from the forward stagnation point to the major diameter. Consideration of the effects of relative gas velocity on the amplitude growth of these waves allows conclusions to be

  10. Probabilistic analysis of the inadvertent reentry of the Cassini spacecraft's radioisotope thermoelectric generators.

    PubMed

    Frank, M V

    2000-04-01

    As part of the launch approval process, the Interagency Nuclear Safety Review Panel provides an independent safety assessment of space missions--such as the Cassini mission--that carry a significant amount of nuclear materials. This survey article describes potential accident scenarios that might lead to release of fuel from an accidental reentry during an Earth swingby maneuver, the probabilities of such scenarios, and their consequences. To illustrate the nature of calculations used in this area, examples are presented of probabilistic models to obtain both the probability of scenario events and the resultant source terms of such scenarios. Because of large extrapolations from the current knowledge base, the analysis emphasizes treatment of uncertainties.

  11. Gravity wave and tidal structures between 60 and 140 km inferred from space shuttle reentry data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritts, David C.; Wang, Ding-Yi; Blanchard, Robert C.

    1993-01-01

    This study presents an analysis of density measurements made using high-resolution accelerometers aboard several space shuttles at altitudes from 60 to 140 km during reentry into the earth's atmosphere. The observed density fluctuations are interpreted in terms of gravity waves and tides and provide evidence of the importance of such motions well into the thermosphere. Height profiles of fractional density variance reveal that wave amplitudes increase at a rate consistent with observations at lower levels up to about 90 km. The rate of amplitude growth decreases at greater heights, however, and appears to cease above about 110 km. Wave amplitudes are nevertheless large at these heights and suggest that gravity waves may play an important role in forcing of the lower thermosphere.

  12. Gravity wave and tidal structures between 60 and 140 km inferred from space shuttle reentry data

    SciTech Connect

    Fritts, D.C. ); Dingyi Wang ); Blanchard, R.C. )

    1993-03-15

    This study presents an analysis of density measurements made using high-resolution accelerometers aboard several space shuttles at altitudes from 60 to 140 km during reentry into the earth's atmosphere. The observed density fluctuations are interpreted in terms of gravity waves and tides and provide evidence of the importance of such motions well into the thermosphere. Height profiles of fractional density variance reveal that wave amplitudes increase at a rate consistent with observations at lower levels up to [approximately]90 km. The rate of amplitude growth decreases at greater heights, however, and appears to cease above [approximately]110 km. Wave amplitudes are nevertheless large at these heights and suggest that gravity waves may play an important role in forcing of the lower thermosphere.

  13. Gravity wave and tidal structures between 60 and 140 km inferred from space shuttle reentry data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritts, David C.; Wang, Ding-Yi; Blanchard, Robert C.

    1993-01-01

    This study presents an analysis of density measurements made using high-resolution accelerometers aboard several space shuttles at altitudes from 60 to 140 km during reentry into the earth's atmosphere. The observed density fluctuations are interpreted in terms of gravity waves and tides and provide evidence of the importance of such motions well into the thermosphere. Height profiles of fractional density variance reveal that wave amplitudes increase at a rate consistent with observations at lower levels up to about 90 km. The rate of amplitude growth decreases at greater heights, however, and appears to cease above about 110 km. Wave amplitudes are nevertheless large at these heights and suggest that gravity waves may play an important role in forcing of the lower thermosphere.

  14. A real-time digital computer program for the simulation of automatic spacecraft reentries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaylor, J. T.; Powell, L. F.; Powell, R. W.

    1977-01-01

    The automatic reentry flight dynamics simulator, a nonlinear, six-degree-of-freedom simulation, digital computer program, has been developed. The program includes a rotating, oblate earth model for accurate navigation calculations and contains adjustable gains on the aerodynamic stability and control parameters. This program uses a real-time simulation system and is designed to examine entries of vehicles which have constant mass properties whose attitudes are controlled by both aerodynamic surfaces and reaction control thrusters, and which have automatic guidance and control systems. The program has been used to study the space shuttle orbiter entry. This report includes descriptions of the equations of motion used, the control and guidance schemes that were implemented, the program flow and operation, and the hardware involved.

  15. Morphological classification of low viscosity drop bag breakup in a continuous air jet stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hui; Liu, Hai-Feng; Li, Wei-Feng; Xu, Jian-Liang

    2010-11-01

    To investigate the effect of Rayleigh-Taylor wave number in the region of maximum cross stream dimension (NRT) on drop breakup morphology, the breakup properties of accelerating low viscosity liquid drops (water and ethanol drops, diameter=1.2-6.6 mm, Weber number=10-80) were investigated using high-speed digital photography. The results of morphological analysis show a good correlation of the observed breakup type with NRT; bag breakup occurred when NRT was 1/√3 -1, bag-stamen breakup at 1-2, and dual-bag breakup at 2-3. The number of nodes in bag breakup, bag-stamen breakup, and dual-bag breakup all increased with Weber number. The experimental results are consistent with the model estimates and in good agreement with those reported in the literature.

  16. 40 CFR 161.390 - Reentry protection data requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... crop Nonfood Greenhouse Food crop Nonfood Forestry Domestic outdoor Indoor Test substance Data to... oncogenic effects or other adverse effects as evidenced by subchronic, chronic, and reproduction studies... could cause adverse effects on persons entering treated sites. In the last situation, reentry...

  17. Estimates of nitric oxide production for lifting spacecraft reentry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, C.

    1971-01-01

    The amount of nitric oxide which may be produced by heating of air during an atmospheric reentry of a lifting spacecraft is estimated by three different methods. Two assume nitrogen fixation by the process of sudden freezing, and the third is a computer calculation using chemical rate equations.

  18. STS-107 Debris Characterization Using Re-entry Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raiche, George A.

    2009-01-01

    Analysis of amateur video of the early reentry phases of the Columbia accident is discussed. With poor video quality and little theoretical guidance, the analysis team estimated mass and acceleration ranges for the debris shedding events observed in the video. Camera calibration and optical performance issues are also described.

  19. Astronauts McNair and Stewart prepare for reentry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Astronauts Ronald E. McNair and Robert L. Stewart prepare for the re-entry phase of the shuttle Challenger near the end of the 41-B mission. The are stationed behind the crew commander and pilot. Stewart is already wearing his helmet. McNair is stowing some of his gear.

  20. Development and Validation of Reentry Simulation Using MATLAB

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-01

    used in the planning for the Mars Airplane (Murray, 2001:3), the aerocapture simulation for the Titan Explorer Mission to the Saturnian system (Way...1980. 17. Way, David W., et al. Aerocapture Simulation and Performance for the Titan Explorer Mission. 2003-4951. American Institute of...DEVELOPMENT AND VALIDATION OF REENTRY SIMULATION USING MATLAB THESIS Robert E Jameson Jr

  1. Young Men's Reentry after Incarceration: A Developmental Paradox

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arditti, Joyce A.; Parkman, Tiffaney

    2011-01-01

    We apply a life course perspective to study young men's transition to adulthood within the context of their return to family after a period of incarceration. Our phenomenological analysis was based on 9 in-depth, semi-structured interviews with formerly incarcerated men between the age of 18 and 24. Our findings revealed that reentry was a…

  2. Reentry Issues upon Returning from Study Abroad Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wielkiewicz, Richard M.; Turkowski, Laura W.

    2010-01-01

    The impact of returning from studying abroad was surveyed in 669 college students. Students who studied abroad scored significantly higher on a Reentry Shock scale, reflecting skepticism toward U.S. culture, than those who did not. They were also more likely to consume alcohol. Study abroad had no detectable influence on students' romantic…

  3. Reusable Reentry Satellite (RRS): Thermal control trade study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, Clark

    1990-01-01

    The design and assessment work performed in defining the on-orbit Thermal Control Subsystem (TCS) requirements for the Reusable Reentry Satellite (RRS) is discussed. Specifically, it describes the hardware and design measures necessary for maintaining the Payload Module (PM) Environmental Control Life Support System (ECLSS) heat exchanger, the hydrazine propellant, and PM water supply within their required temperature limits.

  4. 29 CFR 4207.6 - Partial withdrawals after reentry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... LIABILITY FOR MULTIEMPLOYER PLANS REDUCTION OR WAIVER OF COMPLETE WITHDRAWAL LIABILITY § 4207.6 Partial... for a partial withdrawal occurring upon the employer's reentry before the plan sponsor has determined.... The plan sponsor shall determine whether there is a partial withdrawal described in section...

  5. Orbiter Gap Filler Bending Model for Re-entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Charles H.

    2007-01-01

    Pressure loads on a protruding gap filler during an Orbiter reentry are investigated to evaluate the likelihood of extraction due to pressure loads, and to ascertain how much bending will be induced by re-entry pressure loads. Oblique shock wave theory is utilized to develop a representation of the pressure loads induced on a gap filler for the ISSHVFW trajectory, representative of a heavy weight ISS return. A free body diagram is utilized to react the forces induced by the pressure forces. Preliminary results developed using these methods demonstrate that pressure loads, alone, are not likely causes of gap filler extraction during reentry. Assessment of the amount a gap filler will bend over is presented. Implications of gap filler bending during re-entry include possible mitigation of early boundary layer transition concerns, uncertainty in ground based measurement of protruding gap fillers from historical Orbiter flight history, and uncertainty in the use of Orbiter gap fillers for boundary layer prediction calibration. Authors will be added to the author list as appropriate.

  6. School Reentry for Children with Acquired Central Nervous Systems Injuries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carney, Joan; Porter, Patricia

    2009-01-01

    Onset of acquired central nervous system (CNS) injury during the normal developmental process of childhood can have impact on cognitive, behavioral, and motor function. This alteration of function often necessitates special education programming, modifications, and accommodations in the education setting for successful school reentry. Special…

  7. Calibration of Radar Based Re-Entry Predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemmens, S.; Bastida Virgili, B.; Flohrer, T.; Gini, F.; Krag, H.; Steiger, C.

    2015-03-01

    The availability of GPS observations via the telemetry during GOCE’s (Gravity Field and Steady-State Ocean Circulation Explorer) entire re-entry campaign enabled the generation of high quality orbit products which can be used as input to re-entry predictions. These high precision orbits can be used as reference to assess the quality of orbits generated from other sources. Here we verify the accuracy of orbits based on radar tracking data, obtained by dedicated observations with the Tracking & Imaging Radar system from the Fraunhofer High Frequency Physics and Radar Techniques institute, with respect to the a post-processed GPS based reference orbit. This leads to time-depended quantification of the orbit determination uncertainties on the re-entry predictions. Furthermore, the ballistic coefficient determined by the orbit determination and its time dependent evolution can be used to a priori estimate the attitude behaviour of GOCE, which can be compared to the telemetry. The attitude behaviour can be analysed by the use of inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR) images, also obtained by dedicated observation by TIRA. The effect of adding this knowledge on the attitude evolution to the re-entry predictions is evaluated.

  8. 14 CFR 431.55 - Payload reentry review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Payload reentry review. 431.55 Section 431.55 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... obligations of the United States. (b) The FAA consults with the Department of Defense to determine whether...

  9. Re-entry Women and Graduate School. Field Evaluation Draft.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher-Thompson, Jeanne

    Problems and barriers women often face when re-entering the educational system at the graduate level are identified, and ways in which institutions can be more responsive to the needs of re-entry students are suggested. A wide range of possible actions is included so that institutions can pursue those most appropriate to their individual…

  10. Study Abroad Reentry: Behavior, Affect, and Cultural Distance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Kelsey M.; Savicki, Victor

    2015-01-01

    Reentry has become a more focused aspect of study abroad in recent years as the field has moved away from a laissez-faire approach and toward an emphasis on intervention and support of study abroad students in their efforts to make sense of their experiences (Vande Berg, Paige & Lou, 2012). Although not a new concept (Brathurst & La Brack,…

  11. 14 CFR 431.59 - Issuance of payload reentry determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Issuance of payload reentry determination. 431.59 Section 431.59 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION... payload would adversely affect U.S. national security or foreign policy interests, would jeopardize...

  12. 14 CFR 431.55 - Payload reentry review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... issues adversely affecting U.S. foreign policy interests or international obligations. (d) The FAA... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Payload reentry review. 431.55 Section 431.55 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION,...

  13. 14 CFR 431.59 - Issuance of payload reentry determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Issuance of payload reentry determination. 431.59 Section 431.59 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION... payload would adversely affect U.S. national security or foreign policy interests, would jeopardize...

  14. 14 CFR 431.55 - Payload reentry review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... issues adversely affecting U.S. foreign policy interests or international obligations. (d) The FAA... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Payload reentry review. 431.55 Section 431.55 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION,...

  15. 14 CFR 431.55 - Payload reentry review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... issues adversely affecting U.S. foreign policy interests or international obligations. (d) The FAA... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Payload reentry review. 431.55 Section 431.55 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION,...

  16. 14 CFR 431.55 - Payload reentry review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... issues adversely affecting U.S. foreign policy interests or international obligations. (d) The FAA... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Payload reentry review. 431.55 Section 431.55 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION,...

  17. 14 CFR 431.59 - Issuance of payload reentry determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Issuance of payload reentry determination. 431.59 Section 431.59 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION... payload would adversely affect U.S. national security or foreign policy interests, would jeopardize...

  18. 14 CFR 431.59 - Issuance of payload reentry determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Issuance of payload reentry determination. 431.59 Section 431.59 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION... payload would adversely affect U.S. national security or foreign policy interests, would jeopardize...

  19. 14 CFR 431.59 - Issuance of payload reentry determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Issuance of payload reentry determination. 431.59 Section 431.59 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION... payload would adversely affect U.S. national security or foreign policy interests, would jeopardize...

  20. Reentry Issues upon Returning from Study Abroad Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wielkiewicz, Richard M.; Turkowski, Laura W.

    2010-01-01

    The impact of returning from studying abroad was surveyed in 669 college students. Students who studied abroad scored significantly higher on a Reentry Shock scale, reflecting skepticism toward U.S. culture, than those who did not. They were also more likely to consume alcohol. Study abroad had no detectable influence on students' romantic…

  1. Astronauts McNair and Stewart prepare for reentry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Astronauts Ronald E. McNair and Robert L. Stewart prepare for the re-entry phase of the shuttle Challenger near the end of the 41-B mission. The are stationed behind the crew commander and pilot. Stewart is already wearing his helmet. McNair is stowing some of his gear.

