Science.gov

Sample records for earthquake zone global

  1. Global correlations between maximum magnitudes of subduction zone interface thrust earthquakes and physical parameters of subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schellart, W. P.; Rawlinson, N.

    2013-12-01

    T). The results indicate that MW > 8.5 subduction earthquakes occur for rapidly shortening to slowly extending overriding plates (-3.0 ⩽ vOPD⊥ ⩽ 2.3 cm/yr), slow trench velocities (-2.9 ⩽ vT⊥ ⩽ 2.8 cm/yr), moderate to high subduction partitioning ratios (vSP⊥/vS⊥ ⩽ 0.3-1.4), low subduction thrust dip angles (δST ⩽ 30°), low subduction thrust curvature (CST ⩽ 2.0 × 10-13 m-2) and low trench curvature angles (-6.3° ⩽ αT ⩽ 9.8°). Epicenters of giant earthquakes with MW > 8.5 only occur at trench segments bordering overriding plates that experience shortening or are neutral (vOPD⊥ ⩽ 0), suggesting that such earthquakes initiate at mechanically highly coupled segments of the subduction zone interface that have a relatively high normal stress (deviatoric compression) on the interface (i.e. a normal stress asperity). Notably, for the three largest recorded earthquakes (Chile 1960, Alaska 1964, Sumatra-Andaman 2004) the earthquake rupture propagated from a zone of compressive deviatoric normal stress on the subduction zone interface to a region of lower normal stress (neutral or deviatoric tension). Stress asperities should be seen separately from frictional asperities that result from a variation in friction coefficient along the subduction zone interface. We have developed a global map in which individual subduction zone segments have been ranked in terms of their predicted capability of generating a giant subduction zone earthquake (MW > 8.5) using the six most indicative subduction zone parameters (vOPD⊥, vT⊥, vSP⊥/vS⊥, δST, CST and αT). We identify a number of subduction zones and segments that rank highly, which implies a capability to generate MW > 8.5 earthquakes. These include Sunda, North Sulawesi, Hikurangi, Nankai-northern Ryukyu, Kamchatka-Kuril-Japan, Aleutians-Alaska, Cascadia, Mexico-Central America, South America, Lesser Antilles, western Hellenic and Makran. Several subduction segments have a low score, most notably

  2. Global Omori law decay of triggered earthquakes: Large aftershocks outside the classical aftershock zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parsons, T.

    2002-01-01

    Triggered earthquakes can be large, damaging, and lethal as evidenced by the 1999 shocks in Turkey and the 2001 earthquakes in El Salvador. In this study, earthquakes with Ms ≥ 7.0 from the Harvard centroid moment tensor (CMT) catalog are modeled as dislocations to calculate shear stress changes on subsequent earthquake rupture planes near enough to be affected. About 61% of earthquakes that occured near (defined as having shear stress change |Δ| 0.01 MPa) the Ms ≥ 7.0 shocks are associated with calculated shear stress increases, while ~39% are associated with shear stress decreases. If earthquakes associated with calculated shear stress increases are interpreted as triggered, then such events make up at least 8% of the CMT catalog. Globally, these triggered earthquakes obey an Omori law rate decay that lasts between ~7-11 years after the main shock. Earthquakes associated with calculated shear stress increases occur at higher rates than background up to 240 km away from the main shock centroid. Omori's law is one of the few time-predictable patterns evident in the global occurrence of earthquakes. If large triggered earthquakes habitually obey Omori's law, then their hazard can be more readily assessed. The characteristics rate change with time and spatial distribution can be used to rapidly assess the likelihood of triggered earthquakes following events of Ms ≥7.0. I show an example application to the M = 7.7 13 January 2001 El Salvador earthquake where use of global statistics appears to provide a better rapid hazard estimate than Coulomb stress change calculations.

  3. Global Omori law decay of triggered earthquakes: large aftershocks outside the classical aftershock zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parsons, Tom

    2002-01-01

    Triggered earthquakes can be large, damaging, and lethal as evidenced by the 1999 shocks in Turkey and the 2001 earthquakes in El Salvador. In this study, earthquakes with Ms ≥ 7.0 from the Harvard centroid moment tensor (CMT) catalog are modeled as dislocations to calculate shear stress changes on subsequent earthquake rupture planes near enough to be affected. About 61% of earthquakes that occurred near (defined as having shear stress change ∣Δτ∣ ≥ 0.01 MPa) the Ms ≥ 7.0 shocks are associated with calculated shear stress increases, while ∼39% are associated with shear stress decreases. If earthquakes associated with calculated shear stress increases are interpreted as triggered, then such events make up at least 8% of the CMT catalog. Globally, these triggered earthquakes obey an Omori law rate decay that lasts between ∼7–11 years after the main shock. Earthquakes associated with calculated shear stress increases occur at higher rates than background up to 240 km away from the main shock centroid. Omori's law is one of the few time-predictable patterns evident in the global occurrence of earthquakes. If large triggered earthquakes habitually obey Omori's law, then their hazard can be more readily assessed. The characteristic rate change with time and spatial distribution can be used to rapidly assess the likelihood of triggered earthquakes following events of Ms ≥ 7.0. I show an example application to the M = 7.7 13 January 2001 El Salvador earthquake where use of global statistics appears to provide a better rapid hazard estimate than Coulomb stress change calculations.

  4. The global tsunami hazard due to long return period subduction zone earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Løvholt, Finn; Bonnevie Harbitz, Carl; Glimsdal, Sylfest; Horspool, Nick; Smebye, Helge; de Bono, Andrea; Nadim, Farrokh

    2014-05-01

    Historical tsunamis and paleotsunami evidence indicate that massive megathrust earthquakes lead to the majority of the losses due to tsunamis. There is a need to quantify the tsunami hazard from megathrust events in order to compare tsunamis with other natural hazards on a global level, as previous attempts have been lacking. The global tsunami hazard induced by earthquakes is therefore computed for a return period of 500 years. To this end, the exposed elements at risk such as population, produced capital, and nuclear power plants are determined. It is shown that populous Asian countries account for the largest absolute number of people living in tsunami prone areas, more than 50% of the total exposed people live in Japan. Smaller nations like Macao and the Maldives are among the most exposed by population count. Exposed nuclear power plants are limited to Japan, China, India, Taiwan, and USA. The methods used to quantify the global hazard are obviously crude, and hence the expected accuracy using global methods are discussed.

  5. The global aftershock zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parsons, Thomas E.; Margaret Segou,; Warner Marzocchi,

    2014-01-01

    The aftershock zone of each large (M ≥ 7) earthquake extends throughout the shallows of planet Earth. Most aftershocks cluster near the mainshock rupture, but earthquakes send out shivers in the form of seismic waves, and these temporary distortions are large enough to trigger other earthquakes at global range. The aftershocks that happen at great distance from their mainshock are often superposed onto already seismically active regions, making them difficult to detect and understand. From a hazard perspective we are concerned that this dynamic process might encourage other high magnitude earthquakes, and wonder if a global alarm state is warranted after every large mainshock. From an earthquake process perspective we are curious about the physics of earthquake triggering across the magnitude spectrum. In this review we build upon past studies that examined the combined global response to mainshocks. Such compilations demonstrate significant rate increases during, and immediately after (~ 45 min) M > 7.0 mainshocks in all tectonic settings and ranges. However, it is difficult to find strong evidence for M > 5 rate increases during the passage of surface waves in combined global catalogs. On the other hand, recently published studies of individual large mainshocks associate M > 5 triggering at global range that is delayed by hours to days after surface wave arrivals. The longer the delay between mainshock and global aftershock, the more difficult it is to establish causation. To address these questions, we review the response to 260 M ≥ 7.0 shallow (Z ≤ 50 km) mainshocks in 21 global regions with local seismograph networks. In this way we can examine the detailed temporal and spatial response, or lack thereof, during passing seismic waves, and over the 24 h period after their passing. We see an array of responses that can involve immediate and widespread seismicity outbreaks, delayed and localized earthquake clusters, to no response at all. About 50% of the

  6. The global aftershock zone (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, T.; Segou, M.; Marzocchi, W.

    2013-12-01

    There is little doubt that the whole planet becomes the aftershock zone of large (M≥7) earthquakes. Surface waves distort fault zones and volcanic centers as they pass through the crust, leading to seismic failures. From a hazard perspective we are obviously concerned that this dynamic process might encourage high magnitude earthquakes. Great strides have been made in operational earthquake forecasting near mainshocks in time and space, but we are far less certain how to assess the hazard posed at global distances. Results from global compilations demonstrate significant rate increases during, and immediately after (~45 minutes) M>7.0 mainshocks in all tectonic settings and ranges. However, it is difficult to find strong evidence for M>5 rate increases during the passage of surface waves in combined global catalogs. On the other hand, studies of individual large mainshocks correlate M>5 triggering at global range that is delayed by hours to days after surface wave arrivals. These examples tend to lie in the noise when the global catalogs are examined simultaneously, which implies that they are relatively rare events. However, if large triggered earthquakes can occur in the global aftershock zone, then we must be concerned about how to calculate and convey the hazard they pose. Results from comparative responses of individual regions to hundreds of global M>7 mainshocks give us some preliminary insights into the likelihood of damaging global aftershocks. About 50% of the catalogs we studied showed possible (delayed) remote triggering, and ~20% showed probable (instantaneous) remote triggering. However, in any given region, at most only about 2-3% of global mainshocks cause significant local earthquake rate increases. We note that surface wave amplitude, mainshock magnitude, and relative proximity are not important factors in determining which mainshocks cause remote triggering. Instead, azimuth, and polarization of surface waves with respect to receiver faults

  7. Zoning surface rupture hazard along normal faults: Insight from L'Aquila, 2009 (Mw 6.3, Central Italy) and other global earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boncio, P.; Galli, P.; Naso, G.; Pizzi, A.

    2012-04-01

    Surface fault rupture hazard (SFRH) is a localized seismic hazard due to the breaching of the ground surface from slip along a fault during a large earthquake. This motion may offset, tilt, distort and damage buildings on or in the vicinity of the fault trace. Although SFRH should be one of the most easily detectable seismic hazards, due to the visibility of active fault traces, the April 6, 2009 L'Aquila earthquake in central Italy (Mw 6.3) demonstrates that there is much progress to be made in assessing the hazard. Indeed, the 2009 normal faulting surface ruptures occurred across populated areas, producing mild-to-moderate damages to infrastructure (e.g., pipelines, roads) and buildings, including structures less than a few years old. Similar to other countries with SFRH, Italy does not have explicit and comprehensive codes and/or regulations concerning this important issue. Following the observation of surface faulting occurred during the 2009 earthquake, we propose general criteria for delineating zones of SFRH along active normal faults. Our proposal, which is explicitly inspired to the Californian Alquist-Priolo Earthquake Fault Zoning Act, compares the 2009 coseismic surficial faults to surface rupture data collected globally for several normal faulting earthquakes. We propose Earthquake Fault Zones (EFZ) and fault Setbacks (S) which are asymmetrically shaped around the fault trace. The zones are wider on the hanging wall, consistently with the observation of wider coseismic rupture zones in the hanging wall block compared to the footwall block. For faults mapped in detail, we suggest a 150 m-wide EFZ on the hanging wall and a 30 m-wide EFZ on the footwall. The suggested widths of the S on the hanging wall and footwall are 40 m and 15 m, respectively. Considering the data collected for the L'Aquila fault system and abroad, we are confident that our proposal is conservative enough for Apennine-like normal faults and, applicable to Italy and other areas with

  8. Linking giant earthquakes with the subduction of oceanic fracture zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landgrebe, T. C.; Müller, R. D.; EathByte Group

    2011-12-01

    Giant subduction earthquakes are known to occur in areas not previously identified as prone to high seismic risk. This highlights the need to better identify subduction zone segments potentially dominated by relatively long (up to 1000 years and more) recurrence times of giant earthquakes. Global digital data sets represent a promising source of information for a multi-dimensional earthquake hazard analysis. We combine the NGDC global Significant Earthquakes database with a global strain rate map, gridded ages of the ocean floor, and a recently produced digital data set for oceanic fracture zones, major aseismic ridges and volcanic chains to investigate the association of earthquakes as a function of magnitude with age of the downgoing slab and convergence rates. We use a so-called Top-N recommendation method, a technology originally developed to search, sort, classify, and filter very large and often statistically skewed data sets on the internet, to analyse the association of subduction earthquakes sorted by magnitude with key parameters. The Top-N analysis is used to progressively assess how strongly particular "tectonic niche" locations (e.g. locations along subduction zones intersected with aseismic ridges or volcanic chains) are associated with sets of earthquakes in sorted order in a given magnitude range. As the total number N of sorted earthquakes is increased, by progressively including smaller-magnitude events, the so-called recall is computed, defined as the number of Top-N earthquakes associated with particular target areas divided by N. The resultant statistical measure represents an intuitive description of the effectiveness of a given set of parameters to account for the location of significant earthquakes on record. We use this method to show that the occurrence of great (magnitude ≥ 8) earthquakes on overriding plate segments is strongly biased towards intersections of oceanic fracture zones with subduction zones. These intersection regions are

  9. Global prevalence of double Benioff zones.

    PubMed

    Brudzinski, Michael R; Thurber, Clifford H; Hacker, Bradley R; Engdahl, E Robert

    2007-06-08

    Double Benioff zones provide opportunities for insight into seismogenesis because the underlying mechanism must explain two layers of deep earthquakes and the separation between them. We characterize layer separation inside subducting plates with a coordinate rotation to calculate the slab-normal distribution of earthquakes. Benchmark tests on well-established examples confirm that layer separation is accurately quantified with global seismicity catalogs alone. Global analysis reveals double Benioff zones in 30 segments, including all 16 subduction zones investigated, with varying subducting plate ages and stress orientations, which implies that they are inherent in subducting plates. Layer separation increases with age and is more consistent with dehydration of antigorite than chlorite.

  10. Earthquake hazards on the cascadia subduction zone

    SciTech Connect

    Heaton, T.H.; Hartzell, S.H.

    1987-04-10

    Large subduction earthquakes on the Cascadia subduction zone pose a potential seismic hazard. Very young oceanic lithosphere (10 million years old) is being subducted beneath North America at a rate of approximately 4 centimeters per year. The Cascadia subduction zone shares many characteristics with subduction zones in southern Chile, southwestern Japan, and Colombia, where comparably young oceanic lithosphere is also subducting. Very large subduction earthquakes, ranging in energy magnitude (M/sub w/) between 8 and 9.5, have occurred along these other subduction zones. If the Cascadia subduction zone is also storing elastic energy, a sequence of several great earthquakes (M/sub w/ 8) or a giant earthquake (M/sub w/ 9) would be necessary to fill this 1200-kilometer gap. The nature of strong ground motions recorded during subduction earthquakes of M/sub w/ less than 8.2 is discussed. Strong ground motions from even larger earthquakes (M/sub w/ up to 9.5) are estimated by simple simulations. If large subduction earthquakes occur in the Pacific Northwest, relatively strong shaking can be expected over a large region. Such earthquakes may also be accompanied by large local tsunamis. 35 references, 6 figures.

  11. Earthquake hazards on the cascadia subduction zone.

    PubMed

    Heaton, T H; Hartzell, S H

    1987-04-10

    Large subduction earthquakes on the Cascadia subduction zone pose a potential seismic hazard. Very young oceanic lithosphere (10 million years old) is being subducted beneath North America at a rate of approximately 4 centimeters per year. The Cascadia subduction zone shares many characteristics with subduction zones in southern Chile, southwestern Japan, and Colombia, where comparably young oceanic lithosphere is also subducting. Very large subduction earthquakes, ranging in energy magnitude (M(w)) between 8 and 9.5, have occurred along these other subduction zones. If the Cascadia subduction zone is also storing elastic energy, a sequence of several great earthquakes (M(w) 8) or a giant earthquake (M(w) 9) would be necessary to fill this 1200-kilometer gap. The nature of strong ground motions recorded during subduction earthquakes of M(w) less than 8.2 is discussed. Strong ground motions from even larger earthquakes (M(w) up to 9.5) are estimated by simple simulations. If large subduction earthquakes occur in the Pacific Northwest, relatively strong shaking can be expected over a large region. Such earthquakes may also be accompanied by large local tsunamis.

  12. Global earthquake fatalities and population

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holzer, Thomas L.; Savage, James C.

    2013-01-01

    Modern global earthquake fatalities can be separated into two components: (1) fatalities from an approximately constant annual background rate that is independent of world population growth and (2) fatalities caused by earthquakes with large human death tolls, the frequency of which is dependent on world population. Earthquakes with death tolls greater than 100,000 (and 50,000) have increased with world population and obey a nonstationary Poisson distribution with rate proportional to population. We predict that the number of earthquakes with death tolls greater than 100,000 (50,000) will increase in the 21st century to 8.7±3.3 (20.5±4.3) from 4 (7) observed in the 20th century if world population reaches 10.1 billion in 2100. Combining fatalities caused by the background rate with fatalities caused by catastrophic earthquakes (>100,000 fatalities) indicates global fatalities in the 21st century will be 2.57±0.64 million if the average post-1900 death toll for catastrophic earthquakes (193,000) is assumed.

  13. Crustal earthquake triggering by pre-historic great earthquakes on subduction zone thrusts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sherrod, Brian; Gomberg, Joan

    2014-01-01

    Triggering of earthquakes on upper plate faults during and shortly after recent great (M>8.0) subduction thrust earthquakes raises concerns about earthquake triggering following Cascadia subduction zone earthquakes. Of particular regard to Cascadia was the previously noted, but only qualitatively identified, clustering of M>~6.5 crustal earthquakes in the Puget Sound region between about 1200–900 cal yr B.P. and the possibility that this was triggered by a great Cascadia thrust subduction thrust earthquake, and therefore portends future such clusters. We confirm quantitatively the extraordinary nature of the Puget Sound region crustal earthquake clustering between 1200–900 cal yr B.P., at least over the last 16,000. We conclude that this cluster was not triggered by the penultimate, and possibly full-margin, great Cascadia subduction thrust earthquake. However, we also show that the paleoseismic record for Cascadia is consistent with conclusions of our companion study of the global modern record outside Cascadia, that M>8.6 subduction thrust events have a high probability of triggering at least one or more M>~6.5 crustal earthquakes.

  14. Global Instrumental Seismic Catalog: earthquake relocations for 1900-present

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villasenor, A.; Engdahl, E.; Storchak, D. A.; Bondar, I.

    2010-12-01

    We present the current status of our efforts to produce a set of homogeneous earthquake locations and improved focal depths towards the compilation of a Global Catalog of instrumentally recorded earthquakes that will be complete down to the lowest magnitude threshold possible on a global scale and for the time period considered. This project is currently being carried out under the auspices of GEM (Global Earthquake Model). The resulting earthquake catalog will be a fundamental dataset not only for earthquake risk modeling and assessment on a global scale, but also for a large number of studies such as global and regional seismotectonics; the rupture zones and return time of large, damaging earthquakes; the spatial-temporal pattern of moment release along seismic zones and faults etc. Our current goal is to re-locate all earthquakes with available station arrival data using the following magnitude thresholds: M5.5 for 1964-present, M6.25 for 1918-1963, M7.5 (complemented with significant events in continental regions) for 1900-1917. Phase arrival time data for earthquakes after 1963 are available in digital form from the International Seismological Centre (ISC). For earthquakes in the time period 1918-1963, phase data is obtained by scanning the printed International Seismological Summary (ISS) bulletins and applying optical character recognition routines. For earlier earthquakes we will collect phase data from individual station bulletins. We will illustrate some of the most significant results of this relocation effort, including aftershock distributions for large earthquakes, systematic differences in epicenter and depth with respect to previous location, examples of grossly mislocated events, etc.

  15. GEM - The Global Earthquake Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolka, A.

    2009-04-01

    Over 500,000 people died in the last decade due to earthquakes and tsunamis, mostly in the developing world, where the risk is increasing due to rapid population growth. In many seismic regions, no hazard and risk models exist, and even where models do exist, they are intelligible only by experts, or available only for commercial purposes. The Global Earthquake Model (GEM) answers the need for an openly accessible risk management tool. GEM is an internationally sanctioned public private partnership initiated by the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) which will establish an authoritative standard for calculating and communicating earthquake hazard and risk, and will be designed to serve as the critical instrument to support decisions and actions that reduce earthquake losses worldwide. GEM will integrate developments on the forefront of scientific and engineering knowledge of earthquakes, at global, regional and local scale. The work is organized in three modules: hazard, risk, and socio-economic impact. The hazard module calculates probabilities of earthquake occurrence and resulting shaking at any given location. The risk module calculates fatalities, injuries, and damage based on expected shaking, building vulnerability, and the distribution of population and of exposed values and facilities. The socio-economic impact module delivers tools for making educated decisions to mitigate and manage risk. GEM will be a versatile online tool, with open source code and a map-based graphical interface. The underlying data will be open wherever possible, and its modular input and output will be adapted to multiple user groups: scientists and engineers, risk managers and decision makers in the public and private sectors, and the public-at- large. GEM will be the first global model for seismic risk assessment at a national and regional scale, and aims to achieve broad scientific participation and independence. Its development will occur in a

  16. Earthquake rate and magnitude distributions of great earthquakes for use in global forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagan, Yan Y.; Jackson, David D.

    2016-07-01

    We have obtained new results in the statistical analysis of global earthquake catalogues with special attention to the largest earthquakes, and we examined the statistical behaviour of earthquake rate variations. These results can serve as an input for updating our recent earthquake forecast, known as the `Global Earthquake Activity Rate 1' model (GEAR1), which is based on past earthquakes and geodetic strain rates. The GEAR1 forecast is expressed as the rate density of all earthquakes above magnitude 5.8 within 70 km of sea level everywhere on earth at 0.1 × 0.1 degree resolution, and it is currently being tested by the Collaboratory for Study of Earthquake Predictability. The seismic component of the present model is based on a smoothed version of the Global Centroid Moment Tensor (GCMT) catalogue from 1977 through 2013. The tectonic component is based on the Global Strain Rate Map, a `General Earthquake Model' (GEM) product. The forecast was optimized to fit the GCMT data from 2005 through 2012, but it also fit well the earthquake locations from 1918 to 1976 reported in the International Seismological Centre-Global Earthquake Model (ISC-GEM) global catalogue of instrumental and pre-instrumental magnitude determinations. We have improved the recent forecast by optimizing the treatment of larger magnitudes and including a longer duration (1918-2011) ISC-GEM catalogue of large earthquakes to estimate smoothed seismicity. We revised our estimates of upper magnitude limits, described as corner magnitudes, based on the massive earthquakes since 2004 and the seismic moment conservation principle. The new corner magnitude estimates are somewhat larger than but consistent with our previous estimates. For major subduction zones we find the best estimates of corner magnitude to be in the range 8.9 to 9.6 and consistent with a uniform average of 9.35. Statistical estimates tend to grow with time as larger earthquakes occur. However, by using the moment conservation

  17. The earthquake cycle in subduction zones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melosh, H. J.; Fleitout, L.

    1982-01-01

    A simplified model of a subduction zone is presented, which incorporates the mechanical asymmetry induced by the subducted slab to anchor the subducting plate during post-seismic rebound and thus throw most of the coseismic stream release into the overthrust plate. The model predicts that the trench moves with respect to the deep mantle toward the subducting plate at a velocity equal to one-half of the convergence rate. A strong extensional pulse is propagated into the overthrust plate shortly after the earthquake, and although this extension changes into compression before the next earthquake in the cycle, the period of strong extension following the earthquake may be responsible for extensional tectonic features in the back-arc region.

  18. Controls on Earthquake Rupture and Triggering Mechanisms in Subduction Zones

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    322. Hyndman, R. D., and K. Wang (1993), Thermal constraints on the zone of major thrust earthquake failure: The Cascadia subduction zone , J. Geo- phys...2010-08 DOCTORAL DISSERTATION by Andrea Lesley Llenos June 2010 Controls on Earthquake Rupture and Triggering Mechanisms in Subduction Zones MIT...cited as: Andrea Lesley Llenos, 2010. Controls on Earthquake Rupture and Triggering Mechanisms in Subduction Zones . Ph.D. Thesis. MIT/ WHOI , 2010·08

  19. On subduction zone earthquakes and the Pacific Northwest seismicity

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Dae H.

    1991-12-01

    A short review of subduction zone earthquakes and the seismicity of the Pacific Northwest region of the United States is provided for the purpose of a basis for assessing issues related to earthquake hazard evaluations for the region. This review of seismotectonics regarding historical subduction zone earthquakes and more recent seismological studies pertaining to rupture processes of subduction zone earthquakes, with specific references to the Pacific Northwest, is made in this brief study. Subduction zone earthquakes tend to rupture updip and laterally from the hypocenter. Thus, the rupture surface tends to become more elongated as one considers larger earthquakes (there is limited updip distance that is strongly coupled, whereas rupture length can be quite large). The great Aleutian-Alaska earthquakes of 1957, 1964, and 1965 had rupture lengths of greater than 650 km. The largest earthquake observed instrumentally, the M{sub W} 9.5, 1960 Chile Earthquake, had a rupture length over 1000 km. However, earthquakes of this magnitude are very unlikely on Cascadia. The degree of surface shaking has a very strong dependency on the depth and style of rupture. The rupture surface during a great earthquake shows heterogeneous stress drop, displacement, energy release, etc. The high strength zones are traditionally termed asperities and these asperities control when and how large an earthquake is generated. Mapping of these asperities in specific subduction zones is very difficult before an earthquake. They show up more easily in inversions of dynamic source studies of earthquake ruptures, after an earthquake. Because seismic moment is based on the total radiated-energy from an earthquake, the moment-based magnitude M{sub W} is superior to all other magnitude estimates, such as M{sub L}, m{sub b}, M{sub bLg}, M{sub S}, etc Probably, just to have a common language, non-moment magnitudes should be converted to M{sub W} in any discussions of subduction zone earthquakes.

  20. Earthquake faulting in subduction zones: insights from fault rocks in accretionary prisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ujiie, Kohtaro; Kimura, Gaku

    2014-12-01

    Subduction earthquakes on plate-boundary megathrusts accommodate most of the global seismic moment release, frequently resulting in devastating damage by ground shaking and tsunamis. As many earthquakes occur in deep-sea regions, the dynamics of earthquake faulting in subduction zones is poorly understood. However, the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Nankai Trough Seismogenic Zone Experiment (NanTroSEIZE) and fault rock studies in accretionary prisms exhumed from source depths of subduction earthquakes have greatly improved our understanding of earthquake faulting in subduction zones. Here, we review key advances that have been made over the last decade in the studies of fault rocks and in laboratory experiments using fault zone materials, with a particular focus on the Nankai Trough subduction zone and its on-land analog, the Shimanto accretionary complex in Japan. New insights into earthquake faulting in subduction zones are summarized in terms of the following: (1) the occurrence of seismic slip along velocity-strengthening materials both at shallow and deep depths; (2) dynamic weakening of faults by melt lubrication and fluidization, and possible factors controlling coseismic deformation mechanisms; (3) fluid-rock interactions and mineralogical and geochemical changes during earthquakes; and (4) geological and experimental aspects of slow earthquakes.

  1. Trends in global earthquake loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnst, Isabel; Wenzel, Friedemann; Daniell, James

    2016-04-01

    Based on the CATDAT damage and loss database we analyse global trends of earthquake losses (in current values) and fatalities for the period between 1900 and 2015 from a statistical perspective. For this time period the data are complete for magnitudes above 6. First, we study the basic statistics of losses and find that losses below 10 bl. US satisfy approximately a power law with an exponent of 1.7 for the cumulative distribution. Higher loss values are modelled with the General Pareto Distribution (GPD). The 'transition' between power law and GPD is determined with the Mean Excess Function. We split the data set into a period of pre 1955 and post 1955 loss data as in those periods the exposure is significantly different due to population growth. The Annual Average Loss (AAL) for direct damage for events below 10 bl. US differs by a factor of 6, whereas the incorporation of the extreme loss events increases the AAL from 25 bl. US/yr to 30 bl. US/yr. Annual Average Deaths (AAD) show little (30%) difference for events below 6.000 fatalities and AAD values of 19.000 and 26.000 deaths per year if extreme values are incorporated. With data on the global Gross Domestic Product (GDP) that reflects the annual expenditures (consumption, investment, government spending) and on capital stock we relate losses to the economic capacity of societies and find that GDP (in real terms) grows much faster than losses so that the latter one play a decreasing role given the growing prosperity of mankind. This reasoning does not necessarily apply on a regional scale. Main conclusions of the analysis are that (a) a correct projection of historic loss values to nowadays US values is critical; (b) extreme value analysis is mandatory; (c) growing exposure is reflected in the AAL and AAD results for the periods pre and post 1955 events; (d) scaling loss values with global GDP data indicates that the relative size - from a global perspective - of losses decreases rapidly over time.

  2. Seismic characteristics of outer-rise earthquakes in the different seismic coupling subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hsin-Hua; Lin, Jing-Yi

    2013-04-01

    Characterizing the seismogenic zone of major subduction plate boundaries provides us a possible to reduce large earthquakes hazard. In the past several decades, many scientists have analyzed various geophysical methods and datasets, such as seismic and geodetic ground motion data, historical tsunami deposits, aftershock distributions, and seafloor bathymetry, trying to understand the mechanisms behind great devastating earthquakes, and to estimate the probability of a major earthquake occurrence in the future. In this study, by using the global earthquake catalog (GCMT) from January 1, 1976 to December 31, 2011. We firstly re-examines the outer-rise earthquake model proposed by the Christensen (1988) at the subduction zones suggested to have different coupling levels. The compressive stress cumulated during the subducting processes are often reflected by the occurrence of compressional outer-rise earthquakes. Thus, in the region where the compressional outer-rise earthquakes take place without any corresponding large underthrusting earthquakes, the seismic potential is usually considered to be high. We re-examined the high seismic potential areas determined by this criteria in Christensen (1988) and confirm that the large underthrusting earthquakes did really occur in the 30 years following the appearance of compressional outer-rise events, such as in Tonga region in the vicinity of 20S, a Mw 8.3 large earthquake occurred in 2006. This result represents that the outer-rise earthquake model could be an indicator for the generation of large earthquakes along subduction zones. In addition, to have a more accurate estimation for the seismic potential, we discuss the relationship between the generation of earthquakes and the change of cumulative gravitational potential energy caused by earthquakes (ΔGPE) over time. Our result shows an acceleration of ΔGPE before large earthquakes. Our result also shows that the extensional outer-rise events for strong seismic coupling

  3. 2016 Ecuador earthquake and rupture mode along the Ecuador-Colombia subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumagai, H.; Yoshimoto, M.; Acero, W.; Gabriela, P.; Vasconez, F.; Arrais, S.; Ruiz, M. C.; Alvarado, A. P.; Pedraza, P.; Dionicio, V.; Chamorro, O.; Maeda, Y.; Nakano, M.

    2016-12-01

    A large earthquake (Mw 7.7) occurred on 16 April 2016 within the source region of the 1906 earthquake, which has been interpreted as a megathrust earthquake (Mw 8.8) that ruptured the source regions of smaller earthquakes in 1942 (Mw 7.8), 1958 (Mw 7.7), and 1979 (Mw 8.1). We analyzed the mainshock and aftershocks of the 2016 earthquake using regional broadband seismic data in Ecuador and Colombia. We performed teleseismic slip inversion of the mainshock of the 2016 earthquake using waveform data from the global broadband seismic networks. Our CMT inversion of the 2016 earthquake indicated an Mw 7.7 event with a dip-slip mechanism at a depth of 25 km. Our slip inversion indicated that the rupture propagated from north to south with the maximum slip of 2.2 m. CMT solutions of the aftershocks were characterized dominantly by dip-slip mechanisms, and large aftershocks occurred north and south of the mainshock slip region at shallow depths. The spatial distribution of the 2016 earthquake and its aftershocks correlated with patches of high interplate coupling strength and was similar to the distribution of the 1942 earthquake and aftershocks, suggesting that the 2016 earthquake ruptured the same asperity as the 1942 earthquake for a recurrence interval of 74 years. If this asperity was ruptured by the 1906 earthquake, the 1942 earthquake occurred only 36 years after the 1906 earthquake. Yoshimoto and Kumagai [2016 AGU Meeting] performed tsunami waveform inversion of the 1906 earthquake, which indicated Mw around 8.4 and showed that the main slip occurred near the trench off the source regions of the three historical and 2016 earthquakes. The tsunami inversion results indicate that the 1906 earthquake did not rupture the source region of the 1942 earthquake, which explains the discrepancy in the recurrence interval. These results suggest that the existence of a depth-dependent complex rupture mode along the Ecuador-Colombia subduction zone.

  4. Seismicity as a guide to global tectonics and earthquake prediction.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sykes, L. R.

    1972-01-01

    From seismicity studies, evidence is presented for several aspects of plate-tectonic theory, including ideas of sea-floor spreading, transform faulting and underthrusting of the lithosphere in island arcs. Recent advances in seismic instrumentation, the use of computers in earthquake location, and the installation of local networks of instruments are shown to have vastly increased the data available for seismicity studies. It is pointed out that most of the world's earthquakes are located in very narrow zones along active plate margins and are intimately related to global processes in an extremely coherent manner. Important areas of uncertainty calling for further studies are also pointed out.

  5. Seismicity as a guide to global tectonics and earthquake prediction.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sykes, L. R.

    1972-01-01

    From seismicity studies, evidence is presented for several aspects of plate-tectonic theory, including ideas of sea-floor spreading, transform faulting and underthrusting of the lithosphere in island arcs. Recent advances in seismic instrumentation, the use of computers in earthquake location, and the installation of local networks of instruments are shown to have vastly increased the data available for seismicity studies. It is pointed out that most of the world's earthquakes are located in very narrow zones along active plate margins and are intimately related to global processes in an extremely coherent manner. Important areas of uncertainty calling for further studies are also pointed out.

  6. Low stress drop earthquakes in the rupture zone of the 1992 Nicaragua tsunami earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilek, Susan L.; Rotman, Holly M. M.; Phillips, W. Scott

    2016-10-01

    Tsunami earthquakes, events that generate larger than expected tsunami and are deficient in high-frequency seismic radiation, are rare but hazardous to coastal populations. One model for these events is shallow rupture through low-strength materials. We calculate seismic moment, corner frequency, and stress drop for 216 earthquakes (2.1 < Mw < 4.7, November 2005 to June 2006) within and external to the 1992 Nicaragua tsunami earthquake rupture zone to test the hypothesis that differences in fault zone properties defined the limits of the 1992 tsunami rupture zone and continue to produce spatial variations in earthquake source properties. Mean stress drop of events within the rupture area is 1.2 MPa, and 5.5 MPa for events just outside of the rupture zone, with similar magnitude earthquakes in each group. Our results demonstrate different source parameter characteristics for microseismicity in the region of a past tsunami earthquake.

  7. The Global Earthquake Model - Past, Present, Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolka, Anselm; Schneider, John; Stein, Ross

    2014-05-01

    The Global Earthquake Model (GEM) is a unique collaborative effort that aims to provide organizations and individuals with tools and resources for transparent assessment of earthquake risk anywhere in the world. By pooling data, knowledge and people, GEM acts as an international forum for collaboration and exchange. Sharing of data and risk information, best practices, and approaches across the globe are key to assessing risk more effectively. Through consortium driven global projects, open-source IT development and collaborations with more than 10 regions, leading experts are developing unique global datasets, best practice, open tools and models for seismic hazard and risk assessment. The year 2013 has seen the completion of ten global data sets or components addressing various aspects of earthquake hazard and risk, as well as two GEM-related, but independently managed regional projects SHARE and EMME. Notably, the International Seismological Centre (ISC) led the development of a new ISC-GEM global instrumental earthquake catalogue, which was made publicly available in early 2013. It has set a new standard for global earthquake catalogues and has found widespread acceptance and application in the global earthquake community. By the end of 2014, GEM's OpenQuake computational platform will provide the OpenQuake hazard/risk assessment software and integrate all GEM data and information products. The public release of OpenQuake is planned for the end of this 2014, and will comprise the following datasets and models: • ISC-GEM Instrumental Earthquake Catalogue (released January 2013) • Global Earthquake History Catalogue [1000-1903] • Global Geodetic Strain Rate Database and Model • Global Active Fault Database • Tectonic Regionalisation Model • Global Exposure Database • Buildings and Population Database • Earthquake Consequences Database • Physical Vulnerabilities Database • Socio-Economic Vulnerability and Resilience Indicators • Seismic

  8. A global classification and characterization of earthquake clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaliapin, Ilya; Ben-Zion, Yehuda

    2016-10-01

    We document space-dependent clustering properties of earthquakes with m ≥ 4 in the 1975-2015 worldwide seismic catalogue of the Northern California Earthquake Data Center. Earthquake clusters are identified using a nearest-neighbour distance in time-space-magnitude domain. Multiple cluster characteristics are compared with the heat flow level and type of deformation defined by parameters of the strain rate tensor. The analysis suggests that the dominant type of seismicity clusters in a region depends strongly on the heat flow, while the deformation style and intensity play a secondary role. The results show that there are two dominant types of global clustering: burst-like clusters that represent brittle fracture in relatively cold lithosphere (e.g. shallow events in subduction zones) and swarm-like clusters that represent brittle-ductile deformation in relatively hot lithosphere (e.g. mid-oceanic ridges). The global results are consistent with theoretical expectations and previous analyses of earthquake clustering in southern California based on higher quality catalogues. The observed region-specific deviations from average universal description of seismicity provide important constraints on the physics governing earthquakes and can be used to improve local seismic hazard assessments.

  9. A New Global Classification of Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costain, J. K.; Bollinger, G.

    2010-12-01

    Virtually all naturally-occurring earthquakes fall into one of just two categories: 1) those associated with the dynamics of plate tectonics, or 2) those associated with the elements of the hydrologic cycle ("Hydroseismicity"). Category 1 includes interplate earthquakes triggered by interactions between moving tectonic plates of the Earth. Category 2 includes intraplate and plate-marginal earthquakes triggered in an SOC (self-organized crust) by pore-fluid pressure diffusion associated with rainfall, water-table and reservoir fluctuations, and hurricanes or typhoons. Newly-compiled results from 30 worldwide studies of earthquake-rainfall correlations published over the past 22 years and conducted in both intraplate and plate-marginal environments on five continents provide strong support for Category 2. Many if not most "slow earthquakes" also belong in this category and are a manifestation of pore-fluid pressure diffusion as predicted by Biot's remarkable theory, which describes a slow dilatational wave of pure pore-fluid pressure diffusion in a fluid-saturated porous medium and is characterized by severe attenuation and slow speed (days or months). Liu and others (2009) showed that slow earthquakes in an intraplate setting can be triggered by typhoons. Costain (2008) suggested that the timing of three relatively large intraplate earthquakes in Virginia and West Virginia with respect to hurricanes Camille (1969) and Agnes (1972), together with inferred values of crustal hydraulic diffusivity, was consistent with a causal relationship between the hurricanes and the earthquakes. Thus, recognition of just two categories of naturally-occurring earthquakes allows for a simple global division of seismicity.

  10. Do weak global stresses synchronize earthquakes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendick, R.; Bilham, R.

    2017-08-01

    Insofar as slip in an earthquake is related to the strain accumulated near a fault since a previous earthquake, and this process repeats many times, the earthquake cycle approximates an autonomous oscillator. Its asymmetric slow accumulation of strain and rapid release is quite unlike the harmonic motion of a pendulum and need not be time predictable, but still resembles a class of repeating systems known as integrate-and-fire oscillators, whose behavior has been shown to demonstrate a remarkable ability to synchronize to either external or self-organized forcing. Given sufficient time and even very weak physical coupling, the phases of sets of such oscillators, with similar though not necessarily identical period, approach each other. Topological and time series analyses presented here demonstrate that earthquakes worldwide show evidence of such synchronization. Though numerous studies demonstrate that the composite temporal distribution of major earthquakes in the instrumental record is indistinguishable from random, the additional consideration of event renewal interval serves to identify earthquake groupings suggestive of synchronization that are absent in synthetic catalogs. We envisage the weak forces responsible for clustering originate from lithospheric strain induced by seismicity itself, by finite strains over teleseismic distances, or by other sources of lithospheric loading such as Earth's variable rotation. For example, quasi-periodic maxima in rotational deceleration are accompanied by increased global seismicity at multidecadal intervals.

  11. Studying geodesy and earthquake hazard in and around the New Madrid Seismic Zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boyd, Oliver Salz; Magistrale, Harold

    2011-01-01

    Workshop on New Madrid Geodesy and the Challenges of Understanding Intraplate Earthquakes; Norwood, Massachusetts, 4 March 2011 Twenty-six researchers gathered for a workshop sponsored by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and FM Global to discuss geodesy in and around the New Madrid seismic zone (NMSZ) and its relation to earthquake hazards. The group addressed the challenge of reconciling current geodetic measurements, which show low present-day surface strain rates, with paleoseismic evidence of recent, relatively frequent, major earthquakes in the region. The workshop presentations and conclusions will be available in a forthcoming USGS open-file report (http://pubs.usgs.gov).

  12. Monochromatic body waves excited by great subduction zone earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ihmlé, Pierre F.; Madariaga, Raúl

    Large quasi-monochromatic body waves were excited by the 1995 Chile Mw=8.1 and by the 1994 Kurile Mw=8.3 events. They are observed on vertical/radial component seismograms following the direct P and Pdiff arrivals, at all azimuths. We devise a slant stack algorithm to characterize the source of the oscillations. This technique aims at locating near-source isotropic scatterers using broadband data from global networks. For both events, we find that the oscillations emanate from the trench. We show that these monochromatic waves are due to localized oscillations of the water column. Their period corresponds to the gravest ID mode of a water layer for vertically traveling compressional waves. We suggest that these monochromatic body waves may yield additional constraints on the source process of great subduction zone earthquakes.

  13. Crowd-Sourced Global Earthquake Early Warning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minson, S. E.; Brooks, B. A.; Glennie, C. L.; Murray, J. R.; Langbein, J. O.; Owen, S. E.; Iannucci, B. A.; Hauser, D. L.

    2014-12-01

    Although earthquake early warning (EEW) has shown great promise for reducing loss of life and property, it has only been implemented in a few regions due, in part, to the prohibitive cost of building the required dense seismic and geodetic networks. However, many cars and consumer smartphones, tablets, laptops, and similar devices contain low-cost versions of the same sensors used for earthquake monitoring. If a workable EEW system could be implemented based on either crowd-sourced observations from consumer devices or very inexpensive networks of instruments built from consumer-quality sensors, EEW coverage could potentially be expanded worldwide. Controlled tests of several accelerometers and global navigation satellite system (GNSS) receivers typically found in consumer devices show that, while they are significantly noisier than scientific-grade instruments, they are still accurate enough to capture displacements from moderate and large magnitude earthquakes. The accuracy of these sensors varies greatly depending on the type of data collected. Raw coarse acquisition (C/A) code GPS data are relatively noisy. These observations have a surface displacement detection threshold approaching ~1 m and would thus only be useful in large Mw 8+ earthquakes. However, incorporating either satellite-based differential corrections or using a Kalman filter to combine the raw GNSS data with low-cost acceleration data (such as from a smartphone) decreases the noise dramatically. These approaches allow detection thresholds as low as 5 cm, potentially enabling accurate warnings for earthquakes as small as Mw 6.5. Simulated performance tests show that, with data contributed from only a very small fraction of the population, a crowd-sourced EEW system would be capable of warning San Francisco and San Jose of a Mw 7 rupture on California's Hayward fault and could have accurately issued both earthquake and tsunami warnings for the 2011 Mw 9 Tohoku-oki, Japan earthquake.

  14. A Global Catalog of Calibrated Earthquake Locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeck, W.; Benz, H.; Bergman, E.; Karasozen, E.; Nealy, J. L.; McNamara, D. E.; Hayes, G. P.; Earle, P. S.; Hearne, M. G.

    2016-12-01

    We present a catalog of calibrated earthquake locations, i.e., hypocenters with minimal bias from unknown Earth structure and for which realistic estimates of absolute location uncertainty are given. Calibrated earthquake locations are determined with a multiple event relocation method (Jordan and Sverdrup, 1981) that has been specialized for this purpose. More than 100 globally-distributed earthquake sequences have been relocated and the analysis of additional clusters or sequences is ongoing. Notable recent earthquake mainshock-aftershock sequences that have been calibrated include 2003 M6.6 Bam, Iran; 2008 M6.0 Wells, Nevada; 2010 M8.8 Maule, Chile; 2011 M7.1 Van, Turkey; 2011 M5.8 Mineral, Virginia; 2011 M5.6 Prague, Oklahoma; 2014 M8.2 Iquique, Chile; 2015 M8.3 Illapel, Chile; and 2015 M7.8 Gorkha, Nepal. Epicentral uncertainties in these studies are typically less than 5 km and, in some cases, better than 1 km (e.g., induced seismicity sequences in the central and eastern United States). Focal depths can usually be determined with uncertainty less than 5 km; otherwise focal depths are assigned from independent observations (e.g., from waveform modeling of moment tensors). Origin times are also calibrated, with typical uncertainties of a few tenths of a second. Location calibration at this level of accuracy requires the use of near-source arrival time readings, an appropriate model for local travel times, weighting of data by empirically-determined uncertainties, and careful removal of outlier readings. These relocation studies are of significant value for the study of individual earthquake sequences, but the broader purpose of this catalog is to provide a set of globally distributed "benchmark" locations that can be used as prior constraints in the development of new regional, national, and global earthquake catalogs, or for validation of advanced Earth models and location techniques. Locations and associated phase data, including metadata descriptions of

  15. The earthquake potential of the New Madrid seismic zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tuttle, M.P.; Schweig, E.S.; Sims, J.D.; Lafferty, R.H.; Wolf, L.W.; Haynes, M.L.

    2002-01-01

    The fault system responsible for New Madrid seismicity has generated temporally clustered very large earthquakes in A.D. 900 ?? 100 years and A.D. 1450 ?? 150 years as well as in 1811-1812. Given the uncertainties in dating liquefaction features, the time between the past three New Madrid events may be as short as 200 years and as long as 800 years, with an average of 500 years. This advance in understanding the Late Holocene history of the New Madrid seismic zone and thus, the contemporary tectonic behavior of the associated fault system was made through studies of hundreds of earthquake-induced liquefaction features at more than 250 sites across the New Madrid region. We have found evidence that prehistoric sand blows, like those that formed during the 1811-1812 earthquakes, are probably compound structures resulting from multiple earthquakes closely clustered in time or earthquake sequences. From the spatial distribution and size of sand blows and their sedimentary units, we infer the source zones and estimate the magnitudes of earthquakes within each sequence and thereby characterize the detailed behavior of the fault system. It appears that fault rupture was complex and that the central branch of the seismic zone produced very large earthquakes during the A.D. 900 and A.D. 1450 events as well as in 1811-1812. On the basis of a minimum recurrence rate of 200 years, we are now entering the period during which the next 1811-1812-type event could occur.

  16. Crustal Earthquake Source Zones Within the Anchorage, Alaska Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doser, D. I.; Flores, C.

    2001-12-01

    We are merging the results of waveform modeling, relocation and intensity studies of earthquakes from 1928-present to better define earthquake source zones located within 100 km of Anchorage. Of special interest are large (Mw > 6.4), damaging crustal earthquakes occurring within the North American plate prior to 1964 that produced intensities of VII to VIII in the Anchorage region. Because these earthquakes have smaller magnitudes than the 1964 great Alaskan mainshock, they may have shorter repeat times. Our studies suggest the 1933 Mw 6.9 Upper Cook Inlet earthquake occurred at a depth of 9 km along one of several offshore features exhibiting recent tectonic movement. At present this region shows seismic quiescence at depths above 15 km and a clustering of seismicity at the southwest end of the suspected 1933 rupture zone. Neither the 1933 earthquake or a Mw 7.0 earthquake occurring north of Cook Inlet in 1943 appear to be associated with the Castle Mountain fault or other mapped onshore faults showing Quaternary movement, highlighting the difficulty of identifying seismogenic structures within the Anchorage region. We are currently using Coloumb stress failure modeling to examine the possible effects of the 1933-1943 earthquake sequence on surrounding fault systems. The region of highest pre-1964 crustal seismicity appears to lie above the portion of the plate interface that has experienced maximum post-1964 creep. This may explain the notable lack of occurrence of crustal events of Mw > 5.9 in the region since 1964.

  17. Dependence of earthquake size distributions on convergence rates at subduction zones

    SciTech Connect

    Mccaffrey, R.

    1994-10-01

    The correlation of numbers of thrust earthquakes of moment magnitude 7 or greater in this century at subduction zones with convergence rate results from a combination of lower recurrence intervals for earthquakes of a given size where slip rates are high and peak in the global distribution of subduction zone convergence rates at high values (55 to 90 mm/yr). Hence, physical mechanisms related to convergence rate, such as plate interface force, slab pull, or thermal effects, are not required to explain the distribution of large earthquakes with convergence rate. The seismic coupling coefficient ranges from 10% to 100% at subduction zone segments where convergence is faster than 45 mm/yr but does not correlate with rate. The coefficient is generally orders of magnitude lower at rates below 40 mm/yr which may be due to long recurrence intervals and a short sampling period (94 years).

  18. Subduction zone earthquakes and stress in slabs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vassiliou, M. S.; Hager, B. H.

    1988-01-01

    Simple viscous fluid models of subducting slabs are used to explain observations of the distribution of earthquakes as a function of depth and the orientation of stress axes of deep (greater than 300 km) and intermediate (70-300 km) earthquakes. Results suggest the following features in the distribution of earthquakes with depth: (1) an exponential decrease from shallow depths down to 250 to 300 km, (2) a minimum near 250 to 300 km, and (3) a deep peak below 300 km. Many shallow subducting slabs show only the first characteristic, while deeper extending regions tend to show all three features, with the deep peak varying in position and intensity. These data, combined with the results on the stress orientations of various-depth earthquakes, are consistent with the existence of a barrier of some sort at 670-km depth and a uniform viscosity mantle above this barrier.

  19. Subduction zone earthquakes and stress in slabs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vassiliou, M. S.; Hager, B. H.

    1988-01-01

    Simple viscous fluid models of subducting slabs are used to explain observations of the distribution of earthquakes as a function of depth and the orientation of stress axes of deep (greater than 300 km) and intermediate (70-300 km) earthquakes. Results suggest the following features in the distribution of earthquakes with depth: (1) an exponential decrease from shallow depths down to 250 to 300 km, (2) a minimum near 250 to 300 km, and (3) a deep peak below 300 km. Many shallow subducting slabs show only the first characteristic, while deeper extending regions tend to show all three features, with the deep peak varying in position and intensity. These data, combined with the results on the stress orientations of various-depth earthquakes, are consistent with the existence of a barrier of some sort at 670-km depth and a uniform viscosity mantle above this barrier.

  20. Role of H2O in Generating Subduction Zone Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, A.

    2017-03-01

    A dense nationwide seismic network and high seismic activity in Japan have provided a large volume of high-quality data, enabling high-resolution imaging of the seismic structures defining the Japanese subduction zones. Here, the role of H2O in generating earthquakes in subduction zones is discussed based mainly on recent seismic studies in Japan using these high-quality data. Locations of intermediate-depth intraslab earthquakes and seismic velocity and attenuation structures within the subducted slab provide evidence that strongly supports intermediate-depth intraslab earthquakes, although the details leading to the earthquake rupture are still poorly understood. Coseismic rotations of the principal stress axes observed after great megathrust earthquakes demonstrate that the plate interface is very weak, which is probably caused by overpressured fluids. Detailed tomographic imaging of the seismic velocity structure in and around plate boundary zones suggests that interplate coupling is affected by local fluid overpressure. Seismic tomography studies also show the presence of inclined sheet-like seismic low-velocity, high-attenuation zones in the mantle wedge. These may correspond to the upwelling flow portion of subduction-induced secondary convection in the mantle wedge. The upwelling flows reach the arc Moho directly beneath the volcanic areas, suggesting a direct relationship. H2O originally liberated from the subducted slab is transported by this upwelling flow to the arc crust. The H2O that reaches the crust is overpressured above hydrostatic values, weakening the surrounding crustal rocks and decreasing the shear strength of faults, thereby inducing shallow inland earthquakes. These observations suggest that H2O expelled from the subducting slab plays an important role in generating subduction zone earthquakes both within the subduction zone itself and within the magmatic arc occupying its hanging wall.

  1. Distribution Characteristics of Global Significant Earthquakes and Possible Connection Between Earthquakes and Earth's Variable Rotation Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Li-Hua; Han, Yan-Ben; Yin, Zhi-Qiang

    2007-12-01

    Based on global earthquake catalog released from Paula K. Dunbar et al., the authors investigate distribution characteristics of global significant earthquakes (Ms >=7.5) during 1832-1994, and discuss possible connection between global earthquakes and Earth's variable rotation rate. It is shown that spatial distribution characteristics of earthquakes in this catalog are similar to modern observations, mainly locating in circum-Pacific and Mediterranean-Himalayan seismic belt, and Earth variable rotation rate is highly related to the number of global great earthquakes.

  2. Dynamic Stress Drop of Recent Earthquakes: Variations within Subduction Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruff, L. J.

    Stress drop is a fundamental parameter of earthquakes, but it is difficult to obtain reliable stress drop estimates for most earthquakes. Static stress drop estimates require knowledge of the seismic moment and fault area. Dynamic stress drop estimates are based entirely upon the observed source time functions. Based on analytical formulas that I derive for the crack and slip-pulse rupture models, the amplitude and time of the initial peak in source time functions can be inverted for dynamic stress drop. For multiple event earthquakes, this method only gives the dynamic stress drop of the first event. The Michigan STF catalog provides a uniform data base for all large earthquakes that have occurred in the past four years. Dynamic stress drops are calculated for the nearly 200 events in this catalog, and the resultant estimates scatter between 0.1 and 100 MPa. There is some coherent tectonic signal within this scatter. In the Sanriku (Japan) and Mexico subduction zones, underthrusting earthquakes that occur at the up-dip and down-dip edges of the seismogenic zone have correspondingly low and high values of stress drop. A speculative picture of the stress state of subduction zones emerges from these results. A previous study found that the absolute value of shear stress linearly increases down the seismogenic interface to a value of about 50 MPa at the down-dip edge. In this study, the dynamic stress drop of earthquakes at the up-dip edge is about 0.2 MPa, while large earthquakes at the down-dip edge of the seismogenic plate interface have dynamic stress drops of up to 5 MPa. These results imply that (1) large earthquakes only reduce the shear stress on the plate interface by a small fraction of the absolute level; and thus (2) most of the earthquake energy is partitioned into friction at the plate interface.

  3. Dynamic triggering of low magnitude earthquakes in the Middle American Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escudero, C. R.; Velasco, A. A.

    2010-12-01

    We analyze global and Middle American Subduction Zone (MASZ) seismicity from 1998 to 2008 to quantify the transient stresses effects at teleseismic distances. We use the Bulletin of the International Seismological Centre Catalog (ISCCD) published by the Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology (IRIS). To identify MASZ seismicity changes due to distant, large (Mw >7) earthquakes, we first identify local earthquakes that occurred before and after the mainshocks. We then group the local earthquakes within a cluster radius between 75 to 200 km. We obtain statistics based on characteristics of both mainshocks and local earthquakes clusters, such as local cluster-mainshock azimuth, mainshock focal mechanism, and local earthquakes clusters within the MASZ. Due to lateral variations of the dip along the subducted oceanic plate, we divide the Mexican subduction zone in four segments. We then apply the Paired Samples Statistical Test (PSST) to the sorted data to identify increment, decrement or either in the local seismicity associated with distant large earthquakes. We identify dynamic triggering for all MASZ segments produced by large earthquakes emerging from specific azimuths, as well as, a decrease for some cases. We find no depend of seismicity changes due to focal mainshock mechanism.

  4. 2010 Maule earthquake slip correlates with pre-seismic locking of Andean subduction zone.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Marcos; Rosenau, Matthias; Oncken, Onno

    2010-09-09

    The magnitude-8.8 Maule (Chile) earthquake of 27 February 2010 ruptured a segment of the Andean subduction zone megathrust that has been suspected to be of high seismic potential. It is the largest earthquake to rupture a mature seismic gap in a subduction zone that has been monitored with a dense space-geodetic network before the event. This provides an image of the pre-seismically locked state of the plate interface of unprecedentedly high resolution, allowing for an assessment of the spatial correlation of interseismic locking with coseismic slip. Pre-seismic locking might be used to anticipate future ruptures in many seismic gaps, given the fundamental assumption that locking and slip are similar. This hypothesis, however, could not be tested without the occurrence of the first gap-filling earthquake. Here we show evidence that the 2010 Maule earthquake slip distribution correlates closely with the patchwork of interseismic locking distribution as derived by inversion of global positioning system (GPS) observations during the previous decade. The earthquake nucleated in a region of high locking gradient and released most of the stresses accumulated in the area since the last major event in 1835. Two regions of high seismic slip (asperities) appeared to be nearly fully locked before the earthquake. Between these asperities, the rupture bridged a zone that was creeping interseismically with consistently low coseismic slip. The rupture stopped in areas that were highly locked before the earthquake but where pre-stress had been significantly reduced by overlapping twentieth-century earthquakes. Our work suggests that coseismic slip heterogeneity at the scale of single asperities should indicate the seismic potential of future great earthquakes, which thus might be anticipated by geodetic observations.

  5. Shallow subduction zone earthquakes and their tsunamigenic potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polet, J.; Kanamori, H.

    2000-09-01

    We have examined the source spectra of all shallow subduction zone earthquakes from 1992 to 1996 with moment magnitude 7.0 or greater, as well as some other interesting events, in the period range 1-20s, by computing moment rate functions of teleseismic P waves. After comparing the source spectral characteristics of `tsunami earthquakes' (earthquakes that are followed by tsunamis greater than would be expected from their moment magnitude) with regular events, we identified a subclass of this group: `slow tsunami earthquakes'. This subclass consists of the 1992 Nicaragua, the 1994 Java and the February 1996 Peru earthquakes. We found that these events have an anomalously low energy release in the 1-20s frequency band with respect to their moment magnitude, although their spectral drop-off is comparable to those of the other earthquakes. From an investigation of the centroid and body wave locations, it appears that most earthquakes in this study conformed to a simple model in which the earthquake nucleates in a zone of compacted and dehydrated sediments and ruptures up-dip until the stable sliding friction regime of unconsolidated sediments stops the propagation. Sediment-starved trenches, e.g. near Jalisco, can produce very shallow slip, because the fault material supports unstable sliding. The slow tsunami earthquakes also ruptured up-dip; however, their centroid is located unusually close to the trench axis. The subduction zones in which these events occurred all have a small accretionary prism and a thin layer of subducting sediment. Ocean surveys show that in these regions the ocean floor close to the trench is highly faulted. We suggest that the horst-and-graben structure of a rough subducting oceanic plate will cause contact zones with the overriding plate, making shallow earthquake nucleation and up-dip propagation to the ocean floor possible. The rupture partly propagates in sediments, making the earthquake source process slow. Two factors have to be

  6. Recovering the slip history of a scenario earthquake in the Mexican subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hjorleifsdottir, V.; Perez-Campos, X.; Iglesias, A.; Cruz-Atienza, V.; Ji, C.; Legrand, D.; Husker, A. L.; Kostoglodov, V.; Valdes Gonzalez, C.

    2011-12-01

    The Guerrero segment of the Mexican subduction zone has not experienced a large earthquake for almost 100 years (Singh et al., 1981). Due to its proximity to Mexico City, which was devastated by an earthquake in the more distant Michoacan segment in 1985, it has been studied extensively in recent years. Silent slip events have been observed by a local GPS network (Kostoglodov et al. 2003) and seismic observations from a dense linear array of broadband seismometers (MASE) have provided detailed images of the crustal structure of this part of the subduction zone (see for example Pérez-Campos et al., 2008, Iglesias et al., 2010). Interestingly the part of the fault zone that is locked during the inter-seismic period is thought to reach up to or inland from the coast line. In the event of a large megathrust earthquake, this geometry could allow recordings from above the fault interface. These types of recordings can be critical to resolve the history of slip as a function of time on the fault plane during the earthquake. A well constrained model of slip-time history, together with other observations as mentioned above, could provide very valuable insights into earthquake physics and the earthquake cycle. In order to prepare the scientific response for such an event we generate a scenario earthquake in the Guerrero segment of the subduction zone. We calculate synthetic strong motion records, seismograms for global stations and static offsets on the Earth's surface. To simulate the real data available we add real noise, recorded during times of no earthquake, to the synthetic data. We use a simulated annealing inversion algorithm (Ji et al., 1999) to invert the different datasets and combinations thereof for the time-history of slip on the fault plane. We present the recovery of the slip model using the different datasets, as well as idealized datasets, investigating the expected and best possible levels of recovery.

  7. Radiocarbon test of earthquake magnitude at the Cascadia subduction zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Atwater, B.F.; Stuiver, M.; Yamaguchi, D.K.

    1991-01-01

    THE Cascadia subduction zone, which extends along the northern Pacific coast of North America, might produce earthquakes of magnitude 8 or 9 ('great' earthquakes) even though it has not done so during the past 200 years of European observation 1-7. Much of the evidence for past Cascadia earthquakes comes from former meadows and forests that became tidal mudflats owing to abrupt tectonic subsidence in the past 5,000 years2,3,6,7. If due to a great earthquake, such subsidence should have extended along more than 100 km of the coast2. Here we investigate the extent of coastal subsidence that might have been caused by a single earthquake, through high-precision radiocarbon dating of coastal trees that abruptly subsided into the intertidal zone. The ages leave the great-earthquake hypothesis intact by limiting to a few decades the discordance, if any, in the most recent subsidence of two areas 55 km apart along the Washington coast. This subsidence probably occurred about 300 years ago.

  8. Investigation of the TEC Changes in the vicinity of the Earthquake Preparation Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulukavak, Mustafa; Yalcinkaya, Mualla

    2016-04-01

    Recently, investigation of the anomalies in the ionosphere before the earthquake has taken too much attention. The Total Electron Content (TEC) data has been used to monitor the changes in the ionosphere. Hence, researchers use the TEC changes before the strong earthquakes to monitor the anomalies in the ionosphere. In this study, the GPS-TEC variations, obtained from the GNSS stations in the vicinity of the earthquake preparation zone, was investigated. Nidra earthquake (M6.5), which was occurred on the north-west of Greece on November 17th, 2015 (38.755°N, 20.552°E), was selected for this study. First, the equation proposed by Dobrovolsky et al. (1979) was used to calculate the radius of the earthquake preparation zone. International GNSS Service (IGS) stations in the region were classified with respect to the radius of the earthquake preparation zone. The observation data of each station was obtained from the Crustal Dynamics Data and Information System (CDDIS) archive to estimate GPS-TEC variations between 16 October 2015 and 16 December 2015. Global Ionosphere Maps (GIM) products, obtained from the IGS, was used to check the robustness of the GPS-TEC variations. Possible anomalies were analyzed for each GNSS station by using the 15-day moving median method. In order to analyze these pre-earthquake ionospheric anomalies, we investigated three indices (Kp, F10.7 and Dst) related to the space weather conditions between 16 October 2015 and 16 December 2015. Solar and geomagnetic indices were obtained from The Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), The Canadian Space Weather Forecast Centre (CSWFC), and the Data Analysis Center for Geomagnetism and Space Magnetism Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University (WDC). This study aims at investigating the possible effects of the earthquake on the TEC variations.

  9. Apparent stress, fault maturity and seismic hazard for normal-fault earthquakes at subduction zones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Choy, G.L.; Kirby, S.H.

    2004-01-01

    The behavior of apparent stress for normal-fault earthquakes at subduction zones is derived by examining the apparent stress (?? a = ??Es/Mo, where E s is radiated energy and Mo is seismic moment) of all globally distributed shallow (depth, ?? 1 MPa) are also generally intraslab, but occur where the lithosphere has just begun subduction beneath the overriding plate. They usually occur in cold slabs near trenches where the direction of plate motion across the trench is oblique to the trench axis, or where there are local contortions or geometrical complexities of the plate boundary. Lower ??a (< 1 MPa) is associated with events occurring at the outer rise (OR) complex (between the OR and the trench axis), as well as with intracrustal events occurring just landward of the trench. The average apparent stress of intraslab-normal-fault earthquakes is considerably higher than the average apparent stress of interplate-thrust-fault earthquakes. In turn, the average ?? a of strike-slip earthquakes in intraoceanic environments is considerably higher than that of intraslab-normal-fault earthquakes. The variation of average ??a with focal mechanism and tectonic regime suggests that the level of ?? a is related to fault maturity. Lower stress drops are needed to rupture mature faults such as those found at plate interfaces that have been smoothed by large cumulative displacements (from hundreds to thousands of kilometres). In contrast, immature faults, such as those on which intraslab-normal-fault earthquakes generally occur, are found in cold and intact lithosphere in which total fault displacement has been much less (from hundreds of metres to a few kilometres). Also, faults on which high ??a oceanic strike-slip earthquakes occur are predominantly intraplate or at evolving ends of transforms. At subduction zones, earthquakes occurring on immature faults are likely to be more hazardous as they tend to generate higher amounts of radiated energy per unit of moment than

  10. Pore fluid pressure in impermeable fault zones throughout earthquake cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, A. S.; Barbot, S.; Moore, J. D. P.; Lambert, V.

    2016-12-01

    Earthquakes affect the pore pressure in the crust, leading to dynamic changes in the water table and deformation of the surrounding rocks. Variations in pore pressure can have a strong effect on fault strength and modulate the earthquake cycle, potentially affecting the recurrence and the magnitude of seismicity. Poroelastic rebound has been observed following large and moderate earthquakes but its effect has been challenging to incorporate in time-dependent dynamic models of earthquake cycles, or even in dynamic models of postseismic relaxation. Here, we present a new methodology to incorporate the pore fluid diffusion and poroelastic effects in quasi-dynamic models of slip evolution. We study the case of a dipping thrust fault surrounded by an impermeable fault zone in plane strain condition. The solution method employs newly derived analytic solutions for the stress interactions caused by isotropic strain in finite volume of deformation. We use the integral method to solve the coupled governing equations of poroelasticity and fault slip evolution. We consider the full coupling of fault strength with pore pressure and solve for the evolution of the water table throughout multiple earthquake cycles. We then present simulations of postseismic rebound in the case of three-dimensional deformation following thrust and strike-slip earthquakes on finite faults. Our formulation opens the door to assimilating time-dependent deformation and pore pressure data to constrain the physical properties of crustal rocks. Our approach constitutes an important step towards a unified representation of all the important mechanisms of deformation throughout the earthquake cycle.

  11. Large earthquake processes in the northern Vanuatu subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleveland, K. Michael; Ammon, Charles J.; Lay, Thorne

    2014-12-01

    The northern Vanuatu (formerly New Hebrides) subduction zone (11°S to 14°S) has experienced large shallow thrust earthquakes with Mw > 7 in 1966 (MS 7.9, 7.3), 1980 (Mw 7.5, 7.7), 1997 (Mw 7.7), 2009 (Mw 7.7, 7.8, 7.4), and 2013 (Mw 8.0). We analyze seismic data from the latter four earthquake sequences to quantify the rupture processes of these large earthquakes. The 7 October 2009 earthquakes occurred in close spatial proximity over about 1 h in the same region as the July 1980 doublet. Both sequences activated widespread seismicity along the northern Vanuatu subduction zone. The focal mechanisms indicate interplate thrusting, but there are differences in waveforms that establish that the events are not exact repeats. With an epicenter near the 1980 and 2009 events, the 1997 earthquake appears to have been a shallow intraslab rupture below the megathrust, with strong southward directivity favoring a steeply dipping plane. Some triggered interplate thrusting events occurred as part of this sequence. The 1966 doublet ruptured north of the 1980 and 2009 events and also produced widespread aftershock activity. The 2013 earthquake rupture propagated southward from the northern corner of the trench with shallow slip that generated a substantial tsunami. The repeated occurrence of large earthquake doublets along the northern Vanuatu subduction zone is remarkable considering the doublets likely involved overlapping, yet different combinations of asperities. The frequent occurrence of large doublet events and rapid aftershock expansion in this region indicate the presence of small, irregularly spaced asperities along the plate interface.

  12. The 1945 Balochistan earthquake and probabilistic tsunami hazard assessment for the Makran subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höchner, Andreas; Babeyko, Andrey; Zamora, Natalia

    2014-05-01

    Iran and Pakistan are countries quite frequently affected by destructive earthquakes. For instance, the magnitude 6.6 Bam earthquake in 2003 in Iran with about 30'000 casualties, or the magnitude 7.6 Kashmir earthquake 2005 in Pakistan with about 80'000 casualties. Both events took place inland, but in terms of magnitude, even significantly larger events can be expected to happen offshore, at the Makran subduction zone. This small subduction zone is seismically rather quiescent, but a tsunami caused by a thrust event in 1945 (Balochistan earthquake) led to about 4000 casualties. Nowadays, the coastal regions are more densely populated and vulnerable to similar events. Additionally, some recent publications raise the question of the possiblity of rare but huge magnitude 9 events at the Makran subduction zone. We first model the historic Balochistan event and its effect in terms of coastal wave heights, and then generate various synthetic earthquake and tsunami catalogs including the possibility of large events in order to asses the tsunami hazard at the affected coastal regions. Finally, we show how an effective tsunami early warning could be achieved by the use of an array of high-precision real-time GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite System) receivers along the coast.

  13. Repeating earthquakes analysis in the Taiwan-Ryukyu subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Y. E.; Chen, K. H.; Chen, S.

    2012-12-01

    The understanding of interplate slip has been limited in the Taiwan-Ryukyu subduction zone due to sparse sampling of seismic and geodetic stations. Repeating earthquakes study has been proposed to improve the understanding of deep fault behavior. However, in this particular regions where spatial coverage of seismic station is sparse and one sided with high noise level or where starting catalog origin times are inaccurate; establishing waveform cross-correlation method (wcc) for rapid detection of repeating earthquakes is problematic. When the wcc method is applied over a large area of 100 Km x 300 km for M>2 earthquakes at a depth range of 0-50 km (12932 events in total), a large number of false detections occurred due to low-amplitude signal templates. This leads additional time-consumingefforts on manual re-identification. In this study we propose an efficient repeating sequence identification scheme in the regions where the station coverage is sparse with low signal to noise ratio. Using this identification method, we found 9 (M2.5~4.5) interplate repeating sequences in the Taiwan-Ryukyu subduction zone at 35-45 km depth. The interplate repeating earthquakes tend to be short-lived in the form of doublet or multiplet, which the association between doublet/multiplet generation and subduction zone processes requires further study. Other crustal repeating earthquakes occurred at shallow depth above 20 km; these sequences have occurrence rate strongly associated with the nearby M6 earthquakes. This identification scheme will be applied to deeper events (> 50 km depth) for a more complete image of spatial and temporal distribution of interpolate aseismic slip in the Taiwan-Ryukyu subduction zone .

  14. Empirical relationships between instrumental ground motions and observed intensities for two great Chilean subduction zone earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cilia, M. G.; Baker, L. M.

    2015-12-01

    We determine empirical relationships between instrumental peak ground motions and observed intensities for two great Chilean subduction earthquakes: the 2010 Mw8.8 Maule earthquake and the 2014 Mw8.2 Iquique earthquake. Both occurred immediately offshore on the primary plate boundary interface between the Nazca and South America plates. They are among the largest earthquakes to be instrumentally recorded; the 2010 Maule event is the second largest earthquake to produce strong motion recordings. Ground motion to intensity conversion equations (GMICEs) are used to reconstruct the distribution of shaking for historical earthquakes by using intensities estimated from contemporary accounts. Most great (M>8) earthquakes, like these, occur within subduction zones, yet few GMICEs exist for subduction earthquakes. It is unclear whether GMICEs developed for active crustal regions, such as California, can be scaled up to the large M of subduction zone events, or if new data sets must be analyzed to develop separate subduction GMICEs. To address this question, we pair instrumental peak ground motions, both acceleration (PGA) and velocity (PGV), with intensities derived from onsite surveys of earthquake damage made in the weeks after the events and internet-derived felt reports. We fit a linear predictive equation between the geometric mean of the maximum PGA or PGV of the two horizontal components and intensity, using linear least squares. We use a weighting scheme to express the uncertainty of the pairings based on a station's proximity to the nearest intensity observation. The intensity data derived from the onsite surveys is a complete, high-quality investigation of the earthquake damage. We perform the computations using both the survey data and community decimal intensities (CDI) calculated from felt reports volunteered by citizens (USGS "Did You Feel It", DYFI) and compare the results. We compare the GMICEs we developed to the most widely used GMICEs from California and

  15. An atlas of ShakeMaps for selected global earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allen, Trevor I.; Wald, David J.; Hotovec, Alicia J.; Lin, Kuo-Wan; Earle, Paul S.; Marano, Kristin D.

