Science.gov

Sample records for earth transition metal

  1. Method for treating rare earth-transition metal scrap

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, F.A.; Peterson, D.T.; Wheelock, J.T.; Jones, L.L.

    1992-12-29

    Rare earth-transition metal (e.g., iron) scrap (e.g., Nd-Fe-B scrap) is flux (slag) remelted to reduce tramp non-metallic impurities, such as oxygen and nitrogen, and metallic impurities, such as Li, Na, Al, etc., picked up by the scrap from previous fabrication operations. The tramp impurities are reduced to concentrations acceptable for reuse of the treated alloy in the manufacture of end-use articles, such as permanent magnets. The scrap is electroslag or inductoslag melted using a rare earth fluoride-bearing flux of CaF[sub 2], CaCl[sub 2] or mixtures thereof or the slag resulting from practice of the thermite reduction process to make a rare earth-iron alloy. 3 figs.

  2. Method for treating rare earth-transition metal scrap

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, Frederick A.; Peterson, David T.; Wheelock, John T.; Jones, Lawrence L.

    1992-12-29

    Rare earth-transition metal (e.g., iron) scrap (e.g., Nd-Fe-B scrap) is flux (slag) remelted to reduce tramp non-metallic impurities, such as oxygen and nitrogen, and metallic impurities, such as Li, Na, Al, etc., picked up by the scrap from previous fabrication operations. The tramp impurities are reduced to concentrations acceptable for reuse of the treated alloy in the manufacture of end-use articles, such as permanent magnets. The scrap is electroslag or inductoslag melted using a prefused, rare earth fluoride-bearing flux of CaF.sub.2, CaCl.sub.2 or mixtures thereof or the slag resulting from practice of the thermite reduction process to make a rare earth-iron alloy.

  3. Rare earth-transition metal scrap treatment method

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, Frederick A.; Peterson, David T.; Wheelock, John T.; Jones, Lawrence L.; Lincoln, Lanny P.

    1992-02-11

    Rare earth-transition metal (e.g. iron) scrap (e.g. Nd-Fe-B scrap) is melted to reduce the levels of tramp oxygen and nitrogen impurities therein. The tramp impurities are reduced in the melt by virtue of the reaction of the tramp impurities and the rare earth to form dross on the melt. The purified melt is separated from the dross for reuse. The oxygen and nitrogen of the melt are reduced to levels acceptable for reuse of the treated alloy in the manufacture of end-use articles, such as permanent magnets.

  4. Rare earth-transition metal scrap treatment method

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, F.A.; Peterson, D.T.; Wheelock, J.T.; Jones, L.L.; Lincoln, L.P.

    1992-02-11

    Rare earth-transition metal (e.g. iron) scrap (e.g. Nd-Fe-B scrap) is melted to reduce the levels of tramp oxygen and nitrogen impurities therein. The tramp impurities are reduced in the melt by virtue of the reaction of the tramp impurities and the rare earth to form dross on the melt. The purified melt is separated from the dross for reuse. The oxygen and nitrogen of the melt are reduced to levels acceptable for reuse of the treated alloy in the manufacture of end-use articles, such as permanent magnets. 3 figs.

  5. Recycling of rare earth metals from rare earth-transition metal alloy scrap by liquid metal extraction

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, T.W.; Schmidt, F.A.

    1995-08-01

    A method is described for treating rare earth metal-bearing scrap, waste or other material (e.g. Nd--Fe--B or Dy--Tb--Fe scrap) to recover the rare earth metal comprising melting the rare earth metal-bearing material, melting a Group IIA metal extractant, such as Mg, Ca, or Ba, in which the rare earth is soluble in the molten state, and contacting the melted material and melted extractant at a temperature and for a time effective to extract the rare earth from the melted material into the melted extractant. The rare earth metal is separated from the extractant metal by vacuum sublimation or distillation. 2 figs.

  6. Recycling of rare earth metals from rare earth-transition metal alloy scrap by liquid metal extraction

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, Timothy W.; Schmidt, Frederick A.

    1995-08-01

    Method of treating rare earth metal-bearing scrap, waste or other material (e.g. Nd--Fe--B or Dy--Tb--Fe scrap) to recover the rare earth metal comprising melting the rare earth metal-bearing material, melting a Group IIA metal extractant, such as Mg, Ca, or Ba, in which the rare earth is soluble in the molten state, and contacting the melted material and melted extractant at a temperature and for a time effective to extract the rare earth from the melted material into the melted extractant. The rare earth metal is separated from the extractant metal by vacuum sublimation or distillation.

  7. Lattice vibrations and electronic transitions in the rare-earth metals: yttrium, gadolinium and lutetium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olijnyk, Helmut

    2005-01-01

    Lattice vibrations in high-pressure phases of Y, Gd and Lu were studied by Raman spectroscopy. The observed phonon frequencies decrease towards the transitions to the dhcp and fcc phases. There is evidence that the entire structural sequence {\\mathrm {hcp \\to Sm\\mbox {-}type \\to dhcp \\to fcc}} under pressure for the individual regular rare-earth metals and along the lanthanide series at ambient pressure involve softening of certain acoustic and optical phonon modes and of the elastic shear modulus C44. Comparison is made to transitions between close-packed lattices in other metals, and possible correlations to s-d electron transfer are discussed.

  8. Lattice vibrations and electronic transitions in the rare-earth metals: yttrium, gadolinium and lutetium.

    PubMed

    Olijnyk, Helmut

    2005-01-12

    Lattice vibrations in high-pressure phases of Y, Gd and Lu were studied by Raman spectroscopy. The observed phonon frequencies decrease towards the transitions to the dhcp and fcc phases. There is evidence that the entire structural sequence [Formula: see text] under pressure for the individual regular rare-earth metals and along the lanthanide series at ambient pressure involve softening of certain acoustic and optical phonon modes and of the elastic shear modulus C(44). Comparison is made to transitions between close-packed lattices in other metals, and possible correlations to s-d electron transfer are discussed.

  9. Neutron Diffraction Studies of Some Rare Earth-Transition Metal Deuterides.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-05-01

    RD-A168 M NEUTRON DIFFRACTION STUDIES OF SONE RARE EARTH-TRANSITION METAL DEUTERIDES(U) MISSOURI UNIV-ROLLR MATERIALS RESEARCH CENTER N J JAMES MY 86...REPORT William J. James OTtO -il May 1986 ZLECTEJU U. S. Army Research Office DAAG29-83-K-01 59 ".;’ Graduate Center for Materials Research ...9. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME AND ADDRESS 10. PROGRAM ELEMENT, PROJECT. TASK AREA & WORK UNIT NUMBERS 2* Graduate Center for Materials Research

  10. Hybridization wave as the cause of the metal-insulator transition in rare earth nickelates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyowon; Marianetti, Chris A.; Millis, Andrew J.

    2012-02-01

    The metal-insulator transition driven by varying rare earth (Re) ion in ReNiO3 has been a longstanding challenge to materials theory. Experimental evidence suggesting charge order is seemingly incompatible with the strong Mott-Hubbard correlations characteristic of transition metals. We present density functional, Hartree-Fock and Dynamical Mean field calculations showing that the origin of the insulating phase is a hybridization wave, in which a two sublattice ordering of the oxygen breathing mode produces two Ni sites with almost identical Ni d-charge densities but very different magnetic moments and other properties. The high temperature crystal structure associated with smaller Re ions such as Lu is shown to be more susceptible to the distortion than the high temperature structure associated with larger Re ions such as La.

  11. High-pressure phase transitions in rare earth metal thulium to 195 GPa.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Jeffrey M; Samudrala, Gopi K; Tsoi, Georgiy M; Vohra, Yogesh K

    2011-04-20

    We have performed image plate x-ray diffraction studies on a heavy rare earth metal, thulium (Tm), in a diamond anvil cell to a pressure of 195 GPa and volume compression V/V₀ = 0.38 at room temperature. The rare earth crystal structure sequence, hcp →Sm-type→ dhcp →fcc → distorted fcc, is observed in Tm below 70 GPa with the exception of a pure fcc phase. The focus of our study is on the ultrahigh-pressure phase transition and Rietveld refinement of crystal structures in the pressure range between 70 and 195 GPa. The hexagonal hR-24 phase is seen to describe the distorted fcc phase between 70 and 124 GPa. Above 124 ± 4 GPa, a structural transformation from hR 24 phase to a monoclinic C 2/m phase is observed with a volume change of -1.5%. The equation of state data shows rapid stiffening above the phase transition at 124 GPa and is indicative of participation of f-electrons in bonding. We compare the behavior of Tm to other heavy rare-earths and heavy actinide metals under extreme conditions of pressure.

  12. High-pressure phase transitions in rare earth metal thulium to 195 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, Jeffrey M.; Samudrala, Gopi K.; Tsoi, Georgiy M.; Vohra, Yogesh K.

    2011-04-01

    We have performed image plate x-ray diffraction studies on a heavy rare earth metal, thulium (Tm), in a diamond anvil cell to a pressure of 195 GPa and volume compression V/Vo = 0.38 at room temperature. The rare earth crystal structure sequence, {hcp}\\to {Sm {-}type} \\to {dhcp} \\to {fcc} \\to distorted fcc, is observed in Tm below 70 GPa with the exception of a pure fcc phase. The focus of our study is on the ultrahigh-pressure phase transition and Rietveld refinement of crystal structures in the pressure range between 70 and 195 GPa. The hexagonal hR- 24 phase is seen to describe the distorted fcc phase between 70 and 124 GPa. Above 124 ± 4 GPa, a structural transformation from hR 24 phase to a monoclinic C 2/m phase is observed with a volume change of - 1.5%. The equation of state data shows rapid stiffening above the phase transition at 124 GPa and is indicative of participation of f-electrons in bonding. We compare the behavior of Tm to other heavy rare-earths and heavy actinide metals under extreme conditions of pressure.

  13. Calculating the Magnetic Anisotropy of Rare-Earth-Transition-Metal Ferrimagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patrick, Christopher E.; Kumar, Santosh; Balakrishnan, Geetha; Edwards, Rachel S.; Lees, Martin R.; Petit, Leon; Staunton, Julie B.

    2018-03-01

    Magnetocrystalline anisotropy, the microscopic origin of permanent magnetism, is often explained in terms of ferromagnets. However, the best performing permanent magnets based on rare earths and transition metals (RE-TM) are in fact ferrimagnets, consisting of a number of magnetic sublattices. Here we show how a naive calculation of the magnetocrystalline anisotropy of the classic RE-TM ferrimagnet GdCo5 gives numbers that are too large at 0 K and exhibit the wrong temperature dependence. We solve this problem by introducing a first-principles approach to calculate temperature-dependent magnetization versus field (FPMVB) curves, mirroring the experiments actually used to determine the anisotropy. We pair our calculations with measurements on a recently grown single crystal of GdCo5 , and find excellent agreement. The FPMVB approach demonstrates a new level of sophistication in the use of first-principles calculations to understand RE-TM magnets.

  14. Cluster synthesis and direct ordering of rare-earth transition-metal nanomagnets.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, Balamurugan; Skomski, Ralph; Li, Xingzhong; Valloppilly, Shah R; Shield, Jeffrey E; Hadjipanayis, George C; Sellmyer, David J

    2011-04-13

    Rare-earth transition-metal (R-TM) alloys show superior permanent magnetic properties in the bulk, but the synthesis and application of R-TM nanoparticles remains a challenge due to the requirement of high-temperature annealing above about 800 °C for alloy formation and subsequent crystalline ordering. Here we report a single-step method to produce highly ordered R-TM nanoparticles such as YCo(5) and Y(2)Co(17), without high-temperature thermal annealing by employing a cluster-deposition system and investigate their structural and magnetic properties. The direct ordering is highly desirable to create and assemble R-TM nanoparticle building blocks for future permanent-magnet and other significant applications.

  15. Coercivity of domain wall motion in thin films of amorphous rare earth-transition metal alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mansuripur, M.; Giles, R. C.; Patterson, G.

    1991-01-01

    Computer simulations of a two dimensional lattice of magnetic dipoles are performed on the Connection Machine. The lattice is a discrete model for thin films of amorphous rare-earth transition metal alloys, which have application as the storage media in erasable optical data storage systems. In these simulations, the dipoles follow the dynamic Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation under the influence of an effective field arising from local anisotropy, near-neighbor exchange, classical dipole-dipole interactions, and an externally applied field. Various sources of coercivity, such as defects and/or inhomogeneities in the lattice, are introduced and the subsequent motion of domain walls in response to external fields is investigated.

  16. Calculating the Magnetic Anisotropy of Rare-Earth-Transition-Metal Ferrimagnets.

    PubMed

    Patrick, Christopher E; Kumar, Santosh; Balakrishnan, Geetha; Edwards, Rachel S; Lees, Martin R; Petit, Leon; Staunton, Julie B

    2018-03-02

    Magnetocrystalline anisotropy, the microscopic origin of permanent magnetism, is often explained in terms of ferromagnets. However, the best performing permanent magnets based on rare earths and transition metals (RE-TM) are in fact ferrimagnets, consisting of a number of magnetic sublattices. Here we show how a naive calculation of the magnetocrystalline anisotropy of the classic RE-TM ferrimagnet GdCo_{5} gives numbers that are too large at 0 K and exhibit the wrong temperature dependence. We solve this problem by introducing a first-principles approach to calculate temperature-dependent magnetization versus field (FPMVB) curves, mirroring the experiments actually used to determine the anisotropy. We pair our calculations with measurements on a recently grown single crystal of GdCo_{5}, and find excellent agreement. The FPMVB approach demonstrates a new level of sophistication in the use of first-principles calculations to understand RE-TM magnets.

  17. Unambiguously identifying spin states of transition-metal ions in the Earth (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, H.

    2010-12-01

    The spin state of a transition-metal ion in crystalline solids, defined by the number of unpaired electrons in the ion’s incomplete 3d shell, may vary with many factors, such as temperature, pressure, strain, and the local atomic configuration, to name a few. Such a phenomenon, known as spin-state crossover, plays a crucial role in spintronic materials. Recently, the pressure-induced spin-state crossover in iron-bearing minerals has been recognized to affect the minerals’ structural and elastic properties. However, the detailed mechanism of such crossover in iron-bearing magnesium silicate perovskite, the most abundant mineral in the Earth, remains unclear. A significant part of this confusion arises from the difficulty in reliably extracting the spin state from experiments. For the same reason, the thermally-induced spin-state crossover in lanthanum cobaltite (LaCoO3) has been controversial for more than four decades. In this talk, I will discuss how first-principle calculations can help clarifying these long-standing controversies. In addition to the total energy, equation of state, and elastic properties of each spin state, first-principle calculations also predict the electric field gradient (EFG) at the nucleus of each transition-metal ion. Our calculations showed that the nuclear EFG, a quantity that can be measured via Mössbauer or nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, depends primarily on the spin state, irrespective of the concentration or configuration of transition-metal ions. Such robustness makes EFG a unique fingerprint to identify the spin state. The combination of first-principle calculations and Mössbauer/NMR spectroscopy can therefore be a reliable and efficient approach in tackling spin-state crossover problems in the Earth. This work was primarily supported by the MRSEC Program of NSF under Awards Number DMR-0212302 and DMR-0819885, and partially supported by NSF under ATM-0428774 (V-Lab), EAR-1019853, and EAR-0810272. The

  18. Effect of patch borders on coercivity in amorphous rare earth-transition metal thin films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, G.; Fu, H.; Giles, R. C.; Mansuripur, M.

    1991-01-01

    The coercivity at the micron scale is a very important property of magneto-optical media. It is a key factor that determines the magnetic domain wall movement and domain reversal. How the coercivity is influenced by a special type of patch borders is discussed. Patch formation is a general phenomenon in growth processes of amorphous rare earth transition metal thin films. Different patches may stem from different seeds and the patch borders are formed when they merge. Though little is known about the exact properties of the borders, we may expect that the exchange interaction at the patch border is weaker than that within a patch, since there is usually a spatial gap between two patches. Computer simulations were performed on a 2-D hexagonal lattice consisting of 37 complete patches with random shape and size. From the series of simulations we may conclude that the domain in the patch with borders of 30 percent exchange strength can expand most easily to the whole lattice, because the exchange strength can expand most easily to the whole lattice, because the exchange strength of the border is not too high to prevent the domain from growing within the patch and it is not too low to prevent the domain from expanding beyond the patch.

  19. A miniature single element effusion cell for the vacuum deposition of transition-metal and rare-earth elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, V. G.; Koon, N. C.

    1997-08-01

    A miniature single element effusion cell has been fabricated and tested that allows for the high-vacuum deposition of a variety of transition-metal and rare-earth elements. The cell is designed to operate under high-vacuum conditions, ≈10-9 Torr, with low power demands, <200 W. The virtues of this evaporator are the simplicity of design and ease of fabrication, assembly, maintenance, and operation.

  20. High pressure phase transitions in the rare earth metal erbium to 151 GPa.

    PubMed

    Samudrala, Gopi K; Thomas, Sarah A; Montgomery, Jeffrey M; Vohra, Yogesh K

    2011-08-10

    High pressure x-ray diffraction studies have been performed on the heavy rare earth metal erbium (Er) in a diamond anvil cell at room temperature to a pressure of 151 GPa and Er has been compressed to 40% of its initial volume. The rare earth crystal structure sequence hcp → Sm type → dhcp → distorted fcc (hcp: hexagonal close packed; fcc: face centered cubic; dhcp: double hcp) is observed in Er below 58 GPa. We have carried out Rietveld refinement of crystal structures in the pressure range between 58 GPa and 151 GPa. We have examined various crystal structures that have been proposed for the distorted fcc (dfcc) phase and the post-dfcc phase in rare earth metals. We find that the hexagonal hR 24 structure is the best fit between 58 and 118 GPa. Above 118 GPa, a structural transformation from hR 24 phase to a monoclinic C 2/m phase is observed with a volume change of - 1.9%. We have also established a clear trend for the pressure at which a post-dfcc phase is formed in rare earth metals and show that there is a monotonic increase in this pressure with the filling of 4f shell.

  1. High pressure phase transitions in the rare earth metal erbium to 151 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samudrala, Gopi K.; Thomas, Sarah A.; Montgomery, Jeffrey M.; Vohra, Yogesh K.

    2011-08-01

    High pressure x-ray diffraction studies have been performed on the heavy rare earth metal erbium (Er) in a diamond anvil cell at room temperature to a pressure of 151 GPa and Er has been compressed to 40% of its initial volume. The rare earth crystal structure sequence {hcp} \\to {Sm}~ {type} \\to {dhcp} \\to {distorted} fcc (hcp: hexagonal close packed; fcc: face centered cubic; dhcp: double hcp) is observed in Er below 58 GPa. We have carried out Rietveld refinement of crystal structures in the pressure range between 58 GPa and 151 GPa. We have examined various crystal structures that have been proposed for the distorted fcc (dfcc) phase and the post-dfcc phase in rare earth metals. We find that the hexagonal hR 24 structure is the best fit between 58 and 118 GPa. Above 118 GPa, a structural transformation from hR 24 phase to a monoclinic C 2/m phase is observed with a volume change of - 1.9%. We have also established a clear trend for the pressure at which a post-dfcc phase is formed in rare earth metals and show that there is a monotonic increase in this pressure with the filling of 4f shell.

  2. Blending Non-Group-3 Transition Metal and Rare-Earth Metal into a C80 Fullerene Cage with D5h Symmetry.

    PubMed

    Wei, Tao; Jin, Fei; Guan, Runnan; Huang, Jing; Chen, Muqing; Li, Qunxiang; Yang, Shangfeng

    2018-02-11

    Rare-earth metals have been mostly entrapped into fullerene cages to form endohedral clusterfullerenes, whereas non-Group-3 transition metals that can form clusterfullerenes are limited to titanium (Ti) and vanadium (V), and both are exclusively entrapped within an I h -C 80 cage. Non-Group-3 transition-metal-containing endohedral fullerenes based on a C 80 cage with D 5h symmetry, V x Sc 3-x N@D 5h -C 80 (x=1, 2), have now been synthesized, which exhibit two variable cluster compositions. The molecular structure of VSc 2 N@D 5h -C 80 was unambiguously determined by X-ray crystallography. According to a comparative study with the reported Ti- and V-containing clusterfullerenes based on a I h -C 80 cage and the analogous D 5h -C 80 -based metal nitride clusterfullerenes containing rare-earth metals only, the decisive role of the non-Group-3 transition metal on the formation of the corresponding D 5h -C 80 -based clusterfullerenes is unraveled. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Transition Metal Switchable Mirror

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2017-12-29

    The switchable-mirrors technology was developed by Tom Richardson and Jonathan Slack of Berkeley Lab's Environmental Energy Technologies Division. By using transition metals rather than the rare earth metals used in the first metal-hydride switchable mirrors, Richardson and Slack were able to lower the cost and simplify the manufacturing process. Energy performance is improved as well, because the new windows can reflect or transmit both visible and infrared light. Besides windows for offices and homes, possible applications include automobile sunroofs, signs and displays, aircraft windows, and spacecraft. More information at: http://windows.lbl.gov/materials/chromogenics/default.htm

  4. Transition Metal Switchable Mirror

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2017-12-09

    The switchable-mirrors technology was developed by Tom Richardson and Jonathan Slack of Berkeley Lab's Environmental Energy Technologies Division. By using transition metals rather than the rare earth metals used in the first metal-hydride switchable mirrors, Richardson and Slack were able to lower the cost and simplify the manufacturing process. Energy performance is improved as well, because the new windows can reflect or transmit both visible and infrared light. Besides windows for offices and homes, possible applications include automobile sunroofs, signs and displays, aircraft windows, and spacecraft.

  5. Transition Metal Switchable Mirror

    SciTech Connect

    None

    2009-08-21

    The switchable-mirrors technology was developed by Tom Richardson and Jonathan Slack of Berkeley Lab's Environmental Energy Technologies Division. By using transition metals rather than the rare earth metals used in the first metal-hydride switchable mirrors, Richardson and Slack were able to lower the cost and simplify the manufacturing process. Energy performance is improved as well, because the new windows can reflect or transmit both visible and infrared light. Besides windows for offices and homes, possible applications include automobile sunroofs, signs and displays, aircraft windows, and spacecraft. More information at: http://windows.lbl.gov/materials/chromogenics/default.htm

  6. Transition Metal Switchable Mirror

    SciTech Connect

    None

    2009-08-21

    The switchable-mirrors technology was developed by Tom Richardson and Jonathan Slack of Berkeley Lab's Environmental Energy Technologies Division. By using transition metals rather than the rare earth metals used in the first metal-hydride switchable mirrors, Richardson and Slack were able to lower the cost and simplify the manufacturing process. Energy performance is improved as well, because the new windows can reflect or transmit both visible and infrared light. Besides windows for offices and homes, possible applications include automobile sunroofs, signs and displays, aircraft windows, and spacecraft.

  7. Site specific physics in RT5 (R = rare earths and T = transition metals) materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paudyal, Durga

    Most of RT5 compounds form in hexagonal CaCu5-type structure with three non-equivalent sites: R (1a), T (2c), and T (3g). R atoms sit in the middle of the T (2c) hexagonal layers. Advanced density functional theory calculations including on-site electron correlation and spin orbit coupling show crystal field split localized R 4f states, which are responsible for the large part of the magnetic anisotropy exhibited by these systems. In addition, the hexagonal T (2c) layers help enhancing the magnetic anisotropy. Partially quenched R 4f orbital moment is the origin of magnetic anisotropy which also helps enhancing magnetic moment. The interchange of T sites by other transition metals and the partial substitution of R atoms by transition metals could optimize needed magnetic moment and magnetic anisotropy by forming a complex geometry structure favoring permanent magnetic properties. This research is supported by the Critical Materials Institute, an Energy Innovation Hub funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Advanced Manufacturing office.

  8. Neutron diffraction studies of some rare earth-transition metal deuterides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, W. J.

    1984-04-01

    Neutron diffraction studies of the ternary alloy system Y6(Fel-xMnx)23 reveal that the unusual magnetic behavior upon substitution of Mn or Fe into the end members, is a consequence of atomic ordering wherein there is strong site preference of Mn for the f sub 2 sites and of Fe for the f sub 1 sites. In the Mn-rich compositions, Fe is found to have no spontaneous moments. Therefore, the long range magnetic ordering arises solely from Mn-Mn interactions. Upon substitution of Mn into the Fe-rich ternaries, the Fe moments are considerably reduced. Neutron diffraction studies of Y6Mn23D23 show that a transition occurs below 180K from a fcc structure to a primitive tetragonal structure, space group P4/mmm with the onset of antiferromagnetic ordering. The Mn moments are directed along the c-axis. The transition probably results from atomic ordering of the D atoms at low temperature which induces c axis magnetic ordering. The question of the appropriate space group of LaNi4.5Al0.5D4.5, P6/mmm or P3/m has been resolved by a careful refinement and analysis of neutron diffraction data. The preferred space group is P6/mmm. Neutron powder diffraction and thermal magnetization measurements on small single crystals of ErNi3, ErCo3, and ErFe3 (space group R3m) show that the magnetocrystalline properties are a consequence of competing local site anisotropies between the two non-equivalent crystallographic sites of Er and two of the three non-equivalent sites of the 3d-transition metal.

  9. Magnetic coupling at rare earth ferromagnet/transition metal ferromagnet interfaces: A comprehensive study of Gd/Ni.

    PubMed

    Higgs, T D C; Bonetti, S; Ohldag, H; Banerjee, N; Wang, X L; Rosenberg, A J; Cai, Z; Zhao, J H; Moler, K A; Robinson, J W A

    2016-07-22

    Thin film magnetic heterostructures with competing interfacial coupling and Zeeman energy provide a fertile ground to study phase transition between different equilibrium states as a function of external magnetic field and temperature. A rare-earth (RE)/transition metal (TM) ferromagnetic multilayer is a classic example where the magnetic state is determined by a competition between the Zeeman energy and antiferromagnetic interfacial exchange coupling energy. Technologically, such structures offer the possibility to engineer the macroscopic magnetic response by tuning the microscopic interactions between the layers. We have performed an exhaustive study of nickel/gadolinium as a model system for understanding RE/TM multilayers using the element-specific measurement technique x-ray magnetic circular dichroism, and determined the full magnetic state diagrams as a function of temperature and magnetic layer thickness. We compare our results to a modified Stoner-Wohlfarth-based model and provide evidence of a thickness-dependent transition to a magnetic fan state which is critical in understanding magnetoresistance effects in RE/TM systems. The results provide important insight for spintronics and superconducting spintronics where engineering tunable magnetic inhomogeneity is key for certain applications.

  10. Magnetic coupling at rare earth ferromagnet/transition metal ferromagnet interfaces: A comprehensive study of Gd/Ni

    DOE PAGES

    Higgs, T. D. C.; Bonetti, S.; Ohldag, H.; ...

    2016-07-22

    Thin film magnetic heterostructures with competing interfacial coupling and Zeeman energy provide a fertile ground to study phase transition between different equilibrium states as a function of external magnetic field and temperature. A rare-earth (RE)/transition metal (TM) ferromagnetic multilayer is a classic example where the magnetic state is determined by a competition between the Zeeman energy and antiferromagnetic interfacial exchange coupling energy. Technologically, such structures offer the possibility to engineer the macroscopic magnetic response by tuning the microscopic interactions between the layers. We have performed an exhaustive study of nickel/gadolinium as a model system for understanding RE/TM multilayers using themore » element-specific measurement technique x-ray magnetic circular dichroism, and determined the full magnetic state diagrams as a function of temperature and magnetic layer thickness. We compare our results to a modified Stoner-Wohlfarth-based model and provide evidence of a thickness-dependent transition to a magnetic fan state which is critical in understanding magnetoresistance effects in RE/TM systems. In conclusion, the results provide important insight for spintronics and superconducting spintronics where engineering tunable magnetic inhomogeneity is key for certain applications.« less

  11. Magnetic coupling at rare earth ferromagnet/transition metal ferromagnet interfaces: A comprehensive study of Gd/Ni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgs, T. D. C.; Bonetti, S.; Ohldag, H.; Banerjee, N.; Wang, X. L.; Rosenberg, A. J.; Cai, Z.; Zhao, J. H.; Moler, K. A.; Robinson, J. W. A.

    2016-07-01

    Thin film magnetic heterostructures with competing interfacial coupling and Zeeman energy provide a fertile ground to study phase transition between different equilibrium states as a function of external magnetic field and temperature. A rare-earth (RE)/transition metal (TM) ferromagnetic multilayer is a classic example where the magnetic state is determined by a competition between the Zeeman energy and antiferromagnetic interfacial exchange coupling energy. Technologically, such structures offer the possibility to engineer the macroscopic magnetic response by tuning the microscopic interactions between the layers. We have performed an exhaustive study of nickel/gadolinium as a model system for understanding RE/TM multilayers using the element-specific measurement technique x-ray magnetic circular dichroism, and determined the full magnetic state diagrams as a function of temperature and magnetic layer thickness. We compare our results to a modified Stoner-Wohlfarth-based model and provide evidence of a thickness-dependent transition to a magnetic fan state which is critical in understanding magnetoresistance effects in RE/TM systems. The results provide important insight for spintronics and superconducting spintronics where engineering tunable magnetic inhomogeneity is key for certain applications.

  12. Separation of rare earths from transition metals by liquid-liquid extraction from a molten salt hydrate to an ionic liquid phase.

    PubMed

    Rout, Alok; Binnemans, Koen

    2014-02-28

    The solvent extraction of trivalent rare-earth ions and their separation from divalent transition metal ions using molten salt hydrates as the feed phase and an undiluted fluorine-free ionic liquid as the extracting phase were investigated in detail. The extractant was tricaprylmethylammonium nitrate, [A336][NO3], and the hydrated melt was calcium nitrate tetrahydrate, Ca(NO3)2·4H2O. The extraction behavior of rare-earth ions was studied for solutions of individual elements, as well as for mixtures of rare earths in the hydrated melt. The influence of different extraction parameters was investigated: the initial metal loading in the feed phase, percentage of water in the feed solution, equilibration time, and the type of hydrated melt. The extraction of rare earths from Ca(NO3)2·4H2O was compared with extraction from CaCl2·4H2O by [A336][Cl] (Aliquat 336). The nitrate system was found to be the better one. The extraction and separation of rare earths from the transition metals nickel, cobalt and zinc were also investigated. Remarkably high separation factors of rare-earth ions over transition metal ions were observed for extraction from Ca(NO3)2·4H2O by the [A336][NO3] extracting phase. Furthermore, rare-earth ions could be separated efficiently from transition metal ions, even in melts with very high concentrations of transition metal ions. Rare-earth oxides could be directly dissolved in the Ca(NO3)2·4H2O phase in the presence of small amounts of Al(NO3)3·9H2O or concentrated nitric acid. The efficiency of extraction after dissolving the rare-earth oxides in the hydrated nitrate melt was identical to extraction from solutions with rare-earth nitrates dissolved in the molten phase. The stripping of the rare-earth ions from the loaded ionic liquid phase and the reuse of the recycled ionic liquid were also investigated in detail.

  13. K2-111 b - a short period super-Earth transiting a metal poor, evolved old star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fridlund, Malcolm; Gaidos, Eric; Barragán, Oscar; Persson, Carina M.; Gandolfi, Davide; Cabrera, Juan; Hirano, Teruyuki; Kuzuhara, Masayuki; Csizmadia, Sz.; Nowak, Grzegorz; Endl, Michael; Grziwa, Sascha; Korth, Judith; Pfaff, Jeremias; Bitsch, Bertram; Johansen, Anders; Mustill, Alexander J.; Davies, Melvyn B.; Deeg, Hans J.; Palle, Enric; Cochran, William D.; Eigmüller, Philipp; Erikson, Anders; Guenther, Eike; Hatzes, Artie P.; Kiilerich, Amanda; Kudo, Tomoyuki; MacQueen, Phillip; Narita, Norio; Nespral, David; Pätzold, Martin; Prieto-Arranz, Jorge; Rauer, Heike; Van Eylen, Vincent

    2017-07-01

    Context. From a light curve acquired through the K2 space mission, the star K2-111(EPIC 210894022) has been identified as possibly orbited by a transiting planet. Aims: Our aim is to confirm the planetary nature of the object and derive its fundamental parameters. Methods: We analyse the light curve variations during the planetary transit using packages developed specifically for exoplanetary transits. Reconnaissance spectroscopy and radial velocity observations have been obtained using three separate telescope and spectrograph combinations. The spectroscopic synthesis package SME has been used to derive the stellar photospheric parameters that were used as input to various stellar evolutionary tracks in order to derive the parameters of the system. The planetary transit was also validated to occur on the assumed host star through adaptive imaging and statistical analysis. Results: The star is found to be located in the background of the Hyades cluster at a distance at least 4 times further away from Earth than the cluster itself. The spectrum and the space velocities of K2-111 strongly suggest it to be a member of the thick disk population. The co-added high-resolution spectra show that that it is a metal poor ([Fe/H] = - 0.53 ± 0.05 dex) and α-rich somewhat evolved solar-like star of spectral type G3. We find Teff = 5730 ± 50 K, log g⋆ = 4.15 ± 0.1 cgs, and derive a radius of R⋆ = 1.3 ± 0.1 R⊙ and a mass of M⋆ = 0.88 ± 0.02 M⊙. The currently available radial velocity data confirms a super-Earth class planet with a mass of 8.6 ± 3.9 M⊕ and a radius of 1.9 ± 0.2 R⊕. A second more massive object with a period longer than about 120 days is indicated by a long-term radial velocity drift. Conclusions: The radial velocity detection together with the imaging confirms with a high level of significance that the transit signature is caused by a planet orbiting the star K2-111. This planet is also confirmed in the radial velocity data. A second more

  14. Effect of rare-earth doping on the thermoelectric and electrical transport properties of the transition metal pentatelluride hafnium pentatelluride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowhorn, Nathan Dane

    The transition metal pentatellurides HfTe5 and ZrTe5 have been observed to possess interesting electrical transport properties. High thermopower and low resistivity values result in high thermoelectric power factors. In addition, they possess anomalous transport behavior. The temperature dependence of the resistivity is semimetallic except for a large resistive peak as a function of temperature at around 75 K for HfTe5 and 145 K for ZrTe5. At a temperature corresponding to this peak, the thermopower crosses zero as it moves from large positive values to large negative values. This behavior has been found to be extremely sensitive to changes in the energetics of the system through influences such as magnetic field, stress, pressure, microwave radiation, and substitutional doping. This behavior has yet to be fully explained. Previous doping studies have shown profound and varied effects on the anomalous transport behavior. In this study we investigate the effect on the electrical resistivity, thermopower, and magnetoresistance of doping HfTe5 with rare-earth elements. We have grown single crystals of nominal Hf0.75RE 0.25Te5 where RE = Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Gd, Tb, Dy, and Ho. Electrical resistivity and thermopower data from about 10 K to room temperature are presented and discussed in terms of the thermoelectric properties. Doping with rare-earth elements of increasing atomic number leads to a systematic suppression of the anomalous transport behavior. Rare-earth doping also leads to an enhancement of the thermoelectric power factor over that of previously studied pentatellurides and the commonly used thermoelectric material Bi2Te3. For nominal Hf0.75Nd0.25Te5 and Hf0.75 Sm0.25Te5, values more than a factor of 2 larger than that Bi2Te3 are observed. In addition, suppression of the anomalous transport behavior leads to a suppression of the large magnetoresistive effect observed in the parent compounds. Rare-earth doping of HfTe5 has a profound impact on the anomalous

  15. Heterobimetallic transition metal/rare earth metal bifunctional catalysis: a Cu/Sm/Schiff base complex for syn-selective catalytic asymmetric nitro-Mannich reaction.

    PubMed

    Handa, Shinya; Gnanadesikan, Vijay; Matsunaga, Shigeki; Shibasaki, Masakatsu

    2010-04-07

    The full details of a catalytic asymmetric syn-selective nitro-Mannich reaction promoted by heterobimetallic Cu/Sm/dinucleating Schiff base complexes are described, demonstrating the effectiveness of the heterobimetallic transition metal/rare earth metal bifunctional catalysis. The first-generation system prepared from Cu(OAc)(2)/Sm(O-iPr)(3)/Schiff base 1a = 1:1:1 with an achiral phenol additive was partially successful for achieving the syn-selective catalytic asymmetric nitro-Mannich reaction. The substrate scope and limitations of the first-generation system remained problematic. After mechanistic studies on the catalyst prepared from Sm(O-iPr)(3), we reoptimized the catalyst preparation method, and a catalyst derived from Sm(5)O(O-iPr)(13) showed broader substrate generality as well as higher reactivity and stereoselectivity compared to Sm(O-iPr)(3). The optimal system with Sm(5)O(O-iPr)(13) was applicable to various aromatic, heteroaromatic, and isomerizable aliphatic N-Boc imines, giving products in 66-99% ee and syn/anti = >20:1-13:1. Catalytic asymmetric synthesis of nemonapride is also demonstrated using the catalyst derived from Sm(5)O(O-iPr)(13).

  16. The Visibility of Earth Transits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castellano, Tim; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The recent detection of planetary transits of the solar-like star HD 209458 at a distance of 47 parsecs suggest that transits can reveal the presence of Jupiter-size planetary companions in the solar neighborhood. Recent space-based transit searches have achieved photometric precision within an order of magnitude of that required to detect the much smaller transit signal of an earth-size planet around a solar-size star. Laboratory experiments in the presence of realistic noise sources have shown that CCDs can achieve photometric precision adequate to detect the 9.6 E-5 dimming, of the Sun due to a transit of the Earth. Space-based solar irradiance monitoring has shown that the intrinsic variability of the Sun would not preclude such a detection. Transits of the Sun by the Earth would be detectable by observers that reside within a narrow band of sky positions near the ecliptic plane, if the observers possess current Earth epoch levels of technology and astronomical expertise. A catalog of candidate target stars, their properties, and simulations of the photometric Earth transit signal detectability at each target is presented.

  17. The Visibility of Earth Transits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castellano, Timothy P.; Doyle, Laurance; McIntosh, Dawn; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The recent photometric detection of planetary transits of the solar-like star HD 209458 at a distance of 47 parsecs suggest that transits can reveal the presence of Jupiter-size planetary companions in the solar neighborhood. Recent space-based transit searches have achieved photometric precision within an order of magnitude of that required to detect the much smaller transit signal of an earth-size planet across a solar-size star. Laboratory experiments in the presence of realistic noise sources have shown that CCDs can achieve photometric precision adequate to detect the 9.6 E-5 dimming of the Sun due to a transit of the Earth. Space-based solar irradiance monitoring has shown that the intrinsic variability of the Sun would not preclude such a detection. Transits of the Sun by the Earth would be detectable by observers that reside within a narrow band of sky positions near the ecliptic plane, if the observers possess current Earth epoch levels of technology and astronomical expertise. A catalog of solar-like stars that satisfy the geometric condition for Earth transit visibility are presented.

  18. K2-155: A Bright Metal-poor M Dwarf with Three Transiting Super-Earths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano, Teruyuki; Dai, Fei; Livingston, John H.; Fujii, Yuka; Cochran, William D.; Endl, Michael; Gandolfi, Davide; Redfield, Seth; Winn, Joshua N.; Guenther, Eike W.; Prieto-Arranz, Jorge; Albrecht, Simon; Barragan, Oscar; Cabrera, Juan; Cauley, P. Wilson; Csizmadia, Szilard; Deeg, Hans; Eigmüller, Philipp; Erikson, Anders; Fridlund, Malcolm; Fukui, Akihiko; Grziwa, Sascha; Hatzes, Artie P.; Korth, Judith; Narita, Norio; Nespral, David; Niraula, Prajwal; Nowak, Grzegorz; Pätzold, Martin; Palle, Enric; Persson, Carina M.; Rauer, Heike; Ribas, Ignasi; Smith, Alexis M. S.; Van Eylen, Vincent

    2018-03-01

    We report on the discovery of three transiting super-Earths around K2-155 (EPIC 210897587), a relatively bright early M dwarf (V = 12.81 mag) observed during Campaign 13 of the NASA K2 mission. To characterize the system and validate the planet candidates, we conducted speckle imaging and high-dispersion optical spectroscopy, including radial velocity measurements. Based on the K2 light curve and the spectroscopic characterization of the host star, the planet sizes and orbital periods are {1.55}-0.17+0.20 {R}\\oplus and 6.34365 ± 0.00028 days for the inner planet; {1.95}-0.22+0.27 {R}\\oplus and 13.85402 ± 0.00088 days for the middle planet; and {1.64}-0.17+0.18 {R}\\oplus and 40.6835 ± 0.0031 days for the outer planet. The outer planet (K2-155d) is near the habitable zone, with an insolation 1.67 ± 0.38 times that of the Earth. The planet’s radius falls within the range between that of smaller rocky planets and larger gas-rich planets. To assess the habitability of this planet, we present a series of three-dimensional global climate simulations, assuming that K2-155d is tidally locked and has an Earth-like composition and atmosphere. We find that the planet can maintain a moderate surface temperature if the insolation proves to be smaller than ∼1.5 times that of the Earth. Doppler mass measurements, transit spectroscopy, and other follow-up observations should be rewarding, as K2-155 is one of the optically brightest M dwarfs known to harbor transiting planets.

  19. Response of the Lattice across the Filling-Controlled Mott Metal-Insulator Transition of a Rare Earth Titanate

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Honggyu; Marshall, Patrick B.; Ahadi, Kaveh

    The lattice response of a prototype Mott insulator, SmTiO 3, to hole doping is investigated with atomic-scale spatial resolution. SmTiO 3 films are doped with Sr on the Sm site with concentrations that span the insulating and metallic sides of the filling-controlled Mott metal-insulator transition (MIT). The GdFeO 3-type distortions are investigated using an atomic resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy technique that can resolve small lattice distortions with picometer precision. We show that these distortions are gradually and uniformly reduced as the Sr concentration is increased without any phase separation. Significant distortions persist into the metallic state. In conclusion, themore » results present a new picture of the physics of this prototype filling-controlled MIT, which is discussed.« less

  20. Response of the Lattice across the Filling-Controlled Mott Metal-Insulator Transition of a Rare Earth Titanate

    DOE PAGES

    Kim, Honggyu; Marshall, Patrick B.; Ahadi, Kaveh; ...

    2017-11-02

    The lattice response of a prototype Mott insulator, SmTiO 3, to hole doping is investigated with atomic-scale spatial resolution. SmTiO 3 films are doped with Sr on the Sm site with concentrations that span the insulating and metallic sides of the filling-controlled Mott metal-insulator transition (MIT). The GdFeO 3-type distortions are investigated using an atomic resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy technique that can resolve small lattice distortions with picometer precision. We show that these distortions are gradually and uniformly reduced as the Sr concentration is increased without any phase separation. Significant distortions persist into the metallic state. In conclusion, themore » results present a new picture of the physics of this prototype filling-controlled MIT, which is discussed.« less

  1. A Liquid Chromatography Detector for Transition and Rare-Earth Metal Ions Based on a Cupric Ion-Selective Electrode

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-05-01

    RARE-EARTH METAL IONS BASED ON A CUPRIC ION-SELECTIVE ELECTRODE By - 4 R. CAMERON DOREY TECHNICAL REPORT FJSRL-TR-81-0005 MAY 1981 Approved for public...FORM . REPORT NUMBER 12. GOVT ACCESSION NO. 3. RECIPIENT’S CATALOG NUMBER FJSRL-TR-81-0005BO CO ENGO 4 . TITLE (and Subtitle) 5. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD...common anions, including halide ions, is shown, and the advantages and limitations of the system are discussed. II ’ 4 UNCLASSIFIED SECURITY

  2. Metal-insulator transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imada, Masatoshi; Fujimori, Atsushi; Tokura, Yoshinori

    1998-10-01

    Metal-insulator transitions are accompanied by huge resistivity changes, even over tens of orders of magnitude, and are widely observed in condensed-matter systems. This article presents the observations and current understanding of the metal-insulator transition with a pedagogical introduction to the subject. Especially important are the transitions driven by correlation effects associated with the electron-electron interaction. The insulating phase caused by the correlation effects is categorized as the Mott Insulator. Near the transition point the metallic state shows fluctuations and orderings in the spin, charge, and orbital degrees of freedom. The properties of these metals are frequently quite different from those of ordinary metals, as measured by transport, optical, and magnetic probes. The review first describes theoretical approaches to the unusual metallic states and to the metal-insulator transition. The Fermi-liquid theory treats the correlations that can be adiabatically connected with the noninteracting picture. Strong-coupling models that do not require Fermi-liquid behavior have also been developed. Much work has also been done on the scaling theory of the transition. A central issue for this review is the evaluation of these approaches in simple theoretical systems such as the Hubbard model and t-J models. Another key issue is strong competition among various orderings as in the interplay of spin and orbital fluctuations. Experimentally, the unusual properties of the metallic state near the insulating transition have been most extensively studied in d-electron systems. In particular, there is revived interest in transition-metal oxides, motivated by the epoch-making findings of high-temperature superconductivity in cuprates and colossal magnetoresistance in manganites. The article reviews the rich phenomena of anomalous metallicity, taking as examples Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, and Ru compounds. The diverse phenomena include strong spin and

  3. Superconductivity in transition metals.

    PubMed

    Slocombe, Daniel R; Kuznetsov, Vladimir L; Grochala, Wojciech; Williams, Robert J P; Edwards, Peter P

    2015-03-13

    A qualitative account of the occurrence and magnitude of superconductivity in the transition metals is presented, with a primary emphasis on elements of the first row. Correlations of the important parameters of the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory of superconductivity are highlighted with respect to the number of d-shell electrons per atom of the transition elements. The relation between the systematics of superconductivity in the transition metals and the periodic table high-lights the importance of short-range or chemical bonding on the remarkable natural phenomenon of superconductivity in the chemical elements. A relationship between superconductivity and lattice instability appears naturally as a balance and competition between localized covalent bonding and so-called broken covalency, which favours d-electron delocalization and superconductivity. In this manner, the systematics of superconductivity and various other physical properties of the transition elements are related and unified. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  4. Interplay of rare-earth and transition-metal subsystems in C u3Yb (SeO3) 2O2Cl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markina, M. M.; Zakharov, K. V.; Ovchenkov, E. A.; Berdonosov, P. S.; Dolgikh, V. A.; Kuznetsova, E. S.; Olenev, A. V.; Klimin, S. A.; Kashchenko, M. A.; Budkin, I. V.; Yatsyk, I. V.; Demidov, A. A.; Zvereva, E. A.; Vasiliev, A. N.

    2017-10-01

    We present the synthesis and the experimental and theoretical study of the new member of the francisite family, C u3Yb (SeO3) 2O2Cl . The compound reaches an antiferromagnetic order at TN=36.7 K and experiences first-order spin-reorientation transition to weakly ferromagnetic phase at TR=8.7 K evidenced in specific heat Cp and magnetic susceptibility χ measurements. Distinctly different magnetization loops in T earth and transition-metal subsystems. At low temperatures, the saturation magnetization Ms˜5.2 μB is reached in pulsed magnetic-field measurements. The electron spin resonance data reveal the complicated character of the absorption line attributed to response from both copper and ytterbium ions. Critical broadening of the linewidth at the phase transitions points to quasi-two-dimensional character of the magnetic correlations. The spectroscopy of Y b3 + ions evidences splitting of the lowest-energy Kramers doublet of 2F5 /2 excited multiplet at TRtransition in the framework of a unified approach based on the mean-field approximation and crystal-field calculations.

  5. Doping of alkali, alkaline-earth, and transition metals in covalent-organic frameworks for enhancing CO2 capture by first-principles calculations and molecular simulations.

    PubMed

    Lan, Jianhui; Cao, Dapeng; Wang, Wenchuan; Smit, Berend

    2010-07-27

    We use the multiscale simulation approach, which combines the first-principles calculations and grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations, to comprehensively study the doping of a series of alkali (Li, Na, and K), alkaline-earth (Be, Mg, and Ca), and transition (Sc and Ti) metals in nanoporous covalent organic frameworks (COFs), and the effects of the doped metals on CO2 capture. The results indicate that, among all the metals studied, Li, Sc, and Ti can bind with COFs stably, while Be, Mg, and Ca cannot, because the binding of Be, Mg, and Ca with COFs is very weak. Furthermore, Li, Sc, and Ti can improve the uptakes of CO2 in COFs significantly. However, the binding energy of a CO2 molecule with Sc and Ti exceeds the lower limit of chemisorptions and, thus, suffers from the difficulty of desorption. By the comparative studies above, it is found that Li is the best surface modifier of COFs for CO2 capture among all the metals studied. Therefore, we further investigate the uptakes of CO2 in the Li-doped COFs. Our simulation results show that at 298 K and 1 bar, the excess CO2 uptakes of the Li-doped COF-102 and COF-105 reach 409 and 344 mg/g, which are about eight and four times those in the nondoped ones, respectively. As the pressure increases to 40 bar, the CO2 uptakes of the Li-doped COF-102 and COF-105 reach 1349 and 2266 mg/g at 298 K, respectively, which are among the reported highest scores to date. In summary, doping of metals in porous COFs provides an efficient approach for enhancing CO2 capture.

  6. Gas phase reactions of doubly charged alkaline earth and transition metal(II)-ligand complexes generated by electrospray ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Martin; Leary, Julie A.

    1997-03-01

    Doubly charged metal(II)-complexes of [alpha] 1-3, [alpha] 1-6 mannotriose and the conserved trimannosyl core pentasaccharide as well as doubly charged complexes of Co(II), Mn(II), Ca(II) and Sr(II) with acetonitrile generated by electrospray ionization were studied by low energy collision induced dissociation (CID). Two main fragmentation pathways were observed for the metal(II)-oligosaccharide complexes. Regardless of the coordinating metal, loss of a neutral dehydrohexose residue (162 Da) from the doubly charged precursor ion is observed, forming a doubly charged product ion. However, if the oligosaccharide is coordinated to Co(II) or Mn(II), loss of a dehydroxyhexose cation is also observed. Investigation of the low mass region of the mass spectra of the metal coordinated oligosaccharides revealed intense signals corresponding to [metal(II) + (CH3CN)n2+ (where n = 1-6) species which were being formed by the metal(II) ions and the acetonitrile present in the sample. Analysis of these metal(II)-acetonitrile complexes provided further insight into the processes occurring upon low energy CID of doubly charged metal complexes. The metal(II)-acetonitrile system showed neutral loss and ligand cleavage as observed with the oligosaccharide complexes, as well as a series of six different dissociation mechanisms, most notable among them reduction from [metal(II) + (CH3CN)n2+ to the bare [metal(I)]+ species by electron transfer. Depending on the metal and collision gas chosen, one observes electron transfer from the ligand to the metal, electron transfer from the collision gas to the metal, proton transfer between ligands, heterolytic cleavage of the ligands, reactive collisions and loss of neutral ligands.

  7. Semiconducting transition metal oxides.

    PubMed

    Lany, Stephan

    2015-07-22

    Open shell transition metal oxides are usually described as Mott or charge transfer insulators, which are often viewed as being disparate from semiconductors. Based on the premise that the presence of a correlated gap and semiconductivity are not mutually exclusive, this work reviews electronic structure calculations on the binary 3d oxides, so to distill trends and design principles for semiconducting transition metal oxides. This class of materials possesses the potential for discovery, design, and development of novel functional semiconducting compounds, e.g. for energy applications. In order to place the 3d orbitals and the sp bands into an integrated picture, band structure calculations should treat both contributions on the same footing and, at the same time, account fully for electron correlation in the 3d shell. Fundamentally, this is a rather daunting task for electronic structure calculations, but quasi-particle energy calculations in GW approximation offer a viable approach for band structure predictions in these materials. Compared to conventional semiconductors, the inherent multivalent nature of transition metal cations is more likely to cause undesirable localization of electron or hole carriers. Therefore, a quantitative prediction of the carrier self-trapping energy is essential for the assessing the semiconducting properties and to determine whether the transport mechanism is a band-like large-polaron conduction or a small-polaron hopping conduction. An overview is given for the binary 3d oxides on how the hybridization between the 3d crystal field symmetries with the O-p orbitals of the ligands affects the effective masses and the likelihood of electron and hole self-trapping, identifying those situations where small masses and band-like conduction are more likely to be expected. The review concludes with an illustration of the implications of the increased electronic complexity of transition metal cations on the defect physics and doping, using

  8. Transition Metal Compounds Towards Holography

    PubMed Central

    Dieckmann, Volker; Eicke, Sebastian; Springfeld, Kristin; Imlau, Mirco

    2012-01-01

    We have successfully proposed the application of transition metal compounds in holographic recording media. Such compounds feature an ultra-fast light-induced linkage isomerization of the transition-metal–ligand bond with switching times in the sub-picosecond regime and lifetimes from microseconds up to hours at room temperature. This article highlights the photofunctionality of two of the most promising transition metal compounds and the photophysical mechanisms that are underlying the hologram recording. We present the latest progress with respect to the key measures of holographic media assembled from transition metal compounds, the molecular embedding in a dielectric matrix and their impressive potential for modern holographic applications. PMID:28817028

  9. Electrical Conductivity in Transition Metals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talbot, Christopher; Vickneson, Kishanda

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this "Science Note" is to describe how to test the electron-sea model to determine whether it accurately predicts relative electrical conductivity for first-row transition metals. In the electron-sea model, a metal crystal is viewed as a three-dimensional array of metal cations immersed in a sea of delocalised valence…

  10. Selenophene transition metal complexes

    SciTech Connect

    White, Carter James

    1994-07-27

    This research shows that selenophene transition metal complexes have a chemistry that is similar to their thiophene analogs. Selenophene coordination has been demonstrated and confirmed by molecular structure in both the η 5- and the η 1(Se)-coordination modes. The reaction chemistry of selenophene complexes closely resembles that of the analogous thiophene complexes. One major difference, however, is that selenophene is a better donor ligand than thiophene making the selenophene complexes more stable than the corresponding thiophene complexes. The 77Se NMR chemical shift values for selenophene complexes fall within distinct regions primarily depending on the coordination mode of the selenophene ligand.more » In the final paper, the C-H bond activation of η 1(S)-bound thiophenes, η 1(S)-benzothiophene and η 1(Se)-bound selenophenes has been demonstrated. The deprotonation and rearrangement of the η 1(E)-bound ligand to the carbon bound L-yl complex readily occurs in the presence of base. Reprotonation with a strong acid gives a carbene complex that is unreactive towards nucleophilic attack at the carbene carbon and is stable towards exposure to air. The molecular structure of [Cp(NO)(PPh 3)Re(2-benzothioenylcarbene)]O 3SCF 3 was determined and contains a Re-C bond with substantial double bond character. Methyl substitution for the thienylcarbene or selenylcarbene gives a carbene that rearranges thermally to give back the η 1(E)-bound complex. Based on these model reactions, a new mechanism for the H/D exchange of thiophene over the hydrodesulfurization catalyst has been proposed.« less

  11. Rare-earth transition-metal gallium chalcogenides RE3MGaCh7 (M=Fe, Co, Ni; Ch=S, Se)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudyk, Brent W.; Stoyko, Stanislav S.; Oliynyk, Anton O.; Mar, Arthur

    2014-02-01

    Six series of quaternary rare-earth transition-metal chalcogenides RE3MGaCh7 (M=Fe, Co, Ni; Ch=S, Se), comprising 33 compounds in total, have been prepared by reactions of the elements at 1050 °C (for the sulphides) or 900 °C (for the selenides). They adopt noncentrosymmetric hexagonal structures (ordered Ce3Al1.67S7-type, space group P63, Z=2) with cell parameters in the ranges of a=9.5-10.2 Å and c=6.0-6.1 Å for the sulphides and a=10.0-10.5 Å and c=6.3-6.4 Å for the selenides as refined from powder X-ray diffraction data. Single-crystal structures were determined for five members of the sulphide series RE3FeGaS7 (RE=La, Pr, Tb) and RE3CoGaS7 (RE=La, Tb). The highly anisotropic crystal structures consist of one-dimensional chains of M-centred face-sharing octahedra and stacks of Ga-centred tetrahedra all pointing in the same direction. Magnetic measurements on the sulphides reveal paramagnetic behaviour in some cases and long-range antiferromagnetic behaviour with low Néel temperatures (15 K or lower) in others. Ga L-edge XANES spectra support the presence of highly cationic Ga tetrahedral centres with a tendency towards more covalent Ga-Ch character on proceeding from the sulphides to the selenides. Band structure calculations on La3FeGaS7 indicate that the electronic structure is dominated by Fe 3d-based states near the Fermi level.

  12. Rare Earth Metals: Resourcefulness and Recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shijie

    2013-10-01

    When we appreciate the digital revolution carried over from the twentieth century with mobile communication and the Internet, and when we enjoy our high-tech lifestyle filled with iDevices, hybrid cars, wind turbines, and solar cells in this new century, we should also appreciate that all of these advanced products depend on rare earth metals to function. Although there are only 136,000 tons of annual worldwide demand, (Cho, Rare Earth Metals, Will We Have Enough?)1 rare earth metals are becoming such hot commodities on international markets, due to not only to their increasing uses, including in most critical military hardware, but also to Chinese growth, which accounts for 95% of global rare earth metal production. Hence, the 2013 technical calendar topic, planned by the TMS/Hydrometallurgy and Electrometallurgy Committee, is particularly relevant, with four articles (including this commentary) contributed to the JOM October Issue discussing rare earth metals' resourcefulness and recovery.

  13. Superconductivity in Ternary Rare-Earth Transition Metal Silicides and Germanides with the SCANDIUM(5) COBALT(4) SILICON(10)-TYPE Structure.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, Linda Sue

    A systematic study of the superconducting and normal state properties of some ternary rare earth transition metal silicides and germanides of the Sc(,5)Co(,4)Si(,10) -type is reported in this work. Low temperature heat capacity measurements indicate the presence of a complicated phonon density of states in these structurally complex compounds. A better description of the phonon spectrum of the high T(,c) materials, Sc(,5)Rh(,4)Si(,10), Sc(,5)Ir(,4)Si(,10), and Y(,5)Os(,4)Ge(,10), given by a model proposed by Junod et al.('1), is presented and discussed. The large values of (DELTA)C/(gamma)(,n)T(,c) and the electron-phonon coupling constant for these high T(,c) compounds indicate that they are strong-coupled superconductors. Relative to other ternary superconductors, many of these materials have large Debye temperatures. The BSC theory does not seem to afford an adequate description of the supercon- ducting state in these compounds. DC electrical resistivity measurements on these compounds show resistivity behaviors deviating from those exhibited by simple metals. The (rho)(T) data for Y(,5)Ir(,4)Si(,10), Lu(,5)Rh(,4)Si(,10), Lu(,5)Ir(,4)Si(,10), and Y(,5)Os(,4)Ge(,10), indicate the presence of anomalies. Static molar magnetic susceptibility measurements performed on these compounds indicate (1) a small effective magnetic moment of 0.26(mu)(,B) on the Co atom and (2) anomalous behaviors in the Lu(,5)Rh(,4)Si(,10), Lu(,5)Ir(,4)Si(,10), Y(,5)Ir(,4)Si(,10), Lu(,5)Ir(,4)Ge(,10), and Y(,5)Rh(,4)Ge(,10) data. It is suggested that the same mechanism, namely, the forma- tion of a charge- or spin-density wave, is causing the anomalous behaviors in both the resistivity and susceptibility data. Lastly, upper critical magnetic field measurements were performed on Sc(,5)Co(,4)Si(,10), Sc(,5)Rh(,4)Si(,10), Sc(,5)Ir(,4)Si(,10), Lu(,5)Rh(,4)Si(,10), Lu(,5)Ir(,4)Si(,10), and Y(,5)Os(,4)Ge(,10). Relative to the other five samples, Y(,5)Os(,4)Ge(,10) exhibits very high values for (-d

  14. Solvo-thermal synthesis of a unique alkaline earth-transition Ba-Cd micro-porous coordination framework as hetero-metallic luminescent sensor for Cu2+ and real-time detection of benzaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Bin; Ma, Dian Xue; Zhang, Hui Min; Meng, Xin; Qiu, Rong Rong; Ren, Rong; Wu, Jie; Wu, Xiang Xia; Huo, Jian Zhong; Liu, Yuan Yuan; Shi, Xue Fang

    2018-06-01

    In this work a unique hetero-metallic alkaline earth-transition Ba-Cd luminescent micro-porous metal-organic framework {[BaCd(μ6-tp)1.5(μ2-Cl)(H2O) (DMF)2]·0.75H2O}n (H2tp = terephthalic acid) (1) has been prepared under solvo-thermal conditions. In 1 infinite 1D {Ba-X-Cd} (X = O, Cl) inorganic chains are linked via these full de-pronated tp2- ligands forming a unique 3D I1O2 type micro-porous coordination framework. PXRD patterns of 1 have been determined confirming pure phases of 1. Luminescence investigations suggested that 1 exhibits highly selective and sensitive sensing for trace amounts of benzaldehyde in ethanol, which provides a facile method for real-time detection of benzaldehyde. Meanwhile 1 also exhibits highly selective and sensitive sensing for Cu2+ over other cations with high quenching efficiency Ksv value 1.15 × 104 L·mol-1. As far as we know, 1 represents the first example of alkaline earth-transition hetero-metallic Ba-Cd micro-porous coordination framework as bi-functional luminescent probes for Cu2+ and benzaldehyde.

  15. Solvo-thermal synthesis of a unique alkaline earth-transition Ba-Cd micro-porous coordination framework as hetero-metallic luminescent sensor for Cu2+ and real-time detection of benzaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Ding, Bin; Ma, Dian Xue; Zhang, Hui Min; Meng, Xin; Qiu, Rong Rong; Ren, Rong; Wu, Jie; Wu, Xiang Xia; Huo, Jian Zhong; Liu, Yuan Yuan; Shi, Xue Fang

    2018-06-15

    In this work a unique hetero-metallic alkaline earth-transition Ba-Cd luminescent micro-porous metal-organic framework {[BaCd(μ 6 -tp) 1.5 (μ 2 -Cl)(H 2 O) (DMF) 2 ]·0.75H 2 O} n (H 2 tp=terephthalic acid) (1) has been prepared under solvo-thermal conditions. In 1 infinite 1D {Ba-X-Cd} (X=O, Cl) inorganic chains are linked via these full de-pronated tp 2- ligands forming a unique 3D I 1 O 2 type micro-porous coordination framework. PXRD patterns of 1 have been determined confirming pure phases of 1. Luminescence investigations suggested that 1 exhibits highly selective and sensitive sensing for trace amounts of benzaldehyde in ethanol, which provides a facile method for real-time detection of benzaldehyde. Meanwhile 1 also exhibits highly selective and sensitive sensing for Cu 2+ over other cations with high quenching efficiency K sv value 1.15×10 4 L·mol -1 . As far as we know, 1 represents the first example of alkaline earth-transition hetero-metallic Ba-Cd micro-porous coordination framework as bi-functional luminescent probes for Cu 2+ and benzaldehyde. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Recovering heavy rare earth metals from magnet scrap

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, Ryan T.; McCallum, Ralph W.; Jones, Lawrence L.

    A method of treating rare earth metal-bearing permanent magnet scrap, waste or other material in a manner to recover the heavy rare earth metal content separately from the light rare earth metal content. The heavy rare earth metal content can be recovered either as a heavy rare earth metal-enriched iron based alloy or as a heavy rare earth metal based alloy.

  17. Transition metal sulfide loaded catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Maroni, Victor A.; Iton, Lennox E.; Pasterczyk, James W.; Winterer, Markus; Krause, Theodore R.

    1994-01-01

    A zeolite based catalyst for activation and conversion of methane. A zeolite support includes a transition metal (Mo, Cr or W) sulfide disposed within the micropores of the zeolite. The catalyst allows activation and conversion of methane to C.sub.2 + hydrocarbons in a reducing atmosphere, thereby avoiding formation of oxides of carbon.

  18. Transition metal sulfide loaded catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Maroni, V.A.; Iton, L.E.; Pasterczyk, J.W.; Winterer, M.; Krause, T.R.

    1994-04-26

    A zeolite-based catalyst is described for activation and conversion of methane. A zeolite support includes a transition metal (Mo, Cr or W) sulfide disposed within the micropores of the zeolite. The catalyst allows activation and conversion of methane to C[sub 2]+ hydrocarbons in a reducing atmosphere, thereby avoiding formation of oxides of carbon.

  19. Transition metals in superheat melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jakes, Petr; Wolfbauer, Michael-Patrick

    1993-01-01

    A series of experiments with silicate melts doped with transition element oxides was carried out at atmospheric pressures of inert gas at temperatures exceeding liquidus. As predicted from the shape of fO2 buffer curves in T-fO2 diagrams the reducing conditions for a particular oxide-metal pair can be achieved through the T increase if the released oxygen is continuously removed. Experimental studies suggest that transition metals such as Cr or V behave as siderophile elements at temperatures exceeding liquidus temperatures if the system is not buffered by the presence of other oxide of more siderophile element. For example the presence of FeO prevents the reduction of Cr2O3. The sequence of decreasing siderophility of transition elements at superheat conditions (Mo, Ni, Fe, Cr) matches the decreasing degree of depletion of siderophile elements in mantle rocks as compared to chondrites.

  20. A liquid-liquid transition can exist in monatomic transition metals with a positive melting slope

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Byeongchan; Lee, Geun Woo

    2016-01-01

    Liquid-liquid transitions under high pressure are found in many elemental materials, but the transitions are known to be associated with either sp-valent materials or f-valent rare-earth elements, in which the maximum or a negative slope in the melting line is readily suggestive of the transition. Here we find a liquid-liquid transition with a positive melting slope in transition metal Ti from structural, electronic, and thermodynamic studies using ab-initio molecular dynamics calculations, showing diffusion anomaly, but no density anomaly. The origin of the transition in liquid Ti is a pressure-induced increase of local structures containing very short bonds with directionality in electronic configurations. This behavior appears to be characteristic of the early transition metals. In contrast, the late transition metal liquid Ni does not show the L-L transition with pressure. This result suggests that the possibility of the L-L transition decreases from early to late transition metals as electronic structures of late transition metals barely have a Jahn-Teller effect and bond directionality. Our results generalize that a phase transition in disordered materials is found with any valence band regardless of the sign of the melting slope, but related to the symmetry of electronic structures of constituent elements. PMID:27762334

  1. Transition-Metal Decorated Aluminum Nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Swearer, Dayne F; Leary, Rowan K; Newell, Ryan; Yazdi, Sadegh; Robatjazi, Hossein; Zhang, Yue; Renard, David; Nordlander, Peter; Midgley, Paul A; Halas, Naomi J; Ringe, Emilie

    2017-10-24

    Recently, aluminum has been established as an earth-abundant alternative to gold and silver for plasmonic applications. Particularly, aluminum nanocrystals have shown to be promising plasmonic photocatalysts, especially when coupled with catalytic metals or oxides into "antenna-reactor" heterostructures. Here, a simple polyol synthesis is presented as a flexible route to produce aluminum nanocrystals decorated with eight varieties of size-tunable transition-metal nanoparticle islands, many of which have precedence as heterogeneous catalysts. High-resolution and three-dimensional structural analysis using scanning transmission electron microscopy and electron tomography shows that abundant nanoparticle island decoration in the catalytically relevant few-nanometer size range can be achieved, with many islands spaced closely to their neighbors. When coupled with the Al nanocrystal plasmonic antenna, these small decorating islands will experience increased light absorption and strong hot-spot generation. This combination makes transition-metal decorated aluminum nanocrystals a promising material platform to develop plasmonic photocatalysis, surface-enhanced spectroscopies, and quantum plasmonics.

