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Sample records for east molokai volcano

  1. Evaluation of Ground-Water Resources From Available Data, 1992, East Molokai Volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anthony, Stephen S.

    1995-01-01

    Available ground-water data for East Molokai Volcano consist of well-construction information and records of ground-water pumpage, water levels, and chloride concentrations. Ground-water pumpage records are available for ten wells. Seventeen long-term (10 years or more) records of water-level and/or chloride concentration are available for eleven wells; however, only seven of these records are for observation wells. None of the available data show significant long-term changes in water level or chloride concentration; however, short-term changes due to variations in the quantity of water pumped, and rainfall are evident. Evaluation of the historical distribution and rates of ground-water pumpage, and variations in water levels and chloride concentrations is constrained by the scanty distribution of spatial and temporal data. Data show a range in water levels from greater than 850 feet above mean sea level in wells located in the windward valley of Waikolu to about 10 feet in wells located east of Kualapuu to 1 to 5 feet in the wells located along the south shore of East Molokai Volcano. An accurate contour map of water levels and chloride concentrations at the surface of the basal-water body cannot be constructed for any time period. Because water-level and chloride data are not collected at regular time intervals, many long-term records are incomplete. Information on the variation in chloride concentration with depth through the freshwater part of the basal-water body and into the zone of transition between freshwater and saltwater does not exist.

  2. The distribution of geochemical heterogeneities in the source of Hawaiian shield lavas as revealed by a transect across the strike of the Loa and Kea spatial trends: East Molokai to West Molokai to Penguin Bank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guangping; Huang, Shichun; Frey, Frederick A.; Blichert-Toft, Janne; Abouchami, Wafa; Clague, David A.; Cousens, Brian; Moore, James G.; Beeson, Melvin H.

    2014-05-01

    An important feature of <2 Ma Hawaiian volcanoes is that they define two sub-parallel spatial trends known as the Loa- and Kea-trends. On the Island of Hawaii, the <1.5 Ma shield lavas on the Loa and Kea spatial trends have distinctive geochemical characteristics that are designated as Loa-type and Kea-type. These geochemical differences are clearly expressed in Sr, Nd, Hf and Pb isotopic ratios, major element contents, and ratios of incompatible elements. They are interpreted to reflect varying proportions of sediment, basalt, gabbro and peridotite in subducted oceanic lithosphere. Pb isotopic ratios indicate that the Loa-type component reflects ancient subduction, >2.5 Ga, whereas the Kea-type component reflects younger subduction, <1.5 Ga. To evaluate the temporal persistence of these geochemical differences in the source of Hawaiian shield lavas, we analyzed lavas from the ˜1.5 to 2 Ma Molokai Island volcanoes, East and West Molokai, and the adjacent submarine Penguin Bank. The three volcanoes form a nearly east-west trend that crosscuts the Loa and Kea spatial trends at a high angle; consequently we can determine if these older lavas are Kea-type in the east and Loa-type in the west. All lavas collected from the subaerial flanks of East Molokai, a Kea-trend volcano, have Kea-type geochemical characteristics; however, dive samples collected from Wailau landslide blocks, probably samples of the East Molokai shield that are older than those exposed on the subaerial flanks, include basalt with Loa-type geochemical features. Shield lavas from West Molokai and Penguin Bank, both on the Loa-trend, are dominantly Loa-type, but samples with Kea-type compositions also erupted at these Loa-trend volcanoes. The Loa-trend volcanoes, Mahukona, West Molokai, Penguin Bank, and Koolau, have also erupted lavas with Kea-type geochemical characteristics, and the Kea-trend volcanoes, Mauna Kea, Kohala, Haleakala, and East Molokai, have erupted lavas with Loa-type geochemical

  3. Geology and ground-water resources of the island of Molokai, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stearns, Harold T.; Macdonald, Gordon A.

    1947-01-01

    The island of Molokai is the fifth largest of the Hawaiian Islands, with an area of 250 square miles. It lies 25 miles southeast of Oahu, and 8.5 miles northwest of Maui. It consists of two principal parts, each a major volcanic mountain. East Molokai rises to 4,970 feet altitude. It is built largely of basaltic lavas, with a thin cap of andesites and a little trachyte. The volcanic rocks of East Molokai are named the East Molokai volcanic series, the basaltic part being separated as the lower member of the series, and the andesites and trachytes as the upper member. Large cinder cones and bulbous domes are associated with the lavas of the upper member. Thin beds of ash are present locally in both members. The lavas of the lower member are cut by innumerable dikes lying in two major rift zones trending eastward and northwestward. A large caldera, more than 4 miles long, and a smaller pit 0.8 mile across existed near the summit of the volcano. The rocks formed in and under the caldera are separated on plate 1 as the caldera complex. Stream erosion has cut large amphitheater-headed valleys into the northern coast of East Molokai, exposing the dikes and the caldera complex.West Molokai is lower than East Molokai, rising to 1,380 feet altitude. It was built by basaltic lavas erupted along rift zones trending southwestward and northwestward. Many of the flows were unusually fluid. The volcanic rocks of West Molokai Volcano are named the West Molokai volcanic series. Along its eastern side, the mountain is broken by a series of faults along which its eastern edge has been dropped downward. West Molokai Volcano became extinct earlier than East Molokai Volcano, and its flank is partly buried beneath lavas of East Molokai.Both volcanic mountains were built upward from the sea floor probably during Tertiary time. Following the close of volcanic activity stream erosion cut large canyons on East Molokai, but accomplished much less on drier West Molokai. Marine erosion attacked

  4. Rhenium and chalcophile elements in basaltic glasses from Ko'olau and Moloka'i volcanoes: Magmatic outgassing and composition of the Hawaiian plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norman, Marc D.; Garcia, Michael O.; Bennett, Victoria C.

    2004-09-01

    The behavior of chalcophile metals in volcanic environments is important for a variety of economic and environmental applications, and for understanding large-scale processes such as crustal recycling into the mantle. In order to better define the behavior of chalcophile metals in ocean island volcanoes, we measured the concentrations of Re, Cd, Bi, Cu, Pb, Zn, Pt, S, and a suite of major elements and lithophile trace elements in moderately evolved (6-7% MgO) tholeiitic glasses from Ko'olau and Moloka'i volcanoes. Correlated variations in the Re, Cd, and S contents of these glasses are consistent with loss of these elements as volatile species during magmatic outgassing. Bismuth also shows a good correlation with S in the Ko'olau glasses, but undegassed glasses from Moloka'i have unexpectedly low Bi contents. Rhenium appears to have been more volatile than either Cd or Bi in these magmas. Undegassed glasses with 880-1400 ppm S have 1.2-1.5 ppb Re and 130-145 ppb Cd. In contrast, outgassed melts with low S (<200 ppm) are depleted in these elements by factors of 2-5. Key ratios such as Re/Yb and Cu/Re are fractionated significantly from mantle values. Copper, Pb, and Pt contents of these glasses show no correlation with S, ruling out segregation of an immiscible magmatic sulfide phase as the cause of these variations. Undegassed Hawaiian tholeiites have Re/Yb ratios significantly higher than those of MORB, and extend to values greater than that of the primitive mantle. Loss of Re during outgassing of ocean island volcanoes, may help resolve the apparent paradox of low Re/Os ratios in ocean island basalts with radiogenic Os isotopic compositions. Plume source regions with Re/Yb ratios greater than that of the primitive mantle may provide at least a partial solution to the "missing Re" problem in which one or more reservoirs with high Re/Yb are required to balance the low Re/Yb of MORB. Lithophile trace element compositions of most Ko'olau and Moloka'i tholeiites are

  5. Penguin Bank: A Loa-Trend Hawaiian Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, G.; Blichert-Toft, J.; Clague, D. A.; Cousens, B.; Frey, F. A.; Moore, J. G.

    2007-12-01

    Hawaiian volcanoes along the Hawaiian Ridge from Molokai Island in the northwest to the Big Island in the southeast, define two parallel trends of volcanoes known as the Loa and Kea spatial trends. In general, lavas erupted along these two trends have distinctive geochemical characteristics that have been used to define the spatial distribution of geochemical heterogeneities in the Hawaiian plume (e.g., Abouchami et al., 2005). These geochemical differences are well established for the volcanoes forming the Big Island. The longevity of the Loa- Kea geochemical differences can be assessed by studying East and West Molokai volcanoes and Penguin Bank which form a volcanic ridge perpendicular to the Loa and Kea spatial trends. Previously we showed that East Molokai volcano (~1.5 Ma) is exclusively Kea-like and that West Molokai volcano (~1.8 Ma) includes lavas that are both Loa- and Kea-like (Xu et al., 2005 and 2007).The submarine Penguin Bank (~2.2 Ma), probably an independent volcano constructed west of West Molokai volcano, should be dominantly Loa-like if the systematic Loa and Kea geochemical differences were present at ~2.2 Ma. We have studied 20 samples from Penguin Bank including both submarine and subaerially-erupted lavas recovered by dive and dredging. All lavas are tholeiitic basalt representing shield-stage lavas. Trace element ratios, such as Sr/Nb and Zr/Nb, and isotopic ratios of Sr and Nd clearly are Loa-like. On an ɛNd-ɛHf plot, Penguin Bank lavas fall within the field defined by Mauna Loa lavas. Pb isotopic data lie near the Loa-Kea boundary line defined by Abouchami et al. (2005). In conclusion, we find that from NE to SW, i.e., perpendicular to the Loa and Kea spatial trend, there is a shift from Kea-like East Molokai lavas to Loa-like Penguin Bank lavas with the intermediate West Molokai volcano having lavas with both Loa- and Kea-like geochemical features. Therefore, the Loa and Kea geochemical dichotomy exhibited by Big Island volcanoes

  6. The proximal part of the giant submarine Wailau landslide, Molokai, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clague, D.A.; Moore, J.G.

    2002-01-01

    The main break-in-slope on the northern submarine flank of Molokai at -1500 to -1250 m is a shoreline feature that has been only modestly modified by the Wailau landslide. Submarine canyons above the break-in-slope, including one meandering stream, were subaerially carved. Where such canyons cross the break-in-slope, plunge pools may form by erosion from bedload sediment carried down the canyons. West Molokai Volcano continued infrequent volcanic activity that formed a series of small coastal sea cliffs, now submerged, as the island subsided. Lavas exposed at the break-in-slope are subaerially erupted and emplaced tholeiitic shield lavas. Submarine rejuvenated-stage volcanic cones formed after the landslide took place and following at least 400-500 m of subsidence after the main break-in-slope had formed. The sea cliff on east Molokai is not the headwall of the landslide, nor did it form entirely by erosion. It may mark the location of a listric fault similar to the Hilina faults on present-day Kilauea Volcano. The Wailau landslide occurred about 1.5 Ma and the Kalaupapa Peninsula most likely formed 330??5 ka. Molokai is presently stable relative to sea level and has subsided no more than 30 m in the last 330 ka. At their peak, West and East Molokai stood 1.6 and 3 km above sea level. High rainfall causes high surface runoff and formation of canyons, and increases groundwater pressure that during dike intrusions may lead to flank failure. Active shield or postshield volcanism (with dikes injected along rift zones) and high rainfall appear to be two components needed to trigger the deep-seated giant Hawaiian landslides. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Microtremor study of Gunung Anyar mud volcano, Surabaya, East Java

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syaifuddin, Firman; Bahri, Ayi Syaeful; Lestari, Wien; Pandu, Juan

    2016-05-01

    The existence of mud volcano system in East Java is known from the ancient period, especially in Surabaya. Gunung Anyar mud volcano is one of the mud volcano system manifestation was appeared close to the residence. Because of this phenomenon we have to learn about the impact of this mud volcano manifestation to the neighbourhood. The microtremor study was conducted to evaluate the possible influence effect of the mud volcano to the environment and get more information about the subsurface condition in this area. Microtremor is one of the geophysical methods which measure the natural tremor or vibration of the earth, the dominant frequency of the tremor represent thickness of the soft sediment layer overlay above the bed rock or harder rock layer beneath our feet. In this study 90 stations was measured to record the natural tremor. The result from this study shows the direct influenced area of this small mud volcano system is close to 50m from the centre of the mud volcano and bed rock of this area is range between 66 to 140 meter.

  8. Preliminary volcano-hazard assessment for Akutan Volcano east-central Aleutian Islands, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waythomas, Christopher F.; Power, John A.; Richter, Donlad H.; McGimsey, Robert G.

    1998-01-01

    Akutan Volcano is a 1100-meter-high stratovolcano on Akutan Island in the east-central Aleutian Islands of southwestern Alaska. The volcano is located about 1238 kilometers southwest of Anchorage and about 56 kilometers east of Dutch Harbor/Unalaska. Eruptive activity has occurred at least 27 times since historical observations were recorded beginning in the late 1700?s. Recent eruptions produced only small amounts of fine volcanic ash that fell primarily on the upper flanks of the volcano. Small amounts of ash fell on the Akutan Harbor area during eruptions in 1911, 1948, 1987, and 1989. Plumes of volcanic ash are the primary hazard associated with eruptions of Akutan Volcano and are a major hazard to all aircraft using the airfield at Dutch Harbor or approaching Akutan Island. Eruptions similar to historical Akutan eruptions should be anticipated in the future. Although unlikely, eruptions larger than those of historical time could generate significant amounts of volcanic ash, fallout, pyroclastic flows, and lahars that would be hazardous to life and property on all sectors of the volcano and other parts of the island, but especially in the major valleys that head on the volcano flanks. During a large eruption an ash cloud could be produced that may be hazardous to aircraft using the airfield at Cold Bay and the airspace downwind from the volcano. In the event of a large eruption, volcanic ash fallout could be relatively thick over parts of Akutan Island and volcanic bombs could strike areas more than 10 kilometers from the volcano.

  9. Chaotic deposition by a giant wave, Molokai, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, J.G.; Bryan, W.B.; Ludwig, K. R.

    1994-01-01

    A coral-basalt breccia-conglomerate is exposed >60m above present sea level and nearly 2km inland from the present shoreline on the southwest side of East Molokai Volcano. This deposits was apparently laid down by a giant wave that broke over an outer reef, similar to the present fringing reef, and advanced as a turbulent bore over the back-reef flat, picking up a slurry of carbonate-rich debris and depositing it on the slopes inland as the wave advanced. U-series dating of coral fragments indicates that the age of this deposit is 240-200 ka. This giant wave was most likley caused by one of the many large submarine landslides that have been identified on the lower slopes of the major Hawaiian Islands. -from Authors

  10. Geohydrology and Numerical Simulation of the Ground-Water Flow System of Molokai, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oki, Delwyn S.

    1997-01-01

    A two-dimensional, steady-state, areal ground-water flow model was developed for the island of Molokai, Hawaii, to enhance the understanding of (1) the conceptual framework of the ground-water flow system, (2) the distribution of aquifer hydraulic properties, and (3) the regional effects of ground-water withdrawals on water levels and coastal discharge. The model uses the finite-element code AQUIFEM-SALT, which simulates flow of fresh ground water in systems that may have a freshwater lens floating on denser underlying saltwater. Model results are in agreement with the general conceptual model of the flow system on Molokai, where ground water flows from the interior, high-recharge areas to the coast. The model-calculated ground-water divide separating flow to the northern and southern coasts lies to either the north or the south of the topographic divide but is generally not coincident with the topographic divide. On the basis of model results, the following horizontal hydraulic conductivities were estimated: (1) 1,000 feet per day for the dike-free volcanic rocks of East and West Molokai, (2) 100 feet per day for the marginal dike zone of the East Molokai Volcano, (3) 2 feet per day for the West Molokai dike complex, (4) 0.02 feet per day for the East Molokai dike complex, and (5) 500 feet per day for the Kalaupapa Volcanics. Three simulations to determine the effects of proposed ground-water withdrawals on water levels and coastal discharge, relative to model-calculated water levels and coastal discharge for 1992-96 withdrawal rates, show that the effects are widespread. For a withdrawal rate of 0.337 million gallons per day from a proposed well about 4 miles southeast of Kualapuu and 3 miles north of Kamiloloa, the model-calculated drawdown of 0.01 foot or more extends 4 miles southeast and 6 miles northwest from the well. For a withdrawal rate of 1.326 million gallons per day from the same well, the model-calculated drawdown of 0.01 foot or more extends 6 miles

  11. Cyclic activity of the LUSI mud volcano (East Java, Indonesia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderkluysen, L.; Clarke, A. B.; Hartnett, H. E.

    2011-12-01

    Mud volcanoes often release fluids in a pulsating fashion, with periodic timescales ranging from minutes to days. These oscillations, common in natural systems of multi-phase fluid flow, are thought to result from some combination of complex feedback mechanisms between conduit and source geometry, and such factors as: fluid compressibility, viscosity and density, changes in lithostatic stresses, reservoir pressure, or vent conditions. The LUSI mud volcano is in a densely populated district of the Sidoarjo regency (East Java, Indonesia), and has been erupting since May 2006. Crisis management workers and local residents have reported observations of pulsating eruptive cycles lasting a few hours during the first two years of the eruption, and possibly beyond. Since 2010, however, the activity has shifted to individual transient eruptions recurring at intervals of a few minutes. In the summer of 2011, we documented this cyclic behavior at LUSI using a combination of high-resolution time-lapse photography, webcam, and thermal infrared imagery. The imagery reveals that hot mud and gases were released from three individual sources within the 150 m wide vent pond. The mud, consisting of at least 70% water, is erupted at temperatures close to boiling. Released gases consist principally of water vapor, carbon dioxide and methane. Eruptions ejected mud some 20 m above the vent in an unsteady fountain and formed 50 m-high plumes of hot gas. Pulses, on average 50 s in duration, were characterized by sharp onsets and exponential decays in intensity. We observed explosion periods ranging from 1 to 3 minutes during this campaign, the median period was 100 s, and pulses were separated by periods of apparent quiescence. Each vent was characterized by a different dominant period, indicating that parameters controlling activity vary among the vents. Potential conceptual eruptive models are gas accumulation and release, slug flow, or oscillations in pressure at depth to account for

  12. Moloka'i Fieldtrip Guidebook: Selected Aspects of the Geology, Geography, and Coral Reefs of Moloka'i

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cochran, Susan A.; Roberts, Lucile M.; Evans, Kevin R.

    2002-01-01

    This guidebook was compiled with the express purpose of describing the general geology of Moloka'i and those locations with significance to the U.S. Geological Survey's study of Moloka'i's coral reef, a part of the U.S. Department of Interior's 'Protecting the Nation's Reefs' program. The first portion of the guidebook describes the island and gives the historical background. Fieldtrip stop locations are listed in a logical driving order, essentially from west to east. This order may be changed, or stops deleted, depending on time and scheduling of an individual fieldtrip.

  13. Alaska - Russian Far East connection in volcano research and monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izbekov, P. E.; Eichelberger, J. C.; Gordeev, E.; Neal, C. A.; Chebrov, V. N.; Girina, O. A.; Demyanchuk, Y. V.; Rybin, A. V.

    2012-12-01

    The Kurile-Kamchatka-Alaska portion of the Pacific Rim of Fire spans for nearly 5400 km. It includes more than 80 active volcanoes and averages 4-6 eruptions per year. Resulting ash clouds travel for hundreds to thousands of kilometers defying political borders. To mitigate volcano hazard to aviation and local communities, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) and the Institute of Volcanology and Seismology (IVS), in partnership with the Kamchatkan Branch of the Geophysical Survey of the Russian Academy of Sciences (KBGS), have established a collaborative program with three integrated components: (1) volcano monitoring with rapid information exchange, (2) cooperation in research projects at active volcanoes, and (3) volcanological field schools for students and young scientists. Cooperation in volcano monitoring includes dissemination of daily information on the state of volcanic activity in neighboring regions, satellite and visual data exchange, as well as sharing expertise and technologies between AVO and the Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT) and Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Team (SVERT). Collaboration in scientific research is best illustrated by involvement of AVO, IVS, and KBGS faculty and graduate students in mutual international studies. One of the most recent examples is the NSF-funded Partnerships for International Research and Education (PIRE)-Kamchatka project focusing on multi-disciplinary study of Bezymianny volcano in Kamchatka. This international project is one of many that have been initiated as a direct result of a bi-annual series of meetings known as Japan-Kamchatka-Alaska Subduction Processes (JKASP) workshops that we organize together with colleagues from Hokkaido University, Japan. The most recent JKASP meeting was held in August 2011 in Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky and brought together more than 130 scientists and students from Russia, Japan, and the United States. The key educational component of our collaborative program

  14. Volcanoes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kunar, L. N. S.

    1975-01-01

    Describes the forces responsible for the eruptions of volcanoes and gives the physical and chemical parameters governing the type of eruption. Explains the structure of the earth in relation to volcanoes and explains the location of volcanic regions. (GS)

  15. Volcanoes

    SciTech Connect

    Decker, R.W.; Decker, B.