    2008-01-01

    An atlas of maps of peak ground motions and intensity 'ShakeMaps' has been developed for almost 5,000 recent and historical global earthquakes. These maps are produced using established ShakeMap methodology (Wald and others, 1999c; Wald and others, 2005) and constraints from macroseismic intensity data, instrumental ground motions, regional topographically-based site amplifications, and published earthquake-rupture models. Applying the ShakeMap methodology allows a consistent approach to combine point observations with ground-motion predictions to produce descriptions of peak ground motions and intensity for each event. We also calculate an estimated ground-motion uncertainty grid for each earthquake. The Atlas of ShakeMaps provides a consistent and quantitative description of the distribution and intensity of shaking for recent global earthquakes (1973-2007) as well as selected historic events. As such, the Atlas was developed specifically for calibrating global earthquake loss estimation methodologies to be used in the U.S. Geological Survey Prompt Assessment of Global Earthquakes for Response (PAGER) Project. PAGER will employ these loss models to rapidly estimate the impact of global earthquakes as part of the USGS National Earthquake Information Center's earthquake-response protocol. The development of the Atlas of ShakeMaps has also led to several key improvements to the Global ShakeMap system. The key upgrades include: addition of uncertainties in the ground motion mapping, introduction of modern ground-motion prediction equations, improved estimates of global seismic-site conditions (VS30), and improved definition of stable continental region polygons. Finally, we have merged all of the ShakeMaps in the Atlas to provide a global perspective of earthquake ground shaking for the past 35 years, allowing comparison with probabilistic hazard maps. The online Atlas and supporting databases can be found at http://earthquake.usgs.gov/eqcenter/shakemap/atlas.php/.

  16. Detailed seismotectonic analysis of Sumatra subduction zone revealed by high precision earthquake location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagala, Ricardo Alfencius; Harjadi, P. J. Prih; Heryandoko, Nova; Sianipar, Dimas

    2017-07-01

    Sumatra was one of the most high seismicity regions in Indonesia. The subduction of Indo-Australian plate beneath Eurasian plate in western Sumatra contributes for many significant earthquakes that occur in this area. These earthquake events can be used to analyze the seismotectonic of Sumatra subduction zone and its system. In this study we use teleseismic double-difference method to obtain more high precision earthquake distribution in Sumatra subduction zone. We use a 3D nested regional-global velocity model. We use a combination of data from both of ISC (International Seismological Center) and BMKG (Agency for Meteorology Climatology and Geophysics, Indonesia). We successfully relocate about 6886 earthquakes that occur on period of 1981-2015. We consider that this new location is more precise than the regular bulletin. The relocation results show greatly reduced of RMS residual of travel time. Using this data, we can construct a new seismotectonic map of Sumatra. A well-built geometry of subduction slab, faults and volcano arc can be obtained from the new bulletin. It is also showed that at a depth of 140-170 km, there is many events occur as moderate-to-deep earthquakes, and we consider about the relation of the slab's events with volcanic arc and inland fault system. A reliable slab model is also built from regression equation using new relocated data. We also analyze the spatial-temporal of seismotectonic using b-value mapping that inspected in detail horizontally and vertically cross-section.

  17. Great earthquakes of variable magnitude at the Cascadia subduction zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, A.R.; Kelsey, H.M.; Witter, R.C.

    2006-01-01

    Comparison of histories of great earthquakes and accompanying tsunamis at eight coastal sites suggests plate-boundary ruptures of varying length, implying great earthquakes of variable magnitude at the Cascadia subduction zone. Inference of rupture length relies on degree of overlap on radiocarbon age ranges for earthquakes and tsunamis, and relative amounts of coseismic subsidence and heights of tsunamis. Written records of a tsunami in Japan provide the most conclusive evidence for rupture of much of the plate boundary during the earthquake of 26 January 1700. Cascadia stratigraphic evidence dating from about 1600??cal yr B.P., similar to that for the 1700 earthquake, implies a similarly long rupture with substantial subsidence and a high tsunami. Correlations are consistent with other long ruptures about 1350??cal yr B.P., 2500??cal yr B.P., 3400??cal yr B.P., 3800??cal yr B.P., 4400??cal yr B.P., and 4900??cal yr B.P. A rupture about 700-1100??cal yr B.P. was limited to the northern and central parts of the subduction zone, and a northern rupture about 2900??cal yr B.P. may have been similarly limited. Times of probable short ruptures in southern Cascadia include about 1100??cal yr B.P., 1700??cal yr B.P., 3200??cal yr B.P., 4200??cal yr B.P., 4600??cal yr B.P., and 4700??cal yr B.P. Rupture patterns suggest that the plate boundary in northern Cascadia usually breaks in long ruptures during the greatest earthquakes. Ruptures in southernmost Cascadia vary in length and recurrence intervals more than ruptures in northern Cascadia.

  18. Earthquakes associated with diffuse zones of deformation in the oceanic lithosphere: some examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang-Ping, Chen; Grimison, Nina L.

    1989-09-01

    We review the results of source parameters of earthquakes associated with the eastern end of the Azores-Gibraltar plate boundary, the Davie ridge near Madagascar, and the Horizon bank in the north Fiji basin to characterize the nature of present-day tectonics in diffuse zones of deformation in the oceanic lithosphere. In comparison with typical plate boundaries, diffuse zones of deformation are in general characterized by complex morphological expressions and scattered seismicity of up to several hundred kilometers width. Although the average rate of displacement across these regions is not resolvable by current models of global plate reconstruction, the deformation is not truly intraplate in nature because strain is concentrated and often distinct tectonic boundaries can be identified. Earthquakes with seismic moments as large as 8 × 10 20 Nm have occurred in bands of scattered seismicity that are associated with diffuse zones of deformation in the oceanic lithosphere. In two cases, the zones of diffuse deformation continue into the continental lithosphere east of Gibraltar and north of the Davie ridge. However, the largest earthquakes occur in the oceanic part of these two zones. In contrast to previous reports, the depth of earthquakes is quite shallow (< 15 km) near the Horizon bank (also known as the Hazel-Holme fracture zone) where the predominant mode of deformation is strike-slip motion. This zone is an important tectonic feature in the southwestern Pacific because the rate of seismic strain release along it in recent years is several orders of magnitude higher than that of a proposed nascent plate boundary north of the north Fiji basin. The maximum focal depth reaches about 50 km in the zone of ocean-ocean collision on the eastern end of the Azores-Gibraltar plate boundary where most of the mechanical lithosphere must have been broken during large earthquakes. Focal depths of up to 35 km were observed beneath ocean floors of Mesozoic age at the zone of

  19. Source Mechanisms of Destructive Tsunamigenic Earthquakes occurred along the Major Subduction Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yolsal-Çevikbilen, Seda; Taymaz, Tuncay; Ulutaş, Ergin

    2016-04-01

    Subduction zones, where an oceanic plate is subducted down into the mantle by tectonic forces, are potential tsunami locations. Many big, destructive and tsunamigenic earthquakes (Mw > 7.5) and high amplitude tsunami waves are observed along the major subduction zones particularly near Indonesia, Japan, Kuril and Aleutan Islands, Gulf of Alaska, Southern America. Not all earthquakes are tsunamigenic; in order to generate a tsunami, the earthquake must occur under or near the ocean, be large, and create significant vertical movements of the seafloor. It is also known that tsunamigenic earthquakes release their energy over a couple of minutes, have long source time functions and slow-smooth ruptures. In this study, we performed point-source inversions by using teleseismic long-period P- and SH- and broad-band P-waveforms recorded by the Federation of Digital Seismograph Networks (FDSN) and the Global Digital Seismograph Network (GDSN) stations. We obtained source mechanism parameters and finite-fault slip distributions of recent destructive ten earthquakes (Mw ≥ 7.5) by comparing the shapes and amplitudes of long period P- and SH-waveforms, recorded in the distance range of 30° - 90°, with synthetic waveforms. We further obtained finite-fault rupture histories of those earthquakes to determine the faulting area (fault length and width), maximum displacement, rupture duration and stress drop. We applied a new back-projection method that uses teleseismic P-waveforms to integrate the direct P-phase with reflected phases from structural discontinuities near the source, and customized it to estimate the spatio-temporal distribution of the seismic energy release of earthquakes. Inversion results exhibit that recent tsunamigenic earthquakes show dominantly thrust faulting mechanisms with small amount of strike-slip components. Their focal depths are also relatively shallow (h < 40 km). As an example, the September 16, 2015 Illapel (Chile) earthquake (Mw: 8.3; h: 26 km

  20. The 2012 Mw5.6 earthquake in Sofia seismogenic zone - is it a slow earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raykova, Plamena; Solakov, Dimcho; Slavcheva, Krasimira; Simeonova, Stela; Aleksandrova, Irena

    2017-04-01

    Recently our understanding of tectonic faulting has been shaken by the discoveries of seismic tremor, low frequency earthquakes, slow slip events, and other models of fault slip. These phenomenas represent models of failure that were thought to be non-existent and theoretically impossible only a few years ago. Slow earthquakes are seismic phenomena in which the rupture of geological faults in the earth's crust occurs gradually without creating strong tremors. Despite the growing number of observations of slow earthquakes their origin remains unresolved. Studies show that the duration of slow earthquakes ranges from a few seconds to a few hundred seconds. The regular earthquakes with which most people are familiar release a burst of built-up stress in seconds, slow earthquakes release energy in ways that do little damage. This study focus on the characteristics of the Mw5.6 earthquake occurred in Sofia seismic zone on May 22nd, 2012. The Sofia area is the most populated, industrial and cultural region of Bulgaria that faces considerable earthquake risk. The Sofia seismic zone is located in South-western Bulgaria - the area with pronounce tectonic activity and proved crustal movement. In 19th century the city of Sofia (situated in the centre of the Sofia seismic zone) has experienced two strong earthquakes with epicentral intensity of 10 MSK. During the 20th century the strongest event occurred in the vicinity of the city of Sofia is the 1917 earthquake with MS=5.3 (I0=7-8 MSK64).The 2012 quake occurs in an area characterized by a long quiescence (of 95 years) for moderate events. Moreover, a reduced number of small earthquakes have also been registered in the recent past. The Mw5.6 earthquake is largely felt on the territory of Bulgaria and neighbouring countries. No casualties and severe injuries have been reported. Mostly moderate damages were observed in the cities of Pernik and Sofia and their surroundings. These observations could be assumed indicative for a

  1. On the feedback between forearc tectonics and megathrust earthquakes in subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenau, M.; Oncken, O.

    2009-04-01

    An increasing number of observations suggest an intrinsic relationship between short- and long-term, elastic and plastic deformation processes in subduction zones. These include the global correlation between megathrust earthquake slip patterns with morphotectonic forearc features and the historical predominance of giant earthquakes (M > 9) along accretionary margins (e.g., Chile, Alaska, Cascadia, Sumatra). Here we explore experimentally the feedback between forearc tectonics and megathrust earthquakes. We use compressive granular wedges overlying a rate-and-state dependent frictional interface as analog models of subduction zone forearcs. We simulate and analyze seismotectonic deformation time-series with respect to the accumulation of permanent strain and the evolution of the frequency-size distributions of associated megathrust earthquakes. Over multiple seismic cycles deformation in the overriding plate localizes at the downdip limit of the seismogenic zone in form of a backthrust. A shallow velocity strengthening interface sustains strain localization near the wedge tip. This results in a structural segmentation of the wedge with an elastic domain overlying the seismogenic zone enclosed by plastically shortened domains corresponding to the accretionary wedge/outer arc high and coastal high in nature. Along with the evolution of the wedges from internally deforming wedges to segmented wedges the analog megathrust seismicity develops from random, Gutenberg-Richter like distributed events towards deterministic, periodic events. Accordingly, the frequency distribution of earthquakes becomes narrower as the models evolve from plastic to elastic. Because the width of the frequency distribution controls the length of the time window during which an event can be triggered by a nearby event, this indicates that the probability of synchronous failure of neighboring segments in a single giant event is generally higher along plastically deforming margins than along

  2. Compiling the 'Global Earthquake History' (1000-1903)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albini, P.; Musson, R.; Locati, M.; Rovida, A.

    2013-12-01

    The study of historical earthquakes from historical sources, or historical seismology, is of wider interest than just the seismic hazard and risk community. In the scope of the two-year project (October 2010-March 2013) "Global Earthquake History", developed in the framework of GEM, a reassessment of world historical seismicity was made, from available published studies. The scope of the project is the time window 1000-1903, with magnitudes 7.0 and above. Events with lower magnitudes are included on a case by case, or region by region, basis. The Global Historical Earthquake Archive (GHEA) provides a complete account of the global situation in historical seismology. From GHEA, the Global Historical Earthquake Catalogue (GHEC, v1, available at http://www.emidius.eu/GEH/, under Creative Commons licence) was derived, i.e. a world catalogue of earthquakes for the period 1000-1903, with magnitude 7 and over, using publically-available materials, as for the Archive. This is intended to be the best global historical catalogue of large earthquakes presently available, with the best parameters selected, duplications and fakes removed, and in some cases, new earthquakes discovered. GHEA and GHEC are conceived as providing a basis for co-ordinating future research into historical seismology in any part of the world, and hopefully, encouraging new historical earthquake research initiatives that will continue to improve the information available.

  3. Earthquakes, fluid pressures and rapid subduction zone metamorphism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viete, D. R.

    2013-12-01

    High-pressure/low-temperature (HP/LT) metamorphism is commonly incomplete, meaning that large tracts of rock can remain metastable at blueschist- and eclogite-facies conditions for timescales up to millions of years [1]. When HP/LT metamorphism does take place, it can occur over extremely short durations (<<1 Myr) [1-2]. HP/LT metamorphism must be associated with processes that allow large volumes of rock to remain unaffected over long periods of time, but then suddenly undergo localized metamorphism. Existing models for HP/LT metamorphism have focussed on the role of fluids in providing heat for metamorphism [2] or catalyzing metamorphic reactions [1]. Earthquakes in subduction zone settings can occur to depths of 100s of km. Metamorphic dehydration and the associated development of elevated pore pressures in HP/LT metamorphic rocks has been identified as a cause of earthquake activity at such great depths [3-4]. The process of fracturing/faulting significantly increases rock permeability, causing channelized fluid flow and dissipation of pore pressures [3-4]. Thus, deep subduction zone earthquakes are thought to reflect an evolution in fluid pressure, involving: (1) an initial increase in pore pressure by heating-related dehydration of subduction zone rocks, and (2) rapid relief of pore pressures by faulting and channelized flow. Models for earthquakes at depth in subduction zones have focussed on the in situ effects of dehydration and then sudden escape of fluids from the rock mass following fracturing [3-4]. On the other hand, existing models for rapid and incomplete metamorphism in subduction zones have focussed only on the effects of heating and/or hydration with the arrival of external fluids [1-2]. Significant changes in pressure over very short timescales should result in rapid mineral growth and/or disequilibrium texture development in response to overstepping of mineral reaction boundaries. The repeated process of dehydration-pore pressure development-earthquake

  4. Earthquake supercycle in subduction zones controlled by the downdip width of the seismogenic zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrendörfer, Robert; van Dinther, Ylona; Gerya, Taras; Dalguer, Luis Angel

    2015-04-01

    Supercycles describe a long-term cluster of megathrust earthquakes that consist of partial ruptures before a complete failure of a subduction zone segment (Sieh et al. 2008, Goldfinger et al. 2013). The controls on supercycles remain unclear, although structural or fault frictional heterogeneities were proposed (Sieh et al. 2008). We recognize that supercycles have been suggested in those subduction zones (Sieh et al. 2008, Goldfinger et al. 2013, Metois et al. 2014, Chlieh et al. 2014) for which the seismogenic zone downdip width is estimated (Heuret et al. 2011, Hayes et al. 2012, Hayes et al. 2013) to be larger than average. Here we assess this potential link between the seismogenic zone downdip width and supercycles. For this purpose we use the continuum-based seismo-mechanical model of megathrust earthquake cycles in subduction zones (Van Dinther et al. 2013), which was validated through a comparison against scaled analogue subduction experiments (Corbi et al. 2013). The two-dimensional numerical model setup consists of a visco-elastic wedge underthrusted by a rigid plate and a frictional boundary layer simulating the megathrust. In this boundary layer, we evaluate a non-associative Drucker-Prager plasticity with pressure dependent yield strength and a strongly rate-dependent friction formulation. The velocity-weakening seismogenic zone with a downdip width W is limited up-and downdip by velocity-strengthening regions. In our numerical models, an increasing seismogenic zone downdip width leads to a transition from ordinary cycles of similar sized complete ruptures to supercycles. For supercycles in wide seismogenic zones, we demonstrate how interseismic deformation accompanied by partial ruptures effectively increases the stress throughout the seismogenic zone until a crack-like superevent releases most of the accumulated stresses. Our findings suggest that supercycles are more likely to occur in subduction zones with a large seismogenic downdip width due to a

  5. The Himalayan Seismogenic Zone: A New Frontier for Earthquake Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Larry; Hubbard, Judith; Karplus, Marianne; Klemperer, Simon; Sato, Hiroshi

    2016-04-01

    The Mw 7.8 Gorkha, Nepal, earthquake that occurred on April 25 of this year was a dramatic reminder that great earthquakes are not restricted to the large seismogenic zones associated with subduction of oceanic lithosphere. Not only does Himalayan seismogenesis represents important scientific and societal issues in its own right, it constitutes a reference for evaluating general models of the earthquake cycle derived from the studies of the oceanic subduction systems. This presentation reports results of a Mini-Workshop sponsored by the GeoPrisms project that was held in conjunction with the American Geophysical Union on December 15, 2015, designed to organize a new initiative to study the great Himalaya earthquake machine. The Himalayan seismogenic zone shares with its oceanic counterparts a number of fundamental questions, including: a) What controls the updip and downdip limits of rupture? b) What controls the lateral segmentation of rupture zones (and hence magnitude)? c) What is the role of fluids in facilitating slip and or rupture? d) What nucleates rupture (e..g. asperities?)? e) What physical properties can be monitored as precursors to future events? f) How effectively can the radiation pattern of future events be modeled? g) How can a better understanding of Himalayan rupture be translated into more cost effective preparations for the next major event in this region? However the underthrusting of continental, as opposed to oceanic, lithosphere in the Himalayas frames these questions in a very different context: h) How does the greater thickness and weaker rheology of continental crust/lithosphere affect locking of the seismogenic zone? i) How does the different thermal structure of continental vs oceanic crust affect earthquake geodynamics? j) Are fluids a significant factor in intercontinental thrusting? k) How does the basement morphology of underthrust continental crust affect locking/creep, and how does it differ from the oceanic case? l) What is the

  6. Detection capability of global earthquakes influenced by large intermediate-depth and deep earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwata, T.

    2011-12-01

    This study examined the detection capability of the global CMT catalogue immediately after a large intermediate-depth (70 < depth ≤ 300 km) or deep (300 km < depth) earthquake. Iwata [2008, GJI] have revealed that the detection capability is remarkably lower than ordinary one for several hours after the occurrence of a large shallow (depth ≤ 70 km) earthquake. Since the global CMT catalogue plays an important role in studies on global earthquake forecasting or seismicity pattern [e.g., Kagan and Jackson, 2010, Pageoph], the characteristic of the catalogue should be investigated carefully. We stacked global shallow earthquake sequences, which are taken from the global CMT catalogue from 1977 to 2010, after a large intermediate-depth or deep earthquake. Then, we utilized a statistical model representing an observed magnitude-frequency distribution of earthquakes [e.g., Ringdal, 1975, BSSA; Ogata and Katsura, 1993, GJI]. The applied model is a product of the Gutenberg-Richter law and a detection rate function q(M). Following previous studies, the cumulative distribution of the normal distribution was used as q(M). This model enables us to estimate μ, the magnitude where the detection rate of earthquake is 50 per cent. Finally, a Bayesian approach with a piecewise linear approximation [Iwata, 2008, GJI] was applied to this stacked data to estimate the temporal change of μ. Consequently, we found a significantly lowered detection capability after a intermediate-depth or deep earthquake of which magnitude is 6.5 or larger. The lowered detection capability lasts for several hours or one-half day. During this period of low detection capability, a few per cent of M ≥ 6.0 earthquakes or a few tens percent of M ≥ 5.5 earthquakes are undetected in the global CMT catalogue while the magnitude completeness threshold of the catalogue was estimated to be around 5.5 [e.g., Kagan, 2003, PEPI].

  7. Earthquake Hazard in the New Madrid Seismic Zone Remains a Concern

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frankel, A.D.; Applegate, D.; Tuttle, M.P.; Williams, R.A.

    2009-01-01

    There is broad agreement in the scientific community that a continuing concern exists for a major destructive earthquake in the New Madrid seismic zone. Many structures in Memphis, Tenn., St. Louis, Mo., and other communities in the central Mississippi River Valley region are vulnerable and at risk from severe ground shaking. This assessment is based on decades of research on New Madrid earthquakes and related phenomena by dozens of Federal, university, State, and consulting earth scientists. Considerable interest has developed recently from media reports that the New Madrid seismic zone may be shutting down. These reports stem from published research using global positioning system (GPS) instruments with results of geodetic measurements of strain in the Earth's crust. Because of a lack of measurable strain at the surface in some areas of the seismic zone over the past 14 years, arguments have been advanced that there is no buildup of stress at depth within the New Madrid seismic zone and that the zone may no longer pose a significant hazard. As part of the consensus-building process used to develop the national seismic hazard maps, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) convened a workshop of experts in 2006 to evaluate the latest findings in earthquake hazards in the Eastern United States. These experts considered the GPS data from New Madrid available at that time that also showed little to no ground movement at the surface. The experts did not find the GPS data to be a convincing reason to lower the assessment of earthquake hazard in the New Madrid region, especially in light of the many other types of data that are used to construct the hazard assessment, several of which are described here.

  8. Statistical characteristics of seismo-ionospheric GPS TEC disturbances prior to global Mw ≥ 5.0 earthquakes (1998-2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Munawar; Jin, Shuanggen

    2015-12-01

    Pre-earthquake ionospheric anomalies are still challenging and unclear to obtain and understand, particularly for different earthquake magnitudes and focal depths as well as types of fault. In this paper, the seismo-ionospheric disturbances (SID) related to global earthquakes with 1492 Mw ≥ 5.0 from 1998 to 2014 are investigated using the total electron content (TEC) of GPS global ionosphere maps (GIM). Statistical analysis of 10-day TEC data before global Mw ≥ 5.0 earthquakes shows significant enhancement 5 days before an earthquake of Mw ≥ 6.0 at a 95% confidence level. Earthquakes with a focal depth of less than 60 km and Mw ≥ 6.0 are presumably the root of deviation in the ionospheric TEC because earthquake breeding zones have gigantic quantities of energy at shallower focal depths. Increased anomalous TEC is recorded in cumulative percentages beyond Mw = 5.5. Sharpness in cumulative percentages is evident in seismo-ionospheric disturbance prior to Mw ≥ 6.0 earthquakes. Seismo-ionospheric disturbances related to strike slip and thrust earthquakes are noticeable for magnitude Mw6.0-7.0 earthquakes. The relative values reveal high ratios (up to 2) and low ratios (up to -0.5) within 5 days prior to global earthquakes for positive and negative anomalies. The anomalous patterns in TEC related to earthquakes are possibly due to the coupling of high amounts of energy from earthquake breeding zones of higher magnitude and shallower focal depth.

  9. Relationships between subducting bathymetric ridges and significant subduction earthquakes from global geophysical data mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, R.; Landgrebe, T. C.

    2012-12-01

    The subduction of linear bathymetric asperities has been linked with the location and rupture characteristics of significant subduction earthquakes in many regions. This suggests that earthquake occurrence is biased toward the subduction of particular types of ocean floor fabric that has formed over 10's or 100's of millions of years, but has only recently been transported into the subduction coupling zone as a consequence of long-term plate tectonic processes. Open-access geophysical data sets offer the opportunity to carry out global investigations of the spatial association between significant earthquakes and well-defined subducting bathymetric features including volcanic ridges, fracture zones and seamount chains. We filter a global significant earthquake database to separate events from the subduction coupling zone only. The coupling zone is established by integrating recent 3-dimensional models of subducting slabs and the lithospheric thickness of overriding plates. A statistical methodology is used to compare spatial associations between subducting linear asperities and significant earthquakes with randomly chosen coupling zone locations to establish sensitivity/specificity relationships as a function of proximity, ruling out random effects and establishing meaningful spatial interpretations for hazard analysis. Our association analysis reveals that significant earthquakes are significantly biased towards localities involving both subducting fracture zones and volcanic ridges/chains. Fracture zone intersections are found to exhibit a stronger association within 50km proximity that rapidly diminishes with increasing distance from the targeted regions, whereas volcanic ridges/chains demonstrate a smaller but broader effect. Fracture zone intersections also display strong relationships with earthquakes with moment magnitudes greater than or equal to 8.5, whereas the opposite is the case for volcanic ridges/seamount chains, associated strongly only with events

  10. Mid-continent earthquake zones; lessons from New Madrid, Missouri

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mitchell, B. J.

    1991-01-01

    Many seismically active regions occur throughout the world as concentrated zones surrounded by the relatively stable crust of shields or platforms. Examples occur in central and eastern North America, northeastern Brazil, Australia, Norway, Svalbard, Greenland, and other places. Some of these zones, such as those at New Madrid, Missouri, and in the St. Lawrence Valley on the Canadian border, extend over relatively large areas and are marked by a high level of seismicity. Others, such as that near Anna Ohio, are smaller, and the level of activity is lower. Some zones are occasinoally sites for major earthquakes which, if they are in populated regions, can cause widespread destrucion and loss of life. 

  11. The spatial distribution of earthquake stress rotations following large subduction zone earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardebeck, Jeanne L.

    2017-05-01

    Rotations of the principal stress axes due to great subduction zone earthquakes have been used to infer low differential stress and near-complete stress drop. The spatial distribution of coseismic and postseismic stress rotation as a function of depth and along-strike distance is explored for three recent M ≥ 8.8 subduction megathrust earthquakes. In the down-dip direction, the largest coseismic stress rotations are found just above the Moho depth of the overriding plate. This zone has been identified as hosting large patches of large slip in great earthquakes, based on the lack of high-frequency radiated energy. The large continuous slip patches may facilitate near-complete stress drop. There is seismological evidence for high fluid pressures in the subducted slab around the Moho depth of the overriding plate, suggesting low differential stress levels in this zone due to high fluid pressure, also facilitating stress rotations. The coseismic stress rotations have similar along-strike extent as the mainshock rupture. Postseismic stress rotations tend to occur in the same locations as the coseismic stress rotations, probably due to the very low remaining differential stress following the near-complete coseismic stress drop. The spatial complexity of the observed stress changes suggests that an analytical solution for finding the differential stress from the coseismic stress rotation may be overly simplistic, and that modeling of the full spatial distribution of the mainshock static stress changes is necessary.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  12. The spatial distribution of earthquake stress rotations following large subduction zone earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hardebeck, Jeanne L.

    2017-01-01

    Rotations of the principal stress axes due to great subduction zone earthquakes have been used to infer low differential stress and near-complete stress drop. The spatial distribution of coseismic and postseismic stress rotation as a function of depth and along-strike distance is explored for three recent M ≥ 8.8 subduction megathrust earthquakes. In the down-dip direction, the largest coseismic stress rotations are found just above the Moho depth of the overriding plate. This zone has been identified as hosting large patches of large slip in great earthquakes, based on the lack of high-frequency radiated energy. The large continuous slip patches may facilitate near-complete stress drop. There is seismological evidence for high fluid pressures in the subducted slab around the Moho depth of the overriding plate, suggesting low differential stress levels in this zone due to high fluid pressure, also facilitating stress rotations. The coseismic stress rotations have similar along-strike extent as the mainshock rupture. Postseismic stress rotations tend to occur in the same locations as the coseismic stress rotations, probably due to the very low remaining differential stress following the near-complete coseismic stress drop. The spatial complexity of the observed stress changes suggests that an analytical solution for finding the differential stress from the coseismic stress rotation may be overly simplistic, and that modeling of the full spatial distribution of the mainshock static stress changes is necessary.

  13. Estimating shaking-induced casualties and building damage for global earthquake events: a proposed modelling approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    So, Emily; Spence, Robin

    2013-01-01

    Recent earthquakes such as the Haiti earthquake of 12 January 2010 and the Qinghai earthquake on 14 April 2010 have highlighted the importance of rapid estimation of casualties after the event for humanitarian response. Both of these events resulted in surprisingly high death tolls, casualties and survivors made homeless. In the Mw = 7.0 Haiti earthquake, over 200,000 people perished with more than 300,000 reported injuries and 2 million made homeless. The Mw = 6.9 earthquake in Qinghai resulted in over 2,000 deaths with a further 11,000 people with serious or moderate injuries and 100,000 people have been left homeless in this mountainous region of China. In such events relief efforts can be significantly benefitted by the availability of rapid estimation and mapping of expected casualties. This paper contributes to ongoing global efforts to estimate probable earthquake casualties very rapidly after an earthquake has taken place. The analysis uses the assembled empirical damage and casualty data in the Cambridge Earthquake Impacts Database (CEQID) and explores data by event and across events to test the relationships of building and fatality distributions to the main explanatory variables of building type, building damage level and earthquake intensity. The prototype global casualty estimation model described here uses a semi-empirical approach that estimates damage rates for different classes of buildings present in the local building stock, and then relates fatality rates to the damage rates of each class of buildings. This approach accounts for the effect of the very different types of buildings (by climatic zone, urban or rural location, culture, income level etc), on casualties. The resulting casualty parameters were tested against the overall casualty data from several historical earthquakes in CEQID; a reasonable fit was found.

  14. Characterizing Mega-Earthquake Related Tsunami on Subduction Zones without Large Historical Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, C. R.; Lee, R.; Astill, S.; Farahani, R.; Wilson, P. S.; Mohammed, F.

    2014-12-01

    Due to recent large tsunami events (e.g., Chile 2010 and Japan 2011), the insurance industry is very aware of the importance of managing its exposure to tsunami risk. There are currently few tools available to help establish policies for managing and pricing tsunami risk globally. As a starting point and to help address this issue, Risk Management Solutions Inc. (RMS) is developing a global suite of tsunami inundation footprints. This dataset will include both representations of historical events as well as a series of M9 scenarios on subductions zones that have not historical generated mega earthquakes. The latter set is included to address concerns about the completeness of the historical record for mega earthquakes. This concern stems from the fact that the Tohoku Japan earthquake was considerably larger than had been observed in the historical record. Characterizing the source and rupture pattern for the subduction zones without historical events is a poorly constrained process. In many case, the subduction zones can be segmented based on changes in the characteristics of the subducting slab or major ridge systems. For this project, the unit sources from the NOAA propagation database are utilized to leverage the basin wide modeling included in this dataset. The length of the rupture is characterized based on subduction zone segmentation and the slip per unit source can be determined based on the event magnitude (i.e., M9) and moment balancing. As these events have not occurred historically, there is little to constrain the slip distribution. Sensitivity tests on the potential rupture pattern have been undertaken comparing uniform slip to higher shallow slip and tapered slip models. Subduction zones examined include the Makran Trench, the Lesser Antilles and the Hikurangi Trench. The ultimate goal is to create a series of tsunami footprints to help insurers understand their exposures at risk to tsunami inundation around the world.

  15. Global risk of big earthquakes has not recently increased

    PubMed Central

    Shearer, Peter M.; Stark, Philip B.

    2012-01-01

    The recent elevated rate of large earthquakes has fueled concern that the underlying global rate of earthquake activity has increased, which would have important implications for assessments of seismic hazard and our understanding of how faults interact. We examine the timing of large (magnitude M≥7) earthquakes from 1900 to the present, after removing local clustering related to aftershocks. The global rate of M≥8 earthquakes has been at a record high roughly since 2004, but rates have been almost as high before, and the rate of smaller earthquakes is close to its historical average. Some features of the global catalog are improbable in retrospect, but so are some features of most random sequences—if the features are selected after looking at the data. For a variety of magnitude cutoffs and three statistical tests, the global catalog, with local clusters removed, is not distinguishable from a homogeneous Poisson process. Moreover, no plausible physical mechanism predicts real changes in the underlying global rate of large events. Together these facts suggest that the global risk of large earthquakes is no higher today than it has been in the past. PMID:22184228

  16. Global risk of big earthquakes has not recently increased.

    PubMed

    Shearer, Peter M; Stark, Philip B

    2012-01-17

    The recent elevated rate of large earthquakes has fueled concern that the underlying global rate of earthquake activity has increased, which would have important implications for assessments of seismic hazard and our understanding of how faults interact. We examine the timing of large (magnitude M≥7) earthquakes from 1900 to the present, after removing local clustering related to aftershocks. The global rate of M≥8 earthquakes has been at a record high roughly since 2004, but rates have been almost as high before, and the rate of smaller earthquakes is close to its historical average. Some features of the global catalog are improbable in retrospect, but so are some features of most random sequences--if the features are selected after looking at the data. For a variety of magnitude cutoffs and three statistical tests, the global catalog, with local clusters removed, is not distinguishable from a homogeneous Poisson process. Moreover, no plausible physical mechanism predicts real changes in the underlying global rate of large events. Together these facts suggest that the global risk of large earthquakes is no higher today than it has been in the past.

  17. Detection of earthquake swarms in subduction zones around Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, T.; Ide, S.

    2015-12-01

    Earthquake swarms in subduction zones are likely to be related with slow slip events (SSEs) and locking on the plate interface. In the Boso-Oki region in central Japan, swarms repeatedly occur accompanying SSEs (e.g, Hirose et al., 2012). It is pointed out that ruptures of great earthquakes tend to terminate in regions with recurring swarm activity because of reduced and heterogeneous locking there (Holtkamp and Brudzinsiki, 2014). Given these observations, we may be able to infer aseismic slips and spatial variations in locking on the plate interface by investigating swarm activity in subduction zones. It is known that swarms do not follow Omori's law and have much higher seismicity rates than predicted by the ETAS model (e.g., Llenos et al., 2009). Here, we devised a statistical method to detect unexpectedly frequent earthquakes using the space-time ETAS model (Zhuang et al., 2002). We applied this method to subduction zones around Japan (Tohoku, Ibaraki-Boso-oki, Hokkaido, Izu, Tonankai, Nankai, and Kyushu) and detected swarms in JMA catalog (M ≥ 3) from 2001 to 2010. We detected recurring swarm activities as expected in the Boso-Oki region and also in the Ibaraki-Oki region (see Figures), where intensive foreshock activity was found by Maeda and Hirose (2011). In Tohoku, regions with intensive foreshock activity also appear to roughly correspond to regions with recurring swarm activity. Given that both foreshocks and swarms are triggered by SSEs (e.g., Bouchon et al., 2013), these results suggest that the regions with foreshock activity and swarm activity such as the Ibaraki-Oki region are characterized by extensive occurrences of SSEs just like the Boso-Oki region. Besides Ibaraki-Oki and Boso-Oki, we detected many swarms in Tohoku, Hokkaido, Izu, and Kyushu. On the other hand, swarms are rare in the rupture areas of the 1944 Tonankai and 1946 Nankai earthquakes. These variations in swarm activity may reflect variations in SSE activity among subduction zones

  18. Operational earthquake forecasting in the South Iceland Seismic Zone: improving the earthquake catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panzera, Francesco; Vogfjörd, Kristin; Zechar, J. Douglas; Eberhard, David

    2014-05-01

    A major earthquake sequence is ongoing in the South Iceland Seismic Zone (SISZ), where experts expect earthquakes of up to MW = 7.1 in the coming years to decades. The historical seismicity in this region is well known and many major faults here and on Reykjanes Peninsula (RP) have already been mapped. The faults are predominantly N-S with right-lateral strike-slip motion, while the overall motion in the SISZ is E-W oriented left-lateral motion. The area that we propose for operational earthquake forecasting(OEF) contains both the SISZ and the RP. The earthquake catalogue considered for OEF, called the SIL catalogue, spans the period from 1991 until September 2013 and contains more than 200,000 earthquakes. Some of these events have a large azimuthal gap between stations, and some have large horizontal and vertical uncertainties. We are interested in building seismicity models using high-quality data, so we filter the catalogue using the criteria proposed by Gomberg et al. (1990) and Bondar et al. (2004). The resulting filtered catalogue contains around 130,000 earthquakes. Magnitude estimates in the Iceland catalogue also require special attention. The SIL system uses two methods to estimate magnitude. The first method is based on an empirical local magnitude (ML) relationship. The other magnitude scale is a so-called "local moment magnitude" (MLW), originally constructed by Slunga et al. (1984) to agree with local magnitude scales in Sweden. In the SIL catalogue, there are two main problems with the magnitude estimates and consequently it is not immediately possible to convert MLW to moment magnitude (MW). These problems are: (i) immediate aftershocks of large events are assigned magnitudes that are too high; and (ii) the seismic moment of large earthquakes is underestimated. For this reason the magnitude values in the catalogue must be corrected before developing an OEF system. To obtain a reliable MW estimate, we calibrate a magnitude relationship based on

  19. Strategies for rapid global earthquake impact estimation: the Prompt Assessment of Global Earthquakes for Response (PAGER) system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jaiswal, Kishor; Wald, D.J.

    2013-01-01

    This chapter summarizes the state-of-the-art for rapid earthquake impact estimation. It details the needs and challenges associated with quick estimation of earthquake losses following global earthquakes, and provides a brief literature review of various approaches that have been used in the past. With this background, the chapter introduces the operational earthquake loss estimation system developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) known as PAGER (for Prompt Assessment of Global Earthquakes for Response). It also details some of the ongoing developments of PAGER’s loss estimation models to better supplement the operational empirical models, and to produce value-added web content for a variety of PAGER users.

  20. The Likelihood of Major Global Earthquakes and the 2014 Napa Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ejeta, M. Z.

    2014-12-01

    A previous study that analyzed global major earthquakes of magnitude 7.6 and above for the 1897 to 1977 period suggests that random occurrence of these earthquakes is very unlikely (Olsson 1982). Following an analysis of global major earthquakes of magnitude 7 and above for the 1901 to January 2010 period, a recent study attempts to show an association between major global earthquake and cyclic lunisolar alignment events (Ejeta 2011). The latter study suggests that the inverse square relationship in Newton's law of universal gravitation is likely to explain the physics behind the skewed occurrences of major earthquake events around these alignment events. Using random and non-random occurrence analysis, this paper will present the likelihoods of major global earthquakes since 1990 through September 2014 and how the magnitude 6.0 Napa earthquake of 2014 may be a particular realization of the observed association. Specifically, it will show that using the random occurrence approach, the average probability of occurrence on any day of the 396 major earthquakes recorded by the United States Geological Survey (USGS) during the selected period, which has 9,039 days, is about 4.4%. It will also show that based on the observed association, these events are skewed, with average probabilities of about 39% and 68%, respectively, towards one and two days within lunisolar alignment events recorded by the National Aeronautic and Space Administration (NASA) during the same period. Of the 396 major earthquake events during the selected period, 154 and 271 occurred, respectively, within one and two days of either new, first quarter, full, or last quarter moon days. This result suggests that a major earthquake event that occurred during this period was more likely than not to have occurred within two days of an alignment event. The magnitude 6.0 Napa earthquake of August 24, 2014, occurred within a day of the August 25, 2014, new moon day. This paper suggests that further research

  1. Ground Shaking and Earthquake Engineering Aspects of the M 8.8 Chile Earthquake of 2010 - Applications to Cascadia and Other Subduction Zones (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassidy, J. F.; Boroschek, R.; Ventura, C.; Huffman, S.

    2010-12-01

    building codes to minimising damage from earthquakes. One of the key lessons learned is the importance of ground motion recordings (the value of dense strong motion networks) to understanding shaking and the effects on structures. It is these strong motion recordings that allow for improvements to codes and standards. The relevance of this set of ground motions to the Cascadia Subduction Zone and other global subduction zones will be highlighted.

  2. Estimation of earthquake effects associated with a great earthquake in the New Madrid seismic zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hopper, Margaret G.; Algermissen, Sylvester Theodore; Dobrovolny, Ernest E.

    1983-01-01

    Estimates have been made of the effects of a large Ms = 8.6, Io = XI earthquake hypothesed to occur anywhere in the New Madrid seismic zone. The estimates are based on the distributions of intensities associated with the earthquakes of 1811-12, 1843 and 1895 although the effects of other historical shocks are also considered. The resulting composite type intensity map for a maximum intensity XI is believed to represent the upper level of shaking likely to occur. Specific intensity maps have been developed for six cities near the epicentral region taking into account the most likely distribution of site response in each city. Intensities found are: IX for Carbondale, IL; VIII and IX for Evansville, IN; VI and VIII for Little Rock, AR; IX and X for Memphis, TN; VIII, IX, and X for Paducah, KY; and VIII and X for Poplar Bluff, MO. On a regional scale, intensities are found to attenuate from the New Madrid seismic zone most rapidly to the west and southwest sides of the zone, most slowly to the northwest along the Mississippi River, on the northeast along the Ohio River, and on the southeast toward Georgia and South Carolina. Intensities attenuate toward the north, east, and south in a more normal fashion. Known liquefaction effects are documented but much more research is needed to define the liquefaction potential.

  3. Random variability explains apparent global clustering of large earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Michael, A.J.

    2011-01-01

    The occurrence of 5 Mw ≥ 8.5 earthquakes since 2004 has created a debate over whether or not we are in a global cluster of large earthquakes, temporarily raising risks above long-term levels. I use three classes of statistical tests to determine if the record of M ≥ 7 earthquakes since 1900 can reject a null hypothesis of independent random events with a constant rate plus localized aftershock sequences. The data cannot reject this null hypothesis. Thus, the temporal distribution of large global earthquakes is well-described by a random process, plus localized aftershocks, and apparent clustering is due to random variability. Therefore the risk of future events has not increased, except within ongoing aftershock sequences, and should be estimated from the longest possible record of events.

  4. Computing Earthquake Probabilities on Global Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holliday, James R.; Graves, William R.; Rundle, John B.; Turcotte, Donald L.

    2016-03-01

    Large devastating events in systems such as earthquakes, typhoons, market crashes, electricity grid blackouts, floods, droughts, wars and conflicts, and landslides can be unexpected and devastating. Events in many of these systems display frequency-size statistics that are power laws. Previously, we presented a new method for calculating probabilities for large events in systems such as these. This method counts the number of small events since the last large event and then converts this count into a probability by using a Weibull probability law. We applied this method to the calculation of large earthquake probabilities in California-Nevada, USA. In that study, we considered a fixed geographic region and assumed that all earthquakes within that region, large magnitudes as well as small, were perfectly correlated. In the present article, we extend this model to systems in which the events have a finite correlation length. We modify our previous results by employing the correlation function for near mean field systems having long-range interactions, an example of which is earthquakes and elastic interactions. We then construct an application of the method and show examples of computed earthquake probabilities.

  5. Fault zone structure and seismic reflection characteristics in zones of slow slip and tsunami earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Rebecca; Henrys, Stuart; Sutherland, Rupert; Barker, Daniel; Wallace, Laura; Holden, Caroline; Power, William; Wang, Xiaoming; Morgan, Joanna; Warner, Michael; Downes, Gaye

    2015-04-01

    Over the last couple of decades we have learned that a whole spectrum of different fault slip behaviour takes place on subduction megathrust faults from stick-slip earthquakes to slow slip and stable sliding. Geophysical data, including seismic reflection data, can be used to characterise margins and fault zones that undergo different modes of slip. In this presentation we will focus on the Hikurangi margin, New Zealand, which exhibits marked along-strike changes in seismic behaviour and margin characteristics. Campaign and continuous GPS measurements reveal deep interseismic coupling and deep slow slip events (~30-60 km) at the southern Hikurangi margin. The northern margin, in contrast, experiences aseismic slip and shallow (<10-15 km) slow slip events (SSE) every 18-24 months with equivalent moment magnitudes of Mw 6.5-6.8. Updip of the SSE region two unusual megathrust earthquakes occurred in March and May 1947 with characteristics typical of tsunami earthquakes. The Hikurangi margin is therefore an excellent natural laboratory to study differential fault slip behaviour. Using 2D seismic reflection, magnetic anomaly and geodetic data we observe in the source areas of the 1947 tsunami earthquakes i) low amplitude interface reflectivity, ii) shallower interface relief, iii) bathymetric ridges, iv) magnetic anomaly highs and in the case of the March 1947 earthquake v) stronger geodetic coupling. We suggest that this is due to the subduction of seamounts, similar in dimensions to seamounts observed on the incoming Pacific plate, to depths of <10 km. We propose a source model for the 1947 tsunami earthquakes based on geophysical data and find that extremely low rupture velocities (c. 300 m/s) are required to model the observed large tsunami run-up heights (Bell et al. 2014, EPSL). Our study suggests that subducted topography can cause the nucleation of moderate earthquakes with complex, low velocity rupture scenarios that enhance tsunami waves, and the role of

  6. Earthquake casualty models within the USGS Prompt Assessment of Global Earthquakes for Response (PAGER) system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jaiswal, Kishor; Wald, David J.; Earle, Paul S.; Porter, Keith A.; Hearne, Mike

    2011-01-01

    Since the launch of the USGS’s Prompt Assessment of Global Earthquakes for Response (PAGER) system in fall of 2007, the time needed for the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to determine and comprehend the scope of any major earthquake disaster anywhere in the world has been dramatically reduced to less than 30 min. PAGER alerts consist of estimated shaking hazard from the ShakeMap system, estimates of population exposure at various shaking intensities, and a list of the most severely shaken cities in the epicentral area. These estimates help government, scientific, and relief agencies to guide their responses in the immediate aftermath of a significant earthquake. To account for wide variability and uncertainty associated with inventory, structural vulnerability and casualty data, PAGER employs three different global earthquake fatality/loss computation models. This article describes the development of the models and demonstrates the loss estimation capability for earthquakes that have occurred since 2007. The empirical model relies on country-specific earthquake loss data from past earthquakes and makes use of calibrated casualty rates for future prediction. The semi-empirical and analytical models are engineering-based and rely on complex datasets including building inventories, time-dependent population distributions within different occupancies, the vulnerability of regional building stocks, and casualty rates given structural collapse.

  7. A global earthquake discrimination scheme to optimize ground-motion prediction equation selection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garcia, Daniel; Wald, David J.; Hearne, Michael

    2012-01-01

    We present a new automatic earthquake discrimination procedure to determine in near-real time the tectonic regime and seismotectonic domain of an earthquake, its most likely source type, and the corresponding ground-motion prediction equation (GMPE) class to be used in the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Global ShakeMap system. This method makes use of the Flinn–Engdahl regionalization scheme, seismotectonic information (plate boundaries, global geology, seismicity catalogs, and regional and local studies), and the source parameters available from the USGS National Earthquake Information Center in the minutes following an earthquake to give the best estimation of the setting and mechanism of the event. Depending on the tectonic setting, additional criteria based on hypocentral depth, style of faulting, and regional seismicity may be applied. For subduction zones, these criteria include the use of focal mechanism information and detailed interface models to discriminate among outer-rise, upper-plate, interface, and intraslab seismicity. The scheme is validated against a large database of recent historical earthquakes. Though developed to assess GMPE selection in Global ShakeMap operations, we anticipate a variety of uses for this strategy, from real-time processing systems to any analysis involving tectonic classification of sources from seismic catalogs.

  8. Estimation of recurrence interval of large earthquakes on the central Longmen Shan fault zone based on seismic moment accumulation/release model.

    PubMed

    Ren, Junjie; Zhang, Shimin

    2013-01-01

    Recurrence interval of large earthquake on an active fault zone is an important parameter in assessing seismic hazard. The 2008 Wenchuan earthquake (Mw 7.9) occurred on the central Longmen Shan fault zone and ruptured the Yingxiu-Beichuan fault (YBF) and the Guanxian-Jiangyou fault (GJF). However, there is a considerable discrepancy among recurrence intervals of large earthquake in preseismic and postseismic estimates based on slip rate and paleoseismologic results. Post-seismic trenches showed that the central Longmen Shan fault zone probably undertakes an event similar to the 2008 quake, suggesting a characteristic earthquake model. In this paper, we use the published seismogenic model of the 2008 earthquake based on Global Positioning System (GPS) and Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) data and construct a characteristic seismic moment accumulation/release model to estimate recurrence interval of large earthquakes on the central Longmen Shan fault zone. Our results show that the seismogenic zone accommodates a moment rate of (2.7 ± 0.3) × 10¹⁷ N m/yr, and a recurrence interval of 3900 ± 400 yrs is necessary for accumulation of strain energy equivalent to the 2008 earthquake. This study provides a preferred interval estimation of large earthquakes for seismic hazard analysis in the Longmen Shan region.

  9. Estimation of Recurrence Interval of Large Earthquakes on the Central Longmen Shan Fault Zone Based on Seismic Moment Accumulation/Release Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shimin

    2013-01-01

    Recurrence interval of large earthquake on an active fault zone is an important parameter in assessing seismic hazard. The 2008 Wenchuan earthquake (Mw 7.9) occurred on the central Longmen Shan fault zone and ruptured the Yingxiu-Beichuan fault (YBF) and the Guanxian-Jiangyou fault (GJF). However, there is a considerable discrepancy among recurrence intervals of large earthquake in preseismic and postseismic estimates based on slip rate and paleoseismologic results. Post-seismic trenches showed that the central Longmen Shan fault zone probably undertakes an event similar to the 2008 quake, suggesting a characteristic earthquake model. In this paper, we use the published seismogenic model of the 2008 earthquake based on Global Positioning System (GPS) and Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) data and construct a characteristic seismic moment accumulation/release model to estimate recurrence interval of large earthquakes on the central Longmen Shan fault zone. Our results show that the seismogenic zone accommodates a moment rate of (2.7 ± 0.3) × 1017 N m/yr, and a recurrence interval of 3900 ± 400 yrs is necessary for accumulation of strain energy equivalent to the 2008 earthquake. This study provides a preferred interval estimation of large earthquakes for seismic hazard analysis in the Longmen Shan region. PMID:23878524

  10. Possibility to explain global climate variations by earthquakes influence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molchanov, O.

    2009-12-01

    An additional natural source of the global warming could be heat flux from seismicity. Estimated earthquakes energy release in the near-equatorial Pacific area during a year ≈ 1020 J that is equivalent to the energy released in the detonation about one million atomic bombs of Hiroshima class and produce average power flux due to seismicity ≈ 0.3-1 W/m2 . We have analyzed together the slow climate temperature variations in the near-equatorial Pacific Ocean area (SSTOI indices) and crustal seismic activity in the same region during 1973-2008 time period using correlation analysis and found similarity in seismic and ENSO periodicities (the latter with time lag about 1.5 years). Trends of the processes are also similar showing about 2 times increase in average seismic energy release during the whole period of analysis and conventional 0.10C/(10 years) increase in SSTOI index anomalies. Our main conclusion is on real possibility of climate-seismicity coupling. It is rather probable that at least partially climate ENSO oscillations and temperature anomaly trends are induced by similar variation in seismicity. A mechanism of several years periodicity in the seismic activity is unclear at present. Probably it is initiated in the upper mantle of the Earth (depth 600-700 km) and then penetrates in the crust as so-called deformation (or stress) wave with time delay from 3 to 10 years [1] [1] O.A. Molchanov and S. Uyeda, Upward migration of earthquake hypocenters in Japan,Kurile- Kamchatka and Sunda subduction zones, Physics and Chemistry of the Earth, 34, 423-430, 2009; doi:10.1016/j.pce.2008.09.011.

  11. Hidden Earthquake Potential in Plate Boundary Transition Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furlong, Kevin P.; Herman, Matthew; Govers, Rob

    2017-04-01

    Plate boundaries can exhibit spatially abrupt changes in their long-term tectonic deformation (and associated kinematics) at triple junctions and other sites of changes in plate boundary structure. How earthquake behavior responds to these abrupt tectonic changes is unclear. The situation may be additionally obscured by the effects of superimposed deformational signals - juxtaposed short-term (earthquake cycle) kinematics may combine to produce a net deformational signal that does not reflect intuition about the actual strain accumulation in the region. Two examples of this effect are in the vicinity of the Mendocino triple junction (MTJ) along the west coast of North America, and at the southern end of the Hikurangi subduction zone, New Zealand. In the region immediately north of the MTJ, GPS-based observed crustal displacements (relative to North America (NAm)) are intermediate between Pacific and Juan de Fuca (JdF) motions. With distance north, these displacements rotate to become more aligned with JdF - NAm displacements, i.e. to motions expected along a coupled subduction interface. The deviation of GPS motions from the coupled subduction interface signal near the MTJ has been previously interpreted to reflect clock-wise rotation of a coastal, crustal block and/or reduced coupling at the southern Cascadia margin. The geologic record of crustal deformation near the MTJ reflects the combined effects of northward crustal shortening (on geologic time scales) associated with the MTJ Crustal Conveyor (Furlong and Govers, 1999) overprinted onto the subduction earthquake cycle signal. With this interpretation, the Cascadia subduction margin appears to be well-coupled along its entire length, consistent with paleo-seismic records of large earthquake ruptures extending to its southern limit. At the Hikurangi to Alpine Fault transition in New Zealand, plate interactions switch from subduction to oblique translation as a consequence of changes in lithospheric structure of

  12. Global Review of Induced and Triggered Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foulger, G. R.; Wilson, M.; Gluyas, J.; Julian, B. R.; Davies, R. J.

    2016-12-01

    Natural processes associated with very small incremental stress changes can modulate the spatial and temporal occurrence of earthquakes. These processes include tectonic stress changes, the migration of fluids in the crust, Earth tides, surface ice and snow loading, heavy rain, atmospheric pressure, sediment unloading and groundwater loss. It is thus unsurprising that large anthropogenic projects which may induce stress changes of a similar size also modulate seismicity. As human development accelerates and industrial projects become larger in scale and more numerous, the number of such cases is increasing. That mining and water-reservoir impoundment can induce earthquakes has been accepted for several decades. Now, concern is growing about earthquakes induced by activities such as hydraulic fracturing for shale-gas extraction and waste-water disposal via injection into boreholes. As hydrocarbon reservoirs enter their tertiary phases of production, seismicity may also increase there. The full extent of human activities thought to induce earthquakes is, however, much wider than generally appreciated. We have assembled as near complete a catalog as possible of cases of earthquakes postulated to have been induced by human activity. Our database contains a total of 705 cases and is probably the largest compilation made to date. We include all cases where reasonable arguments have been made for anthropogenic induction, even where these have been challenged in later publications. Our database presents the results of our search but leaves judgment about the merits of individual cases to the user. We divide anthropogenic earthquake-induction processes into: a) Surface operations, b) Extraction of mass from the subsurface, c) Introduction of mass into the subsurface, and d) Explosions. Each of these categories is divided into sub-categories. In some cases, categorization of a particular case is tentative because more than one anthropogenic activity may have preceded or been

  13. Influence of Forearc Structure on the Extent of Great Subduction Zone Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, J. J.; Llenos, A.

    2007-05-01

    Structural features associated with forearc basins appear to strongly influence the rupture processes of large subduction zone earthquakes. Recent studies demonstrated that a significant percentage of the global seismic moment release on subduction zone thrust faults is concentrated beneath the gravity lows resulting from forearc basins. To better determine the nature of this correlation and examine its effect on rupture directivity and termination, we estimated the rupture areas of a set of Mw 7.5-8.7 earthquakes that occurred in circum-Pacific subduction zones. We compare synthetic and observed seismograms by measuring frequency- dependent amplitude and arrival time differences of the first orbit Rayleigh waves. At low frequencies, the amplitude anomalies primarily result from the spatial and temporal extent of the rupture. We then invert the amplitude and arrival time measurements to estimate the second moments of the slip distribution which describe the rupture length, width, duration and propagation velocity of each earthquake. Comparing the rupture areas to the trench-parallel gravity anomaly (TPGA, Song and Simons 2003) above each rupture, we find that in 12 of the 14 events considered in this study the TPGA increases between the centroid and the limits of the rupture. Thus, local increases in TPGA appear to be related to the physical conditions along the plate interface that favor rupture termination. Owing to the inherently long time scales required for forearc basin formation, the correlation between the TPGA field and rupture termination regions indicates that long-lived material heterogeneity rather than short time-scale stress heterogeneities are responsible for arresting most great subduction zone ruptures.

  14. Global Building Inventory for Earthquake Loss Estimation and Risk Management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jaiswal, Kishor; Wald, David; Porter, Keith

    2010-01-01

    We develop a global database of building inventories using taxonomy of global building types for use in near-real-time post-earthquake loss estimation and pre-earthquake risk analysis, for the U.S. Geological Survey’s Prompt Assessment of Global Earthquakes for Response (PAGER) program. The database is available for public use, subject to peer review, scrutiny, and open enhancement. On a country-by-country level, it contains estimates of the distribution of building types categorized by material, lateral force resisting system, and occupancy type (residential or nonresidential, urban or rural). The database draws on and harmonizes numerous sources: (1) UN statistics, (2) UN Habitat’s demographic and health survey (DHS) database, (3) national housing censuses, (4) the World Housing Encyclopedia and (5) other literature.

  15. An empirical model for global earthquake fatality estimation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jaiswal, Kishor; Wald, David

    2010-01-01

    We analyzed mortality rates of earthquakes worldwide and developed a country/region-specific empirical model for earthquake fatality estimation within the U. S. Geological Survey's Prompt Assessment of Global Earthquakes for Response (PAGER) system. The earthquake fatality rate is defined as total killed divided by total population exposed at specific shaking intensity level. The total fatalities for a given earthquake are estimated by multiplying the number of people exposed at each shaking intensity level by the fatality rates for that level and then summing them at all relevant shaking intensities. The fatality rate is expressed in terms of a two-parameter lognormal cumulative distribution function of shaking intensity. The parameters are obtained for each country or a region by minimizing the residual error in hindcasting the total shaking-related deaths from earthquakes recorded between 1973 and 2007. A new global regionalization scheme is used to combine the fatality data across different countries with similar vulnerability traits. [DOI: 10.1193/1.3480331

  16. Rapid estimation of the economic consequences of global earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jaiswal, Kishor; Wald, David J.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) Prompt Assessment of Global Earthquakes for Response (PAGER) system, operational since mid 2007, rapidly estimates the most affected locations and the population exposure at different levels of shaking intensities. The PAGER system has significantly improved the way aid agencies determine the scale of response needed in the aftermath of an earthquake. For example, the PAGER exposure estimates provided reasonably accurate assessments of the scale and spatial extent of the damage and losses following the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake (Mw 7.9) in China, the 2009 L'Aquila earthquake (Mw 6.3) in Italy, the 2010 Haiti earthquake (Mw 7.0), and the 2010 Chile earthquake (Mw 8.8). Nevertheless, some engineering and seismological expertise is often required to digest PAGER's exposure estimate and turn it into estimated fatalities and economic losses. This has been the focus of PAGER's most recent development. With the new loss-estimation component of the PAGER system it is now possible to produce rapid estimation of expected fatalities for global earthquakes (Jaiswal and others, 2009). While an estimate of earthquake fatalities is a fundamental indicator of potential human consequences in developing countries (for example, Iran, Pakistan, Haiti, Peru, and many others), economic consequences often drive the responses in much of the developed world (for example, New Zealand, the United States, and Chile), where the improved structural behavior of seismically resistant buildings significantly reduces earthquake casualties. Rapid availability of estimates of both fatalities and economic losses can be a valuable resource. The total time needed to determine the actual scope of an earthquake disaster and to respond effectively varies from country to country. It can take days or sometimes weeks before the damage and consequences of a disaster can be understood both socially and economically. The objective of the U.S. Geological Survey's PAGER system is

  17. Perspectives on earthquake hazards in the New Madrid seismic zone, Missouri

    SciTech Connect

    Thenhaus, P.C. )

    1990-01-01

    A sequence of three great earthquakes struck the Central United States during the winter of 1811-12 in the area of New Madrid, Missouri. They are considered to be the greatest earthquakes in the conterminous U.S. because they were felt and caused damage at far greater distances than any other earthquakes in US history. In contrast to California, where earthquakes are felt frequently, the damaging earthquakes that have occurred in the Eastern US are generally regarded as only historical phenomena. A fundamental problem in the Eastern US, therefore, is that the earthquake hazard is not generally considered today in land-use and civic planning. This article offers perspectives on the earthquake hazard of the New Madrid seismic zone through discussions of the geology of the Mississippi Embayment, the historical earthquakes that have occurred there, the earthquake risk, and the tools that geoscientists have to study the region. The so-called earthquake hazard is defined by the characterization of the physical attributes of the geological structures that cause earthquakes, the estimation of the recurrence times of the earthquakes, their potential size, and the expected ground motions. The term earthquake risk, on the other hand, refers to aspects of the expected damage to manmade structures and to lifelines as a result of the earthquake hazard.

  18. Underground Testing of Permeability and Earthquake Nucleation in Fault Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    guglielmi, Y.; Cappa, F.; Derode, B.; Jeanne, P.; Rutqvist, J.

    2012-12-01

    The magnitude of fault and fracture zones permeability variations induced by the complex inelastic effects of effective stress variations, and the relationships to seismicity represent gaps of our knowledge of these systems. Here we show how experiments developed in the low noise and well constrained geomechanical environment of an Underground Research Laboratory (http://www.insu.cnrs.fr/co/sites-instrumentes-terre interne/laboratoire-souterrain-a-bas-bruit-lsbb) provide unusual data that contribute to the fundamental understanding of the seismicity caused by non-uniform distributions of fluids and stresses, and hydromechanical heterogeneities. We conducted step-rate water injections (order MPa) to induce the local pressurization and the slip of a critically stressed fault zone at 0.28 km-depth. We took advantage of the underground research laboratory geometry to simultaneously monitor dynamic pressure and deformations at the injection point in the fault, and seismicity in the fault near field 2-to-3 meters around. The striking result of these experiments is to show how off-fault ruptures triggered in the fault damage zone by fluid pressurization or by stress transfer from nearby source zones can be a possible fault weakening mechanism that controls the coupling between fault slip and permeability variations. Experiments also show that fault slow slip which is associated to 80% of the seismic energy released through tremor-like events nucleates after the drastic decrease of fault friction which is associated to the initial 20% of the seismic energy released. Such results are of interest for seismologists and reservoir engineers in natural and induced earthquakes prediction and risk assessment.

  19. Quiet zone within a seismic gap near western Nicaragua: Possible location of a future large earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harlow, D.H.; White, R.A.; Cifuentes, I.L.; Aburto, Q.A.

    1981-01-01

    A 5700-square-kilometer quiet zone occurs in the midst of the locations of more than 4000 earthquakes off the Pacific coast of Nicaragua. The region is indicated by the seismic gap technique to be a likely location for an earthquake of magnitude larger than 7. The quiet zone has existed since at least 1950; the last large earthquake originating from this area occurred in 1898 and was of magnitude 7.5. A rough estimate indicates that the magnitude of an earthquake rupturing the entire quiet zone could be as large as that of the 1898 event. It is not yet possible to forecast a time frame for the occurrence of such an earthquake in the quiet zone. Copyright ?? 1981 AAAS.

  20. The 2004 Sumatra Earthquake and Tsunami: Lessons Learned in Subduction Zone Science and Emergency Management for the Cascadia Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassidy, John F.

    2015-03-01

    The 26 December 2004, Mw 9.3 Sumatra earthquake and tsunami was a pivotal turning point in our awareness of the dangers posed by subduction zone earthquakes and tsunamis. This earthquake was the world's largest in 40 years, and it produced the world's deadliest tsunami. This earthquake ruptured a subduction zone that has many similarities to the Cascadia Subduction Zone. In this article, I summarize lessons learned from this tragedy, and make comparisons with potential rupture characteristics, slip distribution, deformation patterns, and aftershock patterns for Cascadia using theoretical modeling and interseismic observations. Both subduction zones are approximately 1,100-1,300 km in length. Both have similar convergence rates and represent oblique subduction. Slip along the subduction fault during the 26 December earthquake is estimated at 15-25 m, similar to values estimated for Cascadia. The width of the rupture, ~80-150 km estimated from modeling seismic and geodetic data, is similar to the width of the "locked and transition zone" estimated for Cascadia. Coseismic subsidence of up to 2 m along the Sumatra coast is also similar to that predicted for parts of northern Cascadia, based on paleoseismic evidence. In addition to scientific lessons learned, the 2004 tsunami provided many critical lessons for emergency management and preparedness. As a result of that tragedy, a number of preparedness initiatives are now underway to promote awareness of earthquake and tsunami hazards along the west coast of North America, and plans are underway to develop prototype tsunami and earthquake warning systems along Cascadia. Lessons learned from the great Sumatra earthquake and tsunami tragedy, both through scientific studies and through public education initiatives, will help to reduce losses during future earthquakes in Cascadia and other subduction zones of the world.

  1. Seismic gaps and source zones of recent large earthquakes in coastal Peru

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dewey, J.W.; Spence, W.

    1979-01-01

    The earthquakes of central coastal Peru occur principally in two distinct zones of shallow earthquake activity that are inland of and parallel to the axis of the Peru Trench. The interface-thrust (IT) zone includes the great thrust-fault earthquakes of 17 October 1966 and 3 October 1974. The coastal-plate interior (CPI) zone includes the great earthquake of 31 May 1970, and is located about 50 km inland of and 30 km deeper than the interface thrust zone. The occurrence of a large earthquake in one zone may not relieve elastic strain in the adjoining zone, thus complicating the application of the seismic gap concept to central coastal Peru. However, recognition of two seismic zones may facilitate detection of seismicity precursory to a large earthquake in a given zone; removal of probable CPI-zone earthquakes from plots of seismicity prior to the 1974 main shock dramatically emphasizes the high seismic activity near the rupture zone of that earthquake in the five years preceding the main shock. Other conclusions on the seismicity of coastal Peru that affect the application of the seismic gap concept to this region are: (1) Aftershocks of the great earthquakes of 1966, 1970, and 1974 occurred in spatially separated clusters. Some clusters may represent distinct small source regions triggered by the main shock rather than delimiting the total extent of main-shock rupture. The uncertainty in the interpretation of aftershock clusters results in corresponding uncertainties in estimates of stress drop and estimates of the dimensions of the seismic gap that has been filled by a major earthquake. (2) Aftershocks of the great thrust-fault earthquakes of 1966 and 1974 generally did not extend seaward as far as the Peru Trench. (3) None of the three great earthquakes produced significant teleseismic activity in the following month in the source regions of the other two earthquakes. The earthquake hypocenters that form the basis of this study were relocated using station

  2. Quantitative Earthquake Prediction on Global and Regional Scales

    SciTech Connect

    Kossobokov, Vladimir G.

    2006-03-23

    The Earth is a hierarchy of volumes of different size. Driven by planetary convection these volumes are involved into joint and relative movement. The movement is controlled by a wide variety of processes on and around the fractal mesh of boundary zones, and does produce earthquakes. This hierarchy of movable volumes composes a large non-linear dynamical system. Prediction of such a system in a sense of extrapolation of trajectory into the future is futile. However, upon coarse-graining the integral empirical regularities emerge opening possibilities of prediction in a sense of the commonly accepted consensus definition worked out in 1976 by the US National Research Council. Implications of the understanding hierarchical nature of lithosphere and its dynamics based on systematic monitoring and evidence of its unified space-energy similarity at different scales help avoiding basic errors in earthquake prediction claims. They suggest rules and recipes of adequate earthquake prediction classification, comparison and optimization. The approach has already led to the design of reproducible intermediate-term middle-range earthquake prediction technique. Its real-time testing aimed at prediction of the largest earthquakes worldwide has proved beyond any reasonable doubt the effectiveness of practical earthquake forecasting. In the first approximation, the accuracy is about 1-5 years and 5-10 times the anticipated source dimension. Further analysis allows reducing spatial uncertainty down to 1-3 source dimensions, although at a cost of additional failures-to-predict. Despite of limited accuracy a considerable damage could be prevented by timely knowledgeable use of the existing predictions and earthquake prediction strategies. The December 26, 2004 Indian Ocean Disaster seems to be the first indication that the methodology, designed for prediction of M8.0+ earthquakes can be rescaled for prediction of both smaller magnitude earthquakes (e.g., down to M5.5+ in Italy) and

  3. Supercycle at the Ecuadorian subduction zone revealed after the 2016 Pedernales earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nocquet, J.-M.; Jarrin, P.; Vallée, M.; Mothes, P. A.; Grandin, R.; Rolandone, F.; Delouis, B.; Yepes, H.; Font, Y.; Fuentes, D.; Régnier, M.; Laurendeau, A.; Cisneros, D.; Hernandez, S.; Sladen, A.; Singaucho, J.-C.; Mora, H.; Gomez, J.; Montes, L.; Charvis, P.

    2016-12-01

    Large earthquakes are usually assumed to release all of the strain accumulated since the previous event, implying a reduced seismic hazard after them. However, long records of seismic history at several subduction zones suggest supercycle behaviour, where centuries-long accumulated strain is released through clustered large earthquakes, resulting in an extended period of enhanced seismic hazard. Here we combine historical seismology results, present-day geodesy data, and dense local observations of the recent Mw 7.8 2016 Pedernales earthquake to reconstruct the strain budget at the Ecuador subduction zone since the great 1906 earthquake. We show that the Pedernales earthquake involved the successive rupture of two patches on the plate interface that were locked prior to the earthquake and most probably overlaps the area already ruptured in 1942 by a similar earthquake. However, we find that coseismic slip in 2016 exceeds the deficit accumulated since 1942. The seismic moment of every large earthquake during the twentieth century further exceeds the moment deficit accumulated since 1906. These results, together with the seismic quiescence before 1906 highlighted by historical records and marine palaeoseismology, argue for an earthquake supercycle at the Ecuador-Colombia margin. This behaviour, which has led to an enhanced seismic hazard for 110 years, is possibly still going on and may apply to other subduction zones that recently experienced a great earthquake.

  4. Supercycle at the Ecuadorian subduction zone revealed after the 2016 Pedernales earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nocquet, J.-M.; Jarrin, P.; Vallée, M.; Mothes, P. A.; Grandin, R.; Rolandone, F.; Delouis, B.; Yepes, H.; Font, Y.; Fuentes, D.; Régnier, M.; Laurendeau, A.; Cisneros, D.; Hernandez, S.; Sladen, A.; Singaucho, J.-C.; Mora, H.; Gomez, J.; Montes, L.; Charvis, P.

    2017-02-01

    Large earthquakes are usually assumed to release all of the strain accumulated since the previous event, implying a reduced seismic hazard after them. However, long records of seismic history at several subduction zones suggest supercycle behaviour, where centuries-long accumulated strain is released through clustered large earthquakes, resulting in an extended period of enhanced seismic hazard. Here we combine historical seismology results, present-day geodesy data, and dense local observations of the recent Mw 7.8 2016 Pedernales earthquake to reconstruct the strain budget at the Ecuador subduction zone since the great 1906 earthquake. We show that the Pedernales earthquake involved the successive rupture of two patches on the plate interface that were locked prior to the earthquake and most probably overlaps the area already ruptured in 1942 by a similar earthquake. However, we find that coseismic slip in 2016 exceeds the deficit accumulated since 1942. The seismic moment of every large earthquake during the twentieth century further exceeds the moment deficit accumulated since 1906. These results, together with the seismic quiescence before 1906 highlighted by historical records and marine palaeoseismology, argue for an earthquake supercycle at the Ecuador-Colombia margin. This behaviour, which has led to an enhanced seismic hazard for 110 years, is possibly still going on and may apply to other subduction zones that recently experienced a great earthquake.

  5. Repeating earthquakes on the Chile subduction zone following the Maule 2010 M 8.8 earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rietbrock, A.; Jenkins, J.; Tilmann, F. J.; Hicks, S. P.; Palo, M.

