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Sample records for earth tidal strain

  1. Calibration for the shear strain of 3-component borehole strainmeters in eastern Taiwan through Earth and ocean tidal waveform modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canitano, Alexandre; Hsu, Ya-Ju; Lee, Hsin-Ming; Linde, Alan T.; Sacks, Selwyn

    2018-03-01

    We propose an approach for calibrating the horizontal tidal shear components [(differential extension (γ _1) and engineering shear (γ _2)] of two Sacks-Evertson (in Pap Meteorol Geophys 22:195-208, 1971) SES-3 borehole strainmeters installed in the Longitudinal Valley in eastern Taiwan. The method is based on the waveform reconstruction of the Earth and ocean tidal shear signals through linear regressions on strain gauge signals, with variable sensor azimuth. This method allows us to derive the orientation of the sensor without any initial constraints and to calibrate the shear strain components γ _1 and γ _2 against M_2 tidal constituent. The results illustrate the potential of tensor strainmeters for recording horizontal tidal shear strain.

  2. Tidal Locking Of The Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koohafkan, Michael

    2006-05-01

    The Moon's orbit and spin period are nearly synchronized, or tidally locked. Could the Moon's orbit and the Earth's spin eventually synchronize as well? The Moon's gravitational pull on the Earth produces tides in our oceans, and tidal friction gradually lengthens our days. Less obvious gravitational interactions between the Earth and Moon may also have effects on Earth's spin. The Earth is slightly distorted into an egg-like shape, and the torque exerted by the Moon on our equatorial bulge slowly changes the tilt of our spin axis. How do effects such as these change as the Moon drifts away from Earth? I will examine gravitational interactions between Earth and Moon to learn how they contribute to the deceleration of the Earth's rotation. My goal is to determine the amount of time it would take for the Earth's rotational speed to decelerate until the period of a single rotation matches the period of the Moon's orbit around Earth -- when the Earth is ``tidally locked'' with the Moon. I aim to derive a general mathematical expression for the rotational deceleration of the Earth due to Moon's gravitational influences.

  3. Tidal Friction in the Earth and Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, R. D.

    2006-12-01

    "Tidal Friction" is a classic subject in geophysics, with ties to some of the great scientists of the Victorian era. The subject has been reinvigorated over the past decade by space geodesy, and particularly by the Topex/Poseidon satellite altimeter mission. In fact, the topic has now taken on some significance in oceanography, with potential implications for problems of mixing, thermocline maintenance, and the thermohaline circulation. Likewise, tidal measurements have become sufficiently precise to reveal new information about the solid earth. In this respect, the tidal force is an invaluable "probe" of the earth, at frequencies well outside the seismic band. This talk will "follow the energy" of tides while noting some important geophysical implications at each stage. In the present earth-moon-sun configuration, energy for tides is extracted from the earth's rotation. Ancient eclipses bear witness to this, and the discrepancy between Babylonian (and other) observations and tidal predictions yields unique information about the mantle and the overlying fluid envelope. Complementary information comes from tidal anelasticity estimates, which are now available at frequencies ranging from semidiurnal to fortnightly, monthly, and 18.6 years. These data, when combined with various kinds of gravity measurements, are relevant to the present-day sea-level problem. Solid-earth tidal dissipation represents less than 5% of the system total. As has long been realized, the largest energy sink is the ocean. About 70% of the oceanic dissipation occurs in shallow seas (the traditional sink) and 30% in the deep ocean, generally near rugged bottom topography. The latter represents a substantial amount of power, roughly 1 gigawatt, available for generation of internal tides and other baroclinic motions. Experiments like HOME are helping unravel the links between barotropic tides, internal tides, turbulence, and mixing. The latter opens possible linkages to climate, and recent work

  4. TIDAL DISSIPATION COMPARED TO SEISMIC DISSIPATION: IN SMALL BODIES, EARTHS, AND SUPER-EARTHS

    SciT

    Efroimsky, Michael, E-mail: michael.efroimsky@usno.navy.mil

    2012-02-20

    While the seismic quality factor and phase lag are defined solely by the bulk properties of the mantle, their tidal counterparts are determined by both the bulk properties and the size effect (self-gravitation of a body as a whole). For a qualitative estimate, we model the body with a homogeneous sphere, and express the tidal phase lag through the lag in a sample of material. Although simplistic, our model is sufficient to understand that the lags are not identical. The difference emerges because self-gravitation pulls the tidal bulge down. At low frequencies, this reduces strain and the damping rate, makingmore » tidal damping less efficient in larger objects. At higher frequencies, competition between self-gravitation and rheology becomes more complex, though for sufficiently large super-Earths the same rule applies: the larger the planet, the weaker the tidal dissipation in it. Being negligible for small terrestrial planets and moons, the difference between the seismic and tidal lagging (and likewise between the seismic and tidal damping) becomes very considerable for large exoplanets (super-Earths). In those, it is much lower than what one might expect from using a seismic quality factor. The tidal damping rate deviates from the seismic damping rate, especially in the zero-frequency limit, and this difference takes place for bodies of any size. So the equal in magnitude but opposite in sign tidal torques, exerted on one another by the primary and the secondary, have their orbital averages going smoothly through zero as the secondary crosses the synchronous orbit. We describe the mantle rheology with the Andrade model, allowing it to lean toward the Maxwell model at the lowest frequencies. To implement this additional flexibility, we reformulate the Andrade model by endowing it with a free parameter {zeta} which is the ratio of the anelastic timescale to the viscoelastic Maxwell time of the mantle. Some uncertainty in this parameter's frequency dependence does

  5. Contribution to the theory of tidal oscillations of an elastic earth. External tidal potential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musen, P.

    1974-01-01

    The differential equations of the tidal oscillations of the earth were established under the assumption that the interior of the earth is laterally inhomogeneous. The theory was developed using vectorial and dyadic symbolism to shorten the exposition and to reduce the differential equations to a symmetric form convenient for programming and for numerical integration. The formation of tidal buldges on the surfaces of discontinuity and the changes in the internal density produce small periodic variations in the exterior geopotential which are reflected in the motion of artificial satellites. The analoques of Love elastic parameters in the expansion of exterior tidal potential reflect the asymmetric and inhomogeneous structure of the interior of the earth.

  6. Observed tidal braking in the earth/moon/sun system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christodoulidis, D. C.; Smith, D. E.; Williamson, R. G.; Klosko, S. M.

    1987-01-01

    The low degree and order terms in the spherical harmonic model of the tidal potential were observed through the perturbations which are induced on near-earth satellite orbital motions. Evaluations of tracking observations from 17 satellites and a GEM-T1 geopotential model were used in the tidal recovery which was made in the presence of over 600 long-wavelength coefficients from 32 major and minor tides. Wahr's earth tidal model was used as a basis for the recovery of the ocean tidal terms. Using this tidal model, the secular change in the moon's mean motion due to tidal dissipation was found to be -25.27 + or - 0.61 arcsec/century squared. The estimation of lunar acceleration agreed with that observed from lunar laser ranging techniques (-24.9 + or - 1.0 arcsec/century squared), with the corresponding tidal braking of earth's rotation being -5.98 + or - 0.22 x 10 to the minus 22 rad/second squared. If the nontidal braking of the earth due to the observed secular change in the earth's second zonal harmonic is considered, satellite techniques yield a total value of the secular change of the earth's rotation rate of -4.69 + or - 0.36 x 10 to the minus 22 rad/second squared.

  7. Observed tidal braking in the earth/moon/sun system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christodoulidis, D. C.; Smith, D. E.; Williamson, R. G.; Klosko, S. M.

    1988-01-01

    The low degree and order terms in the spherical harmonic model of the tidal potential were observed through the perturbations which are induced on near-earth satellite orbital motions. Evaluations of tracking observations from 17 satellites and a GEM-T1 geopotential model were used in the tidal recovery which was made in the presence of over 600 long-wavelength coefficients from 32 major and minor tides. Wahr's earth tidal model was used as a basis for the recovery of the ocean tidal terms. Using this tidal model, the secular change in the moon's mean motion due to tidal dissipation was found to be -25.27 + or - 0.61 arcsec/century-squared. The estimation of lunar acceleration agreed with that observed from lunar laser ranging techniques (-24.9 + or - 1.0 arcsec/century-squared), with the corresponding tidal braking of earth's rotation being -5.98 + or - 0.22 X 10 to the -22 rad/second-squared. If the nontidal braking of the earth due to the observed secular change in the earth's second zonal harmonic is considered, satellite techniques yield a total value of the secular change in the earth's rotation rate of -4.69 + or - 0.36 X 10 to the -22 rad/second-squared.

  8. Tidal Distortion and Disruption of Earth-Crossing Asteriods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Love, Stanley G.; Bottke, William, Jr.

    1997-01-01

    We represent results of numerical simulations that show Earth's tidal forces can both distort and disrupt Earth-crossing asteriods (ECAs) that have weak rubble-pile structures. Building on previous studies, we consider more realistic asteriod shapes and trajectories, test a variety of spin and rates and axis orientations, and employ a dissipation algorithm to more accurately treat collisions between particles.

  9. The Earth Tides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Judah

    1982-01-01

    In addition to oceans, the earth is subjected to tidal stresses and undergoes tidal deformations. Discusses origin of tides, tidal stresses, and methods of determining tidal deformations (including gravity, tilt, and strain meters). (JN)

  10. The gravitational self-interaction of the Earth's tidal bulge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norsen, Travis; Dreese, Mackenzie; West, Christopher

    2017-09-01

    According to a standard, idealized analysis, the Moon would produce a 54 cm equilibrium tidal bulge in the Earth's oceans. This analysis omits many factors (beyond the scope of the simple idealized model) that dramatically influence the actual height and timing of the tides at different locations, but it is nevertheless an important foundation for more detailed studies. Here, we show that the standard analysis also omits another factor—the gravitational interaction of the tidal bulge with itself—which is entirely compatible with the simple, idealized equilibrium model and which produces a surprisingly non-trivial correction to the predicted size of the tidal bulge. Our analysis uses ideas and techniques that are familiar from electrostatics, and should thus be of interest to teachers and students of undergraduate E&M, Classical Mechanics (and/or other courses that cover the tides), and geophysics courses that cover the closely related topic of Earth's equatorial bulge.

  11. Stratosphere circulation on tidally locked ExoEarths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carone, L.; Keppens, R.; Decin, L.; Henning, Th.

    2018-02-01

    Stratosphere circulation is important to interpret abundances of photochemically produced compounds like ozone which we aim to observe to assess habitability of exoplanets. We thus investigate a tidally locked ExoEarth scenario for TRAPPIST-1b, TRAPPIST-1d, Proxima Centauri b and GJ 667 C f with a simplified 3D atmosphere model and for different stratospheric wind breaking assumptions.

  12. Tidal-friction theory of the earth-moon system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyttleton, R. A.

    1980-01-01

    Serious errors contained in Jeffreys' (1952, 1959, 1970, 1976) discussion of tidal friction in the earth-moon system are identified and their consequences are discussed. A direct solution of the dynamical tidal equations for the couple from the earth acting upon the moon and the couple from the earth acting upon the sun, which were left unsolved by Jeffreys, is found to be incompatible with observations and the predictions of linear or quadratic friction theory, due to his failure to take into account the possible change of the moment of inertia of the earth with time in the derivation of the dynamical equations. Consideration of this factor leads to the conclusion that the earth must be contracting at a rate of 14.7 x 10 to the -11th/year, which can be accounted for only by the Ramsey theory, in which the terrestrial core is considered as a phase change rather than a change in chemical composition. Implications of this value for the rates of changes in day length and lunar distance are also indicated.

  13. On the tidal effects in the motion of earth satellites and the love parameters of the earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musen, P.; Estes, R.

    1972-01-01

    The tidal effects in the motion of artificial satellites are studied to determine the elastic properties of the earth as they are observed from extraterrestrial space. Considering Love numbers, the disturbing potential is obtained as the analytical continuation of the tidal potential from the surface of the earth into-outer space, with parameters which characterize the earth's elastic response to tidal attraction by the moon and the sun. It is concluded that the tidal effects represent a superposition of a large number of periodic terms, and the rotation of the lunar orbital plane produces a term of 18 years period in tidal perturbations of the ascending node of the satellite's orbit.

  14. Tidal Distortion and Disruption of Earth-Crossing Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, D. C.; Bottke, W. F.

    1996-09-01

    There is mounting evidence that most km-sized objects in the solar system are ``rubble-piles'', fragile objects composed of loose collections of smaller components all held together by self-gravity rather than tensile strength. The evidence includes: (a) the paucity of fast rotating km-sized asteroids (Harris, 1996, LPSC 27, 977); (b) the tidal disruption of Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 (SL9) and observations of crater chains on the Moon and Galilean satellites (Schenk et al., 1996, Icarus 121, 149); (c) observations of extremely large craters on Phobos, Gaspra, and Ida; and (d) hydrocode models that realistically treat asteroid impacts (Love and Ahrens, 1996, Icarus, in press). Accordingly, we predict that Earth's tidal forces play a major role in the evolution of rubble-pile Earth-crossing objects (ECOs). By modeling close encounters between the Earth and our rubble-piles (for details, see Bottke et al., this issue), we found that Earth's tidal forces can make the progenitors undergo: (a) ``SL9-type'' disruption (formation of clumps of roughly equal size along the fragment train; this outcome may explain specific crater chains seen on the Moon); (b) mass shedding (over half of the primary remains intact; in many cases, the shed fragments go into orbit around the progenitor, producing binary asteroids, which could explain the population of doublet craters seen on the terrestrial planets (Bottke and Melosh, 1996, Nature 381, 51)); (c) reshaping accompanied by spin-up or spin-down (this mechanism could explain the large aspect ratio (2.76), unusual shape, and short rotation period (5.2 hours) of 1620 Geographos as well as the short rotation periods of many other ECOs). Mass shedding events for ECOs occur more frequently at low velocities relative to Earth than at high velocities, corresponding to low (e, i) values. Thus, Earth's tidal forces should be most effective at disrupting large ECOs (and producing small bodies) in this region. This localized disruption mechanism

  15. The Formation of Super-Earths by Tidally Forced Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Cong

    2017-12-01

    The Kepler observations indicate that many exoplanets are super-Earths, which brings about a puzzle for the core-accretion scenario. Since observed super-Earths are in the range of critical mass, they accrete gas efficiently and become gas giants. Theoretically, super-Earths are predicted to be rare in the core-accretion framework. To resolve this contradiction, we propose that the tidally forced turbulent diffusion may affect the heat transport inside the planet. Thermal feedback induced by turbulent diffusion is investigated. We find that the tidally forced turbulence generates pseudo-adiabatic regions within radiative zones, which pushes the radiative-convective boundaries inward. This decreases the cooling luminosity and enhances the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) timescale. For a given lifetime of protoplanetary disks (PPDs), there exists a critical threshold for the turbulent diffusivity, ν critical. If ν turb > ν critical, the KH timescale is longer than the disk lifetime and the planet becomes a super-Earth, rather than a gas giant. We find that even a small value of turbulent diffusion has influential effects on the evolution of super-Earths. The ν critical increases with the core mass. We further ascertain that, within the minimum-mass extrasolar nebula, ν critical increases with the semimajor axis. This may explain the feature that super-Earths are common in inner PPD regions, while gas giants are common in outer PPD regions. The predicted envelope mass fraction is not fully consistent with observations. We discuss physical processes, such as late core assembly and mass-loss mechanisms, that may be operating during super-Earth formation.

  16. Tidal tomography constrains Earth's deep-mantle buoyancy.

    PubMed

    Lau, Harriet C P; Mitrovica, Jerry X; Davis, James L; Tromp, Jeroen; Yang, Hsin-Ying; Al-Attar, David

    2017-11-15

    Earth's body tide-also known as the solid Earth tide, the displacement of the solid Earth's surface caused by gravitational forces from the Moon and the Sun-is sensitive to the density of the two Large Low Shear Velocity Provinces (LLSVPs) beneath Africa and the Pacific. These massive regions extend approximately 1,000 kilometres upward from the base of the mantle and their buoyancy remains actively debated within the geophysical community. Here we use tidal tomography to constrain Earth's deep-mantle buoyancy derived from Global Positioning System (GPS)-based measurements of semi-diurnal body tide deformation. Using a probabilistic approach, we show that across the bottom two-thirds of the two LLSVPs the mean density is about 0.5 per cent higher than the average mantle density across this depth range (that is, its mean buoyancy is minus 0.5 per cent), although this anomaly may be concentrated towards the very base of the mantle. We conclude that the buoyancy of these structures is dominated by the enrichment of high-density chemical components, probably related to subducted oceanic plates or primordial material associated with Earth's formation. Because the dynamics of the mantle is driven by density variations, our result has important dynamical implications for the stability of the LLSVPs and the long-term evolution of the Earth system.

  17. Tidal effects on Earth, Planets, Sun by far visiting moons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fargion, Daniele

    2016-07-01

    The Earth has been formed by a huge mini-planet collision forming our Earth surface and our Moon today. Such a central collision hit was statistically rare. A much probable skimming or nearby encounter by other moons or planets had to occur. Indeed Recent observations suggest that many planetary-mass objects may be present in the outer solar system between the Kuiper belt and the Oort cloud. Gravitational perturbations may occasionally bring them into the inner solar system. Their passage near Earth could have generated gigantic tidal waves, large volcanic eruptions, sea regressions, large meteoritic impacts and drastic changes in global climate. They could have caused the major biological mass extinctions in the past in the geological records. For instance a ten times a terrestrial radius nearby impact scattering by a peripherical encounter by a small moon-like object will force huge tidal waves (hundred meter height), able to lead to huge tsunami and Earth-quake. Moreover the historical cumulative planet hits in larger and wider planets as Juppiter, Saturn, Uranus will leave a trace, as observed, in their tilted spin axis. Finally a large fraction of counter rotating moons in our solar system probe and test such a visiting mini-planet captur origination. In addition the Earth day duration variability in the early past did show a rare discountinuity, very probably indebt to such a visiting planet crossing event. These far planets in rare trajectory to our Sun may, in thousands event capture, also explain sudden historical and recent temperature changes.

  18. Tidal Dissipation Compared To Seismic Dissipation: In Small Bodies, Earths, And Super-Earths

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-20

    The Astrophysical Journal, 746:150 (20pp), 2012 February 20 doi:10.1088/0004-637X/746/2/150 C© 2012. The American Astronomical Society. All rights...becomes more complex, though for sufficiently large super-Earths the same rule applies: the larger the planet, the weaker the tidal dissipation in it...damping) becomes very considerable for large exoplanets (super-Earths). In those, it is much lower than what one might expect from using a seismic

  19. Earth Tidal Controls on Basal Dynamics and Hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulessa, B.; Hubbard, B. P.; Brown, G. H.; Becker, J.

    2001-12-01

    We appraise earth tidal forcing of coupled mechanical and hydrological processes beneath warm-based ice masses, which have to date been poorly documented but represent exciting phenomena that have important implications for future studies of glacier dynamics. Regular cycles in winter and early spring electrical self-potential (SP), water pressure (PW) and electrical conductivity (EC) were recorded at the bases of several boreholes drilled through Haut Glacier d'Arolla, Switzerland. Fourier power spectra of these data reflect the presence of diurnal and semi-diurnal cycles, and comparison with the earth tidal spectrum indicates that at least four components of the latter are visible in the borehole spectra: the luni-solar diurnal, the principal lunar diurnal, the principal solar semi-diurnal, and the principal lunar semi-diurnal. This correspondence suggests that earth tides exert a strong control over water flow at the bed of the glacier, at least during winter and early spring. We envisage a mechanism that involves earth-tide induced deformation of the bedrock and the unconsolidated sediments beneath the glacier, and to a certain extent probably also the overlying ice body. Basal water pockets, including those containing our sensors, located within these media are in turn also likely to be deformed periodically. We believe that PW gradients induced by such deformation may result in transient water flow and SPs in the pockets. Since PW and EC are typically out-of-phase, injection of waters of lower EC into the pockets during times of peak water flow is likely. Several lines of evidence suggest that such injection was caused by melting of the ice wall due to frictional heating, balancing creep closure which sustained some pockets through the winter. Further, the first annually-repeated post-winter reorganization event, termed the May event, may well be triggered by tidally-induced releases of waters from storage. This implies that the May event marks the opening of

  20. Development of a new model for short period ocean tidal variations of Earth rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuh, Harald

    2015-08-01

    Within project SPOT (Short Period Ocean Tidal variations in Earth rotation) we develop a new high frequency Earth rotation model based on empirical ocean tide models. The main purpose of the SPOT model is its application to space geodetic observations such as GNSS and VLBI.We consider an empirical ocean tide model, which does not require hydrodynamic ocean modeling to determine ocean tidal angular momentum. We use here the EOT11a model of Savcenko & Bosch (2012), which is extended for some additional minor tides (e.g. M1, J1, T2). As empirical tidal models do not provide ocean tidal currents, which are re- quired for the computation of oceanic relative angular momentum, we implement an approach first published by Ray (2001) to estimate ocean tidal current veloci- ties for all tides considered in the extended EOT11a model. The approach itself is tested by application to tidal heights from hydrodynamic ocean tide models, which also provide tidal current velocities. Based on the tidal heights and the associated current velocities the oceanic tidal angular momentum (OTAM) is calculated.For the computation of the related short period variation of Earth rotation, we have re-examined the Euler-Liouville equation for an elastic Earth model with a liquid core. The focus here is on the consistent calculation of the elastic Love num- bers and associated Earth model parameters, which are considered in the Euler- Liouville equation for diurnal and sub-diurnal periods in the frequency domain.

  1. Properties and evolution of near-Earth-object families created by tidal disruption at the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schunova, E.; Walsh, K.; Granvik, M.; Jedicke, R.; Wainscoat, R.; Haghighipour, N.

    2014-07-01

    We have calculated the coherence and detectable lifetimes of synthetic near-Earth object (NEO) families created by catastrophic disruption of a progenitor as it suffers a very close Earth approach. The closest or slowest approaches yield the most violent 'S-class' disruption events and create a 'string of pearls' configuration of the resulting fragments after their reaccummulation into gravitationally bound components [3]. We found that the average absolute magnitude (H) difference between the parent body and the largest fragment is Δ H ˜ 1.0. The average slope of the absolute magnitude (H) distribution, N(H)∝10^{(0.55±0.04) H}, for the fragments in the S-class families is steeper than the slope of the NEO population [2] in the same size range. The families remain coherent as statistically significant clusters of orbits within the NEO population for an average of barτ_c = (14.7±0.6)×10^3 years after disruption. The detectable lifetimes of tidally disrupted families are extremely short compared to the multi-Myr and -Gyr lifetimes of main belt families due to the chaotic dynamical environment in NEO space -- they are detectable with the techniques developed by [1] and [4] for an average duration (barτ_{det}) ranging from about 2,000 to about 12,000 years for progenitors in the absolute magnitude (H_p) range from 20 to 13 corresponding to diameters in the range from about 0.5 to 10 km respectively. The maximum absolute magnitude of a progenitor capable of producing an observable NEO family (i.e. detectable by our family finding technique) is H_{p,max} = 20 (about 350 m diameter). The short detectability lifetime explains why zero NEO families have been discovered to-date. Nonetheless, every tidal disruption event of a progenitor with diameter greater than 0.5 km is capable of producing several million fragments in the 1 m to 10 m diameter range that can contribute to temporary local density enhancements of small NEOs in Earth's vicinity. These objects may be

  2. Tidal Friction in the Earth-Moon System and Laplace Planes: Darwin Redux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubincam, David P.

    2015-01-01

    The dynamical evolution of the Earth-Moon system due to tidal friction is treated here. George H. Darwin used Laplace planes (also called proper planes) in his study of tidal evolution. The Laplace plane approach is adapted here to the formalisms of W.M. Kaula and P. Goldreich. Like Darwin, the approach assumes a three-body problem: Earth, Moon, and Sun, where the Moon and Sun are point-masses. The tidal potential is written in terms of the Laplace plane angles. The resulting secular equations of motion can be easily integrated numerically assuming the Moon is in a circular orbit about the Earth and the Earth is in a circular orbit about the Sun. For Earth-Moon distances greater than 10 Earth radii, the Earth's approximate tidal response can be characterized with a single parameter, which is a ratio: a Love number times the sine of a lag angle divided by another such product. For low parameter values it can be shown that Darwin's low-viscosity molten Earth, M. Ross's and G. Schubert's model of an Earth near melting, and Goldreich's equal tidal lag angles must all give similar histories. For higher parameter values, as perhaps has been the case at times with the ocean tides, the Earth's obliquity may have decreased slightly instead of increased once the Moon's orbit evolved further than 50 Earth radii from the Earth, with possible implications for climate. This is contrast to the other tidal friction models mentioned, which have the obliquity always increasing with time. As for the Moon, its orbit is presently tilted to its Laplace plane by 5.2deg. The equations do not allow the Moon to evolve out of its Laplace plane by tidal friction alone, so that if it was originally in its Laplace plane, the tilt arose with the addition of other mechanisms, such as resonance passages.

  3. Spin-orbit coupling for tidally evolving super-Earths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, A.; Callegari, N.; Michtchenko, T. A.; Hussmann, H.

    2012-12-01

    We investigate the spin behaviour of close-in rocky planets and the implications for their orbital evolution. Considering that the planet rotation evolves under simultaneous actions of the torque due to the equatorial deformation and the tidal torque, both raised by the central star, we analyse the possibility of temporary captures in spin-orbit resonances. The results of the numerical simulations of the exact equations of motions indicate that, whenever the planet rotation is trapped in a resonant motion, the orbital decay and the eccentricity damping are faster than the ones in which the rotation follows the so-called pseudo-synchronization. Analytical results obtained through the averaged equations of the spin-orbit problem show a good agreement with the numerical simulations. We apply the analysis to the cases of the recently discovered hot super-Earths Kepler-10 b, GJ 3634 b and 55 Cnc e. The simulated dynamical history of these systems indicates the possibility of capture in several spin-orbit resonances; particularly, GJ 3634 b and 55 Cnc e can currently evolve under a non-synchronous resonant motion for suitable values of the parameters. Moreover, 55 Cnc e may avoid a chaotic rotation behaviour by evolving towards synchronization through successive temporary resonant trappings.

  4. Satellite Tidal Magnetic Signals Constrain Oceanic Lithosphere-Asthenosphere Boundary Earth Tomography with Tidal Magnetic Signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grayver, Alexander V.; Schnepf, Neesha R.; Kuvshinov, Alexey V.; Sabaka, Terence J.; Chandrasekharan, Manoj; Olsen, Niles

    2016-01-01

    The tidal flow of electrically conductive oceans through the geomagnetic field results in the generation of secondary magnetic signals, which provide information on the subsurface structure. Data from the new generation of satellites were shown to contain magnetic signals due to tidal flow; however, there are no reports that these signals have been used to infer subsurface structure. Here we use satellite-detected tidal magnetic fields to image the global electrical structure of the oceanic lithosphere and upper mantle down to a depth of about 250 km. The model derived from more than 12 years of satellite data reveals an Approximately 72 km thick upper resistive layer followed by a sharp increase in electrical conductivity likely associated with the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary, which separates colder rigid oceanic plates from the ductile and hotter asthenosphere.

  5. The effects of low tidal ventilation on lung strain correlate with respiratory system compliance.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jianfeng; Jin, Fang; Pan, Chun; Liu, Songqiao; Liu, Ling; Xu, Jingyuan; Yang, Yi; Qiu, Haibo

    2017-02-03

    The effect of alterations in tidal volume on mortality of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is determined by respiratory system compliance. We aimed to investigate the effects of different tidal volumes on lung strain in ARDS patients who had various levels of respiratory system compliance. Nineteen patients were divided into high (C high group) and low (C low group) respiratory system compliance groups based on their respiratory system compliance values. We defined compliance ≥0.6 ml/(cmH 2 O/kg) as C high and compliance <0.6 ml/(cmH 2 O/kg) as C low . End-expiratory lung volumes (EELV) at various tidal volumes were measured by nitrogen wash-in/washout. Lung strain was calculated as the ratio between tidal volume and EELV. The primary outcome was that lung strain is a function of tidal volume in patients with various levels of respiratory system compliance. The mean baseline EELV, strain and respiratory system compliance values were 1873 ml, 0.31 and 0.65 ml/(cmH 2 O/kg), respectively; differences in all of these parameters were statistically significant between the two groups. For all participants, a positive correlation was found between the respiratory system compliance and EELV (R = 0.488, p = 0.034). Driving pressure and strain increased together as the tidal volume increased from 6 ml/kg predicted body weight (PBW) to 12 ml/kg PBW. Compared to the C high ARDS patients, the driving pressure was significantly higher in the C low patients at each tidal volume. Similar effects of lung strain were found for tidal volumes of 6 and 8 ml/kg PBW. The "lung injury" limits for driving pressure and lung strain were much easier to exceed with increases in the tidal volume in C low patients. Respiratory system compliance affected the relationships between tidal volume and driving pressure and lung strain in ARDS patients. These results showed that increasing tidal volume induced lung injury more easily in patients with low respiratory system

  6. On the determination of the long period tidal perturbations in the elements of artificial earth satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musen, P.; Felsentreger, T.

    1972-01-01

    The magnitude of the tidal effects depends upon the elastic properties of the earth as described by Love numbers. The Love numbers appear as the coefficients in the expansion of the exterior tidal potential in terms of spherical harmonics (in Maxwellian form). A single averaging process was performed only along the parallels of latitude. This process preserves additional long period tidal effects (with periods of a few days or more). It also eliminates the short period effects with periods of one day or less.

  7. Tidal Heating of Earth-like Exoplanets around M Stars: Thermal, Magnetic, and Orbital Evolutions.

    PubMed

    Driscoll, P E; Barnes, R

    2015-09-01

    The internal thermal and magnetic evolution of rocky exoplanets is critical to their habitability. We focus on the thermal-orbital evolution of Earth-mass planets around low-mass M stars whose radiative habitable zone overlaps with the "tidal zone," where tidal dissipation is expected to be a significant heat source in the interior. We develop a thermal-orbital evolution model calibrated to Earth that couples tidal dissipation, with a temperature-dependent Maxwell rheology, to orbital circularization and migration. We illustrate thermal-orbital steady states where surface heat flow is balanced by tidal dissipation and cooling can be stalled for billions of years until circularization occurs. Orbital energy dissipated as tidal heat in the interior drives both inward migration and circularization, with a circularization time that is inversely proportional to the dissipation rate. We identify a peak in the internal dissipation rate as the mantle passes through a viscoelastic state at mantle temperatures near 1800 K. Planets orbiting a 0.1 solar-mass star within 0.07 AU circularize before 10 Gyr, independent of initial eccentricity. Once circular, these planets cool monotonically and maintain dynamos similar to that of Earth. Planets forced into eccentric orbits can experience a super-cooling of the core and rapid core solidification, inhibiting dynamo action for planets in the habitable zone. We find that tidal heating is insignificant in the habitable zone around 0.45 (or larger) solar-mass stars because tidal dissipation is a stronger function of orbital distance than stellar mass, and the habitable zone is farther from larger stars. Suppression of the planetary magnetic field exposes the atmosphere to stellar wind erosion and the surface to harmful radiation. In addition to weak magnetic fields, massive melt eruption rates and prolonged magma oceans may render eccentric planets in the habitable zone of low-mass stars inhospitable for life.

  8. Tidal evolution of the Moon from a high-obliquity, high-angular-momentum Earth.

    PubMed

    Ćuk, Matija; Hamilton, Douglas P; Lock, Simon J; Stewart, Sarah T

    2016-11-17

    In the giant-impact hypothesis for lunar origin, the Moon accreted from an equatorial circum-terrestrial disk; however, the current lunar orbital inclination of five degrees requires a subsequent dynamical process that is still unclear. In addition, the giant-impact theory has been challenged by the Moon's unexpectedly Earth-like isotopic composition. Here we show that tidal dissipation due to lunar obliquity was an important effect during the Moon's tidal evolution, and the lunar inclination in the past must have been very large, defying theoretical explanations. We present a tidal evolution model starting with the Moon in an equatorial orbit around an initially fast-spinning, high-obliquity Earth, which is a probable outcome of giant impacts. Using numerical modelling, we show that the solar perturbations on the Moon's orbit naturally induce a large lunar inclination and remove angular momentum from the Earth-Moon system. Our tidal evolution model supports recent high-angular-momentum, giant-impact scenarios to explain the Moon's isotopic composition and provides a new pathway to reach Earth's climatically favourable low obliquity.

  9. Possible tidal resonance of the early Earth's ocean due to the lunar orbit evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motoyama, M.; Tsunakawa, H.; Takahashi, F.

    2016-12-01

    The ocean tide is one of the most important factors affecting the Earth's surface environment and the evolution of the Earth-Moon system (e.g. Goldreich, 1966). According to the Giant Impact hypothesis, the Moon was formed very near the Earth 4.6 billion years ago (Hartmann and Davis, 1979). At that time, the tidal force would be about several thousand times as strong as the present. However previous studies pointed out that significant attenuation of tidal waves might have occurred due to mechanical response of water motion (e.g. Hansen, 1982; Abe and Ooe, 2001), resulting in relatively calm state like the present ocean.In the present study, we analyze tidal response of the ocean on the early Earth using a model of constant-depth ocean covering all the surface of the rigid Earth. The examined modes of response are not only M2 corresponding to spherical harmonics Y22 but also others such as Y21, since the lunar orbital plane would be inclined.First, estimated is an ocean depth for possible resonance of the individual mode. Eigen frequencies of the fluid on a rotating sphere with no friction are calculated on the basis of previous study (Longuet-Higgins, 1968). These frequencies depend on the Earth's rotation rate and the ocean depth. The Earth's rotation period is assumed to have changed from 5 hours to 24 hours for the past 4.6 billion years (e.g. Mignard, 1980; Stacey and Davis, 2008). It is found that resonance could occur for diurnal modes of Y21 and Y31 with reasonable depths of the ancient ocean (1300 - 5200 m).Then we obtain a 2D response function on a sphere with friction in order to estimate the tidal amplitude of the ocean for main modes . The response function in the present study shows good agreement with the numerical simulation result of the tidal torque response of M2 (Abe et al., 1997). The calculation results suggest that diurnal modes of Y21 and Y31 would grown on the early Earth, while the other modes would fairly be attenuated. In particular

  10. Tidally-induced thermal runaway on extrasolar Earth: Impact on habitability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behounkova, M.; Tobie, G.; Choblet, G.; Cadek, O.

    2010-12-01

    Low mass extrasolar bodies start to be discovered owing to the increased precision of detection surveys. As the detection probability decreases with the star-body distance, these planets (and the numerous candidates already announced for the coming years) are likely to orbit their parent stars in a close distance. These short-period planets undergo a strong tidal forcing and their orbits are tidally locked. The associated heat production may influence the internal thermal evolution of these bodies: it has even been suggested that the habitable zone could be influenced by tidal heating (Barnes et al. 2008; Henning et al. 2009). In this study, we further investigate the effect of tidal heating on thermal evolution of tidally locked Earth-like planets. Owing to the strong temperature dependence of the mechanical properties of both the long-term evolution and the tidal deformations, the two processes are coupled. Nevertheless, the tidal deformation has no direct effect on the convective flow and only the dissipative part is included as a heat source for mantle dynamics since the time scales of the two processes strongly differs. For significant tidal dissipation rates, the strong positive feedback leads, in some cases, to thermal runaways. We focus here on the susceptibility of Earth-like planets to tidal dissipation for fixed orbital parameters (eccentricity, orbital period and the spin-orbit resonance type) and on the associated timescales for runaway (if any). In order to describe this behavior and the three dimensional nature of both the tidal forcing and the temperature anomalies, a fully three-dimensional approach solving the two processes simultaneously is employed (Běhounková et al., JGR, in press). We consider an extrasolar planet having the internal properties similar to the Earth. Two modes for heat transfer are modeled through the choice of convective parameters (Rayleigh number and temperature dependence of viscosity, amount of radiogenic heating): a

  11. Tidal Heating of Earth-like Exoplanets around M Stars: Thermal, Magnetic, and Orbital Evolutions

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The internal thermal and magnetic evolution of rocky exoplanets is critical to their habitability. We focus on the thermal-orbital evolution of Earth-mass planets around low-mass M stars whose radiative habitable zone overlaps with the “tidal zone,” where tidal dissipation is expected to be a significant heat source in the interior. We develop a thermal-orbital evolution model calibrated to Earth that couples tidal dissipation, with a temperature-dependent Maxwell rheology, to orbital circularization and migration. We illustrate thermal-orbital steady states where surface heat flow is balanced by tidal dissipation and cooling can be stalled for billions of years until circularization occurs. Orbital energy dissipated as tidal heat in the interior drives both inward migration and circularization, with a circularization time that is inversely proportional to the dissipation rate. We identify a peak in the internal dissipation rate as the mantle passes through a viscoelastic state at mantle temperatures near 1800 K. Planets orbiting a 0.1 solar-mass star within 0.07 AU circularize before 10 Gyr, independent of initial eccentricity. Once circular, these planets cool monotonically and maintain dynamos similar to that of Earth. Planets forced into eccentric orbits can experience a super-cooling of the core and rapid core solidification, inhibiting dynamo action for planets in the habitable zone. We find that tidal heating is insignificant in the habitable zone around 0.45 (or larger) solar-mass stars because tidal dissipation is a stronger function of orbital distance than stellar mass, and the habitable zone is farther from larger stars. Suppression of the planetary magnetic field exposes the atmosphere to stellar wind erosion and the surface to harmful radiation. In addition to weak magnetic fields, massive melt eruption rates and prolonged magma oceans may render eccentric planets in the habitable zone of low-mass stars inhospitable for life. Key Words

  12. A REVISED SOLAR TRANSFORMITY FOR TIDAL ENERGY RECEIVED BY THE EARTH AND DISSIPATED GLOBALLY: IMPLICATIONS FOR EMERGY ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Solar transformities for the tidal energy received by the earth and the tidal energy dissipated globally can be calculated because both solar energy and the gravitational attraction of the sun and moon drive independent processes that produce an annual flux of geopotential energy...

  13. Tidal dissipation in the Earth and Moon from lunar laser ranging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoder, C. F.; Williams, J. G.; Dickey, J. O.; Newhall, X. X.

    1984-01-01

    The evolution of the Moon's orbit which is governed by tidal dissipation in the Earth while the evolution of its spin is controlled by its own internal dissipation is discussed. Lunar laser ranging data from August 1969 through May 1982 yields the values of both of these parameters. It is suggested that if the Moon was orbited the Earth since its formation, this must be an anomalously high value presumably due to changes in dissipation in the oceans due to continental drift. The explanation that the dissipation occurs at the interface between the mantle and a liquid core of shell is preferred.

  14. Comparison of Regression Methods to Compute Atmospheric Pressure and Earth Tidal Coefficients in Water Level Associated with Wenchuan Earthquake of 12 May 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Anhua; Singh, Ramesh P.; Sun, Zhaohua; Ye, Qing; Zhao, Gang

    2016-07-01

    The earth tide, atmospheric pressure, precipitation and earthquake fluctuations, especially earthquake greatly impacts water well levels, thus anomalous co-seismic changes in ground water levels have been observed. In this paper, we have used four different models, simple linear regression (SLR), multiple linear regression (MLR), principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares (PLS) to compute the atmospheric pressure and earth tidal effects on water level. Furthermore, we have used the Akaike information criterion (AIC) to study the performance of various models. Based on the lowest AIC and sum of squares for error values, the best estimate of the effects of atmospheric pressure and earth tide on water level is found using the MLR model. However, MLR model does not provide multicollinearity between inputs, as a result the atmospheric pressure and earth tidal response coefficients fail to reflect the mechanisms associated with the groundwater level fluctuations. On the premise of solving serious multicollinearity of inputs, PLS model shows the minimum AIC value. The atmospheric pressure and earth tidal response coefficients show close response with the observation using PLS model. The atmospheric pressure and the earth tidal response coefficients are found to be sensitive to the stress-strain state using the observed data for the period 1 April-8 June 2008 of Chuan 03# well. The transient enhancement of porosity of rock mass around Chuan 03# well associated with the Wenchuan earthquake (Mw = 7.9 of 12 May 2008) that has taken its original pre-seismic level after 13 days indicates that the co-seismic sharp rise of water well could be induced by static stress change, rather than development of new fractures.

  15. Direct estimation of tidally induced Earth rotation variations observed by VLBI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Englich, S.; Heinkelmann, R.; BOHM, J.; Schuh, H.

    2009-09-01

    The subject of our study is the investigation of periodical variations induced by solid Earth tides and ocean tides in Earth rotation parameters (ERP: polar motion, UT1)observed by VLBI. There are two strategies to determine the amplitudes and phases of Earth rotation variations from observations of space geodetic techniques. The common way is to derive time series of Earth rotation parameters first and to estimate amplitudes and phases in a second step. Results obtained by this means were shown in previous studies for zonal tidal variations (Englich et al.; 2008a) and variations caused by ocean tides (Englich et al.; 2008b). The alternative method is to estimate the tidal parameters directly within the VLBI data analysis procedure together with other parameters such as station coordinates, tropospheric delays, clocks etc. The purpose of this work was the application of this direct method to a combined VLBI data analysis using the software packages OCCAM (Version 6.1, Gauss-Markov-Model) and DOGSCS (Gerstl et al.; 2001). The theoretical basis and the preparatory steps for the implementation of this approach are presented here.

  16. Properties and evolution of NEO families created by tidal disruption at Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schunová, Eva; Jedicke, Robert; Walsh, Kevin J.; Granvik, Mikael; Wainscoat, Richard J.; Haghighipour, Nader

    2014-08-01

    We have calculated the coherence and detectable lifetimes of synthetic near-Earth object (NEO) families created by catastrophic disruption of a progenitor as it suffers a very close Earth approach. The closest or slowest approaches yield the most violent ‘s-class’ disruption events where the largest remaining fragment after disruption and reaccumulation retains less than 50% of the parent’s mass. The resulting fragments have a ‘string of pearls’ configuration after their reaccummulation into gravitationally bound components (Richardson, D.C., Bottke, W.F., Love, S.G. [1998]. Icarus 134, 47-76). We found that the average absolute magnitude (H) difference between the parent body and the largest fragment is ΔH∼1.0. The average slope of the absolute magnitude (H) distribution, N(H)∝10, for the fragments in the s-class families is steeper than the slope of the NEO population (Mainzer, A., et al. [2011]. Astrophys. J. 743, 156) in the same size range. The es remain coherent as statistically significant clusters of orbits within the NEO population for an average of τbarc=(14.7±0.6)×103 yr after disruption. The detectable lifetimes of tidally disrupted families are extremely short compared to the multi-Myr and -Gyr lifetimes of main belt families due to the chaotic dynamical environment in NEO space-they are detectable with the techniques developed by Fu et al. and Schunová et al. (Fu, H., Jedicke, R., Durda, D.D., Fevig, R., Binzel, R.P. [2005]. Icarus 178(2), 434-449 and Schunová, E., Granvik, M., Jedicke, R., Gronchi, G., Wainscoat, R., Abe, S. [2012]. Icarus 220, 1050-1063) for an average duration (τbardet) ranging from about 2000 to about 12,000 years for progenitors in the absolute magnitude (Hp) range from 20 to 13 corresponding to diameters in the range from about 0.5 to 10 km respectively. The maximum absolute magnitude of a progenitor capable of producing an observable NEO family (i.e. detectable by our family finding technique) is Hp,max=20

  17. Tidal Amplitude Delta Factors and Phase Shifts for an Oceanic Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiridonov, E. A.

    2017-12-01

    M.S. Molodenskiy's problem, which describes the state of an elastic self-gravitating compressible sphere, is generalized to the case of a biaxial hydrostatically equilibrium rotating elliptical inelastic shell. The system of sixth-order equations is supplemented with corrections due to the relative and Coriolis accelerations. The ordinary and load Love numbers of degree 2 are calculated with allowance for their latitude dependence and dissipation for different models of the Earth's structure (the AK135, IASP91, and PREM models). The problem is solved by Love's method. The theoretical amplitude delta factors and phase shifts of second-order tidal waves for an oceanic Earth are compared with their most recent empirical counterparts obtained by the GGP network superconducting gravimeters. In particular, it is shown that a good matching (up to the fourth decimal place) of the theoretical and observed amplitude factors of semidiurnal tides does not require the application of the nonhydrostatic theory.

  18. Measurement of diurnal and semidiurnal rotational variations and tidal parameters of Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herring, Thomas A.; Dong, Danan

    1994-01-01

    We discuss the determination of diurnal and semidiurnal variations in the rotation rate and the direction of rotation axis of Earth from the analysis of 8 years of very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) data. This analysis clearly show that these variations are largely periodic and tidally driven; that is, the periods of the variations correspond to the periods of the largest lunar and solar tides. For rotation rate variations, expressed in terms of changes in universal time (UT), the tidal lines with the largest observed signals are O1 (amplitude 23.5 microseconds in time (microseconds), period 25.82 solar hours); KL (18.9 microseconds, 23.93 hours); M2 (17.9 microseconds, 12.54 hours); and S2 (8.6 microseconds, 12.00 hours). For variations in the direction of the rotation axis (polar motion), significant signals exist in the retrograde semidiurnal band at the M2 and S2 tides (amplitudes 265 and 119 microarc seconds (microarc seconds, respectively); the prograde diurnal band at the O1, K1, and P1 tides (amplitudes 199, 152, and 60 microarc seconds, respectively); and the prograde semidiurnal band at the M2 and K2 tides (amplitudes 58 and 39 microarc seconds, respectively). Variations in the retrograde diurnal band are represented by corrections with previous estimates except that a previously noted discrepancy in the 13.66-day nutation (corresponding to the O1 tide) is largely removed in this new analysis. We estimate that the standard deviations of these estimates are 1.0 microseconds for the UT1 variations and 14-16 microarc seconds for the polar motion terms. These uncertainties correspond to surface displacements of approximately 0.5 mm. From the analysis of atmospheric angular momentum data we conclude that variations in UT1 excited by the atmosphere with subdaily periods are small (approximately 1 microsecond). We find that the average radial tidal displacements of the VLBI sites in the diurnal band are largely consistent with known deficiencies in current

  19. Wetlands: Tidal

    Conner, William H.; Krauss, Ken W.; Baldwin, Andrew H.; Hutchinson, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Tidal wetlands are some of the most dynamic areas of the Earth and are found at the interface between the land and sea. Salinity, regular tidal flooding, and infrequent catastrophic flooding due to storm events result in complex interactions among biotic and abiotic factors. The complexity of these interactions, along with the uncertainty of where one draws the line between tidal and nontidal, makes characterizing tidal wetlands a difficult task. The three primary types of tidal wetlands are tidal marshes, mangroves, and freshwater forested wetlands. Tidal marshes are dominated by herbaceous plants and are generally found at middle to high latitudes of both hemispheres. Mangrove forests dominate tropical coastlines around the world while tidal freshwater forests are global in distribution. All three wetland types are highly productive ecosystems, supporting abundant and diverse faunal communities. Unfortunately, these wetlands are subject to alteration and loss from both natural and anthropogenic causes.

  20. Characterising the three-dimensional ozone distribution of a tidally locked Earth-like planet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proedrou, Elisavet; Hocke, Klemens

    2016-06-01

    We simulate the 3D ozone distribution of a tidally locked Earth-like exoplanet using the high-resolution, 3D chemistry-climate model CESM1(WACCM) and study how the ozone layer of a tidally locked Earth (TLE) (Ω _{TLE}= 1/365 days) differs from that of our present-day Earth (PDE) (Ω _{PDE}= 1/1 day). The middle atmosphere reaches a steady state asymptotically within the first 80 days of the simulation. An upwelling, centred on the subsolar point, is present on the day side while a downwelling, centred on the antisolar point, is present on the night side. In the mesosphere, we find similar global ozone distributions for the TLE and the PDE, with decreased ozone on the day side and enhanced ozone on the night side. In the lower mesosphere, a jet stream transitions into a large-scale vortex around a low-pressure system, located at low latitudes of the TLE night side. In the middle stratosphere, the concentration of odd oxygen is approximately equal to that of the ozone [({O}x) ≈ ({O}3)]. At these altitudes, the lifetime of odd oxygen is ˜16 h and the transport processes significantly contribute to the global distribution of stratospheric ozone. Compared to the PDE, where the strong Coriolis force acts as a mixing barrier between low and high latitudes, the transport processes of the TLE are governed by jet streams variable in the zonal and meridional directions. In the middle stratosphere of the TLE, we find high ozone values on the day side, due to the increased production of atomic oxygen on the day side, where it immediately recombines with molecular oxygen to form ozone. In contrast, the ozone is depleted on the night side, due to changes in the solar radiation distribution and the presence of a downwelling. As a result of the reduced Coriolis force, the tropical and extratropical air masses are well mixed and the global temperature distribution of the TLE stratosphere has smaller horizontal gradients than the PDE. Compared to the PDE, the total ozone column

  1. Analyses of the solid earth and ocean tidal perturbations on the orbits of the Geos 1 and Geos 2 satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Felsentreger, T. L.; Marsh, J. G.; Agreen, R. W.

    1976-01-01

    Perturbations in the inclination of the Geos 1 and Geos 2 satellite orbits have been analyzed for the solid earth and ocean tide contributions. Precision reduced camera and Tranet Doppler observations spanning periods of over 600 days for each satellite were used to derive mean orbital elements. Perturbations due to the earth's gravity field, solar radiation pressure, and atmospheric drag were modeled, and the resulting inclination residuals were analyzed for tidal effects. The amplitudes of the observed total tidal effects were about 1.2 arc sec (36 m) in the inclination of Geos 1 and 4.5 arc sec (135 m) for Geos 2. The solid earth tides were then modeled by using the Love number 0.30. The resulting inclination residuals were then analyzed for ocean tide spherical harmonic parameters.

  2. Connecting the dots: a versatile model for the atmospheres of tidally locked Super-Earths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carone, L.; Keppens, R.; Decin, L.

    2014-11-01

    Radiative equilibrium temperatures are calculated for the troposphere of a tidally locked Super-Earth based on a simple greenhouse model, using Solar system data as a guideline. These temperatures provide in combination with a Newtonian relaxation scheme thermal forcing for a 3D atmosphere model using the dynamical core of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology global circulation model. Our model is of the same conceptional simplicity than the model of Held & Suarez and is thus computationally fast. Furthermore, because of the coherent, general derivation of radiative equilibrium temperatures, our model is easily adaptable for different planets and atmospheric scenarios. As a case study relevant for Super-Earths, we investigate a Gl581g-like planet with Earth-like atmosphere and irradiation and present results for two representative rotation periods of Prot = 10 d and Prot = 36.5 d. Our results provide proof of concept and highlight interesting dynamical features for the rotating regime 3 < Prot < 100 d, which was shown by Edson et al. to be an intermediate regime between equatorial superrotation and divergence. We confirm that the Prot = 10 d case is more dominated by equatorial superrotation dynamics than the Prot = 36.5 d case, which shows diminishing influence of standing Rossby-Kelvin waves and increasing influence of divergence at the top of the atmosphere. We argue that this dynamical regime change relates to the increase in Rossby deformation radius, in agreement with previous studies. However, we also pay attention to other features that are not or only in partial agreement with other studies, like, e.g. the number of circulation cells and their strength, the role and extent of thermal inversion layers, and the details of heat transport.

  3. Assessment of the effect of three-dimensional mantle density heterogeneity on earth rotation in tidal frequencies.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lanbo; Chao, Benjamin F; Sun, Wenke; Kuang, Weijia

    2016-11-01

    In this paper we report the assessment of the effect of the three-dimensional (3D) density heterogeneity in the mantle on Earth Orientation Parameters (EOP) (i.e., the polar motion, or PM, and the length of day, or LOD) in the tidal frequencies. The 3D mantle density model is estimated based upon a global S-wave velocity tomography model (S16U6L8) and the mineralogical knowledge derived from laboratory experiment. The lateral density variation is referenced against the Preliminary Reference Earth Model (PREM). Using this approach the effects of the heterogeneous mantle density variation in all three tidal frequencies (zonal long periods, tesseral diurnal, and sectorial semidiurnal) are estimated in both PM and LOD. When compared with mass or density perturbations originated on the earth's surface such as the oceanic and barometric changes, the heterogeneous mantle only contributes less than 10% of the total variation in PM and LOD in tidal frequencies. Nevertheless, including the 3D variation of the density in the mantle into account explained a substantial portion of the discrepancy between the observed signals in PM and LOD extracted from the lump-sum values based on continuous space geodetic measurement campaigns (e.g., CONT94) and the computed contribution from ocean tides as predicted by tide models derived from satellite altimetry observations (e.g., TOPEX/Poseidon). In other word, the difference of the two, at all tidal frequencies (long-periods, diurnals, and semi-diurnals) contains contributions of the lateral density heterogeneity of the mantle. Study of the effect of mantle density heterogeneity effect on torque-free earth rotation may provide useful constraints to construct the Reference Earth Model (REM), which is the next major objective in global geophysics research beyond PREM.

  4. Observations of Tidal Straining Within Two Different Ocean Environments in the East China Sea: Stratification and Near-Bottom Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wei; Wei, Hao; Zhao, Liang

    2017-11-01

    Tidal straining describes the straining effect induced by the vertical shear of oscillatory tidal currents that act on horizontal density gradients. It tends to create tidal periodic stratification and modulate the turbulence in the bottom boundary layer (BBL). Here, we present observations of current, hydrology and turbulence obtained at two mooring stations that are characterized by two typical hydrological environments in the East China Sea (ECS). One is located adjacent to the Changjiang River's mouth, and the other is located over a sloping shelf which is far from the freshwater sources. Tidal straining induces a semidiurnal switching between stable and unstable stratification at both stations. Near-bottom high-frequency velocity measurements further reveal that the dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) is highly elevated during periods when unstable stratification occurs. A comparison between the TKE dissipation rate (ɛ) and the shear production (P) further reveals that the near-bottom mixing is locally shear-induced most of the time except during the unstable stratification period. Within this period, the magnitude of dissipation exceeds the expected value based on the law of the wall by an order of magnitude. The buoyancy flux that calculated by the balance method is too small to compensate for the existing discrepancy between the dissipation and shear production. Another plausible candidate is the advection of TKE, which may play an important role in the TKE budget during the unstable stratification period.

  5. Tidal regime of intact planetoid capture model for the Earth-Moon system: Does it relate to the archean sedimentary rock record?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malcuit, Robert J.; Winters, Ronald R.

    1993-01-01

    Regardless of one's favorite model for the origin of the Earth-Moon system (fission, coformation, tidal capture, giant-impact) the early history of lunar orbital evolution would produce significant thermal and earth and ocean tidal effects on the primitive earth. Three of the above lunar origin models (fission, coformation, giant-impact) feature a circular orbit which undergoes a progressive increase in orbital radius from the time of origin to the present time. In contrast, a tidal capture model places the moon in an elliptical orbit undergoing progressive circularization from the time of capture (for model purposes about 3.9 billion years ago) for at least a few 10(exp 8) years following the capture event. Once the orbit is circularized, the subsequent tidal history for a tidal capture scenario is similar to that for other models of lunar origin and features a progressive increase in orbital radius to the current state of the lunar orbit. This elliptical orbit phase, if it occurred, should have left a distinctive signature in the terrestrial and lunar rock records. Depositional events would be associated terrestrial shorelines characterized by abnormally high, but progressively decreasing, ocean tidal amplitudes and ranges associated with such an orbital evolution. Several rock units in the age range 3.6-2.5 billion years before present are reported to have a major tidal component. Examples are the Warrawoona, Fortescue, and Hamersley Groups of Western Australia and the Pangola and Witwatersand Supergroups of South Africa. Detailed study of the features of these tidal sequences may be helpful in deciphering the style of lunar orbital evolution during the Archean Eon.

  6. Resonant Tidal Excitation of Internal Waves in the Earth's Fluid Core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tyler, Robert H.; Kuang, Weijia

    2014-01-01

    It has long been speculated that there is a stably stratified layer below the core-mantle boundary, and two recent studies have improved the constraints on the parameters describing this stratification. Here we consider the dynamical implications of this layer using a simplified model. We first show that the stratification in this surface layer has sensitive control over the rate at which tidal energy is transferred to the core. We then show that when the stratification parameters from the recent studies are used in this model, a resonant configuration arrives whereby tidal forces perform elevated rates of work in exciting core flow. Specifically, the internal wave speed derived from the two independent studies (150 and 155 m/s) are in remarkable agreement with the speed (152 m/s) required for excitation of the primary normal mode of oscillation as calculated from full solutions of the Laplace Tidal Equations applied to a reduced-gravity idealized model representing the stratified layer. In evaluating this agreement it is noteworthy that the idealized model assumed may be regarded as the most reduced representation of the stratified dynamics of the layer, in that there are no non-essential dynamical terms in the governing equations assumed. While it is certainly possible that a more realistic treatment may require additional dynamical terms or coupling, it is also clear that this reduced representation includes no freedom for coercing the correlation described. This suggests that one must accept either (1) that tidal forces resonantly excite core flow and this is predicted by a simple model or (2) that either the independent estimates or the dynamical model does not accurately portray the core surface layer and there has simply been an unlikely coincidence between three estimates of a stratification parameter which would otherwise have a broad plausible range.

  7. Determination of the cosmological rate of change of G and the tidal accelerations of earth and moon from ancient and modern astronomical data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muller, P. M.

    1976-01-01

    The theory and numerical analysis of ancient astronomical observations (1374 to 1715) are combined with modern data in a simultaneous solution for: the tidal acceleration of the lunar longitude; the observed apparent acceleration of the earth's rotation; the true nontidal geophysical part of this acceleration; and the rate of change in the gravitational constant. Provided are three independent determinations of a rate of change of G consistent with the Hubble Constant and a near zero nontidal rotational acceleration of the earth. The tidal accelerations are shown to have remained constant during the historical period within uncertainties. Ancient and modern solar system data, and extragalactic observations provided a completely consistent astronomical and cosmological scheme.

  8. Forecasting tidal marsh elevation and habitat change through fusion of Earth observations and a process model

    Byrd, Kristin B.; Windham-Myers, Lisamarie; Leeuw, Thomas; Downing, Bryan D.; Morris, James T.; Ferner, Matthew C.

    2016-01-01

    Reducing uncertainty in data inputs at relevant spatial scales can improve tidal marsh forecasting models, and their usefulness in coastal climate change adaptation decisions. The Marsh Equilibrium Model (MEM), a one-dimensional mechanistic elevation model, incorporates feedbacks of organic and inorganic inputs to project elevations under sea-level rise scenarios. We tested the feasibility of deriving two key MEM inputs—average annual suspended sediment concentration (SSC) and aboveground peak biomass—from remote sensing data in order to apply MEM across a broader geographic region. We analyzed the precision and representativeness (spatial distribution) of these remote sensing inputs to improve understanding of our study region, a brackish tidal marsh in San Francisco Bay, and to test the applicable spatial extent for coastal modeling. We compared biomass and SSC models derived from Landsat 8, DigitalGlobe WorldView-2, and hyperspectral airborne imagery. Landsat 8-derived inputs were evaluated in a MEM sensitivity analysis. Biomass models were comparable although peak biomass from Landsat 8 best matched field-measured values. The Portable Remote Imaging Spectrometer SSC model was most accurate, although a Landsat 8 time series provided annual average SSC estimates. Landsat 8-measured peak biomass values were randomly distributed, and annual average SSC (30 mg/L) was well represented in the main channels (IQR: 29–32 mg/L), illustrating the suitability of these inputs across the model domain. Trend response surface analysis identified significant diversion between field and remote sensing-based model runs at 60 yr due to model sensitivity at the marsh edge (80–140 cm NAVD88), although at 100 yr, elevation forecasts differed less than 10 cm across 97% of the marsh surface (150–200 cm NAVD88). Results demonstrate the utility of Landsat 8 for landscape-scale tidal marsh elevation projections due to its comparable performance with the other sensors

  9. Measuring rapid ocean tidal earth orientation variations with very long baseline interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sovers, O. J.; Jacobs, C. S.; Gross, R. S.

    1993-01-01

    Ocean tidal effects on universal time and polar motion (UTPM) are investigated at four nearly diurnal (K(sub 1), P(sub 1), O(sub 1), and Q(sub 1)) and four nearly semidiurnal (K(sub 2), S(sub 2), M(sub 2), and N(sub 2)) frequencies by analyzing very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) data extending from 1978 to 1992. We discuss limitations of comparisons between experiment and theory for the retograde nearly diurnal polar motion components due to their degeneracy with prograde components of the nutation model. Estimating amplitudes of contributions to the modeled VLBI observables at these eight frequencies produces a statistically highly significant improvement of 7 mm to the residuals of a fit to the observed delays. Use of such an improved UTPM model also reduces the 14-30 mm scatter of baseline lengths about a time-linear model of tectonic motion by 3-14 mm, also withhigh significance levels. A total of 28 UTPM ocean tidal amplitudes can be unambiguously estimated from the data, with resulting UTI and PM magnitudes as large as 21 micro secs and 270 microarc seconds and formal uncertainties of the order of 0.3 micro secs and 5 microarc secs for UTI and PM, respectively. Empirically determined UTPM amplitudes and phases are com1pared to values calculated theoretically by Gross from Seiler's global ocean tide model. The discrepancy between theory and experiment is larger by a factor of 3 for UTI amplitudes (9 micro secs) than for prograde PM amplitudes (42 microarc secs). The 14-year VLBI data span strongly attenuates the influence of mismodeled effects on estimated UTPM amplitudes and phases that are not coherent with the eight frequencies of interest. Magnitudes of coherent and quasi-coherent systematic errors are quantified by means of internal consistency tests. We conclude that coherent systematic effects are many times larger than the formal uncertainties and can be as large as 4 micro secs for UTI and 60 microarc secs for polar motion. On the basis of such

  10. Measuring rapid ocean tidal earth orientation variations with very long baseline interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sovers, O. J.; Jacobs, C. S.; Gross, R. S.

    1993-11-01

    Ocean tidal effects on universal time and polar motion (UTPM) are investigated at four nearly diurnal (K1, P1, O1, and Q1) and four nearly semidiurnal (K2, S2, M2, and N2) frequencies by analyzing very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) data extending from 1978 to 1992. We discuss limitations of comparisons between experiment and theory for the retrograde nearly diurnal polar motion components due to their degeneracy with prograde components of the nutation model. Estimating amplitudes of contributions to the modeled VLBI observables at these eight frequencies produces a statistically highly significant improvement of 7 mm to the residuals of a fit to the observed delays. Use of such an improved UTPM model also reduces the 14-30 mm scatter of baseline lengths about a time-linear model of tectonic motion by 3-14 mm, also with high significance levels. A total of 28 UTPM ocean tidal amplitudes can be unambiguously estimated from the data, with resulting UT1 and PM magnitudes as large as 21 μs and 270 microarc seconds (μas) and formal uncertainties of the order of 0.3 μs and 5 μas for UTI and PM, respectively. Empirically determined UTPM amplitudes and phases are compared to values calculated theoretically by Gross from Seiler's global ocean tide model. The discrepancy between theory and experiment is larger by a factor of 3 for UT1 amplitudes (9 μs) than for prograde PM amplitudes (42 μas). The 14-year VLBI data span strongly attenuates the influence of mismodeled effects on estimated UTPM amplitudes and phases that are not coherent with the eight frequencies of interest. Magnitudes of coherent and quasi-coherent systematic errors are quantified by means of internal consistency tests. We conclude that coherent systematic effects are many times larger than the formal uncertainties and can be as large as 4 μs for UT1 and 60 μas for polar motion. On the basis of such realistic error estimates, 22 of the 31 fitted UTPM ocean tidal amplitudes differ from zero by

  11. Optical Fiber Sensors for Infrasonic Wind Noise Reduction and Earth Strain Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeWolf, Scott

    Fiber-based interferometers provide the means to sense very small displacements over long baselines, and have the advantage of being nearly completely passive in their operation, making them particularly well suited for geophysical applications. This work presents the development and results from four new systems: one in atmospheric acoustics and three in Earth strain. Turbulent pressure fluctuations (wind noise) are a significant limiting factor in low-frequency atmospheric acoustic measurements. The Optical Fiber Infrasound Sensor (OFIS) provides an alternative to traditional infrasonic wind noise reduction (WNR) techniques by providing an instantaneous average over a large spatial extent. This study shows that linear OFISs ranging in length from 30 to 270 m provide a WNR of up to 30 dB in winds up to 5 m/s, in good agreement with a new analytical model. Arrays of optical fiber strainmeters were deployed to measure sediment compaction at two sites in Bangladesh. One array at Jamalganj (in the north) consists of 20, 40, 60, and 100 m long strainmeters, while the second near Khulna (in the south) also includes lengths of 80 and 300 m. Two years of weekly measurements show a clear seasonal signal and subsidence at both sites that is in reasonable agreement with collocated GPS receivers. A new 250-meter, interferometric vertical borehole strainmeter has been developed based completely on passive optical components. Details of the prototyping, design, and deployment at the Pinon Flat Observatory (PFO) are presented. Power spectra show an intertidal noise level of -130 dB (re. 1 epsilon/Hz), consistent within 1-3 dB between redundant components. Examination of its response to Earth tides and earthquakes relative to the areal strain recorded by an orthogonal pair of collocated, 730 m horizontal laser strainmeters yield a Poisson's ratio of 0.26. Two prototype horizontal strainmeters were also developed to explore the use of similar interferometric optical fiber

  12. Investigation of tidal displacements of the Earth's surface by laser ranging to GEOS-3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bower, D. R.; Halpenny, J.; Paul, M. K.; Lambert, A.

    1980-01-01

    An analysis of laser ranging data from three stations was carried out in an attempt to measure the geometric Earth tide. Two different approaches to the problem were investigated. The dynamic method computes pass to pass apparent movements in stations height relative to short arcs fitted to several passes of data from the same station by the program GEODYNE. The quasi-geometric method reduces the dependence on unmodelled satellite dynamics to a knowledge of only the radial position of the satellite by considering two station simultaneous ranging at the precise time that the satellite passes through the plane defined by two stations and the center of mass of the Earth.

  13. Models of the Origin of the Moon; Early History of Earth and Venus (The Role of Tidal Friction in the Formation of Structure of the Planets)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pechernikova, G. V.; Ruskol, E. L.