    1989-01-01

    This book describes volcanoes although the authors say they are more to be experienced than described. This book poses more question than answers. The public has developed interest and awareness in volcanism since the first edition eight years ago, maybe because since the time 120 volcanoes have erupted. Of those, the more lethal eruptions were from volcanoes not included in the first edition's World's 101 Most Notorious Volcanoes.

  16. Volcanoes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tilling, Robert I.

    One of a series of general interest publications on science topics, this booklet provides a non-technical introduction to the subject of volcanoes. Separate sections examine the nature and workings of volcanoes, types of volcanoes, volcanic geological structures such as plugs and maars, types of eruptions, volcanic-related activity such as geysers…

  17. Seismic evidence for a crustal magma reservoir beneath the upper east rift zoneof Kilauea volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lin, Guoqing; Amelung, Falk; Lavallee, Yan; Okubo, Paul G.

    2014-01-01

    An anomalous body with low Vp (compressional wave velocity), low Vs (shear wave velocity), and high Vp/Vs anomalies is observed at 8–11 km depth beneath the upper east rift zone of Kilauea volcano in Hawaii by simultaneous inversion of seismic velocity structure and earthquake locations. We interpret this body to be a crustal magma reservoir beneath the volcanic pile, similar to those widely recognized beneath mid-ocean ridge volcanoes. Combined seismic velocity and petrophysical models suggest the presence of 10% melt in a cumulate magma mush. This reservoir could have supplied the magma that intruded into the deep section of the east rift zone and caused its rapid expansion following the 1975 M7.2 Kalapana earthquake.

  18. Stratigraphic framework of Holocene volcaniclastic deposits, Akutan Volcano, east-central Aleutian Islands, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waythomas, C.F.

    1999-01-01

    Akutan Volcano is one of the most active volcanoes in the Aleutian arc, but until recently little was known about its history and eruptive character. Following a brief but sustained period of intense seismic activity in March 1996, the Alaska Volcano Observatory began investigating the geology of the volcano and evaluating potential volcanic hazards that could affect residents of Akutan Island. During these studies new information was obtained about the Holocene eruptive history of the volcano on the basis of stratigraphic studies of volcaniclastic deposits and radiocarbon dating of associated buried soils and peat. A black, scoria-bearing, lapilli tephra, informally named the 'Akutan tephra,' is up to 2 m thick and is found over most of the island, primarily east of the volcano summit. Six radiocarbon ages on the humic fraction of soil A-horizons beneath the tephra indicate that the Akutan tephra was erupted approximately 1611 years B.P. At several locations the Akutan tephra is within a conformable stratigraphic sequence of pyroclastic-flow and lahar deposits that are all part of the same eruptive sequence. The thickness, widespread distribution, and conformable stratigraphic association with overlying pyroclastic-flow and lahar deposits indicate that the Akutan tephra likely records a major eruption of Akutan Volcano that may have formed the present summit caldera. Noncohesive lahar and pyroclastic-flow deposits that predate the Akutan tephra occur in the major valleys that head on the volcano and are evidence for six to eight earlier Holocene eruptions. These eruptions were strombolian to subplinian events that generated limited amounts of tephra and small pyroclastic flows that extended only a few kilometers from the vent. The pyroclastic flows melted snow and ice on the volcano flanks and formed lahars that traveled several kilometers down broad, formerly glaciated valleys, reaching the coast as thin, watery, hyperconcentrated flows or water floods. Slightly

  19. Crustal structure of east central Oregon: Relation between Newberry Volcano and regional crustal structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catchings, R. D.; Mooney, W. D.

    1988-09-01

    A 180-km-long seismic refraction transect from the eastern High Cascades, across Newberry Volcano, to the eastern High Lava Plains is used to investigate the subvolcanic crustal and upper mantle velocity structure there. Near-surface volcanic flows and sedimentary debris (1.6-4.7 km/s), ranging from 3 to 5 km in thickness, overlie subvolcanic Basin and Range structures. East and west of Newberry Volcano, the subvolcanic basement (5.6 km/s) has been downwarped, producing 5-km-deep basins. The midcrust (8- to 28-km depth) is characterized by velocities ranging from 6.1 to 6.5 km/s and varies laterally in thicknesses. The lower crust is characterized by art unusually high velocity (about 7.4 km/s), and its geometry mirrors the subvolcanic basement geometry. The Moho is located at a depth of 37 km and represents a transition to an upper mantle velocity of 8.1 km/s. The shallow subsurface (1.2 km) beneath Newberry Volcano is characterized by high-velocity (5.6 km/s, versus 4.1 km/s for the surrounding area) intrusions and appears to be located on a basement high. Beneath the seismic refraction array at Newberry Volcano, an absence of low-velocity anomalies suggests that large silicic magma chambers do not exist in the upper crust, but apparent high attenuation of the seismic wave field may be consistent with either partial melts in small volumes, elevated crustal temperatures, and/or poor geophonerecording site coupling. The east central Oregon velocity structure is nearly identical to that of the northwestern Nevada Basin and Range and the Modoc Plateau of northeastern California, and variations in the deep crustal structure about Newberry Volcano are consistent with tectonism involving crustal underplating, melting, and extension. If paleomagnetic estimates of extension in the east central Oregon area are correct, the North American continent experienced significant growth through extension, underplating, and volcanism in east central Oregon. Comparison of east

  20. Molokai fracture zone: continuation west of the hawaiian ridge.

    PubMed

    Malahoff, A; Strange, W E; Woollard, G P

    1966-07-29

    The Molokai Fracture Zone is one of the principal east-west (striking) fracture zones between California and the mid-Pacific. On the basis of bathymetry alone, it has been assumed that the zone ended abruptly east of the Hawaiian Islands. Use of correlation techniques between bathymetric features and their magnetic anomalies in the vicinity of the islands now show that structural elements of the zone cross the islands and continue westward for at least 130 kilometers. Recent volcanism and deep rift zones of the islands parallel the zone, suggesting structural correlation between the strike of the zone and the origin of recent volcanism in the islands.

  1. The 2007 eruption of Kelut volcano (East Java, Indonesia): Phenomenology, crisis management and social response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Bélizal, Édouard; Lavigne, Franck; Gaillard, J. C.; Grancher, Delphine; Pratomo, Indyo; Komorowski, Jean-Christophe

    2012-01-01

    We focus in this paper on the processes and consequences of an unusual volcanic eruption at Kelut volcano, East Java. In November 2007, after two months of worrying precursor signs, Kelut volcano erupted. But neither explosions nor the usual hazards observed during the historic eruptions happened (e.g. ash falls, volcanic bombs and pyroclastic flows). Instead of an explosive eruption, the 2007 eruption was extrusive. Given than such an eruption could not be predicted, the authorities had to manage a new situation. We conducted interviews with nine stakeholders of the crisis management team, and undertook a questionnaire-based survey in the settlement nearest to the crater, in order to understand how the authorities managed the crisis, and how people reacted. Inquiries and questionnaires were carried out shortly after the end of the evacuation process, when the volcano was still under surveillance for fear of an explosive phase. The results display a real gap in what it takes to manage a crisis or live through a crisis. This suggests that the "unusual" eruption pattern of Kelut volcano was not the only factor of the misunderstanding between the authorities and the population. These problems stem from more structural causes such as the lack of communication and information when there is a need to adapt to a new scenario. In such a situation, the inability of the crisis management system to take decisions underscored the intrinsic vulnerability of the population despite a hierarchical and strategic top-down crisis management approach.

  2. Volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tilling, Robert I.; ,

    1998-01-01

    Volcanoes destroy and volcanoes create. The catastrophic eruption of Mount St. Helens on May 18, 1980, made clear the awesome destructive power of a volcano. Yet, over a time span longer than human memory and record, volcanoes have played a key role in forming and modifying the planet upon which we live. More than 80 percent of the Earth's surface--above and below sea level--is of volcanic origin. Gaseous emissions from volcanic vents over hundreds of millions of years formed the Earth's earliest oceans and atmosphere, which supplied the ingredients vital to evolve and sustain life. Over geologic eons, countless volcanic eruptions have produced mountains, plateaus, and plains, which subsequent erosion and weathering have sculpted into majestic landscapes and formed fertile soils.

  3. The Geothermal System of the Arjuno-Welirang Volcano (East Java, Indonesia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inguaggiato, S.; Mazzini, A.; Vita, F.

    2015-12-01

    Arjuno-Welirang is a twin strato-volcano system located in the East of Java (Indonesia). It features two main peaks: Arjuno (3339 masl) and Welirang (3156 masl). The last recorded eruptive activity took place in August 1950 from the flanks of Kawah Plupuh and in October 1950 by the NW part of the Gunung Welirang. This strato-volcano is characterized by a solfataric area, with high T-vent fumarole at least up to 220°C, located mainly in the Welirang crater zone where sulphur deposits are abundant. In addition, several hot springs vent from the flanks of the volcano, indicating the presence of a large hydrothermal system During July 2015 we carried out a geochemical field campaign on the Arjuno-Welirang volcano-hydrothermal system area sampling water and dissolved gases from the thermal and cold springs located on the flanks of the volcano and from two high-T fumaroles located on the summit area of Welirang. Hydrothermal springs reveal temperatures up to 53°C and pH between 6.2 and 8.2. The hydrothermal springs show a volatile content (mainly CO2 and He) that is several order of magnitude higher than the Air Saturated Waters values (ASW) indicating a strong gas/water interaction processes between waters of meteoric origin and deep volatiles of volcanic origin. The hydrothermal springs have dissolved helium isotopic values with clear magmatic signature (R/Ra around 7) that is remarkably close to the helium isotope values from the fumaroles (R/Ra= 7.30).

  4. Prokaryotic community structure and diversity in the sediments of an active submarine mud volcano (Kazan mud volcano, East Mediterranean Sea).

    PubMed

    Pachiadaki, Maria G; Lykousis, Vasilios; Stefanou, Euripides G; Kormas, Konstantinos A

    2010-06-01

    We investigated 16S rRNA gene diversity at a high sediment depth resolution (every 5 cm, top 30 cm) in an active site of the Kazan mud volcano, East Mediterranean Sea. A total of 242 archaeal and 374 bacterial clones were analysed, which were attributed to 38 and 205 unique phylotypes, respectively (> or = 98% similarity). Most of the archaeal phylotypes were related to ANME-1, -2 and -3 members originating from habitats where anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) occurs, although they occurred in sediment layers with no apparent AOM (below the sulphate depletion depth). Proteobacteria were the most abundant and diverse bacterial group, with the Gammaproteobacteria dominating in most sediment layers and these were related to phylotypes involved in methane cycling. The Deltaproteobacteria included several of the sulphate-reducers related to AOM. The rest of the bacterial phylotypes belonged to 15 known phyla and three unaffiliated groups, with representatives from similar habitats. Diversity index H was in the range 0.56-1.73 and 1.47-3.82 for Archaea and Bacteria, respectively, revealing different depth patterns for the two groups. At 15 and 20 cm below the sea floor, the prokaryotic communities were highly similar, hosting AOM-specific Archaea and Bacteria. Our study revealed different dominant phyla in proximate sediment layers. PMID:20370830

  5. Rifts of deeply eroded Hawaiian basaltic shields: A structural analog for large Martian volcanoes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Michael D.; Walker, G. P. L.; Mouginis-Mark, P. J.; Rowland, Scott K.

    1988-01-01

    Recently derived morphologic evidence suggests that intrusive events have not only influenced the growth of young shield volcanoes on Mars but also the distribution of volatiles surrounding these volcanoes: in addition to rift zones and flank eruptions on Arsia Mons and Pavonis Mons, melt water channels were identified to the northwest of Hecates Tholus, to the south of Hadriaca Patera, and to the SE of Olympus Mons. Melt water release could be the surface expression of tectonic deformation of the region or, potentially, intrusive events associated with dike emplacement from each of these volcanoes. In this study the structural properties of Hawaiian shield volcanoes were studied where subaerial erosion has removed a sufficient amount of the surface to enable a direct investigation of the internal structure of the volcanoes. The field investigation of dike morphology and magma flow characteristics for several volcanoes in Hawaii is reported. A comprehensive investigation was made of the Koolau dike complex that passes through the summit caldera. A study of two other dissected Hawaiian volcanoes, namely Waianae and East Molokai, was commenced. The goal is not only to understand the emplacement process and magma flow within these terrestrial dikes, but also to explore the possible role that intrusive events may have played in volcano growth and the distribution of melt water release on Mars.

  6. Crustal structure of east central Oregon: relation between Newberry Volcano and regional crustal structure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Catchings, R.D.; Mooney, W.D.

    1988-01-01

    A 180-km-long seismic refraction transect from the eastern High Cascades, across Newberry Volcano, to the eastern High Lava Plains is used to investigate the subvolcanic crustal and upper mantle velocity structure there. Near-surface volcanic flows and sedimentary debris (1.6-4.7 km/s), ranging from 3 to 5 km in thickness, overlie subvolcanic Basin and Range structures. East and west of Newberry Volcano, the subvolcanic basement (5.6 km/s) has been downwarped, producing 5-km-deep basins. The midcrust (8- to 28-km depth) is characterized by velocities ranging from 6.1 to 6.5 km/s and varies laterally in thicknesses. The lower crust is characterized by an unusually high velocity (about 7.4 km/s), and its geometry mirrors the subvolcanic basement geometry. The Moho is located at a depth of 37 km and represents a transition to an upper mantle velocity of 8.1 km/s. The shallow subsurface (1.2 km) beneath Newberry Volcano is characterized by high-velocity 5.6 km/s, versus 4.1 km/s for the surrounding area) intrusions and appears to be located on a basement high. Beneath the seismic refraction array at Newberry Volcano, an absence of low-velocity anomalies suggests that large silicic magma chambers do not exist in the upper crust, but apparent high attenuation of the seismic wave field may be consistent with either partial melts in small volumes, elevated crustal temperatures, and/or poor geophone-recording site coupling. -Authors

  7. The 12 September 1999 Upper East Rift Zone dike intrusion at Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cervelli, Peter; Segall, P.; Amelung, F.; Garbeil, H.; Meertens, C.; Owen, S.; Miklius, Asta; Lisowski, M.

    2002-01-01

    Deformation associated with an earthquake swarm on 12 September 1999 in the Upper East Rift Zone of Kilauea Volcano was recorded by continuous GPS receivers and by borehole tiltmeters. Analyses of campaign GPS, leveling data, and interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data from the ERS-2 satellite also reveal significant deformation from the swarm. We interpret the swarm as resulting from a dike intrusion and model the deformation field using a constant pressure dike source. Nonlinear inversion was used to find the model that best fits the data. The optimal dike is located beneath and slightly to the west of Mauna Ulu, dips steeply toward the south, and strikes nearly east-west. It is approximately 3 by 2 km across and was driven by a pressure of ??? 15 MPa. The total volume of the dike was 3.3 x 106 m3. Tilt data indicate a west to east propagation direction. Lack of premonitory inflation of Kilauea's summit suggests a passive intrusion; that is, the immediate cause of the intrusion was probably tensile failure in the shallow crust of the Upper East Rift Zone brought about by persistent deep rifting and by continued seaward sliding of Kilauea's south flank.

  8. Shaded Relief with Height as Color, Virunga and Nyiragongo Volcanoes and the East African Rift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Volcanic, tectonic, erosional and sedimentary landforms are all evident in this comparison of two elevation models of a region along the East African Rift at Lake Kivu. The area shown covers parts of Congo, Rwanda and Uganda.

    These two images show exactly the same area. The image on the left was created using the best global topographic data set previously available, the U.S. Geological Survey's GTOPO30. In contrast, the much more detailed image on the right was generated with data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, which collected enough measurements to map 80 percent of Earth's landmass at this level of precision. Elevation is color coded, progressing from green at the lower elevations through yellow to brown at the higher elevations. A false sun in the northwest (upper left) creates topographic shading.

    Lake Kivu is shown as black in the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission version (southwest corner). It lies within the East African Rift, an elongated tectonic pull-apart depression in Earth's crust. The rift extends to the northeast as a smooth lava- and sediment-filled trough. Two volcanic complexes are seen in the rift. The one closer to the lake is the Nyiragongo volcano, which erupted in January 2002, sending lava toward the lake shore and through the city of Goma. East of the rift, even more volcanoes are seen. These are the Virunga volcano chain, which is the home of the endangered mountain gorillas. Note that the terrain surrounding the volcanoes is much smoother than the eroding mountains that cover most of this view, such that topography alone is a good indicator of the extent of the lava flows. But this clear only at the higher spatial resolution of the shuttle mission's data set.

    For some parts of the globe, Shuttle Radar Topography Mission measurements are 30 times more precise than previously available topographical information, according to NASA scientists. Mission data will be a welcome resource for national and local governments

  9. Evolution and dynamics of magmatic processes below Gede volcano, East-Java, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krimer, Daniel; Costa, Fidel

    2014-05-01

    Subduction-zone volcanism produces a large variety of compositions and eruption styles, but silica-rich explosive eruptions from arc volcanoes are those that pose the most direct threat for those living on and around the volcanoes. The little known Gede volcano (East-Java, Indonesia) is a composite arc-volcano showing evidences of recurrent silicic explosive eruptions and it is a hazard to its 1 million residences settled on its flank also to the two most populated neighboring metropolises: Jakarta and Bandung. Here we present the results of a detailed petrological and geochemical study of Gede's deposits to untangle its magmatic evolution, the key magma reservoir processes, and try to use this information to better anticipate possible future eruptions at Gede. After field-work and dating of the main deposits we identified 5 pyroclastic units ranging from basaltic andesite to dacite, and of eruption ages from about 1 ky to > 45 ky. Bulk-rock major and trace element compositions can be explained as a combination of fractional crystallization and magma mixing/mingling. Crystallization trends evolve with time from wet (amphibole present and plagioclase delayed) to 'dry' (olivine and two pyroxenes, and plagioclase). Petrological and geochemical evidence for within-trend mixing/mingling are common and involve high-Si basalt and dacite end-members. Core to rim electron microprobe and LA-ICP-MS trace element analysis of main phenocrysts (amphibole, plagioclase, ortho- and clinopyroxene) record the details of repetitive magma mixing and mingling events. Cores of amphibole, ortho- and clinopyroxene in the Holocene units have low Mg/Fe, high REEs and Eu-anomaly, and are rimmed Mg/Fe, low REEs and no Eu-anomaly zones. These minerals are thus recording the intrusions of mafic, water-richer and crystal-poor magma into an evolved and partly crystallized magma reservoir. Modeling the diffusive re-equilibration between the crystal cores and rims provides the time elapsed since the

  10. The East Java mud volcano (2006 to present): An earthquake or drilling trigger?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Richard J.; Brumm, Maria; Manga, Michael; Rubiandini, Rudi; Swarbrick, Richard; Tingay, Mark

    2008-08-01

    On May 29th 2006 a mud volcano, later to be named 'Lusi', started to form in East Java. It is still active and has displaced > 30,000 people. The trigger mechanism for this, the world's largest and best known active mud volcano, is still the subject of debate. Trigger mechanisms considered here are (a) the May 27th 2006 Yogyakarta earthquake, (b) the drilling of the nearby Banjar Panji-1 gas exploration well (150 m away), and (c) a combination of the earthquake and drilling operations. We compare the distance and magnitude of the earthquake with the relationship between the distance and magnitude of historical earthquakes that have caused sediment liquefaction, or triggered the eruption of mud volcanoes or caused other hydrological responses. Based on this comparison, an earthquake trigger is not expected. The static stress changes caused by the rupture of the fault that created the Yogyakarta earthquake are a few tens of Pascals, much smaller than changes in stress caused by tides or variations in barometric pressure. At least 22 earthquakes (and possibly hundreds) likely caused stronger ground shaking at the site of Lusi in the past 30 years without causing an eruption. The period immediately preceding the eruption was seismically quieter than average and thus there is no evidence that Lusi was "primed" by previous earthquakes. We thus rule out an earthquake-only trigger. The day before the eruption started (May 28th 2006), as a result of pulling the drill bit and drill pipe out of the hole, there was a significant influx of formation fluid and gas. The monitored pressure after the influx, in the drill pipe and annulus showed variations typical of the leakage of drilling fluid into the surrounding sedimentary rock strata. Furthermore we calculate that the pressure at a depth of 1091 m (the shallowest depth without any protective steel casing) exceeded a critical level after the influx occurred. Fractures formed due to the excess pressure, allowing a fluid

  11. Periodic gas release from the LUSI mud volcano (East Java, Indonesia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderkluysen, L.; Burton, M. R.; Clarke, A. B.; Hartnett, H. E.; Smekens, J.

