Science.gov

Sample records for earth tides effect

  1. Earth tides

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    Nineteen papers on gravity, tilt, and strain tides are compiled into this volume. Detailed chapters cover the calculation of the tidal forces and of the Earth's response to them, as well as actual observations of earth tides. Partial Contents: On Earth tides. The tidal forces: Tidal Forces. New Computations of the Tide-Generating Potential. Corrected Tables of Tidal Harmonics. The Theory of Tidal Deformations. Body Tides on an Elliptical, Rotating, Elastic and Oceanless Earth, Deformation of the Earth by Surface Loads. Gravimetric Tidal Loading Computed from Integrated Green's Functions. Tidal Friction in the Solid Earth. Loading Tides Versus Body Tides. Lunar Tidal Acceleration from Earth Satellite Orbit Analysis. Observations: gravity. Tidal Gravity in Britain: Tidal Loading and the Spatial Distribution of the Marine Tide. Tidal Loading along a Profile Europe-East Africa-South Asia-Australia and the Pacific Ocean. Detailed Gravity-Tide Spectrum between One and Four Cycles per Day. Observations: tilt and strain. Cavity and Topographic Effects in Tilt and Strain Measurement. Observations of Local Elastic Effects on Earth Tide Tilts and Strains.

  2. Dynamic ocean-tide effects on Earth's rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickman, S. R.

    1993-01-01

    This article develops 'broad-band' Liouville equations which are capable of determining the effects on the rotation of the Earth of a periodic excitation even at frequencies as high as semi-diurnal; these equations are then used to predict the rotational effects of altimetric, numerical and 32-constituent spherical harmonic ocean-tide models. The rotational model includes a frequency-dependent decoupled core, the effects of which are especially marked near retrograde diurnal frequencies; and a fully dynamic oceanic response, whose effects appear to be minor despite significant frequency dependence. The model also includes solid-earth effects which are frequency dependent as the result of both anelasticity at long periods and the fluid-core resonance at nearly diurnal periods. The effects of both tidal inertia and relative angular momentum on Earth rotation (polar motion, length of day, 'nutation' and Universal Time) are presented for 32 long- and short-period ocean tides determined as solutions to the author's spherical harmonic tide theory. The lengthening of the Chandler wobble period by the pole tide is also re-computed using the author's full theory. Additionally, using the spherical harmonic theory, tidal currents and their effects on rotation are determined for available numerical and altimetric tide height models. For all models, we find that the effects of tidal currents are at least as important as those of tide height for diurnal and semi-diurnal constituents.

  3. Effects of Long Period Ocean Tides on the Earth's Rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, Richard S.; Chao, Ben F.; Desai, Shailen D.

    1996-01-01

    The spectra of polar motion excitation functions exhibit enhanced power in the fortnightly tidal band. This enhanced power is attributed to ocean tidal excitation. Ocean tide models predict polar motion excitation effects that differ with each other, and with observations, by factors as large as 2-3. There is a need for inproved models for the effect of long-period ocean tides on Earth's rotation.

  4. The Earth Tides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Judah

    1982-01-01

    In addition to oceans, the earth is subjected to tidal stresses and undergoes tidal deformations. Discusses origin of tides, tidal stresses, and methods of determining tidal deformations (including gravity, tilt, and strain meters). (JN)

  5. The influence of earth tides on earth's coordinates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincente, R. O.

    1978-01-01

    The importance of the Earth's tides on Earth coordinates were examined for the following reasons: (1) the precision for obtaining the Earth's coordinates shows that the effects of Earth tides appear on the values obtained for the coordinates; (2) the possibility of determining the values of the Earth tides; and (3) the consideration of theoretical models that can compute the values of Earth tides. The astronomical and geodetic coordinates of a point at the Earth's surface are described.

  6. Effects of dynamic long-period ocean tides on changes in Earth's rotation rate

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, Y.S.; Dickman, S.R. )

    1990-05-10

    As a generalization of the zonal response coefficient first introduced by Agnew and Farrell (1978), the authors define the zonal response function k of the solid earth-ocean system as the ratio, in the frequency domain, of the tidal change in Earth's rotation rate to the tide-generating potential. Amplitudes and phases of k for the monthly, fortnightly, and 9-day lunar tides are estimated from 2 1/2 years of very long baseline interferometry UTI observations (both 5-day and daily time series), corrected for atmospheric angular momentum effects using NMC wind and pressure series. Using the dynamic ocean tide model of Dickman (1988a, 1989a), the authors predict amplitudes and phases of k for an elastic earth-ocean system. The predictions confirm earlier results which found that dynamic effects of the longer-period ocean tides reduce the amplitude of k by about 1%. However, agreement with the observed k is best achieved for all three tides if the predicted tide amplitudes are combined with the much larger satellite-observed ocean tide phases; in these cases the dynamic tidal effects reduce k by up to 8%. Finally, comparison between the observed and predicted amplitudes of k implies that anelastic effects on Earth's rotation at periods less than fortnightly cannot exceed 2%.

  7. Effects of dynamic long-period ocean tides on changes in earth's rotation rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nam, Young; Dickman, S. R.

    1990-01-01

    As a generalization of the zonal response coefficient first introduced by Agnew and Farrell (1978), the zonal response function kappa of the solid earth-ocean system is defined as the ratio, in the frequency domain, of the tidal change in earth's rotation rate to the tide-generating potential. Amplitudes and phases of kappa for the monthly, fortnightly, and nine-day lunar tides are estimated from 2 1/2 years of VLBI UT1 observations, corrected for atmospheric angular momentum effects using NMC wind and pressure series. Using the dynamic ocean tide model of Dickman (1988, 1989), amplitudes and phases of kappa for an elastic earth-ocean system are predicted. The predictions confirm earlier results which found that dynamic effects of the longer-period ocean tides reduce the amplitude of kappa by about 1 percent.

  8. Barometric and Earth Tide Correction

    SciTech Connect

    Toll, Nathaniel J.

    2005-11-10

    BETCO corrects for barometric and earth tide effects in long-term water level records. A regression deconvolution method is used ot solve a series of linear equations to determine an impulse response function for the well pressure head. Using the response function, a pressure head correction is calculated and applied.

  9. The effects of the solid inner core and nonhydrostatic structure on the earth's forced nutations and earth tides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Vries, Dan; Wahr, John M.

    1991-01-01

    This paper computes the effects of the solid inner core (IC) on the forced nutations and earth tides, and on certain of the earth's rotational normal modes. The theoretical results are extended to include the effects of a solid IC and of nonhydrostatic structure. The presence of the IC is responsible for a new, almost diurnal, prograde normal mode which involves a relative rotation between the IC and fluid outer core about an equatorial axis. It is shown that the small size of the IC's effects on both nutations and tides is a consequence of the fact that the IC's moments of inertia are less than 1/1000 of the entire earth's.

  10. Removal of barometric pressure effects and earth tides from observed water levels.

    PubMed

    Toll, Nathanial J; Rasmussen, Todd C

    2007-01-01

    The effects of barometric pressure and earth tide changes are often observed in ground water level measurements. These disturbances can make aquifer test interpretation difficult by masking the small changes induced by aquifer testing at late times and great distances. A computer utility is now available that automatically removes the effects of barometric pressure and earth tides from water level observations using regression deconvolution. This procedure has been shown to remove more noise then traditional constant barometric efficiency techniques in both confined and unconfined aquifers. Instead of a single, instantaneous barometric efficiency, the procedure more correctly accounts for the lagged responses caused by barometric pressure and earth tide changes. Simultaneous measurements of water levels (or total heads) and nearby barometric pressures are required. As an additional option, the effects of earth tides can also be removed using theoretical earth tides. The program is demonstrated for two data sets collected at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, Carlsbad, New Mexico. The program is available free by request at http://www.hydrology.uga.edu/tools.html.

  11. The effect of ocean tides on the earth's rotation as predicted by the results of an ocean tide model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, Richard S.

    1993-01-01

    The published ocean tidal angular momentum results of Seiler (1991) are used to predict the effects of the most important semidiurnal, diurnal, and long period ocean tides on the earth's rotation. The separate, as well as combined, effects of ocean tidal currents and sea level height changes on the length-of-day, UT1, and polar motion are computed. The predicted polar motion results reported here account for the presence of the free core nutation and are given in terms of the motion of the celestial ephemeris pole so that they can be compared directly to the results of observations. Outside the retrograde diurnal tidal band, the summed effect of the semidiurnal and diurnal ocean tides studied here predict peak-to-peak polar motion amplitudes as large as 2 mas. Within the retrograde diurnal tidal band, the resonant enhancement caused by the free core nutation leads to predicted polar motion amplitudes as large as 9 mas.

  12. BETCO: A Computer Program for the Removal of Barometric and Earth Tide Effects From Water Levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toll, N.; Rasmussen, T. C.

    2005-12-01

    Barometric pressure effects in long-term water level measurements can mask drawdown responses to well tests and natural stimuli. Noise caused by barometric pressure and earth tide effects complicates analysis of pressure response data using diagnostic pressure derivative plots. A computer program has been developed to remove fluctuations in groundwater levels induced by changes in barometric pressure and earth tides. The program implements a regression deconvolution method to obtain a barometric response function and remove the barometric pressure and earth tide effects from the groundwater level data. Using the barometric response function yields a better residual or corrected head than using a constant barometric efficiency. The graphical response function can be used to diagnose aquifer type and well skin effects. A modification of the regression deconvolution has been implemented to simultaneously remove earth tide effects as well as barometric effects on water levels. The removal of the earth tide effects is provided as a beta feature. The software has been applied to 13 water level data sets at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in Carlsbad, NM. The results are compared to a constant barometric efficiency correction method. The freeware software is available as an install wizard for Windows XP and 2000. As of submission, all results output from BETCO are considered preliminary, please do not cite. The code is under continued development and will be qualified per the Sandia National Laboratories WIPP Software QA Plan requirements. This research is funded by WIPP programs administered by the Office of Environmental Management (EM) of the U.S. Department of Energy. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  13. Effect of Long-Period Ocean Tides on the Earth's Polar Motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, R. S.; Chao, B. F.; Desai, S. D.

    1997-01-01

    The second-degree zonal tide raising potential is symmetric about the polar axis and hence can excite the Earth's polar motion only through its action upon nonaxisymmetric features of the Earth such as the oceans.

  14. On the effect of ocean tides and tesseral harmonics on spacecraft flybys of the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acedo, L.

    2016-09-01

    The so-called flyby anomaly has encouraged several authors to analyze in detail the minor perturbative contributions to the trajectory of spacecraft performing a flyby manoeuvre. This anomaly consist of an unexplained increase or decrease of the asymptotic velocity of the spacecraft after a flyby of the Earth in the range of a few mm per second. Some order of magnitude estimations have been performed in recent years to dismiss many possible conventional effects as the source of such an anomaly but no explanation has been found yet. In this paper we perform a study of the perturbation induced by ocean tides in a flybying spacecraft by considering the time dependence of the location of the high tide as the Moon follows its orbit. We show that this effect implies a change of the spacecraft velocity of a few micrometers per second. We also consider the coupling of tesseral harmonics inhomogeneities and the rotation of the Earth and its impact of the spacecraft outgoing velocity. Significant corrections to the observed asymptotic velocities are found in this case but neither their sign nor their magnitude coincide with the anomalies. So, we can also rule this out as a conventional explanation.

  15. The effect of error in theoretical Earth tide on calibration of borehole strainmeters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langbein, John

    2010-01-01

    Since the installation of borehole strainmeters into the ground locally distorts the strain in the rock, these strainmeters require calibration from a known source which typically is the Earth tide. Consequently, the accuracy of the observed strain changes from borehole strainmeters depends upon the calibration derived from modeling the Earth tide. Previous work from the mid-1970s, which is replicated here, demonstrate that the theoretical tide can differ by 30% from the tide observed at surface-mounted, long-baseline strainmeters. In spite of possible inaccurate tidal models, many of the 74 borehole strainmeters installed since 2005 can be “calibrated”. However, inaccurate tidal models affect the amplitude and phase of observed transient strain changes which needs to be considered along with the precision of the data from the inherent drift of these borehole instruments. In particular, the error from inaccurate tidal model dominates the error budget in the observation of impulsive, sub-daily, strain-transients.

  16. How do earth tides affect astronomers?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sasao, T.

    1978-01-01

    Earth tides affect astronomical observations of the Earth's rotation in the following two ways: (1) verticals are deflected; and (2) the polar moment of inertia of the Earth is changed causing periodic variations in the rotation rate. The diurnal and semidiurnal tides and nutation were examined in periodic variations. Results indicate little change occured in the polar motions. Nutation observations were disturbed rather seriously by the diurnal tides.

  17. (abstract) Effect of Long Period Ocean Tides on the Earth's Rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, R. S.; Chao, B. F.; Desai, S.

    1996-01-01

    The second-degree zonal tide raising potential, which is responsible for tidal changes in the Earth's rotation rate and length-of-day, is symmetric about the polar axis and hence can excite the Earth's polar motion only through its action upon nonaxisymmetric features of the Earth such as the oceans. Ocean tidal excitation of polar motion in the diurnal and semidiurnal tidal bands has been previously detected and extensively examined. Here, the detection of ocean tidal excitation of polar motion in the long-period tidal band, specifically at the Mf' (13.63-day) and Mf (13.66-day) tidal frequencies, is reported.

  18. Ocean tide models for satellite geodesy and Earth rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickman, Steven R.

    1991-01-01

    A theory is presented which predicts tides in turbulent, self-gravitating, and loading oceans possessing linearized bottom friction, realistic bathymetry, and continents (at coastal boundaries no-flow conditions are imposed). The theory is phrased in terms of spherical harmonics, which allows the tide equations to be reduced to linear matrix equations. This approach also allows an ocean-wide mass conservation constraint to be applied. Solutions were obtained for 32 long and short period luni-solar tidal constituents (and the pole tide), including the tidal velocities in addition to the tide height. Calibrating the intensity of bottom friction produces reasonable phase lags for all constituents; however, tidal amplitudes compare well with those from observation and other theories only for long-period constituents. In the most recent stage of grant research, traditional theory (Liouville equations) for determining the effects of angular momentum exchange on Earth's rotation were extended to encompass high-frequency excitations (such as short-period tides).

  19. Global Earth Response to Loading by Ocean Tide Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estes, R. H.; Strayer, J. M.

    1979-01-01

    Mathematical and programming techniques to numerically calculate Earth response to global semidiurnal and diurnal ocean tide models were developed. Global vertical crustal deformations were evaluated for M sub 2, S sub 2, N sub 2, K sub 2, K sub 1, O sub 1, and P sub 1 ocean tide loading, while horizontal deformations were evaluated for the M sub 2 tidal load. Tidal gravity calculations were performed for M sub 2 tidal loads, and strain tensor elements were evaluated for M sub 2 loads. The M sub 2 solution used for the ocean tide included the effects of self-gravitation and crustal loading.

  20. Tide effects removed from well tests

    SciTech Connect

    Aase, E.P.B.; Jelmert, T.A.; Vik, S.A.

    1995-05-01

    To avoid distorted data when analyzing well pressure tests of permeable offshore reservoirs, one needs to account for periodic ocean tidal stress. Quartz-crystal bottom hole pressure recorders provide a high resolution of reservoir pressure but also measures pressure fluctuations from tidal effects during well testing. Periodic oscillations in the reservoir pressure are due to the three mechanisms: solid earth tide; barometric tide/effect; and ocean tide. The paper uses sample data from an offshore reservoir to illustrate how tide effects can be identified in the data and the correction procedure to use to remove these effects.

  1. Nonlinearity in rock - Evidence from earth tides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agnew, D. C.

    1981-01-01

    The earth is sinusoidally stressed by tidal forces; if the stress-strain relation for rock is nonlinear, energy should appear in an earth tide record at frequencies which are multiples of those of the larger tidal lines. An examination of the signals to be expected for different nonlinear deformation laws shows that for a nonlinear response without dissipation, the largest anomalous signal should occur at twice the forcing frequency, whereas for nonlinear laws involving dissipation (cusped hysteresis loops) the anomalous signal will be greatest at three times this frequency. The size of the signal in the dissipative case depends on the amount by which dissipation affects the particular response being measured. For measurements of strain tides this depends on whether dissipation is assumed to be present throughout the earth or localized around the point of measurement. An analysis of 5.7 years of strain tide records from Pinon Flat, California, shows a small signal at twice the frequency of the largest (M2) tide.

  2. Influence of fortnightly earth tides at Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dzurisin, D.

    1980-01-01

    Analysis of 52 historic eruptions confirms the premise that fortnightly earth tides play a significant role in triggering activity at Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii. Since January 1832, nearly twice as many eruptions have occurred nearer fortnightly tidal maximum than tidal minimum (34 vs. 18). A straightforward significance test indicates that the likelihood of a fortnightly tidal influence on Kilauea eruptions is roughly 90%. This is not the case for Mauna Loa Volcano, where 37 historic eruptions have been distributed randomly with respect to the fortnightly tide. At Kilauea, stresses induced by fortnightly earth tides presumably act in concert with volcanic and tectonic stresses to trigger shallow magma movements along preexisting zones of weakness. Differences in structure or internal plumbing may limit the effectiveness of this mechanism at Mauna Loa. Tidal effects seem to be less marked at shields than at some island-arc volcanoes, possibly because higher average volcanic stress rates in Hawaii more often override the effects of tidal stresses.-Author

  3. Fortnightly Ocean Tides, Earth Rotation, and Mantle Anelasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Richard; Egbert, Gary

    2012-01-01

    The fortnightly Mf ocean tide is the largest of the long-period tides (periods between 1 week and 18.6 years), but Mf is still very small, generally 2 cm or less. All long-period tides are thought to be near equilibrium with the astronomical tidal potential, with an almost pure zonal structure. However, several lines of evidence point to Mf having a significant dynamic response to forcing. We use a combination of numerical modeling, satellite altimetry, and observations of polar motion to determine the Mf ocean tide and to place constraints on certain global properties, such as angular momentum. Polar motion provides the only constraints on Mf tidal currents. With a model of the Mf ocean tide in hand, we use it to remove the effects of the ocean from estimates of fortnightly variations in length-of-day. The latter is dominated by the earth's body tide, but a small residual allows us to place new constraints on the anelasticity of the earth's mantle. The result gives the first experimental confirmation of theoretical predictions made by Wahr and Bergen in 1986.

  4. Fortnightly Earth Rotation, Ocean Tides, and Mantle Anelasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Richard D.; Egbert, Gary D.

    2011-01-01

    Sustained accurate measurements of earth rotation are one of the prime goals of Global Geodetic Observing System (GGOS). We here concentrate on the fortnightly (Mf) tidal component of earth-rotation data to obtain new results concerning anelasticity of the mantle at this period. The study comprises three parts: (1) a new determination of the Mf component of polar motion and length-of-day from a multi-decade time series of space-geodetic data; (2) the use of the polar-motion determination as one constraint in the development of a hydrodynamic ocean model of the Mf tide; and (3) the use of these results to place new constraints on mantle anelasticity. Our model of the Mf ocean tide assimilates more than fourteen years of altimeter data from the Topex/Poseidon and Jason-1 satellites. The polar motion data, plus tide-gauge data and independent altimeter data, give useful additional information, with only the polar motion putting constraints on tidal current velocities. The resulting ocean-tide model, plus the dominant elastic body tide, leaves a small residual in observed length-of-day caused by mantle anelasticity. The inferred effective tidal 0 of the anelastic body tide is 90 and is in line with a omega-alpha frequency dependence with alpha in the range 0.2--0.3.

  5. What can earth tide measurements tell us about ocean tides or earth structure?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, T. F.

    1978-01-01

    Current experimental problems in Earth tides are reviewed using comparisons of tidal gravity and tilt measurements in Europe with loading calculations are examples. The limitations of present day instrumentation and installation techniques are shown as well as some of the ways in which they can be improved. Many of the geophysical and oceanographic investigations that are possible with Earth tide measurements are discussed with emphasis on the percentage accuracies required in the measurements in order to obtain new information about Earth or its oceans.

  6. The inverse problem: Ocean tides derived from earth tide observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuo, J. T.

    1978-01-01

    Indirect mapping ocean tides by means of land and island-based tidal gravity measurements is presented. The inverse scheme of linear programming is used for indirect mapping of ocean tides. Open ocean tides were measured by the numerical integration of Laplace's tidal equations.

  7. Estimating Hydraulic Properties of the Floridan Aquifer System by Analysis of Earth-Tide, Ocean-Tide, and Barometric Effects, Collier and Hendry Counties, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Merritt, Michael L.

    2004-01-01

    Aquifers are subjected to mechanical stresses from natural, non-anthropogenic, processes such as pressure loading or mechanical forcing of the aquifer by ocean tides, earth tides, and pressure fluctuations in the atmosphere. The resulting head fluctuations are evident even in deep confined aquifers. The present study was conducted for the purpose of reviewing the research that has been done on the use of these phenomena for estimating the values of aquifer properties, and determining which of the analytical techniques might be useful for estimating hydraulic properties in the dissolved-carbonate hydrologic environment of southern Florida. Fifteen techniques are discussed in this report, of which four were applied. An analytical solution for head oscillations in a well near enough to the ocean to be influenced by ocean tides was applied to data from monitor zones in a well near Naples, Florida. The solution assumes a completely non-leaky confining unit of infinite extent. Resulting values of transmissivity are in general agreement with the results of aquifer performance tests performed by the South Florida Water Management District. There seems to be an inconsistency between results of the amplitude ratio analysis and independent estimates of loading efficiency. A more general analytical solution that takes leakage through the confining layer into account yielded estimates that were lower than those obtained using the non-leaky method, and closer to the South Florida Water Management District estimates. A numerical model with a cross-sectional grid design was applied to explore additional aspects of the problem. A relation between specific storage and the head oscillation observed in a well provided estimates of specific storage that were considered reasonable. Porosity estimates based on the specific storage estimates were consistent with values obtained from measurements on core samples. Methods are described for determining aquifer diffusivity by comparing the

  8. Observing atmospheric tides in Earth rotation parameters with VLBI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girdiuk, Anastasiia; Böhm, Johannes; Schindelegger, Michael

    2015-04-01

    In this study, we assess the contribution of diurnal (S1) and semi-diurnal (S2) atmospheric tides to variations in Earth rotation by analyzing Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) observations. Particular emphasis is placed on the dependency of S1 and S2 estimates on varying settings in the a priori delay model. We use hourly Earth rotation parameters (ERP) of polar motion and UT1 as determined with the Vienna VLBI Software (VieVS) from 25 years of VLBI observations and we adjust diurnal and semi-diurnal amplitudes to the hourly ERP estimates after disregarding the effect of high-frequency ocean tides. Prograde and retrograde polar motion coefficients are obtained for several solutions differing in processing strategies (with/without thermal deformation, time span of observations, choice of a priori ERP model and celestial pole offsets) and we compare the corresponding harmonics with those derived from atmospheric and non-tidal oceanic angular momentum estimates.

  9. The effects of mantle and anelasticity on nutations, earth tides, and tidal variations in rotation rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wahr, John; Bergen, Zachary

    1986-01-01

    The paper models the effects of mantle anelasticity on luni-solar nutations, on tidal deformation, on tidal variations in rotation rate, and on the eigenfrequency of the free core nutation. The results can be used to invert observations to solve for the anelastic contributions to the shear and bulk moduli of the upper and lower mantle. Specific anelastic models are used to numerically estimate the effects of anelasticity on these geodetic observables. The nutation estimates are compared with observational results. Among the conclusions: (1) mantle anelasticity is likely to be the most important source of damping for the free core nutation; (2) present VLBI nutation results are, in principle, accurate enough to usefully bound anelasticity at diurnal periods. But the discrepancy between the VLBI observed nutations and the 1984 IAU nutation model cannot be explained by anelasticity and is not yet well enough understood to allow anelasticity to be determined from the data.

  10. Interpretation of earth tide response of three deep, confined aquifers

    SciTech Connect

    Narasimhan, T.N.; Kanehiro, B.Y.; Witherspoon, P.A.

    1984-03-10

    The response of a confined, areally infinite aquifer to external loads imposed by earth tides is examined. Because the gravitational influence of celestial objects occurs over large areas of the earth, the confined aquifer is assumed to respond in an undrained fashion. Since undrained response is controlled by water compressibility, earth tide response can be directly used only to evaluate porous medium compressibility if porosity is known. Moreover, since specific storage S/sub s/ quantifies a drained behavior of the porous medium, one cannot directly estimate S/sub s/from earth tide response. Except for the fact that barometric changes act both on the water surface in the well and on the aquifer as a whole while stress changes associated with earth tides act only in the aquifer, the two phenomena influence the confined aquifer in much the same way. In other words, barometric response contains only as much information on the elastic properties of the aquifer as the earth tide response does. Factors such as well bore storage, aquifer transmissivity, and storage coefficient contribute to time lag and damping of the aquifer response as observed in the well. Analysis shows that the observation of fluid pressure changes alone, without concurrent measurement of external stress changes, is sufficient to interpret uniquely earth tide response. In the present work, change in external stress is estimated from dilatation by assuming a reasonable value for bulk modulus. Earth tide response of geothermal aquifers from Marysville, Montana. East Mesa, California; and Raft River Valley, Idaho, were analyzed, and the ratio of S/sub 3/ to porosity was estimated. Comparison of these estimates with independent pumping tests show reasonable agreement.

  11. Constraints on Energy Dissipation in the Earth's Body Tide From Satellite Tracking and Altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Richard D.; Eanes, Richard J.; Lemoine, Frank G.

    1992-01-01

    The phase lag by which the earth's body tide follows the tidal potential is estimated for the principal lunar semidiurnal tide M(sub 2). The estimate results from combining recent tidal solutions from satellite tracking data and from Topex/Poseidon satellite altimeter data. Each data type is sensitive to the body-tide lag: gravitationally for the tracking data, geometrically for the altimetry. Allowance is made for the lunar atmospheric tide. For the tidal potential Love number kappa(sub 2) we obtain a lag epsilon of 0.20 deg +/- 0.05 deg, implying an effective body-tide Q of 280 and body-tide energy dissipation of 110 +/- 25 gigawatts.

  12. The Global S_1 Tide in Earth's Nutation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindelegger, Michael; Einšpigel, David; Salstein, David; Böhm, Johannes

    2016-05-01

    Diurnal S_1 tidal oscillations in the coupled atmosphere-ocean system induce small perturbations of Earth's prograde annual nutation, but matching geophysical model estimates of this Sun-synchronous rotation signal with the observed effect in geodetic Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) data has thus far been elusive. The present study assesses the problem from a geophysical model perspective, using four modern-day atmospheric assimilation systems and a consistently forced barotropic ocean model that dissipates its energy excess in the global abyssal ocean through a parameterized tidal conversion scheme. The use of contemporary meteorological data does, however, not guarantee accurate nutation estimates per se; two of the probed datasets produce atmosphere-ocean-driven S_1 terms that deviate by more than 30 μ as (microarcseconds) from the VLBI-observed harmonic of -16.2+i113.4 μ as. Partial deficiencies of these models in the diurnal band are also borne out by a validation of the air pressure tide against barometric in situ estimates as well as comparisons of simulated sea surface elevations with a global network of S_1 tide gauge determinations. Credence is lent to the global S_1 tide derived from the Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) and the operational model of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF). When averaged over a temporal range of 2004 to 2013, their nutation contributions are estimated to be -8.0+i106.0 μ as (MERRA) and -9.4+i121.8 μ as (ECMWF operational), thus being virtually equivalent with the VLBI estimate. This remarkably close agreement will likely aid forthcoming nutation theories in their unambiguous a priori account of Earth's prograde annual celestial motion.

  13. Transforming Instructional Designs in Earth Science (TIDES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McWilliams, H.; McAuliffe, C.; Penuel, W.

    2008-12-01

    An enduring challenge in Earth system science education has been to prepare teachers to teach for deep understanding of subject matter. Standards and trade textbooks are often too broad to allow for in-depth treatment of specific topics, and many teachers have had limited exposure to how to plan instruction for the core concepts of Earth system science they are expected to teach. High-quality curriculum materials do exist that provide young people with opportunities to explore concepts in depth and to experience the inquiry process. At the same time, few programs provide teachers with the necessary skills and knowledge to enact and adapt those materials to the unique circumstances of their classrooms and schools. Our interdisciplinary team of curriculum and staff developers, researchers, and district personnel developed a program focused on preparing teachers to use a principled approach to curriculum adaptation in Earth system science. In this program, teachers learned how to use the Understanding by Design (UbD) approach developed by Grant Wiggins and Jay McTighe to organize and adapt materials from an expert-designed curriculum. As part of the program, teachers learn to select or modify materials from the curriculum based on how likely the materials are to develop so-called "enduring understandings" of concepts in the district standards. Teachers also learn how to apply the approach in incorporating materials from other sources besides the expert-designed curriculum, which can include their textbook and materials they design on their own or with colleagues. Third, teachers learn how to collect and interpret evidence of student understanding by designing or adapting performance tasks that call for students to apply knowledge acquired during the unit to solve a problem or complete a project. Evidence from a randomized controlled trial indicates the program we created is effective in improving the quality of teacher assignments and in improving student achievement

  14. Earth tides, volcanos and climatic change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roosen, R. G.; Harrington, R. S.; Giles, J.; Browning, I.

    1976-01-01

    The effect of variations in tidal stresses on the earth caused by the sun and moon on volcanic activity and climate is investigated. A statistically significant correlation is found between the derivatives of the envelopes of peak tidal stresses at high northern latitudes and the mean temperature of the Northern Hemisphere as reflected in oxygen isotope ratios in the Greenland ice cap. It is suggested that variations in tidal stresses cause changes in the amount of stratospheric dust produced by volcanic activity, which affects the thickness of the stratospheric dust veil and the atmospheric radiation balance. For a simple model, periodic variations in tidal stress account for 13% of the variance in the ice-core temperature record.

  15. Why earthquakes correlate weakly with the solid Earth tides: Effects of periodic stress on the rate and probability of earthquake occurrence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beeler, N.M.; Lockner, D.A.

    2003-01-01

    We provide an explanation why earthquake occurrence does not correlate well with the daily solid Earth tides. The explanation is derived from analysis of laboratory experiments in which faults are loaded to quasiperiodic failure by the combined action of a constant stressing rate, intended to simulate tectonic loading, and a small sinusoidal stress, analogous to the Earth tides. Event populations whose failure times correlate with the oscillating stress show two modes of response; the response mode depends on the stressing frequency. Correlation that is consistent with stress threshold failure models, e.g., Coulomb failure, results when the period of stress oscillation exceeds a characteristic time tn; the degree of correlation between failure time and the phase of the driving stress depends on the amplitude and frequency of the stress oscillation and on the stressing rate. When the period of the oscillating stress is less than tn, the correlation is not consistent with threshold failure models, and much higher stress amplitudes are required to induce detectable correlation with the oscillating stress. The physical interpretation of tn is the duration of failure nucleation. Behavior at the higher frequencies is consistent with a second-order dependence of the fault strength on sliding rate which determines the duration of nucleation and damps the response to stress change at frequencies greater than 1/tn. Simple extrapolation of these results to the Earth suggests a very weak correlation of earthquakes with the daily Earth tides, one that would require >13,000 earthquakes to detect. On the basis of our experiments and analysis, the absence of definitive daily triggering of earthquakes by the Earth tides requires that for earthquakes, tn exceeds the daily tidal period. The experiments suggest that the minimum typical duration of earthquake nucleation on the San Andreas fault system is ???1 year.

  16. Patterns of earthquakes and the effect of solid earth and ocean load tides at Mount St. Helens prior to the May 18, 1980, eruption

    SciTech Connect

    McNutt, S.R.; Beavan, R.J.

    1984-05-10

    Seismographs near Mount St. Helens Volcano recorded an earthquake swarm lasting nearly 2 months prior to the May 18, 1980, eruption. The earthquakes are divided into four classes based on station CPW (..delta.. = 116 km) seismogram characteristics: (1) events with Sv:P amplitude ratio > 3 and dominant frequency > 3 Hz; (2) events with Sv:P ratio between 1 and 3 and dominant frequency > 2 Hz; (3) events similar to characteristic 2 but with a strong (probably surface wave) phase just after the S phase; and (4) events with frequencies between 1 and 2 Hz lacking a clear S phase. The seismicity pattern for each of the four classes is unique. Solid earth stress and strain tides were calculated at the average hypocentral depth of 4 km. Stress and strain tides induced by ocean loading were also calculated; their amplitudes are typically 20-40% those of the solid earth tides at the location of Mount St. Helens. A weak but significant correlation exists between the latter two classes of events and the tides for a time interval of about 5 days preceding the first onset of volcanic tremor and about 5 days thereafter. The polarity of the correlation is opposite for the two classes of events. In each case, the phase of the correlation changes systematically with time, the changes coinciding with the onset of tremor on March 31 and with a pronounced decrease in earthquake energy release rate on April 3. There are no significant correlations between the tides and the number of events or energy release of these two classes of earthquakes during any other interval between March 20 and May 18, 1980. The first two classes of events show no evidence of significant tidal correlation at any time during the study period. 20 references, 8 figures, 2 tables.

  17. Response of well aquifer systems to earth tides: problem revisited

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hsieh, P.A.; Bredehoeft, J.D.; Rojstaczer, S.A.

    1988-01-01

    Re-examines Bredehoeft's analysis of earthtide response of water wells. Narasimhan et al suggest that Bredehoeft's analysis is internally inconsistent, that one cannot directly estimate the specific storage, which characterizes the drained behavior of a porous medium, from earth tide response, which is an undrained phenomenon. Here it is shown that Bredehoeft's analysis is internally consistent, and that it is possible to determine the specific storage from undrained loading. -from Authors

  18. Tidal Tomography: Constraining Long-Wavelength Deep Mantle Structure Using Earth's Body Tide Signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, H. C. P.; Yang, H. Y.; Tromp, J.; Mitrovica, J. X.; Davis, J. L.; Latychev, K.

    2014-12-01

    Luni-solar gravitational forcing drives the Earth's body-tide response over periods ranging from 8 hours to 18.6 years, a timespan that extends far beyond the seismic band. A finite volume numerical study of body tides in the semi-diurnal (SD) band by Latychev et al. (2008; EPSL) demonstrated that aspherical density and elastic structure inferred from seismic tomography perturbed the radial crustal displacement response by ~1 mm, a level at which they can be observed with modern space-geodetic inferences of body tide signals (Yuan et al., 2012; EPSL). Thus, site-specific estimates of the body-tide response to the known luni-solar forcing potentially provides a new, independent and powerful method for probing long-wavelength, deep mantle structure. To this end, we have used advances in seismic free oscillation theory to derive a new normal mode treatment of the SD body tide response of an aspherical, rotating and anelastic Earth. The accuracy of the theory is demonstrated by benchmarking our body tide predictions against both finite volume treatments of aspherical structure and previous theoretical and observational constraints on the effects of anelasticity. We begin by summarizing these results, as well as a series of synthetic tests that indicate that the body tide response is particularly sensitive to long wavelength, deep mantle structure - a sensitivity that is ideal for investigating the elastic and density structure of the two large low shear velocity provinces (LLSVPs) that exist below the Pacific and southern Africa. Finally, we also present results from a first tidal analysis of the integrated density of the LLSVPs and discuss the implications of these results for the ongoing debate concerning the relative size of thermal and chemical effects on these structures, their net buoyancy and longevity.

  19. Linear and nonlinear interactions between the earth tide and a tectonically stressed earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beaumont, C.

    1978-01-01

    In the vincinity of earthquake focal regions, conditions may not be equal. Crustal rocks stressed to more than approximately 0.6 of their failure strength exhibit material properties over and above that of linear elasticity. Interactions between the earth tide and crustal rocks that are under high tectonic stress are discussed in terms of simple phenomenological models. In particular, the difference between a nonlinear elastic model of dilatancy and a dilatancy model that exhibits hysteresis is noted. It is concluded that the small changes in stress produced by the earth tide act as a probe of the properties of crustal rocks. Observations of earth tide tilts and strains in such high stress zones may, therefore, provide keys to the constitutive properties and the tectonic stress rate tensor of these zones.

  20. Chemical evolution of thermal springs at Arenal Volcano, Costa Rica: Effect of volcanic activity, precipitation, seismic activity, and Earth tides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, D. L.; Bundschuh, J.; Soto, G. J.; Fernández, J. F.; Alvarado, G. E.

    2006-09-01

    decrease when precipitation increases. However, correlations between concentrations and the number of seismic events per month and the modeled vertical tidal acceleration are also observed. The intrinsic periodic behavior of all these variables influenced by the Earth's rotation can complicate the interpretation of the chemical changes at hot springs. For example, variations in atmospheric pressure can affect the degassing and seismic tremor of a volcano as well as the rate of precipitation. Frequent monitoring and understanding of these variations is essential at every volcano if we want to use the variations in chemical composition of hot springs in volcanic monitoring.

  1. Electrodynamic System of Earth in Moon and Solar Tides Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grunskaya, Lubov; Isakevich, Valiriy

    Since 2000 there has been working the united system of monitoring of electrical and geomagnetic fields of ELF range of the atmosphere boundary surface layer at the spaced apart stations: Vladimir State physical experimental ground; the station of RAS Institute of Sun and Earth physics at Lake Baikal; the station in Paratunka (Kamchatka); the station in Obninsk. There has been developed a programme-analytical system (PAS) to investigate signal structures in spectral and time series, caused by geophysical and astrophysical processes based on the method of eigen vectors. There has been developed a programme and analytical system to investigate the signal structure in the spectral and time series caused by geophysical processes. There has been estimated the amplitude and investigated the properties of the Earth atmosphere boundary layer electrical field components localized spectrally at the frequencies of the moon and solar tides. There has been exposed a method of determination of relative and absolute amplitudes of the main components of the eigen series. There has been investigated coherence of the spectral components at the frequencies of solar and moon tides. The work is carried out with supporting of RFFI № 14-07-97510, State Task to Universities on 2014-2016.

  2. Solid Earth Tide Parameters from VLBI Measurements and FCN Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krásná, H.; Böhm, J.; Böhm, S.; Schuh, H.

    2012-12-01

    In a common global adjustment of the 24-hour IVS sessions from 1984.0 till 2011.0 with the Vienna VLBI Software (VieVS), we have estimated simultaneously terrestrial reference frame (station positions and velocities), celestial reference frame (radio source positions), and Earth orientation parameters, together with complex Love and Shida numbers for diurnal tides and their frequency dependence caused by the resonance with the Free Core Nutation (FCN). As the FCN period is contained in the solid Earth tidal displacements and also in the motion of the Celestial Intermediate Pole w.r.t. the celestial reference system, it is determined from both phenomena as a common parameter in the global solution. Our estimated FCN period of -431.18 ± 0.10 sidereal days is slightly different from the value -431.39 sidereal days adopted in the IERS Conventions 2010.

  3. Geodynamic Effects of Ocean Tides: Progress and Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richard, Ray

    1999-01-01

    Satellite altimetry, particularly Topex/Poseidon, has markedly improved our knowledge of global tides, thereby allowing significant progress on some longstanding problems in geodynamics. This paper reviews some of that progress. Emphasis is given to global-scale problems, particularly those falling within the mandate of the new IERS Special Bureau for Tides: angular momentum, gravitational field, geocenter motion. For this discussion I use primarily the new ocean tide solutions GOT99.2, CSR4.0, and TPXO.4 (for which G. Egbert has computed inverse-theoretic error estimates), and I concentrate on new results in angular momentum and gravity and their solid-earth implications. One example is a new estimate of the effective tidal Q at the M_2 frequency, based on combining these ocean models with tidal estimates from satellite laser ranging. Three especially intractable problems are also addressed: (1) determining long-period tides in the Arctic [large unknown effect on the inertia tensor, particularly for Mf]; (2) determining the global psi_l tide [large unknown effect on interpretations of gravimetry for the near-diurnal free wobble]; and (3) determining radiational tides [large unknown temporal variations at important frequencies]. Problems (2) and (3) are related.

  4. Measurement of the Earth tides with a MEMS gravimeter.

    PubMed

    Middlemiss, R P; Samarelli, A; Paul, D J; Hough, J; Rowan, S; Hammond, G D

    2016-03-31

    The ability to measure tiny variations in the local gravitational acceleration allows, besides other applications, the detection of hidden hydrocarbon reserves, magma build-up before volcanic eruptions, and subterranean tunnels. Several technologies are available that achieve the sensitivities required for such applications (tens of microgal per hertz(1/2)): free-fall gravimeters, spring-based gravimeters, superconducting gravimeters, and atom interferometers. All of these devices can observe the Earth tides: the elastic deformation of the Earth's crust as a result of tidal forces. This is a universally predictable gravitational signal that requires both high sensitivity and high stability over timescales of several days to measure. All present gravimeters, however, have limitations of high cost (more than 100,000 US dollars) and high mass (more than 8 kilograms). Here we present a microelectromechanical system (MEMS) device with a sensitivity of 40 microgal per hertz(1/2) only a few cubic centimetres in size. We use it to measure the Earth tides, revealing the long-term stability of our instrument compared to any other MEMS device. MEMS accelerometers--found in most smart phones--can be mass-produced remarkably cheaply, but none are stable enough to be called a gravimeter. Our device has thus made the transition from accelerometer to gravimeter. The small size and low cost of this MEMS gravimeter suggests many applications in gravity mapping. For example, it could be mounted on a drone instead of low-flying aircraft for distributed land surveying and exploration, deployed to monitor volcanoes, or built into multi-pixel density-contrast imaging arrays. PMID:27029276

  5. Measurement of the Earth tides with a MEMS gravimeter.

    PubMed

    Middlemiss, R P; Samarelli, A; Paul, D J; Hough, J; Rowan, S; Hammond, G D

    2016-03-31

    The ability to measure tiny variations in the local gravitational acceleration allows, besides other applications, the detection of hidden hydrocarbon reserves, magma build-up before volcanic eruptions, and subterranean tunnels. Several technologies are available that achieve the sensitivities required for such applications (tens of microgal per hertz(1/2)): free-fall gravimeters, spring-based gravimeters, superconducting gravimeters, and atom interferometers. All of these devices can observe the Earth tides: the elastic deformation of the Earth's crust as a result of tidal forces. This is a universally predictable gravitational signal that requires both high sensitivity and high stability over timescales of several days to measure. All present gravimeters, however, have limitations of high cost (more than 100,000 US dollars) and high mass (more than 8 kilograms). Here we present a microelectromechanical system (MEMS) device with a sensitivity of 40 microgal per hertz(1/2) only a few cubic centimetres in size. We use it to measure the Earth tides, revealing the long-term stability of our instrument compared to any other MEMS device. MEMS accelerometers--found in most smart phones--can be mass-produced remarkably cheaply, but none are stable enough to be called a gravimeter. Our device has thus made the transition from accelerometer to gravimeter. The small size and low cost of this MEMS gravimeter suggests many applications in gravity mapping. For example, it could be mounted on a drone instead of low-flying aircraft for distributed land surveying and exploration, deployed to monitor volcanoes, or built into multi-pixel density-contrast imaging arrays.

  6. Comments on "Fortnightly Earth rotation, ocean tides, and mantle anelasticity" by R.D. Ray and G.D. Egbert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickman, S. R.

    2013-03-01

    Ray & Egbert use Earth rotation observations and ocean tide models to infer the extent of mantle anelasticity at a fortnightly period. However, their preferred fortnightly tide model, which was obtained through a frictional recalibration procedure, exhibits unusually intense tidal currents; these may be a consequence of Ray & Egbert having considered only a limited range of bottom friction strength. The extent of anelasticity is deduced from the tide's effect on the length of day; but their estimate is rendered uncertain because the possibility that the tide model does not conserve global ocean mass has not been addressed. Finally, their quantification of anelasticity, which uses a power law model of the dependence of Q on frequency, might yield a more consistent mantle Q at the fortnightly period if their tide model employed greater bottom friction. For all these reasons their inferences of mantle anelasticity should be considered preliminary.

  7. Assessing hydrofracing success from earth tide and barometric response.

    PubMed

    Burbey, Thomas J; Zhang, Meijing

    2010-01-01

    Identifying fracture pathways and connectivity between adjacent wells is vital for understanding flow characteristics, transport properties, and fracture characteristics. In this investigation, a simple, straightforward methodology is presented for assessing hydrofracing success and identifying possible fracture connectivity between neighboring boreholes, using water-level barometric response and tide signatures of individual fractures in a crystalline-rock setting. Water levels and barometric pressure heads were collected at two wells 27 m apart both prior to, and after, hydrofracing one of the wells at the fractured-rock research site in Floyd County, Virginia. Vastly different barometric and tidal signatures existed at the two wells prior to hydrofracing as well EX-1 had no discernable fractures, while W-03 was connected to an identified fault-zone aquifer and produced a notable water-level earth tide and barometric signatures. After hydrofracing EX-1, new fractures were induced and the resulting water-level tidal signature and barometric efficiencies were nearly identical to the W-03 well. Aquifer testing conducted from both wells verified this connectivity along the fault-zone aquifer. The small phase difference between the tidal responses in the two wells can be accounted for by the calculated differences in transmissivity and casing diameter.

  8. Measurement of the Earth tides with a MEMS gravimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middlemiss, R. P.; Samarelli, A.; Paul, D. J.; Hough, J.; Rowan, S.; Hammond, G. D.

    2016-03-01

    The ability to measure tiny variations in the local gravitational acceleration allows, besides other applications, the detection of hidden hydrocarbon reserves, magma build-up before volcanic eruptions, and subterranean tunnels. Several technologies are available that achieve the sensitivities required for such applications (tens of microgal per hertz1/2): free-fall gravimeters, spring-based gravimeters, superconducting gravimeters, and atom interferometers. All of these devices can observe the Earth tides: the elastic deformation of the Earth’s crust as a result of tidal forces. This is a universally predictable gravitational signal that requires both high sensitivity and high stability over timescales of several days to measure. All present gravimeters, however, have limitations of high cost (more than 100,000 US dollars) and high mass (more than 8 kilograms). Here we present a microelectromechanical system (MEMS) device with a sensitivity of 40 microgal per hertz1/2 only a few cubic centimetres in size. We use it to measure the Earth tides, revealing the long-term stability of our instrument compared to any other MEMS device. MEMS accelerometers—found in most smart phones—can be mass-produced remarkably cheaply, but none are stable enough to be called a gravimeter. Our device has thus made the transition from accelerometer to gravimeter. The small size and low cost of this MEMS gravimeter suggests many applications in gravity mapping. For example, it could be mounted on a drone instead of low-flying aircraft for distributed land surveying and exploration, deployed to monitor volcanoes, or built into multi-pixel density-contrast imaging arrays.

  9. Subsurface Tiltmeter Observations of Solid Earth Tides and Rock Excavation in Northeastern Illinois

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lancelle, C.; Volk, J.; Fratta, D.; Wang, H. F.

    2013-12-01

    Tiltmeter arrays in the Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS) Near Detector Hall at Fermilab and the Lafarge - Conco Mine record solid earth tides and mechanical unloading due to excavation. The arrays are located approximately 100 meters underground in the Galena-Platteville dolomite in Northeastern Illinois. Just off of the MINOS Near Detector Hall a new cavern was excavated to house the Off-axis Neutrino Appearance Experiment (NOvA) program near detector. The recorded excavation response in the MINOS Near Detector Hall due to the NOvA cavern excavation is approximately thirteen times a point-load estimated response calculated using laboratory-determined properties. This discrepancy is likely due to variations in Young's Modulus in the rock in a field versus laboratory scale, although seasonal effects causing long term trends in the data could be part of this response. Amplitudes of measured solid earth tides differ from the amplitudes of theoretical solid earth tides by up to 40 percent for both arrays. This is likely due to a local heterogeneity or discontinuity.

  10. Earth tides can trigger shallow thrust fault earthquakes.

    PubMed

    Cochran, Elizabeth S; Vidale, John E; Tanaka, Sachiko

    2004-11-12

    We show a correlation between the occurrence of shallow thrust earthquakes and the occurrence of the strongest tides. The rate of earthquakes varies from the background rate by a factor of 3 with the tidal stress. The highest correlation is found when we assume a coefficient of friction of mu = 0.4 for the crust, although we see good correlation for mu between 0.2 and 0.6. Our results quantify the effect of applied stress on earthquake triggering, a key factor in understanding earthquake nucleation and cascades whereby one earthquake triggers others.

  11. A diurnal resonance in the ocean tide and in the earth's load response due to the resonant free 'core nutation'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wahr, J. M.; Sasao, T.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of the oceans, which are subject to a resonance due to a free rotational eigenmode of an elliptical, rotating earth with a fluid outer core having an eigenfrequency of (1 + 1/460) cycle/day, on the body tide and nutational response of the earth to the diurnal luni-tidal force are computed. The response of an elastic, rotating, elliptical, oceanless earth with a fluid outer core to a given load distribution on its surface is first considered, and the tidal sea level height for equilibrium and nonequilibrium oceans is examined. Computations of the effects of equilibrium and nonequilibrium oceans on the nutational and deformational responses of the earth are then presented which show small but significant perturbations to the retrograde 18.6-year and prograde six-month nutations, and more important effects on the earth body tide, which is also resonant at the free core notation eigenfrequency.

  12. Numerical simulation of short period Earth rotation variations induced by ocean tides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goss, Andreas; Schindelegger, Michael; Seitz, Florian

    2016-04-01

    The Dynamic Model for Earth Rotation and Gravity (DyMEG) has been used in several previous studies for the numerical simulation of Earth rotation (polar motion and length-of-day) on time scales from seasons to decades. Our current activities aim at the extension of the model and its application for the simulation of high frequency Earth rotation signals with periods of a few hours up to several days. This requires several model adaptations, such as the incorporation of additional excitation mechanisms as well as the identification and implementation of an appropriate numerical integrator. Here we particularly focus on the effect of ocean tides as they - due to their strictly periodic signal characteristics - provide a good possibility to evaluate the performance of the model and to detect potential computational problems. Secondary effects due to atmospheric and non-tidal oceanic influences are incorporated as well. We validate the simulated polar motion and length-of-day time series against hourly GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite System) data and conventional ocean tide routines of the IERS (International Earth Rotation and Reference Systems Service).

  13. Polar motion and earth tides from Beacon Explorer C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolenkiewicz, D. E.; Smith, D. E.; Dunn, P. J.

    1973-01-01

    Seventeen months of laser tracking of the Beacon Explorer C spacecraft by a Goddard Space Flight Center laser system were analyzed. The amplitude and phase of the solid-earth and ocean-tide perturbations of the orbit and the variation in latitude of the tracking station were determined. From an analysis of the orbital inclination obtained from 6 hour data spans the tidal perturbations of the orbit were found to have a magnitude equivalent to a second degree Love number, k sub 2, of 0.245 with a phase lag of about 3.2 degrees. These numbers are in complete agreement with values obtained previously from a much shorter data span, although k sub 2, is lower than the value derived from seismic data. This discrepancy is probably due to the influence of the oceans on the satellite result. After removing the tidal perturbations the residuals in inclination were of order 0.04 arcseconds. This implies that the variation in latitude of the station was being determined during the 17 months period with an rms deviation of about 1.4 meters with respect to the smoothed Bureau International de l'Heure values.

  14. Strong correlation of major earthquakes with solid-earth tides in part of the eastern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weems, R.E.; Perry, W.H.

    1989-01-01

    East of the eastern American continental divide and south of lat. 42.5??N, moderate to large historic earthquakes correlate strongly with times of high and low solid-earth tides. This effect is most pronounced when solar declination lies between 17??N and 17??S. Significant correlation also exist between major earthquakes, time of day, lunar declinations, and lunar phase. -Authors

  15. Global charts of ocean tide loading effects

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, O.; Mazzega, P. )

    1990-07-15

    Global ocean tide loading charts of the radial displacement, the potential divided by g (gravity acceleration), and the gravity effect have been computed using the 11 constituents M{sub 2}, S{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, K{sub 2}K{sub 1}, O{sub 1}, P{sub 1}, Q{sub 1}, M{sub f}, M{sub m}, S{sub s a} of Schwiderski's tidal model. These new charts have a resolution of 1{degree}{times}1{degree} on the continents as well as on the oceanic area. A description of Farrell's convolution method to compute the loading effects is given, and an estimate of the numerical errors leads to the conclusion that these global charts have a precision better than 2.5% independent of the accuracy of Schwiderski's maps. The current approximation of the loading effects by a proportionality relation with the local oceanic tides is also compared with Farrell's convolution method. Departures of several centimeters systematically appear, in particular over the continental shelves. The authors then show that the maps of the oceanic tides deduced from satellite altimetry could be corrected for the loading effect by an iterative computational procedure based on their algorithm of Farrell's convolution.

  16. A new high frequency Earth rotation model based on an empirical ocean tide model from satellite altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madzak, Matthias; Böhm, Sigrid; Böhm, Johannes; Bosch, Wolfgang; Hagedoorn, Jan; Schuh, Harald

    2014-05-01

    A new model for Earth rotation variations based on ocean tide models is highly desirable in order to close the gap between geophysical Earth rotation models and geodetic observations. The current high frequency Earth rotation model mentioned in the IERS Conventions 2010 and thus used by most analysis institutions was developed in 1994. Since then several satellite missions have collected lots of altimetry data and were used to obtain new ocean tide models. Due to the increase of accuracy and resolution of these models, we will develop an improved Earth rotation model for (sub-) daily periods. In order to reduce (hydrodynamic) modeling effects, we use the empirical ocean tide model EOT11a, provided by DGFI, Munich. Global oceanic currents, which are required for ocean tidal angular momentum but not included in empirical models, are obtained using a linearized and simplified Navier-Stokes equation (Ray, 2001). We compare the new model with the model from the IERS Conventions 2010 as well as with an empirical Earth rotation model (Artz et al., 2011) and show the expected differences in the analysis of VLBI observations. For this purpose we use the Vienna VLBI Software (VieVS).

  17. Towards a new model of atmospheric tides: from Venus to super-Earths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auclair-Desrotour, Pierre; Laskar, Jacques; Mathis, Stéphane

    2015-12-01

    Tides can strongly affect the evolution of the spin of planets. Super-Earths presenting a solid core and an atmosphere are submitted to both gravitational tides caused by bodies’ mutual gravitational interactions and thermal tides resulting from stellar insolation. Thermal tides are particularly important for planets in the habitable zone where they drive the tidal response of the atmosphere (Correia & Laskar 2008). They play a key role for the equilibrium states of the spin, as in the case of Venus (Correia & Laskar 2004) and of exoplanets (e.g. the numerical simulations by Leconte & al. 2015). Given the complex mechanisms involved in thermal tides, analytic models are essential to understand the dependence of the perturbation on the physics on the atmosphere and the tidal frequency. The one proposed in the 60’s by Lindzen and Chapman explains well thermal tides in the asymptotic regime of fast rotators but presents a singularity near synchronization. We will present a new analytic approach that generalizes these early works to all regimes of tidal perturbations. This model describes the mechanisms of tidal waves generated in the atmosphere by both gravitational and thermal tides. The tidal torque is computed as a function of the frequency of the forcing and agrees very well with results obtained by direct numerical simulations using General Circulation Models.

  18. Ocean tides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendershott, M. C.

    1975-01-01

    A review of recent developments in the study of ocean tides and related phenomena is presented. Topics briefly discussed include: the mechanism by which tidal dissipation occurs; continental shelf, marginal sea, and baroclinic tides; estimation of the amount of energy stored in the tide; the distribution of energy over the ocean; the resonant frequencies and Q factors of oceanic normal modes; the relationship of earth tides and ocean tides; and numerical global tidal models.

  19. A study on variation in position of an Indian station due to solid earth tides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Jayanta Kumar; Pathak, Shray

    2015-04-01

    In many geodetic analyses, it is important to consider the effect of earth tide on the instantaneous position of a station and its subsequent influence on the computation and interpretation of time series of coordinates as well as related data products. The tidal effect and temporal variations in the position of the IGS (International Global Navigational Satellite Systems [GNSS] Service) stations at Hyderabad (India), Ankara (Turkey) and Beijing Fangshan (China), due to solid earth tides has been studied. Surface tidal displacement of the station has been computed on daily basis for a month, based on the concept of gravity. Further, mean daily coordinates of the station been computed using static precise point positioning (PPP) method for a month. Results show that the station undergoes temporal displacements and its coordinates vary continuously within a day and all the days in the month. The maximum range in vertical displacement of the station has been found to be about 48 cm in a day over a period of a month and that along the north and east directions is respectively 8 cm and 14 cm. This is the maximum range but the mean value in the vertical displacement is 6 cm and along north and east is 1.7 cm and 0.09 cm, respectively. The ranges in variation in the mean value of geodetic latitude, longitude, and height of the station have been found to be 1.23, 2.73, and 3.52 cm, respectively. Further, it has been found that the tidal oscillations follow some periodicity, and thus need to be studied independently for all stations.

  20. Auroral effects on midlatitude semidiurnal tides

    SciTech Connect

    Fesen, C.G. ); Richmond, A.D.; Roble, R.G. )

    1991-03-01

    The effect of auroral activity on mid-latitude semidiurnal tides was investigated using simulations from the NCAR Thermosphere/Ionosphere General Circulation Model (TIGCM). Model runs were made for solar cycle minimum equinox conditions for four levels of geomagnetic activity parameterized by the total hemispheric power index and the cross polar cap potential drop. Simulations at 42.5{degree}N (gg) predicted that the upper thermosphere semidiurnal winds and temperatures generally increase with increasing geomagnetic activity, while the lower thermosphere fields were relatively insensitive to the level of auroral forcing in the model. The modeled semidiurnal mid-latitude tidal response was determined by the magnitude and phasing of the waves generated by in situ solar forcing and the auroral momentum and energy sources, in conjunction with those propagating up from the lower atmosphere. The predicted sensitivity of the model tides to the level of geomagnetic activity may contribute to the observed tidal variability at mid latitudes. Successful modeling of observations will require careful specification of the high-latitude energy and momentum sources.

  1. Loading effect of a self-consistent equilibrium ocean pole tide on the gravimetric parameters of the gravity pole tides at superconducting gravimeter stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaodong; Ducarme, Bernard; Sun, Heping; Xu, Jianqiao

    2008-05-01

    The gravimetric parameters of the gravity pole tide are the amplitude factor δ, which is the ratio of gravity variations induced by polar motion for a real Earth to variations computed for a rigid one, and the phase difference κ between the observed and the rigid gravity pole tide. They can be estimated from the records of superconducting gravimeters (SGs). However, they are affected by the loading effect of the ocean pole tide. Recent results from TOPEX/Poseidon (TP) altimeter confirm that the ocean pole tide has a self-consistent equilibrium response. Accordingly, we calculate the gravity loading effects as well as their influence on the gravimetric parameters of gravity pole tide at all the 26 SG stations in the world on the assumption of a self-consistent equilibrium ocean pole tide model. The gravity loading effect is evaluated between 1 January 1997 and 31 December 2006. Numerical results show that the amplitude of the gravity loading effect reaches 10 -9 m s -2, which is larger than the accuracy (10 -10 m s -2) of a SG. The gravimetric factor δ is 1% larger at all SG stations. Then, the contribution of a self-consistent ocean pole tide to the pole tide gravimetric parameters cannot be ignored as it exceeds the current accuracy of the estimation of the pole tide gravity factors. For the nine stations studied in Ducarme et al. [Ducarme, B., Venedikov, A.P., Arnoso, J., et al., 2006. Global analysis of the GGP superconducting gravimeters network for the estimation of the pole tide gravimetric amplitude factor. J. Geodyn. 41, 334-344.], the mean of the modeled tidal factors δm = 1.1813 agrees very well with the result of a global analysis δCH = 1.1816 ± 0.0047 in that paper. On the other hand, the modeled phase difference κm varies from -0.273° to 0.351°. Comparing to the two main periods of the gravity pole tide, annual period and Chandler period, κm is too small to be considered. Therefore, The computed time difference κL induced by a self

  2. Simulations of the tides of ancient oceans and the evolution of the Earth-Moon system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nerge, P.; Ludwig, T.; Thomas, M.; Jungclaus, J.; Sündermann, J.; Brosche, P.

    2012-04-01

    We will simulate the spatial and temporal characteristics of the ocean tides for the present time as well as for a time slice of the Neoproterozoic Era (˜620 Ma b.p.). A focus will be on the transfer of angular momentum between the Earth and the Moon in order to physically simulate the observed increase of day length and the Moon's distance. The numerical results will be validated against geological proxy data of the tidal spectrum of the Australian continental plate. Subsequently, the evolution of the ocean tides under the influence of the continental drift from present time until the Neoproterozoic will be simulated. Again, a focus will be on the transfer of angular momentum between the Earth and Moon in order to physically explain the dynamical evolution of the Earth-Moon system and, therewith, the increase of day length of about 2 hours as well as the decrease of month length of about 1 day. The simulation of the ocean tides shall be carried out with the three-dimensional Max-Planck-Institute ocean circulation model (Marsland, et al., 2003) forced by the complete lunisolar tidal potential (Thomas, 2001). A curvilinear grid with freely selectable grid poles is utilized by the model. Hence, the resolution can be efficiently increased around Australia for evaluation of our results. The simulations require exceptional performance in computing and storage that is provided by the German Climate Computing Center. So far, the limited availability of geological proxy data has prevented a detailed quantification of the transfer of angular momentum in the Earth-Sun-Moon-system mainly due ocean tides far back in the Earth's history. Considering recent paleontological data, and advances in numerical modelling and high performance computing, we will strive to reduce these deficits. First self-consistent geological data on ocean tides, Earth's rotational parameters and orbital elements of the Moon have been provided by the research of Williams (2000) on the sediment layers

  3. Kingdom of the Tides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Samuel, III

    Areas of discussion are the history of tides, the forces which exert an influence upon the earth's tides, the behavior of tides as modified by terrestrial features, "freak" behavior of tides, the marine life which inhabits tidal areas, the manner in which tides have helped to shape the course of history, how tides affect our lives on a day to day…

  4. Tides of the British Seas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandon, Frank

    1975-01-01

    Examines the gravitational effects and the way that local conditions interact with these effects to produce the tides characteristic of the British seas. Presents some effects of tides including the possibility of harnessing tidal energy and the effect of tidal friction on the use of the earth as a clock. (GS)

  5. High-frequency Earth rotation variations deduced from altimetry-based ocean tides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madzak, Matthias; Schindelegger, Michael; Böhm, Johannes; Bosch, Wolfgang; Hagedoorn, Jan

    2016-06-01

    A model of diurnal and semi-diurnal variations in Earth rotation parameters (ERP) is constructed based on altimetry-measured tidal heights from a multi-mission empirical ocean tide solution. Barotropic currents contributing to relative angular momentum changes are estimated for nine major tides in a global inversion algorithm that solves the two-dimensional momentum equations on a regular 0.5° grid with a heavily weighted continuity constraint. The influence of 19 minor tides is accounted for by linear admittance interpolation of ocean tidal angular momentum, although the assumption of smooth admittance variations with frequency appears to be a doubtful concept for semi-diurnal mass terms in particular. A validation of the newly derived model based on post-fit corrections to polar motion and universal time (Δ UT1) from the analysis of Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) observations shows a variance reduction for semi-diurnal Δ UT1 residuals that is significant at the 0.05 level with respect to the conventional ERP model. Improvements are also evident for the explicitly modeled K_1 , Q_1 , and K_2 tides in individual ERP components, but large residuals of more than 15 μ as remain at the principal lunar frequencies of O_1 and M_2 . We attribute these shortcomings to uncertainties in the inverted relative angular momentum changes and, to a minor extent, to violation of mass conservation in the empirical ocean tide solution. Further dedicated hydrodynamic modeling efforts of these anomalous constituents are required to meet the accuracy standards of modern space geodesy.

  6. High-frequency Earth rotation variations deduced from altimetry-based ocean tides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madzak, Matthias; Schindelegger, Michael; Böhm, Johannes; Bosch, Wolfgang; Hagedoorn, Jan

    2016-11-01

    A model of diurnal and semi-diurnal variations in Earth rotation parameters (ERP) is constructed based on altimetry-measured tidal heights from a multi-mission empirical ocean tide solution. Barotropic currents contributing to relative angular momentum changes are estimated for nine major tides in a global inversion algorithm that solves the two-dimensional momentum equations on a regular 0.5° grid with a heavily weighted continuity constraint. The influence of 19 minor tides is accounted for by linear admittance interpolation of ocean tidal angular momentum, although the assumption of smooth admittance variations with frequency appears to be a doubtful concept for semi-diurnal mass terms in particular. A validation of the newly derived model based on post-fit corrections to polar motion and universal time (Δ UT1) from the analysis of Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) observations shows a variance reduction for semi-diurnal Δ UT1 residuals that is significant at the 0.05 level with respect to the conventional ERP model. Improvements are also evident for the explicitly modeled K_1, Q_1, and K_2 tides in individual ERP components, but large residuals of more than 15 μ as remain at the principal lunar frequencies of O_1 and M_2. We attribute these shortcomings to uncertainties in the inverted relative angular momentum changes and, to a minor extent, to violation of mass conservation in the empirical ocean tide solution. Further dedicated hydrodynamic modeling efforts of these anomalous constituents are required to meet the accuracy standards of modern space geodesy.

  7. Overview of aerosolized Florida red tide toxins: exposures and effects.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Lora E; Backer, Lorraine C; Baden, Daniel G

    2005-05-01

    Florida red tide is caused by Karenia brevis, a dinoflagellate that periodically blooms, releasing its potent neurotoxin, brevetoxin, into the surrounding waters and air along the coast of the Gulf of Mexico. Exposure to Florida red tide toxins has been associated with adverse human health effects and massive fish and marine mammal deaths. The articles in this mini-monograph describe the ongoing interdisciplinary and interagency research program that characterizes the exposures and health effects of aerosolized Florida red tide toxins (brevetoxins). The interdisciplinary research program uses animal models and laboratory studies to develop hypotheses and apply these findings to in situ human exposures. Our ultimate goal is to develop appropriate prevention measures and medical interventions to mitigate or prevent adverse health effects from exposure to complex mixtures of aerosolized red tide toxins.

  8. Earthquake Weather: Linking Seismicity to Changes in Barometric Pressure, Earth Tides, and Rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, J. D.; Garnero, E.; Shirzaei, M.

    2015-12-01

    It has been widely observed that earthquakes can be triggered due to changes in stress induced by the passage of surface waves from remote earthquakes. These stress changes are typically on the order of a few kiloPascals and occur over time spans of seconds. Less well investigated is the question of whether triggering of seismic activity can result from similar stress changes occurring over periods of hours or days due to changing barometric pressure, rainfall, and Earth tides. Past studies have shown a possible link between these stress sources and slow earthquakes in Taiwan (Hsu et al., 2015). Here, we investigate the relationship between seismicity and changing barometric pressure, Earth tides, and rainfall for four regions of the western United States where regional seismic networks provide high-quality seismic catalogs over relatively long time periods: Southern California, Northern California, the Pacific Northwest, and Utah. For each region we obtained seismic catalogs from January 2001 through September 2014 and acquired hourly data for barometric pressure and rainfall across the regions from the National Climatic Data Center. The vertical stress time series due to Earth tides was computed for the location of each weather station in the study areas. We summed the stresses from these 3 sources and looked for variations in seismicity correlated to the stress changes. We show that seismicity rates increase with increasing magnitude of stress change. In many cases the increase in seismicity is larger for reductions in vertical stress than it is for stress increases. We speculate that the dependency of seismic rate on combined vertical stress is acting through a combination of two mechanisms: (1) Reduced stresses reduce the normal force on faults, triggering failure in critically-stressed faults. (2) Increased stresses may similarly reduce the normal force on faults due to increases in pore pressure induced in the fault region.

  9. Triggering and modulation of geyser eruptions in Yellowstone National Park by earthquakes, earth tides, and weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurwitz, Shaul; Sohn, Robert A.; Luttrell, Karen; Manga, Michael

    2014-03-01

    We analyze intervals between eruptions (IBEs) data acquired between 2001 and 2011 at Daisy and Old Faithful geysers in Yellowstone National Park. We focus our statistical analysis on the response of these geysers to stress perturbations from within the solid earth (earthquakes and earth tides) and from weather (air pressure and temperature, precipitation, and wind). We conclude that (1) the IBEs of these geysers are insensitive to periodic stresses induced by solid earth tides and barometric pressure variations; (2) Daisy (pool geyser) IBEs lengthen by evaporation and heat loss in response to large wind storms and cold air; and (3) Old Faithful (cone geyser) IBEs are not modulated by air temperature and pressure variations, wind, and precipitation, suggesting that the subsurface water column is decoupled from the atmosphere. Dynamic stress changes of 0.1-0.2 MPa resulting from the 2002 M-7.9 Denali, Alaska, earthquake surface waves caused a statistically significant shortening of Daisy geyser's IBEs. Stresses induced by other large global earthquakes during the study period were at least an order of magnitude smaller. In contrast, dynamic stresses of >0.5 MPa from three large regional earthquakes in 1959, 1975, and 1983 caused lengthening of Old Faithful's IBEs. We infer that most subannual geyser IBE variability is dominated by internal processes and interaction with other geysers. The results of this study provide quantitative bounds on the sensitivity of hydrothermal systems to external stress perturbations and have implications for studying the triggering and modulation of volcanic eruptions by external forces.

  10. Response of the water level in a well to Earth tides and atmospheric loading under unconfined conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rojstaczer, S.; Riley, F.S.