    2017-05-01

    An analytical review of the two contemporary models of the origin of the Earth-Moon system in the process of solid-body accretion is presented: socalled co-accretion model and as a result of a gigantic collision with a planetarysized body (i.e. a megaimpact model). The co-accretion model may be considered as a universal mechanism of the origin of planetary satellites, that accompanies the growth of planets. We consider the conditions of this process that secure the sufficient mass and angular momentum of the protolunar disk such as macroimpacts (collisions with the bodies of asteroidal size) into the mantle of the growing Earth, the role of an lunar embryo growing on the geocentric lunar orbit, its tidal interaction with the Earth. The most difficult remains the explanation of chemical composition of the Moon. Different scenarios of megaimpact are reviewed, in which the Earth's mantle is destroyed and the protosatellite disk is filled mainly by its fragments. There is evaluated amount of energy transferred to the Earth from the evolution of lunar orbit. It is an order of magnitude lower than three main sources of the Earth's interior heat, i.e. the heat of accretion, the energy of differentiation and the heat of radioactive sources. The tidal heating of the Venus's interiors could reach 1000K by slowing its axial initial rotation, in addition to three sources mentioned above in concern of the Earth.

  14. Assessing the Chemistry of Tidally Locked Earth-like Planets around M-type Stars Using a 3D Coupled Chemistry-Climate Model (CESM/WACCM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzano, Alexander

    2016-10-01

    Given recent discoveries there is a very real potential for tidally-locked Earth-like planets to exist orbiting M stars. To determine whether these planets may be habitable it is necessary to understand the nature of their atmospheres. In our investigation we simulate the evolution of present-day Earth while placed in tidally-locked orbit (meaning the same side of the planet always faces the star) around an M dwarf star. We are particularly interested in the evolution of the planet's ozone layer and whether it will shield the planet, and therefore life, from harmful radiation.To accomplish the above objectives we use a state-of-the-art 3-D terrestrial model, the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM), which fully couples chemistry and climate, and therefore allows self-consistent simulations of atmospheric constituents and their effects on a planet's climate, surface radiation and thus habitability. Preliminary results show that this model is stable and that a tidally-locked Earth is protected from harmful UV radiation produced by G stars. The next step shall be to adapt this model for an M star by including its UV and visible spectrum.This investigation will both provide an insight into the potential for habitable exoplanets and further define the nature of the habitable zones for M class stars. We will also be able to narrow the definition of the habitable zones around distant stars, which will help us identify these planets in the future. Furthermore, this project will allow for a more thorough analysis of data from past and future exoplanet observing missions by defining the atmospheric composition of Earth-like planets around a variety of types of stars.

  15. Tidal calibration of Plate Boundary Observatory borehole strainmeters: Roles of vertical and shear coupling

    Roeloffs, Evelyn

    2010-01-01

    A multicomponent borehole strainmeter directly measures changes in the diameter of its cylindrical housing at several azimuths. To transform these measurements to formation strains requires a calibration matrix, which must be estimated by analyzing the installed strainmeter's response to known strains. Typically, theoretical calculations of Earth tidal strains serve as the known strains. This paper carries out such an analysis for 12 Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) borehole strainmeters, postulating that each of the strainmeters' four gauges responds ("couples") to all three horizontal components of the formation strain tensor, as well as to vertical strain. Orientation corrections are also estimated. The fourth extensometer in each PBO strainmeter provides redundant information used to reduce the chance that coupling coefficients could be misleadingly fit to inappropriate theoretical tides. Satisfactory fits between observed and theoretically calculated tides were obtained for three PBO strainmeters in California, where the calculated tides are corroborated by other instrumentation, as well as for six strainmeters in Oregon and Washington, where no other instruments have ever recorded Earth tidal strain. Several strainmeters have unexpectedly large coupling coefficients for vertical strain, which increases the strainmeter's response to atmospheric pressure. Vertical coupling diminishes, or even changes the sign of, the apparent response to areal strain caused by Earth tides or deep Earth processes because near the free surface, vertical strains are opposite in sign to areal strain. Vertical coupling does not impair the shear strain response, however. PBO borehole strainmeters can provide calibrated shear strain time series of transient strain associated with tectonic or magmatic processes.

  16. On the Possibility of Estimation of the Earth Crust's Properties from the Observations of Electric Field of Electrokinetic Origin, Generated by Tidal Deformation within the Fault Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseev, D. A.; Gokhberg, M. B.

    2018-05-01

    A 2-D boundary problem formulation in terms of pore pressure in Biot poroelasticity model is discussed, with application to a vertical contact model mechanically excited by a lunar-solar tidal deformation wave, representing a fault zone structure. A problem parametrization in terms of permeability and Biot's modulus contrasts is proposed and its numerical solution is obtained for a series of models differing in the values of the above parameters. The behavior of pore pressure and its gradient is analyzed. From those, the electric field of the electrokinetic nature is calculated. The possibilities of estimation of the elastic properties and permeability of geological formations from the observations of the horizontal and vertical electric field measured inside the medium and at the earth's surface near the block boundary are discussed.

  17. Increased riboflavin production from activated bleaching earth by a mutant strain of Ashbya gossypii.

    PubMed

    Tajima, Satoshi; Itoh, Yoko; Sugimoto, Takashi; Kato, Tatsuya; Park, Enoch Y

    2009-10-01

    The production of riboflavin from vegetable oil was increased using a mutant strain of Ashbya gossypii. This mutant was generated by treating the wild-type strain with N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG). Riboflavin production was 10-fold higher in the mutant compared to the wild-type strain. The specific intracellular catalase activity after 3 d of culture was 6-fold higher in the mutant than in the wild-type strain. For the mutant, riboflavin production in the presence of 40 mM hydrogen peroxide was 16% less than that in the absence of hydrogen peroxide, whereas it was 56% less for the wild-type strain. The isocitrate lyase (ICL) activity of the mutant was 0.26 mU/mg of protein during the active riboflavin production phase, which was 2.6-fold higher than the wild-type strain. These data indicate that the mutant utilizes the carbon flux from the TCA cycle to the glyoxylate cycle more efficiently than the wild-type strain, resulting in enhanced riboflavin production. This novel mutant has the potential to be of use for industrial-scale riboflavin production from waste-activated bleaching earth (ABE), thereby transforming a useless material into a valuable bioproduct.

  18. Seasonal Variations of the Earth's Gravitational Field: An Analysis of Atmospheric Pressure, Ocean Tidal, and Surface Water Excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dong, D,; Gross, R.S.; Dickey, J.

    1996-01-01

    Monthly mean gravitational field parameters (denoted here as C(sub even)) that represent linear combinations of the primarily even degree zonal spherical harmonic coefficients of the Earth's gravitational field have been recovered using LAGEOS I data and are compared with those derived from gridded global surface pressure data of the National meteorological center (NMC) spanning 1983-1992. The effect of equilibrium ocean tides and surface water variations are also considered. Atmospheric pressure and surface water fluctuations are shown to be the dominant cause of observed annual C(sub even) variations. Closure with observations is seen at the 1sigma level when atmospheric pressure, ocean tide and surface water effects are include. Equilibrium ocean tides are shown to be the main source of excitation at the semiannual period with closure at the 1sigma level seen when both atmospheric pressure and ocean tide effects are included. The inverted barometer (IB) case is shown to give the best agreement with the observation series. The potential of the observed C(sub even) variations for monitoring mass variations in the polar regions of the Earth and the effect of the land-ocean mask in the IB calculation are discussed.

  19. Tidal energy

    SciT

    Charlier, R.H.

    1982-01-01

    The various methods of extracting energy from the ocean are covered, along with information on what causes tides, how tides are used to generate electricity, and the locations of hundreds of potential sites for tidal power plants. The rehabilitation of old tide mills, new methods of building tidal power plants, and the plastic barrier scheme are described. A world-wide examination is provided of tidal power plant sites and the status of power projects in the US, France, the USSR, England, Canada, North and South Korea, Argentina, Australia, and India. (WHR)

  20. Tidal Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Impact of Science on Society, 1987

    1987-01-01

    States that tidal power projects are feasible in a relatively limited number of locations around the world. Claims that together they could theoretically produce the energy equivalent to more than one million barrels of oil per year. (TW)

  1. Tidal disruption of inviscid planetesimals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boss, A. P.; Cameron, A. G. W.; Benz, W.

    1991-01-01

    In view of previous efforts' demonstration that strongly dissipative planetesimals are immune to tidal disruption, an examination is presently conducted of the complementary case of inviscid planetesimals arising from collisions that are sufficiently energetic to entirely melt the resulting planetesimal and debris. The tidal disruption is numerically simulated by means of the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) code of Cameron and Benz (1991), concentrating on the tidal disruption of 0.01 earth-mass planetesimals passing by the earth with variations in the impact parameter at perigee and velocity at infinity. The SPH models show that tidal forces during a close encounter can efficiently convert orbital angular momentum into spin angular momentum, thereby initiating equatorial mass-shedding to inviscid planetesimals that have been spun up beyond the limit of rotational stability.

  2. Tidally Heated Terrestrial Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henning, Wade Garrett

    This work models the surface and internal temperatures for hypothetical terrestrial planets in situations involving extreme tidal heating. The feasibility of such planets is evaluated in terms of the orbital perturbations that may give rise to them, their required proximity to a hoststar, and the potential for the input tidal heating to cause significant partial melting of the mantle. Trapping terrestrial planets into 2:1 resonances with migrating Hot Jupiters is considered as a reasonable way for Earth-like worlds to both maintain high eccentricities and to move to short enough orbital periods (1-20 days) for extreme tidal heating to occur. Secular resonance and secular orbital perturbations may support moderate tidal heating at a low equilibrium eccentricity. At orbital periods below 10-30 days, with eccentricities from 0.01 to 0.1, tidal heat may greatly exceed radiogenic heat production. It is unlikely to exceed insolation, except when orbiting very low luminosity hosts, and thus will have limited surface temperature expression. Observations of such bodies many not be able to detect tidal surface enhancements given a few percent uncertainty in albedo, except on the nightside of spin synchronous airless objects. Otherwise detection may occur via spectral detection of hotspots or high volcanic gas concentrations including sulfur dioxide and hydrogen sulfide. The most extreme cases may be able to produce magma oceans, or magma slush mantles with up to 40-60% melt fractions. Tides may alter the habitable zones for smaller red dwarf stars, but are generally detrimental. Multiple viscoelastic models, including the Maxwell, Voigt-Kelvin, Standard Anelastic Solid, and Burgers rheologies are explored and applied to objects such as Io and the super-Earth planet GJ 876d. The complex valued Love number for the Burgers rheology is derived and found to be a useful improvement when modeling the low temperature behavior of tidal bodies, particularly during low eccentricity

  3. Decreasing of axial angular momentum of oceanic both fluid continental masses and its contribution to non-tidal acceleration of rotation of the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkin, Yu. V.

    2009-04-01

    Modeling constructions have shown, that a variation of geopotential coefficients, since the second harmonic, are determined basically by redistributions of fluid masses in the top shells of the Earth [1]. Only on a variation of coefficients of the first harmonic essential influence renders displacement of the centre of mass in the basic mantle reference system. By the similar redistribution of masses it is obviously possible to estimate a variation of the axial moment of inertia of the full Earth, including an atmosphere and ocean, on a value of variation of coefficient of the second zonal harmonic of geopotential: Ċ• C = 2˙J2•(3I) (I = 0.3307is a dimensionless polar moment of inertia of the Earth, C is the polar moment of inertia of the Earth). According to satellite observations ˙ J2 = (2.7 ± 0.4) × 10-11 1/yr[2] and, hence, we obtain an estimation Ċ•C = -(5.4 ± 0.8) × 10-11 1/yr. We use this value for an establishment of the new phenomenon - acceleration of return superrotation of fluids in western direction. For what we shall take advantage of known estimations of secular non-tidal acceleration of rotation of the rigid Earth: ˙?•? = (6.9± 1.2) × 10-11 1/yr (corresponding variation LOD makes -0.6 ± 0.1 ms/cy) [3] and variations of angular velocity of axial rotation of the Earth because of secular increase of a polar atmosphere angular moment: -0.56 ms/cy[4]. On Salstein's data for 1970 - 2002 a positive trend of polar component of the angular momentum really exists. Corresponding reduction of duration of day is characterized by velocity-0.525 ms/cy. First of the given values has been obtained by results of observations of solar eclipses over last 2500. And the second value has been obtained on the data on variations of specified component of the angular momentum for last 60 years. Thus, in present epoch an acceleration of superrotation of an atmosphere is observed. Which results in delay of rotation of the Earth with relative

  4. Global Earth Response to Loading by Ocean Tide Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estes, R. H.; Strayer, J. M.

    1979-01-01

    Mathematical and programming techniques to numerically calculate Earth response to global semidiurnal and diurnal ocean tide models were developed. Global vertical crustal deformations were evaluated for M sub 2, S sub 2, N sub 2, K sub 2, K sub 1, O sub 1, and P sub 1 ocean tide loading, while horizontal deformations were evaluated for the M sub 2 tidal load. Tidal gravity calculations were performed for M sub 2 tidal loads, and strain tensor elements were evaluated for M sub 2 loads. The M sub 2 solution used for the ocean tide included the effects of self-gravitation and crustal loading.

  5. Three Conservation Applications of Astronaut Photographs of Earth: Tidal Flat Loss (Japan), Elephant Impacts on Vegetation (Botswana), and Seagrass and Mangrove Monitoring (Australia)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lulla, Kamlesh P.; Robinson, Julie A.; Minorukashiwagi; Maggiesuzuki; Duanenellis, M.; Bussing, Charles E.; Leelong, W. J.; McKenzie, Andlen J.

    2000-01-01

    NASA photographs taken from low Earth orbit can provide information relevant to conservation biology. This data source is now more accessible due to improvements in digitizing technology, Internet file transfer, and availability of image processing software. We present three examples of conservation-related projects that benefited from using orbital photographs. (1) A time series of photographs from the Space Shuttle showing wetland conversion in Japan was used as a tool for communicating about the impacts of tidal flat loss. Real-time communication with astronauts about a newsworthy event resulted in acquiring current imagery. These images and the availability of other high resolution digital images from NASA provided timely public information on the observed changes. (2) A Space Shuttle photograph of Chobe National Park in Botswana was digitally classified and analyzed to identify the locations of elephant-impacted woodland. Field validation later confirmed that areas identified on the image showed evidence of elephant impacts. (3) A summary map from intensive field surveys of seagrasses in Shoalwater Bay, Australia was used as reference data for a supervised classification of a digitized photograph taken from orbit. The classification was able to distinguish seagrasses, sediments and mangroves with accuracy approximating that in studies using other satellite remote sensing data. Orbital photographs are in the public domain and the database of nearly 400,000 photographs from the late 1960s to the present is available at a single searchable location on the Internet. These photographs can be used by conservation biologists for general information about the landscape and in quantitative applications.

  6. Improved vertical optical fiber borehole strainmeter design for measuring Earth strain.

    PubMed

    DeWolf, Scott; Wyatt, Frank K; Zumberge, Mark A; Hatfield, William

    2015-11-01

    Fiber-based interferometers provide the means to sense very small displacements over long baselines, and have the advantage of being nearly completely passive in their operation, making them particularly well suited for geophysical applications. A new 250 m, interferometric vertical borehole strainmeter has been developed based completely on passive optical components. Details of the design and deployment at the Piñon Flat Observatory are presented. Power spectra show an intertidal noise level of -130 dB (re. 1 ϵ(2)/Hz), consistent within 1-3 dB between redundant components. Examination of its response to Earth tides and earthquakes relative to the areal strain recorded by an orthogonal pair of collocated, 730 m horizontal laser strainmeters yield a Poisson's ratio for local near surface material of 0.25 that is consistent with previous results.

  7. Application of Freeze-Dried Powders of Genetically Engineered Microbial Strains as Adsorbents for Rare Earth Metal Ions.

    PubMed

    Moriwaki, Hiroshi; Masuda, Reiko; Yamazaki, Yuki; Horiuchi, Kaoru; Miyashita, Mari; Kasahara, Jun; Tanaka, Tatsuhito; Yamamoto, Hiroki

    2016-10-12

    The adsorption behaviors of the rare earth metal ions onto freeze-dried powders of genetically engineered microbial strains were compared. Cell powders obtained from four kinds of strains, Bacillus subtilis 168 wild type (WT), lipoteichoic acid-defective (ΔLTA), wall teichoic acid-defective (ΔWTA), and cell wall hydrolases-defective (EFKYOJLp) strains, were used as an adsorbent of the rare earth metal ions at pH 3. The adsorption ability of the rare earth metal ions was in the order of EFKYOJLp > WT > ΔLTA > ΔWTA. The order was the same as the order of the phosphorus quantity of the strains. This result indicates that the main adsorption sites for the ions are the phosphate groups and the teichoic acids, LTA and WTA, that contribute to the adsorption of the rare earth metal ions onto the cell walls. The contribution of WTA was clearly greater than that of LTA. Each microbial powder was added to a solution containing 16 kinds of rare earth metal ions, and the removals (%) of each rare earth metal ion were obtained. The scandium ion showed the highest removal (%), while that of the lanthanum ion was the lowest for all the microbial powders. Differences in the distribution coefficients between the kinds of lanthanide ions by the EFKYOJLp and ΔWTA powders were greater than those of the other strains. Therefore, the EFKYOJLp and ΔWTA powders could be applicable for the selective extraction of the lanthanide ions. The ΔLTA powder coagulated by mixing with a rare earth metal ion, although no sedimentation of the WT or ΔWTA powder with a rare earth metal ion was observed under the same conditions. The EFKYOJLp powder was also coagulated, but its flocculating activity was lower than that of ΔLTA. The ΔLTA and EFKYOJLp powders have a long shape compared to those of the WT or ΔWTA strain. The shapes of the cells will play an important role in the sedimentation of the microbial powders with rare earth metal ions. As the results, three kinds of the genetically

  8. Using Google Earth to Explore Strain Rate Models of Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, G. A.; Bell, E. A.; Holt, W. E.

    2007-12-01

    A series of strain rate models for the Transverse Ranges of southern California were developed based on Quaternary fault slip data and geodetic data from high precision GPS stations in southern California. Pacific-North America velocity boundary conditions are applied for all models. Topography changes are calculated using the model dilatation rates, which predict crustal thickness changes under the assumption of Airy isostasy and a specified rate of crustal volume loss through erosion. The models were designed to produce graphical and numerical output representing the configuration of the region from 3 million years ago to 3 million years into the future at intervals of 50 thousand years. Using a North American reference frame, graphical output for the topography and faults and numerical output for locations of faults and points on the crust marked by the locations on cities were used to create data in KML format that can be used in Google Earth to represent time intervals of 50 thousand years. As markers familiar to students, the cities provide a geographic context that can be used to quantify crustal movement, using the Google Earth ruler tool. By comparing distances that markers for selected cities have moved in various parts of the region, students discover that the greatest amount of crustal deformation has occurred in the vicinity of the boundary between the North American and Pacific plates. Students can also identify areas of compression or extension by finding pairs of city markers that have converged or diverged, respectively, over time. The Google Earth layers also reveal that faults that are not parallel to the plate boundary have tended to rotate clockwise due to the right lateral motion along the plate boundary zone. KML TimeSpan markup was added to two versions of the model, enabling the layers to be displayed in an automatic sequenced loop for a movie effect. The data is also available as QuickTime (.mov) and Graphics Interchange Format (.gif

  9. Calculating lunar retreat rates using tidal rhythmites

    Kvale, E.P.; Johnson, H.W.; Sonett, C.P.; Archer, A.W.; Zawistoski, A.N.N.

    1999-01-01

    Tidal rhythmites are small-scale sedimenta??r}- structures that can preserve a hierarchy of astronomically induced tidal periods. They can also preserve a record of periodic nontidal sedimentation. If properly interpreted and understood, tidal rhjthmites can be an important component of paleoastronomy and can be used to extract information on ancient lunar orbital dynamics including changes in Earth-Moon distance through geologic time. Herein we present techniques that can be used to calculate ancient Earth-Moon distances. Each of these techniques, when used on a modern high-tide data set, results in calculated estimates of lunar orbital periods and an EarthMoon distance that fall well within 1 percent of the actual values. Comparisons to results from modern tidal data indicate that ancient tidal rhythmite data as short as 4 months can provide suitable estimates of lunar orbital periods if these tidal records are complete. An understanding of basic tidal theory allows for the evaluation of completeness of the ancient tidal record as derived from an analysis of tidal rhythmites. Utilizing the techniques presented herein, it appears from the rock record that lunar orbital retreat slowed sometime during the midPaleozoic. Copyright ??1999, SEPM (Society for Sedimentary Geology).

  10. Exhaustive testing of recent oceanic and Earth tidal models using combination of tide gravity data from GGP and ICET data banks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopaev, A.; Ducarme, B.

    2003-04-01

    We have used the most recent oceanic tidal models e.g. FES’99/02, GOT’00, CSR’4, NAO’99 and TPXO’5/6 for tidal gravity loading computations using LOAD’97 software. Resulting loading vectors were compared against each other in different regions located at different distances from the sea coast. Results indicate good coincidence for majority of models at the distances larger than 100-200 km, excluding some regions where mostly CSR’4 and TPXO have problems. Outlying models were rejected for this regions and mean loading vectors have been calculated for more than 200 tidal gravity stations from GGP and ICET data banks, representing state of the art of tidal loading correction. Corresponding errors in d-factors and phase lags are generally smaller than 0.1 % resp. 0.05o, that means that we do not have the real troubles with loading corrections and more attention should be applied to the calibration values and phase lag determination accuracies. Corrected values agree with DDW model values very well (within 0.2 %) for majority of GGP stations, whereas some of very good (Chinese network mainly) ICET tidal gravity stations clearly demonstrate statistically significant (up to 0.5 %) anomalies that seems not connected either with calibration troubles or loading problems. Various possible reasons including instrumental and geophysical will be presented and discussed.

  11. Tidal effects on stellar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poppenhaeger, K.

    2017-10-01

    The architecture of many exoplanetary systems is different from the solar system, with exoplanets being in close orbits around their host stars and having orbital periods of only a few days. We can expect interactions between the star and the exoplanet for such systems that are similar to the tidal interactions observed in close stellar binary systems. For the exoplanet, tidal interaction can lead to circularization of its orbit and the synchronization of its rotational and orbital period. For the host star, it has long been speculated if significant angular momentum transfer can take place between the planetary orbit and the stellar rotation. In the case of the Earth-Moon system, such tidal interaction has led to an increasing distance between Earth and Moon. For stars with Hot Jupiters, where the orbital period of the exoplanet is typically shorter than the stellar rotation period, one expects a decreasing semimajor axis for the planet and enhanced stellar rotation, leading to increased stellar activity. Also excess turbulence in the stellar convective zone due to rising and subsiding tidal bulges may change the magnetic activity we observe for the host star. I will review recent observational results on stellar activity and tidal interaction in the presence of close-in exoplanets, and discuss the effects of enhanced stellar activity on the exoplanets in such systems.

  12. Oceanic Loading and Local Distortions at the Baksan, Russia, and Gran Sasso, Italy, Strain Stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milyukov, V. K.; Amoruso, A.; Crescentini, L.; Mironov, A. P.; Myasnikov, A. V.; Lagutkina, A. V.

    2018-03-01

    Reliable use of strain data in geophysical studies requires their preliminary correction for ocean loading and various local distortions. These effects, in turn, can be estimated from the tidal records which are contributed by solid and oceanic loading. In this work, we estimate the oceanic tidal loading at two European strain stations (Baksan, Russia, and Gran Sasso, Italy) by analyzing the results obtained with the different Earth and ocean models. The influence of local distortions on the strain measurements at the two stations is estimated.

  13. Dissipation of Tidal Energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The moon's gravity imparts tremendous energy to the Earth, raising tides throughout the global oceans. What happens to all this energy? This question has been pondered by scientists for over 200 years, and has consequences ranging from the history of the moon to the mixing of the oceans. Richard Ray at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md. and Gary Egbert of the College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Ore. studied six years of altimeter data from the TOPEX/Poseidon satellite to address this question. According to their report in the June 15 issue of Nature, about 1 terawatt, or 25 to 30 percent of the total tidal energy dissipation, occurs in the deep ocean. The remainder occurs in shallow seas, such as on the Patagonian Shelf. 'By measuring sea level with the TOPEX/Poseidon satellite altimeter, our knowledge of the tides in the global ocean has been remarkably improved,' said Richard Ray, a geophysicist at Goddard. The accuracies are now so high that this data can be used to map empirically the tidal energy dissipation. (Red areas, above) The deep-water tidal dissipation occurs generally near rugged bottom topography (seamounts and mid-ocean ridges). 'The observed pattern of deep-ocean dissipation is consistent with topographic scattering of tidal energy into internal motions within the water column, resulting in localized turbulence and mixing', said Gary Egbert an associate professor at OSU. One important implication of this finding concerns the possible energy sources needed to maintain the ocean's large-scale 'conveyor-belt' circulation and to mix upper ocean heat into the abyssal depths. It is thought that 2 terawatts are required for this process. The winds supply about 1 terawatt, and there has been speculation that the tides, by pumping energy into vertical water motions, supply the remainder. However, all current general circulation models of the oceans ignore the tides. 'It is possible that properly

  14. Relativistic theory of tidal Love numbers

    SciT

    Binnington, Taylor; Poisson, Eric

    In Newtonian gravitational theory, a tidal Love number relates the mass multipole moment created by tidal forces on a spherical body to the applied tidal field. The Love number is dimensionless, and it encodes information about the body's internal structure. We present a relativistic theory of Love numbers, which applies to compact bodies with strong internal gravities; the theory extends and completes a recent work by Flanagan and Hinderer, which revealed that the tidal Love number of a neutron star can be measured by Earth-based gravitational-wave detectors. We consider a spherical body deformed by an external tidal field, and providemore » precise and meaningful definitions for electric-type and magnetic-type Love numbers; and these are computed for polytropic equations of state. The theory applies to black holes as well, and we find that the relativistic Love numbers of a nonrotating black hole are all zero.« less

  15. Tidal Asteroseismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkart, Joshua

    2012-01-01

    The recently discovered Kepler system KOI-54 is a face-on eccentric binary consisting of two similar A stars. Its lightcurve exhibits 20 tidally excited pulsations at perfect harmonics of the orbital frequency, and another 10 nonharmonic pulsations. Analysis of such data is a new form of asteroseismology in which oscillation amplitudes and phases rather than frequencies contain information that can be mined to constrain stellar properties. I will discuss the physics of mode excitation and the range of harmonics expected to be observed. I will then show the results of numerical modeling of the pulsation spectrum, using a nonadiabatic stellar oscillation code including rotation in the "traditional approximation", which qualitatively reproduce the observations. I will discuss the evolutionary history of the KOI-54 system, and will show that the system is likely in a state of stochastic dynamical pseudosynchronization with stellar spin periods of 1.5 days, significantly faster than the classical theoretical prediction of 2.5 days. Time permitting, I will also address the nonharmonic pulsations observed in KOI-54, and show that they can be produced by nonlinear three-mode coupling.

  16. TIDALLY HEATED TERRESTRIAL EXOPLANETS: VISCOELASTIC RESPONSE MODELS

    SciT

    Henning, Wade G.; O'Connell, Richard J.; Sasselov, Dimitar D., E-mail: henning@fas.harvard.ed

    Tidal friction in exoplanet systems, driven by orbits that allow for durable nonzero eccentricities at short heliocentric periods, can generate internal heating far in excess of the conditions observed in our own solar system. Secular perturbations or a notional 2:1 resonance between a hot Earth and hot Jupiter can be used as a baseline to consider the thermal evolution of convecting bodies subject to strong viscoelastic tidal heating. We compare results first from simple models using a fixed Quality factor and Love number, and then for three different viscoelastic rheologies: the Maxwell body, the Standard Anelastic Solid (SAS), and themore » Burgers body. The SAS and Burgers models are shown to alter the potential for extreme tidal heating by introducing the possibility of new equilibria and multiple response peaks. We find that tidal heating tends to exceed radionuclide heating at periods below 10-30 days, and exceed insolation only below 1-2 days. Extreme cases produce enough tidal heat to initiate global-scale partial melting, and an analysis of tidal limiting mechanisms such as advective cooling for earthlike planets is discussed. To explore long-term behaviors, we map equilibria points between convective heat loss and tidal heat input as functions of eccentricity. For the periods and magnitudes discussed, we show that tidal heating, if significant, is generally detrimental to the width of habitable zones.« less

  17. Galileo's tidal theory.

    PubMed

    Naylor, Ron

    2007-03-01

    The aim of Galileo's tidal theory was to show that the tides were produced entirely by the earth's motion and thereby to demonstrate the physical truth of Copernicanism. However, in the Dialogue Concerning the Two Chief World Systems Galileo did not explain some of the most significant aspects of the theory completely. As a consequence, the way the theory works has long been disputed. Though there exist a number of interpretations in the literature, the most widely accepted are based on ideas that are not explicitly articulated by Galileo in the Dialogue. This essay attempts to understand the way the theory functions in terms of Galilean physics. It is an interpretation of the theory based solely on Galileo's arguments--and one that reveals it to have had some unrecognized consequences. This interpretation indicates that Galileo's theory would not have worked in the manner he described in the Dialogue.

  18. Earth

    2012-01-30

    Behold one of the more detailed images of the Earth yet created. This Blue Marble Earth montage shown above -- created from photographs taken by the Visible/Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument on board the new Suomi NPP satellite -- shows many stunning details of our home planet. The Suomi NPP satellite was launched last October and renamed last week after Verner Suomi, commonly deemed the father of satellite meteorology. The composite was created from the data collected during four orbits of the robotic satellite taken earlier this month and digitally projected onto the globe. Many features of North America and the Western Hemisphere are particularly visible on a high resolution version of the image. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA18033

  19. Strain-induced modification of magnetic structure and new magnetic phases in rare-earth epitaxial films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufour, C.; Dumesnil, K.; Mangin, Ph

    2006-07-01

    Rare earths exhibit complex magnetic phase diagrams resulting from the competition between various contributions to the magnetic energy: exchange, anisotropy and magnetostriction. The epitaxy of a rare-earth film on a substrate induces (i) a clamping to the substrate and (ii) pseudomorphic strains. Both these effects are shown to lead to modifications of the magnetic properties in (0 0 1)Dy, (0 0 1)Tb and (1 1 0)Eu films. In Dy and Tb films, spectacular variations of the Curie temperature have been evidenced. Additionally, Tb films exhibit a new large wavelength magnetic modulation. In Eu films, one of the helical magnetic domains disappears at low temperature whereas the propagation vectors of the other helices are tilted. The link between structural and magnetic properties is underlined via magnetoelastic models. Moreover, molecular beam epitaxy permits the growth of Sm in a metastable dhcp phase. The magnetic structure of dhcp Sm has been elucidated for the first time. In this review, neutron scattering is shown to be a powerful technique to reveal the magnetic structures of rare-earth films.

  20. Tidal evolution of close binary asteroid systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Patrick A.; Margot, Jean-Luc

    2010-12-01

    We provide a generalized discussion of tidal evolution to arbitrary order in the expansion of the gravitational potential between two spherical bodies of any mass ratio. To accurately reproduce the tidal evolution of a system at separations less than 5 times the radius of the larger primary component, the tidal potential due to the presence of a smaller secondary component is expanded in terms of Legendre polynomials to arbitrary order rather than truncated at leading order as is typically done in studies of well-separated system like the Earth and Moon. The equations of tidal evolution including tidal torques, the changes in spin rates of the components, and the change in semimajor axis (orbital separation) are then derived for binary asteroid systems with circular and equatorial mutual orbits. Accounting for higher-order terms in the tidal potential serves to speed up the tidal evolution of the system leading to underestimates in the time rates of change of the spin rates, semimajor axis, and mean motion in the mutual orbit if such corrections are ignored. Special attention is given to the effect of close orbits on the calculation of material properties of the components, in terms of the rigidity and tidal dissipation function, based on the tidal evolution of the system. It is found that accurate determinations of the physical parameters of the system, e.g., densities, sizes, and current separation, are typically more important than accounting for higher-order terms in the potential when calculating material properties. In the scope of the long-term tidal evolution of the semimajor axis and the component spin rates, correcting for close orbits is a small effect, but for an instantaneous rate of change in spin rate, semimajor axis, or mean motion, the close-orbit correction can be on the order of tens of percent. This work has possible implications for the determination of the Roche limit and for spin-state alteration during close flybys.

  1. The origin of neap-spring tidal cycles

    Kvale, E.P.

    2006-01-01

    The origin of oceanic tides is a basic concept taught in most introductory college-level sedimentology/geology, oceanography, and astronomy courses. Tides are typically explained in the context of the equilibrium tidal theory model. Yet this model does not take into account real tides in many parts of the world. Not only does the equilibrium tidal model fail to explicate amphidromic circulation, it also does not explain diurnal tides in low latitude positions. It likewise fails to explain the existence of tide-dominated areas where neap-spring cycles are synchronized with the 27.32-day orbital cycle of the Moon (tropical month), rather than with the more familiar 29.52-day cycle of lunar phases (synodic month). Both types of neap-spring cycles can be recognized in the rock record. A complete explanation of the origin of tides should include a discussion of dynamic tidal theory. In the dynamic tidal model, tides resulting from the motions of the Moon in its orbit around the Earth and the Earth in its orbit around the Sun are modeled as products of the combined effects of a series of phantom satellites. The movement of each of these satellites, relative to the Earth's equator, creates its own tidal wave that moves around an amphidromic point. Each of these waves is referred to as a tidal constituent. The geometries of the ocean basins determine which of these constituents are amplified. Thus, the tide-raising potential for any locality on Earth can be conceptualized as the result of a series of tidal constituents specific to that region. A better understanding of tidal cycles opens up remarkable opportunities for research on tidal deposits with implications for, among other things, a more complete understanding of the tidal dynamics responsible for sediment transport and deposition, changes in Earth-Moon distance through time, and the possible influences tidal cycles may exert on organisms. ?? 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Strains

    MedlinePlus

    ... the first 3 days. After 3 days, either heat or ice may be helpful if you still have pain. Rest the pulled muscle for at least a day. If possible, keep the pulled muscle raised above your heart. Try not to use a strained muscle while ...

  3. Antagonistic Activities of Bacillus spp. Strains Isolated from Tidal Flat Sediment Towards Anthracnose Pathogens Colletotrichum acutatum and C. gloeosporioides in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Han, Joon-Hee; Shim, Hongsik; Shin, Jong-Hwan; Kim, Kyoung Su

    2015-06-01

    Anthracnose is a fungal disease caused by Colletotrichum species that is detrimental to numerous plant species. Anthracnose control with fungicides has both human health and environmental safety implications. Despite increasing public concerns, fungicide use will continue in the absence of viable alternatives. There have been relatively less efforts to search antagonistic bacteria from mudflats harboring microbial diversity. A total of 420 bacterial strains were isolated from mudflats near the western sea of South Korea. Five bacterial strains, LB01, LB14, HM03, HM17, and LB15, were characterized as having antifungal properties in the presence of C. acutatum and C. gloeosporioides. The three Bacillus atrophaeus strains, LB14, HM03, and HM17, produced large quantities of chitinase and protease enzymes, whereas the B. amyloliquefaciens strain LB01 produced protease and cellulase enzymes. Two important antagonistic traits, siderophore production and solubilization of insoluble phosphate, were observed in the three B. atrophaeus strains. Analyses of disease suppression revealed that LB14 was most effective for suppressing the incidence of anthracnose symptoms on pepper fruits. LB14 produced antagonistic compounds and suppressed conidial germination of C. acutatum and C. gloeosporioides. The results from the present study will provide a basis for developing a reliable alternative to fungicides for anthracnose control.

  4. No Snowball on Habitable Tidally Locked Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Checlair, Jade; Menou, Kristen; Abbot, Dorian S.

    2017-08-01

    The TRAPPIST-1, Proxima Centauri, and LHS 1140 systems are the most exciting prospects for future follow-up observations of potentially inhabited planets. All of the planets orbit nearby M-stars and are likely tidally locked in 1:1 spin–orbit states, which motivates the consideration of the effects that tidal locking might have on planetary habitability. On Earth, periods of global glaciation (snowballs) may have been essential for habitability and remote signs of life (biosignatures) because they are correlated with increases in the complexity of life and in the atmospheric oxygen concentration. In this paper, we investigate the snowball bifurcation (sudden onset of global glaciation) on tidally locked planets using both an energy balance model and an intermediate-complexity global climate model. We show that tidally locked planets are unlikely to exhibit a snowball bifurcation as a direct result of the spatial pattern of insolation they receive. Instead, they will smoothly transition from partial to complete ice coverage and back. A major implication of this work is that tidally locked planets with an active carbon cycle should not be found in a snowball state. Moreover, this work implies that tidally locked planets near the outer edge of the habitable zone with low CO2 outgassing fluxes will equilibrate with a small unglaciated substellar region rather than cycling between warm and snowball states. More work is needed to determine how the lack of a snowball bifurcation might affect the development of life on a tidally locked planet.

  5. Earth strain measurements with the transportable laser ranging system: Field techniques and planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, Y.; Dorman, H. J.; Cahill, T.

    1982-01-01

    The potential of the transportable laser ranging system for monitoring the ground deformation around satellite ranging stations and other geodetic control points was examined with emphasis on testing the usefulness of the relative alteration technique. The temporal variation of the ratio of the length of each survey line to the mean length of all survey lines in a given area is directly related to the mean shear strain rate for the area. The data from a series of experimental measurements taken over the Los Angeles basin from a TLRS station at Mt. Wilson show that such ratios can be determined to an accuracy of one part in 10 million with a measurement program lasting for three days and without using any corrections for variations in atmospheric conditions. A numerical experiment using a set of hypothetical data indicates that reasonable estimates of the present shear strain rate and the direction of the principal axes in southern California can be deduced from such measurements over an interval of one to two years.

  6. Nonlinearity in rock - Evidence from earth tides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agnew, D. C.

    1981-01-01

    The earth is sinusoidally stressed by tidal forces; if the stress-strain relation for rock is nonlinear, energy should appear in an earth tide record at frequencies which are multiples of those of the larger tidal lines. An examination of the signals to be expected for different nonlinear deformation laws shows that for a nonlinear response without dissipation, the largest anomalous signal should occur at twice the forcing frequency, whereas for nonlinear laws involving dissipation (cusped hysteresis loops) the anomalous signal will be greatest at three times this frequency. The size of the signal in the dissipative case depends on the amount by which dissipation affects the particular response being measured. For measurements of strain tides this depends on whether dissipation is assumed to be present throughout the earth or localized around the point of measurement. An analysis of 5.7 years of strain tide records from Pinon Flat, California, shows a small signal at twice the frequency of the largest (M2) tide.

  7. Staging of the Acoustic Response at Laboratory Modelling of Tidal Influence upon Seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saltykov, Vadim; Patonin, Andrey; Kugaenko, Yulia

    2010-05-01

    INTRODUCTION The seismic radiation is varied through the wide range of seismic energy from seismic emission (high-frequency seismic noise, HFSN) to earthquakes. Some features of external influence response on the different scales allow to consider the medium as a single whole seismoactive object. Earth tide is a bright example of external excited field. Tidal topic has long history in seismology. Results obtained by different scientists are contradictory and ambiguous often. We denoted instability of tidal effect manifestation as possible reason of this situation. In view of the aforesaid it is significant, that tidal effects in weak seismicity and HFSN prove more strongly in the stage of large earthquake preparation [Rykunov et al., 1998, Saltykov et al., 2004, 2007]. It is presumed that the metastable medium has more high tidal sensitivity. For example, sources of prepared earthquakes and extensive near-surface zones of micro-fissuring and dilatancy, which appear during source formation and stretch far enough. [Alekseev et all., 2001, Goldin, 2004, 2005]. Common features of observed effects allow to suggest existence of tidal modulation mechanism, which is similar (may be single) for different seismic scales. Modelling of these processes can improve our understanding of tidal effect nature. LABORATORY EXPERIMENT Results of rock sample destruction experiments under controlling are presented. Acoustic emission (AE) pulses act as analogue of seismic events. Tides are simulated by weak long-period variations added to quasi-stationary subcritical loading. The results of tidal modeling confirmed AE intensity synchronization with external periodic influence with large (5-10%) variations of loading are known [Lockner, Beeler, 1999, Ponomarev et al., 2007]. But real (in nature) tidal strain&stress variations are much less and equal to splits of percent. Therefore, investigation of weak modulation influence upon deformed rock is one of main proposed purposes. Used software

  8. Satellite Monitoring of Accumulation of Strain in the Earth's Crust Related to Seismic and Volcanic Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arellano-Baeza, A. A.

    2009-12-01

    Our studies have shown that the strain energy accumulation deep in the Earth’s crust that precedes seismic and volcanic activity can be detected by applying a lineament extraction technique to the high-resolution multispectral satellite images. A lineament is a straight or a somewhat curved feature in a satellite image, which it is possible to detect by a special processing of images based on directional filtering and or Hough transform. We analyzed tens of earthquakes occurred in the Pacific coast of the South America with the magnitude > 4 Mw, using ASTER/TERRA multispectral satellite images for detection and analysis of changes in the system of lineaments previous to a strong earthquake. All events were located in the regions with small seasonal variations and limited vegetation to facilitate the tracking of features associated with the seismic activity only. It was found that the number and orientation of lineaments changed significantly about one month before an earthquake approximately, and a few months later the system returns to its initial state. This effect increases with the earthquake magnitude. It also was shown that the behavior of lineaments associated to the volcano seismic activity is opposite to that obtained previously for earthquakes. This discrepancy can be explained assuming that in the last case the main reason of earthquakes is compression and accumulation of strength in the Earth’s crust due to subduction of tectonic plates, whereas in the first case we deal with the inflation of a volcano edifice due to elevation of pressure and magma intrusion. The results obtained made it possible to include this research as a part of scientific program of Chilean Remote Sensing Satellite mission to be launched in 2010.

  9. Tidal disruption of solid bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobrovolskis, Anthony R.

    1990-01-01

    The problem of stress, strain, and breakup in solid satellites and stray bodies subject to tidal perturbations is presently addressed in view of three novel considerations. After presenting a new analytic solution for the stress tensor in a homogeneous and compressible elastic sphere, where the inclusion of compressibility alters stresses by several percent, realistic failure criteria are noted to demonstrate the general failure of such ductile bodies as iron meteoroids by plastic shear, while brittle ice bodies fail by either tensile or shear fracture. A reexamination of crack propagation after initial failure allows the diverse breakup criteria to be reconciled.

  10. Adsorption of rare earth ions onto the cell walls of wild-type and lipoteichoic acid-defective strains of Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Moriwaki, Hiroshi; Koide, Remi; Yoshikawa, Ritsuko; Warabino, Yuya; Yamamoto, Hiroki

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the potential of cell walls of wild-type and lipoteichoic acid-defective strains of Bacillus subtilis 168 to adsorb rare earth ions. Freeze-dried cell powders prepared from both strains were used for the evaluation of adsorption ability for the rare earth ions, namely, La(III), Eu(III), and Tm(III). The rare earth ions were efficiently adsorbed onto powders of both wild-type strain (WT powder) and lipoteichoic acid-defective strain (∆LTA powder) at pH 3. The maximum adsorption capacities for Tm(III) by WT and ∆LTA powders were 43 and 37 mg g(-1), respectively. Removal (in percent) of Tm(III), La(III), and Eu(III) from aqueous solution by WT powder was greater than by ∆LTA powder. These results indicate that rare earth ions are adsorbed to functional groups, such as phosphate and carboxyl groups, of lipoteichoic acid. We observed coagulated ∆LTA powder in the removal of rare earth ions (1-20 mg L(-1)) from aqueous solution. In contrast, sedimentation of WT powder did not occur under the same conditions. This unique feature of ∆LTA powder may be caused by the difference of the distribution between lipoteichoic acid and wall teichoic acid. It appears that ∆LTA powder is useful for removal of rare earth ions by adsorption, because aggregation allows for rapid separation of the adsorbent by filtration.

  11. Observation of the Earth Liquid Core Resonance by Extensometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bán, Dóra; Mentes, Gyula; Kis, Márta; Koppán, András

    2018-05-01

    We performed Earth tidal measurements by quartz tube extensometers of the same type at several observatories (Budapest, Pécs, Sopronbánfalva in Hungary and Vyhne in Slovakia). In this paper, the first attempts to reveal the effect of the Free Core Nutation (FCN) from strain measurements are described. The effect of the FCN on the P1, K1, Ψ1 and Φ1 tidal waves were studied on the basis of tidal results obtained in four observatories. Effectiveness of the correction of tidal data for temperature, barometric pressure and ocean load was also investigated. The obtained K1/O1 ratios are close to the theoretical values with exception of the Pécs station. We found a discrepancy between the observed and theoretical P1/O1 values for all stations with exception of the Budapest station. It was found that the difference between the measured and theoretical Ψ1/O1 and Φ1/O1 ratios was very large independently of correction of the strain data. These discrepancies need further investigations. According to our results, fluid core resonance effects can also be detected by our quartz tube extensometers but correction of strain data for local effects is necessary.

  12. Enceladus' tidal dissipation revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobie, Gabriel; Behounkova, Marie; Choblet, Gael; Cadek, Ondrej; Soucek, Ondrej

    2016-10-01

    A series of chemical and physical evidence indicates that the intense activity at Enceladus' South Pole is related to a subsurface salty water reservoir underneath the tectonically active ice shell. The detection of a significant libration implies that this water reservoir is global and that the average ice shell thickness is about 20-25km (Thomas et al. 2016). The interpretation of gravity and topography data further predicts large variations in ice shell thickness, resulting in a shell potentially thinner than 5 km in the South Polar Terrain (SPT) (Cadek et al. 2016). Such an ice shell structure requires a very strong heat source in the interior, with a focusing mechanism at the SPT. Thermal diffusion through the ice shell implies that at least 25-30 GW is lost into space by passive diffusion, implying a very efficient dissipation mechanism in Enceladus' interior to maintain such an ocean/ice configuration thermally stable.In order to determine in which conditions such a large dissipation power may be generated, we model the tidal response of Enceladus including variable ice shell thickness. For the rock core, we consider a wide range of rheological parameters representative of water-saturated porous rock materials. We demonstrate that the thinning toward the South Pole leads to a strong increase in heat production in the ice shell, with a optimal thickness obtained between 1.5 and 3 km, depending on the assumed ice viscosity. Our results imply that the heat production in the ice shell within the SPT may be sufficient to counterbalance the heat loss by diffusion and to power eruption activity. However, outside the SPT, a strong dissipation in the porous core is required to counterbalance the diffusive heat loss. We show that about 20 GW can be generated in the core, for an effective viscosity of 1012 Pa.s, which is comparable to the effective viscosity estimated in water-saturated glacial tills on Earth. We will discuss the implications of this revisited tidal

  13. Tidal Heating in Multilayered Terrestrial Exoplanets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henning, Wade G.; Hurford, Terry

    2014-01-01

    The internal pattern and overall magnitude of tidal heating for spin-synchronous terrestrial exoplanets from 1 to 2.5 R(sub E) is investigated using a propagator matrix method for a variety of layer structures. Particular attention is paid to ice-silicate hybrid super-Earths, where a significant ice mantle is modeled to rest atop an iron-silicate core, and may or may not contain a liquid water ocean. We find multilayer modeling often increases tidal dissipation relative to a homogeneous model, across multiple orbital periods, due to the ability to include smaller volume low viscosity regions, and the added flexure allowed by liquid layers. Gradations in parameters with depth are explored, such as allowed by the Preliminary Earth Reference Model. For ice-silicate hybrid worlds, dramatically greater dissipation is possible beyond the case of a silicate mantle only, allowing non-negligible tidal activity to extend to greater orbital periods than previously predicted. Surface patterns of tidal heating are found to potentially be useful for distinguishing internal structure. The influence of ice mantle depth and water ocean size and position are shown for a range of forcing frequencies. Rates of orbital circularization are found to be 10-100 times faster than standard predictions for Earth-analog planets when interiors are moderately warmer than the modern Earth, as well as for a diverse range of ice-silicate hybrid super-Earths. Circularization rates are shown to be significantly longer for planets with layers equivalent to an ocean-free modern Earth, as well as for planets with high fractions of either ice or silicate melting.

  14. Homogeneous wave turbulence driven by tidal flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favier, B.; Le Reun, T.; Barker, A.; Le Bars, M.

    2017-12-01

    When a moon orbits around a planet, the rotation of the induced tidal bulge drives a homogeneous, periodic, large-scale flow. The combination of such an excitation with the rotating motion of the planet has been shown to drive parametric resonance of a pair of inertial waves in a mechanism called the elliptical instability. Geophysical fluid layers can also be stratified: this is the case for instance of the Earth's oceans and, as suggested by several studies, of the upper part of the Earth's liquid Outer Core. We thus investigate the stability of a rotating and stratified layer undergoing tidal distortion in the limit where either rotation or stratification is dominant. We show that the periodic tidal flow drives a parametric subharmonic resonance of inertial (resp. internal) waves in the rotating (resp. stratified) case. The instability saturates into a wave turbulence pervading the whole fluid layer. In such a state, the instability mechanism conveys the tidal energy from the large scale tidal flow to the resonant modes, which then feed a succession of triadic resonances also generating small spatial scales. In the rotating case, we observe a kinetic energy spectrum with a k-2 slope for which the Coriolis force is dominant at all spatial scales. In the stratified case, where the timescale separation is increased between the tidal excitation and the Brunt-Väisälä frequencies, the temporal spectrum decays with a ω-2 power law up to the cut-off frequency beyond which waves do not exist. This result is reminiscent of the Garrett and Munk spectrum measured in the oceans and theoretically described as a manifestation of internal wave turbulence. In addition to revealing an instability driving homogeneous turbulence in geophysical fluid layers, our approach is also an efficient numerical tool to investigate the possibly universal properties of wave turbulence in a geophysical context.

  15. No Snowball on Habitable Tidally Locked Planets

    SciT

    Checlair, Jade; Abbot, Dorian S.; Menou, Kristen, E-mail: jadecheclair@uchicago.edu

    The TRAPPIST-1, Proxima Centauri, and LHS 1140 systems are the most exciting prospects for future follow-up observations of potentially inhabited planets. All of the planets orbit nearby M-stars and are likely tidally locked in 1:1 spin–orbit states, which motivates the consideration of the effects that tidal locking might have on planetary habitability. On Earth, periods of global glaciation (snowballs) may have been essential for habitability and remote signs of life (biosignatures) because they are correlated with increases in the complexity of life and in the atmospheric oxygen concentration. In this paper, we investigate the snowball bifurcation (sudden onset of globalmore » glaciation) on tidally locked planets using both an energy balance model and an intermediate-complexity global climate model. We show that tidally locked planets are unlikely to exhibit a snowball bifurcation as a direct result of the spatial pattern of insolation they receive. Instead, they will smoothly transition from partial to complete ice coverage and back. A major implication of this work is that tidally locked planets with an active carbon cycle should not be found in a snowball state. Moreover, this work implies that tidally locked planets near the outer edge of the habitable zone with low CO{sub 2} outgassing fluxes will equilibrate with a small unglaciated substellar region rather than cycling between warm and snowball states. More work is needed to determine how the lack of a snowball bifurcation might affect the development of life on a tidally locked planet.« less

  16. A Teachable Moment in Earth Deformation: An Undergraduate Strain Module Incorporating GPS Measurement of the August 24, 2014 M6.0 South Napa Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resor, P. G.; Cronin, V. S.; Hammond, W. C.; Pratt-Sitaula, B.; Olds, S. E.

    2014-12-01

    The August 24, 2014 M 6.0 South Napa Earthquake was the largest earthquake to occur in the San Francisco Bay Area, home to more than 7 million people, in almost 25 years. The event occurred within an area of dense GPS instrumentation including continuous stations from the EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory, Bay Area Regional Deformation Network and other networks. Coseismic displacements of up to 3 cm were rapidly estimated within one day after the event, providing a map of Earth shape change at over one hundred stations around the epicenter. The earthquake thus presets as an excellent "teachable moment" to introduce students to basic geoscience concepts, modern geophysical methods, and the state of knowledge in earthquake science. We have developed an example exercise that uses GPS-derived interseismic velocities and coseismic offsets to explore deformation in the vicinity of the earthquake rupture. This exercise builds on the UNAVCO education resource "Infinitesimal Strain Analysis Using GPS Data" (http://www.unavco.org/education/resources/educational-resources/lesson/majors-gps-strain/majors-gps-strain.html), a module designed to introduce undergraduate geoscience majors to concepts of crustal deformation using GPS velocity data. In the module students build their intuition about infinitesimal strain through manipulation of physical models, apply this intuition to interpret maps of GPS velocity vectors, and ultimately calculate the instantaneous deformation rate of triangles on the Earth's surface defined by three GPS sites. The South Napa data sets provide an example with clear societal relevance that can be used to explore the basic concepts of deformation, but may also be extended to explore topics such as strain accumulation, release, and transfer associated with the earthquake cycle. The UNAVCO module could be similarly extended to create additional exercises in response to future events with clear geodetic signals.

  17. On the tidal effects in the motion of artificial satellites.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musen, P.; Estes, R.

    1972-01-01

    The general perturbations in the elliptic and vectorial elements of a satellite as caused by the tidal deformations of the non-spherical Earth are developed into trigonometric series in the standard ecliptical arguments of Hill-Brown lunar theory and in the equatorial elements of the satellite. The integration of the differential equations for variation of elements of the satellite in this theory is easy because all arguments are linear or nearly linear in time. The trigonometrical expansion permits a judgment about the relative significance of the amplitudes and periods of different tidal 'waves' over a long period of time. Graphs are presented of the tidal perturbations in the elliptic elements of the BE-C satellite which illustrate long term periodic behavior. The tidal effects are clearly noticeable in the observations and their comparison with the theory permits improvement of the 'global' Love numbers for the Earth.

  18. Tidal triggering of moonquakes.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, W. L.

    1972-01-01

    It is argued that the moonquakes recorded by sensors at the Apollo 12 landing site between December 1969 and December 1970, and which according to Latham et al. (1971) are believed to be triggered by the anomalistic lunar tide, could be triggered just as well by the latitudinal (or declination) tidal wave. Considerations are set forth which indicate that a combined latitudinal-anomalistic tidal mechanism is supported by Latham's data.

  19. Tidal alignment of galaxies

    SciT

    Blazek, Jonathan; Vlah, Zvonimir; Seljak, Uroš

    We develop an analytic model for galaxy intrinsic alignments (IA) based on the theory of tidal alignment. We calculate all relevant nonlinear corrections at one-loop order, including effects from nonlinear density evolution, galaxy biasing, and source density weighting. Contributions from density weighting are found to be particularly important and lead to bias dependence of the IA amplitude, even on large scales. This effect may be responsible for much of the luminosity dependence in IA observations. The increase in IA amplitude for more highly biased galaxies reflects their locations in regions with large tidal fields. We also consider the impact ofmore » smoothing the tidal field on halo scales. We compare the performance of this consistent nonlinear model in describing the observed alignment of luminous red galaxies with the linear model as well as the frequently used "nonlinear alignment model," finding a significant improvement on small and intermediate scales. We also show that the cross-correlation between density and IA (the "GI" term) can be effectively separated into source alignment and source clustering, and we accurately model the observed alignment down to the one-halo regime using the tidal field from the fully nonlinear halo-matter cross correlation. Inside the one-halo regime, the average alignment of galaxies with density tracers no longer follows the tidal alignment prediction, likely reflecting nonlinear processes that must be considered when modeling IA on these scales. Finally, we discuss tidal alignment in the context of cosmic shear measurements.« less

  20. Tidal alignment of galaxies

    SciT

    Blazek, Jonathan; Vlah, Zvonimir; Seljak, Uroš, E-mail: blazek@berkeley.edu, E-mail: zvlah@stanford.edu, E-mail: useljak@berkeley.edu

    We develop an analytic model for galaxy intrinsic alignments (IA) based on the theory of tidal alignment. We calculate all relevant nonlinear corrections at one-loop order, including effects from nonlinear density evolution, galaxy biasing, and source density weighting. Contributions from density weighting are found to be particularly important and lead to bias dependence of the IA amplitude, even on large scales. This effect may be responsible for much of the luminosity dependence in IA observations. The increase in IA amplitude for more highly biased galaxies reflects their locations in regions with large tidal fields. We also consider the impact ofmore » smoothing the tidal field on halo scales. We compare the performance of this consistent nonlinear model in describing the observed alignment of luminous red galaxies with the linear model as well as the frequently used 'nonlinear alignment model,' finding a significant improvement on small and intermediate scales. We also show that the cross-correlation between density and IA (the 'GI' term) can be effectively separated into source alignment and source clustering, and we accurately model the observed alignment down to the one-halo regime using the tidal field from the fully nonlinear halo-matter cross correlation. Inside the one-halo regime, the average alignment of galaxies with density tracers no longer follows the tidal alignment prediction, likely reflecting nonlinear processes that must be considered when modeling IA on these scales. Finally, we discuss tidal alignment in the context of cosmic shear measurements.« less

  1. Habitability from Tidally Induced Tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valencia, Diana; Tan, Vivian Yun Yan; Zajac, Zachary

    2018-04-01

    The stability of Earth’s climate on geological timescales is enabled by the carbon–silicate cycle that acts as a negative feedback mechanism stabilizing surface temperatures via the intake and outgassing of atmospheric carbon. On Earth, this thermostat is enabled by plate tectonics that sequesters outgassed CO2 back into the mantle via weathering and subduction at convergent margins. Here we propose a separate tectonic mechanism—vertical recycling—that can serve as the vehicle for CO2 outgassing and sequestration over long timescales. The mechanism requires continuous tidal heating, which makes it particularly relevant to planets in the habitable zone of M stars. Dynamical models of this vertical recycling scenario and stability analysis show that temperate climates stable over timescales of billions of years are realized for a variety of initial conditions, even as the M star dims over time. The magnitude of equilibrium surface temperatures depends on the interplay of sea weathering and outgassing, which in turn depends on planetary carbon content, so that planets with lower carbon budgets are favored for temperate conditions. The habitability of planets such as found in the Trappist-1 system may be rooted in tidally driven tectonics.

  2. Characterising Tidal Flow Within AN Energetic Tidal Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neill, S. P.; Goward Brown, A.; Lewis, M. J.

    2016-02-01

    The Pentland Firth is a highly energetic and complex tidal strait separating the north of Scotland with the Orkney Islands and is a key location for tidal energy exploitation. Topographic features including islands and headlands, combined with bathymetric complexities within the Pentland Firth create turbulent hydrodynamic flows which are difficult to observe. Site selection in tidal energy environments historically focuses on tidal current magnitude. Without consideration for the more complex hydrodynamics of tidal energy environments tidal energy developers may miss the opportunity to tune their devices or create environment specific tidal energy converters in order to harness the greatest potential from site. Fully characterising these tidal energy environments ensures economic energy extraction. Understanding the interaction of energy extraction with the environment will reduce uncertainty in site selection and allow mitigation of any potential environmental concerns. We apply the 3D ROMS model to the Pentland Firth with the aim of resolving uncertainties within tidal energy resource assessment. Flow magnitudes and directions are examined with a focus on tidal phasing and asymmetry and application to sediment dynamics. Using the ROMS model, it is possible to determine the extent to which the tidal resource varies temporally and spatially with tidal energy extraction. Accurately modelling the tidal dynamics within this environment ensures that potential consequences of tidal energy extraction on the surrounding environment are better understood.

  3. Characterization of the Vertical Structure of Tidal Currents in the Mouth of the Columbia River and Evaluation of the Selfe Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    declination to the Earth (27.3 days) ( Disney and Overshiner 1925). Changes in the moon’s phase and distance from Earth cause changes in tidal current...strength that are approximately half of the changes in tidal range ( Disney and Overshiner, 1925). 5 3. Non-Tidal Currents Non-tidal constituents in...2014: Columbia River Estuary. [http://www.stccmop.org/news/2013/cmop_study_provide_insight_biogeochemic al_exchange_between_bays_estuary] Disney , L

  4. Global tidal phasing potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neill, S. P.; Cooper, M. M.; Lewis, M. J.

    2016-02-01

    Tidal energy is characterised by intermittency over a range of timescales, from semi-diurnal and lunar periods through to annual and decadal. Therefore, the electricity that can be generated by the tides will be characterised by similar scales of intermittency. However, with knowledge of the phase relationship between sites, it may be possible to reduce intermittency, particularly at the semi-diurnal timescale, by aggregating the electricity generated by discrete regions suitable for the conversion of tidal energy into electricity. In this study, we make use of a global tidal atlas (FES2012) to make a preliminary assessment of regions of the globe where it could be possible to combine the electricity generated at a number of discrete sites to provide firmer power to regional electricity networks. In contrast to the northwest European shelf, where the high tidal stream sites tend to either be in phase or 180 out-of-phase with one-another, we find numerous regions around the globe with potential for regional tidal phasing. However, development of higher resolution regional models, or the examination of field data, are required to fully characterise the phasing potential of these regions. In addition, technical and economical constraints on the resource should be considered such as water depth and distance to shore.

  5. Doublet craters and the tidal disruption of binary asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melosh, H. J.; Stansberry, J. A.

    1991-01-01

    An evaluation is conducted of the possibility that the tidal disruption of a population of contact binary asteroids can account for terrestrial-impact 'doublet' craters. Detailed orbital integrations indicate that while such asteroids are often disrupted by tidal forces outside the Roche limit, the magnitude of the resulting separations is too small to account for the observed doublet craters. It is hypothesized that an initial population of km-scale earth-crossing objects encompassing 10-20 percent binaries must be responsible for doublet impacts, as may be verified by future observations of earth-approaching asteroids.

  6. (abstract) Effect of Long Period Ocean Tides on the Earth's Rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, R. S.; Chao, B. F.; Desai, S.

    1996-01-01

    The second-degree zonal tide raising potential, which is responsible for tidal changes in the Earth's rotation rate and length-of-day, is symmetric about the polar axis and hence can excite the Earth's polar motion only through its action upon nonaxisymmetric features of the Earth such as the oceans. Ocean tidal excitation of polar motion in the diurnal and semidiurnal tidal bands has been previously detected and extensively examined. Here, the detection of ocean tidal excitation of polar motion in the long-period tidal band, specifically at the Mf' (13.63-day) and Mf (13.66-day) tidal frequencies, is reported.

  7. Extensometric observation of Earth tides and local tectonic processes at the Vyhne station, Slovakia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brimich, Ladislav; Bednárik, Martin; Bezák, Vladimír; Kohút, Igor; Bán, Dóra; Eper-Pápai, Ildikó; Mentes, Gyula

    2016-06-01

    The Vyhne Tidal Station of the Earth Science Institute of the Slovak Academy of Sciences is located in the former mining gallery of St. Anthony of Padua in the Vyhne valley, Štiavnické vrchy Mts., Central Slovakia. It is equipped with a 20.5 metre long quartz-tube extensometer measuring Earth's tides, and long-term tectonic deformations of the Earth's crust. Data between 2001 and 2015 with some diverse gaps were digitally collected, processed and analysed. The effects of the local conditions, such as structure of the observatory, cavity effect, topography and geological features of the surrounding rocks, were investigated in detail and these effects were taken into consideration during the interpretation of the results of the data analysis. Tidal analysis of the extensometric data between 2005 and 2015 revealed that the measured tidal amplitudes are close to the theoretical values. The tidal transfer of the observatory was also investigated by coherence analysis between the theoretical and the measured extensometric data. The coherence is better than 0.9 both in the diurnal and semidiurnal band. The effect of the free core nutation resonance was also investigated in the case of the K1 and P1 tidal components. Since the K1/O1 ratio was about the theoretical value 0.8, than the P1/O1 was between 1.0 and 1.15 instead of the theoretical value of 0.9. The rate of the long-term strain rate was also investigated and the obtained -0.05 μstr/y shows a good agreement with the strain rate inferred from GPS measurements in the Central European GPS Reference Network.

  8. Diurnal, semidiurnal, and fortnightly tidal components in orthotidal proglacial rivers.

    PubMed

    Briciu, Andrei-Emil

    2018-02-22

    The orthotidal rivers are a new concept referring to inland rivers influenced by gravitational tides through the groundwater tides. "Orthotidal signals" is intended to describe tidal signals found in inland streamwaters (with no oceanic input); these tidal signals were locally generated and then exported into streamwaters. Here, we show that orthotidal signals can be found in proglacial rivers due to the gravitational tides affecting the glaciers and their surrounding areas. The gravitational tides act on glacier through earth and atmospheric tides, while the subglacial water is affected in a manner similar to the groundwater tides. We used the wavelet analysis in order to find tidally affected streamwaters. T_TIDE analyses were performed for discovering the tidal constituents. Tidal components with 0.95 confidence level are as follows: O1, PI1, P1, S1, K1, PSI1, M2, T2, S2, K2, and MSf. The amplitude of the diurnal tidal constituents is strongly influenced by the daily thermal cycle. The average amplitude of the semidiurnal tidal constituents is less altered and ranges from 0.0007 to 0.0969 m. The lunisolar synodic fortnightly oscillation, found in the time series of the studied river gauges, is a useful signal for detecting orthotidal rivers when using noisier data. The knowledge of the orthotidal oscillations is useful for modeling fine resolution changes in rivers.

  9. Tidal effects in differentiated viscoelastic bodies: a numerical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walterová, M.; Běhounková, M.

    2017-09-01

    The majority of confirmed terrestrial exoplanets orbits close to their host stars and their evolution was likely altered by tidal interaction. Nevertheless, due to their viscoelastic properties on the tidal frequencies, their response cannot be described exactly by standardly employed constant-lag models. We therefore introduce a tidal model based on the numerical evaluation of a continuum mechanics problem describing the deformation of viscoelastic (Maxwell or Andrade) planetary mantles subjected to external force. We apply the method on a model Earth-size planet orbiting a low-mass star and study the effect of the orbital eccentricity, the mantle viscosity and the chosen rheology on the tidal dissipation, the complex Love numbers and the tidal torque. The number of stable spin states (i.e., zero tidal torque) grows with increasing mantle viscosity, similarly to the analytical model of Correia et al. (Astron Astrophys 571:A50, 2014) for homogeneous bodies. This behavior is only slightly influenced by the rheology used. Similarly, the Love numbers do not distinctly depend on the considered rheological model. The increase in viscosity affects the amplitude of their variations. The tidal heating described by the Maxwell rheology attains local minima associated with low spin-orbit resonances, with depth and shape depending on both the eccentricity and the viscosity. For the Andrade rheology, the minima at low resonances are very shallow and the tidal heating for all viscosities resembles a "fluid limit." The tidal heating is the quantity influenced the most by the rheology, having thus possible impact on the internal thermal evolution.