  2. Reusable Reentry Satellite (RRS): Thermal control trade study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Clark

    1990-04-01

    The design and assessment work performed in defining the on-orbit Thermal Control Subsystem (TCS) requirements for the Reusable Reentry Satellite (RRS) is discussed. Specifically, it describes the hardware and design measures necessary for maintaining the Payload Module (PM) Environmental Control Life Support System (ECLSS) heat exchanger, the hydrazine propellant, and PM water supply within their required temperature limits.

  3. The environment and materials for glide reentry vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deutsch, G. C.

    1973-01-01

    The environmental conditions to which a large glide reentry vehicle such as the space shuttle is subjected is discussed. A comparison is made with the state of the art for materials and structures to meet this environmental threat. The options that are available are stressed as are the areas where additional research and development is required.

  4. Sacramento City College Re-Entry Services Comprehensive Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Maureen E.; Smith, William A.

    Sacramento City College (SCC) established its Re-Entry Services program to provide information, referral and support services to students returning to the academic environment after an absence. Since the inception of the program in 1977, the college community has changed considerably. Among these changes are an aging student population, increased…

  5. School Reentry for Children with Acquired Central Nervous Systems Injuries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carney, Joan; Porter, Patricia

    2009-01-01

    Onset of acquired central nervous system (CNS) injury during the normal developmental process of childhood can have impact on cognitive, behavioral, and motor function. This alteration of function often necessitates special education programming, modifications, and accommodations in the education setting for successful school reentry. Special…

  6. 14 CFR 431.7 - Payload and payload reentry determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Payload and payload reentry determinations. 431.7 Section 431.7 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION... determination. Either an RLV mission license applicant or a payload owner or operator may request a review of...

  7. Planned Flight of the Terrestrial HIAD Orbital Reentry (THOR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dillman, Robert; Hughes, Stephen; DiNonno, John; Bodkin, Richard; White, Joseph; DelCorso, Joseph; Cheatwood, F. M.

    2014-01-01

    The Terrestrial HIAD Orbital Reentry (THOR) is planned for flight in 2016 as a secondary payload on an Orbital Sciences commercial resupply mission to the International Space Station. THOR will launch with its Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (HIAD) stowed as a small cylinder between the second stage motor and the launch vehicle fairing. Once the Cygnus cargo vehicle has separated from the second stage, THOR will likewise separate, autonomously re-orient itself, perform a deorbit burn, then inflate the HIAD to a 3.5m diameter cone before atmospheric interface. THOR is a follow-on mission to the IRVE-3 flight test of 2012. The high energy of orbital reentry will allow THOR to demonstrate the performance of its improved, second-generation inflatable structure and flexible TPS materials, in a more energetic entry environment than previous suborbital test flights.This paper discusses the sequence of events planned to occur as part of the THOR mission. Specific topics will include the THOR mission concept, reentry vehicle design for the expected flight environment, the on-board sensors that will allow quantification of vehicle performance, and how we intend to retrieve the flight data from a reentry vehicle splashing down in international waters.

  8. 40 CFR 161.390 - Reentry protection data requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... crop Nonfood Greenhouse Food crop Nonfood Forestry Domestic outdoor Indoor Test substance Data to... oncogenic effects or other adverse effects as evidenced by subchronic, chronic, and reproduction studies... could cause adverse effects on persons entering treated sites. In the last situation, reentry intervals...

  9. 40 CFR 161.390 - Reentry protection data requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... crop Nonfood Greenhouse Food crop Nonfood Forestry Domestic outdoor Indoor Test substance Data to... oncogenic effects or other adverse effects as evidenced by subchronic, chronic, and reproduction studies... could cause adverse effects on persons entering treated sites. In the last situation, reentry intervals...

  10. Meteoroid Streams from Sunskirter Comet Breakup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenniskens, P. M.

    2012-12-01

    In its first year of operations, the CAMS project (Cameras for Allsky Meteor Surveillance) has measured 47,000 meteoroid orbits at Earth, including some that pass the Sun as close as 0.008 AU. The population density increases significantly above perihelion distance q = 0.037 AU. Meteoroid streams are known with q about 0.1 AU. The Sun has a profound effect on comets that pass at 0.04-0.16 AU distance, called the sunskirter comets. SOHO and STEREO see families of small comets called the Marsden and Kracht groups. Sunlight is efficiently scattered by small 10-m sized fragments, making those fragments visible even when far from Earth. These comet groups are associated with meteor showers on Earth, in particular the Daytime Arietids and Delta Aquariids. All are related to 96P/Machholz, a highly inclined short-period (5.2 year) Jupiter family comet that comes to within 0.12 AU from the Sun, the smallest perihelion distance known among numbered comets. The proximity of the Sun speeds up the disintegration process, providing us a unique window on this important decay mechanism of Jupiter family comets and creating meteoroid streams. These are not the only sunskirting comets, however. In this presentation, we will present CAMS observations of the complete low-q meteoroid population at Earth and review their association with known parent bodies.

  11. A Fragment-Cloud Approach for Modeling Atmospheric Breakup of Asteroids with Varied Internal Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Lorien; Mathias, Donovan; NASA Engineering Risk Assessment Team, NASA Asteroid Threat Assessment Project

    2016-10-01

    As an asteroid descends toward Earth, it deposits energy in the atmosphere through aerodynamic drag and ablation. Asteroid impact risk assessments rely on energy deposition estimates to predict blast overpressures and ground damage that may result from an airburst, such as the one that occurred over Chelyabinsk, Russia in 2013. The rates and altitudes at which energy is deposited along the entry trajectory depend upon how the bolide fragments, which in turn depends upon its internal structure and composition. In this work, an analytic asteroid fragmentation model has been developed to model the atmospheric breakup and resulting energy deposition of asteroids with a range of internal structures. The modeling approach combines successive fragmentation of larger independent pieces with aggregate debris clouds released with each fragmentation event. The model can vary the number and masses of fragments produced, the amount of mass released as debris clouds, and the size-strength scaling used to increase the robustness of smaller fragments. The initial asteroid body can be seeded with a distribution of independent fragment sizes amid a remaining debris mass to represent loose rubble pile conglomerations, or can be defined as a monolith with an outer regolith layer. This approach enables the model to represent a range of breakup behaviors and reproduce detailed energy deposition features such as multiple flares due to successive burst events, high-altitude regolith blow-off, or initial disruption of rubble piles followed by more energetic breakup of the constituent boulders. These capabilities provide a means to investigate sensitivities of ground damage to potential variations in asteroid structure.

  12. Inclusive breakup of three-fragment weakly bound nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, B. V.; Frederico, T.; Hussein, M. S.

    2017-04-01

    The inclusive breakup of three-fragment projectiles is discussed within a four-body spectator model. Both the elastic breakup and the non-elastic breakup are obtained in a unified framework. Originally developed in the 80's for two-fragment projectiles such as the deuteron, in this paper the theory is successfully generalized to three-fragment projectiles. The expression obtained for the inclusive cross section allows the extraction of the incomplete fusion cross section, and accordingly generalizes the surrogate method to cases such as (t, p) and (t, n) reactions. It is found that two-fragment correlations inside the projectile affect in a conspicuous way the elastic breakup cross section. The inclusive non-elastic breakup cross section is calculated and is found to contain the contribution of a three-body absorption term that is also strongly influenced by the two-fragment correlations. This latter cross section contains the so-called incomplete fusion where more than one compound nuclei are formed. Our theory describes both stable weakly bound three-fragment projectiles and unstable ones such as the Borromean nuclei.

  13. Selective breakup of lipid vesicles under acoustic microstreaming flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pommella, Angelo; Garbin, Valeria

    2014-11-01

    The dynamics of lipid vesicles under small deformation in simple shear flow is well characterized: complex behaviors such as tumbling, breathing, and tank-treading are observed depending on the viscosity contrast between inner and outer fluid, vesicle excess area, membrane viscosity, and bending modulus. In contrast, phenomena upon large deformation are still poorly understood, in particular vesicle breakup. Simple shear flow geometries do not allow to reach the large stresses necessary to cause vesicle breakup. We use the acoustic microstreaming flow generated by an oscillating microbubble to study the large deformation and breakup of giant unilamellar vesicles. The deformation is governed by a capillary number based on the membrane elasticity K : Ca = ηγ˙a / K where η is the viscosity of the outer fluid, a the vesicle radius, and γ˙ the shear rate. We explore the effect of the mechanical properties of the membrane, and demonstrated selective breakup of vesicles based on the difference in membrane elasticity. The results reveal the influence of membrane mechanical properties in shear-induced vesicle breakup and the possibility to control in a quantitative way the selectivity of the process, with potential applications in biomedical technologies. The authors acknowledge funding from EU/FP7 Grant Number 618333.

  14. Dynamics of bubble breakup at a T junction.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yutao; Fu, Taotao; Zhu, Chunying; Ma, Youguang; Li, Huai Z

    2016-02-01

    The gas-liquid interfacial dynamics of bubble breakup in a T junction was investigated. Four regimes were observed for a bubble passing through the T junction. It was identified by the stop flow that a critical width of the bubble neck existed: if the minimum width of the bubble neck was less than the critical value, the breakup was irreversible and fast; while if the minimum width of the bubble neck was larger than the critical value, the breakup was reversible and slow. The fast breakup was driven by the surface tension and liquid inertia and is independent of the operating conditions. The minimum width of the bubble neck could be scaled with the remaining time as a power law with an exponent of 0.22 in the beginning and of 0.5 approaching the final fast pinch-off. The slow breakup was driven by the continuous phase and the gas-liquid interface was in the equilibrium stage. Before the appearance of the tunnel, the width of the depression region could be scaled with the time as a power law with an exponent of 0.75; while after that, the width of the depression was a logarithmic function with the time.

  15. Breakup of {sup 11}B at low relative energies

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, D.C.; White, C.A.; Wolfs, F.L.H.

    1993-04-01

    The authors have used the segmented focal plane detector of the Rochester Enge split-pole spectrograph to study the breakup of 87 MeV {sup 11}B ions incident on a {sup 12}C target into {sup 4}He and {sup 7}Li fragments at relative energies between 0 MeV and 4 MeV and at laboratory angles between 7.5{degrees} and 25{degrees}. The total kinetic energy spectra of the breakup fragments is dominated by elastic breakup (all reaction products are left in their ground state). The reconstructed relative energy spectra for elastic breakup are dominated by sequential breakup of {sup 11}B via the 9.27 MeV, 10.26 MeV, and 10.60 MeV excited states in {sup 11}B. The measured yields are compared with the calculated cross sections of exciting these states, using DWBA calculations and B(EL) values obtained from radiative capture measurements of {sup 4}He and {sup 7}Li.

  16. Role of QT interval prolongation in the creation of spiral wave type reentry.

    PubMed

    Shibata, N; Watanabe, H; Sakuma, I; Kodama, I; Niwa, R; Fukui, Y; Toyama, J; Hosoda, S

    1997-01-01

    The inducibility of reentry was compared for four QT patterns in a heart conduction simulation model. Local (L) and gradual (G) QT prolongation models are more susceptible to reentry induction than the no (N) QT prolongation model (reentry induced episodes for N, L, and G numbered 90, 120, and 122, respectively). This increased vulnerability was diminished when the QT interval was prolonged at all simulation sites (reentry induced episodes for the diffuse QT prolongation model, D model, numbered 82). Decreased QT dispersion might be important for the prevention of reentry induction regardless of whether the QT interval is increased.

  17. A new model to simulate impact breakup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordelli, Alessandro; Farinella, Paolo

    1997-12-01

    energies) the occurrence of catastrophic breakup. The masses and velocities of the fragments resemble those found in laboratory impact experiments.

  18. Controlled Re-Entry of the H-IIB Launch Vehicle Upper Stage with the Use of the Re-Entry Safety System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ida, K.; Mori, S.; Sakamoto, K.; Ikeda, S.; Sato, T.; Kawabata, H.

    2012-01-01

    On January 22, 2011, during flight No. 2 of the H-IIB launch vehicle, the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) succeeded in performing a controlled re-entry experiment for the upper stage. This is the first time this has been done for the upper stage of a Japanese launch vehicle. For flight No. 1, the upper stage performed a random re- entry. With a view to avoiding debris generation and debris-related impact accidents, JAXA resolved to develop a more refined re-entry process. Consequently, the "Re-entry Safety System" was developed in order to achieve controlled re-entry with certainty. After one orbit, while executing controlled re-entry, the Re-entry Safety System monitored the upper stage's function and orbit. Subsequently, a command disengaging the lockout of the deorbit manoeuvre was issued from ground and re-entry commenced. The details of the Re-entry Safety System, which facilitated the controlled re-entry, are described herein.

  19. The Role of Prevention in Promoting Continuity of Health Care in Prisoner Reentry Initiatives

    PubMed Central

    Lanza, A. Stephen; Dyson, William; Gordon, Derrick M.

    2013-01-01

    Most incarcerated individuals will return to the community, and their successful reentry requires consideration of their health and how their health will affect their families and communities. We propose the use of a prevention science framework that integrates universal, selective, and indicated strategies to facilitate the successful reentry of men released from prison. Understanding how health risks and disparities affect the transition from prison to the community will enhance reentry intervention efforts. To explore the application of the prevention rubric, we evaluated a community-based prisoner reentry initiative. The findings challenge all involved in reentry initiatives to reconceptualize prisoner reentry from a program model to a prevention model that considers multilevel risks to and facilitators of successful reentry. PMID:23488516

  20. Review of semi-classical calculations for breakup

    SciTech Connect

    Baye, Daniel

    2005-10-14

    In semi-classical approximations, the relative motion between target and projectile is represented by a classical trajectory but the projectile internal motion is treated quantum mechanically. A time-dependent Schroedinger equation describes the breakup of exotic nuclei induced by the Coulomb and nuclear forces. Different accurate techniques of resolution of this time-dependent equation are reviewed for one space dimension. The respective merits of their extensions to three dimensions are compared. Applications to the breakup of the 11Be, 15C, and 19C halo nuclei are presented and discussed. The first-order perturbation theory is compared with the time-dependent method and its relevance for the Coulomb breakup determination of the astrophysical S factor is analyzed.