    1990-01-01

    The response to Earth tides is strongly governed by a dimensionless aquifer frequency Q???u. The response to atmospheric loading is strongly governed by two dimensionless vertical fluid flow parameters: a dimensionless unsaturated zone frequency, R, and a dimensionless aquifer frequency Qu. The differences between Q???u and Qu are generally small for aquifers which are highly sensitive to Earth tides. When Q???u and Qu are large, the response of the well to Earth tides and atmospheric loading approaches the static response of the aquifer under confined conditions. At small values of Q???u and Qu, well response to Earth tides and atmospheric loading is strongly influenced by water table drainage. When R is large relative to Qu, the response to atmospheric loading is strongly influenced by attenuation and phase shift of the pneumatic pressure signal in the unsaturated zone. The presence of partial penetration retards phase advance in well response to Earth tides and atmospheric loading. -from Authors

  11. Towards Tidal Tomography: Using Earth's Body-Tide Signal to Constrain Deep-Mantle Density Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Harriet; Yang, Hsin-Ying; Davis, James; Mitrovica, Jerry; Tromp, Jeroen; Latychev, Konstantin

    2015-04-01

    Luni-solar forcings drive long wavelength deformation at timescales ranging from 8 hours to 18.6 years. We propose that globally distributed GPS estimates of this deformation within the semi-diurnal band provide a new and independent constraint on long-wavelength deep mantle structure. A particular target of "tidal tomography" is the buoyancy structure of LLSVPs, which constitute a large volumetric fraction of the mantle. Constraining this structure is the key to understanding the longevity of the LLSVPs, and indeed the evolution of the entire mantle and Earth system. To this end, we begin by reporting on the development of a new normal-mode theory, based on relatively recent advances in free oscillation seismology, which is capable of predicting semi-diurnal body tides on a laterally heterogeneous, rotating and anelastic Earth. We next present the results of a suite of benchmark tests involving comparisons with predictions based on both classical tidal Love number theory for 1-D Earth models and finite-volume simulations that incorporate 3-D elastic and density structure. We find that body tide deformation is most sensitive to long wavelength, deep mantle structure, and, in particularly, to shear wave velocity and density structure. When combined with results from seismological datasets, this sensitivity provides a powerful tool to investigate the buoyancy structure of the LLSVPs. For example, adopting a variety of seismic tomography models a priori, we perform an extensive parameter search to determine misfits between model predictions based on the new theory and GPS-derived estimates of the semi-diurnal body tide displacements. Preliminary results, focusing only on density structure, have indicated that the observations are best fit when the LLSVPs have a bulk density greater than average mantle, in broad agreement with previous inferences based upon seismic normal mode inversions. In follow-up work, we have mapped out trade-offs related to the adopted seismic

  12. Numerical modeling of the oceanic S1 tide for Earth rotation studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindelegger, Michael; Einspigel, David

    2015-04-01

    Diurnal S1 oceanic oscillations induced by atmospheric pressure loading elicit small but measurable perturbations of universal time, polar motion, and the prograde annual component of nutation. In a priori models of Earth rotation variations, these signals are as-yet unconsidered'partly due to the fact that the underlying globally-gridded S1 harmonics can only be inferred from purely hydrodynamic ocean models which lack the reliable elevation constraints from satellite altimetry. Such free-running forward integrations of the shallow water equations usually overestimate tidal energies and therefore also OAM (oceanic angular momentum), unless the model formulation allows for significant dissipation in the deep ocean. For practical purposes, abyssal energy flux and hence the accuracy of tidal elevations can be controlled by a tunable but inordinately high viscosity value or by evoking additional quadratic wave drag when surface heights change rapidly. A third and physically plausible modeling route is to parametrize the sub-grid scale conversion of barotropic currents into small internal tides by aid of a linear drag term. In the present paper, we study the impact of these different dissipation schemes on the fidelity of surface elevations in a simple barotropic time-stepping model forced by selected gravitational equilibrium tides as well as diurnal air pressure variations. After determining the optimal drag formulation through validation runs with the well-known principal gravitational K1 tide, the OAM values for each of the hydrodynamic S1 solutions are documented and discussed in the specific context of their contribution to the prograde annual signal in Earth's nutation.

  13. Absence of earthquake correlation with Earth tides: An indication of high preseismic fault stress rate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vidale, J.E.; Agnew, D.C.; Johnston, M.J.S.; Oppenheimer, D.H.

    1998-01-01

    Because the rate of stress change from the Earth tides exceeds that from tectonic stress accumulation, tidal triggering of earthquakes would be expected if the final hours of loading of the fault were at the tectonic rate and if rupture began soon after the achievement of a critical stress level. We analyze the tidal stresses and stress rates on the fault planes and at the times of 13,042 earthquakes which are so close to the San Andreas and Calaveras faults in California that we may take the fault plane to be known. We find that the stresses and stress rates from Earth tides at the times of earthquakes are distributed in the same way as tidal stresses and stress rates at random times. While the rate of earthquakes when the tidal stress promotes failure is 2% higher than when the stress does not, this difference in rate is not statistically significant. This lack of tidal triggering implies that preseismic stress rates in the nucleation zones of earthquakes are at least 0.15 bar/h just preceding seismic failure, much above the long-term tectonic stress rate of 10-4 bar/h.

  14. Diurnal and Semidiurnal Variations in the Earth's Rotation Rate Induced by Oceanic Tides.

    PubMed

    Ray, R D; Steinberg, D J; Chao, B F; Cartwright, D E

    1994-05-01

    Recent space-geodetic observations have revealed daily and subdaily variations in the Earth's rotation rate. Although spectral analysis suggests that the variations are primarily of tidal origin, comparisons to previous theoretical predictions based on various ocean models have been less than satisfactory. This disagreement is partly caused by deficiencies in physical modeling. Rotation predictions based on a reliable tidal-height model, with corresponding tidal currents inferred from a modified form of Laplace's momentum equations, yield predictions of tidal variations in Universal Time that agree with very long baseline interferometer observations to 2 microseconds. This agreement resolves a major discrepancy between theory and observation and establishes the dominant role of oceanic tides for inducing variation in the Earth's rotation at these frequencies. PMID:17794725

  15. New Geodesy MATLAB Tools To Compute Earth Tides And Analyze Strain Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sievers, C.; Hodgkinson, K. M.; Mencin, D.

    2012-12-01

    UNAVCO is developing two new geodesy MATLAB tools for the community: one is a translation of SPOTL [Agnew, 2012] for tidal predictions, the other processes and analyzes borehole strainmeter data. Processing borehole strainmeter data from raw data to a useful time series involves numerous steps and meticulous record keeping: counts need to be converted to strain, trends such as load tides, atmospheric response, and long time-scale instrument response have to be accounted, and spurious data points and offsets need to be removed. We have created a MATLAB GUI (graphical user interface) tool that seamlessly accomplishes all these tasks. We employ CleanStrain+ [Langbein, 2010], a FORTRAN program, to estimate the offsets in the data. Although solved via a least-squares technique, CleanStrain+ factors in the temporally correlated nature of strain data. When the amplitude and phase of the main tidal constituents are known, the tidal signal can be removed using the MATLAB version of SPOTL. The user has the option of applying offsets, choosing tidal models and borehole trends provided as Level 2 Earthscope Data Products. All this, including loading and saving the edits, is done through a single GUI interface. SPOTL is a FORTRAN code suite is used to predict ocean load and solid Earth body tides at a location and compute tidal time series over a user-specified time span and sample interval. We converted both the code and the tidal models to MATLAB to make it more portable and easy to use. While the code is primarily designed to be run from the command line, we have built is a front-end GUI that can compute most tides and time series and helps visual the results. The user can specify a region of interest, load station coordinates, specify global and regional ocean load models and select specific tides using pull down menus and input boxes. The interactive nature and the visualization aspect of this GUI could make it useful as a teaching tool for understanding tides.

  16. Global crustal response model. [using a computer program to mathematically model the Earth tide and its dynamic response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A computer program was developed for calculating the radial displacement due to the body tide as a function of spatial position and time. The positions of the moon and sun were evaluated by means of the Hill-Brown and Newcomb theories, respectively. Green's functions were utilized to simulate the elastic Earth responses due to point loads, a convolution program has been developed to evaluate the elastic Earth responses due to ocean loading by a given ocean tide constituent. These responses include radial and horizontal displacement, tilt and gravity acceleration, and strain tensor components.

  17. Triggering and modulation of geyser eruptions in Yellowstone National Park by earthquakes, earth tides, and weather

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hurwitz, Shaul; Sohn, Robert A.; Luttrell, Karen; Manga, Michael

    2014-01-01

    We analyze intervals between eruptions (IBEs) data acquired between 2001 and 2011 at Daisy and Old Faithful geysers in Yellowstone National Park. We focus our statistical analysis on the response of these geysers to stress perturbations from within the solid earth (earthquakes and earth tides) and from weather (air pressure and temperature, precipitation, and wind). We conclude that (1) the IBEs of these geysers are insensitive to periodic stresses induced by solid earth tides and barometric pressure variations; (2) Daisy (pool geyser) IBEs lengthen by evaporation and heat loss in response to large wind storms and cold air; and (3) Old Faithful (cone geyser) IBEs are not modulated by air temperature and pressure variations, wind, and precipitation, suggesting that the subsurface water column is decoupled from the atmosphere. Dynamic stress changes of 0.1−0.2 MPa resulting from the 2002 M-7.9 Denali, Alaska, earthquake surface waves caused a statistically significant shortening of Daisy geyser's IBEs. Stresses induced by other large global earthquakes during the study period were at least an order of magnitude smaller. In contrast, dynamic stresses of >0.5 MPa from three large regional earthquakes in 1959, 1975, and 1983 caused lengthening of Old Faithful's IBEs. We infer that most subannual geyser IBE variability is dominated by internal processes and interaction with other geysers. The results of this study provide quantitative bounds on the sensitivity of hydrothermal systems to external stress perturbations and have implications for studying the triggering and modulation of volcanic eruptions by external forces.

  18. The influence of formation material properties on the response of water levels in wells to Earth tides and atmospheric loading

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rojstaczer, S.; Agnew, D.C.

    1989-01-01

    The water level in an open well can change in response to deformation of the surrounding material, either because of applied strains (tidal or tectonic) or surface loading by atmospheric pressure changes. Under conditions of no vertical fluid flow and negligible well bore storage (static-confined conditions), the sensitivities to these effects depend on the elastic properties and porosity which characterize the surrounding medium. The hydraulic diffusivity which governs pressure diffusion in response to surface loading is slightly smaller than that which governs fluid flow in response to applied strain. Analysis of the static-confined response of five wells to atmospheric loading and Earth tides gives generally reasonable estimates for material properties. -from Authors

  19. Deep-seated gas emission induced by the earth tide: a basic observation for geochemical earthquake prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Sugisaki, R.

    1981-06-12

    Variations of the helium/argon ratio of gas bubbles in a mineral spring along a fault zone coincide with fluctuations of areal dilation induced by the earth tide. This observation suggests that deep-seated gases characterized by higher helium/argon ratios are squeezed out by stress preceding an earthquake.

  20. Deep-seated gas emission induced by the Earth tide: a basic observation for geochemical earthquake prediction.

    PubMed

    Sugisaki, R

    1981-06-12

    Variations of the helium/argon ratio of gas bubbles in a mineral spring along a fault zone coincide with fluctuations of areal dilation induced by the earth tide. This observation suggests that deep-seated gases characterized by higher heliumlargon ratios are squeezed out by stress preceding an earthquake.

  1. Effect of the earth's ellipticity on the lunar tidal potential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahlen, F. A.

    1993-01-01

    The earth's orbital acceleration about the moon is influenced by its ellipticity. In this paper it shown that the ellipticity affects tidal gravity by contributing directly to the lunar tide-generating potential (in addition to effecting the elastic-gravitational response of the solid earth and oceans to this potential).

  2. What Causes Tides?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donovan, Deborah

    2004-01-01

    The phenomenon of tides has a faraway source. This rise and fall of the water level over a period of several hours is a result of the gravitational pull of the Moon and the Sun on Earth's oceans. Tides exhibit predictable cycles on daily, monthly, and yearly scales. The magnitude of the tides is dependent on the position of the Earth and Moon in…

  3. Review of Florida Red Tide and Human Health Effects.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Lora E; Kirkpatrick, Barbara; Backer, Lorraine C; Walsh, Cathy J; Nierenberg, Kate; Clark, John; Reich, Andrew; Hollenbeck, Julie; Benson, Janet; Cheng, Yung Sung; Naar, Jerome; Pierce, Richard; Bourdelais, Andrea J; Abraham, William M; Kirkpatrick, Gary; Zaias, Julia; Wanner, Adam; Mendes, Eliana; Shalat, Stuart; Hoagland, Porter; Stephan, Wendy; Bean, Judy; Watkins, Sharon; Clarke, Tainya; Byrne, Margaret; Baden, Daniel G

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews the literature describing research performed over the past decade on the known and possible exposures and human health effects associated with Florida red tides. These harmful algal blooms are caused by the dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis, and similar organisms, all of which produce a suite of natural toxins known as brevetoxins. Florida red tide research has benefited from a consistently funded, long term research program, that has allowed an interdisciplinary team of researchers to focus their attention on this specific environmental issue-one that is critically important to Gulf of Mexico and other coastal communities. This long-term interdisciplinary approach has allowed the team to engage the local community, identify measures to protect public health, take emerging technologies into the field, forge advances in natural products chemistry, and develop a valuable pharmaceutical product. The Review includes a brief discussion of the Florida red tide organisms and their toxins, and then focuses on the effects of these toxins on animals and humans, including how these effects predict what we might expect to see in exposed people.

  4. Review of Florida Red Tide and Human Health Effects

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, Lora E.; Kirkpatrick, Barbara; Backer, Lorraine C.; Walsh, Cathy J.; Nierenberg, Kate; Clark, John; Reich, Andrew; Hollenbeck, Julie; Benson, Janet; Cheng, Yung Sung; Naar, Jerome; Pierce, Richard; Bourdelais, Andrea J; Abraham, William M.; Kirkpatrick, Gary; Zaias, Julia; Wanner, Adam; Mendes, Eliana; Shalat, Stuart; Hoagland, Porter; Stephan, Wendy; Bean, Judy; Watkins, Sharon; Clarke, Tainya; Byrne, Margaret; Baden, Daniel G.

    2010-01-01

    This paper reviews the literature describing research performed over the past decade on the known and possible exposures and human health effects associated with Florida red tides. These harmful algal blooms are caused by the dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis, and similar organisms, all of which produce a suite of natural toxins known as brevetoxins. Florida red tide research has benefited from a consistently funded, long term research program, that has allowed an interdisciplinary team of researchers to focus their attention on this specific environmental issue—one that is critically important to Gulf of Mexico and other coastal communities. This long-term interdisciplinary approach has allowed the team to engage the local community, identify measures to protect public health, take emerging technologies into the field, forge advances in natural products chemistry, and develop a valuable pharmaceutical product. The Review includes a brief discussion of the Florida red tide organisms and their toxins, and then focuses on the effects of these toxins on animals and humans, including how these effects predict what we might expect to see in exposed people. PMID:21218152

  5. Structure and dynamical effects of the thermal tide in the Venus atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, Masahiro; Sugimoto, Norihiko; Ando, Hiroki; Matsuda, Yoshihisa

    2016-10-01

    We investigate structure and dynamical effects of the thermal tide in the Venus atmosphere by using a general circulation model (GCM). The thermal tide is important for the Venus atmospheric dynamics (Fels and Lindzen, 1974; Plumb, 1975; Newman and Leovy, 1992; Takagi and Matsuda, 2007). However, its three-dimensional structure has not been fully investigated so far. It is expected that detailed wind distributions of the thermal tide will be obtained by the Venus Climate Orbiter Akatsuki in the near future. It is necessary to investigate its structure so that the observational results can be interpreted in terms of dynamics. The GCM used in the present study is AFES for Venus (Sugimoto et al., 2014a, b). The resolution is set to T64L120. The model atmosphere extends from the ground to ~120 km. The infrared radiative transfer process is simplified by the Newtonian cooling approximation. See Sugimoto et al. (2014a, b) for more model details. The initial state is an idealized superrotating flow in solid body rotation. The GCM is integrated for 5 Earth years. The result shows that the semidiurnal and diurnal tides are predominant in low and high latitudes poleward of 60 degrees, respectively. The diurnal tide is trapped at 55-75 km levels; the phase is almost unchanged in the vertical direction. This result indicates that the subsolar-antisolar (SS-AS) circulation is predominant at these levels. The strong upward wind is located at early afternoon and near the morning and evening terminators. The vertical velocity of the SS-AS circulation is 0.04 m/s, which is ~10 times as fast as that of the mean meridional circulation (MMC). Titov et al. (2012) pointed out that dark regions are observed in the evening region, suggesting that the dark material is transported from below. These results suggest that the SS-AS circulation is quite important to the material transport at the cloud levels in the Venus atmosphere. The preliminary analysis also shows that the MMC at 50-90 km

  6. The signature of atmospheric tides in sub-daily variations of Earth rotation as unveiled by globally-gridded atmospheric angular momentum functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindelegger, M.; Böhm, J.; Salstein, D. A.; Schuh, H.

    2012-12-01

    Thermally-driven atmospheric tides provide a small but distinct contribution to shortperiod variations of Earth rotation parameters (ERP). The effect of diurnal and semi-diurnal tides, commonly denoted as S1 and S2, respectively, is in the range of 2 - 10 uas for polar motion and 2 - 10 uas for changes in length-of-day (LOD). Even though ocean tides represent a much more dominant driving agent for ERP fluctuations at short time scales, high-frequency atmospheric effects are non-negligible, particularly given the prospective measurement accuracy of space geodetic techniques. However, previous studies, such as Brzezinski et al. (2002), de Viron et al. (2005) or Schindelegger et al. (2011), have been noticeably inconclusive on the exact amplitude and phase values of S1 and S2 atmospheric excitation signals. This study aims at shedding light on the origin of these uncertainties with respect to the axial component of Earth's rotation vector by investigating times series of atmospheric angular momentum (AAM) functions that are given on global grids and computed from three-hourly meteorological data of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF). The signature of diurnal and semi-diurnal atmospheric tides is clearly visible in the gridded axial AAM functions, revealing a distinct spatial and temporal phase difference between pressure and wind tidal constituents of about ± π. It is shown that due to this counterbalance and the explicit axisymmetric spatial structure of S1 and S2, the net effect in sub-diurnal AAM (which is calculated from the global sum of gridded AAM functions) is always a small quantity, particularly sensitive to minor differences between the analysis fields of numerical weather models.

  7. Influence of ocean tides on the diurnal and semidiurnal earth rotation variations from VLBI observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubanov, V. S.; Kurdubov, S. L.

    2015-05-01

    The International astrogeodetic standard IERS Conventions (2010) contains a model of the diurnal and semidiurnal variations in Earth rotation parameters (ERPs), the pole coordinates and the Universal Time, arising from lunisolar tides in the world ocean. This model was constructed in the mid-1990s through a global analysis of Topex/Poseidon altimetry. The goal of this study is to try to estimate the parameters of this model by processing all the available VLBI observations on a global network of stations over the last 35 years performed within the framework of IVS (International VLBI Service) geodetic programs. The complexity of the problemlies in the fact that the sought-for corrections to the parameters of this model lie within 1 mm and, thus, are at the limit of their detectability by all currently available methods of ground-based positional measurements. This requires applying universal software packages with a high accuracy of reduction calculations and a well-developed system of controlling the simultaneous adjustment of observational data to analyze long series of VLBI observations. This study has been performed with the QUASAR software package developed at the Institute of Applied Astronomy of the Russian Academy of Sciences. Although the results obtained, on the whole, confirm a high accuracy of the basic model in the IERS Conventions (2010), statistically significant corrections that allow this model to be refined have been detected for some harmonics of the ERP variations.

  8. The Effect of Warming Oceans at a Tide Gauge Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bâki Iz, H.

    2016-09-01

    This study proposes a new paradigm for assessing thermosteric effects of warming oceans at a tide gauge station. For demonstration, the trend due to the global thermosteric sea level at the Key West, FL tide gauge station was estimated using the tide gauge measurements and the global sea surface temperature anomalies that were represented by yearly distributed lags. A comparison of the estimate with the trend estimate from a descriptive model revealed that 0.7±0.1 mm/yr, (p<0.01), of the total trend 2.2±0.1 mm/yr (p<0.01) estimated using the descriptive model can be attributed to the global warming of the oceans during the last century at this station. The remaining 1.5±0.1 mm/yr, 70 percent of the total trend, is the lump sum estimate of the secular changes due to the eustatic, halosteric, and various local isostatic contributions.

  9. The use of the Earth tide-seismicity compliance parameter maps for earthquake risk mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arabelos D. N.; Contadakis, M. E.; Vergos, G.; S. Spatalas

    2016-04-01

    Applying the Hi(stogram)Cum(ulation) method, which was introduced recently by Cadicheanu, van Ruymbecke and Zhu (2007), we analyze the series of the earthquakes occurred in the last 50 years in seismic active areas of Greece, i.e. the areas (a) of the Mygdonian Basin(Contadakis et al. 2007), (b) of the Ionian Islands (Contadakis et al. 2012 ) and (c) of the Hellenic Arc (Vergos et al. 2015 ) . The result of the analysis for all the areas indicate that the monthly variation of the earthquake frequency is in accordance with the period of the tidal lunar monthly and semi-monthly (Mm and Mf) variations and the same happens with the corresponding daily variations of the frequencies of earthquake occurrence with the diurnal luni-solar (K1) and semidiurnal lunar (M2) tidal variations. In addition the confidence level for the identification of such period accordance between earthquakes occurrence and tidal periods varies with seismic activity, i.e. the higher confidence level corresponds to time periods with stronger seismic activity. These results are in favor of a tidal triggering process on earthquakes when the stress in the focal area is near the critical level (Vidale 1998). Based on these results, we consider the confidence level of earthquake occurrence - tidal period accordance, which we call "earth tide-seismicity compliance parameter p", as an index of tectonic stress criticality for earthquake occurrence and we construct maps of p's over all the area of Greece for each year from 1964 on. It is seen that these maps indicate roughly the seismic active areas. Thus these maps, as well as those of narrower time windows, may be used in earthquake hazard estimation

  10. The pole tide in deep oceans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickman, S. R.

    1990-01-01

    The fluid-dynamical theory of the pole tide is examined by describing the oceanic response to the Chandler wobble and assessing its implications for mantle anelasticity and low-frequency ocean dynamics. The Laplace tide equations accounting for bottom friction are given, and a spherical harmonic approach is delineated in which the time-independent portion of the tide height is expanded. Pole-tide height and related inertia products are linearly proportional to wobble amplitude, and the final equations are modified to account for mantle elasticity and oceanic loading. Results for pole tide effects are given for various earth models with attention to the role of boundary constraints. A dynamic effect is identified which lengthens the Chandler period by about 1 day more than static lengthening, a contribution that suggests a vigorous low-frequency response. The values derived are shown to agree with previous models that do not incorporate the effects of the pole tide.

  11. Theoretical effects of geomagnetic activity on thermospheric tides

    SciTech Connect

    Fesen, C.G.; Richmond, A.D.; Roble, R.G.

    1993-09-01

    The theoretical effects of auroral activity on thermospheric tides during equinox solar cycle minimum are investigated using simulations from the National Center for Atmospheric Research thermosphere-ionosphere general circulation model. One set of model runs examined the effects of increasing levels of geomagnetic activity on the neutral horizontal winds and temperatures. A second set of model runs examined the generation of diurnal and semidiurnal waves in the neutral horizontal winds and temperatures by solar forcing, auroral forcing, and waves propagating vertically from the lower atmosphere. The model simulations were made for four levels of geomagnetic activity, parameterized principally by the total hemispheric power index and the potential drop across the polar cap. The resulting neutral horizontal wind and temperature fields were examined at geographic latitudes of 17.5{degrees}N, 42.5{degrees}N, and 67.5{degrees}N at 70{degrees}W longitude. The modeled response to the level of geomagnetic activity varies with altitude and latitude: the effects tend to maximize at high altitudes and high latitudes and penetrate lower in altitude as geomagnetic activity increases. The simulated mean temperatures increase and the mean winds become more southward and westward at all latitudes with increasing auroral activity. In the upper thermosphere, the model diurnal temperature amplitudes decrease with increasing activity, while the diurnal meridional wind amplitudes increase. The modeled semidiurnal winds are strongly affected by the level of geomagnetic activity, while the semidiurnal temperatures are not. Analysis of the second set of model simulations focusing on the generation of the tidal waves indicates that the tidal response to auroral activity is largely determined by the interference between the waves due to upward propagating tides and in situ solar forcing and those generated by the auroral momentum and energy sources. 28 refs., 19 figs.

  12. Experimental Research on Effect of Tide for Coastal Groundwater Table

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Long-hua; Zhuang, Shui-ying

    2010-11-01

    A tide simulation system based on two-way water pump technique is developed by authors. Using this system, the groundwater table fluctuation characteristics, relative over height of groundwater table, and influencing factors of over height are investigated. The experiment results indicate that the groundwater table fluctuation is of periodicity, and of asymmetry. The amplitude of groundwater table fluctuations decreases with the increase of the onshore distances. There are phase lags of groundwater table fluctuations for different monitoring points. The tide can cause remarkable over height of coastal groundwater table. The dominating factors bring about over height include tide amplitude, tide frequency and aquifer thickness. Under above experiment conditions, the maximum value of over height exceeded 50% of the maximal tide amplitude, and reached about 10% of aquifer thickness. So, over height is not a negligent factor of forecasting the groundwater resource gross in coastal area.

  13. Quartz tube extensometer for observation of Earth tides and local tectonic deformations at the Sopronbanfalva Geodynamic Observatory, Hungary

    SciTech Connect

    Mentes, Gy.

    2010-07-15

    In May 1990, a quartz tube extensometer was installed in the Sopronbanfalva Geodynamic Observatory of the Geodetic and Geophysical Research Institute (GGRI) of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences for recording Earth tides and recent tectonic movements. The paper describes the construction of the extensometer and a portable calibrator used for the in situ calibration of the instrument. The extensometer is very sensitive. Its scale factor is 2.093{+-}0.032 nm/mV according to the highly precise calibration method developed at the GGRI. Since the stability of extensometers is strongly influenced by the geological structure and properties of the rocks in the vicinity of the recording site, the observatory instrument system was tested by coherence analysis between theoretical (as the input signal) and measured tidal data series (as the output signal). In the semidiurnal tidal frequency band the coherence is better than 0.95, while in the diurnal band it is about 0.8. Probably this is due to the fact that the noise is higher in the diurnal band (0.4-0.5 nstr) than in the semidiurnal band (0.19-0.22 nstr). Coherence analysis between theoretical and measured data corrected for barometric changes yielded a small improvement of coherence in both frequency bands, while using temperature data correction, no observable improvement was obtained. Results of the tidal analysis also show that the observatory instrument system is suitable for recording very small tectonic movements. The 18 years of continuous data series measured by the extensometer prove the high quality of the extensometer. On the basis of investigations, it was pointed out that further efforts should be done to improve the barometric correction method and that correction for ocean load, as well as considering topographic and cavity effects are necessary to increase the accuracy of determining tidal parameters.

  14. Perigean Spring Tides and Apogean Neap Tides in History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Donald W.

    2012-01-01

    On January 4, 1912 - almost exactly 100 years ago - both a full Moon and a lunar perigee occurred, with these two events separated by only a few minutes of time and with the Earth near perihelion. The resulting lunar distance (356,375 km) on that date stands as the closest approach of the Moon to the Earth in an interval of more than 1400 years. The centennial of this extreme lunar perigee is an appropriate time to consider the effect of lunar distance on the range of ocean tides. At most ocean ports, spring tides of increased range occur near new and full Moon. If a lunar perigee falls near new or full Moon, then perigean spring tides of even greater range are possible. Conversely, if a lunar apogee falls near first quarter or last quarter Moon, then apogean neap tides of unusually reduced range can occur. Examples of perigean spring tides include a near-coincidence of lunar perigee and new Moon in December 1340 that may be related to a plot device in Chaucer's "The Franklin's Tale,” a Canterbury tale that describes an extreme high tide covering the rocks on the coast of Brittany in "the cold and frosty season of December.” Another example, the disaster known as the Bristol Channel Flood, occurred shortly after a lunar perigee and new Moon in January 1607. A German U-boat employed an exceptionally high perigean spring tide shortly after the new Moon of October 1939 to enter Scapa Flow by an unexpected route and sink the HMS Royal Oak. An apogean neap tide prevailed during the amphibious assault of the U. S. Marines at Tarawa in November 1943, making the eventual victory more costly because the landing craft were unable to reach the island and instead grounded on the surrounding reef.

  15. Tide generator

    SciTech Connect

    Feltenberger, B.D.

    1981-06-16

    A tidewater power system consisting of a high tide reservoir and a low tide reservoir. The high tide reservoir has an inlet adapted to be supported at high tide level and an outlet with a water wheel and generator between the outlet of the high tide reservoir and the low tide reservoir. The low tide reservoir has an outlet at the low tide level. The outlet from the high tide reservoir is adjustable to control the flow rate and the high tide reservoir can be closed at high tide to retain water for use over a period of time.

  16. Analysis of star pair latitudes. [earth tides tesseral harmonics, and polar wandering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graber, M. A.

    1978-01-01

    Star pair latitude observations forming the basis for the pole positions reported by the International Polar Motion Service (IPMS) are processed to produce a mean pole position. However, the time series of raw observations contains high frequency information which is lost in the calculation of the mean pole. Analysis of 2931 star pair observations reveals a possible large excitation at one cycle per solar day. The average power level in the frequency band of the tesseral tides is seen to be high, although the peaks do not occur at the expected tidal frequencies.

  17. The past and present Earth-Moon system: the speed of light stays steady as tides evolve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, James G.; Turyshev, Slava G.; Boggs, Dale H.

    2014-12-01

    Tides induce a semimajor axis rate of +38.08 ± 0.19 mm/yr, corresponding to an acceleration of the Moon's orbital mean longitude of -25.82 ± 0.13 "/cent2, as determined by the analysis of 43 yr of Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR) data. The LLR result is consistent with analyses made with different data spans, different analysis techniques, analysis of optical observations, and independent knowledge of tides. Plate motions change ocean shapes, and geological evidence and model calculations indicate lower rates of tidal evolution for extended past intervals. Earth rotation has long-term slowing due to tidal dissipation, but it also experiences variations for times up to about 105 yr due to changes in the moment of inertia. An analysis of LLR data also tests for any rate of change in either the speed of light c or apparent mean distance. The result is (-2.8 ± 3.4)×10-12 /yr for either scale rate or -(d c/d t)/ c, or equivalently -1.0 ± 1.3 mm/yr for apparent distance rate. The lunar range does not reveal any change in the speed of light.

  18. Effects of a red-tide toxin on fish hearing.

    PubMed

    Lu, Z; Tomchik, S M

    2002-11-01

    Red tides are formed from blooms of marine algae. Among them, the dinoflagellate ( Karenia brevis) that is responsible for Florida red tides can release many types of natural toxins, which cause massive kills of marine animals, including endangered species, and threaten human health. This study was to investigate whether or not a neurotoxin, brevetoxin-3, purified from Florida red tides affects hearing sensitivity of a teleost fish, the goldfish ( Carassius auratus). LD(50) of the goldfish that were intraperitoneally injected with brevetoxin-3 was 0.068 microg g(-1). Evoked auditory brainstem responses were recorded, and hearing threshold was determined using a correlation method. By comparing thresholds of fish before and after a sublethal-dose injection (0.064 microg g(-1)) of the toxin, we found that brevetoxin-3 significantly reduces auditory sensitivity up to 9 dB at low frequencies (100 Hz and 500 Hz), but not at a high frequency (2,000 Hz). Reduction of hearing sensitivity was recovered within 24 h. To our knowledge, this is the first study showing a natural red-tide toxin causes minor hearing loss in vertebrates. Results of the study indicate that brevetoxin-3 could affect hearing capabilities of marine animals that survived exposure to red tides. Mechanisms of the toxin-induced reduction of hearing sensitivity are discussed.

  19. O1, P1, N2 models of the global ocean tide on an elastic earth plus surface potential and spherical harmonic decompositions for M2, S2, and K1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parke, M. E.

    1982-01-01

    The models of M2, S2, and K1 presented in Parke and Hendershott (1980) are supplemented with models of O1, P1, and N2. The models satisfy specified elevation boundary conditions and are generated by fighting a small number of test functions to island data. Maps are presented of the geocentric tide, the induced free space potential, the induced vertical component of the solid earth tide, and the induced vertical component of the gravitational field for each new component. Maps of the tidal potential seen by an observer fixed to the surface of the solid earth are also presented for all six constituents. Spherical harmonic coefficients up to order four and the rms magnitude of the coefficients to order fifteen are presented for each constituent. The rms magnitudes of the P1 and K1 coefficients normalized by their respective equilibrium amplitudes are compared to determine the effect of the diurnal core resonance.

  20. Effects of thermal tides on the Venus atmospheric superrotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, M.; Matsuda, Y.

    2007-08-01

    A nonlinear dynamical model on the sphere has been constructed to investigate a generation mechanism of the Venus atmospheric superrotation by the thermal tides. By using the solar heating exciting the diurnal and semidiurnal tides, the atmospheric superrotation extending from the ground to 80 km is generated. The vertical distributions of the mean zonal flow obtained in our numerical experiments are similar to the observations. The maximum velocity of the mean zonal flow reaches about 60-100 m/s near the cloud top level. A linear theory proposed by Takagi and Matsuda (2006) suggests that the atmospheric superrotation obtained in the present study is generated and maintained by the momentum transport associated with the thermal tides. Namely, the downward transport of zonal momentum associated with the downward propagating semidiurnal tide excited in the cloud layer induces the mean zonal flow opposite to the Venus rotation in the lowest layer adjacent to the ground. Surface friction acting on this counter flow provides the atmosphere with the net angular momentum from the solid part of Venus.

  1. The IERS Special Bureau for Tides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Richard D.; Chao, B. F.; Desai, S. D.

    2002-01-01

    The Global Geophysical Fluids Center of the International Earth Rotation Service (IERS) comprises 8 special bureaus, one of which is the Special Bureau for Tides. Its purpose is to facilitate studies related to tidal effects in earth rotation. To that end it collects various relevant datasets and distributes them, primarily through its website at bowie.gsfc.nasa.gov/ggfc/tides. Example datasets include tabulations of tidal variations in angular momentum and in earth rotation as estimated from numerical ocean tide models and from meteorological reanalysis products. The web site also features an interactive tidal prediction "machine" which generates tidal predictions (e.g., of UT1) from lists of harmonic constants. The Special Bureau relies on the tidal and earth-rotation communities to build and enlarge its datasets; further contributions from this community are most welcome.

  2. Effects of Ocean Tide Models on Gnss-Estimated Ztd and Pwv in Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurbuz, G.; Jin, S.; Mekik, C.

    2015-12-01

    Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) observations can precisely estimate the total zenith tropospheric delay (ZTD) and precipitable water vapour (PWV) for weather prediction and atmospheric research as a continuous and all-weather technique. However, apart from GNSS technique itself, estimations of ZTD and PWV are subject to effects of geophysical models with large uncertainties, particularly imprecise ocean tide models in Turkey. In this paper, GNSS data from Jan. 1st to Dec. 31st of 2014 are processed at 4 co-located GNSS stations (GISM, DIYB, GANM, and ADAN) with radiosonde from Turkish Met-Office along with several nearby IGS stations. The GAMIT/GLOBK software has been used to process GNSS data of 30-second sample using the Vienna Mapping Function and 10° elevation cut-off angle. Also tidal and non-tidal atmospheric pressure loadings (ATML) at the observation level are also applied in GAMIT/GLOBK. Several widely used ocean tide models are used to evaluate their effects on GNSS-estimated ZTD and PWV estimation, such as IERS recommended FES2004, NAO99b from a barotropic hydrodynamic model, CSR4.0 obtained from TOPEX/Poseidon altimetry with the model FES94.1 as the reference model and GOT00 which is again long wavelength adjustments of FES94.1 using TOPEX/Poseidon data at 0.5 by 0.5 degree grid. The ZTD and PWV computed from radiosonde profile observations are regarded as reference values for the comparison and validation. In the processing phase, five different strategies are taken without ocean tide model and with four aforementioned ocean tide models, respectively, which are used to evaluate ocean tide models effects on GNSS-estimated ZTD and PWV estimation through comparing with co-located Radiosonde. Results showed that ocean tide models have greatly affected the estimation of the ZTD in centimeter level and thus the precipitable water vapour in millimeter level, respectively at stations near coasts. The ocean tide model FES2004 that is the product of

  3. Literature Review of Florida Red Tide: Implications for Human Health Effects.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, Barbara; Fleming, Lora E; Squicciarini, Dominick; Backer, Lorrie C; Clark, Richard; Abraham, William; Benson, Janet; Cheng, Yung Sung; Johnson, David; Pierce, Richard; Zaias, Julia; Bossart, Gregory D; Baden, Daniel G

    2004-04-01

    Florida red tides are a natural phenomenon caused by dense aggregations of single cell or several species of unicellular organisms. Patches of discolored water, dead or dying fish, and respiratory irritants in the air often characterize these algal blooms. In humans, two distinct clinical entities, depending on the route of exposure, are associated with exposure to the Florida red tide toxins (particularly the brevetoxins). With the ingestion of brevetoxin-contaminated shellfish, neurotoxic shellfish poisoning (NSP) presents as a milder gastroenteritis with neurologic symptoms compared with other marine toxin diseases such as paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) or ciguatera fish poisoning. With the inhalation of the aerosolized red tide toxins (especially the brevetoxins) from the sea spray, respiratory irritation and possibly other health effects are reported in both humans and other mammals (Baden 1995, Fleming 1998a, Fleming 1998b, Fleming 1999a, Bossart 1998, Asai 1982, Eastaugh 1989, Pierce 1986, Music 1973, Temple 1995, Anderson 1994).This paper reviews the literature on the known and possible human health effects of exposure to the Florida red tides and their toxins. The review includes discussion of the red tide organisms and their toxins, as well as the effects of these toxins on both wild and laboratory animals as they relate to possible human health effects and exposures.

  4. Physic-mathematical modeling of atmospheric tides influence on background circulation and background temperature of lower Earth thermosphere.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrilov, Anatoliy; Kapitsa, Andrey

    Nonstationary semiempirical model of: 1) atmospheric thermal tides (ATT) in middle Earth atmosphere conditional on ozone and water vapor absorption; 2) tidal disturbances (TD) gen-erated by global ozone anomalies. Geophysical phenomenon -distant wave action (teleconnec-tion) of Antarctic ozone anomaly on thermal tidal wind structure, background circulation and background temperature in middle-latitude and polar lower thermosphere of northern hemi-sphere, which was not known earlier, and which was found by means of numerical experiments on constructed model and confirmed by observations, is described. Mean zonal numerical cor-recting models of background circulation and background temperature in lower thermosphere due to semidiurnal and diurnal ATT dissipation at these heights are given. It is noted that background temperature corrections reach maximum value of 40-50 degrees in polar lower ther-mosphere of both hemispheres at 110-metricconverterProductID120 km120 km height due to "heating" caused by semidiurnal ATT, both during equinox and solstice.

  5. Modeling the effect of tides and waves on benthic biofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariotti, G.; Fagherazzi, S.

    2012-12-01

    We propose a simple model for growth of benthic biofilm subject to variable hydrodynamic disturbances and with a biofilm-dependent erodibility (biostabilization). Model results show that, for disturbances with equal intensity, the biofilm is eroded or not depending on its current biomass, which is a function of the past evolution trajectory. Because of the finite time needed for a biofilm to develop, both the intensity and frequency of periodical disturbances, such as tidal currents, determine whether the biofilm can approach its equilibrium biomass. Spring-neap tidal modulation favors biofilm development, since the reduction of the current shear stress associated with neap tides allows biofilm growth, thus increasing biostabilization and the biofilm's likelihood to withstand the subsequent energetic spring tides. On the other hand, diurnal tidal modulations are negative for biofilm development, because the diel biofilm growth is almost negligible. Under stochastic disturbances associated with wind waves, there are two most-likely states for the biofilm biomass: either close to zero or close to the equilibrium value, depending on wave intensity. If biostabilization is reduced or eliminated, the probability of intermediate values for biofilm biomass becomes also significant. The role of biostabilization is hence to exacerbate the probability of the end-member states. Finally, because of the nonmonotonic relationship between water depth and wave induced bed stresses, only extremely shallow and deep areas favor biofilm persistence. If light attenuation with depth is considered, deep water becomes unsuitable for biofilm growth when water turbidity is high.

  6. High tides and rising seas: potential effects on estuarine waterbirds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Erwin, R.M.; Sanders, G.M.; Prosser, D.J.; Cahoon, D.R.; Greenberg, Russell; Maldonado, Jesus; Droege, Sam; McDonald, M.V.

    2006-01-01

    Coastal waterbirds are vulnerable to water-level changes especially under predictions of accelerating sea-level rise and increased storm frequency in the next century. Tidal and wind-driven fluctuations in water levels affecting marshes, their invertebrate communities, and their dependent waterbirds are manifested in daily, monthly, seasonal, annual, and supra-annual (e.g., decadal or 18.6-yr) periodicities. Superimposed on these cyclic patterns is a long-term (50?80 yr) increase in relative sea-level rise that varies from about 2?4 + mm/yr along the Atlantic coastline. At five study sites selected on marsh islands from Cape Cod, Massachusetts to coastal Virginia, we monitored marsh elevation changes and flooding, tide variations over time, and waterbird use. We found from longterm marsh core data that marsh elevations at three of five sites may not be sufficient to maintain pace with current sea-level rise. Results of the short-term (3?4 yr) measures using surface elevation tables suggest a more dramatic difference, with marsh elevation change at four of five sites falling below relative sea-level rise. In addition, we have found a significant increase (in three of four cases) in the rate of surface marsh flooding in New Jersey and Virginia over the past 70?80 yr during May?July when waterbirds are nesting on or near the marsh surface. Short-term, immediate effects of flooding will jeopardize annual fecundity of many species of concern to federal and state agencies, most notably American Black Duck (Anas rubripes), Nelson?s Sharp-tailed Sparrow (Ammodramus nelsoni), Saltmarsh Sharp-tailed Sparrow (A. caudacutus), Seaside Sparrow (A. maritima), Coastal Plain Swamp Sparrow (Melospiza georgiana nigrescens), Black Rail (Laterallus jamaicensis), Forster?s Tern (Sterna forsteri), Gull-billed Tern (S. nilotica), Black Skimmer (Rynchops niger), and American Oystercatcher (Haemotopus palliatus). Forster?s Terns are probably most at risk given the large proportion of their

  7. Late proterozoic and paleozoic tides, retreat of the moon, and rotation of the earth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sonett, C.P.; Kvale, E.P.; Zakharian, A.; Chan, M.A.; Demko, T.M.

    1996-01-01

    The tidal rhythmites in the Proterozoic Big Cottonwood Formation (Utah, United States), the Neoproterozoic Elatina Formation of the Flinders Range (southern Australia), and the Lower Pennsylvanian Pottsville Formation (Alabama, United States) and Mansfield Formation (Indiana, United States) indicate that the rate of retreat of the lunar orbit is d??/dt k2 sin(2??) (where ?? is the Earth-moon radius vector, k2 is the tidal Love number, and ?? is the tidal lag angle) and that this rate has been approximately constant since the late Precambrian. When the contribution to tidal friction from the sun is taken into account, these data imply that the length of the terrestrial day 900 million years ago was -18 hours.

  8. Occupational exposure to aerosolized brevetoxins during Florida red tide events: effects on a healthy worker population.

    PubMed

    Backer, Lorraine C; Kirkpatrick, Barbara; Fleming, Lora E; Cheng, Yung Sung; Pierce, Richard; Bean, Judy A; Clark, Richard; Johnson, David; Wanner, Adam; Tamer, Robert; Zhou, Yue; Baden, Daniel G

    2005-05-01

    Karenia brevis (formerly Gymnodinium breve) is a marine dinoflagellate responsible for red tides that form in the Gulf of Mexico. K. brevis produces brevetoxins, the potent toxins that cause neurotoxic shellfish poisoning. There is also limited information describing human health effects from environmental exposures to brevetoxins. Our objective was to examine the impact of inhaling aerosolized brevetoxins during red tide events on self-reported symptoms and pulmonary function. We recruited a group of 28 healthy lifeguards who are occupationally exposed to red tide toxins during their daily work-related activities. They performed spirometry tests and reported symptoms before and after their 8-hr shifts during a time when there was no red tide (unexposed period) and again when there was a red tide (exposed period). We also examined how mild exercise affected the reported symptoms and spirometry tests during unexposed and exposed periods with a subgroup of the same lifeguards. Environmental sampling (K. brevis cell concentrations in seawater and brevetoxin concentrations in seawater and air) was used to confirm unexposed/exposed status. Compared with unexposed periods, the group of lifeguards reported more upper respiratory symptoms during the exposed periods. We did not observe any impact of exposure to aerosolized brevetoxins, with or without mild exercise, on pulmonary function.

  9. Effect of Ocean Tide Models on the Precise Orbit Determination of Geodetic Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubo-Oka, T.; Matsumoto, K.; Otsubo, T.; Gotoh, T.

    2005-12-01

    Several ocean tide models are tested with precise observation data of satellite laser ranging to geodetic satellites, Starlette and Stella. Four ocean models, NAO.99b, CSR 3.0 (standard model in IERS Conventions 2003), CSR 4.0, and GOT99.2b were implemented in our orbit analysis software "concerto ver. 4". NAO.99b model was developed by assimilating tidal solutions from TOPEX/POSEIDON altimeter data into hydrodynamical model. Eight constituents (M2, S2, K1, O1, N2, P1, K2, Q1) were taken into account in each ocean tide model. Moreover, eight additional constituents (M1, J1, OO1, 2N2, Mu2, Nu2, L2, T2) can be included in NAO.99b model. Effect of ocean tides on geopotential coefficients were computed to 20th order. SLR data to Starlette and Stella were divided into arcs of 7 days length and 52 arcs (Jan. 2 - Dec. 30, 2004) were analyzed. Using different ocean tide model, orbits of these satellites were determined and weighted rms of postfit residuals are compared. We found that the NAO.99b model with 16 constituents can reduce weighted rms of postfit residuals using to the level of about 6.0 cm (Starlette) and 9.6 cm (Stella). These values are about 3-5 % smaller compared to other ocean tide models.

  10. The effect of filtering on the determination of lunar tides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palumbo, A.; Mazzarella, A.

    1980-01-01

    The determination of lunar tides obtained by combination of a filtering process and the fixed lunar age technique is proposed. It is shown that such a method allows a reduction of the signal-to-noise ratio without altering the amplitude and the phase angle of the signal. It consequently allows the significant determination of the lunar semidiurnal component M2 from the series of data shorter than those required by other methods and the deduction of other interesting lunisolar components which have not previously been significantly determined in surface pressure and temperature data. The analysis of the data for Gan, Vesuvian Observatory and the Eiffel Tower have provided new determinations of L2(p) and have allowed comparison between the results obtained by the present and other methods.

  11. Monthly and Fortnightly Tidal Variations of the Earth's Rotation Rate Predicted by a TOPEX/POSEIDON Empirical Ocean Tide Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desai, S.; Wahr, J.

    1998-01-01

    Empirical models of the two largest constituents of the long-period ocean tides, the monthly and the fortnightly constituents, are estimated from repeat cycles 10 to 210 of the TOPEX/POSEIDON (T/P) mission.

  12. A long-term stable equilibrium for synchronous binaries including tides and the byorp effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, Seth A.; Scheeres, D. J.

    2011-04-01

    We present theoretical evidence for the existence of a long-term stable equilibrium solution for synchronous binary asteroids accounting for mutual body tides, the binary YORP (BYORP) effect and dynamics. Synchronous binary asteroid systems consist of a rapidly spinning primary and a tidally-locked secondary, analogous to the Earth-Moon system. Tidal evolution of these systems leads to growth in the semi-major axis. Evolution from the BYORP effect can lead to both contraction and growth of the semi-major axis. There are two scenarios for joint evolution of a synchronous binary when both effects are considered: expansive and opposing evolution. During joint expansive evolution, both effects grow the semi-major axis. The system will either grow to the Hill sphere and disrupt if tidally dominated, or the mutual orbit will be de-stabilized due to runaway eccentricity growth if BYORP dominated. During joint opposing evolution, tidal and BYORP evolution act to evolve the system to a stable equilibrium. The location of this equilibrium to first order depends on just the tidal parameters, specific tidal dissipation number Q and the tidal Love number k, as well as the BYORP shape coefficient. If the observed population of small (0.1 - 10 km diameter), synchronous binaries are assumed to be in this static configuration, then our analysis shows that a monolithic geophysical model is not satisfactory, whereas the ``rubble pile'' model proposed by Goldreich & Sari (2009) is sufficient to prevent runaway eccentricity growth. The existence of this equilibrium and a secondary shape model built from observations enables direct study of asteroid geophysics through tidal theory. The existence of this equilibrium would be confirmed by a lack of migration in observational tests for the BYORP effect. Goldreich, P. & R. Sari, ApJ, 691:54-60 (2009)

  13. Earth-Tide Derived Aquifer Properties in Fractured Granite: Results from a Groundwater Monitoring Well Network in the Peninsular Ranges Batholith

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinberger, J. L.; Quinlan, P. T.; Tartakovsky, D. M.

    2014-12-01

    Fractured rock aquifers are difficult to characterize because of the three dimensional spatial heterogeneity of the fracture networks. Aquifer properties cannot be determined from a single borehole and traditional aquifer tests are difficult to design and analyze without prior knowledge of the subsurface permeability distribution. Using passive monitoring of the water level responses to tidal strains in wells allows for characterization of the aquifer over greater spatial extent and can be used to guide the design and implementation of aquifer tests. In this study, the water level response to tidal strains measured in over 20 groundwater wells, spaced irregularly over an approximately 48 km2 area, was used to estimate the specific storage and transmissivity of the surrounding granite aquifer. The water level data were corrected to remove barometric pressure effects before the amplitude and phase shifts for the O1 and M2 components of the tidal potential were calculated. Systematic differences in the calculated aquifer characteristics were observed. The differences correlate with the density of fractures observed in borehole geophysical logs. The aquifer properties derived from the earth-tide analysis were compared to those derived from aquifer tests conducted at two of the wells analyzed. The two methods yielded similar results.

  14. Dynamics of ocean tides

    SciTech Connect

    Maarchuk, G.I.; Kagan, B.A. )

    1989-01-01

    Ocean tide information can solve vital problems in oceanology and geophysics. Elastic properties of the Earth's crust, tidal gravity variations and deviations in trajectories of artificial satellites can be studied from the dynamics of ocean tides. This book contains mathematical models and applications on several problems related to ocean tide dynamics. The first part serves as an introduction to studies of tidal dynamics equations and the application in experimental studies. Specific problems like free oscillations and forced tidal oscillations in the oceans and the ocean-shelf system are discussed. The book deals with tidal flow in the bottom boundary layer. Data and models are presented and experimental and theoretical results are compared.

  15. Weight, gravitation, inertia, and tides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pujol, Olivier; Lagoute, Christophe; Pérez, José-Philippe

    2015-11-01

    This paper deals with the factors that influence the weight of an object near the Earth's surface. They are: (1) the Earth's gravitational force, (2) the centrifugal force due to the Earth's diurnal rotation, and (3) tidal forces due to the gravitational field of the Moon and Sun, and other solar system bodies to a lesser extent. Each of these three contributions is discussed and expressions are derived. The relationship between weight and gravitation is thus established in a direct and pedagogical manner readily understandable by undergraduate students. The analysis applies to the Newtonian limit of gravitation. The derivation is based on an experimental (or operational) definition of weight, and it is shown that it coincides with the Earth’s gravitational force modified by diurnal rotation around a polar axis and non-uniformity of external gravitational bodies (tidal term). Two examples illustrate and quantify these modifications, respectively the Eötvös effect and the oceanic tides; tidal forces due to differential gravitation on a spacecraft and an asteroid are also proposed as examples. Considerations about inertia are also given and some comments are made about a widespread, yet confusing, explanation of tides based on a centrifugal force. Finally, the expression of the potential energy of the tide-generating force is established rigorously in the appendix.

  16. Initial evaluation of the effects of aerosolized Florida red tide toxins (brevetoxins) in persons with asthma.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Lora E; Kirkpatrick, Barbara; Backer, Lorraine C; Bean, Judy A; Wanner, Adam; Dalpra, Dana; Tamer, Robert; Zaias, Julia; Cheng, Yung Sung; Pierce, Richard; Naar, Jerome; Abraham, William; Clark, Richard; Zhou, Yue; Henry, Michael S; Johnson, David; Van De Bogart, Gayl; Bossart, Gregory D; Harrington, Mark; Baden, Daniel G

    2005-05-01

    Florida red tides annually occur in the Gulf of Mexico, resulting from blooms of the marine dinoflagellate Karenia brevis. K. brevis produces highly potent natural polyether toxins, known as brevetoxins, that activate voltage-sensitive sodium channels. In experimental animals, brevetoxins cause significant bronchoconstriction. A study of persons who visited the beach recreationally found a significant increase in self-reported respiratory symptoms after exposure to aerosolized Florida red tides. Anecdotal reports indicate that persons with underlying respiratory diseases may be particularly susceptible to adverse health effects from these aerosolized toxins. Fifty-nine persons with physician-diagnosed asthma were evaluated for 1 hr before and after going to the beach on days with and without Florida red tide. Study participants were evaluated with a brief symptom questionnaire, nose and throat swabs, and spirometry approved by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. Environmental monitoring, water and air sampling (i.e., K. brevis, brevetoxins, and particulate size distribution), and personal monitoring (for toxins) were performed. Brevetoxin concentrations were measured by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry, high-performance liquid chromatography, and a newly developed brevetoxin enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Participants were significantly more likely to report respiratory symptoms after Florida red tide exposure. Participants demonstrated small but statistically significant decreases in forced expiratory volume in 1 sec, forced expiratory flow between 25 and 75%, and peak expiratory flow after exposure, particularly those regularly using asthma medications. Similar evaluation during nonexposure periods did not significantly differ. This is the first study to show objectively measurable adverse health effects from exposure to aerosolized Florida red tide toxins in persons with asthma. Future studies will examine the possible chronic

  17. Initial Evaluation of the Effects of Aerosolized Florida Red Tide Toxins (Brevetoxins) in Persons with Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, Lora E.; Kirkpatrick, Barbara; Backer, Lorraine C.; Bean, Judy A.; Wanner, Adam; Dalpra, Dana; Tamer, Robert; Zaias, Julia; Cheng, Yung Sung; Pierce, Richard; Naar, Jerome; Abraham, William; Clark, Richard; Zhou, Yue; Henry, Michael S.; Johnson, David; Van De Bogart, Gayl; Bossart, Gregory D.; Harrington, Mark; Baden, Daniel G.

    2005-01-01

    Florida red tides annually occur in the Gulf of Mexico, resulting from blooms of the marine dinoflagellate Karenia brevis. K. brevis produces highly potent natural polyether toxins, known as brevetoxins, that activate voltage-sensitive sodium channels. In experimental animals, brevetoxins cause significant bronchoconstriction. A study of persons who visited the beach recreationally found a significant increase in self-reported respiratory symptoms after exposure to aerosolized Florida red tides. Anecdotal reports indicate that persons with underlying respiratory diseases may be particularly susceptible to adverse health effects from these aerosolized toxins. Fifty-nine persons with physician-diagnosed asthma were evaluated for 1 hr before and after going to the beach on days with and without Florida red tide. Study participants were evaluated with a brief symptom questionnaire, nose and throat swabs, and spirometry approved by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. Environmental monitoring, water and air sampling (i.e., K. brevis, brevetoxins, and particulate size distribution), and personal monitoring (for toxins) were performed. Brevetoxin concentrations were measured by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry, high-performance liquid chromatography, and a newly developed brevetoxin enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Participants were significantly more likely to report respiratory symptoms after Florida red tide exposure. Participants demonstrated small but statistically significant decreases in forced expiratory volume in 1 sec, forced expiratory flow between 25 and 75%, and peak expiratory flow after exposure, particularly those regularly using asthma medications. Similar evaluation during nonexposure periods did not significantly differ. This is the first study to show objectively measurable adverse health effects from exposure to aerosolized Florida red tide toxins in persons with asthma. Future studies will examine the possible chronic

  18. [Removal of different species of red tide organisms with an effective clay-complex system].

    PubMed

    Song, Xiuxian; Yu, Zhiming; Gao, Yonghui

    2003-07-01

    An effective clay-complex system was composed on the base of clay by added other two components A and B. Different red tide species, such as Scrippsiella trochoidea, Amphidinium carterae and Heterosigma akashiwo, were coagulated by this clay-complex system, and the optimum conditions for removal red tide organisms were obtained by means of orthogonal test. The results showed that clay was the most important factors in this complex system to coagulate these three organisms. The removal efficiency on three species was in order of Scrippsiella trochoidea > Amphidinium carterae > Heterosigma akashiwo. At the same time, a preliminary study of mortality rate on Penaeus japonicus (length between 1.0 to 1.5 cm) was conducted with this system, and the result of toxic test revealed that the mortality of aquaculture shrimp in control group (nothing added) reached to 80% after 96 h, however, while that of other three groups which added clay and other two components A and B, was below 40%. Thus, it implied that the addition of clay would be harmless to Penaeus japonicas. Furthermore, suitable concentration of components A and B was not harmful for the aquaculture shrimp, but increased the removal efficiency of red tide organisms. The preliminary results showed that this clay-complex system would be available in the removal of red tide organisms in filed.

  19. Effects of tide cycles on habitat selection and habitat partitioning by migrating shorebirds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burger, J.; Howe, M.A.; Hahn, D.C.; Chase, J.

    1977-01-01

    We studied assemblages of feeding shorebirds in three intertidal habitats on the coast of New Jersey during August to document how species segregates patially both among and within habitats and to determine the effects of tidal cycles on these patterns. The habitats were a sandy beach facing the ocean proper (outer beach), a sandy beach on the mainland side of a barrier island (inner beach), and a small mudflat adjacent to a Spartina alternifiora salt marsh. We were able to identify several microhabitats on the outer beach and mudflat. Most speciesfe d in more than one habitat, but only two, Charadrius semipalmatus and Calidris canutus, used all three habitats regularly. Within habitats, most species exhibited strong preferences for the wettest areas, but we found differences among species in degrees of preference. The least amount of partitioning occurred on the inner beach, where birds crowded into a small zone near the water's edge and had frequent agonistic encounters suggesting intense competition. Shorebird feeding activity was partly a function of tide time: each habitat had a characteristic temporal pattern of use by shorebirds related to tide time rather than diel time; within habitats, we found species-characteristic feeding activity rhythms that were also a function of tide time. Feeding by most species peaked during the first 2 hours after low tide on the outer beach and mudflat. The results are discussed in terms of feeding strategies and interspecific competition.

  20. The coupled effect of tides and stellar winds on the evolution of compact binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Repetto, Serena; Nelemans, Gijs

    2014-10-01

    We follow the evolution of compact binaries under the coupled effect of tides and stellar winds until the onset of Roche lobe overflow. These binaries contain a compact object (either a black hole, a neutron star or a planet) and a stellar component. We integrate the full set of tidal equations, which are based on Hut's model for tidal evolution, and we couple them with the angular momentum loss in a stellar wind. Our aim is twofold. First, we wish to highlight some interesting evolutionary outcomes of the coupling. When tides are coupled with a non-massive stellar wind, one interesting outcome is that in certain types of binaries, the stellar spin tends to reach a quasi-equilibrium state, where the effects of tides and wind are counteracting each other. When tides are coupled with a massive wind, we parametrize the evolution in terms of the decoupling radius, at which the wind decouples from the star. Even for small decoupling radii, this wind braking can drive systems on the main sequence to Roche lobe overflow that otherwise would fail to do so. Our second aim is to inspect whether simple time-scale considerations are a good description of the evolution of the systems. We find that simple time-scale considerations, which rely on neglecting the coupling between tides and stellar winds, do not accurately represent the true evolution of compact binaries. The outcome of the coupled evolution of the rotational and orbital elements can strongly differ from simple time-scale considerations, as already pointed out by Barker and Ogilvie in the case of short-period planetary systems.

  1. Quantifying the Effects of Combined Waves and Tides on Deltas: An Experimental Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paola, C.; Baumgardner, S. E.

    2015-12-01

    The classical Galloway diagram captures qualitatively the dramatic effect waves and tides have on reshaping river deltas. Here we investigate these controls in a series of laboratory experiments in which the relative energetics of river, wave, and tidal forcing could be controlled and systematically varied. The delta is fed from a single source of water and low-density, sand-size sediment in one corner of a 5m x 5m basin. Experimental tides are produced by transferring water back and forth between the main experimental basin and an auxiliary holding basin. The tidal period is 60 s and a typical tidal range is 30 mm. Waves are produced using a floating, oscillating paddle placed opposite the sediment feed location. They typically have a period of 1 s and an amplitude of 10 mm. The total energy flux associated with waves and tides is controlled by varying the temporal intermittency of each process, while river energy and sediment fluxes are held steady. The experiments show a variation in delta morphology as a function of wave and tidal forcing that parallels that observed in the field: increasing wave strength redistributes sediment and flattens the shoreline; increasing tidal strength creates well defined tidal channels as well as inlets through the wave-worked shoreline. Both waves and tides reduce the mobility of the main fluvial channel. Quantitative morphologic measures of these effects vary systematically as a function of dimensionless relative wave and tidal strength. The image below shows typical experimental delta morphology associated with mixed wave-tide forcing.

  2. Understanding Earth's Albedo Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fidler, Chuck

    2012-01-01

    Earth and space science in the middle school classroom are composed of intricately intertwined sets of conceptual systems (AAAS 1993; NRC 1996). Some systems of study, such as the water and rock cycles, are quite explicit and often found as stand-alone middle school science units. Other phenomena are not so apparent, yet they play an extremely…

  3. Tides and Decadal Variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Richard D.

    2003-01-01

    This paper reviews the mechanisms by which oceanic tides and decadal variability in the oceans are connected. We distinguish between variability caused by tides and variability observed in the tides themselves. Both effects have been detected at some level. The most obvious connection with decadal timescales is through the 18.6-year precession of the moon's orbit plane. This precession gives rise to a small tide of the same period and to 18.6-year modulations in the phase and amplitudes of short-period tides. The 18.6-year "node tide" is very small, no more than 2 cm anywhere, and in sea level data it is dominated by the ocean's natural Variability. Some authors have naively attributed climate variations with periods near 19 years directly to the node tide, but the amplitude of the tide is too small for this mechanism to be operative. The more likely explanation (Loder and Garrett, JGR, 83, 1967-70, 1978) is that the 18.6-y modulations in short-period tides, especially h e principal tide M2, cause variations in ocean mixing, which is then observed in temperature and other climatic indicators. Tidally forced variability has also been proposed by some authors, either in response to occasional (and highly predictable) tidal extremes or as a nonlinear low-frequency oscillation caused by interactions between short-period tides. The former mechanism can produce only short-duration events hardly more significant than normal tidal ranges, but the latter mechanism can in principle induce low-frequency oscillations. The most recent proposal of this type is by Keeling and Whorf, who highlight the 1800-year spectral peak discovered by Bond et al. (1997). But the proposal appears contrived and should be considered, in the words of Munk et al. (2002), "as the most likely among unlikely candidates."

  4. Quartz tube extensometer for observation of Earth tides and local tectonic deformations at the Sopronbánfalva Geodynamic Observatory, Hungary.

    PubMed

    Mentes, Gy

    2010-07-01

    In May 1990, a quartz tube extensometer was installed in the Sopronbánfalva Geodynamic Observatory of the Geodetic and Geophysical Research Institute (GGRI) of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences for recording Earth tides and recent tectonic movements. The paper describes the construction of the extensometer and a portable calibrator used for the in situ calibration of the instrument. The extensometer is very sensitive. Its scale factor is 2.093+/-0.032 nm/mV according to the highly precise calibration method developed at the GGRI. Since the stability of extensometers is strongly influenced by the geological structure and properties of the rocks in the vicinity of the recording site, the observatory instrument system was tested by coherence analysis between theoretical (as the input signal) and measured tidal data series (as the output signal). In the semidiurnal tidal frequency band the coherence is better than 0.95, while in the diurnal band it is about 0.8. Probably this is due to the fact that the noise is higher in the diurnal band (0.4-0.5 nstr) than in the semidiurnal band (0.19-0.22 nstr). Coherence analysis between theoretical and measured data corrected for barometric changes yielded a small improvement of coherence in both frequency bands, while using temperature data correction, no observable improvement was obtained. Results of the tidal analysis also show that the observatory instrument system is suitable for recording very small tectonic movements. The 18 years of continuous data series measured by the extensometer prove the high quality of the extensometer. On the basis of investigations, it was pointed out that further efforts should be done to improve the barometric correction method and that correction for ocean load, as well as considering topographic and cavity effects are necessary to increase the accuracy of determining tidal parameters.

  5. Quartz tube extensometer for observation of Earth tides and local tectonic deformations at the Sopronbánfalva Geodynamic Observatory, Hungary.

    PubMed

    Mentes, Gy

    2010-07-01

    In May 1990, a quartz tube extensometer was installed in the Sopronbánfalva Geodynamic Observatory of the Geodetic and Geophysical Research Institute (GGRI) of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences for recording Earth tides and recent tectonic movements. The paper describes the construction of the extensometer and a portable calibrator used for the in situ calibration of the instrument. The extensometer is very sensitive. Its scale factor is 2.093+/-0.032 nm/mV according to the highly precise calibration method developed at the GGRI. Since the stability of extensometers is strongly influenced by the geological structure and properties of the rocks in the vicinity of the recording site, the observatory instrument system was tested by coherence analysis between theoretical (as the input signal) and measured tidal data series (as the output signal). In the semidiurnal tidal frequency band the coherence is better than 0.95, while in the diurnal band it is about 0.8. Probably this is due to the fact that the noise is higher in the diurnal band (0.4-0.5 nstr) than in the semidiurnal band (0.19-0.22 nstr). Coherence analysis between theoretical and measured data corrected for barometric changes yielded a small improvement of coherence in both frequency bands, while using temperature data correction, no observable improvement was obtained. Results of the tidal analysis also show that the observatory instrument system is suitable for recording very small tectonic movements. The 18 years of continuous data series measured by the extensometer prove the high quality of the extensometer. On the basis of investigations, it was pointed out that further efforts should be done to improve the barometric correction method and that correction for ocean load, as well as considering topographic and cavity effects are necessary to increase the accuracy of determining tidal parameters. PMID:20687746

  6. Effects of tides on Riverine and Glacial freshwater transport in the Arctic Ocean.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luneva, Maria; Aksenov, Yevgeny; Harle, James; Holt, Jason

    2016-04-01

    In this study we use a novel pan-Arctic sea NENO-shelf ice-ocean coupled model, to examine the effects of tides, river runoff and vertical mixing schemes on sea ice and the mixing of water masses. Several 20-year long (1990-2010) simulations were performed: with explicitly resolved tides and without any tidal dynamics, with climatology river runoff, Dai et al. ,2009 database and freshwater source from melting Greenland glaciers. We examine also three different turbulent closures structural functions, based on the k-epsilon version of the Generic Length Scale Model: by Canuto group (2001) and two by Kantha and Clayson (1994, 2004). The results have been compared with sea ice volume and concentration trends and temperature and salinity profiles from World Ocean Database . We compared the following characteristics: potential energy anomalies, depth of halocline, mixed layer depth , salinity at the subsurface layer.

  7. A UNIFIED THEORY FOR THE EFFECTS OF STELLAR PERTURBATIONS AND GALACTIC TIDES ON OORT CLOUD COMETS

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Benjamin F.; Sari, Re'em

    2010-11-15

    We examine the effects of passing field stars on the angular momentum of a nearly radial orbit of an Oort cloud comet bound to the Sun. We derive the probability density function of the change in angular momentum from one stellar encounter, assuming a uniform and isotropic field of perturbers. We show that the total angular momentum follows a Levy flight, and determine its distribution function. If there is an asymmetry in the directional distribution of perturber velocities, the marginal probability distribution of each component of the angular momentum vector can be different. The constant torque attributed to Galactic tides arises from a non-cancellation of perturbations with an impact parameter of order the semimajor axis of the comet. When the close encounters are rare, the angular momentum is best modeled by the stochastic growth of stellar encounters. If trajectories passing between the comet and the Sun occur frequently, the angular momentum exhibits the coherent growth attributed to the Galactic tides.

  8. Florida Red Tide Toxins (Brevetoxins) and Longitudinal Respiratory Effects in Asthmatics.

    PubMed

    Bean, Judy A; Fleming, Lora E; Kirkpatrick, Barbara; Backer, Lorraine C; Nierenberg, Kate; Reich, Andrew; Cheng, Yung Sung; Wanner, Adam; Benson, Janet; Naar, Jerome; Pierce, Richard; Abraham, William M; Kirkpatrick, Gary; Hollenbeck, Julie; Zaias, Julia; Mendes, Eliana; Baden, Daniel G

    2011-09-01

    Having demonstrated significant and persistent adverse changes in pulmonary function for asthmatics after 1 hour exposure to brevetoxins in Florida red tide (Karenia brevis bloom) aerosols, we assessed the possible longer term health effects in asthmatics from intermittent environmental exposure to brevetoxins over 7 years. 125 asthmatic subjects were assessed for their pulmonary function and reported symptoms before and after 1 hour of environmental exposure to Florida red tide aerosols for upto 11 studies over seven years. As a group, the asthmatics came to the studies with normal standardized percent predicted pulmonary function values. The 38 asthmatics who participated in only one exposure study were more reactive compared to the 36 asthmatics who participated in ≥4 exposure studies. The 36 asthmatics participating in ≥4 exposure studies demonstrated no significant change in their standardized percent predicted pre-exposure pulmonary function over the 7 years of the study. These results indicate that stable asthmatics living in areas with intermittent Florida red tides do not exhibit chronic respiratory effects from intermittent environmental exposure to aerosolized brevetoxins over a 7 year period.