  10. Tidal Models In A New Era of Satellite Gravimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Richard D.; Rowlings, David D.; Edbert, G. D.; Chao, Benjamin F. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The high precision gravity measurements to be made by recently launched (and recently approved) satellites place new demands on models of Earth, atmospheric, and oceanic tides. The latter is the most problematic. The ocean tides induce variations in the Earth's geoid by amounts that far exceed the new satellite sensitivities, and tidal models must be used to correct for this. Two methods are used here to determine the standard errors in current ocean tide models. At long wavelengths these errors exceed the sensitivity of the GRACE mission. Tidal errors will not prevent the new satellite missions from improving our knowledge of the geopotential by orders of magnitude, but the errors may well contaminate GRACE estimates of temporal variations in gravity. Solar tides are especially problematic because of their long alias periods. The satellite data may be used to improve tidal models once a sufficiently long time series is obtained. Improvements in the long-wavelength components of lunar tides are especially promising.

  11. A reassessment of the role of tidal dispersion in estuaries and bays

    Geyer, W. Rockwell; Signell, Richard P.

    1992-01-01

    The role of tidal dispersion is reassessed, based on a consideration of the relevant physical mechanisms, particularly those elucidated by numerical simulations of tide-induced dispersion. It appears that the principal influence of tidal currents on dispersion occurs at length scales of the tidal excursion and smaller; thus the effectiveness of tidal dispersion depends on the relative scale of the tidal excursion to the spacing between major bathymetric and shoreline features. In estuaries where the typical spacing of topographic features is less than the tidal excursion, tidal dispersion may contribute significantly to the overall flushing. In estuaries and embayments in which the typical spacing between major features is larger than the tidal excursion, the influence of tidal dispersion will be localized, and it will not markedly contribute to overall flushing. Tidal dispersion is most pronounced in regions of abrupt topographic changes such as headlands and inlets, where flow separation occurs. The strong strain rate in the region of flow separation tends to stretch patches of fluid into long filaments, which are subsequently rolled up and distorted by the transient eddy field. The dispersion process accomplished by the tides varies strongly as a function of position and tidal phase and thus does not lend itself to parameterization by an eddy diffusion coefficient.

  12. Tidal Heating in Enceladus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Jennifer; Wisdom, J.

    2007-07-01

    The heating in Enceladus in an equilibrium resonant configuration with other saturnian satellites can be estimated independently of the physical properties of Enceladus. Our results update the values obtained for the equilibrium tidal heating found by Lissauer et al. (1984) and Peale (2003). We find that equilibrium tidal heating cannot account for the heat that is observed to be coming from Enceladus, and current heating rates are even less for conventional estimates of the Love number for Enceladus. Even allowing for a much larger dynamic Love number, as can occur in viscoelastic models (Ross and Schubert, 1989), the equilibrium tidal heating is less than the heat observed to be coming from Enceladus. One resolution is that the tidal equilibrium is unstable and that the system oscillates about equilibrium. Yoder (1981) suggested that Enceladus might oscillate about equilibrium if the Q of Enceladus is stress dependent. An alternate suggestion was made by Ojakangas and Stevenson (1986), who emphasized the possible temperature dependence of Q. In these models Enceladus would now be releasing heat stored during a recent high eccentricity phase. However, we have shown that the Ojakangas and Stevenson model does not produce oscillations for parameters appropriate for Enceladus. Other low-order resonance configurations are possible for the saturnian satellites in the past. These include the 3:2 Mimas-Enceladus and the 3:4 Enceladus-Tethys resonances. The latter resonance has no equilibrium because the orbits are diverging, and the former has an equilibrium heating rate of only 0.48 GW. So equilibrium heating at past resonances is no more successful at explaining past resurfacing events than equilibrium heating is at explaining the present activity.

  13. Tidal Venuses: triggering a climate catastrophe via tidal heating.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Rory; Mullins, Kristina; Goldblatt, Colin; Meadows, Victoria S; Kasting, James F; Heller, René

    2013-03-01

    Traditionally, stellar radiation has been the only heat source considered capable of determining global climate on long timescales. Here, we show that terrestrial exoplanets orbiting low-mass stars may be tidally heated at high-enough levels to induce a runaway greenhouse for a long-enough duration for all the hydrogen to escape. Without hydrogen, the planet no longer has water and cannot support life. We call these planets "Tidal Venuses" and the phenomenon a "tidal greenhouse." Tidal effects also circularize the orbit, which decreases tidal heating. Hence, some planets may form with large eccentricity, with its accompanying large tidal heating, and lose their water, but eventually settle into nearly circular orbits (i.e., with negligible tidal heating) in the habitable zone (HZ). However, these planets are not habitable, as past tidal heating desiccated them, and hence should not be ranked highly for detailed follow-up observations aimed at detecting biosignatures. We simulated the evolution of hypothetical planetary systems in a quasi-continuous parameter distribution and found that we could constrain the history of the system by statistical arguments. Planets orbiting stars with masses<0.3 MSun may be in danger of desiccation via tidal heating. We have applied these concepts to Gl 667C c, a ∼4.5 MEarth planet orbiting a 0.3 MSun star at 0.12 AU. We found that it probably did not lose its water via tidal heating, as orbital stability is unlikely for the high eccentricities required for the tidal greenhouse. As the inner edge of the HZ is defined by the onset of a runaway or moist greenhouse powered by radiation, our results represent a fundamental revision to the HZ for noncircular orbits. In the appendices we review (a) the moist and runaway greenhouses, (b) hydrogen escape, (c) stellar mass-radius and mass-luminosity relations, (d) terrestrial planet mass-radius relations, and (e) linear tidal theories.

  14. Research Article. Towards a tidal loading model for the Argentine-German Geodetic Observatory (La Plata)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, A.; Müller, L.; Marderwald, E.; Mendoza, L.; Kruse, E.; Perdomo, R.; Scheinert, M.; Perdomo, S.

    2017-02-01

    We present a regionalized model of ocean tidal loading effects for the Argentine-German Geodetic Observatory in La Plata. It provides the amplitudes and phases of gravity variations and vertical deformation for nine tidal constituents to be applied as corrections to the observatory's future geodetic observation data. This model combines a global ocean tide model with a model of the tides in the Río de la Plata estuary. A comparison with conventional predictions based only on the global ocean tide model reveals the importance of the incorporation of the regional tide model. Tidal loading at the observatory is dominated by the tides in the Atlantic Ocean. An additional contribution of local tidal loading in channels and groundwater is examined. The magnitude of the tidal loading is also reviewed in the context of the effects of solid earth tides, atmospheric loading and non-tidal loads.

  15. Explicitly modelled deep-time tidal dissipation and its implication for Lunar history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, J. A. M.; Huber, M.; Waltham, D.; Buzan, J.; Wells, M.

    2017-03-01

    Dissipation of tidal energy causes the Moon to recede from the Earth. The currently measured rate of recession implies that the age of the Lunar orbit is 1500 My old, but the Moon is known to be 4500 My old. Consequently, it has been proposed that tidal energy dissipation was weaker in the Earth's past, but explicit numerical calculations are missing for such long time intervals. Here, for the first time, numerical tidal model simulations linked to climate model output are conducted for a range of paleogeographic configurations over the last 252 My. We find that the present is a poor guide to the past in terms of tidal dissipation: the total dissipation rates for most of the past 252 My were far below present levels. This allows us to quantify the reduced tidal dissipation rates over the most resent fraction of lunar history, and the lower dissipation allows refinement of orbitally-derived age models by inserting a complete additional precession cycle.

  16. Tidal and tidally averaged circulation characteristics of Suisun Bay, California

    Smith, Lawrence H.; Cheng, Ralph T.

    1987-01-01

    Availability of extensive field data permitted realistic calibration and validation of a hydrodynamic model of tidal circulation and salt transport for Suisun Bay, California. Suisun Bay is a partially mixed embayment of northern San Francisco Bay located just seaward of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta. The model employs a variant of an alternating direction implicit finite-difference method to solve the hydrodynamic equations and an Eulerian-Lagrangian method to solve the salt transport equation. An upwind formulation of the advective acceleration terms of the momentum equations was employed to avoid oscillations in the tidally averaged velocity field produced by central spatial differencing of these terms. Simulation results of tidal circulation and salt transport demonstrate that tides and the complex bathymetry determine the patterns of tidal velocities and that net changes in the salinity distribution over a few tidal cycles are small despite large changes during each tidal cycle. Computations of tidally averaged circulation suggest that baroclinic and wind effects are important influences on tidally averaged circulation during low freshwater-inflow conditions. Exclusion of baroclinic effects would lead to overestimation of freshwater inflow by several hundred m3/s for a fixed set of model boundary conditions. Likewise, exclusion of wind would cause an underestimation of flux rates between shoals and channels by 70–100%.

  17. Tidal Power Exploitation in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Byung Ho; Kim, Kyeong Ok; Choi, Jae Cheon

    The highest tides in South Korea are found along the northwest coast between latitudes 36-38 degrees and the number of possible sites for tidal range power barrages to create tidal basins is great due to irregular coastlines with numerous bays. At present Lake Sihwa tidal power plant is completed. The plant is consisted of 10 bulb type turbines with 8 sluice gates. The installed capacity of turbines and generators is 254MW and annual energy output expected is about 552.7 GWh taking flood flow generation scheme. Three other TPP projects are being progressed at Garolim Bay (20 turbines with 25.4MW capacity), Kangwha (28 turbines with 25.4MW capacity), Incheon (44 or 48 turbines with 30 MW capacity) and project features will be outlined here. The introduction of tidal barrages into four major TPP projects along the Kyeonggi bay will render wide range of potential impacts. Preliminary attempts were performed to quantify these impacts using 2 D hydrodynamic model demonstrating the changes in tidal amplitude and phase under mean tidal condition, associated changes in residual circulation (indicator for SPM and pollutant dispersion), bottom stress (indicator for bedload movement), and tidal front (positional indicator for bio-productivity) in both shelf scale and local context. Tidal regime modeling system for ocean tides in the seas bordering the Korean Peninsula is designed to cover an area that is broad in scope and size, yet provide a high degree of resolution in strong tidal current region including off southwestern tip of the Peninsula (Uldolmok , Jangjuk, Wando-Hoenggan), Daebang Sudo (Channel) and Kyeonggi Bay. With this simulation system, real tidal time simulation of extended springneap cycles was performed to estimate spatial distribution of tidal current power potentials in terms of power density, energy density and then extrapolated annual energy density.

  18. Tidal dissipation in a viscoelastic planet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, M.; Schubert, G.

    1986-01-01

    Tidal dissipation is examined using Maxwell standard liner solid (SLS), and Kelvin-Voigt models, and viscosity parameters are derived from the models that yield the amount of dissipation previously calculated for a moon model with QW = 100 in a hypothetical orbit closer to the earth. The relevance of these models is then assessed for simulating planetary tidal responses. Viscosities of 10 exp 14 and 10 ex 18 Pa s for the Kelvin-Voigt and Maxwell rheologies, respectively, are needed to match the dissipation rate calculated using the Q approach with a quality factor = 100. The SLS model requires a short time viscosity of 3 x 10 exp 17 Pa s to match the Q = 100 dissipation rate independent of the model's relaxation strength. Since Q = 100 is considered a representative value for the interiors of terrestrial planets, it is proposed that derived viscosities should characterize planetary materials. However, it is shown that neither the Kelvin-Voigt nor the SLS models simulate the behavior of real planetary materials on long time scales. The Maxwell model, by contrast, behaves realistically on both long and short time scales. The inferred Maxwell viscosity, corresponding to the time scale of days, is several times smaller than the longer time scale (greater than or equal to 10 exp 14 years) viscosity of the earth's mantle.

  19. Tidal Pools--Miniature Oceans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plake, Linda Perry

    1977-01-01

    A comprehensive discussion of the biological activity in tidal pools is provided. The importance of environmental factors such as oxygen supply, temperature, salinity, and light is detailed. Plants and animals that might be found in a tidal pool are identified and described. (BT)

  20. Determining the Effect of the Lunar Nodal Cycle on Tidal Mixing and North Pacific Climate Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullman, D. J.; Schmittner, A.; Danabasoglu, G.; Norton, N. J.; Müller, M.

    2016-02-01

    Oscillations in the moon's orbit around the earth modulate regional tidal dissipation with a periodicity of 18.6 years. In regions where the diurnal tidal constituents dominate diapycnal mixing, this Lunar Nodal Cycle (LNC) may be significant enough to influence ocean circulation, sea surface temperature, and climate variability. Such periodicity in the LNC as an external forcing may provide a mechanistic source for Pacific decadal variability (i.e. Pacific Decadal Oscillation, PDO) where diurnal tidal constituents are strong. We have introduced three enhancements to the latest version of the Community Earth System Model (CESM) to better simulate tidal-forced mixing. First, we have produced a sub-grid scale bathymetry scheme that better resolves the vertical distribution of the barotropic energy flux in regions where the native CESM grid does not resolve high spatial-scale bathymetric features. Second, we test a number of alternative barotropic tidal constituent energy flux fields that are derived from various satellite altimeter observations and tidal models. Third, we introduce modulations of the individual diurnal and semi-diurnal tidal constituents, ranging from monthly to decadal periods, as derived from the full lunisolar tidal potential. Using both ocean-only and fully-coupled configurations, we test the influence of these enhancements, particularly the LNC modulations, on ocean mixing and bidecadal climate variability in CESM.

  1. Tidal friction and the early history of the moon's orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubincam, D. P.

    1975-01-01

    The present work investigates the consequences implied by various rheological models of the early earth for the orbital history of the moon subsequent to its formation. Models of the earth that yield small tidal angles, such as low-viscosity models, imply that the moon never orbited in the earth's equatorial plane, thereby ruling out an equatorial origin for the moon. A high-viscosity model is shown to permit the moon to originate in the equatorial plane and still account for the present-day characteristics of the moon's orbit.

  2. Orientations and Relative Shear-strain Response Coefficients for PBO Gladwin Tensor Strainmeters from Teleseismic Love Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roeloffs, E. A.

    2016-12-01

    A Gladwin Tensor Strainmeter (GTSM) is designed to measure changes of the horizontal strain tensor, derived as linear combinations of radial elongations or contractions of the strainmeter's cylindrical housing measured at four azimuths. Each radial measurement responds to changes in the areal, horizontal shear and vertical components of the strain tensor in the surrounding formation. The elastic response coefficients to these components depend on the relative elastic moduli of the housing, formation, and cement. These coefficients must be inferred for each strainmeter after it is cemented into its borehole by analyzing the instrument response to well-characterized strain signals such as earth tides. For some GTSMs of the Earthscope Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO), however, reconciling observed earth-tide signals with modeled tidal strains requires response coefficients that differ substantially between the instrument's four gauges, and/or orientation corrections of tens of degrees. GTSM response coefficients can also be estimated from high-resolution records of teleseismic Love waves from great earthquakes around the world. Such records can be used in conjunction with apparent propagation azimuths from nearby broadband seismic stations to determine the GTSM's orientation. Knowing the orientation allows the ratios between the shear strain response coefficients of a GTSM's four gauges to be estimated. Applying this analysis to 14 PBO GTSMs confirms that orientations of some instruments differ significantly from orientations measured during installation. Orientations inferred from earth-tide response tend to agree with those inferred from Love waves for GTSMs far from tidal water bodies, but to differ for GTSMs closer to coastlines. Orientations derived from teleseismic Love waves agree with those estimated by Grant and Langston (2010) using strains from a broadband seismic array near Anza, California. PBO GTSM recordings of teleseismic Love waves show differences of

  3. Tidal Venuses: Triggering a Climate Catastrophe via Tidal Heating

    PubMed Central

    Mullins, Kristina; Goldblatt, Colin; Meadows, Victoria S.; Kasting, James F.; Heller, René

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Traditionally, stellar radiation has been the only heat source considered capable of determining global climate on long timescales. Here, we show that terrestrial exoplanets orbiting low-mass stars may be tidally heated at high-enough levels to induce a runaway greenhouse for a long-enough duration for all the hydrogen to escape. Without hydrogen, the planet no longer has water and cannot support life. We call these planets “Tidal Venuses” and the phenomenon a “tidal greenhouse.” Tidal effects also circularize the orbit, which decreases tidal heating. Hence, some planets may form with large eccentricity, with its accompanying large tidal heating, and lose their water, but eventually settle into nearly circular orbits (i.e., with negligible tidal heating) in the habitable zone (HZ). However, these planets are not habitable, as past tidal heating desiccated them, and hence should not be ranked highly for detailed follow-up observations aimed at detecting biosignatures. We simulated the evolution of hypothetical planetary systems in a quasi-continuous parameter distribution and found that we could constrain the history of the system by statistical arguments. Planets orbiting stars with masses<0.3 MSun may be in danger of desiccation via tidal heating. We have applied these concepts to Gl 667C c, a ∼4.5 MEarth planet orbiting a 0.3 MSun star at 0.12 AU. We found that it probably did not lose its water via tidal heating, as orbital stability is unlikely for the high eccentricities required for the tidal greenhouse. As the inner edge of the HZ is defined by the onset of a runaway or moist greenhouse powered by radiation, our results represent a fundamental revision to the HZ for noncircular orbits. In the appendices we review (a) the moist and runaway greenhouses, (b) hydrogen escape, (c) stellar mass-radius and mass-luminosity relations, (d) terrestrial planet mass-radius relations, and (e) linear tidal theories. Key Words: Extrasolar terrestrial

  4. Melt Segregation and Tidal Heating at Io

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajendar, A.; Dufek, J.; Roberts, J. H.; Paty, C. S.

    2011-12-01

    Recent evidence of melt beneath Io's surface (Khurana et al., 2010) and repeated observation of volcanic activity and features consistent with volcanic activity at the surface (e.g. Veeder et al, 1994; Rathbun et al., 2004; Lopes-Gautier et al., 1999; Smith et al., 1979) has raised further questions about the structure of the Galilean moon and the processes that shape it. In this study we examine the thermal state, melt fraction, and multiphase dynamics of melt segregation within Io's interior. Using a coupled multiphase dynamics and tidal heating model we explore the location, spatial extent, and temporal residence times of melt in Io's subsurface, as well as response to orbital parameters. In a thermally evolving body subject to tidal forcing, in which melt production and migration takes place, feedback can occur with respect to the physical and thermal properties. We explore this feedback to produce a thermal model of Io, taking into account the rate of tidal heating and fluid motion within the interior. First, a layered model of the internal structure is assumed. The equations of motion for forced oscillations in a layered spherical body are then solved using the propagator matrix method (Sabadini and Vermeesen, 2004) to obtain the displacements and strains due to tidal motion (Roberts and Nimmo, 2008). From this, the radial distribution of tidal heat generation within Io is calculated. This radial heating profile is then used as input for a multi-phase fluid model in order to obtain an estimate of the radial temperature distribution and thus the material properties and melt fractions. In the multiphase model individual phases (melt and solid residue) separately conserve mass, momentum and enthalpy (Dufek and Bachmann, 2010) allowing us to explore melt segregation phenomena. Enthalpy closure is provided by the MELTS (Ghiorso and Sack, 1995) thermodynamics algorithm, which is called at each point in space. This accounts for the partitioning between latent and

  5. Recent progress in tidal modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vial, F.; Forbes, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    Recent contributions to tidal theory during the last five years are reviewed. Specific areas where recent progress has occurred include: the action of mean wind and dissipation on tides, interactions of other waves with tides, the use of TGCM in tidal studies. Furthermore, attention is put on the nonlinear interaction between semidiurnal and diurnal tides. Finally, more realistic thermal excitation and background wind and temperature models have been developed in the past few years. This has led to new month-to-month numerical simulations of the semidiurnal tide. Some results using these models are presented and compared with ATMAP tidal climatologies.

  6. Tidal controls on riverbed denitrification along a tidal freshwater zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knights, Deon; Sawyer, Audrey H.; Barnes, Rebecca T.; Musial, Cole T.; Bray, Samuel

    2017-01-01

    In coastal rivers, tidal pumping enhances the exchange of oxygen-rich river water across the sediment-water interface, controlling nitrogen cycling in riverbed sediment. We developed a one-dimensional, fluid flow and solute transport model that quantifies the influence of tidal pumping on nitrate removal and applied it to the tidal freshwater zone (TFZ) of White Clay Creek (Delaware, USA). In field observations and models, both oxygenated river water and anoxic groundwater deliver nitrate to carbon-rich riverbed sediment. A zone of nitrate removal forms beneath the aerobic interval, which expands and contracts over daily timescales due to tidal pumping. At high tide when oxygen-rich river water infiltrates into the bed, denitrification rates decrease by 25% relative to low tide. In the absence of tidal pumping, our model predicts that the aerobic zone would be thinner, and denitrification rates would increase by 10%. As tidal amplitude increases toward the coast, nitrate removal rates should decrease due to enhanced oxygen exchange across the sediment-water interface, based on sensitivity analysis. Denitrification hot spots in TFZs are more likely to occur in less permeable sediment under lower tidal ranges and higher rates of ambient groundwater discharge. Our models suggest that tidal pumping is not efficient at removing surface water nitrate but can remove up to 81% of nitrate from discharging groundwater in the TFZ of White Clay Creek. Given the high population densities of coastal watersheds, the reactive riverbeds of TFZs play a critical role in mitigating new nitrogen loads to coasts.

  7. Chaotic Excitation and Tidal Damping in the GJ 876 System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puranam, Abhijit; Batygin, Konstantin

    2018-04-01

    The M-dwarf GJ 876 is the closest known star to harbor a multi-planetary system. With three outer planets locked in a chaotic Laplace-type resonance and an appreciably eccentric short-period super-Earth, this system represents a unique exposition of extrasolar planetary dynamics. A key question that concerns the long-term evolution of this system, and the fate of close-in planets in general, is how the significant eccentricity of the inner-most planet is maintained against tidal circularization on timescales comparable to the age of the universe. Here, we employ stochastic secular perturbation theory and N-body simulations to show that the orbit of the inner-most planet is shaped by a delicate balance between extrinsic chaotic forcing and tidal dissipation. As such, the planet’s orbital eccentricity represents an indirect measure of its tidal quality factor. Based on the system’s present-day architecture, we estimate that the extrasolar super-Earth GJ 876 d has a tidal Q ∼ 104–105, a value characteristic of solar system gas giants.

  8. The Algorithm Theoretical Basis Document for Tidal Corrections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fricker, Helen A.; Ridgway, Jeff R.; Minster, Jean-Bernard; Yi, Donghui; Bentley, Charles R.`

    2012-01-01

    This Algorithm Theoretical Basis Document deals with the tidal corrections that need to be applied to range measurements made by the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS). These corrections result from the action of ocean tides and Earth tides which lead to deviations from an equilibrium surface. Since the effect of tides is dependent of the time of measurement, it is necessary to remove the instantaneous tide components when processing altimeter data, so that all measurements are made to the equilibrium surface. The three main tide components to consider are the ocean tide, the solid-earth tide and the ocean loading tide. There are also long period ocean tides and the pole tide. The approximate magnitudes of these components are illustrated in Table 1, together with estimates of their uncertainties (i.e. the residual error after correction). All of these components are important for GLAS measurements over the ice sheets since centimeter-level accuracy for surface elevation change detection is required. The effect of each tidal component is to be removed by approximating their magnitude using tidal prediction models. Conversely, assimilation of GLAS measurements into tidal models will help to improve them, especially at high latitudes.

  9. Simple Tidal Prism Models Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luketina, D.

    1998-01-01

    Simple tidal prism models for well-mixed estuaries have been in use for some time and are discussed in most text books on estuaries. The appeal of this model is its simplicity. However, there are several flaws in the logic behind the model. These flaws are pointed out and a more theoretically correct simple tidal prism model is derived. In doing so, it is made clear which effects can, in theory, be neglected and which can not.

  10. Can barrier islands survive sea level rise? Tidal inlets versus storm overwash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nienhuis, J.; Lorenzo-Trueba, J.

    2017-12-01

    Barrier island response to sea level rise depends on their ability to transgress and move sediment to the back barrier, either through flood-tidal delta deposition or via storm overwash. Our understanding of these processes over decadal to centennial timescales, however, is limited and poorly constrained. We have developed a new barrier inlet environment (BRIE) model to better understand the interplay between tidal dynamics, overwash fluxes, and sea-level rise on barrier evolution. The BRIE model combines existing overwash and shoreface formulations [Lorenzo-Trueba and Ashton, 2014] with alongshore sediment transport, inlet stability [Escoffier, 1940], inlet migration and flood-tidal delta deposition [Nienhuis and Ashton, 2016]. Within BRIE, inlets can open, close, migrate, merge with other inlets, and build flood-tidal delta deposits. The model accounts for feedbacks between overwash and inlets through their mutual dependence on barrier geometry. Model results suggest that when flood-tidal delta deposition is sufficiently large, barriers require less storm overwash to transgress and aggrade during sea level rise. In particular in micro-tidal environments with asymmetric wave climates and high alongshore sediment transport, tidal inlets are effective in depositing flood-tidal deltas and constitute the majority of the transgressive sediment flux. Additionally, we show that artificial inlet stabilization (via jetty construction or maintenance dredging) can make barrier islands more vulnerable to sea level rise. Escoffier, F. F. (1940), The Stability of Tidal Inlets, Shore and Beach, 8(4), 114-115. Lorenzo-Trueba, J., and A. D. Ashton (2014), Rollover, drowning, and discontinuous retreat: Distinct modes of barrier response to sea-level rise arising from a simple morphodynamic model, J. Geophys. Res. Earth Surf., 119(4), 779-801, doi:10.1002/2013JF002941. Nienhuis, J. H., and A. D. Ashton (2016), Mechanics and rates of tidal inlet migration: Modeling and application to

  11. Spin-orbital Tidal Dynamics and Tidal Heating in the TRAPPIST-1 Multiplanet System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarov, Valeri V.; Berghea, Ciprian T.; Efroimsky, Michael

    2018-04-01

    We perform numerical simulations of the TRAPPIST-1 system of seven exoplanets orbiting a nearby M dwarf, starting with a previously suggested stable configuration. The long-term stability of this configuration is confirmed, but the motion of planets is found to be chaotic. The eccentricity values are found to vary within finite ranges. The rates of tidal dissipation and tidal evolution of orbits are estimated, assuming an Earth-like rheology for the planets. We find that under this assumption, the planets b, d, and e were captured in the 3:2 or higher spin–orbit resonances during the initial spin-down, but slipped further down into the 1:1 resonance. Depending on its rheology, the innermost planet b may be captured in a stable pseudosynchronous rotation. Nonsynchronous rotation ensures higher levels of tidal dissipation and internal heating. The positive feedback between the viscosity and the dissipation rate—and the ensuing runaway heating—are terminated by a few self-regulation processes. When the temperature is high and the viscosity is low enough, the planet spontaneously leaves the 3:2 resonance. Further heating is stopped either by passing the peak dissipation or by the emergence of partial melt in the mantle. In the post-solidus state, the tidal dissipation is limited to the levels supported by the heat transfer efficiency. The tides on the host star are unlikely to have had a significant dynamical impact. The tides on the synchronized inner planets tend to reduce these planets’ orbital eccentricity, possibly contributing thereby to the system’s stability.

  12. Superradiance-tidal friction correspondence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glampedakis, Kostas; Kapadia, Shasvath J.; Kennefick, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Since the work of Hartle in the 1970s, and the subsequent development of the membrane paradigm approach to black hole physics it has been widely accepted that superradiant scattering of gravitational waves bears strong similarities with the phenomenon of "tidal friction" (well known from Newtonian gravity) operating in binary systems of viscous material bodies. In this paper we revisit the superradiance-tidal friction analogy within the context of ultracompact relativistic bodies. We advocate that as long as these bodies have nonzero viscosity they should undergo tidal friction that can be construed as a kind of superradiant scattering from the point of view of the dynamics of an orbiting test body. In addition we consider the presence of anisotropic matter, which is required for at least some ultracompact bodies, if they are to sustain a radius very close to the gravitational radius. We find that the tidal friction/superradiance output is enhanced with increasing anisotropy and that strongly anisotropic systems exhibit an unconventional response to tidal and centrifugal forces. Finally, we make contact with the artificial system comprising a black hole with its horizon replaced by a mirror (sometimes used as a proxy for ultracompact material bodies) and discuss superradiance and tidal friction in relation to it.

  13. Tidal Boundary Conditions in SEAWAT

    Mulligan, Ann E.; Langevin, Christian; Post, Vincent E.A.

    2011-01-01

    SEAWAT, a U.S. Geological Survey groundwater flow and transport code, is increasingly used to model the effects of tidal motion on coastal aquifers. Different options are available to simulate tidal boundaries but no guidelines exist nor have comparisons been made to identify the most effective approach. We test seven methods to simulate a sloping beach and a tidal flat. The ocean is represented in one of the three ways: directly using a high hydraulic conductivity (high-K) zone and indirect simulation via specified head boundaries using either the General Head Boundary (GHB) or the new Periodic Boundary Condition (PBC) package. All beach models simulate similar water fluxes across the upland boundary and across the sediment-water interface although the ratio of intertidal to subtidal flow is different at low tide. Simulating a seepage face results in larger intertidal fluxes and influences near-shore heads and salinity. Major differences in flow occur in the tidal flat simulations. Because SEAWAT does not simulate unsaturated flow the water table only rises via flow through the saturated zone. This results in delayed propagation of the rising tidal signal inland. Inundation of the tidal flat is delayed as is flow into the aquifer across the flat. This is severe in the high-K and PBC models but mild in the GHB models. Results indicate that any of the tidal boundary options are fine if the ocean-aquifer interface is steep. However, as the slope of that interface decreases, the high-K and PBC approaches perform poorly and the GHB boundary is preferable.

  14. Tidal triggering of earthquakes in the Ning'er area of Yunnan Province, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Chaodi; Lei, Xinglin; Zhao, Xiaoyan; Ma, Qingbo; Yang, Simeng; Wang, Yingnan

    2017-05-01

    To investigate the potential effect of tidal modulation on the seismicity in the Ning'er area, a seismically and geothermally active zone in Yunnan Province, China, we studied the correlation between Earth tides and the occurrence of M ≥ 6.0 earthquakes dating back to 1970, as well as their aftershock sequences, using theoretically calculated tidal stresses and a statistical test. The results show a significant correlation between Earth tides and the occurrence of earthquakes. Six of seven main events occurred when the Earth tide increased the Coulomb failure stress on the source fault. Four main events occurred in a narrow range of phase angle corresponding to the maximum loading rate of tidal stress. Furthermore, the histories of the aftershock sequence as a function of the tidal phases demonstrate clear tidal modulation with a high significance. Thus, we conclude that Earth tides have a clear role in triggering (or modulating) the rupture of the fault systems in the Ning'er area.

  15. Tidal disruption of inviscid protoplanets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boss, Alan P.; Cameron, A. G. W.; Benz, W.

    1991-01-01

    Roche showed that equilibrium is impossible for a small fluid body synchronously orbiting a primary within a critical radius now termed the Roche limit. Tidal disruption of orbitally unbound bodies is a potentially important process for planetary formation through collisional accumulation, because the area of the Roche limit is considerably larger then the physical cross section of a protoplanet. Several previous studies were made of dynamical tidal disruption and different models of disruption were proposed. Because of the limitation of these analytical models, we have used a smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) code to model the tidal disruption process. The code is basically the same as the one used to model giant impacts; we simply choose impact parameters large enough to avoid collisions. The primary and secondary both have iron cores and silicate mantles, and are initially isothermal at a molten temperature. The conclusions based on the analytical and numerical models are summarized.

  16. Influence of Tidal Forces on the Triggering of Seismic Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varga, Péter; Grafarend, Erik

    2018-05-01

    Tidal stresses are generated in any three-dimensional body influenced by an external inhomogeneous gravity field of rotating planets or moons. In this paper, as a special case, stresses caused within the solid Earth by the body tides are discussed from viewpoint of their influence on seismic activity. The earthquake triggering effects of the Moon and Sun are usually investigated by statistical comparison of tidal variations and temporal distribution of earthquake activity, or with the use of mathematical or experimental modelling of physical processes in earthquake prone structures. In this study, the magnitude of the lunisolar stress tensor in terms of its components along the latitude of the spherical surface of the Earth as well as inside the Earth (up to the core-mantle boundary) were calculated for the PREM (Dziewonski and Anderson in Phys Earth Planet Inter 25(4):297-356, 1981). Results of calculations prove that stress increases as a function of depth reaching a value around some kPa at the depth of 900-1500 km, well below the zone of deep earthquakes. At the depth of the overwhelming part of seismic energy accumulation (around 50 km) the stresses of lunisolar origin are only (0.0-1.0)·103 Pa. Despite the fact that these values are much smaller than the earthquake stress drops (1-30 MPa) (Kanamori in Annu Rev Earth Planet Sci 22:207-237, 1994) this does not exclude the possibility of an impact of tidal forces on outbreak of seismic events. Since the tidal potential and its derivatives are coordinate dependent and the zonal, tesseral and sectorial tides have different distributions from the surface down to the CMB, the lunisolar stress cannot influence the break-out of every seismological event in the same degree. The influencing lunisolar effect of the solid earth tides on earthquake occurrences is connected first of all with stress components acting parallel to the surface of the Earth. The influence of load tides is limited to the loaded area and its

  17. Influence of Tidal Forces on the Triggering of Seismic Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varga, Péter; Grafarend, Erik

    2017-05-01

    Tidal stresses are generated in any three-dimensional body influenced by an external inhomogeneous gravity field of rotating planets or moons. In this paper, as a special case, stresses caused within the solid Earth by the body tides are discussed from viewpoint of their influence on seismic activity. The earthquake triggering effects of the Moon and Sun are usually investigated by statistical comparison of tidal variations and temporal distribution of earthquake activity, or with the use of mathematical or experimental modelling of physical processes in earthquake prone structures. In this study, the magnitude of the lunisolar stress tensor in terms of its components along the latitude of the spherical surface of the Earth as well as inside the Earth (up to the core-mantle boundary) were calculated for the PREM (Dziewonski and Anderson in Phys Earth Planet Inter 25(4):297-356, 1981). Results of calculations prove that stress increases as a function of depth reaching a value around some kPa at the depth of 900-1500 km, well below the zone of deep earthquakes. At the depth of the overwhelming part of seismic energy accumulation (around 50 km) the stresses of lunisolar origin are only (0.0-1.0)·103 Pa. Despite the fact that these values are much smaller than the earthquake stress drops (1-30 MPa) (Kanamori in Annu Rev Earth Planet Sci 22:207-237, 1994) this does not exclude the possibility of an impact of tidal forces on outbreak of seismic events. Since the tidal potential and its derivatives are coordinate dependent and the zonal, tesseral and sectorial tides have different distributions from the surface down to the CMB, the lunisolar stress cannot influence the break-out of every seismological event in the same degree. The influencing lunisolar effect of the solid earth tides on earthquake occurrences is connected first of all with stress components acting parallel to the surface of the Earth. The influence of load tides is limited to the loaded area and its

  18. Tidal atmospheric and ocean loading in VLBI analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girdiuk, Anastasiia; Schindelegger, Michael; Böhm, Johannes

    2016-04-01

    In VLBI (Very Long Baseline Interferometry) analysis, reductions for tidal atmospheric and ocean loading are commonly used according to the IERS Conventions. In this presentation we examine such loading corrections from contemporary geophysical models within routine VLBI processing and discuss the internal consistency of the applied corrections for various effects. In detail, two gravitational ocean tide models, FES2004 and the recent FES2012 atlas with a much finer horizontal resolution and an improved description of hydrodynamic processes, are employed. Moreover, the contribution of atmospheric tidal loading is also re-considered based on data taken from two providers of station displacements, Goddard Space Flight Center and the TU Wien group. Those two models differ in terms of the underlying meteorological data, which can be a reason for inconsistency of VLBI reductions and may lead to systematics in the VLBI products at tidal frequencies. We validate this assumption in terms of Earth rotation parameters, by a tidal analysis of diurnal and semi-diurnal universal time and semi-diurnal polar motion variations as determined with the Vienna VLBI Software. Applying the loading models in a consistent way still leads to unexplained residuals at about 4-5 μas in the diurnal polar motion band, thus limiting the possibility of assessing geophysical models at this particular frequency.

  19. Tidal disruption of dissipative planetesimals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizuno, H.; Boss, A. P.

    1985-01-01

    A self-consistent numerical model is developed for the tidal disruption of a solid planetesimal. The planetesimal is treated as a highly viscous, slightly compressible fluid whose disturbed parts are an inviscid, pressureless fluid undergoing distortion and disruption. The distortions were constrained to being symmetrical above and below the equatorial plane. The tidal potential is expanded in terms of Legendre polynomials, which eliminates the center of mass acceleration effects, permitting definition of equations of motion in a noninertial frame. Consideration is given to viscous dissipation and to characteristics of the solid-atmosphere boundary. The model is applied to sample cases in one, two and three dimensions.

  20. Tidal disruption of viscous bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sridhar, S.; Tremaine, S.

    1992-01-01

    Tidal disruptions are investigated in viscous-fluid planetesimals whose radius is small relative to the distance of closest (parabolic-orbit) approach to a planet. The planetesimal surface is in these conditions always ellipsoidal, facilitating treatment by coupled ODEs which are solvable with high accuracy. While the disrupted planetesimals evolve into needlelike ellipsoids, their density does not decrease. The validity of viscous fluid treatment holds for solid (ice or rock) planetesimals in cases where tidal stresses are greater than material strength, but integrity is maintained by self-gravity.

  1. Alaska Tidal Datum Portal - Alaska Tidal Datum Calculator | Alaska Division

    Coastal Hazards Program Guide to Geologic Hazards in Alaska MAPTEACH Tsunami Inundation Mapping Energy Portal main content Alaska Tidal Datum Portal Unambiguous vertical datums in the coastal environment are projects to ensure protection of human life, property, and the coastal environment. January 2017 - Update

  2. Tidal frequency estimation for closed basins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eades, J. B., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    A method was developed for determining the fundamental tidal frequencies for closed basins of water, by means of an eigenvalue analysis. The mathematical model employed, was the Laplace tidal equations.

  3. Tidal Love and Shida numbers estimated by geodetic VLBI.

    PubMed

    Krásná, Hana; Böhm, Johannes; Schuh, Harald

    2013-10-01

    Frequency-dependent Love and Shida numbers, which characterize the Earth response to the tidal forces, were estimated in a global adjustment of all suitable geodetic Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) sessions from 1984.0 to 2011.0. Several solutions were carried out to determine the Love and Shida numbers for the tidal constituents at periods in the diurnal band and in the long-period band in addition to values of the Love and Shida numbers common for all tides of degree two. Adding up all twelve diurnal tidal waves that were estimated, the total differences in displacement with respect to the theoretical conventional values of the Love and Shida numbers calculated from an Earth model reach 1.73 ± 0.29 mm in radial direction and 1.15 ± 0.15 mm in the transverse plane. The difference in the radial deformation following from the estimates of the zonal Love numbers is largest for the semi-annual tide S sa with 1.07 ± 0.19 mm.

  4. Tidal Love and Shida numbers estimated by geodetic VLBI☆

    PubMed Central

    Krásná, Hana; Böhm, Johannes; Schuh, Harald

    2013-01-01

    Frequency-dependent Love and Shida numbers, which characterize the Earth response to the tidal forces, were estimated in a global adjustment of all suitable geodetic Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) sessions from 1984.0 to 2011.0. Several solutions were carried out to determine the Love and Shida numbers for the tidal constituents at periods in the diurnal band and in the long-period band in addition to values of the Love and Shida numbers common for all tides of degree two. Adding up all twelve diurnal tidal waves that were estimated, the total differences in displacement with respect to the theoretical conventional values of the Love and Shida numbers calculated from an Earth model reach 1.73 ± 0.29 mm in radial direction and 1.15 ± 0.15 mm in the transverse plane. The difference in the radial deformation following from the estimates of the zonal Love numbers is largest for the semi-annual tide Ssa with 1.07 ± 0.19 mm. PMID:26523082

  5. Frequency-Dependent Tidal Triggering of Low Frequency Earthquakes Near Parkfield, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, L.; Burgmann, R.; Shelly, D. R.

    2017-12-01

    The effect of small periodic stress perturbations on earthquake generation is not clear, however, the rate of low-frequency earthquakes (LFEs) near Parkfield, California has been found to be strongly correlated with solid earth tides. Laboratory experiments and theoretical analyses show that the period of imposed forcing and source properties affect the sensitivity to triggering and the phase relation of the peak seismicity rate and the periodic stress, but frequency-dependent triggering has not been quantitatively explored in the field. Tidal forcing acts over a wide range of frequencies, therefore the sensitivity to tidal triggering of LFEs provides a good probe to the physical mechanisms affecting earthquake generation. In this study, we consider the tidal triggering of LFEs near Parkfield, California since 2001. We find the LFEs rate is correlated with tidal shear stress, normal stress rate and shear stress rate. The occurrence of LFEs can also be independently modulated by groups of tidal constituents at semi-diurnal, diurnal and fortnightly frequencies. The strength of the response of LFEs to the different tidal constituents varies between LFE families. Each LFE family has an optimal triggering frequency, which does not appear to be depth dependent or systematically related to other known properties. This suggests the period of the applied forcing plays an important role in the triggering process, and the interaction of periods of loading history and source region properties, such as friction, effective normal stress and pore fluid pressure, produces the observed frequency-dependent tidal triggering of LFEs.

  6. Jannaschia seohaensis sp. nov., isolated from a tidal flat sediment.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jung-Hoon; Kang, So-Jung; Park, Sooyeon; Oh, Ki-Hoon; Oh, Tae-Kwang

    2010-01-01

    A Gram-negative, motile and pleomorphic bacterial strain, SMK-146(T), was isolated from a tidal flat sediment of the Yellow Sea, Korea, and its taxonomic position was investigated. Strain SMK-146(T) grew optimally at pH 7.0-8.0 and 30 degrees C. It contained Q-10 as the predominant ubiquinone and C(18 : 1)omega7c and 11-methyl C(18 : 1)omega7c as the major fatty acids. The major polar lipids were phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylethanolamine. The DNA G+C content was 68.4 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain SMK-146(T) belongs to the genus Jannaschia. Strain SMK-146(T) exhibited 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity values of 95.3-97.0 % to the type strains of the five recognized Jannaschia species. The mean DNA-DNA relatedness value between strain SMK-146(T) and Jannaschia seosinensis KCCM 42114(T), the closest phylogenetic neighbour, was 17 %. Differential phenotypic properties also revealed that strain SMK-146(T) differs from the recognized Jannaschia species. On the basis of phenotypic, phylogenetic and genetic data, strain SMK-146(T) represents a novel species of the genus Jannaschia, for which the name Jannaschia seohaensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is SMK-146(T) (=KCTC 22172(T) =CCUG 55326(T)).

  7. Wavelet analysis of lunar semidiurnal tidal influence on selected inland rivers across the globe.

    PubMed

    Briciu, Andrei-Emil

    2014-02-26

    The lunar semidiurnal influence is already known for tidal rivers. The moon also influences inland rivers at a monthly scale through precipitation. We show that, for some non-tidal rivers, with special geological conditions, the lunar semidiurnal tidal oscillation can be detected. The moon has semidiurnal tidal influence on groundwater, which will then export it to streamflow. Long time series with high frequency measurements were analysed by using standard wavelet analysis techniques. The lunar semidiurnal signal explains the daily double-peaked river level evolution of inland gauges. It is stronger where springs with high discharge occur, especially in the area of Edwards-Trinity and Great Artesian Basin aquifers and in areas with dolomite/limestone strata. The average maximum semidiurnal peaks range between 0.002 and 0.1 m. This secondary effect of the earth tides has important implications in predicting high resolution hydrographs, in the water cycle of wetlands and in water management.

  8. Wavelet analysis of lunar semidiurnal tidal influence on selected inland rivers across the globe

    PubMed Central

    Briciu, Andrei-Emil

    2014-01-01

    The lunar semidiurnal influence is already known for tidal rivers. The moon also influences inland rivers at a monthly scale through precipitation. We show that, for some non-tidal rivers, with special geological conditions, the lunar semidiurnal tidal oscillation can be detected. The moon has semidiurnal tidal influence on groundwater, which will then export it to streamflow. Long time series with high frequency measurements were analysed by using standard wavelet analysis techniques. The lunar semidiurnal signal explains the daily double-peaked river level evolution of inland gauges. It is stronger where springs with high discharge occur, especially in the area of Edwards-Trinity and Great Artesian Basin aquifers and in areas with dolomite/limestone strata. The average maximum semidiurnal peaks range between 0.002 and 0.1 m. This secondary effect of the earth tides has important implications in predicting high resolution hydrographs, in the water cycle of wetlands and in water management. PMID:24569793

  9. Europa, tidally heated oceans, and habitable zones around giant planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, Ray T.; Mckay, Christopher P.; Kasting, James F.

    1987-01-01

    Tidal dissipation in the satellites of a giant planet may provide sufficient heating to maintain an environment favorable to life on the satellite surface or just below a thin ice layer. Europa could have a liquid ocean which may occasionally receive sunlight through cracks in the overlying ice shell. In such a case, sufficient solar energy could reach liquid water that organisms similar to those found under Antarctic ice could grow. In other solar systems, larger satellites with more significant heat flow could represent environments that are stable over an order of eons and in which life could perhaps evolve. A zone around a giant planet is defined in which such satellites could exist as a tidally-heated habitable zone. This zone can be compared to the habitable zone which results from heating due to the radiation of a central star. In this solar system, this radiatively-heated habitable zone contains the earth.

  10. Europa, tidally heated oceans, and habitable zones around giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, R. T.; McKay, C. P.; Kasting, J. F.

    Tidal dissipation in the satellites of a giant planet may provide sufficient heating to maintain an environment favorable to life on the satellite surface or just below a thin ice layer. Europa could have a liquid ocean which may occasionally receive sunlight through cracks in the overlying ice shell. In such a case, sufficient solar energy could reach liquid water that organisms similar to those found under Antarctic ice could grow. In other solar systems, larger satellites with more significant heat flow could represent environments that are stable over an order of eons and in which life could perhaps evolve. A zone around a giant planet is defined in which such satellites could exist as a tidally-heated habitable zone. This zone can be compared to the habitable zone which results from heating due to the radiation of a central star. In this solar system, this radiatively-heated habitable zone contains the earth.

  11. Dwarf Galaxies Swimming in Tidal Tails

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This false-color infrared image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows little 'dwarf galaxies' forming in the 'tails' of two larger galaxies that are colliding together. The big galaxies are at the center of the picture, while the dwarfs can be seen as red dots in the red streamers, or tidal tails. The two blue dots above the big galaxies are stars in the foreground.

    Galaxy mergers are common occurrences in the universe; for example, our own Milky Way galaxy will eventually smash into the nearby Andromeda galaxy. When two galaxies meet, they tend to rip each other apart, leaving a trail, called a tidal tail, of gas and dust in their wake. It is out of this galactic debris that new dwarf galaxies are born.

    The new Spitzer picture demonstrates that these particular dwarfs are actively forming stars. The red color indicates the presence of dust produced in star-forming regions, including organic molecules called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. These carbon-containing molecules are also found on Earth, in car exhaust and on burnt toast, among other places. Here, the molecules are being heated up by the young stars, and, as a result, shine in infrared light.

    This image was taken by the infrared array camera on Spitzer. It is a 4-color composite of infrared light, showing emissions from wavelengths of 3.6 microns (blue), 4.5 microns (green), 5.8 microns (orange), and 8.0 microns (red). Starlight has been subtracted from the orange and red channels in order to enhance the dust features.

  12. Tidal Dissipation Within the Jupiter Moon Io - A Numerical Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinke, Teresa; van der Wal, Wouter; Hu, Haiyang; Vermeersen, Bert

    2017-04-01

    Satellite images and recent Earth-based observations of the innermost of the Galilean moons reveal a conspicuous pattern of volcanic hotspots and paterae on its surface. This pattern is associated with the heat flux originating from tidal dissipation in Io's mantle and asthenosphere. As shown by many analytical studies [e.g. Segatz et al. 1988], the local heat flux pattern depends on the rheology and structure of the satellite's interior and therefore could reveal constraints on Io's present interior. However, non-linear processes, different rheologies, and in particular lateral variations arising from the spatial heating pattern are difficult to incorporate in analytical 1D models but might be crucial. This motivates the development of a 3D finite element model of a layered body disturbed by a tidal potential. As a first step of this project we present a 3D finite element model of a spherically stratified body of linear viscoelastic rheology. For validation, we compare the resulting tidal deformation and local heating patterns with the results obtained by analytical models. Numerical errors increase with lower values of the asthenosphere viscosity. Currently, the numerical model allows realistic simulation down to viscosities of 1018 Pa s. Furthermore, we investigate an adequate way to deal with the relaxation of false modes that arise at the onset of the periodic tidal potential series in the numerical approach. Segatz, M., Spohn, T., Ross, M. N., Schubert, G. (1988). Tidal dissipation, surface heat flow, and figure of viscoelastic models of Io. Icarus, 75(2), 187-206.

  13. Tidal and meteorological forcing of sediment transport in tributary mudflat channels.

    PubMed

    Ralston, David K; Stacey, Mark T

    2007-06-01

    Field observations of flow and sediment transport in a tributary channel through intertidal mudflats indicate that suspended sediment was closely linked to advection and dispersion of a tidal salinity front. During calm weather when tidal forcing was dominant, high concentrations of suspended sediment advected up the mudflat channel in the narrow region between salty water from San Francisco Bay and much fresher runoff from the small local watershed. Salinity and suspended sediment dispersed at similar rates through each tidal inundation, such that during receding ebbs the sediment pulse had spread spatially and maximum concentrations had decreased. Net sediment transport was moderately onshore during the calm weather, as asymmetries in stratification due to tidal straining of the salinity front enhanced deposition, particularly during weaker neap tidal forcing. Sediment transport by tidal forcing was periodically altered by winter storms. During storms, strong winds from the south generated wind waves and temporarily increased suspended sediment concentrations. Increased discharge down the tributary channels due to precipitation had more lasting impact on sediment transport, supplying both buoyancy and fine sediment to the system. Net sediment transport depended on the balance between calm weather tidal forcing and perturbations by episodic storms. Net transport in the tributary channel was generally off-shore during storms and during calm weather spring tides, and on-shore during calm weather neap tides.

  14. Tidal and meteorological forcing of sediment transport in tributary mudflat channels

    PubMed Central

    Ralston, David K.; Stacey, Mark T.

    2011-01-01

    Field observations of flow and sediment transport in a tributary channel through intertidal mudflats indicate that suspended sediment was closely linked to advection and dispersion of a tidal salinity front. During calm weather when tidal forcing was dominant, high concentrations of suspended sediment advected up the mudflat channel in the narrow region between salty water from San Francisco Bay and much fresher runoff from the small local watershed. Salinity and suspended sediment dispersed at similar rates through each tidal inundation, such that during receding ebbs the sediment pulse had spread spatially and maximum concentrations had decreased. Net sediment transport was moderately onshore during the calm weather, as asymmetries in stratification due to tidal straining of the salinity front enhanced deposition, particularly during weaker neap tidal forcing. Sediment transport by tidal forcing was periodically altered by winter storms. During storms, strong winds from the south generated wind waves and temporarily increased suspended sediment concentrations. Increased discharge down the tributary channels due to precipitation had more lasting impact on sediment transport, supplying both buoyancy and fine sediment to the system. Net sediment transport depended on the balance between calm weather tidal forcing and perturbations by episodic storms. Net transport in the tributary channel was generally off-shore during storms and during calm weather spring tides, and on-shore during calm weather neap tides. PMID:21499572

  15. Maine Tidal Power Initiative: Environmental Impact Protocols For Tidal Power

    SciT

    Peterson, Michael Leroy; Zydlewski, Gayle Barbin; Xue, Huijie

    2014-02-02

    The Maine Tidal Power Initiative (MTPI), an interdisciplinary group of engineers, biologists, oceanographers, and social scientists, has been conducting research to evaluate tidal energy resources and better understand the potential effects and impacts of marine hydro-kinetic (MHK) development on the environment and local community. Project efforts include: 1) resource assessment, 2) development of initial device design parameters using scale model tests, 3) baseline environmental studies and monitoring, and 4) human and community responses. This work included in-situ measurement of the environmental and social response to the pre-commercial Turbine Generator Unit (TGU®) developed by Ocean Renewable Power Company (ORPC) as wellmore » as considering the path forward for smaller community scale projects.« less

  16. Anthropogenic changes to the tidal channel network, sediment rerouting, and social implications in southwest Bangladesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, C.; Goodbred, S. L., Jr.; Sams, S.; Small, C.

    2015-12-01

    The tidal channel network in southwest Bangladesh has been undergoing major adjustment in response to anthropogenic modification over the past few decades. Densely inhabited, agricultural islands that have been embanked to protect against inundation by tides, river flooding, and storm surges (i.e., polders) preclude tidal exchange and sedimentation. Studies reveal this results in elevation deficits relative to mean high water, endangering local communities when embankment failures occur (e.g., during storms, lateral channel erosion). In addition, many studies suggest that the decrease in tidal prism and associated change in hydrodynamics from poldering causes shoaling in remaining tidal channels, which can cause a disruption in transportation. The widespread closure and conversion of tidal channel areas to profitable shrimp aquaculture is also prevalent in this region. In this study, we quantify the direct closure of tidal channels due to poldering and shrimp aquaculture using historical Landsat and Google Earth imagery, and analyze the morphologic adjustment of the tidal channel network due to these perturbations. In the natural Sundarbans mangrove forest, the tidal channel network has remained relatively constant since the 1970s. In contrast, construction of polders removed >1000 km of primary tidal creeks and >90 km2 has been reclaimed outside of polders through infilling and closure of formerly-active, higher order conduit channels now used for shrimp aquaculture. Field validation confirm tidal restriction by large sluice gates is prevalent, favoring local channel siltation at rates up to 20cm/yr. With the impoundment of primary creeks and closure of 30-60% of conduit channels in the study area, an estimated 1,400 x 106 m3 of water has been removed from the tidal prism and potentially redirected within remaining channels. This has significant implications for tidal amplification in this region. Further, we estimate that 12.3 x 106 MT of sediment annually

  17. Evaluation of the durability of composite tidal turbine blades.

    PubMed

    Davies, Peter; Germain, Grégory; Gaurier, Benoît; Boisseau, Amélie; Perreux, Dominique

    2013-02-28

    The long-term reliability of tidal turbines is critical if these structures are to be cost effective. Optimized design requires a combination of material durability models and structural analyses. Composites are a natural choice for turbine blades, but there are few data available to predict material behaviour under coupled environmental and cycling loading. The present study addresses this problem, by introducing a multi-level framework for turbine blade qualification. At the material scale, static and cyclic tests have been performed, both in air and in sea water. The influence of ageing in sea water on fatigue performance is then quantified, and much lower fatigue lives are measured after ageing. At a higher level, flume tank tests have been performed on three-blade tidal turbines. Strain gauging of blades has provided data to compare with numerical models.

  18. Influence of fortnightly earth tides at Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii.

    Dzurisin, D.

    1980-01-01

    Analysis of 52 historic eruptions confirms the premise that fortnightly earth tides play a significant role in triggering activity at Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii. Since January 1832, nearly twice as many eruptions have occurred nearer fortnightly tidal maximum than tidal minimum (34 vs. 18). A straightforward significance test indicates that the likelihood of a fortnightly tidal influence on Kilauea eruptions is roughly 90%. This is not the case for Mauna Loa Volcano, where 37 historic eruptions have been distributed randomly with respect to the fortnightly tide. At Kilauea, stresses induced by fortnightly earth tides presumably act in concert with volcanic and tectonic stresses to trigger shallow magma movements along preexisting zones of weakness. Differences in structure or internal plumbing may limit the effectiveness of this mechanism at Mauna Loa. Tidal effects seem to be less marked at shields than at some island-arc volcanoes, possibly because higher average volcanic stress rates in Hawaii more often override the effects of tidal stresses.-Author

  19. Premonitory slip and tidal triggering of earthquakes

    Lockner, D.A.; Beeler, N.M.

    1999-01-01

    Earth tides. Triggered seismicity has been reported resulting from the passage of surface waves excited by the Landers earthquake. These transient waves had measured amplitudes in excess of 0.1 MPa at frequencies of 0.05 to 0.2 Hz in regions of notable seismicity increase. Similar stress oscillations in our laboratory experiments produced strongly correlated stick-slip events. We suggest that seemingly inconsistent natural observations of triggered seismicity and absence of tidal triggering indicate that failure is amplitude and frequency dependent. This is the expected result if, as in our laboratory experiments, the rheology of the Earth's crust permits delayed failure.

  20. ETS and tidal stressing: Fault weakening after main slip pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houston, H.

    2013-12-01

    Time-varying stresses from solid Earth tides and ocean loading influence slow slip (Hawthorne and Rubin, 2010) and, consequently, the frequency of occurrence and intensity of tremor during ETS episodes (Rubinstein et al., 2008). This relationship can illuminate changes in the mechanical response of the rupture surfaces(s) during slip in ETS. I compare the influence of tidal loading when and after the propagating ETS slip front (estimated by tremor density in time) ruptures the fault at a given spot. Using estimates of slip fronts that I derived from tremor locations, I divide ETS tremor into two groups: that occurring within a day of the start of the inferred slip front and that occurring over several days thereafter. The tremor catalog used contains 50K waveform cross-correlation locations of tremor in 7 large ETS in northern Cascadia between 2005 and 2012. I calculate normal, shear and volumetric stresses due to the Earth and ocean tides at numerous locations on the inferred rupture plane of the ETS following the method of Hawthorne and Rubin (2010). The Coulomb stress increment at each tremor time and location is compared with tremor occurrence for the two groups of tremor. Unreasonable results appear if the effective frictional coefficient mu > 0.2, and results are most 'reasonable' when mu is very near or equal to zero. Following passage of the main slip pulse, tremor generation is notably more sensitive to tidal stressing. One kPa of encouraging tidal Coulomb stress boosts the occurrence of tremor after the main slip pulse by about 50% above the average value, while the same amount of discouraging stress decreases the occurrence of such tremor by a similar factor. The greater the encouraging or discouraging stress, the greater the effect. In contrast, tremor in the main slip pulse is much less affected by positive or negative tidal stresses. I interpret the greater sensitivity to tidal stressing of the tremor after the main slip pulse as a measure of the

  1. ARRAY OPTIMIZATION FOR TIDAL ENERGY EXTRACTION IN A TIDAL CHANNEL – A NUMERICAL MODELING ANALYSIS

    SciT

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Taiping; Copping, Andrea

    This paper presents an application of a hydrodynamic model to simulate tidal energy extraction in a tidal dominated estuary in the Pacific Northwest coast. A series of numerical experiments were carried out to simulate tidal energy extraction with different turbine array configurations, including location, spacing and array size. Preliminary model results suggest that array optimization for tidal energy extraction in a real-world site is a very complex process that requires consideration of multiple factors. Numerical models can be used effectively to assist turbine siting and array arrangement in a tidal turbine farm for tidal energy extraction.

  2. North American tidal power prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wayne, W. W., Jr.

    1981-07-01

    Prospects for North American tidal power electrical generation are reviewed. Studies by the US Army Corps of Engineers of 90 possible generation schemes in Cobscook Bay, ME, indicated that maximum power generation rather than dependable capacity was the most economic method. Construction cost estimates for 15 MW bulb units in a single effect mode from basin to the sea are provided; five projects were considered ranging from 110-160 MW. Additional tidal power installations are examined for: Half-Moon Cove, ME (12 MW, 18 ft tide); Cook Inlet, AK, which is shown to pose severe environmental and engineering problems due to fish migration, earthquake hazards, and 300 ft deep silt deposits; and the Bay of Fundy, Canada. This last has a 17.8 MW plant under construction in a 29 ft maximum tide area. Other tidal projects of the Maritime Provinces are reviewed, and it is noted that previous economic evaluations based on an oil price of $16/barrel are in need of revision.

  3. Dispersion in tidally averaged transport equation

    Cheng, R.T.; Casulli, V.

    1992-01-01

    A general governing inter-tidal transport equation for conservative solutes has been derived without invoking the weakly nonlinear approximation. The governing inter-tidal transport equation is a convection-dispersion equation in which the convective velocity is a mean Lagrangian residual current, and the inter-tidal dispersion coefficient is defined by a dispersion patch. When the weakly nonlinear condition is violated, the physical significance of the Stokes' drift, as used in tidal dynamics, becomes questionable. For nonlinear problems, analytical solutions for the mean Lagrangian residual current and for the inter-tidal dispersion coefficient do not exist, they must be determined numerically. A rectangular tidal inlet with a constriction is used in the first example. The solutions of the residual currents and the computed properties of the inter-tidal dispersion coefficient are used to illuminate the mechanisms of the inter-tidal transport processes. Then, the present formulation is tested in a geometrically complex tidal estuary – San Francisco Bay, California. The computed inter-tidal dispersion coefficients are in the range between 5×104 and 5×106 cm2/sec., which are consistent with the values reported in the literature

  4. Computations of M sub 2 and K sub 1 ocean tidal perturbations in satellite elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estes, R. H.

    1974-01-01

    Semi-analytic perturbation equations for the influence of M2 and K1 ocean tidal constituents on satellite motion are expanded into multi-dimensional Fourier series and calculations made for the BE-C satellite. Perturbation in the orbital elements are compared to those of the long period solid earth tides.

  5. TIDAL FRICTION AND TIDAL LAGGING. APPLICABILITY LIMITATIONS OF A POPULAR FORMULA FOR THE TIDAL TORQUE

    SciT

    Efroimsky, Michael; Makarov, Valeri V., E-mail: michael.efroimsky@usno.navy.mil, E-mail: vvm@usno.navy.mil

    Tidal torques play a key role in rotational dynamics of celestial bodies. They govern these bodies' tidal despinning and also participate in the subtle process of entrapment of these bodies into spin-orbit resonances. This makes tidal torques directly relevant to the studies of habitability of planets and their moons. Our work begins with an explanation of how friction and lagging should be built into the theory of bodily tides. Although much of this material can be found in various publications, a short but self-consistent summary on the topic has been lacking in the hitherto literature, and we are filling themore » gap. After these preparations, we address a popular concise formula for the tidal torque, which is often used in the literature, for planets or stars. We explain why the derivation of this expression, offered in the paper by Goldreich and in the books by Kaula (Equation (4.5.29)) and Murray and Dermott (Equation (4.159)), implicitly sets the time lag to be frequency independent. Accordingly, the ensuing expression for the torque can be applied only to bodies having a very special (and very hypothetical) rheology which makes the time lag frequency independent, i.e., the same for all Fourier modes in the spectrum of tide. This expression for the torque should not be used for bodies of other rheologies. Specifically, the expression cannot be combined with an extra assertion of the geometric lag being constant, because at finite eccentricities the said assumption is incompatible with the constant-time-lag condition.« less

  6. Long-Term Evaluation of Ocean Tidal Variation Models of Polar Motion and UT1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karbon, Maria; Balidakis, Kyriakos; Belda, Santiago; Nilsson, Tobias; Hagedoorn, Jan; Schuh, Harald

    2018-04-01

    Recent improvements in the development of VLBI (very long baseline interferometry) and other space geodetic techniques such as the global navigation satellite systems (GNSS) require very precise a-priori information of short-period (daily and sub-daily) Earth rotation variations. One significant contribution to Earth rotation is caused by the diurnal and semi-diurnal ocean tides. Within this work, we developed a new model for the short-period ocean tidal variations in Earth rotation, where the ocean tidal angular momentum model and the Earth rotation variation have been setup jointly. Besides the model of the short-period variation of the Earth's rotation parameters (ERP), based on the empirical ocean tide model EOT11a, we developed also ERP models, that are based on the hydrodynamic ocean tide models FES2012 and HAMTIDE. Furthermore, we have assessed the effect of uncertainties in the elastic Earth model on the resulting ERP models. Our proposed alternative ERP model to the IERS 2010 conventional model considers the elastic model PREM and 260 partial tides. The choice of the ocean tide model and the determination of the tidal velocities have been identified as the main uncertainties. However, in the VLBI analysis all models perform on the same level of accuracy. From these findings, we conclude that the models presented here, which are based on a re-examined theoretical description and long-term satellite altimetry observation only, are an alternative for the IERS conventional model but do not improve the geodetic results.

  7. Gravitoelectromagnetic analogy based on tidal tensors

    SciT

    Costa, L. Filipe O.; Herdeiro, Carlos A. R.

    2008-07-15

    We propose a new approach to a physical analogy between general relativity and electromagnetism, based on tidal tensors of both theories. Using this approach we write a covariant form for the gravitational analogues of the Maxwell equations, which makes transparent both the similarities and key differences between the two interactions. The following realizations of the analogy are given. The first one matches linearized gravitational tidal tensors to exact electromagnetic tidal tensors in Minkowski spacetime. The second one matches exact magnetic gravitational tidal tensors for ultrastationary metrics to exact magnetic tidal tensors of electromagnetism in curved spaces. In the third wemore » show that our approach leads to a two-step exact derivation of Papapetrou's equation describing the force exerted on a spinning test particle. Analogous scalar invariants built from tidal tensors of both theories are also discussed.« less

  8. Observations of a tidal intrusion front in a tidal channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Shasha; Xia, Xiaoming; Thompson, Charlie E. L.; Cao, Zhenyi; Liu, Yifei

    2017-11-01

    A visible front indicated by a surface colour change, and sometimes associated with foam or debris lines, was observed in a tidal channel during neap tide. This is an example of a tidal intrusion front occurring in the absence of sudden topographical changes or reversing flows, typically reported to be associated with such fronts. Detailed Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler and conductivity/temperature/depth measurements were taken on repeated transects both with fronts apparent and with fronts absent. The results indicated that the front occurred as a result of stratification, which was sustained by the buoyancy flux and the weak tide-induced mixing during neap ebb tide. The stronger tide-induced mixing during spring tide restrained stratification, leading to the absence of a front. The mechanism of the frontogenesis was the density gradient between the stratified water formed during neap ebb tide, and the more mixed seawater during neap flood tide; thus, the water on the landward (southwestern) side of the front was stratified, and that on the seaward side (northeastern) of the front was vertically well mixed. Gradient Richardson number estimates suggest that the flow between the stratified and mixed water was near the threshold 0.25 for shear instability. Meanwhile, the density gradient would provide an initial baroclinic contribution to velocity convergence, which is indicated by the accumulation of buoyant matter such as foam, grass, and debris into a sharply defined line along the surface. The front migrates with the flood current, with a local maximum towards the eastern side of the channel, leading to an asymmetrical shape with the eastern side of the front driven further into the Tiaozhoumen tidal channel.