    2012-12-01

    The LUSI mud volcano has been erupting since May 2006 in a densely populated district of the Sidoarjo regency (East Java, Indonesia), forcing the evacuation of 40,000 people and destroying industries, farmlands, and 10,000 homes. Peak mud extrusion rates of 180,000 m3/d were measured in the first few months of the eruption, which have decreased to <20,000 m3/d in 2012. Mud volcanoes often release fluids in a pulsating fashion, with periodic timescales ranging from minutes to days, and LUSI is no exception. These oscillations, common in natural systems of multi-phase fluid flow, are thought to result from some combination of complex feedback mechanisms between conduit and source geometry, fluid compressibility, viscosity and density, changes in lithostatic stresses, reservoir pressure, fluid phases or vent conditions. Crisis management workers and local residents reported observations of pulsating eruptive cycles lasting a few hours during the first two years of the eruption, and possibly beyond. Since that time, activity has shifted to individual transient eruptions recurring at intervals of a few minutes. In May and October of 2011, we documented the periodic explosive release of fluids at LUSI using a combination of high-resolution time-lapse photography, continuous webcam, open path FTIR, and thermal infrared imagery. The mud, consisting of approximately 70% water, is erupted at temperatures close to boiling. Gases are periodically released by the bursting of bubbles approximately 3 m in diameter, triggering mud fountains ~20 m in height. No appreciable gas seepage was detected in the quiescent intervals between bubble bursts. Absorption spectrometry in the infrared spectrum reveals that the gas released during explosions consists of 98.5% water vapor, 1% carbon dioxide, and 0.3% methane. On rare occasions, minor amounts of ammonia were also detected. Using simplified plume geometries based on observations, we estimate that LUSI releases approximately 1,500 T

  12. U-series Chronology of volcanoes in the Central Kenya Peralkaline Province, East African Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negron, L. M.; Ma, L.; Deino, A.; Anthony, E. Y.

    2012-12-01

    We are studying the East African Rift System (EARS) in the Central Kenya Peralkaline Province (CKPP), and specifically the young volcanoes Mt. Suswa, Longonot, and Menengai. Ar dates by Al Deino on K-feldspar phenocrysts show a strong correlation between older Ar ages and decreasing 230Th/232Th, which we interpret to reflect the age of eruption. This system has been the subject of recent research done by several UTEP alumni including Antony Wamalwa using potential field and magnetotelluric (MT) data to identify and characterize fractures and hydrothermal fluids. Also research on geochemical modeling done by John White, Vanessa Espejel and Peter Omenda led to the hypothesis of possible disequilibrium in these young, mainly obsidian samples in their post eruptive history. A pilot study of 8 samples, (also including W-2a USGS standard and a blank) establish the correlation that was seen between the ages found by Deino along with the 230/232Th ratios. All 8 samples from Mt. Suswa showed a 234U/238U ratio of (1) which indicates secular equilibrium or unity and that these are very fresh samples with no post-eruptive decay or leaching of U isotopes. The pilot set was comprised of four samples from the ring-trench group (RTG) with ages ranging from 7ka-present, two samples from the post-caldera stage ranging from 31-10ka, one sample from the syn-caldera stage dated at 41ka, and one sample from the pre-caldera stage dated at 112ka. The young RTG had a 230/232Th fractionation ratio of 0.8 ranging to the older pre-caldera stage with a 230/232Th ratio of 0.6. From this current data and research of 14C ages by Nick Rogers, the data from Longonot volcano was also similar to the 230/232Th ratio we found. Rogers' data places Longonot volcano ages to be no more than 20ka with the youngest samples also roughly around 0.8 disequilibrium. These strong correlations between the pilot study done for Mt. Suswa, 40Ar ages by Deino, along with 14C ages from Rogers have led to the

  13. Volcanic geology and eruption frequency, lower east rift zone of Kilauea volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, R.B.

    1992-01-01

    Detailed geologic mapping and radiocarbon dating of tholeiitic basalts covering about 275 km2 on the lower east rift zone (LERZ) and adjoining flanks of Kilauea volcano, Hawaii, show that at least 112 separate eruptions have occurred during the past 2360 years. Eruptive products include spatter ramparts and cones, a shield, two extensive lithic-rich tuff deposits, aa and pahoehoe flows, and three littoral cones. Areal coverage, number of eruptions and average dormant interval estimates in years for the five age groups assigned are: (I) historic, i.e. A D 1790 and younger: 25%, 5, 42.75; (II) 200-400 years old: 50%, 15, 14.3: (III) 400-750 years old: 20%, 54, 6.6; (IV) 750-1500 years old: 5%, 37, 20.8; (V) 1500-3000 years old: <1%, 1, unknown. At least 4.5-6 km3 of tholeiitic basalt have been erupted from the LERZ during the past 1500 years. Estimated volumes of the exposed products of individual eruptions range from a few tens of cubic meters for older units in small kipukas to as much as 0.4 km3 for the heiheiahulu shield. The average dormant interval has been about 13.6 years during the past 1500 years. The most recent eruption occurred in 1961, and the area may be overdue for its next eruption. However, eruptive activity will not resume on the LERZ until either the dike feeding the current eruption on the middle east rift zone extends farther down rift, or a new dike, unrelated to the current eruption, extends into the LERZ. ?? 1992 Springer-Verlag.

  14. Geologic Map of the Middle East Rift Geothermal Subzone, Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trusdell, Frank A.; Moore, Richard B.

    2006-01-01

    K'lauea is an active shield volcano in the southeastern part of the Island of Hawai'i. The middle east rift zone (MERZ) map includes about 27 square kilometers of the MERZ and shows the distribution of the products of 37 separate eruptions during late Holocene time. Lava flows erupted during 1983-96 have reached the mapped area. The subaerial part of the MERZ is 3-4 km wide and about 18 km long. It is a constructional ridge, 50-150 m above the adjoining terrain, marked by low spatter ramparts and cones as high as 60 m. Lava typically flowed either northeast or southeast, depending on vent location relative to the topographic crest of the rift zone. The MERZ receives more than 100 in. of rainfall annually and is covered by tropical rain forest. Vegetation begins to grow on lava a few months after its eruption. Relative heights of trees can be a guide to relative ages of underlying lava flows, but proximity to faults, presence of easily weathered cinders, and human activity also affect the rate of growth. The rocks have been grouped into five basic age groups. The framework for the ages assigned is provided by eight radiocarbon ages from previous mapping by the authors and a single date from the current mapping effort. The numerical ages are supplemented by observations of stratigraphic relations, degree of weathering, soil development, and vegetative cover.

  15. Puhimau thermal area: a window into the upper east rift zone of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGee, K.A.; Sutton, A.J.; Elias, T.; Doukas, M.P.; Gerlach, T.M.

    2006-01-01

    We report the results of two soil CO2 efflux surveys by the closed chamber circulation method at the Puhimau thermal area in the upper East Rift Zone (ERZ) of  volcano, Hawaii. The surveys were undertaken in 1996 and 1998 to constrain how much CO2 might be reaching the ERZ after degassing beneath the summit caldera and whether the Puhimau thermal area might be a significant contributor to the overall CO2 budget of  . The area was revisited in 2001 to determine the effects of surface disturbance on efflux values by the collar emplacement technique utilized in the earlier surveys. Utilizing a cutoff value of 50 g m−2 d−1 for the surrounding forest background efflux, the CO2 emission rates for the anomaly at Puhimau thermal area were 27 t d−1 in 1996 and 17 t d−1 in 1998. Water vapor was removed before analysis in all cases in order to obtain CO2 values on a dry air basis and mitigate the effect of water vapor dilution on the measurements. It is clear that Puhimau thermal area is not a significant contributor to  CO2 output and that most of  CO2 (8500 t d−1) is degassed at the summit, leaving only magma with its remaining stored volatiles, such as SO2, for injection down the ERZ. Because of the low CO2emission rate and the presence of a shallow water table in the upper ERZ that effectively scrubs SO2 and other acid gases, Puhimau thermal area currently does not appear to be generally well suited for observing temporal changes in degassing at  .

  16. Selected time-lapse movies of the east rift zone eruption of KĪlauea Volcano, 2004–2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Orr, Tim R.

    2011-01-01

    Since 2004, the U.S. Geological Survey's Hawaiian Volcano Observatory has used mass-market digital time-lapse cameras and network-enabled Webcams for visual monitoring and research. The 26 time-lapse movies in this report were selected from the vast collection of images acquired by these camera systems during 2004–2008. Chosen for their content and broad aesthetic appeal, these image sequences document a variety of flow-field and vent processes from Kīlauea's east rift zone eruption, which began in 1983 and is still (as of 2011) ongoing.

  17. Beach and reef-flat sediments along the south shore of Molokai, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Calhoun, R.S.; Field, M.E.; ,

    2000-01-01

    As part of the U.S. Geological Survey's multi-disciplinary Coral Reef Project addressing the health and geological variability of coral reef systems, sediment components and their distribution along the fringing reef on the south shore of the Hawaiian island of Molokai are being examined. Particular interest is being paid to the types and origin of sediment found on the reef. The south shore of Molokai is sheltered by one of the largest fringing reefs in the US. At approximately 50 km in length, up to 1.5 km in width, and covered by 90% live coral in many locations, the reef seemingly should be able to provide ample sediment for large carbonate beaches. However, siliciclastic grains supplied by erosion of the basaltic uplands of Molokai are often the most conspicuous individual nearshore sediment type. Coralline algae and coral are the most common carbonate components of the beaches. On the nearshore reef-flat, chemically-altered carbonate grains, particularly coralline algae, are the most abundant component. Molluscs and Halimeda may be common in specific locations, but are usually minor components. Sediment calcium carbonate levels increase to the west from a minimum at Kamalo, and are high along the east shore of Molokai. However, these general island-scale trends may be overridden by local influences, such as protected stream mouths or high carbonate growth rates. Additionally, trends seen on the beach and nearshore environments may not reflect trends a few hundred meters offshore since shore normal trends are more pronounced than shore parallel ones.

  18. Organic chemical composition of mud from the LUSI mud volcano, Sidoarjo, East Java, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenbauer, R. J.; Campbell, P.; Lam, A.

    2009-12-01

    Sidoarjo, East Java, Indonesia is the site of LUSI, a terrestrial mud volcano that has been erupting since May 29, 2006. In response to a U.S. Department of State request, the U.S. Geological Survey has been assisting the Indonesian Government to describe the geological and geochemical aspects and potential health risk of the mud eruption. We report here on the organic chemical composition of the mud. Organic chemical analyses were carried out by gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy following organic extraction by microwave-assisted solvent extraction and compound fractionation by adsorption chromatography. There is a petroliferous component in the mud that is fresh, immature, and nonbiodegraded. There is a complete suite of n-alkanes with a bell-shaped pattern typical of fresh petroleum with a Cmax around C20. The alkane content ranges from 0.12 to 1.01 mg/kg dry mud. The presence of certain hopanes (i.e. 17 α,21β(H)-30-norhopane and 17α,21β(H)-hopane) is also indicative of the presence of oil. The proportions of other biomarker compounds (pristane/phytane = 2.4) and the dominance of the C27 sterane (5α(H),14α(H),17α(H)-chlolestane) suggest that oil formed under oxic conditions and has a likely coastal marine or terrigenous source. The presence of oleanane indicates a Cretaceous or younger age for the petrogenic material. These geochemical parameters are consistent with Indonesian oil derived from Tertiary marlstone source rocks that contained kerogen deposited under oxic conditions, probably the upper Miocene Klasafet Formation. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are present and range in content from 0.1 to 2.2 mg/kg dry mud. The low molecular weight (LMW) PAHs, in particular, naphthalene and methyl-naphthalene are dominant except for perylene which is ubiquitous in the environment. The presence of both parent and higher homologue PAHs indicate a petrogenic rather than combustion source. PAHs are known carcinogens but toxicity data in sediments are

  19. Reconnaissance gas measurements on the East Rift Zone of Kilauea Volcano, Hawai'i by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGee, Kenneth A.; Elias, Tamar; Sutton, A. Jefferson; Doukas, Michael P.; Zemek, Peter G.; Gerlach, Terrence M.

    2005-01-01

    We report the results of a set of measurements of volcanic gases on two small ground level plumes in the vicinity of Pu`u `O`o cone on the middle East Rift Zone (ERZ) of Kilauea volcano, Hawai`i on 15 June 2001 using open-path Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The work was carried out as a reconnaissance survey to assess the monitoring and research value of FTIR measurements at this volcano. Despite representing emissions of residual volatiles from lava that has undergone prior degassing, the plumes contained detectable amounts of CO2, CO, SO2, HCl, HF and SiF4. Various processes, including subsurface cooling, condensation of water in the atmospheric plume, oxidation, dissolution in water, and reactions with wall rocks at plume vents affect the abundance of these gases. Low concentrations of volcanic CO2 measured against a high ambient background are not well constrained by FTIR spectroscopy. Although there appear to be some differences between these gases and Pu`u `O`o source gases, ratios of HCl/SO2, HF/SO2 and CO/SO2 determined by FTIR measurements of these two small plumes compare reasonably well with earlier published analyses of ERZ vent samples. The measurements yielded emission rate estimates of 4, 11 and 4 t d-1

  20. The growth rate of submarine volcanoes on the South Honshu and East Mariana ridges — Comments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Michael C.; Fryer, Patricia

    1991-04-01

    Growth rates, recently reported for eleven submarine volcanoes of the Mariana arc, are probably in error by several orders of magnitude. The reported growth rates are based solely on comparison of bathymetric surveys done by different methods over a 15-20-year time span. We have additional data on three of the volcanoes which argue against the inferred high growth rates. A detailed seismic reflection survey of one edifice (Fukujin Seamount) reveals that it has a very sharp peak which would be difficult to detect by more regional-scale sonar surveys. Examination of side-scan sonar images and bottom photography, and the recovery of highly weathered rocks in dredge hauls from another volcano (Kasuga Seamount), which is presumed to have grown almost 200 m in height in the last 17 years on the basis of bathymetric surveys, show it to be most likely extinct. Alvin submersible dives, as well as bottom photography and sonar images, on a third seamount (South Kasuga) show processes at its summit to be mainly erosional rather than constructional even though it is considered to be active. The inferred average growth rates of 15 m/y in height for six of the eleven volcanoes located in the northernmost part of the Mariana arc imply a volumetric volcanic production rate for this 500-km-long section of the arc of up to 9 km 3/y which exceeds the estimated global rate for all subduction zones. We believe that navigational errors and lack of total coverage over the summits of these seamounts are the main causes of the apparent differences in their minimum shoal depths between different survey methods.

  1. Relation of summit deformation to east rift zone eruptions on Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    SciTech Connect

    Epp, D.; Decker, R.W.; Okamura, A.T.

    1983-07-01

    An inverse relationship exists between the summit deflation of Kilauea, as recorded by summit tilt, and the elevation of associated eruptive vents on the East Rift Zone. This relationship implies that East Rift eruptions drain the summit magma reservior to pressure levels that are dependent on the elevation of the eruptive vents.

  2. Application of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery to volcano mapping in the humid tropics: a case study in East Java, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carn, Simon A.

    Volcanoes in humid tropical environments are frequently cloud covered, typically densely vegetated and rapidly eroded. These factors complicate field and laboratory studies and even the basic identification of potentially active volcanoes. Numerous previous studies have highlighted the potential value of radar remote sensing for volcanology in equatorial regions. Here, cloud- and vegetation-penetrating LHH-band (λ 24cm) synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data from the Japanese Earth Resources Satellite (JERS-1) are used to investigate persistently active volcanoes and prehistoric calderas in East Java, Indonesia. The LHH-band JERS-1 SAR produces high-spatial-resolution (18m) imagery with relatively high incidence angle that highlights structures and topographic variations at or greater than the wavelength scale while minimising geometrical distortions such as layover and foreshortening. These images, along with Internet browse data derived from the Canadian RADARSAT mission, provide new evidence relating regional tectonics to volcanism throughout East Java. Volcanic events, such as caldera collapse at the Tengger caldera, appear to have been partly controlled by northwest-aligned faults related to intra-arc sedimentary basins. Similar regional controls appear important at historically active Lamongan volcano, which is encircled by numerous flank maars and cinder cones. A previously undocumented pyroclastic sheet and debris avalanche deposit from the Jambangan caldera complex is also manifested in the synoptic radar images. At the currently active Semeru volcano these data permit identification of recent pyroclastic flow and lahar deposits. Radar data therefore offer a valuable tool for mapping and hazard assessment at late Quaternary volcanoes. The criteria developed in the analysis here could be applied to other regions in the humid tropics.

  3. Internal structure of Puna Ridge: evolution of the submarine East Rift Zone of Kilauea Volcano, Hawai ̀i

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leslie, Stephen C.; Moore, Gregory F.; Morgan, Julia K.

    2004-01-01

    Multichannel seismic reflection, sonobuoy, gravity and magnetics data collected over the submarine length of the 75 km long Puna Ridge, Hawai ̀i, resolve the internal structure of the active rift zone. Laterally continuous reflections are imaged deep beneath the axis of the East Rift Zone (ERZ) of Kilauea Volcano. We interpret these reflections as a layer of abyssal sediments lying beneath the volcanic edifice of Kilauea. Early arrival times or 'pull-up' of sediment reflections on time sections imply a region of high P-wave velocity ( Vp) along the submarine ERZ. Refraction measurements along the axis of the ridge yield Vp values of 2.7-4.85 km/s within the upper 1 km of the volcanic pile and 6.5-7 km/s deeper within the edifice. Few coherent reflections are observed on seismic reflection sections within the high-velocity area, suggesting steeply dipping dikes and/or chaotic and fractured volcanic materials. Southeastward dipping reflections beneath the NW flank of Puna Ridge are interpreted as the buried flank of the older Hilo Ridge, indicating that these two ridges overlap at depth. Gravity measurements define a high-density anomaly coincident with the high-velocity region and support the existence of a complex of intrusive dikes associated with the ERZ. Gravity modeling shows that the intrusive core of the ERZ is offset to the southeast of the topographic axis of the rift zone, and that the surface of the core dips more steeply to the northwest than to the southeast, suggesting that the dike complex has been progressively displaced to the southeast by subsequent intrusions. The gravity signature of the dike complex decreases in width down-rift, and is absent in the distal portion of the rift zone. Based on these observations, and analysis of Puna Ridge bathymetry, we define three morphological and structural regimes of the submarine ERZ, that correlate to down-rift changes in rift zone dynamics and partitioning of intrusive materials. We propose that these

  4. Trace element and isotopic geochemistry of lavas from Haleakala Volcano, east Maui, Hawaii: Implications for the origin of Hawaiian basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chu-Yung; Frey, Frederick A.

    1985-09-01

    Haleakala volcano on East Maui, Hawaii, consists of a tholeiitic basalt shield which grades into a younger alkalic series that was followed by a posterosional alkalic series. Tholeiitic, transitional, and alkalic basalts range widely in Sr and Nd isotopic ratios (from mid-ocean ridge basalt to bulk earth ratios) and incompatible element (P, K, Rb, Sr, Zr, Nb, Ba, REE, Hf, Ta, and Th) abundances, but isotopic ratios and incompatible element abundance ratios (e.g., Ba/La, Nb/La, La/Ce, La/Sm) vary systematically with age. The youngest series (posterosional alkalic lavas) has the highest Rb/Sr, Ba/La, Nb/La, La/Ce, and 143Nd/144Nd ratios and the lowest 87sr/86sr ratios, whereas the oldest series (dominantly tholeiitic basalts) has the lowest Rb/Sr, Ba/La, Nb/La, La/Ce, and 143Nd/144Nd ratios and the highest 87sr/86sr ratios. The most striking features of the trace element and isotopic data are the inverse correlations between isotopic ratios and parent/daughter abundance ratios in the Sr and Nd systems. Although some of the geochemical variations can be explained by shallow level fractional crystallization (e.g., alkali basalt to mugearite [Chen et al., 1984, and manuscript in preparation, 1985]), the temporal geochemical trends require a major role for mixing. We propose a model in which melts from a diaper interact with incipient melts of its wall rocks, presumed to be oceanic lithosphere. Because of motion between the lithosphere and mantle hot spot the relative contribution of melts from the diapir (mantle plume) material to the lavas decreases with time; consequently, with decreasing age the basalts become more enriched in incompatible trace elements and acquire Sr and Nd isotopic ratios which overlap with mid-ocean ridge basalts. This model quantitatively explains the isotopic ratios and incompatible trace element abundances in representative samples from the three Haleakala volcanic series. On the basis of the degrees of melting inferred for the mixing

  5. Quantitative morphology of a fringing reef tract from high-resolution laser bathymetry: Southern Molokai, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Storlazzi, C.D.; Logan, J.B.; Field, M.E.