  9. Determination of the Earth's pole tide Love number k2 from observations of polar motion using an adaptive Kalman filter approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seitz, F.; Kirschner, S.; Neubersch, D.

    2012-09-01

    The geophysical interpretation of observed time series of Earth rotation parameters (ERP) is commonly based on numerical models that describe and balance variations of angular momentum in various subsystems of the Earth. Naturally, models are dependent on geometrical, rheological and physical parameters. Many of these are weakly determined from other models or observations. In our study we present an adaptive Kalman filter approach for the improvement of parameters of the dynamic Earth system model DyMEG which acts as a simulator of ERP. In particular we focus on the improvement of the pole tide Love number k2. In the frame of a sensitivity analysis k2 has been identified as one of the most crucial parameters of DyMEG since it directly influences the modeled Chandler oscillation. At the same time k2 is one of the most uncertain parameters in the model. Our simulations with DyMEG cover a period of 60 years after which a steady state of k2 is reached. The estimate for k2, accounting for the anelastic response of the Earth's mantle and the ocean, is 0.3531 + 0.0030i. We demonstrate that the application of the improved parameter k2 in DyMEG leads to significantly better results for polar motion than the original value taken from the Conventions of the International Earth Rotation and Reference Systems Service (IERS).

  10. Aerosolized Red Tide Toxins (Brevetoxins) and Asthma: Continued health effects after 1 hour beach exposure.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, Barbara; Fleming, Lora E; Bean, Judy A; Nierenberg, Kate; Backer, Lorraine C; Cheng, Yung Sung; Pierce, Richard; Reich, Andrew; Naar, Jerome; Wanner, Adam; Abraham, William M; Zhou, Yue; Hollenbeck, Julie; Baden, Daniel G

    2011-01-01

    Blooms of the toxic dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis, produce potent neurotoxins in marine aerosols. Recent studies have demonstrated acute changes in both symptoms and pulmonary function in asthmatics after only 1 hour of beach exposure to these aerosols. This study investigated if there were latent and/or sustained effects in asthmatics in the days following the initial beach exposure during periods with and without an active Florida red tide.Symptom data and spirometry data were collected before and after 1 hour of beach exposure. Subjects kept daily symptom diaries and measured their peak flow each morning for 5 days following beach exposure. During non-exposure periods, there were no significant changes in symptoms or pulmonary function either acutely or over 5 days of follow-up. After the beach exposure during an active Florida red tide, subjects had elevated mean symptoms which did not return to the pre-exposure baseline for at least 4 days. The peak flow measurements decreased after the initial beach exposure, decreased further within 24 hours, and continued to be suppressed even after 5 days. Asthmatics may continue to have increased symptoms and delayed respiratory function suppression for several days after 1 hour of exposure to the Florida red tide toxin aerosols.

  11. The Effects of Thermal Tides and Dust on Traveling Waves in the Martian Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Toigo, A. D.; Richardson, M. I.

    2014-12-01

    Observations show that traveling waves with zonal wavenumber k = 3 correlate closely with the development of frontal / flushing dust storms which are important in the Martian dust cycle. Previous modeling work suggests that both the polar hood [Barnes et al., 2014] and the cap edge dust storms [Wang et al., 2013] have the potential to enhance these waves. In this presentation, we investigate the case of cap edge dust further, focusing on the following results. We will show that the relative strength of the traveling waves depends not only on the time, geolocation, height and variable under consideration, but also on the analysis method. For near surface temperature which is observable by spacecraft, the spectral and time averaged wave power can lead to a different answer than the monochromatic wave power. In particular, in the presence of cap edge dust, the modeled zonal wavenumber k = 3 can dominate the traveling wave spectra at times. In the presence of cap edge dust in the model, the enhancement of the k = 3 traveling waves is accompanied by pronounced increase of the diurnal tide. To test the effect of thermal tides on traveling waves, we have performed sensitivity runs where the insolation is replaced by the diurnally averaged value. We find that the amplitude of the k = 3 traveling waves are greatly reduced without thermal tides. Detailed analyses of the relationship between the waves will be presented.

  12. Aerosolized Red Tide Toxins (Brevetoxins) and Asthma: Continued health effects after 1 hour beach exposure.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, Barbara; Fleming, Lora E; Bean, Judy A; Nierenberg, Kate; Backer, Lorraine C; Cheng, Yung Sung; Pierce, Richard; Reich, Andrew; Naar, Jerome; Wanner, Adam; Abraham, William M; Zhou, Yue; Hollenbeck, Julie; Baden, Daniel G

    2011-01-01

    Blooms of the toxic dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis, produce potent neurotoxins in marine aerosols. Recent studies have demonstrated acute changes in both symptoms and pulmonary function in asthmatics after only 1 hour of beach exposure to these aerosols. This study investigated if there were latent and/or sustained effects in asthmatics in the days following the initial beach exposure during periods with and without an active Florida red tide.Symptom data and spirometry data were collected before and after 1 hour of beach exposure. Subjects kept daily symptom diaries and measured their peak flow each morning for 5 days following beach exposure. During non-exposure periods, there were no significant changes in symptoms or pulmonary function either acutely or over 5 days of follow-up. After the beach exposure during an active Florida red tide, subjects had elevated mean symptoms which did not return to the pre-exposure baseline for at least 4 days. The peak flow measurements decreased after the initial beach exposure, decreased further within 24 hours, and continued to be suppressed even after 5 days. Asthmatics may continue to have increased symptoms and delayed respiratory function suppression for several days after 1 hour of exposure to the Florida red tide toxin aerosols. PMID:21499552

  13. Improving a prediction system for oil spills in the Yellow Sea: effect of tides on subtidal flow.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chang-Sin; Cho, Yang-Ki; Choi, Byoung-Ju; Jung, Kyung Tae; You, Sung Hyup

    2013-03-15

    A multi-nested prediction system for the Yellow Sea using drifter trajectory simulations was developed to predict the movements of an oil spill after the MV Hebei Spirit accident. The speeds of the oil spill trajectories predicted by the model without tidal forcing were substantially faster than the observations; however, predictions taking into account the tides, including both tidal cycle and subtidal periods, were satisfactorily improved. Subtidal flow in the simulation without tides was stronger than in that with tides because of reduced frictional effects. Friction induced by tidal stress decelerated the southward subtidal flows driven by northwesterly winter winds along the Korean coast of the Yellow Sea. These results strongly suggest that in order to produce accurate predictions of oil spill trajectories, simulations must include tidal effects, such as variations within a tidal cycle and advections over longer time scales in tide-dominated areas.

  14. The self-consistent dynamic pole tide in non-global oceans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickman, S. R.

    1988-01-01

    The dynamic pole tide is determined by solving Laplace tide equations which take into account the presence of continents in oceans, oceanic self-gravitation and loading, and mantle elasticity. Dynamical effects are found to be only mild. It is shown that the dynamical pole tide contributes about one day more to the Chandler period than a static pole tide would, and dissipates wobble energy at a very weak rate. It is noted that, depending on the wobble period predicted for an oceanless elastic earth, mantle anelasticity at low frequencies may nevertheless contribute negligibly to the Chandler period.

  15. The influence of barometric pressure fluctuations, earth tides and rainfall loading on fluid pressures in coastal plain aquifers, Burke County, Georgia

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, S.M.; Moore, J.; Daggett, J.; Snipes, D.S. . Dept. of Earth Sciences)

    1993-03-01

    High precision pressure measurements from several aquifers in the top 225 m of coastal plain sediments reveal that barometric pressure fluctuations, earth tides and rainfall loading create pressure fluctuations on the order of tens of centimeters. If not correctly identified, erroneous conclusions regarding the magnitude of pressure communication within and across aquifers during pumping tests may be inferred. Aquifer pressure data with an equivalent resolution of 0.1 mm change in water level were measured in 4 wells over a 10 day period at the USGS Miller's Pond Test Site. During this time, barometric pressures fluctuated by the equivalent of 20 cm of water. Aquifer pressures mimicked these changes, with corresponding barometric efficiencies ranging from 0.59 for the deepest well (215 to 224 m) to 0.73 for the shallowest (136 to 145 m). After removing barometric influences from the pressure data, periodic pressure fluctuations of 2 cm were observed. These correlate well with fluctuations in the earths gravitational field created by planetary motion. A twelve component earth tide model was used to calculate the magnitude of the gravitational fluctuations and provide a quantitative basis for comparing them to observed aquifer pressure fluctuations. Additionally, three rainfall events caused rapid and relatively large increases in aquifer pressures. Up to 4 cm increase in the aquifer pressure accompanied the heaviest rains. The pressures increased concurrent to the rains and decayed slowly to background levels over a several day period, indicating a loading response instead of an infiltration induced pressure increase. The relatively large magnitude of these influences, compared to the small changes induced by leakage across confining layers requires careful consideration in the data analysis.

  16. King Tide floods in Tuvalu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, C.-C.; Ho, C.-R.; Cheng, Y.-H.

    2013-05-01

    The spatial and temporal distributions of sea level rise present regional floods in some certain areas. The low-lying island countries are obviously the spots affected severely. Tuvalu, an atoll island country located in the south-west Pacific Ocean, is suffering the devastating effects of losing life, property, and intending migration caused by floods. They blame the regional flooding to King Tide, a term used but not clearly identified by Pacific islanders. In this study, we clarify what King Tide is first. By the tide gauge and topography data, we estimated the reasonable value of 3.2 m as the threshold of King Tide. This definition also fits to the statement by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) of King Tide occurring once or twice a year. In addition, We cross validate the 19 yr data of tide gauge and satellite altimeter (1993-2012), the correlation coefficient indicates King Tide phenomenon is considerable connected to warm water mass. The 28 King Tide events revealed the fact that flooding can be referenced against spring tide levels, so can it be turned up by warm water mass. The warm water mass pushes up sea level; once spring tide, storm surge, or other climate variability overlaps it, the rising sea level might overflow and so has been called "King Tide" for the floods in Tuvalu. This study provides more understanding of the signals of King Tide and an island country case study of regional sea level rise.

  17. Nonmigrating tides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kato, S.

    1989-01-01

    Recently an interesting advancement in the study of nonmigrating tides has occurred. There have been two distinct approaches in works on this subject. One is based on mechanistic models as considering nonuniform global distribution of water vapor or heating only on land, solving a set of linear equations. It is found that insolation absorption of the nonuniformly distributed water vapor produces only weak nonmigrating tides in the lower thermosphere; the planetary boundary layer heating on land can explain the enhanced tides on land and those with short vertical wavelengths in the stratosphere. The other approach is novel and uses simulation on the general circulation model (GCM). This realistic model can reproduce tides globally and in many details. The enhancement of two nonmigrating modes as eastward traveling modes with a wave number 3 and westward traveling modes with a wave number 5 is in surprisingly good agreement with observation at sea level, at 700 mb and even at 300 mb.

  18. Calculating Rotating Hydrodynamic and Magnetohydrodynamic Waves to Understand Magnetic Effects on Dynamical Tides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xing

    2016-09-01

    To understand magnetic effects on dynamical tides, we study the rotating magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flow driven by harmonic forcing. The linear responses are analytically derived in a periodic box under the local WKB approximation. Both the kinetic and Ohmic dissipations at the resonant frequencies are calculated, and the various parameters are investigated. Although magnetic pressure may be negligible compared to thermal pressure, the magnetic field can be important for the first-order perturbation, e.g., dynamical tides. It is found that the magnetic field splits the resonant frequency, namely the rotating hydrodynamic flow has only one resonant frequency, but the rotating MHD flow has two, one positive and the other negative. In the weak field regime the dissipations are asymmetric around the two resonant frequencies and this asymmetry is more striking with a weaker magnetic field. It is also found that both the kinetic and Ohmic dissipations at the resonant frequencies are inversely proportional to the Ekman number and the square of the wavenumber. The dissipation at the resonant frequency on small scales is almost equal to the dissipation at the non-resonant frequencies, namely the resonance takes its effect on the dissipation at intermediate length scales. Moreover, the waves with phase propagation that is perpendicular to the magnetic field are much more damped. It is also interesting to find that the frequency-averaged dissipation is constant. This result suggests that in compact objects, magnetic effects on tidal dissipation should be considered.

  19. The effect of tides and an inner core on the forced longitudinal libration of Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Hoolst, Tim; Rivoldini, Attilio; Baland, Rose-Marie; Yseboodt, Marie

    2012-06-01

    Mercury's longitudinal libration at a period of 88 days depends on the moment of inertia of the planet's silicate outer part and as such contains information on the interior structure and composition of Mercury. Secondary effects on the libration may affect the interpretation of libration observations in terms of interior structure properties and may also provide further information on Mercury's interior. Here we assess the importance of the effects of tides and the existence of a solid inner core on the librations of Mercury with particular focus on the 88 days libration amplitude. Tides affect the librations of Mercury by changing the gravitational torque exerted by the Sun on Mercury and by changing the polar moment of inertia. We show that they slightly decrease the 88 days libration amplitude by about 1-2 m, which is below the current and future expected observational precision. We further demonstrate that the effect of an inner core on Mercury's 88 days libration amplitude is also below the observational precision for small inner cores, but could be observed if Mercury's inner core is larger than at least 1000 km. An inner core also changes considerably the free libration period by up to 25% if the inner core is very large. Besides giving information on the moment of inertia of the silicate shell, observations of Mercury's libration can therefore also yield information on the inner core.

  20. Re-examining Galileo's theory of tides.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmieri, P.

    1998-11-01

    This study expounds the model of the Earth tides by Galileo Galilei in all its amazing complexity by bringing to light its completely forgotten vision of the flux and reflux of the sea as a wave-like phenomenon and by reassessing Galileo's claim that this model was a physical proof of the double motion of the Earth as postulated by Copernicus, namely, its diurnal rotation about its polar axis and its annual revolution around the Sun. The study is organized in the chapters: (1) Galileo's tide-generating acceleration: the woad-grindstone model; composition of speeds and relativity; tide-generating acceleration as a historiographical stumbling block. (2) Newton's tide-generating force: Newton's dynamic model; asymmetric tide-generating force and asymmetric tide periods. (3) Galileo's oscillatory model: a simple oscillating system; the laws of basins and superposition of waves. (4) The "warping" of history: Galileo's claim that tides prove Copernicus; Galileo's notions on bodies that move around a centre; tide equations - the quasi-Galilean term; tides in a non-Newtonian universe. (5) Simulate the wind and the sea: comets and winds; rotating buckets and the terrestrial atmosphere; tide experiments - artificial vessels and tide-machines. (6) Celestial wheel clock: monthly and annual periodicities; the celestial balance-stick regulator. (7) Moon and waves: lunar trepidations and tides - a new research programme; a single great wave.

  1. Tides and Habitability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, R.

    2014-04-01

    The relatively low luminosities of M dwarfs, white dwarfs, and brown dwarfs result in habitable zones that are close enough in for strong tidal processes between the planet and its host to occur. As is well known, tidal despinning can result in slow or synchronous rotation for close-in planets, but recent investigations have revealed that tides impact habitability in other ways. Tides can drive planetary obliquity to 0, eliminating seasons and creating strong cold traps at the poles. Tides can force a migration of the semi-major axis, possibly removing planets from the habitable zone. Tidal despinning and orbital evolution produces internal heating that can alter both the interior and the atmosphere. For modest eccentricities, tidal heating can be comparable to the modern Earth's (non-tidal) energy sources, changing the thermal profile in the planet and possibly quenching dynamo generation. For larger eccentricities tidal heating can be orders of magnitude larger, suggesting some super-Earths are actually "super-Ios." In extreme cases tidal heating could trigger a runaway greenhouse for hundreds of millions of years, threatening permanent sterilization. Tides damp eccentricity, which lowers the heating rate, but companion planets can perturb orbits and maintain non-zero eccentricities. In some cases, tidal heating sustained by companions could power geochemical cycles that permit habitability for trillions of years.

  2. Effects of Neutron-Star Dynamic Tides on Gravitational Waveforms within the Effective-One-Body Approach.

    PubMed

    Hinderer, Tanja; Taracchini, Andrea; Foucart, Francois; Buonanno, Alessandra; Steinhoff, Jan; Duez, Matthew; Kidder, Lawrence E; Pfeiffer, Harald P; Scheel, Mark A; Szilagyi, Bela; Hotokezaka, Kenta; Kyutoku, Koutarou; Shibata, Masaru; Carpenter, Cory W

    2016-05-01

    Extracting the unique information on ultradense nuclear matter from the gravitational waves emitted by merging neutron-star binaries requires robust theoretical models of the signal. We develop a novel effective-one-body waveform model that includes, for the first time, dynamic (instead of only adiabatic) tides of the neutron star as well as the merger signal for neutron-star-black-hole binaries. We demonstrate the importance of the dynamic tides by comparing our model against new numerical-relativity simulations of nonspinning neutron-star-black-hole binaries spanning more than 24 gravitational-wave cycles, and to other existing numerical simulations for double neutron-star systems. Furthermore, we derive an effective description that makes explicit the dependence of matter effects on two key parameters: tidal deformability and fundamental oscillation frequency.

  3. Effects of Neutron-Star Dynamic Tides on Gravitational Waveforms within the Effective-One-Body Approach.

    PubMed

    Hinderer, Tanja; Taracchini, Andrea; Foucart, Francois; Buonanno, Alessandra; Steinhoff, Jan; Duez, Matthew; Kidder, Lawrence E; Pfeiffer, Harald P; Scheel, Mark A; Szilagyi, Bela; Hotokezaka, Kenta; Kyutoku, Koutarou; Shibata, Masaru; Carpenter, Cory W

    2016-05-01

    Extracting the unique information on ultradense nuclear matter from the gravitational waves emitted by merging neutron-star binaries requires robust theoretical models of the signal. We develop a novel effective-one-body waveform model that includes, for the first time, dynamic (instead of only adiabatic) tides of the neutron star as well as the merger signal for neutron-star-black-hole binaries. We demonstrate the importance of the dynamic tides by comparing our model against new numerical-relativity simulations of nonspinning neutron-star-black-hole binaries spanning more than 24 gravitational-wave cycles, and to other existing numerical simulations for double neutron-star systems. Furthermore, we derive an effective description that makes explicit the dependence of matter effects on two key parameters: tidal deformability and fundamental oscillation frequency. PMID:27203312

  4. Pattern formation in a spatial plant-wrack model with tide effect on the wrack.

    PubMed

    Sun, Gui-Quan; Li, Li; Jin, Zhen; Li, Bai-Lian

    2010-03-01

    Spatial patterns are a subfield of spatial ecology, and these patterns modify the temporal dynamics and stability properties of population densities at a range of spatial scales. Localized ecological interactions can generate striking large-scale spatial patterns in ecosystems through spatial self-organization. Possible mechanisms include oscillating consumer-resource interactions, localized disturbance-recovery processes, and scale-dependent feedback. However, in this paper, our main aim is to study the effect of tide on the pattern formation of a spatial plant-wrack model. We discuss the changes of the wavelength, wave speed, and the conditions of the spatial pattern formation, according to the dispersion relation formula. Both the mathematical analysis and numerical simulations reveal that the tide has great influence on the spatial pattern. More specifically, typical traveling spatial patterns can be obtained. Our obtained results are consistent with the previous observation that wracks exhibit traveling patterns, which is useful to help us better understand the dynamics of the real ecosystems.

  5. Internal tide oceanic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhongxiang

    2016-09-01

    A concept of internal tide oceanic tomography (ITOT) is proposed to monitor ocean warming on a global scale. ITOT is similar to acoustic tomography, but that work waves are internal tides. ITOT detects ocean temperature changes by precisely measuring travel time changes of long-range propagating internal tides. The underlying principle is that upper ocean warming strengthens ocean stratification and thus increases the propagation speed of internal tides. This concept is inspired by recent advances in observing internal tides by satellite altimetry. In particular, a plane wave fit method can separately resolve multiple internal tidal waves and thus accurately determines the phase of each wave. Two examples are presented to demonstrate the feasibility and usefulness of ITOT. In the eastern tropical Pacific, the yearly time series of travel time changes of the M2 internal tide is closely correlated with the El Niño-Southern Oscillation index. In the North Atlantic, significant interannual variations and bidecadal trends are observed and consistent with the changes in ocean heat content measured by Argo floats. ITOT offers a long-term, cost-effective, environmentally friendly technique for monitoring global ocean warming. Future work is needed to quantify the accuracy of this technique.

  6. [Allelopathic effects of Corallina pilulifera on red tide microalgae Heterosigma akashiwo].

    PubMed

    Wang, Ren-Jun; Tang, Xue-Xi; Sun, Jun-Hua

    2008-10-01

    Different concentration methanol-, acetone-, ether-, and chloroform extracts of Corallina pilulifera were used to study their growth inhibitory effects on red tide microalgae Heterosigma akashiwo. The results showed that methanol extract at relatively higher concentrations had the highest growth inhibitory activity and killed all H. akashiwo cells, while the other three kinds of organic solvent extracts had no apparent inhibitory effects, suggesting that the growth inhibitory substances in C. pilulifera had relatively high polarity. The methanol extract was partitioned to petroleum ether phase, ethyl acetate phase, butanol phase, and distilled water phase by liquid-liquid fractionation, and the bioassays on the activity of each fraction were carried out on H. akashiwo. It was found that petroleum ether phase and ethyl acetate phase had strong algicidal effects on H. akashiwo, suggesting that the fatty acids in C. pilulifera tissues might be one of the main allelochemicals.

  7. The dynamo of the diurnal tide and its effect on the thermospheric circulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayr, H. G.; Harris, I.; Herrero, F. A.

    1990-01-01

    A theoretical multiconstituent model (including O, N2, and O2) which describes the interactions between neutral winds, dynamo electric fields, and ion drifts is used to interpret observations that revealed a dominance of the fundamental diurnal tide in the upper thermosphere and at equatorial latitudes, and its effect on the thermospheric circulation. The model is shown to reproduce reasonably well the magnitudes of the neutral winds, ion drift velocities, and the ratio between the two. A solution for the neutral winds in which the dynamo electric field is forced to zero shows that the dynamo-induced ion drift is very important in accelerating the neutral atmosphere at higher altitudes. The dynamo interaction primarily affects the curl component of the field; its effect on the temperature and density perturbations is small.

  8. Pulsating Mantle Hypothesis "PMH" and its Applications on Apparent Solar Day Length Variations, Geodynamo and Plate Tectonics Theories, Tide, Earth's Axis Tilted and Earthquake Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gholibeigian, H.; Amirshakarami, A.

    2012-12-01

    In this hypothesis, two phenomena; Inner Core Dislocation (ICD) and Outer Core Bulge (OCB) have appeared inside the Earth due to unbalanced gravitational attraction of the Sun and the Moon, and consequently the mantle is under diurnal cyclic pulsating load by it. In the other words, the inner core's center and axis (Earth's magnetic axis) do not crossed or overlapped on the Earth's center and axis (geographic axis) and distance between these two centers vary permanently in magnitude and direction. See Fig 1,2. ( C is geo-center, C' is inner core's center and always CC'>>0 ). These two phenomena which have diurnal, monthly and yearly cycles, have generated hydro-magneto-thermo-mechanical load including high kinetic energy which produces forced convection system in the outer core and pressurizes the mantle from its bottom. In this paper, we briefly discuss the six scientific results and applications of the hypothesis which are derived from ICD&OCB 1- Cause of apparent solar day length variations, and its overlapping with ICD&OCB variations spectrum, Fig 2, as the first observable factor for proving the PMH. In this section we use data for apparent solar day length variations in year 1998, and Figure's sheet is the same equatorial sheet, minimum of length day is in September 16 which is 24h-21.3 sec., as we can see the length of the ICD&OCB's vector which is result of the Sun and Moon's gravity forces, is minimum but in Dec. 22 which length day is 24h+29 sec, its vector is bigger 2- Generation and diurnal variation of the Earth's magnetic field and its overlapping with ICD&OCB variation as the second observable factor for proving the PMH. In this section we develop the Geodynamo Theory. 3- The ICD&OCB as the main engine of the tectonic plate's motion is discussed. In this section we develop the Plate Tectonics Theory. 4- How four Earth's systems; ICD&OCB, Sun's thermal energy, Sun and Moon's gravity forces interact and work together for generation of tide. 5- Eight

  9. Environmental exposures to Florida red tides: Effects on emergency room respiratory diagnoses admissions.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, Barbara; Fleming, Lora E; Backer, Lorraine C; Bean, Judy A; Tamer, Robert; Kirkpatrick, Gary; Kane, Terrance; Wanner, Adam; Dalpra, Dana; Reich, Andrew; Baden, Daniel G

    2006-10-01

    Human exposure to Florida red tides formed by Karenia brevis, occurs from eating contaminated shellfish and inhaling aerosolized brevetoxins. Recent studies have documented acute symptom changes and pulmonary function responses after inhalation of the toxic aerosols, particularly among asthmatics. These findings suggest that there are increases in medical care facility visits for respiratory complaints and for exacerbations of underlying respiratory diseases associated with the occurrence of Florida red tides.This study examined whether the presence of a Florida red tide affected the rates of admission with a respiratory diagnosis to a hospital emergency room in Sarasota, FL. The rate of respiratory diagnoses admissions were compared for a 3-month time period when there was an onshore red tide in 2001 (red tide period) and during the same 3-month period in 2002 when no red tide bloom occurred (non-red tide period). There was no significant increase in the total number of respiratory admissions between the two time periods. However, there was a 19% increase in the rate of pneumonia cases diagnosed during the red tide period compared with the non-red tide period. We categorized home residence zip codes as coastal (within 1.6 km from the shore) or inland (>1.6 km from shore). Compared with the non-red tide period, the coastal residents had a significantly higher (54%) rate of respiratory diagnoses admissions than during the red tide period. We then divided the diagnoses into subcategories (i.e. pneumonia, bronchitis, asthma, and upper airway disease). When compared with the non-red tide period, the coastal zip codes had increases in the rates of admission of each of the subcategories during the red tide period (i.e. 31, 56, 44, and 64%, respectively). This increase was not observed seen in the inland zip codes.These results suggest that the healthcare community has a significant burden from patients, particularly those who live along the coast, needing emergency

  10. Environmental exposures to Florida red tides: Effects on emergency room respiratory diagnoses admissions.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, Barbara; Fleming, Lora E; Backer, Lorraine C; Bean, Judy A; Tamer, Robert; Kirkpatrick, Gary; Kane, Terrance; Wanner, Adam; Dalpra, Dana; Reich, Andrew; Baden, Daniel G

    2006-10-01

    Human exposure to Florida red tides formed by Karenia brevis, occurs from eating contaminated shellfish and inhaling aerosolized brevetoxins. Recent studies have documented acute symptom changes and pulmonary function responses after inhalation of the toxic aerosols, particularly among asthmatics. These findings suggest that there are increases in medical care facility visits for respiratory complaints and for exacerbations of underlying respiratory diseases associated with the occurrence of Florida red tides.This study examined whether the presence of a Florida red tide affected the rates of admission with a respiratory diagnosis to a hospital emergency room in Sarasota, FL. The rate of respiratory diagnoses admissions were compared for a 3-month time period when there was an onshore red tide in 2001 (red tide period) and during the same 3-month period in 2002 when no red tide bloom occurred (non-red tide period). There was no significant increase in the total number of respiratory admissions between the two time periods. However, there was a 19% increase in the rate of pneumonia cases diagnosed during the red tide period compared with the non-red tide period. We categorized home residence zip codes as coastal (within 1.6 km from the shore) or inland (>1.6 km from shore). Compared with the non-red tide period, the coastal residents had a significantly higher (54%) rate of respiratory diagnoses admissions than during the red tide period. We then divided the diagnoses into subcategories (i.e. pneumonia, bronchitis, asthma, and upper airway disease). When compared with the non-red tide period, the coastal zip codes had increases in the rates of admission of each of the subcategories during the red tide period (i.e. 31, 56, 44, and 64%, respectively). This increase was not observed seen in the inland zip codes.These results suggest that the healthcare community has a significant burden from patients, particularly those who live along the coast, needing emergency

  11. Analyze satellite-tracking laser data in order to study satellite ephemerides, solid-Earth and ocean tides and laser system performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaposchkin, E. M.

    1981-01-01

    The decrease in the semimajor axis of Lageos is considerably larger than expected. Gravitational effects, reference system effects, solar radiation pressure, Earth albedo pressure, neutral atmospheric drag, the Poynting Robertson Effect, and electrodynamic effects were used in explaining the observations. Quick look data provided are used to determine the Earth's polar motion and length of day. This process is routine, and provides these geophysical data every five days.

  12. Revisiting the pole tide for and from satellite altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, Shailen; Wahr, John; Beckley, Brian

    2015-12-01

    Satellite altimeter sea surface height observations include the geocentric displacements caused by the pole tide, namely the response of the solid Earth and oceans to polar motion. Most users of these data remove these effects using a model that was developed more than 20 years ago. We describe two improvements to the pole tide model for satellite altimeter measurements. Firstly, we recommend an approach that improves the model for the response of the oceans by including the effects of self-gravitation, loading, and mass conservation. Our recommended approach also specifically includes the previously ignored displacement of the solid Earth due to the load of the ocean response, and includes the effects of geocenter motion. Altogether, this improvement amplifies the modeled geocentric pole tide by 15 %, or up to 2 mm of sea surface height displacement. We validate this improvement using two decades of satellite altimeter measurements. Secondly, we recommend that the altimetry pole tide model exclude geocentric sea surface displacements resulting from the long-term drift in polar motion. The response to this particular component of polar motion requires a more rigorous approach than is used by conventional models. We show that erroneously including the response to this component of polar motion in the pole tide model impacts interpretation of regional sea level rise by ± 0.25 mm/year.

  13. Effects of Cd, Cu, Ni, and Zn on brown tide alga Aureococcus anophagefferens growth and metal accumulation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Axe, Lisa; Michalopoulou, Zoi-Heleni; Wei, Liping

    2012-01-01

    Trace metals play important roles in regulating phytoplankton growth and could influence algal bloom development. Laboratory studies were conducted to evaluate the influence of environmentally relevant concentrations of Cd, Cu, Ni, and Zn on Aureococcus anophagefferens bloom (brown tide) development. Results show that the elevated Ni(2+) concentrations, e.g. those of brown tide waters in the northeastern US, greatly stimulated A. anophagefferens growth (as compared to the control without Ni addition), yet, only low amounts of dissolved Ni were sequestered, thus leaving excessive Ni directly promoting A. anophagefferens blooms. The medium effective concentration EC(50) (Me(2+)) suggests A. anophagefferens has similar Cd sensitivity but much greater Cu tolerance as compared to cyanobacteria, as such, excessive Cu could indirectly promote A. anophagefferens blooms by inhibiting competitors such as Synechococcus sp. The effects of Ni and Cu promoting growth are consistent with the recent genomic study of this alga. In addition, Zn(2+) concentrations lower than those in brown tide waters enhance A. anophagefferens growth, but Zn sequestration in A. anophagefferens would not substantially reduce total dissolved Zn in these waters. Overall, this study, showing that excessive Cu and Ni likely promote brown tides, provides evidence for trace metal linkages in algal bloom development.

  14. Modelling the 2013 Typhoon Haiyan storm surge: Effect of waves, offshore winds, tide phase, and translation speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilgera, P. H. T.

    2015-12-01

    Super Typhoon Haiyan, with wind speeds exceeding 300 km h-1 (160 knots) generated a storm surge in San Pedro Bay reaching heights of more than 6m in Tacloban City. Delft Dashboard (DDB), an open-source standalone Matlab based graphical user interface linked to the FLOW and WAVE modeling software of Deltares, was used to develop a coupled flow and wave storm surge model to understand the Typhoon Haiyan storm surge development and propagation. Various experiments were designed to determine the effect of waves, the occurrence of offshore winds prior to the surge, tidal phase, and typhoon translation speed on the surge height. Wave coupling decreased the surge height by about 0.5m probably due to energy dissipation from white capping, bottom friction, and depth-induced breaking. Offshore-directed winds before the arrival of the storm eye resulted to receding of the water level in San Pedro and Cancabato Bay, corroborated by eyewitness and tide gauge data. The experiment wherein the offshore winds were removed resulted to no water receding and a surge with a smaller and gentler surge front, pointing to the importance of the initial water level drawdown in contributing to the destructive power of the wave front. With regard to tides, the effect in Tacloban was actually neither linear nor additive to the surge, with higher surge coincident to low tides and lower surge coincident to high tides. Lastly, the model run with typhoon having a slower translation speed than Haiyan was found to generate higher surges.

  15. Research on Earth's rotation and the effect of atmospheric pressure on vertical deformation and sea level variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wahr, John

    1993-01-01

    The work done under NASA grant NAG5-485 included modelling the deformation of the earth caused by variations in atmospheric pressure. The amount of deformation near coasts is sensitive to the nature of the oceanic response to the pressure. The PSMSL (Permanent Service for Mean Sea Level) data suggest the response is inverted barometer at periods greater than a couple months. Green's functions were constructed to describe the perturbation of the geoid caused by atmospheric and oceanic loading and by the accompanying load-induced deformation. It was found that perturbation of up to 2 cm are possible. Ice mass balance data was used for continental glaciers to look at the glacial contributions to time-dependent changes in polar motion, the lod, the earth's gravitational field, the position of the earth's center-of-mass, and global sea level. It was found that there can be lateral, non-hydrostatic structure inside the fluid core caused by gravitational forcing from the mantle, from the inner core, or from topography at the core/mantle or inner core/outer core boundaries. The nutational and tidal response of a non-hydrostatic earth with a solid inner core was modeled. Monthly, global tide gauge data from PSMSL was used to look at the 18.6-year ocean tide, the 14-month pole tide, the oceanic response to pressure, the linear trend and inter-annual variability in the earth's gravity field, the global sea level rise, and the effects of post glacial rebound. The effects of mantle anelasticity on nutations, earth tides, and tidal variation in the lod was modeled. Results of this model can be used with Crustal Dynamics observations to look at the anelastic dissipation and dispersion at tidal periods. The effects of surface topography on various components of crustal deformation was also modeled, and numerical models were developed of post glacial rebound.

  16. Research on Earth's rotation and the effect of atmospheric pressure on vertical deformation and sea level variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahr, John

    1993-03-01

    The work done under NASA grant NAG5-485 included modelling the deformation of the earth caused by variations in atmospheric pressure. The amount of deformation near coasts is sensitive to the nature of the oceanic response to the pressure. The PSMSL (Permanent Service for Mean Sea Level) data suggest the response is inverted barometer at periods greater than a couple months. Green's functions were constructed to describe the perturbation of the geoid caused by atmospheric and oceanic loading and by the accompanying load-induced deformation. It was found that perturbation of up to 2 cm are possible. Ice mass balance data was used for continental glaciers to look at the glacial contributions to time-dependent changes in polar motion, the lod, the earth's gravitational field, the position of the earth's center-of-mass, and global sea level. It was found that there can be lateral, non-hydrostatic structure inside the fluid core caused by gravitational forcing from the mantle, from the inner core, or from topography at the core/mantle or inner core/outer core boundaries. The nutational and tidal response of a non-hydrostatic earth with a solid inner core was modeled. Monthly, global tide gauge data from PSMSL was used to look at the 18.6-year ocean tide, the 14-month pole tide, the oceanic response to pressure, the linear trend and inter-annual variability in the earth's gravity field, the global sea level rise, and the effects of post glacial rebound. The effects of mantle anelasticity on nutations, earth tides, and tidal variation in the lod was modeled. Results of this model can be used with Crustal Dynamics observations to look at the anelastic dissipation and dispersion at tidal periods. The effects of surface topography on various components of crustal deformation was also modeled, and numerical models were developed of post glacial rebound.

  17. New ERP predictions based on (sub-)daily ocean tides from satellite altimetry data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madzak, Matthias; Böhm, Sigrid; Böhm, Johannes; Bosch, Wolfgang; Schuh, Harald

    2013-04-01

    A new model for Earth rotation variations based on ocean tide models is highly desirable in order to close the gap between geophysical Earth rotation models and geodetic observations. We have started a project, SPOT (Short Period Ocean Tidal variations in Earth Rotation), with the goal to develop a new model of short period Earth rotation variations based on one of the best currently available empirical ocean tide models obtained from satellite altimetry. We employ the EOT11a model which is an upgrade of EOT08a, developed at DGFI, Munich. As EOT11a does not provide the tidal current velocities which are fundamental contributors to Earth rotation excitation, the calculation of current velocities from the tidal elevations is one of three main areas of research in project SPOT. The second key aspect is the conversion from ocean tidal angular momentum to the corresponding ERP variations using state-of-the-art transfer functions. A peculiar innovation at this step will be to consider the Earth's response to ocean tidal loading based on a realistic Earth model, including an anelastic mantle. The third part of the project deals with the introduction of the effect of minor tides. Ocean tide models usually only provide major semi-diurnal and diurnal tidal terms and the minor tides have to be inferred through admittance assumptions. Within the proposed project, selected minor tidal terms and the corresponding ERP variations shall be derived directly from satellite altimetry data. We determine ocean tidal angular momentum of four diurnal and five sub-daily tides from EOT11a and apply the angular momentum approach to derive a new model of ocean tidal Earth rotation variations. This poster gives a detailed description of project SPOT as well as the status of work progress. First results are presented as well.

  18. Effect of Lunar Phases, Tides, and Wind Speed on the Abundance of Diptera Calliphoridae in a Mangrove Swamp.

    PubMed

    Batista-da-Silva, J A

    2014-02-01

    Abiotic factors, such as lunar phases and tides, have a significant effect on insect development. Reproduction and immature development are usually interlinked to these abiotic factors. The tide is at its highest levels at full moon or new moon, hindering the feeding of the immature or causing their drowning. The oviposition by adult females is also compromised on these days because much of the available food is submerged. Another important abiotic factor is the wind, which displaces odoriferous particles in the air. Wind speed and direction are important elements to indicate potential sources of food for insects. I report on the effects of lunar phases, tides, and wind speed on the Calliphoridae fauna in mangrove swamps. The different species collected were identified, and the predominant species in the area were quantified. A total of 1,710 flies were collected over a 1-year period. Six Calliphoridae flies, Chloroprocta idioidea (Robineau-Desvoidy), Chrysomya megacephala (Fabricius), Chrysomya albiceps (Wiedemann), Chrysomya putoria (Wiedemann), Cochliomyia macellaria (Fabricius), and Lucilia eximia (Wiedemann) were collected. Data indicated that lunar phases have a significant effect on the abundance of C. albiceps (r = 0.39, p < 0.01), and that the variation of the tides also affected the abundance of C. putoria (r = 0.40, p < 0.00), C. macellaria (r = 0.41, p < 0.00), and C. idioidea (r = 0.31, p < 0.04). The wind speed, however, did not affect these species.

  19. The effect of a liquid layer and tides on the longitudinal libration of Mercury and of large icy satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Hoolst, T.

    2012-09-01

    The gravitational forcing from a central primary body not only induces tides in secondary bodies in spinorbit resonance around the primary but also small periodic variations in the rotation rate, or forced longitudinal librations. In view of the recent observations of these librations and of the low-degree gravitational field for Mercury, we study the effect of tides and the existence of a solid inner core on the librations of Mercury, which is in a 3:2 spin-orbit resonance. We also theoretically estimate the amplitude of longitudinal librations of Titan and the Galilean satellites, satellites for which accurate rotation data is already available thanks to the Cassini mission or will be measured in the future by the JUICE mission to the Jupiter system, recently selected as the first L-class mission of the cosmic vision program of ESA. We show that observations of rotation data can yield important information on the interior structure.

  20. The human health effects of Florida red tide (FRT) blooms: an expanded analysis.

    PubMed

    Hoagland, Porter; Jin, Di; Beet, Andrew; Kirkpatrick, Barbara; Reich, Andrew; Ullmann, Steve; Fleming, Lora E; Kirkpatrick, Gary

    2014-07-01

    Human respiratory and digestive illnesses can be caused by exposures to brevetoxins from blooms of the marine alga Karenia brevis, also known as Florida red tide (FRT). K. brevis requires macro-nutrients to grow; although the sources of these nutrients have not been resolved completely, they are thought to originate both naturally and anthropogenically. The latter sources comprise atmospheric depositions, industrial effluents, land runoffs, or submerged groundwater discharges. To date, there has been only limited research on the extent of human health risks and economic impacts due to FRT. We hypothesized that FRT blooms were associated with increases in the numbers of emergency room visits and hospital inpatient admissions for both respiratory and digestive illnesses. We sought to estimate these relationships and to calculate the costs of associated adverse health impacts. We developed environmental exposure-response models to test the effects of FRT blooms on human health, using data from diverse sources. We estimated the FRT bloom-associated illness costs, using extant data and parameters from the literature. When controlling for resident population, a proxy for tourism, and seasonal and annual effects, we found that increases in respiratory and digestive illnesses can be explained by FRT blooms. Specifically, FRT blooms were associated with human health and economic effects in older cohorts (≥55 years of age) in six southwest Florida counties. Annual costs of illness ranged from $60,000 to $700,000 annually, but these costs could exceed $1.0 million per year for severe, long-lasting FRT blooms, such as the one that occurred during 2005. Assuming that the average annual illness costs of FRT blooms persist into the future, using a discount rate of 3%, the capitalized costs of future illnesses would range between $2 and 24 million.

  1. The human health effects of Florida red tide (FRT) blooms: an expanded analysis.

    PubMed

    Hoagland, Porter; Jin, Di; Beet, Andrew; Kirkpatrick, Barbara; Reich, Andrew; Ullmann, Steve; Fleming, Lora E; Kirkpatrick, Gary

    2014-07-01

    Human respiratory and digestive illnesses can be caused by exposures to brevetoxins from blooms of the marine alga Karenia brevis, also known as Florida red tide (FRT). K. brevis requires macro-nutrients to grow; although the sources of these nutrients have not been resolved completely, they are thought to originate both naturally and anthropogenically. The latter sources comprise atmospheric depositions, industrial effluents, land runoffs, or submerged groundwater discharges. To date, there has been only limited research on the extent of human health risks and economic impacts due to FRT. We hypothesized that FRT blooms were associated with increases in the numbers of emergency room visits and hospital inpatient admissions for both respiratory and digestive illnesses. We sought to estimate these relationships and to calculate the costs of associated adverse health impacts. We developed environmental exposure-response models to test the effects of FRT blooms on human health, using data from diverse sources. We estimated the FRT bloom-associated illness costs, using extant data and parameters from the literature. When controlling for resident population, a proxy for tourism, and seasonal and annual effects, we found that increases in respiratory and digestive illnesses can be explained by FRT blooms. Specifically, FRT blooms were associated with human health and economic effects in older cohorts (≥55 years of age) in six southwest Florida counties. Annual costs of illness ranged from $60,000 to $700,000 annually, but these costs could exceed $1.0 million per year for severe, long-lasting FRT blooms, such as the one that occurred during 2005. Assuming that the average annual illness costs of FRT blooms persist into the future, using a discount rate of 3%, the capitalized costs of future illnesses would range between $2 and 24 million. PMID:24727069

  2. Simulation of the effects of proposed tide gates on circulation, flushing, and water quality in residential canals, Cape Coral Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goodwin, Carl R.

    1991-01-01

    Decades of dredging and filling of Florida's low-lying coastal wetlands have produced thousands of miles of residential tidal canals and adjacent waterfront property. Typically, these canals are poorly flushed, and over time, accumulated organic-rich bottom materials, contribute to an increasingly severe degraded water quality. One-dimensional hydrodynamic and constituent-transport models were applied to two dead-end canal systems to determine the effects of canal system interconnection using tide gates on water circulation and constituent flushing. The model simulates existing and possible future circulation and flushing conditions in about 29 miles of the approximately 130 miles of tidally influenced canals in Cape Coral, located on the central west coast of peninsular Florida. Model results indicate that tidal water-level differences between the two canal systems can be converted to kinetic energy, in the form of increased water circulation, but the use of one-way tide gate interconnections. Computations show that construction of from one to four tide gates will cause replacement of a volume of water equivalent to the total volume of canals in both systems in 15 to 9 days, respectively. Because some canals flush faster than others, 47 and 21 percent of the original canal water will remain in both systems 50 days after start of operation of one and four tide gates, respectively. Some of the effects that such increased flushing are expected to have include reduced density stratification and associated dissolved-oxygen depletion in canal bottom waters, increased localized reaeration, and more efficient discharge of stormwater runoff entering the canals.

  3. Restoration and recovery of hurricane-damaged mangroves using the knickpoint retreat effect and tides as dredging tools.

    PubMed

    Bashan, Yoav; Moreno, Manuel; Salazar, Bernardo G; Alvarez, Leonardo

    2013-02-15

    In 2001, a hurricane moved a large sand dune, blocking the sole outlet channel of a mangrove. In the absence of daily tidal flow, the two ponds containing the mangrove vegetation evaporated, the secondary drainage channels were lost, and a salt crust formed on the bed of the ponds. The mangrove lost most of its trees and the remaining suffered from osmotic shock that led to defoliation. Restoration involved creating a knickpoint retreat (waterfall retreat effect) and tidal flow as a dredging mechanism to restore the outlet and form secondary channels in the ponds. During a very low tide, we deepened the mouth of the outlet channel by 1 m below high tide level to form a small waterfall when high tides receded. During successive tides, this one-step knickpoint deteriorated and formed a series of low rapids. With a steep gradient, the rapids retreated upstream into the ponds, first reopening the outlet channel and then carving new secondary channels in the pond mud flat. The excavation process of the outlet channel was repeated three times and was sufficient to effectively improve the hydrology of the entire pond system; allowing adequate flooding and draining of the mangrove ponds. Hydrology analysis tested by the Engelund-Hansen sediment transport formula established that the output of sediment from the ecosystem is greater than the input of sand into the mangroves. This is keeping the main channel continuously open. After eight years, tidal flow continues to keep the channels open; the salt crust has disappeared; the trees have recovered, and a large area of new vegetation has emerged.

  4. Restoration and recovery of hurricane-damaged mangroves using the knickpoint retreat effect and tides as dredging tools.

    PubMed

    Bashan, Yoav; Moreno, Manuel; Salazar, Bernardo G; Alvarez, Leonardo

    2013-02-15

    In 2001, a hurricane moved a large sand dune, blocking the sole outlet channel of a mangrove. In the absence of daily tidal flow, the two ponds containing the mangrove vegetation evaporated, the secondary drainage channels were lost, and a salt crust formed on the bed of the ponds. The mangrove lost most of its trees and the remaining suffered from osmotic shock that led to defoliation. Restoration involved creating a knickpoint retreat (waterfall retreat effect) and tidal flow as a dredging mechanism to restore the outlet and form secondary channels in the ponds. During a very low tide, we deepened the mouth of the outlet channel by 1 m below high tide level to form a small waterfall when high tides receded. During successive tides, this one-step knickpoint deteriorated and formed a series of low rapids. With a steep gradient, the rapids retreated upstream into the ponds, first reopening the outlet channel and then carving new secondary channels in the pond mud flat. The excavation process of the outlet channel was repeated three times and was sufficient to effectively improve the hydrology of the entire pond system; allowing adequate flooding and draining of the mangrove ponds. Hydrology analysis tested by the Engelund-Hansen sediment transport formula established that the output of sediment from the ecosystem is greater than the input of sand into the mangroves. This is keeping the main channel continuously open. After eight years, tidal flow continues to keep the channels open; the salt crust has disappeared; the trees have recovered, and a large area of new vegetation has emerged. PMID:23333638

  5. Tides and deltaic morphodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plink-Bjorklund, Piret

    2016-04-01

    Tide-dominated and tide-influenced deltas are not widely recognized in the ancient record, despite the numerous modern and Holocene examples, including eight of the twelve modern largest deltas in the world, like the Ganges-Brahmaputra, Amazon, Chang Jiang, and Irrawadi. Furthermore, tide-dominated or tide-influenced deltas are suggested to be more common in inner-shelf or embayment settings rather than close to or at a shelf edge, primarily because wave energy is expected to be higher and tidal energy lower in outer shelf and shelf-edge areas. Thus, most shelf-edge deltas are suggested to be fluvial or wave dominated. However, there are ancient examples of tide-influenced shelf-edge deltas, indicating that the controls on tidal morphodynamics in deltas are not yet well understood. This paper asks the following questions: (1) How do tides influence delta deposition, beyond creating recognizable tidal facies? (2) Does tidal reworking create specific geometries in delta clinoforms? (3) Does tidal reworking change progradation rates of deltas? (4) Is significant tidal reworking of deltas restricted to inner-shelf deltas only? (5) What are the conditions at which deltas may be tidally influenced or tide-dominated in outer-shelf areas or at the shelf edge? (6) What are the main morphodynamic controls on the degree of tidal reworking of deltas? The paper utilizes a dataset of multiple ancient and modern deltas, situated both on the shelf and shelf edge. We show that beyond the commonly recognized shore-perpendicular morphological features and the recognizable tidal facies, the main effects of tidal reworking of deltas are associated with delta clinoform morphology, morphodynamics of delta lobe switching, delta front progradation rates, and the nature of the delta plain. Strong tidal influence is here documented to promote subaqueous, rapid progradation of deltas, by efficiently removing sediment from river mouth and thus reducing mouth bar aggradation and fluvial delta

  6. Effects of Tide Stage on the Use of Salt Marshes by Wading Birds in Rhode Island

    EPA Science Inventory

    To determine how tide stage affects wading bird abundance, behavior, and foraging in three Narragansett Bay salt marshes (RI), we conducted surveys at 10-min intervals—across the full tidal range—during six days at each marsh in July/September of 2006. The wading bird community ...

  7. EVALUATION OF THE EFFECTS ON BENTHIC ORGANISMS FROM CLAY FLOCCULATION OF RED TIDE ORGANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evaluating the feasibility of controlling red tide using clay flocculation is part of an ECOHAB-funded project. One aspect for the feasibility and future application of clays is the determination of potential negative environmental impacts. The removal of toxin-containing dinofl...

  8. Europa Tide Movie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for Europa Tide Movie

    In this movie Europa is seen in a cutaway view through two cycles of its 3.5 day orbit about the giant planet Jupiter. Like Earth, Europa is thought to have an iron core, a rocky mantle and a surface ocean of salty water. Unlike on Earth, however, this ocean is deep enough to cover the whole moon, and being far from the sun, the ocean surface is globally frozen over. Europa's orbit is eccentric, which means as it travels around Jupiter, large tides, raised by Jupiter, rise and fall. Jupiter's position relative to Europa is also seen to librate, or wobble, with the same period. This tidal kneading causes frictional heating within Europa, much in the same way a paper clip bent back and forth can get hot to the touch, as illustrated by the red glow in the interior of Europa's rocky mantle and in the lower, warmer part of its ice shell. This tidal heating is what keeps Europa's ocean liquid and could prove critical to the survival of simple organisms within the ocean, if they exist.

  9. The effect of tides on sea ice, temperature and salinity fields in the Arctic Ocean on multi-decadal scales.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luneva, Maria; Harle, James; Holt, Jason; Aksenov, Yevgeny

    2014-05-01

    The effects of tides on the hydrographical fields and sea-ice on multi-decadal timescales (from 1978-2007) has been examined using a newly developed Arctic Ocean NEMO-shelf-ice coupled model of moderate (10-15km) resolution, which explicitly simulates tides and processes in the benthic boundary layer. The model realistically reproduces the tides, which can be extremely strong on the Arctic shelf, with amplitudes reaching 4.4m in the Hudson Strait, 2-3m in the White Sea and above 1m in the Canadian Archipelago. It also accurately predicts the sea ice volume trends over this period, when compared with PIOMAS results, and demonstrates a stronger reduction in ice volume (by ~15%) and extent (by ~5%) in comparison with simulations without tides. By including tides in the Arctic simulation we find: (i) a decrease in ice thickness from 0.1 to 1m in Central Arctic, and up to 2m in the Canadian Archipelago; (ii) ice melting and thinning is accompanied by an increase in average surface salinity by 2PSU and changes of river freshwater pathways; (iii) cooling of the upper 300m of the Arctic Ocean in comparison with non-tidal simulations. We hypothesize that tidal mixing and advection support the supply of heat from warm Atlantic waters through the strongly stratified halocline layer. It has been found that tidal effects on the water mass structure are regionally localised, but subsequent can be transported across the entire basin. We discuss the following physical mechanisms for tidal influence: (a) increased vertical mixing near the bottom layer and on the ice-ocean interface; (b) opening and closing of leads in the sea ice in summer time altering the solar radiation flux to water below, thus affecting the ocean heat content and amount of ice melt ; (c) opening and closing of leads in the sea ice during winter leading to an increase the heat loss from the ocean to atmosphere, with subsequent ice production and brine rejection; (d) increased mixing in the pycnocline and at the

  10. Partitions and vertical profiles of 9 endocrine disrupting chemicals in an estuarine environment: Effect of tide, particle size and salinity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lihua; Cheng, Qiao; Lin, Li; Wang, Xiaowei; Chen, Baowei; Luan, Tiangang; Tam, Nora F Y

    2016-04-01

    Phenolic endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in an estuarine water column in a depth profile of five water layers (0.05 D, 0.20 D, 0.60 D, 0.80 D and 0.90 D, D = Depth, 10.7 ± 0.7 m) and their corresponding environmental parameters (tide, salinity and particle size) were investigated over a year. Water sample from each layer was further separated into three fractions, which were dissolved, coarse (SPM-D, Φ ≥ 2.7 μm) and fine (SPM-F, 2.7 μm > Φ ≥ 0.7 μm) suspended particulate matters. Most of EDCs in the water column were presented in the dissolved fraction. Vertical profiles of salinity fluctuations showed that the upper water layer was most influenced by upstream flow. Estriol (E3), mestranol (Mes) and 17α-ethynylestradiol (EE2) concentrations were significantly higher in ebb tide than in flood tide, indicating that EDCs mainly came from terrestrial source, the upstream flow. Dissolved EDCs also exhibited high levels in the surface layer (0.05 D) due to the upstream source and atmosphere deposition, followed by the bottom layer (0.90 D) owing to the re-suspension of EDCs-containing sediment. Compared to the dissolved phase, the contents of BPA, Mes and EE2 in the solid phase were affected by particle size and exhibited a trend of SPM-F > SPM-D > sediment. On the other hand, the concentrations of octylphenol (OP) and t-nonylphenol (NP), the degradation products from common nonionic surfactants, in sediment were higher than those in suspended particles, and NP concentration was higher in flood tide than that in ebb tide. For both SPM-D and SPM-F, their corresponding EDCs concentrations were negatively related to SPM concentrations due to particle concentration effect (PCE). Owing to the "salting-out effect", salinity pushed EDCs from dissolved fraction to particulate or sedimentary phase.

  11. Partitions and vertical profiles of 9 endocrine disrupting chemicals in an estuarine environment: Effect of tide, particle size and salinity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lihua; Cheng, Qiao; Lin, Li; Wang, Xiaowei; Chen, Baowei; Luan, Tiangang; Tam, Nora F Y

    2016-04-01

    Phenolic endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in an estuarine water column in a depth profile of five water layers (0.05 D, 0.20 D, 0.60 D, 0.80 D and 0.90 D, D = Depth, 10.7 ± 0.7 m) and their corresponding environmental parameters (tide, salinity and particle size) were investigated over a year. Water sample from each layer was further separated into three fractions, which were dissolved, coarse (SPM-D, Φ ≥ 2.7 μm) and fine (SPM-F, 2.7 μm > Φ ≥ 0.7 μm) suspended particulate matters. Most of EDCs in the water column were presented in the dissolved fraction. Vertical profiles of salinity fluctuations showed that the upper water layer was most influenced by upstream flow. Estriol (E3), mestranol (Mes) and 17α-ethynylestradiol (EE2) concentrations were significantly higher in ebb tide than in flood tide, indicating that EDCs mainly came from terrestrial source, the upstream flow. Dissolved EDCs also exhibited high levels in the surface layer (0.05 D) due to the upstream source and atmosphere deposition, followed by the bottom layer (0.90 D) owing to the re-suspension of EDCs-containing sediment. Compared to the dissolved phase, the contents of BPA, Mes and EE2 in the solid phase were affected by particle size and exhibited a trend of SPM-F > SPM-D > sediment. On the other hand, the concentrations of octylphenol (OP) and t-nonylphenol (NP), the degradation products from common nonionic surfactants, in sediment were higher than those in suspended particles, and NP concentration was higher in flood tide than that in ebb tide. For both SPM-D and SPM-F, their corresponding EDCs concentrations were negatively related to SPM concentrations due to particle concentration effect (PCE). Owing to the "salting-out effect", salinity pushed EDCs from dissolved fraction to particulate or sedimentary phase. PMID:26736056

  12. Tropospheric tides from 80 to 400 km: Propagation, interannual variability, and solar cycle effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberheide, J.; Forbes, J. M.; HäUsler, K.; Wu, Q.; Bruinsma, S. L.

    2009-01-01

    Recent observations and model simulations demonstrate unequivocally that non-Sun-synchronous (nonmigrating) tides due to deep tropical convection produce large longitudinal and local time variations in bulk ionosphere-thermosphere-mesosphere properties. We thus stand at an exciting research frontier: understanding how persistent, large-scale tropospheric weather systems affect the geospace environment. Science challenge questions include: (1) How much of the tropospheric influence is due to tidal propagation directly into the upper thermosphere? (2) How large is the interannual and the solar cycle variability of the tides and what causes them? These questions are addressed using solar maximum to solar minimum tidal wind and temperature analyses from the Thermosphere Ionosphere Mesosphere Electrodynamics and Dynamics (TIMED) satellite in the mesosphere/lower thermosphere (MLT), and from the Challenging Minisatellite Payload (CHAMP) satellite at ˜400 km. A physics-based empirical fit model is used to connect the TIMED with the CHAMP tides, i.e., to close the "thermospheric gap" of current spaceborne observations. Temperature, density, and horizontal and vertical wind results are presented for the important diurnal, eastward, wave number 3 (DE3) tide and may be summarized as follows. (1) Upper thermospheric DE3 tidal winds and temperatures are fully attributable to troposphere forcing. (2) A quasi-2-year 15-20% amplitude modulation in the MLT is presumably caused by the QBO. No perceivable solar cycle dependence is found in the MLT region. DE3 amplitudes in the upper thermosphere can increase by a factor of 3 in the zonal wind, by ˜60% in temperature and by a factor of 5 in density, caused by reduced dissipation above 120 km during solar minimum.

  13. Tropospheric tides from 80 to 400 km: Propagation, interannual variability, and solar cycle effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberheide, J.; Forbes, J. M.; Häusler, K.; Wu, Q.; Bruinsma, S. L.

    2009-12-01

    Recent observations and model simulations demonstrate unequivocally that non-Sun-synchronous (nonmigrating) tides due to deep tropical convection produce large longitudinal and local time variations in bulk ionosphere-thermosphere-mesosphere properties. We thus stand at an exciting research frontier: understanding how persistent, large-scale tropospheric weather systems affect the geospace environment. Science challenge questions include: (1) How much of the tropospheric influence is due to tidal propagation directly into the upper thermosphere? (2) How large is the interannual and the solar cycle variability of the tides and what causes them? These questions are addressed using solar maximum to solar minimum tidal wind and temperature analyses from the Thermosphere Ionosphere Mesosphere Electrodynamics and Dynamics (TIMED) satellite in the mesosphere/lower thermosphere (MLT), and from the Challenging Minisatellite Payload (CHAMP) satellite at ˜400 km. A physics-based empirical fit model is used to connect the TIMED with the CHAMP tides, i.e., to close the “thermospheric gap” of current spaceborne observations. Temperature, density, and horizontal and vertical wind results are presented for the important diurnal, eastward, wave number 3 (DE3) tide and may be summarized as follows. (1) Upper thermospheric DE3 tidal winds and temperatures are fully attributable to troposphere forcing. (2) A quasi-2-year 15-20% amplitude modulation in the MLT is presumably caused by the QBO. No perceivable solar cycle dependence is found in the MLT region. DE3 amplitudes in the upper thermosphere can increase by a factor of 3 in the zonal wind, by ˜60% in temperature and by a factor of 5 in density, caused by reduced dissipation above 120 km during solar minimum.

  14. The effect of channel deepening on tides and storm surge: A case study of Wilmington, NC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Familkhalili, R.; Talke, S. A.

    2016-09-01

    In this study we investigate the hypothesis that increasing channel depth in estuaries can amplify both tides and storm surge by developing an idealized numerical model representing the 1888, 1975, and 2015 bathymetric conditions of the Cape Fear River Estuary, NC. Archival tide gauge data recovered from the U.S. National Archives indicates that mean tidal range in Wilmington has doubled to 1.55 m since the 1880s, with a much smaller increase of 0.07 m observed near the ocean boundary. These tidal changes are reproduced by simulating channel depths of 7 m (1888 condition) and 15.5 m (modern condition). Similarly, model sensitivity studies using idealized, parametric tropical cyclones suggest that the storm surge in the worst-case, CAT-5 event may have increased from 3.8 ± 0.25 m to 5.6 ± 0.6 m since the nineteenth century. The amplification in both tides and storm surge is influenced by reduced hydraulic drag caused by greater mean depths.

  15. Management and conservation of San Francisco Bay salt ponds: Effects of pond salinity, area, tide, and season on pacific flyway waterbirds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warnock, N.; Page, G.W.; Ruhlen, T.D.; Nur, N.; Takekawa, J.Y.; Hanson, J.T.

    2002-01-01

    Throughout the world, coastal salt ponds provide habitat for large numbers and diversities of waterbirds. San Francisco Bay contains the most important coastal salt pond complexes for waterbirds in the United States, supporting more than a million waterbirds through the year. As an initial step in attempting to understand how the anticipated conversion of salt ponds to tidal marsh might affect the Bay's bird populations, the number of birds using salt ponds on high and low tides was counted during the winter months of 1999/00 and 2000/01. Behavior and habitat use of birds in these ponds were assessed, and the effects of tide cycle, pond salinity, and pond area on bird use were examined. We recorded 75 species of waterbirds in surveys of salt ponds in the South Bay from September 1999 to February 2001, totaling over a million bird use days on high tide. Shorebirds and dabbling ducks were the most abundant groups of birds using the salt ponds. Waterbird numbers and diversity were significantly affected by the salinity of ponds in a non-linear fashion with lower numbers and diversity on the highest salinity ponds. With the exception of ducks and Eared Grebe (Podiceps nigricollis), tide height at the Bay significantly affected bird numbers in the salt ponds with ponds at high tides having higher numbers of birds than the same ponds on low tides. Considerable numbers of birds fed in the salt ponds on high and low tides, although this varied greatly by species. Habitat use varied by tide. Management recommendations include maintaining ponds of varying salinities and depths. Restoring salt ponds to tidal marsh should proceed with caution to avoid loss of waterbird diversity and numbers in San Francisco Bay.

  16. Allelopathic effects of macroalga Corallina pilulifera on the red-tide forming alga Heterosigma akashiwo under laboratory conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Renjun; Tang, Xuexi

    2016-03-01

    Over the past few years, harmful algal blooms (HABs), such as red tides, have been frequently observed in coastal zones worldwide. The natural allelopathic interactions among macroalgae and red tide microalgae can alter the structure and succession of aquatic ecosystems. We investigated the influence of four environmental factors (temperature, salinity, light, and pH) on the allelopathic effects of the macroalgae Corallina pilulifera on red-tide forming Heterosigma akashiwo under laboratory conditions. Each of the factors had four levels: temperature (15, 20, 25, and 30°C), salinity (10, 20, 30, and 40), light (20, 100, 200 and 400 μmol/(m2•s)), and pH (5.5, 7, 8.5, and 10. Two-factor experiments were designed for each two environmental factors, with six combination treatments (temperature-salinity, temperature-light, temperature-pH, salinity-light, salinity-pH, and light-pH). Results showed that the allelopathic effect was significantly influenced by temperature, salinity, light, and pH. As single factors, the low temperature (15°C), low salinity (10), high-intensity light (400 μmol/(m2•s)), and high pH (10) treatments substantially enhanced the allelopathic effect. The strongest allelopathic effect of C. pilulifera on H. akashiwo was observed under the following treatments: 15°C and salinity of 40, 25°C and pH 10, 25°C with medium- to high-intensity light at 200-400 μmol/(m 2 •s), 400 μmol/(m2•s) and salinity of 10, 400 μmol/(m2•s) and pH 10, and pH 10 with a salinity of 40.

  17. The magnetic tides of Honolulu

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Love, Jeffrey J.; Rigler, Erin Joshua

    2013-01-01

    We review the phenomenon of time-stationary, periodic quiet-time geomagnetic tides. These are generated by the ionospheric and oceanic dynamos, and, to a lesser-extent, by the quiet-time magnetosphere, and they are affected by currents induced in the Earth's electrically conducting interior. We examine historical time series of hourly magnetic-vector measurements made at the Honolulu observatory. We construct high-resolution, frequency-domain Lomb-periodogram and maximum-entropy power spectra that reveal a panorama of stationary harmonics across periods from 0.1 to 10000.0-d, including harmonics that result from amplitude and phase modulation. We identify solar-diurnal tides and their annual and solar-cycle sideband modulations, lunar semi-diurnal tides and their solar-diurnal sidebands, and tides due to precession of lunar eccentricity and nodes. We provide evidence that a method intended for separating the ionospheric and oceanic dynamo signals by midnight subsampling of observatory data time series is prone to frequency-domain aliasing. The tidal signals we summarize in this review can be used to test our fundamental understanding of the dynamics of the quiet-time ionosphere and magnetosphere, induction in the ocean and in the electrically conducting interior of the Earth, and they are useful for defining a quiet-time baseline against which magnetospheric-storm intensity is measured.

  18. The magnetic tides of Honolulu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Love, J. J.; Rigler, E. J.

    2013-12-01

    We review the phenomenon of time-stationary, periodic quiet-time geomagnetic tides. These are generated by the ionospheric and oceanic dynamos, and, to a lesser-extent, by the quiet-time magnetosphere, and they are affected by currents induced in the Earth's electrically conducting interior. We examine historical time series of hourly magnetic-vector measurements made at the Honolulu observatory. We construct high-resolution, frequency-domain Lomb-periodogram and maximum-entropy power spectra that reveal a panorama of stationary harmonics across periods from 0.1 to 10000.0-d, including harmonics that result from amplitude and phase modulation. We identify solar-diurnal tides and their annual and solar-cycle sideband modulations, lunar semi-diurnal tides and their solar-diurnal sidebands, and tides due to precession of lunar eccentricity and nodes. We provide evidence that a method intended for separating the ionospheric and oceanic dynamo signals by midnight subsampling of observatory data time series is prone to frequency-domain aliasing. The tidal signals we summarize in this review can be used to test our fundamental understanding of the dynamics of the quiet-time ionosphere and magnetosphere, induction in the ocean and in the electrically conducting interior of the Earth, and they are useful for defining a quiet-time baseline against which magnetospheric-storm intensity is measured.

  19. Altimetry, Orbits and Tides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colombo, O. L.

    1984-01-01

    The nature of the orbit error and its effect on the sea surface heights calculated with satellite altimetry are explained. The elementary concepts of celestial mechanics required to follow a general discussion of the problem are included. Consideration of errors in the orbits of satellites with precisely repeating ground tracks (SEASAT, TOPEX, ERS-1, POSEIDON, amongst past and future altimeter satellites) are detailed. The theoretical conclusions are illustrated with the numerical results of computer simulations. The nature of the errors in this type of orbits is such that this error can be filtered out by using height differences along repeating (overlapping) passes. This makes them particularly valuable for the study and monitoring of changes in the sea surface, such as tides. Elements of tidal theory, showing how these principles can be combined with those pertinent to the orbit error to make direct maps of the tides using altimetry are presented.

  20. Interconnection of the Electric Field of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer with the Lunar and Solar Tides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grunskaya, L. V.; Isakevich, V. V.; Efimov, V. V.; Zakirov, A. A.; Rubay, D. V.

    The work is connected with experimental study of predicted theoretical possible interconnection of electromagnetic fields with gravitational tide influence (in particular moon gravitational tides) [1]. The object of the investigations is electromagnetic field in the Earth - ionosphere resonator.Our world is non-linear. Attempts to analyze complex processes in which a lot of objects of the classical spectral analysis showed its insuffiency. Detection of influence on tide processes on the Earth electromagnetism require great time series (continuous registrations for a year) and they are not stationary time processes. Using classical spectral analysis in such situation firstly isn't legal and secondly, as it turned out, doesn't allow to detect for sure the influence of the gravitational moon tides on the electromagnetic fields. There was used a method of the analysis of the latent vectors of the time series covariance matrix for exposing influence of the moon tides on Ez. The method allows to distribute an experimental signal into non-correlated periodicities. The present method is effective just in the situation when energetical deposit because of possible influence of moon tides upon the electromagnetic fields is little.

  1. Influence of an Ultra Fast Kelvin Wave on the Migrating Diurnal Tide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, L. C.; Palo, S. E.; Liu, H.