  2. Rare earth metal-containing ionic liquids

    DOE PAGES

    Prodius, Denis; Mudring, Anja-Verena

    2018-03-07

    As an innovative tool, ionic liquids (ILs) are widely employed as an alternative, smart, reaction media (vs. traditional solvents) offering interesting technology solutions for dissolving, processing and recycling of metal-containing materials. The costly mining and refining of rare earths (RE), combined with increasing demand for high-tech and energy-related applications around the world, urgently requires effective approaches to improve the efficiency of rare earth separation and recovery. In this context, ionic liquids appear as an attractive technology solution. Finally, this paper addresses the structural and coordination chemistry of ionic liquids comprising rare earth metals with the aim to add to understandingmore » prospects of ionic liquids in the chemistry of rare earths.« less

  3. Rare earth metal-containing ionic liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Prodius, Denis; Mudring, Anja-Verena

    As an innovative tool, ionic liquids (ILs) are widely employed as an alternative, smart, reaction media (vs. traditional solvents) offering interesting technology solutions for dissolving, processing and recycling of metal-containing materials. The costly mining and refining of rare earths (RE), combined with increasing demand for high-tech and energy-related applications around the world, urgently requires effective approaches to improve the efficiency of rare earth separation and recovery. In this context, ionic liquids appear as an attractive technology solution. Finally, this paper addresses the structural and coordination chemistry of ionic liquids comprising rare earth metals with the aim to add to understandingmore » prospects of ionic liquids in the chemistry of rare earths.« less

  4. Alkali metal and alkali earth metal gadolinium halide scintillators

    DOEpatents

    Bourret-Courchesne, Edith; Derenzo, Stephen E.; Parms, Shameka; Porter-Chapman, Yetta D.; Wiggins, Latoria K.

    2016-08-02

    The present invention provides for a composition comprising an inorganic scintillator comprising a gadolinium halide, optionally cerium-doped, having the formula A.sub.nGdX.sub.m:Ce; wherein A is nothing, an alkali metal, such as Li or Na, or an alkali earth metal, such as Ba; X is F, Br, Cl, or I; n is an integer from 1 to 2; m is an integer from 4 to 7; and the molar percent of cerium is 0% to 100%. The gadolinium halides or alkali earth metal gadolinium halides are scintillators and produce a bright luminescence upon irradiation by a suitable radiation.

  5. Thermophysical properties of liquid rare earth metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakor, P. B.; Sonvane, Y. A.; Patel, H. P.; Jani, A. R.

    2013-06-01

    The thermodynamical properties like long wavelength limit S(0), iso-thermal compressibility (χT), thermal expansion coefficient (αV), thermal pressure coefficient (γV), specific heat at constant volume (CV) and specific heat at constant pressure (CP) are calculated for liquid rare earth metals. Our newly constructed parameter free model potential is used to describe the electron ion interaction due to Sarkar et al (S) local field correction function. Lastly, we conclude that our newly constructed model potential is capable to explain the thermophysical properties of liquid rare earth metals.

  6. Transition Metals and Virulence in Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Lauren D; Skaar, Eric P

    2016-11-23

    Transition metals are required trace elements for all forms of life. Due to their unique inorganic and redox properties, transition metals serve as cofactors for enzymes and other proteins. In bacterial pathogenesis, the vertebrate host represents a rich source of nutrient metals, and bacteria have evolved diverse metal acquisition strategies. Host metal homeostasis changes dramatically in response to bacterial infections, including production of metal sequestering proteins and the bombardment of bacteria with toxic levels of metals. In response, bacteria have evolved systems to subvert metal sequestration and toxicity. The coevolution of hosts and their bacterial pathogens in the battle for metals has uncovered emerging paradigms in social microbiology, rapid evolution, host specificity, and metal homeostasis across domains. This review focuses on recent advances and open questions in our understanding of the complex role of transition metals at the host-pathogen interface.

  7. Transition Metals and Virulence in Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Lauren D.; Skaar, Eric P.

    2016-01-01

    Transition metals are required trace elements for all forms of life. Due to their unique inorganic and redox properties, transition metals serve as cofactors for enzymes and other proteins. In bacterial pathogenesis, the vertebrate host represents a rich source of nutrient metals, and bacteria have evolved diverse metal acquisition strategies. Host metal homeostasis changes dramatically in response to bacterial infections, including production of metal sequestering proteins and the bombardment of bacteria with toxic levels of metals. Presumably, in response, bacteria have evolved systems to subvert metal sequestration and toxicity. The coevolution of hosts and their bacterial pathogens in the battle for metals has uncovered emerging paradigms in social microbiology, rapid evolution, host specificity, and metal homeostasis across domains. This review focuses on recent advances and open questions in our understanding of the complex role of transition metals at the host-pathogen interface. PMID:27617971

  8. 2D transition metal dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzeli, Sajedeh; Ovchinnikov, Dmitry; Pasquier, Diego; Yazyev, Oleg V.; Kis, Andras

    2017-08-01

    Graphene is very popular because of its many fascinating properties, but its lack of an electronic bandgap has stimulated the search for 2D materials with semiconducting character. Transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs), which are semiconductors of the type MX2, where M is a transition metal atom (such as Mo or W) and X is a chalcogen atom (such as S, Se or Te), provide a promising alternative. Because of its robustness, MoS2 is the most studied material in this family. TMDCs exhibit a unique combination of atomic-scale thickness, direct bandgap, strong spin-orbit coupling and favourable electronic and mechanical properties, which make them interesting for fundamental studies and for applications in high-end electronics, spintronics, optoelectronics, energy harvesting, flexible electronics, DNA sequencing and personalized medicine. In this Review, the methods used to synthesize TMDCs are examined and their properties are discussed, with particular attention to their charge density wave, superconductive and topological phases. The use of TMCDs in nanoelectronic devices is also explored, along with strategies to improve charge carrier mobility, high frequency operation and the use of strain engineering to tailor their properties.

  9. Biomass transition metal hydrogen-evolution electrocatalysts and electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Wei-Fu; Iyer, Shweta; Iyer, Shilpa; Sasaki, Kotaro; Muckerman, James T.; Fujita, Etsuko

    2017-02-28

    A catalytic composition from earth-abundant transition metal salts and biomass is disclosed. A calcined catalytic composition formed from soybean powder and ammonium molybdate is specifically exemplified herein. Methods for making the catalytic composition are disclosed as are electrodes for hydrogen evolution reactions comprising the catalytic composition.

  10. Molecular precursor routes to transition metal sulfides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinnage, Christopher Walker

    This thesis is primarily concerned with the synthesis of homoleptic early transition meta thiolates and the subsequent preparation of bulk and thin-film metal disulfides from these compounds. Chapter 1 gives an introduction into the properties, preparation procedures and uses of bulk and thin-film transition metal disulfides as well as giving an overview of early transition metal thiolates synthesied so far in the literature (for titanium, zirconium, tantalum and niobium). Chapter 2 is concerned with the synthesis of a number of ionic and neutral transition metal thiolates. The main synthetic methodologies discussed in this chapter include substitution reactions of transition metal amides and alkyls with thiols, salt metathesis reactions of transition metal chlorides with alkali metal thiolates or with a base / thiol and the use of Grignard reagents. Chapter 3 discusses the preparation of bulk transition metal disulfides using the thiolates prepared in the previous chapter via a thio "sol-gel" route. The preparation of a range of bulk metal and mixed-metal disulfides using transition metal chlorides and hexamethyldisilathiane is also discussed in this chapter. Finally, chapter 4 is concerned with the attempted preparation of thin-films of some transition metal disulfides. Decomposition studies of some of the thiolates prepared in chapter 2 are discussed using thermal gravimetric analysis. Vapour-phase deposition studies are also explored in order to test the potential of the transition metal thiolates as precursors to the disulfides. Experiments using low-pressure chemical vapour deposition and aerosol-assisted chemical vapour deposition are also described.

  11. Method for dry etching of transition metals

    DOEpatents

    Ashby, C.I.H.; Baca, A.G.; Esherick, P.; Parmeter, J.E.; Rieger, D.J.; Shul, R.J.

    1998-09-29

    A method for dry etching of transition metals is disclosed. The method for dry etching of a transition metal (or a transition metal alloy such as a silicide) on a substrate comprises providing at least one nitrogen- or phosphorus-containing {pi}-acceptor ligand in proximity to the transition metal, and etching the transition metal to form a volatile transition metal/{pi}-acceptor ligand complex. The dry etching may be performed in a plasma etching system such as a reactive ion etching (RIE) system, a downstream plasma etching system (i.e. a plasma afterglow), a chemically-assisted ion beam etching (CAIBE) system or the like. The dry etching may also be performed by generating the {pi}-acceptor ligands directly from a ligand source gas (e.g. nitrosyl ligands generated from nitric oxide), or from contact with energized particles such as photons, electrons, ions, atoms, or molecules. In some preferred embodiments of the present invention, an intermediary reactant species such as carbonyl or a halide ligand is used for an initial chemical reaction with the transition metal, with the intermediary reactant species being replaced at least in part by the {pi}-acceptor ligand for forming the volatile transition metal/{pi}-acceptor ligand complex.

  12. Method for dry etching of transition metals

    DOEpatents

    Ashby, Carol I. H.; Baca, Albert G.; Esherick, Peter; Parmeter, John E.; Rieger, Dennis J.; Shul, Randy J.

    1998-01-01

    A method for dry etching of transition metals. The method for dry etching of a transition metal (or a transition metal alloy such as a silicide) on a substrate comprises providing at least one nitrogen- or phosphorous-containing .pi.-acceptor ligand in proximity to the transition metal, and etching the transition metal to form a volatile transition metal/.pi.-acceptor ligand complex. The dry etching may be performed in a plasma etching system such as a reactive ion etching (RIE) system, a downstream plasma etching system (i.e. a plasma afterglow), a chemically-assisted ion beam etching (CAIBE) system or the like. The dry etching may also be performed by generating the .pi.-acceptor ligands directly from a ligand source gas (e.g. nitrosyl ligands generated from nitric oxide), or from contact with energized particles such as photons, electrons, ions, atoms, or molecules. In some preferred embodiments of the present invention, an intermediary reactant species such as carbonyl or a halide ligand is used for an initial chemical reaction with the transition metal, with the intermediary reactant species being replaced at least in part by the .pi.-acceptor ligand for forming the volatile transition metal/.pi.-acceptor ligand complex.

  13. Metal-metal bond lengths in complexes of transition metals*

    PubMed Central

    Pauling, Linus

    1976-01-01

    In complexes of the transition metals containing clusters of metal atoms the cobalt-cobalt bond lengths are almost always within 1 pm of the single-bond value 246 pm given by the enneacovalent radius of cobalt, whereas most of the observed iron-iron bond lengths are significantly larger than the single-bond value 248 pm, the mean being 264 pm, which corresponds to a half-bond. A simple discussion of the structures of these complexes based on spd hybrid orbitals, the electroneutrality principle, and the partial ionic character of bonds between unlike atoms leads to the conclusion that resonance between single bonds and no-bonds would occur for iron and its congeners but not for cobalt and its congeners, explaining the difference in the bond lengths. PMID:16592368

  14. Metal-metal bond lengths in complexes of transition metals.

    PubMed

    Pauling, L

    1976-12-01

    In complexes of the transition metals containing clusters of metal atoms the cobalt-cobalt bond lengths are almost always within 1 pm of the single-bond value 246 pm given by the enneacovalent radius of cobalt, whereas most of the observed iron-iron bond lengths are significantly larger than the single-bond value 248 pm, the mean being 264 pm, which corresponds to a half-bond. A simple discussion of the structures of these complexes based on spd hybrid orbitals, the electroneutrality principle, and the partial ionic character of bonds between unlike atoms leads to the conclusion that resonance between single bonds and no-bonds would occur for iron and its congeners but not for cobalt and its congeners, explaining the difference in the bond lengths.

  15. Catalysts Based on Earth-Abundant Metals for Visible Light-Driven Water Oxidation Reaction.

    PubMed

    Lin, Junqi; Han, Qing; Ding, Yong

    2018-06-04

    Exploration of water oxidation catalyst (WOC) with excellent performance is the key for the overall water splitting reaction, which is a feasible strategy to convert solar energy to chemical energy. Although some compounds composed of noble metals, mainly Ru and Ir, have been reported to catalyze water oxidation with high efficiency, catalysts based on low-cost and earth-abundant transition metals are essential for realizing economical and large-scale light-driven water splitting. Various WOCs containing earth-abundant metals (mainly Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu) have been utilized for visible light-driven water oxidation in recent years. In this Personal Account, we summarize our recent developments in WOCs based on earth-abundant transition metals including polyoxometalates (POMs), metal oxides or bimetal oxides, and metal complexes containing multidentate ligand scaffolds for visible light-driven water oxidation reaction. © 2018 The Chemical Society of Japan & Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Superconducting Metallic Glass Transition-Edge-Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hays, Charles C. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A superconducting metallic glass transition-edge sensor (MGTES) and a method for fabricating the MGTES are provided. A single-layer superconducting amorphous metal alloy is deposited on a substrate. The single-layer superconducting amorphous metal alloy is an absorber for the MGTES and is electrically connected to a circuit configured for readout and biasing to sense electromagnetic radiation.

  17. Vibronic transitions in the alkali-metal (Li, Na, K, Rb) - alkaline-earth-metal (Ca, Sr) series: A systematic analysis of de-excitation mechanisms based on the graphical mapping of Frank-Condon integrals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pototschnig, Johann V.; Meyer, Ralf; Hauser, Andreas W.; Ernst, Wolfgang E.

    2017-02-01

    Research on ultracold molecules has seen a growing interest recently in the context of high-resolution spectroscopy and quantum computation. After forming weakly bound molecules from atoms in cold collisions, the preparation of molecules in low vibrational levels of the ground state is experimentally challenging, and typically achieved by population transfer using excited electronic states. Accurate potential energy surfaces are needed for a correct description of processes such as the coherent de-excitation from the highest and therefore weakly bound vibrational levels in the electronic ground state via couplings to electronically excited states. This paper is dedicated to the vibrational analysis of potentially relevant electronically excited states in the alkali-metal (Li, Na, K, Rb)- alkaline-earth metal (Ca,Sr) diatomic series. Graphical maps of Frank-Condon overlap integrals are presented for all molecules of the group. By comparison to overlap graphics produced for idealized potential surfaces, we judge the usability of the selected states for future experiments on laser-enhanced molecular formation from mixtures of quantum degenerate gases.

  18. Electronic doping of transition metal oxide perovskites

    SciTech Connect

    Cammarata, Antonio, E-mail: cammaant@fel.cvut.cz; Rondinelli, James M.

    2016-05-23

    CaFeO{sub 3} is a prototypical negative charge transfer oxide that undergoes electronic metal-insulator transition concomitant with a dilation and contraction of nearly rigid octahedra. Altering the charge neutrality of the bulk system destroys the electronic transition, while the structure is significantly modified at high charge content. Using density functional theory simulations, we predict an alternative avenue to modulate the structure and the electronic transition in CaFeO{sub 3}. Charge distribution can be modulated using strain-rotation coupling and thin film engineering strategies, proposing themselves as a promising avenue for fine tuning electronic features in transition metal-oxide perovskites.

  19. Effects of Rare Earth Metals on Steel Microstructures

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Fei; Zhang, Jian; Chen, Hao-Long; Su, Yen-Hsun; Kuo, Chia-Liang; Su, Yen-Hao; Chen, Shin-Hau; Lin, Kuan-Ju; Hsieh, Ping-Hung; Hwang, Weng-Sing

    2016-01-01

    Rare earth metals are used in semiconductors, solar cells and catalysts. This review focuses on the background of oxide metallurgy technologies, the chemical and physical properties of rare earth (RE) metals, the background of oxide metallurgy, the functions of RE metals in steelmaking, and the influences of RE metals on steel microstructures. Future prospects for RE metal applications in steelmaking are also presented. PMID:28773545

  20. HPTLC and magnetochromatography of new complexes of carboxylates with transition metals or rare earth elements and their ligands - study of lipophilicity.

    PubMed

    Malinowska, Irena; Wronka, Agnieszka; Ferenc, Wiesława

    2017-05-01

    Nineteen new complexes of carboxylates with transition and rare elements as central ions and their ligands were characterized by chromatographic analyses. The parameter of relative lipophilicity (R M0 ) of the tested compounds was determined experimentally by the reversed-phase high-performance thin layer chromatography method with mixtures of various organic modifiers (acetonitrile, acetone, dioxane) and water as a mobile phase. The extrapolated R M0 values were compared with the logP values calculated from the molecular structures of tested solutes. Similarities between the lipophilicity indices were analysed by principal component analysis and linear regression. Thin-layer chromatography combined with a magnetic field has been proposed as a complementary method for determination of lipophilicity of the investigated compounds. The chromatograms in the field and outside it were developed simultaneously in two identical chromatographic chambers. One of them was placed in the external magnetic field of 0.4 T inductivity. We proved that chelation causes a drastic change in compound lipophilicity, but all complexes did not exhibit enhanced activity as compared with the parent ligand. Also in the magnetic field the retention of some complexes changed, which means that the presence of the field influences the physicochemical properties of the compounds and their interactions with the stationary phase. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Properties of Transition Metal Doped Alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nykwest, Erik; Limmer, Krista; Brennan, Ray; Blair, Victoria; Ramprasad, Rampi

    Crystallographic texture can have profound effects on the properties of a material. One method of texturing is through the application of an external magnetic field during processing. While this method works with highly magnetic systems, doping is required to couple non-magnetic systems with the external field. Experiments have shown that low concentrations of rare earth (RE) dopants in alumina powders have enabled this kind of texturing. The magnetic properties of RE elements are directly related to their f orbital, which can have as many as 7 unpaired electrons. Since d-block elements can have as many as 5 unpaired electrons the effects of substitutional doping of 3d transition metals (TM) for Al in alpha (stable) and theta (metastable) alumina on the local structure and magnetic properties, in addition to the energetic cost, have been calculated by performing first-principles calculations based on density functional theory. This study has led to the development of general guidelines for the magnetic moment distribution at and around the dopant atom, and the dependence of this distribution on the dopant atom type and its coordination environment. It is anticipated that these findings can aid in the selection of suitable dopants help to guide parallel experimental efforts. This project was supported in part by an internship at the Army Research Laboratory, administered by the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, along with a grant of computer time from the DoD High Performance Computing Modernization Program.

  2. Au/MxOy/TiO2 catalysts for CO oxidation: promotional effect of main-group, transition, and rare-earth metal oxide additives.

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Zhen; Overbury, Steven; Dai, Sheng

    Au/TiO2 catalysts are active for CO oxidation, but they suffer from high-temperature sintering of the gold particles, and few attempts have been made to promote or stabilize Au/TiO2. Our recent communication addressed these issues by loading gold onto Al2O3/TiO2 prepared via surface-sol-gel processing of Al(sec-OC4H9)3 on TiO2. In our current full paper, Au/Al2O3/TiO2 catalysts were prepared alternatively by thermal decomposition of Al(NO3)3 on TiO2 followed by loading gold, and the influences of the decomposition temperature and Al2O3 content were systematically surveyed. This facile method was subsequently extended to the preparation of a battery of metal oxide-modified Au/TiO2 catalysts virtually notmore » reported. It was found that Au/TiO2 modified by CaO, NiO, ZnO, Ga2O3, Y2O3, ZrO2, La2O3, Pr2O3, Nd2O3, Sm2O3, Eu2O3, Gd2O3, Dy2O3, Ho2O3, Er2O3, or Yb2O3 could retain significant activity at ambient temperature even after aging in O2-He at 500 C, whereas unmodified Au/TiO2 lost its activity. Moreover, some 200 C-calcined promoted catalysts showed high activity even at about -100 C. The deactivation and regeneration of some of these new catalysts were studied. This work furnished novel catalysts for further fundamental and applied research.« less

  3. Ternary alkali-metal and transition metal or metalloid acetylides as alkali-metal intercalation electrodes for batteries

    DOEpatents

    Nemeth, Karoly; Srajer, George; Harkay, Katherine C; Terdik, Joseph Z

    2015-02-10

    Novel intercalation electrode materials including ternary acetylides of chemical formula: A.sub.nMC.sub.2 where A is alkali or alkaline-earth element; M is transition metal or metalloid element; C.sub.2 is reference to the acetylide ion; n is an integer that is 0, 1, 2, 3 or 4 when A is alkali element and 0, 1, or 2 when A is alkaline-earth element. The alkali elements are Lithium (Li), Sodium (Na), Potassium (K), Rubidium (Rb), Cesium (Cs) and Francium (Fr). The alkaline-earth elements are Berilium (Be), Magnesium (Mg), Calcium (Ca), Strontium (Sr), Barium (Ba), and Radium (Ra). M is a transition metal that is any element in groups 3 through 12 inclusive on the Periodic Table of Elements (elements 21 (Sc) to element 30 (Zn)). In another exemplary embodiment, M is a metalloid element.

  4. METHOD OF MAKING ALLOYS OF SECOND RARE EARTH SERIES METALS

    DOEpatents

    Baker, R.D.; Hayward, B.R.

    1963-01-01

    >This invention relates to a process for alloying the second rare earth series metals with Mo, Nb, or Zr. A halide of the rare earth metal is mixed with about 1 to 20 at.% of an oxide of Mo, Nb, or Zr. Iodine and an alkali or alkaline earth metal are added, and the resulting mixture is heated in an inert atmosphere to 350 deg C. (AEC)

  5. Mass fractionation processes of transition metal isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, X. K.; Guo, Y.; Williams, R. J. P.; O'Nions, R. K.; Matthews, A.; Belshaw, N. S.; Canters, G. W.; de Waal, E. C.; Weser, U.; Burgess, B. K.; Salvato, B.

    2002-06-01

    Recent advances in mass spectrometry make it possible to utilise isotope variations of transition metals to address some important issues in solar system and biological sciences. Realisation of the potential offered by these new isotope systems however requires an adequate understanding of the factors controlling their isotope fractionation. Here we show the results of a broadly based study on copper and iron isotope fractionation during various inorganic and biological processes. These results demonstrate that: (1) naturally occurring inorganic processes can fractionate Fe isotope to a detectable level even at temperature ˜1000°C, which challenges the previous view that Fe isotope variations in natural system are unique biosignatures; (2) multiple-step equilibrium processes at low temperatures may cause large mass fractionation of transition metal isotopes even when the fractionation per single step is small; (3) oxidation-reduction is an importation controlling factor of isotope fractionation of transition metal elements with multiple valences, which opens a wide range of applications of these new isotope systems, ranging from metal-silicate fractionation in the solar system to uptake pathways of these elements in biological systems; (4) organisms incorporate lighter isotopes of transition metals preferentially, and transition metal isotope fractionation occurs stepwise along their pathways within biological systems during their uptake.

  6. Method of boronizing transition metal surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Koyama, Koichiro; Shimotake, Hiroshi.

    1983-08-16

    A method is presented for preparing a boride layer on a transition metal substrate for use in corrosive environments or as a harden surface in machine applications. This method is particularly useful in treating current collectors for use within a high temperature and corrosive electrochemical cell environment. A melt of a alkali metal boride tetrafluoride salt including such as KF to lower its melting point is prepared including a dissolved boron containing material, for instance NiB, MnB[sub 2], or CrB[sub 2]. A transition metal to be coated is immersed in the melt at a temperature of no more than 700 C and a surface boride layer of that transition metal is formed within a period of about 24 hours on the substrate surface. 4 figs.

  7. Method of boronizing transition metal surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Koyama, Koichiro; Shimotake, Hiroshi

    1983-01-01

    A method is presented for preparing a boride layer on a transition metal substrate for use in corrosive environments or as a harden surface in machine applications. This method is particularly useful in treating current collectors for use within a high temperature and corrosive electrochemical cell environment. A melt of a alkali metal boride tetrafluoride salt including such as KF to lower its melting point is prepared including a dissolved boron containing material, for instance NiB, MnB.sub.2, or CrB.sub.2. A transition metal to be coated is immersed in the melt at a temperature of no more than 700.degree. C. and a surface boride layer of that transition metal is formed within a period of about 24 hours on the substrate surface.

  8. Understanding topological phase transition in monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choe, Duk-Hyun; Sung, Ha-Jun; Chang, K. J.

    2016-03-01

    Despite considerable interest in layered transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), such as M X2 with M =(Mo ,W ) and X =(S ,Se ,Te ) , the physical origin of their topological nature is still poorly understood. In the conventional view of topological phase transition (TPT), the nontrivial topology of electron bands in TMDs is caused by the band inversion between metal d - and chalcogen p -orbital bands where the former is pulled down below the latter. Here, we show that, in TMDs, the TPT is entirely different from the conventional speculation. In particular, M S2 and M S e2 exhibits the opposite behavior of TPT such that the chalcogen p -orbital band moves down below the metal d -orbital band. More interestingly, in M T e2 , the band inversion occurs between the metal d -orbital bands. Our findings cast doubts on the common view of TPT and provide clear guidelines for understanding the topological nature in new topological materials to be discovered.

  9. Microwave-assisted synthesis of transition metal phosphide

    DOEpatents

    Viswanathan, Tito

    2014-12-30

    A method of synthesizing transition metal phosphide. In one embodiment, the method has the steps of preparing a transition metal lignosulfonate, mixing the transition metal lignosulfonate with phosphoric acid to form a mixture, and subjecting the mixture to a microwave radiation for a duration of time effective to obtain a transition metal phosphide.

  10. Maximum-valence radii of transition metals

    PubMed Central

    Pauling, Linus

    1975-01-01

    In many of their compounds the transition metals have covalence 9, forming nine bonds with use of nine hybrid spd bond orbitals. A set of maximum-valence single-bond radii is formulated for use in these compounds. These radii are in reasonably good agreement with observed bond lengths. Quadruple bonds between two transition metal atoms are about 50 pm (iron-group atoms) or 55 pm (palladium and platinum-group atoms) shorter than single bonds. This amount of shortening corresponds to four bent single bonds with the best set of bond angles, 79.24° and 128.8°. PMID:16578730

  11. Synthesis of Oxides Containing Transition Metals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-07-09

    metal oxide single crystals by the electrolysis of molten salts containing mixtures of the appropriate oxides. Andreiux and Bozon (33-34) were able to...examples of unusual transition metal oxides which can be prepared (usually as single crystals) by electrolysis of fused salts . Summary The methods of...ferrites with the composition MFe 204 involved the thermal decomposition of oxalate (3) or pyridinate salts (1). The synthesis of ferrites from mixed

  12. New chemistry of transition metal oxyhydrides

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Yoji; Hernandez, Olivier; Tassel, Cédric; Kageyama, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    Abstract In this review we describe recent advances in transition metal oxyhydride chemistry obtained by topochemical routes, such as low temperature reduction with metal hydrides, or high-pressure solid-state reactions. Besides the crystal chemistry, magnetic and transport properties of the bulk powder and epitaxial thin film samples, the remarkable lability of the hydride anion is particularly highlighted as a new strategy to discover unprecedented mixed anion materials. PMID:29383042

  13. The Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence in Earth's Solar Transit Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heller, René; Pudritz, Ralph E.

    2016-04-01

    Over the past few years, astronomers have detected thousands of planets and candidate planets by observing their periodic transits in front of their host stars. A related method, called transit spectroscopy, might soon allow studies of the chemical imprints of life in extrasolar planetary atmospheres. Here, we address the reciprocal question, namely, from where is Earth detectable by extrasolar observers using similar methods. We explore Earth's transit zone (ETZ), the projection of a band around Earth's ecliptic onto the celestial plane, where observers can detect Earth transits across the Sun. ETZ is between 0.520° and 0.537° wide due to the noncircular Earth orbit. The restricted Earth transit zone (rETZ), where Earth transits the Sun less than 0.5 solar radii from its center, is about 0.262° wide. We first compile a target list of 45 K and 37 G dwarf stars inside the rETZ and within 1 kpc (about 3260 light-years) using the Hipparcos catalogue. We then greatly enlarge the number of potential targets by constructing an analytic galactic disk model and find that about 105 K and G dwarf stars should reside within the rETZ. The ongoing Gaia space mission can potentially discover all G dwarfs among them (several 104) within the next 5 years. Many more potentially habitable planets orbit dim, unknown M stars in ETZ and other stars that traversed ETZ thousands of years ago. If any of these planets host intelligent observers, they could have identified Earth as a habitable, or even as a living, world long ago, and we could be receiving their broadcasts today. The K2 mission, the Allen Telescope Array, the upcoming Square Kilometer Array, or the Green Bank Telescope might detect such deliberate extraterrestrial messages. Ultimately, ETZ would be an ideal region to be monitored by the Breakthrough Listen Initiatives, an upcoming survey that will constitute the most comprehensive search for extraterrestrial intelligence so far.

  14. Phase stability of transition metals and alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Hixson, R.S.; Schiferl, D.; Wills, J.M.

    1997-06-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This project was focused on resolving unexplained differences in calculated and measured phase transition pressures in transition metals. Part of the approach was to do new, higher accuracy calculations of transmission pressures for group 4B and group 6B metals. Theory indicates that the transition pressures for these baseline metals should change if alloyed with a d-electron donor metal, and calculations done using the Local Density Approximation (LDA) and the Virtual Crystal Approximation (VCA) indicate that this is true. Alloymore » systems were calculated for Ti, Zr and Hf based alloys with various solute concentrations. The second part of the program was to do new Diamond Anvil Cell (DAC) measurements to experimentally verify calculational results. Alloys were prepared for these systems with grain size suitable for Diamond Anvil Cell experiments. Experiments were done on pure Ti as well as Ti-V and Ti-Ta alloys. Measuring unambiguous transition pressures for these systems proved difficult, but a new technique developed yielded good results.« less

  15. High Pressure Synthesis of Transition Metal Carbonyls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagen, A. P.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Presents an experiment which uses readily available starting materials and inexpensive equipment for synthesis of transition metal carbonyls at 1000 atm and which is intended to give students experience in techniques used in research and industry. Safety precautions are emphasized. (Author/SA)

  16. Mesoporous Transition Metal Oxides for Supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Guo, Jin; Wang, Tingfeng; Shao, Junfeng; Wang, Dong; Yang, Ying-Wei

    2015-10-14

    Recently, transition metal oxides, such as ruthenium oxide (RuO₂), manganese dioxide (MnO₂), nickel oxides (NiO) and cobalt oxide (Co₃O₄), have been widely investigated as electrode materials for pseudo-capacitors. In particular, these metal oxides with mesoporous structures have become very hot nanomaterials in the field of supercapacitors owing to their large specific surface areas and suitable pore size distributions. The high specific capacities of these mesoporous metal oxides are resulted from the effective contacts between electrode materials and electrolytes as well as fast transportation of ions and electrons in the bulk of electrode and at the interface of electrode and electrolyte. During the past decade, many achievements on mesoporous transition metal oxides have been made. In this mini-review, we select several typical nanomaterials, such as RuO₂, MnO₂, NiO, Co₃O₄ and nickel cobaltite (NiCo₂O₄), and briefly summarize the recent research progress of these mesoporous transition metal oxides-based electrodes in the field of supercapacitors.

  17. Mesoporous Transition Metal Oxides for Supercapacitors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Guo, Jin; Wang, Tingfeng; Shao, Junfeng; Wang, Dong; Yang, Ying-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Recently, transition metal oxides, such as ruthenium oxide (RuO2), manganese dioxide (MnO2), nickel oxides (NiO) and cobalt oxide (Co3O4), have been widely investigated as electrode materials for pseudo-capacitors. In particular, these metal oxides with mesoporous structures have become very hot nanomaterials in the field of supercapacitors owing to their large specific surface areas and suitable pore size distributions. The high specific capacities of these mesoporous metal oxides are resulted from the effective contacts between electrode materials and electrolytes as well as fast transportation of ions and electrons in the bulk of electrode and at the interface of electrode and electrolyte. During the past decade, many achievements on mesoporous transition metal oxides have been made. In this mini-review, we select several typical nanomaterials, such as RuO2, MnO2, NiO, Co3O4 and nickel cobaltite (NiCo2O4), and briefly summarize the recent research progress of these mesoporous transition metal oxides-based electrodes in the field of supercapacitors. PMID:28347088

  18. COVER Project and Earth resources research transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Botkin, D. B.; Estes, J. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1986-01-01

    Results of research in the remote sensing of natural boreal forest vegetation (the COVER project) are summarized. The study objectives were to establish a baseline forest test site; develop transforms of LANDSAT MSS and TM data for forest composition, biomass, leaf area index, and net primary productivity; and perform tasks required for testing hypotheses regarding observed spectral responses to changes in leaf area index in aspen. In addition, the transfer and documentation of data collected in the COVER project (removed from the Johnson Space Center following the discontinuation of Earth resources research at that facility) is described.

  19. Spin doping using transition metal phthalocyanine molecules

    PubMed Central

    Atxabal, A.; Ribeiro, M.; Parui, S.; Urreta, L.; Sagasta, E.; Sun, X.; Llopis, R.; Casanova, F.; Hueso, L. E.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular spins have become key enablers for exploring magnetic interactions, quantum information processes and many-body effects in metals. Metal-organic molecules, in particular, let the spin state of the core metal ion to be modified according to its organic environment, allowing localized magnetic moments to emerge as functional entities with radically different properties from its simple atomic counterparts. Here, using and preserving the integrity of transition metal phthalocyanine high-spin complexes, we demonstrate the magnetic doping of gold thin films, effectively creating a new ground state. We demonstrate it by electrical transport measurements that are sensitive to the scattering of itinerant electrons with magnetic impurities, such as Kondo effect and weak antilocalization. Our work expands in a simple and powerful way the classes of materials that can be used as magnetic dopants, opening a new channel to couple the wide range of molecular properties with spin phenomena at a functional scale. PMID:27941810

  20. First-row transition metal hydrogenation and hydrosilylation catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Trovitch, Ryan J.; Mukhopadhyay, Tufan K.; Pal, Raja

    Transition metal compounds, and specifically transition metal compounds having a tetradentate and/or pentadentate supporting ligand are described, together with methods for the preparation thereof and the use of such compounds as hydrogenation and/or hydrosilylation catalysts.

  1. Near-Earth asteroids: Metals occurrence, extraction, and fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westfall, Richard

    1991-01-01

    Near-earth asteroids occur in three principle types of orbits: Amor, Apollo, and Aten. Amor asteroids make relatively close (within 0.3 AU) approaches to the earth's orbit, but do not actually overlap it. Apollo asteroids spend most of their time outside the earth's orbital path, but at some point of close approach to the sun, they cross the orbit of the earth. Aten asteroids are those whose orbits remain inside the earth's path for the majority of their time, with semi-major axes less than 0.1 AU. Near-earth orbit asteroids include: stones, stony-irons, irons, carbonaceous, and super-carbonaceous. Metals within these asteroids include: iron, nickel, cobalt, the platinum group, aluminum, titanium, and others. Focus is on the extraction of ferrous and platinum group metals from the stony-iron asteroids, and the iron asteroids. Extraction of the metal fraction can be accomplished through the use of tunnel-boring-machines (TBM) in the case of the stony-irons. The metals within the story-iron asteroids occur as dispersed granules, which can be separated from the stony fraction through magnetic and gaseous digestion separation techniques. The metal asteroids are processes by drilling and gaseous digestion or by gaseous digestion alone. Manufacturing of structures, housings, framing networks, pressure vessels, mirrors, and other products is accomplished through the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of metal coating on advanced composites and on the inside of contour-defining inflatables (CDI). Metal coatings on advanced composites provide: resistance to degradation in the hostile environments of space; superior optical properties; superior heat dissipation; service as wear coatings; and service as evidential coatings. Metal coatings on the inside of CDI produce metal load-bearing products. Fibers such as graphite, kevlar, glass, ceramic, metal, etc., can be incorporated in the metal coatings on the inside of CDI producing metal matrix products which exhibit high strength

  2. Near-Earth asteroids: Metals occurrence, extraction, and fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westfall, Richard

    Near-earth asteroids occur in three principle types of orbits: Amor, Apollo, and Aten. Amor asteroids make relatively close (within 0.3 AU) approaches to the earth's orbit, but do not actually overlap it. Apollo asteroids spend most of their time outside the earth's orbital path, but at some point of close approach to the sun, they cross the orbit of the earth. Aten asteroids are those whose orbits remain inside the earth's path for the majority of their time, with semi-major axes less than 0.1 AU. Near-earth orbit asteroids include: stones, stony-irons, irons, carbonaceous, and super-carbonaceous. Metals within these asteroids include: iron, nickel, cobalt, the platinum group, aluminum, titanium, and others. Focus is on the extraction of ferrous and platinum group metals from the stony-iron asteroids, and the iron asteroids. Extraction of the metal fraction can be accomplished through the use of tunnel-boring-machines (TBM) in the case of the stony-irons. The metals within the story-iron asteroids occur as dispersed granules, which can be separated from the stony fraction through magnetic and gaseous digestion separation techniques. The metal asteroids are processes by drilling and gaseous digestion or by gaseous digestion alone. Manufacturing of structures, housings, framing networks, pressure vessels, mirrors, and other products is accomplished through the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of metal coating on advanced composites and on the inside of contour-defining inflatables (CDI). Metal coatings on advanced composites provide: resistance to degradation in the hostile environments of space; superior optical properties; superior heat dissipation; service as wear coatings; and service as evidential coatings. Metal coatings on the inside of CDI produce metal load-bearing products. Fibers such as graphite, kevlar, glass, ceramic, metal, etc., can be incorporated in the metal coatings on the inside of CDI producing metal matrix products which exhibit high strength

  3. A Transition to Metallic Hydrogen: Evidence of the Plasma Phase Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvera, Isaac; Zaghoo, Mohamed; Salamat, Ashkan

    The insulator-metal transition in hydrogen is one of the most outstanding problems in condensed matter physics. The high-pressure metallic phase is now predicted to be liquid atomic from T =0 K to very high temperatures. We have conducted measurements of optical properties of hot dense hydrogen in the region of 1.1-1.7 Mbar and up to 2200 K in a diamond anvil cell using pulsed laser heating of the sample. We present evidence in two forms: a plateau in the heating curves (average laser power vs temperature) characteristic of a first-order phase transition with latent heat, and changes in transmittance and reflectance characteristic of a metal for temperatures above the plateau temperature. For thick films the reflectance saturates at ~0.5. The phase line of this transition has a negative slope in agreement with theories of the so-called plasma phase transition. The NSF, Grant DMR-1308641, the DOE Stockpile Stewardship Academic Alliance Program, Grant DE-FG52-10NA29656, and NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowship Program, Award NNX14AP17H supported this research.

  4. Cascade morphology transition in bcc metals

    SciTech Connect

    Setyawan, Wahyu; Selby, A.; Juslin, Niklas

    2015-06-10

    Energetic atom collisions in solids induce shockwaves with complex morphologies. In this paper, we establish the existence of a morphological transition in such cascades. The order parameter of the morphology is defined as the exponent,more » $b$, in the defect production curve as a function of cascade energy ($$N_F$$$ \\sim$$$E_{MD}^b$$). Response of different bcc metals can be compared in a consistent energy domain when the energy is normalized by the transition energy, $$\\mu$$, between the high- and the low-energy regime. Using Cr, Fe, Mo and W data, an empirical formula of $$\\mu$$ as a function of displacement threshold energy, $$E_d$$, is presented for bcc metals.« less

  5. Cascade morphology transition in bcc metals

    DOE PAGES

    Setyawan, Wahyu; Selby, Aaron P.; Juslin, Niklas; ...

    2015-05-18

    Energetic atom collisions in solids induce shockwaves with complex morphologies. In this paper, we establish the existence of a morphological transition in such cascades. The order parameter of the morphology is defined as the exponent, b, in the defect production curve as a function of cascade energy (N-F similar to E-MD(b)). Response of different bcc metals can be compared in a consistent energy domain when the energy is normalized by the transition energy, mu, between the high-and the low-energy regime. Using Cr, Fe, Mo and W data, an empirical formula of mu as a function of displacement threshold energy, E-d,more » is presented for bcc metals.« less

  6. Transitioning Unmanned Technologies for Earth Science Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wardell, L. J.; Douglas, J.

    2008-12-01

    Development of small unmanned aerial systems (UAS) has progressed dramatically in recent years along with miniaturization of sensor technology. This confluence of development paths has resulted in greater capability in smaller, less expensive platforms allowing research to be performed where manned airborne platforms are impractical or dangerous. Recent applications include small UAS for studies involving hurricanes, volcanic activity, sea ice changes, glacier melt, biological monitoring of land and sea species, wildfire monitoring, and others. However, the majority of UAS employed in these investigations were originally developed for non-civilian applications and many of the required interfaces are locked behind proprietary specifications, requiring expensive customization by the manufacturer to transform a military UAS into one suitable for civilian work. A small UAS for scientific research should be standards-based, low-cost, user friendly, field serviceable, and be designed to accept a range of payloads. The AV8R UAS is one example of an unmanned system that has been developed for specific application to earth observation missions. This system is designed to be operated by the user with difficult environmental conditions and field logistics in mind. Numerous features and innovations that advance this technology as a research tool as well as its planned science missions will be presented. Most importantly, all interfaces to the system required for successful design and integration of various payloads will be openly available. The environment of open, standards based development allow the small technologies companies that serve as the backbone for much of the technology development to participate in the rapid development of industry capabilities. This is particularly true with UAS technologies. Programs within the USA such as the STTR foster collaborations with small businesses and university researchers. Other innovations related to autonomous unmanned systems

  7. Single-layer transition metal sulfide catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Thoma, Steven G [Albuquerque, NM

    2011-05-31

    Transition Metal Sulfides (TMS), such as molybdenum disulfide (MoS.sub.2), are the petroleum industry's "workhorse" catalysts for upgrading heavy petroleum feedstocks and removing sulfur, nitrogen and other pollutants from fuels. We have developed an improved synthesis technique to produce SLTMS catalysts, such as molybdenum disulfide, with potentially greater activity and specificity than those currently available. Applications for this technology include heavy feed upgrading, in-situ catalysis, bio-fuel conversion and coal liquefaction.

  8. Impurity effects in transition metal silicides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lien, C.-D.; Nicolet, M.-A.

    1984-01-01

    Impurities can affect the properties of silicides directly by virtue of their presence. Impurities can also influence the processes by which silicides are formed. The effect of impurities on the reaction of transition metal films with a silicon substrate induced by thermal annealing are well documented. The interpretation of these results is discussed. It is shown that impurity redistribution is a major factor in determining how significant the effect of an impurity is. Redistribution observed for dopant impurities is also discussed.

  9. The Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence in Earth's Solar Transit Zone.

    PubMed

    Heller, René; Pudritz, Ralph E

    2016-04-01

    Over the past few years, astronomers have detected thousands of planets and candidate planets by observing their periodic transits in front of their host stars. A related method, called transit spectroscopy, might soon allow studies of the chemical imprints of life in extrasolar planetary atmospheres. Here, we address the reciprocal question, namely, from where is Earth detectable by extrasolar observers using similar methods. We explore Earth's transit zone (ETZ), the projection of a band around Earth's ecliptic onto the celestial plane, where observers can detect Earth transits across the Sun. ETZ is between 0.520° and 0.537° wide due to the noncircular Earth orbit. The restricted Earth transit zone (rETZ), where Earth transits the Sun less than 0.5 solar radii from its center, is about 0.262° wide. We first compile a target list of 45 K and 37 G dwarf stars inside the rETZ and within 1 kpc (about 3260 light-years) using the Hipparcos catalogue. We then greatly enlarge the number of potential targets by constructing an analytic galactic disk model and find that about 10(5) K and G dwarf stars should reside within the rETZ. The ongoing Gaia space mission can potentially discover all G dwarfs among them (several 10(4)) within the next 5 years. Many more potentially habitable planets orbit dim, unknown M stars in ETZ and other stars that traversed ETZ thousands of years ago. If any of these planets host intelligent observers, they could have identified Earth as a habitable, or even as a living, world long ago, and we could be receiving their broadcasts today. The K2 mission, the Allen Telescope Array, the upcoming Square Kilometer Array, or the Green Bank Telescope might detect such deliberate extraterrestrial messages. Ultimately, ETZ would be an ideal region to be monitored by the Breakthrough Listen Initiatives, an upcoming survey that will constitute the most comprehensive search for extraterrestrial intelligence so far.

  10. Ferroelectric control of metal-insulator transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xu; Jin, Kui-juan; Ge, Chen; Ma, Zhong-shui; Yang, Guo-zhen

    2016-03-01

    We propose a method of controlling the metal-insulator transition of one perovskite material at its interface with another ferroelectric material based on first principle calculations. The operating principle is that the rotation of oxygen octahedra tuned by the ferroelectric polarization can modulate the superexchange interaction in this perovskite. We designed a tri-color superlattice of (BiFeO3)N/LaNiO3/LaTiO3, in which the BiFeO3 layers are ferroelectric, the LaNiO3 layer is the layer of which the electronic structure is to be tuned, and LaTiO3 layer is inserted to enhance the inversion asymmetry. By reversing the ferroelectric polarization in this structure, there is a metal-insulator transition of the LaNiO3 layer because of the changes of crystal field splitting of the Ni eg orbitals and the bandwidth of the Ni in-plane eg orbital. It is highly expected that a metal-transition can be realized by designing the structures at the interfaces for more materials.

  11. Trends in hydrogen chemisorption on transition metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muscat, J. P.

    1981-10-01

    A systematic study of H adsorption on the close-packed surfaces of the transition metals in the 3d and 4d series is presented. The effect of the TM d band on the chemisorption bond is investigated, by embedding a cluster of TM muffin tins at the surface of an effective jellium-like medium. It is found that the broad and incomplete H/jellium resonance is narrowed, shifted down and made to contain more electrons as a result of hybridization with the TM d states. These effects are larger in the case of the 4d metals, thus indicating a greater participation in the chemisorption bond of the d electrons for these metals than for the 3d metals. Calculation of one-electron energy differences on going from the H on jellium system to that of H on the TM cluster are presented. Trends for the one-electron energy differences are compared to trends in experimental chemisorption energy. H adsorption in the three-fold hollow site with no secondlayer TM atom below the H site is favoured for the hcp metals, while no discernible preference between the two hollow sites is recorded for the fcc metals, with the exception of Rh where the site with no second-layer TM atom below is preferred.

  12. Thermodynamic Hydricity of Transition Metal Hydrides

    DOE PAGES

    Wiedner, Eric S.; Chambers, Matthew B.; Pitman, Catherine L.; ...

    2016-08-02

    Transition metal hydrides play a critical role in stoichiometric and catalytic transformations. Knowledge of free energies for cleaving metal hydride bonds enables the prediction of chemical reactivity, such as for the bond-forming and bondbreaking events that occur in a catalytic reaction. Thermodynamic hydricity is the free energy required to cleave an M-H bond to generate a hydride ion (H -). Three primary methods have been developed for hydricity determination: the hydride transfer method establishes hydride transfer equilibrium with a hydride donor/acceptor pair of known hydricity, the H 2 heterolysis method involves measuring the equilibrium of heterolytic cleavage of H 2more » in the presence of a base, and the potential-pK a method considers stepwise transfer of a proton and two electrons to give a net hydride transfer. Using these methods, over 100 thermodynamic hydricity values for transition metal hydrides have been determined in acetonitrile or water. In acetonitrile, the hydricity of metal hydrides spans a range of more than 50 kcal/mol. Finally, methods for using hydricity values to predict chemical reactivity are also discussed, including organic transformations, the reduction of CO 2, and the production and oxidation of hydrogen.« less

  13. Delayed Ionization in Transition Metal Carbon Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kooi, S. E.; Castleman, A. W., Jr.

    1997-03-01

    Mass spectrometric studies of several single and binary transition metal carbon cluster systems, produced in a laser vaporization source, reveal several species that undergo delayed ionization. Pulsed extraction and blocking electric fields, in a time-of-flight mass spectrometer, allow the study of delayed ionization over a time window after excitation with a pulsed laser. In systems where metallocarbohedrenes (Met-Cars) are produced, the Met-Cars are the dominate delayed species. Delayed ionization of binary metal Met-Cars Ti_xM_yC_12 (M=Zr,Nb,Y; x+y=8) is dependent on the ratio of the two metals. Delayed behavior is investigated over a range of photoionization wavelengths and fluences. In order to determine the degree to which the delayed ionization is thermionic in character, the experimental data have been compared to Klots's model for thermionic emission from small particles.

  14. Crystallographic phases in heavy rare earth metals under megabar pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samudrala, G. K.; Vohra, Y. K.

    2012-07-01

    Experiments aimed at understanding the crystallographic phases of heavy rare earth metals were carried out in a diamond anvil cell at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory. Heavy rare earth metals dysprosium (Dy), holmium (Ho), erbium (Er) and thulium (Tm) were compressed to multi-megabar pressures. The rare earth crystal sequence hcp→Sm-type→dhcp→distorted-fcc (dfcc) is observed in all four elements. Upon further compression, a structural transformation to a monoclinic C2/m phase has been observed. We summarize the results from these experiments and present Rietveld structural refinements on high pressure phases for the specific case of dysprosium.

  15. Origin of Transitions between Metallic and Insulating States in Simple Metals

    DOE PAGES

    Naumov, Ivan I.; Hemley, Russell J.

    2015-04-17

    Unifying principles that underlie recently discovered transitions between metallic and insulating states in elemental solids under pressure are developed. Using group theory arguments and first principles calculations, we show that the electronic properties of the phases involved in these transitions are controlled by symmetry principles not previously recognized. The valence bands in these systems are described by simple and composite band representations constructed from localized Wannier functions centered on points unoccupied by atoms, and which are not necessarily all symmetrical. The character of the Wannier functions is closely related to the degree of s-p(-d) hybridization and reflects multi-center chemical bondingmore » in these insulating states. The conditions under which an insulating state is allowed for structures having an integer number of atoms per primitive unit cell as well as re-entrant (i.e., metal-insulator-metal) transition sequences are detailed, resulting in predictions of novel behavior such as phases having three-dimensional Dirac-like points. The general principles developed are tested and applied to the alkali and alkaline earth metals, including elements where high-pressure insulating phases have been identified or reported (e.g., Li, Na, and Ca).« less

  16. Density functional plus dynamical mean-field theory of the metal-insulator transition in early transition-metal oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, Hung T.; Ai, Xinyuan; Millis, Andrew J.; Marianetti, Chris A.

    2014-09-01

    The combination of density functional theory and single-site dynamical mean-field theory, using both Hartree and full continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo impurity solvers, is used to study the metal-insulator phase diagram of perovskite transition-metal oxides of the form ABO3 with a rare-earth ion A =Sr, La, Y and transition metal B =Ti, V, Cr. The correlated subspace is constructed from atomiclike d orbitals defined using maximally localized Wannier functions derived from the full p-d manifold; for comparison, results obtained using a projector method are also given. Paramagnetic DFT + DMFT computations using full charge self-consistency along with the standard "fully localized limit" (FLL) double counting are shown to incorrectly predict that LaTiO3, YTiO3, LaVO3, and SrMnO3 are metals. A more general examination of the dependence of physical properties on the mean p-d energy splitting, the occupancy of the correlated d states, the double-counting correction, and the lattice structure demonstrates the importance of charge-transfer physics even in the early transition-metal oxides and elucidates the factors underlying the failure of the standard approximations. If the double counting is chosen to produce a p-d splitting consistent with experimental spectra, single-site dynamical mean-field theory provides a reasonable account of the materials properties. The relation of the results to those obtained from "d-only" models in which the correlation problem is based on the frontier orbital p-d antibonding bands is determined. It is found that if an effective interaction U is properly chosen the d-only model provides a good account of the physics of the d1 and d2 materials.

  17. Ultrafast photophysics of transition metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Chergui, Majed

    2015-03-17

    The properties of transition metal complexes are interesting not only for their potential applications in solar energy conversion, OLEDs, molecular electronics, biology, photochemistry, etc. but also for their fascinating photophysical properties that call for a rethinking of fundamental concepts. With the advent of ultrafast spectroscopy over 25 years ago and, more particularly, with improvements in the past 10-15 years, a new area of study was opened that has led to insightful observations of the intramolecular relaxation processes such as internal conversion (IC), intersystem crossing (ISC), and intramolecular vibrational redistribution (IVR). Indeed, ultrafast optical spectroscopic tools, such as fluorescence up-conversion, show that in many cases, intramolecular relaxation processes can be extremely fast and even shorter than time scales of vibrations. In addition, more and more examples are appearing showing that ultrafast ISC rates do not scale with the magnitude of the metal spin-orbit coupling constant, that is, that there is no heavy-atom effect on ultrafast time scales. It appears that the structural dynamics of the system and the density of states play a crucial role therein. While optical spectroscopy delivers an insightful picture of electronic relaxation processes involving valence orbitals, the photophysics of metal complexes involves excitations that may be centered on the metal (called metal-centered or MC) or the ligand (called ligand-centered or LC) or involve a transition from one to the other or vice versa (called MLCT or LMCT). These excitations call for an element-specific probe of the photophysics, which is achieved by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. In this case, transitions from core orbitals to valence orbitals or higher allow probing the electronic structure changes induced by the optical excitation of the valence orbitals, while also delivering information about the geometrical rearrangement of the neighbor atoms around the atom of

  18. Metal-insulator and charge ordering transitions in oxide nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Sujay Kumar

    Strongly correlated oxides are a class of materials wherein interplay of various degrees of freedom results in novel electronic and magnetic phenomena. Vanadium oxides are widely studied correlated materials that exhibit metal-insulator transitions (MIT) in a wide temperature range from 70 K to 380 K. In this Thesis, results from electrical transport measurements on vanadium dioxide (VO2) and vanadium oxide bronze (MxV 2O5) (where M: alkali, alkaline earth, and transition metal cations) are presented and discussed. Although the MIT in VO2 has been studied for more than 50 years, the microscopic origin of the transition is still debated since a slew of external parameters such as light, voltage, and strain are found to significantly alter the transition. Furthermore, recent works on electrically driven switching in VO2 have shown that the role of Joule heating to be a major cause as opposed to electric field. We explore the mechanisms behind the electrically driven switching in single crystalline nanobeams of VO2 through DC and AC transport measurements. The harmonic analysis of the AC measurement data shows that non-uniform Joule heating causes electronic inhomogeneities to develop within the nanobeam and is responsible for driving the transition in VO2. Surprisingly, field assisted emission mechanisms such as Poole-Frenkel effect is found to be absent and the role of percolation is also identified in the electrically driven transition. This Thesis also provides a new insight into the mechanisms behind the electrolyte gating induced resistance modulation and the suppression of MIT in VO2. We show that the metallic phase of VO2 induced by electrolyte gating is due to an electrochemical process and can be both reversible and irreversible under different conditions. The kinetics of the redox processes increase with temperature; a complete suppression of the transition and the stabilization of the metallic phase are achievable by gating in the rutile metallic phase

  19. Syntheses and structures of alkaline earth metal bis(diphenylamides).

    PubMed

    Gärtner, Martin; Fischer, Reinald; Langer, Jens; Görls, Helmar; Walther, Dirk; Westerhausen, Matthias

    2007-06-11

    Various preparative procedures are employed in order to synthesize alkaline earth metal bis(diphenylamides) such as (i) metalation of HNPh2 with the alkaline earth metal M, (ii) metalation of HNPh2 with MPh2, (iii) metathesis reaction of MI2 with KNPh2, (iv) metalation of HNPh2 with PhMI in THF, and (v) metathesis reaction of PhMI with KNPh2 followed by a dismutation reaction yielding MPh2 and M(NPh2)2. The magnesium compounds [(diox)MgPh2]infinity (1) and (thf)2Mg(NPh2)2 (2) show tetracoordinate metal atoms, whereas in (dme)2Ca(NPh2)2 (3), (thf)4Sr(NPh2)2 (4), and (thf)4Ba(NPh2)2 (5) the metals are 6-fold coordinated. Additional agostic interactions between an ipso-carbon of one of the phenyl groups of the amide ligand and the alkaline earth metal atom lead to unsymmetric coordination of the NPh2 anions with two strongly different M-N-C angles in 3-5.

  20. Role of thermal heating on the voltage induced insulator-metal transition in VO2.

    PubMed

    Zimmers, A; Aigouy, L; Mortier, M; Sharoni, A; Wang, Siming; West, K G; Ramirez, J G; Schuller, Ivan K

    2013-02-01

    We show that the main mechanism for the dc voltage or dc current induced insulator-metal transition in vanadium dioxide VO(2) is due to local Joule heating and not a purely electronic effect. This "tour de force" experiment was accomplished by using the fluorescence spectra of rare-earth doped micron sized particles as local temperature sensors. As the insulator-metal transition is induced by a dc voltage or dc current, the local temperature reaches the transition temperature indicating that Joule heating plays a predominant role. This has critical implications for the understanding of the dc voltage or dc current induced insulator-metal transition and has a direct impact on applications which use dc voltage or dc current to externally drive the transition.

  1. Edge Delamination of Monolayer Transition Metal Dichalcogenides.

    PubMed

    Ly, Thuc Hue; Yun, Seok Joon; Thi, Quoc Huy; Zhao, Jiong

    2017-07-25

    Delamination of thin films from the supportive substrates is a critical issue within the thin film industry. The emergent two-dimensional, atomic layered materials, including transition metal dichalcogenides, are highly flexible; thus buckles and wrinkles can be easily generated and play vital roles in the corresponding physical properties. Here we introduce one kind of patterned buckling behavior caused by the delamination from a substrate initiated at the edges of the chemical vapor deposition synthesized monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides, led by thermal expansion mismatch. The atomic force microscopy and optical characterizations clearly showed the puckered structures associated with the strain, whereas the transmission electron microscopy revealed the special sawtooth-shaped edges, which break the geometrical symmetry for the buckling behavior of hexagonal samples. The condition of the edge delamination is in accordance with the fracture behavior of thin film interfaces. This edge delamination and buckling process is universal for most ultrathin two-dimensional materials, which requires more attention in various future applications.

  2. Janus monolayers of transition metal dichalcogenides.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ang-Yu; Zhu, Hanyu; Xiao, Jun; Chuu, Chih-Piao; Han, Yimo; Chiu, Ming-Hui; Cheng, Chia-Chin; Yang, Chih-Wen; Wei, Kung-Hwa; Yang, Yiming; Wang, Yuan; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Nordlund, Dennis; Yang, Peidong; Muller, David A; Chou, Mei-Yin; Zhang, Xiang; Li, Lain-Jong

    2017-08-01

    Structural symmetry-breaking plays a crucial role in determining the electronic band structures of two-dimensional materials. Tremendous efforts have been devoted to breaking the in-plane symmetry of graphene with electric fields on AB-stacked bilayers or stacked van der Waals heterostructures. In contrast, transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers are semiconductors with intrinsic in-plane asymmetry, leading to direct electronic bandgaps, distinctive optical properties and great potential in optoelectronics. Apart from their in-plane inversion asymmetry, an additional degree of freedom allowing spin manipulation can be induced by breaking the out-of-plane mirror symmetry with external electric fields or, as theoretically proposed, with an asymmetric out-of-plane structural configuration. Here, we report a synthetic strategy to grow Janus monolayers of transition metal dichalcogenides breaking the out-of-plane structural symmetry. In particular, based on a MoS 2 monolayer, we fully replace the top-layer S with Se atoms. We confirm the Janus structure of MoSSe directly by means of scanning transmission electron microscopy and energy-dependent X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and prove the existence of vertical dipoles by second harmonic generation and piezoresponse force microscopy measurements.

  3. Metal Insulator transition in Vanadium Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovaini, Azita; Fujita, Shigeji; Suzuki, Akira; Godoy, Salvador

    2012-02-01

    MAR12-2011-000262 Abstract Submitted for the MAR12 Meeting of The American Physical Society Sorting Category: 03.9 (T) On the metal-insulator-transition in vanadium dioxide AZITA JOVAINI, SHIGEJI FUJITA, University at Buffalo, SALVADOR GODOY, UNAM, AKIRA SUZUKI, Tokyo University of Science --- Vanadium dioxide (VO2) undergoes a metal-insulator transition (MIT) at 340 K with the structural change from tetragonal to monoclinic crystal. The conductivity _/ drops at MIT by four orders of magnitude. The low temperature monoclinic phase is known to have a lower ground-state energy. The existence of the k-vector k is prerequisite for the conduction since the k appears in the semiclassical equation of motion for the conduction electron (wave packet). The tetragonal (VO2)3 unit is periodic along the crystal's x-, y-, and z-axes, and hence there is a three-dimensional k-vector. There is a one-dimensional k for a monoclinic crystal. We believe this difference in the dimensionality of the k-vector is the cause of the conductivity drop. Prefer Oral Session X Prefer .

  4. Metal–insulator transition in a transition metal dichalcogenide: Dependence on metal contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimazu, Y.; Arai, K.; Iwabuchi, T.

    2018-03-01

    Transition metal dichalcogenides are promising layered materials for realizing novel nanoelectronic and nano-optoelectronic devices. Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), a typical transition metal dichalcogenide, has been extensively investigated due to the presence of a sizable band gap, which enables the use of MoS2 as a channel material in field-effect transistors (FET). The gate-voltage-tunable metal–insulator transition and superconductivity using MoS2 have been demonstrated in previous studies. These interesting phenomena can be considered as quantum phase transitions in two-dimensional systems. In this study, we observed that the transport properties of thin MoS2 flakes in FET geometry significantly depend on metal contacts. On comparing Ti/Au with Al contacts, it was found that the threshold voltages for FET switching and metal–insulator transition were considerably lower for the device with Al contacts. This result indicated the significant influence of the Al contacts on the properties of MoS2 devices.

  5. Atomically thin transition metal layers: Atomic layer stabilization and metal-semiconductor transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Jeongwoon; Oh, Young Jun; Kim, Jiyoung; Sung, Myung Mo; Cho, Kyeongjae

    2018-04-01

    We have performed first-principle calculations to explore the possibility of synthesizing atomically thin transition metal (TM) layers. Buckled structures as well as planar structures of elemental 2D TM layers result in significantly higher formation energies compared with sp-bonded elemental 2D materials with similar structures, such as silicene and phosphorene. It is shown that the TM layers can be stabilized by surface passivation with HS, C6H5S2, or O, and O passivation is most effective. The surface oxygen passivation can improve stability leading to thermodynamically stable TM monolayers except Au, which is the most non-reactive metal element. Such stabilized TM monolayers also show an electronic structure transition from metallic state of free-standing TM layer to semiconducting O-passivated Mo and W monolayers with band gaps of 0.20-1.38 eV.

  6. Nucleic acid-functionalized transition metal nanosheets for biosensing applications

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Liuting; Li, Juan; Liu, Qiaoling; Qiu, Liping; Tan, Weihong

    2017-01-01

    In clinical diagnostics, as well as food and environmental safety practices, biosensors are powerful tools for monitoring biological or biochemical processes. Two-dimensional (2D) transition metal nanomaterials, including transition metal chalcogenides (TMCs) and transition metal oxides (TMOs), are receiving growing interest for their use in biosensing applications based on such unique properties as high surface area and fluorescence quenching abilities. Meanwhile, nucleic acid probes based on Watson-Crick base-pairing rules are also being widely applied in biosensing based on their excellent recognition capability. In particular, the emergence of functional nucleic acids in the 1980s, especially aptamers, has substantially extended the recognition capability of nucleic acids to various targets, ranging from small organic molecules and metal ions to proteins and cells. Based on π-π stacking interaction between transition metal nanosheets and nucleic acids, biosensing systems can be easily assembled. Therefore, the combination of 2D transition metal nanomaterials and nucleic acids brings intriguing opportunities in bioanalysis and biomedicine. In this review, we summarize recent advances of nucleic acid-functionalized transition metal nanosheets in biosensing applications. The structure and properties of 2D transition metal nanomaterials are first discussed, emphasizing the interaction between transition metal nanosheets and nucleic acids. Then, the applications of nucleic acid-functionalized transition metal nanosheet-based biosensors are discussed in the context of different signal transducing mechanisms, including optical and electrochemical approaches. Finally, we provide our perspectives on the current challenges and opportunities in this promising field. PMID:27020066

  7. Peruvian perovskite Between Transition-metal to PGM/PlatinumGroupMetal Catalytic Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksoed, Wh-

    2016-11-01

    Strongly correlated electronic materials made of simple building blocks, such as a transition-metal ion in an octahedral oxygen cage forming a perovskite structure- Dagotto & Tokura for examples are the high-temperature superconductivity & the CMR/Colossal Magnetoresistance . Helium-4 denotes from LC Case,ScD: "Catalytic Fusion of Deuterium into Helium-4"- 1998 dealt with gaseous D2- "contacted with a supported metallic catalyst at superatmospheric pressure". The catalyst is a platinum-group metal, at about 0.5% - 1% by weight, on activated C. Accompanies Stephen J Geier, 2010 quotes "transition metal complexes", the Energy thus produced is enormous, and because the deuterium is very cheap in the form of heavy water (less than US 1/g), the fuel cost is very low (<<1 %/KwH). "The oceans contain enough deuterium to satisfy the Earth's energy needs for many millions of year" to keep "maria"/Latin name of seas &Deuteronomy to be eternally preserves. Heartfelt Gratitudes to HE. Mr. Prof. Ir. HANDOJO.

  8. Dynamical Generation of the Transition Zone in the Earth's Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, U.; Stemmer, K.

    2005-12-01

    The internal structure of the Earth is made up by a series of layers, though it is unclear how many layers exist and if there are layers invisible to remote sensing techniques. The transition zone is likely to be a boundary layer separating the convective systems in the lower and upper mantle. It seems likely that currently there is some mass exchange across this boundary, rather than the two systems beeing strictly separated.a Double-diffusive convection(d.d.c) is a vital mechanism which can generate layered structure and may thus be an important mmical machinery behind the formation of the transition zone. Double-diffusive convection determines the dynamics of systems whose density is influenced by at least two components with different molecular diffusivities.In the mantle, composition and temperature play the role of those two components. By means of numerical experiments we demonstrate that under mantle relevant conditions d.d.c typically leads to the formation of a transition zone. The calculations encompass two- and three dimensional Cartesian geometries as well as fully 3D spherical domains. We have further included strongly temperature dependent viscosity and find that this leads to even more pronounced layering. In most cases a layered flow pattern emerges, where two layers with a transition zone in between resembles a quasistationary state. Thus, the transition zone can be the result of a self organization process of the convective flow in the mantle. The presence of a phase transition further helps to stabilize the boundary against overturning, even on a time scale on the order of the age of the Earth.

