Science.gov

Sample records for earth return vehicle

  1. Mars Earth Return Vehicle (MERV) Propulsion Options

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oleson, Steven R.; McGuire, Melissa L.; Burke, Laura; Fincannon, James; Warner, Joe; Williams, Glenn; Parkey, Thomas; Colozza, Tony; Fittje, Jim; Martini, Mike; hide

    2010-01-01

    The COMPASS Team was tasked with the design of a Mars Sample Return Vehicle. The current Mars sample return mission is a joint National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and European Space Agency (ESA) mission, with ESA contributing the launch vehicle for the Mars Sample Return Vehicle. The COMPASS Team ran a series of design trades for this Mars sample return vehicle. Four design options were investigated: Chemical Return /solar electric propulsion (SEP) stage outbound, all-SEP, all chemical and chemical with aerobraking. The all-SEP and Chemical with aerobraking were deemed the best choices for comparison. SEP can eliminate both the Earth flyby and the aerobraking maneuver (both considered high risk by the Mars Sample Return Project) required by the chemical propulsion option but also require long low thrust spiral times. However this is offset somewhat by the chemical/aerobrake missions use of an Earth flyby and aerobraking which also take many months. Cost and risk analyses are used to further differentiate the all-SEP and Chemical/Aerobrake options.

  2. Earth Return Aerocapture for the TransHab/Ellipsled Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muth, W. D.; Hoffmann, C.; Lyne, J. E.

    2000-01-01

    The current architecture being considered by NASA for a human Mars mission involves the use of an aerocapture procedure at Mars arrival and possibly upon Earth return. This technique would be used to decelerate the vehicles and insert them into their desired target orbits, thereby eliminating the need for propulsive orbital insertions. The crew may make the interplanetary journey in a large, inflatable habitat known as the TransHab. It has been proposed that upon Earth return, this habitat be captured into orbit for use on subsequent missions. In this case, the TransHab would be complimented with an aeroshell, which would protect it from heating during the atmospheric entry and provide the vehicle with aerodynamic lift. The aeroshell has been dubbed the "Ellipsled" because of its characteristic shape. This paper reports the results of a preliminary study of the aerocapture of the TransHab/Ellipsled vehicle upon Earth return. Undershoot and overshoot boundaries have been determined for a range of entry velocities, and the effects of variations in the atmospheric density profile, the vehicle deceleration limit, the maximum vehicle roll rate, the target orbit, and the vehicle ballistic coefficient have been examined. A simple, 180 degree roll maneuver was implemented in the undershoot trajectories to target the desired 407 km circular Earth orbit. A three-roll sequence was developed to target not only a specific orbital energy, but also a particular inclination, thereby decreasing propulsive inclination changes and post-aerocapture delta-V requirements. Results show that the TransHab/Ellipsled vehicle has a nominal corridor width of at least 0.7 degrees for entry speeds up to 14.0 km/s. Most trajectories were simulated using continuum flow aerodynamics, but the impact of high-altitude viscous effects was evaluated and found to be minimal. In addition, entry corridor comparisons have been made between the TransHab/Ellipsled and a modified Apollo capsule which is also

  3. Overview of the Mars Sample Return Earth Entry Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dillman, Robert; Corliss, James

    2008-01-01

    NASA's Mars Sample Return (MSR) project will bring Mars surface and atmosphere samples back to Earth for detailed examination. Langley Research Center's MSR Earth Entry Vehicle (EEV) is a core part of the mission, protecting the sample container during atmospheric entry, descent, and landing. Planetary protection requirements demand a higher reliability from the EEV than for any previous planetary entry vehicle. An overview of the EEV design and preliminary analysis is presented, with a follow-on discussion of recommended future design trade studies to be performed over the next several years in support of an MSR launch in 2018 or 2020. Planned topics include vehicle size for impact protection of a range of sample container sizes, outer mold line changes to achieve surface sterilization during re-entry, micrometeoroid protection, aerodynamic stability, thermal protection, and structural materials selection.

  4. Ablative Heat Shield Studies for NASA Mars/Earth Return Entry Vehicles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-09-01

    RETURN ENTRY VEHICLES by Michael K. Hamm September, 1990 NASA Thesis Advisor: William D. Henline Thesis Co-Advisor: Max F. Platzer Approved for public...STUDIES FOR NASA MARS/EARTH RETURN ENTRY VEHICLES (UNCLASSIFIED) 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Harm, Michael, K. 13a TYPE OF REPORT 13b TIME COVERED 14 DATE OF...theoretical values. The tests were performed to ascertain if RSI type materials could be used for entry vehicles proposed in NASA Mars missions. 20

  5. Assured crew return vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cerimele, Christopher J. (Inventor); Ried, Robert C. (Inventor); Peterson, Wayne L. (Inventor); Zupp, George A., Jr. (Inventor); Stagnaro, Michael J. (Inventor); Ross, Brian P. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A return vehicle is disclosed for use in returning a crew to Earth from low earth orbit in a safe and relatively cost effective manner. The return vehicle comprises a cylindrically-shaped crew compartment attached to the large diameter of a conical heat shield having a spherically rounded nose. On-board inertial navigation and cold gas control systems are used together with a de-orbit propulsion system to effect a landing near a preferred site on the surface of the Earth. State vectors and attitude data are loaded from the attached orbiting craft just prior to separation of the return vehicle.

  6. Optimization of Return Trajectories for Orbital Transfer Vehicle between Earth and Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funase, Ryu; Tsuda, Yuichi; Kawaguchi, Jun'ichiro

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, optimum trajectories in Earth Transfer Orbit (ETO) for a lunar transportation system are proposed. This paper aims at improving the payload ratio of the reusable orbital transfer vehicle (OTV), which transports the payload from Low Earth Orbit (LEO) to Lunar Low Orbit (LLO) and returns to LEO. In ETO, we discuss ballistic flight using chemical propulsion, multi-impulse flight using electrical propulsion, and aero-assisted flight using aero-brake. The feasibility of the OTV is considered.

  7. Earth Entry Vehicle Design for Sample Return Missions Using M-SAPE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samareh, Jamshid

    2015-01-01

    Most mission concepts that return sample material to Earth share one common element: an Earth entry vehicle (EEV). The primary focus of this paper is the examination of EEV design space for relevant sample return missions. Mission requirements for EEV concepts can be divided into three major groups: entry conditions (e.g., velocity and flight path angle), payload (e.g., mass, volume, and g-load limit), and vehicle characteristics (e.g., thermal protection system, structural topology, and landing concepts). The impacts of these requirements on the EEV design have been studied with an integrated system analysis tool, and the results will be discussed in details. In addition, through sensitivities analyses, critical design drivers that have been identified will be reviewed.

  8. Assured Crew Return Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, D. A.; Craig, J. W.; Drone, B.; Gerlach, R. H.; Williams, R. J.

    1991-01-01

    The developmental status is discussed regarding the 'lifeboat' vehicle to enhance the safety of the crew on the Space Station Freedom (SSF). NASA's Assured Crew Return Vehicle (ACRV) is intended to provide a means for returning the SSF crew to earth at all times. The 'lifeboat' philosophy is the key to managing the development of the ACRV which further depends on matrixed support and total quality management for implementation. The risk of SSF mission scenarios are related to selected ACRV mission requirements, and the system and vehicle designs are related to these precepts. Four possible ACRV configurations are mentioned including the lifting-body, Apollo shape, Discoverer shape, and a new lift-to-drag concept. The SCRAM design concept is discussed in detail with attention to the 'lifeboat' philosophy and requirements for implementation.

  9. Trajectory-based heating analysis for the European Space Agency/Rosetta Earth Return Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henline, William D.; Tauber, Michael E.

    1994-01-01

    A coupled, trajectory-based flowfield and material thermal-response analysis is presented for the European Space Agency proposed Rosetta comet nucleus sample return vehicle. The probe returns to earth along a hyperbolic trajectory with an entry velocity of 16.5 km/s and requires an ablative heat shield on the forebody. Combined radiative and convective ablating flowfield analyses were performed for the significant heating portion of the shallow ballistic entry trajectory. Both quasisteady ablation and fully transient analyses were performed for a heat shield composed of carbon-phenolic ablative material. Quasisteady analysis was performed using the two-dimensional axisymmetric codes RASLE and BLIMPK. Transient computational results were obtained from the one-dimensional ablation/conduction code CMA. Results are presented for heating, temperature, and ablation rate distributions over the probe forebody for various trajectory points. Comparison of transient and quasisteady results indicates that, for the heating pulse encountered by this probe, the quasisteady approach is conservative from the standpoint of predicted surface recession.

  10. Analytical Simulations of Energy-Absorbing Impact Spheres for a Mars Sample Return Earth Entry Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billings, Marcus Dwight; Fasanella, Edwin L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Nonlinear dynamic finite element simulations were performed to aid in the design of an energy-absorbing impact sphere for a passive Earth Entry Vehicle (EEV) that is a possible architecture for the Mars Sample Return (MSR) mission. The MSR EEV concept uses an entry capsule and energy-absorbing impact sphere designed to contain and limit the acceleration of collected samples during Earth impact without a parachute. The spherical shaped impact sphere is composed of solid hexagonal and pentagonal foam-filled cells with hybrid composite, graphite-epoxy/Kevlar cell walls. Collected Martian samples will fit inside a smaller spherical sample container at the center of the EEV's cellular structure. Comparisons were made of analytical results obtained using MSC.Dytran with test results obtained from impact tests performed at NASA Langley Research Center for impact velocities from 30 to 40 m/s. Acceleration, velocity, and deformation results compared well with the test results. The correlated finite element model was then used for simulations of various off-nominal impact scenarios. Off-nominal simulations at an impact velocity of 40 m/s included a rotated cellular structure impact onto a flat surface, a cellular structure impact onto an angled surface, and a cellular structure impact onto the corner of a step.

  11. Micrometeoroid and Orbital Debris Threat Assessment: Mars Sample Return Earth Entry Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christiansen, Eric L.; Hyde, James L.; Bjorkman, Michael D.; Hoffman, Kevin D.; Lear, Dana M.; Prior, Thomas G.

    2011-01-01

    This report provides results of a Micrometeoroid and Orbital Debris (MMOD) risk assessment of the Mars Sample Return Earth Entry Vehicle (MSR EEV). The assessment was performed using standard risk assessment methodology illustrated in Figure 1-1. Central to the process is the Bumper risk assessment code (Figure 1-2), which calculates the critical penetration risk based on geometry, shielding configurations and flight parameters. The assessment process begins by building a finite element model (FEM) of the spacecraft, which defines the size and shape of the spacecraft as well as the locations of the various shielding configurations. This model is built using the NX I-deas software package from Siemens PLM Software. The FEM is constructed using triangular and quadrilateral elements that define the outer shell of the spacecraft. Bumper-II uses the model file to determine the geometry of the spacecraft for the analysis. The next step of the process is to identify the ballistic limit characteristics for the various shield types. These ballistic limits define the critical size particle that will penetrate a shield at a given impact angle and impact velocity. When the finite element model is built, each individual element is assigned a property identifier (PID) to act as an index for its shielding properties. Using the ballistic limit equations (BLEs) built into the Bumper-II code, the shield characteristics are defined for each and every PID in the model. The final stage of the analysis is to determine the probability of no penetration (PNP) on the spacecraft. This is done using the micrometeoroid and orbital debris environment definitions that are built into the Bumper-II code. These engineering models take into account orbit inclination, altitude, attitude and analysis date in order to predict an impacting particle flux on the spacecraft. Using the geometry and shielding characteristics previously defined for the spacecraft and combining that information with the

  12. Mars to earth optical communication link for the proposed Mars Sample Return mission roving vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sipes, Donald L., Jr.

    The Mars Sample Return (MSR) mission planed for 1989 will deploy a rover from its landing craft to survey the Martian surface. During traversals of the rover from one site to the next in search of samples, three-dimensional images from a pair of video cameras will be transmitted to earth; the terrestrial operators will then send back high level direction commands to the rover. Attention is presently given to the effects of wind and dust on communications, the architecture of the optical communications package, and the identification of technological areas requiring further development for MSR incorporation.

  13. Thermal Protection for Mars Sample Return Earth Entry Vehicle: A Grand Challenge for Design Methodology and Reliability Verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatapathy, Ethiraj; Gage, Peter; Wright, Michael J.

    2017-01-01

    Mars Sample Return is our Grand Challenge for the coming decade. TPS (Thermal Protection System) nominal performance is not the key challenge. The main difficulty for designers is the need to verify unprecedented reliability for the entry system: current guidelines for prevention of backward contamination require that the probability of spores larger than 1 micron diameter escaping into the Earth environment be lower than 1 million for the entire system, and the allocation to TPS would be more stringent than that. For reference, the reliability allocation for Orion TPS is closer to 11000, and the demonstrated reliability for previous human Earth return systems was closer to 1100. Improving reliability by more than 3 orders of magnitude is a grand challenge indeed. The TPS community must embrace the possibility of new architectures that are focused on reliability above thermal performance and mass efficiency. MSR (Mars Sample Return) EEV (Earth Entry Vehicle) will be hit with MMOD (Micrometeoroid and Orbital Debris) prior to reentry. A chute-less aero-shell design which allows for self-righting shape was baselined in prior MSR studies, with the assumption that a passive system will maximize EEV robustness. Hence the aero-shell along with the TPS has to take ground impact and not break apart. System verification will require testing to establish ablative performance and thermal failure but also testing of damage from MMOD, and structural performance at ground impact. Mission requirements will demand analysis, testing and verification that are focused on establishing reliability of the design. In this proposed talk, we will focus on the grand challenge of MSR EEV TPS and the need for innovative approaches to address challenges in modeling, testing, manufacturing and verification.

  14. Probabilistic Design of a Mars Sample Return Earth Entry Vehicle Thermal Protection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dec, John A.; Mitcheltree, Robert A.

    2002-01-01

    The driving requirement for design of a Mars Sample Return mission is to assure containment of the returned samples. Designing to, and demonstrating compliance with, such a requirement requires physics based tools that establish the relationship between engineer's sizing margins and probabilities of failure. The traditional method of determining margins on ablative thermal protection systems, while conservative, provides little insight into the actual probability of an over-temperature during flight. The objective of this paper is to describe a new methodology for establishing margins on sizing the thermal protection system (TPS). Results of this Monte Carlo approach are compared with traditional methods.

  15. Near-Earth Asteroid Returned Sample (NEARS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoemaker, Eugene M.; Cheng, Andrew F.

    1994-01-01

    The concept of the Near-Earth Asteroid Returned Sample (NEARS) mission is to return to Earth 10-100 g from each of four to six sites on a near-Earth asteroid and to perform global characterization of the asteroid and measure mass, volume, and density to ten percent. The target asteroid for the mission is 4660 Nereus, probably a primitive C-type asteroid, with the alternate target being 1989ML, an extremely accessible asteroid of unknown type. Launch dates will be 1998, 2000, 2002, and 2004 on the Delta II-7925 launch vehicle. The mission objectives are three-fold. (1) Provide first direct and detailed petrological, chemical, age, and isotopic characterization of a near-Earth asteroid and relate it to terrestrial, lunar, and meteoritic materials. (2) Sample the asteroid regolith and characterize any exotic fragments. (3) Identify heterogeneity in the asteroid's isotopic properties, age, and elemental chemistry.

  16. Mid-Air Retrieval of Heavy, Earth-Returning Space Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, John W.; Brierly, Gregory T.; Cruz, Josue; Lowry, Allen; Fogleman, Lynn; Johnson, Brian; Peterson, Kristina; Gibson, Ian; Neave, Matthew D.; Streetman, Brett; hide

    2016-01-01

    This subject technology has the potential to reduce cost for many Earth returning missions, both Government and commercial, including reentry vehicles, launch assets, and scientific experiments using balloons.

  17. An Integrated Tool for System Analysis of Sample Return Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samareh, Jamshid A.; Maddock, Robert W.; Winski, Richard G.

    2012-01-01

    The next important step in space exploration is the return of sample materials from extraterrestrial locations to Earth for analysis. Most mission concepts that return sample material to Earth share one common element: an Earth entry vehicle. The analysis and design of entry vehicles is multidisciplinary in nature, requiring the application of mass sizing, flight mechanics, aerodynamics, aerothermodynamics, thermal analysis, structural analysis, and impact analysis tools. Integration of a multidisciplinary problem is a challenging task; the execution process and data transfer among disciplines should be automated and consistent. This paper describes an integrated analysis tool for the design and sizing of an Earth entry vehicle. The current tool includes the following disciplines: mass sizing, flight mechanics, aerodynamics, aerothermodynamics, and impact analysis tools. Python and Java languages are used for integration. Results are presented and compared with the results from previous studies.

  18. Winged cargo return vehicle conceptual design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    NASA is committed to placing a permanent space station in Earth orbit in the 1990's. Space Station Freedom (SSF) will be located in a 220 n.m. orbit at 28.5 degrees inclination. The Winged Cargo Return Vehicle's (CRV) primary mission is to support SSF crew by flying regular resupply missions. The winged CRV is designed to be reusable, dry land recoverable, and unmanned. The CRV will be launched inline on three liquid hydrogen/oxygen rocket boosters with a payload capacity of 113,000 lbs. The three boosters will take the CRV to an orbit of 50 by 110 n.m. From this altitude the orbital manuevering engine will place the vehicle in synchronous orbit with the space station. The winged CRV will deliver cargo modules to the space station by direct docking or by remaining outside the SSF command zone and using the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) to transfer cargo. After unloading/loading, the CRV will deorbit and fly back to Kennedy Space Center. The CRV has a wing span of 57.8 feet, a length of 76.0 feet, and a dry weight of 61.5 klb. The cargo capacity of the vehicle is 44.4 klb. The vehicle has a lift-drag ratio of 1.28 (hypersonic) and 6.0 (subsonic), resulting in a 1351 n.m. cross range. The overall mission length ranges between 18.8 and 80.5 hr. The operational period will be the years 2000 to 2020.

  19. Mars Sample Return: Mars Ascent Vehicle Mission and Technology Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, Jeffrey V.; Huynh, Loc C.; Hawke, Veronica M.; Jiang, Xun J.

    2013-01-01

    A Mars Sample Return mission is the highest priority science mission for the next decade recommended by the recent Decadal Survey of Planetary Science, the key community input process that guides NASAs science missions. A feasibility study was conducted of a potentially simple and low cost approach to Mars Sample Return mission enabled by the use of developing commercial capabilities. Previous studies of MSR have shown that landing an all up sample return mission with a high mass capacity lander is a cost effective approach. The approach proposed is the use of an emerging commercially available capsule to land the launch vehicle system that would return samples to Earth. This paper describes the mission and technology requirements impact on the launch vehicle system design, referred to as the Mars Ascent Vehicle (MAV).

  20. Mars Sample Return: Mars Ascent Vehicle Mission and Technology Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, Jeffrey V.; Huynh, Loc C.; Hawke, Veronica M.

    2013-01-01

    A Mars Sample Return mission is the highest priority science mission for the next decade recommended by the recent Decadal Survey of Planetary Science, the key community input process that guides NASA's science missions. A feasibility study was conducted of a potentially simple and low cost approach to Mars Sample Return mission enabled by the use of new commercial capabilities. Previous studies of MSR have shown that landing an all up sample return mission with a high mass capacity lander is a cost effective approach. The approach proposed is the use of a SpaceX Dragon capsule to land the launch vehicle system that would return samples to Earth. This paper describes the mission and technology requirements impact on the launch vehicle system design, referred to as the Mars Ascent Vehicle (MAV).

  1. Stardust Returns to Earth Artist Concept

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-11-03

    Artist rendering of NASA’s Stardust returning to Earth. Stardust is the first U.S. space mission dedicated to the exploration of a comet, and the first robotic mission designed to return extraterrestrial material from outside the orbit of the Moon.

  2. Assured crew return capability Crew Emergency Return Vehicle (CERV) avionics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Harvey Dean

    1990-01-01

    The Crew Emergency Return Vehicle (CERV) is being defined to provide Assured Crew Return Capability (ACRC) for Space Station Freedom. The CERV, in providing the standby lifeboat capability, would remain in a dormat mode over long periods of time as would a lifeboat on a ship at sea. The vehicle must be simple, reliable, and constantly available to assure the crew's safety. The CERV must also provide this capability in a cost effective and affordable manner. The CERV Project philosophy of a simple vehicle is to maximize its useability by a physically deconditioned crew. The vehicle reliability goes unquestioned since, when needed, it is the vehicle of last resort. Therefore, its systems and subsystems must be simple, proven, state-of-the-art technology with sufficient redundancy to make it available for use as required for the life of the program. The CERV Project Phase 1'/2 Request for Proposal (RFP) is currently scheduled for release on October 2, 1989. The Phase 1'/2 effort will affirm the existing project requirements or amend and modify them based on a thorough evaluation of the contractor(s) recommendations. The system definition phase, Phase 2, will serve to define CERV systems and subsystems. The current CERV Project schedule has Phase 2 scheduled to begin October 1990. Since a firm CERV avionics design is not in place at this time, the treatment of the CERV avionics complement for the reference configuration is not intended to express a preference with regard to a system or subsystem.

  3. Hayabusa: Navigation Challenges for Earth Return

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haw, Robert J.; Bhaskaran, S.; Strauss, W.; Sklyanskiy, E.; Graat, E. J.; Smith, J. J.; Menom, P.; Ardalan, S.; Ballard, C.; Williams, P.; hide

    2011-01-01

    Hayabusa was a JAXA sample-return mission to Itokawa navigated, in part, by JPL personnel. Hayabusa survived several near mission-ending failures at Itokawa yet returned to Earth with an asteroid regolith sample on June 13, 2010. This paper describes NASA/JPL's participation in the Hayabusa mission during the last 100 days of its mission, wherein JPL provided tracking data and orbit determination, plus verification of maneuver design and entry, descent and landing.

  4. Crew emergency return vehicle - Electrical power system design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darcy, E. C.; Barrera, T. P.

    1989-01-01

    A crew emergency return vehicle (CERV) is proposed to perform the lifeboat function for the manned Space Station Freedom. This escape module will be permanently docked to Freedom and, on demand, will be capable of safely returning the crew to earth. The unique requirements that the CERV imposes on its power source are presented, power source options are examined, and a baseline system is selected. It consists of an active Li-BCX DD-cell modular battery system and was chosen for the maturity of its man-rated design and its low development costs.

  5. COMPASS Final Report: Near Earth Asteroids Rendezvous and Sample Earth Returns (NEARER)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oleson, Steven R.; McGuire, Melissa L.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, the Collaborative Modeling for Parametric Assessment of Space Systems (COMPASS) team completed a design for a multi-asteroid (Nereus and 1996 FG3) sample return capable spacecraft for the NASA In-Space Propulsion Office. The objective of the study was to support technology development and assess the relative benefits of different electric propulsion systems on asteroid sample return design. The design uses a single, heritage Orion solar array (SA) (approx.6.5 kW at 1 AU) to power a single NASA Evolutionary Xenon Thruster ((NEXT) a spare NEXT is carried) to propel a lander to two near Earth asteroids. After landing and gathering science samples, the Solar Electric Propulsion (SEP) vehicle spirals back to Earth where it drops off the first sample s return capsule and performs an Earth flyby to assist the craft in rendezvousing with a second asteroid, which is then sampled. The second sample is returned in a similar fashion. The vehicle, dubbed Near Earth Asteroids Rendezvous and Sample Earth Returns (NEARER), easily fits in an Atlas 401 launcher and its cost estimates put the mission in the New Frontier s (NF's) class mission.

  6. Passive vs. Parachute System Architecture for Robotic Sample Return Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddock, Robert W.; Henning, Allen B.; Samareh, Jamshid A.

    2016-01-01

    The Multi-Mission Earth Entry Vehicle (MMEEV) is a flexible vehicle concept based on the Mars Sample Return (MSR) EEV design which can be used in the preliminary sample return mission study phase to parametrically investigate any trade space of interest to determine the best entry vehicle design approach for that particular mission concept. In addition to the trade space dimensions often considered (e.g. entry conditions, payload size and mass, vehicle size, etc.), the MMEEV trade space considers whether it might be more beneficial for the vehicle to utilize a parachute system during descent/landing or to be fully passive (i.e. not use a parachute). In order to evaluate this trade space dimension, a simplified parachute system model has been developed based on inputs such as vehicle size/mass, payload size/mass and landing requirements. This model works in conjunction with analytical approximations of a mission trade space dataset provided by the MMEEV System Analysis for Planetary EDL (M-SAPE) tool to help quantify the differences between an active (with parachute) and a passive (no parachute) vehicle concept.

  7. Near-Earth Asteroid Sample Return Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This volume contains abstracts that have been accepted for presentation at the Near-Earth Asteroid Sample Return Workshop, 11-12 Dec 2000. The Steering Committee consisted of Derek Sears, Chair, Dan Britt, Don Brownlee, Andrew Cheng, Benton Clark, Leon Gefert, Steve Gorevan, Marilyn Lindstrom, Carle Pieters, Jeff Preble, Brian Wilcox, and Don Yeomans. Logistical, administrative, and publications support were provided by the Publications and Program Services Department of the Lunar and Planetary Institute.

  8. MSR ESA Earth Return Orbiter Mission Design Trades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez Perez, J. M.; Varga, G. I.; Huesing, J.; Beyer, F.

    2018-04-01

    The paper describes the work performed at ESOC in support of the Mars Sample Return ESA Earth Return Orbiter definition studies by exploring the trajectory optimization and mission design trade spaces of Mars return missions using electric and chemical propulsion.

  9. Crew emergency return vehicle autoland feasibility study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bossi, J. A.; Langehough, M. A.; Lee, K. L.

    1989-01-01

    The crew emergency return vehicle (CERV) autoland feasibility study focused on determining the controllability of the NASA Langley high lift over drag CERV for performing an automatic landing at a prescribed runway. An autoland system was developed using integral linear quadratic Gaussian (LQG) design techniques. The design was verified using a nonlinear 6 DOF simulation. Simulation results demonstrate that the CERV configuration is a very flyable configuration for performing an autoland mission. Adequate stability and control was demonstrated for wind turbulence and wind shear. Control surface actuator requirements were developed.

  10. Notes on Earth Atmospheric Entry for Mars Sample Return Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivell, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    The entry of sample return vehicles (SRVs) into the Earth's atmosphere is the subject of this document. The Earth entry environment for vehicles, or capsules, returning from the planet Mars is discussed along with the subjects of dynamics, aerodynamics, and heat transfer. The material presented is intended for engineers and scientists who do not have strong backgrounds in aerodynamics, aerothermodynamics and flight mechanics. The document is not intended to be comprehensive and some important topics are omitted. The topics considered in this document include basic principles of physics (fluid mechanics, dynamics and heat transfer), chemistry and engineering mechanics. These subjects include: a) fluid mechanics (aerodynamics, aerothermodynamics, compressible fluids, shock waves, boundary layers, and flow regimes from subsonic to hypervelocity; b) the Earth s atmosphere and gravity; c) thermal protection system design considerations; d) heat and mass transfer (convection, radiation, and ablation); e) flight mechanics (basic rigid body dynamics and stability); and f) flight- and ground-test requirements; and g) trajectory and flow simulation methods.

  11. Cargo launch vehicles to low earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Austin, Robert E.

    1990-01-01

    There are two primary space transportation capabilities required to support both base programs and expanded mission requirements: earth-to-orbit (ETO) transportation systems and space transfer vehicle systems. Existing and new ETO vehicles required to support mission requirements, and planned robotic missions, along with currently planned ETO vehicles are provided. Lunar outposts, Mars' outposts, base and expanded model, ETO vehicles, advanced avionics technologies, expert systems, network architecture and operations systems, and technology transfer are discussed.

  12. Parachute Testing for the NASA X-38 Crew Return Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, Jenny M.

    2005-01-01

    NASA's X-38 program was an in-house technology demonstration program to develop a Crew Return Vehicle (CRV) for the International Space Station capable of returning seven crewmembers to Earth when the Space Shuttle was not present at the station. The program, managed out of NASA's Johnson Space Center, was started in 1995 and was cancelled in 2003. Eight flights with a prototype atmospheric vehicle were successfully flown at Edwards Air Force Base, demonstrating the feasibility of a parachute landing system for spacecraft. The intensive testing conducted by the program included testing of large ram-air parafoils. The flight test techniques, instrumentation, and simulation models developed during the parachute test program culminated in the successful demonstration of a guided parafoil system to land a 25,000 Ib spacecraft. The test program utilized parafoils of sizes ranging from 750 to 7500 p. The guidance, navigation, and control system (GN&C) consisted of winches, laser or radar altimeter, global positioning system (GPS), magnetic compass, barometric altimeter, flight computer, and modems for uplink commands and downlink data. The winches were used to steer the parafoil and to perform the dynamic flare maneuver for a soft landing. The laser or radar altimeter was used to initiate the flare. In the event of a GPS failure, the software navigated by dead reckoning using the compass and barometric altimeter data. The GN&C test beds included platforms dropped from cargo aircraft, atmospheric vehicles released from a 8-52, and a Buckeye powered parachute. This paper will describe the test program and significant results.

  13. Circumlunar Free-Return Cycler Orbits for a Manned Earth-Moon Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Genova, Anthony L.; Aldrin, Buzz

    2015-01-01

    Multiple free-return circumlunar cycler orbits were designed to allow regular travel between the Earth and Moon by a manned space station. The presented cycler orbits contain circumlunar free-return "figure-8" segments and yield lunar encounters every month. Smaller space "taxi" vehicles can rendezvous with (and depart from) the cycling Earth-Moon space station to enter lunar orbit (and/or land on the lunar surface), return to Earth, or reach destinations including Earth-Moon L1 and L2 halo orbits, near-Earth objects (NEOs), Venus, and Mars. To assess the practicality of the selected orbits, relevant cycler characteristics (including (Delta)V maintenance requirements) are presented and compared.

  14. Biconic cargo return vehicle with an advanced recovery system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The current space exploration initiative is focused around the development of the Space Station Freedom (SSF). Regular resupply missions must support a full crew on the station. The present mission capability of the shuttle is insufficient, making it necessary to find an alternative. One alternative is a reusable Cargo Return Vehicle (CRV). The suggested design is a biconic shaped, dry land recovery CRV with an advance recovery system (ARC). A liquid rocket booster will insert the CRV into a low Earth orbit. Three onboard liquid hydrogen/liquid oxygen engines are used to reach the orbit of the station. The CRV will dock to the station and cargo exchange will take place. Within the command and control zone (CCZ), the CRV will be controlled by a gaseous nitrogen reaction control system (RCS). The CRV will have the capability to exchange the payload with the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV). The bent biconic shape will give the CRV sufficient crossrange to reach Edwards Air Force Base and several alternative sites. Near the landing site, a parafoil-shaped ARS is deployed. The CRV is designed to carry a payload of 40 klb, and has an unloaded weight of 35 klb.

  15. Winged cargo return vehicle. Volume 1: Conceptual design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The Advanced Design Project (ADP) allows an opportunity for students to work in conjunction with NASA and other aerospace companies on NASA Advanced Design Projects. The following volumes represent the design report: Volume 1 Conceptual Design; Volume 2 Wind Tunnel Tests; Volume 3 Structural Analysis; and Volume 4 Water Tunnel Tests. The project chosen by the University of Minnesota in conjunction with NASA Marshall Space Flight Center for this year is a Cargo Return Vehicle (CRV) to support the Space Station Freedom. The vehicle is the third generation of vehicles to be built by NASA, the first two being the Apollo program, and the Space Shuttle program. The CRV is to work in conjunction with a personnel launch system (PLS) to further subdivide and specialize the vehicles that NASA will operate in the year 2000. The cargo return vehicle will carry payload to and from the Space Station Freedom (SSF).

  16. Assured crew return vehicle man-systems integration standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This is Volume 6 of the Man-Systems Integration Standards (MSIS) family of documents, which is contained in several volumes and a relational database. Each volume has a specific purpose, and each has been assembled from the data contained in the relational database. Volume 6 serves as the Assured Crew Return Vehicle project man-systems integration design requirements. The data in this document is a subset of the data found in Volume 1 and defines the requirements which are pertinent to the Assured Crew Return Vehicle as defined in the SPRD. Additional data and guidelines are provided to assist in the design.

  17. Sample Return: What Happens to the Samples on Earth?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNamara, Karen

    2010-01-01

    As space agencies throughout the world turn their attention toward human exploration of the Moon, Mars, and the solar system beyond, there has been an increase in the number of robotic sample return missions proposed as precursors to these human endeavors. In reality, however, we, as a global community, have very little experience with robotic sample return missions: 3 of the Russian Luna Missions successfully returned lunar material in the 1970s; 28 years later, in 2004, NASA s Genesis Mission returned material from the solar wind; and in 2006, NASA s Stardust Mission returned material from the Comet Wild2. [Note: The Japanese Hyabusa mission continues in space with the hope of returning material from the asteroid 25143 Itokawa.] We launch many spacecraft to LEO and return them to Earth. We also launch spacecraft beyond LEO to explore the planets, our solar system, and beyond. Some even land on these bodies. But these do not return. So as we begin to contemplate the sample return missions of the future, some common questions arise: "What really happens when the capsule returns?" "Where does it land?" "Who retrieves it and just how do they do that?" "Where does it go after that?" "How do the scientists get the samples?" "Do they keep them?" "Who is in charge?" The questions are nearly endless. The goal of this paper/presentation is to uncover many of the mysteries of the post-return phase of a mission - from the time the return body enters the atmosphere until the mission ends and the samples become part of a long term collection. The discussion will be based largely on the author s own experience with both the Genesis and Stardust missions. Of course, these two missions have a great deal in common, being funded by the same NASA Program (Discovery) and having similar team composition. The intent, however, is to use these missions as examples in order to highlight the general requirements and the challenges in defining and meeting those requirements for the final

  18. Global Positioning Svstem (GPS) on International Space Station (ISS) and Crew Return Vehicle (CRV)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gomez, Susan F.

    2002-01-01

    Both the International Space Station and Crew Return Vehicle desired to have GPS on their vehicles due to improve state determination over traditional ground tracking techniques used in the past for space vehicles. Both also opted to use GPS for attitude determination to save the expense of a star tracker. Both vehicles have stringent pointing requirements for roll, pitch, and heading, making a sun or earth sensor not a viable option since the heading is undetermined. This paper discusses the technical challenges associated with the implementation of GPS on both of these vehicles. ISS and CRY use the same GPS receiver, but have faced different challenges since the mission of each is di fferent. ISS will be discussed first, then CRY. The flight experiments flown on the Space Shuttle in support of these efforts is also discussed.

  19. Radiation from lightning return strokes over a finitely conducting earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le Vine, D. M.; Gesell, L.; Kao, Michael

    1986-01-01

    The effects of the conductivity of the earth on radiation from lightning return strokes are examined theoretically using a piecewise linear transmission line model for the return stroke. First, calculations are made of the electric field radiated during the return stroke, and then this electric field is used to compute the response of conventional AM radio receivers and electric field change systems during the return stroke. The calculations apply to the entire transient waveform (they are not restricted to the initial portions of the return stroke) and yield fast field changes and RF radiation in agreement with measurements made during real lightning. This research was motivated by measurements indicating that a time delay exists between the time of arrival of the fast electric field change and the RF radiation from first return strokes. The time delay is on the order of 20 microsec for frequencies in the HF-UHF range for lightning in Florida. The time delay is obtained theoretically in this paper. It occurs when both the effects of attenuation due to conductivity of the earth, and the finite velocity of propagation of the current pulse up the return stroke channel, are taken into account in the model.

  20. Passive Earth Entry Vehicle Landing Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kellas, Sotiris

    2017-01-01

    Two full-scale passive Earth Entry Vehicles (EEV) with realistic structure, surrogate sample container, and surrogate Thermal Protection System (TPS) were built at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) and tested at the Utah Test and Training Range (UTTR). The main test objective was to demonstrate structural integrity and investigate possible impact response deviations of the realistic vehicle as compared to rigid penetrometer responses. With the exception of the surrogate TPS and minor structural differences in the back shell construction, the two test vehicles were identical in geometry and both utilized the Integrated Composite Stiffener Structure (ICoSS) structural concept in the forward shell. The ICoSS concept is a lightweight and highly adaptable composite concept developed at NASA LaRC specifically for entry vehicle TPS carrier structures. The instrumented test vehicles were released from a helicopter approximately 400 m above ground. The drop height was selected such that at least 98% of the vehicles terminal velocity would be achieved. While drop tests of spherical penetrometers and a low fidelity aerodynamic EEV model were conducted at UTTR in 1998 and 2000, this was the first time a passive EEV with flight-like structure, surrogate TPS, and sample container was tested at UTTR for the purpose of complete structural system validation. Test results showed that at a landing vertical speed of approximately 30 m/s, the test vehicle maintained structural integrity and enough rigidity to penetrate the sandy clay surface thus attenuating the landing load, as measured at the vehicle CG, to less than 600 g. This measured deceleration was found to be in family with rigid penetrometer test data from the 1998 and 2000 test campaigns. Design implications of vehicle structure/soil interaction with respect to sample container and sample survivability are briefly discussed.

  1. Autonomous Mars ascent and orbit rendezvous for earth return missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, H. C.; Balmanno, W. F.; Cruz, Manuel I.; Ilgen, Marc R.

    1991-01-01

    The details of tha assessment of autonomous Mars ascent and orbit rendezvous for earth return missions are presented. Analyses addressing navigation system assessments, trajectory planning, targeting approaches, flight control guidance strategies, and performance sensitivities are included. Tradeoffs in the analysis and design process are discussed.

  2. Launch vehicles of the future - Earth to near-earth space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keyworth, G. A., II

    Attention is given to criteria for launch vehicles of the future, namely, cost, flexibility of payload size, and routine access to space. The National Aerospace Plane (NASP), an airplane designed to achieve hypersonic speeds using a sophisticated air-breathing engine, is argued to meet these criteria. Little additional oxygen is needed to enter low-earth orbit, and it will return to an airport runway under powered flight. Cost estimates for a NASP-derived vehicle are two to five million dollars for a payload of 20,000 to 30,000 pounds to orbit. For the Shuttle, a comparable payload is nominally about 150 million dollars. NASP estimates for the new single-stage-to-orbit designs are substantially lower than existing launch costs. The NASP also offers fast turnaround and minimal logistics. Access to virtually all near-earth orbits will be provided as well.

  3. EarthCube's Assessment Framework: Ensuring Return on Investment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehnert, K.

    2016-12-01

    EarthCube is a community-governed, NSF-funded initiative to transform geoscience research by developing cyberinfrastructure that improves access, sharing, visualization, and analysis of all forms of geosciences data and related resources. EarthCube's goal is to enable geoscientists to tackle the challenges of understanding and predicting a complex and evolving solid Earth, hydrosphere, atmosphere, and space environment systems. EarthCube's infrastructure needs capabilities around data, software, and systems. It is essential for EarthCube to determine the value of new capabilities for the community and the progress of the overall effort to demonstrate its value to the science community and Return on Investment for the NSF. EarthCube is therefore developing an assessment framework for research proposals, projects funded by EarthCube, and the overall EarthCube program. As a first step, a software assessment framework has been developed that addresses the EarthCube Strategic Vision by promoting best practices in software development, complete and useful documentation, interoperability, standards adherence, open science, and education and training opportunities for research developers.

  4. Project EGRESS: The design of an assured crew return vehicle for the space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Keeping preliminary studies by NASA in mind, an Assured Crew Return Vehicle (ACRV) was developed. The system allows the escape of one or more crew members from Space Station Freedom in case of emergency. The design of the vehicle addresses propulsion, orbital operations, reentry, landing and recovery, power and communication, and life support. In light of recent modifications in Space Station design, Project EGRESS (Earthbound Guaranteed ReEntry from Space Station) pays particular attention to its impact on Space Station operations, interfaces and docking facilities, and maintenance needs. A water landing, medium lift vehicle was found to best satisfy project goals of simplicity and cost efficiency without sacrificing the safety and reliability requirements. With a single vehicle, one injured crew member could be returned to Earth with minimal pilot involvement. Since the craft is capable of returning up to five crew members, two such permanently docked vehicles would allow full evacuation of the Space Station. The craft could be constructed entirely with available 1990 technology and launched aboard a shuttle orbiter.

  5. Earth recovery mode analysis for a Martian sample return mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, J. P.

    1978-01-01

    The analysis has concerned itself with evaluating alternative methods of recovering a sample module from a trans-earth trajectory originating in the vicinity of Mars. The major modes evaluated are: (1) direct atmospheric entry from trans-earth trajectory; (2) earth orbit insertion by retropropulsion; and (3) atmospheric braking to a capture orbit. In addition, the question of guided vs. unguided entry vehicles was considered, as well as alternative methods of recovery after orbit insertion for modes (2) and (3). A summary of results and conclusions is presented. Analytical results for aerodynamic and propulsive maneuvering vehicles are discussed. System performance requirements and alternatives for inertial systems implementation are also discussed. Orbital recovery operations and further studies required to resolve the recovery mode issue are described.

  6. Magnetobraking: Use of tether electrodynamic drag for Earth return from Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1994-01-01

    It has often been proposed that a vehicle returning from Mars will use aerobraking in the Earth's atmosphere to dissipate hyperbolic excess velocity to capture into Earth orbit. Here a different system for dissipating excess velocity without expenditure of reaction mass, magnetobraking, is proposed. Magnetobraking uses the force on an electrodynamic tether in the Earth's magnetic field to produce thrust. An electrodynamic tether is deployed from the spacecraft as it approaches the Earth. The Earth's magnetic field produces a force on electrical current in the tether. If the tether is oriented perpendicularly to the Earth's magnetic field and to the direction of motion of the spacecraft, force produced by the Earth's magnetic field can be used to either brake or accelerate the spacecraft without expenditure of reaction mass. The peak acceleration on the Mars return is 0.007 m/sq sec, and the amount of braking possible is dependent on the density and current-carrying capacity of the tether, but is independent of length. A superconducting tether is required. The required critical current is shown to be within the range of superconducting technology now available in the laboratory.

  7. Preliminary subsystem designs for the Assured Crew Return Vehicle (ACRV)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Described herein is a series of design studies concerning the Assured Crew Return Vehicle (ACRV). Study topics include a braking and landing system for the ACRV, ACRV growth options, and the design impacts of ACRV's role as a medical emergency vehicle. Four alternate designs are presented for the ACRV braking and landing system. Options presented include ballistic and lifting body reentries; the use of high-lift, high-payload aerodynamic decelerators, as well as conventional parachutes; landing systems designed for water landings, land landings or both; and an aerial recovery system. Uses of the ACRV or a similarly designed vehicle in several roles for possible future space missions are discussed, along with the required changes to the ACRV to allow it to perform these missions optimally. The impacts on the design of the ACRV due to its role as an emergency vehicle were studied and are presented here. This study included the design of a stretcher-like system to transport an ill or injured crewmember safely within the ACRV; a compilation of necessary medical equipment and decisions on how or where to store it; and recommendations about internal and external vehicle characteristics that will ease the transport of the ill or injured crewmember and allow for swift and easy ingress/egress of the vehicle.

  8. Convective and radiative heating for vehicle return from the Moon and Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greendyke, Robert B.; Gnoffo, Peter A.

    1995-01-01

    The aerothermal environment is examined for two vehicle forebodies near the peak heating points of lunar and martian return-to-earth trajectories at several nominal entry velocities. The first vehicle forebody is that of a 70 deg aerobrake for entry into earth orbit; the second, a capsule of Apollo configuration for direct entry into the earth's atmosphere. The configurations and trajectories are considered likely candidates for such missions. Two-temperature, thermochemical nonequilibrium models are used in the flow field analyses. In addition to Park's empirical model for dissociation under conditions of thermal nonequilibrium, the Gordiets kinetic model for the homonuclear dissociation of N2 and O2 is also considered. Temperature and emission profiles indicate nonequilibrium effects in a 2 to 5 cm post shock region. Substantial portions of the shock layer flow appear to be in equilibrium. The shock layer over an aerobrake for return from the moon exhibits the largest extent of nonequilibrium effects of all considered missions. Differences between the Gordiets and Parks kinetic model were generally very small for the lunar return aerobrake case, the greatest difference of 6.1 percent occurring in the radiative heating levels.

  9. Guidance Scheme for Modulation of Drag Devices to Enable Return from Low Earth Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dutta, Soumyo; Bowes, Angela L.; Cianciolo, Alicia D.; Glass, Christopher E.; Powell, Richard W.

    2017-01-01

    Passive drag devices provide opportunities to return payloads from low Earth orbits quickly without using onboard propulsive systems to de-orbit the spacecraft. However, one potential disadvantage of such systems has been the lack of landing accuracy. Drag modulation or changing the shape of the drag device during flight offer a way to control the de-orbit trajectory and target a specific landing location. This paper discusses a candidate passive drag based system, called Exo-brake, as well as efforts to model the dynamics of the vehicle as it de-orbits and guidance schemes used to control the trajectory. Such systems can enable quick return of payloads from low Earth orbit assets like the International Space Station without the use of large re-entry cargo capsules or propulsive systems.

  10. A Passive Earth-Entry Capsule for Mars Sample Return

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitcheltree, Robert A.; Kellas, Sotiris

    1999-01-01

    A combination of aerodynamic analysis and testing, aerothermodynamic analysis, structural analysis and testing, impact analysis and testing, thermal analysis, ground characterization tests, configuration packaging, and trajectory simulation are employed to determine the feasibility of an entirely passive Earth entry capsule for the Mars Sample Return mission. The design circumvents the potential failure modes of a parachute terminal descent system by replacing that system with passive energy absorbing material to cushion the Mars samples during ground impact. The suggested design utilizes a spherically blunted 45-degree half-angle cone forebody with an ablative heat shield. The primary structure is a hemispherical, composite sandwich enclosing carbon foam energy absorbing material. Though no demonstration test of the entire system is included, results of the tests and analysis presented indicate that the design is a viable option for the Mars Sample Return Mission.

  11. Risk analysis of earth return options for the Mars rover/sample return mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Four options for return of a Mars surface sample to Earth were studied to estimate the risk of mission failure and the risk of a sample container breach that might result in the release of Martian life forms, should such exist, in the Earth's biosphere. The probabilities calculated refer only to the time period from the last midcourse correction burn to possession of the sample on Earth. Two extreme views characterize this subject. In one view, there is no life on Mars, therefore there is no significant risk and no serious effort is required to deal with back contamination. In the other view, public safety overrides any desire to return Martian samples, and any risk of damaging contamination greater than zero is unacceptable. Zero risk requires great expense to achieve and may prevent the mission as currently envisioned from taking place. The major conclusion is that risk of sample container breach can be reduced to a very low number within the framework of the mission as now envisioned, but significant expense and effort, above that currently planned is needed. There are benefits to the public that warrant some risk. Martian life, if it exists, will be a major discovery. If it does not, there is no risk.

  12. Assured crew return vehicle post landing configuration design and test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Loren A.; Armitage, Pamela Kay

    1992-01-01

    The 1991-1992 senior Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Design class continued work on the post landing configurations for the Assured Crew Return Vehicle (ACRV) and the Emergency Egress Couch (EEC). The ACRV will be permanently docked to Space Station Freedom, fulfilling NASA's commitment of Assured Crew Return Capability in the event of an accident or illness aboard Space Station Freedom. The EEC provides medical support and a transportation surface for an incapacitated crew member. The objective of the projects was to give the ACRV Project Office data to feed into their feasibility studies. Four design teams were given the task of developing models with dynamically and geometrically scaled characteristics. Groups one and two combined effort to design a one-fifth scale model of the Apollo Command Module derivative, an on-board flotation system, and a lift attachment point system. This model was designed to test the feasibility of a rigid flotation and stabilization system and to determine the dynamics associated with lifting the vehicle during retrieval. However, due to priorities, it was not built. Group three designed a one-fifth scale model of the Johnson Space Center (JSC) benchmark configuration, the Station Crew Return Alternative Module (SCRAM) with a lift attachment point system. This model helped to determine the flotation and lifting characteristics of the SCRAM configuration. Group four designed a full scale EEC with changeable geometric and dynamic characteristics. This model provided data on the geometric characteristics of the EEC and on the placement of the CG and moment of inertia. It also gave the helicopter rescue personnel direct input to the feasibility study.

  13. MARCO POLO: near earth object sample return mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barucci, M. A.; Yoshikawa, M.; Michel, P.; Kawagushi, J.; Yano, H.; Brucato, J. R.; Franchi, I. A.; Dotto, E.; Fulchignoni, M.; Ulamec, S.

    2009-03-01

    MARCO POLO is a joint European-Japanese sample return mission to a Near-Earth Object. This Euro-Asian mission will go to a primitive Near-Earth Object (NEO), which we anticipate will contain primitive materials without any known meteorite analogue, scientifically characterize it at multiple scales, and bring samples back to Earth for detailed scientific investigation. Small bodies, as primitive leftover building blocks of the Solar System formation process, offer important clues to the chemical mixture from which the planets formed some 4.6 billion years ago. Current exobiological scenarios for the origin of Life invoke an exogenous delivery of organic matter to the early Earth: it has been proposed that primitive bodies could have brought these complex organic molecules capable of triggering the pre-biotic synthesis of biochemical compounds. Moreover, collisions of NEOs with the Earth pose a finite hazard to life. For all these reasons, the exploration of such objects is particularly interesting and urgent. The scientific objectives of MARCO POLO will therefore contribute to a better understanding of the origin and evolution of the Solar System, the Earth, and possibly Life itself. Moreover, MARCO POLO provides important information on the volatile-rich (e.g. water) nature of primitive NEOs, which may be particularly important for future space resource utilization as well as providing critical information for the security of Earth. MARCO POLO is a proposal offering several options, leading to great flexibility in the actual implementation. The baseline mission scenario is based on a launch with a Soyuz-type launcher and consists of a Mother Spacecraft (MSC) carrying a possible Lander named SIFNOS, small hoppers, sampling devices, a re-entry capsule and scientific payloads. The MSC leaves Earth orbit, cruises toward the target with ion engines, rendezvous with the target, conducts a global characterization of the target to select a sampling site, and delivers small

  14. Parametric Thermal Soak Model for Earth Entry Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, Parul; Samareh, Jamshid; Doan, Quy D.

    2013-01-01

    The analysis and design of an Earth Entry Vehicle (EEV) is multidisciplinary in nature, requiring the application many disciplines. An integrated tool called Multi Mission System Analysis for Planetary Entry Descent and Landing or M-SAPE is being developed as part of Entry Vehicle Technology project under In-Space Technology program. Integration of a multidisciplinary problem is a challenging task. Automation of the execution process and data transfer among disciplines can be accomplished to provide significant benefits. Thermal soak analysis and temperature predictions of various interior components of entry vehicle, including the impact foam and payload container are part of the solution that M-SAPE will offer to spacecraft designers. The present paper focuses on the thermal soak analysis of an entry vehicle design based on the Mars Sample Return entry vehicle geometry and discusses a technical approach to develop parametric models for thermal soak analysis that will be integrated into M-SAPE. One of the main objectives is to be able to identify the important parameters and to develop correlation coefficients so that, for a given trajectory, can estimate the peak payload temperature based on relevant trajectory parameters and vehicle geometry. The models are being developed for two primary thermal protection (TPS) materials: 1) carbon phenolic that was used for Galileo and Pioneer Venus probes and, 2) Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA), TPS material for Mars Science Lab mission. Several representative trajectories were selected from a very large trade space to include in the thermal analysis in order to develop an effective parametric thermal soak model. The selected trajectories covered a wide range of heatload and heatflux combinations. Non-linear, fully transient, thermal finite element simulations were performed for the selected trajectories to generate the temperature histories at the interior of the vehicle. Figure 1 shows the finite element model

  15. Thermal Response Modeling System for a Mars Sample Return Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Y.-K.; Miles, Frank S.; Arnold, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A multi-dimensional, coupled thermal response modeling system for analysis of hypersonic entry vehicles is presented. The system consists of a high fidelity Navier-Stokes equation solver (GIANTS), a two-dimensional implicit thermal response, pyrolysis and ablation program (TITAN), and a commercial finite-element thermal and mechanical analysis code (MARC). The simulations performed by this integrated system include hypersonic flowfield, fluid and solid interaction, ablation, shape change, pyrolysis gas eneration and flow, and thermal response of heatshield and structure. The thermal response of the heatshield is simulated using TITAN, and that of the underlying structural is simulated using MARC. The ablating heatshield is treated as an outer boundary condition of the structure, and continuity conditions of temperature and heat flux are imposed at the interface between TITAN and MARC. Aerothermal environments with fluid and solid interaction are predicted by coupling TITAN and GIANTS through surface energy balance equations. With this integrated system, the aerothermal environments for an entry vehicle and the thermal response of the entire vehicle can be obtained simultaneously. Representative computations for a flat-faced arc-jet test model and a proposed Mars sample return capsule are presented and discussed.

  16. Thermal Response Modeling System for a Mars Sample Return Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Y.-K.; Milos, F. S.

    2002-01-01

    A multi-dimensional, coupled thermal response modeling system for analysis of hypersonic entry vehicles is presented. The system consists of a high fidelity Navier-Stokes equation solver (GIANTS), a two-dimensional implicit thermal response, pyrolysis and ablation program (TITAN), and a commercial finite element thermal and mechanical analysis code (MARC). The simulations performed by this integrated system include hypersonic flowfield, fluid and solid interaction, ablation, shape change, pyrolysis gas generation and flow, and thermal response of heatshield and structure. The thermal response of the heatshield is simulated using TITAN, and that of the underlying structural is simulated using MARC. The ablating heatshield is treated as an outer boundary condition of the structure, and continuity conditions of temperature and heat flux are imposed at the interface between TITAN and MARC. Aerothermal environments with fluid and solid interaction are predicted by coupling TITAN and GIANTS through surface energy balance equations. With this integrated system, the aerothermal environments for an entry vehicle and the thermal response of the entire vehicle can be obtained simultaneously. Representative computations for a flat-faced arc-jet test model and a proposed Mars sample return capsule are presented and discussed.

  17. Lunar Return Reentry Thermal Analysis of a Generic Crew Exploration Vehicle Wall Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.; Tran, Van T.; Bowles, Jeff

    2007-01-01

    Thermostructural analysis was performed on generic crew exploration vehicle (GCEV) heat shielded wall structures subjected to reentry heating rates based on five potential lunar return reentry trajectories. The GCEV windward outer wall is fabricated with a graphite/epoxy composite honeycomb sandwich panel and the inner wall with an aluminum honeycomb sandwich panel. The outer wall is protected with an ablative Avcoat-5026-39H/CG thermal protection system (TPS). A virtual ablation method (a graphical approximation) developed earlier was further extended, and was used to estimate the ablation periods, ablation heat loads, and the TPS recession layer depths. It was found that up to 83 95 percent of the total reentry heat load was dissipated in the TPS ablation process, leaving a small amount (3-15 percent) of the remaining total reentry heat load to heat the virgin TPS and maintain the TPS surface at the ablation temperature, 1,200 F. The GCEV stagnation point TPS recession layer depths were estimated to be in the range of 0.280-0.910 in, and the allowable minimum stagnation point TPS thicknesses that could maintain the substructural composite sandwich wall at the limit temperature of 300 F were found to be in the range of 0.767-1.538 in. Based on results from the present analyses, the lunar return abort ballistic reentry was found to be quite attractive because it required less TPS weight than the lunar return direct, the lunar return skipping, or the low Earth orbit guided reentry, and only 11.6 percent more TPS weight than the low Earth orbit ballistic reentry that will encounter a considerable weight penalty to obtain the Earth orbit. The analysis also showed that the TPS weight required for the lunar return skipping reentry was much more than the TPS weight necessary for any of the other reentry trajectories considered.

  18. Assured crew return vehicle post landing configuration design and test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The 1991-1992 senior Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Design class continued work on the post landing configurations for the Assured Crew Return Vehicle (ACRV) and the Emergency Egress Couch (EEC). The ACRV will be permanently docked to Space Station Freedom fulfilling NASA's commitment of Assured Crew Return Capability in the event of an accident or illness aboard Space Station Freedom. The EEC provides medical support and a transportation surface for an incapacitated crew member. The objective of the projects was to give the ACRV Project Office data to feed into their feasibility studies. Four design teams were given the task of developing models with dynamically and geometrically scaled characteristics. Groups one and two combined efforts to design a one-fifth scale model for the Apollo Command Module derivative, an on-board flotation system, and a lift attachment point system. This model was designed to test the feasibility of a rigid flotation and stabilization system and to determine the dynamics associated with lifting the vehicle during retrieval. However, due to priorities, it was not built. Group three designed a one-fifth scale model of the Johnson Space Center (JSC) benchmark configuration, the Station Crew Return Alternative Module (SCRAM) with a lift attachment point system. This model helped to determine the flotation and lifting characteristics of the SCRAM configuration. Group four designed a full scale EEC with changeable geometric and geometric and dynamic characteristics. This model provided data on the geometric characteristics of the EEC and on the placement of the CG and moment of inertia. It also gave the helicopter rescue personnel direct input to the feasibility study. Section 1 describes in detail the design of a one-fifth scale model of the Apollo Command Module Derivative (ACMD) ACRV. The objective of the ACMD Configuration Model Team was to use geometric and dynamic constraints to design a one-fifth scale working model of the

  19. The 2014 Earth return of the ISEE-3/ICE spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunham, David W.; Farquhar, Robert W.; Loucks, Michel; Roberts, Craig E.; Wingo, Dennis; Cowing, Keith L.; Garcia, Leonard N.; Craychee, Tim; Nickel, Craig; Ford, Anthony; Colleluori, Marco; Folta, David C.; Giorgini, Jon D.; Nace, Edward; Spohr, John E.; Dove, William; Mogk, Nathan; Furfaro, Roberto; Martin, Warren L.