  1. Modeling Tear Film Evaporation and Breakup with Duplex Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stapf, Michael; Braun, Richard; Begley, Carolyn; Driscoll, Tobin; King-Smith, Peter Ewen

    2015-11-01

    Tear film thinning, hyperosmolarity, and breakup can irritate and damage the ocular surface. Recent research hypothesizes deficiencies in the lipid layer may cause locally increased evaporation, inducing conditions for breakup. We consider a model for team film evolution incorporating two mobile fluid layers, the aqueous and lipid layers. In addition, we include the effects of salt concentration, osmosis, evaporation as modified by the lipid layer, and the polar portion of the lipid layer. Numerically solving the resulting model, we explore the conditions for tear film breakup and analyze the response of the system to changes in our parameters. Our studies indicate sufficiently fast peak values or sufficiently wide areas of evaporation promote TBU, as does diffusion of solutes. In addition, the Marangoni effect representing polar lipids dominates viscous dissipation from the non-polar lipid layer in the model. This work was supported in part by NSF grant 1412085 and NIH grant 1R01EY021794.

  2. RITD - Adapting Mars Entry, Descent and Landing System for Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heilimo, Jyri; Harri, Ari-Matti; Aleksashkin, Sergey; Koryanov, Vsevolod; Arruego, Ignacio; Schmidt, Walter; Haukka, Harri; Finchenko, Valery; Martynov, Maxim; Ostresko, Boris; Ponomarenko, Andrey; Kazakovtsev, Viktor; Martin, Susanna; Siili, Tero

    2014-05-01

    A new generation of inflatable Entry, Descent and Landing System (EDLS) for Mars has been developed. It is used in both the initial atmospheric entry and atmospheric descent before the semi-hard impact of the penetrator into Martian surface. The EDLS applicability to Earth's atmosphere is studied by the EU/RITD [1] project. Project focuses to the analysis and tests of the transonic behaviour of this compact and light weight payload entry system at the Earth re-entry. 1. EDLS for Earth The dynamical stability of the craft is analysed, concentrating on the most critical part of the atmospheric re-entry, the transonic phase. In Martian atmosphere the MetNet vehicle stability during the transonic phase is understood. However, in the more dense Earth's atmosphere, the transonic phase is shorter and turbulence more violent. Therefore, the EDLS has to be sufficiently dynamically stable to overcome the forces tending to deflect the craft from its nominal trajectory and attitude. The preliminary design of the inflatable EDLS for Earth will be commenced once the scaling of the re-entry system and the dynamical stability analysis have been performed. The RITD-project concentrates on mission and applications achievable with the current MetNet-type (i.e. 'Mini-1' category) of lander, and on requirements posed by other type Earth re-entry concepts. 2. Entry Angle Determination for Mini-1 - lander For successful Earth landing, the suitable re-entry angle and velocity with specific descent vehicle (DV) mass and heat flux parameters need to be determined. These key parameters in determining the Earth re-entry for DV are: qmax (kW/m2): maximal specific heat flux, Q (MJ/m2): specific integral heat flux to DV front shield, m (kg): descent vehicle (DV) mass, V (m/s): re-entry velocity and Θ (deg.): flight-path angle at Earth re-entry For Earth re-entry, the calculation results in the optimal value of entry velocity for MetNet ('Mini-1' category) -type lander, with mass of 22kg, being

  3. Effect of boiling regime on melt stream breakup in water

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, B.W.; Gabor, J.D.; Cassulo, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    A study has been performed examining the breakup and mixing behavior of an initially coherent stream of high-density melt as it flows downward through water. This work has application to the quenching of molten core materials as they drain downward during a postulated severe reactor accident. The study has included examination of various models of breakup distances based upon interfacial instabilities dominated either by liquid-liquid contact or by liquid-vapor contact. A series of experiments was performed to provide a data base for assessment of the various modeling approaches. The experiments involved Wood's metal (T/sub m/ = 73/sup 0/C, rho = 9.2 g/cm/sup 3/, d/sub j/ = 20 mm) poured into a deep pool of water. The temperature of the water and wood's metal were varied to span the range from single-phase, liquid-liquid contact to the film boiling regime. Experiment results showed that breakup occurred largely as a result of the spreading and entrainment from the leading edge of the jet. However, for streams of sufficient lengths a breakup length could be discerned at which there was no longer a coherent central core of the jet to feed the leading edge region. The erosion of the vertical trailing column is by Kelvin-Helmoltz instabilities and related disengagement of droplets from the jet into the surrounding fluid. For conditions of liquid-liquid contact, the breakup length has been found to be about 20 jet diameters; when substantial vapor is produced at the interface due to heat transfer from the jet to the water, the breakup distance was found to range to as high as 50 jet diameters. The former values are close to the analytical prediction of Taylor, whereas the latter values are better predicted by the model of Epstein and Fauske.

  4. Refined Ordovician timescale reveals no link between asteroid breakup and biodiversification

    PubMed Central

    Lindskog, A.; Costa, M. M.; Rasmussen, C.M.Ø.; Connelly, J. N.; Eriksson, M. E.

    2017-01-01

    The catastrophic disruption of the L chondrite parent body in the asteroid belt c. 470 Ma initiated a prolonged meteorite bombardment of Earth that started in the Ordovician and continues today. Abundant L chondrite meteorites in Middle Ordovician strata have been interpreted to be the consequence of the asteroid breakup event. Here we report a zircon U-Pb date of 467.50±0.28 Ma from a distinct bed within the meteorite-bearing interval of southern Sweden that, combined with published cosmic-ray exposure ages of co-occurring meteoritic material, provides a precise age for the L chondrite breakup at 468.0±0.3 Ma. The new zircon date requires significant revision of the Ordovician timescale that has implications for the understanding of the astrogeobiologic development during this period. It has been suggested that the Middle Ordovician meteorite bombardment played a crucial role in the Great Ordovician Biodiversification Event, but this study shows that the two phenomena were unrelated. PMID:28117834

  5. Refined Ordovician timescale reveals no link between asteroid breakup and biodiversification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindskog, A.; Costa, M. M.; Rasmussen, C. M. Ø.; Connelly, J. N.; Eriksson, M. E.

    2017-01-01

    The catastrophic disruption of the L chondrite parent body in the asteroid belt c. 470 Ma initiated a prolonged meteorite bombardment of Earth that started in the Ordovician and continues today. Abundant L chondrite meteorites in Middle Ordovician strata have been interpreted to be the consequence of the asteroid breakup event. Here we report a zircon U-Pb date of 467.50+/-0.28 Ma from a distinct bed within the meteorite-bearing interval of southern Sweden that, combined with published cosmic-ray exposure ages of co-occurring meteoritic material, provides a precise age for the L chondrite breakup at 468.0+/-0.3 Ma. The new zircon date requires significant revision of the Ordovician timescale that has implications for the understanding of the astrogeobiologic development during this period. It has been suggested that the Middle Ordovician meteorite bombardment played a crucial role in the Great Ordovician Biodiversification Event, but this study shows that the two phenomena were unrelated.

  6. Refined Ordovician timescale reveals no link between asteroid breakup and biodiversification.

    PubMed

    Lindskog, A; Costa, M M; Rasmussen, C M Ø; Connelly, J N; Eriksson, M E

    2017-01-24

    The catastrophic disruption of the L chondrite parent body in the asteroid belt c. 470 Ma initiated a prolonged meteorite bombardment of Earth that started in the Ordovician and continues today. Abundant L chondrite meteorites in Middle Ordovician strata have been interpreted to be the consequence of the asteroid breakup event. Here we report a zircon U-Pb date of 467.50±0.28 Ma from a distinct bed within the meteorite-bearing interval of southern Sweden that, combined with published cosmic-ray exposure ages of co-occurring meteoritic material, provides a precise age for the L chondrite breakup at 468.0±0.3 Ma. The new zircon date requires significant revision of the Ordovician timescale that has implications for the understanding of the astrogeobiologic development during this period. It has been suggested that the Middle Ordovician meteorite bombardment played a crucial role in the Great Ordovician Biodiversification Event, but this study shows that the two phenomena were unrelated.

  7. Atmospheric Breakup and Energy Deposition Modeling for Asteroid Impact Risk Assessmen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, L.; Mathias, D.

    2016-12-01

    The Asteroid Threat Assessment Project (ATAP) team at NASA Ames Research Center is developing physics-based models to assess the risk posed by potential asteroid strikes on Earth. As part of this effort, an analytic asteroid fragmentation model has been developed to model the atmospheric energy deposition of asteroids with a range of compositional properties and entry conditions. The resulting energy deposition profiles are used to estimate airburst altitudes and blast overpressure damage on the ground. The model approach combines successive fragmentation of larger independent pieces with the release of aggregate clouds of debris. A wide range of potential breakup behaviors can be assessed by varying the number and masses of fragments produced, the fraction of mass released as debris clouds, and the size-strength scaling used to increase the durability of smaller fragments. The initial asteroid body can also be seeded with a distribution of independent fragment sizes and remaining debris mass to represent a variety of structural types, from rubble piles to coherent monoliths. The model is able to reproduce key energy deposition features, such as multiple flares, high-altitude regolith blow-off, or initial disruption of loosely bound conglomerations followed by more energetic breakup of the constituent boulders. These capabilities provide a means to investigate sensitivities of energy deposition to potential variations in asteroid structure, while also maintaining a level of fidelity appropriate for the large numbers of cases needed for statistical risk assessment.

  8. On the breakup of tectonic plates by polar wandering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, H.-S.

    1974-01-01

    The equations for the stresses in a homogeneous shell of uniform thickness caused by a shift of the axis of rotation are derived. The magnitude of these stresses reaches a maximum value of the order of 10 to the 9th power dyn/sq cm, which is sufficient for explaining a tectonic breakup. In order to deduce the fracture pattern according to which the breakup of tectonic plates can be expected the theory of plastic deformation of shells is applied. The analysis of this pattern gives an explanation of the existing boundary systems of the major tectonic plates as described by Morgan (1968), LePichon (1968) and Isacks et al. (1968).

  9. Forecast Tools for Alaska River Ice Breakup Timing and Severity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, E. H.; Lindsey, S.; van Breukelen, C. M.; Thoman, R.

    2016-12-01

    Spring Breakup on the large interior rivers in Alaska means a time of nervous anticipation for many of the residents in the villages alongside those rivers. On the Yukon and Kuskokwim Rivers the record flood for most villages occurred as a result of ice jams that backed up water and dump truck sized ice floes into the village. Those floods can occur suddenly and can literally wipe out a village. The challenge is that with a limited observation network (3 automated USGS gages along the 1200 miles of the Yukon River flowing through Alaska) and the inherently transient nature of ice jam formation, prediction of the timing and severity of these events has been a tremendous challenge. Staff at the Alaska Pacific River Forecast Center as well as the Alaska Region Climate Program Manager have been developing more quantitative tools to attempt to provide a longer lead time for villages to prepare for potentially devastating flooding. In the past, a very qualitative assessment of the primary drivers of Spring Breakup (snow pack, river ice thickness and forecast spring weather) have led to the successful identification of years when flood severity was likely to be elevated or significantly decreased. These qualitative assessments have also allowed the forecasting of the probability of either a thermal or a dynamic breakup. But there has continued to be a need for an objective tool that can handle weather patterns that border on the tails of the climatic distributions as well as the timing and flood potential from weather patterns that are closer to the median of the distribution. Over the past 8 years there have been a significant number of years with anomalous spring weather patterns including cold springs followed by rapid warmups leading to record flooding from ice jams during spring breakup (2009, 2013), record late breakup (2013), record early breakup (2016), record high snowfall (2012), record snowmelt and aufeis flooding (2015) and record low snowfall (2015). The need

  10. Ground Observation of the Hayabusa Reentry: The Third Opportunity of Man-made Fireball from Interplanetary Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishihara, Y.; Yamamoto, M.; Hiramatsu, Y.; Furumoto, M.; Fujita, K.

    2010-12-01

    After 7 years and 6,000,000,000 km of challenging cruise in the solar system, the Hayabusa did come back to the Earth on June 13, 2010. The Hayabusa, the first sample-return explorer to NEA, landed on 25243 Itokawa in 2005, capturing surface particles on the S-type asteroid into its sample return capsule (SRC). Following to the reentries of the Genesis in 2004 and the Stardust in 2006, the return of the Hayabusa SRC was the third direct reentry event from the interplanetary transfer orbit to the Earth at a velocity of over 11.2 km/s. In addition, it was world first case of direct reentry of spacecraft from interplanetary transfer orbit. After the successful resumption of the SRC, it was carefully sent to ISAS/JAXA, and at present, small particles expected to be the first sample-return materials from the minor planet are carefully investigated. In order to obtain precise trajectory information to ensure the quick procedure for the Hayabusa SRC resumption team, we observed the Hayabusa SRC reentry by optically in Australian night sky. High-resolution imaging and spectroscopy were carried out with several high-sensitivity instruments to investigate thermal-protection process of thermal protection ablator (TPA) as well as interaction process between SRC surface materials and upper atmospheric neutral and plasma components. Moreover, shockwaves were observed by infrasound/seismic sensor arrays on ground to investigate reentry related shockwaves as well as air-to-ground coupling process at the extremely rare opportunity. With respect to nominal trajectory of the Hayabusa SRC reentry, four optical stations were set inside and near the Woomera Prohibited Area, Australia, targeting on peak-heat and/or front-heat profiles of ablating TPA for engineering aspect. Infrasound and seismic sensors were also deployed as three arrayed stations and three single stations to realize direction findings of sonic boom type shockwaves from the SRC and spacecraft and point source type

  11. Silicic Volcanics in the South Mountain Region: A Volcanic Center with the Breakup of Rodinia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, C. W.; Rooney, T. O.; Sinha, A.

    2008-12-01

    provinces may provide insight into the petrogenic processes generating felsic volcanism during continental break-up. Brophy, James G (2008), A study of rare earth element (REE)-SiO2 variations in felsic liquids enerated by basalt fractionation and amphibolites melting: a potential test for discriminating between the two different processes, Contrib Mineral Petrol, 156, 337-337.