    2013-12-01

    We investigate repeating earthquakes (REs) on the Chile subduction zone, in the first 9 months following the Maule 2010 M 8.8 earthquake. Using the aftershock catalogue of approximately 30,000 events (Rietbrock et al., 2012) and the data from the International Maule Aftershock Dataset (IMAD), we identify 1550 clusters of small magnitude (Mw ~1.5-3) events showing similar waveforms (cross-correlation coefficients>0.9). Clusters are found from the surface to depths of ~60km, indicating the generation of RE on pre-existing crustal faults and slab interface. A particularly dense band of clustered seismicity runs NE-SW along the length of Chile at 37-47km depth on the slab/continent interface, apparently defining the limit of plate coupling (Rietbrock et al, 2012; Lange et al., 2012). Relocation of deep clusters, via the double difference method (hypoDD), reveal that they lie within a region of increased fluid content (interpreted from high Vp/Vs ratio (Hicks et al., 2012)), and define streaks of seismicity orientated down-dip. Moment tensor analysis of selected aftershocks shows that larger events M 4-5 are located at the interface or deeper in the slab (5-8km beneath the slab interface) and show thrust motion along the direction of the plate interface. REs, in contrast, show predominantly strike-slip motion and are located close to the interface. Temporal analysis also shows non-constant recurrence times of events within clusters, which we interpret as an indication that the seismicity in the deep clusters are driven by pulses of after-slip from the Maule 2010 event together with episodic fluid migration. We introduce a model of Mixed Mode Fault Slip (MMFS) to explain our observations, where aseismic sliding of trench sediments in the subduction channel build up stress on fragments of ocean crust, causing them to repeatedly fracture and generate repeating earthquakes.

  6. The global geodynamic effect of the Macquarie Ridge earthquake

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, R.S.; Chao, B. Fong

    1990-06-01

    Besides generating seismic waves, which eventually dissipate, an earthquake also generates a static displacement field everywhere within the Earth. This global displacement field rearranges the Earth's mass distribution, causing the Earth's rotational properties and gravitational field to change. The size of these changes depends, in general, upon the size of the earthquake. The Macquarie Ridge earthquake of May 23, 1989 is considered to be the largest earthquake to have occurred since the 1977 Sumba and Tonga events. As such, the coseismic effect of this earthquake upon the Earth's length-of-day, polar motion, and low-degree harmonic coefficients of the gravitational field are computed. It is found that this earthquake should have caused the length-of-day to decrease by 0.06 {mu}sec, the position of the mean rotation pole to shift 0.11 milli-arcsec towards 323{degree}E longitude, and selected degree l = 2-5 gravitational field coefficients to change by about 1 part in 10{sup 13}. These changes are all smaller than can be detected by current observational techniques. However, changes of this size could perhaps be detected in the future with the implementation of proposed improvements to the techniques of monitoring the Earth's rotation, and (especially for the low-degree gravitational field coefficients) with the placement of GPS receivers onboard orbiting spacecraft.

  7. The Global Earthquake Explorer: A Versatile Tool for Educational Seismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, T. J.; Crotwell, P.

    2004-12-01

    User-friendly access, suitable for an educational environment, to the vast IRIS seismological data holdings has been a stated goal of the Education & Outreach community for some time. The Global Earthquake Explorer (GEE) utilizes advanced data access technology hidden by an intuitive map-based interface to provide educational users with full access to data from the IRIS Data Management Center. Within minutes of a significant earthquake anywhere in the world, seismograms of that earthquake are transmitted to center recording facilities for analysis. Designed with education in mind, GEE can access these same data sources used by professional seismologists through a clickable map interface that allows users to easily select the earthquake and seismograph stations of interest and then receive the seismograms over the Internet with a single click of a mouse. With GEE, users can then view and analyze these seismograms on their local computer. GEE is also a teaching tool. It offers teachers a simple and fun way to introduce their students to earthquakes, earth structure, and wave properties. GEE includes several structured Learning Modules that help develop an elementary understanding of physical principles behind earthquakes and seismology.

  8. Relationships between Slow Slip and Earthquakes at the Brittle-Ductile Transition of Subduction Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brudzinski, M. R.; Colella, H.; Skoumal, R.; Cabral-Cano, E.; Arciniega-Ceballos, A.; Graham, S. E.; DeMets, C.; Sit, S. M.; Holtkamp, S. G.

    2014-12-01

    Following the discovery of episodic tremor and slip, one of the key questions raised is whether the phenomena can be a harbinger of megathrust earthquakes. Several recent large subduction earthquakes have provided an opportunity to investigate this question. The March 20, 2012 Mw 7.4 Ometepec earthquake in southern Mexico represents one such opportunity as it occurred in an area with a joint seismic and geodetic network in the source region that can examine whether patterns in the episodic tremor and slip were related to the earthquake. GPS data indicate that a 5-month-long slow slip episode (SSE) migrated toward and reached the vicinity of the mainshock source zone a few weeks before the earthquake. With multi-station waveform matching of templates constructed from visible aftershock signals, we find an increase in seismic activity during the SSE. The fault patches represented by these templates fill in the gap between the earthquake epicenter and the primary SSE. Analysis of other seismic swarms in Oaxaca near the down-dip end of the seismogenic zone with multi-station template matching also shows an increase in seismicity during SSEs. This evidence adds to a growing number of published accounts that indicate slow slip, whether geodetically or seismically inferred, is becoming a more commonly observed pre-earthquake signature. We use RSQSim earthquake simulations to model these scenarios using a subduction interface with a shallow seismogenic zone, deep SSE zone, and a microseismicity zone in between. Simulations where the microseismicity zone is assigned varying effective normal stresses and slip speeds over small distances generate cases in which microseismicity primarily occurs when a SSE migrates up-dip to the point enough stress is transferred to nucleate an earthquake on elements with a higher effective normal stress. Together these observations support the notion that SSE can trigger traditional earthquakes, not just tremor and low-frequency earthquakes.

  9. Has El Salvador Fault Zone produced M ≥ 7.0 earthquakes? The 1719 El Salvador earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canora, C.; Martínez-Díaz, J.; Álvarez-Gómez, J.; Villamor, P.; Ínsua-Arévalo, J.; Alonso-Henar, J.; Capote, R.

    2013-05-01

    Historically, large earthquakes, Mw ≥ 7.0, in the Εl Salvador area have been attributed to activity in the Cocos-Caribbean subduction zone. Τhis is correct for most of the earthquakes of magnitude greater than 6.5. However, recent paleoseismic evidence points to the existence of large earthquakes associated with rupture of the Εl Salvador Fault Ζone, an Ε-W oriented strike slip fault system that extends for 150 km through central Εl Salvador. Τo calibrate our results from paleoseismic studies, we have analyzed the historical seismicity of the area. In particular, we suggest that the 1719 earthquake can be associated with paleoseismic activity evidenced in the Εl Salvador Fault Ζone. Α reinterpreted isoseismal map for this event suggests that the damage reported could have been a consequence of the rupture of Εl Salvador Fault Ζone, rather than rupture of the subduction zone. Τhe isoseismal is not different to other upper crustal earthquakes in similar tectonovolcanic environments. We thus challenge the traditional assumption that only the subduction zone is capable of generating earthquakes of magnitude greater than 7.0 in this region. Τhis result has broad implications for future risk management in the region. Τhe potential occurrence of strong ground motion, significantly higher and closer to the Salvadorian populations that those assumed to date, must be considered in seismic hazard assessment studies in this area.

  10. Wasatch fault zone, Utah - segmentation and history of Holocene earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Machette, Michael N.; Personius, Stephen F.; Nelson, Alan R.; Schwartz, David P.; Lund, William R.

    1991-01-01

    The Wasatch fault zone (WFZ) forms the eastern boundary of the Basin and Range province and is the longest continuous, active normal fault (343 km) in the United States. It underlies an urban corridor of 1.6 million people (80% of Utah's population) representing the largest earthquake risk in the interior of the western United States. The authors have used paleoseismological data to identify 10 discrete segments of the WFZ. Five are active, medial segments with Holocene slip rates of 1-2 mm a-1, recurrence intervals of 2000-4000 years and average lengths of about 50 km. Five are less active, distal segments with mostly pre-Holocene surface ruptures, late Quaternary slip rates of <0.5 mm a-1, recurrence intervals of ???10,000 years and average lengths of about 20 km. Surface-faulting events on each of the medial segments of the WFZ formed 2-4-m-high scarps repeatedly during the Holocene. Paleoseismological records for the past 6000 years indicate that a major surface-rupturing earthquake has occurred along one of the medial segments about every 395 ?? 60 years. However, between about 400 and 1500 years ago, the WFZ experienced six major surface-rupturing events, an average of one event every 220 years, or about twice as often as expected from the 6000-year record. Evidence has been found that surface-rupturing events occurred on the WFZ during the past 400 years, a time period which is twice the average intracluster recurrence interval and equal to the average Holocene recurrence interval.

  11. Perspectives on earthquake hazards in the New Madrid seismic zone, Missouri

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thenhaus, P.C.

    1990-01-01

    A sequence of three great earthquakes struck the Central United States during the winter of 1811-1812 in the area of New Madrid, Missouri. they are considered to be the greatest earthquakes in the conterminous U.S because they were felt and caused damage at far greater distances than any other earthquakes in U.S history. The large population currently living within the damage area of these earthquakes means that widespread destruction and loss of life is likely if the sequence were repeated. In contrast to California, where the earthquakes are felt frequently, the damaging earthquakes that have occurred in the Easter U.S-in 155 (Cape Ann, Mass.), 1811-12 (New Madrid, Mo.), 1886 (Charleston S.C) ,and 1897 (Giles County, Va.- are generally regarded as only historical phenomena (fig. 1). The social memory of these earthquakes no longer exists. A fundamental problem in the Eastern U.S, therefore, is that the earthquake hazard is not generally considered today in land-use and civic planning. This article offers perspectives on the earthquake hazard of the New Madrid seismic zone through discussions of the geology of the Mississippi Embayment, the historical earthquakes that have occurred there, the earthquake risk, and the "tools" that geoscientists have to study the region. The so-called earthquake hazard is defined  by the characterization of the physical attributes of the geological structures that cause earthquakes, the estimation of the recurrence times of the earthquakes, the estimation of the recurrence times of the earthquakes, their potential size, and the expected ground motions. the term "earthquake risk," on the other hand, refers to aspects of the expected damage to manmade strctures and to lifelines as a result of the earthquake hazard.  

  12. Estimation of strong ground motions from hypothetical earthquakes on the Cascadia subduction zone, Pacific Northwest

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heaton, T.H.; Hartzell, S.H.

    1989-01-01

    Strong ground motions are estimated for the Pacific Northwest assuming that large shallow earthquakes, similar to those experienced in southern Chile, southwestern Japan, and Colombia, may also occur on the Cascadia subduction zone. Fifty-six strong motion recordings for twenty-five subduction earthquakes of Ms???7.0 are used to estimate the response spectra that may result from earthquakes Mw<81/4. Large variations in observed ground motion levels are noted for a given site distance and earthquake magnitude. When compared with motions that have been observed in the western United States, large subduction zone earthquakes produce relatively large ground motions at surprisingly large distances. An earthquake similar to the 22 May 1960 Chilean earthquake (Mw 9.5) is the largest event that is considered to be plausible for the Cascadia subduction zone. This event has a moment which is two orders of magnitude larger than the largest earthquake for which we have strong motion records. The empirical Green's function technique is used to synthesize strong ground motions for such giant earthquakes. Observed teleseismic P-waveforms from giant earthquakes are also modeled using the empirical Green's function technique in order to constrain model parameters. The teleseismic modeling in the period range of 1.0 to 50 sec strongly suggests that fewer Green's functions should be randomly summed than is required to match the long-period moments of giant earthquakes. It appears that a large portion of the moment associated with giant earthquakes occurs at very long periods that are outside the frequency band of interest for strong ground motions. Nevertheless, the occurrence of a giant earthquake in the Pacific Northwest may produce quite strong shaking over a very large region. ?? 1989 Birkha??user Verlag.

  13. An investigation on seismo-ionospheric precursors in various earthquake zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Y.; Liu, J. G.; Chen, M.

    2011-12-01

    Y. C. Su1, J. Y. Liu1 and M. Q. Chen1 1Institute of Space Science, National Central University, Chung-Li,Taiwan. This paper examines the relationships between the ionosphere and earthquakes occurring in different earthquake zones e.g. Malaysia area, Tibet plateau, mid-ocean ridge, Andes, etc., to reveal the possible seismo-ionospheric precursors for these area. Because the lithology, focal mechanism of earthquakes and electrodynamics in the ionosphere at different area are different, it is probable to have diverse ionospheric reactions before large earthquakes occurring in these areas. In addition to statistical analyses on increase or decrease anomalies of the ionospheric electron density few days before large earthquakes, we focus on the seismo-ionospheric precursors for oceanic and land earthquakes as well as for earthquakes with different focal mechanisms.

  14. A mechanical model for intraplate earthquakes: application to the new madrid seismic zone

    PubMed

    Kenner; Segall

    2000-09-29

    We present a time-dependent model for the generation of repeated intraplate earthquakes that incorporates a weak lower crustal zone within an elastic lithosphere. Relaxation of this weak zone after tectonic perturbations transfers stress to the overlying crust, generating a sequence of earthquakes that continues until the zone fully relaxes. Simulations predict large (5 to 10 meters) slip events with recurrence intervals of 250 to 4000 years and cumulative offsets of about 100 meters, depending on material parameters and far-field stress magnitude. Most are consistent with earthquake magnitude, coseismic slip, recurrence intervals, cumulative offset, and surface deformation rates in the New Madrid Seismic Zone. Computed interseismic strain rates may not be detectable with available geodetic data, implying that low observed rates of strain accumulation cannot be used to rule out future damaging earthquakes.

  15. A Computer-Based Subduction-Zone-Earthquake Exercise for Introductory-Geology Classes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shea, James Herbert

    1991-01-01

    Describes the author's computer-based program for a subduction-zone-earthquake exercise. Instructions for conducting the activity and obtaining the program from the author are provided. Written in IBM QuickBasic. (PR)

  16. A Computer-Based Subduction-Zone-Earthquake Exercise for Introductory-Geology Classes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shea, James Herbert

    1991-01-01

    Describes the author's computer-based program for a subduction-zone-earthquake exercise. Instructions for conducting the activity and obtaining the program from the author are provided. Written in IBM QuickBasic. (PR)

  17. Time-Dependent Earthquake Forecasts on a Global Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rundle, J. B.; Holliday, J. R.; Turcotte, D. L.; Graves, W. R.

    2014-12-01

    We develop and implement a new type of global earthquake forecast. Our forecast is a perturbation on a smoothed seismicity (Relative Intensity) spatial forecast combined with a temporal time-averaged ("Poisson") forecast. A variety of statistical and fault-system models have been discussed for use in computing forecast probabilities. An example is the Working Group on California Earthquake Probabilities, which has been using fault-based models to compute conditional probabilities in California since 1988. An example of a forecast is the Epidemic-Type Aftershock Sequence (ETAS), which is based on the Gutenberg-Richter (GR) magnitude-frequency law, the Omori aftershock law, and Poisson statistics. The method discussed in this talk is based on the observation that GR statistics characterize seismicity for all space and time. Small magnitude event counts (quake counts) are used as "markers" for the approach of large events. More specifically, if the GR b-value = 1, then for every 1000 M>3 earthquakes, one expects 1 M>6 earthquake. So if ~1000 M>3 events have occurred in a spatial region since the last M>6 earthquake, another M>6 earthquake should be expected soon. In physics, event count models have been called natural time models, since counts of small events represent a physical or natural time scale characterizing the system dynamics. In a previous research, we used conditional Weibull statistics to convert event counts into a temporal probability for a given fixed region. In the present paper, we move belyond a fixed region, and develop a method to compute these Natural Time Weibull (NTW) forecasts on a global scale, using an internally consistent method, in regions of arbitrary shape and size. We develop and implement these methods on a modern web-service computing platform, which can be found at www.openhazards.com and www.quakesim.org. We also discuss constraints on the User Interface (UI) that follow from practical considerations of site usability.

  18. How complete is the ISC-GEM Global Earthquake Catalog?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Michael, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    The International Seismological Centre, in collaboration with the Global Earthquake Model effort, has released a new global earthquake catalog, covering the time period from 1900 through the end of 2009. In order to use this catalog for global earthquake studies, I determined the magnitude of completeness (Mc) as a function of time by dividing the earthquakes shallower than 60 km into 7 time periods based on major changes in catalog processing and data availability and applying 4 objective methods to determine Mc, with uncertainties determined by non-parametric bootstrapping. Deeper events were divided into 2 time periods. Due to differences between the 4 methods, the final Mc was determined subjectively by examining the features that each method focused on in both the cumulative and binned magnitude frequency distributions. The time periods and Mc values for shallow events are: 1900-1917, Mc=7.7; 1918-1939, Mc=7.0; 1940-1954, Mc=6.8; 1955-1963, Mc=6.5; 1964-1975, Mc=6.0; 1976-2003, Mc=5.8; and 2004-2009, Mc=5.7. Using these Mc values for the longest time periods they are valid for (e.g. 1918-2009, 1940-2009,…) the shallow data fits a Gutenberg-Richter distribution with b=1.05 and a=8.3, within 1 standard deviation, with no declustering. The exception is for time periods that include 1900-1917 in which there are only 33 events with M≥ Mc and for those few data b=2.15±0.46. That result calls for further investigations for this time period, ideally having a larger number of earthquakes. For deep events, the results are Mc=7.1 for 1900-1963, although the early data are problematic; and Mc=5.7 for 1964-2009. For that later time period, b=0.99 and a=7.3.

  19. A Mw 8.1 Earthquake on a Fossil Fracture Zone: The December 23, 2004 Macquarie Ridge Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, D. P.; Sandron, D.; Das, S.

    2006-12-01

    a fossil fracture zones, which is at an angle of ~60° to the plate boundary. This is the largest known earthquake to have occurred on an old fracture zone.

  20. Prospective Evaluation of the Global Earthquake Activity Rate Model (GEAR1) Earthquake Forecast: Preliminary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strader, Anne; Schorlemmer, Danijel; Beutin, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    The Global Earthquake Activity Rate Model (GEAR1) is a hybrid seismicity model, constructed from a loglinear combination of smoothed seismicity from the Global Centroid Moment Tensor (CMT) earthquake catalog and geodetic strain rates (Global Strain Rate Map, version 2.1). For the 2005-2012 retrospective evaluation period, GEAR1 outperformed both parent strain rate and smoothed seismicity forecasts. Since 1. October 2015, GEAR1 has been prospectively evaluated by the Collaboratory for the Study of Earthquake Predictability (CSEP) testing center. Here, we present initial one-year test results of the GEAR1, GSRM and GSRM2.1, as well as localized evaluation of GEAR1 performance. The models were evaluated on the consistency in number (N-test), spatial (S-test) and magnitude (M-test) distribution of forecasted and observed earthquakes, as well as overall data consistency (CL-, L-tests). Performance at target earthquake locations was compared between models using the classical paired T-test and its non-parametric equivalent, the W-test, to determine if one model could be rejected in favor of another at the 0.05 significance level. For the evaluation period from 1. October 2015 to 1. October 2016, the GEAR1, GSRM and GSRM2.1 forecasts pass all CSEP likelihood tests. Comparative test results show statistically significant improvement of GEAR1 performance over both strain rate-based forecasts, both of which can be rejected in favor of GEAR1. Using point process residual analysis, we investigate the spatial distribution of differences in GEAR1, GSRM and GSRM2 model performance, to identify regions where the GEAR1 model should be adjusted, that could not be inferred from CSEP test results. Furthermore, we investigate whether the optimal combination of smoothed seismicity and strain rates remains stable over space and time.

  1. Transition Zone of the Cascadia Subduction Fault: Insights from Seismic Imaging of Slow Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, A.

    2012-12-01

    Transition zone lies between the updip locked and downdip freely slipping zone, and presumably marks the downdip extent of rupture during large megathrust earthquakes. Tectonic behavior of the transition zone and its possible implications on the occurrence of destructive megathurst earthquakes, however, remain poorly understood mainly due to lack of seismic events in this zone. Slow earthquakes, marked by seismically observed tremor and geodetically observed slow slip, occur in the transition zone offering a unique window to this zone, and allow us to study the dynamics of this enigmatic part of the fault. I developed a novel multi beam-backprojection (MBBP) algorithm to image slow earthquakes with high resolution using small-aperture seismic arrays. Application of MBBP technique on slow earthquakes in Cascadia indicates that the majority of the tremor is located near the plate interface [Ghosh et al., JGR, 2012]. Spatiotemporal distribution of tremor is fairly complex, and strikingly different over different time scales. Transition zone appears to be characterized by several patches with dimension of tens of kilometers. The patches behave like asperities, and possibly represent more seismic part of the fault embedded within a relatively aseismic background. Tremor asperities are spatially stable and marked by prolific tremor activity. These tremor asperities seem to control evolution of slow earthquakes and likely represent rheological and/or frictional heterogeneity on the fault plane. In addition, structural features on the fault plane of the transition zone seem to play an important role in shaping the characteristics of the seismic energy radiated from here. Dynamically evolving state-of-stress during slow earthquakes and its interaction with the fault structures possibly govern near-continuous rapid streaking of tremor [Ghosh et al., G-cubed, 2010] and diverse nature of tremor propagations observed over different time scales. Overall, slow quakes are giving

  2. Earthquake-Induced Liquefaction of Confined Soil Zones: A Centrifuge Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-12-09

    AD-A277 135 ANS&A111111 Ill `eo 111 lit 1 11 l e otechnical Centrifuge A Technology EARTHQUAKE-INDUCED LIQUEFACTION OF i CONFINED SOIL ZONES: A...EARTHQUAKE-INDUCED LIQUEFACTION OF ) CONFINED SOIL ZONES: A CENTRIFUGE STUDY A’ Contract Number: DAJA45-93.C-0029 ANS&A Reprot Number : 26-04-R-05 1.0...during the earthquake loading the increase in pore pressure is translated into a lowering of the effective stress. This results in liquefaction

  3. An updated global earthquake catalogue for stable continental regions: reassessing the correlation with ancient rifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulte, Saskia M.; Mooney, Walter D.

    2005-06-01

    We present an updated global earthquake catalogue for stable continental regions (SCRs; i.e. intraplate earthquakes) that is available on the Internet. Our database contains information on location, magnitude, seismic moment and focal mechanisms for over 1300 M (moment magnitude) >= 4.5 historic and instrumentally recorded crustal events. Using this updated earthquake database in combination with a recently published global catalogue of rifts, we assess the correlation of intraplate seismicity with ancient rifts on a global scale. Each tectonic event is put into one of five categories based on location: (i) interior rifts/taphrogens, (ii) rifted continental margins, (iii) non-rifted crust, (iv) possible interior rifts and (v) possible rifted margins. We find that approximately 27 per cent of all events are classified as interior rifts (i), 25 per cent are rifted continental margins (ii), 36 per cent are within non-rifted crust (iii) and 12 per cent (iv and v) remain uncertain. Thus, over half (52 per cent) of all events are associated with rifted crust, although within the continental interiors (i.e. away from continental margins), non-rifted crust has experienced more earthquakes than interior rifts. No major change in distribution is found if only large (M>= 6.0) earthquakes are considered. The largest events (M>= 7.0) however, have occurred predominantly within rifts (50 per cent) and continental margins (43 per cent). Intraplate seismicity is not distributed evenly. Instead several zones of concentrated seismicity seem to exist. This is especially true for interior rifts/taphrogens, where a total of only 12 regions are responsible for 74 per cent of all events and as much as 98 per cent of all seismic moment released in that category. Of the four rifts/taphrogens that have experienced the largest earthquakes, seismicity within the Kutch rift, India, and the East China rift system, may be controlled by diffuse plate boundary deformation more than by the presence

  4. An updated global earthquake catalogue for stable continental regions: Reassessing the correlation with ancient rifts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schulte, S.M.; Mooney, W.D.

    2005-01-01

    We present an updated global earthquake catalogue for stable continental regions (SCRs; i.e. intraplate earthquakes) that is available on the Internet. Our database contains information on location, magnitude, seismic moment and focal mechanisms for over 1300 M (moment magnitude) ??? 4.5 historic and instrumentally recorded crustal events. Using this updated earthquake database in combination with a recently published global catalogue of rifts, we assess the correlation of intraplate seismicity with ancient rifts on a global scale. Each tectonic event is put into one of five categories based on location: (i) interior rifts/taphrogens, (ii) rifted continental margins, (iii) non-rifted crust, (iv) possible interior rifts and (v) possible rifted margins. We find that approximately 27 per cent of all events are classified as interior rifts (i), 25 per cent are rifted continental margins (ii), 36 per cent are within non-rifted crust (iii) and 12 per cent (iv and v) remain uncertain. Thus, over half (52 per cent) of all events are associated with rifted crust, although within the continental interiors (i.e. away from continental margins), non-rifted crust has experienced more earthquakes than interior rifts. No major change in distribution is found if only large (M ??? 6.0) earthquakes are considered. The largest events (M ??? 7.0) however, have occurred predominantly within rifts (50 per cent) and continental margins (43 per cent). Intraplate seismicity is not distributed evenly. Instead several zones of concentrated seismicity seem to exist. This is especially true for interior rifts/taphrogens, where a total of only 12 regions are responsible for 74 per cent of all events and as much as 98 per cent of all seismic moment released in that category. Of the four rifts/taphrogens that have experienced the largest earthquakes, seismicity within the Kutch rift, India, and the East China rift system, may be controlled by diffuse plate boundary deformation more than by the

  5. Aftereffects of Subduction-Zone Earthquakes: Potential Tsunami Hazards along the Japan Sea Coast.

    PubMed

    Minoura, Koji; Sugawara, Daisuke; Yamanoi, Tohru; Yamada, Tsutomu

    2015-10-01

    The 2011 Tohoku-Oki Earthquake is a typical subduction-zone earthquake and is the 4th largest earthquake after the beginning of instrumental observation of earthquakes in the 19th century. In fact, the 2011 Tohoku-Oki Earthquake displaced the northeast Japan island arc horizontally and vertically. The displacement largely changed the tectonic situation of the arc from compressive to tensile. The 9th century in Japan was a period of natural hazards caused by frequent large-scale earthquakes. The aseismic tsunamis that inflicted damage on the Japan Sea coast in the 11th century were related to the occurrence of massive earthquakes that represented the final stage of a period of high seismic activity. Anti-compressive tectonics triggered by the subduction-zone earthquakes induced gravitational instability, which resulted in the generation of tsunamis caused by slope failing at the arc-back-arc boundary. The crustal displacement after the 2011 earthquake infers an increased risk of unexpected local tsunami flooding in the Japan Sea coastal areas.

  6. Deep postseismic viscoelastic relaxation excited by an intraslab normal fault earthquake in the Chile subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bie, Lidong; Ryder, Isabelle; Métois, Marianne

    2017-08-01

    The 2005 Mw 7.8 Tarapaca earthquake was the result of normal faulting on a west-dipping plane at a depth of 90 km within the subducting slab down-dip of the North Chilean gap that partially ruptured in the 2014 M 8.2 Iquique earthquake. We use Envisat observations of nearly four years of postseismic deformation following the earthquake, together with some survey GPS measurements, to investigate the viscoelastic relaxation response of the surrounding upper mantle to the coseismic stress. We constrain the rheological structure by testing various 3D models, taking into account the vertical and lateral heterogeneities in viscosity that one would expect in a subduction zone environment. A viscosity of 4-8 × 1018 Pa s for the continental mantle asthenosphere fits both InSAR line-of-sight (LOS) and GPS horizontal displacements reasonably well. In order to test whether the Tarapaca earthquake and associated postseismic relaxation could have triggered the 2014 Iquique sequence, we computed the Coulomb stress change induced by the co- and postseismic deformation following the Tarapaca earthquake on the megathrust interface and nodal planes of its M 6.7 foreshock. These static stress calculations show that the Tarapaca earthquake may have an indirect influence on the Iquique earthquake, via loading of the M 6.7 preshock positively. We demonstrate the feasibility of using deep intraslab earthquakes to constrain subduction zone rheology. Continuing geodetic observation following the 2014 Iquique earthquake may further validate the rheological parameters obtained here.

  7. Interaction of the san jacinto and san andreas fault zones, southern california: triggered earthquake migration and coupled recurrence intervals.

    PubMed

    Sanders, C O

    1993-05-14

    Two lines of evidence suggest that large earthquakes that occur on either the San Jacinto fault zone (SJFZ) or the San Andreas fault zone (SAFZ) may be triggered by large earthquakes that occur on the other. First, the great 1857 Fort Tejon earthquake in the SAFZ seems to have triggered a progressive sequence of earthquakes in the SJFZ. These earthquakes occurred at times and locations that are consistent with triggering by a strain pulse that propagated southeastward at a rate of 1.7 kilometers per year along the SJFZ after the 1857 earthquake. Second, the similarity in average recurrence intervals in the SJFZ (about 150 years) and in the Mojave segment of the SAFZ (132 years) suggests that large earthquakes in the northern SJFZ may stimulate the relatively frequent major earthquakes on the Mojave segment. Analysis of historic earthquake occurrence in the SJFZ suggests little likelihood of extended quiescence between earthquake sequences.

  8. Interaction of the San Jacinto and San Andreas Fault Zones, Southern California: Triggered Earthquake Migration and Coupled Recurrence Intervals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Christopher O.

    1993-05-01

    Two lines of evidence suggest that large earthquakes that occur on either the San Jacinto fault zone (SJFZ) or the San Andreas fault zone (SAFZ) may be triggered by large earthquakes that occur on the other. First, the great 1857 Fort Tejon earthquake in the SAFZ seems to have triggered a progressive sequence of earthquakes in the SJFZ. These earthquakes occurred at times and locations that are consistent with triggering by a strain pulse that propagated southeastward at a rate of 1.7 kilometers per year along the SJFZ after the 1857 earthquake. Second, the similarity in average recurrence intervals in the SJFZ (about 150 years) and in the Mojave segment of the SAFZ (132 years) suggests that large earthquakes in the northern SJFZ may stimulate the relatively frequent major earthquakes on the Mojave segment. Analysis of historic earthquake occurrence in the SJFZ suggests little likelihood of extended quiescence between earthquake sequences.

  9. Global assessment of human losses due to earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Silva, Vitor; Jaiswal, Kishor; Weatherill, Graeme; Crowley, Helen

    2014-01-01

    Current studies have demonstrated a sharp increase in human losses due to earthquakes. These alarming levels of casualties suggest the need for large-scale investment in seismic risk mitigation, which, in turn, requires an adequate understanding of the extent of the losses, and location of the most affected regions. Recent developments in global and uniform datasets such as instrumental and historical earthquake catalogues, population spatial distribution and country-based vulnerability functions, have opened an unprecedented possibility for a reliable assessment of earthquake consequences at a global scale. In this study, a uniform probabilistic seismic hazard assessment (PSHA) model was employed to derive a set of global seismic hazard curves, using the open-source software OpenQuake for seismic hazard and risk analysis. These results were combined with a collection of empirical fatality vulnerability functions and a population dataset to calculate average annual human losses at the country level. The results from this study highlight the regions/countries in the world with a higher seismic risk, and thus where risk reduction measures should be prioritized.

  10. Variations in the mode of great earthquake rupture along the central Peru subduction zone

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, S.L. ); Nishenko, S.P.

    1990-10-01

    The historic record for the central Peru subduction zone suggests significant variations in the earthquake size during the last 400 years. During this century there have been four great underthrusting earthquakes along the central Peru seismic zone. From the north to south these are the 17 October 1966 (M{sub w} = 8.1), 24 May 1940 (M {approximately} 8), 3 October 1974 (M{sub 2} = 8.1), and 24 August 1942 (M {approximately} 8.2) earthquakes. Modified Mercalli intensity data and tsunami observations for the earthquakes in this century are compared with the 29 October 1746 and 20 October 1687 earthquakes. The 1746 earthquake had maximum intensity values between 9{degree} and 13{degree}S while the 1687 event had maximum values between 12{degree} and 14{degree}S suggesting that the two events failed different segments of the subduction zone. The authors find that the 1746 event occurred along the segment that includes both 1940 and 1966 earthquakes. The size of the 1746 event is estimated to M{sub w} {approximately} 8.8 based on the ratio of near-field tsunami heights for the 1746 and 1966 earthquakes. The 1687 earthquake probably ruptured the 1974 segment as well as the adjacent segment to the south where there is at present a gap between the 1942 and 1974 rupture zones. The size of the 1687 event is estimated to be M{sub w} {approximately} 8.7 based on both far-field and near-field tsunami height ratios of the 1687 and 1974 events. Both 1746 and 1687 earthquakes appear to be much larger than the events of this century. In contrast to the simple, single asperity nature of the 20th century earthquakes, these older and larger events may represent multiple-asperity ruptures along the Peru subduction zone. Hence, variations in the mode of earthquake rupture from cycle to cycle along the central Peru seismic zone may explain the significant difference in earthquake size during the last 400 years.

  11. Seismological investigation of earthquakes in the New Madrid Seismic Zone. Final report, September 1986--December 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmann, R.B.; Nguyen, B.

    1993-08-01

    Earthquake activity in the New Madrid Seismic Zone had been monitored by regional seismic networks since 1975. During this time period, over 3,700 earthquakes have been located within the region bounded by latitudes 35{degrees}--39{degrees}N and longitudes 87{degrees}--92{degrees}W. Most of these earthquakes occur within a 1.5{degrees} x 2{degrees} zone centered on the Missouri Bootheel. Source parameters of larger earthquakes in the zone and in eastern North America are determined using surface-wave spectral amplitudes and broadband waveforms for the purpose of determining the focal mechanism, source depth and seismic moment. Waveform modeling of broadband data is shown to be a powerful tool in defining these source parameters when used complementary with regional seismic network data, and in addition, in verifying the correctness of previously published focal mechanism solutions.

  12. Statistical tests on clustered global earthquake synthetic data sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daub, Eric G.; Trugman, Daniel T.; Johnson, Paul A.

    2015-08-01

    We study the ability of statistical tests to identify nonrandom features of earthquake catalogs, with a focus on the global earthquake record since 1900. We construct four types of synthetic data sets containing varying strengths of clustering, with each data set containing on average 10,000 events over 100 years with magnitudes above M = 6. We apply a suite of statistical tests to each synthetic realization in order to evaluate the ability of each test to identify the sequences of events as nonrandom. Our results show that detection ability is dependent on the quantity of data, the nature of the type of clustering, and the specific signal used in the statistical test. Data sets that exhibit a stronger variation in the seismicity rate are generally easier to identify as nonrandom for a given background rate. We also show that we can address this problem in a Bayesian framework, with the clustered data sets as prior distributions. Using this new Bayesian approach, we can place quantitative bounds on the range of possible clustering strengths that are consistent with the global earthquake data. At M = 7, we can estimate 99th percentile confidence bounds on the number of triggered events, with an upper bound of 20% of the catalog for global aftershock sequences, with a stronger upper bound on the fraction of triggered events of 10% for long-term event clusters. At M = 8, the bounds are less strict due to the reduced number of events. However, our analysis shows that other types of clustering could be present in the data that we are unable to detect. Our results aid in the interpretation of the results of statistical tests on earthquake catalogs, both worldwide and regionally.

  13. Fault zone controlled seafloor methane seepage in the rupture area of the 2010 Maule earthquake, Central Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geersen, Jacob; Scholz, Florian; Linke, Peter; Schmidt, Mark; Lange, Dietrich; Behrmann, Jan H.; Völker, David; Hensen, Christian

    2016-11-01

    Seafloor seepage of hydrocarbon-bearing fluids has been identified in a number of marine fore arcs. However, temporal variations in seep activity and the structural and tectonic parameters that control the seepage often remain poorly constrained. Subduction zone earthquakes, for example, are often discussed to trigger seafloor seepage but causal links that go beyond theoretical considerations have not yet been fully established. This is mainly due to the inaccessibility of offshore epicentral areas, the infrequent occurrence of large earthquakes, and challenges associated with offshore monitoring of seepage over large areas and sufficient time periods. Here we report visual, geochemical, geophysical, and modeling results and observations from the Concepción Methane Seep Area (offshore Central Chile) located in the rupture area of the 2010 Mw. 8.8 Maule earthquake. High methane concentrations in the oceanic water column and a shallow subbottom depth of sulfate penetration indicate active methane seepage. The stable carbon isotope signature of the methane and hydrocarbon composition of the released gas indicate a mixture of shallow-sourced biogenic gas and a deeper sourced thermogenic component. Pristine fissures and fractures observed at the seafloor together with seismically imaged large faults in the marine fore arc may represent effective pathways for methane migration. Upper plate fault activity with hydraulic fracturing and dilation is in line with increased normal Coulomb stress during large plate-boundary earthquakes, as exemplarily modeled for the 2010 earthquake. On a global perspective our results point out the possible role of recurring large subduction zone earthquakes in driving hydrocarbon seepage from marine fore arcs over long timescales.

  14. Three dimensional attenuation and high resolution earthquake location: Applications to the new Madrid seismic zone and Costa Rica seismogenic zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisrat, Shishay Tesfay

    Part 1: Event archives and continuous waveform data recorded by the Cooperative New Madrid Seismic Network (CNSMN) from 1995 to 2008 are analyzed with waveform cross-correlation techniques to investigate the spatiotemporal distribution of MD < 2.4 earthquakes in the New Madrid Seismic Zone (NMSZ). The resulting clusters are divided into swarm clusters and repeating earthquake clusters depending on interevent duration of time. Most swarm clusters occur near Ridgely, Tennessee. Other swarms and repeating earthquake clusters occur at proposed fault intersections in the crystalline basement or along strong velocity contrasts. The presence of anomalously high pore-fluid pressure is the most likely cause of swarm activity. Repeating earthquake ruptures are interpreted as reactivation of small asperities. Part 2: A three-dimensional, high-resolution P-wave seismic attenuation model (QP) for NMSZ is determined from P-wave path attenuation (t*) values of MD < 3.9 earthquakes recorded at 89 seismometers of the CNMSN and 40 seismometers of the Portable Array for Numerical Data Acquisition (PANDA) deployment. The amplitude spectra of all the earthquakes are simultaneously inverted for source, path and site parameters. The t* values are inverted for Qp using local earthquake tomography (LET) methods and a known 3D P-wave velocity model for the region. The four major seismicity arms of the NMSZ exhibit lower Q P values than the surrounding crust. The larger QP anomalies coincide with previously reported high swarm activity attributed to possibly fluid rich fractures along the southeast extension of the Reelfoot fault. Part 3: We use the spectra of 210 earthquakes recorded by 35 seismometers to image the attenuation structure of the seismogenic zone below Nicoya Peninsula, Costa Rica. The amplitude spectra of the earthquakes are used to estimate t* using common spectrum method. An attenuation map is then obtained using LET using a previously constrained velocity model and

  15. Global S-Wave Tomography Using Receiver Pairs: An Alternative to Get Rid of Earthquake Mislocation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leveque, J. J.; Zaroli, C.; Schuberth, B. S. A.; Duputel, Z.; Nolet, G.

    2014-12-01

    Global seismic tomography suffers from uncertainties in earthquake parameters routinely published in seismic catalogues. In particular, errors in earthquake location and origin-time may lead to strong biases in measured body-wave delay-times and significantly pollute tomographic models. Common ways of dealing with this issue are to incorporate source parameters as additional unknowns into the linear tomographic equations, or to seek combinations of data to minimise the influence of source mislocations.We propose an alternative, physically-based method to desensitise direct S-wave delay-times to errors in earthquake location and origin-time. Our approach takes advantage of the fact that mislocation delay-time biases depend to first order on the earthquake-receiver azimuth, and to second order on the epicentral distance. Therefore, for every earthquake, we compute S-wave differential delay-times between optimised receiver pairs, such that a large part of their mislocation delay-time biases cancels out (for example origin-time fully subtracts out), while the difference of their sensitivity kernels remains sensitive to the model parameters of interest. Considering realistic, randomly distributed source mislocation vectors, as well as various levels of data noise and different synthetic Earths, we demonstrate that mislocation-related model errors are highly reduced when inverting for such differential delay-times, compared to absolute ones. The reduction is particularly rewarding for imaging the upper-mantle and transition-zone.We conclude that using optimised receiver pairs is a suitable, low cost alternative to get rid of errors on earthquake location and origin-time for teleseismic direct S-wave traveltimes. Moreover, it can partly remove unilateral rupture propagation effects in cross-correlation delay-times, since they are similar to mislocation effects.

  16. Global S-wave tomography using receiver pairs: an alternative to get rid of earthquake mislocation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaroli, C.; Lévêque, J.-J.; Schuberth, B. S. A.; Duputel, Z.; Nolet, G.

    2014-11-01

    Global seismic tomography suffers from uncertainties in earthquake parameters routinely published in seismic catalogues. In particular, errors in earthquake location and origin-time may lead to strong biases in measured body wave delay-times and significantly pollute tomographic models. Common ways of dealing with this issue are to incorporate source parameters as additional unknowns into the linear tomographic equations, or to seek combinations of data to minimize the influence of source mislocations. We propose an alternative, physically-based method to desensitize direct S-wave delay-times to errors in earthquake location and origin-time. Our approach takes advantage of the fact that mislocation delay-time biases depend to first order on the earthquake-receiver azimuth, and to second order on the epicentral distance. Therefore, for every earthquake, we compute S-wave differential delay-times between optimized receiver pairs, such that a large part of their mislocation delay-time biases cancels out (for example origin-time fully subtracts out), while the difference of their sensitivity kernels remains sensitive to the model parameters of interest. Considering realistic, randomly distributed source mislocation vectors, as well as various levels of data noise and different synthetic Earths, we demonstrate that mislocation-related model errors are highly reduced when inverting for such differential delay-times, compared to absolute ones. The reduction is particularly rewarding for imaging the upper-mantle and transition zone. We conclude that using optimized receiver pairs is a suitable, low cost alternative to get rid of errors on earthquake location and origin-time for teleseismic direct S-wave traveltimes. Moreover, it can partly remove unilateral rupture propagation effects in cross-correlation delay-times, since they are similar to mislocation effects.

  17. Revision of earthquake hypocentre locations in global bulletin data sets using source-specific station terms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nooshiri, Nima; Saul, Joachim; Heimann, Sebastian; Tilmann, Frederik; Dahm, Torsten

    2017-02-01

    Global earthquake locations are often associated with very large systematic travel-time residuals even for clear arrivals, especially for regional and near-regional stations in subduction zones because of their strongly heterogeneous velocity structure. Travel-time corrections can drastically reduce travel-time residuals at regional stations and, in consequence, improve the relative location accuracy. We have extended the shrinking-box source-specific station terms technique to regional and teleseismic distances and adopted the algorithm for probabilistic, nonlinear, global-search location. We evaluated the potential of the method to compute precise relative hypocentre locations on a global scale. The method has been applied to two specific test regions using existing P- and pP-phase picks. The first data set consists of 3103 events along the Chilean margin and the second one comprises 1680 earthquakes in the Tonga-Fiji subduction zone. Pick data were obtained from the GEOFON earthquake bulletin, produced using data from all available, global station networks. A set of timing corrections varying as a function of source position was calculated for each seismic station. In this way, we could correct the systematic errors introduced into the locations by the inaccuracies in the assumed velocity structure without explicitly solving for a velocity model. Residual statistics show that the median absolute deviation of the travel-time residuals is reduced by 40-60 per cent at regional distances, where the velocity anomalies are strong. Moreover, the spread of the travel-time residuals decreased by ˜20 per cent at teleseismic distances (>28°). Furthermore, strong variations in initial residuals as a function of recording distance are smoothed out in the final residuals. The relocated catalogues exhibit less scattered locations in depth and sharper images of the seismicity associated with the subducting slabs. Comparison with a high-resolution local catalogue reveals that

  18. Revision of Earthquake Hypocentre Locations in Global Bulletin Data Sets using Source-Specific Station Terms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nooshiri, Nima; Saul, Joachim; Heimann, Sebastian; Tilmann, Frederik; Dahm, Torsten

    2016-10-01

    Global earthquake locations are often associated with very large systematic travel time residuals even for clear arrivals, especially for regional and near-regional stations in subduction zones because of their strongly heterogeneous velocity structure. Travel time corrections can drastically reduce travel-time residuals at regional stations and, in consequence, improve the relative location accuracy. We have extended the shrinking box source-specific station terms (SSST) technique to regional and teleseismic distances and adopted the algorithm for probabilistic, non-linear, global-search location. We evaluated the potential of the method to compute precise relative hypocentre locations on a global scale. The method has been applied to two specific test regions using existing P- and pP-phase picks. The first data set consists of 3103 events along the Chilean margin and the second one comprises 1680 earthquakes in the Tonga-Fiji subduction zone. Pick data were obtained from the GEOFON earthquake bulletin, produced using data from all available, global station networks. A set of timing corrections varying as a function of source position was calculated for each seismic station. In this way, we could correct the systematic errors introduced into the locations by the inaccuracies in the assumed velocity structure without explicitly solving for a velocity model. Residual statistics show that the median absolute deviation (MAD) of the travel time residuals is reduced by 40% - 60% at regional distances, where the velocity anomalies are strong. Moreover, the spread of the travel time residuals decreased by ˜20% at teleseismic distances (>28°). Furthermore, strong variations in initial residuals as a function of recording distance are smoothed out in the final residuals. The relocated catalogues exhibit less scattered locations in depth and sharper images of the seismicity associated with the subducting slabs. Comparison with a high resolution local catalogue reveals that

  19. A Global Review of Slow Slip Events and Seismic Tremor at Circum-Pacific Subduction Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, S. Y.; Rokosky, J. M.

    2006-12-01

    It has been known for a long time that slip accompanying earthquakes accounts for only a fraction of plate tectonic displacements. However, only recently has a fuller spectrum of strain release processes, including normal, slow and silent earthquakes (or slow slip events), and continuous and episodic creep, been observed and generated by numerical simulations of the earthquake cycle. Despite a profusion of observations and modeling studies, the physical mechanism of slow slip events (SSEs) remains elusive. The concurrence of seismic tremor, similar to signals observed at volcanoes, with slow slip episodes in Cascadia and southwestern Japan suggests that SSEs may be related to fluid migration on or near the plate interface. We compare the location, spatial extent, magnitude, duration, slip rate, recurrence behavior and associated tremor and seismicity of aseismic slip transients worldwide to better understand their generation and earthquake hazard implications. We find that slow slip events occur at either the down-dip edge of the seismogenic zone, or at complementary locations to strongly locked patches or co-seismic asperities within the seismogenic zone. Nucleation of SSEs at frictional transitions is supported by rate- and state-dependent frictional modeling. We find a global scaling relationship between SSE duration and equivalent moment magnitude that implies a constant rate of slow slip propagation, consistent with the small range in observed SSE migration rates. Afterslip following moderate to large earthquakes suggests a relationship between slow slip and higher velocity rupture (earthquakes). We assess if such a cause-and-effect relationship exists between interseismic SSEs and earthquake activity. We find that although isolated episodes of interseismic slow slip can be related to nearby earthquake activity, a consistent triggering pattern has yet to emerge and further study is clearly warranted.

  20. Toward a Global Model for Predicting Earthquake-Induced Landslides in Near-Real Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowicki, M. A.; Wald, D. J.; Hamburger, M. W.; Hearne, M.; Thompson, E.

    2013-12-01

    We present a newly developed statistical model for estimating the distribution of earthquake-triggered landslides in near-real time, which is designed for use in the USGS Prompt Assessment of Global Earthquakes for Response (PAGER) and ShakeCast systems. We use standardized estimates of ground shaking from the USGS ShakeMap Atlas 2.0 to develop an empirical landslide probability model by combining shaking estimates with broadly available landslide susceptibility proxies, including topographic slope, surface geology, and climatic parameters. While the initial model was based on four earthquakes for which digitally mapped landslide inventories and well constrained ShakeMaps are available--the Guatemala (1976), Northridge, California (1994), Chi-Chi, Taiwan (1999), and Wenchuan, China (2008) earthquakes, our improved model includes observations from approximately ten other events from a variety of tectonic and geomorphic settings for which we have obtained landslide inventories. Using logistic regression, this database is used to build a predictive model of the probability of landslide occurrence. We assess the performance of the regression model using statistical goodness-of-fit metrics to determine which combination of the tested landslide proxies provides the optimum prediction of observed landslides while minimizing ';false alarms' in non-landslide zones. Our initial results indicate strong correlations with peak ground acceleration and maximum slope, and weaker correlations with surface geological and soil wetness proxies. In terms of the original four events included, the global model predicts landslides most accurately when applied to the Wenchuan and Chi-Chi events, and less accurately when applied to the Northridge and Guatemala datasets. Combined with near-real time ShakeMaps, the model can be used to make generalized predictions of whether or not landslides are likely to occur (and if so, where) for future earthquakes around the globe, and these estimates

  1. Seismic source zoning and maximum credible earthquake prognosis of the Greater Kashmir Territory, NW Himalaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sana, Hamid; Nath, Sankar Kumar

    2017-03-01

    We present the seismic source zoning of the tectonically active Greater Kashmir territory of the Northwestern Himalaya and seismicity analysis (Gutenberg-Richter parameters) and maximum credible earthquake ( m max) estimation of each zone. The earthquake catalogue used in the analysis is an extensive one compiled from various sources which spans from 1907 to 2012. Five seismogenic zones were delineated, viz. Hazara-Kashmir Syntaxis, Karakorum Seismic Zone, Kohistan Seismic Zone, Nanga Parbat Syntaxis, and SE-Kashmir Seismic Zone. Then, the seismicity analysis and maximum credible earthquake estimation were carried out for each zone. The low b value (<1.0) indicates a higher stress regime in all the zones except Nanga Parbat Syntaxis Seismic Zone and SE-Kashmir Seismic Zone. The m max was estimated following three different methodologies, the fault parameter approach, convergence rates using geodetic measurements, and the probabilistic approach using the earthquake catalogue and is estimated to be M w 7.7, M w 8.5, and M w 8.1, respectively. The maximum credible earthquake ( m max) estimated for each zone shows that Hazara Kashmir Syntaxis Seismic Zone has the highest m max of M w 8.1 (±0.36), which is espoused by the historical 1555 Kashmir earthquake of M w 7.6 as well as the recent 8 October 2005 Kashmir earthquake of M w 7.6. The variation in the estimated m max by the above discussed methodologies is obvious, as the definition and interpretation of the m max change with the method. Interestingly, historical archives (˜900 years) do not speak of a great earthquake in this region, which is attributed to the complex and unique tectonic and geologic setup of the Kashmir Himalaya. The convergence is this part of the Himalaya is distributed not only along the main boundary faults but also along the various active out-of-sequence faults as compared to the Central Himalaya, where it is mainly adjusted along the main boundary fault.

  2. Seismic source zoning and maximum credible earthquake prognosis of the Greater Kashmir Territory, NW Himalaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sana, Hamid; Nath, Sankar Kumar

    2016-09-01

    We present the seismic source zoning of the tectonically active Greater Kashmir territory of the Northwestern Himalaya and seismicity analysis (Gutenberg-Richter parameters) and maximum credible earthquake (m max) estimation of each zone. The earthquake catalogue used in the analysis is an extensive one compiled from various sources which spans from 1907 to 2012. Five seismogenic zones were delineated, viz. Hazara-Kashmir Syntaxis, Karakorum Seismic Zone, Kohistan Seismic Zone, Nanga Parbat Syntaxis, and SE-Kashmir Seismic Zone. Then, the seismicity analysis and maximum credible earthquake estimation were carried out for each zone. The low b value (<1.0) indicates a higher stress regime in all the zones except Nanga Parbat Syntaxis Seismic Zone and SE-Kashmir Seismic Zone. The m max was estimated following three different methodologies, the fault parameter approach, convergence rates using geodetic measurements, and the probabilistic approach using the earthquake catalogue and is estimated to be M w 7.7, M w 8.5, and M w 8.1, respectively. The maximum credible earthquake (m max) estimated for each zone shows that Hazara Kashmir Syntaxis Seismic Zone has the highest m max of M w 8.1 (±0.36), which is espoused by the historical 1555 Kashmir earthquake of M w 7.6 as well as the recent 8 October 2005 Kashmir earthquake of M w 7.6. The variation in the estimated m max by the above discussed methodologies is obvious, as the definition and interpretation of the m max change with the method. Interestingly, historical archives (˜900 years) do not speak of a great earthquake in this region, which is attributed to the complex and unique tectonic and geologic setup of the Kashmir Himalaya. The convergence is this part of the Himalaya is distributed not only along the main boundary faults but also along the various active out-of-sequence faults as compared to the Central Himalaya, where it is mainly adjusted along the main boundary fault.

  3. Geodetic, teleseismic, and strong motion constraints on slip from recent southern Peru subduction zone earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pritchard, M. E.; Norabuena, E. O.; Ji, C.; Boroschek, R.; Comte, D.; Simons, M.; Dixon, T. H.; Rosen, P. A.

    2007-03-01

    We use seismic and geodetic data both jointly and separately to constrain coseismic slip from the 12 November 1996 Mw 7.7 and 23 June 2001 Mw 8.5 southern Peru subduction zone earthquakes, as well as two large aftershocks following the 2001 earthquake on 26 June and 7 July 2001. We use all available data in our inversions: GPS, interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) from the ERS-1, ERS-2, JERS, and RADARSAT-1 satellites, and seismic data from teleseismic and strong motion stations. Our two-dimensional slip models derived from only teleseismic body waves from South American subduction zone earthquakes with Mw > 7.5 do not reliably predict available geodetic data. In particular, we find significant differences in the distribution of slip for the 2001 earthquake from models that use only seismic (teleseismic and two strong motion stations) or geodetic (InSAR and GPS) data. The differences might be related to postseismic deformation or, more likely, the different sensitivities of the teleseismic and geodetic data to coseismic rupture properties. The earthquakes studied here follow the pattern of earthquake directivity along the coast of western South America, north of 5°S, earthquakes rupture to the north; south of about 12°S, directivity is southerly; and in between, earthquakes are bilateral. The predicted deformation at the Arequipa GPS station from the seismic-only slip model for the 7 July 2001 aftershock is not consistent with significant preseismic motion.

  4. Evidence for large prehistoric earthquakes in the northern New Madrid Seismic Zone, central United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Li, Y.; Schweig, E.S.; Tuttle, M.P.; Ellis, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    We surveyed the area north of New Madris, Missouri, for prehistoric liquefaction deposits and uncovered two new sites with evidence of pre-1811 earthquakes. At one site, located about 20 km northeast of New Madrid, Missouri, radiocarbon dating indicates that an upper sand blow was probably deposited after A.D. 1510 and a lower sand blow was deposited prior to A.D. 1040. A sand blow at another site about 45 km northeast of New Madrid, Missouri, is dated as likely being deposited between A.D.55 and A.D. 1620 and represents the northernmost recognized expression of prehistoric liquefaction likely related to the New Madrid seismic zone. This study, taken together with other data, supports the occurrence of at least two earthquakes strong enough to indcue liquefaction or faulting before A.D. 1811, and after A.D. 400. One earthquake probably occurred around AD 900 and a second earthquake occurred around A.D. 1350. The data are not yet sufficient to estimate the magnitudes of the causative earthquakes for these liquefaction deposits although we conclude that all of the earthquakes are at least moment magnitude M ~6.8, the size of the 1895 Charleston, Missouri, earthquake. A more rigorous estimate of the number and sizes of prehistoric earthquakes in the New Madrid sesmic zone awaits evaluation of additional sites.

  5. Areas of slip of recent earthquakes in the Mexican subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hjorleifsdottir, V.; Sánchez-Reyes, H. S.; Singh, S.; Ji, C.; Iglesias, A.; Perez-Campos, X.

    2012-12-01

    The Mexican subduction zone is unusual: the width of the seismogenic zone is relatively narrow and a large portion of the co-seismic slip generally occurs below the coast, ~ 45 to 80 km from the trench. The earthquake recurrence interval is relatively short and almost the entire length of the zone has experienced a large (Mw≥7.4) earthquake in the last 100 years (Singh et al., 1981). In this study we present detailed analysis of the areas of significant slip during several recent (last 20 years) large earthquakes in the Mexican subduction zone. The most recent earthquake of 20 March 2012 (Mw7.4) occurred near the Guerrero/Oaxaca border. The slip was concentrated on the plate interface below land and the epicentral PGAs ranged between 0.2 and 0.7g. The updip portion of the plate interface had previously broken during the 25 Feb 1996 earthquake (Mw7.1), which was a slow earthquake and produced anomalously low PGAs (Iglesias et al., 2003). This indicates that in this region the area close to the trench is at least partially locked, with some earthquakes breaking the down-dip portion of the interface and others rupturing the up-dip portion. The Jalisco/Colima segment of the subduction zone seems to behave in a similar fashion. The 9 October 1995 (Mw 8.0) earthquake generated small accelerations relative to its size. The energy to moment ratio, E0/M0, is 4.2e-6 (Pérez-Campos, Singh and Beroza, 2003), a value similar to the Feb, 1996 earthquake. This value is low compared to other thrust events in the region. The earthquake also had the largest (Ms-Mw) disparity along the Mexican subduction zone, 7.4 vs 8.0. The event produced relatively large tsunami. On the contrary, the 3 June 1932 earthquake (Ms8.2, Mw8.0), that is believed to have broken the same segment of the subduction zone, appears to be "normal." Based on the available evidence, it may be concluded that the 1932 event broke a deeper patch of the plate interface relative to the 1995 event. The mode of rupture

  6. Automatic picking and earthquake relocation for the Antilles subduction zone (1972-2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massin, F.; Amorèse, D.; Bengoubou-Valerius, M.; Bernard, M.

    2013-12-01

    Locations for earthquake recorded in the Antilles subduction zone are processed separately by regional observatories and ISC. There is no earthquake location catalog available compiling all available first arrival data. We aim to produce a best complete earthquake catalog by merging all available first arrival data for better constrains on earthquake locations. ISC provides the first arrival data of 29243 earthquakes (magnitude range from 1.4 to 6.4) recorded by PRSN (Porto Rico), SRC (British West Indies), and form FUNVISIS (Venezuela). IPGP provided the first arrival data of 68718 earthquakes (magnitude from 0.1 to 7.5) recorded by OVSG (Guadeloupe, 53226 earthquakes since 1981) and by OVSM (Martinique, 29931 earthquakes since 1972). IPGP also provides the accelerometer waveform data of the GIS-RAP network in the Antilles. The final catalog contains 84979 earthquakes between 1972 and 2013, 24528 of which we compiled additional data. We achieved automatic picking using the Component Energy Correlation Method. The CECM provide high precision phase detection, a realistic estimation of picking error and realistic weights that can be used with manual pick weights. The CECM add an average of 3 P-waves and 2 S-waves arrivals to 3846 earthquakes recoded by the GIS-RAP network since 2002. Cluster analysis, earthquake local tomography and relative locations are to be applied in order to image active faulting and migration of seismicity. This will help to understand seismic coupling in the seismogenic zone as well as triggering mechanisms of intermediate depth seismicity like fluid migration beneath the volcanic arc.

  7. Biogeography of the Global Ocean's Mesopelagic Zone.

    PubMed

    Proud, Roland; Cox, Martin J; Brierley, Andrew S

    2017-01-09

    The global ocean's near surface can be partitioned into distinct provinces on the basis of regional primary productivity and oceanography [1]. This ecological geography provides a valuable framework for understanding spatial variability in ecosystem function but has relevance only partway into the epipelagic zone (the top 200 m). The mesopelagic (200-1,000 m) makes up approximately 20% of the global ocean volume, plays important roles in biogeochemical cycling [2], and holds potentially huge fish resources [3-5]. It is, however, hidden from satellite observation, and a lack of globally consistent data has prevented development of a global-scale understanding. Acoustic deep scattering layers (DSLs) are prominent features of the mesopelagic. These vertically narrow (tens to hundreds of m) but horizontally extensive (continuous for tens to thousands of km) layers comprise fish and zooplankton and are readily detectable using echosounders. We have compiled a database of DSL characteristics globally. We show that DSL depth and acoustic backscattering intensity (a measure of biomass) can be modeled accurately using just surface primary productivity, temperature, and wind stress. Spatial variability in these environmental factors leads to a natural partition of the mesopelagic into ten distinct classes. These classes demark a more complex biogeography than the latitudinally banded schemes proposed before [6, 7]. Knowledge of how environmental factors influence the mesopelagic enables future change to be explored: we predict that by 2100 there will be widespread homogenization of mesopelagic communities and that mesopelagic biomass could increase by approximately 17%. The biomass increase requires increased trophic efficiency, which could arise because of ocean warming and DSL shallowing.

  8. Near-surface versus fault zone damage following the 1999 Chi-Chi earthquake: Observation and simulation of repeating earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kate Huihsuan; Furumura, Takashi; Rubinstein, Justin

    2015-04-01

    We observe crustal damage and its subsequent recovery caused by the 1999 M7.6 Chi-Chi earthquake in central Taiwan. Analysis of repeating earthquakes in Hualien region, ~70 km east of the Chi-Chi earthquake, shows a remarkable change in wave propagation beginning in the year 2000, revealing damage within the fault zone and distributed across the near surface. We use moving window cross correlation to identify a dramatic decrease in the waveform similarity and delays in the S wave coda. The maximum delay is up to 59 ms, corresponding to a 7.6% velocity decrease averaged over the wave propagation path. The waveform changes on either side of the fault are distinct. They occur in different parts of the waveforms, affect different frequencies, and the size of the velocity reductions is different. Using a finite difference method, we simulate the effect of postseismic changes in the wavefield by introducing S wave velocity anomaly in the fault zone and near the surface. The models that best fit the observations point to pervasive damage in the near surface and deep, along-fault damage at the time of the Chi-Chi earthquake. The footwall stations show the combined effect of near-surface and the fault zone damage, where the velocity reduction (2-7%) is twofold to threefold greater than the fault zone damage observed in the hanging wall stations. The physical models obtained here allow us to monitor the temporal evolution and recovering process of the Chi-Chi fault zone damage.

  9. Near-surface versus fault zone damage following the 1999 Chi-Chi earthquake: Observation and simulation of repeating earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, Kate Huihsuan; Furumura, Takashi; Rubinstein, Justin L.

    2015-01-01

    We observe crustal damage and its subsequent recovery caused by the 1999 M7.6 Chi-Chi earthquake in central Taiwan. Analysis of repeating earthquakes in Hualien region, ~70 km east of the Chi-Chi earthquake, shows a remarkable change in wave propagation beginning in the year 2000, revealing damage within the fault zone and distributed across the near surface. We use moving window cross correlation to identify a dramatic decrease in the waveform similarity and delays in the S wave coda. The maximum delay is up to 59 ms, corresponding to a 7.6% velocity decrease averaged over the wave propagation path. The waveform changes on either side of the fault are distinct. They occur in different parts of the waveforms, affect different frequencies, and the size of the velocity reductions is different. Using a finite difference method, we simulate the effect of postseismic changes in the wavefield by introducing S wave velocity anomaly in the fault zone and near the surface. The models that best fit the observations point to pervasive damage in the near surface and deep, along-fault damage at the time of the Chi-Chi earthquake. The footwall stations show the combined effect of near-surface and the fault zone damage, where the velocity reduction (2–7%) is twofold to threefold greater than the fault zone damage observed in the hanging wall stations. The physical models obtained here allow us to monitor the temporal evolution and recovering process of the Chi-Chi fault zone damage.

  10. Tsunami potential assessment based on rupture zones, focal mechanisms and repeat times of strong earthquakes in the major Atlantic-Mediterranean seismic fracture zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agalos, Apostolos; Papadopoulos, Gerassimos A.; Kijko, Andrzej; Papageorgiou, Antonia; Smit, Ansie; Triantafyllou, Ioanna

    2016-04-01

    In the major Atlantic-Mediterranean seismic fracture zone, extended from Azores islands in the west to the easternmost Mediterranean Sea in the east, including the Marmara and Black Seas, a number of 22 tsunamigenic zones have been determined from historical and instrumental tsunami documentation. Although some tsunamis were produced by volcanic activity or landslides, the majority of them was generated by strong earthquakes. Since the generation of seismic tsunamis depends on several factors, like the earthquake size, focal depth and focal mechanism, the study of such parameters is of particular importance for the assessment of the potential for the generation of future tsunamis. However, one may not rule out the possibility for tsunami generation in areas outside of the 22 zones determined so far. For the Atlantic-Mediterranean seismic fracture zone we have compiled a catalogue of strong, potentially tsunamigenic (focal depth less than 100 km) historical earthquakes from various data bases and other sources. The lateral areas of rupture zones of these earthquakes were determined. Rupture zone is the area where the strain after the earthquake has dropped substantially with respect the strain before the earthquake. Aftershock areas were assumed to determine areas of rupture zones for instrumental earthquakes. For historical earthquakes macroseismic criteria were used such as spots of higher-degree seismic intensity and of important ground failures. For the period of instrumental seismicity, focal mechanism solutions from CMT, EMMA and other data bases were selected for strong earthquakes. From the geographical distribution of seismic rupture zones and the corresponding focal mechanisms in the entire Atlantic-Mediterranean seismic fracture zone we determined potentially tsunamigenic zones regardless they are known to have produced seismic tsunamis in the past or not. An attempt has been made to calculate in each one of such zones the repeat times of strong

  11. Detection of change points in underlying earthquake rates, with application to global mega-earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Touati, Sarah; Naylor, Mark; Main, Ian

    2016-02-01

    The recent spate of mega-earthquakes since 2004 has led to speculation of an underlying change in the global `background' rate of large events. At a regional scale, detecting changes in background rate is also an important practical problem for operational forecasting and risk calculation, for example due to volcanic processes, seismicity induced by fluid injection or withdrawal, or due to redistribution of Coulomb stress after natural large events. Here we examine the general problem of detecting changes in background rate in earthquake catalogues with and without correlated events, for the first time using the Bayes factor as a discriminant for models of varying complexity. First we use synthetic Poisson (purely random) and Epidemic-Type Aftershock Sequence (ETAS) models (which also allow for earthquake triggering) to test the effectiveness of many standard methods of addressing this question. These fall into two classes: those that evaluate the relative likelihood of different models, for example using Information Criteria or the Bayes Factor; and those that evaluate the probability of the observations (including extreme events or clusters of events) under a single null hypothesis, for example by applying the Kolmogorov-Smirnov and `runs' tests, and a variety of Z-score tests. The results demonstrate that the effectiveness among these tests varies widely. Information Criteria worked at least as well as the more computationally expensive Bayes factor method, and the Kolmogorov-Smirnov and runs tests proved to be the relatively ineffective in reliably detecting a change point. We then apply the methods tested to events at different thresholds above magnitude M ≥ 7 in the global earthquake catalogue since 1918, after first declustering the catalogue. This is most effectively done by removing likely correlated events using a much lower magnitude threshold (M ≥ 5), where triggering is much more obvious. We find no strong evidence that the background rate of large

  12. Meeting the Challenge of Earthquake Risk Globalisation: Towards the Global Earthquake Model GEM (Sergey Soloviev Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zschau, J.

    2009-04-01

    Earthquake risk, like natural risks in general, has become a highly dynamic and globally interdependent phenomenon. Due to the "urban explosion" in the Third World, an increasingly complex cross linking of critical infrastructure and lifelines in the industrial nations and a growing globalisation of the world's economies, we are presently facing a dramatic increase of our society's vulnerability to earthquakes in practically all seismic regions on our globe. Such fast and global changes cannot be captured with conventional earthquake risk models anymore. The sciences in this field are, therefore, asked to come up with new solutions that are no longer exclusively aiming at the best possible quantification of the present risks but also keep an eye on their changes with time and allow to project these into the future. This does not apply to the vulnerablity component of earthquake risk alone, but also to its hazard component which has been realized to be time-dependent, too. The challenges of earthquake risk dynamics and -globalisation have recently been accepted by the Global Science Forum of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD - GSF) who initiated the "Global Earthquake Model (GEM)", a public-private partnership for establishing an independent standard to calculate, monitor and communicate earthquake risk globally, raise awareness and promote mitigation.

  13. Rare dynamic triggering of remote M ≥ 5.5 earthquakes from global catalog analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Christopher W.; Bürgmann, Roland; Pollitz, Fred F.

    2015-03-01

    Probing the effects of a transient stress on the timing of an earthquake occurrence is necessary for understanding the remote interaction of large-magnitude events. Global catalog data containing 35 years of M ≥ 5.5 earthquakes allow us to explore for periods of enhanced or suppressed seismic activity. We consider 113 M ≥ 7.5 main shocks between 1977 and 2012 and focus on seismic activity on time scales from seconds to days following these main shocks. We search for evidence of dynamic triggering of large-magnitude events similar to the previously observed global increase during the first few days following the 2012 M8.6 Indian Ocean main shock. We restrict the analysis to regions of elevated strain during the passage of surface waves. Using a threshold of 0.1 microstrain (~3 kPa) and a temporal window of ±1 year, we stack daily seismicity rate curves using the exclusion-zone declustered M ≥ 5.5 catalog events in order to resolve deviations from the background rate. Our results do not indicate a significant change in activity for at least 10 days when considering the collective set of 113 main shocks and subsets at M8.0 and M8.5 thresholds. The results also do not indicate immediate triggering of M ≥ 5.5 events. We do find two instances of increased seismicity in the elevated strain region within 10 days. These increases are subsequent to two main shocks, the 1977 M8.3 and 2012 M8.6, both located in the Indian Ocean. We conclude that a global change in M ≥ 5.5 earthquake rates following a transient stress from distant earthquakes is a rare occurrence.

  14. Dietary attitudes and behaviours of women in China after the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake in three seismically different zones.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ping; Han, Ling-Li; Hou, Feng-Gang; Xu, Xiang-Long; Sharma, Manoj; Zhao, Yong

    2016-12-01

    The sudden occurrence of the 2008 Wenchuan Earthquake not only devastated people's health, but also may have impacted on the psychological and dietary attitudes and behaviours of the survivors. Although the influence of natural disaster on people's health has been extensively investigated, there is a lack of information about the effects on people's dietary attitudes and behaviours. Our aim was to evaluate the influence of the Wenchuan earthquake on the dietary attitudes and behaviours of adult women from different zones of China in July 2008. 736 women, aged 18-55 years old, were randomly selected and interviewed after the earthquake. Women were selected from three zones: the earthquake zone (n=206), the shaking zone (n=326), and the non-seismic zone (n=204). Although nutrition knowledge mean scores of women in the three zones were relatively low, the women in the earthquake zone became more vigilant about the nutritional value and acceptability of food than women in the other two zones. Nevertheless, women in the earthquake zone also developed some arguably untoward, if understandable, behaviour after the disaster. They increased their consumption and tendency to stock instant food and snack items. That said, these findings were modulated by other factors such as age, residence, Body Mass Index (BMI), and nutrition knowledge itself, as were post-earthquake eating behaviours, as judged by the ordinal logistic regression analyses performed. The major Wenchuan earthquake was associated with differentials in dietary attitudes and behaviours among women by seismic zone.

  15. Shear zones formed along long, straight traces of fault zones during the 28 June 1992 Landers, California, earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Arvid M.; Fleming, Robert W.; Cruikshank, Kenneth M.

    1994-01-01

    Surface rupturing during the 28 June 1992 Landers, California, earthquake, east of Los Angeles, accommodated right-lateral offsets up to about 6 m along segments of distinct, en-echelon fault zones with a total length of 80 km. The offsets were accommodated generally not by faults—distinct slip surfaces—but rather by shear zones, tabular bands of localized shearing. Along simple stretches of fault zones at Landers the rupture is characterized by telescoping of shear zones and intensification of shearing: broad shear zones of mild shearing, containing narrow shear zones of more intense shearing, containing even narrower shear zones of very intense shearing, which may contain a fault. Thus the ground ruptured across broad belts of shearing with clearly defined, subparallel walls, oriented NW. Each broad belt consists of a broad zone of mild shearing, extending across its entire width (50 to 200 m), and much narrower (a few meters wide) shear zones that accommodate most of the offset of the belt and are portrayed by en-echelon tension cracks. In response to right-lateral shearing, the slices of ground bounded by the tension cracks rotated in a clockwise sense, producing left-lateral shearing, and the slices were forced against the walls of the shear zone, producing thrusting. Even narrower shear zones formed within the narrow shear zones. Although these probably are guides to right-lateral fault segments below, the surface rupturing during the earthquake is characterized not by faulting, but by the formation of shear zones at various scales.