    2015-05-01

    In 1978, the 3rd International Sun-Earth Explorer (ISEE-3) became the first libration-point mission, about the Sun-Earth L1 point. Four years later, a complex series of lunar swingbys and small propulsive maneuvers ejected ISEE-3 from the Earth-Moon system, to fly by a comet (Giacobini-Zinner) for the first time in 1985, as the rechristened International Cometary Explorer (ICE). In its heliocentric orbit, ISEE-3/ICE slowly drifted around the Sun to return to the Earth's vicinity in 2014. Maneuvers in 1986 targeted a 2014 August 10th lunar swingby to recapture ISEE-3 into Earth orbit. In 1999, ISEE-3/ICE passed behind the Sun; after that, tracking of the spacecraft ceased and its control center at Goddard was shut down. In 2013, meetings were held to assess the viability of "re-awakening" ISEE-3. The goal was to target the 2014 lunar swingby, to recapture the spacecraft back into a halo-like Sun-Earth L1 orbit. However, special hardware for communicating with the spacecraft via NASA's Deep Space Network stations was discarded after 1999, and NASA had no funds to reconstruct the lost equipment. After ISEE-3's carrier signal was detected on March 1st with the 20 m antenna at Bochum, Germany, Skycorp, Inc. decided to initiate the ISEE-3 Reboot Project, to use software-defined radio with a less costly S-band transmitter that was purchased with a successful RocketHub crowdsourcing effort. NASA granted Skycorp permission to command the spacecraft. Commanding was successfully accomplished using the 300 m radio telescope at Arecibo. New capture trajectories were computed, including trajectories that would target the August lunar swingby and use a second ΔV (velocity change) that could target later lunar swingbys that would allow capture into almost any desired final orbit, including orbits about either the Sun-Earth L1 or L2 points, a lunar distant retrograde orbit, or targeting a flyby of the Earth-approaching active Comet Wirtanen in 2018. A tiny spinup maneuver was

  20. Spacecraft Conceptual Design for Returning Entire Near-Earth Asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brophy, John R.; Oleson, Steve

    2012-01-01

    In situ resource utilization (ISRU) in general, and asteroid mining in particular are ideas that have been around for a long time, and for good reason. It is clear that ultimately human exploration beyond low-Earth orbit will have to utilize the material resources available in space. Historically, the lack of sufficiently capable in-space transportation has been one of the key impediments to the harvesting of near-Earth asteroid resources. With the advent of high-power (or order 40 kW) solar electric propulsion systems, that impediment is being removed. High-power solar electric propulsion (SEP) would be enabling for the exploitation of asteroid resources. The design of a 40-kW end-of-life SEP system is presented that could rendezvous with, capture, and subsequently transport a 1,000-metric-ton near-Earth asteroid back to cislunar space. The conceptual spacecraft design was developed by the Collaborative Modeling for Parametric Assessment of Space Systems (COMPASS) team at the Glenn Research Center in collaboration with the Keck Institute for Space Studies (KISS) team assembled to investigate the feasibility of an asteroid retrieval mission. Returning such an object to cislunar space would enable astronaut crews to inspect, sample, dissect, and ultimately determine how to extract the desired materials from the asteroid. This process could jump-start the entire ISRU industry.

  1. Subsonic Dynamic Stability Tests of a Sample Return Entry Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fremaux, C. Michael; Johnson, R. Keith

    2006-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted in the NASA Langley 20-Foot Vertical Spin Tunnel (VST) to determine the subsonic dynamic stability characteristics of a proposed atmospheric entry vehicle for sample return missions. In particular, the effects of changes in aft-body geometry on stability were examined. Freeflying tests of a dynamically scaled model with various geometric features were conducted, including cases in which the model was perturbed to measure dynamic response. Both perturbed and non-perturbed runs were recorded as motion time histories using the VST optical data acquisition system and reduced for post-test analysis. In addition, preliminary results from a static force and moment test of a similar model in the Langley 12-Foot Low Speed Tunnel are presented. Results indicate that the configuration is dynamically stable for the baseline geometry, but exhibits degraded dynamic behavior for the geometry modifications tested.

  2. Postlanding optimum designs for the assured crew return vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hosterman, Kenneth C.; Anderson, Loren A.

    1990-01-01

    The optimized preliminary engineering design concepts for postlanding operations of a water-landing Assured Crew Return Vehicle (ACRV) during a medical rescue mission are presented. Two ACRVs will be permanently docked to Space Station Freedom, fulfilling NASA's commitment to Assured Crew Return Capability in the event of an accident or illness. The optimized configuration of the ACRV is based on an Apollo command module (ACM) derivative. The scenario assumes landing a sick or injured crewmember on water with the possibility of a delayed rescue. Design emphasis is placed on four major areas. First is the design of a mechanism that provides a safe and time-critical means of removing the sick or injured crewmember from the ACRV. Support to the assisting rescue personnel is also provided. Second is the design of a system that orients and stabilizes the craft after landing so as to cause no further injury or discomfort to the already ill or injured crewmember. Third is the design of a system that provides full medical support to a sick or injured crewmember aboard the ACRV from the time of separation from the space station to rescue by recovery forces. Last is the design of a system that provides for the comfort and safety of the entire crew after splashdown up to the point of rescue. The four systems are conceptually integrated into the ACRV.

  3. Autonomous oxygen production for a Mars return vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ash, R. L.; Richter, R.; Dowler, W. L.; Hanson, J. A.; Uphoff, C. W.

    1982-01-01

    The way in which a chemical processor that uses the Martian atmosphere as its only feedstock, thereby reducing the mass that must be launched from earth, can help to return a surface sample from Mars from a single Space Shuttle launch is described. Richter's (1981) study on both the theoretical and experimental aspects of oxygen separation using yttria-stabilized zirconia membranes is cited. Here, separation is accomplished by applying a voltage across the membrane which results in the selective conduction of oxygen ions from one side to the other. It is noted that by using thermal dissociation of the carbon dioxide in the Martian atmosphere to produce oxygen (and carbon monoxide), these zirconia electrolytic cells can be employed to separate oxygen from the atmospheric stream. Descriptions are also given of atmospheric filtration, atmospheric compression, and waste heat recovery, and of the oxygen precooler and oxygen compressor.

  4. Interfacing with USSTRATCOM and UTTR during Stardust Earth Return

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jefferson, David C.; Baird, Darren T.; Cangahuala, Laureano A.; Lewis, George D.

    2006-01-01

    The Stardust Sample Return Capsule separated from the main spacecraft four hours prior to atmospheric entry. Between this time and the time at which the SRC touched down at the Utah Test and Training Range, two organizations external to JPL were involved in tracking the Sample Return Capsule. Orbit determination for the Stardust spacecraft during deep space cruise, the encounters of asteroid Annefrank and comet Wild 2, and the final approach to Earth used X-band radio metric Doppler and range data obtained through the Deep Space Network. The SRC lacked the electronics needed for coherently transponded radio metric tracking, so the DSN was not able to track the SRC after it separated from the main spacecraft. Although the expected delivery accuracy at atmospheric entry was well within the capability needed to target the SRC to the desired ground location, it was still desirable to obtain direct knowledge of the SRC trajectory in case of anomalies. For this reason U.S. Strategic Command was engaged to track the SRC between separation and atmospheric entry. Once the SRC entered the atmosphere, ground sensors at UTTR were tasked to acquire the descending SRC and maintain track during the descent in order to determine the landing location, to which the ground recovery team was then directed. This paper discusses organizational interfaces, data products, and delivery schedules, and the actual tracking operations are described.

  5. Taurus lightweight manned spacecraft Earth orbiting vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chase, Kevin A.; Vandersall, Eric J.; Plotkin, Jennifer; Travisano, Jeffrey J.; Loveless, Dennis; Kaczmarek, Michael; White, Anthony G.; Est, Andy; Bulla, Gregory; Henry, Chris

    1991-01-01

    The Taurus Lightweight Manned Spacecraft (LMS) was developed by students of the University of Maryland's Aerospace Engineering course in Space Vehicle Design. That course required students to design an Alternative Manned Spacecraft (AMS) to augment or replace the Space Transportation System and meet the following design requirements: (1) launch on the Taurus Booster being developed by Orbital Sciences Corporation; (2) 99.9 percent assured crew survival rate; (3) technology cutoff data of 1 Jan. 1991; (4) compatibility with current space administration infrastructure; and (5) first flight by May 1995. The Taurus LMS design meets the above requirements and represents an initial step towards larger and more complex spacecraft. The Taurus LMS has a very limited application when compared to the Space Shuttle, but it demonstrates that the U.S. can have a safe, reliable, and low cost space system. The Taurus LMS is a short mission duration spacecraft designed to place one man into low earth orbit (LEO). The driving factor for this design was the low payload carrying capabilities of the Taurus Booster--1300 kg to a 300 km orbit. The Taurus LMS design is divided into six major design sections. The human factors system deals with the problems of life support and spacecraft cooling. The propulsion section contains the abort system, the Orbital Maneuvering System (OMS), the Reaction Control System (RCS), and power generation. The thermal protection systems and spacecraft structure are contained in the structures section. The avionics section includes navigation, attitude determination, data processing, communication systems, and sensors. The mission analysis section was responsible for ground processing and spacecraft astrodynamics. The systems integration section pulled the above sections together into one spacecraft and addressed costing and reliability.

  6. Taurus Lightweight Manned Spacecraft Earth orbiting vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosset, M.

    1991-01-01

    The Taurus Lightweight Manned Spacecraft (LMS) was developed by students of the University of Maryland's Aerospace Engineering course in Space Vehicle Design. That course required students to design an Alternative Manned Spacecraft (AMS) to augment or replace the Space Transportation System and meet the following design requirements: (1) launch on the Taurus Booster being developed by Orbital Sciences Corporation; (2) 99.9 percent assured crew survival rate; (3) technology cutoff date of 1 Jan. 1991; (4) compatibility with current space administration infrastructure; and (5) first flight by May 1995. The Taurus LMS design meets the above requirements and represents an initial step toward larger and more complex spacecraft. The Taurus LMS has a very limited application when compared to the space shuttle, but it demonstrates that the U.S. can have a safe, reliable, and low-cost space system. The Taurus LMS is a short mission duration spacecraft designed to place one man into low Earth orbit (LEO). The driving factor for this design was the low payload carrying capabilities of the Taurus Booster - 1300 kg to a 300-km orbit. The Taurus LMS design is divided into six major design sections. The Human Factors section deals with the problems of life support and spacecraft cooling. The Propulsion section contains the Abort System, the Orbital Maneuvering System (OMS), the Reaction Control System (RCS), and Power Generation. The thermal protection systems and spacecraft structure are contained in the Structures section. The Avionics section includes Navigation, Attitude Determination, Data Processing, Communication systems, and Sensors. The Mission Analysis section was responsible for ground processing and spacecraft astrodynamics. The Systems Integration Section pulled the above sections together into one spacecraft, and addressed costing and reliability.

  7. 19 CFR 123.82 - Treatment of stolen vehicles returned from Mexico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Treatment of stolen vehicles returned from Mexico... SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY CUSTOMS RELATIONS WITH CANADA AND MEXICO Miscellaneous Provisions § 123.82 Treatment of stolen vehicles returned from Mexico. Port directors shall admit without entry and...

  8. 19 CFR 123.82 - Treatment of stolen vehicles returned from Mexico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Treatment of stolen vehicles returned from Mexico... SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY CBP RELATIONS WITH CANADA AND MEXICO Miscellaneous Provisions § 123.82 Treatment of stolen vehicles returned from Mexico. Port directors shall admit without entry and payment of...

  9. 19 CFR 123.82 - Treatment of stolen vehicles returned from Mexico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Treatment of stolen vehicles returned from Mexico... SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY CBP RELATIONS WITH CANADA AND MEXICO Miscellaneous Provisions § 123.82 Treatment of stolen vehicles returned from Mexico. Port directors shall admit without entry and payment of...

  10. 19 CFR 123.82 - Treatment of stolen vehicles returned from Mexico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Treatment of stolen vehicles returned from Mexico... SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY CBP RELATIONS WITH CANADA AND MEXICO Miscellaneous Provisions § 123.82 Treatment of stolen vehicles returned from Mexico. Port directors shall admit without entry and payment of...

  11. 19 CFR 123.82 - Treatment of stolen vehicles returned from Mexico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Treatment of stolen vehicles returned from Mexico... SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY CBP RELATIONS WITH CANADA AND MEXICO Miscellaneous Provisions § 123.82 Treatment of stolen vehicles returned from Mexico. Port directors shall admit without entry and payment of...

  12. Returning an Entire Near-Earth Asteroid in Support of Human Exploration Beyond Low-Earth Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brophy, John R.; Friedman, Louis

    2012-01-01

    the solar system. The capture, transportation, examination, and dissection of an entire NEA would provide valuable information for planetary defense activities that may someday have to deflect a much larger near-Earth object. Transportation of the NEA to lunar orbit with a total flight time of 6 to 10 years would be enabled by a 40-kW solar electric propulsion system with a specific impulse of 3,000 s. The flight system could be launched to low-Earth orbit (LEO) on a single Atlas V-class launch vehicle, and return to lunar orbit a NEA with at least 28 times the mass launched to LEO. Longer flight times, higher power SEP systems, or a target asteroid in a particularly favorable orbit could increase the mass amplification factor from 28-to-1 to 70-to-1 or greater. The NASA GRC COMPASS team estimated the full life-cycle cost of an asteroid capture and return mission at approx.$2.6B.

  13. Supporting a Deep Space Gateway with Free-Return Earth-Moon Periodic Orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genova, A. L.; Dunham, D. W.; Hardgrove, C.

    2018-02-01

    Earth-Moon periodic orbits travel between the Earth and Moon via free-return circumlunar segments and can host a station that can provide architecture support to other nodes near the Moon and Mars while enabling science return from cislunar space.

  14. System for Packaging Planetary Samples for Return to Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badescu, Mircea; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Backes, paul G.; Sherrit, Stewart; Bao, Xiaoqi; Scott, James S.

    2010-01-01

    A system is proposed for packaging material samples on a remote planet (especially Mars) in sealed sample tubes in preparation for later return to Earth. The sample tubes (Figure 1) would comprise (1) tubes initially having open tops and closed bottoms; (2) small, bellows-like collapsible bodies inside the tubes at their bottoms; and (3) plugs to be eventually used to close the tops of the tubes. The top inner surface of each tube would be coated with solder. The side of each plug, which would fit snugly into a tube, would feature a solder-filled ring groove. The system would include equipment for storing, manipulating, filling, and sealing the tubes. The containerization system (see Figure 2) will be organized in stations and will include: the storage station, the loading station, and the heating station. These stations can be structured in circular or linear pattern to minimize the manipulator complexity, allowing for compact design and mass efficiency. The manipulation of the sample tube between stations is done by a simple manipulator arm. The storage station contains the unloaded sample tubes and the plugs before sealing as well as the sealed sample tubes with samples after loading and sealing. The chambers at the storage station also allow for plug insertion into the sample tube. At the loading station the sample is poured or inserted into the sample tube and then the tube is topped off. At the heating station the plug is heated so the solder ring melts and seals the plug to the sample tube. The process is performed as follows: Each tube is filled or slightly overfilled with sample material and the excess sample material is wiped off the top. Then, the plug is inserted into the top section of the tube packing the sample material against the collapsible bellowslike body allowing the accommodation of the sample volume. The plug and the top of the tube are heated momentarily to melt the solder in order to seal the tube.

  15. Mars Sample Return Using Commercial Capabilities: Propulsive Entry, Descent, and Landing of a Capsule Form Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzales, Andrew A.; Lemke, Lawrence G.; Huynh, Loc C.

    2014-01-01

    Dragon missions shows no significant stressors. A useful payload mass of 2.0 mt is provided and includes mass and grow allowance for a Mars Ascent Vehicle (MAV), Earth Return Vehicle (ERV), and mission unique equipment. The useful payload supports an architecture that receives a sample from another surface asset and sends it directly back to Earth for recovery in a high Earth orbit. The work shows that emerging commercial capabilities as well as previously studied EDL methodologies can be used to efficiently support an important planetary science objective. The work also has applications for human exploration missions that will also use propulsive EDL techniques

  16. Utah's Mobile Earth Science Outreach Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoessow, F. S.; Christian, L.

    2016-12-01

    Students at Utah State University's College of Natural Resources have engineered the first mobile Earth Science outreach platform capable of delivering high-tech and interactive solar-powered educational resources to the traditionally-underserved, remote communities of rural Utah. By retrofitting and modifying an industrial box-truck, this project effectively created a highly mobile and energy independent "school in a box" which seeks to help change the way that Earth science is communicated, eliminate traditional barriers, and increase science accessibility - both physically and conceptually. The project's education platform is focused on developing a more effective, sustainable, and engaging platform for presenting Earth science outreach curricula to community members of all ages in an engaging fashion. Furthermore, this project affords university students the opportunity to demonstrate innovative science communication techniques, translating vital university research into educational outreach operations aimed at doing real, measurable good for local communities.

  17. Battery/Ultracapacitor Evaluation for X-38 Crew Return Vehicle (CRV)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darcy, Eric; Strangways, Bradley

    1999-01-01

    This presentation reported on the evaluation of the battery/ultracapacitor for the crew return vehicle (CRV). The CRV, as part of the international space station (ISS) planning, will be available to return to earth an ill or injured crew person, or if the ISS becomes unsafe, and the shuttle is not available. The requirements of the X-38 CRV are reviewed, and in light of the power requirements, the battery's required performance is reviewed. The ultracapacitor bank, and its test method is described. The test results are reviewed. A picture of the test set up is displayed showing the ultracapacitor bank and the NiMH battery. The presentation continues by reviewing tests of 5 available trade high power cell designs: (1) Hawker lead acid, (2) Bolder lead acid, (3) Energizer NiMH, (4) Sanyo NiCd, and (5) Energizer NiCd. The test methods and results are reviewed. There is also a review of the issues concerning lead acid batteries and conclusions.

  18. The Moon as a 100% Isolation Barrier for Earth During Exobiological Examination of Solar System Sample Return Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiGregorio, B. E.

    2018-04-01

    The only 100% guarantee of protecting Earth's biosphere from a hazardous back contamination event is to use the Moon as a sample return examination facility to qualify samples for eventual return to Earth.

  19. A Comprehensive Structural Dynamic Analysis Approach for Multi Mission Earth Entry Vehicle (MMEEV) Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perino, Scott; Bayandor, Javid; Siddens, Aaron

    2012-01-01

    The anticipated NASA Mars Sample Return Mission (MSR) requires a simple and reliable method in which to return collected Martian samples back to earth for scientific analysis. The Multi-Mission Earth Entry Vehicle (MMEEV) is NASA's proposed solution to this MSR requirement. Key aspects of the MMEEV are its reliable and passive operation, energy absorbing foam-composite structure, and modular impact sphere (IS) design. To aid in the development of an EEV design that can be modified for various missions requirements, two fully parametric finite element models were developed. The first model was developed in an explicit finite element code and was designed to evaluate the impact response of the vehicle and payload during the final stage of the vehicle's return to earth. The second model was developed in an explicit code and was designed to evaluate the static and dynamic structural response of the vehicle during launch and reentry. In contrast to most other FE models, built through a Graphical User Interface (GUI) pre-processor, the current model was developed using a coding technique that allows the analyst to quickly change nearly all aspects of the model including: geometric dimensions, material properties, load and boundary conditions, mesh properties, and analysis controls. Using the developed design tool, a full range of proposed designs can quickly be analyzed numerically and thus the design trade space for the EEV can be fully understood. An engineer can then quickly reach the best design for a specific mission and also adapt and optimize the general design for different missions.

  20. Earth-to-orbit reusable launch vehicles: A comparative assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chase, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    A representative set of space systems, functions, and missions for NASA and DoD from which launch vehicle requirements and characteristics was established as well as a set of air-breathing launch vehicles based on graduated technology capabilities corresponding to increasingly higher staging Mach numbers. The utility of the air-breathing launch vehicle candidates based on lift-off weight, performance, technology needs, and risk was assessed and costs were compared to alternative concepts. The results indicate that a fully reusable launch vehicle, whether two stage or one stage, could potentially reduce the cost per flight 60-80% compared to that for a partially reusable vehicle but would require advances in thermal protection system technology. A two-stage-to-orbit, parallel-lift vehicle with an air-breathing booster would cost approximately the same as a single-stage-to-orbit vehicle, but the former would have greater flexibility and a significantly reduced developmental risk. A twin-booster, subsonic-staged, parallel-lift vehicle represents the lowest system cost and developmental risk. However, if a large supersonic turbojet engine in the 350,000-N thrust class were available, supersonic staging would be preferred, and the investment in development would be returned in reduced program cost.

  1. CORSAIR (COmet Rendezvous, Sample Acquisition, Investigation, and Return): A New Frontiers Mission Concept to Collect Samples from a Comet and Return Them to Earth for Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandford, S. A.; Chabot, N. L.; Dello Russo, N.; Leary, J. C.; Reynolds, E. L.; Weaver, H. A.; Wooden, D. H.

    2017-07-01

    CORSAIR (COmet Rendezvous, Sample Acquisition, Investigation, and Return) is a mission concept submitted in response to NASA's New Frontiers 4 call. CORSAIR's proposed mission is to return comet nucleus samples to Earth for detailed analysis.

  2. Earth-return trajectory options for the 1985-86 Halley opportunity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farquhar, R. W.; Dunham, D. W.

    1982-01-01

    A unique and useful family of ballistic trajectories to Halley's comet is described. The distinguishing feature of this family is that all of the trajectories return to the Earth's vicinity after the Halley intercept. It is shown that, in some cases, the original Earth-return path can be reshaped by Earth-swingby maneuvers to achieve additional small-body encounters. One mission profile includes flybys of the asteroid Geographos and comet Tempel-2 following the Halley intercept. Dual-flyby missions involving comets Encke and Borrelly and the asteroid Anteros are also discussed. Dust and gas samples are collected during the high-velocity (about 70 km/sec) flythrough of Halley, and then returned to a high-apogee Earth orbit. Aerobraking maneuvers are used to bring the sample-return spacecraft to a low-altitude circular orbit where it can be recovered by the Space Shuttle.

  3. International Space Station Crew Return Vehicle: X-38. Educational Brief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

    The International Space Station (ISS) will provide the world with an orbiting laboratory that will have long-duration micro-gravity experimentation capability. The crew size for this facility will depend upon the crew return capability. The first crews will consist of three astronauts from Russia and the United States. The crew is limited to three…

  4. Preliminary Results From Observing The Fast Stardust Sample Return Capsule Entry In Earth's Atmosphere On January 15, 2006.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenniskens, P.; Jordan, D.; Kontinos, D.; Wright, M.; Olejniczak, J.; Raiche, G.; Wercinski, P.; Schilling, E.; Taylor, M.; Rairden, R.; Stenbaek-Nielsen, H.; McHarg, M. G.; Abe, S.; Winter, M.

    2006-08-01

    In order for NASA's Stardust mission to return a comet sample to Earth, the probe was put in an orbit similar to that of Near Earth Asteroids. As a result, the reentry in Earth's atmosphere on January 15, 2006, was the fastest entry ever for a NASA spacecraft, with a speed of 12.8 km/s, similar to that of natural fireballs. A new thermal protection material, PICA, was used to protect the sample, a material that may have a future as thermal protection for the Crew Return Vehicle or for future planetary missions. An airborne and ground-based observing campaign, the "Stardust Hyperseed MAC", was organized to observe the reentry under good observing conditions, with spectroscopic and imaging techniques commonly used for meteor observations (http:// reentry.arc.nasa.gov). A spectacular video of the reentry was obtained. The spectroscopic observations measure how much light was generated in the shock wave, how that radiation added to heating the surface, how the PICA ablated as a function of altitude, and how the carbon reacted with the shock wave to form CN, a possible marker of prebiotic chemistry in natural meteors. In addition, the observations measured a transient signal of zinc and potassium early in the trajectory, from the ablation of a white paint layer that had been applied to the heat shield for thermal control. Implications for sample return and the exploration of atmospheres in future planetary missions will be discussed.

  5. Neural readaptation to Earth's gravity following return from space.

    PubMed

    Boyle, R; Mensinger, A F; Yoshida, K; Usui, S; Intravaia, A; Tricas, T; Highstein, S M

    2001-10-01

    The consequence of exposure to microgravity on the otolith organs was studied by recording the responses of vestibular nerve afferents supplying the utricular otolith organ to inertial accelerations in four toadfish, Opsanus tau, sequentially for 5 days following two National Aeronautics and Space Administration shuttle orbital flights. Within the first day postflight, the magnitude of response to an applied translation was on average three times greater than for controls. The reduced gravitational acceleration in orbit apparently resulted in an upregulation of the sensitivity of utricular afferents. By 30 h postflight, responses were statistically similar to control. The time course of return to normal afferent sensitivity parallels the reported decrease in vestibular disorientation in astronauts following return from space.

  6. Neural readaptation to Earth's gravity following return from space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyle, R.; Mensinger, A. F.; Yoshida, K.; Usui, S.; Intravaia, A.; Tricas, T.; Highstein, S. M.

    2001-01-01

    The consequence of exposure to microgravity on the otolith organs was studied by recording the responses of vestibular nerve afferents supplying the utricular otolith organ to inertial accelerations in four toadfish, Opsanus tau, sequentially for 5 days following two National Aeronautics and Space Administration shuttle orbital flights. Within the first day postflight, the magnitude of response to an applied translation was on average three times greater than for controls. The reduced gravitational acceleration in orbit apparently resulted in an upregulation of the sensitivity of utricular afferents. By 30 h postflight, responses were statistically similar to control. The time course of return to normal afferent sensitivity parallels the reported decrease in vestibular disorientation in astronauts following return from space.

  7. 21st century early mission concepts for Mars delivery and earth return

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruz, Manuel I.; Ilgen, Marc R.

    1990-01-01

    In the 21st century, the early missions to Mars will entail unmanned Rover and Sample Return reconnaissance missions to be followed by manned exploration missions. High performance leverage technologies will be required to reach Mars and return to earth. This paper describes the mission concepts currently identified for these early Mars missions. These concepts include requirements and capabilities for Mars and earth aerocapture, Mars surface operations and ascent, and Mars and earth rendezvous. Although the focus is on the unmanned missions, synergism with the manned missions is also discussed.

  8. Investigation of Alternative Return Strategies for Orion Trans-earth Injection Design Options

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marchand, Belinda G.; Scarritt, Sara K.; Howell, Kathleen C.; Weeks, Michael W.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate alternative return strategies for the Orion trans-Earth injection (TEI) phase. A dynamical systems analysis approach considers the structure of the stable and unstable Sun perturbed Earth-Moon manifolds near the Earth-Moon interface region. A hybrid approach, then, combines the results from this analysis with classical two-body methods in a targeting process that seeks to expand the window of return opportunities in a precision entry scenario. The resulting startup arcs can be used, for instance, to enhance the block set of solutions available onboard during an autonomous targeting process.

  9. Relativistic effects in earth-orbiting Doppler lidar return signals.

    PubMed

    Ashby, Neil

    2007-11-01

    Frequency shifts of side-ranging lidar signals are calculated to high order in the small quantities (v/c), where v is the velocity of a spacecraft carrying a lidar laser or of an aerosol particle that scatters the radiation back into a detector (c is the speed of light). Frequency shift measurements determine horizontal components of ground velocity of the scattering particle, but measured fractional frequency shifts are large because of the large velocities of the spacecraft and of the rotating earth. Subtractions of large terms cause a loss of significant digits and magnify the effect of relativistic corrections in determination of wind velocity. Spacecraft acceleration is also considered. Calculations are performed in an earth-centered inertial frame, and appropriate transformations are applied giving the velocities of scatterers relative to the ground.

  10. Study of Aerothermodynamic Modeling Issues Relevant to High-Speed Sample Return Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Christopher O.

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the application of state-of-the-art coupled ablation and radiation simulations to highspeed sample return vehicles, such as those returning from Mars or an asteroid. A defining characteristic of these entries is that the surface recession rates and temperatures are driven by nonequilibrium convective and radiative heating through a boundary layer with significant surface blowing and ablation products. Measurements relevant to validating the simulation of these phenomena are reviewed and the Stardust entry is identified as providing the best relevant measurements. A coupled ablation and radiation flowfield analysis is presented that implements a finite-rate surface chemistry model. Comparisons between this finite-rate model and a equilibrium ablation model show that, while good agreement is seen for diffusion-limited oxidation cases, the finite-rate model predicts up to 50% lower char rates than the equilibrium model at sublimation conditions. Both the equilibrium and finite rate models predict significant negative mass flux at the surface due to sublimation of atomic carbon. A sensitivity analysis to flowfield and surface chemistry rates show that, for a sample return capsule at 10, 12, and 14 km/s, the sublimation rates for C and C3 provide the largest changes to the convective flux, radiative flux, and char rate. A parametric uncertainty analysis of the radiative heating due to radiation modeling parameters indicates uncertainties ranging from 27% at 10 km/s to 36% at 14 km/s. Applying the developed coupled analysis to the Stardust entry results in temperatures within 10% of those inferred from observations, and final recession values within 20% of measurements, which improves upon the 60% over-prediction at the stagnation point obtained through an uncoupled analysis. Emission from CN Violet is shown to be over-predicted by nearly and order-of-magnitude, which is consistent with the results of previous independent analyses. Finally, the

  11. High-Grading Lunar Samples for Return to Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Carlton; Sellar, Glenn; Nunez, Jorge; Winterhalter, Daniel; Farmer, Jack

    2009-01-01

    Astronauts on long-duration lunar missions will need the capability to "high-grade" their samples to select the highest value samples for transport to Earth and to leave others on the Moon. We are supporting studies to defile the "necessary and sufficient" measurements and techniques for highgrading samples at a lunar outpost. A glovebox, dedicated to testing instruments and techniques for high-grading samples, is in operation at the JSC Lunar Experiment Laboratory.

  12. The Return of Astromaterials to Earth Over the Next Decade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zolensky, Michael E.

    1999-01-01

    We are entering a new and golden age of sample return missions. In the coming decade we will harvest samples from Comet P/Wild II and interstellar dust courtesy of the STARDUST Mission (Brownlee et al., 1997), an asteroid (probably 4660 Nereus or 1989ML) by the ISAS MUSES-C Mission (ISAS, 1997), and solar wind by the Genesis Mission. A sample return from Mars is also envisioned as early as 2008, and possibly one from the two moons of Mars. It is, however, sobering to realize that MUSES-C aims to return 3-10 g of sample, STARDUST will provide micrograms of comet and interstellar dust, and Genesis will harvest only few micrograms of atoms. The diminutive size of the returning samples may be a source of concern for petrologists used only to looking at hefty lunar rocks and meteorites. How much sample is really needed to achieve prime science objectives, while maintaining a cost effective mission? The range of geological processes that we will want to address with these samples is staggering, encompassing not merely the entire history of the Solar system, but the history of the elements themselves. The interstellar processes include element formation, production and interactions with radiation, formation of organics, grain condensation and evolution, and interactions with magnetic fields. In the pre-accretionary (nebular) environment we wish to understand grain condensation, evaporation and recondensation, shock, radiation processing, solar energetic particle implantation, gas composition, the magnetic environment, and the evolution of organics. Finally, for solid bodies we wish to examine accretion history, shock, brecciation, impact gardening, metamorphism, aqueous alteration, weathering, exposure history, volcanism, fumarolic activity, differentiation, the magnetic environment, atmosphere evolution, and the evolution of organics. Since 1981, NASA has supported asteroid and comet science by collecting dust grains from these bodies in the stratosphere, and making them

  13. Sample Return Science by Hayabusa Near-Earth Asteroid Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujiwara, A.; Abe, M.; Kato, M.; Kushiro, I.; Mukai, T.; Okada, T.; Saito, J.; Sasaki, S.; Yano, H.; Yeomans, D.

    2004-01-01

    Assigning the material species to each asteroid spectral type and finding out the corresponding meteorite category is crucial to make the global material map in the whole asteroid belt and to understand the evolution of the asteroid belt. Recent direct observations by spacecrafts are revealing new intriguing aspects of asteroids which cannot be obtained solely from ground-based observations or meteorite studies. However identification of the real material species constituting asteroids and their corresponding meteorite analogs are still ambiguous. Space weathering makes difficult to identify the true material, and there is still a great gap between the remote sensing data on the global surface and the local microscopic data from meteorites. Sample return from asteroids are inevitable to solve these problems. For this purpose sample return missions to asteroids belonging to various spectral classes are required. The HAYABUSA spacecraft (prelaunch name is MUSESC) launched last year is the first attempt on this concept. This report presents outline of the mission with special stress on its science.

  14. Space vehicle with artificial gravity and earth-like environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, V. H. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A space vehicle adapted to provide an artificial gravity and earthlike atmospheric environment for occupants is disclosed. The vehicle comprises a cylindrically shaped, hollow pressure-tight body, one end of which is tapered from the largest diameter of the body, the other end is flat and transparent to sunlight. The vehicle is provided with thrust means which rotates the body about its longitudinal axis, generating an artificial gravity effect upon the interior walls of the body due to centrifugal forces. The walls of the tapered end of the body are maintained at a temperature below the dew point of water vapor in the body and lower than the temperature near the transparent end of the body. The controlled environment and sunlight permits an earth like environment to be maintained wherein the CO2/O2 is balanced, and food for the travelers is supplied through a natural system of plant life grown on spacecraft walls where soil is located.

  15. Aerothermodynamic optimization of Earth entry blunt body heat shields for Lunar and Mars return

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Joshua E.

    A differential evolutionary algorithm has been executed to optimize the hypersonic aerodynamic and stagnation-point heat transfer performance of Earth entry heat shields for Lunar and Mars return manned missions with entry velocities of 11 and 12.5 km/s respectively. The aerothermodynamic performance of heat shield geometries with lift-to-drag ratios up to 1.0 is studied. Each considered heat shield geometry is composed of an axial profile tailored to fit a base cross section. Axial profiles consist of spherical segments, spherically blunted cones, and power laws. Heat shield cross sections include oblate and prolate ellipses, rounded-edge parallelograms, and blendings of the two. Aerothermodynamic models are based on modified Newtonian impact theory with semi-empirical correlations for convection and radiation. Multi-objective function optimization is performed to determine optimal trade-offs between performance parameters. Objective functions consist of minimizing heat load and heat flux and maximizing down range and cross range. Results indicate that skipping trajectories allow for vehicles with L/D = 0.3, 0.5, and 1.0 at lunar return flight conditions to produce maximum cross ranges of 950, 1500, and 3000 km respectively before Qs,tot increases dramatically. Maximum cross range increases by ˜20% with an increase in entry velocity from 11 to 12.5 km/s. Optimal configurations for all three lift-to-drag ratios produce down ranges up to approximately 26,000 km for both lunar and Mars return. Assuming a 10,000 kg mass and L/D = 0.27, the current Orion configuration is projected to experience a heat load of approximately 68 kJ/cm2 for Mars return flight conditions. For both L/D = 0.3 and 0.5, a 30% increase in entry vehicle mass from 10,000 kg produces a 20-30% increase in Qs,tot. For a given L/D, highly-eccentric heat shields do not produce greater cross range or down range. With a 5 g deceleration limit and L/D = 0.3, a highly oblate cross section with an

  16. Auxiliary propulsion technology for advanced Earth-to-orbit vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Steven J.

    1987-01-01

    The payload which can be delivered to orbit by advanced Earth-to-Orbit vehicles is significantly increased by advanced subsystem technology. Any weight which can be saved by advanced subsystem design can be converted to payload at Main Engine Cut Off (MECO) given the same launch vehicle performance. The auxiliary propulsion subsystem and the impetus for the current hydrogen/oxygen technology program is examined. A review of the auxiliary propulsion requirements of advanced Earth-to-Orbit (ETO) vehicles and their proposed missions is given first. Then the performance benefits of hydrogen/oxygen auxiliary propulsion are illustrated using current shuttle data. The proposed auxiliary propulsion subsystem implementation includes liquid hydrogen/liquid oxygen (LH2/LO2) primary Reaction Control System (RCS) engines and gaseous hydrogen/gaseous oxygen (GH2/GO2) vernier RCS engines. A distribution system for the liquid cryogens to the engines is outlined. The possibility of providing one dual-phase engine that can operate on either liquid or gaseous propellants is being explored, as well as the simultaneous firing of redundant primary RCS thrusters to provide Orbital Maneuvering System (OMS) level impulse. Scavenging of propellants from integral main engine tankage is proposed to utilize main engine tank residuals and to combine launch vehicle and subsystem reserves.

  17. Optimal design of near-Earth asteroid sample-return trajectories in the Sun-Earth-Moon system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Shengmao; Zhu, Zhengfan; Peng, Chao; Ma, Jian; Zhu, Xiaolong; Gao, Yang

    2016-08-01

    In the 6th edition of the Chinese Space Trajectory Design Competition held in 2014, a near-Earth asteroid sample-return trajectory design problem was released, in which the motion of the spacecraft is modeled in multi-body dynamics, considering the gravitational forces of the Sun, Earth, and Moon. It is proposed that an electric-propulsion spacecraft initially parking in a circular 200-km-altitude low Earth orbit is expected to rendezvous with an asteroid and carry as much sample as possible back to the Earth in a 10-year time frame. The team from the Technology and Engineering Center for Space Utilization, Chinese Academy of Sciences has reported a solution with an asteroid sample mass of 328 tons, which is ranked first in the competition. In this article, we will present our design and optimization methods, primarily including overall analysis, target selection, escape from and capture by the Earth-Moon system, and optimization of impulsive and low-thrust trajectories that are modeled in multi-body dynamics. The orbital resonance concept and lunar gravity assists are considered key techniques employed for trajectory design. The reported solution, preliminarily revealing the feasibility of returning a hundreds-of-tons asteroid or asteroid sample, envisions future space missions relating to near-Earth asteroid exploration.

  18. The Moon: A 100% Isolation Barrier for Earth During Exobiological Examination of Solar System Sample Return Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiGregorio, B. E.

    2018-02-01

    The only 100% guarantee of protecting our planet's biosphere from a back contamination event is to use the Moon as a sample return examination facility to qualify samples for eventual return to Earth.

  19. Mars Ascent Vehicle Gross Lift-off Mass Sensitivities for Robotic Mars Sample Return

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dux, Ian J.; Huwaldt, Joseph A.; McKamey, R. Steve; Dankanich, John W.

    2011-01-01

    The Mars ascent vehicle is a critical element of the robotic Mars Sample Return (MSR) mission. The Mars ascent vehicle must be developed to survive a variety of conditions including the trans-Mars journey, descent through the Martian atmosphere and the harsh Martian surface environments while maintaining the ability to deliver its payload to a low Mars orbit. The primary technology challenge of developing the Mars ascent vehicle system is designing for all conditions while ensuring the mass limitations of the entry descent and landing system are not exceeded. The NASA In-Space Propulsion technology project has initiated the development of Mars ascent vehicle technologies with propulsion system performance and launch environments yet to be defined. To support the project s evaluation and development of various technology options the sensitivity of the Mars ascent vehicle gross lift-off mass to engine performance, inert mass, target orbits, and launch conditions has been completed with the results presented herein.

  20. View of earth during return from moon taken from Apollo 8 spacecraft

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1968-12-24

    AS8-15-2561 (21-27 Dec. 1968) --- View of Earth as photographed by the Apollo 8 astronauts on their return trip from the moon. Note that the terminator is straighter than on the outbound pictures. The terminator crosses Australia. India is visible. The sun reflection is within the Indian Ocean.

  1. A Free-Return Earth-Moon Cycler Orbit for an Interplanetary Cruise Ship

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Genova, Anthony L.; Aldrin, Buzz

    2015-01-01

    A periodic circumlunar orbit is presented that can be used by an interplanetary cruise ship for regular travel between Earth and the Moon. This Earth-Moon cycler orbit was revealed by introducing solar gravity and modest phasing maneuvers (average of 39 m/s per month) which yields close-Earth encounters every 7 or 10 days. Lunar encounters occur every 26 days and offer the chance for a smaller craft to depart the cycler and enter lunar orbit, or head for a Lagrange point (e.g., EM-L2 halo orbit), distant retrograde orbit (DRO), or interplanetary destination such as a near-Earth object (NEO) or Mars. Additionally, return-to-Earth abort options are available from many points along the cycling trajectory.

  2. Low Earth Orbit Raider (LER) winged air launch vehicle concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feaux, Karl; Jordan, William; Killough, Graham; Miller, Robert; Plunk, Vonn

    1989-01-01

    The need to launch small payloads into low earth orbit has increased dramatically during the past several years. The Low Earth orbit Raider (LER) is an answer to this need. The LER is an air-launched, winged vehicle designed to carry a 1500 pound payload into a 250 nautical mile orbit. The LER is launched from the back of a 747-100B at 35,000 feet and a Mach number of 0.8. Three staged solid propellant motors offer safe ground and flight handling, reliable operation, and decreased fabrication cost. The wing provides lift for 747 separation and during the first stage burn. Also, aerodynamic controls are provided to simplify first stage maneuvers. The air-launch concept offers many advantages to the consumer compared to conventional methods. Launching at 35,000 feet lowers atmospheric drag and other loads on the vehicle considerably. Since the 747 is a mobile launch pad, flexibility in orbit selection and launch time is unparalleled. Even polar orbits are accessible with a decreased payload. Most importantly, the LER launch service can come to the customer, satellites and experiments need not be transported to ground based launch facilities. The LER is designed to offer increased consumer freedom at a lower cost over existing launch systems. Simplistic design emphasizing reliability at low cost allows for the light payloads of the LER.

  3. The Suess-Urey mission (return of solar matter to Earth).

    PubMed

    Rapp, D; Naderi, F; Neugebauer, M; Sevilla, D; Sweetnam, D; Burnett, D; Wiens, R; Smith, N; Clark, B; McComas, D; Stansbery, E

    1996-01-01

    The Suess-Urey (S-U) mission has been proposed as a NASA Discovery mission to return samples of matter from the Sun to the Earth for isotopic and chemical analyses in terrestrial laboratories to provide a major improvement in our knowledge of the average chemical and isotopic composition of the solar system. The S-U spacecraft and sample return capsule will be placed in a halo orbit around the L1 Sun-Earth libration point for two years to collect solar wind ions which implant into large passive collectors made of ultra-pure materials. Constant Spacecraft-Sun-Earth geometries enable simple spin stabilized attitude control, simple passive thermal control, and a fixed medium gain antenna. Low data requirements and the safety of a Sun-pointed spinner, result in extremely low mission operations costs.

  4. Integrated Thermal Response Tool for Earth Entry Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Y.-K.; Milos, F. S.; Partridge, Harry (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A system is presented for multi-dimensional, fully-coupled thermal response modeling of hypersonic entry vehicles. The system consists of a two-dimensional implicit thermal response, pyrolysis and ablation program (TITAN), a commercial finite-element thermal and mechanical analysis code (MARC), and a high fidelity Navier-Stokes equation solver (GIANTS). The simulations performed by this integrated system include hypersonic flow-field, fluid and solid interaction, ablation, shape change, pyrolysis gas generation and flow, and thermal response of heatshield and structure. The thermal response of the ablating and charring heatshield material is simulated using TITAN, and that of the underlying structural is simulated using MARC. The ablating heatshield is treated as an outer boundary condition of the structure, and continuity conditions of temperature and heat flux are imposed at the interface between TITAN and MARC. Aerothermal environments with fluid and solid interaction are predicted by coupling TITAN and GIANTS through surface energy balance equations. With this integrated system, the aerothermal environments for an entry vehicle and the thermal response of both the heatshield and the structure can be obtained simultaneously. Representative computations for a proposed blunt body earth entry vehicle are presented and discussed in detail.

  5. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - A 20-foot by 15-foot replica of the STS-107 logo has been installed above the “A” on the A tower in the transfer aisle of the Vehicle Assembly Building. The debris from the orbiter Columbia, lost in a tragic accident on its return to Earth from the STS-107 mission, is permanently stored in the tower. A dedication ceremony Jan. 29, 2004, unveiled a plaque being installed in the storage area in honor of “Columbia, the crew of STS-107, and their loved ones.”

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-01-29

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - A 20-foot by 15-foot replica of the STS-107 logo has been installed above the “A” on the A tower in the transfer aisle of the Vehicle Assembly Building. The debris from the orbiter Columbia, lost in a tragic accident on its return to Earth from the STS-107 mission, is permanently stored in the tower. A dedication ceremony Jan. 29, 2004, unveiled a plaque being installed in the storage area in honor of “Columbia, the crew of STS-107, and their loved ones.”

  6. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Workers install a 20-foot by 15-foot replica of the STS-107 logo above the “A” on the A tower in the transfer aisle of the Vehicle Assembly Building. The debris from the orbiter Columbia, lost in a tragic accident on its return to Earth from the STS-107 mission, is permanently stored in the tower. A dedication ceremony Jan. 29, 2004, revealed a plaque being installed in the storage area in honor of “Columbia, the crew of STS-107, and their loved ones.”

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-01-29

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Workers install a 20-foot by 15-foot replica of the STS-107 logo above the “A” on the A tower in the transfer aisle of the Vehicle Assembly Building. The debris from the orbiter Columbia, lost in a tragic accident on its return to Earth from the STS-107 mission, is permanently stored in the tower. A dedication ceremony Jan. 29, 2004, revealed a plaque being installed in the storage area in honor of “Columbia, the crew of STS-107, and their loved ones.”

  7. Impact Test and Simulation of Energy Absorbing Concepts for Earth Entry Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billings, Marcus D.; Fasanella, Edwin L.; Kellas, Sotiris

    2001-01-01

    Nonlinear dynamic finite element simulations have been performed to aid in the design of an energy absorbing concept for a highly reliable passive Earth Entry Vehicle (EEV) that will directly impact the Earth without a parachute. EEV's are designed to return materials from asteroids, comets, or planets for laboratory analysis on Earth. The EEV concept uses an energy absorbing cellular structure designed to contain and limit the acceleration of space exploration samples during Earth impact. The spherical shaped cellular structure is composed of solid hexagonal and pentagonal foam-filled cells with hybrid graphite- epoxy/Kevlar cell walls. Space samples fit inside a smaller sphere at the center of the EEV's cellular structure. Comparisons of analytical predictions using MSC,Dytran with test results obtained from impact tests performed at NASA Langley Research Center were made for three impact velocities ranging from 32 to 40 m/s. Acceleration and deformation results compared well with the test results. These finite element models will be useful for parametric studies of off-nominal impact conditions.

  8. A Study of a Lifting Body as a Space Station Crew Exigency Return Vehicle (CERV)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacConochie, Ian O.

    2000-01-01

    A lifting body is described for use as a return vehicle for crews from a space station. Reentry trajectories, subsystem weights and performance, and costs are included. The baseline vehicle is sized for a crew of eight. An alternate configuration is shown in which only four crew are carried with the extra volume reserved for logistics cargo. A water parachute recovery system is shown as an emergency alternative to a runway landing. Primary reaction control thrusters from the Shuttle program are used for orbital maneuvering while the Shuttle verniers are used for all attitude control maneuvers.

  9. Mobile/Modular BSL-4 Facilities for Meeting Restricted Earth Return Containment Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calaway, M. J.; McCubbin, F. M.; Allton, J. H.; Zeigler, R. A.; Pace, L. F.

    2017-01-01

    NASA robotic sample return missions designated Category V Restricted Earth Return by the NASA Planetary Protection Office require sample containment and biohazard testing in a receiving laboratory as directed by NASA Procedural Requirement (NPR) 8020.12D - ensuring the preservation and protection of Earth and the sample. Currently, NPR 8020.12D classifies Restricted Earth Return for robotic sample return missions from Mars, Europa, and Enceladus with the caveat that future proposed mission locations could be added or restrictions lifted on a case by case basis as scientific knowledge and understanding of biohazards progresses. Since the 1960s, sample containment from an unknown extraterrestrial biohazard have been related to the highest containment standards and protocols known to modern science. Today, Biosafety Level (BSL) 4 standards and protocols are used to study the most dangerous high-risk diseases and unknown biological agents on Earth. Over 30 BSL-4 facilities have been constructed worldwide with 12 residing in the United States; of theses, 8 are operational. In the last two decades, these brick and mortar facilities have cost in the hundreds of millions of dollars dependent on the facility requirements and size. Previous mission concept studies for constructing a NASA sample receiving facility with an integrated BSL-4 quarantine and biohazard testing facility have also been estimated in the hundreds of millions of dollars. As an alternative option, we have recently conducted an initial trade study for constructing a mobile and/or modular sample containment laboratory that would meet all BSL-4 and planetary protection standards and protocols at a faction of the cost. Mobile and modular BSL-2 and 3 facilities have been successfully constructed and deployed world-wide for government testing of pathogens and pharmaceutical production. Our study showed that a modular BSL-4 construction could result in approximately 90% cost reduction when compared to

  10. A Draft Test Protocol for Detecting Possible Biohazards in Martian Samples Returned to Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rummel, John D. (Editor); Race, Margaret S.; DeVincenzi, Donald L.; Schad, P. Jackson; Stabekis, Pericles D.; Viso, Michel; Acevedo, Sara E.

    2002-01-01

    This document presents the first complete draft of a protocol for detecting possible biohazards in Mars samples returned to Earth: it is the final product of the Mars Sample Handling Protocol Workshop Series. convened in 2000-2001 by NASA's Planetary Protection Officer. The goal of the five-workshop Series vas to develop a comprehensive protocol by which returned martian sample materials could be assessed k r the presence of any biological hazard(s) while safeguarding the purity of the samples from possible terrestrial contamination.

  11. A Draft Test Protocol for Detecting Possible Biohazards in Martian Samples Returned to Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rummel, John D.; Race, Margaret S.; DeVinenzi, Donald L.; Schad, P. Jackson; Stabekis, Pericles D.; Viso, Michel; Acevedo, Sara E.

    2002-01-01

    This document presents the first complete draft of a protocol for detecting possible biohazards in Mars samples returned to Earth; it is the final product of the Mars Sample Handling Protocol Workshop Series, convened in 2000-2001 by NASA's Planetary Protection Officer. The goal of the five-workshop Series vas to develop a comprehensive protocol by which returned martian sample materials could be assessed for the presence of any biological hazard(s) while safeguarding the purity of the samples from possible terrestrial contamination The reference numbers for the proceedings from the five individual Workshops.

  12. Uniform Foam Crush Testing for Multi-Mission Earth Entry Vehicle Impact Attenuation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Byron W.; Glaab, Louis J.

    2012-01-01

    Multi-Mission Earth Entry Vehicles (MMEEVs) are blunt-body vehicles designed with the purpose of transporting payloads from outer space to the surface of the Earth. To achieve high-reliability and minimum weight, MMEEVs avoid use of limited-reliability systems, such as parachutes and retro-rockets, instead using built-in impact attenuators to absorb energy remaining at impact to meet landing loads requirements. The Multi-Mission Systems Analysis for Planetary Entry (M-SAPE) parametric design tool is used to facilitate the design of MMEEVs and develop the trade space. Testing was conducted to characterize the material properties of several candidate impact foam attenuators to enhance M-SAPE analysis. In the current effort, four different Rohacell foams are tested at three different, uniform, strain rates (approximately 0.17, approximately 100, approximately 13,600%/s). The primary data analysis method uses a global data smoothing technique in the frequency domain to remove noise and system natural frequencies. The results from the data indicate that the filter and smoothing technique are successful in identifying the foam crush event and removing aberrations. The effect of strain rate increases with increasing foam density. The 71-WF-HT foam may support Mars Sample Return requirements. Several recommendations to improve the drop tower test technique are identified.

  13. Considerations for Medical Transport from the Space Station via an Assured Crew Return Vehicle (ACRV)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stepaniak, Philip; Hamilton, Glenn C.; Stizza, Denis; Garrison, Richard; Gerstner, David

    2001-01-01

    In developing a permanently crewed space station, the importance of medical care has been continually reaffirmed; and the health maintenance facility (HMF) is an integral component. It has diagnostic, therapeutic, monitoring, and information management capability. It is designed to allow supportive care for: (1) non-life-threatening illnesses; e.g., headache, lacerations; (2) moderate to severe, possibly life-threatening illnesses; e.g., appendicitis, kidney stones; and (3) severe, incapacitating, life-threatening illnesses; e.g., major trauma, toxic exposure. Since the HMF will not have a general surgical capability, the need for emergency escape and recovery methods has been studied. Medical risk assessments have determined that it is impossible to accurately predict the incidence of crewmember illness/injury. A best estimate is 1:3 per work-year, with 1% of these needing an ACRV. For an eight-person crew, this means that one assured crew return vehicle (ACRV) will be used every 4 to 12 years. The ACRV would serve at least three basic objectives as: (1) a crew return if the space shuttle is unavailable; (2) an escape vehicle from a major time-critical space station emergency; and (3) a full or partial crew return vehicle for a medical emergency. The focus of this paper is the third objective for the ACRV.

  14. Aerobraking strategies for the sample of comet coma earth return mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abe, Takashi; Kawaguchi, Jun'ichiro; Uesugi, Kuninori; Yen, Chen-Wan L.

    1990-01-01

    The results of a study to the validate the applicability of the aerobraking concept to the SOCCER (sample of comet coma earth return) mission using a six-DOF computer simulation of the aerobraking process are presented. The SOCCER spacecraft and the aerobraking scenario and power supply problem are briefly described. Results are presented for the spin effect, payload exposure problem, and sun angle effect.

  15. Aerobraking strategies for the sample of comet coma earth return mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Takashi; Kawaguchi, Jun'ichiro; Uesugi, Kuninori; Yen, Chen-Wan L.

    The results of a study to the validate the applicability of the aerobraking concept to the SOCCER (sample of comet coma earth return) mission using a six-DOF computer simulation of the aerobraking process are presented. The SOCCER spacecraft and the aerobraking scenario and power supply problem are briefly described. Results are presented for the spin effect, payload exposure problem, and sun angle effect.

  16. A Genesis breakup and burnup analysis in off-nominal Earth return and atmospheric entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, Ahmed; Ling, Lisa; McRonald, Angus

    2005-01-01

    The Genesis project conducted a detailed breakup/burnup analysis before the Earth return to determine if any spacecraft component could survive and reach the ground intact in case of an off-nominal entry. In addition, an independent JPL team was chartered with the responsibility of analyzing several definitive breakup scenarios to verify the official project analysis. This paper presents the analysis and results of this independent team.

  17. Navigating the Return Trip from the Moon Using Earth-Based Ground Tracking and GPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Kevin; Carpenter, Russell; Moreau, Michael C.; Lee, Taesul; Holt, Gregg N.

    2009-01-01

    NASA s Constellation Program is planning a human return to the Moon late in the next decade. From a navigation perspective, one of the most critical phases of a lunar mission is the series of burns performed to leave lunar orbit, insert onto a trans-Earth trajectory, and target a precise re-entry corridor in the Earth s atmosphere. A study was conducted to examine sensitivity of the navigation performance during this phase of the mission to the type and availability of tracking data from Earth-based ground stations, and the sensitivity to key error sources. This study also investigated whether GPS measurements could be used to augment Earth-based tracking data, and how far from the Earth GPS measurements would be useful. The ability to track and utilize weak GPS signals transmitted across the limb of the Earth is highly dependent on the configuration and sensitivity of the GPS receiver being used. For this study three GPS configurations were considered: a "standard" GPS receiver with zero dB antenna gain, a "weak signal" GPS receiver with zero dB antenna gain, and a "weak signal" GPS receiver with an Earth-pointing direction antenna (providing 10 dB additional gain). The analysis indicates that with proper selection and configuration of the GPS receiver on the Orion spacecraft, GPS can potentially improve navigation performance during the critical final phases of flight prior to Earth atmospheric entry interface, and may reduce reliance on two-way range tracking from Earth-based ground stations.

  18. X-38 Prototype Technology Demonstrator for the Crew Return Vehicle (CRV) and Project Managers Bob Ba

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Bob Baron of the Dryden Flight Research Center (left) and Brian Anderson of the Johnson Space Flight Center (right) flank an X-38 prototype Crew Return Vehicle technology demonstrator under construction at the Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas. The X-38 Crew Return Vehicle (CRV) research project is designed to develop the technology for a prototype emergency crew return vehicle, or lifeboat, for the International Space Station. The project is also intended to develop a crew return vehicle design that could be modified for other uses, such as a joint U.S. and international human spacecraft that could be launched on the French Ariane-5 Booster. The X-38 project is using available technology and off-the-shelf equipment to significantly decrease development costs. Original estimates to develop a capsule-type crew return vehicle were estimated at more than $2 billion. X-38 project officials have estimated that development costs for the X-38 concept will be approximately one quarter of the original estimate. Off-the-shelf technology is not necessarily 'old' technology. Many of the technologies being used in the X-38 project have never before been applied to a human-flight spacecraft. For example, the X-38 flight computer is commercial equipment currently used in aircraft and the flight software operating system is a commercial system already in use in many aerospace applications. The video equipment for the X-38 is existing equipment, some of which has already flown on the space shuttle for previous NASA experiments. The X-38's primary navigational equipment, the Inertial Navigation System/Global Positioning System, is a unit already in use on Navy fighters. The X-38 electromechanical actuators come from previous joint NASA, U.S. Air Force, and U.S. Navy research and development projects. Finally, an existing special coating developed by NASA will be used on the X-38 thermal tiles to make them more durable than those used on the space shuttles. The X-38 itself was an

  19. Restricted by Whom? A Historical Review of Strategies and Organization for Restricted Earth Return of Samples from NASA Planetary Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pugel, Betsy

    2017-01-01

    This presentation is a review of the timeline for Apollo's approach to Planetary Protection, then known as Planetary Quarantine. Return of samples from Apollo 11, 12 and 14 represented NASA's first attempts into conducting what is now known as Restricted Earth Return, where return of samples is undertaken by the Agency with the utmost care for the impact that the samples may have on Earth's environment due to the potential presence of microbial or other life forms that originate from the parent body (in this case, Earth's Moon).

  20. Preliminary subsystem designs for the Assured Crew Return Vehicle (ACRV), volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    A series of design studies is presented concerning the Assured Crew Return Vehicle (ACRV) for Space Station Freedom. Four alternate designs are presented for the ACRV braking and landing system. Options presented include: ballistic and lifting body reentries; the use of high-lift, high-payload aerodynamic decelerators, as well as conventional parachutes; landing systems designed for water landings, land landings, or both; and an aerial recovery system. All four design options presented combine some or all of the above attributes, and all meet performance requirements established by the ACRV Program Office. Two studies of ACRV growth options are also presented. Use of the ACRV or a similarly designed vehicle in several roles for possible future space missions is discussed, along with the required changes to a basic ACRV to allow it to perform these missions optimally. The outcome of these studies is a set of recommendations to the ACRV Program Office describing the vehicle characteristics of the basic ACRV which lend themselves most readily to be adapted for use in other missions. Finally, the impacts on the design of the ACRV due to its role as a medical emergency vehicle were studied and are presented. The use of the ACRV in this manner will impact its shape, internal configuration, and equipment.

  1. Low Cost Mars Sample Return Utilizing Dragon Lander Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoker, Carol R.

    2014-01-01

    We studied a Mars sample return (MSR) mission that lands a SpaceX Dragon Capsule on Mars carrying sample collection hardware (an arm, drill, or small rover) and a spacecraft stack consisting of a Mars Ascent Vehicle (MAV) and Earth Return Vehicle (ERV) that collectively carry the sample container from Mars back to Earth orbit.

  2. Space Station Astronauts Return Safely to Earth on This Week @NASA – December 11, 2015

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-12-11

    On Dec. 11 aboard the International Space Station, NASA’s Kjell Lindgren, Russian cosmonaut Oleg Kononenko and Kimiya Yui of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, bid farewell to crew members remaining on the station -- including Commander Scott Kelly, NASA’s one-year mission astronaut. The returning members of Expedition 45 then climbed aboard their Soyuz spacecraft for the trip back to Earth. They safely touched down hours later in Kazakhstan – closing out a 141-day stay in space. Also, Next space station crew prepares for launch, Supply mission arrives at space station, Quantum computing lab and more!