    2003-01-01

    High-resolution Scanning Hydrographic Operational Airborne Lidar Survey (SHOALS) laser-determined bathymetric data were used to define the morphology of spur-and-groove structures on the fringing reef off the south coast of Molokai, Hawaii. These data provide a basis for mapping and analyzing morphology of the reef with a level of precision and spatial coverage never before attained. An extensive fringing coral reef stretches along the central two-thirds of Molokai's south shore (???40 km); along the east and west ends there is only a thin veneer of living coral with no developed reef complex. In total, ???4800 measurements of spur-and-groove height and the distance between adjacent spur crests (wavelength) were obtained along four isobaths. Between the 5m and 15m isobaths, the mean spur height increased from 0.7 m to 1.6 m, whereas the mean wavelength increased from 71 m to 104 m. Reef flat width was found to exponentially decrease with increasing wave energy. Overall, mean spur-and-groove height and wavelength were shown to be inversely proportional to wave energy. In high-energy environments, spur-and-groove morphology remains relatively constant across all water depths. In low-energy environments, however, spur-and-groove structures display much greater variation; they are relatively small and narrow in shallow depths and develop into much larger and broader features in deeper water. Therefore, it appears that waves exert a primary control on both the small and large-scale morphology of the reef off south Molokai.

  6. Paleo-geomorphic evolution of the Ciomadul volcano (East Carpathians, Romania) using integrated volcanological, stratigraphical and radiometric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karátson, Dávid; Wulf, Sabine; Veres, Daniel; Gertisser, Ralf; Telbisz, Tamás; Magyari, Enikö

    2016-04-01

    Ciomadul volcano is the youngest eruptive center of the Carpatho-Pannonian Region (CPR), located at the southernmost end of the Intra-Carpathian Volcanic Range, and within this, the Harghita Mountains in the East Carpathians. As a result of multi-disciplinary, ongoing studies (Karátson et al. 2013 and in review; Magyari et al. 2014; Veres et al. in prep.; Wulf et al. in review), we have obtained a number of constraints on the paleo-geomorphic evolution of the volcano. Our studies clarified that this volcano, a lava dome complex with a twin-crater (i.e. the older Mohos peat bog and the younger St. Ana lake), produced frequent explosive eruptions between 50 and 29 ky. As a result, a set of superimposed volcanic landforms were created, the chronology of which in some cases can be well constrained, in other cases further studies are required to infer their timing. Ciomadul evolved as a moderately explosive dacitic dome complex possibly for several hundred ka (see controversial chronology in Karátson et al. 2013, Harangi et al. 2015 and Szakács et al. 2015), resulting in a set of adjoining lava domes and a central complex. There is no evidence for crater-forming eruptions during that time, although the possibility of moderate explosions cannot be ruled out. Field relations show that the first exposive products are phreatomagmatic tuff series, called Turia type, dated at ca. 50 ka. These tephra units could be linked to the formation of a "Paleo-Mohos" crater, and possibly to the northern half-caldera rim which consists of massive lava dome rock and hosts Ciomadul Mare, the highest point of the volcano (1300 m). After this first explosive activity, volcanism seems to have migrated toward the W, at the site of the later St. Ana crater. Following plinian eruption(s) at ca. 47-43 ka, the explosive activity went dormant, and a lava dome might have grown up in a possibly small "Proto-St. Ana" crater. At 31-32 ka, a succession of violent magmatic explosive eruptions occurred

  7. Preliminary Analytical Results for a Mud Sample Collected from the LUSI Mud Volcano, Sidoarjo, East Java, Indonesia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Plumlee, Geoffrey S.; Casadevall, Thomas J.; Wibowo, Handoko T.; Rosenbauer, Robert J.; Johnson, Craig A.; Breit, George N.; Lowers, Heather; Wolf, Ruth E.; Hageman, Philip L.; Goldstein, Harland L.; Anthony, Michael W.; Berry, Cyrus J.; Fey, David L.; Meeker, Gregory P.; Morman, Suzette A.

    2008-01-01

    On May 29, 2006, mud and gases began erupting unexpectedly from a vent 150 meters away from a hydrocarbon exploration well near Sidoarjo, East Java, Indonesia. The eruption, called the LUSI (Lumpur 'mud'-Sidoarjo) mud volcano, has continued since then at rates as high as 160,000 m3 per day. At the request of the United States Department of State, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has been providing technical assistance to the Indonesian Government on the geological and geochemical aspects of the mud eruption. This report presents initial characterization results of a sample of the mud collected on September 22, 2007, as well as inerpretive findings based on the analytical results. The focus is on characteristics of the mud sample (including the solid and water components of the mud) that may be of potential environmental or human health concern. Characteristics that provide insights into the possible origins of the mud and its contained solids and waters have also been evaluated.

  8. Multispectral thermal infrared mapping of sulfur dioxide plumes: A case study from the East Rift Zone of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Realmuto, V.J.; Sutton, A.J.; Elias, T.

    1997-01-01

    The synoptic perspective and rapid mode of data acquisition provided by remote sensing are well suited for the study of volcanic SO2 plumes. In this paper we describe a plume-mapping procedure that is based on image data acquired with NASA's airborne thermal infrared multispectral scanner (TIMS) and apply the procedure to TIMS data collected over the East Rift Zone of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, on September 30, 1988. These image data covered the Pu'u 'O'o and Kupaianaha vents and a skylight in the lava tube that was draining the Kupaianaha lava pond. Our estimate of the SO2 emission rate from Pu'u 'O'o (17 - 20 kg s-1) is roughly twice the average of estimates derived from correlation spectrometer (COSPEC) measurements collected 10 days prior to the TIMS overflight (10 kg s-1). The agreement between the TIMS and COSPEC results improves when we compare SO2 burden estimates, which are relatively independent of wind speed. We demonstrate the feasibility of mapping Pu'u 'O'o - scale SO2 plumes from space in anticipation of the 1998 launch of the advanced spaceborne thermal emission and reflectance radiometer (ASTER). Copyright 1997 by the American Geophysical Union.

  9. Multibeam Bathymetry of Haleakala Volcano, Maui

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eakins, B. W.; Robinson, J.

    2002-12-01

    The submarine northeast flank of Haleakala Volcano, Maui was mapped in detail during the summers of 2001 and 2002 by a joint team from the Japan Marine Science and Technology Center (JAMSTEC), Tokyo Institute of Technology, University of Hawaii, and the U.S. Geological Survey. JAMSTEC instruments used included SeaBeam 2112 hull-mounted multibeam sonar (bathymetry and sidescan imagery), manned submersible Shinkai 6500 and ROV Kaiko (bottom video, photographs and sampling of Hana Ridge), gravimeter, magnetometer, and single-channel seismic system. Hana Ridge, Haleakala's submarine east rift zone, is capped by coral-reef terraces for much of its length, which are flexurally tilted towards the axis of the Hawaiian Ridge and delineate former shorelines. Its deeper, more distal portion exhibits a pair of parallel, linear crests, studded with volcanic cones, that suggest lateral migration of the rift zone during its growth. The northern face of the arcuate ridge terminus is a landslide scar in one of these crests, while its southwestern prong is a small, constructional ridge. The Hana slump, a series of basins and ridges analogous to the Laupahoehoe slump off Kohala Volcano, Hawaii, lies north of Hana Ridge and extends down to the Hawaiian moat. Northwest of this slump region a small, dual-crested ridge strikes toward the Hawaiian moat and is inferred to represent a fossil rift zone, perhaps of East Molokai Volcano. A sediment chute along its southern flank has built a large submarine fan with a staircase of contour-parallel folds on its surface that are probably derived from slow creep of sediments down into the moat. Sediments infill the basins of the Hana slump [Moore et al., 1989], whose lowermost layers have been variously back-tilted by block rotation during slumping and flexural loading of the Hawaiian Ridge; the ridges define the outer edges of those down-dropped blocks, which may have subsided several kilometers. An apron of volcaniclastic debris shed from

  10. Terrigenous sediment provenance from geochemical tracers, south Molokai reef flat, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Takesue, R.K.

    2010-01-01

    Land-derived runoff is one of the greatest threats to coral-reef health. Identification of runoff sources is an important step in erosion mitigation efforts. A geochemical sediment provenance study was done in uplands and across the adjacent fringing reef on the southeast shore of Molokai, Hawaii, to determine whether sediment runoff originated from hillsides or gulches. Source-region identification was based on geochemical differences between alkalic basalt, which outcrops on hillsides, and tholeiitic basalt, which outcrops in gulches. In Kawela watershed, copper to iron ratios (Cu/Fe) were distinct in hillside soil versus gulch sediment and suggest that hillside erosion is the predominant mechanism of sediment delivery to the nearshore. This suggests that runoff-mitigation efforts should take steps to reduce hillside erosion. Cadmium to thorium ratios (Cd/Th) in nearshore sediment suggest that there is a high-Cd source of runoff east of Kamalo Gulch. This compositional difference is consistent with the predominance of tholeiitic basalt on the eastern end of Molokai.

  11. High spatio-temporal resolution observations of crater lake temperatures at Kawah Ijen volcano, East Java, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Caudron, Corentin; van Hinsberg, Vincent J.; Hilley, George E.

    2016-08-01

    The crater lake of Kawah Ijen volcano, East Java, Indonesia, has displayed large and rapid changes in temperature at point locations during periods of unrest, but measurement techniques employed to date have not resolved how the lake's thermal regime has evolved over both space and time. We applied a novel approach for mapping and monitoring variations in crater lake apparent surface ("skin") temperatures at high spatial (˜32 cm) and temporal (every 2 min) resolution at Kawah Ijen on 18 September 2014. We used a ground-based FLIR T650sc camera with digital and thermal infrared (TIR) sensors from the crater rim to collect (1) a set of visible imagery around the crater during the daytime and (2) a time series of co-located visible and TIR imagery at one location from pre-dawn to daytime. We processed daytime visible imagery with the Structure-from-Motion photogrammetric method to create a digital elevation model onto which the time series of TIR imagery was orthorectified and georeferenced. Lake apparent skin temperatures typically ranged from ˜21 to 33 °C. At two locations, apparent skin temperatures were ˜4 and 7 °C less than in situ lake temperature measurements at 1.5 and 5-m depth, respectively. These differences, as well as the large spatio-temporal variations observed in skin temperatures, were likely largely associated with atmospheric effects such as the evaporative cooling of the lake surface and infrared absorption by water vapor and SO2. Calculations based on orthorectified TIR imagery thus yielded underestimates of volcanic heat fluxes into the lake, whereas volcanic heat fluxes estimated based on in situ temperature measurements (68 to 111 MW) were likely more representative of Kawah Ijen in a quiescent state. The ground-based imaging technique should provide a valuable tool to continuously monitor crater lake temperatures and contribute insight into the spatio-temporal evolution of these temperatures associated with volcanic activity.

  12. Age and petrology of the Kalaupapa Basalt, Molokai, Hawaii ( geochemistry, Sr isotopes).

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clague, D.A.

    1982-01-01

    The post-erosional Kalaupapa Basalt on East Molokai, Hawaii, erupted between 0.34 and 0.57 million years ago to form the Kalaupapa Peninsula. The Kalaupapa Basalt ranges in composition from basanite to lava transitional between alkalic and tholeiitic basalt. Rare-earth and other trace-element abundances suggest that the Kalaupapa Basalt could be generated by 11-17% partial melting of a light-REE-enriched source like that from which the post-erosional lavas of the Honolulu Group on Oahu were generated by 2-11% melting. The 87Sr/86Sr ratios of the lavas range from 0.70320 to 0.70332, suggesting that the variation in composition mainly reflects variation in the melting process rather than heterogeneity of sources. The length of the period of volcanic quiescence that preceded eruption of post-erosional lavas in the Hawaiian Islands decreased as volcanism progressed from Kauai toward Kilauea. - Authors

  13. Molokai Community Needs Assessment for Agriculture Education and Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pezzoli, Jean A.

    In order to assess the needs of agriculture (AG) education and ascertain the potential employment demand for pre-service and in-service training in agriculture over the next 5 years, Maui Community College (MCC) sent questionnaires to Molokai community businesses, inquiring about their agricultural labor demand. In December 1997, 68 questionnaires…

  14. Paralysis at the Top of a Roaring Volcano: Israel and the Schooling of Palestinians in East Jerusalem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yair, Gad; Alayan, Samira

    2009-01-01

    Conflicts over East Jerusalem are often thought to reflect larger conflicts in the Middle East. In this article, the authors focus on schooling in East Jerusalem in order to provide a better appreciation of the protracted conflict in the area. This close examination of schooling in East Jerusalem can illuminate reasons for the political paralysis…

  15. High spatio-temporal resolution observations of crater-lake temperatures at Kawah Ijen volcano, East Java, Indonesia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Corentin Caudron,; Vincent van Hinsberg,; George Hilley,

    2016-01-01

    The crater lake of Kawah Ijen volcano, East Java, Indonesia, has displayed large and rapid changes in temperature at point locations during periods of unrest, but measurement techniques employed to-date have not resolved how the lake’s thermal regime has evolved over both space and time. We applied a novel approach for mapping and monitoring variations in crater-lake apparent surface (“skin”) temperatures at high spatial (~32 cm) and temporal (every two minutes) resolution at Kawah Ijen on 18 September 2014. We used a ground-based FLIR T650sc camera with digital and thermal infrared (TIR) sensors from the crater rim to collect (1) a set of visible imagery around the crater during the daytime and (2) a time series of co-located visible and TIR imagery at one location from pre-dawn to daytime. We processed daytime visible imagery with the Structure-from-Motion photogrammetric method to create a digital elevation model onto which the time series of TIR imagery was orthorectified and georeferenced. Lake apparent skin temperatures typically ranged from ~21 to 33oC. At two locations, apparent skin temperatures were ~ 4 and 7 oC less than in-situ lake temperature measurements at 1.5 and 5 m depth, respectively. These differences, as well as the large spatio-temporal variations observed in skin temperatures, were likely largely associated with atmospheric effects such as evaporative cooling of the lake surface and infrared absorption by water vapor and SO2. Calculations based on orthorectified TIR imagery thus yielded underestimates of volcanic heat fluxes into the lake, whereas volcanic heat fluxes estimated based on in-situ temperature measurements (68 to 111 MW) were likely more representative of Kawah Ijen in a quiescent state. The ground-based imaging technique should provide a valuable tool to continuously monitor crater-lake temperatures and contribute insight into the spatio-temporal evolution of these temperatures associated with volcanic activity.

  16. SO2 from episode 48A eruption, Hawaii: Sulfur dioxide emissions from the episode 48A East Rift Zone eruption of Kilauea volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andres, R.J.; Kyle, P.R.; Stokes, J.B.; Rose, William I.

    1989-01-01

    An SO2 flux of 1170??400 (1??) tonnes per day was measured with a correlation spectrometer (COSPEC) in October and November 1986 from the continuous, nonfountaining, basaltic East Rift Zone eruption (episode 48A) of Kilauea volcano. This flux is 5-27 times less than those of highfountaining episodes, 3-5 times greater than those of contemporaneous summit emissions or interphase Pu'u O'o emissions, and 1.3-2 times the emissions from Pu'u O'o alone during 48A. Calculations based on the SO2 emission rate resulted in a magma supply rate of 0.44 million m3 per day and a 0.042 wt% sulfur loss from the magma upon eruption. Both of these calculated parameters agree with determinations made previously by other methods. ?? 1989 Springer-Verlag.

  17. Thermal and rheological controls on magma migration in dikes: Examples from the east rift zone of Kilauea volcano, Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parfitt, E. A.; Wilson, L.; Pinkerton, H.

    1993-01-01

    Long-lived eruptions from basaltic volcanoes involving episodic or steady activity indicate that a delicate balance has been struck between the rate of magma cooling in the dike system feeding the vent and the rate of magma supply to the dike system from a reservoir. We describe some key factors, involving the relationships between magma temperature, magma rheology, and dike geometry that control the nature of such eruptions.

  18. The latest explosive eruptions of Ciomadul (Csomád) volcano, East Carpathians - A tephrostratigraphic approach for the 51-29 ka BP time interval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karátson, D.; Wulf, S.; Veres, D.; Magyari, E. K.; Gertisser, R.; Timar-Gabor, A.; Novothny, Á.; Telbisz, T.; Szalai, Z.; Anechitei-Deacu, V.; Appelt, O.; Bormann, M.; Jánosi, Cs.; Hubay, K.; Schäbitz, F.

    2016-06-01

    . Ana crater, was followed by a so far unknown, but likewise violent last eruptive stage from the same vent, creating the final morphology of the crater. This stage, referred to as LSPA (Latest St. Ana Phreatomagmatic Activity), produced pyroclastic-fall deposits of more evolved rhyolitic glass composition (ca. 72.8-78.8 wt.% SiO2) compared to that of the previous MPA stage. According to radiocarbon age constraints on bulk sediment, charcoal and organic matter from lacustrine sediments recovered from both craters, the last of these phreatomagmatic eruptions - that draped the landscape toward the east and southeast of the volcano - occurred at ~ 29.6 ka BP, some 2000 years later than the previously suggested last eruption of Ciomadul.

  19. Causes of unrest at silicic calderas in the East African Rift: New constraints from InSAR and soil-gas chemistry at Aluto volcano, Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchison, William; Biggs, Juliet; Mather, Tamsin A.; Pyle, David M.; Lewi, Elias; Yirgu, Gezahegn; Caliro, Stefano; Chiodini, Giovanni; Clor, Laura E.; Fischer, Tobias P.

    2016-08-01

    Restless silicic calderas present major geological hazards, and yet many also host significant untapped geothermal resources. In East Africa, this poses a major challenge, although the calderas are largely unmonitored their geothermal resources could provide substantial economic benefits to the region. Understanding what causes unrest at these volcanoes is vital for weighing up the opportunities against the potential risks. Here we bring together new field and remote sensing observations to evaluate causes of ground deformation at Aluto, a restless silicic volcano located in the Main Ethiopian Rift (MER). Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) data reveal the temporal and spatial characteristics of a ground deformation episode that took place between 2008 and 2010. Deformation time series reveal pulses of accelerating uplift that transition to gradual long-term subsidence, and analytical models support inflation source depths of ˜5 km. Gases escaping along the major fault zone of Aluto show high CO2 flux, and a clear magmatic carbon signature (CO2-δ13C of -4.2‰ to -4.5‰). This provides compelling evidence that the magmatic and hydrothermal reservoirs of the complex are physically connected. We suggest that a coupled magmatic-hydrothermal system can explain the uplift-subsidence signals. We hypothesize that magmatic fluid injection and/or intrusion in the cap of the magmatic reservoir drives edifice-wide inflation while subsequent deflation is related to magmatic degassing and depressurization of the hydrothermal system. These new constraints on the plumbing of Aluto yield important insights into the behavior of rift volcanic systems and will be crucial for interpreting future patterns of unrest.

  20. 22. VIEW EAST TOWARDS WAIKOLU VALLEY OF PIPELINE ALONG PALI. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. VIEW EAST TOWARDS WAIKOLU VALLEY OF PIPELINE ALONG PALI. EYE BOLTS IN ROCK FACE AT RIGHT WERE USED BRIEFLY IN PLACE OF PIERS TO SUSPEND PIPE BY CHAIN BECAUSE THE CONCRETE PIERS WERE SUSCEPTIBLE TO HEAVY WAVE ACTION IN THIS AREA. - Kalaupapa Water Supply System, Waikolu Valley to Kalaupapa Settlement, Island of Molokai, Kalaupapa, Kalawao County, HI

  1. 21. VIEW EAST ALONG PALI TOWARDS WAIKOLU VALLEY OF ELEVATED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. VIEW EAST ALONG PALI TOWARDS WAIKOLU VALLEY OF ELEVATED PIPELINE ON CONCRETE PIERS. PIPE IS BURIED AT THIS POINT. NOTE REMAINS OF WOOD FRAMEWORK FOR CATWALK (DESTROYED). - Kalaupapa Water Supply System, Waikolu Valley to Kalaupapa Settlement, Island of Molokai, Kalaupapa, Kalawao County, HI

  2. Vertical Motions of Oceanic Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clague, D. A.; Moore, J. G.

    2006-12-01

    Oceanic volcanoes offer abundant evidence of changes in their elevations through time. Their large-scale motions begin with a period of rapid subsidence lasting hundreds of thousands of years caused by isostatic compensation of the added mass of the volcano on the ocean lithosphere. The response is within thousands of years and lasts as long as the active volcano keeps adding mass on the ocean floor. Downward flexure caused by volcanic loading creates troughs around the growing volcanoes that eventually fill with sediment. Seismic surveys show that the overall depression of the old ocean floor beneath Hawaiian volcanoes such as Mauna Loa is about 10 km. This gross subsidence means that the drowned shorelines only record a small part of the total subsidence the islands experienced. In Hawaii, this history is recorded by long-term tide-gauge data, the depth in drill holes of subaerial lava flows and soil horizons, former shorelines presently located below sea level. Offshore Hawaii, a series of at least 7 drowned reefs and terraces record subsidence of about 1325 m during the last half million years. Older sequences of drowned reefs and terraces define the early rapid phase of subsidence of Maui, Molokai, Lanai, Oahu, Kauai, and Niihau. Volcanic islands, such as Maui, tip down toward the next younger volcano as it begins rapid growth and subsidence. Such tipping results in drowned reefs on Haleakala as deep as 2400 m where they are tipped towards Hawaii. Flat-topped volcanoes on submarine rift zones also record this tipping towards the next younger volcano. This early rapid subsidence phase is followed by a period of slow subsidence lasting for millions of years caused by thermal contraction of the aging ocean lithosphere beneath the volcano. The well-known evolution along the Hawaiian chain from high to low volcanic island, to coral island, and to guyot is due to this process. This history of rapid and then slow subsidence is interrupted by a period of minor uplift

  3. The flight of Arcadia: spatial CO2/SO2 variations in a cross section above the Nord East crater of Etna volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuffrida, Giovanni; Calabrese, Sergio; Bobrowski, Nicole; Finkenzeller, Henning; Pecoraino, Giovannella; Scaglione, Sarah

    2015-04-01

    The CO2/SO2 ratio in volcanic plumes of open conduit volcanoes can provide useful information about the magma depth inside a conduit and the possible occurrence of an eruptive event. Moreover, the same CO2 measurement when combined with a SO2 flux measurement, commonly carried out at many volcanoes nowadays, is used to contribute to an improved estimate of global volcanic CO2 budget. Today worldwide at 13 volcanoes automated in-situ instruments (known as Multi-GAS stations) are applied to continuously determine CO2/SO2 ratios and to use this signal as additional parameter for volcanic monitoring. Usually these instruments carry out measurements of half an hour 4 - 6 times/day and thus provide continuous CO2/SO2 values and their variability. The stations are located at crater rims in a position that according to the prevailing winds is invested by the plume. Obviously, although the stations are carefully positioned, it is inevitable that other sources than the plume itself, e.g. soil degassing and surrounding fumaroles, contribute and will be measured as well, covering the 'real' values. Between July and September 2014 experiments were carried out on the North East crater (NEC) of Mount Etna, installing a self-made cable car that crossed the crater from one side to the other. The basket, called "Arcadia", was equipped with an automated standard Multi-GAS station and a GPS, which acquired at high frequency (0.5 Hz) the following parameters : CO2, SO2, H2S, Rh, T, P and geo-coordinates. The choice of NEC of the volcano Etna was based on its accessibility, the relative small diameter (about 230 m) and the presence of a relatively constant and rather concentrated plume. Actually, NEC belongs also to the monitoring network EtnaPlume (managed by the INGV of Palermo). The aim of these experiments was to observe variations of each parameter, in particular the fluctuation of the CO2/SO2 ratio within the plume, moving from the edge to the center of the crater. The gained

  4. Volcano hazards at Newberry Volcano, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sherrod, David R.; Mastin, Larry G.; Scott, William E.; Schilling, Steven P.