  9. Recognition- and Reactivity-Based Fluorescent Probes for Studying Transition Metal Signaling in Living Systems

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Conspectus Metals are essential for life, playing critical roles in all aspects of the central dogma of biology (e.g., the transcription and translation of nucleic acids and synthesis of proteins). Redox-inactive alkali, alkaline earth, and transition metals such as sodium, potassium, calcium, and zinc are widely recognized as dynamic signals, whereas redox-active transition metals such as copper and iron are traditionally thought of as sequestered by protein ligands, including as static enzyme cofactors, in part because of their potential to trigger oxidative stress and damage via Fenton chemistry. Metals in biology can be broadly categorized into two pools: static and labile. In the former, proteins and other macromolecules tightly bind metals; in the latter, metals are bound relatively weakly to cellular ligands, including proteins and low molecular weight ligands. Fluorescent probes can be useful tools for studying the roles of transition metals in their labile forms. Probes for imaging transition metal dynamics in living systems must meet several stringent criteria. In addition to exhibiting desirable photophysical properties and biocompatibility, they must be selective and show a fluorescence turn-on response to the metal of interest. To meet this challenge, we have pursued two general strategies for metal detection, termed “recognition” and “reactivity”. Our design of transition metal probes makes use of a recognition-based approach for copper and nickel and a reactivity-based approach for cobalt and iron. This Account summarizes progress in our laboratory on both the development and application of fluorescent probes to identify and study the signaling roles of transition metals in biology. In conjunction with complementary methods for direct metal detection and genetic and/or pharmacological manipulations, fluorescent probes for transition metals have helped reveal a number of principles underlying transition metal dynamics. In this Account, we give

  10. Recognition- and reactivity-based fluorescent probes for studying transition metal signaling in living systems.

    PubMed

    Aron, Allegra T; Ramos-Torres, Karla M; Cotruvo, Joseph A; Chang, Christopher J

    2015-08-18

    Metals are essential for life, playing critical roles in all aspects of the central dogma of biology (e.g., the transcription and translation of nucleic acids and synthesis of proteins). Redox-inactive alkali, alkaline earth, and transition metals such as sodium, potassium, calcium, and zinc are widely recognized as dynamic signals, whereas redox-active transition metals such as copper and iron are traditionally thought of as sequestered by protein ligands, including as static enzyme cofactors, in part because of their potential to trigger oxidative stress and damage via Fenton chemistry. Metals in biology can be broadly categorized into two pools: static and labile. In the former, proteins and other macromolecules tightly bind metals; in the latter, metals are bound relatively weakly to cellular ligands, including proteins and low molecular weight ligands. Fluorescent probes can be useful tools for studying the roles of transition metals in their labile forms. Probes for imaging transition metal dynamics in living systems must meet several stringent criteria. In addition to exhibiting desirable photophysical properties and biocompatibility, they must be selective and show a fluorescence turn-on response to the metal of interest. To meet this challenge, we have pursued two general strategies for metal detection, termed "recognition" and "reactivity". Our design of transition metal probes makes use of a recognition-based approach for copper and nickel and a reactivity-based approach for cobalt and iron. This Account summarizes progress in our laboratory on both the development and application of fluorescent probes to identify and study the signaling roles of transition metals in biology. In conjunction with complementary methods for direct metal detection and genetic and/or pharmacological manipulations, fluorescent probes for transition metals have helped reveal a number of principles underlying transition metal dynamics. In this Account, we give three recent

  11. Rare-Earth Metals and Their Applications in Aviation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-08-01

    metals are not as common as iron and steel which are visible everywhere, yet they are not unfamiliar to us. We often encounter them in everyday life...the flint of a lighter. It is an alloy of rare-earth metal and iron . It contains about 30% iron and the remainder is a composite rare-earth alloy...used to manufacture the detonators of bullets and shells as well as the pyrophoric alloys of firing devices. This type of alloy has a 49.5% content of

  12. Charge-separated and molecular heterobimetallic rare earth-rare earth and alkaline earth-rare earth aryloxo complexes featuring intramolecular metal-pi-arene interactions.

    PubMed

    Deacon, Glen B; Junk, Peter C; Moxey, Graeme J; Ruhlandt-Senge, Karin; St Prix, Courtney; Zuniga, Maria F

    2009-01-01

    Treatment of a rare earth metal (Ln) and a potential divalent rare earth metal (Ln') or an alkaline earth metal (Ae) with 2,6-diphenylphenol (HOdpp) at elevated temperatures (200-250 degrees C) afforded heterobimetallic aryloxo complexes, which were structurally characterised. A charge-separated species [(Ln'/Ae)(2)(Odpp)(3)][Ln(Odpp)(4)] was obtained for a range of metals, demonstrating the similarities between the chemistry of the divalent rare earth metals and the alkaline earth metals. The [(Ln'/Ae)(2)(Odpp)(3)](+) cation in the heterobimetallic structures is unusual in that it consists solely of bridging aryloxide ligands. A molecular heterobimetallic species [AeEu(Odpp)(4)] (Ae = Ca, Sr, Ba) was obtained by treating an alkaline earth metal and Eu metal with HOdpp at elevated temperatures. Similarly, [BaSr(Odpp)(4)] was prepared by treating Ba metal and Sr metal with HOdpp. Treatment of [Ba(2)(Odpp)(4)] with [Mg(Odpp)(2)(thf)(2)] in toluene afforded [Ba(2)(Odpp)(3)][Mg(Odpp)(3)(thf)]. Analogous solution-based syntheses were not possible for [(Ln'/Ae)(2)(Odpp)(3)][Ln(Odpp)(4)] complexes, for which the free-metal route was essential. As a result of the absence of additional donor ligands, the crystal structures of the heterobimetallic complexes feature extensive pi-Ph-metal interactions involving the pendant phenyl groups of the Odpp ligands, thus enabling the large electropositive metal atoms to attain coordination saturation. The charge-separated heterobimetallic species were purified by extraction with toluene/thf mixtures at ambient temperature (Ba-containing compounds) or by extraction with toluene under pressure above the boiling point of the solvent (other products). In donor solvents, heterobimetallic complexes other than those containing barium were found to fragment into homometallic species.

  13. Determination of Thermodynamic Properties of Alkaline Earth-liquid Metal Alloys Using the Electromotive Force Technique

    PubMed Central

    Nigl, Thomas P.; Smith, Nathan D.; Lichtenstein, Timothy; Gesualdi, Jarrod; Kumar, Kuldeep; Kim, Hojong

    2017-01-01

    A novel electrochemical cell based on a CaF2 solid-state electrolyte has been developed to measure the electromotive force (emf) of binary alkaline earth-liquid metal alloys as functions of both composition and temperature in order to acquire thermodynamic data. The cell consists of a chemically stable solid-state CaF2-AF2 electrolyte (where A is the alkaline-earth element such as Ca, Sr, or Ba), with binary A-B alloy (where B is the liquid metal such as Bi or Sb) working electrodes, and a pure A metal reference electrode. Emf data are collected over a temperature range of 723 K to 1,123 K in 25 K increments for multiple alloy compositions per experiment and the results are analyzed to yield activity values, phase transition temperatures, and partial molar entropies/enthalpies for each composition. PMID:29155770

  14. Transition-Metal Oxide (111) Bilayers

    DOE PAGES

    Okamoto, Satoshi; Xiao, Di

    2018-04-15

    Correlated electron systems on a honeycomb lattice have emerged as a fertile playground to explore exotic electronic phenomena. Theoretical and experimental work has appeared to realize novel behavior, including quantum Hall effects and valleytronics, mainly focusing on van der Waals compounds, such as graphene, chalcogenides, and halides. Here in this paper, we review our theoretical study on perovskite transition-metal oxides (TMOs) as an alternative system to realize such exotic phenomena. We demonstrate that novel quantum Hall effects and related phenomena associated with the honeycomb structure could be artificially designed by such TMOs by growing their heterostructures along the [111] crystallographicmore » axis. One of the important predictions is that such TMO heterostructures could support two-dimensional topological insulating states. The strong correlation effects inherent to TM d electrons further enrich the behavior.« less

  15. Electronic entanglement in late transition metal oxides.

    PubMed

    Thunström, Patrik; Di Marco, Igor; Eriksson, Olle

    2012-11-02

    We present a study of the entanglement in the electronic structure of the late transition metal monoxides--MnO, FeO, CoO, and NiO--obtained by means of density-functional theory in the local density approximation combined with dynamical mean-field theory. The impurity problem is solved through exact diagonalization, which grants full access to the thermally mixed many-body ground state density operator. The quality of the electronic structure is affirmed through a direct comparison between the calculated electronic excitation spectrum and photoemission experiments. Our treatment allows for a quantitative investigation of the entanglement in the electronic structure. Two main sources of entanglement are explicitly resolved through the use of a fidelity based geometrical entanglement measure, and additional information is gained from a complementary entropic entanglement measure. We show that the interplay of crystal field effects and Coulomb interaction causes the entanglement in CoO to take a particularly intricate form.

  16. Elastic properties of some transition metal arsenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, Vikas; Verma, U. P.; Bisht, P. S.

    2018-05-01

    The elastic properties of transition metal arsenides (TMAs) have been studied by employing Wien2K package based on density functional theory in the zinc blende (ZB) and rock salt (RS) phase treating valance electron scalar relativistically. Further, we have also treated them non-relativistically to find out the relativistic effect. We have calculated the elastic properties by computing the volume conservative stress tensor for small strains, using the method developed by Charpin. The obtained results are discussed in paper. From the obtained results, it is clear that the values of C11 > C12 and C44 for all the compounds. The values of shear moduli of these compounds are also calculated. The internal parameter for these compounds shows that ZB structures of these compounds have high resistance against bond order. We find that the estimated elastic constants are in good agreement with the available data.

  17. Transition-Metal Oxide (111) Bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Satoshi; Xiao, Di

    2018-04-01

    Correlated electron systems on a honeycomb lattice have emerged as a fertile playground to explore exotic electronic phenomena. Theoretical and experimental work has appeared to realize novel behavior, including quantum Hall effects and valleytronics, mainly focusing on van der Waals compounds, such as graphene, chalcogenides, and halides. In this article, we review our theoretical study on perovskite transition-metal oxides (TMOs) as an alternative system to realize such exotic phenomena. We demonstrate that novel quantum Hall effects and related phenomena associated with the honeycomb structure could be artificially designed by such TMOs by growing their heterostructures along the [111] crystallographic axis. One of the important predictions is that such TMO heterostructures could support two-dimensional topological insulating states. The strong correlation effects inherent to TM d electrons further enrich the behavior.

  18. Photodissociation Spectroscopy of Anionic Transition Metal Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, Sydney Hamilton

    Transition metal complexes play an important role in many aspects of chemistry; whether in supporting biological functions, as catalysts for organic reactions, in the environment, or in industry. This thesis is comprised of gas-phase spectroscopic studies of four transition metal species with implications for many different chemical applications. Most knowledge of the target molecules in this thesis are derived from studies in the condensed phase, where the chemical environment can change molecular properties. As a result, it is difficult to gain an understanding of the intrinsic properties in solution as well as a molecular-level picture of chemical reactions that take place where many oxidation states, molecular species, and solvent interactions occur. By isolating one particular species in the gas phase, we are able to observe how each species interacts with light independent of perturbing effects of solvent and counter ions. In this thesis, we perform spectroscopic experiments on mass-selected ions in the gas phase, where we are able to gain information on intrinsic molecular properties without the influence of a condensed phase chemical environment. We employ photodissociation spectroscopy, where we mass-select a particular ionic species from solution and irradiate that molecular ion with the output of a tunable laser in the ultraviolet and visible regions. By monitoring the fragments produced, we can obtain an electronic absorption spectrum of the isolated species as well as gain insight into the photochemistry of the ions under study from the fragmentation pathways observed. We combine this method with solution absorption spectra as well as electronic structure calculations.

  19. Earth Science Markup Language: Transitioning From Design to Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moe, Karen; Graves, Sara; Ramachandran, Rahul

    2002-01-01

    The primary objective of the proposed Earth Science Markup Language (ESML) research is to transition from design to application. The resulting schema and prototype software will foster community acceptance for the "define once, use anywhere" concept central to ESML. Supporting goals include: 1. Refinement of the ESML schema and software libraries in cooperation with the user community. 2. Application of the ESML schema and software libraries to a variety of Earth science data sets and analysis tools. 3. Development of supporting prototype software for enhanced ease of use. 4. Cooperation with standards bodies in order to assure ESML is aligned with related metadata standards as appropriate. 5. Widespread publication of the ESML approach, schema, and software.

  20. Temperate Earth-sized planets transiting a nearby ultracool dwarf star

    PubMed Central

    Gillon, Michaël; Jehin, Emmanuël; Lederer, Susan M.; Delrez, Laetitia; de Wit, Julien; Burdanov, Artem; Van Grootel, Valérie; Burgasser, Adam; Triaud, Amaury H. M. J.; Opitom, Cyrielle; Demory, Brice-Olivier; Sahu, Devendra K.; Bardalez Gagliuffi, Daniella; Magain, Pierre; Queloz, Didier

    2017-01-01

    Stellar-like objects with effective temperatures of 2700K and below are referred to as “ultracool dwarfs”1. This heterogeneous group includes both extremely low-mass stars and brown dwarfs (substellar objects not massive enough to sustain hydrogen fusion), and represents about 15% of the stellar-like objects in the vicinity of the Sun2. Based on the small masses and sizes of their protoplanetary disks3,4, core-accretion theory for ultracool dwarfs predicts a large, but heretofore undetected population of close-in terrestrial planets5, ranging from metal-rich Mercury-sized planets6 to more hospitable volatile-rich Earth-sized planets7. Here we report the discovery of three short-period Earth-sized planets transiting an ultracool dwarf star 12 parsecs away using data collected by the TRAPPIST8 telescope as part of an ongoing prototype transit survey9. The inner two planets receive four and two times the irradiation of Earth, respectively, placing them close to the inner edge of the habitable zone of the star10. Eleven orbits remain possible for the third planet based on our data, the most likely resulting in an irradiation significantly smaller than Earth's. The infrared brightness of the host star combined with its Jupiter-like size offer the possibility of thoroughly characterizing the components of this nearby planetary system. PMID:27135924

  1. A SUPER-EARTH TRANSITING A NAKED-EYE STAR

    SciTech Connect

    Winn, Joshua N.; Matthews, Jaymie M.; Kallinger, Thomas

    We have detected transits of the innermost planet 'e' orbiting 55 Cnc (V = 6.0), based on two weeks of nearly continuous photometric monitoring with the MOST space telescope. The transits occur with the period (0.74 days) and phase that had been predicted by Dawson and Fabrycky, and with the expected duration and depth for the crossing of a Sun-like star by a hot super-Earth. Assuming the star's mass and radius to be 0.963{sup +0.051}{sub -0.029} M{sub sun} and 0.943 {+-} 0.010 R{sub sun}, the planet's mass, radius, and mean density are 8.63 {+-} 0.35 M{sub +}, 2.00 {+-} 0.14more » R{sub +}, and 5.9{sup +1.5}{sub -1.1} g cm{sup -3}, respectively. The mean density is comparable to that of Earth, despite the greater mass and consequently greater compression of the interior of 55 Cnc e. This suggests a rock-iron composition supplemented by a significant mass of water, gas, or other light elements. Outside of transits, we detected a sinusoidal signal resembling the expected signal due to the changing illuminated phase of the planet, but with a full range (168 {+-} 70 ppm) too large to be reflected light or thermal emission. This signal has no straightforward interpretation and should be checked with further observations. The host star of 55 Cnc e is brighter than that of any other known transiting planet, which will facilitate future investigations.« less

  2. Water-induced convection in the Earth's mantle transition zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, Guillaume C.; Bercovici, David

    2009-01-01

    Water enters the Earth's mantle by subduction of oceanic lithosphere. Most of this water immediately returns to the atmosphere through arc volcanism, but a part of it is expected as deep as the mantle transition zone (410-660 km depth). There, slabs can be deflected and linger before sinking into the lower mantle. Because it lowers the density and viscosity of the transition zone minerals (i.e., wadsleyite and ringwoodite), water is likely to affect the dynamics of the transition zone mantle overlying stagnant slabs. The consequences of water exchange between a floating slab and the transition zone are investigated. In particular, we focus on the possible onset of small-scale convection despite the adverse thermal gradient (i.e., mantle is cooled from below by the slab). The competition between thermal and hydrous effects on the density and thus on the convective stability of the top layer of the slab is examined numerically, including water-dependent density and viscosity and temperature-dependent water solubility. For plausible initial water content in a slab (≥0.5 wt %), an episode of convection is likely to occur after a relatively short time delay (5-20 Ma) after the slab enters the transition zone. However, water induced rheological weakening is seen to be a controlling parameter for the onset time of convection. Moreover, small-scale convection above a stagnant slab greatly enhances the rate of slab dehydration. Small-scale convection also facilitates heating of the slab, which in itself may prolong the residence time of the slab in the transition zone.

  3. Nanostructured transition metal oxides useful for water oxidation catalysis

    DOEpatents

    Frei, Heinz M; Jiao, Feng

    2013-12-24

    The present invention provides for a composition comprising a nanostructured transition metal oxide capable of oxidizing two H.sub.2O molecules to obtain four protons. In some embodiments of the invention, the composition further comprises a porous matrix wherein the nanocluster of the transition metal oxide is embedded on and/or in the porous matrix.

  4. Trends in Ionization Energy of Transition-Metal Elements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matsumoto, Paul S.

    2005-01-01

    A rationale for the difference in the periodic trends in the ionization energy of the transition-metal elements versus the main-group elements is presented. The difference is that in the transition-metal elements, the electrons enter an inner-shell electron orbital, while in the main-group elements, the electrons enter an outer-shell electron…

  5. Compositional dependence of elastic moduli for transition-metal oxide spinels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichmann, H. J.; Jacobsen, S. D.; Boffa Ballaran, T.

    2012-12-01

    Spinel phases (AB2O4) are common non-silicate oxides in the Earth's crust and upper mantle. A characteristic of this mineral group is the ability to host a wide range of transition metals. Here we summarize the influence of transition metals (Fe, Zn, and Mn) on the pressure dependence of elastic moduli of related spinels (magnetite, gahnite, and franklinite) using GHz-ultrasonic interferometry. Measurements were carried out up to 10 GPa in diamond-anvil cells using hydrostatic pressure media. Transition metals with unfilled 3d orbitals strongly influence the elastic properties of spinels. Franklinite (Zn,Mn)Fe2O4 and magnetite Fe3O4 with transition metals on both A and B cation sites exhibit pressure-induced mode softening of C44, whereas C44 of gahnite(ZnAl2O4) and spinel (MgAl2O4) exhibit positive pressure derivatives of the shear moduli. Spinels with two transition elements tend to undergo phase changes at a lower pressure than those with none or only one transition metal. Along the Mn-Zn solid solution, the variation of moduli with composition is non-linear, and a mid-range franklinite composition studied here shows a minimum in C44 compared with either end-member: MnFe2O 4 or ZnFe2O4. In general, the linear variation of sound velocity with density (Birch's Law) is followed by spinels, however spinels containing only one or no transition metals follow a distinct slope from those containing transition metals on both A and B sites. The Cauchy relation, 0.5(C12 - C44) = P is fulfilled by spinels with only one or no transition metals, suggesting that that Coulomb interactions dominate. Spinels with two transition metals fail to meet the Cauchy relation, indicating strong directional dependence and covalent character of bonding. The bonding character of transition metals is crucial to understanding the elastic behavior of natural and synthetic spinel solid solutions containing transition metals.

  6. Reentrant Metal-Insulator Transitions in Silicon -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, John William M.

    This thesis describes a study of reentrant metal -insulator transitions observed in the inversion layer of extremely high mobility Si-MOSFETs. Magneto-transport measurements were carried out in the temperature range 20mK-4.2 K in a ^3He/^4 He dilution refrigerator which was surrounded by a 15 Tesla superconducting magnet. Below a melting temperature (T_{M}~500 mK) and a critical electron density (n_{s }~9times10^{10} cm^{-2}), the Shubnikov -de Haas oscillations in the diagonal resistivity enormous maximum values at the half filled Landau levels while maintaining deep minima corresponding to the quantum Hall effect at filled Landau levels. At even lower electron densities the insulating regions began to spread and eventually a metal-insulator transition could be induced at zero magnetic field. The measurement of extremely large resistances in the milliKelvin temperature range required the use of very low currents (typically in the 10^ {-12} A range) and in certain measurements minimizing the noise was also a consideration. The improvements achieved in these areas through the use of shielding, optical decouplers and battery operated instruments are described. The transport signatures of the insulating state are considered in terms of two basic mechanisms: single particle localization with transport by variable range hopping and the formation of a collective state such as a pinned Wigner crystal or electron solid with transport through the motion of bound dislocation pairs. The experimental data is best described by the latter model. Thus the two dimensional electron system in these high mobility Si-MOSFETs provides the first and only experimental demonstration to date of the formation of an electron solid at zero and low magnetic fields in the quantum limit where the Coulomb interaction energy dominates over the zero point oscillation energy. The role of disorder in favouring either single particle localization or the formation of a Wigner crystal is explored by

  7. Transition Metal-Involved Photon Upconversion.

    PubMed

    Ye, Shi; Song, En-Hai; Zhang, Qin-Yuan

    2016-12-01

    Upconversion (UC) luminescence of lanthanide ions (Ln 3+ ) has been extensively investigated for several decades and is a constant research hotspot owing to its fundamental significance and widespread applications. In contrast to the multiple and fixed UC emissions of Ln 3+ , transition metal (TM) ions, e.g., Mn 2+ , usually possess a single broadband emission due to its 3 d 5 electronic configuration. Wavelength-tuneable single UC emission can be achieved in some TM ion-activated systems ascribed to the susceptibility of d electrons to the chemical environment, which is appealing in molecular sensing and lighting. Moreover, the UC emissions of Ln 3+ can be modulated by TM ions (specifically d -block element ions with unfilled d orbitals), which benefits from the specific metastable energy levels of Ln 3+ owing to the well-shielded 4 f electrons and tuneable energy levels of the TM ions. The electric versatility of d 0 ion-containing hosts ( d 0 normally viewed as charged anion groups, such as MoO 6 6- and TiO 4 4- ) may also have a strong influence on the electric dipole transition of Ln 3+ , resulting in multifunctional properties of modulated UC emission and electrical behaviour, such as ferroelectricity and oxide-ion conductivity. This review focuses on recent advances in the room temperature (RT) UC of TM ions, the UC of Ln 3+ tuned by TM or d 0 ions, and the UC of d 0 ion-centred groups, as well as their potential applications in bioimaging, solar cells and multifunctional devices.

  8. Covalence of atoms in the heavier transition metals*

    PubMed Central

    Pauling, Linus

    1977-01-01

    The observed magnetic properties of the heavier transition metals permit them to have larger metallic valences than their iron-group congeners. With 0.72 metallic orbital, as found for the iron-group metals, the maximum metallic valence and minimum interatomic distance would occur for 8.28 transargononic electrons. The curves of observed interatomic distances for the close-packed metals of the second and third long periods have minima at this point, supporting the assignment of high valences to these metals. Values of the single-bond radii corresponding to these valences are calculated. PMID:16592407

  9. Photocatalysis of Modified Transition Metal Oxide Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Batzill, Matthias

    The goal of this project has been to establish a cause-effect relationship for photocatalytic activity variations of different structures of the same material; and furthermore gain fundamental understanding on modification of photocatalysts by compositional or surface modifications. The reasoning is that gaining atomic scale understanding of how surface and bulk modifications alter the photo reactivity will lead to design principles for next generation photocatalysts. As a prototypical photocatalyst the research focused on TiO 2 synthesized in well-defined single crystalline form to enable fundamental characterizations.We have obtained results in the following areas: (a) Preparation of epitaxial anatase TiO 2 samples bymore » pulsed laser deposition. (b) Comparison of hydrogen diffusion on different crystallographic surface. (c) Determining the stability of the TiO 2(011)-2x1 reconstruction upon interactions with adsorbates. (d) Characterization of adsorption and (thermal and photo) reaction of molecules with nitro-endgroups, (e) Exploring the possibility of modifying planar model photocatalyst surfaces with graphene to enable fundamental studies on reported enhanced photocatalytic activities of graphene modified transition metal oxides, (f) gained fundamental understanding on the role of crystallographic polymorphs of the same material for their photocatalytic activities.« less

  10. Muon Sites in Transition Metal Oxides.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Kwaichow Benjamin

    Muon behavior in a selected series of transition -metal oxides has been investigated by the Muon Spin Rotation (muSR) technique. The materials studied are the corundum structured oxides (M_2 O_3: M = Fe, Cr, V, Ti) and the high-Tc superconducting oxides in Y-Ba-Cu-O system. The muon is first implanted into the oxide crystalline and its subsequent behavior in the presence of magnetic field is monitored through counting the positron emitted by the decayed muon. The muon is found to behave like a free muon and to become localized at low temperatures and diffusional at higher temperatures. The location of the muon is important for interpreting the muSR data. To identify muon sites, a combination of electrostatic potential and magnetic dipolar field calculation is used. Dipole -field calculation allows matching the experimental results to the calculated values if the origin of the magnetic field is dominantly dipolar as in the case of V _2O_3 and Cr _2O_3. In the potential model, in addition to the coulombic interaction, the muon is assumed to form a muon-oxygen bond in analogy to the hydroxyl bond (OH)^-. Morse potential is used to simulate the mu^+ -O^= bonding. The potential minima found are then assigned as muon sites. A set of muon sites thus found in these oxides are their implications are presented. The inadequacies of the classical model and a more realistic model for predicting muon sites are also discussed.

  11. Topological superconductivity in monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Yi-Ting; Vaezi, Abolhassan; Fischer, Mark H; Kim, Eun-Ah

    2017-04-11

    Theoretically, it has been known that breaking spin degeneracy and effectively realizing spinless fermions is a promising path to topological superconductors. Yet, topological superconductors are rare to date. Here we propose to realize spinless fermions by splitting the spin degeneracy in momentum space. Specifically, we identify monolayer hole-doped transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD)s as candidates for topological superconductors out of such momentum-space-split spinless fermions. Although electron-doped TMDs have recently been found superconducting, the observed superconductivity is unlikely topological because of the near spin degeneracy. Meanwhile, hole-doped TMDs with momentum-space-split spinless fermions remain unexplored. Employing a renormalization group analysis, we propose that the unusual spin-valley locking in hole-doped TMDs together with repulsive interactions selectively favours two topological superconducting states: interpocket paired state with Chern number 2 and intrapocket paired state with finite pair momentum. A confirmation of our predictions will open up possibilities for manipulating topological superconductors on the device-friendly platform of monolayer TMDs.

  12. Electrical valley filtering in transition metal dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Tzu-Chi; Chou, Mei-Yin; Wu, Yu-Shu

    2018-03-01

    This work investigates the feasibility of electrical valley filtering for holes in transition metal dichalcogenides. We look specifically into the scheme that utilizes a potential barrier to produce valley-dependent tunneling rates, and perform the study with both a k .p -based analytic method and a recursive Green's function-based numerical method. The study yields the transmission coefficient as a function of incident energy and transverse wave vector, for holes going through lateral quantum barriers oriented in either armchair or zigzag directions, in both homogeneous and heterogeneous systems. The main findings are the following: (1) The tunneling current valley polarization increases with increasing barrier width or height; (2) both the valley-orbit interaction and band structure warping contribute to valley-dependent tunneling, with the former contribution being manifest in structures with asymmetric potential barriers, and the latter being orientation dependent and reaching maximum for transmission in the armchair direction; and (3) for transmission ˜0.1 , a tunneling current valley polarization of the order of 10 % can be achieved.

  13. Monolayer Transition Metal Dichalcogenides as Light Sources.

    PubMed

    Pu, Jiang; Takenobu, Taishi

    2018-06-13

    Reducing the dimensions of materials is one of the key approaches to discovering novel optical phenomena. The recent emergence of 2D transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) has provided a promising platform for exploring new optoelectronic device applications, with their tunable electronic properties, structural controllability, and unique spin valley-coupled systems. This progress report provides an overview of recent advances in TMDC-based light-emitting devices discussed from several aspects in terms of device concepts, material designs, device fabrication, and their diverse functionalities. First, the advantages of TMDCs used in light-emitting devices and their possible functionalities are presented. Second, conventional approaches for fabricating TMDC light-emitting devices are emphasized, followed by introducing a newly established, versatile method for generating light emission in TMDCs. Third, current growing technologies for heterostructure fabrication, in which distinct TMDCs are vertically stacked or laterally stitched, are explained as a possible means for designing high-performance light-emitting devices. Finally, utilizing the topological features of TMDCs, the challenges for controlling circularly polarized light emission and its device applications are discussed from both theoretical and experimental points of view. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Transition-Metal Hydride Radical Cations.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yue; Shaw, Anthony P; Estes, Deven P; Norton, Jack R

    2016-08-10

    Transition-metal hydride radical cations (TMHRCs) are involved in a variety of chemical and biochemical reactions, making a more thorough understanding of their properties essential for explaining observed reactivity and for the eventual development of new applications. Generally, these species may be treated as the ones formed by one-electron oxidation of diamagnetic analogues that are neutral or cationic. Despite the importance of TMHRCs, the generally sensitive nature of these complexes has hindered their development. However, over the last four decades, many more TMHRCs have been synthesized, characterized, isolated, or hypothesized as reaction intermediates. This comprehensive review focuses on experimental studies of TMHRCs reported through the year 2014, with an emphasis on isolated and observed species. The methods used for the generation or synthesis of TMHRCs are surveyed, followed by a discussion about the stability of these complexes. The fundamental properties of TMHRCs, especially those pertaining to the M-H bond, are described, followed by a detailed treatment of decomposition pathways. Finally, reactions involving TMHRCs as intermediates are described.

  15. Transition metal-free olefin polymerization catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Sen, Ayusman; Wojcinski, II, Louis M.; Liu, Shengsheng

    2001-01-01

    Ethylene and/or propylene are polymerized to form high molecular weight, linear polymers by contacting ethylene and/or propylene monomer, in the presence of an inert reaction medium, with a catalyst system which consists essentially of (1) an aluminum alkyl component, such as trimethylaluminum, triethylaluminum, triisobutylaluminum, tri-n-octylaluminum and diethylaluminum hydride and (2) a Lewis acid or Lewis acid derivative component, such as B (C.sub.6 F.sub.5).sub.3, [(CH.sub.3).sub.2 N (H) (C.sub.6 H.sub.5)].sup.+ [B (C.sub.6 F.sub.5)4].sup.-, [(C.sub.2 H.sub.5).sub.3 NH].sup.+ [B C.sub.6 F.sub.5).sub.4 ],.sup.-, [C(C.sub.6 F.sub.5).sub.3 ].sup.+ [B(C.sub.6 F.sub.5).sub.4 ].sup.-, (C.sub.2 H.sub.5).sub.2 Al(OCH.sub.3), (C.sub.2 H.sub.5).sub.2 Al(2,6-di-t-butyl-4-methylphenoxide), (C.sub.2 H.sub.5)Al(2,6 -di-t-butylphenoxide).sub.2, (C.sub.2 H.sub.5).sub.2 Al(2,6-di-t-butylphonoxide) , 2,6 -di-t-butylphenol.multidot.methylaluminoxane or an alkylaluminoxane, and which may be completely free any transition metal component(s).

  16. Exciton Dynamics in Monolayer Transition Metal Dichalcogenides.

    PubMed

    Moody, Galan; Schaibley, John; Xu, Xiaodong

    2016-07-01

    Since the discovery of semiconducting monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides, a variety of experimental and theoretical studies have been carried out seeking to understand the intrinsic exciton population recombination and valley relaxation dynamics. Reports of the exciton decay time range from hundreds of femtoseconds to ten nanoseconds, while the valley depolarization time can exceed one nanosecond. At present, however, a consensus on the microscopic mechanisms governing exciton radiative and non-radiative recombination is lacking. The strong exciton oscillator strength resulting in up to ~ 20% absorption for a single monolayer points to ultrafast radiative recombination. However, the low quantum yield and large variance in the reported lifetimes suggest that non-radiative Auger-type processes obscure the intrinsic exciton radiative lifetime. In either case, the electron-hole exchange interaction plays an important role in the exciton spin and valley dynamics. In this article, we review the experiments and theory that have led to these conclusions and comment on future experiments that could complement our current understanding.

  17. Exciton Dynamics in Monolayer Transition Metal Dichalcogenides

    PubMed Central

    Moody, Galan; Schaibley, John; Xu, Xiaodong

    2017-01-01

    Since the discovery of semiconducting monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides, a variety of experimental and theoretical studies have been carried out seeking to understand the intrinsic exciton population recombination and valley relaxation dynamics. Reports of the exciton decay time range from hundreds of femtoseconds to ten nanoseconds, while the valley depolarization time can exceed one nanosecond. At present, however, a consensus on the microscopic mechanisms governing exciton radiative and non-radiative recombination is lacking. The strong exciton oscillator strength resulting in up to ~ 20% absorption for a single monolayer points to ultrafast radiative recombination. However, the low quantum yield and large variance in the reported lifetimes suggest that non-radiative Auger-type processes obscure the intrinsic exciton radiative lifetime. In either case, the electron-hole exchange interaction plays an important role in the exciton spin and valley dynamics. In this article, we review the experiments and theory that have led to these conclusions and comment on future experiments that could complement our current understanding. PMID:28890600

  18. Nucleic acid-functionalized transition metal nanosheets for biosensing applications.

    PubMed

    Mo, Liuting; Li, Juan; Liu, Qiaoling; Qiu, Liping; Tan, Weihong

    2017-03-15

    In clinical diagnostics, as well as food and environmental safety practices, biosensors are powerful tools for monitoring biological or biochemical processes. Two-dimensional (2D) transition metal nanomaterials, including transition metal chalcogenides (TMCs) and transition metal oxides (TMOs), are receiving growing interest for their use in biosensing applications based on such unique properties as high surface area and fluorescence quenching abilities. Meanwhile, nucleic acid probes based on Watson-Crick base-pairing rules are also being widely applied in biosensing based on their excellent recognition capability. In particular, the emergence of functional nucleic acids in the 1980s, especially aptamers, has substantially extended the recognition capability of nucleic acids to various targets, ranging from small organic molecules and metal ions to proteins and cells. Based on π-π stacking interaction between transition metal nanosheets and nucleic acids, biosensing systems can be easily assembled. Therefore, the combination of 2D transition metal nanomaterials and nucleic acids brings intriguing opportunities in bioanalysis and biomedicine. In this review, we summarize recent advances of nucleic acid-functionalized transition metal nanosheets in biosensing applications. The structure and properties of 2D transition metal nanomaterials are first discussed, emphasizing the interaction between transition metal nanosheets and nucleic acids. Then, the applications of nucleic acid-functionalized transition metal nanosheet-based biosensors are discussed in the context of different signal transducing mechanisms, including optical and electrochemical approaches. Finally, we provide our perspectives on the current challenges and opportunities in this promising field. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Dynamical Correlation In Some Liquid Alkaline Earth Metals Near Melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakore, B. Y.; Suthar, P. H.; Khambholja, S. G.; Gajjar, P. N.; Jani, A. R.

    2010-12-01

    The study of dynamical variables: velocity autocorrelation function (VACF) and power spectrum of liquid alkaline earth metals (Ca, Sr, and Ba) have been presented based on the static harmonic well approximation. The effective interatomic potential for liquid metals is computed using our well recognized model potential with the exchange correlation functions due to Hartree, Taylor, Ichimaru and Utsumi, Farid et al. and Sarkar et al. It is observed that the VACF computed using Sarkar et al. gives the good agreement with available molecular dynamics simulation (MD) results [Phys Rev. B 62, 14818 (2000)]. The shoulder of the power spectrum depends upon the type of local field correlation function used.

  20. 40 CFR 421.270 - Applicability: Description of the primary rare earth metals subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... primary rare earth metals subcategory. 421.270 Section 421.270 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Primary Rare Earth Metals Subcategory § 421.270 Applicability: Description of the primary rare earth metals subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges resulting from the...

  1. 40 CFR 721.4668 - Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4668 Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions. (a... hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions (PMN P-94-1557) is subject to reporting under...

  2. 40 CFR 721.4668 - Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4668 Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions. (a... hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions (PMN P-94-1557) is subject to reporting under...

  3. 40 CFR 421.270 - Applicability: Description of the primary rare earth metals subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... primary rare earth metals subcategory. 421.270 Section 421.270 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Primary Rare Earth Metals Subcategory § 421.270 Applicability: Description of the primary rare earth metals subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges resulting from the...

  4. 40 CFR 721.4668 - Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4668 Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions. (a... hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions (PMN P-94-1557) is subject to reporting under...

  5. 40 CFR 421.270 - Applicability: Description of the primary rare earth metals subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... primary rare earth metals subcategory. 421.270 Section 421.270 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Primary Rare Earth Metals Subcategory § 421.270 Applicability: Description of the primary rare earth metals subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges resulting from the...

  6. 40 CFR 721.4668 - Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4668 Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions. (a... hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions (PMN P-94-1557) is subject to reporting under...

  7. 40 CFR 421.270 - Applicability: Description of the primary rare earth metals subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... primary rare earth metals subcategory. 421.270 Section 421.270 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Primary Rare Earth Metals Subcategory § 421.270 Applicability: Description of the primary rare earth metals subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges resulting from the...

  8. 40 CFR 421.270 - Applicability: Description of the primary rare earth metals subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... primary rare earth metals subcategory. 421.270 Section 421.270 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Primary Rare Earth Metals Subcategory § 421.270 Applicability: Description of the primary rare earth metals subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges resulting from the...

  9. 40 CFR 721.4668 - Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4668 Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions. (a... hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions (PMN P-94-1557) is subject to reporting under...

  10. Band gap tuning in transition metal oxides by site-specific substitution

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Ho Nyung; Chisholm, Jr., Matthew F; Jellison, Jr., Gerald Earle; Singh, David J; Choi, Woo Seok

    2013-12-24

    A transition metal oxide insulator composition having a tuned band gap includes a transition metal oxide having a perovskite or a perovskite-like crystalline structure. The transition metal oxide includes at least one first element selected form the group of Bi, Ca, Ba, Sr, Li, Na, Mg, K, Pb, and Pr; and at least one second element selected from the group of Ti, Al, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zr, Nb, Mo, Ru, Rh, Hf, Ta, W, Re, Os, Ir, and Pt. At least one correlated insulator is integrated into the crystalline structure, including REMO.sub.3, wherein RE is at least one Rare Earth element, and wherein M is at least one element selected from the group of Co, V, Cr, Ni, Mn, and Fe. The composition is characterized by a band gap of less of 4.5 eV.

  11. Metal Based Synthetic Strategies and the Examination of Structure Determining Factors in Alkaline Earth Metal Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Yuriko

    Last decades have witnessed a large expansion of the organometallic heavier alkaline earth metal species. However, continued growth of this promising area of chemistry has been slowed by severe restrictions and limitations in viable synthetic methodologies leading to difficulties in preparing and characterizing the target compounds. There is clearly a need for the further development of synthetic methodologies and detailed structure function analysis that will promote the further advancement of organoalkaline earth metal chemistry in applications as diverse as materials chemistry and catalysis. This thesis work greatly extends the synthetic options currently available towards organoalkaline earth metal species by introducing redox transmetallation protolysis (RTP), a reaction based on the readily available Ph3Bi as a non-toxic transmetallation agent. Based on a straightforward one-pot procedure and work-up, Ph3Bi based RTP presents a powerful synthetic alternative for the facile preparation of a large variety of heavy alkaline earth metal compounds. The second part of the thesis explores the effect of secondary non covalent interactions on the coordination chemistry as well as thermal properties of a series of novel alkali, alkaline earth, rare earth as well as heterobimetallic alkali/alkaline earth fluoroalkoxides. These compounds showcase the significance of non-covalent M···F-C and agostic interactions on metal stabilization and structural features, providing critical input on ligand design for the design of advanced metal organic vapor deposition (MOCVD) precursor materials. This work also showcases the impact of M···F-C interactions over M---co-ligand coordination, a critical precursor design element as well.

  12. Pentadienyl chemistry of the heavy alkaline-earth metals revisited.

    PubMed

    Reiners, Matthias; Fecker, Ann Christin; Freytag, Matthias; Jones, Peter G; Walter, Marc D

    2014-05-14

    Open-metallocenes of the heavy alkaline-earth metals [(η(5)-Pdl')2M(thf)n] (M = Ca (1), Sr (2), n = 1; M = Ba (3), n = 2; Pdl' = 2,4-tBu2C5H5) are readily prepared by salt-metathesis between MI2 and KPdl' and characterized by NMR spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction studies.

  13. Metal sulfide and rare-earth phosphate nanostructures and methods of making same

    DOEpatents

    Wong, Stanislaus; Zhang, Fen

    2016-06-28

    The present invention provides a method of producing a crystalline rare earth phosphate nanostructure. The method comprising: providing a rare earth metal precursor solution and providing a phosphate precursor solution; placing a porous membrane between the metal precursor solution and the phosphate precursor solution, wherein metal cations of the metal precursor solution and phosphate ions of the phosphate precursor solution react, thereby producing a crystalline rare earth metal phosphate nanostructure.

  14. Three 2012 Transits of Venus: From Earth, Jupiter, and Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasachoff, Jay M.; Schneider, G.; Babcock, B. A.; Lu, M.; Edelman, E.; Reardon, K.; Widemann, T.; Tanga, P.; Dantowitz, R.; Silverstone, M. D.; Ehrenreich, D.; Vidal-Madjar, A.; Nicholson, P. D.; Willson, R. C.; Kopp, G. A.; Yurchyshyn, V. B.; Sterling, A. C.; Scherrer, P. H.; Schou, J.; Golub, L.; McCauley, P.; Reeves, K.

    2013-01-01

    We observed the 2012 June 6/5 transit seen from Earth (E/ToV), simultaneously with Venus Express and several other spacecraft not only to study the Cytherean atmosphere but also to provide an exoplanet-transit analog. From Haleakala, the whole transit was visible in coronal skies; among our instruments was one of the world-wide Venus Twilight Experiment's nine coronagraphs. Venus's atmosphere became visible before first contact. SacPeak/IBIS provided high-resolution images at Hα/carbon-dioxide. Big Bear's NST also provided high-resolution observations of the Cytherean atmosphere and black-drop evolution. Our liaison with UH's Mees Solar Observatory scientists provided magneto-optical imaging at calcium and potassium. Solar Dynamics Observatory's AIA and HMI, and the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) and X-ray Telescope (XRT) on Hinode, and total-solar-irradiance measurements with ACRIMSAT and SORCE/TIM, were used to observe the event as an exoplanet-transit analog. On September 20, we imaged Jupiter for 14 Hubble Space Telescope orbits, centered on a 10-hour ToV visible from Jupiter (J/ToV), as an exoplanet-transit analog in our own solar system, using Jupiter as an integrating sphere. Imaging was good, although much work remains to determine if we can detect the expected 0.01% solar irradiance decrease at Jupiter and the even slighter differential effect between our violet and near-infrared filters caused by Venus's atmosphere. We also give a first report on our currently planned December 21 Cassini UVIS observations of a transit of Venus from Saturn (S/ToV). Our E/ToV expedition was sponsored by the Committee for Research and Exploration/National Geographic Society; supplemented: NASA/AAS's Small Research Grant Program. We thank Rob Ratkowski, Stan Truitt, Rob Lucas, Aram Friedman, and Eric Pilger '82 at Haleakala, and Joseph Gangestad '06 at Big Bear for assistance, and Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Lab and Hinode science and operations teams for support

  15. Transition-Metal Substitution Doping in Synthetic Atomically Thin Semiconductors

    DOE PAGES

    Gao, Jian; Kim, Young Duck; Liang, Liangbo; ...

    2016-09-20

    Semiconductor impurity doping has enabled an entire generation of technology. The emergence of alternative semiconductor material systems, such as transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs), requires the development of scalable doping strategies. We report an unprecedented one-pot synthesis for transition-metal substitution in large-area, synthetic monolayer TMDCs. Electron microscopy, optical and electronic transport characterization and ab initio calculations indicate that our doping strategy preserves the attractive qualities of TMDC monolayers, including semiconducting transport and strong direct-gap luminescence. These results are expected to encourage exploration of transition-metal substitution in two-dimensional systems, potentially enabling next-generation optoelectronic technology in the atomically-thin regime.

  16. Temperate Earth-sized planets transiting a nearby ultracool dwarf star.

    PubMed

    Gillon, Michaël; Jehin, Emmanuël; Lederer, Susan M; Delrez, Laetitia; de Wit, Julien; Burdanov, Artem; Van Grootel, Valérie; Burgasser, Adam J; Triaud, Amaury H M J; Opitom, Cyrielle; Demory, Brice-Olivier; Sahu, Devendra K; Bardalez Gagliuffi, Daniella; Magain, Pierre; Queloz, Didier

    2016-05-12

    Star-like objects with effective temperatures of less than 2,700 kelvin are referred to as 'ultracool dwarfs'. This heterogeneous group includes stars of extremely low mass as well as brown dwarfs (substellar objects not massive enough to sustain hydrogen fusion), and represents about 15 per cent of the population of astronomical objects near the Sun. Core-accretion theory predicts that, given the small masses of these ultracool dwarfs, and the small sizes of their protoplanetary disks, there should be a large but hitherto undetected population of terrestrial planets orbiting them--ranging from metal-rich Mercury-sized planets to more hospitable volatile-rich Earth-sized planets. Here we report observations of three short-period Earth-sized planets transiting an ultracool dwarf star only 12 parsecs away. The inner two planets receive four times and two times the irradiation of Earth, respectively, placing them close to the inner edge of the habitable zone of the star. Our data suggest that 11 orbits remain possible for the third planet, the most likely resulting in irradiation significantly less than that received by Earth. The infrared brightness of the host star, combined with its Jupiter-like size, offers the possibility of thoroughly characterizing the components of this nearby planetary system.

  17. Temperate Earth-sized planets transiting a nearby ultracool dwarf star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillon, Michaël; Jehin, Emmanuël; Lederer, Susan M.; Delrez, Laetitia; de Wit, Julien; Burdanov, Artem; Van Grootel, Valérie; Burgasser, Adam J.; Triaud, Amaury H. M. J.; Opitom, Cyrielle; Demory, Brice-Olivier; Sahu, Devendra K.; Bardalez Gagliuffi, Daniella; Magain, Pierre; Queloz, Didier

    2016-05-01

    Star-like objects with effective temperatures of less than 2,700 kelvin are referred to as ‘ultracool dwarfs’. This heterogeneous group includes stars of extremely low mass as well as brown dwarfs (substellar objects not massive enough to sustain hydrogen fusion), and represents about 15 per cent of the population of astronomical objects near the Sun. Core-accretion theory predicts that, given the small masses of these ultracool dwarfs, and the small sizes of their protoplanetary disks, there should be a large but hitherto undetected population of terrestrial planets orbiting them—ranging from metal-rich Mercury-sized planets to more hospitable volatile-rich Earth-sized planets. Here we report observations of three short-period Earth-sized planets transiting an ultracool dwarf star only 12 parsecs away. The inner two planets receive four times and two times the irradiation of Earth, respectively, placing them close to the inner edge of the habitable zone of the star. Our data suggest that 11 orbits remain possible for the third planet, the most likely resulting in irradiation significantly less than that received by Earth. The infrared brightness of the host star, combined with its Jupiter-like size, offers the possibility of thoroughly characterizing the components of this nearby planetary system.

  18. Environmentally relevant metal and transition metal ions enhance Fc epsilon RI-mediated mast cell activation.

    PubMed Central

    Walczak-Drzewiecka, Aurelia; Wyczólkowska, Janina; Dastych, Jaroslaw

    2003-01-01

    Upon contact with allergen, sensitized mast cells release highly active proinflammatory mediators. Allergen-mediated mast cell activation is an important mechanism in the pathogenesis of atopic asthma. Asthmatic patients are especially susceptible to air pollution. Epidemiologic studies found a positive correlation between severity of symptoms among asthmatic patients and the level of particulate matter (PM) in the air. Among the constituents of PM are metals and transition metals, which could mediate some of its adverse effects on human health. We sought to determine the effect of metal and transition metal ions on allergen-mediated mast cell activation. We observed that several metal and transition metal ions activated mast cells and enhanced allergen-mediated mast cell activation. Thus, Al(3+), Cd(2+), and Sr(2+) induced release of granule-associated N-acetyl-ss-d-hexosaminidase, and Al(3+) and Ni(2+) enhanced antigen-mediated release. Metal and transition metal ions also induced significant secretion of interleukin (IL)-4 and increased antigen-mediated IL-4 secretion in mast cells. These effects of metal and transition metal ions on mast cells were observed at concentrations that do not result in direct cytotoxicity and might be relevant for environmental exposure. Thus, metals and transition metals could increase the level of allergen-mediated mast cell activation, which might be one of the mechanisms mediating exacerbation of allergen-driven asthma symptoms by air pollution. PMID:12727598

  19. Process for making transition metal nitride whiskers

    DOEpatents

    Bamberger, Carlos E.

    1989-01-01

    A process for making metal nitrides, particularly titanium nitride whiskers, using a cyanide salt as a reducing agent for a metal compound in the presence of an alkali metal oxide. Sodium cyanide, various titanates and titanium oxide mixed with sodium oxide react to provide titanium nitride whiskers that can be used as reinforcement to ceramic composites.

  20. Process for making transition metal nitride whiskers

    DOEpatents

    Bamberger, C.E.

    1988-04-12

    A process for making metal nitrides, particularly titanium nitride whiskers, using a cyanide salt as a reducing agent for a metal compound in the presence of an alkali metal oxide. Sodium cyanide, various titanates and titanium oxide mixed with sodium oxide react to provide titanium nitride whiskers that can be used as reinforcement to ceramic composites. 1 fig., 1 tab.

  1. Spin crossover and Mott—Hubbard transition under high pressure and high temperature in the low mantle of the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovchinnikov, S. G.; Ovchinnikova, T. M.; Plotkin, V. V.; Dyad'kov, P. G.

    2015-11-01

    Effect of high pressure induced spin crossover on the magnetic, electronic and structural properties of the minerals forming the Earth's low mantle is discussed. The low temperature P, T phase diagram of ferropericlase has the quantum phase transition point Pc = 56 GPa at T = 0 confirmed recently by the synchrotron Mössbauer spectroscopy. The LDA+GTB calculated phase diagram describes the experimental data. Its extension to the high temperature resulted earlier in prediction of the metallic properties of the Earth's mantle at the depth 1400 km < h < 1800 km. Estimation of the electrical conductivity based on the percolation theory is given. We discuss also the thermodynamic properties and structural anomalies resulting from the spin crossover and metal-insulator transition and compare them with the experimental seismic and geomagnetic field data.

  2. Ultrafast Transient Absorption Spectroscopy of Polymer-Based Organophotoredox Catalysts Mimicking Transition-Metal Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamhawi, Abdelqader; Paul, Anam C.; Smith, Justin D.; Handa, Sachin; Liu, Jinjun

    2017-06-01

    Transition-metal complexes of rare earth metals including ruthenium and iridium are most commonly employed as visible-light photocatalysts. Despite their highly important and broad applications, they have many disadvantages including high cost associated with low abundance in earth crust, potential toxicity, requirement of specialized ligands for desired activity, and difficulty in recycling of metal contents as well as associated ligands. Polymer-based organophotoredox catalysts are promising alternatives and possess unique advantages such as easier synthesis from inexpensive starting material, longer excited state life time, broad range of activity, sustainability, and recyclability. In this research talk, time-resolved photoluminescence and femtosecond transient absorption (TA) spectroscopy measurements of three novel polymer-based organophotoredox catalysts will be presented. By our synthetic team, their catalytic activity has been proven in some highly valuable chemical transformations, that otherwise require transition metal complexes. Time-resolved spectroscopic investigations have demonstrated that photoinduced processes in these catalysts are similar to the transition metal complexes. Especially, intramolecular vibrational relaxation, internal conversion, and intersystem crossing from the S1 state to the T1 state all occur on a sub-picosecond timescale. The long lifetime of the T1 state ( 2-3 microsecond) renders these polymers potent oxidizing and reducing agents. A spectroscopic and kinetic model has been developed for global fitting of TA spectra in both the frequency and time domains. Implication of the current ultrafast spectroscopy studies of these novel molecules to their roles in photocatalysis will be discussed.

  3. Reaction between hydrous wadsleyite and iron: Implication for water distribution in Earth's transition zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, F.; Li, J.; Liu, J.; Dong, J.

    2017-12-01

    The mantle transition zone (TZ) is considered as a potential water reservoir due to large capacities of wadsleyite and ringwoodite to store water in the structures. Whether it is a hydrous layer or an empty reservoir, however, is still under debate. Because the TZ may contain metallic iron1, 2 and water is an oxidizing agent at > 5 GPa, the stability of coexisting iron and TZ hydrous phases needs to be examined. In this study, we conducted multi-anvil experiments on iron with synthetic hydrous wadsleyite or forsterite and water under TZ pressure-temperature conditions. Similar rapid reactions were observed for both types of starting materials, producing ferropericlase, iron-bearing wadsleyite or ringwoodite, and iron hydride. The results imply that a hydrous TZ is incompatible with a reduced state, and that water distribution of TZ is confined to subducting slabs and slab-mantle boundaries, where water or hydrous phases in slab must oxidize the adjacent mantle before they can hydrate the silicates. In contrast, the bulk transition zone may be mostly dry. The iron hydride produced from this slab-mantle interaction may sink to greater depths due to their low melting temperature3, thus providing a pathway for hydrogen to enter the lower mantle and core. References 1. O'Neill HSC, McCammon C, Canil D, Rubie D, Ross C, Seifert F. Mossbauer spectroscopy of mantle transition zone phases and determination of minimum Fe3+ content. American Mineralogist 1993, 78(3-4): 456-460. 2. Rohrbach A, Ballhaus C, Golla-Schindler U, Ulmer P, Kamenetsky VS, Kuzmin DV. Metal saturation in the upper mantle. Nature 2007, 449(7161): 456-458. 3. Sakamaki K, Takahashi E, Nakajima Y, Nishihara Y, Funakoshi K, Suzuki T, et al. Melting phase relation of FeH x up to 20GPa: Implication for the temperature of the Earth's core. Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors 2009, 174(1): 192-201.

  4. Transition metal mediated transformations of small molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, Ayusman

    Catalysis at metal centers is of great scientific, as well as practical, importance because of the high efficiency, high specificity, and low energy demands often associated with such systems. The two major themes of our research are (a) the design of metal-based systems for the synthesis of novel classes of polymers and (b) the identification of new metal-catalyzed systems for the conversion of biomass to fuels and chemicals, and related “green” chemical processes.

  5. Photocurrent generation in a metallic transition-metal dichalcogenide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehmood, Naveed; Rasouli, Hamid Reza; ćakıroǧlu, Onur; Kasırga, T. Serkan

    2018-05-01

    Photocurrent generation is unexpected in metallic 2D layered materials unless a photothermal mechanism is prevalent. Yet, typical high thermal conductivity and low absorption of the visible spectrum prevent photothermal current generation in metals. Here, we report photoresponse from two-terminal devices of mechanically exfoliated metallic 3R-Nb S2 thin crystals using scanning photocurrent microscopy (SPCM) both at zero and finite bias. SPCM measurements reveal that the photocurrent predominantly emerges from metal/Nb S2 junctions of the two-terminal device at zero bias. At finite biases, along with the photocurrent generated at metal/Nb S2 junctions, now a negative photoresponse from all over the Nb S2 crystal is evident. Among our results, we realized that the observed photocurrent can be explained by the local heating caused by the laser excitation. These findings show that Nb S2 is among a few metallic materials in which photocurrent generation is possible.

  6. Alkaline and alkaline earth metal phosphate halides and phosphors

    DOEpatents

    Lyons, Robert Joseph; Setlur, Anant Achyut; Cleaver, Robert John

    2012-11-13

    Compounds, phosphor materials and apparatus related to nacaphite family of materials are presented. Potassium and rubidium based nacaphite family compounds and phosphors designed by doping divalent rare earth elements in the sites of alkaline earth metals in the nacaphite material families are descried. An apparatus comprising the phosphors based on the nacaphite family materials are presented herein. The compounds presented is of formula A.sub.2B.sub.1-yR.sub.yPO.sub.4X where the elements A, B, R, X and suffix y are defined such that A is potassium, rubidium, or a combination of potassium and rubidium and B is calcium, strontium, barium, or a combination of any of calcium, strontium and barium. X is fluorine, chlorine, or a combination of fluorine and chlorine, R is europium, samarium, ytterbium, or a combination of any of europium, samarium, and ytterbium, and y ranges from 0 to about 0.1.

  7. Metallic rare-earth silicide nanowires on silicon surfaces.

    PubMed

    Dähne, Mario; Wanke, Martina

    2013-01-09

    The formation, atomic structure, and electronic properties of self-assembled rare-earth silicide nanowires on silicon surfaces were studied by scanning tunneling microscopy and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. Metallic dysprosium and erbium silicide nanowires were observed on both the Si(001) and Si(557) surfaces. It was found that they consist of hexagonal rare-earth disilicides for both surface orientations. On Si(001), the nanowires are characterized by a one-dimensional band structure, while the electronic dispersion is two-dimensional for the nanowires formed on Si(557). This behavior is explained by the different orientations of the hexagonal c axis of the silicide leading to different conditions for the carrier confinement. By considering this carrier confinement it is demonstrated how the one-dimensional band structure of the nanowires on Si(001) can be derived from the two-dimensional one of the silicide monolayer on Si(111).

  8. Rare earth element and rare metal inventory of central Asia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mihalasky, Mark J.; Tucker, Robert D.; Renaud, Karine; Verstraeten, Ingrid M.

    2018-03-06

    Rare earth elements (REE), with their unique physical and chemical properties, are an essential part of modern living. REE have enabled development and manufacture of high-performance materials, processes, and electronic technologies commonly used today in computing and communications, clean energy and transportation, medical treatment and health care, glass and ceramics, aerospace and defense, and metallurgy and chemical refining. Central Asia is an emerging REE and rare metals (RM) producing region. A newly compiled inventory of REE-RM-bearing mineral occurrences and delineation of areas-of-interest indicate this region may have considerable undiscovered resources.

  9. Spectroscopic studies of transition-metal ions in molten alkali-metal carboxylates

    SciTech Connect

    Maroni, V.A.; Maciejewski, M.L.

    This paper presents the results of electronic absorption and /sup 13/C-NMR measurements on molten alkali metal formates and acetates and on solutions of selected 3d transition metal ions therein. These studies provide a unique opportunity to explore (1) the highly ordered nature of alkali carboxylates, (2) the ligand field properties of acetate and formate ions, and (3) the coordination chemistry of the 3d transition metals in molten carboxylates. 1 figure, 2 tables.

  10. Understanding Metal-Insulator transitions in ultra-thin films of LaNiO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravichandran, Jayakanth; King, Philip D. C.; Schlom, Darrell G.; Shen, Kyle M.; Kim, Philip

    2014-03-01

    LaNiO3 (LNO) is a bulk paramagnetic metal and a member of the family of RENiO3 Nickelates (RE = Rare Earth Metals), which is on the verge of the metal-insulator transition. Ultra-thin films of LNO has been studied extensively in the past and due to its sensitivity to disorder, the true nature of the metal-insulator transition in these films have been hard to decipher. We grow high quality ultra-thin films of LNO using reactive molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and use a combination of ionic liquid gating and magneto-transport measurements to understand the nature and tunability of metal-insulator transition as a function of thickness for LNO. The underlying mechanisms for the transition are discussed in the framework of standard transport models. These results are discussed in the light of other Mott insulators such as Sr2IrO4, where we have performed similar measurements around the insulating state.

  11. Trion formation dynamics in monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides

    DOE PAGES

    Singh, Akashay; Moody, Galan; Schaibley, John R.; ...

    2016-01-05

    Here, we report charged exciton (trion) formation dynamics in doped monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides, specifically molybdenum diselenide (MoSe 2), using resonant two-color pump-probe spectroscopy. When resonantly pumping the exciton transition, trions are generated on a picosecond time scale through exciton-electron interaction. As the pump energy is tuned from the high energy to low energy side of the inhomogeneously broadened exciton resonance, the trion formation time increases by ~50%. This feature can be explained by the existence of both localized and delocalized excitons in a disordered potential and suggests the existence of an exciton mobility edge in transition metal dichalcogenides.

  12. Light-induced metal-insulator transition in a switchable mirror.

    PubMed

    Hoekstra, A F; Roy, A S; Rosenbaum, T F; Griessen, R; Wijngaarden, R J; Koeman, N J

    2001-06-04

    Rare earth hydride films can be converted reversibly from metallic mirrors to insulating windows simply by changing the surrounding hydrogen gas pressure at room temperature. At low temperatures, in situ doping is not possible in this way as hydrogen cannot diffuse. However, our finding of persistent photoconductivity under ultraviolet illumination offers an attractive possibility to tune yttrium hydride through the T = 0 metal-insulator transition. Conductivity and Hall measurements are used to determine critical exponents. The unusually large value for the product of the static and dynamical critical exponents appears to signify the important role played by electron-electron interactions.

  13. Activated phosphors having matrices of yttrium-transition metal compound

    DOEpatents

    De Kalb, E.L.; Fassel, V.A.

    1975-07-01

    A method is described for preparing a phosphor composition containing a lanthanide activator element with a host matrix having a transition element as a major component. The host matrix is composed of certain rare earth phosphates or vanadates such as YPO$sub 4$ with a portion of the rare earth replaced with one or more of the transition elements. On x-ray or other electromagnetic excitation, trace lanthanide impurities or additives within the phosphor are spectrometrically determined from their characteristic luminescence. (auth)

  14. Nature of the transition between a ferromagnetic metal and a spin-glass insulator in pyrochlore molybdates.

    PubMed

    Hanasaki, N; Watanabe, K; Ohtsuka, T; Kézsmárki, I; Iguchi, S; Miyasaka, S; Tokura, Y

    2007-08-24

    The metal-insulator transition has been investigated for pyrochlore molybdates R(2)Mo(2)O(7) with nonmagnetic rare-earth ions R. The dynamical scaling analysis of ac susceptibility reveals that the geometrical frustration causes the atomic spin-glass state. The reentrant spin-glass phase exists below the ferromagnetic transition. The electronic specific heat is enhanced as compared to the band calculation result, perhaps due to the orbital fluctuation in the half-metallic ferromagnetic state. The large specific heat is rather reduced upon the transition, likely because the short-range antiferromagnetic fluctuation shrinks the Fermi surface.

  15. Molten metal containment vessel with rare earth oxysulfide protective coating thereon and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Krikorian, Oscar H.; Curtis, Paul G.

    1992-01-01

    An improved molten metal containment vessel is disclosed in which wetting of the vessel's inner wall surfaces by molten metal is inhibited by coating at least the inner surfaces of the containment vessel with one or more rare earth oxysulfide or rare earth sulfide compounds to inhibit wetting and or adherence by the molten metal to the surfaces of the containment vessel.

  16. Half-Metallic Ferromagnetism and Stability of Transition Metal Pnictides and Chalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bang-Gui

    It is highly desirable to explore robust half-metallic ferromagnetic materials compatible with important semiconductors for spintronic applications. A state-of-the-art full potential augmented plane wave method within the densityfunctional theory is reliable enough for this purpose. In this chapter we review theoretical research on half-metallic ferromagnetism and structural stability of transition metal pnictides and chalcogenides. We show that some zincblende transition metal pnictides are half-metallic and the half-metallic gap can be fairly wide, which is consistent with experiment. Systematic calculations reveal that zincblende phases of CrTe, CrSe, and VTe are excellent half-metallic ferromagnets. These three materials have wide half-metallic gaps, are low in total energy with respect to the corresponding ground-state phases, and, importantly, are structurally stable. Halfmetallic ferromagnetism is also found in wurtzite transition metal pnictides and chalcogenides and in transition-metal doped semiconductors as well as deformed structures. Some of these half-metallic materials could be grown epitaxially in the form of ultrathin .lms or layers suitable for real spintronic applications.

  17. Lunar Flight Study Series: Volume 6. A Study of Geometrical and Terminal Characteristics of Earth-Moon Transits Embedded in the Earth-Moon Plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lisle, B. J.

    1963-01-01

    This report represents the results of a study of coplanar earth-moon transits. The study was initiated to provide information concerning coplanar geometrical characteristics of earth-moon trnasits. The geometrical aspects of transit behavior are related to variations injection conditions. The model of the earth-moon system used in this investigation is the Jacobian model of the restricted three body problem. All transits considered in this study are restricted to the moon-earth plane (MEP).

  18. Flexible metallic seal for transition duct in turbine system

    DOEpatents

    Flanagan, James Scott; LeBegue, Jeffrey Scott; McMahan, Kevin Weston; Dillard, Daniel Jackson; Pentecost, Ronnie Ray

    2014-04-22

    A turbine system is disclosed. In one embodiment, the turbine system includes a transition duct. The transition duct includes an inlet, an outlet, and a passage extending between the inlet and the outlet and defining a longitudinal axis, a radial axis, and a tangential axis. The outlet of the transition duct is offset from the inlet along the longitudinal axis and the tangential axis. The transition duct further includes an interface member for interfacing with a turbine section. The turbine system further includes a flexible metallic seal contacting the interface member to provide a seal between the interface member and the turbine section.

  19. Host Materials for Transition-Metal Ions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-01

    Spectra of 3d Transition Elements in KMgF3 Crystal, Soy. Phys. Solid State 19 (1977), 340. 21. H . Onuki , F. Sugawara, M. Hirano, and Y. Yamaguchi...on Cs2SnBr 6 .... h ............. 84 13.2 Crystal-Field Components, Anm, for Sn (Oh) Site .............. 814 13.3 Experimental Parameters...A.M VSg Kleef, Y. N. .3oshi, and R. P. Srivastava, Analysis of’ Cd V: I.--4Ida-id’ 5p Transitions, Physica 114IC (1982), 105. 15. H . Benschop, Y. N

  20. A Simple, General Synthetic Route toward Nanoscale Transition Metal Borides.

    PubMed

    Jothi, Palani R; Yubuta, Kunio; Fokwa, Boniface P T

    2018-04-01

    Most nanomaterials, such as transition metal carbides, phosphides, nitrides, chalcogenides, etc., have been extensively studied for their various properties in recent years. The similarly attractive transition metal borides, on the contrary, have seen little interest from the materials science community, mainly because nanomaterials are notoriously difficult to synthesize. Herein, a simple, general synthetic method toward crystalline transition metal boride nanomaterials is proposed. This new method takes advantage of the redox chemistry of Sn/SnCl 2 , the volatility and recrystallization of SnCl 2 at the synthesis conditions, as well as the immiscibility of tin with boron, to produce crystalline phases of 3d, 4d, and 5d transition metal nanoborides with different morphologies (nanorods, nanosheets, nanoprisms, nanoplates, nanoparticles, etc.). Importantly, this method allows flexibility in the choice of the transition metal, as well as the ability to target several compositions within the same binary phase diagram (e.g., Mo 2 B, α-MoB, MoB 2 , Mo 2 B 4 ). The simplicity and wide applicability of the method should enable the fulfillment of the great potential of this understudied class of materials, which show a variety of excellent chemical, electrochemical, and physical properties at the microscale. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Harnessing the metal-insulator transition for tunable metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charipar, Nicholas A.; Charipar, Kristin M.; Kim, Heungsoo; Bingham, Nicholas S.; Suess, Ryan J.; Mathews, Scott A.; Auyeung, Raymond C. Y.; Piqué, Alberto

    2017-08-01

    The control of light-matter interaction through the use of subwavelength structures known as metamaterials has facilitated the ability to control electromagnetic radiation in ways not previously achievable. A plethora of passive metamaterials as well as examples of active or tunable metamaterials have been realized in recent years. However, the development of tunable metamaterials is still met with challenges due to lack of materials choices. To this end, materials that exhibit a metal-insulator transition are being explored as the active element for future metamaterials because of their characteristic abrupt change in electrical conductivity across their phase transition. The fast switching times (▵t < 100 fs) and a change in resistivity of four orders or more make vanadium dioxide (VO2) an ideal candidate for active metamaterials. It is known that the properties associated with thin film metal-insulator transition materials are strongly dependent on the growth conditions. For this work, we have studied how growth conditions (such as gas partial pressure) influence the metalinsulator transition in VO2 thin films made by pulsed laser deposition. In addition, strain engineering during the growth process has been investigated as a method to tune the metal-insulator transition temperature. Examples of both the optical and electrical transient dynamics facilitating the metal-insulator transition will be presented together with specific examples of thin film metamaterial devices.