  3. Design of fast earth-return trajectories from a lunar base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anhorn, Walter

    1991-09-01

    The Apollo Lunar Program utilized efficient transearth trajectories which employed parking orbits in order to minimize energy requirements. This thesis concentrates on a different type of transearth trajectory. These are direct-ascent, hyperbolic trajectories which omit the parking orbits in order to achieve short flight times to and from a future lunar base. The object of the thesis is the development of a three-dimensional transearth trajectory model and associated computer program for exploring trade-offs between flight-time and energy, given various mission constraints. The program also targets the Moon with a hyperbolic trajectory, which can be used for targeting Earth impact points. The first-order model is based on an Earth-centered conic and a massless spherical Moon, using MathCAD version 3.0. This model is intended as the basis for future patched-conic formulations for the design of fast Earth-return trajectories. Applications include placing nuclear deterrent arsenals on the Moon, various space support related activities, and finally protection against Earth-threatening asteroids and comets using lunar bases.

  4. A Draft Protocol for Detecting Possible Biohazards in Martian Samples Returned to Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viso, M.; DeVincenzi, D. L.; Race, M. S.; Schad, P. J.; Stabekis, P. D.; Acevedo, S. E.; Rummel, J. D.

    2002-01-01

    In preparation for missions to Mars that will involve the return of samples, it is necessary to prepare for the safe receiving, handling, testing, distributing, and archiving of martian materials here on Earth. Previous groups and committees have studied selected aspects of sample return activities, but a specific protocol for handling and testing of returned -=1 samples from Mars remained to be developed. To refine the requirements for Mars sample hazard testing and to develop criteria for the subsequent release of sample materials from precautionary containment, NASA Planetary Protection Officer, working in collaboration with CNES, convened a series of workshops to produce a Protocol by which returned martian sample materials could be assessed for biological hazards and examined for evidence of life (extant or extinct), while safeguarding the samples from possible terrestrial contamination. The Draft Protocol was then reviewed by an Oversight and Review Committee formed specifically for that purpose and composed of senior scientists. In order to preserve the scientific value of returned martian samples under safe conditions, while avoiding false indications of life within the samples, the Sample Receiving Facility (SRF) is required to allow handling and processing of the Mars samples to prevent their terrestrial contamination while maintaining strict biological containment. It is anticipated that samples will be able to be shipped among appropriate containment facilities wherever necessary, under procedures developed in cooperation with international appropriate institutions. The SRF will need to provide different types of laboratory environments for carrying out, beyond sample description and curation, the various aspects of the protocol: Physical/Chemical analysis, Life Detection testing, and Biohazard testing. The main principle of these tests will be described and the criteria for release will be discussed, as well as the requirements for the SRF and its

  5. Biconic cargo return vehicle with an advanced recovery system. Volume 1: Conceptual design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The conceptual design of the biconic Cargo Return Vehicle (CRV) is presented. The CRV will be able to meet all of the Space Station Freedom (SSF's) resupply needs. Worth note is the absence of a backup recovery chute in case of Advanced Recovery System (ARS) failure. The high reliability of ram-air parachutes does not warrant the penalty weight that such a system would create on successful missions. The CRV will launch vertically integrated with an Liquid Rocket Booster (LRB) vehicle and meets all NASA restrictions on fuel type for all phases of the mission. Because of the downscaled Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) program, the CRV has been designed to be able to transfer cargo by docking directly to the Space Station Freedom as well as with OMV assistance. The CRV will cover enough crossrange to reach its primary landing site, Edwards Airforce Base, and all secondary landing sites with the exception of one orbit. Transportation back to KSC will be via the Boeing Super Guppy. Due to difficulties with man-rating the CRV, it will not be used in a CERV role. A brief summary of the CRV's specifications is given.

  6. Are Samples Obtained after Return to Earth Reflective of Spaceflight or Increased Gravity?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wade, C. R.; Holton, E.; Baer, L.; Moran, M.

    2001-01-01

    Upon return to Earth, following space flight, living systems are immediately exposed to an increase in gravity of 1G. It has been difficult to differentiate between changes that are residuals of the acclimation to space flight from those resulting from acute exposure to an increase in =gravity upon re-entry. We compared previously reported changes observed in male Sprague-Dawley rats upon return to Earth to those induced by centrifugation, because both paradigms result in an increase of 1G. With both treatments there was a reduction in body mass, due to reduced food intake and increased urine output. The decrease in food intake was initially greater with centrifugation. The magnitudes of the changes in food intake and urine output were similar in both treatments. However, the slightly greater initial loss in body mass with centrifugation was due to a decrease in water intake not seen after space flight. The absence of pronounced differences between these treatments suggest the responses observed after landing are not residuals of adaptation to the space flight environment, but the result of adaptation to an increase in the level of gravity.

  7. Atmospheric Ar and Ne returned from mantle depths to the Earth's surface by forearc recycling.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Suzanne L; Das, J P

    2015-11-17

    In subduction zones, sediments, hydrothermally altered lithosphere, fluids, and atmospheric gases are transported into the mantle, where ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) metamorphism takes place. However, the extent to which atmospheric noble gases are trapped in minerals crystallized during UHP metamorphism is unknown. We measured Ar and Ne trapped in phengite and omphacite from the youngest known UHP terrane on Earth to determine the composition of Ar and Ne returned from mantle depths to the surface by forearc recycling. An (40)Ar/(39)Ar age [7.93 ± 0.10 My (1σ)] for phengite is interpreted as the timing of crystallization at mantle depths and indicates that (40)Ar/(39)Ar phengite ages reliably record the timing of UHP metamorphism. Both phengite and omphacite yielded atmospheric (38)Ar/(36)Ar and (20)Ne/(22)Ne. Our study provides the first documentation, to our knowledge, of entrapment of atmospheric Ar and Ne in phengite and omphacite. Results indicate that a subduction barrier for atmospheric-derived noble gases does not exist at mantle depths associated with UHP metamorphism. We show that the crystallization age together with the isotopic composition of nonradiogenic noble gases trapped in minerals formed during subsolidus crystallization at mantle depths can be used to unambiguously assess forearc recycling of atmospheric noble gases. The flux of atmospheric noble gas entering the deep Earth through subduction and returning to the surface cannot be fully realized until the abundances of atmospheric noble gases trapped in exhumed UHP rocks are known.

  8. International Space Station (ISS) Accommodation of a Single US Assured Crew Return Vehicle (ACRV)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazanek, Daniel D.; Garn, Michelle A.; Troutman, Patrick A.; Wang, Yuan; Kumar, Renjith; Heck, Michael L.

    1997-01-01

    The following report was generated to give the International Space Station (ISS) Program some additional insight into the operations and issues associated with accommodating a single U.S. developed Assured Crew Return Vehicle (ACRV). During the generation of this report, changes in both the ISS and ACRV programs were factored into the analysis with the realization that most of the work performed will eventually need to be repeated once the two programs become more integrated. No significant issues associated with the ISS accommodating the ACRV were uncovered. Kinematic analysis of ACRV installation showed that there are viable methods of using Shuttle and Station robotic manipulators. Separation analysis demonstrated that the ACRV departure path clears the Station structure for all likely contingency scenarios. The payload bay packaging analysis identified trades that can be made between payload bay location, Shuttle Remote Manipulator System (SRMS) reach and eventual designs of de-orbit stages and docking adapters.

  9. Post landing design and testing of an ACRV model. [Assured Crew Return Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hosterman, Kenneth C.; Anderson, Loren A.

    1991-01-01

    Consideration is given to a 1990-1991 program concentrated on the design, building, and testing of a one-fifth scale model of the egress and stabilization systems for an Apollo Command Module (ACM)-based assured crew return vehicle (ACRV). The program is aimed at determining the feasibility of 1) stabilizing the ACRV out of the range of motions which cause space sickness and 2) the safe and rapid removaling of a sick or injured crewmember from the ACRV. Research have been conducted in the following areas: ACRV model construction, water test facility identification, and stabilization control systems. The fidelity of the model has been established from geometric and dynamic characteristic tests performed on the model.

  10. Design, building, and testing of the post landing systems for the assured crew return vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Loren A.

    1991-01-01

    The design, building, and testing of the post landing support systems for a water landing Assured Crew Return Vehicle (ACRV) are presented. One ACRV will be permanently docked to Space Station Freedom, fulfilling NASA's commitment to Assured Crew Return Capability in the event of an accident or illness. The configuration of the ACRV is based on an Apollo Command Module (ACM) derivative. The 1990 to 91 effort concentrated on the design, building, and testing of a 1/5 scale model of the egress and stabilization systems. The objective was to determine the feasibility of: (1) stabilizing the ACM out of the range of motions which cause sea sickness; and (2) the safe and rapid removal of a sick or injured crewmember from the ACRV. The ACRV model construction is presented along with a discussion of the water test facility. The rapid egress system is also presented along with a discussion of the ACRV stabilization control systems. Results are given and discussed in detail.

  11. Design, building, and testing of the postlanding systems for the assured crew return vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hosterman, Kenneth C.; Anderson, Loren A.

    1991-01-01

    The design, building, and testing of the postlanding support systems for a water-landing Assured Crew Return Vehicle (ACRV) are presented. One ACRV will be permanently docked to Space Station Freedom, fulfilling NASA's commitment to Assured Crew Return Capability in the event of an accident or illness. The configuration of the ACRV is based on an Apollo Command Module (ACM) derivative. The 1990-1991 effort concentrated on the design, building, and testing of a one-fifth scale model of the egress and stabilization systems. The objective was to determine the feasibility of (1) stabilizing the ACM out of the range of motions that cause seasickness and (2) the safe and rapid removal of a sick or injured crew member from the ACRV. The development of the ACRV postlanding systems model was performed at the University of Central Florida with guidance from the Kennedy Space Center ACRV program managers. Emphasis was placed on four major areas. First was design and construction of a one-fifth scale model of the ACM derivative to accommodate the egress and stabilization systems for testing. Second was the identification of a water test facility suitable for testing the model in all possible configurations. Third was the construction of the rapid egress mechanism designed in the previous academic year for incorporation into the ACRV model. The fourth area was construction and motion response testing of the attitude ring and underwater parachute systems.

  12. Testing of the International Space Station and X-38 Crew Return Vehicle GPS Receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, James; Campbell, Chip; Carpenter, Russell; Davis, Ed; Kizhner, Semion; Lightsey, E. Glenn; Davis, George; Jackson, Larry

    1999-01-01

    This paper discusses the process and results of the performance testing of the GPS receiver planned for use on the International Space Station (ISS) and the X-38 Crew Return Vehicle (CRV). The receiver is a Force-19 unit manufactured by Trimble Navigation and Modified in software by the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) to perform navigation and attitude determination in space. The receiver is the primary source of navigation and attitude information for ISS and CRV. Engineers at GSFC have developed and tested the new receiver with a Global Simulation Systems Ltd (GSS) GPS Signal Generator (GPSSG). This paper documents the unique aspects of ground testing a GPS receiver that is designed for use in space. A discussion of the design and tests using the GPSSG, documentation, data capture, data analysis, and lessons learned will precede an overview of the performance of the new receiver. A description of the challenges of that were overcome during this testing exercise will be presented. Results from testing show that the receiver will be within or near the specifications for ISS attitude and navigation performance. The process for verifying other requirements such as Time to First Fix, Time to First Attitude, selection/deselection of a specific GPS satellite vehicles (SV), minimum signal strength while still obtaining attitude and navigation, navigation and attitude output coverage, GPS week rollover, and Y2K requirements are also given in this paper.

  13. Testing of the International Space Station and X-38 Crew Return Vehicle GPS Receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, James; Lightsey, Glenn; Campbell, Chip; Carpenter, Russell; Davis, George; Jackson, Larry; Davis, Ed; Kizhner, Semion

    1999-01-01

    This paper discusses the process and results of the performance testing of the GPS receiver planned for use on the International Space Station (ISS) and the X- 38CrewReturnVehicle(CRV). The receiver is a Force-19 unit manufactured by Trimble Navigation and modified in software by NASA:s Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) to perform navigation and attitude determination in space. The receiver is the primary source of navigation and attitude information for ISS and CRV. Engineers at GSFC have developed and tested the new receiver with a Global Simulation Systems Ltd (GSS) GPS Signal Generator (GPSSG). This paper documents the unique aspects of ground testing a GPS receiver that is designed for use in space. A discussion of the design of tests using the GPSSG, documentation, data capture, data analysis, and lessons learned will precede an overview of the performance of the new receiver. A description of the challenges that were overcome during this testing exercise will be presented. Results from testing show that the receiver will be within or near the specifications for ISS attitude and navigation performance. The process for verifying other requirements such as Time to First Fix, Time to First Attitude, selection/deselection of a specific GPS satellite vehicles (SV), minimum signal strength while still obtaining attitude and navigation, navigation and attitude output coverage, GPS week rollover, and Y2K requirements are also given in this paper.

  14. Testing of the International Space Station and X-38 Crew Return Vehicle GPS Receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, James; Campbell, Chip; Carpenter, Russell; Davis, Ed; Kizhner, Semion; Lightsey, E. Glenn; Davis, George; Jackson, Larry

    1999-01-01

    This paper discusses the process and results of the performance testing of the GPS receiver planned for use on the International Space Station (ISS) and the X-38 Crew Return Vehicle (CRV). The receiver is a Force-19 unit manufactured by Trimble Navigation and modified in software by the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) to perform navigation and attitude determination in space. The receiver is the primary source of navigation and attitude information for ISS and CRV. Engineers at GSFC have developed and tested the new receiver with a Global Simulation Systems Ltd (GSS) GPS Signal Generator (GPSSG). This paper documents the unique aspects of ground testing a GPS receiver that is designed for use in space. A discussion of the design of tests using the GPSSG, documentation, data capture, data analysis, and lessons learned will precede an overview of the performance of the new receiver. A description of the challenges that were overcome during this testing exercise will be presented. Results from testing show that the receiver will be within or near the specifications for ISS attitude and navigation performance. The process for verifying other requirements such as Time to First Fix, Time to First Attitude, selection/deselection of a specific GPS satellite vehicles (SV), minimum signal strength while still obtaining attitude and navigation, navigation and attitude output coverage, GPS week rollover, and Y2K requirements are also given in this paper.

  15. Safety Guided Design of Crew Return Vehicle in Concept Design Phase Using STAMP/STPA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakao, H.; Katahira, M.; Miyamoto, Y.; Leveson, N.

    2012-01-01

    In the concept development and design phase of a new space system, such as a Crew Vehicle, designers tend to focus on how to implement new technology. Designers also consider the difficulty of using the new technology and trade off several system design candidates. Then they choose an optimal design from the candidates. Safety should be a key aspect driving optimal concept design. However, in past concept design activities, safety analysis such as FTA has not used to drive the design because such analysis techniques focus on component failure and component failure cannot be considered in the concept design phase. The solution to these problems is to apply a new hazard analysis technique, called STAMP/STPA. STAMP/STPA defines safety as a control problem rather than a failure problem and identifies hazardous scenarios and their causes. Defining control flow is the essential in concept design phase. Therefore STAMP/STPA could be a useful tool to assess the safety of system candidates and to be part of the rationale for choosing a design as the baseline of the system. In this paper, we explain our case study of safety guided concept design using STPA, the new hazard analysis technique, and model-based specification technique on Crew Return Vehicle design and evaluate benefits of using STAMP/STPA in concept development phase.

  16. Soyuz-TM-based interim Assured Crew Return Vehicle (ACRV) for the Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Semenov, Yu. P.; Babkov, Oleg I.; Timchenko, Vladimir A.; Craig, Jerry W.

    1993-01-01

    The concept of using the available Soyuz-TM Assured Crew Return Vehicle (ACRV) spacecraft for the assurance of the safety of the Space Station Freedom (SSF) crew after the departure of the Space Shuttle from SSF was proposed by the NPO Energia and was accepted by NASA in 1992. The ACRV will provide the crew with the capability to evacuate a seriously injured/ill crewmember from the SSF to a ground-based care facility under medically tolerable conditions and with the capability for a safe evacuation from SSF in the events SSF becomes uninhabitable or the Space Shuttle flights are interrupted for a time that exceeds SSF ability for crew support and/or safe operations. This paper presents the main results of studies on Phase A (including studies on the service life of ACRV; spacecraft design and operations; prelaunch processing; mission support; safety, reliability, maintenance and quality and assurance; landing, and search/rescue operations; interfaces with the SSF and with Space Shuttle; crew accommodation; motion of orbital an service modules; and ACRV injection by the Expendable Launch Vehicles), along with the objectives of further work on the Phase B.

  17. UK technical activities associated with the return to Earth of the MIR space station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowther, Richard; Tremayne-Smith, Richard

    2002-11-01

    The British National Space Centre (BNSC) acts as the focus in the United Kingdom (UK) for space-related activities. With the anticipated return to Earth of the MIR space station, BNSC established a group of technical experts to consider the associated implications for the UK, and to address both national and international activities relating to the planned de-orbit. In particular, the risk to the UK of an uncontrolled re-entry was considered in contingency planning and the means for the provision of accurate information to the public and media were established to ensure balanced view of the potential hazards that MIR posed to persons and property on the ground. The MIR de-orbit was exemplary, both in terms of the technical activities of the Rosaviakosmos and the safe disposal of MIR in the Pacific, and in relation to the open and effective communication between agencies and the positive reporting by the media.

  18. Preliminary Subsystem Designs for the Assured Crew Return Vehicle (ACRV), volumes 1-3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    A long term manned facility in space must include provisions for the safety of the crew. The resolution of this need was the design of an Assured Crew Return Vehicle (ACRV). The main focus is on the braking and landing system of the ACRV. This subsystem of the ACRV was divided into three phases. The Phase 1 analysis showed that the use of a tether to aid in the reentry of the ACRV was infeasible due to cost and efficiency. Therefore, a standard rocket would be used for reentry. It was also found that the continental United States was an achievable landing site for the ACRV. The Phase 2 analysis determined the L/D of the vehicle to be 1.8, thus requiring the use of a lifting body for reentry. It was also determined that shuttle tiles would be used for the thermal protection system. In addition, a parachute sequence for further deceleration was included, namely a ringslot drogue chute, a pilot chute, and finally a ringsail main parachute. This sequence was found to be capable of slowing the vehicle to a descent velocity of 9 to 10 m/s, which is the required velocity for aerial recovery. The Phase 3 analysis proved that a Sikorsky CH-53E helicopter is capable of retrieving the ACRV at 5.5 km altitude with minimal g-forces induced on the ACRV and minimal induced moments on the helicopter upon hookup. The helicopter would be modified such that it could stabilize the ACRV close to the bottom of helicopter and carry it to the nearest designated trauma center.

  19. 75 FR 1285 - Vehicle-Mounted Earth Stations (VMES)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-11

    ... Earth Stations (VMES) AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Final Rule; announcement of...-Mounted Earth Stations in Certain Frequency Bands Allocated to the Fixed-Satellite Service, IB Docket No...(i), 4(j), 7(a), 301, 303(c), 303(f), 303(g), 303(r), 303(y) and 308 of the Communications Act of...

  20. Rat gestation during space flight: outcomes for dams and their offspring born after return to Earth.

    PubMed

    Wong, A M; DeSantis, M

    1997-01-01

    Sprague-Dawley rats were studied to learn whether gestation in the near-zero gravity, high radiation environment of space impacts selected mammalian postnatal events. Ten rats spent days nine to twenty of pregnancy aboard the space shuttle orbiter Atlantis (STS-66). Their movement was studied shortly after return to Earth; subsequently, several of their offspring were cross-fostered and examined through postnatal day 81 (P81) for whole body growth and somatic motor development. Values for the flight animals were compared to ground-based control groups. Relative to controls, the pregnant flight rats showed a marked paucity of locomotion during the first few hours after returning to Earth. There was greater likelihood of perinatal morbidity for the offspring of flight dams when compared to the control groups. Whole body weight of surviving offspring, averaged for each group separately, showed typical sigmoidal growth curves when plotted against postnatal age. The flight group for our study had a larger ratio of female to male pups, and that was sufficient to account for the lower average daily weight gained by the flight animals when compared to the control groups. Walking was universally achieved by P13 and preceded eye opening, which was complete in all pups by P17. Thus, both of these developmental horizons were attained on schedule in the flight as well as the control rats. Characteristic changes were observed in hind limb step length and gait width as the pups grew. These patterns occurred at the same time in each group of rats. Therefore, prenatal space flight from days nine to twenty of gestation did not interfere with the establishment of normal patterns for hind paw placement during walking.

  1. Rat Gestation During Space Flight: Outcomes for Dams and Their Offspring Born After Return to Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Andre M.; DeSantis, Mark

    1997-01-01

    Sprague-Dawley rats were studied to learn whether gestation in the near-zero gravity, high radiation environment of space impacts selected mammalian postnatal events. Ten rats spent days nine to twenty of pregnancy aboard the space shuttle orbiter Atlantis (STS-66). Their movement was studied shortly after return to Earth; subsequently, several of their offspring were cross-fostered and examined through postnatal day 81 (P81) for whole body growth and somatic motor development. Values for the flight animals were compared to ground-based control groups. Relative to controls, the pregnant flight rats showed a marked paucity of locomotion during the first few hours after returning to Earth. There was greater likelihood of perinatal morbidity for the offspring of flight dams when compared to the control groups. Whole body weight of surviving offspring, averaged for each group separately, showed typical sigmoidal growth curves when plotted against postnatal age. The flight group for our study had a larger ratio of female to male pups, and that was sufficient to account for the lower average daily weight gained by the flight animals when compared to the control groups. Walking was universally achieved by P13 and preceded eye opening, which was complete in all pups by P17. Thus, both of these developmental horizons were attained on schedule in the flight as well as the control rats. Characteristic changes were observed in hind limb step length and gait width as the pups grew. These patterns occurred at the same time in each group of rats. Therefore, prenatal space flight from days nine to twenty of gestation did not interfere with the establishment of normal patterns for hind paw placement during walking.

  2. Evaluation of X-38 Crew Return Vehicle Input Control Devices in a Microgravity Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welge, Kirsten; Moore, Alicia; Pope, Ruth Ann; Shivers, Suzette; Fox, Jeffrey

    2000-01-01

    This report was created by students from Longview High School, Longview, Texas. Longview High School was selected from a group of Texas high schools to participate in the 1999 Texas Fly High Program. This program gives Texas high school students a chance to work with NASA engineers to design and fly a real-world experiment aboard the KC-135 during zero-g parabolas. Jeffrey Fox's role was to provide a concept for the experiment and to mentor the students in its design and testing. The students were responsible for executing all phases of the project. The X-38 Project Office at the Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center Johnson Space is designing a crew return vehicle (CRV) to be docked at the International Space Station for crew rescue in an emergency. Vehicle controls will be almost completely automated, but a few functions will be manually controlled. Four crew input control devices were selected for evaluation by Longview High School students as part of the 1999 Texas Fly High program. These were (1) Logitech Trackman Marble (optical trackball), (2) Smart Cat Touchpad. (3) Microsoft SideWinder 3D-Pro Joystick, and (4) Microsoft SideWinder Gamepad. In two flight tests in the KC-135 aircraft and a series of ground tests, the devices were evaluated for ability to maneuver an on-screen cursor, level of accuracy, ease of handling blind operations, and level of user comfort in microgravity. The tests results led to recommendation of further tests with the Joystick and the Trackman by astronauts and actual space station residents.

  3. Thermal History of Near-Earth Asteroids: Implications for OSIRIS-REx Asteroid Sample Return

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Springmann, Alessondra; Lauretta, Dante S.

    2016-10-01

    The connection between orbital and temperature history of small Solar System bodies has only been studied through modeling. The upcoming OSIRIS-REx asteroid sample return mission provides an opportunity to connect thermal modeling predictions with laboratory studies of meteorites to predict past heating and thus dynamical histories of bodies such as OSIRIS-REx mission target asteroid (101955) Bennu. Bennu is a desirable target for asteroid sample return due to its inferred primitive nature, likely 4.5 Gyr old, with chemistry and mineralogy established in the first 10 Myr of solar system history (Lauretta et al. 2015). Delbo & Michel (2011) studied connections between the temperature and orbital history of Bennu. Their results suggest that the surface of Bennu (assuming no regolith turnover) has a 50% probability of being heated to 500 K in the past. Further, the Delbo & Michel simulations show that the temperature within the asteroid below the top layer of regolith could remain at temperatures ~100 K below that of the surface. The Touch-And-Go Sample Acquisition Mechanism on OSIRIS-REx could access both the surface and near surface regolith, collecting primitive asteroid material for study in Earth-based laboratories in 2023. To quantify the effects of thermal metamorphism on the Bennu regolith, laboratory heating experiments on carbonaceous chondrite meteorites with compositions likely similar to that of Bennu were conducted from 300-1200 K. These experiments show mobilization and volatilization of a suite of labile elements (sulfur, mercury, arsenic, tellurium, selenium, antimony, and cadmium) at temperatures that could be reached by asteroids that cross Mercury's orbit. We are able to quantify element loss with temperature for several carbonaceous chondrites and use these results to constrain past orbital histories of Bennu. When OSIRIS-REx samples arrive for analysis we will be able to measure labile element loss in the material, determine maximum past

  4. 26 CFR 1.168(f)(8)-1T - Safe-harbor lease information returns concerning qualified mass commuting vehicles (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Safe-harbor lease information returns concerning qualified mass commuting vehicles (temporary). 1.168(f)(8)-1T Section 1.168(f)(8)-1T Internal Revenue... information returns concerning qualified mass commuting vehicles (temporary). In general. Form 6793, Safe...

  5. Battery Systems for X-38 Crew Return Vehicle (CRV) and Deorbit Propulsion Stage (DPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darcy, Eric

    1998-01-01

    A 28V 32 Ah cell Li/MnO2 and a 28V NiMH battery systems for the Deorbit Propulsion Stage (DPS) and the X-38 Crew Return Vehicle (CRV) are developed in Friwo-Silforkraft, Germany with the following objectives and approach: Provide safe battery designs for lowest volume and cost, and within schedule; Take advantage of less complex requests for V201 vs OPS CRV to simplify design and reduce cost; Use only existing commercial cell designs as building blocks for larger battery; Derive battery designs from the ASTRO-SPAS design which is the largest lithium battery design with Shuttle flight experience; Place maximum amount of battery energy on DPS; DPS battery is non rechargeable; and CRV batteries are rechargeable. This paper contains the following sections: a brief introduction on CRV requirements, CRV advantages over Soyuz, and X-38 programs; Battery objectives and approach; Battery requirements and groundrules (performance, on-orbit operation, etc); Design trades, solutions, redundancy plan, and margins; Envelope, size, and mass; Interfaces (structural, electrical & thermal); and Deviation from OPS CRV.

  6. Development of the J-2X Engine for the Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle and the Ares V Cargo Launch Vehicle: Building on the Apollo Program for Lunar Return Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snoddy, Jim

    2006-01-01

    The United States (U.S.) Vision for Space Exploration directs NASA to develop two new launch vehicles for sending humans to the Moon, Mars, and beyond. In January 2006, NASA streamlined its hardware development approach for replacing the Space Shuttle after it is retired in 2010. Benefits of this approach include reduced programmatic and technical risks and the potential to return to the Moon by 2020, by developing the Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV) propulsion elements now, with full extensibility to future Ares V Cargo Launch Vehicle (CaLV) lunar systems. This decision was reached after the Exploration Launch Projects Office performed a variety of risk analyses, commonality assessments, and trade studies. The Constellation Program selected the Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne J-2X engine to power the Ares I Upper Stage Element and the Ares V Earth Departure Stage. This paper narrates the evolution of that decision; describes the performance capabilities expected of the J-2X design, including potential commonality challenges and opportunities between the Ares I and Ares V launch vehicles; and provides a current status of J-2X design, development, and hardware testing activities. This paper also explains how the J-2X engine effort mitigates risk by building on the Apollo Program and other lessons lived to deliver a human-rated engine that is on an aggressive development schedule, with its first demonstration flight in 2012.

  7. Ion engine propelled Earth-Mars cycler with nuclear thermal propelled transfer vehicle, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Rudolf X.; Baker, Myles; Melko, Joseph

    1994-01-01

    The goal of this project was to perform a preliminary design of a long term, reusable transportation system between earth and Mars which would be capable of providing both artificial gravity and shelter from solar flare radiation. The heart of this system was assumed to be a Cycler spacecraft propelled by an ion propulsion system. The crew transfer vehicle was designed to be propelled by a nuclear-thermal propulsion system. Several Mars transportation system architectures and their associated space vehicles were designed.

  8. Design of an unmanned, reusable vehicle to de-orbit debris in Earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aziz, Shahed; Cunningham, Timothy W.; Moore-Mccassey, Michelle

    1990-01-01

    The space debris problem is becoming more important because as orbital missions increase, the amount of debris increases. It was the design team's objective to present alternative designs and a problem solution for a deorbiting vehicle that will alleviate the problem by reducing the amount of large debris in earth orbit. The design team was asked to design a reusable, unmanned vehicle to de-orbit debris in earth orbit. The design team will also construct a model to demonstrate the system configuration and key operating features. The alternative designs for the unmanned, reusable vehicle were developed in three stages: selection of project requirements and success criteria, formulation of a specification list, and the creation of alternatives that would satisfy the standards set forth by the design team and their sponsor. The design team selected a Chain and Bar Shot method for deorbiting debris in earth orbit. The De-orbiting Vehicle (DOV) uses the NASA Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) as the propulsion and command modules with the deorbiting module attached to the front.

  9. Predictors of return to work following motor vehicle related orthopaedic trauma.

    PubMed

    Murgatroyd, Darnel F; Harris, Ian A; Tran, Yvonne; Cameron, Ian D; Murgatroyd, Darnel

    2016-04-19

    Work disability following motor vehicle related orthopaedic trauma is a significant contributor to the burden of injury and disease. Early identification of predictors for return to work (RTW) is essential for developing effective interventions to prevent work disability. The study aim was to determine the predictors (including compensation related factors) of time to RTW following motor vehicle related orthopaedic trauma. Admitted patients were recruited prospectively from two trauma hospitals with upper and/or lower extremity fractures following a motor vehicle crash. Baseline and follow up data were collected by written questionnaire. For baseline, this occurred in person within 2 weeks of injury. For follow up, this occurred by mail at six, 12 and 24 months. Additional demographic and injury-related information was retrieved from hospital databases. Analysis involved: descriptive statistics; logrank test to detect survival distributions of categorical variables; and Cox proportional hazards regression models for risks of time to RTW using baseline characteristic and compensation related variables (at 6 months). Of 452 study participants 334 (74%) were working pre-injury: results are based on this subset. Baseline characteristics were mean age 36 years (13.9 Standard Deviation [SD]), 80% male; 72% self-assessed very good-excellent pre-injury health, 83% household income > AU$40,000 (Australian Dollar). Follow up data was available for 233 (70%), 210 (63%), and 182 (54%) participants at six, 12 and 24 months respectively. Significant risks of a longer time to RTW were greater injury severity, as measured by the New Injury Severity Score (NISS) (Hazards Rate Ratio [HRR] = 0.54, 95% CI 0.35-0.82); and lower occupational skill levels (HRR = 0.53, 95% CI 0.34-0.83). Significant risks of a shorter time to RTW were: recovery expectations for usual activities within 90 days (HRR = 2.10, 95% CI 1.49-2.95); full-time pre-injury work hours (HRR = 1.99, 95% CI 1

  10. Requirements for a near-earth space tug vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunn, Charles R.

    1990-01-01

    The requirement for a small but powerful space tug, which will be capable of autonomous orbital rendezvous, docking and translating cargos between near-earth orbits by the end of this decade to support the growing national and international space infrastructure focused near the Space Station Freedom, is described. An aggregate of missions drives the need for a space tug including reboosting decaying satellites back to their operational altitudes, retrieving failed or exhausted satellites to Shuttle or SSF for on-orbit refueling or repair, and transporting a satellite servicer system with an FTS to ailing satellites for supervised in-place repair. It is shown that the development and operation of a space tug to perform such numerous missions is more cost effective than separate module and satellite systems to perform the same tasks.

  11. Next generation earth-to-orbit space transportation systems: Unmanned vehicles and liquid/hybrid boosters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hueter, Uwe

    1991-01-01

    The United States civil space effort when viewed from a launch vehicle perspective tends to categorize into pre-Shuttle and Shuttle eras. The pre-Shuttle era consisted of expendable launch vehicles where a broad set of capabilities were matured in a range of vehicles, followed by a clear reluctance to build on and utilize those systems. The Shuttle era marked the beginning of the U.S. venture into reusable space launch vehicles and the consolidation of launch systems used to this one vehicle. This led to a tremendous capability, but utilized men on a few missions where it was not essential and compromised launch capability resiliency in the long term. Launch vehicle failures, between the period of Aug. 1985 and May 1986, of the Titan 34D, Shuttle Challenger, and the Delta vehicles resulted in a reassessment of U.S. launch vehicle capability. The reassessment resulted in President Reagan issuing a new National Space Policy in 1988 calling for more coordination between Federal agencies, broadening the launch capabilities and preparing for manned flight beyond the Earth into the solar system. As a result, the Department of Defense (DoD) and NASA are jointly assessing the requirements and needs for this nations's future transportation system. Reliability/safety, balanced fleet, and resiliency are the cornerstone to the future. An insight is provided into the current thinking in establishing future unmanned earth-to-orbit (ETO) space transportation needs and capabilities. A background of previous launch capabilities, future needs, current and proposed near term systems, and system considerations to assure future mission need will be met, are presented. The focus is on propulsion options associated with unmanned cargo vehicles and liquid booster required to assure future mission needs will be met.

  12. Evaluation of Proposed Rocket Engines for Earth-to-Orbit Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, James A.; Kramer, Richard D.

    1990-01-01

    The objective is to evaluate recently analyzed rocket engines for advanced Earth-to-orbit vehicles. The engines evaluated are full-flow staged combustion engines and split expander engines, both at mixture ratios at 6 and above with oxygen and hydrogen propellants. The vehicles considered are single-stage and two-stage fully reusable vehicles and the Space Shuttle with liquid rocket boosters. The results indicate that the split expander engine at a mixture ratio of about 7 is competitive with the full-flow staged combustion engine for all three vehicle concepts. A key factor in this result is the capability to increase the chamber pressure for the split expander as the mixture ratio is increased from 6 to 7.

  13. Full-Scale Passive Earth Entry Vehicle Landing Tests: Methods and Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Littell, Justin D.; Kellas, Sotiris

    2018-01-01

    During the summer of 2016, a series of drop tests were conducted on two passive earth entry vehicle (EEV) test articles at the Utah Test and Training Range (UTTR). The tests were conducted to evaluate the structural integrity of a realistic EEV vehicle under anticipated landing loads. The test vehicles were lifted to an altitude of approximately 400m via a helicopter and released via release hook into a predesignated 61 m landing zone. Onboard accelerometers were capable of measuring vehicle free flight and impact loads. High-speed cameras on the ground tracked the free-falling vehicles and data was used to calculate critical impact parameters during the final seconds of flight. Additional sets of high definition and ultra-high definition cameras were able to supplement the high-speed data by capturing the release and free flight of the test articles. Three tests were successfully completed and showed that the passive vehicle design was able to withstand the impact loads from nominal and off-nominal impacts at landing velocities of approximately 29 m/s. Two out of three test resulted in off-nominal impacts due to a combination of high winds at altitude and the method used to suspend the vehicle from the helicopter. Both the video and acceleration data captured is examined and discussed. Finally, recommendations for improved release and instrumentation methods are presented.

  14. Solar Electric Propulsion Vehicle Design Study for Cargo Transfer to Earth-moon L1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarver-Verhey, Timothy R.; Kerslake, Thomas W.; Rawlin, Vincent K.; Falck, Robert D.; Dudzinski, Leonard J.; Oleson, Steven R.

    2002-01-01

    A design study for a cargo transfer vehicle using solar electric propulsion was performed for NASA's Revolutionary Aerospace Systems Concepts program. Targeted for 2016, the solar electric propulsion (SEP) transfer vehicle is required to deliver a propellant supply module with a mass of approximately 36 metric tons from Low Earth Orbit to the first Earth-Moon libration point (LL1) within 270 days. Following an examination of propulsion and power technology options, a SEP transfer vehicle design was selected that incorporated large-area (approx. 2700 sq m) thin film solar arrays and a clustered engine configuration of eight 50 kW gridded ion thrusters mounted on an articulated boom. Refinement of the SEP vehicle design was performed iteratively to properly estimate the required xenon propellant load for the out-bound orbit transfer. The SEP vehicle performance, including the xenon propellant estimation, was verified via the SNAP trajectory code. Further efforts are underway to extend this system model to other orbit transfer missions.

  15. Mars Rover Sample Return mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bourke, Roger D.; Kwok, Johnny H.; Friedlander, Alan

    1989-01-01

    To gain a detailed understanding of the character of the planet Mars, it is necessary to send vehicle to the surface and return selected samples for intensive study in earth laboratories. Toward that end, studies have been underway for several years to determine the technically feasible means for exploring the surface and returning selected samples. This paper describes several MRSR mission concepts that have emerged from the most recent studies.

  16. An Efficient Approach for Mars Sample Return Using Emerging Commercial Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzales, Andrew A.; Stoker, Carol R.

    2016-01-01

    Mars Sample Return is the highest priority science mission for the next decade as recommended by the 2011 Decadal Survey of Planetary Science. This article presents the results of a feasibility study for a Mars Sample Return mission that efficiently uses emerging commercial capabilities expected to be available in the near future. The motivation of our study was the recognition that emerging commercial capabilities might be used to perform Mars Sample Return with an Earth-direct architecture, and that this may offer a desirable simpler and lower cost approach. The objective of the study was to determine whether these capabilities can be used to optimize the number of mission systems and launches required to return the samples, with the goal of achieving the desired simplicity. All of the major element required for the Mars Sample Return mission are described. Mission system elements were analyzed with either direct techniques or by using parametric mass estimating relationships. The analysis shows the feasibility of a complete and closed Mars Sample Return mission design based on the following scenario: A SpaceX Falcon Heavy launch vehicle places a modified version of a SpaceX Dragon capsule, referred to as "Red Dragon", onto a Trans Mars Injection trajectory. The capsule carries all the hardware needed to return to Earth Orbit samples collected by a prior mission, such as the planned NASA Mars 2020 sample collection rover. The payload includes a fully fueled Mars Ascent Vehicle; a fueled Earth Return Vehicle, support equipment, and a mechanism to transfer samples from the sample cache system onboard the rover to the Earth Return Vehicle. The Red Dragon descends to land on the surface of Mars using Supersonic Retropropulsion. After collected samples are transferred to the Earth Return Vehicle, the single-stage Mars Ascent Vehicle launches the Earth Return Vehicle from the surface of Mars to a Mars phasing orbit. After a brief phasing period, the Earth Return

  17. An efficient approach for Mars Sample Return using emerging commercial capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzales, Andrew A.; Stoker, Carol R.

    2016-06-01

    Mars Sample Return is the highest priority science mission for the next decade as recommended by the 2011 Decadal Survey of Planetary Science (Squyres, 2011 [1]). This article presents the results of a feasibility study for a Mars Sample Return mission that efficiently uses emerging commercial capabilities expected to be available in the near future. The motivation of our study was the recognition that emerging commercial capabilities might be used to perform Mars Sample Return with an Earth-direct architecture, and that this may offer a desirable simpler and lower cost approach. The objective of the study was to determine whether these capabilities can be used to optimize the number of mission systems and launches required to return the samples, with the goal of achieving the desired simplicity. All of the major element required for the Mars Sample Return mission are described. Mission system elements were analyzed with either direct techniques or by using parametric mass estimating relationships. The analysis shows the feasibility of a complete and closed Mars Sample Return mission design based on the following scenario: A SpaceX Falcon Heavy launch vehicle places a modified version of a SpaceX Dragon capsule, referred to as ;Red Dragon;, onto a Trans Mars Injection trajectory. The capsule carries all the hardware needed to return to Earth Orbit samples collected by a prior mission, such as the planned NASA Mars 2020 sample collection rover. The payload includes a fully fueled Mars Ascent Vehicle; a fueled Earth Return Vehicle, support equipment, and a mechanism to transfer samples from the sample cache system onboard the rover to the Earth Return Vehicle. The Red Dragon descends to land on the surface of Mars using Supersonic Retropropulsion. After collected samples are transferred to the Earth Return Vehicle, the single-stage Mars Ascent Vehicle launches the Earth Return Vehicle from the surface of Mars to a Mars phasing orbit. After a brief phasing period, the

  18. An Efficient Approach for Mars Sample Return Using Emerging Commercial Capabilities.

    PubMed

    Gonzales, Andrew A; Stoker, Carol R

    2016-06-01

    Mars Sample Return is the highest priority science mission for the next decade as recommended by the 2011 Decadal Survey of Planetary Science [1]. This article presents the results of a feasibility study for a Mars Sample Return mission that efficiently uses emerging commercial capabilities expected to be available in the near future. The motivation of our study was the recognition that emerging commercial capabilities might be used to perform Mars Sample Return with an Earth-direct architecture, and that this may offer a desirable simpler and lower cost approach. The objective of the study was to determine whether these capabilities can be used to optimize the number of mission systems and launches required to return the samples, with the goal of achieving the desired simplicity. All of the major element required for the Mars Sample Return mission are described. Mission system elements were analyzed with either direct techniques or by using parametric mass estimating relationships. The analysis shows the feasibility of a complete and closed Mars Sample Return mission design based on the following scenario: A SpaceX Falcon Heavy launch vehicle places a modified version of a SpaceX Dragon capsule, referred to as "Red Dragon", onto a Trans Mars Injection trajectory. The capsule carries all the hardware needed to return to Earth Orbit samples collected by a prior mission, such as the planned NASA Mars 2020 sample collection rover. The payload includes a fully fueled Mars Ascent Vehicle; a fueled Earth Return Vehicle, support equipment, and a mechanism to transfer samples from the sample cache system onboard the rover to the Earth Return Vehicle. The Red Dragon descends to land on the surface of Mars using Supersonic Retropropulsion. After collected samples are transferred to the Earth Return Vehicle, the single-stage Mars Ascent Vehicle launches the Earth Return Vehicle from the surface of Mars to a Mars phasing orbit. After a brief phasing period, the Earth Return

  19. A Full-Size Mockup of the Cabin for the Crew Return Vehicle (CRV) for the International Space Statio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This photo, taken at NASA's Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas, shows a full-size mockup of the cabin for the Crew Return Vehicle (CRV) for the International Space Station The X-38 Crew Return Vehicle (CRV) research project is designed to develop the technology for a prototype emergency crew return vehicle, or lifeboat, for the International Space Station. The project is also intended to develop a crew return vehicle design that could be modified for other uses, such as a joint U.S. and international human spacecraft that could be launched on the French Ariane-5 Booster. The X-38 project is using available technology and off-the-shelf equipment to significantly decrease development costs. Original estimates to develop a capsule-type crew return vehicle were estimated at more than $2 billion. X-38 project officials have estimated that development costs for the X-38 concept will be approximately one quarter of the original estimate. Off-the-shelf technology is not necessarily 'old' technology. Many of the technologies being used in the X-38 project have never before been applied to a human-flight spacecraft. For example, the X-38 flight computer is commercial equipment currently used in aircraft and the flight software operating system is a commercial system already in use in many aerospace applications. The video equipment for the X-38 is existing equipment, some of which has already flown on the space shuttle for previous NASA experiments. The X-38's primary navigational equipment, the Inertial Navigation System/Global Positioning System, is a unit already in use on Navy fighters. The X-38 electromechanical actuators come from previous joint NASA, U.S. Air Force, and U.S. Navy research and development projects. Finally, an existing special coating developed by NASA will be used on the X-38 thermal tiles to make them more durable than those used on the space shuttles. The X-38 itself was an unpiloted lifting body designed at 80 percent of the size of a projected

  20. The Interior of the Crew Return Vehicle (CRV) Shows How Up to Seven Astronauts Can Be Carried

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This photo of the interior of a full-size mock-up of the Crew Return Vehicle (CRV) cabin at NASA's Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas, shows how up to seven astronauts could be carried aboard the spacecraft. The X-38 Crew Return Vehicle (CRV) research project is designed to develop the technology for a prototype emergency crew return vehicle, or lifeboat, for the International Space Station. The project is also intended to develop a crew return vehicle design that could be modified for other uses, such as a joint U.S. and international human spacecraft that could be launched on the French Ariane-5 Booster. The X-38 project is using available technology and off-the-shelf equipment to significantly decrease development costs. Original estimates to develop a capsule-type crew return vehicle were estimated at more than $2 billion. X-38 project officials have estimated that development costs for the X-38 concept will be approximately one quarter of the original estimate. Off-the-shelf technology is not necessarily 'old' technology. Many of the technologies being used in the X-38 project have never before been applied to a human-flight spacecraft. For example, the X-38 flight computer is commercial equipment currently used in aircraft and the flight software operating system is a commercial system already in use in many aerospace applications. The video equipment for the X-38 is existing equipment, some of which has already flown on the space shuttle for previous NASA experiments. The X-38's primary navigational equipment, the Inertial Navigation System/Global Positioning System, is a unit already in use on Navy fighters. The X-38 electromechanical actuators come from previous joint NASA, U.S. Air Force, and U.S. Navy research and development projects. Finally, an existing special coating developed by NASA will be used on the X-38 thermal tiles to make them more durable than those used on the space shuttles. The X-38 itself was an unpiloted lifting body designed at 80

  1. Orbit/launch vehicle tradeoff studies. Earth Observatory Satellite system definition study (EOS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    An evaluation of the Earth Observatory Satellite (EOS) design, performance, and cost factors which affect the choices of an orbit and a launch vehicle is presented. Primary emphasis is given to low altitude (300 to 900 nautical miles) land resources management applications for which payload design factors are defined. The subjects considered are: (1) a mission model, (2) orbit analysis and characterization, (3) characteristics and capabilities of candidate conventional launch vehicles, and space shuttle support. Recommendations are submitted for the EOS-A mission, the Single Multispectral Scanner payload, the Single Multispectral Scanner plus Thematic Mapper payload, the Dual Multispectral Scanner payload, and the Dual Multispectral Scanner plus Thematic Mapper payload.

  2. Mars rover sample return mission utilizing in situ production of the return propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruckner, A. P.; Nill, L.; Schubert, H.; Thill, B.; Warwick, R.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents an unmanned Mars sample return mission that utilizes propellants manufactured in situ from the Martian atmosphere for the return trip. A key goal of the mission is to demonstrate the considerable benefits that can be realized through the use of indigenous resources and to test the viability of this approach as a precursor to manned missions to Mars. Two in situ propellant combinations, methane/oxygen and carbon monoxide/oxygen, are compared to imported terrestrial hydrogen/oxygen within a single mission architecture, using a single Earth launch vehicle. The mission is assumed to be launched from Earth in 2003. Upon reaching Mars, the landing vehicle aerobrakes, deploys a small satellite, and lands on the Martian surface. Once on the ground, the propellant production unit is activated, and the product gases are liquefied and stored in the empty tanks of the Earth Return Vehicle (ERV). Power for these activities is provided by a dynamic isotope power system. A semiautonomous rover, powered by the indigenous propellants, gathers between 25 and 30 kg of soil and rock samples which are loaded aboard the ERV for return to Earth. After a surface stay time of approximately 1.5 years, the ERV leaves Mars for the return voyage to Earth. When the vehicle reaches the vicinity of Earth, the sample return capsule detaches, and is captured and circularized in LEO via aerobraking maneuvers.

  3. An Efficient Approach for Mars Sample Return Using Emerging Commercial Capabilities

    PubMed Central

    Gonzales, Andrew A.; Stoker, Carol R.

    2016-01-01

    Mars Sample Return is the highest priority science mission for the next decade as recommended by the 2011 Decadal Survey of Planetary Science [1]. This article presents the results of a feasibility study for a Mars Sample Return mission that efficiently uses emerging commercial capabilities expected to be available in the near future. The motivation of our study was the recognition that emerging commercial capabilities might be used to perform Mars Sample Return with an Earth-direct architecture, and that this may offer a desirable simpler and lower cost approach. The objective of the study was to determine whether these capabilities can be used to optimize the number of mission systems and launches required to return the samples, with the goal of achieving the desired simplicity. All of the major element required for the Mars Sample Return mission are described. Mission system elements were analyzed with either direct techniques or by using parametric mass estimating relationships. The analysis shows the feasibility of a complete and closed Mars Sample Return mission design based on the following scenario: A SpaceX Falcon Heavy launch vehicle places a modified version of a SpaceX Dragon capsule, referred to as “Red Dragon”, onto a Trans Mars Injection trajectory. The capsule carries all the hardware needed to return to Earth Orbit samples collected by a prior mission, such as the planned NASA Mars 2020 sample collection rover. The payload includes a fully fueled Mars Ascent Vehicle; a fueled Earth Return Vehicle, support equipment, and a mechanism to transfer samples from the sample cache system onboard the rover to the Earth Return Vehicle. The Red Dragon descends to land on the surface of Mars using Supersonic Retropropulsion. After collected samples are transferred to the Earth Return Vehicle, the single-stage Mars Ascent Vehicle launches the Earth Return Vehicle from the surface of Mars to a Mars phasing orbit. After a brief phasing period, the Earth

  4. Development of the J-2X Engine for the Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle and the Ares V Cargo Launch Vehicle: Building on the Apollo Program for Lunar Return Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, WIlliam

    2007-01-01

    The United States (U.S.) Vision for Space Exploration has directed NASA to develop two new launch vehicles for sending humans to the Moon, Mars, and beyond. In January 2006, NASA streamlined its hardware development approach for replacing the Space Shuttle after it is retired in 2010. Benefits of this approach include reduced programmatic and technical risks and the potential to return to the Moon by 2020 by developing the Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV) propulsion elements now, with full extensibility to future Ares V Cargo Launch Vehicle (CaLV) lunar systems. The Constellation Program selected the Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne J-2X engine to power the Ares I Upper Stage Element and the Ares V Earth Departure Stage (EDS). This decision was reached during the Exploration Systems Architecture Study and confirmed after the Exploration Launch Projects Office performed a variety of risk analyses, commonality assessments, and trade studies. This paper narrates the evolution of that decision; describes the performance capabilities expected of the J-2X design, including potential commonality challenges and opportunities between the Ares I and Ares V launch vehicles; and provides a current status of J-2X design, development, and hardware testing activities. This paper also explains how the J-2X engine effort mitigates risk by testing existing engine hardware and designs; building on the Apollo Program (1961 to 1975), the Space Shuttle Program (1972 to 2010); and consulting with Apollo era experts to derive other lessons learned to deliver a human-rated engine that is on an aggressive development schedule, with its first demonstration flight in 2012.

  5. Development of the J-2X Engine for the Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle and the Ares V Cargo Launch Vehicle: Building on the Apollo Program for Lunar Return Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, William D.; Snoddy, Jim

    2007-01-01

    The United States (U.S.) Vision for Space Exploration has directed NASA to develop two new launch vehicles for sending humans to the Moon, Mars, and beyond. In January 2006, NASA streamlined its hardware development approach for replacing the Space Shuttle after it is retired in 2010. Benefits of this approach include reduced programmatic and technical risks and the potential to return to the Moon by 2020, by developing the Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV) propulsion elements now, with full extensibility to future Ares V Cargo Launch Vehicle (CaLV) lunar systems. The Constellation Program selected the Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne J-2X engine to power the Ares I Upper Stage Element and the Ares V Earth Departure Stage. This decision was reached during the Exploration Systems Architecture Study and confirmed after the Exploration Launch Projects Office performed a variety of risk analyses, commonality assessments, and trade studies. This paper narrates the evolution of that decision; describes the performance capabilities expected of the J-2X design, including potential commonality challenges and opportunities between the Ares I and Ares V launch vehicles; and provides a current status of J-2X design, development, and hardware testing activities. This paper also explains how the J-2X engine effort mitigates risk by testing existing engine hardware and designs; building on the Apollo Program (1961 to 1975), the Space Shuttle Program (1972 to 2010); and consulting with Apollo-era experts to derive other lessons lived to deliver a human-rated engine that is on an aggressive development schedule, with its first demonstration flight in 2012.

  6. Interplanetary Mission Design Handbook: Earth-to-Mars Mission Opportunities and Mars-to-Earth Return Opportunities 2009-2024

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, L. E.; Kos, L. D.

    1998-01-01

    This paper provides information for trajectory designers and mission planners to determine Earth-Mars and Mars-Earth mission opportunities for the years 2009-2024. These studies were performed in support of a human Mars mission scenario that will consist of two cargo launches followed by a piloted mission during the next opportunity approximately 2 years later. "Porkchop" plots defining all of these mission opportunities are provided which include departure energy, departure excess speed, departure declination arrival excess speed, and arrival declinations for the mission space surrounding each opportunity. These plots are intended to be directly applicable for the human Mars mission scenario described briefly herein. In addition, specific trajectories and several alternate trajectories are recommended for each cargo and piloted opportunity. Finally, additional studies were performed to evaluate the effect of various thrust-to-weight ratios on gravity losses and total time-of-flight tradeoff, and the resultant propellant savings and are briefly summarized.

  7. The Disposal of Spacecraft and Launch Vehicle Stages in Low Earth Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Nicholas L.

    2007-01-01

    Spacecraft and launch vehicle stages abandoned in Earth orbit have historically been a primary source of debris from accidental explosions. In the future, such satellites will become the principal cause of orbital debris via inadvertent collisions. To curtail both the near-term and far-term risks posed by derelict spacecraft and launch vehicle stages to operational space systems, numerous national and international orbital debris mitigation guidelines specifically recommend actions which could prevent or limit such future debris generation. Although considerable progress has been made in implementing these recommendations, some changes to existing vehicle designs can be difficult. Moreover, the nature of some missions also can present technological and budgetary challenges to be compliant with widely accepted orbital debris mitigation measures.

  8. Vertical Spin Tunnel Testing and Stability Analysis of Multi-Mission Earth Entry Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaab, Louis J.; Morelli, Eugene A.; Fremaux, C. Michael; Bean, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    Multi-Mission Earth Entry Vehicles (MMEEVs) are blunt-body vehicles designed with the purpose of transporting payloads from space to the surface of the Earth. To achieve high reliability and minimum weight, MMEEVs avoid using limited-reliability systems, such as parachutes, retro-rockets, and reaction control systems and rely on the natural aerodynamic stability of the vehicle throughout the Entry, Descent, and Landing phases of flight. Testing in NASA Langley's 20-FT Vertical Spin Tunnel (20-FT VST), dynamically-scaled MMEEV models was conducted to improve subsonic aerodynamic models and validate stability criteria for this class of vehicle. This report documents the resulting data from VST testing for an array of 60-deg sphere-cone MMEEVs. Model configurations included were 1.2 meter, and 1.8 meter designs. The addition of a backshell extender, which provided a 150% increase in backshell diameter for the 1.2 meter design, provided a third test configuration. Center of Gravity limits were established for all MMEEV configurations. An application of System Identification (SID) techniques was performed to determine the aerodynamic coefficients in order to provide databases for subsequent 6-degree-of-freedom simulations.

  9. Multi-Mission Earth Vehicle Subsonic Dynamic Stability Testing and Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaab, Louis J.; Fremaux, C. Michael

    2013-01-01

    Multi-Mission Earth Entry Vehicles (MMEEVs) are blunt-body vehicles designed with the purpose of transporting payloads from outer space to the surface of the Earth. To achieve high-reliability and minimum weight, MMEEVs avoid use of limited-reliability systems, such as parachutes, retro-rockets, and reaction control systems and rely on the natural aerodynamic stability of the vehicle throughout the Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) phase of flight. The Multi-Mission Systems Analysis for Planetary Entry (M-SAPE) parametric design tool is used to facilitate the design of MMEEVs for an array of missions and develop and visualize the trade space. Testing in NASA Langley?s Vertical Spin Tunnel (VST) was conducted to significantly improve M-SAPE?s subsonic aerodynamic models. Vehicle size and shape can be driven by entry flight path angle and speed, thermal protection system performance, terminal velocity limitations, payload mass and density, among other design parameters. The objectives of the VST testing were to define usable subsonic center of gravity limits, and aerodynamic parameters for 6-degree-of-freedom (6-DOF) simulations, for a range of MMEEV designs. The range of MMEEVs tested was from 1.8m down to 1.2m diameter. A backshell extender provided the ability to test a design with a much larger payload for the 1.2m MMEEV.

  10. Evaluation of innovative rocket engines for single-stage earth-to-orbit vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manski, Detlef; Martin, James A.

    1988-07-01

    Computer models of rocket engines and single-stage-to-orbit vehicles that were developed by the authors at DFVLR and NASA have been combined. The resulting code consists of engine mass, performance, trajectory and vehicle sizing models. The engine mass model includes equations for each subsystem and describes their dependences on various propulsion parameters. The engine performance model consists of multidimensional sets of theoretical propulsion properties and a complete thermodynamic analysis of the engine cycle. The vehicle analyses include an optimized trajectory analysis, mass estimation, and vehicle sizing. A vertical-takeoff, horizontal-landing, single-stage, winged, manned, fully reusable vehicle with a payload capability of 13.6 Mg (30,000 lb) to low earth orbit was selected. Hydrogen, methane, propane, and dual-fuel engines were studied with staged-combustion, gas-generator, dual bell, and the dual-expander cycles. Mixture ratio, chamber pressure, nozzle exit pressure liftoff acceleration, and dual fuel propulsive parameters were optimized.

  11. Evaluation of innovative rocket engines for single-stage earth-to-orbit vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manski, Detlef; Martin, James A.

    1988-01-01

    Computer models of rocket engines and single-stage-to-orbit vehicles that were developed by the authors at DFVLR and NASA have been combined. The resulting code consists of engine mass, performance, trajectory and vehicle sizing models. The engine mass model includes equations for each subsystem and describes their dependences on various propulsion parameters. The engine performance model consists of multidimensional sets of theoretical propulsion properties and a complete thermodynamic analysis of the engine cycle. The vehicle analyses include an optimized trajectory analysis, mass estimation, and vehicle sizing. A vertical-takeoff, horizontal-landing, single-stage, winged, manned, fully reusable vehicle with a payload capability of 13.6 Mg (30,000 lb) to low earth orbit was selected. Hydrogen, methane, propane, and dual-fuel engines were studied with staged-combustion, gas-generator, dual bell, and the dual-expander cycles. Mixture ratio, chamber pressure, nozzle exit pressure liftoff acceleration, and dual fuel propulsive parameters were optimized.

  12. Two stage launch vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The Advanced Space Design project for 1986-87 was the design of a two stage launch vehicle, representing a second generation space transportation system (STS) which will be needed to support the space station. The first stage is an unmanned winged booster which is fully reusable with a fly back capability. It has jet engines so that it can fly back to the landing site. This adds safety as well as the flexibility to choose alternate landing sites. There are two different second stages. One of the second stages is a manned advanced space shuttle called Space Shuttle II. Space Shuttle II has a payload capability of delivering 40,000 pounds to the space station in low Earth orbit (LEO), and returning 40,000 pounds to Earth. Servicing the space station makes the ability to return a heavy payload to Earth as important as being able to launch a heavy payload. The other second stage is an unmanned heavy lift cargo vehicle with ability to deliver 150,000 pounds of payload to LEO. This vehicle will not return to Earth; however, the engines and electronics can be removed and returned to Earth in the Space Shuttle II. The rest of the vehicle can then be used on orbit for storage or raw materials, supplies, and space manufactured items awaiting transport back to Earth.