    2008-12-01

    The migrating diurnal tide is one of the dominant dynamical features of the Earth's Mesosphere and Lower Thermosphere (MLT) region, particularly at low latitudes. While the long term evolution of the migrating diurnal tide is dependent primarily upon seasonal changes in the solar heating profile and the background atmosphere, short term fluctuations on the order of a few days have been observed, occurring at time scales too short to be explained by changes in solar heating. These short-term fluctuations are often manifested as a modulation of tidal amplitudes at frequencies corresponding to those of propagating planetary wave modes, suggesting that short term variability in the tide can be driven by nonlinear wave-wave interactions between the tide and various propagating planetary waves also present in the region. However, many questions still remain about the nature of such interactions. The conditions under which various planetary waves may or may not interact with the atmospheric tides, as well as the mechanisms and overall effects of a planetary wave / tidal interaction are still unclear. In this study, we explore the effect of ultra fast Kelvin waves (UFKWs) on the migrating diurnal tide. The UFKWs are eastward propagating disturbances that occur sporadically throughout the year in the low latitude MLT region where the migrating diurnal tide is large. The NCAR Thermosphere Ionosphere Mesosphere Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (TIME-GCM) is used to simulate a control case without a UFKW and cases in which a UFKW of various magnitudes is present. Use of a global circulation model in this way allows us to characterize the effects of UFKW on the migrating diurnal tide and to investigate the underlying physical processes responsible for the interactions. Initial studies have indicated the UFKW does clearly modulate the amplitude of the tidal parameters influencing the overall amplitude and spatial structure of the migrating diurnal tide.

  2. A survey of the theory of the Earth's rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cannon, W. H.

    1981-01-01

    The theory of the Earth's rotation and the geophysical phenomena affecting it is examined. First principles are reviewed and the problem of polar motion and UT1 variations is formulated in considerable generality and detail. The effects of Earth deformations and the solid Earth tides are analyzed.

  3. Evidence for Excitation of Polar Motion by Fortnightly Ocean Tides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, Richard S.; Hamdan, Kamal H.; Boggs, Dale H.

    1996-01-01

    The second-degree zonal tide raising potential, which is responsible for tidal changes in the Earth's rotation rate and length-of-day, is symmetric about the polar axis and hence can excite the Earth's polar motion only through its action upon nonaxisymmetric features of the Earth such as the oceans. Ocean tidal excitation of polar motion in the diurnal and semidiurnal tidal bands has been previously detected and examined. Here, the detection of ocean tidal excitation of polar motion in the long-period tidal band, specifically at the Mf' (13.63-day) and Mf (13.66-day) tidal frequencies, is reported. Spectra of the SPACE94 polar motion excitation series exhibit peaks at the prograde and retrograde fortnightly tidal periods. After removing effects of atmospheric wind and pressure changes, an empirical model for the effect of the fortnightly ocean tides upon polar motion excitation is obtained by least-squares fitting periodic terms at the Mf and Mf' tidal frequencies to the residual polar motion excitation series. The resulting empirical model is then compared with the predictions of two hydrodynamic ocean tide models.

  4. Effect of spring-neap tide and evaporation on the salt dynamics in estuarine marshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chenming; Shen, Chengji; Xin, Pei; Li, Ling

    2016-04-01

    Salt dynamics in estuarine tidal marshes are strongly associated with their intrinsic hydrological processes and ecological behaviors, which are not well understood. Numerical simulations were carried out to investigate the transport and distribution of pore-water and salt in a vertical cross section perpendicular to a tidal creek that subjects to spring-neap tide and evaporation. Vaporizing pore-water from the unsaturated soil surface with salt left in, the time-variant actual evaporation is affected by aerodynamic factors as well as soil conditions, including pore-water saturation, salinity and the thickness of salt precipitation above the soil surface (efflorescence). Different simulation cases were performed by adjusting the potential evaporation rate, tidal signals, marsh platform slope and soil properties. The simulation analysis indicates that, the tide-averaged soil salinity increases with the reduction of inundation period under a spring-neap tide cycle. As the salt accumulated by evaporation could leave soil from seepage back to seawater during ebbtide, the pore-water salinity at the surface within the tidal range remains below solubility. Coarse soils tend to have more intensified seepage flow and hence less pore-water salinity than fine soils. With the presence of hyper-saline soil and efflorescence, salt flat develops only in the area where capillary connection between evaporating surface and water table is maintained while tidal inundation absent. On the contrary, the supratidal marsh where hydrological connections are disrupted keeps a relatively low soil salinity (40-60 ppt) and pore-water saturation as evaporation remains low throughout the tidal cycles.

  5. Lunar Core and Tides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. G.; Boggs, D. H.; Ratcliff, J. T.

    2004-01-01

    Variations in rotation and orientation of the Moon are sensitive to solid-body tidal dissipation, dissipation due to relative motion at the fluid-core/solid-mantle boundary, and tidal Love number k2 [1,2]. There is weaker sensitivity to flattening of the core-mantle boundary (CMB) [2,3,4] and fluid core moment of inertia [1]. Accurate Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR) measurements of the distance from observatories on the Earth to four retroreflector arrays on the Moon are sensitive to lunar rotation and orientation variations and tidal displacements. Past solutions using the LLR data have given results for dissipation due to solid-body tides and fluid core [1] plus Love number [1-5]. Detection of CMB flattening, which in the past has been marginal but improving [3,4,5], now seems significant. Direct detection of the core moment has not yet been achieved.

  6. In vivo effects of brown tide on the feeding function of the gill of the northern quahog Mercenaria mercenaria (Bivalvia: Veneridae).

    PubMed

    Robbins, Heather M; Bricelj, V Monica; Ward, J Evan

    2010-08-01

    The in vivo response of adult northern quahogs, Mercenaria mercenaria, to Aureococcus anophagefferens (brown tide) at the level of the gill was determined using video-endoscopy. Feeding activity, particle-approach velocities, and ventral-groove-transport velocities were documented after the quahogs were exposed to Isochryis galbana (baseline observations) supplemented with either toxic or nontoxic A. anophagefferens at two bloom concentrations (8 x 10(5) or 2 x 10(6) cells ml(-1)). Externally, there was no evidence of adverse effects of brown tide on feeding, as siphons remained extended and dilated. Toxic brown tide at both concentrations elicited gill muscular contractions, intermittent cessation of water flow, and decreased particle loading within the pallial cavity. The 8 x 10(5) cell ml(-1) toxic treatment had no significant effect on approach velocities or ventral-groove-transport velocities after 2 h, although time-averaging showed significant reduction of the latter during the last 30 min of exposure. The higher concentration of toxic brown tide caused a significant decrease in these velocities after only 1 h. Nontoxic brown tide produced none of these effects. Thus, A. anophagefferens compromised quahog feeding by stimulating contractions of the branchial musculature and interfering with lateral and ventral groove ciliary beating. These effects were both time- and concentration-dependent and could be caused by either a dopaminergic or a serotonergic toxic factor.

  7. Microorganism dynamics during a rising tide: Disentangling effects of resuspension and mixing with offshore waters above an intertidal mudflat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guizien, Katell; Dupuy, Christine; Ory, Pascaline; Montanié, Hélène; Hartmann, Hans; Chatelain, Mathieu; Karpytchev, Mikhaïl

    2014-01-01

    Resuspension of microphytobenthic biomass that builds up during low tide has been acknowledged as a major driver of the highly productive food web of intertidal mudflats. Yet, little is known about the contribution to pelagic food web of the resuspension of other microorganisms such as viruses, picoeukaryotes, cyanobacteria, bacteria, nanoflagellates, and ciliates, living in biofilms associated with microphytobenthos and surficial sediment. In the present study, a novel approach that involves simultaneous Lagrangian and Eulerian surveys enabled to disentangle the effects of resuspension and mixing with offshore waters on the dynamics of water column microorganisms during a rising tide in the presence of waves. Temporal changes in the concentration of microorganisms present in the water column were recorded along a 3 km cross-shore transect and at a fixed subtidal location. In both surveys, physical and biological processes were separated by comparing the time-evolution of sedimentary particles and microorganism concentrations. During a rising tide, sediment erosion under wave action occurred over the lower and upper parts of the mudflat, where erodibility was highest. Although erosion was expected to enrich the water column with the most abundant benthic microorganisms, such as diatoms, bacteria and viruses, enrichment was only observed for nanoflagellates and ciliates. Grazing probably overwhelmed erosion transfer for diatoms and bacteria, while adsorption on clayed particles may have masked the expected water column enrichment in free viruses due to resuspension. Ciliate enrichment could not be attributed to resuspension as those organisms were absent from the sediment. Wave agitation during the water flow on the mudflat likely dispersed gregarious ciliates over the entire water column. During the rising tide, offshore waters imported more autotrophic, mainly cyanobacteria genus Synechococcus sp. than heterotrophic microorganisms, but this import was also heavily

  8. Improvement of ocean loading correction on gravity data with additional tide gauge measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumeyer, Juergen; del Pino, Jorge; Dierks, Olaf; Sun, He-Ping; Pflug, Hartmut

    2005-08-01

    Because a gravimeter records the sum of all gravity variations associated with mass redistribution in its near and far surrounding the investigation of a single special gravity effect (e.g. Earth tides or core modes) requires the reduction of all other effects from the data. In our study, we are dealing with the ocean loading effect. High-precision tidal gravity and atmospheric pressure observations are carried out at the station Rio Carpintero in combination with tide gauge measurements at the coast of Santiago de Cuba. The gravity data are subjected to atmospheric pressure and ocean loading corrections with different oceanic tidal models. In order to test the efficiency of the different ocean loading corrections the gravity data are analysed for various tidal waves and the determined Earth tide parameters are compared with model parameters. Additionally, tide gauge measurements are analysed and used for improving the ocean loading correction on gravity data. The results show that present-day global oceanic tidal models, e.g. NAO99b and FES2002 in combination with the ocean loading calculation program (LOAD97), are not sufficient for a complete correction of this effect. With our approach, the discrepancies between the observed Earth tide parameters and those from theoretical prediction for main waves in diurnal and semidiurnal tidal bands are further reduced when taking into account the tide gauge data recorded offshore. After additional removal of oceanic signals, based on the tide gauge data, the analysed Earth tide parameters are closer to the Wahr-Dehant model. The improvement is up to 4% and the noise is reduced from 20 nm/s 2 to 10 nm/s 2 within the examined period range of 10-1500 min. Therefore, high-precision gravity measurements (e.g. with Superconducting Gravimeters), especially for stations near the coastal lines, should take into account tide gauge measurements for the ocean loading correction. With improved ocean loading correction and reduced noise

  9. Effects of tides on the quasi-steady upwelling-downwelling regimes and water mass exchange between the Arctic and Atlantic Oceans.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luneva, Maria; Harle, James

    2016-04-01

    Astronomical tides are strong in the regions of the Arctic shelf and GIN Seas, with amplitudes reaching up to 4.4m in the Hudson Strait, 2-3m in the White Sea and greater than 1m in the Canadian Archipelago. If nonlinear friction is present, at the sea bed or within a stratification water column, periodical motions transfer energy to shear stresses with a substantial non-periodic component. Over bottom topography, anomalous bottom shear stress generates vorticity and vertical motions, resulting in either an ageostrophic circulation or geostrophic upwelling/downwelling of isopycnals. Using a pan-Arctic and a North Atlantic ocean-ice model, both of which explicitly resolve tides, we examine the effects of tides on the vertical motions generated by Ekman pumping near the sea bed and at the ice-ocean interface, and the stretching and tilting of vorticity. We found that tides significantly increase the intensity of vertical upwellings and downwelling regimes near the shelf break. We extend the semi-geostrophic two dimensional Eliassen -Sawyer equation and three-dimensional omega-equation to take into account the effects of tides. We also discuss the application of the equations for the analysis of watermass transformations and dense water overflow in the main gateways between the Atlantic and Arctic Oceans : Fram Strait, Yermak Plateau, Barents Sea shelf break, Denmark Strait and Faroe Channel.

  10. Stratospheric Sudden Warming Effects on the Ionospheric Migrating Tides during 2008-2010 observed by FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, J.; Lin, C.; Chang, L. C.; Liu, H.; Chen, W.; Chen, C.; Liu, J. G.

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, ionospheric electron densities obtained from radio occultation soundings of FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC are decomposed into their various constituent tidal components for studying the stratospheric sudden warming (SSW) effects on the ionosphere during 2008-2010. The tidal analysis indicates that the amplitudes of the zonal mean and major migrating tidal components (DW1, SW2 and TW3) decrease around the time of the SSW, with phase/time shifts in the daily time of maximum around EIA and middle latitudes. Meanwhile consistent enhancements of the SW2 and nonmigrating SW1 tides are seen after the stratospheric temperature increase. In addition to the amplitude changes of the tidal components, well matched phase shifts of the ionospheric migrating tides and the stratospheric temperatures are found for the three SSW events, suggesting a good indicator of the ionospheric response. Although the conditions of the planetary waves and the mean winds in the middle atmosphere region during the 2008-2010 SSW events may be different, similar variations of the ionospheric tidal components and their associated phase shifts are found. Futher, these ionospheric responses will be compared with realistic simulations of Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesophere-Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (TIME-GCM) by nudging Modern-Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) data.

  11. The effect of tides and eddies on the hydrophysical fields in the NEMO-shelf Arctic Ocean model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luneva, M. V.

    2012-04-01

    We present the results of the coupled ocean-ice NEMO-shelf pan-Arctic model, which is still under development. The model has generalized s-z partial step vertical coordinates and horizontal resolutions of 1/16o and 1/32o in the rotated system of coordinates. The model explicitly resolves tides (8 tidal harmonics), has advanced vertical mixing schemes (generalized length scale turbulence closure model) and monotonic, low diffusive Piecewise Parabolic Method for vertical advection. The model reasonably reproduces tidal dynamics, ice formation. We examine the following effects of tides on the low -frequency components of hydro-physical fields : tidal Reynolds stresses, bottom shear stresses , lateral and vertical salt and heat fluxes. We have found, that the effects of advection (tidal Reynolds stresses) on the slow varying component of currents are relatively small. The additional component of bottom shear stresses, induced by tides, strongly affects the low-frequency component of currents on the shelves and shelf breaks. These effects can be considered as additional "tidal bottom wind shear " stresses, which act as an external forcing, driving the current, rather than damping it. As the typical spatial length-scales of tidal currents variability is much smaller than atmospheric wind length scales , these "tidal wind stresses" create very strong bottom Ekman pumping, reaching magnitudes of 0.1 -1 mm/s for monthly averages. The important features of the Arctic ocean circulation are narrow jets, following along the bottom topography slopes (topostrophic currents). These currents are assumed to be eddy-driven ("Neptune effect"). Traditionally, topostrophic currents are assumed to be proportional to local topography slope and dependent on one empirical length scale parameter. Idealised theory, developed for the Zapiola Anticyclone in a tropical region predicts that these strong , nearly barotropic currents , following bottom topography contours, are driven by the

  12. The ultimate high tide

    SciTech Connect

    Dean, R.G. )

    1990-01-01

    This paper discusses the possible coastal impacts of a rise in sea level. Control measures that are available to coastal communities are emphasized, including pumping of seawater into the ground, replenishing beach sand, protection or moving of potable-water intakes, elevating roadways, and building dikes. Economics will determine which, if any, measures are reasonable at a particular site. There is an upward trend in the mean CO{sub 2} concentration and predictions about the greenhouse effect are creating a rising tide of concern.

  13. Tides and Modern Geodesy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Richard D.; Chao, Benjamin F. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In modem high-precision geodesy, and especially in modem space geodesy, every measurement that one makes contains tidal signals. Generally these signals are considered noise and must somehow be eliminated. The stringent requirements of the latest space geodetic missions place severe demands on tidal models. On the other hand, these missions provide the strongest data for improving tidal models. In particular, TOPEX/POSEIDON altimetry and LAGEOS laser ranging have improved models to such an extent that new geophysical information about the ocean and the solid Earth are coming to light. Presumably GRACE intersatellite ranging data will also add to this information. This paper discusses several of these new geophysical results, with special emphasis given to the dissipation of tidal energy. Strong constraints have recently been placed on the partitioning of energy dissipation among the ocean, atmosphere, and solid earth and between the deep and shallow ocean. The dissipation in deep water is associated with internal tides and has potentially important implications for understanding the ocean's thermohaline circulation.

  14. Long-term equilibrium tides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaffer, John A.; Cerveny, Randall S.

    1998-08-01

    Extreme equilibrium tides, or ``hypertides,'' are computed in a new equilibrium tidal model combining algorithms of a version of the Chapront ELP-2000/82 Lunar Theory with the BER78 Milankovitch astronomical expansions. For the recent past, a high correspondence exists between computed semidiurnal tide levels and a record of coastal flooding demonstrating that astronomical alignment is a potential influence on such flooding. For the Holocene and near future, maximum tides demonstrate cyclic variations with peaks at near 5000 B.P. and 4000 A.P. On the late Quaternary timescale, variations in maximum equilibrium tide level display oscillations with periods of approximately 10,000, 100,000 and 400,000 years, because of precessional shifts in tidal maxima between vernal and autumnal equinoxes. While flooding occurs under the combined effects of tides and storms via ``storm surges,'' the most extensive flooding will occur with the coincidence of storms and the rarer hypertides and is thus primarily influenced by hypertides. Therefore we suggest that astronomical alignment's relationship to coastal flooding is probabilistic rather than deterministic. Data derived from this model are applicable to (1) archaeological and paleoclimatic coastal reconstructions, (2) long-term planning, for example, radioactive waste site selection, (3) sealevel change and paleoestuarine studies or (4) ocean-meteorological interactions.

  15. Solar Cycle Variability in Mean Thermospheric Composition and Temperature Induced by Atmospheric Tides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, M., Jr.; Forbes, J. M.; Hagan, M. E.

    2015-12-01

    Vertically-propagating atmospheric thermal tides whose origins lie in Earth's lower atmosphere are now widely recognized as one of the dominant "meteorological" drivers of space weather. Many prior research efforts have focused on documenting and understanding the role that dissipating tides play in determining the longitudinal and seasonal variability associated with lower thermospheric winds, temperature, and constituent densities. However, considerably less attention has focused on understanding the potential solar cycle variability in the mean thermospheric state induced by the tides. In this paper we utilize the National Center for Atmospheric Research Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (TIE-GCM), forced with observationally-based tides at the model lower boundary from the Climatological Tidal Model of the Thermosphere (CTMT, from Oberheide et al. [2011]), to elucidate how the dissipating tides induce variations of up to 30 K in the zonal-mean thermosphere temperature between solar minimum and maximum. Numerical experiments are performed for the month of September and for solar minimum, medium, and maximum conditions in order to quantify the solar cycle variability associated with the different terms in the thermodynamic energy, major and minor neutral constituent continuity equations. Our analysis indicates that solar cycle variability in neutral temperatures results from a combination of net eddy heat transport effects and tidal modulation of net nitric oxide (NO) cooling. The chemical and dynamical pathways through which dissipating tides affect mean NO cooling differently at solar minimum and maximum are diagnosed.

  16. Stratospheric Tides and Data Assimilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swinbank, R.; Orris, R. L.; Wu, D. L.

    1999-01-01

    In the upper stratosphere, the atmosphere exhibits significant diurnal and semi-diurnal tidal variations, with typical amplitude of about 2K in mid-latitudes. In this paper we examine how well the tidal variations in temperature are represented by the Goddard Geodesic Earth Orbiting Satellite (GEOS-2) data assimilation system. We show that the GEOS-2 atmospheric model is quite successful at simulating the tidal temperature variations. However, the assimilation of satellite temperature soundings significantly damps the simulated tides. The reason is because the tides are not well represented by the satellite retrievals used by the assimilation system (which have a typical tidal amplitude of around 1K). As a result of this study, we suggest improvements that should be made to the treatment of satellite soundings by the assimilation system.

  17. Tides and Trends in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fincher, Cameron

    This paper examines changes in American higher education, using the metaphor of ocean tides. The tides of change in the 1980s included public demands for assessment and accountability; fairness and credibility in advantages and benefits; improved quality of education; effectiveness and efficiency; assurance that college graduates were personally…

  18. The magnetic tides of Honolulu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Love, Jeffrey J.; Rigler, E. Joshua

    2014-06-01

    We review and analyse the phenomenon of time-invariant, periodic geomagnetic tides. These are generated by the deterministic physics of the ionospheric and oceanic dynamos, and, to a lesser extent, by the solar-quiet magnetosphere, and they are affected by currents induced in the Earth's electrically conducting interior. Using a long historical time-series of hourly magnetic vector measurements made at the Honolulu observatory, we construct high-resolution, frequency-domain power spectra across periods from 0.1 to 10 000.0 d using maximum-entropy and Lomb periodogram algorithms. Recognizing that harmonics corresponding to fundamental forcing periods can, themselves, have amplitude and phase modulation driven by other forcing harmonics, we identify solar-diurnal tides and their annual and solar-cycle sideband modulations, lunar semidiurnal tides and their solar-diurnal sidebands, and tides due to precession of lunar eccentricity and nodes. In contrast to reports by other investigators, we cannot identify tidal signals that might be related to the 22-yr Hale cycle, the Chandler wobble and the quasi-biennial oscillation. Using a least-squares algorithm to estimate the amplitudes and phases of individual tidal constituents, we construct synthetic model time-series that are representative of geomagnetic tidal variation. The signals summarized in this report can be used to test fundamental understanding of the dynamics of the solar-quiet ionosphere and magnetosphere, the ocean and the electrically conducting interior of the Earth, and they can be used to specify a quiet-time baseline against which magnetospheric storm disturbance can be measured.

  19. Investigation on empirical estimation of minor tides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosch, Wolfgang; Madzak, Matthias; Hagedorn, Jan; Schuh, Harald; Böhm, Sigrid

    2014-05-01

    In general recent global ocean tide models provide tidal constants for the most dominant semi-diurnal, diurnal, selected shallow water and some long period tides, typically M2, N2, N2 , K2, 2N2, O1 , P1 , Q1 , K1, S1, M4, Mf and Mm. Contributions of minor tidal terms and modulations of the main terms are in general considered by inferring admittance assumptions and nodal corrections. The rather new hydrodynamic model FES2012 extends this list and now provides additional tables for tidal constants for some 18 complementary minor tides. We investigate here if the long time series of precise multi-mission altimeter data (e.g. on the repeated ground tracks of TOPEX/Jason1/Jason2) allows a robust empirical estimation of those minor tides which appear to be (after the major tides listed above) the next dominant tidal waves. Candidate minor tidal waves are M1, J1, σ1, ν2, L2, T2, μ2. Can these partial tides empirically separated from tides with adjacent frequencies (e.g. μ2 versus 2N2 or T2 versus S2)? How do the tidal constant for those minor tides compare with those of the hydrodynamic model FES2012? What are the quantitative differences between applying admittance theory and using the tidal constants derived empirically? These investigations are performed in the context of the SPOT-project, aiming to improve the transfer function from ocean tide angular momentum to Earth rotation parameters, the variations of polar motion and LOD.

  20. Influence of temperature variations on the noise level of the data of the LaCoste and Romberg Earth tide gravity meter ET18

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegewald, Anne; Jentzsch, Gerhard; Jahr, Thomas

    2011-04-01

    Gravity records include a wide spectrum of signals based on mass changes in the Earth's crust. Today, the detectable amplitudes of the signals of interest become smaller and smaller (e.g., hydrological effects). From this it follows that the accuracy and resolution of measurements must be very high and the noise level as low as possible. In this study, the influence of the temperature variations as noise signal in the gravity records was investigated. Therefore, two 215 day time series of the LaCoste and Romberg gravity meter ET18 in the broadband Geodynamical Observatory Moxa were analyzed and compared. Each time series was recorded in another room. The first room is characterized by a temperature variation of ±4°C per year. The second room has a constant temperature of 19°C. As reference data, the parallel recorded time series of the superconducting gravity meter (SG) CD-034, installed in the temperature-stabilized room were used. The result of this study shows a clear influence of temperature variation on the noise level in the spectra of the ET18 compared to the SG spectra. Depending on the frequency ranges, the ratios of the noise levels of the ET18 and SG spectra are between 2 and 5. In the frequency range up to 0.01 cph the ET18/SG factor is 2, between 0.01 cph and 0.09 cph the factor is 3, and above 0.09 cph the factor is 5.

  1. Tides at the east coast of Lanzarote Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benavent, M.; Arnoso, J.; Vélez, E. J.

    2012-04-01

    The main goal of this work is the study of the ocean tides at the east coast of Lanzarote (Canary Islands). We have analyzed time series of tide gauge and bottom pressure observations available in the region and we have made a further comparative validation with recent global and local ocean tide models. Lanzarote island shows singular features, with regard its volcanic structure and geomorphological properties and, also, concerning the characteristics of the ocean tides in the surrounding waters. For this reason, this region experiences a great interest in Geodesy and Geodynamics. Particularly, an accurate modelization of the ocean tides is of great importance to correct with high accuracy the effect of the ocean over the multiple geodetic measurements that are being carried out in the Geodynamic Laboratory of Lanzarote, LGL (Vieira et al., 1991; 2006). Furthermore, the analysis of tide gauge and bottom pressure records in this area is of great importance to investigate sea level variations, to evaluate and quantify the causes of these changes and the possible correlation with vertical movements of the Earth's crust. The time series of sea level and bottom pressure data considered in this work are obtained at two different locations of the island and, in each of them, using several sensors at different periods of time. First location is Jameos del Agua (JA) station, which belongs to the LGL. This station is placed in the open ocean, 200 meters distant from the northeastern coast of the island and at 8 meters depth. The observations have been carried out using 3 bottom pressure sensors (Aanderaa WLR7, SAIV TD301A and Aqualogger 210PT) at different periods of time (spanning a total of six years). Second location is Arrecife (AR) station, which is 23 km south of JA station. In this case, the sea level data come from a float tide gauge belonging to the Instituto Español de Oceanografía, installed at the beginning of the loading bay, and a radar tide gauge from the

  2. [Synergistic effects of low temperature in winter and ebb tide at night on Sonneratia apetala seedlings growth and key eco-physiological traits].

    PubMed

    Chen, Lu-Zhen; Du, Xiao-Na; Lu, Luan-Mei; Zheng, Shi-Jie; Yang, Sheng-Chang

    2012-04-01

    By setting up a set of simulated tidal systems with different air- and water temperature and tidal flood conditions, this paper studied the synergistic effects of low temperature in winter and ebb tide at night on the growth and key eco-physiological traits of Sonneratia apetala seedlings. Low air temperature depressed the seedlings growth, but the reduction in the seedling height and basal stem diameter was compensated 41.2% and 44.6%, respectively by a 5 degrees C increase of water temperature. Low air temperature (15 degrees C) reduced the leaf Fv/Fm significantly, indicating a dramatic reduction in the leaf photosynthetic capacity, whereas the flooded tide with higher water temperature could not compensate this damage. The flooded tide with high air temperature increased the proline and soluble sugar contents in mature leaves, which could protect the mature leaves from cold damage. When extreme cold events occurred, the flooded tide at night worked as a heat storage medium, which alleviated the cold damage on the seedlings growth and leaf physiological traits, and promoted the survival rate of S. apetala seedlings.

  3. Red Tide Strands South African Rock Lobsters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Although some red tides form a healthy part of phytoplankton production, recurrent harmful or toxic blooms also occur, with results depending upon the type of plankton and on atmospheric and oceanic conditions. At Elands Bay in South Africa's Western Cape province, about 1000 tons of rock lobsters beached themselves during February 2002, when the decay of dense blooms of phytoplankton caused a rapid reduction in the oxygen concentration of nearshore waters. The lobsters (or crayfish, as they are known locally) moved toward the breaking surf in search of oxygen, but were stranded by the retreating tide.

    The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer's nadir camera acquired these red, green, blue composites on February 2 and 18, 2002, during Terra orbits 11315 and 11548. The colors have been accentuated to highlight the bloom, and land and water have been enhanced separately. The two views show the shoreward migration of the algal bloom. Each image represents an area of about 205 kilometers x 330 kilometers. Elands Bay is situated near the mouth of the Doring River, about 75 kilometers northeast of the jutting Cape Columbine.

    The term 'red tide' is used to refer to a number of different types of phytoplankton blooms of various hues. The wine color of certain parts of this bloom are consistent with the ciliate species Mesodinium rubrum, which has been associated with recurring harmful algal blooms along the Western Cape coast. Under these conditions, the lobsters are not poisoned. During the recent event, government and military staff transported as many of the living lobsters as possible to areas that were less affected by the red tide. At the same time, people came from across South Africa to gather the undersized creatures for food. The effects of the losses on the maritime economy are expected to be felt over the next few years.

    MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Earth Science, Washington

  4. Red Tide Strands South African Rock Lobsters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Although some red tides form a healthy part of phytoplankton production, recurrent harmful or toxic blooms also occur, with results depending upon the type of plankton and on atmospheric and oceanic conditions. At Elands Bay in South Africa's Western Cape province, about 1000 tons of rock lobsters beached themselves during February 2002, when the decay of dense blooms of phytoplankton caused a rapid reduction in the oxygen concentration of nearshore waters. The lobsters (or crayfish, as they are known locally) moved toward the breaking surf in search of oxygen, but were stranded by the retreating tide. The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer's nadir camera acquired these red, green, blue composites on February 2 and 18, 2002, during Terra orbits 11315 and 11548. The colors have been accentuated to highlight the bloom, and land and water have been enhanced separately. The two views show the shoreward migration of the algal bloom. Each image represents an area of about 205 kilometers x 330 kilometers. Elands Bay is situated near the mouth of the Doring River, about 75 kilometers northeast of the jutting Cape Columbine. The term 'red tide' is used to refer to a number of different types of phytoplankton blooms of various hues. The wine color of certain parts of this bloom are consistent with the ciliate species Mesodinium rubrum, which has been associated with recurring harmful algal blooms along the Western Cape coast. Under these conditions, the lobsters are not poisoned. During the recent event, government and military staff transported as many of the living lobsters as possible to areas that were less affected by the red tide. At the same time, people came from across South Africa to gather the undersized creatures for food. The effects of the losses on the maritime economy are expected to be felt over the next few years. MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Earth Science, Washington, DC. The Terra

  5. A Modeling Study of the Effect of Tide Energy Extraction on Estuarine Circulation and Its Implication on Water Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, T.; Yang, Z.; Copping, A. E.

    2011-12-01

    The growing interest in harnessing tidal energy has raised concerns about the impact of energy extraction on water circulation, and the implication those changes can have on water quality and the marine food web. There are few direct observations of the effect of energy extraction on ecosystems; however our understanding of the magnitude and importance of these effects can be enhanced through numerical analysis at the appropriate temporal and spatial scales This paper presents a numerical modeling study to simulate in-stream tidal energy extraction and assess its effect on the circulation and mixing in a tide-dominated estuary using a three-dimensional (3D) unstructured grid finite volume coastal ocean model. A tidal turbine module is incorporated into the hydrodynamic model using a momentum source/sink approach. The tidal turbine module is applied to simulate the tidal energy extraction in an idealized tidal system. A series of numerical experiments are carried out to assess the effect of tidal energy extraction on volume flux, vertical velocity structure, and flushing time within the system. The implication of changes in physical processes due to tidal energy extraction on water quality is also discussed, including changes in dissolved oxygen, nutrients and chlorophyll.

  6. A model of the Earth's Dole effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Georg; Cuntz, Matthias; Weber, Christine; Ciais, Philippe; Friedlingstein, Pierre; Heimann, Martin; Jouzel, Jean; Kaduk, JöRg; Maier-Reimer, Ernst; Seibt, Ulrike; Six, Katharina

    2004-03-01

    The Earth's Dole effect describes the isotopic 18O/16O-enrichment of atmospheric oxygen with respect to ocean water, amounting under today's conditions to 23.5‰. We have developed a model of the Earth's Dole effect by combining the results of three-dimensional models of the oceanic and terrestrial carbon and oxygen cycles with results of atmospheric general circulation models (AGCMs) with built-in water isotope diagnostics. We obtain a range from 22.4‰ to 23.3‰ for the isotopic enrichment of atmospheric oxygen. We estimate a stronger contribution to the global Dole effect by the terrestrial relative to the marine biosphere in contrast to previous studies. This is primarily caused by a modeled high leaf water enrichment of 5-6‰. Leaf water enrichment rises by ˜1‰ to 6-7‰ when we use it to fit the observed 23.5‰ of the global Dole effect. The present model is designed to be utilized in forthcoming paleo studies allowing a quantitative analysis of long-term observations from polar ice cores.

  7. Tide operated power generating apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Kertzman, H. Z.

    1981-02-03

    An improved tide operated power generating apparatus is disclosed in which a hollow float, rising and falling with the ocean tide, transmits energy to a power generator. The improvement comprises means for filling the float with water during the incoming tide to provide a substantial increase in the float dead weight during the outgoing tide. Means are further provided to then empty the float before the outgoing tide whereby the float becomes free to rise again on the next incoming tide.

  8. High precision tide spectroscopy. [using the superconducting gravimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodkind, J. M.

    1978-01-01

    Diurnal and long period earth tides were measured to high accuracy and precision with the superconducting gravimeter. The results provide new evidence on the geophysical questions which have been attacked through earth tide measurements in the past. In addition, they raise new questions of potential interest. Slow fluctuations in gravity of order 10 micron gal over periods of 3 to 5 months were observed and are discussed.

  9. Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carr, M. H.

    1984-01-01

    The following aspects of the planet Earth are discussed: plate tectonics, the interior of the planet, the formation of the Earth, and the evolution of the atmosphere and hydrosphere. The Earth's crust, mantle, and core are examined along with the bulk composition of the planet.

  10. Stratospheric sudden warming and lunar tide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Yosuke; Kosch, Michael

    2016-07-01

    A stratospheric sudden warming is a large-scale disturbance in the middle atmosphere. Recent studies have shown that the effect of stratospheric sudden warnings extends well into the upper atmosphere. A stratospheric sudden warming is often accompanied by an amplification of lunar tides in the ionosphere/theremosphere. However, there are occasionally winters when a stratospheric sudden warming occurs without an enhancement of the lunar tide in the upper atmosphere, and other winters when large lunar tides are observed without a strong stratospheric sudden warming. We examine the winters when the correlation breaks down and discuss possible causes.

  11. Florida Red Tide Perception: Residents versus Tourists.

    PubMed

    Nierenberg, Kate; Byrne, Margaret; Fleming, Lora E; Stephan, Wendy; Reich, Andrew; Backer, Lorraine C; Tanga, Elvira; Dalpra, Dana R; Kirkpatrick, Barbara

    2010-09-01

    The west coast of Florida has annual blooms of the toxin-producing dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis with Sarasota, FL considered the epicenter for these blooms. Numerous outreach materials, including Frequently Asked Question (FAQ) cards, exhibits for local museums and aquaria, public beach signs, and numerous websites have been developed to disseminate information to the public about this natural hazard. In addition, during intense onshore blooms, a great deal of media attention, primarily via newspaper (print and web) and television, is focused on red tide. However to date, the only measure of effectiveness of these outreach methods has been counts of the number of people exposed to the information, e.g., visits to a website or number of FAQ cards distributed. No formal assessment has been conducted to determine if these materials meet their goal of informing the public about Florida red tide. Also, although local residents have the opinion that they are very knowledgeable about Florida red tide, this has not been verified empirically. This study addressed these issues by creating and administering an evaluation tool for the assessment of public knowledge about Florida red tide. A focus group of Florida red tide outreach developers assisted in the creation of the evaluation tool. The location of the evaluation was the west coast of Florida, in Sarasota County. The objective was to assess the knowledge of the general public about Florida red tide. This assessment identified gaps in public knowledge regarding Florida red tides and also identified what information sources people want to use to obtain information on Florida red tide. The results from this study can be used to develop more effective outreach materials on Florida red tide.

  12. Effect of the fluid core on changes in the length of day due to long period tides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wahr, J. M.; Smith, M. L.; Sasao, T.

    1981-01-01

    The long period luni-solar tidal potential is known to cause periodic changes in the earth's rotation rate. It is found that the effect of a dissipationless fluid outer core is to reduce the amplitudes of these tidal perturbations by about 11 percent. When the fluid core effect is added to Agnew and Farrell's (1978) estimate of the effect of an equilibrium ocean, the result is in accord with observation. The effects of dissipative processes within the fluid core are also examined. Out-of-phase perturbations are found which could be as large as about 10 ms at 18.6 yr. It is concluded, however, that the poorly understood decade fluctuations in the earth's rotation rate will prohibit observation of this effect.

  13. Tides and tsunamis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zetler, B. D.

    1972-01-01

    Although tides and tsunamis are both shallow water waves, it does not follow that they are equally amenable to an observational program using an orbiting altimeter on a satellite. A numerical feasibility investigation using a hypothetical satellite orbit, real tide observations, and sequentially increased levels of white noise has been conducted to study the degradation of the tidal harmonic constants caused by adding noise to the tide data. Tsunami waves, possibly a foot high and one hundred miles long, must be measured in individual orbits, thus requiring high relative resolution.

  14. Co-Seismic Mass Dislocation and Its Effect on Earth's Rotation and Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Benjamin F.

    1999-01-01

    Mantle processes often involve large-scale mass transport, ranging from mantle convection, tectonic motions, glacial isostatic adjustment, to tides, atmospheric and oceanic loadings, volcanism and seismicity. On very short time scale of less than an hour, co-seismic event, apart from the "shaking" that is the earthquake, leaves behind permanent (step-function-like) dislocations in the crust and mantle. This redistribution of mass changes the Earth's inertia tensor (and hence Earth's rotation in both length-of-day and polar motion), and the gravity field (in terms of spherical harmonic Stokes coefficients). The question is whether these effects are large enough to be of any significance. In this paper we report updated calculation results. The calculation uses the normal mode summation scheme, applied to 15,814 major earthquakes that occurred during 1976-1998, according to source mechanism solutions given by the Harvard Central Moment Tensor catalog. Compared to the truly large ones earlier in the century, the earthquakes we study are individually all too small to have left any discernible signature in geodetic records of Earth rotation or global gravity field. However, their collective effects continue to exhibit an extremely strong statistical tendencies. For example, earthquakes conspire to decrease J(sub 2) and J(sub 22) while shortening LOD, resulting in a rounder and more compact Earth. Strong tendency is also seen in the earthquakes trying to "nudge" the Earth rotation pole towards about 140 degree E, roughly opposite to the observed polar drift direction. The geophysical significance and implications will be further studied.

  15. Co-Seismic Mass Displacement and its Effect on Earth's Rotation and Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, B. F.; Gross, R. S.

    2004-01-01

    Mantle processes often involve large-scale mass transport, ranging from mantle convection, tectonic motions, glacial isostatic adjustment, to tides, atmospheric and oceanic loadings, volcanism and seismicity. On very short time scale of less than an hour, co-seismic event, apart from the "shaking" that is the earthquake, leaves behind permanent (step-function-like) displacements in the crust and mantle. This redistribution of mass changes the Earth's inertia tensor (and hence Earth's rotation in both length-of-day and polar motion), and the gravity field. The question is whether these effects are large enough to be of any significance. In this paper we report updated calculation results based on Chao & Gross. The calculation uses the normal mode summation scheme, applied to over twenty thousand major earthquakes that occurred during 1976-2002, according to source mechanism solutions given by the Harvard Centroid Moment Tensor catalog. Compared to the truly large ones earlier in the century, the earthquakes we study are individually all too small to have left any discernible signature in geodetic records of Earth rotation or global gravity field. However, their collective effects continue to exhibit an extremely strong statistical tendencies, conspiring to decrease J2 and J22 while shortening LOD, resulting in a rounder and more compact Earth. Strong tendency is also seen in the earthquakes trying to "nudge" the Earth rotation pole towards approx. 140 deg.E, roughly opposite to the observed polar drift direction. Currently, the Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) is measuring the time-variable gravity to high degree and order with unprecedented accuracy. Our results show that great earthquakes such as the 1960 Chilean or 1964 Alaskan events cause gravitational field changes that are large enough to be detected by GRACE.

  16. Co-Seismic Mass Dislocation and its Effect on Earth's Rotation and Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, B. F.; Gross, R. S.

    2002-01-01

    Mantle processes often involve large-scale mass transport, ranging from mantle convection, tectonic motions, glacial isostatic adjustment, to tides, atmospheric and oceanic loadings, volcanism and seismicity. On very short time scale of less than an hour, co-seismic event, apart from the shaking that is the earthquake, leaves behind permanent (step-function-like) dislocations in the crust and mantle. This redistribution of mass changes the Earth's inertia tensor (and hence Earth's rotation in both length-of-day and polar motion), and the gravity field (in terms of spherical harmonic Stokes coefficients). The question is whether these effects are large enough to be of any significance. In this paper we report updated calculation results based on Chao & Gross (1987). The calculation uses the normal mode summation scheme, applied to nearly twenty thousand major earthquakes that occurred during 1976-2002, according to source mechanism solutions given by the Harvard Central Moment Tensor catalog. Compared to the truly large ones earlier in the century, the earthquakes we study are individually all too small to have left any discernible signature in geodetic records of Earth rotation or global gravity field. However, their collective effects continue to exhibit an extremely strong statistical tendencies. For example, earthquakes conspire to decrease J2 and J22 while shortening LOD, resulting in a rounder and more compact Earth. Strong tendency is also seen in the earthquakes trying to nudge the Earth rotation pole towards approximately 140 degrees E, roughly opposite to the observed polar drift direction. The geophysical significance and implications will be further studied.

  17. Earth radiation pressure effects on satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knocke, P. C.; Ries, J. C.; Tapley, B. D.

    1988-01-01

    A diffuse-earth radiation force model is presented, which includes a latitudinally varying representation of the shortwave and longwave radiation of the terrestrial sphere. Applications to various earth satellites indicate that this force, in particular the shortwave component, can materially affect the recovery of estimated parameters. Earth radiation pressure cannot explain the anomalous deceleration of LAGEOS, but can produce significant along track accelerations on satellites with highly eccentric orbits. Analyses of GEOS-1 tracking data confirm this result.

  18. Atmospheric Tides over the Pyrenees. Observational study and numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz de Argandoña, Javier; Ezcurra, Agustin; Saenz, Jon; Campistron, Bernard; Ibarra-Berastegi, Gabriel; Saïd, Frederique

    2010-05-01

    Atmospheric tides refer to the oscillations in the atmosphere whose periods are integral fractions of a day. In some magnitudes (e.g. temperature), these oscillations are quite evident but in others, such as the pressure in the midlatitudes, they are usually masked by the greater variations produced during the transient pass of synoptic weather systems. The main forcing agent for these oscillations, as opposed to ocean tides, is not the solar or lunar gravity pull, but the daily variations in solar insolation and the thermal effect derived from it. The main components of the solar atmospheric tides are the semidiurnal, with a 12-hour period, and the 24-hour period component or diurnal tide. The global scale tides are usually referred to as migrating tides, and are the result of a gravity wave which travels westerly with the apparent motion of the sun. Nevertheless, a significant part of the tide can be related to local characteristics, and this part is considered as the non-migrating component of the tide. Barometric tides around the Pyrenees mountain range are analyzed by means of ground synoptic stations data recorded during one year, ground data from PYREX experiment and the CRA/LA VHF wind profiler installed in the North of the range. Tides are decomposed in their diurnal and semidiurnal components. Diurnal tides show a strong non migrating component and are very dependent on local conditions. Semidiurnal tides are more homogeneous and present a north-south asymmetry, also noted in the Alps. This cross-range asymmetry seems to be related to some interference effect caused by the mountain range in the migrating semidiurnal tide wave. The diurnal component asymmetry presents a very strong seasonal variation, so its cause must be probably related to thermal local conditions. A three month simulation carried out with NCAR's WRF limited area model reproduces this asymmetry and some of the features of the observed tides.

  19. Migrating thermospheric tides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagan, M. E.; Roble, R. G.; Hackney, J.

    2001-07-01

    The capabilities of the global-scale wave model (GSWM) [Hagan et al., 1995, 1999] are extended to include migrating thermospheric solar tides. The GSWM thermospheric tidal forcing parameterization is based on neutral gas heating calculated from first principles in the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) thermosphere/ionosphere electrodynamics general circulation model (TIE-GCM). This is the first time that a physics-based thermospheric forcing scheme has been used in a model like GSWM. Previous two-dimensional steady state linear tidal models used exospheric temperature measurements to calibrate upper atmospheric tidal forcing. New GSWM results illustrate thermospheric tidal responses that are largely consistent with tides in the TIE-GCM. Diurnal temperature amplitudes increase with increasing solar activity, but there is no analogous diurnal wind response. The thermospheric semidiurnal tide is much weaker than the diurnal tide. Semidiurnal temperature perturbations peak in the lower thermosphere where the semidiurnal forcing maximizes. The new in situ results must be combined with the GSWM upward propagating tide in the lower thermosphere, because the upward propagating components dominate the semidiurnal response throughout the region and the diurnal response below ˜130 km. In situ forcing accounts for most of the diurnal response aloft. Our preliminary evaluation of the GSWM thermospheric predictions is inconclusive. More extensive evaluations are necessary to make a firm assessment of whether the model captures the salient features of the seasonal and solar cycle variability of thermospheric tides.

  20. MST radar detection of middle atmosphere tides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forbes, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    Meteorological and dynamical requirements pertaining to the specification of middle atmosphere tides by the MST radar technique are outlined. Major issues addressed include: (1) the extraction of tidal information from measurements covering a fraction of a day; (2) the ramifications of transient effects (tidal variability) on the determination and interpretation of tides; (3) required temporal and spatial resolutions and; (4) global distributions of MST radars, so as to complement existing MST, meteor wind, and partial reflection drift radar locations.

  1. Modelling the effects of tides and storm surges on coastal aquifers using a coupled surface-subsurface approach.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie; Graf, Thomas; Herold, Maria; Ptak, Thomas

    2013-06-01

    Coastal aquifers are complex hydrologic systems because many physical processes interact: (i) variably saturated flow, (ii) spatial-temporal fluid density variations, (iii) tidal fluctuations, (iv) storm surges overtopping dykes, and (v) surface runoff of storm water. The HydroGeoSphere model is used to numerically simulate coastal flow dynamics, assuming a fully coupled surface-subsurface approach, accounting for all processes listed above. The diffusive wave approximation of the St. Venant equation is used to describe surface flow. Surface flow and salt transport are fully coupled with subsurficial variably saturated, variable-density flow and salt transport through mathematical terms that represent exchange of fluid mass and solute mass, respectively. Tides and storm surges induce a time-variant head that is applied to nodes of the surface domain. The approach is applied to real cases of tide and storm surge events. Tide simulation results confirm the existence of a recirculating zone, forming beneath the upper part of the intertidal zone. By monitoring the exchange fluid flux rates through the beach, it was found that the major inflow to the aquifer takes place at the upper part of the intertidal zone, which explains the formation of the recirculating zone. The recirculating zone is forming particularly during rising tide. Results from a storm surge simulation show that plume fingers develop below the flooded land surface. Natural remediation by seaward flowing freshwater is relatively slow, such that reducing the salt concentration in the aquifer down to drinking water standards takes up to 10 years. PMID:23603354

  2. Modelling the effects of tides and storm surges on coastal aquifers using a coupled surface-subsurface approach.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie; Graf, Thomas; Herold, Maria; Ptak, Thomas

    2013-06-01

    Coastal aquifers are complex hydrologic systems because many physical processes interact: (i) variably saturated flow, (ii) spatial-temporal fluid density variations, (iii) tidal fluctuations, (iv) storm surges overtopping dykes, and (v) surface runoff of storm water. The HydroGeoSphere model is used to numerically simulate coastal flow dynamics, assuming a fully coupled surface-subsurface approach, accounting for all processes listed above. The diffusive wave approximation of the St. Venant equation is used to describe surface flow. Surface flow and salt transport are fully coupled with subsurficial variably saturated, variable-density flow and salt transport through mathematical terms that represent exchange of fluid mass and solute mass, respectively. Tides and storm surges induce a time-variant head that is applied to nodes of the surface domain. The approach is applied to real cases of tide and storm surge events. Tide simulation results confirm the existence of a recirculating zone, forming beneath the upper part of the intertidal zone. By monitoring the exchange fluid flux rates through the beach, it was found that the major inflow to the aquifer takes place at the upper part of the intertidal zone, which explains the formation of the recirculating zone. The recirculating zone is forming particularly during rising tide. Results from a storm surge simulation show that plume fingers develop below the flooded land surface. Natural remediation by seaward flowing freshwater is relatively slow, such that reducing the salt concentration in the aquifer down to drinking water standards takes up to 10 years.

  3. The tide in the seas of Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sagan, C.; Dermott, S. F.

    1982-01-01

    The parameters of the tides in the near-global ocean that may exist on Titan are assessed. A formula for the difference between the maximum heights of the oceanic and body tides is used to determine that the amplitude of the apparent, near-stationary, oceanic tide on Titan is greater than about 100 m. The effects of tidal dissipation are evaluated, showing that the amplitude of the tide will vary by nine percent over its 15.95-day period. The observed eccentricity of Titan's orbit is used to establish limits on the satellite's surface topography and oceanic depths. It is concluded that either Titan is covered by a near-global methane ocean over 400 m deep, or that there is no methane ocean at all. Reflectivity measurements can decide between these alternatives.

  4. Mapping Hurricane Rita inland storm tide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berenbrock, Charles; Mason, Jr., Robert R.; Blanchard, Stephen F.; Simonovic, Slobodan P.

    2009-01-01

    Flood-inundation data are most useful for decision makers when presented in the context of maps of effected communities and (or) areas. But because the data are scarce and rarely cover the full extent of the flooding, interpolation and extrapolation of the information are needed. Many geographic information systems (GIS) provide various interpolation tools, but these tools often ignore the effects of the topographic and hydraulic features that influence flooding. A barrier mapping method was developed to improve maps of storm tide produced by Hurricane Rita. Maps were developed for the maximum storm tide and at 3-hour intervals from midnight (0000 hour) through noon (1200 hour) on September 24, 2005. The improved maps depict storm-tide elevations and the extent of flooding. The extent of storm-tide inundation from the improved maximum storm-tide map was compared to the extent of flood-inundation from a map prepared by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). The boundaries from these two maps generally compared quite well especially along the Calcasieu River. Also a cross-section profile that parallels the Louisiana coast was developed from the maximum storm-tide map and included FEMA high-water marks.

  5. A novel thiazolidinedione derivative TD118 showing selective algicidal effects for red tide control.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ying; Lee, Yew; Jung, Seul-Gi; Kim, Minju; Eom, Chi-Yong; Kim, Si Wouk; Cho, Hoon; Jin, Eonseon

    2014-05-01

    Thiazolidinedione (TD) derivatives have been found to have an algicidal effect on harmful algal bloom microalgae. In this study, 75 TD derivatives were synthesized and analyzed for algicidal activity. Among these synthetic TDs, 18 TD derivatives showed specific algicidal activity on two strains belonging to the classes Raphidophyceae (Chattonella marina and Heterosigma akashiwo) and Dinophyceae (Cochlodinium polykrikoides). Two strains belonging to Bacillariophyceae (Navicula pelliculosa and Phaeodactylum EPV), one strain belonging to Dinophyceae (Amphidinium sp.), and a Eustigmatophycean microalga (Nannochloropsis oculata) showed less sensitivity to the TD derivatives than the other two phyla. The most reactive TD derivative, compound 2 (TD118), was selected and tested for morphological and physiological changes. TD118 effectively damaged the cell membrane of C. marina, H. akashiwo and C. polykrikoides. The O₂ evolution and photosystem II efficiency (F(v)/F(m)) of C. marina, H. akashiwo and C. polykrikoides were also severely reduced by TD118 treatment. Amphidinium sp., N. pelliculosa, Phaeodactylum EPV and N. oculata showed less reduction of O₂ evolution and the F(v)/F(m) by TD118. These results imply that the species-specific TD structure relationship may be due to structural and/or physiological differences among microalgal species.

  6. Groundwater dynamics in a coastal aquifer: combined effects of tides and beach morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Li, L.; Erler, D.

    2013-12-01

    The interaction between fresh groundwater and seawater, driven by oceanic oscillations and the inland hydraulic head gradient, has been shown to affect the pore water characteristics, which in turn influence the fate of contaminants in coastal aquifers. We show here that beach morphology interacting with the tidal force can also modulate nearshore groundwater flow and solute transport. Detailed field investigations were combined with numerical simulations to examine the groundwater dynamics in a carbonate-sandy intertidal aquifer on the tropical island of Rarotonga, Cook Islands. Groundwater salinity values revealed different salinity distributions under conditions of different beach profiles, inland heads and tidal signals. Fresh groundwater was also found to discharge around an intertidal beach slope break (located in the middle region of intertidal zone). This suggests that the interplay of beach morphology and tidal forcing may play an important role in groundwater flow and solute transport near the shore. The numerical models enabled quantitatively analysis of the effects of beach morphology on groundwater circulations and solute pathway. We found that (1) the groundwater discharge location is largely controlled by beach morphology in connection with the tidal force; (2) under particular conditions, the groundwater flow pattern is very sensitive to the beach slope breaks. In particular, the beach slope break combined with the tidal oscillation can induce local circulation cells. These results further demonstrate the complexity of nearshore groundwater systems and have implications for future studies of nutrients transport and transformations associated with SGD.

  7. Waves: Internal Tides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Richard D.

    1999-01-01

    Oceanic internal tides are internal waves with tidal periodicities. They are ubiquitous throughout the ocean, although generally more pronounced near large bathymetric features such as mid-ocean ridges and continental slopes. The internal vertical displacements associated with these waves can be extraordinarily large. Near some shelf breaks where the surface tides are strong, internal displacements (e.g., of an isothermal surface) can exceed 200 meters. Displacements of 10 meters in the open ocean are not uncommon. The associated current velocities are usually comparable to or larger than the currents of the surface tide. On continental shelves internal tides can occasionally generate packets of internal solitons, which are detectable in remote sensing imagery. Other common nonlinear features are generation of higher harmonics (e.g., 6-hr waves) and wave breaking. Internal tides are known to be an important energy source for mixing of shelf waters. Recent research suggests that they may also be a significant energy source for deep-ocean mixing.

  8. Dynamics of sand ridges in coastal seas: the effect of storms, tides and grain sorting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walgreen, M.

    2003-10-01

    The work presented in this thesis concerns the dynamics of shoreface-connected ridges and tidal sand ridges. These large-scale bedforms are observed on the inner and outer shelf of coastal seas in water depths of 10-20m. The motivation of this work is to improve the understanding of the mechanisms related to their formation and the processes that determine their main characteristics. This is done with the use of idealised morphodynamic models. The basic assumption underlying these models is that large-scale sand ridges can solely form as free instabilities on a flat sea bottom. Mathematical methods based on a stability analysis are applied, whereas analytical and numerical methods are used to solve the equations. Existing models are extended with new physical processes, in particular including the role of grain sorting. An important part of this thesis concerns the unresolved question about the origin of the observed mean grain size pattern over the ridges. It explores the hydrodynamic processes that can lead to sediment sorting and the formation of large-scale sand ridges. The model results indicate that the dynamics for different forcing conditions strongly differ. Shoreface-connected sand ridges mainly form during storm conditions, whereas if fair weather conditions prevail the more offshore located tidal sand ridges develop. A probabilistic formulation of these two realisation of the model is used to find conditions for which both types of large-scale bedforms occur simultaneously, as is the case in the southern North Sea. These conditions turn out to be a low storm fraction and the presence of both tidal and storm-driven currents. The transport of non-uniform sediment is described by formulations for both bed load and suspended load, both of which account for dynamic hiding effects. A one-layer model for the bed evolution is used and two grain size classes (fine and coarse sand) are considered. The results of the model for storm conditions indicate that the

  9. Tides of global ice-covered oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wunsch, Carl

    2016-08-01

    The tides of an ice-covered ocean are examined using a Cartesian representation of the elastic and fluid equations. Although unconstrained by any observations, the ocean tides of a Neoproterozoic "snowball" Earth could have been significantly larger than they are today. Time-mean tidal-residual circulations would then have been set up that are competitive with the circulation driven by geothermal heating. In any realistic configuration, the snowball Earth would have had an ice cover that is in the thin shell limit, but by permitting the ice thickness to become large, more interesting ice tidal response can be found, ones conceivably of application to bodies in the outer Solar System or hypothetical exoplanets. Little can be said concerning a reduction in tidal dissipation necessary to avoid a crisis in the history of the lunar orbit.

  10. Mapping hurricane rita inland storm tide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berenbrock, C.; Mason, R.R.; Blanchard, S.F.

    2009-01-01

    Flood-inundation data are most useful for decision makers when presented in the context of maps of affected communities and (or) areas. But because the data are scarce and rarely cover the full extent of the flooding, interpolation and extrapolation of the information are needed. Many geographic information systems provide various interpolation tools, but these tools often ignore the effects of the topographic and hydraulic features that influence flooding. A barrier mapping method was developed to improve maps of storm tide produced by Hurricane Rita. Maps were developed for the maximum storm tide and at 3-h intervals from midnight (00:00 hours) through noon (12:00 hours) on 24 September 2005. The improved maps depict storm-tide elevations and the extent of flooding. The extent of storm-tide inundation from the improved maximum storm-tide map was compared with the extent of flood inundation from a map prepared by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). The boundaries from these two maps generally compared quite well especially along the Calcasieu River. Also a cross-section profile that parallels the Louisiana coast was developed from the maximum storm-tide map and included FEMA high-water marks. ?? 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. Application of database technology to red tide remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, Xiuhua; Zhang, Jie; Ma, Yi; Zhang, Hongliang

    2003-05-01

    The red tide spectrum database is the basis and prerequisite for red tide hyperspectral remote sensing, a technical support for the field investigation on red tide and the main technical measure for red tide data management and application. The data in the database mentioned in this paper come mainly from the red tide mesocosm experiment, and include the simultaneously collected biological, chemical, hydrographic and meteorological data besides the spectrum data of red tide dominant species. The database has not only the conventional functions for data query, retrieval and plotting, but also the algorithmic functions for the ground object spectrum data processing in the Visual FoxPro system environment and the biological information extraction using the ground object spectrum data. This system is not only an effective application system for detecting the red tide organism, identifying the red tide dominant species and analyzing the characteristic amount of red tide organism, but also a powerful tool for the marine environmental protection and the red tide disaster reduction in the future.

  12. Ocean science. Enhanced: internal tides and ocean mixing.

    PubMed

    Garrett, Chris

    2003-09-26

    Recent satellite and in situ observations have shown that at ocean ridges and other seafloor topographic features, a substantial amount of energy is transferred from the main ocean tides into "internal tides." In his Perspective, Garrett explains how these internal waves with tidal periods propagate through the density-stratified deep ocean and eventually break down into turbulence. The resulting mixing affects ocean stratification and ocean circulation. It thus influences climate as well as biological production. The energy for the internal tides is derived from the rotational energy of the Earth-Moon system changes of the length of the day and the distance to the Moon. PMID:14512611

  13. [Biological effects of rare earth elements and their action mechanisms].

    PubMed

    He, Yuejun; Xue, Li

    2005-10-01

    This paper reviewed the effects of rare earth elements on plant root development, biomass, quality, and resistance against stress. Applying appropriate amount of rare earth elements could not only promote seed germination and root development, increase plant biomass, but also improve harvest quality and plant resistance against stress. The plant uptake characteristics of rare earth elements, as well as their contents, distribution, existing forms, and cytolocalization in plants were discussed, with the focus on the effects of rare earth elements on photosynthesis and chlorophyll formation, nutrient uptake, relationships between rare earth elements and calcium, and action mechanisms of rare earth elements on cell membrane and enzymes. Rare earth elements could enhance chlorophyll content and improve photosynthetic rate, and thus, could increase plant biomass. When an appropriate amount of rare earth elements was applied, the uptake of nutrients by plant and their transformation and utilization were promoted. Rare earth elements could replace calcium ion to participate in enzymatic reactions, maintain the osmosis and stability of cell membrane, promote the protection function of cell membrane, and enhance the plant resistance capability against stress. In the end, further researches on rare earth elements were suggested.

  14. Semidiurnal and diurnal temperature tides (30-55 km): Climatology and effect on UARS-LIDAR data comparisons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keckhut, Philippe; Gelman, M. E.; Wild, J. D.; Tissot, F.; Miller, A. J.; Hauchecorne, A.; Chanin, M.-L.; Fishbein, E. F.; Gille, J.; Russell, J. M.; Taylor, F. W.

    1996-04-01

    Very good agreement is shown for diurnal and semidiurnal temperature variations calculated from lidar measurements in southern France and from data of the microwave limb sounder of the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS). Tides induce temperature deviations observed in southern France to be as large as ±3 K, with a maximum at the stratopause. The amplitudes and phases of the semidiurnal variation change significantly with season and location. Seasonal changes up to 2 K have been clearly identified for the diurnal component. An analytic model of the diurnal component, based on sinusoidal functions, fits the data well, but is less successful for the semidiurnal component. Substantial agreement is also reported for the diurnal component between the results of our analytical model and the published results of a two-dimensional global-scale wave model. In contrast, the semidiurnal component is in total disagreement with numerical simulations that report very small amplitudes, as compared with the observations reported here. The confidence in detecting bias in data comparisons is improved if data used are limited to periods from April to September and if time-of-day adjustments are applied. Comparison between lidar and nearly coincident UARS temperature measurements have revealed, systematically, for the 4 experiments aboard UARS, a significant residual mean difference of up to 3 K around 35-43 km. A comparison using simultaneous measurements suggests that the bias is associated with the variability of migrating tides and/or the presence of nonmigrating tides rather than instrumental characteristics.

  15. Dynamic Elastic Tides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wisdom, Jack; Meyer, Jennifer

    2016-04-01

    This is an exploration of dynamic tides on elastic bodies. The body is thought of as a dynamical system described by its modes of oscillation. The dynamics of these modes are governed by differential equations that depend on the rheology. The modes are damped by dissipation. Tidal friction occurs as exterior bodies excite the modes and the modes act back on the tide raising body. The whole process is governed by a closed set of differential equations. Standard results from tidal theory are recovered in a two-timescale approximation to the solution of these differential equations.

  16. Dynamic Elastic Tides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wisdom, Jack; Meyer, Jennifer

    2016-11-01

    This is an exploration of dynamic tides on elastic bodies. The body is thought of as a dynamical system described by its modes of oscillation. The dynamics of these modes are governed by differential equations that depend on the rheology. The modes are damped by dissipation. Tidal friction occurs as exterior bodies excite the modes and the modes act back on the tide raising body. The whole process is governed by a closed set of differential equations. Standard results from tidal theory are recovered in a two-timescale approximation to the solution of these differential equations.

  17. Ocean Tide Loading Computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agnew, Duncan Carr

    2005-01-01

    September 15,2003 through May 15,2005 This grant funds the maintenance, updating, and distribution of programs for computing ocean tide loading, to enable the corrections for such loading to be more widely applied in space- geodetic and gravity measurements. These programs, developed under funding from the CDP and DOSE programs, incorporate the most recent global tidal models developed from Topex/Poscidon data, and also local tide models for regions around North America; the design of the algorithm and software makes it straightforward to combine local and global models.

  18. Tidal Locking Of The Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koohafkan, Michael

    2006-05-01

    The Moon's orbit and spin period are nearly synchronized, or tidally locked. Could the Moon's orbit and the Earth's spin eventually synchronize as well? The Moon's gravitational pull on the Earth produces tides in our oceans, and tidal friction gradually lengthens our days. Less obvious gravitational interactions between the Earth and Moon may also have effects on Earth's spin. The Earth is slightly distorted into an egg-like shape, and the torque exerted by the Moon on our equatorial bulge slowly changes the tilt of our spin axis. How do effects such as these change as the Moon drifts away from Earth? I will examine gravitational interactions between Earth and Moon to learn how they contribute to the deceleration of the Earth's rotation. My goal is to determine the amount of time it would take for the Earth's rotational speed to decelerate until the period of a single rotation matches the period of the Moon's orbit around Earth -- when the Earth is ``tidally locked'' with the Moon. I aim to derive a general mathematical expression for the rotational deceleration of the Earth due to Moon's gravitational influences.

  19. On the influence of the surface and body tides on the motion of a satellite. [earth geophysical aspects of orbit perturbations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musen, P.

    1973-01-01

    Some geophysical aspects of the tidal perturbations in the motion of artificial satellites are investigated and a system of formulas is developed that is convenient for computation of the tidal effects in the elements using a step-by-step numerical integration.

  20. Apparent Relations Between Solar Activity and Solar Tides Caused by the Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, Ching-Cheh

    2007-01-01

    A solar storm is a storm of ions and electrons from the Sun. Large solar storms are usually preceded by solar flares, phenomena that can be characterized quantitatively from Earth. Twenty-five of the thirty-eight largest known solar flares were observed to start when one or more tide-producing planets (Mercury, Venus, Earth, and Jupiter) were either nearly above the event positions (less than 10 deg. longitude) or at the opposing side of the Sun. The probability for this to happen at random is 0.039 percent. This supports the hypothesis that the force or momentum balance (between the solar atmospheric pressure, the gravity field, and magnetic field) on plasma in the looping magnetic field lines in solar corona could be disturbed by tides, resulting in magnetic field reconnection, solar flares, and solar storms. Separately, from the daily position data of Venus, Earth, and Jupiter, an 11-year planet alignment cycle is observed to approximately match the sunspot cycle. This observation supports the hypothesis that the resonance and beat between the solar tide cycle and nontidal solar activity cycle influences the sunspot cycle and its varying magnitudes. The above relations between the unpredictable solar flares and the predictable solar tidal effects could be used and further developed to forecast the dangerous space weather and therefore reduce its destructive power against the humans in space and satellites controlling mobile phones and global positioning satellite (GPS) systems.

  1. Characterizing and minimizing the effects of noise in tide gauge time series: relative and geocentric sea level rise around Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgette, Reed J.; Watson, Christopher S.; Church, John A.; White, Neil J.; Tregoning, Paul; Coleman, Richard

    2013-08-01

    We quantify the rate of sea level rise around the Australian continent from an analysis of tide gauge and Global Positioning System (GPS) data sets. To estimate the underlying linear rates of sea level change in the presence of significant interannual and decadal variability (treated here as noise), we adopt and extend a novel network adjustment approach. We simultaneously estimate time-correlated noise as well as linear model parameters and realistic uncertainties from sea level time series at individual gauges, as well as from time-series differences computed between pairs of gauges. The noise content at individual gauges is consistent with a combination of white and time-correlated noise. We find that the noise in time series from the western coast of Australia is best described by a first-order Gauss-Markov model, whereas east coast stations generally exhibit lower levels of time-correlated noise that is better described by a power-law process. These findings suggest several decades of monthly tide gauge data are needed to reduce rate uncertainties to <0.5 mm yr-1 for undifferenced single site time series with typical noise characteristics. Our subsequent adjustment strategy exploits the more precise differential rates estimated from differenced time series from pairs of tide gauges to estimate rates among the network of 43 tide gauges that passed a stability analysis. We estimate relative sea level rates over three temporal windows (1900-2011, 1966-2011 and 1993-2011), accounting for covariance between time series. The resultant adjustment reduces the rate uncertainty across individual gauges, and partially mitigates the need for century-scale time series at all sites in the network. Our adjustment reveals a spatially coherent pattern of sea level rise around the coastline, with the highest rates in northern Australia. Over the time periods beginning in 1900, 1966 and 1993, we find weighted average rates of sea level rise of 1.4 ± 0.6, 1.7 ± 0.6 and 4.6 ± 0

  2. Effects of spraying rare earths on contents of rare Earth elements and effective components in tea.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dongfeng; Wang, Changhong; Ye, Sheng; Qi, Hongtao; Zhao, Guiwen

    2003-11-01

    Rare earth (RE) fertilizer is widely applied in China to increase the yield and the quality of crops including tea. However, the effects of spraying RE fertilizer on the contents of rare earth elements (REE) and effective components in tea are unknown. The results from basin and field experiments show that the values of the REE concentrations in new shoots of tea plants and the concentration of REE in the soil (REE/REEs) either from control basins or from treatment basins were smaller than those in other parts of tea plant and similar between control and treatment. The longer the interval between spraying RE fertilizer and picking the shoots of tea plants, the less the effects from spraying. About 80% summation operator REE (the sum of the concentrations of 15 REE) in tea, whether it came from spraying or not, was insoluble in the infusion. About 10% the soluble REE of summation operator REE in tea infusion was bound to polysaccharide, and the amount of REE bound polysaccharide decreased over time. At least a 25 day safety interval is needed between spraying and picking if the microelement fertilizer is used, in order to enhance tea output and to ensure tea safety. PMID:14582968

  3. Early intense cratering: Effects on growth of earth's crust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, William K.

    1988-01-01

    The disrupting effects of early intense meteorite bombardment on Earth's protocrustal evolution is discussed. The author emphasized that one should not consider the Earth's impact history as a discrete phase separate from an early crust forming event, and also that the end of the impacts was not a singular event that destroyed all previously formed crust.

  4. Ocean tide energy converter

    SciTech Connect

    Rainey, D.E.

    1980-06-24

    A tide motor energy source includes a tidal piston with a valved chamber. The piston drives a hydraulic ram to generate electrical power through a pressure accumulator and hydraulic motor. The ram can be locked hydraulically to enable the tidal piston to be held fixed at a desired elevation and the valves in the chamber permit it to be filled with water or air. The piston with its chamber filled with air at its low tide position and then released for controlled ascent while submerged acts as a submerged float for driving the ram upwardly while the tide runs in during one phase of its operation. The piston with its chamber filled with water while locked at its highest position as the tide begins to run out, and then released to fall under control, acts as a weight suspended in air after the water level drops below the piston for driving the ram downwardly during the second phase of its operation. The rising and falling motion of the tidal piston is used as the energy source.