  2. Metal sulfide and rare-earth phosphate nanostructures and methods of making same

    DOEpatents

    Wong, Stanislaus; Zhang, Fen

    2014-05-13

    The present invention provides a method of producing a crystalline metal sulfide nanostructure. The metal is a transitional metal or a Group IV metal. In the method, a porous membrane is placed between a metal precursor solution and a sulfur precursor solution. The metal cations of the metal precursor solution and sulfur ions of the sulfur precursor solution react, thereby producing a crystalline metal sulfide nanostructure.

  3. Characterizing K2 Planet Discoveries: A Super-Earth Transiting the Bright K Dwarf HIP 116454

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderburg, Andrew; Montet, Benjamin T.; Johnson, John Asher; Buchhave, Lars A.; Zeng, Li; Pepe, Francesco; Collier Cameron, Andrew; Latham, David W.; Molinari, Emilio; Udry, Stéphane; Lovis, Christophe; Matthews, Jaymie M.; Cameron, Chris; Law, Nicholas; Bowler, Brendan P.; Angus, Ruth; Baranec, Christoph; Bieryla, Allyson; Boschin, Walter; Charbonneau, David; Cosentino, Rosario; Dumusque, Xavier; Figueira, Pedro; Guenther, David B.; Harutyunyan, Avet; Hellier, Coel; Kuschnig, Rainer; Lopez-Morales, Mercedes; Mayor, Michel; Micela, Giusi; Moffat, Anthony F. J.; Pedani, Marco; Phillips, David F.; Piotto, Giampaolo; Pollacco, Don; Queloz, Didier; Rice, Ken; Riddle, Reed; Rowe, Jason F.; Rucinski, Slavek M.; Sasselov, Dimitar; Ségransan, Damien; Sozzetti, Alessandro; Szentgyorgyi, Andrew; Watson, Chris; Weiss, Werner W.

    2015-02-01

    We report the first planet discovery from the two-wheeled Kepler (K2) mission: HIP 116454 b. The host star HIP 116454 is a bright (V = 10.1, K = 8.0) K1 dwarf with high proper motion and a parallax-based distance of 55.2 ± 5.4 pc. Based on high-resolution optical spectroscopy, we find that the host star is metal-poor with [Fe/H] =-0.16 ± 0.08 and has a radius R sstarf = 0.716 ± 0.024 R ⊙ and mass M sstarf = 0.775 ± 0.027 M ⊙. The star was observed by the Kepler spacecraft during its Two-Wheeled Concept Engineering Test in 2014 February. During the 9 days of observations, K2 observed a single transit event. Using a new K2 photometric analysis technique, we are able to correct small telescope drifts and recover the observed transit at high confidence, corresponding to a planetary radius of Rp = 2.53 ± 0.18 R ⊕. Radial velocity observations with the HARPS-N spectrograph reveal a 11.82 ± 1.33 M ⊕ planet in a 9.1 day orbit, consistent with the transit depth, duration, and ephemeris. Follow-up photometric measurements from the MOST satellite confirm the transit observed in the K2 photometry and provide a refined ephemeris, making HIP 116454 b amenable for future follow-up observations of this latest addition to the growing population of transiting super-Earths around nearby, bright stars.

  4. CHARACTERIZING K2 PLANET DISCOVERIES: A SUPER-EARTH TRANSITING THE BRIGHT K DWARF HIP 116454

    SciTech Connect

    Vanderburg, Andrew; Montet, Benjamin T.; Johnson, John Asher

    We report the first planet discovery from the two-wheeled Kepler (K2) mission: HIP 116454 b. The host star HIP 116454 is a bright (V = 10.1, K = 8.0) K1 dwarf with high proper motion and a parallax-based distance of 55.2 ± 5.4 pc. Based on high-resolution optical spectroscopy, we find that the host star is metal-poor with [Fe/H] =–0.16 ± 0.08 and has a radius R {sub *} = 0.716 ± 0.024 R {sub ☉} and mass M {sub *} = 0.775 ± 0.027 M {sub ☉}. The star was observed by the Kepler spacecraft during its Two-Wheeled Concept Engineering Test in 2014more » February. During the 9 days of observations, K2 observed a single transit event. Using a new K2 photometric analysis technique, we are able to correct small telescope drifts and recover the observed transit at high confidence, corresponding to a planetary radius of R{sub p} = 2.53 ± 0.18 R {sub ⊕}. Radial velocity observations with the HARPS-N spectrograph reveal a 11.82 ± 1.33 M {sub ⊕} planet in a 9.1 day orbit, consistent with the transit depth, duration, and ephemeris. Follow-up photometric measurements from the MOST satellite confirm the transit observed in the K2 photometry and provide a refined ephemeris, making HIP 116454 b amenable for future follow-up observations of this latest addition to the growing population of transiting super-Earths around nearby, bright stars.« less

  5. Intercalation of Transition Metals into Stacked Benzene Rings: A Model Study of the Intercalation of Transition Metals into Bilayered Graphene.

    PubMed

    Youn, Il Seung; Kim, Dong Young; Singh, N Jiten; Park, Sung Woo; Youn, Jihee; Kim, Kwang S

    2012-01-10

    Structures of neutral metal-dibenzene complexes, M(C6H6)2 (M = Sc-Zn), are investigated by using Møller-Plesset second order perturbation theory (MP2). The benzene molecules change their conformation and shape upon complexation with the transition metals. We find two types of structures: (i) stacked forms for early transition metal complexes and (ii) distorted forms for late transition metal ones. The benzene molecules and the metal atom are bound together by δ bonds which originate from the interaction of π-MOs and d orbitals. The binding energy shows a maximum for Cr(C6H6)2, which obeys the 18-electron rule. It is noticeable that Mn(C6H6)2, a 19-electron complex, manages to have a stacked structure with an excess electron delocalized. For other late transition metal complexes having more than 19 electrons, the benzene molecules are bent or stray away from each other to reduce the electron density around a metal atom. For the early transition metals, the M(C6H6) complexes are found to be more weakly bound than M(C6H6)2. This is because the M(C6H6) complexes do not have enough electrons to satisfy the 18-electron rule, and so the M(C6H6)2 complexes generally tend to have tighter binding with a shorter benzene-metal length than the M(C6H6) complexes, which is quite unusual. The present results could provide a possible explanation of why on the Ni surface graphene tends to grow in a few layers, while on the Cu surface the weak interaction between the copper surface and graphene allows for the formation of a single layer of graphene, in agreement with chemical vapor deposition experiments.

  6. Stable isotopes of transition and post-transition metals as tracers in environmental studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bullen, Thomas D.; Baskaran, Mark

    2011-01-01

    The transition and post-transition metals, which include the elements in Groups 3–12 of the Periodic Table, have a broad range of geological and biological roles as well as industrial applications and thus are widespread in the environment. Interdisciplinary research over the past decade has resulted in a broad understanding of the isotope systematics of this important group of elements and revealed largely unexpected variability in isotope composition for natural materials. Significant kinetic and equilibrium isotope fractionation has been observed for redox sensitive metals such as iron, chromium, copper, molybdenum and mercury, and for metals that are not redox sensitive in nature such as cadmium and zinc. In the environmental sciences, the isotopes are increasingly being used to understand important issues such as tracing of metal contaminant sources and fates, unraveling metal redox cycles, deciphering metal nutrient pathways and cycles, and developing isotope biosignatures that can indicate the role of biological activity in ancient and modern planetary systems.

  7. Polyoxometalate electrocatalysts based on earth-abundant metals for efficient water oxidation in acidic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blasco-Ahicart, Marta; Soriano-López, Joaquín; Carbó, Jorge J.; Poblet, Josep M.; Galan-Mascaros, J. R.

    2018-01-01

    Water splitting is a promising approach to the efficient and cost-effective production of renewable fuels, but water oxidation remains a bottleneck in its technological development because it largely relies on noble-metal catalysts. Although inexpensive transition-metal oxides are competitive water oxidation catalysts in alkaline media, they cannot compete with noble metals in acidic media, in which hydrogen production is easier and faster. Here, we report a water oxidation catalyst based on earth-abundant metals that performs well in acidic conditions. Specifically, we report the enhanced catalytic activity of insoluble salts of polyoxometalates with caesium or barium counter-cations for oxygen evolution. In particular, the barium salt of a cobalt-phosphotungstate polyanion outperforms the state-of-the-art IrO2 catalyst even at pH < 1, with an overpotential of 189 mV at 1 mA cm-2. In addition, we find that a carbon-paste conducting support with a hydrocarbon binder can improve the stability of metal-oxide catalysts in acidic media by providing a hydrophobic environment.

  8. First-principles simulations of transition metal ions in silicon as potential quantum bits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, He; Seo, Hosung; Galli, Giulia

    Optically active spin defects in semiconductors have gained increasing attention in recent years for use as potential solid-state quantum bits (or qubits). Examples include the nitrogen-vacancy center in diamond, transition metal impurities, and rare earth ions. In this talk, we present first-principles theoretical results on group 6 transition metal ion (Chromium, Molybdenum and Tungsten) impurities in silicon, and we investigate their potential use as qubits. We used density functional theory (DFT) to calculate defect formation energies and we found that transition metal ions have lower formation energies at interstitial than substitutional sites. We also computed the electronic structure of the defects with particular attention to the position of the defect energy levels with respect to the silicon band edges. Based on our results, we will discuss the possibility of implementing qubits in silicon using group 6 transition metal ions. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF) through the University of Chicago MRSEC under Award Number DMR-1420709.

  9. Photochemistry of Metal-Metal Bonded Transition Element Complexes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-12

    longest-lived metal - metal bonded complex in 298 K fluid solution is of tl.e order of _10-6 a in lifetime (7). Thus, excited state reactions of any kind must...may be greater since cage escape of Re(CO)5 radicals may be less thin unity. There is a solvent viscosity effect on the disappearance quantum yield of...M2 (CO) 1 0 in the presence of 12,consistent with a solvent cage effect (11). In polar solvents (pyridine, THF, alcohols, etc.) the photochemistry of

  10. Nanodisperse transition metal electrodes (NTME) for electrochemical cells

    DOEpatents

    Striebel, Kathryn A.; Wen, Shi-Jie

    2000-01-01

    Disclosed are transition metal electrodes for electrochemical cells using gel-state and solid-state polymers. The electrodes are suitable for use in primary and secondary cells. The electrodes (either negative electrode or positive electrode) are characterized by uniform dispersion of the transition metal at the nanoscale in the polymer. The transition metal moiety is structurally amorphous, so no capacity fade should occur due to lattice expansion/contraction mechanisms. The small grain size, amorphous structure and homogeneous distribution provide improved charge/discharge cycling performance, and a higher initial discharge rate capability. The cells can be cycled at high current densities, limited only by the electrolyte conductivity. A method of making the electrodes (positive and negative), and their usage in electrochemical cells are disclosed.

  11. Weyl Semimetal to Metal Phase Transitions Driven by Quasiperiodic Potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pixley, J. H.; Wilson, Justin H.; Huse, David A.; Gopalakrishnan, Sarang

    2018-05-01

    We explore the stability of three-dimensional Weyl and Dirac semimetals subject to quasiperiodic potentials. We present numerical evidence that the semimetal is stable for weak quasiperiodic potentials, despite being unstable for weak random potentials. As the quasiperiodic potential strength increases, the semimetal transitions to a metal, then to an "inverted" semimetal, and then finally to a metal again. The semimetal and metal are distinguished by the density of states at the Weyl point, as well as by level statistics, transport, and the momentum-space structure of eigenstates near the Weyl point. The critical properties of the transitions in quasiperiodic systems differ from those in random systems: we do not find a clear critical scaling regime in energy; instead, at the quasiperiodic transitions, the density of states appears to jump abruptly (and discontinuously to within our resolution).

  12. Transition metal-substituted cobalt ferrite nanoparticles for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Sanpo, Noppakun; Berndt, Christopher C; Wen, Cuie; Wang, James

    2013-03-01

    Transition metals of copper, zinc, chromium and nickel were substituted into cobalt ferrite nanoparticles via a sol-gel route using citric acid as a chelating agent. The microstructure and elemental composition were characterized using scanning electron microscopy combined with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Phase analysis of transition metal-substituted cobalt ferrite nanoparticles was performed via X-ray diffraction. Surface wettability was measured using the water contact angle technique. The surface roughness of all nanoparticles was measured using profilometry. Moreover, thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry were performed to determine the temperature at which the decomposition and oxidation of the chelating agents took place. Results indicated that the substitution of transition metals influences strongly the microstructure, crystal structure and antibacterial property of the cobalt ferrite nanoparticles. Copyright © 2012 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. How Does Boiling in the Earth's Crust Influence Metal Speciation and Transport?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kam, K.; Lemke, K.

    2014-12-01

    The presence of large quantities of precious metals, such as gold and copper, near the Earth's surface (upper crust) is commonly attributed to transport in aqueous solution and precipitation upon variations in temperature and pressure. As a consequence, gold exploration is closely linked to solution chemistry, i.e. hydrothermal processes involving aqueous fluids with densities of around unity. However, as crustal fluids buoyantly ascend, boiling produces a coexisting low-density aqueous liquid with fundamentally different physical and chemical properties, and a, most importantly, a high affinity for coinage metals (Heinrich et al., Econ Geol., 1992, 87, 1566). From recent experimental studies of Au (Hurtig and Williams-Jones, 2014, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta,, 127, 304), we know that metal speciation in this low-density phase differs fundamentally from that observed in bulk solution, clearly, with important implications for Au, and metal speciation in general, transport and ore concentrations processes (these processes would also be operable in industrial geothermal plants given the quite special solvent properties of steam). In brief, this study focuses on the speciation of select metal halides in bulk solution as well as in water vapor, and is driven by our need to understand the solvent properties of around 2.0x109 cubic kilometers of free water (or 2,500 times as much water as stored in all lakes and rivers) present in the Earth's crust. The scope of this study has particular applications in the geothermal and oil industries, as both deal with high temperature low-density aqueous fluids. Understanding how metal halide species behave upon boiling can also provide insight into how metals, such as copper and silver, coat turbine equipment and steam piping in geothermal plants, ultimately rendering these components inoperable. This study will also provide preliminary results from mass spectrometric experiments of transition metal halides, and will be augmented with

  14. Anharmonic Vibrational Spectroscopy on Metal Transition Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latouche, Camille; Bloino, Julien; Barone, Vincenzo

    2014-06-01

    Advances in hardware performance and the availability of efficient and reliable computational models have made possible the application of computational spectroscopy to ever larger molecular systems. The systematic interpretation of experimental data and the full characterization of complex molecules can then be facilitated. Focusing on vibrational spectroscopy, several approaches have been proposed to simulate spectra beyond the double harmonic approximation, so that more details become available. However, a routine use of such tools requires the preliminary definition of a valid protocol with the most appropriate combination of electronic structure and nuclear calculation models. Several benchmark of anharmonic calculations frequency have been realized on organic molecules. Nevertheless, benchmarks of organometallics or inorganic metal complexes at this level are strongly lacking despite the interest of these systems due to their strong emission and vibrational properties. Herein we report the benchmark study realized with anharmonic calculations on simple metal complexes, along with some pilot applications on systems of direct technological or biological interest.

  15. Role of phonons in the metal-insulator phase transition.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langer, W. D.

    1972-01-01

    Review, for the transition series oxides, of the Mattis and Lander model, which is one of electrons interacting with lattice vibrations (electron and phonon interaction). The model displays superconducting, insulating, and metallic phases. Its basic properties evolve from a finite crystallographic distortion associated with a dominant phonon mode and the splitting of the Brillouin zone into two subzones, a property of simple cubic and body centered cubic lattices. The order of the metal-insulator phase transition is examined. The basic model has a second-order phase transition and the effects of additional mechanisms on the model are calculated. The way in which these mechanisms affect the magnetically ordered transition series oxides as described by the Hubbard model is discussed.

  16. Covalent functionalization of monolayered transition metal dichalcogenides by phase engineering.

    PubMed

    Voiry, Damien; Goswami, Anandarup; Kappera, Rajesh; e Silva, Cecilia de Carvalho Castro; Kaplan, Daniel; Fujita, Takeshi; Chen, Mingwei; Asefa, Tewodros; Chhowalla, Manish

    2015-01-01

    Chemical functionalization of low-dimensional materials such as nanotubes, nanowires and graphene leads to profound changes in their properties and is essential for solubilizing them in common solvents. Covalent attachment of functional groups is generally achieved at defect sites, which facilitate electron transfer. Here, we describe a simple and general method for covalent functionalization of two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenide nanosheets (MoS₂, WS₂ and MoSe₂), which does not rely on defect engineering. The functionalization reaction is instead facilitated by electron transfer between the electron-rich metallic 1T phase and an organohalide reactant, resulting in functional groups that are covalently attached to the chalcogen atoms of the transition metal dichalcogenide. The attachment of functional groups leads to dramatic changes in the optoelectronic properties of the material. For example, we show that it renders the metallic 1T phase semiconducting, and gives it strong and tunable photoluminescence and gate modulation in field-effect transistors.

  17. Hund’s rule in superatoms with transition metal impurities

    PubMed Central

    Medel, Victor M.; Reveles, Jose Ulises; Khanna, Shiv N.; Chauhan, Vikas; Sen, Prasenjit; Castleman, A. Welford

    2011-01-01

    The quantum states in metal clusters bunch into supershells with associated orbitals having shapes resembling those in atoms, giving rise to the concept that selected clusters could mimic the characteristics of atoms and be classified as superatoms. Unlike atoms, the superatom orbitals span over multiple atoms and the filling of orbitals does not usually exhibit Hund’s rule seen in atoms. Here, we demonstrate the possibility of enhancing exchange splitting in superatom shells via a composite cluster of a central transition metal and surrounding nearly free electron metal atoms. The transition metal d states hybridize with superatom D states and result in enhanced splitting between the majority and minority sets where the moment and the splitting can be controlled by the nature of the central atom. We demonstrate these findings through studies on TMMgn clusters where TM is a 3d atom. The clusters exhibit Hund’s filling, opening the pathway to superatoms with magnetic shells. PMID:21646542

  18. Hund's rule in superatoms with transition metal impurities.

    PubMed

    Medel, Victor M; Reveles, Jose Ulises; Khanna, Shiv N; Chauhan, Vikas; Sen, Prasenjit; Castleman, A Welford

    2011-06-21

    The quantum states in metal clusters bunch into supershells with associated orbitals having shapes resembling those in atoms, giving rise to the concept that selected clusters could mimic the characteristics of atoms and be classified as superatoms. Unlike atoms, the superatom orbitals span over multiple atoms and the filling of orbitals does not usually exhibit Hund's rule seen in atoms. Here, we demonstrate the possibility of enhancing exchange splitting in superatom shells via a composite cluster of a central transition metal and surrounding nearly free electron metal atoms. The transition metal d states hybridize with superatom D states and result in enhanced splitting between the majority and minority sets where the moment and the splitting can be controlled by the nature of the central atom. We demonstrate these findings through studies on TMMg(n) clusters where TM is a 3d atom. The clusters exhibit Hund's filling, opening the pathway to superatoms with magnetic shells.

  19. Hall effect at a tunable metal-insulator transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teizer, W.; Hellman, F.; Dynes, R. C.

    2003-03-01

    Using a rotating magnetic field, the Hall effect in three-dimensional amorphous GdxSi1-x has been measured in the critical regime of the metal-insulator transition for a constant total magnetic field. The Hall coefficient R0 is negative, indicating electronlike conductivity, with a magnitude that increases with decreasing conductivity. R0 diverges at the metal-insulator transition, and displays critical behavior with exponent -1 [R0˜(H-HC)-1]. This dependence is interpreted as a linear decrease in the density of mobile carriers n˜R-10˜H-HC, indicative of the dominant influence of interaction effects.

  20. Designing Superhard Materials by Incorporating Boron Into Heavy Transition Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Yongcheng; Li, Anhu; Zhao, Jianzhi; Zhang, Wenqing

    First-principles calculations on the incompressibility, elasticity and hardness of the Os, OsB2, Re, and ReB2 materials have systematically been performed by the plane-wave basis pseudopotential method. Transition metals Os and Re, which have high bulk modulus but low hardness, can be converted into hard materials by combining them with small B atoms. Moreover, electronic and structural mechanisms of ReB2 and OsB2 are analyzed in detail and compared. It is shown that incorporating small B atoms into heavy transition metals should be a valid pathway to obtain new superhard materials.

  1. Shear Viscosity Coefficient of 5d Liquid Transition Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakor, P. B.; Sonvane, Y. A.; Gajjar, P. N.; Jani, A. R.

    2011-07-01

    In the present paper we have calculated shear viscosity coefficient (η) of 5 d liquid transition metals. To calculate effective pair potential ν(r) and pair distribution function g(r) we have used our own newly constructed model potential and Percus- Yevick hard sphere (PYHS) structure factor S(q) respectively. We have also investigated the effect of different correction function like Hartree (H), Taylor (T) and Sarkar et al. (S) on shear viscosity coefficient (η). Our newly constructed model potential successfully explains the shear viscosity coefficient (η) of 5 d liquid transition metals.

  2. Manipulating Light with Transition Metal Clusters, Organic Dyes, and Metal Organic Frameworks

    SciTech Connect

    Ogut, Serdar

    The primary goals of our research program is to develop and apply state-of-the-art first-principles methods to predict electronic and optical properties of three systems of significant scientific and technological interest: transition metal clusters, organic dyes, and metal-organic frameworks. These systems offer great opportunities to manipulate light for a wide ranging list of energy-related scientific problems and applications. During this grant period, we focused our investigations on the development, implementation, and benchmarking of many-body Green’s function methods (GW approximation and the Bethe-Salpeter equation) to examine excited-state properties of transition metal/transition-metal-oxide clusters and organic molecules that comprise the building blocks of dyesmore » and metal-organic frameworks.« less

  3. A system of three transiting super-Earths in a cool dwarf star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díez Alonso, E.; Suárez& Gómez, S. L.; González Hernández, J. I.; Suárez Mascareño, A.; González Gutiérrez, C.; Velasco, S.; Toledo-Padrón, B.; de Cos Juez, F. J.; Rebolo, R.

    2018-05-01

    We present the detection of three super-Earths transiting the cool star LP415-17, monitored by K2 mission in its 13th campaign. High-resolution spectra obtained with High Accuracy Radial velocity Planet Searcher-North/Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (HARPS-N/TNG) showed that the star is a mid-late K dwarf. Using spectral synthesis models, we infer its effective temperature, surface gravity, and metallicity, and subsequently determined from evolutionary models a stellar radius of 0.58 R⊙. The planets have radii of 1.8, 2.6, and 1.9 R⊕ and orbital periods of 6.34, 13.85, and 40.72 d. High-resolution images discard any significant contamination by an intervening star in the line of sight. The orbit of the furthest planet has radius of 0.18 au, close to the inner edge of the habitable zone. The system is suitable to improve our understanding of formation and dynamical evolution of super-Earth systems in the rocky-gaseous threshold, their atmospheres, internal structure, composition, and interactions with host stars.

  4. Numerical simulations of the optical gain of crystalline fiber doped by rare earth and transition ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daoui, A. K.; Boubir, B.; Adouane, A.; Demagh, N.; Ghoumazi, M.

    2015-02-01

    A fiber laser is a laser whose gain medium is a doped fiber, although lasers whose cavity is made wholly of fibers have also been called fiber lasers. The gain media in a fiber laser is usually fiber doped with rare-earth ions, such as erbium (Er), neodymium (Nd), ytterbium (Yb), thulium (Tm), or praseodymium (Pr), which is doped into the core of the optical fiber, similar to those used to transmit telecommunications signals. Fiber lasers find many applications in materials processing, including cutting, welding, drilling, and marking metal. To maximize their market penetration, it is necessary to increase their output power. In this work, we present a detailed study based on the numerical simulation using MATLAB, of one of the principal characteristics of a fiber laser doped with rare earth ions and transition ion. The gain depends on several parameters such as the length of the doped fiber, the density, the pump power, noise, etc.). The used program resolves the state equations in this context together with those governing the light propagation phenomena. The developed code can also be used to study the dynamic operating modes of a doped fiber laser.

  5. Transition metals in the transition zone: Crystal chemistry of minor element substitution in wadsleyite

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Li; Smyth, Joseph R.; Allaz, Julien; ...

    2016-10-01

    As the most abundant solid phase at depths of 410 to 525 km, wadsleyite constitutes a large geochemical reservoir in the Earth. In order to better understand the implications of minor element substitution and cation ordering in wadsleyite, we have synthesized wadsleyites coexisting with pyroxenes with about 3 wt% of either TiO 2, Cr 2O 3, V 2O 3, CoO, NiO, or ZnO under hydrous conditions in separate experiments at 1300 °C and 15 GPa. We have refined the crystal structures of these wadsleyites by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, analyzed the compositions by electron microprobe, and estimated M3 vacancy concentration frommore » b/a cell-parameter ratios. According to the crystal structure refinements, trivalent cations Fe 3+, Cr 3+ and V 3+, show a strong preference for M3 over M1 and M2 and significant substitution up to 2.7 % (atomic percent) at the tetrahedral site (T site). Divalent cations, Ni 2+, Co 2+, and Zn 2+ show site preferences similar to those of Fe2+ with M1≈ M3 > M2 > T. Transition metal site preferences appear to correlate with crystal field stabilization energies (CFSE) and are inconsistent with cation radius effects. The avoidance of Ni 2+, Co 2+ and Fe 2+ for the M2 site in both wadsleyite and olivine can be influenced by CFSE, which has a positive correlation with site preferences at octahedral sites, indicating that avoidance of the lower-symmetry M2 site is stronger for cations having lower (greater absolute value) CFSE. Ti 4+ substitutes primarily into the M3 octahedron, rather than M1, M2, or T sites. Electron microprobe analysis reveals that Ti 4+, Cr 3+, and V 3+ have greater solubility in wadsleyite than in olivine. Furthermore these transition metal cations may be enriched in a melt or an accessory phase if hydrous melting occurs on upward convection across the wadsleyite-olivine boundary and may be useful as indicators of high pressure origin.« less

  6. Fluorescent probes and bioimaging: alkali metals, alkaline earth metals and pH.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jun; Hu, Ying; Yoon, Juyoung

    2015-07-21

    All living species and life forms have an absolute requirement for bio-functional metals and acid-base equilibrium chemistry owing to the critical roles they play in biological processes. Hence, a great need exists for efficient methods to detect and monitor biometals and acids. In the last few years, great attention has been paid to the development of organic molecule based fluorescent chemosensors. The availability of new synthetic fluorescent probes has made fluorescence microscopy an indispensable tool for tracing biologically important molecules and in the area of clinical diagnostics. This review highlights the recent advances that have been made in the design and bioimaging applications of fluorescent probes for alkali metals and alkaline earth metal cations, including lithium, sodium and potassium, magnesium and calcium, and for pH determination within biological systems.

  7. The Electronic Structure of Transition Metal Coated Fullerenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patton, David C.; Pederson, Mark R.; Kaxiras, Efthimios

    1998-03-01

    Clusters composed of fullerene molecules with an outer shell of transition metal atoms in the composition C_60M_62 (M being a transition metal) have been produced with laser vaporisation techniques(F. Tast, N. Malinowski, S. Frank, M. Heinebrodt, I.M.L. Billas, and T. P. Martin, Z. Phys D 40), 351 (1997).. We have studied several of these very large systems with a parallel version of the all-electron NRLMOL cluster code. Optimized geometries of the metal encased fullerenes C_60Ti_62 and C_60V_62 are presented along with their HOMO-LUMO gaps, electron affinities, ionization energies, and cohesive energies. We compare the stability of these clusters to relaxed met-car structures (e.g. Ti_8C_12) and to relaxed rocksalt metal-carbide fragments (TiC)n with n=8 and 32. In addition to metal-coated fullerenes we consider the possibility of a trilayered structure consisting of a small shell of metal atoms enclosed by a metal coated fullerene. The nature of bonding in these systems is analyzed by studying the electronic charge distributions.

  8. Electronic and structural properties of Lu under pressure: Relation to structural phases of the rare-earth metals

    SciTech Connect

    Min, B.I.; Oguchi, T.; Jansen, H.J.F.

    1986-07-15

    Ground-state electronic and structural properties of Lu under pressure are investigated with use of the self-consistent all-electron total-energy linear muffin-tin orbital band-structure method within a local-density-functional approximation. Pressure-induced structural transitions are found to occur in the following sequence: hcp--(Sm-type)--dhcp--fcc, which is the same as that observed in the crystal structures of the trivalent rare-earth metals with decreasing atomic number. This structural transition is correlated with the increase in the number of d-italic electrons under pressure.

  9. Preparation of nanoporous metal foam from high nitrogen transition metal complexes

    DOEpatents

    Tappan, Bryce C.; Huynh, My Hang V.; Hiskey, Michael A.; Son, Steven F.; Oschwald, David M.; Chavez, David E.; Naud, Darren L.

    2006-11-28

    Nanoporous metal foams are prepared by ignition of high nitrogen transition metal complexes. The ammonium salts of iron(III) tris[bi(tetrazolato)-amine], cobalt(III) tris(bi(tetrazolato)amine), and high nitrogen compounds of copper and silver were prepared as loose powders, pressed into pellets and wafers, and ignited under an inert atmosphere to form nanoporous metal foam monoliths having very high surface area and very low density.

  10. Stable singlet carbenes as mimics for transition metal centers

    PubMed Central

    Martin, David; Soleilhavoup, Michele

    2011-01-01

    This perspective summarizes recent results, which demonstrate that stable carbenes can activate small molecules (CO, H2, NH3 and P4) and stabilize highly reactive intermediates (main group elements in the zero oxidation state and paramagnetic species). These two tasks were previously exclusive for transition metal complexes. PMID:21743834

  11. The Electrochemical Synthesis of Transition-Metal Acetylacetonates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, S. R.; Browning, S. R.; Lagowski, J. J.

    2008-01-01

    The electrochemical synthesis of transition-metal acetylacetonates described here can form the basis of assisting in the transformation of an entry-level laboratory course into a research-like environment where all members of a class are working on the same problem, but where each member has a personal responsibility for the synthesis and…

  12. Luminescent molecular rods - transition-metal alkynyl complexes.

    PubMed

    Yam, Vivian Wing-Wah; Wong, Keith Man-Chung

    2005-01-01

    A number of transition-metal complexes have been reported to exhibit rich luminescence, usually originating from phosphorescence. Such luminescence properties of the triplet excited state with a large Stoke's shift, long lifetime, high luminescence quantum yield as well as lower excitation energy, are envisaged to serve as an ideal candidate in the area of potential applications for chemosensors, dye-sensitized solar cells, flat panel displays, optics, new materials and biological sciences. Organic alkynes (poly-ynes), with extended or conjugatedπ-systems and rigid structure with linear geometry, have become a significant research area due to their novel electronic and physical properties and their potential applications in nanotechnology. Owing to the presence of unsaturated sp-hybridized carbon atoms, the alkynyl unit can serve as a versatile building block in the construction of alkynyl transition-metal complexes, not only throughσ-bonding but also viaπ-bonding interactions. By incorporation of linear alkynyl groups into luminescent transition-metal complexes, the alkynyl moiety with goodσ-donor,π-donor andπ-acceptor abilities is envisaged to tune or perturb the emission behaviors, including emission energy (color), intensity and lifetime by its role as an auxiliary ligand as well as to govern the emission origin from its direct involvement. This review summarizes recent efforts on the synthesis of luminescent rod-like alkynyl complexes with different classes of transition metals and details the effects of the introduction of alkynyl groups on the luminescence properties of the complexes.

  13. Hydroxyapatite substituted by transition metals: experiment and theory.

    PubMed

    Zilm, M E; Chen, L; Sharma, V; McDannald, A; Jain, M; Ramprasad, R; Wei, M

    2016-06-28

    Bioceramics are versatile materials for hard tissue engineering. Hydroxyapatite (HA) is a widely studied biomaterial for bone grafting and tissue engineering applications. The crystal structure of HA allows for a wide range of substitutions, which allows for tailoring materials properties. Transition metals and lanthanides are of interest since substitution in HA can result in magnetic properties. In this study, experimental results were compared to theoretical calculations of HA substituted with a transition metal. Calculation of a 10 atomic percent substitution of a transition metal ion Mn(2+), Fe(2+), and Co(2+) substituted HA samples lead to magnetic moments of 5, 4, and 3 Bohr magnetons, respectively. Hydroxyapatite substituted by transition metals (MHA) was fabricated through an ion exchange procedure and characterized with X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and vibrating sample magnetometer, and results were compared to theoretical calculations. All the substitutions resulted in phase-pure M(2+)HA with lattice parameters and FTIR spectra in good agreement with calculations. Magnetic measurements revealed that the substitution of Mn(2+) has the greatest effect on the magnetic properties of HA followed by the substitution of Fe(2+) and then Co(2+). The present work underlines the power of synergistic theoretical-experimental work in guiding the rational design of materials.

  14. Electrocatalysis using transition metal carbide and oxide nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regmi, Yagya N.

    Carbides are one of the several families of transition metal compounds that are considered economic alternatives to catalysts based on noble metals and their compounds. Phase pure transition metal carbides of group 4-6 metals, in the first three periods, were synthesized using a common eutectic salt flux synthesis method, and their electrocatalytic activities compared under uniform electrochemical conditions. Mo2C showed highest hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) and oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activities among the nine metal carbides investigated, but all other metal carbides also showed substantial activities. All the metal carbides showed remarkable enhancement in catalytic activities as supports, when compared to traditional graphitic carbon as platinum support. Mo2C, the most active transition metal carbide electrocatalyst, was prepared using four different synthesis routes, and the synthesis route dependent activities compared. Bifunctional Mo 2C that is HER as well as oxygen evolution reaction (OER) active, was achieved when the carbide was templated on a multiwalled carbon nanotube using carbothermic reduction method. Bimetallic carbides of Fe, Co, and Ni with Mo or W were prepared using a common carbothermic reduction method. Two different stoichiometries of bimetallic carbides were obtained for each system within a 60 °C temperature window. While the bimetallic carbides showed relatively lower electrocatalytic activities towards HER and ORR in comparison to Mo2C and WC, they revealed remarkably higher OER activities than IrO2 and RuO2, the state-of-the-art OER catalysts. Bimetallic oxides of Fe, Co, and Ni with Mo and W were also prepared using a hydrothermal synthesis method and they also revealed OER activities that are much higher than RuO2 and IrO2. Additionally, the OER activities were dependent on the degree and nature of hydration in the bimetallic oxide crystal lattice, with the completely hydrated, as synthesized, cobalt molybdate and nickel

  15. On the thermodynamics of phase transitions in metal hydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Vita, Andrea

    2012-02-01

    Metal hydrides are solutions of hydrogen in a metal, where phase transitions may occur depending on temperature, pressure etc. We apply Le Chatelier's principle of thermodynamics to a particular phase transition in TiH x , which can approximately be described as a second-order phase transition. We show that the fluctuations of the order parameter correspond to fluctuations both of the density of H+ ions and of the distance between adjacent H+ ions. Moreover, as the system approaches the transition and the correlation radius increases, we show -with the help of statistical mechanics-that the statistical weight of modes involving a large number of H+ ions (`collective modes') increases sharply, in spite of the fact that the Boltzmann factor of each collective mode is exponentially small. As a result, the interaction of the H+ ions with collective modes makes a tiny suprathermal fraction of the H+ population appear. Our results hold for similar transitions in metal deuterides, too. A violation of an -insofar undisputed-upper bound on hydrogen loading follows.

  16. Transition Metal Nitrides for Electrocatalytic Energy Conversion: Opportunities and Challenges.

    PubMed

    Xie, Junfeng; Xie, Yi

    2016-03-07

    Electrocatalytic energy conversion has been considered as one of the most efficient and promising pathways for realizing energy storage and energy utilization in modern society. To improve electrocatalytic reactions, specific catalysts are needed to lower the overpotential. In the search for efficient alternatives to noble metal catalysts, transition metal nitrides have attracted considerable interest due to their high catalytic activity and unique electronic structure. Over the past few decades, numerous nitride-based catalysts have been explored with respect to their ability to drive various electrocatalytic reactions, such as the hydrogen evolution reaction and the oxygen evolution reaction to achieve water splitting and the oxygen reduction reaction coupled with the methanol oxidation reaction to construct fuel cells or rechargeable Li-O2 batteries. This Minireview provides a brief overview of recent progress on electrocatalysts based on transition metal nitrides, and outlines the current challenges and future opportunities. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Thermal conductivity switch: Optimal semiconductor/metal melting transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kwangnam; Kaviany, Massoud

    2016-10-01

    Scrutinizing distinct solid/liquid (s /l ) and solid/solid (s /s ) phase transitions (passive transitions) for large change in bulk (and homogenous) thermal conductivity, we find the s /l semiconductor/metal (S/M) transition produces the largest dimensionless thermal conductivity switch (TCS) figure of merit ZTCS (change in thermal conductivity divided by smaller conductivity). At melting temperature, the solid phonon and liquid molecular thermal conductivities are comparable and generally small, so the TCS requires localized electron solid and delocalized electron liquid states. For cyclic phase reversibility, the congruent phase transition (no change in composition) is as important as the thermal transport. We identify X Sb and X As (X =Al , Cd, Ga, In, Zn) and describe atomic-structural metrics for large ZTCS, then show the superiority of S/M phonon- to electron-dominated transport melting transition. We use existing experimental results and theoretical and ab initio calculations of the related properties for both phases (including the Kubo-Greenwood and Bridgman formulations of liquid conductivities). The 5 p orbital of Sb contributes to the semiconductor behavior in the solid-phase band gap and upon disorder and bond-length changes in the liquid phase this changes to metallic, creating the large contrast in thermal conductivity. The charge density distribution, electronic localization function, and electron density of states are used to mark this S/M transition. For optimal TCS, we examine the elemental selection from the transition, basic, and semimetals and semiconductor groups. For CdSb, addition of residual Ag suppresses the bipolar conductivity and its ZTCS is over 7, and for Zn3Sb2 it is expected to be over 14, based on the structure and transport properties of the better-known β -Zn4Sb3 . This is the highest ZTCS identified. In addition to the metallic melting, the high ZTCS is due to the electron-poor nature of II-V semiconductors, leading to the

  18. Transition Metal d-Orbital Splitting Diagrams: An Updated Educational Resource for Square Planar Transition Metal Complexes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bo¨rgel, Jonas; Campbell, Michael G.; Ritter, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    The presentation of d-orbital splitting diagrams for square planar transition metal complexes in textbooks and educational materials is often inconsistent and therefore confusing for students. Here we provide a concise summary of the key features of orbital splitting diagrams for square planar complexes, which we propose may be used as an updated…

  19. Self-assembly of noble metal monolayers on transition metal carbide nanoparticle catalysts

    DOE PAGES

    Hunt, Sean T.; Milina, Maria; Alba-Rubio, Ana C.; ...

    2016-05-20

    Here, we demonstrated the self-assembly of transition metal carbide nanoparticles coated with atomically thin noble metal monolayers by carburizing mixtures of noble metal salts and transition metal oxides encapsulated in removable silica templates. This approach allows for control of the final core-shell architecture, including particle size, monolayer coverage, and heterometallic composition. Carbon-supported Ti 0.1W 0.9C nanoparticles coated with Pt or bimetallic PtRu monolayers exhibited enhanced resistance to sintering and CO poisoning, achieving an order of magnitude increase in specific activity over commercial catalysts for methanol electrooxidation after 10,000 cycles. These core-shell materials provide a new direction to reduce the loading,more » enhance the activity, and increase the stability of noble metal catalysts.« less

  20. Rare-earth metal prices in the USA ca. 1960 to 1994

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hedrick, James B.

    1997-01-01

    Rare-earth metal prices were compiled from the late 1950s and early 1960s through 1994. Although commercial demand for rare-earth metals began in 1908, as the alloy mischmetal, commercial quantities of a wide range of individual rare-earth metals were not available until the late 1950s. The discovery of a large, high-grade rare-earth deposit at Mountain Pass. CA, USA, in 1949, was significant because it led to the production of commercial quantities or rare-earth elements that reduced prices and encouraged wider application of the materials. The availability of ore from Mountain Pass, and other large rare-earth deposits, especially those in Australia and China, has provided the world with abundant resources for rare-earth metal production. This availability, coupled with improved technology from Government and private-sector metallurgical research, has resulted in substantial decreases in rare-earth metal prices since the late 1950s and early 1960s. Price series for the individual rare-earth metals (except promethium) are quoted on a kilogram basis from the late 1950s and early 1960s through 1994. Prices are given in US dollars on an actual and constant dollar basis. Industrial and economic factors affecting prices during this time period are examined.

  1. Rare-earth metal prices in the USA ca. 1960 to 1994

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hedrick, J.B.

    1997-01-01

    Rare-earth metal prices were compiled from the late 1950s and early 1960s through 1994. Although commercial demand for rare-earth metals began in 1908, as the alloy mischmetal, commercial quantities of a wide range of individual rare-earth metals were not available until the late 1950s. The discovery of a large, high-grade rare-earth deposit at Mountain Pass, CA, USA, in 1949, was significant because it led to the production of commercial quantities of rare-earth elements that reduced prices and encouraged wider application of the materials. The availability of ore from Mountain Pass, and other large rare-earth deposits, especially those in Australia and China, has provided the world with abundant resources for rare-earth metal production. This availability, coupled with improved technology from Government and private-sector metallurgical research, has resulted in substantial decreases in rare-earth metal prices since the late 1950s and early 1960s. Price series for the individual rare-earth metals (except promethium) are quoted on a kilogram basis from the late 1950s and early 1960s through 1994. Prices are given in US dollars on an actual and constant dollar basis. Industrial and economic factors affecting prices during this time period are examined.

  2. Covalent bonds against magnetism in transition metal compounds

    PubMed Central

    Streltsov, Sergey V.; Khomskii, Daniel I.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetism in transition metal compounds is usually considered starting from a description of isolated ions, as exact as possible, and treating their (exchange) interaction at a later stage. We show that this standard approach may break down in many cases, especially in 4d and 5d compounds. We argue that there is an important intersite effect—an orbital-selective formation of covalent metal–metal bonds that leads to an “exclusion” of corresponding electrons from the magnetic subsystem, and thus strongly affects magnetic properties of the system. This effect is especially prominent for noninteger electron number, when it results in suppression of the famous double exchange, the main mechanism of ferromagnetism in transition metal compounds. We study this mechanism analytically and numerically and show that it explains magnetic properties of not only several 4d–5d materials, including Nb2O2F3 and Ba5AlIr2O11, but can also be operative in 3d transition metal oxides, e.g., in CrO2 under pressure. We also discuss the role of spin–orbit coupling on the competition between covalency and magnetism. Our results demonstrate that strong intersite coupling may invalidate the standard single-site starting point for considering magnetism, and can lead to a qualitatively new behavior. PMID:27601669

  3. Pseudopotentials for quantum Monte Carlo studies of transition metal oxides

    DOE PAGES

    Krogel, Jaron T.; Santana Palacio, Juan A.; Reboredo, Fernando A.

    2016-02-22

    Quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) calculations of transition metal oxides are partially limited by the availability of high-quality pseudopotentials that are both accurate in QMC and compatible with major plane-wave electronic structure codes. We have generated a set of neon-core pseudopotentials with small cutoff radii for the early transition metal elements Sc to Zn within the local density approximation of density functional theory. The pseudopotentials have been directly tested for accuracy within QMC by calculating the first through fourth ionization potentials of the isolated transition metal (M) atoms and the binding curve of each M-O dimer. We find the ionization potentialsmore » to be accurate to 0.16(1) eV, on average, relative to experiment. The equilibrium bond lengths of the dimers are within 0.5(1)% of experimental values, on average, and the binding energies are also typically accurate to 0.18(3) eV. The level of accuracy we find for atoms and dimers is comparable to what has recently been observed for bulk metals and oxides using the same pseudopotentials. Our QMC pseudopotential results compare well with the findings of previous QMC studies and benchmark quantum chemical calculations.« less

  4. Mechanical and electronic properties of Janus monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Wenwu; Wang, Zhiguo

    2018-05-01

    The mechanical and electronic properties of Janus monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides MXY (M  =  Ti, Zr, Hf, V, Nb, Ta, Cr, Mo, W; X/Y  =  S, Se, Te) were investigated using density functional theory. Results show that breaking the out-of-plane structural symmetry can be used to tune the electronic and mechanical behavior of monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides. The band gaps of monolayer WXY and MoXY are in the ranges of 0.16–1.91 and 0.94–1.69 eV, respectively. A semiconductor to metallic phase transition occurred in Janus monolayer MXY (M  =  Ti, Zr and Hf). The monolayers MXY (M  =  V, Nb, Ta and Cr) show metallic characteristics, which show no dependence on the structural symmetry breaking. The mechanical properties of MXY depended on the composition. Monolayer MXY (M  =  Mo, Ti, Zr, Hf and W) showed brittle characteristic, whereas monolayer CrXY and VXY are with ductile characteristic. The in-plane stiffness of pristine and Janus monolayer MXY are in the range between 22 and 158 N m‑1. The tunable electronic and mechanical properties of these 2D materials would advance the development of ultra-sensitive detectors, nanogenerators, low-power electronics, and energy harvesting and electromechanical systems.

  5. Hot carrier dynamics in plasmonic transition metal nitrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habib, Adela; Florio, Fred; Sundararaman, Ravishankar

    2018-06-01

    Extraction of non-equilibrium hot carriers generated by plasmon decay in metallic nano-structures is an increasingly exciting prospect for utilizing plasmonic losses, but the search for optimum plasmonic materials with long-lived carriers is ongoing. Transition metal nitrides are an exciting class of new plasmonic materials with superior thermal and mechanical properties compared to conventional noble metals, but their suitability for plasmonic hot carrier applications remains unknown. Here, we present fully first principles calculations of the plasmonic response, hot carrier generation and subsequent thermalization of all group IV, V and VI transition metal nitrides, fully accounting for direct and phonon-assisted transitions as well as electron–electron and electron–phonon scattering. We find the largest frequency ranges for plasmonic response in ZrN, HfN and WN, between those of gold and silver, while we predict strongest absorption in the visible spectrum for the VN, NbN and TaN. Hot carrier generation is dominated by direct transitions for most of the relevant energy range in all these nitrides, while phonon-assisted processes dominate only below 1 eV plasmon energies primarily for the group IV nitrides. Finally, we predict the maximum hot carrier lifetimes to be around 10 fs for group IV and VI nitrides, a factor of 3–4 smaller than noble metals, due to strong electron–phonon scattering. However, we find longer carrier lifetimes for group V nitrides, comparable to silver for NbN and TaN, while exceeding 100 fs (twice that of silver) for VN, making them promising candidates for efficient hot carrier extraction.

  6. Vibrational energy transfer dynamics in ruthenium polypyridine transition metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Fedoseeva, Marina; Delor, Milan; Parker, Simon C; Sazanovich, Igor V; Towrie, Michael; Parker, Anthony W; Weinstein, Julia A

    2015-01-21

    Understanding the dynamics of the initial stages of vibrational energy transfer in transition metal complexes is a challenging fundamental question which is also of crucial importance for many applications, such as improving the performance of solar devices or photocatalysis. The present study investigates vibrational energy transport in the ground and the electronic excited state of Ru(4,4'-(COOEt)2-2,2-bpy)2(NCS)2, a close relative of the efficient "N3" dye used in dye-sensitized solar cells. Using the emerging technique of ultrafast two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy, we show that, similarly to other transition-metal complexes, the central Ru heavy atom acts as a "bottleneck" making the energy transfer from small ligands with high energy vibrational stretching frequencies less favorable and thereby affecting the efficiency of vibrational energy flow in the complex. Comparison of the vibrational relaxation times in the electronic ground and excited state of Ru(4,4'-(COOEt)2-2,2-bpy)2(NCS)2 shows that it is dramatically faster in the latter. We propose to explain this observation by the intramolecular electrostatic interactions between the thiocyanate group and partially oxidised Ru metal center, which increase the degree of vibrational coupling between CN and Ru-N modes in the excited state thus reducing structural and thermodynamic barriers that slow down vibrational relaxation and energy transport in the electronic ground state. As a very similar behavior was earlier observed in another transition-metal complex, Re(4,4'-(COOEt)2-2,2'-bpy)(CO)3Cl, we suggest that this effect in vibrational energy dynamics might be common for transition-metal complexes with heavy central atoms.

  7. The Transition from Earth-Centred Biology to Cosmic Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickramasinghe, N. Chandra; Tokoro, Gensuke; Wainwright, Milton

    A paradigm shift with potentially profound implications has been taking place over the past 3 decades. The convergence of research in diverse disciplines points to life being a cosmic phenomenon. A near-infinite information content of life appears to have evolved on a cosmological scale -- over vast distances, and enormous spans of time. It appears highly unlikely that life could have emerged from chemicals in "some warm little pond" on the Earth; in contrast we maintain that every species of life on the Earth, including Homo sapiens, is in essence the result of an assembly of cosmologically derived viral genes. The ingress of such genes that continues to the present day led to their accommodation within the genomes of evolving lineages, sifted according to the "natural processes of selection", a mechanism first enunciated by Patrick Matthews and later used by Darwin. The evidence for this point of view has now grown to the point where we believe, it will soon need to be accepted by the majority of the scientific community. This is particularly critical, since we suggest that new diseases capable of threatening Man's existence could arrive to Earth from space. Moreover, we need to understand that we must live in harmony with the Earth and its ever-changing biosphere if we are to coexist with it.

  8. The transition to the metallic state in low density hydrogen

    DOE PAGES

    McMinis, Jeremy; Morales, Miguel A.; Ceperley, David M.; ...

    2015-11-18

    Solid atomic hydrogen is one of the simplest systems to undergo a metal-insulator transition. Near the transition, the electronic degrees of freedom become strongly correlated and their description provides a difficult challenge for theoretical methods. As a result, the order and density of the phase transition are still subject to debate. In this work we use diffusion quantum Monte Carlo to benchmark the transition between the paramagnetic and anti-ferromagnetic phases of ground state body centered cubic atomic hydrogen. We locate the density of the transition by computing the equation of state for these two phases and identify the phase transitionmore » order by computing the band gap near the phase transition. These benchmark results show that the phase transition is continuous and occurs at a Wigner-Seitz radius of r s = 2.27(3)a 0. As a result, we compare our results to previously reported density functional theory, Hedin s GW approximation, and dynamical mean field theory results.« less

  9. An Alternative Approach to the Teaching of Systematic Transition Metal Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hathaway, Brian

    1979-01-01

    Presents an alternative approach to teaching Systematic Transition Metal Chemistry with the transition metal chemistry skeleton features of interest. The "skeleton" is intended as a guide to predicting the chemistry of a selected compound. (Author/SA)

  10. Cross-linking proteins with bimetallic tetracarboxylate compounds of transition metals

    DOEpatents

    Kostic, Nenad M.; Chen, Jian

    1991-03-05

    Stable cross-linked complexes of transition-metal tetracarboxylates and proteins are formed. The preferred transition-metal is rhodium. The protein may be collagen or an enzyme such as a proteolytic enzyme.

  11. Cross-linking proteins with bimetallic tetracarboxylate compounds of transition metals

    DOEpatents

    Kostic, N.M.; Chen, J.

    1991-03-05

    Stable cross-linked complexes of transition-metal tetracarboxylates and proteins are formed. The preferred transition-metal is rhodium. The protein may be collagen or an enzyme such as a proteolytic enzyme. No Drawings

  12. Thermal properties of zirconium diboride -- transition metal boride solid solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClane, Devon Lee

    This research focuses on the thermal properties of zirconium diboride (ZrB2) based ceramics. The overall goal was to improve the understanding of how different transition metal (TM) additives influence thermal transport in ZrB2. To achieve this, ZrB2 with 0.5 wt% carbon, and 3 mol% of individual transition metal borides, was densified by hot-press sintering. The transition metals that were investigated were: Y, Ti, Hf, V, Nb, Ta, Cr, Mo, W, and Re. The room temperature thermal diffusivities of the compositions ranged from 0.331 cm2/s for nominally pure ZrB2 to 0.105 cm2/s for (Zr,Cr)B2 and converged around 0.155cm2/s at higher temperatures for all compositions. Thermal conductivities were calculated from the diffusivities, using temperature-dependent values for density and heat capacity. The electron contribution to thermal conductivity was calculated from measured electrical resistivity according to the Wiedemann-Franz law. The phonon contribution to thermal conductivity was calculated by subtracting the electron contribution from the total thermal conductivity. Rietveld refinement of x-ray diffraction data was used to determine the lattice parameters of the compositions. The decrease in thermal conductivity for individual additives correlated directly to the metallic radius of the additive. Additional strain appeared to exist for additives when the stable TM boride for that metal had different crystal symmetries than ZrB2. This research provided insight into how additives and impurities affect thermal transport in ZrB2. The research potentially offers a basis for future modeling of thermal conductivity in ultra-high temperature ceramics based on the correlation between metallic radius and the decrease in thermal conductivity.

  13. Engineering of Transition Metal Catalysts Confined in Zeolites

    PubMed Central

    2018-01-01

    Transition metal–zeolite composites are versatile catalytic materials for a wide range of industrial and lab-scale processes. Significant advances in fabrication and characterization of well-defined metal centers confined in zeolite matrixes have greatly expanded the library of available materials and, accordingly, their catalytic utility. In this review, we summarize recent developments in the field from the perspective of materials chemistry, focusing on synthesis, postsynthesis modification, (operando) spectroscopy characterization, and computational modeling of transition metal–zeolite catalysts. PMID:29861546

  14. Transition-Metal-Free Alkynylation of Aryl Chlorides

    PubMed Central

    Truong, Thanh; Daugulis, Olafs

    2011-01-01

    Two sets of conditions have been developed for a base-mediated, transition-metal-free alkynylation of aryl chlorides that proceeds via benzyne intermediates. The first set of conditions involves the use of TMPLi base in a pentane/THF mixture at 25 °C. The second set involves use of a metal alkoxide base in dioxane at elevated temperature. Reasonable functional group tolerance has been observed. Fluoro, trifluoromethyl, silyl, cyano, and alcohol functionalities are compatible with the reaction conditions. PMID:21786825

  15. Transition metal catalysis in the generation of petroleum and natural gas. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mango, F.D.

    1997-01-21

    This project originated on the premise that natural gas could be formed catalytically in the earth rather than thermally as commonly believed. The intention was to test this hypothetical view and to explore generally the role of sedimentary metals in the generation of light hydrocarbons (C1 - C9). We showed the metalliferous source rocks are indeed catalytic in the generation of natural gas. Various metal compounds in the pure state show the same levels of catalytic activity as sedimentary rocks and the products are identical. Nickel is particularly active among the early transition metals and is projected to remain catalyticallymore » robust at all stages of catagenesis. Nickel oxide promotes the formation of n-alkanes in addition to natural gas (NG), demonstrating the full scope of the hypothetical catalytic process: The composition of catalytic gas duplicates the entire range of natural gas, from so-called wet gas to dry gas (60 to 95+ wt % methane), while gas generated thermally is consistently depleted in methane (10 to 60 wt % methane). These results support the view that metal catalysis is a major pathway through which natural gas is formed in the earth.« less

  16. Electroforming and Switching in Oxides of Transition Metals: The Role of Metal Insulator Transition in the Switching Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chudnovskii, F. A.; Odynets, L. L.; Pergament, A. L.; Stefanovich, G. B.

    1996-02-01

    Electroforming and switching effects in sandwich structures based on anodic films of transition metal oxides (V, Nb, Ti, Fe, Ta, W, Zr, Hf, Mo) have been studied. After being electroformed, some materials exhibited current-controlled negative resistance with S-shapedV-Icharacteristics. For V, Fe, Ti, and Nb oxides, the temperature dependences of the threshold voltage have been measured. As the temperature increased,Vthdecreased to zero at a critical temperatureT0, which depended on the film material. Comparison of theT0values with the temperatures of metal-insulator phase transition for some compounds (Tt= 120 K for Fe3O4, 340 K for VO2, ∼500 K for Ti2O3, and 1070 K for NbO2) showed that switching was related to the transition in the applied electric field. Channels consisting of the above-mentioned lower oxides were formed in the initial anodic films during the electroforming. The possibility of formation of these oxides with a metal-insulator transition was confirmed by thermodynamic calculations.

  17. Control of interlayer physics in 2H transition metal dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kuang-Chung; Stanev, Teodor K.; Valencia, Daniel; Charles, James; Henning, Alex; Sangwan, Vinod K.; Lahiri, Aritra; Mejia, Daniel; Sarangapani, Prasad; Povolotskyi, Michael; Afzalian, Aryan; Maassen, Jesse; Klimeck, Gerhard; Hersam, Mark C.; Lauhon, Lincoln J.; Stern, Nathaniel P.; Kubis, Tillmann

    2017-12-01

    It is assessed in detail both experimentally and theoretically how the interlayer coupling of transition metal dichalcogenides controls the electronic properties of the respective devices. Gated transition metal dichalcogenide structures show electrons and holes to either localize in individual monolayers, or delocalize beyond multiple layers—depending on the balance between spin-orbit interaction and interlayer hopping. This balance depends on the layer thickness, momentum space symmetry points, and applied gate fields. The design range of this balance, the effective Fermi levels, and all relevant effective masses is analyzed in great detail. A good quantitative agreement of predictions and measurements of the quantum confined Stark effect in gated MoS2 systems unveils intralayer excitons as the major source for the observed photoluminescence.

  18. Marrying Excitons and Plasmons in Monolayer Transition-Metal Dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Tuan, Dinh; Scharf, Benedikt; Žutić, Igor; Dery, Hanan

    2017-10-01

    Just as photons are the quanta of light, plasmons are the quanta of orchestrated charge-density oscillations in conducting media. Plasmon phenomena in normal metals, superconductors, and doped semiconductors are often driven by long-wavelength Coulomb interactions. However, in crystals whose Fermi surface is comprised of disconnected pockets in the Brillouin zone, collective electron excitations can also attain a shortwave component when electrons transition between these pockets. In this work, we show that the band structure of monolayer transition-metal dichalcogenides gives rise to an intriguing mechanism through which shortwave plasmons are paired up with excitons. The coupling elucidates the origin for the optical sideband that is observed repeatedly in monolayers of WSe2 and WS2 but not understood. The theory makes it clear why exciton-plasmon coupling has the right conditions to manifest itself distinctly only in the optical spectra of electron-doped tungsten-based monolayers.

  19. [Spectroscopic studies on transition metal ions in colored diamonds].

    PubMed

    Meng, Yu-Fei; Peng, Ming-Sheng

    2004-07-01

    Transition metals like nickel, cobalt and iron have been often used as solvent catalysts in high pressure high temperature (HPHT) synthesis of diamond, and nickel and cobalt ions have been found in diamond lattice. Available studies indicated that nickel and cobalt ions could enter the lattice as interstitial or substitutional impurities and form complexes with nitrogen. Polarized microscopy, SEM-EDS, EPR, PL and FTIR have been used in this study to investigate six fancy color natural and synthetic diamonds in order to determine the spectroscopic characteristics and the existing forms of transition metal ions in colored diamond lattice. Cobalt-related optical centers were first found in natural chameleon diamonds, and some new nickel and cobalt-related optical and EPR centers have also been detected in these diamond samples.

  20. Mechanical properties of 4d transition metals in molten state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Deobrat; Sonvane, Yogesh; Thakor, P. B.

    2016-05-01

    Mechanical properties of 4d transition metals in molten state have been studied in the present study. We have calculated mechanical properties such as isothermal bulk modulus (B), modulus of rigidity (G), Young's modulus (Y) and Hardness have also been calculated from the elastic part of the Phonon dispersion curve (PDC). To describe the structural information, we have used different structure factor S(q) using Percus-Yevick hard sphere (PYHS) reference systems along with our newly constructed parameter free model potential.To see the influence of exchange and correlation effect on the above said properties of 3d liquid transition metals, we have used Sarkar et al (S)local field correction functions. Present results have been found good in agreement with available experimental data.

  1. GLANCING VIEWS OF THE EARTH: FROM A LUNAR ECLIPSE TO AN EXOPLANETARY TRANSIT

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia Munoz, A.; Barrena, R.; Montanes-Rodriguez, P.

    2012-08-20

    It has been posited that lunar eclipse observations may help predict the in-transit signature of Earth-like extrasolar planets. However, a comparative analysis of the two phenomena addressing in detail the transport of stellar light through the planet's atmosphere has not yet been presented. Here, we proceed with the investigation of both phenomena by making use of a common formulation. Our starting point is a set of previously unpublished near-infrared spectra collected at various phases during the 2008 August lunar eclipse. We then take the formulation to the limit of an infinitely distant observer in order to investigate the in-transit signaturemore » of the Earth-Sun system as being observed from outside our solar system. The refraction bending of sunlight rays that pass through Earth's atmosphere is a critical factor in the illumination of the eclipsed Moon. Likewise, refraction will have an impact on the in-transit transmission spectrum for specific planet-star systems depending on the refractive properties of the planet's atmosphere, the stellar size, and the planet's orbital distance. For the Earth-Sun system, at mid-transit, refraction prevents the remote observer's access to the lower {approx}12-14 km of the atmosphere and, thus, also to the bulk of the spectroscopically active atmospheric gases. We demonstrate that the effective optical radius of the Earth in-transit is modulated by refraction and varies by {approx}12 km from mid-transit to internal contact. The refractive nature of atmospheres, a property which is rarely accounted for in published investigations, will pose additional challenges to the characterization of Earth-like extrasolar planets. Refraction may have a lesser impact for Earth-like extrasolar planets within the habitable zone of some M-type stars.« less

  2. Novel photoinduced phase transitions in transition metal oxides and diluted magnetic semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Mizokawa, Takashi

    2012-10-23

    Some transition metal oxides have frustrated electronic states under multiphase competition due to strongly correlated d electrons with spin, charge, and orbital degrees of freedom and exhibit drastic responses to external stimuli such as optical excitation. Here, we present photoemission studies on Pr0.55(Ca1 - ySry)0.45MnO3 (y = 0.25), SrTiO3, and Ti1 - xCoxO2 (x = 0.05, 0.10) under laser illumination and discuss electronic structural changes induced by optical excitation in these strongly correlated oxides. We discuss the novel photoinduced phase transitions in these transition metal oxides and diluted magnetic semiconductors on the basis of polaronic pictures such as orbital, ferromagnetic, and ferroelectric polarons.

  3. Valence-bond theory of compounds of transition metals

    PubMed Central

    Pauling, Linus

    1975-01-01

    An equation relating the strength (bondforming power) of an spd hybrid bond orbital to the angles it makes with other bond orbitals is formulated and applied in the discussion of the structures of transition-metal carbonyls and other substances by the valence-bond method. The rather simple theory gives results that agree well with those obtained by the complicated and laborious calculation of sets of orthogonal hybrid bond orbitals with maximum strength. PMID:16592279

  4. Zwitterionic Group VIII transition metal initiators supported by olefin ligands

    DOEpatents

    Bazan, Guillermo C [Goleta, CA; Chen, Yaofeng [Shanghai, CN

    2011-10-25

    A zwitterionic Group VIII transition metal complex containing the simple and relatively small 3-(arylimino)-but-1-en-2-olato ligand that catalyzes the formation of polypropylene and high molecular weight polyethylene. A novel feature of this catalyst is that the active species is stabilized by a chelated olefin adduct. The present invention also provides methods of polymerizing olefin monomers using zwitterionic catalysts, particularly polypropylene and high molecular weight polyethylene.

  5. The Reactivity of Transition Metal-Silicon Compounds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-08-08

    light, and appear to follow both thermal and photochemical pathways. Compounds 9 and 10 are efficient acetylene polymerization catalysts . The scandium...containing both silicon and an early-transition- metal, Previously this field was quite undeveloped, therefore we surveyed a number ( approaches to...15- C5Me5)Ta(SiMe 3)C13 ," J Arnold and T D Tilley, J Am Chem Soc, 107, 6409 (1985) "Tetrahedral Lewis Base Adducts of an Acyl. Preparation and X-ray

  6. Novel Transition Metal Compounds with Promising Thermoelectric Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caillat, T.; Borshchevsky, A.; Fleurial, J. -P.

    1993-01-01

    Progress in the search for new high temperature thermoelectric materials at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory is reviewed. Novel transition metal compounds were selected as potential new high performance thermoelectric materials and criteria of selection are presented and discussed. Samples of these new compounds were prepared at JPL by a variety of techniques. Encouraging experimental results obtained on several of these compounds are reported and show that they have the potential to be the next generation of thermoelectric materials.

  7. Tailoring transition-metal hydroxides and oxides by photon-induced reactions

    DOE PAGES

    Niu, Kai -Yang; Fang, Liang; Ye, Rong; ...

    2016-10-18

    Controlled synthesis of transition-metal hydroxides and oxides with earth-abundant elements have attracted significant interest because of their wide applications, for example as battery electrode materials or electrocatalysts for fuel generation. Here, we report the tuning of the structure of transition-metal hydroxides and oxides by controlling chemical reactions using an unfocused laser to irradiate the precursor solution. A Nd:YAG laser with wavelengths of 532 nm or 1064 nm was used. The Ni 2+, Mn 2+, and Co 2+ ion-containing aqueous solution undergoes photo-induced reactions and produces hollow metal-oxide nanospheres (Ni 0.18Mn 0.45Co 0.37O x) or core–shell metal hydroxide nanoflowers ([Ni 0.15Mnmore » 0.15Co 0.7(OH) 2](NO 3) 0.2•H 2O), depending on the laser wavelengths. We propose two reaction pathways, either by photo-induced redox reaction or hydrolysis reaction, which are responsible for the formation of distinct nanostructures. As a result, the study of photon-induced materials growth shines light on the rational design of complex nanostructures with advanced functionalities.« less

  8. The Importance of Transition Metals in the Expanding Network of Microbial Metabolism in the Archean Eon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, E. K.; Jelen, B. I.; Giovannelli, D.; Prabhu, A.; Raanan, H.; Falkowski, P. G.

    2017-12-01

    Deep time changes in Earth surface redox conditions, particularly due to global oxygenation, has impacted the availability of different metals and substrates that are central in biology. Oxidoreductase proteins are molecular nanomachines responsible for all biological electron transfer processes across the tree of life. These enzymes largely contain transition metals in their active sites. Microbial metabolic pathways form a global network of electron transfer, which expanded throughout the Archean eon. Older metabolisms (sulfur reduction, methanogenesis, anoxygenic photosynthesis) accessed negative redox potentials, while later evolving metabolisms (oxygenic photosynthesis, nitrification/denitrification, aerobic respiration) accessed positive redox potentials. The incorporation of different transition metals facilitated biological innovation and the expansion of the network of microbial metabolism. Network analysis was used to examine the connections between microbial taxa, metabolic pathways, crucial metallocofactors, and substrates in deep time by incorporating biosignatures preserved in the geologic record. Nitrogen fixation and aerobic respiration have the highest level of betweenness among metabolisms in the network, indicating that the oldest metabolisms are not the most central. Fe has by far the highest betweenness among metals. Clustering analysis largely separates High Metal Bacteria (HMB), Low Metal Bacteria (LMB), and Archaea showing that simple un-weighted links between taxa, metabolism, and metals have phylogenetic relevance. On average HMB have the highest betweenness among taxa, followed by Archaea and LMB. There is a correlation between the number of metallocofactors and metabolic pathways in representative bacterial taxa, but Archaea do not follow this trend. In many cases older and more recently evolved metabolisms were clustered together supporting previous findings that proliferation of metabolic pathways is not necessarily chronological.