  9. Homogeneous internal wave turbulence driven by tidal flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Reun, Thomas; Favier, Benjamin; Le Bars, Michael; Erc Fludyco Team

    2017-11-01

    We propose a novel investigation of the stability of strongly stratified planetary fluid layers undergoing periodic tidal distortion in the limit where rotational effects are negligible compared to buoyancy. With the help of a local model focusing on a small fluid area compared to the global layer, we find that periodic tidal distortion drives a parametric subharmonic resonance of internal. This instability saturates into an homogeneous internal wave turbulence pervading the whole fluid interior: the energy is injected in the unstable waves which then feed a succession of triadic resonances also generating small spatial scales. As the timescale separation between the forcing and Brunt-Väisälä is increased, the temporal spectrum of this turbulence displays a -2 power law reminiscent of the Garrett and Munk spectrum measured in the oceans (Garett & Munk 1979). Moreover, in this state consisting of a superposition of waves in weak non-linear interaction, the mixing efficiency is increased compared to classical, Kolmogorov-like stratified turbulence. This study is of wide interest in geophysical fluid dynamics ranging from oceanic turbulence and tidal heating in icy satellites to dynamo action in partially stratified planetary cores as it could be the case in the Earth. We acknowledge support from the European Research Council (ERC) under the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation program (Grant Agreement No. 681835-FLUDYCO-ERC-2015-CoG).

  10. Methodology for classification of geographical features with remote sensing images: Application to tidal flats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revollo Sarmiento, G. N.; Cipolletti, M. P.; Perillo, M. M.; Delrieux, C. A.; Perillo, Gerardo M. E.

    2016-03-01

    Tidal flats generally exhibit ponds of diverse size, shape, orientation and origin. Studying the genesis, evolution, stability and erosive mechanisms of these geographic features is critical to understand the dynamics of coastal wetlands. However, monitoring these locations through direct access is hard and expensive, not always feasible, and environmentally damaging. Processing remote sensing images is a natural alternative for the extraction of qualitative and quantitative data due to their non-invasive nature. In this work, a robust methodology for automatic classification of ponds and tidal creeks in tidal flats using Google Earth images is proposed. The applicability of our method is tested in nine zones with different morphological settings. Each zone is processed by a segmentation stage, where ponds and tidal creeks are identified. Next, each geographical feature is measured and a set of shape descriptors is calculated. This dataset, together with a-priori classification of each geographical feature, is used to define a regression model, which allows an extensive automatic classification of large volumes of data discriminating ponds and tidal creeks against other various geographical features. In all cases, we identified and automatically classified different geographic features with an average accuracy over 90% (89.7% in the worst case, and 99.4% in the best case). These results show the feasibility of using freely available Google Earth imagery for the automatic identification and classification of complex geographical features. Also, the presented methodology may be easily applied in other wetlands of the world and perhaps employing other remote sensing imagery.

  11. The early history of the lunar inclination. [effect of tidal friction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubincam, D. P.

    1973-01-01

    The effect of tidal friction on the inclination of the lunar orbit to the earth's equator for earth-moon distances of less than 10 earth radii is examined. The results obtained bear on a conclusion drawn by Gerstenkorn and others which has been raised as a fatal objection to the fission hypothesis of lunar origin, namely, that the present nonzero inclination of the moon's orbit to the ecliptic implies a steep inclination of the moon's orbit to the earth's equatorial plane in the early history of the earth-moon system. This conclusion is shown to be valid only for particular rheological models of the earth. The earth is assumed to behave like a highly viscous fluid in response to tides raised in it by the moon. The moon is assumed to be tideless and in a circular orbit about the earth. The equations of tidal friction are integrated numerically to give inclination of the lunar orbit as a function of earth-moon distance.

  12. Wavelet filter analysis of local atmospheric pressure effects in the long-period tidal bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, X.-G.; Liu, L. T.; Ducarme, B.; Hsu, H. T.; Sun, H.-P.

    2006-11-01

    It is well known that local atmospheric pressure variations obviously affect the observation of short-period Earth tides, such as diurnal tides, semi-diurnal tides and ter-diurnal tides, but local atmospheric pressure effects on the long-period Earth tides have not been studied in detail. This is because the local atmospheric pressure is believed not to be sufficient for an effective pressure correction in long-period tidal bands, and there are no efficient methods to investigate local atmospheric effects in these bands. The usual tidal analysis software package, such as ETERNA, Baytap-G and VAV, cannot provide detailed pressure admittances for long-period tidal bands. We propose a wavelet method to investigate local atmospheric effects on gravity variations in long-period tidal bands. This method constructs efficient orthogonal filter bank with Daubechies wavelets of high vanishing moments. The main advantage of the wavelet filter bank is that it has excellent low frequency response and efficiently suppresses instrumental drift of superconducting gravimeters (SGs) without using any mathematical model. Applying the wavelet method to the 13-year continuous gravity observations from SG T003 in Brussels, Belgium, we filtered 12 long-period tidal groups into eight narrow frequency bands. Wavelet method demonstrates that local atmospheric pressure fluctuations are highly correlated with the noise of SG measurements in the period band 4-40 days with correlation coefficients higher than 0.95 and local atmospheric pressure variations are the main error source for the determination of the tidal parameters in these bands. We show the significant improvement of long-period tidal parameters provided by wavelet method in term of precision.

  13. Earth tides, volcanos and climatic change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roosen, R. G.; Harrington, R. S.; Giles, J.; Browning, I.

    1976-01-01

    The effect of variations in tidal stresses on the earth caused by the sun and moon on volcanic activity and climate is investigated. A statistically significant correlation is found between the derivatives of the envelopes of peak tidal stresses at high northern latitudes and the mean temperature of the Northern Hemisphere as reflected in oxygen isotope ratios in the Greenland ice cap. It is suggested that variations in tidal stresses cause changes in the amount of stratospheric dust produced by volcanic activity, which affects the thickness of the stratospheric dust veil and the atmospheric radiation balance. For a simple model, periodic variations in tidal stress account for 13% of the variance in the ice-core temperature record.

  14. Tidal dissipiation in Europa - A correction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassen, P.; Reynolds, R. T.; Peale, S. J.

    1980-01-01

    The possibility that tidal dissipation in a thin ice crust was sufficient to preserve liquid water on Jupiter's satellite Europa was suggested by Cassen et al. (1979). However, their calculation of the tidal heating rate for that situation is in error; for the same parameter values, the actual heating rate would be much less than given in their paper. Thus, their conclusion regarding the possibility that liquid water exists today on Europa is considerably weakened. This paper corrects the calculation of the tidal dissipation rate in a Europan ice crust, and discusses the implications for Europa's thermal history, and clarifies certain aspects of the tidal heating problem.

  15. Storm surge and tidal range energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Matthew; Angeloudis, Athanasios; Robins, Peter; Evans, Paul; Neill, Simon

    2017-04-01

    The need to reduce carbon-based energy sources whilst increasing renewable energy forms has led to concerns of intermittency within a national electricity supply strategy. The regular rise and fall of the tide makes prediction almost entirely deterministic compared to other stochastic renewable energy forms; therefore, tidal range energy is often stated as a predictable and firm renewable energy source. Storm surge is the term used for the non-astronomical forcing of tidal elevation, and is synonymous with coastal flooding because positive storm surges can elevate water-levels above the height of coastal flood defences. We hypothesis storm surges will affect the reliability of the tidal range energy resource; with negative surge events reducing the tidal range, and conversely, positive surge events increasing the available resource. Moreover, tide-surge interaction, which results in positive storm surges more likely to occur on a flooding tide, will reduce the annual tidal range energy resource estimate. Water-level data (2000-2012) at nine UK tide gauges, where the mean tidal amplitude is above 2.5m and thus suitable for tidal-range energy development (e.g. Bristol Channel), were used to predict tidal range power with a 0D modelling approach. Storm surge affected the annual resource estimate by between -5% to +3%, due to inter-annual variability. Instantaneous power output were significantly affected (Normalised Root Mean Squared Error: 3%-8%, Scatter Index: 15%-41%) with spatial variability and variability due to operational strategy. We therefore find a storm surge affects the theoretical reliability of tidal range power, such that a prediction system may be required for any future electricity generation scenario that includes large amounts of tidal-range energy; however, annual resource estimation from astronomical tides alone appears sufficient for resource estimation. Future work should investigate water-level uncertainties on the reliability and

  16. Space-Time Variations in Tidal Stress and Cascadia Tremor Amplitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaus, A. J.; Creager, K. C.; Sweet, J.; Wech, A.

    2011-12-01

    We present a new analysis of the influence of tidal stresses on the amplitude of non-volcanic tremor in Washington State. Tremor counts (Thomas et al., 2009), tremor amplitude (Rubinstein et al., 2008), and strain (Hawthorne and Rubin, 2010) are modulated by tidal stresses in Cascadia as well as in California. However, tremor amplitudes have not yet been extensively studied in Cascadia. Furthermore, Hawthorne and Rubin's Cascadia-wide tidal stress model (2010) allows us to look at the tremor-tide relationship in more detail than ever before. The ability to look at the tidal modulation of tremor amplitude in space as well as time will increase our understanding of this phenomenon and may provide information about the frictional properties of the plate interface. We focus on the August 2010 episodic tremor and slip (ETS) event recorded by the Array of Arrays, a seismic experiment on the Olympic Peninsula. The instrument response is deconvolved, seismograms band-pass filtered at 1.5-5.5 Hz and envelopes are made in 5-minute windows. An inverse problem compensates for site corrections and source-receiver distances to produce, for any given time, a single amplitude measurement at the source. Source locations are determined using an envelope waveform cross-correlation method. Then, we compare the amplitudes, catalog of tremor locations, and the tidal stress at the desired location and time. Amplitudes during the August 2010 ETS event are clearly modulated by tidal stresses. Viewed in the frequency domain, there are clear peaks in the tremor amplitude spectrum at several tidal periods, most prominently the 12.4 and 24 hour periods. Comparison with Hawthorne and Rubin's tidal stress model shows that higher amplitudes are associated with positive shear stress in the downdip direction and, less strongly, with more compressional normal stress.

  17. Understanding tidal friction: the history of science in nuce.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brosche, P.

    The evolution of the topic of tidal friction took place for a long time along two completely separated routes. The empirical evidence derived from ancient observations seemed to show a secular acceleration of the mean motion of the Moon. This was first recognized by Halley in 1695. On the theoretical side there was the solitary speculation of Kant (1754) that oceanic tides ought to have a retarding action on the rotation of the earth. The precise meeting point of the two routes is not yet known. While the greatest celestial mechanics had convincingly shown earlier that conservative mechanics could explain the facts, later Robert Mayer and G. H. Darwin introduced the fully developed concept of angular momentum transfer in the earth-moon-system. Today the precise mechanism of energy dissipation is still an enigma. In the long run, the tides must be computed for the seas by the geological past. The first steps in this direction have already been taken.

  18. Interior structures and tidal heating in the TRAPPIST-1 planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barr, Amy C.; Dobos, Vera; Kiss, László L.

    2018-05-01

    Context. With seven planets, the TRAPPIST-1 system has among the largest number of exoplanets discovered in a single system so far. The system is of astrobiological interest, because three of its planets orbit in the habitable zone of the ultracool M dwarf. Aims: We aim to determine interior structures for each planet and estimate the temperatures of their rock mantles due to a balance between tidal heating and convective heat transport to assess their habitability. We also aim to determine the precision in mass and radius necessary to determine the planets' compositions. Methods: Assuming the planets are composed of uniform-density noncompressible materials (iron, rock, H2O), we determine possible compositional models and interior structures for each planet. We also construct a tidal heat generation model using a single uniform viscosity and rigidity based on each planet's composition. Results: The compositions for planets b, c, d, and e remain uncertain given the error bars on mass and radius. With the exception of TRAPPIST-1c, all have densities low enough to indicate the presence of significant H2O. Planets b and c experience enough heating from planetary tides to maintain magma oceans in their rock mantles; planet c may have surface eruptions of silicate magma, potentially detectable with next-generation instrumentation. Tidal heat fluxes on planets d, e, and f are twenty times higher than Earth's mean heat flow. Conclusions: Planets d and e are the most likely to be habitable. Planet d avoids the runaway greenhouse state if its albedo is ≳0.3. Determining the planet's masses within 0.1-0.5 Earth masses would confirm or rule out the presence of H2O and/or iron. Understanding the geodynamics of ice-rich planets f, g, and h requires more sophisticated modeling that can self-consistently balance heat production and transport in both rock and ice layers.

  19. Mountain building and earth rotation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermeersen, L. L. A.; Sabadini, R.; Spada, G.; Vlaar, N. J.

    1994-06-01

    Whereas the present-day true polar wander and the secular non-tidal acceleration of the Earth have usually been attributed to postglacial rebound, it has recently been suggested that non-glacially induced vertical tectonic movements taking place under non-isostatic conditions can also be effective in changing the Earth's rotation. The authors present a case study in which they analyse the effects of some simple uplift histories of the Himalayas and the Tibetan Plateau on the rotational axis and on the second-degree zonal harmonic of the geoid, for time-scales of up to a few million years.

  20. Gaetbulibacter lutimaris sp. nov., isolated from a tidal flat sediment.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jung-Hoon; Lee, Soo-Young; Oh, Tae-Kwang

    2013-03-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, aerobic, non-flagellated, non-gliding, rod-shaped bacterial strain, D1-y4(T), was isolated from a tidal flat sediment of the South Sea in South Korea and subjected to a polyphasic study. Strain D1-y4(T) grew optimally at 25 °C, at pH 7.0-7.5 and in the presence of 2-3 % (w/v) NaCl. Phylogenetic trees based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strain D1-y4(T) belonged to the genus Gaetbulibacter, joining the type strain of Gaetbulibacter marinus, with which it exhibited 97.8 % similarity. Sequence similarities to Gaetbulibacter saemankumensis SMK-12(T) and Gaetbulibacter aestuarii KYW382(T) were 96.5 and 96.2 %, respectively. Strain D1-y4(T) contained MK-6 as the predominant menaquionone and iso-C15 : 0, iso-C15 : 1 G and anteiso-C15 : 0 as the major fatty acids. The major polar lipids were phosphatidylethanolamine and one unidentified lipid. The DNA G+C content of strain D1-y4(T) was 34.6 mol% and its mean DNA-DNA relatedness value with G. marinus KCTC 23046(T) was 7 %. The phylogenetic and genetic distinctiveness and differential phenotypic properties revealed that strain D1-y4(T) is distinguishable from the three recognized Gaetbulibacter species. On the basis of the data presented here, strain D1-y4(T) is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Gaetbulibacter, for which the name Gaetbulibacter lutimaris sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is D1-y4(T) ( = KCTC 23716(T)  = CCUG 61504(T)).

  1. Controls on the Climates of Tidally Locked Terrestrial Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, J.; Cowan, N. B.; Abbot, D. S.

    2013-12-01

    Earth-size planets in the habitable zone of M-dwarf stars may be very common. Due to strong tidal forces, these planets in circulate orbits are expected to be tidally locked, with one hemisphere experiencing perpetual day and the other permanent night. Previous studies on the climates of tidally locked planets were primarily based on complex 3D general circulation models (GCMs). The central question to be answered in this work is: what is the minimum necessary physics needed to understand the climates simulated by GCMs? A two-column model, primarily based on the weak temperature gradient (WTG) approximation (Sobel et al. 2001) and the fixed anvil temperature (FAT) hypothesis (Hartmann and Larson 2002) for the tropical climate of Earth, is developed for understanding the climates of tidally locked planets. This highly idealized model well reproduces fundamental features of the climates obtained in complicated GCMs (Yang et al. 2013), including planetary albedo, longwave cloud forcing, outgoing longwave radiation (OLR), and atmospheric energy transport. This suggests that the WTG approximation and the FAT hypothesis may be good approximations for tidally locked habitable planets, which provides strong constraints on the large-scale circulations, diabatic processes, and cloud behaviour on these planets. Both the simple model and the GCMs predict that (i) convection and planetary albedo on the dayside increase as stellar flux is increased; (ii) longwave cloud radiative forcing increases as stellar flux is increased, due to the cloud top temperature remains nearly constant as the climate changes (FAT hypothesis); (iii) for planets at the inner regions of the habitable zone, the dayside--nightside OLR contrast becomes very weak or even reverses, due to the strong longwave absorption by water vapor and clouds on the dayside; (iv) the dayside--to--nightside atmospheric energy transport (AET) increases as stellar flux is increased, and decreases as oceanic energy transport

  2. Genome-wide transcriptional responses of Alteromonas naphthalenivorans SN2 to contaminated seawater and marine tidal flat sediment.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hyun Mi; Jeong, Hye Im; Kim, Kyung Hyun; Hahn, Yoonsoo; Madsen, Eugene L; Jeon, Che Ok

    2016-02-18

    A genome-wide transcriptional analysis of Alteromonas naphthalenivorans SN2 was performed to investigate its ecophysiological behavior in contaminated tidal flats and seawater. The experimental design mimicked these habitats that either added naphthalene or pyruvate; tidal flat-naphthalene (TF-N), tidal flat-pyruvate (TF-P), seawater-naphthalene (SW-N), and seawater-pyruvate (SW-P). The transcriptional profiles clustered by habitat (TF-N/TF-P and SW-N/SW-P), rather than carbon source, suggesting that the former may exert a greater influence on genome-wide expression in strain SN2 than the latter. Metabolic mapping of cDNA reads from strain SN2 based on KEGG pathway showed that metabolic and regulatory genes associated with energy metabolism, translation, and cell motility were highly expressed in all four test conditions, probably highlighting the copiotrophic properties of strain SN2 as an opportunistic marine r-strategist. Differential gene expression analysis revealed that strain SN2 displayed specific cellular responses to environmental variables (tidal flat, seawater, naphthalene, and pyruvate) and exhibited certain ecological fitness traits -- its notable PAH degradation capability in seasonally cold tidal flat might be reflected in elevated expression of stress response and chaperone proteins, while fast growth in nitrogen-deficient and aerobic seawater probably correlated with high expression of glutamine synthetase, enzymes utilizing nitrite/nitrate, and those involved in the removal of reactive oxygen species.

  3. Genome-wide transcriptional responses of Alteromonas naphthalenivorans SN2 to contaminated seawater and marine tidal flat sediment

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Hyun Mi; Jeong, Hye Im; Kim, Kyung Hyun; Hahn, Yoonsoo; Madsen, Eugene L.; Jeon, Che Ok

    2016-01-01

    A genome-wide transcriptional analysis of Alteromonas naphthalenivorans SN2 was performed to investigate its ecophysiological behavior in contaminated tidal flats and seawater. The experimental design mimicked these habitats that either added naphthalene or pyruvate; tidal flat-naphthalene (TF-N), tidal flat-pyruvate (TF-P), seawater-naphthalene (SW-N), and seawater-pyruvate (SW-P). The transcriptional profiles clustered by habitat (TF-N/TF-P and SW-N/SW-P), rather than carbon source, suggesting that the former may exert a greater influence on genome-wide expression in strain SN2 than the latter. Metabolic mapping of cDNA reads from strain SN2 based on KEGG pathway showed that metabolic and regulatory genes associated with energy metabolism, translation, and cell motility were highly expressed in all four test conditions, probably highlighting the copiotrophic properties of strain SN2 as an opportunistic marine r-strategist. Differential gene expression analysis revealed that strain SN2 displayed specific cellular responses to environmental variables (tidal flat, seawater, naphthalene, and pyruvate) and exhibited certain ecological fitness traits –– its notable PAH degradation capability in seasonally cold tidal flat might be reflected in elevated expression of stress response and chaperone proteins, while fast growth in nitrogen-deficient and aerobic seawater probably correlated with high expression of glutamine synthetase, enzymes utilizing nitrite/nitrate, and those involved in the removal of reactive oxygen species. PMID:26887987

  4. Autocyclic erosion in tidal marshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh Chauhan, Poornendu P.

    2009-09-01

    A common mode whereby destruction of coastal lowlands occurs is frontal erosion. The edge cliffing, nonetheless, is also an inherent aspect of salt marsh development in many northwest European tidal marshes. Quite a few geomorphologists in the earlier half of the past century recognized such edge erosion as a definite repetitive stage within an autocyclic mode of marsh growth. A shift in research priorities during the past decades (primarily because of coastal management concerns, however) has resulted in an enhanced focus on sediment-flux measurement campaigns on salt marshes. This, somewhat "object-oriented" strategy hindered any further development of the once-established autocyclic growth concept, which virtually has gone into oblivion in recent times. This work makes an attempt to resurrect the notion of autocyclicity by employing its premises to address edge erosion in tidal marshes. Through a review of intertidal morphosedimentology the underlying framework for autocyclicity is envisaged. The phenomenon is demonstrated in the Holocene salt marsh plain of Moricambe basin in NW England that displays several distinct phases of marsh retreat in the form of abandoned clifflets. The suite of abandoned shorelines and terraces has been identified in detailed field mapping that followed analysis of topographic maps and aerial photographs. Vertical trends in marsh plain sediments are recorded in trenches for signs of past marsh front movements. The characteristic sea level history of the area offers an opportunity to differentiate the morphodynamic variability induced in the autocyclic growth of the marsh plain in scenarios of rising and falling sea level and the accompanied change in sediment budget. The ideas gathered are incorporated to construct a conceptual model that links temporal extent of marsh erosion to inner tidal flat sediment budget and sea level tendency. The review leads to recognition of the necessity of adopting an holistic approach in the

  5. Tidal current and tidal energy changes imposed by a dynamic tidal power system in the Taiwan Strait, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Peng; Zhang, Jisheng; Zheng, Jinhai

    2017-12-01

    The Taiwan Strait has recently been proposed as a promising site for dynamic tidal power systems because of its shallow depth and strong tides. Dynamic tidal power is a new concept for extracting tidal potential energy in which a coast-perpendicular dike is used to create water head and generate electricity via turbines inserted in the dike. Before starting such a project, the potential power output and hydrodynamic impacts of the dike must be assessed. In this study, a two-dimensional numerical model based on the Delft3D-FLOW module is established to simulate tides in China. A dike module is developed to account for turbine processes and estimate power output by integrating a special algorithm into the model. The domain decomposition technique is used to divide the computational zone into two subdomains with grid refinement near the dike. The hydrodynamic processes predicted by the model, both with and without the proposed construction, are examined in detail, including tidal currents and tidal energy flux. The predicted time-averaged power yields with various opening ratios are presented. The results show that time-averaged power yield peaks at an 8% opening ratio. For semidiurnal tides, the flow velocity increases in front of the head of the dike and decreases on either side. For diurnal tides, these changes are complicated by the oblique incidence of tidal currents with respect to the dike as well as by bathymetric features. The dike itself blocks the propagation of tidal energy flux.

  6. The Fate of Close-in Planets: Tidal or Magnetic Migration?

    SciT

    Strugarek, A.; Bolmont, E.; Mathis, S.

    Planets in close-in orbits interact magnetically and tidally with their host stars. These interactions lead to a net torque that makes close-in planets migrate inward or outward depending on their orbital distance. We systematically compare the strength of magnetic and tidal torques for typical observed star–planet systems (T-Tauri and hot Jupiter, M-dwarf and Earth-like planet, K star and hot Jupiter) based on state-of-the-art scaling laws. We find that depending on the characteristics of the system, tidal or magnetic effects can dominate. For very close-in planets, we find that both torques can make a planet migrate on a timescale as smallmore » as 10–100 thousands of years. Both effects thus have to be taken into account when predicting the evolution of compact systems.« less

  7. Tidal Streams Near and Far

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fardal, Mark A.

    2014-06-01

    The Pandas survey of stars in M31's disk and halo is crisscrossed by numerous tidal features from both M31 and the Milky Way. Here I focus on two narrow stellar streams visible in the survey. They have comparable angular extent in the survey (10-13 degrees long versus only 0.3 degree wide), but one is a local Milky Way stream at about 30 kpc and one is in M31, roughly 25 times more distant. I estimate the stellar mass and metallicity in the streams and the distance gradient along them. The kinematics of the M31 stream is sparsely sampled by red giant stars and globular clusters. Bayesian modeling of the stream data yields accurate constraints on the orbital parameters of the streams.

  8. Stirring up a storm: convective climate variability on tidally locked exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koll, D. D. B.; Cronin, T.

    2017-12-01

    Earth-sized exoplanets are extremely common in the galaxy and many of them are likely tidally locked, such that they have permanent day- and nightsides. Astronomers have started to probe the atmospheres of such planets, which raises the question: can tidally locked planets support habitable climates and life?Several studies have explored this question using global circulation models (GCMs). Not only did these studies find that tidally locked Earth analogs can indeed sustain habitable climates, their large day-night contrast should also create a distinct cloud structure that could help astronomers identify such planets. These studies, however, relied on GCMs which do not explicitly resolve convection, raising the question of how robust their results are.Here we consider the dynamics of clouds and convection on a tidally locked planet using the System for Atmospheric Modeling (SAM) cloud-resolving model. We simulate a 3d `channel', representing an equatorial strip that covers both day- and nightside of a tidally locked planet. We use interactive radiation and an interactive slab ocean surface and investigate the response to changes in the stellar constant. We find mean climates that are broadly comparable to those produced by a GCM. However, when the slab ocean is shallow, we also find internal variability that is far bigger than in a GCM. Convection in a tidally locked domain can self-organize in a dramatic fashion, with large outbursts of convection followed by periods of relative calm. We show that one of the timescales for this behavior is set by the time it takes for a dry gravity wave to travel between day- and nightside. The quasi-periodic self-organization of clouds can vary the planetary albedo by up to 50%. Changes this large are potentially detectable with future space telescopes, which raises the prospect of using convectively driven variability to identify high priority targets in the search for life around other stars.

  9. Tidal interactions of inspiraling compact binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bildsten, Lars; Cutler, Curt

    1992-01-01

    We discuss the tidal interaction in neutron star-neutron star and neutron star-black hole binaries and argue that they will not be tidally locked during the gravitational inspiral. More specifically, we show that, for inspiraling neutron stars of mass greater than about 1.2 solar mass, the shortest possible tidal synchronization time exceeds the gravitational decay time, so that the neutron star cannot be tidally locked prior to tidal disruption, regardless of its internal viscosity. For smaller mass neutron stars, an implausibly large kinematic viscosity - nearly the speed of light times the stellar radius - is required for tidal locking. We also argue that the mass transfer which occurs when the neutron star reaches the tidal radius will be unstable in neutron star-black hole binaries, and the instability will destroy the neutron star in a few orbital periods. The implications of our work for the detection of these sources by LIGO and other gravitational wave observatories and for the gamma-ray burst scenarios of Paczynski (1986, 1991) are discussed.

  10. Relevance of Tidal Heating on Large TNOs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saxena, Prabal; Renaud, Joe P.; Henning, Wade G.; Jutzi, Martin; Hurford, Terry A.

    2017-01-01

    We examine the relevance of tidal heating for large Trans-Neptunian Objects, with a focus on its potential to melt and maintain layers of subsurface liquid water. Depending on their past orbital evolution, tidal heating may be an important part of the heat budget for a number of discovered and hypothetical TNO systems and may enable formation of, and increased access to, subsurface liquid water. Tidal heating induced by the process of despinning is found to be particularly able to compete with heating due to radionuclide decay in a number of different scenarios. In cases where radiogenic heating alone may establish subsurface conditions for liquid water, we focus on the extent by which tidal activity lifts the depth of such conditions closer to the surface. While it is common for strong tidal heating and long lived tides to be mutually exclusive, we find this is not always the case, and highlight when these two traits occur together. We find cases where TNO systems experience tidal heating that is a significant proportion of, or greater than radiogenic heating for periods ranging from100 s of millions to a billion years. For subsurface oceans that contain a small antifreeze component, tidal heating due to very high initial spin states may enable liquid water to be preserved right up to the present day. Of particular interest is the Eris-Dysnomia system, which in those cases may exhibit extant cryovolcanism.

  11. Spin Dependence in Tidal Disruption Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesden, Michael; Stone, Nicholas; van Velzen, Sjoert

    2018-01-01

    A supermassive black hole (SBH) can tidally disrupt stars when its tidal field overwhelms the stars’ self-gravity. The stellar debris produced in such tidal disruption events (TDEs) evolves into tidal streams that can self-intersect. These inelastic stream collisions dissipate orbital energy, both circularizing the tidal stream and contributing to the emission observed during the TDE. Once circularized into a disk, the stellar debris can be viscously accreted by the SBH powering additional luminous emission. We explore how SBH spin can affect the tidal disruption process. Tidal forces are spin dependent, as is the minimum orbital angular momentum below which stars are directly captured by the SBH. This implies that the TDE rate will be spin dependent, particularly for more massive SBHs for which relativistic effects are more significant. SBH spin also affects TDE light curves through the initial debris orbits, the nature of the stream collisions, the viscous evolution of the accretion disk, and the possibility of launching jets. We explore the spin dependence of these phenomena to identify promising signatures for upcoming surveys expected to discover hundreds of TDE candidates in the next decade.

  12. Relevance of tidal heating on large TNOs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxena, Prabal; Renaud, Joe P.; Henning, Wade G.; Jutzi, Martin; Hurford, Terry

    2018-03-01

    We examine the relevance of tidal heating for large Trans-Neptunian Objects, with a focus on its potential to melt and maintain layers of subsurface liquid water. Depending on their past orbital evolution, tidal heating may be an important part of the heat budget for a number of discovered and hypothetical TNO systems and may enable formation of, and increased access to, subsurface liquid water. Tidal heating induced by the process of despinning is found to be particularly able to compete with heating due to radionuclide decay in a number of different scenarios. In cases where radiogenic heating alone may establish subsurface conditions for liquid water, we focus on the extent by which tidal activity lifts the depth of such conditions closer to the surface. While it is common for strong tidal heating and long lived tides to be mutually exclusive, we find this is not always the case, and highlight when these two traits occur together. We find cases where TNO systems experience tidal heating that is a significant proportion of, or greater than radiogenic heating for periods ranging from100‧s of millions to a billion years. For subsurface oceans that contain a small antifreeze component, tidal heating due to very high initial spin states may enable liquid water to be preserved right up to the present day. Of particular interest is the Eris-Dysnomia system, which in those cases may exhibit extant cryovolcanism.

  13. Tidal river dynamics: Implications for deltas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoitink, A. J. F.; Jay, D. A.

    2016-03-01

    Tidal rivers are a vital and little studied nexus between physical oceanography and hydrology. It is only in the last few decades that substantial research efforts have been focused on the interactions of river discharge with tidal waves and storm surges into regions beyond the limit of salinity intrusion, a realm that can extend inland hundreds of kilometers. One key phenomenon resulting from this interaction is the emergence of large fortnightly tides, which are forced long waves with amplitudes that may increase beyond the point where astronomical tides have become extinct. These can be larger than the linear tide itself at more landward locations, and they greatly influence tidal river water levels and wetland inundation. Exploration of the spectral redistribution and attenuation of tidal energy in rivers has led to new appreciation of a wide range of consequences for fluvial and coastal sedimentology, delta evolution, wetland conservation, and salinity intrusion under the influence of sea level rise and delta subsidence. Modern research aims at unifying traditional harmonic tidal analysis, nonparametric regression techniques, and the existing understanding of tidal hydrodynamics to better predict and model tidal river dynamics both in single-thread channels and in branching channel networks. In this context, this review summarizes results from field observations and modeling studies set in tidal river environments as diverse as the Amazon in Brazil, the Columbia, Fraser and Saint Lawrence in North America, the Yangtze and Pearl in China, and the Berau and Mahakam in Indonesia. A description of state-of-the-art methods for a comprehensive analysis of water levels, wave propagation, discharges, and inundation extent in tidal rivers is provided. Implications for lowland river deltas are also discussed in terms of sedimentary deposits, channel bifurcation, avulsion, and salinity intrusion, addressing contemporary research challenges.

  14. Natural and anthropogenic change in the morphology and connectivity of tidal channels of southwest Bangladesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, C.; Goodbred, S. L., Jr.; Wallace Auerbach, L.; Ahmed, K. R.; Small, C.; Sams, S. E.

    2014-12-01

    Over the last century, land use changes in the Ganges-Brahmaputra tidal delta have transformed >5000 km2 of intertidal mangrove forest to densely inhabited, agricultural islands that have been embanked to protect against tides and storm surges (i.e., polders). More recently, the conversion of rice paddies to profitable shrimp aquaculture has become increasingly widespread. Recent field studies documented that poldering in southwest Bangladesh has resulted in an elevation deficit relative to that of the natural mangrove forests and mean high water (MHW). The offset is a function of lost sedimentation, enhanced compaction, and an effective rise in MHW from tidal amplification. The morphologic adjustment of the tidal channel network to these perturbations, however, has gone largely undocumented. One effect has been the shoaling of many channels due to decreases in fluvial discharge and tidal prism. We document a previously unrecognized anthropogenic component: the widespread closure of large conduit tidal channels for land reclamation and shrimp farming. GIS analysis of historical Landsat and Google Earth imagery within six 1000 km2 study areas reveals that the tidal network in the natural Sundarbans mangrove forest has remained relatively constant since the 1970s, while significant changes are observed in human-modified areas. Construction of the original embankments removed >1000 km of primary tidal creeks, and >80 km2 of land has been reclaimed outside of polders through the closure of formerly active tidal channels (decrease in mean channel width from 256±91 m to 25±10 m). Tidal restriction by large sluice gates is prevalent, favoring local channel siltation. Furthermore, severing the intertidal platform and large conduit channels from the tidal network has had serious repercussions, such as increased lateral migration and straightening of the remaining channels. Where banklines have eroded, the adjacent embankments appear to be more vulnerable to failure, as

  15. Propagation of Tidal and Subtidal Free Surface Oscillations into River Channels from the South Atlantic Bight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, S. K.; Cloarec, M.; Yankovsky, A. E.

    2014-12-01

    Tidal sea level oscillations propagate from continental shelves into river channels in the form of long gravity waves well beyond the limits of salt intrusion. These dynamics were a focus of numerous recent studies, which led to the development of the "tidal river" concept. Subtidal oscillations in the "weather" frequency band (periods from a few days to a few weeks) can exhibit similar propagation upstream the river channel, but have so far attracted less attention from researchers. In this work, we analyze data obtained from USGS stream gauge stations at several rivers flowing into the South Atlantic Bight along with NOAA tide gauge stations located on the adjacent coastline. Subtidal free surface oscillations in river channels decay at a slower rate than tidal oscillations (referenced to their amplitude on the coast), while their propagation speed is lower than at tidal frequencies. Potential to kinetic energy ratio sufficiently far upstream in the river channel becomes comparable for tidal and subtidal oscillations, as effects of earth's rotation become negligible. The results suggest that a coastal storm surge can cause more severe flooding inland along the river channel than tides with comparable coastal amplitude.

  16. Constraints on deep moonquake focal mechanisms through analyses of tidal stress

    Weber, R.C.; Bills, B.G.; Johnson, C.L.

    2009-01-01

    [1] A relationship between deep moonquake occurrence and tidal forcing is suggested by the monthly periodicities observed in the occurrence times of events recorded by the Apollo Passive Seismic Experiment. In addition, the typically large S wave to P wave arrival amplitude ratios observed on deep moonquake seismograms are indicative of shear failure. Tidal stress, induced in the lunar interior by the gravitational influence of the Earth, may influence moonquake activity. We investigate the relationship between tidal stress and deep moonquake occurrence by searching for a linear combination of the normal and shear components of tidal stress that best approximates a constant value when evaluated at the times of moonquakes from 39 different moonquake clusters. We perform a grid search at each cluster location, computing the stresses resolved onto a suite of possible failure planes, to obtain the best fitting fault orientation at each location. We find that while linear combinations of stresses (and in some cases stress rates) can fit moonquake occurrence at many clusters quite well; for other clusters, the fit is not strongly dependent on plane orientation. This suggests that deep moonquakes may occur in response to factors other than, or in addition to, tidal stress. Several of our inferences support the hypothesis that deep moonquakes might be related to transformational faulting, in which shear failure is induced by mineral phase changes at depth. The occurrence of this process would have important implications for the lunar interior. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  17. The 1,800-year oceanic tidal cycle: A possible cause of rapid climate change

    PubMed Central

    Keeling, Charles D.; Whorf, Timothy P.

    2000-01-01

    Variations in solar irradiance are widely believed to explain climatic change on 20,000- to 100,000-year time-scales in accordance with the Milankovitch theory of the ice ages, but there is no conclusive evidence that variable irradiance can be the cause of abrupt fluctuations in climate on time-scales as short as 1,000 years. We propose that such abrupt millennial changes, seen in ice and sedimentary core records, were produced in part by well characterized, almost periodic variations in the strength of the global oceanic tide-raising forces caused by resonances in the periodic motions of the earth and moon. A well defined 1,800-year tidal cycle is associated with gradually shifting lunar declination from one episode of maximum tidal forcing on the centennial time-scale to the next. An amplitude modulation of this cycle occurs with an average period of about 5,000 years, associated with gradually shifting separation-intervals between perihelion and syzygy at maxima of the 1,800-year cycle. We propose that strong tidal forcing causes cooling at the sea surface by increasing vertical mixing in the oceans. On the millennial time-scale, this tidal hypothesis is supported by findings, from sedimentary records of ice-rafting debris, that ocean waters cooled close to the times predicted for strong tidal forcing. PMID:10725399

  18. Galactic Tidal Shocks Effects in Globular Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz, F.; Aguilar, L.

    2001-07-01

    We present results of a set of N--Body simulations of 105--particle King models in the presence of a realistic Galactic tidal field. Tidal effects over a cluster are dominated by two processes, differentiated by the way they produc e mass loss in the system. The first one is the Roche lobe overflow, which depend s directly on the ratio of cluster to the Roche lobe size. The second process is tidal heating, produced by the time varying part of the Galactic tide, which injects energy directly on the orbits of the stars inside the cluster.

  19. Tidal energetics: Studies with a barotropic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, James Scott

    The tidal energy from luni-solar gravitational forcing is dissipated principally through the dissipation of oceanic tides. Recent estimates using disparate methods, including analysis of satellite orbits and the timing of ancient eclipses, now indicate that this dissipation totals approximately 3.5 terawatts. However, the mechanisms and spatial distribution of this dissipation is not yet fully understood. In this work, three different aspects of tidal energetics are investigated with a variable resolution barotropic tidal model. The distribution of tidal energy, dissipation and energy flux are examined using high resolution models of several marginal seas: the European shelf, the Sea of Okhotsk, the Yellow and East China Seas, the South China Sea and the Bering Sea. Most modern tide models dissipate tidal energy with a quadratic friction parameterization of bottom friction. Since such dissipation depends nonlinearly on the velocity of the tidal current, these models dissipate primarily in shallow seas where current magnitudes are high. Without assimilating observational data, such tidal models have unreasonably high levels of tidal-period averaged kinetic and potential energies. I have added a linear friction parameterization to the traditional quadratic formulation and am able to obtain realistic tidal energy levels with an unassimilated model. The resulting model is used to investigate the tidal energetics of the recent geological past when sea level was 50 meters higher and 120 meters lower than at the present time. Long-period tides are of small enough amplitude that their energetics are an almost negligible part of the total tidal energy budget. However, the behavior of these tides yields insights into the response of the ocean to large scale forcing. We have modeled the lunar fortnightly (M f) and lunar monthly (Mm) tidal components and determined that the ratio of the Mf potential-to-kinetic energy ratio to that of Mm is about 3.9, consistent with values

  20. ON THE TIDAL DISSIPATION OF OBLIQUITY

    SciT

    Rogers, T. M.; Lin, D. N. C., E-mail: tami@lpl.arizona.edu, E-mail: lin@ucolick.org

    2013-05-20

    We investigate tidal dissipation of obliquity in hot Jupiters. Assuming an initial random orientation of obliquity and parameters relevant to the observed population, the obliquity of hot Jupiters does not evolve to purely aligned systems. In fact, the obliquity evolves to either prograde, retrograde, or 90 Degree-Sign orbits where the torque due to tidal perturbations vanishes. This distribution is incompatible with observations which show that hot Jupiters around cool stars are generally aligned. This calls into question the viability of tidal dissipation as the mechanism for obliquity alignment of hot Jupiters around cool stars.

  1. Tidal Response of Europa's Subsurface Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karatekin, O.; Comblen, R.; Deleersnijder, E.; Dehant, V. M.

    2010-12-01

    Time-variable tides in the subsurface oceans of icy satellites cause large periodic surface displacements and tidal dissipation can become a major energy source that can affect long-term orbital and internal evolution. In the present study, we investigate the response of the subsurface ocean of Europa to a time-varibale tidal potential. Two-dimensional nonlinear shallow water equations are solved on a sphere by means of a finite element code. The resulting ocean tidal flow velocities,dissipation and surface displacements will be presented.

  2. Tidal influence on subtropical estuarine methane emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturm, Katrin; Grinham, Alistair; Werner, Ursula; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2014-05-01

    The relatively unstudied subtropical estuaries, particularly in the Southern Hemisphere, represent an important gap in our understanding of global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. These systems are likely to form an important component of GHG budgets as they occupy a relatively large surface area, over 38 000 km2 in Australia. Here, we present studies conducted in the Brisbane River estuary, a representative system within the subtropical region of Queensland, Australia. This is a highly modified system typical of 80% of Australia's estuaries. Generally, these systems have undergone channel deepening and straightening for safer shipping access and these modifications have resulted in large increases in tidal reach. The Brisbane River estuary's natural tidal reach was 16 km and this is now 85 km and tidal currents influence double the surface area (9 km2 to 18 km2) in this system. Field studies were undertaken to improve understanding of the driving factors behind methane water-air fluxes. Water-air fluxes in estuaries are usually calculated with the gas exchange coefficient (k) for currents and wind as well as the concentration difference across the water-air interface. Tidal studies in the lower and middle reaches of the estuary were performed to monitor the influence of the tidal stage (a proxy for kcurrent) on methane fluxes. Results for both investigated reaches showed significantly higher methane fluxes during the transition time of tides, the time of greatest tidal currents, than during slack tide periods. At these tidal transition times with highest methane chamber fluxes, lowest methane surface water concentrations were monitored. Modelled fluxes using only wind speed (kwind) were at least one order of magnitude lower than observed from floating chambers, demonstrating that current speed was likely the driving factor of water-air fluxes. An additional study was then conducted sampling the lower, middle and upper reaches during a tidal transition period

  3. Intra-tidal variability of the vertical current structure in the western Dutch Wadden Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vries, Jurre; Ridderinkhof, Herman; van Aken, Hendrik

    2014-05-01

    Long-term velocity measurements are presented which were collected during three different seasons at one single location in an estuarine basin of the western Dutch Wadden Sea. These data are used to investigate the processes that determine the variability of the vertical current structure in the western Dutch Wadden Sea, in combination with simplified model runs using the one-dimensional water column model GETM (http://www.getm.eu/). Jay and Musiak [1996] were the first to suggest that intra-tidal variations in the vertical current might be important in determining the residual circulation patterns. More research [e.g. Stacey et al., 2001; Burchard and Hetland, 2010] has supported this hypothesis. Recently, lateral processes have been shown to influence the vertical current structure of alongstream velocity and hence the residual circulation [e.g. Lerczak and Geyer, 2004; Burchard and Schuttelaars, 2012]. Therefore to better understand the tidal dynamics in the western Dutch Wadden Sea, it is crucial to understand the processes that determine the vertical current structure. The two main findings of this study are that the complex bathymetry at the study site seems to produce an intra-tidal asymmetry in near-bed velocities and secondly that cross-stream processes strongly modify the current structure during late flood. Near-bed velocity and the bed roughness are greater during ebb than during flood. The GETM simulations suggest that vertical mixing during ebb is sufficient to destroy vertical stratification generated by classical tidal straining. The cross-stream current during late flood generate vertical stratification and drive an early reversal of the flood current near the surface. Therefore, it is hypothesized that this processes might increase the residual estuarine circulation at the study site. References - Burchard, H., Hetland, R.D. (2010), Quantifying the contributions of tidal straining and gravitational circulation to residual circulation in

  4. Survival of spores of the UV-resistant Bacillus subtilis strain MW01 after exposure to low-earth orbit and simulated martian conditions: data from the space experiment ADAPT on EXPOSE-E.

    PubMed

    Wassmann, Marko; Moeller, Ralf; Rabbow, Elke; Panitz, Corinna; Horneck, Gerda; Reitz, Günther; Douki, Thierry; Cadet, Jean; Stan-Lotter, Helga; Cockell, Charles S; Rettberg, Petra

    2012-05-01

    In the space experiment "Molecular adaptation strategies of microorganisms to different space and planetary UV climate conditions" (ADAPT), bacterial endospores of the highly UV-resistant Bacillus subtilis strain MW01 were exposed to low-Earth orbit (LEO) and simulated martian surface conditions for 559 days on board the European Space Agency's exposure facility EXPOSE-E, mounted outside the International Space Station. The survival of B. subtilis MW01 spores from both assays (LEO and simulated martian conditions) was determined by a colony-formation assay after retrieval. It was clearly shown that solar extraterrestrial UV radiation (λ≥110 nm) as well as the martian UV spectrum (λ≥200 nm) was the most deleterious factor applied; in some samples only a few spore survivors were recovered from B. subtilis MW01 spores exposed in monolayers. However, if shielded from solar irradiation, about 8% of MW01 spores survived in LEO conditions, and 100% survived in simulated martian conditions, compared to the laboratory controls. The results demonstrate the effect of shielding against the high inactivation potential of extraterrestrial solar UV radiation, which limits the chances of survival of even the highly UV-resistant strain of B. subtilis MW01 in the harsh environments of outer space and the martian surface.

  5. Numerical simulation of the Earth satellites motion using parallel computing. accounting of weak disturbances. (Russian Title: Прогнозирование движения ИСЗ с использованием параллельных вычислений. учет слабых возмущений)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuvashov, I. N.

    2010-12-01

    The features of high-precision numerical simulation of the Earth satellite motion using parallel computing are discussed on example the implementation of the cluster "Skiff Cyberia" software complex "Numerical model of the motion of system satellites". It is shown that the use of 128 bit word length allows considering weak perturbations from the high-order harmonics in the expansion of the geopotential and the effect of strain geopotential harmonics arising due to the combination of tidal perturbations associated with exposure to the moon and sun on the solid Earth and its oceans.

  6. Effects of Long Period Ocean Tides on the Earth's Rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, Richard S.; Chao, Ben F.; Desai, Shailen D.

    1996-01-01

    The spectra of polar motion excitation functions exhibit enhanced power in the fortnightly tidal band. This enhanced power is attributed to ocean tidal excitation. Ocean tide models predict polar motion excitation effects that differ with each other, and with observations, by factors as large as 2-3. There is a need for inproved models for the effect of long-period ocean tides on Earth's rotation.

  7. Geomorphic Modeling of Macro-Tidal Embayment with Extensive Tidal Flats: Skagit Bay, Washington

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-30

    tidal flats: Skagit Bay , Washington Lyle Hibler Battelle-Pacific Northwest Division Marine Sciences Laboratory Sequim , WA 98382 phone: (360) 681...3616 fax: (360) 681-4559 email: lyle.hibler@pnnl.gov Adam Maxwell Battelle-Pacific Northwest Division Marine Sciences Laboratory Sequim , WA...Geomorphic modeling of macro-tidal embayment with extensive tidal flats: Skagit Bay , Washington 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT

  8. Tidal Forces: A Different Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masters, Roy

    2010-10-01

    We revisit the theories describing the moon raising the tides by virtue of pull gravity combined with the moon's centripetal angular momentum. We show that if gravity is considered as the attractive interaction between individual bodies, then the moon would have fallen to earth eons ago. Isaac Newton's laws of motion cannot work with pull gravity. However, they do with gravity as a property of the universe as Einstein said with a huge energy bonus. In other words, the moon-Earth system becomes the first observable vacuum gravity energy machine, meaning that it not only produces energy, but provides also escape momentum for the moon's centripetal motion at 4cm per year.

  9. Cullinan Ranch Tidal Marsh Restoration Project

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Information about the SFBWQP Cullinan Ranch Tidal Marsh Restoration Project, part of an EPA competitive grant program to improve SF Bay water quality focused on restoring impaired waters and enhancing aquatic resources.

  10. Impact of tidal density variability on orbital and reentry predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, J. M.; Forbes, J. M.; Born, G. H.

    2012-12-01

    Since the first satellites entered Earth orbit in the late 1950's and early 1960's, the influences of solar and geomagnetic variability on the satellite drag environment have been studied, and parameterized in empirical density models with increasing sophistication. However, only within the past 5 years has the realization emerged that "troposphere weather" contributes significantly to the "space weather" of the thermosphere, especially during solar minimum conditions. Much of the attendant variability is attributable to upward-propagating solar tides excited by latent heating due to deep tropical convection, and solar radiation absorption primarily by water vapor and ozone in the stratosphere and mesosphere, respectively. We know that this tidal spectrum significantly modifies the orbital (>200 km) and reentry (60-150 km) drag environments, and that these tidal components induce longitude variability not yet emulated in empirical density models. Yet, current requirements for improvements in orbital prediction make clear that further refinements to density models are needed. In this paper, the operational consequences of longitude-dependent tides are quantitatively assessed through a series of orbital and reentry predictions. We find that in-track prediction differences incurred by tidal effects are typically of order 200 ± 100 m for satellites in 400-km circular orbits and 15 ± 10 km for satellites in 200-km circular orbits for a 24-hour prediction. For an initial 200-km circular orbit, surface impact differences of order 15° ± 15° latitude are incurred. For operational problems with similar accuracy needs, a density model that includes a climatological representation of longitude-dependent tides should significantly reduce errors due to this source.

  11. On the ambiguity in relativistic tidal deformability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gralla, Samuel E.

    2018-04-01

    The LIGO collaboration recently reported the first gravitational-wave constraints on the tidal deformability of neutron stars. I discuss an inherent ambiguity in the notion of relativistic tidal deformability that, while too small to affect the present measurement, may become important in the future. I propose a new way to understand the ambiguity and discuss future prospects for reliably linking observed gravitational waveforms to compact object microphysics.

  12. Complete tidal evolution of Pluto-Charon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, W. H.; Lee, Man Hoi; Peale, S. J.

    2014-05-01

    Both Pluto and its satellite Charon have rotation rates synchronous with their orbital mean motion. This is the theoretical end point of tidal evolution where transfer of angular momentum has ceased. Here we follow Pluto’s tidal evolution from an initial state having the current total angular momentum of the system but with Charon in an eccentric orbit with semimajor axis a≈4RP (where RP is the radius of Pluto), consistent with its impact origin. Two tidal models are used, where the tidal dissipation function Q∝1/frequency and Q = constant, where details of the evolution are strongly model dependent. The inclusion of the gravitational harmonic coefficient C22 of both bodies in the analysis allows smooth, self consistent evolution to the dual synchronous state, whereas its omission frustrates successful evolution in some cases. The zonal harmonic J2 can also be included, but does not cause a significant effect on the overall evolution. The ratio of dissipation in Charon to that in Pluto controls the behavior of the orbital eccentricity, where a judicious choice leads to a nearly constant eccentricity until the final approach to dual synchronous rotation. The tidal models are complete in the sense that every nuance of tidal evolution is realized while conserving total angular momentum-including temporary capture into spin-orbit resonances as Charon’s spin decreases and damped librations about the same.

  13. VISCOELASTIC MODELS OF TIDALLY HEATED EXOMOONS

    SciT

    Dobos, Vera; Turner, Edwin L., E-mail: dobos@konkoly.hu

    2015-05-01

    Tidal heating of exomoons may play a key role in their habitability, since the elevated temperature can melt the ice on the body even without significant solar radiation. The possibility of life has been intensely studied on solar system moons such as Europa or Enceladus where the surface ice layer covers a tidally heated water ocean. Tidal forces may be even stronger in extrasolar systems, depending on the properties of the moon and its orbit. To study the tidally heated surface temperature of exomoons, we used a viscoelastic model for the first time. This model is more realistic than themore » widely used, so-called fixed Q models because it takes into account the temperature dependence of the tidal heat flux and the melting of the inner material. Using this model, we introduced the circumplanetary Tidal Temperate Zone (TTZ), which strongly depends on the orbital period of the moon and less on its radius. We compared the results with the fixed Q model and investigated the statistical volume of the TTZ using both models. We have found that the viscoelastic model predicts 2.8 times more exomoons in the TTZ with orbital periods between 0.1 and 3.5 days than the fixed Q model for plausible distributions of physical and orbital parameters. The viscoelastic model provides more promising results in terms of habitability because the inner melting of the body moderates the surface temperature, acting like a thermostat.« less

  14. Tidal Excitation of the Core Dynamo of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyed-Mahmoud, B.; Arkani-Hamed, J.; Aldridge, K.

    2007-05-01

    The lack of magnetic anomalies inside the giant impact basins Hellas, Isidis, Utopia and Argyre, inside the northern low lands, over the Tharsis bulge, and over the Tharsis and Olympus mounts suggests that the core field of Mars ceased to exist by about 4 Gyr ago, almost when the giant basins were formed. On the other hand, the giant basins are located on a great circle, implying that the basins were likely produced by fragments of a large asteroid that broke apart as it entered the Roche limit of Mars. This scenario offers a causative relationship for the apparent coincidence of the formation of the giant basins and the cessation of the core dynamo. We suggest that the core dynamo was excited by tidally driven elliptical instability in the Martian core. The breaking of the asteroid and its final impact on Mars eliminated the excitation and thus killed the dynamo. We show that a retrograde asteroid captured in a Keplerian orbit around Mars at a distance of about 50,000-100,000 km could orbit Mars for several hundreds of millions of years before impacting the planet due to the tidal coupling of the asteroid and Mars. Because of relatively very short growth time of the elliptical instability, less than 50,000 years, the asteroid was capable of retaining the elliptical instability and energizing the core dynamo for a geologically long period prior to 4 Ga. Our laboratory observations of a parametric instability of a rotating incompressible fluid, contained in a flexible-walled spherical cavity, confirm the possibility that an early Martian dynamo could have been powered by tidal straining.

  15. Oceanic Tidal Mixing As a Contributor to Milankovitch-scale Climate Change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munk, Walter; Bills, Bruce

    2004-01-01

    We propose that changes in the magnitude of oceanic tidal mixing on long time scales is an important, but previously unrecognized, contributor to global climate change. it is well known that Earth's orbital and rotational state changes significantly on 10(exp 4)-10(exp 5) year time scales, and that this influences the spatial and temporal pattern of incident radiation. It is widely supposed that climatic variations on these same time scales are, in large part, a response of the ocean-atmosphere-cryosphere system to this radiative forcing. Our proposal is that variations in the luni-solar tidal potential, induced by these same orbital and rotational variations, influences oceanic mixing and thus modulates meridional heat transport, by amounts which are competitive with the radiative forcing. There are some obvious differences between tidal potential and insolation. First is that the Sun and Moon both contribute to tides, whereas the radiation is entirely of solar origin. Second is that the Earth is transparent to gravity but opaque to radiation. Clipping associated with this opacity makes the radiation pattern temporal spectrum rather more complex than the tidal spectrum. A third point is that solar radiation directly delivers energy to Earth's surface whereas tidal mixing will only expedite lateral transport of heat in association with oceanic thermohaline circulation. The diurnal average insolation pattern is best parameterized via a Fourier series in time of year and Legendre polynomials in sine of latitude. Our present focus will be on the annual average terms. The Legendre degree n=0 term describes the global average insolation, and is nearly constant. The degree n=l term describes differences between northern and southern hemispheres, and the annual mean is zero. The degree n=2 term is the main contributor to the equator to pole variations, and varies with obliquity and orbital eccentricity, with the obliquity variation dominating. The lowest order

  16. Oceanic Tidal Mixing as a Contributor to Milankovitch-scale Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munk, W.; Bills, B. G.

    2004-12-01

    We propose that changes in the magnitude of oceanic tidal mixing on long time scales is an important, but previously unrecognized, contributor to global climate change. It is well known that Earth's orbital and rotational state changes significantly on 104-105 year time scales, and that this influences the spatial and temporal pattern of incident radiation. It is widely supposed that climatic variations on these same time scales are, in large part, a response of the ocean-atmosphere-cryosphere system to this radiative forcing. Our proposal is that variations in the luni-solar tidal potential, induced by these same orbital and rotational variations, influences oceanic mixing and thus modulates meridional heat transport, by amounts which are competitive with the radiative forcing. There are some obvious differences between tidal potential and insolation. First is that the Sun and Moon both contribute to tides, whereas the radiation is entirely of solar origin. Second is that the Earth is transparent to gravity but opaque to radiation. Clipping associated with this opacity makes the radiation pattern temporal spectrum rather more complex than the tidal spectrum. A third point is that solar radiation directly delivers energy to Earth's surface whereas tidal mixing will only expedite lateral transport of heat in association with oceanic thermo-haline circulation. The diurnal average insolation pattern is best parameterized via a Fourier series in time of year and Legendre polynomials in sine of latitude. Our present focus will be on the annual average terms. The Legendre degree n=0 term describes the global average insolation, and is nearly constant. The degree n=1 term describes differences between northern and southern hemispheres, and the annual mean is zero. The degree n=2 term is the main contributor to the equator to pole variations, and varies with obliquity and orbital eccentricity, with the obliquity variation dominating. The lowest order decomposition of the

  17. Europa, tidally heated oceans, and habitable zones around giant planets.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, R T; McKay, C P; Kasting, J F

    1987-01-01

    Tidal dissipation in the satellites of a giant planet may provide sufficient heating to maintain an environment favorable to life on the satellite surface or just below a thin ice layer. In our own solar system, Europa, one of the Galilean satellites of Jupiter, could have a liquid ocean which may occasionally receive sunlight through cracks in the overlying ice shell. In such case, sufficient solar energy could reach liquid water that organisms similar to those found under Antarctic ice could grow. In other solar systems, larger satellites with more significant heat flow could represent environments that are stable over an order of Aeons and in which life could perhaps evolve. We define a zone around a giant planet in which such satellites could exist as a tidally-heated habitable zone. This zone can be compared to the habitable zone which results from heating due to the radiation of a central star. In our solar system, this radiatively-heated habitable zone contains the Earth.

  18. A Study of Secular and Tidal Tilt in Wyoming and Utah.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-11-01

    block number) Tiltmeters , Earth Tides, Yellowstone Caldera, Finite-element models. S 20. ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse side It necessary end Identify...borehole tiltmeter design by measuring the tidal admittance at two sites near Boulder. We found good agreement between theory and experiment. and we...were encouraged to proceed with the construction and installation of an array of borehole tiltmeters in Yellowstone National Park. The primary purpose

  19. A Study of Secular and Tidal Tilt in Wyoming and Utah.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-09-15

    addition to storing the data from the tiltmeters at each site* . some of the dataloggers will be eq?,ioped with sensors to monitor atmospheric pressure and...WORDS (Continue en reverse side it neceeeary end identify by block number) Earth tides Tiltmeter Hydrofracture Tidal admittance .Ut 20. ABSTRACT...Contput-onreverse side if necessary and identify by block number) Q~ring the period .rvered by this report, we have used our 4porehole tiltmeter arrays to

  20. Tides and tidal stress: Applications to Europa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurford, Terry Anthony, Jr.

    A review of analytical techniques and documentation of previously inaccessible mathematical formulations is applied to study of Jupiter's satellite Europa. Compared with numerical codes that are commonly used to model global tidal effects, analytical models of tidal deformation give deeper insight into the mechanics of tides, and can better reveal the nature of the dependence of observable effects on key parameters. I develop analytical models for tidal deformation of multi-layered bodies. Previous studies of Europa, based on numerical computation, only to show isolated examples from parameter space. My results show a systematic dependence of tidal response on the thicknesses and material parameters of Europa's core, rocky mantle, liquid water ocean, and outer layer of ice. As in the earlier work, I restrict these studies to incompressible materials. Any set of Love numbers h 2 and k 2 which describe a planet's tidal deformation, could be fit by a range of ice thickness values, by adjusting other parameters such as mantle rigidity or core size, an important result for mission planning. Inclusion of compression into multilayer models has been addressed analytically, uncovering several issues that are not explicit in the literature. Full evaluation with compression is here restricted to a uniform sphere. A set of singularities in the classical solution, which correspond to instabilities due to self-gravity has been identified and mapped in parameter space. The analytical models of tidal response yield the stresses anywhere within the body, including on its surface. Crack patterns (such as cycloids) on Europa are probably controlled by these stresses. However, in contrast to previous studies which used a thin shell approximation of the tidal stress, I consider how other tidal models compare with the observed tectonic features. In this way the relationship between Europa's surface tectonics and the global tidal distortion can be constrained. While large-scale tidal

  1. Precession, Nutation and Wobble of the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehant, V.; Mathews, P. M.

    2015-04-01

    Covering both astronomical and geophysical perspectives, this book describes changes in the Earth's orientation, specifically precession and nutation, and how they are observed and computed in terms of tidal forcing and models of the Earth's interior. Following an introduction to key concepts and elementary geodetic theory, the book describes how precise measurements of the Earth's orientation are made using observations of extra-galactic radio-sources by Very Long Baseline Interferometry techniques. It demonstrates how models are used to accurately pinpoint the location and orientation of the Earth with reference to the stars and how to determine variations in its rotation speed. A theoretical framework is also presented that describes the role played by the structure and properties of the Earth's deep interior. Incorporating suggestions for future developments in nutation theory for the next generation models, this book is ideal for advanced-level students and researche! rs in solid Earth geophysics, planetary science and astronomy.

  2. Plant distributions along salinity and tidal gradients in Oregon tidal marshes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Accurately modeling climate change effects on tidal marshes in the Pacific Northwest requires understanding how plant assemblages and species are presently distributed along gradients of salinity and tidal inundation. We outline on-going field efforts by the EPA and USGS to dete...

  3. End Tidal CO2 Tension

    PubMed Central

    Pugh, Meredith E.; Newman, Alexander L.; Robbins, Ivan M.; Tolle, James; Austin, Eric D.; Newman, John H.

    2011-01-01

    Background: CO2 excretion is impaired in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) due to underlying vascular obstruction and increased dead space. Our aim was to determine whether resting end tidal CO2 (Etco2) could differentiate patients with PAH from those with pulmonary venous hypertension (PVH) or patients without pulmonary hypertension (PH) and whether successful treatment of PAH resulted in higher Etco2 values. Methods: We performed Etco2 measurements for five breaths at rest and after a 6-min walk test (6MWT) in patients seen at our pulmonary vascular center. Mean Etco2 values were correlated with 6-min walk distance and right-sided heart catheterization data. Results: We enrolled 84 patients with PAH, 17 with PVH without left ventricular systolic dysfunction, and seven with no PH and no severe alterations in pulmonary function testing. Etco2 was significantly lower in patients with PAH than in those with no PH and PVH (P < .0001 PAH vs both groups). Etco2 correlated with the pulmonary artery diastolic pressure-to-pulmonary artery occlusion pressure gradient (r = −0.50, P = .0002) and pulmonary vascular resistance (r = −0.44, P = .002). Etco2 after 6MWT correlated with walk distance (r = 0.34, P = .003). In patients with prostaglandin therapy escalation, Etco2 increased in those who had clinical improvement, whereas in patients who did not improve clinically, Etco2 failed to rise (P = .04). Conclusions: Etco2 is a promising tool to differentiate patients with PAH from those with PVH or no PH, correlates with diagnostic and prognostic hemodynamic indicators, and may increase with successful treatment of PAH. PMID:21622547

  4. Tidal dissipation in a homogeneous spherical body. II. Three examples: Mercury, Io, and Kepler-10 b

    SciT

    Makarov, Valeri V.; Efroimsky, Michael, E-mail: vvm@usno.navy.mil, E-mail: michael.efroimsky@usno.navy.mil

    In Efroimsky and Makarov (Paper I), we derived from the first principles a formula for the tidal heating rate in a homogeneous sphere, compared it with the previously used formulae, and noted the differences. Now we present case studies: Mercury, Kepler-10 b, and a triaxial Io. A sharp frequency dependence of k {sub 2}/Q near spin-orbit resonances yields a sharp dependence of k {sub 2}/Q (and, therefore, of tidal heating) upon the spin rate. Thereby physical libration plays a major role in tidal heating of synchronously rotating planets. The magnitude of libration in the spin rate being defined by themore » planet's triaxiality, the latter becomes a factor determining the dissipation rate. Other parameters equal, a strongly triaxial synchronized body generates more heat than a similar body of a more symmetrical shape. After an initially triaxial object melts and loses its triaxiality, dissipation becomes less intensive; the body can solidify, with the tidal bulge becoming a new figure with triaxiality lower than the original. We derive approximate expressions for the dissipation rate in a Maxwell planet with the Maxwell time longer than the inverse tidal frequency. The expressions derived pertain to the 1:1 and 3:2 resonances and a nonresonant case; so they are applicable to most close-in super-Earths detected. In these planets, the heating outside synchronism is weakly dependent on the eccentricity and obliquity, provided both these parameters's values are moderate. According to our calculation, Kepler-10 b could hardly survive the intensive tidal heating without being synchronized, circularized, and reshaped through a complete or partial melt-down.« less

  5. Lunar tidal effects during the 2013 stratospheric sudden warming as simulated by the TIME-GCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maute, A. I.; Forbes, J. M.; Zhang, X.; Fejer, B. G.; Yudin, V. A.; Pedatella, N. M.

    2015-12-01

    Stratospheric Sudden Warmings (SSW) are associated with strong planetary wave activity in the winterpolar stratosphere which result in a very disturbed middle atmosphere. The changes in the middle atmospherealter the propagation conditions and the nonlinear interactions of waves and tides, and result in SSW signals in the upper atmosphere in e.g., neutral winds, electric fields, ionospheric currents and plasma distribution. The upper atmosphere changes can be significant at low-latitudes even during medium solar flux conditions. Observationsalso reveal a strong lunar signal during SSW periods in the low latitude vertical drifts and in ionospheric quantities. Forbes and Zhang [2012] demonstrated that during the 2009 SSW period the Pekeris resonance peak of the atmosphere was altered such that the M2 and N2 lunar tidal componentsgot amplified. This study focuses on the effect of the lunar tidal forcing on the thermosphere-ionosphere system during theJanuary 2013 SSW period. We employthe NCAR Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere-Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (TIME-GCM)with a nudging scheme using the Whole-Atmosphere-Community-Climate-Model-Extended (WACCM-X)/Goddard Earth Observing System Model, Version 5 (GEOS5) results to simulate the effects of meteorological forcing on the upper atmosphere. Additionally lunar tidal forcingis included at the lower boundary of the model. To delineate the lunar tidal effects a base simulation without lunar forcingis employed. Interestingly, Jicamarca observations of that period reveal a suppression of the daytime vertical drift before and after the drift enhancement due the SSW. The simulation suggests that the modulation of the vertical driftmay be caused by the interplay of the migrating solar and lunar semidiurnal tide, and therefore can only be reproduced by the inclusion of both lunar and solar tidal forcings in the model. In this presentation the changes due to the lunar tidal forcing will be quantified, and compared

  6. Insert Tidal Here: Finding Stability of Galilean Satellite Interiors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, M.; Bills, B. G.; Mitchell, J.; Rhoden, A.