  13. Integrated Vehicle and Trajectory Design of Small Spacecraft with Electric Propulsion for Earth and Interplanetary Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spangelo, Sara; Dalle, Derek; Longmier, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the feasibility of Earth-transfer and interplanetary mission architectures for miniaturized spacecraft using emerging small solar electric propulsion technologies. Emerging small SEP thrusters offer significant advantages relative to existing technologies and will enable U-class systems to perform trajectory maneuvers with significant Delta V requirements. The approach in this paper is unique because it integrates trajectory design with vehicle sizing and accounts for the system and operational constraints of small U-class missions. The modeling framework includes integrated propulsion, orbit, energy, and external environment dynamics and systems-level power, energy, mass, and volume constraints. The trajectory simulation environment models orbit boosts in Earth orbit and flyby and capture trajectories to interplanetary destinations. A family of small spacecraft mission architectures are studied, including altitude and inclination transfers in Earth orbit and trajectories that escape Earth orbit and travel to interplanetary destinations such as Mercury, Venus, and Mars. Results are presented visually to show the trade-offs between competing performance objectives such as maximizing available mass and volume for payloads and minimizing transfer time. The results demonstrate the feasibility of using small spacecraft to perform significant Earth and interplanetary orbit transfers in less than one year with reasonable U-class mass, power, volume, and mission durations.

  14. Contemporary Impact Analysis Methodology for Planetary Sample Return Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perino, Scott V.; Bayandor, Javid; Samareh, Jamshid A.; Armand, Sasan C.

    2015-01-01

    Development of an Earth entry vehicle and the methodology created to evaluate the vehicle's impact landing response when returning to Earth is reported. NASA's future Mars Sample Return Mission requires a robust vehicle to return Martian samples back to Earth for analysis. The Earth entry vehicle is a proposed solution to this Mars mission requirement. During Earth reentry, the vehicle slows within the atmosphere and then impacts the ground at its terminal velocity. To protect the Martian samples, a spherical energy absorber called an impact sphere is under development. The impact sphere is composed of hybrid composite and crushable foam elements that endure large plastic deformations during impact and cause a highly nonlinear vehicle response. The developed analysis methodology captures a range of complex structural interactions and much of the failure physics that occurs during impact. Numerical models were created and benchmarked against experimental tests conducted at NASA Langley Research Center. The postimpact structural damage assessment showed close correlation between simulation predictions and experimental results. Acceleration, velocity, displacement, damage modes, and failure mechanisms were all effectively captured. These investigations demonstrate that the Earth entry vehicle has great potential in facilitating future sample return missions.

  15. Scientific Exploration of Near-Earth Objects via the Crew Exploration Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abell, P. A.; Korsmeyer, D. J.; Landis, R. R.; Lu, E.; Adamo, D.; Jones, T.; Lemke, L.; Gonzales, A.; Gershman, B.; Morrison, D.; hide

    2007-01-01

    The concept of a crewed mission to a near-Earth object (NEO) has been previously analyzed several times in the past. A more in depth feasibility study has been sponsored by the Advanced Projects Office within NASA's Constellation Program to examine the ability of a Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) to support a mission to a NEO. The national mission profile would involve a crew of 2 or 3 astronauts on a 90 to 120 day mission, which would include a 7 to 14 day stay for proximity operations at the target NEO.

  16. View of Earth above the antenna of the lunar roving vehicle during EVA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1972-12-13

    AS17-134-20473 (13 Dec. 1972) --- Earth appears in the far distant background above the hi-gain antenna of the Lunar Roving Vehicle in this photograph taken by scientist-astronaut Harrison H. Schmitt during the third Apollo 17 extravehicular activity (EVA) at the Taurus-Littrow landing site. Astronaut Eugene A. Cernan, Apollo 17 commander, stands beside the LRV. Schmitt is the mission's lunar module pilot. While Cernan and Schmitt descended in the lunar module "Challenger" to explore the moon, astronaut Ronald E. Evans, command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules in lunar orbit.

  17. Analysis of quasi-hybrid solid rocket booster concepts for advanced earth-to-orbit vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zurawski, Robert L.; Rapp, Douglas C.

    1987-01-01

    A study was conducted to assess the feasibility of quasi-hybrid solid rocket boosters for advanced Earth-to-orbit vehicles. Thermochemical calculations were conducted to determine the effect of liquid hydrogen addition, solids composition change plus liquid hydrogen addition, and the addition of an aluminum/liquid hydrogen slurry on the theoretical performance of a PBAN solid propellant rocket. The space shuttle solid rocket booster was used as a reference point. All three quasi-hybrid systems theoretically offer higher specific impulse when compared with the space shuttle solid rocket boosters. However, based on operational and safety considerations, the quasi-hybrid rocket is not a practical choice for near-term Earth-to-orbit booster applications. Safety and technology issues pertinent to quasi-hybrid rocket systems are discussed.

  18. Earth Entry Requirements for Mars, Europa and Enceladus Sample Return Missions: A Thermal Protection System Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatapathy, Ethiraj; Gage, Peter; Ellerby, Don; Mahzari, Milad; Peterson, Keith; Stackpoole, Mairead; Young, Zion

    2016-01-01

    This oral presentation will be given at the 13th International Planetary Probe Workshop on June 14th, 2016 and will cover the drivers for reliability and the challenges faced in selecting and designing the thermal protection system (TPS). In addition, an assessment is made on new emerging TPS related technologies that could help with designs to meet the planetary protection requirements to prevent backward (Earth) contamination by biohazardous samples.

  19. Strategies for the return of science data from in situ vehicles at Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spilker, T. R.; Reh, K. R.; Erd, C.; Elliott, J. O.; Mohr, D.; Strange, N. J.

    2009-04-01

    Collaborative studies of the Titan Saturn System Mission (TSSM) in 2008 by ESA and NASA have included examination of strategies for optimizing the science return from that mission concept's proposed in situ elements. The current baselined mission concept calls for an orbiter provided and launched by NASA that would deliver to Titan and support two ESA-provided in situ elements, a lake lander whose science mission duration would be about nine hours, and a montgolfière (hot-air balloon) that would operate at ~10 km altitude in Titan's lower atmosphere for 6-12 months. This architecture has much in common with the highly successful Cassini-Huygens mission. The short-lived lake lander in particular would have a mission profile very similar to that of the Huygens probe, with all science data communications occurring while the NASA orbiter is relatively near Titan. Practical mission profile options for the montgolfière include extended periods when the NASA orbiter is farther from Titan, reducing data rates. Over long periods of time the montgolfière cannot be considered fixed over one location on Titan's surface, and in fact is expected to circumnavigate Titan in less than six months. Thus the schedule of communications windows between the in situ elements and the orbiter cannot be precisely determined far in advance, varying as the balloon literally "rides the wind". Other issues played critical roles in evaluating the many options available early in the studies. Some options for the timing of delivery of the in situ elements yielded more mass capability available for those elements, but their reduced data return due to orbit geometry outweighs the added mass capability. Another delivery option, delivery from Titan orbit, yields reduced delivery mass capability but was thought (before studies) to offer better data relay capability. Studies revealed that this strategy actually decreases the return from the lake lander as compared to options delivering the in situ

  20. Obtaining coincident image observations for Mission to Planet Earth science data return

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Lauri Kraft; Folta, David C.; Farrell, James P.

    1994-01-01

    One objective of the Mission to Planet Earth (MTPE) program involves comparing data from various instruments on multiple spacecraft to obtain a total picture of the Earth's systems. To correlate image data from instruments on different spacecraft, these spacecraft must be able to image the same location on the Earth at approximately the same time. Depending on the orbits of the spacecraft involved, complicated operational details must be considered to obtain such observations. If the spacecraft are in similar orbits, close formation flying or synchronization techniques may be used to assure coincident observations. If the orbits are dissimilar, the launch time of the second satellite may need to be restricted in order to align its orbit with that of the first satellite launched. This paper examines strategies for obtaining coincident observations for spacecraft in both similar and dissimilar orbits. Although these calculations may be performed easily for coplanar spacecraft, the non-coplanar case involves additional considerations which are incorporated into the algorithms presented herein.

  1. An Integrated Approach to Modeling Solar Electric Propulsion Vehicles During Long Duration, Near-Earth Orbit Transfers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David A.; Hojnicki, Jeffrey S.; Sjauw, Waldy K.

    2014-01-01

    Recent NASA interest in utilizing solar electronic propulsion (SEP) technology to transfer payloads, e.g. from low-Earth orbit (LEO) to higher energy geostationary-Earth orbit (GEO) or to Earth escape, has necessitated the development of high fidelity SEP vehicle models and simulations. These models and simulations need to be capable of capturing vehicle dynamics and sub-system interactions experienced during the transfer trajectories which are typically accomplished with continuous-burn (potentially interrupted by solar eclipse), long duration "spiral out" maneuvers taking several months or more to complete. This paper presents details of an integrated simulation approach achieved by combining a high fidelity vehicle simulation code with a detailed solar array model. The combined simulation tool gives researchers the functionality to study the integrated effects of various vehicle sub-systems (e.g. vehicle guidance, navigation and control (GN&C), electric propulsion system (EP)) with time varying power production. Results from a simulation model of a vehicle with a 50 kW class SEP system using the integrated tool are presented and compared to the results from another simulation model employing a 50 kW end-of-life (EOL) fixed power level assumption. These models simulate a vehicle under three degree of freedom dynamics (i.e. translational dynamics only) and include the effects of a targeting guidance algorithm (providing a "near optimal" transfer) during a LEO to near Earth escape (C (sub 3) = -2.0 km (sup 2) / sec (sup -2) spiral trajectory. The presented results include the impact of the fully integrated, time-varying solar array model (e.g. cumulative array degradation from traversing the Van Allen belts, impact of solar eclipses on the vehicle and the related temperature responses in the solar arrays due to operating in the Earth's thermal environment, high fidelity array power module, etc.); these are used to assess the impact on vehicle performance (i

  2. Optimal control theory determination of feasible return-to-launch-site aborts for the HL-20 Personnel Launch System vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dutton, Kevin E.

    1994-01-01

    The personnel launch system (PLS) being studied by NASA is a system to complement the space shuttle and provide alternative access to space. The PLS consists of a manned spacecraft launched by an expendable launch vehicle (ELV). A candidate for the manned spacecraft is the HL-20 lifting body. In the event of an ELV malfunction during the initial portion of the ascent trajectory, the HL-20 will separate from the rocket and perform an unpowered return to launch site (RTLS) abort. This work details an investigation, using optimal control theory, of the RTLS abort scenario. The objective of the optimization was to maximize final altitude. With final altitude as the cost function, the feasibility of an RTLS abort at different times during the ascent was determined. The method of differential inclusions was used to determine the optimal state trajectories, and the optimal controls were then calculated from the optimal states and state rates.

  3. Spin State of Returning Fly-by Near Earth Asteroid 2012 TC4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, William; Ryan, Eileen V.

    2017-10-01

    The ten-meter class near-Earth asteroid 2012 TC4 will make a close approach to the Earth on October 12, 2017. As of July 2017, the close approach distance ranges from 0.003 to 0.64 lunar distances (LD) with a nominal value of 0.23 LD. However this is the second observable close approach that this object has made since its discovery. In particular, broadband photometry was obtained for 2012 TC4 on 10 and 11 October 2012 using the Magdalena Ridge Observatory (MRO) 2.4-meter telescope. A periodicity of ~12.2 minutes was immediately evident in the time-series data, which was in agreement with the reported values of Polishook (2013), Odden et al. (2012), Warner (2013), and Carbognani (2014). The lightcurve displays an amplitude of ~0.9 magnitude, which implies that it is highly elongated with an axial ratio of a/b>2.3. However, a second period is also clearly evident in the MRO data, indicating that the asteroid is in a state of non-principle axis rotation.The nature of its orbit has made 2012 TC4 an attractive Earth-impacting asteroid surrogate for an exercise testing the capabilities of the scientific and emergency response communities (Reddy, 2017). For this reason, it is anticipated that considerable resources, including MRO, will be utilized to take advantage of the 2017 flyby to study this asteroid. Here, we present the details of the tumbling nature of this fast-spinning object observed during the October 2012 discovery apparition. These data were acquired before closest approach in 2012 where the asteroid came within 0.25 lunar distances of Earth. Therefore, this analysis will be discussed in the context of the spin state observations planned for early October 2017 at MRO, for which preliminary results will also be reported. In particular, comparison of the observed rotation state from the two apparitions can be indicative of any effects of Earth’s gravity during the 2012 flyby.References:Odden, C.E., Verhaegh, J.C., McCullough, D.G., and Briggs, J.W. (2013

  4. Impact Foam Testing for Multi-Mission Earth Entry Vehicle Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaab, Louis J.; Agrawal, Paul; Hawbaker, James

    2013-01-01

    Multi-Mission Earth Entry Vehicles (MMEEVs) are blunt-body vehicles designed with the purpose of transporting payloads from outer space to the surface of the Earth. To achieve high-reliability and minimum weight, MMEEVs avoid use of limited-reliability systems, such as parachutes and retro-rockets, instead using built-in impact attenuators to absorb energy remaining at impact to meet landing loads requirements. The Multi-Mission Systems Analysis for Planetary Entry (M-SAPE) parametric design tool is used to facilitate the design of MMEEVs and develop the trade space. Testing was conducted to characterize the material properties of several candidate impact foam attenuators to enhance M-SAPE analysis. In the current effort, two different Rohacell foams were tested to determine their thermal conductivity in support of MMEEV design applications. These applications include thermal insulation during atmospheric entry, impact attenuation, and post-impact thermal insulation in support of thermal soak analysis. Results indicate that for these closed-cell foams, the effect of impact is limited on thermal conductivity due to the venting of the virgin material gas and subsequent ambient air replacement. Results also indicate that the effect of foam temperature is significant compared to data suggested by manufacturer's specifications.

  5. Sustainable Mars Sample Return

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alston, Christie; Hancock, Sean; Laub, Joshua; Perry, Christopher; Ash, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The proposed Mars sample return mission will be completed using natural Martian resources for the majority of its operations. The system uses the following technologies: In-Situ Propellant Production (ISPP), a methane-oxygen propelled Mars Ascent Vehicle (MAV), a carbon dioxide powered hopper, and a hydrogen fueled balloon system (large balloons and small weather balloons). The ISPP system will produce the hydrogen, methane, and oxygen using a Sabatier reactor. a water electrolysis cell, water extracted from the Martian surface, and carbon dioxide extracted from the Martian atmosphere. Indigenous hydrogen will fuel the balloon systems and locally-derived methane and oxygen will fuel the MAV for the return of a 50 kg sample to Earth. The ISPP system will have a production cycle of 800 days and the estimated overall mission length is 1355 days from Earth departure to return to low Earth orbit. Combining these advanced technologies will enable the proposed sample return mission to be executed with reduced initial launch mass and thus be more cost efficient. The successful completion of this mission will serve as the next step in the advancement of Mars exploration technology.

  6. The Mars Sample Return Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Neil, W. J.; Cazaux, C.

    2000-01-01

    The Mars Sample Return (MSR) Project is underway. A 2003 mission to be launched on a Delta III Class vehicle and a 2005 mission launched on an Ariane 5 will culminate in carefully selected Mars samples arriving on Earth in 2008. NASA is the lead agency and will provide the Mars landed elements, namely, landers, rovers, and Mars ascent vehicles (MAVs). The French Space Agency CNES is the largest international partner and will provide for the joint NASA/CNES 2005 Mission the Ariane 5 launch and the Earth Return Mars Orbiter that will capture the sample canisters from the Mars parking orbits the MAVs place them in. The sample canisters will be returned to Earth aboard the CNES Orbiter in the Earth Entry Vehicles provided by NASA. Other national space agencies are also expected to participate in substantial roles. Italy is planning to provide a drill that will operate from the Landers to provide subsurface samples. Other experiments in addition to the MSR payload will also be carried on the Landers. This paper will present the current status of the design of the MSR missions and flight articles. c 2000 American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Inc. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd.

  7. The X-38 prototype of the Crew Return Vehicle is suspended under its giant 7,500-square-foot parafoi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The X-38 prototype of the Crew Return Vehicle for the International Space Station is suspended under its giant 7,500-square-foot parafoil during its eighth free flight on Thursday, Dec. 13, 2001. A portion of the descent was flown by remote control by a NASA astronaut from a ground vehicle configured like the CRV's interior before the X-38 made an autonomous landing on Rogers Dry Lake.

  8. Adaptive Changes in the Vestibular System of Land Snail to a 30-Day Spaceflight and Readaptation on Return to Earth

    PubMed Central

    Aseyev, Nikolay; Vinarskaya, Alia Kh.; Roshchin, Matvey; Korshunova, Tatiana A.; Malyshev, Aleksey Yu.; Zuzina, Alena B.; Ierusalimsky, Victor N.; Lemak, Maria S.; Zakharov, Igor S.; Novikov, Ivan A.; Kolosov, Peter; Chesnokova, Ekaterina; Volkova, Svetlana; Kasianov, Artem; Uroshlev, Leonid; Popova, Yekaterina; Boyle, Richard D.; Balaban, Pavel M.

    2017-01-01

    The vestibular system receives a permanent influence from gravity and reflexively controls equilibrium. If we assume gravity has remained constant during the species' evolution, will its sensory system adapt to abrupt loss of that force? We address this question in the land snail Helix lucorum exposed to 30 days of near weightlessness aboard the Bion-M1 satellite, and studied geotactic behavior of postflight snails, differential gene expressions in statocyst transcriptome, and electrophysiological responses of mechanoreceptors to applied tilts. Each approach revealed plastic changes in the snail's vestibular system assumed in response to spaceflight. Absence of light during the mission also affected statocyst physiology, as revealed by comparison to dark-conditioned control groups. Readaptation to normal tilt responses occurred at ~20 h following return to Earth. Despite the permanence of gravity, the snail responded in a compensatory manner to its loss and readapted once gravity was restored. PMID:29163058

  9. Adaptive Changes in the Vestibular System of Land Snail to a 30-Day Spaceflight and Readaptation on Return to Earth.

    PubMed

    Aseyev, Nikolay; Vinarskaya, Alia Kh; Roshchin, Matvey; Korshunova, Tatiana A; Malyshev, Aleksey Yu; Zuzina, Alena B; Ierusalimsky, Victor N; Lemak, Maria S; Zakharov, Igor S; Novikov, Ivan A; Kolosov, Peter; Chesnokova, Ekaterina; Volkova, Svetlana; Kasianov, Artem; Uroshlev, Leonid; Popova, Yekaterina; Boyle, Richard D; Balaban, Pavel M

    2017-01-01

    The vestibular system receives a permanent influence from gravity and reflexively controls equilibrium. If we assume gravity has remained constant during the species' evolution, will its sensory system adapt to abrupt loss of that force? We address this question in the land snail Helix lucorum exposed to 30 days of near weightlessness aboard the Bion-M1 satellite, and studied geotactic behavior of postflight snails, differential gene expressions in statocyst transcriptome, and electrophysiological responses of mechanoreceptors to applied tilts. Each approach revealed plastic changes in the snail's vestibular system assumed in response to spaceflight. Absence of light during the mission also affected statocyst physiology, as revealed by comparison to dark-conditioned control groups. Readaptation to normal tilt responses occurred at ~20 h following return to Earth. Despite the permanence of gravity, the snail responded in a compensatory manner to its loss and readapted once gravity was restored.

  10. Two-stage earth-to-orbit vehicles with dual-fuel propulsion in the Orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, J. A.

    1982-01-01

    Earth-to-orbit vehicle studies of future replacements for the Space Shuttle are needed to guide technology development. Previous studies that have examined single-stage vehicles have shown advantages for dual-fuel propulsion. Previous two-stage system studies have assumed all-hydrogen fuel for the Orbiters. The present study examined dual-fuel Orbiters and found that the system dry mass could be reduced with this concept. The possibility of staging the booster at a staging velocity low enough to allow coast-back to the launch site is shown to be beneficial, particularly in combination with a dual-fuel Orbiter. An engine evaluation indicated the same ranking of engines as did a previous single-stage study. Propane and RP-1 fuels result in lower vehicle dry mass than methane, and staged-combustion engines are preferred over gas-generator engines. The sensitivity to the engine selection is less for two-stage systems than for single-stage systems.

  11. Heating Rate Distributions at Mach 10 on a Circular Body Earth-to-Orbit Transport Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, William L.; MacConochie, Ian O.; Helms, Vernon T., III; Raney, David

    1985-01-01

    Among the concepts being considered for future Earth-to-orbit transport vehicles are fully reusable single-stage systems which take off vertically and land horizontally. Because these vehicles carry their own propellant internally, they are much larger than the present Space Shuttle Orbiter. One such single-stage vehicle under study is the circular body configuration which has the advantages of simple structural design and large volume-to-weight ratio. As part of an overall evaluation of this configuration, a series of heat transfer and surface flow tests were conducted. The phase-change paint and oil-flow tests were performed in the Langley 31-Inch Mach-10 Tunnel at angles of attack from 20 through 40 degrees in 5-degree increments. Heat-transfer coefficient data are presented for all angles of attack and detailed oil-flow photographs are shown for windward and leeward surfaces at 25 and 40 degrees angle of attack. In many ways, heating was similar to that previously determined for the Shuttle Orbiter so that, in a cursory sense, existing thermal protection systems would appear to be adequate for the proposed circular-body configurations.

  12. Long-term geomagnetically induced current observations in New Zealand: Earth return corrections and geomagnetic field driver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mac Manus, Daniel H.; Rodger, Craig J.; Dalzell, Michael; Thomson, Alan W. P.; Clilverd, Mark A.; Petersen, Tanja; Wolf, Moritz M.; Thomson, Neil R.; Divett, Tim

    2017-08-01

    Transpower New Zealand Limited has measured DC currents in transformer neutrals in the New Zealand electrical network at multiple South Island locations. Near-continuous archived DC current data exist since 2001, starting with 12 different substations and expanding from 2009 to include 17 substations. From 2001 to 2015 up to 58 individual transformers were simultaneously monitored. Primarily, the measurements were intended to monitor the impact of the high-voltage DC system linking the North and South Islands when it is operating in "Earth return" mode. However, after correcting for Earth return operation, as described here, the New Zealand measurements provide an unusually long and spatially detailed set of geomagnetically induced current (GIC) measurements. We examine the peak GIC magnitudes observed from these observations during two large geomagnetic storms on 6 November 2001 and 2 October 2013. Currents of 30-50 A are observed, depending on the measurement location. There are large spatial variations in the GIC observations over comparatively small distances, which likely depend upon network layout and ground conductivity. We then go on to examine the GIC in transformers throughout the South Island during more than 151 h of geomagnetic storm conditions. We compare the GIC to the various magnitude and rate of change components of the magnetic field. Our results show that there is a strong correlation between the magnitude of the GIC and the rate of change of the horizontal magnetic field (H'). This correlation is particularly clear for transformers that show large GIC current during magnetic storms.

  13. Modeling, Simulation, and Control of a Solar Electric Propulsion Vehicle in Near-Earth Vicinity Including Solar Array Degradation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witzberger, Kevin (Inventor); Hojnicki, Jeffery (Inventor); Manzella, David (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Modeling and control software that integrates the complexities of solar array models, a space environment, and an electric propulsion system into a rigid body vehicle simulation and control model is provided. A rigid body vehicle simulation of a solar electric propulsion (SEP) vehicle may be created using at least one solar array model, at least one model of a space environment, and at least one model of a SEP propulsion system. Power availability and thrust profiles may be determined based on the rigid body vehicle simulation as the SEP vehicle transitions from a low Earth orbit (LEO) to a higher orbit or trajectory. The power availability and thrust profiles may be displayed such that a user can use the displayed power availability and thrust profiles to determine design parameters for an SEP vehicle mission.

  14. High-resolution sensing for precision agriculture: from Earth-observing satellites to unmanned aerial vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCabe, Matthew F.; Houborg, Rasmus; Lucieer, Arko

    2016-10-01

    With global population projected to approach 9 billion by 2050, it has been estimated that a 40% increase in cereal production will be required to satisfy the worlds growing nutritional demands. Any such increases in agricultural productivity are likely to occur within a system that has limited room for growth and in a world with a climate that is different from that of today. Fundamental to achieving food and water security, is the capacity to monitor the health and condition of agricultural systems. While space-agency based satellites have provided the backbone for earth observation over the last few decades, many developments in the field of high-resolution earth observation have been advanced by the commercial sector. These advances relate not just to technological developments in the use of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), but also the advent of nano-satellite constellations that offer a radical shift in the way earth observations are now being retrieved. Such technologies present opportunities for improving our description of the water, energy and carbon cycles. Efforts towards developing new observational techniques and interpretative frameworks are required to provide the tools and information needed to improve the management and security of agricultural and related sectors. These developments are one of the surest ways to better manage, protect and preserve national food and water resources. Here we review the capabilities of recently deployed satellite systems and UAVs and examine their potential for application in precision agriculture.

  15. Scientific Exploration of Near-Earth Objects via the Crew Exploration Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abell, Paul A.; Korsmeyer, D. J.; Landis, R. R.; Lu, E.; Adamo (D.); Jones (T.); Lemke, L.; Gonzales, A.; Gershman, B.; Morrison, D.; hide

    2007-01-01

    The concept of a crewed mission to a Near-Earth Object (NEO) has been analyzed in depth in 1989 as part of the Space Exploration Initiative. Since that time two other studies have investigated the possibility of sending similar missions to NEOs. A more recent study has been sponsored by the Advanced Programs Office within NASA's Constellation Program. This study team has representatives from across NASA and is currently examining the feasibility of sending a Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) to a near-Earth object (NEO). The ideal mission profile would involve a crew of 2 or 3 astronauts on a 90 to 120 day flight, which would include a 7 to 14 day stay for proximity operations at the target NEO. One of the significant advantages of this type of mission is that it strengthens and validates the foundational infrastructure for the Vision for Space Exploration (VSE) and Exploration Systems Architecture Study (ESAS) in the run up to the lunar sorties at the end of the next decade (approx.2020). Sending a human expedition to a NEO, within the context of the VSE and ESAS, demonstrates the broad utility of the Constellation Program s Orion (CEV) crew capsule and Ares (CLV) launch systems. This mission would be the first human expedition to an interplanetary body outside of the cislunar system. Also, it will help NASA regain crucial operational experience conducting human exploration missions outside of low Earth orbit, which humanity has not attempted in nearly 40 years.

  16. Orbital Transfer Vehicle (space taxi) with aerobraking at Earth and Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    This report shall cover all major aspects of the design of an Aeroassisted Manned Transfer Vehicle (or TAXI) for use as part of advanced manned Mars missions based on a cycling ship concept. Along with the heliocentric orbiting Cycling Spacecraft, such a TAXI would be a primary component of a long-term transportation system for Mars exploration. The Aeroassisted Manned Transfer Vehicle (AMTV) design developed shall operate along transfer trajectories between Earth and a Cycling Spacecraft (designed by the University of Michigan) and Mars. All operations of the AMTV shall be done primarily within the sphere of influence of the two planets. Maximum delta-V's for the vehicle have been established near 9 km/sec, with transfer durations of about 3 days. Acceleration deltaV's will be accomplished using 3 SSME-based hydrogen-oxygen chemical rockets (l(sub sp) = 485 sec & Thrust greater than = 300,00 Ib(sub f)/engine) with a thrust vector directly opposite the aerobraking deceleration vector. The aerobraking deceleration portion of an AMTV mission would be accomplished in this design by a moderate L/D aeroshield of an ellipsoidally-blunt, raked-off, elliptic cone (EBROEC) shape. The reusable thermal protection material comprising the shield will consist of a flexible, multi-layer, ceramic fabric stretched over a lightweight, rigid, shape - defining truss structure. Behind this truss, other components, including the engine supports, would be attached and protected from heating during aerobraking passes. Among these other components would be 2 LOX tanks and 4 LH2 tanks (and their support frames) holding over 670,000 lbm of propellant necessary to impart the required delta-V to the 98,000 lbm burnout mass vehicle. A 20,000 lbm crew module with docking port (oriented parallel to the accel./decel. axis) will provide accommodations for 9 crew members (11 under extreme conditions) for durations up to seven days, thus allowing extra time for emergency situations. This AMTV will be

  17. Design, Fabrication and Testing of a Crushable Energy Absorber for a Passive Earth Entry Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kellas, Sotiris; Corliss, James M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A conceptual study was performed to investigate the impact response of a crushable energy absorber for a passive Earth entry vehicle. The spherical energy-absorbing concept consisted of a foam-filled composite cellular structure capable of omni-directional impact-load attenuation as well as penetration resistance. Five composite cellular samples of hemispherical geometry were fabricated and tested dynamically with impact speeds varying from 30 to 42 meters per second. Theoretical crush load predictions were obtained with the aid of a generalized theory which accounts for the energy dissipated during the folding deformation of the cell-walls. Excellent correlation was obtained between theoretical predictions and experimental tests on characteristic cell-web intersections. Good correlation of theory with experiment was also found to exist for the more complex spherical cellular structures. All preliminary design requirements were met by the cellular structure concept, which exhibited a near-ideal sustained crush-load and approximately 90% crush stroke.

  18. Technology and operational considerations for low-heat-rate trajectories. [of future winged earth reentry vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wurster, K. E.; Eldred, C. H.

    1979-01-01

    A broad parametric study which examines several critical aspects of low-heat-rate entry trajectories is performed. Low planform loadings associated with future winged earth-entry vehicles coupled with the potential application of metallic thermal protection systems (TPS) suggest that such trajectories are of particular interest. Studied are three heating conditions - reference, stagnation, and windward centerline, for both laminar and turbulent flow; configuration-related factors including planform loading and hypersonic angle of attack; and mission-related factors such as cross-range and orbit inclination. Results indicate benefits in the design of TPS to be gained by utilizing moderate angles of attack as opposed to high-lift coefficient, high angles of attack, during entry. An assessment of design and technology implications is made.

  19. Implications of Emerging Vehicle Technologies on Rare Earth Supply and Demand in the United States

    DOE PAGES

    Fishman, Tomer; Myers, Rupert; Rios, Orlando; ...

    2018-01-25

    In this article, we explore the long-term demand and supply potentials of rare earth elements in alternative energy vehicles (AEVs) in the United States until 2050. Using a stock-flow model, we compare a baseline scenario with scenarios that incorporate an exemplary technological innovation: a novel aluminum–cerium–magnesium alloy. We find that the introduction of the novel alloy demonstrates that even low penetration rates can exceed domestic cerium production capacity, illustrating possible consequences of technological innovations to material supply and demand. End-of-life vehicles can, however, overtake domestic mining as a source of materials, calling for proper technologies and policies to utilize thismore » emerging source. The long-term importing of critical materials in manufactured and semi-manufactured products shifts the location of material stocks and hence future secondary supply of high-value materials, culminating in a double benefit to the importing country. This modeling approach is adaptable to the study of varied scenarios and materials, linking technologies with supply and demand dynamics in order to understand their potential economic and environmental consequences.« less

  20. Implications of Emerging Vehicle Technologies on Rare Earth Supply and Demand in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Fishman, Tomer; Myers, Rupert; Rios, Orlando

    In this article, we explore the long-term demand and supply potentials of rare earth elements in alternative energy vehicles (AEVs) in the United States until 2050. Using a stock-flow model, we compare a baseline scenario with scenarios that incorporate an exemplary technological innovation: a novel aluminum–cerium–magnesium alloy. We find that the introduction of the novel alloy demonstrates that even low penetration rates can exceed domestic cerium production capacity, illustrating possible consequences of technological innovations to material supply and demand. End-of-life vehicles can, however, overtake domestic mining as a source of materials, calling for proper technologies and policies to utilize thismore » emerging source. The long-term importing of critical materials in manufactured and semi-manufactured products shifts the location of material stocks and hence future secondary supply of high-value materials, culminating in a double benefit to the importing country. This modeling approach is adaptable to the study of varied scenarios and materials, linking technologies with supply and demand dynamics in order to understand their potential economic and environmental consequences.« less

  1. Benefits of in situ propellant utilization for a Mars sample return mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wadel, Mary F.

    1993-01-01

    Previous Mars rover sample return mission studies have shown a requirement for Titan 4 or STS Space Shuttle launch vehicles to complete a sample return from a single Mars site. These studies have either used terrestrial propellants or considered in situ production of methane and oxygen for the return portion of the mission. Using in situ propellants for the return vehicles reduces the Earth launch mass and allows for a smaller Earth launch vehicle, since the return propellant is not carried from Earth. Carbon monoxide and oxygen (CO/O2) and methane and oxygen (CH4/O2) were investigated as in situ propellants for a Mars sample return mission and the results were compared to a baseline study performed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory using terrestrial propellants. Capability for increased sample return mass, use of an alternate launch vehicle, and an additional mini-rover as payload were included. CO/O2 and CH4/O2 were found to decrease the baseline Earth launch mass by 13.6 and 9.2 percent, respectively. This resulted in higher payload mass margins for the baseline Atlas 2AS launch vehicle. CO/O2 had the highest mass margin. And because of this, it was not only possible to increase the sample return mass and carry an additional mini-rover, but was also possible to use the smaller Atlas 2A launch vehicle.

  2. Trajectory Control for Vehicles Entering the Earth's Atmosphere at Small Flight Path Angles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eggleston, John M.

    1959-01-01

    Methods of controlling the trajectories of high-drag-low-lift vehicles entering the earth's atmosphere at angles of attack near 90 deg and at initial entry angles up to 3 deg are studied. The trajectories are calculated for vehicles whose angle of attack can be held constant at some specified value or can be perfectly controlled as a function of some measured quantity along the trajectory. The results might be applied in the design of automatic control systems or in the design of instruments which will give the human pilot sufficient information to control his trajectory properly during an atmospheric entry. Trajectory data are compared on the basis of the deceleration, range, angle of attack, and, in some cases, the rate of descent. The aerodynamic heat-transfer rate and skin temperature of a vehicle with a simple heat-sink type of structure are calculated for trajectories made with several types of control functions. For the range of entry angles considered, it is found that the angle of attack can be controlled to restrict the deceleration down to an arbitrarily chosen level of 3g. All the control functions tried are successful in reducing the maximum deceleration to the desired level. However, in order to avoid a tendency for the deceleration to reach an initial peak decrease, and then reach a second peak, some anticipation is required in the control function so that the change in angle of attack will lead the change in deceleration. When the angle of attack is controlled in the aforementioned manner, the maximum rate of aerodynamic heat transfer to the skin is reduced, the maximum skin temperature of the vehicle is virtually unaffected, and the total heat absorbed is slightly increased. The increase in total heat can be minimized, however, by maintaining the maximum desired deceleration for as much of the trajectory as possible. From an initial angle of attack of 90 deg, the angle-of-attack requirements necessary to maintain constant values of deceleration (1g

  3. Earth Observatory Satellite system definition study. Report 1: Orbit/launch vehicle trade-off studies and recommendations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    A summary of the constraints and requirements on the Earth Observatory Satellite (EOS-A) orbit and launch vehicle analysis is presented. The propulsion system (hydrazine) and the launch vehicle (Delta 2910) selected for EOS-A are examined. The rationale for the selection of the recommended orbital altitude of 418 nautical miles is explained. The original analysis was based on the EOS-A mission with the Thematic Mapper and the High Resolution Pointable Imager. The impact of the revised mission model is analyzed to show how the new mission model affects the previously defined propulsion system, launch vehicle, and orbit. A table is provided to show all aspects of the EOS multiple mission concepts. The subjects considered include the following: (1) mission orbit analysis, (2) spacecraft parametric performance analysis, (3) launch system performance analysis, and (4) orbits/launch vehicle selection.

  4. Comparison of reusable insulation systems for cryogenically-tanked earth-based space vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sumner, I. E.; Barber, J. R.

    1978-01-01

    Three reusable insulation systems concepts have been developed for use with cryogenic tanks of earth-based space vehicles. Two concepts utilized double-goldized Kapton (DGK) or double-aluminized Mylar (DAM) multilayer insulation (MLI), while the third utilized a hollow-glass-microsphere, load-bearing insulation (LBI). All three insulation systems have recently undergone experimental testing and evaluation under NASA-sponsored programs. Thermal performance measurements were made under space-hold (vacuum) conditions for insulation warm boundary temperatures of approximately 291 K. The resulting effective thermal conductivity was approximately .00008 W/m-K for the MLI systems (liquid hydrogen test results) and .00054 W/m-K for the LBI system (liquid nitrogen test results corrected to liquid hydrogen temperature). The DGK MLI system experienced a maximum thermal degradation of 38 percent, the DAM MLI system 14 percent, and the LBI system 6.7 percent due to repeated thermal cycling representing typical space flight conditions. Repeated exposure of the DAM MLI system to a high humidity environment for periods as long as 8 weeks provided a maximum degradation of only 24 percent.

  5. A multimodal micro air vehicle for autonomous flight in near-earth environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, William Edward

    Reconnaissance, surveillance, and search-and-rescue missions in near-Earth environments such as caves, forests, and urban areas pose many new challenges to command and control (C2) teams. Of great significance is how to acquire situational awareness when access to the scene is blocked by enemy fire, rubble, or other occlusions. Small bird-sized aerial robots are expendable and can fly over obstacles and through small openings to assist in the acquisition and distribution of intelligence. However, limited flying space and densely populated obstacle fields requires a vehicle that is capable of hovering, but also maneuverable. A secondary flight mode was incorporated into a fixed-wing aircraft to preserve its maneuverability while adding the capability of hovering. An inertial measurement sensor and onboard flight control system were interfaced and used to transition the hybrid prototype from cruise to hover flight and sustain a hover autonomously. Furthermore, the hovering flight mode can be used to maneuver the aircraft through small openings such as doorways. An ultrasonic and infrared sensor suite was designed to follow exterior building walls until an ingress route was detected. Reactive control was then used to traverse the doorway and gather reconnaissance. Entering a dangerous environment to gather intelligence autonomously will provide an invaluable resource to any C2 team. The holistic approach of platform development, sensor suite design, and control serves as the philosophy of this work.

  6. Earth Observatory Satellite system definition study. Report no. 1: Orbit/launch vehicle tradeoff studies and recommendations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the recommended orbit for the Earth Observatory Satellite (EOS) Land Resources Mission. It was determined that a promising sun synchronous orbit is 366 nautical miles when using an instrument with a 100 nautical mile swath width. The orbit has a 17 day repeat cycle and a 14 nautical mile swath overlap. Payloads were developed for each mission, EOS A through F. For each mission, the lowest cost booster that was capable of lifting the payload to the EOS orbit was selected. The launch vehicles selected for the missions are identified on the basis of tradeoff studies and recommendations. The reliability aspects of the launch vehicles are analyzed.

  7. Ras Labs-CASIS-ISS NL experiment for synthetic muscle returned to Earth: resistance to ionizing radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, Lenore; Albers, Leila N.; Rodriguez, Simone; Gentile, Charles; Meixler, Lewis D.; Ascione, George; Hitchner, Robert; Taylor, James; Hoffman, Dan; Cylinder, David; Gaza, Ramona; Moy, Leon; Mark, Patrick S.; Prillaman, Daniel L.; Nodarse, Robert; Menegus, Michael J.; Ratto, Jo Ann; Thellen, Christopher T.; Froio, Danielle; Valenza, Logan; Poirier, Catherine; Sinkler, Charles; Corl, Dylan; Hablani, Surbhi; Fuerst, Tyler; Gallucci, Sergio; Blocher, Whitney; Liffland, Stephanie

    2017-04-01

    SpaceX CRS-6 payload, and after 1+ year space exposure, returned to Earth on May 11, 2016 on SpaceX CRS-8. The results were very good, with the survival of all flown samples, which compared very well with the ground control samples. The most significant change observed was color change (yellowing) in some of the flown EAP samples, which in polymers can be indicative of accelerated aging. While the Synthetic Muscle Experiment was in orbit on the ISS-NL, photo events occur every 4 to 6 weeks to observe any changes, such as color, in the samples. Both the 32 flown EAP samples and 32 ground control samples were tested for pH, material integrity, durometer, and electroactivity, with very good results. The samples were also analyzed using stereo microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM)), and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Smart electroactive polymer based materials and actuators promise to transform prostheses and robots, allowing for the treatment, reduction, and prevention of debilitating injury and fatalities, and to further our exploration by land, sea, air, and space.

  8. Cardiovascular adaptations in weightlessness: The influence of in-flight exercise programs on the cardiovascular adjustments during weightlessness and upon returning to Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, C. H.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of in-flight exercise programs on astronauts' cardiovascular adjustments during spaceflight weightlessness and upon return to Earth was studied. Physiological changes in muscle strength and volume, cardiovascular responses during the application of lower body negative pressure, and metabolic activities during pre-flight and flight tests were made on Skylab crewmembers. The successful completion of the Skylab missions showed that man can perform submaximal and maximal aerobic exercise in the weightless enviroment without detrimental trends in any of the physiologic data. Exercise tolerance during flight was unaffected. It was only after return to Earth that a tolerance decrement was noted. The rapid postflight recovery of orthostatic and exercise tolerance following two of the three Skylab missions appeared to be directly related to total in-flight exercise as well as to the graded, regular program of exercise performed during the postflight debriefing period.

  9. Aerobraking orbital transfer vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Carl D. (Inventor); Nagy, Kornel (Inventor); Roberts, Barney B. (Inventor); Ried, Robert C. (Inventor); Kroll, Kenneth R. (Inventor); Gamble, Joe (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    An aerobraking orbital transfer vehicle which includes an aerobraking device which also serves as a heat shield in the shape of a raked-off elliptic or circular cone with a circular or elliptical base, and with an ellipsoid or other blunt shape nose. The aerobraking device is fitted with a toroid-like skirt and is integral with the support structure of the propulsion system and other systems of the space vehicle. The vehicle is intended to be transported in components to a space station in lower earth orbit where it is assembled for use as a transportation system from low earth orbit to geosynchronous earth orbit and return. Conventional guidance means are included for autonomous flight.

  10. Aerothermodynamic environments for Mars entry, Mars return, and lunar return aerobraking missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rochelle, W. C.; Bouslog, S. A.; Ting, P. C.; Curry, D. M.

    1990-06-01

    The aeroheating environments to vehicles undergoing Mars aerocapture, earth aerocapture from Mars, and earth aerocapture from the moon are presented. An engineering approach for the analysis of various types of vehicles and trajectories was taken, rather than performing a benchmark computation for a specific point at a selected time point in a trajectory. The radiation into Mars using the Mars Rover Sample Return (MRSR) 2-ft nose radius bionic remains a small contributor of heating for 6 to 10 km/sec; however, at 12 km/sec it becomes comparable with the convection. For earth aerocapture, returning from Mars, peak radiation for the MRSR SRC is only 25 percent of the peak convection for the 12-km/sec trajectory. However, when large vehicles are considered with this trajectory, peak radiation can become 2 to 4 times higher than the peak convection. For both Mars entry and return, a partially ablative Thermal Protection System (TPS) would be required, but for Lunar Transfer Vehicle return an all-reusable TPS can be used.

  11. Sample Return Propulsion Technology Development Under NASA's ISPT Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, David J.; Dankanich, John; Hahne, David; Pencil, Eric; Peterson, Todd; Munk, Michelle M.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract In 2009, the In-Space Propulsion Technology (ISPT) program was tasked to start development of propulsion technologies that would enable future sample return missions. Sample return missions can be quite varied, from collecting and bringing back samples of comets or asteroids, to soil, rocks, or atmosphere from planets or moons. As a result, ISPT s propulsion technology development needs are also broad, and include: 1) Sample Return Propulsion (SRP), 2) Planetary Ascent Vehicles (PAV), 3) Multi-mission technologies for Earth Entry Vehicles (MMEEV), and 4) Systems/mission analysis and tools that focuses on sample return propulsion. The SRP area includes electric propulsion for sample return and low cost Discovery-class missions, and propulsion systems for Earth Return Vehicles (ERV) including transfer stages to the destination. Initially the SRP effort will transition ongoing work on a High-Voltage Hall Accelerator (HIVHAC) thruster into developing a full HIVHAC system. SRP will also leverage recent lightweight propellant-tanks advancements and develop flight-qualified propellant tanks with direct applicability to the Mars Sample Return (MSR) mission and with general applicability to all future planetary spacecraft. ISPT s previous aerocapture efforts will merge with earlier Earth Entry Vehicles developments to form the starting point for the MMEEV effort. The first task under the Planetary Ascent Vehicles (PAV) effort is the development of a Mars Ascent Vehicle (MAV). The new MAV effort will leverage past MAV analysis and technology developments from the Mars Technology Program (MTP) and previous MSR studies. This paper will describe the state of ISPT project s propulsion technology development for future sample return missions.12

  12. Status of Sample Return Propulsion Technology Development Under NASA's ISPT Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, David J.; Glaab, Louis J.; Munk, Michelle M.; Pencil, Eric; Dankanich, John; Peterson, Todd T.

    2012-01-01

    The In-Space Propulsion Technology (ISPT) program was tasked in 2009 to start development of propulsion technologies that would enable future sample return missions. ISPT s sample return technology development areas are diverse. Sample Return Propulsion (SRP) addresses electric propulsion for sample return and low cost Discovery-class missions, propulsion systems for Earth Return Vehicles (ERV) including transfer stages to the destination, and low technology readiness level (TRL) advanced propulsion technologies. The SRP effort continues work on HIVHAC thruster development to transition into developing a Hall-effect propulsion system for sample return (ERV and transfer stages) and low-cost missions. Previous work on the lightweight propellant-tanks continues for sample return with direct applicability to a Mars Sample Return (MSR) mission with general applicability to all future planetary spacecraft. The Earth Entry Vehicle (EEV) work focuses on building a fundamental base of multi-mission technologies for Earth Entry Vehicles (MMEEV). The main focus of the Planetary Ascent Vehicles (PAV) area is technology development for the Mars Ascent Vehicle (MAV), which builds upon and leverages the past MAV analysis and technology developments from the Mars Technology Program (MTP) and previous MSR studies

  13. Propulsion Technology Development for Sample Return Missions Under NASA's ISPT Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, David J.; Pencil, Eric J.; Vento, Daniel; Dankanich, John W.; Munk, Michelle M.; Hahne, David

    2011-01-01

    The In-Space Propulsion Technology (ISPT) Program was tasked in 2009 to start development of propulsion technologies that would enable future sample return missions. Sample return missions could be quite varied, from collecting and bringing back samples of comets or asteroids, to soil, rocks, or atmosphere from planets or moons. The paper will describe the ISPT Program s propulsion technology development activities relevant to future sample return missions. The sample return propulsion technology development areas for ISPT are: 1) Sample Return Propulsion (SRP), 2) Planetary Ascent Vehicles (PAV), 3) Entry Vehicle Technologies (EVT), and 4) Systems/mission analysis and tools that focuses on sample return propulsion. The Sample Return Propulsion area is subdivided into: a) Electric propulsion for sample return and low cost Discovery-class missions, b) Propulsion systems for Earth Return Vehicles (ERV) including transfer stages to the destination, and c) Low TRL advanced propulsion technologies. The SRP effort will continue work on HIVHAC thruster development in FY2011 and then transitions into developing a HIVHAC system under future Electric Propulsion for sample return (ERV and transfer stages) and low-cost missions. Previous work on the lightweight propellant-tanks will continue under advanced propulsion technologies for sample return with direct applicability to a Mars Sample Return (MSR) mission and with general applicability to all future planetary spacecraft. A major effort under the EVT area is multi-mission technologies for Earth Entry Vehicles (MMEEV), which will leverage and build upon previous work related to Earth Entry Vehicles (EEV). The major effort under the PAV area is the Mars Ascent Vehicle (MAV). The MAV is a new development area to ISPT, and builds upon and leverages the past MAV analysis and technology developments from the Mars Technology Program (MTP) and previous MSR studies.

  14. Optical Navigation for the Orion Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crain, Timothy; Getchius, Joel; D'Souza, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    The Orion vehicle is being designed to provide nominal crew transport to the lunar transportation stack in low Earth orbit, crew abort prior during transit to the moon, and crew return to Earth once lunar orbit is achieved. One of the design requirements levied on the Orion vehicle is the ability to return to the vehicle and crew to Earth in the case of loss of communications and command with the Mission Control Center. Central to fulfilling this requirement, is the ability of Orion to navigate autonomously. In low-Earth orbit, this may be solved with the use of GPS, but in cis-lunar and lunar orbit this requires optical navigation. This paper documents the preliminary analyses performed by members of the Orion Orbit GN&C System team.

  15. MOI to TEI : a Mars Sample Return strategy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Chad W.; Maddock, Robert W.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the issues and challenges related to the design of the rendezvous between the Earth Return Vehicle (ERV) and the Orbiting Sample (OS) for the Mars Sample Return (MSR) mission. In particular, attention will be focused on the strategy for 'optimizing' the intermediate segment of the rendezvous process, during which there are a great number of variables that must be considered and well understood.

  16. Capturing asteroids into bound orbits around the earth: Massive early return on an asteroid terminal defense system

    SciTech Connect

    Hills, J.G.

    1992-02-06

    Nuclear explosives may be used to capture small asteroids (e.g., 20--50 meters in diameter) into bound orbits around the earth. The captured objects could be used for construction material for manned and unmanned activity in Earth orbit. Asteroids with small approach velocities, which are the ones most likely to have close approaches to the Earth, require the least energy for capture. They are particularly easy to capture if they pass within one Earth radius of the surface of the Earth. They could be intercepted with intercontinental missiles if the latter were retrofit with a more flexible guiding and homing capability.more » This asteroid capture-defense system could be implemented in a few years at low cost by using decommissioned ICMs. The economic value of even one captured asteroid is many times the initial investment. The asteroid capture system would be an essential part of the learning curve for dealing with larger asteroids that can hit the earth.« less

  17. Earth Sciences as a Vehicle for Gifted Education--The Hong Kong Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Phillip J.; Chan, Lung Sang; Murphy, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    The development and delivery of an Earth-science-focused short course designed to prepare Hong Kong students for university level study is described. Earth sciences provide an inspirational and challenging context for learning and teaching in Hong Kong's increasingly skills-based curriculum. (Contains 3 figures and 4 online resources.)

  18. Orion Optical Navigation for Loss of Communication Lunar Return Contingencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Getchius, Joel; Hanak, Chad; Kubitschek, Daniel G.

    2010-01-01

    The Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) will replace the Space Shuttle and serve as the next-generation spaceship to carry humans back to the Moon for the first time since the Apollo program. For nominal lunar mission operations, the Mission Control Navigation team will utilize radiometric measurements to determine the position and velocity of Orion and uplink state information to support Lunar return. However, in the loss of communications contingency return scenario, Orion must safely return the crew to the Earth's surface. The navigation design solution for this loss of communications scenario is optical navigation consisting of lunar landmark tracking in low lunar orbit and star- horizon angular measurements coupled with apparent planetary diameter for Earth return trajectories. This paper describes the optical measurement errors and the navigation filter that will process those measurements to support navigation for safe crew return.

  19. Dual-fuel propulsion - Why it works, possible engines, and results of vehicle studies. [on earth-to-orbit Space Shuttle flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, J. A.; Wilhite, A. W.

    1979-01-01

    The reasons why dual-fuel propulsion works are discussed. Various engine options are discussed, and vehicle mass and cost results are presented for earth-to-orbit vehicles. The results indicate that dual-fuel propulsion is attractive, particularly with the dual-expander engine. A unique orbit-transfer vehicle is described which uses dual-fuel propulsion. One Space Shuttle flight and one flight of a heavy-lift Shuttle derivative are used for each orbit-transfer vehicle flight, and the payload capability is quite attractive.

  20. Mars Sample Return - Launch and Detection Strategies for Orbital Rendezvous

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woolley, Ryan C.; Mattingly, Richard L.; Riedel, Joseph E.; Sturm, Erick J.

    2011-01-01

    This study sets forth conceptual mission design strategies for the ascent and rendezvous phase of the proposed NASA/ESA joint Mars Sample Return Campaign. The current notional mission architecture calls for the launch of an acquisition/cache rover in 2018, an orbiter with an Earth return vehicle in 2022, and a fetch rover and ascent vehicle in 2024. Strategies are presented to launch the sample into a coplanar orbit with the Orbiter which facilitate robust optical detection, orbit determination, and rendezvous. Repeating ground track orbits exist at 457 and 572 km which provide multiple launch opportunities with similar geometries for detection and rendezvous.

  1. Zero Rare-Earth Magnet Integrated Starter-Generator Development for Military Vehicle Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-14

    platform. – Support of on-board hybrid electric features such as regenerative braking , torque assist and stop-start operation. 14 August 2013 4...13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES GROUND VEHICLE SYSTEMS ENGINEERING AND TECHNOLOGY SYMPOSIUM (GVSETS), SET FOR AUG. 21-22, 2013 14. ABSTRACT Briefing Charts

  2. Meteors as a Delivery Vehicle for Organic Matter to the Early Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenniskens, Peter; DeVincenzi, D. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Only in recent years has a concerted effort been made to study the circumstances under which extraterrestrial organic matter is accreted on Earth by way of meteors. Meteors are the luminous phenomena associated with the (partial) ablation of meteoric matter and represent the dominant pathway from space to Earth, with the possible exception of rare giant impacts of asteroids and comets. Meteors dominated the supply of organics to the early Earth if organic matter survived this pathway efficiently. Moreover, meteors are a source of kinetic energy that can convert inert atmospheric gases such as CO, N, and H2O into useful compounds, such as HCN and NO. Understanding these processes relies heavily on empirical evidence that is still very limited. Here I report on the observations in hand and discuss their relevance in the context of the origin of life.

  3. Mars Sample Return Using Solar Sail Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Les; Macdonald, Malcolm; Mcinnes, Colin; Percy, Tom

    2012-01-01

    Many Mars Sample Return (MSR) architecture studies have been conducted over the years. A key element of them is the Earth Return Stage (ERS) whose objective is to obtain the sample from the Mars Ascent Vehicle (MAV) and return it safely to the surface of the Earth. ERS designs predominantly use chemical propulsion [1], incurring a significant launch mass penalty due to the low specific impulse of such systems coupled with the launch mass sensitivity to returned mass. It is proposed to use solar sail propulsion for the ERS, providing a high (effective) specific impulse propulsion system in the final stage of the multi-stage system. By doing so to the launch mass of the orbiter mission can be significantly reduced and hence potentially decreasing mission cost. Further, solar sailing offers a unique set of non-Keplerian low thrust trajectories that may enable modifications to the current approach to designing the Earth Entry Vehicle by potentially reducing the Earth arrival velocity. This modification will further decrease the mass of the orbiter system. Solar sail propulsion uses sunlight to propel vehicles through space by reflecting solar photons from a large, mirror-like surface made of a lightweight, reflective material. The continuous photonic pressure provides propellantless thrust to conduct orbital maneuvering and plane changes more efficiently than conventional chemical propulsion. Because the Sun supplies the necessary propulsive energy, solar sails require no onboard propellant, thus reducing system mass. This technology is currently at TRL 7/8 as demonstrated by the 2010 flight of the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency, JAXA, IKAROS mission. [2

  4. 2005 Earth-Mars Round Trip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents, in viewgraph form, the 2005 Earth-Mars Round Trip. The contents include: 1) Lander; 2) Mars Sample Return Project; 3) Rover; 4) Rover Size Comparison; 5) Mars Ascent Vehicle; 6) Return Orbiter; 7) A New Mars Surveyor Program Architecture; 8) Definition Study Summary Result; 9) Mars Surveyor Proposed Architecture 2003, 2005 Opportunities; 10) Mars Micromissions Using Ariane 5; 11) Potential International Partnerships; 12) Proposed Integrated Architecture; and 13) Mars Exploration Program Report of the Architecture Team.

  5. Heat-physical properties of lunar surface material returned to earth by the Luna 16 automatic station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avduyevskiy, V. S.; Anfimov, N. A.; Marov, M. Y.; Treskin, Y. A.; Shalayev, S. P.; Ekonomov, A. P.

    1974-01-01

    Density, specific heat capacity, and coefficient of thermal conductivity were studied on a sample of lunar surface material returned by the Luna 16 automatic station. The study was carried out in a helium-filled chamber. The density of the surface material when freely heaped was 1.2 g/cu cm, and when shaken down -- 1.7 g/cu cm. The specific heat capacity was 0.177 + or - 0.010 cal x g/1 x deg/1. The coefficient of thermal conductivity in the material was 4.8 x 10/6 + or - 1.2 x 10/6 cal x cm/1 x sec/1 x deg/1.

  6. The X-38 prototype of the Crew Return Vehicle is suspended under its giant 7,500-square-foot parafoil during its eighth free flight on Thursday, December 13, 2001

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-12-13

    The X-38 prototype of the Crew Return Vehicle for the International Space Station is suspended under its giant 7,500-square-foot parafoil during its eighth free flight on Thursday, Dec. 13, 2001. A portion of the descent was flown by remote control by a NASA astronaut from a ground vehicle configured like the CRV's interior before the X-38 made an autonomous landing on Rogers Dry Lake.

  7. Earth

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-01-30

    Behold one of the more detailed images of the Earth yet created. This Blue Marble Earth montage shown above -- created from photographs taken by the Visible/Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument on board the new Suomi NPP satellite -- shows many stunning details of our home planet. The Suomi NPP satellite was launched last October and renamed last week after Verner Suomi, commonly deemed the father of satellite meteorology. The composite was created from the data collected during four orbits of the robotic satellite taken earlier this month and digitally projected onto the globe. Many features of North America and the Western Hemisphere are particularly visible on a high resolution version of the image. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA18033

  8. Design studies of large aperture, high-resolution Earth science microwave radiometers compatible with small launch vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroeder, Lyle C.; Bailey, M. C.; Harrington, Richard F.; Kendall, Bruce M.; Campbell, Thomas G.

    1994-01-01

    High-spatial-resolution microwave radiometer sensing from space with reasonable swath widths and revisit times favors large aperture systems. However, with traditional precision antenna design, the size and weight requirements for such systems are in conflict with the need to emphasize small launch vehicles. This paper describes tradeoffs between the science requirements, basic operational parameters, and expected sensor performance for selected satellite radiometer concepts utilizing novel lightweight compactly packaged real apertures. Antenna, feed, and radiometer subsystem design and calibration are presented. Preliminary results show that novel lightweight real aperture coupled with state-of-the-art radiometer designs are compatible with small launch systems, and hold promise for high-resolution earth science measurements of sea ice, precipitation, soil moisture, sea surface temperature, and ocean wind speeds.

  9. Rocket nozzle expansion ratio analysis for dual-fuel earth-to-orbit vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, James A.

    1989-01-01

    Results are reported from a recent study of the effects of Space Shuttle Main Engine expansion ratio modifications, in the cases of both single-stage and two-stage systems. Two-position nozzles were employed; after varying the lower expansion ratio while the higher was held constant at 120, the lower expansion ratio was held constant at 40 or 60 while the higher expansion ratio was varied. The expansion ratios for minimum vehicle dry mass are different for single-stage and two-stage systems. For two-stage systems, a single expansion ratio of 77.5 provides a lower dry mass than any two-position nozzle.