  9. Layered transition metal dichalcogenide electrochemistry: journey across the periodic table.

    PubMed

    Chia, Xinyi; Pumera, Martin

    2018-06-08

    Studies on layered transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), in particular for Group VIB TMDs like MoS2 and WS2, have long reached a crescendo in the realms of electrochemical applications initiated by their remarkable catalytic and electronic properties. One area that garnered considerable attention is the fervent pursuit of layered TMDs as electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER), driven by global efforts towards reducing carbon footprint and attaining hydrogen economy. This Tutorial Review captures the essence of electrochemistry of different classes of layered TMDs and metal chalcogenides across the period table and showcases their tuneable electrochemical and HER catalytic attributes that are governed by the elemental composition, structure and anisotropy. Of interest to the assiduously studied Group VIB TMDs, we describe the role of elemental constituents and material purity in aspects of surface composition and structure, on their electrochemistry. Across families of layered TMDs in the periodic table, we highlight the apparent trends in their electrochemical and electrocatalytic properties through diligent comparison. Inevitably, these trends vary according to the type of chalcogen or transition metal that constitutes the eventual TMD. Beyond layered TMDs, we discuss the electrochemistry and recent progress in HER electrocatalysis of other layered metal chalcogenides that are overshadowed by the success of Group VIB TMDs. At the pinnacle of the emergent applications of layered TMDs, it is prudent to demystify the intrinsic electrochemical behaviour that originates from the participation of the elemental constitution of transition metal or chalcogen. Moreover, knowledge of the catalytic and electronic properties of the various TMD families and emerging trends across the period or down the group is of paramount importance when introducing or refining their prospective uses. The annotations in this Tutorial Review are envisioned to promote

  10. Hydrogen and dihydrogen bonding of transition metal hydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobsen, Heiko

    2008-04-01

    Intermolecular interactions between a prototypical transition metal hydride WH(CO) 2NO(PH 3) 2 and a small proton donor H 2O have been studied using DFT methodology. The hydride, nitrosyl and carbonyl ligand have been considered as site of protonation. Further, DFT-D calculations in which empirical corrections for the dispersion energy are included, have been carried out. A variety of pure and hybrid density functionals (BP86, PW91, PBE, BLYP, OLYP, B3LYP, B1PW91, PBE0, X3LYP) have been considered, and our calculations indicate the PBE functional and its hybrid variation are well suited for the calculation of transition metal hydride hydrogen and dihydrogen bonding. Dispersive interactions make up for a sizeable portion of the intermolecular interaction, and amount to 20-30% of the bond energy and to 30-40% of the bond enthalpy. An energy decomposition analysis reveals that the H⋯H bond of transition metal hydrides contains both covalent and electrostatic contributions.

  11. Stabilization of Lithium Transition Metal Silicates in the Olivine Structure

    DOE PAGES

    Sun, Xiaoqi; Tripathi, Rajesh; Popov, Guerman; ...

    2017-07-28

    While olivine LiFePO 4 shows amongst the best electrochemical properties of Li-ion positive electrodes with respect to rate behavior owing to facile Li + migration pathways in the framework, replacing the [PO 4] 3- polyanion with a silicate [SO 4] 4- moitie in olivine is desirable. This would allow additional balancing alkali content and hence electron transfer, and increase the capacity. We demonstrate the first stabilization of a lithium transition-metal silicate (as a pure silicate) in the olivine structure type. Using LiInSiO 4 and LiScSiO 4 as the parent materials, transition metal (Mn, Fe, Co) substitutions on the In/Sc sitemore » were investigated by computational modelling via atomic scale simulation. Transition metal substitution was found to be only favourable for Co, a finding confirmed by the successful solid state synthesis of olivine LixInyCo 2-x-ySiO 4. Finally, the stabilization of the structure was achieved by entropy provided by cation disorder.« less

  12. Transition-metal impurities in semiconductors and heterojunction band lineups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langer, Jerzy M.; Delerue, C.; Lannoo, M.; Heinrich, Helmut

    1988-10-01

    The validity of a recent proposal that transition-metal impurity levels in semiconductors may serve as a reference in band alignment in semiconductor heterojunctions is positively verified by using the most recent data on band offsets in the following lattice-matched heterojunctions: Ga1-xAlxAs/GaAs, In1-xGaxAsyP1-y/InP, In1-xGaxP/GaAs, and Cd1-xHgxTe/CdTe. The alignment procedure is justified theoretically by showing that transition-metal energy levels are effectively pinned to the average dangling-bond energy level, which serves as the reference level for the heterojunction band alignment. Experimental and theoretical arguments showing that an increasingly popular notion on transition-metal energy-level pinning to the vacuum level is unjustified and must be abandoned in favor of the internal-reference rule proposed recently [J. M. Langer and H. Heinrich, Phys. Rev. Lett. 55, 1414 (1985)] are presented.

  13. Pressure induced structural phase transition in IB transition metal nitrides compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Soni, Shubhangi; Kaurav, Netram, E-mail: netramkaurav@yahoo.co.uk; Jain, A.

    2015-06-24

    Transition metal mononitrides are known as refractory compounds, and they have, relatively, high hardness, brittleness, melting point, and superconducting transition temperature, and they also have interesting optical, electronic, catalytic, and magnetic properties. Evolution of structural properties would be an important step towards realizing the potential technological scenario of this material of class. In the present study, an effective interionic interaction potential (EIOP) is developed to investigate the pressure induced phase transitions in IB transition metal nitrides TMN [TM = Cu, Ag, and Au] compounds. The long range Coulomb, van der Waals (vdW) interaction and the short-range repulsive interaction upto second-neighbormore » ions within the Hafemeister and Flygare approach with modified ionic charge are properly incorporated in the EIOP. The vdW coefficients are computed following the Slater-Kirkwood variational method, as both the ions are polarizable. The estimated value of the phase transition pressure (Pt) and the magnitude of the discontinuity in volume at the transition pressure are consistent as compared to the reported data.« less

  14. Structural implications for oxygen electrocatalysis in earthabundant transition metal oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Graeme Patrick

    Transition metal oxides and related nitrides/nitride-oxides represent a class of materials that have shown great promise as oxygen electrocatalysts to replace the otherwise non-scalable noble metal-based catalysts currently implemented in commercial technologies. That is, compounds in this class of materials have shown promise as electrocatalysts for both the oxygen evolution (OER) and oxygen reduction reactions (ORR). The two aforementioned half-reactions are at the cornerstone of most renewable energy transformations, as oxygen is an inherently practical and abundant source and sink for electrons. In water electrolysis to produce hydrogen, oxygen is inevitably formed, and in a fuel cell the driving force for extracting electrochemical energy from hydrogen is pairing it with the reduction of oxygen to water. If this can be accomplished reversibly, the problem of "transient" renewable energy and its storage can be mitigated. We have examined many metal oxides and related compounds based upon Earth- abundant transition metals (primarily first row) that are crystalline, yet high surface area, for these important electrocatalytic reactions, and found that crystal structure plays a crucial role in determining activity. In fact, while most studies on heterogeneous catalysis focus on the synthesis of defect-rich, high surface area, practically amorphous materials to elicit high activity, we have found that particular crystalline phases possess not only the appropriate activity, but to some degree more importantly, the stability to be named good catalysts. In Chapter 2, we demonstrate that of the two structural types of lithium cobalt oxide (LiCoO2) - layered (R-3m) and cubic (Fd-3m) - only the cubic phase is revealed to be an efficient and stable catalyst for OER. Whether water oxidation is driven photochemically, or electrochemically, the cubic phase LiCoO2 possessing a spinel-like structure (AB 2O4) with [Co4O4] subunits within the crystal is more active. It is seen

  15. When VSEPR Fails: Experimental and Theoretical Investigations of the Behavior of Alkaline-Earth-Metal Acetylides

    PubMed Central

    Guino-o, Marites A.; Alexander, Jacob S.; McKee, Michael L.; Hope, Håkon; Englich, Ulrich B.

    2014-01-01

    The synthesis, structural, and spectral characterization as well as a theoretical study of a family of alkaline-earth-metal acetylides provides insights into synthetic access and the structural and bonding characteristics of this group of highly reactive compounds. Based on our earlier communication that reported unusual geometry for a family of triphenylsilyl-substituted alkaline-earth-metal acetylides, we herein present our studies on an expanded family of target derivatives, providing experimental and theoretical data to offer new insights into the intensively debated theme of structural chemistry in heavy alkaline-earth-metal chemistry. PMID:19844925

  16. Soldering of Carbon Materials Using Transition Metal Rich Alloys.

    PubMed

    Burda, Marek; Lekawa-Raus, Agnieszka; Gruszczyk, Andrzej; Koziol, Krzysztof K K

    2015-08-25

    Joining of carbon materials via soldering has not been possible up to now due to lack of wetting of carbons by metals at standard soldering temperatures. This issue has been a severely restricting factor for many potential electrical/electronic and mechanical applications of nanostructured and conventional carbon materials. Here we demonstrate the formation of alloys that enable soldering of these structures. By addition of several percent (2.5-5%) of transition metal such as chromium or nickel to a standard lead-free soldering tin based alloy we obtained a solder that can be applied using a commercial soldering iron at typical soldering temperatures of approximately 350 °C and at ambient conditions. The use of this solder enables the formation of mechanically strong and electrically conductive joints between carbon materials and, when supported by a simple two-step technique, can successfully bond carbon structures to any metal terminal. It has been shown using optical and scanning electron microscope images as well as X-ray diffraction patterns and energy dispersive X-ray mapping that the successful formation of carbon-solder bonds is possible, first, thanks to the uniform nonreactive dispersion of transition metals in the tin-based matrix. Further, during the soldering process, these free elements diffuse into the carbon-alloy border with no formation of brazing-like carbides, which would damage the surface of the carbon materials.

  17. Thermophysical Property Measurements of Silicon-Transition Metal Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banish, R. Michael; Erwin, William R.; Sansoucie, Michael P.; Lee, Jonghyun; Gave, Matthew A.

    2014-01-01

    Metals and metallic alloys often have high melting temperatures and highly reactive liquids. Processing reactive liquids in containers can result in significant contamination and limited undercooling. This is particularly true for molten silicon and it alloys. Silicon is commonly termed "the universal solvent". The viscosity, surface tension, and density of several silicon-transition metal alloys were determined using the Electrostatic Levitator system at the Marshall Space Flight Center. The temperature dependence of the viscosity followed an Arrhenius dependence, and the surface tension followed a linear temperature dependence. The density of the melts, including the undercooled region, showed a linear behavior as well. Viscosity and surface tension values were obtain for several of the alloys in the undercooled region.

  18. Metal insulator transition in nickel substituted FeSi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, M.; Mishra, Ashish; Singh, Durgesh; Venkatesh, R.; Gangrade, Mohan; Ganesan, V.

    2018-04-01

    Resistivity of Fe1-xNixSi has been reported. Metal Insulator transition (MIT) is observed in Nickel (Ni) substituted FeSi for x in the range from 2 to 4 percentage. Two Band Model has been employed in order to calculate activation energy and to predict how band structure renormalized with substitution of nickel in FeSi. At sufficient level of nickel concentration an impurity band forms around Fermi level and contributes to the conduction heavily at low temperatures. Concentration around x = 0.04, displays metallic property below ˜ 70 K and is quantitatively similar to systems like Fe1-xTxSi (T = Co, Mn). Metallic component thus derived from Ni substituted FeSi seems to have an unconventional temperature dependence that may be attributed to the onset of departures from Fermi liquid picture.

  19. Transition-metal prion protein attachment: Competition with copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodak, Miroslav; Bernholc, Jerry

    2012-02-01

    Prion protein, PrP, is a protein capable of binding copper ions in multiple modes depending on their concentration. Misfolded PrP is implicated in a group of neurodegenerative diseases, which include ``mad cow disease'' and its human form, variant Creutzfeld-Jacob disease. An increasing amount of evidence suggests that attachment of non-copper metal ions to PrP triggers transformations to abnormal forms similar to those observed in prion diseases. In this work, we use hybrid Kohn-Sham/orbital-free density functional theory simulations to investigate copper replacement by other transition metals that bind to PrP, including zinc, iron and manganese. We consider all known copper binding modes in the N-terminal domain of PrP. Our calculations identify modes most susceptible to copper replacement and reveal metals that can successfully compete with copper for attachment to PrP.

  20. Chemical analysis of extracting transition metal oxides from polymetallic ore by sulphate process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enkh-Uyanga, Otgon-Uul; Munkhtsetseg, Baatar; Urangoo, Urtnasan; Tserendulam, Enkhtur; Agiimaa, Davaadorj

    2017-06-01

    In this research work we attempt to improve the purity of polymetallic ores in Mongolia whilst developing practical applications of its refinement processes and this paper presents the results of chemical research of extracting transition metal titanium oxides, ferrous oxide and rare earth oxides from polymetallic ore. Thereby, chemical and mineral analysis of polymetallic ore is carried out basis of responses to the support process at various degrees of water whereas transition metal sulphates solubility differ. As a result of sulphate and resulphurization process we have extracted anatase with 62.5 percent titanium dioxide and brookite mineral with 89.6 percent of titanium dioxide as well as mineral with 83.8 percent of ferrous oxide hematite and rare earth oxides with 57.6 percent of cerium oxide. These oxides are identified under various conditions in the thermal processing. The morphology structure and chemical content compound of the mineral has been verified as a result of the XRF, XRD, SEM-EDX analysis.

  1. Surface Charge Development on Transition Metal Sulfides: An Electrokinetic Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bebie, Joakim; Schoonen, Martin A. A.; Fuhrmann, Mark; Strongin, Daniel R.

    1998-02-01

    The isoelectric points, pH i.e.p., of ZnS, PbS, CuFeS 2, FeS, FeS 2, NiS 2, CoS 2, and MnS 2 in NaCl supported electrolyte solutions are estimated to be between pH 3.3 and 0.6, with most of the isoelectric points below pH 2. The first electrokinetic measurements on NiS 2, CoS 2, and MnS 2 are reported here. Below pH i.e.p. the metal-sulfide surfaces are positively charged, above pH i.e.p. the surfaces are negatively charged. The addition of Me 2+ ions shifts the pH i.e.p. and changes the pH dependence considerably. The isoelectric points of the measured transition metal sulfides in the absence of metal ions or dissolved sulfide (H 2S or HS -) are in agreement with those found in earlier studies. The pH range of observed isoelectric points for metal sulfides (0.6-3.3) is compared to the considerably wider pH i.e.p. range (2-12) found for oxides. The correlation between pH i.e.p. and the electronegativities of the metal sulfides suggests that all metal sulfides will have an isoelectric point between pH 0.6 and 3.3. Compared to metal oxides, sulfides exhibit an isoelectric point that is largely independent of the nature of the metal cation in the solid.

  2. Polaronic Transport in Phosphate Glasses Containing Transition Metal Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Mark

    The goal of this dissertation is to characterize the basic transport properties of phosphate glasses containing various amounts of TIs and to identify and explain any electronic phase transitions which may occur. The P2 O5-V2O5-WO3 (PVW) glass system will be analyzed to find the effect of TI concentration on conduction. In addition, the effect of the relative concentrations of network forming ions (SiO2 and P2O5) on transport will be studied in the P2O5-SiO2-Fe2O 3 (PSF) system. Also presented is a numerical study on a tight-binding model adapted for the purposes of modelling Gaussian traps, mimicking TI's, which are arranged in an extended network. The results of this project will contribute to the development of fundamental theories on the electronic transport in glasses containing mixtures of transition oxides as well as those containing multiple network formers without discernible phase separation. The present study on the PVW follows up on previous investigation into the effect on mixed transition ions in oxide glasses. Past research has focused on glasses containing transition metal ions from the 3d row. The inclusion of tungsten, a 5d transition metal, adds a layer of complexity through the mismatch of the energies of the orbitals contributing to localized states. The data have indicated that a transition reminiscent of a metal-insulator transition (MIT) occurs in this system as the concentration of tungsten increases. As opposed to some other MIT-like transitions found in phosphate glass systems, there seems to be no polaron to bipolaron conversion. Instead, the individual localization parameter for tungsten noticeably decreases dramatically at the transition point as well as the adiabaticity. Another distinctive feature of this project is the study of the PSF system, which contains two true network formers, phosphorous pentoxide (P2O 5) and silicon dioxide (SiO2). It is not usually possible to do a reliable investigation of the conduction properties of

  3. Process optimization and kinetics for leaching of rare earth metals from the spent Ni-metal hydride batteries.

    PubMed

    Meshram, Pratima; Pandey, B D; Mankhand, T R

    2016-05-01

    Nickel-metal hydride batteries (Ni-MH) contain not only the base metals, but valuable rare earth metals (REMs) viz. La, Sm, Nd, Pr and Ce as well. In view of the importance of resource recycling and assured supply of the contained metals in such wastes, the present study has focussed on the leaching of the rare earth metals from the spent Ni-MH batteries. The conditions for the leaching of REMs from the spent batteries were optimized as: 2M H2SO4, 348K temperature and 120min of time at a pulp density (PD) of 100g/L. Under this condition, the leaching of 98.1% Nd, 98.4% Sm, 95.5% Pr and 89.4% Ce was achieved. Besides the rare earth metals, more than 90% of base metals (Ni, Co, Mn and Zn) were also leached out in this condition. Kinetic data for the dissolution of all the rare earth metals showed the best fit to the chemical control shrinking core model. The leaching of metals followed the mechanism involving the chemical reaction proceeding on the surface of particles by the lixiviant, which was corroborated by the XRD phase analysis and SEM-EDS studies. The activation energy of 7.6, 6.3, 11.3 and 13.5kJ/mol was acquired for the leaching of neodymium, samarium, praseodymium and cerium, respectively in the temperature range 305-348K. From the leach liquor, the mixed rare earth metals were precipitated at pH∼1.8 and the precipitated REMs was analyzed by XRD and SEM studies to determine the phases and the morphological features. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Isomorphic introduction of d(0) transition metals to mesoporous silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morey, Mark Sanson

    1998-12-01

    Early transition metals (Ti, V, Zr, Mo, W) have been incorporated in the mesoporous silicate system by hydrothermal and post-synthesis treatments. The materials were studied by diffraction, adsorption and spectroscopic techniques and were found to have catalytic, halogenation activity toward organic substrates at neutral pH. Intense interest has been shown in the new class of silica-based, mesoporous materials due to their high potential for catalytic applications. Their synthesis occurs via a cooperative self-assembly of surfactant/silicate pairs to form numerous, extended network structures upon silicate condensation based on liquid crystal phases of surfactant/water systems. Surfactant micelle removal by calcination generates a well defined pore system with a narrow pore size distribution. Of these phases, the cubic MCM-48 form possesses a high surface area (1200-1500msp2/g), a 3-D array of pores, and a large pore diameter (20-100A) so that selectivity for large (>10A kinetic diameter) molecules is possible. For this work, the MCM-48 phase was chosen since its branched, bi-continuous pore array would be less likely to clog during use than a one dimensional array. Two techniques for transition metal incorporation are compared consisting of hydrothermal and post-synthesis treatment. A brief description of an attempt to synthesize mesoporous molybdena will be included. The first approach consists of combining various metal and Si precursors in the starting gel, while exploring a broad region of the multi-component phase diagram. The second pathway involves grafting metal species on a pure silica, MCM-48 support by anchoring them to surface silanols using reactive metal alkoxides. Bulk structural characterization by X-ray powder diffraction and nitrogen adsorption shows that the pore structure is maintained after incorporation of metal species by both methods. Spectroscopic methods (FTIR/RAMAN and UV/VIS) are used to gain insight into the local metal

  5. Tunable magnetic and magnetocaloric properties in heavy rare-earth based metallic glasses through the substitution of similar elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Huiyan; Li, Ran; Zhang, Leilei; Zhang, Tao

    2014-04-01

    The influence of interchangeable substitution of similar heavy rare-earth-elements (HRE), i.e., Gd-Ho, Gd-Er, and Ho-Er, on the magnetic and magnetocaloric properties of HRE55Al27.5Co17.5 metallic glasses was evaluated. The magnetic transition temperature (TC) can be tuned in a wide temperature range from 8 K to 93 K by adjusting the substitutional concentration in the resulting metallic glasses. A roughly linear correlation between peak value of magnetic entropy change (|ΔSMpk|) and TC-2/3 was obtained in the three systems. This kind of substitutional adjustment provides a useful method for designing desirable candidates in metallic glasses with high magnetic entropy change, large magnetic cooling efficiency, and tunable TC for magnetic refrigerant in nitrogen and hydrogen liquefaction temperature ranges.

  6. Potentiometric and spectroscopic study of the interaction of 3d transition metal ions with inositol hexakisphosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veiga, Nicolás; Macho, Israel; Gómez, Kerman; González, Gabriel; Kremer, Carlos; Torres, Julia

    2015-10-01

    Among myo-inositol phosphates, the most abundant in nature is the myo-inositol hexakisphosphate, InsP6. Although it is known to be vital to cell functioning, the biochemical research into its metabolism needs chemical and structural analysis of all the protonation, complexation and precipitation processes that it undergoes in the biological media. In view of its high negative charge at physiological level, our group has been leading a thorough research into the InsP6 chemical and structural behavior in the presence of the alkali and alkaline earth metal ions essential for life. The aim of this article is to extend these studies, dealing with the chemical and structural features of the InsP6 interaction with biologically relevant 3d transition metal ions (Fe(II), Fe(III), Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II)), in a non-interacting medium and under simulated physiological conditions. The metal-complex stability constants were determined by potentiometry, showing under ligand-excess conditions the formation of mononuclear species in different protonation states. Under metal ion excess, polymetallic species were detected for Fe(II), Fe(III), Zn(II) and Cu(II). Additionally, the 31P NMR and UV-vis spectroscopic studies provided interesting structural aspects of the strong metal ion-InsP6 interaction.

  7. Ultrathin and Atomically Flat Transition-Metal Oxide: Promising Building Blocks for Metal-Insulator Electronics.

    PubMed

    Cui, Qingsong; Sakhdari, Maryam; Chamlagain, Bhim; Chuang, Hsun-Jen; Liu, Yi; Cheng, Mark Ming-Cheng; Zhou, Zhixian; Chen, Pai-Yen

    2016-12-21

    We present a new and viable template-assisted thermal synthesis method for preparing amorphous ultrathin transition-metal oxides (TMOs) such as TiO 2 and Ta 2 O 5 , which are converted from crystalline two-dimensional (2D) transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) down to a few atomic layers. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) were used to characterize the chemical composition and bonding, surface morphology, and atomic structure of these ultrathin amorphous materials to validate the effectiveness of our synthesis approach. Furthermore, we have fabricated metal-insulator-metal (MIM) diodes using the TiO 2 and Ta 2 O 5 as ultrathin insulating layers with low potential barrier heights. Our MIM diodes show a clear transition from direct tunneling to Fowler-Nordheim tunneling, which was not observed in previously reported MIM diodes with TiO 2 or Ta 2 O 5 as the insulating layer. We attribute the improved performance of our MIM diodes to the excellent flatness and low pinhole/defect densities in our TMO insulting layers converted from 2D TMDs, which enable the low-threshold and controllable electron tunneling transport. We envision that it is possible to use the ultrathin TMOs converted from 2D TMDs as the insulating layer of a wide variety of metal-insulator and field-effect electronic devices for various applications ranging from microwave mixing, parametric conversion, infrared photodetection, emissive energy harvesting, to ultrafast electronic switching.

  8. X-ray Emission Spectroscopy in Magnetic 3d-Transition Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Iota, V; Park, J; Baer, B

    2003-11-18

    The application of high pressure affects the band structure and magnetic interactions in solids by modifying nearest-neighbor distances and interatomic potentials. While all materials experience electronic changes with increasing pressure, spin polarized, strongly electron correlated materials are expected to undergo the most dramatic transformations. In such materials, (d and f-electron metals and compounds), applied pressure reduces the strength of on-site correlations, leading to increased electron delocalization and, eventually, to loss of its magnetism. In this ongoing project, we study the electronic and magnetic properties of Group VIII, 3d (Fe, Co and Ni) magnetic transition metals and their compounds at highmore » pressures. The high-pressure properties of magnetic 3d-transition metals and compounds have been studied extensively over the years, because of iron being a major constituent of the Earth's core and its relevance to the planetary modeling to understand the chemical composition, internal structure, and geomagnetism. However, the fundamental scientific interest in the high-pressure properties of magnetic 3d-electron systems extends well beyond the geophysical applications to include the electron correlation-driven physics. The role of magnetic interactions in the stabilization of the ''non-standard'' ambient pressure structures of Fe, Co and Ni is still incompletely understood. Theoretical studies have predicted (and high pressure experiments are beginning to show) strong correlations between the electronic structure and phase stability in these materials. The phase diagrams of magnetic 3d systems reflect a delicate balance between spin interactions and structural configuration. At ambient conditions, the crystal structures of {alpha}-Fe(bcc) and {var_epsilon}-Co(hcp) phases depart from the standard sequence (hcp {yields} bcc{yields} hcp {yields} fcc), as observed in all other non-magnetic transition metals with increasing the d-band occupancy

  9. A Spitzer search for transits of radial velocity detected super-Earths

    SciTech Connect

    Kammer, J. A.; Knutson, H. A.; Desert, J.-M.

    2014-02-01

    Unlike hot Jupiters or other gas giants, super-Earths are expected to have a wide variety of compositions, ranging from terrestrial bodies like our own to more gaseous planets like Neptune. Observations of transiting systems, which allow us to directly measure planet masses and radii and constrain atmospheric properties, are key to understanding the compositional diversity of the planets in this mass range. Although Kepler has discovered hundreds of transiting super-Earth candidates over the past 4 yr, the majority of these planets orbit stars that are too far away and too faint to allow for detailed atmospheric characterization and reliable massmore » estimates. Ground-based transit surveys focus on much brighter stars, but most lack the sensitivity to detect planets in this size range. One way to get around the difficulty of finding these smaller planets in transit is to start by choosing targets that are already known to host super-Earth sized bodies detected using the radial velocity (RV) technique. Here we present results from a Spitzer program to observe six of the most favorable RV-detected super-Earth systems, including HD 1461, HD 7924, HD 156668, HIP 57274, and GJ 876. We find no evidence for transits in any of their 4.5 μm flux light curves, and place limits on the allowed transit depths and corresponding planet radii that rule out even the most dense and iron-rich compositions for these objects. We also observed HD 97658, but the observation window was based on a possible ground-based transit detection that was later ruled out; thus the window did not include the predicted time for the transit detection recently made by the Microvariability and Oscillations of Stars space telescope.« less

  10. Transition-metal phosphors with cyclometalating ligands: fundamentals and applications.

    PubMed

    Chi, Yun; Chou, Pi-Tai

    2010-02-01

    One goal of this critical review is to provide advanced methodologies for systematic preparation of transition-metal based phosphors that show latent applications in the field of organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs). We are therefore reviewing various types of cyclometalating chelates for which the favorable metal-chelate bonding interaction, on the one hand, makes the resulting phosphorescent complexes highly emissive in both fluid and solid states at room temperature. On the other hand, fine adjustment of ligand-centered pi-pi* electronic transitions allows tuning of emission wavelength across the whole visible spectrum. The cyclometalating chelates are then classified according to types of cyclometalating groups, i.e. either aromatic C-H or azolic N-H fragment, and the adjacent donor fragment involved in the formation of metallacycles; the latter is an N-containing heterocycle, N-heterocyclic (NHC) carbene fragment or even diphenylphosphino group. These cyclometalating ligands are capable to react with heavy transition-metal elements, namely: Ru(II), Os(II), Ir(III) and Pt(II), to afford a variety of highly emissive phosphors, for which the photophysical properties as a function of chelate or metal characteristics are systematically discussed. Using Ir(III) complexes as examples, the C--N chelates possessing both C-H site and N-heterocyclic donor group are essential for obtaining phosphors with emission ranging from sky-blue to saturated red, while the N--N chelates such as 2-pyridyl-C-linked azolates are found useful for serving as true-blue chromophores due to their increased ligand-centered pi-pi* energy gap. Lastly, the remaining NHC carbene and benzyl phosphine chelates are highly desirable to serve as ancillary chelates in localizing the electronic transition between the metal and remaining lower energy chromophoric chelates. As for the potential opto-electronic applications, many of them exhibit remarkable performance data, which are convincing to pave a

  11. Process for preparing higher oxides of the alkali and alkaline earth metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadhukhan, P.; Bell, A. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    High purity inorganic higher oxides of the alkali and alkaline earth metals are prepared by subjecting the hydroxide of the alkali and alkaline earth metal to a radio frequency discharge sustained in oxygen. The process is particulary adaptable to the production of high purity potassium superoxide by subjecting potassium hydroxide to glow discharge sustained in oxygen under the pressure of about 0.75 to 1.00 torr.

  12. Cohesion and coordination effects on transition metal surface energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruvireta, Judit; Vega, Lorena; Viñes, Francesc

    2017-10-01

    Here we explore the accuracy of Stefan equation and broken-bond model semiempirical approaches to obtain surface energies on transition metals. Cohesive factors are accounted for either via the vaporization enthalpies, as proposed in Stefan equation, or via cohesive energies, as employed in the broken-bond model. Coordination effects are considered including the saturation degree, as suggested in Stefan equation, employing Coordination Numbers (CN), or as the ratio of broken bonds, according to the bond-cutting model, considering as well the square root dependency of the bond strength on CN. Further, generalized coordination numbers CN bar are contemplated as well, exploring a total number of 12 semiempirical formulations on the three most densely packed surfaces of 3d, 4d, and 5d Transition Metals (TMs) displaying face-centered cubic (fcc), body-centered cubic (bcc), or hexagonal close-packed (hcp) crystallographic structures. Estimates are compared to available experimental surface energies obtained extrapolated to zero temperature. Results reveal that Stefan formula cohesive and coordination dependencies are only qualitative suited, but unadvised for quantitative discussion, as surface energies are highly overestimated, favoring in addition the stability of under-coordinated surfaces. Broken-bond cohesion and coordination dependencies are a suited basis for quantitative comparison, where square-root dependencies on CN to account for bond weakening are sensibly worse. An analysis using Wulff shaped averaged surface energies suggests the employment of broken-bond model using CN to gain surface energies for TMs, likely applicable to other metals.

  13. High Pressure Phase Transformations in Heavy Rare Earth Metals and Connections to Actinide Crystal Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Vohra, Yogesh K.; Sangala, Bagvanth Reddy; Stemshorn, Andrew K.

    2008-07-01

    High-pressure studies have been performed on heavy rare earth metals Terbium (Tb) to 155 GPa and Holmium (Ho) to 134 GPa in a diamond anvil cell at room temperature. The following crystal structure sequence was observed in both metals hcp {yields} Sm-type {yields} dhcp {yields} distorted fcc (hR-24) {yields} monoclinic (C2/m) with increasing pressure. The last transformation to a low symmetry monoclinic phase is accompanied by a volume collapse of 5 % for Tb at 51 GPa and a volume collapse of 3 % for Ho at 103 GPa. This volume collapse under high pressure is reminiscent of f-shell delocalizationmore » in light rare earth metal Cerium (Ce), Praseodymium (Pr), and heavy actinide metals Americium (Am) and Curium (Cm). The orthorhombic Pnma phase that has been reported in Am and Cm after f-shell delocalization is not observed in heavy rare earth metals under high pressures. (authors)« less

  14. Plasma-Enhanced Deposition and Processing of Transition Metals and Transition Metal Silicides for VLSI.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-05-20

    molybdenum trifluoride in the deposited material. Titanium silicide films formed from a discharge of titanium tetrachlotide, silane, and hydrogen...displayed resistivities of -150 /4-cm, due to small amounts of oxygen and chlorine incorporated during deposition. Plasma etching studies of tungsten films...material, thereby reducing speed, and aluminum is a low melting material, thereby limiting processing latitude. As a result, mmition metals and

  15. Spin-exchange interaction between transition metals and metalloids in soft-ferromagnetic metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Santanu; Choudhary, Kamal; Chernatynskiy, Aleksandr; Choi Yim, Haein; Bandyopadhyay, Asis K.; Mukherjee, Sundeep

    2016-06-01

    High-performance magnetic materials have immense industrial and scientific importance in wide-ranging electronic, electromechanical, and medical device technologies. Metallic glasses with a fully amorphous structure are particularly suited for advanced soft-magnetic applications. However, fundamental scientific understanding is lacking for the spin-exchange interaction between metal and metalloid atoms, which typically constitute a metallic glass. Using an integrated experimental and molecular dynamics approach, we demonstrate the mechanism of electron interaction between transition metals and metalloids. Spin-exchange interactions were investigated for a Fe-Co metallic glass system of composition [(Co1-x Fe x )0.75B0.2Si0.05]96Cr4. The saturation magnetization increased with higher Fe concentration, but the trend significantly deviated from simple rule of mixtures. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulation was used to identify the ferromagnetic/anti-ferromagnetic interaction between the transition metals and metalloids. The overlapping band-structure and density of states represent ‘Stoner type’ magnetization for the amorphous alloys in contrast to ‘Heisenberg type’ in crystalline iron. The enhancement of magnetization by increasing iron was attributed to the interaction between Fe 3d and B 2p bands, which was further validated by valence-band study.

  16. The effects of refraction on transit transmission spectroscopy: application to Earth-like exoplanets

    SciTech Connect

    Misra, Amit; Meadows, Victoria; Crisp, Dave, E-mail: amit0@astro.washington.edu

    2014-09-01

    We quantify the effects of refraction in transit transmission spectroscopy on spectral absorption features and on temporal variations that could be used to obtain altitude-dependent spectra for planets orbiting stars of different stellar types. We validate our model against altitude-dependent transmission spectra of the Earth from ATMOS and against lunar eclipse spectra from Pallé et al. We perform detectability studies to show the potential effects of refraction on hypothetical observations of Earth analogs with the James Webb Space Telescope NIRSPEC. Due to refraction, there will be a maximum tangent pressure level that can be probed during transit for each givenmore » planet-star system. We show that because of refraction, for an Earth-analog planet orbiting in the habitable zone of a Sun-like star only the top 0.3 bars of the atmosphere can be probed, leading to a decrease in the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of absorption features by 60%, while for an Earth-analog planet orbiting in the habitable zone of an M5V star it is possible to probe almost the entire atmosphere with minimal decreases in S/N. We also show that refraction can result in temporal variations in the transit transmission spectrum which may provide a way to obtain altitude-dependent spectra of exoplanet atmospheres. Additionally, the variations prior to ingress and subsequent to egress provide a way to probe pressures greater than the maximum tangent pressure that can be probed during transit. Therefore, probing the maximum range of atmospheric altitudes, and in particular the near-surface environment of an Earth-analog exoplanet, will require looking at out-of-transit refracted light in addition to the in-transit spectrum.« less

  17. Low temperature synthesis of transition metal oxides containing surfactant ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janauer, Gerald Gilbert

    1998-11-01

    Recently there has been much interest in reacting vanadium oxides hydrothermally with cationic surfactants to form novel layered compounds. A series of new transition metal oxides, however, has also been formed at or near room temperature in open containers. Synthesis, characterization, and proposed mechanisms of formation are the focus of this work. Low temperature reactions of vanadium pentoxide and ammonium transition metallates with long chain amine surfactants, such as dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide yielded interesting new products many of which are layered phases. DTAsb4\\ Hsb2Vsb{10}Osb{28}. 8Hsb2O, a layered highly crystalline phase, is the first such phase for which a single crystal X-ray structure has been determined. The unit cell for this material was found to be triclinic with space group P1-, cell parameters a=9.8945(3)A, b=11.5962(1)A, c=21.9238(2)A, alpha=95.153(2)sp°,\\ beta=93.778(1)sp°, and gamma=101.360(1)sp°. Additionally, a novel tungsten, a molybdenum and a dichromate phase will be discussed. Both the tungsten and the dichromate materials were indexed from their powder diffraction patterns yielding monoclinic unit cells. The tungsten material was found to have a=50.56(4)A, b=54.41(4)A, c=13.12(1)A, and beta=99.21sp°. The dichromate compound was determined to have a=26.757(5)A, b=10.458(2)A, c=14.829(3)A and beta=98.01(1)sp°. Interlayer spacings for the lamellar dichromate and molybdenum phases were d001 = 28.7 A, and d001 = 22.9 A. The synthesis, characterization, composition, and structure of these transition metal oxide-surfactant materials will be discussed.

  18. Signatures of exciton condensation in a transition metal dichalcogenide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogar, Anshul; Rak, Melinda S.; Vig, Sean; Husain, Ali A.; Flicker, Felix; Joe, Young Il; Venema, Luc; MacDougall, Greg J.; Chiang, Tai C.; Fradkin, Eduardo; van Wezel, Jasper; Abbamonte, Peter

    2017-12-01

    Bose condensation has shaped our understanding of macroscopic quantum phenomena, having been realized in superconductors, atomic gases, and liquid helium. Excitons are bosons that have been predicted to condense into either a superfluid or an insulating electronic crystal. Using the recently developed technique of momentum-resolved electron energy-loss spectroscopy (M-EELS), we studied electronic collective modes in the transition metal dichalcogenide semimetal 1T-TiSe2. Near the phase-transition temperature (190 kelvin), the energy of the electronic mode fell to zero at nonzero momentum, indicating dynamical slowing of plasma fluctuations and crystallization of the valence electrons into an exciton condensate. Our study provides compelling evidence for exciton condensation in a three-dimensional solid and establishes M-EELS as a versatile technique sensitive to valence band excitations in quantum materials.

  19. High-temperature corrosion of metals in the salt and metallic melts containing rare earths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpov, V. V.; Abramov, A. V.; Zhilyakov, A. Yu.; Belikov, S. V.; Volkovich, V. A.; Polovov, I. B.; Rebrin, O. I.

    2016-09-01

    A complex of independent methods was employed to study the corrosion resistance of molybdenum, zirconium, tantalum and tungsten in chloride, chloride-fluoride and fluoride-oxide melts based on LiCl, CaCl2, NaCl- KCl, LiF, and containing rare earths. Tests were conducted for 30 h at 750-1050 °C. The metals showed excellent corrosion resistance in fused chlorides (the corrosion rates were below 0.0005 g/(m2 h). Despite the presence of chemically active fluoride ions in the chloride-fluoride melts, the metals studied also showed very low corrosion rates, except molybdenum, for which the rate of corrosion was 0,8 g/(m2 h). The corrosion resistance of tantalum was considerably reduced in the fluoride-oxide melts; the corrosion rate was over 1 g/(m2 h) corresponding to the 8-th grade of stability and placing tantalum to the group of "low stability" materials.

  20. Control of plasmonic nanoantennas by reversible metal-insulator transition

    PubMed Central

    Abate, Yohannes; Marvel, Robert E.; Ziegler, Jed I.; Gamage, Sampath; Javani, Mohammad H.; Stockman, Mark I.; Haglund, Richard F.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate dynamic reversible switching of VO2 insulator-to-metal transition (IMT) locally on the scale of 15 nm or less and control of nanoantennas, observed for the first time in the near-field. Using polarization-selective near-field imaging techniques, we simultaneously monitor the IMT in VO2 and the change of plasmons on gold infrared nanoantennas. Structured nanodomains of the metallic VO2 locally and reversibly transform infrared plasmonic dipole nanoantennas to monopole nanoantennas. Fundamentally, the IMT in VO2 can be triggered on femtosecond timescale to allow ultrafast nanoscale control of optical phenomena. These unique features open up promising novel applications in active nanophotonics. PMID:26358623

  1. Theoretical study of transition-metal ions bound to benzene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Partridge, Harry; Langhoff, Stephen R.

    1992-01-01

    Theoretical binding energies are reported for all first-row and selected second-row transition metal ions (M+) bound to benzene. The calculations employ basis sets of at least double-zeta plus polarization quality and account for electron correlation using the modified coupled-pair functional method. While the bending is predominantly electrostatic, the binding energies are significantly increased by electron correlation, because the donation from the metal d orbitals to the benzene pi* orbitals is not well described at the self-consistent-field level. The uncertainties in the computed binding energies are estimated to be about 5 kcal/mol. Although the calculated and experimental binding energies generally agree to within their combined uncertainties, it is likely that the true binding energies lie in the lower portion of the experimental range. This is supported by the very good agreement between the theoretical and recent experimental binding energies for AgC6H6(+).

  2. Control of plasmonic nanoantennas by reversible metal-insulator transition

    DOE PAGES

    Abate, Yohannes; Marvel, Robert E.; Ziegler, Jed I.; ...

    2015-09-11

    We demonstrate dynamic reversible switching of VO 2 insulator-to-metal transition (IMT) locally on the scale of 15 nm or less and control of nanoantennas, observed for the first time in the near-field. Using polarization-selective near-field imaging techniques, we simultaneously monitor the IMT in VO 2 and the change of plasmons on gold infrared nanoantennas. Structured nanodomains of the metallic VO 2 locally and reversibly transform infrared plasmonic dipole nanoantennas to monopole nanoantennas. Fundamentally, the IMT in VO 2 can be triggered on femtosecond timescale to allow ultrafast nanoscale control of optical phenomena. In conclusion, these unique features open up promisingmore » novel applications in active nanophotonics.« less

  3. Ground-based Search of Earth-mass Exoplanets using Transit-Timing Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, J. M.

    2010-10-01

    This work presents recent results from a ground-based transit follow-up program of the extrasolar planet XO-2b in order to find Earth-mass companions. It also introduces the future use of the MONET 1m-class robotic telescopes as part of the effort to overcome the difficulties of this kind of project.

  4. Lunar Flight Study Series: Volume 4. Preliminary Investigation of the Astronautics of Earth - Moon Transits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braud, Nolan J.

    1963-01-01

    Preliminary information on flight profiles, velocity budgets and launch windows for Apollo and Support Vehicle flights is presented in this report. A newly conceived method of establishing a flight mechanical classification of the earth-moon transits is discussed. The results are empirical and are designed to contribute to the mission mode selection.

  5. Inhomogeneous composition distribution in monolayer transition metal dichalcogenide alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Shuang; Xu, Mingsheng; Huang, Shuyun; Liang, Tao; Wang, Shengping; Li, Hongfei; Iwai, Hideo; Onishi, Keiko; Hanagata, Nobutaka; Fujita, Daisuke; Ma, Xiangyang; Yang, Deren

    2017-04-01

    Alloying with various compositions is an efficient method to tailor the optoelectronic properties of two-dimensional (2D) transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs). However, the composition distribution in the monolayer of TMDs alloys lacks detailed investigation. Here, by exploring scanning Auger electron spectroscopy, we investigate the composition distribution in MoS2(1-x)Se2x monolayers with high spatial resolution. Our results demonstrate that inhomogeneous composition distribution exists not only among different nanosheets on a substrate but also within individual nanosheets. Our study would be helpful to develop new methods for controllable synthesis of TMDs alloys and other 2D materials.

  6. Theoretical study of electron correlation effects in transition metal dimers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Das, G. P.; Jaffe, R. L.

    1984-01-01

    Introduction of partially localized orbitals is shown to reduce the number of terms needed to describe the bonding in transition metal clusters. Using this formalism, it is possible to compute the various intra- and inter-atomic electron correlation contributions to the bond energy. Calculations demonstrate the relative importance of several kinds of electron correlation terms involving the 3p, 3d, and 4s electrons. Improved interaction potentials are obtained for the dimers V(2) and Cr(2) when additional correlation is added to the CAS SCF results of Walch, Bauschlicher, Roos, and Nelin (1983).

  7. CH functionalization of heteroaromatic compounds by transition metal catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanba, Shunsuke; Fujiwara, Taiki; Monguchi, Daiki; Mori, Atsunori

    2010-06-01

    Transition metal-catalyzed CH functioanlization of thiazoles and thiophenes are carried out. The reaction of thiophene with aryl halide in the presence of a palladium catalyst underwent the CC bond forming reaction at the CH bond of thiophene. By employing the reaction head-to-tail-type oligothiophene is synthesized in a stepwise manner. When several azoles are treated with secondary amines and amides in the presence of a copper catalyst, oxidative CH-NH coupling took place to form the carbon-nitrogen bond.

  8. Piezoelectric coefficients of bulk 3R transition metal dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konabe, Satoru; Yamamoto, Takahiro

    2017-09-01

    The piezoelectric properties of bulk transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) with a 3R structure were investigated using first-principles calculations based on density functional theory combined with the Berry phase treatment. Values for the elastic constant Cijkl , the piezoelectric coefficient eijk , and the piezoelectric coefficient dijk are given for bulk 3R-TMDCs (MoS2, MoSe2, WS2, and WSe2). The piezoelectric coefficients of bulk 3R-TMDCs are shown to be sufficiently large or comparable to those of conventional bulk piezoelectric materials such as α-quartz, wurtzite GaN, and wurtzite AlN.

  9. Transition-Metal-Catalyzed C-H Alkylation Using Alkenes.

    PubMed

    Dong, Zhe; Ren, Zhi; Thompson, Samuel J; Xu, Yan; Dong, Guangbin

    2017-07-12

    Alkylation reactions represent an important organic transformation to form C-C bonds. In addition to conventional approaches with alkyl halides or sulfonates as alkylating agents, the use of unactivated olefins for alkylations has become attractive from both cost and sustainability viewpoints. This Review summarizes transition-metal-catalyzed alkylations of various carbon-hydrogen bonds (addition of C-H bonds across olefins) using regular olefins or 1,3-dienes up to May 2016. According to the mode of activation, the Review is divided into two sections: alkylation via C-H activation and alkylation via olefin activation.

  10. Transition metal partially supported graphene: Magnetism and oscillatory electrostatic potentials

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Xiaojie; Wang, Cai-Zhuang

    2017-08-07

    Using first-principles calculations here, we show that Mn and Cr layers under graphene exhibit almost zero magnetic moment due to anti-ferromagnetic order, while ferromagnetic coupling in Fe, Co, and Ni leads to large magnetic moment. The transition metal partially supported graphene, with a mixture of supported and pristine areas, exhibits an oscillatory electrostatic potential, thus alternating the electric field across the supported and pristine areas. Such an effect can be utilized to control mass transport and nanostructure self-organization on graphene at the atomic level.

  11. Transition metal partially supported graphene: Magnetism and oscillatory electrostatic potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xiaojie; Wang, Cai-Zhuang

    Using first-principles calculations here, we show that Mn and Cr layers under graphene exhibit almost zero magnetic moment due to anti-ferromagnetic order, while ferromagnetic coupling in Fe, Co, and Ni leads to large magnetic moment. The transition metal partially supported graphene, with a mixture of supported and pristine areas, exhibits an oscillatory electrostatic potential, thus alternating the electric field across the supported and pristine areas. Such an effect can be utilized to control mass transport and nanostructure self-organization on graphene at the atomic level.

  12. Quantum superconductor-metal transition in a proximity array.

    PubMed

    Feigel'man, M V; Larkin, A I; Skvortsov, M A

    2001-02-26

    A theory of the zero-temperature superconductor-metal transition is developed for an array of superconductive islands (of size d) coupled via a disordered two-dimensional conductor with the dimensionless conductance g = Planck's over 2 pi/e(2)R(square)>1. At T = 0 the macroscopically superconductive state of the array with lattice spacing b>d is destroyed at g

  13. Band engineering in transition metal dichalcogenides: Stacked versus lateral heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Yuzheng; Robertson, John

    2016-06-06

    We calculate a large difference in the band alignments for transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) heterojunctions when arranged in the stacked layer or lateral (in-plane) geometries, using direct supercell calculations. The stacked case follows the unpinned limit of the electron affinity rule, whereas the lateral geometry follows the strongly pinned limit of alignment of charge neutrality levels. TMDs therefore provide one of the few clear tests of band alignment models, whereas three-dimensional semiconductors give less stringent tests because of accidental chemical trends in their properties.

  14. Brittle-to-Ductile Transition in Metallic Glass Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Şopu, D; Foroughi, A; Stoica, M; Eckert, J

    2016-07-13

    When reducing the size of metallic glass samples down to the nanoscale regime, experimental studies on the plasticity under uniaxial tension show a wide range of failure modes ranging from brittle to ductile ones. Simulations on the deformation behavior of nanoscaled metallic glasses report an unusual extended strain softening and are not able to reproduce the brittle-like fracture deformation as found in experiments. Using large-scale molecular dynamics simulations we provide an atomistic understanding of the deformation mechanisms of metallic glass nanowires and differentiate the extrinsic size effects and aspect ratio contribution to plasticity. A model for predicting the critical nanowire aspect ratio for the ductile-to-brittle transition is developed. Furthermore, the structure of brittle nanowires can be tuned to a softer phase characterized by a defective short-range order and an excess free volume upon systematic structural rejuvenation, leading to enhanced tensile ductility. The presented results shed light on the fundamental deformation mechanisms of nanoscaled metallic glasses and demarcate ductile and catastrophic failure.

  15. Transition Metal Intercalators as Anticancer Agents—Recent Advances

    PubMed Central

    Deo, Krishant M.; Pages, Benjamin J.; Ang, Dale L.; Gordon, Christopher P.; Aldrich-Wright, Janice R.

    2016-01-01

    The diverse anticancer utility of cisplatin has stimulated significant interest in the development of additional platinum-based therapies, resulting in several analogues receiving clinical approval worldwide. However, due to structural and mechanistic similarities, the effectiveness of platinum-based therapies is countered by severe side-effects, narrow spectrum of activity and the development of resistance. Nonetheless, metal complexes offer unique characteristics and exceptional versatility, with the ability to alter their pharmacology through facile modifications of geometry and coordination number. This has prompted the search for metal-based complexes with distinctly different structural motifs and non-covalent modes of binding with a primary aim of circumventing current clinical limitations. This review discusses recent advances in platinum and other transition metal-based complexes with mechanisms of action involving intercalation. This mode of DNA binding is distinct from cisplatin and its derivatives. The metals focused on in this review include Pt, Ru and Cu along with examples of Au, Ni, Zn and Fe complexes; these complexes are capable of DNA intercalation and are highly biologically active. PMID:27809241

  16. Phase transitions in MgSiO3 post-perovskite in super-Earth mantles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umemoto, Koichiro; Wentzcovitch, Renata M.; Wu, Shunqing; Ji, Min; Wang, Cai-Zhuang; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2017-11-01

    The highest pressure form of the major Earth-forming mantle silicate is MgSiO3 post-perovskite (PPv). Understanding the fate of PPv at TPa pressures is the first step for understanding the mineralogy of super-Earths-type exoplanets, arguably the most interesting for their similarities with Earth. Modeling their internal structure requires knowledge of stable mineral phases, their properties under compression, and major element abundances. Several studies of PPv under extreme pressures support the notion that a sequence of pressure induced dissociation transitions produce the elementary oxides SiO2 and MgO as the ultimate aggregation form at ∼3 TPa. However, none of these studies have addressed the problem of mantle composition, particularly major element abundances usually expressed in terms of three main variables, the Mg/Si and Fe/Si ratios and the Mg#, as in the Earth. Here we show that the critical compositional parameter, the Mg/Si ratio, whose value in the Earth's mantle is still debated, is a vital ingredient for modeling phase transitions and internal structure of super-Earth mantles. Specifically, we have identified new sequences of phase transformations, including new recombination reactions that depend decisively on this ratio. This is a new level of complexity that has not been previously addressed, but proves essential for modeling the nature and number of internal layers in these rocky mantles.

  17. Enabling the transition towards Earth Observation Science 2.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathieu, Pierre-Philippe; Desnos, Yves-Louis

    2015-04-01

    Science 2.0 refers to the rapid and systematic changes in doing Research and organising Science driven by the rapid advances in ICT and digital technologies combined with a growing demand to do Science for Society (actionable research) and in Society (co-design of knowledge). Nowadays, teams of researchers around the world can easily access a wide range of open data across disciplines and remotely process them on the Cloud, combining them with their own data to generate knowledge, develop information products for societal applications, and tackle complex integrative complex problems that could not be addressed a few years ago. Such rapid exchange of digital data is fostering a new world of data-intensive research, characterized by openness, transparency, and scrutiny and traceability of results, access to large volume of complex data, availability of community open tools, unprecedented level of computing power, and new collaboration among researchers and new actors such as citizen scientists. The EO scientific community is now facing the challenge of responding to this new paradigm in science 2.0 in order to make the most of the large volume of complex and diverse data delivered by the new generation of EO missions, and in particular the Sentinels. In this context, ESA - in particular within the framework of the Scientific Exploitation of Operational Missions (SEOM) element - is supporting a variety of activities in partnership with research communities to ease the transition and make the most of the data. These include the generation of new open tools and exploitation platforms, exploring new ways to exploit data on cloud-based platforms, dissiminate data, building new partnership with citizen scientists, and training the new generation of data scientists. The paper will give a brief overview of some of ESA activities aiming to facilitate the exploitation of large amount of data from EO missions in a collaborative, cross-disciplinary, and open way, from science to

  18. A temperate rocky super-Earth transiting a nearby cool star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittmann, Jason A.; Irwin, Jonathan M.; Charbonneau, David; Bonfils, Xavier; Astudillo-Defru, Nicola; Haywood, Raphaëlle D.; Berta-Thompson, Zachory K.; Newton, Elisabeth R.; Rodriguez, Joseph E.; Winters, Jennifer G.; Tan, Thiam-Guan; Almenara, Jose-Manuel; Bouchy, François; Delfosse, Xavier; Forveille, Thierry; Lovis, Christophe; Murgas, Felipe; Pepe, Francesco; Santos, Nuno C.; Udry, Stephane; Wünsche, Anaël; Esquerdo, Gilbert A.; Latham, David W.; Dressing, Courtney D.

    2017-04-01

    M dwarf stars, which have masses less than 60 per cent that of the Sun, make up 75 per cent of the population of the stars in the Galaxy. The atmospheres of orbiting Earth-sized planets are observationally accessible via transmission spectroscopy when the planets pass in front of these stars. Statistical results suggest that the nearest transiting Earth-sized planet in the liquid-water, habitable zone of an M dwarf star is probably around 10.5 parsecs away. A temperate planet has been discovered orbiting Proxima Centauri, the closest M dwarf, but it probably does not transit and its true mass is unknown. Seven Earth-sized planets transit the very low-mass star TRAPPIST-1, which is 12 parsecs away, but their masses and, particularly, their densities are poorly constrained. Here we report observations of LHS 1140b, a planet with a radius of 1.4 Earth radii transiting a small, cool star (LHS 1140) 12 parsecs away. We measure the mass of the planet to be 6.6 times that of Earth, consistent with a rocky bulk composition. LHS 1140b receives an insolation of 0.46 times that of Earth, placing it within the liquid-water, habitable zone. With 90 per cent confidence, we place an upper limit on the orbital eccentricity of 0.29. The circular orbit is unlikely to be the result of tides and therefore was probably present at formation. Given its large surface gravity and cool insolation, the planet may have retained its atmosphere despite the greater luminosity (compared to the present-day) of its host star in its youth. Because LHS 1140 is nearby, telescopes currently under construction might be able to search for specific atmospheric gases in the future.

  19. A temperate rocky super-Earth transiting a nearby cool star.

    PubMed

    Dittmann, Jason A; Irwin, Jonathan M; Charbonneau, David; Bonfils, Xavier; Astudillo-Defru, Nicola; Haywood, Raphaëlle D; Berta-Thompson, Zachory K; Newton, Elisabeth R; Rodriguez, Joseph E; Winters, Jennifer G; Tan, Thiam-Guan; Almenara, Jose-Manuel; Bouchy, François; Delfosse, Xavier; Forveille, Thierry; Lovis, Christophe; Murgas, Felipe; Pepe, Francesco; Santos, Nuno C; Udry, Stephane; Wünsche, Anaël; Esquerdo, Gilbert A; Latham, David W; Dressing, Courtney D

    2017-04-19

    M dwarf stars, which have masses less than 60 per cent that of the Sun, make up 75 per cent of the population of the stars in the Galaxy. The atmospheres of orbiting Earth-sized planets are observationally accessible via transmission spectroscopy when the planets pass in front of these stars. Statistical results suggest that the nearest transiting Earth-sized planet in the liquid-water, habitable zone of an M dwarf star is probably around 10.5 parsecs away. A temperate planet has been discovered orbiting Proxima Centauri, the closest M dwarf, but it probably does not transit and its true mass is unknown. Seven Earth-sized planets transit the very low-mass star TRAPPIST-1, which is 12 parsecs away, but their masses and, particularly, their densities are poorly constrained. Here we report observations of LHS 1140b, a planet with a radius of 1.4 Earth radii transiting a small, cool star (LHS 1140) 12 parsecs away. We measure the mass of the planet to be 6.6 times that of Earth, consistent with a rocky bulk composition. LHS 1140b receives an insolation of 0.46 times that of Earth, placing it within the liquid-water, habitable zone. With 90 per cent confidence, we place an upper limit on the orbital eccentricity of 0.29. The circular orbit is unlikely to be the result of tides and therefore was probably present at formation. Given its large surface gravity and cool insolation, the planet may have retained its atmosphere despite the greater luminosity (compared to the present-day) of its host star in its youth. Because LHS 1140 is nearby, telescopes currently under construction might be able to search for specific atmospheric gases in the future.

  20. Silylation of C-H bonds in aromatic heterocycles by an Earth-abundant metal catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toutov, Anton A.; Liu, Wen-Bo; Betz, Kerry N.; Fedorov, Alexey; Stoltz, Brian M.; Grubbs, Robert H.

    2015-02-01

    Heteroaromatic compounds containing carbon-silicon (C-Si) bonds are of great interest in the fields of organic electronics and photonics, drug discovery, nuclear medicine and complex molecule synthesis, because these compounds have very useful physicochemical properties. Many of the methods now used to construct heteroaromatic C-Si bonds involve stoichiometric reactions between heteroaryl organometallic species and silicon electrophiles or direct, transition-metal-catalysed intermolecular carbon-hydrogen (C-H) silylation using rhodium or iridium complexes in the presence of excess hydrogen acceptors. Both approaches are useful, but their limitations include functional group incompatibility, narrow scope of application, high cost and low availability of the catalysts, and unproven scalability. For this reason, a new and general catalytic approach to heteroaromatic C-Si bond construction that avoids such limitations is highly desirable. Here we report an example of cross-dehydrogenative heteroaromatic C-H functionalization catalysed by an Earth-abundant alkali metal species. We found that readily available and inexpensive potassium tert-butoxide catalyses the direct silylation of aromatic heterocycles with hydrosilanes, furnishing heteroarylsilanes in a single step. The silylation proceeds under mild conditions, in the absence of hydrogen acceptors, ligands or additives, and is scalable to greater than 100 grams under optionally solvent-free conditions. Substrate classes that are difficult to activate with precious metal catalysts are silylated in good yield and with excellent regioselectivity. The derived heteroarylsilane products readily engage in versatile transformations enabling new synthetic strategies for heteroaromatic elaboration, and are useful in their own right in pharmaceutical and materials science applications.

  1. Impurities in Antiferromagnetic Transition-Metal Oxides - Symmetry and Optical Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, John Emil, III

    The study of antiferromagnetic transition-metal oxides is an extremely active area in the physical sciences, where condensed matter physics, inorganic chemistry, and materials science blend together. The sheer number of potential commercial applications is staggering, but much of the fundamental science remains unexplained. This is not due to a lack of effort, however, as theorists have been struggling to understand these materials for decades - particularly the character of the band edges and first optical transitions. The difficulty lies in the strong correlation or Coloumb attraction between the electrons in the anisotropic d orbitals, which conventional band theory cannot describe adequately. The correlation problem is approached here by the well-accepted method of adding a Hubbard potential energy term to the ground state Hamiltonian, calculated within Density Functional Theory. The frequency-dependent complex dielectric function is calculated within the Independent Particle Approximation, and optical transitions are evaluated in multiple different ways. Peaks in the imaginary part of the dielectric function are compared energetically to orbitally decomposed density of states calculations. Optical transitions are typically analyzed in terms of atomic orbitals, which, strictly speaking, gives misleading results. Here, however, from the calculated data, two alternative interpretations are analyzed for each material studied. The first employs rigorous group theoretical analysis to determine allowed electric-dipole transitions, taking into account both orbital hybridization and crystal symmetry. The second interpretation is that of metal cation site hopping. In this interpretation, carriers hop from the x2 - y2 d orbital of one metal cation lattice site to the next metal cation site which is antiferromagnetically aligned. At times, thoughout this work, one interpretation is favorable to the other. Which interpretation is most valid depends on the material

  2. New insight into enhanced superconductivity in metals near the metal-insulator transition.

    PubMed

    Osofsky, M S; Soulen, R J; Claassen, J H; Trotter, G; Kim, H; Horwitz, J S

    2001-11-05

    We have studied the transport properties of disordered WSi films near the metal/insulator transition (MIT) and we have also reviewed the data for several other disordered materials near their MIT. In all cases, we found the presence of enhanced superconductivity. We constructed a superconductivity "phase diagram" (i.e., T(c) versus sigma) for each system, which reveals a striking correlation: In all cases, T(c) values are significantly enhanced only for samples whose conductivities lie within a narrow range on the metallic side of, and moderately near, the MIT. We present a heuristic model to explain this phenomenon.

  3. In pursuit of barrierless transition metal dichalcogenides lateral heterojunctions.

    PubMed

    Aierken, Yierpan; Sevik, Cem; Gülseren, Oğuz; Peeters, François M; Çakır, Deniz

    2018-07-20

    There is an increasing need to understand interfaces between two-dimensional materials to realize an energy efficient boundary with low contact resistance and small heat dissipation. In this respect, we investigated the impact of charge and substitutional atom doping on the electronic transport properties of the hybrid metallic-semiconducting lateral junctions, formed between metallic (1T and 1T d ) and semiconducting (1H) phases of MoS 2 by means of first-principles and non-equilibrium Green function formalism based calculations. Our results clearly revealed the strong influence of the type of interface and crystallographic orientation of the metallic phase on the transport properties of these systems. The Schottky barrier height, which is the dominant mechanism for contact resistance, was found to be as large as 0.63 eV and 1.19 eV for holes and electrons, respectively. We found that armchair interfaces are more conductive as compared to zigzag termination due to the presence of the metallic Mo zigzag chains that are directed along the transport direction. In order to manipulate these barrier heights we investigated the influence of electron doping of the metallic part (i.e. 1T d -MoS 2 ). We observed that the Fermi level of the hybrid system moves towards the conduction band of semiconducting 1H-MoS 2 due to filling of 4d-orbital of metallic MoS 2 , and thus the Schottky barrier for electrons decreases considerably. Besides electron doping, we also investigated the effect of substitutional doping of metallic MoS 2 by replacing Mo atoms with either Re or Ta. Due to its valency, Re (Ta) behaves as a donor (acceptor) and reduces the Schottky barrier for electrons (holes). Since Re and Ta based transition metal dichalcogenides crystallize in either the 1T d or 1T phase, substitutional doping with these atom favors the stabilization of the 1T d phase of MoS 2 . Co-doping of hybrid structure results in an electronic structure, which facilities easy dissociation of

  4. Hydrogen collisions with transition metal surfaces: Universal electronically nonadiabatic adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorenkamp, Yvonne; Jiang, Hongyan; Köckert, Hansjochen; Hertl, Nils; Kammler, Marvin; Janke, Svenja M.; Kandratsenka, Alexander; Wodtke, Alec M.; Bünermann, Oliver

    2018-01-01

    Inelastic scattering of H and D atoms from the (111) surfaces of six fcc transition metals (Au, Pt, Ag, Pd, Cu, and Ni) was investigated, and in each case, excitation of electron-hole pairs dominates the inelasticity. The results are very similar for all six metals. Differences in the average kinetic energy losses between metals can mainly be attributed to different efficiencies in the coupling to phonons due to the different masses of the metal atoms. The experimental observations can be reproduced by molecular dynamics simulations based on full-dimensional potential energy surfaces and including electronic excitations by using electronic friction in the local density friction approximation. The determining factors for the energy loss are the electron density at the surface, which is similar for all six metals, and the mass ratio between the impinging atoms and the surface atoms. Details of the electronic structure of the metal do not play a significant role. The experimentally validated simulations are used to explore sticking over a wide range of incidence conditions. We find that the sticking probability increases for H and D collisions near normal incidence—consistent with a previously reported penetration-resurfacing mechanism. The sticking probability for H or D on any of these metals may be represented as a simple function of the incidence energy, Ein, metal atom mass, M, and incidence angle, 𝜗i n. S =(S0+a ṡEi n+b ṡM ) *(1 -h (𝜗i n-c ) (1 -cos(𝜗 i n-c ) d ṡh (Ei n-e ) (Ei n-e ) ) ) , where h is the Heaviside step function and for H, S0 = 1.081, a = -0.125 eV-1, b =-8.40 ṡ1 0-4 u-1, c = 28.88°, d = 1.166 eV-1, and e = 0.442 eV; whereas for D, S0 = 1.120, a = -0.124 eV-1, b =-1.20 ṡ1 0-3 u-1, c = 28.62°, d = 1.196 eV-1, and e = 0.474 eV.

  5. In pursuit of barrierless transition metal dichalcogenides lateral heterojunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aierken, Yierpan; Sevik, Cem; Gülseren, Oğuz; Peeters, François M.; Çakır, Deniz

    2018-07-01

    There is an increasing need to understand interfaces between two-dimensional materials to realize an energy efficient boundary with low contact resistance and small heat dissipation. In this respect, we investigated the impact of charge and substitutional atom doping on the electronic transport properties of the hybrid metallic-semiconducting lateral junctions, formed between metallic (1T and 1T d ) and semiconducting (1H) phases of MoS2 by means of first-principles and non-equilibrium Green function formalism based calculations. Our results clearly revealed the strong influence of the type of interface and crystallographic orientation of the metallic phase on the transport properties of these systems. The Schottky barrier height, which is the dominant mechanism for contact resistance, was found to be as large as 0.63 eV and 1.19 eV for holes and electrons, respectively. We found that armchair interfaces are more conductive as compared to zigzag termination due to the presence of the metallic Mo zigzag chains that are directed along the transport direction. In order to manipulate these barrier heights we investigated the influence of electron doping of the metallic part (i.e. 1T d -MoS2). We observed that the Fermi level of the hybrid system moves towards the conduction band of semiconducting 1H-MoS2 due to filling of 4d-orbital of metallic MoS2, and thus the Schottky barrier for electrons decreases considerably. Besides electron doping, we also investigated the effect of substitutional doping of metallic MoS2 by replacing Mo atoms with either Re or Ta. Due to its valency, Re (Ta) behaves as a donor (acceptor) and reduces the Schottky barrier for electrons (holes). Since Re and Ta based transition metal dichalcogenides crystallize in either the 1T d or 1T phase, substitutional doping with these atom favors the stabilization of the 1T d phase of MoS2. Co-doping of hybrid structure results in an electronic structure, which facilities easy dissociation of excitons

  6. Anderson metal-insulator transitions with classical magnetic impurities

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Daniel; Kettemann, Stefan

    We study the effects of classical magnetic impurities on the Anderson metal-insulator transition (AMIT) numerically. In particular we find that while a finite concentration of Ising impurities lowers the critical value of the site-diagonal disorder amplitude W{sub c}, in the presence of Heisenberg impurities, W{sub c} is first increased with increasing exchange coupling strength J due to time-reversal symmetry breaking. The resulting scaling with J is compared to analytical predictions by Wegner [1]. The results are obtained numerically, based on a finite-size scaling procedure for the typical density of states [2], which is the geometric average of the local densitymore » of states. The latter can efficiently be calculated using the kernel polynomial method [3]. Although still suffering from methodical shortcomings, our method proves to deliver results close to established results for the orthogonal symmetry class [4]. We extend previous approaches [5] by combining the KPM with a finite-size scaling analysis. We also discuss the relevance of our findings for systems like phosphor-doped silicon (Si:P), which are known to exhibit a quantum phase transition from metal to insulator driven by the interplay of both interaction and disorder, accompanied by the presence of a finite concentration of magnetic moments [6].« less

  7. Transition metal oxide as anode interface buffer for impedance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hui; Tang, Chao; Wang, Xu-Liang; Zhai, Wen-Juan; Liu, Rui-Lan; Rong, Zhou; Pang, Zong-Qiang; Jiang, Bing; Fan, Qu-Li; Huang, Wei

    2015-12-01

    Impedance spectroscopy is a strong method in electric measurement, which also shows powerful function in research of carrier dynamics in organic semiconductors when suitable mathematical physical models are used. Apart from this, another requirement is that the contact interface between the electrode and materials should at least be quasi-ohmic contact. So in this report, three different transitional metal oxides, V2O5, MoO3 and WO3 were used as hole injection buffer for interface of ITO/NPB. Through the impedance spectroscopy and PSO algorithm, the carrier mobilities and I-V characteristics of the NPB in different devices were measured. Then the data curves were compared with the single layer device without the interface layer in order to investigate the influence of transitional metal oxides on the carrier mobility. The careful research showed that when the work function (WF) of the buffer material was just between the work function of anode and the HOMO of the organic material, such interface material could work as a good bridge for carrier injection. Under such condition, the carrier mobility measured through impedance spectroscopy should be close to the intrinsic value. Considering that the HOMO (or LUMO) of most organic semiconductors did not match with the work function of the electrode, this report also provides a method for wide application of impedance spectroscopy to the research of carrier dynamics.