    2017-12-01

    The tidal environment is often hypothesized as a cause of surface expression in the satellites of the outer solar system. In two notable cases, Io's volcanism is thought to be driven by tidal heating of its mantle while the shattered surface of Europa's ice shell is said to be generated by tidal stresses in that ice. Being adjacent moons of Jupiter, these satellites give us a unique opportunity to apply a single set of general coupled models at each body to predict how one model can predict the heat generation and flow, strain and stress states, and structural parameters for each body. We include the effects of interior evolution into the tidal environment in addition to an evolving orbit. We find that the interiors of Io and Europa will evolve, as a consequence of the heat transfer from interior to surface, and stable structural and heat flow conditions are found. Then as their orbits evolve, perturbed by the mutual interactions of the Laplace mean motion resonance, those conditions of structural and heat stability also change. In particular, we find that at current orbital conditions there is sufficient heat to completely melt Io models for which a convecting interior is capped by a conducting lid. This argues for the presence of a non dissipating (or barely dissipating) core below the mantle, which future Io structure models should include. For the Europa model at current orbit, we use a silicate interior under an ocean capped by a two layer ice; convecting below with a conducting surface. We find stability in heat and structure occurs when the lower ice melts and recedes until the shell is roughly 50km thick. We present a variety of plausible structures for these bodies, and track how the stability of those structures trend as the orbit (in particular the orbital eccentricity, mean motion, and obliquity) change. We show how the Love numbers, layer thicknesses, surface heat flow, and orbital parameters are all linked. For Europa, upcoming measurements from

  7. Salicornia strobilacea (Synonym of Halocnemum strobilaceum) Grown under Different Tidal Regimes Selects Rhizosphere Bacteria Capable of Promoting Plant Growth.

    PubMed

    Marasco, Ramona; Mapelli, Francesca; Rolli, Eleonora; Mosqueira, Maria J; Fusi, Marco; Bariselli, Paola; Reddy, Muppala; Cherif, Ameur; Tsiamis, George; Borin, Sara; Daffonchio, Daniele

    2016-01-01

    Halophytes classified under the common name of salicornia colonize salty and coastal environments across tidal inundation gradients. To unravel the role of tide-related regimes on the structure and functionality of root associated bacteria, the rhizospheric soil of Salicornia strobilacea (synonym of Halocnemum strobilaceum) plants was studied in a tidal zone of the coastline of Southern Tunisia. Although total counts of cultivable bacteria did not change in the rhizosphere of plants grown along a tidal gradient, significant differences were observed in the diversity of both the cultivable and uncultivable bacterial communities. This observation indicates that the tidal regime is contributing to the bacterial species selection in the rhizosphere. Despite the observed diversity in the bacterial community structure, the plant growth promoting (PGP) potential of cultivable rhizospheric bacteria, assessed through in vitro and in vivo tests, was equally distributed along the tidal gradient. Root colonization tests with selected strains proved that halophyte rhizospheric bacteria (i) stably colonize S. strobilacea rhizoplane and the plant shoot suggesting that they move from the root to the shoot and (ii) are capable of improving plant growth. The versatility in the root colonization, the overall PGP traits and the in vivo plant growth promotion under saline condition suggest that such beneficial activities likely take place naturally under a range of tidal regimes.

  8. Tidal characteristics of the gulf of Tonkin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minh, Nguyen Nguyet; Patrick, Marchesiello; Florent, Lyard; Sylvain, Ouillon; Gildas, Cambon; Damien, Allain; Van Uu, Dinh

    2014-12-01

    The Gulf of Tonkin, situated in the South China Sea, is a zone of strong ecological, touristic and economic interest. Improving our knowledge of its hydro-sedimentary processes is of great importance to the sustainable development of the area. The scientific objective of this study is to revisit the dominant physical processes that characterize tidal dynamics in the Gulf of Tonkin using a high-resolution model and combination of all available data. Particular attention is thus given to model-data cross-examination using tidal gauges and coastal satellite altimetry and to model calibration derived from a set of sensitivity experiments to model parameters. The tidal energy budget of the gulf (energy flux and dissipation) is then analyzed and its resonance properties are evaluated and compared with idealized models and observations. Then, the tidal residual flow in both Eulerian and Lagrangian frameworks is evaluated. Finally, the problem of tidal frontogenesis is addressed to explain the observed summer frontal structures in chlorophyll concentrations.

  9. Carbon sequestration by Australian tidal marshes.

    PubMed

    Macreadie, Peter I; Ollivier, Q R; Kelleway, J J; Serrano, O; Carnell, P E; Ewers Lewis, C J; Atwood, T B; Sanderman, J; Baldock, J; Connolly, R M; Duarte, C M; Lavery, P S; Steven, A; Lovelock, C E

    2017-03-10

    Australia's tidal marshes have suffered significant losses but their recently recognised importance in CO 2 sequestration is creating opportunities for their protection and restoration. We compiled all available data on soil organic carbon (OC) storage in Australia's tidal marshes (323 cores). OC stocks in the surface 1 m averaged 165.41 (SE 6.96) Mg OC ha -1 (range 14-963 Mg OC ha -1 ). The mean OC accumulation rate was 0.55 ± 0.02 Mg OC ha -1 yr -1 . Geomorphology was the most important predictor of OC stocks, with fluvial sites having twice the stock of OC as seaward sites. Australia's 1.4 million hectares of tidal marshes contain an estimated 212 million tonnes of OC in the surface 1 m, with a potential CO 2 -equivalent value of $USD7.19 billion. Annual sequestration is 0.75 Tg OC yr -1 , with a CO 2 -equivalent value of $USD28.02 million per annum. This study provides the most comprehensive estimates of tidal marsh blue carbon in Australia, and illustrates their importance in climate change mitigation and adaptation, acting as CO 2 sinks and buffering the impacts of rising sea level. We outline potential further development of carbon offset schemes to restore the sequestration capacity and other ecosystem services provided by Australia tidal marshes.

  10. Ridges and tidal stress on Io

    Bart, G.D.; Turtle, E.P.; Jaeger, W.L.; Keszthelyi, L.P.; Greenberg, R.

    2004-01-01

    Sets of ridges of uncertain origin are seen in twenty-nine high-resolution Galileo images, which sample seven locales on Io. These ridges are on the order of a few kilometers in length with a spacing of about a kilometer. Within each locale, the ridges have a consistent orientation, but the orientations vary from place to place. We investigate whether these ridges could be a result of tidal flexing of Io by comparing their orientations with the peak tidal stress orientations at the same locations. We find that ridges grouped near the equator are aligned either north-south or east-west, as are the predicted principal stress orientations there. It is not clear why particular groups run north-south and others east-west. The one set of ridges observed far from the equator (52?? S) has an oblique azimuth, as do the tidal stresses at those latitudes. Therefore, all observed ridges have similar orientations to the tidal stress in their region. This correlation is consistent with the hypothesis that tidal flexing of Io plays an important role in ridge formation. ?? 2004 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Carbon sequestration by Australian tidal marshes

    PubMed Central

    Macreadie, Peter I.; Ollivier, Q. R.; Kelleway, J. J.; Serrano, O.; Carnell, P. E.; Ewers Lewis, C. J.; Atwood, T. B.; Sanderman, J.; Baldock, J.; Connolly, R. M.; Duarte, C. M.; Lavery, P. S.; Steven, A.; Lovelock, C. E.

    2017-01-01

    Australia’s tidal marshes have suffered significant losses but their recently recognised importance in CO2 sequestration is creating opportunities for their protection and restoration. We compiled all available data on soil organic carbon (OC) storage in Australia’s tidal marshes (323 cores). OC stocks in the surface 1 m averaged 165.41 (SE 6.96) Mg OC ha−1 (range 14–963 Mg OC ha−1). The mean OC accumulation rate was 0.55 ± 0.02 Mg OC ha−1 yr−1. Geomorphology was the most important predictor of OC stocks, with fluvial sites having twice the stock of OC as seaward sites. Australia’s 1.4 million hectares of tidal marshes contain an estimated 212 million tonnes of OC in the surface 1 m, with a potential CO2-equivalent value of $USD7.19 billion. Annual sequestration is 0.75 Tg OC yr−1, with a CO2-equivalent value of $USD28.02 million per annum. This study provides the most comprehensive estimates of tidal marsh blue carbon in Australia, and illustrates their importance in climate change mitigation and adaptation, acting as CO2 sinks and buffering the impacts of rising sea level. We outline potential further development of carbon offset schemes to restore the sequestration capacity and other ecosystem services provided by Australia tidal marshes. PMID:28281574

  12. Evaluating Tidal Energy Resource Assessment Guidelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, K. A.

    2016-02-01

    All tidal energy projects require resource assessments for determining the feasibility of a particular site, performing the project layout design and providing the projected annual energy production (AEP). The methods for the different resource assessments depend on both the assessment scope as well as the project scale. To assist with the development of the hydrokinetic industry as a whole, much work over the past decade has been completed to develop international technical standards that can be used by the full range of stakeholders in the hydrokinetic industry. In particular, a new International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) Technical Specification (TS) has recently been published outlining a standardized methodology for performing tidal energy resource assessments. This presentation will cover the various methods for performing the different types of tidal resource assessments (national reconnaissance, regional feasibility and layout design). Illustrations through case studies will be presented for each type of resource assessment. In particular, the ability of a grid refinement technique which satisfies the TS grid resolution requirements for the assessment of tidal current energy while maintaining low computational expenses will be evaluated. Example applications will be described for mapping the tidal resources near two facilities (Portsmouth Naval Shipyard in Maine and Key West Naval Station in Florida) for possible future deployments of Marine Hydro-Kinetic (MHK) technologies. These assessments will include and demonstrate the importance of the effect of energy extraction as required by the TS.

  13. Tidal Response of Preliminary Jupiter Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahl, Sean M.; Hubbard, William B.; Militzer, Burkhard

    2016-11-01

    In anticipation of improved observational data for Jupiter’s gravitational field, from the Juno spacecraft, we predict the static tidal response for a variety of Jupiter interior models based on ab initio computer simulations of hydrogen-helium mixtures. We calculate hydrostatic-equilibrium gravity terms, using the non-perturbative concentric Maclaurin Spheroid method that eliminates lengthy expansions used in the theory of figures. Our method captures terms arising from the coupled tidal and rotational perturbations, which we find to be important for a rapidly rotating planet like Jupiter. Our predicted static tidal Love number, {k}2=0.5900, is ˜10% larger than previous estimates. The value is, as expected, highly correlated with the zonal harmonic coefficient J 2, and is thus nearly constant when plausible changes are made to the interior structure while holding J 2 fixed at the observed value. We note that the predicted static k 2 might change, due to Jupiter’s dynamical response to the Galilean moons, and find reasons to argue that the change may be detectable—although we do not present here a theory of dynamical tides for highly oblate Jovian planets. An accurate model of Jupiter’s tidal response will be essential for interpreting Juno observations and identifying tidal signals from effects of other interior dynamics of Jupiter’s gravitational field.

  14. Tidal volume in acute respiratory distress syndrome: how best to select it.

    PubMed

    Umbrello, Michele; Marino, Antonella; Chiumello, Davide

    2017-07-01

    Mechanical ventilation is the type of organ support most widely provided in the intensive care unit. However, this form of support does not constitute a cure for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), as it mainly works by buying time for the lungs to heal while contributing to the maintenance of vital gas exchange. Moreover, it can further damage the lung, leading to the development of a particular form of lung injury named ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). Experimental evidence accumulated over the last 30 years highlighted the factors associated with an injurious form of mechanical ventilation. The present paper illustrates the physiological effects of delivering a tidal volume to the lungs of patients with ARDS, and suggests an approach to tidal volume selection. The relationship between tidal volume and the development of VILI, the so called volotrauma, will be reviewed. The still actual suggestion of a lung-protective ventilatory strategy based on the use of low tidal volumes scaled to the predicted body weight (PBW) will be presented, together with newer strategies such as the use of airway driving pressure as a surrogate for the amount of ventilatable lung tissue or the concept of strain, i.e., the ratio between the tidal volume delivered relative to the resting condition, that is the functional residual capacity (FRC). An ultra-low tidal volume strategy with the use of extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal (ECCO 2 R) will be presented and discussed. Eventually, the role of other ventilator-related parameters in the generation of VILI will be considered (namely, plateau pressure, airway driving pressure, respiratory rate (RR), inspiratory flow), and the promising unifying framework of mechanical power will be presented.

  15. Tidal volume in acute respiratory distress syndrome: how best to select it

    PubMed Central

    Umbrello, Michele; Marino, Antonella

    2017-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation is the type of organ support most widely provided in the intensive care unit. However, this form of support does not constitute a cure for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), as it mainly works by buying time for the lungs to heal while contributing to the maintenance of vital gas exchange. Moreover, it can further damage the lung, leading to the development of a particular form of lung injury named ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). Experimental evidence accumulated over the last 30 years highlighted the factors associated with an injurious form of mechanical ventilation. The present paper illustrates the physiological effects of delivering a tidal volume to the lungs of patients with ARDS, and suggests an approach to tidal volume selection. The relationship between tidal volume and the development of VILI, the so called volotrauma, will be reviewed. The still actual suggestion of a lung-protective ventilatory strategy based on the use of low tidal volumes scaled to the predicted body weight (PBW) will be presented, together with newer strategies such as the use of airway driving pressure as a surrogate for the amount of ventilatable lung tissue or the concept of strain, i.e., the ratio between the tidal volume delivered relative to the resting condition, that is the functional residual capacity (FRC). An ultra-low tidal volume strategy with the use of extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal (ECCO2R) will be presented and discussed. Eventually, the role of other ventilator-related parameters in the generation of VILI will be considered (namely, plateau pressure, airway driving pressure, respiratory rate (RR), inspiratory flow), and the promising unifying framework of mechanical power will be presented. PMID:28828362

  16. Tidal parameters derived from the perturbations in the orbital inclinations of the BE-C, GEOS-1 and GEOS-2 satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubincam, D. P.

    1976-01-01

    Effective tidal Love numbers and phase angles for the O sub one, K sub one, M sub two, K sub two, P sub one, and S sub two, tides are recovered. The effective tidal phase angles tend to be on the order of a few degrees. The effective tidal Love numbers are generally less than the solid earth Love number K sub two, of about 0.30. This supports the contention that the ocean tides give an apparent depression of the solid earth Love number. Ocean tide amplitudes and phases are calculated for the above tides assuming K sub two = 0.30 and the solid earth lag angle O sub two = 0. The results show good agreement on GEOS-1 but not on GEOS-II.

  17. Stratification and salt-wedge in the Seomjin river estuary under the idealized tidal influence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Jin Hwan; Jang, Dongmin; Kim, Yong Hoon

    2017-12-01

    Advection, straining, and vertical mixing play primary roles in the process of estuarine stratification. Estuaries can be classified as salt-wedge, partially-mixed or well-mixed depending on the vertical density structure determined by the balancing of advection, mixing and straining. In particular, straining plays a major role in the stratification of the estuarine water body along the estuarine channel. Also, the behavior of a salt wedge with a halocline shape in a stratified channel can be controlled by the competition between straining and mixing induced by buoyancy from the riverine source and tidal forcing. The present study uses Finite Volume Coastal Ocean Model (FVCOM) to show that straining and vertical mixing play major roles in controlling along-channel flow and stratification structures in the Seomjin river estuary (SRE) under idealized conditions. The Potential Energy Anomaly (PEA) dynamic equation quantifies the governing processes thereby enabling the determination of the stratification type. By comparing terms in the equation, we examined how the relative strengths of straining and mixing alter the stratification types in the SRE due to changes in river discharge and the depth resulting from dredging activities. SRE under idealized tidal forcing tends to be partially-mixed based on an analysis of the balance between terms and the vertical structure of salinity, and the morphological and hydrological change in SRE results in the shift of stratification type. While the depth affects the mixing, the freshwater discharge mainly controls the straining, and the balance between mixing and straining determines the final state of the stratification in an estuarine channel. As a result, the development and location of a salt wedge along the channel in a partially mixed and highly stratified condition is also determined by the ratio of straining to mixing. Finally, our findings confirm that the contributions of mixing and straining can be assessed by using the

  18. The dependence of estuarine turbidity on tidal intrusion length, tidal range and residence time

    Uncles, R.J.; Stephens, J.A.; Smith, R.E.

    2002-01-01

    It is shown that there is a marked tendency for long, strongly tidal estuaries to have greater suspended particulate matter (SPM) concentrations within their high-turbidity regions than shorter estuaries with comparable tidal ranges at their mouths, or weakly tidal estuaries. Using consistently derived data from 44 estuaries in Europe and the Americas, contours of the logarithm of maximum estuarine SPM concentration are shown to be reasonably smooth when plotted against the logarithm of mean spring tidal range (at the estuary mouth) and the logarithm of estuarine tidal length. Predictions from the plot are compared with published observations made in the Delaware, Scheldt, Rio de la Plata, Gironde, Bay of Fundy, Changjiang (Yangtze), Amazon, Paros Lagoon and the Hawkesbury Estuary and it is shown that, qualitatively, there are no serious discrepancies. Short, weakly tidal estuaries are predicted to have very low 'intrinsic' SPM concentrations. High SPM concentrations in these estuaries would most likely be the result of either locally generated wave resuspension, high freshwater sediment loads due to freshets, or intruding seawater carrying suspended sediments derived from wave activity in the coastal zone. Application of a generic tidal model demonstrates that longer estuaries possess faster tidal currents for a given tidal range at their mouth and, in the presence of a supply of erodable fine sediment, therefore (by implication) produce greater concentrations of SPM that can be accumulated within a turbidity maximum. The same is true if the tidal range is increased for estuaries of a given length. These features are illustrated by comparing surveys of SPM data from two large estuaries possessing greatly different tidal ranges (the microtidal, medium turbidity Potomac and the macrotidal, highly turbid Humber-Ouse) and a third, much smaller but strongly tidal estuary (the low-turbidity Tweed). It is demonstrated that longer estuaries tend to have longer flushing

  19. The dependence of estuarine turbidity on tidal intrusion length, tidal range and residence time

    Uncles, R.J.; Stephens, J.A.; Smith, R.E.

    2002-01-01

    It is shown that there is a marked tendency for long, strongly tidal estuaries to have greater suspended particulate matter (SPM) concentrations within their high-turbidity regions than shorter estuaries with comparable tidal ranges at their mouths, or weakly tidal estuaries. Using consistently derived data from 44 estuaries in Europe and the Americas, contours of the logarithm of maximum estuarine SPM concentration are shown to be reasonably smooth when plotted against the logarithm of mean spring tidal range (at the estuary mouth) and the logarithm of estuarine tidal length. Predictions from the plot are compared with published observations made in the Delaware, Scheldt, Rio de la Plata, Gironde, Bay of Fundy, Changjiang (Yangtze), Amazon, Patos Lagoon and the Hawkesbury Estuary and it is shown that, qualitatively, there are no serious discrepancies. Short, weakly tidal estuaries are predicted to have very low ‘intrinsic’ SPM concentrations. High SPM concentrations in these estuaries would most likely be the result of either locally generated wave resuspension, high freshwater sediment loads due to freshets, or intruding seawater carrying suspended sediments derived from wave activity in the coastal zone. Application of a generic tidal model demonstrates that longer estuaries possess faster tidal currents for a given tidal range at their mouth and, in the presence of a supply of erodable fine sediment, therefore (by implication) produce greater concentrations of SPM that can be accumulated within a turbidity maximum. The same is true if the tidal range is increased for estuaries of a given length. These features are illustrated by comparing surveys of SPM data from two large estuaries possessing greatly different tidal ranges (the microtidal, medium turbidity Potomac and the macrotidal, highly turbid Humber-Ouse) and a third, much smaller but strongly tidal estuary (the low-turbidity Tweed). It is demonstrated that longer estuaries tend to have longer

  20. Tidal modulation of slow slip events in the Nankai trough subduction zone detected by borehole strainmeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, J.; Ide, S.; Matsumoto, N.

    2016-12-01

    Slow slip events (SSEs) often occur in the Nankai subduction zone, Japan, within a band-like zone extended from the center of Honshu to western Shikoku. SSEs are believed as shear slip on the plate interface, where the frictional property changes from velocity weakening to strengthening in the dip direction. Therefore the dynamics of SSEs may give some hints on the depth dependent friction and plate subduction. The tidal modulation of SSEs has been identified by statistical analysis using strain data of Plate Boundary Observatory, in the Cascadia subduction zone [Hawthorne & Rubin, 2010]. Here, we perform similar statistical analyses using strain data recorded at borehole stations maintained by National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, in western Japan. The correlation between the oscillation in SSEs and tidal stress was confirmed statistically. In Nankai subduction zone, it is known that SSEs are accompanied with high activity of deep tectonic tremors [Hirose & Obara, 2006]. These tremors have been known to be sensitive to tidal stress [Nakata et al., 2008]. Therefore, the tidal modulation of SSEs is another representation of tidal modulation of tremors. To clarify the relation between SSEs and tremors, we investigate whether strain changes corresponding to SSEs can be explained only by tremors activity. For an SSE occurred in Aug. 2010 in Bungo channel, we assume that the seismic moment of the SSE is 1.6 × 1018 Nm (Mw 6.1) based on the inversion of GNSS data [Nishimura et al., 2013], and that this moment is released by 715 tremors that occur during this SSE [Idehara et al., 2014]. In this case, each tremor is assigned with seismic moment of 2.2 × 1015 Nm (Mw 4.2). Then the strain change at the observation station by these tremors is calculated using the Okada [1992] method, assuming a half space and focal mechanism consistent with the regional plate motion. The calculated strain is qualitatively similar with the observed strain

  1. Gravitational circulation in a tidal strait

    Smith, P.E.; Cheng, R.T.; Burau, J.R.; Simpson, M.R.; ,

    1991-01-01

    Eight months of continuous measurements of tidal current profiles with an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) were made in Carquinez Strait, California, during 1988 for the purpose of estimating long-term variations in vertical profiles of Eulerian residual currents. Salinity stratification near the ADCP deployment site also was analyzed. The strength of density-driven gravitational circulation and the amount of salinity stratification in the strait varied significantly over the spring-neap tidal cycle. Density currents and stratification were greater during neap tides when vertical mixing from the tide is at a minimum. Landward residual currents along the bottom were observed only during neap tides. Simulations made with a three-dimensional model to supplement the field measurements show a significant, tidally induced lateral variation in residual currents across the strait. The Stokes drift of 1-2 cm/s in the strait is small relative to the speed of gravitational currents.

  2. Oceanic tidal signals in magnetic satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wardinski, I.; Lesur, V.

    2015-12-01

    In this study we discuss the observation of oceanic tidal signals in magnetic satellite data. We analyse 10 years of CHAMP satellite data. The detection algorithm is applied on residual signal that remains after the derivation of GRIMM 42 (Lesur et al., 2015). The signals found represent the major tidal constituents, such as the M2 tide. However, other tidal constituents appear to be swallowed by unmodelled external and induced magnetic signal, particularly in equatorial and circumpolar regions. A part of the study also focuses on the temporal variability of the signal detection and its dependence on geomagnetic activity. Possible refinements to the detection algorithm and its applicability to SWARM data are also presented and discussed.

  3. The wave and tidal resource of Scotland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neill, Simon; Vogler, Arne; Lewis, Matt; Goward-Brown, Alice

    2017-04-01

    As the marine renewable energy industry evolves, in parallel with an increase in the quantity of available data and improvements in validated numerical simulations, it is occasionally appropriate to re-assess the wave and tidal resource of a region. This is particularly true for Scotland - a leading nation that the international community monitors for developments in the marine renewable energy industry, and which has witnessed much progress in the sector over the last decade. With 7 leased wave and 17 leased tidal sites, Scotland is well poised to generate significant levels of electricity from its abundant natural marine resources. In this review of Scotland's wave and tidal resource, I present the theoretical and technical resource, and provide an overview of commercial progress. I also discuss issues that affect future development of the marine energy seascape in Scotland, applicable to other regions of the world, including the potential for developing lower energy sites, and grid connectivity.

  4. Tidal analysis of Met rocket wind data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bedinger, J. F.; Constantinides, E.

    1976-01-01

    A method of analyzing Met Rocket wind data is described. Modern tidal theory and specialized analytical techniques were used to resolve specific tidal modes and prevailing components in observed wind data. A representation of the wind which is continuous in both space and time was formulated. Such a representation allows direct comparison with theory, allows the derivation of other quantities such as temperature and pressure which in turn may be compared with observed values, and allows the formation of a wind model which extends over a broader range of space and time. Significant diurnal tidal modes with wavelengths of 10 and 7 km were present in the data and were resolved by the analytical technique.

  5. From Globular Clusters to Tidal Dwarfs: Structure Formation in Tidal Tails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knierman, K.; Hunsberger, S.; Gallagher, S.; Charlton, J.; Whitmore, B.; Hibbard, J.; Kundu, A.; Zaritsky, D.

    1999-12-01

    Galaxy interactions trigger star formation in tidal debris. How does this star formation depend on the local and global physical conditions? Using WFPC2/HST images, we investigate the range of structure within tidal tails of four classic ``Toomre Sequence'' mergers: NGC 4038/9 (``Antennae''), NGC 7252 (``Atoms for Peace''), NGC 3921, and NGC 3256. These tails contain a variety of stellar associations with sizes from globular clusters up to dwarf Irregulars. We explore whether there is a continuum between the two extremes. Our eight fields sample seven tidal tails at a variety of stages in the evolutionary sequence. Some of these tails are rich in HI while others are HI poor. Large tidal dwarfs are embedded in three of the tails. Using V and I WFPC2 images, we measure luminosities and colors of substructures within the tidal tails. The properties of globular cluster candidates in the tails will be contrasted with those of the hundreds of young clusters in the central regions of these mergers. We address whether globular clusters form and survive in the tidal tails and whether tidal dwarfs are composed of only young stars. By comparing the properties of structures in the tails of the four mergers with different ages, we examine systematic evolution of structure along the evolutionary sequence and as a function of HI content. We acknowledge support from NASA through STScI, and from NSF for an REU supplement for Karen Knierman.

  6. Tidal truncation and barotropic convergence in a channel network tidally driven from opposing entrances

    Warner, J.C.; Schoellhamer, D.; Schladow, G.

    2003-01-01

    Residual circulation patterns in a channel network that is tidally driven from entrances on opposite sides are controlled by the temporal phasing and spatial asymmetry of the two forcing tides. The Napa/Sonoma Marsh Complex in San Francisco Bay, CA, is such a system. A sill on the west entrance to the system prevents a complete tidal range at spring tides that results in tidal truncation of water levels. Tidal truncation does not occur on the east side but asymmetries develop due to friction and off-channel wetland storage. The east and west asymmetric tides meet in the middle to produce a barotropic convergence zone that controls the transport of water and sediment. During spring tides, tidally averaged water-surface elevations are higher on the truncated west side. This creates tidally averaged fluxes of water and sediment to the east. During neap tides, the water levels are not truncated and the propagation speed of the tides controls residual circulation, creating a tidally averaged flux in the opposite direction. ?? 2003 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Localized tidal deformations and dissipation in Enceladus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beuthe, M.

    2017-12-01

    The geologic activity at Enceladus's south pole remains unexplained, though tidal deformations are probably the ultimate cause. Recent gravity and libration data indicate that Enceladus's icy crust floats on a global ocean, is rather thin, and has a strongly non-uniform thickness. Tidal effects are enhanced by crustal thinning at the south pole, so that realistic models of tidal tectonics and dissipation should include lateral variations of shell structure. I solve this problem with a new theory of non-uniform viscoelastic thin shells, allowing for large lateral variations of crustal thickness as well as large 3D variations of crustal rheology. The coupling to tidal forcing takes into account self-gravity, density stratification below the shell, core viscoelasticity, and crustal compressibility. The resulting tidal thin shell equations are two partial differential equations defined on the spherical surface, which can be solved numerically much faster than 3D Finite Element Methods. The error on tidal displacements is less than 5% if the thickness is less than 10% of the radius while the error on the deviatoric stress varies between 0 and 10%. If Enceladus's shell is conductive with isostatic thickness variations, crustal thinning increases surface stresses by 60% at the north pole and by a factor of more than 3 at the south pole. Similarly, the surface flux resulting from crustal dissipation increases by a factor of 3 at the south pole. If dissipation is an order of magnitude higher than predicted by the Maxwell model (as suggested by recent experimental data), the power dissipated in the crust could reach 50% of the total power required to maintain the crust in thermal equilibrium, and most of the surface flux variation could be explained by latitudinal variations of crustal dissipation. In all cases, a large part of the heat budget must be generated below the crust.

  8. On inter-tidal transport equation

    Cheng, Ralph T.; Feng, Shizuo; Pangen, Xi

    1989-01-01

    The transports of solutes, sediments, nutrients, and other tracers are fundamental to the interactive physical, chemical, and biological processes in estuaries. The characteristic time scales for most estuarine biological and chemical processes are on the order of several tidal cycles or longer. To address the long-term transport mechanism meaningfully, the formulation of an inter-tidal conservation equation is the main subject of this paper. The commonly used inter-tidal conservation equation takes the form of a convection-dispersion equation in which the convection is represented by the Eulerian residual current, and the dispersion terms are due to the introduction of a Fickian hypothesis, unfortunately, the physical significance of this equation is not clear, and the introduction of a Fickian hypothesis is at best an ad hoc approximation. Some recent research results on the Lagrangian residual current suggest that the long-term transport problem is more closely related to the Lagrangian residual current than to the Eulerian residual current. With the aid of additional insight of residual current, the inter-tidal transport equation has been reformulated in this paper using a small perturbation method for a weakly nonlinear tidal system. When tidal flows can be represented by an M2 system, the new intertidal transport equation also takes the form of a convective-dispersion equation without the introduction of a Fickian hypothesis. The convective velocity turns out to be the first order Lagrangian residual current (the sum of the Eulerian residual current and the Stokes’ drift), and the correlation terms take the form of convection with the Stokes’ drift as the convective velocity. The remaining dispersion terms are perturbations of lower order solution to higher order solutions due to shear effect and turbulent mixing.

  9. On the phase lag of turbulent dissipation in rotating tidal flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qianjiang; Wu, Jiaxue

    2018-03-01

    Field observations of rotating tidal flows in a shallow tidally swept sea reveal that a notable phase lag of both shear production and turbulent dissipation increases with height above the seafloor. These vertical delays of turbulent quantities are approximately equivalent in magnitude to that of squared mean shear. The shear production approximately equals turbulent dissipation over the phase-lag column, and thus a main mechanism of phase lag of dissipation is mean shear, rather than vertical diffusion of turbulent kinetic energy. By relating the phase lag of dissipation to that of the mean shear, a simple formulation with constant eddy viscosity is developed to describe the phase lag in rotating tidal flows. An analytical solution indicates that the phase lag increases linearly with height subjected to a combined effect of tidal frequency, Coriolis parameter and eddy viscosity. The vertical diffusion of momentum associated with eddy viscosity produces the phase lag of squared mean shear, and resultant delay of turbulent quantities. Its magnitude is inhibited by Earth's rotation. Furthermore, a theoretical formulation of the phase lag with a parabolic eddy viscosity profile can be constructed. A first-order approximation of this formulation is still a linear function of height, and its magnitude is approximately 0.8 times that with constant viscosity. Finally, the theoretical solutions of phase lag with realistic viscosity can be satisfactorily justified by realistic phase lags of dissipation.

  10. Applications of Remote Sensing for Studying Lateral Carbon Fluxes and Inundation Dynamics in Tidal Wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamb, B. T.; Tzortziou, M.; McDonald, K. C.

    2017-12-01

    Wetlands play a key role in Earth's carbon cycle. However, wetland carbon cycling exhibits a high level of spatiotemporal dynamism, and thus, is not as well understood as carbon cycling in other ecosystems. In order to accurately characterize wetland carbon cycling and fluxes, wetland vegetation phenology, seasonal inundation dynamics, and tidal regimes must be understood as these factors influence carbon generation and transport. Here, we use radar remote sensing to map wetland properties in the Chesapeake Bay, the largest estuary in the United States with more than 1,500 square miles of tidal wetlands, across a range of tidal amplitudes, salinity regimes, and soil organic matter content levels. We have been using Sentinel-1 and ALOS PALSAR-1 radar measurements to characterize vegetation and seasonal inundation dynamics with the future goal of characterizing salinity gradients and tidal regimes. Differences in radar backscatter from various surface targets has been shown to effectively discriminate between dry soil, wet soil, vegetated areas, and open water. Radar polarization differences and ratios are particularly effective at distinguishing between vegetated and non-vegetated areas. Utilizing these principles, we have been characterizing wetland types using supervised classification techniques including: Random Forest, Maximum Likelihood, and Minimum Distance. The National Wetlands Inventory has been used as training and validation data. Ideally, the techniques we outline in this research will be applicable to the characterization of wetlands in coastal areas outside of Chesapeake Bay.

  11. Increased Tidal Dissipation Using Advanced Rheological Models: Implications for Io and Tidally Active Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renaud, Joe P.; Henning, Wade G.

    2018-04-01

    The advanced rheological models of Andrade and Sundberg & Cooper are compared to the traditional Maxwell model to understand how each affects the tidal dissipation of heat within rocky bodies. We find both Andrade and Sundberg–Cooper rheologies can produce at least 10× the tidal heating compared to a traditional Maxwell model for a warm (1400–1600 K) Io-like satellite. Sundberg–Cooper can cause even larger dissipation around a critical temperature and frequency. These models allow cooler planets to stay tidally active in the face of orbital perturbations—a condition we term “tidal resilience.” This has implications for the time evolution of tidally active worlds and the long-term equilibria they fall into. For instance, if Io’s interior is better modeled by the Andrade or Sundberg–Cooper rheologies, the number of possible resonance-forming scenarios that still produce a hot, modern Io is expanded, and these scenarios do not require an early formation of the Laplace resonance. The two primary empirical parameters that define the Andrade anelasticity are examined in several phase spaces to provide guidance on how their uncertainties impact tidal outcomes, as laboratory studies continue to constrain their real values. We provide detailed reference tables on the fully general equations required for others to insert the models of Andrade and Sundberg–Cooper into standard tidal formulae. Lastly, we show that advanced rheologies can greatly impact the heating of short-period exoplanets and exomoons, while the properties of tidal resilience could mean a greater number of tidally active worlds among all extrasolar systems.

  12. Earth Observation

    2014-06-01

    ISS040-E-006327 (1 June 2014) --- A portion of International Space Station solar array panels and Earth?s horizon are featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 40 crew member on the space station.

  13. Electrical Resistivity Imaging of Tidal Fluctuations in the Water Table at Inwood Hill Park, Manhattan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenyon, P. M.; Kassem, D.; Olin, A.; Nunez, J.; Smalling, A.

    2005-05-01

    Inwood Hill Park is located on the northern tip of Manhattan and has been extensively modified over the years by human activities. In its current form, it has a backbone of exposed or lightly covered bedrock along the Hudson River, adjacent to a flat area with two tidal inlets along the northern shore of Manhattan. The tidal motions in the inlets are expected to drive corresponding fluctuations in the water table along the borders of the inlets. In the Fall of 2002, a group of students from the Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences at the City College of New York studied these fluctuations. Electrical resistivity cross sections were obtained with a Syscal Kid Switch 24 resistivity meter during the course of a tidal cycle at three locations surrounding the westernmost inlet in the park. No change was seen over a tidal cycle at Site 1, possibly due to the effect of concrete erosion barriers which were located between the land and the water surrounding this site. Measurements at Site 2 revealed a small, regular change in the water table elevation of approximately 5 cm over the course of a tidal cycle. This site is inferred to rest on alluvial sediments deposited by a small creek. The cross sections taken at different times during a tidal cycle at Site 3 were the most interesting. They show a very heterogeneous subsurface, with water spurting between blocks of high resistivity materials during the rising portion of the cycle. A small sinkhole was observed on the surface of the ground directly above an obvious plume of water in the cross section. Park personnel confirmed that this sinkhole, like others scattered around this site, is natural and not due to recent construction activity. They also indicated that debris from the construction of the New York City subways may have been dumped in the area in the past. Our conclusion is that the tidal fluctuations at Site 3 are being channeled by solid blocks in the construction debris, and that the sinkholes currently

  14. Spatial Shifts in Tidal-Fluvial Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dykstra, S. L.; Dzwonkowski, B.

    2017-12-01

    Fresh water discharge damps tidal propagation and increases the phase lag, which has important impacts on system-wide sediment transport process and ecological structure. Here, the role of discharge on spatial variability in the dynamics of tidal rivers is investigated in Mobile Bay and Delta, a microtidal diurnal system where discharge ranges multiple orders of magnitude. Long-term observations at 7 velocity stations and 20 water level stations, ranging over 260km along the system, were analyzed. Observations of the tidal extinguishing point in both velocity and water level were highly variable with significant shifts in location covering a distance over 140km. The velocity stations also allowed for measuring the extent of flood (i.e. point where tidal flow is arrested by discharge) shifting 100km. With increased discharge, flow characteristics at station locations can transition from an estuary (i.e. bidirectional tidal flow) to a tidal river to a traditional fluvial environment. This revealed systematic discharge induced damping and an increase in phase lag. Interestingly, before damping occurs, the tide amplifies ( 15%) seaward of the extent of flood. Another consistent pattern is the higher sensitivity of the velocity signal to discharge than water level. This causes the velocity to lag more and create progressive tides. In a microtidal diurnal system, the signal propagates further inland than a semidiurnal tide due to its lower frequency but is easily damped due to the small amplitude, creating large shifts. Previous research has focused on environments dominated by semidiurnal tides with similar magnitudes to discharge using water level observations. For example, the well studied Columbia and the St. Lawrence rivers have small shifts in their tidal extinguishing point O(10km) (Jay 2016, Matte 2014). These shifts are not large enough to observe process like discharge-induced amplification and damping at the same site like in the Mobile system, but they may

  15. Tidal capture of stars by a massive black hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novikov, I. D.; Pethick, C. J.; Polnarev, A. G.

    1992-01-01

    The processes leading to tidal capture of stars by a massive black hole and the consequences of these processes in a dense stellar cluster are discussed in detail. When the amplitude of a tide and the subsequent oscillations are sufficiently large, the energy deposited in a star after periastron passage and formation of a bound orbit cannot be estimated directly using the linear theory of oscillations of a spherical star, but rather numerical estimates must be used. The evolution of a star after tidal capture is discussed. The maximum ratio R of the cross-section for tidal capture to that for tidal disruption is about 3 for real systems. For the case of a stellar system with an empty capture loss cone, even in the case when the impact parameter for tidal capture only slightly exceeds the impact parameter for direct tidal disruption, tidal capture would be much more important than tidal disruption.

  16. Tidal modulation of nonvolcanic tremor.

    PubMed

    Rubinstein, Justin L; La Rocca, Mario; Vidale, John E; Creager, Kenneth C; Wech, Aaron G

    2008-01-11

    Episodes of nonvolcanic tremor and accompanying slow slip recently have been observed in the subduction zones of Japan and Cascadia. In Cascadia, such episodes typically last a few weeks and differ from "normal" earthquakes in their source location and moment-duration scaling. The three most recent episodes in the Puget Sound/southern Vancouver Island portion of the Cascadia subduction zone were exceptionally well recorded. In each episode, we saw clear pulsing of tremor activity with periods of 12.4 and 24 to 25 hours, the same as the principal lunar and lunisolar tides. This indicates that the small stresses associated with the solid-earth and ocean tides influence the genesis of tremor much more effectively than they do the genesis of normal earthquakes. Because the lithostatic stresses are 10(5) times larger than those associated with the tides, we argue that tremor occurs on very weak faults.

  17. Anomalous tidal loading signals in South-West England and Brittany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keshin, M.; Penna, N. T.; Clarke, P. J.; Bos, M. S.; Baker, T. F.

    2010-05-01

    The tidal deformation of the Earth, including ocean tide loading (OTL), sheds light on the Earth's internal structure. Uncertainties in the knowledge of this deformation may be a source of both direct and propagated periodic errors in GPS geodesy. The increasing number of global GPS stations with long histories of observations, as well as recent developments in precise GPS geodesy such as the availability of reprocessed satellite orbits, enables further study of these geophysical and geodetic phenomena. There are more than 10 worldwide regions where OTL displacement amplitudes exceed 25mm. In our work we considered one such region covering South-West England and stretching southward along the coasts of France, Spain and Portugal. Estimates of three-dimensional harmonic site motion at each of the principal diurnal (K1, O1, P1, Q1) and semi-diurnal (K2, M2, N2, S2) frequencies were obtained for 40 European stations with at least 2 year observation span, using the GIPSY-OASIS II software package with reprocessed precise satellite orbits from JPL. All GPS data available from 2002.0 to 2010.0 were considered. 34 stations were situated close to the Atlantic coast; a further 6 inland stations at similar latitudes were processed as a check on solid Earth tide models. Inter-model OTL displacement differences are small, especially for the inland sites; the problematic Bristol Channel area of South-West England was excluded. We validated the quality of our GPS estimates by using and comparing three different analysis strategies: (1) Harmonic estimation of total tidal displacement in 24-hour Precise Point Positioning (PPP) batch solutions: harmonic displacements are estimated per coordinate component for each of the eight principal tidal constituents. OTL is not modelled a priori, and nodal corrections are applied in post-processing after combination of the daily results; (2) Harmonic estimation of residual tidal displacement in 24-hour PPP batch solutions: OTL is modelled a

  18. What can earth tide measurements tell us about ocean tides or earth structure?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, T. F.

    1978-01-01

    Current experimental problems in Earth tides are reviewed using comparisons of tidal gravity and tilt measurements in Europe with loading calculations are examples. The limitations of present day instrumentation and installation techniques are shown as well as some of the ways in which they can be improved. Many of the geophysical and oceanographic investigations that are possible with Earth tide measurements are discussed with emphasis on the percentage accuracies required in the measurements in order to obtain new information about Earth or its oceans.

  19. Muricauda taeanensis sp. nov., isolated from a marine tidal flat.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong Myeong; Jin, Hyun Mi; Jeon, Che Ok

    2013-07-01

    A novel Gram-stain-negative, heterotrophic, moderate halophilic and strictly aerobic bacterium, strain 105(T), was isolated from a tidal flat of Taean in Korea. Cells were catalase- and oxidase-positive long rods that showed gliding motility. Optimum temperature, pH and salinity for the growth of strain 105(T) were observed at 30-37 °C, at pH 7.0-7.5, and in the presence of 2-4 % (w/v) NaCl, respectively. The major cellular fatty acids were iso-C15 : 1 G, iso-C15 : 0 and iso-C17 : 0 3-OH. Phosphatidylethanolamine and five unidentified lipids were identified as the major polar lipids. The genomic DNA G+C content of strain 105(T) was 42.4 mol% and MK-6 was detected as the predominant isoprenoid quinone. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain 105(T) formed a phyletic lineage with members of the genus Muricauda. Strain 105(T) was most closely related to Muricauda aquimarina SW-63(T) (97.6 %), Muricauda beolgyonensis BB-My12(T) (97.5 %), Muricauda lutimaris SMK-108(T) (97.5 %), Muricauda ruestringensis B1(T) (97.3 %), Muricauda flavescens CL-SS4(T) (97.2 %) and Muricauda olearia (96.2 %). The DNA-DNA relatedness values of strain 105(T) with M. aquimarina JCM 11811(T), M. beolgyonensis KCTC 23501(T), M. lutimaris KCTC 22173(T), M. ruestringensis DSM 13258(T) and M. flavescens JCM 11812(T) were 17.2 ± 6.0, 8.7 ± 2.2, 3.7 ± 0.5, 11.0 ± 1.9 and 7.1 ± 1.3 %, respectively. On the basis of phenotypic and molecular features, strain 105(T) represents a novel species of the genus Muricauda, for which the name Muricauda taeanensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is 105(T) ( = KACC 16195(T) = JCM 17757(T)).

  20. Monitoring Tidal Currents with a Towed ADCP System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-22

    these make tidal stream energy a more reliable source than other forms of ma- rine energy, such as waves and offshore wind. The place of tidal stream...big tidal range (9 m), relatively strong (2 m/s) currents, and moderate wind waves (less than 3 m in the an- nual mean), it is considered to be a...Monitoring tidal currents with a towed ADCP system Alexei Sentchev1 & Max Yaremchuk2 Received: 22 September 2015 /Accepted: 10 December 2015

  1. A radar map of Titan Seas: Tidal dissipation and ocean mixing through the throat of Kraken

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Ralph D.; Kirk, Randolph L.; Hayes, Alexander G.; Anderson, Yanhua Z.; Lunine, Jonathan I.; Tokano, Tetsuya; Turtle, Elizabeth P.; Malaska, Michael J.; Soderblom, Jason M.; Lucas, Antoine; Karatekin, Özgür; Wall, Stephen D.

    2014-07-01

    We present a radar map of the Titan’s seas, with bathymetry estimated as proportional to distance from the nearest shore. This naïve analytic bathymetry, scaled to a recent radar sounding of Ligeia Mare, suggests a total liquid volume of ∼32,000 km3, at the low end of estimates made in 2008 when mapping coverage was incomplete. We note that Kraken Mare has two principal basins, separated by a narrow (∼17 km wide, ∼40 km long) strait we refer to as the ‘throat’. Tidal currents in this strait may be dramatic (∼0.5 m/s), generating observable effects such as dynamic topography, whirlpools, and acoustic noise, much like tidal races on Earth such as the Corryvreckan off Scotland. If tidal flow through this strait is the dominant mixing process, the two basins take ∼20 Earth years to exchange their liquid inventory. Thus compositional differences over seasonal timescales may exist, but the composition of solutes (and thus evaporites) over Croll-Milankovich timescales should be homogenized.

  2. How Tidal Forces Cause Ocean Tides in the Equilibrium Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ng, Chiu-king

    2015-01-01

    We analyse why it is erroneous to think that a tidal bulge is formed by pulling the water surface directly up by a local vertical tidal force. In fact, ocean tides are caused by the global effect of the horizontal components of the tidal forces.

  3. Tidal Marshes: The Boundary between Land and Ocean.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gosselink, James

    An overview of the ecology of the tidal marshes along the gulf coast of the United States is presented. The following topics are included: (1) the human impact on tidal marshes; (2) the geologic origins of tidal marshes; (3) a description of the physical characteristics and ecosystem of the marshlands; (4) a description of the marshland food chain…

  4. Field migration rates of tidal meanders recapitulate fluvial morphodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finotello, Alvise; Lanzoni, Stefano; Ghinassi, Massimiliano; Marani, Marco; Rinaldo, Andrea; D'Alpaos, Andrea

    2018-02-01

    The majority of tidal channels display marked meandering features. Despite their importance in oil-reservoir formation and tidal landscape morphology, questions remain on whether tidal-meander dynamics could be understood in terms of fluvial processes and theory. Key differences suggest otherwise, like the periodic reversal of landscape-forming tidal flows and the widely accepted empirical notion that tidal meanders are stable landscape features, in stark contrast with their migrating fluvial counterparts. On the contrary, here we show that, once properly normalized, observed migration rates of tidal and fluvial meanders are remarkably similar. Key to normalization is the role of tidal channel width that responds to the strong spatial gradients of landscape-forming flow rates and tidal prisms. We find that migration dynamics of tidal meanders agree with nonlinear theories for river meander evolution. Our results challenge the conventional view of tidal channels as stable landscape features and suggest that meandering tidal channels recapitulate many fluvial counterparts owing to large gradients of tidal prisms across meander wavelengths.

  5. Geodetic Strain Analysis Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kedar, Sharon; Baxter, Sean C.; Parker, Jay W.; Webb, Frank H.; Owen, Susan E.; Sibthorpe, Anthony J.; Dong, Danan

    2011-01-01

    A geodetic software analysis tool enables the user to analyze 2D crustal strain from geodetic ground motion, and create models of crustal deformation using a graphical interface. Users can use any geodetic measurements of ground motion and derive the 2D crustal strain interactively. This software also provides a forward-modeling tool that calculates a geodetic velocity and strain field for a given fault model, and lets the user compare the modeled strain field with the strain field obtained from the user s data. Users may change parameters on-the-fly and obtain a real-time recalculation of the resulting strain field. Four data products are computed: maximum shear, dilatation, shear angle, and principal components. The current view and data dependencies are processed first. The remaining data products and views are then computed in a round-robin fashion to anticipate view changes. When an analysis or display parameter is changed, the affected data products and views are invalidated and progressively re-displayed as available. This software is designed to facilitate the derivation of the strain fields from the GPS and strain meter data that sample it to facilitate the understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of the strain field derivation from continuous GPS (CGPS) and other geodetic data from a variety of tectonic settings, to converge on the "best practices" strain derivation strategy for the Solid Earth Science ESDR System (SESES) project given the CGPS station distribution in the western U.S., and to provide SESES users with a scientific and educational tool to explore the strain field on their own with user-defined parameters.

  6. Modelling the far field hydro-environmental impacts of tidal farms - A focus on tidal regime, inter-tidal zones and flushing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nash, S.; O'Brien, N.; Olbert, A.; Hartnett, M.

    2014-10-01

    The introduction of tidal stream turbines into water bodies can have an impact on the environment due to changes in the hydrodynamic flow fields resulting from the extraction of energy by the tidal turbines. Water levels, tidal currents and flushing characteristics could potentially be significantly altered with the introduction of tidal turbine farms, which could lead to possible loss of habitat and a change in the tidal regime. Therefore, planning of tidal turbines field deployments must take into account possible hydro-environmental impacts. This paper describes research undertaken by the authors in the Shannon Estuary to predict changes in the tidal regime and flushing characteristics, with the introduction of tidal turbine farms of different array configurations. The model was simulated using a 2D hydrodynamic model that was modified to incorporate the effects of tidal turbine fields. Water levels are shown to have been affected with the inclusion of turbines, especially in areas upstream of the turbine farm where inter-tidal zones could become predominately inundated resulting in loss of habitat in the estuary. Flushing parameters were also shown to be altered with the inclusion of turbines, with residence time shown to be increased, which could change pollutant transport in the region.

  7. Estuaries and Tidal Marshes. Habitat Pac.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fish and Wildlife Service (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    This educational packet consists of an overview, three lesson plans, student data sheets, and a poster. The overview examines estuaries and tidal or salt marshes by discussing the plants and animals in these habitats, marsh productivity, benefits and management of the habitats, historical aspects, and development and pollution. A glossary and list…

  8. Tidal dwarf galaxies in cosmological simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ploeckinger, Sylvia; Sharma, Kuldeep; Schaye, Joop; Crain, Robert A.; Schaller, Matthieu; Barber, Christopher

    2018-02-01

    The formation and evolution of gravitationally bound, star forming substructures in tidal tails of interacting galaxies, called tidal dwarf galaxies (TDG), has been studied, until now, only in idealized simulations of individual pairs of interacting galaxies for pre-determined orbits, mass ratios and gas fractions. Here, we present the first identification of TDG candidates in fully cosmological simulations, specifically the high-resolution simulations of the EAGLE suite. The finite resolution of the simulation limits their ability to predict the exact formation rate and survival time-scale of TDGs, but we show that gravitationally bound baryonic structures in tidal arms already form in current state-of-the-art cosmological simulations. In this case, the orbital parameter, disc orientations as well as stellar and gas masses and the specific angular momentum of the TDG forming galaxies are a direct consequence of cosmic structure formation. We identify TDG candidates in a wide range of environments, such as multiple galaxy mergers, clumpy high-redshift (up to z = 2) galaxies, high-speed encounters and tidal interactions with gas-poor galaxies. We present selection methods, the properties of the identified TDG candidates and a road map for more quantitative analyses using future high-resolution simulations.

  9. An optimal tuning strategy for tidal turbines.

    PubMed

    Vennell, Ross

    2016-11-01

    Tuning wind and tidal turbines is critical to maximizing their power output. Adopting a wind turbine tuning strategy of maximizing the output at any given time is shown to be an extremely poor strategy for large arrays of tidal turbines in channels. This 'impatient-tuning strategy' results in far lower power output, much higher structural loads and greater environmental impacts due to flow reduction than an existing 'patient-tuning strategy' which maximizes the power output averaged over the tidal cycle. This paper presents a 'smart patient tuning strategy', which can increase array output by up to 35% over the existing strategy. This smart strategy forgoes some power generation early in the half tidal cycle in order to allow stronger flows to develop later in the cycle. It extracts enough power from these stronger flows to produce more power from the cycle as a whole than the existing strategy. Surprisingly, the smart strategy can often extract more power without increasing maximum structural loads on the turbines, while also maintaining stronger flows along the channel. This paper also shows that, counterintuitively, for some tuning strategies imposing a cap on turbine power output to limit loads can increase a turbine's average power output.

  10. An optimal tuning strategy for tidal turbines

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Tuning wind and tidal turbines is critical to maximizing their power output. Adopting a wind turbine tuning strategy of maximizing the output at any given time is shown to be an extremely poor strategy for large arrays of tidal turbines in channels. This ‘impatient-tuning strategy’ results in far lower power output, much higher structural loads and greater environmental impacts due to flow reduction than an existing ‘patient-tuning strategy’ which maximizes the power output averaged over the tidal cycle. This paper presents a ‘smart patient tuning strategy’, which can increase array output by up to 35% over the existing strategy. This smart strategy forgoes some power generation early in the half tidal cycle in order to allow stronger flows to develop later in the cycle. It extracts enough power from these stronger flows to produce more power from the cycle as a whole than the existing strategy. Surprisingly, the smart strategy can often extract more power without increasing maximum structural loads on the turbines, while also maintaining stronger flows along the channel. This paper also shows that, counterintuitively, for some tuning strategies imposing a cap on turbine power output to limit loads can increase a turbine’s average power output. PMID:27956870

  11. Life on the Tidal Mudflats: Elkhorn Slough.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andresen, Ruth

    Life in an estuarine environment is studied in this set of audio-visual materials prepared for grades 6-12. A 71-frame colored filmstrip, cassette tape narration, and teacher's guide focus upon Elkhorn Slough, a tidal mudflat in the Monterey Bay area, California. Topics examined range from river drainage and the effects of pollution on living…

  12. Tidal deformation, Orbital Dynamics and JIMO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratcliff, J. T.; Wu, X.; Williams, J. G.

    2003-12-01

    Observations of Europa, Ganymede and Callisto obtained from encounters by the Galileo spacecraft strongly suggest the possibility of liquid oceans under the icy shells of these Jovian satellites. The strong tidal environments in which these moons are found and the fact that a planetary body with internal fluid undergoes greater deformation than an otherwise solid body make a compelling case for using tidal observations as a method for ocean detection. Given the high degree of uncertainty in our knowledge of the interiors of these moons, a comprehensive geodetic program measuring different physical signatures related to tidal deformation and interior structure is preferred to using separate and various interior parameters that may not be as closely tied to actual measurable quantities. Potential and displacement tidal Love numbers, libration amplitudes of the surface ice shell and rocky mantle, static topography and gravity fields and other quantities should all be included in the measurement objectives. Many geodetic techniques rely heavily upon orbital positions of the spacecraft. Their accurate determination depend on factors such as the orbital configuration, the gravity fields of the icy moons, as well as the duration and geometry of tracking. Given the competing science, engineering and planetary protection demands, orbital accuracy subject to constraints has become a critical mission design issue. Orbit determination simulations and covariance analyses will be used to investigate the achievable accuracies of spacecraft position and geodetic signatures under different orbital and tracking scenarios.

  13. Sediment Transport in a Tidal Inlet.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-01

    Approved foz public relecasel Distributioni Unlimited FOREWORD Work performed under this contract was funded jointly by the U.S. Armqy Research Office...sensitive to changes in water * quality and tidal exchange, so changes in inlet configuration can affect the viability of these animals , as well as

  14. An optimal tuning strategy for tidal turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vennell, Ross

    2016-11-01

    Tuning wind and tidal turbines is critical to maximizing their power output. Adopting a wind turbine tuning strategy of maximizing the output at any given time is shown to be an extremely poor strategy for large arrays of tidal turbines in channels. This `impatient-tuning strategy' results in far lower power output, much higher structural loads and greater environmental impacts due to flow reduction than an existing `patient-tuning strategy' which maximizes the power output averaged over the tidal cycle. This paper presents a `smart patient tuning strategy', which can increase array output by up to 35% over the existing strategy. This smart strategy forgoes some power generation early in the half tidal cycle in order to allow stronger flows to develop later in the cycle. It extracts enough power from these stronger flows to produce more power from the cycle as a whole than the existing strategy. Surprisingly, the smart strategy can often extract more power without increasing maximum structural loads on the turbines, while also maintaining stronger flows along the channel. This paper also shows that, counterintuitively, for some tuning strategies imposing a cap on turbine power output to limit loads can increase a turbine's average power output.

  15. Natural Strain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, Alan D.

    1997-01-01

    Logarithmic strain is the preferred measure of strain used by materials scientists, who typically refer to it as the "true strain." It was Nadai who gave it the name "natural strain," which seems more appropriate. This strain measure was proposed by Ludwik for the one-dimensional extension of a rod with length l. It was defined via the integral of dl/l to which Ludwik gave the name "effective specific strain." Today, it is after Hencky, who extended Ludwik's measure to three-dimensional analysis by defining logarithmic strains for the three principal directions.

  16. Phase lag control of tidally reversing mega-ripple geometry and bed stress in tidal inlets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traykovski, P.

    2016-02-01

    Recent observations in the Columbia River Mouth, New River Inlet, and Wasque Shoals have shown that tidally reversing mega-ripples are an ubiquitous bedform morphology in energetic tidal inlets. As the name implies, these bedforms reverse asymmetry and migration direction in each half tidal cycle. With wavelengths of 2 to 5 m and heights of 0.2 to 0.5 m, these bedforms are larger than current formed ripples, but smaller than dunes. Unlike dunes which have a depth dependent geometry, observations indicate the tidally reversing mega-ripples geometry is related to the time dependent tidal flow and independent of depth. Previous empirical relations for predicting the geometry of ripples or dunes do not successfully predict the geometry of these features. A time dependent geometric model was developed that accounts for the reversal of migration and asymmetry to successfully predict bedform geometry. The model requires sufficient sediment transport in each half tidal cycle to reverse the asymmetry before the bedforms begin to grow. Both the observations and model indicate that the complete reversal of asymmetry and development of a steep lee face occurs near or after maximum flow in each half tidal cycle. This phase lag in bedform response to tidal forcing also has important implications for bed stress in tidal inlets. Observations of frictional drag in the Columbia River mouth based on a tidal momentum balance of surface slope over 10 km regressed against quadratic near bed velocity show drag coefficients that fall off as CD U-1.4. Reynolds stress measurements performed using the dual ADV differencing technique show similar relations. The Reynolds stress measurements also show a dramatic asymmetry between accelerating flows and decelerating flows with a factor of 5 increase during deceleration. Pulse coherent Doppler profiles of near bed turbulence indicate that the turbulence is dominated by energetic fluctuations in separation zones downstream of steep lee faces. The

  17. Displacement and dissipation under the rotating tidal potential, in contrast to Love's geostationary potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostrom, R. C.

    The Earth rotates relative to the solunar gravity field. In consequence the M2, S2 tides are represented by permanent bulges, travelling westward around the Earth as distortion waves. The associated tidal stress ellipsoid progresses perpetually by rotation, without reversal. It is shown that under imperfect elasticity, in lieu of the body forces induced by Love's geostationary time-variant potential a rotating potential induces internal body couples, equally pervasive. Displacement is cumulative, and in the vortical mode formulated by Helmholtz (1858). Whereas in the geostationary formulation of Love cumulative distortion is nil, in actuality this motion is primary, and dimensionally capable of coupling with extant mantle convection. Unlike the marine tides, the bodily wave-tides proceed unhindered around the Earth unhindered by continental margins. Corrected for oceanic effects the complex Love numbers measure dissipation, as commonly supposed. However dissipation is the result of unmapped cumulative vortical displacement (a circulation component), rather than oscillatory forces having the form of a geographically stationary spheroidal eigenvibration. The characteristic period of the loss factor 1/Q is infinity rather than the period pertinent to seismicity or wobble, to which it is dimensionally unrelated. Although primary vorticity-induction is required by the existence of the rotating tidal potential, its tectonic consequences are a matter of speculation, treated elsewhere [1]. --- [1] Bostrom, R.C., 1998. Tectonic Consequences of the Earth's Rotation. Oxfo rd University Press.

  18. Relativistic tidal properties of neutron stars

    SciT

    Damour, Thibault; Nagar, Alessandro; ICRANet, 65122 Pescara

    We study the various linear responses of neutron stars to external relativistic tidal fields. We focus on three different tidal responses, associated to three different tidal coefficients: (i) a gravito-electric-type coefficient G{mu}{sub l}=[length]{sup 2l+1} measuring the lth-order mass multipolar moment GM{sub a{sub 1}}{sub ...a{sub I}} induced in a star by an external lth-order gravito-electric tidal field G{sub a{sub 1}}{sub ...a{sub I}}; (ii) a gravito-magnetic-type coefficient G{sigma}{sub l}=[length]{sup 2l+1} measuring the lth spin multipole moment GS{sub a{sub 1}}{sub ...a{sub I}} induced in a star by an external lth-order gravito-magnetic tidal field H{sub a{sub 1}}{sub ...a{sub I}}; and (iii) a dimensionless 'shape'more » Love number h{sub l} measuring the distortion of the shape of the surface of a star by an external lth-order gravito-electric tidal field. All the dimensionless tidal coefficients G{mu}{sub l}/R{sup 2l+1}, G{sigma}{sub l}/R{sup 2l+1}, and h{sub l} (where R is the radius of the star) are found to have a strong sensitivity to the value of the star's 'compactness'c{identical_to}GM/(c{sub 0}{sup 2}R) (where we indicate by c{sub 0} the speed of light). In particular, G{mu}{sub l}/R{sup 2l+1}{approx}k{sub l} is found to strongly decrease, as c increases, down to a zero value as c is formally extended to the 'black hole (BH) limit'c{sup BH}=1/2. The shape Love number h{sub l} is also found to significantly decrease as c increases, though it does not vanish in the formal limit c{yields}c{sup BH}, but is rather found to agree with the recently determined shape Love numbers of black holes. The formal vanishing of {mu}{sub l} and {sigma}{sub l} as c{yields}c{sup BH} is a consequence of the no-hair properties of black holes. This vanishing suggests, but in no way proves, that the effective action describing the gravitational interactions of black holes may not need to be augmented by nonminimal worldline couplings.« less

  19. Geomorphic Modeling of Macro-Tidal Embayment with Extensive Tidal Flats: Skagit Bay, Washington

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-30

    Geomorphic modeling of macro-tidal embayment with extensive tidal flats: Skagit Bay , Washington Lyle Hibler Battelle-Pacific Northwest Division...Marine Sciences Laboratory Sequim , WA 98382 phone: (360) 681-3616 fax: (360) 681-4559 email: lyle.hibler@pnl.gov Adam Maxwell Battelle-Pacific...Northwest Division Marine Sciences Laboratory Sequim , WA 98382 phone: (360) 681-4591 fax: (360) 681-4559 email: adam.maxwell@pnl.gov Award

  20. Comparative genomics reveals adaptation by Alteromonas sp. SN2 to marine tidal-flat conditions: cold tolerance and aromatic hydrocarbon metabolism.

    PubMed

    Math, Renukaradhya K; Jin, Hyun Mi; Kim, Jeong Myeong; Hahn, Yoonsoo; Park, Woojun; Madsen, Eugene L; Jeon, Che Ok

    2012-01-01

    Alteromonas species are globally distributed copiotrophic bacteria in marine habitats. Among these, sea-tidal flats are distinctive: undergoing seasonal temperature and oxygen-tension changes, plus periodic exposure to petroleum hydrocarbons. Strain SN2 of the genus Alteromonas was isolated from hydrocarbon-contaminated sea-tidal flat sediment and has been shown to metabolize aromatic hydrocarbons there. Strain SN2's genomic features were analyzed bioinformatically and compared to those of Alteromonas macleodii ecotypes: AltDE and ATCC 27126. Strain SN2's genome differs from that of the other two strains in: size, average nucleotide identity value, tRNA genes, noncoding RNAs, dioxygenase gene content, signal transduction genes, and the degree to which genes collected during the Global Ocean Sampling project are represented. Patterns in genetic characteristics (e.g., GC content, GC skew, Karlin signature, CRISPR gene homology) indicate that strain SN2's genome architecture has been altered via horizontal gene transfer (HGT). Experiments proved that strain SN2 was far more cold tolerant, especially at 5°C, than the other two strains. Consistent with the HGT hypothesis, a total of 15 genomic islands in strain SN2 likely confer ecological fitness traits (especially membrane transport, aromatic hydrocarbon metabolism, and fatty acid biosynthesis) specific to the adaptation of strain SN2 to its seasonally cold sea-tidal flat habitat.

  1. Comparative Genomics Reveals Adaptation by Alteromonas sp. SN2 to Marine Tidal-Flat Conditions: Cold Tolerance and Aromatic Hydrocarbon Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Math, Renukaradhya K.; Jin, Hyun Mi; Kim, Jeong Myeong; Hahn, Yoonsoo; Park, Woojun; Madsen, Eugene L.; Jeon, Che Ok

    2012-01-01

    Alteromonas species are globally distributed copiotrophic bacteria in marine habitats. Among these, sea-tidal flats are distinctive: undergoing seasonal temperature and oxygen-tension changes, plus periodic exposure to petroleum hydrocarbons. Strain SN2 of the genus Alteromonas was isolated from hydrocarbon-contaminated sea-tidal flat sediment and has been shown to metabolize aromatic hydrocarbons there. Strain SN2's genomic features were analyzed bioinformatically and compared to those of Alteromonas macleodii ecotypes: AltDE and ATCC 27126. Strain SN2's genome differs from that of the other two strains in: size, average nucleotide identity value, tRNA genes, noncoding RNAs, dioxygenase gene content, signal transduction genes, and the degree to which genes collected during the Global Ocean Sampling project are represented. Patterns in genetic characteristics (e.g., GC content, GC skew, Karlin signature, CRISPR gene homology) indicate that strain SN2's genome architecture has been altered via horizontal gene transfer (HGT). Experiments proved that strain SN2 was far more cold tolerant, especially at 5°C, than the other two strains. Consistent with the HGT hypothesis, a total of 15 genomic islands in strain SN2 likely confer ecological fitness traits (especially membrane transport, aromatic hydrocarbon metabolism, and fatty acid biosynthesis) specific to the adaptation of strain SN2 to its seasonally cold sea-tidal flat habitat. PMID:22563400

  2. Tenacibaculum litoreum sp. nov., isolated from tidal flat sediment.

    PubMed

    Choi, Dong Han; Kim, Yoon-Gon; Hwang, Chung Yeon; Yi, Hana; Chun, Jongsik; Cho, Byung Cheol

    2006-03-01

    A rod-shaped bacterium, designated CL-TF13T, was isolated from a tidal flat in Ganghwa, Korea. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence revealed an affiliation with the genus Tenacibaculum. The sequence similarities between CL-TF13T and type strains of members of the genus Tenacibaculum were from 94.2 to 97.4%. Cells were motile by means of gliding. Strain CL-TF13T grew on solid medium as pale-yellow colonies with an irregular spreading edge. The strain was able to grow in NaCl at a range of 3-5%. They grew within a temperature range of 5-40 degrees C and at pH range of 6-10. The major fatty acids were summed feature 3 (C(16:1)omega7c and/or iso-C(15:0) 2-OH, 19.6%), iso-C(15:0) (18.8%) and iso-C(17:0) 3-OH (13.6%). Fatty acids such as C(18:3)omega6c (6,9,12) (1.5%) and summed feature 4 (iso I- and/or anteiso B-C(17:1), 1.3%) were uniquely found in minor quantities in CL-TF13T among Tenacibaculum species. The DNA G + C content was 30 mol%. According to physiological data, fatty-acid composition and 16S rRNA gene sequence, CL-TF13T could be assigned to the genus Tenacibaculum but distinguished from the recognized species of the genus. Therefore, strain CL-TF13T (= KCCM 42115T = JCM 13039T) represents a novel species, for which the name Tenacibaculum litoreum sp. nov. is proposed.