    1997-01-01

    Newberry volcano is a broad shield volcano located in central Oregon. It has been built by thousands of eruptions, beginning about 600,000 years ago. At least 25 vents on the flanks and summit have been active during several eruptive episodes of the past 10,000 years. The most recent eruption 1,300 years ago produced the Big Obsidian Flow. Thus, the volcano's long history and recent activity indicate that Newberry will erupt in the future. The most-visited part of the volcano is Newberry Crater, a volcanic depression or caldera at the summit of the volcano. Seven campgrounds, two resorts, six summer homes, and two major lakes (East and Paulina Lakes) are nestled in the caldera. The caldera has been the focus of Newberry's volcanic activity for at least the past 10,000 years. Other eruptions during this time have occurred along a rift zone on the volcano's northwest flank and, to a lesser extent, the south flank. Many striking volcanic features lie in Newberry National Volcanic Monument, which is managed by the U.S. Forest Service. The monument includes the caldera and extends along the northwest rift zone to the Deschutes River. About 30 percent of the area within the monument is covered by volcanic products erupted during the past 10,000 years from Newberry volcano. Newberry volcano is presently quiet. Local earthquake activity (seismicity) has been trifling throughout historic time. Subterranean heat is still present, as indicated by hot springs in the caldera and high temperatures encountered during exploratory drilling for geothermal energy. This report describes the kinds of hazardous geologic events that might occur in the future at Newberry volcano. A hazard-zonation map is included to show the areas that will most likely be affected by renewed eruptions. In terms of our own lifetimes, volcanic events at Newberry are not of day-to-day concern because they occur so infrequently; however, the consequences of some types of eruptions can be severe. When Newberry

  5. Nicaraguan Volcanoes

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-18

    article title:  Nicaraguan Volcanoes     View Larger Image Nicaraguan volcanoes, February 26, 2000 . The true-color image at left is a ... February 26, 2000 - Plumes from the San Cristobal and Masaya volcanoes. project:  MISR category:  gallery ...

  6. Volcano-hazard zonation for San Vicente volcano, El Salvador

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Major, J.J.; Schilling, S.P.; Pullinger, C.R.; Escobar, C.D.; Howell, M.M.

    2001-01-01

    San Vicente volcano, also known as Chichontepec, is one of many volcanoes along the volcanic arc in El Salvador. This composite volcano, located about 50 kilometers east of the capital city San Salvador, has a volume of about 130 cubic kilometers, rises to an altitude of about 2180 meters, and towers above major communities such as San Vicente, Tepetitan, Guadalupe, Zacatecoluca, and Tecoluca. In addition to the larger communities that surround the volcano, several smaller communities and coffee plantations are located on or around the flanks of the volcano, and major transportation routes are located near the lowermost southern and eastern flanks of the volcano. The population density and proximity around San Vicente volcano, as well as the proximity of major transportation routes, increase the risk that even small landslides or eruptions, likely to occur again, can have serious societal consequences. The eruptive history of San Vicente volcano is not well known, and there is no definitive record of historical eruptive activity. The last significant eruption occurred more than 1700 years ago, and perhaps long before permanent human habitation of the area. Nevertheless, this volcano has a very long history of repeated, and sometimes violent, eruptions, and at least once a large section of the volcano collapsed in a massive landslide. The oldest rocks associated with a volcanic center at San Vicente are more than 2 million years old. The volcano is composed of remnants of multiple eruptive centers that have migrated roughly eastward with time. Future eruptions of this volcano will pose substantial risk to surrounding communities.

  7. Recharge Data for the Islands of Kauai, Lanai and Molokai, Hawaii

    DOE Data Explorer

    Nicole Lautze

    2015-01-01

    Recharge data for the islands of Kauai, Lanai and Molokai in shapefile format. These data are from the following sources: Whittier, R.B and A.I. El-Kadi. 2014. Human Health and Environmental Risk Ranking of On-Site Sewage Disposal systems for the Hawaiian Islands of Kauai, Molokai, Maui, and Hawaii – Final, Prepared for Hawaii Dept. of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch by the University of Hawaii, Dept. of Geology and Geophysics. (for Kauai, Lanai, Molokai). Shade, P.J., 1995, Water Budget for the Island of Kauai, Hawaii, USGS Water-Resources Investigations Report 95-4128, 25 p. (for Kauai). Izuka, S.K. and D.S. Oki, 2002 Numerical simulation of ground-water withdrawals in the Southern Lihue Basin, Kauai, Hawaii, U.S. Geologic Survey Water-Resources Investigations Report 01-4200, 52 pgs. (for Kauai). Hardy, W.R., 1996, A Numerical Groundwater Model for the Island of Lanai, Hawaii - CWRM Report No., CWRM-1, Commission on Water Resources Management, Department of Natural Resources, State of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI. (for Lanai). Oki, D.S., 1997, Geohydrology and numerical Simulation of the Ground-Water Flow System of Molokai, Hawaii, USGS Water-Resources Investigations Report 97-4176, 62 p. (for Molokai).

  8. Anomalously high b-values in the South Flank of Kilauea volcano, Hawaii: Evidence for the distribution of magma below Kilauea's East rift zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wyss, M.; Klein, F.; Nagamine, K.; Wiemer, S.

    2001-01-01

    The pattern of b-value of the frequency-magnitude relation, or mean magnitude, varies little in the Kaoiki-Hilea area of Hawaii, and the b-values are normal, with b = 0.8 in the top 10 km and somewhat lower values below that depth. We interpret the Kaoiki-Hilea area as relatively stable, normal Hawaiian crust. In contrast, the b-values beneath Kilauea's South Flank are anomalously high (b = 1.3-1.7) at depths between 4 and 8 km, with the highest values near the East Rift zone, but extending 5-8 km away from the rift. Also, the anomalously high b-values vary along strike, parallel to the rift zone. The highest b-values are observed near Hiiaka and Pauahi craters at the bend in the rift, the next highest are near Makaopuhi and also near Puu Kaliu. The mildest anomalies occur adjacent to the central section of the rift. The locations of the three major and two minor b-value anomalies correspond to places where shallow magma reservoirs have been proposed based on analyses of seismicity, geodetic data and differentiated lava chemistry. The existence of the magma reservoirs is also supported by magnetic anomalies, which may be areas of dike concentration, and self-potential anomalies, which are areas of thermal upwelling above a hot source. The simplest explanation of these anomalously high b-values is that they are due to the presence of active magma bodies beneath the East Rift zone at depths down to 8 km. In other volcanoes, anomalously high b-values correlate with volumes adjacent to active magma chambers. This supports a model of a magma body beneath the East Rift zone, which may widen and thin along strike, and which may reach 8 km depth and extend from Kilauea's summit to a distance of at least 40 km down rift. The anomalously high b-values at the center of the South Flank, several kilometers away from the rift, may be explained by unusually high pore pressure throughout the South Flank, or by anomalously strong heterogeneity due to extensive cracking, or by both

  9. Holocene reef accretion: southwest Molokai, Hawaii, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Engels, Mary S.; Fletcher, Charles H.; Field, Michael E.; Storlazzi, Curt D.; Grossman, Eric E.; Rooney, John J.B.; Conger, Christopher L.; Glenn, Craig

    2004-01-01

    Two reef systems off south Molokai, Hale O Lono and Hikauhi (separated by only 10 km), show strong and fundamental differences in modern ecosystem structure and Holocene accretion history that reflect the influence of wave-induced near-bed shear stresses on reef development in Hawaii. Both sites are exposed to similar impacts from south, Kona, and trade-wind swell. However, the Hale O Lono site is exposed to north swell and the Hikuahi site is not. As a result, the reef at Hale O Lono records no late Holocene net accretion while the reef at Hikauhi records consistent and robust accretion over late Holocene time. Analysis and dating of 24 cores from Hale O Lono and Hikauhi reveal the presence of five major lithofacies that reflect paleo-environmental conditions. In order of decreasing depositional energy they are: (1) coral-algal bindstone; (2) mixed skeletal rudstone; (3) massive coral framestone; (4) unconsolidated floatstone; and (5) branching coral framestone-bafflestone. At Hale O Lono, 10 cores document a backstepping reef ranging from ∼ 8,100 cal yr BP (offshore) to ∼ 4,800 cal yr BP (nearshore). A depauperate community of modern coral diminishes shoreward and seaward of ∼ 15 m depth due to wave energy, disrupted recruitment activities, and physical abrasion. Evidence suggests a change from conditions conducive to accretion during the early Holocene to conditions detrimental to accretion in the late Holocene. Reef structure at Hikauhi, reconstructed from 14 cores, reveals a thick, rapidly accreting and young reef (maximum age ∼ 900 cal yr BP). Living coral cover on this reef increases seaward with distance from the reef crest but terminates at a depth of ∼ 20 m where the reef ends in a large sand field. The primary limitation on vertical reef growth is accommodation space under wave base, not recruitment activities or energy conditions. Interpretations of cored lithofacies suggest that modern reef growth on the southwest corner of Molokai, and by

  10. Perspective View, Radar Image, Color as Height, Molokai, Lanai and Maui, Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This perspective view shows three Hawaiian islands: Molokai (lower left), Lanai (right), and the northwest tip of Maui (upper left). Data such as these will be useful for studying the history of volcanic activity on these now extinct volcanoes. SRTM data also will help local officials evaluate and mitigate natural hazards for islands throughout the Pacific. For example, improved elevation data will make it easier for communities to plan for tsunamis (tidal waves generated by earthquakes around the perimeter of the Pacific) by helping them identify evacuation routes and areas prone to flooding.

    This perspective view combines two types of data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission. The image brightness corresponds to the strength of the radar signal reflected from the ground, while colors show the elevation as measured by SRTM. Colors range from blue at the lowest elevations to white at the highest elevations. This image contains 1800 meters (5900 feet) of total relief.

    The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), launched on February 11,2000, uses the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. The mission is designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, an additional C-band imaging antenna and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) and the German (DLR) and Italian (ASI) space agencies. It is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise,Washington, DC.

    Size: 60 by 70 kilometers (37 by 43 miles) Location: 20.8 deg. North lat., 156.7 deg. West lon. Orientation: Looking southeast Original Data Resolution: 30 meters (99 feet

  11. Volcano Vents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 5 May 2003

    This low-relief shield volcano imaged with the THEMIS visible camera has two large vents which have erupted several individual lava flows. The positions of the origins of many of the flows indicate that it is probable that the vents are secondary structures that formed only after the shield was built up by eruptions from a central caldera.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 17.6, Longitude 243.6 East (116.4 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  12. Volcano Hazards Assessment for Medicine Lake Volcano, Northern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Donnelly-Nolan, Julie M.; Nathenson, Manuel; Champion, Duane E.; Ramsey, David W.; Lowenstern, Jacob B.; Ewert, John W.

    2007-01-01

    Medicine Lake volcano (MLV) is a very large shield-shaped volcano located in northern California where it forms part of the southern Cascade Range of volcanoes. It has erupted hundreds of times during its half-million-year history, including nine times during the past 5,200 years, most recently 950 years ago. This record represents one of the highest eruptive frequencies among Cascade volcanoes and includes a wide variety of different types of lava flows and at least two explosive eruptions that produced widespread fallout. Compared to those of a typical Cascade stratovolcano, eruptive vents at MLV are widely distributed, extending 55 km north-south and 40 km east-west. The total area covered by MLV lavas is >2,000 km2, about 10 times the area of Mount St. Helens, Washington. Judging from its long eruptive history and its frequent eruptions in recent geologic time, MLV will erupt again. Although the probability of an eruption is very small in the next year (one chance in 3,600), the consequences of some types of possible eruptions could be severe. Furthermore, the documented episodic behavior of the volcano indicates that once it becomes active, the volcano could continue to erupt for decades, or even erupt intermittently for centuries, and very likely from multiple vents scattered across the edifice. Owing to its frequent eruptions, explosive nature, and proximity to regional infrastructure, MLV has been designated a 'high threat volcano' by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Volcano Early Warning System assessment. Volcanic eruptions are typically preceded by seismic activity, but with only two seismometers located high on the volcano and no other USGS monitoring equipment in place, MLV is at present among the most poorly monitored Cascade volcanoes.

  13. 77 FR 24381 - Security Zone; Passenger Vessel SAFARI EXPLORER Arrival/Departure, Kaunakakai Harbor, Molokai, HI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-24

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA87 Security Zone; Passenger Vessel SAFARI EXPLORER Arrival... Passenger Vessel Safari Explorer in Kaunakakai Harbor, Molokai, Hawaii. The effective period for this... written comments identified by docket number USCG-2011-1159 using any one of the following methods:...

  14. The pre-eruptive magma plumbing system of the 2007-2008 dome-forming eruption of Kelut volcano, East Java, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffery, A. J.; Gertisser, R.; Troll, V. R.; Jolis, E. M.; Dahren, B.; Harris, C.; Tindle, A. G.; Preece, K.; O'Driscoll, B.; Humaida, H.; Chadwick, J. P.

    2013-07-01

    Kelut volcano, East Java, is an active volcanic complex hosting a summit crater lake that has been the source of some of Indonesia's most destructive lahars. In November 2007, an effusive eruption lasting approximately 7 months led to the formation of a 260-m-high and 400-m-wide lava dome that displaced most of the crater lake. The 2007-2008 Kelut dome comprises crystal-rich basaltic andesite with a texturally complex crystal cargo of strongly zoned and in part resorbed plagioclase (An47-94), orthopyroxene (En64-72, Fs24-32, Wo2-4), clinopyroxene (En40-48, Fs14-19, Wo34-46), Ti-magnetite (Usp16-34) and trace amounts of apatite, as well as ubiquitous glomerocrysts of varying magmatic mineral assemblages. In addition, the notable occurrence of magmatic and crustal xenoliths (meta-basalts, amphibole-bearing cumulates, and skarn-type calc-silicates and meta-volcaniclastic rocks) is a distinct feature of the dome. New petrographical, whole rock major and trace element data, mineral chemistry as well as oxygen isotope data for both whole rocks and minerals indicate a complex regime of magma-mixing, decompression-driven resorption, degassing and crystallisation and crustal assimilation within the Kelut plumbing system prior to extrusion of the dome. Detailed investigation of plagioclase textures alongside crystal size distribution analyses provide evidence for magma mixing as a major pre-eruptive process that blends multiple crystal cargoes together. Distinct magma storage zones are postulated, with a deeper zone at lower crustal levels or near the crust-mantle boundary (>15 km depth), a second zone at mid-crustal levels (~10 km depth) and several magma storage zones distributed throughout the uppermost crust (<10 km depth). Plagioclase-melt and amphibole hygrometry indicate magmatic H2O contents ranging from ~8.1 to 8.6 wt.% in the lower crustal system to ~1.5 to 3.3 wt.% in the mid to upper crust. Pyroxene and plagioclase δ18O values range from 5.4 to 6.7 ‰, and 6

  15. Chemical, mineralogical, and isotopic characteristics of mud from the LUSI mud volcano, Sidoarjo, East Java, Indonesia: implications for the environment, public health, and eruption processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plumlee, G. S.; Casadevall, T. J.; Wibowo, H. T.; Rosenbauer, R. J.; Johnson, C. A.; Breit, G. N.; Hageman, P. L.; Wolf, R. E.; Morman, S. A.

    2009-12-01

    On May 29, 2006, mud and gases began erupting from a vent 150 meters away from a gas exploration well near Sidoarjo, East Java, Indonesia. The eruption, called the LUSI mud volcano, has continued at rates as high as 160,000 m3 per day. At the request of the United States Department of State, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has been providing technical assistance to the Indonesian Government on the geological and geochemical aspects of the mud eruption. This paper will present analytical results of mud samples collected in Sept. 2007 and Nov. 2008, and interpretive findings based on the analytical results. The 2007 mud sample contains high proportions of particles that could be ingestible by hand-mouth transmission (~98 vol % <250 microns,), inhalable into the upper respiratory tract (~80 vol % <10 microns), and respirable into the lung alveoli (~ 40 vol % <2.5 microns), so the mud and dust from the dried mud could be readily taken up by exposed individuals. Our results confirm those of a previous study that the levels of potentially toxic heavy metals or metalloids in the mud are low. A complex mixture of organic compounds in the mud is likely derived from petroleum source rocks. Although the 2007 mud sample contains several percent iron sulfides, net acid production tests indicate that enough carbonate material is also present to prevent the mud from becoming acid-generating due to weathering and sulfide oxidation in the near-surface environment. Water derived from settling mud deposits may have the potential to adversely affect the quality of surface- or groundwater sources for drinking water, due to high levels of fluoride, nitrate, iron, manganese, aluminum, sulfate, chloride, and total dissolved solids. The very high nitrate levels in the waters contained within the mud may present a source of nutrients that could enhance algal blooms and resulting adverse impacts such as hypoxia in fresh-water and marine ecosystems into which some of the mud is being

  16. Geology of Kilauea volcano

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, R.B. . Federal Center); Trusdell, F.A. . Hawaiian Volcano Observatory)

    1993-08-01

    This paper summarizes studies of the structure, stratigraphy, petrology, drill holes, eruption frequency, and volcanic and seismic hazards of Kilauea volcano. All the volcano is discussed, but the focus is on its lower east rift zone (LERZ) because active exploration for geothermal energy is concentrated in that area. Kilauea probably has several separate hydrothermal-convection systems that develop in response to the dynamic behavior of the volcano and the influx of abundant meteoric water. Important features of some of these hydrothermal-convection systems are known through studies of surface geology and drill holes. Observations of eruptions during the past two centuries, detailed geologic mapping, radiocarbon dating, and paleomagnetic secular-variation studies indicate that Kilauea has erupted frequently from its summit and two radial rift zones during Quaternary time. Petrologic studies have established that Kilauea erupts only tholeiitic basalt. Extensive ash deposits at Kilauea's summit and on its LERZ record locally violent, but temporary, disruptions of local hydrothermal-convection systems during the interaction of water or steam with magma. Recent drill holes on the LERZ provide data on the temperatures of the hydrothermal-convection systems, intensity of dike intrusion, porosity and permeability, and an increasing amount of hydrothermal alteration with depth. The prehistoric and historic record of volcanic and seismic activity indicates that magma will continue to be supplied to deep and shallow reservoirs beneath Kilauea's summit and rift zones and that the volcano will be affected by eruptions and earthquakes for many thousands of years. 71 refs., 2 figs.