  16. Source Properties of Repeating Small Earthquakes in the Aftershock Zones of the 1999 Izmit and Duzce Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Zion, Y.; Peng, Z.

    2006-12-01

    We estimate the source parameters of repeating small earthquakes in the aftershock zones of the 1999 Mw7.4 Izmit and Mw7.1 Duzce earthquakes. The analysis employs 36 sets of highly repeating earthquakes, ranging in size from M 0 to M 3.0, that occurred from August 1999 to February 2000 along the Karadere-Duzce segment of the north Anatolian fault [Peng and Ben-Zion, 2006]. A local PASSCAL network consisting of 10 short-period stations recorded the data. We compute spectra from each seismogram using a multitaper technique. We measure the difference between events by dividing the spectra of the each individual record to the average spectra at that station [Vidale et al., 1994]. Stable spectra ratios are obtained by stacking the ratios calculated from moving windows starting from the P waves to the S-coda waves [Imanishi and Ellsworth, 2006]. Next, we estimate the seismic potencies and corner frequencies for events in each cluster using a simple source model. The continuing work will focus on deriving static stress drops, apparent stresses and radiated energy of these repeating earthquakes. A comparison of the source properties of the repeating small earthquakes with those of large aftershocks and the Duzce main shock would allow us to examine whether there are systematic variations with location and/or size.

  17. ISC-GEM: Global Instrumental Earthquake Catalogue (1900-2009) I. Location and Seismicity Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondar, I.; Engdahl, E. R.; Villasenor, A.; Storchak, D. A.

    2012-12-01

    We present the final results of a two-year project sponsored by the GEM (Global Earthquake Model) Foundation. The ISC-GEM global catalogue consists of some 19 thousand instrumentally recorded, moderate to large earthquakes, spanning 110 years of seismicity. We relocated all events in the catalogue using a two-tier approach. The EHB location methodology (Engdahl et al., 1998) was applied first to obtain improved hypocentres with special focus on the depth determination. The locations were further refined in the next step by fixing the depths to those from the EHB analysis and applying the new ISC location algorithm (Bondár and Storchak, 2011) that reduces location bias by accounting for correlated travel-time prediction error structure. To facilitate the relocation effort, some 900,000 seismic P and S wave arrival-time data were added to the ISC database for the period between 1904 and 1963, either from original station bulletins in the ISC archive or by digitizing the scanned images of the ISS bulletin (Villaseñor and Engdahl, 2005; 2007). Although no substantial amount of new phase data were acquired for the modern period (1964-2009), the number of phases used in the location has still increased by 3 million, owing to fact that both the EHB and ISC locators use all ak135 (Kennett et al., 1995) phases in the location. We show that the relocation effort yielded substantially improved locations, especially in the first half of the 20th century; we demonstrate significant improvements in focal depth estimates in subduction zones and other seismically active regions; and we show that the ISC-GEM catalogue provides an improved view of 110 years of global seismicity of the Earth. The ISC-GEM Global Instrumental Earthquake Catalogue represents the final product of one of the ten global components in the GEM program, and will be made available to researchers at the ISC (www.isc.ac.uk) website.

  18. Critical Zone Science and Global Societal Challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldhaber, M. B.; Banwart, S. A.

    2014-12-01

    Earth's Critical Zone (CZ) is the thin outer veneer of our planet from the top of the tree canopy to the bottom of our drinking water aquifers that supports almost all human activity. Despite its fundamental importance to terrestrial life, understanding of the operation of the coupled geologic, hydrologic, topographic, and biotic CZ processes across time and space is far from complete. These interactions are complex and they establish a mechanistic 'chain of impact' that transmits the effects of environmental change throughout the CZ. Characterization of these processes is made more urgent by the fact that globally, the CZ is experiencing ever-increasing pressure from growth in human population and wealth. Within the next four decades, demand for food and fuel is expected to double along with a more than 50% increase in demand for clean water. Understanding, predicting and managing intensification of land use and associated economic services, while mitigating and adapting to rapid climate change, is now one of the most pressing societal challenges of the 21st century. In this talk we summarize the profound global societal impacts to the Earth's near surface arising from exponential human population growth, increasing affluence, and technological advance, to provide context for discussions on constructing an array of CZ observatories to both characterize fundamental critical zone processes and forecast the effects of planetary change. We will suggest goals and options relevant to planning for a future international array of CZ observatories and a research agenda that matches the urgency of the projected resource demands and environmental pressures of the coming four decades.

  19. Empirical ground-motion relations for subduction-zone earthquakes and their application to Cascadia and other regions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Atkinson, G.M.; Boore, D.M.

    2003-01-01

    Ground-motion relations for earthquakes that occur in subduction zones are an important input to seismic-hazard analyses in many parts of the world. In the Cascadia region (Washington, Oregon, northern California, and British Columbia), for example, there is a significant hazard from megathrust earthquakes along the subduction interface and from large events within the subducting slab. These hazards are in addition to the hazard from shallow earthquakes in the overlying crust. We have compiled a response spectra database from thousands of strong-motion recordings from events of moment magnitude (M) 5-8.3 occurring in subduction zones around the world, including both interface and in-slab events. The 2001 M 6.8 Nisqually and 1999 M 5.9 Satsop earthquakes are included in the database, as are many records from subduction zones in Japan (Kyoshin-Net data), Mexico (Guerrero data), and Central America. The size of the database is four times larger than that available for previous empirical regressions to determine ground-motion relations for subduction-zone earthquakes. The large dataset enables improved determination of attenuation parameters and magnitude scaling, for both interface and in-slab events. Soil response parameters are also better determined by the data. We use the database to develop global ground-motion relations for interface and in-slab earthquakes, using a maximum likelihood regression method. We analyze regional variability of ground-motion amplitudes across the global database and find that there are significant regional differences. In particular, amplitudes in Cascadia differ by more than a factor of 2 from those in Japan for the same magnitude, distance, event type, and National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (NEHRP) soil class. This is believed to be due to regional differences in the depth of the soil profile, which are not captured by the NEHRP site classification scheme. Regional correction factors to account for these differences are

  20. Earthquake swarm activity in the Oaxaca segment of Middle American Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brudzinski, M. R.; Cabral, E.; Arciniega-Ceballos, A.

    2013-05-01

    An outstanding question in geophysics is the degree to which the newly discovered family of slow fault slip behaviors is related to more traditional earthquakes, especially since theoretical predictions indicate slip in the deeper transitional zone promotes failure in the shallower seismogenic zone. The Oaxacan segment of the Middle American Subduction zone is a natural region to pursue detailed studies of the spectrum of fault slip due to the unusually shallow subduction angle and short trench-to-coast distances that bring broad portions of the seismogenic and transitional zones of the plate interface inland. A deployment of broadband seismometers in this region has improved the network coverage to ~70 km station spacing since 2006, providing new opportunities to investigate smaller seismic phenomena. While characterization of tectonic tremor has been a prominent focus of this deployment, the improved network has also revealed productive earthquake swarms, whose sustained periods of similar magnitude earthquakes are also thought to be driven by slow slip. We identify a particularly productive earthquake swarm in July 2006 (~600 similar earthquakes detected), which occurred during a week-long episode of tectonic tremor and geodetically detected slow slip. Using a multi-station "template matching" waveform cross correlation technique, we have been able to detect and locate swarm earthquakes several orders of magnitude smaller than that of traditional processing, particularly during periods of increased background activity, because the detector is finely tuned to events with similar hypocentral location and focal mechanism. When we scan for repeats of the event families detected in the July 2006 sequence throughout the 6+ years since, we find these families were also activated during several other slow slip episodes, which indicates a link between slow slip in the transition zone and earthquakes at the downdip end of the seismogenic portion of the megathrust.

  1. Unrevealing the History of Earthquakes and Tsunamis of the Mexican Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez-Herrera, M. T.; Castillo-Aja, M. D. R.; Cruz, S.; Corona, N.; Rangel Velarde, V.; Lagos, M.

    2014-12-01

    The great earthquakes and tsunamis of the last decades in Sumatra, Chile, and Japan remind us of the need for expanding the record of history of such catastrophic events. It can't be argued that even countries with extensive historical documents and tsunami sand deposits still have unsolved questions on the frequency of them, and the variables that control them along subduction zones. We present here preliminary results of a combined approach using historical archives and multiple proxies of the sedimentary record to unrevealing the history of possible great earthquakes and their tsunamis on the Mexican Subduction zone. The Mexican subduction zone extends over 1000 km long and little is known if the entire subduction zone along the Middle American Trench behaves as one enormous unit rather than in segments that rupture at different frequencies and with different strengths (as the short instrumental record shows). We searched on historical archives and earthquake databases to distinguish tsunamigenic events registered from the 16th century to now along the Jalisco-Colima and Guerrero-Oaxaca coastal stretches. The historical data referred are mostly from the 19th century on since the population on the coast was scarce before. We found 21 earthquakes with tsunamigenic potential, and of those 16 with doubtful to definitive accompanying tsunami on the Jalisco-Colima coast, and 31 tsunamigenic earthquakes on the Oaxaca-Guerrero coast. Evidence of great earthquakes and their tsunamis from the sedimentary record are scarce, perhaps due poor preservation of tsunami deposits in this tropical environment. Nevertheless, we have found evidence for a number of tsunamigenic events, both historical and prehistorical, 1932 and 1400 AD on Jalisco, and 3400 BP, 1789 AD, 1979 ad, and 1985 AD on Guerrero-Oaxaca. We continue working and a number of events are still to be dated. This work would aid in elucidating the history of earthquakes and tsunamis on the Mexican subduction zone.

  2. Coseismic Slip Distributions of Great or Large Earthquakes in the Northern Japan to Kurile Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, T.; Satake, K.; Ishibashi, K.

    2011-12-01

    Slip distributions of great and large earthquakes since 1963 along the northern Japan and Kuril trenches are examined to study the recurrence of interplate, intraslab and outer-rise earthquakes. The main findings are that the large earthquakes in 1991 and 1995 reruptured the 1963 great Urup earthquake source, and the 2006, 2007 and 2009 Simshir earthquakes were all different types. We also identify three seismic gaps. The northern Japan to southern Kurile trenches have been regarded as a typical subduction zone with spatially and temporally regular recurrence of great (M>8) interplate earthquakes. The source regions were grouped into six segments by Utsu (1972; 1984). The Headquarters for Earthquake Research Promotion of the Japanese government (2004) divided the southern Kurile subduction zone into four regions and evaluated future probabilities of great interplate earthquakes. Besides great interplate events, however, many large (M>7) interplate, intraslab, outer-rise and tsunami earthquakes have also occurred in this region. Harada, Ishibashi, and Satake (2010, 2011) depicted the space-time pattern of M>7 earthquakes along the northern Japan to Kuril trench, based on the relocated mainshock-aftershock distributions of all types of earthquakes occurred since 1913. The space-time pattern is more complex than that had been considered conventionally. Each region has been ruptured by a M8-class interplate earthquake or by multiple M7-class events. In this study, in order to examine more detail space pattern, or rupture areas, of M>7 earthquakes since 1963 (WWSSN waveform data have been available since this year), we estimated cosiesmic slip distributions by the Kikuchi and Kanamori's (2003) teleseismic body wave inversion method. The WWSSN waveform data were used for earthquakes before 1990, and digital teleseismic waveform data compiled by the IRIS were used for events after 1990. Main-shock hypocenters that had been relocated by our previous study were used as

  3. Earthquake precise locations catalog for the Lesser Antilles subduction zone (1972-2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massin, Frederick; Amorese, Daniel; Beauducel, Francois; Bengoubou-Valérius, Mendy; Bernard, Marie-Lise; Bertil, Didier

    2014-05-01

    Locations for earthquake recorded in the Lesser Antilles subduction zone are processed separately by regional observatories, NEIC and ISC. There is no earthquake location catalog available compiling all available phase arrival data. We propose a new best complete earthquake catalog by merging all available phase arrival data for better constrains on earthquake locations. ISC provides the phase arrival data of 29243 earthquakes (magnitude range from 1.4 to 6.4) recorded by PRSN (Porto Rico), SRC (British West Indies), and from FUNVISIS (Venezuela). We add phases data from IPGP observatories for 68718 earthquakes from magnitudes 0.1 to 7.5 (OVSG, Guadeloupe, recorded 53226 earthquakes since 1981, and OVSM, Martinique, recorded 29931 earthquakes since 1972). IPGP also provides the accelerometer waveform data of the GIS-RAP network. We achieved automatic picking on the GIS-RAP data using the Component Energy Correlation Method. The CECM provides high precision phase detection, a realistic estimation of picking error and realistic weights that can be used with manual pick weights. The CECM add an average of 3 P-waves and 2 S-waves arrivals to 3846 earthquakes recorded by the GIS-RAP network since 2002. The final catalog contains 84979 earthquakes between 1972 and 2013, 24528 of which we compiled additional data. We achieve earthquake location using NonLinLoc, regional P and S waves data and a set of one dimensional velocity models. We produce improved locations for 22974 earthquakes (better residuals, on equal or larger arrival dataset) and improved duration magnitudes for 6258 earthquakes (using duration data and improved locations). A subset of best constrained 15626 hypocenters (with more than 8 phases and an average RMS of 0.48±0.77s) could be used for structural analysis and earthquake local tomography. Relative locations are to be applied in order to image active faulting. We aim to understand coupling in the seismogenic zone as well as triggering mechanisms of

  4. Earthquake Facts

    MedlinePlus

    ... landslide (usually triggered by an earthquake) displacing the ocean water. The hypocenter of an earthquake is the ... is the zone of earthquakes surrounding the Pacific Ocean — about 90% of the world’s earthquakes occur ...

  5. Air quality in developing world disaster and conflict zones--the case of post-earthquake Haiti.

    PubMed

    Davis, Mary E; Rappaport, Ann

    2014-10-15

    Data on air quality are remarkably limited in the poorest of the world's countries. This is especially true for post-conflict and disaster zones, where international relief efforts focus largely on more salient public health challenges such as water and sanitation, infectious diseases, and housing. Using post-earthquake Haiti as the example case, this commentary explores air quality challenges in the developing world, highlighting concerns related to infrastructure damage from post-conflict and disaster settings. We contend that there is a growing and presently unmet need for further research and attention from the global health community to address these issues. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Frequency-size distributions of Wadati-Benioff zone and near-boundary, intraplate earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todes, J.; Okal, E.; Kirby, S. H.

    2016-12-01

    We conduct a systematic analysis of the frequency-moment distribution for a number of earthquake populations, motivated by the more than three-fold increase in the available CMT database since our previous study (Okal and Kirby, 1995; hereafter OK95), where some datasets may have been undersampled. We characterize our results in terms of variations in the parameter β, the absolute value of the slope of the logarithmic regression of population vs. seismic moment. We first examine global datasets boxed into 100-km depth slices. For most, we uphold the results of OK95: namely, β-values (before saturation) close to the theoretical 2/3 predicted under seismic similitude with a fractal dimension of 2 for the seismogenic zone. In the 500-to-600 km depth range, we obtain slightly lower β-values (0.57 vs. 0.66), and confirm the distinct behavior between the Tonga subduction zone, where β-values decrease (from 0.80 to 0.47) beyond the saturation elbow, and other provinces of deep seismicity, where they show an increase (from 0.38 to 0.82). In addition, we report on a dataset of more than 600 normal faulting events in the outer rise region of subduction trenches. This population features a β-value close to 2/3; the similarity of β between intermediate- depth slab earthquakes (in the 100-200 km range) and this class of events would suggest that the former occur on reactivated faults already present in the lithosphere subducting at the trench. However, characteristics of the saturation elbow and post-saturation behavior are found to differ in the two populations. A smaller dataset of outer rise thrust earthquakes, expected to occur at greater depths in the subducting plate, also feature a typical β (0.59), with a steeper slope beyond saturation. By contrast, intraplate normal faulting events occurring in the vicinity of mid-ocean ridges are typified by a higher β-value (0.99), with a significant, inverse dependence on spreading rate.

  7. Direct Seafloor Imaging of the 2012 Wharton Basin Great Strike-slip Earthquakes rupture zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S. C.; Hananto, N.; Leclerc, F.; Wei, S.; Carton, H. D.; Tapponnier, P.; Sieh, K.; Qin, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The 2012 Wharton Basin earthquakes (Mw=8.6 and Mw=8.2) were the largest intra-plate strike-slip earthquakes ever recorded. Based on seismological and geodetic studies, different, and partly contradictory, models have been proposed for the fault geometry requiring a complex faulting mechanism with several faults, oblique to one-another. These earthquakes occurred in the Wharton Basin, which is considered to be a broad diffuse zone of intra-plate deformation with deformation taking place along re-activated N5ºE striking fracture zones, which was inconsistent with most of the seismology or geodesy based rupture models. In May-June 2015, we acquired 13 high-resolution seismic reflection profiles and more than 8500 km2 of bathymetric data to the south and southwest of the main N-S segment of the Mw=8.6 earthquake rupture and across the Mw=8.2 earthquake rupture zone. We find that the epicenter of the Mw=8.2 earthquake lies on a re-activated fracture zone, expressed as a ~50-km wide region with four N5ºE striking left-lateral sub-faults. The easternmost sub-fault is most active and might be the master fault, where the maximum deformation might be taking place. The deformation along the other sub-faults becomes more diffuse moving westward. We also imaged a set of N110ºE trending 2-km wide right-lateral shear zones, which might act as transfer zones between the re-activated N5ºE striking fracture zones, and have orientations in agreement with aftershock focal mechanisms. We suggest that the 2012 great Wharton Basin earthquakes ruptured N5ºE re-activated fractures. Furthermore, the rupture of the Mw=8.6 event proceeded in en échelon fashion with this suite of N110ºE striking shear zones connecting the re-activated fracture zone imaged in this study with another N5ºE trending re-activated fracture zone on the Ninety East Ridge. Our model explains the discrepancy between direct observations on the seafloor and distant seismological and geodetic results.

  8. Slab1.0: A three-dimensional model of global subduction zone geometries

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hayes, G.P.; Wald, D.J.; Johnson, R.L.

    2012-01-01

    We describe and present a new model of global subduction zone geometries, called Slab1.0. An extension of previous efforts to constrain the two-dimensional non-planar geometry of subduction zones around the focus of large earthquakes, Slab1.0 describes the detailed, non-planar, three-dimensional geometry of approximately 85% of subduction zones worldwide. While the model focuses on the detailed form of each slab from their trenches through the seismogenic zone, where it combines data sets from active source and passive seismology, it also continues to the limits of their seismic extent in the upper-mid mantle, providing a uniform approach to the definition of the entire seismically active slab geometry. Examples are shown for two well-constrained global locations; models for many other regions are available and can be freely downloaded in several formats from our new Slab1.0 website, http://on.doi.gov/ d9ARbS. We describe improvements in our two-dimensional geometry constraint inversion, including the use of average active source seismic data profiles in the shallow trench regions where data are otherwise lacking, derived from the interpolation between other active source seismic data along-strike in the same subduction zone. We include several analyses of the uncertainty and robustness of our three-dimensional interpolation methods. In addition, we use the filtered, subduction-related earthquake data sets compiled to build Slab1.0 in a reassessment of previous analyses of the deep limit of the thrust interface seismogenic zone for all subduction zones included in our global model thus far, concluding that the width of these seismogenic zones is on average 30% larger than previous studies have suggested. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  9. Simulation of tsunamis from great earthquakes on the cascadia subduction zone.

    PubMed

    Ng, M K; Leblond, P H; Murty, T S

    1990-11-30

    Large earthquakes occur episodically in the Cascadia subduction zone. A numerical model has been used to simulate and assess the hazards of a tsunami generated by a hypothetical earthquake of magnitude 8.5 associated with rupture of the northern sections of the subduction zone. Wave amplitudes on the outer coast are closely related to the magnitude of sea-bottom displacement (5.0 meters). Some amplification, up to a factor of 3, may occur in some coastal embayments. Wave amplitudes in the protected waters of Puget Sound and the Strait of Georgia are predicted to be only about one fifth of those estmated on the outer coast.

  10. Global observation of Omori-law decay in the rate of triggered earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, T.

    2001-12-01

    Triggered earthquakes can be large, damaging, and lethal as evidenced by the 1999 shocks in Turkey and the 2001 events in El Salvador. In this study, earthquakes with M greater than 7.0 from the Harvard CMT catalog are modeled as dislocations to calculate shear stress changes on subsequent earthquake rupture planes near enough to be affected. About 61% of earthquakes that occurred near the main shocks are associated with calculated shear stress increases, while ~39% are associated with shear stress decreases. If earthquakes associated with calculated shear stress increases are interpreted as triggered, then such events make up at least 8% of the CMT catalog. Globally, triggered earthquakes obey an Omori-law rate decay that lasts between ~7-11 years after the main shock. Earthquakes associated with calculated shear stress increases occur at higher rates than background up to 240 km away from the main-shock centroid. Earthquakes triggered by smaller quakes (foreshocks) also obey Omori's law, which is one of the few time-predictable patterns evident in the global occurrence of earthquakes. These observations indicate that earthquake probability calculations which include interactions from previous shocks should incorporate a transient Omori-law decay with time. In addition, a very simple model using the observed global rate change with time and spatial distribution of triggered earthquakes can be applied to immediately assess the likelihood of triggered earthquakes following large events, and can be in place until more sophisticated analyses are conducted.

  11. The dynamic response of geomagnetic sudden commencement to tectonic zone and large earthquakes in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, X.; Zheng, J.; Wang, Z.; Lin, Y.

    2009-12-01

    Based on the skin effect of EM waves, geomagnetic storm variations can be used to study the subsurface tectonic structure and faulting to have information of penetration view of the earth’s interior. We collected geomagnetic storm report data for 8 years 2000-2007 from 35 geomagnetic stations in China and calculated the amplitude of the vertical component of geomagnetic storm sudden commencement (△Zssc) to study the correlations between △Zssc and the occurrence of Ms=6.0-8.1 earthquakes in China and its vicinity (70-140°E, 15-55°N) in the period of Year 2000 to 2008. We found that there were significant correlations between the spatial distribution of amplitude changes of △Zssc, fault activity and occurrence of large earthquakes. Our study provides a method to monitor possibility of medium-to-short term (0.5-12 months) earthquake. There are 5 △Zssc zero isoporic lines delineating 5 areas normally distributed in China where we called Zero Isoporic Zone (ZIZ) as following, and apparently they coincide with several tectonic zones and seismic gaps from the past 60 years. 1.△Zssc zero isoporic line in eastern China, extending along the rivers of Heilongjiang and Yalu - Eastern Coastal Area - Taiwan Strait - the South China Sea. 2. ZIZ in Luliang Mountain area, where is east to the Great Bend of the Yellow River; 3. ZIZ in Wuling Mountain area is in south of Yangtze River; 4. ZIZ in Longmenshan Fault Zone in central China. This is one area to note in particular. 5. ZIZ in Middle and South Yunnan region. Longmenshan fault zone located at the geographic center of China, where is a seismic sensitive band to correspond to great earthquakes of around Ms8.0. On May 12, 2008, Wenchuan Earthquake of Ms 8.0 occurred in this area. We noticed that, over the period of January 2000 to May 2008, in 5 great earthquakes of Ms=7.8-8.1 in China and its vicinity, 2 to 5 months before the earthquakes, the ZIZ in Longmenshan Fault Zone showed the translation and deformation

  12. Crust and upper mantle structure of the New Madrid Seismic Zone: Insight into intraplate earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chuanxu; Zhao, Dapeng; Wu, Shiguo

    2014-05-01

    We determine a 3-D P-wave velocity model of the crust and upper mantle down to 400 km depth to investigate structural heterogeneity and its influences on the generation of intraplate earthquakes in the New Madrid Seismic Zone. We used 4871 high-quality arrival times from 187 local earthquakes and 30,846 precise travel-time residuals from 1041 teleseismic events recorded by the EarthScope/USArray Transportable Array. Our results show that, beneath the Reelfoot rift, a significant low-velocity (low-V) zone exists in the upper mantle down to 200 km depth, with a large volume of 200 × 200 × 150 km3. The origin of the low-V zone may be related to the passage of the Bermuda hotspot and the stalled ancient Farallon slab materials foundering in the mantle transition zone. This low-V zone may have relatively low shear strength and act as a viscously weak zone embedded in the lithosphere, being apt to concentrate tectonic stress and transfer stress to the seismogenic faults in the upper crust, leading to the large intraplate earthquakes in the New Madrid Seismic Zone.

  13. Maximum slip in earthquake fault zones, apparent stress, and stick-slip friction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGarr, A.; Fletcher, Joe B.

    2003-01-01

    The maximum slip, observed or inferred, for a small patch within the larger fault zone of an earthquake is a remarkably well-constrained function of the seismic moment. A large set of maximum slips, mostly derived from slip models of major earthquakes, indicate that this parameter increases according to the cube root of the seismic moment. Consistent with this finding, neither the average slip rate for the patches of maximum slip nor the apparent stresses of earthquakes show any systematic dependence on seismic moment. Maximum average slip rates are several meters per second independent of moment and, for earthquakes in continental crustal settings, the apparent stress is limited to about 10 MPa. Results from stick-slip friction experiments in the laboratory, combined with information about the state of stress in the crust, can be used to predict, quite closely, the maximum slips and maximum average slip rates within the fault zones of major earthquakes as well as their apparent stresses. These findings suggest that stick-slip friction events observed in the laboratory and earthquakes in continental settings, even with large magnitudes, have similar rupture mechanisms.

  14. Shear deformation of lawsonite blueschist at high pressures and implications for earthquakes in the subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Haemyeong; Choi, Seungsoon; Jung, Sejin

    2017-04-01

    Recent seismological observations indicate that many earthquakes occur at the top of subducting slabs where oceanic crust is transformed to blueschist facies rocks under high pressure and temperature conditions. Episodic slip and tremor (ETS) events and low frequency earthquakes (LFEs) and intermediate-depth earthquakes in cold subduction zones often occur where lawsonite blueschist is stable at the top of the subducting slab, but the mechanism of these earthquakes is still poorly constrained because of a lack of laboratory measurements of rock properties (i.e., lawsonite blueschist) in shear experiments at various conditions reflecting the source region of these earthquakes. Here we report the results of experimental deformation of lawsonite blueschist under high pressure and temperature conditions consistent with the stability field of lawsonite blueschist. Our data show that lawsonite blueschist deforms cataclastically at high pressures (1-2 GPa), producing faults and slip weakening through the formation of nanoparticles and amorphous phases along highly localized faults. Our results have important implications for the understanding of seismogenesis and the mechanism behind ETS/LFEs and intermediate-depth earthquakes in cold subduction zones.

  15. An Integrated Geospatial System for earthquake precursors assessment in Vrancea tectonic active zone in Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoran, Maria A.; Savastru, Roxana S.; Savastru, Dan M.

    2015-10-01

    With the development of space-based technologies to measure surface geophysical parameters and deformation at the boundaries of tectonic plates and large faults, earthquake science has entered a new era. Using time series satellite data for earthquake prediction, it is possible to pursue the behaviors of earthquake precursors in the future and to announce early warnings when the differences between the predicted value and the observed value exceed the pre-define threshold value. Starting with almost one week prior to a moderate or strong earthquake a transient thermal infrared rise in LST of several Celsius degrees (oC) and the increased OLR values higher than the normal have been recorded around epicentral areas, function of the magnitude and focal depth, which disappeared after the main shock. Also are recorded associated geomagnetic and ionospheric distrurbances. Vrancea tectonic active zone in Romania is characterized by a high seismic hazard in European- Mediterranean region, being responsible of strong or moderate intermediate depth and normal earthquakes generation on a confined epicentral area. Based on recorded geophysical parameters anomalies was developed an integrated geospatial system for earthquake precursors assessment in Vrancea active seismic zone. This system integrates derived from time series MODIS Terra/Aqua, NOAA-AVHRR, ASTER, Landsat TM/ETM satellite data multi geophysical parameters (land surface temperature -LST, outgoing long-wave radiation- OLR, and mean air temperature- AT as well as geomagnetic and ionospheric data in synergy with in-situ data for surveillance and forecasting of seismic events.

  16. Do Large Earthquakes Penetrate below the Seismogenic Zone? Potential Clues from Microseismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, J.; Lapusta, N.

    2012-12-01

    It is typically assumed that slip in large earthquakes is confined within the seismogenic zone - often defined by the extent of the background seismicity - with regions below creeping. In terms of rate-and-state friction properties, the locked seismogenic zone and the deeper creeping fault extensions are velocity-weakening (VW) and velocity-strengthening (VS), respectively. Recently, it has been hypothesized that earthquake rupture could penetrate into the deeper creeping regions (Shaw and Wesnousky, BSSA, 2008), and yet it is difficult to detect the deep slip due to limited resolution of source inversions with depth. We hypothesize that absence of concentrated microseismicity at the bottom of the seismogenic zone may point to the existence of deep-penetrating earthquake ruptures. The creeping-locked boundary creates strain and stress concentrations. If it is at the bottom of the VW region, which supports earthquake nucleation, microseismicity should persistently occur at the bottom of the seismogenic zone. Such behavior has been observed on the Parkfield segment of the San Andreas Fault (SAF) and the Calaveras fault. However, such microseismicity would be inhibited if dynamic earthquake rupture penetrates substantially below the VW/VS transition, which would drop stress in the ruptured VS areas, making them effectively locked. Hence the creeping-locked boundary, with its stress concentration, would be located within the VS area, where earthquake nucleation is inhibited. Indeed, microseismicity concentration at the bottom of the seismogenic zone is not observed for several faults that hosted major earthquakes, such as the Carizzo segment of the SAF (the site of 1857 Mw 7.9 Fort Tejon earthquake) and Palu-Lake-Hazar segment of the Eastern Anatolian Fault. We confirm this hypothesis by simulating earthquake sequences and aseismic slip in 3D fault models (Lapusta and Liu, 2009; Noda and Lapusta, 2010). The fault is governed by rate-and-state friction laws, with a VW

  17. Investigating relationships between the seismic "nucleation" phases and breakaway phases of recent Mw 8 earthquakes using global broadband seismic observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, C.

    2012-12-01

    It is known that the far field P wave velocity observations of large earthquakes frequently start with a small interval of weak motion, which was described as "fore-shock", "pre-shock", or seismic nucleation phase (SNP) by various researchers, e.g, Ellsworth and Beroza (1995). The energetic ground motion immediately following this interesting phase was named as "breakaway" phase. Recent global surveys indicate that for about 50% of Mw>7.5 earthquakes their SNP could be observed teleseismically and the distribution of the earthquakes with SNP appears to be correlated with the tectonic environment and focal mechanisms (Ji et al, 2010; Burkhart and Ji, 2011). Here, a multiple double-couple (MDC) algorithm is developed to quantitatively investigate the relationship between the SNPs and "breakaway" phases of 22 Mw>8 earthquakes since 1990. Our preliminary analysis indicates that the average moment acceleration during the first 4 s of the 2011 Mw 9.1 Tohoku earthquake is only about 2% of that associating with subsequent "breakaway" rupture stage. As the rupture of moderate or large earthquakes often initiate at the vicinity of one of their high slip fault patches, i.e., asperities (Mai et al., 2005), this kind of big discrepancies might shed the light on the intrinsic differences between the asperity and the weak zone in its vicinity, as hypothesized by the asperity theory (e.g., Kanamori, 1981).

  18. Coseismic changes of gravitational potential energy induced by global earthquakes based on spherical-Earth elastic dislocation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Changyi; Chao, B. Fong

    2017-05-01

    We compute the coseismic gravitational potential energy Eg change using the spherical-Earth elastic dislocation theory and either the fault model treated as a point source or the finite fault model. The rate of the accumulative Eg loss produced by historical earthquakes from 1976 to 2016 (about 42,000 events) using the Global Centroid Moment Tensor Solution catalogue is estimated to be on the order of -2.1 × 1020 J/a, or -6.7 TW (1 TW = 1012 W), amounting to 15% in the total terrestrial heat flow. The energy loss is dominated by the thrust faulting, especially the megathrust earthquakes such as the 2004 Sumatra earthquake (Mw 9.0) and the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake (Mw 9.1). It is notable that the very deep focus events, the 1994 Bolivia earthquake (Mw 8.2) and the 2013 Okhotsk earthquake (Mw 8.3), produced significant overall coseismic Eg gain according to our calculation. The accumulative coseismic Eg is mainly lost in the mantle of the Earth and also lost in the core of the Earth but with a relatively smaller magnitude. By contrast, the crust of the Earth gains gravitational potential energy cumulatively because of the coseismic deformations. We further investigate the tectonic signature in the coseismic crustal Eg changes in some complex tectonic zone, such as Taiwan region and the northeastern margin of the Tibetan Plateau. We found that the coseismic Eg change is consistent with the regional tectonic character.

  19. Late Holocene earthquakes on the Toe Jam Hill fault, Seattle fault zone, Bainbridge Island, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, A.R.; Johnson, S.Y.; Kelsey, H.M.; Wells, R.E.; Sherrod, B.L.; Pezzopane, S.K.; Bradley, L.-A.; Koehler, R. D.; Bucknam, R.C.

    2003-01-01

    Five trenches across a Holocene fault scarp yield the first radiocarbon-measured earthquake recurrence intervals for a crustal fault in western Washington. The scarp, the first to be revealed by laser imagery, marks the Toe Jam Hill fault, a north-dipping backthrust to the Seattle fault. Folded and faulted strata, liquefaction features, and forest soil A horizons buried by hanging-wall-collapse colluvium record three, or possibly four, earthquakes between 2500 and 1000 yr ago. The most recent earthquake is probably the 1050-1020 cal. (calibrated) yr B.P. (A.D. 900-930) earthquake that raised marine terraces and triggered a tsunami in Puget Sound. Vertical deformation estimated from stratigraphic and surface offsets at trench sites suggests late Holocene earthquake magnitudes near M7, corresponding to surface ruptures >36 km long. Deformation features recording poorly understood latest Pleistocene earthquakes suggest that they were smaller than late Holocene earthquakes. Postglacial earthquake recurrence intervals based on 97 radiocarbon ages, most on detrital charcoal, range from ???12,000 yr to as little as a century or less; corresponding fault-slip rates are 0.2 mm/yr for the past 16,000 yr and 2 mm/yr for the past 2500 yr. Because the Toe Jam Hill fault is a backthrust to the Seattle fault, it may not have ruptured during every earthquake on the Seattle fault. But the earthquake history of the Toe Jam Hill fault is at least a partial proxy for the history of the rest of the Seattle fault zone.

  20. Improving Estimates of Coseismic Subsidence from southern Cascadia Subduction Zone Earthquakes at northern Humboldt Bay, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padgett, J. S.; Engelhart, S. E.; Hemphill-Haley, E.; Kelsey, H. M.; Witter, R. C.

    2015-12-01

    Geological estimates of subsidence from past earthquakes help to constrain Cascadia subduction zone (CSZ) earthquake rupture models. To improve subsidence estimates for past earthquakes along the southern CSZ, we apply transfer function analysis on microfossils from 3 intertidal marshes in northern Humboldt Bay, California, ~60 km north of the Mendocino Triple Junction. The transfer function method uses elevation-dependent intertidal foraminiferal and diatom assemblages to reconstruct relative sea-level (RSL) change indicated by shifts in microfossil assemblages. We interpret stratigraphic evidence associated with sudden shifts in microfossils to reflect sudden RSL rise due to subsidence during past CSZ earthquakes. Laterally extensive (>5 km) and sharp mud-over-peat contacts beneath marshes at Jacoby Creek, Mad River Slough, and McDaniel Slough demonstrate widespread earthquake subsidence in northern Humboldt Bay. C-14 ages of plant macrofossils taken from above and below three contacts that correlate across all three sites, provide estimates of the times of subsidence at ~250 yr BP, ~1300 yr BP and ~1700 yr BP. Two further contacts observed at only two sites provide evidence for subsidence during possible CSZ earthquakes at ~900 yr BP and ~1100 yr BP. Our study contributes 20 AMS radiocarbon ages, of identifiable plant macrofossils, that improve estimates of the timing of past earthquakes along the southern CSZ. We anticipate that our results will provide more accurate and precise reconstructions of RSL change induced by southern CSZ earthquakes. Prior to our work, studies in northern Humboldt Bay provided subsidence estimates with vertical uncertainties >±0.5 m; too imprecise to adequately constrain earthquake rupture models. Our method, applied recently in coastal Oregon, has shown that subsidence during past CSZ earthquakes can be reconstructed with a precision of ±0.3m and substantially improves constraints on rupture models used for seismic hazard

  1. Detection of Repeating Earthquakes Along the Northern Mariana Shallow Thrust Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eimer, M. O.; Wiens, D. A.; Rowe, C. A.

    2014-12-01

    The seismogenic character of the Northern Mariana Thrust Zone is unknown because of the absence of large historical megathrust earthquakes and the lack of appropriate geodetic data. Subduction seismicity in the Northern Mariana forearc shows clustering of events along strike and with depth. To further investigate the seismogenic characteristics of the region, we search for repeating earthquakes along the shallow thrust zone. Using the 2003-2004 Subduction Factory and 2012-2013 Mariana Trench Imaging Experiments, a cross correlation detection scanner is implemented to find repeating earthquakes. Template earthquakes are chosen from seismicity located within clusters along the shallow thrust zone and compared with continuous data from nearby ocean bottom seismometers using both conventional and subspace correlation detection methods. Preliminary results from scanning the 2003-2004 deployment have identified several families of repeating events. Many of these groups consist of repeating events that occur within a short time frame of the template event. In particular, several families have been detected in conjunction with the July 15, 2003 magnitude 5.1 earthquake, indicating detection of aftershock sequences. Repeating events that occur throughout the 2003-2004 yearlong deployment have also been detected, suggesting stable sliding of the plate with small asperities causing these repeating events. Further work may allow delineation of stable sliding regions as well as evaluation of the possible effects of several seamounts which are subducting within the study region.

  2. Sweet Spot Tremor Triggered by Intraslab Earthquakes in the Nankai Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aiken, C.; Obara, K.; Peng, Z.; Chao, K.; Maeda, T.

    2014-12-01

    Deep tectonic tremor has been observed at several major plate-bounding faults around the Pacific Rim. Tremor­ in these regions can be triggered by small stresses arising from solid earth tides as well as passing seismic waves of large, distant earthquakes. While large, distant earthquakes are capable of repeatedly triggering tremor in the same region (i.e., a sweet spot), it is less understood how intraslab earthquakes interact with sweet spot tremor areas. We conduct a systematic survey of tremor triggered in the Nankai subduction zone by intraslab earthquakes to better understand what governs fault slip along the Eurasian-Philippine Sea Plate boundary. We examine 3 tremor sweet spots in the Nankai subduction zone: Shikoku West, Kii North, and Tokai. In each region, we select earthquakes from the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) catalog that occur from mid-2009 to mid-2014 with magnitude (M) greater than 2, that occur within the down-going Philippine Sea Plate, and within a 300 km epicentral distance of the sweet spot region. Using these selection criteria, we obtain ~1,200 earthquakes in each region. We examine a tremor catalog immediately before and after these local events as well as visually inspect filtered waveforms from short-period Hi-net seismic stations surrounding the sweet spot areas to identify additional tremor signals. From our initial analysis, we have identified 18 clear cases of increased tremor activity immediately following intraslab earthquakes in Shikoku West, most of which occur down-dip of the Shikoku West sweet spot. In comparison, we have identified only 5 triggering earthquakes in Kii North, and our investigation at Tokai is still ongoing. Our results so far are in agreement with triggering susceptibility being dependent upon background activity rates, as has been suggested for remote triggering of microearthquakes in geothermal regions by large, distant earthquakes as well as for remotely triggered tremor in the Nankai subduction zone

  3. Repeating and not so Repeating Large Earthquakes in the Mexican Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hjorleifsdottir, V.; Singh, S.; Iglesias, A.; Perez-Campos, X.

    2013-12-01

    The rupture area and recurrence interval of large earthquakes in the mexican subduction zone are relatively small and almost the entire length of the zone has experienced a large (Mw≥7.0) earthquake in the last 100 years (Singh et al., 1981). Several segments have experienced multiple large earthquakes in this time period. However, as the rupture areas of events prior to 1973 are only approximately known, the recurrence periods are uncertain. Large earthquakes occurred in the Ometepec, Guerrero, segment in 1937, 1950, 1982 and 2012 (Singh et al., 1981). In 1982, two earthquakes (Ms 6.9 and Ms 7.0) occurred about 4 hours apart, one apparently downdip from the other (Astiz & Kanamori, 1984; Beroza et al. 1984). The 2012 earthquake on the other hand had a magnitude of Mw 7.5 (globalcmt.org), breaking approximately the same area as the 1982 doublet, but with a total scalar moment about three times larger than the 1982 doublet combined. It therefore seems that 'repeat earthquakes' in the Ometepec segment are not necessarily very similar one to another. The Central Oaxaca segment broke in large earthquakes in 1928 (Mw7.7) and 1978 (Mw7.7) . Seismograms for the two events, recorded at the Wiechert seismograph in Uppsala, show remarkable similarity, suggesting that in this area, large earthquakes can repeat. The extent to which the near-trench part of the fault plane participates in the ruptures is not well understood. In the Ometepec segment, the updip portion of the plate interface broke during the 25 Feb 1996 earthquake (Mw7.1), which was a slow earthquake and produced anomalously low PGAs (Iglesias et al., 2003). Historical records indicate that a great tsunamigenic earthquake, M~8.6, occurred in the Oaxaca region in 1787, breaking the Central Oaxaca segment together with several adjacent segments (Suarez & Albini 2009). Whether the updip portion of the fault broke in this event remains speculative, although plausible based on the large tsunami. Evidence from the

  4. Source Parameters of Large Magnitude Subduction Zone Earthquakes Along Oaxaca, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fannon, M. L.; Bilek, S. L.

    2014-12-01

    Subduction zones are host to temporally and spatially varying seismogenic activity including, megathrust earthquakes, slow slip events (SSE), nonvolcanic tremor (NVT), and ultra-slow velocity layers (USL). We explore these variations by determining source parameters for large earthquakes (M > 5.5) along the Oaxaca segment of the Mexico subduction zone, an area encompasses the wide range of activity noted above. We use waveform data for 36 earthquakes that occurred between January 1, 1990 to June 1, 2014, obtained from the IRIS DMC, generate synthetic Green's functions for the available stations, and deconvolve these from the ­­­observed records to determine a source time function for each event. From these source time functions, we measured rupture durations and scaled these by the cube root to calculate the normalized duration for each event. Within our dataset, four events located updip from the SSE, USL, and NVT areas have longer rupture durations than the other events in this analysis. Two of these four events, along with one other event, are located within the SSE and NVT areas. The results in this study show that large earthquakes just updip from SSE and NVT have slower rupture characteristics than other events along the subduction zone not adjacent to SSE, USL, and NVT zones. Based on our results, we suggest a transitional zone for the seismic behavior rather than a distinct change at a particular depth. This study will help aid in understanding seismogenic behavior that occurs along subduction zones and the rupture characteristics of earthquakes near areas of slow slip processes.

  5. Lithosphere structure of the Longmenshan tectonic zone and main factors of the 2008 Wenchuan Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, F.; Wang, X.; Qing, Z.; Bai, D.; Meixing, H.; Jingqi, L.; Gang, Z.; Yongzhen, Y.

    2013-12-01

    We analysis the lithosphere structure of the Longmenshan tectonic zone and main factors of the 2008 Wenchuan Earthquake from the results of magnetotelluric sounding, gravity and magnetic detection. The comprehensive geophysical profiles were detected across Songpan-Ganzi folded zone, Longmenshan tectonic zone and Western Sichuan foreland basin. Two-dimensional electrical structure shows that the major tectonic units have different electrical characteristics. The Western Sichuan foreland basin is a typical craton model which has higher resistivity and thinner layers of the lithosphere than the Songpan-Ganzi folded zone, low resistivity anomaly zones only exist in horizontal direction on upper crust, the middle lower crust and upper mantle performance for high resistance characteristics, the vertical stratification is not obvious in the Western Sichuan foreland basin . The Songpan-Ganzi folded zone is a typical thickening crust model , which has large-scale low resistivity anomaly layers in the middle and lower crust, and high resistivity abnormal layers in the upper crust. Density detection results shows that the density of the local high resistance body under the Longmenshan Caopo country is relatively high (3.0 g/cm3) , which is likely to be the mantle-derived basic substances from the invasion of the upper crust. Longmenshan tectonic zone has two sets of fault system: one is a shallow fault system mainly consist of brittle shear zone from the surface layer of the earth's crust, another is a deep fault system mainly consist of ductile shear zone cutting the Moho or crust-mantle transition zone. Shallow and deep tectonic action indicates that the tectonism of these areas are different, which is probably caused by the earth's crust and mantle medium motion decoupling. The main source of 5.12 Wenchuan earthquake located in the footwall of Yingxiu fault, however, the earthquake fracture which induced the 5.12 Wenchuan earthquake is not Yingxiu fault but maybe a

  6. Maximum earthquake magnitudes along different sections of the North Anatolian fault zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohnhoff, Marco; Martínez-Garzón, Patricia; Bulut, Fatih; Stierle, Eva; Ben-Zion, Yehuda

    2016-04-01

    Constraining the maximum likely magnitude of future earthquakes on continental transform faults has fundamental consequences for the expected seismic hazard. Since the recurrence time for those earthquakes is typically longer than a century, such estimates rely primarily on well-documented historical earthquake catalogs, when available. Here we discuss the maximum observed earthquake magnitudes along different sections of the North Anatolian Fault Zone (NAFZ) in relation to the age of the fault activity, cumulative offset, slip rate and maximum length of coherent fault segments. The findings are based on a newly compiled catalog of historical earthquakes in the region, using the extensive literary sources that exist owing to the long civilization record. We find that the largest M7.8-8.0 earthquakes are exclusively observed along the older eastern part of the NAFZ that also has longer coherent fault segments. In contrast, the maximum observed events on the younger western part where the fault branches into two or more strands are smaller. No first-order relations between maximum magnitudes and fault offset or slip rates are found. The results suggest that the maximum expected earthquake magnitude in the densely populated Marmara-Istanbul region would probably not exceed M7.5. The findings are consistent with available knowledge for the San Andreas Fault and Dead Sea Transform, and can help in estimating hazard potential associated with different sections of large transform faults.

  7. Probabilities of Earthquake Occurrences along the Sumatra-Andaman Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pailoplee, Santi

    2017-01-01

    Earthquake activities along the Sumatra-Andaman Subduction Zone (SASZ) were clarified using the derived frequency-magnitude distribution in terms of the (i) most probable maximum magnitudes, (ii) return periods and (iii) probabilities of earthquake occurrences. The northern segment of SASZ, along the western coast of Myanmar to southern Nicobar, was found to be capable of generating an earthquake of magnitude 6.1-6.4 Mw in the next 30-50 years, whilst the southern segment of offshore of the northwestern and western parts of Sumatra (defined as a high hazard region) had a short recurrence interval of 6-12 and 10-30 years for a 6.0 and 7.0 Mw magnitude earthquake, respectively, compared to the other regions. Throughout the area along the SASZ, there are 70- almost 100% probabilities of the earthquake with Mw up to 6.0 might be generated in the next 50 years whilst the northern segment had less than 50% chance of occurrence of a 7.0 Mw earthquake in the next 50 year. Although Rangoon was defined as the lowest hazard among the major city in the vicinity of SASZ, there is 90% chance of a 6.0 Mw earthquake in the next 50 years. Therefore, the effective mitigation plan of seismic hazard should be contributed.

  8. Periodic Viscous Shear Heating Instability in Fine-Grained Shear Zones: Possible Mechanism for Intermediate Depth Earthquakes and Slow Earthquakes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelemen, P. B.; Hirth, G.

    2004-12-01

    creep and grain boundary sliding as a function of stress and strain, and undergoes diffusive growth during diffusion creep. For strain rates ca E-13 per second and initial temperatures ca 600 to 850 C, this model produces periodic viscous shear heating events with periods of 100's of years. Strain rates during these events approach 1 per second as temperatures reach 1400 C, so future models will incorporate inertial terms in the stress. Cooling between events returns the shear zone almost to its initial temperature, but ultimately shear zone temperature between events exceeds 850 C resulting in stable viscous creep. Back of the envelope calculations based on model results support the view that viscous deformation in both shear zone and host will be mainly via grain-size sensitive creep, and thus deformation will remain localized in shear zones. Similarly, we infer that inertial terms will remain small. Future models will test and quantify these inferences. The simple model described above provides an attractive explanation for intermediate-depth earthquakes, especially those in subduction zones that occur in a narrow thermal window (e.g., Hacker et al JGR 2003). We think that a "smoother"periodic instability might be produced via the same mechanism in weaker materials, which could provide a viscous mechanism for some slow earthquakes. By AGU, we will construct a second, simple model using quartz rheology to investigate this. Finally, coupling of viscous shear heating instabilities in the shallow mantle with brittle stick-slip deformation in the weaker, overlying crust may influence earthquake frequency.

  9. Seismic Velocity and Attenuation Images of the Nankai Subduction Zone: New Insight into Megathrust Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, D.; Liu, X.

    2015-12-01

    Dapeng Zhao, Xin Liu (Tohoku University, Japan) Many large interplate earthquakes (M > 7) occurred on the megathrust fault of the Nankai subduction zone, where the young Philippine Sea plate is subducting beneath the Eurasian plate along the Nankai Trough. The most significant megathrust events in this region are the 1944 Tonankai (Mw 8.1), the 1946 Nankai (Mw 8.3) and the 1968 Hyuganada (Mw 7.5) earthquakes. The landward down-dip limit of the Nankai megathrust seismogenic zone is located at a depth of ~30-40 km, marked by the occurrence of episodic tremors and slips. The seaward up-dip limit is not very distinct, being generally at a depth of ~10 km and correlated with a suite of diagenetic to low-grade metamorphic processes. To clarify the causal mechanism of the megathrust earthquakes, we studied the detailed three-dimensional P and S wave velocity (Vp and Vs), attenuation (Qp and Qs), and Poisson's ratio (σ) structures of the SW Japan forearc, using a large number of high-quality arrival time and t* data measured precisely from seismograms of local earthquakes. The suboceanic earthquakes used are relocated precisely using sP depth phase and ocean bottom seismometer data. Our results show the existence of two prominent high-V, high-Q, and low-σ patches separated by low-V, low-Q, and high-σ anomalies in the Nankai megathrust zone. Megathrust earthquakes during 1900 to 2013 nucleated in or around the high-V, high-Q, and low-σ patches, which may represent strongly coupled areas (i.e., asperities) in the megathrust zone. This feature is very similar to that of the NE Japan megathrust zone where the great Tohoku-oki earthquake (Mw 9.0) occurred on 11 March 2011 (e.g., Zhao, 2015). These results indicate that structural heterogeneities in the megathrust zone, such as the subducting seafloor topography and compositional variations, control the nucleation of megathrust earthquakes.

  10. Laboratory-based maximum slip rates in earthquake rupture zones and radiated energy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGarr, A.; Fletcher, Joe B.; Boettcher, M.; Beeler, N.; Boatwright, J.

    2010-01-01

    Laboratory stick-slip friction experiments indicate that peak slip rates increase with the stresses loading the fault to cause rupture. If this applies also to earthquake fault zones, then the analysis of rupture processes is simplified inasmuch as the slip rates depend only on the local yield stress and are independent of factors specific to a particular event, including the distribution of slip in space and time. We test this hypothesis by first using it to develop an expression for radiated energy that depends primarily on the seismic moment and the maximum slip rate. From laboratory results, the maximum slip rate for any crustal earthquake, as well as various stress parameters including the yield stress, can be determined based on its seismic moment and the maximum slip within its rupture zone. After finding that our new equation for radiated energy works well for laboratory stick-slip friction experiments, we used it to estimate radiated energies for five earthquakes with magnitudes near 2 that were induced in a deep gold mine, an M 2.1 repeating earthquake near the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) site and seven major earthquakes in California and found good agreement with energies estimated independently from spectra of local and regional ground-motion data. Estimates of yield stress for the earthquakes in our study range from 12 MPa to 122 MPa with a median of 64 MPa. The lowest value was estimated for the 2004 M 6 Parkfield, California, earthquake whereas the nearby M 2.1 repeating earthquake, as recorded in the SAFOD pilot hole, showed a more typical yield stress of 64 MPa.

  11. Prompt Assessment of Global Earthquakes for Response (PAGER): A System for Rapidly Determining the Impact of Earthquakes Worldwide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Earle, Paul S.; Wald, David J.; Jaiswal, Kishor S.; Allen, Trevor I.; Hearne, Michael G.; Marano, Kristin D.; Hotovec, Alicia J.; Fee, Jeremy

    2009-01-01

    Within minutes of a significant earthquake anywhere on the globe, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Prompt Assessment of Global Earthquakes for Response (PAGER) system assesses its potential societal impact. PAGER automatically estimates the number of people exposed to severe ground shaking and the shaking intensity at affected cities. Accompanying maps of the epicentral region show the population distribution and estimated ground-shaking intensity. A regionally specific comment describes the inferred vulnerability of the regional building inventory and, when available, lists recent nearby earthquakes and their effects. PAGER's results are posted on the USGS Earthquake Program Web site (http://earthquake.usgs.gov/), consolidated in a concise one-page report, and sent in near real-time to emergency responders, government agencies, and the media. Both rapid and accurate results are obtained through manual and automatic updates of PAGER's content in the hours following significant earthquakes. These updates incorporate the most recent estimates of earthquake location, magnitude, faulting geometry, and first-hand accounts of shaking. PAGER relies on a rich set of earthquake analysis and assessment tools operated by the USGS and contributing Advanced National Seismic System (ANSS) regional networks. A focused research effort is underway to extend PAGER's near real-time capabilities beyond population exposure to quantitative estimates of fatalities, injuries, and displaced population.

  12. Understanding Earthquake Slip Surface Distribution in a Lithologically Heterogeneous Shear Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, E.; Rowe, C. D.

    2016-12-01

    Understanding where earthquake slip surfaces are distributed within a fault core relates to earthquake processes within the seismogenic zone. A heterogeneous assemblage of sheared lithologies at brittle-ductile transitional conditions within an exhumed continental strike-slip fault contains evidence for compositionally controlled earthquake slip surface distribution. The spatial distribution of strain within the shear zone core is observable using a high resolution 1:8 map of the area. Compositional and grain size heterogeneities define different strength materials, and it is hypothesised that ultramylonite surfaces containing preserved pseudotachylite textures occurring along the interface between different units are preserved earthquake slip surfaces. While microstructural evidence for both britle and ductile deformation is present in most observed mylonites, these ultramylonites show primarily plastic flow overprinting characteristic frictional melting textures. These surfaces occur in centimeter wide bands which are continuous along strike. They are abundant and non-randomly distributed within the study area, comprising an estimated five percent of the total exposure and nearly twenty percent when hosted within pegmatite derived quartzo-feldspathic mylonite boudins. Relative strength distribution within the fault is estimated based on lithology and used to assess the dependence of possible earthquake slip-surface distribution on the nature of surronding materials. A numerical representation of the interfacial relationships found within the Pofadder Shear Zone will be used to test the reproducibility of this elastic and plastic cycling along the interface of sheared materials. We have demonstrated that the presence and distribution of earthquake slip surfaces in the Pofadder shear zone, defined by the preserved pseudotachylite content, is controlled by the rheological contrast between different mylonitic materials within the brittle-ductile transitional

  13. Towards Estimating the Magnitude of Earthquakes from EM Data Collected from the Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heraud, J. A.

    2016-12-01

    During the past three years, magnetometers deployed in the Peruvian coast have been providing evidence that the ULF pulses received are indeed generated at the subduction or Benioff zone. Such evidence was presented at the AGU 2015 Fall meeting, showing the results of triangulation of pulses from two magnetometers located in the central area of Peru, using data collected during a two-year period. The process has been extended in time, only pulses associated with the occurrence of earthquakes and several pulse parameters have been used to estimate a function relating the magnitude of the earthquake with the value of a function generated with those parameters. The results shown, including an animated data video, are a first approximation towards the estimation of the magnitude of an earthquake about to occur, based on electromagnetic pulses that originated at the subduction zone. During the past three years, magnetometers deployed in the Peruvian coast have been providing evidence that the ULF pulses received are indeed generated at the subduction or Benioff zone. Such evidence was presented at the AGU 2015 Fall meeting, showing the results of triangulation of pulses from two magnetometers located in the central area of Peru, using data collected during a two-year period. The process has been extended in time, only pulses associated with the occurrence of earthquakes have been used and several pulse parameters have been used to estimate a function relating the magnitude of the earthquake with the value of a function generated with those parameters. The results shown, including an animated data video, are a first approximation towards the estimation of the magnitude of an earthquake about to occur, based on electromagnetic pulses that originated at the subduction zone.

  14. Paleoseismic Investigations of Subduction Zone Earthquakes on the Southeastern Coast of the Kenai Peninsula, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelsey, H. M.; Witter, R. C.; Briggs, R. W.; Engelhart, S. E.; Nelson, A. R.; Haeussler, P. J.

    2013-12-01

    Rupture extents for prehistoric subduction zone earthquakes on the Alaska margin are poorly documented. For example, the 1964 great Alaska earthquake ruptured the subduction zone from Prince William Sound westward to the southwest end of Kodiak Island, but an outstanding question is whether or not earlier subduction earthquakes ruptured a shorter segment in the Kodiak region with the eastern margin located in the Kenai Peninsula. To address the question, we investigated several embayments on the Pacific (southeastern) coast of the Kenai Peninsula to reconstruct the late Holocene paleoseismic history. Constraints to constructing a paleoseismic history on the outer Kenai coast include recent deglaciation of embayments that limits a stratigraphic record to approximately the last 1 to 3 thousand years and the high wave-energy environment that results in frequent closure of embayments by barrier bars. Recognizing these constraints, two approaches have proved productive in investigating paleoseismic history on the outer Kenai coast. One involves understanding how beach ridges can be formed and modified by coseismic subsidence and documenting timing and number of late Holocene prehistoric earthquakes based on beach ridge genesis and evolution. The other approach, which is the more conventional paleoseismic approach for subduction zones, is investigating stratigraphic evidence for coseismic subsidence in peaty and muddy sediment within embayments. We illustrate these two approaches using two coastal sites in Aialik Bay within Kenai Fjords National Park, a strandplain complex at Verdant Cove and a drowned embayment at Quicksand Cove, respectively. Both sites record two prehistoric subduction zone earthquakes prior to the historically known 1964 great Alaska earthquake.

  15. The Global Earthquake Model and Disaster Risk Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolka, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    Advanced, reliable and transparent tools and data to assess earthquake risk are inaccessible to most, especially in less developed regions of the world while few, if any, globally accepted standards currently allow a meaningful comparison of risk between places. The Global Earthquake Model (GEM) is a collaborative effort that aims to provide models, datasets and state-of-the-art tools for transparent assessment of earthquake hazard and risk. As part of this goal, GEM and its global network of collaborators have developed the OpenQuake engine (an open-source software for hazard and risk calculations), the OpenQuake platform (a web-based portal making GEM's resources and datasets freely available to all potential users), and a suite of tools to support modelers and other experts in the development of hazard, exposure and vulnerability models. These resources are being used extensively across the world in hazard and risk assessment, from individual practitioners to local and national institutions, and in regional projects to inform disaster risk reduction. Practical examples for how GEM is bridging the gap between science and disaster risk reduction are: - Several countries including Switzerland, Turkey, Italy, Ecuador, Papua-New Guinea and Taiwan (with more to follow) are computing national seismic hazard using the OpenQuake-engine. In some cases these results are used for the definition of actions in building codes. - Technical support, tools and data for the development of hazard, exposure, vulnerability and risk models for regional projects in South America and Sub-Saharan Africa. - Going beyond physical risk, GEM's scorecard approach evaluates local resilience by bringing together neighborhood/community leaders and the risk reduction community as a basis for designing risk reduction programs at various levels of geography. Actual case studies are Lalitpur in the Kathmandu Valley in Nepal and Quito/Ecuador. In agreement with GEM's collaborative approach, all

  16. Viscoelastic shear zone model of a strike-slip earthquake cycle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollitz, F.F.

    2001-01-01

    I examine the behavior of a two-dimensional (2-D) strike-slip fault system embedded in a 1-D elastic layer (schizosphere) overlying a uniform viscoelastic half-space (plastosphere) and within the boundaries of a finite width shear zone. The viscoelastic coupling model of Savage and Prescott [1978] considers the viscoelastic response of this system, in the absence of the shear zone boundaries, to an earthquake occurring within the upper elastic layer, steady slip beneath a prescribed depth, and the superposition of the responses of multiple earthquakes with characteristic slip occurring at regular intervals. So formulated, the viscoelastic coupling model predicts that sufficiently long after initiation of the system, (1) average fault-parallel velocity at any point is the average slip rate of that side of the fault and (2) far-field velocities equal the same constant rate. Because of the sensitivity to the mechanical properties of the schizosphere-plastosphere system (i.e., elastic layer thickness, plastosphere viscosity), this model has been used to infer such properties from measurements of interseismic velocity. Such inferences exploit the predicted behavior at a known time within the earthquake cycle. By modifying the viscoelastic coupling model to satisfy the additional constraint that the absolute velocity at prescribed shear zone boundaries is constant, I find that even though the time-averaged behavior remains the same, the spatiotemporal pattern of surface deformation (particularly its temporal variation within an earthquake cycle) is markedly different from that predicted by the conventional viscoelastic coupling model. These differences are magnified as plastosphere viscosity is reduced or as the recurrence interval of periodic earthquakes is lengthened. Application to the interseismic velocity field along the Mojave section of the San Andreas fault suggests that the region behaves mechanically like a ???600-km-wide shear zone accommodating 50 mm/yr fault

  17. Global survey of earthquakes and non-volcanic tremor triggered by the 2008 Mw7.9 Wenchuan earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, T.; Peng, Z.; Wang, W.; Chen, Q.

    2008-12-01

    We perform a global survey of triggered earthquakes and non-volcanic tremor by the 2008 Mw7.9 Wenchuan earthquake. The analyzed data is obtained from the Global Seismic Network and various local and regional seismic networks around the world. We identify triggered earthquakes as impulsive seismic energies with clear P and S arrivals on 5 Hz high-pass-filtered three-component velocity seismograms, and triggered tremor as bursts of high-frequency, non-impulsive seismic energies that are coherent among many stations and during the passage of teleseismic body and surface waves. We find wide-spread triggering of regular earthquakes within mainland China and elsewhere in the world. The triggered earthquakes mostly occur in tectonically active regions in northwest and northeast China. However, we also find clear evidence of triggered earthquakes in southeast China that is not tectonically active. Our observations are consistent with previous studies of earthquake triggering (e.g., Gomberg et al., 2004; Velasco et al., 2008), indicating that dynamic triggering of earthquakes is ubiquitous and independent of the tectonic environments. In comparison, clear triggered tremor associated with the Wenchuan earthquake is found in the Taiwan Island (Chao and Peng, 2008), southwest Japan, Cascadia (Vidale et al., 2008), and around the Parkfield section of the San Andreas fault (Peng et al., 2008), where regular and/or triggered tremor has been found before. So far we have not found clear evidence of triggered tremor within mainland China. At least part of the reason could be due to severe clippings of the broadband waveforms during large-amplitude surface waves for many stations within 2000 km of the epicenter. Updated results will be presented at the meeting.

  18. Rapid changes in the electrical state of the 1999 Izmit earthquake rupture zone

    PubMed Central

    Honkura, Yoshimori; Oshiman, Naoto; Matsushima, Masaki; Barış, Şerif; Kemal Tunçer, Mustafa; Bülent Tank, Sabri; Çelik, Cengiz; Çiftçi, Elif Tolak

    2013-01-01

    Crustal fluids exist near fault zones, but their relation to the processes that generate earthquakes, including slow-slip events, is unclear. Fault-zone fluids are characterized by low electrical resistivity. Here we investigate the time-dependent crustal resistivity in the rupture area of the 1999 Mw 7.6 Izmit earthquake using electromagnetic data acquired at four sites before and after the earthquake. Most estimates of apparent resistivity in the frequency range of 0.05 to 2.0 Hz show abrupt co-seismic decreases on the order of tens of per cent. Data acquired at two sites 1 month after the Izmit earthquake indicate that the resistivity had already returned to pre-seismic levels. We interpret such changes as the pressure-induced transition between isolated and interconnected fluids. Some data show pre-seismic changes and this suggests that the transition is associated with foreshocks and slow-slip events before large earthquakes. PMID:23820970

  19. Fractal analysis of the spatial distribution of earthquakes along the Hellenic Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadakis, Giorgos; Vallianatos, Filippos; Sammonds, Peter

    2014-05-01

    The Hellenic Subduction Zone (HSZ) is the most seismically active region in Europe. Many destructive earthquakes have taken place along the HSZ in the past. The evolution of such active regions is expressed through seismicity and is characterized by complex phenomenology. The understanding of the tectonic evolution process and the physical state of subducting regimes is crucial in earthquake prediction. In recent years, there is a growing interest concerning an approach to seismicity based on the science of complex systems (Papadakis et al., 2013; Vallianatos et al., 2012). In this study we calculate the fractal dimension of the spatial distribution of earthquakes along the HSZ and we aim to understand the significance of the obtained values to the tectonic and geodynamic evolution of this area. We use the external seismic sources provided by Papaioannou and Papazachos (2000) to create a dataset regarding the subduction zone. According to the aforementioned authors, we define five seismic zones. Then, we structure an earthquake dataset which is based on the updated and extended earthquake catalogue for Greece and the adjacent areas by Makropoulos et al. (2012), covering the period 1976-2009. The fractal dimension of the spatial distribution of earthquakes is calculated for each seismic zone and for the HSZ as a unified system using the box-counting method (Turcotte, 1997; Robertson et al., 1995; Caneva and Smirnov, 2004). Moreover, the variation of the fractal dimension is demonstrated in different time windows. These spatiotemporal variations could be used as an additional index to inform us about the physical state of each seismic zone. As a precursor in earthquake forecasting, the use of the fractal dimension appears to be a very interesting future work. Acknowledgements Giorgos Papadakis wish to acknowledge the Greek State Scholarships Foundation (IKY). References Caneva, A., Smirnov, V., 2004. Using the fractal dimension of earthquake distributions and the

  20. The January 25th, 2014 Kebumen earthquake: A normal faulting in subduction zone of Southern Java

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serhalawan, Yopi Ruben; Sianipar, Dimas; Suardi, Iman

    2017-07-01

    Normal faulting mechanism of earthquake in subduction zone is quite interested to study further. We investigated the Kebumen, January 25, 2014 earthquake sequences by retrieving focal mechanisms using full moment tensor inversion. We used BMKG seismic data from stations in the vicinity of Central Java region for these inversions. Then we correlated the static coulomb stress change by the mainshock to the aftershocks. We found that mainshock is a normal faulting earthquake with nodal plane 1; strike 283, dip 22 and rake -100; nodal plane 2 with strike 113, dip 68 and rake -86. Using distribution analysis of high precision aftershocks after relocated; we considered that the reliable fault plane was nodal plane 1 with strike trending SE-NW. The focal mechanisms provide an estimate of the local stress field in the Wadati-Beniof Zone of Southern Java subduction zone. There is also conclution stating that the mainshock may trigger the aftershocks mainly in three zones, i.e. in continental crustal, upper mantle and on the oceanic slab. This is visually showed that the high quality aftershocks located in positive zones of static coulomb stress change.

  1. GEM1: First-year modeling and IT activities for the Global Earthquake Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, G.; Giardini, D.; Wiemer, S.

    2009-04-01

    components are in the planning stages, such as the developments of a unified active fault database and earthquake catalog. The flagship activity of GEM's first year is GEM1, a focused pilot project to develop GEM's first hazard and risk modeling products and initial IT infrastructure, starting in January 2009 and ending in March 2010. GEM1 will provide core capabilities for the present and key knowledge for future development of the full GEM computing Environment and product set. We will build GEM1 largely using existing tools and datasets, connected through a unified IT infrastructure, in order to bring GEM's initial capabilities online as rapidly as possible. The Swiss Seismological Service at ETH-Zurich is leading the GEM1 effort in cooperation with partners around the world. We anticipate that GEM1's products will include: • A global compilation of regional seismic source zone models in one or more common representations • Global synthetic earthquake catalogs for use in hazard calculations • Initial set of regional and global catalogues for validation • Global hazard models in map and database forms • First compilation of global vulnerabilities and fragilities • Tools for exposure and loss assessment • Validation of results and software for existing risk assessment tools to be used in future GEM stages • Demonstration risk scenarios for target cities • First version of GEM IT infrastructure All these products will be made freely available to the greatest extent possible. For more information on GEM and GEM1, please visit http://www.globalquakemodel.org.

  2. Seismic attenuation tomography of the source zone of the 2016 Kumamoto earthquake (M 7.3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zewei; Zhao, Dapeng; Liu, Xin; Li, Xibing

    2017-04-01

    We study the three-dimensional seismic attenuation (QP and QS) structure in the source area of the 2016 Kumamoto earthquake (M 7.3) by using 18,296 tP* and 29,668 tS* data from 742 local earthquakes recorded by a dense seismic network consisting of 112 stations deployed in Kyushu Island. Our results show that significant low-Q (high-attenuation) anomalies exist in the crust and mantle wedge beneath the volcanic front and back-arc area, which reflect hot and wet zones caused by convective circulation in the mantle wedge and dehydration of the young Philippine Sea (PHS) slab. The 2016 Kumamoto earthquake occurred in a high-Q and high-velocity (high-V) zone in the upper crust, which is surrounded and underlain by low-Q and low-V anomalies in the lower crust and upper mantle. These results suggest that the 2016 Kumamoto earthquake took place in a brittle seismogenic layer in the upper crust, but its rupture nucleation was affected by fluids and arc magma ascending from the mantle wedge. In addition, an obvious low-Q zone is revealed in the fore-arc mantle wedge, which reflects serpentinization of the fore-arc mantle due to abundant fluids from the PHS slab dehydration.

  3. Scenarios of tsunamigenic earthquakes generated along the Hellenic subduction zone and impact along the French coastlines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gailler, Audrey; Hébert, Hélène; Schindelé, François

    2016-04-01

    The Hellenic subduction is an active deformation zone characterized by a sustained day-to-day seismicity (magnitude < 4.5) among the strongest in Europe. The last significant earthquake along the Hellenic subduction zone detected and characterized by the French tsunami warning center (CENALT) occurred on 16th April 2015 (Mw = 6.0) along the southeastern coasts of Crete, without any tsunami risk for the French coastlines. Even if great subduction earthquakes (magnitude > 7.5) are less frequent than in Chile or Japan, the Hellenic area experienced several strong events by the past, the biggest being associated with major tsunamis (e.g., in 551, in 1303). The last known sequence dates the end of the 19th beginning of the 20th century with a seismic gap located along the South Peloponnese - West Crete segment. The legendary 365 AD great earthquake (magnitude 8 to 8.5) is assumed to have ruptured along a major inverse fault parallel to the trench in this area, generating a large tsunami observed up to the Adriatic. In this work we investigate the tsunami potential of earthquakes localized along the Hellenic subduction zone, especially the minimum magnitude required to generate a tsunami that would be able to cross from Eastern to Western Mediterranean. The impact along Corsica coastlines is discussed through the modeling of a set of tsunami scenarios (magnitude ranging from 8.0 to 8.5) established from historical events parameters.

  4. Detection of postseismic fault-zone collapse following the Landers earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Massonnet, D.; Thatcher, W.; Vadon, H.

    1996-01-01

    Stress changes caused by fault movement in an earthquake induce transient aseismic crustal movements in the earthquake source region that continue for months to decades following large events. These motions reflect aseismic adjustments of the fault zone and/or bulk deformation of the surroundings in response to applied stresses, and supply information regarding the inelastic behaviour of the Earth's crust. These processes are imperfectly understood because it is difficult to infer what occurs at depth using only surface measurements, which are in general poorly sampled. Here we push satellite radar interferometry to near its typical artefact level, to obtain a map of the postseismic deformation field in the three years following the 28 June 1992 Landers, California earthquake. From the map, we deduce two distinct types of deformation: afterslip at depth on the fault that ruptured in the earthquake, and shortening normal to the fault zone. The latter movement may reflect the closure of dilatant cracks and fluid expulsion from a transiently over-pressured fault zone.