  12. A Paleo-Mesoproterozoic supercontinent: assembly, growth and breakup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Guochun; Sun, Min; Wilde, Simon A.; Li, Sanzhong

    2004-09-01

    Geological and paleomagnetic data support the hypothesis that a Paleo-Mesoproterozoic supercontinent, referred to as Columbia, existed before the formation of Rodinia. This pre-Rodinia supercontinent was assembled along global-scale 2.1-1.8 Ga collisional orogens and contained almost all of Earth's continental blocks. Following its final assembly at ˜1.8 Ga, the supercontinent Columbia underwent long-lived (1.8-1.3 Ga), subduction-related growth via accretion at key continental margins, forming a 1.8-1.3 Ga large magmatic accretionary belt along the present-day southern margin of North America, Greenland and Baltica. It includes the 1.8-1.7 Ga Yavapai, Central Plains and Makkovikian Belts, 1.7-1.6 Ga Mazatzal and Labradorian Belts, 1.5-1.3 Ga St. Francois and Spavinaw Belts and 1.3-1.2 Ga Elzevirian Belt in North America; the 1.8-1.7 Ga Ketilidian Belt in Greenland; and the 1.8-1.7-Transscandinavian Igneous Belt, 1.7-1.6 Ga Kongsberggian-Gothian Belt, and 1.5-1.3 Ga Southwest Sweden Granitoid Belt in Baltica. Other cratonic blocks also underwent marginal outgrowth at about the same time. In South America, a 1.8-1.3 Ga accretionary zone occurs along the western margin of the Amazonia Craton, represented by the Rio Negro, Juruena and Rondonian Belts. In Australia, 1.8-1.5 Ga accretionary magmatic belts, including the Arunta, Mt. Isa, Georgetown, Coen and Broken Hill Belts, occur surrounding the southern and eastern margins of the North Australia Craton and the eastern margin of the Gawler Craton. In China, a 1.8-1.4 Ga accretionary magmatic zone, called the Xiong'er belt (Group), extends along the southern margin of the North China Craton. Fragmentation of this supercontinent began about 1.6 Ga ago, associated with continental rifting along the western margin of Laurentia (Belt-Purcell Supergroup), southern margin of Baltica (Telemark Supergroup), southeastern margin of Siberia (Riphean aulacogens), northwestern margin of South Africa (Kalahari Copper Belt), and

  13. Cardiovascular effects of anti-G suit and cooling garment during space shuttle re-entry and landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez, Sondra A.; Charles, John B.; Fortner, G. William; Hurst, Victor 4th; Meck, Janice V.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many cardiovascular changes associated with spaceflight reduce the ability of the cardiovascular system to oppose gravity on return to Earth, leaving astronauts susceptible to orthostatic hypotension during re-entry and landing. Consequently, an anti-G suit was developed to protect arterial pressure during re-entry. A liquid cooling garment (LCG) was then needed to alleviate the thermal stress resulting from use of the launch and entry suit. METHODS: We studied 34 astronauts on 22 flights (4-16 d). Subjects were studied 10 d before launch and on landing day. Preflight, crewmembers were suited with their anti-G suits set to the intended inflation for re-entry. Three consecutive measurements of heart rate and arterial pressure were obtained while seated and then again while standing. Three subjects who inflated the anti-G suits also donned the LCG for landing. Arterial pressure and heart rate were measured every 5 min during the de-orbit maneuver, through maximum G-loading (max-G) and touch down (TD). After TD, crew-members again initiated three seated measurements followed by three standing measurements. RESULTS: Astronauts with inflated anti-G suits had higher arterial pressure than those who did not have inflated anti-G suits during re-entry and landing (133.1 +/- 2.5/76.1 +/- 2.1 vs. 128.3 +/- 4.2/79.3 +/- 2.9, de-orbit; 157.3 +/- 4.5/102.1 +/- 3.6 vs. 145.2 +/- 10.5/95.7 + 5.5, max-G; 159.6 +/- 3.9/103.7 +/- 3.3 vs. 134.1 +/- 5.1/85.7 +/- 3.1, TD). In the group with inflated anti-G suits, those who also wore the LCG exhibited significantly lower heart rates than those who did not (75.7 +/- 11.5 vs. 86.5 +/- 6.2, de-orbit; 79.5 +/- 24.8 vs. 112.1 +/- 8.7, max-G; 84.7 +/- 8.0 vs. 110.5 +/- 7.9, TD). CONCLUSIONS: The anti-G suit is effective in supporting arterial pressure. The addition of the LCG lowers heart rate during re-entry.

  14. Cardiovascular effects of anti-G suit and cooling garment during space shuttle re-entry and landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez, Sondra A.; Charles, John B.; Fortner, G. William; Hurst, Victor 4th; Meck, Janice V.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many cardiovascular changes associated with spaceflight reduce the ability of the cardiovascular system to oppose gravity on return to Earth, leaving astronauts susceptible to orthostatic hypotension during re-entry and landing. Consequently, an anti-G suit was developed to protect arterial pressure during re-entry. A liquid cooling garment (LCG) was then needed to alleviate the thermal stress resulting from use of the launch and entry suit. METHODS: We studied 34 astronauts on 22 flights (4-16 d). Subjects were studied 10 d before launch and on landing day. Preflight, crewmembers were suited with their anti-G suits set to the intended inflation for re-entry. Three consecutive measurements of heart rate and arterial pressure were obtained while seated and then again while standing. Three subjects who inflated the anti-G suits also donned the LCG for landing. Arterial pressure and heart rate were measured every 5 min during the de-orbit maneuver, through maximum G-loading (max-G) and touch down (TD). After TD, crew-members again initiated three seated measurements followed by three standing measurements. RESULTS: Astronauts with inflated anti-G suits had higher arterial pressure than those who did not have inflated anti-G suits during re-entry and landing (133.1 +/- 2.5/76.1 +/- 2.1 vs. 128.3 +/- 4.2/79.3 +/- 2.9, de-orbit; 157.3 +/- 4.5/102.1 +/- 3.6 vs. 145.2 +/- 10.5/95.7 + 5.5, max-G; 159.6 +/- 3.9/103.7 +/- 3.3 vs. 134.1 +/- 5.1/85.7 +/- 3.1, TD). In the group with inflated anti-G suits, those who also wore the LCG exhibited significantly lower heart rates than those who did not (75.7 +/- 11.5 vs. 86.5 +/- 6.2, de-orbit; 79.5 +/- 24.8 vs. 112.1 +/- 8.7, max-G; 84.7 +/- 8.0 vs. 110.5 +/- 7.9, TD). CONCLUSIONS: The anti-G suit is effective in supporting arterial pressure. The addition of the LCG lowers heart rate during re-entry.

  15. Asymptotic and near-target direct breakup of 6Li and 7Li

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalkal, Sunil; Simpson, E. C.; Luong, D. H.; Cook, K. J.; Dasgupta, M.; Hinde, D. J.; Carter, I. P.; Jeung, D. Y.; Mohanto, G.; Palshetkar, C. S.; Prasad, E.; Rafferty, D. C.; Simenel, C.; Vo-Phuoc, K.; Williams, E.; Gasques, L. R.; Gomes, P. R. S.; Linares, R.

    2016-04-01

    Background: Li,76 and 9Be are weakly bound against breakup into their cluster constituents. Breakup location is important for determining the role of breakup in above-barrier complete fusion suppression. Recent works have pointed out that experimental observables can be used to separate near-target and asymptotic breakup. Purpose: Our purpose is to distinguish near-target and asymptotic direct breakup of Li,76 in reactions with nuclei in different mass regions. Method: Charged particle coincidence measurements are carried out with pulsed Li,76 beams on 58Ni and 64Zn targets at sub-barrier energies and compared with previous measurements using 208Pb and 209Bi targets. A detector array providing a large angular coverage is used, along with time-of-flight information to give definitive particle identification of the direct breakup fragments. Results: In interactions of 6Li with 58Ni and 64Zn, direct breakup occurs only asymptotically far away from the target. However, in interactions with 208Pb and 209Bi, near-target breakup occurs in addition to asymptotic breakup. Direct breakup of 7Li into α -t is not observed in interactions with 58Ni and 64Zn. However, near-target dominated direct breakup was observed in measurements with 208Pb and 209Bi. A modified version of the Monte Carlo classical trajectory model code platypus, which explicitly takes into account lifetimes associated with unbound states, is used to simulate sub-barrier breakup reactions. Conclusions: Near-target breakup in interactions with Li,76 is an important mechanism only for the heavy targets 208Pb and 209Bi. There is insignificant near-target direct breakup of 6Li and no direct breakup of 7Li in reactions with 58Ni and 64Zn. Therefore, direct breakup is unlikely to suppress the above-barrier fusion cross section in reactions of Li,76 with 58Ni and 64Zn nuclei.

  16. RITD - Adapting Mars Entry, Descent and Landing System for Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heilimo, Jyri; Aleksashkin, Sergey; Martynov, Maxim; Schmidt, Walter; Harri, Ari-Matti; Vsevolod Koryanov, D.; Kazakovtcev, Victor; Haukka, Harri; Arruego, Ignacio; Finchenko, Valery; Ostresko, Boris; Ponomarenko, Andrei; Martin, Susanna; Siili, Tero

    Abstract A new generation of inflatable Entry, Descent and Landing System (EDLS) or Mars has been developed. It is used in both the initial atmospheric entry and atmospheric descent before the semi-hard impact of the penetrator into Martian surface. The EDLS applicability to Earth’s atmosphere is studied by the EU/RITD [1] project. Project focuses to the analysis and tests of the transonic behaviour of this compact and light weight payload entry system at the Earth re-entry 1. EDLS for Earth The dynamical stability of the craft is analysed, concentrating on the most critical part of the atmospheric re-entry, the transonic phase. In Martian atmosphere the MetNet vehicle stability during the transonic phase is understood. However, in the more dense Earth’s atmosphere, the transonic phase is shorter and turbulence more violent. Therefore, the EDLS has to be sufficiently dynamically stable to overcome the forces tending to deflect the craft from its nominal trajectory and attitude. The preliminary design of the inflatable EDLS for Earth will be commenced once the scaling of the re-entry system and the dynamical stability analysis have been performed. The RITD-project concentrates on mission and applications achievable with the current MetNet-type (i.e. “Mini-1” category) of lander, and on requirements posed by other type Earth re-entry concepts. 2. Entry Angle Determination for Mini-1 - lander For successful Earth landing, the suitable re-entry angle and velocity with specific descent vehicle (DV) mass and heat flux parameters need to be determined. These key parameters in determining the Earth re-entry for DV are: - qmax (kW/m2): maximal specific heat flux, - Q (MJ/m2): specific integral heat flux to DV front shield, - m (kg): descent vehicle (DV) mass, - V (m/s): re-entry velocity and - theta(deg.): flight-path angle at Earth re-entry For Earth re-entry, the calculation results in the optimal value of entry velocity for MetNet (“Mini-1” category) -type

  17. Analysis of Damped Oscillations during Reentry: A New Approach to Evaluate Cardiac Restitution☆

    PubMed Central

    Munteanu, Adelina; Kondratyev, Aleksandar A.; Kucera, Jan P.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Reentry is a mechanism underlying numerous cardiac arrhythmias. During reentry, head-tail interactions of the action potential can cause cycle length (CL) oscillations and affect the stability of reentry. We developed a method based on a difference-delay equation to determine the slopes of the action potential duration and conduction velocity restitution functions, known to be major determinants of reentrant arrhythmogenesis, from the spatial period P and the decay length D of damped CL oscillations. Using this approach, we analyzed CL oscillations after the induction of reentry and the resetting of reentry with electrical stimuli in rings of cultured neonatal rat ventricular myocytes grown on microelectrode arrays and in corresponding simulations with the Luo-Rudy model. In the experiments, P was larger and D was smaller after resetting impulses compared to the induction of reentry, indicating that reentry became more stable. Both restitution slopes were smaller. Consistent with the experimental findings, resetting of simulated reentry caused oscillations with gradually increasing P, decreasing D, and decreasing restitution slopes. However, these parameters remained constant when ion concentrations were clamped, revealing that intracellular ion accumulation stabilizes reentry. Thus, the analysis of CL oscillations during reentry opens new perspectives to gain quantitative insight into action potential restitution. PMID:17921218

  18. Asset and prime - Gliding re-entry test vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, J. W.; Hengeveld, E.

    1983-08-01

    The history of the USAF development programs for winged controlled-reentry vehicles based on a dynamic-gliding principle, ASSET (1957-1965) and PRIME (1964-1967), is recounted. The ASSET program, developed from the initial Dyna-Soar project, comprised three aerothermodynamic-structural vehicles and three aerothermoelastic vehicles, all utilizing exotic refractory metal structures partially coated with silicon-boron, zirconia-ceramic nose caps, and LV-2C Thor launchers. The three PRIME SV-5D vehicles employed elastomeric-blanket ablative heat shields and molded carbon-phenolic-composite nose caps and were launched by SLV-3 Atlas rockets. It is noted that these projects, although successful, did not lead directly to the production of lifting-body or winged reentry vehicles, but rather provided data useful in the later Shuttle development program.

  19. Reentry confined to the atrioventricular node: electrophysiologic and anatomic findings.

    PubMed

    Sheinman, M M; Gonzalez, R; Thomas, A; Ullyot, D; Bharati, S; Lev, M

    1982-05-01

    A patient with recurrent disabling, paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia refractory to drug treatment underwent electrophysiologic studies. The paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia was found to be due to atrioventricular (A-V) nodal reentry. The patient died shortly after surgical His bundle section and detailed anatomic studies were performed. These showed fatty infiltration of the approaches to the sinoatrial node, atrial preferential pathways, and A-V node and common bundle. The A-V node was mechanically damaged and the common His bundle was completely severed. These abnormalities were clearly delineated and there was no evidence of an atrio-His bundle bypass tract to an accessory A-V node. Specifically, the central fibrous body and pars membranacea were defined and no atrial muscular fibers pierced these structures to joint the A-V bundle. It is concluded that paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia due to A-V nodal reentry can be confined to the A-V node.