  17. Volcano spacing and plate rigidity

    SciTech Connect

    Brink, U. )

    1991-04-01

    In-plane stresses, which accompany the flexural deformation of the lithosphere under the load adjacent volcanoes, may govern the spacing of volcanoes in hotspot provinces. Specifically, compressive stresses in the vicinity of a volcano prevent new upwelling in this area, forcing a new volcano to develop at a minimum distance that is equal to the distance in which the radial stresses change from compressional to tensile (the inflection point). If a volcano is modeled as a point load on a thin elastic plate, then the distance to the inflection point is proportional to the thickness of the plate to the power of 3/4. Compilation of volcano spacing in seven volcanic groups in East Africa and seven volcanic groups of oceanic hotspots shows significant correlation with the elastic thickness of the plate and matches the calculated distance to the inflection point. In contrast, volcano spacing in island arcs and over subduction zones is fairly uniform and is much larger than predicted by the distance to the inflection point, reflecting differences in the geometry of the source and the upwelling areas.

  18. Terrestrial analogs to lunar sinuous rilles - Kauhako Crater and channel, Kalaupapa, Molokai, and other Hawaiian lava conduit systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coombs, C. R.; Hawke, B. R.; Wilson, L.

    1990-01-01

    Two source vents, one explosive and one effusive erupted to form a cinder cone and low lava shield that together compose the Kalaupapa peninsula of Molokai, Hawaii, A 50-100-m-wide channel/tube system extends 2.3 km northward from kauhako crater in the center of the shield. Based on modeling, a volume of up to about 0.2 cu km of lava erupted at a rate of 260 cu m/sec to flow through the Kauhako conduit system in one of the last eruptive episodes on the peninsula. Channel downcutting by thermal erosion occurred at a rate of about 10 micron/sec to help form the 30-m-deep conduit. Two smaller, secondary tube systems formed east of the main lava channel/tube. Several other lava conduit systems on the islands of Oahu and Hawaii were also compared to the Kauhako and lunar sinuous rille systems. These other lava conduits include Whittington, Kupaianaha, and Mauna Ulu lava tubes. Morphologically, the Hawaiian tube systems studied are very similar to lunar sinuous rilles in that they have deep head craters, sinuous channels, and gentle slopes. Thermal erosion is postulated to be an important factor in the formation of these terrestrial channel systems and by analogy is inferred to be an important process involved in the formation of lunar sinuous rilles.

  19. Preliminary volcano-hazard assessment for Great Sitkin Volcano, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waythomas, Christopher F.; Miller, Thomas P.; Nye, Christopher J.

    2003-01-01

    Great Sitkin Volcano is a composite andesitic stratovolcano on Great Sitkin Island (51°05’ N latitude, 176°25’ W longitude), a small (14 x 16 km), circular volcanic island in the western Aleutian Islands of Alaska. Great Sitkin Island is located about 35 kilometers northeast of the community of Adak on Adak Island and 130 kilometers west of the community of Atka on Atka Island. Great Sitkin Volcano is an active volcano and has erupted at least eight times in the past 250 years (Miller and others, 1998). The most recent eruption in 1974 caused minor ash fall on the flanks of the volcano and resulted in the emplacement of a lava dome in the summit crater. The summit of the composite cone of Great Sitkin Volcano is 1,740 meters above sea level. The active crater is somewhat lower than the summit, and the highest point along its rim is about 1,460 meters above sea level. The crater is about 1,000 meters in diameter and is almost entirely filled by a lava dome emplaced in 1974. An area of active fumaroles, hot springs, and bubbling hot mud is present on the south flank of the volcano at the head of Big Fox Creek (see the map), and smaller ephemeral fumaroles and steam vents are present in the crater and around the crater rim. The flanking slopes of the volcano are gradual to steep and consist of variously weathered and vegetated blocky lava flows that formed during Pleistocene and Holocene eruptions. The modern edifice occupies a caldera structure that truncates an older sequence of lava flows and minor pyroclastic rocks on the east side of the volcano. The eastern sector of the volcano includes the remains of an ancestral volcano that was partially destroyed by a northwest-directed flank collapse. In winter, Great Sitkin Volcano is typically completely snow covered. Should explosive pyroclastic eruptions occur at this time, the snow would be a source of water for volcanic mudflows or lahars. In summer, much of the snowpack melts, leaving only a patchy

  20. 77 FR 47587 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Listing 38 Species on Molokai, Lanai, and Maui as...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-09

    ...We, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service), are extending the comment period on our proposed rule to, among other things, list 38 species on the Hawaiian Islands of Molokai, Lanai, and Maui as endangered species under the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended, and designate critical habitat on Molokai, Lanai, Maui, and Kahoolawe for 135 species. We made the proposed rule available......

  1. Dante's Volcano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This video contains two segments: one a 0:01:50 spot and the other a 0:08:21 feature. Dante 2, an eight-legged walking machine, is shown during field trials as it explores the inner depths of an active volcano at Mount Spurr, Alaska. A NASA sponsored team at Carnegie Mellon University built Dante to withstand earth's harshest conditions, to deliver a science payload to the interior of a volcano, and to report on its journey to the floor of a volcano. Remotely controlled from 80-miles away, the robot explored the inner depths of the volcano and information from onboard video cameras and sensors was relayed via satellite to scientists in Anchorage. There, using a computer generated image, controllers tracked the robot's movement. Ultimately the robot team hopes to apply the technology to future planetary missions.

  2. Dante's volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1994-09-01

    This video contains two segments: one a 0:01:50 spot and the other a 0:08:21 feature. Dante 2, an eight-legged walking machine, is shown during field trials as it explores the inner depths of an active volcano at Mount Spurr, Alaska. A NASA sponsored team at Carnegie Mellon University built Dante to withstand earth's harshest conditions, to deliver a science payload to the interior of a volcano, and to report on its journey to the floor of a volcano. Remotely controlled from 80-miles away, the robot explored the inner depths of the volcano and information from onboard video cameras and sensors was relayed via satellite to scientists in Anchorage. There, using a computer generated image, controllers tracked the robot's movement. Ultimately the robot team hopes to apply the technology to future planetary missions.

  3. Anatahan Volcano, Mariana Islands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    In the early hours of February 7, ASTER captured this nighttime thermal infrared image of an eruption of Anatahan Volcano in the central Mariana Islands. The summit of the volcano is bright indicating there is a very hot area there. Streaming to the west is an ash plume, visible by the red color indicating the presence of silicate-rich particles. Dark grey areas are clouds that appear colder than the ocean. Anatahan is a stratovolcano that started erupting in May 2003, forming a new crater.

    The image covers an area of 56.3 x 41.8 km, and is located 16 degrees north latitude and 145.6 degrees east longitude.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  4. Volcano Infrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, J. B.; Fee, D.; Matoza, R. S.

    2013-12-01

    Open-vent volcanoes generate prodigious low frequency sound waves that tend to peak in the infrasound (<20 Hz) band. These long wavelength (> ~20 m) atmospheric pressure waves often propagate long distances with low intrinsic attenuation and can be well recorded with a variety of low frequency sensitive microphones. Infrasound records may be used to remotely monitor eruptions, identify active vents or track gravity-driven flows, and/or characterize source processes. Such studies provide information vital for both scientific study and volcano monitoring efforts. This presentation proposes to summarize and standardize some of the terminology used in the still young, yet rapidly growing field of volcano infrasound. Herein we suggest classification of typical infrasound waveform types, which include bimodal pulses, blast (or N-) waves, and a variety of infrasonic tremors (including broadband, harmonic, and monotonic signals). We summarize various metrics, including reduced pressure, intensity, power, and energy, in which infrasound excess pressures are often quantified. We also describe the spectrum of source types and radiation patterns, which are typically responsible for recorded infrasound. Finally we summarize the variety of propagation paths that are common for volcano infrasound radiating to local (<10 km), regional (out to several hundred kilometers), and global distances. The effort to establish common terminology requires community feedback, but is now timely as volcano infrasound studies proliferate and infrasound becomes a standard component of volcano monitoring.

  5. Venus - Volcano in Parga Chasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This comet-like tail, trending northeast from the volcanic structure, is a relatively radar-bright deposit. The volcano, with a base diameter of 5 kilometers (about 3 miles) is a local topographic high point that has slowed down northeast trending winds enough to cause deposition of this material. The streak is 35 kilometers (about 22 miles) long and 10 kilometers (about 6 miles) wide. The volcano is located at the western end of Parga Chasma at 9.4 degrees south latitude and 247.5 degrees east longitude.

  6. Ultrastructure and potential sub-seafloor evidence of bacteriogenic iron oxides from Axial Volcano, Juan de Fuca Ridge, north-east Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, C B; Scott, S D; Ferris, F G

    2003-03-01

    Iron oxides from the caldera of Axial Volcano, a site of hydrothermal vent activity along the Juan de Fuca Ridge, were found to consist predominantly of microbial structures in hydrated whole mounts examined using an environmental scanning electron microscope. Novel observations were made of the iron oxides revealing the spatial relationships of the bacteria within to be more consistent with microbial mats than mineral precipitates. The bacterial structures are attributed to the sheaths of Leptothrix ochracea, the stalks of Gallionella ferruginea, and the filaments of a novel iron oxidizing PV-1 strain, based on the distinctive morphological characteristics of these three bacteria. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy revealed the presence and distribution of Fe, Si, and Cl on the bacterial sheaths, stalks and filaments. The iron oxides were identified by X-ray diffraction to be two-line ferrihydrite, a poorly ordered iron oxyhydroxide. Adsorption of Si in particular to two-line ferrihydrite likely contributes to its stability on the seafloor, and might also be a preservation mechanism creating microfossils of the bacterial structures encrusted with ferrihydrite. Presumptive evidence of the sub-seafloor presence of L. ochracea, G. ferruginea and PV-1 at Axial Volcano was obtained from the presence of these bacteria on a trap that had been placed within an active vent, and also in a vent fluid sample. If indeed these bacteria are present in the sub-seafloor, it may be an indication that the surface expression of iron oxide deposits at Axial Volcano is minimal in comparison to what exists beneath the seafloor.

  7. Volcano Hazards Program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Venezky, Dina Y.; Myers, Bobbie; Driedger, Carolyn

    2008-01-01

    Diagram of common volcano hazards. The U.S. Geological Survey Volcano Hazards Program (VHP) monitors unrest and eruptions at U.S. volcanoes, assesses potential hazards, responds to volcanic crises, and conducts research on how volcanoes work. When conditions change at a monitored volcano, the VHP issues public advisories and warnings to alert emergency-management authorities and the public. See http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/ to learn more about volcanoes and find out what's happening now.

  8. Chikurachki Volcano

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    ... and ice. According to the Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruptions Response Team (KVERT), the temperature of the plume near the volcano on April ... D.C. The Terra spacecraft is managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD. The MISR data were obtained from the NASA Langley ...

  9. Santorini Volcano

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Druitt, T.H.; Edwards, L.; Mellors, R.M.; Pyle, D.M.; Sparks, R.S.J.; Lanphere, M.; Davies, M.; Barreirio, B.

    1999-01-01

    Santorini is one of the most spectacular caldera volcanoes in the world. It has been the focus of significant scientific and scholastic interest because of the great Bronze Age explosive eruption that buried the Minoan town of Akrotiri. Santorini is still active. It has been dormant since 1950, but there have been several substantial historic eruptions. Because of this potential risk to life, both for the indigenous population and for the large number of tourists who visit it, Santorini has been designated one of five European Laboratory Volcanoes by the European Commission. Santorini has long fascinated geologists, with some important early work on volcanoes being conducted there. Since 1980, research groups at Cambridge University, and later at the University of Bristol and Blaise Pascal University in Clermont-Ferrand, have collected a large amount of data on the stratigraphy, geochemistry, geochronology and petrology of the volcanics. The volcanic field has been remapped at a scale of 1:10 000. A remarkable picture of cyclic volcanic activity and magmatic evolution has emerged from this work. Much of this work has remained unpublished until now. This Memoir synthesizes for the first time all the data from the Cambridge/Bristol/Clermont groups, and integrates published data from other research groups. It provides the latest interpretation of the tectonic and magmatic evolution of Santorini. It is accompanied by the new 1:10 000 full-colour geological map of the island.

  10. Hawaiian Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Venezky, Dina Y.; Orr, Tim R.

    2008-01-01

    Lava from Kilauea volcano flowing through a forest in the Royal Gardens subdivision, Hawai'i, in February 2008. The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) monitors the volcanoes of Hawai'i and is located within Hawaiian Volcanoes National Park. HVO is one of five USGS Volcano Hazards Program observatories that monitor U.S. volcanoes for science and public safety. Learn more about Kilauea and HVO at http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov.

  11. Volcanic hazards at Atitlan volcano, Guatemala

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haapala, J.M.; Escobar Wolf, R.; Vallance, James W.; Rose, William I.; Griswold, J.P.; Schilling, S.P.; Ewert, J.W.; Mota, M.

    2006-01-01

    Atitlan Volcano is in the Guatemalan Highlands, along a west-northwest trending chain of volcanoes parallel to the mid-American trench. The volcano perches on the southern rim of the Atitlan caldera, which contains Lake Atitlan. Since the major caldera-forming eruption 85 thousand years ago (ka), three stratovolcanoes--San Pedro, Toliman, and Atitlan--have formed in and around the caldera. Atitlan is the youngest and most active of the three volcanoes. Atitlan Volcano is a composite volcano, with a steep-sided, symmetrical cone comprising alternating layers of lava flows, volcanic ash, cinders, blocks, and bombs. Eruptions of Atitlan began more than 10 ka [1] and, since the arrival of the Spanish in the mid-1400's, eruptions have occurred in six eruptive clusters (1469, 1505, 1579, 1663, 1717, 1826-1856). Owing to its distance from population centers and the limited written record from 200 to 500 years ago, only an incomplete sample of the volcano's behavior is documented prior to the 1800's. The geologic record provides a more complete sample of the volcano's behavior since the 19th century. Geologic and historical data suggest that the intensity and pattern of activity at Atitlan Volcano is similar to that of Fuego Volcano, 44 km to the east, where active eruptions have been observed throughout the historical period. Because of Atitlan's moderately explosive nature and frequency of eruptions, there is a need for local and regional hazard planning and mitigation efforts. Tourism has flourished in the area; economic pressure has pushed agricultural activity higher up the slopes of Atitlan and closer to the source of possible future volcanic activity. This report summarizes the hazards posed by Atitlan Volcano in the event of renewed activity but does not imply that an eruption is imminent. However, the recognition of potential activity will facilitate hazard and emergency preparedness.

  12. An autogamous rainforest species of Schiedea (Caryophyllaceae) from East Maui, Hawaiian Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wagner, W.L.; Weller, S.G.; Sakai, A.K.; Medeiros, A.C.

    1999-01-01

    A new autogamous species of Schiedea is described and illustrated. It is known only from cliff habitat in rainforest on a single ridge in the Natural Area Reserve, Hanawi, East Maui. With the addition of this species there are 28 species in this endemic Hawaiian genus. The new species appears to be most closely related to Schiedea nuttallii, a species of mesic habitats on O'ahu, Moloka'i, and Maui.

  13. Distribution of differentiated tholeiitic basalts on the lower east rift zone of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii: a possible guide to geothermal exploration.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, R.B.

    1983-01-01

    Geological mapping of the lower east rift zone indicates that >100 eruptions have extruded an estimated 10 km3 of basalt during the past 2000 yr; six eruptions in the past 200 yr have extruded approx 1 km3. The eruptive recurrence interval has ranged 1-115 yr since the middle of the 18th century and has averaged 20 yr or less over the past 2000 yr. New chemical analyses (100) indicate that the tholeiites erupted commonly differentiated beyond olivine control or are hybrid mixtures of differentiates with more mafic (olivine-controlled) summit magmas. The distribution of vents for differentiated lavas suggests that several large magma chambers underlie the lower east rift zone. Several workers have recognized that a chamber underlies the area near a producing geothermal well, HGP-A; petrological and 14C data indicate that it has existed for at least 1300 yr. Stratigraphy, petrology and surface-deformation patterns suggest that two other areas, Heiheiahulu and Kaliu, also overlie magma chambers and show favourable geothermal prospects.-A.P.

  14. Volcanoes, Nicaragua

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    This 150 kilometer stretch of the Pacific coastal plain of Nicaragua (12.0N, 86.5W) from the Gulf of Fonseca to Lake Managua. The large crater on the peninsula is Coseguina, which erupted in 1835, forming a 2 km. wide by 500 meter deep caldera and deposited ash as far away as Mexico City, some 1400 km. to the north. A plume of Steam can be seen venting from San Cristobal volcano, in the Marabios Range, the highest mouintain in Nicaragua.

  15. East Maui Groundwater Flow Model

    SciTech Connect

    Nicole Lautze

    2015-01-01

    Groundwater flow model for East Maui. Data is from the following sources: Whittier, R. and A.I. El-Kadi. 2014. Human and Environmental Risk Ranking of Onsite Sewage Disposal Systems For the Hawaiian Islands of Kauai, Molokai, Maui, and Hawaii – Final. Prepared by the University of Hawaii, Dept. of Geology and Geophysics for the State of Hawaii Dept. of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch. September 2014; and Whittier, R.B., K. Rotzoll, S. Dhal, A.I. El-Kadi, C. Ray, G. Chen, and D. Chang. 2004. Hawaii Source Water Assessment Program Report – Volume V – Island of Maui Source Water Assessment Program Report. Prepared for the Hawaii Department of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch. University of Hawaii, Water Resources Research Center. Updated 2008.

  16. Preliminary volcano-hazard assessment for Augustine Volcano, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waythomas, Christopher F.; Waitt, Richard B.

    1998-01-01

    Augustine Volcano is a 1250-meter high stratovolcano in southwestern Cook Inlet about 280 kilometers southwest of Anchorage and within about 300 kilometers of more than half of the population of Alaska. Explosive eruptions have occurred six times since the early 1800s (1812, 1883, 1935, 1964-65, 1976, and 1986). The 1976 and 1986 eruptions began with an initial series of vent-clearing explosions and high vertical plumes of volcanic ash followed by pyroclastic flows, surges, and lahars on the volcano flanks. Unlike some prehistoric eruptions, a summit edifice collapse and debris avalanche did not occur in 1812, 1935, 1964-65, 1976, or 1986. However, early in the 1883 eruption, a portion of the volcano summit broke loose forming a debris avalanche that flowed to the sea. The avalanche initiated a small tsunami reported on the Kenai Peninsula at English Bay, 90 kilometers east of the volcano. Plumes of volcanic ash are a major hazard to jet aircraft using Anchorage International and other local airports. Ashfall from future eruptions could disrupt oil and gas operations and shipping activities in Cook Inlet. Eruptions similar to the historical and prehistoric eruptions are likely in Augustine's future.

  17. Nyiragonga Volcano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This image of the Nyiragonga volcano eruption in the Congo was acquired on January 28, 2002 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters about 50 to 300 feet ), ASTER will image Earth for the next 6 years to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    Image: A river of molten rock poured from the Nyiragongo volcano in the Congo on January 18, 2002, a day after it erupted, killing dozens, swallowing buildings and forcing hundreds of thousands to flee the town of Goma. The flow continued into Lake Kivu. The lave flows are depicted in red on the image indicating they are still hot. Two of them flowed south form the volcano's summit and went through the town of Goma. Another flow can be seen at the top of the image, flowing towards the northwest. One of Africa's most notable volcanoes, Nyiragongo contained an active lava lake in its deep summit crater that drained catastrophically through its outer flanks in 1977. Extremely fluid, fast-moving lava flows draining from the summit lava lake in 1977 killed 50 to 100 people, and several villages were destroyed. The image covers an area of 21 x 24 km and combines a thermal band in red, and two infrared bands in green and blue.

    Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of International Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is the U.S. Science team leader; Moshe Pniel of JPL is the project manager. ASTER is the only high resolution imaging sensor on Terra. The primary goal of the

  18. 50 CFR 17.99 - Critical habitat; plants on the islands of Kauai, Niihau, Molokai, Maui, Kahoolawe, Oahu, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Critical habitat; plants on the islands of Kauai, Niihau, Molokai, Maui, Kahoolawe, Oahu, and Hawaii, HI, and on the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands. 17.99 Section 17.99 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) TAKING,...

  19. 50 CFR 17.99 - Critical habitat; plants on the islands of Kauai, Niihau, Molokai, Maui, Kahoolawe, Oahu, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Critical habitat; plants on the islands of Kauai, Niihau, Molokai, Maui, Kahoolawe, Oahu, and Hawaii, HI, and on the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands. 17.99 Section 17.99 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) TAKING,...

  20. 50 CFR 17.99 - Critical habitat; plants on the islands of Kauai, Niihau, Molokai, Maui, Kahoolawe, Oahu, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Critical habitat; plants on the islands of Kauai, Niihau, Molokai, Maui, Kahoolawe, Oahu, and Hawaii, HI, and on the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands. 17.99 Section 17.99 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) TAKING,...