  5. Tides and Marshes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pouler, Chris

    The Maryland Marine Science Education Project has produced a series of mini-units in marine science education for the junior high/middle school classroom. This unit focuses on tides and marshes. Although the unit specifically treats the Chesapeake Bay, it may be adapted for use with similar estuarine systems. In addition, the unit may be…

  6. Precise Comparisons of Bottom-Pressure and Altimetric Ocean Tides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Richard D.

    2013-01-01

    A new set of pelagic tide determinations is constructed from seafloor pressure measurements obtained at 151 sites in the deep ocean. To maximize precision of estimated tides, only stations with long time series are used; median time series length is 567 days. Geographical coverage is considerably improved by use of the international tsunami network, but coverage in the Indian Ocean and South Pacific is still weak. As a tool for assessing global ocean tide models, the data set is considerably more reliable than older data sets : the root-mean-square difference with a recent altimetric tide model is approximately 5 mm for the M2 constituent. Precision is sufficiently high to allow secondary effects in altimetric and bottom-pressure tide differences to be studied. The atmospheric tide in bottom pressure is clearly detected at the S1, S2, and T2 frequencies. The altimetric tide model is improved if satellite altimetry is corrected for crustal loading by the atmospheric tide. Models of the solid body tide can also be constrained. The free corenutation effect in the K1 Love number is easily detected, but the overall estimates are not as accurate as a recent determination with very long baseline interferometry.

  7. Polar Motion Constraints on Models of the Fortnightly Tide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Richard D.; Egbert, G. D.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Estimates of the near-fortnightly Mf ocean tide from Topex/Poseidon satellite altimetry and from numerical solutions to the shallow water equations agree reasonably well, at least in their basin-scale features. For example, both show that the Pacific Ocean tide lags the Atlantic tide by roughly 30 degrees. There are hints of finer scale agreements in the elevation fields, but noise levels are high. In contrast, estimates of Mf currents are only weakly constrained by the TP data, because high-wavenumber Rossby waves (with intense currents) are associated with relatively small perturbations in surface elevation. As a result, a wide range of Mf current fields are consistent with both the TP data and the hydrodynamic equations within a priori plausible misfit bounds. We find that a useful constraint on the Mf currents is provided by independent estimates of the Earth's polar motion. At the Mf period polar motion shows a weak signal (both prograde and retrograde) which must be almost entirely caused by the ocean tide. We have estimated this signal from the SPACE2000 time series, after applying a broad-band correction for atmospheric angular momentum. Although the polar motion estimates have relatively large uncertainties, they are sufficiently precise to fix optimum data weights in a global ocean inverse model of Mf. These weights control the tradeoff between fitting a prior hydrodynamic model of Mf and fitting the relatively noisy T/P measurements of Mf. The predicted polar motion from the final inverse model agrees remarkably well with the Mf polar motion observations. The preferred model is also consistent with noise levels suggested by island gauges, and it is marginally consistent with differences observed by subsetting the altimetry (to the small extent that this is possible). In turn, this new model of the Mf ocean tide allows the ocean component to be removed from Mf estimates of length of day, thus yielding estimates of complex Love numbers less contaminated by

  8. Artificial tide generation and its effects on the water environment in the backwater of Three Gorges Reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sha, Yukun; Wei, Yongping; Li, Weipeng; Fan, Jihui; Cheng, Genwei

    2015-09-01

    Since the water impounding of the Three Gorges Reservoir (TGR) in 2003, the water stage in the backwater region increased from 65 m before water impounding to 145 m, and the velocity of the stream flow decreased significantly. The outflows of the tributaries that flow into TGR were also obstructed by the backwater. Stopping the stream flow prevented the pollutants from diffusing and transporting themselves into the water body, hence polluting the water in several tributaries. The authors proposed an artificial tide generation approach to solve this problem. The man-made flood peak in the downstream and the waves of the water stage in the upstream of the TGR can be produced by operating hydropower generators daily to deal with peak-and-bottom variations in the electricity demand. These waves will propagate upwards and form artificial tides in the backwater area. The water stage variation will intensify the flow exchange between the main stem and the tributaries as well as enhance the diffusion of pollutants, which will subsequently decrease the eutrophication of the water body in the outlet of branches as well as relieve the algal bloom problem in the region. The daily operations in the reservoir were simulated and tested by using the proposed hydrodynamic model of TGR. The hydropower operation for the peak load of electricity demand will produce artificial tides in the backwater area of TGR as well as increase the water stage variation from 0.30 m to 0.50 m within a day. This periodic fluctuation of water stage waves will intensify the water exchange between the main reach of Changjiang (Yangtze River) and its tributaries with an additional inflow or outflow of up to 300-500 m3/s, which is equivalent to the average discharge of these tributaries during the summer. The artificial tide generation can enhance the internal exchange of backwater as well as improve the water environment condition in the backwater area. This operation approach provides a new technology

  9. Long-period perturbations in Starlette orbit and tide solution

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, M.K.; Shum, C.K.; Eanes, R.J.; Schutz, B.E.; Tapley, B.D. )

    1990-06-10

    Continuous and dynamically consistent orbits have been computed using satellite laser ranging (SLR) data to Starlette for one-year period during 1976 and 1977 and the three-year period from 1983 through 1985. A low degree and order ocean tide solution, consisting of a total of 66 tidal parameters from 14 tidal constituents, was obtained in a combined solution using both the one-and three-year Starlette orbits. Yearly values for the second-degree annual tides, S{sub a}, which produce seasonal variations on the Starlette node, were obtained also. These variations were found to have year-to-year fluctuations of more than 25% about the mean value and produced significant long-period perturbations in the Starlette orbit. The Starlette tide solution is in good agreement with the Schwiderski tide solutions and with other satellite solutions, including multi-satellite tide solutions. The average uncertainties are approximately 0.1 cm for the estimated semidiurnal and diurnal tides and 0.4 cm for the long-period tides. The discrepancies of effective k{sub 2} inferred from the Starlette tide solution and other tide solutions are less than 0.01. The tide solutions were evaluated using orbit fits of a three-year LAGEOS and a one-year Starlette long arc. The results indicate that the Starlette tide solution produces significantly improved orbit fits for both LAGEOS and Starlette. The uncertainties for the estimated tide model coefficients were used to predict tidal errors for the LAGEOS orbit and were found to be consistent with the apparent tidal errors present in this orbit. The computed secular change in the Moon's mean motion due to tidal dissipation is {minus}24.8 {plus minus} 0.8 arc second/century{sup 2}, which is in good agreement with the results obtained from other investigations.

  10. Observations and simulations of the ionospheric lunar tide: Seasonal variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedatella, N. M.

    2014-07-01

    The seasonal variability of the ionospheric lunar tide is investigated using a combination of Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate (COSMIC) observations and thermosphere-ionosphere-mesosphere electrodynamics general circulation model (TIME-GCM) simulations. The present study focuses on the seasonal variability of the lunar tide in the ionosphere and its potential connection to the occurrence of stratosphere sudden warmings (SSWs). COSMIC maximum F region electron density (NmF2) and total electron content observations reveal a primarily annual variation of the ionospheric lunar tide, with maximum amplitudes occurring at low latitudes during December-February. Simulations of the lunar tide climatology in TIME-GCM display a similar annual variability as the COSMIC observations. This leads to the conclusion that the annual variability of the lunar tide in the ionosphere is not solely due to the occurrence of SSWs. Rather, the annual variability of the lunar tide in the ionosphere is generated by the seasonal variability of the lunar tide at E region altitudes. However, compared to the observations, the ionospheric lunar tide annual variability is weaker in the climatological simulations which is attributed to the occurrence of SSWs during the majority of the years included in the observations. Introducing a SSW into the TIME-GCM simulation leads to an additional enhancement of the lunar tide during Northern Hemisphere winter, increasing the lunar tide annual variability and resulting in an annual variability that is more consistent with the observations. The occurrence of SSWs can therefore potentially bias lunar tide climatologies, and it is important to consider these effects in studies of the lunar tide in the atmosphere and ionosphere.

  11. Earth tides, global heat flow, and tectonics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shaw, H.R.

    1970-01-01

    The power of a heat engine ignited by tidal energy can account for geologically reasonable rates of average magma production and sea floor spreading. These rates control similarity of heat flux over continents and oceans because of an inverse relationship between respective depth intervals for mass transfer and consequent distributions of radiogenic heat production.

  12. Investigating earthquake cycle vertical deformation recorded by GPS and regional tide gauge stations in California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, S.; Konter, B.

    2013-12-01

    Geodetic and tide gauge measurements of vertical deformation record localized zones of uplift and subsidence that may document critical components of both long and short-period earthquake cycle deformation. In this study, we compare vertical tide gauge data from the Permanent Service for Mean Sea Level (PSMSL) and vertical GPS data from the EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) for 10 approximately co-located station pairs along coastal California from Point Reyes, CA to Ensenada, Mexico. To compare these two datasets, we first truncate both datasets so that they span a common time frame for all stations (2007 - 2012). PSMSL data are treated for both average global sea level rise (~1.8 mm/yr) and global isostatic adjustment. We then calculate a 2-month running mean for tide gauge and a 1-month running mean for GPS datasets to smooth out daily oceanographic or anthropologic disturbances but maintain the overall trend of each dataset. As major ocean-climate signals, such as El Nino, are considered regional features of the Pacific Ocean and likely common to all California tide gauge stations, we subtract a reference sea level record (San Francisco station) from all other stations to eliminate this signal. The GPS and tide gauge data show varying degrees of correlation spanning both 3-month and 4-year time-scales. We infer that the slope of vertical displacements are largely controlled by interseismic motions, however displacements from major earthquakes are evident and are required to explain some of the unique signatures in the tide gauge and GPS data. Specifically, we find that stations from both datasets in Southern California show an anomalous trend since the 2010 Baja California earthquake. To further investigate this trend and others, we compare these data to vertical motions estimated by a suite of 3-D viscoelastic earthquake cycle deformation models. Long-term tide gauge time series are well simulated by the models, but short-term time series are not as

  13. Energy deposition of thermal tides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, E.

    2015-12-01

    The main role of vertically propagating waves in the general circulation is to transfer pseudo momentum from the region of generation to the region of wave breaking. The most prominent examples in atmospheric dynamics are planetary Rossby waves forced in the troposphere, which drive a poleward residual circulation in the winter stratosphere, and mesoscale gravity waves with tropospheric origin, which drive a summer-to-winter-pole circulation in the mesopasue region. In addition, the role of energy deposition by gravity waves has long been recognized to contribute substantially to the energy budget above the stratopause. In atmospheric circulation models, gravity waves are usually parameterized. Their energy deposition can be computed along with the momentum deposition and the turbulent diffusivity associated with wave breaking. In particular, the energy deposition is expressed in terms of secondary moments of the parameterized waves. Therefore, one is tempted to assume that the energy deposition of waves that are resolved in circulation models, e.g., Rossby waves and thermal tides, is automatically taken into account. This assumption is, however, flawed. We show that the energy deposition by resolved waves corresponds to the shear production (frictional heating) of the subgrid-scale turbulence model by which these waves are damped. Computational results from an atmospheric circulation model with energetically consistent treatment of momentum diffusion and frictional heating show that the energy deposition of thermal tides is substantial above the mesopause. This effect is either incomplete or even ignored in conventional atmospheric models that resolve the mesopause region. An idealized sensitivity experiment furthermore shows that thermal tides lead to a significant downward shift of gravity-wave breaking in the upper mesosphere.

  14. Effects of river discharge and high-tide stage on salinity intrusion in the Weeki Wachee, Crystal, and Withlacoochee River estuaries, southwest Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yobbi, D.K.; Knochenmus, L.A.

    1989-01-01

    The Weeki Wachee, Crystal, and Withlacoochee Rivers are coastal streams flowing into the Gulf of Mexico that may be affected by either future surface water or groundwater withdrawals. Reduction of river discharge will affect the upstream extent of saltwater intrusion in the rivers; however, under certain reduced low-flow discharges, the estimated change in upstream extent of saltwater intrusion is on the order of several tenths of a mile and frequently is within the range of predicted error. Data on flow, tides, and salinity describe the physical characteristics of the Weeki Wachee, Crystal, and Withlacoochee River systems. Vertical and longitudinal salinity profiles indicate that salinity of the rivers increases downstream and varies substantially at any given location. The Weeki Wachee River system is the best mixed of the three. The Crystal River system exhibited the next best mixed system, and the Withlacoochee River system exhibited the most variation in its salinity regime. The daily maximum upstream extent of salinity intrusion is described by multiple linear-regression analysis based on daily mean streamflow of each river and high-tide stage of the gulf. The equations are used to show the effects of discharge on the daily maximum upstream extent of salinity intrusion in the rivers. (USGS)

  15. Collaborative Project. Understanding the effects of tides and eddies on the ocean dynamics, sea ice cover and decadal/centennial climate prediction using the Regional Arctic Climate Model (RACM)

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchings, Jennifer; Joseph, Renu

    2013-09-14

    The goal of this project is to develop an eddy resolving ocean model (POP) with tides coupled to a sea ice model (CICE) within the Regional Arctic System Model (RASM) to investigate the importance of ocean tides and mesoscale eddies in arctic climate simulations and quantify biases associated with these processes and how their relative contribution may improve decadal to centennial arctic climate predictions. Ocean, sea ice and coupled arctic climate response to these small scale processes will be evaluated with regard to their influence on mass, momentum and property exchange between oceans, shelf-basin, ice-ocean, and ocean-atmosphere. The project will facilitate the future routine inclusion of polar tides and eddies in Earth System Models when computing power allows. As such, the proposed research addresses the science in support of the BER’s Climate and Environmental Sciences Division Long Term Measure as it will improve the ocean and sea ice model components as well as the fully coupled RASM and Community Earth System Model (CESM) and it will make them more accurate and computationally efficient.

  16. Minutes of TOPEX/POSEIDON Science Working Team Meeting and Ocean Tides Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fu, Lee-Lueng (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    This third TOPEX/POSEIDON Science Working Team meeting was held on December 4, 1994 to review progress in defining ocean tide models, precision Earth orbits, and various science algorithms. A related workshop on ocean tides convened to select the best models to be used by scientists in the Geophysical Data Records.

  17. Detrimental Effects of Extreme Solar Activity on Life on Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Airapetian, Vladimir; Glocer, Alex; Jackman, Charles

    2015-07-01

    Solar Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs), the most energetic eruptions in the Solar System, represent large-scale disturbances forming with the solar corona and are associated with solar flares and Solar Energetic Particles (SEP) events. Current Kepler data from solar-like stars suggest that the frequency of occurrence of energetic flares and associated CMEs from the Sun can be as high as 1 per 1500 years. What effects would CME and associated SEPs have on Earth's habitability? We have performed a three-dimensional time-dependent global magnetohydrodynamic simulation of the magnetic interaction of such a CME cloud with the Earth's magnetosphere. We calculated the global structure of the perturbed magnetosphere and derive the latitude of the open-closed magnetic field boundary. We used a 2D GSFC atmospheric code to calculate the efficiency of ozone depletion in the Earth's atmosphere due to SEP events and its effects on our society and life on Earth.

  18. Impact of sea level rise on tide gate function.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Sean; Miskewitz, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Sea level rise resulting from climate change and land subsidence is expected to severely impact the duration and associated damage resulting from flooding events in tidal communities. These communities must continuously invest resources for the maintenance of existing structures and installation of new flood prevention infrastructure. Tide gates are a common flood prevention structure for low-lying communities in the tidal zone. Tide gates close during incoming tides to prevent inundation from downstream water propagating inland and open during outgoing tides to drain upland areas. Higher downstream mean sea level elevations reduce the effectiveness of tide gates by impacting the hydraulics of the system. This project developed a HEC-RAS and HEC-HMS model of an existing tide gate structure and its upland drainage area in the New Jersey Meadowlands to simulate the impact of rising mean sea level elevations on the tide gate's ability to prevent upstream flooding. Model predictions indicate that sea level rise will reduce the tide gate effectiveness resulting in longer lasting and deeper flood events. The results indicate that there is a critical point in the sea level elevation for this local area, beyond which flooding scenarios become dramatically worse and would have a significantly negative impact on the standard of living and ability to do business in one of the most densely populated areas of America.

  19. Tides of the Caribbean Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Kjerfve, B.

    1981-05-20

    Analysis of tidal characteristics from 45 gauge locations indicates that the Caribbean Sea has a microtidal range, for the most part between 10 and 20 cm. The tide is primarily either mixed semidiurnal or mixed diurnal but a substantial section from Puerto Rico to Venezuela experiences diurnal tides. Empirical charts of six component tides (M/sub 2/, S/sub 2/, N/sub 2/, K/sub 1/, O/sub 1/, and P/sub 1/) show local detail of phase and amplitude. Each of the semidiurnal component tides is characterized by anticlockwise rotating amphidromes centered in the eastern Caribbean. There is evidence of strong radiational forcing of the S/sub 2/ tide in the south-western Caribbean. The diurnal component tides are largely uniform in both phase and amplitude for most of the western and central Caribbean. However, the diurnal phases increase rapidly towards the northwest and the Yucatan Channel.

  20. Greenhouse effects: earth's climate in transition

    SciTech Connect

    Shepard, M.; Hakkarinen, C.; Hansen, A.; Spencer, D.

    1986-06-01

    Many experts are predicting significant change in the earth's climate during the next 50 years as theories of global warming gain broad acceptance in the scientific community. The consequences of accumulating greenhouse gases in the atmosphere may turn out to be the greatest environmental problem of modern times. One of the key uncertainties in projecting temperature change centers on the question of how much of the carbon dioxide (CO/sub 2/) released to the atmosphere will remain there. Scientists do not yet agree on how the CO/sub 2/ is apportioned among the plants and oceans, how much CO/sub 2/ these reservoirs can hold, or how long they can hold it. Climatologists link hundreds of mathematical equations and temperature measurements to develop their climate models, which are limited by their ability to predict regional changes accurately. There is no consensus on whether there is a need to focus on research or on developing an appropriate response. 12 references, 6 figures.

  1. Ocean tide loading displacements in western Europe: 2. GPS-observed anelastic dispersion in the asthenosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bos, Machiel S.; Penna, Nigel T.; Baker, Trevor F.; Clarke, Peter J.

    2015-09-01

    GPS-observed vertical ocean tide loading displacements show in Cornwall, southwest England, and in Brittany, northwest France, discrepancies of 2-3 mm with predicted values based on the isotropic Preliminary Reference Earth Model for the main tidal harmonic M2, yet in central Europe the agreement is better than 0.5 mm. By comparison of ocean tide models and validation with tide gauge observations, we demonstrate that the uncertainties in the former are too small to cause this disagreement. Furthermore, we find that different local models of the crust and different global elastic reference models derived from seismological observations can only reduce the observed discrepancies to 1-2 mm, which still exceeds the GPS observational uncertainty of 0.2-0.4 mm. It is customary to use the elastic properties of the Earth as given by seismic models. Previously, there has been insufficient evidence to determine how to modify these properties during the transformation from seismic to tidal frequencies to account for possible anelastic dispersion in the asthenosphere, and so this effect has been ignored. If we include this effect, then our discrepancies reduce further to 0.2-0.4 mm. This value is of the same order as the sum of the remaining errors due to uncertainties in the ocean tide models and in the GPS observations themselves. This research provides evidence in western Europe of a reduction of around 8-10% of the seismic shear modulus in the asthenosphere at tidal frequencies. In addition, we find that the asthenosphere absorption band frequencies can be represented by a constant quality factor Q.

  2. Effect of equinoctial precession on geosynchronous earth satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurfil, P.

    The long-periodic effects of the equinoctial precession on geosynchronous Earth orbit satellites are investigated. The equations of motion in a reference frame that coprecesses with the Earth are developed, and the resulting variational equations are derived using mean classical orbital elements. The Earth gravitational model includes the J_2 and J_3 zonal harmonics, which induce the equinoctial precession due to the lunisolar gravitational torque. It is shown that the ever-growing lifetime and mass of geosynchronous Earth orbit satellites render the equinoctial precession a significant factor, which should be taken into account during mission design, as it affects north-south stationkeeping maneuvers. The equilibria of the variational equations including the zonal harmonics and the equinoctial precession are investigated and a class of stable frozen orbits which are equinoctial precession invariant is derived.

  3. Radiation shelter effectiveness beyond the earth magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shurshakov, V. A.; Benghin, V. V.; Kolomensky, A. V.; Petrov, V. M.

    Solar energetic particles (SEP) and galactic cosmic rays are known to be the sources of radiation hazard for missions beyond the Earth magnetosphere. An additionally shielded compartment of the mission spacecraft, called usually the radiation shelter, is considered as an important part of the radiation safety system. The shielding of the radiation shelter must be at least a few times higher than that of the remaining compartments. The mission crewmembers are supposed to stay in the radiation shelter for relatively short time of less than a day or two during SEP events only. A job-oriented radiation monitoring system (RMS) should be used on board the Martian mission spacecraft to provide the crew with necessary prediction information concerning the onset of a large SEP event. The information should be obtained independently of the ground-based support services and, hence, should be derived from online measurements of the dynamics of soft X-rays and charged energetic particles using the RMS sensors. As a result, the signal for the spacecrew members to go to the shelter gets somewhat delayed with respect to the SEP event onset, so that they appear to stay outside the shelter for some time during the event. The dependence of the crew-received dose on the SEP event prediction lag has been analyzed in terms of the standard SEP dynamics model for a typical 500-day Martian mission scenario. The Martian mission dose simulations have demonstrated a high efficiency of the radiation shelter despite the unavoidable lag of the RMS prediction signal.

  4. Orthogonal stack of global tide gauge sea level data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trupin, A.; Wahr, J.

    1990-01-01

    Yearly and monthly tide gauge sea level data from around the globe are fitted to numerically generated equilibrium tidal data to search for the 18.6 year lunar tide and 14 month pole tide. Both tides are clearly evident in the results, and their amplitudes and phases are found to be consistent with a global equilibrium response. Global, monthly sea level data from outside the Baltic sea and Gulf of Bothnia are fitted to global atmospheric pressure data to study the response of the ocean to pressure fluctuations. The response is found to be inverted barometer at periods greater than two months. Global averages of tide gauge data, after correcting for the effects of post glacial rebound on individual station records, reveal an increase in sea level over the last 80 years of between 1.1 mm/yr and 1.9 mm/yr.

  5. Detecting the red tide based on remote sensing data in optically complex East China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaohui; Pan, Delu; Mao, Zhihua; Tao, Bangyi; Liu, Qiong

    2012-09-01

    Red tide not only destroys marine fishery production, deteriorates the marine environment, affects coastal tourist industry, but also causes human poison, even death by eating toxic seafood contaminated by red tide organisms. Remote sensing technology has the characteristics of large-scale, synchronized, rapid monitoring, so it is one of the most important and most effective means of red tide monitoring. This paper selects the high frequency red tides areas of the East China Sea as study area, MODIS/Aqua L2 data as the data source, analysis and compares the spectral differences in the red tide water bodies and non-red tide water bodies of many historical events. Based on the spectral differences, this paper develops the algorithm of Rrs555/Rrs488> 1.5 to extract the red tide information. Apply the algorithm on red tide event happened in the East China Sea on May 28, 2009 to extract the information of red tide, and found that the method can determine effectively the location of the occurrence of red tide; there is a good corresponding relationship between red tide extraction result and chlorophyll a concentration extracted by remote sensing, shows that these algorithm can determine effectively the location and extract the red tide information.

  6. Forbush Effects on the Martian Surface and Earth's Poles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posner, A.; Guo, J.; Heber, B.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.; Zeitlin, C.; Zheng, Y.; MacNeice, P. J.; Odstrcil, D.; Rastaetter, L.; Steigies, C. T.; Andrews, J. P.; Appel, J. K.; Beaujean, R.; Berger, L.; Boettcher, S. I.; Brinza, D. E.; Bullock, M.; Burmeister, S.; Cucinotta, F.; Dresing, N.; Drews, C.; Ehresmann, B.; Epperly, M. E.; Hassler, D.; Herbst, K.; Kim, M. H. Y.; Kohler, J.; Kühl, P.; Lohf, H.; Martin-Garcia, C.; Müller-Mellin, R.; Neal, K.; Rafkin, S. C.; Reitz, G.; Smith, K. D.; Tyler, Y.; weigle, G., II

    2015-12-01

    We analyzed MSL/RAD observation of Forbush effects on the surface of Mars over a full Mars year from landing through the Mars opposition period in 2014. For the extended Mars opposition phase we compared the observed Forbush effects with those identified at Earth's south pole utilizing observations of the South Pole neutron monitor. Identification of the drivers of Forbush effects, recurrent and transient solar wind structures in the inner heliosphere, is aided by WSA-ENLIL simulations. We show that a remarkable correlations of count rates of (secondary) cosmic rays at Mars' surface and at the Earth's south pole is established for a minimum duration of 6 months around the Mars opposition, in particular when time shifted with propagation and/or corotation delays of the drivers of cosmic ray decreases in the solar wind. Moreover, the magnitude of Forbush effects on Mars is larger statistically than the equivalent near Earth's poles.

  7. Tide gate valve

    SciTech Connect

    Raftis, S. G.

    1985-01-08

    A tide gate check valve in which at least three converging sides are provided at a tapered region of a flexible sleeve, so that on reverse back pressure build-up of fluid, reverse fluid flow is prevented, while the valve sleeve does not invert or collapse. The present configuration features embedded reinforcing elements for resisting inversion or collapsing when the back pressure builds up. This feature is especially important for large-sized conduits of 36'' or 72'' diameter, or even larger, such as are common in storm sewer applications.

  8. How much do tides affect the circulation of the Mediterranean Sea? From local processes in the Strait of Gibraltar to basin-scale effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naranjo, C.; Garcia-Lafuente, J.; Sannino, G.; Sanchez-Garrido, J. C.

    2014-09-01

    The effects of tidal forcing on the exchange flow through the Strait of Gibraltar and the circulation in the near-field region are revisited with a regional numerical model. Also a basin-scale model run is conducted in a first attempt to assess the impact of these local processes on the Western Mediterranean thermohaline circulation. In the Strait of Gibraltar, tides are found to (1) increase the exchange flow volume transport, (2) modify the hydrological properties of Atlantic inflowing waters through the enhancement of mixing, and (3) facilitate the drainage of Mediterranean deep water. In the far-field, the model reveals that these local processes can favor deep convection in the Gulf of Lion. Some thoughts are provided offering possible explanations.

  9. Effect of tides, river flow, and gate operations on entrainment of juvenile salmon into the interior Sacramento–San Joaquin River Delta

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perry, Russell W.; Brandes, Patricia L.; Burau, Jon R.; Sandstrom, Philip T.; Skalski, John R.

    2015-01-01

    Juvenile Chinook Salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha emigrating from natal tributaries of the Sacramento River, California, must negotiate the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta (hereafter, the Delta), a complex network of natural and man-made channels linking the Sacramento River with San Francisco Bay. Fish that enter the interior and southern Delta—the region to the south of the Sacramento River where water pumping stations are located—survive at a lower rate than fish that use alternative migration routes. Consequently, total survival decreases as the fraction of the population entering the interior Delta increases, thus spurring management actions to reduce the proportion of fish that are entrained into the interior Delta. To better inform management actions, we modeled entrainment probability as a function of hydrodynamic variables. We fitted alternative entrainment models to telemetry data that identified when tagged fish in the Sacramento River entered two river channels leading to the interior Delta (Georgiana Slough and the gated Delta Cross Channel). We found that the probability of entrainment into the interior Delta through both channels depended strongly on the river flow and tidal stage at the time of fish arrival at the river junction. Fish that arrived during ebb tides had a low entrainment probability, whereas fish that arrived during flood tides (i.e., when the river's flow was reversed) had a high probability of entering the interior Delta. We coupled our entrainment model with a flow simulation model to evaluate the effect of nighttime closures of the Delta Cross Channel gates on the daily probability of fish entrainment into the interior Delta. Relative to 24-h gate closures, nighttime closures increased daily entrainment probability by 3 percentage points on average if fish arrived at the river junction uniformly throughout the day and by only 1.3 percentage points if 85% of fish arrived at night. We illustrate how our model can be used to

  10. Lunar and Solar Torques on the Oceanic Tides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Richard D.; Bills, Bruce G.; Chao, Benjamin Fong

    1998-01-01

    A general framework for calculating lunar and solar torques on the oceanic tides is developed in terms of harmonic constituents. Axial torques and their associated angular momentum and earth-rotation variations are deduced from recent satellite-altimeter and satellite-tracking tide solutions. Torques on the prograde components of the tide produce the familiar secular braking of the rotation rate. The estimated secular acceleration is approximately -1300 sec/century(sup 2) (less 4% after including atmospheric tides); the implied rate of change in the length of day is 2.28 milliseconds/century. Torques on the retrograde components of the tide produce periodic rotation variations at twice the tidal frequency. Interaction torques, e.g. solar torques on lunar tides, generate a large suite of rotation-rate variations at sums and differences of the original tidal frequencies. These are estimated for periods from 18.6 years to quarter-diurnal. At subdaily periods the angular momentum variations are 5 to 6 orders of magnitude smaller than the variations caused by ocean tidal currents.

  11. Instability of some divalent rare earth ions and photochromic effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egranov, A. V.; Sizova, T. Yu.; Shendrik, R. Yu.; Smirnova, N. A.

    2016-03-01

    It was shown that the divalent rare earth ions (La, Ce, Gd, Tb, Lu, and Y) in cubic sites in alkaline earth fluorides are unstable with respect to electron autodetachment since its d1(eg) ground state is located in the conduction band which is consistent with the general tendency of these ions in various compounds. The localization of doubly degenerate d1(eg) level in the conduction band creates a configuration instability around the divalent rare earth ion that leading to the formation of anion vacancy in the nearest neighborhood, as was reported in the previous paper [A. Egranov, T. Sizova, Configurational instability at the excited impurity ions in alkaline earth fluorites, J. Phys. Chem. Solids 74 (2013) 530-534]. Thus, the formation of the stable divalent ions as La, Ce, Gd, Tb, Lu, and Y (PC+ centers) in CaF2 and SrF2 crystals during x-ray irradiation occurs via the formation of charged anion vacancies near divalent ions (Re2+va), which lower the ground state of the divalent ion relative to the conductivity band. Photochromic effect occurs under thermally or optically stimulated electron transition from the divalent rare earth ion to the neighboring anion vacancy and reverse under ultraviolet light irradiation. It is shown that the optical absorption of the PC+ centers due to d → d and d → f transitions of the divalent rare-earth ion.

  12. FULLY COMPRESSIVE TIDES IN GALAXY MERGERS

    SciTech Connect

    Renaud, F.; Boily, C. M.; Naab, T.; Theis, Ch.

    2009-11-20

    The disruptive effect of galactic tides is a textbook example of gravitational dynamics. However, depending on the shape of the potential, tides can also become fully compressive. When that is the case, they might trigger or strengthen the formation of galactic substructures (star clusters and tidal dwarf galaxies), instead of destroying them. We perform N-body simulations of interacting galaxies to quantify this effect. We demonstrate that tidal compression occurs repeatedly during a galaxy merger, independently of the specific choice of parameterization. With a model tailored to the Antennae galaxies, we show that the distribution of compressive tides matches the locations and timescales of observed substructures. After extending our study to a broad range of parameters, we conclude that neither the importance of the compressive tides (approx15% of the stellar mass) nor their duration (approx10{sup 7} yr) is strongly affected by changes in the progenitors' configurations and orbits. Moreover, we show that individual clumps of matter can enter compressive regions several times in the course of a simulation. We speculate that this may spawn multiple star formation episodes in some star clusters, through, e.g., enhanced gas retention.

  13. [Illumination's effect on the growth and nitrate reductase activity of typical red-tide algae in the East China Sea].

    PubMed

    Li, Hong-mei; Shi, Xiao-yong; Ding, Yan-yan; Tang, Hong-jie

    2013-09-01

    Two typical red-tide algae, Skeletonema costatum and Prorocentrum donghaiense were selected as studied objects. The nitrate reductase activity (NRA) and the growth of the two algae under different illuminations through incubation experiment were studied. The illumination condition was consistent with in situ. Results showed that P. donghaiense and S. costatum could grow normally in the solar radiation ranged from 30-60 W x m(-2), and the growth curve was "S" type. However, when solar radiation was below 9 W x m(-2), the two alga could hardly grow. In the range of 0-60 W x m(-2), three parameters (NRAmax, micro(max), Bf) increased with the increasing of light intensity, indicating that the light intensity can influence the grow of alga indirectly through influencing the nitrate reductase activity. The micro(max) and NRAmax in unite volume of Skeletonema costatum were higher than those of Prorocentrum donghaiense, indicating that Skeletonema costatum can better utilize the nitrate than Prorocentrum donghaiense.

  14. Turning the tide: effects of river inflow and tidal amplitude on sandy estuaries in laboratory landscape experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinhans, Maarten; Braat, Lisanne; Leuven, Jasper; Baar, Anne; van der Vegt, Maarten; van Maarseveen, Marcel; Markies, Henk; Roosendaal, Chris; van Eijk, Arjan

    2016-04-01

    Many estuaries formed over the Holocene through a combination of fluvial and coastal influxes, but how estuary planform shape and size depend on tides, wave climate and river influxes remains unclear. Here we use a novel tidal flume setup of 20 m length by 3 m width, the Metronome (http://www.uu.nl/metronome), to create estuaries and explore a parameter space for the simple initial condition of a straight river in sandy substrate. Tidal currents capable of transporting sediment in both the ebb and flood phase because they are caused by periodic tilting of the flume rather than the classic method of water level fluctuation. Particle imaging velocimetry and a 1D shallow flow model demonstrate that this principle leads to similar sediment mobility as in nature. Ten landscape experiments recorded by timelapse overhead imaging and AGIsoft DEMs of the final bed elevation show that absence of river inflow leads to short tidal basins whereas even a minor discharge leads to long convergent estuaries. Estuary width and length as well as morphological time scale over thousands of tidal cycles strongly depend on tidal current amplitude. Paddle-generated waves subdue the ebb delta causing stronger tidal currents in the basin. Bar length-width ratios in estuaries are slightly larger to those in braided rivers in experiments and nature. Mutually evasive ebb- and flood-dominated channels are ubiquitous and appear to be formed by an instability mechanism with growing bar and bifurcation asymmetry. Future experiments will include mud flats and live vegetation.

  15. [Illumination's effect on the growth and nitrate reductase activity of typical red-tide algae in the East China Sea].

    PubMed

    Li, Hong-mei; Shi, Xiao-yong; Ding, Yan-yan; Tang, Hong-jie

    2013-09-01

    Two typical red-tide algae, Skeletonema costatum and Prorocentrum donghaiense were selected as studied objects. The nitrate reductase activity (NRA) and the growth of the two algae under different illuminations through incubation experiment were studied. The illumination condition was consistent with in situ. Results showed that P. donghaiense and S. costatum could grow normally in the solar radiation ranged from 30-60 W x m(-2), and the growth curve was "S" type. However, when solar radiation was below 9 W x m(-2), the two alga could hardly grow. In the range of 0-60 W x m(-2), three parameters (NRAmax, micro(max), Bf) increased with the increasing of light intensity, indicating that the light intensity can influence the grow of alga indirectly through influencing the nitrate reductase activity. The micro(max) and NRAmax in unite volume of Skeletonema costatum were higher than those of Prorocentrum donghaiense, indicating that Skeletonema costatum can better utilize the nitrate than Prorocentrum donghaiense. PMID:24288981

  16. Reduction of ocean tide aliasing in the context of a next generation gravity field mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pail, Roland; Hauk, Markus; Daras, Ilias; Murböck, Michael; Purkhauser, Anna

    2016-04-01

    Ocean tide aliasing is currently one of the main limiting factors for temporal gravity field determination and the derivation of mass transport processes in the Earth system. This will be true even more for future gravity field missions with improved measurement technology, which cannot be fully exploited due to this dominant systematic error source. In several previous studies it has been shown that temporal aliasing, related to tidal and non-tidal sources, can be significantly reduced by double-pair formations, e.g., in a so-called Bender configuration, and its effects can be migrated to higher frequencies by an optimum orbit choice, especially the orbit altitude (Murböck et al. 2014). Improved processing strategies and extended parameter models should be able to further reduce the problem. Concerning non-tidal aliasing, it could be shown that the parameterization of short-period long-wavelength gravity field signals, the so-called Wiese approach, is a powerful method for aliasing reduction (Wiese et al. 2011), but it does not really work for the very short-period signals of ocean tides with mainly semi-diurnal and diurnal periods (Daras 2015). In this contribution, several methods dealing with the reduction of ocean tide aliasing are investigated both from a methodological and a numerical point of view. One of the promising strategies is the co-estimation of selected tidal constituents over long time periods, also considering the basic orbit frequencies of the satellites. These improved estimates for ocean tide signals can then be used in a second step as an enhanced de-aliasing product for the computation of short-period temporal gravity fields. From a number of theoretical considerations and numerical case-studies, recommendations for an optimum orbit selection with respect to reduction of ocean tide aliasing shall be derived for two main mission scenarios. The first one is a classical Bender configuration being composed of a (near-)polar and an inclined in

  17. Lunar and Solar Torques on the Oceanic Tides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Richard D.; Bills, Bruce G.; Chao, Benjamin F.

    1998-01-01

    Brosche and Seiler recently suggested that direct lunar and solar tidal torques on the oceanic tides play a significant role in the earth's short-period angular momentum balance ("short-period" here meaning daily and sub-daily). We reexamine that suggestion here, concentrating on axial torques and hence on variations in rotation rate. Only those spherical harmonic components of the ocean tide having the same degree and order as the tidal potential induce nonzero torques. Prograde components (those moving in the same direction as the tide-generating body) produce the familiar secular braking of the earth's rotation. Retrograde components, however, produce rapid variations in UTI at twice the tidal frequency. There also exist interaction torques between tidal constituents, e.g. solar torques on lunar tides. They generate UTI variations at frequencies equal to the sums and differences of the original tidal frequencies. We give estimates of the torques and angular momentum variations for each of the important regimes, secular to quarter-diurnal. For the M(sub 2) potential acting on the M(sub 2) ocean tide, we find an associated angular momentum variation of amplitude 3 x 10(exp 19) N m. This is 5 to 6 orders of magnitude smaller than the angular momentum variations associated with tidal currents. We conclude that these torques do not play a significant role in the short-period angular momentum balance.

  18. Cloud feedback - A stabilizing effect for the early earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossow, W. B.; Weinreich, S. K.; Henderson-Sellers, A.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of variations in cloud cover, optical properties, and fractional distribution with altitude on the mean surface temperature of a model of the early earth has been investigated. In all cases examined, cloud-climate feedbacks result in temperatures greater than those in models with no cloud feedbacks. If the model of hydrospheric feedback effects is correct, then cloud feedbacks are as important to the climate as changes in solar luminosity and atmospheric composition during the earth's atmospheric evolution. In particular, the early earth need not become completely ice-covered if strong negative cloud feedbacks occur. However, until a proper understanding of cloud feedbacks is available, conclusions regarding conditions in the early atmosphere must remain in doubt.

  19. Ocean tides for satellite geodesy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickman, S. R.

    1990-01-01

    Spherical harmonic tidal solutions have been obtained at the frequencies of the 32 largest luni-solar tides using prior theory of the author. That theory was developed for turbulent, nonglobal, self-gravitating, and loading oceans possessing realistic bathymetry and linearized bottom friction; the oceans satisfy no-flow boundary conditions at coastlines. In this theory the eddy viscosity and bottom drag coefficients are treated as spatially uniform. Comparison of the predicted degree-2 components of the Mf, P1, and M2 tides with those from numerical and satellite-based tide models allows the ocean friction parameters to be estimated at long and short periods. Using the 32 tide solutions, the frequency dependence of tidal admittance is investigated, and the validity of sideband tide models used in satellite orbit analysis is examined. The implications of admittance variability for oceanic resonances are also explored.

  20. Effects of three macroalgae, Ulva linza (Chlorophyta), Corallina pilulifera (Rhodophyta) and Sargassum thunbergii (Phaeophyta) on the growth of the red tide microalga Prorocentrum donghaiense under laboratory conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Renjun; Xiao, Hui; Wang, You; Zhou, Wenli; Tang, Xuexi

    2007-10-01

    Allelopathic effects of several concentrations of fresh tissue and dry powder of three macroalgae, Ulva linza, Corallina pilulifera and Sargassum thunbergii, on the red tide microalga Prorocentrum donghaiense were evaluated in microcosms. Preliminary studies on the algicidal effects of one aqueous and four organic solvent extracts from the macroalgae on the microalga were carried out to confirm the existence of allelochemicals in the tissues of the macroalgae. The effects of macroalgal culture medium filtrate on P. donghaiense were investigated using initial or semi-continuous filtrate addition. Furthermore, the potential effects of the microalga on these three macroalgae were also tested. The results of the microcosm assay showed that the growth of P. donghaiense was strongly inhibited by using fresh tissues and dry powder of the three macroalgae. Both aqueous and methanol extracts of the macroalgae had strong growth inhibitory effects on P. donghaiense, while the other three organic solvent extracts (acetone, ether and chloroform) had no apparent effect on its growth; this suggested that the allelochemicals from these three macroalga had relatively high polarities. The three macroalgal culture medium filtrates exhibited apparent growth inhibitory effect on the microalgae under initial or semi-continuous addition, which suggested that the cells of P. donghaiense are sensitive to the allelochemicals. In contrast, P. donghaiense had no apparent effect on the growth of the macroalgae in coexistence experiment.

  1. Effects of currents and tides on fine-scale use of marine bird habitats in a Southeast Alaska hotspot

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Drew, Gary S.; Piatt, John F.; Hill, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Areas with high species richness have become focal points in the establishment of marine protected areas, but an understanding of the factors that support this diversity is still incomplete. In coastal areas, tidal currents—modulated by bathymetry and manifested in variable speeds—are a dominant physical feature of the environment. However, difficulties resolving tidally affected currents and depths at fine spatial-temporal scales have limited our ability to understand their influence the distribution of marine birds. We used a hydrographic model of the water mass in Glacier Bay, Alaska to link depths and current velocities with the locations of 15 common marine bird species observed during fine-scale boat-based surveys of the bay conducted during June of four consecutive years (2000-2003). Marine birds that forage on the bottom tended to occupy shallow habitats with slow-moving currents; mid-water foragers used habitats with intermediate depths and current speeds; and surface-foraging species tended to use habitats with fast-moving, deep waters. Within foraging groups there was variability among species in their use of habitats. While species obligated to foraging near bottom were constrained to use similar types of habitat, species in the mid-water foraging group were associated with a wider range of marine habitat characteristics. Species also showed varying levels of site use depending on tide stage. The dramatic variability in bottom topography—especially the presence of numerous sills, islands, headlands and channels—and large tidal ranges in Glacier Bay create a wide range of current-affected fine-scale foraging habitats that may contribute to the high diversity of marine bird species found there.

  2. Gastrointestinal Emergency Room Admissions and Florida Red Tide Blooms.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, Barbara; Bean, Judy A; Fleming, Lora E; Kirkpatrick, Gary; Grief, Lynne; Nierenberg, Kate; Reich, Andrew; Watkins, Sharon; Naar, Jerome

    2010-01-01

    Human exposure to brevetoxins during Florida red tide blooms formed by Karenia brevis has been documented to cause acute gastrointestinal, neurologic, and respiratory health effects.. Traditionally, the routes of brevetoxin exposure have been through the consumption of contaminated bivalve shellfish and the inhalation of contaminated aerosols. However, recent studies using more sensitive methods have demonstrated the presence of brevetoxins in many components of the aquatic food web which may indicate potential alternative routes for human exposure.This study examined whether the presence of a Florida red tide bloom affected the rates of admission for a gastrointestinal diagnosis to a hospital emergency room in Sarasota, FL. The rates of gastrointestinal diagnoses admissions were compared for a 3-month time period in 2001 when Florida red tide bloom was present onshore to the same 3-month period in 2002 when no Florida red tide bloom occurred. A significant 40% increase in the total number of gastrointestinal emergency room admissions for the Florida red tide bloom period was found compared to the non red tide period.These results suggest that the healthcare community may experience a significant and unrecognized impact from patients needing emergency medical care for gastrointestinal illnesses during Florida red tide blooms. Thus, additional studies characterizing the potential sources of exposure to the toxins, as well as the dose/effect relationship of brevetoxin exposure, should be undertaken.

  3. The effects of general relativity on near-earth satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ries, J. C.; Watkins, M. M.; Tapley, B. D.; Huang, C.

    1990-01-01

    Whether one uses a solar system barycentric frame or a geocentric frame when including the general theory of relativity in orbit determination for near-earth satellites, the results should be equivalent to some limiting accuracy. The purpose of this paper is to clarify the effects of relativity in each frame and to demonstrate their equivalence through the analysis of three years of laser tracking data taken on the Lageos satellite. It is demonstrated that the simpler formulation in the geocentric frame is adequate for the purpose of near-earth satellite orbit determination. A correction to the conventional barycentric equations of motion is shown to be required.

  4. The Runaway Greenhouse Effect on Earth and other Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rabbette, Maura; Pilewskie, Peter; McKay, Christopher; Young, Robert

    2001-01-01

    Water vapor is an efficient absorber of outgoing longwave infrared radiation on Earth and is the primary greenhouse gas. Since evaporation increases with increasing sea surface temperature, and the increase in water vapor further increases greenhouse warming, there is a positive feedback. The runaway greenhouse effect occurs if this feedback continues unchecked until all the water has left the surface and enters the atmosphere. For Mars and the Earth the runaway greenhouse was halted when water vapor became saturated with respect to ice or liquid water respectively. However, Venus is considered to be an example of a planet where the runaway greenhouse effect did occur, and it has been speculated that if the solar luminosity were to increase above a certain limit, it would also occur on the Earth. Satellite data acquired during the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) under clear sky conditions shows that as the sea surface temperature (SST) increases, the rate of outgoing infrared radiation at the top of the atmosphere also increases, as expected. Over the pacific warm pool where the SST exceeds 300 K the outgoing radiation emitted to space actually decreases with increasing SST, leading to a potentially unstable system. This behavior is a signature of the runaway greenhouse effect on Earth. However, the SST never exceeds 303K, thus the system has a natural cap which stops the runaway. According to Stefan-Boltzmann's law the amount of heat energy radiated by the Earth's surface is proportional to (T(sup 4)). However, if the planet has a substantial atmosphere, it can absorb all infrared radiation from the lower surface before the radiation penetrates into outer space. Thus, an instrument in space looking at the planet does not detect radiation from the surface. The radiation it sees comes from some level higher up. For the earth#s atmosphere the effective temperature (T(sub e)) has a value of 255 K corresponding to the middle troposphere, above most of the

  5. Low-earth-orbit effects on strength of glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiedlocher, David E.; Tucker, Dennis S.; Nichols, Ron; Kinser, Donald L.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of a 5.8-y exposure to low-earth-orbit environment upon the mechanical properties of five commercial glasses and a low-expansion-coefficient glass-ceramic have been examined. The radiation components of the earth-orbit environment did not degrade the mechanical strength of the samples examined within the limits of experimental error. Statistical problems arising from the low frequency of micrometeorite or space debris impacts upon the samples precluded statistically valid measurement of impacted sample strengths. Upper bounds for the magnitude of the impact event damage upon the strengths for impacted samples have been determined.

  6. A review of ionospheric effects on Earth-space propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klobuchar, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    A short description is given of each ionospheric total electron content (TEC) effect upon radio waves, along with a representative value of the magnitude of each of these effects under normal ionospheric conditions. A discussion is given of the important characteristics of average ionospheric TEC behavior and the temporal and spatial variability of TEC. Radio waves undergo several effects when they pass through the Earth's ionosphere. One of the most important of these effects is a retardation, or group delay, on the modulation or information carried on the radio wave that is due to its encounter with the free, thermal electrons in the Earth's ionosphere. Other effects the ionosphere has on radio waves include: radio frequency (RF) carrier phase advance; Doppler shift of the RF carrier of the radio wave; Faraday rotation of the plane of polarization of linearly polarized waves; angular refraction or bending of the radio wave path as it travels through the ionosphere; and amplitude and phase scintillations.

  7. Red tide (Ptychodiscus brevis) toxin aerosols: a review.

    PubMed

    Pierce, R H

    1986-01-01

    Advances in knowledge concerning red tide toxin aerosols (airborne) of the Florida red tide organism, Ptychodiscus brevis, have not kept pace with information about waterborne toxins. This review provides a summary of current knowledge regarding the characterization, effect and production of red tide toxin aerosols. Insight into the chemical characterization and toxic effects of aerosolized toxins is provided from investigations of toxins extracted from natural blooms, as well as from laboratory cultures, of P. brevis. This information is used in conjunction with the few studies that have been performed on toxin aerosols to consider toxic effects. The production of aerosolized toxins is considered through studies of jet drop aerosol formation from bursting bubbles. Existing information suggests that aerosolized red tide toxins may be the same chemicals as those extracted from laboratory cultures, with one of the toxins having a greater respiratory effect than others.

  8. The self-consistent dynamic pole tide in global oceans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickman, S. R.

    1985-01-01

    The dynamic pole tide is characterized in a self-consistent manner by means of introducing a single nondifferential matrix equation compatible with the Liouville equation, modelling the ocean as global and of uniform depth. The deviations of the theory from the realistic ocean, associated with the nonglobality of the latter, are also given consideration, with an inference that in realistic oceans long-period modes of resonances would be increasingly likely to exist. The analysis of the nature of the pole tide and its effects on the Chandler wobble indicate that departures of the pole tide from the equilibrium may indeed be minimal.

  9. The measurement of Earth rotation on a deformable Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cannon, W. H.

    1980-01-01

    Until recently, the methods of geodetic positioning on the Earth were limited to a precision of roughly one part in 10 to the 6th power. At this level of precision, the Earth can be regarded as a rigid body since the largest departure of the Earth from rigidity is manifested in the strains of the Earth tides which are of the order of one part in 10 to the 7th power. Long baseline interferometry is expected to routinely provide global positioning to a precision of one part in 10 to the 8th power or better. At this level of precision, all parts of the Earth's surface must be regarded as being, at least potentially, in continual motion relative to the geocenter as a result of a variety of geophysical effects. The general implications of this phenomenon for the theory of the Earth's rotation is discussed. Particular attention is given to the question of the measurement of the 'Earth's rotation vector' on a deformable Earth.

  10. Effects of megascale eruptions on Earth and Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thordarson, T.; Rampino, M.; Keszthelyi, L.P.; Self, S.

    2009-01-01

    Volcanic features are common on geologically active earthlike planets. Megascale or "super" eruptions involving >1000 Gt of magma have occurred on both Earth and Mars in the geologically recent past, introducing prodigious volumes of ash and volcanic gases into the atmosphere. Here we discuss felsic (explosive) and mafi c (flood lava) supereruptions and their potential atmospheric and environmental effects on both planets. On Earth, felsic supereruptions recur on average about every 100-200,000 years and our present knowledge of the 73.5 ka Toba eruption implies that such events can have the potential to be catastrophic to human civilization. A future eruption of this type may require an unprecedented response from humankind to assure the continuation of civilization as we know it. Mafi c supereruptions have resulted in atmospheric injection of volcanic gases (especially SO2) and may have played a part in punctuating the history of life on Earth. The contrast between the more sustained effects of flood basalt eruptions (decades to centuries) and the near-instantaneous effects of large impacts (months to years) is worthy of more detailed study than has been completed to date. Products of mafi c supereruptions, signifi cantly larger than known from the geologic record on Earth, are well preserved on Mars. The volatile emissions from these eruptions most likely had global dispersal, but the effects may not have been outside what Mars endures even in the absence of volcanic eruptions. This is testament to the extreme variability of the current Martian atmosphere: situations that would be considered catastrophic on Earth are the norm on Mars. ?? 2009 The Geological Society of America.

  11. M2 world ocean tide from tide gauge measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, O.; Mazzega, P. )

    1991-06-01

    An empirical model of the M2 oceanic tide has been computed form the harmonic constants of a subset of deep sea and coastal tide gauge measurements. The optimal interpolation of these data based on inverse theory' uses a priori covariance functions deduced from a global hydrodynamical model. The inverse solution, produced with its associated error maps and samples of error spectra, is surprisingly good when compared to in situ data and to a hydrodynamical model.

  12. Earth Impact Effects Program: Estimating the Regional Environmental Consequences of Impacts On Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, G. S.; Melosh, H. J.; Marcus, R. A.

    2009-12-01

    The Earth Impact Effects Program (www.lpl.arizona.edu/impacteffects) is a popular web-based calculator for estimating the regional environmental consequences of a comet or asteroid impact on Earth. It is widely used, both by inquisitive members of the public as an educational device and by scientists as a simple research tool. It applies a variety of scaling laws, based on theory, nuclear explosion test data, observations from terrestrial and extraterrestrial craters and the results of small-scale impact experiments and numerical modelling, to quantify the principal hazards that might affect the people, buildings and landscape in the vicinity of an impact. The program requires six inputs: impactor diameter, impactor density, impact velocity prior to atmospheric entry, impact angle, and the target type (sedimentary rock, crystalline rock, or a water layer above rock), as well as the distance from the impact at which the environmental effects are to be calculated. The program includes simple algorithms for estimating the fate of the impactor during atmospheric traverse, the thermal radiation emitted by the impact plume (fireball) and the intensity of seismic shaking. The program also approximates various dimensions of the impact crater and ejecta deposit, as well as estimating the severity of the air blast in both crater-forming and airburst impacts. We illustrate the strengths and limitations of the program by comparing its predictions (where possible) against known impacts, such as Carancas, Peru (2007); Tunguska, Siberia (1908); Barringer (Meteor) crater, Arizona (ca 49 ka). These tests demonstrate that, while adequate for large impactors, the simple approximation of atmospheric entry in the original program does not properly account for the disruption and dispersal of small impactors as they traverse Earth's atmosphere. We describe recent improvements to the calculator to better describe atmospheric entry of small meteors; the consequences of oceanic impacts; and

  13. Long-period perturbations in Starlette orbit and tide solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, M. K.; Shum, C. K.; Eanes, R. J.; Schutz, B. E.; Tapley, B. D.

    1990-01-01

    The long-period perturbations present in the orbit of the Starlette geodetic satellite is analyzed using a one-year continuous orbit from October 1976 through October 1977 and a three-year orbit during 1983 through 1985. A solution for 66 ocean tidal parameters for 14 low-degree tidal constituents is obtained in a simultaneous least squares estimation procedure with other geodynamic and orbit parameters. The yearly values of the second-degree S(a) tides, which have been observed to produce significant seasonal variations on the Starlette node, are included in the solution. Good agreement is found between the solutions, other satellite solutions, the oceanographic tide solutions, and other investigations using the computation of the earth's tidal response. The results indicate that the Starlette tide solutions produces significantly improved orbit fits for both Lageos and Starlette.

  14. Error analysis of empirical ocean tide models estimated from TOPEX/POSEIDON altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, Shailen D.; Wahr, John M.; Chao, Yi

    1997-11-01

    An error budget is proposed for the TOPEX/POSEIDON (T/P) empirical ocean tide models estimated during the primary mission. The error budget evaluates the individual contribution of errors in each of the altimetric range corrections, orbit errors caused by errors in the background ocean tide potential, and errors caused by the general circulation of the oceans, to errors in the ocean tide models of the eight principal diurnal and semidiurnal tidal components, and the two principal long-period tidal components. The effect of continually updating the T/P empirical ocean tide models during the primary T/P mission is illustrated through tide gauge comparisons and then used to predict the impact of further updates during the extended mission. Both the tide gauge comparisons and the error analysis predict errors in the tide models for the eight principal diurnal and semidiurnal constituents to be of the order of 2-3 cm root-sum-square. The dominant source of errors in the T/P ocean tide models appears to be caused by the general circulation of the oceans observed by the T/P altimeter. Further updates of the T/P empirical ocean tide models during the extended mission should not provide significant improvements in the diurnal and semidiurnal ocean tide models but should provide significant improvements in the long-period ocean tide models, particularly in the monthly (Mm) tidal component.

  15. Tides in Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, David J.

    2015-11-01

    The arrival of Juno at Jupiter in less than a year necessitates analysis of what we can learn from the gravitational signal due to tides raised on the planet by satellites (especially Io but also Europa). In the existing literature, there is extensive work on static tidal theory (the response of the planet to a tidal potential whose time dependence is ignored) and this is what is usually quoted when people refer to tidal Love numbers. If this were correct then there would be almost no new information content in the measurement of tidally induced gravity field, since the perturbation is of the same kind as the response to rotation (i.e., the measurement of J2, a well-known quantity). However, tides are dynamic (that is, k2 is frequency dependent) and so there is new information in the frequency dependent part. There is also (highly important) information in the imaginary part (more commonly expressed as tidal Q) but there is no prospect of direct detection of this by Juno since that quadrature signal is so small. The difference between what we expect to measure and what we can already calculate directly from J2 is easily shown to be of order the square of tidal frequency over the lowest order normal mode frequency, and thus of order 10%. However, the governing equations are not simple (not separable) because of the Coriolis force. An approximate solution has been obtained for the n =1 polytrope showing that the correction to k2 is even smaller, typically a few percent, because the tidal frequency is not very different from twice the rotation frequency. Moreover, it is not highly sensitive to structure in standard models. However, the deep interior of the planet may be stably stratified because of a compositional gradient and this modifies the tidal flow amplitude, changing the dynamic k2 but not the static k2. This raises the exciting possibility that we can use the determination of k2 to set bounds on the extent of static stability, if any. There is also the slight

  16. Flattening Earth acceleration in atomic fountains

    SciTech Connect

    Bertoldi, Andrea

    2010-07-15

    A method to compensate for Earth's gravity tide over an extended axial region is reported. Flattening acceleration is important in experiments where the coupling of the dynamics of free-falling probes to the gravity gradient generates stochastic noise on the measurement. Optimized cylindrically symmetric mass distributions lower Earth's tidal effect over 10 cm by a factor 10{sup 3}. A multimass compensation system with comparable performance is devised for tall atom interferometers. Reducing the gravity gradient is essential in terrestrial experiments based on atom fountain configurations being developed to precisely test general relativity or the neutrality of matter.

  17. Radiative effects of the ozone layer on Snowball Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Y.; Yang, J.

    2011-12-01

    Geochemical and geological evidence suggested that atmospheric oxygen rose from about 2% to about 10% of the present atmospheric level over the period of 750-580 million years ago when several nearly global glaciations or Snowball Earth events formed. The increase in oxygen would lead to an increase in ozone concentration in the atmosphere. Since ozone is a greenhouse gas, changes in ozone concentration would alter surface temperatures. Thus, ozone changes would have important influences on Snowball Earth formation or deglaciation. Previous works for either the initiation or the deglaciation of the hard Snowball Earth have not taken the radiative effects of the ozone layer into account. Here, we study this issue by carrying out simulations using an atmospheric general circulation model with various ozone concentrations and spatial distributions. Simulation results show that as O3 concentration is uniformly reduced from 100% to 50%, the global-mean surface temperature is decreased by approximately 1 K, and the largest decrease is located at the subpolar region, with values up to 3 K. As ozone concentration is reduced, the ozone layer is lowered, and weak ozone transport from the tropics to higher latitudes, surface temperature is decreased by approximately 1 K in the tropics and by about 6 K in polar regions. These results suggest that simulations with the present-day ozone concentration and spatial distributions would overestimate (underestimate) the CO2 threshold required to initiate (terminate) the Snowball Earth.

  18. Earth's rotation variations effect the earthquake triggering and lithospheric plates movement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrihansky, Lubor

    2013-04-01

    The first group of scientists claims that the headline stated above is quite absurd because the Earth's rotation variations exert the pressure only ~1 Pa on the lithosphere. The second group claims that the despinning of the axial Earth's rotation only influences not determines the plate motion and earthquake triggering. However the third possibility is correct. The Earth's rotation variations cause the earthquake triggering and the plate movement as many observations can prove. Comparison with neighboring planets shows that Mars has no plate movement owing to the absence of large tidal forming body and Venus has slow rotation and negligible flattening. It is not true that tidal forces acting on the Earth are insufficient. Tidal forces acting on the Earth's flattening cause sufficient northward directing torques acting on plates comparable in magnitudes with the seismic moments. The westward movement of plates is evident but its calculation is more difficult and it is necessary to suppose that both the acceleration and deceleration of the Earth's rotation cause the westward lithosphere movement. Many statistics prove the coincidence of earthquakes with semidiurnal tides as result of mid-ocean ridges formation owing to the material fatigue and by loading of waters in subduction zones. Coincidence of earthquakes with LOD variations extremes resulting in Earth moment of inertia changes owing to the tidal deformation and other coincidences with factors influencing the Earth's rotation as 8.45 years Moon perigee rotation and 18.63 years nodal variation present next proofs. The last confirmation follows from the earthquake repetitions in 19 years Metonic cycle. But claims that the plate movement is caused by the mantle convection or by inhomogenities in the mantle or even by the Earth's expansions are easily disprovable conjectures.

  19. Earth matter effect on active-sterile neutrino oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acero, Mario A.; Aguilar-Arevalo, Alexis A.; D'Olivo, J. C.

    2011-08-01

    Oscillations between active and sterile neutrinos remain as an open possibility to explain some experimental observations. In a four-neutrino mixing scheme, we use the Magnus expansion of the evolution operator to study the evolution of neutrino flavor amplitudes within the Earth. We apply this formalism to calculate the transition probabilities from active to sterile neutrinos taking into account the matter effect for a varying terrestrial density.

  20. Magnetostatic Effects in the Nucleation of Rare Earth Ferromagnetic Phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durfee, C. S.; Flynn, C. P.

    2001-07-01

    It has been reported that superheating, supercooling, and explosive kinetics coupled to other degrees of freedom occur at the ferromagnetic transitions of Er and Dy, and that metastable phases occur during the transition kinetics of Er. We explain these observations in terms of magnetostatic energy, which requires highly eccentric nuclei in the homogeneous nucleation of magnetic transitions in heavy rare earths. The magnetostatics favor transitions through ferrimagnetic intermediaries. The unusual kinetics derive from effective spin lattice relaxation.

  1. Magnetostatic Effects in the Nucleation of Rare Earth Ferromagnetic Phases

    SciTech Connect

    Durfee, C. S.; Flynn, C. P.

    2001-07-30

    It has been reported that superheating, supercooling, and explosive kinetics coupled to other degrees of freedom occur at the ferromagnetic transitions of Er and Dy, and that metastable phases occur during the transition kinetics of Er. We explain these observations in terms of magnetostatic energy, which requires highly eccentric nuclei in the homogeneous nucleation of magnetic transitions in heavy rare earths. The magnetostatics favor transitions through ferrimagnetic intermediaries. The unusual kinetics derive from effective spin lattice relaxation.

  2. On the tidal effects in the motion of earth satellites and the love parameters of the earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musen, P.; Estes, R.

    1972-01-01

    The tidal effects in the motion of artificial satellites are studied to determine the elastic properties of the earth as they are observed from extraterrestrial space. Considering Love numbers, the disturbing potential is obtained as the analytical continuation of the tidal potential from the surface of the earth into-outer space, with parameters which characterize the earth's elastic response to tidal attraction by the moon and the sun. It is concluded that the tidal effects represent a superposition of a large number of periodic terms, and the rotation of the lunar orbital plane produces a term of 18 years period in tidal perturbations of the ascending node of the satellite's orbit.

  3. M2, S2, K1 models of the global ocean tide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parke, M. E.; Hendershott, M. C.

    1979-01-01

    Ocean tidal signals appear in many geophysical measurements. Geophysicists need realistic tidal models to aid in interpretation of their data. Because of the closeness to resonance of dissipationless ocean tides, it is difficult for numerical models to correctly represent the actual open ocean tide. As an approximate solution to this problem, test functions derived by solving Laplace's Tidal Equations with ocean loading and self gravitation are used as a basis for least squares dynamic interpolation of coastal and island tidal data for the constituents M2, S2, and Kl. The resulting representations of the global tide are stable over at least a ?5% variation in the mean depth of the model basin, and they conserve mass. Maps of the geocentric tide, the induced free space potential, the induced vertical component of the solid earth tide, and the induced vertical component of the gravitational field for each contituent are presented.

  4. Downwelling wind, tides, and estuarine plume dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Zhigang; Ma, Ronghua; Huang, Mingfen; Chen, Changsheng; Chen, Yong; Xie, Congbin; Beardsley, Robert C.

    2016-06-01

    The estuarine plume dynamics under a downwelling-favorable wind condition were examined in the windy dry season of the Pearl River Estuary (PRE) using the PRE primitive-equation Finite-Volume Community Ocean Model (FVCOM). The wind and tide-driven estuarine circulation had a significant influence on the plume dynamics on both local and remote scales. Specifically, the local effect of downwelling-favorable winds on the plume was similar to the theoretical descriptions of coastal plumes, narrowing the plume width, and setting up a vertically uniform downstream current at the plume edge. Tides tended to reduce these plume responses through local turbulent mixing and advection from upstream regions, resulting in an adjustment of the isohalines in the plume and a weakening of the vertically uniform downstream current. The remote effect of downwelling-favorable winds on the plume was due to the wind-induced estuarine sea surface height (SSH), which strengthened the estuarine circulation and enhanced the plume transport accordingly. Associated with these processes, tide-induced mixing tended to weaken the SSH gradient and thus the estuarine circulation over a remote influence scale. Overall, the typical features of downwelling-favorable wind-driven estuarine plumes revealed in this study enhanced our understanding of the estuarine plume dynamics under downwelling-favorable wind conditions.

  5. Red Tide off Texas Coast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Red tides (algae) bloomed late this summer along a 300-mile stretch of Texas' Gulf Coast, killing millions of fish and shellfish as well as making some people sick. State officials are calling this the worst red tide bloom in 14 years. The algae produces a poison that paralyzes fish and prevents them from breathing. There is concern that the deadly algae could impact or even wipe out this year's oyster harvest in Texas, which usually peaks during the Thanksgiving and Christmas holidays. The red tides were first observed off the Texas coast in mid-August and have been growing steadily in size ever since. Red tides tend to bloom and subside rapidly, depending upon changes in wind speed and direction, water temperature, salinity, and rainfall patterns (as the algae doesn't do as well in fresher water). This true-color image of the Texas Gulf Coast was acquired on September 29, 2000, by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) flying aboard NASA's Terra spacecraft. The red tide can be seen as the dark reddish discoloration in the ocean running southwest to northeast along the coast. In this scene, the bloom appears to be concentrated north and east of Corpus Christi, just off Matagorda Island. The image was made at 500-meter resolution using a combination of MODIS' visible bands 1 (red), 4 (green), and 3 (blue). The city of Houston can be seen clearly as the large, greyish cluster of pixels to the north and west of Galveston Bay, which is about mid-way up the coastline in this image. Also visible in this image are plumes of smoke, perhaps wildfires, both to the north and northeast of Houston. For more information about red tides, refer to the Texas Red Tide Web site. Image courtesy Andrey Savtchenko, MODIS Data Support Team, and the MODIS Ocean Team, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

  6. Anomalous Hall Effect in a Feromagnetic Rare-Earth Cobalite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samoilov, A. V.; Yeh, N. C.; Vasquez, R. P.

    1996-01-01

    Rare-Earth manganites and cobalites with the perovskite structure have been a subject of great recent interest because their electrical resistance changes significantly when a magnetic field is applied...we have studied the Hall effect in thin film La(sub 0.5)Ca(sub 0.5)CoO(sub 3) material and have obtained convincing evidence fo the so called anomalous Hall effect, typical for magnetic metals...Our results suggest that near the ferromagnetic ordering temperature, the dominant electron scattering mechanism is the spin fluctuation.

  7. Tides and the evolution of planetary habitability.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Rory; Raymond, Sean N; Jackson, Brian; Greenberg, Richard

    2008-06-01

    Tides raised on a planet by the gravity of its host star can reduce the planet's orbital semi-major axis and eccentricity. This effect is only relevant for planets orbiting very close to their host stars. The habitable zones of low-mass stars are also close in, and tides can alter the orbits of planets in these locations. We calculate the tidal evolution of hypothetical terrestrial planets around low-mass stars and show that tides can evolve planets past the inner edge of the habitable zone, sometimes in less than 1 billion years. This migration requires large eccentricities (>0.5) and low-mass stars ( less or similar to 0.35 M(circle)). Such migration may have important implications for the evolution of the atmosphere, internal heating, and the Gaia hypothesis. Similarly, a planet that is detected interior to the habitable zone could have been habitable in the past. We consider the past habitability of the recently discovered, approximately 5 M(circle) planet, Gliese 581 c. We find that it could have been habitable for reasonable choices of orbital and physical properties as recently as 2 Gyr ago. However, when constraints derived from the additional companions are included, most parameter choices that indicate past habitability require the two inner planets of the system to have crossed their mutual 3:1 mean motion resonance. As this crossing would likely have resulted in resonance capture, which is not observed, we conclude that Gl 581 c was probably never habitable.