  5. Earthquake source characterization for tsunami zoning (Case study of the Bengkulu 12 September 2007 tsunami and the 2 June 1994 Banyuwangi tsunami)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pribadi, S.; Puspito, N. T.; Rahman, M. S. S.; Tristanawati

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study is to characterize the earthquake generating tsunami in Indonesia, that influenced by the magnitude in the source. This study consists of the catalog and data of NOAA, Russian Tsunami Laboratory, BMKG observation, Global CMT, USGS and GEBCO bathymetry. Characterization of earthquakes based on Wphase method and the ratio of energy-seismic moment. Wphase widely applied in the global tsunami early warning using a group of P wave teleseismic with very low frequencies below 0005 Hz but yield an accurate result closed to Global CMT. The ratio of energy produced from seismic moment of broadband velocity waveform that give a threshold of the tsunamigenic earthquake with Θ ratio between -4.9 to -5.7 and the tsunami earthquake that Θ below -5.7. Further the characterization parameter used as an input tsunami modelling to give 2.2 m run-up height in case of Bengkulu 2007 tsunami and the highest run-up in Bali 5 m with inundation distance of 711 m in case of Banyuwangi 1994 tsunami. Tsunami zoning prone area is affected by tsunami source consisting of earthquake magnitude, distance to subduction trenches, geological conditions as hypocenter depth, bathymetry and coastal morphology exciting tsunami amplification.

  6. Transient uplift after a 17th-century earthquake along the kuril subduction zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sawai, Y.; Satake, K.; Kamataki, T.; Nasu, H.; Shishikura, M.; Atwater, B.F.; Horton, B.P.; Kelsey, H.M.; Nagumo, T.; Yamaguchi, M.

    2004-01-01

    In eastern Hokkaido, 60 to 80 kilometers above a subducting oceanic plate, tidal mudflats changed into freshwater forests during the first decades after a 17th-century tsunami. The mudflats gradually rose by a meter, as judged from fossil diatom assemblages. Both the tsunami and the ensuing uplift exceeded any in the region's 200 years of written history, and both resulted from a shallow plate-boundary earthquake of unusually large size along the Kuril subduction zone. This earthquake probably induced more creep farther down the plate boundary than did any of the region's historical events.

  7. Calculation of Confidence Intervals for the Maximum Magnitude of Earthquakes in Different Seismotectonic Zones of Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salamat, Mona; Zare, Mehdi; Holschneider, Matthias; Zöller, Gert

    2017-03-01

    The problem of estimating the maximum possible earthquake magnitude m_max has attracted growing attention in recent years. Due to sparse data, the role of uncertainties becomes crucial. In this work, we determine the uncertainties related to the maximum magnitude in terms of confidence intervals. Using an earthquake catalog of Iran, m_max is estimated for different predefined levels of confidence in six seismotectonic zones. Assuming the doubly truncated Gutenberg-Richter distribution as a statistical model for earthquake magnitudes, confidence intervals for the maximum possible magnitude of earthquakes are calculated in each zone. While the lower limit of the confidence interval is the magnitude of the maximum observed event,the upper limit is calculated from the catalog and the statistical model. For this aim, we use the original catalog which no declustering methods applied on as well as a declustered version of the catalog. Based on the study by Holschneider et al. (Bull Seismol Soc Am 101(4):1649-1659, 2011), the confidence interval for m_max is frequently unbounded, especially if high levels of confidence are required. In this case, no information is gained from the data. Therefore, we elaborate for which settings finite confidence levels are obtained. In this work, Iran is divided into six seismotectonic zones, namely Alborz, Azerbaijan, Zagros, Makran, Kopet Dagh, Central Iran. Although calculations of the confidence interval in Central Iran and Zagros seismotectonic zones are relatively acceptable for meaningful levels of confidence, results in Kopet Dagh, Alborz, Azerbaijan and Makran are not that much promising. The results indicate that estimating m_max from an earthquake catalog for reasonable levels of confidence alone is almost impossible.

  8. Earthquakes

    MedlinePlus

    An earthquake happens when two blocks of the earth suddenly slip past one another. Earthquakes strike suddenly, violently, and without warning at any time of the day or night. If an earthquake occurs in a populated area, it may cause ...

  9. Coulomb stress interactions among M≥5.9 earthquakes in the Gorda deformation zone and on the Mendocino Fracture Zone, Cascadia megathrust, and northern San Andreas fault

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rollins, John C.; Stein, Ross S.

    2010-01-01

    The Gorda deformation zone, a 50,000 km2 area of diffuse shear and rotation offshore northernmost California, has been the site of 20 M ≥ 5.9 earthquakes on four different fault orientations since 1976, including four M ≥ 7 shocks. This is the highest rate of large earthquakes in the contiguous United States. We calculate that the source faults of six recent M ≥ 5.9 earthquakes had experienced ≥0.6 bar Coulomb stress increases imparted by earthquakes that struck less than 9 months beforehand. Control tests indicate that ≥0.6 bar Coulomb stress interactions between M ≥ 5.9 earthquakes separated by Mw = 7.3 Trinidad earthquake are consistent with the locations of M ≥ 5.9 earthquakes in the Gorda zone until at least 1995, as well as earthquakes on the Mendocino Fault Zone in 1994 and 2000. Coulomb stress changes imparted by the 1980 earthquake are also consistent with its distinct elbow-shaped aftershock pattern. From these observations, we derive generalized static stress interactions among right-lateral, left-lateral and thrust faults near triple junctions.

  10. Deep Structure and Earthquake Generating Properties in the Yamasaki Fault Zone Estimated from Dense Seismic Observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishigami, K.; Shibutani, T.; Katao, H.; Yamaguchi, S.; Mamada, Y.

    2010-12-01

    We have been estimating crustal heterogeneous structure and earthquake generating properties in and around the Yamasaki fault zone, which is a left-lateral strike-slip active fault with a total length of about 80 km in southwest Japan. We deployed dense seismic observation network, composed of 32 stations with average spacing of 5-10 km around the Yamasaki fault zone. We estimate detailed fault structure such as fault dip and shape, segmentation, and possible location of asperities and rupture initiation point, as well as generating properties of earthquakes in the fault zone, through analyses of accurate hypocenter distribution, focal mechanism, 3-D velocity tomography, coda wave inversion, and other waveform analyses. We also deployed a linear seismic array across the fault, composed of 20 stations with about 20 m spacing, in order to delineate the fault-zone structure in more detail using the seismic waves trapped inside the low velocity zone. We also estimate detailed resistivity structure at shallow depth of the fault zone by AMT (audio-frequency magnetotelluric) and MT surveys. In the scattering analysis of coda waves, we used 2,391 wave traces from 121 earthquakes that occurred in 2002, 2003, 2008 and 2009, recorded at 60 stations, including dense temporary and routine stations. We estimated 3-D distribution of relative scattering coefficients along the Yamasaki fault zone. Microseismicity is high and scattering coefficient is relatively larger in the upper crust along the entire fault zone. The distribution of strong scatterers suggests that the Ohara and Hijima faults, which are the segments in the northwestern part of the Yamasaki fault zone, have almost vertical fault plane from surface to a depth of about 15 km. We used seismic network data operated by Universities, NIED, AIST, and JMA. This study has been carried out as a part of the project "Study on evaluation of earthquake source faults based on surveys of inland active faults" by Japan Nuclear

  11. Slab stress field in the Hellenic subduction zone as inferred from intermediate depth earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rontogianni, S.; Konstantinou, K.; Melis, N. S.; Evangelidis, C.

    2010-12-01

    In this study we investigate the stress regime of the subducting slab beneath the Hellenic Arc aiming to answer two fundamental questions; a) How does the slab deformation vary horizontally and vertically along this large curvature arc? b) Which are the mechanisms inferred from global observations that can explain this deformation and have not been identified previously due to dataset limitations. The data are selected from various seismic networks, global and local seismic catalogues and the newly established Hellenic broadband seismic network (http://bbnet.gein.noa.gr/). An updated view of the geometry of the Hellenic Wadati-Benioff zone (WBZ) is gained by the spatial distribution of intermediate depth earthquakes (40 km≤ depth ≤ 180km). Stress tensor inversion is performed on 100 fault plane solutions of intermediate depth earthquakes after quality control has been applied. The stress field parameters are determined along the arc for several depth ranges. The slab is divided into four subsets, each containing enough focal mechanisms for stress inversion to be performed successfully. The Peloponnese segment shows for depths 50-80 km σ1 almost normal to the slab and σ3 steeper than the slab dip that might indicate suction force-the component of the slab pull force that is unbalanced by the subduction resistance. The Kithira-Western Crete segment shows for depths 50-100 km a biaxial deviatoric compression or a state of confined compression with the σ1 along strike. The stress regime in this section of the slab might be related to its complex shape and geometry (width, curvature) reflecting changes in the slab dip between the Peloponnese-Kithira strait and the Crete region as has also been identified by teleseimic receiver functions. The third segment below Crete shows σ1 along strike and σ3 almost subvertical to slab direction. The stress field for the forth segment below Karpathos and Rhodos has been divided into two depth ranges. The shallow subset (50

  12. Observations of large earthquakes in the Mexican subduction zone over 110 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hjörleifsdóttir, Vala; Krishna Singh, Shri; Martínez-Peláez, Liliana; Garza-Girón, Ricardo; Lund, Björn; Ji, Chen

    2016-04-01

    Fault slip during an earthquake is observed to be highly heterogeneous, with areas of large slip interspersed with areas of smaller or even no slip. The cause of the heterogeneity is debated. One hypothesis is that the frictional properties on the fault are heterogeneous. The parts of the rupture surface that have large slip during earthquakes are coupled more strongly, whereas the areas in between and around creep continuously or episodically. The continuously or episodically creeping areas can partly release strain energy through aseismic slip during the interseismic period, resulting in relatively lower prestress than on the coupled areas. This would lead to subsequent earthquakes having large slip in the same place, or persistent asperities. A second hypothesis is that in the absence of creeping sections, the prestress is governed mainly by the accumulative stress change associated with previous earthquakes. Assuming homogeneous frictional properties on the fault, a larger prestress results in larger slip, i.e. the next earthquake may have large slip where there was little or no slip in the previous earthquake, which translates to non-persistent asperities. The study of earthquake cycles are hampered by short time period for which high quality, broadband seismological and accelerographic records, needed for detailed studies of slip distributions, are available. The earthquake cycle in the Mexican subduction zone is relatively short, with about 30 years between large events in many places. We are therefore entering a period for which we have good records for two subsequent events occurring in the same segment of the subduction zone. In this study we compare seismograms recorded either at the Wiechert seismograph or on a modern broadband seismometer located in Uppsala, Sweden for subsequent earthquakes in the Mexican subduction zone rupturing the same patch. The Wiechert seismograph is unique in the sense that it recorded continuously for more than 80 years

  13. Public release of the ISC-GEM Global Instrumental Earthquake Catalogue (1900-2009)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Storchak, Dmitry A.; Di Giacomo, Domenico; Bondára, István; Engdahl, E. Robert; Harris, James; Lee, William H.K.; Villaseñor, Antonio; Bormann, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The International Seismological Centre–Global Earthquake Model (ISC–GEM) Global Instrumental Earthquake Catalogue (1900–2009) is the result of a special effort to substantially extend and improve currently existing global catalogs to serve the requirements of specific user groups who assess and model seismic hazard and risk. The data from the ISC–GEM Catalogue would be used worldwide yet will prove absolutely essential in those regions where a high seismicity level strongly correlates with a high population density.

  14. The radiated seismic energy and apparent stress of interplate and intraplate earthquakes at subduction zone environments; implications for seismic hazard estimation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Choy, George L.; Boatwright, John L.; Kirby, Stephen H.

    2001-01-01

    The radiated seismic energies (ES) of 980 shallow subduction-zone earthquakes with magnitudes ? 5.8 are used to examine global patterns of energy release and apparent stress. In contrast to traditional methods which have relied upon empirical formulas, these energies are computed through direct spectral analysis of broadband seismic waveforms. Energy gives a physically different measure of earthquake size than moment. Moment, being derived from the low-frequency asymptote of the displacement spectra, is related to the final static displacement. Thus, moment is crucial to the long-term tectonic implication of an earthquake. In contrast, energy, being derived from the velocity power spectra, is more a measure of seismic potential for damage to anthropogenic structures. There is considerable scatter in the plot of ES-M0 for worldwide earthquakes. For any given M0, the ES can vary by as much as an order of magnitude about the mean regression line. The global variation between ES and M0, while large, is not random. When subsets of ES-M0 are plotted as a function of seismic region, tectonic setting and faulting type, the scatter in data is often substantially reduced. There are two profound implications for the estimation of seismic and tsunamic hazard. First, it is now feasible to characterize the apparent stress for particular regions. Second, a given M0 does not have a unique ES. This means that M0 alone is not sufficient to describe all aspects of an earthquake. In particular, we have found examples of interplate thrust-faulting earthquakes and intraslab normal-faulting earthquakes occurring in the same epicentral region with vastly different macroseismic effects. Despite the gross macroseismic disparities, the MW?s in these examples were identical. However, the Me?s (energy magnitudes) successfully distinguished the earthquakes that were more damaging.

  15. FDM Simulation of an Anomalous Later Phase from the Japan Trench Subduction Zone Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguchi, Shinako; Maeda, Takuto; Furumura, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the development of a distinct later phase observed at stations near the Japan Trench associated with shallow, outer-rise earthquakes off the coast of Sanriku, northern Japan based on the analysis of three-component broadband seismograms and FDM simulations of seismic wave propagation using a heterogeneous structural model of the Japan Trench subduction zone. Snapshots of seismic wave propagation obtained through these simulations clearly demonstrate the complicated seismic wavefield constructed by a coupling of the ocean acoustic waves and the Rayleigh waves propagating within seawater and below the sea bottom by multiple reflections associated with shallow subduction zone earthquakes. We demonstrated that the conversion to the Rayleigh wave from the coupled ocean acoustic waves and the Rayleigh wave as they propagate upward along the slope of seafloor near the coast is the primary cause of the arrival of the distinct later phase at the station near the coast. Through a sequence of simulations using different structural models of the Japan Trench subduction zone, we determined that the thick layer of seawater along the trench and the suddenly rising sea bottom onshore of the Japanese island are the major causes of the distinct later phase. The results of the present study indicate that for realistic modeling of seismic wave propagation from the subduction zone earthquakes, a high-resolution bathymetry model is very crucial, although most current simulations do not include a water column in their simulation models.

  16. Comparision of the different probability distributions for earthquake hazard assessment in the North Anatolian Fault Zone

    SciTech Connect

    Yilmaz, Şeyda Bayrak, Erdem; Bayrak, Yusuf

    2016-04-18

    In this study we examined and compared the three different probabilistic distribution methods for determining the best suitable model in probabilistic assessment of earthquake hazards. We analyzed a reliable homogeneous earthquake catalogue between a time period 1900-2015 for magnitude M ≥ 6.0 and estimated the probabilistic seismic hazard in the North Anatolian Fault zone (39°-41° N 30°-40° E) using three distribution methods namely Weibull distribution, Frechet distribution and three-parameter Weibull distribution. The distribution parameters suitability was evaluated Kolmogorov-Smirnov (K-S) goodness-of-fit test. We also compared the estimated cumulative probability and the conditional probabilities of occurrence of earthquakes for different elapsed time using these three distribution methods. We used Easyfit and Matlab software to calculate these distribution parameters and plotted the conditional probability curves. We concluded that the Weibull distribution method was the most suitable than other distribution methods in this region.

  17. Long-term perspectives on giant earthquakes and tsunamis at subduction zones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Satake, K.; Atwater, B.F.; ,

    2007-01-01

    Histories of earthquakes and tsunamis, inferred from geological evidence, aid in anticipating future catastrophes. This natural warning system now influences building codes and tsunami planning in the United States, Canada, and Japan, particularly where geology demonstrates the past occurrence of earthquakes and tsunamis larger than those known from written and instrumental records. Under favorable circumstances, paleoseismology can thus provide long-term advisories of unusually large tsunamis. The extraordinary Indian Ocean tsunami of 2004 resulted from a fault rupture more than 1000 km in length that included and dwarfed fault patches that had broken historically during lesser shocks. Such variation in rupture mode, known from written history at a few subduction zones, is also characteristic of earthquake histories inferred from geology on the Pacific Rim. Copyright ?? 2007 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved.

  18. Low Vp/Vs ratios and Earthquake Occurrence in Intraplate Seismic zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, C. A.

    2011-12-01

    Local earthquake tomography results for three North American intraplate seismic zones demonstrate a correspondence between anomalously low Vp/Vs ratios and earthquake occurrence. Vp and Vs models are determined for the New Madrid seismic zone (NMSZ), the eastern Tennessee seismic zone (ETSZ) and the Charlevoix seismic zone (CSZ) and Vp/Vs ratios are found by dividing Vp by Vs in those portions of the models where P- and S-wave raypath coverage is similar. In the NMSZ, Vp/Vs ratios as low as 1.62 are associated with the northern portion of the Reelfoot fault and the two arms of seismicity extending from its northern end. In the ETSZ, Vp/Vs ratios of 1.68 occur at depths greater than 12 km and are associated with the most seismogenic portion of the zone. Only a limited data set is available for the CSZ but low Vp/Vs ratios of 1.68 occur at depths exceeding 8 km and correspond to the two major NE trending branches of seismicity. Low Vp/Vs ratios are produced by negative Vp anomalies and positive Vs anomalies in all three seismic zones, suggesting the controlling factor is rock composition rather than the presence of fractures and elevated pore pressure. Compositionally, low Vp/Vs ratios can be explained by the presence of quartz rich rocks. For example, the 1.62 Vp/Vs ratio in the NMSZ can be attributed to rocks containing about 25 to 30% (weight percent) more quartz than is commonly found in granite. Quartz is a weak mineral and the presence of quartz-rich rocks could facilitate ductile behavior (creep) at depth, resulting in shear strain loading and the generation of earthquakes in the crust above. The presence of quartz rich basement rocks may place an important constraint on the location of intraplate seismic zones.

  19. Slip Distribution of Two Recent Large Earthquakes in the Guerrero Segment of the Mexican Subduction Zone, and Their Relation to Previous Earthquakes, Silent Slip Events and Seismic Gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hjorleifsdottir, V.; Ji, C.; Iglesias, A.; Cruz-Atienza, V. M.; Singh, S. K.

    2016-12-01

    In 2012 and 2014 mega-thrust earthquakes occurred approximately 300 km apart, in the state of Guerrero, Mexico. The westernmost half of the segment between them has not had a large earthquake in at least 100 years and most of the easternmost half last broke in 1957. However, down dip of both earthquakes, silent slip events have been reported, as well as in the gap between them (Kostoglodov et al 2003, Graham 2014). There are indications that the westernmost half has different frictional properties than the areas surrounds it. However, the two events at the edges of the zone also seem to behave in different manners, indicating a broad range of frictional properties in this area, with changes occurring over short distances. The 2012/03/20, M7.5 earthquake occurred near the Guerrero-Oaxaca border, between the towns of Ometepec (Gro.) and Pinotepa Nacional (Oax.). This earthquake is noteworthy for breaking the same asperities as two previously recorded earthquakes, the M7.2 1937 and M6.9 1982(a) earthquakes, in very large "repeating earthquakes". Furthermore, the density of repeating smaller events is larger in this zone than in other parts of the subduction zone (Dominguez et al, submitted) and this earthquake has had very many aftershocks for its size (UNAM Seis. group, 2013). The 2012 event may have broken two asperities (UNAM Seis. group, 2013). How the two asperities relate to the previous relatively smaller "large events", to the repeating earthquakes, the high number of aftershocks and to the slow slip event is not clear. The 2014/04/18 M 7.2 earthquake broke a patch on the edge of the Guerrero gap, that previously broke in the 1979 M7.4 earthquake as well as the 1943 M 7.4 earthquake. This earthquake, despite being smaller, had a much larger duration, few aftershocks and clearly ruptured two separate patches (UNAM Seis. group 2015). In this work we estimate the slip distributions for the 2012 and 2014 earthquakes, by combining the data used separately in

  20. ISC-GEM: Global Instrumental Earthquake Catalogue (1900-2009), II. Location and seismicity patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondár, I.; Engdahl, E. Robert; Villaseñor, A.; Harris, James; Storchak, D.

    2015-02-01

    We present the final results of a two-year project sponsored by the Global Earthquake Model (GEM) Foundation. The ISC-GEM global catalogue consists of some 19 thousand instrumentally recorded, moderate to large earthquakes, spanning 110 years of seismicity. We relocated all events in the catalogue using a two-tier approach. The EHB location methodology (Engdahl et al., 1998) was applied first to obtain improved hypocentres with special focus on the depth determination. The locations were further refined in the next step by fixing the depths to those from the EHB analysis and applying the new International Seismological Centre (ISC) location algorithm (Bondár and Storchak, 2011) that reduces location bias by accounting for correlated travel-time prediction error structure. To facilitate the relocation effort, some one million seismic P and S wave arrival-time data were added to the ISC database for the period between 1904 and 1970, either from original station bulletins in the ISC archive or by digitizing the scanned images of the International Seismological Summary (ISS) bulletin (Villaseñor and Engdahl, 2005, 2007). Although no substantial amount of new phase data were acquired for the modern period (1964-2009), the number of phases used in the location has still increased by three millions, owing to fact that both the EHB and ISC locators use most well-recorded ak135 (Kennett et al., 1995) phases in the location. We show that the relocation effort yielded substantially improved locations, especially in the first half of the 20th century; we demonstrate significant improvements in focal depth estimates in subduction zones and other seismically active regions; and we show that the ISC-GEM catalogue provides an improved view of 110 years of global seismicity of the Earth. The ISC-GEM Global Instrumental Earthquake Catalogue represents the final product of one of the ten global components in the GEM program, and is available to researchers at the ISC (http://www.isc.ac.uk).

  1. Stress development in heterogenetic lithosphere: Insights into earthquake processes in the New Madrid Seismic Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Y.; Gregg, P. M.; Hou, G.

    2015-12-01

    The New Madrid Seismic Zone (NMSZ) in the Central and Eastern United States (CEUS) is the site of several major M 6.8-8 earthquakes in 1811-1812, and remains seismically active. Although extensive investigations have been carried out, the ultimate controls on earthquake initiation and the duration of the seismicity remains unclear. Especially ambiguous is the role of a heterogenetic lithosphere in the development and propagation of stress throughout the crust in intraplate settings. In this study, we develop a finite element model to conduct a series of numerical experiments, the goal of which is to determine the impact of heterogeneity in the Upper Crust, the Lower Crust, and the Mantle on earthquake nucleation and rupture processes. Results indicate that when the differential stresses are built up from boundary displacements, similar to tectonic loading, the stresses below the Reelfoot Rift in the NMSZ are highly concentrated, whereas the stresses below the geologically similar Midcontinent Rift System are low, corresponding with the earthquakes distribution. By comparing the results with three reference models, we argue that the extensive Mantle Low Velocity Zone (MLVZ) beneath the NMSZ produces differential stress localization in the layers above. Furthermore, the relatively strong crust in this region, exhibited by high seismic velocity, enables the elevated stress to extend to the bottom of the ancient rift system, reactivating fossil rifting faults and therefore triggering earthquakes. Although our numerical models focus on loading by a far-field stress source, they explain why the New Madrid inevitably became the most earthquake susceptible region in the CEUS since a heterogeneous lithosphere. Specifically, the presence of the MLVZ will further concentrate stresses resulting from other unloading process, such as melting of the ice sheets or sudden river incision.

  2. Quantifying potential earthquake and tsunami hazard in the Lesser Antilles subduction zone of the Caribbean region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hayes, Gavin P.; McNamara, Daniel E.; Seidman, Lily; Roger, Jean

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we quantify the seismic and tsunami hazard in the Lesser Antilles subduction zone, focusing on the plate interface offshore of Guadeloupe. We compare potential strain accumulated via GPS-derived plate motions to strain release due to earthquakes that have occurred over the past 110 yr, and compute the resulting moment deficit. Our results suggest that enough strain is currently stored in the seismogenic zone of the Lesser Antilles subduction arc in the region of Guadeloupe to cause a large and damaging earthquake of magnitude Mw ∼ 8.2 ± 0.4. We model several scenario earthquakes over this magnitude range, using a variety of earthquake magnitudes and rupture areas, and utilizing the USGS ShakeMap and PAGER software packages. Strong ground shaking during the earthquake will likely cause loss of life and damage estimated to be in the range of several tens to several hundreds of fatalities and hundreds of millions to potentially billions of U.S. dollars of damage. In addition, such an event could produce a significant tsunami. Modelled tsunamis resulting from these scenario earthquakes predict meter-scale wave amplitudes even for events at the lower end of our magnitude range (M 7.8), and heights of over 3 m in several locations with our favoured scenario (M 8.0, partially locked interface from 15–45 km depth). In all scenarios, only short lead-times (on the order of tens of minutes) would be possible in the Caribbean before the arrival of damaging waves.

  3. The Muertos Subduction Zone as a Major Earthquake and Tsunami Hazard for Puerto Rico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCann, W. R.

    2007-05-01

    A revised catalog of 25 years of locally recorded earthquakes located using newly developed 1-D and 3-D velocity models allows us to better understand the spatial distribution of these events and their relation to known tectonic structures. In map view, the relocated events still show a pattern generally lacking in lineations that might be related to crustal faults. However, the previous cloud of crustal events in vertical cross sections now display a clear northerly dipping seismic zone as shallow as 10 km depth along the island's south coast extending to 40 km depth along the north coast of the island. This dipping seismic zone is interpreted as the Muertos Megathrust along which buoyant Caribbean Plate is obliquely underthrust beneath Puerto Rico. 3-D velocity anomalies associated with the region of high seismicity in western Puerto Rico confirm subducted Caribbean crust and lithosphere. The dipping seismic zone is seen best in SW Puerto Rico but also extends to the easternmost part of the island. Seismicity and historic earthquakes in the Dominican Republic also indicate the presence of the Muertos Megathrust beneath the SE part o that country. A large earthquake in 1751 generated a damaging tsunami. These new data suggest a new paradigm for earthquake hazards from "crustal" or "shallow" earthquakes in Puerto Rico. That is, after removing events associated with the dipping megathrust, little "random crustal seismicity" is left in the crustal wedge above the plate interface, and the amount and location of random crustal events depends heavily upon exactly which events are chosen to be part of the megathrust seismicity.

  4. The Cascadia Subduction Zone and related subduction systems: seismic structure, intraslab earthquakes and processes, and earthquake hazards

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kirby, Stephen H.; Wang, Kelin; Dunlop, Susan

    2002-01-01

    The following report is the principal product of an international workshop titled “Intraslab Earthquakes in the Cascadia Subduction System: Science and Hazards” and was sponsored by the U.S. Geological Survey, the Geological Survey of Canada and the University of Victoria. This meeting was held at the University of Victoria’s Dunsmuir Lodge, Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada on September 18–21, 2000 and brought 46 participants from the U.S., Canada, Latin America and Japan. This gathering was organized to bring together active research investigators in the science of subduction and intraslab earthquake hazards. Special emphasis was given to “warm-slab” subduction systems, i.e., those systems involving young oceanic lithosphere subducting at moderate to slow rates, such as the Cascadia system in the U.S. and Canada, and the Nankai system in Japan. All the speakers and poster presenters provided abstracts of their presentations that were a made available in an abstract volume at the workshop. Most of the authors subsequently provided full articles or extended abstracts for this volume on the topics that they discussed at the workshop. Where updated versions were not provided, the original workshop abstracts have been included. By organizing this workshop and assembling this volume, our aim is to provide a global perspective on the science of warm-slab subduction, to thereby advance our understanding of internal slab processes and to use this understanding to improve appraisals of the hazards associated with large intraslab earthquakes in the Cascadia system. These events have been the most frequent and damaging earthquakes in western Washington State over the last century. As if to underscore this fact, just six months after this workshop was held, the magnitude 6.8 Nisqually earthquake occurred on February 28th, 2001 at a depth of about 55 km in the Juan de Fuca slab beneath the southern Puget Sound region of western Washington. The Governor

  5. Multi-Scale Structure and Earthquake Properties in the San Jacinto Fault Zone Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Zion, Y.

    2014-12-01

    I review multi-scale multi-signal seismological results on structure and earthquake properties within and around the San Jacinto Fault Zone (SJFZ) in southern California. The results are based on data of the southern California and ANZA networks covering scales from a few km to over 100 km, additional near-fault seismometers and linear arrays with instrument spacing 25-50 m that cross the SJFZ at several locations, and a dense rectangular array with >1100 vertical-component nodes separated by 10-30 m centered on the fault. The structural studies utilize earthquake data to image the seismogenic sections and ambient noise to image the shallower structures. The earthquake studies use waveform inversions and additional time domain and spectral methods. We observe pronounced damage regions with low seismic velocities and anomalous Vp/Vs ratios around the fault, and clear velocity contrasts across various sections. The damage zones and velocity contrasts produce fault zone trapped and head waves at various locations, along with time delays, anisotropy and other signals. The damage zones follow a flower-shape with depth; in places with velocity contrast they are offset to the stiffer side at depth as expected for bimaterial ruptures with persistent propagation direction. Analysis of PGV and PGA indicates clear persistent directivity at given fault sections and overall motion amplification within several km around the fault. Clear temporal changes of velocities, probably involving primarily the shallow material, are observed in response to seasonal, earthquake and other loadings. Full source tensor properties of M>4 earthquakes in the complex trifurcation area include statistically-robust small isotropic component, likely reflecting dynamic generation of rock damage in the source volumes. The dense fault zone instruments record seismic "noise" at frequencies >200 Hz that can be used for imaging and monitoring the shallow material with high space and time details, and

  6. Earthquakes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walter, Edward J.

    1977-01-01

    Presents an analysis of the causes of earthquakes. Topics discussed include (1) geological and seismological factors that determine the effect of a particular earthquake on a given structure; (2) description of some large earthquakes such as the San Francisco quake; and (3) prediction of earthquakes. (HM)

  7. Earthquakes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walter, Edward J.

    1977-01-01

    Presents an analysis of the causes of earthquakes. Topics discussed include (1) geological and seismological factors that determine the effect of a particular earthquake on a given structure; (2) description of some large earthquakes such as the San Francisco quake; and (3) prediction of earthquakes. (HM)

  8. Earthquakes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pakiser, Louis C.

    One of a series of general interest publications on science topics, the booklet provides those interested in earthquakes with an introduction to the subject. Following a section presenting an historical look at the world's major earthquakes, the booklet discusses earthquake-prone geographic areas, the nature and workings of earthquakes, earthquake…

  9. Shear Wave Splitting from Local Earthquakes in the New Madrid Seismic Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, P.; Arroucau, P.; Vlahovic, G.

    2012-12-01

    In this study we investigate crustal anisotropy in the New Madrid seismic zone (NMSZ), by analyzing shear wave splitting from local earthquake data. The NMSZ is centrally located in the United States, spanning portions of western Tennessee, northeastern Arkansas, and southeastern Missouri. The NMSZ is also the location in which three of the largest known earthquakes took place in North America, occurring in 1811-1812. Although many seismic studies have been performed in this region, there is no consensus about which driving mechanism could satisfy both the current observations, as well as the historically observed seismicity. Therefore, it is important to continue investigating the NMSZ, to gain a better understanding of its seismicity, and the possible mechanisms that drive it. The automated technique developed by Savage et al. (2010) is used to perform the shear wave splitting measurements at 120 seismic stations within the NMSZ. The Center for Earthquake Research and Information (CERI) at the University of Memphis provided data for 1151 earthquakes spanning the years 2003-2011. The initial event selection was reduced to 245 earthquakes ranging in magnitude from 2.0 to 4.6, which fell within the shear wave window of one or more of the stations. The results of this study provide information about orientation of microcracks in the upper portion of the crust; future work will include analysis for temporal and spatial variations in order to assess the state of stress in the region.

  10. Frictional properties of JFAST core samples and implications for slow earthquakes at the Tohoku subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawai, Michiyo; Niemeijer, André R.; Hirose, Takehiro; Spiers, Christopher J.

    2017-09-01

    Slow earthquakes occur in the shallow (<20 km deep) part of the Tohoku subduction zone. To understand how frictional properties of the plate boundary fault affect the generation of these slow earthquakes, we conducted friction experiments using borehole samples retrieved from the plate boundary décollement and footwall during Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 343 (Japan Trench Fast Drilling Project (JFAST)). The plate boundary fault material exhibits a transition from velocity-strengthening to velocity-weakening behavior at temperatures between 50 and 150°C, which, in the framework of rate-and-state friction laws, is a necessary condition for the generation of slow earthquakes, whereas the footwall sample mainly shows velocity-strengthening behavior except at temperatures of <50°C. The downdip temperature limit of slow earthquakes in the Japan Trench also lies between 100 and 150°C. Our results suggest that the frictional properties of the plate boundary fault may play a key role in controlling the locations of observed slow earthquakes.

  11. Earthquake source parameters at the sumatran fault zone: Identification of the activated fault plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasmolan, Madlazim; Santosa, Bagus Jaya; Lees, Jonathan M.; Utama, Widya

    2010-12-01

    Fifteen earthquakes (Mw 4.1-6.4) occurring at ten major segments of the Sumatran Fault Zone (SFZ) were analyzed to identify their respective fault planes. The events were relocated in order to assess hypocenter uncertainty. Earthquake source parameters were determined from three-component local waveforms recorded by IRIS-DMC and GEOFON broadband lA networks. Epicentral distances of all stations were less than 10°. Moment tensor solutions of the events were calculated, along with simultaneous determination of centroid position. Joint analysis of hypocenter position, centroid position, and nodal planes produced clear outlines of the Sumatran fault planes. The preferable seismotectonic interpretation is that the events activated the SFZ at a depth of approximately 14-210 km, corresponding to the interplate Sumatran fault boundary. The identification of this seismic fault zone is significant to the investigation of seismic hazards in the region.

  12. Three dimensional elastoplastic response of compliant fault zones to nearby earthquakes: A theoretic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, J.; Duan, B.

    2012-12-01

    Response of compliant fault zone to the nearby dynamic rupture is detected by seismic and InSAR observations. Seismic observations of damage to the Landers fault zone by the Hector Mine earthquake suggest that response of fault zones can be inelastic. Recent two dimensional theoretical studies reveal that inelastic response of fault zones results in distinguished features in the surface residual displacement field that can be detected by InSAR images. In this study, we extend the recent theoretical studies to three dimensions, so that we may compare modeling results with InSAR observations in the future. We use a Drucker-Prager criterion to characterize elastoplastic response of rocks to nearby spontaneous dynamic rupture in an inhomogeneous medium that contains a compliant fault zone. A finite element method is used to simulate dynamic rupture and seismic wave propagations in the model. Preliminary results show that 1) depth dependence of plastic strain within the fault zone may have important effects on the surface deformation field, 2) plastic strain near the Earth's surface within the fault zone can occur in both extensional and compressive quadrants of the rupture, which is different from previous two dimensional studies, and 3) the vertical surface residual displacement is enhanced within the fault zone, while is reduced outside of the fault zone.

  13. Earthquakes as a trigger of fluid-driven metamorphism and shear zone development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamtveit, Bjørn; Aupart, Claire; Dunkel, Kristina; Petley-Ragan, Arianne; Austrheim, Håkon

    2017-04-01

    Fluid-consuming metamorphism is often associated with fluid introduction along zones of localized deformation such as faults and shear zones. In such zones, disequilibrium metamorphism usually produces fine-grained hydrous minerals and/or carbonates which leads to a pronounced reaction-driven weakening (Jamtveit et al., 2016). Continued deformation and reaction at lower stress conditions within faults or shear zones will in most cases obliterate features formed during the earlier stages. Information about the initial stages of coupled deformation and metamorphism is therefore often lost from zones of localized deformation. Valuable information about these stages can, however, be obtained from microstructures recorded by the less deformed wall rocks. Microstructural observations from wall rock minerals surrounding faults formed by deep crustal earthquakes from the Bergen Arcs, Norway (Austrheim et al., 2017) and the HP-LT terrain of Alpine Corsica record massive fragmentation, a high density of inclusions, and other features previously described from impact-related shock metamorphism. This reflects very high stresses during the initial stages of metamorphism. Some of these features are also observed in and near faults from other localities where no independent evidence for seismic slip (such as pseudotachylites) are observed and may indicate that fluid-driven metamorphism along localized deformation zones is often initiated by earthquakes. Jamtveit, B., Austrheim, H., and Putnis, A., 2016, Disequilibrium metamorphism of stressed lithosphere. Earth-Science Reviews, 154, 1-13 Austrheim, H., Dunkel, K.G., Plümper, O., Ildefonse, B., Liu, Y., and Jamtveit, B., 2017, Fragmentation of wall rock garnets during deep crustal earthquakes. Science Advances (in press)

  14. Probability Assessment of Mega-thrust Earthquakes in Global Subduction Zones -from the View of Slip Deficit-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikuta, R.; Mitsui, Y.; Ando, M.

    2014-12-01

    We studied inter-plate slip history for about 100 years using earthquake catalogs. On assumption that each earthquake has stick-slip patch centered in its centroid, we regard cumulative seismic slips around the centroid as representing the inter-plate dislocation. We evaluated the slips on the stick-slip patches of over-M5-class earthquakes prior to three recent mega-thrust earthquakes, the 2004 Sumatra (Mw9.2), the 2010 Chile (Mw8.8), and the 2011 Tohoku (Mw9.0) around them. Comparing the cumulative seismic slips with the plate convergence, the slips before the mega-thrust events are significantly short in large area corresponding to the size of the mega-thrust events. We also researched cumulative seismic slips after other three mega-thrust earthquakes occurred in this 100 years, the 1952 Kamchatka (Mw9.0), the 1960 Chile (Mw9.5), the 1964 Alaska (Mw9.2). The cumulative slips have been significantly short in and around the focal area after their occurrence. The result should reflect persistency of the strong or/and large inter-plate coupled area capable of mega-thrust earthquakes. We applied the same procedure to global subduction zones to find that 21 regions including the focal area of above mega-thrust earthquakes show slip deficit over large area corresponding to the size of M9-class earthquakes. Considering that at least six M9-class earthquakes occurred in this 100 years and each recurrence interval should be 500-1000 years, it would not be surprised that from five to ten times of the already known regions (30 to 60 regions) are capable of M9 class earthquakes. The 21 regions as expected M9 class focal areas in our study is less than 5 to 10 times of the known 6, some of these regions may be divided into a few M9 class focal area because they extend to much larger area than typical M9 class focal area.

  15. Model for episodic flow of high-pressure water in fault zones before earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Byerlee, J.

    1993-01-01

    In this model for the evolution of large crustal faults, water originally from the country rock saturates the porous and permeable fault zone. During shearing, the fault zone compacts and water flows back into the country rock, but the flow is arrested by silicate deposition that forms low permeability seals. The fluid will be confined to seal-bounded fluid compartments of various sizes and porosity that are not hydraulically connected with each other. When the seal between two compartments is ruptured, an electrical streaming potential will be generated by the sudden movement of fluid from the high-pressure compartment to the low-pressure compartment. During an earthquake the width of the fault zone will increase by failure of the geometric irregularities on the fault. This newly created, porous and permeable, wider fault zone will fill with water, and the process described above will be repeated. Thus, the process is episodic with the water moving in and out of the fault zone, and each large earthquake should be preceded by an electrical and/or magnetic signal. -from Author

  16. Ionospheric precursors of earthquakes and Global Electric Circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulinets, Sergey; Davidenko, Dmitry

    2014-03-01

    The electromagnetic coupling between the seismically activated area and the ionosphere is considered within the framework of the Global Electric Circuit (GEC) conception. First we consider the anomalous variations in the ionosphere associated with the earthquake preparation process, their temporal and spatial characteristics using the results from recent publications. Then the GEC conception is presented shortly with main accent put on ionization processes which play key role in the complex chain of physical and chemical interactions changing the electric properties of the planetary boundary layer of atmosphere. We treat this part of troposphere as an open complex system with dissipation where so called “blow up” processes are developed leading to sharp and fast changes of atmospheric parameters including the electric properties of the boundary layer. The new concept named Spatial Scintillation Index is introduced in the last part of the paper. In general, this paper may be considered as a short review of the recent achievements in understanding of the seismo-ionospheric coupling.

  17. Creating a Global Building Inventory for Earthquake Loss Assessment and Risk Management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jaiswal, Kishor; Wald, David J.

    2008-01-01

    Earthquakes have claimed approximately 8 million lives over the last 2,000 years (Dunbar, Lockridge and others, 1992) and fatality rates are likely to continue to rise with increased population and urbanizations of global settlements especially in developing countries. More than 75% of earthquake-related human casualties are caused by the collapse of buildings or structures (Coburn and Spence, 2002). It is disheartening to note that large fractions of the world's population still reside in informal, poorly-constructed & non-engineered dwellings which have high susceptibility to collapse during earthquakes. Moreover, with increasing urbanization half of world's population now lives in urban areas (United Nations, 2001), and half of these urban centers are located in earthquake-prone regions (Bilham, 2004). The poor performance of most building stocks during earthquakes remains a primary societal concern. However, despite this dark history and bleaker future trends, there are no comprehensive global building inventories of sufficient quality and coverage to adequately address and characterize future earthquake losses. Such an inventory is vital both for earthquake loss mitigation and for earthquake disaster response purposes. While the latter purpose is the motivation of this work, we hope that the global building inventory database described herein will find widespread use for other mitigation efforts as well. For a real-time earthquake impact alert system, such as U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) Prompt Assessment of Global Earthquakes for Response (PAGER), (Wald, Earle and others, 2006), we seek to rapidly evaluate potential casualties associated with earthquake ground shaking for any region of the world. The casualty estimation is based primarily on (1) rapid estimation of the ground shaking hazard, (2) aggregating the population exposure within different building types, and (3) estimating the casualties from the collapse of vulnerable buildings. Thus, the

  18. New evidence for global tectonic zones on Venus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kozak, R.C.; Schaber, G.G.

    1989-01-01

    Venera 15 and 16 spacecraft images show clear evidence of major crustal disruptions on Venus which have been interpreted to indicate crustal divergence. Complementary to the divergent zones are mountain belts that border the continent-like high terrains. The requisite transcurrent motions appear to be manifested as diffuse shear zones. The rift zones form an interconnected transpolar system which ties in with previously recognized equatorial disruption zones, suggesting a global tectonic network. Several independent lines of evidence suggest that the tectonism may be geologically young. -Authors

  19. Improving automatic earthquake locations in subduction zones: a case study for GEOFON catalog of Tonga-Fiji region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nooshiri, Nima; Heimann, Sebastian; Saul, Joachim; Tilmann, Frederik; Dahm, Torsten

    2015-04-01

    Automatic earthquake locations are sometimes associated with very large residuals up to 10 s even for clear arrivals, especially for regional stations in subduction zones because of their strongly heterogeneous velocity structure associated. Although these residuals are most likely not related to measurement errors but unmodelled velocity heterogeneity, these stations are usually removed from or down-weighted in the location procedure. While this is possible for large events, it may not be useful if the earthquake is weak. In this case, implementation of travel-time station corrections may significantly improve the automatic locations. Here, the shrinking box source-specific station term method (SSST) [Lin and Shearer, 2005] has been applied to improve relative location accuracy of 1678 events that occurred in the Tonga subduction zone between 2010 and mid-2014. Picks were obtained from the GEOFON earthquake bulletin for all available station networks. We calculated a set of timing corrections for each station which vary as a function of source position. A separate time correction was computed for each source-receiver path at the given station by smoothing the residual field over nearby events. We begin with a very large smoothing radius essentially encompassing the whole event set and iterate by progressively shrinking the smoothing radius. In this way, we attempted to correct for the systematic errors, that are introduced into the locations by the inaccuracies in the assumed velocity structure, without solving for a new velocity model itself. One of the advantages of the SSST technique is that the event location part of the calculation is separate from the station term calculation and can be performed using any single event location method. In this study, we applied a non-linear, probabilistic, global-search earthquake location method using the software package NonLinLoc [Lomax et al., 2000]. The non-linear location algorithm implemented in NonLinLoc is less

  20. Global earthquake casualties due to secondary effects: A quantitative analysis for improving rapid loss analyses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marano, K.D.; Wald, D.J.; Allen, T.I.

    2010-01-01

    This study presents a quantitative and geospatial description of global losses due to earthquake-induced secondary effects, including landslide, liquefaction, tsunami, and fire for events during the past 40 years. These processes are of great importance to the US Geological Survey's (USGS) Prompt Assessment of Global Earthquakes for Response (PAGER) system, which is currently being developed to deliver rapid earthquake impact and loss assessments following large/significant global earthquakes. An important question is how dominant are losses due to secondary effects (and under what conditions, and in which regions)? Thus, which of these effects should receive higher priority research efforts in order to enhance PAGER's overall assessment of earthquakes losses and alerting for the likelihood of secondary impacts? We find that while 21.5% of fatal earthquakes have deaths due to secondary (non-shaking) causes, only rarely are secondary effects the main cause of fatalities. The recent 2004 Great Sumatra-Andaman Islands earthquake is a notable exception, with extraordinary losses due to tsunami. The potential for secondary hazards varies greatly, and systematically, due to regional geologic and geomorphic conditions. Based on our findings, we have built country-specific disclaimers for PAGER that address potential for each hazard (Earle et al., Proceedings of the 14th World Conference of the Earthquake Engineering, Beijing, China, 2008). We will now focus on ways to model casualties from secondary effects based on their relative importance as well as their general predictability. ?? Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009.

  1. Global Earthquake Casualties due to Secondary Effects: A Quantitative Analysis for Improving PAGER Losses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wald, David J.

    2010-01-01

    This study presents a quantitative and geospatial description of global losses due to earthquake-induced secondary effects, including landslide, liquefaction, tsunami, and fire for events during the past 40 years. These processes are of great importance to the US Geological Survey’s (USGS) Prompt Assessment of Global Earthquakes for Response (PAGER) system, which is currently being developed to deliver rapid earthquake impact and loss assessments following large/significant global earthquakes. An important question is how dominant are losses due to secondary effects (and under what conditions, and in which regions)? Thus, which of these effects should receive higher priority research efforts in order to enhance PAGER’s overall assessment of earthquakes losses and alerting for the likelihood of secondary impacts? We find that while 21.5% of fatal earthquakes have deaths due to secondary (non-shaking) causes, only rarely are secondary effects the main cause of fatalities. The recent 2004 Great Sumatra–Andaman Islands earthquake is a notable exception, with extraordinary losses due to tsunami. The potential for secondary hazards varies greatly, and systematically, due to regional geologic and geomorphic conditions. Based on our findings, we have built country-specific disclaimers for PAGER that address potential for each hazard (Earle et al., Proceedings of the 14th World Conference of the Earthquake Engineering, Beijing, China, 2008). We will now focus on ways to model casualties from secondary effects based on their relative importance as well as their general predictability.

  2. Two Decades of Seismic Monitoring by WEBNET: Disclosing a Lifecycle of an Earthquake Swarm Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, T.; Horalek, J.; Cermakova, H.; Michalek, J.; Doubravova, J.; Bouskova, A.; Bachura, M.

    2014-12-01

    The area of West Bohemia/Vogtland in western Eger Rift is typified by earthquake swarm activity with maximum magnitudes not exceeding ML 5. The seismicity is dominated by the area near Novy Kostel where earthquakes cluster along a narrow and steeply dipping focal zone of 8 km length that strikes about N-S in the depth range 7-11 km. Detailed seismic monitoring has been carried out by the WEBNET seismic network since 1992. During that period earthquake swarms with several mainshocks exceeding magnitude level ML 3 took place in 2000, 2008 and 2011. These swarms were characteristic by episodic character where the activity of individual episodes overlapped in time and space. Interestingly, the rate of activity of individual swarms increased with each subsequent swarm; the 2000 swarm being the slowest and the 2011 swarm the most rapid one. In 2014 the character of seismicity has changed from a swarm-like activity to a mainshock-aftershock activity. Already three mainshocks has occurred since May 2014; the ML 3.6 event of May 24, the ML 4.5 event of May 31 and the ML 3.5 event of August 3. All these events were followed by a short aftershock sequence of one to four days duration. All three events exceeded the following aftershocks by more than one magnitude level and none of these mainshocks were preceded by foreshocks, which differentiates this activity from the preceding swarm seismicity. Interestingly, the hypocenters of the mentioned earthquake swarms and mainshock-aftershock sequences share a common fault zone and overlap significantly. We present detailed analysis of precise hypocenter locations and statistical characteristics of the activity in order to find the origin of different behavior of seismic activity, which results in either earthquake swarms or mainshock-aftershock activity.

  3. Integrated Land- and Underwater-Based Sensors for a Subduction Zone Earthquake Early Warning System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirenne, B.; Rosenberger, A.; Rogers, G. C.; Henton, J.; Lu, Y.; Moore, T.

    2016-12-01

    Ocean Networks Canada (ONC — oceannetworks.ca/ ) operates cabled ocean observatories off the coast of British Columbia (BC) to support research and operational oceanography. Recently, ONC has been funded by the Province of BC to deliver an earthquake early warning (EEW) system that integrates offshore and land-based sensors to deliver alerts of incoming ground shaking from the Cascadia Subduction Zone. ONC's cabled seismic network has the unique advantage of being located offshore on either side of the surface expression of the subduction zone. The proximity of ONC's sensors to the fault can result in faster, more effective warnings, which translates into more lives saved, injuries avoided and more ability for mitigative actions to take place.ONC delivers near real-time data from various instrument types simultaneously, providing distinct advantages to seismic monitoring and earthquake early warning. The EEW system consists of a network of sensors, located on the ocean floor and on land, that detect and analyze the initial p-wave of an earthquake as well as the crustal deformation on land during the earthquake sequence. Once the p-wave is detected and characterized, software systems correlate the data streams of the various sensors and deliver alerts to clients through a Common Alerting Protocol-compliant data package. This presentation will focus on the development of the earthquake early warning capacity at ONC. It will describe the seismic sensors and their distribution, the p-wave detection algorithms selected and the overall architecture of the system. It will further overview the plan to achieve operational readiness at project completion.

  4. Pre-seismic electromagnetic anomalies induced by intermediate-depth earthquakes (Vrancea zone-Romania)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanica, Dumitru; Dragos Stanica, Armand

    2014-05-01

    Recent studies show that before the earthquake initiation, the high stress level which reached within the seismogenic volume may generate dehydration of rocks and fluids migration along surrounding faulting systems and could be reflected by electrical conductivity changes. In this paper, we investigate these changes of conductivity using ULF electromagnetic data recorded at the Geodynamic Observatory Provita de Sus, located on the Carpathian electrical conductivity anomaly (CECA), at about 100km distance of Vrancea epicentral zone. Using ground-based monitoring system (GMS 06 and MAG03 DAM electromagnetic and geomagnetic equipments, respectively), possible anomalous variations of the electromagnetic normalized functions (ENF) have been analyzed in correlation with earthquakes with Mw > 3.7 triggered in 2013 year at the intermediate depth interval 70-160km, in seismic active Vrancea zone. Thus, the daily mean distributions of the both functions Bzn = Bz/Bperp (where: Bz is vertical component of the geomagnetic field; Bperp is geomagnetic component perpendicular to the strike orientation) and Rn = Rpar/Rz (where: Rpar is resistivity parallel to strike; Rz is vertical resistivity), together with their standard deviation (SD) are performed by using the FFT band-pass filter analysis in the frequency range (0.001Hz to 0.016Hz). After analyzing the anomalous intervals of the Bzn* and Ron* values obtained by using a standardized random variable equation, we may conclude that: (i) a pre-seismic anomalous value of maximum related to the both ENF may reflect an impending earthquake; (ii) a superimposed effect of some earthquakes occurred at short time-intervals is also reflected by the anomalous maximum value; (iii) pre-seismic lead time is between 1 to 32 days before the impending earthquake.

  5. Tularemia and plague survey in rodents in an earthquake zone in southeastern Iran

    PubMed Central

    Gyuranecz, Miklós

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Earthquakes are one the most common natural disasters that lead to increased mortality and morbidity from transmissible diseases, partially because the rodents displaced by an earthquake can lead to an increased rate of disease transmission. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of plague and tularemia in rodents in the earthquake zones in southeastern Iran. METHODS: In April 2013, a research team was dispatched to explore the possible presence of diseases in rodents displaced by a recent earthquake magnitude 7.7 around the cities of Khash and Saravan in Sistan and Baluchestan Province. Rodents were trapped near and in the earthquake zone, in a location where an outbreak of tularemia was reported in 2007. Rodent serums were tested for a serological survey using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. RESULTS: In the 13 areas that were studied, nine rodents were caught over a total of 200 trap-days. Forty-eight fleas and 10 ticks were obtained from the rodents. The ticks were from the Hyalomma genus and the fleas were from the Xenopsylla genus. All the trapped rodents were Tatera indica. Serological results were negative for plague, but the serum agglutination test was positive for tularemia in one of the rodents. Tatera indica has never been previously documented to be involved in the transmission of tularemia. CONCLUSIONS: No evidence of the plague cycle was found in the rodents of the area, but evidence was found of tularemia infection in rodents, as demonstrated by a positive serological test for tularemia in one rodent. PMID:26602769

  6. Crustal Deformation in Southcentral Alaska: The 1964 Prince William Sound Earthquake Subduction Zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Steven C.; Freymueller, Jeffrey T.

    2003-01-01

    This article, for Advances in Geophysics, is a summary of crustal deformation studies in southcentral Alaska. In 1964, southcentral Alaska was struck by the largest earthquake (moment magnitude 9.2) occurring in historical times in North America and the second largest earthquake occurring in the world during the past century. Conventional and space-based geodetic measurements have revealed a complex temporal-spatial pattern of crustal movement. Numerical models suggest that ongoing convergence between the North America and Pacific Plates, viscoelastic rebound, aseismic creep along the tectonic plate interface, and variable plate coupling all play important roles in controlling both the surface and subsurface movements. The geodetic data sets include tide-gauge observations that in some cases provide records back to the decades preceding the earthquake, leveling data that span a few decades around the earthquake, VLBI data from the late 1980s, and GPS data since the mid-1990s. Geologic data provide additional estimates of vertical movements and a chronology of large seismic events. Some of the important features that are revealed by the ensemble of studies that are reviewed in this paper include: (1) Crustal uplift in the region that subsided by up 2 m at the time of the earthquake is as much as 1 m since the earthquake. In the Turnagain Arm and Kenai Peninsula regions of southcentral Alaska, uplift rates in the immediate aftermath of the earthquake reached 150 mm/yr , but this rapid uplift decayed rapidly after the first few years following the earthquake. (2) At some other locales, notably those away the middle of the coseismic rupture zone, postseismic uplift rates were initially slower but the rates decay over a longer time interval. At Kodiak Island, for example, the uplift rates have been decreasing at a rate of about 7mm/yr per decade. At yet other locations, the uplift rates have shown little time dependence so far, but are thought not to be sustainable

  7. Stress changes induced at neighbouring faults by the June 2000 earthquakes, South Iceland Seismic Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plateaux, Romain; Angelier, Jacques; Bergerat, Françoise; Cappa, Frédéric; Stefansson, Ragnar

    2010-05-01

    The Icelandic rift system belongs to the Mid-Atlantic Ridge and is connected to the offshore Reykjanes and Kolbeinsey ridges by two active transform zones. Plate separation occurs at a rate of nearly 2 cm/yr along the N105°E direction. With respect to the Icelandic Hotspot, westward plate velocities in Iceland are 1.8-2.2 cm/yr for North America and 0-0.4 cm/yr for Eurasia, resulting in a westward displacement of the Icelandic Rift relative to the hotspot. Rift jumps occur when the plate boundary has migrated to a critical point to the west, and a new rift develops above the hotspot apex while the old rift is dying out. The two active transform zones, the Tjörnes Fracture Zone (TFZ) and the South Iceland Seismic Zone (SISZ), resulted from such eastward rift jumps. Our study focuses on the SISZ which is an onland, E-W trending transform zone where N-S trending right-lateral strike-slip faults accommodate left-lateral transform motion as revealed by historical seismicity. During the most recent seismic crisis, in June 2000, two major earthquakes of magnitude (Mw) 6.4 occurred along N-S right-lateral faults in the central segment of the SISZ. The high sensitivity SIL (South Iceland Lowlands) seismic network run by the Icelandic Meteorological Office (IMO) provided a complete record of earthquakes down to magnitude Mw = -1. Here, we present an analysis of this earthquakes sequence in term of stress regimes in order to examine the response of two faults that did not experience significant motion during the earthquakes, and hence to determine how far such fault zones provide information about stress changes in space and time when large earthquakes occur at distance of some tens of kilometres. The faults considered are the Skard and Leirubakki faults, along which large earthquakes and significant displacement occurred in the past Using seismological data recorded from 1991 to 2007, we carried out stress inversion of focal mechanisms of 1,340 earthquakes that affected

  8. Messages from a medical library in the earthquake-prone zone.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Kayo; Minamidate, Yoshitaka; Nagai, Takayuki

    2011-01-01

    On March 11, 2011 at 14:46 (Friday), a massive magnitude-9.0 earthquake attacked large areas of northeastern Japan, including Sendai City. The huge earthquake generated catastrophic tsunamis, leading to unprecedented disasters in the seacoast areas of the Tohoku region (about 20,000 dead and missing persons). Upon this earthquake, in Tohoku University Medical Library, a 3-storey earthquake-resistant building, most of books fell down from bookshelves on the second and third floors, but the bookshelves remained steady because of the effective fixation. Many piles of fallen books blocked up the walkways and the narrow passages between the bookshelves; namely, books are easily transformed to dangerous weapons in a shaking building. Fortunately, all library staffs and users evacuated outside the building without even a scratch. Importantly, we were able to open the first floor of the Medical Library on March 14 (Monday), because the first floor has been used for the Learning Commons, with open space for group meetings. We thus provided students, medical staffs, and faculty members with the comfortable place during the early stage of the disasters. In fact, medical staffs and faculty members worked hard over weekend to deal with many patients and clear the post-quake confusions. Moreover, electricity, gas, or water supply was not yet restored in most areas of Sendai City. In the earthquake-prone zones, the Medical Library should function as a facility that not only enhances information gathering but also provides the place like an oasis of relaxation for students and medical staffs upon great earthquakes.

  9. Geologic Evidence of Earthquakes and Tsunamis in the Mexican Subduction zone - Guerrero

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez-Herrera, M.; Lagos, M.; Hutchinson, I.; Ruiz-Fernández, A.; Machain, M.; Caballero, M.; Rangel, V.; Nava, H.; Corona, N.; Bautista, F.; Kostoglodov, V.; Goguitchaichrili, A.; Morales, J.; Quintana, P.

    2010-12-01

    A study of large historic and prehistoric earthquakes and their tsunamis using a multiproxy approach (geomorphic features, sediment deposits, microfossils, sediment geochemistry and more recently the use of magnetic properties) has provided valuable information in the assessment of earthquake and tsunami record. The Pacific coast of Mexico is located over the active subduction zone (~1000 km) that has experienced numerous large magnitude earthquakes in historical time (Mw>7.5), and more than 50 documented tsunamis since 1732. Geomorphic and stratigraphic studies through test pits at 13 sites on the Guerrero coast reveal distinct stratigraphic changes with depth, indicating clear rapid change in depositional environments over time. Microfossil ecology (diatoms and foraminifera), sediment geochemistry (concentration increment in elements such as Sr, Ba, Ca, P, Si, K), stratigraphy, sediment magnetic properties (magnetic susceptibility anisotropy for the first time applied in tsunami deposits identification) and other proxies are indicative of sudden changes in land level and tsunami deposits. Buried evidence of liquefaction confirms the occurrence of a large earthquake at Barra de Potosi and Ixtapa, Guerrero. Preliminary 210Pb analysis suggests a sedimentation rate of ca. 0.1±0.01 cm/year and an estimated minimum age of ~ 100 years (maximum age at ca. 450 years?) for the most recent earthquake. At least three large events can be recognized by sharp contacts and sand layers in the sedimentary record. Ongoing C14, OSL and 210Pb dating will constrain the timing of these events. Deposits from three marine inwash events (tsunamis) dating from the past 4600 years have been identified on the Guerrero coast. A near-surface sand bed with a sharp basal contact overlying soil at sites near Ixtapa and Barra de Potosi most probably marks the tsunami following the 1985 Mw 8.2 earthquake. Interviews with Barra de Potosi fishermen and locals corroborate that these sites were

  10. Characterizing potentially induced earthquake rate changes in the Brawley Seismic Zone, southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Llenos, Andrea L.; Michael, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    The Brawley seismic zone (BSZ), in the Salton trough of southern California, has a history of earthquake swarms and geothermal energy exploitation. Some earthquake rate changes may have been induced by fluid extraction and injection activity at local geothermal fields, particularly at the North Brawley Geothermal Field (NBGF) and at the Salton Sea Geothermal Field (SSGF). We explore this issue by examining earthquake rate changes and interevent distance distributions in these fields. In Oklahoma and Arkansas, where considerable wastewater injection occurs, increases in background seismicity rate and aftershock productivity and decreases in interevent distance were indicative of fluid‐injection‐induced seismicity. Here, we test if similar changes occur that may be associated with fluid injection and extraction in geothermal areas. We use stochastic epidemic‐type aftershock sequence models to detect changes in the underlying seismogenic processes, shown by statistically significant changes in the model parameters. The most robust model changes in the SSGF roughly occur when large changes in net fluid production occur, but a similar correlation is not seen in the NBGF. Also, although both background seismicity rate and aftershock productivity increased for fluid‐injection‐induced earthquake rate changes in Oklahoma and Arkansas, the background rate increases significantly in the BSZ only, roughly corresponding with net fluid production rate increases. Moreover, in both fields the interevent spacing does not change significantly during active energy projects. This suggests that, although geothermal field activities in a tectonically active region may not significantly change the physics of earthquake interactions, earthquake rates may still be driven by fluid injection or extraction rates, particularly in the SSGF.

  11. Paleoseismology Along the Japan Trench Subduction Zone: Deep-Sea Sediment Records of Earthquakes in Tohoku

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanamatsu, T.; Ikehara, K.; Strasser, M.; Usami, K.; McHugh, C. M.; Fink, H. G.; Nakamura, Y.; Kodaira, S.

    2014-12-01

    After the 2011 off the Pacific coast of Tohoku Earthquake, we have intensively explored earthquake-induced records in the deep-sea basins close to rupture zones of the 2011 and past earthquakes in Tohoku, Our study area focuses on small terminal basins near the trench for the following reason. Mass transport deposits from up-slope area down into the Japan Trench axis floor during the 2011 event were documented (e. g. Oguri et al., 2013). Similarly past earthquake-induced turbidites were expected to have been deposited in a number of small basins in the trench floor and in a lower slope terrace. Here we introduce our recent results and future prospects for paleoseismology in the Japan Trench. We collected cores from areas that are generally composed of diatomaceous fine grain sediment and fine-grained turbidites. Occasionally, wide spread tephra patches/layers are intercalated in the sediment. In the trench floor, two thick turbidite units below (older) than the 2011 event deposits were identified in up to 10m long sedimentary cores. An intercalated tephra within these turbidite units indicates that turbidites were triggered by historical earthquakes in Tohoku (Ikehara et al., in prep). On the other hand, frequent occurrence of thin-bedded turbidites was identified in the lower slope terrace. Several turbidite layers can be correlated over a wide area by tephra-correlation and matching of paleomagnetic secular variations (Usami et al., in this session). Turbidite-stratigraphy from both locations, the trench and lower slope terrace shows a similar pattern, and seems to be tied to the onland tsunami deposit stratigraphy straightforwardly. These observations suggest that deep-sea turbidite records are more reliable proxy for paleoseimic-stratigraphy of the Tohoku area. Encouraged by the results obtained so far, we plan extensive investigations in the area over the next few years to document effectively the spatiotemporal distribution of earthquake records of Tohoku.

  12. Recognition of earthquake-related damage in archaeological sites: Examples from the Dead Sea fault zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marco, Shmuel

    2008-06-01

    Archaeological structures that exhibit seismogenic damage expand our knowledge of temporal and spatial distribution of earthquakes, afford independent examination of historical accounts, provide information on local earthquake intensities and enable the delineation of macroseismic zones. They also illustrate what might happen in future earthquakes. In order to recover this information, we should be able to distinguish earthquake damage from anthropogenic damage and from other natural processes of wear and tear. The present paper reviews several types of damage that can be attributed with high certainty to earthquakes and discusses associated caveats. In the rare cases, where faults intersect with archaeological sites, offset structures enable precise determination of sense and size of slip, and constrain its time. Among the characteristic off-fault damage types, I consider horizontal shifting of large building blocks, downward sliding of one or several blocks from masonry arches, collapse of heavy, stably-built walls, chipping of corners of building blocks, and aligned falling of walls and columns. Other damage features are less conclusive and require additional evidence, e.g., fractures that cut across several structures, leaning walls and columns, warps and bulges in walls. Circumstantial evidence for catastrophic earthquake-related destruction includes contemporaneous damage in many sites in the same area, absence of weapons or other anthropogenic damage, stratigraphic data on collapse of walls and ceilings onto floors and other living horizons and burial of valuable artifacts, as well as associated geological palaeoseismic phenomena such as liquefaction, land- and rock-slides, and fault ruptures. Additional support may be found in reliable historical accounts. Special care must be taken in order to avoid circular reasoning by maintaining the independence of data acquisition methods.

  13. Major Existence of Very Low Frequency Earthquakes in Background Seismicity Along Subduction Zone of South-western Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishihara, Y.

    2003-12-01

    The condense, high quality and equalized broadband seismic network provided us to recognize the variety of seismic sources. The active volcanoes excite seismic waves with various frequency characteristics. Some cases show the long period seismic waves greater than 10 sec associates with volcanic activities. The tectonic seismic events originated at the close to trench zone are frequently lack of high frequency, greater than 1 Hz, seismic wave component. Meanwhile, the many low frequency earthquakes and tremors whose sources are not explicated are occurred in lower crust and subcrustal region. The subduction zone of Philippine Sea plate in south-western Japan is actively genetic area of low frequency earthquake group. The broadband seismic array of Japan region observed unknown long period ground motions. The seismograms are higher amplitude between 10 and 30 sec period than ground noise level. The earthquake JMA and USGS catalogues don_ft list about these long period seismograms. The arrival order of wave packet means that these events locate subduction zone around Japan. The hypocenters of unknown events are estimated by arrival times of vertical peak amplitude using the assumption that the ground motion dominates Rayleigh wave. The more detailed determination of major events is performed by combined technique for moment tensor inversion and grid search. The moment magnitude of uncatalogued event is greater than 3.5 because of the detection limitation. The largest event is distributed to about 4.5 Mw level and special event is greater than 5.0. The frequency characteristics show that source time is 7 to 20 sec by comparison with synthetic seismograms. We call these uncatalogued events _gvery low frequency earthquake_h. The hypocenters are located to two kinds of zones along the Philippine Sea subducting plate in south-western Japan. The one zone is very close to the trough. The seismicity listed by earthquake catalogues is low level in the zone and hypocenters are

  14. Broad belts of shear zones: The common form of surface rupture produced by the 28 June 1992 Landers, California, earthquake

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, A.M.; Cruikshank, K.M. |; Fleming, R.W.

    1993-12-31

    Surface rupturing during the 28 June 1992, Landers, California earthquake, east of Los Angeles, accommodated right-lateral offsets up to about 6 m along segments of distinct, en echelon fault zones with a total length of about 80 km. The offsets were accommodated generally not by faults -- distinct slip surfaces -- but rather by shear zones, tabular bands of localized shearing. In long, straight stretches of fault zones at Landers the rupture is characterized by telescoping of shear zones and intensification of shearing: broad shear zones of mild shearing, containing narrow shear zones of more intense shearing, containing even-narrower shear zones of very intense shearing, which may contain a fault. Thus the ground ruptured across broad belts of shearing with subparallel walls, oriented NW. Each broad belt consists of a broad zone of mild shearing, extending across its entire width (50 to 200 m), and much narrower (a few m wide) shear zones that accommodate most of the offset of the belt and are portrayed by en echelon tension cracks. In response to right-lateral shearing, the slices of ground bounded by the tension cracks rotated in a clockwise sense, producing left lateral shearing, and the slices were forced against the walls of the shear zone, producing thrusting. Even narrower shear zones formed within the narrow shear zones, and some of these were faults. Although the narrower shear zones probably are indicators to right-lateral fault segments at depth, the surface rupturing during the earthquake is characterized not by faulting, but by zones of shearing at various scales. Furthermore, understanding of the formation of the shear zones may be critical to understanding of earthquake faulting because, where faulting is associated with the formation of a shear zone, the faulting occurs late in the development of the shear zone. The faulting occurs after a shear zone or a belt of shear zones forms.

  15. Evidence of shallow fault zone strengthening after the 1992 M7.5 Landers, California, earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Li, Y.-G.; Vidale, J.E.; Aki, K.; Xu, Fei; Burdette, T.

    1998-01-01

    Repeated seismic surveys of the Landers, California, fault zone that ruptured in the magnitude (M) 7.5 earthquake of 1992 reveal an increase in seismic velocity with time. P, S, and fault zone trapped waves were excited by near-surface explosions in two locations in 1994 and 1996, and were recorded on two linear, three-component seismic arrays deployed across the Johnson Valley fault trace. The travel times of P and S waves for identical shot-receiver pairs decreased by 0.5 to 1.5 percent from 1994 to 1996, with the larger changes at stations located within the fault zone. These observations indicate that the shallow Johnson Valley fault is strengthening after the main shock, most likely because of closure of cracks that were opened by the 1992 earthquake. The increase in velocity is consistent with the prevalence of dry over wet cracks and with a reduction in the apparent crack density near the fault zone by approximately 1.0 percent from 1994 to 1996.

  16. Significant foreshock activities of M>7.5 earthquakes in the Kuril subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, T.; Yokoi, S.; Satake, K.

    2014-12-01

    In the Kuril subduction zone, some M>7.5 earthquakes are accompanied by significant foreshock activities, providing a good opportunity to understand the characteristics of foreshocks for large interplate events such as occur along the Japan Trench and Nankai Trough etc. Some preliminary results from our examination of the foreshock sequences are as follows. Relocated foreshocks tend to migrate with time toward the trench axis. Foreshock distributions of the interplate earthquakes do not overlap with the large coseismic slips (asperities) of the mainshocks. Foreshocks of the 2007 northern Kuril outer-rise event, however, were distributed on the entire rupture area. Foreshock sequences seem to be limited in the regions where the background seismicity rates are relatively high. The foreshock activities were found in the examination of the space-time pattern of M>7 events along the northern Japan to Kuril trench since 1913 (e.g. Harada, Satake, and Ishibashi, 2011:AGU, 2012:AOGS). The large earthquakes preceded by active foreshock sequences are: the 2006 (M8.3), 2007 (M8.1) offshore Simushir earthquakes, the 1963 (M8.5), 1991 (M7.6), 1995 (M7.9) offshore Urup events, the 1978 (M7.8) offshore Iturup events, the 1969 (M8.2) offshore Shikotan event. In contrast, M>7.5 interplate earthquakes offshore Hokkaido (1952 (M8.1), 1973 (M7.8), 2003 (M8.1)) and intraslab earthquakes (1958 (M8.3), 1978 (M7.8), 1993 (M7.6), 1994 (M8.3)) had few or no foreshocks. In the examination of the active foreshocks, we relocated foreshocks by the Modified JHD method (Hurukawa, 1995), compared relocated foreshock areas with mainshock coseismic slip distributions estimated by the teleseismic body-wave inversion (Kikuchi and Kanamori, 2003), and examined the relation between active foreshock sequences and regional background seismicity. This study was supported by the MEXT's "New disaster mitigation research project on Mega thrust earthquakes around Nankai/Ryukyu subduction zones".

  17. Chronology of historical tsunamis in Mexico and its relation to large earthquakes along the subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suarez, G.; Mortera, C.