  1. 50 CFR 17.99 - Critical habitat; plants on the islands of Kauai, Niihau, Molokai, Maui, Kahoolawe, Oahu, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 7 2014-10-01 2013-10-01 true Critical habitat; plants on the islands of Kauai, Niihau, Molokai, Maui, Kahoolawe, Oahu, and Hawaii, HI, and on the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands. 17.99 Section 17.99 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) TAKING,...

  2. 50 CFR 17.99 - Critical habitat; plants on the islands of Kauai, Niihau, Molokai, Maui, Kahoolawe, Oahu, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Critical habitat; plants on the islands of Kauai, Niihau, Molokai, Maui, Kahoolawe, Oahu, and Hawaii, HI, and on the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands. 17.99 Section 17.99 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) TAKING,...

  3. 50 CFR 17.99 - Critical habitat; plants on the islands of Kauai, Niihau, Molokai, Maui, Kahoolawe, Oahu, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 7 2011-10-01 2005-10-01 true Critical habitat; plants on the islands of Kauai, Niihau, Molokai, Maui, Kahoolawe, Oahu, and Hawaii, HI, and on the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands. (Continued) 17.99 Section 17.99 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED)...

  4. 50 CFR 17.99 - Critical habitat; plants on the islands of Kauai, Niihau, Molokai, Maui, Kahoolawe, Oahu, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Critical habitat; plants on the islands of Kauai, Niihau, Molokai, Maui, Kahoolawe, Oahu, and Hawaii, HI, and on the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands. (Continued) 17.99 Section 17.99 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED)...

  5. 50 CFR 17.99 - Critical habitat; plants on the islands of Kauai, Niihau, Molokai, Maui, Kahoolawe, Oahu, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Critical habitat; plants on the islands of...) Interagency Cooperation (Continued) § 17.99 Critical habitat; plants on the islands of Kauai, Niihau, Molokai... and critical habitat unit descriptions for the island of Oahu, HI. The following paragraphs...

  6. Kilauea volcano eruption seen from orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The STS-51 crew had a clear view of the erupting Kilauea volcano during the early morning pass over the Hawaiian islands. Kilauea, on the southwest side of the island of Hawaii, has been erupting almost continuously since January, 1983. Kilauea's summit caldera, with the smaller Halemaumau crater nestled within, is highlighted in the early morning sun (just above the center of the picture). The lava flows which covered roads and subdivisions in 1983-90 can be seen as dark flows to the east (toward the upper right) of the steam plumes on this photo. The summit crater and lava flows of Mauna Loa volcano make up the left side of the photo. Features like the Volcano House and Kilauea Visitor Center on the edge of the caldera, the small subdivisions east of the summit, Ola's Rain Forest north of the summit, and agricultural land along the coast are easily identified.

  7. Geologic map of Medicine Lake volcano, northern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Donnelly-Nolan, Julie M.

    2011-01-01

    Medicine Lake volcano forms a broad, seemingly nondescript highland, as viewed from any angle on the ground. Seen from an airplane, however, treeless lava flows are scattered across the surface of this potentially active volcanic edifice. Lavas of Medicine Lake volcano, which range in composition from basalt through rhyolite, cover more than 2,000 km2 east of the main axis of the Cascade Range in northern California. Across the Cascade Range axis to the west-southwest is Mount Shasta, its towering volcanic neighbor, whose stratocone shape contrasts with the broad shield shape of Medicine Lake volcano. Hidden in the center of Medicine Lake volcano is a 7 km by 12 km summit caldera in which nestles its namesake, Medicine Lake. The flanks of Medicine Lake volcano, which are dotted with cinder cones, slope gently upward to the caldera rim, which reaches an elevation of nearly 8,000 ft (2,440 m). The maximum extent of lavas from this half-million-year-old volcano is about 80 km north-south by 45 km east-west. In postglacial time, 17 eruptions have added approximately 7.5 km3 to its total estimated volume of 600 km3, and it is considered to be the largest by volume among volcanoes of the Cascades arc. The volcano has erupted nine times in the past 5,200 years, a rate more frequent than has been documented at all other Cascades arc volcanoes except Mount St. Helens.

  8. In-situ Ar isotope, 40Ar/39Ar analysis and mineral chemistry of nosean in the phonolite from Olbrück volcano, East Eifel volcanic field, Germany: Implication for the source of excess 40Ar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudo, Masafumi; Altenberger, Uwe; Günter, Christina

    2014-05-01

    Since the report by Lippolt et al. (1990), hauyne and nosean phenocrysts in certain phonolites from the northwest in the Quaternary East Eifel volcanic field in Germany were known to contain significant amounts of excess 40Ar, thus, show apparent older ages than the other minerals. However, its petrographic meaning have not been well known. Meanwhile, Sumino et al. (2008) has identified the source of the excess 40Ar in the plagioclase phenocrysts from the historic Unzen dacite lava as the melt inclusions in the zones parallely developed to the plagioclase rim by in-situ laser Ar isotope analysis. In order to obtain eruption ages of very young volcanoes as like Quaternary Eifel volcanic field by the K-Ar system, it is quite essential to know about the location of excess 40Ar in volcanic rocks. We have collected phonolites from the Olbrück volcano in East Eifel and investigated its petrography and mineral chemistry and also performed in-situ Ar isotope analyses of unirradiated rock section sample and also in-situ 40Ar/39Ar analysis of neutron irradiated section sample with the UV pulse laser (wavelength 266 nm) and 40Ar/39Ar analytical system of the University of Potsdam. Petrographically, nosean contained fine melt and/or gas inclusions of less than 5 micrometer, which mostly distribute linearly and are relatively enriched in chlorine than the areas without inclusions. Solid inclusions of similar sizes contain CaO and fluorine. In nosean, typically around 5 wt% of sulfur is contained. The 40Ar/39Ar dating was also performed to leucite, sanidine and groundmass in the same section for comparison of those ages with that of nosean. In each analysis, 200 micrometer of beam size was used for making a pit with depth of up to 300 micrometer by laser ablation. As our 40Ar/39Ar analyses were conducted one and half year after the neutron irradiation, thus, short lived 37Ar derived from Ca had decayed very much, we measured Ca and K contents in nosean by SEM-EDS then applied

  9. Venus - Rhea Mons Volcano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Two mosaiced pieces of Magellan image strips display the area east of the Rhea Mons volcano on Venus. This image is centered at about 32.5 degrees north latitude and 286.6 degrees east longitude. The mosaic is 47 kilometers (28 miles) wide and 135 km (81 miles) long. This region has been previously identified as 'tessera' from Earth-based radar (Arecibo) images. The center of the image is dominated by a network of intersecting ridges and valleys. The radar bright north south trending features in this image range from 1 km (0.6 mile) to 3 km (1.8 miles) in length. The average spacing between these ridges is about 1.5 km (0.9 mile). The dark patches at the top of the image are smooth surfaces and may be lava flows located in lowlands between the higher ridge and the valley terrain. This image is a mosaic of two orbits obtained in the first Magellan radar test and played back to Earth to the Deep Space Network stations near Goldstone, Calif. and Canberra, Australia, respectively. The resolution of this image is approximately 120 meters (400 feet).

  10. Venus - Volcano With Massive Landslides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This Magellan full-resolution mosaic which covers an area 143 by 146 kilometers (89 by 91 miles) is centered at 55 degrees north latitude, 266 degrees east longitude. The bright feature, slightly south of center is interpreted to be a volcano, 15-20 kilometers (9.3 to 12.4 miles) in diameter with a large apron of blocky debris to its right and some smaller aprons to its left. A preferred explanation is that several massive catastrophic landslides dropped down steep slopes and were carried by their momentum out into the smooth, dark lava plains. At the base of the east-facing or largest scallop on the volcano is what appears to be a large block of coherent rock, 8 to 10 kilometers (5 to 6 miles) in length. The similar margin of both the scallop and block and the shape in general is typical of terrestrial slumped blocks (masses of rock which slide and rotate down a slope instead of breaking apart and tumbling). The bright lobe to the south of the volcano may either be a lava flow or finer debris from other landslides. This volcanic feature, characterized by its scalloped flanks is part of a class of volcanoes called scalloped or collapsed domes of which there are more than 80 on Venus. Based on the chute-like shapes of the scallops and the existence of a spectrum of intermediate to well defined examples, it is hypothesized that all of the scallops are remnants of landslides even though the landslide debris is often not visible. Possible explanations for the missing debris are that it may have been covered by lava flows, the debris may have weathered or that the radar may not be recognizing it because the individual blocks are too small

  11. Olivine-liquid relations of lava erupted by Kilauea volcano from 1994 to 1998: Implications for shallow magmatic processes associated with the ongoing east-rift-zone eruption

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thornber, C.R.

    2001-01-01

    From 1994 through 1998, the eruption of Ki??lauea, in Hawai'i, was dominated by steady-state effusion at Pu'u 'O??'??o that was briefly disrupted by an eruption 4 km uprift at Np??au Crater on January 30, 1997. In this paper, I describe the systematic relations of whole-rock, glass, olivine, and olivine-inclusion compositions of lava samples collected throughout this interval. This suite comprises vent samples and tube-contained flows collected at variable distances from the vent. The glass composition of tube lava varies systematically with distance and allows for the "vent-correction" of glass thermometry and olivine-liquid KD as a function of tube-transport distance. Combined olivine-liquid data for vent samples and "vent-corrected" lava-tube samples are used to document pre-eruptive magmatic conditions. KD values determined for matrix glasses and forsterite cores define three types of olivine phenocrysts: type A (in equilibrium with host glass), type B (Mg-rich relative to host glass) and type C (Mg-poor relative to host glass). All three types of olivine have a cognate association with melts that are present within the shallow magmatic plumbing system during this interval. During steady-state eruptive activity, the compositions of whole-rock, glass and most olivine phenocrysts (type A) all vary sympathetically over time and as influenced by changes of magmatic pressure within the summit-rift-zone plumbing system. Type-A olivine is interpreted as having grown during passage from the summit magmachamber along the east-rift-zone conduit. Type-B olivine (high Fo) is consistent with equilibrium crystallization from bulk-rock compositions and is likely to have grown within the summit magma-chamber. Lower-temperature, fractionated lava was erupted during non-steady state activity of the Na??pau Crater eruption. Type-A and type-B olivine-liquid relations indicate that this lava is a mixture of rift-stored and summit-derived magmas. Post-Na??pau lava (at Pu'u 'O?? 'o

  12. Preliminary volcano-hazard assessment for Mount Spurr Volcano, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waythomas, Christopher F.; Nye, Christopher J.

    2001-01-01

    Mount Spurr volcano is an ice- and snow-covered stratovolcano complex located in the north-central Cook Inlet region about 100 kilometers west of Anchorage, Alaska. Mount Spurr volcano consists of a breached stratovolcano, a lava dome at the summit of Mount Spurr, and Crater Peak vent, a small stratocone on the south flank of Mount Spurr volcano. Historical eruptions of Crater Peak occurred in 1953 and 1992. These eruptions were relatively small but explosive, and they dispersed volcanic ash over areas of interior, south-central, and southeastern Alaska. Individual ash clouds produced by the 1992 eruption drifted east, north, and south. Within a few days of the eruption, the south-moving ash cloud was detected over the North Atlantic. Pyroclastic flows that descended the south flank of Crater Peak during both historical eruptions initiated volcanic-debris flows or lahars that formed temporary debris dams across the Chakachatna River, the principal drainage south of Crater Peak. Prehistoric eruptions of Crater Peak and Mount Spurr generated clouds of volcanic ash, pyroclastic flows, and lahars that extended to the volcano flanks and beyond. A flank collapse on the southeast side of Mount Spurr generated a large debris avalanche that flowed about 20 kilometers beyond the volcano into the Chakachatna River valley. The debris-avalanche deposit probably formed a large, temporary debris dam across the Chakachatna River. The distribution and thickness of volcanic-ash deposits from Mount Spurr volcano in the Cook Inlet region indicate that volcanic-ash clouds from most prehistoric eruptions were as voluminous as those produced by the 1953 and 1992 eruptions. Clouds of volcanic ash emitted from the active vent, Crater Peak, would be a major hazard to all aircraft using Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport and other local airports and, depending on wind direction, could drift a considerable distance beyond the volcano. Ash fall from future eruptions could disrupt many

  13. Gravity model studies of Newberry Volcano, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Gettings, M.E.; Griscom, A.

    1988-09-10

    Newberry, Volcano, a large Quaternary volcano located about 60 km east of the axis of the High Cascades volcanoes in central Oregon, has a coincident positive residual gravity anomaly of about 12 mGals. Model calculations of the gravity anomaly field suggest that the volcano is underlain by an intrusive complex of mafic composition of about 20-km diameter and 2-km thickness, at depths above 4 km below sea level. However, uplifted basement in a northwest trending ridge may form part of the underlying excess mass, thus reducing the volume of the subvolcanic intrusive. A ring dike of mafic composition is inferred to intrude to near-surface levels along the caldera ring fractures, and low-density fill of the caldera floor probably has a thickness of 0.7--0.9 km. The gravity anomaly attributable to the volcano is reduced to the east across a north-northwest trending gravity anomaly gradient through Newberry caldera and suggests that normal, perhaps extensional, faulting has occurred subsequent to caldera formation and may have controlled the location of some late-stage basaltic and rhyolitic eruptions. Significant amounts of felsic intrusive material may exist above the mafic intrusive zone but cannot be resolved by the gravity data.

  14. Geology and petrology of Mahukona Volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clague, D.A.; Moore, J.G.

    1991-01-01

    The submarine Mahukona Volcano, west of the island of Hawaii, is located on the Loa loci line between Kahoolawe and Hualalai Volcanoes. The west rift zone ridge of the volcano extends across a drowned coral reef at about-1150 m and a major slope break at about-1340 m, both of which represent former shoreines. The summit of the volcano apparently reached to about 250 m above sea level (now at-1100 m depth) did was surmounted by a roughly circular caldera. A econd rift zone probably extended toward the east or sutheast, but is completely covered by younger lavas from the adjacent subaerial volcanoes. Samples were vecovered from nine dredges and four submersible lives. Using subsidence rates and the compositions of flows which drape the dated shoreline terraces, we infer that the voluminous phase of tholeiitic shield growth ended about 470 ka, but tholeiitic eruptions continued until at least 435 ka. Basalt, transitional between tholeiitic and alkalic basalt, erupted at the end of tholeiitic volcanism, but no postshield-alkalic stage volcanism occurred. The summit of the volcano apparently subcided below sea level between 435 and 365 ka. The tholeiitic lavas recovered are compositionally diverse. ?? 1991 Springer-Verlag.

  15. Scoping Meeting Summary, Kaunakakai, Moloka'i, March 12, 1992, 2 PM Session

    SciTech Connect

    Quinby-Hunt, Mary S.

    1992-06-01

    The meeting began with presentations by the facilitator, Mr. Spiegel, and Dr. Lewis, the program manager from DOE. The facilitator introduced those on the podium. He then described the general structure of the meeting and its purpose: to hear the issues and concerns of those present regarding the proposed Hawaiian Geothermal Project. He described his role as assuring the impartiality and fairness of the meeting. Dr. Lewis of DOE further defined the scope of the project, introduced members of the EIS team, and briefly described.the EIS process. The overwhelming concerns of the meeting were Native Hawaiian issues. The presenters [more than 70%, most of whom addressed no other issue] want the EIS to respect Native Hawaiian religion, race, rights, language, and culture, noting that they believe that geothermal development is a desecration of Pele [{approx}60% of all presenters]. They expressed concern that their ancestors and burials should not be desecrated. The EIS should address Native Hawaiian concerns that the HGP would negatively impact Native Hawaiian fisheries, subsistence lifestyles, and religious practices. Virtually all the speakers expressed frustration with government. Most (> 70%) of the speakers voiced concern and frustration regarding lack of consideration for Native Hawaiians by government and lack of trust in government. One commenter requested that the EIS should consider the international implications of the U.S allowing their rainforests to be cleared, when the U.S. government asks other nations to preserve theirs. Nearly 30% of the commenters want the EIS to address the concern that people on Moloka'i will bear major environmental consequences of the HGP, but not gain from it. The commenters question whether it is right for Moloka'i to pay for benefits to Oahu, particularly using an unproven technology. After questioning the reliability and feasibility of the marine cable:, nearly 30% of the presenters were concerned about the impacts of the

  16. Coral proxy record of decadal-scale reduction in base flow from Moloka'i, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prouty, N.G.; Jupiter, S.D.; Field, M.E.; McCulloch, M.T.

    2009-01-01

    Groundwater is a major resource in Hawaii and is the principal source of water for municipal, agricultural, and industrial use. With a growing population, a long-term downward trend in rainfall, and the need for proper groundwater management, a better understanding of the hydroclimatological system is essential. Proxy records from corals can supplement long-term observational networks, offering an accessible source of hydrologie and climate information. To develop a qualitative proxy for historic groundwater discharge to coastal waters, a suite of rare earth elements and yttrium (REYs) were analyzed from coral cores collected along the south shore of Moloka'i, Hawaii. The coral REY to calcium (Ca) ratios were evaluated against hydrological parameters, yielding the strongest relationship to base flow. Dissolution of REYs from labradorite and olivine in the basaltic rock aquifers is likely the primary source of coastal ocean REYs. There was a statistically significant downward trend (-40%) in subannually resolved REY/Ca ratios over the last century. This is consistent with long-term records of stream discharge from Moloka'i, which imply a downward trend in base flow since 1913. A decrease in base flow is observed statewide, consistent with the long-term downward trend in annual rainfall over much of the state. With greater demands on freshwater resources, it is appropriate for withdrawal scenarios to consider long-term trends and short-term climate variability. It is possible that coral paleohydrological records can be used to conduct model-data comparisons in groundwater flow models used to simulate changes in groundwater level and coastal discharge. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  17. Coral proxy record of decadal-scale reduction in base flow from Moloka'i, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prouty, Nancy G.; Jupiter, Stacy D.; Field, Michael E.; McCulloch, Malcolm T.

    2009-01-01

    Groundwater is a major resource in Hawaii and is the principal source of water for municipal, agricultural, and industrial use. With a growing population, a long-term downward trend in rainfall, and the need for proper groundwater management, a better understanding of the hydroclimatological system is essential. Proxy records from corals can supplement long-term observational networks, offering an accessible source of hydrologic and climate information. To develop a qualitative proxy for historic groundwater discharge to coastal waters, a suite of rare earth elements and yttrium (REYs) were analyzed from coral cores collected along the south shore of Moloka'i, Hawaii. The coral REY to calcium (Ca) ratios were evaluated against hydrological parameters, yielding the strongest relationship to base flow. Dissolution of REYs from labradorite and olivine in the basaltic rock aquifers is likely the primary source of coastal ocean REYs. There was a statistically significant downward trend (−40%) in subannually resolved REY/Ca ratios over the last century. This is consistent with long-term records of stream discharge from Moloka'i, which imply a downward trend in base flow since 1913. A decrease in base flow is observed statewide, consistent with the long-term downward trend in annual rainfall over much of the state. With greater demands on freshwater resources, it is appropriate for withdrawal scenarios to consider long-term trends and short-term climate variability. It is possible that coral paleohydrological records can be used to conduct model-data comparisons in groundwater flow models used to simulate changes in groundwater level and coastal discharge.

  18. A Scientific Excursion: Volcanoes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olds, Henry, Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Reviews an educationally valuable and reasonably well-designed simulation of volcanic activity in an imaginary land. VOLCANOES creates an excellent context for learning information about volcanoes and for developing skills and practicing methods needed to study behavior of volcanoes. (Author/JN)

  19. Focus: alien volcanos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, Michael; Lopes, Rosaly

    2007-03-01

    Part 1: Volcanoes on Earth - blowing their top; Part 2: Volcanoes of the inner Solar System - dead or alive: the Moon, Mercury, Mars, Venus; Part 3: Volcanoes of the outer Solar System - fire and ice: Io, Europa, Ganymede and Miranda, Titan, Triton, Enceladus.

  20. Database for the Geologic Map of Newberry Volcano, Deschutes, Klamath, and Lake Counties, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bard, Joseph A.; Ramsey, David W.; MacLeod, Norman S.; Sherrod, David R.; Chitwood, Lawrence A.; Jensen, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Newberry Volcano, one of the largest Quaternary volcanoes in the conterminous United States, is a broad shield-shaped volcano measuring 60 km north-south by 30 km east-west with a maximum elevation of more than 2 km. Newberry Volcano is the product of deposits from thousands of eruptions, including at least 25 in the past approximately 12,000 years (Holocene Epoch). Newberry Volcano has erupted as recently as 1,300 years ago, but isotopic ages indicate that the volcano began its growth as early as 0.6 million years ago. Such a long eruptive history and recent activity suggest that Newberry Volcano is likely to erupt in the future. This geologic map database of Newberry Volcano distinguishes rocks and deposits based on their composition, age, and lithology.