  8. Colloquium: Excitons in atomically thin transition metal dichalcogenides

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Gang; Chernikov, Alexey; Glazov, Mikhail M.

    Atomically thin materials such as graphene and monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) exhibit remarkable physical properties resulting from their reduced dimensionality and crystal symmetry. The family of semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides is an especially promising platform for fundamental studies of two-dimensional (2D) systems, with potential applications in optoelectronics and valleytronics due to their direct band gap in the monolayer limit and highly efficient light-matter coupling. A crystal lattice with broken inversion symmetry combined with strong spin-orbit interactions leads to a unique combination of the spin and valley degrees of freedom. In addition, the 2D character of the monolayers and weakmore » dielectric screening from the environment yield a significant enhancement of the Coulomb interaction. The resulting formation of bound electron-hole pairs, or excitons, dominates the optical and spin properties of the material. In this article, recent progress in understanding of the excitonic properties in monolayer TMDs is reviewed and future challenges are laid out. Discussed are the consequences of the strong direct and exchange Coulomb interaction, exciton light-matter coupling, and influence of finite carrier and electron-hole pair densities on the exciton properties in TMDs. Finally, the impact on valley polarization is described and the tuning of the energies and polarization observed in applied electric and magnetic fields is summarized.« less

  9. Stabilization of Small Boron Cage by Transition Metal Encapsulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lijun; Lv, Jian; Wang, Yanchao; Ma, Yanming

    2015-03-01

    The discovery of chemically stable fullerene-like structures formed by elements other than carbon has been long-standing desired. On this aspect significant efforts have centered around boron, only one electron deficient compared with carbon. However, during the past decade a large number of experimental and theoretical studies have established that small boron clusters are either planar/quasi-planar or forming double-ring tubular structures. Until recently, two all-boron fullerenes have been independently discovered: B38 proposed by our structure searching calculations and B40 observed in a joint experimental and theoretical study. Here we extend our work to the even smaller boron clusters and propose an effective routine to stabilize them by transition metal encapsulation. By combining swarm-intelligence structure searching and first-principles calculations, we have systematically investigated the energy landscapes of transition-metal-doped MB24 clusters (M = Ti, Zr, Hf, Cr, Mo, W, Fe, Ru and Os). Two stable symmetric endohedral boron cages, MoB24 and WB24 are identified. The stability of them can be rationalized in terms of their unique 18-electron closed-shell electronic structures. Funded by Recruitment Program of Global Experts of China and China Postdoctoral Science Foundation.

  10. Colloquium: Excitons in atomically thin transition metal dichalcogenides

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Gang; Chernikov, Alexey; Glazov, Mikhail M.; ...

    2018-04-04

    Atomically thin materials such as graphene and monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) exhibit remarkable physical properties resulting from their reduced dimensionality and crystal symmetry. The family of semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides is an especially promising platform for fundamental studies of two-dimensional (2D) systems, with potential applications in optoelectronics and valleytronics due to their direct band gap in the monolayer limit and highly efficient light-matter coupling. A crystal lattice with broken inversion symmetry combined with strong spin-orbit interactions leads to a unique combination of the spin and valley degrees of freedom. In addition, the 2D character of the monolayers and weakmore » dielectric screening from the environment yield a significant enhancement of the Coulomb interaction. The resulting formation of bound electron-hole pairs, or excitons, dominates the optical and spin properties of the material. In this article, recent progress in understanding of the excitonic properties in monolayer TMDs is reviewed and future challenges are laid out. Discussed are the consequences of the strong direct and exchange Coulomb interaction, exciton light-matter coupling, and influence of finite carrier and electron-hole pair densities on the exciton properties in TMDs. Finally, the impact on valley polarization is described and the tuning of the energies and polarization observed in applied electric and magnetic fields is summarized.« less

  11. Properties of binary transition-metal arsenides (TAs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saparov, Bayrammurad; Mitchell, Jonathan E.; Sefat, Athena S.

    2012-08-01

    We present thermodynamic and transport properties of transition-metal (T) arsenides, TAs, with T = Sc to Ni (3d), Zr, Nb, Ru (4d), Hf and Ta (5d). Characterization of these binaries is carried out with powder x-ray diffraction, temperature- and field-dependent magnetization and resistivity, temperature-dependent heat capacity, Seebeck coefficient, and thermal conductivity. All binaries show metallic behavior except TaAs and RuAs. TaAs, NbAs, ScAs and ZrAs are diamagnetic, while CoAs, VAs, TiAs, NiAs and RuAs show approximately Pauli paramagnetic behavior. FeAs and CrAs undergo antiferromagnetic ordering below TN ≈ 71 K and TN ≈ 260 K, respectively. MnAs is a ferromagnet below TC ≈ 317 K and undergoes hexagonal-orthorhombic-hexagonal transitions at TS ≈ 317 K and 384 K, respectively. For TAs, Seebeck coefficients vary between + 40 and - 40 μV K-1 in the 2-300 K range, whereas thermal conductivity values stay below 18 W m-1 K-1. The Sommerfeld coefficients γ are less than 10 mJ K-2 mol-1. At room temperature with application of 8 T magnetic field, large positive magnetoresistance is found for TaAs (˜25%), MnAs (˜90%) and NbAs (˜75%).

  12. Colloquium: Excitons in atomically thin transition metal dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Gang; Chernikov, Alexey; Glazov, Mikhail M.; Heinz, Tony F.; Marie, Xavier; Amand, Thierry; Urbaszek, Bernhard

    2018-04-01

    Atomically thin materials such as graphene and monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) exhibit remarkable physical properties resulting from their reduced dimensionality and crystal symmetry. The family of semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides is an especially promising platform for fundamental studies of two-dimensional (2D) systems, with potential applications in optoelectronics and valleytronics due to their direct band gap in the monolayer limit and highly efficient light-matter coupling. A crystal lattice with broken inversion symmetry combined with strong spin-orbit interactions leads to a unique combination of the spin and valley degrees of freedom. In addition, the 2D character of the monolayers and weak dielectric screening from the environment yield a significant enhancement of the Coulomb interaction. The resulting formation of bound electron-hole pairs, or excitons, dominates the optical and spin properties of the material. Here recent progress in understanding of the excitonic properties in monolayer TMDs is reviewed and future challenges are laid out. Discussed are the consequences of the strong direct and exchange Coulomb interaction, exciton light-matter coupling, and influence of finite carrier and electron-hole pair densities on the exciton properties in TMDs. Finally, the impact on valley polarization is described and the tuning of the energies and polarization observed in applied electric and magnetic fields is summarized.

  13. Designer Shape Anisotropy on Transition-Metal-Dichalcogenide Nanosheets.

    PubMed

    Martella, Christian; Mennucci, Carlo; Lamperti, Alessio; Cappelluti, Emmanuele; de Mongeot, Francesco Buatier; Molle, Alessandro

    2018-03-01

    MoS 2 and generally speaking, the wide family of transition-metal dichalcogenides represents a solid nanotechnology platform on which to engineer a wealth of new and outperforming applications involving 2D materials. An even richer flexibility can be gained by extrinsically inducing an in-plane shape anisotropy of the nanosheets. Here, the synthesis of anisotropic MoS 2 nanosheets is proposed as a prototypical example in this respect starting from a highly conformal chemical vapor deposition on prepatterend substrates and aiming at the more general purpose of tailoring anisotropy of 2D nanosheets by design. This is envisioned to be a suitable configuration for strain engineering as far as strain can be spatially redistributed in morphologically different regions. With a similar approach, both the optical and electronic properties of the 2D transition-metal dichalcogenides can be tailored over macroscopic sample areas in a self-organized fashion, thus paving the way for new applications in the field of optical metasurfaces, light harvesting, and catalysis. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Ultrafast exciton relaxation in monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides

    SciTech Connect

    Thilagam, A., E-mail: thilaphys@gmail.com

    2016-04-28

    We examine a mechanism by which excitons undergo ultrafast relaxation in common monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides. It is shown that at densities ≈1 × 10{sup 11 }cm{sup −2} and temperatures ≤60 K, excitons in well known monolayers (MoS{sub 2}, MoSe{sub 2}, WS{sub 2}, and WSe{sub 2}) exist as point-like structureless electron-hole quasi-particles. We evaluate the average rate of exciton energy relaxation due to acoustic phonons via the deformation potential and the piezoelectric coupling mechanisms and examine the effect of spreading of the excitonic wavefunction into the region perpendicular to the monolayer plane. Our results show that the exciton relaxation rate is enhanced with increasemore » in the exciton temperature, while it is decreased with increase in the lattice temperature. Good agreements with available experimental data are obtained when the calculations are extrapolated to room temperatures. A unified approach taking into account the deformation potential and piezoelectric coupling mechanisms shows that exciton relaxation induced by phonons is as significant as defect assisted scattering and trapping of excitons by surface states in monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides.« less

  15. Effects of interband transitions on Faraday rotation in metallic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wysin, G M; Chikan, Viktor; Young, Nathan; Dani, Raj Kumar

    2013-08-14

    The Faraday rotation in metallic nanoparticles is considered based on a quantum model for the dielectric function ϵ(ω) in the presence of a DC magnetic field B. We focus on effects in ϵ(ω) due to interband transitions (IBTs), which are important in the blue and ultraviolet for noble metals used in plasmonics. The dielectric function is found using the perturbation of the electron density matrix due to the optical field of the incident electromagnetic radiation. The calculation is applied to transitions between two bands (d and p, for example) separated by a gap, as one finds in gold at the L-point of the Fermi surface. The result of the DC magnetic field is a shift in the effective optical frequency causing IBTs by ±μBB/ħ, where opposite signs are associated with left/right circular polarizations. The Faraday rotation for a dilute solution of 17 nm diameter gold nanoparticles is measured and compared with both the IBT theory and a simpler Drude model for the bound electron response. Effects of the plasmon resonance mode on Faraday rotation in nanoparticles are also discussed.

  16. Electrical and Magnetic Properties of Binary Amorphous Transition Metal Alloys.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liou, Sy-Hwang

    The electrical, superconductive and magnetic properties of several binary transition metal amorphous and metastable crystalline alloys, Fe(,x)Ti(,100-x) (30 (LESSTHEQ) x (LESSTHEQ) 100), Fe(,x)Zr(,100-x) (20 (LESSTHEQ) x (LESSTHEQ) 93), Fe(,x)Hf(,100-x) (20 (LESSTHEQ) x (LESSTHEQ) 100), Fe(,x)Nb(,100 -x) (22 (LESSTHEQ) x (LESSTHEQ) 85), Ni(,x)Nb(,100-x) (20 (LESSTHEQ) x (LESSTHEQ) 80), Cu(,x)Nb(,100-x) (10 (LESSTHEQ) x (LESSTHEQ) 90) were studied over a wide composition range. Films were made using a magnetron sputtering system, and the structure of the films was investigated by energy dispersive x-ray diffraction. The composition region of each amorphous alloys system was determined and found in good agreement with a model proposed by Egami and Waseda. The magnetic properties and hyperfine interactions in the films were investigated using a conventional Mossbauer spectrometer and a ('57)Co in Rh matrix source. In all Fe-early transition metal binary alloys systems, Fe does not retain its moment in the low iron concentration region and the result is that the critical concentration for magnetic order (x(,c)) is much larger than anticipated from percolation considerations. A direct comparison between crystalline alloys and their amorphous counterparts of the same composition illustrate no clear correlation between crystalline and amorphous states. Pronounced discontinuities in the magnetic properties with variation in Fe content of all Fe-early transition metal alloys at phase boundaries separating amorphous and crystalline states have been observed. This is caused by the differences in the atomic arrangement and the electronic structure between crystalline and amorphous solids. The temperature dependence of resistivity, (rho)(T), of several binary amorphous alloys of Fe-TM (where TM = Ti, Zr, Hf, Nb etc.) has been studied from 2K to 300K. The Fe-poor (x < x(,c)) samples and the Fe-rich (x > x(,c)) samples have distinctive differences in (rho)(T) at low temperature

  17. Two planetary systems with transiting Earth-size and super-Earth planets orbiting late-type dwarf stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso, E. Díez; Hernández, J. I. González; Suárez Gómez, S. L.; Aguado, D. S.; González Gutiérrez, C.; Suárez Mascareño, A.; Cabrera-Lavers, A.; González-Nuevo, J.; Toledo-Padrón, B.; Gracia, J.; de Cos Juez, F. J.; Rebolo, R.

    2018-06-01

    We present two new planetary systems found around cool dwarf stars with data from the K2 mission. The first system was found in K2-XX1 (EPIC 248545986), characterized in this work as M3.0V and observed in the 14th campaign of K2. It consists of three Earth-size transiting planets with radii of 1.1, 1.0 and 1.1 R⊕, showing a compact configuration with orbital periods of 5.24, 7.78 and 10.1 days, close to 2:3:4 resonance. The second was found in K2-XX2 (EPIC 249801827), characterized in this work as M0.5V and observed in the 15th campaign. It consists of two transiting super-Earths with radii 2.0 and 1.8 R⊕ and orbital periods of 6.03 and 20.5 days. The equilibrium temperatures of the atmospheres of these planets are estimated to be in the range of 380-600 K and the amplitudes of signals in transmission spectroscopy are estimated at ˜ 10 ppm.

  18. Yttrium and rare earth stabilized fast reactor metal fuel

    DOEpatents

    Guon, Jerold; Grantham, LeRoy F.; Specht, Eugene R.

    1992-01-01

    To increase the operating temperature of a reactor, the melting point and mechanical properties of the fuel must be increased. For an actinide-rich fuel, yttrium, lanthanum and/or rare earth elements can be added, as stabilizers, to uranium and plutonium and/or a mixture of other actinides to raise the melting point of the fuel and improve its mechanical properties. Since only about 1% of the actinide fuel may be yttrium, lanthanum, or a rare earth element, the neutron penalty is low, the reactor core size can be reduced, the fuel can be burned efficiently, reprocessing requirements are reduced, and the nuclear waste disposal volumes reduced. A further advantage occurs when yttrium, lanthanum, and/or other rare earth elements are exposed to radiation in a reactor, they produce only short half life radioisotopes, which reduce nuclear waste disposal problems through much shorter assured-isolation requirements.

  19. MOST Detects Transits of HD 97658b, a Warm, Likely Volatile-rich Super-Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragomir, Diana; Matthews, Jaymie M.; Eastman, Jason D.; Cameron, Chris; Howard, Andrew W.; Guenther, David B.; Kuschnig, Rainer; Moffat, Anthony F. J.; Rowe, Jason F.; Rucinski, Slavek M.; Sasselov, Dimitar; Weiss, Werner W.

    2013-07-01

    Through photometric monitoring of the extended transit window of HD 97658b with the MOST space telescope, we have found that this exoplanet transits with an ephemeris consistent with that predicted from radial velocity measurements. The mid-transit times are 5.6σ earlier than those of the unverified transit-like signals reported in 2011, and we find no connection between the two sets of events. The transit depth together with our determined stellar radius (R_\\star = 0.703^{+0.039}_{-0.034}\\ R_\\odot) indicates a 2.34^{+0.18}_{-0.15} R ⊕ super-Earth. When combined with the radial velocity determined mass of 7.86 ± 0.73 M ⊕, our radius measure allows us to derive a planet density of 3.44^{+0.91}_{-0.82} g cm-3. Models suggest that a planet with our measured density has a rocky core that is enveloped in an atmosphere composed of lighter elements. The star of the HD 97658 system is the second brightest known to host a transiting super-Earth, facilitating follow-up studies of this not easily daunted, warm and likely volatile-rich exoplanet. Based on data from the MOST satellite, a Canadian Space Agency mission operated by Microsatellite Systems Canada Inc. (MSCI; former Dynacon Inc.) and the Universities of Toronto and British Columbia, with the assistance of the University of Vienna.

  20. Electron transport in molecular wires with transition metal contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalgleish, Hugh

    A molecular wire is an organic molecule that forms a conducting bridge between electronic contacts. Single molecules are likely to be the smallest entities to conduct electricity and thus molecular wires present many interesting challenges to fundamental science as well as enormous potential for nanoelectronic technological applications. A particular challenge stems from the realization that the properties of molecular wires are strongly influenced by the combined characteristics of the molecule and the metal contacts. While gold has been the most studied contact material to date, interest in molecular wires with transition metal contacts that are electronically more complex than gold is growing. This thesis presents a theoretical investigation of electron transport and associated phenomena in molecular wires with transition metal contacts. An appropriate methodology is developed on the basis of Landauer theory and ab initio and semi-empirical considerations and new, physically important systems are identified. Spin-dependent transport mechanisms and device characteristics are explored for molecular wires with ferromagnetic iron contacts, systems that have not been considered previously, either theoretically or experimentally. Electron transport between iron point contacts bridged by iron atoms is also investigated. Spin-dependent transport is also studied for molecules bridging nickel contacts and a possible explanation of some experimentally observed phenomena is proposed. A novel physical phenomenon termed strong spin current rectification and a new controllable negative differential resistance mechanism with potential applications for molecular electronic technology are introduced. The phenomena predicted in this thesis should be accessible to present day experimental techniques and this work is intended to stimulate experiments directed at observing them. Keywords. molecular electronics; spintronics; electron transport; interface states.

  1. Novel doping alternatives for single-layer transition metal dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onofrio, Nicolas; Guzman, David; Strachan, Alejandro

    2017-11-01

    Successful doping of single-layer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) remains a formidable barrier to their incorporation into a range of technologies. We use density functional theory to study doping of molybdenum and tungsten dichalcogenides with a large fraction of the periodic table. An automated analysis of the energetics, atomic and electronic structure of thousands of calculations results in insightful trends across the periodic table and points out promising dopants to be pursued experimentally. Beyond previously studied cases, our predictions suggest promising substitutional dopants that result in p-type transport and reveal interesting physics behind the substitution of the metal site. Doping with early transition metals (TMs) leads to tensile strain and a significant reduction in the bandgap. The bandgap increases and strain is reduced as the d-states are filled into the mid TMs; these trends reverse as we move into the late TMs. Additionally, the Fermi energy increases monotonously as the d-shell is filled from the early to mid TMs and we observe few to no gap states, indicating the possibility of both p- (early TMs) and n- (mid TMs) type doping. Quite surprisingly, the simulations indicate the possibility of interstitial doping of TMDs; the energetics reveal that a significant number of dopants, increasing in number from molybdenum disulfide to diselenide and to ditelluride, favor the interstitial sites over adsorbed ones. Furthermore, calculations of the activation energy associated with capturing the dopants into the interstitial site indicate that the process is kinetically possible. This suggests that interstitial impurities in TMDs are more common than thought to date and we propose a series of potential interstitial dopants for TMDs relevant for application in nanoelectronics based on a detailed analysis of the predicted electronic structures.

  2. Plasma-enhanced deposition and processing of transition metals and transition metal silicides for VLSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, D. W.

    1986-05-01

    Radiofrequency (rf) discharges have been used to deposit films of tungsten, molybdenum and titanium silicide. As-deposited tungsten films, from tungsten hexafluoride and hydrogen source gases, were metastable (beta W), with significant (>1 atomic percent) fluorine incorporation. Film resistivities were 40-55 micro ohm - cm due to the beta W, but dropped to about 8 micro ohm cm after a short heat treatment at 700 C which resulted in a phase transition to alpha W (bcc form). The high resistivity (>10,000 micro ohm) associated with molybdenum films deposited from molybdenum hexafluoride and hydrogen appeared to be a result of the formation of molybdenum trifluoride in the deposited material. Titanium silicide films formed from a discharge of titanium tetrachloride, silane, and hydrogen, displayed resistivities of about 150 micro ohm cm, due to small amounts of oxygen and chlorine incorporated during deposition. Plasma etching studies of tungsten films with fluorine containing gases suggest that the etchant species for tungsten in these discharges are fluorine atoms.

  3. Density functional theory based screening of ternary alkali-transition metal borohydrides: A computational material design project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hummelshøj, J. S.; Landis, D. D.; Voss, J.; Jiang, T.; Tekin, A.; Bork, N.; Dułak, M.; Mortensen, J. J.; Adamska, L.; Andersin, J.; Baran, J. D.; Barmparis, G. D.; Bell, F.; Bezanilla, A. L.; Bjork, J.; Björketun, M. E.; Bleken, F.; Buchter, F.; Bürkle, M.; Burton, P. D.; Buus, B. B.; Calborean, A.; Calle-Vallejo, F.; Casolo, S.; Chandler, B. D.; Chi, D. H.; Czekaj, I.; Datta, S.; Datye, A.; DeLaRiva, A.; Despoja, V.; Dobrin, S.; Engelund, M.; Ferrighi, L.; Frondelius, P.; Fu, Q.; Fuentes, A.; Fürst, J.; García-Fuente, A.; Gavnholt, J.; Goeke, R.; Gudmundsdottir, S.; Hammond, K. D.; Hansen, H. A.; Hibbitts, D.; Hobi, E.; Howalt, J. G.; Hruby, S. L.; Huth, A.; Isaeva, L.; Jelic, J.; Jensen, I. J. T.; Kacprzak, K. A.; Kelkkanen, A.; Kelsey, D.; Kesanakurthi, D. S.; Kleis, J.; Klüpfel, P. J.; Konstantinov, I.; Korytar, R.; Koskinen, P.; Krishna, C.; Kunkes, E.; Larsen, A. H.; Lastra, J. M. G.; Lin, H.; Lopez-Acevedo, O.; Mantega, M.; Martínez, J. I.; Mesa, I. N.; Mowbray, D. J.; Mýrdal, J. S. G.; Natanzon, Y.; Nistor, A.; Olsen, T.; Park, H.; Pedroza, L. S.; Petzold, V.; Plaisance, C.; Rasmussen, J. A.; Ren, H.; Rizzi, M.; Ronco, A. S.; Rostgaard, C.; Saadi, S.; Salguero, L. A.; Santos, E. J. G.; Schoenhalz, A. L.; Shen, J.; Smedemand, M.; Stausholm-Møller, O. J.; Stibius, M.; Strange, M.; Su, H. B.; Temel, B.; Toftelund, A.; Tripkovic, V.; Vanin, M.; Viswanathan, V.; Vojvodic, A.; Wang, S.; Wellendorff, J.; Thygesen, K. S.; Rossmeisl, J.; Bligaard, T.; Jacobsen, K. W.; Nørskov, J. K.; Vegge, T.

    2009-07-01

    We present a computational screening study of ternary metal borohydrides for reversible hydrogen storage based on density functional theory. We investigate the stability and decomposition of alloys containing 1 alkali metal atom, Li, Na, or K (M1); and 1 alkali, alkaline earth or 3d/4d transition metal atom (M2) plus two to five (BH4)- groups, i.e., M1M2(BH4)2-5, using a number of model structures with trigonal, tetrahedral, octahedral, and free coordination of the metal borohydride complexes. Of the over 700 investigated structures, about 20 were predicted to form potentially stable alloys with promising decomposition energies. The M1(Al/Mn/Fe)(BH4)4, (Li/Na)Zn(BH4)3, and (Na/K)(Ni/Co)(BH4)3 alloys are found to be the most promising, followed by selected M1(Nb/Rh)(BH4)4 alloys.

  4. Electronic and magnetic properties of transition metal doped graphyne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangan, Abhijeet Sadashiv; Yadav, Asha S.; Chakraborty, Brahmananda; Ramaniah, Lavanya M.

    2017-05-01

    We have theoretically investigated the interaction of few 3d (V,Mn) and 4d (Y,Zr) transition metals with the γ-graphyne structure using the spin-polarized density functional theory for its potentials application in Hydrogen storage, spintronics and nano-electronics. By doping different TMs we have observed that the system can be either metallic(Y), semi-conducting or half metallic. The system for Y and Zr doped graphyne becomes non-magnetic while V and Mn doped graphyne have a magnetic moments of l μB and 3 μB respectively From bader charge analysis it is seen that there is a charge transfer from the TM atom to the graphyne. Zr and Y have a net charge transfer of 2.15e and 1.73e respectively. Charge density analysis also shows the polarization on the carbon skeleton which becomes larger as the charge transfer for the TM atom increases. Thus we see Y and Zr are better candidates for hydrogen storage devices since they are non-magnetic and have less d electrons which is ideal for kubas-type interactions between hydrogen molecule and TM.

  5. Comparative study of the synthesis of layered transition metal molybdates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, S.; Gómez-Avilés, A.; Gardner, C.; Jones, W.

    2010-01-01

    Mixed metal oxides (MMOs) prepared by the mild thermal decomposition of layered double hydroxides (LDHs) differ in their reactivity on exposure to aqueous molybdate containing solutions. In this study, we investigate the reactivity of some T-Al containing MMOs ( T=Co, Ni, Cu or Zn) towards the formation of layered transition metal molybdates (LTMs) possessing the general formula AT2(OH)(MoO 4) 2·H 2O, where A=NH 4+, Na + or K +. The phase selectivity of the reaction was studied with respect to the source of molybdate, the ratio of T to Mo and the reaction pH. LTMs were obtained on reaction of Cu-Al and Zn-Al containing MMOs with aqueous solutions of ammonium heptamolybdate. Rehydration of these oxides in the presence of sodium or potassium molybdate yielded a rehydrated LDH phase as the only crystalline product. The LTM products obtained by the rehydration of MMO precursors were compared with LTMs prepared by direct precipitation from the metal salts in order to study the influence of preparative route on their chemical and physical properties. Differences were noted in the composition, morphology and thermal properties of the resulting products.

  6. Nonlinear d10-ML2 Transition-Metal Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Wolters, Lando P; Bickelhaupt, F Matthias

    2013-01-01

    We have investigated the molecular geometries of a series of dicoordinated d10-transition-metal complexes ML2 (M=Co−, Rh−, Ir−, Ni, Pd, Pt, Cu+, Ag+, Au+; L=NH3, PH3, CO) using relativistic density functional theory (DFT) at ZORA-BLYP/TZ2P. Not all complexes have the expected linear ligand–metal–ligand (L–M–L) angle: this angle varies from 180° to 128.6° as a function of the metal as well as the ligands. Our main objective is to present a detailed explanation why ML2 complexes can become bent. To this end, we have analyzed the bonding mechanism in ML2 as a function of the L–M–L angle using quantitative Kohn–Sham molecular orbital (MO) theory in combination with an energy decomposition analysis (EDA) scheme. The origin of bent L–M–L structures is π backdonation. In situations of strong π backdonation, smaller angles increase the overlap of the ligand’s acceptor orbital with a higher-energy donor orbital on the metal-ligand fragment, and therefore favor π backdonation, resulting in additional stabilization. The angle of the complexes thus depends on the balance between this additional stabilization and increased steric repulsion that occurs as the complexes are bent. PMID:24551547

  7. Neutron Scattering Studies on Correlated Transition-Metal Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Mengze

    We have explored the collective phenomena of correlated electrons in two different transition-metal oxides, Ruddlesden-Popper type ruthenates (Sr,Ca) n+1RunO3n+1 and inverse-trirutile chromates Cr2MO6 (M = Te, Mo and W), using neutron scattering in combination with various material characterization methods. (Sr,Ca)n+1RunO 3n+1 are 4d transition-metal oxides exhibiting competing magnetic and electronic tendencies. The delicate balance among the competing states can be readily tuned by perturbations, such as chemical doping and magnetic field, which gives rise to emergent phenomena. We have investigated the effects of 3d transition-metal doping on the magnetic and electronic properties of layered ruthenates. For instance, the single-layer (n = 1) Sr2RuO4 is an unconventional superconductor possessing an incommensurate spin density wave instability with a wave vector qic= (0.3 0.3 L) driven by Fermi surface nesting. Upon Fe substitution, we have unveiled an unexpected commensurate spin density wave order with a propagation vector qc= (0.25 0.25 0) in Sr2Ru1-xFexO 4 (x = 0.03 and 0.05), despite the magnetic fluctuations persisting at qic. The latter feature is corroborated by the first principles calculations, which show that Fe doping barely changes the nesting vector of the Fermi surface. These results suggest that in addition to the known incommensurate magnetic instability, Sr2RuO4 is also in proximity to a commensurate magnetic tendency that can be stabilized via Fe doping. We have also studied the effects of a magnetic field. For example, the bilayer (n = 2) Ca3(Ru1-xTi x)2O7 (x = 0.03) is a G-type antiferromagnetic Mott insulator. We have revealed that a modest magnetic field can lead to colossal magnetoresistance arising from an anomalous collapse of the Mott insulating state. Such an insulator-to-metal transition is accompanied by magnetic and structural transitions. These findings call for deeper theoretical studies to reexamine the magnetic field tuning of

  8. Electronic Relaxation Processes of Transition Metal Atoms in Helium Nanodroplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kautsch, Andreas; Lindebner, Friedrich; Koch, Markus; Ernst, Wolfgang E.

    2014-06-01

    Spectroscopy of doped superfluid helium nanodroplets (He_N) gives information about the influence of this cold, chemically inert, and least interacting matrix environment on the excitation and relaxation dynamics of dopant atoms and molecules. We present the results from laser induced fluorescence (LIF), photoionization (PI), and mass spectroscopy of Cr and Cu doped He_N. From these results, we can draw a comprehensive picture of the complex behavior of such transition metal atoms in He_N upon photo-excitation. The strong Cr and Cu ground state transitions show an excitation blueshift and broadening with respect to the bare atom transitions which can be taken as indication for the solvation inside the droplet. From the originally excited states the atoms relax to energetically lower states and are ejected from the He_N. The relaxation processes include bare atom spin-forbidden transitions, which clearly bears the signature of the He_N influence. Two-color resonant two-photon ionization (2CR2PI) also shows the formation of bare atoms and small Cr-He_n and Cu-He_n clusters in their ground and metastable states ^c. Currently, Cr dimer excitation studies are in progress and a brief outlook on the available results will be given. C. Callegari and W. E. Ernst, Helium Droplets as Nanocryostats for Molecular Spectroscopy - from the Vacuum Ultraviolet to the Microwave Regime, in Handbook of High-Resolution Spectroscopy, eds. M. Quack and F. Merkt, John Wiley & Sons, Chichester, 2011. A. Kautsch, M. Koch, and W. E. Ernst, J. Phys. Chem. A, 117 (2013) 9621-9625, DOI: 10.1021/jp312336m F. Lindebner, A. Kautsch, M. Koch, and W. E. Ernst, Int. J. Mass Spectrom. (2014) in press, DOI: 10.1016/j.ijms.2013.12.022 M. Koch, A. Kautsch, F. Lackner, and W. E. Ernst, submitted to J. Phys. Chem. A

  9. Structural variation in transition-metal bispidine compounds.

    PubMed

    Comba, Peter; Kerscher, Marion; Merz, Michael; Müller, Vera; Pritzkow, Hans; Remenyi, Rainer; Schiek, Wolfgang; Xiong, Yun

    2002-12-16

    The experimentally determined molecular structures of 40 transition metal complexes with the tetradentate bispyridine-substituted bispidone ligand, 2,4-bis(2-pyridine)-3,7-diazabicyclo[3.3.1]nonane-9-one [M(bisp)XYZ]n+; M = CrIII, MnII, FeII, CoII, CuII, CuI, ZnII; X, Y, Z = mono- or bidentate co-ligands; penta-, hexa- or heptacoordinate complexes) are characterized in detail, supported by force-field and DFT calculations. While the bispidine ligand is very rigid (N3...N7 distance = 2.933 +/- 0.025 A), it tolerates a large range of metal-donor bond lengths (2.07 A < sigma(M-N)/4 < 2.35 A). Of particular interest is the ratio of the bond lengths between the metal center and the two tertiary amine donors (0.84 A < M-N3/M-N7 < 1.05 A) and the fact that, in terms of this ratio there seem to be two clusters with M-N3 < M-N7 and M-N3 > or = M-N7. Calculations indicate that the two structural types are close to degenerate, and the structural form therefore depends on the metal ion, the number and type of co-ligands, as well as structural variations of the bispidine ligand backbone. Tuning of the structures is of importance since the structurally differing complexes have very different stabilities and reactivities.

  10. Control of valence and conduction band energies in layered transition metal phosphates via surface functionalization

    SciTech Connect

    Lentz, Levi C.; Kolb, Brian; Kolpak, Alexie M.

    Layered transition metal phosphates and phosphites (TMPs) are a class of 2D materials bound togetherviavan der Waals interactions. Through simple functionalization, band energies can be systematically controlled.

  11. Magnetic ordering temperatures in rare earth metal dysprosium under ultrahigh pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Samudrala, Gopi K.; Tsoi, Georgiy M.; Weir, Samuel T.

    Magnetic ordering temperatures in heavy rare earth metal Dysprosium (Dy) have been studied using an ultrasensitive electrical transport measurement technique in a designer diamond anvil cell to extreme conditions of pressure to 69 GPa and temperature to 10 K. Previous studies using magnetic susceptibility measurements at high pressures were only able to track magnetic ordering temperature till 7 GPa in the hexagonal close packed ( hcp) phase of Dy. Our studies indicate that the magnetic ordering temperature shows an abrupt drop of 80 K at the hcp-Sm phase transition followed by a gradual decrease that continues till 17 GPa. Thismore » is followed by a rapid increase in the magnetic ordering temperatures in the double hexagonal close packed phase and finally leveling off in the distorted face centered cubic phase of Dy. Lastly, our studies reaffirm that 4f-shell remain localized in Dy and there is no loss of magnetic moment or 4f-shell delocalization for pressures up to 69 GPa.« less

  12. Magnetic ordering temperatures in rare earth metal dysprosium under ultrahigh pressures

    DOE PAGES

    Samudrala, Gopi K.; Tsoi, Georgiy M.; Weir, Samuel T.; ...

    2014-04-03

    Magnetic ordering temperatures in heavy rare earth metal Dysprosium (Dy) have been studied using an ultrasensitive electrical transport measurement technique in a designer diamond anvil cell to extreme conditions of pressure to 69 GPa and temperature to 10 K. Previous studies using magnetic susceptibility measurements at high pressures were only able to track magnetic ordering temperature till 7 GPa in the hexagonal close packed ( hcp) phase of Dy. Our studies indicate that the magnetic ordering temperature shows an abrupt drop of 80 K at the hcp-Sm phase transition followed by a gradual decrease that continues till 17 GPa. Thismore » is followed by a rapid increase in the magnetic ordering temperatures in the double hexagonal close packed phase and finally leveling off in the distorted face centered cubic phase of Dy. Lastly, our studies reaffirm that 4f-shell remain localized in Dy and there is no loss of magnetic moment or 4f-shell delocalization for pressures up to 69 GPa.« less

  13. Environmental Defects And Economic Impact On Global Market Of Rare Earth Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charalampides, G.; Vatalis, K.; Karayannis, V.; Baklavaridis, A.

    2016-11-01

    Rare earth elements include the 14 lanthanides as well as lanthanium and often yttrium. Actually, most of them are not very rare and occur widely dispersed in a variety of rocks. Rare earth metals are vital to some of the world's faster growing industries: catalysts, Nd-magnets, ceramics, glass, metallurgy, battery alloys, electronics and phosphors. Worldwide, the main countries for distribution of rare earths deposits include China, USA, Russia, Brasil, India, Australia, Greenland and Malaysia. The mining and processing of rare earth metals usually result in significant environmental defects. Many deposits are associated with high concentrations of radioactive elements such as uranium and thorium, which requires separate treatment and disposal. The accumulation of rare earth elements in soils has occurred due to pollution caused by the exploitation of rare earth resources and the wide use of rare earths as fertilizers in agriculture. This accumulation has a toxic effect on the soil microfauna community. However, there are large differences in market prices due to the degree of purity determined by the specifications in the applications. The main focus of this article is to overview Rare Earth Metals’ overall impact on global economy and their environmental defects on soils during processing techniques and as they are used as fertilizers.

  14. Recent Transits of the Super-Earth Exoplanet GJ 1214B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sada, Pedro V.; Deming, Drake; Jackson, Brian; Jennings, Donald E.; Peterson, Steven W.; Haase, Flynn; Bays, Kevin; OGorman, Eamon; Lundsford, Alan

    2001-01-01

    We report recent ground-based photometry of the transiting super-Earth exoplanet GJ1214b at several wavelengths, including the infrared near 1.25 microns (J-band). We observed a J-band transit with the FLAMINGOS infrared imager and the 2.1-meter telescope on Kitt Peak, and we observed several optical transits using a 0.5-meter telescope on Kitt Peak and the 0.36-meter Universidad de Monterrey Observatory telescope. Our high-precision J-band observations exploit the brightness of the M-dwarf host star at this infrared wavelength as compared to the optical, as well as being significantly less affected by stellar activity and limb darkening. We fit the J-band transit to obtain an independent determination of the planetary and stellar radii. Our radius for the planet (2.61 +0.30 / -0.11 Earth radii) is in excellent agreement with the discovery value reported by Charbonneau et al. based on optical data. We demonstrate that the planetary radius is insensitive to degeneracies in the fitting process. We use all of our observations to improve the transit ephemeris, finding P=1.5804043 +/- 0.0000005 days, and T0=2454964.94390 +/- 0.00006 BJD.

  15. The Effect of Rare-Earth Metals on Cast Steels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1954-04-01

    as the 1-inch section is also illustrated in Figure 23 and consists of tempered bainite and tempered martensite. Both of the control steels (AE-1...section Tempered bainite and tempered martensite 4 inch section Figure 23 Microstructure ol the Mn-Cr-Mo base control steels . Etched with... bainite 4-inch Section Figure 25—Microstructures of the MnCr-Mo + Rare Earths f B cast steels . Etched with picral, SOOX - .1 €. Figure 26

  16. Moderate temperature sodium cells. I - Transition metal disulfide cathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abraham, K. M.; Pitts, L.; Schiff, R.

    1980-01-01

    TiS2, VS2, and Nb(1.1)S2 transition metal disulfides were evaluated as cathode materials for a moderate temperature rechargeable Na cell operating at 130 C. The 1st discharge of TiS2 results in a capacity of 0.85 eq/mole; approximately half of the Na in the 1st phase spanning the Na range from zero to 0.30 and almost all the Na in the 2nd phase spanning the 0.37 to 0.80 range are rechargeable. VS2 intercalates up to one mole of Na/mole of VS2 in the 1st discharge; the resulting Na(x)VS2 ternary consists of 3 phases in the 3 ranges of Na from zero to 1. Niobium disulfide undergoes a phase change in the 1st discharge; the average rechargeable capacity in extended cycling of this cathode is 0.50 eq/mole.

  17. Ferromagnetism and spin glass ordering in transition metal alloys (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crane, S.; Carnegie, D. W., Jr.; Claus, H.

    1982-03-01

    Magnetic properties of transition metal alloys near the percolation threshold are often complicated by metallurgical effects. Alloys like AuFe, VFe, CuNi, RhNi, and PdNi are in general not random solid solutions but have various degrees of atomic clustering or short-range order (SRO), depending on the heat treatment. First, it is shown how the magnetic ordering temperature of these alloys varies with the degree of clustering or SRO. Second, by systematically changing this degree of clustering or SRO, important information can be obtained about the magnetic phase diagram. In all these alloys below the percolation limit, the onset of ferromagnetic order is probably preceded by a spin glass-type ordering. However, details of the magnetic phase diagram near the critical point can be quite different alloy systems.

  18. Electronics and optoelectronics of two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing Hua; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kourosh; Kis, Andras; Coleman, Jonathan N; Strano, Michael S

    2012-11-01

    The remarkable properties of graphene have renewed interest in inorganic, two-dimensional materials with unique electronic and optical attributes. Transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) are layered materials with strong in-plane bonding and weak out-of-plane interactions enabling exfoliation into two-dimensional layers of single unit cell thickness. Although TMDCs have been studied for decades, recent advances in nanoscale materials characterization and device fabrication have opened up new opportunities for two-dimensional layers of thin TMDCs in nanoelectronics and optoelectronics. TMDCs such as MoS(2), MoSe(2), WS(2) and WSe(2) have sizable bandgaps that change from indirect to direct in single layers, allowing applications such as transistors, photodetectors and electroluminescent devices. We review the historical development of TMDCs, methods for preparing atomically thin layers, their electronic and optical properties, and prospects for future advances in electronics and optoelectronics.

  19. Two-photon absorption in layered transition metal dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Ningning; Zhang, Saifeng; Li, Yuanxin; Wang, Jun

    2018-02-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) layered transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) exhibit unique nonlinear optical (NLO) features and have becoming intriguing and promising candidate materials for photonic and optoelectronic devices with high performance and unique functions. Owing to layered geometry and the thickness-dependent bandgap, we studied the ultrafast NLO properties of a range of TMDCs. TMDCs with high-quality layered nanosheets were prepared through chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique and vapor-phase growth method. Saturable absorption, two photon absorption (TPA) and two photon pumped frequency up-converted luminescence were observed from these 2D nanostructures. The exciting results open up the door to 2D photonic devices, such as passive mode-lockers, Q-switchers, optical limiters, light emitters, etc.

  20. Finding Effective Models in Transition Metals using Quantum Monte Carlo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Kiel; Wagner, Lucas K.

    There is a gap between high-accuracy ab-initio calculations, like those produced from Quantum Monte Carlo (QMC), and effective lattice models such as the Hubbard model. We have developed a method that combines data produced from QMC with fitting techniques taken from data science, allowing us to determine which degrees of freedom are required to connect ab-initio and model calculations. We test this approach for transition metal atoms, where spectroscopic reference data exists. We report on the accuracy of several derived effective models that include different degrees of freedom, and comment on the quality of the parameter values we obtain from our fitting procedure. We gratefully acknowledge funding from the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship Program under Grant Number DGE-1144245 (K.T.W.) and from SciDAC Grant DE-FG02-12ER46875 (L.K.W.).

  1. Molecule signatures in photoluminescence spectra of transition metal dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feierabend, Maja; Berghäuser, Gunnar; Selig, Malte; Brem, Samuel; Shegai, Timur; Eigler, Siegfried; Malic, Ermin

    2018-01-01

    Monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) show an optimal surface-to-volume ratio and are thus promising candidates for novel molecule sensor devices. It was recently predicted that a certain class of molecules exhibiting a large dipole moment can be detected through the activation of optically inaccessible (dark) excitonic states in absorption spectra of tungsten-based TMDs. In this paper, we investigate the molecule signatures in photoluminescence spectra in dependence of a number of different experimentally accessible quantities, such as excitation density, temperature, as well as molecular characteristics including the dipole moment and its orientation, molecule-TMD distance, molecular coverage, and distribution. We show that under certain optimal conditions even room-temperature detection of molecules can be achieved.

  2. Excitonic linewidth and coherence lifetime in monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides

    DOE PAGES

    Selig, Malte; Berghäuser, Gunnar; Raja, Archana; ...

    2016-11-07

    Atomically thin transition metal dichalcogenides are direct-gap semiconductors with strong light–matter and Coulomb interactions. The latter accounts for tightly bound excitons, which dominate their optical properties. Besides the optically accessible bright excitons, these systems exhibit a variety of dark excitonic states. They are not visible in the optical spectra, but can strongly influence the coherence lifetime and the linewidth of the emission from bright exciton states. We investigate the microscopic origin of the excitonic coherence lifetime in two representative materials (WS 2 and MoSe 2) through a study combining microscopic theory with spectroscopic measurements. We also show that the excitonicmore » coherence lifetime is determined by phonon-induced intravalley scattering and intervalley scattering into dark excitonic states. Particularly, we identify exciton relaxation processes involving phonon emission into lower-lying dark states that are operative at all temperatures, in WS 2.« less

  3. Proximity-induced magnetism in transition-metal substituted graphene

    PubMed Central

    Crook, Charles B.; Constantin, Costel; Ahmed, Towfiq; Zhu, Jian-Xin; Balatsky, Alexander V.; Haraldsen, Jason T.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the interactions between two identical magnetic impurities substituted into a graphene superlattice. Using a first-principles approach, we calculate the electronic and magnetic properties for transition-metal substituted graphene systems with varying spatial separation. These calculations are compared for three different magnetic impurities, manganese, chromium, and vanadium. We determine the electronic band structure, density of states, and Millikan populations (magnetic moment) for each atom, as well as calculate the exchange parameter between the two magnetic atoms as a function of spatial separation. We find that the presence of magnetic impurities establishes a distinct magnetic moment in the graphene lattice, where the interactions are highly dependent on the spatial and magnetic characteristic between the magnetic and carbon atoms, which leads to either ferromagnetic or antiferromagnetic behavior. Furthermore, through an analysis of the calculated exchange energies and partial density of states, it is determined that interactions between the magnetic atoms can be classified as an RKKY interaction. PMID:26235646

  4. On the metal-insulator-transition in vanadium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovaini, Azita; Fujita, Shigeji; Godoy, Salvador; Suzuki, Akira

    2012-02-01

    Vanadium dioxide (VO2) undergoes a metal-insulator transition (MIT) at 340 K with the structural change from tetragonal to monoclinic crystal. The conductivity σ drops at MIT by four orders of magnitude. The low temperature monoclinic phase is known to have a lower ground-state energy. The existence of the k-vector k is prerequisite for the conduction since the k appears in the semiclassical equation of motion for the conduction electron (wave packet). The tetragonal (VO2)3 unit is periodic along the crystal's x-, y-, and z-axes, and hence there is a three-dimensional k-vector. There is a one-dimensional k for a monoclinic crystal. We believe this difference in the dimensionality of the k-vector is the cause of the conductivity drop.

  5. Transition Metal Dichalcogenide Growth via Close Proximity Precursor Supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Maria; McEvoy, Niall; Hallam, Toby; Kim, Hye-Young; Berner, Nina C.; Hanlon, Damien; Lee, Kangho; Coleman, Jonathan N.; Duesberg, Georg S.

    2014-12-01

    Reliable chemical vapour deposition (CVD) of transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) is currently a highly pressing research field, as numerous potential applications rely on the production of high quality films on a macroscopic scale. Here, we show the use of liquid phase exfoliated nanosheets and patterned sputter deposited layers as solid precursors for chemical vapour deposition. TMD monolayers were realized using a close proximity precursor supply in a CVD microreactor setup. A model describing the growth mechanism, which is capable of producing TMD monolayers on arbitrary substrates, is presented. Raman spectroscopy, photoluminescence, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and electrical transport measurements reveal the high quality of the TMD samples produced. Furthermore, through patterning of the precursor supply, we achieve patterned growth of monolayer TMDs in defined locations, which could be adapted for the facile production of electronic device components.

  6. Plasmonics and SERS activity of post-transition metal nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezerra, A. G.; Machado, T. N.; Woiski, T. D.; Turchetti, D. A.; Lenz, J. A.; Akcelrud, L.; Schreiner, W. H.

    2018-05-01

    Nanoparticles of the post-transition metals, In, Sn, Pb, and Bi, and of the metalloid Sb were produced by laser ablation synthesis in solution (LASiS) and tested for localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPR) and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). The nanoparticles were characterized by UV-Vis optical absorption, dynamic light scattering (DLS), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Several organic and biological molecules were tested, and SERS activity was demonstrated for all tested nanoparticles and molecules. The Raman enhancement factor for each nanoparticle class and molecule was experimentally determined. The search for new plasmonic nanostructures is important mainly for life sciences-related applications and this study expands the range of SERS active systems.

  7. Chemical vapour deposition: Transition metal carbides go 2D

    DOE PAGES

    Gogotsi, Yury

    2015-08-17

    Here, the research community has been steadily expanding the family of few-atom-thick crystals beyond graphene, discovering new materials or producing known materials in a 2D state and demonstrating their unique properties 1, 2. Recently, nanometre-thin 2D transition metal carbides have also joined this family 3. Writing in Nature Materials, Chuan Xu and colleagues now report a significant advance in the field, showing the synthesis of large-area, high-quality, nanometre-thin crystals of molybdenum carbide that demonstrate low-temperature 2D superconductivity 4. Moreover, they also show that other ultrathin carbide crystals, such as tungsten and tantalum carbides, can be grown by chemical vapour depositionmore » with a high crystallinity and very low defect concentration.« less

  8. Moderate temperature sodium cells. I - Transition metal disulfide cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, K. M.; Pitts, L.; Schiff, R.

    1980-12-01

    TiS2, VS2, and Nb(1.1)S2 transition metal disulfides were evaluated as cathode materials for a moderate temperature rechargeable Na cell operating at 130 C. The 1st discharge of TiS2 results in a capacity of 0.85 eq/mole; approximately half of the Na in the 1st phase spanning the Na range from zero to 0.30 and almost all the Na in the 2nd phase spanning the 0.37 to 0.80 range are rechargeable. VS2 intercalates up to one mole of Na/mole of VS2 in the 1st discharge; the resulting Na(x)VS2 ternary consists of 3 phases in the 3 ranges of Na from zero to 1. Niobium disulfide undergoes a phase change in the 1st discharge; the average rechargeable capacity in extended cycling of this cathode is 0.50 eq/mole.

  9. Electron-doping by hydrogen in transition-metal dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Sehoon; Im, Seongil; Choi, Hyoung Joon

    Using first-principles calculations, we investigate the atomic and electronic structures of 2H-phase transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDC), 2H-MX2, with and without defects, where M is Mo or W and X is S, Se or Te. We find that doping of atomic hydrogen on 2H-MX2 induces electron doping in the conduction band. To understand the mechanism of this electron doping, we analyze the electronic structures with and without impurities. We also calculate the diffusion energy barrier to discuss the spatial stability of the doping. Based on these results, we suggest a possible way to fabricate elaborately-patterned circuits by modulating the carrier type of 2H-MoTe2. We also discuss possible applications of this doping in designing nano-devices. This work was supported by NRF of Korea (Grant No. 2011-0018306) and KISTI supercomputing center (Project No. KSC-2016-C3-0052).

  10. Exciton fission in monolayer transition metal dichalcogenide semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Steinhoff, A; Florian, M; Rösner, M; Schönhoff, G; Wehling, T O; Jahnke, F

    2017-10-27

    When electron-hole pairs are excited in a semiconductor, it is a priori not clear if they form a plasma of unbound fermionic particles or a gas of composite bosons called excitons. Usually, the exciton phase is associated with low temperatures. In atomically thin transition metal dichalcogenide semiconductors, excitons are particularly important even at room temperature due to strong Coulomb interaction and a large exciton density of states. Using state-of-the-art many-body theory, we show that the thermodynamic fission-fusion balance of excitons and electron-hole plasma can be efficiently tuned via the dielectric environment as well as charge carrier doping. We propose the observation of these effects by studying exciton satellites in photoemission and tunneling spectroscopy, which present direct solid-state counterparts of high-energy collider experiments on the induced fission of composite particles.

  11. Transition Metal Carbides and Nitrides in Energy Storage and Conversion

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Yu; Shi, Fan; Zhan, Jiye; Tu, Jiangping

    2016-01-01

    High‐performance electrode materials are the key to advances in the areas of energy conversion and storage (e.g., fuel cells and batteries). In this Review, recent progress in the synthesis and electrochemical application of transition metal carbides (TMCs) and nitrides (TMNs) for energy storage and conversion is summarized. Their electrochemical properties in Li‐ion and Na‐ion batteries as well as in supercapacitors, and electrocatalytic reactions (oxygen evolution and reduction reactions, and hydrogen evolution reaction) are discussed in association with their crystal structure/morphology/composition. Advantages and benefits of nanostructuring (e.g., 2D MXenes) are highlighted. Prospects of future research trends in rational design of high‐performance TMCs and TMNs electrodes are provided at the end. PMID:27812464

  12. Two-dimensional inorganic analogues of graphene: transition metal dichalcogenides.

    PubMed

    Jana, Manoj K; Rao, C N R

    2016-09-13

    The discovery of graphene marks a major event in the physics and chemistry of materials. The amazing properties of this two-dimensional (2D) material have prompted research on other 2D layered materials, of which layered transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) are important members. Single-layer and few-layer TMDCs have been synthesized and characterized. They possess a wide range of properties many of which have not been known hitherto. A typical example of such materials is MoS2 In this article, we briefly present various aspects of layered analogues of graphene as exemplified by TMDCs. The discussion includes not only synthesis and characterization, but also various properties and phenomena exhibited by the TMDCs.This article is part of the themed issue 'Fullerenes: past, present and future, celebrating the 30th anniversary of Buckminster Fullerene'. © 2016 The Author(s).

  13. Two-dimensional inorganic analogues of graphene: transition metal dichalcogenides

    PubMed Central

    Jana, Manoj K.; Rao, C. N. R.

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of graphene marks a major event in the physics and chemistry of materials. The amazing properties of this two-dimensional (2D) material have prompted research on other 2D layered materials, of which layered transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) are important members. Single-layer and few-layer TMDCs have been synthesized and characterized. They possess a wide range of properties many of which have not been known hitherto. A typical example of such materials is MoS2. In this article, we briefly present various aspects of layered analogues of graphene as exemplified by TMDCs. The discussion includes not only synthesis and characterization, but also various properties and phenomena exhibited by the TMDCs. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Fullerenes: past, present and future, celebrating the 30th anniversary of Buckminster Fullerene’. PMID:27501969

  14. Nonequilibrium carrier dynamics in transition metal dichalcogenide semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinhoff, A.; Florian, M.; Rösner, M.; Lorke, M.; Wehling, T. O.; Gies, C.; Jahnke, F.

    2016-09-01

    When exploring new materials for their potential in (opto)electronic device applications, it is important to understand the role of various carrier interaction and scattering processes. In atomically thin transition metal dichalcogenide semiconductors, the Coulomb interaction is known to be much stronger than in quantum wells of conventional semiconductors like GaAs, as witnessed by the 50 times larger exciton binding energy. The question arises, whether this directly translates into equivalently faster carrier-carrier Coulomb scattering of excited carriers. Here we show that a combination of ab initio band-structure and many-body theory predicts Coulomb-mediated carrier relaxation on a sub-100 fs time scale for a wide range of excitation densities, which is less than an order of magnitude faster than in quantum wells.

  15. Ferromagnetism in Fe-doped transition metal nitrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Ramesh; Sharma, Yamini

    2018-04-01

    Early transition metal mononitrides ScN and YN are refractory compounds with high hardness and melting points as well semiconducting properties. The presence of nitrogen vacancies in ScN/YN introduces asymmetric peaks in the density of states close to Fermi level, the same effects can be achieved by doping by Mn or Fe-atoms. Due to the substitution of TM atoms at Sc/Y sites, it was found that the p-d hybridization induces small magnetic moments at both Sc/Y and N sites giving rise to magnetic semiconductors (MS). From the calculated temperature dependent transport properties, the power factor and ZT is found to be lowered for doped ScN whereas it increases for doped YN. It is proposed that these materials have promising applications as spintronics and thermoelectric materials.

  16. Room temperature ferromagnetism in transition metal-doped black phosphorous

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xiaohong; Zhang, Xinwei; Xiong, Fang; Hua, Zhenghe; Wang, Zhihe; Yang, Shaoguang

    2018-05-01

    High pressure high temperature synthesis of transition metal (TM = V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu) doped black phosphorus (BP) was performed. Room temperature ferromagnetism was observed in Cr and Mn doped BP samples. X-ray diffraction and Raman measurements revealed pure phase BP without any impurity. Transport measurements showed us semiconducting character in 5 at. % doped BP samples Cr5%P95% and Mn5%P95%. The magnetoresistance (MR) studies presented positive MR in the relatively high temperature range and negative MR in the low temperature range. Compared to that of pure BP, the maximum MR was enhanced in Cr5%P95%. However, paramagnetism was observed in V, Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu doped BP samples.

  17. Theoretical ultra-fast spectroscopy in transition metal dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina-Sanchez, Alejandro; Sangalli, Davide; Marini, Andrea; Wirtz, Ludger

    Semiconducting 2D-materials like the transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) MoS2, MoSe2, WS2, WSe2 are promising alternatives to graphene for designing novel opto-electronic devices. The strong spin-orbit interaction along with the breaking of inversion symmetry in single-layer TMDs allow using the valley-index as a new quantum number. The practical use of valley physics depends on the lifetimes of valley-polarized excitons which are affected by scattering at phonons, impurities and by carrier-carrier interactions. The carrier dynamics can be monitored using ultra-fast spectroscopies such as pump-probe experiments. The carrier dynamics is simulated using non-equilibrium Green's function theory in an ab-initio framework. We include carrier relaxation through electron-phonon interaction. We obtain the transient absorption spectra of single-layer TMD and compare our simulations with recent pump-probe experiments

  18. Voltage Control of Rare-Earth Magnetic Moments at the Magnetic-Insulator-Metal Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leon, Alejandro O.; Cahaya, Adam B.; Bauer, Gerrit E. W.

    2018-01-01

    The large spin-orbit interaction in the lanthanides implies a strong coupling between their internal charge and spin degrees of freedom. We formulate the coupling between the voltage and the local magnetic moments of rare-earth atoms with a partially filled 4 f shell at the interface between an insulator and a metal. The rare-earth-mediated torques allow the power-efficient control of spintronic devices by electric-field-induced ferromagnetic resonance and magnetization switching.

  19. Low frequency vibrational spectra and the nature of metal-oxygen bond of alkaline earth metal acetylacetonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakheri, Hamideh; Tayyari, Sayyed Faramarz; Heravi, Mohammad Momen; Morsali, Ali

    2017-12-01

    Theoretical quantum chemistry calculations were used to assign the observed vibrational band frequencies of Be, Mg, Ca, Sr, and Ba acetylacetonates complexes. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations have been carried out at the B3LYP level, using LanL2DZ, def2SVP, and mixed, GenECP, (def2SVP for metal ions and 6-311++G** for all other atoms) basis sets. The B3LYP level, with mixed basis sets, was utilized for calculations of vibrational frequencies, IR intensity, and Raman activity. Analysis of the vibrational spectra indicates that there are several bands which could almost be assigned mainly to the metal-oxygen vibrations. The strongest Raman band in this region could be used as a measure of the stability of the complex. The effects of central metal on the bond orders and charge distributions in alkaline earth metal acetylacetonates were studied by the Natural Bond Orbital (NBO) method for fully optimized compounds. Optimization were performed at the B3LYP/6-311++G** level for the lighter alkaline earth metal complexes (Be, Mg, and Ca acetylacetonates) while the B3LYP level, using LanL2DZ (extrabasis, d and f on oxygen and metal atoms), def2SVP and mixed (def2SVP on metal ions and 6-311++G** for all other atoms) basis sets for all understudy complexes. Calculations indicate that the covalence nature of metal-oxygen bonds considerably decreases from Be to Ba complexes. The nature of metal-oxygen bond was further studied by using Atoms In Molecules (AIM) analysis. The topological parameters, Wiberg bond orders, natural charges of O and metal ions, and also some vibrational band frequencies were correlated with the stability constants of understudy complexes.

  20. Preparation and magnetic properties of phthalocyanine-based carbon materials containing transition metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, Z.; Sato, S.; Hagiwara, M.; Kida, T.; Sakai, M.; Fukuda, T.; Kamata, N.

    2016-07-01

    A simple method for the preparation of bulk quantities of magnetic carbon materials, which contain uniformly dispersed transition metals (M = Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu) as the magnetic components, is presented. By using highly chlorinated metal phthalocyanine as the building block and potassium as the coupling reagent, phthalocyanine-based carbon materials (PBCMs) containing transition metals were obtained. Our experiments demonstrate the structure of these PBCMs consists of transition metals embedded in graphitic carbon that includes a square planar MN4 magnetic core and the Fe and Co-PBCM possess spontaneous magnetization at room temperature. In addition, carbon-coated transition metal particles were obtained by the Wurtz-type reaction with excess amount of potassium coupling agent. The large transition metal surface area and magnetization of these M-PBCMs are useful for spintronic and catalytic applications.

  1. Overcoming nanoscale friction barriers in transition metal dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cammarata, Antonio; Polcar, Tomas

    2017-08-01

    We study the atomic contributions to the nanoscale friction in layered M X2 (M =Mo , W; X =S , Se, Te) transition metal dichalcogenides by combining ab initio techniques with group-theoretical analysis. Starting from stable atomic configurations, we propose a computational method, named normal-modes transition approximation (NMTA), to individuate possible sliding paths from only the analysis of the phonon modes of the stable geometry. The method provides a way to decompose the atomic displacements realizing the layer sliding in terms of phonon modes of the stable structure, so as to guide the selection and tuning of specific atomic motions promoting M X2 sheets gliding, and to adjust the corresponding energy barrier. The present results show that main contributions to the nanoscale friction are due to few low frequency phonon modes, corresponding to rigid shifts of M X2 layers. We also provide further evidences that a previously reported Ti-doped MoS2 phase is a promising candidate as new material with enhanced tribologic properties. The NMTA approach can be exploited to tune the energetic and the structural features of specific phonon modes, and, thanks to its general formulation, can also be applied to any solid state system, irrespective of the chemical composition and structural topology.

  2. Canonical Schottky barrier heights of transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers in contact with a metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szcześniak, Dominik; Hoehn, Ross D.; Kais, Sabre

    2018-05-01

    The transition metal dichalcogenide (M X2 , where M =Mo , W and X =S , Se, Te) monolayers are of high interest for semiconducting applications at the nanoscale level; this interest is due to both their direct band gaps and high charge mobilities. In this regard, an in-depth understating of the related Schottky barrier heights, associated with the incorporation of M X2 sheets into novel low-dimensional metal-semiconductor junctions, is of crucial importance. Herein, we generate and provide analysis of the Schottky barrier heights behavior to account for the metal-induced gap states concept as its explanation. In particular, the present investigations concentrate on the estimation of the charge neutrality levels directly by employing the primary theoretical model, i.e., the cell-averaged Green's function formalism combined with the complex band structure technique. The results presented herein place charge neutrality levels in the vicinity of the midgap; this is in agreement with previous reports and analogous to the behavior of three-dimensional semiconductors. The calculated canonical Schottky barrier heights are also found to be in agreement with other computational and experimental values in cases where the difference between electronegativities of the semiconductor and metal contact is small. Moreover, the influence of the spin-orbit effects is herein considered and supports that Schottky barrier heights have metal-induced gap state-derived character, regardless whether spin-orbit coupling interactions are considered. The results presented within this report constitute a direct and vital verification of the importance of metal-induced gap states in explaining the behavior of observed Schottky barrier heights at M X2 -metal junctions.

  3. Formation enthalpies for transition metal alloys using machine learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ubaru, Shashanka; Miedlar, Agnieszka; Saad, Yousef; Chelikowsky, James R.

    2017-06-01

    The enthalpy of formation is an important thermodynamic property. Developing fast and accurate methods for its prediction is of practical interest in a variety of applications. Material informatics techniques based on machine learning have recently been introduced in the literature as an inexpensive means of exploiting materials data, and can be used to examine a variety of thermodynamics properties. We investigate the use of such machine learning tools for predicting the formation enthalpies of binary intermetallic compounds that contain at least one transition metal. We consider certain easily available properties of the constituting elements complemented by some basic properties of the compounds, to predict the formation enthalpies. We show how choosing these properties (input features) based on a literature study (using prior physics knowledge) seems to outperform machine learning based feature selection methods such as sensitivity analysis and LASSO (least absolute shrinkage and selection operator) based methods. A nonlinear kernel based support vector regression method is employed to perform the predictions. The predictive ability of our model is illustrated via several experiments on a dataset containing 648 binary alloys. We train and validate the model using the formation enthalpies calculated using a model by Miedema, which is a popular semiempirical model used for the prediction of formation enthalpies of metal alloys.

  4. Magnesium nanoparticles with transition metal decoration for hydrogen storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasquini, Luca; Callini, Elsa; Brighi, Matteo; Boscherini, Federico; Montone, Amelia; Jensen, Torben R.; Maurizio, Chiara; Vittori Antisari, Marco; Bonetti, Ennio

    2011-11-01

    We report on the hydrogen storage behaviour of Mg nanoparticles (NPs) (size range 100 nm-1 μm) with metal-oxide core-shell morphology synthesized by inert gas condensation and decorated by transition metal (TM) (Pd or Ti) clusters via in situ vacuum deposition. The structure and morphology of the as-prepared and hydrogenated NPs is studied by electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction including in situ experiments and X-ray absorption spectroscopy, in order to investigate the relationships with the hydrogen storage kinetics measured by the volumetric Sieverts method. With both Pd and Ti, the decoration deeply improves the hydrogen sorption properties: previously inert NPs exhibit complete hydrogenation with fast transformation kinetics, good stability and reversible gravimetric capacity that can attain 6 wt%. In the case of Pd-decoration, the occurrence of Mg-Pd alloying is observed at high temperatures and in dependence of the hydrogen pressure conditions. These structural transformations modify both the kinetics and thermodynamics of hydride formation, while Ti-decoration has an effect only on the kinetics. The experimental results are discussed in relation with key issues such as the amount of decoration, the heat of mixing between TM and Mg and the binding energy between TM and hydrogen.

  5. Kohn Anomaly and Phase Stability in Group VB Transition Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Landa, Alexander; Soderlind, Per; Naumov, Ivan

    In the periodic table, only a few pure metals exhibit lattice or magnetic instabilities associated with Fermi surface nesting, the classical examples being α-U and Cr. Whereas α-U displays a strong Kohn anomaly in the phonon spectrum that ultimately leads to the formation of charge density waves (CDWs), Cr is known for its nesting-induced spin density waves (SDWs). Recently, it has become clear that a pronounced Kohn anomaly and the corresponding softening in the elastic constants is also the key factor that controls structural transformations and mechanical properties in compressed group VB metals—materials with relatively high superconducting critical temperatures. Thismore » article reviews the current understanding of the structural and mechanical behavior of these metals under pressure with an introduction to the concept of the Kohn anomaly and how it is related to the important concept of Peierls instability. We review both experimental and theoretical results showing different manifestations of the Kohn anomaly in the transverse acoustic phonon mode TA (ξ00) in V, Nb, and Ta. Specifically, in V the anomaly triggers a structural transition to a rhombohedral phase, whereas in Nb and Ta it leads to an anomalous reduction in yield strength.« less

  6. Kohn Anomaly and Phase Stability in Group VB Transition Metals

    DOE PAGES

    Landa, Alexander; Soderlind, Per; Naumov, Ivan; ...