    2013-05-01

    The chronology of historical earthquakes along the subduction zone in Mexico spans a time period of approximately 400 years. Although the population density along the coast of Mexico has always been low, relative to that of central Mexico, several of the large subduction earthquakes reports include references to the presence of tsunamis invading the southern coast of Mexico. Here we present a chronology of historical tsunamis affecting the Pacific coast of Mexico and compare this with the historical record of subduction events and to the existing Mexican and worldwide catalogs of tsunamis in the Pacific basin. Due to the geographical orientation of the Pacific coat of Mexico, tsunamis generated on the other subduction zones of the Pacific have not had damaging effects in the country. Among the tsunamis generated by local earthquakes, the largest one by far is the one produced by the earthquake of 28 March 1787. The reported tsunami has an inundation area that reaches for over 6 km inland. The length of the coast where the tsunami was reported extends for over 450 km. In the last 100 years two large tsunamis have been reported along the Pacific coast of Mexico. On 22 June 1932 a tsunami with reported wave heights of up to 11 m hit the coast of Jalisco and Colima. The town of Cuyutlan was heavily damaged and approximately 50 people lost their lives do to the impact of the tsunami. This unusual tsunami was generated by an aftershock (M 6.9) of the large 3 June 1932 event (M 8.1). The main shock of 3 June did not produce a perceptible tsunami. It has been proposed that the 22 June event is a tsunami earthquake generated on the shallow part of the subduction zone. On 16 November 1925 an unusual tsunami was reported in the town of Zihuatanejo in the state of Guerrero, Mexico. No earthquake on the Pacific rim occurs at the same time as this tsunami and the historical record of hurricanes and tropical storms do not list the presence of a meteorological disturbance that

  18. Earthquakes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roper, Paul J.; Roper, Jere Gerard

    1974-01-01

    Describes the causes and effects of earthquakes, defines the meaning of magnitude (measured on the Richter Magnitude Scale) and intensity (measured on a modified Mercalli Intensity Scale) and discusses earthquake prediction and control. (JR)

  19. Earthquakes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roper, Paul J.; Roper, Jere Gerard

    1974-01-01

    Describes the causes and effects of earthquakes, defines the meaning of magnitude (measured on the Richter Magnitude Scale) and intensity (measured on a modified Mercalli Intensity Scale) and discusses earthquake prediction and control. (JR)

  20. A global building inventory for earthquake loss estimation and risk management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jaiswal, K.; Wald, D.; Porter, K.

    2010-01-01

    We develop a global database of building inventories using taxonomy of global building types for use in near-real-time post-earthquake loss estimation and pre-earthquake risk analysis, for the U.S. Geological Survey's Prompt Assessment of Global Earthquakes for Response (PAGER) program. The database is available for public use, subject to peer review, scrutiny, and open enhancement. On a country-by-country level, it contains estimates of the distribution of building types categorized by material, lateral force resisting system, and occupancy type (residential or nonresidential, urban or rural). The database draws on and harmonizes numerous sources: (1) UN statistics, (2) UN Habitat's demographic and health survey (DHS) database, (3) national housing censuses, (4) the World Housing Encyclopedia and (5) other literature. ?? 2010, Earthquake Engineering Research Institute.

  1. Forecast model for great earthquakes at the Nankai Trough subduction zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stuart, W.D.

    1988-01-01

    An earthquake instability model is formulated for recurring great earthquakes at the Nankai Trough subduction zone in southwest Japan. The model is quasistatic, two-dimensional, and has a displacement and velocity dependent constitutive law applied at the fault plane. A constant rate of fault slip at depth represents forcing due to relative motion of the Philippine Sea and Eurasian plates. The model simulates fault slip and stress for all parts of repeated earthquake cycles, including post-, inter-, pre- and coseismic stages. Calculated ground uplift is in agreement with most of the main features of elevation changes observed before and after the M=8.1 1946 Nankaido earthquake. In model simulations, accelerating fault slip has two time-scales. The first time-scale is several years long and is interpreted as an intermediate-term precursor. The second time-scale is a few days long and is interpreted as a short-term precursor. Accelerating fault slip on both time-scales causes anomalous elevation changes of the ground surface over the fault plane of 100 mm or less within 50 km of the fault trace. ?? 1988 Birkha??user Verlag.

  2. Spatiotemporal earthquake clusters along the North Anatolian fault zone offshore Istanbul

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bulut, Fatih; Ellsworth, William L.; Bohnhoff, Marco; Aktar, Mustafa; Dresen, Georg

    2011-01-01

    We investigate earthquakes with similar waveforms in order to characterize spatiotemporal microseismicity clusters within the North Anatolian fault zone (NAFZ) in northwest Turkey along the transition between the 1999 ??zmit rupture zone and the Marmara Sea seismic gap. Earthquakes within distinct activity clusters are relocated with cross-correlation derived relative travel times using the double difference method. The spatiotemporal distribution of micro earthquakes within individual clusters is resolved with relative location accuracy comparable to or better than the source size. High-precision relative hypocenters define the geometry of individual fault patches, permitting a better understanding of fault kinematics and their role in local-scale seismotectonics along the region of interest. Temporal seismic sequences observed in the eastern Sea of Marmara region suggest progressive failure of mostly nonoverlapping areas on adjacent fault patches and systematic migration of microearthquakes within clusters during the progressive failure of neighboring fault patches. The temporal distributions of magnitudes as well as the number of events follow swarmlike behavior rather than a mainshock/aftershock pattern.

  3. Ambient seafloor noise excited by earthquakes in the Nankai subduction zone

    PubMed Central

    Tonegawa, Takashi; Fukao, Yoshio; Takahashi, Tsutomu; Obana, Koichiro; Kodaira, Shuichi; Kaneda, Yoshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    Excitations of seismic background noises are mostly related to fluid disturbances in the atmosphere, ocean and the solid Earth. Earthquakes have not been considered as a stationary excitation source because they occur intermittently. Here we report that acoustic-coupled Rayleigh waves (at 0.7–2.0 Hz) travelling in the ocean and marine sediments, retrieved by correlating ambient noise on a hydrophone array deployed through a shallow to deep seafloor (100–4,800 m) across the Nankai Trough, Japan, are incessantly excited by nearby small earthquakes. The observed cross-correlation functions and 2D numerical simulations for wave propagation through a laterally heterogeneous ocean–crust system show that, in a subduction zone, energetic wave sources are located primarily under the seafloor in directions consistent with nearby seismicity, and secondarily in the ocean. Short-period background noise in the ocean–crust system in the Nankai subduction zone is mainly attributed to ocean-acoustic Rayleigh waves of earthquake origin. PMID:25635384

  4. Mapping apparent stress and energy radiation over fault zones of major earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGarr, A.; Fletcher, Joe B.

    2002-01-01

    Using published slip models for five major earthquakes, 1979 Imperial Valley, 1989 Loma Prieta, 1992 Landers, 1994 Northridge, and 1995 Kobe, we produce maps of apparent stress and radiated seismic energy over their fault surfaces. The slip models, obtained by inverting seismic and geodetic data, entail the division of the fault surfaces into many subfaults for which the time histories of seismic slip are determined. To estimate the seismic energy radiated by each subfault, we measure the near-fault seismic-energy flux from the time-dependent slip there and then multiply by a function of rupture velocity to obtain the corresponding energy that propagates into the far-field. This function, the ratio of far-field to near-fault energy, is typically less than 1/3, inasmuch as most of the near-fault energy remains near the fault and is associated with permanent earthquake deformation. Adding the energy contributions from all of the subfaults yields an estimate of the total seismic energy, which can be compared with independent energy estimates based on seismic-energy flux measured in the far-field, often at teleseismic distances. Estimates of seismic energy based on slip models are robust, in that different models, for a given earthquake, yield energy estimates that are in close agreement. Moreover, the slip-model estimates of energy are generally in good accord with independent estimates by others, based on regional or teleseismic data. Apparent stress is estimated for each subfault by dividing the corresponding seismic moment into the radiated energy. Distributions of apparent stress over an earthquake fault zone show considerable heterogeneity, with peak values that are typically about double the whole-earthquake values (based on the ratio of seismic energy to seismic moment). The range of apparent stresses estimated for subfaults of the events studied here is similar to the range of apparent stresses for earthquakes in continental settings, with peak values of about

  5. Distribution of stress drop, stiffness, and fracture energy over earthquake rupture zones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fletcher, Joe B.; McGarr, A.

    2006-01-01

    Using information provided by slip models and the methodology of McGarr and Fletcher (2002), we map static stress drop, stiffness (k = ????/u, where ???? is static stress drop and u is slip), and fracture energy over the slip surface to investigate the earthquake rupture process and energy budget. For the 1994 M6.7 Northridge, 1992 M7.3 Landers, and 1995 M6.9 Kobe earthquakes, the distributions of static stress drop show strong heterogeneity, emphasizing the importance of asperities in the rupture process. Average values of static stress drop are 17, 11, and 4 Mpa for Northridge, Landers, and Kobe, respectively. These values are substantially higher than estimates based on simple crack models, suggesting that the failure process involves the rupture of asperities within the larger fault zone. Stress drop as a function of depth for the Northridge and Landers earthquakes suggests that stress drops are limited by crustal strength. For these two earthquakes, regions of high slip are surrounded by high values of stiffness. Particularly for the Northridge earthquake, the prominent patch of high slip in the central part of the fault is bordered by a ring of high stiffness and is consistent with expectations based on the failure of an asperity loaded at its edge due to exterior slip. Stiffness within an asperity is inversely related to its dimensions. Estimates of fracture energy, based on static stress drop, slip, and rupture speed, were used to investigate the nature of slip weakening at four locations near the hypocenter of the Kobe earthquake for comparison with independent results based on a dynamic model of this earthquake. One subfault updip and to the NE of the hypocenter has a fracture energy of 1.1 MJ/m2 and a slip-weakening distance, Dc, of 0.66 m. Right triangles, whose base and height are Dc and the dynamic stress drop, respectively, approximately overlie the slip-dependent stress given by Ide and Takeo (1997) for the same locations near the hypocenter. The

  6. Deep low-frequency earthquakes in tremor localize to the plate interface in multiple subduction zones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, Justin R.; Beroza, Gregory C.; Ide, Satoshi; Ohta, Kazuaki; Shelly, David R.; Schwartz, Susan Y.; Rabbel, Wolfgang; Thorwart, M.; Kao, Honn

    2009-01-01

    Deep tremor under Shikoku, Japan, consists primarily, and perhaps entirely, of swarms of low-frequency earthquakes (LFEs) that occur as shear slip on the plate interface. Although tremor is observed at other plate boundaries, the lack of cataloged low-frequency earthquakes has precluded a similar conclusion about tremor in those locales. We use a network autocorrelation approach to detect and locate LFEs within tremor recorded at three subduction zones characterized by different thermal structures and levels of interplate seismicity: southwest Japan, northern Cascadia, and Costa Rica. In each case we find that LFEs are the primary constituent of tremor and that they locate on the deep continuation of the plate boundary. This suggests that tremor in these regions shares a common mechanism and that temperature is not the primary control on such activity.

  7. Deep low-frequency earthquakes in tremor localize to the plate interface in multiple subduction zones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, J.R.; Beroza, G.C.; Ide, S.; Ohta, K.; Shelly, D.R.; Schwartz, S.Y.; Rabbel, W.; Thorwart, M.; Kao, H.

    2009-01-01

    Deep tremor under Shikoku, Japan, consists primarily, and perhaps entirely, of swarms of low-frequency earthquakes (LFEs) that occur as shear slip on the plate interface. Although tremor is observed at other plate boundaries, the lack of cataloged low-frequency earthquakes has precluded a similar conclusion about tremor in those locales. We use a network autocorrelation approach to detect and locate LFEs within tremor recorded at three subduction zones characterized by different thermal structures and levels of interplate seismicity: southwest Japan, northern Cascadia, and Costa Rica. In each case we find that LFEs are the primary constituent of tremor and that they locate on the deep continuation of the plate boundary. This suggests that tremor in these regions shares a common mechanism and that temperature is not the primary control on such activity. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  8. Using earthquake clusters to identify fracture zones at Puna geothermal field, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, A.; Shalev, E.; Malin, P.; Kenedi, C. L.

    2010-12-01

    The actively producing Puna geothermal system (PGS) is located on the Kilauea East Rift Zone (ERZ), which extends out from the active Kilauea volcano on Hawaii. In the Puna area the rift trend is identified as NE-SW from surface expressions of normal faulting with a corresponding strike; at PGS the surface expression offsets in a left step, but no rift perpendicular faulting is observed. An eight station borehole seismic network has been installed in the area of the geothermal system. Since June 2006, a total of 6162 earthquakes have been located close to or inside the geothermal system. The spread of earthquake locations follows the rift trend, but down rift to the NE of PGS almost no earthquakes are observed. Most earthquakes located within the PGS range between 2-3 km depth. Up rift to the SW of PGS the number of events decreases and the depth range increases to 3-4 km. All initial locations used Hypoinverse71 and showed no trends other than the dominant rift parallel. Double difference relocation of all earthquakes, using both catalog and cross-correlation, identified one large cluster but could not conclusively identify trends within the cluster. A large number of earthquake waveforms showed identifiable shear wave splitting. For five stations out of the six where shear wave splitting was observed, the dominant polarization direction was rift parallel. Two of the five stations also showed a smaller rift perpendicular signal. The sixth station (located close to the area of the rift offset) displayed a N-S polarization, approximately halfway between rift parallel and perpendicular. The shear wave splitting time delays indicate that fracture density is higher at the PGS compared to the surrounding ERZ. Correlation co-efficient clustering with independent P and S wave windows was used to identify clusters based on similar earthquake waveforms. In total, 40 localized clusters containing ten or more events were identified. The largest cluster was located in the

  9. Global root zone storage capacity from satellite-based evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang-Erlandsson, Lan; Bastiaanssen, Wim G. M.; Gao, Hongkai; Jägermeyr, Jonas; Senay, Gabriel B.; van Dijk, Albert I. J. M.; Guerschman, Juan P.; Keys, Patrick W.; Gordon, Line J.; Savenije, Hubert H. G.

    2016-04-01

    This study presents an "Earth observation-based" method for estimating root zone storage capacity - a critical, yet uncertain parameter in hydrological and land surface modelling. By assuming that vegetation optimises its root zone storage capacity to bridge critical dry periods, we were able to use state-of-the-art satellite-based evaporation data computed with independent energy balance equations to derive gridded root zone storage capacity at global scale. This approach does not require soil or vegetation information, is model independent, and is in principle scale independent. In contrast to a traditional look-up table approach, our method captures the variability in root zone storage capacity within land cover types, including in rainforests where direct measurements of root depths otherwise are scarce. Implementing the estimated root zone storage capacity in the global hydrological model STEAM (Simple Terrestrial Evaporation to Atmosphere Model) improved evaporation simulation overall, and in particular during the least evaporating months in sub-humid to humid regions with moderate to high seasonality. Our results suggest that several forest types are able to create a large storage to buffer for severe droughts (with a very long return period), in contrast to, for example, savannahs and woody savannahs (medium length return period), as well as grasslands, shrublands, and croplands (very short return period). The presented method to estimate root zone storage capacity eliminates the need for poor resolution soil and rooting depth data that form a limitation for achieving progress in the global land surface modelling community.

  10. Electromagnetic Precursors Leading to Triangulation of Future Earthquakes and Imaging of the Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heraud, J. A.; Centa, V. A.; Bleier, T.

    2015-12-01

    During several sessions in past AGU meetings, reports on the progress of analysis of magnetometer data have been given, as our research moved from a one dimensional geometry, to two and finally to a three dimensional image. In the first case, we learned how to extract one coordinate, azimuth information, on the occurrence of an earthquake based on the processing of mono-polar pulses received at a single station. A two dimensional geometry was implemented through triangulation and we showed the use of this technique to find out where a future epicenter would occur. Recently, we have obtained compelling evidence that the pressure points leading to the determination of future epicenters originate at a plane, inclined with the same angle as the subduction zone, a three-dimensional position of the future hypocenter. Hence, an image of the subduction zone or interface between the Nazca plate and the continental plate in the northern area of Lima, Peru, has been obtained, corresponding to the subduction zone obtained by traditional seismic methods. Our work with magnetometers deployed along part of the Peruvian coast since 2009, has shown that it is possible to measure, with significant precision, the azimuth of electromagnetic pulses propagating from stress points in the earth's crust due to the subduction of tectonic plates, as to be able to determine precisely the origin of the pulses. The occurrence of earthquakes approximately 11 to 18 days after the appearance of the first pulses and the recognition of grouping of such pulses, has allowed us to determine accurately the direction and the timing of future seismic events. Magnetometers, donated by Quakefinder and Telefonica del Peru were then strategically installed in different locations in Peru with the purpose of achieving triangulation. During two years since 2013, about a dozen earthquakes have been associated with future seismic activity in a pre or post occurrence way. Our presentation will be based on animated

  11. Velocity Structure in the West Bohemia Seismic Zone: Velocity Models Retrieved from different Earthquake Swarms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrakis, C.; Löberich, E.; Kieslich, A.; Calo, M.; Vavrycuk, V.; Buske, S.

    2015-12-01

    Earthquake swarms, fluid migration and gas springs are indications of the ongoing geodynamic processes within the West Bohemia seismic zone located at the Czech-German border. The possible relationship between the fluids, gas and seismicity is of particular interest and has motivated numerous past, ongoing and future studies, including a multidisciplinary monitoring proposal through the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program (ICDP). The most seismically active area within the West Bohemia seismic zone is located at the Czech town Nový Kostel. The Nový Kostel zone experiences frequent swarms of several hundreds to thousands of earthquakes over a period of weeks to several months. The seismicity is always located in the same area and depth range (~5-15 km), however the activated fault segments and planes differ. For example, the 2008 swarm activated faults along the southern end of the seismic zone, the 2011 swarm activated the northern segment, and the recent 2014 swarm activated the middle of the seismic zone. This indicates changes to the local stress field, and may relate to fluid migration and/or the complicated tectonic situation. The West Bohemia Seismic Network (WEBNET) is ideally located for studying the Nový Kostel swarm area and provides good azimuthal coverage. Here, we use the high quality P- and S-wave arrival picks recorded by WEBNET to calculate swarm-dependent velocity models for the 2008 and 2011 swarms, and an averaged (swarm independent) model using earthquakes recorded between 1991 and 2011. To this end, we use double-difference tomography to calculate P- and S-wave velocity models. The models are compared and examined in terms of swarm-dependent velocities and structures. Since the P-to-S velocity ratio is particularly sensitive to the presence of pore fluids, we derive ratio models directly from the inverted P- and S-wave models in order to investigate the potential influence of fluids on the seismicity. Finally, clustering

  12. Geologic Hazards Associated with Longmen Shan Fault zone, During and After the Mw 8.0, May 12, 2008 Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, X.; Kusky, T.; Li, Z.

    2008-12-01

    A magnitude 8.0 earthquake shook the northeastern margin of the Tibetan plateau, on May 12, 2008 along the Longmen Shan orogenic belt that marks the boundary between the Songpan Ganzi terrane and Yangtze block. The Tibetan plateau is expanding eastwards, and GPS observations show that surface motion directions are northeast relative to the Sizhuan basin where the earthquake occurred. This sense of motion of crustal blocks is the reason why the main faults in Longmen Shan are oblique thrust-dextral strike slip faults. There are three main parallel thrust/ dextral-slip faults in Longmen Shan. All three faults strike northeast and dip to northwest. The May 12 rupture extends 270 km along the fault zone, and the epicenter of the magnitude 8.0 earthquake was located in Wenchuan, 90 km WNW of Chengdu, Sichuan, China. The devastating earthquake killed at least 87,652 people and destroyed all the buildings in epicenter. The victims of the earthquake zone want to rebuild their homes immediately, but they need more suggestions about the geologic hazards to help them withstand future possible earthquakes. So after earthquake, we went to disaster areas from July 5th to 10th to get first-hand field data, which include observations of surface ruptures, landslides, features of X joints on the damaged buildings, parameters of the active faults and landslides. If we only depend on the field data in accessible locations, we can only know the information of the ruptures in these positions, and we can't learn more information about the whole area affected by the earthquake. The earthquake zone shows surface rupture features of both thrust and strike-slip fault activities, indicating oblique slip followed by thrusting during the May 12 earthquake. In my talk, I will show the general regional geological disaster information by processing the pro- and post-earthquake satellite data. Then we combine the raw field data and regional geology as the restrictive conditions to determine the

  13. Long-term slow slip events along the Nankai trough subduction zone after the 2011 Tohoku earthquake in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozawa, Shinzaburo

    2017-04-01

    The global navigation satellite system (GNSS) network in Japan has detected transient crustal deformation in regions along the Nankai trough subduction zone in southwest Japan from approximately 2013, after the 2011 Tohoku earthquake. Using the GNSS data, we estimated the spatiotemporal evolution of long-term aseismic slip along the Nankai trough. The result indicates that aseismic slip has occurred on the plate interface in the Bungo, northern Miyazaki, and southern Miyazaki regions, southwest Japan. The estimated time evolution between October 2013 and April 2015 shows the simultaneous occurrence of northern and southern Miyazaki slow slips with different durations followed by a Bungo slow slip in 2014. A southern Miyazaki slow slip occurred from approximately July 2015, which was followed by a northern Miyazaki slow slip and a Bungo slow slip in 2016. The 2016 Bungo slow slip occurred in a shallow area that did not slip at the time of the 2014 Bungo slow slip. The two different rupture processes from 2013 to 2015 and from 2015 to 2016 may be an important clue toward understanding subduction tectonics in southwest Japan. These interplate slow slip events are changing the stress state in favor of the occurrence of Nankai and Hyuga-nada earthquakes together with Tokai and Kii channel slow slips, which have been occurring since approximately 2013 and 2014, respectively.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  14. Earthquake behavior of the Enriquillo fault zone, Haiti revealed by interactive terrain visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowgill, E.; Bernardin, T. S.; Oskin, M. E.; Bowles, C. J.; Yikilmaz, M. B.; Kreylos, O.; Elliott, A. J.; Bishop, M. S.; Gold, R. D.; Morelan, A.; Bawden, G. W.; Hamann, B.; Kellogg, L. H.

    2010-12-01

    The Mw 7.0 January 12, 2010 Haiti earthquake ended 240 years of relative quiescence following earthquakes that destroyed Port-au-Prince in 1751 and 1770. We place the 2010 rupture in the context of past earthquakes and future hazards by using remote analysis of airborne LiDAR to observe the topographic expression of active faulting and develop a new conceptual model for the earthquake behavior of the eastern Enriquillo fault zone (EFZ). In this model, the 2010 event occupies a long-lived segment boundary at a stepover within the EFZ separating fault segments that likely ruptured in 1751 and 1770, explaining both past clustering and the lack of 2010 surface rupture. Immediately following the 2010 earthquake, an airborne LiDAR point cloud containing over 2.7 billion point measurements of surface features was collected by the Rochester Inst. of Technology. To analyze these data, we capitalize on the human capacity to visually identify meaningful patterns embedded in noisy data by conducting interactive visual analysis of the entire 66.8 GB Haiti terrain data in a 4-sided, 800 ft3 immersive virtual-reality environment at the UC Davis KeckCAVES using the software tools LiDAR Viewer (to analyze point cloud data) and Crusta (for 3D surficial geologic mapping on DEM data). We discovered and measured landforms displaced by past surface-rupturing earthquakes and remotely characterized the regional fault geometry. Our analysis of the ~50 km long reach of EFZ spanning the 2010 epicenter indicates that geomorphic evidence of active faulting is clearer east of the epicenter than to the west. West of the epicenter, and in the region of the 2010 rupture, the fault is poorly defined along an embayed, low-relief range front, with little evidence of recent surface rupture. In contrast, landform offsets of 6 to 50 m along the reach of the EFZ east of the epicenter and closest to Port-au-Prince attest to repeated recent surface-rupturing earthquakes here. Specifically, we found and

  15. Stress development in heterogenetic lithosphere: Insights into earthquake processes in the New Madrid Seismic Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Yan; Hou, Guiting; Kusky, Timothy; Gregg, Patricia M.

    2016-03-01

    The New Madrid Seismic Zone (NMSZ) in the Midwestern United States was the site of several major M 6.8-8 earthquakes in 1811-1812, and remains seismically active. Although this region has been investigated extensively, the ultimate controls on earthquake initiation and the duration of the seismicity remain unclear. In this study, we develop a finite element model for the Central United States to conduct a series of numerical experiments with the goal of determining the impact of heterogeneity in the upper crust, the lower crust, and the mantle on earthquake nucleation and rupture processes. Regional seismic tomography data (CITE) are utilized to infer the viscosity structure of the lithosphere which provide an important input to the numerical models. Results indicate that when differential stresses build in the Central United States, the stresses accumulating beneath the Reelfoot Rift in the NMSZ are highly concentrated, whereas the stresses below the geologically similar Midcontinent Rift System are comparatively low. The numerical observations coincide with the observed distribution of seismicity throughout the region. By comparing the numerical results with three reference models, we argue that an extensive mantle low velocity zone beneath the NMSZ produces differential stress localization in the layers above. Furthermore, the relatively strong crust in this region, exhibited by high seismic velocities, enables the elevated stress to extend to the base of the ancient rift system, reactivating fossil rifting faults and therefore triggering earthquakes. These results show that, if boundary displacements are significant, the NMSZ is able to localize tectonic stresses, which may be released when faults close to failure are triggered by external processes such as melting of the Laurentide ice sheet or rapid river incision.

  16. The Gibraltar Arc seismogenic zone and the great Lisbon earthquake of 1755

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutscher, M.-A.; Malod, J. A.; Rehault, J.-P.; Thiebot, E.; Contrucci, I.; Baptista, M. A.; Miranda, J. M.

    2003-04-01

    New geophysical data provide compelling evidence for an active east dipping subduction zone beneath the Gibraltar Arc. SISMAR marine seismic data in the Gulf of Cadiz image an actively deforming accretionary wedge, with east dipping thrust faults disrupting the seafloor and soleing out to an east dipping decollement. Tomographic cross-sections as well as hypocenter distribution support a continuous east dipping slab of oceanic lithosphere from the Atlantic domain to beneath the Western Alboran Sea. The great Lisbon earthquake of 1755 (felt as far away as Hamburg, the Azores and Cape Verde Islands) has the largest documented felt area of any shallow earthquake and an estimated magnitude of 8.5 - 9.0. The associated tsunami ravaged the coast of SW Portugal and the Gulf of Cadiz, with run-up heights reported to have reached 5 - 15 m. While several source regions offshore SW Portugal have been proposed (e.g. - Gorringe Bank, Marques de Pombal fault), no single source appears to be able to account for the great seismic moment and the tsunami amplitude and travel-time observations. We propose the Gibraltar arc seismogenic zone to be the source of the 1755 earthquake. This hypothesis may be tested in several ways. We perform tsunami wave form modeling for a shallow east dipping fault plane with dimensions of 180 km (N-S) x 210 km (E-W) and a co-seismic slip of 20 m. For convergence rates of 1 - 2 cm/yr an event of this magnitude could recur every 1000 - 2000 years. Furthermore, the DELILA geophysical cruise is proposed for 2004 to conduct a bathymetric and seismic survey of the accretionary wedge and to sample the turbidites in the adjacent abyssal plains which record the history of great earthquakes.

  17. Crustal structure of the 2004 Great Sumatra Earthquake epicentral zone from wide-angle seismic data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klingelhoefer, F.; Dessa, J.; Graindorge, D.; Gutscher, M.; Permana, H.; Andre, C.; Dean, S.; Singh, S.; Chauhan, A.

    2007-12-01

    The 26th December 2004 great Sumatra earthquake (Mw=9.1) is among the 4 largest earthquakes ever recorded and the largest of the last 40 years. It initiated at a depth of 20-30 km and ruptured about 1300 km of the Indo-Australian/Sunda plate boundary, from the vicinity of Simeulue Island up to the north of Andaman Islands. During the SAGER-OBS cruise 56 ocean-bottom seismometers were deployed on a profile which crosses the margin north of Simeulue Island, in the epicentral area. The profile is 252 km-long, resulting in a 4.6 km instrument interval. A seismic refraction source of 8,300 in3 was used to fire 2170 shots on the profile. Data quality is excellent with useful arrivals to distances up to 180 km from the shot position. A tomographic inversion of 33127 picked first arrivals allows first insights into the deep structure of the zone of origin of the great earthquake. The subducting oceanic slab can be imaged down to a depth of ~25 km, more than 100 km landward from the trench. Based on seismic velocities, there is no evidence of a crystalline backstop up to ~120 km from the trench axis, below the fore arc basin. This implies that a significant part of the seismogenic interplate would consist of a contact between ancient accreted sediments and the downgoing plate. A high velocity zone at the lower landward limit of the ray-covered domain, at ~23 km depth, may indicate a shallow continental Moho. This observation might imply that the 2004 megathrust earthquake nucleated on a portion of the plate contact that lies between the upper surface of the downgoing plate and the fore arc mantle. At the seaward end of the model, 4-5 km of sediments seem to overlie the oceanic crust at the trench, most likely consisting of trench fill and older hemi-pelagic sediments.

  18. Single-Station Strong Ground-Motion Relationship for North Eastern Taiwan Subduction Zone Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Ting-Yu; Lee, Chyi-Tyi

    2016-04-01

    Sigma (standard deviation) of ground-motion prediction equation (GMPE) has great impact on probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA). Therefore, how to properly evaluate the sigma has been a crucial issue currently. It is very suitable for seismic-related research due to the abundant earthquake data in Taiwan. With establishing single-station GMPE, the sigma can be reduced due to eliminating the variance from site effect. In this study, ground-motion data of subduction zone for both interface and intraslab earthquakes are obtained from the Taiwan Strong-Motion Instrumentation Program (TSMIP). A total of 174 earthquakes and 14,551 records which moment magnitude greater than 4.0 are selected to establish PGA attenuation relationship. We chose the general usage of the functional forms by reviewing of previous studies. Each candidate term in the form was tested with Taiwan data set. The final form is generally similar to the form proposed by Lin and Lee (2008), besides a quadratic magnitude term, a VS30 term and a focal mechanism term were added. The coefficients of the equation are determined through non-linear regression analysis using maximum likelihood method (MLE) and mixed-effects model. Both regional GMPE and 44 single-station GMPEs are done in this study. The results show that intraslab earthquakes generaly predict higher PGA than that of interface earthquakes. Comparing the sigma of regional GMPE and single-station GMPEs, the single-station sigmas are smaller than the regional sigma with a reduction rate from 1.5% to 37.0%, averaging 21.7%.

  19. Tomography of the source zone of the 2016 South Taiwan earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyokuni, Genti; Zhao, Dapeng; Chen, Kate Huihsuan

    2016-10-01

    On 2016 February 6 the South Taiwan earthquake (Mw 6.4) occurred in the Meinong District of Kaohsiung, southern Taiwan, at a depth of 17 km. It caused 117 fatalities and widespread damage to infrastructures, especially in the Tainan city. To clarify the generating mechanism of this damaging earthquake, we determined high-resolution 3-D images of P- and S-wave velocity (VP, VS) and Poisson's ratio (σ) in the epicentral area. We used 105 712 P- and 61 250 S-wave arrival times of 8279 local earthquakes (1.5 ≤ M ≤ 6.4) recorded at 41 seismic stations in South Taiwan during 2000-2011. In the upper crust (depth ≤ 10 km), the most remarkable feature is low-VP, low-VS and high-σ anomalies in areas with known active faults in the southwestern and easternmost parts of Taiwan. In contrast, high-VP, high-VS and low-σ anomalies become dominant in the lower crust. The hypocentre of the 2016 South Taiwan earthquake is located in a boundary zone where seismic velocity and Poisson's ratio change drastically in both the horizontal and vertical directions. Furthermore, the hypocentre is underlain by a vertically elongated high-σ anomaly at depths of 23-40 km, which may reflect ascending fluids from the upper (or uppermost) mantle. The low-V and high-σ anomalies in the upper crust coincide with areas of low heat flow, negative Bouguer gravity anomaly, and low magnetotelluric resistivity, which may reflect crustal fluids contained in the young fold-and-thrust belt. These results suggest that the 2016 South Taiwan earthquake was triggered by ascending fluids from dehydration of the subducting Eurasian slab, invading into active faults with a high loading rate.

  20. Possible control of subduction zone slow-earthquake periodicity by silica enrichment.

    PubMed

    Audet, Pascal; Bürgmann, Roland

    2014-06-19

    Seismic and geodetic observations in subduction zone forearcs indicate that slow earthquakes, including episodic tremor and slip, recur at intervals of less than six months to more than two years. In Cascadia, slow slip is segmented along strike and tremor data show a gradation from large, infrequent slip episodes to small, frequent slip events with increasing depth of the plate interface. Observations and models of slow slip and tremor require the presence of near-lithostatic pore-fluid pressures in slow-earthquake source regions; however, direct evidence of factors controlling the variability in recurrence times is elusive. Here we compile seismic data from subduction zone forearcs exhibiting recurring slow earthquakes and show that the average ratio of compressional (P)-wave velocity to shear (S)-wave velocity (vP/vS) of the overlying forearc crust ranges between 1.6 and 2.0 and is linearly related to the average recurrence time of slow earthquakes. In northern Cascadia, forearc vP/vS values decrease with increasing depth of the plate interface and with decreasing tremor-episode recurrence intervals. Low vP/vS values require a large addition of quartz in a mostly mafic forearc environment. We propose that silica enrichment varying from 5 per cent to 15 per cent by volume from slab-derived fluids and upward mineralization in quartz veins can explain the range of observed vP/vS values as well as the downdip decrease in vP/vS. The solubility of silica depends on temperature, and deposition prevails near the base of the forearc crust. We further propose that the strong temperature dependence of healing and permeability reduction in silica-rich fault gouge via dissolution-precipitation creep can explain the reduction in tremor recurrence time with progressive silica enrichment. Lower gouge permeability at higher temperatures leads to faster fluid overpressure development and low effective fault-normal stress, and therefore shorter recurrence times. Our results also

  1. Possible control of subduction zone slow-earthquake periodicity by silica enrichment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audet, Pascal; Bürgmann, Roland

    2014-06-01

    Seismic and geodetic observations in subduction zone forearcs indicate that slow earthquakes, including episodic tremor and slip, recur at intervals of less than six months to more than two years. In Cascadia, slow slip is segmented along strike and tremor data show a gradation from large, infrequent slip episodes to small, frequent slip events with increasing depth of the plate interface. Observations and models of slow slip and tremor require the presence of near-lithostatic pore-fluid pressures in slow-earthquake source regions; however, direct evidence of factors controlling the variability in recurrence times is elusive. Here we compile seismic data from subduction zone forearcs exhibiting recurring slow earthquakes and show that the average ratio of compressional (P)-wave velocity to shear (S)-wave velocity (vP/vS) of the overlying forearc crust ranges between 1.6 and 2.0 and is linearly related to the average recurrence time of slow earthquakes. In northern Cascadia, forearc vP/vS values decrease with increasing depth of the plate interface and with decreasing tremor-episode recurrence intervals. Low vP/vS values require a large addition of quartz in a mostly mafic forearc environment. We propose that silica enrichment varying from 5 per cent to 15 per cent by volume from slab-derived fluids and upward mineralization in quartz veins can explain the range of observed vP/vS values as well as the downdip decrease in vP/vS. The solubility of silica depends on temperature, and deposition prevails near the base of the forearc crust. We further propose that the strong temperature dependence of healing and permeability reduction in silica-rich fault gouge via dissolution-precipitation creep can explain the reduction in tremor recurrence time with progressive silica enrichment. Lower gouge permeability at higher temperatures leads to faster fluid overpressure development and low effective fault-normal stress, and therefore shorter recurrence times. Our results also

  2. Strain-dependent Damage Evolution and Velocity Reduction in Fault Zones Induced by Earthquake Rupture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, J.; Duan, B.

    2009-12-01

    Low-velocity fault zones (LVFZs) with reduced seismic velocities relative to the surrounding wall rocks are widely observed around active faults. The presence of such a zone will affect rupture propagation, near-field ground motion, and off-fault damage in subsequent earth-quakes. In this study, we quantify the reduction of seismic velocities caused by dynamic rup-ture on a 2D planar fault surrounded by a low-velocity fault zone. First, we implement the damage rheology (Lyakhovsky et al. 1997) in EQdyna (Duan and Oglesby 2006), an explicit dynamic finite element code. We further extend this damage rheology model to include the dependence of strains on crack density. Then, we quantify off-fault continuum damage distribution and velocity reduction induced by earthquake rupture with the presence of a preexisting LVFZ. We find that the presence of a LVFZ affects the tempo-spatial distribu-tions of off-fault damage. Because lack of constraint in some damage parameters, we further investigate the relationship between velocity reduction and these damage prameters by a large suite of numerical simulations. Slip velocity, slip, and near-field ground motions computed from damage rheology are also compared with those from off-fault elastic or elastoplastic responses. We find that the reduction in elastic moduli during dynamic rupture has profound impact on these quantities.

  3. Thrust-type subduction-zone earthquakes and seamount asperites: A physical model for seismic rupture

    SciTech Connect

    Cloos, M. )

    1992-07-01

    A thrust-type subduction-zone earthquake of M{sub W} 7.6 ruptures an area of {approximately}6,000 km{sup 2}, has a seismic slip of {approximately}1 m, and is nucleated by the rupture of an asperity {approximately}25km across. A model for thrust-type subduction-zone seismicity is proposed in which basaltic seamounts jammed against the base of the overriding plate act as strong asperities that rupture by stick-slip faulting. A M{sub W} 7.6 event would correspond to the near-basal rupture of a {approximately}2-km-tall seamount. The base of the seamount is surrounded by a low shear-strength layer composed of subducting sediment that also deforms between seismic events by distributed strain (viscous flow). Planar faults form in this layer as the seismic rupture propagates out of the seamount at speeds of kilometers per second. The faults in the shear zone are disrupted after the event by aseismic, slow viscous flow of the subducting sediment layer. Consequently, the extent of fault rupture varies for different earthquakes nucleated at the same seamount asperity because new fault surfaces form in the surrounding subducting sediment layer during each fast seismic rupture.

  4. Global Correlation between the Size of Subduction Earthquakes and the Magnitude of Crustal Normal Fault Aftershocks in the Forearc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aron, F.; Allmendinger, R. W.; Jensen Siles, E.

    2013-12-01

    Large, shallow reactivations of forearc normal faults, reaching Mw up to 7.0, were some of the notable effects of the 2010, Mw 8.8 Maule and 2011, Mw 9.0 Tohoku earthquakes. But how likely are large, upper-plate normal fault aftershocks after a great megathrust event? We use data from the Global CMT catalog to analyze globally the seismicity in forearc regions following all the great subduction ruptures > Mw 7.7, since 1976 (44 events). The intraplate aftershocks selected have hypocentral locations inside the 3D wedge defined by the seismogenic zone of the slab, the rupture extension and the forearc topography. Our search spans the 3 years following the main rupture, to include both the coseismic and post-seismic deformation periods. Within the detection limits of the catalog and with just a few exceptions, most of the megathrust events (~77%) triggered upper-plate normal faulting. More importantly, for any given megathrust the summation of the Mw accounted by the all the forearc events has a positive correlation with the Mw of the subduction earthquake; the larger the megathrust the larger the energy released by forearc earthquakes. Great megathrust events, such as the Maule and Tohoku earthquakes, not only shake the ground and deform elastically the crust; they also leave a permanent deformation mark in the geological record of the upper plate, especially on the forearc above the seismogenic zone. Because the continent is mostly stretched in the direction of the coseismic rebound, this permanent signature is expressed as extensional features, including surface tension cracks and shallow, intraplate normal fault reactivations. Those reactivations tend to occur in structures which strike sub-perpendicular to the maximum coseismic stretching orientation, but the observations show that only some particular faults produced significant aftershocks - not all the properly oriented forearc structures above the megathrust rupture slipped seismically after a single

  5. Study on earthquake potential and GPS deformation of the middle-southern segment of the Liupanshan fault zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Du; Xue-Ze, Wen; Ming-Jian, Liang; Feng, Long; Jiang, Wu

    2016-04-01

    The Liupanshan fault zone is a border-type and active thrust zone between the Qinghai-Tibet block and the North China block. The fault zone trends nearly N-S direction north of Guyuan and NNW-direction south of Guyuan. The middle segment of the fault zone consists of several branches, including the western and eastern branches, as well as the Xiaoguanshan fault. They are all belonging to active thrust faults in the late Quaternary. The southern segment of the fault zone also consists of several branches, such as the Taoyuan-Guichuansi fault, the Guguan-Baoji fault and the Longxian-Zhishan-Mazhao fault. They exhibit mainly sinistral strike-slip faulting. We have identified a seismic gap of major earthquakes which exists in the middle segment of the Liupanshan fault zone, south of Guyuan. Several historical earthquakes occurred on the fault zone at and north of Guyuan, among them are the 1219 M=7 event, the 1306 M=7 event, and the 1622 M=7 event. The southern segment of the Liupanshan fault zone could be the seismogenic one of the Tianshui-Longxian earthquake of 600 AD. This early historical event might have a greater magnitude than 61/2 that is given in the current earthquake catalog. No strong earthquake occurred on the southern segment of the Liupanshan fault zone between Longde and Longxian in the documentedly recorded history. So, the time period without major earthquake rupture in the seismic gap on the middle segment of the fault zone is at least 1415 years. The seismic gap has a length of about 70 km. The GPS velocity profile across middle-southern segment of the Liupanshan fault zone suggests that inter-seismic locking is happening there. An analysis of the GPS velocity profiles mainly shows that, horizontal shortening is occurring from west to east in the fault-perpendicular direction and horizontal left-lateral shearing parallel to the fault's strike is occurring in the area from the middle segment of the fault zone to tens of kilometers away west of the

  6. The GED4GEM project: development of a Global Exposure Database for the Global Earthquake Model initiative

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gamba, P.; Cavalca, D.; Jaiswal, K.S.; Huyck, C.; Crowley, H.

    2012-01-01

    In order to quantify earthquake risk of any selected region or a country of the world within the Global Earthquake Model (GEM) framework (www.globalquakemodel.org/), a systematic compilation of building inventory and population exposure is indispensable. Through the consortium of leading institutions and by engaging the domain-experts from multiple countries, the GED4GEM project has been working towards the development of a first comprehensive publicly available Global Exposure Database (GED). This geospatial exposure database will eventually facilitate global earthquake risk and loss estimation through GEM’s OpenQuake platform. This paper provides an overview of the GED concepts, aims, datasets, and inference methodology, as well as the current implementation scheme, status and way forward.

  7. Space-time Renewal Model for Repeating Earthquakes and Slow Slip before and after the Major Earthquakes in the Northeastern Japan Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, S.; Ogata, Y.; Uchida, N.

    2014-12-01

    Repeating earthquake sequences on the plate subduction zone represent the slip-rate histories around their fault patches. So they are useful resources for monitoring precursory aseismic slip of major earthquakes on plate boundaries. Repeating earthquakes are often modeled by renewal processes, point processes whose recurrence intervals are independent and identically distributed. However, their repeating intervals are greatly influenced by larger seismic events or aseismic slow slip, and hence we need to model such non-stationary behavior of repeating earthquakes. In this study, we propose a non-stationary space-time model for repeating earthquakes based on the model in Nomura et al. (2014) applied to the Parkfield catalog. We used the empirical relation between magnitudes and slip sizes of repeating earthquakes by Nadeau and Johnson (1998) to estimate the slip-rate histories in repeating sequences. The proposed model can estimate spatio-temporal variation in slip rate with smoothness restriction adjusted to optimize its Bayesian likelihood.We apply the proposed model to the large catalog of repeating earthquakes in Uchida and Matsuzawa (2013) on subduction zone of Pacific Plate in the northeastern Japan from 1993 to 2011 and estimate slip-rate history of the plate boundary. From this analysis, we discuss the characteristic changes in slip rate before and after the major earthquakes such as Sanriku-Haruka-Oki (1994 Mw7.6), Tokachi-Oki (2003 Mw8.0), Kushiro-Oki (2004 Mw7.1), Fukushima-Oki (2008 Mw6.9), Ibaraki-Oki (2008 Mw7.0) and Tohoku-Oki (2011 Mw9.0).

  8. Monofractal and multifractal analysis of the spatial distribution of earthquakes in the central zone of Chile.

    PubMed

    Pastén, Denisse; Muñoz, Víctor; Cisternas, Armando; Rogan, José; Valdivia, Juan Alejandro

    2011-12-01

    Statistical and fractal properties of the spatial distribution of earthquakes in the central zone of Chile are studied. In particular, data are shown to behave according to the well-known Gutenberg-Richter law. The fractal structure is evident for epicenters, not for hypocenters. The multifractal spectrum is also determined, both for the spatial distribution of epicenters and hypocenters. For negative values of the index of multifractal measure q, the multifractal spectrum, which usually cannot be reliably found from data, is calculated from a generalized Cantor-set model, which fits the multifractal spectrum for q > 0, a technique which has been previously applied for analysis of solar wind data.

  9. Radon measurements for earthquake prediction along the North Anatolian Fault Zone: a progress report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedmann, H.; Aric, K.; Gutdeutsch, R.; King, C.-Y.; Altay, C.; Sav, H.

    1988-01-01

    Radon (222Rn) concentration has been continuously measured since 1983 in groundwater at a spring and in subsurface soil gas at five sites along a 200 km segment of the North Anatolian Fault Zone near Bolu, Turkey. The groundwater radon concentration showed a significant increase before the Biga earthquake of magnitude 5.7 on 5 July 1983 at an epicentral distance of 350 km, and a long-term increase between March 1983 and April 1985. The soil-gas radon concentration showed large changes in 1985, apparently not meteorologically induced. The soil-gas and groundwater data at Bolu did not show any obvious correlation. ?? 1988.

  10. New evidence for a large earthquake in the New Madrid seismic zone between A.D. 1400 and 1670

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuttle, M. P.; Collier, J.; Wolf, L. W.; Lafferty, R. H., III

    1999-09-01

    In an integrated geological, archaeological, and geophysical study in the New Madrid seismic zone of the southeastern United States, we documented a prehistoric sand blow and related feeder dikes at an archaeological site near Steele, Missouri. Archaeological analysis combined with radiocarbon dating suggest that the earthquake-induced features formed between A.D. 1400 and 1670. This paleoseismic study provides the best evidence to date for a large earthquake occurring in the zone within ˜400 yr prior to the 1811 1812 New Madrid earthquake sequence. To determine an optimal location for excavating at the study site, we mapped surficial artifact density and conducted geophysical surveys. In doing so, we were able to reveal critical relationships for constraining the age of the prehistoric earthquake with minimal impact to the archaeological site.

  11. Long-Term Seismic Quiescences and Great Earthquakes in and Around the Japan Subduction Zone Between 1975 and 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsumata, Kei

    2016-10-01

    An earthquake catalog created by the International Seismological Center (ISC) was analyzed, including 3898 earthquakes located in and around Japan between January 1964 and June 2012 shallower than 60 km with the body wave magnitude of 5.0 or larger. Clustered events such as earthquake swarms and aftershocks were removed from the ISC catalog by using a stochastic declustering method based on Epidemic-Type Aftershock Sequence (ETAS) model. A detailed analysis of the earthquake catalog using a simple scanning technique (ZMAP) shows that the long-term seismic quiescences lasting more than 9 years were recognized ten times along the subduction zone in and around Japan. The three seismic quiescences among them were followed by three great earthquakes: the 1994 Hokkaido-toho-oki earthquake (M w 8.3), the 2003 Tokachi-oki earthquake (M w 8.3), and the 2011 Tohoku earthquake (M w 9.0). The remaining seven seismic quiescences were followed by no earthquake with the seismic moment M 0 ≥ 3.0 × 1021 Nm (M w 8.25), which are candidates of the false alarm. The 2006 Kurile Islands earthquake (M w 8.3) was not preceded by the significant seismic quiescence, which is a case of the surprise occurrence. As a result, when limited to earthquakes with the seismic moment of M 0 ≥ 3.0 × 1021 Nm, four earthquakes occurred between 1976 and 2012 in and around Japan, and three of them were preceded by the long-term seismic quiescence lasting more than 9 years.

  12. Long-Term Seismic Quiescences and Great Earthquakes in and Around the Japan Subduction Zone Between 1975 and 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsumata, Kei

    2017-06-01

    An earthquake catalog created by the International Seismological Center (ISC) was analyzed, including 3898 earthquakes located in and around Japan between January 1964 and June 2012 shallower than 60 km with the body wave magnitude of 5.0 or larger. Clustered events such as earthquake swarms and aftershocks were removed from the ISC catalog by using a stochastic declustering method based on Epidemic-Type Aftershock Sequence (ETAS) model. A detailed analysis of the earthquake catalog using a simple scanning technique (ZMAP) shows that the long-term seismic quiescences lasting more than 9 years were recognized ten times along the subduction zone in and around Japan. The three seismic quiescences among them were followed by three great earthquakes: the 1994 Hokkaido-toho-oki earthquake ( M w 8.3), the 2003 Tokachi-oki earthquake ( M w 8.3), and the 2011 Tohoku earthquake ( M w 9.0). The remaining seven seismic quiescences were followed by no earthquake with the seismic moment M 0 ≥ 3.0 × 1021 Nm ( M w 8.25), which are candidates of the false alarm. The 2006 Kurile Islands earthquake ( M w 8.3) was not preceded by the significant seismic quiescence, which is a case of the surprise occurrence. As a result, when limited to earthquakes with the seismic moment of M 0 ≥ 3.0 × 1021 Nm, four earthquakes occurred between 1976 and 2012 in and around Japan, and three of them were preceded by the long-term seismic quiescence lasting more than 9 years.

  13. Development of a Global Slope Dataset for Estimation of Landslide Occurrence Resulting from Earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Verdin, Kristine L.; Godt, Jonathan W.; Funk, Christopher C.; Pedreros, Diego; Worstell, Bruce; Verdin, James

    2007-01-01

    Landslides resulting from earthquakes can cause widespread loss of life and damage to critical infrastructure. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has developed an alarm system, PAGER (Prompt Assessment of Global Earthquakes for Response), that aims to provide timely information to emergency relief organizations on the impact of earthquakes. Landslides are responsible for many of the damaging effects following large earthquakes in mountainous regions, and thus data defining the topographic relief and slope are critical to the PAGER system. A new global topographic dataset was developed to aid in rapidly estimating landslide potential following large earthquakes. We used the remotely-sensed elevation data collected as part of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) to generate a slope dataset with nearly global coverage. Slopes from the SRTM data, computed at 3-arc-second resolution, were summarized at 30-arc-second resolution, along with statistics developed to describe the distribution of slope within each 30-arc-second pixel. Because there are many small areas lacking SRTM data and the northern limit of the SRTM mission was lat 60?N., statistical methods referencing other elevation data were used to fill the voids within the dataset and to extrapolate the data north of 60?. The dataset will be used in the PAGER system to rapidly assess the susceptibility of areas to landsliding following large earthquakes.

  14. Brief Communication: Correlation of global earthquake rates with temperature and sunspot cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajesh, R.; Tiwari, R. K.

    2014-04-01

    We studied the complex and non-stationary records of global earthquake employing the robust statistical and spectral techniques to understand the patterns, processes and periodicity. Singular Spectral Analysis (SSA) and correlation methods are used to quantify the nature of principle dynamical processes of global annual earthquake rates. The SSA decomposes the principle component of earthquake rates (first mode), which suggests that there is a linear increase in the yearly earthquake number from 1975 to 2005 accounting for 93% variance and may be identified with the earth's internal dynamical processes. Superimposed on this monotonic trend, there is an 11 years cyclic variation (second and third modes) accounting for 5% variance, which may corresponds to the well-known solar cycle. The remaining 2% higher order fluctuating components appears to be associated with artificial recharge and natural triggering forces (reservoir, tidal triggering etc.). The correlation study indicates that there is strong positive and negative correlation among the global earthquake rates with surface air temperature and sunspot numbers respectively. Interesting coupling mechanisms do exist, in which atmospheric circulations perturbed by the abrupt temperature variability might change the torques/momentum of inertia (earth's angular momentum) of the earth and thereby may offer the required inputs to trigger earthquake activities at the "critical phases".

  15. Multiple-event relocation of historic earthquakes along Blanco Transform Fault Zone, NE Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cronin, Vincent S.; Sverdrup, Keith A.

    2003-10-01

    Blanco Transform Fault Zone (BTFZ) is part of the Juan de Fuca Ridge system located ~200-500 km west of the Oregon coastline. Individually located epicenters reported by the International Seismological Center (ISC) and National Earthquake Information Center along the BTFZ are not well correlated spatially with the active transform boundary. More accurate locations of 120 mb >= 5.0 earthquakes relative to each other have been obtained using a joint-relocation process that yields improved epicenter locations relative to each other. Six of these earthquakes have been independently located using data from the U.S. Navy's SOSUS hydrophone array, enabling specification of a static correction to improve absolute locations for all 120 relocated epicenters relative to the BTFZ. The final locations average ~34.6 +/- 15.2 km toward azimuth 196° +/- 28° relative to the original ISC locations. The 95% confidence ellipses of most of the relocated epicenters fall on or very near active structural features along the BTFZ.

  16. Basin-centered asperities in great subduction zone earthquakes: A link between slip, subsidence, and subduction erosion?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wells, R.E.; Blakely, R.J.; Sugiyama, Y.; Scholl, D. W.; Dinterman, P.A.

    2003-01-01

    Published areas of high coseismic slip, or asperities, for 29 of the largest Circum-Pacific megathrust earthquakes are compared to forearc structure revealed by satellite free-air gravity, bathymetry, and seismic profiling. On average, 71% of an earthquake's seismic moment and 79% of its asperity area occur beneath the prominent gravity low outlining the deep-sea terrace; 57% of an earthquake's asperity area, on average, occurs beneath the forearc basins that lie within the deep-sea terrace. In SW Japan, slip in the 1923, 1944, 1946, and 1968 earthquakes was largely centered beneath five forearc basins whose landward edge overlies the 350??C isotherm on the plate boundary, the inferred downdip limit of the locked zone. Basin-centered coseismic slip also occurred along the Aleutian, Mexico, Peru, and Chile subduction zones but was ambiguous for the great 1964 Alaska earthquake. Beneath intrabasin structural highs, seismic slip tends to be lower, possibly due to higher temperatures and fluid pressures. Kilometers of late Cenozoic subsidence and crustal thinning above some of the source zones are indicated by seismic profiling and drilling and are thought to be caused by basal subduction erosion. The deep-sea terraces and basins may evolve not just by growth of the outer arc high but also by interseismic subsidence not recovered during earthquakes. Basin-centered asperities could indicate a link between subsidence, subduction erosion, and seismogenesis. Whatever the cause, forearc basins may be useful indicators of long-term seismic moment release. The source zone for Cascadia's 1700 A.D. earthquake contains five large, basin-centered gravity lows that may indicate potential asperities at depth. The gravity gradient marking the inferred downdip limit to large coseismic slip lies offshore, except in northwestern Washington, where the low extends landward beneath the coast. Transverse gravity highs between the basins suggest that the margin is seismically segmented and

  17. Simulations of seismic hazard for the Pacific Northwest of the United States from earthquakes associated with the Cascadia subduction zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Petersen, M.D.; Cramer, C.H.; Frankel, A.D.

    2002-01-01

    We investigate the impact of different rupture and attenuation models for the Cascadia subduction zone by simulating seismic hazard models for the Pacific Northwest of the U.S. at 2% probability of exceedance in 50 years. We calculate the sensitivity of hazard (probabilistic ground motions) to the source parameters and the attenuation relations for both intraslab and interface earthquakes and present these in the framework of the standard USGS hazard model that includes crustal earthquakes. Our results indicate that allowing the deep intraslab earthquakes to occur anywhere along the subduction zone increases the peak ground acceleration hazard near Portland, Oregon by about 20%. Alternative attenuation relations for deep earthquakes can result in ground motions that differ by a factor of two. The hazard uncertainty for the plate interface and intraslab earthquakes is analyzed through a Monte-Carlo logic tree approach and indicates a seismic hazard exceeding 1 g (0.2 s spectral acceleration) consistent with the U.S. National Seismic Hazard Maps in western Washington, Oregon, and California and an overall coefficient of variation that ranges from 0.1 to 0.4. Sensitivity studies indicate that the paleoseismic chronology and the magnitude of great plate interface earthquakes contribute significantly to the hazard uncertainty estimates for this region. Paleoseismic data indicate that the mean earthquake recurrence interval for great earthquakes is about 500 years and that it has been 300 years since the last great earthquake. We calculate the probability of such a great earthquake along the Cascadia plate interface to be about 14% when considering a time-dependent model and about 10% when considering a time-independent Poisson model during the next 50-year interval.

  18. Multi-surface Earthquake Rupture Recorded in Pseudotachylyte Vein Geometries, Norumbega Shear Zone, southern Maine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, C.; Rowe, C. D.; Pollock, S. G.; Swanson, M.; Tarling, M.; Backeberg, N. R.; Coulson, S.; Barshi, N.; Bate, C.; Dascher-Cousineau, K.; Scibek, J.; Harrichhausen, N.; Timofeev, A.; Rakoczy, P.; Nisbet, H.; Castro, A.; Smith, H.

    2015-12-01

    Earthquake rupture surfaces are typically treated as single rupture planes. However, the observation of four linked, non-parallel to sub-parallel slip surfaces on a mining induced earthquake in 2004 shows that rupture geometries may be more complicated (Heesakkers et al., 2011). Multiple pseudotachylyte-bearing fault surfaces are exposed within a 1.1 km wide mylonite zone of the Paleozoic Norumbega fault system. The pseudotachylytes are present in two juxtaposed mylonite zones: the Ray Corner mylonite and a mylonite derived from Scarboro Formation metavolcanics. The Ray Corner mylonite crosscuts pelitic schists of the Cape Elizabeth Formation, at upper greenschist-facies conditions (quartz + feldspar + chlorite + muscovite ± titanite ± pyrite). The pseudotachylyte veins formed late in the deformational history, during a period of predominantly brittle dextral offset. The pseudotachylytes are cryptocrystalline and have rounded porphyroclasts of quartz and feldspar. Microstructural observations show evidence for static and dynamic recrystallization overprinting the primary quench textures, suggesting that previous generations of rupture surfaces have been recycled into the mylonitic fabric (Price et al., 2012). Many of the pseudotachylyte veins have a sharp boundary on one side and are poorly defined on the other, providing insight to the propagation direction. This confirms that the paleo-earthquake ruptures occurred at conditions where quartz and feldspar were able to deform plastically, near the base of the seismogenic zone. Using differential GPS, we mapped the geometry of pseudotachylyte fault veins, injection veins, and slip surface intersections. At Ray Corner, there are 7 layer-parallel pseudotachylytes in a 4 m wide zone with linking and subsequent oblique pseudotachylytes. Some intersections between pseudotachylytes are dilational, depending on the intersection angle and relative displacement on the two faults. At these sites, pseudotachylyte melt sourced

  19. Mechanical and Statistical Evidence of Human-Caused Earthquakes - A Global Data Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klose, C. D.

    2012-12-01

    The causality of large-scale geoengineering activities and the occurrence of earthquakes with magnitudes of up to M=8 is discussed and mechanical and statistical evidence is provided. The earthquakes were caused by artificial water reservoir impoundments, underground and open-pit mining, coastal management, hydrocarbon production and fluid injections/extractions. The presented global earthquake catalog has been recently published in the Journal of Seismology and is available for the public at www.cdklose.com. The data show evidence that geomechanical relationships exist with statistical significance between a) seismic moment magnitudes of observed earthquakes, b) anthropogenic mass shifts on the Earth's crust, and c) lateral distances of the earthquake hypocenters to the locations of the mass shifts. Research findings depend on uncertainties, in particular, of source parameter estimations of seismic events before instrumental recoding. First analyses, however, indicate that that small- to medium size earthquakes (M6) tend to be triggered. The rupture propagation of triggered events might be dominated by pre-existing tectonic stress conditions. Besides event specific evidence, large earthquakes such as China's 2008 M7.9 Wenchuan earthquake fall into a global pattern and can not be considered as outliers or simply seen as an act of god. Observations also indicate that every second seismic event tends to occur after a decade, while pore pressure diffusion seems to only play a role when injecting fluids deep underground. The chance of an earthquake to nucleate after two or 20 years near an area with a significant mass shift is 25% or 75% respectively. Moreover, causative effects of seismic activities highly depend on the tectonic stress regime in the Earth's crust in which geoengineering takes place.

  20. Coastal evidence for Holocene subduction-zone earthquakes and tsunamis in central Chile

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dure, Tina; Cisternas, Marco; Horton, Benjamin; Ely, Lisa; Nelson, Alan R.; Wesson, Robert L.; Pilarczyk, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    The ∼500-year historical record of seismicity along the central Chile coast (30–34°S) is characterized by a series of ∼M 8.0–8.5 earthquakes followed by low tsunamis (<4 m) occurring on the megathrust about every 80 years. One exception is the AD 1730 great earthquake (M 9.0–9.5) and high tsunami (>10 m), but the frequency of such large events is unknown. We extend the seismic history of central Chile through a study of a lowland stratigraphic sequence along the metropolitan coast north of Valparaíso (33°S). At this site, higher relative sea level during the mid Holocene created a tidal marsh and the accommodation space necessary for sediment that preserves earthquake and tsunami evidence. Within this 2600-yr-long sequence, we traced six laterally continuous sand beds probably deposited by high tsunamis. Plant remains that underlie the sand beds were radiocarbon dated to 6200, 5600, 5000, 4400, 3800, and 3700 cal yr BP. Sediment properties and diatom assemblages of the sand beds—for example, anomalous marine planktonic diatoms and upward fining of silt-sized diatom valves—point to a marine sediment source and high-energy deposition. Grain-size analysis shows a strong similarity between inferred tsunami deposits and modern coastal sediment. Upward fining sequences characteristic of suspension deposition are present in five of the six sand beds. Despite the lack of significant lithologic changes between the sedimentary units under- and overlying tsunami deposits, we infer that the increase in freshwater siliceous microfossils in overlying units records coseismic uplift concurrent with the deposition of five of the sand beds. During our mid-Holocene window of evidence preservation, the mean recurrence interval of earthquakes and tsunamis is ∼500 years. Our findings imply that the frequency of historical earthquakes in central Chile is not representative of the greatest earthquakes and tsunamis that the central Chilean subduction zone has

  1. Earthquake Rate Changes and Interevent Distance Distributions in the Brawley Seismic Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llenos, A. L.; Michael, A. J.

    2013-12-01

    The Brawley Seismic Zone (BSZ), located in the Salton Trough of southern California, has a long history of earthquake swarm activity and a high level of geothermal energy exploitation activity. A swarm occurred in August 2012 near the North Brawley Geothermal Field (NBGF), which raised the question of whether it and other recent earthquake rate changes may have been induced by fluid extraction and injection activity (e.g., Chen and Shearer, JGR, 2011; Brodsky and Lajoie, Science, 2013). We explore this issue by examining earthquake rate changes and interevent distance distributions in two geothermal fields in the region, the NBGF and the Salton Sea Geothermal Field (SSGF). In Oklahoma and Arkansas, where considerable wastewater injection occurs, increases in background seismicity rate and aftershock productivity and decreases in interevent distance have been diagnostic of fluid-injection induced seismicity (Llenos and Michael, BSSA, in press). Here we test if similar changes occur that may be associated with fluid injection and extraction at the two geothermal fields. We identify clusters in earthquake catalogs from 1981-2012 in the SSGF and the NBGF, then compute interevent distances within each cluster. Preliminary results suggest that in both fields, the interevent spacing does not appear to change significantly with the start of fluid injection or extraction in 1982. We also use the stochastic Epidemic-Type Aftershock Sequence (ETAS) model (Ogata, JASA, 1988) to determine if changes in the underlying earthquake driving processes, either natural or due to geothermal exploitation activities, have occurred in the BSZ, as shown by statistically significant changes in the model parameters. While increases in the background seismicity rate and aftershock productivity parameters were associated with fluid-injection induced earthquake rate changes in Oklahoma and Arkansas, preliminary results indicate that similar changes are not as apparent in the BSZ. The higher heat

  2. Microscale anatomy of the 1999 Chi-Chi earthquake fault zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boullier, Anne-Marie; Yeh, En-Chao; Boutareaud, SéBastien; Song, Sheng-Rong; Tsai, Chin-Ho

    2009-03-01

    Two TCDP boreholes A and B were drilled in the northern part of the Chelungpu thrust fault where the Chi-Chi earthquake (21 September 1999, Mw 7.6) showed large displacement, low ground acceleration, and high slip velocity. In this paper, we describe the microstructures of the Chi-Chi Principal Slip Zone (PSZ) within black gouges localized at 1111 m depth in Hole A and at 1136 m depth in Hole B. In the FZA1111 the PSZ is a 2 cm-thick isotropic clay-rich gouge which contains aggregates formed by central clasts coated by clay cortex (clay-clast aggregates (CCAs)) and fragments of older gouges segregated in the top third of the PSZ. In FZB1136 the PSZ is 3 mm thick and is characterized by a foliated gouge displaying an alternation of clay-rich and clast-rich layers. The presence of CCAs, plucked underlying gouge fragments, gouge injections, and the occurrence of reverse grain size segregation of large clasts in the FZA1111 isotropic gouge suggest that the gouge was fluidized as a result of frictional heating and thermal pressurization. The foliated gouge in FZB1136 may be one locus of strain localization and related heat production. Small calcite veins present above the isotropic FZA1111 PSZ gouge and, characterized by an increasing strain with increasing distance away from the PSZ, are attributed to coseismic fluid escape from the pressurized gouge. The observed microstructures are interpreted in view of their seismic implications for the Chi-Chi earthquake in terms of slip weakening mechanisms by thermal pressurization, gouge fluidization, coseismic fluid distribution, and postseismic slip. Above the PSZ, several layers of compacted gouges containing deformed CCAs and gouge fragments correspond to several PSZ of past earthquakes similar to the Chi-Chi earthquake and display a fault-parallel cleavage resulting from a low strain rate pressure solution deformation mechanism that may be correlated to the interseismic periods.

  3. Stuck in the Mud? Earthquake Propagation Through Clay-rich Fault Zones (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faulkner, D. R.; Mitchell, T. M.; Hirose, T.; Shimamoto, T.

    2009-12-01

    Many major faults that are postulated to host earthquake ruptures contain a clay-rich fault core that shows a localized principal slip surface. Other clay-rich fault zones appear to show distributed deformation that might be related to strain/velocity hardening and fault creep. Indeed, the frictional behaviour of most clays at low slip velocities is velocity strengthening, supporting the notion that earthquake nucleation on clay-rich faults is difficult. We have performed high velocity frictional experiments on a range of common clays, both wet and dry, at a slip velocity of 1.3 m/s and normal stresses ranging from 0.8 to 3.25 MPa. In the dry tests, peak frictional coefficients are reached almost immediately and are comparable to those measured in low velocity, low normal stress tests (0.5 μm/s) on the same material. This is followed by prolonged weakening over slip distances of several metres to friction coefficients of ~0.2. In the wet tests, the peak friction is substantially reduced and the corresponding slip weakening distance reduces to very low values. This is despite the wet and dry frictional coefficients in low velocity, low normal stress tests being comparable. We infer from our results that thermal pressurization is responsible for the almost immediate weakening of the wet samples. These measurements suggest that earthquakes will propagate easily through clay-rich regions of the rupture plane, with minimal fracture energy. However, the nucleation of the rupture may have to occur on clay-poor regions of the fault plane where velocity weakening friction is dominant. However, these conclusions do not explain why earthquake ruptures appear to arrest in regions where fault creep dominates, for example, in the central portion of the San Andreas fault.

  4. Coseismic and postseismic stress rotations due to great subduction zone earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hardebeck, Jeanne L.

    2012-01-01

    The three largest recent great subduction zone earthquakes (2011 M9.0 Tohoku, Japan; 2010 M8.8 Maule, Chile; and 2004 M9.2 Sumatra-Andaman) exhibit similar coseismic rotations of the principal stress axes. Prior to each mainshock, the maximum compressive stress axis was shallowly plunging, while immediately after the mainshock, both the maximum and minimum compressive stress axes plunge at ~45°. Dipping faults can be oriented for either reverse or normal faulting in this post-mainshock stress field, depending on their dip, explaining the observed normal-faulting aftershocks without requiring a complete reversal of the stress field. The significant stress rotations imply near-complete stress drop in the mainshocks, with >80% of the pre-mainshock stress relieved in the Tohoku and Maule earthquakes and in the northern part of the Sumatra-Andaman rupture. The southern part of the Sumatra-Andaman rupture relieved ~60% of the pre-mainshock stress. The stress axes rotated back rapidly in the months following the Tohoku and Maule mainshocks, and similarly in the southern part of the Sumatra-Andaman rupture. A rapid postseismic rotation is possible because the near-complete stress drop leaves very little “background” stress at the beginning of the postseismic reloading. In contrast, there has been little or no postseismic rotation in the northern part of the Sumatra-Andaman rupture over the 7 years since the mainshock. All M ≥8.0 subduction earthquakes since 1990 with an adequate number of pre- and post-mainshock events were evaluated, and not all show similar coseismic stress rotations. Deeper earthquakes exhibit smaller coseismic stress rotations, likely due to increasing deviatoric stress with depth.

  5. Origin and formation of carbonaceous material veins in the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake fault zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiang; Li, Haibing; Zhang, Jinjiang; Zhang, Bo

    2016-02-01

    This paper establishes a reference data set of carbonaceous materials (CMs) from the active fault zone of the Longmen Shan fault belt that ruptured in the 2008 Mw7.9 Wenchuan earthquake and presents an application of these data for studies of both other exhumed carbonaceous-rich fault zones and deep-drilling cores. The CMs distributed in the active fault zone are found as narrow veins and located along the slip surfaces. Microstructural observation shows that the carbonaceous material veins (CMVs) are located along slip surfaces in the fault gouge zones. Some CMVs have a cataclastic fabric, and their branches intrude into voids around the slip surfaces. Raman spectra of the CMVs show a wide (full width at half maximum >200 cm-1) D-peak at ~1345 cm-1 (defect peak), which is much lower than the O-peak at ~1595 cm-1 (ordered peak), indicating a metamorphic temperature of zeolite facies or lower than 250 °C. In addition, the stable carbon isotopic compositions (δ13C values) of the CMVs, ranging from -23.4 to -26.4‰, are very similar to that of the kerogen collected from the Late Triassic Xujiahe Formation in Sichuan Basin. Given the data at which it may be formed, the Xujiahe Formation is the most likely origin of CMs for the CMVs, and it seems that some CMVs in the fault zone were crushed and intruded into the voids during coseismic events, possibly driven by an enhanced pore fluid pressure. Since graphitization is suggested as an indicator of transient frictional heating in this area, our study providing a reference data set of CMs would help future CM-rich fault-zone research to retrieve seismic signatures presumably occurring in the Longmen Shan fault zone belt.

  6. Aftershocks illuminate the 2011 Mineral, Virginia, earthquake causative fault zone and nearby active faults

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Horton, Jr., J. Wright; Shah, Anjana K.; McNamara, Daniel E.; Snyder, Stephen L.; Carter, Aina M

    2015-01-01

    Deployment of temporary seismic stations after the 2011 Mineral, Virginia (USA), earthquake produced a well-recorded aftershock sequence. The majority of aftershocks are in a tabular cluster that delineates the previously unknown Quail fault zone. Quail fault zone aftershocks range from ~3 to 8 km in depth and are in a 1-km-thick zone striking ~036° and dipping ~50°SE, consistent with a 028°, 50°SE main-shock nodal plane having mostly reverse slip. This cluster extends ~10 km along strike. The Quail fault zone projects to the surface in gneiss of the Ordovician Chopawamsic Formation just southeast of the Ordovician–Silurian Ellisville Granodiorite pluton tail. The following three clusters of shallow (<3 km) aftershocks illuminate other faults. (1) An elongate cluster of early aftershocks, ~10 km east of the Quail fault zone, extends 8 km from Fredericks Hall, strikes ~035°–039°, and appears to be roughly vertical. The Fredericks Hall fault may be a strand or splay of the older Lakeside fault zone, which to the south spans a width of several kilometers. (2) A cluster of later aftershocks ~3 km northeast of Cuckoo delineates a fault near the eastern contact of the Ordovician Quantico Formation. (3) An elongate cluster of late aftershocks ~1 km northwest of the Quail fault zone aftershock cluster delineates the northwest fault (described herein), which is temporally distinct, dips more steeply, and has a more northeastward strike. Some aftershock-illuminated faults coincide with preexisting units or structures evident from radiometric anomalies, suggesting tectonic inheritance or reactivation.