  8. On the polarization relations of diurnal and semidiurnal tide in the mesopause region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    She, Chiao-Yao; Krueger, David A.; Yuan, Tao; Oberheide, Jens

    2016-05-01

    The polarization relations for gravity waves are well known and have proven to be very powerful for the investigation of their dynamics. Though tides are sometimes regarded as low-frequency gravity waves, their polarization relations are hardly considered. We derive the polarization relationships of tides from the primitive equations for perturbations of a dissipation-less atmosphere. The vertical wind tide is found to relate directly to temperature tide, independent of tidal structure and geometric location. On the other hand, the relation between meridional wind tide and zonal wind tide is found to depend on the horizontal derivatives of the associated geopotential perturbation, thus depending on tidal structure and geometric location. Lidar observed tides at a local station (tidal period perturbations) in the midlatitude mesopause region (80-105 km) and the Climatological Tidal Model of the Thermosphere (CTMT) based on Hough Mode Extension (HME) technique at the lidar site, both of which include the effect of dissipation, are then compared. These tidal amplitudes and phases are employed to discuss the results and implications of the derived tidal wave polarization relations. The dominance of the migrating tide follows from the phase relationship between zonal and meridional wind tides. By comparing the observed and derived vertical wind tides, we reveal qualitatively the altitude dependence of tidal wave dissipation.

  9. Remote Sensing Monitoring of Tide Propagation Through Coastal Wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wdowinski, S.; Hong, S.; Mulcan, A.; Brisco, B.

    2013-05-01

    Coastal wetlands including mangrove forests and saltwater marshes are considered among the most valuable ecosystems on earth, yet their existence is presently being threatened by climate change (sea-level rise) and human interference (e.g. infrastructure development). These fragile ecosystems depend on a continuous water and nutrient replenishment by ocean tidal flow. While ocean tides are well known and forecasted, tidal flow movements through coastal wetlands are poorly known due to the fact that vegetation resists the flow and delays both inland and seaward flow at rising and subsiding tide conditions, respectively. Thus far, most observations on tide propagation through coastal wetlands have been obtained from stage (water level) measurements within the vegetated tidal zone. These stage measurements possess high temporal resolution observations, but acquired at a limited number of measurement points. Wetland InSAR (Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar) observations provide a new complementary source of information for detecting tidal flow in coastal wetlands, by supplying high spatial resolution maps of water level changes between two SAR acquisition times. In this study, we use InSAR observations to detect surface water level changes in response to ocean tide propagation through the coastal Everglades' mangrove forests. Interferometric processing of the data show that the highest rate of water level changes occurs near channels, as the Shark Valley River (Fig 1., center of image). These high water level gradients reflect rapid horizontal flow into and from the channel during low and high tide conditions, respectively. The high spatial resolution wetland InSAR observations provide important constraints for detailed coastal wetland flow models. RADARSAT-2 interferogram of western south Florida showing tide-induced water level changes along the transition between the saltwater mangrove marsh in the southwest and freshwater swamp in the northeast.

  10. A decade climatology of terdiurnal tides using TIMED/SABER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, Jeff; Moudden, Youssef

    2013-04-01

    Atmospheric tides are important for coupling the lower and middle atmosphere with the thermosphere and ionosphere, and for driving neutral and plasma density variability in the latter. Terdiurnal tides are recognized as an important contributor to this variability, but their study from a global perspective has not been as comprehensive as their diurnal and semidiurnal counterparts. In this study we globally characterize the solar terdiurnal tide in the 80-110 km region of Earth's atmosphere through analysis of 10 years of temperature measurements made by the SABER instrument on the TIMED spacecraft. The Sun-synchronous (``migrating'') component (TW3), which is longitude independent, achieves maximum amplitudes of order 5K (10K) at 90 km (110 km), not too different than the 7-15 K amplitudes that are typical of the migrating diurnal and semidiurnal tides in this region. Significant longitude variability (~20-25%) in terdiurnal temperature amplitudes also exists, which is decomposed into zonal wavenumber components. The largest of these (TE1, TW4, TW5) reveal distinct seasonal-latitudinal and height versus latitude patterns, and inter-annual consistency. In addition, it is demonstrated that these particular components vary in ways that suggest that they originate from nonlinear interactions between diurnal and semidiurnal tides, specifically between DE3 and SW2 for TE1, between DW2 and SW2 for TW4, and between DW1 and SW4 for TW5. We also demonstrate that the terdiurnal tides derived here are not influenced to any significant degree by aliasing due to the presence of other waves.

  11. Role of lunar atmospheric tides in thermosphere density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palus, Shannon

    2014-11-01

    Half a million objects, including debris, satellites, and the International Space Station, orbit Earth in the thermosphere, the largest layer of the planet's atmosphere. To predict the orbits—and potential collisions—of all this stuff, scientists must forecast the weather in the thermosphere. To help develop a more comprehensive and nuanced model of this weather, Zhang et al. explored the role that lunar atmospheric tides play in the density of thermosphere air.

  12. Magnus Effect on a Spinning Satellite in Low Earth Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramjatan, Sahadeo; Fitz-Coy, Norman; Yew, Alvin Garwai

    2016-01-01

    A spinning body in a flow field generates an aerodynamic lift or Magnus effect that displaces the body in a direction normal to the freestream flow. Earth orbiting satellites with substantial body rotation in appreciable atmospheric densities may generate a Magnus force to perturb orbital dynamics. We investigate the feasibility of using this effect for spacecraft at a perigee of 80km using the Systems Tool Kit (STK). Results show that for a satellite of reasonable properties, the Magnus effect doubles the amount of time in orbit. Orbital decay was greatly mitigated for satellites spinning at 10000 and 15000RPM. This study demonstrates that the Magnus effect has the potential to sustain a spacecraft's orbit at a low perigee altitude and could also serve as an orbital maneuver capability.

  13. Analyses of the solid earth and ocean tidal perturbations on the orbits of the GEOS-1 and GEOS-2 satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Felsentreger, T. L.; Marsh, J. G.; Agreen, R. W.

    1975-01-01

    The luni-solar tidal perturbations in the inclination of the GEOS-I and GEOS-II satellite orbits were analyzed for the solid Earth and ocean tide conditions. Precision reduced camera and TRANET Doppler observations spanning periods of over 600 days for each satellite were used to derive mean orbital elements. Perturbations due to the earth's gravity field, solar radiation pressure, and atmospheric drag were modelled, and the resulting inclination residuals were analyzed for tidal effects. The amplitudes of the observed total tidal effects were about 1.2 arc seconds (36 meters) in the inclination of GEOS-I and 4.5 arc seconds (135 meters) for GEOS-II. The solid earth tides were then modelled using earth tide measurements, earth rotation observations, and seismic data. The resulting inclination residuals were analyzed for ocean tide parameters. The derived parameters consist of one second degree coefficient and an accompanying phase angle in a spherical harmonic expansion of the ocean tidal potential for each tidal constituent. The results are presented.

  14. New Jersey Tide Telemetry System

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoppe, Heidi L.

    2007-01-01

    Each summer the population of the barrier-island communities of New Jersey increases by tens of thousands. When a coastal storm threatens these communities, the limited number of bridges and causeways that connect the islands with the mainland become overcrowded, making evacuations from the barrier islands to the mainland difficult. Timely evacuation depends on well-defined emergency evacuation plans used in conjunction with accurate flood forecasting and up to the minute (real-time) tide-level information. The 'Great Nor'easter' storm that struck the coastal areas of New Jersey on December 11, 1992, caused about $270 million in insured damages to public and private property (Dorr and others, 1995). Most of the damage was due to tidal flooding and storm surge, which were especially severe along the back bay areas. Comprehensive and reliable tide-level and meteorological data for the back bays was needed to make accurate flood forecasts. Collection of tidal data for the ocean and large bays was adequately covered by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's National Ocean Service (NOAA's NOS), but in New Jersey little to no data are available for the back-bay areas. The back bays behave quite differently than the ocean as a result of the complex interaction between the winds and the geometry of the inlets and bays. A slow moving Nor'easter can keep tide levels in back bays several feet higher than the ocean tide by not allowing tides to recede, resulting in flooding of bridges and causeways that link the barrier islands to the mainland. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the New Jersey Department of Transportation (NJDOT), designed and installed the New Jersey Tide Telemetry System (NJTTS) with assistance from NOAA's NOS in 1997. This system is part of a statewide network of tide gages, weather stations, and stream gages that collect data in real time. The NJTTS supplies comprehensive, reliable real-time tide-level and meteorological

  15. A computer software system for the generation of global ocean tides including self-gravitation and crustal loading effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estes, R. H.

    1977-01-01

    A computer software system is described which computes global numerical solutions of the integro-differential Laplace tidal equations, including dissipation terms and ocean loading and self-gravitation effects, for arbitrary diurnal and semidiurnal tidal constituents. The integration algorithm features a successive approximation scheme for the integro-differential system, with time stepping forward differences in the time variable and central differences in spatial variables. Solutions for M2, S2, N2, K2, K1, O1, P1 tidal constituents neglecting the effects of ocean loading and self-gravitation and a converged M2, solution including ocean loading and self-gravitation effects are presented in the form of cotidal and corange maps.

  16. Barometric Tides from ECMWF Operational Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, R. D.; Ponte, R. M.

    2003-01-01

    The solar diurnal and semidiurnal tidal oscillations in surface pressure are extracted from the the operational analysis product of the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasting (ECMWF). For the semidiurnal tide this involves a special temporal interpolation, following Van den Dool and colleagues. The resulting tides are compared with a ground truth tide dataset, a compilation of well-determined tide estimates deduced from long time series of station barometer measurements. These comparisons show that the ECMWF tides are significantly more accurate than the tides deduced from two other widely available reanalysis products. Spectral analysis of ECMWF pressure series shows that the tides consist of sharp central peaks with modulating sidelines at integer multiples of 1 cycle/year, superimposed on a broad cusp of stochastic energy. The integrated energy in the cusp dominates that of the sidelines. This complicates development of a simple model that can characterize the full temporal variability of the tides.

  17. A computer software system for the generation of global ocean tides including self-gravitation and crustal loading effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estes, R. H.

    1977-01-01

    A computer software system is described which computes global numerical solutions of the integro-differential Laplace tidal equations, including dissipation terms and ocean loading and self-gravitation effects, for arbitrary diurnal and semidiurnal tidal constituents. The integration algorithm features a successive approximation scheme for the integro-differential system, with time stepping forward differences in the time variable and central differences in spatial variables.

  18. Tides on the Moon: Theory and determination of dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, James G.; Boggs, Dale. H.

    2015-04-01

    Solid body tides on the Moon vary by about ±0.1 m each month. In addition to changes in shape, the Moon's gravity field and orientation in space are affected by tides. The tidal expressions for an elastic sphere are compact, but dissipation introduces modifications that depend on the forcing period. Consequently, a Fourier representation of the tide-raising potential is needed. A mathematical model for the distortion-caused tidal potential may be used for the analysis of precise spacecraft tracking data. Since tides affect gravitational torques on the Moon from the Earth's attraction, the lunar orientation is also affected. Expressions for five periodic perturbations of orientation are presented. The rheological properties of lunar materials determine how the Moon responds to different tidal periods. New lunar laser ranging solutions for the tidal orientation terms are presented. The quality factor Q is 38 ± 4 at 1 month, 41 ± 9 at 1 year, ≥74 at 3 years, and ≥58 at 6 years. The ranging results can be matched with absorption band models that peak at ~120 days and single relaxation time models that peak at ~100 days. Combined models are possibilities. Dissipation can modify laser ranging solutions; previously reported core flattening is too uncertain to be useful. Strong lunar tidal dissipation, modeled to arise in the deep hot mantle, appears to be from a region with radius ≥535 km. Classical Maxwell-type dissipation is too weak to detect at 3 and 6 year periods.

  19. NONLINEAR TIDES IN CLOSE BINARY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Weinberg, Nevin N.; Arras, Phil; Quataert, Eliot; Burkart, Josh

    2012-06-01

    We study the excitation and damping of tides in close binary systems, accounting for the leading-order nonlinear corrections to linear tidal theory. These nonlinear corrections include two distinct physical effects: three-mode nonlinear interactions, i.e., the redistribution of energy among stellar modes of oscillation, and nonlinear excitation of stellar normal modes by the time-varying gravitational potential of the companion. This paper, the first in a series, presents the formalism for studying nonlinear tides and studies the nonlinear stability of the linear tidal flow. Although the formalism we present is applicable to binaries containing stars, planets, and/or compact objects, we focus on non-rotating solar-type stars with stellar or planetary companions. Our primary results include the following: (1) The linear tidal solution almost universally used in studies of binary evolution is unstable over much of the parameter space in which it is employed. More specifically, resonantly excited internal gravity waves in solar-type stars are nonlinearly unstable to parametric resonance for companion masses M' {approx}> 10-100 M{sub Circled-Plus} at orbital periods P Almost-Equal-To 1-10 days. The nearly static 'equilibrium' tidal distortion is, however, stable to parametric resonance except for solar binaries with P {approx}< 2-5 days. (2) For companion masses larger than a few Jupiter masses, the dynamical tide causes short length scale waves to grow so rapidly that they must be treated as traveling waves, rather than standing waves. (3) We show that the global three-wave treatment of parametric instability typically used in the astrophysics literature does not yield the fastest-growing daughter modes or instability threshold in many cases. We find a form of parametric instability in which a single parent wave excites a very large number of daughter waves (N Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 3}[P/10 days] for a solar-type star) and drives them as a single coherent unit with

  20. Fate of Earth Microbes on Mars: UV Radiation Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cockell, Charles

    2000-01-01

    A radiative transfer model is used to quantitatively investigate aspects of the martian ultraviolet radiation environment. Biological action spectra for DNA inactivation are used to estimate biologically effective irradiances for the martian surface under cloudless skies. Although the present-day martian UV flux is similar to early earth and thus may not be a limitation to life in the evolutionary context, it is a constraint to an unadapted biota and will rapidly kill spacecraft-borne microbes not covered by a martian dust layer. Here calculations for loss of microbial viability on the Pathfinder and Polar lander spacecraft are presented and the effects of martian dust on loss of viability are discussed. Details of the radiative transfer model are presented.

  1. Fate of Earth Microbes on Mars -- UV Radiation Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cockell, Charles

    2000-01-01

    A radiative transfer model is used to quantitatively investigate aspects of the martian ultraviolet radiation environment. Biological action spectra for DNA inactivation are used to estimate biologically effective irradiances for the martian surface under cloudless skies. Although the present-day martian UV flux is similar to early earth and thus may not be a limitation to life in the evolutionary context, it is a constraint to an unadapted biota and will rapidly kill spacecraft-borne microbes not covered by a martian dust layer. Here calculations for loss of microbial viability on the Pathfinder and Polar lander spacecraft are presented and the effects of martian dust on loss of viability are discussed. Details of the radiative transfer model are presented.

  2. Effect of river discharge and geometry on tides and net water transport in an estuarine network, an idealized model applied to the Yangtze Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alebregtse, N. C.; de Swart, H. E.

    2016-07-01

    Tidal propagation in, and division of net water transport over different channels in an estuarine network are analyzed using a newly developed idealized model. The water motion in this model is governed by the cross-sectionally averaged shallow water equations and is forced by tides at the seaward boundaries and by river discharge. Approximate analytical solutions are constructed by means of a harmonic truncation and a perturbation expansion in a small parameter, being the ratio of tidal amplitude and depth. The net water transport results from an imposed river discharge and from residual water transport generated by nonlinear tidal rectification. Two new drivers are identified that contribute to the net water transport in tidal estuarine networks, viz. the generation of residual water transport due to gradients in dynamic pressure and due to a coupling between the tidally averaged and quarter diurnal currents through the quadratic bottom stress. The model is applied in a case study on the Yangtze Estuary, to investigate tides and division of net water transport over its multiple channels during the wet and dry season, as well as before and after the construction of the Deepwater Navigation Channel. Model results agree fairly well with observations. Process analysis reveals that the decrease in tides from dry to wet season is due to enhanced bottom stress generated by river-tide interactions. Also, the seasonal variations in net water transport are explained. It is furthermore shown and explained that due to the Deepwater Navigation Channel tidal currents have increased and net water transport has decreased in the North Passage. These changes have profound implications for net sediment transport and salinity intrusion.

  3. Effects of Fe spin transition in the Earth's lower mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speziale, S.; Lee, V. E.; Clark, S. M.; Pasternak, M. P.; Jeanloz, R.

    2005-12-01

    Knowing the properties of the Earth's lower-mantle minerals is crucial for interpreting seismological and other geophysical observations, and hence understanding the constitution, state and evolution of this region that makes up the bulk of our planet's interior. The behavior of Fe, the most abundant transition element, is especially important at deep-Earth conditions, with past work predicting that it should collapse in size due to a transition from high-spin (HS) to low-spin (LS) configurations at mantle pressures. Recent experimental observations of the Fe spin transition in both (Mg,Fe)SiO3-perovskite and ferropericlase (Mg,Fe)O at high-pressure impact our understanding of the stability, chemical partitioning and transport properties of the two most abundant minerals of the Earth's mantle. We focus on the structural and density effect of the high-spin to low-spin transition in ferropericlase (Mg1-x,Fex)O by performing high-pressure x-ray diffraction experiments on compositions (x < 0.25) relevant to the lower mantle. We obtain high-resolution measurements by simultaneously monitoring the unit-cell volumes of our target sample along with those of a different composition of (Mg,Fe)O that shows the spin transition at higher pressures. Our new results, compared with previous Mossbauer data on a large range of (Mg,Fe)O compositions, confirm that the transition is gradual with pressure at room temperature, and it involves an overall 3 ± 1% volume decrease over a pressure range starting at 40 GPa and extending up to as much as 80 GPa. By combining our results with those of independent studies of comparable compositions [Lin et al., Science, 2005], we infer a 6 ± 1% increase of the bulk sound velocity, which could cause visible seismic anomalies in regions of the lower mantle. In addition to the change in density at the spin transition, more fundamental issues emerge from our and other groups' results. The coexistence of HSFe and LSFe species poses questions about

  4. Effect of rare-earth chromites on sintering of magnesia

    SciTech Connect

    Kashcheev, I.D.

    1994-09-01

    The effect of neodymium, cerium, lanthanum, and ytrrium chromites, added in amounts of not more than 8%, on the sintering of magnesia in air and in vacuum has been studied. On addition of rare-earth chromites, the initial magnesia is sintered to a density of 0.98. By their sintering action, these chromites fall into the following sequence: neodymium chromite-lanthanum chromite-yttrium chromite-cerium chromite. The highest density (0.98-0.99) and the lowest porosity (1-2%) are obtained on addition of 2% of neodymium chromite to magnesia. The process of sintering of magnesia is accompanied by an increase in the size of periclase crystals from 12 to 38-56 {mu}m.

  5. Effects of the Rare Earth Cerium on Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Sobek, Joseph M.; Talburt, Dwight E.

    1968-01-01

    The rare earth cerium was found to bind rapidly to Escherichia coli. Cerium inhibited oxygen uptake in the presence of glucose as well as the endogenous respiration of glucose-grown cells. For a cell concentration of 4 mg per ml, maximal inhibition was obtained at 120 μg per ml. Greater concentrations did not increase the inhibitory effect. Cerium inhibited 14CO2 evolution and 14C uptake from uniformly labeled glucose. Marked changes in the distribution of 14C incorporated into different chemical fractions of the cell were noted. The most striking changes occurred in the alcohol- and alcohol ether-soluble fractions, in which the 14C activity was increased 5- to 20-fold in the presence of cerium. PMID:4866102

  6. Limiting amplitudes of fully nonlinear interfacial tides and solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguiar-González, Borja; Gerkema, Theo

    2016-08-01

    A new two-fluid layer model consisting of forced rotation-modified Boussinesq equations is derived for studying tidally generated fully nonlinear, weakly nonhydrostatic dispersive interfacial waves. This set is a generalization of the Choi-Camassa equations, extended here with forcing terms and Coriolis effects. The forcing is represented by a horizontally oscillating sill, mimicking a barotropic tidal flow over topography. Solitons are generated by a disintegration of the interfacial tide. Because of strong nonlinearity, solitons may attain a limiting table-shaped form, in accordance with soliton theory. In addition, we use a quasi-linear version of the model (i.e. including barotropic advection but linear in the baroclinic fields) to investigate the role of the initial stages of the internal tide prior to its nonlinear disintegration. Numerical solutions reveal that the internal tide then reaches a limiting amplitude under increasing barotropic forcing. In the fully nonlinear regime, numerical experiments suggest that this limiting amplitude in the underlying internal tide extends to the nonlinear case in that internal solitons formed by a disintegration of the internal tide may not reach their table-shaped form with increased forcing, but appear limited well below that state.

  7. Hydroxyl radical generation by red tide algae.

    PubMed

    Oda, T; Akaike, T; Sato, K; Ishimatsu, A; Takeshita, S; Muramatsu, T; Maeda, H

    1992-04-01

    The unicellular marine phytoplankton Chattonella marina is known to have toxic effects against various living marine organisms, especially fishes. However, details of the mechanism of the toxicity of this plankton remain obscure. Here we demonstrate the generation of superoxide and hydroxyl radicals from a red tide unicellular organism, C. marina, by using ESR spectroscopy with the spin traps 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO) and N-t-butyl-alpha-phenylnitrone (PBN), and by using the luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence response. The spin-trapping assay revealed productions of spin adduct of superoxide anion (O2-) (DMPO-OOH) and that of hydroxyl radical (.OH) (DMPO-OH) in the algal suspension, which was not observed in the ultrasonic-ruptured suspension. The addition of superoxide dismutase (500 U/ml) almost completely inhibited the formation of both DMPO-OOH and DMPO-OH, and carbon-centered radicals were generated with the disappearance of DMPO-OH after addition of 5% dimethyl sulfoxide (Me2SO) and 5% ethanol. Furthermore, the generation of methyl and methoxyl radicals, which are thought to be produced by the reaction of hydroxyl radical and Me2SO under aerobic condition, was identified using spin trapping with a combination of PBN and Me2SO. Luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence assay also supported the above observations. These results clearly indicate that C. marina generates and releases the superoxide radical followed by the production of hydroxyl radical to the surrounding environment. The velocity of superoxide generation by C. marina was about 100 times faster than that by mammalian phagocytes per cell basis. The generation of oxygen radical is suggested to be a pathogenic principle in the toxication of red tide to susceptible aquaculture fishes and may be directly correlated with the coastal pollution by red tide.

  8. Nonlinear Tides in Coalescing Binary Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinberg, Nevin

    2016-03-01

    Coalescing binary neutron stars are among the most promising sources for ground-based gravitational wave detectors such as Advanced LIGO. Tidal interactions in such systems extract energy from the orbit and, at some level, modify the gravitational wave signal. Previous studies found that tidal effects are probably too small to be detected from individual systems with LIGO. However, these studies typically assumed that the tide can be treated as a linear perturbation to the star. I will show that the linear approximation is invalid even during the early stages of inspiral and that nonlinear fluid effects in the form of tide-internal wave interactions become important around the time the binary first enters LIGO's bandpass (at gravitational wave frequencies around 30 Hz). Although the precise influence of nonlinear fluid effects is not yet well constrained, I will show that they may significantly modify the gravitational wave signal and electromagnetic emission from coalescing binary neutron stars. This research was supported by NASA Grant NNX14AB40G.

  9. Lunar effects on close encounters of hungaria asteroids and near-Earth asteroids with the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazso, A.; Galiazzo, M.

    2012-12-01

    The Earth is target to many celestial objects, among them Near Earth Asteroids (NEA) play a significant role. Different dynamical groups have been found, the source of these asteroids is mainly the main belt and, in particular the Hungaria group. We carry out a statistical investigation by numerical integration of the motion of real asteroids and their hypothetical clones in a simplified dynamical model of the solar system up to 100 My. In a first part we present integrations of existing Hungaria asteroids to determine which of them could become NEAs. Then the influence of the Moon on the orbits of these NEAs is investigated. The main goal is to find the frequency of close encounters and deflection angles due to them, possible impacts and the strength of deflection by the Moon.

  10. New Jersey Tide Telemetry System

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Summer, William M.

    1998-01-01

    Each summer the population of the barrier-island communities of New Jersey increases by tens of thousands. When a hurricane threatens these communities, the few bridges and causeways that connect the islands with the mainland become overcrowded, making evacuations from the barrier islands to the mainland difficult. Timely evacuation depends on welldefined emergency evacuation plans used in conjunction with accurate flood forecasting and up to the minute (real-time) tide-level information.

  11. Oxidation Effects in Rare Earth Doped Topological Insulator Thin Films.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, A I; van der Laan, G; Harrison, S E; Cibin, G; Hesjedal, T

    2016-01-01

    The breaking of time-reversal symmetry (TRS) in topological insulators is a prerequisite for unlocking their exotic properties and for observing the quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE). The incorporation of dopants which exhibit magnetic long-range order is the most promising approach for TRS-breaking. REBiTe3, wherein 50% of the Bi is substitutionally replaced by a RE atom (RE = Gd, Dy, and Ho), is a predicted QAHE system. Despite the low solubility of REs in bulk crystals of a few %, highly doped thin films have been demonstrated, which are free of secondary phases and of high crystalline quality. Here we study the effects of exposure to atmosphere of rare earth-doped Bi2(Se, Te)3 thin films using x-ray absorption spectroscopy. We demonstrate that these RE dopants are all trivalent and effectively substitute for Bi(3+) in the Bi2(Se, Te)3 matrix. We find an unexpected high degree of sample oxidation for the most highly doped samples, which is not restricted to the surface of the films. In the low-doping limit, the RE-doped films mostly show surface oxidation, which can be prevented by surface passivation, encapsulation, or in-situ cleaving to recover the topological surface state. PMID:26956771

  12. Mixed alkaline earth effect in the compressibility of aluminosilicate glasses.

    PubMed

    Smedskjaer, Morten M; Rzoska, Sylwester J; Bockowski, Michal; Mauro, John C

    2014-02-01

    The mixed modifier effect (MME) in oxide glasses manifests itself as a non-additive variation in certain properties when one modifier oxide species is substituted by another one at constant total modifier content. However, the structural and topological origins of the MME are still under debate. This study provides new insights into the MME by investigating the effect of isostatic compression on density and hardness of mixed MgO/CaO sodium aluminosilicate glasses. This is done using a specially designed setup allowing isostatic compression of bulk glass samples up to 1 GPa at elevated temperature. A mixed alkaline earth effect is found in the compressibility and relative change of hardness, viz., a local maximum of density as a function of Mg/Ca ratio appears following compression, whereas a local minimum of hardness in the uncompressed glasses nearly disappears after compression. Moreover, the densification of these glasses is found to occur at temperatures much below the glass transition temperature, indicating that a non-viscous mechanism is at play. This is further supported by the fact that density relaxes in a stretched exponential manner upon subsequent annealing at ambient pressure with an exponent of ∼0.62. This is close to the Phillips value of 3/5 for relaxation in three dimensions when both short- and long-range interactions are activated.

  13. Oxidation Effects in Rare Earth Doped Topological Insulator Thin Films

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa, A. I.; van der Laan, G.; Harrison, S. E.; Cibin, G.; Hesjedal, T.

    2016-01-01

    The breaking of time-reversal symmetry (TRS) in topological insulators is a prerequisite for unlocking their exotic properties and for observing the quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE). The incorporation of dopants which exhibit magnetic long-range order is the most promising approach for TRS-breaking. REBiTe3, wherein 50% of the Bi is substitutionally replaced by a RE atom (RE = Gd, Dy, and Ho), is a predicted QAHE system. Despite the low solubility of REs in bulk crystals of a few %, highly doped thin films have been demonstrated, which are free of secondary phases and of high crystalline quality. Here we study the effects of exposure to atmosphere of rare earth-doped Bi2(Se, Te)3 thin films using x-ray absorption spectroscopy. We demonstrate that these RE dopants are all trivalent and effectively substitute for Bi3+ in the Bi2(Se, Te)3 matrix. We find an unexpected high degree of sample oxidation for the most highly doped samples, which is not restricted to the surface of the films. In the low-doping limit, the RE-doped films mostly show surface oxidation, which can be prevented by surface passivation, encapsulation, or in-situ cleaving to recover the topological surface state. PMID:26956771

  14. Atmospheric Tides Simulated by WACCM-1 and CMIP3 / IPCC Climate Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Covey, C. C.; Dai, A.; Lindzen, R. S.

    2008-12-01

    Atmospheric tides driven by solar heating are readily detectable at Earth's surface as variations in air pressure. Above the lower stratosphere the tides attain large amplitudes and can be a significant part of atmospheric motion. Output from the general circulation model WACCM, the Whole-Atmosphere Community Climate Model, contains tidal oscillations in its middle and upper atmosphere, but it has not previously been examined for the surface signature of the tides. We have done so both for WACCM Version 1 and for the climate models contributing to the latest assessment report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (taken from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 3 [CMIP3] archive; see URL below). Surface pressure tides in WACCM-1's output occur mainly in the tropics and are dominated by the semidiurnal component, as observed. Quantitatively, however, WACCM-1 overestimates the diurnal tide amplitude by up to a factor of two over tropical land while underestimating it by about one-third globally. Similar though less egregious errors occur in WACCM-1's semidiurnal tide. Although the observed pressure field is contaminated by sampling errors, it is clear that WACCM-1 misses robust real-world features such as the large diurnal tides over mid-latitude high terrain and the non-migrating component of both diurnal and semidiurnal tides. We have not yet examined output from the most recent version of the model (WACCM-3), however. Climate modelers generally do not have atmospheric tides or the middle atmosphere in mind during the model development process, and conventional wisdom holds that the dominant semidiurnal surface-pressure tide is mainly forced by ozone heating in the middle atmosphere. One might therefore expect that climate models with tops below the ozone heating peak (at roughly 50 km altitude) or with poor resolution in the middle atmosphere would produce surface pressure tides that are weaker than observed and perhaps dominated by the

  15. The Anomalously High Pole Tide in the North and Baltic Seas Estimated by the PSMSL Tide Gauge Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedev, Igor; Rabinovich, Alexander; Kulikov, Evgueni

    2014-05-01

    Pole tide driven by the Chandler wobble, has the period of about 14 months and typical amplitudes in the World Ocean of ~ 0.5 cm. However, in the North and Baltic Seas they are anomalously high. To examine this effect we used long monthly sea level records from 80 stations with the length up to 212 years. High-resolution spectra revealed a cluster of neighboring peaks with periods from 410 to 440 days. The results of spectral analysis were applied to estimate the integral amplitudes of pole tides from all available tide gauges along the coast of seas. The height of the pole tide was found to gradually increase from the entrance of the Baltic Sea (Danish Straits) to the northeast end of the Baltic Sea. The largest amplitudes - up to 4.5-7 cm - were observed in the heads of the Gulf of Finland and the Gulf of Bothnia. Significant temporal fluctuations in amplitudes and periods of the pole tide were observed during XIX and XX centuries.

  16. Storm Surge and Tide Interaction: A Complete Paradigm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horsburgh, K.

    2014-12-01

    Estimates show that in 2005, in the largest 136 coastal cities, there were 40 million people and 3,000 billion of assets exposed to 1 in 100 year coastal flood events. Mean sea level rise will increase this exposure to 150 million people and 35,000 billion of assets by 2070. Any further change in the statistics of flood frequency or severity would impact severely on economic and social systems. It is therefore crucial to understand the physical drivers of extreme storm surges, and to have confidence in datasets used for extreme sea level statistics. Much previous research has focussed on the process of tide-surge interaction, and it is now widely accepted that the physical basis of tide-surge interaction is that a phase shift of the tidal signal represents the effect of the surge on the tide. The second aspect of interaction is that shallow water momentum considerations imply that differing tidal states should modulate surge generation: wind stress should have greater surge-generating potential on lower tides. We present results from a storm surge model of the European shelf that demonstrate that tidal range does have an effect on the surges generated. The cycle-integrated effects of wind stress (i.e. the skew surge) are greater when tidal range is low. Our results contradict the absence of any such correlation in tide gauge records. This suggests that whilst the modulating effect of the tide on the skew surge (the time-independent difference between peak prediction and observations) is significant, the difference between individual storms is dominant. This implies that forecasting systems must predict salient detail of the most intense storms. A further implication is that flood forecasting models need to simulate tides with acceptable accuracy at all coastal locations. We extend our model analysis to show that the same modulation of storm surges (by tidal conditions) applies to tropical cyclones. We conduct simulations using a mature operational storm surge model

  17. The Role of Tides in Known Multi-Planet Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.; DeVincenzi, D. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The first known extrasolar planet system, upsilon Andromedae, was discovered in 1999. The number of stars known to possess more than one planet has been growing rapidly since then. The dynamical interactions among such planets can be quite strong. These interactions can excite the orbital eccentricities of planets, even planets orbiting very close to their stars. Stellar tides can damp the eccentricities of such close-in planets, removing dynamical energy from the system and ultimately affecting the motions of all of the planets. These and other effects of tides in extrasolar multi-planet systems will be discussed.

  18. Laboratory simulation of Low Earth Orbit (LEO) atomic oxygen effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caledonia, George E.; Krech, Robert H.; Oakes, David B.

    1994-01-01

    A pulsed fast oxygen atom source has been used extensively over the last 7 years to investigate the effects of ambient oxygen atoms impacting materials placed in low Earth orbit. In this period, we irradiated well over 2000 material samples with 8 km/s oxygen atoms generated in our source. Typical irradiance level is 3 x 10(exp 20) O atoms/sq cm although some materials have been irradiated to fluence levels as high as 6 x 10(exp 21) O atoms/sq cm. The operating principles and characteristics of our source are reviewed along with diagnostic and handling procedures appropriate to material testing. Representative data is presented on the velocity dependence of oxygen atom erosion rates (the PSI source provides oxygen atoms tunable over the velocity range of 5 to 12 km/s) as well as the dependence on material temperature. Specific examples of non-linear oxidative effects related to surface contamination and test duration are also be provided.

  19. Effects of the low Earth orbital environment on spacecraft materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leger, L. J.

    1986-01-01

    It is evident from space flights during the last three years that the low Earth orbital (LEO) environment interacts with spacecraft surfaces in significant ways. One manifestation of these interactions is recession of, in particular, organic-polymer-based surfaces presumably due to oxidation by atomic oxygen, the major component of the LEO environment. Three experiments have been conducted on Space Shuttle flights 5, 8 and 41-G to measure reaction rates and the effects of various parameters on reaction rates. Surface recession on these flights indicates reaction efficiencies approximately 3 x 10(-24) cu cm/atoms for unfilled organic polymers. Of the metals, silver and osmium are very reactive. Effects on spacecraft or experiment surfaces can be evaluated using the derived reaction efficiencies and a definition of the total exposure to atomic oxygen. This exposure is obtained using an ambient density model, solar activity data and spacecraft parameters of altitude, attitude and operational date. Oxygen flux on a given surface is obtained from the ambient density and spacecraft velocity and can then be integrated to provide the total exposure or fluence. Such information can be generated using simple computational programs and can be converted to various formats. Overall, the extent of damage is strongly dependent on the type of surface and total exposure time.

  20. Analysis of earth rotation solution from Starlette

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutz, B. E.; Cheng, M. K.; Shum, C. K.; Eanes, R. J.; Tapley, B. D.

    1989-01-01

    Earth rotation parameter (ERP) solutions were derived from the Starlette orbit analysis during the Main MERIT Campaign, using a technique of a consider-covariance analysis to assess the effects of errors on the polar motion solutions. The polar motion solution was then improved through the simultaneous adjustment of some dynamical parameters representing identified dominant perturbing sources (such as the geopotential and ocean-tide coefficients) on the polar motion solutions. Finally, an improved ERP solution was derived using the gravity field model, PTCF1, described by Tapley et al. (1986). The accuracy of the Starlette ERP solution was assessed by a comparison with the LAGEOS-derived ERP solutions.

  1. Analysis of earth rotation solution from Starlette

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schutz, B. E.; Cheng, M. K.; Shum, C. K.; Eanes, R. J.; Tapley, B. D.

    1989-08-01

    Earth rotation parameter (ERP) solutions were derived from the Starlette orbit analysis during the Main MERIT Campaign, using a technique of a consider-covariance analysis to assess the effects of errors on the polar motion solutions. The polar motion solution was then improved through the simultaneous adjustment of some dynamical parameters representing identified dominant perturbing sources (such as the geopotential and ocean-tide coefficients) on the polar motion solutions. Finally, an improved ERP solution was derived using the gravity field model, PTCF1, described by Tapley et al. (1986). The accuracy of the Starlette ERP solution was assessed by a comparison with the LAGEOS-derived ERP solutions.

  2. Tidal asymmetry in a tidal creek with mixed mainly semidiurnal tide, Bushehr Port, Persian Gulf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, Seyed Taleb; Chegini, Vahid; Sadrinasab, Masoud; Siadatmousavi, Seyed Mostafa; Yari, Sadegh

    2016-03-01

    This study investigated the tidal asymmetry imposed by both the interaction of principal tides and the higher harmonics generated by distortions within a tidal creek network with mixed mainly semidiurnal tide in the Bushehr Port, Persian Gulf. Since velocity and water-level imposed by principal triad tides K1-O1-M2 are in quadrature, duration asymmetries during a tidal period in this short, shallow inverse estuary should be manifest as skewed velocities. The principal tides produce periodic asymmetries including a strong ebb-dominance and a weak flood-dominance condition during spring and neap tides respectively. The higher harmonics induced by nonlinearities engender a flood-dominance condition where the convergence effects are higher than frictional effects, and an ebbdominance condition where intertidal storage are extended. Since the triad K1-O1-M2 driven asymmetry is not overcome by higher harmonics close to the mouth, the periodic asymmetry dominates within the creek in which higher harmonics reinforce the weak flood-dominance (strong ebb-dominance) condition in the convergent channel (divergent area). Also, the maximum flood and the maximum ebb from all harmonic constituents occurred close to high water slack time during both spring and neap tides in this short creek. Since occational wetting of intertidal areas happened close to the high water (HW) time during spring tide, the water level flooded slowly close to the HW time of the spring tide.

  3. Florida Red Tide Knowledge and Risk Perception: Is there a need for tailored messaging?

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, Barbara; Kohler, Kate; Byrne, Margaret M; Studts, Jamie

    2014-02-01

    Harmful algal blooms of the toxic dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis, occur throughout the Gulf of Mexico. Recent research efforts sponsored by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) and others found that Florida red tide causes both acute and possibly chronic health effects from the toxic aerosols. Florida red tide also demonstrated significant social and economic impacts to both coastal residents and visitors. In conjunction with the research, persistent outreach efforts were conducted over the 11 year period. The goal of this project was to assess potential needs for tailored messaging needed among different red tide information user groups. Survey participants included 303 local residents, both with asthma and without, and 'snowbirds (seasonal residents that reside in the Sarasota area for more than 3 months but less than 6 months/year), also both with asthma and without. The questionnaire assessed Florida red tide knowledge and risk perception regarding Florida red tide using items drawn from two previously published surveys to allow comparison. Our results reveal that overall knowledge of Florida red tide has not changed. We found that knowledge was consistent across our selected groups and also did not vary by age, gender and education level. However, knowledge regarding consumption of seafood during Florida red tide has declined. Risk perception increased significantly for people who have asthma. Individuals responsible for public health communication regarding Florida red tide and human health concerns need to continue to pursue more effective outreach messages and delivery methods.

  4. Florida Red Tide Knowledge and Risk Perception: Is there a need for tailored messaging?

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, Barbara; Kohler, Kate; Byrne, Margaret M; Studts, Jamie

    2014-02-01

    Harmful algal blooms of the toxic dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis, occur throughout the Gulf of Mexico. Recent research efforts sponsored by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) and others found that Florida red tide causes both acute and possibly chronic health effects from the toxic aerosols. Florida red tide also demonstrated significant social and economic impacts to both coastal residents and visitors. In conjunction with the research, persistent outreach efforts were conducted over the 11 year period. The goal of this project was to assess potential needs for tailored messaging needed among different red tide information user groups. Survey participants included 303 local residents, both with asthma and without, and 'snowbirds (seasonal residents that reside in the Sarasota area for more than 3 months but less than 6 months/year), also both with asthma and without. The questionnaire assessed Florida red tide knowledge and risk perception regarding Florida red tide using items drawn from two previously published surveys to allow comparison. Our results reveal that overall knowledge of Florida red tide has not changed. We found that knowledge was consistent across our selected groups and also did not vary by age, gender and education level. However, knowledge regarding consumption of seafood during Florida red tide has declined. Risk perception increased significantly for people who have asthma. Individuals responsible for public health communication regarding Florida red tide and human health concerns need to continue to pursue more effective outreach messages and delivery methods. PMID:24563634

  5. Non-linear processes in the Earth atmosphere boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grunskaya, Lubov; Valery, Isakevich; Dmitry, Rubay

    2013-04-01

    The work is connected with studying electromagnetic fields in the resonator Earth-Ionosphere. There is studied the interconnection of tide processes of geophysical and astrophysical origin with the Earth electromagnetic fields. On account of non-linear property of the resonator Earth-Ionosphere the tides (moon and astrophysical tides) in the electromagnetic Earth fields are kinds of polyharmonic nature. It is impossible to detect such non-linear processes with the help of the classical spectral analysis. Therefore to extract tide processes in the electromagnetic fields, the method of covariance matrix eigen vectors is used. Experimental investigations of electromagnetic fields in the atmosphere boundary layer are done at the distance spaced stations, situated on Vladimir State University test ground, at Main Geophysical Observatory (St. Petersburg), on Kamchatka pen., on Lake Baikal. In 2012 there was continued to operate the multichannel synchronic monitoring system of electrical and geomagnetic fields at the spaced apart stations: VSU physical experimental proving ground; the station of the Institute of Solar and Terrestrial Physics of Russian Academy of Science (RAS) at Lake Baikal; the station of the Institute of volcanology and seismology of RAS in Paratunka; the station in Obninsk on the base of the scientific and production society "Typhoon". Such investigations turned out to be possible after developing the method of scanning experimental signal of electromagnetic field into non- correlated components. There was used a method of the analysis of the eigen vectors ofthe time series covariance matrix for exposing influence of the moon tides on Ez. The method allows to distribute an experimental signal into non-correlated periodicities. The present method is effective just in the situation when energetical deposit because of possible influence of moon tides upon the electromagnetic fields is little. There have been developed and realized in program components

  6. Volume dependence of landslide effective friction on Earth and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangeney, A.; Lucas, A.; Ampuero, J. P.

    2012-12-01

    One of the ultimate goals in landslides hazard assessment is to predict their maximum extension along the slope (runout distance) and their velocity. Despite the great amount of work already devoted to this issue, main questions are still open on the physical processes at work in these granular flows at the natural scale. In particular, field observations show that some landslides may travel over unexpectedly long distances, suggesting a very low mean dissipation during their flow. On the other hand, numerical simulation of real landslides often necessitates the assumption of very small friction coefficient to reproduce the extension of their deposits. Field observations show that the so-called Heim coefficient (i. e. the ratio between the difference of the height of the initial mass and that of the deposit, and the traveling distance) decreases with increasing volume, for landslides observed on Earth and on other planets. Whether this coefficient represents an estimate of the mean effective friction during the flow is still a controversial issue. We show here, using analytical and numerical solutions of granular flows over sloping beds and field observations, that the Heim ratio does not represent the effective friction coefficient. We propose another way to estimate this coefficient from field data. Using this new method, we show that the friction coefficient indeed decreases with increasing volume, but in a different way than that predicted by the Heim coefficient. Numerical simulation of natural landslides on real topography corroborates the volume dependence of the effective friction coefficient. These simulations are used to investigate different processes that may be at the origin of this mean friction weakening with increasing volume.

  7. Effects of differentiation on the geodynamics of the early Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piccolo, Andrea; Kaus, Boris; White, Richard; Johnson, Tim

    2016-04-01

    Archean geodynamic processes are not well understood, but there is general agreement that the mantle potential temperature was higher than present, and that as a consequence significant amounts of melt were produced both in the mantle and any overlying crust. This has likely resulted in crustal differentiation. An early attempt to model the geodynamic effects of differentiation was made by Johnson et al. (2014), who used numerical modeling to investigate the crust production and recycling in conjunction with representative phase diagrams (based on the inferred chemical composition of the primary melt in accordance with the Archean temperature field). The results of the simulations show that the base of the over-thickened primary basaltic crust becomes gravitational unstable due to the mineral assemblage changes. This instability leads to the dripping of dense material into the mantle, which causes an asthenospheric return flow, local partial melting and new primary crust generation that is rapidly recycled in to mantle. Whereas they gave important insights, the previous simulations were simplified in a number of aspects: 1) the rheology employed was viscous, and both elasticity and pressure-dependent plasticity were not considered; 2) extracted mantle melts were 100% transformed into volcanic rocks, whereas on the present day Earth only about 20-30% are volcanic and the remainder is plutonic; 3) the effect of a free surface was not studied in a systematic manner. In order to better understand how these simplifications affect the geodynamic models, we here present additional simulations to study the effects of each of these parameters. Johnson, T.E., Brown, M., Kaus, B., and VanTongeren, J.A., 2014, Delamination and recycling of Archaean crust caused by gravitational instabilities: Nature Geoscience, v. 7, no. 1, p. 47-52, doi: 10.1038/NGEO2019.

  8. On the predictability of mode-1 internal tides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dushaw, Brian D.; Worcester, Peter F.; Dzieciuch, Matthew A.

    2011-06-01

    A frequency-wavenumber tidal analysis for deriving internal-tide harmonic constants from TOPEX/Poseidon (T/P) measurements of sea-surface height (SSH) has been developed, taking advantage of the evident temporal and spatial coherence and the weak dissipation of internal tides. Previous analyses consisted of simple tidal analysis at individual points, which gave inconsistent harmonic constants at altimeter track crossover points. Such analyses have difficulty in distinguishing between the effects of interference, incoherence, and dissipation. The frequency-wavenumber analysis provides an objective way to interpolate the internal tides measured along altimetry tracks to any arbitrary point, while leveraging all available data for optimal tidal estimates. Tidal analysis of T/P data from 2000 to 2007 is used to predict in situ time series measured during the 2001-2002 Hawaiian Ocean mixing experiment (HOME), the 1987 reciprocal tomography experiment (RTE87), and the 1991 acoustic mid-ocean dynamics experiment (AMODE), demonstrating both the temporal coherence and the lack of incoherent elements to this wave propagation. It has been conjectured that significant energy would be lost from mode-1 internal tides as they cross the 28.9°N critical latitude of parametric subharmonic instability (PSI). No apparent change in amplitude at 28.9°N was detected by this analysis, however. Further, after correcting for changes in background stratification, the amplitude of the mode-1 internal tide was found to decrease by less than 20% over the 2000 km between the Hawaiian Ridge and 40°N. A significant fraction of the variability of internal waves, that component associated with mode-1 internal tides, appears to be predictable over most of the world's oceans, using harmonic constants derived from satellite altimetry.

  9. Earth curvature and atmospheric refraction effects on radar signal propagation.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2013-01-01

    The earth isnt flat, and radar beams dont travel straight. This becomes more noticeable as range increases, particularly at shallow depression/grazing angles. This report explores models for characterizing this behavior.

  10. Atmospheric effects on measurements of distance to Earth artificial satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kablak, N.; Klimyk, V.; Shvalagin, I.; Kablak, U.

    2005-06-01

    This paper is devoted to the problem of accuracy increasing in allowing for Earth's atmosphere influences on results of daily ranging observations of the Earth artificial satellites (ASE). Atmosphere delays and their spatial-timely variations for spherical-symmetrical and nonspherical models of atmosphere were determined radiosounding data gathered during a year in Ukraine region using, developed valuing and analysis of models reductions to over of atmosphere, which recommended of IERS for processing distance-ranging observations of the Earth artificial satellites. Investigated and improved models of reductions to over of the atmosphere on the basis of discovered regional and local peculiarity's of influence atmosphere on the laser and radio ranging observations of the Earth artificial satellites.

  11. Effects of simulated rare earth recycling wastewaters on biological nitrification

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, Yoshiko; Barnes, Joni; Eslamimanesh, Ali; Lencka, Malgorzata M.; Anderko, Andrzej; Riman, Richard E.; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2015-07-16

    Current efforts to increase domestic availability of rare-earth element (REE) supplies by recycling and expanded ore processing efforts will result in increased generation of associated wastewaters. In some cases disposal to a sewage treatment plant may be favored but plant performance must be maintained. To assess the potential effects of such wastewaters on biological wastewater treatment, model nitrifying organisms Nitrosomonas europaea and Nitrobacter winogradskyi were exposed to simulated wastewaters containing varying levels of yttrium or europium (10, 50 and 100 ppm), and the REE extractant tributyl phosphate (TBP, at 0.1 g/L). Y and Eu additions above 10 ppm inhibited N. europaea activity, even when initially virtually all of the REE was insoluble. The provision of TBP together with Eu increased inhibition of nitrite production by the N. europaea, although TBP alone did not substantially alter nitrifying activity N. winogradskyi was more sensitive to the stimulated wastewaters, with even 10 ppm Eu or Y inducing significant inhibition, and a complete shutdown of nitrifying activity occurred in the presence of the TBP. To analyze the availability of REEs in aqueous solutions, REE solubility has been calculated using the previously developed MSE (Mixed-Solvent Electrolyte) thermodynamic model. The model calculations reveal a strong pH dependence of solubility, which is typically controlled by the precipitation of REE hydroxides but may also be influenced by the formation of a phosphate phase.

  12. Effects of Simulated Rare Earth Recycling Wastewaters on Biological Nitrification.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Yoshiko; Barnes, Joni; Eslamimanesh, Ali; Lencka, Malgorzata M; Anderko, Andrzej; Riman, Richard E; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2015-08-18

    Increasing rare earth element (REE) supplies by recycling and expanded ore processing will result in generation of new wastewaters. In some cases, disposal to a sewage treatment plant may be favored, but plant performance must be maintained. To assess the potential effects of such wastewaters on biological treatment, model nitrifying organisms Nitrosomonas europaea and Nitrobacter winogradskyi were exposed to simulated wastewaters containing varying levels of yttrium or europium (10, 50, and 100 ppm), and the extractant tributyl phosphate (TBP, at 0.1 g/L). Y and Eu additions at 50 and 100 ppm inhibited N. europaea, even when virtually all of the REE was insoluble. Provision of TBP with Eu increased N. europaea inhibition, although TBP alone did not substantially alter activity. For N. winogradskyi cultures, Eu or Y additions at all tested levels induced significant inhibition, and nitrification shut down completely with TBP addition. REE solubility was calculated using the previously developed MSE (Mixed-Solvent Electrolyte) thermodynamic model. The model calculations reveal a strong pH dependence of solubility, typically controlled by the precipitation of REE hydroxides but also likely affected by the formation of unknown phosphate phases, which determined aqueous concentrations experienced by the microorganisms. PMID:26132866

  13. Effects of simulated rare earth recycling wastewaters on biological nitrification

    DOE PAGES

    Fujita, Yoshiko; Barnes, Joni; Eslamimanesh, Ali; Lencka, Malgorzata M.; Anderko, Andrzej; Riman, Richard E.; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2015-07-16

    Current efforts to increase domestic availability of rare-earth element (REE) supplies by recycling and expanded ore processing efforts will result in increased generation of associated wastewaters. In some cases disposal to a sewage treatment plant may be favored but plant performance must be maintained. To assess the potential effects of such wastewaters on biological wastewater treatment, model nitrifying organisms Nitrosomonas europaea and Nitrobacter winogradskyi were exposed to simulated wastewaters containing varying levels of yttrium or europium (10, 50 and 100 ppm), and the REE extractant tributyl phosphate (TBP, at 0.1 g/L). Y and Eu additions above 10 ppm inhibited N.more » europaea activity, even when initially virtually all of the REE was insoluble. The provision of TBP together with Eu increased inhibition of nitrite production by the N. europaea, although TBP alone did not substantially alter nitrifying activity N. winogradskyi was more sensitive to the stimulated wastewaters, with even 10 ppm Eu or Y inducing significant inhibition, and a complete shutdown of nitrifying activity occurred in the presence of the TBP. To analyze the availability of REEs in aqueous solutions, REE solubility has been calculated using the previously developed MSE (Mixed-Solvent Electrolyte) thermodynamic model. The model calculations reveal a strong pH dependence of solubility, which is typically controlled by the precipitation of REE hydroxides but may also be influenced by the formation of a phosphate phase.« less

  14. Effects of Simulated Rare Earth Recycling Wastewaters on Biological Nitrification.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Yoshiko; Barnes, Joni; Eslamimanesh, Ali; Lencka, Malgorzata M; Anderko, Andrzej; Riman, Richard E; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2015-08-18

    Increasing rare earth element (REE) supplies by recycling and expanded ore processing will result in generation of new wastewaters. In some cases, disposal to a sewage treatment plant may be favored, but plant performance must be maintained. To assess the potential effects of such wastewaters on biological treatment, model nitrifying organisms Nitrosomonas europaea and Nitrobacter winogradskyi were exposed to simulated wastewaters containing varying levels of yttrium or europium (10, 50, and 100 ppm), and the extractant tributyl phosphate (TBP, at 0.1 g/L). Y and Eu additions at 50 and 100 ppm inhibited N. europaea, even when virtually all of the REE was insoluble. Provision of TBP with Eu increased N. europaea inhibition, although TBP alone did not substantially alter activity. For N. winogradskyi cultures, Eu or Y additions at all tested levels induced significant inhibition, and nitrification shut down completely with TBP addition. REE solubility was calculated using the previously developed MSE (Mixed-Solvent Electrolyte) thermodynamic model. The model calculations reveal a strong pH dependence of solubility, typically controlled by the precipitation of REE hydroxides but also likely affected by the formation of unknown phosphate phases, which determined aqueous concentrations experienced by the microorganisms.

  15. Observations and Effects of Dipolarization Fronts Observed in Earth's Magnetotail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, Melvyn L.

    2011-01-01

    Dipolarization fronts in Earth's magnetotail are characterized by sharp jumps in magnetic field, a drop in density, and often follow earthward fast plasma flow. They are commonly detected near the equatorial plane of Earth s tail plasma sheet. Sometimes, but not always, dipolarization fronts are associated with global substorms and auroral brightenings. Both Cluster, THEMIS, and other spacecraft have detected dipolarization fronts in a variety of locations in the magnetotail. Using multi-spacecraft analyses together with simulations, we have investigated the propagation and evolution of some dipolarization events. We have also investigated the acceleration of electrons and ions that results from such magnetic-field changes. In some situations, the velocities of fast earthward flows are comparable to the Alfven speed, indicating that the flow bursts might have been generated by bursty reconnection that occurred tailward of the spacecraft. Based on multi-spacecraft timing analysis, dipolarization fronts are found to propagate mainly earthward at 160-335 km/s and have thicknesses of 900-1500 km, which corresponds to the ion inertial length or gyroradius scale. Following the passage of dipolarization fronts, significant fluctuations are observed in the x and y components of the magnetic field. These peaks in the magnetic field come approximately 1-2 minutes after passage of the dipolarization front. These Bx and By fluctuations propagate primarily dawnward and earthward. Field-aligned electron beams are observed coincident with those magnetic field fluctuations. Non-Maxwellian electron and ion distributions are observed that are associated with the dipolarization that may be unstable to a range of electrostatic and/or whistler instabilities. Enhanced electrostatic broadband noise at frequencies below and near the lower-hybrid frequency is also observed at or very close to these fronts. This broadband noise is thought to play a role in further energizing the particles

  16. Effects of Low Earth Orbit on Docking Seal Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imka, Emily C.; Asmar, Olivia C.; deGroh, Henry C., III; Banks, Bruce A.

    2014-01-01

    Spacecraft docking seals are typically made of silicone elastomers. When such seals are exposed to low Earth orbit (LEO) conditions, they can suffer damage from ultraviolet (UV) radiation and atomic oxygen (AO, or monoatomic oxygen, the predominant oxygen species in LEO). An experiment flew on the International Space Station (ISS) to measure the effects of LEO on seal materials S0383-70 and ELA-SA-401 and various mating counterface materials which included anodized aluminum. Samples flown in different orientations received different amounts of UV and AO. The hypotheses were that most of the damage would be from UV, and 10 days or more of exposure in LEO would badly damage the seals. Eighteen seals were exposed for 543 days in ram (windward), zenith (away from Earth), or wake (leeward) orientations, and 15 control samples (not flown) provided undamaged baseline leakage. To determine post-flight leak rates, each of the 33 seals were placed in an O-ring groove of a leak test fixture and pressure tested over time. Resistance temperature detectors (RTDs), pressure transducers, and LabVIEW (National Instruments) programs were used to measure and analyze the temperature and pressure and calculate leakage. Average leakage of control samples was 2.6 x 10(exp -7) lbs/day. LEO exposure did not considerably damage ELA-SA-401. The S0383-70 flight samples leaked at least 10 times more than ELA-SA-401 in all cases except one, demonstrating that ELA-SA-401 may be a more suitable sealing material in LEO. AO caused greater damage than UV; samples in ram orientation (receiving an AO fluence of 4.3 x 10(exp 21) atoms/(sq cm) and in wake (2.9x 10(exp 20) atoms/(sq cm)) leaked more than those in zenith orientation (1.58 x 10(exp 20) atoms/(sq cm)), whereas variations in UV exposure did not seem to affect the samples. Exposure to LEO did less damage to the seals than hypothesized, and the data did not support the conjecture that UV causes more damage than AO.

  17. The effects of geomagnetic disturbances and atmospheric tides upon middle atmosphere winds and MF radar scatter at Saskatoon (52 degree N, 107 degree W, 61 degree geomagnetic). [medium frequency, 2-3 MHz

    SciTech Connect

    Manson, A.H.; Meek, C.E. )

    1991-01-20

    The radar-derived winds (60-110 km) at Saskatoon (52{degree}N, 107{degree}W, 61{degree} geomagnetic) for the summer and winter months of 1982/1983 are separated into categories according to the daily planetary magnetic index Ap: quiet <7 (Q), moderate 7-19 (M), and disturbed >19 (D). The data yield, which is directly related to the scatter of radar pulses from the middle atmosphere, is much enhanced for both the moderate and disturbed categories during nighttime and early morning hours. The seasonal and height variations of radar scatter are related to particle precipitation characteristics. Above 90 km there are also small changes in the mean winds and in the amplitudes of both 24- and 12-hour tidal oscillations (10%) due to variations in magnetic activity. The small phase changes identified for both tidal oscillations show interannual variation and are most likely due to data selection effects. The wind data are further separated according to the amplitudes of the daily tides (greater or less than 20 m/s).The yield of radar data is significantly greater when the tides are large for each season and disturbance category. This effect is related to the dynamic stability of the atmosphere and the increase of turbulence and hence radar scatter due to the large tidal amplitude.

  18. How Tidal Forces Cause Ocean Tides in the Equilibrium Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ng, Chiu-king

    2015-01-01

    We analyse why it is erroneous to think that a tidal bulge is formed by pulling the water surface directly up by a local vertical tidal force. In fact, ocean tides are caused by the global effect of the horizontal components of the tidal forces.

  19. Comparison of relativistic effects in barycentric and Earth-centered coordinates and implications for determination of GM for Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashby, Neil

    1987-01-01

    The results of an investigation of relativistic effects which have an influence on the determination of GM sub E (M sub E is the mass of the Earth, G is the Newtonian gravitaional constant) are summarized. The detailed arguments and derivations are discussed. The Parametrized Post-Newtonian (PPN) coordinates; Eddington-Clark (EC) coordinates; a coordinate system based on barycentric dynamical time (TBC coordinates); and Local Inertial coordinates are discussed.

  20. HPLC pigment analysis of marine phytoplankton during a red tide occurrence in Tolo Harbour, Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Wong, C Kwan; Wong, C Kim

    2003-09-01

    A red tide was detected in the inner parts of Tolo Harbour, Hong Kong, in November 2000. Water samples were collected from a fixed station at the centre of the red tide patch for microscopic analysis of phytoplankton community composition and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis of phytoplankton pigments. At the peak of the red tide on 24 November 2000, phytoplankton was dominated by the dinoflagellate Scrippsiella trochoidea. The red tide began to decline at the end of November and, by 1 December 2000, the phytoplankton was dominated by diatoms. Chlorophylls and carotenoids in water samples were analysed using HPLC pigment separation technique. Dinoflagellates were indicated by the signature pigment peridinin. Significant correlation (r=0.999) was found between the peridinin concentration and dinoflagellate density. A decrease in peridinin and an increase in fucoxanthin, a major carotenoid in diatoms, marked the shift in phytoplankton composition at the end of the red tide. HPLC analysis also revealed the occurrence of minor phytoplankton groups that are difficult to identify by light microscopy. Red tide monitoring and study of red tide dynamics in Hong Kong have been based on cell counting and spectrophotometric or fluorometric measurement of chlorophyll a. HPLC pigment analysis provides an effective alternative for investigating phytoplankton dynamics during red tide and other algal blooms.

  1. Turning the tide.

    PubMed

    Kahane, T

    1993-07-01

    It is estimated that 120,000-800,000 people in Vietnam out of a population of 67 million use injectable drugs for recreational purposes. Concurrently, HIV is spreading rapidly in the southern provinces of the country. The sharing of HIV-contaminated needles and injection equipment facilitate the dissemination of HIV so that more than 90% of the 332 cases of HIV infection officially notified by May 1993 are drug related. The most common injected drug is liquid opium. Large quantities of the drug are needed for the user to feel any effect, so large veins must be punctured with large needles. To realize this objective, each group of 20 IV-drug users (IVDU) tends to have its own skilled, yet untrained person who is paid to find and inject the opium in large veins in the leg or thigh. The same needle is used for everyone without sterilization. Funded by a group of American Vietnam war veterans, Jon Stuen-Parker, founder of the Boston-based National AIDS Brigade which provides AIDS information and runs needle exchange programs, visited Vietnam in March 1993 to establish a needle exchange program in the main areas of Ho Chi Minh City frequented by drug users. Unlike in the US, he was warmly received by officials and the program was implemented without controversy. Since IVDUs in this population do not self-inject, the report notes the need to educate only those who inject others about sterile needles and clean paraphernalia. Taking a different approach in recognition of the fact that needles are more expensive than liquid opium, CARE International proposes cleaning needles with bleach for both medical use and IVDUs. Accordingly, the Health Information and Education Center in Vietnam has produced literature promoting the bleach strategy which awaits approval for release. Stuen-Parker warns, however, that needles must soak for at least 30 seconds in 100% bleach to become sterile. He has planned a 2nd trip in July with the founder of the Vietnam Veterans with AIDS Committee

  2. The lunar nodal tide and the distance to tne Moon during the Precambrian era

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, J. C. G.; Zahnle, K. J.

    1986-01-01

    The origin and early evolution of life on Earth occurred under physical and chemical conditions distinctly different from those of the present day. The broad goal of this research program is to characterize these conditions. One aspect involves the dynamics of the Earth-Moon system, the distance of the Moon from the Earth, and the length of the day. These have evolved during the course of Earth history as a result of the dissipation of tidal energy. As the moon has receded the amplitude of oceanic tides has decreased while the increasing length of the day should have influenced climate and the circulation of atmosphere and ocean. A 23.3 year periodicity preserved in a 2500 million year old banded iron-formation was interpreted as reflecting the climatic influence of the lunar nodal tide. The corresponding lunar distance would then have been approx. 52 Earth radii. The influence of the lunar nodal tide is also apparent in rocks with an age of 680 million years B.P. The derived value for lunar distance 2500 million years ago is the only datum on the dynamics of the Earth-Moon system during the Precambrian era of Earth history. The implied development of Precambrian tidal friction is in accord with more recent paleontological evidence as well as the long term stability of the lunar orbit.

  3. Generation and propagation of internal tides and solitary waves at the shelf edge of the Bay of Biscay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, X. H.; Cuypers, Y.; Bouruet-Aubertot, P.; Pichon, A.; Lourenço, A.; Ferron, B.

    2015-10-01

    High-frequency mooring data were collected near the northern shelf edge of the Bay of Biscay to investigate the generation and propagation of internal tides and internal solitary waves (ISWs). During spring tide, strong nonlinear internal tides and large amplitude ISWs are observed every semidiurnal tidal period. While onshore propagation was expected since the mooring is located shoreward of the maximum internal tidal generation location, both onshore and seaward traveling internal tides are identified. Within a tidal period at spring tide, three ISW packets are observed. Like internal tides, different ISW packets have opposite (seaward and shoreward) propagating direction. Based on realistic hydrostatic HYCOM simulations, it is suggested that advection by the barotropic tide affects wave generation and propagation significantly and is essential for the seaward traveling internal tides to appear shoreward of their generation location. A two-layer idealized nonhydrostatic model derived by Gerkema (1996) further confirms the effect of advection on the generation and propagation of internal tides. Moreover, the two-layer model reproduces one seaward propagating ISW packet and one shoreward propagating ISW packet, indicating that the offshore and onshore traveling ISWs are excited by nonlinear steepening of the seaward and shoreward traveling internal tides, respectively.

  4. Possible forcing of global temperature by the oceanic tides

    PubMed Central

    Keeling, Charles D.; Whorf, Timothy P.

    1997-01-01

    An approximately decadal periodicity in surface air temperature is discernable in global observations from A.D. 1855 to 1900 and since A.D. 1945, but with a periodicity of only about 6 years during the intervening period. Changes in solar irradiance related to the sunspot cycle have been proposed to account for the former, but cannot account for the latter. To explain both by a single mechanism, we propose that extreme oceanic tides may produce changes in sea surface temperature at repeat periods, which alternate between approximately one-third and one-half of the lunar nodal cycle of 18.6 years. These alternations, recurring at nearly 90-year intervals, reflect varying slight degrees of misalignment and departures from the closest approach of the Earth with the Moon and Sun at times of extreme tide raising forces. Strong forcing, consistent with observed temperature periodicities, occurred at 9-year intervals close to perihelion (solar perigee) for several decades centered on A.D. 1881 and 1974, but at 6-year intervals for several decades centered on A.D. 1923. As a physical explanation for tidal forcing of temperature we propose that the dissipation of extreme tides increases vertical mixing of sea water, thereby causing episodic cooling near the sea surface. If this mechanism correctly explains near-decadal temperature periodicities, it may also apply to variability in temperature and climate on other times-scales, even millennial and longer. PMID:11607740

  5. [Physiological effects of rare earth elements and their application in traditional Chinese medicine].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jie; Guo, Lanping; Xiao, Wenjuan; Geng, Yanling; Wang, Xiao; Shi, Xin'gang; Dan, Staerk

    2012-08-01

    The process in the studies on physiological effects of rare earth elements in plants and their action mechanisms were summarized in the aspects of seed germination, photosynthesis, mineral metabolism and stress resistance. And the applications of rare earth elements in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) in recent years were also overviewed, which will provide reference for further development and application of rare earth elements in TCM.

  6. On the tidal oscillations of the liquid core of the earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musen, P.

    1978-01-01

    An important goal of a tidal theory is the improvement of nutational amplitude and of the parameters of the earth's elastic response. A theory of tidal oscillations inside a rotating elliptical earth was developed, with special emphasis on tides in the liquid core. The Molodensky and Kramer theory of the resonance effect, as caused by the proximity of the frequency of the free diurnal wobble of the liquid core to the frequency of K sub 1 astronomical tide, was amended to include the effect of the possible deviation of the liquid core from the state of neutral stability. Coupling effects between the toroidal and spheroidal oscillations, as caused by the Coriolis force, were taken into consideration.

  7. ISS Charging Hazards and Low Earth Orbit Space Weather Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minow, Joseph; Parker, L.; Coffey, V.; Wright K.; Koontz, S.; Edwards, D.

    2008-01-01

    Current collection by high voltage solar arrays on the International Space Station (ISS) drives the vehicle to negative floating potentials in the low Earth orbit daytime plasma environment. Pre-flight predictions of ISS floating potentials Phi greater than |-100 V| suggested a risk for degradation of dielectric thermal control coatings on surfaces in the U.S. sector due to arcing and an electrical shock hazard to astronauts during extravehicular activity (EVA). However, hazard studies conducted by the ISS program have demonstrated that the thermal control material degradation risk is effectively mitigated during the lifetime of the ISS vehicle by a sufficiently large ion collection area present on the vehicle to balance current collection by the solar arrays. To date, crew risk during EVA has been mitigated by operating one of two plasma contactors during EVA to control the vehicle potential within Phi less than or equal to |-40 V| with a backup process requiring reorientation of the solar arrays into a configuration which places the current collection surfaces into wake. This operation minimizes current collection by the solar arrays should the plasma contactors fail. This paper presents an analysis of F-region electron density and temperature variations at low and midlatitudes generated by space weather events to determine what range of conditions represent charging threats to ISS. We first use historical ionospheric plasma measurements from spacecraft operating at altitudes relevant to the 51.6 degree inclination ISS orbit to provide an extensive database of F-region plasma conditions over a variety of solar cycle conditions. Then, the statistical results from the historical data are compared to more recent in-situ measurements from the Floating Potential Measurement Unit (FPMU) operating on ISS in a campaign mode since its installation in August, 2006.

  8. Solar rotation effects on the thermospheres of Mars and Earth.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Jeffrey M; Bruinsma, Sean; Lemoine, Frank G

    2006-06-01

    The responses of Earth's and Mars' thermospheres to the quasi-periodic (27-day) variation of solar flux due to solar rotation were measured contemporaneously, revealing that this response is twice as large for Earth as for Mars. Per typical 20-unit change in 10.7-centimeter radio flux (used as a proxy for extreme ultraviolet flux) reaching each planet, we found temperature changes of 42.0 +/- 8.0 kelvin and 19.2 +/- 3.6 kelvin for Earth and Mars, respectively. Existing data for Venus indicate values of 3.6 +/- 0.6 kelvin. Our observational result constrains comparative planetary thermosphere simulations and may help resolve existing uncertainties in thermal balance processes, particularly CO2 cooling.

  9. Nonlinear Shallow-Water Tides Observed with Excellent Signal-to-Noise Ratio by Two Geodetic Laser Strainmeters at the Canfranc (Spain) Underground Laboratory.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crescentini, L.; Amoruso, A.