    2018-03-26

    In the periodic table, only a few pure metals exhibit lattice or magnetic instabilities associated with Fermi surface nesting, the classical examples being α-U and Cr. Whereas α-U displays a strong Kohn anomaly in the phonon spectrum that ultimately leads to the formation of charge density waves (CDWs), Cr is known for its nesting-induced spin density waves (SDWs). Recently, it has become clear that a pronounced Kohn anomaly and the corresponding softening in the elastic constants is also the key factor that controls structural transformations and mechanical properties in compressed group VB metals—materials with relatively high superconducting critical temperatures. Thismore » article reviews the current understanding of the structural and mechanical behavior of these metals under pressure with an introduction to the concept of the Kohn anomaly and how it is related to the important concept of Peierls instability. We review both experimental and theoretical results showing different manifestations of the Kohn anomaly in the transverse acoustic phonon mode TA (ξ00) in V, Nb, and Ta. Specifically, in V the anomaly triggers a structural transition to a rhombohedral phase, whereas in Nb and Ta it leads to an anomalous reduction in yield strength.« less

  7. Photoinduced energy transfer in transition metal complex oligomers

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1997-04-01

    The work we have done over the past three years has been directed toward the preparation, characterization and photophysical examination of mono- and bimetallic diimine complexes. The work is part of a broader project directed toward the development of stable, efficient, light harvesting arrays of transition metal complex chromophores. One focus has been the synthesis of rigid bis-bidentate and bis-tridentate bridging ligands. We have managed to make the ligand bphb in multigram quantities from inexpensive starting materials. The synthetic approach used has allowed us prepare a variety of other ligands which may have unique applications (vide infra). We have prepared,more » characterized and examined the photophysical behavior of Ru(II) and Re(I) complexes of the ligands. Energy donor/acceptor complexes of bphb have been prepared which exhibit nearly activationless energy transfer. Complexes of Ru(II) and Re(I) have also been prepared with other polyunsaturated ligands in which two different long lived ( > 50 ns) excited states exist; results of luminescence and transient absorbance measurements suggest the two states are metal-to-ligand charge transfer and ligand localized {pi}{r_arrow}{pi}* triplets. Finally, we have developed methods to prepare polymetallic complexes which are covalently bound to various surfaces. The long term objective of this work is to make light harvesting arrays for the sensitization of large band gap semiconductors. Details of this work are provided in the body of the report.« less

  8. Photoinduced energy transfer in transition metal complex oligomers

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1997-06-01

    The work done over the past three years has been directed toward the preparation, characterization and photophysical examination of mono- and bimetallic diimine complexes. The work is part of a broader project directed toward the development of stable, efficient, light harvesting arrays of transition metal complex chromophores. One focus has been the synthesis of rigid bis-bidentate and bis-tridentate bridging ligands. The authors have managed to make the ligand bphb in multigram quantities from inexpensive starting materials. The synthetic approach used has allowed them to prepare a variety of other ligands which may have unique applications (vide infra). They have prepared,more » characterized and examined the photophysical behavior of Ru(II) and Re(I) complexes of the ligands. Energy donor/acceptor complexes of bphb have been prepared which exhibit nearly activationless energy transfer. Complexes of Ru(II) and Re(I) have also been prepared with other polyunsaturated ligands in which two different long lived (> 50 ns) excited states exist; results of luminescence and transient absorbance measurements suggest the two states are metal-to-ligand charge transfer and ligand localized {pi}{r_arrow}{pi}* triplets. Finally, the authors have developed methods to prepare polymetallic complexes which are covalently bound to various surfaces. The long term objective of this work is to make light harvesting arrays for the sensitization of large band gap semiconductors. Details of this work are provided in the body of the report.« less

  9. THEORETICAL TRANSIT SPECTRA FOR GJ 1214b AND OTHER 'SUPER-EARTHS'

    SciTech Connect

    Howe, Alex R.; Burrows, Adam S., E-mail: arhowe@astro.princeton.edu, E-mail: burrows@astro.princeton.edu

    2012-09-10

    We present new calculations of transit spectra of super-Earths that allow for atmospheres with arbitrary proportions of common molecular species and haze. We test this method with generic spectra, reproducing the expected systematics and absorption features, then apply it to the nearby super-Earth GJ 1214b, which has produced conflicting observational data, leaving the questions of a hydrogen-rich versus hydrogen-poor atmosphere and the water content of the atmosphere ambiguous. We present representative transit spectra for a range of classes of atmosphere models for GJ 1214b. Our analysis supports a hydrogen-rich atmosphere with a cloud or haze layer, although a hydrogen-poor modelmore » with {approx}<10% water is not ruled out. Several classes of models are ruled out, however, including hydrogen-rich atmospheres with no haze, hydrogen-rich atmospheres with a haze of {approx}0.01 {mu}m tholin particles, and hydrogen-poor atmospheres with major sources of absorption other than water. We propose an observational test to distinguish hydrogen-rich from hydrogen-poor atmospheres. Finally, we provide a library of theoretical transit spectra for super-Earths with a broad range of parameters to facilitate future comparison with anticipated data.« less

  10. Control of Exciton Valley Coherence in Transition Metal Dichalcogenide Monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Gang

    Current research on Transition Metal Dichalcogenide (TMD) Monolayers is stimulated by their strong light-matter interaction and the possibility to use the valley index in addition to spin as an information carrier. The direct gap interband transitions in TMD monolayers are governed by chiral optical selection rules. Determined by laser helicity, optical transitions in either the K+ or K- valley in momentum space are induced. Very recently the optical generation of valley polarization and valley coherence (coherent superposition of valley states) have been reported. In this work we go a step further by discussing the coherent manipulation of valley states. Linearly polarized laser excitation prepares a coherent superposition of valley states. We demonstrate the control of the exciton valley coherence in monolayer WSe2 by tuning the applied magnetic field perpendicular to the monolayer plane. The induced valley Zeeman splitting between K+ and K- results in a change of the oscillation frequency of the superposition of the valley states, which corresponds to a rotation of the exciton valley pseudo-spin. We show rotation of this coherent superposition of valley states by angles as large as 30 degrees in applied fields up to 9T and discuss valley coherence in other TMD monolayer materials. This exciton valley coherence control on ps time scale could be an important step towards complete control of qubits based on the valley degree of freedom. In collaboration with X. Marie, T. Amand, C. Robert, F. Cadiz, P. Renucci, B. Urbaszek (Université de Toulouse, INSA-CNRS-UPS, LPCNO, France), B. L. Liu (Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China) and we acknowledge ERC Grant No. 306719.

  11. Metal-semiconductor barrier modulation for high photoresponse in transition metal dichalcogenide field effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Li, Hua-Min; Lee, Dae-Yeong; Choi, Min Sup; Qu, Deshun; Liu, Xiaochi; Ra, Chang-Ho; Yoo, Won Jong

    2014-02-10

    A gate-controlled metal-semiconductor barrier modulation and its effect on carrier transport were investigated in two-dimensional (2D) transition metal dichalcogenide (TMDC) field effect transistors (FETs). A strong photoresponse was observed in both unipolar MoS2 and ambipolar WSe2 FETs (i) at the high drain voltage due to a high electric field along the channel for separating photo-excited charge carriers and (ii) at the certain gate voltage due to the optimized barriers for the collection of photo-excited charge carriers at metal contacts. The effective barrier height between Ti/Au and TMDCs was estimated by a low temperature measurement. An ohmic contact behavior and drain-induced barrier lowering (DIBL) were clearly observed in MoS2 FET. In contrast, a Schottky-to-ohmic contact transition was observed in WSe2 FET as the gate voltage increases, due to the change of majority carrier transport from holes to electrons. The gate-dependent barrier modulation effectively controls the carrier transport, demonstrating its great potential in 2D TMDCs for electronic and optoelectronic applications.

  12. Transition metal doped (X = V, Cr) CdS monolayer: A DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deb, Jyotirmoy; Paul, Debolina; Sarkar, Utpal

    2018-05-01

    In this work based on density functional theory approach with generalized gradient approximation we have investigated the effect doping and co-doping of transition metal atoms in CdS monolayer sheet. On the basis cohesive energy, we have determined the stability of all the transition metal doped systems. CdS monolayer is of nonmagnetic character but the insertion of transition metal atoms introduces the spontaneous spin polarization which results in a significant value of magnetic moment. The band structure analysis reveals that three different types of conducting nature such as spin-select-half-semiconductor, half metallic and metallic nature with total spin polarization has also been observed. The versatile conducting nature of the transition metal doped CdS monolayer predicts the possibility of using these systems in spintronics mainly as a spin filter and also to form metal-semiconductor interface etc. at nanoscale level.

  13. Inner-shell photodetachment of transition metal negative ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumitriu, Ileana

    This thesis focuses on the study of inner-shell photodetachment of transition metal negative ions, specifically Fe- and Ru- . Experimental investigations have been performed with the aim of gaining new insights into the physics of negative atomic ions and providing valuable absolute cross section data for astrophysics. The experiments were performed using the X-ray radiation from the Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and the merged-beam technique for photoion spectroscopy. Negative ions are a special class of atomic systems very different from neutral atoms and positive ions. The fundamental physics of the interaction of transition metal negative ions with photons is interesting but difficult to analyze in detail because the angular momentum coupling generates a large number of possible terms resulting from the open d shell. Our work reports on the first inner-shell photodetachment studies and absolute cross section measurements for Fe- and Ru -. In the case of Fe-, an important astrophysical abundant element, the inner-shell photodetachment cross section was obtained by measuring the Fe+ and Fe2+ ion production over the photon energy range of 48--72 eV. The absolute cross sections for the production of Fe+ and Fe2+ were measured at four photon energies. Strong shape resonances due to the 3p→3d photoexcitation were measured above the 3p detachment threshold. The production of Ru+, Ru2+, and Ru3+ from Ru- was measured over 30--90 eV photon energy range The absolute photodetachment cross sections of Ru - ([Kr] 4d75s 2) leading to Ru+, Ru2+, and Ru 3+ ion production were measured at three photon energies. Resonance effects were observed due to interference between transitions of the 4 p-electrons to the quasi-bound 4p54d85s 2 states and the 4d→epsilonf continuum. The role of many-particle effects, intershell interaction, and polarization seems much more significant in Ru- than in Fe- photodetachment.

  14. Ammonia and hydrazine. Transition-metal-catalyzed hydroamination and metal-free catalyzed functionalization

    SciTech Connect

    Bertrand, Guy

    2012-06-29

    The efficient and selective preparation of organic molecules is critical for mankind. For the future, it is of paramount importance to find catalysts able to transform abundant and cheap feedstocks into useful compounds. Acyclic and heterocyclic nitrogen-containing derivatives are common components of naturally occurring compounds, agrochemicals, cosmetics, and pharmaceuticals; they are also useful intermediates in a number of industrial processes. One of the most widely used synthetic strategies, allowing the formation of an N-C bond, is the addition of an N-H bond across a carbon-carbon multiple bond, the so-called hydroamination reaction. This chemical transformation fulfills the principle of “green chemistry”more » since it ideally occurs with 100% atom economy. Various catalysts have been found to promote this reaction, although many limitations remain; one of the most prominent is the lack of methods that permit the use of NH 3 and NH 2NH 2 as the amine partners. In fact, ammonia and hydrazine have rarely succumbed to homogeneous catalytic transformations. Considering the low cost and abundance of ammonia (136 million metric tons produced in 2011) and hydrazine, catalysts able to improve the reactivity and selectivity of the NH 3- and NH 2NH 2-hydroamination reaction, and more broadly speaking the functionalization of these chemicals, are highly desirable. In the last funded period, we discovered the first homogeneous catalysts able to promote the hydroamination of alkynes and allenes with ammonia and the parent hydrazine. The key feature of our catalytic systems is that the formation of catalytically inactive Werner complexes is reversible, in marked contrast to most of the known ammonia and hydrazine transition metal complexes. This is due to the peculiar electronic properties of our neutral ancillary ligands, especially their strong donating capabilities. However, our catalysts currently require high temperatures and long reaction times. To address

  15. (S)TEM analysis of functional transition metal oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Miaofang

    Perovskite vanadates (AVO3) form an ideal family to study the structure-property relationships in transition metal oxides because their physical properties can easily be tailored by varying the A-site cations. (S)TEM is an ideal tool for this type of study due to its capacity for simultaneous imaging and chemical analysis. Determination of the oxidation state of vanadium in complex oxides have been carried out by electron energy loss spectroscopy. SrVO3/LaAlO3 is then studied both experimentally and theoretically as a prototype system. Extra electrons have been detected on the interface layer, and further proven to originate mainly from a change in the local bonding configuration of V at the La-O terminated substrate surface. Cr-containing stainless steel deposited with a LaCrO3 thin-film layer is a promising interconnect material of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC). Our investigation on its microstructural evolution reveals that the LaCrO 3 thin film plays a role in inhibiting the growth of an oxide layer on the metal surface and thus protects the surface of the stainless steel. Ca-doped LaCoO3 is a promising SOFC cathode material. The domain structures and the oxidation state of Co in Ca-doped LaCoO3, which are directly related to its mechanical properties and electronic conductivity, are investigated by in-situ TEM and EELS. The formation of microcracks is observed during thermal cycles. Ca-doping in LaCoO3 is shown to not only improve the electronic conductivity of the material, but is also likely to strengthen the grain boundaries. The realization of its application in SOFCs depends on depressing the ferroelastisity to reduce strain formation during thermal cycles. The application of the (S)TEM techniques used for studying the perovskite systems are further extended to other compounds containing transition metal elements. The refractory minerals from Comet 81 P/Wild-2 are studied to investigate the formation of the early solar system. A relatively high Ti3+/Ti 4

  16. New technology of extracting the amount of rare earth metals from the red mud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martoyan, G. A.; Karamyan, G. G.; Vardan, G. A.

    2016-01-01

    The paper outlined the environmental and economic problems associated with red mud - the waste generated in processing of bauxite ore for aluminum production. The chemical analysis of red mud has identified a number of useful elements including rare earth metals. The electromembrane technology of red mud processing with extraction of valuable elements is described. A possible scheme of separation of these metals through electrolysis is also given.

  17. GROUND-BASED TRANSIT OBSERVATIONS OF THE SUPER-EARTH 55 Cnc e

    SciTech Connect

    De Mooij, E. J. W.; López-Morales, M.; Karjalainen, R.

    2014-12-20

    We report the first ground-based detections of the shallow transit of the super-Earth exoplanet 55 Cnc e using a 2 m class telescope. Using differential spectrophotometry, we observed one transit in 2013 and another in 2014, with average spectral resolutions of ∼700 and ∼250, spanning the Johnson BVR photometric bands. We find a white light planet-to-star radius ratio of 0.0190{sub −0.0027}{sup +0.0023} from the 2013 observations and 0.0200{sub −0.0018}{sup +0.0017} from the 2014 observations. The two data sets combined result in a radius ratio of 0.0198{sub −0.0014}{sup +0.0013}. These values are all in agreement with previous space-based results. Scintillation noise in themore » data prevents us from placing strong constraints on the presence of an extended hydrogen-rich atmosphere. Nevertheless, our detections of 55 Cnc e in transit demonstrate that moderate-sized telescopes on the ground will be capable of routine follow-up observations of super-Earth candidates discovered by the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite around bright stars. We expect it also will be possible to place constraints on the atmospheric characteristics of those planets by devising observational strategies to minimize scintillation noise.« less

  18. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering from metal and transition metal nano-caped arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Huanhuan; Gao, Renxian; Zhu, Aonan; Hua, Zhong; Chen, Lei; Wang, Yaxin; Zhang, Yongjun

    2018-03-01

    The metal and transition metal cap-shaped arrays on polystyrene colloidal particle (PSCP) templates were fabricated to study the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) effect. We obtained the Ag and Fe complex film by a co-sputtering deposition method. The size of the deposited Fe particle was changed by the sputtering power. We also study the SERS enhancement mechanism by decorating the PATP probe molecule on the different films. The SERS signals increased firstly, and then decreased as the size of Fe particles grows gradually. The finite-difference time domain (FDTD) simulation and experimental Raman results manifest that SERS enhancement was mainly attributed to surface plasma resonance (SPR) between Ag and Ag nanoparticles. The SERS signals of PATP molecule were enhanced to reach a lowest detectable concentration of 10-8 mol/L. The research demonstrates that the SERS substrates with Ag-Fe cap-shaped arrays have a high sensitivity.

  19. Ternary Amides Containing Transition Metals for Hydrogen Storage: A Case Study with Alkali Metal Amidozincates.

    PubMed

    Cao, Hujun; Richter, Theresia M M; Pistidda, Claudio; Chaudhary, Anna-Lisa; Santoru, Antonio; Gizer, Gökhan; Niewa, Rainer; Chen, Ping; Klassen, Thomas; Dornheim, Martin

    2015-11-01

    The alkali metal amidozincates Li4 [Zn(NH2)4](NH2)2 and K2[Zn(NH2)4] were, to the best of our knowledge, studied for the first time as hydrogen storage media. Compared with the LiNH2-2 LiH system, both Li4 [Zn(NH2)4](NH2)2-12 LiH and K2[Zn(NH2)4]-8 LiH systems showed improved rehydrogenation performance, especially K2[Zn(NH2)4]-8 LiH, which can be fully hydrogenated within 30 s at approximately 230 °C. The absorption properties are stable upon cycling. This work shows that ternary amides containing transition metals have great potential as hydrogen storage materials. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Fermi surfaces and electronic topological transitions in metallic solid solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruno, E.; Ginatempo, B.; Guiliano, E. S.; Ruban, A. V.; Vekilov, Yu. Kh.

    1994-12-01

    Notwithstanding the substitutional disorder, the Fermi surface of metallic alloys can be measured and computed. We show that, from the theoretical point of view, it is defined as the locus of the peaks of the Bloch Spectral Function (BSF). Such Fermi surfaces, on varying the atomic concentrations, may undergo changes of their topology, known as Electronic Topological Transitions (ETT). Thus, for instance, pockets of electrons or holes may appear or disappear, necks may open or close. ETTs cause anomalous behaviours of thermodynamic, transport and elastic properties of metals and constitute a fascinating field in the study of Fermi liquid systems. Although ETTs could be studied on pure systems as a function of the thermodynamic variables, nevertheless such a study would often require extreme conditions, and would lead to experimental difficulties. On the other hand, it is possible to explore the variations of atomic concentration, i.e. the valence electron per atom ratio, in metallic solid solutions with a relative experimental ease. In this paper we review the theoretical techniques for the determination of Fermi surfaces in metallic solid solutions and discuss some examples of ETTs, namely LiMg, ZrNb, NbMo, MoRe, AgPd, CdMg, NiW and NiTi alloys, also in connection with experimental data as thermoelectric power, resistivity, elastic constants and electron-phonon coupling and with the determinations of the electron momentum distribution function from Compton scattering and positron annihilation experiments. We show that the ab initio calculations of the electronic structure for the quoted systems, together with a careful determination of the BSF, are able to predict quantitatively ETTs at those concentrations where physical quantities display anomalies, so confirming directly ETT theory. Although it is not the purpose of the present review to give a full account of electronic structure calculation schemes, however, we briefly discuss the

  1. Synthetic Fabrication of Nanoscale MoS2-Based Transition Metal Sulfides

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shutao; An, Changhua; Yuan, Jikang

    2010-01-01

    Transition metal sulfides are scientifically and technologically important materials. This review summarizes recent progress on the synthetic fabrication of transition metal sulfides nanocrystals with controlled shape, size, and surface functionality. Special attention is paid to the case of MoS2 nanoparticles, where organic (surfactant, polymer), inorganic (support, promoter, doping) compounds and intercalation chemistry are applied.

  2. Ligational behavior of Schiff bases towards transition metal ion and metalation effect on their antibacterial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devi, Jai; Batra, Nisha; Malhotra, Rajesh

    2012-11-01

    New Schiff bases pyrazine-2-carboxylicacid (phenyl-pyridin-2-yl-methylene)-hydrazide (Hpch-bp) HL1 and pyrazine-2-carboxylicacid (pyridin-2-ylmethylene)-hydrazide (Hpch-pc) HL2 derived from condensation of pyrazine carboxylic hydrazide (Hpch) with 2-benzoyl pyridine (bp) or pyridine 2-carbaldehyde (pc) and their transition metal complexes of type ML(1-2)2 have been synthesized, where M = Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II). Characterization of ligands and their metal complexes was carried out by elemental analysis, conductimetric studies, magnetic susceptibility, spectroscopic techniques (IR, UV-VIS, NMR, ESR, Mass) and thermogravimetric analysis. The physico-chemical studies revealed octahedral geometry or distorted octahedral geometry around metal ion. These azomethine Schiff base ligands acted as tridentate ? coordinating through carbonyl, azomethine and pyridine nitrogen present in the ligand. The thermodynamic and thermal properties of the complexes have been investigated and it was observed on the basis of these studies that thermal stability of complexes follows the order Mn < Zn < Cu < Co < Ni. The ligands and their complexes were tested for in vitro antibacterial activity at different concentrations against bacteria viz. Gram positive Bacillus subtilis, Micrococcus luteus and Gram negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas mendocina. A marked enhancement in biocidal activity of the ligands under similar experimental conditions was observed as a consequence of coordination with metal ions. The trend of growth inhibition in the complexes was found to be in the order: Cu > Mn > Ni > Co > Zn.

  3. A super-Earth transiting a nearby low-mass star.

    PubMed

    Charbonneau, David; Berta, Zachory K; Irwin, Jonathan; Burke, Christopher J; Nutzman, Philip; Buchhave, Lars A; Lovis, Christophe; Bonfils, Xavier; Latham, David W; Udry, Stéphane; Murray-Clay, Ruth A; Holman, Matthew J; Falco, Emilio E; Winn, Joshua N; Queloz, Didier; Pepe, Francesco; Mayor, Michel; Delfosse, Xavier; Forveille, Thierry

    2009-12-17

    A decade ago, the detection of the first transiting extrasolar planet provided a direct constraint on its composition and opened the door to spectroscopic investigations of extrasolar planetary atmospheres. Because such characterization studies are feasible only for transiting systems that are both nearby and for which the planet-to-star radius ratio is relatively large, nearby small stars have been surveyed intensively. Doppler studies and microlensing have uncovered a population of planets with minimum masses of 1.9-10 times the Earth's mass (M[symbol:see text]), called super-Earths. The first constraint on the bulk composition of this novel class of planets was afforded by CoRoT-7b (refs 8, 9), but the distance and size of its star preclude atmospheric studies in the foreseeable future. Here we report observations of the transiting planet GJ 1214b, which has a mass of 6.55M[symbol:see text]), and a radius 2.68 times Earth's radius (R[symbol:see text]), indicating that it is intermediate in stature between Earth and the ice giants of the Solar System. We find that the planetary mass and radius are consistent with a composition of primarily water enshrouded by a hydrogen-helium envelope that is only 0.05% of the mass of the planet. The atmosphere is probably escaping hydrodynamically, indicating that it has undergone significant evolution during its history. The star is small and only 13 parsecs away, so the planetary atmosphere is amenable to study with current observatories.

  4. Aluminum/alkaline earth metal composites and method for producing

    DOEpatents

    Russell, Alan M; Anderson, Iver E; Kim, Hyong J; Freichs, Andrew E

    2014-02-11

    A composite is provided having an electrically conducting Al matrix and elongated filaments comprising Ca and/or Sr and/or Ba disposed in the matrix and extending along a longitudinal axis of the composite. The filaments initially comprise Ca and/or Sr and/or Ba metal or allow and then may be reacted with the Al matrix to form a strengthening intermetallic compound comprising Al and Ca and/or Sr and/or Ba. The composite is useful as a long-distance, high voltage power transmission conductor.

  5. Pore-Environment Engineering with Multiple Metal Sites in Rare-Earth Porphyrinic Metal-Organic Frameworks.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liangliang; Yuan, Shuai; Feng, Liang; Guo, Bingbing; Qin, Jun-Sheng; Xu, Ben; Lollar, Christina; Sun, Daofeng; Zhou, Hong-Cai

    2018-04-23

    Multi-component metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) with precisely controlled pore environments are highly desired owing to their potential applications in gas adsorption, separation, cooperative catalysis, and biomimetics. A series of multi-component MOFs, namely PCN-900(RE), were constructed from a combination of tetratopic porphyrinic linkers, linear linkers, and rare-earth hexanuclear clusters (RE 6 ) under the guidance of thermodynamics. These MOFs exhibit high surface areas (up to 2523 cm 2  g -1 ) and unlimited tunability by modification of metal nodes and/or linker components. Post-synthetic exchange of linear linkers and metalation of two organic linkers were realized, allowing the incorporation of a wide range of functional moieties. Two different metal sites were sequentially placed on the linear linker and the tetratopic porphyrinic linker, respectively, giving rise to an ideal platform for heterogeneous catalysis. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Improving the Transition of Earth Satellite Observations from Research to Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Steven J.; Lapenta, William M.; Jedlovec, Gary J.

    2004-01-01

    There are significant gaps between the observations, models, and decision support tools that make use of new data. These challenges include: 1) Decreasing the time to incorporate new satellite data into operational forecast assimilation systems, 2) Blending in-situ and satellite observing systems to produce the most accurate and comprehensive data products and assessments, 3) Accelerating the transition from research to applications through national test beds, field campaigns, and pilot demonstrations, and 4) Developing the partnerships and organizational structures to effectively transition new technology into operations. At the Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPORT) Center in Huntsville, Alabama, a NASA-NOAA-University collaboration has been developed to accelerate the infusion of NASA Earth science observations, data assimilation and modeling research into NWS forecast operations and decision-making. The SPoRT Center research focus is to improve forecasts through new observation capability and the regional prediction objectives of the US Weather Research Program dealing with 0-1 day forecast issues such as convective initiation and 24-hr quantitative precipitation forecasting. The near real-time availability of high-resolution experimental products of the atmosphere, land, and ocean from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), the Advanced Infrared Spectroradiometer (AIRS), and lightning mapping systems provide an opportunity for science and algorithm risk reduction, and for application assessment prior to planned observations from the next generation of operational low Earth orbiting and geostationary Earth orbiting satellites. This paper describes the process for the transition of experimental products into forecast operations, current products undergoing assessment by forecasters, and plans for the future. The SPoRT Web page is at (http://www.ghcc.msfc.nasa.gov/sport).

  7. Rare earth zirconium oxide buffer layers on metal substrates

    DOEpatents

    Williams, Robert K.; Paranthaman, Mariappan; Chirayil, Thomas G.; Lee, Dominic F.; Goyal, Amit; Feenstra, Roeland

    2001-01-01

    A laminate article comprises a substrate and a biaxially textured (RE.sub.x A.sub.(1-x)).sub.2 O.sub.2-(x/2) buffer layer over the substrate, wherein 0metal-organic decomposition. The laminate article can include a layer of YBCO over the (RE.sub.x A.sub.(1-x)).sub.2 O.sub.2-(x/2) buffer layer. A layer of CeO.sub.2 between the YBCO layer and the (RE.sub.x A.sub.(1-x)).sub.2 O.sub.2-(x/2) buffer layer can also be include. Further included can be a layer of YSZ between the CeO.sub.2 layer and the (RE.sub.x A.sub.(1-x)).sub.2 O.sub.2-(x/2) buffer layer. The substrate can be a biaxially textured metal, such as nickel. A method of forming the laminate article is also disclosed.

  8. Converged G W quasiparticle energies for transition metal oxide perovskites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ergönenc, Zeynep; Kim, Bongjae; Liu, Peitao; Kresse, Georg; Franchini, Cesare

    2018-02-01

    The ab initio calculation of quasiparticle (QP) energies is a technically and computationally challenging problem. In condensed matter physics, the most widely used approach to determine QP energies is the G W approximation. Although the G W method has been widely applied to many typical semiconductors and insulators, its application to more complex compounds such as transition metal oxide perovskites has been comparatively rare, and its proper use is not well established from a technical point of view. In this work, we have applied the single-shot G0W0 method to a representative set of transition metal oxide perovskites including 3 d (SrTiO3, LaScO3, SrMnO3, LaTiO3, LaVO3, LaCrO3, LaMnO3, and LaFeO3), 4 d (SrZrO3, SrTcO3, and Ca2RuO4 ), and 5 d (SrHfO3, KTaO3, and NaOsO3) compounds with different electronic configurations, magnetic orderings, structural characteristics, and band gaps ranging from 0.1 to 6.1 eV. We discuss the proper procedure to obtain well-converged QP energies and accurate band gaps within single-shot G0W0 by comparing the conventional approach based on an incremental variation of a specific set of parameters (number of bands, energy cutoff for the plane-wave expansion and number of k points) and the basis-set extrapolation scheme [J. Klimeš et al., Phys. Rev. B 90, 075125 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevB.90.075125]. Although the conventional scheme is not supported by a formal proof of convergence, for most cases it delivers QP energies in reasonably good agreement with those obtained by the basis-set correction procedure and it is by construction more useful for calculating band structures. In addition, we have inspected the difference between the adoption of norm-conserving and ultrasoft potentials in G W calculations and found that the norm violation for the d shell can lead to less accurate results in particular for charge-transfer systems and late transition metals. A minimal statistical analysis indicates that the correlation of the G W data

  9. Quantum spin liquids and the metal-insulator transition in doped semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Potter, Andrew C; Barkeshli, Maissam; McGreevy, John; Senthil, T

    2012-08-17

    We describe a new possible route to the metal-insulator transition in doped semiconductors such as Si:P or Si:B. We explore the possibility that the loss of metallic transport occurs through Mott localization of electrons into a quantum spin liquid state with diffusive charge neutral "spinon" excitations. Such a quantum spin liquid state can appear as an intermediate phase between the metal and the Anderson-Mott insulator. An immediate testable consequence is the presence of metallic thermal conductivity at low temperature in the electrical insulator near the metal-insulator transition. Further, we show that though the transition is second order, the zero temperature residual electrical conductivity will jump as the transition is approached from the metallic side. However, the electrical conductivity will have a nonmonotonic temperature dependence that may complicate the extrapolation to zero temperature. Signatures in other experiments and some comparisons with existing data are made.

  10. Composite nanoparticles containing rare earth metal and methods of preparation thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Kandapallil, Binil Itty Ipe; Krishnan, Lakshmi; Johnson, Francis

    The present invention is directed to composite nanoparticles comprising a metal, a rare earth element, and, optionally, a complexing ligand. The invention is also directed to composite nanoparticles having a core-shell structure and to processes for preparation of composite nanoparticles of the invention.

  11. Adsorption Behavior of Rare Earth Metal Cations in the Interlayer Space of γ-ZrP.

    PubMed

    Takei, Takahiro; Iidzuka, Kiyoaki; Miura, Akira; Yanagida, Sayaka; Kumada, Nobuhiro; Magome, Eisuke; Moriyoshi, Chikako; Kuroiwa, Yoshihiro

    2016-10-04

    Adsorption competencies of rare earth metal cations in γ-zirconium phosphate were examined by ICP, synchrotron X-ray diffraction (SXRD), and ab initio simulation. The adsorption amounts are around 0.06-0.10 per zirconium phosphate. From the SXRD patterns of the adsorbed samples, the basal spacing estimated by c sin β increased linearly with an increasing ionic radius of rare earth metal cation, though a and b lattice constants show no change. These SXRD patterns can be classified into four groups that have different super lattices. The four superlattices have multiplicities of x131, x241, and x221 for the xabc axis, and the location of the rare earth metal cation in the original unit cell changes depending on the superlattice cell. In the x131 superlattice, Yb and Er occupied the site near the zirconium phosphate layer, though La and Ce in the x221 superlattice remained in the center position between the phosphate sheet. For the ab initio simulation of γ-ZrP with the typical rare earth metal cations (Tb, Eu, Dy, and La), the results of simulation show a similar tendency of the position estimated by SXRD refinements.

  12. Engineered Transition Metal Chalcogenides for Photovoltaic, Thermoelectric, and Magnetic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moroz, Nicholas Anton

    This work focuses on the development of ternary and quaternary chalcogenide compounds featuring transition metal cations through careful engineering of the electronic and thermal transport as well as magnetic properties by traditional solid-state doping techniques and novel template structure synthesis methods for improvements in thermoelectric performance, diluted magnetic semiconductors, and photovoltaic conversion. Presented here is an innovative low-temperature batch synthesis that was developed to create hexagonal nanoplatelets of thermoelectrically interesting CuAgSe. This process utilized room temperature ion exchange reactions to convert cubic Cu2-xSe nanoplatelets into CuAgSe by replacing a portion of the Cu+ ions with Ag+ while maintaining the morphology of the nanoplatelet. This simple reaction process offers an energy efficient and versatile strategy to create interesting materials with superior thermoelectric performance. An investigation of the thermal and electronic transport of CuAl(S xSe1-x)2 solid solutions was also conducted. While these compounds yielded low thermal conductivity, they also exhibited low electronic conductivity. Doping with transition metals Ag, Hf, and Ti further reduced the thermal conductivity below 1 W/mK; however, most exciting was the determination that the thermal transport of the system could be modified by doping at the Al3+ site without affecting the electronic structure of the system, potentially leading to the use of CuAl(SxSe 1-x)2 as a heavily doped thermoelectric material. The effect of local carrier concentration in the diluted magnetic semiconductor FeSb2Se4 was studied by substitution of In3+ for Sb3+. Using systematic Rietveld refinement, it was determined that In3+ resides in the semiconducting layer of the structure for concentrations of x ≤ 0.1, and the magnetic layer for x > 0.1. The increase in local carrier concentration has an appreciable effect on the electronic and magnetic properties of the material

  13. A X-Ray Absorption Study of Transition Metal Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunker, Grant Byrd

    This work is an experimental and theoretical study of the x-ray absorption near-edge structure of selected 3d transition metal compounds. The goal is to understand the physical mechanisms of XANES, using the competing multiple scattering (MS) and single scattering formalisms of Durham et al, and of Muller and Schaich, respectively. Careful experimental measurements of the K edge absorption of Mn oxides and KMnO(,4) at 300(DEGREES)K, 140(DEGREES)K and 80(DEGREES)K were made. These materials were chosen because they exhibit a variety of structures and oxidation states. Computer simulations of the XANES using the formalisms above were also performed. The experimental results show that atoms beyond the first coordination shell significantly affect the XANES near and above the edge; in particular the temperature dependent XANES and the "white line" in MnO establish this. We conclude that XANES, like EXAFS, is primarily sensitive to geometrical structure, except within about 1 Rydberg of the Fermi level. Two types of MS are distinguished: type 1 (forward scattering) is important in both XANES and EXAFS regions; type 2 (large angle scattering) is important only at and below the edge. MS of the photoelectron among the first shell Oxygen atoms in KMnO(,4) is observed experimentally, and found to become negligible above (DBLTURN) 1 Rydberg past the edge. The sharp features in XANES are primarily due to scattering from distant atoms, rather than localized states, except below the edge. This is supported by the observation that (alpha)-Mn(,2)O(,3) and Mn(,3)O(,4) spectra are nearly identical; their structures are the same, but the average oxidation states are different. We find the bond length strongly affects the edge position and the intensity of the 3d absorption in tetrahedrally coordinated transition metals. Other new results are the first shell EXAFS amplitude in MnO shows an anomalous energy dependence, which apparently cannot be explained by current theory. A new

  14. Cohesive Energies of Some Transition Metal Compounds Using Embedded Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Press, Mehernosh Rustom

    The molecular-clusters approach to electronic structure calculation is especially well-suited to the study of properties that depend primarily on the local environment of a system, especially those with no translational symmetry, e.g. systems with defects and structural deformations. The presence of the rest of the crystal environment can be accounted for approximately by embedding the cluster in a self-consistent crystal potential. This thesis makes a contribution in the area of investigating the capability of embedded molecular-clusters to yield reliable bulk structural properties. To this end, an algorithm for calculating the cohesive energies of clusters within the discrete-variational X(,(alpha)) LCAO-MO formulation is set up and verified on simple solids: Li, Na, Cu and LiF. We then use this formulation to study transition metal compounds, for which the interesting physics lies in local lattice defects, foreign impurities and structural deformations. In a self -consistent calculation of the lattice energies and stability of defect clusters in wustite, Fe(,1-x)O, corner-sharing aggregates of the 4:1 defect are identified as the most stable defect configurations due to efficient compensation of the cluster charge. The intercalation properties of layered-transition-metal-dichalcogenides continues to be a fertile experimental working area, backed by comparatively little theoretical study. We find that intercalation of ZrS(,2) with Na perturbs the valence energy level structure sufficiently to induce a more ionic Zr-S bond, a narrowing of the optical gap and filling of the lowest unoccupied host lattice orbitals with the electron donated by Na. Fe - intercalation in ZrS(,2) is accommodated via a strong Fe-S bond, impurity-like band levels in the optical gap of the host and hybridization-driven compression and lowering of the conduction band energy levels. The piezoelectric cuprous halides, CuCl and CuBr, exhibit a host of intriguing properties due to a filled and

  15. Experimentally determined Si isotope fractionation between silicate and Fe metal and implications for Earth's core formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahar, Anat; Ziegler, Karen; Young, Edward D.; Ricolleau, Angele; Schauble, Edwin A.; Fei, Yingwei

    2009-10-01

    Stable isotope fractionation amongst phases comprising terrestrial planets and asteroids can be used to elucidate planet-forming processes. To date, the composition of the Earth's core remains largely unknown though cosmochemical and geophysical evidence indicates that elements lighter than iron and nickel must reside there. Silicon is often cited as a light element that could explain the seismic properties of the core. The amount of silicon in the core, if any, can be deduced from the difference in 30Si/ 28Si between meteorites and terrestrial rocks if the Si isotope fractionation between silicate and Fe-rich metal is known. Recent studies (e.g., [Georg R.B., Halliday A.N., Schauble E.A., Reynolds B.C., 2007. Silicon in the Earth's core. Nature 447 (31), 1102-1106.]; [Fitoussi, C., Bourdon, B., Kleine, T., Oberli, F., Reynolds, B. C., 2009. Si isotope systematics of meteorites and terrestrial peridotites: implications for Mg/Si fractionation in the solar nebula and for Si in the Earth's core. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 287, 77-85.]) showing (sometimes subtle) differences between 30Si/ 28Si in meteorites and terrestrial rocks suggest that Si missing from terrestrial rocks might be in the core. However, any conclusion based on Earth-meteorite comparisons depends on the veracity of the 30Si/ 28Si fractionation factor between silicates and metals at appropriate conditions. Here we present the first direct experimental evidence that silicon isotopes are not distributed uniformly between iron metal and rock when equilibrated at high temperatures. High-precision measurements of the silicon isotope ratios in iron-silicon alloy and silicate equilibrated at 1 GPa and 1800 °C show that Si in silicate has higher 30Si/ 28Si than Si in metal, by at least 2.0‰. These findings provide an experimental foundation for using isotope ratios of silicon as indicators of terrestrial planet formation processes. They imply that if Si isotope equilibrium existed during segregation of Earth

  16. Deoxygenation of Palmitic Acid on Unsupported Transition-Metal Phosphides

    SciTech Connect

    Peroni, Marco; Lee, Insu; Huang, Xiaoyang

    Abstract Highly active bulk transition metal phosphides (WP, MoP, and Ni2P) were synthesized for the catalytic hydrodeoxygenation of palmitic acid, hexadecanol, hexadecanal, and microalgae oil. The specific activities positively correlated with the concentration of exposed metal sites, although the relative rates changed with temperature due to activation energies varying from 57 kJ·mol-1 for MoP to 142 kJ·mol-1 for WP. The reduction of the fatty acid to the aldehyde occurs through a Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism, where the rate-determining step is the addition of the second H to the hydrocarbon. On WP, the conversion of palmitic acid proceeds via R-CH2COOH R-CH2CHO R-CH2CH2OH R-CHCH2more » R-CH2CH3 (hydrodeoxygenation). Decarbonylation of the intermittently formed aldehyde (R-CH2COOH R-CH2CHO R-CH3) was an important pathway on MoP and Ni2P. Conversion via dehydration to a ketene, followed by its decarbonylation occurred only on Ni2P. The rates of alcohol dehydration (R-CH2CH2OH R-CHCH2) correlate with the concentration of Lewis acid sites of the phosphides. Acknowledgements The authors would like to thank Roel Prins for the critical discussion of the results. We are also grateful to Xaver Hecht for technical support. Funding by the German Federal Ministry of Food and Agriculture in the framework of the Advanced Biomass Value project (03SF0446A) is gratefully acknowledged. J.A.L. acknowledges support for his contribution by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences for exploring non-oxidic supports for deoxygenation reactions.« less

  17. Discovery of Temperate Earth-Sized Planets Transiting a Nearby Ultracool Dwarf Star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jehin, Emmanuel; Gillon, Michael; Lederer, Susan M.; Delrez, Laetitia; De Wit, Julien; Burdanov, Artem; Van Grootel, Valerie; Burgasser, Adam; Triaud, Amaury; Demory, Brice-Olivier; hide

    2016-01-01

    We report the discovery of three short-period Earth-sized planets transiting a nearby ultracool dwarf star using data collected by the Liège TRAPPIST telescope, located in la Silla (Chile). TRAPPIST-1 is an isolated M8.0+/-0.5-type dwarf star at a distance of 12.0+/-0.4 parsecs as measured by its trigonometric parallax, with an age constrained to be > 500 Myr, and with a luminosity, mass, and radius of 0.05%, 8% and 11.5% those of the Sun, respectively. The small size of the host star, only slightly larger than Jupiter, translates into Earth-like radii for the three discovered planets, as deduced from their transit depths. The inner two planets receive four and two times the irradiation of Earth, respectively, placing them close to the inner edge of the habitable zone of the star. Several orbits remain possible for the third planet based on our current data. The infrared brightness of the host star combined with its Jupiter-like size offer the possibility of thoroughly characterizing the components of this nearby planetary system.

  18. Molecular Beam Epitaxy Growth of Transition Metal Dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Ruoyu

    The exponential growth of Si-based technology has finally reached its limit, and a new generation of devices must be developed to continue scaling. A unique class of materials, transition metal dichalcogenides (TMD), have attracted great attention due to their remarkable optical and electronic properties at the atomic thickness scale. Over the past decade, enormous efforts have been put into TMD research for application in low-power devices. Among these studies, a high-quality TMD synthesis method is essential. Molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) can enable high-quality TMD growth by combining high purity elemental sources and an ultra-high vacuum growth environment, together with the back-end-of-line compatible growth temperatures. Although many TMD candidates have been grown by MBE with promising microstructure, the limited grain size (< 200 nm) for the MBE-grown TMDs reported in the literature thus far is unsuitable for high-performance device applications. In this dissertation, the synthesis of TMDs by MBE and their implementation in device structures were investigated. van der Waals epitaxial growth of these TMDs (HfSe2, WTe2, WSe2, WTex Se2-x), due to the relaxed interactions at the interface, have been demonstrated on large lattice-mismatched substrates without strain and misfit dislocations. The fundamental nucleation and growth behavior of WSe2 was investigated through a detailed experimental design, combined with on-lattice, diffusion-based first principles kinetic modeling. Over one order of magnitude improvement in grain size was achieved through this study. Results from both experiment and simulation showed that reducing the growth rate, enabled by high growth temperature and low metal flux, is vital to nucleation density control. Meanwhile, providing a chalcogen-rich growth environment will promote larger grain lateral growth by suppressing vertical growth. Applying the knowledge learned from the nucleation study, we sucessfully integrated the MBE-grown WSe2

  19. RECENT TRANSITS OF THE SUPER-EARTH EXOPLANET GJ 1214b

    SciTech Connect

    Sada, Pedro V.; Deming, Drake; Jackson, Brian

    We report recent ground-based photometry of the transiting super-Earth exoplanet GJ 1214b at several wavelengths, including the infrared near 1.25 {mu}m (J band). We observed a J-band transit with the FLAMINGOS infrared imager and the 2.1 m telescope on Kitt Peak, and we observed several optical transits using a 0.5 m telescope on Kitt Peak and the 0.36 m Universidad de Monterrey Observatory telescope. Our high-precision J-band observations exploit the brightness of the M dwarf host star at this infrared wavelength as compared with the optical and are significantly less affected by stellar activity and limb darkening. We fit themore » J-band transit to obtain an independent determination of the planetary and stellar radii. Our radius for the planet (2.61{sup +0.30} {sub -0.11} R {sub +}) is in excellent agreement with the discovery value reported by Charbonneau et al. based on optical data. We demonstrate that the planetary radius is insensitive to degeneracies in the fitting process. We use all of our observations to improve the transit ephemeris, finding P = 1.5804043 {+-} 0.0000005 days and T {sub 0} = 2454964.94390 {+-} 0.00006 BJD.« less

  20. Recent Transits of the Super-Earth Exoplanet GJ 1214b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sada, Pedro V.; Deming, Drake; Jackson, Brian; Jennings, Donald E.; Peterson, Steven W.; Haase, Flynn; Bays, Kevin; O'Gorman, Eamon; Lundsford, Alan

    2010-09-01

    We report recent ground-based photometry of the transiting super-Earth exoplanet GJ 1214b at several wavelengths, including the infrared near 1.25 μm (J band). We observed a J-band transit with the FLAMINGOS infrared imager and the 2.1 m telescope on Kitt Peak, and we observed several optical transits using a 0.5 m telescope on Kitt Peak and the 0.36 m Universidad de Monterrey Observatory telescope. Our high-precision J-band observations exploit the brightness of the M dwarf host star at this infrared wavelength as compared with the optical and are significantly less affected by stellar activity and limb darkening. We fit the J-band transit to obtain an independent determination of the planetary and stellar radii. Our radius for the planet (2.61+0.30 -0.11 R ⊕) is in excellent agreement with the discovery value reported by Charbonneau et al. based on optical data. We demonstrate that the planetary radius is insensitive to degeneracies in the fitting process. We use all of our observations to improve the transit ephemeris, finding P = 1.5804043 ± 0.0000005 days and T 0 = 2454964.94390 ± 0.00006 BJD.

  1. Effect of rare earth metal on the spin-orbit torque in magnetic heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Ueda, Kohei; Pai, Chi-Feng; Tan, Aik Jun

    2016-06-06

    We report the effect of the rare earth metal Gd on current-induced spin-orbit torques (SOTs) in perpendicularly magnetized Pt/Co/Gd heterostructures, characterized using harmonic measurements and spin-torque ferromagnetic resonance (ST-FMR). By varying the Gd metal layer thickness from 0 nm to 8 nm, harmonic measurements reveal a significant enhancement of the effective fields generated from the Slonczewski-like and field-like torques. ST-FMR measurements confirm an enhanced effective spin Hall angle and show a corresponding increase in the magnetic damping constant with increasing Gd thickness. These results suggest that Gd plays an active role in generating SOTs in these heterostructures. Our finding may lead tomore » spin-orbitronics device application such as non-volatile magnetic random access memory, based on rare earth metals.« less

  2. Asymmetric Catalysis with bis(hydroxyphenyl)diamides/rare-earth metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Kumagai, Naoya; Shibasaki, Masakatsu

    2013-01-02

    A series of asymmetric catalysts composed of conformationally flexible amide-based chiral ligands and rare-earth metals was developed for proton-transfer catalysis. These ligands derived from amino acids provide an intriguing chiral platform for the formation of asymmetric catalysts upon complexation with rare-earth metals. The scope of this arsenal of catalysts was further broadened by the development of heterobimetallic catalytic systems. The cooperative function of hydrogen bonding and metal coordination resulted in intriguing substrate specificity and stereocontrol, and the dynamic nature of the catalysts led to a switch of their function. Herein, we summarize our recent exploration of this class of catalysts. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Thermoelectricity in transition metal compounds: The role of spin disorder

    DOE PAGES

    Gorai, Prashun; Toberer, Eric S.; Stevanović, Vladan

    2016-11-01

    Here, at room temperature and above, most magnetic materials adopt a spin-disordered (paramagnetic) state whose electronic properties can differ significantly from their low-temperature, spin-ordered counterparts. Yet computational searches for new functional materials usually assume some type of magnetic order. In the present work, we demonstrate a methodology to incorporate spin disorder in computational searches and predict the electronic properties of the paramagnetic phase. We implement this method in a high-throughput framework to assess the potential for thermoelectric performance of 1350 transition-metal sulfides and find that all magnetic systems we identify as promising in the spin-ordered ground state cease to bemore » promising in the paramagnetic phase due to disorder-induced deterioration of the charge carrier transport properties. We also identify promising non-magnetic candidates that do not suffer from these spin disorder effects. In addition to identifying promising materials, our results offer insights into the apparent scarcity of magnetic systems among known thermoelectrics and highlight the importance of including spin disorder in computational searches.« less

  4. Possible metastable rhombohedral states of the bcc transition metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehl, Michael; Finkenstadt, Daniel

    2007-03-01

    The energy E(c/a) for a bcc element stretched along its [001] axis (the Bain path) has a minimum at c/a = 1, a maximum at c/a = √2, and an elastically unstable local minimum at c/a > √2. A rhombohedral strain is an alternative method of connecting the bcc and fcc structures. The primitive lattice keeps R3m symmetry, with the angle α changing from 109.4^o (bcc), to 90^o (simple cubic), to 60^o (fcc). We studied this path for the non-magnetic bcc transition metals (V, Nb, Mo, Ta, and W) using both a full-potential LAPW and PAW VASP. Except for Ta, the energy E(α) has a local maximum at α=60^o, with local minima near 55^o and 70^o, the later having lower energy. We studied the elastic stability of the 70^o minimum structure. Only W is elastically stable in this structure, with the smallest eigenvalue of the elastic tensor at 4 GPa, while the other three elements are unstable. We discuss the possibility that Tungsten is actually metastable in this structure. We also consider the possible epitaxial growth of this structure. M. J. Mehl, A. Aguayo, L. L. Boyer, and R. De Coss, Phys. Rev. B 70, 014105 (2004).

  5. Hierarchically Nanostructured Transition Metal Oxides for Lithium‐Ion Batteries

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Mingbo; Tang, Hao; Li, Lulu; Hu, Qin; Zhang, Li; Xue, Huaiguo

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Lithium‐ion batteries (LIBs) have been widely used in the field of portable electric devices because of their high energy density and long cycling life. To further improve the performance of LIBs, it is of great importance to develop new electrode materials. Various transition metal oxides (TMOs) have been extensively investigated as electrode materials for LIBs. According to the reaction mechanism, there are mainly two kinds of TMOs, one is based on conversion reaction and the other is based on intercalation/deintercalation reaction. Recently, hierarchically nanostructured TMOs have become a hot research area in the field of LIBs. Hierarchical architecture can provide numerous accessible electroactive sites for redox reactions, shorten the diffusion distance of Li‐ion during the reaction, and accommodate volume expansion during cycling. With rapid research progress in this field, a timely account of this advanced technology is highly necessary. Here, the research progress on the synthesis methods, morphological characteristics, and electrochemical performances of hierarchically nanostructured TMOs for LIBs is summarized and discussed. Some relevant prospects are also proposed. PMID:29593962

  6. Electric Field-Dependent Photoluminescence in Multilayer Transition Metal Dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanev, T. K.; Henning, A.; Sangwan, V. K.; Speiser, N.; Stern, N. P.; Lauhon, L. J.; Hersam, M. C.; Wang, K.; Valencia, D.; Charles, J.; Kubis, T. C.

    Owing to interlayer coupling, transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) such as MoS2 exhibit strong layer dependence of optical and electronic phenomena such as the band gap and trion and neutral exciton population dynamics. Here, we systematically measure the effect of layer number on the optical response of multilayer MoS2 in an external electric field, observing field and layer number dependent emission energy and photoluminescence intensity. These effects are studied in few (2-6) and bulk (11 +) layered structures at low temperatures. In MoS2\\ the observed layer dependence arises from several mechanisms, including interlayer charge transfer, band structure, Stark Effect, Fermi level changes, screening, and surface effects, so it can be challenging to isolate how these mechanisms impact the observables. Because it behaves like a stack of weakly interacting monolayers rather than multilayer or bulk, ReS2 provides a comparison to traditional TMDCs to help isolate the underlying physical mechanisms dictating the response of multilayers. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation MRSEC program (DMR-1121262), and the 2-DARE Grant (EFRI-1433510). N.P.S. is an Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellow.

  7. Transition-metal dichalcogenides heterostructure saturable absorbers for ultrafast photonics.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hao; Yin, Jinde; Yang, Jingwei; Zhang, Xuejun; Liu, Mengli; Jiang, Zike; Wang, Jinzhang; Sun, Zhipei; Guo, Tuan; Liu, Wenjun; Yan, Peiguang

    2017-11-01

    In this Letter, high-quality WS 2 film and MoS 2 film were vertically stacked on the tip of a single-mode fiber in turns to form heterostructure (WS 2 -MoS 2 -WS 2 )-based saturable absorbers with all-fiber integrated features. Their nonlinear saturable absorption properties were remarkable, such as a large modulation depth (∼16.99%) and a small saturable intensity (6.23  MW·cm -2 ). Stable pulses at 1.55 μm with duration as short as 296 fs and average power as high as 25 mW were obtained in an erbium-doped fiber laser system. The results demonstrate that the proposed heterostructures own remarkable nonlinear optical properties and offer a platform for adjusting nonlinear optical properties by stacking different transition-metal dichalcogenides or modifying the thickness of each layer, paving the way for engineering functional ultrafast photonics devices with desirable properties.

  8. Approaching the intrinsic photoluminescence linewidth in transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers

    DOE PAGES

    Ajayi, Obafunso A.; Ardelean, Jenny V.; Shepard, Gabriella D.; ...

    2017-07-24

    Excitonic states in monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) have been the subject of extensive recent interest. Their intrinsic properties can, however, be obscured due to the influence of inhomogeneity in the external environment. Here we report methods for fabricating high quality TMDC monolayers with narrow photoluminescence (PL) linewidth approaching the intrinsic limit. We find that encapsulation in hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) sharply reduces the PL linewidth, and that passivation of the oxide substrate by an alkyl monolayer further decreases the linewidth and also minimizes the charged exciton (trion) peak. The combination of these sample preparation methods results in much reducedmore » spatial variation in the PL emission, with a full-width-at-half-maximum as low as 1.7 meV. Furthermore, analysis of the PL line shape yields a homogeneous width of 1.43 ± 0.08 meV and inhomogeneous broadening of 1.1 ± 0.3 meV.« less

  9. Integrated Freestanding Two-dimensional Transition Metal Dichalcogenides.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Hyun; Oh, Hye Min; Gokarna, Anisha; Kim, Hyun; Yun, Seok Joon; Han, Gang Hee; Jeong, Mun Seok; Lee, Young Hee; Lerondel, Gilles

    2017-05-01

    This paper reports on the integration of freestanding transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs). Monolayer (1-L) MoS 2 , WS 2 , and WSe 2 as representative TMDs are transferred on ZnO nanorods (NRs), used here as nanostructured substrates. The photoluminescence (PL) spectra of 1-L TMDs on NRs show a giant PL intensity enhancement, compared with those of 1-L TMDs on SiO 2 . The strong increases in Raman and PL intensities, along with the characteristic peak shifts, confirm the absence of stress in the TMDs on NRs. In depth analysis of the PL emission also reveals that the ratio between the exciton and trion peak intensity is almost not modified after transfer. The latter shows that the effect of charge transfer between the 1-L TMDs and ZnO NRs is here negligible. Furthermore, confocal PL and Raman spectroscopy reveal a fairly consistent distribution of PL and Raman intensities. These observations are in agreement with a very limited points contact between the support and the 1-L TMDs. The entire process reported here is scalable and may pave the way for the development of very efficient ultrathin optoelectronics. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Magnetism by embedding 3d transition metal atoms into germanene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Durgesh Kumar; Kumar, Sudhir; Auluck, Sushil

    2018-06-01

    We have performed a series of first-principles calculations within the framework of density functional theory for germanene including mono vacancy (MV) and double vacancy (DV). Perdew–Burke–Ernzerhof generalized gradient approximation (GGA) in the form of exchange-correlation potential was used. Ten transition metals (TMs) i.e. Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu and Zn, have been embedded at MV and DV site for the purpose to introduce magnetism into germanene. We find TM embedded germanene is stable and the value of magnetic moment can be tune with the TM impurities. Further, carbon (C) or nitrogen (N) in the vicinity of MV has been considered to find its influence on stability and total magnetic moment. Present predictions indicate Mn impurity shows largest magnetic moment among considered ten TMs. The Heyd–Scuseria–Ernzerhof (HSE06) hybrid functional based calculations have been also carried out for Mn system only for shake of comparison standpoint. The GGA/HSE06 calculations show better stability of TM embedded germanene after doping of C or N in vicinity of TM. Our calculations may provide a promising approach to design germanene based spintronic devices.

  11. Stimulated x-ray emission spectroscopy in transition metal complexes

    DOE PAGES

    Kroll, Thomas; Weninger, Clemens; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; ...

    2018-03-27

    We report the observation and analysis of the gain curve of amplified Kα X-ray emission from solutions of Mn(II) and Mn(VII) complexes using an X-ray free electron laser to create the 1s core-hole population inversion. We find spectra at amplification levels extending over four orders of magnitude until saturation. We observe bandwidths below the Mn 1s core-hole lifetime broadening in the onset of the stimulated emission. In the exponential amplification regime the resolution corrected spectral width of ~1.7 eV FWHM is constant over three orders of magnitude, pointing to the build-up of transform limited pulses of ~1fs duration. Driving the amplification into saturation leads to broadening and shift of the line. Importantly, the chemical sensitivity of the stimulated X-ray emission to the Mn oxidation state is preserved at power densities ofmore » $$\\sim10 20$$~W/cm 2 for the incoming X-ray pulses. Differences in signal sensitivity and spectral information compared to conventional (spontaneous) X-ray emission spectroscopy are discussed. Our findings build a baseline for nonlinear X-ray spectroscopy for a wide range of transition metal complexes in inorganic chemistry, catalysis and materials science.« less

  12. Multiple Types of Topological Fermions in Transition Metal Silicides

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Peizhe; Zhou, Quan; Zhang, Shou -Cheng

    Exotic massless fermionic excitations with nonzero Berry flux, other than the Dirac and Weyl fermions, could exist in condensed matter systems under the protection of crystalline symmetries, such as spin-1 excitations with threefold degeneracy and spin-3/2 Rarita-Schwinger-Weyl fermions. Herein, by using the ab initio density functional theory, we show that these unconventional quasiparticles coexist with type-I and type-II Weyl fermions in a family of transition metal silicides, including CoSi, RhSi, RhGe, and CoGe, when spin-orbit coupling is considered. Their nontrivial topology results in a series of extensive Fermi arcs connecting projections of these bulk excitations on the side surface, whichmore » is confirmed by (001) surface electronic spectra of CoSi. Additionally, these stable arc states exist within a wide energy window around the Fermi level, which makes them readily accessible in angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy measurements.« less

  13. Hierarchically Nanostructured Transition Metal Oxides for Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Mingbo; Tang, Hao; Li, Lulu; Hu, Qin; Zhang, Li; Xue, Huaiguo; Pang, Huan

    2018-03-01

    Lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) have been widely used in the field of portable electric devices because of their high energy density and long cycling life. To further improve the performance of LIBs, it is of great importance to develop new electrode materials. Various transition metal oxides (TMOs) have been extensively investigated as electrode materials for LIBs. According to the reaction mechanism, there are mainly two kinds of TMOs, one is based on conversion reaction and the other is based on intercalation/deintercalation reaction. Recently, hierarchically nanostructured TMOs have become a hot research area in the field of LIBs. Hierarchical architecture can provide numerous accessible electroactive sites for redox reactions, shorten the diffusion distance of Li-ion during the reaction, and accommodate volume expansion during cycling. With rapid research progress in this field, a timely account of this advanced technology is highly necessary. Here, the research progress on the synthesis methods, morphological characteristics, and electrochemical performances of hierarchically nanostructured TMOs for LIBs is summarized and discussed. Some relevant prospects are also proposed.

  14. The prospects of transition metal dichalcogenides for ultimately scaled CMOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiele, S.; Kinberger, W.; Granzner, R.; Fiori, G.; Schwierz, F.

    2018-05-01

    MOSFET gate length scaling has been a main source of progress in digital electronics for decades. Today, researchers still spend considerable efforts on reducing the gate length and on developing ultimately scaled MOSFETs, thereby exploring both new device architectures and alternative channel materials beyond Silicon such as two-dimensional TMDs (transition metal dichalcogenide). On the other hand, the envisaged scaling scenario for the next 15 years has undergone a significant change recently. While the 2013 ITRS edition required a continuation of aggressive gate length scaling for at least another 15 years, the 2015 edition of the ITRS suggests a deceleration and eventually a levelling off of gate length scaling and puts more emphasis on alternative options such as pitch scaling to keep Moore's Law alive. In the present paper, future CMOS scaling is discussed in the light of emerging two-dimensional MOSFET channel, in particular two-dimensional TMDs. To this end, the scaling scenarios of the 2013 and 2015 ITRS editions are considered and the scaling potential of TMD MOSFETs is investigated by means of quantum-mechanical device simulations. It is shown that for ultimately scaled MOSFETs as required in the 2013 ITRS, the heavy carrier effective masses of the Mo- and W-based TMDs are beneficial for the suppression of direct source-drain tunneling, while to meet the significantly relaxed scaling targets of the 2016 ITRS heavy-effective-mass channels are not needed.

  15. Two-Dimensional, Ordered, Double Transition Metals Carbides (MXenes)

    DOE PAGES

    Anasori, Babak; Xie, Yu; Beidaghi, Majid; ...

    2015-07-24

    The higher the chemical diversity and structural complexity of two-dimensional (2D) materials, the higher the likelihood they possess unique and useful properties. In this paper, density functional theory (DFT) is used to predict the existence of two new families of 2D ordered, carbides (MXenes), M' 2M"C 2 and M' 2M" 2C 3, where M' and M" are two different early transition metals. In these solids, M' layers sandwich M" carbide layers. By synthesizing Mo 2TiC 2T x, Mo 2Ti 2C 3T x, and Cr 2TiC 2T x (where T is a surface termination), we validated the DFT predictions. Since themore » Mo and Cr atoms are on the outside, they control the 2D flakes’ chemical and electrochemical properties. The latter was proven by showing quite different electrochemical behavior of Mo 2TiC 2T x and Ti 3C 2T x. Finally, this work further expands the family of 2D materials, offering additional choices of structures, chemistries, and ultimately useful properties.« less

  16. Superconductivity Series in Transition Metal Dichalcogenides by Ionic Gating

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Wu; Ye, Jianting; Zhang, Yijin; Suzuki, Ryuji; Yoshida, Masaro; Miyazaki, Jun; Inoue, Naoko; Saito, Yu; Iwasa, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Functionalities of two-dimensional (2D) crystals based on semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) have now stemmed from simple field effect transistors (FETs) to a variety of electronic and opto-valleytronic devices, and even to superconductivity. Among them, superconductivity is the least studied property in TMDs due to methodological difficulty accessing it in different TMD species. Here, we report the systematic study of superconductivity in MoSe2, MoTe2 and WS2 by ionic gating in different regimes. Electrostatic gating using ionic liquid was able to induce superconductivity in MoSe2 but not in MoTe2 because of inefficient electron accumulation limited by electronic band alignment. Alternative gating using KClO4/polyethylene glycol enabled a crossover from surface doping to bulk doping, which induced superconductivities in MoTe2 and WS2 electrochemically. These new varieties greatly enriched the TMD superconductor families and unveiled critical methodology to expand the capability of ionic gating to other materials. PMID:26235962

  17. Superconductivity Series in Transition Metal Dichalcogenides by Ionic Gating.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wu; Ye, Jianting; Zhang, Yijin; Suzuki, Ryuji; Yoshida, Masaro; Miyazaki, Jun; Inoue, Naoko; Saito, Yu; Iwasa, Yoshihiro

    2015-08-03

    Functionalities of two-dimensional (2D) crystals based on semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) have now stemmed from simple field effect transistors (FETs) to a variety of electronic and opto-valleytronic devices, and even to superconductivity. Among them, superconductivity is the least studied property in TMDs due to methodological difficulty accessing it in different TMD species. Here, we report the systematic study of superconductivity in MoSe2, MoTe2 and WS2 by ionic gating in different regimes. Electrostatic gating using ionic liquid was able to induce superconductivity in MoSe2 but not in MoTe2 because of inefficient electron accumulation limited by electronic band alignment. Alternative gating using KClO4/polyethylene glycol enabled a crossover from surface doping to bulk doping, which induced superconductivities in MoTe2 and WS2 electrochemically. These new varieties greatly enriched the TMD superconductor families and unveiled critical methodology to expand the capability of ionic gating to other materials.

  18. Synthesis of millimeter-scale transition metal dichalcogenides single crystals

    DOE PAGES

    Gong, Yongji; Ye, Gonglan; Lei, Sidong; ...

    2016-02-10

    The emergence of semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) atomic layers has opened up unprecedented opportunities in atomically thin electronics. Yet the scalable growth of TMD layers with large grain sizes and uniformity has remained very challenging. Here is reported a simple, scalable chemical vapor deposition approach for the growth of MoSe2 layers is reported, in which the nucleation density can be reduced from 105 to 25 nuclei cm -2, leading to millimeter-scale MoSe 2 single crystals as well as continuous macrocrystalline films with millimeter size grains. The selective growth of monolayers and multilayered MoSe2 films with well-defined stacking orientation canmore » also be controlled via tuning the growth temperature. In addition, periodic defects, such as nanoscale triangular holes, can be engineered into these layers by controlling the growth conditions. The low density of grain boundaries in the films results in high average mobilities, around ≈42 cm 2 V -1 s -1, for back-gated MoSe 2 transistors. This generic synthesis approach is also demonstrated for other TMD layers such as millimeter-scale WSe 2 single crystals.« less

  19. Optical fingerprint of non-covalently functionalized transition metal dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feierabend, Maja; Malic, Ermin; Knorr, Andreas; Berghäuser, Gunnar

    2017-09-01

    Atomically thin transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) hold promising potential for applications in optoelectronics. Due to their direct band gap and the extraordinarily strong Coulomb interaction, TMDs exhibit efficient light-matter coupling and tightly bound excitons. Moreover, large spin orbit coupling in combination with circular dichroism allows for spin and valley selective optical excitation. As atomically thin materials, they are very sensitive to changes in the surrounding environment. This motivates a functionalization approach, where external molecules are adsorbed to the materials surface to tailor its optical properties. Here, we apply the density matrix theory to investigate the potential of non-covalently functionalized monolayer TMDs. Considering exemplary molecules with a strong dipole moment, we predict spectral redshifts and the appearance of an additional side peak in the absorption spectrum of functionalized TMDs. We show that the molecular characteristics, e.g. coverage, orientation and dipole moment, crucially influence the optical properties of TMDs, leaving a unique optical fingerprint in the absorption spectrum. Furthermore, we find that the molecular dipole moments open a channel for coherent intervalley coupling between the high-symmetry K and K\\prime points which may create new possibilities for spin-valleytronics application.

  20. The gas phase structure of transition metal dihydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demuynck, Jean; Schaefer, Henry F.

    1980-01-01

    ESR and infrared spectroscopic measurements on matrix isolated MnH2 and CrH2 have recently suggested that these simple molecules may be bent. This result would be the opposite of that found experimentally for the transition metal dihalides MX2, known to be linear. Here the geometrical structure of MnH2 has been investigated by molecular electronic structure theory. A large contracted Gaussian basis set [Mn(14s11p6p/9s8p3d), H(5s1p/3s1p)] was used in conjunction with self-consistent field and configuration interaction methods. These suggest that the 6A1 ground state of MnH2 is linear. Further studies of the 3A1 state (one of several low-lying states) of TiH2 also favor linearity, although this potential energy surface is extremely flat with respect to bending. Thus it appears probable that most MH2 molecules, like the related MX2 family, are linear.