  7. Shallow low-velocity zone of the San Jacinto fault from local earthquake waveform modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hongfeng; Zhu, Lupei

    2010-10-01

    We developed a method to determine the depth extent of low-velocity zone (LVZ) associated with a fault zone (FZ) using S-wave precursors from local earthquakes. The precursors are diffracted S waves around the edges of LVZ and their relative amplitudes to the direct S waves are sensitive to the LVZ depth. We applied the method to data recorded by three temporary arrays across three branches of the San Jacinto FZ. The FZ dip was constrained by differential traveltimes of P waves between stations at two side of the FZ. Other FZ parameters (width and velocity contrast) were determined by modelling waveforms of direct and FZ-reflected P and S waves. We found that the LVZ of the Buck Ridge fault branch has a width of ~150 m with a 30-40 per cent reduction in Vp and a 50-60 per cent reduction in Vs. The fault dips 70 +/- 5° to southwest and its LVZ extends only to 2 +/- 1 km in depth. The LVZ of the Clark Valley fault branch has a width of ~200 m with 40 per cent reduction in Vp and 50 per cent reduction in Vs. The Coyote Creek branch is nearly vertical and has a LVZ of ~150 m in width and of 25 per cent reduction in Vp and 50 per cent reduction in Vs. The LVZs of these three branches are not centred at the surface fault trace but are located to their northeast, indicating asymmetric damage during earthquakes.

  8. On the duration of seismic motion incident onto the Valley of Mexico for subduction zone earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, Nikolai M.; Olsen, Kim B.; Singh, K.

    2002-11-01

    We have used finite difference simulations in 2-D models of the lithosphere to estimate the duration of long-period (>2 s) ground motion incident onto the Valley of Mexico for subduction zone earthquakes. Our simulations suggest that two heterogeneous structures extend the duration of the ground motion between the subduction zone and Mexico City by more than 1 min: (1) the Mexican Volcanic Belt and (2) two low-velocity layers in the coastal region; the accretionary prism and the water layer. The duration generated by a crustal model including these structures is similar to that for earthquake records observed in between the coast and Mexico City. In the Valley of Mexico, our models including only regional-scale heterogeneity reproduce approximately one half of the observed duration. The results suggest that both the regional- and the local-scale low-velocity structures must be taken into account in order to explain the observed extended signal duration in the Valley of Mexico.

  9. Geophysical reconnaissance of earthquake-induced liquefaction features in the New Madrid seismic zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, L. W.; Collier, J.; Tuttle, M.; Bodin, P.

    1998-07-01

    Electrical resistivity and electromagnetic induction surveys performed at a site in the New Madrid seismic zone in the central United States demonstrate the ability of geophysical instrumentation to determine the location, size and orientation of earthquake-induced liquefaction features in the subsurface. Liquefaction features, including sand blows and sand dikes, are common within the Late Pleistocene and Holocene floodplain of the Mississippi River. These features and their relationship to host sediments provide important information about historic and prehistoric earthquakes and their source parameters, such as timing, epicentral location and magnitude. Following the geophysical surveys, two excavations were made and documented for a paleoseismic study. Sediment samples of soils, Native American occupation horizons, and liquefaction features within the trenches were collected for sedimentological and archeological analyses and compared with the geophysical observations. Measurements of the heights of cotton plants growing at the site were also taken, since growth appeared to reflect variations in the texture and thickness of soils developed on fluvial deposits and sand blows. The excavations, along with sedimentological and agricultural data, provided a means for calibrating sediment characteristics with the geophysical interpretations and for developing criteria to distinguish anomalies due to facies changes from anomalies related to liquefaction features. Disruption of the local sedimentological trends by an en echelon arrangement of sand dikes and related sand blows is seen in the combined geophysical and agricultural data. Results of the surveys indicate that constant-spread resistivity profiling (Wenner array) was an effective method for locating and mapping shallow sand dikes, some with widths of less than 50 cm. The electromagnetic induction method (EM-31), while less sensitive to dike locations, was useful in characterizing depositional facies changes by

  10. The effect of compliant prisms on subduction zone earthquakes and tsunamis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotto, Gabriel C.; Dunham, Eric M.; Jeppson, Tamara N.; Tobin, Harold J.

    2017-01-01

    Earthquakes generate tsunamis by coseismically deforming the seafloor, and that deformation is largely controlled by the shallow rupture process. Therefore, in order to better understand how earthquakes generate tsunamis, one must consider the material structure and frictional properties of the shallowest part of the subduction zone, where ruptures often encounter compliant sedimentary prisms. Compliant prisms have been associated with enhanced shallow slip, seafloor deformation, and tsunami heights, particularly in the context of tsunami earthquakes. To rigorously quantify the role compliant prisms play in generating tsunamis, we perform a series of numerical simulations that directly couple dynamic rupture on a dipping thrust fault to the elastodynamic response of the Earth and the acoustic response of the ocean. Gravity is included in our simulations in the context of a linearized Eulerian description of the ocean, which allows us to model tsunami generation and propagation, including dispersion and related nonhydrostatic effects. Our simulations span a three-dimensional parameter space of prism size, prism compliance, and sub-prism friction - specifically, the rate-and-state parameter b - a that determines velocity-weakening or velocity-strengthening behavior. We find that compliant prisms generally slow rupture velocity and, for larger prisms, generate tsunamis more efficiently than subduction zones without prisms. In most but not all cases, larger, more compliant prisms cause greater amounts of shallow slip and larger tsunamis. Furthermore, shallow friction is also quite important in determining overall slip; increasing sub-prism b - a enhances slip everywhere along the fault. Counterintuitively, we find that in simulations with large prisms and velocity-strengthening friction at the base of the prism, increasing prism compliance reduces rather than enhances shallow slip and tsunami wave height.

  11. Subduction zone and crustal dynamics of western Washington; a tectonic model for earthquake hazards evaluation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stanley, Dal; Villaseñor, Antonio; Benz, Harley

    1999-01-01

    The Cascadia subduction zone is extremely complex in the western Washington region, involving local deformation of the subducting Juan de Fuca plate and complicated block structures in the crust. It has been postulated that the Cascadia subduction zone could be the source for a large thrust earthquake, possibly as large as M9.0. Large intraplate earthquakes from within the subducting Juan de Fuca plate beneath the Puget Sound region have accounted for most of the energy release in this century and future such large earthquakes are expected. Added to these possible hazards is clear evidence for strong crustal deformation events in the Puget Sound region near faults such as the Seattle fault, which passes through the southern Seattle metropolitan area. In order to understand the nature of these individual earthquake sources and their possible interrelationship, we have conducted an extensive seismotectonic study of the region. We have employed P-wave velocity models developed using local earthquake tomography as a key tool in this research. Other information utilized includes geological, paleoseismic, gravity, magnetic, magnetotelluric, deformation, seismicity, focal mechanism and geodetic data. Neotectonic concepts were tested and augmented through use of anelastic (creep) deformation models based on thin-plate, finite-element techniques developed by Peter Bird, UCLA. These programs model anelastic strain rate, stress, and velocity fields for given rheological parameters, variable crust and lithosphere thicknesses, heat flow, and elevation. Known faults in western Washington and the main Cascadia subduction thrust were incorporated in the modeling process. Significant results from the velocity models include delineation of a previously studied arch in the subducting Juan de Fuca plate. The axis of the arch is oriented in the direction of current subduction and asymmetrically deformed due to the effects of a northern buttress mapped in the velocity models. This

  12. 100+ years of instrumental seismology: the example of the ISC-GEM Global Earthquake Instrumental Catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storchak, Dmitry; Di Giacomo, Domenico

    2015-04-01

    Systematic seismological observations of earthquakes using seismic instruments on a global scale began more than 100 years ago. Since then seismologists made many discoveries about the Earth interior and the physics of the earthquakes, also thanks to major developments in the seismic instrumentation deployed around the world. Besides, since the establishment of the first global networks (Milne and Jesuit networks), seismologists around the world stored and exchanged the results of routine observations (e.g., picking of arrival times, amplitude-period measurements, etc.) or more sophisticated analyses (e.g., moment tensor inversion) in seismological bulletins/catalogues. With a project funded by the GEM Foundation (www.globalquakemodel.org), the ISC and the Team of International Experts released a new global earthquake catalogue, the ISC-GEM Global Instrumental Earthquake Catalogue (1900 2009) (www.isc.ac.uk/iscgem/index.php), which, differently from previous global seismic catalogues, has the unique feature of covering the entire period of instrumental seismology with locations and magnitude re-assessed using modern approaches for the global earthquakes selected for processing (in the current version approximately 21,000). During the 110 years covered by the ISC-GEM catalogue many seismological developments occurred in terms of instrumentation, seismological practice and knowledge of the physics of the earthquakes. In this contribution we give a brief overview of the major milestones characterizing the last 100+ years of instrumental seismology that were relevant for the production of the ISC-GEM catalogue and the major challenges we faced to obtain a catalogue as homogenous as possible.

  13. A Robust Scheme for the Global Earthquake Early Warning Based on Characteristic Frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yu-Chang; Chiao, Ling-Yun; Wu, Cheng-Ju

    2017-04-01

    Earthquake hazards mitigation have always been an important issue. Prompt and rapid high precision magnitude estimation is essential to achieve the goal of effective early warning. However, the current state of the method including the maximum predominant period (τpmax), the vertical displacement of P-wave (Pd), and the τc × Pdmethod has reached a standstill for nearly a decade. The major shortcoming is that these methods are not quite applicable for large earthquakes (M>7). Therefore, a new magnitude estimation method for earthquake early warning is crucial and is needed for human preventing loss and casualties in the large earthquakes. Here we demonstrate a robust scheme based on the characteristic frequency. Our result shows a linear relation between the momentum magnitude and the characteristic frequency of P-wave which appears within the first few seconds. This method requires fewer calculations and doesn't need to apply any filter to obtain better results, so the data processing time needed for the real-time earthquake early warning system is greatly reduced. This method also indicates strong applicability for estimating earthquakes with magnitude larger than 7. We demonstrate a robust scheme of global earthquake early warning.

  14. The ISC-GEM Global Instrumental Earthquake Catalogue (1900-2009): Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storchak, D. A.; Di Giacomo, D.; Engdahl, E. R.; Harris, J.; Bondár, I.; Lee, W. H. K.; Bormann, P.; Villaseñor, A.

    2015-02-01

    In this introductory article we give a general description of the ISC-GEM Global Instrumental Earthquake Catalogue (1900-2009). We also provide the background for four further articles that describe the effort in collecting and digitizing parametric earthquake bulletin data as well as the methodologies developed to compute homogeneous earthquake parameters. The result of the two and a half year project is a catalogue of approximately 20,000 large earthquakes covering 110 years with hypocentres and uncertainties computed using the same technique and velocity model. We show that the overall homogeneity of the main earthquake parameters in the catalogue was achieved despite changes in instrumentation and routine measurement practices concurrent with developments in instrumental seismology from almost a ground level to its current state. For each earthquake, MW magnitude values and uncertainties were computed either based on available estimates of seismic moment or using new empirical relationships between MW, MS and mb. Further important results of this project include the electronic availability of a considerable volume of seismic wave arrival time and amplitude measurements from early instrumental printed station bulletins. These newly recovered amplitude measurements provided a basis for computation of many previously unavailable MS magnitudes with uncertainties. In this article we describe why such a catalogue is required for a comprehensive assessment of global and regional seismic hazard. We also describe other potential uses of the catalogue in many other fields of Earth Sciences. We discuss the catalogue availability and lay out the plans of further development.

  15. Discovery of amorphous carbon veins in the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake fault zone: implications for the fault weakening mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, B.; Li, H.

    2013-12-01

    The 2008 Wenchuan earthquake generated 270- and 80-km-long surface ruptures along Yingxiu-Beichuan fault and Guanxian-Anxian fault, respectively. At the outcrop near Hongkou village, southwest segment of Yingxiu-Beichuan rupture, network black amorphous carbon veins were discovered near fault planes in the 190-m-wide earthquake fault zone. These veins are mainly composed of ultrafine- and fine-grained amorphous carbon, usually narrower than 5mm and injected into faults and cracks as far as several meter. Flowage structures like asymmetrical structures around few stiff rock fragments indicate materials flew when the veins formed. Fluidization of cataclastic amorphous carbon and the powerful driving force in the veins imply high pore pressure built up during earthquakes. High pore pressure solution and graphite reported in the fault gouge (Togo et al., 2011) can lead very low dynamic friction during the Wenchuan earthquake. This deduction hypothesis is in accordance with the very low thermal abnormal measured on the principle fault zone following the Wenchuan earthquake (Mori et al., 2010). Furthermore, network amorphous carbon veins of different generations suggest similar weakening mechanism also worked on historical earthquakes in Longmenshan fault zone. Reference: Brodsky, E. E., Li, H., Mori, J. J., Kano, Y., and Xue, L., 2012, Frictional Stress Measured Through Temperature Profiles in the Wenchuan Scientific Fault Zone Drilling Project. American Geophysical Union, Fall Meeting. San Francisco, T44B-07 Li, H., Xu, Z., Si, J., Pei, J., Song, S., Sun, Z., and Chevalier, M., 2012, Wenchuan Earthquake Fault Scientific Drilling program (WFSD): Overview and Results. American Geophysical Union, Fall Meeting. San Francisco, T44B-01 Mori, J. J., Li, H., Wang, H., Kano, Y., Pei, J., Xu, Z., and Brodsky, E. E., 2010, Temperature measurements in the WFSD-1 borehole following the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake (MW7.9). American Geophysical Union, Fall Meeting. San Francisco, T53E

  16. Assessment of maximum earthquake potential of the Kopili fault zone in northeast India and strong ground motion simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutar, Anup K.; Verma, Mithila; Pandey, Ajeet P.; Bansal, B. K.; Rajendra Prasad, P.; Rama Rao, P.; Sharma, Babita

    2017-10-01

    Maximum magnitude (MM) earthquake in the Kopili fault zone of North-East India has been assessed using different approaches, which are primarily dependent on various parameters such as fault geometry, slip rate, geodetic moment rate, and convergence rate. The analyses reveal that the source zone has accumulated strain energy, during the last 72 years since 1943, enough to produce a strong earthquake of magnitude ≥ 7. On supplementing with the historical data, we conclude Mw7.3 as the maximum potential earthquake for the Kopili source zone. Such large earthquake, on its occurrence, may cause widespread significant ground shakings and damage to infrastructures in the study region. We, therefore, also simulated strong ground motion, in the form of peak ground acceleration (PGA), for the Mw7.3 potential earthquake using Empirical Green's Function (EGF) approach for ten different sites. In the analysis, an earthquake of magnitude Mw6.5, which has been simulated using a recorded Mw5.3 earthquake, is used as Green's Function. The two-step approach is adopted in the simulation process, as the required criteria, i.e., moment ratio of < 1000 between the target potential event (Mw7.3) and the element event (Mw5.3) could not be met. We found that the cities like Tezpur, Masamari, Tumuki, Dhekiajuli, Nagaon, Bomdila, Udalguri, Seppa, Hajoi, Behali, Guwahati, and Itanagar that are located ∼ 60-130 km from the source zone may experience very strong to moderate ground shaking with PGA ranging between 0.36-0.14 g. However, the cities located in the distance range of ∼ 130 - 300 km from the source, namely Jorhat, Ziro, Mokokchung, Dhubri, and Kokrajhar are expected to have low ground shaking with PGA < 0.14 g. The study therefore provides valuable insights to the likely seismic hazard scenario in north-east India.

  17. Teleseismic constraints on the geological environment of deep episodic slow earthquakes in subduction zone forearcs: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audet, Pascal; Kim, YoungHee

    2016-02-01

    More than a decade after the discovery of deep episodic slow slip and tremor, or slow earthquakes, at subduction zones, much research has been carried out to investigate the structural and seismic properties of the environment in which they occur. Slow earthquakes generally occur on the megathrust fault some distance downdip of the great earthquake seismogenic zone in the vicinity of the mantle wedge corner, where three major structural elements are in contact: the subducting oceanic crust, the overriding forearc crust and the continental mantle. In this region, thermo-petrological models predict significant fluid production from the dehydrating oceanic crust and mantle due to prograde metamorphic reactions, and their consumption by hydrating the mantle wedge. These fluids are expected to affect the dynamic stability of the megathrust fault and enable slow slip by increasing pore-fluid pressure and/or reducing friction in fault gouges. Resolving the fine-scale structure of the deep megathrust fault and the in situ distribution of fluids where slow earthquakes occur is challenging, and most advances have been made using teleseismic scattering techniques (e.g., receiver functions). In this paper we review the teleseismic structure of six well-studied subduction zones (three hot, i.e., Cascadia, southwest Japan, central Mexico, and three cool, i.e., Costa Rica, Alaska, and Hikurangi) that exhibit slow earthquake processes and discuss the evidence of structural and geological controls on the slow earthquake behavior. We conclude that changes in the mechanical properties of geological materials downdip of the seismogenic zone play a dominant role in controlling slow earthquake behavior, and that near-lithostatic pore-fluid pressures near the megathrust fault may be a necessary but insufficient condition for their occurrence.

  18. Investigation of complex slow slip behavior along the Hikurangi subduction zone with earthquake simulator RSQSim

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colella, H.; Ellis, S. M.; Williams, C. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Hikurangi subduction zone (New Zealand) is one of many subudction zones that exhibit slow slip behavior. Geodetic observations along the Hikurangi subduction zone are unusual in that not only does the subduction zone exhibit periodic slow slip events at "typical" subduction-zone depths of 25-50 km along the southern part of the margin, but also much shallower depths of 8-15 km along the northern part of the margin. Furthermore, there is evidence for interplay between slow slip events at these different depth ranges (between the deep and shallow events) along the central part of the margin, and some of the slow slip behavior is observed along regions of the interface that were previously considered locked, which raises questions about the slip behavior of this region. This study employs the earthquake simulator, RSQSim, to explore variations in the effective normal stress (i.e., stress after the addition of pore fluid pressures) and the frictional instability necessary to generate the complex slow slip events observed along the Hikurangi margin. Preliminary results suggest that to generate slow slip events with similar recurrence intervals to those observed the effective normal stress (MPa) is 3x higher in the south than the north, 6-9MPa versus 2-3MPa, respectively. Results also suggest that, at a minimum, that some overlap along the central margin must exist between the slow slip sections in the north and south to reproduce the types of slip events observed along the Hikurangi subduction zone. To further validate the results from the simulations, Okada solutions for surface displacements will be compared to geodetic solution to more accurately constrain the areas in which slip behavior varies and the cause(s) for the variation(s).

  19. [Characteristics of Raman spectra of minerals in the veins of Wenchuan earthquake fault zone].

    PubMed

    Xie, Chao; Zhou, Ben-gang; Liu, Lei; Zhou, Xiao-cheng; Yi, Li; Chen, Zhi; Cui, Yue-ju; Li, Jing; Chen, Zheng-wei; Du, Jian-guo

    2015-01-01

    Quartz in the veins at the Shenxigou section of Wenchuan earthquake fault zone was investigated by micro-Raman spectroscopic measurement, and the distribution of compressive stress in the fault zone was estimated by the frequency shifts of the 464 cm-1 vibrational mode of quartz grains in the veins. It was showed that the 464 cm-1 peak arising from the quartz grains in the veins near the fault plane shifts by 3. 29 cm-1 , and the corresponding compressive stress is 368. 63 MPa, which is significantly lower than the stress accumulation on both sides due to multi-stage events. Stress accumulation increased with moving away from the fault plane in the footwall with the offset of the 464 cm-1 peak arising from the quartz grains in the veins increasing, which can reach 494. 77 MPa at a distance of 21 m with a high offset of 4. 40 cm-1 of the 464 cm-1 peak. The compressive stress gets the maximum value of 519.87 MPa at a distance of 10 m from the fault plane in the hanging wall with the offset of the 464 cm-1 peak arising from the quartz grains in the veins being 4. 62 cm-1, followed by a sudden drop in stress accumulation, and it drops to 359. 59 MPa at a distance of 17 m. Because of moving away from the foult plane at the edge of the foult zone, the stress drops to 359. 59 MPa with a small value of 464 cm-1 peak offset 3. 21 cm-1 at a distance of 27 m from the fault plane in the hanging wall due to the little effect by the fault activity. Therefore, the stress of Wenchuan earthquake fault zone is partially released, but the rest of the stress distribution is uneven, and there is also a high stress accumulation in somewhere in the fault zone, which reflects that the mechanical properties of the rocks in the fault zone have a characteristic of unevenness in space.

  20. Bayesian probabilities for Mw 9.0+ earthquakes in the Aleutian Islands from a regionally scaled global rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, Rhett; Frazer, L. Neil; Templeton, William J.

    2016-05-01

    We use the global rate of Mw ≥ 9.0 earthquakes, and standard Bayesian procedures, to estimate the probability of such mega events in the Aleutian Islands, where they pose a significant risk to Hawaii. We find that the probability of such an earthquake along the Aleutians island arc is 6.5% to 12% over the next 50 years (50% credibility interval) and that the annualized risk to Hawai'i is about $30 M. Our method (the regionally scaled global rate method or RSGR) is to scale the global rate of Mw 9.0+ events in proportion to the fraction of global subduction (units of area per year) that takes place in the Aleutians. The RSGR method assumes that Mw 9.0+ events are a Poisson process with a rate that is both globally and regionally stationary on the time scale of centuries, and it follows the principle of Burbidge et al. (2008) who used the product of fault length and convergence rate, i.e., the area being subducted per annum, to scale the Poisson rate for the GSS to sections of the Indonesian subduction zone. Before applying RSGR to the Aleutians, we first apply it to five other regions of the global subduction system where its rate predictions can be compared with those from paleotsunami, paleoseismic, and geoarcheology data. To obtain regional rates from paleodata, we give a closed-form solution for the probability density function of the Poisson rate when event count and observation time are both uncertain.

  1. Earthquake genesis in Nepal Himalaya: A perspective from imaging of the 25th April 2015 Mw 7.8 earthquake source zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Anand K.; Saikia, Dipankar; Kumar, M. Ravi

    2017-06-01

    The Mw 7.8 earthquake in Central Nepal nucleated in the mid-crustal ramp zone of the Main Himalayan décollement Thrust (MHT) and propagated eastward for >140 km where the largest triggered event of Mw 7.3 occurred without any surface rupture. Although it is advocated that the slip and rupture dynamics are controlled by the structural configuration of the MHT and the upper crust, precise correlation between the seismic structure and seismogenesis is hitherto scarce in the Himalaya. To address the issue, we imaged the crustal structure along three profiles covering the earthquake source region using receiver function analysis of the seismic data from the HiCLIMB and HIMNT seismic networks to understand the lateral variability. A ∼5 km thick, low velocity layer is observed at the mid-crustal level, that steepens in the MHT ramp zone. The bulk of the seismicity including large shocks after the 2015 Nepal earthquake lies in the vicinity of this low velocity layer. Correlation of the seismic structure and aftershock distribution with the published crustal structure clearly suggests that the rupture involves a thicker zone extending for >40 km to the south of the source zone in the MHT ramp. We refined the structure of the MHT zone incorporating published coseismic slip and ground deformation to suggest that the rupture terminated at the footwall imbricate (horse) on the floor thrust below the zone of maximum coseismic uplift and there was a two stage rupture towards the eastern margin of the rupture zone.

  2. Periodic Viscous Shear Heating Instability in Fine-Grained Shear Zones: Mechanism for Intermediate Depth Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coon, E.; Kelemen, P.; Hirth, G.; Spiegelman, M.

    2005-12-01

    Kelemen and Hirth (Fall 2004 AGU) presented a model for periodic, viscous shear heating instabilities along pre-existing, fine grained shear zones. This provides an attractive alternative to dehydration embrittlement for explaining intermediate-depth earthquakes, especially those in a narrow thermal window within the mantle section of subducting oceanic plates (Hacker et al JGR03). Ductile shear zones with widths of cm to m are common in shallow mantle massifs and peridotite along oceanic fracture zones. Pseudotachylites in a mantle shear zone show that shear heating temperatures exceeded the mantle solidus (Obata & Karato Tectonophys95). Olivine grain growth in shear zones is pinned by closely spaced pyroxenes; thus, once formed, these features do not `heal' on geological time scales in the absence of melt or fluid (Warren & Hirth EPSL05). Grain-size sensitive creep will be localized within these shear zones, in preference to host rocks with olivine grain size from 1 to 10 mm. Inspired by the work of Whitehead & Gans (GJRAS74), we proposed that such pre-existing shear zones might undergo repeated shear heating instabilities. This is not a new concept; what is new is that viscous deformation is limited to a narrow shear zone, because grain boundary sliding, sensitive to both stress and grain size, may accommodate creep even at high stress and high temperature. These new ideas yield a new result: simple models for a periodic shear heating instability. Last year, we presented a 1D numerical model using olivine flow laws, assuming that viscous deformation remains localized in shear zones, surrounded by host rocks undergoing elastic deformation. Stress evolves due to elastic strain and drives viscous deformation in a shear zone of specified width. Shear heating and thermal diffusion control T. A maximum of 1400 C (substantial melting of peridotite ) was imposed. Grain size evolves due to recrystallization and diffusion. For strain rates of E-13 to E-14 per sec and

  3. Surface faulting along the Superstition Hills fault zone and nearby faults associated with the earthquakes of 24 November 1987

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sharp, R.V.

    1989-01-01

    The M6.2 Elmore Desert Ranch earthquake of 24 November 1987 was associated spatially and probably temporally with left-lateral surface rupture on many northeast-trending faults in and near the Superstition Hills in western Imperial Valley. Three curving discontinuous principal zones of rupture among these breaks extended northeastward from near the Superstition Hills fault zone as far as 9km; the maximum observed surface slip, 12.5cm, was on the northern of the three, the Elmore Ranch fault, at a point near the epicenter. Twelve hours after the Elmore Ranch earthquake, the M6.6 Superstition Hills earthquake occurred near the northwest end of the right-lateral Superstition Hills fault zone. We measured displacements over 339 days at as many as 296 sites along the Superstition Hills fault zone, and repeated measurements at 49 sites provided sufficient data to fit with a simple power law. The overall distributions of right-lateral displacement at 1 day and the estimated final slip are nearly symmetrical about the midpoint of the surface rupture. The average estimated final right-lateral slip for the Superstition Hills fault zone is ~54cm. The average left-lateral slip for the conjugate faults trending northeastward is ~23cm. The southernmost ruptured member of the Superstition Hills fault zone, newly named the Wienert fault, extends the known length of the zone by about 4km. -from Authors

  4. Intertidal land-level changes during the most recent megathrust earthquake at the Cascadia subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milker, Y.; Horton, B.; Engelhart, S. E.; Nelson, A. R.; Witter, R. C.

    2013-12-01

    Estuarine marshes along the US-Pacific coast host unique stratigraphic sequences that record coseismic land-level changes and tsunamis during the most recent magnitude 8-9 earthquakes at the Cascadia subduction zone. Earlier studies have shown the great potential of microfossil reconstructions of land-level changes during past earthquakes, but these estimates are available only at a few sites and the precision of many is quite low with errors of >×0.3 m. To make more accurate reconstructions of earthquake-induced land-level changes along the Oregon coast of Cascadia, we sampled a surface transect (18 stations) in the Sough Slough estuary in order to identify live and dead benthic foraminiferal assemblages and their relations to their environment. We collected 0.5-m-long Russian cores at seven selected stations in the Sough Slough estuary in order to study the influence of infaunal living species on the reliability and precision of relative sea-level estimates. We also collected 3-4-m-long vibracores in South Slough and a second estuary 12 km to the south to examine changes in late Holocene fossil foraminiferal assemblages resulting from land-level changes and sea-level rise. New local and regional transfer functions using modern benthic foraminiferal assemblages will be developed and their performance will be evaluated before applying them to the fossil assemblages. The modern foraminiferal assemblages in the South Slough estuary show a strong vertical distribution with higher numbers of Miliammina fusca restricted to the mud flat and low marsh stations, and higher numbers of Jadammina macresences, Balticammina pseudomacrescens, Trochammina inflata and Haplophragmoides manilaensis in the middle marsh stations. Higher numbers of Trochamminita irregularis and Trochamminita sp. were observed in the high marsh and upland stations. Our initial results of the infaunal distribution study shows that the majority of living foraminifera (51 - 118 specimen per 10 cm3

  5. Structural variation along the southwestern Nankai seismogenic zone related to various earthquake phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakanishi, A.; Shimomura, N.; Kodaira, S.; Obana, K.; Takahashi, T.; Yamamoto, Y.; Sato, T.; Kashiwase, K.; Fujimori, H.; Kaneda, Y.; Mochizuki, K.; Kato, A.; Iidaka, T.; Kurashimo, E.; Shinohara, M.; Takeda, T.; Shiomi, K.

    2011-12-01

    In the Nankai Trough subduction seismogenic zone, the Nankai and Tonankai earthquakes had often occurred simultaneously, and caused a great event. In order to reduce a great deal of damage to coastal area from both strong ground motion and tsunami generation, it is necessary to understand rupture synchronization and segmentation of the Nankai megathrust earthquake. For a precise estimate of the rupture area of the Nankai megathrust event, it is important to know the geometry of the subducting Philippine Sea plate and deep subduction structure along the Nankai Trough. To obtain the deep subduction structure of the coseismic rupture area of the Nankai earthquake in 1946 off Shikoku area, the large-scale high-resolution wide-angle seismic study was conducted in 2009 and 2010. In this study, 201 and 200 ocean bottom seismographs were deployed off the Shikoku Island and the Kii channel respectively. A tuned airgun system (7800 cu. in.) shot every 200m along 13 profiles. Airgun shots were also recorded along an onshore seismic profile (prepared by ERI, univ. of Tokyo and NIED) prolonged from the offshore profile off the Kii Peninsula. Long-term observation was conducted for ~9 months by 21 OBSs off the Shikoku area and 20 OBSs off the Kii channel.This research is part of 'Research concerning Interaction Between the Tokai, Tonankai and Nankai Earthquakes' funded by Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, Japan. Structural images of the overriding plate indicate the old accreted sediments (the Cretaceous-Tertiary accretionary prism) with the velocity greater than 6km/s extend seaward from off the Shikoku to the Hyuga-nada. Moreover, the young accreted sediments become relatively thinner eastward from off the cape Ashizuri to Muroto. These structural variations might be related to the different rupture pattern of the Nankai event. Structural image of the deep low frequency earthquakes and tremors is shown by using the airgun shots recorded at onshore

  6. A Poisson method application to the assessment of the earthquake hazard in the North Anatolian Fault Zone, Turkey

    SciTech Connect

    Türker, Tuğba

    2016-04-18

    North Anatolian Fault (NAF) is one from the most important strike-slip fault zones in the world and located among regions in the highest seismic activity. The NAFZ observed very large earthquakes from the past to present. The aim of this study; the important parameters of Gutenberg-Richter relationship (a and b values) estimated and this parameters taking into account, earthquakes were examined in the between years 1900-2015 for 10 different seismic source regions in the NAFZ. After that estimated occurrence probabilities and return periods of occurring earthquakes in fault zone in the next years, and is being assessed with Poisson method the earthquake hazard of the NAFZ. The Region 2 were observed the largest earthquakes for the only historical period and hasn’t been observed large earthquake for the instrumental period in this region. Two historical earthquakes (1766, M{sub S}=7.3 and 1897, M{sub S}=7.0) are included for Region 2 (Marmara Region) where a large earthquake is expected in the next years. The 10 different seismic source regions are determined the relationships between the cumulative number-magnitude which estimated a and b parameters with the equation of LogN=a-bM in the Gutenberg-Richter. A homogenous earthquake catalog for M{sub S} magnitude which is equal or larger than 4.0 is used for the time period between 1900 and 2015. The database of catalog used in the study has been created from International Seismological Center (ISC) and Boğazici University Kandilli observation and earthquake research institute (KOERI). The earthquake data were obtained until from 1900 to 1974 from KOERI and ISC until from 1974 to 2015 from KOERI. The probabilities of the earthquake occurring are estimated for the next 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90 and 100 years in the 10 different seismic source regions. The highest earthquake occur probabilities in 10 different seismic source regions in the next years estimated that the region Tokat-Erzincan (Region 9) %99

  7. A Poisson method application to the assessment of the earthquake hazard in the North Anatolian Fault Zone, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Türker, Tuǧba; Bayrak, Yusuf

    2016-04-01

    North Anatolian Fault (NAF) is one from the most important strike-slip fault zones in the world and located among regions in the highest seismic activity. The NAFZ observed very large earthquakes from the past to present. The aim of this study; the important parameters of Gutenberg-Richter relationship (a and b values) estimated and this parameters taking into account, earthquakes were examined in the between years 1900-2015 for 10 different seismic source regions in the NAFZ. After that estimated occurrence probabilities and return periods of occurring earthquakes in fault zone in the next years, and is being assessed with Poisson method the earthquake hazard of the NAFZ. The Region 2 were observed the largest earthquakes for the only historical period and hasn't been observed large earthquake for the instrumental period in this region. Two historical earthquakes (1766, MS=7.3 and 1897, MS=7.0) are included for Region 2 (Marmara Region) where a large earthquake is expected in the next years. The 10 different seismic source regions are determined the relationships between the cumulative number-magnitude which estimated a and b parameters with the equation of LogN=a-bM in the Gutenberg-Richter. A homogenous earthquake catalog for MS magnitude which is equal or larger than 4.0 is used for the time period between 1900 and 2015. The database of catalog used in the study has been created from International Seismological Center (ISC) and Boǧazici University Kandilli observation and earthquake research institute (KOERI). The earthquake data were obtained until from 1900 to 1974 from KOERI and ISC until from 1974 to 2015 from KOERI. The probabilities of the earthquake occurring are estimated for the next 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90 and 100 years in the 10 different seismic source regions. The highest earthquake occur probabilities in 10 different seismic source regions in the next years estimated that the region Tokat-Erzincan (Region 9) %99 with an earthquake

  8. Coastal-zone biogeochemical dynamics under global warming

    SciTech Connect

    Mackenzie, F.T.; Ver, L.M.; Lerman, A.

    2000-03-01

    The coastal zone, consisting of the continental shelves to a depth of 200 meters, including bays, lagoons, estuaries, and near-shore banks, is an environment that is strongly affected by its biogeochemical and physical interactions with reservoirs in the adjacent domains of land, atmosphere, open ocean, and marine sediments. Because the coastal zone is smaller in volume and area coverage relative to the open ocean, it traditionally has been studied as an integral part of the global oceans. In this paper, the authors show by numerical modeling that it is important to consider the coastal zone as an entity separate from the open ocean in any assessment of future Earth-system response under human perturbation. Model analyses for the early part of the 21st century suggest that the coastal zone plays a significant modifying role in the biogeochemical dynamics of the carbon cycle and the nutrient cycles coupled to it. This role is manifested in changes in primary production, storage, and/or export of organic matter, its remineralization, and calcium carbonate precipitation--all of which determine the state of the coastal zone with respect to exchange of CO{sub 2} with the atmosphere. Under a scenario of future reduced or complete cessation of the thermohaline circulation (THC) of the global oceans, coastal waters become an important sink for atmospheric CO{sub 2}, as opposed to the conditions in the past and present, when coastal waters are believed to be a source of CO{sub 2} to the atmosphere. Profound changes in coastal-zone primary productivity underscore the important role of phosphorus as a limiting nutrient. In addition, calculations indicate that the saturation state of coastal waters with respect to carbonate minerals will decline by {approximately}15% by the year 2030. Any future slowdown in the THC of the oceans will increase slightly the rate of decline in saturation state.

  9. Preliminary Results on Earthquake Recurrence Intervals, Rupture Segmentation, and Potential Earthquake Moment Magnitudes along the Tahoe-Sierra Frontal Fault Zone, Lake Tahoe, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howle, J.; Bawden, G. W.; Schweickert, R. A.; Hunter, L. E.; Rose, R.

    2012-12-01

    Utilizing high-resolution bare-earth LiDAR topography, field observations, and earlier results of Howle et al. (2012), we estimate latest Pleistocene/Holocene earthquake-recurrence intervals, propose scenarios for earthquake-rupture segmentation, and estimate potential earthquake moment magnitudes for the Tahoe-Sierra frontal fault zone (TSFFZ), west of Lake Tahoe, California. We have developed a new technique to estimate the vertical separation for the most recent and the previous ground-rupturing earthquakes at five sites along the Echo Peak and Mt. Tallac segments of the TSFFZ. At these sites are fault scarps with two bevels separated by an inflection point (compound fault scarps), indicating that the cumulative vertical separation (VS) across the scarp resulted from two events. This technique, modified from the modeling methods of Howle et al. (2012), uses the far-field plunge of the best-fit footwall vector and the fault-scarp morphology from high-resolution LiDAR profiles to estimate the per-event VS. From this data, we conclude that the adjacent and overlapping Echo Peak and Mt. Tallac segments have ruptured coseismically twice during the Holocene. The right-stepping, en echelon range-front segments of the TSFFZ show progressively greater VS rates and shorter earthquake-recurrence intervals from southeast to northwest. Our preliminary estimates suggest latest Pleistocene/ Holocene earthquake-recurrence intervals of 4.8±0.9x103 years for a coseismic rupture of the Echo Peak and Mt. Tallac segments, located at the southeastern end of the TSFFZ. For the Rubicon Peak segment, northwest of the Echo Peak and Mt. Tallac segments, our preliminary estimate of the maximum earthquake-recurrence interval is 2.8±1.0x103 years, based on data from two sites. The correspondence between high VS rates and short recurrence intervals suggests that earthquake sequences along the TSFFZ may initiate in the northwest part of the zone and then occur to the southeast with a lower

  10. Earthquake!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernandez, Hildo

    2000-01-01

    Examines the types of damage experienced by California State University at Northridge during the 1994 earthquake and what lessons were learned in handling this emergency are discussed. The problem of loose asbestos is addressed. (GR)

  11. Earthquake!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernandez, Hildo

    2000-01-01

    Examines the types of damage experienced by California State University at Northridge during the 1994 earthquake and what lessons were learned in handling this emergency are discussed. The problem of loose asbestos is addressed. (GR)

  12. Earthquakes in the Orozco transform zone: seismicity, source mechanisms, and tectonics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trehu, Anne M.; Solomon, Sean C.

    1983-01-01

    As part of the Rivera Ocean Seismic Experiment, a network of ocean bottom seismometers and hydrophones was deployed in order to determine the seismic characteristics of the Orozco transform fault in the central eastern Pacific. We present hypocentral locations and source mechanisms for 70 earthquakes recorded by this network. All epicenters are within the transform region of the Orozco Fracture Zone and clearly delineate the active plate boundary. About half of the epicenters define a narrow line of activity parallel to the spreading direction and situated along a deep topographic trough that forms the northern boundary of the transform zone (region 1). Most focal depths for these events are very shallow, within 4 km of the seafloor; several well-determined focal depths, however, are as great as 7 km. No shallowing of seismic activity is observed as the rise-transform intersection is approached; to the contrary, the deepest events are within 10 km of the intersection. First motion polarities for most of the earthquakes in region 1 are compatible with right-lateral strike slip faulting along a nearly vertical plane, striking parallel to the spreading direction. Another zone of activity is observed in the central part of the transform (region 2). The apparent horizontal and vertical distribution of activity in this region is more scattered than in the first, and the first motion radiation patterns of these events do not appear to be compatible with any known fault mechanism. Pronounced lateral variations in crustal velocity structure are indicated for the transform region from refraction data and measurements of wave propagation directions. The effect of this lateral heterogeneity on hypocenters and fault plane solutions is evaluated by tracing rays through a three-dimensional velocity grid. While findings for events in region 1 are not significantly affected, in region 2, epicentral mislocations of up to 10 km and azimuthal deflections of up to 45° may result from

  13. Subducting fracture zones control earthquake distribution and upper plate properties: examples from Sumatra and Kamchatka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaedicke, C.; Freitag, R.; Barckhausen, U.; Franke, D.; Ladage, S.; Schnabel, M.; Tsukanov, N.

    2010-12-01

    With newly acquired marine geophysical data from the oceanic crust off Sumatra and Kamchatka (SO186 and SO201) we investigate the influence of the relief of the downgoing plate on seismicity and fore arc structure, architecture and properties along two different active margins, namely the Sumatra and the Kamchatka subduction zones. Off northern Sumatra two mega-thrust events occurred on 26.12.2004 (Mw=9.1-9.3) and on 28.03.2005 (Mw=8.6). Seismological investigations, GPS measurements and in-situ and remote observation of vertical motion on fore arc islands show both, an abrupt southern termination of the large 12/2004 rupture and a sharp northern termination of the rupture zone of the 03/2005 mega-thrust. Wide-angle/refraction seismic and MCS data show an abrupt arc parallel depth change of 3 km within 40 km in the oceanic crust beneath the fore arc SW of Simeulue Island. We interpret the abrupt depth change originates from a ramp or tear in the subducted oceanic crust. The discontinuity in the oceanic crust likely trends NNE and is located east of a continuation of an extinct FZ on the subducting Indo-Australian plate. This indicates a pervasive lower plate control on margin structure, particularly its segmentation. The tear might be the reason for rupture propagation termination of the great Sumatra-Andaman earthquakes. During RV Sonne cruise SO201 we collected geophysical profiles in the NW Pacific off Kamchatka and the Aleutian arc crossing the Emperor Seamount Chain and the Krusenstern FZ. The Krusenstern FZ is being subducted at the Kamchatka margin. It comprises a maximum vertical offset of about 1080 m. From our data we suggest that the Krusenstern FZ is reactivated in the vicinity of the Kamchatka margin due to the load of the subducting/colliding Meiji Guyot. It enters the subduction zone right off Kronotsky Peninsula, where a major segment boundary separates domains of different properties of the fore arc: It differs in terms of exhumation, uplift and

  14. Heterogeneous slip and rupture models of the San Andreas fault zone based upon three-dimensional earthquake tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Foxall, William

    1992-11-01

    Crystal fault zones exhibit spatially heterogeneous slip behavior at all scales, slip being partitioned between stable frictional sliding, or fault creep, and unstable earthquake rupture. An understanding the mechanisms underlying slip segmentation is fundamental to research into fault dynamics and the physics of earthquake generation. This thesis investigates the influence that large-scale along-strike heterogeneity in fault zone lithology has on slip segmentation. Large-scale transitions from the stable block sliding of the Central 4D Creeping Section of the San Andreas, fault to the locked 1906 and 1857 earthquake segments takes place along the Loma Prieta and Parkfield sections of the fault, respectively, the transitions being accomplished in part by the generation of earthquakes in the magnitude range 6 (Parkfield) to 7 (Loma Prieta). Information on sub-surface lithology interpreted from the Loma Prieta and Parkfield three-dimensional crustal velocity models computed by Michelini (1991) is integrated with information on slip behavior provided by the distributions of earthquakes located using, the three-dimensional models and by surface creep data to study the relationships between large-scale lithological heterogeneity and slip segmentation along these two sections of the fault zone.

  15. Global teleseismic earthquake relocation with improved travel times and procedures for depth determination

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robert, Engdah E.; Van Hilst, R. D.; Buland, Raymond P.

    1998-01-01

    We relocate nearly 100, 000 events that occurred during the period 1964 to 1995 and are well-constrained teleseismically by arrival-time data reported to the International Seismological Centre (ISC) and to the U. S. Geological Survey's National Earthquake Information Center (NEIC). Hypocenter determination is significantly improved by using, in addition to regional and teleseismic P and S phases, the arrival times of PKiKP, PKPdf, and the teleseismic depth phases pP, pwP, and sP in the relocation procedure. A global probability model developed for later-arriving phases is used to independently identify the depth phases. The relocations are compared to hypocenters reported in the ISC and NEIC catalogs and by other sources. Differences in our epicenters with respect to ISC and NEIC estimates are generally small and regionally systematic due to the combined effects of the observing station network and plate geometry regionally, differences in upper mantle travel times between the reference earth models used, and the use of later-arriving phases. Focal depths are improved substantially over most other independent estimates, demonstrating (for example) how regional structures such as downgoing slabs can severely bias depth estimation when only regional and teleseismic P arrivals are used to determine the hypocenter. The new data base, which is complete to about Mw 5. 2 and includes all events for which moment-tensor solutions are available, has immediate application to high-resolution definition of Wadati-Benioff Zones (WBZs) worldwide, regional and global tomographic imaging, and other studies of earth structure.

  16. Shallow Fault-zone Dilatancy Recovery after the 2003 Bam, Iran Earthquake from Eight Years of InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fielding, E. J.; Burgmann, R.; Lundgren, P.; Funning, G. J.

    2011-12-01

    The December 2003 Mw 6.6 earthquake that devastated Bam, Iran involved several meters of slip on a previously unknown fault beneath the city, but surface ruptures showed a maximum of 25 cm of offset. At shallow depths, the earthquake strain was distributed over a zone roughly 500-2000 m wide in a thick alluvial layer. The outstanding surface conditions for InSAR (interferometric synthetic aperture radar) and frequent coverage by Envisat ASAR provide an opportunity to map the coseismic and postseismic ground deformation and study the time history in the eight years since the earthquake using InSAR time series analysis. Postseismic deformation in the first three and a half years showed a clear pattern of subsidence over the main fault rupture, reflecting compaction of the fault zone material after the earthquake. Another pattern of postseismic deformation is consistent with afterslip on deeper parts of the fault zone. Compaction in the area of a compressional step-over in the fault may be due to poroelastic rebound, but the compaction in the straight fault segments is interpreted to be due to recovery of coseismic dilatancy. Simple modeling of the surface subsidence signal with volume changes in an elastic half space suggest that the compaction with a volume decrease of about 105 m3 occurred in the upper km of the fault zone over a length of about 4 km during the first 3.5 years after the earthquake, with a time function that can be approximated as log(t) where t is the time since the earthquake. The compaction of the shallow fault-zone is directly above the area of largest coseismic slip at depth. We infer that this part of the fault zone absorbed the upward-propagating coseismic rupture by distributed shear and damage in the unlithified or poorly lithified alluvial material that generated significant dilatancy. After the earthquake, compaction processes recovered this dilatancy. Distributed shearing of the shallow fault zone may resolve the paradox of shallow slip

  17. Earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shedlock, Kaye M.; Pakiser, Louis Charles

    1998-01-01

    One of the most frightening and destructive phenomena of nature is a severe earthquake and its terrible aftereffects. An earthquake is a sudden movement of the Earth, caused by the abrupt release of strain that has accumulated over a long time. For hundreds of millions of years, the forces of plate tectonics have shaped the Earth as the huge plates that form the Earth's surface slowly move over, under, and past each other. Sometimes the movement is gradual. At other times, the plates are locked together, unable to release the accumulating energy. When the accumulated energy grows strong enough, the plates break free. If the earthquake occurs in a populated area, it may cause many deaths and injuries and extensive property damage. Today we are challenging the assumption that earthquakes must present an uncontrollable and unpredictable hazard to life and property. Scientists have begun to estimate the locations and likelihoods of future damaging earthquakes. Sites of greatest hazard are being identified, and definite progress is being made in designing structures that will withstand the effects of earthquakes.

  18. Rapid, Global Assessment of the Societal Impacts of Earthquake Induced Landsliding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godt, J. W.; Verdin, K. L.; Jibson, R. W.; Wald, D. J.; Earle, P. S.; Harp, E. L.

    2006-05-01

    We evaluate the feasibility of rapidly estimating landslide potential after large earthquakes by combining near- real-time estimates of ground shaking with a simple slope stability model that uses a new global topographic database derived from elevation data collected as part of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). Landslides triggered by ground shaking during earthquakes have caused widespread loss of life and damage to critical infrastructure. For example, the magnitude-7.6 earthquake of 8 October 2005 in Pakistan-administered Kashmir generated thousands of landslides that blocked many roads and damned rivers in the mountainous region. Overland access to many remote villages has yet to be restored 5 months after the quake. To provide timely information to emergency relief organizations on the possible societal effects of earthquakes, the USGS has developed an alarm system, PAGER (Prompt Assessment of Global Earthquakes for Response) that combines an estimate of ground shaking with a global population database. Maps of peak ground acceleration are generated in near real time using the methodology and software developed for ShakeMap (http://earthquake.usgs.gov/eqcenter/shakemap/). To evaluate the seismic landslide susceptibility worldwide, we rely on the SRTM data to generate statistics (at 1-km spacing) on the distribution of topographic slope calculated from 3-arcsecond (90m) data. Because many small areas of no more than a few square kilometers lack SRTM data, statistical methods referencing other elevation data were used to create a globally complete dataset. These topographic data are then used in a simplified Newmark analysis that uses spatially uniform material strengths and neglects the effects of groundwater to estimate the relative susceptibility to both shallow and deep landslides from a given earthquake. We present an initial application from the Muzaffarabad region of Pakistan and discuss results in the context of field and aerial observations

  19. Fault-rock magnetism from the earth surface trench closed to the Wenchuan Earthquake Surface Rupture Zone imply the different slip dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, D.; Li, H.; Lee, T. Q.; Sun, Z.

    2014-12-01

    The 2008 Mw 7.9 Wenchuan Earthquake had induced two major earthquake surface rupture zones, including the Yingxiu-Beichuan earthquake fault (Y-B F.) and Guanxian-Anxian earthquake fault (G-A F.) earthquake surface rupture zones. This giant earthquake had caused great human and financial loss. After main shock, the Wenchuan earthquake Fault Scientific Drilling project (WFSD) was co-organized by the Ministry of Science and Technology, Ministry of Land and Resources and China Bureau of Seismology, and this project focused on earthquake fault mechanics, earthquake slip process, fault physical and chemical characteristics, mechanical behavior, fluid behavior, fracture energy, and so on. In this study, the fault-rocks in the two trenches close to the two Wenchuan Earthquake surface rupture zone were used to discuss the earthquake slip dynamics, including the Bajiaomiao and Jiulong trenches along the Y-B F. and G-A F. earthquake surface rupture zones, respectively. This study also combined with the recent fault-rock magnetism from the earth surface and WFSD-1. The rock magnetism, from the Bajiaomiao trench and other previous researches, shows that the high susceptibility of the fault gouge along the Yingxiu-Beichuan earthquake fault zone was caused by the new-formed ferrimagnetic minerals, such as magnetite and hematite, so the Y-B F. had experienced high temperature and rapid speed thermal pressurization earthquake slip mechanism. The rock magnetism from the Jiulong trench implied that the slightly low average susceptibility of fault gouge was caused by high content of Fe-sulfides than that of fault breccia and Jurassic sandstones, which was possibly induced by earthquake process or earth surface process after the fault rocks exposed to the surface. If the high content of Fe-sulfides was induced by earthquake process, the G-A F. had experienced the low temperature and slow speed machanical lubrication earthquake slip mechanism. The different earthquake slip mechanism was

  20. Low Velocity Zones along the San Jacinto Fault, Southern California, inferred from Local Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z.; Yang, H.; Peng, Z.; Ben-Zion, Y.; Vernon, F.

    2013-12-01

    Natural fault zones have regions of brittle damage leading to a low-velocity zone (LVZ) in the immediate vicinity of the main fault interface. The LVZ may amplify ground motion, modify rupture propagation, and impact derivation of earthquke properties. Here we image low-velocity fault zone structures along the San Jacinto Fault (SJF), southern California, using waveforms of local earthquakes that are recorded at several dense arrays across the SJFZ. We use generalized ray theory to compute synthetic travel times to track the direct and FZ-reflected waves bouncing from the FZ boundaries. This method can effectively reduce the trade-off between FZ width and velocity reduction relative to the host rock. Our preliminary results from travel time modeling show the clear signature of LVZs along the SJF, including the segment of the Anza seismic gap. At the southern part near the trifrication area, the LVZ of the Clark Valley branch (array JF) has a width of ~200 m with ~55% reduction in Vp and Vs. This is consistent with what have been suggested from previous studies. In comparison, we find that the velocity reduction relative to the host rock across the Anza seismic gap (array RA) is ~50% for both Vp and Vs, nearly as prominent as that on the southern branches. The width of the LVZ is ~230 m. In addition, the LVZ across the Anza gap appears to locate in the northeast side of the RA array, implying potential preferred propagation direction of past ruptures.

  1. Seismic Attenuation in the Rupture Zone of the 2010 Maule, Chile, Earthquake: Two Spectral Ratio Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torpey, M.; Russo, R. M.; Beck, S. L.; Meltzer, A.; Roecker, S. W.

    2013-12-01

    We used data from the IRIS CHAMP temporary seismic network, deployed for 6 months following the February 2010 Mw 8.8 Maule earthquake, to estimate differential attenuation of P and S waves in the Maule rupture zone, 33°S - 38°S. We used two complementary spectral ratio methods both of which assume identical source-to-station travel paths which allowed us to neglect the source-time function and instrument response of each P-S phase pair. The first method iteratively determines 400 individual Qs values and uncertainties for each phase pair and the second method stacks the spectra of each of the 400 measurements to yield a composite spectrum from which we derive a single Qs. Measurements are deemed acceptable when the two methods agree. We examined 235 local events yielding a total of 1083 Qs measurements.The majority of ray paths evaluated show low Qs values (100-400) with an average Qs over the entire rupture zone of 350 and an average standard deviation of +/- 569. We are evaluating spatial and temporal variability in Qs; however, from our preliminary measurements we do not observe a temporal variability in Qs throughout the rupture zone nor do we recognize any consistent spatial pattern in the measurements. Tomographic inversion of the Qs measurements made along ray paths spanning the upper mantle wedge and South American crust above the Maule rupture region will allow us to interpret the observed Qs variability.

  2. Coseismic fault zone deformation revealed with differential lidar: Examples from Japanese Mw ∼7 intraplate earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nissen, Edwin; Maruyama, Tadashi; Ramon Arrowsmith, J.; Elliott, John R.; Krishnan, Aravindhan K.; Oskin, Michael E.; Saripalli, Srikanth

    2014-11-01

    We use two recent Japanese earthquakes to demonstrate the rich potential, as well as some of the challenges, of differencing repeat airborne Light Detection and Ranging (lidar) topographic data to measure coseismic fault zone deformation. We focus on densely-vegetated sections of the 14 June 2008 Iwate-Miyagi (Mw 6.9) and 11 April 2011 Fukushima-Hamadori (Mw 7.1) earthquake ruptures, each covered by 2 m-resolution pre-event and 1 m-resolution post-event bare Earth digital terrain models (DTMs) obtained from commercial lidar providers. Three-dimensional displacements and rotations were extracted from these datasets using an adaptation of the Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm. These displacements remain coherent close to surface fault breaks, as well as within dense forest, despite intervals of ∼2 years (Iwate-Miyagi) and ∼4 years (Fukushima-Hamadori) encompassed by the lidar scenes. Differential lidar analysis is thus complementary to Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) and sub-pixel correlation techniques which often break down under conditions of long time intervals, dense vegetation or steep displacement gradients. Although the ICP displacements are much noisier than overlapping InSAR line-of-sight displacements, they still provide powerful constraints on near-surface fault slip. In the Fukushima-Hamadori case, near-fault displacements and rotations are consistent with decreased primary fault slip at very shallow depths of a few tens of meters, helping to account for the large, along-strike heterogeneity in surface offsets observed in the field. This displacement field also captures long-wavelength deformation resulting from the 11 March 2011 Tohoku great earthquake.

  3. Time-Dependent Inner Core Structures Examined by Repeating Earthquakes in the Southwest Pacific Subduction Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, W. C.

    2014-12-01

    Time-dependent inner core structure is interpreted as differential rotation of the Earth's inner core. This inference is made on the basis of variations deviated from an isotropic and homogeneous inner core structure and the amount of velocity perturbations progressively evolving as a function of calendar time. Most compelling evidences for inner core rotation come from the inner core structures beneath Colombia and Venezuela, characterized by strong anisotropy and lateral variation, for the South Sandwich Islands earthquakes recorded by College (COL) and other seismic stations in Alaska. Repeating earthquakes with highly similar waveforms can minimize the potential artifacts due to inter-event separation and unknown short-scale mantle heterogeneities, and can acquire robust measurement of time shift due to temporal change of inner core structures. Moderate repeating earthquake sequences (RES) in the Tonga-Kermadec-Vanuatu in the southwest Pacific subduction zones are studied over a 20-year time window between 1990 and 2009. I select 13 RES consisting of two or three events with time separation of 2 - 14.4 years and analyze the PKiKP-PKPdf, PKPbc-PKPdf, and PKPab-PKPdf phase pairs recorded by the European, African, and central Asian stations sampling the eastern hemisphere of the inner core. I measure the double differential time of the phase pairs using waveform cross-correlation. Majority of the double differential time measurements within ±50 millisecond can largely be explained by the time shift due to inter-event distance on the order of hundreds of meters or less and null change of the PKPdf phase. These observations indicate inner core structures in the eastern hemisphere are uniform and probably insensitive to motion of the inner core.

  4. The Wasatch fault zone, utah-segmentation and history of Holocene earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Machette, M.N.; Personius, S.F.; Nelson, A.R.; Schwartz, D.P.; Lund, W.R.

    1991-01-01

    The Wasatch fault zone (WFZ) forms the eastern boundary of the Basin and Range province and is the longest continuous, active normal fault (343 km) in the United States. It underlies an urban corridor of 1.6 million people (80% of Utah's population) representing the largest earthquake risk in the interior of the western United States. We have used paleoseismological data to identify 10 discrete segments of the WFZ. Five are active, medial segments with Holocene slip rates of 1-2 mm a-1, recurrence intervals of 2000-4000 years and average lengths of about 50 km. Five are less active, distal segments with mostly pre-Holocene surface ruptures, late Quaternary slip rates of 6.5 have occurred since 1860. Although the time scale of the clustering is different-130 years vs 1100 years-we consider the central Nevada-eastern California Seismic Belt to be a historic analog for movement on the WFZ during the past 1500 years. We have found no evidence that surface-rupturing events occurred on the WFZ during the past 400 years, a time period which is twice the average intracluster recurrence interval and equal to the average Holocene recurrence interval. In particular, the Brigham City segment (the northernmost medial segment) has not ruptured in the past 3600 years-a period that is about three times longer than this segment's average recurrence interval during the early and middle Holocene. Although the WFZ's seismological record is one of relative quiescence, a comparison with other historic surface-rupturing earthquakes in the region suggests that earthquakes having moment magnitudes of 7.1-7.4 (or surface-wave magnitudes of 7.5-7.7)-each associated with tens of kilometers of surface rupture and several meters of normal dip slip-have occurred about every four centuries during the Holocene and should be expected in the future. ?? 1991.

  5. Magnetotelluric Studies of Fault Zones Surrounding the 2016 Pawnee, Oklahoma Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, R. L.; Key, K.; Atekwana, E. A.

    2016-12-01

    Since 2008, there has been a dramatic increase in earthquake activity in the central United States in association with major oil and gas operations. Oklahoma is now considered one the most seismically active states. Although seismic networks are able to detect activity and map its locus, they are unable to image the distribution of fluids in the fault responsible for triggering seismicity. Electrical geophysical methods are ideally suited to image fluid bearing faults since the injected waste-waters are highly saline and hence have a high electrical conductivity. To date, no study has imaged the fluids in the faults in Oklahoma and made a direct link to the seismicity. The 2016 M5.8 Pawnee, Oklahoma earthquake provides an unprecedented opportunity for scientists to provide that link. Several injection wells are located within a 20 km radius of the epicenter; and studies have suggested that injection of fluids in high-volume wells can trigger earthquakes as far away as 30 km. During late October to early November, 2016, we are collecting magnetotelluric (MT) data with the aim of constraining the distribution of fluids in the fault zone. The MT technique uses naturally occurring electric and magnetic fields measured at Earth's surface to measure conductivity structure. We plan to carry out a series of short two-dimensional (2D) profiles of wideband MT acquisition located through areas where the fault recently ruptured and seismic activity is concentrated and also across the faults in the vicinity that did not rupture. The integration of our results and ongoing seismic studies will lead to a better understanding of the links between fluid injection and seismicity.

  6. Preservation of Paleoseismic and Paleogeodetic Records of mid to late Holocene Subduction Zone Earthquakes in Different Coastal Settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelsey, H. M.; Horton, B.; Rubin, C. M.; Grand Pre, C.; Hawkes, A. D.; Dura, T.; Daryono, M.; Ladinsky, T.

    2009-12-01

    Dynamic variations in sea level and solid Earth properties along active subduction zones predetermine the duration and when paleoseismic and paleogeodetic records will be preserved in coastal regions. The most direct, reliable way to chronicle the history of past subduction zone earthquakes is through coastal stratigraphic sequences that preserve abrupt and gradual relative sea level changes caused by great subduction earthquake cycles. Specifically, paleoseismic timing and paleo geodetic determination of vertical displacement can be obtained through the application of litho-, bio- and chronostratigraphic analyses of selected coastal stratigraphic sequences. Such stratigraphic sequences are only preserved under a specific set of conditions wherein sea level rise, crustal loading, local crustal thickness and imposed strain accumulation and release from megathrust and upper plate faults and folds collectively conspire to provide a long-term, gradual relative sea level rise over millenia that span at least two or three subduction earthquake cycles. Given the conditions necessary to preserve stratigraphic sequences recording multiple great subduction earthquake cycles, it is not surprising that robust paleoseismic records from coastal marsh stratigraphies are rare. To illustrate the conditions under which coastal marshes preserve paleoseismic records of great subduction zone earthquakes, we present two sites with different combinations of sea level rise, crustal loading, crustal thickness and local tectonics. Although both sites preserve a paleoseismic record of subduction zone earthquakes, the length of the records and the specific time range of the records are notably different. The coastal, equatorial, island tropical setting in the Indian Ocean preserves tidal-marsh stratigraphic records of great subduction zone earthquakes in the time window 7-5 ka. In contrast, mid-latitude, North American, northeast Pacific coastal settings preserve tidal-marsh stratigraphic

  7. Foreshock patterns preceding large earthquakes in the subduction zone of Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minadakis, George; Papadopoulos, Gerassimos A.

    2016-04-01

    Some of the largest earthquakes in the globe occur in the subduction zone of Chile. Therefore, it is of particular interest to investigate foreshock patterns preceding such earthquakes. Foreshocks in Chile were recognized as early as 1960. In fact, the giant (Mw9.5) earthquake of 22 May 1960, which was the largest ever instrumentally recorded, was preceded by 45 foreshocks in a time period of 33h before the mainshock, while 250 aftershocks were recorded in a 33h time period after the mainshock. Four foreshocks were bigger than magnitude 7.0, including a magnitude 7.9 on May 21 that caused severe damage in the Concepcion area. More recently, Brodsky and Lay (2014) and Bedford et al. (2015) reported on foreshock activity before the 1 April 2014 large earthquake (Mw8.2). However, 3-D foreshock patterns in space, time and size were not studied in depth so far. Since such studies require for good seismic catalogues to be available, we have investigated 3-D foreshock patterns only before the recent, very large mainshocks occurring on 27 February 2010 (Mw 8.8), 1 April 2014 (Mw8.2) and 16 September 2015 (Mw8.4). Although our analysis does not depend on a priori definition of short-term foreshocks, our interest focuses in the short-term time frame, that is in the last 5-6 months before the mainshock. The analysis of the 2014 event showed an excellent foreshock sequence consisting by an early-weak foreshock stage lasting for about 1.8 months and by a main-strong precursory foreshock stage that was evolved in the last 18 days before the mainshock. During the strong foreshock period the seismicity concentrated around the mainshock epicenter in a critical area of about 65 km mainly along the trench domain to the south of the mainshock epicenter. At the same time, the activity rate increased dramatically, the b-value dropped and the mean magnitude increased significantly, while the level of seismic energy released also increased. In view of these highly significant seismicity

  8. The Key Role of Eyewitnesses in Rapid Impact Assessment of Global Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bossu, R.; Steed, R.; Mazet-Roux, G.; Roussel, F.; Etivant, C.; Frobert, L.; Godey, S.

    2014-12-01

    Uncertainties in rapid impact assessments of global earthquakes are intrinsically large because they rely on 3 main elements (ground motion prediction models, building stock inventory and related vulnerability) which values and/or spatial variations are poorly constrained. Furthermore, variations of hypocentral location and magnitude within their respective uncertainty domain can lead to significantly different shaking level for centers of population and change the scope of the disaster. We present the strategy and methods implemented at the Euro-Med Seismological Centre (EMSC) to rapidly collect in-situ observations on earthquake effects from eyewitnesses for reducing uncertainties of rapid earthquake impact assessment. It comprises crowdsourced information (online questionnaires, pics) as well as information derived from real time analysis of web traffic (flashourcing technique), and more recently deployment of QCN (Quake Catcher Network) low cost sensors. We underline the importance of merging results of different methods to improve performances and reliability of collected data.We try to better understand and respond to public demands and expectations after earthquakes through improved information services and diversification of information tools (social networks, smartphone app., browsers adds-on…), which, in turn, drive more eyewitnesses to our services and improve data collection. We will notably present our LastQuake Twitter feed (Quakebot) and smartphone applications (IOs and android) which only report earthquakes that matter for the public and authorities, i.e. felt and damaging earthquakes identified thanks to citizen generated information.

  9. The energy release in earthquakes, and subduction zone seismicity and stress in slabs. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vassiliou, M. S.

    1983-01-01

    Energy release in earthquakes is discussed. Dynamic energy from source time function, a simplified procedure for modeling deep focus events, static energy estimates, near source energy studies, and energy and magnitude are addressed. Subduction zone seismicity and stress in slabs are also discussed.

  10. Seismic evidence for active underplating below the megathrust earthquake zone in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Hisanori; Takeda, Tetsuya; Obara, Kazushige; Kasahara, Keiji

    2010-07-09

    Determining the structure of subduction zones is important for understanding mechanisms for the generation of interplate phenomena such as megathrust earthquakes. The peeling off of the uppermost part of a subducting slab and accretion to the bottom of an overlying plate (underplating) at deep regions has been inferred from exhumed metamorphic rocks and deep seismic imaging, but direct seismic evidence of this process is lacking. By comparing seismic reflection profiles with microearthquake distributions in central Japan, we show that repeating microearthquakes occur along the bottom interface of the layer peeling off from the subducting Philippine Sea plate. This region coincides with the location of slow-slip events that may serve as signals for monitoring active underplating.

  11. Geoarchaeological evidence of strong prehistoric earthquakes in the New Madrid (Missouri) seismic zone

    SciTech Connect

    Saucier, R.T. )

    1991-04-01

    Sand blows and fissures that cover >10,500 km{sup 2} in northeastern Arkansas and southeastern Missouri attest to the severity of the 1811-1812 earthquake series in the New Madrid seismic zone. However, except for one occurence near New Madrid, Missouri, the region has been devoid of any evidence of other major shocks for at least 1.3 ka prior to 1811 and possibly for >9 ka. Stratigraphic relations and radiocarbon dating at a recently excavated archaeological site near East Prairie, Missouri, have revealed liquifaction phenomena attributable to a shock dated to within about 100 yr prior to A.D. 539 and a probable second one dated between about A.D. 539 and 991.

  12. Moon Connection with MEGA and Giant Earthquakes in Subduction Zones during One Solar Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagen, M. T.; Azevedo, A. T.

    2016-12-01

    We investigated in this paper the possible influences of the moon on earthquakes during one Solar cycle. The Earth - Moon gravitational force produces a variation in the perigee force that may trigger seismological events. The oscillation force creates a wave that is generated by the moon rotation around the earth, which takes a month. The wave complete a cycle after 13- 14 months in average and the period is roughly 5400 hours as calculated. The major moon phases which are New and Full Moon is when the perigee force is stronger. The Solar Wind charges the Moon during the New phases. The plasmasphere charges the satellite during the Full Moon. Both create the Spring Tides what affects mostly the subduction zones connected with the Mega and Giant events in Pacific areas. Moon - Earth connections are resilient in locations with convergent tectonic plates. Inserted:

  13. Fault mirrors in seismically active fault zones: A fossil of small earthquakes at shallow depths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Li-Wei; Song, Sheng-Rong; Suppe, John; Yeh, En-Chao

    2016-03-01

    Fault mirrors (FMs) are naturally polished and glossy fault slip surfaces that can record seismic deformation at shallow depths. They are important for investigating the processes controlling dynamic fault slip. We characterize FMs in borehole samples from the hanging wall damage zone of the active Hsiaotungshi reverse fault, Taiwan. Here we report the first documented occurrence of the combination of silica gel and melt patches coating FMs, with the silica gel resembling those observed on experimentally formed FMs that were cataclastically generated. In addition, the melt patches, which are unambiguous indicators of coseismic slip, suggest that the natural FMs were produced at seismic rates, presumably resulting from flash heating at asperities on the slip surfaces. Since flash heating is efficient at small slip, we propose that these natural FMs represent fossils of small earthquakes, formed in either coseismic faulting and folding or aftershock deformation in the active Taiwan fold-and-thrust belt.

  14. Global Earthquake Activity Rate models based on version 2 of the Global Strain Rate Map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bird, P.; Kreemer, C.; Kagan, Y. Y.; Jackson, D. D.

    2013-12-01

    Global Earthquake Activity Rate (GEAR) models have usually been based on either relative tectonic motion (fault slip rates and/or distributed strain rates), or on smoothing of seismic catalogs. However, a hybrid approach appears to perform better than either parent, at least in some retrospective tests. First, we construct a Tectonic ('T') forecast of shallow (≤ 70 km) seismicity based on global plate-boundary strain rates from version 2 of the Global Strain Rate Map. Our approach is the SHIFT (Seismic Hazard Inferred From Tectonics) method described by Bird et al. [2010, SRL], in which the character of the strain rate tensor (thrusting and/or strike-slip and/or normal) is used to select the most comparable type of plate boundary for calibration of the coupled seismogenic lithosphere thickness and corner magnitude. One difference is that activity of offshore plate boundaries is spatially smoothed using empirical half-widths [Bird & Kagan, 2004, BSSA] before conversion to seismicity. Another is that the velocity-dependence of coupling in subduction and continental-convergent boundaries [Bird et al., 2009, BSSA] is incorporated. Another forecast component is the smoothed-seismicity ('S') forecast model of [Kagan & Jackson, 1994, JGR; Kagan & Jackson, 2010, GJI], which was based on optimized smoothing of the shallow part of the GCMT catalog, years 1977-2004. Both forecasts were prepared for threshold magnitude 5.767. Then, we create hybrid forecasts by one of 3 methods: (a) taking the greater of S or T; (b) simple weighted-average of S and T; or (c) log of the forecast rate is a weighted average of the logs of S and T. In methods (b) and (c) there is one free parameter, which is the fractional contribution from S. All hybrid forecasts are normalized to the same global rate. Pseudo-prospective tests for 2005-2012 (using versions of S and T calibrated on years 1977-2004) show that many hybrid models outperform both parents (S and T), and that the optimal weight on S

  15. Detection of Very Low Frequency Earthquakes in the Mexican Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maury, J.; Ide, S.; Cruz-Atienza, V. M.; Kostoglodov, V.; Perez-Campos, X.

    2016-12-01

    Tremors have already been detected in three different areas (Jalisco, Guerrero and Oaxaca) of the Mexican subduction zone but their moment tensor is difficult to estimate. However, Very Low Frequency (VLF) earthquakes have been shown to occur at the subduction interface in Guerrero, Mexico at the same time as tremors and their focal mechanisms have been calculated. We try to detect VLF events using the same method in Jalisco and in Oaxaca. With this aim we detect tremors using an envelope correlation method in Oaxaca and use a previously determined tremor catalog in Jalisco [Idehara et al., 2014]. Using the method of Ide and Yabe [2014], we stack waveforms, in the VLF band, at the time of occurrence of tremors. Finally, the stacked waveforms are inverted to better estimate the depth of these events and their moment tensor. This analysis is carried out for different time periods between 2005 and 2015, depending on the deployment of temporary network along the Mexican coast. In addition, permanent broadband stations of the Servicio Sismológico Nacional (Mexico) are used. The tremors detected in Oaxaca area are located farther west than previously known probably because of the more eastern location of stations. Our results show the spatial distribution of moment tensor along the Mexican subduction zone. The VLF sources are located at or close to the plate interface in Oaxaca and Jalisco as is observed in Guerrero. These events have magnitudes of about 3 and very low-angle to low-angle thrust mechanisms in agreement with the varying geometry of the subduction interface. The slip directions of VLF earthquakes are also consistent with the plates convergence vectors. In addition, some clear VLF signals are detected without any stacking using correlation methods. These individual detections confirm the results of our statistical analysis.