  3. Light rays and the tidal gravitational pendulum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farley, A. N. St J.

    2018-05-01

    Null geodesic deviation in classical general relativity is expressed in terms of a scalar function, defined as the invariant magnitude of the connecting vector between neighbouring light rays in a null geodesic congruence projected onto a two-dimensional screen space orthogonal to the rays, where λ is an affine parameter along the rays. We demonstrate that η satisfies a harmonic oscillator-like equation with a λ-dependent frequency, which comprises terms accounting for local matter affecting the congruence and tidal gravitational effects from distant matter or gravitational waves passing through the congruence, represented by the amplitude, of a complex Weyl driving term. Oscillating solutions for η imply the presence of conjugate or focal points along the rays. A polarisation angle, is introduced comprising the orientation of the connecting vector on the screen space and the phase, of the Weyl driving term. Interpreting β as the polarisation of a gravitational wave encountering the light rays, we consider linearly polarised waves in the first instance. A highly non-linear, second-order ordinary differential equation, (the tidal pendulum equation), is then derived, so-called due to its analogy with the equation describing a non-linear, variable-length pendulum oscillating under gravity. The variable pendulum length is represented by the connecting vector magnitude, whilst the acceleration due to gravity in the familiar pendulum formulation is effectively replaced by . A tidal torque interpretation is also developed, where the torque is expressed as a coupling between the moment of inertia of the pendulum and the tidal gravitational field. Precessional effects are briefly discussed. A solution to the tidal pendulum equation in terms of familiar gravitational lensing variables is presented. The potential emergence of chaos in general relativity is discussed in the context of circularly, elliptically or randomly polarised gravitational waves encountering the null

  4. Effect of the tidal-seismic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Y.; Zheng, Y.

    2017-12-01

    For a moon spiraling inward to its planet, the tidal force frequency of a moon is increasing. When the distance of the moon to the planet is close enough, the tidal force frequency can intrude into the frequency range of planet normal modes. Usually the football mode, also known as 0S2, has the lowest frequency. This mode is most likely to be excited and coupled first. When the tidal force has the same frequency with the normal modes, the resonance can happen. The existence of the topography or internal heterogeneities of the planet can have mode coupling. So the energy of gravity force with higher spatial frequencies can be transferred to the low spatial 0S2 mode. The resonant mode 0S2 can exert a negative torque to the rotating moon so its orbit decays. With our 3D numerical boundary element method which takes into account planet surface topography (i.e., Mars as example), we found that the closer the moon is to the planet, the greater falling rate of the moon would be. We applied our method to a planet with equal size of Mars and elastic constants in possible range. The vibration amplitude on the planet surface can reach to the scale of meters when as the moon drop down to about 1.04 radius of the planet to achieve resonance with the 0S2 mode. Our modeling showed that the influence of tidal force caused resonance could not be neglected in the process of moon falling. On the other hand, the resonance may also be able to speed up the accretion of the early forming planet by absorbing the dust of small asteroid nearby by the tidal-seismic resonance.

  5. Tidally Induced Bars of Galaxies in Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Łokas, Ewa L.; Ebrová, Ivana; del Pino, Andrés; Sybilska, Agnieszka; Athanassoula, E.; Semczuk, Marcin; Gajda, Grzegorz; Fouquet, Sylvain

    2016-08-01

    Using N-body simulations, we study the formation and evolution of tidally induced bars in disky galaxies in clusters. Our progenitor is a massive, late-type galaxy similar to the Milky Way, composed of an exponential disk and a Navarro-Frenk-White dark matter halo. We place the galaxy on four different orbits in a Virgo-like cluster and evolve it for 10 Gyr. As a reference case, we also evolve the same model in isolation. Tidally induced bars form on all orbits soon after the first pericenter passage and survive until the end of the evolution. They appear earlier, are stronger and longer, and have lower pattern speeds for tighter orbits. Only for the tightest orbit are the properties of the bar controlled by the orientation of the tidal torque from the cluster at pericenter. The mechanism behind the formation of the bars is the angular momentum transfer from the galaxy stellar component to its halo. All of the bars undergo extended periods of buckling instability that occur earlier and lead to more pronounced boxy/peanut shapes when the tidal forces are stronger. Using all simulation outputs of galaxies at different evolutionary stages, we construct a toy model of the galaxy population in the cluster and measure the average bar strength and bar fraction as a function of clustercentric radius. Both are found to be mildly decreasing functions of radius. We conclude that tidal forces can trigger bar formation in cluster cores, but not in the outskirts, and thus can cause larger concentrations of barred galaxies toward the cluster center.

  6. EARTH’S ROTATIONAL DECELERATION: DETERMINATION OF TIDAL FRICTION INDEPENDENT OF TIMESCALES

    SciT

    Deines, Steven D.; Williams, Carol A., E-mail: steven.deines@gmail.com, E-mail: cw@math.usf.edu

    This paper determines Earth's rotational deceleration without relying on atomic or ephemeris timescales. Earth's rotation defines the civil time standard called Universal Time (UT). Our previous paper did not examine tidal friction in depth when analyzing the timescale divergence between UT and International Atomic Time (TAI). We examine all available paleontological fossils and deposits for the direct measurements of Earth's past rotation rates, because that record includes all contributing effects. We examine paleontological reports that date Earth's rotation rate using corals, bivalves, brachiopods, rhythmites, and stromatolites. Contributions that vary Earth's moment of inertia, such as continental plate drifts, coastline changes, icemore » age formations, and viscous glacial rebounds, are superimposed with the secular deceleration. The average deceleration of Earth's rotation rate from all available fossil data is found to be (5.969 ± 1.762) × 10{sup −7} rad yr{sup −2}. Our value is 99.8% of the total rotational deceleration determined by Christodoulidis et al., who used artificial satellite data, and our value is 96.6% of the expected tidal friction value obtained by Stephenson and Morrison. Taking the derivative of conserved angular momentum, the predicted lunar orbital deceleration caused by the average rotational deceleration corresponds closely to lunar models. When evaluating the significant time gaps between UT and TAI, Earth's rotational deceleration is a minor contributing factor. Also, the secular deceleration rate is necessary to correctly date ancient astronomical events. We strongly encourage that more ocean paleontological evidence be found to supplement the record to separate the many periodic variations embedded in these data.« less

  7. Earth’s Rotational Deceleration: Determination of Tidal Friction Independent of Timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deines, Steven D.; Williams, Carol A.

    2016-04-01

    This paper determines Earth's rotational deceleration without relying on atomic or ephemeris timescales. Earth's rotation defines the civil time standard called Universal Time (UT). Our previous paper did not examine tidal friction in depth when analyzing the timescale divergence between UT and International Atomic Time (TAI). We examine all available paleontological fossils and deposits for the direct measurements of Earth's past rotation rates, because that record includes all contributing effects. We examine paleontological reports that date Earth's rotation rate using corals, bivalves, brachiopods, rhythmites, and stromatolites. Contributions that vary Earth's moment of inertia, such as continental plate drifts, coastline changes, ice age formations, and viscous glacial rebounds, are superimposed with the secular deceleration. The average deceleration of Earth's rotation rate from all available fossil data is found to be (5.969 ± 1.762) × 10-7 rad yr-2. Our value is 99.8% of the total rotational deceleration determined by Christodoulidis et al., who used artificial satellite data, and our value is 96.6% of the expected tidal friction value obtained by Stephenson and Morrison. Taking the derivative of conserved angular momentum, the predicted lunar orbital deceleration caused by the average rotational deceleration corresponds closely to lunar models. When evaluating the significant time gaps between UT and TAI, Earth's rotational deceleration is a minor contributing factor. Also, the secular deceleration rate is necessary to correctly date ancient astronomical events. We strongly encourage that more ocean paleontological evidence be found to supplement the record to separate the many periodic variations embedded in these data.

  8. Discover Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, Colleen

    1998-01-01

    Discover Earth is a NASA-sponsored project for teachers of grades 5-12, designed to: (1) enhance understanding of the Earth as an integrated system; (2) enhance the interdisciplinary approach to science instruction; and (3) provide classroom materials that focus on those goals. Discover Earth is conducted by the Institute for Global Environmental Strategies in collaboration with Dr. Eric Barron, Director, Earth System Science Center, The Pennsylvania State University; and Dr. Robert Hudson, Chair, the Department of Meteorology, University of Maryland at College Park. The enclosed materials: (1) represent only part of the Discover Earth materials; (2) were developed by classroom teachers who are participating in the Discover Earth project; (3) utilize an investigative approach and on-line data; and (4) can be effectively adjusted to classrooms with greater/without technology access. The Discover Earth classroom materials focus on the Earth system and key issues of global climate change including topics such as the greenhouse effect, clouds and Earth's radiation balance, surface hydrology and land cover, and volcanoes and climate change. All the materials developed to date are available on line at (http://www.strategies.org) You are encouraged to submit comments and recommendations about these materials to the Discover Earth project manager, contact information is listed below. You are welcome to duplicate all these materials.

  9. Lunar recession encoded in tidal rhythmites: a selective overview with examples from Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Azarevich, Vanina L. López; Azarevich, Miguel B.

    2017-08-01

    The study of tides from the sedimentary record of tidal rhythmites, applying fast Fourier transform analysis, contributes to the understanding of the surficial evolution of our highly dynamic planet, and of the astronomical cycles that influenced the ancient tidal systems. This overview of lunar retreat rates, which includes examples from Argentina, displays a generalized pattern of nonlinear, progressively extended lunar cycles up to the present day. The lunar retreat calculated at different stages of the Earth's history identifies three time spans of extremely high recession rates, amounting to almost twice that of the present day: Archean-Paleoproterozoic (6.93 cm/year), Neoproterozoic I-Ediacaran (7.01 cm/year) and Ediacaran-early Cambrian (6.48 cm/year). Older comparable recession rates are difficult to recognize because of the lack of tidal rhythmic sequences. The maximum lunar retreat rate is registered after the Copernican meteor bombardment event on the Moon at 900 Ma, and the time span coincides with the continental dispersal of Rodinia. Every acceleration of the lunar retreat rate coincides with two main processes: (1) meteorite impacts on the Earth or Moon, and (2) reconfiguration of landmasses accompanied by earthquakes that generated changes in the rotational axis of the Earth, inundation surfaces, and glaciation/deglaciation processes. The simultaneous occurrence of such processes makes it difficult to distinguish the causes and effects of each individual process, but its conjunction would have promoted the destabilization of the Earth-Moon system in terms of moment of inertia that was transferred to the Moon rotation.

  10. Tidal Control of Jet Eruptions Observed by Cassini ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurford, T. A.; Helfenstein, P.; Spitale, J. N.

    2012-01-01

    Observations by Cassini's Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) of Enceladus' south polar region at high phase angles has revealed jets of material venting into space. Observations by Cassini's Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) have also shown that the south polar region is anomalously warm with hotspots associated with geological features called the Tiger Stripes. The Tiger Stripes are large rifts near the south pole of Enceladus, which are typically about 130 km in length, 2 km wide, with a trough 500 m deep, and are l1anked on each side by 100m tall ridges. Preliminary triangulation of jets as viewed at different times and with different viewing geometries in Cassini ISS images taken between 2005 and 2007 have constrained the locations of eight major eruptions of material and found all of them associated with the south polar fractures unofficially the 'Tiger Stripes', and found four of them coincident with the hotspots reported in 2006 by CIRS. While published ISS observations of jet activity suggest that individual eruption sites stay active on the timescale of years, any shorter temporal variability (on timescales of an orbital period, or 1.3 Earth days, for example) is more difficult to establish because of the spotty temporal coverage and the difficulty of visually isolating one jet from the forest of many seen in a typical image. Consequently, it is not known whether individual jets are continuously active, randomly active, or if they erupt on a predictable, periodic schedule. One mechanism that may control the timing of eruptions is diurnal tidal stress, which oscillates between compression/tension as well as right and left lateral shear at any given location throughout Enceladus' orbit and may allow the cracks to open and close regularly. We examine the stresses on the Tiger Stripe regions to see how well diurnal tidal stress caused by Enceladus' orbital eccentricity may possibly correlate with and thus control the observed eruptions. We then identify

  11. Initial Dynamical Evolution of Star Clusters with Tidal Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, So-Myoung; Goodwin, Simon P.; Kim, Sungsoo S.

    2017-03-01

    Observations have been suggested that star clusters could form from the rapid collapse and violent relaxation of substructured distributions. We investigate the collapse of fractal stellar distributions in no, weak, and very strong tidal fields. We find that the rapid collapse of substructure into spherical clusters happens quickly with no or a weak tidal field, but very strong tidal fields prevent a cluster forming. However, we also find that dense Plummer spheres are also rapidly destroyed in strong tidal fields. We suggest that this is why the low-mass star clusters cannot survive near the galactic centre which has strong tidal field.

  12. Pentacyclic antibiotics from a tidal mud flat-derived actinomycete.

    PubMed

    Moon, Kyuho; Chung, Beomkoo; Shin, Yoonho; Rheingold, Arnold L; Moore, Curtis E; Park, Sung Jean; Park, Sunghyouk; Lee, Sang Kook; Oh, Ki-Bong; Shin, Jongheon; Oh, Dong-Chan

    2015-03-27

    The combination of investigating a unique source of chemically prolific bacterium with an LC/MS-based bacterial strain selection approach resulted in the discovery of two new secondary metabolites, buanmycin (1) and buanquinone (2), from the culture of a marine Streptomyces strain, which was isolated from a tidal mudflat in Buan, Republic of Korea. The carbon backbone of buanmycin (1), comprising 20 quaternary carbons out of 30 total carbons, was determined via (13)C-(13)C COSY NMR analysis after labeling 1 with (13)C by culturing the bacterium with (13)C-glucose. The complete structure of 1 was confidently elucidated, primarily based on 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopic and X-ray crystallographic analysis, as that of a new pentacyclic xanthone. The absolute configuration of the α-methyl serine unit in 1 was established by applying the advanced Marfey's method. The structure of buanquinone (2) was determined to be a new pentacyclic quinone based on NMR and MS spectroscopic data. Buanmycin exhibited potent cytotoxicity against colorectal carcinoma cells (HCT-116) and gastric carcinoma cells (SNU-638) with submicromolar IC50 values and strongly inhibited the pathogenic Gram-negative bacterium Salmonella enterica (MIC = 0.7 μM). In particular, buanmycin demonstrated inhibition of sortase A, which is a promising target for antibiotic discovery.

  13. Natural Strain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, Alan D.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a consistent and thorough development of the strain and strain-rate measures affiliated with Hencky. Natural measures for strain and strain-rate, as I refer to them, are first expressed in terms of of the fundamental body-metric tensors of Lodge. These strain and strain-rate measures are mixed tensor fields. They are mapped from the body to space in both the Eulerian and Lagrangian configurations, and then transformed from general to Cartesian fields. There they are compared with the various strain and strain-rate measures found in the literature. A simple Cartesian description for Hencky strain-rate in the Lagrangian state is obtained.

  14. Tidal disruption of fuzzy dark matter subhalo cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Xiaolong; Schwabe, Bodo; Niemeyer, Jens C.; Bürger, David

    2018-03-01

    We study tidal stripping of fuzzy dark matter (FDM) subhalo cores using simulations of the Schrödinger-Poisson equations and analyze the dynamics of tidal disruption, highlighting the differences with standard cold dark matter. Mass loss outside of the tidal radius forces the core to relax into a less compact configuration, lowering the tidal radius. As the characteristic radius of a solitonic core scales inversely with its mass, tidal stripping results in a runaway effect and rapid tidal disruption of the core once its central density drops below 4.5 times the average density of the host within the orbital radius. Additionally, we find that the core is deformed into a tidally locked ellipsoid with increasing eccentricities until it is completely disrupted. Using the core mass loss rate, we compute the minimum mass of cores that can survive several orbits for different FDM particle masses and compare it with observed masses of satellite galaxies in the Milky Way.

  15. Geophysics-based method of locating a stationary earth object

    DOEpatents

    Daily, Michael R [Albuquerque, NM; Rohde, Steven B [Corrales, NM; Novak, James L [Albuquerque, NM

    2008-05-20

    A geophysics-based method for determining the position of a stationary earth object uses the periodic changes in the gravity vector of the earth caused by the sun- and moon-orbits. Because the local gravity field is highly irregular over a global scale, a model of local tidal accelerations can be compared to actual accelerometer measurements to determine the latitude and longitude of the stationary object.

  16. The Tidal Triggering of Earthquakes Under Certain Circumstances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodacre, A. K.

    2004-05-01

    Although it would be lunacy to claim that all earthquakes are triggered by the motions of the Moon and Sun, there are certain circumstances where these celestial bodies might play a role. This would especially be the case where pre-existing, nearly vertical zones of weakness are present and, hence, the solid-earth tidal stresses would have maximum effect. I have investigated two possible areas: i) the Charlevoix seismic region of Québec along the St. Lawrence River and )ii the San Andreas and Calaveras Faults in California. In the Charlevoix region there a few suites of earthquakes, recognized by Maurice Lamontagne and lying mainly beneath or at the edge of the St. Lawrence River, in which the events in each suite occur in a relatively small volume of rock and produce similar waveforms characteristic of the particular location involved. This sort of repeated rupturing suggests the possibility of triggering by solid-earth and/or marine tides. In one sequence of 9 events (2 of which are left out of the analysis because they are aftershocks) it appears that there is only about one chance in ten that this sequence occurred at random. Unfortunately, there are no fault-plane solutions for any events in this particular set of earthquakes and so it is difficult to comment on failure mechanisms. However, in the case of the Calaveras and San Andreas Faults of California where fault-plane solutions are often available, if we restrict our attention to the larger, strike-slip earthquakes, it appears that lunar and solar tides (both solid-earth and marine) do, in fact, play a role in the timing of these events and the triggering mechanism may involve the amount of incremental normal stress acting upon these two faults.

  17. North American coastal carbon stocks and exchanges among the coupled ecosystems of tidal wetlands and estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windham-Myers, L.; Cai, W. J.

    2017-12-01

    The development of the 2nd State of the Carbon Cycle Report (SOCCR-2) has recognized a significant role of aquatic ecosystems, including coastal zones, in reconciling some of the gaps associated with the North American carbon (C) budget. Along with a large community of coauthors, we report major C stocks and fluxes for tidal wetlands and estuaries of Canada, Mexico and the United States. We find divergent patterns between these coupled ecosystems, with tidal wetlands largely serving as CO2 sinks (net autotrophic), and open-water estuaries largely serving as CO2 sources (net heterotrophic). We summarized measurements across 4 continental regions - East Coast, Gulf of Mexico, West Coast, and High Latitudes - to assess spatial variability and datagaps in our understanding of coastal C cycling. Subtracting estuarine outgassing of 10 ± 10 Tg C yr-1 from the tidal wetland uptake of 23 ± 10 Tg C yr-1 leaves a net uptake of the combined system of 13 ± 14 Tg C yr-1. High uncertainty for net atmospheric C exchange in this combined coastal system is further complicated by spatially and temporally dynamic boundaries, as well as terrestrial C sources. Tidal wetlands are among the most productive ecosystems on earth and are capable of continuously accumulating organic C in their sediments as a result of environmental conditions that inhibit organic matter decomposition. Estuaries have more interannual variability in C dynamics than those of tidal wetlands, reflecting the estuarine balance of exchanges with terrestrial watersheds, tidal wetlands, and the continental shelf. Whereas tidal, subtidal and estuarine maps are of limited accuracy at larger scales, North America likely represents less than 1/10 of global distributions of coastal wetland habitats. Coupled land-ocean C flux models are increasingly robust but lacking much of the data needed for parameterization and validation. Accurate boundary maps and synoptic monitoring data on air-water CO2 exchange may be developed

  18. Observation of the nearly diurnal resonance of the earth using a laser strainmeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, J.

    1978-01-01

    The response of the Earth to the diurnal and semidiurnal tidal excitations was studied. Results show that there is significant structure in the response of the earth to tidal excitations near one cycle/sidereal day. This structure agrees with the resonance behavior predicted from the calculations of the forced elasticgravitational response of an elliptical, rotating earth with a liquid outer core. The data is used to test for possible preferred frames and spatial anisotropies. Upper bounds on the parameterized post-Newtonian (PPN) parameters were examined.

  19. Continuous borehole strain and pore pressure in the near field of the 28 September 2004 M 6.0 parkfield, California, earthquake: Implications for nucleation, fault response, earthquake prediction and tremor

    Johnston, M.J.S.; Borcherdt, R.D.; Linde, A.T.; Gladwin, M.T.

    2006-01-01

    Near-field observations of high-precision borehole strain and pore pressure, show no indication of coherent accelerating strain or pore pressure during the weeks to seconds before the 28 September 2004 M 6.0 Parkfield earthquake. Minor changes in strain rate did occur at a few sites during the last 24 hr before the earthquake but these changes are neither significant nor have the form expected for strain during slip coalescence initiating fault failure. Seconds before the event, strain is stable at the 10-11 level. Final prerupture nucleation slip in the hypocentral region is constrained to have a moment less than 2 ?? 1012 N m (M 2.2) and a source size less than 30 m. Ground displacement data indicate similar constraints. Localized rupture nucleation and runaway precludes useful prediction of damaging earthquakes. Coseismic dynamic strains of about 10 microstrain peak-to-peak were superimposed on volumetric strain offsets of about 0.5 microstrain to the northwest of the epicenter and about 0.2 microstrain to the southeast of the epicenter, consistent with right lateral slip. Observed strain and Global Positioning System (GPS) offsets can be simply fit with 20 cm of slip between 4 and 10 km on a 20-km segment of the fault north of Gold Hill (M0 = 7 ?? 1017 N m). Variable slip inversion models using GPS data and seismic data indicate similar moments. Observed postseismic strain is 60% to 300% of the coseismic strain, indicating incomplete release of accumulated strain. No measurable change in fault zone compliance preceding or following the earthquake is indicated by stable earth tidal response. No indications of strain change accompany nonvolcanic tremor events reported prior to and following the earthquake.

  20. HABEBEE: habitability of eyeball-exo-Earths.

    PubMed

    Angerhausen, Daniel; Sapers, Haley; Citron, Robert; Bergantini, Alexandre; Lutz, Stefanie; Queiroz, Luciano Lopes; da Rosa Alexandre, Marcelo; Araujo, Ana Carolina Vieira

    2013-03-01

    Extrasolar Earth and super-Earth planets orbiting within the habitable zone of M dwarf host stars may play a significant role in the discovery of habitable environments beyond Earth. Spectroscopic characterization of these exoplanets with respect to habitability requires the determination of habitability parameters with respect to remote sensing. The habitable zone of dwarf stars is located in close proximity to the host star, such that exoplanets orbiting within this zone will likely be tidally locked. On terrestrial planets with an icy shell, this may produce a liquid water ocean at the substellar point, one particular "Eyeball Earth" state. In this research proposal, HABEBEE: exploring the HABitability of Eyeball-Exo-Earths, we define the parameters necessary to achieve a stable icy Eyeball Earth capable of supporting life. Astronomical and geochemical research will define parameters needed to simulate potentially habitable environments on an icy Eyeball Earth planet. Biological requirements will be based on detailed studies of microbial communities within Earth analog environments. Using the interdisciplinary results of both the physical and biological teams, we will set up a simulation chamber to expose a cold- and UV-tolerant microbial community to the theoretically derived Eyeball Earth climate states, simulating the composition, atmosphere, physical parameters, and stellar irradiation. Combining the results of both studies will enable us to derive observable parameters as well as target decision guidance and feasibility analysis for upcoming astronomical platforms.

  1. Colwellia aestuarii sp. nov., isolated from a tidal flat sediment in Korea.

    PubMed

    Jung, Seo-Youn; Oh, Tae-Kwang; Yoon, Jung-Hoon

    2006-01-01

    A novel Colwellia-like bacterial strain, SMK-10T, was isolated from a tidal flat sediment in Korea and subjected to a polyphasic taxonomic analysis. Cells of strain SMK-10T were Gram-negative, motile, greyish yellow-pigmented, curved rods. Optimal growth occurred at 25-30 degrees C and in the presence of 2-3 % (w/v) NaCl. Strain SMK-10T contained Q-8 as the predominant ubiquinone and C(16 : 1)omega7c and/or iso-C(15 : 0) 2-OH, C(17 : 1), C(15 : 1) and iso-C(16 : 0) as major fatty acids. The DNA G+C content was 39.3 mol%. Phylogenetic trees based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis showed that strain SMK-10T belonged to the genus Colwellia. 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity values (94.7-96.7 %) to the type strains of all other Colwellia species and various differential phenotypic properties were sufficient to distinguish strain SMK-10T from recognized Colwellia species. On the basis of its phenotypic properties and phylogenetic distinctiveness, strain SMK-10T (= KCTC 12480T = DSM 17314T) is classified as the type strain of a novel Colwellia species, for which the name Colwellia aestuarii sp. nov. is proposed.

  2. Roseovarius aestuarii sp. nov., isolated from a tidal flat of the Yellow Sea in Korea.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jung-Hoon; Kang, So-Jung; Oh, Tae-Kwang

    2008-05-01

    A Gram-negative, motile, ovoid to rod-shaped bacterial strain, designated strain SMK-122T, was isolated from a Yellow Sea tidal flat located on the coast of Korea. Strain SMK-122T grew optimally at pH 7.0-8.0 and 30 degrees C. It contained Q-10 as the predominant ubiquinone and possessed C18 : 1omega7c and C16 : 0 as the major fatty acids. The DNA G+C content was 58.6 mol%. A phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain SMK-122T fell within the genus Roseovarius, being closest to Roseovarius nubinhibens ISM(T); the sequence similarities with respect to Roseovarius species ranged from 94.9 to 97.3 %. The mean value for DNA-DNA relatedness between strain SMK-122T and Rva. nubinhibens DSM 15170T was 13 %. Differential phenotypic properties of SMK-122T, together with its phylogenetic and genetic distinctiveness, revealed that this strain is distinct from recognized Roseovarius species. On this basis, strain SMK-122T represents a novel species of the genus Roseovarius, for which the name Roseovarius aestuarii sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is SMK-122T (=KCTC 22174T =CCUG 55325T).

  3. Experiments on topographies lacking tidal conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maas, Leo; Paci, Alexandre; Yuan, Bing

    2015-11-01

    In a stratified sea, internal tides are supposedly generated when the tide passes over irregular topography. It has been shown that for any given frequency in the internal wave band there are an infinite number of exceptions to this rule of thumb. This ``stealth-like'' property of the topography is due to a subtle annihilation of the internal waves generated during the surface tide's passage over the irregular bottom. We here demonstrate this in a lab-experiment. However, for any such topography, subsequently changing the surface tide's frequency does lead to tidal conversion. The upshot of this is that a tidal wave passing over an irregular bottom is for a substantial part trapped to this irregularity, and only partly converted into freely propagating internal tides. Financially supported by the European Community's 7th Framework Programme HYDRALAB IV.

  4. Tidal Disruption Events from Eccentric Nuclear Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wernke, Heather N.; Madigan, Ann-Marie

    2018-04-01

    Stars that get too close to a supermassive black hole are in danger of being tidally disrupted. Stellar two-body relaxation is commonly assumed to be the main driver of these events. Recent work has shown, however, that secular gravitational torques from eccentric nuclear disks can push stars to extreme eccentricities at much higher rates than predicted by two-body relaxation. This work did not include the effects of general relativity, however, which could quench secular torques via rapid apsidal precession. Here we show that, for a star in danger of disruption, general relativity acts on a timescale of less than an orbital period. This short timescale means that general relativity does not have enough time to have a major effect on the orbit. When driven by secular torques from eccentric nuclear disks, tidal disruption event rates are not affected by general relativity.

  5. Power Generation for River and Tidal Generators

    SciT

    Muljadi, Eduard; Wright, Alan; Gevorgian, Vahan

    Renewable energy sources are the second largest contributor to global electricity production, after fossil fuels. The integration of renewable energy continued to grow in 2014 against a backdrop of increasing global energy consumption and a dramatic decline in oil prices during the second half of the year. As renewable generation has become less expensive during recent decades, and it becomes more accepted by the global population, the focus on renewable generation has expanded from primarily wind and solar to include new types with promising future applications, such as hydropower generation, including river and tidal generation. Today, hydropower is considered onemore » of the most important renewable energy sources. In river and tidal generation, the input resource flow is slower but also steadier than it is in wind or solar generation, yet the level of water turbulent flow may vary from one place to another. This report focuses on hydrokinetic power conversion.« less

  6. Tidal Forces as Drivers of Collisional Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asphaug, E.; Agnor, C.; Williams, Q.

    2005-01-01

    Planetary collisions are usually understood as shock-related phenomena, analogous to impact cratering. But at large scales, where the impact timescale is comparable to the gravitational timescale, collisions can be dominated by gravitational torques and disruptive tides. Shock physics fares poorly, in many respects, in explaining asteroid and meteorite genesis. Melts, melt residues, welded agglomerates and hydrous and gasrich phases among meteorites lead to an array of diverse puzzles whose solution might be explained, in part, by the thermomechanics of tidal unloading. Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 disrupted in a process that is common in the present and ancestral solar system, so here we consider specific effects tidal disruption had on the evolution of asteroids, comets and meteorites the unaccreted residues of planet formation.

  7. Earth Wisdom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Matre, Steve

    1985-01-01

    In our human-centered ignorance and arrogance we are rapidly destroying the earth. We must start helping people understand the big picture of ecological concepts. What these concepts mean for our own lives and how we must begin to change our lifestyles in order to live more harmoniously with the earth. (JHZ)

  8. Earth Science

    1976-01-01

    The LAGEOS I (Laser Geodynamics Satellite) was developed and launched by the Marshall Space Flight Center on May 4, 1976 from Vandenberg Air Force Base, California . The two-foot diameter satellite orbited the Earth from pole to pole and measured the movements of the Earth's surface.

  9. The influence of neap-spring tidal variation and wave energy on sediment flux in salt marsh tidal creeks

    Lacy, Jessica; Ferner, Matthew C.; Callaway, John C.

    2018-01-01

    Sediment flux in marsh tidal creeks is commonly used to gage sediment supply to marshes. We conducted a field investigation of temporal variability in sediment flux in tidal creeks in the accreting tidal marsh at China Camp State Park adjacent to northern San Francisco Bay. Suspended-sediment concentration (SSC), velocity, and depth were measured near the mouths of two tidal creeks during three six-to-ten-week deployments: two in winter and one in summer. Currents, wave properties and SSC were measured in the adjacent shallows. All deployments spanned the largest spring tides of the season. Results show that tidally-averaged suspended-sediment flux (SSF) in the tidal creeks decreased with increasing tidal energy, and SSF was negative (bayward) for tidal cycles with maximum water surface elevation above the marsh plain. Export during the largest spring tides dominated the cumulative SSF measured during the deployments. During ebb tides following the highest tides, velocities exceeded 1 m/s in the narrow tidal creeks, resulting in negative tidally-averaged water flux, and mobilizing sediment from the creek banks or bed. Storm surge also produced negative SSF. Tidally-averaged SSF was positive in wavey conditions with moderate tides. Spring-tide sediment export was about 50% less at a station 130 m further up the tidal creek than at the creek mouth. The negative tidally-averaged water flux near the creek mouth during spring tides indicates that in the lower marsh, some of the water flooding directly across the bay--marsh interface drains through the tidal creeks, and suggests that this interface may be a pathway for sediment supply to the lower marsh as well.

  10. Effect of tidal fields on star clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernoff, David; Weinberg, Martin

    1991-01-01

    We follow the dynamical evolution of a star cluster in a galactic tidal field using a restricted N-body code. We find large asymmetric distortions in the outer profile of the cluster in the first 10 or so crossing times as material is lost. Prograde stars escape preferentially and establish a potentially observable retrograde rotation in the halo. We present the rate of particle loss and compare with the prescription proposed by Lee and Ostriker (1987).

  11. Tidal and Dynamical Evolution of Binary Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, Seth A.; Scheeres, D. J.

    2009-05-01

    We derive a realistic model for the evolution of a tidally perturbed binary, using classical theory, to examine the system just after a spin-up fission event. The spin rate of an asteroid can be increased by the Yarkovsky-O'Keefe-Radzievskii-Paddack (YORP) effect -- thermal re-radiation from an asymmetric body, which induces torques that can rotationally accelerate the body. If the asteroid is modeled as a "rubble pile", a collection of gravitationally bound gravel with no tensile strength, increasing the spin rate will lead to a fission process that would resemble that of a viscous fluidic body [Holsapple 2007]. However, high-resolution imagery of an asteroid's constituents indicates that there is a significant distribution of size scales. A specific example is the asteroid Itokawa, which appears to be two such rubble piles in contact with each other [Fujiwara 2006]. The shape of these bodies will be irregular (modeled as tri-axial ellipsoids with a gravitational potential expanded up to second order). Their motions will raise tides on the opposing body. These tides will dissipate energy, potentially providing enough energy loss for the system to settle into a stable orbit. Fissioned binary systems are always initially unstable [Scheeres 2009, 2008]. We expect tidal dissipation rates to vary widely during the initial evolution of the system, due to this instability. The model applies instantaneous tidal torques to determine energy loss. Our preliminary results indicate that tidal energy dissipation could relax the system to a state of relative equilibrium on order 100,000 years, creating systems similar to those observed. Holsapple, K. A., Icarus, 187, 2007. Fujiwara, A., Science, 312, 2006. Scheeres, D., CMDA, 2009 (Accepted Jan 10, 2009). Scheeres, D., AAS, DDA meeting #39, #9.01, 2008.

  12. Capture of Small Bodies After Tidal Disruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ershova, A.; Medvedev, Yu.

    2017-09-01

    The subject of the current work is the phisical and dynamical evolution of the small comets group formed by tidal disruption of the protocomet while passing near the large body (Sun, Jupiter). The equations of motion were integrated numericaly. In case of the Sun the evolution of the sun-grazing orbits were discussed and the typical lifetime of such comets was estimated. Nongravitational acceleration and the size reduction of fragments due to sublimation were taking into account using the Marsden formula.

  13. Tidal Dynamics and Mixing Over Steep Topography

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-06-01

    California continental shelf have been observed at several locations (Huthnance, 1989). Shea and Broenkow (1982) observed large 33 tidally related...enhanced transport inside the canyon (Huthnance, 1989). This type of pressure gradient supports the conceptual model proposed by Shea and Broenkow (1982...predicted an enhanced internal tide up-canyon and near the bottom, verified by observations of strong internal tides by Shea and Broenkow (1982) at

  14. Integrating tidal and nontidal ecological assessments

    Mark Southerland; Roberto Llanso

    2016-01-01

    The Maryland Department of Natural Resources (DNR) has a long history of conducting rigorous assessments of ecological conditions in both tidal and nontidal waters. The Long-Term Benthic (LTB) Monitoring Program and the Maryland Biological Stream Survey (MBSS) both use reference-based indicators of benthic invertebrate communities to provide areawide estimates of ...

  15. Influence of fortnightly earth tides at Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    SciT

    Dzurisin, D.

    1980-11-01

    Analysis of 52 historic eruptions confirms the premise that fortnightly earth tides play a significant role in triggering activity at Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii. Since January 1832, nearly twice as many eruptions have occurred nearer fortnightly tidal maximum than tidal minimum (34 vs 18). A straightforward significance test indicates that the likelihood of a fortnightly tidal influence on Kilauea eruptions is roughly 90%. This is not the case for Mauna Loa Volcano, where 37 historic eruptions have been distributed randomly with respect to the fortnightly tide. At Kilauea, stresses induced by fortnightly earth tides presumably act in concert with volcanic andmore » tectonic stresses to trigger shallow magma movements along preexisting zones of weakness. Differences in structure or internal plumbing may limit the effectiveness of this mechanism at Mauna Loa. Tidal effects seem to be less marked at shields than at some island-arc volcanoes, possibly because higher average volcanic stress rates in Hawaii more often override the effects of tidal stresses.« less

  16. [Critical tidal level for Kandelia candel forestation in strong tidal range area].

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jian-biao; Huang, Li; Chen, Shao-bo; Chi, Wei; Ding, Wen-yong; Zhou, Chao-sheng; Zheng, Chun-fang; Wang, Wen-qing

    2010-05-01

    Taking Ximen island of Yueqing bay, the biggest tidal range area among the coasts of China, as study site, an investigation was made on the survival rate, growth characteristics, and attached barnacles of 1- and 3-year-old Kandelia candel seedlings at the elevations 1.96, 1.66, 1.35, and 1.03 m above the zero tidal level of Yellow Sea. Significant differences were observed in the survival rate and growth situation of the seedlings among the elevations. There were two barnacle species, Balanus albicostatus and Balanus amphitrite amphitrite, and B. albicostatus was the major species which attached K. candel most seriously at elevation 1.35 m. The critical tidal level for K. candel in the site was 1.66 m above the zero tidal level, i.e., at least 1.29 m higher than the local mean sea level, and the flooding time per tide cycle being less than 3.65 h. Barnacle, strong tide, and extreme weather event were the main reasons for the higher critical tidal level.

  17. Aestuariispira insulae gen. nov., sp. nov., a lipolytic bacterium isolated from a tidal flat.

    PubMed

    Park, Sooyeon; Park, Ji-Min; Kang, Chul-Hyung; Yoon, Jung-Hoon

    2014-06-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, non-motile, aerobic, curved-to-spiral-rod-shaped bacterium, designated AH-MY2(T), was isolated from a tidal flat on Aphae island in the sea to the south-west of South Korea, and its taxonomic position was investigated using a polyphasic taxonomic approach. Strain AH-MY2(T) grew optimally at 30 °C, at pH 7.0-8.0 and in the presence of 2.0% (w/v) NaCl. Neighbour-joining, maximum-likelihood and maximum-parsimony phylogenetic trees based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain AH-MY2(T) clustered with the type strain of Terasakiella pusilla and that this cluster joined the clade comprising the type strains of species of the genus Thalassospira. Strain AH-MY2(T) exhibited 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity values of 90.6% to the type strain of Terasakiella pusilla and of less than 91.0% to the type strains of other species with validly published names. Strain AH-MY2(T) contained Q-10 as the predominant ubiquinone and C(18 : 1)ω7c as the major fatty acid. The major polar lipids detected in strain AH-MY2(T) were phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, two unidentified aminolipids and one unidentified glycolipid. The DNA G+C content of strain AH-MY2(T) was 56.0 mol%. The phylogenetic data and differential chemotaxonomic and other phenotypic properties revealed that strain AH-MY2(T) represented a novel genus and species within the family Rhodospirillaceae of the class Alphaproteobacteria, for which the name Aestuariispira insulae gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Aestuariispira insulae is AH-MY2(T) ( = KCTC 32577(T) = CECT 8488(T)). © 2014 IUMS.

  18. Tidal controls on river delta morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoitink, A. J. F.; Wang, Z. B.; Vermeulen, B.; Huismans, Y.; Kästner, K.

    2017-09-01

    River delta degradation has been caused by extraction of natural resources, sediment retention by reservoirs, and sea-level rise. Despite global concerns about these issues, human activity in the world’s largest deltas intensifies. Harbour development, construction of flood defences, sand mining and land reclamation emerge as key contemporary factors that exert an impact on delta morphology. Tides interacting with river discharge can play a crucial role in the morphodynamic development of deltas under pressure. Emerging insights into tidal controls on river delta morphology suggest that--despite the active morphodynamics in tidal channels and mouth bar regions--tidal motion acts to stabilize delta morphology at the landscape scale under the condition that sediment import during low flows largely balances sediment export during high flows. Distributary channels subject to tides show lower migration rates and are less easily flooded by the river because of opposing non-linear interactions between river discharge and the tide. These interactions lead to flow changes within channels, and a more uniform distribution of discharge across channels. Sediment depletion and rigorous human interventions in deltas, including storm surge defence works, disrupt the dynamic morphological equilibrium and can lead to erosion and severe scour at the channel bed, even decades after an intervention.

  19. Tidal energy extraction: renewable, sustainable and predictable.

    PubMed

    Nicholls-Lee, R F; Turnock, S R

    2008-01-01

    The tidal flow of sea water induced by planetary motion is a potential source of energy if suitable systems can be designed and operated in a cost-effective manner This paper examines the physical origins of the tides and how the local currents are influenced by the depth of the seabed and presence of land mass and associated coastal features. The available methods of extracting energy from tidal movement are classified into devices that store and release potential energy and those that capture kinetic energy directly. A survey is made of candidate designs and, for the most promising, the likely efficiency of energy conversion and methods of installing them are considered. Overall, the need to reduce CO2 emissions, a likely continued rise in fossil fuel cost will result in a significantly increased use of tidal energy. What is still required, especially for kinetic energy devices, is a much greater understanding of how they can be designed to withstand long-term immersion in the marine environment.

  20. Influence of tidal range on the stability of coastal marshland

    Kirwan, Matthew L.; Guntenspergen, Glenn R.

    2010-01-01

    Early comparisons between rates of vertical accretion and sea level rise across marshes in different tidal ranges inspired a paradigm that marshes in high tidal range environments are more resilient to sea level rise than marshes in low tidal range environments. We use field-based observations to propose a relationship between vegetation growth and tidal range and to adapt two numerical models of marsh evolution to explicitly consider the effect of tidal range on the response of the marsh platform channel network system to accelerating rates of sea level rise. We find that the stability of both the channel network and vegetated platform increases with increasing tidal range. Our results support earlier hypotheses that suggest enhanced stability can be directly attributable to a vegetation growth range that expands with tidal range. Accretion rates equilibrate to the rate of sea level rise in all experiments regardless of tidal range, suggesting that comparisons between accretion rate and tidal range will not likely produce a significant relationship. Therefore, our model results offer an explanation to widely inconsistent field-based attempts to quantify this relationship while still supporting the long-held paradigm that high tidal range marshes are indeed more stable.

  1. Tidal controls on earthquake size-frequency statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ide, S.; Yabe, S.; Tanaka, Y.

    2016-12-01

    The possibility that tidal stresses can trigger earthquakes is a long-standing issue in seismology. Except in some special cases, a causal relationship between seismicity and the phase of tidal stress has been rejected on the basis of studies using many small events. However, recently discovered deep tectonic tremors are highly sensitive to tidal stress levels, with the relationship being governed by a nonlinear law according to which the tremor rate increases exponentially with increasing stress; thus, slow deformation (and the probability of earthquakes) may be enhanced during periods of large tidal stress. Here, we show the influence of tidal stress on seismicity by calculating histories of tidal shear stress during the 2-week period before earthquakes. Very large earthquakes tend to occur near the time of maximum tidal stress, but this tendency is not obvious for small earthquakes. Rather, we found that tidal stress controls the earthquake size-frequency statistics; i.e., the fraction of large events increases (i.e. the b-value of the Gutenberg-Richter relation decreases) as the tidal shear stress increases. This correlation is apparent in data from the global catalog and in relatively homogeneous regional catalogues of earthquakes in Japan. The relationship is also reasonable, considering the well-known relationship between stress and the b-value. Our findings indicate that the probability of a tiny rock failure expanding to a gigantic rupture increases with increasing tidal stress levels. This finding has clear implications for probabilistic earthquake forecasting.

  2. The effects of tidal range on saltmarsh morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwin, Guillaume; Mudd, Simon

    2017-04-01

    Saltmarshes are highly productive coastal ecosystems that act simultaneously as flood barriers, carbon storage, pollutant filters and nurseries. As halophytic plants trap suspended sediment and decay in the settled strata, innervated platforms emerge from the neighbouring tidal flats, forming sub-vertical scarps on their eroding borders and sub-horizontal pioneer zones in areas of seasonal expansion. These evolutions are subject to two contrasting influences: stochastically generated waves erode scarps and scour tidal flats, whereas tidally-generated currents transport sediment to and from the marsh through the channel network. Hence, the relative power of waves and tidal currents strongly influences saltmarsh evolution, and regional variations in tidal range yield marshes of differing morphologies. We analyse several sheltered saltmarshes to determine how their morphology reflects variations in tidal forcing. Using tidal, topographic and spectral data, we implement an algorithm based on the open-source software LSDTopoTools to automatically identify features such as marsh platforms, tidal flats, erosion scarps, pioneer zones and tidal channels on local Digital Elevation Models. Normalised geometric properties are then computed and compared throughout the spectrum of tidal range, highlighting a notable effect on channel networks, platform geometry and wave exposure. We observe that micro-tidal marshes typically display jagged outlines and multiple islands along with wide, shallow channels. As tidal range increases, we note the progressive disappearance of marsh islands and linearization of scarps, both indicative of higher hydrodynamic stress, along with a structuration of channel networks and the increase of levee volume, suggesting higher sediment input on the platform. Future research will lead to observing and modelling the evolution of saltmarshes under various tidal forcing in order to assess their resilience to environmental change.

  3. Tidally influenced alongshore circulation at an inlet-adjacent shoreline

    Hansen, Jeff E.; Elias, Edwin P.L.; List, Jeffrey H.; Erikson, Li H.; Barnard, Patrick L.

    2013-01-01

    The contribution of tidal forcing to alongshore circulation inside the surfzone is investigated at a 7 km long sandy beach adjacent to a large tidal inlet. Ocean Beach in San Francisco, CA (USA) is onshore of a ∼150 km2 ebb-tidal delta and directly south of the Golden Gate, the sole entrance to San Francisco Bay. Using a coupled flow-wave numerical model, we find that the tides modulate, and in some cases can reverse the direction of, surfzone alongshore flows through two separate mechanisms. First, tidal flow through the inlet results in a barotropic tidal pressure gradient that, when integrated across the surfzone, represents an important contribution to the surfzone alongshore force balance. Even during energetic wave conditions, the tidal pressure gradient can account for more than 30% of the total alongshore pressure gradient (wave and tidal components) and up to 55% during small waves. The wave driven component of the alongshore pressure gradient results from alongshore wave height and corresponding setup gradients induced by refraction over the ebb-tidal delta. Second, wave refraction patterns over the inner shelf are tidally modulated as a result of both tidal water depth changes and strong tidal flows (∼1 m/s), with the effect from currents being larger. These tidally induced changes in wave refraction result in corresponding variability of the alongshore radiation stress and pressure gradients within the surfzone. Our results indicate that tidal contributions to the surfzone force balance can be significant and important in determining the direction and magnitude of alongshore flow.

  4. Ancient Earth, Alien Earths Event

    2014-08-20

    Panelists pose for a group photo at the “Ancient Earth, Alien Earths” Event at NASA Headquarters in Washington, DC Wednesday, August 20, 2014. The event was sponsored by NASA, the National Science Foundation (NSF), and the Smithsonian Institution and highlighted how research on early Earth could help guide our search for habitable planets orbiting other stars. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  5. Tidal exchange between a freshwater tidal marsh and an impacted estuary: the Scheldt estuary, Belgium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Damme, Stefan; Frank, Dehairs; Micky, Tackx; Olivier, Beauchard; Eric, Struyf; Britta, Gribsholt; Oswald, Van Cleemput; Patrick, Meire

    2009-11-01

    Tidal marsh exchange studies are relatively simple tools to investigate the interaction between tidal marshes and estuaries. They have mostly been confined to only a few elements and to saltwater or brackish systems. This study presents mass-balance results of an integrated one year campaign in a freshwater tidal marsh along the Scheldt estuary (Belgium), covering oxygen, nutrients (N, P and Si), carbon, chlorophyll, suspended matter, chloride and sulfate. The role of seepage from the marsh was also investigated. A ranking between the parameters revealed that oxygenation was the strongest effect of the marsh on the estuarine water. Particulate parameters showed overall import. Export of dissolved silica (DSi) was more important than exchange of any other nutrient form. Export of DSi and import of total dissolved nitrogen (DIN) nevertheless contributed about equally to the increase of the Si:N ratio in the seepage water. The marsh had a counteracting effect on the long term trend of nutrient ratios in the estuary.

  6. Towards a population synthesis model of objects formed by self-gravitating disc fragmentation and tidal downsizing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forgan, Duncan; Rice, Ken

    2013-07-01

    . Around 40 per cent of surviving objects form solid cores of the order of 5-10 M⊕, and of this group a few do migrate to distances amenable to current exoplanet observations. Over a million disc fragments were simulated in this work, and only one resulted in the formation of a terrestrial planet (i.e. with a core mass of a few Earth masses and no gaseous envelope). These early results suggest that GI followed by tidal downsizing is not the principal mode of planet formation, but remains an excellent means of forming gas giant planets, brown dwarfs and low-mass stars at large semimajor axes.

  7. From Globular Clusters to Tidal Dwarfs: Structure Formation in the Tidal Tails of Merging Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knierman, Karen A.; Gallagher, Sarah C.; Charlton, Jane C.; Hunsberger, Sally D.; Whitmore, Bradley; Kundu, Arunav; Hibbard, J. E.; Zaritsky, Dennis

    2003-09-01

    Using V and I images obtained with the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) of the Hubble Space Telescope, we investigate compact stellar structures within tidal tails. Six regions of tidal debris in the four classic ``Toomre sequence'' mergers: NGC 4038/39 (``Antennae''), NGC 3256, NGC 3921, and NGC 7252 (``Atoms for Peace'') have been studied in order to explore how the star formation depends on the local and global physical conditions. These mergers sample a range of stages in the evolutionary sequence and tails with and without embedded tidal dwarf galaxies. The six tails are found to contain a variety of stellar structures, with sizes ranging from those of globular clusters up to those of dwarf galaxies. From V and I WFPC2 images, we measure the luminosities and colors of the star clusters. NGC 3256 is found to have a large population of blue clusters (0.2<~V-I<~0.9), particularly in its western tail, similar to those found in the inner region of the merger. In contrast, NGC 4038/39 has no clusters in the observed region of the tail, only less luminous point sources likely to be individual stars. NGC 3921 and NGC 7252 have small populations of clusters along their tails. A significant cluster population is clearly associated with the prominent tidal dwarf candidates in the eastern and western tails of NGC 7252. The cluster-rich western tail of NGC 3256 is not distinguished from the others by its dynamical age or by its total H I mass. However, the mergers that have few clusters in the tail all have tidal dwarf galaxies, while NGC 3256 does not have prominent tidal dwarfs. We speculate that star formation in tidal tails may manifest itself either in small structures like clusters along the tail or in large structures such as dwarf galaxies, but not in both. Also, NGC 3256 has the highest star formation rate of the four mergers studied, which may contribute to the high number of star clusters in its tidal tails. Based in part on observations obtained with the

  8. Tenacibaculum aestuarii sp. nov., isolated from a tidal flat sediment in Korea.

    PubMed

    Jung, Seo-Youn; Oh, Tae-Kwang; Yoon, Jung-Hoon

    2006-07-01

    A novel Tenacibaculum-like bacterial strain, SMK-4(T), was isolated from a tidal flat sediment in Korea. Strain SMK-4(T) was Gram-negative, pale yellow-pigmented and rod-shaped. It grew optimally at 30-37 degrees C and in the presence of 2-3 % (w/v) NaCl. It contained MK-6 as the predominant menaquinone and iso-C(15 : 0), iso-C(16 : 0) 3-OH and C(16 : 1)omega7c and/or iso-C(15 : 0) 2-OH as the major fatty acids (>10 % of total fatty acids). The DNA G+C content was 33.6 mol%. Phylogenetic trees based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain SMK-4(T) fell within the evolutionary radiation encompassed by the genus Tenacibaculum. Strain SMK-4(T) exhibited 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity levels of 95.2-98.6 % with respect to the type strains of recognized Tenacibaculum species. DNA-DNA relatedness levels and differential phenotypic properties made it possible to categorize strain SMK-4(T) as a species that is separate from previously described Tenacibaculum species. On the basis of phenotypic properties and phylogenetic and genetic distinctiveness, strain SMK-4(T) (=KCTC 12569(T)=JCM 13491(T)) should be classified as a novel Tenacibaculum species, for which the name Tenacibaculum aestuarii sp. nov. is proposed.

  9. Lutimaribacter saemankumensis gen. nov., sp. nov., isolated from a tidal flat of the Yellow Sea.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jung-Hoon; Kang, So-Jung; Lee, Jung-Sook; Oh, Tae-Kwang

    2009-01-01

    A Gram-negative, non-motile, rod-shaped bacterial strain, designated SMK-117T, belonging to the Alphaproteobacteria, was isolated from a tidal flat of the Yellow Sea, Korea, and was subjected to a polyphasic taxonomic study. Strain SMK-117T grew optimally at pH 7.0-8.0 and 30 degrees C in the presence of 2 % (w/v) NaCl. Neighbour-joining and maximum-likelihood phylogenetic trees based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain SMK-117T clustered with Maritimibacter alkaliphilus HTCC2654T, with which it exhibited a sequence similarity of 95.3 %. Strain SMK-117T contained Q-10 as the predominant ubiquinone and C(18 : 1)omega7c and 11-methyl C(18 : 1)omega7c as the major fatty acids. The major polar lipids were phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, an unidentified aminolipid and two unidentified phospholipids. The DNA G+C content was 63.5 mol%. Strain SMK-117T was differentiated from members of the genera Maritimibacter and Oceanicola on the basis of differences in the fatty acid and polar lipid profiles. The phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic data indicated that strain SMK-117T represents a novel genus and species, for which the name Lutimaribacter saemankumensis gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Lutimaribacter saemankumensis is SMK-117T (=KCTC 22244T =CCUG 55760T).

  10. Tenacibaculum caenipelagi sp. nov., a member of the family Flavobacteriaceae isolated from tidal flat sediment.

    PubMed

    Park, Sooyeon; Yoon, Jung-Hoon

    2013-08-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, non-spore-forming, aerobic, non-flagellated, gliding and rod-shaped bacterial strain, designated HJ-26M(T), was isolated from a tidal flat sediment in the Korean peninsula. It grew optimally at 25-30 °C, at pH 7.0-8.0 and in the presence of 2 % (w/v) NaCl. A neighbour-joining phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that the strain fell within the clade comprising Tenacibaculum species, clustering coherently with the type strains of Tenacibaculum lutimaris and Tenacibaculum aestuarii. Strain HJ-26M(T) exhibited the highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity values of 98.4 and 98.2 % to T. lutimaris TF-26(T) and T. aestuarii SMK-4(T), respectively, and of 94.9-97.4 % to the type strains of the other Tenacibaculum species. Strain HJ-26M(T) contained MK-6 as the predominant menaquinone and iso-C15:0 and iso-C17:0 3-OH as the major fatty acids. The DNA G+C content of strain HJ-26M(T) was 34.5 mol% and its mean DNA-DNA relatedness values with the type strains of T. lutimaris and T. aestuarii were 19 and 23 %, respectively. Differential phenotypic properties, together with the phylogenetic and genetic distinctiveness, revealed that strain HJ-26M(T) is separate from other Tenacibaculum species. On the basis of the data presented, strain HJ-26M(T) is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Tenacibaculum, for which the name Tenacibaculum caenipelagi sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is HJ-26M(T) (= KCTC 32323(T) = CECT 8283(T)).

  11. Tidal salt marshes of the southeast Atlantic Coast: A community profile

    SciT

    Wiegert, R.G.; Freeman, B.J.

    1990-09-01

    This report is part of a series of community profiles on the ecology of wetland and marine communities. This particular profile considers tidal marshes of the southeastern Atlantic coast, from North Carolina south to northern Florida. Alone among the earth's ecosystems, coastal communities are subjected to a bidirectional flooding sometimes occurring twice each day; this flooding affects successional development, species composition, stability, and productivity. In the tidally influenced salt marsh, salinity ranges from less than 1 ppt to that of seawater. Dominant plant species include cordgrasses (Spartina alterniflora and S. cynosuroides), black needlerush (Juncus romerianus), and salt marsh bulrush (Scirpusmore » robustus). Both terrestrail and aquatic animals occur in salt marshes and include herons, egrets ospreys (Pandion haliaetus), bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus), alligators (Alligator Mississippiensis), manatees (Trichecus manatus), oysters, mussels, and fiddler crabs. Currently, the only significant direct commercial use of the tidal salt marshes is by crabbers seeking the blue crab Callinectes sapidus, but the marshes are quite important recreationally, aesthetically, and educationally. 151 refs., 45 figs., 6 tabs.« less

  12. Earth Observation

    2013-08-20

    Earth observation taken during day pass by an Expedition 36 crew member on board the International Space Station (ISS). Per Twitter message: Looking southwest over northern Africa. Libya, Algeria, Niger.

  13. Earth Observation

    2014-09-01

    Earth Observation taken during a night pass by the Expedition 40 crew aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Folder lists this as: New Zealand Aurora night pass. On crewmember's Flickr page - Look straight down into an aurora.

  14. Earth Observation

    2014-06-07

    ISS040-E-008174 (7 June 2014) --- Layers of Earth's atmosphere, brightly colored as the sun rises, are featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 40 crew member on the International Space Station.

  15. Earth Observation

    2014-06-02

    ISS040-E-006817 (2 June 2014) --- Intersecting the thin line of Earth's atmosphere, International Space Station solar array wings are featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 40 crew member on the International Space Station.

  16. Earth Science

    1992-07-18

    Workers at Launch Complex 17 Pad A, Kennedy Space Center (KSC) encapsulate the Geomagnetic Tail (GEOTAIL) spacecraft (upper) and attached payload Assist Module-D upper stage (lower) in the protective payload fairing. GEOTAIL project was designed to study the effects of Earth's magnetic field. The solar wind draws the Earth's magnetic field into a long tail on the night side of the Earth and stores energy in the stretched field lines of the magnetotail. During active periods, the tail couples with the near-Earth magnetosphere, sometimes releasing energy stored in the tail and activating auroras in the polar ionosphere. GEOTAIL measures the flow of energy and its transformation in the magnetotail and will help clarify the mechanisms that control the imput, transport, storage, release, and conversion of mass, momentum, and energy in the magnetotail.

  17. Discover Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Discover Earth is a NASA-funded project for teachers of grades 5-12 who want to expand their knowledge of the Earth system, and prepare to become master teachers who promote Earth system science in their own schools, counties, and throughout their state. Participants from the following states are invited to apply: Connecticut, Delaware, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Washington, DC. Teachers selected for the project participate in a two-week summer workshop conducted at the University of Maryland, College Park; develop classroom-ready materials during the workshop for broad dissemination; conduct a minimum of two peer training activities during the coming school year; and participate in other enrichment/education opportunities as available and desired. Discover Earth is a team effort that utilizes expertise from a range of contributors, and balances science content with hands-on classroom applications.

  18. Earth Observation

    2014-05-31

    Earth Observation taken during a day pass by the Expedition 40 crew aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Folder lists this as: CEO - Arena de Sao Paolo. View used for Twitter message: Cloudy skies over São Paulo Brazil

  19. Earth Observation

    2013-07-26

    Earth observation taken during day pass by an Expedition 36 crew member on board the International Space Station (ISS). Per Twitter message: Never tire of finding shapes in the clouds! These look very botanical to me. Simply perfect.

  20. Earth Observation

    2014-06-12

    Earth Observation taken during a day pass by the Expedition 40 crew aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Folder lists this as: Moon, Japan, Kamchatka with a wild cloud. Part of a solar array is also visible.

  1. Earth Science

    1990-10-24

    Solar Vector Magnetograph is used to predict solar flares, and other activities associated with sun spots. This research provides new understanding about weather on the Earth, and solar-related conditions in orbit.

  2. Earth Observation

    2013-08-03

    Earth observation taken during day pass by an Expedition 36 crew member on board the International Space Station (ISS). Per Twitter message: Perhaps a dandelion losing its seeds in the wind? Love clouds!

  3. Earth Observation

    2014-06-27

    Earth Observation taken during a day pass by the Expedition 40 crew aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Part of Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) is visible. Folder lists this as: the Middle East, Israel.

  4. Measurement of the Tidal Dissipation in Multiple Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokovinin, Andrei

    2007-08-01

    Considerable effort has been spent to date in measuring the period of tidal circularisation in close binaries as a function of age, in order to constrain the tidal dissipation theory. Here we evaluate a new, direct method of measuring the tidal dissipation by precise timings of periastron passages in a very eccentric binary. The example of the 41 Dra system is studied in some detail.

  5. A note on evaluating model tidal currents against observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummins, Patrick F.; Thupaki, Pramod

    2018-01-01

    The root-mean-square magnitude of the vector difference between modeled and observed tidal ellipses is a comprehensive metric to evaluate the representation of tidal currents in ocean models. A practical expression for this difference is given in terms of the harmonic constants that are routinely used to specify current ellipses for a given tidal constituent. The resulting metric is sensitive to differences in all four current ellipse parameters, including phase.

  6. On the tidal prism-channel area relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Alpaos, Andrea; Lanzoni, Stefano; Marani, Marco; Rinaldo, Andrea

    2010-03-01

    We verify the broad applicability of tidal prism cross-sectional area relationships, originally proposed to relate the total water volume entering a lagoon during a characteristic tidal cycle (the tidal prism) to the size of its inlet, to arbitrary sheltered cross sections within a tidal network. We suggest, with reasonable approximation defining a statistical tendency rather than a pointwise equivalence, that the regime of tidal channels may be anywhere related to local landscape-forming prisms embedded in a characteristic spring tide oscillation. The importance of the proposed extension stems from its potential for quantitative predictions of the long-term morphological evolution of whole tidal landforms, in response to forcings affecting tidal prisms. This is the case, in particular, for alterations of relative mean sea levels possibly driven by climate change. Various 1-D and 2-D morphodynamic and hydrodynamic models are employed to evaluate peak flow rates, bottom shear stresses, and the ensuing local tidal prisms. One-dimensional morphodynamic models describing both the longitudinal and cross-sectional evolution of tidal channels are used to verify the validity of the relationship for sheltered sections. Relevant hydrodynamic features determined through accurate 2-D numerical models are compared with those obtained through time-invariant equivalents, defining a mean watershed by an energy landscape from averaged free surface gradients. Empirical evidence gathered within the lagoon of Venice (Italy) supports the proposed extension. We conclude that the geomorphic law relating tidal prisms to channel cross-sectional areas anywhere within a tidal landscape is a valuable tool for studies on long-term tidal geomorphology.

  7. Earth Observations

    2010-06-16

    ISS024-E-006136 (16 June 2010) --- Polar mesospheric clouds, illuminated by an orbital sunrise, are featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 24 crew member on the International Space Station. Polar mesospheric, or noctilucent (?night shining?), clouds are observed from both Earth?s surface and in orbit by crew members aboard the space station. They are called night-shining clouds as they are usually seen at twilight. Following the setting of the sun below the horizon and darkening of Earth?s surface, these high clouds are still briefly illuminated by sunlight. Occasionally the ISS orbital track becomes nearly parallel to Earth?s day/night terminator for a time, allowing polar mesospheric clouds to be visible to the crew at times other than the usual twilight due to the space station altitude. This unusual photograph shows polar mesospheric clouds illuminated by the rising, rather than setting, sun at center right. Low clouds on the horizon appear yellow and orange, while higher clouds and aerosols are illuminated a brilliant white. Polar mesospheric clouds appear as light blue ribbons extending across the top of the image. These clouds typically occur at high latitudes of both the Northern and Southern Hemispheres, and at fairly high altitudes of 76?85 kilometers (near the boundary between the mesosphere and thermosphere atmospheric layers). The ISS was located over the Greek island of Kos in the Aegean Sea (near the southwestern coastline of Turkey) when the image was taken at approximately midnight local time. The orbital complex was tracking northeastward, nearly parallel to the terminator, making it possible to observe an apparent ?sunrise? located almost due north. A similar unusual alignment of the ISS orbit track, terminator position, and seasonal position of Earth?s orbit around the sun allowed for striking imagery of polar mesospheric clouds over the Southern Hemisphere earlier this year.

  8. Earth Rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickey, Jean O.

    1995-01-01

    The study of the Earth's rotation in space (encompassing Universal Time (UT1), length of day, polar motion, and the phenomena of precession and nutation) addresses the complex nature of Earth orientation changes, the mechanisms of excitation of these changes and their geophysical implications in a broad variety of areas. In the absence of internal sources of energy or interactions with astronomical objects, the Earth would move as a rigid body with its various parts (the crust, mantle, inner and outer cores, atmosphere and oceans) rotating together at a constant fixed rate. In reality, the world is considerably more complicated, as is schematically illustrated. The rotation rate of the Earth's crust is not constant, but exhibits complicated fluctuations in speed amounting to several parts in 10(exp 8) [corresponding to a variation of several milliseconds (ms) in the Length Of the Day (LOD) and about one part in 10(exp 6) in the orientation of the rotation axis relative to the solid Earth's axis of figure (polar motion). These changes occur over a broad spectrum of time scales, ranging from hours to centuries and longer, reflecting the fact that they are produced by a wide variety of geophysical and astronomical processes. Geodetic observations of Earth rotation changes thus provide insights into the geophysical processes illustrated, which are often difficult to obtain by other means. In addition, these measurements are required for engineering purposes. Theoretical studies of Earth rotation variations are based on the application of Euler's dynamical equations to the problem of finding the response of slightly deformable solid Earth to variety of surface and internal stresses.

  9. Anelastic tidal dissipation in multi-layer planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remus, F.; Mathis, S.; Zahn, J.-P.; Lainey, V.