  10. A survey of rapid sample return needs from Space Station Freedom and potential return systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccandless, Ronald S.; Siegel, Bette; Charlton, Kevin

    1991-01-01

    Results are presented of a survey conducted among potential users of the life sciences and material sciences facilities at the Space Station Freedom (SSF) to determine the need for a special rapid sample return (RSR) mission to bring the experimental samples from the Space Station Freedom (SSF) to earth between the Space Shuttle visits. The results of the survey show that, while some experimental objectives would benefit from the RSR capability, other available cost- and mission-effective means could be used instead of the RSR proposed. Potential vehicles for transporting samples from the SSF to earth are examined in the context of the survey results.

  11. Lunar far side sample return missions using the Soviet Luna system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, P. H., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    The paper assesses the feasibility of using the Soviet Lunar Sample Return vehicle in cooperation with the United States to return a sample of lunar soil from the far side of the moon. Analysis of the orbital mechanics of the Luna system shows how landing sites are restricted on the moon. The trajectory model is used to duplicate the 3 Luna missions flown to date and the results compared to actual Soviet data. The existence of suitable trajectories for the earth return trip is assessed, including landing dispersions at earth. Several possible areas of technical difficulty are identified.

  12. Design Guide for Aerodynamics Testing of Earth and Planetary Entry Vehicles in a Ballistic Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogdanoff, David W.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this manual is to aid in the design of an aerodynamics test of an earth or planetary entry capsule in a ballistic range. In this manual, much use is made of the results and experience gained in 50 years of ballistic range aerodynamics testing at the NASA Ames Research Center, and in particular, that gained in the last 27 years, while the author was working at NASA Ames. The topics treated herein include: Data to be obtained; flight data needed to design test; Reynolds number and dynamic similarity of flight trajectory and ballistic range test; capabilities of various ballistic ranges; Calculations of swerves due to average and oscillating lift and of drag-induced velocity decreases; Model and sabot design; materials, weights and stresses; Sabot separation; Launches at angle of attack and slapping with paper to produce pitch/yaw oscillations.

  13. Phobos Sample Return: Next Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelenyi, Lev; Martynov, Maxim; Zakharov, Alexander; Korablev, Oleg; Ivanov, Alexey; Karabadzak, George

    possible scenario of the Boomerang mission includes the approach to Deimos prior to the landing of Phobos. The needed excess ΔV w.r.t. simple scenario (elliptical orbit à near-Phobos orbit) amounts to 0.67 km s-1 (1.6 vs 0.93 km s-1). The Boomerang mission basically repeats the Phobos-SR (2011) architecture, where the transfer-orbiting spacecraft lands on the Phobos surface and a small return vehicle launches the return capsule to Earth. We consider the Boomerang mission as an important step in Mars exploration and a direct precursor of Mars Sample Return. The following elements of the Boomerang mission might be directly employed, or serve as the prototypes for the Mars Sample return in future: Return vehicle, Earth descent module, Transfer-orbital spacecraft. We urge the development of this project for its high science value and recognize its elements as potential national contribution to an international Mars Sample Return project. Galimov E.M., Phobos sample return mission: scientific substantiation, Solar System Res., v.44, No.1, pp5-14, 2010. Chappaz L., H.J. Melosh, M. Vaguero, and K.C. Howell, Material transfer from the surface of Mars to Phobos and Deimos, 43rd Lunar and planetary Science Conference, paper 1422, 2012.

  14. Subsonic Aerodynamic Characteristics of a Circular Body Earth-to-Orbit Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepsch, Roger A., Jr.; Ware, George M.; MacConochie, Ian O.

    1996-01-01

    A test of a generic reusable earth-to-orbit transport was conducted in the 7- by 10-Foot high-speed tunnel at the Langley Research Center at Mach number 0.3. The model had a body with a circular cross section and a thick clipped delta wing as the major lifting surface. For directional control, three different vertical fin arrangements were investigated: a conventional aft-mounted center vertical fin, wingtip fins, and a nose-mounted vertical fin. The configuration was longitudinally stable about the estimated center-of-gravity position of 0.72 body length and had sufficient pitch-control authority for stable trim over a wide range of angle of attack, regardless of fin arrangement. The maximum trimmed lift/drag ratio for the aft center-fin configuration was less than 5, whereas the other configurations had values of above 6. The aft center-fin configuration was directionally stable for all angles of attack tested. The wingtip and nose fins were not intended to produce directional stability but to be active controllers for artificial stabilization. Small rolling-moment values resulted from yaw control of the nose fin. Large adverse rolling-moment increments resulted from tip-fin controller deflection above 13 deg angle of attack. Flow visualization indicated that the adverse rolling-moment increments were probably caused by the influence of the deflected tip-fin controller on wing flow separation.

  15. Supersonic aerodynamic characteristics of a circular body Earth-to-Orbit vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ware, George M.; Engelund, Walter C.; Macconochie, Ian O.

    1994-01-01

    The circular body configuration is a generic single- or multi-stage reusable Earth-to-orbit transport. A thick clipped-delta wing is the major lifting surface. For directional control, three different vertical fin arrangements were investigated: a conventional aft-mounted center fin, wingtip fins, and a nose-mounted fin. The tests were conducted in the Langley Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel. The configuration is longitudinally stable about the estimated center of gravity of 0.72 body length up to a Mach number of about 3.0. Above Mach 3.0, the model is longitudinally unstable at low angles of attack but has a stable secondary trim point at angles of attack above 30 deg. The model has sufficient pitch control authority with elevator and body flap to produce stable trim over the test range. The model with the center fin is directionally stable at low angles of attack up to a Mach number of 3.90. The rudder-like surfaces on the tip fins and the all-movable nose fin are designed as active controls to produce artificial directional stability and are effective in producing yawing moment. The wing trailing-edge aileron surfaces are effective in producing rolling moment, but they also produce large adverse yawing moment.

  16. A Simple Space Station Rescue Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petro, Andrew

    1995-01-01

    Early in the development of the Space Station it was determined that there is a need to have a vehicle which could be used in the event that the Space Station crew need to quickly depart and return to Earth when the Space Shuttle is not available. Unplanned return missions might occur because of a medical emergency, a major Space Station failure, or if there is a long-term interruption in the delivery of logistics to the Station. The rescue vehicle ms envisioned as a simple capsule-type spacecraft which would be maintained in a dormant state at the Station for several years and be quickly activated by the crew when needed. During the assembly phase for the International Space Station, unplanned return missions will be performed by the Russian Soyuz vehicle, which can return up to three people. When the Station assembly is complete there will be a need for rescue capability for up to six people. This need might be met by an additional Soyuz vehicle or by a new vehicle which might come from a variety of sources. This paper describes one candidate concept for a Space Station rescue vehicle. The proposed rescue vehicle design has the blunt-cone shape of the Apollo command module but with a larger diameter. The rescue vehicle would be delivered to the Station in the payload bay of the Space Shuttle. The spacecraft design can accommodate six to eight people for a one-day return mission. All of the systems for the mission including deorbit propulsion are contained within the conical spacecraft and so there is no separate service module. The use of the proven Apollo re-entry shape would greatly reduce the time and cost for development and testing. Other aspects of the design are also intended to minimize development cost and simplify operations. This paper will summarize the evolution of rescue vehicle concepts, the functional requirements for a rescue vehicle, and describe the proposed design.

  17. EURECA orbits above the Earth's surface prior to STS-57 OV-105 RMS capture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Backdropped against open ocean waters, the European Retrievable Carrier (EURECA) spacecraft, with solar array (SA) panels folded flat against its sides, approaches Endeavour, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 105, on flight day five. Later, the remote manipulator system (RMS) end effector was used to 'capture' the spacecraft. After ten days in Earth orbit, the crew returned to Earth, bringing EURECA home.

  18. Laboratory simulation of vehicle-plasma interaction in low Earth orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svenes, K. R.; Troim, J.

    1994-01-01

    We have performed simulations in a plasma chamber of the interaction between a stationary charged body and a streaming plasma. The plasma was set up so as to correspond to the conditions encountered in low Earth orbit (LEO). In this paper we will concentrate on the region of decreased ion density, downstream of the body, known as the `wake' region. The extent of the `near-wake' region (`closure distance') has been utilized to investigate the relative importance of the various factors influencing the formation of the complete wake region. As expected, both the Mach number and the body potential had a significant influence on the wake formation. In fact, it was verified that in the case of the circular disc the functional dependence of the closure distance on the Mach number and the body potential may be fitted to a semi-empirical form developed by Martin et al., (1991) on the basis of numerical simulations. However, it turned out that the general structure of the wake region as well as the closure distance was also very strongly dependent on the body geometry. This is due to the fact that both the magnitude and the distribution of the resulting electric fields are dependent both on the applied voltage and the geometry of the particular body. Hence, the path of the streaming plasma particles will be different for each of the various geometries. This has the consequence that any realistic simulation study of spacecraft-plasma interactions must take into account the detailed geometric specification of the particular system under consideration.

  19. Diatomaceous earth as a protective vehicle for bacteria applied for self-healing concrete.

    PubMed

    Wang, J Y; Belie, N De; Verstraete, W

    2012-04-01

    Crack repair is crucial since cracks are the main cause for the decreased service life of concrete structures. An original and promising way to repair cracks is to pre-incorporate healing agents inside the concrete matrix to heal cracks the moment they appear. Thus, the concrete obtains self-healing properties. The goal of our research is to apply bacterially precipitated CaCO₃ to heal cracks in concrete since the microbial calcium carbonate is more compatible with the concrete matrix and more environmentally friendly relative to the normally used polymeric materials. Diatomaceous earth (DE) was used in this study to protect bacteria from the high-pH environment of concrete. The experimental results showed that DE had a very good protective effect for bacteria. DE immobilized bacteria had much higher ureolytic activity (12-17 g/l urea was decomposed within 3 days) than that of un-immobilized bacteria (less than 1 g/l urea was decomposed within the same time span) in cement slurry. The optimal concentration of DE for immobilization was 60% (w/v, weight of DE/volume of bacterial suspension). Self-healing in cracked specimens was visualized under light microscopy. The images showed that cracks with a width ranging from 0.15 to 0.17 mm in the specimens containing DE immobilized bacteria were completely filled by the precipitation. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) were used to characterize the precipitation around the crack wall, which was confirmed to be calcium carbonate. The result from a capillary water absorption test showed that the specimens with DE immobilized bacteria had the lowest water absorption (30% of the reference ones), which indicated that the precipitation inside the cracks increased the water penetration resistance of the cracked specimens.

  20. Asteroid Return Mission Feasibility Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brophy, John R.; Gershman, Robert; Landau, Damon; Polk, James; Porter, Chris; Yeomans, Don; Allen, Carlton; Williams, Willie; Asphaug, Erik

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes an investigation into the technological feasibility of finding, characterizing, robotically capturing, and returning an entire Near-Earth Asteroid (NEA) to the International Space Station (ISS) for scientific investigation, evaluation of its resource potential, determination of its internal structure and other aspects important for planetary defense activities, and to serve as a testbed for human operations in the vicinity of an asteroid. Reasonable projections suggest that several dozen candidates NEAs in the size range of interest (approximately 2-m diameter) will be known before the end of the decade from which a suitable target could be selected. The conceptual mission objective is to return an approximately 10,000-kg asteroid to the ISS in a total flight time of approximately 5 years using a single Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicle. Preliminary calculations indicate that this could be accomplished using a solar electric propulsion (SEP) system with high-power Hall thrusters and a maximum power into the propulsion system of approximately 40 kW. The SEP system would be used to provide all of the post-launch delta V. The asteroid would have an unrestricted Earth return Planetary Protection categorization, and would be curated at the ISS where numerous scientific and resource utilization experiments would be conducted. Asteroid material brought to the ground would be curated at the NASA Johnson Space Center. This preliminary study identified several areas where additional work is required, but no show stoppers were identified for the approach that would return an entire 10,000-kg asteroid to the ISS in a mission that could be launched by the end of this decade.

  1. Mars sample return mission architectures utilizing low thrust propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derz, Uwe; Seboldt, Wolfgang

    2012-08-01

    The Mars sample return mission is a flagship mission within ESA's Aurora program and envisioned to take place in the timeframe of 2020-2025. Previous studies developed a mission architecture consisting of two elements, an orbiter and a lander, each utilizing chemical propulsion and a heavy launcher like Ariane 5 ECA. The lander transports an ascent vehicle to the surface of Mars. The orbiter performs a separate impulsive transfer to Mars, conducts a rendezvous in Mars orbit with the sample container, delivered by the ascent vehicle, and returns the samples back to Earth in a small Earth entry capsule. Because the launch of the heavy orbiter by Ariane 5 ECA makes an Earth swing by mandatory for the trans-Mars injection, its total mission time amounts to about 1460 days. The present study takes a fresh look at the subject and conducts a more general mission and system analysis of the space transportation elements including electric propulsion for the transfer. Therefore, detailed spacecraft models for orbiters, landers and ascent vehicles are developed. Based on that, trajectory calculations and optimizations of interplanetary transfers, Mars entries, descents and landings as well as Mars ascents are carried out. The results of the system analysis identified electric propulsion for the orbiter as most beneficial in terms of launch mass, leading to a reduction of launch vehicle requirements and enabling a launch by a Soyuz-Fregat into GTO. Such a sample return mission could be conducted within 1150-1250 days. Concerning the lander, a separate launch in combination with electric propulsion leads to a significant reduction of launch vehicle requirements, but also requires a large number of engines and correspondingly a large power system. Therefore, a lander performing a separate chemical transfer could possibly be more advantageous. Alternatively, a second possible mission architecture has been developed, requiring only one heavy launch vehicle (e.g., Proton). In that

  2. Mars Sample Return: Launch and Detection Strategies for Orbital Rendezvous

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woolley, Ryan C.; Mattingly, Richard L.; Riedel, Joseph E.; Sturm, Erick J.

    2011-01-01

    This study sets forth conceptual mission design strategies for the ascent and rendezvous phase of the proposed NASA/ESA joint Mars Sample Return Campaign. The current notional mission architecture calls for the launch of an acquisition/ caching rover in 2018, an Earth return orbiter in 2022, and a fetch rover with ascent vehicle in 2024. Strategies are presented to launch the sample into a nearly coplanar orbit with the Orbiter which would facilitate robust optical detection, orbit determination, and rendezvous. Repeating ground track orbits existat 457 and 572 km which would provide multiple launch opportunities with similar geometries for detection and rendezvous.

  3. Guidance Concept for a Mars Ascent Vehicle First Stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Queen, Eric M.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents a guidance concept for use on the first stage of a Mars Ascent Vehicle (MAV). The guidance is based on a calculus of variations approach similar to that used for the final phase of the Apollo Earth return guidance. A three degree-of-freedom (3DOF) Monte Carlo simulation is used to evaluate performance and robustness of the algorithm.

  4. Dr. von Braun With a Model of a Launch Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1950-01-01

    Dr. von Braun stands beside a model of the upper stage (Earth-returnable stage) of the three-stage launch vehicle built for the series of the motion picture productions of space flight produced by Walt Disney in the mid-1950's.

  5. Mars Sample Return Architecture Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, C. D.; Vijendran, S.

    2018-04-01

    NASA and ESA are exploring potential concepts for a Sample Retrieval Lander and Earth Return Orbiter that could return samples planned to be collected and cached by the Mars 2020 rover mission. We provide an overview of the Mars Sample Return architecture.

  6. Advanced transportation system study: Manned launch vehicle concepts for two way transportation system payloads to LEO. Program cost estimates document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, James B.

    1993-01-01

    This report describes Rockwell International's cost analysis results of manned launch vehicle concepts for two way transportation system payloads to low earth orbit during the basic and option 1 period of performance for contract NAS8-39207, advanced transportation system studies. Vehicles analyzed include the space shuttle, personnel launch system (PLS) with advanced launch system (ALS) and national launch system (NLS) boosters, foreign launch vehicles, NLS-2 derived launch vehicles, liquid rocket booster (LRB) derived launch vehicle, and cargo transfer and return vehicle (CTRV).

  7. Arc Jet Testing of Carbon Phenolic for Mars Sample Return and Future NASA Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laub, Bernard; Chen, Yih-Kanq; Skokova, Kristina; Delano, Chad

    2004-01-01

    The objective of the Mars Sample Return (MSR) Mission is to return a sample of MArtian soil to Earth. The Earth Entry Vehicle (EEV) brings te samples through the atmosphere to the ground.The program aims to: Model aerothermal environment during EEV flight; On the basis of results, select potential TPS materials for EEV forebody; Fabricate TPS materials; Test the materials in the arc jet environment representative of predicted flight environment;Evaluate material performance; Compare results of modeling predictions with test results.

  8. Rocket-powered single-stage-to-orbit vehicles for safe economical access to low earth orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, D. G.; Davis, E. E.; Bangsund, E. L.

    1991-10-01

    Rocket-powered SSTO vehicles were investigated during the SSTO technology demonstration contracts. Vehicle configurations were defined to include various technology concepts such as advanced rocket or air breathing engines, takeoff assist options, and advanced high temperature structural materials. Results of these investigations are summarized and performance and turnaround data are presented.

  9. Vehicle fuel system

    DOEpatents

    Risse, John T.; Taggart, James C.

    1976-01-01

    A vehicle fuel system comprising a plurality of tanks, each tank having a feed and a return conduit extending into a lower portion thereof, the several feed conduits joined to form one supply conduit feeding fuel to a supply pump and using means, unused fuel being returned via a return conduit which branches off to the several return conduits.

  10. Aerodynamics of Stardust Sample Return Capsule

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitcheltree, R. A.; Wilmoth, R. G.; Cheatwood, F. M.; Brauckmann, G. J.; Greene, F. A.

    1997-01-01

    Successful return of interstellar dust and cometary material by the Stardust Sample Return Capsule requires an accurate description of the Earth entry vehicle's aerodynamics. This description must span the hypersonic-rarefied, hypersonic-continuum, supersonic, transonic, and subsonic flow regimes. Data from numerous sources are compiled to accomplish this objective. These include Direct Simulation Monte Carlo analyses, thermochemical nonequilibrium computational fluid dynamics, transonic computational fluid dynamics, existing wind tunnel data, and new wind tunnel data. Four observations are highlighted: 1) a static instability is revealed in the free-molecular and early transitional-flow regime due to aft location of the vehicle s center-of-gravity, 2) the aerodynamics across the hypersonic regime are compared with the Newtonian flow approximation and a correlation between the accuracy of the Newtonian flow assumption and the sonic line position is noted, 3) the primary effect of shape change due to ablation is shown to be a reduction in drag, and 4) a subsonic dynamic instability is revealed which will necessitate either a change in the vehicle s center-of-gravity location or the use of a stabilizing drogue parachute.

  11. Aeroassist Key to Returning From Space and the Case for AFE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Louis J.; Putnam, Terrill W.; Morris, Robert

    1997-01-01

    The Aeroassist Flight Experiment (AFE) is important in the development of a substantial and cost-competitive space industry. It is a research program to develop the technology base needed to design a new class of advanced entry vehicles that will play a key role in establishing a mature U.S. space presence in the next century. A dynamic and economical space program in the 21st century will include many operations involving the return of satellites, materials, and products from high Earth orbits (HEO), lunar bases, and planetary missions. The common and dominant characteristics of vehicles returning from such missions will be their very high speed as they approach the Earth. This high speed must be reduced substantially before the returning vehicle can be landed safely on Earth or placed in low Earth orbit (LEO), where the Space Shuttle operates now and the Space Station Freedom will operate in the future. LEO is a strategic that will always play a critical role in any space program. Its location just beyond earth's appreciable atmosphere can be reached from earth with the lowest cost in energy, and it is the natural and convenient spaceport location. In the next century LEO will contain a broad complex of assembly, research, repair, and production facilities. Their effective and cost-competitive use will require a class of routine workhorse transportation vehicles whose importance might be over-looked at a time when dramatic space exploration is occurring. Yet it is these vehicles, the Aeroassisted Space Transfer Vehicles (ASTV's) that will provide that solid transportation base on which a productive space industry will grow. The ASTV's will be assembled in orbit and will never return to earth's surface. They will be used to transfer people and material from high locations to LEO. They will reduce their high velocities in the outer reaches of the earth's atmosphere where aerodynamic drag will slow them to the appropriate speed for LEO. They will then maneuver out

  12. Strutjet-powered reusable launch vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siebenhaar, A.; Bulman, M. J.; Sasso, S. E.; Schnackel, J. A.

    1994-01-01

    Martin Marietta and Aerojet are co-investigating the feasibility and viability of reusable launch vehicle designs. We are assessing two vehicle concepts, each delivering 8000 lb to a geosynchronous transfer orbit (GTO). Both accomplish this task as a two-state system. The major difference between the two concepts is staging. The first concept, the two-stage-to-orbit (TSTO) system, stages at about 16 kft/sec, allowing immediate return of the first stage to the launch site using its airbreathing propulsion system for a powered cruise flight. The second concept, the single-stage-to-orit (SSTO) system, accomplishes stage separation in a stable low earth orbit (LEO).

  13. Crew Exploration Vehicle Service Module Ascent Abort Coverage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tedesco, Mark B.; Evans, Bryan M.; Merritt, Deborah S.; Falck, Robert D.

    2007-01-01

    The Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) is required to maintain continuous abort capability from lift off through destination arrival. This requirement is driven by the desire to provide the capability to safely return the crew to Earth after failure scenarios during the various phases of the mission. This paper addresses abort trajectory design considerations, concept of operations and guidance algorithm prototypes for the portion of the ascent trajectory following nominal jettison of the Launch Abort System (LAS) until safe orbit insertion. Factors such as abort system performance, crew load limits, natural environments, crew recovery, and vehicle element disposal were investigated to determine how to achieve continuous vehicle abort capability.

  14. Project Hyreus: Mars Sample Return Mission Utilizing in Situ Propellant Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruckner, A. P.; Thill, Brian; Abrego, Anita; Koch, Amber; Kruse, Ross; Nicholson, Heather; Nill, Laurie; Schubert, Heidi; Schug, Eric; Smith, Brian

    1993-01-01

    Project Hyreus is an unmanned Mars sample return mission that utilizes propellants manufactured in situ from the Martian atmosphere for the return voyage. A key goal of the mission is to demonstrate the considerable benefits of using indigenous resources and to test the viability of this approach as a precursor to manned Mars missions. The techniques, materials, and equipment used in Project Hyreus represent those that are currently available or that could be developed and readied in time for the proposed launch date in 2003. Project Hyreus includes such features as a Mars-orbiting satellite equipped with ground-penetrating radar, a large rover capable of sample gathering and detailed surface investigations, and a planetary science array to perform on-site research before samples are returned to Earth. Project Hyreus calls for the Mars Landing Vehicle to land in the Mangala Valles region of Mars, where it will remain for approximately 1.5 years. Methane and oxygen propellant for the Earth return voyage will be produced using carbon dioxide from the Martian atmosphere and a small supply of hydrogen brought from Earth. This process is key to returning a large Martian sample to Earth with a single Earth launch.

  15. Project Hyreus: Mars sample return mission utilizing in situ propellant production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abrego, Anita; Bair, Chris; Hink, Anthony; Kim, Jae; Koch, Amber; Kruse, Ross; Ngo, Dung; Nicholson, Heather; Nill, Laurie; Perras, Craig

    1993-01-01

    Project Hyreus is an unmanned Mars sample return mission that utilizes propellants manufactured in situ from the Martian atmosphere for the return voyage. A key goal of the mission is to demonstrate the considerable benefits of using indigenous resources and to test the viability of this approach as a precursor to manned Mars missions. The techniques, materials, and equipment used in Project Hyreus represent those that are currently available or that could be developed and readied in time for the proposed launch date in 2003. Project Hyreus includes such features as a Mars-orbiting satellite equipped with ground-penetrating radar, a large rover capable of sample gathering and detailed surface investigations, and a planetary science array to perform on-site research before samples are returned to Earth. Project Hyreus calls for the Mars Landing Vehicle to land in the Mangala Valles region of Mars, where it will remain for approximately 1.5 years. Methane and oxygen propellant for the Earth return voyage will be produced using carbon dioxide from the Martian atmosphere and a small supply of hydrogen brought from Earth. This process is key to returning a large Martian sample to Earth with a single Earth launch.

  16. Local Observability Analysis of Star Sensor Installation Errors in a SINS/CNS Integration System for Near-Earth Flight Vehicles

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yanqiang; Zhang, Chunxi; Lu, Jiazhen

    2017-01-01

    Strapdown inertial navigation system/celestial navigation system (SINS/CNS) integrated navigation is a fully autonomous and high precision method, which has been widely used to improve the hitting accuracy and quick reaction capability of near-Earth flight vehicles. The installation errors between SINS and star sensors have been one of the main factors that restrict the actual accuracy of SINS/CNS. In this paper, an integration algorithm based on the star vector observations is derived considering the star sensor installation error. Then, the star sensor installation error is accurately estimated based on Kalman Filtering (KF). Meanwhile, a local observability analysis is performed on the rank of observability matrix obtained via linearization observation equation, and the observable conditions are presented and validated. The number of star vectors should be greater than or equal to 2, and the times of posture adjustment also should be greater than or equal to 2. Simulations indicate that the star sensor installation error could be readily observable based on the maneuvering condition; moreover, the attitude errors of SINS are less than 7 arc-seconds. This analysis method and conclusion are useful in the ballistic trajectory design of near-Earth flight vehicles. PMID:28275211

  17. Local Observability Analysis of Star Sensor Installation Errors in a SINS/CNS Integration System for Near-Earth Flight Vehicles.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yanqiang; Zhang, Chunxi; Lu, Jiazhen

    2017-01-16

    Strapdown inertial navigation system/celestial navigation system (SINS/CNS) integrated navigation is a fully autonomous and high precision method, which has been widely used to improve the hitting accuracy and quick reaction capability of near-Earth flight vehicles. The installation errors between SINS and star sensors have been one of the main factors that restrict the actual accuracy of SINS/CNS. In this paper, an integration algorithm based on the star vector observations is derived considering the star sensor installation error. Then, the star sensor installation error is accurately estimated based on Kalman Filtering (KF). Meanwhile, a local observability analysis is performed on the rank of observability matrix obtained via linearization observation equation, and the observable conditions are presented and validated. The number of star vectors should be greater than or equal to 2, and the times of posture adjustment also should be greater than or equal to 2. Simulations indicate that the star sensor installation error could be readily observable based on the maneuvering condition; moreover, the attitude errors of SINS are less than 7 arc-seconds. This analysis method and conclusion are useful in the ballistic trajectory design of near-Earth flight vehicles.

  18. Mars Sample Return mission: Two alternate scenarios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Two scenarios for accomplishing a Mars Sample Return mission are presented herein. Mission A is a low cost, low mass scenario, while Mission B is a high technology, high science alternative. Mission A begins with the launch of one Titan IV rocket with a Centaur G' upper stage. The Centaur performs the trans-Mars injection burn and is then released. The payload consists of two lander packages and the Orbital Transfer Vehicle, which is responsible for supporting the landers during launch and interplanetary cruise. After descending to the surface, the landers deploy small, local rovers to collect samples. Mission B starts with 4 Titan IV launches, used to place the parts of the Planetary Transfer Vehicle (PTV) into orbit. The fourth launch payload is able to move to assemble the entire vehicle by simple docking routines. Once complete, the PTV begins a low thrust trajectory out from low Earth orbit, through interplanetary space, and into low Martian orbit. It deploys a communication satellite into a 1/2 sol orbit and then releases the lander package at 500 km altitude. The lander package contains the lander, the Mars Ascent Vehicle (MAV), two lighter than air rovers (called Aereons), and one conventional land rover. The entire package is contained with a biconic aeroshell. After release from the PTV, the lander package descends to the surface, where all three rovers are released to collect samples and map the terrain.

  19. Mars Sample Return Landed with Red Dragon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoker, Carol R.; Lemke, Lawrence G.

    2013-01-01

    A Mars Sample Return (MSR) mission is the highest priority science mission for the next decade as recommended by the recent Decadal Survey of Planetary Science. However, an affordable program to carry this out has not been defined. This paper describes a study that examined use of emerging commercial capabilities to land the sample return elements, with the goal of reducing mission cost. A team at NASA Ames examined the feasibility of the following scenario for MSR: A Falcon Heavy launcher injects a SpaceX Dragon crew capsule and trunk onto a Trans Mars Injection trajectory. The capsule is modified to carry all the hardware needed to return samples collected on Mars including a Mars Ascent Vehicle (MAV), an Earth Return Vehicle (ERV) and Sample Collection and Storage hardware. The Dragon descends to land on the surface of Mars using SuperSonic Retro Propulsion (SSRP) as described by Braun and Manning [IEEEAC paper 0076, 2005]. Samples are acquired and deliverd to the MAV by a prelanded asset, possibly the proposed 2020 rover. After samples are obtained and stored in the ERV, the MAV launches the sample-containing ERV from the surface of Mars. We examined cases where the ERV is delivered to either low Mars orbit (LMO), C3 = 0 (Mars escape), or an intermediate energy state. The ERV then provides the rest of the energy (delta V) required to perform trans-Earth injection (TEI), cruise, and insertion into a Moon-trailing Earth Orbit (MTEO). A later mission, possibly a crewed Dragon launched by a Falcon Heavy (not part of the current study) retrieves the sample container, packages the sample, and performs a controlled Earth re-entry to prevent Mars materials from accidentally contaminating Earth. The key analysis methods used in the study employed a set of parametric mass estimating relationships (MERs) and standard aerospace analysis software codes modified for the MAV class of launch vehicle to determine the range of performance parameters that produced converged

  20. The Earth & Moon

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-06-04

    During its flight, NASA’s Galileo spacecraft returned images of the Earth and Moon. Separate images of the Earth and Moon were combined to generate this view. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00342

  1. Crew Exploration Vehicle Ascent Abort Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, John B., Jr.; Madsen, Jennifer M.; Proud, Ryan W.; Merritt, Deborah S.; Sparks, Dean W., Jr.; Kenyon, Paul R.; Burt, Richard; McFarland, Mike

    2007-01-01

    One of the primary design drivers for NASA's Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) is to ensure crew safety. Aborts during the critical ascent flight phase require the design and operation of CEV systems to escape from the Crew Launch Vehicle and return the crew safely to the Earth. To accomplish this requirement of continuous abort coverage, CEV ascent abort modes are being designed and analyzed to accommodate the velocity, altitude, atmospheric, and vehicle configuration changes that occur during ascent. The analysis involves an evaluation of the feasibility and survivability of each abort mode and an assessment of the abort mode coverage. These studies and design trades are being conducted so that more informed decisions can be made regarding the vehicle abort requirements, design, and operation. This paper presents an overview of the CEV, driving requirements for abort scenarios, and an overview of current ascent abort modes. Example analysis results are then discussed. Finally, future areas for abort analysis are addressed.

  2. The Mission Accessibility of Near-Earth Asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbee, Brent W.; Abell, Paul A.; Adamo, Daniel R.; Mazanek, Daniel D.; Johnson, Lindley N.; Yeomans, Donald K.; Chodas, Paul W.; Chamberlin, Alan B.; Benner, Lance A. M.; Taylor, Patrick; hide

    2015-01-01

    Astrodynamical Earth departure dates; mission v; mission duration; stay time; etc. Physical I NEO size(?); rotation rate; dust satellites environment; chemistry; etc. Architectural Launch vehicle(s); crew vehicle(s); habitat module(s); budget; etc. Operational Operations experience; abort options profiles; etc. Astrodynamical Accessibility is the starting point for understanding the options and opportunities available to us. Here we shall focus on. Astrodynamical Accessibility.2 Earth departure date between 2015-01-01 and 2040-12-31 Earth departure C3 60 km2s2. Total mission v 12 kms. The total v includes (1) the Earth departure maneuver from a 400 km altitude circular parking orbit, (2) the maneuver to match the NEAs velocity at arrival, (3) the maneuver to depart the NEA and, (4) if necessary, a maneuver to control the atmospheric re-entry speed during Earth return. Total round trip mission duration 450 days. Stay time at the NEA 8 days Earth atmospheric entry speed 12 kms at an altitude of 125 km. A near-Earth asteroid (NEA) that offers at least one trajectory solution meeting those criteria is classified as NHATS-compliant.

  3. A review of shock waves around aeroassisted orbital transfer vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, C.

    1986-01-01

    Aeroassisted orbital transfer vehicles (AOTVs) are a proposed type of reusable spacecraft that would be used to transport cargoes from one earth-bound orbit to another. Such vehicles could be based on the proposed space station and used to transport commercial satellites from the space station to geostationary orbits or to polar orbits and return. During a mission, AOTVs would fly through earth's atmosphere, thus generating aerodynamic forces that could be used for decelerating the vehicles or changing their direction. AOTV research findings were concerned with the shock-wave-induced, high-temperature airflows that would be produced around these vehicles during atmospheric flight. Special emphasis was placed on the problems of: (1) the chemical physics of multitemperature, ionizing, nonequilibrium air flows, and (2) the dynamics of the flows in the base region of a blunt body with complex afterbody geometry.

  4. A review of shock waves around aeroassisted orbital transfer vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, C.

    1985-01-01

    Aeroassisted orbital transfer vehicles (AOTVs) are a proposed type of reusable spacecraft that would be used to transport cargoes from one Earth-bound orbit to another. Such vehicles could be based on the proposed space station and used to transport commercial satellites from the space station to geostationary orbits or to polar orbits and return. During a mission, AOTVs would fly through Earth's atmosphere, thus generating aerodynamic forces that could be used for decelerating the vehicles or changing their direction. AOTV research findings were concerned with the shock-wave-induced, high-temperature airflows that would be produced around these vehicles during atmospheric flight. Special emphasis was placed on the problems of: (1) the chemical physics of multitemperature, ionizing, nonequilibrium air flows, and (2) the dynamics of the flows in the base region of a blunt body with complex afterbody geometry.

  5. Aerospace Vehicle Design, Spacecraft Section. Final Project Reports. Volume 2; Project Groups 6-8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Three groups of student engineers in an aerospace vehicle design course present their designs for a vehicle that can be used to resupply the Space Station Freedam and provide emergency crew return to earth capability. The vehicle's requirements include a lifetime that exceeds six years, low cost, the capability for withstanding pressurization, launch, orbit, and reentry hazards, and reliability. The vehicle's subsystems are structures, communication and command data systems, attitude and articulation control, life support and crew systems, power and propulsion, reentry and recovery systems, and mission management, planning, and costing. Special attention is given to spacecraft communications.

  6. Aerospace Vehicle Design, Spacecraft Section. Volume 1: Project Groups 3-5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Three groups of student engineers in an aerospace vehicle design course present their designs for a vehicle that can be used to resupply the Space Station Freedom and provide an emergency crew return to earth capability. The vehicle's requirements include a lifetime that exceeds six years, low cost, the capability for withstanding pressurization, launch, orbit, and reentry hazards, and reliability. The vehicle's subsystems are analyzed. These subsystems are structures, communication and command data systems, attitude and articulation control, life support and crew systems, power and propulsion, reentry and recovery systems, and mission management, planning, and costing.

  7. 47 CFR 25.226 - Blanket licensing provisions for domestic, U.S. Vehicle-Mounted Earth Stations (VMESs) receiving...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... of VMESs in the 14.47-14.5 GHz (Earth-to-space) frequency band in the vicinity of radio astronomy... location, and the applicable coordination zone. Table 1—Applicable Radio Astronomy Service (RAS) Facilities... Astronomical Research Institute, Rosman, NC 35°11′59″ 82°52′19″ 160. U of Michigan Radio Astronomy Observatory...

  8. 47 CFR 25.226 - Blanket licensing provisions for domestic, U.S. Vehicle-Mounted Earth Stations (VMESs) receiving...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... of VMESs in the 14.47-14.5 GHz (Earth-to-space) frequency band in the vicinity of radio astronomy... location, and the applicable coordination zone. Table 1—Applicable Radio Astronomy Service (RAS) Facilities... Astronomical Research Institute, Rosman, NC 35°11′59″ 82°52′19″ 160. U of Michigan Radio Astronomy Observatory...

  9. 47 CFR 25.226 - Blanket Licensing provisions for domestic, U.S. Vehicle-Mounted Earth Stations (VMESs) receiving...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... in the 14.47-14.5 GHz (Earth-to-space) frequency band in the vicinity of radio astronomy service (RAS... coordination zone. Table 1—Applicable Radio Astronomy Service (RAS) Facilities and Associated Coordination..., Rosman, NC 35°11′59″ 82°52′19″ 160. U of Michigan Radio Astronomy Observatory, Stinchfield Woods, MI 42...

  10. 47 CFR 25.226 - Blanket licensing provisions for domestic, U.S. Vehicle-Mounted Earth Stations (VMESs) receiving...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... of VMESs in the 14.47-14.5 GHz (Earth-to-space) frequency band in the vicinity of radio astronomy... location, and the applicable coordination zone. Table 1—Applicable Radio Astronomy Service (RAS) Facilities... Astronomical Research Institute, Rosman, NC 35°11′59″ 82°52′19″ 160. U of Michigan Radio Astronomy Observatory...

  11. Sample Returns Missions in the Coming Decade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desai, Prasun N.; Mitcheltree, Robert A.; Cheatwood, F. McNeil

    2000-01-01

    In the coming decade, several missions will attempt to return samples to Earth from varying parts of the solar system. These samples will provide invaluable insight into the conditions present during the early formation of the solar system, and possibly give clues to how life began on Earth. A description of five sample return missions is presented (Stardust, Genesis, Muses-C. Mars Sample Return, and Comet Nucleus Sample Return). An overview of each sample return mission is given, concentrating particularly on the technical challenges posed during the Earth entry, descent, and landing phase of the missions. Each mission faces unique challenges in the design of an Earth entry capsule. The design of the entry capsule must address the aerodynamic, heating, deceleration, landing, and recovery requirements for the safe return of samples to Earth.

  12. Aerodynamic characteristics of proposed assured crew return capability (ACRC) configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ware, George M.; Spencer, Bernard, Jr.; Micol, John R.

    1989-01-01

    The aerodynamic characteristics of seven reentry configurations suggested as possible candidate vehicles to return crew members from the U.S. Space Station Freedom to earth has been reviewed. The shapes varied from those capable of purely ballistic entry to those capable of gliding entry and fromk parachute landing to conventional landing. Data were obtained from existing (published and unpublished) sources and from recent wind tunnel tests. The lifting concepts are more versatile and satisfy all the mission requirements. Two of the lifting shapes studied appear promising - a lifting body and a deployable wing concept. The choice of an ACRC concept, however, will be made after all factors involving transportation from earth to orbit and back to earth again have been weighed.

  13. Aerodynamic characteristics of proposed assured crew return capability (ACRC) configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ware, George M.; Spencer, Bernard, Jr.; Micol, John R.

    1989-07-01

    The aerodynamic characteristics of seven reentry configurations suggested as possible candidate vehicles to return crew members from the U.S. Space Station Freedom to earth has been reviewed. The shapes varied from those capable of purely ballistic entry to those capable of gliding entry and fromk parachute landing to conventional landing. Data were obtained from existing (published and unpublished) sources and from recent wind tunnel tests. The lifting concepts are more versatile and satisfy all the mission requirements. Two of the lifting shapes studied appear promising - a lifting body and a deployable wing concept. The choice of an ACRC concept, however, will be made after all factors involving transportation from earth to orbit and back to earth again have been weighed.

  14. Automated Mars surface sample return mission concepts for achievement of essential scientific objectives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, W. L.; Norton, H. N.; Darnell, W. L.

    1975-01-01

    Mission concepts were investigated for automated return to Earth of a Mars surface sample adequate for detailed analyses in scientific laboratories. The minimum sample mass sufficient to meet scientific requirements was determined. Types of materials and supporting measurements for essential analyses are reported. A baseline trajectory profile was selected for its low energy requirements and relatively simple implementation, and trajectory profile design data were developed for 1979 and 1981 launch opportunities. Efficient spacecraft systems were conceived by utilizing existing technology where possible. Systems concepts emphasized the 1979 launch opportunity, and the applicability of results to other opportunities was assessed. It was shown that the baseline missions (return through Mars parking orbit) and some comparison missions (return after sample transfer in Mars orbit) can be accomplished by using a single Titan III E/Centaur as the launch vehicle. All missions investigated can be accomplished by use of Space Shuttle/Centaur vehicles.

  15. Fast Calculation of Abort Return Trajectories for Manned Missions to the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Senent, Juan S.

    2010-01-01

    In order to support the anytime abort requirements of a manned mission to the Moon, the vehicle abort capabilities for the translunar and circumlunar phases of the mission must be studied. Depending on the location of the abort maneuver, the maximum return time to Earth and the available propellant, two different kinds of return trajectories can be calculated: direct and fly-by. This paper presents a new method to compute these return trajectories in a deterministic and fast way without using numerical optimizers. Since no simplifications of the gravity model are required, the resulting trajectories are very accurate and can be used for both mission design and operations. This technique has been extensively used to evaluate the abort capabilities of the Orion/Altair vehicles in the Constellation program for the translunar phase of the mission.

  16. Concept Study For A Near-term Mars Surface Sample Return Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, M. F.; Thatcher, J.; Sallaberger, C.; Reedman, T.; Pillinger, C. T.; Sims, M. R.

    The return of samples from the surface of Mars is a challenging problem. Present mission planning is for complex missions to return large, focused samples sometime in the next decade. There is, however, much scientific merit in returning a small sample of Martian regolith before the end of this decade at a fraction of the cost of the more ambitious missions. This paper sets out the key elements of this concept that builds on the work of the Beagle 2 project and space robotics work in Canada. The paper will expand the science case for returning a regolith sample that is only in the range of 50-250g but would nevertheless include plenty of interesting mate- rial as the regolith comprises soil grains from a wide variety of locations i.e. nearby rocks, sedimentary formations and materials moved by fluids, winds and impacts. It is possible that a fine core sample could also be extracted and returned. The mission concept is to send a lander sized at around 130kg on the 2007 or 2009 opportunity, immediately collect the sample from the surface, launch it to Mars orbit, collect it by the lander parent craft and make an immediate Earth return. Return to Earth orbit is envisaged rather than direct Earth re-entry. The lander concept is essen- tially a twice-size Beagle 2 carrying the sample collection and return capsule loading equipment plus the ascent vehicle. The return capsule is envisaged as no more than 1kg. An overall description of the mission along with methods for sample acquisition, or- bital rendezvous and capsule return will be outlined and the overall systems budgets presented. To demonstrate the near term feasibility of the mission, the use of existing Canadian and European technologies will be highlighted.

  17. Comet flyby sample return

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsou, P.; Albee, A.

    1985-01-01

    The results of a joint JPL/CSFC feasability study of a low-cost comet sample return flyby mission are presented. It is shown that the mission could be undertaken using current earth orbiter spacecraft technology in conjunction with pathfinder or beacon spacrcraft. Detailed scenarios of missions to the comets Honda-Mrkos-Pajdusakova (HMP), comet Kopff, and comet Giacobini-Zinner (GZ) are given, and some crossectional diagrams of the spacecraft designs are provided.

  18. Launch vehicle selection model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montoya, Alex J.

    1990-01-01

    Over the next 50 years, humans will be heading for the Moon and Mars to build scientific bases to gain further knowledge about the universe and to develop rewarding space activities. These large scale projects will last many years and will require large amounts of mass to be delivered to Low Earth Orbit (LEO). It will take a great deal of planning to complete these missions in an efficient manner. The planning of a future Heavy Lift Launch Vehicle (HLLV) will significantly impact the overall multi-year launching cost for the vehicle fleet depending upon when the HLLV will be ready for use. It is desirable to develop a model in which many trade studies can be performed. In one sample multi-year space program analysis, the total launch vehicle cost of implementing the program reduced from 50 percent to 25 percent. This indicates how critical it is to reduce space logistics costs. A linear programming model has been developed to answer such questions. The model is now in its second phase of development, and this paper will address the capabilities of the model and its intended uses. The main emphasis over the past year was to make the model user friendly and to incorporate additional realistic constraints that are difficult to represent mathematically. We have developed a methodology in which the user has to be knowledgeable about the mission model and the requirements of the payloads. We have found a representation that will cut down the solution space of the problem by inserting some preliminary tests to eliminate some infeasible vehicle solutions. The paper will address the handling of these additional constraints and the methodology for incorporating new costing information utilizing learning curve theory. The paper will review several test cases that will explore the preferred vehicle characteristics and the preferred period of construction, i.e., within the next decade, or in the first decade of the next century. Finally, the paper will explore the interaction

  19. Evaluating Core Quality for a Mars Sample Return Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, D. K.; Budney, C.; Shiraishi, L.; Klein, K.

    2012-01-01

    Sample return missions, including the proposed Mars Sample Return (MSR) mission, propose to collect core samples from scientifically valuable sites on Mars. These core samples would undergo extreme forces during the drilling process, and during the reentry process if the EEV (Earth Entry Vehicle) performed a hard landing on Earth. Because of the foreseen damage to the stratigraphy of the cores, it is important to evaluate each core for rock quality. However, because no core sample return mission has yet been conducted to another planetary body, it remains unclear as to how to assess the cores for rock quality. In this report, we describe the development of a metric designed to quantitatively assess the mechanical quality of any rock cores returned from Mars (or other planetary bodies). We report on the process by which we tested the metric on core samples of Mars analogue materials, and the effectiveness of the core assessment metric (CAM) in assessing rock core quality before and after the cores were subjected to shocking (g forces representative of an EEV landing).

  20. Technology requirements for advanced earth-orbital transportation systems, dual-mode propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haefeli, R. C.; Littler, E. G.; Hurley, J. B.; Winter, M. G.

    1977-01-01

    The application of dual-mode propulsion concepts to fully reusable single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO) vehicles is discussed. Dual-mode propulsion uses main rocket engines that consume hydrocarbon fuels as well as liquid hydrogen fuel. Liquid oxygen is used as the oxidizer. These engine concepts were integrated into transportation vehicle designs capable of vertical takeoff, delivering a payload to earth orbit, and return to earth with a horizontal landing. Benefits of these vehicles were assessed and compared with vehicles using single-mode propulsion (liquid hydrogen and oxygen engines). Technology requirements for such advanced transportation systems were identified. Figures of merit, including life-cycle cost savings and research costs, were derived for dual-mode technology programs, and were used for assessments of potential benefits of proposed technology activities. Dual-mode propulsion concepts display potential for significant cost and performance benefits when applied to SSTO vehicles.

  1. Google Earth as a Vehicle to Integrating Multiple Layers of Environmental Satellite Data for Weather and Science Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turk, F. J.; Miller, S. D.

    2007-12-01

    One of the main challenges facing current and future environmental satellite systems (e.g, the future National Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS)) is reaching and entraining the diverse user community via communication of how these systems address their particular needs. A necessary element to meeting this challenge is effective data visualization: facilitating the display, animation and layering of multiple satellite imaging and sounding sensors (providing complementary information) in a user-friendly and intuitive fashion. In light of the fact that these data are rapidly making their way into the classroom owing to efficient and timely data archival systems and dissemination over the Internet, there is a golden opportunity to leverage existing technology to introduce environmental science to wide spectrum of users. Google Earth's simplified interface and underlying markup language enables access to detailed global geographic information, and contains features which are both desirable and advantageous for geo-referencing and combining a wide range of environmental satellite data types. Since these satellite data are available with a variety of horizontal spatial resolutions (tens of km down to hundreds of meters), the imagery can be sub-setted (tiled) at a very small size. This allows low-bandwidth users to efficiently view and animate a sequence of imagery while zoomed out from the surface, whereas high-bandwidth users can efficiently zoom into the finest image resolution when viewing fine-scale phenomena such as fires, volcanic activity, as well as the details of meteorological phenomena such as hurricanes, rainfall, lightning, winds, etc. Dynamically updated network links allow for near real-time updates such that these data can be integrated with other Earth-hosted applications and exploited not only in the teaching environment, but also for operational users in the government and private industry sectors. To conceptualize how environmental

  2. MRV - Modular Robotic Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ridley, Justin; Bluethmann, Bill

    2015-01-01

    The Modular Robotic Vehicle, or MRV, completed in 2013, was developed at the Johnson Space Center in order to advance technologies which have applications for future vehicles both in space and on Earth. With seating for two people, MRV is a fully electric vehicle modeled as a "city car", suited for busy urban environments.

  3. Apollo 11 Earth Training Exercises

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    In preparation of the nation's first lunar landing mission, Apollo 11 crew members underwent training to practice activities they would be performing during the mission. In this photograph, taken at the Manned Spacecraft Center in Houston, Texas, an engineer, Bob Mason, donned in a space suit, goes through some of those training exercises on the mock lunar surface. He performed activites similar to those planned for astronauts Neil Armstrong and Edwin Aldrin during their moon walk. The Apollo 11 mission launched from the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Florida via the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) developed Saturn V launch vehicle on July 16, 1969 and safely returned to Earth on July 24, 1969. Aboard the space craft were astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, commander; Michael Collins, Command Module (CM) pilot; and Edwin E. (Buzz) Aldrin Jr., Lunar Module (LM) pilot. The CM, 'Columbia', piloted by Collins, remained in a parking orbit around the Moon while the LM, 'Eagle'', carrying astronauts Armstrong and Aldrin, landed on the Moon. On July 20, 1969, Armstrong was the first human to ever stand on the lunar surface, followed by Aldrin. During 2½ hours of surface exploration, the crew collected 47 pounds of lunar surface material for analysis back on Earth. With the success of Apollo 11, the national objective to land men on the Moon and return them safely to Earth had been accomplished.

  4. Logistics resupply and emergency crew return system for Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahne, D.; Caldwell, D.; Davis, K.; Delmedico, S.; Heinen, E.; Ismail, S.; Sumner, C.; Bock, J.; Buente, B.; Gliane, R.

    1989-01-01

    Sometime in the late 1990's, if all goes according to plan, Space Station Freedom will allow the United States and its cooperating partners to maintain a permanent presence in space. Acting as a scientific base of operations, it will also serve as a way station for future explorations of the Moon and perhaps even Mars. Systems onboard the station will have longer lifetimes, higher reliability, and lower maintenance requirements than seen on any previous space flight vehicle. Accordingly, the station will have to be resupplied with consumables (air, water, food, etc.) and other equipment changeouts (experiments, etc.) on a periodic basis. Waste materials and other products will also be removed from the station for return to Earth. The availability of a Logistics Resupply Module (LRM), akin to the Soviet's Progress vehicle, would help to accomplish these tasks. Riding into orbit on an expendable launch vehicle, the LRM would be configured to rendezvous autonomously and dock with the space station. After the module is emptied of its cargo, waste material from the space station would be loaded back into it. The module would then begin its descent to a recovery point on Earth. Logistics Resupply Modules could be configured in a variety of forms depending on the type of cargo being transferred. If the LRM's were cycled to the space station in such a way that at least one vehicle remained parked at the station at all times, the modules could serve double duty as crew emergency return capsules. A pressurized LRM could then bring two or more crew-persons requiring immediate return (because of health problems, system failure, or unavoidable catastrophes) back to Earth. Large cost savings would be accrued by combining the crew return function with a logistics resupply system.

  5. [Prediction of cardiac function deviations (ECG data) in the course of permanent cosmonaut's monitoring starting from selection till return to earth after short-duration space flight].

    PubMed

    Kotovskaia, A R; Koloteva, M I; Luk'ianiuk, V Iu; Stepanova, G P; Filatova, L M; Buĭlov, S P; Zhernavkov, A F; Kondratiuk, L L

    2007-01-01

    Analyzed were deviations in cardiac function in 29 cosmonauts with previous aviation and other occupations ranging of 29 to 61 y.o. who made 8- to 30-day space flights (totai number of flights = 34) between 1982 and 2006. The deviations were identified in ECG records collected during clinical selection, clinical physiological examination (CPE) before flight, insertion and deorbit in transport vehicles, and post-flight CPE. Based on the analysis, the cosmonauts were distributed into three groups. The first group (55.2% of the cosmonauts) did not exhibit noticeable shifts and unfavorable trends in ECG at any time of the period of observation. The second group (34.5%) showed some deviations during selection and pre-flight CPE that became more apparent in the period of deorbit and were still present in post-flight ECG records. The third group (10.3%) displayed health-threatening deviations in cardiac function during deorbit. These findings give start to important investigations with the purpose to define permissible medical risks and ensuing establishment and perfection of medical criteria for candidates to cosmonauts with certain health problems.

  6. Declining Returns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosen, Gerald H.; Perrin, Robert

    1992-01-01

    The Teachers Insurance and Annuities Association's (TIAA) College Retirement and Equity Fund is criticized for its low returns and its chief executive officer's recent salary raise. It is said to be in need of additional regulation and policyholder involvement. A TIAA vice president responds that the analysis given is inaccurate and misleading.…

  7. Putting Technology to Work in Science - How to Select Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) and their Instrumentation for Atmospheric and Earth Surface Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teller, Amit; Lange, Manfred; Ioannou, Stelios; Keleshis, Christos

    2010-05-01

    The Autonomous Flying Platforms for Atmospheric and Earth Surface Observations project (APAESO) of the Energy, Environment and Water Research Center (EEWRC) at the Cyprus Institute is aimed at the dual purpose of carrying out atmospheric and earth-surface observations in the Mediterranean. The APAESO platforms will offer the unique potential to determine physical, chemical and radiative atmospheric properties, aerosol and dust concentrations, atmospheric dynamics, surface morphology, vegetation and land use patterns as well as ocean surface properties (biology, waves, currents) and to carry out archaeological site reconnaissance and contaminant detection at high spatial resolution. The first phase of APAESO was dedicated to the preliminary design and the selection of an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) as the backbone of the APAESO infrastructure. Selection of a UAV suitable for the many research objectives as outlined above is challenging because the UAV technology is new and rapidly evolving. This notwithstanding, a very large number of systems, mostly utilized for defense purposes, are currently available. The major challenge in the selection process lies in considering the trade-off between different platform characteristics (e.g. payload weight, endurance, max. altitude for operation and price) and in optimizing the potential performance of the UAV. Based on the required characteristics for the UAV platform, a survey of possible UAVs and suitable sensors was prepared based on various data sources. We used an elimination process in order to consider only a few models for the final selection process out of about 1000 commercially available UAV models that were initially investigated. The presentation will discuss the main scientific objectives that determine the specification of the UAV platform, major considerations in selecting best available technology for our needs and will briefly describe the next phases of the project.

  8. TPS design for aerobraking at Earth and Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, S. D.; Gietzel, M. M.; Rochelle, W. C.; Curry, D. M.

    1991-08-01

    An investigation was made to determine the feasibility of using an aerobrake system for manned and unmanned missions to Mars, and to Earth from Mars and lunar orbits. A preliminary thermal protection system (TPS) was examined for five unmanned small nose radius, straight bi-conic vehicles and a scaled up Aeroassist Flight Experiment (AFE) vehicle aerocapturing at Mars. Analyses were also conducted for the scaled up AFE and an unmanned Sample Return Cannister (SRC) returning from Mars and aerocapturing into Earth orbit. Also analyzed were three different classes of lunar transfer vehicles (LTV's): an expendable scaled up modified Apollo Command Module (CM), a raked cone (modified AFT), and three large nose radius domed cylinders. The LTV's would be used to transport personnel and supplies between Earth and the moon in order to establish a manned base on the lunar surface. The TPS for all vehicles analyzed is shown to have an advantage over an all-propulsive velocity reduction for orbit insertion. Results indicate that TPS weight penalties of less than 28 percent can be achieved using current material technology, and slightly less than the most favorable LTV using advanced material technology.

  9. Effect of inert propellant injection on Mars ascent vehicle performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colvin, James E.; Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1992-01-01

    A Mars ascent vehicle is limited in performance by the propellant which can be brought from Earth. In some cases the vehicle performance can be improved by injecting inert gas into the engine, if the inert gas is available as an in-situ resource and does not have to be brought from Earth. Carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and argon are constituents of the Martian atmosphere which could be separated by compressing the atmosphere, without any chemical processing step. The effect of inert gas injection on rocket engine performance was analyzed with a numerical combustion code that calculated chemical equilibrium for engines of varying combustion chamber pressure, expansion ratio, oxidizer/fuel ratio, and inert injection fraction. Results of this analysis were applied to several candidate missions to determine how the required mass of return propellant needed in low Earth orbit could be decreased using inert propellant injection.

  10. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-08-23

    ISS024-E-016042 (23 Aug. 2010) --- This night time view captured by one of the Expedition 24 crew members aboard the International Space Station some 220 miles above Earth is looking southward from central Romania over the Aegean Sea toward Greece and it includes Thessaloniki (near center), the larger bright mass of Athens (left center), and the Macedonian capital of Skopje (lower right). Center point coordinates of the area pictured are 46.4 degrees north latitude and 25.5 degrees east longitude. The picture was taken in August and was physically brought back to Earth on a disk with the return of the Expedition 25 crew in November 2010.

  11. Autonomous Science Decision Making for Mars Sample Return

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roush, Ted L.; Gulick, V.; Morris, R.; Gazis, P.; Benedix, G.; Glymour, C.; Ramsey, J.; Pedersen, L.; Ruzon, M.; Buntine, W.; hide

    1999-01-01

    In the near future NASA intends to explore Mars in preparation for a sample return mission using robotic devices such as landers, rovers, orbiters, airplanes, and/or balloons. Such platforms will likely carry imaging devices to characterize the surface morphology, and a variety of analytical instruments intended to evaluate the chemical and mineralogical nature of the environment(s) that they encounter. Historically, mission operations have involved the following sequence of activities: (1) return of scientific data from the vehicle; (2) evaluation of the data by space scientists; (3) recommendations of the scientists regarding future mission activity; (4) transmission of commands to the vehicle to achieve this activity; and (5) new activity by the vehicle in response to those commands. This is repeated for the duration of the mission, with command opportunities once or perhaps twice per day. In a rapidly changing environment, such as might be encountered by a rover traversing hundreds of meters a day or an airplane soaring over several hundred of kilometers, this traditional cycle of data evaluation and commands is not amenable to rapid long range traverses, discovery of novelty, or rapid response to any unanticipated situations. In addition, to issues of response time, the nature of imaging and/or spectroscopic devices are such that tremendous data volumes can be acquired, for example during a traverse. These data volumes can rapidly exceed on-board memory capabilities prior to an opportunity to transmit it to Earth.

  12. Mars Sample Return Using Commercial Capabilities: ERV Trajectory and Capture Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faber, Nicolas F.; Foster, Cyrus James; Wilson, David; Gonzales, Andrew; Stoker, Carol R.