  1. Three equations of state and their application to transition metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronggang, Tian; Jiuxun, Sun; Wei, Yang; Fei, Yu

    2010-10-01

    A modified generalized Morse (mGMSE) equation of state (EOS) is proposed that can incorporate the cohesive energy data correctly. It is compared with a four-parameter modified Rose (MR) EOS, which is proposed by following Rose's approach, and the Murnaghan (MNH) EOS. The MR, mGMSE and MNH EOSs are applied to five transition metals and then compared to the available experimental compression data. The results obtained show that for all pressure ranges, the mGMSE EOS fits experimental data most accurately. From a comparison of the variation in pressure and energy versus the compression ratio between MR and mGMSE EOSs, it is clear that the pressure and energy of the MR EOS oscillate both in the neighborhood of (V/V0 ) ≈ 0.005 and in the range (V/V0 )> 1. Generally speaking, the mGMSE EOS has many evident advantages over the other two EOSs, while the practical applications of the MR EOS are seriously limited because of physically incorrect oscillations.

  2. Magnetization and Magnetoresistance in Iron Intercalated Transition Metal Dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choe, Jesse

    The understanding of magnetism in strongly correlated electronic systems is a vital area of research. Not only is it linked to other phenomena like high temperature superconductivity in the cuprates and iron pnictides, but magnetic materials have been used in electronics since before the computer. As it becomes harder to prop up Moore's law by increasing the density of transistors, mankind must look towards new methods to improve technology or risk stagnation. Research into alternative materials for technology, such as transition metal dichalcogenides, is a promising direction of research to maintain the rate of technological improvement. Our work focuses on the effect of iron intercalation in TiS2. Single crystals of FexTiS 2 (0 ≤ x ≤ 1) were grown using vapor transport. Anisotropic susceptibility and magnetization measurements of the samples were measured, showing ferromagnetism and sharp switching behavior in the magnetization. Finally electrical transport measurements were taken, both with and without field. Measurements of magnetoresistance for x = 0.2 and 0.3 show large magnetoresistance (up to ˜ 60%) and an atypical 'bowtie' shape.

  3. Quantum dot behavior in transition metal dichalcogenides nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Gang; Zhang, Zhuo-Zhi; Li, Hai-Ou; Song, Xiang-Xiang; Deng, Guang-Wei; Cao, Gang; Xiao, Ming; Guo, Guo-Ping

    2017-08-01

    Recently, transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) semiconductors have been utilized for investigating quantum phenomena because of their unique band structures and novel electronic properties. In a quantum dot (QD), electrons are confined in all lateral dimensions, offering the possibility for detailed investigation and controlled manipulation of individual quantum systems. Beyond the definition of graphene QDs by opening an energy gap in nanoconstrictions, with the presence of a bandgap, gate-defined QDs can be achieved on TMDCs semiconductors. In this paper, we review the confinement and transport of QDs in TMDCs nanostructures. The fabrication techniques for demonstrating two-dimensional (2D) materials nanostructures such as field-effect transistors and QDs, mainly based on e-beam lithography and transfer assembly techniques are discussed. Subsequently, we focus on electron transport through TMDCs nanostructures and QDs. With steady improvement in nanoscale materials characterization and using graphene as a springboard, 2D materials offer a platform that allows creation of heterostructure QDs integrated with a variety of crystals, each of which has entirely unique physical properties.

  4. Chemical contrast in STM imaging of transition metal aluminides

    SciTech Connect

    Duguet, T.; Thiel, Patricia A.

    2012-08-01

    The present manuscript reviews recent scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) studies of transition metal (TM) aluminide surfaces. It provides a general perspective on the contrast between Al atoms and TM atoms in STM imaging. A general trend is the much stronger bias dependence of TM atoms, or TM-rich regions of the surface. This dependence can be attenuated by the local chemical arrangements and environments. Al atoms can show a stronger bias dependence when their chemical environment, such as their immediate subsurface, is populated with TM. All this is well explained in light of combined results of STM and both theoretical andmore » experimental electronic and crystallographic structure determinations. Since STM probes the Fermi surface, the electronic structure in the vicinity of the Fermi level (EF) is essential for understanding contrast and bias dependence. Hence, partial density of states provides information about the TM d band position and width, s–p–d hybridization or interactions, or charge transfer between constituent elements. In addition, recent developments in STM image simulations are very interesting for elucidating chemical contrast at Al–TM alloy surfaces, and allow direct atomic identification, when the surface does not show too much disorder. Overall, we show that chemically-specific imaging is often possible at these surfaces.« less

  5. Protactinium and the intersection of actinide and transition metal chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Richard E.; De Sio, Stephanie; Vallet, Valérie

    The role of the 5f and 6d orbitals in the chemistry of the actinide elements has been of considerable interest since their discovery and synthesis. Relativistic effects cause the energetics of the 5f and 6d orbitals to change as the actinide series is traversed left to right imparting a rich and complex chemistry. The 5f and 6d atomic states cross in energy at protactinium (Pa), making it a potential intersection between transition metal and actinide chemistries. Herein, we report the synthesis of a Pa-peroxo cluster, A(6)(Pa4O(O-2)(6)F-12) [A = Rb, Cs, (CH3)(4)N], formed in pursuit of an actinide polyoxometalate. Quantum chemicalmore » calculations at the density functional theory level demonstrate equal 5f and 6d orbital participation in the chemistry of Pa and increasing 5f orbital participation for the heavier actinides. Periodic changes in orbital character to the bonding in the early actinides highlights the influence of the 5f orbitals in their reactivity and chemical structure.« less

  6. Ultrafast Interlayer Electron Transfer in Incommensurate Transition Metal Dichalcogenide Homobilayers.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuanyuan; Cui, Qiannan; Ceballos, Frank; Lane, Samuel D; Qi, Zeming; Zhao, Hui

    2017-11-08

    Two-dimensional materials, such as graphene, transition metal dichalcogenides, and phosphorene, can be used to construct van der Waals multilayer structures. This approach has shown potentials to produce new materials that combine novel properties of the participating individual layers. One key requirement for effectively harnessing emergent properties of these materials is electronic connection of the involved atomic layers through efficient interlayer charge or energy transfer. Recently, ultrafast charge transfer on a time scale shorter than 100 fs has been observed in several van der Waals bilayer heterostructures formed by two different materials. However, information on the transfer between two atomic layers of the same type is rare. Because these homobilayers are essential elements in constructing multilayer structures with desired optoelectronic properties, efficient interlayer transfer is highly desired. Here we show that electron transfer between two monolayers of MoSe 2 occurs on a picosecond time scale. Even faster transfer was observed in homobilayers of WS 2 and WSe 2 . The samples were fabricated by manually stacking two exfoliated monolayer flakes. By adding a graphene layer as a fast carrier recombination channel for one of the two monolayers, the transfer of the photoexcited carriers from the populated to the drained monolayers was time-resolved by femtosecond transient absorption measurements. The observed efficient interlayer carrier transfer indicates that such homobilayers can be used in van der Waals multilayers to enhance their optical absorption without significantly compromising the interlayer transport performance. Our results also provide valuable information for understanding interlayer charge transfer in heterostructures.

  7. Valency configuration of transition metal impurities in ZnO

    SciTech Connect

    Petit, Leon; Schulthess, Thomas C; Svane, Axel

    2006-01-01

    We use the self-interaction corrected local spin-density approximation to investigate the ground state valency configuration of transition metal (TM=Mn, Co) impurities in n- and p-type ZnO. We find that in pure Zn{sub 1-x}TM{sub x}O, the localized TM{sup 2+} configuration is energetically favored over the itinerant d-electron configuration of the local spin density (LSD) picture. Our calculations indicate furthermore that the (+/0) donor level is situated in the ZnO gap. Consequently, for n-type conditions, with the Fermi energy {epsilon}F close to the conduction band minimum, TM remains in the 2+ charge state, while for p-type conditions, with {epsilon}F close to themore » valence band maximum, the 3+ charge state is energetically preferred. In the latter scenario, modeled here by co-doping with N, the additional delocalized d-electron charge transfers into the entire states at the top of the valence band, and hole carriers will only exist, if the N concentration exceeds the TM impurity concentration.« less

  8. Multiple Types of Topological Fermions in Transition Metal Silicides

    DOE PAGES

    Tang, Peizhe; Zhou, Quan; Zhang, Shou -Cheng

    2017-11-17

    Exotic massless fermionic excitations with nonzero Berry flux, other than the Dirac and Weyl fermions, could exist in condensed matter systems under the protection of crystalline symmetries, such as spin-1 excitations with threefold degeneracy and spin-3/2 Rarita-Schwinger-Weyl fermions. Herein, by using the ab initio density functional theory, we show that these unconventional quasiparticles coexist with type-I and type-II Weyl fermions in a family of transition metal silicides, including CoSi, RhSi, RhGe, and CoGe, when spin-orbit coupling is considered. Their nontrivial topology results in a series of extensive Fermi arcs connecting projections of these bulk excitations on the side surface, whichmore » is confirmed by (001) surface electronic spectra of CoSi. Additionally, these stable arc states exist within a wide energy window around the Fermi level, which makes them readily accessible in angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy measurements.« less

  9. Stimulated x-ray emission spectroscopy in transition metal complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Kroll, Thomas; Weninger, Clemens; Alonso-Mori, Roberto

    We report the observation and analysis of the gain curve of amplified Kα X-ray emission from solutions of Mn(II) and Mn(VII) complexes using an X-ray free electron laser to create the 1s core-hole population inversion. We find spectra at amplification levels extending over four orders of magnitude until saturation. We observe bandwidths below the Mn 1s core-hole lifetime broadening in the onset of the stimulated emission. In the exponential amplification regime the resolution corrected spectral width of ~1.7 eV FWHM is constant over three orders of magnitude, pointing to the build-up of transform limited pulses of ~1fs duration. Driving the amplification into saturation leads to broadening and shift of the line. Importantly, the chemical sensitivity of the stimulated X-ray emission to the Mn oxidation state is preserved at power densities ofmore » $$\\sim10 20$$~W/cm 2 for the incoming X-ray pulses. Differences in signal sensitivity and spectral information compared to conventional (spontaneous) X-ray emission spectroscopy are discussed. Our findings build a baseline for nonlinear X-ray spectroscopy for a wide range of transition metal complexes in inorganic chemistry, catalysis and materials science.« less

  10. Novel thermoelectric properties of complex transition-metal oxides.

    PubMed

    Terasaki, Ichiro; Iwakawa, Manabu; Nakano, Tomohito; Tsukuda, Akira; Kobayashi, Wataru

    2010-01-28

    We report how the thermopower of complex transition-metal oxides is susceptible to small changes in material parameters. In the A-site ordered perovskite oxide R(2/3)Cu(3)Ti(3.6)Ru(0.4)O(12), the thermopower changes from 15 to -100 microV K(-1) at 300 K in going from R = La to Er. We associate this with the hybridization between Cu 3d and Ru 4d electrons, which depends on R. For stronger hybridization, the Cu 3d electrons become more itinerant leading to positive thermopower. In the A-site ordered perovskite cobalt oxide Sr(3)YCo(4)O(10.5), the spin state of the Co(3+) ions determines the magnitude of the thermopower, where partial isovalent substitution (Ca for Sr and Rh for Co) enhances the thermopower whilst keeping the resistivity intact. These substitutions stabilize the low spin state of the Co(3+) ions, which affects the thermopower through the entropy of the background for the carriers. We propose that the control of the magnetism plays a pivotal role in determining the thermopower in a certain class of complex oxides.

  11. Stimulated X-Ray Emission Spectroscopy in Transition Metal Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroll, Thomas; Weninger, Clemens; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Zhu, Diling; Mercadier, Laurent; Majety, Vinay P.; Marinelli, Agostino; Lutman, Alberto; Guetg, Marc W.; Decker, Franz-Josef; Boutet, Sébastien; Aquila, Andy; Koglin, Jason; Koralek, Jake; DePonte, Daniel P.; Kern, Jan; Fuller, Franklin D.; Pastor, Ernest; Fransson, Thomas; Zhang, Yu; Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K.; Rohringer, Nina; Bergmann, Uwe

    2018-03-01

    We report the observation and analysis of the gain curve of amplified K α x-ray emission from solutions of Mn(II) and Mn(VII) complexes using an x-ray free electron laser to create the 1 s core-hole population inversion. We find spectra at amplification levels extending over 4 orders of magnitude until saturation. We observe bandwidths below the Mn 1 s core-hole lifetime broadening in the onset of the stimulated emission. In the exponential amplification regime the resolution corrected spectral width of ˜1.7 eV FWHM is constant over 3 orders of magnitude, pointing to the buildup of transform limited pulses of ˜1 fs duration. Driving the amplification into saturation leads to broadening and a shift of the line. Importantly, the chemical sensitivity of the stimulated x-ray emission to the Mn oxidation state is preserved at power densities of ˜1020 W /cm2 for the incoming x-ray pulses. Differences in signal sensitivity and spectral information compared to conventional (spontaneous) x-ray emission spectroscopy are discussed. Our findings build a baseline for nonlinear x-ray spectroscopy for a wide range of transition metal complexes in inorganic chemistry, catalysis, and materials science.

  12. Lattice Mechanical Properties of Noble and Transition Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baria, J. K.

    2004-04-01

    A model pseudopotential depending on an effective core radius but otherwise parameter free is used to study the interatomic interactions, phonon dispersion curves (in q and r-space analysis), phonon density of states, mode Grüneisen parameters, dynamical elastic constants ( C 11, C 12 and C 44), bulk modulus ( B), shear modulus ( C'), deviation from Cauchy relation ( C 12 C 44), Poisson’s ratio ( σ), Young’s modulus ( Y), behavior of phonon frequencies in the elastic limit independent of the direction ( Y 1), limiting value in the [110] direction ( Y 2), degree of elastic anisotropy ( A), maximum frequency ω max, mean frequency < ω>, < ω 2>1/2=(< ω>/< ω -1>)1/2, fundamental frequency < ω 2>, and propagation velocities of the elastic constants in Cu, Ag, Au, Ni, Pd, and Pt. The contribution of s-like electrons is calculated in the second-order perturbation theory for the model potential while that of d-like electrons is taken into account by introducing repulsive short-range Born-Mayer like term. Very recently proposed screening function due to Sarkar et al. has been used to obtain the screened form factor. The theoretical results are compared with experimental findings wherever possible. A good agreement between theoretical investigations and experimental findings has proved the ability of our model potential for predicting a large number of physical properties of transition metals.

  13. Transition metal-substituted lead halide perovskite absorbers

    DOE PAGES

    Sampson, M. D.; Park, J. S.; Schaller, R. D.; ...

    2017-01-27

    Here, lead halide perovskites have proven to be a versatile class of visible light absorbers that allow rapid access to the long minority carrier lifetimes and diffusion lengths desirable for traditional single-junction photovoltaics. We explore the extent to which the attractive features of these semiconductors may be extended to include an intermediate density of states for future application in multi-level solar energy conversion systems capable of exceeding the Shockley–Queisser limit. We computationally and experimentally explore the substitution of transition metals on the Pb site of MAPbX 3 (MA = methylammonium, X = Br or Cl) to achieve a tunable densitymore » of states within the parent gap. Computational screening identified both Fe- and Co-substituted MAPbBr 3 as promising absorbers with a mid-gap density of states, and the later films were synthesized via conventional solution-based processing techniques. First-principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations support the existence of mid-gap states upon Co incorporation and enhanced sub-gap absorption, which are consistent with UV-visible-NIR absorption spectroscopy. Strikingly, steady state and time-resolved PL studies reveal no sign of self-quenching for Co-substitution up to 25%, which suggest this class of materials to be a worthy candidate for future application in intermediate band photovoltaics.« less

  14. Proximity-induced magnetism in transition-metal substituted graphene

    DOE PAGES

    Crook, Charles B.; Constantin, Costel; Ahmed, Towfiq; ...

    2015-08-03

    We investigate the interactions between two identical magnetic impurities substituted into a graphene superlattice. Using a first-principles approach, we calculate the electronic and magnetic properties for transition-metal substituted graphene systems with varying spatial separation. These calculations are compared for three different magnetic impurities, manganese, chromium, and vanadium. We determine the electronic band structure, density of states, and Millikan populations (magnetic moment) for each atom, as well as calculate the exchange parameter between the two magnetic atoms as a function of spatial separation. We find that the presence of magnetic impurities establishes a distinct magnetic moment in the graphene lattice, wheremore » the interactions are highly dependent on the spatial and magnetic characteristic between the magnetic and carbon atoms, which leads to either ferromagnetic or antiferromagnetic behavior. Furthermore, through an analysis of the calculated exchange energies and partial density of states, it is determined that interactions between the magnetic atoms can be classified as an RKKY interaction.« less

  15. Production method for making rare earth compounds

    DOEpatents

    McCallum, R. William; Ellis, Timothy W.; Dennis, Kevin W.; Hofer, Robert J.; Branagan, Daniel J.

    1997-11-25

    A method of making a rare earth compound, such as a earth-transition metal permanent magnet compound, without the need for producing rare earth metal as a process step, comprises carbothermically reacting a rare earth oxide to form a rare earth carbide and heating the rare earth carbide, a compound-forming reactant (e.g. a transition metal and optional boron), and a carbide-forming element (e.g. a refractory metal) that forms a carbide that is more thermodynamically favorable than the rare earth carbide whereby the rare earth compound (e.g. Nd.sub.2 Fe.sub.14 B or LaNi.sub.5) and a carbide of the carbide-forming element are formed.

  16. Production method for making rare earth compounds

    DOEpatents

    McCallum, R.W.; Ellis, T.W.; Dennis, K.W.; Hofer, R.J.; Branagan, D.J.

    1997-11-25

    A method of making a rare earth compound, such as a earth-transition metal permanent magnet compound, without the need for producing rare earth metal as a process step, comprises carbothermically reacting a rare earth oxide to form a rare earth carbide and heating the rare earth carbide, a compound-forming reactant (e.g., a transition metal and optional boron), and a carbide-forming element (e.g., a refractory metal) that forms a carbide that is more thermodynamically favorable than the rare earth carbide whereby the rare earth compound (e.g., Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B or LaNi{sub 5}) and a carbide of the carbide-forming element are formed.

  17. Controls on the Transition Metal Isotopic Composition of Seawater: Diatom Culture Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vance, D.; Archer, C.; Kennaway, G.; Cox, E.; Statham, P. J.

    2004-12-01

    Many transition metals are essential micronutrients for marine phytoplankton. As a result the expectation is that biological processes play an important, perhaps a dominant, role in their marine isotope geochemistry. These observations raise the prospect of using isotope records to trace transition metal micronutrient usage in the past oceans, an issue that is of importance to the efficiency of the biological pump and atmospheric carbon dioxide. As such, the characterisation of trace metal isotopic fractionations associated with marine primary productivity are an important scientific goal. Here we report fractionations associated with Fe, Cu and Zn sequestration by diatoms, one of the main primary producers in the oceans. Axenic unialgal cultures of Thalassiosira weissflogii and Thalassiosira pseudonana were established in artificial seawater + F/2 medium at 18° C on a 16:8 light:dark cycle. The cultures were filtered to separate diatom material from residual media and analysed for Zn, Cu and Fe concentrations and isotope composition using techniques described elsewhere1,2. Aliquots of the starting medium were also measured for each batch of cultures. The diatom organic material shows small, but consistent and resolvable, positive fractionations (0.1-0.3 per mil) for Fe, Cu and Zn relative to the starting medium. In the case of all three metals, but particularly for Zn (70-95% depending on experiment size), the diatoms had sequestered a large proportion of the available metal, suggesting that the fractionation factor for metal usage by the diatoms is much greater than 1.0001 to 1.0003. Time-series experiments are under way to determine the exact magnitude of the fractionation factor. The mass-balance is supported by the fact that the residual medium is around -0.4 per mil for Zn. The fact that diatoms incorporate trace metals that are isotopically heavier than the nutrient pool is a surprising result, the expectation having been that, as with carbon, the

  18. Synthesis and Characterization of the 2-Dimensional Transition Metal Dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browning, Robert

    In the last 50 years, the semiconductor industry has been scaling the silicon transistor to achieve faster devices, lower power consumption, and improve device performance. Transistor gate dimensions have become so small that short channel effects and gate leakage have become a significant problem. To address these issues, performance enhancement techniques such as strained silicon are used to improve mobility, while new high-k gate dielectric materials replace silicon oxide to reduce gate leakage. At some point the fundamental limit of silicon will be reached and the semiconductor industry will need to find an alternate solution. The advent of graphene led to the discovery of other layered materials such as the transition metal dichalcogenides. These materials have a layered structure similar to graphene and therefore possess some of the same qualities, but unlike graphene, these materials possess sizeable bandgaps between 1-2 eV making them useful for digital electronic applications. Since initially discovered, most of the research on these films has been from mechanically exfoliated flakes, which are easily produced due to the weak van der Waals force binding the layers together. For these materials to be considered for use in mainstream semiconductor technology, methods need to be explored to grow these films uniformly over a large area. In this research, atomic layer deposition (ALD) was employed as the growth technique used to produce large area uniform thin films of several different transition metal dichalcogenides. By optimizing the ALD growth parameters, it is possible to grow high quality films a few to several monolayers thick over a large area with good uniformity. This has been demonstrated and verified using several physical analytical tests such as Raman spectroscopy, photoluminescence, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, transmission electron spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy, which show that these films possess the

  19. Effects of spin transition on diffusion of Fe2+ in ferropericlase in Earth's lower mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Saumitra; Bengtson, Amelia; Crispin, Katherine L.; van Orman, James A.; Morgan, Dane

    2011-11-01

    Knowledge of Fe composition in lower-mantle minerals (primarily perovskite and ferropericlase) is essential to a complete understanding of the Earth's interior. Fe cation diffusion potentially controls many aspects of the distribution of Fe in the Earth's lower mantle, including mixing of chemical heterogeneities, element partitioning, and the extent of core-mantle communications. Fe in ferropericlase has been shown to undergo a spin transition starting at about 40 GPa and exists in a mixture of high-spin and low-spin states over a wide range of pressures. Present experimental data on Fe transport in ferropericlase is limited to pressures below 35 GPa and provides little information on the pressure dependence of the activation volume and none on the impact of the spin transition on diffusion. Therefore, known experimental data on Fe diffusion cannot be reliably extrapolated to predict diffusion throughout the lower mantle. Here, first-principles and statistical modeling are combined to predict diffusion of Fe in ferropericlase over the entire lower mantle, including the effects of the Fe spin transition. A thorough statistical thermodynamic treatment is given to fully incorporate the coexistence of high- and low-spin Fe in the model of overall Fe diffusion in the lower mantle. Pure low-spin Fe diffuses approximately 104 times slower than high-spin Fe in ferropericlase but Fe diffusion of the mixed-spin state is only about 10 times slower than that of high-spin Fe. The predicted Fe diffusivities demonstrate that ferropericlase is unlikely to be rate limiting in transporting Fe in deep earth since much slower Fe diffusion in perovskite is predicted.

  20. Transition metal catalysis in the generation of petroleum and natural gas. Final report, September 1, 1992--October 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Mango, F.D.

    1997-01-21

    This project originated on the premise that natural gas could be formed catalytically in the earth rather than thermally as commonly believed. The intention was to test this hypothetical view and to explore generally the role of sedimentary metals in the generation of light hydrocarbons (C1 - C9). We showed the metalliferous source rocks are indeed catalytic in the generation of natural gas. Various metal compounds in the pure state show the same levels of catalytic activity as sedimentary rocks and the products are identical. Nickel is particularly active among the early transition metals and is projected to remain catalyticallymore » robust at all stages of catagenesis. Nickel oxide promotes the formation of n-alkanes in addition to natural gas (NG), demonstrating the full scope of the hypothetical catalytic process. The composition of catalytic gas duplicates the entire range of natural gas, from so-called wet gas to dry gas (60 to 95+ wt % methane), while gas generated thermally is consistently depleted in methane (10 to 60 wt % methane). These results support the view that metal catalysis is a major pathway through which natural gas is formed in the earth.« less

  1. Breeding Super-Earths and Birthing Super-puffs in Transitional Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Eve J.; Chiang, Eugene

    2016-02-01

    The riddle posed by super-Earths (1-4R⊕, 2-20M⊕) is that they are not Jupiters: their core masses are large enough to trigger runaway gas accretion, yet somehow super-Earths accreted atmospheres that weigh only a few percent of their total mass. We show that this puzzle is solved if super-Earths formed late, as the last vestiges of their parent gas disks were about to clear. This scenario would seem to present fine-tuning problems, but we show that there are none. Ambient gas densities can span many (in one case up to 9) orders of magnitude, and super-Earths can still robustly emerge after ˜0.1-1 Myr with percent-by-weight atmospheres. Super-Earth cores are naturally bred in gas-poor environments where gas dynamical friction has weakened sufficiently to allow constituent protocores to gravitationally stir one another and merge. So little gas is present at the time of core assembly that cores hardly migrate by disk torques: formation of super-Earths can be in situ. The basic picture—that close-in super-Earths form in a gas-poor (but not gas-empty) inner disk, fed continuously by gas that bleeds inward from a more massive outer disk—recalls the largely evacuated but still accreting inner cavities of transitional protoplanetary disks. We also address the inverse problem presented by super-puffs: an uncommon class of short-period planets seemingly too voluminous for their small masses (4-10R⊕, 2-6M⊕). Super-puffs most easily acquire their thick atmospheres as dust-free, rapidly cooling worlds outside ˜1 AU where nebular gas is colder, less dense, and therefore less opaque. Unlike super-Earths, which can form in situ, super-puffs probably migrated in to their current orbits; they are expected to form the outer links of mean-motion resonant chains, and to exhibit greater water content. We close by confronting observations and itemizing remaining questions.

  2. BREEDING SUPER-EARTHS AND BIRTHING SUPER-PUFFS IN TRANSITIONAL DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Eve J.; Chiang, Eugene, E-mail: evelee@berkeley.edu, E-mail: echiang@astro.berkeley.edu

    The riddle posed by super-Earths (1–4R{sub ⊕}, 2–20M{sub ⊕}) is that they are not Jupiters: their core masses are large enough to trigger runaway gas accretion, yet somehow super-Earths accreted atmospheres that weigh only a few percent of their total mass. We show that this puzzle is solved if super-Earths formed late, as the last vestiges of their parent gas disks were about to clear. This scenario would seem to present fine-tuning problems, but we show that there are none. Ambient gas densities can span many (in one case up to 9) orders of magnitude, and super-Earths can still robustlymore » emerge after ∼0.1–1 Myr with percent-by-weight atmospheres. Super-Earth cores are naturally bred in gas-poor environments where gas dynamical friction has weakened sufficiently to allow constituent protocores to gravitationally stir one another and merge. So little gas is present at the time of core assembly that cores hardly migrate by disk torques: formation of super-Earths can be in situ. The basic picture—that close-in super-Earths form in a gas-poor (but not gas-empty) inner disk, fed continuously by gas that bleeds inward from a more massive outer disk—recalls the largely evacuated but still accreting inner cavities of transitional protoplanetary disks. We also address the inverse problem presented by super-puffs: an uncommon class of short-period planets seemingly too voluminous for their small masses (4–10R{sub ⊕}, 2–6M{sub ⊕}). Super-puffs most easily acquire their thick atmospheres as dust-free, rapidly cooling worlds outside ∼1 AU where nebular gas is colder, less dense, and therefore less opaque. Unlike super-Earths, which can form in situ, super-puffs probably migrated in to their current orbits; they are expected to form the outer links of mean-motion resonant chains, and to exhibit greater water content. We close by confronting observations and itemizing remaining questions.« less

  3. Ultrafast photo-induced dynamics across the metal-insulator transition of VO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Siming; Ramírez, Juan Gabriel; Jeffet, Jonathan; Bar-Ad, Shimshon; Huppert, Dan; Schuller, Ivan K.

    2017-04-01

    The transient reflectivity of VO2 films across the metal-insulator transition clearly shows that with low-fluence excitation, when insulating domains are dominant, energy transfer from the optically excited electrons to the lattice is not instantaneous, but precedes the superheating-driven expansion of the metallic domains. This implies that the phase transition in the coexistence regime is lattice-, not electronically-driven, at weak laser excitation. The superheated phonons provide the latent heat required for the propagation of the optically-induced phase transition. For VO2 this transition path is significantly different from what has been reported in the strong-excitation regime. We also observe a slow-down of the superheating-driven expansion of the metallic domains around the metal-insulator transition, which is possibly due to the competition among several co-existing phases, or an emergent critical-like behavior.

  4. Selective extraction and recovery of rare earth metals from phosphor powders in waste fluorescent lamps using an ionic liquid system.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Kubota, Fukiko; Baba, Yuzo; Kamiya, Noriho; Goto, Masahiro

    2013-06-15

    The recycling of rare earth metals from phosphor powders in waste fluorescent lamps by solvent extraction using ionic liquids was studied. Acid leaching of rare earth metals from the waste phosphor powder was examined first. Yttrium (Y) and europium (Eu) dissolved readily in the acid solution; however, the leaching of other rare earth metals required substantial energy input. Ionization of target rare earth metals from the waste phosphor powders into the leach solution was critical for their successful recovery. As a high temperature was required for the complete leaching of all rare earth metals, ionic liquids, for which vapor pressure is negligible, were used as an alternative extracting phase to the conventional organic diluent. An extractant, N, N-dioctyldiglycol amic acid (DODGAA), which was recently developed, showed a high affinity for rare earth metal ions in liquid-liquid extraction although a conventional commercial phosphonic extractant did not. An effective recovery of the rare earth metals, Y, Eu, La and Ce, from the metal impurities, Fe, Al and Zn, was achieved from the acidic leach solution of phosphor powders using an ionic liquid containing DODGAA as novel extractant system. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Discovering the electronic circuit diagram of life: structural relationships among transition metal binding sites in oxidoreductases

    PubMed Central

    Kim, J. Dongun; Senn, Stefan; Harel, Arye; Jelen, Benjamin I.; Falkowski, Paul G.

    2013-01-01

    Oxidoreductases play a central role in catalysing enzymatic electron-transfer reactions across the tree of life. To first order, the equilibrium thermodynamic properties of these proteins are governed by protein folds associated with specific transition metals and ligands at the active site. A global analysis of holoenzyme structures and functions suggests that there are fewer than approximately 500 fundamental oxidoreductases, which can be further clustered into 35 unique groups. These catalysts evolved in prokaryotes early in the Earth's history and are largely responsible for the emergence of non-equilibrium biogeochemical cycles on the planet's surface. Although the evolutionary history of the amino acid sequences in the oxidoreductases is very difficult to reconstruct due to gene duplication and horizontal gene transfer, the evolution of the folds in the catalytic sites can potentially be used to infer the history of these enzymes. Using a novel, yet simple analysis of the secondary structures associated with the ligands in oxidoreductases, we developed a structural phylogeny of these enzymes. The results of this ‘composome’ analysis suggest an early split from a basal set of a small group of proteins dominated by loop structures into two families of oxidoreductases, one dominated by α-helices and the second by β-sheets. The structural evolutionary patterns in both clades trace redox gradients and increased hydrogen bond energy in the active sites. The overall pattern suggests that the evolution of the oxidoreductases led to decreased entropy in the transition metal folds over approximately 2.5 billion years, allowing the enzymes to use increasingly oxidized substrates with high specificity. PMID:23754810

  6. Energy Transfer between Post-Transition Elements & Rare Earths in Oxide & Chalcogenide Glasses.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-08-27

    Caird [13]. A calculation of reduced matrix elements of Pr3 in 20 Na O • 80 TeO2 glass [14] showed that they differ slightly from data of ref. [121... glasses Transition (lass 35 ZnO 65 TeO2 20 Na2 O 80 TeO 2 fX 106 fX 106 l.,eas 3a, a) Ia’l. faI f.me.s f al f+ I fal 3 H4 - 3 H6 1.56 1.65 1.12...Rare-Earth Doped Glasses 20. jIST HAEV CCnFn~m ,i cn,on ra e sideit If c."*Ar’ -- ~ 14-r by t?-h.c .: r Intensity parameters, radiative transition

  7. Porous nanoarchitectures of spinel-type transition metal oxides for electrochemical energy storage systems.

    PubMed

    Park, Min-Sik; Kim, Jeonghun; Kim, Ki Jae; Lee, Jong-Won; Kim, Jung Ho; Yamauchi, Yusuke

    2015-12-14

    Transition metal oxides possessing two kinds of metals (denoted as AxB3-xO4, which is generally defined as a spinel structure; A, B = Co, Ni, Zn, Mn, Fe, etc.), with stoichiometric or even non-stoichiometric compositions, have recently attracted great interest in electrochemical energy storage systems (ESSs). The spinel-type transition metal oxides exhibit outstanding electrochemical activity and stability, and thus, they can play a key role in realising cost-effective and environmentally friendly ESSs. Moreover, porous nanoarchitectures can offer a large number of electrochemically active sites and, at the same time, facilitate transport of charge carriers (electrons and ions) during energy storage reactions. In the design of spinel-type transition metal oxides for energy storage applications, therefore, nanostructural engineering is one of the most essential approaches to achieving high electrochemical performance in ESSs. In this perspective, we introduce spinel-type transition metal oxides with various transition metals and present recent research advances in material design of spinel-type transition metal oxides with tunable architectures (shape, porosity, and size) and compositions on the micro- and nano-scale. Furthermore, their technological applications as electrode materials for next-generation ESSs, including metal-air batteries, lithium-ion batteries, and supercapacitors, are discussed.

  8. Adsorption of alkali and alkaline earth metal atoms and dimers on monolayer germanium carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gökçe, Aytaç Gürhan; Ersan, Fatih

    2017-01-01

    First-principles plane wave calculations have been performed to study the adsorption of alkali and alkaline earth metals on monolayer germanium carbide (GeC). We found that the favourable adsorption sites on GeC sheet for single alkali and alkaline earth adatoms are generally different from graphene or germanene. Among them, Mg, Na and their dimers have weakly bounded to GeC due to their closed valence electron shells, so they may have high mobility on GeC. Two different levels of adatom coverage (? and ?) have been investigated and we concluded that different electronic structures and magnetic moments for both coverages owing to alkali and alkaline earth atoms have long range electrostatic interactions. Lithium atom prefers to adsorbed on hollow site similar to other group-IV monolayers and the adsorption results in metallisation of GeC instead of semiconducting behaviour. Na and K adsorption can induce 1 ? total magnetic moment on GeC structures and they have shown semiconductor property which may have potential use in spintronic devices. We also showed that alkali or alkaline earth metal atoms can form dimer on GeC sheet. Calculated adsorption energies suggest that clustering of alkali and alkaline earth atoms is energetically favourable. All dimer adsorbed GeC systems have nonmagnetic semiconductor property with varying band gaps from 0.391 to 1.311 eV which are very suitable values for various device applications.

  9. Abnormal Elasticity of Single-Crystal Magnesiosiderite across the Spin Transition in Earth's Lower Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Suyu; Yang, Jing; Lin, Jung-Fu

    2017-01-01

    Brillouin light scattering and impulsive stimulated light scattering have been used to determine the full elastic constants of magnesiosiderite [(Mg0.35Fe0.65)CO3 ] up to 70 GPa at room temperature in a diamond-anvil cell. Drastic softening in C11 , C33 , C12 , and C13 elastic moduli associated with the compressive stress component and stiffening in C44 and C14 moduli associated with the shear stress component are observed to occur within the spin transition between ˜42.4 and ˜46.5 GPa . Negative values of C12 and C13 are also observed within the spin transition region. The Born criteria constants for the crystal remain positive within the spin transition, indicating that the mixed-spin state remains mechanically stable. Significant auxeticity can be related to the electronic spin transition-induced elastic anomalies based on the analysis of Poisson's ratio. These elastic anomalies are explained using a thermoelastic model for the rhombohedral system. Finally, we conclude that mixed-spin state ferromagnesite, which is potentially a major deep-carbon carrier, is expected to exhibit abnormal elasticity, including a negative Poisson's ratio of -0.6 and drastically reduced VP by 10%, in Earth's midlower mantle.

  10. Adjustable metal-semiconductor transition of FeS thin films by thermal annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Ganhua; Polity, Angelika; Volbers, Niklas; Meyer, Bruno K.; Mogwitz, Boris; Janek, Jürgen

    2006-12-01

    FeS polycrystalline thin films were prepared on float glass at 500°C by radio-frequency reactive sputtering. The influence of vacuum annealing on the metal-semiconductor transition of FeS films was investigated. It has been found that with the increase of the annealing temperature from 360to600°C, the metal-semiconductor transition temperature of FeS films first decreases and then increases, associated with first a reduction and then an enhancement of hysteresis width. The thermal stress is considered to give rise to the abnormal change of the metal-semiconductor transition of the FeS film during annealing.

  11. Microalloying of transition metal silicides by mechanical activation and field-activated reaction

    DOEpatents

    Munir, Zuhair A [Davis, CA; Woolman, Joseph N [Davis, CA; Petrovic, John J [Los Alamos, NM

    2003-09-02

    Alloys of transition metal suicides that contain one or more alloying elements are fabricated by a two-stage process involving mechanical activation as the first stage and densification and field-activated reaction as the second stage. Mechanical activation, preferably performed by high-energy planetary milling, results in the incorporation of atoms of the alloying element(s) into the crystal lattice of the transition metal, while the densification and field-activated reaction, preferably performed by spark plasma sintering, result in the formation of the alloyed transition metal silicide. Among the many advantages of the process are its ability to accommodate materials that are incompatible in other alloying methods.

  12. Evaluating transition-metal catalysis in gas generation from the Permian Kupferschiefer by hydrous pyrolysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lewan, M.D.; Kotarba, M.J.; Wieclaw, D.; Piestrzynski, A.

    2008-01-01

    Transition metals in source rocks have been advocated as catalysts in determining extent, composition, and timing of natural gas generation (Mango, F. D. (1996) Transition metal catalysis in the generation of natural gas. Org. Geochem.24, 977–984). This controversial hypothesis may have important implications concerning gas generation in unconventional shale-gas accumulations. Although experiments have been conducted to test the metal-catalysis hypothesis, their approach and results remain equivocal in evaluating natural assemblages of transition metals and organic matter in shale. The Permian Kupferschiefer of Poland offers an excellent opportunity to test the hypothesis with immature to marginally mature shale rich in both transition metals and organic matter. Twelve subsurface samples containing similar Type-II kerogen with different amounts and types of transition metals were subjected to hydrous pyrolysis at 330° and 355 °C for 72 h. The gases generated in these experiments were quantitatively collected and analyzed for molecular composition and stable isotopes. Expelled immiscible oils, reacted waters, and spent rock were also quantitatively collected. The results show that transition metals have no effect on methane yields or enrichment. δ13C values of generated methane, ethane, propane and butanes show no systematic changes with increasing transition metals. The potential for transition metals to enhance gas generation and oil cracking was examined by looking at the ratio of the generated hydrocarbon gases to generated expelled immiscible oil (i.e., GOR), which showed no systematic change with increasing transition metals. Assuming maximum yields at 355 °C for 72 h and first-order reaction rates, pseudo-rate constants for methane generation at 330 °C were calculated. These rate constants showed no increase with increasing transition metals. The lack of a significant catalytic effect of transition metals on the extent, composition, and timing of

  13. Anaerobic Killing of Oral Streptococci by Reduced, Transition Metal Cations

    PubMed Central

    Dunning, J. C.; Ma, Y.; Marquis, R. E.

    1998-01-01

    Reduced, transition metal cations commonly enhance oxidative damage to cells caused by hydroperoxides formed as a result of oxygen metabolism or added externally. As expected, the cations Fe2+ and Cu+ enhanced killing of Streptococcus mutans GS-5 by hydroperoxides. However, unexpectedly, they also induced lethal damage under fully anaerobic conditions in a glove box with no exposure to O2 or hydroperoxides from initial treatment with the cations. Sensitivities to anaerobic killing by Fe2+ varied among the organisms tested. The oral streptococci Streptococcus gordonii ATCC 10558, Streptococcus rattus FA-1, and Streptococcus sanguis NCTC 10904 were approximately as sensitive as S. mutans GS-5. Enterococcus hirae ATCC 9790, Actinomyces viscosus OMZ105E, and Actinomyces naeslundii WVU45 had intermediate sensitivity, while Lactobacillus casei ATCC 4646 and Escherichia coli B were insensitive. Killing of S. mutans GS-5 in response to millimolar levels of added Fe2+ occurred over a wide range of temperatures and pH. The organism was able to take up ferrous iron, but ferric reductase activity could not be detected. Chelators, uric acid, and thiocyanate were not effective inhibitors of the lethal damage. Sulfhydryl compounds, ferricyanide, and ferrocyanide were protective if added prior to Fe2+ exposure. Fe2+, but not Fe3+, acted to reduce the acid tolerance of glycolysis by intact cells of S. mutans. The reduction in acid tolerance appeared to be related directly to Fe2+ inhibition of F-ATPase, which could be assayed with permeabilized cells, isolated membranes, or F1 enzyme separated from membranes. Cu+ and Cu2+ also inhibited F-ATPase and sensitized glycolysis by intact cells to acid. All of these damaging actions occurred anaerobically and thus did not appear to involve reactive oxygen species. PMID:9435058

  14. Metal-Insulator Transition in W-doped VO2 Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Gen; Parry, James; Whittaker, Luisa; Banerjee, Sarbajit; Zeng, Hao

    2010-03-01

    We report a systematic study of the metal-insulator transition in W-doped VO2 nanowires. Magnetic susceptibility were measured for a bulk amount of VO2 nanowire powder. The susceptibility shows a sharp drop with decreasing temperature corresponding to the metal-insulator transition. The transition shows large temperature hysteresis for cooling and heating. With increasing doping concentration, the transition temperatures decreases systematically from 320 K to 275K. Charge transport measurements on the same nanowires showed similar behavior. XRD and TEM measurements were taken to further determine the structure of the materials in study.

  15. Tuning Magnetic Order in Transition Metal Oxide Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grutter, Alexander John

    growth on (110) and (111) oriented substrates we explore the effects of different distortion symmetries on SrRuO3 and demonstrate the first reported strain induced transition to a high-spin state of Ru 4+. Finally, we examine the effects of strain on SrRuO3 thin films and demonstrate a completely reversible universal out-of-plane magnetic easy axis on films grown on different substrate orientations. Having demonstrated the ability to tune nearly every magnetic parameter of SrRuO 3 through strain, we turn to magnetic properties at interfaces. We study the emergent interfacial ferromagnetism in superlattices of the paramagnetic metal CaRuO3 and the antiferromagnetic insulator CaMnO3 and demonstrate that the interfacial ferromagnetic layer in this system is confined to a single unit cell of CaMnO3 at the interface. We discuss the remarkable oscillatory dependence of the saturated magnetic moment on the thickness of the CaMnO3 layers and explore mechanisms by which this oscillation may be stabilized. We find long range coherence of the antiferromagnetism of the CaMnO3 layers across intervening layers of paramagnetic CaRuO3. Finally, we utilize the system of LaNiO3/CaMnO3 to separate the effects of intermixing and interfacial electronic reconstruction and conclusively demonstrate intrinsic interfacial ferromagnetism at the interface between a paramagnetic metal and an antiferromagnetic insulator. We find that the emergent ferromagnetism is stabilized through interfacial double exchange and that the leakage of conduction electrons from the paramagnetic metal to the antiferromagnetic insulator is critical to establishing the ferromagnetic ground state.

  16. Small Effect of Hydration on Elastic Wave Velocities of Ringwoodite in Earth's Transition Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulze, K.; Marquardt, H.; Boffa Ballaran, T.; Kurnosov, A.; Kawazoe, T.; Koch-Müller, M.

    2017-12-01

    Ringwoodite can incorporate significant amounts of hydrogen as OH-defects into its crystal structure. The measurement of 1.4 wt.% H20 in a natural ringwoodite diamond inclusion (Pearson et al. 2014) showed that hydrous ringwoodite can exist in the Earth's mantle. Since ringwoodite is considered to be the major phase in the mantle between 520 and 660 km depth it likely plays an important role for Earth's deep water cycle and the mantle water budget. Previous experimental work has shown that hydration reduces seismic wave velocities in ringwoodite, motivating attempts to map the hydration state of the mantle using seismic wave speed variations as depicted by seismic tomography. However, large uncertainties on the actual effects at transition zone pressures and temperatures remain. A major difficulty is the comparability of studies with different experimental setups and pressure- and temperature conditions. Here, we present results from a comparative elasticity study designed to quantify the effects of hydration on the seismic wave velocities of ringwoodite in Earth's transition zone. Focused ion beam cut single-crystals of four samples of either Fo90 or Fo100 ringwoodite with hydration states between 0.21 - 1.71 wt.% H2O were loaded in the pressure chamber of one diamond-anvil cell to ensure identical experimental conditions. Single-crystal Brillouin Spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction measurements were performed at room temperature to a pressure of 22 GPa. Additional experiments at high pressure and temperatures up to 500 K were performed. Our data collected at low pressures show a significant reduction of elastic wave velocities with hydration, consistent with previous work. However, in contrast to previous inferences, our results indicate that pressure significantly reduces the effect of hydration. Based on the outcome of our work, the redution in aggregate velocities caused by 1 wt.% H2O becomes smaller than 1% in ringwoodite at pressures equivalent to the Earth

  17. Rare earth element recycling from waste nickel-metal hydride batteries.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiuli; Zhang, Junwei; Fang, Xihui

    2014-08-30

    With an increase in number of waste nickel-metal hydride batteries, and because of the importance of rare earth elements, the recycling of rare earth elements is becoming increasingly important. In this paper, we investigate the effects of temperature, hydrochloric acid concentration, and leaching time to optimize leaching conditions and determine leach kinetics. The results indicate that an increase in temperature, hydrochloric acid concentration, and leaching time enhance the leaching rate of rare earth elements. A maximum rare earth elements recovery of 95.16% was achieved at optimal leaching conditions of 70°C, solid/liquid ratio of 1:10, 20% hydrochloric acid concentration, -74μm particle size, and 100min leaching time. The experimental data were best fitted by a chemical reaction-controlled model. The activation energy was 43.98kJ/mol and the reaction order for hydrochloric acid concentration was 0.64. The kinetic equation for the leaching process was found to be: 1-(1-x)(1/3)=A/ρr0[HCl](0.64)exp-439,8008.314Tt. After leaching and filtration, by adding saturated oxalic solution to the filtrate, rare earth element oxalates were obtained. After removing impurities by adding ammonia, filtering, washing with dilute hydrochloric acid, and calcining at 810°C, a final product of 99% pure rare earth oxides was obtained. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Transitioning Earth Remote Sensing Data to Benefit Society: A Paradigm for a Center of Excellence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jedlovec, Gary; Bjorgo, Einar; Burn, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decade there has been a substantial increase in the number of Earth remote sensing satellites launched for research and operational usage and numerous others planned by the international community. These satellites have been used to varying degrees by their supporting agencies for weather and environmental monitoring, climate studies, disaster monitoring and response, and other humanitarian activities. While there are success stories on useful applications of remote sensing data, the broader use of these satellite assets by other organizations and entities has been limited for a number of reasons including lack of data services, data dissemination issues, and a general failure to engage the broader end user community with useful data access and knowledge of how to use the data and products. This paper describes some of these current limitations on the broader use of Earth remote sensing data by the international community and describes the concept of a general "Center of Excellence" to facilitate the development, transition, and utilization of these Earth remote sensing observations by the broader international community.

  19. High-pressure phase of brucite stable at Earth's mantle transition zone and lower mantle conditions.

    PubMed

    Hermann, Andreas; Mookherjee, Mainak

    2016-12-06

    We investigate the high-pressure phase diagram of the hydrous mineral brucite, Mg(OH) 2 , using structure search algorithms and ab initio simulations. We predict a high-pressure phase stable at pressure and temperature conditions found in cold subducting slabs in Earth's mantle transition zone and lower mantle. This prediction implies that brucite can play a much more important role in water transport and storage in Earth's interior than hitherto thought. The predicted high-pressure phase, stable in calculations between 20 and 35 GPa and up to 800 K, features MgO 6 octahedral units arranged in the anatase-TiO 2 structure. Our findings suggest that brucite will transform from a layered to a compact 3D network structure before eventual decomposition into periclase and ice. We show that the high-pressure phase has unique spectroscopic fingerprints that should allow for straightforward detection in experiments. The phase also has distinct elastic properties that might make its direct detection in the deep Earth possible with geophysical methods.

  20. Characterization of metal binding sites onto biochar using rare earth elements as a fingerprint.

    PubMed

    Pourret, Olivier; Houben, David

    2018-02-01

    The ability of biochar to immobilize metals relies on the amount of functional groups at its surface but the contribution of each functional groups (e.g. carboxylic, phenolic) to metal bonding is poorly known. Using a new approach based on previous works on rare earth element (REE) interactions with humic substances, we aim at elucidating the relative contribution of these binding sites to metal sorption under various conditions (i.e. pH and ionic strengths, IS). Using batch experiments, REE sorption onto biochar was analyzed from pH 3 to 9 and IS 10 -1 mol/L to 10 -3 mol/L. Rare earth element patterns show a Middle REE (MREE) downward concavity at acidic pH and low ionic strength. These patterns are in good agreement with existing datasets quantifying REE binding with humic substances. Indeed, the MREE downward concavity displayed by REE-biochar complexation pattern compares well with REE patterns with various organic compounds. This similarity in the REE complexation pattern shapes suggests that carboxylic groups are the main binding sites of REE in biochar. Overall, our results indicate that the strength of the metal bonding with biochar increases when pH and IS increase, suggesting that biochar is more efficient for long-term metal immobilization at near neutral pH and high ionic strength.

  1. Chemoselective single-site Earth-abundant metal catalysts at metal–organic framework nodes

    PubMed Central

    Manna, Kuntal; Ji, Pengfei; Lin, Zekai; Greene, Francis X.; Urban, Ania; Thacker, Nathan C.; Lin, Wenbin

    2016-01-01

    Earth-abundant metal catalysts are critically needed for sustainable chemical synthesis. Here we report a simple, cheap and effective strategy of producing novel earth-abundant metal catalysts at metal–organic framework (MOF) nodes for broad-scope organic transformations. The straightforward metalation of MOF secondary building units (SBUs) with cobalt and iron salts affords highly active and reusable single-site solid catalysts for a range of organic reactions, including chemoselective borylation, silylation and amination of benzylic C–H bonds, as well as hydrogenation and hydroboration of alkenes and ketones. Our structural, spectroscopic and kinetic studies suggest that chemoselective organic transformations occur on site-isolated, electron-deficient and coordinatively unsaturated metal centres at the SBUs via σ-bond metathesis pathways and as a result of the steric environment around the catalytic site. MOFs thus provide a novel platform for the development of highly active and affordable base metal catalysts for the sustainable synthesis of fine chemicals. PMID:27574182

  2. Chemoselective single-site Earth-abundant metal catalysts at metal–organic framework nodes

    SciTech Connect

    Manna, Kuntal; Ji, Pengfei; Lin, Zekai

    2016-08-30

    Earth-abundant metal catalysts are critically needed for sustainable chemical synthesis. Here we report a simple, cheap and effective strategy of producing novel earth-abundant metal catalysts at metal–organic framework (MOF) nodes for broad-scope organic transformations. The straightforward metalation of MOF secondary building units (SBUs) with cobalt and iron salts affords highly active and reusable single-site solid catalysts for a range of organic reactions, including chemoselective borylation, silylation and amination of benzylic C–H bonds, as well as hydrogenation and hydroboration of alkenes and ketones. Our structural, spectroscopic and kinetic studies suggest that chemoselective organic transformations occur on site-isolated, electron-deficient and coordinatively unsaturatedmore » metal centres at the SBUs via σ-bond metathesis pathways and as a result of the steric environment around the catalytic site. MOFs thus provide a novel platform for the development of highly active and affordable base metal catalysts for the sustainable synthesis of fine chemicals.« less

  3. An easy access to nanocrystalline alkaline earth metal fluorides - just by shaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreger, M.; Scholz, G.; Kemnitz, E.

    2012-04-01

    High energy ball milling as fast, direct and solvent free method allows an easy access to nanocrystalline alkaline earth metal fluorides MF2 (M: Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba). Comparable metal sources (acetates, carbonates, hydroxides, alkoxides) were used for the reaction with NH4F as fluorinating agent. Even very simple manual shaking experiments between NH4F and the corresponding hydroxides in the stoichiometric ratio (M:F = 1:2, M: Ca, Sr, Ba) give phase pure fluorides. Moreover, comparable classical thermal reactions in closed crucibles at higher temperatures provide phase pure crystalline fluorides in nearly all cases as well.

  4. Transition Metal Oxides as Electrocatalysts for the Oxygen Evolution Reaction in Alkaline Solutions: An Application-Inspired Renaissance.

    PubMed

    Song, Fang; Bai, Lichen; Moysiadou, Aliki; Lee, Seunghwa; Hu, Chao; Liardet, Laurent; Hu, Xile

    2018-06-27

    Water splitting is the essential chemical reaction to enable the storage of intermittent energies such as solar and wind in the form of hydrogen fuel. The oxygen evolution reaction (OER) is often considered as the bottleneck in water splitting. Though metal oxides had been reported as OER electrocatalysts more than half a century ago, the recent interest in renewable energy storage has spurred a renaissance of the studies of transition metal oxides as Earth-abundant and nonprecious OER catalysts. This Perspective presents major progress in several key areas of the field such as theoretical understanding, activity trend, in situ and operando characterization, active site determination, and novel materials. A personal overview of the past achievements and future challenges is also provided.

  5. Solvation structures and dynamics of alkaline earth metal halides in supercritical water: A molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keshri, Sonanki; Mandal, Ratnamala; Tembe, B. L.

    2016-09-01

    Constrained molecular dynamics simulations of alkaline earth metal halides have been carried out to investigate their structural and dynamical properties in supercritical water. Potentials of mean force (PMFs) for all the alkaline earth metal halides in supercritical water have been computed. Contact ion pairs (CIPs) are found to be more stable than all other configurations of the ion pairs except for MgI2 where solvent shared ion pair (SShIP) is more stable than the CIP. There is hardly any difference in the PMFs between the M2+ (M = Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba) and the X- (X = F, Cl, Br, I) ions whether the second X- ion is present in the first coordination shell of the M2+ ion or not. The solvent molecules in the solvation shells diffuse at a much slower rate compared to the bulk. Orientational distribution functions of solvent molecules are sharper for smaller ions.

  6. Formation of an integrated holding company to produce rare-earth metal articles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanov, S. V.; Grishaev, S. I.

    2013-12-01

    The possibility of formation of a Russian holding company for the production of rare-earth metal articles under conditions of its increasing demand on the world market is considered. It is reasonable to ensure stable business operation on the market under conditions of state-private partnership after the fraction of soled products is determined and supported by the competitive advantages of Russian products.

  7. Effect of composition on the structure of lithium- and manganese-rich transition metal oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, Alpesh Khushalchand; Ramasse, Quentin M.; Ophus, Colin

    In this work, we establish a definitive structural model for lithium- and manganese-rich transition metal oxides and demonstrate the effect of composition on their bulk as well as the surface structure.

  8. Activation of methane by transition metal-substituted aluminophosphate molecular sieves

    DOEpatents

    Iton, Lennox E.; Maroni, Victor A.

    1991-01-01

    Aluminophosphate molecular sieves substituted with cobalt, manganese or iron and having the AlPO.sub.4 -34 or AlPO.sub.4 -5, or related AlPO.sub.4 structure activate methane starting at approximately 350.degree. C. Between 400.degree. and 500.degree. C. and at methane pressures .ltoreq.1 atmosphere the rate of methane conversion increases steadily with typical conversion efficiencies at 500.degree. C. approaching 50% and selectivity to the production of C.sub.2+ hydrocarbons approaching 100%. The activation mechanism is based on reduction of the transition metal(III) form of the molecular sieve to the transition metal(II) form with accompanying oxidative dehydrogenation of the methane. Reoxidation of the - transition metal(II) form to the transition metal(III) form can be done either chemically (e.g., using O.sub.2) or electrochemically.

  9. Effect of composition on the structure of lithium- and manganese-rich transition metal oxides

    DOE PAGES

    Shukla, Alpesh Khushalchand; Ramasse, Quentin M.; Ophus, Colin; ...

    2018-01-01

    In this work, we establish a definitive structural model for lithium- and manganese-rich transition metal oxides and demonstrate the effect of composition on their bulk as well as the surface structure.

  10. Theoretical research program to study transition metal trimers and embedded clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, Stephen P.

    1987-01-01

    The results of ab-initio calculations are reported for (1) small transition metal clusters and (2) potential energy surfaces for chemical reactions important in hydrogen combustion and high temperature air chemistry.

  11. Suppression of Structural Phase Transition in VO2 by Epitaxial Strain in Vicinity of Metal-insulator Transition

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Mengmeng; Yang, Yuanjun; Bin Hong; Wang, Liangxin; Hu, Kai; Dong, Yongqi; Xu, Han; Huang, Haoliang; Zhao, Jiangtao; Chen, Haiping; Song, Li; Ju, Huanxin; Zhu, Junfa; Bao, Jun; Li, Xiaoguang; Gu, Yueliang; Yang, Tieying; Gao, Xingyu; Luo, Zhenlin; Gao, Chen

    2016-01-01

    Mechanism of metal-insulator transition (MIT) in strained VO2 thin films is very complicated and incompletely understood despite three scenarios with potential explanations including electronic correlation (Mott mechanism), structural transformation (Peierls theory) and collaborative Mott-Peierls transition. Herein, we have decoupled coactions of structural and electronic phase transitions across the MIT by implementing epitaxial strain on 13-nm-thick (001)-VO2 films in comparison to thicker films. The structural evolution during MIT characterized by temperature-dependent synchrotron radiation high-resolution X-ray diffraction reciprocal space mapping and Raman spectroscopy suggested that the structural phase transition in the temperature range of vicinity of the MIT is suppressed by epitaxial strain. Furthermore, temperature-dependent Ultraviolet Photoelectron Spectroscopy (UPS) revealed the changes in electron occupancy near the Fermi energy EF of V 3d orbital, implying that the electronic transition triggers the MIT in the strained films. Thus the MIT in the bi-axially strained VO2 thin films should be only driven by electronic transition without assistance of structural phase transition. Density functional theoretical calculations further confirmed that the tetragonal phase across the MIT can be both in insulating and metallic states in the strained (001)-VO2/TiO2 thin films. This work offers a better understanding of the mechanism of MIT in the strained VO2 films. PMID:26975328

  12. Ground-state properties of rare-earth metals: an evaluation of density-functional theory.

    PubMed

    Söderlind, Per; Turchi, P E A; Landa, A; Lordi, V

    2014-10-15

    The rare-earth metals have important technological applications due to their magnetic properties, but are scarce and expensive. Development of high-performance magnetic materials with less rare-earth content is desired, but theoretical modeling is hampered by complexities of the rare earths electronic structure. The existence of correlated (atomic-like) 4f electrons in the vicinity of the valence band makes any first-principles theory challenging. Here, we apply and evaluate the efficacy of density-functional theory for the series of lanthanides (rare earths), investigating the influence of the electron exchange and correlation functional, spin-orbit interaction, and orbital polarization. As a reference, the results are compared with those of the so-called 'standard model' of the lanthanides in which electrons are constrained to occupy 4f core states with no hybridization with the valence electrons. Some comparisons are also made with models designed for strong electron correlations. Our results suggest that spin-orbit coupling and orbital polarization are important, particularly for the magnitude of the magnetic moments, and that calculated equilibrium volumes, bulk moduli, and magnetic moments show correct trends overall. However, the precision of the calculated properties is not at the level of that found for simpler metals in the Periodic Table of Elements, and the electronic structures do not accurately reproduce x-ray photoemission spectra.

  13. Nonequilibrium Phase Precursors during a Photoexcited Insulator-to-Metal Transition in V2O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, Andrej; Ramirez, Juan Gabriel; Valmianski, Ilya; Cela, Devin; Hua, Nelson; Kukreja, Roopali; Wingert, James; Kovalchuk, Olesya; Glownia, James M.; Sikorski, Marcin; Chollet, Matthieu; Holt, Martin; Schuller, Ivan K.; Shpyrko, Oleg G.

    2018-05-01

    Here, we photoinduce and directly observe with x-ray scattering an ultrafast enhancement of the structural long-range order in the archetypal Mott system V2O3 . Despite the ultrafast increase in crystal symmetry, the change of unit cell volume occurs an order of magnitude slower and coincides with the insulator-to-metal transition. The decoupling between the two structural responses in the time domain highlights the existence of a transient photoinduced precursor phase, which is distinct from the two structural phases present in equilibrium. X-ray nanoscopy reveals that acoustic phonons trapped in nanoscale twin domains govern the dynamics of the ultrafast transition into the precursor phase, while nucleation and growth of metallic domains dictate the duration of the slower transition into the metallic phase. The enhancement of the long-range order before completion of the electronic transition demonstrates the critical role the nonequilibrium structural phases play during electronic phase transitions in correlated electrons systems.

  14. Alkaline earth metal doped tin oxide as a novel oxygen storage material

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Qiang, E-mail: dong@tagen.tohoku.ac.jp; Yin, Shu; Yoshida, Mizuki

    2015-09-15

    Alkaline earth metal doped tin oxide (SnO{sub 2}) hollow nanospheres with a diameter of 50 nm have been synthesized successfully via a facial solvothermal route in a very simple system composed of only ethanol, acetic acid, SnCl{sub 4}·5H{sub 2}O and A(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}·xH{sub 2}O (A = Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba). The synthesized undoped SnO{sub 2} and A-doped SnO{sub 2} hollow nanospheres were characterized by the oxygen storage capacity (OSC), X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and the Brunauer–Emmet–Teller (BET) technique. The OSC values of all samples were measured using thermogravimetric-differential thermal analysis. The incorporation of alkaline earth metal ion into tinmore » oxide greatly enhanced the thermal stability and OSC. Especially, Ba-doped SnO{sub 2} hollow nanospheres calcined at 1000 °C for 20 h with a BET surface area of 61 m{sup 2} g{sup −1} exhibited the considerably high OSC of 457 μmol-O g{sup −1} and good thermal stability. Alkaline earth metal doped tin oxide has the potential to be a novel oxygen storage material.« less

  15. Bridged transition-metal complexes and uses thereof for hydrogen separation, storage and hydrogenation

    DOEpatents

    Lilga, Michael A.; Hallen, Richard T.

    1990-01-01

    The present invention constitutes a class of organometallic complexes which reversibly react with hydrogen to form dihydrides and processes by which these compounds can be utilized. The class includes bimetallic complexes in which two cyclopentadienyl rings are bridged together and also separately .pi.-bonded to two transition metal atoms. The transition metals are believed to bond with the hydrogen in forming the dihydride. Transition metals such as Fe, Mn or Co may be employed in the complexes although Cr constitutes the preferred metal. A multiple number of ancilliary ligands such as CO are bonded to the metal atoms in the complexes. Alkyl groups and the like may be substituted on the cyclopentadienyl rings. These organometallic compounds may be used in absorption/desorption systems and in facilitated transport membrane systems for storing and separating out H.sub.2 from mixed gas streams such as the produce gas from coal gasification processes.

  16. Bridged transition-metal complexes and uses thereof for hydrogen separation, storage and hydrogenation

    DOEpatents

    Lilga, M.A.; Hallen, R.T.

    1991-10-15

    The present invention constitutes a class of organometallic complexes which reversibly react with hydrogen to form dihydrides and processes by which these compounds can be utilized. The class includes bimetallic complexes in which two cyclopentadienyl rings are bridged together and also separately [pi]-bonded to two transition metal atoms. The transition metals are believed to bond with the hydrogen in forming the dihydride. Transition metals such as Fe, Mn or Co may be employed in the complexes although Cr constitutes the preferred metal. A multiple number of ancillary ligands such as CO are bonded to the metal atoms in the complexes. Alkyl groups and the like may be substituted on the cyclopentadienyl rings. These organometallic compounds may be used in absorption/desorption systems and in facilitated transport membrane systems for storing and separating out H[sub 2] from mixed gas streams such as the product gas from coal gasification processes. 3 figures.

  17. Bridged transition-metal complexes and uses thereof for hydrogen separation, storage and hydrogenation

    DOEpatents

    Lilga, M.A.; Hallen, R.T.

    1990-08-28

    The present invention constitutes a class of organometallic complexes which reversibly react with hydrogen to form dihydrides and processes by which these compounds can be utilized. The class includes bimetallic complexes in which two cyclopentadienyl rings are bridged together and also separately [pi]-bonded to two transition metal atoms. The transition metals are believed to bond with the hydrogen in forming the dihydride. Transition metals such as Fe, Mn or Co may be employed in the complexes although Cr constitutes the preferred metal. A multiple number of ancillary ligands such as CO are bonded to the metal atoms in the complexes. Alkyl groups and the like may be substituted on the cyclopentadienyl rings. These organometallic compounds may be used in absorption/desorption systems and in facilitated transport membrane systems for storing and separating out H[sub 2] from mixed gas streams such as the producer gas from coal gasification processes. 3 figs.

  18. Bridged transition-metal complexes and uses thereof for hydrogen separation, storage and hydrogenation

    DOEpatents

    Lilga, Michael A.; Hallen, Richard T.

    1991-01-01

    The present invention constitutes a class of organometallic complexes which reversibly react with hydrogen to form dihydrides and processes by which these compounds can be utilized. The class includes bimetallic complexes in which two cyclopentadienyl rings are bridged together and also separately .pi.-bonded to two transition metal atoms. The transition metals are believed to bond with the hydrogen in forming the dihydride. Transition metals such as Fe, Mn or Co may be employed in the complexes although Cr constitutes the preferred metal. A multiple number of ancilliary ligands such as CO are bonded to the metal atoms in the complexes. Alkyl groups and the like may be substituted on the cyclopentadienyl rings. These organometallic compounds may be used in absorption/desorption systems and in facilitated transport membrane systems for storing and separating out H.sub.2 from mixed gas streams such as the product gas from coal gasification processes.

  19. Preparation of transition metal nanoparticles and surfaces modified with (CO)polymers synthesized by RAFT

    DOEpatents

    McCormick, III., Charles L.; Lowe, Andrew B.; Sumerlin, Brent S.

    2006-11-21

    A new, facile, general one-phase method of generating thio-functionalized transition metal nanoparticles and surfaces modified by (co)polymers synthesized by the RAFT method is described. The method includes the stops of forming a (co)polymer in aqueous solution using the RAFT methodology, forming a colloidal transition metal precursor solution from an appropriate transition metal; adding the metal precursor solution or surface to the (co)polymer solution, adding a reducing agent into the solution to reduce the metal colloid in situ to produce the stabilized nanoparticles or surface, and isolating the stabilized nanoparticles or surface in a manner such that aggregation is minimized. The functionalized surfaces generated using these methods can further undergo planar surface modifications, such as functionalization with a variety of different chemical groups, expanding their utility and application.

  20. Preparation of transition metal nanoparticles and surfaces modified with (co)polymers synthesized by RAFT

    DOEpatents

    McCormick, III, Charles L.; Lowe, Andrew B [Hattiesburg, MS; Sumerlin, Brent S [Pittsburgh, PA

    2011-12-27

    A new, facile, general one-phase method of generating thiol-functionalized transition metal nanoparticles and surfaces modified by (co)polymers synthesized by the RAFT method is described. The method includes the steps of forming a (co)polymer in aqueous solution using the RAFT methodology, forming a colloidal transition metal precursor solution from an appropriate transition metal; adding the metal precursor solution or surface to the (co)polymer solution, adding a reducing agent into the solution to reduce the metal colloid in situ to produce the stabilized nanoparticles or surface, and isolating the stabilized nanoparticles or surface in a manner such that aggregation is minimized. The functionalized surfaces generated using these methods can further undergo planar surface modifications, such as functionalization with a variety of different chemical groups, expanding their utility and application.