    2012-09-01

    Earth-like planets have anelastic mantles, whereas giant planets may have anelastic cores. As for the fluid parts of a body, the tidal dissipation of such solid regions, gravitationally perturbed by a companion body, highly depends on its internal friction, and thus on its internal structure. Therefore, modelling this kind of interaction presents a high interest to provide constraints on planets interiors, whose properties are still quite uncertain. Here, we examine the equilibrium tide in the solid part of a planet, taking into account the presence of a fluid envelope. We derive the different Love numbers that describe its deformation and discuss the dependence of the quality factor Q on the chosen anelastic model and the size of the core. Taking plausible values for the anelastic parameters, and discussing the frequency-dependence of the solid dissipation, we show how this mechanism may compete with the dissipation in fluid layers, when applied to Jupiter- and Saturn-like planets. We also discuss the case of the icy giants Uranus and Neptune. Finally, we present the way to implement the results in the equations that describe the dynamical evolution of planetary systems.

  10. DECIPHERING THERMAL PHASE CURVES OF DRY, TIDALLY LOCKED TERRESTRIAL PLANETS

    SciT

    Koll, Daniel D. B.; Abbot, Dorian S., E-mail: dkoll@uchicago.edu

    2015-03-20

    Next-generation space telescopes will allow us to characterize terrestrial exoplanets. To do so effectively it will be crucial to make use of all available data. We investigate which atmospheric properties can, and cannot, be inferred from the broadband thermal phase curve of a dry and tidally locked terrestrial planet. First, we use dimensional analysis to show that phase curves are controlled by six nondimensional parameters. Second, we use an idealized general circulation model to explore the relative sensitivity of phase curves to these parameters. We find that the feature of phase curves most sensitive to atmospheric parameters is the peak-to-troughmore » amplitude. Moreover, except for hot and rapidly rotating planets, the phase amplitude is primarily sensitive to only two nondimensional parameters: (1) the ratio of dynamical to radiative timescales and (2) the longwave optical depth at the surface. As an application of this technique, we show how phase curve measurements can be combined with transit or emission spectroscopy to yield a new constraint for the surface pressure and atmospheric mass of terrestrial planets. We estimate that a single broadband phase curve, measured over half an orbit with the James Webb Space Telescope, could meaningfully constrain the atmospheric mass of a nearby super-Earth. Such constraints will be important for studying the atmospheric evolution of terrestrial exoplanets as well as characterizing the surface conditions on potentially habitable planets.« less

  11. Impact of tidal heating on the onset of convection in Enceladus' ice shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behounkova, Marie; Tobie, Gabriel; Choblet, Gael; Cadek, Ondrej

    2013-04-01

    Observations of Enceladus by the Cassini spacecraft indicated that its south pole is very active, with jets of water vapor and ice emanating from warm tectonic ridges. Convective processes in the ice shell are commonly advocated to explain the enhanced activity at the south pole. The conditions under which convection may occur on Enceladus are, however, still puzzling. According to the estimation of Barr and McKinnon (2007) based on scaling laws, convection may initiate in Enceladus' ice shell only for grain size smaller than 0.3 mm, which is very small compared to the grain size observed on Earth in polar ice sheets for similar temperature and stress conditions (2-4mm). Moreover, Bahounková et al. (2012) showed that such enhanced activity periods associated with thermal convection and internal melting should be brief (~ 1 - 10Myrs) and should be followed by relatively long periods of inactivity (~ 100Myrs), with a probable cessation of thermal convection. In order to constrain the likelihood and periodicity of enhanced activity periods, the conditions under which thermal convection may restart are needed to be investigated. In particular, the goal is to understand how tidal heating, especially during periods of elevated eccentricity, may influence the onset of convection. To answer this question, 3D simulations of thermal convection including a self-consistent computation of tidal dissipation using the code Antigone (Bahounková et al., 2010, 2012) were performed, a composite non-Newtonian rheology (Goldsby and Kohlstedt, 2001) and Maxwell-like rheology mimicking Andrade model were considered. Our simulations show that the onset of convection may occur in Enceladus' ice shell only for ice grain size smaller or equal than 0.5 mm in absence of tidal heating. Tidal dissipation shifts the critical grain size for convection up to values of 1-1.5 mm. The convection is initiated in the polar region due to enhanced tidal dissipation in this area and remains in the

  12. Earth Observations taken during Expedition Four

    2002-04-21

    ISS004-E-10288 (21 April 2002) --- This view featuring the San Francisco Bay Area was photographed by an Expedition 4 crewmember onboard the International Space Station (ISS). The gray urban footprint of San Francisco, Oakland, San Jose, and their surrounding suburbs contrasts strongly with the green hillsides. Of particular note are the Pacific Ocean water patterns that are highlighted in the sun glint. Sets of internal waves traveling east impinge on the coastline south of San Francisco. At the same time, fresher bay water flows out from the bay beneath the Golden Gate Bridge, creating a large plume traveling westward. Tidal current channels suggest the tidal flow deep in the bay. Because the ISS orbits are not synchronous with the sun, station crewmembers view Earth with variable solar illumination angles. This allows them to document phenomena such as the sun reflecting differentially off surface waters in a way that outlines complicated water structures.

  13. The measurement of Earth rotation on a deformable Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cannon, W. H.

    1980-01-01

    Until recently, the methods of geodetic positioning on the Earth were limited to a precision of roughly one part in 10 to the 6th power. At this level of precision, the Earth can be regarded as a rigid body since the largest departure of the Earth from rigidity is manifested in the strains of the Earth tides which are of the order of one part in 10 to the 7th power. Long baseline interferometry is expected to routinely provide global positioning to a precision of one part in 10 to the 8th power or better. At this level of precision, all parts of the Earth's surface must be regarded as being, at least potentially, in continual motion relative to the geocenter as a result of a variety of geophysical effects. The general implications of this phenomenon for the theory of the Earth's rotation is discussed. Particular attention is given to the question of the measurement of the 'Earth's rotation vector' on a deformable Earth.

  14. Tidal constraints on the interior of Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumoulin, Caroline; Tobie, Gabriel; Verhoeven, Olivier; Rosenblatt, Pascal; Rambaux, Nicolas

    2017-04-01

    As a prospective study for a future exploration of Venus, we compute the tidal response of Venus' interior assuming various mantle compositions and temperature profiles representative of different scenarios of Venus' formation and evolution. The mantle density and seismic velocities are modeled from thermodynamical equilibria of mantle minerals and used to predict the moment of inertia, Love numbers and tidal lag characterizing the signature of the internal structure in the gravity field. The viscoelasticity of the mantle is parameterized using an Andrade rheology. From the models considered here, the moment of inertia lies in the range of 0.327 to 0.342, corresponding to a core radius of 2900 to 3450 km. The potential Love number, k2, varies from 0.25 to 0.36. Viscoelasticity of the mantle strongly increases the Love number relative to previous elastic models : depending on mantle viscosity, k2 is increased by up to 25% using a liquid core. Moreover, once a viscoelastic rheology is assumed for the core, our calculations show that the estimation of k2 from tracking of Magellan and Pioneer Venus Orbiter does not rule out the possibility of a completely solid core. Except if the solid core has a high viscosity (≥ 1018 Pa.s), solutions with both liquid and solid cores are consistent with the present-day estimation of k2. More accurate estimation of the Love number together with estimation of tidal lag by future exploration mission are required to determine the state of Venus' core and to constrain the thermo-compositional evolution of the mantle.

  15. Diffusive Tidal Evolution for Migrating Hot Jupiters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yanqin

    2018-03-01

    I consider a Jovian planet on a highly eccentric orbit around its host star, a situation produced by secular interactions with its planetary or stellar companions. The tidal interactions at every periastron passage exchange energy between the orbit and the planet’s degree-2 fundamental-mode. Starting from zero energy, the f-mode can diffusively grow to large amplitudes if its one-kick energy gain is ≥10‑5 of the orbital energy. This requires a pericenter distance of ≤4 tidal radii (or 1.6 Roche radii). If the f-mode has a non-negligible initial energy, diffusive evolution can occur at a lower threshold. The first effect can stall the secular migration as the f-mode can absorb orbital energy and decouple the planet from its secular perturbers, parking all migrating jupiters safely outside the zone of tidal disruption. The second effect leads to rapid orbit circularization as it allows an excited f-mode to continuously absorb orbital energy as the orbit eccentricity decreases. So without any explicit dissipation, other than the fact that the f-mode will damp nonlinearly when its amplitude reaches unity, the planet can be transported from a few au to ∼0.2 au in ∼104 years. Such a rapid circularization is equivalent to a dissipation factor Q ∼ 1, and it explains the observed deficit of super-eccentric Jovian planets. Lastly, the repeated f-mode breaking likely deposits energy and angular momentum in the outer envelope and avoids thermally ablating the planet. Overall, this work boosts the case for hot Jupiter formation through high-eccentricity secular migration.

  16. Airway Strain during Mechanical Ventilation in an Intact Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Sinclair, Scott E.; Molthen, Robert C.; Haworth, Steve T.; Dawson, Christopher A.; Waters, Christopher M.

    2007-01-01

    Rationale: Mechanical ventilation with large tidal volumes causes ventilator-induced lung injury in animal models. Little direct evidence exists regarding the deformation of airways in vivo during mechanical ventilation, or in the presence of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP). Objectives: To measure airway strain and to estimate airway wall tension during mechanical ventilation in an intact animal model. Methods: Sprague-Dawley rats were anesthetized and mechanically ventilated with tidal volumes of 6, 12, and 25 cm3/kg with and without 10–cm H2O PEEP. Real-time tantalum bronchograms were obtained for each condition, using microfocal X-ray imaging. Images were used to calculate circumferential and longitudinal airway strains, and on the basis of a simplified mathematical model we estimated airway wall tensions. Measurements and Main Results: Circumferential and longitudinal airway strains increased with increasing tidal volume. Levels of mechanical strain were heterogeneous throughout the bronchial tree. Circumferential strains were higher in smaller airways (less than 800 μm). Airway size did not influence longitudinal strain. When PEEP was applied, wall tensions increased more rapidly than did strain levels, suggesting that a “strain limit” had been reached. Airway collapse was not observed under any experimental condition. Conclusions: Mechanical ventilation results in significant airway mechanical strain that is heterogeneously distributed in the uninjured lung. The magnitude of circumferential but not axial strain varies with airway diameter. Airways exhibit a “strain limit” above which an abrupt dramatic rise in wall tension is observed. PMID:17626911

  17. The Ebb and Flow of Tidal Science, and the Impact of Satellite Altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Richard; Egbert, Gary

    2006-01-01

    In the years immediately preceding the launches of Geosat and Topex/Poseidon, tidal science had lapsed into a period of uncertainty and discouragement, brought about by the failure of once-exciting new ideas that eventually proved overly optimistic. A long list of outstanding problems presented themselves, but progress had reached a "low water mark". What was lacking was a high-quality global dataset of tidal measurements, which satellite altimetry -- and especially Topex/Poseidon -- provided. With these data in hand, a "flood tide" of marked progress resulted. In this paper we review some of that progress. An important area of progress, with potentially important implications for other areas of physical oceanography, falls under the topic of "energy dissipation." With precise global constraints provided by altimetry -- combined with precise laser tracking of the altimeter, other geodetic satellites like Lageos, as well as the moon -- the planetary energy budgets of both Earth and ocean tides are now well determined. Moreover, the local energy balances, and thus local estimates of tidal dissipation, have now been mapped, although somewhat coarsely, throughout the ocean. This work has pointed to internal-tide generation in the deep ocean as the once missing sink of tidal energy, and has led to a plethora of new observational and theoretical studies of internal tides, and their role in vertical mixing of the deep ocean. The discovery that internal tides, or some part of them, can be directly mapped with an altimeter opens new lines of research on this topic. Low-mode internal tides have been found, at least in some regions, to propagate several thousand kilometers across open ocean. The study of such waves with altimetry gives us a global view heretofore unattainable, allowing strong observational constraints to be placed on possible ocean mixing processes, such as subharmonic instabilities.

  18. Earth: Earth Science and Health

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maynard, Nancy G.

    2001-01-01

    A major new NASA initiative on environmental change and health has been established to promote the application of Earth science remote sensing data, information, observations, and technologies to issues of human health. NASA's Earth Sciences suite of Earth observing instruments are now providing improved observations science, data, and advanced technologies about the Earth's land, atmosphere, and oceans. These new space-based resources are being combined with other agency and university resources, data integration and fusion technologies, geographic information systems (GIS), and the spectrum of tools available from the public health community, making it possible to better understand how the environment and climate are linked to specific diseases, to improve outbreak prediction, and to minimize disease risk. This presentation is an overview of NASA's tools, capabilities, and research advances in this initiative.

  19. Empirical Tidal Dissipation in Exoplanet Hosts From Tidal Spin-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penev, Kaloyan; Bouma, L. G.; Winn, Joshua N.; Hartman, Joel D.

    2018-04-01

    Stars with hot Jupiters (HJs) tend to rotate faster than other stars of the same age and mass. This trend has been attributed to tidal interactions between the star and planet. A constraint on the dissipation parameter {Q}\\star {\\prime } follows from the assumption that tides have managed to spin up the star to the observed rate within the age of the system. This technique was applied previously to HATS-18 and WASP-19. Here, we analyze the sample of all 188 known HJs with an orbital period <3.5 days and a “cool” host star (T eff < 6100 K). We find evidence that the tidal dissipation parameter ({Q}\\star {\\prime }) increases sharply with forcing frequency, from 105 at 0.5 day‑1 to 107 at 2 day‑1. This helps to resolve a number of apparent discrepancies between studies of tidal dissipation in binary stars, HJs, and warm Jupiters. It may also allow for a HJ to damp the obliquity of its host star prior to being destroyed by tidal decay.

  20. Tidal Wetlands and Coastal Ocean Carbon Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkinson, C.; Wang, S. R.; Forbrich, I.; Giblin, A. E.; Cai, W. J.

    2017-12-01

    Recent overviews of coastal ocean C dynamics have tidal wetlands in a prominent position: a local sink for atmospheric CO2, a local store of OC, and a source of DIC and OC for the adjacent estuary and nearshore ocean. Over the past decade there have been great strides made in quantifying and understanding these flows and linkages. GPP and R of the wetlands are not nearly as imbalanced as thought 30 yrs ago. Heterotrophy of adjacent estuarine waters is not solely due to the respiration of OC exported from the marsh, rather we see the marsh directly respiring into the water during tidal inundation and accumulated marsh DIC draining into tidal creeks. Organic carbon burial on the marsh is still a relatively minor flux, but it is large relative to marsh NEE. Using literature and unpublished data on marsh DIC export, we used examples from Sapelo Island GA USA and Plum Island MA USA to constrain estimates of NEP and potential OC export. P. There remain large uncertainties in quantifying C dynamics of coupled wetland - estuary systems. Gas exchange from the water to atmosphere is one of the largest uncertainties. Work at Sapelo suggests that upwards of 40% of all daily exchange occurs from water flooding the marsh, which is but a few hours a day. This estimate is based on the intercept value for gas exchange vs wind velocity. Another major uncertainty comes from converting between O2 based estimates of metabolism to C. At Sapelo we find PQ and RQ values diverging greatly from Redfield. Finally, C dynamics of the coastal ocean, especially the role of tidal wetlands is likely to change substantially in the future. Studies at Plum Island show a reversal of the 4000 yr process of marsh progradation with marshes eroding away at their edges because of inadequate sediment supply and rising sea level. The fate of eroded OC is questionable. Landward transgression with SLR is the only likely counter to continued wetland loss - but that's a complex social issue requiring new

  1. Does tidal capture produce cataclysmic variables?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailyn, Charles D.; Grindlay, Jonathan E.; Garcia, Michael R.

    1990-01-01

    It is shown that earlier estimates of the number of cataclysmic variables (CVs) to be expected from tidal capture in globular clusters may have been considerably too high, since many such binaries will result in unstable mass transfer, and thus not become CVs after all. In particular, CVs with white dwarf masses less than or obout 1.0 solar mass will be supressed. Such unstable mass transfer events may produce some of the cluster mass loss required to stabilize the cluster core. The smaller number of stable CVs predicted may suggest a reconsideration of the nature of some of the low-luminosity cluster X-ray sources.

  2. Engineering works and the tidal Chesapeake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hargis, W. J., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    The tidal tributaries of the ocean and coastal areas of the mid-Atlantic region and the ecological significance of engineering projects are discussed. The effects of engineering works on maritime environments and resources, with the Chesapeake Bay as the area of prime interest are examined. Significant engineering projects, both actual and proposed, are described. The conflict of navigational demands and maintenance of an estuarine environment for commercial and sport fishing and recreation is described. Specific applications of remote sensors for analyzing ecological conditions of the bay are included.

  3. Comprehensive Characterization a Tidal Energy Site (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polagye, B. L.; Thomson, J. M.; Bassett, C. S.; Epler, J.; Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center

    2010-12-01

    Northern Admiralty Inlet, Puget Sound, Washington is the proposed location of a pilot tidal energy project. Site-specific characterization of the physical and biological environment is required for device engineering and environmental analysis. However, the deep water and strong currents which make the site attractive for tidal energy development also pose unique challenges to collecting comprehensive information. This talk focuses on efforts to optimally site hydrokinetic turbines and estimate their acoustic impact, based on 18 months of field data collected to date. Additional characterization efforts being undertaken by the University of Washington branch of the Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center and its partners include marine mammal presence and behavior, water quality, seabed geology, and biofouling potential. Because kinetic power density varies with the cube of horizontal current velocity, an accurate map of spatial current variations is required to optimally site hydrokinetic turbines. Acoustic Doppler profilers deployed on the seabed show operationally meaningful variations in flow characteristics (e.g., power density, directionality, vertical shear) and tidal harmonic constituents over length scales of less than 100m. This is, in part, attributed to the proximity of this site to a headland. Because of these variations, interpolation between stationary measurement locations introduces potentially high uncertainty. The use of shipboard acoustic Doppler profilers is shown to be an effective tool for mapping peak currents and, combined with information from seabed profilers, may be able to resolve power density variations in the project area. Because noise levels from operating turbines are expected to exceed regulatory thresholds for incidental harassment of marine mammals known to be present in the project area, an estimate of the acoustic footprint is required to permit the pilot project. This requires site-specific descriptions of pre

  4. Physics and observations of tidal disruption events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangalam, Arun; Mageshwaran, Tamilan

    2018-04-01

    We describe a model of tidal disruption events (TDEs) with input physical parameters that include the black hole (BH) mass M•, the specific orbital energy E, the angular momentum J, the star mass M⊙ and radius R⊙. We calculate the rise time of the TDEs, the peak bolometric luminosity in terms of these physical parameters and a typical light curve of TDEs for various All Sky Survey (ASS) and Deep Sky Survey (DSS) missions. We then derive the expected detection rates and discuss the follow up of TDEs through observations in various spectral bands from X-rays to radio wavelengths.

  5. Tidal interactions and infrared-bright QSOs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutchings, J. B.; Neff, S. G.

    1988-01-01

    Deep direct images of five IRAS-selected QSOs with similar IR luminosities and spectral indices have been analyzed. The present objects possess IR luminosities similar to those of the IRAS flux-lined sample of ultraluminous galaxies, but have IR spectral indices similar to those of normal QSOs. Four of the objects are in strong tidal interaction and have blue host galaxies and reddened nuclei. It is suggested that these objects are QSOs and AGN in an intermediate stage of their activity, which lies between that of ultraluminous galaxies and optically selected QSOs.

  6. Atmospheric dynamics of tidally synchronized extrasolar planets.

    PubMed

    Cho, James Y-K

    2008-12-13

    Tidally synchronized planets present a new opportunity for enriching our understanding of atmospheric dynamics on planets. Subject to an unusual forcing arrangement (steady irradiation on the same side of the planet throughout its orbit), the dynamics on these planets may be unlike that on any of the Solar System planets. Characterizing the flow pattern and temperature distribution on the extrasolar planets is necessary for reliable interpretation of data currently being collected, as well as for guiding future observations. In this paper, several fundamental concepts from atmospheric dynamics, likely to be central for characterization, are discussed. Theoretical issues that need to be addressed in the near future are also highlighted.

  7. Ancient Earth, Alien Earths Event

    2014-08-20

    Panelists discuss how research on early Earth could help guide our search for habitable planets orbiting other stars at the “Ancient Earth, Alien Earths” Event at NASA Headquarters in Washington, DC Wednesday, August 20, 2014. The event was sponsored by NASA, the National Science Foundation (NSF), and the Smithsonian Institution and was moderated by Dr. David H. Grinspoon, Senior Scientist at the Planetary Science Institute. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  8. Ancient Earth, Alien Earths Event

    2014-08-20

    Dr. David H. Grinspoon, Senior Scientist, Planetary Science Institute, moderates a panel at the “Ancient Earth, Alien Earths” Event at NASA Headquarters in Washington, DC Wednesday, August 20, 2014. The event was sponsored by NASA, the National Science Foundation (NSF), and the Smithsonian Institution and highlighted how research on early Earth could help guide our search for habitable planets orbiting other stars. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  9. Ancient Earth, Alien Earths Event

    2014-08-20

    An audience member asks the panelists a question at the “Ancient Earth, Alien Earths” Event at NASA Headquarters in Washington, DC Wednesday, August 20, 2014. The event was sponsored by NASA, the National Science Foundation (NSF), and the Smithsonian Institution and was moderated by Dr. David H. Grinspoon, Senior Scientist at the Planetary Science Institute. Six scientists discussed how research on early Earth could help guide our search for habitable planets orbiting other stars. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  10. Photosynthetic and physiological responses of native and exotic tidal woody seedlings to simulated tidal immersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Tonggui; Gu, Shenhua; Zhou, Hefeng; Wang, G. Geoff; Cheng, Xiangrong; Yu, Mukui

    2013-12-01

    Hibiscus hamabo, a native tidal woody species, and Myrica cerifera, an exotic tidal woody species, have been widely planted on coastal beaches in subtropical China. However, whether there are differences in physiological response and tolerance to immersion between the two tidal species is still unknown. Our objectives were to evaluate differences in the photosynthetic and physiological responses to tidal immersion for the two species in the context of sea level rise. With increasing immersion, net photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, intercellular CO2 concentration, and light saturation point declined progressively for both species, whereas dark respiration and light compensation point showed the reverse trend. Lower variation was observed in H. hamabo than in M. cerifera for each index in the same treatment. Photosynthetic ability and utilization of light, especially under high light intensity, decreased for both species. Leaf soluble sugar and protein contents, and glycolate oxidase activity first increased and then decreased with increasing of immersion degree, with the higher values observed in the W4 (4 h duration, 15 cm depth) and W6 (6 h duration, 25 cm depth) treatments for H. hamabo, and W2 (2 h duration, 5 cm depth) and W4 treatments for M. cerifera. These findings indicate that H. hamabo has a better ability to keep the reduction of photosynthesis at a minimum through soluble substance regulated osmotic potential and avoiding excess light damage to the photosynthetic system through increased photorespiration, heat dissipation, chlorophyll fluorescence. Our results suggest that H. hamabo is more tolerant to tidal immersion than M. cerifera, and therefore it is better adapted to the anticipated sea level rise in future.

  11. Conditions for tidal bore formation in convergent alluvial estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonneton, Philippe; Filippini, Andrea Gilberto; Arpaia, Luca; Bonneton, Natalie; Ricchiuto, Mario

    2016-04-01

    Over the last decade there has been an increasing interest in tidal bore dynamics. However most studies have been focused on small-scale bore processes. The present paper describes the first quantitative study, at the estuary scale, of the conditions for tidal bore formation in convergent alluvial estuaries. When freshwater discharge and large-scale spatial variations of the estuary water depth can be neglected, tide propagation in such estuaries is controlled by three main dimensionless parameters: the nonlinearity parameter ε0 , the convergence ratio δ0 and the friction parameter ϕ0. In this paper we explore this dimensionless parameter space, in terms of tidal bore occurrence, from a database of 21 estuaries (8 tidal-bore estuaries and 13 non tidal-bore estuaries). The field data point out that tidal bores occur for convergence ratios close to the critical convergence δc. A new proposed definition of the friction parameter highlights a clear separation on the parameter plane (ϕ0,ε0) between tidal-bore estuaries and non tidal-bore estuaries. More specifically, we have established that tidal bores occur in convergent estuaries when the nonlinearity parameter is greater than a critical value, εc , which is an increasing function of the friction parameter ϕ0. This result has been confirmed by numerical simulations of the two-dimensional Saint Venant equations. The real-estuary observations and the numerical simulations also show that, contrary to what is generally assumed, tide amplification is not a necessary condition for tidal bore formation. The effect of freshwater discharge on tidal bore occurrence has been analyzed from the database acquired during three long-term campaigns carried out on the Gironde/Garonne estuary. We have shown that in the upper estuary the tidal bore intensity is mainly governed by the local dimensionless tide amplitude ε. The bore intensity is an increasing function of ε and this relationship does not depend on freshwater

  12. Catalog of worldwide tidal bore occurrences and characteristics

    Bartsch-Winkler, S.; Lynch, David K.

    1988-01-01

    Documentation of tidal bore phenomena occurring throughout the world aids in defining the typical geographical setting of tidal bores and enables prediction of their occurrence in remote areas. Tidal bores are naturally occurring, tidally generated, solitary, moving water waves up to 6 meters in height that form upstream in estuaries with semidiurnal or nearly semidiurnal tide ranges exceeding 4 meters. Estuarine settings that have tidal bores typically include meandering fluvial systems with shallow gradients. Bores are well defined, having amplitudes greater than wind- or turbulence-caused waves, and may be undular or breaking. Formation of a bore is dependent on depth and velocity of the incoming tide and river outflow. Bores may occur in series (in several channels) or in succession (marking each tidal pulse). Tidal bores propagate up tidal estuaries a greater distance than the width of the estuary and most occur within 100 kilometers upstream of the estuary mouth. Because they are dynamic, bores cause difficulties in some shipping ports and are targets for eradication. Tidal bores are known to occur, or to have occurred in the recent past, in at least 67 localities in 16 countries at all latitudes, including every continent except Antarctica. Parts of Argentina, Canada, Central America, China, Mozambique, Madagascar, Northern Europe, North and South Korea, the United Kingdom, and the U.S.S.R. probably have additional undiscovered or unreported tidal bores. In Turnagain Arm estuary in Alaska, bores cause an abrupt increase in salinity, suspended sediment, surface character, and bottom pressure, a decrease in illumination of the water column, and a change in water temperature. Tidal bores occurring in Turnagain Arm, Alaska, have the

  13. Strain Gage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    HITEC Corporation developed a strain gage application for DanteII, a mobile robot developed for NASA. The gage measured bending forces on the robot's legs and warned human controllers when acceptable forces were exceeded. HITEC further developed the technology for strain gage services in creating transducers out of "Indy" racing car suspension pushrods, NASCAR suspension components and components used in motion control.

  14. Ocean tide models for satellite geodesy and Earth rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickman, Steven R.

    1991-01-01

    A theory is presented which predicts tides in turbulent, self-gravitating, and loading oceans possessing linearized bottom friction, realistic bathymetry, and continents (at coastal boundaries no-flow conditions are imposed). The theory is phrased in terms of spherical harmonics, which allows the tide equations to be reduced to linear matrix equations. This approach also allows an ocean-wide mass conservation constraint to be applied. Solutions were obtained for 32 long and short period luni-solar tidal constituents (and the pole tide), including the tidal velocities in addition to the tide height. Calibrating the intensity of bottom friction produces reasonable phase lags for all constituents; however, tidal amplitudes compare well with those from observation and other theories only for long-period constituents. In the most recent stage of grant research, traditional theory (Liouville equations) for determining the effects of angular momentum exchange on Earth's rotation were extended to encompass high-frequency excitations (such as short-period tides).

  15. Gaetbulicola byunsanensis gen. nov., sp. nov., isolated from tidal flat sediment.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jung-Hoon; Kang, So-Jung; Jung, Yong-Taek; Oh, Tae-Kwang

    2010-01-01

    A Gram-negative, non-motile and pleomorphic bacterial strain, SMK-114(T), which belongs to the class Alphaproteobacteria, was isolated from a tidal flat sample collected in Byunsan, Korea. Strain SMK-114(T) grew optimally at pH 7.0-8.0 and 25-30 degrees C and in the presence of 2 % (w/v) NaCl. A neighbour-joining phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain SMK-114(T) formed a cluster with Octadecabacter species, with which it exhibited 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity values of 95.2-95.4 %. This cluster was part of the clade comprising Thalassobius species with a bootstrap resampling value of 76.3 %. Strain SMK-114(T) exhibited 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity values of 95.1-96.3 % to members of the genus Thalassobius. It contained Q-10 as the predominant ubiquinone and C(18 : 1)omega7c as the major fatty acid. The DNA G+C content was 60.0 mol%. On the basis of phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic data, strain SMK-114(T) is considered to represent a novel species in a new genus for which the name Gaetbulicola byunsanensis gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Gaetbulicola byunsanensis is SMK-114(T) (=KCTC 22632(T) =CCUG 57612(T)).

  16. Muricauda lutimaris sp. nov., isolated from a tidal flat of the Yellow Sea.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jung-Hoon; Kang, So-Jung; Jung, Yong-Taek; Oh, Tae-Kwang

    2008-07-01

    A Gram-negative, non-motile, rod-shaped bacterial strain, SMK-108(T), was isolated from a tidal flat of the Yellow Sea in Korea and was subjected to a polyphasic taxonomic investigation. Strain SMK-108(T) grew optimally at pH 7.0-8.0 and at 30 degrees C. It contained MK-6 as the predominant menaquinone. The major fatty acids were iso-C(17 : 0) 3-OH, iso-C(15 : 1) and iso-C(15 : 0). The DNA G+C content was 41.1 mol%. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis showed that strain SMK-108(T) was related most closely to members of the genus Muricauda, exhibiting 96.6-98.8 % sequence similarity to the type strains of recognized Muricauda species. Strain SMK-108(T) was distinguishable from recognized Muricauda species on the basis of differential phenotypic characteristics, levels of DNA-DNA relatedness and phylogenetic distinctiveness. This organism is thus considered to represent a novel species of the genus Muricauda, for which the name Muricauda lutimaris sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is SMK-108(T) (=KCTC 22173(T) =CCUG 55324(T)).

  17. Do tidal or swing waves roughen planetary surfaces?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochemasov, Gennady G.

    2010-05-01

    Surfaces of the terrestrial planets and their moons are far from being smooth. They are warped by several wavelengths and show a remarkable regularity: their roughness increases with the solar distance. Thus, if for Mercury the surface relief range does not exceed several km, for Mars it is already about 30 km. Earth's range is 20 km, Venus' one 14 km. Recently it was shown that this row of ranges reflects ratios of the tectonic granules radii of terrestrial planets [1, 2]. These radii related to unity of reduced planetary globes (in a geometrical model all planets are represented by even circles [2]) are as follows: Mercury πR/16, Venus πR/6, Earth πR/4, Mars πR/2. It means that in the great planetary circles (equators) there are 32, 12, 8, and 4 tectonic granules (now they all are mapped by remote methods) and their numbers are inversely proportional to the orbital frequencies of the planets: higher frequency - smaller granule, and, vice versa, lower frequency - larger granule. In this planetary law is a firm confirmation of the main conceptual point of the wave planetology: "Orbits make structures" [3]. But how this happens? A basic reason lies in the keplerian elliptical orbits implying periodical changes of planetary bodies accelerations. Periodical slowing down and speeding up produce inertia-gravity waves warping any celestial body. In rotating bodies this wave warping is divided in four directions: two orthogonal and two diagonal. An interference of these directions produces tectonic blocks of three kinds: uplifting, subsiding, and neutral. Sizes and amplitudes of the blocks (granules) depend on the warping wavelengths and increase with the solar distance. Thus, a relief-forming potential and the actual relief range observed on the planets increase in this direction [1, 2, 4]. But the tidal forces diminish in this direction. That is why they cannot be a reason for the relief-forming potential. Having in mind a swinging action of planetary orbits on

  18. Earth Science

    1994-03-08

    Workers at the Astrotech processing facility in Titusville prepared for a news media showing of the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite-1 (GOES-1). GOES-1 was the first in a new generation of weather satellites deployed above Earth. It was the first 3-axis, body-stabilized meteorological satellite to be used by the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and NASA. These features allowed GOES-1 to continuously monitor the Earth, rather than viewing it just five percent of the time as was the case with spin-stabilized meteorological satellites. GOES-1 also has independent imaging and sounding instruments which can operate simultaneously yet independently. As a result, observations provided by each instrument will not be interrupted. The imager produces visual and infrared images of the Earth's surface, oceans, cloud cover and severe storm development, while the prime sounding products include vertical temperature and moisture profiles, and layer mean moisture.

  19. Earth Science

    1994-09-02

    This image depicts a full view of the Earth, taken by the Geostationary Operational Environment Satellite (GOES-8). The red and green charnels represent visible data, while the blue channel represents inverted 11 micron infrared data. The north and south poles were not actually observed by GOES-8. To produce this image, poles were taken from a GOES-7 image. Owned and operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), GOES satellites provide the kind of continuous monitoring necessary for intensive data analysis. They circle the Earth in a geosynchronous orbit, which means they orbit the equatorial plane of the Earth at a speed matching the Earth's rotation. This allows them to hover continuously over one position on the surface. The geosynchronous plane is about 35,800 km (22,300 miles) above the Earth, high enough to allow the satellites a full-disc view of the Earth. Because they stay above a fixed spot on the surface, they provide a constant vigil for the atmospheric triggers for severe weather conditions such as tornadoes, flash floods, hail storms, and hurricanes. When these conditions develop, the GOES satellites are able to monitor storm development and track their movements. NASA manages the design and launch of the spacecraft. NASA launched the first GOES for NOAA in 1975 and followed it with another in 1977. Currently, the United States is operating GOES-8, positioned at 75 west longitude and the equator, and GOES-10, which is positioned at 135 west longitude and the equator. (GOES-9, which malfunctioned in 1998, is being stored in orbit as an emergency backup should either GOES-8 or GOES-10 fail. GOES-11 was launched on May 3, 2000 and GOES-12 on July 23, 2001. Both are being stored in orbit as a fully functioning replacement for GOES-8 or GOES-10 on failure.

  20. Tidal constraints on the interior of Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumoulin, C.; Tobie, G.; Verhoeven, O.; Rosenblatt, P.; Rambaux, N.

    2017-06-01

    As a prospective study for a future exploration of Venus, we compute the tidal response of Venus' interior assuming various mantle compositions and temperature profiles representative of different scenarios of Venus' formation and evolution. The mantle density and seismic velocities are modeled from thermodynamical equilibria of mantle minerals and used to predict the moment of inertia, Love numbers, and tide-induced phase lag characterizing the signature of the internal structure in the gravity field. The viscoelasticity of the mantle is parameterized using an Andrade rheology. From the models considered here, the moment of inertia lies in the range of 0.327 to 0.342, corresponding to a core radius of 2900 to 3450 km. Viscoelasticity of the mantle strongly increases the potential Love number relative to previously published elastic models. Due to the anelasticity effects, we show that the possibility of a completely solid metal core inside Venus cannot be ruled out based on the available estimate of k2 from the Magellan mission (Konopliv and Yoder, 1996). A Love number k2 lower than 0.27 would indicate the presence of a fully solid iron core, while for larger values, solutions with an entirely or partially liquid core are possible. Precise determination of the Love numbers, k2 and h2, together with an estimate of the tidal phase lag, are required to determine the state and size of the core, as well as the composition and viscosity of the mantle.

  1. Tidal constraints on the interior of Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumoulin, C.; Tobie, G.; Verhoeven, O.; Rosenblatt, P.; Rambaux, N.

    2017-12-01

    As a prospective study for a future exploration of Venus, we compute the tidal response of Venus' interior assuming various mantle compositions and temperature profiles representative of different scenarios of Venus' formation and evolution. The mantle density and seismic velocities are modeled from thermodynamical equilibria of mantle minerals and used to predict the moment of inertia, Love numbers, and tide-induced phase lag characterizing the signature of the internal structure in the gravity field. The viscoelasticity of the mantle is parameterized using an Andrade rheology. From the models considered here, the moment of inertia lies in the range of 0.327 to 0.342, corresponding to a core radius of 2900 to 3450 km. Viscoelasticity of the mantle strongly increases the potential Love number relative to previously published elastic models. Due to the anelasticity effects, we show that the possibility of a completely solid metal core inside Venus cannot be ruled out based on the available estimate of k2 from the Magellan mission (Konopliv and Yoder, 1996). A Love number k2 lower than 0.27 would indicate the presence of a fully solid iron core, while for larger values, solutions with an entirely or partially liquid core are possible. Precise determination of the Love numbers, k2 and h2, together with an estimate of the tidal phase lag, are required to determine the state and size of the core, as well as the composition and viscosity of the mantle.

  2. Pond fractals in a tidal flat.

    PubMed

    Cael, B B; Lambert, Bennett; Bisson, Kelsey

    2015-11-01

    Studies over the past decade have reported power-law distributions for the areas of terrestrial lakes and Arctic melt ponds, as well as fractal relationships between their areas and coastlines. Here we report similar fractal structure of ponds in a tidal flat, thereby extending the spatial and temporal scales on which such phenomena have been observed in geophysical systems. Images taken during low tide of a tidal flat in Damariscotta, Maine, reveal a well-resolved power-law distribution of pond sizes over three orders of magnitude with a consistent fractal area-perimeter relationship. The data are consistent with the predictions of percolation theory for unscreened perimeters and scale-free cluster size distributions and are robust to alterations of the image processing procedure. The small spatial and temporal scales of these data suggest this easily observable system may serve as a useful model for investigating the evolution of pond geometries, while emphasizing the generality of fractal behavior in geophysical surfaces.

  3. Simulations of Instabilities in Tidal Tails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comparetta, Justin N.; Quillen, A. C.

    2010-05-01

    We use graphics cards to run a hybrid test particle/N-body simulation to integrate 4 million massless particle trajectories within fully self-consistent N-body simulations of 128,000 - 256,000 particles. The number of massless particles allows us to resolve fine structure in the spatial distribution and phase space of a dwarf galaxy that is disrupted in the tidal field of a Milky Way type galaxy. The tidal tails exhibit clumping or a smoke-like appearance. By running simulations with different satellite particle mass, number of massive vs massless particles and with and without a galaxy disk, we have determined that the instabilities are not due to numerical noise or shocking as the satellite passes through the disk of the Galaxy. The instability is possibly a result of self-gravity which indicates it may be due to Jeans instabilities. Simulations involving different halo particle mass may suggest limitations on dark matter halo substructure. We find that the instabilities are visible in velocity space as well as real space and thus could be identified from velocity surveys as well as number counts.

  4. Pond fractals in a tidal flat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cael, B. B.; Lambert, Bennett; Bisson, Kelsey

    2015-11-01

    Studies over the past decade have reported power-law distributions for the areas of terrestrial lakes and Arctic melt ponds, as well as fractal relationships between their areas and coastlines. Here we report similar fractal structure of ponds in a tidal flat, thereby extending the spatial and temporal scales on which such phenomena have been observed in geophysical systems. Images taken during low tide of a tidal flat in Damariscotta, Maine, reveal a well-resolved power-law distribution of pond sizes over three orders of magnitude with a consistent fractal area-perimeter relationship. The data are consistent with the predictions of percolation theory for unscreened perimeters and scale-free cluster size distributions and are robust to alterations of the image processing procedure. The small spatial and temporal scales of these data suggest this easily observable system may serve as a useful model for investigating the evolution of pond geometries, while emphasizing the generality of fractal behavior in geophysical surfaces.

  5. Earth Observation

    2010-08-23

    ISS024-E-016042 (23 Aug. 2010) --- This night time view captured by one of the Expedition 24 crew members aboard the International Space Station some 220 miles above Earth is looking southward from central Romania over the Aegean Sea toward Greece and it includes Thessaloniki (near center), the larger bright mass of Athens (left center), and the Macedonian capital of Skopje (lower right). Center point coordinates of the area pictured are 46.4 degrees north latitude and 25.5 degrees east longitude. The picture was taken in August and was physically brought back to Earth on a disk with the return of the Expedition 25 crew in November 2010.

  6. Earth Observation

    2014-07-19

    ISS040-E-070412 (19 July 2014) --- One of the Expedition 40 crew members aboard the Earth-orbiting International Space Station recorded this July 19 panorama featuring wildfires which are plaguing the Northwest and causing widespread destruction. (Note: south is at the top of the frame). The orbital outpost was flying 223 nautical miles above Earth at the time of the photo. Parts of Oregon and Washington are included in the scene. Mt. Jefferson, Three Sisters and Mt. St. Helens are all snow-capped and visible in the photo, and the Columbia River can also be delineated.

  7. Earth Observation

    2014-07-19

    ISS040-E-070424 (19 July 2014) --- One of the Expedition 40 crew members aboard the Earth-orbiting International Space Station recorded this July 19 image of wildfires which are plaguing the Northwest and causing widespread destruction. The orbital outpost was flying 223 nautical miles above Earth at the time of the photo. Lightning has been given as the cause of the Ochoco Complex fires in the Ochoco National Forest in central Oregon. The complex has gotten larger since this photo was taken.

  8. Earth observation

    2014-09-04

    ISS040-E-129950 (4 Sept. 2014) --- In this photograph. taken by one of the Expedition 40 crew members aboard the Earth-orbiting International Space Station, the orange spot located in the very center is the sun, which appears to be sitting on Earth's limb. At far right, a small bright spot is believed to be a reflection from somewhere in the camera system or something on the orbital outpost. When the photographed was exposed, the orbital outpost was flying at an altutude of 226 nautical miles above a point near French Polynesia in the Pacific Ocean.

  9. Earth Science

    2004-08-13

    This panoramic view of Hurricane Charley was photographed by the Expedition 9 crew aboard the International Space Station (ISS) on August 13, 2004, at a vantage point just north of Tampa, Florida. The small eye was not visible in this view, but the raised cloud tops near the center coincide roughly with the time that the storm began to rapidly strengthen. The category 2 hurricane was moving north-northwest at 18 mph packing winds of 105 mph. Crew Earth Observations record Earth surface changes over time, as well as more fleeting events such as storms, floods, fires, and volcanic eruptions.

  10. Earth Science

    2004-09-11

    This image hosts a look at the eye of Hurricane Ivan, one of the strongest hurricanes on record, as the storm topped the western Caribbean Sea on Saturday, September 11, 2004. The hurricane was photographed by astronaut Edward M. (Mike) Fincke from aboard the International Space Station (ISS) at an altitude of approximately 230 miles. At the time, the category 5 storm sustained winds in the eye of the wall that were reported at about 160 mph. Crew Earth Observations record Earth surface changes over time, as well as more fleeting events such as storms, floods, fires, and volcanic eruptions.

  11. Earth Science

    2004-09-15

    Except for a small portion of the International Space Station (ISS) in the foreground, Hurricane Ivan, one of the strongest hurricanes on record, fills this image over the northern Gulf of Mexico. As the downgraded category 4 storm approached landfall on the Alabama coast Wednesday afternoon on September 15, 2004, sustained winds in the eye of the wall were reported at about 135 mph. The hurricane was photographed by astronaut Edward M. (Mike) Fincke from aboard the ISS at an altitude of approximately 230 miles. Crew Earth Observations record Earth surface changes over time, as well as more fleeting events such as storms, floods, fires, and volcanic eruptions.

  12. Earth Science

    2004-09-15

    This image hosts a look into the eye of Hurricane Ivan, one of the strongest hurricanes on record, as the storm approached landfall on the central Gulf coast Wednesday afternoon on September 15, 2004. The hurricane was photographed by astronaut Edward M. (Mike) Fincke from aboard the International Space Station (ISS) at an altitude of approximately 230 miles. At the time, sustained winds in the eye of the wall were reported at about 135 mph as the downgraded category 4 storm approached the Alabama coast. Crew Earth Observations record Earth surface changes over time, as well as more fleeting events such as storms, floods, fires, and volcanic eruptions.

  13. Changing tidal hydrodynamics during different stages of eco-geomorphological development of a tidal marsh: A numerical modeling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, J.; Meire, P.; Temmerman, S.

    2017-03-01

    The eco-geomorphological development of tidal marshes, from initially low-elevated bare tidal flats up to a high-elevated marsh and its typical network of channels and creeks, induces long-term changes in tidal hydrodynamics in a marsh, which will have feedback effects on the marsh development. We use a two-dimensional hydrodynamic model of the Saeftinghe marsh (Netherlands) to study tidal hydrodynamics, and tidal asymmetry in particular, for model scenarios with different input bathymetries and vegetation coverages that represent different stages of eco-geomorphological marsh development, from a low elevation stage with low vegetation coverage to a high and fully vegetated marsh platform. Tidal asymmetry is quantified along a 4 km marsh channel by (1) the difference in peak flood and peak ebb velocities, (2) the ratio between duration of the rising tide and the falling tide and (3) the time-integrated dimensionless bed shear stress during flood and ebb. Although spatial variations in tidal asymmetry are large and the different indicators for tidal asymmetry do not always respond similarly to eco-geomorphological changes, some general trends can be obtained. Flood-dominance prevails during the initial bare stage of a low-lying tidal flat. Vegetation establishment and platform expansion lead to marsh-scale flow concentration to the bare channels, causing an increase in tidal prism in the channels along with a less flood-dominant asymmetry of the horizontal tide. The decrease in flood-dominance continues as the platform grows vertically and the sediment-demand of the platform decreases. However, when the platform elevation gets sufficiently high in the tidal frame and part of the spring-neap cycle is confined to the channels, the discharge in the channels decreases and tidal asymmetry becomes more flood-dominant again, indicating an infilling of the marsh channels. Furthermore, model results suggest that hydro-morphodynamic feedbacks based on tidal prism to channel

  14. Topographic enhancement of tidal motion in the western Barents Sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kowalik, Z.; Proshutinsky, A. YU.

    1995-01-01

    A high-resolution numerical lattice is used to study a topographically trapped motion around islands and shallow banks of the western Barents Sea caused both by the semidiurnal and diurnal tidal waves. Observations and model computations in the vicinity of Bear Island show well-developed trapped motion with distinctive tidal oscillatory motion. Numerical investigations demonstrate that one source of the trapped motion is tidal current rectification over shallow topgraphy. Tidal motion supports residual currents of the order of 8 cm/s around Bear Island and shallow Spitsbergenbanken. The structures of enhanced tidal currents for the semidiurnal components are generated in the shallow areas due to topographic amplification. In the diurnal band of oscillations the maximum current is associated with the shelf wave occurrence. Residual currents due to diurnal tides occur at both the shallow areas and the shelf slope in regions of maximum topographic gradients. Surface manifestation of the diurnal current enhancement is the local maximum of tidal amplitude at the shelf break of the order of 5 to 10 cm. Tidal current enhancement and tidally generated residual currents in the Bear Island and Spitsbergenabanken regions cause an increased generation of ice leads, ridges and, trapped motion of the ice floes.

  15. Land use in Korean tidal wetlands: impacts and management strategies.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sun-Kee; Koh, Chul-Hwan; Harris, Richard R; Kim, Jae-Eun; Lee, Jeom-Sook; Ihm, Byung-Sun

    2010-05-01

    The coastal landscapes in southwestern Korea include a diverse array of tidal wetlands and salt marshes. These coastal zones link the ecological functions of marine tidal wetlands and freshwater ecosystems with terrestrial ecosystems. They are rich in biological diversity and play important roles in sustaining ecological health and processing environmental pollutants. Korean tidal wetlands are particularly important as nurseries for economically important fishes and habitats for migratory birds. Diking, draining, tourism, and conversion to agricultural and urban uses have adversely affected Korean tidal wetlands. Recent large development projects have contributed to further losses. Environmental impact assessments conducted for projects affecting tidal wetlands and their surrounding landscapes should be customized for application to these special settings. Adequate environmental impact assessments will include classification of hydrogeomorphic units and consideration of their responses to biological and environmental stressors. As is true worldwide, Korean laws and regulations are changing to be more favorable to the conservation and protection of tidal wetlands. More public education needs to be done at the local level to build support for tidal wetland conservation. Some key public education points include the role of tidal wetlands in maintaining healthy fish populations and reducing impacts of nonpoint source pollution. There is also a need to develop procedures for integrating economic and environmental objectives within the overall context of sustainable management and land uses.

  16. Alaska Tidal Datum Portal | Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical

    Engineering Geology Alaska Tidal Datum Portal Climate and Cryosphere Hazards Coastal Hazards Program Guide to Portal Unambiguous vertical datums in the coastal environment are critical to the evaluation of natural human life, property, and the coastal environment. January 2017 - Update Summary Alaska Tidal Datum

  17. Potential sites for tidal power in New Jersey.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2014-04-01

    High-resolution simulation is made to model tidal energy along the coastlines of New Jersey (NJ) and its neighbor states with an : unprecedentedly fine grid. On the basis of the simulation, a thorough search is made for sites for tidal power generati...

  18. Land Use in Korean Tidal Wetlands: Impacts and Management Strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Sun-Kee; Koh, Chul-Hwan; Harris, Richard R.; Kim, Jae-Eun; Lee, Jeom-Sook; Ihm, Byung-Sun

    2010-05-01

    The coastal landscapes in southwestern Korea include a diverse array of tidal wetlands and salt marshes. These coastal zones link the ecological functions of marine tidal wetlands and freshwater ecosystems with terrestrial ecosystems. They are rich in biological diversity and play important roles in sustaining ecological health and processing environmental pollutants. Korean tidal wetlands are particularly important as nurseries for economically important fishes and habitats for migratory birds. Diking, draining, tourism, and conversion to agricultural and urban uses have adversely affected Korean tidal wetlands. Recent large development projects have contributed to further losses. Environmental impact assessments conducted for projects affecting tidal wetlands and their surrounding landscapes should be customized for application to these special settings. Adequate environmental impact assessments will include classification of hydrogeomorphic units and consideration of their responses to biological and environmental stressors. As is true worldwide, Korean laws and regulations are changing to be more favorable to the conservation and protection of tidal wetlands. More public education needs to be done at the local level to build support for tidal wetland conservation. Some key public education points include the role of tidal wetlands in maintaining healthy fish populations and reducing impacts of nonpoint source pollution. There is also a need to develop procedures for integrating economic and environmental objectives within the overall context of sustainable management and land uses.

  19. Tidal Wave Reflectance, Evolution and Distortion in Elkhorn Slough, CA

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    School O1 Lunisolar diurnal Tidal Constituent ONR Office of Naval Research p Pressure Rhfm High-Frequency Motion Tidal Reflection Coefficient RIVET ...2012 an experiment at the New River Inlet, known as the River and Inlet Dynamics experiment ( RIVET ) was conducted. RIVET 2 is currently scheduled for

  20. A Review of Indicators of Estuarine Tidal Wetland Condition

    EPA Science Inventory

    This review critically evaluates indicators of tidal wetland condition based on 36 indicator development studies and indicators developed as part of U.S. state tidal wetland monitoring programs. Individual metrics were evaluated based on relative scores on two sets of evaluation ...

  1. Are Wave and Tidal Energy Plants New Green Technologies?

    PubMed

    Douziech, Mélanie; Hellweg, Stefanie; Verones, Francesca

    2016-07-19

    Wave and tidal energy plants are upcoming, potentially green technologies. This study aims at quantifying their various potential environmental impacts. Three tidal stream devices, one tidal range plant and one wave energy harnessing device are analyzed over their entire life cycles, using the ReCiPe 2008 methodology at midpoint level. The impacts of the tidal range plant were on average 1.6 times higher than the ones of hydro-power plants (without considering natural land transformation). A similar ratio was found when comparing the results of the three tidal stream devices to offshore wind power plants (without considering water depletion). The wave energy harnessing device had on average 3.5 times higher impacts than offshore wind power. On the contrary, the considered plants have on average 8 (wave energy) to 20 (tidal stream), or even 115 times (tidal range) lower impact than electricity generated from coal power. Further, testing the sensitivity of the results highlighted the advantage of long lifetimes and small material requirements. Overall, this study supports the potential of wave and tidal energy plants as alternative green technologies. However, potential unknown effects, such as the impact of turbulence or noise on marine ecosystems, should be further explored in future research.

  2. A novel approach to flow estimation in tidal rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moftakhari, H. R.; Jay, D. A.; Talke, S. A.; Kukulka, T.; Bromirski, P. D.

    2013-08-01

    Reliable estimation of river discharge to the ocean from large tidal rivers is vital for water resources management and climate analyses. Due to the difficulties inherent in measuring tidal-river discharge, flow records are often limited in length and/or quality and tidal records often predate discharge records. Tidal theory indicates that tides and river discharge interact through quadratic bed friction, which diminishes and distorts the tidal wave as discharge increases. We use this phenomenon to develop a method of estimating river discharge for time periods with tidal data but no flow record. Employing sequential 32 day harmonic analyses of tidal properties, we calibrate San Francisco (SF), CA tide data to the Sacramento River delta outflow index from 1930 to 1990, and use the resulting relationship to hindcast river flow from 1858 to 1929. The M2 admittance (a ratio of the observed M2 tidal constituent to its astronomical forcing) best reproduces high flows, while low-flow periods are better represented by amplitude ratios based on higher harmonics (e.g.,M4/M22). Results show that the annual inflow to SF Bay is now 30% less than before 1900 and confirm that the flood of January 1862 was the largest since 1858.

  3. Digital Earth - A sustainable Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahavir

    2014-02-01

    All life, particularly human, cannot be sustainable, unless complimented with shelter, poverty reduction, provision of basic infrastructure and services, equal opportunities and social justice. Yet, in the context of cities, it is believed that they can accommodate more and more people, endlessly, regardless to their carrying capacity and increasing ecological footprint. The 'inclusion', for bringing more and more people in the purview of development is often limited to social and economic inclusion rather than spatial and ecological inclusion. Economic investment decisions are also not always supported with spatial planning decisions. Most planning for a sustainable Earth, be at a level of rural settlement, city, region, national or Global, fail on the capacity and capability fronts. In India, for example, out of some 8,000 towns and cities, Master Plans exist for only about 1,800. A chapter on sustainability or environment is neither statutorily compulsory nor a norm for these Master Plans. Geospatial technologies including Remote Sensing, GIS, Indian National Spatial Data Infrastructure (NSDI), Indian National Urban Information Systems (NUIS), Indian Environmental Information System (ENVIS), and Indian National GIS (NGIS), etc. have potential to map, analyse, visualize and take sustainable developmental decisions based on participatory social, economic and social inclusion. Sustainable Earth, at all scales, is a logical and natural outcome of a digitally mapped, conceived and planned Earth. Digital Earth, in fact, itself offers a platform to dovetail the ecological, social and economic considerations in transforming it into a sustainable Earth.

  4. A stand-alone tidal prediction application for mobile devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Cheng-Han; Fan, Ren-Ye; Yang, Yi-Chung

    2017-04-01

    It is essential for people conducting fishing, leisure, or research activities at the coasts to have timely and handy tidal information. Although tidal information can be found easily on the internet or using mobile device applications, this information is all applicable for only certain specific locations, not anywhere on the coast, and they need an internet connection. We have developed an application for Android devices, which allows the user to obtain hourly tidal height anywhere on the coast for the next 24 hours without having to have any internet connection. All the necessary information needed for the tidal height calculation is stored in the application. To develop this application, we first simulate tides in the Taiwan Sea using the hydrodynamic model (MIKE21 HD) developed by the DHI. The simulation domain covers the whole coast of Taiwan and the surrounding seas with a grid size of 1 km by 1 km. This grid size allows us to calculate tides with high spatial resolution. The boundary conditions for the simulation domain were obtained from the Tidal Model Driver of the Oregon State University, using its tidal constants of eight constituents: M2, S2, N2, K2, K1, O1, P1, and Q1. The simulation calculates tides for 183 days so that the tidal constants for the above eight constituents of each water grid can be extracted by harmonic analysis. Using the calculated tidal constants, we can predict the tides in each grid of our simulation domain, which is useful when one needs the tidal information for any location in the Taiwan Sea. However, for the mobile application, we only store the eight tidal constants for the water grids on the coast. Once the user activates the application, it reads the longitude and latitude from the GPS sensor in the mobile device and finds the nearest coastal grid which has our tidal constants. Then, the application calculates tidal height variation based on the harmonic analysis. The application also allows the user to input location and

  5. Quantification of tidal parameters from Solar System data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lainey, Valéry

    2016-11-01

    Tidal dissipation is the main driver of orbital evolution of natural satellites and a key point to understand the exoplanetary system configurations. Despite its importance, its quantification from observations still remains difficult for most objects of our own Solar System. In this work, we overview the method that has been used to determine, directly from observations, the tidal parameters, with emphasis on the Love number k_2 and the tidal quality factor Q. Up-to-date values of these tidal parameters are summarized. Last, an assessment on the possible determination of the tidal ratio k_2/Q of Uranus and Neptune is done. This may be particularly relevant for coming astrometric campaigns and future space missions focused on these systems.

  6. Tidal creek changes at the Sonoma Baylands restoration site

    Dingler, John R.; Cacchione, David A.; ,

    1998-01-01

    Over the past 150 years, human activity has had a major impact on tidal wetlands adjoining the San Francisco Bay-Delta estuary Growing concern about the effect of this change on the ecology of the estuary has prompted Bay area managers to attempt to reclaim tidal wetlands. The Sonoma Baylands Restoration Project is designed to use dredge material to convert 348 acres from farmland to wetland. This paper describes changes to a tidal creek that flows from that restoration site to San Pablo Bay (north San Francisco Bay) through an existing tidal wetland during different phases of the project. Hydrologic measurements near the bottom of the creek and cross-creek profiles show how the creek responded to non-tidal flow conditions introduced by filling the site with dredge materials. At the time of this study, the creek had deepened by approximately 40 cm but had not widened.

  7. Tidal Forces in Dyonic Reissner-Nördstrom Black Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharif, M.; Kousar, Lubna

    2018-03-01

    This paper investigates the tidal as well as magnetic charge effects produced in dyonic Reissner-Nordström black hole. We evaluate Newtonian radial acceleration using radial geodesics for freely falling test particles. We establish system of equations governing radial and angular tidal forces using geodesic deviation equation and discuss their solutions for bodies falling freely towards this black hole. The radial tidal force turns out to be compressing outside the event horizon whereas the angular tidal force changes sign between event and Cauchy horizons unlike Schwarzschild black hole. The radial geodesic component starts decreasing in dyonic Reissner-Nordström black hole unlike Schwarzschild case. We conclude that magnetic charge strongly affects the radial as well as angular components of tidal force.

  8. Numerical simulation of tidal dispersion around a coastal headland

    Signell, R.P.; Geyer, W. Rockwell; Cheng, Ralph T.

    1990-01-01

    Tidal flows around headlands can exhibit strong spatial gradients in the Eulerian currents, resulting in complex Lagrangian trajectories and dispersion of the vertically integrated flow. This typically occurs when the horizontal length scale of the headland is comparable to or smaller than the tidal excursion. The effects of these headlands on dispersion are investigated using a depthaveraged hydrodynamic model combined with a particle tracking model. The dispersion of patches of fluid is found to vary by more than an order of magnitude, depending both on position and tidal phase at the time of release. This is due to the infrequent interaction of material with the strongly sheared flow at the tip of the headland, where flow separation occurs during times of maximum tidal flow. Spreading of these patches over many tidal cycles is not Gaussian, but rather shows a patchy, streaky structure.

  9. Understanding the Influence of Retention Basin on Tidal Dynamics in Tidal Estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Mohit; Schuttelaars, Henk; Roos, Pieter

    2014-05-01

    Both the tidal motion and suspended sediment concentration (SSC) in tidal embayments and estuaries are influenced by anthropogenic (e.g. deepening ) and natural changes. An example of such an estuary is the Ems estuary, situated on the border of the Netherlands and Germany. The mean tidal range towards the end of the Ems estuary has increased from 1.5m in the 1950s to more than 3m in the 1990s while the suspended concentration has increased by a factor 10. To possibly reduce these negative effects, the construction of retention basin(s) (RB) is considered. In this contribution, the influence of location and geometry of RBs on tidal dynamics and SSC is investigated. For this purpose, a three-dimensional semi-analytic idealized model is developed. This model is an extension of the model proposed by Winant (2007) to arbitrary domain and realistic bathymetry with partial slip boundary condition at the bottom. The sea surface elevation (SSE) is calculated numerically using a finite element method. Next, the three-dimensional velocities are calculated by combining the analytically calculated vertical profiles and the gradients of the SSE which are obtained numerically. Firstly, the influence of a RB on the tidal dynamics in an infinitely long, rectangular, frictionless estuary is considered. The SSE decreases when the RB is located between a node and a landward antinode, consistent with the work of Alebregtse et al. (2013). Secondly, an estuary of finite length is connected to a sea. By varying the width of the sea, not only the effect of the distance of the RB to the landward end plays a role, but also the distance to the open sea becomes important. Finally, we discuss the influence of a RB on the tidal motion and initial sediment transport, considering the Ems estuary with realistic bathymetry. Results show that the SSE at the landward end of the Ems estuary decreases for all locations of the RBs. This decrease is most pronounced for the RB which is closest to the end

  10. Impact of Tidal-Stream Turbines on the Generation of the Higher Tidal Harmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, Daniel; Ilic, Suzana; Folkard, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    The higher tidal harmonics result from the interaction of the astronomic tides with both themselves and each other through non-linear processes. In shallower waters such as those near the coast these non-linear processes become more significant and thus, so too do the higher tidal harmonics become more significant. The interaction of the tide with tidal-stream turbines (TSTs), through thrust and drag processes will be non-linear and as such will contribute to the generation of higher tidal harmonics, thus changing the nature of the tide downstream of the turbines. The change to the tide may potentially impact on the downstream energy resource (Robins et al. 2015) and sediment transport processes (Pingree & Griffiths 1979). This paper will present analytical results, which suggest that TSTs will impact on the generation of all higher harmonics but with odd overtides being impacted more than even overtides, the most important examples of which are the M6 and M4 tides respectively, which are the first odd and even overtides of the M2 tide. Change in phase and amplitude of the M6 tide by TSTs will distort the tide but will not cause an asymmetry between the flood and ebb of the tide. Change in the phase and amplitude of the M4 can not only distort the tide but also cause asymmetry. Hence any change to the M4 tide by the turbines is more significant, despite the magnitude of change to the M6 being greater. In order to gain a fuller understanding of the way in which TSTs change the tide downstream and the significance of any change for transport processes or energy resource, a numerical modelling study will be carried out, which will be presented in a future paper. Robins, P.E., Neill, S.P., Lewis, M. & Ward, S.L., 2015. Characterising the spatial and temporal variability of the tidal-stream energy resource over the northwest European shelf seas. Applied Energy, 147: 510-522. Pingree, R.D. & Griffiths, D.K., 1979. Sand transport paths around the British Isles resulting

  11. Earth Observation

    2014-08-10

    ISS040-E-091158 (10 Aug. 2014) --- One of the Expedition 40 crew members 225 nautical miles above Earth onboard the International Space Station used a 200mm lens to record this image of Hawke's Bay, New Zealand on Aug. 10, 2014. Napier and the bay area's most populous area are at bottom center of the frame.

  12. Earth Observation

    2013-06-13

    ISS036-E-007619 (13 June 2013) --- To a crew member aboard the International Space Station, the home planet is seen from many different angles and perspectives, as evdenced by this Expedition 36 image of Earth's atmophere partially obscured by one of the orbital outpost's solar panels.

  13. Think Earth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niedermeyer, Fred; Ice, Kay

    1992-01-01

    Describes a series of environmental education instructional units for grades K-6 developed by the Think Earth Consortium that cover topics such as conservation, pollution control, and waste reduction. Provides testimony from one sixth-grade teacher that field tested the second-grade unit. (MDH)

  14. Earth Observation

    2014-09-01

    Earth Observation taken during a night pass by the Expedition 40 crew aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Folder lists this as: New Zealand Aurora night pass. Docked Soyuz and Progress spacecraft are visible. On crewmember's Flickr page - The Moon, about to dive into a glowing ocean of green᥿9.

  15. Earth Observation

    2013-07-21

    Earth observation taken during night pass by an Expedition 36 crew member on board the International Space Station (ISS). Per Twitter message this is labeled as : Tehran, Iran. Lights along the coast of the Caspian Sea visible through clouds. July 21.

  16. Earth Observation

    2013-05-19

    ISS036-E-002224 (21 May 2013) --- The sun is captured in a "starburst" mode over Earth's horizon by one of the Expedition 36 crew members as the orbital outpost was above a point in southwestern Minnesota on May 21, 2013.

  17. Earth Algebra.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaufele, Christopher; Zumoff, Nancy

    Earth Algebra is an entry level college algebra course that incorporates the spirit of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) Curriculum and Evaluation Standards for School Mathematics at the college level. The context of the course places mathematics at the center of one of the major current concerns of the world. Through…

  18. Earth Science

    1993-03-29

    Small Expendable Deployer System (SEDS) is a tethered date collecting satellite and is intended to demonstrate a versatile and economical way of delivering smaller payloads to higher orbits or downward toward Earth's atmosphere. 19th Navstar Global Positioning System Satellite mission joined with previously launched satellites used for navigational purposes and geodite studies. These satellites are used commercially as well as by the military.

  19. Earth Observation

    2014-06-14

    ISS040-E-011868 (14 June 2014) --- The dark waters of the Salton Sea stand out against neighboring cultivation and desert sands in the middle of the Southern California desert, as photographed by one of the Expedition 40 crew members aboard the Earth-orbiting International Space Station on June 14, 2014.

  20. Earth Observation

    2013-08-03

    Earth observation taken during day pass by an Expedition 36 crew member on board the International Space Station (ISS). Per Twitter message: From southernmost point of orbit over the South Pacific- all clouds seemed to be leading to the South Pole.

  1. Earth Sky

    1965-12-16

    S65-63282 (16 Dec. 1965) --- Area of Indian Ocean, just east of the island of Madagascar, as seen from the Gemini-6 spacecraft during its 15th revolution of Earth. Land mass at top of picture is the Malagasy Republic (Madagascar). Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  2. Rare earths

    Gambogi, J.

    2013-01-01

    Global mine production of rare earths was estimated to have declined slightly in 2012 relative to 2011 (Fig. 1). Production in China was estimated to have decreased to 95 from 105 kt (104,700 from 115,700 st) in 2011, while new mine production in the United States and Australia increased.

  3. Earth Observation

    2013-07-04

    ISS036-E-015354 (4 July 2013) --- A number of Quebec, Canada wildfires near the Manicouagan Reservoir (seen at lower left) were recorded as part of a series of photographs taken and downlinked to Earth on July 4 by the Expedition 36 crew members aboard the International Space Station.

  4. Earth Observation

    2013-07-04

    ISS036-E-015355 (4 July 2013) --- A number of Quebec, Canada wildfires near the Manicouagan Reservoir (seen at bottom center) were recorded in a series of photographs taken and downlinked to Earth on July 4 by the Expedition 36 crew members aboard the International Space Station.