  20. Design of a recovery system for a reentry vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Eckroth, Wulf; Garrard, William L.; Miller, Norman

    1993-01-01

    Engineers are often required to design decelerator systems which are deployed in cross-wind orientations. If the system is not designed to minimize 'line sail', damage to the parachutes could result. A Reentry Vehicle Analysis Code (RVAC) and an accompanying graphics animation software program (DISPLAY) are presented in this paper. These computer codes allow the user to quickly apply the Purvis line sail modeling technique to any vehicle and then observe the relative motion of the vehicle, nose cap, suspension lines, pilot and drogue bags and canopies on a computer screen. Data files are created which allow plots of velocities, spacial positions, and dynamic pressures versus time to be generated. The code is an important tool for the design engineer because it integrates two degrees of freedom (DOF) line sail equations with a three DOF model of the reentry body and jettisoned nose cap to provide an animated output.

  1. Inflatable Re-entry Vehicle Experiment (IRVE-4) Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litton, Daniel K.; Bose, David M.; Cheatwood, F. McNeil; Hughes, Stephen; Wright, Henry S.; Lindell, Michael C.; Derry, Stephen D.; Olds, Aaron

    2011-01-01

    The suite of Inflatable Re-Entry Vehicle Experiments (IRVE) is designed to further our knowledge and understanding of Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerators (HIADs). Before infusion into a future mission, three challenges need to be addressed: surviving the heat pulse during re-entry, demonstrating system performance at relevant scales, and demonstrating controllability in the atmosphere. IRVE-4 will contribute to a better understanding of controllability by characterizing how a HIAD responds to a set of controlled inputs. The ability to control a HIAD is vital for missions that are g-limited, require precision targeting and guidance for aerocapture or entry, descent, and landing. The IRVE-4 flight test will focus on taking a first look into controlling a HIAD. This paper will give an overview of the IRVE-4 mission including the control response portion of the flight test sequence, and will provide a review of the mission s development.

  2. Color Breakup In Sequentially-Scanned LC Displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arend, L.; Lubin, J.; Gille, J.; Larimer, J.; Statler, Irving C. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    In sequentially-scanned liquid-crystal displays the chromatic components of color pixels are distributed in time. For such displays eye, head, display, and image-object movements can cause the individual color elements to be visible. We analyze conditions (scan designs, types of eye movement) likely to produce color breakup.

  3. Breakup of New Orleans Households after Hurricane Katrina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rendall, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    Theory and evidence on disaster-induced population displacement have focused on individual and population-subgroup characteristics. Less is known about impacts on households. I estimate excess incidence of household breakup resulting from Hurricane Katrina by comparing a probability sample of pre-Katrina New Orleans resident adult household heads…

  4. Cumulative beam breakup with time-dependent parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Jean Delayen

    2004-08-01

    A general analytical formalism developed recently for cumulative beam breakup (BBU) in linear accelerators with arbitrary beam current profile and misalignments [1, 2] is extended to include time-dependent parameters such as energy chirp or rf focusing in order to reduce BBU-induced instabilities and emittance growth. Analytical results are presented and applied to practical accelerator configurations.

  5. Framework for Control of Dynamic Ice Breakup by River Regulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-01

    and if ration. Other important characteristics of these wave formation occurs upstream or in a tribu - waves are significant stage increase, short dura...stage must occur to produce the high forces cut River danis for a controlled ice lireakup experi- needed for a dynamic breakup, and very high 1e1it

  6. Breakup of New Orleans Households after Hurricane Katrina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rendall, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    Theory and evidence on disaster-induced population displacement have focused on individual and population-subgroup characteristics. Less is known about impacts on households. I estimate excess incidence of household breakup resulting from Hurricane Katrina by comparing a probability sample of pre-Katrina New Orleans resident adult household heads…

  7. Mass estimation in the breakups of Soviet satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, Gautam D.; Anz-Meador, Phillip D.

    1990-01-01

    An attempt is made to estimate the mass of the parent satellite from the mass of the debris remaining from its breakup using a technique based on the decay rate and radar cross-section time history. The decay of perigee and apogee with time of an object in orbit provides the area-to-mass ratio and the radar cross-section provides a measure of the effective area of the object, while combining the two gives the mass of the object. The technique has been successfully applied to 12 U.S. breakups and one Arianespace breakup. Calculations exhibiting good agreement with reference mass are also discussed for Soviet intact C-class boosters, intact ASAT target satellites, and intact navigational satellites. It is found that the calculated mass of the ASAT interceptor spacecraft is about one-half of the expected mass, but it is pointed out that this may be due to fuel carried on board. For ASAT target breakups the calculated mass is 20-30 times too low; no clear explanation can yet be found for this phenomenon.

  8. A fundamental study of liquid phase particle breakup. Revision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1984-12-01

    Combustion efficiency of aluminized propellants in solid rocket motors is reduced by incomplete aluminum combustion and two-phase nozzle flow losses. Combustion of these propellants can produce large Al/Al2O3 agglomerates. As a direct result of agglomerate breakup, the aluminum combustion rate is increased, and the thermal energy released is more efficiently transferred into exhaust kinetic energy. This research sought to obtain physical data to characterize the mechanisms of aerodynamic droplet breakup. Experiments have been completed in which conventional liquids and a liquid metal (mercury) was studied. The primary goal of the conventional liquid experiments was to examine the effect of liquid properties (viscosity and surface tension) on the breakup mechanism, time scale, and fragment size distribution. The goal of the mercury experiments was to examine the effect of the much higher surface tension more characteristic of liquid aluminum. A key element of the experimental effort is the use of nonintrusive laser diagnostics including pulsed laser holography (PLH) and laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV). The exceptional temporal and spatial resolution of PLH provided the ability to resolve the mechanism of breakup and the size distribution of the fragments. LDV was used to determine drop velocity distributions along the nozzle revealing the rapid acceleration of the flattened droplets and then, surprisingly, the milder acceleration of the fragments.

  9. Armor breakup and reformation in a degradational laboratory experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orrú, Clara; Blom, Astrid; Uijttewaal, Wim S. J.

    2016-06-01

    Armor breakup and reformation was studied in a laboratory experiment using a trimodal mixture composed of a 1 mm sand fraction and two gravel fractions (6 and 10 mm). The initial bed was characterized by a stepwise downstream fining pattern (trimodal reach) and a downstream sand reach, and the experiment was conducted under conditions without sediment supply. In the initial stage of the experiment an armor formed over the trimodal reach. The formation of the armor under partial transport conditions led to an abrupt spatial transition in the bed slope and in the mean grain size of the bed surface, as such showing similar results to a previous laboratory experiment conducted with a bimodal mixture. The focus of the current analysis is to study the mechanisms of armor breakup. After an increase in flow rate the armor broke up and a new coarser armor quickly formed. The breakup initially induced a bed surface fining due to the exposure of the finer substrate, which was accompanied by a sudden increase in the sediment transport rate, followed by the formation of an armor that was coarser than the initial one. The reformation of the armor was enabled by the supply of coarse material from the upstream degrading reach and the presence of gravel in the original substrate sediment. Here armor breakup and reformation enabled slope adjustment such that the new steady state was closer to normal flow conditions.

  10. Verapamil reduces incidence of reentry during ventricular fibrillation in pigs.

    PubMed

    Jin, Qi; Dosdall, Derek J; Li, Li; Rogers, Jack M; Ideker, Raymond E; Huang, Jian

    2014-11-01

    The characteristics of reentrant circuits during short duration ventricular fibrillation (SDVF; 20 s in duration) and the role of Ca(++) and rapid-activating delayed rectifier potassium currents during long duration ventricular fibrillation (LDVF; up to 10 min in duration) were investigated using verapamil and sotalol. Activation mapping of the LV epicardium with a 21 × 24 electrode plaque was performed in 12 open-chest pigs. Pigs were given either verapamil (0.136 mg/kg) or sotalol (1.5 mg/kg) and verapamil. Reentry patterns were quantified for SDVF, and, for LDVF, activation patterns were compared with our previously reported control LDVF data. Verapamil significantly increased conduction velocity around the reentrant core by 10% and reduced the reentrant cycle length by 15%, with a net reduction in reentry incidence of 70%. Sotolol had an opposite effect of decreasing the conduction velocity around the core by 6% but increasing the reentrant cycle length by 13%, with a net reduction of reentry incidence of 50%. After 200 s of VF, verapamil significantly slowed wavefront conduction velocity and activation rate compared with control data. Verapamil decreased the incidence of reentry in SDVF by accelerating conduction velocity to increase the likelihood of conduction block, possibly through increased sympathetic tone. The drug slowed activation rate and conduction velocity after 200 s of VF, suggesting that L-type Ca(++) channels remain active and may be important in the maintenance of LDVF. Sotalol in addition to verapamil caused no additional antiarrhythmic effect. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  11. Aerodynamics of the EXPERT Re-Entry Ballistic Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharitonov, A. M.; Adamov, N. P.; Mazhul, I. I.; Vasenyov, L. G.; Zvegintsev, V. I.; Muylaert, J. M.

    2009-01-01

    Since 2002 till now, experimental studies of the EXPERT reentry capsule have been performed in ITAM SB RAS wind tunnels. These studies have been performed in consecutive ISTC project No. 2109, 3151, and currently ongoing project No. 3550. The results of earlier studies in ITAM wind tunnels can be found in [1-4]. The present paper describes new data obtained for the EXPERT model.

  12. Aerodynamics of the EXPERT Reentry Capsule Along the Descent Trajectory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vashchenkov, P.; Kashkovsky, A.; Ivanov, M.

    2009-01-01

    Results of numerical simulations of high-altitude aero thermodynamics of the EXPERT reentry capsule along its descent trajectory are presented. Aerodynamic characteristics for different angles of attack and rolling of the capsule at altitude of 150 down to 20 km are studied. An engineering local bridging method is used in computations. The uncertainty of the engineering method in the transitional regime is determined by comparisons with results obtained by DSMC simulations.

  13. A Survey of Uncontrolled Satellite reentry and Impact Prediction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-09-23

    190 1. Estimation of Reentry Trajctonies .................... 190 2. Analysis of Tracking and Impact Prediction (TIP) .......... 202 B. MONTE CARLO ...path angle, --y as a function of (v) at severial (-yi), for equation (93) [Ref. 41:p. 121]. 5. Attitude Dynamics of Uncontrolled Motion During...Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) as developed by Bird, [Ref. 81] where the molecular velocity and energy distributions of the gas molecules are a direct

  14. Aerodynamic characteristics of reentry vehicles at supersonic velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamov, N. P.; Kharitonov, A. M.; Chasovnikov, E. A.; Dyad'kin, A. A.; Kazakov, M. I.; Krylov, A. N.; Skorovarov, A. Yu.

    2015-09-01

    Models of promising reentry vehicles, experimental equipment, and test program are described. The method used to determine the total aerodynamic characteristics of these models on the AB-313 mechanical balance in the T-313 supersonic wind tunnel and the method used for simulations are presented. The aerodynamic coefficients of the examined objects in wide ranges of Mach numbers and angles of attack are obtained. The experimental data are compared with the results of simulations.

  15. Terminal Control of a Variable-Stability Slender Reentry Vehicle

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-02

    technology was applied to additional pursuits: reconnaissance satellites, the Galileo Jovian atmosphere probe, numerous Martian landers. The pur- suit of...and other aerospace environments previously unexplored.[1] The rigorous demands of atmo- spheric reentry environment often drive vehicle designs, which...amount of computational and wind tun- nel tests and simulations can be conducted, high-speed ight is dicult to model, and previously unconsidered

  16. Workforce re-entry for Japanese unemployed dental hygienists.

    PubMed

    Usui, Y; Miura, H

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to define the profile of unemployed dental hygienists who could be enticed to re-enter the workforce and the factors that could facilitate their re-entry into the dental field in Japan. The questionnaire was mailed with a postage-paid return envelope to a sample of 3095 licensed dental hygienists. A 50.4% response rate (S = 1477) was observed. The rate of working dental hygienists was 60.3% (n = 891), and of unemployed dental hygienists was 39.7% (n = 586). Of the latter, 31.9% (n = 187) stated intentions of returning to the workplace. The unemployed dental hygienists seeking employment were more often married and had more children, compared with working dental hygienists currently. This group also had significantly fewer total service years. Moreover, only 11.96% of them belonged to the Japan Dental Hygienists' Association, and 41.3% of those attended training workshops. According to their response, they perceived their top three major barriers to re-entry as 'lack sufficient dental hygiene skill', 'child rearing' and 'poor working atmosphere'. 'Flexibility in the work schedule' and 'location' were the most important factors for re-entry from their perspective. There were not many dental hygienists hoping to return to the dental field. The findings suggested that strategies to encourage non-practicing dental hygienists to re-entry should be emphasized in the areas of a flexible working atmosphere, easy access to information on how to return to practice and guidance on how to maintain professionalism during inactivity. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Properties of spray formation by turbulent primary breakup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sallam, Khaled Abd-Elmonem

    The formation of drops at the surface of turbulent liquids, e.g., turbulent primary breakup, was studied due to the importance of this mechanism for a variety of natural and technological spray formation processes, e.g., white caps on water, water falls, white water rapids, bow waves of ships, and many types of commercial spray atomizers, among others. Pulsed shadowgraphy and holography were used to observe the properties of the liquid surface and the drops formed by turbulent primary breakup of liquid jets in still air. Measured properties included liquid surface velocities, conditions at the onset of ligament and drop formation, ligament and drop sizes, ligament and drop velocities, rates of drop formation and the lengths of the liquid jets. Phenomenological theories were used to help interpret and correlate the measurements. Present results show that the onset of ligament formation occurs once the kinetic energy of the turbulent eddies that form the ligaments exceeds the required surface tension energy of a ligament of comparable size. Subsequently, the onset of drop formation occurs once drops form at the tips of ligaments due to classical Rayleigh breakup. This same mechanism controls the subsequent variation of drop sizes due to turbulent primary breakup as a function of distance from the jet exit. Breakup of the entire liquid jet occurs in two ways: a turbulent mechanism where the drops formed by turbulent primary breakup became comparable to the size of the liquid jet itself, and an aerodynamic mechanism where large turbulent eddies place the liquid jet in cross flow. In addition, ligament and drop velocities were associated with mean and fluctuating velocities of the liquid, and rates of drop formation could be expressed by surface efficiency factors defined as the fraction of the maximum cross stream liquid mass flux. Liquid volume fraction measurements indicated a rather dilute spray structure in contrast to earlier speculations. Finally, the turbulence

  18. Ares I-X Separation and Reentry Trajectory Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tartabini, Paul V.; Starr, Brett R.