  16. Calculation of earthquake rupture histories using a hybrid global search algorithm: Application to the 1992 Landers, California, earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hartzell, S.; Liu, P.

    1996-01-01

    A method is presented for the simultaneous calculation of slip amplitudes and rupture times for a finite fault using a hybrid global search algorithm. The method we use combines simulated annealing with the downhill simplex method to produce a more efficient search algorithm then either of the two constituent parts. This formulation has advantages over traditional iterative or linearized approaches to the problem because it is able to escape local minima in its search through model space for the global optimum. We apply this global search method to the calculation of the rupture history for the Landers, California, earthquake. The rupture is modeled using three separate finite-fault planes to represent the three main fault segments that failed during this earthquake. Both the slip amplitude and the time of slip are calculated for a grid work of subfaults. The data used consist of digital, teleseismic P and SH body waves. Long-period, broadband, and short-period records are utilized to obtain a wideband characterization of the source. The results of the global search inversion are compared with a more traditional linear-least-squares inversion for only slip amplitudes. We use a multi-time-window linear analysis to relax the constraints on rupture time and rise time in the least-squares inversion. Both inversions produce similar slip distributions, although the linear-least-squares solution has a 10% larger moment (7.3 ?? 1026 dyne-cm compared with 6.6 ?? 1026 dyne-cm). Both inversions fit the data equally well and point out the importance of (1) using a parameterization with sufficient spatial and temporal flexibility to encompass likely complexities in the rupture process, (2) including suitable physically based constraints on the inversion to reduce instabilities in the solution, and (3) focusing on those robust rupture characteristics that rise above the details of the parameterization and data set.

  17. Micro-Scale Anatomy of the 1999 Chi-Chi Earthquake Fault Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boullier, A.-M.; Yeh, E.-C.; Boutareaud, S.; Song, S.-R.; Tsai, C.-H.

    2009-04-01

    Two TCDP bore-holes A and B were drilled in the northern part of the Chelungpu thrust fault where the Chi-Chi earthquake (September 21, 1999, Mw 7.6) showed large displacement, low ground acceleration and high slip velocity. In this paper, we describe the microstructures of the Chi-Chi Principal Slip Zone (PSZ) within black gouges localized at 1111m depth in Hole A and at 1136m depth in Hole B. In the FZA1111 the PSZ is a 2 cm-thick isotropic clay-rich gouge which contains aggregates formed by central clasts coated by clay cortex (Clay Clast Aggregates, CCAs), and fragments of older gouges segregated in the top third of the PSZ. In FZB1136 the PSZ is 3 mm-thick and is characterized by a foliated gouge displaying an alternation of clay-rich and clast-rich layers. The presence of CCAs, plucked underlying gouge fragments, gouge injections, and the occurrence of reverse grain size segregation of large clasts in the FZA1111 isotropic gouge suggest that the gouge was fluidized as a result of frictional heating and thermal pressurization. The foliated gouge in FZB1136 may be one locus of strain localization and related heat production. Small calcite veins present above the isotropic FZA1111 PSZ gouge, and characterized by an increasing strain with increasing distance away from the PSZ, are attributed to co-seismic fluid escape from the pressurized gouge. The observed microstructures are interpreted in view of their seismic implications for the Chi-Chi earthquake in terms of slip weakening mechanisms by thermal pressurization, gouge fluidization, co-seismic fluid distribution and post-seismic slip. Above the PSZ, several layers of compacted gouges containing deformed CCAs and gouge fragments correspond to several PSZ of past earthquakes similar to the Chi-Chi earthquake, and display a fault-parallel cleavage resulting from a low strain-rate pressure solution deformation mechanism that may be correlated to the inter-seismic periods.

  18. Frequency-dependent moment release of very low frequency earthquakes in the Cascadia subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeo, A.; Houston, H.

    2014-12-01

    Episodic tremor and slip (ETS) has been observed in Cascadia subduction zone at two different time scales: tremor at a high-frequency range of 2-8 Hz and slow slip events at a geodetic time-scale of days-months. The intermediate time scale is needed to understand the source spectrum of slow earthquakes. Ghosh et al. (2014, IRIS abs) recently reported the presence of very low frequency earthquakes (VLFEs) in Cascadia. In southwest Japan, VLFEs are usually observed at a period range around 20-50 s, and coincide with tremors (e.g., Ito et al. 2007). In this study, we analyzed VLFEs in and around the Olympic Peninsula to confirm their presence and estimate their moment release. We first detected VLFE events by using broadband seismograms with a band-pass filter of 20-50 s. The preliminary result shows that there are at least 16 VLFE events with moment magnitudes of 3.2-3.7 during the M6.8 2010 ETS. The focal mechanisms are consistent with the thrust earthquakes at the subducting plate interface. To detect signals of VLFEs below noise level, we further stacked long-period waveforms at the peak timings of tremor amplitudes for tremors within a 10-15 km radius by using tremor catalogs in 2006-2010, and estimated the focal mechanisms for each tremor source region as done in southwest Japan (Takeo et al. 2010 GRL). As a result, VLFEs could be detected for almost the entire tremor source region at a period range of 20-50 s with average moment magnitudes in each 5-min tremor window of 2.4-2.8. Although the region is limited, we could also detect VLFEs at a period range of 50-100 s with average moment magnitudes of 3.0-3.2. The moment release at 50-100 s is 4-8 times larger than that at 20-50 s, roughly consistent with an omega-squared spectral model. Further study including tremor, slow slip events and characteristic activities, such as rapid tremor reversal and tremor streaks, will reveal the source spectrum of slow earthquakes in a broader time scale from 0.1 s to days.

  19. Foreshock Patterns Preceding Great Earthquakes in the Subduction Zone of Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadopoulos, G. A.; Minadakis, G.

    2016-10-01

    Foreshock activity is considered as one of the most promising precursory changes for the main shock prediction in the short term. Averaging over several foreshock sequences has shown that foreshocks are characterized by distinct 3D patterns: their epicenters move towards the main shock epicenter, event count accelerates, and b-value drops. However, these space-time-size patterns were verified so far only in a very few individual cases mainly due to inadequate seismicity catalogue data. We have investigated 3D foreshock patterns before the M w 8.8 Maule in 27 February 2010, M w 8.1 Iquique in 1 April 2014, and M w 8.4 Illapel in 16 September 2015 great earthquakes in the Chile subduction zone. To avoid biased results, no a priori spatiotemporal definitions of foreshocks were inserted. The procedure was based on pattern recognition from statistically significant seismicity changes in the three domains. The pattern recognition in one domain was independent of the pattern recognition in another domain. We found and verified with two independent catalogue data sets (CSN, IPOC) that within a critical area of ca. 65 km from the main shock epicenter, the 2014 event was preceded by distinct foreshock 3D patterns. A nearly weak foreshock stage (20 January-14 March 2014) was followed by a main-strong stage (15 March-1 April 2014) highly significant in all domains, although foreshock activity slightly decreased in about the last 5 days. Seismic moment release also accelerated in the last stage due to the occurrence of a cluster of very strong foreshock events. Foreshock activity very likely occurred in the hanging-wall fault domain on the South American Plate overriding Nazca Plate. The 2014 foreshock activity was quite similar to the one preceding the 6 Apr. 2009 L' Aquila (Italy) M w 6.3 earthquake associated with normal faulting. Using the 2014 earthquake as a reference event, we observed that similar foreshock 3D patterns preceded the 2010 and 2015 earthquakes within

  20. Recurrence of Great Earthquakes: Evidence of Double Periodicity Along the Cascadia Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurney, C.

    2002-12-01

    Since the recognition that the Cascadia subduction zone in the US Pacific Northwest has produced large magnitude earthquakes in the past seven thousand years there has been considerable discussion centered on the dates and intervals between the earthquakes. Accurate information about the intervals between events improves the estimated date and magnitude of the next great earthquake and increases our ability to assess the potential level of risk to the residents and structures of the Cascadia margin. The penultimate event occurred about 1000 years ago but relatively little organic material has been dated. In this study, organic material collected from buried soils along the banks of the Lewis and Clark River near Astoria, Oregon yielded high precision radiocarbon dates that better constrain the dates of the penultimate and the fourth event. The peaty horizon of soil 2, marking the penultimate event, yielded an age of 990 +/-\\ 60 RCYBP. The muddy horizon of soil 2 approximately 20-30 cm below the peaty soil yielded an age of 1227 \\pm 30 RCYBP. A Sitka spruce stump in growth position in soil 4 yielded an age of 1698 \\pm$14 RCYBP. These new dates are combined with paleoseismological data from literature in an attempt to find a distribution of recurrence between earthquakes. The accompanying statistical analysis systematically combines the average dates with two comparable sources of standard deviations, arising from (i) radiocarbon dating, and (ii) inter-sample deviations as reported by different authors. The resulting statistical distribution of recurrence intervals in the Cascadia margin allows us to reject both the hypothesis of single normally distributed periodic rate, and Poissonian random recurrence model. The minimal distribution fitting the data is the superposition of two normals, a "short" one with average period of 310 years/standard deviation of 120 years, and a "long" one with average of 820 years and standard deviation of 140 years. This fit leads to

  1. PAGER-CAT: A composite earthquake catalog for calibrating global fatality models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allen, T.I.; Marano, K.D.; Earle, P.S.; Wald, D.J.

    2009-01-01

    We have described the compilation and contents of PAGER-CAT, an earthquake catalog developed principally for calibrating earthquake fatality models. It brings together information from a range of sources in a comprehensive, easy to use digital format. Earthquake source information (e.g., origin time, hypocenter, and magnitude) contained in PAGER-CAT has been used to develop an Atlas of Shake Maps of historical earthquakes (Allen et al. 2008) that can subsequently be used to estimate the population exposed to various levels of ground shaking (Wald et al. 2008). These measures will ultimately yield improved earthquake loss models employing the uniform hazard mapping methods of ShakeMap. Currently PAGER-CAT does not consistently contain indicators of landslide and liquefaction occurrence prior to 1973. In future PAGER-CAT releases we plan to better document the incidence of these secondary hazards. This information is contained in some existing global catalogs but is far from complete and often difficult to parse. Landslide and liquefaction hazards can be important factors contributing to earthquake losses (e.g., Marano et al. unpublished). Consequently, the absence of secondary hazard indicators in PAGER-CAT, particularly for events prior to 1973, could be misleading to sorne users concerned with ground-shaking-related losses. We have applied our best judgment in the selection of PAGER-CAT's preferred source parameters and earthquake effects. We acknowledge the creation of a composite catalog always requires subjective decisions, but we believe PAGER-CAT represents a significant step forward in bringing together the best available estimates of earthquake source parameters and reports of earthquake effects. All information considered in PAGER-CAT is stored as provided in its native catalog so that other users can modify PAGER preferred parameters based on their specific needs or opinions. As with all catalogs, the values of some parameters listed in PAGER-CAT are

  2. Imaging of the Rupture Zone of the Magnitude 6.2 Karonga Earthquake of 2009 using Electrical Resistivity Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clappe, B.; Hull, C. D.; Dawson, S.; Johnson, T.; Laó-Dávila, D. A.; Abdelsalam, M. G.; Chindandali, P. R. N.; Nyalugwe, V.; Atekwana, E. A.; Salima, J.

    2015-12-01

    The 2009 Karonga earthquakes occurred in an area where active faults had not previously been known to exist. Over 5000 buildings were destroyed in the area and at least 4 people lost their lives as a direct result of the 19th of December magnitude 6.2 earthquake. The earthquake swarms occurred in the hanging wall of the main Livingstone border fault along segmented, west dipping faults that are synthetic to the Livingstone fault. The faults have a general trend of 290-350 degrees. Electrical resistivity surveys were conducted to investigate the nature of known rupture and seismogenic zones that resulted from the 2009 earthquakes in the Karonga, Malawi area. The goal of this study was to produce high-resolution images below the epicenter and nearby areas of liquefaction to determine changes in conductivity/resistivity signatures in the subsurface. An Iris Syscal Pro was utilized to conduct dipole-dipole resistivity measurements below the surface of soil at farmlands at 6 locations. Each transect was 710 meters long and had an electrode spacing of 10 meters. RES2DINV software was used to create 2-D inversion images of the rupture and seismogenic zones. We were able to observe three distinct geoelectrical layers to the north of the rupture zone and two south of the rupture zone with the discontinuity between the two marked by the location of the surface rupture. The rupture zone is characterized by ~80-meter wide area of enhanced conductivity, 5 m thick underlain by a more resistive layer dipping west. We interpret this to be the result of fine grain sands and silts brought up from depth to near surface as a result of shearing along the fault rupture or liquefaction. Electrical resistivity surveys are valuable, yet under-utilized tools for imaging near-surface effects of earthquakes.

  3. Early Jurassic black shales: Global anoxia or regional "Dead Zones"?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Schootbrugge, B.; Payne, J.; Wignall, P.

    2012-12-01

    The so-called "Schwarzer Jura" or "Black Jurassic" in Germany is informally used to designate a series of organic-rich sediments that roughly span the Early Jurassic (201.6 - 175.6 Myr), and which culminate in the Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic Event. Based on organic and inorganic geochemical as well as (micro)palaeontological data from several recently drilled cores, black shales deposited directly following the end-Triassic extinction (201.6 Ma) during the Hettangian are extremely similar to Toarcian black shales. Both events are characterized by laminated black shales that contain high amounts of the biomarker isorenieratane, a fossilized pigment derived from green sulphur bacteria. Furthermore, the two intervals show similar changes in phytoplankton assemblages from chromophyte (red) to chlorophyte (green) algae. Combined, the evidence suggests that photic zone euxinia developed repeatedly during the Early Jurassic, making wide swaths of shelf area inhospitable to benthic life. In the oceans today such areas are called "Dead Zones" and they are increasing in number and extent due to the combined effects of man-made eutrophication and global warming. During the Early Jurassic, regional anoxic events developed in response to flood basalt volcanism, which triggered global warming, increased run-off, and changes in ocean circulation. The patchiness of Early Jurassic anoxia allows comparisons to be made with present-day "Dead Zones", while at the same time ocean de-oxygenation in the past may serve to predict future perturbations in the Earth system.

  4. Why Do Slow Earthquakes Occur Favorably in Hot Subduction Zones? : 2D Numerical Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, T.; Schubnel, A.

    2014-12-01

    It is puzzling why slow earthquakes occur in hot subduction zones only. We study numerically how antigorite dehydration coupled with slip-induced dilatancy and thermal pressurization affects rupture behavior to solve the above puzzle. Recent related studies actually suggest importance of antigorite dehydration. We assume faulting in a 2D thermoporoelastic medium. The mineral reaction is assumed using a first order Arrhenius law. Nondimensional parameters important in the modeling are Su, Su' and X' according to our former study; Su' and Su are proportional to permeability and increase rate of slip-induced porosity. X' denotes volume change induced by the reaction. Our calculation shows that moment release rate and fault tip growth rate are smaller for larger values of Su, smaller values of X' or smaller values of Su'. These two rates are found to be negligibly small compared with the solutions for the dynamic elasticity analysis when Su>1 and X'<0 are satisfied. Slow sustained fault growth occurs for such values of Su and X'. This suggests that Su>1 and X'<0 are satisfied at hot subduction zones; the condition X'<0 is consistent with the reaction expected at hot subduction zones. In cold subduction zones however, antigorite dehydration will occur at depth greater than 60km, with -0.1

  5. Impact of the viscoelastic postseismic deformation following megathrust earthquake on seismic hazard in subduction zones : the case of the Maule and Illapel earthquakes in Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Emilie; Vigny, Christophe; Fleitout, Luce; Garaud, Jean-Didier

    2016-04-01

    On 16th September 2015, the Mw8,3 Illapel earthquake occurred in the region of Coquimbo, Central Chile. In this area, similar size (Mw 8+) megathrust earthquakes had occurred in 1943 and 1880 and GPS measurements conducted over the last 15 years revealed an apparent coupling of more than 60 %. Therefore, this segment seems to be a clear application of the seismic gap theory with recurrent earthquakes of similar size. However, the precise timing and extension of the 2015 rupture are quite unsettling : it occurred about 6 years after the Maule Mw 8,8 earthquake, why not sooner ? Also, it did not connect to the 2010 rupture area, leaving an even more coupled 200km-long section unbroken in front of Valparaiso. The analysis of 5 years of GPS data following the 2010 event highlights a propagation of the postseismic deformation at very large scale, that we attributed mostly to viscoelastic relaxation in the asthenosphere and in a low viscosity channel along the slab. Orientated trenchward in the Maule rupture zone, the postseismic displacements are rotating northward at the edge of the 2010 rupture, reaching a Northeastern direction in the Coquimbo region. There, we observe an increase of about 10 % of the horizontal surface velocity, roughly aligned with the pre-seismic direction. Between these two sections of the subduction (Maule where strain is highly decreased by post-seismic relaxation and Illapel where strain is increased) lies the Valparaiso section. The latitude where strain starts to increase significantly is located at 32°S (Los Vilos), approximately where the 2015 rupture started. In this study, we take advantage of the very dense GPS data sets to quantify precisely the stress transfer due to viscous relaxation using 3D FE models. We show that the amplitude and orientation of the postseismic deformation in the Valparaiso area contributes to release strain in the upper plate, when on the contrary, it induces a significant stress increase of about 0,3 bar

  6. Large mid-Holocene and late Pleistocene earthquakes on the Oquirrh fault zone, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olig, S.S.; Lund, W.R.; Black, B.D.

    1994-01-01

    The Oquirrh fault zone is a range-front normal fault that bounds the east side of Tooele Valley and it has long been recognized as a potential source for large earthquakes that pose a significant hazard to population centers along the Wasatch Front in central Utah. Scarps of the Oquirrh fault zone offset the Provo shoreline of Lake Bonneville and previous studies of scarp morphology suggested that the most recent surface-faulting earthquake occurred between 9000 and 13,500 years ago. Based on a potential rupture length of 12 to 21 km from previous mapping, moment magnitude (Mw) estimates for this event range from 6.3 to 6.6 In contrast, our results from detailed mapping and trench excavations at two sites indicate that the most-recent event actually occurred between 4300 and 6900 yr B.P. (4800 and 7900 cal B.P.) and net vertical displacements were 2.2 to 2.7 m, much larger than expected considering estimated rupture lengths for this event. Empirical relations between magnitude and displacement yield Mw 7.0 to 7.2. A few, short discontinuous fault scarps as far south as Stockton, Utah have been identified in a recent mapping investigation and our results suggest that they may be part of the Oquirrh fault zone, increasing the total fault length to 32 km. These results emphasize the importance of integrating stratigraphic and geomorphic information in fault investigations for earthquake hazard evaluations. At both the Big Canyon and Pole Canyon sites, trenches exposed faulted Lake Bonneville sediments and thick wedges of fault-scarp derived colluvium associated with the most-recent event. Bulk sediment samples from a faulted debris-flow deposit at the Big Canyon site yield radiocarbon ages of 7650 ?? 90 yr B.P. and 6840 ?? 100 yr B.P. (all lab errors are ??1??). A bulk sediment sample from unfaulted fluvial deposits that bury the fault scarp yield a radiocarbon age estimate of 4340 ?? 60 yr B.P. Stratigraphic evidence for a pre-Bonneville lake cycle penultimate

  7. Large mid-Holocene and late Pleistocene earthquakes on the Oquirrh fault zone, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olig, Susan S.; Lund, William R.; Black, Bill D.

    1994-08-01

    The Oquirrh fault zone is a range-front normal fault that bounds the east side of Tooele Valley and it has long been recognized as a potential source for large earthquakes that pose a significant hazard to population centers along the Wasatch Front in central Utah. Scarps of the Oquirrh fault zone offset the Provo shoreline of Lake Bonneville and previous studies of scarp morphology suggested that the most recent surface-faulting earthquake occurred between 9000 and 13,500 years ago. Based on a potential rupture length of 12 to 21 km from previous mapping, moment magnitude ( Mw) estimates for this event range from 6.3 to 6.6 In contrast, our results from detailed mapping and trench excavations at two sites indicate that the most-recent event actually occurred between 4300 and 6900 yr B.P. (4800 and 7900 cal B.P.) and net vertical displacements were 2.2 to 2.7 m, much larger than expected considering estimated rupture lengths for this event. Empirical relations between magnitude and displacement yield Mw 7.0 to 7.2. A few, short discontinuous fault scarps as far south as Stockton, Utah have been identified in a recent mapping investigation and our results suggest that they may be part of the Oquirrh fault zone, increasing the total fault length to 32 km. These results emphasize the importance of integrating stratigraphic and geomorphic information in fault investigations for earthquake hazard evaluations. At both the Big Canyon and Pole Canyon sites, trenches exposed faulted Lake Bonneville sediments and thick wedges of fault-scarp derived colluvium associated with the most-recent event. Bulk sediment samples from a faulted debris-flow deposit at the Big Canyon site yield radiocarbon ages of 7650 ± 90 yr B.P. and 6840 ± 100 yr B.P. (all lab errors are ±1 α). A bulk sediment sample from unfaulted fluvial deposits that bury the fault scarp yield a radiocarbon age estimate of 4340 ± 60 yr B.P. Stratigraphic evidence for a pre-Bonneville lake cycle penultimate

  8. The Constitución earthquake of 25 March 2012: A large aftershock of the Maule earthquake near the bottom of the seismogenic zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Sergio; Grandin, Raphael; Dionicio, Viviana; Satriano, Claudio; Fuenzalida, Amaya; Vigny, Christophe; Kiraly, Eszter; Meyer, Clio; Baez, Juan Carlos; Riquelme, Sebastian; Madariaga, Raúl; Campos, Jaime

    2013-09-01

    The Mw 7.0 Constitución earthquake of March 2012 is one of the largest interplate aftershocks of the Maule 2010 Mw 8.8 mega-thrust earthquake. This event was recorded by high-rate GPS stations, local seismometers and accelerometers, the Global Seismographic Network and SAR acquisitions by the ENVISAT satellite. We have used these data to perform a kinematic inversion and back projection to identify the principal characteristics of this event. The Constitución earthquake nucleated at 39 km depth and then propagated up-dip at subshear speed towards its centroid, with an unusually long initiation phase that lasted almost 6 s. The largest slip of this event was located in the deeper part of the subduction interface, between the region of maximum co-seismic slip of the 2010 Maule earthquake, and the area where rapid afterslip occurred following that event. Features of the Constitución earthquake may suggest that larger interplate aftershocks of the Maule event preferentially occur in the deeper part of the plate interface where ruptures are complex, produce high frequencies and involve numerous asperities.

  9. Assessment of impact of strong earthquakes to the global economy by example of Thoku event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatiana, Skufina; Peter, Skuf'in; Sergey, Baranov; Vera, Samarina; Taisiya, Shatalova

    2016-04-01

    We examine the economic consequences of strong earthquakes by example of M9 Tahoku one that occurred on March 11, 2011 close to the northeast shore of Japanese coast Honshu. This earthquake became the strongest in the whole history of the seismological observations in this part of the planet. The generated tsunami killed more than 15,700 people, damaged 332,395 buildings and 2,126 roads. The total economic loss in Japan was estimated at 309 billion. The catastrophe in Japan also impacted global economy. To estimate its impact, we used regional and global stock indexes, production indexes, stock prices of the main Japanese, European and US companies, import and export dynamics, as well as the data provided by the custom of Japan. We also demonstrated that the catastrophe substantially affected the markets and on the short run in some indicators it even exceeded the effect of the global financial crisis of 2008. The last strong earthquake occurred in Nepal (25.04.2015, M7.8) and Chile (16.09.2015, M8.3), both actualized the research of cost assessments of the overall economic impact of seismic hazard. We concluded that it is necessary to treat strong earthquakes as one very important factor that affects the world economy depending on their location. The research was supported by Russian Foundation for Basic Research (Project 16-06-00056A).

  10. Control of high oceanic features and subduction channel on earthquake ruptures along the Chile-Peru subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras-Reyes, Eduardo; Carrizo, Daniel

    2011-05-01

    We discuss the earthquake rupture behavior along the Chile-Peru subduction zone in terms of the buoyancy of the subducting high oceanic features (HOF's), and the effect of the interplay between HOF and subduction channel thickness on the degree of interplate coupling. We show a strong relation between subduction of HOF's and earthquake rupture segments along the Chile-Peru margin, elucidating how these subducting features play a key role in seismic segmentation. Within this context, the extra increase of normal stress at the subduction interface is strongly controlled by the buoyancy of HOF's which is likely caused by crustal thickening and mantle serpentinization beneath hotspot ridges and fracture zones, respectively. Buoyancy of HOF's provide an increase in normal stress estimated to be as high as 10-50 MPa. This significant increase of normal stress will enhance seismic coupling across the subduction interface and hence will affect the seismicity. In particular, several large earthquakes (Mw ≥ 7.5) have occurred in regions characterized by subduction of HOF's including fracture zones (e.g., Nazca, Challenger and Mocha), hotspot ridges (e.g., Nazca, Iquique, and Juan Fernández) and the active Nazca-Antarctic spreading center. For instance, the giant 1960 earthquake (Mw = 9.5) is coincident with the linear projections of the Mocha Fracture Zone and the buoyant Chile Rise, while the active seismic gap of north Chile spatially correlates with the subduction of the Iquique Ridge. Further comparison of rupture characteristics of large underthrusting earthquakes and the locations of subducting features provide evidence that HOF's control earthquake rupture acting as both asperities and barriers. This dual behavior can be partially controlled by the subduction channel thickness. A thick subduction channel smooths the degree of coupling caused by the subducted HOF which allows lateral earthquake rupture propagation. This may explain why the 1960 rupture propagates

  11. Facilitating open global data use in earthquake source modelling to improve geodetic and seismological approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudhaus, Henriette; Heimann, Sebastian; Steinberg, Andreas; Isken, Marius; Vasyura-Bathke, Hannes

    2017-04-01

    In the last few years impressive achievements have been made in improving inferences about earthquake sources by using InSAR (Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar) data. Several factors aided these developments. The open data basis of earthquake observations has expanded vastly with the two powerful Sentinel-1 SAR sensors up in space. Increasing computer power allows processing of large data sets for more detailed source models. Moreover, data inversion approaches for earthquake source inferences are becoming more advanced. By now data error propagation is widely implemented and the estimation of model uncertainties is a regular feature of reported optimum earthquake source models. Also, more regularly InSAR-derived surface displacements and seismological waveforms are combined, which requires finite rupture models instead of point-source approximations and layered medium models instead of homogeneous half-spaces. In other words the disciplinary differences in geodetic and seismological earthquake source modelling shrink towards common source-medium descriptions and a source near-field/far-field data point of view. We explore and facilitate the combination of InSAR-derived near-field static surface displacement maps and dynamic far-field seismological waveform data for global earthquake source inferences. We join in the community efforts with the particular goal to improve crustal earthquake source inferences in generally not well instrumented areas, where often only the global backbone observations of earthquakes are available provided by seismological broadband sensor networks and, since recently, by Sentinel-1 SAR acquisitions. We present our work on modelling standards for the combination of static and dynamic surface displacements in the source's near-field and far-field, e.g. on data and prediction error estimations as well as model uncertainty estimation. Rectangular dislocations and moment-tensor point sources are exchanged by simple planar finite

  12. Fault plane orientations of intermediate-depth and deep-focus earthquakes in the Japan-Kuril-Kamchatka subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Linda M.; Baluyut, Elena C.; Osburg, Timothy; Lisac, Kristen; Kokkinen, Siiri

    2015-12-01

    In the northwestern Pacific, the Pacific plate subducts to the west at the Japan, Kuril, and Kamchatka trenches. Throughout most of the subduction zone, the subducting slab is planar and dipping at an angle of 30°-60°, with the exception of a fold in the southern Kuril segment. To investigate how the slab deforms in response to the applied forces and which mechanism generates the earthquakes, we analyze the rupture properties of 111 large (MW≥5.7) intermediate-depth and deep-focus earthquakes (60-656 km depth) from 1990 to 2014 in the Japan-Kuril-Kamchatka subduction zone. For each earthquake, we use rupture directivity to estimate rupture direction and rupture speed and to distinguish the fault plane from the auxiliary plane of the focal mechanism. Seventy six percent of the earthquakes with sufficient station coverage are well modeled by unilateral rupture propagation. The estimated rupture speeds range from zero to supershear. The estimated rupture directions allow identification of the fault plane as the more horizontal nodal plane for 30 earthquakes, while an additional 11 earthquakes rupture toward the intersection of the nodal planes, so the fault plane cannot be identified. Combining our newly identified fault planes with previously identified fault planes in the region, we observe that in planar slab segments, most earthquakes slip along a dominant fault orientation. For a steeply dipping slab, this orientation is subhorizontal. In more sharply bent slab segments, such as the Kuril fold, deformation is accommodated along more variable fault orientations, including subvertical faults. The correlation of slab geometry with fault orientation suggests that the local stress field controls fault orientations.

  13. The ANSS response to the Mw 5.8 Central Virginia Seismic Zone earthquake of August 23, 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNamara, D. E.; Horton, S.; Benz, H.; Earle, P. S.; Withers, M. M.; Hayes, G. P.; Kim, W. Y.; Chapman, M. C.; Herrmann, R. B.; Petersen, M. D.; Williams, R. A.

    2011-12-01

    An Mw 5.8 earthquake (depth=6km) occurred on August 23, 2011 (17:51:04 UTC) near Mineral, Virginia, which was widely felt from Maine to Georgia along the eastern seaboard and west to Chicago and western Tennessee. The USGS tallied nearly 142,000 felt reports submitted to the Did You Feel It (DYFI) internet community intensity system, making it the most widely felt earthquake since the web-site began, and demonstrating that more people felt this earthquake than any other in U.S. history. Significant damage was reported in the epicentral area and as far away as Washington D.C. (135 km away); minor damage was reported in Baltimore (200 km). The reverse faulting earthquake occurred on a northeast-striking plane within a region of diffuse seismicity known as the Central Virginia Seismic Zone. Within the first week, the mainshock was followed by 17 aftershocks with magnitude greater than 2, including Mw 4.5, 4.2, and 3.8 events. In the days following the mainshock, 46 portable seismic stations were deployed by several organizations, making this among the best-recorded aftershock sequence in the eastern U.S. Within 24 hours of the mainshock, 8 portable stations were deployed in time to record the largest aftershock to date (M4.5). We will present the results of our post-earthquake response, including attenuation and site amplification observations using portable aftershock station data, details on the initial USGS NEIC post earthquake response products and an assessment of the seismotectonics of the Central Virginia Seismic Zone based on aftershock locations and source parameter modeling of the larger earthquakes.

  14. Aftershock seismicity of the 27 February 2010 Mw 8.8 Maule earthquake rupture zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, Dietrich; Tilmann, Frederik; Barrientos, Sergio E.; Contreras-Reyes, Eduardo; Methe, Pascal; Moreno, Marcos; Heit, Ben; Agurto, Hans; Bernard, Pascal; Vilotte, Jean-Pierre; Beck, Susan

    2012-02-01

    On 27 February 2010 the Mw 8.8 Maule earthquake in Central Chile ruptured a seismic gap where significant strain had accumulated since 1835. Shortly after the mainshock a dense network of temporary seismic stations was installed along the whole rupture zone in order to capture the aftershock activity. Here, we present the aftershock distribution and first motion polarity focal mechanisms based on automatic detection algorithms and picking engines. By processing the seismic data between 15 March and 30 September 2010 from stations from IRIS, IPGP, GFZ and University of Liverpool we determined 20,205 hypocentres with magnitudes Mw between 1 and 5.5. Seismic activity occurs in six groups: 1.) Normal faulting outer rise events 2.) A shallow group of plate interface seismicity apparent at 25-35 km depth and 50-120 km distance to the trench with some variations between profiles. Along strike, the aftershocks occur largely within the zone of coseismic slip but extend ~ 50 km further north, and with predominantly shallowly dipping thrust mechanisms. Along dip, the events are either within the zone of coseismic slip, or downdip from it, depending on the coseismic slip model used. 3.) A third band of seismicity is observed further downdip at 40-50 km depth and further inland at 150-160 km trench perpendicular distance, with mostly shallow dipping (~ 28°) thrust focal mechanisms indicating rupture of the plate interface significantly downdip of the coseismic rupture, and presumably above the intersection of the continental Moho with the plate interface. 4.) A deep group of intermediate depth events between 80 and 120 km depth is present north of 36°S. Within the Maule segment, a large portion of events during the inter-seismic phase originated from this depth range. 5.) The magmatic arc exhibits a small amount of crustal seismicity but does not appear to show significantly enhanced activity after the Mw 8.8 Maule 2010 earthquake. 6.) Pronounced crustal aftershock activity

  15. Development of the Global Earthquake Model’s neotectonic fault database

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christophersen, Annemarie; Litchfield, Nicola; Berryman, Kelvin; Thomas, Richard; Basili, Roberto; Wallace, Laura; Ries, William; Hayes, Gavin P.; Haller, Kathleen M.; Yoshioka, Toshikazu; Koehler, Richard D.; Clark, Dan; Wolfson-Schwehr, Monica; Boettcher, Margaret S.; Villamor, Pilar; Horspool, Nick; Ornthammarath, Teraphan; Zuñiga, Ramon; Langridge, Robert M.; Stirling, Mark W.; Goded, Tatiana; Costa, Carlos; Yeats, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The Global Earthquake Model (GEM) aims to develop uniform, openly available, standards, datasets and tools for worldwide seismic risk assessment through global collaboration, transparent communication and adapting state-of-the-art science. GEM Faulted Earth (GFE) is one of GEM’s global hazard module projects. This paper describes GFE’s development of a modern neotectonic fault database and a unique graphical interface for the compilation of new fault data. A key design principle is that of an electronic field notebook for capturing observations a geologist would make about a fault. The database is designed to accommodate abundant as well as sparse fault observations. It features two layers, one for capturing neotectonic faults and fold observations, and the other to calculate potential earthquake fault sources from the observations. In order to test the flexibility of the database structure and to start a global compilation, five preexisting databases have been uploaded to the first layer and two to the second. In addition, the GFE project has characterised the world’s approximately 55,000 km of subduction interfaces in a globally consistent manner as a basis for generating earthquake event sets for inclusion in earthquake hazard and risk modelling. Following the subduction interface fault schema and including the trace attributes of the GFE database schema, the 2500-km-long frontal thrust fault system of the Himalaya has also been characterised. We propose the database structure to be used widely, so that neotectonic fault data can make a more complete and beneficial contribution to seismic hazard and risk characterisation globally.

  16. Earthquakes

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Information on this page will help you understand environmental dangers related to earthquakes, what you can do to prepare and recover. It will also help you recognize possible environmental hazards and learn what you can do to protect you and your family

  17. Tsunami history of an Oregon coastal lake reveals a 4600 yr record of great earthquakes on the Cascadia subduction zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kelsey, H.M.; Nelson, A.R.; Hemphill-Haley, E.; Witter, R.C.

    2005-01-01

    Bradley Lake, on the southern Oregon coastal plain, records local tsunamis and seismic shaking on the Cascadia subduction zone over the last 7000 yr. Thirteen marine incursions delivered landward-thinning sheets of sand to the lake from nearshore, beach, and dune environments to the west. Following each incursion, a slug of marine water near the bottom of the freshwater lake instigated a few-year-to-several-decade period of a brackish (??? 4??? salinity) lake. Four additional disturbances without marine incursions destabilized sideslopes and bottom sediment, producing a suspension deposit that blanketed the lake bottom. Considering the magnitude and duration of the disturbances necessary to produce Bradley Lake's marine incursions, a local tsunami generated by a great earthquake on the Cascadia subduction zone is the only accountable mechanism. Extreme ocean levels must have been at least 5-8 m above sea level, and the cumulative duration of each marine incursion must have been at least 10 min. Disturbances without marine incursions require seismic shaking as well. Over the 4600 yr period when Bradley Lake was an optimum tsunami recorder, tsunamis from Cascadia plate-boundary earthquakes came in clusters. Between 4600 and 2800 cal yr B.P., tsunamis occurred at the average frequency of ??? 3-4 every 1000 yr. Then, starting ???2800 cal yr B.P., there was a 930-1260 yr interval with no tsunamis. That gap was followed by a ???1000 yr period with 4 tsunamis. In the last millennium, a 670-750 yr gap preceded the A.D. 1700 earthquake and tsunami. The A.D. 1700 earthquake may be the first of a new cluster of plate-boundary earthquakes and accompanying tsunamis. Local tsunamis entered Bradley Lake an average of every 390 yr, whereas the portion of the Cascadia plate boundary that underlies Bradley Lake ruptured in a great earthquake less frequently, about once every 500 yr. Therefore, the entire length of the subduction zone does not rupture in every earthquake, and Bradley

  18. Distribution of Active Faults and Recent Earthquake Ruptures along the Gobi-Altai Active Fault Zone, Southern Mongolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugito, N.; Goto, H.; Suzuki, Y.; Ishiguro, S.; Hirouchi, D.; Tsutsumi, H.; Enkhtaivan, D.; Batkhishig, O.; Narangerel, S.; Purevsuren, N.; Avirmed, E.; Otgonbayar, M.; Sukhbaatar, O.

    2007-12-01

    The Gobi-Altai earthquake of 4 December 1957 in southern Mongolia is one of the largest recorded intracontinental earthquakes in the world. The surface ruptures associated with this M8.3 earthquake extend for about 260 km long and 40 km wide, involving strike-slip and reverse faulting (Kurushin et al., 1997). Earthquake ruptures appeared along a limited portion of the entire Gobi-Altai fault zone. West of the 1957 rupture zone, surface ruptures during historical and prehistrical earthquakes have been reported. Khil?fko and others (1985) reported surface deformation along the southern slope of the Bayan Tsagaan Mountains produced during the earthquake of 7 April 1958. They also identified two more Holocene rupture zones: west-northwest of the Bayan Tsagaan rupture near the village of Chandman, and west-northwest of the Chandman rupture near the village of Myangayn. However, previous studies do not discuss relationship between the distributions of active faults and earthquake ruptures along the entire active fault zone, because the exact location of the pre-existing active fault traces has not been mapped on large-scale maps. We have made distribution map of active fault traces based on interpretation of stereo-pair CORONA satellite photographs, which were taken between 1959 and 1972 for military intelligence during Cold War period. We also observed fault scarps in the field and made geomorphic profiles across the fault scarps. We were able to detect a lot of recent surface ruptures including the 1957 earthquake rupture, the Bayan Tsagaan, Chandman and Myangayn ruptures along the active fault traces. Fault scarps of these ruptures cross fluvial terraces of late Pleistocene as well as present riverbeds continuously. This indicates some of the active faults recently ruptured during a relatively short period. On the other hand, there exists an approximately 100-km-long portion between the 1957 and Chandman ruptures that has not displaced recent fluvial terraces

  19. Sources characteristics and Afterslip of Great Earthquakes in the Western Sunda Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chlieh, M.; Avouac, J.; Sieh, K.; Natawidjaja, D. H.

    2006-12-01

    We determine coseismic and the first-month postseismic deformation associated with the Sumatra-Andaman earthquake of December 26, 2004 from near-field Global Positioning System (GPS) surveys in northwestern Sumatra and along the Nicobar-Andaman islands, continuous and campaign GPS measurements from Thailand and Malaysia, and in-situ and remotely sensed observations of the vertical motion of coral reefs. The coseismic model shows that the Sunda subduction megathrust ruptured over a distance of about 1500 km and a width of less than 150 km, releasing a total moment of 6.7-7.0 1022 Nm, equivalent to a magnitude Mw~9.15. The latitudinal distribution of released moment in our model has three distinct peaks around 4°N, 7° and 9°N, which compares well to the latitudinal variations seen in the seismic inversion and of the analysis of radiated T-waves. Our coseismic model is also consistent with interpretation of normal modes and with the amplitude of very long period surface waves. The tsunami predicted from this model fits relatively well the altimetric measurements made by the JASON and TOPEX satellites. Neither slow nor delayed slip is needed to explain the normal modes and the tsunami wave. The near-field geodetic data that encompass both coseismic deformation and up to 40 days of postseismic deformation require that slip must have continued on the plate interface after the 500s long seismic rupture releasing a moment equivalent to 2.5 1022 Nm (Mw~8.8). The Mw8.6 Nias-Simeulue earthquake of March 28, 2005, ruptured the southern adjacent segment of the Sumatra-Andaman earthquake. This event occurred within an array of continuous GPS stations and produced measurable vertical displacement of the fringing coral reefs above the fault rupture. Source models obtained from the joint inversion of various combinations of the teleseismic body waves and geodetic data indicate a relatively slow average rupture velocity of 1.5 to 2.5km/s and long average rise time of up to 20s

  20. Seismological investigation of earthquakes in the New Madrid seismic zone and the northeastern extent of the New Madrid seismic zone: Final report, September 1981-December 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmann, R.B.; Taylor, K.; Nguyen, B.

    1988-07-01

    Earthquake activity in the Central Mississippi Valley has been monitored by an eight station seismograph network in the Wabash River Valley of southeastern Illinois and by a six station seismograph network in the New Madrid seismic zone. This network is a major component of a larger network in the region, jointly sponsored by the NRC, USGS, universities and states. During the time period of the contract, October 1981 through December 1986, 1206 earthquakes were located in the Central Mississippi Valley, of which 808 were in the New Madrid, Missouri area. Significant earthquakes studied in detail occurred in northeastern Ohio on January 31, 1986 and in southeastern Illinois on June 10, 1987. Focal mechanisms have been calculated for the 10 June 1987 southern Illinois earthquake using both P-wave first motions and long-period surface-wave spectral amplitude data. The long-period surface-wave and strong ground motion accelerogram recordings of the January 3, 1986, northeastern Ohio earthquake were used to estimate the focal mechanism and source time function of the source.reverse arrow

  1. Modeling long- and short-term slow slip events and their interaction with large earthquakes along the Hikurangi subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibazaki, B.; Matsuzawa, T.; Wallace, L. M.; Ito, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Recent high-resolution geodetic observations revealed the occurrence of various slow slip events (SSEs) along the Hikurangi subduction plate interfaces. Long-term SSEs with a duration of 1.5 years (e.g., Manawatu SSEs) occur at the deeper portion of the Hikurangi subduction zone, and shallow short-term SSEs with a duration of 1-3 weeks occur along the northern and central parts of the subduction zone. Wallace et al. (2012) reported a sequence of simultaneous short-term and long-term SSEs along the Hikurangi subduction zone during 2010-2011. In the present study, we perform quasi-dynamic modeling on short-term and long-term SSEs along the Hikurangi subduction zone using a rate- and state-dependent friction law, while assigning realistic configurations of the plate interface. Based on the study of interseismic coupling by Wallace et al. (2009), we set the seismogenic zone where a-b is negative. We reproduce the long-term Manawatu SSEs and short-term shallow SSEs by setting the effective stress of these zones at 2.56 MPa and 0.48-0.64 MPa, respectively. The effective stress of the Manawatu SSE zone is approximately five times larger than that of the short-term SSE zones. However, the ratio of effective stress to critical displacement of the Manawatu SSE zone is smaller than that of the short-term SSE zones. A sequence of simultaneous short-term SSEs and the long-term Manawatu SSE can be reproduced as observed by Wallace et al. (2012). Long-term SSEs often trigger short-term SSEs that are located at the shallower extension of the Manawatu SSE zone. We also investigate the interaction between the SSEs and large earthquakes. A large earthquake nucleates at the southern segment and propagates to the northern narrow seismic zones. Slips occur even at the SSE zones, and these slips contribute to the size of the earthquake. The occurrence of the various slip processes suggests heterogeneous distributions of constitutive law parameters along the Hikurangi subduction zone.

  2. Seismic velocity variations along the rupture zone of the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, G.; Thurber, C. H.

    2012-09-01

    We revisit the rupture zone of the 1989 Mw6.9 Loma Prieta earthquake, central California, by developing high-resolution three-dimensional (3-D)Vp and Vp/Vs models. We apply the simul2000 inversion method and algorithm to a set of "composite" events, which have greater number of picks per event and reduced random picking errors compared with traditional master events. Our final P-wave velocity model generally agrees with previous studies, showing a high velocity body of above 6.7 km/s in the southeast rupture zone of the main shock. The 3-DVp/Vs model, however, has different features, with low Vp/Vs in the upper crust and high Vp/Vs anomalies in deeper layers of the rupture zone. We interpret the low Vp/Vs at shallow depths to be granitic rocks, whereas at greater depths the areas of higher Vp/Vs(around 1.725-1.75) presumably are mafic rocks. The resulting 3-D velocity model was used to improve absolute locations for all local events between 1984 and 2010 in our study area. We then applied a similar event cluster analysis, waveform cross-correlation, and differential time relocation methods to improve relative event location accuracy. Over 88% of the seismicity falls into similar event clusters. A dramatic sharpening of seismicity patterns is obtained after using these methods. The medians of the relative location uncertainties calculated by using the bootstrap approach are 5 m for horizontal and 8 m for vertical. Differential times from cross-correlation are used to estimatein situnear-sourceVp/Vsratio within each event cluster. The high-resolutionVp/Vs method confirms the trend of the velocity variations from the tomographic results, although absolute values are slightly different.

  3. Small repeating earthquake activity, interplate quasi-static slip, and interplate coupling in the Hyuga-nada, southwestern Japan subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Yusuke; Shimizu, Hiroshi; Goto, Kazuhiko

    2012-04-01

    Small repeating earthquake (RE) analysis is a useful method for estimating interplate quasi-static slip, which is a good indicator of interplate coupling. We detected 170 continual-type interplate RE groups and then estimated the spatial variation in quasi-static slip in the Hyuga-nada over the past 17 years. The RE activity in this region has different characteristics compared with that in the northeast Japan subduction zone, presumably reflecting differences in the subduction properties. Our results revealed that interplate coupling spatially changes along the trench-axis and dip-direction—a phenomenon that cannot be resolved by land-based Global Positioning System (GPS) analysis. By comparing seismicity, the low-slip-rate areas correspond with the location of hypocenters and asperities for large- and moderate-sized interplate earthquakes, suggesting strong interplate coupling at these sites. These results indicate that the slip rate distribution estimated from RE activity is reliable and useful for assessing the potential of future large earthquakes.

  4. Velocity and Density Models Incorporating the Cascadia Subduction Zone for 3D Earthquake Ground Motion Simulations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stephenson, William J.

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION In support of earthquake hazards and ground motion studies in the Pacific Northwest, three-dimensional P- and S-wave velocity (3D Vp and Vs) and density (3D rho) models incorporating the Cascadia subduction zone have been developed for the region encompassed from about 40.2?N to 50?N latitude, and from about -122?W to -129?W longitude. The model volume includes elevations from 0 km to 60 km (elevation is opposite of depth in model coordinates). Stephenson and Frankel (2003) presented preliminary ground motion simulations valid up to 0.1 Hz using an earlier version of these models. The version of the model volume described here includes more structural and geophysical detail, particularly in the Puget Lowland as required for scenario earthquake simulations in the development of the Seattle Urban Hazards Maps (Frankel and others, 2007). Olsen and others (in press) used the model volume discussed here to perform a Cascadia simulation up to 0.5 Hz using a Sumatra-Andaman Islands rupture history. As research from the EarthScope Program (http://www.earthscope.org) is published, a wealth of important detail can be added to these model volumes, particularly to depths of the upper-mantle. However, at the time of development for this model version, no EarthScope-specific results were incorporated. This report is intended to be a reference for colleagues and associates who have used or are planning to use this preliminary model in their research. To this end, it is intended that these models will be considered a beginning template for a community velocity model of the Cascadia region as more data and results become available.

  5. Spatial aspects of building and population exposure data and their implications for global earthquake exposure modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dell’Acqua, F.; Gamba, P.; Jaiswal, K.

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses spatial aspects of the global exposure dataset and mapping needs for earthquake risk assessment. We discuss this in the context of development of a Global Exposure Database for the Global Earthquake Model (GED4GEM), which requires compilation of a multi-scale inventory of assets at risk, for example, buildings, populations, and economic exposure. After defining the relevant spatial and geographic scales of interest, different procedures are proposed to disaggregate coarse-resolution data, to map them, and if necessary to infer missing data by using proxies. We discuss the advantages and limitations of these methodologies and detail the potentials of utilizing remote-sensing data. The latter is used especially to homogenize an existing coarser dataset and, where possible, replace it with detailed information extracted from remote sensing using the built-up indicators for different environments. Present research shows that the spatial aspects of earthquake risk computation are tightly connected with the availability of datasets of the resolution necessary for producing sufficiently detailed exposure. The global exposure database designed by the GED4GEM project is able to manage datasets and queries of multiple spatial scales.

  6. Global positioning system measurements of deformations associated with the 1987 Superstition Hills earthquake - Evidence for conjugate faulting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsen, Shawn; Reilinger, Robert; Neugebauer, Helen; Strange, William

    1992-01-01

    Large station displacements observed from Imperial Valley Global Positioning System (GPS) compaigns are attributed to the November 24, 1987 Superstition Hills earthquake sequence. Thirty sites from a 42 station GPS network established in 1986 were reoccupied during 1988 and/or 1990. Displacements at three sites within 3 kilometers of the surface rupture approach 0.5 m. Eight additional stations within 20 km of the seismic zone are displaced at least 10 cm. This is the first occurrence of a large earthquake (M(sub S) 6.6) within a preexisting GPS network. Best-fitting uniform slip models of rectangular dislocations in an elastic half-space indicate 130 + or - 8 cm right-lateral displacement along the northwest-trending Superstition Hills fault and 30 + or - 10 cm left-lateral displacement along the conjugate northeast-trending Elmore Ranch fault. The geodetic moments are 9.4 x 10 (exp 25) dyne-cm and 2.3 x 10 (exp 25) dyne-cm for the Superstition Hills and Elmore Ranch faults, respectively, consistent with teleseismic source parameters. The data also suggest the post seismic slip along the Superstition Hills fault is concentrated at shallow depths. Distributed slip solutions using Singular Value Decomposition indicate near uniform displacement along the Elmore Ranch fault and concentrated slip to the northwest and southeast along the Superstition Hills fault. A significant component of non-seismic displacement is observed across the Imperial Valley, which is attributed in part to interseismic plate-boundary deformation.

  7. Global positioning system measurements of deformations associated with the 1987 Superstition Hills earthquake - Evidence for conjugate faulting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Shawn; Reilinger, Robert; Neugebauer, Helen; Strange, William

    1992-04-01

    Large station displacements observed from Imperial Valley Global Positioning System (GPS) compaigns are attributed to the November 24, 1987 Superstition Hills earthquake sequence. Thirty sites from a 42 station GPS network established in 1986 were reoccupied during 1988 and/or 1990. Displacements at three sites within 3 kilometers of the surface rupture approach 0.5 m. Eight additional stations within 20 km of the seismic zone are displaced at least 10 cm. This is the first occurrence of a large earthquake (M(sub S) 6.6) within a preexisting GPS network. Best-fitting uniform slip models of rectangular dislocations in an elastic half-space indicate 130 + or - 8 cm right-lateral displacement along the northwest-trending Superstition Hills fault and 30 + or - 10 cm left-lateral displacement along the conjugate northeast-trending Elmore Ranch fault. The geodetic moments are 9.4 x 10 (exp 25) dyne-cm and 2.3 x 10 (exp 25) dyne-cm for the Superstition Hills and Elmore Ranch faults, respectively, consistent with teleseismic source parameters. The data also suggest the post seismic slip along the Superstition Hills fault is concentrated at shallow depths. Distributed slip solutions using Singular Value Decomposition indicate near uniform displacement along the Elmore Ranch fault and concentrated slip to the northwest and southeast along the Superstition Hills fault. A significant component of non-seismic displacement is observed across the Imperial Valley, which is attributed in part to interseismic plate-boundary deformation.

  8. STRIKE SLIP ON REACTIVATED TRIASSIC(? ) BASIN BOUNDARY FAULT ZONES AS SOURCES OF EARTHQUAKES NEAR CHARLESTON, S. C.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Behrendt, John C.; Yuan, Annette

    1986-01-01

    Interpretation of several thousand kilometers of multifold seismic reflection data supports the old theory that earthquakes in the Charleston, S. C. area are associated with reactivated Triassic(? ) basin boundary extensional fault zones. The Gants-Cooke fault zone associated with the Jedburg basin in the 1886 meizoseismal area, an unnamed fault along the margin of the Branchville basin in the Bowman earthquake area and the offshore Helena Banks fault zone (no observed seismicity) along the margin of the Kiawah basin show evidence of reactivation of Triassic(? ) normal faults zones in a compressional, probably strike slip sense. The previously reported reverse separation of these faults observed on the seismic profiles in the late Cretaceous-Cenozoic Coastal Plain sediments is possibly produced by oblique slip with the horizontal component possibly 10 to 100 times the vertical. Earthquake recurrence intervals of several thousand years reported in the Charleston area appear consistent with ranges of magnitude of strike slip displacement inferred from the seismic reflection data, and are constrained by aeromagnetic data.

  9. Role of Fault Dilatancy in Subduction Zone Aseismic Deformation Transients and Thrust Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Rubin, A. M.; Rice, J. R.; Segall, P.

    2008-12-01

    -dipping subduction fault model using recently reported hydrothermal gabbro gouge friction data [He et al., Tectonophys., 2006, 2007]. The along-dip elevated p is constrained by seismological observations and by thermal and petrological models for the northern Cascadia margin (p near-lithostatic around stability transition and lower in the seismogenic zone). Similarly, aseismic transients can exist for a much broader range of W / h★, making it plausible to produce transients with total slips of a few centimeters and recurrence periods of a couple years while using lab values for L of 10s of microns in the low σ× zone. Inclusion of dilatancy also reduces the speed and spatial extent of coseismic rupture. For a fixed T = 1 and ɛ / β = 0.2 MPa, rupture stops ~ 50 km up-dip of the lower stability transition and causes nearly no coseismic slip at the trench. The depth of complete interseismic locking also varies with parameters E and T in the seismogenic zone. This suggests that a subduction fault extending well down-dip of the limit of seismogenesis could be frictionally unstable (a-b<0) but undergo no seismic slip due to effective dilatancy stabilization. This has implications for the relative depths of slow slip events and thrust earthquakes and for the total slip budget in an earthquake cycle.

  10. Triggering of slow slip and tremor by small earthquakes at the Nankai subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, J.; Vidale, J. E.; Houston, H.; Chao, K.; Obara, K.

    2014-12-01

    Nearby earthquakes and slow slip could potentially trigger each other. This correlation, however, has not been clearly quantified. Previous studies of the triggering between nearby earthquakes and slow slip (as delineated by tremor) are mostly based on a single slow slip event or big earthquake, and have been quantified only for stresses from distant earthquakes and tides. We investigate 12-year earthquake and tremor catalogs for Southwest Japan, and find that local intraslab earthquakes (M1-4) are weakly correlated with subsequent tremor. Earthquakes bigger than M2 tend to be followed by tremor more than expected at random; smaller earthquakes show less triggering. The number of correlated tremor before earthquakes is not as significant, although there are marginally more than expected. To understand the possible underlying mechanisms for triggering of tremor from earthquakes, we evaluate both the static and the dynamic stress changes associated with the earthquakes. The triggering mechanism is most likely to be the dynamic rather than the much smaller static stress changes. We find that dynamic shear stress changes of several tens of kPa due to incoming S-waves from nearby earthquakes increase the tremor rate by a factor of about 2 to 5. This rate is similar to although perhaps a factor of a few lower than rates of tremor triggering observed for similar stress changes by the much lower-frequency teleseismic surface waves and tides, suggesting that the duration of an applied stress perturbation affects triggering efficiency much less than the amplitude affects it.

  11. Earthquake mechanics and deformation in the Tonga-Kermadec subduction zone from fault plane orientations of intermediate- and deep-focus earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Linda M.; Hughes, Amanda N.; Silver, Paul G.

    2007-05-01

    We make use of rupture directivity to analyze 82 deep earthquakes (≥100 km depth) in the Tonga-Kermadec subduction zone. Identifying the fault planes for 25 of them, we are able to place new constraints on both the physical mechanism of intermediate- and deep-focus earthquakes and deformation within the subducting slab. We find that half of deep earthquakes with MW ≥ 6 have detectable directivity. We compare the obtained fault orientations with those expected for the reactivation of outer-rise normal faults and with those expected for the creation of new faults in response to the ambient stress field. Earthquakes >300 km depth match the patterns expected for the creation of a new system of faults: we observe both subhorizontal and subvertical fault planes consistent with a downdip-compressional stress field. Slip along these faults causes the slab to thicken. Rupture propagation shows no systematic directional pattern. In contrast, at intermediate depths (100-300 km), all ruptures propagate subhorizontally and all identified fault planes, whether in the upper or lower region of the double seismic zone, are subhorizontal. Rupture propagation tends to be directed away from the top surface of the slab. After accounting for the angle of subduction, the subhorizontal fault plane orientation is inconsistent with the orientation of outer-rise normal faults, allowing us to rule out mechanisms that require the reactivation of these large surface faults. Subhorizontal faults are consistent with only one of the two failure planes expected from the slab stress field, suggesting that isobaric rupture processes or preexisting slab structures may also influence the fault plane orientation. If all deformation takes place on these subhorizontal faults, it would cause the slab to thin. Assuming the slab is incompressible, this implies that the slab is also lengthening and suggests that slab pull rather than unbending is the primary force controlling slab seismicity at

  12. Postseismic velocity changes along the 2008 M7.9 Wenchuan Earthquake rupture zone revealed by the variations in S coda of repeating events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Le; Niu, Fenglin; Chen, Qi-Fu; Su, Jinrong; He, Jiabin

    2016-12-01

    We investigated postseismic velocity changes within the fault zone of the 2008 M7.9 Wenchuan earthquake using coda-wave data of repeating small earthquakes. We employed template matching and grid search methods to identify well-defined repeating earthquakes in order to minimize artifacts induced by variations in source location. We identified a total of 12 isolated patches in the fault zone that ruptured more than twice in a one-year period after the M7.9 earthquake. We applied the coda wave interferometry technique to the waveform data of the 34 identified repeating earthquakes to estimate velocity changes between the first and subsequent events in each cluster. We found that major postseismic velocity changes occurred in the southwestern part of the rupture area, where the main rupture was initiated and characterized by thrust motion, while the Beichuan area in the northeastern part of the rupture zone appears to experience very little postseismic velocity changes.

  13. Formation of left-lateral fractures within the Summit Ridge shear zone, 1989 Loma Prieta, California, earthquake

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, A.M.; Fleming, R.W. |

    1993-12-01

    The 1989 Loma Prieta, California, earthquake is characterized by the lack of major, throughgoing, coseismic, right-lateral faulting along strands of the San Andreas fault zone in the epicentral area. Instead, throughout the Summit Ridge area there are zones of tension cracks and left-lateral fracture zones oriented about N45 deg W, that is, roughly parallel to the San Andreas fault in this area. The left-lateral fractures zones are enigmatic because their left-lateral slip is opposite to the right-lateral sense of the relative motion between the Pacific and North American plates. We suggest that the enigmatic fractures can be understood if we assume that coesiesmic deformation was by right-lateral shear across a broad zone, about 0.5 km wide and 4 km long, beneath Summit Ridge. Contrary to most previous reports on the Loma Prieta earthquake, which assert that coseismic, right-lateral ground rupture was restricted to considerable (greater than 4 km) depths in the epicentral area, we find that nearly all the right-lateral offset is represented at the ground surface by the Summit Ridge shear zone.

  14. Deformation of conjugate compliant fault zones induced by the 2013 Mw7.7 Baluchistan (Pakistan) earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Rishabh; Wang, Teng; Feng, Guangcai; Harrington, Jonathan; Vasyura-Bathke, Hannes; Jónsson, Sigurjón

    2017-04-01

    Strain localizations in compliant fault zones (with elastic moduli lower than the surrounding rocks) induced by nearby earthquakes have been detected using geodetic observations in a few cases in the past. Here we observe small-scale changes in interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) measurements along multiple conjugate faults near the rupture of the 2013 Mw7.7 Baluchistan (Pakistan) earthquake. After removing the main coseismic deformation signal in the interferograms and correcting them for topography-related phase, we observe 2-3 cm signal along several conjugate faults that are 15-30 km from the mainshock fault rupture. These conjugate compliant faults have strikes of N30°E and N45°W. The sense of motion indicates left-lateral deformation across the N30°E faults and right-lateral deformation across the N45°W faults, which suggests the conjugate faults were subjected to extensional coseismic stresses along the WSW-ENE direction. The spacing between the different sets of faults is around 5 to 8 km. We explain the observed strain localizations as an elastic response of the compliant conjugate faults induced by the Baluchistan earthquake. Using 3D Finite Element models (FEM), we impose coseismic static displacements due to the earthquake along the boundaries of the FEM domain to reproduce the coseismic stress changes acting across the compliant faults. The InSAR measurements are used to constrain the geometry and rigidity variations of the compliant faults with respect to the surrounding rocks. The best fitting models show the compliant fault zones to have a width of 0.5 km to 2 km and a reduction of the shear modulus by a factor of 3 to 4. Our study yields similar values as were found for compliant fault zones near the 1992 Landers and the 1999 Hector Mine earthquakes in California, although here the strain localization is occurring on more complex conjugate sets of faults.

  15. Swiss Re Global Flood Hazard Zones: Know your flood risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinukollu, R. K.; Castaldi, A.; Mehlhorn, J.

    2012-12-01

    Floods, among all natural disasters, have a great damage potential. On a global basis, there is strong evidence of increase in the number of people affected and economic losses due to floods. For example, global insured flood losses have increased by 12% every year since 1970 and this is expected to further increase with growing exposure in the high risk areas close to rivers and coastlines. Recently, the insurance industry has been surprised by the large extent of losses, because most countries lack reliable hazard information. One example has been the 2011 Thailand floods where millions of people were affected and the total economic losses were 30 billion USD. In order to assess the flood risk across different regions and countries, the flood team at Swiss Re based on a Geomorphologic Regression approach, developed in house and patented, produced global maps of flood zones. Input data for the study was obtained from NASA's Shuttle Radar Topographic Mission (SRTM) elevation data, Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) Global Digital Elevation Model (GDEM) and HydroSHEDS. The underlying assumptions of the approach are that naturally flowing rivers shape their channel and flood plain according to basin inherent forces and characteristics and that the flood water extent strongly depends on the shape of the flood plain. On the basis of the catchment characteristics, the model finally calculates the probability of a location to be flooded or not for a defined return period, which in the current study was set to 100 years. The data is produced at a 90-m resolution for latitudes 60S to 60N. This global product is now used in the insurance industry to inspect, inform and/or insure the flood risk across the world.

  16. Compactness vs. Smoothness: Methods for regularizing fault slip inversions with application to subduction zone earthquakes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohman, R. B.; Simons, M.

    2004-12-01

    can explain the data. In these "compact slip" inversions, we define model simplicity as the spatial compactness of the fault slip distribution. Our measure of compactness allows for multiple regions of slip when they are required by the data. We compare inversions using compactness and smoothness as regularization criteria in several synthetic scenarios. We also apply the compact slip technique to coseismic and postseismic deformation associated with the 1995 Mw 8.1 Antofagasta, Chile, and 2003 Mw 8.1 Tokachi-Oki, Japan, subduction zone earthquakes, using InSAR and GPS data.

  17. Sub-crustal earthquakes within the Australia-Pacific plate boundary zone beneath the Southern Alps, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boese, C. M.; Stern, T. A.; Townend, J.; Bourguignon, S.; Sheehan, A.; Smith, E. G. C.

    2013-08-01

    Sub-crustal earthquakes have been observed sporadically for ∼40 years in the central South Island of New Zealand. We report on 20 events recorded between December 2008 and February 2012 near the Alpine Fault in the continental collision zone between the Australian and Pacific plates. A subset of 18 events at depths of 47-74 km occurs south of Mt. Cook and together with recently reported tremor locations indicates along-strike variations in deformation behaviour along the plate boundary. The sub-crustal earthquakes south of Mt. Cook increase in depth, frequency and size southwards towards the Puysegur subduction zone. Focal mechanisms could be determined for 14 earthquakes and exhibit predominantly strike-slip and reverse faulting solutions. Stress inversion analysis of the focal mechanisms yields a stress field favouring oblique-reverse faulting. We interpret the geographic and vertical distributions of these sub-crustal events in relation to a previously proposed tectonic model of a remnant passive margin that formed south of New Zealand in the Eocene and was overridden when dextral strike-slip motion initiated on the Alpine Fault. We infer that sub-crustal earthquakes occur along the leading edge of this structure, which is attached to the continental Australian crust.

  18. History of late Holocene earthquakes at the Willow Creek site on the Nephi segment, Wasatch fault zone, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crone, Anthony J.; Personius, Stephen F.; Duross, Christopher; Machette, Michael N.; Mahan, Shannon

    2014-01-01

    This 43-page report presents new data from the Willow Creek site that provides well-defined and narrow bounds on the times of the three youngest earthquakes on the southern strand of the Nephi segment, Wasatch Fault zone, and refines the time of the youngest earthquake to about 200 years ago. This is the youngest surface rupture on the entire Wasatch fault zone, which occurred about a century or less before European settles arrived in Utah. Two trenches at the Willow Creek site exposed three scarp-derived colluvial wedges that are evidence of three paleoearthquakes. OxCal modeling of ages from Willow Creek indicate that paleoearthquake WC1 occurred at 0.2 ± 0.1 ka, WC2 occurred at 1.2 ± 0.1 ka, and WC3 occurred at 1.9 ± 0.6 ka. Stratigraphic constraints on the time of paleoearthquake WC4 are extremely poor, so OxCal modeling only yields a broadly constrained age of 4.7 ± 1.8 ka. Results from the Willow Creek site significantly refine the times of late Holocene earthquakes on the Southern strand of the Nephi segment, and this result, when combined with a reanalysis of the stratigraphic and chronologic information from previous investigations at North Creek and Red Canyon, yield a stronger basis of correlating individual earthquakes between all three sites.

  19. A global biogeographic classification of the mesopelagic zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutton, Tracey T.; Clark, Malcolm R.; Dunn, Daniel C.; Halpin, Patrick N.; Rogers, Alex D.; Guinotte, John; Bograd, Steven J.; Angel, Martin V.; Perez, Jose Angel A.; Wishner, Karen; Haedrich, Richard L.; Lindsay, Dhugal J.; Drazen, Jeffrey C.; Vereshchaka, Alexander; Piatkowski, Uwe; Morato, Telmo; Błachowiak-Samołyk, Katarzyna; Robison, Bruce H.; Gjerde, Kristina M.; Pierrot-Bults, Annelies; Bernal, Patricio; Reygondeau, Gabriel; Heino, Mikko

    2017-08-01

    We have developed a global biogeographic classification of the mesopelagic zone to reflect the regional scales over which the ocean interior varies in terms of biodiversity and function. An integrated approach was necessary, as global gaps in information and variable sampling methods preclude strictly statistical approaches. A panel combining expertise in oceanography, geospatial mapping, and deep-sea biology convened to collate expert opinion on the distributional patterns of pelagic fauna relative to environmental proxies (temperature, salinity, and dissolved oxygen at mesopelagic depths). An iterative Delphi Method integrating additional biological and physical data was used to classify biogeographic ecoregions and to identify the location of ecoregion boundaries or inter-regions gradients. We define 33 global mesopelagic ecoregions. Of these, 20 are oceanic while 13 are 'distant neritic.' While each is driven by a complex of controlling factors, the putative primary driver of each ecoregion was identified. While work remains to be done to produce a comprehensive and robust mesopelagic biogeography (i.e., reflecting temporal variation), we believe that the classification set forth in this study will prove to be a useful and timely input to policy planning and management for conservation of deep-pelagic marine resources. In particular, it gives an indication of the spatial scale at which faunal communities are expected to be broadly similar in composition, and hence can inform application of ecosystem-based management approaches, marine spatial planning and the distribution and spacing of networks of representative protected areas.

  20. The May 29 2008 earthquake aftershock sequence within the South Iceland Seismic Zone: Fault locations and source parameters of aftershocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandsdottir, B.; Parsons, M.; White, R. S.; Gudmundsson, O.; Drew, J.

    2010-12-01

    The mid-Atlantic plate boundary breaks up into a series of segments across Iceland. The South Iceland Seismic Zone (SISZ) is a complex transform zone where left-lateral E-W shear between the Reykjanes Peninsula Rift Zone and the Eastern Volcanic Zone is accommodated by bookshelf faulting along N-S lateral strike-slip faults. The SISZ is also a transient feature, migrating sideways in response to the southward propagation of the Eastern Volcanic Zone. Sequences of large earthquakes (M > 6) lasting from days to years and affecting most of the seismic zone have occurred repeatedly in historical time (last 1100 years), separated by intervals of relative quiescence lasting decades to more than a century. On May 29 2008, a Mw 6.1 earthquake struck the western part of the South Iceland Seismic Zone, followed within seconds by a slightly smaller event on a second fault ~5 km further west. Aftershocks, detected by a temporal array of 11 seismometers and three permanent Icelandic Meteorological Office stations were located using an automated Coalescence Microseismic Mapping technique. The epicenters delineate two major and several smaller N-S faults as well as an E-W zone of activity stretching further west into the Reykjanes Peninsula Rift Zone. Fault plane solutions show both right lateral and oblique strike slip mechanisms along the two major N-S faults. The aftershocks deepen from 3-5 km in the north to 8-9 km in the south, suggesting that the main faults dip southwards. The faulting is interpreted to be driven by the local stress due to transform motion between two parallel segments of the divergent plate boundary crossing Iceland.

  1. The Global Fracture Zone and Magnetic Lineation Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wessel, P.; Müller, D.; Sandwell, D. T.; Cande, S. C.

    2009-12-01

    Plate kinematic models derive from the detailed identifications of conjugate magnetic isochron picks and fracture zones (FZ). These data form the foundation of relative marine plate tectonic reconstructions and codify our understanding of Earth’s surface evolution since the Mesozoic. Furthermore, FZ traces have extensive uses in other geophysical investigations such as studying the origins of transform fault offsets, identifying seamounts and isolating abyssal hill roughness within fracture zone provinces, examining predictions from competing thermal models of the lithosphere, and much more. Kinematic models also require temporal information and this dimension is provided by identification of key magnetic isochron boundaries from total field magnetic anomalies collected along ship tracks. The joint FZ and isochron pick data constitute the fundamental constraints on marine relative plate motion models. Much work has been performed in trying to determine globally consistent data sets of FZ and isochrons. Unfortunately, advances in data collection and processing tend to make specific “snap-shot” compilations obsolete, thus necessitating a new analysis following the addition of new data. A complete re-analysis can be a daunting task when a global reconstruction is one of the design goals. Effectively, such high barriers to undertaking exploratory research limit the progress that can be made in many fields of marine science and deprive us of serendipitous and curiosity-driven investigations which have proven so valuable throughout the history of plate tectonics. Here, we report progress of a pilot study to establish new infrastructure for users of FZ and magnetic isochron data. We are developing an open source, community-driven database where consistent and well-documented information on FZ and magnetic isochrons will be collected, accessible from a dedicated website. For fracture zones, we store mostly meta-data about each FZ and a few key locations along its

  2. Zemmouri earthquake rupture zone (Mw 6.8, Algeria): Aftershocks sequence relocation and 3D velocity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayadi, A.; Dorbath, C.; Ousadou, F.; Maouche, S.; Chikh, M.; Bounif, M. A.; Meghraoui, M.

    2008-09-01

    We analyze the aftershocks sequence of the Zemmouri thrust faulting earthquake (21 May 2003, Mw 6.8) located east of Algiers in the Tell Atlas. The seismic sequence located during ˜2 months following the mainshock is made of more than 1500 earthquakes and extends NE-SW along a ˜60-km fault rupture zone crossing the coastline. The earthquake relocation was performed using handpicked P and S phases located with the tomoDD in a detailed 3D velocity structure of the epicentra