    2014-12-01

    Comparisons between observed Earth strain tides and model predicted ocean tidal loading can give an independent mean to validate the ocean models and finally the whole modelling process. In particular, the accurate representation of non-linear tides, such as quater-diurnal and higher-frequency components, and of their loading effects is a challenging task to be accomplished in the next years. The Canfranc underground laboratory (LSC), excavated in the rock under the Central Pyrenees (Spain), is mainly devoted to the study of phenomena which needs "cosmic silence", as the detection of cosmic neutrinos or "dark matter" particles, but, as the site is located in one of the most active seismic areas in Western Europe, it also hosts a geodynamic facility capable to record the whole geodynamic spectrum, from near-field seismicity to tectonic deformation, including Earth tides.Using two near-orthogonally-oriented 70-m-long high-resolution laser strainmeters installed at LSC, we have obtained continuous precision measurements of local strain in terms of dL/L, where L is the interferometer length and dL its change over time. The laser strainmeters are operational since early 2012.Spectra show clear tidal peaks whose frequencies range from the diurnal band to at least 8 cicles per day (cpd). Tidal peaks at frequencies higher than 2 cpd are ascribable to ocean loading of non-linear constituents, mainly from the Bay of Biscay. Strain amplitudes of observed non-linear tides range from few 10^-12 (e. g. 3*M2+K2) to 4x10^-10 (M4).We will show comparisons between observations and predicted strain tides, computed using ocean-tide loading programs included in the SPOTL package (Agnew, 2013) and two ocean tidal models, namely TPXO8-atlas (enriched with the European Shelf 2008 regional solution) and FES2012.In particular, M4, MS4, and MN4 will be compared with predictions by both ocean tidal models, while MKS2 (semidiurnal band), N4, and M6 will be compared with predictions by FES2012

  10. Public perceptions of Florida red tide risks.

    PubMed

    Kuhar, Sara E; Nierenberg, Kate; Kirkpatrick, Barbara; Tobin, Graham A

    2009-07-01

    This research integrates theoretical frameworks of risk perception, social amplification of risk, and the role of place-specific contexts in order to explore the various perceptions surrounding Florida red tides. Florida red tides are naturally occurring events that are increasing in frequency, duration, and severity. This has implications for public health, the local economy, and ecosystem health. While many of the negative impacts of Florida red tides are not easily controlled, some of the secondary impacts may be mitigated through individuals' responses. However, public perception and consequent reactions to Florida red tides have not been investigated. This research uses questionnaire surveys, and semi-structured interviews, to explore the various perceptions of the risk surrounding red tides. Surveys and interviews were conducted along two Florida west coast beaches. The results indicate that the underlying foundations of the social amplification of the risk framework are applicable to understanding how individuals form perceptions of risk relative to red tide events. There are key differences between the spatial locations of individuals and corresponding perceptions, indicating that place-specific contexts are essential to understanding how individuals receive and interpret risk information. The results also suggest that individuals may be lacking efficient and up-to-date information about Florida red tides and their impacts because of inconsistent public outreach. Overall, social and spatial factors appear to be influential as to whether individuals amplify or attenuate the risks associated with Florida red tides.

  11. COLORS OF A SECOND EARTH. II. EFFECTS OF CLOUDS ON PHOTOMETRIC CHARACTERIZATION OF EARTH-LIKE EXOPLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, Yuka; Suto, Yasushi; Turner, Edwin L.; Kawahara, Hajime; Fukuda, Satoru; Nakajima, Teruyuki; Livengood, Timothy A.

    2011-09-10

    As a test bed for future investigations of directly imaged terrestrial exoplanets, we present the recovery of the surface components of the Earth from multi-band diurnal light curves obtained with the EPOXI spacecraft. We find that the presence and longitudinal distribution of ocean, soil, and vegetation are reasonably well reproduced by fitting the observed color variations with a simplified model composed of a priori known albedo spectra of ocean, soil, vegetation, snow, and clouds. The effect of atmosphere, including clouds, on light scattered from surface components is modeled using a radiative transfer code. The required noise levels for future observations of exoplanets are also determined. Our model-dependent approach allows us to infer the presence of major elements of the planet (in the case of the Earth, clouds, and ocean) with observations having signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) {approx}> 10 in most cases and with high confidence if S/N {approx}> 20. In addition, S/N {approx}> 100 enables us to detect the presence of components other than ocean and clouds in a fairly model-independent way. Degradation of our inversion procedure produced by cloud cover is also quantified. While cloud cover significantly dilutes the magnitude of color variations compared with the cloudless case, the pattern of color changes remains. Therefore, the possibility of investigating surface features through light-curve fitting remains even for exoplanets with cloud cover similar to Earth's.

  12. Best Mitigation Paths To Effectively Reduce Earth's Orbital Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiegman, Bruce M.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews some ways to reduce the problem posed by debris in orbit around the Earth. It reviews the orbital debris environment, the near-term needs to minimize the Kessler syndrome, also known as collisional cascading, a survey of active orbital debris mitigation strategies, the best paths to actively remove orbital debris, and technologies that are required for active debris mitigation.

  13. Differential responses of net ecosystem exchange of carbon dioxide to light and temperature between spring and neap tides in subtropical mangrove forests.

    PubMed

    Li, Qing; Lu, Weizhi; Chen, Hui; Luo, Yiqi; Lin, Guanghui

    2014-01-01

    The eddy flux data with field records of tidal water inundation depths of the year 2010 from two mangroves forests in southern China were analyzed to investigate the tidal effect on mangrove carbon cycle. We compared the net ecosystem exchange (NEE) and its responses to light and temperature, respectively, between spring tide and neap tide inundation periods. For the most time of the year 2010, higher daytime NEE values were found during spring tides than during neap tides at both study sites. Regression analysis of daytime NEE to photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) using the Landsberg model showed increased sensitivity of NEE to PAR with higher maximum photosynthetic rate during spring tides than neap tides. In contrast, the light compensation points acquired from the regression function of the Landsberg model were smaller during spring tides than neap tides in most months. The dependence of nighttime NEE on soil temperature was lower under spring tide than under neap tides. All these results above indicated that ecosystem carbon uptake rates of mangrove forests were strengthened, while ecosystem respirations were inhibited during spring tides in comparison with those during neap tides, which needs to be considered in modeling mangrove ecosystem carbon cycle under future sea level rise scenarios.

  14. Differential Responses of Net Ecosystem Exchange of Carbon Dioxide to Light and Temperature between Spring and Neap Tides in Subtropical Mangrove Forests

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qing; Lu, Weizhi; Chen, Hui; Luo, Yiqi; Lin, Guanghui

    2014-01-01

    The eddy flux data with field records of tidal water inundation depths of the year 2010 from two mangroves forests in southern China were analyzed to investigate the tidal effect on mangrove carbon cycle. We compared the net ecosystem exchange (NEE) and its responses to light and temperature, respectively, between spring tide and neap tide inundation periods. For the most time of the year 2010, higher daytime NEE values were found during spring tides than during neap tides at both study sites. Regression analysis of daytime NEE to photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) using the Landsberg model showed increased sensitivity of NEE to PAR with higher maximum photosynthetic rate during spring tides than neap tides. In contrast, the light compensation points acquired from the regression function of the Landsberg model were smaller during spring tides than neap tides in most months. The dependence of nighttime NEE on soil temperature was lower under spring tide than under neap tides. All these results above indicated that ecosystem carbon uptake rates of mangrove forests were strengthened, while ecosystem respirations were inhibited during spring tides in comparison with those during neap tides, which needs to be considered in modeling mangrove ecosystem carbon cycle under future sea level rise scenarios. PMID:25133267

  15. Differential responses of net ecosystem exchange of carbon dioxide to light and temperature between spring and neap tides in subtropical mangrove forests.

    PubMed

    Li, Qing; Lu, Weizhi; Chen, Hui; Luo, Yiqi; Lin, Guanghui

    2014-01-01

    The eddy flux data with field records of tidal water inundation depths of the year 2010 from two mangroves forests in southern China were analyzed to investigate the tidal effect on mangrove carbon cycle. We compared the net ecosystem exchange (NEE) and its responses to light and temperature, respectively, between spring tide and neap tide inundation periods. For the most time of the year 2010, higher daytime NEE values were found during spring tides than during neap tides at both study sites. Regression analysis of daytime NEE to photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) using the Landsberg model showed increased sensitivity of NEE to PAR with higher maximum photosynthetic rate during spring tides than neap tides. In contrast, the light compensation points acquired from the regression function of the Landsberg model were smaller during spring tides than neap tides in most months. The dependence of nighttime NEE on soil temperature was lower under spring tide than under neap tides. All these results above indicated that ecosystem carbon uptake rates of mangrove forests were strengthened, while ecosystem respirations were inhibited during spring tides in comparison with those during neap tides, which needs to be considered in modeling mangrove ecosystem carbon cycle under future sea level rise scenarios. PMID:25133267

  16. Environmental Chemistry and Chemical Ecology of "Green Tide" Seaweed Blooms.

    PubMed

    Van Alstyne, Kathryn L; Nelson, Timothy A; Ridgway, Richard L

    2015-09-01

    Green tides are large growths or accumulations of green seaweeds that have been increasing in magnitude and frequency around the world. Because green tides consist of vast biomasses of algae in a limited area and are often seasonal or episodic, they go through periods of rapid growth in which they take up large amounts of nutrients and dissolved gases and generate bioactive natural products that may be stored in the plants, released into the environment, or broken down during decomposition. As a result of the use and production of inorganic and organic compounds, the algae in these blooms can have detrimental impacts on other organisms. Here, we review some of the effects that green tides have on the chemistry of seawater and the effects of the natural products that they produce. As blooms are developing and expanding, algae in green tides take up inorganic nutrients, such as nitrate and ortho-phosphate, which can limit their availability to other photosynthetic organisms. Their uptake of dissolved inorganic carbon for use in photosynthesis can cause localized spikes in the pH of seawater during the day with concomitant drops in the pH at night when the algae are respiring. Many of the algae that form green-tide blooms produce allelopathic compounds, which are metabolites that affect other species. The best documented allelopathic compounds include dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP), dopamine, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) and their breakdown products. DMSP and dopamine are involved in defenses against herbivores. Dopamine and ROS are released into seawater where they can be allelopathic or toxic to other organisms. Thus, these macroalgal blooms can have harmful effects on nearby organisms by altering concentrations of nutrients and dissolved gas in seawater and by producing and releasing allelopathic or toxic compounds. PMID:25972565

  17. Environmental Chemistry and Chemical Ecology of "Green Tide" Seaweed Blooms.

    PubMed

    Van Alstyne, Kathryn L; Nelson, Timothy A; Ridgway, Richard L

    2015-09-01

    Green tides are large growths or accumulations of green seaweeds that have been increasing in magnitude and frequency around the world. Because green tides consist of vast biomasses of algae in a limited area and are often seasonal or episodic, they go through periods of rapid growth in which they take up large amounts of nutrients and dissolved gases and generate bioactive natural products that may be stored in the plants, released into the environment, or broken down during decomposition. As a result of the use and production of inorganic and organic compounds, the algae in these blooms can have detrimental impacts on other organisms. Here, we review some of the effects that green tides have on the chemistry of seawater and the effects of the natural products that they produce. As blooms are developing and expanding, algae in green tides take up inorganic nutrients, such as nitrate and ortho-phosphate, which can limit their availability to other photosynthetic organisms. Their uptake of dissolved inorganic carbon for use in photosynthesis can cause localized spikes in the pH of seawater during the day with concomitant drops in the pH at night when the algae are respiring. Many of the algae that form green-tide blooms produce allelopathic compounds, which are metabolites that affect other species. The best documented allelopathic compounds include dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP), dopamine, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) and their breakdown products. DMSP and dopamine are involved in defenses against herbivores. Dopamine and ROS are released into seawater where they can be allelopathic or toxic to other organisms. Thus, these macroalgal blooms can have harmful effects on nearby organisms by altering concentrations of nutrients and dissolved gas in seawater and by producing and releasing allelopathic or toxic compounds.

  18. The Art of Red Tide Science.

    PubMed

    Hall, Emily R; Nierenberg, Kate; Boyes, Anamari J; Heil, Cynthia A; Flewelling, Leanne J; Kirkpatrick, Barbara

    2012-05-01

    Over the years, numerous outreach strategies by the science community, such as FAQ cards and website information, have been used to explain blooms of the toxic dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis that occur annually off the west coast of Florida to the impacted communities. Many state and federal agencies have turned to funded research groups for assistance in the development and testing of environmental outreach products. In the case of Florida red tide, the Fish and Wildlife Research Institute/Mote Marine Laboratory (MML) Cooperative Red Tide Agreement allowed MML to initiate a project aimed at developing innovative outreach products about Florida red tide. This project, which we coined "The Art of Red Tide Science," consisted of a team effort between scientists from MML and students from Ringling College of Art and Design. This successful outreach project focused on Florida red tide can be used as a model to develop similar outreach projects for equally complex ecological issues.

  19. The Art of Red Tide Science

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Emily R.; Nierenberg, Kate; Boyes, Anamari J.; Heil, Cynthia A.; Flewelling, Leanne J.; Kirkpatrick, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Over the years, numerous outreach strategies by the science community, such as FAQ cards and website information, have been used to explain blooms of the toxic dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis that occur annually off the west coast of Florida to the impacted communities. Many state and federal agencies have turned to funded research groups for assistance in the development and testing of environmental outreach products. In the case of Florida red tide, the Fish and Wildlife Research Institute/Mote Marine Laboratory (MML) Cooperative Red Tide Agreement allowed MML to initiate a project aimed at developing innovative outreach products about Florida red tide. This project, which we coined “The Art of Red Tide Science,” consisted of a team effort between scientists from MML and students from Ringling College of Art and Design. This successful outreach project focused on Florida red tide can be used as a model to develop similar outreach projects for equally complex ecological issues. PMID:22712002

  20. The Art of Red Tide Science.

    PubMed

    Hall, Emily R; Nierenberg, Kate; Boyes, Anamari J; Heil, Cynthia A; Flewelling, Leanne J; Kirkpatrick, Barbara

    2012-05-01

    Over the years, numerous outreach strategies by the science community, such as FAQ cards and website information, have been used to explain blooms of the toxic dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis that occur annually off the west coast of Florida to the impacted communities. Many state and federal agencies have turned to funded research groups for assistance in the development and testing of environmental outreach products. In the case of Florida red tide, the Fish and Wildlife Research Institute/Mote Marine Laboratory (MML) Cooperative Red Tide Agreement allowed MML to initiate a project aimed at developing innovative outreach products about Florida red tide. This project, which we coined "The Art of Red Tide Science," consisted of a team effort between scientists from MML and students from Ringling College of Art and Design. This successful outreach project focused on Florida red tide can be used as a model to develop similar outreach projects for equally complex ecological issues. PMID:22712002

  1. Tidal effects on Earth, Planets, Sun by far visiting moons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fargion, Daniele

    2016-07-01

    The Earth has been formed by a huge mini-planet collision forming our Earth surface and our Moon today. Such a central collision hit was statistically rare. A much probable skimming or nearby encounter by other moons or planets had to occur. Indeed Recent observations suggest that many planetary-mass objects may be present in the outer solar system between the Kuiper belt and the Oort cloud. Gravitational perturbations may occasionally bring them into the inner solar system. Their passage near Earth could have generated gigantic tidal waves, large volcanic eruptions, sea regressions, large meteoritic impacts and drastic changes in global climate. They could have caused the major biological mass extinctions in the past in the geological records. For instance a ten times a terrestrial radius nearby impact scattering by a peripherical encounter by a small moon-like object will force huge tidal waves (hundred meter height), able to lead to huge tsunami and Earth-quake. Moreover the historical cumulative planet hits in larger and wider planets as Juppiter, Saturn, Uranus will leave a trace, as observed, in their tilted spin axis. Finally a large fraction of counter rotating moons in our solar system probe and test such a visiting mini-planet captur origination. In addition the Earth day duration variability in the early past did show a rare discountinuity, very probably indebt to such a visiting planet crossing event. These far planets in rare trajectory to our Sun may, in thousands event capture, also explain sudden historical and recent temperature changes.

  2. Geocenter location and variations in earth orientation using global positioning system measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malla, R. P.; Wu, S. C.; Lichten, S. M.

    1993-01-01

    We have studied the use of GPS ground and flight tracking data to measure short-period earth orientation variations and changes in geocenter location. Comparisons between GPS-estimated earth rotation variations and those calculated from ocean tide models suggest that observed subdaily variations in earth rotation are dominated by oceanic tidal effects. Our preliminary GPS estimates for geocenter location agree with an independent satellite laser ranging estimates to 10-15 cm. Covariance analysis predicts that temporal resolution of GPS estimates for earth orientation and geocenter improves significantly when data collected from low earth-orbiting satellites as well as from ground sites are combined. The low-earth GPS tracking data enhance the accuracy and resolution for measuring high-frequency global geodynamical signals over time scales less than 1 day.

  3. Assessing change of environmental dynamics by legislation in Japan, using red tide occurrence in Ise Bay as an indicator.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Chika

    2016-01-30

    Tokyo Bay, Ise Bay, and the Seto Inland Sea are the total pollutant load control target areas in Japan. A significant correlation between the incidence of red tides and water quality has been observed in the Seto Inland Sea (Honjo, 1991). However, while red tides also occur in Ise Bay and Tokyo Bay, similar correlations have not been observed. Hence, it is necessary to understand what factors cause red tides to effectively manage these semi-closed systems. This study aims to investigate the relationship between the dynamics of the Red Tide Index and nitrogen regulation as well as phosphorus regulation, even in Ise Bay where, unlike Tokyo Bay, there are few observation items, by selecting a suitable objective variable. The introduction of a new technique that uses the Red Tide Index has revealed a possibility that the total pollution load control has influenced the dynamics of red tide blooms in Ise Bay.

  4. Assessing change of environmental dynamics by legislation in Japan, using red tide occurrence in Ise Bay as an indicator.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Chika

    2016-01-30

    Tokyo Bay, Ise Bay, and the Seto Inland Sea are the total pollutant load control target areas in Japan. A significant correlation between the incidence of red tides and water quality has been observed in the Seto Inland Sea (Honjo, 1991). However, while red tides also occur in Ise Bay and Tokyo Bay, similar correlations have not been observed. Hence, it is necessary to understand what factors cause red tides to effectively manage these semi-closed systems. This study aims to investigate the relationship between the dynamics of the Red Tide Index and nitrogen regulation as well as phosphorus regulation, even in Ise Bay where, unlike Tokyo Bay, there are few observation items, by selecting a suitable objective variable. The introduction of a new technique that uses the Red Tide Index has revealed a possibility that the total pollution load control has influenced the dynamics of red tide blooms in Ise Bay. PMID:26337227

  5. Brevetoxicosis: red tides and marine mammal mortalities.

    PubMed

    Flewelling, Leanne J; Naar, Jerome P; Abbott, Jay P; Baden, Daniel G; Barros, Nélio B; Bossart, Gregory D; Bottein, Marie-Yasmine D; Hammond, Daniel G; Haubold, Elsa M; Heil, Cynthia A; Henry, Michael S; Jacocks, Henry M; Leighfield, Tod A; Pierce, Richard H; Pitchford, Thomas D; Rommel, Sentiel A; Scott, Paula S; Steidinger, Karen A; Truby, Earnest W; Van Dolah, Frances M; Landsberg, Jan H

    2005-06-01

    Potent marine neurotoxins known as brevetoxins are produced by the 'red tide' dinoflagellate Karenia brevis. They kill large numbers of fish and cause illness in humans who ingest toxic filter-feeding shellfish or inhale toxic aerosols. The toxins are also suspected of having been involved in events in which many manatees and dolphins died, but this has usually not been verified owing to limited confirmation of toxin exposure, unexplained intoxication mechanisms and complicating pathologies. Here we show that fish and seagrass can accumulate high concentrations of brevetoxins and that these have acted as toxin vectors during recent deaths of dolphins and manatees, respectively. Our results challenge claims that the deleterious effects of a brevetoxin on fish (ichthyotoxicity) preclude its accumulation in live fish, and they reveal a new vector mechanism for brevetoxin spread through food webs that poses a threat to upper trophic levels. PMID:15944690

  6. [Mechanisms of removing red tide organisms by organo-clays].

    PubMed

    Cao, Xi-Hua; Song, Xiu-Xian; Yu, Zhi-Ming; Wang, Kui

    2006-08-01

    We tested the influence of the preparation conditions of the quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs) modified clays on their capacities to remove red tide organisms, then discussed the mechanisms of the organo-clays removing red tide organisms. Hexadecyltrimethylammonium (HDTMA) improved the capacity of clays to flocculate red tide algae, and the HDTMA in metastable state enhanced the toxicity of the clay complexes to algae. The capacities of the organo-clays correlated with the toxicity and the adsorbed amount of the QACs used in clays modification, but as the incubation time was prolonged the stability of the organo-clays was improved and the algal removal efficiencies of the clay complexes decreased. When the adsorbed HDTMA was arranged in different clays in which the spatial resistance was different, there was more HDTMA in metastable state in the three-layer montmorillonite. Because of the homo-ion effect the bivalent or trivalent metal ions induced more HDTMA in metastable state and the corresponding organo-clays had high capacities to remove red tide organisms. When the reaction temperature was 60 degrees C the adsorbed HDTMA was easily arranged on cation exchange sites, if the temperature rose or fell the metastable HDTMA would increase so that the capacity of the clays was improved.

  7. [Temporal dynamics of phytoplankton and nutrients during red tides].

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yaowen; Zhu, Liangsheng; Li, Jinrong; Liang, Song; Qi, Yuzao

    2003-07-01

    The relationships between temporal dynamics of phytoplankton density and nutrients (NO3-, NH4+, PO4(3-), SiO3(2-), Fe) contents in the water body at Aotou waters of Daya Bay during red tide were comprehensively analysed based on the fixed position investigation of red tide in the summer of 2000 and the several years investigation data by using grey linear regression model. The relationships between phytoplankton cell density and chlorophyll a content were also analysed. The results showed that the predicted values were well consistent with the measurement values, and their correlation coefficients were between 0.51-0.83. Red tide might break out if chlorophyll a contents in water body were larger than 5.8 micrograms.dm-3. The study could provide a simple effective method to forecast red tide by sampling water samples to analyse chlorophyll a concentration, or using SeaWiFS data, and then, to calculating phytoplankton density. In addition, the primary productivity of the water areas was controlled by phosphorus. PMID:14587335

  8. Coordinated radar observations of atmospheric diurnal tides in equatorial regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuda, Toshitaka; Ohnishi, Kazunori; Isoda, Fusako; Nakamura, Takuji; Vincent, Robert A.; Reid, Iain M.; Harijono, Sri Woro B.; Sribimawati, Tien; Nuryanto, Agus; Wiryosumarto, Harsono

    1999-07-01

    The long-term behavior of atmospheric tides in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere has been observed with the meteor wind radar (MWR) in Jakarta, Indonesia (6°S, 107°E) from November 1992 to August 1997. The amplitudes and phases of the diurnal tides show systematic seasonal variations, particularly distinct in the meridional component. In addition, substantial interannual variability is evident, characterized by a biennial periodicity of tidal parameters, and considerably small tidal amplitudes exclusively seen in 1996. The MWR results are compared with the Global Scale Wave Model (GSWM) as well as MF radar data collected in two equatorial sites in Pontianak (0.03°N, 109°E) and Christmas Island (2°N, 158°W) for November 1995-July 1997 and January 1996-October 1997, respectively. Comparison studies of these radar data have revealed the detailed latitudinal structure of the diurnal tide near the equator. The GSWM has successfully described the general characteristics of the radar results, although some discrepancies are recognized. In 1996 when radar data are available at all the three sites, the monthly mean values of tidal amplitudes at 90 km agreed very well between Jakarta and Pontianak, while significant discrepancy was found for Christmas Island, suggesting the existence of geographical effects such as non-migrating tides.

  9. [Temporal dynamics of phytoplankton and nutrients during red tides].

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yaowen; Zhu, Liangsheng; Li, Jinrong; Liang, Song; Qi, Yuzao

    2003-07-01

    The relationships between temporal dynamics of phytoplankton density and nutrients (NO3-, NH4+, PO4(3-), SiO3(2-), Fe) contents in the water body at Aotou waters of Daya Bay during red tide were comprehensively analysed based on the fixed position investigation of red tide in the summer of 2000 and the several years investigation data by using grey linear regression model. The relationships between phytoplankton cell density and chlorophyll a content were also analysed. The results showed that the predicted values were well consistent with the measurement values, and their correlation coefficients were between 0.51-0.83. Red tide might break out if chlorophyll a contents in water body were larger than 5.8 micrograms.dm-3. The study could provide a simple effective method to forecast red tide by sampling water samples to analyse chlorophyll a concentration, or using SeaWiFS data, and then, to calculating phytoplankton density. In addition, the primary productivity of the water areas was controlled by phosphorus.

  10. Atmospheric tides in Gale Crater, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzewich, Scott D.; Newman, C. E.; de la Torre Juárez, M.; Wilson, R. J.; Lemmon, M.; Smith, M. D.; Kahanpää, H.; Harri, A.-M.

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric tides are the primary source of daily air pressure variation at the surface of Mars. These tides are forced by solar heating of the atmosphere and modulated by the presence of atmospheric dust, topography, and surface albedo and thermal inertia. This results in a complex mix of sun-synchronous and non-sun-synchronous tides propagating both eastward and westward around the planet in periods that are integer fractions of a solar day. The Rover Environmental Monitoring Station on board the Mars Science Laboratory has observed air pressure at a regular cadence for over 1 Mars year and here we analyze and diagnose atmospheric tides in this pressure record. The diurnal tide amplitude varies from 26 to 63 Pa with an average phase of 0424 local true solar time, while the semidiurnal tide amplitude varies from 5 to 20 Pa with an average phase of 0929. We find that both the diurnal and semidiurnal tides in Gale Crater are highly correlated to atmospheric opacity variations at a value of 0.9 and to each other at a value of 0.77, with some key exceptions occurring during regional and local dust storms. We supplement our analysis with MarsWRF general circulation modeling to examine how a local dust storm impacts the diurnal tide in its vicinity. We find that both the diurnal tide amplitude enhancement and regional coverage of notable amplitude enhancement linearly scales with the size of the local dust storm. Our results provide the first long-term record of surface pressure tides near the martian equator.

  11. The Impenetrable Barrier Revisited - Anthroprogenic Effects on Earth's Radiation Belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, J. C.; Baker, D. N.; Erickson, P. J.; Albert, J.; Fennell, J. F.; Mishin, E. V.; Starks, M. J.; Jaynes, A. N.; Li, X.; Kanekal, S. G.; Kletzing, C.

    2015-12-01

    The Van Allen Probes are contributing significantly to the understanding of processes effecting Earth's radiation belts. It has been noted that the earthward extent of the outer zone highly-relativistic electrons encounters a nearly impenetrable barrier at a radial distance (L) near 2.8 RE inside of which they are not observed. Modeling suggests that this is the result of a balance between slow inward diffusion and hiss-induced precipitation. The large storm of 17 March 2015 afforded an excellent opportunity to investigate the impenetrable barrier using the full complement of sensors carried by the Van Allen Probes. The storm was marked by the rapid reappearance of strong fluxes of MeV electrons directly outside the barrier with the formation of very steep MeV flux gradients. In spite of the strong rapid recovery of MeV electron fluxes immediately outside the barrier, the sharpness and constancy of the gradient at the barrier is strongly suggestive of a previously unrecognized fast-acting and spatially localized mechanism responsible for the formation of such a well-defined feature during these dramatic circumstances. The Van Allen Probes regularly observe a magnetically confined bubble of VLF emissions of terrestrial origin filling the inner magnetosphere. Strongest signals are from US Navy VLF transmitters used for one-way communication to submarines. These signals largely are confined to the region of L space where their frequency is < ½ fce. The strong signal from station NAA at 24 kHz is confined to L < 2.8 where it encounters the ½ fce limit. During the event, the flux of MeV electrons decreased by 1000x across 0.5 RE outside L = 2.8 simultaneous with a 6 order of magnitude increase in the VLF wave intensity as the Probes entered the VLF bubble. The VLF transmitter frequencies are amplified at the point where they overlap natural chorus band near ½ fce suggestive of transmitter-induced triggered emissions. MeV radiation belt electrons encounter this

  12. Effect of Earth's rotation on thermal convection in the mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozoki, Tamas; Herein, Mátyás; Galsa, Attila

    2016-04-01

    Numerical model calculations have been carried out to study the effect of the centrifugal force on the thermal convection in the mantle. With the help of a simple dimensional analysis it can be shown that among the inertial forces generated by Earth's rotation, only the centrifugal force might have a detectable effect on the thermal convection in the mantle. A new non-dimensional parameter, RaCF was introduced to characterize the thermal buoyancy caused by the centrifugal force compared to the viscous force. Two-dimensional cylindrical shell geometry was applied with stationary value of angular velocity. The models started from the same non-rotated, quasi-stationary convection and 10 Gyr temporal evolution was observed. In the different models the magnitude of angular velocity varied from the recent value of Ω0 = 7.29E-5 1/s to the extreme value of 100 Ω0. The temporal and spatial variation of the surface heat flux (qs) and the root-mean-square velocity (vRMS) depending on the rotation velocity were investigated systematically in the model. Velocity was decomposed to tangential (vφ) and radial (vr) velocity to analyze the effect of the rotation on the flow system. The rotation arranges the convection to polar up- and equatorial downwellings, which structure is more peculiar at higher angular velocities and by the progress of time. Three main regimes can be identified based on the monitoring parameters (qs, vRMS). At low angular velocities (Ω = 0 - 4 Ω0) the convection pattern and the surface heat flux are slightly influenced by the centrifugal force. The most specific effect appears in the middle transitional regime (Ω = 4 - 15 Ω0) where the monotonic decrease of the heat flux separates from the unvarying average velocity. In this regime the constant vRMS is maintained by the enhanced tangential and reduced radial velocity component which is in accordance with the decrease in the number of plumes. vφ and vr shows an intensive decrease from the angular

  13. Mesospheric Non-Migrating Tides Generated With Planetary Waves: II Influence of Gravity Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayr, H. G.; Mengel, J. G.; Talaat, E. L.; Porter, H. S.; Chan, K. L.

    2003-01-01

    We demonstrated that, in our model, non-linear interactions between planetary waves (PW) and migrating tides could generate in the upper mesosphere non-migrating tides with amplitudes comparable to those observed. The Numerical Spectral Model (NSM) we employ incorporates Hines Doppler Spread Parameterization for small-scale gravity waves (GW), which affect in numerous ways the dynamics of the mesosphere. The latitudinal (seasonal) reversals in the temperature and zonal circulation, which are largely caused by GWs (Lindzen, 198l), filter the PWs and contribute to the instabilities that generate the PWs. The PWs in turn are amplified by the momentum deposition of upward propagating GWs, as are the migrating tides. The GWs thus affect significantly the migrating tides and PWs, the building blocks of non-migrating tides. In the present paper, we demonstrate that GW filtering also contributes to the non-linear coupling between PWs and tides. Two computer experiments are presented to make this point. In one, we simply turn off the GW source to show the effect. In the second case, we demonstrate the effect by selectively suppressing the momentum source for the m = 0 non-migrating tides.

  14. The effect of the earth's rotation on ground water motion.

    PubMed

    Loáiciga, Hugo A

    2007-01-01

    The average pore velocity of ground water according to Darcy's law is a function of the fluid pressure gradient and the gravitational force (per unit volume of ground water) and of aquifer properties. There is also an acceleration exerted on ground water that arises from the Earth's rotation. The magnitude and direction of this rotation-induced force are determined in exact mathematical form in this article. It is calculated that the gravitational force is at least 300 times larger than the largest rotation-induced force anywhere on Earth, the latter force being maximal along the equator and approximately equal to 34 N/m(3) there. This compares with a gravitational force of approximately 10(4) N/m(3).

  15. Observation of the Earth liquid core resonance by extensometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bán, Dóra; Mentes, Gyula

    2016-04-01

    The axis of the fluid outer core of the Earth and the rotation axis of the mantle do not coincide therefore restoring forces are set up at the core-mantle boundary which try to realign the two axes causing a resonance effect. In celestial reference system it is called the "Free Core Nutation" (FCN), which can be characterized by a period of 432 days while in the Earth reference system it is called the "Nearly Diurnal Free Wobble" (NDFW). The frequency of this phenomenon is near to the diurnal tidal frequencies, especially to P1 and K1 waves. Due to its resonance effect this phenomenon can be detected also by quartz tube extensometers suitable for Earth tides recording. In this study data series measured in several extensometric stations were used to reveal the presence of the FCN resonance. In the Pannonian Basin there are five observatories where extensometric measurements were carried out in different lengths of time. Four stations in Hungary: Sopronbánfalva Geodynamical Observatory (2000-2014), Budapest Mátyáshegy Gravity and Geodynamic Observatory (2005-2012), Pécs uranium mine (1991-1999), Bakonya, near to Pécs (2004-2005) and in Slovakia: Vyhne Earth Tide Observatory (2001-2013). Identical instrumentation in different observatories provides the opportunity to compare measurements with various topography, geology and environmental parameters. The results are also compared to values inferred from extensometric measurements in other stations.

  16. Seasonal Variations of the Earth's Gravitational Field: An Analysis of Atmospheric Pressure, Ocean Tidal, and Surface Water Excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dong, D,; Gross, R.S.; Dickey, J.

    1996-01-01

    Monthly mean gravitational field parameters (denoted here as C(sub even)) that represent linear combinations of the primarily even degree zonal spherical harmonic coefficients of the Earth's gravitational field have been recovered using LAGEOS I data and are compared with those derived from gridded global surface pressure data of the National meteorological center (NMC) spanning 1983-1992. The effect of equilibrium ocean tides and surface water variations are also considered. Atmospheric pressure and surface water fluctuations are shown to be the dominant cause of observed annual C(sub even) variations. Closure with observations is seen at the 1sigma level when atmospheric pressure, ocean tide and surface water effects are include. Equilibrium ocean tides are shown to be the main source of excitation at the semiannual period with closure at the 1sigma level seen when both atmospheric pressure and ocean tide effects are included. The inverted barometer (IB) case is shown to give the best agreement with the observation series. The potential of the observed C(sub even) variations for monitoring mass variations in the polar regions of the Earth and the effect of the land-ocean mask in the IB calculation are discussed.

  17. Nonmigrating diurnal tides in the equatorial middle atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Lieberman, R.S.

    1992-01-01

    Data from the Nimbus 7 Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratosphere (LIMS) are used to analyze the diurnal tides in the middle atmosphere. A novel aspect of this study is the emphasis on the relative importance of the nonmigrating components. These modes display a high degree of temporal variability during the LIMS observing period, and contribute substantially to the diurnal signal in wind and temperature. Their observed vertical phase variations are variable; however there is evidence for upward energy propagation. It has long been hypothesized that nonmigrating tides are driven by the diurnally-varying zonally asymmetric tropospheric heating constituents. This premise is examined by employing a linear tidal model to simulate the response of the atmosphere to realistic tidal drives. These quantities are calculated from the NCAR Community Climate Model. The large-scale CCM2 diurnal surface pressure, OLR and hydrology are well simulated under July and January conditions. The CCM2 diurnal fields of short-wave radiative, convective and diffusive PBL heating are used as input to a linear tidal model with Newtonian cooling. This model successfully reproduces many observed features of the migrating and nonmigrating diurnal surface pressure tides at low latitudes. In the middle atmosphere, tropospheric solar heating is the dominant source of the migrating tide. The zonal means and eastward migrating wavenumber one components are also associated with radiative heating. The eastward migrating wavenumber three pattern is strongly linked to the dry and moist convective heating as well. The observed eastward migrating tides are harder to simulate, due in part to the failure of the linear model to incorporate the dissipative effects to which they are prone.

  18. Tidal friction in the solid earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zschau, J.

    1978-01-01

    The earth's imperfectly elastic response to body and loading tidal forces is discussed using complex Love numbers and complex mass loading coefficients. Exact analytical expressions were derived relating the energy dissipation within an inhomogeneous, compressible solid earth to the surface values of these complex characteristic numbers, thus relating the global dissipation function Q to the phase shifts in the potential, gravity, tilt, strain and displacement tides. Integration of a global ocean tidal model shows that energy dissipated in the solid earth due to ocean loading is at least 10% of that dissipated in the body tides.

  19. [Relationships between pollutants discharge and red tide occurrence in Shenzhen eastern coast].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Tian-jiu; Niu, Tao; Ying, Wen-ye

    2007-05-01

    The study on the effects of pollutants discharge on red tide occurrence in eastern sea area of Shenzhen showed that the occurrence frequency of dinoflagellate red tide had significant positive correlations with the net discharge of total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorous (TP) as well as the N/P ratio of the discharge. The thresholds of net discharged TN and TP were estimated to be 3.917 x 10(3) t and 2.123 x 10(4) t, respectively. No significant correlation was observed between diatom red tide and alongshore pollutants discharge. An example was given to illustrate the means of pollutants discharge control.

  20. Measurement of diurnal and semidiurnal rotational variations and tidal parameters of Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herring, Thomas A.; Dong, Danan

    1994-01-01

    tidal models, i.e., deficiencies of up to 0.9 mm in the treatment of the free core nutation resonance. In the semidiurnal band, our analysis yields estimates of the second-degree harmonic radial Love number h(sub 2) at the M2 tide of 0.604 + i0.005 +/- 0.002. The most likely explanation for the rotational variations are the effects of ocean tides, but there may also be some contributions from atmospheric tides, the effects of triaxiality of Earth, and the equatorial second-degree-harmonic components of the core- mantle boundary.

  1. [Adaptability of mangrove Avicennia marina seedlings to simulated tide-inundated times].

    PubMed

    Liao, Bao-wen; Qiu, Feng-ying; Zhang, Liu-en; Han, Jing; Guan, Wei

    2010-05-01

    A laboratory test on the effects of differents simulated tide-inundated times with 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, 16, 18, 20, 22, 24 h x d(-1) on the growth of Avicennia marina seedlings was conducted. The ten growth information indices including chlorophyll, root vigor, growth, biomass and photosynthetic rate were mensurated. The principal components analysis was made combining the ten growth information indices. The 210 d experimental results showed that the chlorophyll, root vigor, growth and biomass would rise first and then fall as the extension of the inundate time; and they changed suddenly at the threshold inundate time 16 h x d(-1). The growth and biomass of Avicennia marina seedlings with more than 16 hours tide-inundated time per day were less than them with no more than 16 hours tide-inundated time per day. The maximum value of stem increment each month, leaf blade increment each month, dry weight of stem, dry weight of root and total biomass were under the 10 hours tide-inundated time per day. It concluded that Avicennia marina seedlings would grow adaptively with less than 16 hours tide-inundated time per day, 8-12 hours of tide-inundated time per day is the most suitable for the growth of Avicennia marina seedlings, while 16 h x d(-1) is a critical tide-inundated time when the plant responded to be obviously inadaptable.

  2. Impacts of tides on tsunami propagation due to potential Nankai Trough earthquakes in the Seto Inland Sea, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Han Soo; Shimoyama, Tomohisa; Popinet, Stéphane

    2015-10-01

    The impacts of tides on extreme tsunami propagation due to potential Nankai Trough earthquakes in the Seto Inland Sea (SIS), Japan, are investigated through numerical experiments. Tsunami experiments are conducted based on five scenarios that consider tides at four different phases, such as flood, high, ebb, and low tides. The probes that were selected arbitrarily in the Bungo and Kii Channels show less significant effects of tides on tsunami heights and the arrival times of the first waves than those that experience large tidal ranges in inner basins and bays of the SIS. For instance, the maximum tsunami height and the arrival time at Toyomaesi differ by more than 0.5 m and nearly 1 h, respectively, depending on the tidal phase. The uncertainties defined in terms of calculated maximum tsunami heights due to tides illustrate that the calculated maximum tsunami heights in the inner SIS with standing tides have much larger uncertainties than those of two channels with propagating tides. Particularly in Harima Nada, the uncertainties due to the impacts of tides are greater than 50% of the tsunami heights without tidal interaction. The results recommend simulate tsunamis together with tides in shallow water environments to reduce the uncertainties involved with tsunami modeling and predictions for tsunami hazards preparedness. This article was corrected on 26 OCT 2015. See the end of the full text for details.

  3. Ocean tides from Seasat-A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendershott, M. C.; Munk, W. H.; Zetler, B. D.

    1974-01-01

    Two procedures for the evaluation of global tides from SEASAT-A altimetry data are elaborated: an empirical method leading to the response functions for a grid of about 500 points from which the tide can be predicted for any point in the oceans, and a dynamic method which consists of iteratively modifying the parameters in a numerical solution to Laplace tide equations. It is assumed that the shape of the received altimeter signal can be interpreted for sea state and that orbit calculations are available so that absolute sea levels can be obtained.

  4. Single Event Effects Testing For Low Earth Orbit Missions with Neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddell, Brandon; O'Neill, Pat; Bailey, Chuck; Nguyen, Kyson

    2015-01-01

    Neutrons can effectively be used to screen electronic parts intended to be used in Low Earth Orbit. This paper compares neutron with proton environments in spacecraft and discusses recent comparison testing.

  5. Galileo and Descartes on Copernicanism and the cause of the tides.

    PubMed

    Schmaltz, Tad M

    2015-06-01

    Galileo and Descartes were on the front lines of the defense of Copernicanism against theological objections that took on special importance during the seventeenth century. Galileo attempted to overcome opposition to Copernicanism within the Catholic Church by offering a demonstration of this theory that appeals to the fact that the double motion of the earth is necessary as a cause of the tides. It turns out, however, that the details of Galileo's tidal theory compromise his demonstration. Far from attempting to provide a demonstration of the earth's motion, Descartes ultimately argued that his system is compatible with the determination of the Church that the earth is at rest. Nonetheless, Descartes's account of the cause of the tides creates difficulty for this argument. PMID:26227234

  6. Galileo and Descartes on Copernicanism and the cause of the tides.

    PubMed

    Schmaltz, Tad M

    2015-06-01

    Galileo and Descartes were on the front lines of the defense of Copernicanism against theological objections that took on special importance during the seventeenth century. Galileo attempted to overcome opposition to Copernicanism within the Catholic Church by offering a demonstration of this theory that appeals to the fact that the double motion of the earth is necessary as a cause of the tides. It turns out, however, that the details of Galileo's tidal theory compromise his demonstration. Far from attempting to provide a demonstration of the earth's motion, Descartes ultimately argued that his system is compatible with the determination of the Church that the earth is at rest. Nonetheless, Descartes's account of the cause of the tides creates difficulty for this argument.

  7. Nonequilibrium effects on shock-layer radiometry during earth entry.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, J. O.; Whiting, E. E.

    1973-01-01

    Radiative enhancement factors for the CN violet and N2(+) first negative band systems caused by nonequilibrium thermochemistry in the shock layer of a blunt-nosed vehicle during earth entry are reported. The results are based on radiometric measurements obtained with the aid of a combustion-driven shock tube. The technique of converting the shock-tube measurements into predictions of the enhancement factors for the blunt-body case is described, showing it to be useful for similar applications of other shock-tube measurements.

  8. Wind Forcing of the North Sea Pole Tide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OConnor, W.; Chao, B. F.; Zheng, D. W.; Au, Z. Y.

    1998-01-01

    The Chandler wobble of the earth's rotation has a period near 14 months and sets up the 0.5 cm amplitude pole tide in the deep oceans, However, the pole tide is anomalously large in the North Sea, where the amplitude increases sharply up to 3 cm along the continental coast. It is shown here that the sea levels are well correlated with winds at the pole tide frequency. The Princeton Ocean Model is used to investigate the response of the North Sea to wind forcing. The barotropic numerical ocean model depicts realistic coastlines and bathymetry at 5 ft x 5 ft resolution, with 97 x 73 grid points. The monthly mean wind fields for the 40-year period (1958-1997) from the National Centers for Atmospheric Prediction (NCEP) reanalysis were used to force the model. The winds were converted to stress with a neutral drag coefficient that varied linearly with windspeed (instead of using the NCEP windstress). A 5-day simulation was made for each month until the resulting flow regime came into equilibrium, and model water levels at various station locations were saved for comparison with tidal-gauge observed sea levels from the Permanent Service for Mean Sea Level (PSMSL). The comparison is made for 10 North Sea stations with high quality tide gauge data. We find: (1) good agreement in annual and semi-annual phases and in the trend of amplitude w.r.t. latitude; (2) more importantly for this study, the model-predicted and observed non-seasonal sea level variations show a very significant temporal correlation as well as spectral coherence. However, a large amplitude difference exists between the two sets -- the overall amplitude variability of the observed is generally a factor of 2-3 larger than the model prediction (this same phenomenon has been reported in ocean circulation studies, although the cause is not yet clear.) Our results indicate that the wind forcing is the main cause of the observed large pole tide in the North Sea.

  9. Study of effects of space power satellites on life support functions of the earth's magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglas, M.; Laquey, R.; Deforest, S. E.; Lindsey, C.; Warshaw, H.

    1977-01-01

    The effects of the Satellite Solar Power System (SSPS) on the life support functions of the earth's magnetosphere were investigated. Topics considered include: (1) thruster effluent effects on the magnetosphere; (2) biological consequences of SSPS reflected light; (3) impact on earth bound astronomy; (4) catastrophic failure and debris; (5) satellite induced processes; and (6) microwave power transmission. Several impacts are identified and recommendations for further studies are provided.

  10. Geographical representation of radial orbit perturbations due to ocean tides: Implications for satellite altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bettadpur, Srinivas V.; Eanes, Richard J.

    1994-01-01

    In analogy to the geographical representation of the zeroth-order radial orbit perturbations due to the static geopotential, similar relationships have been derived for radial orbit perturbations due to the ocean tides. At each location these perturbations are seen to be coherent with the tide height variations. The study of this singularity is of obvious importance to the estimation of ocean tides from satellite altimeter data. We derive analytical expressions for the sensitivity of altimeter derived ocean tide models to the ocean tide force model induced errors in the orbits of the altimeter satellite. In particular, we focus on characterizing and quantifying the nonresonant tidal orbit perturbations, which cannot be adjusted into the empirical accelerations or radial perturbation adjustments commonly used during orbit determination and in altimeter data processing. As an illustration of the utility of this technique, we study the differences between a TOPEX/POSEIDON-derived ocean tide model and the Cartwright and Ray 1991 Geosat model. This analysis shows that nearly 60% of the variance of this difference for M(sub 2) can be explained by the Geosat radial orbit eror due to the omission of coefficients from the GEM-T2 background ocean tide model. For O(sub 1), K(sub 1), S(sub 2), and K(sub 2) the orbital effects account for approximately 10 to 40% of the variances of these differences. The utility of this technique to assessment of the ocean tide induced errors in the TOPEX/POSEIDON-derived tide models is also discussed.

  11. Chemical effects of large impacts on the Earth's primitive atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Fegley, B; Prinn, R G; Hartman, H; Watkins, G H

    1986-01-23

    Intense bombardment of the moon and terrestrial planets approximately 3.9-4.0 x 10(9) years ago could have caused the chemical reprocessing of the Earth's primitive atmosphere. In particular, the shock heating and rapid quenching caused by the impact of large bodies into the atmosphere could produce molecules such as HCN and H2CO4 which are important precursors for the abiotic synthesis of complex organic molecules. Here we model the production of HCN and H2CO by thermochemical equilibrium and chemical kinetic calculations of the composition of shocked air parcels for a wide range of temperatures, pressures and initial compositions. For atmospheres with C/O > or = 1, our results suggest that bolide impacts cause HCN volume mixing ratios of approximately 10(-3) to 10(-5) in the impact region and global average ratios of 10(-5) to 10(-12). The corresponding H2CO mixing ratios in the impact region are 10(-7) to 10(-9); no-global mixing can occur, however, as H2CO is rapidly destroyed or rained out of the atmosphere within days to hours. Rainout to the oceans of 3-15% of the HCN produced can provide approximately (3-14) x 10(11) mol HCN per year. This is somewhat larger than other predicted sources of HCN and H2CO on the primitive Earth.

  12. The effect of EarthPulse on learning of declarative knowledge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinney, Heather E.

    The purpose of this double-blind, bio-medical research study was to investigate the effect of EarthPulse, a brainwave entrainment and pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) device, on learning of declarative knowledge. Currently, PEMF research explores physiological and psychological effects but a gap exists in the potential effects of PEMF on learning. The study explored whether a relationship existed between receiving a thirty minute EarthPulse treatment on the "Entrain Up" setting and learning of declarative knowledge; whether the relationship remained over time; whether EarthPulse had an effect on sleep; and whether EarthPulse had an effect on attrition. Ninety-eight, randomly assigned, undergraduate students participated in this double-blind, experimental design study, of which 87 remained after attrition. After receiving a thirty minute EarthPulse or placebo treatment, experimental and control groups read identical passages and completed identical instruments to test learning and retention of declarative knowledge. Participants completed the same test in two intervals: an immediate (learning) and delayed (retention) posttest. Assumptions for normality and reliability were met. One-way ANOVA revealed no statistically significant effects on learning or retention at the 0.05 level. However, Chi square analysis revealed those who received the EarthPulse treatment were significantly less likely to fall asleep than those who received the control treatment (p=0.022) and very closely approached significance for attrition (p=0.051).

  13. Solar Energetic Particles and Their Near-Earth Effects in Cycle 24 So Far (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luhmann, J. G.; Randall, C. E.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Cohen, C. M.; Leske, R. A.; Jackman, C. H.; Jian, L.; Bain, H. M.; Li, Y.; Russell, C. T.; Odstrcil, D.

    2013-12-01

    Solar Energetic Particles were practically absent in the STEREO-era (STEREO started its prime mission in late 2006), with the exception of the significant events of December, 2006 at the end of cycle 23. The December 13, 2006 event included a GLE that affected Earth's polar middle atmosphere composition and the December 6, 2006 radio event had significant effects on GPS accuracy. Only weak impulsive events were then seen until late 2009 when the corona went through a brief dipolar phase. So far in cycle 24, the most impressive SEP event was seen on STEREO-A in July 2012, at a time when STEREO was far-removed from Earth's vicinity. Had that event impacted Earth what effects would it have produced? We compare the July 2012 SEP event with some other large events from the previously observed, much stronger solar cycles, and consider their relative effects on the Earth's upper atmosphere.

  14. The Effect of Rare Earth on the Structure and Performance of Laser Clad Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Ruiliang; Yu, Huijun; Chen, Chuanzhong; Dong, Qing

    Laser cladding is one kind of advanced surface modification technology and has the abroad prospect in making the wear-resistant coating on metal substrates. However, the application of laser cladding technology does not achieve the people's expectation in the practical production because of many defects such as cracks, pores and so on. The addiction of rare earth can effectively reduce the number of cracks in the clad coating and enhance the coating wear-resistance. In the paper, the effects of rare earth on metallurgical quality, microstructure, phase structure and wear-resistance are analyzed in turns. The preliminary discussion is also carried out on the effect mechanism of rare earth. At last, the development tendency of rare earth in the laser cladding has been briefly elaborated.

  15. 18.6-year Earth tide regulates geyser activity.

    PubMed

    Rinehart, J S

    1972-07-28

    Over 40 years of records from Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, show that the 18.6-year tidal component strongly regulates the frequencies of eruption of Grand and Steamboat geysers. The frequency of Grand Geyser increases with increasing tidal force and that of Steamboat Geyser decreases, which suggests that tidal dilatation is one factor affecting heat flow to a geyser.

  16. 18.6-year Earth tide regulates geyser activity.

    PubMed

    Rinehart, J S

    1972-07-28

    Over 40 years of records from Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, show that the 18.6-year tidal component strongly regulates the frequencies of eruption of Grand and Steamboat geysers. The frequency of Grand Geyser increases with increasing tidal force and that of Steamboat Geyser decreases, which suggests that tidal dilatation is one factor affecting heat flow to a geyser. PMID:17813197

  17. Investigations in Marine Chemistry: Tide Pool Ecology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlenker, Richard M.

    Students investigated the salinity of tide pools at different levels in the intertidal zone. Data are analyzed collectively. Students graphed and discussed data. Included are suggestions for evaluation and further study. (Author)

  18. The improvement and the effect of IERS conventions (2003)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Na; Shi, Chuang; Li, Min; Rong, Zou

    2008-12-01

    The new generation of space datum in China should comply with the latest IERS (International Earth Rotation and Reference System Service) convention as much as possible. This paper has deeply addressed and researched the main improvements of the current version IERS Conventions (2003), including the changes of the Terrestrial Reference System, the Celestial Reference System, and the transformation between them, the tide correction and so on, which would undoubtedly benefit the realization and maintenance of our space datum. Based on PANDA (Position And Navigation Data Analyst) software developed by GNSS Center of Wuhan University, we analyzed the effect of improvements of the IERS Conventions (2003) on precise orbit determination and precise positioning. The results show that the effect of improvements of models of the coordinate transformation between the celestial and the terrestrial reference system and tide correction (including solid earth tide, ocean tide and polar tide) on precise orbit determination are 4mm, 9mm and 5mm in terms of RMS in along, cross and radial direction of the track; and the effect of the improvement of the tide models on positioning is basically under 0.6mm, and the RMS of the differences are 0.3mm, 0.3mm and 0.2mm in X, Y and Z.

  19. Simultaneous generation and scattering of internal tides by ocean floor topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathur, Manikandan

    2015-11-01

    Internal waves play a significant role in the global energy budget of the ocean, with internal tides potentially contributing to the conversion of a large amount of mechanical energy into heat in the deep ocean. Several studies in the past decade have investigated internal tide generation and internal tide scattering by ocean floor topography, but by treating them as two separate, independent processes. In this talk, we use the recently developed Green function model (Mathur et al., J. Geophys. Res. Oceans, 119, 2165-2182, 2014), sans the WKB approximation, to quantify the extent to which internal tide generation (scattering) that results from barotropic (baroclinic) forcing on small- and large-scale topography in uniform and nonuniform stratifications is modified by the presence of a background baroclinic (barotropic) tide. Results on idealized topography, stratification and forcing will first be presented, followed by a discussion on the relevance of our studies in the real ocean scenario. The author thanks the Ministry of Earth Sciences, Government of India for financial support under the Monsoon Mission Grant MM/2014/IND-002.

  20. Biological effects of high ultraviolet radiation on early earth--a theoretical evaluation.

    PubMed

    Cockell, C S

    1998-08-21

    The surface of early Earth was exposed to both UVC radiation (< 280 nm) and higher doses of UVB (280-315 nm) compared with the surface of present day Earth. The degree to which this radiation environment acted as a selection pressure on organisms and biological systems has rarely been theoretically examined with respect to the biologically effective irradiances that ancient organisms would receive. Here action spectra for DNA inactivation and isolated chloroplast inhibition are used to estimate biologically effective irradiances on archean Earth. Comparisons are made with present day Earth. The theoretical estimations on the UV radiation screening required to protect DNA on archean Earth compare well with field and laboratory observations on protection strategies found in present day microbial communities. They suggest that many physical and biological methods may have been effective and would have allowed for the radiation of life even under the high UV radiation regimes of archean Earth. Such strategies would also have provided effective reduction of photoinhibition by UV radiation. The data also suggest that the UV regime on the surface of Mars is not a life limiting factor per se, although other environmental factors such as desiccation and low temperatures may contribute towards the apparent lack of a surface biota.

  1. The Near-Earth Plasma Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfaff, Robert F., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    An overview of the plasma environment near the earth is provided. We describe how the near-earth plasma is formed, including photo-ionization from solar photons and impact ionization at high latitudes from energetic particles. We review the fundamental characteristics of the earth's plasma environment, with emphasis on the ionosphere and its interactions with the extended neutral atmosphere. Important processes that control ionospheric physics at low, middle, and high latitudes are discussed. The general dynamics and morphology of the ionized gas at mid- and low-latitudes are described including electrodynamic contributions from wind-driven dynamos, tides, and planetary-scale waves. The unique properties of the near-earth plasma and its associated currents at high latitudes are shown to depend on precipitating auroral charged particles and strong electric fields which map earthward from the magnetosphere. The upper atmosphere is shown to have profound effects on the transfer of energy and momentum between the high-latitude plasma and the neutral constituents. The article concludes with a discussion of how the near-earth plasma responds to magnetic storms associated with solar disturbances.

  2. Tide and tidal current observation in the Karimata Strait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Zexun; Fang, Guohong; Sulistiyo, Budi; Dwi Susanto, R.; Setiawan, Agus; Rameyo Adi, Tukul; Qiao, Fangli; Fan, Bin; Li, Shujiang

    2013-04-01

    It is believed that the water exchanges between the South China Sea and the Indonesian Seas are significant, and play an important role in the water mass formation and air-sea interactions of both the South China Sea and Indonesian Seas. It has also been found that the current in Sunda Strait has been obvious seasonal variation, which indicates the water exchange between West Indonesian Seas and India Ocean. In order to make quantitative evaluation of the magnitudes of the exchange, the First Institute of Oceanography (FIO), China, the Agency for Marine and Fisheries Research, Indonesia, and the Lamont-Doheries Earth Observatory, USA established a collaborative program, "The South-China Sea-Indonesian Seas Transport/Exchange (SITE) and Impacts on Seasonal Fish Migration" in 2006. And, they extend and expand the cooperation to Sunda Strait in 2008, the title of the collaborative program was changed to "The South China Sea - Indonesian Seas Transport/Exchange (SITE) and Dynamics of Sunda and Lombok Straits, and Their Impacts on Seasonal Fish Migration". Till now, 12 joint cruises have been conducted since December, 2007. Ten Trawl-Resistant Bottom Mounts (TRBM) have been deployed in the Karimata and Sunda Straits. The TRBMs are equipped with ADCPs and tide gauges for measuring current profiles and sea levels, respectively. The temperature-salinity profiles were measured with ship-board CTD during the cruises. Data obtained in Karimata Strait revealed that a significant water mass transport. This indicates that the Karimata Strait throughflow can greatly impacts the circulation of both the South China Sea and the Indonesian Seas. The data obtained at the 5 stations alone the two sections in the Karimata Strait were used to study the tide and tidal currents in the Karimata Strait. 2 TRBMs were deployed at Section A, as well as 3 at Section B, which lies at the southeast of Section A. Station B1 is in the Gaspar Strait between Bangka Island and Belitung Island, Stations

  3. Discover Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, Colleen

    1998-01-01

    Discover Earth is a NASA-sponsored project for teachers of grades 5-12, designed to: (1) enhance understanding of the Earth as an integrated system; (2) enhance the interdisciplinary approach to science instruction; and (3) provide classroom materials that focus on those goals. Discover Earth is conducted by the Institute for Global Environmental Strategies in collaboration with Dr. Eric Barron, Director, Earth System Science Center, The Pennsylvania State University; and Dr. Robert Hudson, Chair, the Department of Meteorology, University of Maryland at College Park. The enclosed materials: (1) represent only part of the Discover Earth materials; (2) were developed by classroom teachers who are participating in the Discover Earth project; (3) utilize an investigative approach and on-line data; and (4) can be effectively adjusted to classrooms with greater/without technology access. The Discover Earth classroom materials focus on the Earth system and key issues of global climate change including topics such as the greenhouse effect, clouds and Earth's radiation balance, surface hydrology and land cover, and volcanoes and climate change. All the materials developed to date are available on line at (http://www.strategies.org) You are encouraged to submit comments and recommendations about these materials to the Discover Earth project manager, contact information is listed below. You are welcome to duplicate all these materials.

  4. Earth rotation and geodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogusz, Janusz; Brzezinski, Aleksander; Kosek, Wieslaw; Nastula, Jolanta

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents the summary of research activities carried out in Poland in 2011-2014 in the field of Earth rotation and geodynamics by several Polish research institutions. It contains a summary of works on Earth rotation, including evaluation and prediction of its parameters and analysis of the related excitation data as well as research on associated geodynamic phenomena such as geocentre motion, global sea level change and hydrological processes. The second part of the paper deals with monitoring of geodynamic phenomena. It contains analysis of geodynamic networks of local, and regional scale using space (GNSS and SLR) techniques, Earth tides monitoring with gravimeters and water-tube hydrostatic clinometer, and the determination of secular variation of the Earth' magnetic field.

  5. Modeling Tides, Planetary Waves, and Equatorial Oscillations in the MLT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mengel, J. G.; Mayr, H. G.; Drob, D. P.; Porter, H. S.; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Applying Hines Doppler Spread Parameterization for gravity waves (GW), our 3D model reproduces some essential features that characterize the observed seasonal variations of tides and planetary waves in the upper mesosphere. In 2D, our model also reproduces the large Semi-Annual Oscillation (SAO) and Quasi Biennial Oscillation (QBO) observed in this region at low latitudes. It is more challenging to describe these features combined in a more comprehensive self consistent model, and we give a progress report that outlines the difficulties and reports some success. In 3D, the GW's are partially absorbed by tides and planetary waves to amplify them. Thus the waves are less efficient in generating the QBO and SAO at equatorial latitudes. Some of this deficiency is compensated by the fact that the GW activity is observed to be enhanced at low latitudes. Increasing the GW source has the desired effect to boost the QBO, but the effect is confined primarily to the stratosphere. With increasing altitude, the meridional circulation becomes more important in redistributing the momentum deposited in the background flow by the GW's. Another factor involved is the altitude at which the GW's originate, which we had originally chosen to be the surface. Numerical experiments show that moving this source altitude to the top of the troposphere significantly increases the efficiency for generating the QBO without affecting much the tides and planetary waves in the model. Attention to the details in which the GW source comes into play thus appears to be of critical importance in modeling the phenomenology of the MLT. Among the suite of numerical experiments reported, we present a simulation that produced significant variations of tides and planetary waves in the upper mesosphere. The effect is related to the QBO generated in the model, and GW filtering is the likely cause.

  6. Tide-related biological rhythm in the oxygen consumption rate of ghost shrimp (Neotrypaea uncinata).

    PubMed

    Leiva, Félix P; Niklitschek, Edwin J; Paschke, Kurt; Gebauer, Paulina; Urbina, Mauricio A

    2016-07-01

    The effects of tidal height (high and low), acclimation to laboratory conditions (days in captivity) and oxygen level (hypoxia and normoxia) were evaluated in the oxygen consumption rate (OCR) of the ghost shrimp Neotrypaea uncinata We evaluated the hypothesis that N. uncinata reduces its OCR during low tide and increases it during high tide, regardless of oxygen level or acclimation. Additionally, the existence of an endogenous rhythm in OCR was explored, and we examined whether it synchronized with tidal, diurnal or semidiurnal cycles. Unexpectedly, high OCRs were observed at low tide, during normoxia, in non-acclimated animals. Results from a second, longer experiment under normoxic conditions suggested the presence of a tide-related metabolic rhythm, a response pattern not yet demonstrated for a burrowing decapod. Although rhythms persisted for only 2 days after capture, their period of 12.8 h closely matched the semidiurnal tidal cycle that ghost shrimp confront inside their burrows. PMID:27099365

  7. Tide-related biological rhythm in the oxygen consumption rate of ghost shrimp (Neotrypaea uncinata).

    PubMed

    Leiva, Félix P; Niklitschek, Edwin J; Paschke, Kurt; Gebauer, Paulina; Urbina, Mauricio A

    2016-07-01

    The effects of tidal height (high and low), acclimation to laboratory conditions (days in captivity) and oxygen level (hypoxia and normoxia) were evaluated in the oxygen consumption rate (OCR) of the ghost shrimp Neotrypaea uncinata We evaluated the hypothesis that N. uncinata reduces its OCR during low tide and increases it during high tide, regardless of oxygen level or acclimation. Additionally, the existence of an endogenous rhythm in OCR was explored, and we examined whether it synchronized with tidal, diurnal or semidiurnal cycles. Unexpectedly, high OCRs were observed at low tide, during normoxia, in non-acclimated animals. Results from a second, longer experiment under normoxic conditions suggested the presence of a tide-related metabolic rhythm, a response pattern not yet demonstrated for a burrowing decapod. Although rhythms persisted for only 2 days after capture, their period of 12.8 h closely matched the semidiurnal tidal cycle that ghost shrimp confront inside their burrows.

  8. Earth and ocean physics. [results of ERTS-1 imagery for determining earth gravity and tectonic conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A procedure for obtaining a parameterization of the marine geoid for suitable orthogonality properties in altimetry data is discussed. The application of the technique to the Puerto Rico trench is explained and a map of the data is developed. The Goddard Earth Model (GEM-6) is described to show the method for determining the earth gravity field using data obtained from satellite tracking stations. The derivation of a global ocean tide model from satellite data is explained. The influence of solid earth and ocean tides on the inclination of GEOS-1 is plotted. The delineation of the geographical fracture pattern and boundary system of the tectonic plates using ERTS satellite is shown.

  9. Planetary meteorology - A new perspective on the earth's weather

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joels, K.

    1976-01-01

    Meteorological observations of other planets which may contribute to an understanding of the meteorological processes on the earth are discussed. The high solar input and extremely low rotation rate of Venus simplify the analysis of the interaction of solar energy with the atmosphere. The dust present in the atmosphere of Mars may provide a useful model for studying the effects of anthropogenic aerosols in the atmosphere of earth. Observations of Mars may also be expected to yield information on the evolution of severe storms and on atmospheric tides. The belts and zones in the Jovian atmosphere bear some similarities to cyclones on earth, although they are produced differently; careful modeling of Jupiter's atmosphere may cast light on terrestrial cyclonic activity.

  10. Zonal winds near Venus' cloud top level - A model study of the interaction between the zonal mean circulation and the semidiurnal tide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, N. L.; Leovy, C. B.

    1987-02-01

    A primitive equation wave-mean flow interaction model, designed by J. R. Holton and used originally to study Earth's middle atmosphere, has been adapted to Venus in order to clarify the understanding of the interaction between the semidiurnal tide and the thermally driven mean meridional circulation near the cloud top level. With or without the tide the model produces midlatitude jets whose structure is insensitive to vertical shear of the background angular velocity above and below the cloud top level, but it is sensitive to background angular velocity at the cloud top level. Agreement between the model tide and the observed tide, or the tide determined in the more detailed calculations of Pechmann and Ingersoll, is best when the background angular velocity at the jet level is about 30% larger than that observed.

  11. Does lunisolar gravitational tide affect the activity of animals?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshcherevskii, A. V.; Sidorin, A. Ya.

    2010-12-01

    Multiyear time series obtained by the continuous instrumental monitoring of the electrical activity (EA) of weakly electric fish Gnathonemus leopoldianus and the motor activity (MA) of the freshwater catfish Hoplosternum thoracatum and the cockroach Blaberus craniifer are compared to the parameters of the lunisolar gravitational tide. These curves are observed to be very similar for a large number of time intervals. However, a more detailed analysis shows this to be only a superficial resemblance caused by the closeness of the periods of diurnal and semidiurnal rhythms of bioindicator activity (the dominant rhythms in EA and MA patterns) and the periods of main gravitational tidal waves. It is concluded that the lunisolar gravitational tide has no significant effect on animal behavior in our experiment.

  12. Seasonal variations in Pluto's atmospheric tides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, Richard G.; Toigo, Anthony D.; Gierasch, Peter J.; Hansen, Candice J.; Young, Leslie A.; Sicardy, Bruno; Dias-Oliveira, Alex; Guzewich, Scott D.

    2015-01-01

    Pluto's tenuous atmosphere exhibits remarkable seasonal change as a result of the planet's substantial obliquity and highly eccentric orbit. Over the past two decades, occultations have revealed that the atmospheric pressure on Pluto has increased substantially, perhaps by a factor as large as 2 to 4, as the planet has moved from equinox towards solstice conditions. These data have also shown variations in the strength of the dynamical activity in the atmosphere, as revealed by the varying abundance and amplitude of spikes in the occultation light curves resulting from refractive focussing by atmospheric waves. Toigo et al. (Toigo et al. [2010]. Icarus, 208, 402-411) explored the possibility that these waves are caused by solar-induced sublimation and diurnal deposition from N2 frost patches, driven by weak vertical winds resulting from the rising and sinking gas as it is released from or deposited onto the surface. Here, we extend this model to account explicitly for seasonal variations in average insolation and for the significant damping of vertical wave propagation by kinematic viscosity and thermal diffusivity (Hubbard et al. [2009]. Icarus, 204, 284-289). Damping is extremely effective in suppressing vertical propagation of waves with vertical wavelengths of a few kilometers or less, and the dominant surviving tidal modes have characteristic vertical wavelengths λ ∼ 10-13 km . We estimate the expected strength and regional characteristics of atmospheric tides over the course of Pluto's orbit for a variety of assumed spatial distributions of surface frost and atmospheric surface pressure. We compute the predicted strength of tide-induced wave activity based on the actual frost distribution observed on Pluto from Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations (Stern et al. [1997]. Astron. J., 113, 827; Buie et al. [2010]. Astron. J., 139, 1128-1143), and compare the results to calculations for volatile transport models of Young (Young [2013]. Astrophys. J., 766

  13. Effect of rare earth substitution in cobalt ferrite bulk materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulai, G.; Diamandescu, L.; Dumitru, I.; Gurlui, S.; Feder, M.; Caltun, O. F.