    2011-01-01

    The Ares I-X Flight Test Vehicle was launched on October 28, 2009 and was the first and only test flight of NASA s two-stage Ares I launch vehicle design. The launch was successful and the flight test met all of its primary and secondary objectives. This paper discusses the stage separation and reentry trajectory analysis that was performed in support of the Ares I-X test flight. Pre-flight analyses were conducted to assess the risk of stage recontact during separation, to evaluate the first stage flight dynamics during reentry, and to define the range safety impact ellipses of both stages. The results of these pre-flight analyses were compared with available flight data. On-board video taken during flight showed that the flight test vehicle successfully separated without any recontact. Reconstructed trajectory data also showed that first stage flight dynamics were well characterized by pre-flight Monte Carlo results. In addition, comparisons with flight data indicated that the complex interference aerodynamic models employed in the reentry simulation were effective in capturing the flight dynamics during separation. Finally, the splash-down locations of both stages were well within predicted impact ellipses.

  19. Displacements of Metallic Thermal Protection System Panels During Reentry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daryabeigi, Kamran; Blosser, Max L.; Wurster, Kathryn E.

    2006-01-01

    Bowing of metallic thermal protection systems for reentry of a previously proposed single-stage-to-orbit reusable launch vehicle was studied. The outer layer of current metallic thermal protection system concepts typically consists of a honeycomb panel made of a high temperature nickel alloy. During portions of reentry when the thermal protection system is exposed to rapidly varying heating rates, a significant temperature gradient develops across the honeycomb panel thickness, resulting in bowing of the honeycomb panel. The deformations of the honeycomb panel increase the roughness of the outer mold line of the vehicle, which could possibly result in premature boundary layer transition, resulting in significantly higher downstream heating rates. The aerothermal loads and parameters for three locations on the centerline of the windward side of this vehicle were calculated using an engineering code. The transient temperature distributions through a metallic thermal protection system were obtained using 1-D finite volume thermal analysis, and the resulting displacements of the thermal protection system were calculated. The maximum deflection of the thermal protection system throughout the reentry trajectory was 6.4 mm. The maximum ratio of deflection to boundary layer thickness was 0.032. Based on previously developed distributed roughness correlations, it was concluded that these defections will not result in tripping the hypersonic boundary layer.

  20. Role of the dispersion of refractoriness on cardiac reentries.

    PubMed

    Seigneuric, R G; Chassé, J L; Auger, P M; Bardou, A L

    1999-03-15

    We used computer simulation to study the possible role of the dispersion of cellular coupling, refractoriness or both, in the mechanisms underlying cardiac arrhythmias. Local ischemia was first assumed to induce cell to cell dispersion of the coupling resistance (case 1), refractory period (case 2), or both (case 3). Our numerical experiments based on the van Capelle and Durrer model showed that vortices could not be induced. On the other hand, with cellular properties dispersed in a patchy way within the ischemic zone, a single activation wave could give rise to abnormal activities. This demonstrates the stability of the wave front under small inhomogeneities. Probabilities of reentry, estimated for the three cases cited above showed that a severe alteration of the coupling resistance may be an important factor in the genesis of reentry. Moreover, use of isochronal maps revealed that vortices were both stable and sustained with an alteration of the coupling alone or along with a reduction of the action potential duration. Conversely, simulations with reduction of the refractoriness alone, inducing only transient patterns, could exhibit functionally determined reentries.

  1. High performance modeling of atmospheric re-entry vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Alexandre; Scalabrin, Leonardo C.; Boyd, Iain D.

    2012-02-01

    Re-entry vehicles designed for space exploration are usually equipped with thermal protection systems made of ablative material. In order to properly model and predict the aerothermal environment of the vehicle, it is imperative to account for the gases produced by ablation processes. In the case of charring ablators, where an inner resin is pyrolyzed at a relatively low temperature, the composition of the gas expelled into the boundary layer is complex and may lead to thermal chemical reactions that cannot be captured with simple flow chemistry models. In order to obtain better predictions, an appropriate gas flow chemistry model needs to be included in the CFD calculations. Using a recently developed chemistry model for ablating carbon-phenolic-in-air species, a CFD calculation of the Stardust re-entry at 71 km is presented. The code used for that purpose has been designed to take advantage of the nature of the problem and therefore remains very efficient when a high number of chemical species are involved. The CFD result demonstrates the need for such chemistry model when modeling the flow field around an ablative material. Modeling of the nonequilibrium radiation spectra is also presented, and compared to the experimental data obtained during Stardust re-entry by the Echelle instrument. The predicted emission from the CN lines compares quite well with the experimental results, demonstrating the validity of the current approach.

  2. Application of the Constrained Admissible Region Multiple Hypothesis Filter to Initial Orbit Determination of a Break-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelecy, Tom; Shoemaker, Michael; Jah, Moriba

    2013-08-01

    A break-up in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) is simulated for 10 objects having area-to-mass ratios (AMR's) ranging from 0.1-10.0 m2/kg. The Constrained Admissible Region Multiple Hypothesis Filter (CAR-MHF) is applied to determining and characterizing the orbit and atmospheric drag parameters (CdA/m) simultaneously for each of the 10 objects with no a priori orbit or drag information. The results indicate that CAR-MHF shows promise for accurate, unambiguous and autonomous determination of the orbit and drag states.

  3. Interaction of the LDEF spacecraft with SRM re-entry firings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stabroth, Sebastian; Flegel, Sven Kevin; Wiedemann, Carsten; Krag, Holger; Klinkrad, Heiner; Vörsmann, Peter

    The ESA space debris population model MASTER (Meteoroid and Space Debris Terrestrial Environment Reference) shows a highly dynamic sub-millimetre size particle environment. The dust population released during firings of solid rocket motors (SRM) in space is a major contributor to the debris flux imposed to orbiting spacecraft. Flux predictions of the current model version MASTER-2005 agree with recent impact data from returned spacecraft surfaces like the Hubble Space Telescope solar arrays orbiting the Earth between 1993 and 2002. However, it was found during validation of MASTER-2005 that the flux level for dust is underpredicted by the model for some of the analysed surfaces of the Long-Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) in orbit between 1984 and 1990. Since the release of MASTER-2005, it has been recognised that this historical model difference is most likely the result of a large number of Russian SRM retroburns with return capsules not included in the MASTER-2005 event database. The extension of the firing list with the re-entry firings and the re-simulation of the debris environment based on the gathered information closes the gap between measurements and model predictions. In this paper, the identification of previously unknown signatures of the re-entry firings in the impact records of the Interplanetary Dust Experiment (IDE) carried by LDEF will be outlined. The direct confirmation of the simulated firings in the measured data supports the assumptions taken in the database generation and underlines the quality of the particle release models of MASTER. The interaction of LDEF with the simulated particle clouds will be discussed.

  4. The role of deep subduction in supercontinent breakup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capitanio, Fabio; Dal Zilio, Luca; Faccenda, Manuele

    2016-04-01

    The breakup of continents is a crucial stage of the episodic aggregation and dispersal of tectonic plates. In particular, the transition from a stable supercontinent to its rifting, breakup and subsequent drifting is one of the least understood aspects of plate tectonics. Over the last decades, several works have highlighted the potential role of pre-existing weaknesses or that of raising mantle plumes in assisting the localization of strain. However, to sustain large-scale divergent regime over geological time, extensional stresses are strictly required. Here we present results from 2-D thermo-mechanical numerical experiments and we show that rifting and drifting of continents result from lithospheric subduction at convergent margins, when this extends to lower mantle depths. We quantify the drag exerted by subduction-induced mantle flow along the basal surface of continental plates, comparing models where lithospheric slabs stagnate above the upper-lower mantle boundary with those where slabs penetrate into the lower mantle. When subduction is upper mantle-confined, divergent basal tractions localize at distances comparable to the effective upper mantle thickness (~500 km), causing the breakup of a microcontinent and opening of a marginal basin. Instead, when the descending lithosphere subducts deeper, extensional stresses localize at greater distances from the trench (≥ 2900 km), are higher and are sustained over a longer time. Although relatively low, basal shear stresses integrated over large plates generate tension forces that may exceed the strength of the continental lithosphere, eventually leading to breakup and opening of an intervening distal basin. The models illustrate that the mechanism leading to the formation of back-arc basins above upper mantle-confined subduction provides a viable explanation for the opening of larger basins above deeper subduction. Examples include the Atlantic Ocean formation and the South and North American plates drifting

  5. Shear-Induced Breakup of Cellulose Nanocrystal Aggregates.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hua-Neng; Tang, Yi-You; Ouyang, Xiao-Kun

    2017-01-10

    The flow properties of two kinds of cellulose nanocrystal (CNC) rods with different aspect ratios and similar zeta potentials in aqueous suspensions have been investigated. The aqueous CNC suspensions undergo a direct transition from dilute solution to colloidal glass instead of phase separation with the increasing CNC concentration. The viscosity profile shows a single shear-thinning behavior over the whole range of shear rates investigated. The shear-thinning behavior becomes stronger with the increasing CNC concentration. The viscosity is much higher for the unsonicated suspension when compared with the sonicated suspensions. The CNC rods appear arrested without alignment with an increasing shear rate from the small-angle light scattering patterns. The arrested glass state results from electric double layers surrounding the CNC rods, which give rise to long-ranged repulsive interactions. For the first time, we demonstrate that, within a narrow range of CNC concentrations, a shear-induced breakup process of the CNC aggregates exists when the shear rate is over a critical value and that the process is reversible in the sense that the aggregates can be reformed. We discuss the competition between the shear-induced breakup and the concentration-driven aggregation based on the experimental observations. The generated aggregate structure during the breakup process is characterized by a fractal dimension of 2.41. Furthermore, we determine two important variables-the breakup rate and the characteristic aggregate size-and derive analytical expressions for their evolution during the breakup process. The model predictions are in quantitative agreement with the experimental results.

  6. Sonic boom measurement test plan for Space Shuttle STS-3 reentry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, H. R.

    1982-01-01

    The lateral area from the reentry ground track affected by sonic boom overpressure levels is determined. Four data acquisition stations are deployed laterally to the STS-3 reentry flight track. These stations provide six intermediate band FM channels of sonic boom data, universal time synchronization, and voice annotation. All measurements are correlated with the vehicle reentry flight track information along with atmospheric and vehicle operation conditions.

  7. Re-Entry of Women to the Labour Market After an Interruption in Employment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seear, B. N.

    The problems involved in the re-entry of women into employment were studied, and the extent to which there exists a demand for employment for re-entry women was examined. A growing number of women are seeking re-entry in a wide range of income levels. The demand for part-time work appears to exceed supply. Official machinery for assisting re-entry…

  8. Spectroscopy of Project Fire 1, April 14, 1964. [comparison of reentry vehicle and meteor spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millman, P. M.

    1973-01-01

    The Fire 1 test was designed to study the heating of an Apollo-type reentry vehicle. The total reentry complex weighed approximately 230 kg and entered the upper atmosphere at a velocity of 11.5 km/s. The spectrum of the reentry complex has been studied in the wavelength range 3700 to 8800 A, where 102 multiplets of 21 atoms and the band systems of 5 diatomic molecules have been identified. Comparisons with meteor spectra are made.

  9. Breakup characteristics of a liquid jet in subsonic crossflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopala, Yogish

    This thesis describes an experimental investigation of the breakup processes involved in the formation of a spray created by a liquid jet injected into a gaseous crossflow. This work is motivated by the utilization of this method to inject fuel in combustors and afterburners of airplane engines. This study aims to develop a better understanding of the spray breakup processes and to provide better experimental inputs to improve the fidelity of numerical models. A review of the literature in this field identified the fundamental physical processes involved in the breakup of the spray and the dependence of spray properties on operating conditions. The time taken for the liquid column to break up into ligaments and droplets, the primary breakup time and the effect of injector geometry on the spray formation processes and spray properties as the key research areas in which research done so far has been inadequate. Determination of the location where the liquid column broke up was made difficult by the presence of a large number of droplets surrounding it. This study utilizes the liquid jet light guiding technique that enables accurate measurements of this location for a wide range of operating conditions. Prior to this study, the primary breakup time was thought to be a function the density ratio of the liquid and the gas, the diameter of the orifice and the air velocity. This study found that the time to breakup of the liquid column depends on the Reynolds number of the liquid jet. This suggests that the breakup of a turbulent liquid jet is influenced by both the aerodynamic breakup processes and the turbulent breakup processes. Observations of the phenomenon of the liquid jet splitting up into two or more jets were made at some operating conditions with the aid of the new visualization technique. Finally, this thesis investigates the effect of injector geometry on spray characteristics. One injector was a round edged orifice with a length to diameter ratio of 1 and a

  10. Effects of Na(+) channel and cell coupling abnormalities on vulnerability to reentry: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Qu, Zhilin; Karagueuzian, Hrayr S; Garfinkel, Alan; Weiss, James N

    2004-04-01

    The role of dynamic instabilities in the initiation of reentry in diseased (remodeled) hearts remains poorly explored. Using computer simulations, we studied the effects of altered Na(+) channel and cell coupling properties on the vulnerable window (VW) for reentry in simulated two-dimensional cardiac tissue with and without dynamic instabilities. We related the VW for reentry to effects on conduction velocity, action potential duration (APD), effective refractory period dispersion and restitution, and concordant and discordant APD alternans. We found the following: 1). reduced Na(+) current density and slowed recovery promoted postrepolarization refractoriness and enhanced concordant and discordant APD alternans, which increased the VW for reentry; 2). uniformly reduced cell coupling had little effect on cellular electrophysiological properties and the VW for reentry. However, randomly reduced cell coupling combined with decoupling promoted APD dispersion and alternans, which also increased the VW for reentry; 3). the combination of decreased Na(+) channel conductance, slowed Na(+) channel recovery, and cellular uncoupling synergistically increased the VW for reentry; and 4) the VW for reentry was greater when APD restitution slope was steep than when it was flat. In summary, altered Na(+) channel and cellular coupling properties increase vulnerability to reentrant arrhythmias. In remodeled hearts with altered Na(+) channel properties and cellular uncoupling, dynamic instabilities arising from electrical restitution exert important influences on the VW for reentry.