    2013-01-01

    Mars Sample Return was presented as the highest priority planetary science mission of the next decade [1]. Lemke et al. [2] present a Mars Sample Return mission concept in which the sample is returned directly from the surface of Mars to an Earth orbit. The sample is recovered in Earth Orbit instead of being transferred between spacecraft in Mars Orbit. This paper provides the details of this sample recovery in Earth orbit and presents as such a sub-element of the overall Mars sample return concept given in [2]. We start from the assumption that a Mars Ascent Vehicle (MAV), initially landed on Mars using a modified SpaceX Dragon capsule, has successfully delivered the sample, already contained within an Earth Return Vehicle (ERV), to a parking orbit around Mars. From the parking orbit, the ERV imparts sufficient Delta-V to inject itself into an earthbound trajectory and to be captured into an Earth orbit eventually. We take into account launch window and Delta-V considerations as well as the additional constraint of increased safety margins imposed by planetary protection regulations. We focus on how to overcome two distinct challenges of the sample return that are driven by the issues of planetary protection: (1) the design of an ERV trajectory meeting all the requirements including the need to avoid contamination of Earth's atmosphere; (2) the concept of operations for retrieving the Martian samples in Earth orbit in a safe way. We present an approach to retrieve the samples through a rendezvous between the ERV and a second SpaceX Dragon capsule. The ERV executes a trajectory that brings it from low Mars orbit (LMO) to a Moon-trailing Earth orbit at high inclination with respect to the Earth-Moon plane. After a first burn at Trans-Earth Injection (TEI), the trajectory uses a second burn at perigee during an Earth flyby maneuver to capture the ERV in Earth orbit. The ERV then uses a non-propulsive Moon flyby to come to a near-circular Moon-trailing orbit. To

  13. Study of sample drilling techniques for Mars sample return missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, D. C.; Harris, P. T.

    1980-01-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility of acquiring various surface samples for a Mars sample return mission the following tasks were performed: (1) design of a Mars rover-mounted drill system capable of acquiring crystalline rock cores; prediction of performance, mass, and power requirements for various size systems, and the generation of engineering drawings; (2) performance of simulated permafrost coring tests using a residual Apollo lunar surface drill, (3) design of a rock breaker system which can be used to produce small samples of rock chips from rocks which are too large to return to Earth, but too small to be cored with the Rover-mounted drill; (4)design of sample containers for the selected regolith cores, rock cores, and small particulate or rock samples; and (5) design of sample handling and transfer techniques which will be required through all phase of sample acquisition, processing, and stowage on-board the Earth return vehicle. A preliminary design of a light-weight Rover-mounted sampling scoop was also developed.

  14. Aerothermodynamic Environment Definition for the Genesis Sample Return Capsule

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheatwood, F. McNeil; Merski, N. Ronald, Jr.; Riley, Christopher J.; Mitcheltree, Robert A.

    2001-01-01

    NASA's Genesis sample return mission will be the first to return material from beyond the Earth-Moon system. NASA Langley Research Center supported this mission with aerothermodynamic analyses of the sample return capsule. This paper provides an overview of that effort. The capsule is attached through its forebody to the spacecraft bus. When the attachment is severed prior to Earth entry, forebody cavities remain. The presence of these cavities could dramatically increase the heating environment in their vicinity and downstream. A combination of computational fluid dynamics calculations and wind tunnel phosphor thermography tests were employed to address this issue. These results quantify the heating environment in and around the cavities, and were a factor in the decision to switch forebody heat shield materials. A transition map is developed which predicts that the flow aft of the penetrations will still be laminar at the peak heating point of the trajectory. As the vehicle continues along the trajectory to the peak dynamic pressure point, fully turbulent flow aft of the penetrations could occur. The integrated heat load calculations show that a heat shield sized to the stagnation point levels will be adequate for the predicted environment aft of the penetrations.

  15. A preliminary study of Mars rover/sample return missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The Solar System Exploration Committee (SSEC) of the NASA Advisory Council recommends that a Mars Sample Return mission be undertaken before the year 2000. Comprehensive studies of a Mars Sample Return mission have been ongoing since 1984. The initial focus of these studies was an integrated mission concept with the surface rover and sample return vehicle elements delivered to Mars on a single launch and landed together. This approach, to be carried out as a unilateral U.S. initiative, is still a high priority goal in an Augmented Program of exploration, as the SSEC recommendation clearly states. With this background of a well-understood mission concept, NASA decided to focus its 1986 study effort on a potential opportunity not previously examined; namely, a Mars Rover/Sample Return (MRSR) mission which would involve a significant aspect of international cooperation. As envisioned, responsibility for the various mission operations and hardware elements would be divided in a logical manner with clearly defined and acceptable interfaces. The U.S. and its international partner would carry out separately launched but coordinated missions with the overall goal of accomplishing in situ science and returning several kilograms of surface samples from Mars. Important considerations for implementation of such a plan are minimum technology transfer, maximum sharing of scientific results, and independent credibility of each mission role. Under the guidance and oversight of a Mars Exploration Strategy Advisory Group organized by NASA, a study team was formed in the fall of 1986 to develop a preliminary definition of a flight-separable, cooperative mission. The selected concept assumes that the U.S. would undertake the rover mission with its sample collection operations and our international partner would return the samples to Earth. Although the inverse of these roles is also possible, this study report focuses on the rover functions of MRSR because rover operations have not

  16. Mars Orbiter Sample Return Power Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mardesich, N.; Dawson, S.

    2005-01-01

    Mars has greatly intrigued scientists and the general public for many years because, of all the planets, its environment is most like Earth's. Many scientists believe that Mars once had running water, although surface water is gone today. The planet is very cold with a very thin atmosphere consisting mainly of CO2. Mariner 4, 6, and 7 explored the planet in flybys in the 1960s and by the orbiting Mariner 9 in 1971. NASA then mounted the ambitious Viking mission, which launched two orbiters and two landers to the planet in 1975. The landers found ambiguous evidence of life. Mars Pathfinder landed on the planet on July 4, 1997, delivering a mobile robot rover that demonstrated exploration of the local surface environment. Mars Global Surveyor is creating a highest-resolution map of the planet's surface. These prior and current missions to Mars have paved the way for a complex Mars Sample Return mission planned for 2003 and 2005. Returning surface samples from Mars will necessitate retrieval of material from Mars orbit. Sample mass and orbit are restricted to the launch capability of the Mars Ascent Vehicle. A small sample canister having a mass less than 4 kg and diameter of less than 16 cm will spend from three to seven years in a 600 km orbit waiting for retrieval by a second spacecraft consisting of an orbiter equipped with a sample canister retrieval system, and a Earth Entry Vehicle. To allow rapid detection of the on-orbit canister, rendezvous, and collection of the samples, the canister will have a tracking beacon powered by a surface mounted solar array. The canister must communicate using RF transmission with the recovery vehicle that will be coming in 2006 or 2009 to retrieve the canister. This paper considers the aspect and conclusion that went into the design of the power system that achieves the maximum power with the minimum risk. The power output for the spherical orbiting canister was modeled and plotted in various views of the orbit by the Satellite

  17. A Mars Sample Return Sample Handling System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, David; Stroker, Carol

    2013-01-01

    alloy caps [5] if the heating does not affect the sample, or by crimping caps similar to bottle capping. We prefer cap sealing surfaces be external to the cup rim to prevent sample dust inside the cups interfering with sealing, or, contamination of the sample by Teflon seal elements (if adopted). Finally the sample collection rover, or a Fetch rover, selects cups with best choice samples and loads them into a sample tray, before delivering it to the Earth Return Vehicle (ERV) in the MSR Dragon capsule as described in [1] (Fig 1). This ensures best use of the MSR payload mass allowance. A 3 meter long jointed robot arm is extended from the Dragon capsule's crew hatch, retrieves the sample tray and inserts it into the sample canister payload located on the ERV stage. The robot arm has capacity to obtain grab samples in the event of a rover failure. The sample canister has a robot arm capture casting to enable capture by crewed or robot spacecraft when it returns to Earth orbit

  18. Martian Chemical and Isotopic Reference Standards in Earth-based Laboratories — An Invitation for Geochemical, Astrobiological, and Engineering Dialog on Considering a Weathered Chondrite for Mars Sample Return.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashley, J. W.; Tait, A. W.; Velbel, M. A.; Boston, P. J.; Carrier, B. L.; Cohen, B. A.; Schröder, C.; Bland, P.

    2017-12-01

    Exogenic rocks (meteorites) found on Mars 1) have unweathered counterparts on Earth; 2) weather differently than indigenous rocks; and 3) may be ideal habitats for putative microorganisms and subsequent biosignature preservation. These attributes show the potential of meteorites for addressing hypothesis-driven science. They raise the question of whether chondritic meteorites, of sufficient weathering intensity, might be considered as candidates for sample return in a potential future mission. Pursuant to this discussion are the following questions. A) Is there anything to be learned from the laboratory study of a martian chondrite that cannot be learned from indigenous materials; and if so, B) is the science value high enough to justify recovery? If both A and B answer affirmatively, then C) what are the engineering constraints for sample collection for Mars 2020 and potential follow-on missions; and finally D) what is the likelihood of finding a favorable sample? Observations relevant to these questions include: i) Since 2005, 24 candidate and confirmed meteorites have been identified on Mars at three rover landing sites, demonstrating their ubiquity and setting expectations for future finds. All have been heavily altered by a variety of physical and chemical processes. While the majority of these are irons (not suitable for recovery), several are weathered stony meteorites. ii) Exogenic reference materials provide the only chemical/isotope standards on Mars, permitting quantification of alteration rates if residence ages can be attained; and possibly enabling the removal of Late Amazonian weathering overprints from other returned samples. iii) Recent studies have established the habitability of chondritic meteorites with terrestrial microorganisms, recommending their consideration when exploring astrobiological questions. High reactivity, organic content, and permeability show stony meteorites to be more attractive for colonization and subsequent biosignature

  19. Earth Science

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1991-01-01

    In July 1990, the Marshall Space Flight Center, in a joint project with the Department of Defense/Air Force Space Test Program, launched the Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES) using an Atlas I launch vehicle. The mission was designed to study the effects of artificial ion clouds produced by chemical releases on the Earth's ionosphere and magnetosphere, and to monitor the effects of space radiation environment on sophisticated electronics.

  20. Options for human ``return to the moon'' using tomorrow's SSTO, ISRU, and LOX-augmented NTR technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borowski, Stanley K.

    1996-03-01

    The feasibility of conducting human missions to the Moon is examined assuming the use of three ``high leverage'' technologies: (1) a single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO) launch vehicle, (2) ``in-situ'' resource utilization (ISRU)—specifically ``lunar-derived'' liquid oxygen (LUNOX), and (3) LOX-augmented nuclear thermal rocket (LANTR) propulsion. Lunar transportation system elements consisting of a LANTR-powered lunar transfer vehicle (LTV) and a chemical propulsion lunar landing/Earth return vehicle (LERV) are configured to fit within the ``compact'' dimensions of the SSTO cargo bay (diameter: 4.6 m/length: 9.0 m) while satisfying an initial mass in low Earth orbit (IMLEO) limit of ˜60 t (3 SSTO launches). Using ˜8 t of LUNOX to ``reoxidize'' the LERV for a ``direct return'' flight to Earth reduces its size and mass allowing delivery to LEO on a single 20 t SSTO launch. Similarly, the LANTR engine's ability to operate at any oxygen/hydrogen mixture ratio from 0 to 7 with high specific impulse (˜940 to 515 s) is exploited to reduce hydrogen tank volume, thereby improving packaging of the LANTR LTV's ``propulsion'' and ``propellant modules''. Expendable and reusable, piloted and cargo missions and vehicle designs are presented along with estimates of LUNOX production required to support the different mission modes.

  1. Equilibrium radiative heating tables for Earth entry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutton, Kenneth; Hartung, Lin C.

    1990-05-01

    The recent resurgence of interest in blunt-body atmospheric entry for applications such as aeroassisted orbital transfer and planetary return has engendered a corresponding revival of interest in radiative heating. Radiative heating may be of importance in these blunt-body flows because of the highly energetic shock layer around the blunt nose. Sutton developed an inviscid, stagnation point, radiation coupled flow field code for investigating blunt-body atmospheric entry. The method has been compared with ground-based and flight data, and reasonable agreement has been found. To provide information for entry body studies in support of lunar and Mars return scenarios of interest in the 1970's, the code was exercised over a matrix of Earth entry conditions. Recently, this matrix was extended slightly to reflect entry vehicle designs of current interest. Complete results are presented.

  2. Returned Solar Max hardware degradation study results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Triolo, Jack J.; Ousley, Gilbert W.

    1989-01-01

    The Solar Maximum Repair Mission returned with the replaced hardware that had been in low Earth orbit for over four years. The materials of this returned hardware gave the aerospace community an opportunity to study the realtime effects of atomic oxygen, solar radiation, impact particles, charged particle radiation, and molecular contamination. The results of these studies are summarized.

  3. A study of flight control requirements for advanced, winged, earth-to-orbit vehicles with far-aft center-of-gravity locations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hepler, A. K.; Zeck, H.; Walker, W. H.; Polack, A.

    1982-01-01

    Control requirements of Controlled Configured Design Approach vehicles with far-aft center of gravity locations are studied. The baseline system investigated is a fully reusable vertical takeoff/horizontal landing single stage-to-orbit vehicle with mission requirements similar to that of the space shuttle vehicle. Evaluations were made to determine dynamic stability boundaries, time responses, trim control, operational center-of-gravity limits, and flight control subsystem design requirements. Study tasks included a baseline vehicle analysis, an aft center of gravity study, a payload size study, and a technology assessment.

  4. Earth Day 2018 Activities

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2018-04-18

    Employees discuss one of the electric vehicles on display during Kennedy Space Center’s annual Earth Day celebration. The two-day event featured approximately 50 exhibitors offering information on a variety of topics, including electric vehicles, sustainable lighting, renewable energy, Florida-friendly landscaping tips, Florida’s biking trails and more.

  5. Earth Day 2018 Activities

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2018-04-18

    An array of electric vehicles are on display for Kennedy Space Center employees during the center’s annual Earth Day celebration. The two-day event featured approximately 50 exhibitors offering information on a variety of topics, including electric vehicles, sustainable lighting, renewable energy, Florida-friendly landscaping tips, Florida’s biking trails and more.

  6. Earth Day 2018 Activities

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2018-04-18

    Employees had the opportunity to take a look under the hood of an electric vehicle on display during Kennedy Space Center’s annual Earth Day celebration. The two-day event featured approximately 50 exhibitors offering information on a variety of topics, including electric vehicles, sustainable lighting, renewable energy, Florida-friendly landscaping tips, Florida’s biking trails and more.

  7. Earth Day 2018 Activities

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2018-04-17

    During the annual Earth Day celebration at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex, guests have an opportunity to get an up-close look at experimental electric vehicles. The two-day event featured approximately 50 exhibitors offering information on a variety of topics, including electric vehicles, sustainable lighting, renewable energy, Florida-friendly landscaping tips, Florida’s biking trails and more.

  8. NASA needs a long-term sample return strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agee, C.

    Sample return missions, as demonstrated by Apollo, can have a huge payoff for plan- etary science. Beyond NASAAfs current Discovery missions, Stardust and Genesis, there are no future U.S. sample return missions on the books. At this juncture, it would be desirable for NASA to develop a coherent, long-term strategy for sample return missions to prime targets such as Mars, Venus, and other solar system bodies. The roster of missions planned for this decade in NASAAfs Mars Program no longer includes a sample return. Arguments against an early Mars sample return (MSR) in- clude the high cost, high risk, and not knowing the Agright placeAh on the Martian surface to sample. On the other hand, answering many of the key scientific questions about Mars, including the search for life, may require sample return. In lieu of MSR, NASA plans, out to 2009, a mix of orbital and landed missions that will perform re- mote and in-situ science at Mars. One approach to MSR that may lead to success in the opportunities beyond 2009 is a series of simple missions where large rovers and complex instruments are replaced by robust Mars ascent vehicles and lander-based sampling techniques. AgMobilityAh and Agsample diversityAh in these early reconnaissance sample return missions are accomplished by sending each mission to a distinctly different location based on our understanding of Martian geology prior to launch. The expected wealth of knowledge from these simple sample return missions will help guide Mars exploration beyond 2020. Venus sample return (VSR) should also be a high priority in NASAAfs exploration of the solar system. Our understanding of the Venusian surface is fragmentary at best and the mineralogy in unknown. We have no verified meteorites from Venus and thus radiometric ages of the crust do not exist. Venusian science best done on Earth from a VSR would include (1) precise isotopic measurements of atmospheric gases, soil, and rock, (2) age dating of rock, (3) trace element

  9. Apollo Seals: A Basis for the Crew Exploration Vehicle Seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finkbeiner, Joshua R.; Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr.; Steinetz, Bruce M.; Daniels, Christopher C.

    2006-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration is currently designing the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) as a replacement for the Space Shuttle for manned missions to the International Space Station, as a command module for returning astronauts to the moon, and as an earth reentry vehicle for the final leg of manned missions to the moon and Mars. The CEV resembles a scaled-up version of the heritage Apollo vehicle; however, the CEV seal requirements are different than those from Apollo because of its different mission requirements. A review is presented of some of the seals used on the Apollo spacecraft for the gap between the heat shield and backshell and for penetrations through the heat shield, docking hatches, windows, and the capsule pressure hull.

  10. Apollo Seals: A Basis for the Crew Exploration Vehicle Seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finkbeiner, Joshua R.; Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr.; Steinetz, Bruce M.; Daniels, Christopher C.

    2007-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration is currently designing the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) as a replacement for the Space Shuttle for manned missions to the International Space Station, as a command module for returning astronauts to the moon, and as an earth reentry vehicle for the final leg of manned missions to the moon and Mars. The CEV resembles a scaled-up version of the heritage Apollo vehicle; however, the CEV seal requirements are different than those from Apollo because of its different mission requirements. A review is presented of some of the seals used on the Apollo spacecraft for the gap between the heat shield and backshell and for penetrations through the heat shield, docking hatches, windows, and the capsule pressure hull.

  11. Illustration of Ares I and Ares V Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Named for the Greek god associated with Mars, the NASA developed Ares launch vehicles will return humans to the moon and later take them to Mars and other destinations. In this early illustration, the vehicle depicted on the left is the Ares I. Ares I is an inline, two-stage rocket configuration topped by the Orion crew vehicle and its launch abort system. In addition to its primary mission of carrying four to six member crews to Earth orbit, Ares I may also use its 25-ton payload capacity to deliver resources and supplies to the International Space Station (ISS), or to 'park' payloads in orbit for retrieval by other spacecraft bound for the moon or other destinations. The Ares I employs a single five-segment solid rocket booster, a derivative of the space shuttle solid rocket booster, for the first stage. A liquid oxygen/liquid hydrogen J-2X engine derived from the J-2 engine used on the second stage of the Apollo vehicle will power the Ares V second stage. The Ares I can lift more than 55,000 pounds to low Earth orbit. The vehicle illustrated on the right is the Ares V, a heavy lift launch vehicle that will use five RS-68 liquid oxygen/liquid hydrogen engines mounted below a larger version of the space shuttle external tank, and two five-segment solid propellant rocket boosters for the first stage. The upper stage will use the same J-2X engine as the Ares I. The Ares V can lift more than 286,000 pounds to low Earth orbit and stands approximately 360 feet tall. This versatile system will be used to carry cargo and the components into orbit needed to go to the moon and later to Mars. Both vehicles are subject to configuration changes before they are actually launched. This illustration reflects the latest configuration as of September 2006.

  12. Advanced APS impacts on vehicle payloads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Steven J.; Reed, Brian D.

    1989-01-01

    Advanced auxiliary propulsion system (APS) technology has the potential to both, increase the payload capability of earth-to-orbit (ETO) vehicles by reducing APS propellant mass, and simplify ground operations and logistics by reducing the number of fluids on the vehicle and eliminating toxic, corrosive propellants. The impact of integrated cryogenic APS on vehicle payloads is addressed. In this system, launch propulsion system residuals are scavenged from integral launch propulsion tanks for use in the APS. Sufficient propellant is preloaded into the APS to return to earth with margin and noncomplete scavenging assumed. No propellant conditioning is required by the APS, but ambient heat soak is accommodated. High temperature rocket materials enable the use of the unconditioned hydrogen/oxygen in the APS and are estimated to give APS rockets specific impulse of up to about 444 sec. The payload benefits are quantified and compared with an uprated monomethylhydrazine/nitrogen tetroxide system in a conservative fashion, by assuming a 25.5 percent weight growth for the hydrogen/oxygen system and a 0 percent weight growth for the uprated system. The combination of scavenging and high performance gives payload impacts which are highly mission specific. A payload benefit of 861 kg (1898 lbm) was estimated for a Space Station Freedom rendezvous mission and 2099 kg (4626 lbm) for a sortie mission, with payload impacts varying with the amount of launch propulsion residual propellants. Missions without liquid propellant scavenging were estimated to have payload penalties, however, operational benefits were still possible.

  13. Advanced APS Impacts on Vehicle Payloads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Steven J.; Reed, Brian D.

    1989-01-01

    Advanced auxiliary propulsion system (APS) technology has the potential to both, increase the payload capability of earth-to-orbit (ETO) vehicles by reducing APS propellant mass, and simplify ground operations and logistics by reducing the number of fluids on the vehicle and eliminating toxic, corrosive propellants. The impact of integrated cryogenic APS on vehicle payloads is addressed. In this system, launch propulsion system residuals are scavenged from integral launch propulsion tanks for use in the APS. Sufficient propellant is preloaded into the APS to return to earth with margin and noncomplete scavenging assumed. No propellant conditioning is required by the APS, but ambient heat soak is accommodated. High temperature rocket materials enable the use of the unconditioned hydrogen/oxygen in the APS and are estimated to give APS rockets specific impulse of up to about 444 sec. The payload benefits are quantified and compared with an uprated monomethyl hydrazine/nitrogen tetroxide system in a conservative fashion, by assuming a 25.5 percent weight growth for the hydrogen/oxygen system and a 0 percent weight growth for the uprated system. The combination and scavenging and high performance gives payload impacts which are highly mission specific. A payload benefit of 861 kg (1898 lbm) was estimated for a Space Station Freedom rendezvous mission and 2099 kg (4626 lbm) for a sortie mission, with payload impacts varying with the amount of launch propulsion residual propellants. Missions without liquid propellant scavenging were estimated to have payload penalties, however, operational benefits were still possible.

  14. Emergency-vehicle VHF antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, R. E.; Carlson, A. W.; Lewis, J.

    1977-01-01

    Helical VHF antenna mounts on roof of moving vehicle to communicate with distant stations via earth satellites. Antenna requires no pointing and can provide two-way communication while vehicle moves at high speed. Device has proved extremely successful in electrocardiogram transmission tests between medical services vehicle and hospital emergency room.

  15. Round-Trip Solar Electric Propulsion Missions for Mars Sample Return

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Zachary J.; Sturm, Erick J.; Kowalkowski, Theresa D.; Lock, Robert E.; Woolley, Ryan C.; Nicholas, Austin K.

    2014-01-01

    Mars Sample Return (MSR) missions could benefit from the high specific impulse of Solar Electric Propulsion (SEP) to achieve lower launch masses than with chemical propulsion. SEP presents formulation challenges due to the coupled nature of launch vehicle performance, propulsion system, power system, and mission timeline. This paper describes a SEP orbiter-sizing tool, which models spacecraft mass & timeline in conjunction with low thrust round-trip Earth-Mars trajectories, and presents selected concept designs. A variety of system designs are possible for SEP MSR orbiters, with large dry mass allocations, similar round-trip durations to chemical orbiters, and reduced design variability between opportunities.

  16. Earth Science

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1992-07-24

    A Delta II rocket carrying the Geomagnetic Tail Lab (GEOTAIL) spacecraft lifts off at Launch Complex 17, Kennedy Space Center (KSC) into a cloud-dappled sky. This liftoff marks the first Delta launch under the medium expendable launch vehicle services contract between NASA and McDonnell Douglas Space Systems Co. The GEOTAIL mission, a joint US/Japanese project, is the first in a series of five satellites to study the interactions between the Sun, the Earth's magnetic field, and the Van Allen radiation belts.

  17. Abort Options for Human Lunar Missions between Earth Orbit and Lunar Vicinity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Condon, Gerald L.; Senent, Juan S.; Llama, Eduardo Garcia

    2005-01-01

    Apollo mission design emphasized operational flexibility that supported premature return to Earth. However, that design was tailored to use expendable hardware for short expeditions to low-latitude sites and cannot be applied directly to an evolutionary program requiring long stay times at arbitrary sites. This work establishes abort performanc e requirements for representative onorbit phases of missions involvin g rendezvous in lunar-orbit, lunar-surface and at the Earth-Moon libr ation point. This study submits reference abort delta-V requirements and other Earth return data (e.g., entry speed, flight path angle) and also examines the effect of abort performance requirements on propul sive capability for selected vehicle configurations.

  18. Comet coma sample return instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albee, A. L.; Brownlee, Don E.; Burnett, Donald S.; Tsou, Peter; Uesugi, K. T.

    1994-01-01

    The sample collection technology and instrument concept for the Sample of Comet Coma Earth Return Mission (SOCCER) are described. The scientific goals of this Flyby Sample Return are to return to coma dust and volatile samples from a known comet source, which will permit accurate elemental and isotopic measurements for thousands of individual solid particles and volatiles, detailed analysis of the dust structure, morphology, and mineralogy of the intact samples, and identification of the biogenic elements or compounds in the solid and volatile samples. Having these intact samples, morphologic, petrographic, and phase structural features can be determined. Information on dust particle size, shape, and density can be ascertained by analyzing penetration holes and tracks in the capture medium. Time and spatial data of dust capture will provide understanding of the flux dynamics of the coma and the jets. Additional information will include the identification of cosmic ray tracks in the cometary grains, which can provide a particle's process history and perhaps even the age of the comet. The measurements will be made with the same equipment used for studying micrometeorites for decades past; hence, the results can be directly compared without extrapolation or modification. The data will provide a powerful and direct technique for comparing the cometary samples with all known types of meteorites and interplanetary dust. This sample collection system will provide the first sample return from a specifically identified primitive body and will allow, for the first time, a direct method of matching meteoritic materials captured on Earth with known parent bodies.

  19. Lightweight rovers for Mars science exploration and sample return

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenker, Paul S.; Sword, Lee F.; Ganino, A. J.; Bickler, Donald B.; Hickey, G. S.; Brown, D. K.; Baumgartner, Eric T.; Matthies, Larry H.; Wilcox, Brian H.; Balch, T.; Aghazarian, H.; Garrett, M. S.

    1997-09-01

    We report on the development of new mobile robots for Mars exploration missions. These 'lightweight survivable rover (LSR)' systems are of potential interest to both space and terrestrial applications, and are distinguished from more conventional designs by their use of new composite materials, collapsible running gear, integrated thermal-structural chassis, and other mechanical features enabling improved mobility and environmental robustness at reduced mass, volume, and power. Our first demonstrated such rover architecture, LSR-1, introduces running gear based on 2D composite struts and 3D machined composite joints, a novel collapsible hybrid composite-aluminum wheel design, a unit-body structural- thermal chassis with improved internal temperature isolation and stabilization, and a spot-pushbroom laser/CCD sensor enabling accurate, fast hazard detection and terrain mapping. LSR-1 is an approximately .7 $MIL 1.0 meter(Lambda) 2(W X L) footprint six-wheel (20 cm dia.) rocker-bogie geometry vehicle of approximately 30 cm ground clearance, weighing only 7 kilograms with an onboard .3 kilogram multi-spectral imager and spectroscopic photometer. By comparison, NASA/JPL's recently flown Mars Pathfinder rover Sojourner is an 11+ kilogram flight experiment (carrying a 1 kg APXS instrument) having approximately .45 X .6 meter(Lambda) 2(WXL) footprint and 15 cm ground clearance, and about half the warm electronics enclosure (WEE) volume with twice the diurnal temperature swing (-40 to +40 degrees Celsius) of LSR- 1 in nominal Mars environments. We are also developing a new, smaller 5 kilogram class LSR-type vehicle for Mars sample return -- the travel to, localization of, pick-up, and transport back to an Earth return ascent vehicle of a sample cache collected by earlier science missions. This sample retrieval rover R&D prototype has a completely collapsible mobility system enabling rover stowage to approximately 25% operational volume, as well an actively articulated axle

  20. Comet nucleus and asteroid sample return missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melton, Robert G.; Thompson, Roger C.; Starchville, Thomas F., Jr.; Adams, C.; Aldo, A.; Dobson, K.; Flotta, C.; Gagliardino, J.; Lear, M.; Mcmillan, C.

    1992-01-01

    During the 1991-92 academic year, the Pennsylvania State University has developed three sample return missions: one to the nucleus of comet Wild 2, one to the asteroid Eros, and one to three asteroids located in the Main Belt. The primary objective of the comet nucleus sample return mission is to rendezvous with a short period comet and acquire a 10 kg sample for return to Earth. Upon rendezvous with the comet, a tethered coring and sampler drill will contact the surface and extract a two-meter core sample from the target site. Before the spacecraft returns to Earth, a monitoring penetrator containing scientific instruments will be deployed for gathering long-term data about the comet. A single asteroid sample return mission to the asteroid 433 Eros (chosen for proximity and launch opportunities) will extract a sample from the asteroid surface for return to Earth. To limit overall mission cost, most of the mission design uses current technologies, except the sampler drill design. The multiple asteroid sample return mission could best be characterized through its use of future technology including an optical communications system, a nuclear power reactor, and a low-thrust propulsion system. A low-thrust trajectory optimization code (QuickTop 2) obtained from the NASA LeRC helped in planning the size of major subsystem components, as well as the trajectory between targets.

  1. OSIRIS-REx: Sample Return from Asteroid (101955) Bennu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauretta, D. S.; Balram-Knutson, S. S.; Beshore, E.; Boynton, W. V.; Drouet d'Aubigny, C.; DellaGiustina, D. N.; Enos, H. L.; Golish, D. R.; Hergenrother, C. W.; Howell, E. S.; Bennett, C. A.; Morton, E. T.; Nolan, M. C.; Rizk, B.; Roper, H. L.; Bartels, A. E.; Bos, B. J.; Dworkin, J. P.; Highsmith, D. E.; Lorenz, D. A.; Lim, L. F.; Mink, R.; Moreau, M. C.; Nuth, J. A.; Reuter, D. C.; Simon, A. A.; Bierhaus, E. B.; Bryan, B. H.; Ballouz, R.; Barnouin, O. S.; Binzel, R. P.; Bottke, W. F.; Hamilton, V. E.; Walsh, K. J.; Chesley, S. R.; Christensen, P. R.; Clark, B. E.; Connolly, H. C.; Crombie, M. K.; Daly, M. G.; Emery, J. P.; McCoy, T. J.; McMahon, J. W.; Scheeres, D. J.; Messenger, S.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Righter, K.; Sandford, S. A.

    2017-10-01

    In May of 2011, NASA selected the Origins, Spectral Interpretation, Resource Identification, and Security- Regolith Explorer (OSIRIS-REx) asteroid sample return mission as the third mission in the New Frontiers program. The other two New Frontiers missions are New Horizons, which explored Pluto during a flyby in July 2015 and is on its way for a flyby of Kuiper Belt object 2014 MU69 on January 1, 2019, and Juno, an orbiting mission that is studying the origin, evolution, and internal structure of Jupiter. The spacecraft departed for near-Earth asteroid (101955) Bennu aboard an United Launch Alliance Atlas V 411 evolved expendable launch vehicle at 7:05 p.m. EDT on September 8, 2016, on a seven-year journey to return samples from Bennu. The spacecraft is on an outbound-cruise trajectory that will result in a rendezvous with Bennu in November 2018. The science instruments on the spacecraft will survey Bennu to measure its physical, geological, and chemical properties, and the team will use these data to select a site on the surface to collect at least 60 g of asteroid regolith. The team will also analyze the remote-sensing data to perform a detailed study of the sample site for context, assess Bennu's resource potential, refine estimates of its impact probability with Earth, and provide ground-truth data for the extensive astronomical data set collected on this asteroid. The spacecraft will leave Bennu in 2021 and return the sample to the Utah Test and Training Range (UTTR) on September 24, 2023.

  2. Final design report of a personnel launch system and a family of heavy lift launch vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tupa, James; Merritt, Debbie; Riha, David; Burton, Lee; Kubinski, Russell; Drake, Kerry; Mann, Darrin; Turner, Ken

    1991-01-01

    The objective was to design both a Personnel Launch System (PLS) and a family of Heavy Lift Launch Vehicles (FHLLVs) that provide low cost and efficient operation in missions not suited for the Shuttle. The PLS vehicle is designed primarily for space station crew rotation and emergency crew return. The final design of the PLS vehicle and its interior is given. The mission of the FHLLVs is to place large, massive payloads into Earth orbit with payload flexibility being considered foremost in the design. The final design of three launch vehicles was found to yield a payload capacity range from 20 to 200 mt. These designs include the use of multistaged, high thrust liquid engines mounted on the core stages of the rocket.

  3. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The red NASA engine moves forward past the Vehicle Assembly Building with its cargo of containers enclosing segments of a solid rocket booster being returned to Utah for testing. The segments were part of the STS-114 stack. It is the first time actual flight segments that had been stacked for flight in the VAB are being returned for testing. They will undergo firing, which will enable inspectors to check the viability of the solid and verify the life expectancy for stacked segments.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-01-30

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The red NASA engine moves forward past the Vehicle Assembly Building with its cargo of containers enclosing segments of a solid rocket booster being returned to Utah for testing. The segments were part of the STS-114 stack. It is the first time actual flight segments that had been stacked for flight in the VAB are being returned for testing. They will undergo firing, which will enable inspectors to check the viability of the solid and verify the life expectancy for stacked segments.

  4. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis moves into high bay 4 of the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB). It was towed from the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) to allow work to be performed in the bay that can only be accomplished while it is empty. Work scheduled in the processing facility includes annual validation of the bay's cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms, and jack stands. Atlantis will remain in the VAB for about 10 days, then return to the OPF as work resumes to prepare it for launch in September 2004 on the first return-to-flight mission, STS-114.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-12-05

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis moves into high bay 4 of the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB). It was towed from the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) to allow work to be performed in the bay that can only be accomplished while it is empty. Work scheduled in the processing facility includes annual validation of the bay's cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms, and jack stands. Atlantis will remain in the VAB for about 10 days, then return to the OPF as work resumes to prepare it for launch in September 2004 on the first return-to-flight mission, STS-114.

  5. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis awaits a tow from the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) to the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB). The move will allow work to be performed in the OPF that can only be accomplished while the bay is empty. Work scheduled in the processing facility includes annual validation of the bay's cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms, and jack stands. Atlantis will remain in the VAB for about 10 days, then return to the OPF as work resumes to prepare it for launch in September 2004 on the first return-to-flight mission, STS-114.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-12-05

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis awaits a tow from the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) to the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB). The move will allow work to be performed in the OPF that can only be accomplished while the bay is empty. Work scheduled in the processing facility includes annual validation of the bay's cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms, and jack stands. Atlantis will remain in the VAB for about 10 days, then return to the OPF as work resumes to prepare it for launch in September 2004 on the first return-to-flight mission, STS-114.

  6. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis is turned into position outside the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) for its tow to the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB). The move will allow work to be performed in the OPF that can only be accomplished while the bay is empty. Work scheduled in the processing facility includes annual validation of the bay's cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms, and jack stands. Atlantis will remain in the VAB for about 10 days, then return to the OPF as work resumes to prepare it for launch in September 2004 on the first return-to-flight mission, STS-114.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-12-05

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis is turned into position outside the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) for its tow to the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB). The move will allow work to be performed in the OPF that can only be accomplished while the bay is empty. Work scheduled in the processing facility includes annual validation of the bay's cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms, and jack stands. Atlantis will remain in the VAB for about 10 days, then return to the OPF as work resumes to prepare it for launch in September 2004 on the first return-to-flight mission, STS-114.

  7. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis awaits transport from the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) to the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB). The move will allow work to be performed in the OPF that can only be accomplished while the bay is empty. Work scheduled in the processing facility includes annual validation of the bay's cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms, and jack stands. Atlantis will remain in the VAB for about 10 days, then return to the OPF as work resumes to prepare it for launch in September 2004 on the first return-to-flight mission, STS-114.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-12-05

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis awaits transport from the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) to the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB). The move will allow work to be performed in the OPF that can only be accomplished while the bay is empty. Work scheduled in the processing facility includes annual validation of the bay's cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms, and jack stands. Atlantis will remain in the VAB for about 10 days, then return to the OPF as work resumes to prepare it for launch in September 2004 on the first return-to-flight mission, STS-114.

  8. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Workers back the Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis out of the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) for its move to the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB). The move will allow work to be performed in the OPF that can only be accomplished while the bay is empty. Work scheduled in the processing facility includes annual validation of the bay's cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms, and jack stands. Atlantis will remain in the VAB for about 10 days, then return to the OPF as work resumes to prepare it for launch in September 2004 on the first return-to-flight mission, STS-114.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-12-05

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Workers back the Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis out of the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) for its move to the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB). The move will allow work to be performed in the OPF that can only be accomplished while the bay is empty. Work scheduled in the processing facility includes annual validation of the bay's cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms, and jack stands. Atlantis will remain in the VAB for about 10 days, then return to the OPF as work resumes to prepare it for launch in September 2004 on the first return-to-flight mission, STS-114.

  9. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis is moved into high bay 4 of the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB). It was towed from the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) to allow work to be performed in the bay that can only be accomplished while it is empty. Work scheduled in the processing facility includes annual validation of the bay's cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms, and jack stands. Atlantis will remain in the VAB for about 10 days, then return to the OPF as work resumes to prepare it for launch in September 2004 on the first return-to-flight mission, STS-114.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-12-05

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis is moved into high bay 4 of the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB). It was towed from the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) to allow work to be performed in the bay that can only be accomplished while it is empty. Work scheduled in the processing facility includes annual validation of the bay's cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms, and jack stands. Atlantis will remain in the VAB for about 10 days, then return to the OPF as work resumes to prepare it for launch in September 2004 on the first return-to-flight mission, STS-114.

  10. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Workers prepare to tow the Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis from the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) to the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB). The move will allow work to be performed in the OPF that can only be accomplished while the bay is empty. Work scheduled in the processing facility includes annual validation of the bay's cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms, and jack stands. Atlantis will remain in the VAB for about 10 days, then return to the OPF as work resumes to prepare it for launch in September 2004 on the first return-to-flight mission, STS-114.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-12-05

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Workers prepare to tow the Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis from the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) to the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB). The move will allow work to be performed in the OPF that can only be accomplished while the bay is empty. Work scheduled in the processing facility includes annual validation of the bay's cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms, and jack stands. Atlantis will remain in the VAB for about 10 days, then return to the OPF as work resumes to prepare it for launch in September 2004 on the first return-to-flight mission, STS-114.

  11. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis is moments away from a tow from the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) to the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB). The move will allow work to be performed in the OPF that can only be accomplished while the bay is empty. Work scheduled in the processing facility includes annual validation of the bay's cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms, and jack stands. Atlantis will remain in the VAB for about 10 days, then return to the OPF as work resumes to prepare it for launch in September 2004 on the first return-to-flight mission, STS-114.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-12-05

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis is moments away from a tow from the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) to the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB). The move will allow work to be performed in the OPF that can only be accomplished while the bay is empty. Work scheduled in the processing facility includes annual validation of the bay's cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms, and jack stands. Atlantis will remain in the VAB for about 10 days, then return to the OPF as work resumes to prepare it for launch in September 2004 on the first return-to-flight mission, STS-114.

  12. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Workers monitor the Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis as it is towed from the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) to the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB). The move will allow work to be performed in the OPF that can only be accomplished while the bay is empty. Work scheduled in the processing facility includes annual validation of the bay's cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms, and jack stands. Atlantis will remain in the VAB for about 10 days, then return to the OPF as work resumes to prepare it for launch in September 2004 on the first return-to-flight mission, STS-114.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-12-05

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Workers monitor the Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis as it is towed from the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) to the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB). The move will allow work to be performed in the OPF that can only be accomplished while the bay is empty. Work scheduled in the processing facility includes annual validation of the bay's cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms, and jack stands. Atlantis will remain in the VAB for about 10 days, then return to the OPF as work resumes to prepare it for launch in September 2004 on the first return-to-flight mission, STS-114.

  13. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis approaches the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) high bay 4. It is being towed from the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) to allow work to be performed in the bay that can only be accomplished while it is empty. Work scheduled in the processing facility includes annual validation of the bay's cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms, and jack stands. Atlantis will remain in the VAB for about 10 days, then return to the OPF as work resumes to prepare it for launch in September 2004 on the first return-to-flight mission, STS-114.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-12-05

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis approaches the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) high bay 4. It is being towed from the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) to allow work to be performed in the bay that can only be accomplished while it is empty. Work scheduled in the processing facility includes annual validation of the bay's cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms, and jack stands. Atlantis will remain in the VAB for about 10 days, then return to the OPF as work resumes to prepare it for launch in September 2004 on the first return-to-flight mission, STS-114.

  14. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis approaches high bay 4 of the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB). It was towed from the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) to allow work to be performed in the bay that can only be accomplished while it is empty. Work scheduled in the processing facility includes annual validation of the bay's cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms, and jack stands. Atlantis will remain in the VAB for about 10 days, then return to the OPF as work resumes to prepare it for launch in September 2004 on the first return-to-flight mission, STS-114.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-12-05

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis approaches high bay 4 of the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB). It was towed from the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) to allow work to be performed in the bay that can only be accomplished while it is empty. Work scheduled in the processing facility includes annual validation of the bay's cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms, and jack stands. Atlantis will remain in the VAB for about 10 days, then return to the OPF as work resumes to prepare it for launch in September 2004 on the first return-to-flight mission, STS-114.

  15. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Workers walk with Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis from the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) to the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) high bay 4. The move will allow work to be performed in the OPF that can only be accomplished while the bay is empty. Work scheduled in the processing facility includes annual validation of the bay's cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms, and jack stands. Atlantis will remain in the VAB for about 10 days, then return to the OPF as work resumes to prepare it for launch in September 2004 on the first return-to-flight mission, STS-114.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-12-05

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Workers walk with Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis from the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) to the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) high bay 4. The move will allow work to be performed in the OPF that can only be accomplished while the bay is empty. Work scheduled in the processing facility includes annual validation of the bay's cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms, and jack stands. Atlantis will remain in the VAB for about 10 days, then return to the OPF as work resumes to prepare it for launch in September 2004 on the first return-to-flight mission, STS-114.

  16. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis backs out of the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) for its move to the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB). The move will allow work to be performed in the OPF that can only be accomplished while the bay is empty. Work scheduled in the processing facility includes annual validation of the bay's cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms, and jack stands. Atlantis will remain in the VAB for about 10 days, then return to the OPF as work resumes to prepare it for launch in September 2004 on the first return-to-flight mission, STS-114.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-12-05

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis backs out of the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) for its move to the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB). The move will allow work to be performed in the OPF that can only be accomplished while the bay is empty. Work scheduled in the processing facility includes annual validation of the bay's cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms, and jack stands. Atlantis will remain in the VAB for about 10 days, then return to the OPF as work resumes to prepare it for launch in September 2004 on the first return-to-flight mission, STS-114.

  17. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis arrives in high bay 4 of the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB). It was towed from the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) to allow work to be performed in the bay that can only be accomplished while it is empty. Work scheduled in the processing facility includes annual validation of the bay's cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms, and jack stands. Atlantis will remain in the VAB for about 10 days, then return to the OPF as work resumes to prepare it for launch in September 2004 on the first return-to-flight mission, STS-114.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-12-05

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis arrives in high bay 4 of the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB). It was towed from the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) to allow work to be performed in the bay that can only be accomplished while it is empty. Work scheduled in the processing facility includes annual validation of the bay's cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms, and jack stands. Atlantis will remain in the VAB for about 10 days, then return to the OPF as work resumes to prepare it for launch in September 2004 on the first return-to-flight mission, STS-114.

  18. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis is almost in position in high bay 4 of the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB). It was towed from the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) to allow work to be performed in the bay that can only be accomplished while it is empty. Work scheduled in the processing facility includes annual validation of the bay's cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms, and jack stands. Atlantis will remain in the VAB for about 10 days, then return to the OPF as work resumes to prepare it for launch in September 2004 on the first return-to-flight mission, STS-114.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-12-05

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis is almost in position in high bay 4 of the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB). It was towed from the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) to allow work to be performed in the bay that can only be accomplished while it is empty. Work scheduled in the processing facility includes annual validation of the bay's cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms, and jack stands. Atlantis will remain in the VAB for about 10 days, then return to the OPF as work resumes to prepare it for launch in September 2004 on the first return-to-flight mission, STS-114.

  19. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis is reflected in a rain puddle as it is towed from the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) to the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB). The move will allow work to be performed in the OPF that can only be accomplished while the bay is empty. Work scheduled in the processing facility includes annual validation of the bay's cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms, and jack stands. Atlantis will remain in the VAB for about 10 days, then return to the OPF as work resumes to prepare it for launch in September 2004 on the first return-to-flight mission, STS-114.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-12-05

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis is reflected in a rain puddle as it is towed from the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) to the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB). The move will allow work to be performed in the OPF that can only be accomplished while the bay is empty. Work scheduled in the processing facility includes annual validation of the bay's cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms, and jack stands. Atlantis will remain in the VAB for about 10 days, then return to the OPF as work resumes to prepare it for launch in September 2004 on the first return-to-flight mission, STS-114.

  20. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis approaches the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB). It is being towed from the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) to allow work to be performed in the bay that can only be accomplished while it is empty. Work scheduled in the processing facility includes annual validation of the bay's cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms, and jack stands. Atlantis will remain in the VAB for about 10 days, then return to the OPF as work resumes to prepare it for launch in September 2004 on the first return-to-flight mission, STS-114.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-12-05

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis approaches the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB). It is being towed from the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) to allow work to be performed in the bay that can only be accomplished while it is empty. Work scheduled in the processing facility includes annual validation of the bay's cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms, and jack stands. Atlantis will remain in the VAB for about 10 days, then return to the OPF as work resumes to prepare it for launch in September 2004 on the first return-to-flight mission, STS-114.

  1. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis is towed from the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) to the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB). The move will allow work to be performed in the OPF that can only be accomplished while the bay is empty. Work scheduled in the processing facility includes annual validation of the bay's cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms, and jack stands. Atlantis will remain in the VAB for about 10 days, then return to the OPF as work resumes to prepare it for launch in September 2004 on the first return-to-flight mission, STS-114.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-12-05

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis is towed from the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) to the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB). The move will allow work to be performed in the OPF that can only be accomplished while the bay is empty. Work scheduled in the processing facility includes annual validation of the bay's cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms, and jack stands. Atlantis will remain in the VAB for about 10 days, then return to the OPF as work resumes to prepare it for launch in September 2004 on the first return-to-flight mission, STS-114.

  2. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis nears the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB). It is being towed from the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) to allow work to be performed in the bay that can only be accomplished while it is empty. Work scheduled in the processing facility includes annual validation of the bay's cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms, and jack stands. Atlantis will remain in the VAB for about 10 days, then return to the OPF as work resumes to prepare it for launch in September 2004 on the first return-to-flight mission, STS-114.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-12-05

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis nears the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB). It is being towed from the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) to allow work to be performed in the bay that can only be accomplished while it is empty. Work scheduled in the processing facility includes annual validation of the bay's cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms, and jack stands. Atlantis will remain in the VAB for about 10 days, then return to the OPF as work resumes to prepare it for launch in September 2004 on the first return-to-flight mission, STS-114.

  3. Near-Earth Asteroid Scout

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNutt, Leslie; Johnson, Les; Clardy, Dennon; Castillo-Rogez, Julie; Frick, Andreas; Jones, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Near-Earth Asteroids (NEAs) are an easily accessible object in Earth's vicinity. Detections of NEAs are expected to grow in the near future, offering increasing target opportunities. As NASA continues to refine its plans to possibly explore these small worlds with human explorers, initial reconnaissance with comparatively inexpensive robotic precursors is necessary. Obtaining and analyzing relevant data about these bodies via robotic precursors before committing a crew to visit a NEA will significantly minimize crew and mission risk, as well as maximize exploration return potential. The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) are jointly examining a mission concept, tentatively called 'NEA Scout,' utilizing a low-cost CubeSats platform in response to the current needs for affordable missions with exploration science value. The NEA Scout mission concept would be a secondary payload on the Space Launch System (SLS) Exploration Mission 1 (EM-1), the first planned flight of the SLS and the second un-crewed test flight of the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV).

  4. Sample Return from Small Solar System Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orgel, L.; A'Hearn, M.; Bada, J.; Baross, J.; Chapman, C.; Drake, M.; Kerridge, J.; Race, M.; Sogin, M.; Squyres, S.

    With plans for multiple sample return missions in the next decade, NASA requested guidance from the National Research Council's SSB on how to treat samples returned from solar system bodies such as planetary satellites, asteroids and comets. A special Task Group assessed the potential for a living entity to be included in return samples from various bodies as well as the potential for large scale effects if such an entity were inadvertently introduced into the Earth's biosphere. The Group also assessed differences among solar system bodies, identified investigations that could reduce uncertainty about the bodies, and considered risks of returned samples compared to natural influx of material to the Earth in the form of interplanetary dust particles, meteorites and other small impactors. The final report (NRC, 1998) provides a decision making framework for future missions and makes recommendations on how to handle samples from different planetary satellites and primitive solar system bodies

  5. Entry Descent and Landing Workshop Proceedings. Volume 1; Inflatable Reentry Vehicle Experiment-3 (IRVE-3) Project Overview & Instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dillman, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Entry mass at Mars is limited by the payload size that can be carried by a rigid capsule that can fit inside the launch vehicle fairing. Landing altitude at Mars is limited by ballistic coefficient (mass per area) of entry body. Inflatable technologies allow payload to use full diameter of launch fairing, and deploy larger aeroshell before atmospheric interface, landing more payload at a higher altitude. Also useful for return of large payloads from Low Earth Orbit (LEO).

  6. Unmanned Vehicle Material Flammability Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urban, David; Ruff, Gary A.; Fernandez-Pello, A. Carlos; T’ien, James S.; Torero, Jose L.; Cowlard, Adam; Rouvreau, Sebastian; Minster, Olivier; Toth, Balazs; Legros, Guillaume; hide

    2013-01-01

    Microgravity combustion phenomena have been an active area of research for the past 3 decades however, there have been very few experiments directly studying spacecraft fire safety under low-gravity conditions. Furthermore, none of these experiments have studied sample and environment sizes typical of those expected in a spacecraft fire. All previous experiments have been limited to samples of the order of 10 cm in length and width or smaller. Terrestrial fire safety standards for all other habitable volumes on earth, e.g. mines, buildings, airplanes, ships, etc., are based upon testing conducted with full-scale fires. Given the large differences between fire behavior in normal and reduced gravity, this lack of an experimental data base at relevant length scales forces spacecraft designers to base their designs using 1-g understanding. To address this question a large scale spacecraft fire experiment has been proposed by an international team of investigators. This poster presents the objectives, status and concept of this collaborative international project to examine spacecraft material flammability at realistic scales. The concept behind this project is to utilize an unmanned spacecraft such as Orbital Cygnus vehicle after it has completed its delivery of cargo to the ISS and it has begun its return journey to earth. This experiment will consist of a flame spread test involving a meter scale sample ignited in the pressurized volume of the spacecraft and allowed to burn to completion while measurements are made. A computer modeling effort will complement the experimental effort. Although the experiment will need to meet rigorous safety requirements to ensure the carrier vehicle does not sustain damage, the absence of a crew removes the need for strict containment of combustion products. This will facilitate the examination of fire behavior on a scale that is relevant to spacecraft fire safety and will provide unique data for fire model validation. This will be

  7. Comet nucleus sample return mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    A comet nucleus sample return mission in terms of its relevant science objectives, candidate mission concepts, key design/technology requirements, and programmatic issues is discussed. The primary objective was to collect a sample of undisturbed comet material from beneath the surface of an active comet and to preserve its chemical and, if possible, its physical integrity and return it to Earth in a minimally altered state. The secondary objectives are to: (1) characterize the comet to a level consistent with a rendezvous mission; (2) monitor the comet dynamics through perihelion and aphelion with a long lived lander; and (3) determine the subsurface properties of the nucleus in an area local to the sampled core. A set of candidate comets is discussed. The hazards which the spacecraft would encounter in the vicinity of the comet are also discussed. The encounter strategy, the sampling hardware, the thermal control of the pristine comet material during the return to Earth, and the flight performance of various spacecraft systems and the cost estimates of such a mission are presented.

  8. Factors influencing donor return.

    PubMed

    Schlumpf, Karen S; Glynn, Simone A; Schreiber, George B; Wright, David J; Randolph Steele, Whitney; Tu, Yongling; Hermansen, Sigurd; Higgins, Martha J; Garratty, George; Murphy, Edward L

    2008-02-01

    To predict future blood donation behavior and improve donor retention, it is important to understand the determinants of donor return. A self-administered questionnaire was completed in 2003 by 7905 current donors. With data mining methods, all factors measured by the survey were ranked as possible predictors of actual return within 12 months. Significant factors were analyzed with logistic regression to determine predictors of intention and of actual return. Younger and minority donors were less likely to return in 12 months. Predictors of donor return were higher prior donation frequency, higher intention to return, a convenient place to donate, and having a good donation experience. Most factors associated with actual donor return were also associated with a high intention to return. Although not significant for actual return, feeling a responsibility to help others, higher empathetic concern, and a feeling that being a blood donor means more than just donating blood were related to high intention to return. Prior donation frequency, intention to return, donation experience, and having a convenient location appear to significantly predict donor return. Clearly, donor behavior is dependent on more than one factor alone. Altruistic behavior, empathy, and social responsibility items did not enter our model to predict actual return. A donor's stated intention to give again is positively related to actual return and, while not a perfect measure, might be a useful proxy when donor return cannot be determined.

  9. Earth Day 2018 Activities

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2018-04-17

    During the annual Earth Day celebration at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex, guests have an opportunity to get an up-close look at experimental electric vehicles. The "Remove Before Flight" tag is on a Polaris GEM electric car. The two-day event featured approximately 50 exhibitors offering information on a variety of topics, including electric vehicles, sustainable lighting, renewable energy, Florida-friendly landscaping tips, Florida’s biking trails and more.

  10. Advanced Crew Rescue Vehicle/Personnel Launch System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, Jerry W.

    1993-02-01

    The Advanced Crew Rescue Vehicle (ACRV) will be an essential element of the Space Station to respond to three specific missions, all of which have occurred during the history space exploration by the U.S. and the Soviets: (1) Mission DRM-1: Return of disabled crew members during medical emergencies; (2) Mission DRM-2: Return of crew members from accidents or as a result of failures of Space Station systems; and (3) Mission DRM-3: Return of crew members during interruption of Space Shuttle launches. The ACRV will have the ability to transport up to eight astronauts during a 24-hour mission. Not only would the ACRV serve as a lifeboat to provide transportation back to Earth, but it would also be available as a immediately available safe refuge in case the Space Station were severely damaged by space debris or other catastrophe. Upon return to Earth, existing world-wide search and rescue assets operated by the Coast Guard and Department of Defense would be able to retrieve personnel returned to Earth via the ACRV. The operational approach proposed for the ACRV is tailored to satisfying mission requirements for simplicity of operation (no piloting skills or specially trained personnel are required), continuous availability, high reliability and affordability. By using proven systems as the basis for many critical ACRV systems, the ACRV program is more likely to achieve each of these mission requirements. Nonetheless, the need for the ACRV to operate reliably with little preflight preparation after, perhaps, 5 to 10 years in orbit imposes challenges not faced by any previous space system of this complexity. Specific concerns exist regarding micrometeoroid impacts, battery life, and degradation of recovery parachutes while in storage.

  11. Advanced Crew Rescue Vehicle/Personnel Launch System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, Jerry W.

    1993-01-01

    The Advanced Crew Rescue Vehicle (ACRV) will be an essential element of the Space Station to respond to three specific missions, all of which have occurred during the history space exploration by the U.S. and the Soviets: (1) Mission DRM-1: Return of disabled crew members during medical emergencies; (2) Mission DRM-2: Return of crew members from accidents or as a result of failures of Space Station systems; and (3) Mission DRM-3: Return of crew members during interruption of Space Shuttle launches. The ACRV will have the ability to transport up to eight astronauts during a 24-hour mission. Not only would the ACRV serve as a lifeboat to provide transportation back to Earth, but it would also be available as a immediately available safe refuge in case the Space Station were severely damaged by space debris or other catastrophe. Upon return to Earth, existing world-wide search and rescue assets operated by the Coast Guard and Department of Defense would be able to retrieve personnel returned to Earth via the ACRV. The operational approach proposed for the ACRV is tailored to satisfying mission requirements for simplicity of operation (no piloting skills or specially trained personnel are required), continuous availability, high reliability and affordability. By using proven systems as the basis for many critical ACRV systems, the ACRV program is more likely to achieve each of these mission requirements. Nonetheless, the need for the ACRV to operate reliably with little preflight preparation after, perhaps, 5 to 10 years in orbit imposes challenges not faced by any previous space system of this complexity. Specific concerns exist regarding micrometeoroid impacts, battery life, and degradation of recovery parachutes while in storage.

  12. Mars Sample Return Spacecraft Before Arrival Artist Concept

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-06-20

    This artist concept of a proposed Mars sample return mission portrays an aeroshell-encased spacecraft approaching Mars. This spacecraft would put a sample-retrieving rover and an ascent vehicle onto the surface of Mars.

  13. Earth Day 2018 Activities

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2018-04-18

    Students from Rockledge High School in Rockledge, Fla., make “plarn” – plastic yarn -- out of used plastic bags during Kennedy Space Center’s annual Earth Day celebration. The plarn was donated to be woven into mats for homeless veterans. The two-day Earth Day event featured approximately 50 exhibitors offering information on a variety of topics, including electric vehicles, sustainable lighting, renewable energy, Florida-friendly landscaping tips, Florida’s biking trails and more.

  14. Earth Day 2018 Activities

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2018-04-18

    Organizers and volunteers for Kennedy Space Center’s Earth Day celebration gather for a photo at the NASA Exchange raffle booth. From left to right are Jeanne Ryba, Environmental Sustainability program specialist; Robert Smith, Earth Day volunteer; and Natasha Darre, Cultural Resources Specialist. The two-day event featured approximately 50 exhibitors offering information on a variety of topics, including electric vehicles, sustainable lighting, renewable energy, Florida-friendly landscaping tips, Florida’s biking trails and more.

  15. Earth Day 2018 Activities

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2018-04-17

    During the annual Earth Day celebration at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex, guests have an opportunity to get an up-close look at experimental electric vehicles and see and Apollo era Lunar Roving Vehicle used in astronaut training. The battery-operated car was used on Apollos 15, 16 and 17 in 1971 and 1972. The two-day event featured approximately 50 exhibitors offering information on a variety of topics, including electric vehicles, sustainable lighting, renewable energy, Florida-friendly landscaping tips, Florida’s biking trails and more.