  5. Earth Observation

    2013-07-03

    ISS036-E-015292 (3 July 2013) --- A number of Quebec, Canada wildfires southeast of James Bay were recorded as part of a series of photographs taken and downlinked to Earth on July 3-4 by the Expedition 36 crew members aboard the International Space Station. This image was recorded on July 3.

  6. Earth Observation

    2013-07-04

    ISS036-E-015342 (4 July 2013) --- A number of Quebec, Canada wildfires southeast of James Bay were recorded as part of a series of photographs taken and downlinked to Earth on July 4 by the Expedition 36 crew members aboard the International Space Station.

  7. Earth Observation

    2013-07-04

    ISS036-E-015335 (4 July 2013) --- A number of Quebec, Canada wildfires southeast of James Bay were recorded as part of a series of photographs taken and downlinked to Earth on July 4 by the Expedition 36 crew members aboard the International Space Station.

  8. Earth Observation

    2014-06-12

    Earth Observation taken during a day pass by the Expedition 40 crew aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Folder lists this as: Moon, Japan, Kamchatka with a wild cloud. Part of the U.S. Lab and PMM are also visible.

  9. Earth Observation

    2013-08-29

    ISS036-E-038117 (29 Aug. 2013) --- One of the Expedition 36 crew members aboard the Earth-orbiting International Space Station photographed massive smoke plumes from the California wildfires. When this image was exposed on Aug. 29, the orbital outpost was approximately 220 miles above a point located at 38.6 degrees north latitude and 123.2 degrees west longitude.

  10. Earth Observation

    2013-08-29

    ISS036-E-038114 (29 Aug. 2013) --- One of the Expedition 36 crew members aboard the Earth-orbiting International Space Station photographed massive smoke plumes from the California wildfires. When this image was exposed on Aug. 29, the orbital outpost was approximately 220 miles above a point located at 38.6 degrees north latitude and 123.3 degrees west longitude.

  11. Earth Observations

    2014-11-18

    ISS042E006751 (11/08/2014) --- Earth observation taken from the International Space Station of the coastline of the United Arab Emirates. The large wheel along the coast center left is "Jumeirah" Palm Island, with a conference center, hotels, recreation areas and a large marine zoo.

  12. Earth Moon

    1998-06-08

    NASA Galileo spacecraft took this image of Earth moon on December 7, 1992 on its way to explore the Jupiter system in 1995-97. The distinct bright ray crater at the bottom of the image is the Tycho impact basin. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00405

  13. Earth's horizon

    2005-07-30

    S114-E-6076 (30 July 2005) --- The blackness of space and Earth’s horizon form the backdrop for this view of the extended Space Shuttle Discovery’s remote manipulator system (RMS) robotic arm while docked to the International Space Station during the STS-114 mission.

  14. Tidal variations of flow convergence, shear, and stratification at the Rio de la Plata estuary turbidity front

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    FramiñAn, Mariana B.; Valle-Levinson, Arnoldo; Sepúlveda, HéCtor H.; Brown, Otis B.

    2008-08-01

    Intratidal variability of density and velocity fields is investigated at the turbidity front of the Río de la Plata Estuary, South America. Current velocity and temperature-salinity profiles collected in August 1999 along a repeated transect crossing the front are analyzed. Horizontal and vertical gradients, stability of the front, convergence zones, and transverse flow associated to the frontal boundary are described. Strong horizontal convergence of the across-front velocity and build up of along-front velocity shear were observed at the front. In the proximity of the front, enhanced transverse (or along-front) flow created jet-like structures at the surface and near the bottom flowing in opposite directions. These structures persisted throughout the tidal cycle and were advected upstream (downstream) by the flood (ebb) current through a distance of ˜10 km. During peak flood, the upper layer flow reversed from its predominant downstream direction and upstreamflow occupied the entire water column; outside the peak flood, two-layer estuarine circulation dominated. Changes in density field were observed in response to tidal straining, tidal advection, and wind-induced mixing, but stratification remained throughout the tidal cycle. This work demonstrates the large spatial variability of the velocity field at the turbidity front; it provides evidence of enhanced transverse circulation along the frontal boundary; and reveals the importance of advective and frictional intratidal processes in the dynamics of the central part of the estuary.

  15. Diurnal and Semidiurnal Variations in Earth Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weijing, Q.; Xu, X.; Dong, D.; Zhou, Y.

    2016-12-01

    In recent decades, earth orientation has been monitored with increasing accuracy by advanced space-geodetic techniques, including Satellite Laser ranging (SLR), Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) and the Global Positioning System (GPS). We are able to obtain the Earth Rotation Parameters (ERP, polar motion and rotation rate changes) by even 1 to 2 hours observation data, form which obvious diurnal and semidiurnal signals can be detected, and compare them with the predicted results by the ocean model. Both the amplitude and phase are in good agreement in the main diurnal and semidiurnal wave frequency, especially for the UT1 with Consistency of 90% , and 60% for polar motion, there are 30% motivating factor of the diurnal and semidiurnal polar motion have not been identified. This work add the motivating term libration to the empirical tidal models, which can reduce the difference between the high frequency earth rotation model and observations. Then the numerical simulated ocean tidal model is obtained with the newest ERP datas from GPS, and the Scaled Sensitivity Matrix (SSM) approach is used to separate the sidebands in major ocean tides.

  16. Linking channel hydrology with riparian wetland accretion in tidal rivers

    Ensign, Scott H.; Noe, Gregory B.; Hupp, Cliff R.

    2014-01-01

    The hydrologic processes by which tide affects river channel and riparian morphology within the tidal freshwater zone are poorly understood, yet are fundamental to predicting the fate of coastal rivers and wetlands as sea level rises. We investigated patterns of sediment accretion in riparian wetlands along the non-tidal through oligohaline portion of two coastal plain rivers in Maryland, U.S.A., and how flow velocity, water level, and suspended sediment concentration (SSC) in the channel may have contributed to those patterns. Sediment accretion was measured over a one year period using artificial marker horizons, channel hydrology was measured over a one month period using acoustic Doppler current profilers, and SSC was predicted from acoustic backscatter. Riparian sediment accretion was lowest at the non-tidal sites (mean and standard deviation = 8 ± 8 mm yr-1), highest at the upstream tidal freshwater forested wetlands (TFFW) (33 ± 28 mm yr-1), low at the midstream TFFW (12 ± 9 mm yr-1), and high at the oligohaline (fresh-to-brackish) marshes (19 ± 8 mm yr-1). Channel maximum flood and ebb velocity was 2-fold faster at the oligohaline than tidal freshwater zone on both tidal rivers, corresponding with the differences in in-channel SSC: the oligohaline zone's SSC was more than double the tidal freshwater zone's, and was greater than historical SSC at the non-tidal gages. The tidal wave characteristics differed between rivers, leading to significantly greater in-channel SSC during floodplain inundation in the weakly convergent than the strongly convergent tidal river. Overall sediment accretion was higher in the embayed river likely due to a single storm discharge and associated sedimentation.

  17. Earth Observations

    2010-09-09

    ISS024-E-014071 (9 Sept. 2010) --- This striking panoramic view of the southwestern USA and Pacific Ocean is an oblique image photographed by an Expedition 24 crew member looking outwards at an angle from the International Space Station (ISS). While most unmanned orbital satellites view Earth from a nadir perspective?in other words, collecting data with a ?straight down? viewing geometry?crew members onboard the space station can acquire imagery at a wide range of viewing angles using handheld digital cameras. The ISS nadir point (the point on Earth?s surface directly below the spacecraft) was located in northwestern Arizona, approximately 260 kilometers to the east-southeast, when this image was taken. The image includes parts of the States of Arizona, Nevada, Utah, and California together with a small segment of the Baja California, Mexico coastline at center left. Several landmarks and physiographic features are readily visible. The Las Vegas, NV metropolitan area appears as a gray region adjacent to the Spring Mountains and Sheep Range (both covered by white clouds). The Grand Canyon, located on the Colorado Plateau in Arizona, is visible (lower left) to the east of Las Vegas with the blue waters of Lake Mead in between. The image also includes the Mojave Desert, stretching north from the Salton Sea (left) to the Sierra Nevada mountain range. The Sierra Nevada range is roughly 640 kilometers long (north-south) and forms the boundary between the Central Valley of California and the adjacent Basin and Range. The Basin and Range is so called due to the pattern of long linear valleys separated by parallel linear mountain ranges ? this landscape, formed by extension and thinning of Earth?s crust, is particularly visible at right.

  18. Earth Observations

    2010-07-23

    ISS024-E-009404 (23 July 2010) --- This photo taken from the International Space Station on July 23, 2010, shows the Gulf of Mexico oil spill as part of ongoing observations of the region. When this image was taken, three months after the explosion on the Deepwater Horizon oil rig, the leak had been plugged for eight days. Water surfaces appear bright and land surfaces appear dark in the image. The stark contrast is due to sun glint, in which the sun is reflected brilliantly off all water surfaces back towards the astronaut observer on board the station. The sun glint reveals various features in the Gulf of Mexico, especially sheens of oil as packets of long bright streaks seen on the left side of the image. Sediments carried by the Mississippi River have a light-yellow coloration in this image, with distinct margins between plumes that likely mark tidal pulses of river water into the Gulf of Mexico. A boat wake cuts across one of the oil packets at image lower left. Daily National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) maps of oil distribution show predicted heavier and lighter oil movement near the Gulf coastline. The maps show that on the day this image was taken, the north edge of the ?oiled? zone was expected to bank up against the delta. The observed spread of the surface oil in the approximately 100 days since the explosion highlights the connectivity between the deepwater areas and coastlines of the Gulf of Mexico.

  19. Ancient Earth, Alien Earths Event

    2014-08-20

    Dr. Shawn Domagal-Goldman, Research Space Scientist, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, speaks on a panel at the “Ancient Earth, Alien Earths” Event at NASA Headquarters in Washington, DC Wednesday, August 20, 2014. The event was sponsored by NASA, the National Science Foundation (NSF), and the Smithsonian Institution and was moderated by Dr. David H. Grinspoon, Senior Scientist at the Planetary Science Institute. Six scientists discussed how research on early Earth could help guide our search for habitable planets orbiting other stars. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  20. Ancient Earth, Alien Earths Event

    2014-08-20

    Dr. Phoebe Cohen, Professor of Geosciences, Williams College, speaks on a panel at the “Ancient Earth, Alien Earths” Event at NASA Headquarters in Washington, DC Wednesday, August 20, 2014. The event was sponsored by NASA, the National Science Foundation (NSF), and the Smithsonian Institution and was moderated by Dr. David H. Grinspoon, Senior Scientist at the Planetary Science Institute. Six scientists discussed how research on early Earth could help guide our search for habitable planets orbiting other stars. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  1. Ancient Earth, Alien Earths Event

    2014-08-20

    Dr. Christopher House, Professor of Geosciences, Pennsylvania State University, speaks on a panel at the “Ancient Earth, Alien Earths” Event at NASA Headquarters in Washington, DC Wednesday, August 20, 2014. The event was sponsored by NASA, the National Science Foundation (NSF), and the Smithsonian Institution and was moderated by Dr. David H. Grinspoon, Senior Scientist at the Planetary Science Institute. Six scientists discussed how research on early Earth could help guide our search for habitable planets orbiting other stars. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  2. Ancient Earth, Alien Earths Event

    2014-08-20

    Dr. Dawn Sumner, Professor of Geology, UC Davis, speaks on a panel at the “Ancient Earth, Alien Earths” Event at NASA Headquarters in Washington, DC Wednesday, August 20, 2014. The event was sponsored by NASA, the National Science Foundation (NSF), and the Smithsonian Institution and was moderated by Dr. David H. Grinspoon, Senior Scientist at the Planetary Science Institute. Six scientists discussed how research on early Earth could help guide our search for habitable planets orbiting other stars. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  3. Ancient Earth, Alien Earths Event

    2014-08-20

    Dr. Timothy Lyons, Professor of Biogeochemistry, UC Riverside, speaks on a panel at the “Ancient Earth, Alien Earths” Event at NASA Headquarters in Washington, DC Wednesday, August 20, 2014. The event was sponsored by NASA, the National Science Foundation (NSF), and the Smithsonian Institution and was moderated by Dr. David H. Grinspoon, Senior Scientist at the Planetary Science Institute. Six scientists discussed how research on early Earth could help guide our search for habitable planets orbiting other stars. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  4. Tidal dissipation and evolution of white dwarfs around massive black holes: an eccentric path to tidal disruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vick, Michelle; Lai, Dong; Fuller, Jim

    2017-06-01

    A white dwarf (WD) captured into a high-eccentricity orbit around a massive black hole (MBH) may undergo many pericentre passages before tidal disruption. During these passages, the tidal potential of the MBH excites internal oscillations or waves in the WD, and the dissipation of these oscillations can significantly influence the physical properties of the WD prior to its disruption. We calculate the amplitude of the tidally excited gravity (buoyancy) waves in the WD as a function of the pericentre distance and eccentricity for realistic WD models, under the assumption that these outgoing gravity waves are efficiently dissipated in the outer layers of the WD by non-linear effects or radiative damping. We obtain fitting formulae for the tidal energy and angular momentum transfer rates as well as the tidal heating rate. We find that these dynamical tides are much weaker than gravitational radiation in driving the orbital decay of the WD-MBH binary, and they are also inefficient in changing the WD spin during the orbital evolution. Incorporating our computed tidal dissipation rate into a mesa-based WD evolution code, we find that tidal heating can lead to appreciable brightening of the WD and may induce runaway fusion in the hydrogen envelope well before the WD undergoes tidal disruption.

  5. Earth meandering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asadiyan, H.; Zamani, A.

    2009-04-01

    In this paper we try to put away current Global Tectonic Model to look the tectonic evolution of the earth from new point of view. Our new dynamic model is based on study of river meandering (RM) which infer new concept as Earth meandering(EM). In a universal gravitational field if we consider a clockwise spiral galaxy model rotate above Ninety East Ridge (geotectonic axis GA), this system with applying torsion field (likes geomagnetic field) in side direction from Rocky Mt. (west geotectonic pole WGP) to Tibetan plateau TP (east geotectonic pole EGP),it seems that pulled mass from WGP and pushed it in EGP due to it's rolling dynamics. According to this idea we see in topographic map that North America and Green land like a tongue pulled from Pacific mouth toward TP. Actually this system rolled or meander the earth over itself fractaly from small scale to big scale and what we see in the river meandering and Earth meandering are two faces of one coin. River transport water and sediments from high elevation to lower elevation and also in EM, mass transport from high altitude-Rocky Mt. to lower altitude Himalaya Mt. along 'S' shape geodetic line-optimum path which connect points from high altitude to lower altitude as kind of Euler Elastica(EE). These curves are responsible for mass spreading (source) and mass concentration (sink). In this regard, tiltness of earth spin axis plays an important role, 'S' are part of sigmoidal shape which formed due to intersection of Earth rolling with the Earth glob and actual feature of transform fault and river meandering. Longitudinal profile in mature rivers as a part of 'S' curve also is a kind of EE. 'S' which bound the whole earth is named S-1(S order 1) and cube corresponding to this which represent Earth fracturing in global scale named C-1(cube order 1 or side vergence cube SVC), C-1 is a biggest cycle of spiral polygon, so it is not completely closed and it has separation about diameter of C-7. Inside SVC we introduce cone

  6. Ultraviolet Spectroscopy of Tidal Disruption Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cenko, Stephen B.

    2017-08-01

    When a star passes within the sphere of disruption of a massive black hole, tidal forces will overcome self-gravity and unbind the star. While approximately half of the stellar debris is ejected at high velocities, the remaining material stays bound to the black hole and accretes, resulting in a luminous, long-lived transient known as a tidal disruption flare (TDF). In addition to serving as unique laboratories for accretion physics,TDFs offer the hope of measuring black hole masses in galaxies much too distant for resolved kinematic studies.In order to realize this potential, we must better understand the detailed processes by which the bound debris circularizes and forms an accretion disk. Spectroscopy is critical to this effort, as emission and absorption line diagnostics provide insight into the location and physical state (velocity, density, composition) of the emitting gas (in analogy with quasars). UV spectra are particularly critical, as most strong atomic features fall in this bandpass, and high-redshift TDF discoveries from LSST will sample rest-frame UV wavelengths.Here I present recent attempts to obtain UV spectra of tidal disruption flares. I describe the UV spectrum of ASASSN-14li, in which we detect three classes of features: narrow absorption from the Milky Way (probably a high-velocity cloud), and narrow absorption and broad (2000-8000 km s-1) emission lines at or near the systemic host velocity. The absorption lines are blueshifted with respect to the emission lines by 250-400 km s-1. Due both to this velocity offset and the lack of common low-ionization features (Mg II, Fe II), we argue these arise from the same absorbing material responsible for the low-velocity outflow discovered at X-ray wavelengths. The broad nuclear emission lines display a remarkable abundance pattern: N III], N IV], and He II are quite prominent, while the common quasar emission lines of C III] and Mg II are weak or entirely absent. Detailed modeling of this spectrum will

  7. Anisotropic dissipation of the global internal tide from a higher-order multiscale barotropic tidal simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salehipour, Hesam; Peltier, W. Richard

    2013-04-01

    will present maps of energy dissipation for different tidal constituents using grids with resolutions up to 1/18° in coastal regions as well as in areas with high gradients in the bottom topography. The discontinuous Galerkin formulation provides important energy conservation properties as well as enabling the accurate representation of sharp topographic gradients without smoothing, a feature well matched to the multi-scale problem of the dissipation of the internal tide. We will describe the detailed energy budgets delivered by this model under both modern and Last Glacial Maximum oceanographic conditions, including relative sea level and internal density stratification effects. The results of the simulations will be illustrated with global maps with enhanced resolution for the internal tidal dissipation which may be exploited in the parameterization of vertical mixing. We will use the reconstructed paleotopography of the ICE-5G model of Peltier [Annu. Rev. Earth Planet Sci. 2004] as well as the more recent refinement (ICE-6G) to compute the characteristics of the LGM tidal regime and will compare these characteristics to those of the modern ocean.

  8. Sediment Dynamics in Shallow Tidal Landscapes: The Role of Wind Waves and Tidal Currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carniello, L.; D'Alpaos, A.

    2014-12-01

    A precise description of sediment dynamics (resuspension and re-distribution of sediments) is crucial when investigating the long term evolution of the different morphological entities characterizing tidal landscapes. It has been demonstrated that wind waves are the main responsible for sediment resuspension in shallow micro-tidal lagoons where tidal currents, which produce shear stresses large enough to carry sediments into suspension only within the main channels, are mainly responsible for sediment redistribution. A mathematical model has been developed to describe sediment entrainment, transport and deposition due to the combined effect of tidal currents and wind waves in shallow lagoons considering both cohesive and non-cohesive sediments. The model was calibrated and tested using both in situ point observations and turbidity maps obtained analyzing satellite images. Once calibrated the model can integrate the high temporal resolution of point observations with the high spatial resolution of remote sensing, overcoming the intrinsic limitation of these two types of observations. The model was applied to the specific test case of the Venice lagoon simulating an entire year (2005) which was shown to be a "representative" year for wind and tide characteristics. The time evolution of the computed total bottom shear stresses (BSS) and suspended sediment concentration (SSC) was analyzed on the basis of a "Peaks Over Threshold" method once a critical value for shear stress and turbidity were chosen. The analyses of the numerical results enabled us to demonstrate that resuspension events can be modeled as marked Poisson processes: interarrival time, intensity of peak excesses and duration being exponentially distributed random variable. The probability distributions of the interarrival time of overthreshold exceedances in both BSS and SSC as well as their intensity and duration can be used in long-term morphodynamic studies to generate synthetic series statistically

  9. Geomorphologic Modeling of a Macro-Tidal Embayment With Extensive Tidal Flats: Skagit Bay, WA

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    Tidal Flats: Skagit Bay , WA Lyle Hibler Pacific Northwest National Laboratory 1529 West Sequim Bay Road Sequim , WA 98382 phone: (360) 681...3616 fax: (360) 681-3681 email: lyle.hibler@pnl.gov Adam Maxwell Pacific Northwest National Laboratory 1529 West Sequim Bay Road Sequim , WA... Sequim Bay Road, Sequim ,WA,98382 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 10. SPONSOR

  10. Geomorphic modeling of macro-tidal embayment with extensive tidal flats: Skagit Bay, Washington

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-30

    integrated Delft3D-MOR submodel. Measured river discharge, predicted tides, bathymetry, wind , and density-driven flow were incorporated into the model...supplied with sediment initially. Water temperature and salinity at the tidal boundary were adapted from (Moore et al., 2008). Wind forcing was...tide range varied from 2.4 m at Deception Pass to 3.5 m at Crescent Harbor. Because observations have indicated that wind -generated waves may be

  11. Tidal evolution in close binary systems.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopal, Z.

    1972-01-01

    Mathematical outline of the theory of tidal evolution in close binary systems of secularly constant total momentum. Following a general outline of the problem the basic expressions for the energy and momenta of close binaries consisting of components of arbitrary internal structure are established, and the maximum and minimum values of the energy (kinetic and potential) which such systems can attain for a given amount of total momentum are investigated. These results are compared with the actual facts encountered in binaries with components whose internal structure (and, therefore, rotational momenta) are known from evidence furnished by the observed rates of apsidal advance. The results show that all such systems whether of detached or semidetached type - disclose that more than 99% of their total momenta are stored in the orbital momentum. The sum of the rotational momenta of the constituent components amounts to less than 1% of the total -a situation characteristic of a state close to the minimum energy for given total momentum.

  12. Assimilating data into open ocean tidal models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kivman, Gennady A.

    The problem of deriving tidal fields from observations by reason of incompleteness and imperfectness of every data set practically available has an infinitely large number of allowable solutions fitting the data within measurement errors and hence can be treated as ill-posed. Therefore, interpolating the data always relies on some a priori assumptions concerning the tides, which provide a rule of sampling or, in other words, a regularization of the ill-posed problem. Data assimilation procedures used in large scale tide modeling are viewed in a common mathematical framework as such regularizations. It is shown that they all (basis functions expansion, parameter estimation, nudging, objective analysis, general inversion, and extended general inversion), including those (objective analysis and general inversion) originally formulated in stochastic terms, may be considered as utilizations of one of the three general methods suggested by the theory of ill-posed problems. The problem of grid refinement critical for inverse methods and nudging is discussed.

  13. Dynamics of Tidally Locked, Ultrafast Rotating Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Xianyu; Showman, Adam P.

    2017-10-01

    Tidally locked gas giants, which exhibit a novel regime of day-night thermal forcing and extreme stellar irradiation, are typically in several-day orbits, implying slow rotation and a modest role for rotation in the atmospheric circulation. Nevertheless, there exist a class of gas-giant, highly irradiated objects - brown dwarfs orbiting white dwarfs in extremely tight orbits - whose orbital and hence rotation periods are as short as 1-2 hours. Spitzer phase curves and other observations have already been obtained for this fascinating class of objects, which raise fundamental questions about the role of rotation in controlling the circulation. So far, most modeling studies have investigated rotation periods exceeding a day, as appropriate for typical hot Jupiters. In this work we investigate the dynamics of tidally locked atmospheres in shorter rotation periods down to about two hours. With increasing rotation rate (decreasing rotation period), we show that the width of the equatorial eastward jet decreases, consistent with the narrowing of wave-mean-flow interacting region due to decrease of the equatorial deformation radius. The eastward-shifted equatorial hot spot offset decreases accordingly, and the westward-shifted hot regions poleward of the equatorial jet associated with Rossby gyres become increasingly distinctive. At high latitudes, winds becomes weaker and more geostrophic. The day-night temperature contrast becomes larger due to the stronger influence of rotation. Our simulated atmospheres exhibit small-scale variability, presumably caused by shear instability. Unlike typical hot Jupiters, phase curves of fast-rotating models show an alignment of peak flux to secondary eclipse. Our results have important implications for phase curve observations of brown dwarfs orbiting white dwarfs in ultra tight orbits.

  14. Ambient Noise in an Urbanized Tidal Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassett, Christopher

    In coastal environments, when topographic and bathymetric constrictions are combined with large tidal amplitudes, strong currents (> 2 m/s) can occur. Because such environments are relatively rare and difficult to study, until recently, they have received little attention from the scientific community. However, in recent years, interest in developing tidal hydrokinetic power projects in these environments has motivated studies to improve this understanding. In order to support an analysis of the acoustic effects of tidal power generation, a multi-year study was conducted at a proposed project site in Puget Sound (WA) are analyzed at a site where peak currents exceeded 3.5 m/s. From these analyses, three noise sources are shown to dominate the observed variability in ambient noise between 0.02-30 kHz: anthropogenic noise from vessel traffic, sediment-generated noise during periods of strong currents, and flow-noise resulting from turbulence advected over the hydrophones. To assess the contribution of vessel traffic noise, one calendar year of Automatic Identification System (AIS) ship-traffic data was paired with hydrophone recordings. The study region included inland waters of the Salish Sea within a 20 km radius of the hydrophone deployment site in northern Admiralty Inlet. The variability in spectra and hourly, daily, and monthly ambient noise statistics for unweighted broadband and M-weighted sound pressure levels is driven largely by vessel traffic. Within the one-year study period, at least one AIS transmitting vessel is present in the study area 90% of the time and over 1,363 unique vessels are recorded. A noise budget for vessels equipped with AIS transponders identifies cargo ships, tugs, and passenger vessels as the largest contributors to noise levels. A simple model to predict received levels at the site based on an incoherent summation of noise from different vessel types yields a cumulative probability density function of broadband sound pressure

  15. Tidal asymmetry in a tidal creek with mixed mainly semidiurnal tide, Bushehr Port, Persian Gulf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, Seyed Taleb; Chegini, Vahid; Sadrinasab, Masoud; Siadatmousavi, Seyed Mostafa; Yari, Sadegh

    2016-03-01

    This study investigated the tidal asymmetry imposed by both the interaction of principal tides and the higher harmonics generated by distortions within a tidal creek network with mixed mainly semidiurnal tide in the Bushehr Port, Persian Gulf. Since velocity and water-level imposed by principal triad tides K1-O1-M2 are in quadrature, duration asymmetries during a tidal period in this short, shallow inverse estuary should be manifest as skewed velocities. The principal tides produce periodic asymmetries including a strong ebb-dominance and a weak flood-dominance condition during spring and neap tides respectively. The higher harmonics induced by nonlinearities engender a flood-dominance condition where the convergence effects are higher than frictional effects, and an ebbdominance condition where intertidal storage are extended. Since the triad K1-O1-M2 driven asymmetry is not overcome by higher harmonics close to the mouth, the periodic asymmetry dominates within the creek in which higher harmonics reinforce the weak flood-dominance (strong ebb-dominance) condition in the convergent channel (divergent area). Also, the maximum flood and the maximum ebb from all harmonic constituents occurred close to high water slack time during both spring and neap tides in this short creek. Since occational wetting of intertidal areas happened close to the high water (HW) time during spring tide, the water level flooded slowly close to the HW time of the spring tide.

  16. Dynamical Studies of N-Body Gravity and Tidal Dissipation in the TRAPPIST-1 Star System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, Michael; Kuettel, Donald H.; Stebler, Shane T.; Udrea, Bogdan

    2018-01-01

    To date, we have discovered a total of 2,729 planetary systems that contain more than 3,639 known exoplanets [1]. A majority of these are defined as compact systems, containing multiple exoplanets within 0.25 AU of the central star. It has been shown that tightly packed exoplanets avoid colliding due to long-term resonance-induced orbit stability [2]. However, due to extreme proximity, these planets experience intense gravitational forces from each other that are unprecedented within our own solar system, which makes the existence of exomoons doubtful. We present the results of an initial study evaluating dynamical stability of potential exomoons within such highly compact systems.This work is baselined around TRAPPIST-1, an ultra-cool dwarf star that hosts seven temperate terrestrial planets, three of which are in the habitable zone, orbiting within 0.06 AU [3]. N-body simulations place a grid of test particles varying semi-major axis, eccentricity, and inclination around the three habitable zone planets. We find that most exomoons with semi-major axes less than half the Hill sphere of their respective planet are stable over 10 kyrs, with several stable over 300 kyrs.However, in compact systems, tidal influences from other planets can compete with tidal effects from the primary planet, resulting in possible instabilities and massive amounts of tidal dissipation. We investigate these effects with a large grid search that incorporates exomoon radius, tidal quality factor and a range of planet rigidities. Results of simulations that combine n-body gravity effects with both planetary and satellite tides are presented and contrasted with n-body results. Finally, we examine long-term stability (> 1Myrs) of the stable subset of test particles from the n-body simulation with the addition of tidal dissipation, to determine if exomoons can survive around planets e, f, and g in the TRAPPIST-1 system.[1] Schneider (2017). The Extrasolar Planets Encyclopedia. http

  17. Earth Observation

    2014-07-19

    ISS040-E-070439 (19 July 2014) --- One of the Expedition 40 crew members aboard the Earth-orbiting International Space Station recorded this July 19 image of wildfires which are plaguing the Northwest and causing widespread destruction. The orbital outpost was flying 223 nautical miles above a point on Earth located at 48.0 degrees north latitude and 116.9 degrees west longitude when the image was exposed. The state of Washington is especially affected by the fires, many of which have been blamed on lightning. This particular fire was part of the Carlton Complex Fire, located near the city of Brewster in north central Washington. The reservoir visible near the center of the image is Banks Lake.

  18. Earth Observation

    2014-07-25

    ISS040-E-081008 (25 July 2014) --- One of the Expedition 40 crew members aboard the International Space Station, flying 225 nautical miles above Earth, photographed this image of the Tifernine dunes and the Tassili Najjer Mountains in Algeria. The area is about 800 miles south, southeast of Algiers, the capital of Algeria. The dunes are in excess of 1,000 feet in height.

  19. Earth Observation

    2014-07-15

    ISS040-E-063578 (15 July 2014) --- One of the Expedition 40 crew members aboard the Earth-orbiting International Space Station, flying some 225 nautical miles above the Caribbean Sea in the early morning hours of July 15, photographed this north-looking panorama that includes parts of Cuba, the Bahamas and Florida, and even runs into several other areas in the southeastern U.S. The long stretch of lights to the left of center frame gives the shape of Miami.

  20. Earth Observations

    2011-05-28

    ISS028-E-006059 (28 May 2011) --- One of the Expedition 28 crew members, photographing Earth images onboard the International Space Station while docked with the space shuttle Endeavour and flying at an altitude of just under 220 miles, captured this frame of the Salton Sea. The body of water, easily identifiable from low orbit spacecraft, is a saline, endorheic rift lake located directly on the San Andreas Fault. The agricultural area is within the Coachella Valley.

  1. Earth Science

    1991-01-01

    In July 1990, the Marshall Space Flight Center, in a joint project with the Department of Defense/Air Force Space Test Program, launched the Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES) using an Atlas I launch vehicle. The mission was designed to study the effects of artificial ion clouds produced by chemical releases on the Earth's ionosphere and magnetosphere, and to monitor the effects of space radiation environment on sophisticated electronics.

  2. Earth Observation

    2011-06-27

    ISS028-E-009979 (27 June 2011) --- The Massachusetts coastline is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 28 crew member on the International Space Station. The Crew Earth Observations team at NASA Johnson Space Center sends specific ground targets for photography up to the station crew on a daily basis, but sometimes the crew takes imagery on their own of striking displays visible from orbit. One such display, often visible to the ISS crew due to their ability to look outwards at angles between 0 and 90 degrees, is sunglint on the waters of Earth. Sunglint is caused by sunlight reflecting off of a water surface?much as light reflects from a mirror?directly towards the observer. Roughness variations of the water surface scatter the light, blurring the reflection and producing the typical silvery sheen of the sunglint area. The point of maximum sunglint is centered within Cape Cod Bay, the body of water partially enclosed by the ?hook? of Cape Cod in Massachusetts (bottom). Cape Cod was formally designated a National Seashore in 1966. Sunglint off the water provides sharp contrast with the coastline and the nearby islands of Martha?s Vineyard and Nantucket (lower left), both popular destinations for tourists and summer residents. To the north, rocky Cape Ann extends out into the Atlantic Ocean; the border with New Hampshire is located approximately 30 kilometers up the coast. Further to the west, the eastern half of Long Island, New York is visible emerging from extensive cloud cover over the mid-Atlantic and Midwestern States. Persistent storm tracks had been contributing to record flooding along rivers in the Midwest at the time this image was taken in late June 2011. Thin blue layers of the atmosphere, contrasted against the darkness of space, are visible extending along the Earth?s curvature at top.

  3. Assessment of tidal circulation and tidal current asymmetry in the Iroise sea with specific emphasis on characterization of tidal energy resources around the Ushant Island.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiébaut, Maxime; Sentchev, Alexei

    2015-04-01

    We use the current velocity time series recorded by High Frequency Radars (HFR) to study circulation in highly energetic tidal basin - the Iroise sea. We focus on the analysis of tidal current pattern around the Ushant Island which is a promising site of tidal energy. The analysis reveals surface current speeds reaching 4 m/s in the North of Ushant Island and in the Fromveur Strait. In these regions 1 m/s is exceeded 60% of time and up to 70% of time in center of Fromveur. This velocity value is particularly interesting because it represents the cut-in-speed of the most of marine turbine devices. Tidal current asymmetry is not always considered in tidal energy site selection. However, this quantity plays an important role in the quantification of hydrokinetic resources. Current velocity times series recorded by HFR highlights the existence of a pronounced asymmetry in current magnitude between the flood and ebb tide ranging from -0.5 to more 2.5. Power output of free-stream devices depends to velocity cubed. Thus a small current asymmetry can generate a significant power output asymmetry. Spatial distribution of asymmetry coefficient shows persistent pattern and fine scale structure which were quantified with high degree of accuracy. The particular asymmetry evolution on both side of Fromveur strait is related to the spatial distribution of the phase lag of the principal semi-diurnal tidal constituent M2 and its higher order harmonics. In Fromveur, the asymmetry is reinforced due to the high velocity magnitude of the sixth-diurnal tidal harmonics. HF radar provides surface velocity speed, however the quantification of hydrokinetic resources has to take into account the decreasing of velocity with depth. In order to highlight this phenomenon, we plot several velocity profiles given by an ADCP which was installed in the HFR study area during the same period. The mean velocity in the water column calculated by using the ADCP data show that it is about 80% of the

  4. Late proterozoic and paleozoic tides, retreat of the moon, and rotation of the earth

    Sonett, C.P.; Kvale, E.P.; Zakharian, A.; Chan, M.A.; Demko, T.M.

    1996-01-01

    The tidal rhythmites in the Proterozoic Big Cottonwood Formation (Utah, United States), the Neoproterozoic Elatina Formation of the Flinders Range (southern Australia), and the Lower Pennsylvanian Pottsville Formation (Alabama, United States) and Mansfield Formation (Indiana, United States) indicate that the rate of retreat of the lunar orbit is d??/dt k2 sin(2??) (where ?? is the Earth-moon radius vector, k2 is the tidal Love number, and ?? is the tidal lag angle) and that this rate has been approximately constant since the late Precambrian. When the contribution to tidal friction from the sun is taken into account, these data imply that the length of the terrestrial day 900 million years ago was -18 hours.

  5. Cloudy Earth

    2015-05-08

    Decades of satellite observations and astronaut photographs show that clouds dominate space-based views of Earth. One study based on nearly a decade of satellite data estimated that about 67 percent of Earth’s surface is typically covered by clouds. This is especially the case over the oceans, where other research shows less than 10 percent of the sky is completely clear of clouds at any one time. Over land, 30 percent of skies are completely cloud free. Earth’s cloudy nature is unmistakable in this global cloud fraction map, based on data collected by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Aqua satellite. While MODIS collects enough data to make a new global map of cloudiness every day, this version of the map shows an average of all of the satellite’s cloud observations between July 2002 and April 2015. Colors range from dark blue (no clouds) to light blue (some clouds) to white (frequent clouds). Read more here: 1.usa.gov/1P6lbMU Credit: NASA Earth Observatory NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  6. Earth Observation

    2011-08-02

    ISS028-E-020276 (2 Aug. 2011) --- This photograph of polar mesospheric clouds was acquired at an altitude of just over 202 nautical miles (about 322 kilometers) in the evening hours (03:19:54 Greenwich Mean Time) on Aug. 2, 2011, as the International Space Station was passing over the English Channel. The nadir coordinates of the station were 49.1 degrees north latitude and 5.5 degrees west longitude. Polar mesospheric clouds (also known as noctilucent, or ?night-shining? clouds) are transient, upper atmospheric phenomena that are usually observed in the summer months at high latitudes (greater than 50 degrees) of both the Northern and Southern Hemispheres. They appear bright and cloudlike while in deep twilight. They are illuminated by sunlight when the lower layers of the atmosphere are in the darkness of Earth?s shadow. The horizon of Earth appears at the bottom of the image, with some layers of the lower atmosphere already illuminated by the rising sun. The higher, bluish-colored clouds look much like wispy cirrus clouds, which can be found as high as 60,000 feet (18 kilometers) in the atmosphere. However noctilucent clouds, as seen here, are observed in the mesosphere at altitudes of 250,000 to 280,000 feet (about 76 to 85 kilometers). Astronaut observations of polar mesospheric clouds over northern Europe in the summer are not uncommon.

  7. Derivation of Delaware Bay tidal parameters from Space Shuttle photography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zheng, Quanan; Yan, Xiao-Hai; Klemas, Vic

    1993-01-01

    The tide-related parameters of the Delaware Bay are derived from Space Shuttle time-series photographs. The water areas in the bay are measured from interpretation maps of the photographs with a CALCOMP 9100 digitizer and ERDAS Image Processing System. The corresponding tidal levels are calculated using the exposure time annotated on the photographs. From these data, an approximate function relating the water area to the tidal level at a reference point is determined. Based on the function, the water areas of the Delaware Bay at mean high water (MHW) and mean low water (MLW), below 0 m, and for the tidal zone are inferred. With MHW and MLW areas and the mean tidal range, we calculate the tidal influx of the Delaware Bay, which is 2.76 x 10 exp 9 cu m. The velocity of flood tide at the bay mouth is determined using the tidal flux and an integral of the velocity distribution function at the cross section between Cape Henlopen and Cape May. The result is 132 cm/s, which compares well with the data on tidal current charts.

  8. Magnetic fields driven by tidal mixing in radiative stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal, Jérémie; Cébron, David; Schaeffer, Nathanaël; Hollerbach, Rainer

    2018-04-01

    Stellar magnetism plays an important role in stellar evolution theory. Approximatively 10 per cent of observed main sequence (MS) and pre-main-sequence (PMS) radiative stars exhibit surface magnetic fields above the detection limit, raising the question of their origin. These stars host outer radiative envelopes, which are stably stratified. Therefore, they are assumed to be motionless in standard models of stellar structure and evolution. We focus on rapidly rotating, radiative stars which may be prone to the tidal instability, due to an orbital companion. Using direct numerical simulations in a sphere, we study the interplay between a stable stratification and the tidal instability, and assess its dynamo capability. We show that the tidal instability is triggered regardless of the strength of the stratification (Brunt-Väisälä frequency). Furthermore, the tidal instability can lead to both mixing and self-induced magnetic fields in stably stratified layers (provided that the Brunt-Väisälä frequency does not exceed the stellar spin rate in the simulations too much). The application to stars suggests that the resulting magnetic fields could be observable at the stellar surfaces. Indeed, we expect magnetic field strengths up to several Gauss. Consequently, tidally driven dynamos should be considered as a (complementary) dynamo mechanism, possibly operating in radiative MS and PMS stars hosting orbital companions. In particular, tidally driven dynamos may explain the observed magnetism of tidally deformed and rapidly rotating Vega-like stars.

  9. Observation and numerical modeling of tidal dune dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doré, Arnaud; Bonneton, Philippe; Marieu, Vincent; Garlan, Thierry

    2018-05-01

    Tidal sand dune dynamics is observed for two tidal cycles in the Arcachon tidal inlet, southwest France. An array of instruments is deployed to measure bathymetric and current variations along dune profiles. Based on the measurements, dune crest horizontal and vertical displacements are quantified and show important dynamics in phase with tidal currents. We observed superimposed ripples on the dune stoss side and front, migrating and changing polarity as tidal currents reverse. A 2D RANS numerical model is used to simulate the morphodynamic evolution of a flat non-cohesive sand bed submitted to a tidal current. The model reproduces the bed evolution until a field of sand bedforms is obtained that are comparable with observed superimposed ripples in terms of geometrical dimensions and dynamics. The model is then applied to simulate the dynamics of a field of large sand dunes of similar size as the dunes observed in situ. In both cases, simulation results compare well with measurements qualitatively and quantitatively. This research allows for a better understanding of tidal sand dune and superimposed ripple morphodynamics and opens new perspectives for the use of numerical models to predict their evolution.

  10. Do ocean tidal signals influence recovery of solar quiet variations?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzavina, Martina; Grayver, Alexander; Kuvshinov, Alexey

    2018-01-01

    The solar quiet (Sq) source morphology changes on a daily basis and becomes disturbed during periods of increased magnetic activity. Therefore, it may be preferable to use single-day magnetic field recordings for the analysis of Sq variations. However, in short recordings, Sq and ocean tidal magnetic signals are often indistinguishable because of the close periods. As a result, the tidal magnetic signals can be erroneously attributed to signals of Sq origin, which can potentially lead to wrong interpretations, especially when small signals, such as those induced by the 3-D heterogeneities in the mantle, are sought. In this work, we quantitatively estimate the effect of ocean tidal signals in daily variations by performing rigorous 3-D modeling and comparing the results with real measurements from ground and sea floor observatories. We found that the vertical magnetic field component, Z, is affected the most such that at some locations the tidal signals explain the majority of the observed daily variation. Further, horizontal tidal magnetic fields at the sea floor are larger in amplitude and exhibit different spatial structures compared to signals estimated at the sea level. We propose a scheme aimed at correcting data for the ocean tidal signals and show that such correction suppresses the tidal signals in the observed field variations.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  11. The effect of lagoons on Adriatic Sea tidal dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrarin, Christian; Maicu, Francesco; Umgiesser, Georg

    2017-11-01

    In this study the effects that lagoons exert on the barotropic tidal dynamics of a regional sea, the Adriatic Sea, were numerically explored. This semi-enclosed basin is one of the places with the highest tidal range in the Mediterranean Sea and is characterised by the presence of several lagoons in its northern part. The tidal dynamics of a system comprising the whole Adriatic Sea and the lagoons of Venice, Marano-Grado and Po Delta were investigated using an unstructured hydrodynamic model. Numerical experiments with and without lagoons reveal that even if the considered shallow water bodies represent only the 0.5 and 0.002% of the Adriatic Sea surface and volume, respectively, they significantly affect the entire Northern Adriatic Sea tidal dynamics by enhancing tidal range (by 5%) and currents (by 10%). The inclusion of lagoons in the computation improved the model performance by 25% in reproducing tidal constituents in the Adriatic Sea. The back-effect of the lagoons on the open-sea tide is due to the waves radiating from the co-oscillating lagoons into the adjacent sea. This is the first time these processes are shown to be relevant for the Adriatic Sea, thus enhancing the understanding of the tidal dynamics in this regional sea. These findings may also apply to other coastal seas with connections to lagoons, bays and estuaries.

  12. A simple approach to adjust tidal forcing in fjord models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hjelmervik, Karina; Kristensen, Nils Melsom; Staalstrøm, André; Røed, Lars Petter

    2017-07-01

    To model currents in a fjord accurate tidal forcing is of extreme importance. Due to complex topography with narrow and shallow straits, the tides in the innermost parts of a fjord are both shifted in phase and altered in amplitude compared to the tides in the open water outside the fjord. Commonly, coastal tide information extracted from global or regional models is used on the boundary of the fjord model. Since tides vary over short distances in shallower waters close to the coast, the global and regional tidal forcings are usually too coarse to achieve sufficiently accurate tides in fjords. We present a straightforward method to remedy this problem by simply adjusting the tides to fit the observed tides at the entrance of the fjord. To evaluate the method, we present results from the Oslofjord, Norway. A model for the fjord is first run using raw tidal forcing on its open boundary. By comparing modelled and observed time series of water level at a tidal gauge station close to the open boundary of the model, a factor for the amplitude and a shift in phase are computed. The amplitude factor and the phase shift are then applied to produce adjusted tidal forcing at the open boundary. Next, we rerun the fjord model using the adjusted tidal forcing. The results from the two runs are then compared to independent observations inside the fjord in terms of amplitude and phases of the various tidal components, the total tidal water level, and the depth integrated tidal currents. The results show improvements in the modelled tides in both the outer, and more importantly, the inner parts of the fjord.

  13. Jerks as Guiding Influences on the Global Environment: Effects on the Solid Earth, Its Angular Momentum and Lithospheric Plate Motions, the Atmosphere, Weather, and Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, J. M.; Leybourne, B. A.

    2010-12-01

    Jerks are thought to be the result of torques applied at the core-mantle boundary (CMB) caused by either of two possible processes, working together or separately: 1) Electromagnetic Induction and 2) Mechanical Slippage. In the first case, it is thought that electromagnetic energy slowly builds-up at the CMB, reaches some critical level, and is then suddenly released, causing a geomagneticly induced torque at the CMB due to the differential electrical conductivity between the lower mantle and the surface of the outer core. The second case is driven by stress and strain increases that buildup mechanical potential energy, which is released when a critical level is reached, thereby generating a torque at the CMB. Generally, a trigger is required to start the Jerk process in motion. In the electromagnetic case, it is suggested that energy from the Sun may supply the requisite energy buildup that is subsequently released by a magnetic storm trigger, for instance. In the case of mechanical slippage, bari-center motion among the Earth, Moon, and Sun, as well as tidal forces and mass redistributions through Earth's wobbles combine to provide the accumulated stress/strain buildup and subsequent trigger. The resulting fluid flow changes at the CMB result in geomagnetic field changes and Joule heating throughout the solid Earth, its oceans, and atmosphere. It is shown that the Global Temperature Anomaly (GTA), which is measured at Earth's surface, correlates with changes in the geomagnetic non-dipole moment, and thus with core fluid motions. This links Global Warming and weather with core processes, important examples being the 1930's Dust Bowl Era and the 1947 Impulse. The CMB torque also affects Earth's angular momentum. But it appears that magnetic storms can as well. As a consequence, the Jet Stream, atmospheric circulation patterns, and the Global Oscillation System (i.e., El-Nino/Southern-Oscillation, North Atlantic Oscillation, the Pacific Decade Oscillation, etc.) are

  14. Spatial Distribution of Volcanic Hotspots and Paterae on Io: Implications for Tidal Heating Models and Magmatic Pathways

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, C. W.; Beggan, C. D.; Lopes, R.; Williams, D. A.; Radenbaugh, J.

    2011-01-01

    Io, the innermost of Jupiter's Galilean satellites, is the most volcanically active body in the Solar. System. Io's global mean heat flow is approximately 2 W/square m, which is approximately 20 times larger than on Earth. High surface temperatures concentrate within "hotspots" and, to date, 172 Ionian hotspots have been identified by spacecraft and Earth-based telescopes. The Laplace resonance between Io, Europa, and Ganymede maintains these satellites in noncircular orbits and causes displacement of their tidal bulges as the overhead position of Jupiter changes for each moon. Gravitational interactions between Jupiter and Io dominate the orbital evolution of the Laplacian system and generate enormous heat within to as tidal energy is dissipated. If this energy were transferred out of Io at the same rate as it is generated, then the associated surface heat flux would be 2.24 +/- 0.45 W/square m. This estimate is in good agreement with observed global heat flow, but to better constrain tidal dissipation mechanisms and infer how thermal energy is transferred to Io's surface, it is critical to closely examine the spatial distribution of volcanic features. End-member tidal dissipation models either consider that heating occurs completely in the mantle, or completely in the asthenosphere. Mixed models typically favor one-third mantle and two-thirds asthenosphere heating. Recent models also consider the effects of mantle-asthenosphere boundary permeability and asthenospheric instabilities. Deep-mantle heating models predict maximum surface heat flux near the poles, whereas asthenosphere heating models predict maxima near the equator-particularly in the Sub-Jovian and Anti-Jovian hemispheres, with smaller maxima occurring at orbit tangent longitudes. Previous studies have examined the global distribution of Ionian hotspots and patera (i.e., irregular or complex craters with scalloped edges that are generally interpreted to be volcanic calderas), but in this study, we

  15. Effect of tidal fluctuations on contaminant transfer to the ocean

    Licata, I.L.; Langevin, C.D.; Dausman, A.M.

    2007-01-01

    Variable-density groundwater flow was simulated to examine the effects that tide has on the coastward migration of a contaminant through a freshwater/saltwater interface and toward a coastal ocean boundary. Simulated ocean tides did not significantly affect the total contaminant mass input to the ocean; however, the difference in tidal and non-tidal simulated concentrations could be as much as 15%. It may be possible to numerically approximate the tidal-driven hydraulic transients in transport models that do not explicitly include tides by locally increasing dispersivity. Copyright ?? 2007 IAHS Press.

  16. On the tidal evolution and tails formation of disc galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alavi, M.; Razmi, H.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we want to study the tidal effect of an external perturber upon a disc galaxy based on the generalization of already used Keplerian potential. The generalization of the simple ideal Keplerian potential includes an orbital centripetal term and an overall finite range controlling correction. Considering the generalized form of the interaction potential, the velocity impulse expressions resulting from tidal forces are computed; then, using typical real values already known from modern observational data, the evolution of the disc including tidal tails formation is graphically investigated.

  17. Tidal double detonation: a new mechanism for the thermonuclear explosion of a white dwarf induced by a tidal disruption event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanikawa, Ataru

    2018-03-01

    We suggest tidal double detonation as a new mechanism for the thermonuclear explosion of a white dwarf (WD) induced by a tidal disruption event (TDE). Tidal detonation is also a WD explosion induced by a TDE. In this case, helium (He) and carbon-oxygen (CO) detonation waves incinerate He WDs and CO WDs, respectively. On the other hand, for tidal double detonation, He detonation is first excited in the He shell of a CO WD, which then drives CO detonation in the CO core. We name this mechanism after the double detonation scenario in the context of type Ia supernovae. In this paper, by performing numerical simulations for CO WDs of mass 0.60 M⊙ with and without a He shell, we show that tidal double detonation occurs in the shallower encounter of a CO WD with an intermediate-mass black hole (IMBH) compared to simple tidal detonation. We expect tidal double detonation will increase the possibility of the occurrence of WD TDEs, which can help us to understand IMBHs.

  18. Tidal energy site resource assessment in the East River tidal strait, near Roosevelt Island, New York, New York

    SciT

    Gunawan, Budi; Neary, Vincent S.; Colby, Jonathan

    This study demonstrates a site resource assessment to examine the temporal variation of the mean current, turbulence intensities, and power densities for a tidal energy site in the East River tidal strait. These variables were derived from two-months of acoustic Doppler velocimeter (ADV) measurements at the design hub height of the Verdant Power Gen5 hydrokinetic turbine. The study site is a tidal strait that exhibits semi-diurnal tidal current characteristics, with a mean horizontal current speed of 1.4 m s -1, and turbulence intensity of 15% at a reference mean current of 2 m s -1. Flood and ebb flow directionsmore » are nearly bi-directional, with higher current magnitude during flood tide, which skews the power production towards the flood tide period. The tidal hydrodynamics at the site are highly regular, as indicated by the tidal current time series that resembles a sinusoidal function. This study also shows that the theoretical force and power densities derived from the current measurements can significantly be influenced by the length of the time window used for averaging the current data. Furthermore, the theoretical power density at the site, derived from the current measurements, is one order of magnitude greater than that reported in the U.S. national resource assessment. As a result, this discrepancy highlights the importance of conducting site resource assessments based on measurements at the tidal energy converter device scale.« less

  19. Tidal energy site resource assessment in the East River tidal strait, near Roosevelt Island, New York, New York

    DOE PAGES

    Gunawan, Budi; Neary, Vincent S.; Colby, Jonathan

    2014-06-22

    This study demonstrates a site resource assessment to examine the temporal variation of the mean current, turbulence intensities, and power densities for a tidal energy site in the East River tidal strait. These variables were derived from two-months of acoustic Doppler velocimeter (ADV) measurements at the design hub height of the Verdant Power Gen5 hydrokinetic turbine. The study site is a tidal strait that exhibits semi-diurnal tidal current characteristics, with a mean horizontal current speed of 1.4 m s -1, and turbulence intensity of 15% at a reference mean current of 2 m s -1. Flood and ebb flow directionsmore » are nearly bi-directional, with higher current magnitude during flood tide, which skews the power production towards the flood tide period. The tidal hydrodynamics at the site are highly regular, as indicated by the tidal current time series that resembles a sinusoidal function. This study also shows that the theoretical force and power densities derived from the current measurements can significantly be influenced by the length of the time window used for averaging the current data. Furthermore, the theoretical power density at the site, derived from the current measurements, is one order of magnitude greater than that reported in the U.S. national resource assessment. As a result, this discrepancy highlights the importance of conducting site resource assessments based on measurements at the tidal energy converter device scale.« less

  20. Tidal Analysis and Arrival Process Mining Using Automatic Identification System (AIS) Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-01-01

    elevation at the time of vessel movement and calculating the tidal dependence (TD) parameter to 23 U.S. port areas for the years 2012– 2014. Tidal prediction...predictions, obtained from the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration, are used to rank relative tidal dependence for arriving cargo and...sector traffic percentages and tidal dependence metric ............................. 11 Arrival process mining

  1. Linking freshwater tidal hydrology to carbon cycling in bottomland hardwood wetlands

    Carl C. Trettin; Brooke J. Czwartacki; Craig J. Allan; Devendra M. Amatya

    2016-01-01

    Hydrology is recognized as one of the principal factors regulating soil biogeochemical processes in forested wetlands. However, the consequences of tidally mediated hydrology are seldom considered within forested wetlands that occur along tidal water bodies. These tidal water bodies may be either fresh or brackish, and the tidal streams function as a reservoir to...

  2. Earth Observations

    2010-09-11

    ISS024-E-014233 (11 Sept. 2010) --- A smoke plume near the northern Caspian Sea, Kazakhstan is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 24 crew member on the International Space Station. This broad view of the north coast of the Caspian Sea shows a smoke plume (left) and two river deltas (bottom and lower right). The larger delta is that of the Volga River which appears prominently here in sunglint (light reflected off a water surface back towards the observer), and the smaller less prominent delta is that of the Ural River. Wide angle, oblique views ? taken looking outward at an angle, rather than straight down towards Earth ? such as this give an excellent impression of how crew members onboard the space station view Earth. For a sense of scale, the Caucasus Mts. (across the Caspian, top right) are approximately 1,100 kilometers to the southwest of the International Space Station?s nadir point location ? the point on Earth directly underneath the spacecraft ? at the time this image was taken. The smoke plume appears to be sourced in the dark-toned coastal marsh vegetation along the outer fringe of the Ural River delta, rather than in a city or at some oil storage facility. Although even small fires produce plumes that are long and bright and thus easily visible from space, the density of the smoke in this plume, and its 350-kilometer length across the entire north lobe of the Caspian Sea, suggest it was a significant fire. The smoke was thick enough nearer the source to cast shadows on the sea surface below. Lines mark three separate pulses of smoke, the most recent, nearest the source, extending directly south away from the coastline (lower left). With time, plumes become progressively more diffuse. The oldest pulse appears to be the thinnest, casting no obvious shadows (center left).

  3. Earth Observation

    2016-04-20

    ISS047e069406 (04/20/2016) ---Earth observation image taken by the Expedition 47 crew aboard the International Space Station. This is an oblique south-looking view of the main Bahama island chain. Cuba is across the entire top of the image, the Florida Peninsula on the right margin. In the Bahamas, the main Andros island is just distinguishable under cloud upper left of center. Under less cloud is the Abaco Islands in the foreground (middle of pic nearest camera left of center.)

  4. Earth Observation

    2014-06-24

    ISS040-E-018729 (24 June 2014) --- One of the Expedition 40 crew members aboard the Earth-orbiting International Space Station photographed this image featuring the peninsular portion of the state of Florida. Lake Okeechobee stands out in the south central part of the state. The heavily-populated area of Miami can be traced along the Atlantic Coast near the bottom of the scene. Cape Canaveral and the Kennedy Space Center are just below center frame on the Atlantic Coast. The Florida Keys are at the south (left) portion of the scene and the Gulf Coast, including the Tampa-St. Petersburg area, is near frame center.

  5. Earth Observation

    2014-05-29

    ISS040-E-005979 (29 May 2014) --- One of the Expedition 40 crew members aboard the International Space Station used a 200mm lens to photograph this image from 222 nautical miles above Earth showing Harris County and Galveston County, Texas plus several other surrounding counties, including a long stretch along the Gulf of Mexico (bottom left). The entirety of Galveston Bay is visible at bottom center. Just below center lies the 1625-acre site of NASA's Johnson Space Center, one of the training venues for all space station crew members and the nearby long-time area of residence for NASA astronauts.

  6. Earth Observation

    2013-07-31

    ISS036-E-027014 (31 July 2013) --- One of the Expedition 36 crew members aboard the Earth-orbiting International Space Station, as it was passing over Eastern Europe on July 31, 2013, took this night picture looking toward the Mediterranean Sea, which almost blends into the horizon. Also visible are the Aegean Sea, Adriatic Sea and Mediterranean Sea. Parts of the following countries are among those visible as well: Greece, Italy, Sicily, Bulgaria, Serbia, Croatia and Albania. The high oblique 50mm lens shot includes a number of stars in the late July sky. A solar array panel is visible in the darkness on the right side of the frame.

  7. Earth Explorer

    ,

    2000-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) Earth Explorer Web site provides access to millions of land-related products, including the following: Satellite images from Landsat, advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR), and Corona data sets. Aerial photographs from the National Aerial Photography Program, NASA, and USGS data sets.  Digital cartographic data from digital elevation models, digital line graphs, digital raster graphics, and digital orthophoto quadrangles. USGS paper maps Digital, film, and paper products are available, and many products can be previewed before ordering.

  8. Earth Science

    1992-07-24

    A Delta II rocket carrying the Geomagnetic Tail Lab (GEOTAIL) spacecraft lifts off at Launch Complex 17, Kennedy Space Center (KSC) into a cloud-dappled sky. This liftoff marks the first Delta launch under the medium expendable launch vehicle services contract between NASA and McDonnell Douglas Space Systems Co. The GEOTAIL mission, a joint US/Japanese project, is the first in a series of five satellites to study the interactions between the Sun, the Earth's magnetic field, and the Van Allen radiation belts.

  9. Earth Science

    1996-01-31

    The Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR) spacecraft embarks on a journey that will culminate in a close encounter with an asteroid. The launch of NEAR inaugurates NASA's irnovative Discovery program of small-scale planetary missions with rapid, lower-cost development cycles and focused science objectives. NEAR will rendezvous in 1999 with the asteroid 433 Eros to begin the first long-term, close-up look at an asteroid's surface composition and physical properties. NEAR's science payload includes an x-ray/gamma ray spectrometer, an near-infrared spectrograph, a laser rangefinder, a magnetometer, a radio science experiment and a multi-spectral imager.

  10. Seismicity and strain transients in the Gulf of Corinth (Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canitano, A.; Bernard, P.; Linde, A. T.; Sacks, S. I.; Boudin, F.

    2009-12-01

    The Gulf of Corinth (Greece) is one of the most seismic regions in Europe, producing some earthquakes of magnitude greater than 5.8 in the last 35 years, 1 to 1.5 cm/yr of north-south extension, and frequent seismic swarms. This structure is a 110 km long, N110°E oriented graben bounded by systems of very recent normal faults. This zone thus provides an ideal site for investigating in situ the physics of earthquake sources and for developing efficient seismic hazard reduction procedures. The Corinth Rift Laboratory (CRL) project is concentrated in the western part of the rift, around the city of Aigion, where instrumental seismicity and strain rate is highest. The CRL Network is made up about fifteen seismic stations as well as tiltmeters, strainmeters or GPS in order to study the local seismicity, and to observe and model the short and long term mechanics of the normal fault system. The instrumental seismicity in the Aigion zone clearly shows a strong concentration of small earthquakes between 5 and 10 km. In order to study slow transient deformation, two borehole strainmeters have been installed in the Gulf (Trizonia, Monasteraki). The strainmeter installed in the Trizonia island is continuously recording the horizontal strain at 150m depth with a resolution better than 10-9. The dominant signal is the earth and sea tidal effects (few 10-7 strain), this one is modulated by the mechanical effects of the free oscillations of the Gulf with periods between 8 and 40 min. The barometric pressure fluctuations acts in combination with the mean sea level variation at longer periods and both effects are not independant. The comparison between the strain data and the two forcing signals (sea-level, barometric pressure) shows clearly a non zero phase delay of the sea-level. The analysis of time correlations between the signals in differents frequency range exhibits that the sea level delay and the strainmeter/sea-level coupling coefficient are increasing with period (about

  11. Dynamic ocean-tide effects on Earth's rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickman, S. R.

    1993-01-01

    This article develops 'broad-band' Liouville equations which are capable of determining the effects on the rotation of the Earth of a periodic excitation even at frequencies as high as semi-diurnal; these equations are then used to predict the rotational effects of altimetric, numerical and 32-constituent spherical harmonic ocean-tide models. The rotational model includes a frequency-dependent decoupled core, the effects of which are especially marked near retrograde diurnal frequencies; and a fully dynamic oceanic response, whose effects appear to be minor despite significant frequency dependence. The model also includes solid-earth effects which are frequency dependent as the result of both anelasticity at long periods and the fluid-core resonance at nearly diurnal periods. The effects of both tidal inertia and relative angular momentum on Earth rotation (polar motion, length of day, 'nutation' and Universal Time) are presented for 32 long- and short-period ocean tides determined as solutions to the author's spherical harmonic tide theory. The lengthening of the Chandler wobble period by the pole tide is also re-computed using the author's full theory. Additionally, using the spherical harmonic theory, tidal currents and their effects on rotation are determined for available numerical and altimetric tide height models. For all models, we find that the effects of tidal currents are at least as important as those of tide height for diurnal and semi-diurnal constituents.

  12. Turbine Control of a Tidal and River Power Generator

    SciT

    Muljadi, Eduard; Wright, Alan; Gevorgian, Vahan

    As renewable generation has become less expensive during recent decades, and it becomes more accepted by the global population, the focus on renewable generation has expanded to include new types with promising future applications, such as river and tidal generation. The input variations to these types of resources are slower but also steadier than wind or solar generation. The level of water turbulent flow may vary from one place to another, however, the control algorithm can be adjusted to local environment. This paper describes the hydrokinetic aspects of river and tidal generation based on a river and tidal generator. Althoughmore » the information given in this paper is not that of an exact generator deployed on site, the data used is representative of a typical river or tidal generator. In this paper, the hydrokinetic and associated electrical controller of the system were not included; however, the focus of this paper is on the hydrodynamic control.« less

  13. Turbine Control of a Tidal and River Power Generator: Preprint

    SciT

    Muljadi, Eduard; Gevorgian, Vahan; Wright, Alan

    As renewable generation has become less expensive during recent decades, and it becomes more accepted by the global population, the focus on renewable generation has expanded to include new types with promising future applications, such as river and tidal generation. The input variations to these types of resources are slower but also steadier than wind or solar generation. The level of water turbulent flow may vary from one place to another, however, the control algorithm can be adjusted to local environment. This paper describes the hydrokinetic aspects of river and tidal generation based on a river and tidal generator. Althoughmore » the information given in this paper is not that of an exact generator deployed on site, the data used is representative of a typical river or tidal generator. In this paper, the hydrokinetic and associated electrical controller of the system were not included; however, the focus of this paper is on the hydrodynamic control.« less

  14. South Bay Salt Pond Tidal Wetland Restoration Phase II Planning

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Information about the SFBWQP South Bay Salt Pond Tidal Wetland Restoration Phase II Planning project, part of an EPA competitive grant program to improve SF Bay water quality focused on restoring impaired waters and enhancing aquatic re

  15. Sears Point Tidal Marsh Restoration Project: Phase I

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Information about the SFBWQP Sears Point Tidal Marsh Restoration Project: Phase I project, part of an EPA competitive grant program to improve SF Bay water quality focused on restoring impaired waters and enhancing aquatic resources.

  16. Black Hole vs. Star: A Tidal Disruption Event (Artist's Concept)

    2018-06-15

    An artist's concept of a tidal disruption event (TDE) that happens when a star passes fatally close to a supermassive black hole, which reacts by launching a relativistic jet. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA22355

  17. Sears Point Tidal Marsh Restoration Project: Phase II

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Information about the SFBWQP Sears Point Tidal Marsh Restoration Project: Phase II, part of an EPA competitive grant program to improve SF Bay water quality focused on restoring impaired waters and enhancing aquatic resources.

  18. M2 tidal effects in greater cook strait, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kibblewhite, Alick C.; Ash, David E.

    1980-05-01

    The application of a M2 nonlinear numerical tidal model to the shelf seas of central New Zealand (~38.500 km2 area) is described. It has provided a preliminary assessment of tidal and residual currents, bottom stress, energy dissipation, and the stratification index. The existence of a permanent, tidally driven mesoscale eddy (~75 km diameter) is predicted nort of D'Urville Island. Large spatial gradients in bottom stress qualitatively agree with many features of the surficial sediment distribution. A comparison of all available bulk stratification data with the h/u3 stratification index clearly demonstrates the dominance of tidal versus wind mixing over the control of summer stratification. A potential application of the model to fisheries science is suggested through a comparison of the stratification index contour map and some observations of squid fishing vessel locations.

  19. M 2 tidal effects in greater Cook Strait, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, Malcolm J.; Kibblewhite, Alick C.; Ash, David E.

    1980-05-01

    The application of an M2 nonlinear numerical tidal model to the shelf seas of central New Zealand (˜38,500 km2 area) is described. It has provided a preliminary assessment of tidal and residual currents, bottom stress, energy dissipation, and the stratification index. The existence of a permanent, tidally driven mesoscale eddy (˜75 km diameter) is predicted north of D'Urville Island. Large spatial gradients in bottom stress qualitatively agree with many features of the surficial sediment distribution. A comparison of all available bulk stratification data with the h/u3 stratification index clearly demonstrates the dominance of tidal versus wind mixing over the control of summer stratification. A potential application of the model to fisheries science is suggested through a comparison of the stratification index contour map and some observations of squid fishing vessel locations.

  20. Emerson Parcel of Dutch Slough Tidal Marsh Restoration Project

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Information about the SFBWQP Emerson Parcel of Dutch Slough Tidal Marsh Restoration Project, part of an EPA competitive grant program to improve SF Bay water quality focused on restoring impaired waters and enhancing aquatic resources.