  11. The Re-Entry Safety of H-II Transfer Vehicle(HTV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozawa, Masayuki; Sasaki, Hiroshi; Yoshihara, Toru

    2010-09-01

    JAXA has recently established own regulation for the controlled reentry in addition to the existing requirements applicable to the natural reentry. This regulation added the requirements which addresses the safety control philosophy, the definition of the control system, the trajectory deviation to be considered, the criterion of the expected number of casualties(Ec) and other related requirements / processes. This paper introduces the contents of this regulation and the first application result to the HTV-1 reentry. The safety evaluation result for the HTV-1 reentry is also summarized.

  12. Academic Continuity and School Reentry Support as a Standard of Care in Pediatric Oncology.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Amanda L; Christiansen, Heather L; Elam, Megan; Hoag, Jennifer; Irwin, Mary Kay; Pao, Maryland; Voll, Megan; Noll, Robert B; Kelly, Katherine Patterson

    2015-12-01

    Clinicians agree that return to school after diagnosis promotes the positive adjustment of children and adolescents with cancer; however, the school reentry process can present challenges. The aim of this review was to critically evaluate the literature on school reentry support for youth with cancer. Seventeen publications were identified. School reentry services were well-received by families and educators; increased teacher and peer knowledge about childhood cancer; influenced peer and educator attitudes toward the patient; and improved communication and collaboration between patients/families, school, and the healthcare team. Evidence supports a strong recommendation for school reentry support for youth with cancer. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. RITD - Adapting Mars Entry, Descent and Landing System for Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haukka, H.; Heilimo, J.; Harri, A.-M.; Aleksashkin, S.; Koryanov, V.; Arruego, I.; Schmidt, W.; Finchenko, V.; Martynov, M.; Ponomarenko, A.; Kazakovtsev, V.; Martin, S.

    2015-10-01

    We have developed an atmospheric re-entry and descent system concept based on inflatable hypersonic decelerator techniques that were originally developed for Mars. The ultimate goal of this EU-funded RITD-project (Re-entry: Inflatable Technology Development) was to assess the benefits of this technology when deploying small payloads from low Earth orbits to the surface of the Earth with modest costs. The principal goal was to assess and develop a preliminary EDLS design for the entire relevant range of aerodynamic regimes expected to be encountered in Earth's atmosphere during entry, descent and landing. Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and even Lunar applications envisaged include the use of the EDLS approach in returning payloads of 4-8 kg down to the surface.

  14. Adaptive Guidance and Control Algorithms applied to the X-38 Reentry Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graesslin, M.; Wallner, E.; Burkhardt, J.; Schoettle, U.; Well, K. H.

    International Space Station's Crew Return/Rescue Vehicle (CRV) is planned to autonomously return the complete crew of 7 astronauts back to earth in case of an emergency. As prototype of such a vehicle, the X-38, is being developed and built by NASA with European participation. The X-38 is a lifting body with a hyper- sonic lift to drag ratio of about 0.9. In comparison to the Space Shuttle Orbiter, the X-38 has less aerodynamic manoeuvring capability and less actuators. Within the German technology programme TETRA (TEchnologies for future space TRAnsportation systems) contributing to the X-38 program, guidance and control algorithms have been developed and applied to the X-38 reentry mission. The adaptive guidance concept conceived combines an on-board closed-loop predictive guidance algorithm with flight load control that temporarily overrides the attitude commands of the predictive component if the corre- sponding load constraints are violated. The predictive guidance scheme combines an optimization step and a sequence of constraint restoration cycles. In order to satisfy on-board computation limitations the complete scheme is performed only during the exo-atmospheric flight coast phase. During the controlled atmospheric flight segment the task is reduced to a repeatedly solved targeting problem based on the initial optimal solution, thus omitting in-flight constraints. To keep the flight loads - especially the heat flux, which is in fact a major concern of the X-38 reentry flight - below their maximum admissible values, a flight path controller based on quadratic minimization techniques may override the predictive guidance command for a flight along the con- straint boundary. The attitude control algorithms developed are based on dynamic inversion. This methodology enables the designer to straightforwardly devise a controller structure from the system dynamics. The main ad- vantage of this approach with regard to reentry control design lies in the fact that

  15. Caenorhabditis elegans survives atmospheric breakup of STS-107, space shuttle Columbia.

    PubMed

    Szewczyk, Nathaniel J; Mancinelli, Rocco L; McLamb, William; Reed, David; Blumberg, Baruch S; Conley, Catharine A

    2005-12-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, a popular organism for biological studies, is being developed as a model system for space biology. The chemically defined liquid medium, C. elegans Maintenance Medium (CeMM), allows axenic cultivation and automation of experiments that are critical for spaceflight research. To validate CeMM for use during spaceflight, we grew animals using CeMM and standard laboratory conditions onboard STS-107, space shuttle Columbia. Tragically, the Columbia was destroyed while reentering the Earth's atmosphere. During the massive recovery effort, hardware that contained our experiment was found. Live animals were observed in four of the five recovered canisters, which had survived on both types of media. These data demonstrate that CeMM is capable of supporting C. elegans during spaceflight. They also demonstrate that animals can survive a relatively unprotected reentry into the Earth's atmosphere, which has implications with regard to the packaging of living material during space flight, planetary protection, and the interplanetary transfer of life.

  16. Spacecraft For Transport Between The Earth And The Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capps, Stephen; Sherwood, Brent; Woodcock, Gordon R.

    1995-01-01

    Report proposes development of family of spacecraft for transport between Earth and Moon. Development program oriented toward evolutionary improvements of equipment with minimal redesign of hardware. Intention to develop lineage of spacecraft, designs evolved to adapt to changing requirements and fabricated on long-lived production lines. Conceptual future enhancements include different propulsion systems, transfer habitats, crew cabs, and aerobrakes for reentry to atmoshphere of Earth.

  17. Additive empirical parametrization and microscopic study of deuteron breakup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avrigeanu, M.; Avrigeanu, V.

    2017-02-01

    Comparative assessment of the total breakup proton-emission cross sections measured for 56 MeV deuteron interaction with target nuclei from 12C to 209Bi, with an empirical parametrization and recently calculated microscopic neutron-removal cross sections was done at the same time with similar data measured at 15, 25.5, 70, and 80 MeV. Comparable mass dependencies of the elastic-breakup (EB) cross sections provided by the empirical parametrization and the microscopic results have been also found at the deuteron energy of 56 MeV, while the assessment of absolute-values variance up to a factor of two was not possible because of the lack of EB measurements at energies higher than 25.5 MeV. While the similarities represent an additional validation of the microscopic calculations, the cross-section difference should be considered within the objectives of further measurements.

  18. Thermally induced breakup of metallic nanowires: experiment and theory.

    PubMed

    Schnedlitz, Martin; Lasserus, Maximilian; Knez, Daniel; Hauser, Andreas W; Hofer, Ferdinand; Ernst, Wolfgang E

    2017-04-05

    We present time-resolved transmission electron microscopy studies of the degradation of Au, Ag, Cu and Ni nanowires deposited on a heated support. The wires are grown under fully inert conditions in superfluid helium droplets and deposited onto amorphous carbon. The inherent stability of these pristine metal nanowires with diameters below 10 nm is investigated in the absence of any stabilizers, templates or solvents. The phenomenon of Rayleigh-breakup, a consequence of diffusion processes along the wire surfaces, is analysed in situ via scans over time and support temperature. Our experimental efforts are combined with simulations based on a novel model featuring a cellular automaton to emulate surface diffusion. Based on this model, correlations between the material parameters and actual breakup behaviour are studied.

  19. Breakup reaction study of the Brunnian nucleus {sup 10}C

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, N.; Ashwood, N. I.; Clarke, N. M.; Freer, M.; Haigh, P. J.; Ziman, V.; Achouri, N. L.; Laurent, B.; Orr, N. A.; Bohlen, H. G.; Catford, W. N.; Patterson, N. P.; Thomas, J. S.; Soic, N.

    2008-02-15

    The structure and 2{alpha}+2p breakup of {sup 10}C, the only known Brunnian nucleus, has been studied at 33.3 MeV/nucleon. The breakup kinematics were used to reconstruct the {sup 10}C {yields} {sup 9}B +p,{sup 9}B {yields} {sup 8}Be +p,{sup 8}Be {yields}{alpha}+{alpha} and {sup 10}C {yields} {sup 6}Be +{alpha},{sup 6}Be {yields} {sup 5}Li +p,{sup 5}Li {yields}{alpha}+p decay paths. Proton emission was seen to be favored. The decay of excited states at E{sub x}=4.20,5.31, and 6.74 MeV was observed. The previously unobserved state at 4.20 MeV may correspond to a J{sup {pi}}=0{sup +}{alpha}+2p+{alpha} cluster structure.

  20. Viscous Particle Breakup within a Cooling Nuclear Fireball

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkinson, J. T.; Knight, K. B.; Dai, Z.; Ramon, C. E.; Reid, J. D.

    2016-10-04

    Following the surface detonation of a nuclear weapon, the Earth’s crust and immediate surroundings are drawn into the fireball and form melts. Fallout is formed as these melts incorporate radioactive material from the bomb vapor and cool rapidly. The resultant fallout plume and dispersion of radioactive contamination is a function of several factors including weather patterns and fallout particle shapes and size distributions. Accurate modeling of the size distributions of fallout forms an important data point for dispersion codes that calculate the aerial distribution of fallout. While morphological evidence for aggregation of molten droplets is well documented in fallout glass populations, the breakup of these molten droplets has not been similarly studied. This study documents evidence that quenched fallout populations preserve evidence of molten breakup mechanisms.

  1. The Soviet Breakup and U.S. Foreign Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Allen

    1991-01-01

    This issue of a quarterly publication on world affairs explores the historical significance of the disintegration of the Soviet Union and the implication for U.S. foreign policy. With the breakup of the USSR in 1990-91, Russia for the first time this century does not have control over the non-Russian nations of its former empire in Central Asia,…

  2. An analysis of the 2016 Hitomi breakup event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flegel, Sven; Bennett, James; Lachut, Michael; Möckel, Marek; Smith, Craig

    2017-04-01

    The breakup of Hitomi (ASTRO-H) on 26 March 2016 is analysed. Debris from the fragmentation is used to estimate the time of the event by propagating backwards and estimating the close approach with the parent object. Based on this method, the breakup event is predicted to have occurred at approximately 01:42 UTC on 26 March 2016. The Gaussian variation of parameters equations based on the instantaneous orbits at the predicted time of the event are solved to gain additional insight into the on-orbit position of Hitomi at the time of the event and to test an alternate approach of determining the event epoch and location. A conjunction analysis is carried out between Hitomi and all catalogued objects which were in orbit around the estimated time of the anomaly. Several debris objects have close approaches with Hitomi; however, there is no evidence to support the breakup was caused by a catalogued object. Debris from both of the largest fragmentation events—the Iridium 33-Cosmos 2251 conjunction in 2009 and the intentional destruction of Fengyun 1C in 2007—is involved in close approaches with Hitomi indicating the persistent threat these events have caused in subsequent space missions. To quantify the magnitude of a potential conjunction, the fragmentation resulting from a collision with the debris is modelled using the EVOLVE-4 breakup model. The debris characteristics are estimated from two-line element data. This analysis is indicative of the threat to space assets that mission planners face due to the growing debris population. The impact of the actual event to the environment is investigated based on the debris associated with Hitomi which is currently contained in the United States Strategic Command's catalogue. A look at the active missions in the orbital vicinity of Hitomi reveals that the Hubble Space Telescope is among the spacecraft which may be immediately affected by the new debris.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  3. Semiclassical calculations of observable cross sections in breakup reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Marta, H. D.; Canto, L. F.; Donangelo, R.

    2008-09-15

    We develop a semiclassical procedure to calculate breakup reaction products' angular and energy distributions in the laboratory frame of reference. The effects of the Coulomb and nuclear interaction potentials on the classical trajectories, as well as bound-bound, bound-continuum, and continuum-continuum couplings, are included. As an example we consider the {sup 8}B+{sup 58}Ni system at E{sub lab}=26 MeV and find very good agreement with the available experimental data.

  4. Peregrine soliton generation and breakup in standard telecommunications fiber.

    PubMed

    Hammani, Kamal; Kibler, Bertrand; Finot, Christophe; Morin, Philippe; Fatome, Julien; Dudley, John M; Millot, Guy

    2011-01-15

    We present experimental and numerical results showing the generation and breakup of the Peregrine soliton in standard telecommunications fiber. The impact of nonideal initial conditions is studied through direct cutback measurements of the longitudinal evolution of the emerging soliton dynamics and is shown to be associated with the splitting of the Peregrine soliton into two subpulses, with each subpulse itself exhibiting Peregrine soliton characteristics. Experimental results are in good agreement with simulations.

  5. Study of Liquid Breakup Process in Solid Rocket Motors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    Averaged Navier-Stokes code ( URANS ) to investigate the interaction of the liquid film flow with the gas flow, and analyzed the breakup process for...unsteady-flow Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes code ( URANS ) to investigate the interaction of the liquid film flow with the gas flow, and analyzed the...predict the flows by solving the unsteady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes ( URANS ) equations16. The system of equations was solved in an Eulerian multi

  6. The Soviet Breakup and U.S. Foreign Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Allen

    1991-01-01

    This issue of a quarterly publication on world affairs explores the historical significance of the disintegration of the Soviet Union and the implication for U.S. foreign policy. With the breakup of the USSR in 1990-91, Russia for the first time this century does not have control over the non-Russian nations of its former empire in Central Asia,…

  7. Beam break-up in the two beam accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Whittum, D.H.; Travish, G.A.; Sessler, A.M.; Craig, G.D.; DeFord, J.F.