  16. OSIRIS-REx, Returning the Asteroid Sample

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ajluni, Thomas, M.; Everett, David F.; Linn, Timothy; Mink, Ronald; Willcockson, William; Wood, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    This paper addresses the technical aspects of the sample return system for the upcoming Origins, Spectral Interpretation, Resource Identification, and Security-Regolith Explorer (OSIRIS-REx) asteroid sample return mission. The overall mission design and current implementation are presented as an overview to establish a context for the technical description of the reentry and landing segment of the mission.The prime objective of the OSIRIS-REx mission is to sample a primitive, carbonaceous asteroid and to return that sample to Earth in pristine condition for detailed laboratory analysis. Targeting the near-Earth asteroid Bennu, the mission launches in September 2016 with an Earth reentry date of September 24, 2023.OSIRIS-REx will thoroughly characterize asteroid Bennu providing knowledge of the nature of near-Earth asteroids that is fundamental to understanding planet formation and the origin of life. The return to Earth of pristine samples with known geologic context will enable precise analyses that cannot be duplicated by spacecraft-based instruments, revolutionizing our understanding of the early Solar System. Bennu is both the most accessible carbonaceous asteroid and one of the most potentially Earth-hazardous asteroids known. Study of Bennu addresses multiple NASA objectives to understand the origin of the Solar System and the origin of life and will provide a greater understanding of both the hazards and resources in near-Earth space, serving as a precursor to future human missions to asteroids.This paper focuses on the technical aspects of the Sample Return Capsule (SRC) design and concept of operations, including trajectory design and reentry retrieval. Highlights of the mission are included below.The OSIRIS-REx spacecraft provides the essential functions for an asteroid characterization and sample return mission: attitude control propulsion power thermal control telecommunications command and data handling structural support to ensure successful

  17. Returning Samples from Enceladus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsou, P.; Kanik, I.; Brownlee, D.; McKay, C.; Anbar, A.; Glavin, D.; Yano, H.

    2012-12-01

    search for chemical biosignatures to understand the habitability potential of the subsurface ocean of Enceladus [Glavin et al. 2011]. By assessing the chiral excess among different amino acids, identifying chains of amino acids, isolate distinct sequences of these chains and the same for nucleic acids, we can formulate a new set of hypotheses to address some of the key science questions required for investigating the stage of extraterrestrial life at Enceladus beyond the four factors of habitability. Criticality of Analyses - For extraterrestrial organic matter analyses such as chirality and compound-specific isotopes, the repeatable robustness of laboratory measurements is a necessity. These analyses require a series of chemical extraction and derivatization steps prior to analysis that is adapted to the sample and procedures results-driven. The Stardust mission is an excellent example of the challenges in the analysis of organics. Confirmation of the cometary origin of the amino acid glycine from comet Wild 2 was obtained 3 years after the samples were returned to Earth. This long period of laboratory development allowed several modifications to the extraction protocol, multiple analytical techniques and instrumentations. Reference: Tsou et al., Astrobiology, in press 2012. McKay et al. Astrobiology 2008. Waite et al. Nature V 460 I 7254, 2009. Postberg et al. EPSC 642P 2011. Glavin et al., LPSC, #5002, 2011.

  18. Technology for return of planetary samples, 1977

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Recent progress on the development of a basic warning system (BWS) proposed to assess the biohazard of a Mars sample returned to earth, an earth orbiting spacecraft, or to a moon base was presented. The BWS package consists of terrestrial microorganisms representing major metabolic pathways. A vital processes component of the BWS will examine the effects of a Mars sample at terrestrial atmospheric conditions while a hardy organism component will examine the effects of a Mars sample under conditions approaching those of the Martian environment. Any deleterious insult on terrestrial metabolism effected by the Mars sample could be indicated long before the sample reached earth proximity.

  19. Why Do Staff Return?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magnuson, Connie

    1992-01-01

    Surveyed 211 returning staff from 25 camps and interviewed 19 returning staff to study factors that influence a counselor's decision to return to camp. Examined the following dimensions of motivation and hygiene factors: (1) stimulation or inspiration; (2) personal; (3) job-related experience; (4) living conditions and camp life; (5) camp…

  20. Mars double-aeroflyby free returns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jesick, Mark

    2017-09-01

    Mars double-flyby free-return trajectories that pass twice through the Martian atmosphere are documented. This class of trajectories is advantageous for potential Mars atmospheric sample return missions because of its low geocentric energy at departure and arrival, because it would enable two sample collections at unique locations during different Martian seasons, and because of its lack of deterministic maneuvers. Free return opportunities are documented over Earth departure dates ranging from 2015 through 2100, with viable missions available every Earth-Mars synodic period. After constraining the maximum lift-to-drag ratio to be less than one, the minimum observed Earth departure hyperbolic excess speed is 3.23 km/s, the minimum Earth atmospheric entry speed is 11.42 km/s, and the minimum round-trip flight time is 805 days. An algorithm using simplified dynamics is developed along with a method to derive an initial estimate for trajectories in a more realistic dynamic model. Multiple examples are presented, including free returns that pass outside and inside of Mars's appreciable atmosphere.

  1. Feasibility Analysis for a Manned Mars Free-Return Mission in 2018

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tito, Dennis A.; Anderson, Grant; Carrico, John P., Jr.; Clark, Jonathan; Finger, Barry; Lantz, Gary A.; Loucks, Michel E.; MacCallum, Taber; Poynter, Jane; Squire, Thomas H.; hide

    2013-01-01

    In 1998 Patel et al searched for Earth-Mars free-return trajectories that leave Earth, fly by Mars, and return to Earth without any deterministic maneuvers after Trans-Mars Injection. They found fast trajectory opportunities occurring two times every 15 years with a 1.4-year duration, significantly less than most Mars free return trajectories, which take up to 3.5 years. This paper investigates these fast trajectories. It also determines the launch and life support feasibility of flying such a mission using hardware expected to be available in time for an optimized fast trajectory opportunity in January, 2018. The authors optimized the original trajectory using patched-conic approximations, and then modeled the trajectory using numerical integration with high fidelity force models and the JPL planetary ephemerides. We calculated an optimum trajectory launching in early January, 2018. At the Mars encounter, the spacecraft will pass within a few hundred kilometers of the surface. We investigated the Earth reentry conditions and developed some aerocapture options to mitigate G-loads on the returning crew. We also describe tradeoffs and studies necessary to develop the Thermal Protection System (TPS). To size the Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) we set the initial mission assumption to two crew members for 500 days in a modified SpaceX Dragon class of vehicle. The journey is treated as a high-risk mission, which drives towards reliable - but minimalist - accommodations and provisions. As such, we investigated State Of the Art (SOA) technologies that would meet only basic human needs to support metabolic requirements and limited crew comfort allowances. We compare a baseline SOA architecture with an advanced architecture. The advanced architecture uses recently developed equipment that has higher efficiencies for water recovery and lighter base mass. They are not currently in operation and therefore present a schedule risk for development and

  2. SOCCER: Comet Coma Sample Return Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albee, A. L.; Uesugi, K. T.; Tsou, Peter

    1994-01-01

    Comets, being considered the most primitive bodies in the solar system, command the highest priority among solar system objects for studying solar nebula evolution and the evolution of life through biogenic elements and compounds. Sample Of Comet Coma Earth Return (SOCCER), a joint effort between NASA and the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS) in Japan, has two primary science objectives: (1) the imaging of the comet nucleus and (2) the return to Earth of samples of volatile species and intact dust. This effort makes use of the unique strengths and capabilities of both countries in realizing this important quest for the return of samples from a comet. This paper presents an overview of SOCCER's science payloads, engineering flight system, and its mission operations.

  3. The technology applying of inflatable devices to access adaptation, movement and landing descent vehicle from Martian environment to the Earth conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koryanov, Vsevolod V.; Kazakovtsev, Victor P.

    2017-07-01

    At present, the idea has emerged to use special inflatable braking device (IBD) which permits to implement the landing vehicle (LV) "soft" landing on the planet's surface without a parachute system. Braking device (BD) unfolds still at the extra-atmospheric flight stage to provide the LV passive stabilisation, and the entire apparatus together with the braking device is twisted around its longitudinal axis. The advantage of an inflatable BD over traditional non-rigid brakes - parachutes is that it can be used at the atmospheric stage of the descent, starting from hypersonic speeds, and ending subsonic ones. These main theses are implemented in the project MetNet and its sequel project RITD, using Entry, Descent and Landing System (EDLS) system [1].

  4. Earth Day 2018 Activities

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2018-04-18

    Employees stop by the University of Florida's Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences booth at Kennedy Space Center’s annual Earth Day celebration. The two-day event featured approximately 50 exhibitors offering information on a variety of topics, including electric vehicles, sustainable lighting, renewable energy, Florida-friendly landscaping tips, Florida’s biking trails and more.

  5. Earth Day 2018 Activities

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2018-04-17

    During the annual Earth Day celebration at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex, guests have an opportunity to learn more about energy awareness, the environment and sustainability. The two-day event featured approximately 50 exhibitors offering information on a variety of topics, including electric vehicles, sustainable lighting, renewable energy, Florida-friendly landscaping tips, Florida’s biking trails and more.

  6. Earth Day 2018 Activities

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2018-04-18

    An employee learns about indoor air quality at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Environmental and Medical Contract (KEMCON) booth at the center’s annual Earth Day celebration. The two-day event featured approximately 50 exhibitors offering information on a variety of topics, including electric vehicles, sustainable lighting, renewable energy, Florida-friendly landscaping tips, Florida’s biking trails and more.

  7. Earth Day 2018 Activities

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2018-04-17

    During the annual Earth Day celebration at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex, guests have an opportunity to learn about the environment. The two-day event featured approximately 50 exhibitors offering information on a variety of topics, including electric vehicles, sustainable lighting, renewable energy, Florida-friendly landscaping tips, Florida’s biking trails and more.

  8. Earth Day 2018 Activities

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2018-04-17

    During the annual Earth Day celebration at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex, guests have an opportunity to learn about the environment and meet Butterfly Dan” Dunwoody. The two-day event featured approximately 50 exhibitors offering information on a variety of topics, including electric vehicles, sustainable lighting, renewable energy, Florida-friendly landscaping tips, Florida’s biking trails and more.

  9. Mars Sample Return Using Commercial Capabilities: Mission Architecture Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzales, Andrew A.; Stoker, Carol R.; Lemke, Lawrence G.; Faber, Nicholas T.; Race, Margaret S.

    2013-01-01

    Mars Sample Return (MSR) is the highest priority science mission for the next decade as recommended by the recent Decadal Survey of Planetary Science. This paper presents an overview of a feasibility study for a MSR mission. The objective of the study was to determine whether emerging commercial capabilities can be used to reduce the number of mission systems and launches required to return the samples, with the goal of reducing mission cost. The major element required for the MSR mission are described and include an integration of the emerging commercial capabilities with small spacecraft design techniques; new utilizations of traditional aerospace technologies; and recent technological developments. We report the feasibility of a complete and closed MSR mission design using the following scenario that covers three synodic launch opportunities, beginning with the 2022 opportunity: A Falcon Heavy injects a SpaceX Red Dragon capsule and trunk onto a Trans Mars Injection (TMI) trajectory. The capsule is modified to carry all the hardware needed to return samples collected on Mars including a Mars Ascent Vehicle (MAV); an Earth Return Vehicle (ERV); and hardware to transfer a sample collected in a previously landed rover mission to the ERV. The Red Dragon descends to land on the surface of Mars using Supersonic Retro Propulsion (SRP). After previously collected samples are transferred to the ERV, the single-stage MAV launches the ERV from the surface of Mars to a Mars phasing orbit. The MAV uses a storable liquid, pump fed bi-propellant propulsion system. After a brief phasing period, the ERV, which also uses a storable bi-propellant system, performs a Trans Earth Injection (TEI) burn. Once near Earth the ERV performs Earth and lunar swing-bys and is placed into a Lunar Trailing Orbit (LTO0 - an Earth orbit, at lunar distance. A later mission, using a Dragon and launched by a Falcon Heavy, performs a rendezvous with the ERV in the lunar trailing orbit, retrieves the

  10. Ares Launch Vehicles Overview: Space Access Society

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Steve

    2007-01-01

    America is returning to the Moon in preparation for the first human footprint on Mars, guided by the U.S. Vision for Space Exploration. This presentation will discuss NASA's mission, the reasons for returning to the Moon and going to Mars, and how NASA will accomplish that mission in ways that promote leadership in space and economic expansion on the new frontier. The primary goals of the Vision for Space Exploration are to finish the International Space Station, retire the Space Shuttle, and build the new spacecraft needed to return people to the Moon and go to Mars. The Vision commits NASA and the nation to an agenda of exploration that also includes robotic exploration and technology development, while building on lessons learned over 50 years of hard-won experience. NASA is building on common hardware, shared knowledge, and unique experience derived from the Apollo Saturn, Space Shuttle, and contemporary commercial launch vehicle programs. The journeys to the Moon and Mars will require a variety of vehicles, including the Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle, which transports the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle, and the Ares V Cargo Launch Vehicle, which transports the Lunar Surface Access Module. The architecture for the lunar missions will use one launch to ferry the crew into orbit, where it will rendezvous with the Lunar Module in the Earth Departure Stage, which will then propel the combination into lunar orbit. The imperative to explore space with the combination of astronauts and robots will be the impetus for inventions such as solar power and water and waste recycling. This next chapter in NASA's history promises to write the next chapter in American history, as well. It will require this nation to provide the talent to develop tools, machines, materials, processes, technologies, and capabilities that can benefit nearly all aspects of life on Earth. Roles and responsibilities are shared between a nationwide Government and industry team. The Exploration Launch

  11. Astronaut Richard Gordon returns to hatch of spacecraft following EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Astronaut Richard F. Gordon Jr., pilot for the Gemini 11 space flight, returns to the hatch of the spacecraft following extravehicular activity (EVA). This picture was taken over the Atlantic Ocean at approximately 160 nautical miles above the earth's surface.

  12. Rare-Earth-Free Permanent Magnets for Electrical Vehicle Motors and Wind Turbine Generators: Hexagonal Symmetry Based Materials Systems Mn-Bi and M-type Hexaferrite

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Yang-Ki; Haskew, Timothy; Myryasov, Oleg

    2014-06-05

    The research we conducted focuses on the rare-earth (RE)-free permanent magnet by modeling, simulating, and synthesizing exchange coupled two-phase (hard/soft) RE-free core-shell nano-structured magnet. The RE-free magnets are made of magnetically hard core materials (high anisotropy materials including Mn-Bi-X and M-type hexaferrite) coated by soft shell materials (high magnetization materials including Fe-Co or Co). Therefore, our research helps understand the exchange coupling conditions of the core/shell magnets, interface exchange behavior between core and shell materials, formation mechanism of core/shell structures, stability conditions of core and shell materials, etc.

  13. Mission and vehicle sizing sensitivities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Archie C.

    1986-01-01

    Representative interplanetary space vehicle systems are sized to compare and show sensitivity of the initial mass required in low Earth orbit to one mission mode and mission opportunity. Data are presented to show the requirements for Earth-Mars opposition and conjunction class roundtrip flyby and stopover mission opportunities available during the time period from year 1997 to year 2045. The interplanetary space vehicle consists of a spacecraft and a space vehicle acceleration system. Propellant boil-off for the various mission phases is given for the Lox/LH (Liquid Oxygen/Liquid Hydrogen) propulsion systems. Mission abort information is presented for the 1999 Venus outbound swingby trajectory, transfer profile.

  14. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Endeavour begins rolling out of the Orbiter Processing Facility for temporary transfer to the Vehicle Assembly Building. The move allows work to be performed in the OPF that can only be accomplished while the bay is empty. Work scheduled in the OPF includes annual validation of the bay’s cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms and jack stands. Endeavour will remain in the VAB for approximately 12 days, then return to the OPF.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-01-09

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Endeavour begins rolling out of the Orbiter Processing Facility for temporary transfer to the Vehicle Assembly Building. The move allows work to be performed in the OPF that can only be accomplished while the bay is empty. Work scheduled in the OPF includes annual validation of the bay’s cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms and jack stands. Endeavour will remain in the VAB for approximately 12 days, then return to the OPF.

  15. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Endeavour rolls into the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) for temporary storage. The orbiter has been moved from the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) to allow work to be performed in the OPF that can only be accomplished while the bay is empty. Work scheduled in the OPF includes annual validation of the bay’s cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms and jack stands. Endeavour will remain in the VAB for approximately 12 days, then return to the OPF.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-01-09

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Endeavour rolls into the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) for temporary storage. The orbiter has been moved from the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) to allow work to be performed in the OPF that can only be accomplished while the bay is empty. Work scheduled in the OPF includes annual validation of the bay’s cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms and jack stands. Endeavour will remain in the VAB for approximately 12 days, then return to the OPF.

  16. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Endeavour is towed toward the Vehicle Assembly Building for temporary storage. The orbiter has been moved from the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) to allow work to be performed in the OPF that can only be accomplished while the bay is empty. Work scheduled in the OPF includes annual validation of the bay’s cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms and jack stands. Endeavour will remain in the VAB for approximately 12 days, then return to the OPF.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-01-09

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Endeavour is towed toward the Vehicle Assembly Building for temporary storage. The orbiter has been moved from the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) to allow work to be performed in the OPF that can only be accomplished while the bay is empty. Work scheduled in the OPF includes annual validation of the bay’s cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms and jack stands. Endeavour will remain in the VAB for approximately 12 days, then return to the OPF.

  17. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The orbiter Atlantis rolls into the Orbiter Processing Facility after spending 10 days in the Vehicle Assembly Building. The hiatus in the VAB allowed work to be performed in the OPF that can only be accomplished while the bay is empty. Work included annual validation of the bay's cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms and jack stands. Work resumes to prepare Atlantis for launch in September 2004 on the first return-to-flight mission, STS-114.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-12-16

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The orbiter Atlantis rolls into the Orbiter Processing Facility after spending 10 days in the Vehicle Assembly Building. The hiatus in the VAB allowed work to be performed in the OPF that can only be accomplished while the bay is empty. Work included annual validation of the bay's cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms and jack stands. Work resumes to prepare Atlantis for launch in September 2004 on the first return-to-flight mission, STS-114.

  18. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Endeavour is ready to be rolled out of the Orbiter Processing Facility for temporary transfer to the Vehicle Assembly Building. The move allows work to be performed in the OPF that can only be accomplished while the bay is empty. Work scheduled in the OPF includes annual validation of the bay’s cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms and jack stands. Endeavour will remain in the VAB for approximately 12 days, then return to the OPF.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-01-09

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Endeavour is ready to be rolled out of the Orbiter Processing Facility for temporary transfer to the Vehicle Assembly Building. The move allows work to be performed in the OPF that can only be accomplished while the bay is empty. Work scheduled in the OPF includes annual validation of the bay’s cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms and jack stands. Endeavour will remain in the VAB for approximately 12 days, then return to the OPF.

  19. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The orbiter Atlantis is back inside the Orbiter Processing Facility after spending 10 days in the Vehicle Assembly Building. The hiatus in the VAB allowed work to be performed in the OPF that can only be accomplished while the bay is empty. Work included annual validation of the bay's cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms and jack stands. Work resumes to prepare Atlantis for launch in September 2004 on the first return-to-flight mission, STS-114.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-12-16

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The orbiter Atlantis is back inside the Orbiter Processing Facility after spending 10 days in the Vehicle Assembly Building. The hiatus in the VAB allowed work to be performed in the OPF that can only be accomplished while the bay is empty. Work included annual validation of the bay's cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms and jack stands. Work resumes to prepare Atlantis for launch in September 2004 on the first return-to-flight mission, STS-114.

  20. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The orbiter Atlantis rolls toward the Orbiter Processing Facility after spending 10 days in the Vehicle Assembly Building. The hiatus in the VAB allowed work to be performed in the OPF that can only be accomplished while the bay is empty. Work included annual validation of the bay's cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms and jack stands. Work resumes to prepare Atlantis for launch in September 2004 on the first return-to-flight mission, STS-114.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-12-16

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The orbiter Atlantis rolls toward the Orbiter Processing Facility after spending 10 days in the Vehicle Assembly Building. The hiatus in the VAB allowed work to be performed in the OPF that can only be accomplished while the bay is empty. Work included annual validation of the bay's cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms and jack stands. Work resumes to prepare Atlantis for launch in September 2004 on the first return-to-flight mission, STS-114.

  1. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The orbiter Atlantis rolls out of the Vehicle Assembly Building for transfer back to the Orbiter Processing Facility. Atlantis spent 10 days in the VAB to allow work to be performed in the OPF that can only be accomplished while the bay is empty. Work included annual validation of the bay's cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms and jack stands. Work resumes to prepare Atlantis for launch in September 2004 on the first return-to-flight mission, STS-114.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-12-16

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The orbiter Atlantis rolls out of the Vehicle Assembly Building for transfer back to the Orbiter Processing Facility. Atlantis spent 10 days in the VAB to allow work to be performed in the OPF that can only be accomplished while the bay is empty. Work included annual validation of the bay's cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms and jack stands. Work resumes to prepare Atlantis for launch in September 2004 on the first return-to-flight mission, STS-114.

  2. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The orbiter Atlantis is towed back to the Orbiter Processing Facility after spending 10 days in the Vehicle Assembly Building. The hiatus in the VAB allowed work to be performed in the OPF that can only be accomplished while the bay is empty. Work included annual validation of the bay's cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms and jack stands. Work resumes to prepare Atlantis for launch in September 2004 on the first return-to-flight mission, STS-114.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-12-16

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The orbiter Atlantis is towed back to the Orbiter Processing Facility after spending 10 days in the Vehicle Assembly Building. The hiatus in the VAB allowed work to be performed in the OPF that can only be accomplished while the bay is empty. Work included annual validation of the bay's cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms and jack stands. Work resumes to prepare Atlantis for launch in September 2004 on the first return-to-flight mission, STS-114.

  3. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Endeavour backs out of the Orbiter Processing Facility for temporary transfer to the Vehicle Assembly Building. The move allows work to be performed in the OPF that can only be accomplished while the bay is empty. Work scheduled in the OPF includes annual validation of the bay’s cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms and jack stands. Endeavour will remain in the VAB for approximately 12 days, then return to the OPF.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-01-09

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Endeavour backs out of the Orbiter Processing Facility for temporary transfer to the Vehicle Assembly Building. The move allows work to be performed in the OPF that can only be accomplished while the bay is empty. Work scheduled in the OPF includes annual validation of the bay’s cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms and jack stands. Endeavour will remain in the VAB for approximately 12 days, then return to the OPF.

  4. Ares V and Future Very Large Launch Vehicles to Enable Major Astronomical Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thronson, Harley A.; Lester, Daniel F.; Langhoff, Stephanie R.; Corell, Randy; Stahl, H. Philip

    2008-01-01

    The current NASA architecture intended to return humans to the lunar surface includes the Ares V cargo launch vehicle, which is planned to be available within a decade. The capabilities designed for Ares V would permit an 8.8-m diameter, 55 mT payload to be carried to Sun-Earth L1,2 locations. That is, this vehicle could launch very large optical systems to achieve major scientific goals that would otherwise be very difficult. For example, an 8-m monolith UV/visual/IR telescope appears able to be launched to a Sun-Earth L2 location. Even larger apertures that are deployed or assembled seem possible. Alternatively, multiple elements of a spatial array or two or three astronomical observatories might be launched simultaneously. Over the years, scientists and engineers have been evaluating concepts for astronomical observatories that use future large launch vehicles. In this presentation, we report on results of a recent workshop held at NASA Ames Research Center that have improved understanding of the science goals that can be achieved using Ares V. While such a vehicle uniquely enables few of the observatory concepts considered at the workshop, most have a baseline mission that can be flown on existing or near-future vehicles. However, the performance of the Ares V permits design concepts (e.g., large monolithic mirrors) that reduce complexity and risk.

  5. Nuclear reactor power for an electrically powered orbital transfer vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, L.; Beatty, R.; Bhandari, P.; Chow, E.; Deininger, W.; Ewell, R.; Fujita, T.; Grossman, M.; Kia, T.; Nesmith, B.

    1987-01-01

    To help determine the systems requirements for a 300-kWe space nuclear reactor power system, a mission and spacecraft have been examined which utilize electric propulsion and this nuclear reactor power for multiple transfers of cargo between low earth orbit (LEO) and geosynchronous earth orbit (GEO). A propulsion system employing ion thrusters and xenon propellant was selected. Propellant and thrusters are replaced after each sortie to GEO. The mass of the Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OTV), empty and dry, is 11,000 kg; nominal propellant load is 5000 kg. The OTV operates between a circular orbit at 925 km altitude, 28.5 deg inclination, and GEO. Cargo is brought to the OTV by Shuttle and an Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV); the OTV then takes it to GEO. The OTV can also bring cargo back from GEO, for transfer by OMV to the Shuttle. OTV propellant is resupplied and the ion thrusters are replaced by the OMV before each trip to GEO. At the end of mission life, the OTV's electric propulsion is used to place it in a heliocentric orbit so that the reactor will not return to earth. The nominal cargo capability to GEO is 6000 kg with a transit time of 120 days; 1350 kg can be transferred in 90 days, and 14,300 kg in 240 days. These capabilities can be considerably increased by using separate Shuttle launches to bring up propellant and cargo, or by changing to mercury propellant.

  6. Geology of Potential Landing Sites for Martian Sample Returns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, Ronald

    2003-01-01

    This project involved the analysis of potential landing sites on Mars. As originally proposed, the project focused on landing sites from which samples might be returned to Earth. However, as the project proceeded, the emphasis shifted to missions that would not include sample return, because the Mars Exploration Program had deferred sample returns to the next decade. Subsequently, this project focused on the study of potential landing sites for the Mars Exploration Rovers.

  7. [Dose loads on and radiation risk values for cosmonauts on a mission to Mars estimated from actual Martian vehicle engineering development].

    PubMed

    Shafirkin, A V; Kolomenskiĭ, A V; Mitrikas, V G; Petrov, V M

    2010-01-01

    The current design philosophy of a Mars orbiting vehicle, takeoff and landing systems and the transport return vehicle was taken into consideration for calculating the equivalent doses imparted to cosmonaut's organs and tissues by galactic cosmic rays, solar rays and the Earth's radiation belts, values of the total radiation risk over the lifespan following the mission and over the whole career period, and possible shortening of life expectancy. There are a number of uncertainties that should be evaluated, and radiation limits specified before setting off to Mars.

  8. General Education Earth, Astronomy and Space Science College Courses Serve as a Vehicle for Improving Science Literacy in the United States.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prather, E.

    2011-10-01

    Every year approximately 500,000 undergraduate college students take a general education Earth, Astronomy and Space Science (EASS) course in the Unites States. For the majority of these students this will be their last physical science course in life. This population of students is incredibly important to the science literacy of the United States citizenry and to the success of the STEM career pipeline. These students represent future scientists, technologists, business leaders, politicians, journalists, historians, artists, and most importantly, policy makers, parents, voters, and teachers. A significant portion of these students are taught at minority serving institutions and community colleges and often are from underserved and underrepresented groups, such as women and minorities. Members of the Center for Astronomy Education (CAE) at the University of Arizona have been developing and conducting research on the effectiveness of instructional strategies and materials that are explicitly designed to challenge students' naïve ideas and intellectually engage their thinking at a deep level in the traditional lecture classroom. The results of this work show that dramatic improvement in student understanding can be made from increased use of interactive learning strategies. These improvements are shown to be independent of institution type or class size, but appear to be strongly influenced by the quality of the instructor's implementation. In addition, we find that the positive effects of interactive learning strategies apply equally to men and women, across ethnicities, for students with all levels of prior mathematical preparation and physical science course experience, independent of GPA, and regardless of primary language. These results powerfully illustrate that all students can benefit from the effective implementation of interactive learning strategies.

  9. Mars Sample Return Using Commercial Capabilities: Mission Architecture Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzales, Andrew A.; Lemke, Lawrence G.; Stoker, Carol R.; Faber, Nicolas T.; Race, Margaret S.

    2014-01-01

    Mars Sample Return (MSR) is the highest priority science mission for the next decade as recommended by the recent Decadal Survey of Planetary Science. This paper presents an overview of a feasibility study for an MSR mission. The objective of the study was to determine whether emerging commercial capabilities can be used to reduce the number of mission systems and launches required to return the samples, with the goal of reducing mission cost. We report the feasibility of a complete and closed MSR mission design using the following scenario that covers three synodic launch opportunities, beginning with the 2022 opportunity: A Falcon Heavy injects a SpaceX Red Dragon capsule and trunk onto a Trans Mars Injection (TMI) trajectory. The capsule is modified to carry all the hardware needed to return samples collected on Mars including a Mars Ascent Vehicle (MAV), an Earth Return Vehicle (ERV), and hardware to transfer a sample collected in a previously landed rover mission to the ERV. The Red Dragon descends to land on the surface of Mars using Super Sonic Retro Propulsion (SSRP). After previously collected samples are transferred to the ERV, the single-stage MAV launches the ERV from the surface of Mars. The MAV uses a storable liquid bi-propellant propulsion system to deliver the ERV to a Mars phasing orbit. After a brief phasing period, the ERV, which also uses a storable bi-propellant system, performs a Trans Earth Injection (TEI) burn. Upon arrival at Earth, the ERV performs Earth and lunar swing-bys and is placed into a lunar trailing circular orbit - an Earth orbit, at lunar distance. A later mission, using Dragon and launched by a Falcon Heavy, performs a rendezvous with the ERV in the lunar trailing orbit, retrieves the sample container and breaks the chain of contact with Mars by transferring the sample into a sterile and secure container. With the sample contained, the retrieving spacecraft makes a controlled Earth re-entry preventing any unintended release

  10. Mars manned transportation vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez-Davis, Marla E.; Faymon, Karl A.

    1987-01-01

    A viable power system technology for a surface transportation vehicle to explore the planet Mars is presented. A number of power traction systems were investigated, and it was found that a regenerative hydrogen-oxygen fuel cell appears to be attractive for a manned Mars rover application. Mission requirements were obtained from the Manned Mars Mission Working Group. Power systems weights, power, and reactants requirements were determined as a function of vehicle weights for vehicles weighing from 6,000 to 16,000 lb (2,722 to 7,257 kg), (Earth weight). The vehicle performance requirements were: velocity, 10 km/hr; range, 100 km; slope climbing capability, 30 deg uphill for 50 km; mission duration, 5 days; and crew, 5. Power requirements for the operation of scientific equipment and support system capabilities were also specified and included in this study. The concept developed here would also be applicable to a Lunar based vehicle for Lunar exploration. The reduced gravity on the Lunar surface, (over that on the Martian surface), would result in an increased range or capability over that of the Mars vehicle since many of the power and energy requirements for the vehicle are gravity dependent.

  11. Parachute Compartment Drop Test Vehicle for Testing the Crew Exploration Vehicle's Parachute Assembly System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lubey, Daniel P.; Thiele, Sara R.; Gruseck, Madelyn L.; Evans, Carol T.

    2010-01-01

    Though getting astronauts safely into orbit and beyond has long been one of NASA?s chief goals, their safe return has always been equally as important. The Crew Exploration Vehicle?s (CEV) Parachute Assembly System (CPAS) is designed to safely return astronauts to Earth on the next-generation manned spacecraft Orion. As one means for validating this system?s requirements and testing its functionality, a test article known as the Parachute Compartment Drop Test Vehicle (PC-DTV) will carry a fully-loaded yet truncated CPAS Parachute Compartment (PC) in a series of drop tests. Two aerodynamic profiles for the PC-DTV currently exist, though both share the same interior structure, and both have an Orion-representative weight of 20,800 lbf. Two extraction methods have been developed as well. The first (Cradle Monorail System 2 - CMS2) uses a sliding rail technique to release the PC-DTV midair, and the second (Modified DTV Sled; MDS) features a much less constrained separation method though slightly more complex. The decision as to which aerodynamic profile and extraction method to use is still not finalized. Additional CFD and stress analysis must be undertaken in order to determine the more desirable options, though at present the "boat tail" profile and the CMS2 extraction method seem to be the favored options in their respective categories. Fabrication of the PC-DTV and the selected extraction sled is set to begin in early October 2010 with an anticipated first drop test in mid-March 2011.

  12. Optimization of vehicle weight for Mars excursion missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferebee, Melvin J., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The excursion class mission to Mars is defined as a mission with one year durations coupled with a stay time of up to 30 days. The fuel budget for such a mission is investigated. The overall figure of merit in such an assessment is the vehicle weight ratio, the ratio between the wet vehicle weight to the dry vehicle weight. It is necessary to minimize the overall fuel budget for the mission in order to maximize the benefits that could be obtained by sending humans to Mars. Assumptions used in the analysis are: each mission will depart and terminate in low-earth-orbit (LEO) (500 km circular) and the maximum stay time at Mars is 30 days. The maximum mission duration is one year (355-375 days). The mass returned to LEO is 135,000 kg, the dropoff mass left at Mars is 168,000 kg. Three propulsive techniques for atmospheric interface are investigated: aerobraking, all-chemical propulsion, and nuclear thermal propulsion. By defining the fuel requirements, the space transfer vehicle's configuration is defined.

  13. Synchronized Lunar Pole Impact Plume Sample Return Trajectory Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Genova, Anthony L.; Foster, Cyrus; Colaprete, Tony

    2016-01-01

    The presented trajectory design enables two maneuverable spacecraft launched onto the same trans-lunar injection trajectory to coordinate a steep impact of a lunar pole and subsequent sample return of the ejecta plume to Earth. To demonstrate this concept, the impactor is assumed to use the LCROSS missions trajectory and spacecraft architecture, thus the permanently-shadowed Cabeus crater on the lunar south pole is assumed as the impact site. The sample-return spacecraft is assumed to be a CubeSat that requires a complimentary trajectory design that avoids lunar impact after passing through the ejecta plume to enable sample-return to Earth via atmospheric entry.

  14. Horizontal fields generated by return strokes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooray, Vernon

    1991-01-01

    Horizontal fields generated by return strokes play an important role in the interaction of lightning generated electric fields with power lines. In many of the recent investigations on the interaction of lightning electromagnetic fields with power lines, the horizontal field was calculated by employing the expression for the tilt of the electric field of a plane wave propagating over finitely conducting earth. The method is suitable for calculating horizontal fields generated by return strokes at distances as close as 200m. At these close ranges, the use of the wavetilt expression can cause large errors.

  15. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Center Director Jim Kennedy speaks to attendees at a memorial service honoring the crew of Columbia. He stands in front of the Space Memorial Mirror at the KSC Visitor Complex. Feb. 1 is the one-year anniversary of the loss of the crew and orbiter Columbia in a tragic accident as the ship returned to Earth following mission STS-107. Attended by many friends, co-workers and families, the memorial service was also open to the public.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-02-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Center Director Jim Kennedy speaks to attendees at a memorial service honoring the crew of Columbia. He stands in front of the Space Memorial Mirror at the KSC Visitor Complex. Feb. 1 is the one-year anniversary of the loss of the crew and orbiter Columbia in a tragic accident as the ship returned to Earth following mission STS-107. Attended by many friends, co-workers and families, the memorial service was also open to the public.

  16. Comet Odyssey: Comet Surface Sample Return

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weissman, Paul R.; Bradley, J.; Smythe, W. D.; Brophy, J. R.; Lisano, M. E.; Syvertson, M. L.; Cangahuala, L. A.; Liu, J.; Carlisle, G. L.

    2010-10-01

    Comet Odyssey is a proposed New Frontiers mission that would return the first samples from the surface of a cometary nucleus. Stardust demonstrated the tremendous power of analysis of returned samples in terrestrial laboratories versus what can be accomplished in situ with robotic missions. But Stardust collected only 1 milligram of coma dust, and the 6.1 km/s flyby speed heated samples up to 2000 K. Comet Odyssey would collect two independent 800 cc samples directly from the surface in a far more benign manner, preserving the primitive composition. Given a minimum surface density of 0.2 g/cm3, this would return two 160 g surface samples to Earth. Comet Odyssey employs solar-electric propulsion to rendezvous with the target comet. After 180 days of reconnaissance and site selection, the spacecraft performs a "touch-and-go” maneuver with surface contact lasting 3 seconds. A brush-wheel sampler on a remote arm collects up to 800 cc of sample. A duplicate second arm and sampler collects the second sample. The samples are placed in a return capsule and maintained at colder than -70 C during the return flight and at colder than -30 C during re-entry and for up to six hours after landing. The entire capsule is then refrigerated and transported to the Astromaterials Curatorial Facility at NASA/JSC for initial inspection and sample analysis by the Comet Odyssey team. Comet Odyssey's planned target was comet 9P/Tempel 1, with launch in December 2017 and comet arrival in June 2022. After a stay of 300 days at the comet, the spacecraft departs and arrives at Earth in May 2027. Comet Odyssey is a forerunner to a flagship Cryogenic Comet Sample Return mission that would return samples from deep below the nucleus surface, including volatile ices. This work was supported by internal funds from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  17. Reentry Capsule for Sample Return from Asteroids in the Planetary Exploration Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inatani, Yoshifumi

    2018-04-01

    For carrying sample from the bodies of interplanetary space, a wide range of knowledge of reentry technology is needed. HAYABUSA(MUSES-C) was an asteroid explorer returned to the earth after the 7 years of voyage, and its capsule reenters into the Earth’s atmosphere, which was a good example of reentry technology implemented to the flight vehicle. It performed a safe reentry flight and recovery. For the design of the capsule, many considerations were made due to its higher entry velocity and higher aerodynamic heating than those of normal reentry from the low earth orbit. Taking into account the required functions throughout the orbital flight, reentry flight, and descent/recovery phase, the capsule was deigned, tested, manufactured and flight demonstrated finally. The paper presents the concept of the design and qualification approach of the small space capsule of the asteroid sample and return mission. And presented are how the reentry flight was performed and a brief overview of the post flight analysis primarily for these design validation purposes and for the better understanding of the flight results.

  18. Apollo experience report: Development of guidance targeting techniques for the command module and launch vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yencharis, J. D.; Wiley, R. F.; Davis, R. S.; Holmes, Q. A.; Zeiler, K. T.

    1972-01-01

    The development of the guidance targeting techniques for the Apollo command module and launch vehicle is discussed for four types of maneuvers: (1) translunar injection, (2) translunar midcourse, (3) lunar orbit insertion, and (4) return to earth. The development of real-time targeting programs for these maneuvers and the targeting procedures represented are discussed. The material is intended to convey historically the development of the targeting techniques required to meet the defined target objectives and to illustrate the solutions to problems encountered during that development.

  19. STS-105 Expedition 2 Return

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-08-23

    JSC2001-E-25809 (23 August 2001) --- The STS-105 and Expedition Two crews meet their families and friends during the crew return ceremonies at Ellington Field. Among the crowd are Johnson Space Center's (JSC) Acting Director Roy Estess (back left), astronaut Marsha S. Ivins (third from the left), cosmonaut Yury V. Usachev (fourth from the left), Expedition Two mission commander, Susan J. Helms (fifth from the left), Expedition Two flight engineer, James S. Voss (third from the right), Expedition Two flight engineer, and cosmonaut Vasili V. Tsibliyev. The STS-105 crew delivered the Expedition Three crew and supplies to the International Space Station (ISS) and brought the Expedition Two crew back to Earth.

  20. STARDUST: An Incredulous Dream to Incredible Return

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsou, Peter

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the Stardust mission. The goal of the mission was to return to Earth a very small part of a comet for study. The success of the mission gave us a small part of a comet to use for research into questions such as the cometary origin of water and life on earth and the formation of the solar system. The slides review the challenges, the strategy, the laboratory experiments, the instrument development, the characteristics of Aerogel, the Stardust trajectory, pictures of the samples and a listing of the firsts that were accomplished during the Stardust project.

  1. Performance Efficient Launch Vehicle Recovery and Reuse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, John G.; Ragab, Mohamed M.; Cheatwood, F. McNeil; Hughes, Stephen J.; Dinonno, J.; Bodkin, R.; Lowry, Allen; Brierly, Gregory T.; Kelly, John W.

    2016-01-01

    for space asset recovery and high altitude deployment. The next proposed HIAD flight demonstration is called HULA (for HIAD on ULA), and will feature a 6m diameter HIAD. An update for the HULA concept will be provided in this paper. As proposed, this demonstration will fly as a secondary payload on an Atlas mission. The Centaur upper stage provides the reentry pointing, deorbit burn, and entry vehicle spin up. The flight test will culminate with a recovery of the HIAD using MAR. HULA will provide data from a Low Earth Orbit (LEO) return aeroheating environment that enables predictive model correlation and refinement. The resultant reduction in performance uncertainties should lead to design efficiencies that are increasingly significant at larger scales. Relevance to human scale Mars EDL using a HIAD will also be presented, and the applicability of the data generated from both HULA and SMART Vulcan flights, and its value for NASA's human exploration efforts will be discussed. A summary and conclusion will follow.

  2. Mars Sample Return without Landing on the Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jurewicz, A. J. G.; Jones, Steven M.; Yen, A. S.

    2000-01-01

    Many in the science community want a Mars sample return in the near future, with the expectation that it will provide in-depth information, significantly beyond what we know from remote sensing, limited in-situ measurements, and work with Martian meteorites. Certainly, return of samples from the Moon resulted in major advances in our understanding of both the geologic history of our planetary satellite, and its relationship to Earth. Similar scientific insights would be expected from analyses of samples returned from Mars. Unfortunately, Mars-lander sample-return missions have been delayed, for the reason that NASA needs more time to review the complexities and risks associated with that type of mission. A traditional sample return entails a complex transfer-chain, including landing, collection, launch, rendezvous, and the return to Earth, as well as an evaluation of potential biological hazards involved with bringing pristine Martian organics to Earth. There are, however, means of returning scientifically-rich samples from Mars without landing on the surface. This paper discusses an approach for returning intact samples of surface dust, based on known instrument technology, without using an actual Martian lander.

  3. Phobos-Grunt: Russian sample return mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marov, M. Ya.; Avduevsky, V. S.; Akim, E. L.; Eneev, T. M.; Kremnev, R. S.; Kulikov, S. D.; Pichkhadze, K. M.; Popov, G. A.; Rogovsky, G. N.

    2004-01-01

    As an important milestone in the exploration of Mars and small bodies, a new generation space vehicle ``Phobos-Grunt'' is planned to be launched by the Russian Aviation and Space Agency. The project is optimized around a Phobos sample return mission and follow up missions targeted to study some main asteroid belt bodies, NEOs and short period comets. The principal constraint is use of the ``Soyuz-Fregat'' rather than the ``Proton'' launcher to accomplish these challenging goals. The vehicle design incorporates innovative SEP technology involving electrojet engines that allowed us to increase significantly the mission's energetic capabilities, as well as highly autonomous on-board systems. Basic criteria underlining the ``Phobos-Grunt'' mission scenario, scientific objectives and rationale including Mars observations during the vehicle's insertion into Mars orbit and Phobos approach maneuvers, are discussed and an opportunity for international cooperation is suggested.

  4. Phobos-Grunt ; Russian Sample Return Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marov, M.

    As an important milestone in the Mars exploration, space vehicle of new generation "Phobos-Grunt" is planned to be launched by the Russian Aviation and Space Agency. The project is optimized around Phobos sample return mission and follow up missions targeted to study some Main asteroid belt bodies, NEO , and short period comets. The principal constrain is "Soyuz-Fregat" rather than "Proton" launcher utilization to accomplish these challenging goals. The vehicle design incorporates innovative SEP technology involving electrojet engines that allowed us to increase significantly the missions energetic capabilities, as well as high autonomous on- board systems . Basic criteria underlining the "Phobos-Grunt" mission scenario, scientific objections and rationale, involving Mars observations during the vehicle insertion into Mars orbit and Phobos approach manoeuvres, are discussed and an opportunity for international cooperation is suggested.

  5. Three orbital transfer vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Aerospace engineering students at the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University undertook three design projects under the sponsorship of the NASA/USRA Advanced Space Design Program. All three projects addressed cargo and/or crew transportation between low Earth orbit and geosynchronous Earth orbit. Project SPARC presents a preliminary design of a fully reusable, chemically powered aeroassisted vehicle for a transfer of a crew of five and a 6000 to 20000 pound payload. The ASTV project outlines a chemically powered aeroassisted configuration that uses disposable tanks and a relatively small aerobrake to realize propellant savings. The third project, LOCOST, involves a reusable, hybrid laser/chemical vehicle designed for large cargo (up to 88,200 pounds) transportation.

  6. Earth Day 2018 Activities

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2018-04-18

    Employees get an up-close look at some Florida marine life during a visit to the University of Florida's Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences booth at Kennedy Space Center’s annual Earth Day celebration. The two-day event featured approximately 50 exhibitors offering information on a variety of topics, including electric vehicles, sustainable lighting, renewable energy, Florida-friendly landscaping tips, Florida’s biking trails and more.

  7. Earth Day 2018 Activities

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2018-04-17

    David Bell of Renew Merchandise was one of 50 exhibitors offering information on a variety of topics, including electric vehicles, sustainable lighting, renewable energy, Florida-friendly landscaping tips, Florida’s biking trails and more. The event took place during the annual Earth Day celebration at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex, guests have an opportunity to learn more about energy awareness, the environment and sustainability.

  8. STS-43 Earth observation of a colorful sunrise

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1991-08-11

    STS-43 Earth observation taken aboard Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, captures the Earth's limb at sunrise with unusual cloud patterns silhouetted by the sunlight and rising into the terminator lines.

  9. OSIRIS-REx Asterod Sample Return Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura-Messinger, Keiki; Connolly, Harold C. Jr.; Messenger, Scott; Lauretta, Dante S.

    2017-01-01

    OSIRIS-REx is NASA's third New Frontiers Program mission, following New Horizons that completed a flyby of Pluto in 2015 and the Juno mission to Jupiter that has just begun science operations. The OSIRIS-REx mission's primary objective is to collect pristine surface samples of a carbonaceous asteroid and return to Earth for analysis. Carbonaceous asteroids and comets are 'primitive' bodies that preserved remnants of the Solar System starting materials and through their study scientists can learn about the origin and the earliest evolution of the Solar System. The OSIRIS-REx spacecraft was successfully launched on September 8, 2016, beginning its seven year journey to asteroid 101955 Bennu. The robotic arm will collect 60-2000 grams of material from the surface of Bennu and will return to Earth in 2023 for worldwide distribution by the Astromaterials Curation Facility at NASA Johnson Space Center. The name OSIRIS-REx embodies the mission objectives (1) Origins: Return and analyze a sample of a carbonaceous asteroid, (2) Spectral Interpretation: Provide ground-truth for remote observation of asteroids, (3) Resource Identification: Determine the mineral and chemical makeup of a near-Earth asteroid (4) Security: Measure the non-gravitational that changes asteroidal orbits and (5) Regolith Explorer: Determine the properties of the material covering an asteroid surface. Asteroid Bennu may preserve remnants of stardust, interstellar materials and the first solids to form in the Solar System and the molecular precursors to the origin of life and the Earth's oceans. Bennu is a potentially hazardous asteroid, with an approximately 1 in 2700 chance of impacting the Earth late in the 22nd century. OSIRIS-REx collects from Bennu will help formulate the types of operations and identify mission activities that astronauts will perform during their expeditions. Such information is crucial in preparing for humanity's next steps beyond low Earthy orbit and on to deep space

  10. Dynamic Finite Element Predictions for Mars Sample Return Cellular Impact Test #4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fasanella, Edwin L.; Billings, Marcus D.

    2001-01-01

    The nonlinear, transient dynamic finite element code, MSC.Dytran, was used to simulate an impact test of an energy absorbing Earth Entry Vehicle (EEV) that will impact without a parachute. EEVOs are designed to return materials from asteroids, comets, or planets for laboratory analysis on Earth. The EEV concept uses an energy absorbing cellular structure designed to contain and limit the acceleration of space exploration samples during Earth impact. The spherical shaped cellular structure is composed of solid hexagonal and pentagonal foam-filled cells with hybrid graphite-epoxy/Kevlar cell walls. Space samples fit inside a smaller sphere at the center of the EEVOs cellular structure. Pre-test analytical predictions were compared with the test results from a bungee accelerator. The model used to represent the foam and the proper failure criteria for the cell walls were critical in predicting the impact loads of the cellular structure. It was determined that a FOAM1 model for the foam and a 20% failure strain criteria for the cell walls gave an accurate prediction of the acceleration pulse for cellular impact.

  11. Advanced transportation system study: Manned launch vehicle concepts for two way transportation system payloads to LEO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, James B.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of the Advanced Transportation System Study (ATSS) task area 1 study effort is to examine manned launch vehicle booster concepts and two-way cargo transfer and return vehicle concepts to determine which of the many proposed concepts best meets NASA's needs for two-way transportation to low earth orbit. The study identified specific configurations of the normally unmanned, expendable launch vehicles (such as the National Launch System family) necessary to fly manned payloads. These launch vehicle configurations were then analyzed to determine the integrated booster/spacecraft performance, operations, reliability, and cost characteristics for the payload delivery and return mission. Design impacts to the expendable launch vehicles which would be required to perform the manned payload delivery mission were also identified. These impacts included the implications of applying NASA's man-rating requirements, as well as any mission or payload unique impacts. The booster concepts evaluated included the National Launch System (NLS) family of expendable vehicles and several variations of the NLS reference configurations to deliver larger manned payload concepts (such as the crew logistics vehicle (CLV) proposed by NASA JSC). Advanced, clean sheet concepts such as an F-1A engine derived liquid rocket booster (LRB), the single stage to orbit rocket, and a NASP-derived aerospace plane were also included in the study effort. Existing expendable launch vehicles such as the Titan 4, Ariane 5, Energia, and Proton were also examined. Although several manned payload concepts were considered in the analyses, the reference manned payload was the NASA Langley Research Center's HL-20 version of the personnel launch system (PLS). A scaled up version of the PLS for combined crew/cargo delivery capability, the HL-42 configuration, was also included in the analyses of cargo transfer and return vehicle (CTRV) booster concepts. In addition to strictly manned payloads, two-way cargo

  12. 19 CFR 12.73 - Motor vehicle and engine compliance with Federal antipollution emission requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) Vehicles of returning residents. Vehicles of residents returning from Canada, Mexico or other countries as... Canadian or Mexican border, or waive the requirements for Mexico or Canadian-registered vehicles of... outside of the United States, Canada, Mexico, or other countries as EPA may designate, until the catalytic...

  13. 19 CFR 12.73 - Motor vehicle and engine compliance with Federal antipollution emission requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) Vehicles of returning residents. Vehicles of residents returning from Canada, Mexico or other countries as... Canadian or Mexican border, or waive the requirements for Mexico or Canadian-registered vehicles of... outside of the United States, Canada, Mexico, or other countries as EPA may designate, until the catalytic...

  14. Illustration of Ares I Launch Vehicle With Call Outs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Named for the Greek god associated with Mars, the NASA developed Ares launch vehicles will return humans to the moon and later take them to Mars and other destinations. This is an illustration of the Ares I with call outs. Ares I is an inline, two-stage rocket configuration topped by the Orion crew vehicle and its launch abort system. In addition to the primary mission of carrying crews of four to six astronauts to Earth orbit, Ares I may also use its 25-ton payload capacity to deliver resources and supplies to the International Space Station, or to 'park' payloads in orbit for retrieval by other spacecraft bound for the moon or other destinations. Ares I employs a single five-segment solid rocket booster, a derivative of the space shuttle solid rocket booster, for the first stage. A liquid oxygen/liquid hydrogen J-2X engine derived from the J-2 engine used on the Apollo second stage will power the Ares I second stage. The Ares I can lift more than 55,000 pounds to low Earth orbit. Ares I is subject to configuration changes before it is actually launched. This illustration reflects the latest configuration as of January 2007.

  15. LIFE: Life Investigation For Enceladus A Sample Return Mission Concept in Search for Evidence of Life.

    PubMed

    Tsou, Peter; Brownlee, Donald E; McKay, Christopher P; Anbar, Ariel D; Yano, Hajime; Altwegg, Kathrin; Beegle, Luther W; Dissly, Richard; Strange, Nathan J; Kanik, Isik

    2012-08-01

    Life Investigation For Enceladus (LIFE) presents a low-cost sample return mission to Enceladus, a body with high astrobiological potential. There is ample evidence that liquid water exists under ice coverage in the form of active geysers in the "tiger stripes" area of the southern Enceladus hemisphere. This active plume consists of gas and ice particles and enables the sampling of fresh materials from the interior that may originate from a liquid water source. The particles consist mostly of water ice and are 1-10 μ in diameter. The plume composition shows H(2)O, CO(2), CH(4), NH(3), Ar, and evidence that more complex organic species might be present. Since life on Earth exists whenever liquid water, organics, and energy coexist, understanding the chemical components of the emanating ice particles could indicate whether life is potentially present on Enceladus. The icy worlds of the outer planets are testing grounds for some of the theories for the origin of life on Earth. The LIFE mission concept is envisioned in two parts: first, to orbit Saturn (in order to achieve lower sampling speeds, approaching 2 km/s, and thus enable a softer sample collection impact than Stardust, and to make possible multiple flybys of Enceladus); second, to sample Enceladus' plume, the E ring of Saturn, and the Titan upper atmosphere. With new findings from these samples, NASA could provide detailed chemical and isotopic and, potentially, biological compositional context of the plume. Since the duration of the Enceladus plume is unpredictable, it is imperative that these samples are captured at the earliest flight opportunity. If LIFE is launched before 2019, it could take advantage of a Jupiter gravity assist, which would thus reduce mission lifetimes and launch vehicle costs. The LIFE concept offers science returns comparable to those of a Flagship mission but at the measurably lower sample return costs of a Discovery-class mission.

  16. X-38: Artist Concept of Re-Entering Earth's Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This is an artist's depiction of NASA's proposed Crew Return Vehicle (CRV) re-entering the earth's atmosphere. A team of NASA researchers began free flight tests of the X-38, a technology demonstrator for the CRV, at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, in 1998. The CRV is being designed as a 'lifeboat' for the International Space Station The X-38 Crew Return Vehicle (CRV) research project is designed to develop the technology for a prototype emergency crew return vehicle, or lifeboat, for the International Space Station. The project is also intended to develop a crew return vehicle design that could be modified for other uses, such as a joint U.S. and international human spacecraft that could be launched on the French Ariane-5 Booster. The X-38 project is using available technology and off-the-shelf equipment to significantly decrease development costs. Original estimates to develop a capsule-type crew return vehicle were estimated at more than $2 billion. X-38 project officials have estimated that development costs for the X-38 concept will be approximately one quarter of the original estimate. Off-the-shelf technology is not necessarily 'old' technology. Many of the technologies being used in the X-38 project have never before been applied to a human-flight spacecraft. For example, the X-38 flight computer is commercial equipment currently used in aircraft and the flight software operating system is a commercial system already in use in many aerospace applications. The video equipment for the X-38 is existing equipment, some of which has already flown on the space shuttle for previous NASA experiments. The X-38's primary navigational equipment, the Inertial Navigation System/Global Positioning System, is a unit already in use on Navy fighters. The X-38 electromechanical actuators come from previous joint NASA, U.S. Air Force, and U.S. Navy research and development projects. Finally, an existing special coating developed by NASA will be used

  17. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-06-01

    ISS040-E-006327 (1 June 2014) --- A portion of International Space Station solar array panels and Earth?s horizon are featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 40 crew member on the space station.

  18. Project Argo: The design and analysis of an all-propulsive and an aeroassisted version of a manned space transportation vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Project Argo is the design of a manned Space Transportation Vehicle (STV) that would transport payloads between LEO (altitude lying between 278 to 500 km above the Earth) and GEO (altitude is approximately 35,800 km above the Earth) and would be refueled and refurbished at the Space Station Freedom. Argo would be man's first space-based manned vehicle and would provide a crucial link to geosynchronous orbit where the vast majority of satellites are located. The vehicle could be built and launched shortly after the space station and give invaluable space experience while serving as a workhorse to deliver and repair satellites. Eventually, if a manned space station is established in GEO, then Argo could serve as the transport between the Space Station Freedom and a Geostation. If necessary, modifications could be made to allow the vehicle to reach the moon or possibly Mars. Project Argo is unique in that it consists of the design and comparison of two different concepts to accomplish the same mission. The first is an all-propulsive vehicle which uses chemical propulsion for all of its major maneuvers between LEO and GEO. The second is a vehicle that uses aeroassisted braking during its return from GEO to LEO by passing through the upper portions of the atmosphere.

  19. Electric vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-03-01

    Quiet, clean, and efficient, electric vehicles (EVs) may someday become a practical mode of transportation for the general public. Electric vehicles can provide many advantages for the nation's environment and energy supply because they run on electricity, which can be produced from many sources of energy such as coal, natural gas, uranium, and hydropower. These vehicles offer fuel versatility to the transportation sector, which depends almost solely on oil for its energy needs. Electric vehicles are any mode of transportation operated by a motor that receives electricity from a battery or fuel cell. EVs come in all shapes and sizes and may be used for different tasks. Some EVs are small and simple, such as golf carts and electric wheel chairs. Others are larger and more complex, such as automobile and vans. Some EVs, such as fork lifts, are used in industries. In this fact sheet, we will discuss mostly automobiles and vans. There are also variations on electric vehicles, such as hybrid vehicles and solar-powered vehicles. Hybrid vehicles use electricity as their primary source of energy, however, they also use a backup source of energy, such as gasoline, methanol or ethanol. Solar-powered vehicles are electric vehicles that use photovoltaic cells (cells that convert solar energy to electricity) rather than utility-supplied electricity to recharge the batteries. These concepts are discussed.

  20. Vehicle health management technology needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammond, Walter E.; Jones, W. G.

    1992-01-01

    Background material on vehicle health management (VHM) and health monitoring/control is presented. VHM benefits are described and a list of VHM technology needs that should be pursued is presented. The NASA funding process as it impacts VHM technology funding is touched upon, and the VHM architecture guidelines for generic launch vehicles are described. An example of a good VHM architecture, design, and operational philosophy as it was conceptualized for the National Launch System program is presented. Consideration is given to the Strategic Avionics Technology Working Group's role in VHM, earth-to-orbit, and space vehicle avionics technology development considerations, and some actual examples of VHM benefits for checkout are given.

  1. Electrostatic Return of Contaminants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rantanen, R.; Gordon, T.

    2003-01-01

    A Model has been developed capable of calculating the electrostatic return of spacecraft-emitted molecules that are ionized and attracted back to the spacecraft by the spacecraft electric potential on its surfaces. The return of ionized contaminant molecules to charged spacecraft surfaces is very important to all altitudes. It is especially important at geosynchronous and interplanetary environments, since it may be the only mechanism by which contaminants can degrade a surface. This model is applicable to all altitudes and spacecraft geometries. In addition to results of the model will be completed to cover a wide range of potential space systems.

  2. Performance evaluation of the atmospheric phase of aeromaneuvering orbital transfer vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, R. W.; Stone, H. W.; Naftel, J. C.