    2015-09-01

    The study was focused on the influence of small amounts of rare earth (RE=La, Ce, Sm, Gd, Dy, Ho, Er, Yb) addition on the microstructure, phase content and magnetic properties of cobalt ferrite bulk materials. The X-Ray diffraction measurements confirmed the formation of the spinel structure but also the presence of secondary phases of RE oxides or orthoferrite in small percentages (up to 3%). Density measurements obtained by Archimedes method revealed a ~1 g cm-3 decrease for the RE doped cobalt ferrite samples compared with stoichiometric one. Both the Mössbauer and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrocopy analysis results confirmed the formation of the spinel phase. The saturation magnetization and coercive field values of the doped samples obtained by Vibrating Sample Magnetometry were close to those of the pure cobalt ferrite. For magnetostrictive property studies the samples were analyzed using the strain gauge method. Higher maximum magnetostriction coefficients were found for the Ho, Ce, Sm and Yb doped cobalt ferrite bulk materials as related to the stoichiometric CoFe2O4 sample. Moreover, improved strain derivative was observed for these samples but at higher magnetic fields due to the low increase of the coercive field values for doped samples.

  14. [Removal efficiency of red tide organisms by modified clay and its impacts on cultured organisms].

    PubMed

    Cao, Xi-hua; Song, Xiu-xian; Yu, Zhi-ming

    2004-09-01

    Removal efficiencies of Prorocentrum donghaiense (Prorocentrum dentatum) by Hexadecyltrimethylammonium (HDTMA) bromide and organo-clay modified by HDTMA were identified. Moreover the toxicity of the unbound HDTMA and HDTMA plus clay to aquacultural organisms, Penaeus japonicus, was also tested. The results suggested that (1) The unbound HDTMA had an excellent ability to remove the red tide organisms. However, its strong toxicity to Penaeus japonicus would restrict its practical use in red tide control. (2) The toxicity of HDTMA could be remarkably decreased by addition of clay and the organo-clay complex had a good ability to removal red tide organisms. At the same time the availability of organo-clay to remove the red tide of P. donghaiense and Heterosigma akashiwo in the lab-imitated cultures were studied. The results indicated that the organo-clay complex could remove 100% P. donghaiense at the dosage of 0.03 g/L and effectively control H. akashiwo at 0.09 g/L while the survival rate of Penaeus japonicus larvae, which were cultured in the red tide seawater, is kept 100%. According to the results in laboratory, the mesocosm tests (CEPEX) in East China Sea were conducted in April and May of 2003. The removal efficiencies of original clay, organic clay and inorganic clay were compared during the CEPEX tests. The results revealed that both inorganic clay and organic clay could remove red tide organisms more effectively than the original clay.

  15. The black tide model of QSOs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, P. J.; Shields, G. A.; Wheeler, J. C.

    1977-01-01

    The paper develops certain aspects of a model wherein a QSO is a massive black hole located in a dense galactic nucleus, with its growth and luminosity fueled by tidal disruption of passing stars. Cross sections for tidal disruptions are calculated, taking into account the thermal energy of stars, relativistic effects, and partial disruption removing only the outer layers of a star. Accretion rates are computed for a realistic distribution of stellar masses and evolutionary phases, the effect of the black hole on the cluster distribution is examined, and the red-giant disruption rate is evaluated for hole mass of at least 300 million solar masses, the cutoff of disruption of main-sequence stars. The results show that this black-tide model can explain QSO luminosities of at least 1 trillion suns if the black hole remains almost maximally Kerr as it grows above 100 million solar masses and if 'loss-cone' depletion of the number of stars in disruptive orbits is unimportant.

  16. Effects of selective fusion on the thermal history of the earth's mantle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, W.H.K.

    1968-01-01

    A comparative study on the thermal history of the earth's mantle was made by numerical solutions of the heat equation including and excluding selective fusion of silicates. Selective fusion was approximated by melting in a multicomponent system and redistribution of radioactive elements. Effects of selective fusion on the thermal models are (1) lowering (by several hundred degrees centigrade) and stabilizing the internal temperature distribution, and (2) increasing the surface heat-flow. It was found that models with selective fusion gave results more compatible with observations of both present temperature and surface heat-flow. The results therefore suggest continuous differentiation of the earth's mantle throughout geologic time, and support the hypothesis that the earth's atmosphere, oceans, and crust have been accumulated throughout the earth's history by degassing and selective fusion of the mantle. ?? 1968.

  17. Effect of limb darkening on earth radiation incident on a spherical satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katzoff, S.; Smith, G. L.

    1974-01-01

    The thermal radiation from the earth incident on a spherical satellite depends on the angular distribution of earth-emitted radiation. An analysis is presented of this dependency, and calculated results are given, based on a published limb-darkening curve for the earth. The curve was determined from Tiros data, and is a statistical average over the entire globe between 75 deg latitude. The computed effect of limb darkening was 1.8 percent at 900 km altitude, 2.5 percent at 500 km altitude, and 3.0 percent at 300 km altitude. Below 300 km, it increased rapidly with decreasing altitude. Discussion is included of various other problems inherent in the use of orbiting spheres and stabilized flat plates to measure the heat radiated from the earth.

  18. Using the Earth as an Effective Model for Integrating Space Science Into Education Outreach Programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, P. A.; Allen, J.; Galindo, C.; McKay, G.; Obot, V.; Reiff, P.

    2005-05-01

    Our methods of teaching Earth and space science as two disciplines do not represent the spirit of earlier scientists such as Aristotle, da Vinci, and Galileo. We need to re-evaluate these methods and take advantage of the excitement created in the general public over the recent space science exploration programs. The information that we are obtaining from both the Mars missions and Cassini-Huygens focuses on interpreting geomorphology, mineral compositions and gas identification based on Earth as a baseline for data evaluation. This type of evaluation is an extension of Hutton's 18th century principle of Uniformitarianism, the present is the key to the past, or Earth is the key for understanding extraterrestrial bodies. Geomorphological examples are volcanic activity, meteoritic impacts, and evidence of water altering surface features. The Hawaiian, or shield, type volcanoes are analogues for Olympus Mons and the other volcanoes on Mars. Other examples include comparing sand dunes on Earth with possible Martian dunes, known stream patterns on Earth with potential stream patterns on Mars, and even comparing meteoritic impact features on Mars, the Earth, Moon and Mercury. All of these comparisons have been developed into inquiry-based activities and are available through NASA publications. Each of these activities is easily adapted to emphasize either Earth science or space science or both. Beyond geomorphology, solar storms are an excellent topic for integrating Earth and space science. Solar storms are traditionally part of space science studies, but most students do not understand their effect on Earth or the intense effects they could have on humans, whether traveling through space or exploring the surfaces of the Moon or Mars. Effects are not only limited to space travel and other planetary surfaces but also include Earth's magnetosphere, which in turn, affect radio transmission and potentially climate. Like geomorphology courses, there are extensive NASA

  19. Perceived Barriers and Strategies to Effective Online Earth and Space Science Instruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pottinger, James E.

    With the continual growth and demand of online courses, higher education institutions are attempting to meet the needs of today's learners by modifying and developing new student centered services and programs. As a result, faculty members are being forced into teaching online, including Earth and Space science faculty. Online Earth and Space science courses are different than typical online courses in that they need to incorporate an inquiry-based component to ensure students fully understand the course concepts and science principles in the Earth and Space sciences. Studies have addressed the barriers in other inquiry-based online science courses, including biology, physics, and chemistry. This holistic, multiple-case qualitative study investigated perceived barriers and strategies to effective online Earth and Space science instruction through in-depth interviews with six experienced post-secondary online science instructors. Data from this study was analyzed using a thematic analysis approach and revealed four common themes when teaching online Earth and Space science. A positive perception and philosophy of online teaching is essential, the instructor-student interaction is dynamic, course structure and design modification will occur, and online lab activities must make science operational and relevant. The findings in this study demonstrated that online Earth and Space science instructors need institutional support in the form of a strong faculty development program and support staff in order to be as effective as possible. From this study, instructors realize that the instructor-student relationship and course structure is paramount, especially when teaching online science with labs. A final understanding from this study was that online Earth and Space science lab activities must incorporate the use and application of scientific skills and knowledge. Recommendations for future research include (a) qualitative research conducted in specific areas within the

  20. Earth and ocean dynamics satellites and systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonbun, F. O.

    1975-01-01

    An overview is presented of the present state of satellite and ground systems making observations of the dynamics of the solid earth and the oceans. Emphasis is placed on applications of space technology for practical use. Topics discussed include: satellite missions and results over the last two decades in the areas of earth gravity field, polar motions, earth tides, magnetic anomalies, and satellite-to-satellite tracking; laser ranging systems; development of the Very Long Baseline Interferometer; and Skylab radar altimeter data applications.

  1. The effects of mantle compressibility on mantle dynamics, magmatism and degassing for super-Earths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.; Zhong, S.

    2010-12-01

    The discovery of extra-solar planets, especially massive terrestrial super-Earths, prompts studies of surface and internal characteristics of super-Earths that may help characterize super-Earths and understand their surface environments and habitability. An important question is related to the formation and evolution of super-Earth’s atmosphere for which mantle degassing resulting from magmatism has important controls. Similar to terrestrial planets in our Solar system, volcanism and magmatism for super-Earths, as a form of heat release from planetary interiors, are likely controlled by the dynamics of mantle convection, and more specifically plate tectonic process and mantle upwelling plumes. However, compared with that for terrestrial planets in our Solar system, the dynamics of mantle convection for super-Earths due to their larger size and mass should be more dissipative and display larger compressibility effects. Using a radius scaling with mass for super-Earths by Valencia et al. [2007], it can be inferred that the mantle dissipation number Di for super-Earths with ~10 Earth’s mass may be 4 times larger than that for the Earth. This may lead to rapid cooling of mantle upwellings and warming of mantle downwellings for super-Earths, thus diminishing mantle buoyancy driving mantle convection. With the large dissipation number, we found that the excess temperature of mantle upwelling plumes may decrease by one order of magnitude as they ascend through the mantle, thus greatly reducing plume-related magmatism and degassing. Another important control on Super-Earth’s magmatism and degassing comes from their increased surface gravitational acceleration that for super-Earths with ~10 Earth’s mass may be three times larger than that at the Earth’s surface. This limits the melting to relatively shallow depths and within small depth ranges, thus posing additional difficulties for plume-related magmatism and degassing. This implies that degassing for super-Earths

  2. Effect of the shrinking dipole on solar-terrestrial energy input to the Earth's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPherron, R. L.

    2011-12-01

    The global average temperature of the Earth is rising rapidly. This rise is primarily attributed to the release of greenhouse gases as a result of human activity. However, it has been argued that changes in radiation from the Sun might play a role. Most energy input to the Earth is light in the visible spectrum. Our best measurements suggest this power input has been constant for the last 40 years (the space age) apart from a small 11-year variation due to the solar cycle of sunspot activity. Another possible energy input from the Sun is the solar wind. The supersonic solar wind carries the magnetic field of the Sun into the solar system. As it passes the Earth it can connect to the Earth's magnetic field whenever it is antiparallel t the Earth's field. This connection allows mass, momentum, and energy from the solar wind to enter the magnetosphere producing geomagnetic activity. Ultimately much of this energy is deposited at high latitudes in the form of particle precipitation (aurora) and heating by electrical currents. Although the energy input by this process is miniscule compared to that from visible radiation it might alter the absorption of visible radiation. Two other processes affected by the solar cycle are atmospheric entry of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar energetic protons (SEP). A weak solar magnetic field at sunspot minimum facilitates GCR entry which has been implicated in creation of clouds. Large coronal mass ejections and solar flares create SEP at solar maximum. All of these alternative energy inputs and their effects depend on the strength of the Earth's magnetic field. Currently the Earth's field is decreasing rapidly and conceivably might reverse polarity in 1000 years. In this paper we describe the changes in the Earth's magnetic field and how this might affect GCR, SEP, electrical heating, aurora, and radio propagation. Whether these effects are important in global climate change can only be determined by detailed physical models.

  3. Landslide movement in southwest Colorado triggered by atmospheric tides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schulz, W.H.; Kean, J.W.; Wang, G.

    2009-01-01

    Landslides are among the most hazardous of geological processes, causing thousands of casualties and damage on the order of billions of dollars annually. The movement of most landslides occurs along a discrete shear surface, and is triggered by a reduction in the frictional strength of the surface. Infiltration of water into the landslide from rainfall and snowmelt and ground motion from earthquakes are generally implicated in lowering the frictional strength of this surface. However, solid-Earth and ocean tides have recently been shown to trigger shear sliding in other processes, such as earthquakes and glacial motion. Here we use observations and numerical modelling to show that a similar processatmospheric tidescan trigger movement in an ongoing landslide. The Slumgullion landslide, located in the SanJuan Mountains of Colorado, shows daily movement, primarily during diurnal low tides of the atmosphere. According to our model, the tidal changes in air pressure cause air and water in the sediment pores to flow vertically, altering the frictional stress of the shear surface; upward fluid flow during periods of atmospheric low pressure is most conducive to sliding. We suggest that tidally modulated changes in shear strength may also affect the stability of other landslides, and that the rapid pressure variations associated with some fast-moving storm systems could trigger a similar response. ?? 2009 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  4. Frontiers in Outreach and Education: The Florida Red Tide Experience.

    PubMed

    Nierenberg, Kate; Hollenbeck, Julie; Fleming, Lora E; Stephan, Wendy; Reich, Andrew; Backer, Lorraine C; Currier, Robert; Kirkpatrick, Barbara

    2011-05-01

    To enhance information sharing and garner increased support from the public for scientific research, funding agencies now typically require that research groups receiving support convey their work to stakeholders. The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences-(NIEHS) funded Aerosolized Florida Red Tide P01 research group (Florida Red Tide Research Group) has employed a variety of outreach strategies to meet this requirement. Messages developed from this project began a decade ago and have evolved from basic print material (fliers and posters) to an interactive website, to the use of video and social networking technologies, such as Facebook and Twitter. The group was able to track dissemination of these information products; however, evaluation of their effectiveness presented much larger challenges. The primary lesson learned by the Florida Red Tide Research Group is that the best ways to reach specific stakeholders is to develop unique products or services to address specific stakeholders needs, such as the Beach Conditions Reporting System. Based on the experience of the Group, the most productive messaging products result when scientific community engages potential stakeholders and outreach experts during the very initial phases of a project.

  5. The Global S$_1$ Ocean Tide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Richard D.; Egbert, G. D.

    2003-01-01

    The small S$_1$ ocean tide is caused primarily by diurnal atmospheric pressure loading. Its excitation is therefore unlike any other diurnal tide. The global character of $S-1$ is here determined by numerical modeling and by analysis of Topex/Poseidon satellite altimeter data. The two approaches yield reasonably consistent results, and large ( $ greater than $l\\cm) amplitudes in several regions are further confirmed by comparison with coastal tide gauges. Notwithstanding their excitation differences, S$-1$ and other diurnal tides are found to share several common features, such as relatively large amplitudes in the Arabian Sea, the Sea of Okhotsk, and the Gulf of Alaska. The most noticeable difference is the lack of an S$-1$ Antarctic Kelvin wave. These similarities and differences can be explained in terms of the coherences between near-diurnal oceanic normal modes and the underlying tidal forcings. While gravitational diurnal tidal forces excite primarily a 28-hour Antarctic-Pacific mode, the S$_1$ air tide excites several other near-diurnal modes, none of which has large amplitudes near Antarctica.

  6. Malaria and Red Tide Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinhorst, Sabine; Cannon, Gordon

    1998-10-01

    The January 1st, 1998, issue of Nature (Vol. 391) presented us with the annual "Anniversaries" commentary (pp 13-16) which commemorates landmark scientific discoveries and puts them in a historical perspective. Pierre and Marie Curie discovered polonium and radium in 1898; Henry Cavendish measured gravity and determined the density of the earth for the first time in 1798; and Hildegard von Bingen was born in 1098.

  7. The effect of SST emissions on the earth's ozone layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitten, R. C.; Turco, R. P.

    1974-01-01

    The work presented here is directed toward assessment of environmental effects of the supersonic transport (SST). The model used for the purpose includes vertical eddy transport and the photochemistry of the O-H-N system. It is found that the flight altitude has a pronounced effect on ozone depletion. The largest ozone reduction occurs for NO deposition above an altitude of 20 km.

  8. Effect of earth's precession on geosynchronous satellites under lunisolar perturbations and tesseral resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyanin, S.; Gurfil, P.

    2008-06-01

    In this study, we investigate the effect of Earth's precession on the orbital dynamics of geostationary satellites. Our astrodynamical model includes second-order zonal and tesseral harmonics, and lunisolar gravitation. We show that the equinoctial precession induces secular inclination growth and thus bares a non-negligible effect on north-south stationkeeping for long mission lifetimes.

  9. Effect of earth's precession on geosynchronous satellites under lunisolar perturbations and tesseral resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyanin, S.; Gurfil, P.

    2008-02-01

    In this study, we investigate the effect of Earth's precession on the orbital dynamics of geostationary satellites. Our astrodynamical model includes second-order zonal and tesseral harmonics, and lunisolar gravitation. We show that the equinoctial precession induces secular inclination growth and thus bares a non-negligible effect on north-south stationkeeping for long mission lifetimes.

  10. Titan's Greenhouse Effect And Climate: Lessons From The Earth's Cooler Cousin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nixon, Conor A.; Titan Climate White Paper Proposal Team

    2009-12-01

    We argue that continuing scientific study of Earth's `distant cousin’ Titan can provide a greater understanding and insight into the energy balance of our own planet's atmosphere. Titan's Earth-like properties have been recognized for some time, from the discovery of its atmosphere in 1907, through the Voyager 1 encounter in 1980 that showed Titan's atmosphere is mostly nitrogen gas with a surface pressure within a factor of two of terrestrial. Calculation shows that Titan's atmosphere causes `greenhouse’ warming of the surface, an effect similar to that seen on the Earth, Mars, and Venus. In the 1990s, direct imaging from the Earth by adaptive optics revealed that Titan's ubiquitous haze layer is slowly changing in apparent response to the seasons that occur due to the Saturn system's obliquity. The NASA Cassini mission that arrived in Saturnian orbit in 2004, and the ESA Huygens Titan probe of 2005, have returned a flood of new data regarding this intriguing world. For the first time, we are building a detailed picture of weather in the lower atmosphere, where condensable methane takes on the role played by water in the Earth's atmosphere, leading to methane rainfall, rivers and lakes. We examine parallels between the atmospheres of Earth and of Titan, including the possibilities for dramatic climate change. Extending the duration of the Cassini spacecraft mission during the next decade will provide part of the needed picture, but in addition we urge planning for a future new mission focused on Titan's climate, and other measures.

  11. Climatic effects due to halogenated compounds in the earth's atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, W.-C.; Pinto, J. P.; Yung, Y. L.

    1980-01-01

    Using a one-dimensional radiative-convective model, a sensitivity study is performed of the effect of ozone depletion in the stratosphere on the surface temperature. There could be a cooling of the surface temperature by approximately 0.2 K due to chlorofluoromethane-induced ozone depletion at steady state (assuming 1973 release rates). This cooling reduces significantly the greenhouse effect due to the presence of chlorofluoromethanes. Carbon tetrafluoride has a strong nu sub 3 band at 7.8 microns, and the atmospheric greenhouse effect is shown to be 0.07 and 0.12 K/ppbv with and without taking into account overlap with CH4 and N2O bands. At concentrations higher than 1 ppbv, absorption by the nu sub 3 band starts to saturate and the greenhouse effect becomes less efficient.

  12. Effects of rare earth elements on telomerase activity and apoptosis of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Li; Dai, Yucheng; Yuan, Zhaokang; Li, Jie

    2007-04-01

    To study the effects of rare earth exposure on human telomerase and apoptosis of mononuclear cells from human peripheral blood (PBMNCs). The blood contents of 15 rare earth elements, including La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu, and Y, were measured by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. Telomeric repeat amplification protocol assay and flow cytometer analysis were carried out to analyze the telomerase activity and apoptosis of PBMNCs, respectively. The total content of rare earth elements in the blood showed significant differences between the exposed group and the control group. The rare earth exposure increased the telomerase activity and the percentages of cells in the S-phase and the G2/M phase in PBMNCs, but it had no effect on the apoptotic rate of PBMNCs. Under the exposure to lower concentrations of rare earth elements, the telomerase activity of PBMNCs in the exposed group was higher than that of the control group, and there was no effect on the apoptotic rate of PBMNCs, but promoted the diploid DNA replication and increased the percentages of G2/M- and S-phase cells.

  13. Plasma and magnetic field variations in the distant magnetotail associated with near-earth substorm effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, D. N.; Bame, S. J.; Mccomas, D. J.; Zwickl, R. D.; Slavin, J. A.; Smith, E. J.

    1987-01-01

    Examination of many individual event periods in the ISEE 3 deep-tail data set has suggested that magnetospheric substorms produce a characteristic pattern of effects in the distant magnetotail. During the growth, or tail-energy-storage phase of substorms, the magnetotail appears to grow diametrically in size, often by many earth radii. Subsequently, after the substorm expansive phase onset at earth, the distant tail undergoes a sequence of plasma, field, and energetic-particle variations as large-scale plasmoids move rapidly down the tail following their disconnection from the near-earth plasma sheet. ISEE 3 data are appropriate for the study of these effects since the spacecraft remained fixed within the nominal tail location for long periods. Using newly available auroral electrojet indices (AE and AL) and Geo particle data to time substorm onsets at earth, superposed epoch analyses of ISEE 3 and near-earth data prior to, and following, substorm expansive phase onsets have been performed. These analyses quantify and extend substantially the understanding of the deep-tail pattern of response to global substorm-induced dynamical effects.

  14. Lunar Fluid Core and Solid-Body Tides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. G.; Boggs, D. H.; Ratcliff, J. T.

    2005-01-01

    Variations in rotation and orientation of the Moon are sensitive to solid-body tidal dissipation, dissipation due to relative motion at the fluid-core/solid-mantle boundary, and tidal Love number k2 [1,2]. There is weaker sensitivity to flattening of the core-mantle boundary (CMB) [2-5] and fluid core moment of inertia [1]. Accurate Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR) measurements of the distance from observatories on the Earth to four retroreflector arrays on the Moon are sensitive to lunar rotation and orientation variations and tidal displacements. Past solutions using the LLR data have given results for dissipation due to solid-body tides and fluid core [1] plus Love number [1-5]. Detection of CMB flattening has been improving [3,5] and now seems significant. This strengthens the case for a fluid lunar core.

  15. [Effect of rare earth elements on the seedling ratio of crops].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z; Chang, J; Wang, C; Chai, S; Han, X; Li, R

    2001-06-01

    The effects of rare earth elements(REEs) on the relative seedling ratio of three crops(rice, rape and soybean) in three soil(red soil, yellow fluvo-aquic soil and yellow cinnamon soil) were studied according to OECD method, and the LC50 were obtained. Toxicity effect of REEs on rice was minimum among the crops tested. The toxicity on crops in yellow cinnamon soil was lower, whereas on soybean in yellow fluvo-aquic soil and on rape in red earth were higher.

  16. Tidal Effects on GOCE Satellite Gravity Gradiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Z. C.; Yang, G.; Zhong, B.; Wu, Y. L.

    2009-04-01

    The primary object of GOCE (Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer) is the determination of the global static gravity field with uttermost precision and resolution, instead of its temporal variations. Hence, the effects of time-variation signals, which include tidal effects and other temporal effects, should be taken into account prior to the data reduction process. Direct astronomical tides, solid earth tides, ocean tides and pole tide, which are the principal contributors for the tidal part, are selected for simulation analysis. In this paper, their effects on the orbiting gravity gradiometry are calculated on a sphere at the altitude of GOCE spacecraft with respect to the local north-oriented reference frame, other than along the track of GOCE satellite, in order to ascertain the impact at the global level. The spatial distributions of the tidal effects are presented and the maximum and minimum values during an interval of 30 days are estimated. Besides, the power spectral density is evaluated to characterize the tide power signals and the influences are compared with the GOCE measurement error to find out whether the GOCE satellite possesses the competence to sense these impacts. To correct the tidal effects on the GOCE gravity gradient, we calculate their action on the gradiometer, which are the second order derivatives of the tidal generating potential from July 15, 2000 to August 14, 2000, with the interval of 30 minutes. Each calculation point locates at the center of 1˚ Ã-1˚ grid on a sphere at the height of 250 km, the average altitude of GOCE satellite. We plot the spatial distribution of the gravity gradient corrections and find out that, with time passing by, the direct astronomical tides and the solid earth tides move from east to west systematically. The transfiguration of ocean tides is complicated and the solid earth polar tide changes imperceptibly. The entire influence of the solid earth tides is lower than that of the

  17. Thulium anomalies and rare earth element patterns in meteorites and Earth: Nebular fractionation and the nugget effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dauphas, Nicolas; Pourmand, Ali

    2015-08-01

    This study reports the bulk rare earth element (REEs, La-Lu) compositions of 41 chondrites, including 32 falls and 9 finds from carbonaceous (CI, CM, CO and CV), enstatite (EH and EL) and ordinary (H, L and LL) groups, as well as 2 enstatite achondrites (aubrite). The measurements were done in dynamic mode using multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometers (MC-ICPMS), allowing precise quantification of mono-isotopic REEs (Pr, Tb, Ho and Tm). The CI-chondrite-normalized REE patterns (LaN/LuN; a proxy for fractionation of light vs. heavy REEs) and Eu anomalies in ordinary and enstatite chondrites show more scatter in more metamorphosed (petrologic types 4-6) than in unequilibrated (types 1-3) chondrites. This is due to parent-body redistribution of the REEs in various carrier phases during metamorphism. A model is presented that predicts the dispersion of elemental and isotopic ratios due to the nugget effect when the analyzed sample mass is limited and elements are concentrated in minor grains. The dispersion in REE patterns of equilibrated ordinary chondrites is reproduced well by this model, considering that REEs are concentrated in 200 μm-size phosphates, which have high LaN/LuN ratios and negative Eu anomalies. Terrestrial rocks and samples from ordinary and enstatite chondrites display negative Tm anomalies of ∼-4.5% relative to CI chondrites. In contrast, CM, CO and CV (except Allende) show no significant Tm anomalies. Allende CV chondrite shows large excess Tm (∼+10%). These anomalies are similar to those found in group II refractory inclusions in meteorites but of much smaller magnitude. The presence of Tm anomalies in meteorites and terrestrial rocks suggests that either (i) the material in the inner part of the solar system was formed from a gas reservoir that had been depleted in refractory dust and carried positive Tm anomalies or (ii) CI chondrites are enriched in refractory dust and are not representative of solar composition for

  18. Effects of Solar Radiation Pressure on Earth Satellite Orbits.

    PubMed

    Parkinson, R W; Jones, H M; Shapiro, I I

    1960-03-25

    Calculations show that, at a mean altitude of 1000 miles, radiation pressure can displace the orbit of the 100-foot Echo balloon at rates up to 3.7 miles per day, the orbit of the 12-foot Beacon satellite at 0.7 mile per day. For certain resonant conditions this effect accumulates, drastically affecting the satellite's lifetime.

  19. The effect of rare earth elements on the texture and formability of asymmetrically rolled magnesium sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Alderman, Dr. Martyn; Cavin, Odis Burl; Davis, Dr. Bruce; Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Muth, Thomas R; Peter, William H; Randman, David; Watkins, Thomas R

    2011-01-01

    The lack of formability is a serious issue when considering magnesium alloys for various applications. Standard symmetric rolling introduces a strong basal texture that decreases the formability; however, asymmetric rolling has been put forward as a possible route to produce sheet with weaker texture and greater ductility. It has also been shown in recent work that weaker textures can be produced through the addition of rare earth elements to magnesium alloys. Therefore, this study has been carried out to investigate the effect of rare earth additions on the texture changes during asymmetric rolling. Two alloys have been used, AZ31B and ZEK100. The effect that the rare earth additions have on the texture of asymmetrically rolled sheet and the subsequent changes in formability will be discussed.

  20. COST Action ES1401 TIDES: a European network on TIme DEpendent Seismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morelli, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    Using the full-length records of seismic events and background ambient noise, today seismology is going beyond still-life snapshots of the interior of the Earth, and look into time-dependent changes of its properties. Data availability has grown dramatically with the expansion of seismographic networks and data centers, so as to enable much more detailed and accurate analyses. COST Action ES1401 TIDES (TIme DEpendent Seismology; http://tides-cost.eu) aims at structuring the EU seismological community to enable development of data-intensive, time-dependent techniques for monitoring Earth active processes (e.g., earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, landslides, glacial earthquakes) as well as oil/gas reservoirs. The main structure of TIDES is organised around working groups on: Workflow integration of data and computing resources; Seismic interferometry and ambient noise; Forward problems and High-performance computing applications; Seismic tomography, full waveform inversion and uncertainties; Applications in the natural environment and industry. TIDES is an open network of European laboratories with complementary skills, and is organising a series of events - workshops and advanced training schools - as well as supporting short-duration scientific stays. The first advanced training school was held in Bertinoro (Italy) on June 2015, with attendance of about 100 participants from 20 European countries, was devoted to how to manage and model seismic data with modern tools. The next school, devoted to ambient noise, will be held in 2016 Portugal: the program will be announced at the time of this conference. TIDES will strengthen Europe's role in a critical field for natural hazards and natural resource management.

  1. Palaeoclimate: ocean tides and Heinrich events.

    PubMed

    Arbic, Brian K; Macayeal, Douglas R; Mitrovica, Jerry X; Milne, Glenn A

    2004-11-25

    Climate varied enormously over the most recent ice age--for example, large pulses of ice-rafted debris, originating mainly from the Labrador Sea, were deposited into the North Atlantic at roughly 7,000-year intervals, with global climatic implications. Here we show that ocean tides within the Labrador Sea were exceptionally large over the period spanning these huge, abrupt ice movements, which are known as Heinrich events. We propose that tides played a catalytic role in liberating iceberg armadas during that time. PMID:15565143

  2. Effect of the Sun's gravity on the distribution and detection of dark matter near the Earth

    SciTech Connect

    Griest, K.

    1988-05-15

    The effect of the Sun's gravity on the distribution of dark-matter (DM) particles in the vicinity of the Earth is considered. The event rate in a cryogenic detector is found and the annual modulation of the signal due to this effect is compared to the annual modulation due to the relative velocities of the Sun and Earth. The effect is order 1% and probably too small to be seen experimentally. The effect of this distribution function on the capture rate of DM particles into the Earth is also considered. The rate could be suppressed for DM particles not well matched in mass to common elements in the Earth. Finally, the density of DM particles in bound orbits around the Sun is estimated and, contrary to earlier work, no way of generating an enhancement over ''equilibrium'' density is found; in fact, a general argument shows the density to be very nearly the ''equilibrium'' density. The inclusion of an ''equilibrium'' density of bound particles has negligible effect on direct detection, but removes the capture rate suppression.

  3. A Model for Teaching the Dynamical Theory of Tides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Railsback, L. Bruce

    1991-01-01

    The dynamical theory of tides is often neglected in teaching oceanography because students have difficulty in visualizing the movements of the tides across the glove. A schematic diagram portraying amphidromic systems as mechanical gears helps overcome these problems. (Author)

  4. TIDE TOOL: Open-Source Sea-Level Monitoring Software for Tsunami Warning Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinstein, S. A.; Kong, L. S.; Becker, N. C.; Wang, D.

    2012-12-01

    -series data in the GUI as well. This GUI also includes mouse-clickable functions such as zooming or expanding the time-series display, measuring tsunami signal characteristics (arrival time, wave period and amplitude, etc.), and removing the tide signal from the time-series data. De-tiding of the time series is necessary to obtain accurate measurements of tsunami wave parameters and to maintain accurate historical tsunami databases. With TIDE TOOL, de-tiding is accomplished with a set of tide harmonic coefficients routinely computed and updated at PTWC for many of the stations in PTWC's inventory (~570). PTWC also uses the decoded time series files (previous 3-5 days' worth) to compute on-the-fly tide coefficients. The latter is useful in cases where the station is new and a long-term stable set of tide coefficients are not available or cannot be easily obtained due to various non-astronomical effects. The international tsunami warning system is coordinated globally by the UNESCO IOC, and a number of countries in the Pacific and Indian Ocean, and Caribbean depend on Tide Tool to monitor tsunamis in real time.

  5. Hydrological Effects in the EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meertens, C.; Wahr, J.; Borsa, A.; Jackson, M.; Wahr, A.

    2008-12-01

    The dense network of 1,100 continuously operating GPS stations in the Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) is providing high quality position time series. Data are processed by PBO Analysis Centers at the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology and at Central Washington University. The results are combined by the Analysis Center Coordinator at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and are made available from the UNAVCO Data Center in Boulder. Analysis software of Langbein, 2008, was used to estimate secular trends and annual variations in the time series. The results were interpreted in terms of hydrological loading and poroelastic effects, from both natural and anthropogenic changes in water storage. The effects of monument stability were also considered. The density of PBO observations allows for the identification of spatial patterns that appear coherent over relatively broad areas. Vertical annual signals of 8-10 mm peak-to-peak amplitude are evident at stations in the mountains of northern and central California and southern Oregon showing peak uplift in October and are correlated to hydrological loading. The vertical elastic loading signal, calculated from the 0.25 by 0.25 degree community Noah land-surface model, fits the annual signal well and appears also to model the secular trends, although the time duration of ~3 years is still limited. In contrast to mountainous regions, stations in the valleys of California show greater spatial variability ranging from stations with almost no detectable annual signal to stations with very large, 20-30 mm, amplitudes with peak uplift in March. The vertical signals are temporally correlated to ground-water variations caused by pumping for agricultural irrigation and likely are caused by poroelastic effects in the sediments rather than loading. Annual vertical signals in southern California, where not obviously influenced from localized ground-water fluctuations, are small with ~2 mm amplitude and may be due to

  6. Effects of atmospheric breakup on crater field formation. [on earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Passey, Q. R.; Melosh, H. J.

    1980-01-01

    This paper investigates the physics of meteoroid breakup in the atmosphere and its implications for the observed features of strewn fields. There are several effects which cause dispersion of the meteoroid fragments: gravity, differential lift of the fragments, bow shock interaction just after breakup, centripetal separation by a rotating meteroid, and possibly a dynamical transverse separation resulting from the crushing deceleration in the atmosphere. Of these, it is shown that gravity alone can produce the common pattern in which the largest crater occurs at the downrange end of the scatter ellipse. The average lift-to-drag ratio of the tumbling fragments must be less than about 0.001, otherwise small fragments would produce small craters downrange of the main crater, and this is not generally observed. The cross-range dispersion is probably due to the combined effects of bow shock interaction, crushing deceleration, and possibly spinning of the meteoroid. A number of terrestrial strewn fields are discussed in the light of these ideas, which are formulated quantitatively for a range of meteoroid velocities, entry angles, and crushing strengths. It is found that when the crater size exceeds about 1 km, the separation between the fragments upon landing is a fraction of their own diameter, so that the crater formed by such a fragmented meteoroid is almost indistinguishable from that formed by a solid body of the same total mass and velocity.

  7. Low Earth Orbit Environmental Effects on Space Tether Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finckernor, Miria M.; Gitlemeier, Keith A.; Hawk, Clark W.; Watts, Ed

    2005-01-01

    Atomic oxygen (AO) and ultraviolet (UV) radiation erode and embrittle most polymeric materials. This research was designed to test several different materials and coatings under consideration for their application to space tethers, for resistance to these effects. The samples were vacuum dehydrated, weighed and then exposed to various levels of AO or UV radiation at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. They were then re-weighed to determine mass loss due to atomic oxygen erosion, inspected for damage and tensile tested to determine strength loss. The experiments determined that the Photosil coating process, while affording some protection, damaged the tether materials worse than the AO exposure. TOR-LM also failed to fully protect the materials, especially from UV radiation. The POSS and nickel coatings did provide some protection to the tethers, which survived the entire test regime. M5 was tested, uncoated, and survived AO exposure, though its brittleness prevented any tensile testing.

  8. Imaging the earth's magnetosphere - Effects of plasma flow and temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrido, D. E.; Smith, R. W.; Swift, D. S.; Akasofu, S.-I.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of Doppler shifting on the line centers of the magnetospheric O(+) cross section are investigated, and the resulting structure of the scattering rate as a function of bulk density is explained. Whereas the Doppler shifting frequently results in a decrease of the scattering rate, it is demonstrated that for certain drift speeds the overlap of the cross section and the solar intensity profile can lead to an increased rate, thus enhancing the relative brightness of the image above that obtained when v(p) is zero. Simulated images of the magnetosphere are obtained which are used to show quantitively how the magnetospheric image responds to variations in plasma drift speed and temperature. Changes in the brightness of the magnetospheric images also depend on the variability of the solar flux at 83.4 nm. In regions where there are plasma drifts, the brightness in the image is governed by the structure of the scattering rate, assuming a fixed temperature.

  9. A Study of Students' Perceptions of the Organisation and Effectiveness of Fieldwork in Earth Sciences Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marques, Luis; Praia, Joao; Kempa, Richard

    2003-01-01

    This paper reports the findings of a preliminary evaluation of an in-service training programme designed for practising geology/earth science teachers in Portuguese high schools and intended to enhance the effectiveness of fieldwork activities organised by them for their students. Among the points particularly stressed during the in-service…

  10. Removal of earth's magnetic field effect on magnetoelastic resonance sensors by an antisymmetric bias field

    PubMed Central

    Bergmair, Bernhard; Huber, Thomas; Bruckner, Florian; Vogler, Christoph; Suess, Dieter

    2012-01-01

    Magnetoelastic sensors are used in a wide field of wireless sensing applications. The sensing element is a low-cost magnetostrictive ribbon whose resonant frequency depends on the measured quantity. The accuracy of magnetoelastic sensors is limited by the fact that the resonant frequency is also affected by the earth's magnetic field. In this paper we present a technique to minimize this effect by applying an antisymmetric magnetic bias field to the ribbon. The ribbon's response to external perturbation fields was measured and compared to a conventional sensor design. Our results show that the influence of the earth's magnetic field could be reduced by 77%. PMID:23565035

  11. Relativistic effects of the rotation of the earth on remote clock synchronization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhardt, V.

    1974-01-01

    A treatment is given of relativistic clock synchronization effects due to the rotation of the earth. Unlike other approaches, the point of view of an earth fixed coordinate system is used which offers insight to many problems. An attempt is made to give the reader an intuitive grasp of the subject as well as to provide formulae for his use. Specific applications to global timekeeping, navigation, VLBI, relativistic clock experiments, and satellite clock synchronization are discussed. The question of whether atomic clocks are ideal clocks is also treated.

  12. Green and golden seaweed tides on the rise.

    PubMed

    Smetacek, Victor; Zingone, Adriana

    2013-12-01

    Sudden beaching of huge seaweed masses smother the coastline and form rotting piles on the shore. The number of reports of these events in previously unaffected areas has increased worldwide in recent years. These 'seaweed tides' can harm tourism-based economies, smother aquaculture operations or disrupt traditional artisanal fisheries. Coastal eutrophication is the obvious, ultimate explanation for the increase in seaweed biomass, but the proximate processes that are responsible for individual beaching events are complex and require dedicated study to develop effective mitigation strategies. Harvesting the macroalgae, a valuable raw material, before they beach could well be developed into an effective solution.

  13. The effects of solar Reimers η on the final destinies of Venus, the Earth, and Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jianpo; Lin, Ling; Bai, Chunyan; Liu, Jinzhong

    2016-04-01

    Our Sun will lose sizable mass and expand enormously when it evolves to the red giant branch phase and the asymptotic giant branch phase. The loss of solar mass will push a planet outward. On the contrary, solar expansion will enhance tidal effects, and tidal force will drive a planet inward. Will our Sun finally engulf Venus, the Earth, and Mars? In the literature, one can find a large number of studies with different points of view. A key factor is that we do not know how much mass the Sun will lose at the late stages. The Reimers η can describe the efficiency of stellar mass-loss and greatly affect solar mass and solar radius at the late stages. In this work, we study how the final destinies of Venus, the Earth, and Mars can be depending on Reimers η chosen. In our calculation, the Reimers η varies from 0.00 to 0.75, with the minimum interval 0.0025. Our results show that Venus will be engulfed by the Sun and Mars will most probably survive finally. The fate of the Earth is uncertain. The Earth will finally be engulfed by the Sun while η <0.4600, and it will finally survive while η ≥ 0.4600. New observations indicate that the average Reimers η for solar-like stars is 0.477. This implies that Earth may survive finally.

  14. Tidal asymmetry in a funnel-shaped estuary with mixed semidiurnal tides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Wenping; Schuttelaars, Henk; Zhang, Heng

    2016-05-01

    competition among the above interactions determines the FDA and TDA, whereas for the FVA, aside from the interaction among different tidal constituents, an extra component, the residual flow, plays an important role. The results show that the FDA exhibits a predominant tendency of shorter duration of low water slack, favoring the landward transport of fine sediment. The FVA demonstrates prevailing ebb dominance in the study period, favoring the seaward transport of coarse sediment. This ebb dominance is primarily induced by the interaction among the residual flow and the tidal constituents. The external TDA in the ocean experiences distinct cyclic variations with positive asymmetry when semidiurnal tides dominate and negative asymmetry during the periods when diurnal tides dominate. The funnel shape of the HE is advantageous for the development of positive tidal asymmetry as the semidiurnal tides are more amplified than the diurnal tides. The effect of river flow can enhance the ebb dominance, while the baroclinic effect is more complex. The existence of channel and shoals favors the development of residual pattern with seaward flow (ebb dominance) in the channel and landward flow (flood dominance) at the shoal when the tides are strong (semidiurnal tides dominate) and the residual pattern with landward flow (flood dominance) in the channel and seaward flow (ebb dominance) at the shoal when the baroclinic effect is dominant (diurnal tides dominate).

  15. Spatial nonlinearities: Cascading effects in the earth system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, Debra P.C.; Pielke, R.A.; Bestelmeyer, B.T.; Allen, Craig D.; Munson-McGee, S.; Havstad, K. M.

    2006-01-01

    Nonlinear interactions and feedbacks associated with thresholds through time and across space are common features of biological, physical and materials systems. These spatial nonlinearities generate surprising behavior where dynamics at one scale cannot be easily predicted based on information obtained at finer or broader scales. These cascading effects often result in severe consequences for the environment and human welfare (i.e., catastrophes) that are expected to be particularly important under conditions of changes in climate and land use. In this chapter, we illustrate the usefulness of a general conceptual and mathematical framework for understanding and forecasting spatially nonlinear responses to global change. This framework includes cross-scale interactions, threshold behavior and feedback mechanisms. We focus on spatial nonlinearities produced by fine-scale processes that cascade through time and across space to influence broad spatial extents. Here we describe the spread of catastrophic events in the context of our cross-disciplinary framework using examples from biology (wildfires, desertification, infectious diseases) and engineering (structural failures) and discuss the consequences of applying these ideas to forecasting future dynamics under a changing global environment.

  16. New Miscellaneous Results in Tides from Topex/Poseidon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Richard D.; Egbert, G.; Cartwright, D.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes a variety of new results concerning ocean tides that have been derived from Topex/Poseidon satellite altimeter data. Most of these results are based on new tidal solutions employing nearly 8 years of data. The topics covered include internal tides and long-period tides.

  17. Changes in Work Habits of Lifeguards in Relation to Florida Red Tide.

    PubMed

    Nierenberg, Kate; Kirner, Karen; Hoagland, Porter; Ullmann, Steven; Leblanc, William G; Kirkpatrick, Gary; Fleming, Lora E; Kirkpatrick, Barbara

    2010-05-01

    The marine dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis, is responsible for Florida red tides. Brevetoxins, the neurotoxins produced by K. brevis blooms, can cause fish kills, contaminate shellfish, and lead to respiratory illness in humans. Although several studies have assessed different economic impacts from Florida red tide blooms, no studies to date have considered the impact on beach lifeguard work performance. Sarasota County experiences frequent Florida red tides and staffs lifeguards at its beaches 365 days a year. This study examined lifeguard attendance records during the time periods of March 1 to September 30 in 2004 (no bloom) and March 1 to September 30 in 2005 (bloom). The lifeguard attendance data demonstrated statistically significant absenteeism during a Florida red tide bloom. The potential economic costs resulting from red tide blooms were comprised of both lifeguard absenteeism and presenteeism. Our estimate of the costs of absenteeism due to the 2005 red tide in Sarasota County is about $3,000. On average, the capitalized costs of lifeguard absenteeism in Sarasota County may be on the order of $100,000 at Sarasota County beaches alone. When surveyed, lifeguards reported not only that they experienced adverse health effects of exposure to Florida red tide but also that their attentiveness and abilities to take preventative actions decrease when they worked during a bloom, implying presenteeism effects. The costs of presenteeism, which imply increased risks to beachgoers, arguably could exceed those of absenteeism by an order of magnitude. Due to the lack of data, however, we are unable to provide credible estimates of the costs of presenteeism or the potential increased risks to bathers.

  18. A decade-long climatology of terdiurnal tides using TIMED/SABER observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moudden, Y.; Forbes, J. M.

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, we globally characterize the solar terdiurnal tide in the 80-110 km region of Earth's atmosphere through analysis of 10 years of temperature measurements made by the Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry instrument on the Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics spacecraft. The Sun-synchronous ("migrating") component (TW3), which is longitude-independent and achieves maximum amplitudes of order of 5 K (10 K) at 90 km (110 km), not too different than the 7-15 K amplitudes that are typical of the migrating diurnal and semidiurnal tides in this region. Significant longitude variability (˜ 20-25%) in terdiurnal temperature amplitudes also exists, which is decomposed into zonal wave number components. The largest of these (TE1, TW4, and TW5) reveal distinct seasonal-latitudinal and height versus latitude patterns and interannual consistency. In addition, it is demonstrated that these particular components vary in ways that suggest that they originate from nonlinear interactions between diurnal and semidiurnal tides, specifically between DE3 and SW2 for TE1, between DW2 and SW2 for TW4, and between DW1 and SW4 for TW5. We also demonstrate that the terdiurnal tides derived here are not influenced to any significant degree by aliasing due to the presence of other waves.

  19. Revisiting global mean sea level changes from tide gauge records corrected for vertical land motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dangendorf, Sönke; Marcos, Marta

    2016-04-01

    Observational evidence of global/regional mean sea level (GMSL/RMSL) over the 20th century is restricted to a spatially and temporally heterogeneously distributed set of tide gauges along the coast, whose measurements are impacted by vertical land motion (VLM) of the Earth's crust. Here we revisit estimates of 20th century RMSL and GMSL using an area weighting virtual station approach applied to a novel set of VLM corrected tide gauges from six coherently varying oceanic regions. We test our approach in a realistic ocean reanalysis, where the "true" modeled GMSL is a priori known. We find that the performance in reconstructing RMSL and GMSL is strongly influenced by the available tide gauges leading to unavoidable biases in the late 19th and early 20th century. While in regions such as the Pacific Ocean spatially coherent large-scale climate signals, as the Pacific Decadal Oscillation, allow for relatively accurate estimates of the low-frequency variability, in regions such as the South Atlantic the poor availability of tide gauge records hampers sophisticated estimates of RMSL. These uncertainties directly transmit into GMSL estimates. A further bias of roughly 0.2 mm/yr is introduced when not accounting for the area weights of regions for which the virtual stations are representative. However, from ~1920 onwards, the available stations allow us to capture the low frequency variability and trends in GMSL.

  20. Using Tide Data in Introductory Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Jong, Marvin L.

    2006-01-01

    Oceantides are not typically high in our consciousness here in Missouri, but in teaching astronomy and physical science the subject always comes up, and teachers of physical science and astronomy are all quite familiar with the textbook explanations. Our goal here is not to explain tides but to make some suggestions about how, on their own,…

  1. Parents Who Moved against the Tide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perske, Robert

    2003-01-01

    This article recounts the historical discrimination against children with mental retardation and the extraordinary efforts made by parents of children with disabilities to speak out against the tide that dehumanized their children. The growth of national, state, and local Arcs and parent advocacy efforts are discussed. (Contains 5 references.) (CR)

  2. In Brief: Red tide Web site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy; Kumar, Mohi

    2008-06-01

    The U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has established the NOAA New England Red Tide Information Center to help people understand the significant red tides that are predicted to form there later this spring. The site (http://www.oceanservice.noaa.gov/redtide) will provide a summary of the current red tide situation and its potential harmful impacts on humans and animals and will serve as a central repository of information. The site also will have direct links to news releases, changes to relevant federal fishing regulations, links to closures of shellfish waters, and links to state agency Web sites with localized information. In addition, the site will have information about NOAA's scientific response effort as well as information from several other sources including NOAA's major response partner, the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI). On 24 April, WHOI scientists, using forecast models developed with NOAA funding support, predicted ``that excess winter precipitation has set the stage for a harmful algal bloom similar to the historic red tide of 2005.'' That bloom shut down shellfish beds from the Bay of Fundy to Martha's Vineyard for several months.

  3. Semidiurnal solar tides in the mountain atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteman, C.D.; Bian, X.

    1994-09-01

    Harmonic analysis of Doppler radar wind profiler data west of the Rocky Mountains has identified a coherent semidiurnal wind system above the wintertime boundary layer at multiple sites in the region. The unusual characteristics of this mountain wind system (its semidiurnal frequency, amplitude, phase, and direction of rotation) suggest that is is a semidiurnal solar tide. Such tides have not been previously documented in the mountain atmosphere or in the troposphere generally but, because semidiurnal signatures are well known in surface barometric traces, and large amplitude semidiurnal tides are known in the upper atmosphere, they are not unexpected. Our future research on this semidiurnal cordilleran wind system will focus on obtaining sufficient data to resolve further the vertical structure, seasonal variation, and spatial variations of the wind system. Of particular interest is the role of the Rocky Mountains and other cordilleras in modifying the global tides. It remains to be seen whether semidiurnal cordilleran circulations will be of sufficient magnitude to be observed across major arcuate-shaped east-west-oriented mountain massifs such as the Alps. There, wind systems may develop in response to pressure gradients (Frei and Davies, 1993) that form across the Alps due to differences in the amplitudes and phases of semidiurnal and diurnal pressure oscillations on the north and south sides of the mountain barrier.

  4. Ocean energy-waves, currents, and tides

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, J.; Shelpuk, B.

    1981-05-01

    An overview is presented on the mechanical forms of ocean energy; i.e., waves, currents, and tides. Following an introductory section on wave mechanics, each of the three forms of ocean energy is considered under the headings of the resource, device types for energy extraction, and prognosis for practical implementation.

  5. Temporal variations of groundwater salinity and temperature in a tidal flat in front of a tide pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakashita, Shinya; Hibino, Tadashi; Komai, Katsuaki; Narong, Touch

    2016-07-01

    A tidal flat in an estuary is a complex hydrological system, which is characterized by interactions between surface water in river and groundwater and is particularly driven by tides. Small-scale variability in the discharge or inflow could lead to variable results of surface groundwater salinity and temperature. In particular, there is a high possibility that a hydraulic head difference due to the presence of a tide pool, lagoon, or seep would cause the generation of small-scale spatial submarine groundwater discharge. This study investigates the spatio-temporal variations in surface groundwater salinity and temperature (0-50 cm depth) and the groundwater table in a tidal flat in the presence and absence of a tide pool. A tide pool formed in the Ota River diversion channel at the study observation site following the construction of a masonry revetment in the intertidal zone. We established observation sites at three locations to consider the effects of the presence or absence of a tide pool. Specifically, we measured the surface water in river and groundwater salinity, temperature, and level in the presence and absence of a tide pool in 2007 and 2009. Reviewing the past data based on these results, we found the characteristic variation of groundwater salinity around the tide pool during flood event in 2004. Groundwater salinity and temperature were directly measured by setting conductivity-temperature meters in the tidal flat. We conclude that the groundwater table in the presence of the tide pool was 20 cm higher than in areas where no tide pool existed. The temporal variation of groundwater salinity in the presence of the tide pool was 5 psu lower than those where a tide pool was absent. Moreover, we confirmed the increase in groundwater salinity up to 8 psu in the tidal flat during flood, when river water salinity was at 0 psu and groundwater salinity in the tide pool was at 10 psu. We consider that the high groundwater table, the low salinity, and the increase

  6. A tide prediction and tide height control system for laboratory mesocosms.

    PubMed

    Miller, Luke P; Long, Jeremy D

    2015-01-01

    Experimental mesocosm studies of rocky shore and estuarine intertidal systems may benefit from the application of natural tide cycles to better replicate variation in immersion time, water depth, and attendant fluctuations in abiotic and edaphic conditions. Here we describe a stand-alone microcontroller tide prediction open-source software program, coupled with a mechanical tidal elevation control system, which allows continuous adjustment of aquarium water depths in synchrony with local tide cycles. We used this system to monitor the growth of Spartina foliosa marsh cordgrass and scale insect herbivores at three simulated shore elevations in laboratory mesocosms. Plant growth decreased with increasing shore elevation, while scale insect population growth on the plants was not strongly affected by immersion time. This system shows promise for a range of laboratory mesocosm studies where natural tide cycling could impact organism performance or behavior, while the tide prediction system could additionally be utilized in field experiments where treatments need to be applied at certain stages of the tide cycle.

  7. A tide prediction and tide height control system for laboratory mesocosms

    PubMed Central

    Long, Jeremy D.

    2015-01-01

    Experimental mesocosm studies of rocky shore and estuarine intertidal systems may benefit from the application of natural tide cycles to better replicate variation in immersion time, water depth, and attendant fluctuations in abiotic and edaphic conditions. Here we describe a stand-alone microcontroller tide prediction open-source software program, coupled with a mechanical tidal elevation control system, which allows continuous adjustment of aquarium water depths in synchrony with local tide cycles. We used this system to monitor the growth of Spartina foliosa marsh cordgrass and scale insect herbivores at three simulated shore elevations in laboratory mesocosms. Plant growth decreased with increasing shore elevation, while scale insect population growth on the plants was not strongly affected by immersion time. This system shows promise for a range of laboratory mesocosm studies where natural tide cycling could impact organism performance or behavior, while the tide prediction system could additionally be utilized in field experiments where treatments need to be applied at certain stages of the tide cycle. PMID:26623195

  8. Tides and lake-level variations in the great Patagonian lakes: Observations, modelling and geophysical implications.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marderwald, Eric; Richter, Andreas; Horwath, Martin; Hormaechea, Jose Luis; Groh, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    In Patagonia, the glacial-isostatic adjustment (GIA) to past ice-mass changes (Ivins & James 2004; Klemann et al. 2007) is of particular interest in the context of the determination of the complex regional rheology related to plate subduction in a triple-junction constellation. To further complicate the situation, GIA is overlaid with load deformation not only due to present ice mass changes but also due to water-level changes in the lakes surrounding the icefields and the ocean surrounding Patagonia. These elastic deformations affect the determination of glacial-isostatic uplift rates from GPS observations (Dietrich et al. 2010; Lange et al. 2014). Observations of lake tides and their comparison with the theoretical tidal signal have been used previously to validate predictions of ocean tidal loading and have revealed regional deviations from conventional global elastic earth models (Richter et al. 2009). In this work we investigate the tides and lake-level variations in Lago Argentino, Lago Viedma, Lago San Martín/O'Higgins and Lago Buenos Aires/General Carrera. This allows us to test, among other things, the validity of tidal loading models. We present pressure tide-gauge records from two sites in Lago Argentino extending over 2.5 years (Richter et al. 2015). These observations are complemented by lake-level records provided by the Argentine National Hydrometeorological Network. Based on these lake-level time series the principal processes affecting the lake level are identified and quantified. Lake-level changes reflecting variations in lake volume are dominated by a seasonal cycle exceeding 1 m in amplitude. Lake-volume changes occur in addition with a daily period in response to melt water influx from surrounding glaciers. In Lago Argentino sporadic lake-volume jumps are caused by bursting of the ice dam of Perito Moreno glacier. Water movements in these lakes are dominated by surface seiches reaching 20 cm in amplitude. A harmonic tidal analysis of the lake

  9. Determination of ocean tides from the first year of TOPEX/POSEIDON altimeter measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, X. C.; Shum, C. K.; Eanes, R. J.; Tapley, B. D.

    1994-01-01

    An improved geocentric global ocean tide model has been determined using 1 year of TOPEX/POSEIDON altimeter measurements to provide corrections to the Cartwright and Ray (1991) model (CR91). The corrections were determined on a 3 deg x 3 deg grid using both the harmonic analysis method and the response method. The two approaches produce similar solutions. The effect on the tide solution of simultaneously adjusting radial orbit correction parameters using altimeter measurements was examined. Four semidiurnal (N(sub 2), M(sub 2), S(sub 2) and K(sub 2)), four diurnal (Q(sdub 1), O(sub 1), P(sub 1), and K(sub 1)), and three long-period (S(sub sa), M(sub m), and M(sub f)) constituents, along with the variations at the annual frequency, were included in the harmomnic analysis solution. The observed annual variations represents the first global measurement describing accurate seasonal changes of the ocean during an El Nino year. The corrections to the M(sub 2) constituent have an root mean square (RMS) of 3.6 cm and display a clear banding pattern with regional highs and lows reaching 8 cm. The improved tide model reduces the weighted altimeter crossover residual from 9.8 cm RMS, when the CR91 tide model is used, to 8.2 cm on RMS. Comparison of the improved model to pelagic tidal constants determined from 80 tide gauges gives RMS differences of 2.7 cm for M(sub 2) and 1.7 cm for K(sub 1). Comparable values when the CR91 model is used are 3.9 cm and 2.0 cm, respectively. Examination of TOPEX/POSEIDON sea level anomaly variations using the new tide model further confirms that the tide model has been improved.

  10. Female "Big Fish" Swimming against the Tide: The "Big-Fish-Little-Pond Effect" and Gender-Ratio in Special Gifted Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preckel, Franzis; Zeidner, Moshe; Goetz, Thomas; Schleyer, Esther Jane

    2008-01-01

    This study takes a second look at the "big-fish-little-pond effect" (BFLPE) on a national sample of 769 gifted Israeli students (32% female) previously investigated by Zeidner and Schleyer (Zeidner, M., & Schleyer, E. J., (1999a). "The big-fish-little-pond effect for academic self-concept, test anxiety, and school grades in gifted children."…

  11. New Models of Water Delivery To Earth: The Effects of Ice Longevity and Collisional Water Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maindl, Thomas I.; Haghighipour, Nader

    2016-10-01

    It is widely accepted that the vast majority of Earth's water was delivered to its accretion zone by water-carrying planetesimals and planetary embryos from the outer regions of the asteroid belt while Earth was still forming. Modern simulations of the formation of terrestrial planets show this process with high resolution. However, their treatment of the actual delivery of water is still rudimentary assuming that a water-carrying object will maintain all its water content during its journey from its original orbit to the accretion zone of Earth. Models of the ice longevity have, however, shown that the water-ice may not stay intact, and asteroids and planetary embryos may lose some of their original water in form of ice sublimation during the dynamical evolution of these bodies. Also, collisions among these bodies while on their journey to Earth's accretion zone will result in the loss of large amounts of their water. These effects could be especially important during the formation of terrestrial planets as this process takes tens to hundreds of millions of years. We have developed a more accurate model in which the sublimation of ice during the process of the scattering of icy asteroids and planetary embryos into the accretion zone of Earth is taken into account. Our model includes two different modes of handling ice sublimation, one for sub-surface water and one for deeper ice. We also estimate water loss and retention during collisions which depends on the physical and dynamical parameters of the impacts. The results of our simulations put stringent constraints on the initial water distribution in the protoplanetary disk, the location of snowline, and the contribution of water from the primordial nebula to the final water budget of Earth. In this poster, we will present the results of our new simulations and discuss their implications for models of solar system formation and dynamics.

  12. The effects of core formation on the Pb- and Tl- isotopic composition of the silicate Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Bernard J.; Nielsen, Sune G.; Rehkämper, Mark; Halliday, Alex N.

    2008-05-01

    We have performed metal-silicate partitioning experiments at 2 GPa and 1650-2180 °C to investigate the behaviour of Pb and Tl during terrestrial core formation. The aim was to test the hypothesis that metal core formation followed by late sulphide addition to the core resulted in the concentrations and isotopic compositions of Pb and Tl in the silicate Earth. We investigated DPbmet/sil and DTLmet/sil as functions of the sulphur content of the metal and measured the equilibrium Tl isotope fractionation between the coexisting phases. Lead is moderately siderophile under the likely conditions (initially reducing [Wade, J., Wood, B.J., Core formation and the oxidation state of the Earth, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 236(2005) 78-95.]) of core segregation on Earth so that the μ( 238U/ 204Pb) of the bulk silicate Earth should have increased by a factor of 6.5 ( DPb ˜ 13) as the core separated. In the case of Tl, core segregation should have reduced the Tl concentration of the BSE by about 50%. Neither the Pb nor Tl isotopic compositions of the bulk silicate Earth can, however, be completely explained by S-free iron core formation. Thallium isotopes were found not to be significantly fractionated by metal or sulphide separation from silicate. Addition of sulphur to the metal greatly increases metal-silicate partition coefficients for both Pb and Tl. DPbmet/sil increases by a factor of 15 and DTLmet/sil by a factor of 45 as S increases from 0 to 35% in the metal phase. This means that extraction of sulphide from a molten mantle would result in DPbsulph/sil of ˜ 40 and DTLsulph/sil of ˜ 60. We used the latter results to calculate the effects of late sulphide extraction on the Pb and Tl isotopic compositions of the silicate Earth. For a bulk Earth with μ of 0.7 addition of 1.6% sulphide to the core 100-140 Myr after the beginning of the solar system is sufficient to displace the Pb-isotopic composition of the silicate Earth into the region indicated by estimates in the

  13. The 1971 red tide and its impact on certain reef communities in the mid-eastern Gulf of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Smith, G B

    1975-01-01

    Effects of the 1971 spring-summer red tide upon mid-eastern Gulf of Mexico patch reef communities are discussed. In situ (SCUBA) observations at widely scattered reef localities between 13-30 m off Sarasota, Florida, both before and after the red tide support the following: 1) under the appropriate environmental conditions, red tides may result in near-complete extirpations of shallow-water (less than 40 m) reef biotas from extensive areas on the inner central-West Florida Shelf), 2) recolonization by certain biotic groups is relatively rapid (e.g., benthic algae and fishes) while that of others (e.g., alcyonarian corals, scleractinian corals, and echinoderms) is slow and may require several years, and 3) seasonal progression as well as true ecological succession following certain red tides may temporarily result in floral and faunal assemblages qualitatively and quantitatively distinctive from those prior to the red tide. It is therefore suggested that certain red tides, particularly those generated beneath pronounced thermoclines, may be previously underestimated phenomena regulating the composition, abundance, and distribution of shallow-water reef biotas in the mid-eastern Gulf of Mexico. It is surmised that the periodic occurrence of these red tides may prevent the evolution of a climax or equilibrium reef community.

  14. Comparative study on the toxic effects of red tide flagellates Heterocapsa circularisquama and Chattonella marina on the short-necked clam (Ruditapes philippinarum).

    PubMed

    Kim, Daekyung; Choi, Kwang-Sik; Hong, Hyun-Ki; Jiang, Zedong; Zou, Yanan; Choi, Kyu-Sung; Yamasaki, Yasuhiro; Matsuyama, Yukihiko; Yamaguchi, Kenichi; Oda, Tatsuya

    2011-01-01

    Heterocapsa circularisquama showed much higher toxic effects on short-necked clams than Chattonella marina. Clams exposed to H. circularisquama exhibited morphological changes concomitant with an accumulation of mucus-like substances in the gills, a profound reduction in filtration activity, and lysosomal destabilization in hemocytes. Chattonella marina was less effective than H. circularisquama, and Heterocapsa triquetra was almost harmless in all these criteria. These results suggest that H. circularisquama exerted its lethal effect on short-necked clams through gill tissue damage and subsequent induction of physiological stress.

  15. [Effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on the growth and rare earth elements uptake of soybean grown in rare earth mine tailings].

    PubMed

    Guo, Wei; Zhao, Ren-xin; Zhao, Wen-jing; Fu, Rui-ying; Guo, Jiang-yuan; Zhang, Jun

    2013-05-01

    A greenhouse pot experiment was conducted to investigate the influence of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi Glomus versiforme on the plant growth, nutrient uptake, C: N: P stoichiometric, uptake of heavy metals and rare earth elements by soybean (Glycine max) grown in rare earth mine tailings. The aim was to provide a basis for the revegetation of rare earth mine tailings. The results indicated that soybean had a high mycorrhizal colonization and symbiotic associations were successfully established with G. versiforme, with an average rate of approximately 67%. The colonization of G. versiforme significantly promoted the growth of soybean, increased P, K contents, and decreased C: N: P ratios, supporting the growth rate hypothesis. Inoculation with G. versiforme significantly decreased shoots and roots La, Ce, Pr and Nd concentrations of soybean compared to the control treatment. However, inoculation with G. versiforme had no significant effect on the heavy metal concentrations, except for significantly decreased shoot Fe and Cr concentrations and increased root Cd concentrations. The experiment demonstrates that AM fungi have a potential role for soybean to adapt the composite adversity of rare earth tailings and play a positive role in revegetation of rare earth mine tailings. Further studies on the role of AM fungi under natural conditions should be conducted.

  16. Precambrian climate: The effects of land area and earth's rotation rate

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, G.S. ); Marshall, H.G.; Kuhn, W.R. )

    1993-05-20

    The authors present results of model studies using general circulation models of climatic effects of variations in the rotation rate of the earth. These studies are of relevance for the Precambrian times, when the rotation period of the earth was considerably shorter. The authors include in their model studies a number of factors which were left out in previous studies. The rotation rate has a strong effect on atmospheric circulation, as evidenced in the theory of geostrophic turbulence, mid-latitude baroclinic instability, and the Hadley cell. One can expect the contraction of circulation patterns, both horizontally and vertically. This should also impact heat transport, though questions of mean temperature effects are more open, unless one allows cloud cover to vary. The authors put more realistic starting conditions into the model, and also allow clouds and hydrology to have a feedback role to see what impact rotation rates will have on global climate.

  17. Low earth orbit environmental effects on the Space Station photovoltaic power generation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahra, H. K.

    1988-01-01

    A summary of the low earth orbital environment, its impact on the photovoltaic power systems of the Space Station and the solutions implemented to resolve the environmental concerns or issues are described. Low earth orbital environment (LEO) presents several concerns to the photovoltaic power systems of the Space Station. These concerns include atomic oxygen interaction with the polymeric substrate of the solar arrays, ionized environment effects on the array operating voltage, the effects of the meteoroids and debris impacts and penetration through the different layers of the solar cells and their circuits, and the high energy particle and radiation effects on the overall solar array performance. Potential solutions to some of the degrading environmental interactions that will provide the photovoltaic power system of the Space Station with the desired life are also summarized.

  18. Effect of rare earth metal on the spin-orbit torque in magnetic heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, Kohei; Pai, Chi-Feng; Tan, Aik Jun; Mann, Maxwell; Beach, Geoffrey S. D.

    2016-06-01

    We report the effect of the rare earth metal Gd on current-induced spin-orbit torques (SOTs) in perpendicularly magnetized Pt/Co/Gd heterostructures, characterized using harmonic measurements and spin-torque ferromagnetic resonance (ST-FMR). By varying the Gd metal layer thickness from 0 nm to 8 nm, harmonic measurements reveal a significant enhancement of the effective fields generated from the Slonczewski-like and field-like torques. ST-FMR measurements confirm an enhanced effective spin Hall angle and show a corresponding increase in the magnetic damping constant with increasing Gd thickness. These results suggest that Gd plays an active role in generating SOTs in these heterostructures. Our finding may lead to spin-orbitronics device application such as non-volatile magnetic random access memory, based on rare earth metals.

  19. Low Earth orbit environmental effects on the space station photovoltaic power generation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahra, Henry K.

    1987-01-01

    A summary of the Low Earth Orbital Environment, its impact on the Photovoltaic Power systems of the space station and the solutions implemented to resolve the environmental concerns or issues are described. Low Earth Orbital Environment (LEO) presents several concerns to the Photovoltaic power systems of the space station. These concerns include atomic oxygen interaction with the polymeric substrate of the solar arrays, ionized environment effects on the array operating voltage, the effects of the meteoroids and debris impacts and penetration through the different layers of the solar cells and their circuits, and the high energy particle and radiation effects on the overall solar array performance. Potential solutions to some of the degrading environmental interactions that will provide the photovoltaic power system of the space station with the desired life are also summarized.

  20. Using inquiry-based instruction with Web-based data archives to facilitate conceptual change about tides among preservice teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ucar, Sedat

    The purpose of this mixed methods study was to describe and understand preservice teachers' conceptions of tides and to explore an instructional strategy that might promote the learning of scientific concepts. The participants were preservice teachers in three initial licensure programs. A total of 80 graduate students, in secondary, middle, and early childhood education programs completed a multiple choice assessment of their knowledge of tides-related concepts. Thirty of the 80 participants were interviewed before the instruction. Nineteen of the 30 students who were interviewed also participated in the instruction and were interviewed after the instruction. These 19 students also completed both the pre-test and 18 of them completed the post-test on tides and related content. Data regarding the participants' conceptual understandings of tides were collected before and after the instruction using both qualitative and quantitative data collection methods. A multiple choice pre-test was developed by the researcher. The same test was used before and after the instructional intervention. Structured interviews were conducted with participants before and after instruction. In addition to interviews, participants were asked to write a short journal after instruction. The constant comparative method was used to analyze the qualitative data. Preservice teachers' conceptual understandings of tides were categorized under six different types of conceptual understandings. Before the instruction, all preservice teachers held alternative or alternative fragments as their types of conceptual understandings of tides, and these preservice teachers who held alternative conceptions about tides were likely to indicate that there is one tidal bulge on Earth. They tried to explain this one tidal bulge using various alternative conceptions. After completing an inquiry-based and technology-enhanced instruction of tides, preservice teachers were more likely to hold a scientific conceptual