    1989-03-01

    We have studied numerically beam break-up (BBU) in the drive beam of a Two-Beam Accelerator (TBA), using transverse wakes calculated numerically using the AMOS Code. We examine only cumulative BBU due to the wake of the linear induction accelerator cavities. We do not consider regenerative BBU due to the relativistic klystron (RK) cavities. We find growth lengths of order /approximately/100 m for typical parameters. 14 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Breakup modes of fluid drops in confined shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barai, Nilkamal; Mandal, Nibir

    2016-07-01

    Using a conservative level set method we investigate the deformation behavior of isolated spherical fluid drops in a fluid channel subjected to simple shear flows, accounting the following three non-dimensional parameters: (1) degree of confinement (Wc = 2a/h, where a is the drop radius and h is the channel thickness); (2) viscosity ratio between the two fluids (λ = μd/μm, where μd is the drop viscosity and μm is the matrix viscosity); and (3) capillary number (Ca). For a given Wc, a drop steadily deforms to attain a stable geometry (Taylor number and inclination of its long axis to the shear direction) when Ca < 0.3. For Ca > 0.3, the deformation behavior turns to be unsteady, leading to oscillatory variations of both its shape and orientation with progressive shear. This kind of unsteady deformation also occurs in a condition of high viscosity ratios (λ > 2). Here we present a detailed parametric analysis of the drop geometry with increasing shear as a function of Wc, Ca, and λ. Under a threshold condition, deforming drops become unstable, resulting in their breakup into smaller droplets. We recognize three principal modes of breakup: Mode I (mid-point pinching), Mode II (edge breakup), and Mode III (homogeneous breakup). Each of these modes is shown to be most effective in the specific field defined by Ca and λ. Our study also demonstrates the role of channel confinement (Wc) in controlling the transition of Mode I to III. Finally, we discuss implications of the three modes in determining characteristic drop size distributions in multiphase flows.

  9. Beam breakup integral measurement on high-power laser chains.

    PubMed

    Villate, Denis; Blanchot, Nathalie; Rouyer, Claude

    2007-03-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the efficiency of a single-shot method to measure the beam breakup integral (B) accumulated across a high power chain. The technique uses spectrally shaped strongly chirped femtosecond pulses and takes advantage of time-to-spectral coupling generated by nonlinear effects. We performed B measurements on regenerative amplifiers (Ti:sapphire) and on the ALISE 200 J facility currently installed at CEA-CESTA (France).

  10. Radial electron-beam-breakup transit-time oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Mostrom, M.A.; Kwan, T.J.T.

    1995-01-01

    A new radially-driven electron-beam-breakup transit-time oscillator has been investigated analytically and through computer simulation as a compact low-impedance high-power microwave generator. In a 1MV, 50kA device 35cm in radius and 15cm long, with no external magnetic field, 5GW of extracted power and a growth rate of 0.26/ns have been observed. Theoretical maximum efficiencies are several times higher.

  11. The Effect of Crustal Strength on Volcanism During Continental Breakup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armitage, J. J.; Petersen, K. D.; Perez-Gussinye, M.; Collier, J.; Pik, R.

    2015-12-01

    Segmentation is a fundamental property of rifted margins which is thought to be inherited from pre-breakup lithospheric structure. The volume of melt emplaced during rifting typically varies across these segments. Notable examples are the Gulf of California, break-up in the South Atlantic, and the Afar depression. For example in Afar there is a clear north south transition from break-up in the Erta Ale segment, where there is localised young (<1 Ma) volcanism, to the Dabbahu segment where there is the 4-1 Ma Stratoid volcanic series and distributed faulting. Along the Namibian and conjugate Argentinian margin there is evidence that surface area of seaward dipping reflectors change across segments. Such lateral changes in volcanism over a relatively short spatial scale are hard to explain by change in mantle temperature. We will demonstrate that crustal strength places a crucial control on the volume and composition of melt generated during break-up. We have compared models of extension with a weaker and strong lower crust based on observed rock rheologies. Melt composition and volume is found to be a function of the lower crustal rheology as it effects the shape of the melt zone during extension. By comparing a suite models we find that Afar volcanism can be matched by models with both a weak or strong lower crust. If however the crust is weaker then the equivalent volume and composition is created with less crustal thinning but over a greater period of time. The difference in time required to generate significant volcanic rock may explain the change in surface area of sub-areal volcanism in both Afar, where there is a transition of strong to weak crust from Erta Ale to Dabbahu, and off-shore Namibia. Lateral variation in volcanism between segments may therefore be fundamentally controlled by the crust.

  12. Thermocapillary-induced breakup of molten cladding films

    SciTech Connect

    Henkel, P.R.

    1987-06-01

    The fragmentation of molten cladding films into rivulets and single waves is investigated. This problem is especially relevant to liquid-metal fast breeder reactor safety analysis because of its impact on the flow regime of the clad metal. Among other effects, various instabilities may contribute to film breakup. In the axial direction, the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability can arise. As the Sandia transient axial relocation experiments frequently exhibit, an azimuthal fragmentation process also occurs. Consequently, another instability due to thermocapillarity is proposed.

  13. Study of Liquid Breakup Process in Solid Rocket Motor Nozzle

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-02-16

    a higher Weber Number relates to higher breakup of the two-phase flow. 15. SUBJECT TERMS N /A 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION...Unclassified SAR 31 19b. TELEPHONE NO (include area code) N /A Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. 239.18...temperature correlated density parameter = Volume fraction of n th phase in VOF model β = Thermal expansion coefficient = Kronecker delta = 3rd

  14. Effect of fibre rotation on the initiation of re-entry in cardiac tissue.

    PubMed

    Vigmond, E J; Leon, L J

    2001-07-01

    Transmural rotation of cardiac fibres can have a big influence on the initiation of re-entry in the heart. However, owing to computational demands, this has not been fully explored in a three-dimensional model of cardiac tissue that has a microscopic description of membrane currents, such as the Luo-Rudy model. Using a previously described model that is computationally fast, re-entry in three-dimensional blocks of cardiac tissue is induced by a cross-shock protocol, and the activity is examined. In the study, the effect of the transmural fibre rotation is ascertained by examining differences between a tissue block with no rotation and ones with 1, 2 and 3 degrees of rotation per fibre layer. The direction of the re-entry is significant in establishing whether or not re-entry can be induced, with clockwise re-entry being easier to initiate. Owing to the rotating anisotropy that results in preferential propagation along the fibre axis, the timing of the second stimulus in the cross-shock protocol has to be changed for different rates of fibre rotation. The fibre rotation either increases or decreases the window of opportunity for re-entry, depending on whether the activation front is perpendicular or parallel to the fibre direction. By varying the transmural extent of the S2, it is found that a deeper stimulus has to be applied to the blocks with fibre rotation to create re-entry. Increasing the transmural resistance also tends to reduce the extent of the S2 required to induce re-entry. Results suggest that increasing fibre rotation reduces the susceptibility of the tissue to re-entry, but that more complex spatiotemporal patterns are possible, e.g. stable figure-of-eight re-entries and transient rotors. Three mechanisms of re-entry annihilation are identified: front catchup, filling of the excitable gap and core wander.

  15. Ukrainian prisoners and community reentry challenges: implications for transitional care

    PubMed Central

    Morozova, Olga; Azbel, Lyuba; Grishaev, Yevgeny; Dvoryak, Sergii; Wickersham, Jeffrey A.; Altice, Frederick L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The study aims to assess reentry challenges faced by Ukrainian prisoners and to determine the factors associated with having a greater number of challenges in order to suggest pre- and post-release interventions with the aim of facilitating community reintegration. Design/methodology/approach A representative national cross-sectional study with a sample size of 402 prisoners was conducted among imprisoned adults within six months of release. The study consisted of interviews and biological testing for infectious diseases. Anticipated reentry challenges were assessed using a structured questionnaire. Findings The most difficult and relatively important challenges identified were finding a job or a stable source of income and staying out of prison following release. Risk-specific challenges pertinent to drug users and HIV-infected individuals were assessed as difficult, but generally less important. Similarly, challenges associated with reducing drug relapse were ranked as less important, with only 0.6 percent identifying opioid substitution therapy as a helpful measure. In the multivariate analysis, having a greater number of challenges is associated with previous incarcerations, drug use immediately before incarceration and lower levels of social support. Practical implications To facilitate community re-integration, it is vital to design interventions aimed at reducing recidivism and improvement of social support through comprehensive case management as well as to improve understanding about and address drug dependence issues among inmates by implementing evidence-based treatment both within prisons and after release. Originality/value This is the first comprehensive assessment of community reentry challenges by prisoners in the former Soviet Union. PMID:25152767

  16. Rescue Shuttle Flight Re-Entry: Controlling Astronaut Thermal Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillis, David B.; Hamilton, Douglas; Ilcus, Stana; Stepaniak, Phil; Polk, J. D.; Son, Chang; Bue, Grant

    2008-01-01

    A rescue mission for the STS-125 Hubble Telescope Repair Mission requires reentry from space with 11 crew members aboard, exceeding past cabin thermal load experience and risking crew thermal stress potentially causing cognitive performance and physiological decrements. The space shuttle crew cabin air revitalization system (ARS) was designed to support a nominal crew complement of 4 to 7 crew and 10 persons in emergencies, all in a shirt-sleeve environment. Subsequent to the addition of full pressure suits with individual cooling units, the ARS cannot maintain a stable temperature in the crew cabin during reentry thermal loads. Bulk cabin thermal models, used for rescue mission planning and analysis of crew cabin air, were unable to accurately represent crew workstation values of air flow, carbon dioxide, and heat content for the middeck. Crew temperature models suggested significantly elevated core temperatures. Planning for an STS-400 potential rescue of seven stranded crew utilized computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models to demonstrate inhomogeneous cabin thermal properties and improve analysis compared to bulk models. In the absence of monitoring of crew temperature, heart rate, metabolic rate and incomplete engineering data on the performance of the integrated cooling garment/cooling unit (ICG/CU) at cabin temperatures above 75 degrees F, related systems & models were reevaluated and tests conducted with humans in the loop. Changes to the cabin ventilation, ICU placement, crew reentry suit-donning procedures, Orbiter Program wave-off policy and post-landing power down and crew extraction were adopted. A second CFD and core temperature model incorporated the proposed changes and confirmed satisfactory cabin temperature, improved air distribution, and estimated core temperatures within safe limits. CONCLUSIONS: These changes in equipment, in-flight and post-landing procedures, and policy were implemented for the STS-400 rescue shuttle & will be implemented in

  17. Transverse liquid fuel jet breakup, burning, and ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H.

    1990-01-01

    An analytical/numerical study of the breakup, burning, and ignition of liquid fuels injected transversely into a hot air stream is conducted. The non-reacting liquid jet breakup location is determined by the local sonic point criterion first proposed by Schetz, et al. (1980). Two models, one employing analysis of an elliptical jet cross-section and the other employing a two-dimensional blunt body to represent the transverse jet, have been used for sonic point calculations. An auxiliary criterion based on surface tension stability is used as a separate means of determining the breakup location. For the reacting liquid jet problem, a diffusion flame supported by a one-step chemical reaction within the gaseous boundary layer is solved along the ellipse surface in subsonic crossflow. Typical flame structures and concentration profiles have been calculated for various locations along the jet cross-section as a function of upstream Mach numbers. The integrated reaction rate along the jet cross-section is used to predict ignition position, which is found to be situated near the stagnation point. While a multi-step reaction is needed to represent the ignition process more accurately, the present calculation does yield reasonable predictions concerning ignition along a curved surface.

  18. NAVSPASUR orbital processing for satellite break-up events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schumacher, Paul W., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Satellite breakups via explosion or collision can instantly increase the trackable orbiting population by up to several hundred objects, temporarily perturbing the routine space surveillance operations at U.S. Space Command (USSPACWCOM) and the Naval Space Surveillance Center (NAVSPASUR). This paper is a survey of some of the procedures and techniques used by NAVSPASUR to respond to such events. First, the overall data flow at NAVSPASUR is described highlighting the places at which human analysts may intervene with special processing. So-called manual intervention is required in a variety of non-nominal situations, including breakups. Second, a description is given of some of the orbital analysis and other software tools available to NAVSPASUR analysts. These tools were developed in-house over the past thirty years and can be employed in a highly flexible manner. The basic design philosophy for these tools was to implement simple concepts as efficiently as possible and to allow the analyst maximum use of his personal expertise. Finally, several historical breakup scenarios are discussed briefly. These scenarios provide examples of the types of questions that are fairly easy to answer in the present operational environment, as well as examples of questions that are very difficult to answer.

  19. Breakup length of harmonically stimulated capillary jets - theory and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia Garcia, Francisco Javier; Gonzalez Garcia, Heliodoro; Castrejon-Pita, Jose Rafael; Castrejon-Pita, Alfonso Arturo

    2014-11-01

    A stream of liquid breaks up into several drops by the action of surface tension. Capillary breakup forms the basis of some modern digital technologies, especially inkjet printing (including 3D manufacturing). Therefore, the control and prediction of the breakup length of harmonically modulated capillary jets is of great importance, in particular in Continuous InkJet systems (CIJ). However, a theoretical model that rigorously takes into account the physical characteristics of the system, and that properly describes this phenomenon did not exist until now. In this work we present a simple transfer function, derived from first principles, that accurately predicts the experimentally obtained breakup lengths of pressure-modulated capillary jets. No fitting parameters are necessary. A detailed description of the theoretical model and experimental setup will be presented. Spanish government (FIS2011-25161), Junta de Andalucia (P09-FQM-4584 and P11-FQM-7919), EPSRC-UK (EP/H018913/1), Royal Society and John Fell Fund (OUP).

  20. Resonant breakup of {sup 19}C on a proton target

    SciTech Connect

    Crespo, R.; Rodriguez-Gallardo, M.; Moro, A. M.; Deltuva, A.; Cravo, E.; Fonseca, A. C.

    2011-05-15

    The resonant breakup of {sup 19}C on a proton target at 70 MeV/nucleon is analyzed using Faddeev-Alt, Grassberger, Sandhas (Faddeev-AGS) and continuum-discretized coupled-channels (CDCC) reaction frameworks, where in both cases a three-body model ({sup 18}C+n+p) for the reaction is considered. Taking a {sup 18}C + p potential from a global nucleon-nucleus parametrization and a L-independent Gaussian proton-neutron potential, both methods provide very similar results for the calculated observables. However, when this simplified proton-neutron potential is replaced by the more realistic CD-Bonn potential, the breakup cross section, calculated with the Faddeev AGS formalism, decreases by almost one order of magnitude, largely underestimating the experimental data. From this calculation, we conclude that, within a core + valence neutron model, the single-particle mechanism gives a negligible contribution to the calculated resonant breakup and therefore core-excitation mechanisms should be taken into account.