    1984-01-01

    Studies are underway to design reusable orbital transfer vehicles that would be used to transfer payloads from low-earth orbit to higher orbits and return. One promising concept is to use an atmospheric pass on the return leg to reduce the amount of fuel for the mission. This paper discusses a six-degree-of-freedom simulation analysis for two configurations, a low-lift-to-drag ratio configuration and a medium-lift-to-drag ratio configuration using both a predictive guidance technique and an adaptive guidance technique. Both guidance schemes were evaluated using the 1962 standard atmosphere and three atmospheres that had been derived from three entries of the Space Shuttle. The predictive technique requires less reaction control system activity for both configurations, but because of the limited number of updates and because each update used the 1962 standard atmosphere, the adaptive technique produces more accurate exit conditions.

  3. Nuclear electric power for multimegawatt orbit transfer vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casagrande, R. D.

    Multimegawatt nuclear propulsion is an attractive option for orbit transfer vehicles. The masses of these platforms are expected to exceed the capability of a single launch from Earth necessitating assembly in space in a parking orbit. The OTV would transfer the platform from the parking orbit to the operational orbit and then return for the next mission. Electric propulsion is advantageous because of the high specific impulse achieved by the technology, 1000 to 5000 s and beyond, to reduce the propellant required. Nuclear power is attractive as the power system because of the weight savings over solar systems in the multimegawatt regime, and multimegawatts of power are required. A conceptual diagram is shown of an OTV with a command control module using electric thrusters powered from an SP-100 class nuclear reactor power system.

  4. The aerobraking space transfer vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, Glen; Carpenter, Brian; Corns, Steve; Harris, Robert; Jun, Brian; Munro, Bruce; Pulling, Eric; Sekhon, Amrit; Welton, Walt; Jakubowski, A.

    1990-01-01

    With the advent of the Space Station and the proposed Geosynchronous Operation Support Center (GeoShack) in the early 21st century, the need for a cost effective, reusable orbital transport vehicle has arisen. This transport vehicle will be used in conjunction with the Space Shuttle, the Space Station, and GeoShack. The vehicle will transfer mission crew and payloads between low earth and geosynchronous orbits with minimal cost. Recent technological advances in thermal protection systems such as those employed in the Space Shuttle have made it possible to incorporate and aerobrake on the transfer vehicle to further reduce transport costs. The research and final design configuration of the aerospace senior design team from VPISU, working in conjunction with NASA, are presented. The topic of aerobraking and focuses on the evolution of an Aerobraking Space Transfer Vehicle (ASTV), is addressed.

  5. System technology analysis of aeroassisted orbital transfer vehicles - Moderate lift/drag

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Florence, D. E.; Fischer, G.

    1983-01-01

    The utilization of procedures involving aerodynamic braking and/or aerodynamic maneuvering on return from higher altitude orbits to low-earth orbit makes it possible to realize significant performance benefits. The present study is concerned with a number of mission scenarios for Aeroassisted Orbital Transfer Vehicles (AOTV) and the impact of potential technology advances in the performance enhancement of the class of AOTV's having a hypersonic lift to drag ratio (L/D) of 0.75 to 1.5. It is found that the synergistic combination of a hypersonic L/D of 1.2, an advanced cryopropelled engine, and an LH2 drop tank (1-1/2 stage) leads to a single 65,000 pound shuttle, two-man geosynchronous mission with 2100 pounds of useful paylod. Additional payload enhancement is possible with AOTV dry weight reductions due to technology advances in the areas of vehicle structures and thermal protection systems and other subsystems.

  6. Vehicle Characteristics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-14

    g. Material. 5.1.7 Wheel Geometry. a. Camber angle. b. Caster angle. c. Pivot angle. d. Static toe-in. e. Turning angles...the vehicle characteristics to be obtained during testing of wheeled and tracked vehicles and their components. Physical characterization of test...frontal area Characteristic data sheet Power train Suspention Wheel geometry Vehicle clearance angles Armament Gun control systems 16. SECURITY

  7. Higher Education Endowments Return

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bahlmann, David; Walda, John D.; Sedlacek, Verne O.

    2012-01-01

    A new study of endowments by the National Association of College and University Business Officers (NACUBO) and the Commonfund Institute has brought good news to college and universities: While endowment returns dropped precipitously in fiscal year 2009 as a result of the financial crisis and accompanying slide in equity markets, they climbed to an…

  8. Return to Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangan, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    Call it physical activity, call it games, or call it play. Whatever its name, it's a place we all need to return to. In the physical education, recreation, and dance professions, we need to redesign programs to address the need for and want of play that is inherent in all of us.

  9. Advanced Aero-Propulsive Mid-Lift-to-Drag Ratio Entry Vehicle for Future Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, C. H.; Stosaric, R. R; Cerimele, C. J.; Wong, K. A.; Valle, G. D.; Garcia, J. A.; Melton, J. E.; Munk, M. M.; Blades, E.; Kuruvila, G.; hide

    2012-01-01

    NASA is currently looking well into the future toward realizing Exploration mission possibilities to destinations including the Earth-Moon Lagrange points, Near-Earth Asteroids (NEAs) and the Moon. These are stepping stones to our ultimate destination Mars. New ideas will be required to conquer the significant challenges that await us, some just conceptions and others beginning to be realized. Bringing these ideas to fruition and enabling further expansion into space will require varying degrees of change, from engineering and integration approaches used in spacecraft design and operations, to high-level architectural capabilities bounded only by the limits of our ideas. The most profound change will be realized by paradigm change, thus enabling our ultimate goals to be achieved. Inherent to achieving these goals, higher entry, descent, and landing (EDL) performance has been identified as a high priority. Increased EDL performance will be enabled by highly-capable thermal protection systems (TPS), the ability to deliver larger and heavier payloads, increased surface access, and tighter landing footprints to accommodate multiple asset, single-site staging. In addition, realizing reduced cost access to space will demand more efficient approaches and reusable launch vehicle systems. Current operational spacecraft and launch vehicles do not incorporate the technologies required for these far-reaching missions and goals, nor what is needed to achieve the desired launch vehicle cost savings. To facilitate these missions and provide for safe and more reliable capabilities, NASA and its partners will need to make ideas reality by gaining knowledge through the design, development, manufacturing, implementation and flight testing of robotic and human spacecraft. To accomplish these goals, an approach is recommended for integrated development and implementation of three paradigm-shifting capabilities into an advanced entry vehicle system with additional application to launch

  10. Trajectory and Aeroheating Environment Development and Sensitivity Analysis for Capsule-shaped Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Jeffrey S.; Wurster, Kathryn E.

    2006-01-01

    Recently, NASA's Exploration Systems Research and Technology Project funded several tasks that endeavored to develop and evaluate various thermal protection systems and high temperature material concepts for potential use on the crew exploration vehicle. In support of these tasks, NASA Langley's Vehicle Analysis Branch generated trajectory information and associated aeroheating environments for more than 60 unique entry cases. Using the Apollo Command Module as the baseline entry system because of its relevance to the favored crew exploration vehicle design, trajectories for a range of lunar and Mars return, direct and aerocapture Earth-entry scenarios were developed. For direct entry, a matrix of cases was created that reflects reasonably expected minimum and maximum values of vehicle ballistic coefficient, inertial velocity at entry interface, and inertial flight path angle at entry interface. For aerocapture, trajectories were generated for a range of values of initial velocity and ballistic coefficient that, when combined with proper initial flight path angles, resulted in achieving a low Earth orbit either by employing a full lift vector up or full lift vector down attitude. For each trajectory generated, aeroheating environments were generated which were intended to bound the thermal protection system requirements for likely crew exploration vehicle concepts. The trades examined clearly pointed to a range of missions / concepts that will require ablative systems as well as a range for which reusable systems may be feasible. In addition, the results clearly indicated those entry conditions and modes suitable for manned flight, considering vehicle deceleration levels experienced during entry. This paper presents an overview of the analysis performed, including the assumptions, methods, and general approach used, as well as a summary of the trajectory and aerothermal environment information that was generated.

  11. X-38 Drop Model: Glides to Earth After Being Dropped from a Cessna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    A 4-foot-long model of NASA's X-38, an experimental crew return vehicle, glides to earth after being dropped from a Cessna aircraft in late 1995. The model was used to test the ram-air parafoil landing system, which could allow for accurate and controlled landings of an emergency Crew Return Vehicle spacecraft returning to Earth. The X-38 Crew Return Vehicle (CRV) research project is designed to develop the technology for a prototype emergency crew return vehicle, or lifeboat, for the International Space Station. The project is also intended to develop a crew return vehicle design that could be modified for other uses, such as a joint U.S. and international human spacecraft that could be launched on the French Ariane-5 Booster. The X-38 project is using available technology and off-the-shelf equipment to significantly decrease development costs. Original estimates to develop a capsule-type crew return vehicle were estimated at more than $2 billion. X-38 project officials have estimated that development costs for the X-38 concept will be approximately one quarter of the original estimate. Off-the-shelf technology is not necessarily 'old' technology. Many of the technologies being used in the X-38 project have never before been applied to a human-flight spacecraft. For example, the X-38 flight computer is commercial equipment currently used in aircraft and the flight software operating system is a commercial system already in use in many aerospace applications. The video equipment for the X-38 is existing equipment, some of which has already flown on the space shuttle for previous NASA experiments. The X-38's primary navigational equipment, the Inertial Navigation System/Global Positioning System, is a unit already in use on Navy fighters. The X-38 electromechanical actuators come from previous joint NASA, U.S. Air Force, and U.S. Navy research and development projects. Finally, an existing special coating developed by NASA will be used on the X-38 thermal tiles to

  12. Solar Electric Propulsion Technologies Being Designed for Orbit Transfer Vehicle Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarver-Verhey, Timothy R.; Hoffman, David J.; Kerslake, Thomas W.; Oleson, Steven R.; Falck, Robert D.

    2002-01-01

    There is increasing interest in employing Solar Electric Propulsion (SEP) for new missions requiring transfer from low Earth orbit to the Earth-Moon Lagrange point, L1. Mission architecture plans place the Gateway Habitat at L1 in the 2011 to 2016 timeframe. The Gateway Habitat is envisioned to be used for Lunar exploration, space telescopes, and planetary mission staging. In these scenarios, an SEP stage, or "tug," is used to transport payloads to L1--such as the habitat module, lunar excursion and return vehicles, and chemical propellant for return crew trips. SEP tugs are attractive because they are able to efficiently transport large (less than 10,000 kg) payloads while minimizing propellant requirements. To meet the needs of these missions, a preliminary conceptual design for a general-purpose SEP tug was developed that incorporates several of the advanced space power and in-space propulsion technologies (such as high-power gridded ion and Hall thrusters, high-performance thin-film photovoltaics, lithium-ion batteries, and advanced high-voltage power processing) being developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center. A spreadsheet-based vehicle system model was developed for component sizing and is currently being used for mission planning. This model incorporates a low-thrust orbit transfer algorithm to make preliminary determinations of transfer times and propellant requirements. Results from this combined tug mass estimation and orbit transfer model will be used in a higher fidelity trajectory model to refine the analysis.

  13. The NASA Space Shuttle Earth Observations Office

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helfert, Michael R.; Wood, Charles A.

    1989-01-01

    The NASA Space Shuttle Earth Observations Office conducts astronaut training in earth observations, provides orbital documentation for acquisition of data and catalogs, and analyzes the astronaut handheld photography upon the return of Space Shuttle missions. This paper provides backgrounds on these functions and outlines the data constraints, organization, formats, and modes of access within the public domain.

  14. Analysis of Chinese Donors’ Return Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Nan; Wang, Jingxing; Ness, Paul; Yao, Fuzhu; Dong, Xiangdong; Bi, Xinhong; Mei, Heili; Li, Julin; He, Weilan; Lu, Yunlai; Ma, Hongli; Wen, Xiuqiong; Huang, Mei; Wright, David J.; King, Melissa; High, Patrick; Nelson, Kenrad; Shan, Hua

    2010-01-01

    Background It is important to understand donor return behavior. Converting first time donors to become repeat donors is essential for maintaining an adequate blood supply. Methods Characteristics of 241,552 whole blood (WB) donations from first time (FT) and repeat (RPT) donors who donated in 2008 at the 5 blood centers in China were compared. A subset of 54,394 WB donors who donated between January 1 and March 31, 2008 were analyzed for their return behavior in 2008 following the index donation using logistic regression. Results Of all donations, 64% was from FT donors. Donors with self-reported previous donations tended to be male, older, married, donated larger volume (≥300mL), and were heavier in weight. Among donors who donated from January to March, 2008, 14% returned for subsequent WB donations by the end of 2008. The number of previous donations and blood collection location were the two strongest predictors for making subsequent donations. Donors with 1, 2–3 and more than 3 previous donations were 3.7, 5.7, and 11.0 times more likely to return than FT donors. Those who donated in a blood collection vehicle were 4 times more likely to return than those who donated at a blood center. Being female, younger and of a lower education level (≤ middle school) were positively associated with subsequent return blood donation during the follow-up period observed in this study. Conclusion Most of the Chinese blood supply is from first time donors. Strategies aimed at encouraging current donors to become repeat donors are needed. PMID:20849408

  15. More About Reconfigurable Exploratory Robotic Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Ayanna; Nesnas, Issa; Werger, Barry; Helmick, Daniel; Clark, Murray; Christian, Raymond; Cipra, Raymond

    2009-01-01

    Modular exploratory robotic vehicles that will be able to reconfigure themselves in the field are undergoing development. Proposed for use in exploration of the surfaces of Mars and other remote planets, these vehicles and others of similar design could also be useful for exploring hostile terrain on Earth.

  16. Discover Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, Colleen

    1998-01-01

    Discover Earth is a NASA-sponsored project for teachers of grades 5-12, designed to: (1) enhance understanding of the Earth as an integrated system; (2) enhance the interdisciplinary approach to science instruction; and (3) provide classroom materials that focus on those goals. Discover Earth is conducted by the Institute for Global Environmental Strategies in collaboration with Dr. Eric Barron, Director, Earth System Science Center, The Pennsylvania State University; and Dr. Robert Hudson, Chair, the Department of Meteorology, University of Maryland at College Park. The enclosed materials: (1) represent only part of the Discover Earth materials; (2) were developed by classroom teachers who are participating in the Discover Earth project; (3) utilize an investigative approach and on-line data; and (4) can be effectively adjusted to classrooms with greater/without technology access. The Discover Earth classroom materials focus on the Earth system and key issues of global climate change including topics such as the greenhouse effect, clouds and Earth's radiation balance, surface hydrology and land cover, and volcanoes and climate change. All the materials developed to date are available on line at (http://www.strategies.org) You are encouraged to submit comments and recommendations about these materials to the Discover Earth project manager, contact information is listed below. You are welcome to duplicate all these materials.

  17. Returning Coronal Hole

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-02-06

    A substantial coronal hole rotated across the face of the sun this past week and is again streaming solar wind towards Earth (Jan. 30 - Feb. 2, 2017). This same coronal hole was facing Earth about a month ago and has rotated into a similar position again. Coronal holes are areas of open magnetic field from which solar wind particles stream into space. In this wavelength of extreme ultraviolet light it appears as a dark area near the center and lower portion of the sun. Movies are available at http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA11177

  18. Vehicle systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bales, Tom; Modlin, Tom; Suddreth, Jack; Wheeler, Tom; Tenney, Darrel R.; Bayless, Ernest O.; Lisagor, W. Barry; Bolstad, Donald A.; Croop, Harold; Dyer, J.

    1993-01-01

    Perspectives of the subpanel on expendable launch vehicle structures and cryotanks are: (1) new materials which provide the primary weight savings effect on vehicle mass/size; (2) today's investment; (3) typically 10-20 years to mature and fully characterize new materials.

  19. Autonomous Laser-Powered Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, William C. (Inventor); Hogan, Bartholomew P. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    An autonomous laser-powered vehicle designed to autonomously penetrate through ice caps of substantial (e.g., kilometers) thickness by melting a path ahead of the vehicle as it descends. A high powered laser beam is transmitted to the vehicle via an onboard bare fiber spooler. After the beam enters through the dispersion optics, the beam expands into a cavity. A radiation shield limits backscatter radiation from heating the optics. The expanded beam enters the heat exchanger and is reflected by a dispersion mirror. Forward-facing beveled circular grooves absorb the reflected radiant energy preventing the energy from being reflected back towards the optics. Microchannels along the inner circumference of the beam dump heat exchanger maximize heat transfer. Sufficient amount of fiber is wound on the fiber spooler to permit not only a descent but also to permit a sample return mission by inverting the vehicle and melting its way back to the surface.

  20. Manned Orbital Transfer Vehicle (MOTV). Volume 3: Program requirements documents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyland, R. E.; Sherman, S. W.; Morfin, H. W.

    1979-01-01

    The requirements for geosynchronous orbit capability using the manned orbit transfer vehicle (MOTV) are defined. The program requirements, the mission requirements, and the system and subsystem requirements for the MOTV are discussed. The mission requirements include a geosynchronous Earth orbit vehicle for the construction, servicing, repair and operation of communications, solar power, and Earth observation satellites.

  1. Project EGRESS: Earthbound Guaranteed Reentry from Space Station. the Design of an Assured Crew Recovery Vehicle for the Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Unlike previously designed space-based working environments, the shuttle orbiter servicing the space station will not remain docked the entire time the station is occupied. While an Apollo capsule was permanently available on Skylab, plans for Space Station Freedom call for a shuttle orbiter to be docked at the space station for no more than two weeks four times each year. Consideration of crew safety inspired the design of an Assured Crew Recovery Vehicle (ACRV). A conceptual design of an ACRV was developed. The system allows the escape of one or more crew members from Space Station Freedom in case of emergency. The design of the vehicle addresses propulsion, orbital operations, reentry, landing and recovery, power and communication, and life support. In light of recent modifications in space station design, Project EGRESS (Earthbound Guaranteed ReEntry from Space Station) pays particular attention to its impact on space station operations, interfaces and docking facilities, and maintenance needs. A water-landing medium-lift vehicle was found to best satisfy project goals of simplicity and cost efficiency without sacrificing safety and reliability requirements. One or more seriously injured crew members could be returned to an earth-based health facility with minimal pilot involvement. Since the craft is capable of returning up to five crew members, two such permanently docked vehicles would allow a full evacuation of the space station. The craft could be constructed entirely with available 1990 technology, and launched aboard a shuttle orbiter.

  2. Artist's Concept of the X-38 Crew Return

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This is an artist's concept of the X-38 Crew Return Vehicle (CRV). The X-38 will take place of the Russian Soyuz capsule and is well underway on development for the International Space Station. The Soyuz can only stay on orbit for six months as opposed to three years for the CRV.

  3. Thermal protection system development, testing, and qualification for atmospheric probes and sample return missions. Examples for Saturn, Titan and Stardust-type sample return

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatapathy, E.; Laub, B.; Hartman, G. J.; Arnold, J. O.; Wright, M. J.; Allen, G. A.

    2009-07-01

    The science community has continued to be interested in planetary entry probes, aerocapture, and sample return missions to improve our understanding of the Solar System. As in the case of the Galileo entry probe, such missions are critical to the understanding not only of the individual planets, but also to further knowledge regarding the formation of the Solar System. It is believed that Saturn probes to depths corresponding to 10 bars will be sufficient to provide the desired data on its atmospheric composition. An aerocapture mission would enable delivery of a satellite to provide insight into how gravitational forces cause dynamic changes in Saturn's ring structure that are akin to the evolution of protoplanetary accretion disks. Heating rates for the "shallow" Saturn probes, Saturn aerocapture, and sample Earth return missions with higher re-entry speeds (13-15 km/s) from Mars, Venus, comets, and asteroids are in the range of 1-6 KW/cm 2. New, mid-density thermal protection system (TPS) materials for such probes can be mission enabling for mass efficiency and also for use on smaller vehicles enabled by advancements in scientific instrumentation. Past consideration of new Jovian multiprobe missions has been considered problematic without the Giant Planet arcjet facility that was used to qualify carbon phenolic for the Galileo probe. This paper describes emerging TPS technologies and the proposed use of an affordable, small 5 MW arcjet that can be used for TPS development, in test gases appropriate for future planetary probe and aerocapture applications. Emerging TPS technologies of interest include new versions of the Apollo Avcoat material and a densified variant of Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA). Application of these and other TPS materials and the use of other facilities for development and qualification of TPS for Saturn, Titan, and Sample Return missions of the Stardust class with entry speeds from 6.0 to 28.6 km/s are discussed.

  4. Returning to Army Leadership

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-15

    ABSTRACT AUTHOR: Colonel John M. Riley TITLE: Returning To Army Leadership FORMAT: Strategy Research Project DATE: 15 March 2011...the market on the heels of the renewed fervor for stories of leadership, character, and values spurred perhaps by cinematic works of the past ten...the Army, March 8, 2007). 6 U.S. Department of the Army, Army Leadership: Competent, Confident, and Agile, Field Manual 6-22 (Washington, DC

  5. Mars Ascent Vehicle Needs Technology Development with a Focus on High Propellant Fractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitehead, J. C.

    2018-04-01

    Launching from Mars to orbit requires a miniature launch vehicle, beyond any known spacecraft propulsion. The Mars Ascent Vehicle (MAV) needs an unusually high propellant mass fraction. MAV mass has high leverage for the cost of Mars Sample Return.

  6. A Sample Return Container with Hermetic Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kong, Kin Yuen; Rafeek, Shaheed; Sadick, Shazad; Porter, Christopher C.

    2000-01-01

    A sample return container is being developed by Honeybee Robotics to receive samples from a derivative of the Champollion/ST4 Sample Acquisition and Transfer Mechanism or other samplers and then hermetically seal samples for a sample return mission. The container is enclosed in a phase change material (PCM) chamber to prevent phase change during return and re-entry to earth. This container is designed to operate passively with no motors and actuators. Using the sampler's featured drill tip for interfacing, transfer-ring and sealing samples, the container consumes no electrical power and therefore minimizes sample temperature change. The circular container houses a few isolated canisters, which will be sealed individually for samples acquired from different sites or depths. The drill based sampler indexes each canister to the sample transfer position, below the index interface for sample transfer. After sample transfer is completed, the sampler indexes a seal carrier, which lines up seals with the openings of the canisters. The sampler moves to the sealing interface and seals the sample canisters one by one. The sealing interface can be designed to work with C-seals, knife edge seals and cup seals. Again, the sampler provides all sealing actuation. This sample return container and co-engineered sample acquisition system are being developed by Honeybee Robotics in collaboration with the JPL Exploration Technology program.

  7. Space-based laser-powered orbital transfer vehicle (Project SLICK)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    A conceptual design study of a laser-powered orbital transfer vehicle (LOTV) is presented. The LOTV, nicknamed SLICK (Space Laser Interorbital Cargo Kite), will be utilized for the transfer of 16000 kg of cargo between Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and either Geosynchronous Earth Orbit (GEO) or Low Lunar Orbit (LLO). This design concentrates primarily on the LEO/GEO scenario, which will have typical LEO-to-GEO trip time of 6 days and two return versions. One version uses an all propulsive return while the other utilizes a ballute aerobrake for the return trip. Furthermore, three return cargo options of 16000 kg, 5000 kg (standard option), and 1600 kg are considered for this scenario. The LEO/LLO scenario uses only a standard, aerobraked version. The basic concept behind the LOTV is that the power for the propulsion system is supplied by a source separate from the LOTV itself. For the LEO/GEO scenario the LOTV utilizes a direct solar-pumped iodide laser and possibly two relay stations, all orbiting at an altitude of one Earth radius and zero inclination. An additional nuclear-powered laser is placed on the Moon for the LEO/LLO scenario. The propulsion system of the LOTV consists of a single engine fueled with liquid hydrogen. The laser beam is captured and directed by a four mirror optical system through a window in the thrust chamber of the engine. There, seven plasmas are created to convert the laser beam energy into thermal energy at an efficiency of at least 50 percent. For the LEO/LLO scenario the laser propulsion is supplemented by LH2/LOX chemical thrusters.

  8. Dynamic Finite Element Predictions for Mars Sample Return Cellular Impact Test #4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fasanella, Edwin L.; Billings, Marcus D.

    2001-01-01

    The nonlinear finite element program MSC.Dytran was used to predict the impact pulse for (he drop test of an energy absorbing cellular structure. This pre-test simulation was performed to aid in the design of an energy absorbing concept for a highly reliable passive Earth Entry Vehicle (EEV) that will directly impact the Earth without a parachute. In addition, a goal of the simulation was to bound the acceleration pulse produced and delivered to the simulated space cargo container. EEV's are designed to return materials from asteroids, comets, or planets for laboratory analysis on Earth. The EEV concept uses an energy absorbing cellular structure designed to contain and limit the acceleration of space exploration samples during Earth impact. The spherical shaped cellular structure is composed of solid hexagonal and pentagonal foam-filled cells with hybrid graphite-epoxy/Kevlar cell walls. Space samples fit inside a smaller sphere at the enter of the EEV's cellular structure. The material models and failure criteria were varied to determine their effect on the resulting acceleration pulse. Pre-test analytical predictions using MSC.Dytran were compared with the test results obtained from impact test #4 using bungee accelerator located at the NASA Langley Research Center Impact Dynamics Research Facility. The material model used to represent the foam and the proper failure criteria for the cell walls were critical in predicting the impact loads of the cellular structure. It was determined that a FOAMI model for the foam and a 20% failure strain criteria for the cell walls gave an accurate prediction of the acceleration pulse for drop test #4.

  9. Ultra Lightweight Ballutes for Return to Earth from the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masciarelli, James P.; Lin, John K. H.; Ware, Joanne S.; Rohrschneider, Reuben R.; Braun, Robert D.; Bartels, Robert E.; Moses, Robert W.; Hall, Jeffery L.

    2006-01-01

    Ultra lightweight ballutes offer revolutionary mass and cost benefits along with flexibility in flight system design compared to traditional entry system technologies. Under funding provided by NASA s Exploration Systems Research & Technology program, our team was able to make progress in developing this technology through systems analysis and design, evaluation of materials and construction methods, and development of critical analysis tools. Results show that once this technology is mature, significant launch mass savings, operational simplicity, and mission robustness will be available to help carry out NASA s Vision for Space Exploration.

  10. Earth Wisdom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Matre, Steve

    1985-01-01

    In our human-centered ignorance and arrogance we are rapidly destroying the earth. We must start helping people understand the big picture of ecological concepts. What these concepts mean for our own lives and how we must begin to change our lifestyles in order to live more harmoniously with the earth. (JHZ)

  11. Earth Science

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1976-01-01

    The LAGEOS I (Laser Geodynamics Satellite) was developed and launched by the Marshall Space Flight Center on May 4, 1976 from Vandenberg Air Force Base, California . The two-foot diameter satellite orbited the Earth from pole to pole and measured the movements of the Earth's surface.

  12. Technology for return of planetary samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The problem of returning a Mars sample to Earth was considered. The model ecosystem concept was advanced as the most reliable, sensitive method for assessing the biohazard from the Mars sample before it is permitted on Earth. Two approaches to ecosystem development were studied. In the first approach, the Mars sample would be introduced into the ecosystem and exposed to conditions which are as similar to the Martian environment as the constitutent terrestrial organisms can tolerate. In the second approach, the Mars sample would be tested to determine its effects on important terrestrial cellular functions. In addition, efforts were directed toward establishing design considerations for a Mars Planetary Receiving Laboratory. The problems encountered with the Lunar Receiving Laboratory were evaluated in this context. A questionnaire was developed to obtain information regarding important experiments to be conducted in the Planetary Receiving Laboratory.

  13. SAE Mil-1394 For Military and Aerospace Vehicle Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunga, Larry; Wroble, Mike; Kreska, Jack

    2004-01-01

    Unique opportunity to utilize new technology while increasing vehicle and crew member safety. Demonstration of new technology that can be utilized for Crew Exploration Vehicle and other future manned vehicles. Future work for other cameras in the vehicle that can be IEEE1394 based without major vehicle modifications. Demonstrates that LM can share information and knowledge between internal groups and NASA to assist in providing a product in support of the NASA Return to Flight Activities. This upgrade will provide a flight active data bus that is 100 times faster than any similar bus on the vehicle.

  14. Robotic vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Box, W.D.

    1997-02-11

    A robotic vehicle is described for travel through a conduit. The robotic vehicle includes forward and rear housings each having a hub portion, and each being provided with surface engaging mechanisms for selectively engaging the walls of the conduit such that the housings can be selectively held in stationary positions within the conduit. The surface engaging mechanisms of each housing includes a plurality of extendable appendages, each of which is radially extendable relative to the operatively associated hub portion between a retracted position and a radially extended position. The robotic vehicle also includes at least three selectively extendable members extending between the forward and rear housings, for selectively changing the distance between the forward and rear housings to effect movement of the robotic vehicle. 20 figs.

  15. Robotic vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Box, W.D.

    1998-08-11

    A robotic vehicle is described for travel through a conduit. The robotic vehicle includes forward and rear housings each having a hub portion, and each being provided with surface engaging mechanisms for selectively engaging the walls of the conduit such that the housings can be selectively held in stationary positions within the conduit. The surface engaging mechanisms of each housing includes a plurality of extendible appendages, each of which is radially extendible relative to the operatively associated hub portion between a retracted position and a radially extended position. The robotic vehicle also includes at least three selectively extendible members extending between the forward and rear housings, for selectively changing the distance between the forward and rear housings to effect movement of the robotic vehicle. 20 figs.

  16. Robotic vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Box, W. Donald

    1998-01-01

    A robotic vehicle for travel through a conduit. The robotic vehicle includes forward and rear housings each having a hub portion, and each being provided with surface engaging mechanisms for selectively engaging the walls of the conduit such that the housings can be selectively held in stationary positions within the conduit. The surface engaging mechanisms of each housing includes a plurality of extendable appendages, each of which is radially extendable relative to the operatively associated hub portion between a retracted position and a radially extended position. The robotic vehicle also includes at least three selectively extendable members extending between the forward and rear housings, for selectively changing the distance between the forward and rear housings to effect movement of the robotic vehicle.

  17. Robotic vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Box, W. Donald

    1997-01-01

    A robotic vehicle for travel through a conduit. The robotic vehicle includes forward and rear housings each having a hub portion, and each being provided with surface engaging mechanisms for selectively engaging the walls of the conduit such that the housings can be selectively held in stationary positions within the conduit. The surface engaging mechanisms of each housing includes a plurality of extendable appendages, each of which is radially extendable relative to the operatively associated hub portion between a retracted position and a radially extended position. The robotic vehicle also includes at least three selectively extendable members extending between the forward and rear housings, for selectively changing the distance between the forward and rear housings to effect movement of the robotic vehicle.

  18. Launch Vehicles

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1990-06-01

    The Delta II expendable launch vehicle with the ROSAT (Roentgen Satellite), cooperative space X-ray astronomy mission between NASA, Germany and United Kingdom, was launched from the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station on June 1, 1990.

  19. Titan Science Return Quantification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisbin, Charles R.; Lincoln, William

    2014-01-01

    Each proposal for a NASA mission concept includes a Science Traceability Matrix (STM), intended to show that what is being proposed would contribute to satisfying one or more of the agency's top-level science goals. But the information traditionally provided cannot be used directly to quantitatively compare anticipated science return. We added numerical elements to NASA's STM and developed a software tool to process the data. We then applied this methodology to evaluate a group of competing concepts for a proposed mission to Saturn's moon, Titan.

  20. Expedition 8 Returns Home

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-30

    JSC2004-E-21242 (30 April 2004) --- Astronaut C. Michael Foale, Expedition 8 commander and NASA ISS science officer, gives thumbs up after he and his crewmates, cosmonaut Alexander Y. Kaleri, Soyuz flight engineer representing Russia?s Federal Space Agency, and European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Andre Kuipers of the Netherlands, successfully landed in north central Kazakhstan on April 30, 2004, in their Soyuz TMA-3 capsule. Foale and Kaleri completed 195 days in space aboard the International Space Station (ISS), while Kuipers returned after an 11-day research mission as part of a commercial agreement between ESA and Russia?s Federal Space Agency. Photo credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls

  1. Launch Vehicles

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-15

    The Titan II liftoff. The Titan II launch vehicle was used for carrying astronauts on the Gemini mission. The Gemini Program was an intermediate step between the Project Mercury and the Apollo Program. The major objectives were to subject are two men and supporting equipment to long duration flights, to effect rendezvous and docking with other orbiting vehicle, and to perfect methods of reentry, and landing the spacecraft.

  2. Near-Earth Asteroid (NEA) Scout

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNutt, Leslie; Johnson, Les; Kahn, Peter; Castillo-Rogez, Julie; Frick, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) are the most easily accessible bodies in the solar system, and detections of NEAs are expected to grow exponentially in the near future, offering increasing target opportunities. As NASA continues to refine its plans to possibly explore these small worlds with human explorers, initial reconnaissance with comparatively inexpensive robotic precursors is necessary. Obtaining and analyzing relevant data about these bodies via robotic precursors before committing a crew to visit a NEA will significantly minimize crew and mission risk, as well as maximize exploration return potential. The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) are jointly examining a potential mission concept, tentatively called 'NEAScout,' utilizing a low-cost platform such as CubeSat in response to the current needs for affordable missions with exploration science value. The NEAScout mission concept would be treated as a secondary payload on the Space Launch System (SLS) Exploration Mission 1 (EM-1), the first planned flight of the SLS and the second un-crewed test flight of the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV).

  3. Energy Vs. Productivity: Diminishing Returns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MOSAIC, 1975

    1975-01-01

    Energy invested in corn production is compared with food energy returned in calculations by David Pimentel at Cornell University. The rate of return is falling off sharply in this already energy-intensive agriculture. Increased energy input, in the form of fertilizer, would yield far greater returns where agriculture is less sophisticated.…

  4. Puerto Rican Return Migrant Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carrasquillo, Angela; Carrasquillo, Ceferino

    Among Puerto Ricans who have migrated to the United States, a significant number have returned to Puerto Rico, while others shuttle between Puerto Rico and the United States. These groups of people are identified as return migrants. Studies suggest that return migrant youth in Puerto Rico have had to make environmental and cultural adjustments…

  5. Returns to Education in Bangladesh

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asadullah, Mohammad Niaz

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports labour market returns to education in Bangladesh using data from recent nationwide household survey. Returns are estimated separately for rural and urban samples, males, females and private-sector employees. Substantial heterogeneity in returns is observed; for example, estimates are higher for urban (than rural sample) and…

  6. Connected vehicle applications : safety.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2016-01-01

    Connected vehicle safety applications are designed to increase situational awareness : and reduce or eliminate crashes through vehicle-to-infrastructure, vehicle-to-vehicle, : and vehicle-to-pedestrian data transmissions. Applications support advisor...

  7. Connected vehicle applications : safety.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2016-01-01

    Connected vehicle safety applications are designed to increase situational awareness and reduce or eliminate crashes through vehicle-to-infrastructure, vehicle-to-vehicle, and vehicle-to-pedestrian data transmissions. Applications support advisories ...

  8. Ancient Earth, Alien Earths Event

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-08-20

    Panelists pose for a group photo at the “Ancient Earth, Alien Earths” Event at NASA Headquarters in Washington, DC Wednesday, August 20, 2014. The event was sponsored by NASA, the National Science Foundation (NSF), and the Smithsonian Institution and highlighted how research on early Earth could help guide our search for habitable planets orbiting other stars. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  9. Europa Sample Return Mission Utilizing High Specific Impulse Propulsion Refueled with Indigenous Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paniagua, J.; Powell, J. R.; Maise, G.

    2002-01-01

    We have conducted studies of a revolutionary new concept for conducting a Europa Sample Return Mission. Robotic spacecraft exploration of the Solar System has been severely constrained by the large energy requirements of interplanetary trajectories and the inherent delta V limitations of chemical rockets. Current missions use gravitational assists from intermediate planets to achieve these high-energy trajectories restricting payload size and increasing flight times. We propose a 6-year Europa Sample Return mission with very modest launch requirements enabled by MITEE. A new nuclear thermal propulsion engine design, termed MITEE (MIniature reacTor EnginE), has over twice the delta V capability of H2/O2 rockets (and much greater when refueled with H2 propellant from indigenous extraterrestrial resources) enabling unique missions that are not feasible with chemical propulsion. The MITEE engine is a compact, ultra-lightweight, thermal nuclear rocket that uses hydrogen as the propellant. MITEE, with its small size (50 cm O.D.), low mass (200 kg), and high specific impulse (~1000 sec), can provide a quantum leap in the capability for space science and exploration missions. The Robotic Europa Explorer (REE) spacecraft has a two-year outbound direct trajectory and lands on the satellite surface for an approximate 9 month stay. During this time, the vehicle is refueled with H2 propellant derived from Europa ice by the Autonomous Propellant Producer (APP), while collecting samples and searching for life. A small nuclear-heated submarine probe, the Autonomous Submarine Vehicle (ASV), based on MITEE technology, would melt through the ice and explore the undersea realm. The spacecraft has approximately a three year return to Earth after departure from Europa with samples onboard. Spacecraft payload is 430 kg at the start of the mission and can be launched with a single, conventional medium-sized Delta III booster. The spacecraft can bring back 25 kg of samples from Europa

  10. Thermal Design and Analysis of the Supersonic Flight Dynamics Test Vehicle for the Low Density Supersonic Decelerator Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mastropietro, A. J.; Pauken, Michael; Sunada, Eric; Gray, Sandria

    2013-01-01

    The thermal design and analysis of the experimental Supersonic Flight Dynamics Test (SFDT) vehicle is presented. The SFDT vehicle is currently being designed as a platform to help demonstrate key technologies for NASA's Low Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD) project. The LDSD project is charged by NASA's Office of the Chief Technologist (OCT) with the task of advancing the state of the art in Mars Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) systems by developing and testing three new technologies required for landing heavier payloads on Mars. The enabling technologies under development consist of a large 33.5 meter diameter Supersonic Ringsail (SSRS) parachute and two different types of Supersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (SIAD) devices - a robotic class, SIAD-R, that inflates to a 6 meter diameter torus, and an exploration class, SIAD-E, that inflates to an 8 meter diameter isotensoid. As part of the technology development effort, the various elements of the new supersonic decelerator system must be tested in a Mars-like environment. This is currently planned to be accomplished by sending a series of SFDT vehicles into Earth's stratosphere. Each SFDT vehicle will be lifted to a stable float altitude by a large helium carrier balloon. Once at altitude, the SFDT vehicles will be released from their carrier balloon and spun up via spin motors to provide trajectory stability. An onboard third stage solid rocket motor will propel each test vehicle to supersonic flight in the upper atmosphere. After main engine burnout, each vehicle will be despun and testing of the deceleration system will begin: first an inflatable decelerator will be deployed around the aeroshell to increase the drag surface area, and then the large parachute will be deployed to continue the deceleration and return the vehicle back to the Earth's surface. The SFDT vehicle thermal system must passively protect the vehicle structure and its components from cold temperatures experienced during the

  11. Vehicle systems and payload requirements evaluation. [computer programs for identifying launch vehicle system requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rea, F. G.; Pittenger, J. L.; Conlon, R. J.; Allen, J. D.

    1975-01-01

    Techniques developed for identifying launch vehicle system requirements for NASA automated space missions are discussed. Emphasis is placed on development of computer programs and investigation of astrionics for OSS missions and Scout. The Earth Orbit Mission Program - 1 which performs linear error analysis of launch vehicle dispersions for both vehicle and navigation system factors is described along with the Interactive Graphic Orbit Selection program which allows the user to select orbits which satisfy mission requirements and to evaluate the necessary injection accuracy.

  12. Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle Launch Abort System Guidance and Control Analysis Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, John B.; Kim, Sungwan; Raney, David L.; Aubuchon, Vanessa V.; Sparks, Dean W.; Busan, Ronald C.; Proud, Ryan W.; Merritt, Deborah S.

    2008-01-01

    Aborts during the critical ascent flight phase require the design and operation of Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) systems to escape from the Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV) and return the crew safely to the Earth. To accomplish this requirement of continuous abort coverage, CEV ascent abort modes are being designed and analyzed to accommodate the velocity, altitude, atmospheric, and vehicle configuration changes that occur during ascent. Aborts from the launch pad to early in the flight of the CLV second stage are performed using the Launch Abort System (LAS). During this type of abort, the LAS Abort Motor is used to pull the Crew Module (CM) safely away from the CLV and Service Module (SM). LAS abort guidance and control studies and design trades are being conducted so that more informed decisions can be made regarding the vehicle abort requirements, design, and operation. This paper presents an overview of the Orion CEV, an overview of the LAS ascent abort mode, and a summary of key LAS abort analysis methods and results.

  13. Shuttle Atlantis in Mate-Demate Device Being Loaded onto SCA-747 for Return to Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This photo shows a night view of the orbiter Atlantis being loaded onto one of NASA's Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA) at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields

  14. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-08-20

    Earth observation taken during day pass by an Expedition 36 crew member on board the International Space Station (ISS). Per Twitter message: Looking southwest over northern Africa. Libya, Algeria, Niger.

  15. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-09-01

    Earth Observation taken during a night pass by the Expedition 40 crew aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Folder lists this as: New Zealand Aurora night pass. On crewmember's Flickr page - Look straight down into an aurora.

  16. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-06-07

    ISS040-E-008174 (7 June 2014) --- Layers of Earth's atmosphere, brightly colored as the sun rises, are featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 40 crew member on the International Space Station.

  17. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-06-02

    ISS040-E-006817 (2 June 2014) --- Intersecting the thin line of Earth's atmosphere, International Space Station solar array wings are featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 40 crew member on the International Space Station.

  18. Earth Science

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1992-07-18

    Workers at Launch Complex 17 Pad A, Kennedy Space Center (KSC) encapsulate the Geomagnetic Tail (GEOTAIL) spacecraft (upper) and attached payload Assist Module-D upper stage (lower) in the protective payload fairing. GEOTAIL project was designed to study the effects of Earth's magnetic field. The solar wind draws the Earth's magnetic field into a long tail on the night side of the Earth and stores energy in the stretched field lines of the magnetotail. During active periods, the tail couples with the near-Earth magnetosphere, sometimes releasing energy stored in the tail and activating auroras in the polar ionosphere. GEOTAIL measures the flow of energy and its transformation in the magnetotail and will help clarify the mechanisms that control the imput, transport, storage, release, and conversion of mass, momentum, and energy in the magnetotail.

  19. Discover Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Discover Earth is a NASA-funded project for teachers of grades 5-12 who want to expand their knowledge of the Earth system, and prepare to become master teachers who promote Earth system science in their own schools, counties, and throughout their state. Participants from the following states are invited to apply: Connecticut, Delaware, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Washington, DC. Teachers selected for the project participate in a two-week summer workshop conducted at the University of Maryland, College Park; develop classroom-ready materials during the workshop for broad dissemination; conduct a minimum of two peer training activities during the coming school year; and participate in other enrichment/education opportunities as available and desired. Discover Earth is a team effort that utilizes expertise from a range of contributors, and balances science content with hands-on classroom applications.

  20. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-05-31

    Earth Observation taken during a day pass by the Expedition 40 crew aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Folder lists this as: CEO - Arena de Sao Paolo. View used for Twitter message: Cloudy skies over São Paulo Brazil

  1. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-07-26

    Earth observation taken during day pass by an Expedition 36 crew member on board the International Space Station (ISS). Per Twitter message: Never tire of finding shapes in the clouds! These look very botanical to me. Simply perfect.

  2. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-06-12

    Earth Observation taken during a day pass by the Expedition 40 crew aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Folder lists this as: Moon, Japan, Kamchatka with a wild cloud. Part of a solar array is also visible.

  3. Earth Science

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1990-10-24

    Solar Vector Magnetograph is used to predict solar flares, and other activities associated with sun spots. This research provides new understanding about weather on the Earth, and solar-related conditions in orbit.

  4. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-08-03

    Earth observation taken during day pass by an Expedition 36 crew member on board the International Space Station (ISS). Per Twitter message: Perhaps a dandelion losing its seeds in the wind? Love clouds!

  5. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-06-27

    Earth Observation taken during a day pass by the Expedition 40 crew aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Part of Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) is visible. Folder lists this as: the Middle East, Israel.

  6. Earth Observations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-06-16

    ISS024-E-006136 (16 June 2010) --- Polar mesospheric clouds, illuminated by an orbital sunrise, are featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 24 crew member on the International Space Station. Polar mesospheric, or noctilucent (?night shining?), clouds are observed from both Earth?s surface and in orbit by crew members aboard the space station. They are called night-shining clouds as they are usually seen at twilight. Following the setting of the sun below the horizon and darkening of Earth?s surface, these high clouds are still briefly illuminated by sunlight. Occasionally the ISS orbital track becomes nearly parallel to Earth?s day/night terminator for a time, allowing polar mesospheric clouds to be visible to the crew at times other than the usual twilight due to the space station altitude. This unusual photograph shows polar mesospheric clouds illuminated by the rising, rather than setting, sun at center right. Low clouds on the horizon appear yellow and orange, while higher clouds and aerosols are illuminated a brilliant white. Polar mesospheric clouds appear as light blue ribbons extending across the top of the image. These clouds typically occur at high latitudes of both the Northern and Southern Hemispheres, and at fairly high altitudes of 76?85 kilometers (near the boundary between the mesosphere and thermosphere atmospheric layers). The ISS was located over the Greek island of Kos in the Aegean Sea (near the southwestern coastline of Turkey) when the image was taken at approximately midnight local time. The orbital complex was tracking northeastward, nearly parallel to the terminator, making it possible to observe an apparent ?sunrise? located almost due north. A similar unusual alignment of the ISS orbit track, terminator position, and seasonal position of Earth?s orbit around the sun allowed for striking imagery of polar mesospheric clouds over the Southern Hemisphere earlier this year.

  7. Earth Rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickey, Jean O.

    1995-01-01

    The study of the Earth's rotation in space (encompassing Universal Time (UT1), length of day, polar motion, and the phenomena of precession and nutation) addresses the complex nature of Earth orientation changes, the mechanisms of excitation of these changes and their geophysical implications in a broad variety of areas. In the absence of internal sources of energy or interactions with astronomical objects, the Earth would move as a rigid body with its various parts (the crust, mantle, inner and outer cores, atmosphere and oceans) rotating together at a constant fixed rate. In reality, the world is considerably more complicated, as is schematically illustrated. The rotation rate of the Earth's crust is not constant, but exhibits complicated fluctuations in speed amounting to several parts in 10(exp 8) [corresponding to a variation of several milliseconds (ms) in the Length Of the Day (LOD) and about one part in 10(exp 6) in the orientation of the rotation axis relative to the solid Earth's axis of figure (polar motion). These changes occur over a broad spectrum of time scales, ranging from hours to centuries and longer, reflecting the fact that they are produced by a wide variety of geophysical and astronomical processes. Geodetic observations of Earth rotation changes thus provide insights into the geophysical processes illustrated, which are often difficult to obtain by other means. In addition, these measurements are required for engineering purposes. Theoretical studies of Earth rotation variations are based on the application of Euler's dynamical equations to the problem of finding the response of slightly deformable solid Earth to variety of surface and internal stresses.

  8. Clementine Images of Earth and Moon

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-06-12

    During its flight and lunar orbit, NASA’s Clementine spacecraft returned images of the planet Earth and the Moon. This collection of UVVIS camera Clementine images shows the Earth from the Moon and 3 images of the Earth. The image on the left shows the Earth as seen across the lunar north pole; the large crater in the foreground is Plaskett. The Earth actually appeared about twice as far above the lunar horizon as shown. The top right image shows the Earth as viewed by the UVVIS camera while Clementine was in transit to the Moon; swirling white cloud patterns indicate storms. The two views of southeastern Africa were acquired by the UVVIS camera while Clementine was in low Earth orbit early in the mission. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00432

  9. Clementine Images of Earth and Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    During its flight and lunar orbit, the Clementine spacecraft returned images of the planet Earth and the Moon. This collection of UVVIS camera Clementine images shows the Earth from the Moon and 3 images of the Earth.

    The image on the left shows the Earth as seen across the lunar north pole; the large crater in the foreground is Plaskett. The Earth actually appeared about twice as far above the lunar horizon as shown. The top right image shows the Earth as viewed by the UVVIS camera while Clementine was in transit to the Moon; swirling white cloud patterns indicate storms. The two views of southeastern Africa were acquired by the UVVIS camera while Clementine was in low Earth orbit early in the mission

  10. NASA/USRA advanced space design program: The laser powered interorbital vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    A preliminary design is presented for a low-thrust Laser Powered Interorbital Vehicle (LPIV) intended for cargo transportation between an earth space station and a lunar base. The LPIV receives its power from two iodide laser stations, one orbiting the earth and the other located on the surface of the moon. The selected mission utilizes a spiral trajectory, characteristic of a low-thrust spacecraft, requiring 8 days for a lunar rendezvous and an additional 9 days for return. The ship's configuration consists primarily of an optical train, two hydrogen plasma engines, a 37.1 m box beam truss, a payload module, and fuel tanks. The total mass of the vehicle fully loaded is 63300 kg. A single plasma, regeneratively cooled engine design is incorporated into the two 500 N engines. These are connected to the spacecraft by turntables which allow the vehicle to thrust tangentially to the flight path. Proper collection and transmission of the laser beam to the thrust chambers is provided through the optical train. This system consists of the 23 m diameter primary mirror, a convex parabolic secondary mirror, a beam splitter and two concave parabolic tertiary mirrors. The payload bay is capable of carrying 18000 kg of cargo. The module is located opposite the primary mirror on the main truss. Fuel tanks carrying a maximum of 35000 kg of liquid hydrogen are fastened to tracks which allow the tanks to be moved perpendicular to the main truss. This capability is required to prevent the center of mass from moving out of the thrust vector line. The laser beam is located and tracked by means of an acquisition, pointing and tracking system which can be locked onto the space-based laser station. Correct orientation of the spacecraft with the laser beam is maintained by control moment gyros and reaction control rockets. Additionally an aerobrake configuration was designed to provide the option of using the atmospheric drag in place of propulsion for a return trajectory.

  11. Astrobiology Objectives for Mars Sample Return

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, M. A.

    2002-05-01

    Astrobiology is the study of life in the Universe, and a major objective is to understand the past, present, and future biologic potential of Mars. The current Mars Exploration Program encompasses a series of missions for reconnaissance and in-situ analyses to define in time and space the degree of habitability on Mars. Determining whether life ever existed on Mars is a more demanding question as evidenced by controversies concerning the biogenicity of features in the Mars meteorite ALH84001 and in the earliest rocks on Earth. In-situ studies may find samples of extreme interest but resolution of the life question most probably would require a sample returned to Earth. A selected sample from Mars has the many advantages: State-of-the-art instruments, precision sample handling and processing, scrutiny by different investigators employing different techniques, and adaptation of approach to any surprises It is with a returned sample from Mars that Astrobiology has the most to gain in determining whether life did, does, or could exist on Mars.

  12. Expedition 8 Returns Home

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-30

    JSC2004-E-21252 (30 April 2004) --- Astronaut C. Michael Foale, Expedition 8 commander and NASA ISS science officer, is carried in a chair from the Soyuz landing site to an inflatable medical tent after he and his crewmates, cosmonaut Alexander Y. Kaleri (out of frame), Soyuz flight engineer representing Russia’s Federal Space Agency, and European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Andre Kuipers (out of frame) of the Netherlands, successfully landed in north central Kazakhstan on April 30, 2004, in their Soyuz TMA-3 capsule. Foale and Kaleri completed 195 days in space aboard the International Space Station (ISS), while Kuipers returned after an 11-day research mission as part of a commercial agreement between ESA and Russia’s Federal Space Agency. Photo Credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls

  13. Spacecraft Charging Issues for Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buhler, Janessa L.; Minow, Joseph I.; Trout, Dawn H.

    2014-01-01

    Spacecraft charging is well known threat to successful long term spacecraft operations and instrument reliability in orbits that spend significant time in hot electron environments. In recent years, spacecraft charging has increasingly been recognized as a potentially significant engineering issue for launch vehicles used to deploy spacecraft using (a) low Earth orbit (LEO), high inclination flight trajectories that pass through the auroral zone, (b) geostationary transfer orbits that require exposures to the hot electron environments in the Earths outer radiation belts, and (c) LEO escape trajectories using multiple phasing orbits through the Earths radiation belts while raising apogee towards a final Earth escape geometry. Charging becomes an issue when significant areas of exposed insulating materials or ungrounded conductors are used in the launch vehicle design or the payload is designed for use in a benign charging region beyond the Earths magnetosphere but must survive passage through the strong charging regimes of the Earths radiation belts. This presentation will first outline the charging risks encountered on typical launch trajectories used to deploy spacecraft into Earth orbit and Earth escape trajectories. We then describe the process used by NASAs Launch Services Program to evaluate when surface and internal charging is a potential risk to a NASA mission. Finally, we describe the options for mitigating charging risks including modification of the launch vehicle andor payload design and controlling the risk through operational launch constraints to avoid significant charging environments.

  14. Near Earth asteroid rendezvous

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The Spacecraft Design Course is the capstone design class for the M.S. in astronautics at the Naval Postgraduate School. The Fall 92 class designed a spacecraft for the Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous Mission (NEAR). The NEAR mission uses a robotic spacecraft to conduct up-close reconnaissance of a near-earth asteroid. Such a mission will provide information on Solar System formation and possible space resources. The spacecraft is intended to complete a NEAR mission as a relatively low-budget program while striving to gather as much information about the target asteroid as possible. A complete mission analysis and detailed spacecraft design were completed. Mission analysis includes orbit comparison and selection, payload and telemetry requirements, spacecraft configuration, and launch vehicle selection. Spacecraft design includes all major subsystems: structure, electrical power, attitude control, propulsion, payload integration, and thermal control. The resulting spacecraft demonstrates the possibility to meet the NEAR mission requirements using existing technology, 'off-the-shelf' components, and a relatively low-cost launch vehicle.

  15. Some Problems of Rocket-Space Vehicles' Characteristics co- ordination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergienko, Alexander A.

    2002-01-01

    of the XX century suffered a reverse. The designers of the United States' firms and enterprises of aviation and rocket-space industry (Boeing, Rocketdyne, Lockheed Martin, McDonnell Douglas, Rockwell, etc.) and NASA (Marshall Space Flight Center, Johnson Space Center, Langley Research Center and Lewis Research Center and others) could not correctly co-ordinate the characteristics of a propulsion system and a space vehicle for elaboration of the "Single-Stage-To-Orbit" reusable vehicle (SSTO) as an integral whole system, which is would able to inject a payload into an orbit and to return back on the Earth. jet nozzle design as well as the choice of propulsion system characteristics, ensuring the high ballistic efficiency, are considered in the present report. The efficiency criterions for the engine and launch system parameters optimization are discussed. The new methods of the nozzle block optimal parameters' choice for the satisfaction of the object task of flight are suggested. The family of SSTO with a payload mass from 5 to 20 ton and initial weight under 800 ton is considered.

  16. Illustration of Ares V Launch Vehicle With Call Outs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    The NASA developed Ares rockets, named for the Greek god associated with Mars, will return humans to the moon and later take them to Mars and other destinations. This is an illustration of the Ares V with call outs. The Ares V is a heavy lift launch vehicle that will use five RS-68 liquid oxygen/liquid hydrogen engines mounted below a larger version of the space shuttle external tank, and two five-segment solid propellant rocket boosters for the first stage. The upper stage will use the same J-2X engine as the Ares I and past Apollo vehicles. The Ares V can lift more than 286,000 pounds to low Earth orbit and stands approximately 360 feet tall. This versatile system will be used to carry cargo and the components into orbit needed to go to the moon and later to Mars. Ares V is subject to configuration changes before it is actually launched. This illustration reflects the latest configuration as of January 2007.

  17. Launch Vehicles

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1961-01-01

    This is a comparison illustration of the Redstone, Jupiter-C, and Mercury Redstone launch vehicles. The Redstone ballistic missile was a high-accuracy, liquid-propelled, surface-to-surface missile. Originally developed as a nose cone re-entry test vehicle for the Jupiter intermediate range ballistic missile, the Jupiter-C was a modification of the Redstone missile and successfully launched the first American Satellite, Explorer-1, in orbit on January 31, 1958. The Mercury Redstone lifted off carrying the first American, astronaut Alan Shepard, in his Mercury spacecraft Freedom 7, on May 5, 1961.

  18. Recommended Maximum Temperature For Mars Returned Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beaty, D. W.; McSween, H. Y.; Czaja, A. D.; Goreva, Y. S.; Hausrath, E.; Herd, C. D. K.; Humayun, M.; McCubbin, F. M.; McLennan, S. M.; Hays, L. E.

    2016-01-01

    The Returned Sample Science Board (RSSB) was established in 2015 by NASA to provide expertise from the planetary sample community to the Mars 2020 Project. The RSSB's first task was to address the effect of heating during acquisition and storage of samples on scientific investigations that could be expected to be conducted if the samples are returned to Earth. Sample heating may cause changes that could ad-versely affect scientific investigations. Previous studies of temperature requirements for returned mar-tian samples fall within a wide range (-73 to 50 degrees Centigrade) and, for mission concepts that have a life detection component, the recommended threshold was less than or equal to -20 degrees Centigrade. The RSSB was asked by the Mars 2020 project to determine whether or not a temperature requirement was needed within the range of 30 to 70 degrees Centigrade. There are eight expected temperature regimes to which the samples could be exposed, from the moment that they are drilled until they are placed into a temperature-controlled environment on Earth. Two of those - heating during sample acquisition (drilling) and heating while cached on the Martian surface - potentially subject samples to the highest temperatures. The RSSB focused on the upper temperature limit that Mars samples should be allowed to reach. We considered 11 scientific investigations where thermal excursions may have an adverse effect on the science outcome. Those are: (T-1) organic geochemistry, (T-2) stable isotope geochemistry, (T-3) prevention of mineral hydration/dehydration and phase transformation, (T-4) retention of water, (T-5) characterization of amorphous materials, (T-6) putative Martian organisms, (T-7) oxidation/reduction reactions, (T-8) (sup 4) He thermochronometry, (T-9) radiometric dating using fission, cosmic-ray or solar-flare tracks, (T-10) analyses of trapped gasses, and (T-11) magnetic studies.

  19. Electric-Drive Vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Septon, Kendall K

    Electric-drive vehicles use electricity as their primary fuel or to improve the efficiency of conventional vehicle designs. These vehicles can be divided into three categories: Hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs), All-electric vehicles (EVs). Together, PHEVs and EVs can also be referred to as plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs).

  20. Earth: Earth Science and Health

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maynard, Nancy G.

    2001-01-01

    A major new NASA initiative on environmental change and health has been established to promote the application of Earth science remote sensing data, information, observations, and technologies to issues of human health. NASA's Earth Sciences suite of Earth observing instruments are now providing improved observations science, data, and advanced technologies about the Earth's land, atmosphere, and oceans. These new space-based resources are being combined with other agency and university resources, data integration and fusion technologies, geographic information systems (GIS), and the spectrum of tools available from the public health community, making it possible to better understand how the environment and climate are linked to specific diseases, to improve outbreak prediction, and to minimize disease risk. This presentation is an overview of NASA's tools, capabilities, and research advances in this initiative.