  1. Earthquakes - Volcanoes (Causes and Forecast)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsiapas, E.

    2009-04-01

    EARTHQUAKES - VOLCANOES (CAUSES AND FORECAST) ELIAS TSIAPAS RESEARCHER NEA STYRA, EVIA,GREECE TEL.0302224041057 tsiapas@hol.gr The earthquakes are caused by large quantities of liquids (e.g. H2O, H2S, SO2, ect.) moving through lithosphere and pyrosphere (MOHO discontinuity) till they meet projections (mountains negative projections or projections coming from sinking lithosphere). The liquids are moved from West Eastward carried away by the pyrosphere because of differential speed of rotation of the pyrosphere by the lithosphere. With starting point an earthquake which was noticed at an area and from statistical studies, we know when, where and what rate an earthquake may be, which earthquake is caused by the same quantity of liquids, at the next east region. The forecast of an earthquake ceases to be valid if these components meet a crack in the lithosphere (e.g. limits of lithosphere plates) or a volcano crater. In this case the liquids come out into the atmosphere by the form of gasses carrying small quantities of lava with them (volcano explosion).

  2. Newberry Volcano (Oregon, USA) Revised

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly-Nolan, J. M.; Grove, T. L.

    2015-12-01

    Newberry Volcano (NV) located E. of the Cascades arc axis is often interpreted as (1) a High Lava Plains (NW Basin & Range -- B&R) volcano hosting rhyolites generated by a traveling plume, (2) a shield volcano built of basalt, or (3) an enigma unrelated to the adjacent High Cascades. Recent work shows that these interpretations are incorrect. Petrologic, geochemical, isotopic, drill hole, & seismic data indicate that the NV magma system results from arc-related processes at the NW corner of the B&R, where this major extensional province impinges on the Cascades arc. NV rhyolites are geochemically distinct and lower in SiO2 than those to the east where a general NW-younging trend of rhyolite ages has suggested a traveling hotspot -- a consequence instead of propagation of B&R extension. NV lies ~90 km above the downgoing slab based on seismic evidence (McCrory et al. 2012), ~15 km deeper than under the Three Sisters (TS) volcanic complex 60 km to the NW on the arc axis. NV & TS exhibit a range of compositions and both have generated rhyodacite with unusually high Na2O contents (~7 wt. %; Mandler et al. 2014), exhibiting similar petrogenetic processes. Silicic lavas and tuffs of the caldera-centric NV make up a significant component (~20% of drill core) of its 600 km3, although basaltic andesite is the dominant composition. Basalts of calcalkaline affinity erupted on the edifice as recently as early Holocene time. These basalts contain petrologic evidence for high pre-eruptive H2O contents, have strong arc-like trace element signatures, and are isotopically Cascadian and distinct from basalts to the east in the B&R that have much higher 3/4He (Graham et al. 2009). NV is one variety of Cascades arc volcano among which are a range of stratovolcanoes including Mt. Baker (15 km3) and Mt. Shasta (500 km3), a Holocene caldera (Crater Lake), and the many basaltic andesite shield volcanoes that make up most of the Oregon High Cascades.

  3. Cascades Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Venezky, Dina Y.; Driedger, Carolyn; Pallister, John

    2008-01-01

    Washington's Mount St. Helens volcano reawakens explosively on October 1, 2004, after 18 years of quiescence. Scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey's Cascades Volcano Observatory (CVO) study and observe Mount St. Helens and other volcanoes of the Cascade Range in Washington, Oregon, and northern California that hold potential for future eruptions. CVO is one of five USGS Volcano Hazards Program observatories that monitor U.S. volcanoes for science and public safety. Learn more about Mount St. Helens and CVO at http://vulcan.wr.usgs.gov/.

  4. Volcano seismology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chouet, B.

    2003-01-01

    A fundamental goal of volcano seismology is to understand active magmatic systems, to characterize the configuration of such systems, and to determine the extent and evolution of source regions of magmatic energy. Such understanding is critical to our assessment of eruptive behavior and its hazardous impacts. With the emergence of portable broadband seismic instrumentation, availability of digital networks with wide dynamic range, and development of new powerful analysis techniques, rapid progress is being made toward a synthesis of high-quality seismic data to develop a coherent model of eruption mechanics. Examples of recent advances are: (1) high-resolution tomography to image subsurface volcanic structures at scales of a few hundred meters; (2) use of small-aperture seismic antennas to map the spatio-temporal properties of long-period (LP) seismicity; (3) moment tensor inversions of very-long-period (VLP) data to derive the source geometry and mass-transport budget of magmatic fluids; (4) spectral analyses of LP events to determine the acoustic properties of magmatic and associated hydrothermal fluids; and (5) experimental modeling of the source dynamics of volcanic tremor. These promising advances provide new insights into the mechanical properties of volcanic fluids and subvolcanic mass-transport dynamics. As new seismic methods refine our understanding of seismic sources, and geochemical methods better constrain mass balance and magma behavior, we face new challenges in elucidating the physico-chemical processes that cause volcanic unrest and its seismic and gas-discharge manifestations. Much work remains to be done toward a synthesis of seismological, geochemical, and petrological observations into an integrated model of volcanic behavior. Future important goals must include: (1) interpreting the key types of magma movement, degassing and boiling events that produce characteristic seismic phenomena; (2) characterizing multiphase fluids in subvolcanic

  5. The hydrogeology of Kilauea volcano

    SciTech Connect

    Ingebritsen, S.E.; Scholl, M.A. )

    1993-08-01

    The hydrogeology of Kilauea volcano and adjacent areas has been studied since the turn of this century. However, most studies to date have focused on the relatively shallow, low-salinity parts of the ground-water system, and the deeper hydrothermal system remains poorly understood. The rift zones of adjacent Mauna Loa volcano bound the regional ground-water flow system that includes Kilauea, and the area bounded by the rift zones of Kilauea and the ocean may comprise a partly isolated subsystem. Rates of ground-water recharge vary greatly over the area, and discharge is difficult to measure, because streams are ephemeral and most ground-water discharges diffusely at or below sea level. Hydrothermal systems exist at depth in Kilauea's east and southwest rift zone, as evidenced by thermal springs at the coast and wells in the lower east-rift zone. Available data suggest that dike-impounded, heated ground water occurs at relatively high elevations in the upper east- and southwest-rift zones of Kilauea, and that permeability at depth in the rift zones. Available data suggest that dike-impounded, heated ground water occurs at relatively high elevations in the upper east- and southwest-rift zones of Kilauea, and that permeability at depth in the rift zones (probably [le]10[sup [minus]15] m[sup 2]) is much lower than that of unaltered basalt flows closer to the surface ([ge]10[sup [minus]10] m[sup 2]). Substantial variations in permeability and the presence of magmatic heat sources influence that structure of the fresh water-salt water interface, so the Ghyben-Herzberg model will often fail to predict its position. Numerical modeling studies have considered only subsets of the hydrothermal system, because no existing computer code solves the coupled fluid-flow, heat- and solute-transport problem over the temperature and salinity range encountered at Kilauea. 73 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Venezky, Dina Y.; Murray, Tom; Read, Cyrus

    2008-01-01

    Steam plume from the 2006 eruption of Augustine volcano in Cook Inlet, Alaska. Explosive ash-producing eruptions from Alaska's 40+ historically active volcanoes pose hazards to aviation, including commercial aircraft flying the busy North Pacific routes between North America and Asia. The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) monitors these volcanoes to provide forecasts of eruptive activity. AVO is a joint program of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the Geophysical Institute of the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAFGI), and the State of Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys (ADGGS). AVO is one of five USGS Volcano Hazards Program observatories that monitor U.S. volcanoes for science and public safety. Learn more about Augustine volcano and AVO at http://www.avo.alaska.edu.

  7. Glaciation of Haleakala volcano, Hawaii

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, J.G.; Mark, R. ); Porter, S.C. . Quaternary Research Center)

    1993-04-01

    Early debates regarding the large (5 [times] 10 km) summit crater'' of Haleakala volcano (3,055 m altitude) on the island of Maui attributed its origin to renting, rifting, caldera collapse, or erosion. It now is commonly assumed to have resulted from headward expansion of giant canyons by stream erosion (Stearns, 1942). Slope maps and shaded relief images based on new USGS digital elevation data point to the apparent overfit of the canyons that drain the summit depression. Studies of drowned coral reefs and terraces on the offshore east rift of Haleakala indicate that this part of the volcano has undergone submergence of about 2 km, as well as tilting, since 850 ka ago. Such subsidence indicates that the summit altitude at the end of the shield-building phase reached ca. 5,000 m, well above both the present and full-glacial snowlines. A comparison with the radiometrically dated glacial record of Mauna Kea and its reconstructed snowline history suggests that Haleakala experienced 10 or more glaciations, the most extensive during marine isotope stages 20, 18, and 16. By isotope stage 10, the summit had subsided below the full-glacial snowline. Diamictons on the south slope of the volcano, previously described as mudflows, contain lava clasts with superchilled margins, identical to margins of subglacially erupted lavas on Mauna Kea. Glacier ice that mantled the upper slopes of the volcano continuously for several hundred thousand years and intermittently thereafter, is inferred to have carved Haleakala crater and the upper reaches of large canyons radiating from it.

  8. Geology of Medicine Lake Volcano, Northern California Cascade Range

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Donnelly-Nolan, Julie

    1990-01-01

    Medicine Lake volcano (MLV) is located in an E-W extensional environment on the Modoc Plateau just east of the main arc of the Cascades. It consists mainly of mafic lavas, although drillhole data indicate that a larger volume of rhyolite is present than is indicated by surface mapping. The most recent eruption was rhyolitic and occurred about 900 years ago. At least seventeen eruptions have occurred since 12,000 years ago, or between 1 and 2 eruptions per century on average, although activity appears to be strongly episodic. The calculated eruptive rate is about 0.6 km3 per thousand years during the entire history of the volcano. Drillhole data indicate that the plateau surface underlying the volcano has been downwarped by 0.5 km under the center of MLV. The volcano may be even larger than the estimated 600 km3, already the largest volcano by volume in the Cascades.

  9. Volcanoes: Nature's Caldrons Challenge Geochemists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zurer, Pamela S.

    1984-01-01

    Reviews various topics and research studies on the geology of volcanoes. Areas examined include volcanoes and weather, plate margins, origins of magma, magma evolution, United States Geological Survey (USGS) volcano hazards program, USGS volcano observatories, volcanic gases, potassium-argon dating activities, and volcano monitoring strategies.…

  10. Galactic Super Volcano Similar to Iceland Volcano

    NASA Video Gallery

    This composite image from NASAs Chandra X-ray Observatory with radio data from the Very Large Array shows a cosmic volcano being driven by a black hole in the center of the M87 galaxy. This eruptio...

  11. Voluminous submarine lava flows from Hawaiian volcanoes

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, R.T.; Moore, J.G.; Lipman, P.W.; Belderson, R.H.

    1988-05-01

    The GLORIA long-range sonar imaging system has revealed fields of large lava flows in the Hawaiian Trough east and south of Hawaii in water as deep as 5.5 km. Flows in the most extensive field (110 km long) have erupted from the deep submarine segment of Kilauea's east rift zone. Other flows have been erupted from Loihi and Mauna Loa. This discovery confirms a suspicion, long held from subaerial studies, that voluminous submarine flows are erupted from Hawaiian volcanoes, and it supports an inference that summit calderas repeatedly collapse and fill at intervals of centuries to millenia owing to voluminous eruptions. These extensive flows differ greatly in form from pillow lavas found previously along shallower segments of the rift zones; therefore, revision of concepts of volcano stratigraphy and structure may be required.

  12. Results of repeated leveling surveys at Newberry Volcano, Oregon, and near Lassen Peak Volcano, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dzurisin, D.

    1999-01-01

    Personnel from the U.S. Geological Survey's Cascades Volcano Observatory conducted first-order, class-II leveling surveys near Lassen Peak, California, in 1991 and at Newberry Volcano, Oregon, in 1985, 1986, and 1994. Near Lassen Peak no significant vertical displacements had occurred along either of two traverses, 33 and 44 km long, since second-order surveys in 1932 and 1934. At Newberry, however, the 1994 survey suggests that the volcano's summit area had risen as much as 97??22 mm with respect to a third-order survey in 1931. The 1931 and 1994 surveys measured a 37-km-long, east-west traverse across the entire volcano. The 1985 and 1986 surveys, on the other hand, measured only a 9-km-long traverse across the summit caldera with only one benchmark in common with the 1931 survey. Comparison of the 1985, 1986, and 1994 surveys revealed no significant differential displacements inside the caldera. A possible mechanism for uplift during 1931-1994 is injection of approximately 0.06 km3 of magma at a depth of approximately 10 km beneath the volcano's summit. The average magma supply rate of approximately 1 x 10-3 km3/year would be generally consistent with the volcano's growth rate averaged over its 600,000-year history (0.7-1.7 x 10-3 km3/year).

  13. Volcanoes, Observations and Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurber, Clifford; Prejean, Stephanie

    Volcanoes are critical geologic hazards that challenge our ability to make long-term forecasts of their eruptive behaviors. They also have direct and indirect impacts on human lives and society. As is the case with many geologic phenomena, the time scales over which volcanoes evolve greatly exceed that of a human lifetime. On the other hand, the time scale over which a volcano can move from inactivity to eruption can be rather short: months, weeks, days, and even hours. Thus, scientific study and monitoring of volcanoes is essential to mitigate risk. There are thousands of volcanoes on Earth, and it is impractical to study and implement ground-based monitoring at them all. Fortunately, there are other effective means for volcano monitoring, including increasing capabilities for satellite-based technologies.

  14. The Volcano Adventure Guide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goff, Fraser

    2005-05-01

    Adventure travels to volcanoes offer chance encounters with danger, excitement, and romance, plus opportunities to experience scientific enlightenment and culture. To witness a violently erupting volcano and its resulting impacts on landscape, climate, and humanity is a powerful personal encounter with gigantic planetary forces. To study volcano processes and products during eruptions is to walk in the footsteps of Pliny himself. To tour the splendors and horrors of 25 preeminent volcanoes might be the experience of a lifetime, for scientists and nonscientists alike. In The Volcano Adventure Guide, we now have the ultimate tourist volume to lead us safely to many of the world's famous volcanoes and to ensure that we will see the important sites at each one.

  15. Volcanoes: observations and impact

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thurber, Clifford; Prejean, Stephanie G.

    2012-01-01

    Volcanoes are critical geologic hazards that challenge our ability to make long-term forecasts of their eruptive behaviors. They also have direct and indirect impacts on human lives and society. As is the case with many geologic phenomena, the time scales over which volcanoes evolve greatly exceed that of a human lifetime. On the other hand, the time scale over which a volcano can move from inactivity to eruption can be rather short: months, weeks, days, and even hours. Thus, scientific study and monitoring of volcanoes is essential to mitigate risk. There are thousands of volcanoes on Earth, and it is impractical to study and implement ground-based monitoring at them all. Fortunately, there are other effective means for volcano monitoring, including increasing capabilities for satellite-based technologies.

  16. Muria Volcano, Island of Java, Indonesia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This view of the north coast of central Java, Indonesia centers on the currently inactive Muria Volcano (6.5S, 111.0E). Muria is 5,330 ft. tall and lies just north of Java's main volcanic belt which runs east - west down the spine of the island attesting to the volcanic origin of the more than 1,500 Indonesian Islands.

  17. Northern Arizona Volcanoes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Northern Arizona is best known for the Grand Canyon. Less widely known are the hundreds of geologically young volcanoes, at least one of which buried the homes of local residents. San Francisco Mtn., a truncated stratovolcano at 3887 meters, was once a much taller structure (about 4900 meters) before it exploded some 400,000 years ago a la Mt. St. Helens. The young cinder cone field to its east includes Sunset Crater, that erupted in 1064 and buried Native American homes. This ASTER perspective was created by draping ASTER image data over topographic data from the U.S. Geological Survey National Elevation Data.

    With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

    Size: 20.4 by 24.6 kilometers (12.6 by 15.2 miles) Location: 35.3 degrees North latitude, 111

  18. Yellowstone Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Venezky, Dina Y.; Lowenstern, Jacob

    2008-01-01

    Eruption of Yellowstone's Old Faithful Geyser. Yellowstone hosts the world's largest and most diverse collection of natural thermal features, which are the surface expression of magmatic heat at shallow depths in the crust. The Yellowstone system is monitored by the Yellowstone Volcano Observatory (YVO), a partnership among the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Yellowstone National Park, and the University of Utah. YVO is one of five USGS Volcano Hazards Program observatories that monitor U.S. volcanoes for science and public safety. Learn more about Yellowstone and YVO at http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/yvo.

  19. Mud volcanoes on Mars?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komar, Paul D.

    1991-01-01

    The term mud volcano is applied to a variety of landforms having in common a formation by extrusion of mud from beneath the ground. Although mud is the principal solid material that issues from a mud volcano, there are many examples where clasts up to boulder size are found, sometimes thrown high into the air during an eruption. Other characteristics of mud volcanoes (on Earth) are discussed. The possible presence of mud volcanoes, which are common and widespread on Earth, on Mars is considered.

  20. Diurnal variability in turbidity and coral fluorescence on a fringing reef flat: Southern Molokai, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piniak, Gregory A.; Storlazzi, Curt D.

    2008-03-01

    Terrigenous sediment in the nearshore environment can pose both acute and chronic stresses to coral reefs. The reef flat off southern Molokai, Hawaii, typically experiences daily turbidity events, in which trade winds and tides combine to resuspend terrigenous sediment and transport it alongshore. These chronic turbidity events could play a role in restricting coral distribution on the reef flat by reducing the light available for photosynthesis. This study describes the effects of these turbidity events on the Hawaiian reef coral Montipora capitata using in situ diurnal measurements of turbidity, light levels, and chlorophyll fluorescence yield via pulse-amplitude-modulated (PAM) fluorometry. Average surface irradiance was similar in the morning and the afternoon, while increased afternoon turbidity resulted in lower subsurface irradiance, higher fluorescence yield (Δ F/ Fm'), and lower relative electron transport rates (rETR). Model calculations based on observed light extinction coeffecients suggest that in the absence of turbidity events, afternoon subsurface irradiances would be 1.43 times higher than observed, resulting in rETR for M. capitata that are 1.40 times higher.

  1. Sand composition and transport history on a fringing coral reef, Molokai, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Calhoun, R.S.; Field, M.E.

    2008-01-01

    Composition of sand grains from the beaches, reef flat, and fore reef of south Molokai, Hawaii, provides key information about the origin and transport history of sediment on the reef and adjacent beach. The most common grain types include coralline algae, coral, chemically altered carbonate, and siliciclastic grains. Minor components include calcareous algal plates (Halimeda), mollusk fragments, and foraminifera; in selected areas, these components are abundant. Similarities in composition indicate that sand grains are freely transported between the beach and the reef-flat environments, whereas the fore reef has limited exchange of sand with either the beach or the reef flat. Overall, the calcium carbonate fraction of the sand, silt, and clay increases with distance offshore from 400 to 650 m, where the percentages plateau and remain relatively stable across the fore reef. The calcium carbonate content of bottom sediment indicates that sand transport on the reef flat is generally shore parallel with little shore-normal movement. This study has implications for management of beaches and coastal resources along fringing coral reefs in that it documents the effectiveness of the wide reef flat and reef crest in blocking sand transport with the fore reef. It also indicates that sediment introduced to the inner reef flat is not quickly dispersed seaward and therefore has a relatively high residence time in that setting.

  2. Diurnal variability in turbidity and coral fluorescence on a fringing reef flat: Southern Molokai, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Piniak, G.A.; Storlazzi, C.D.

    2008-01-01

    Terrigenous sediment in the nearshore environment can pose both acute and chronic stresses to coral reefs. The reef flat off southern Molokai, Hawaii, typically experiences daily turbidity events, in which trade winds and tides combine to resuspend terrigenous sediment and transport it alongshore. These chronic turbidity events could play a role in restricting coral distribution on the reef flat by reducing the light available for photosynthesis. This study describes the effects of these turbidity events on the Hawaiian reef coral Montipora capitata using in situ diurnal measurements of turbidity, light levels, and chlorophyll fluorescence yield via pulse-amplitude-modulated (PAM) fluorometry. Average surface irradiance was similar in the morning and the afternoon, while increased afternoon turbidity resulted in lower subsurface irradiance, higher fluorescence yield (??F/Fm???), and lower relative electron transport rates (rETR). Model calculations based on observed light extinction coeffecients suggest that in the absence of turbidity events, afternoon subsurface irradiances would be 1.43 times higher than observed, resulting in rETR for M. capitata that are 1.40 times higher.

  3. Geologic Map of the Summit Region of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neal, Christina A.; Lockwood, John P.

    2003-01-01

    This report consists of a large map sheet and a pamphlet. The map shows the geology, some photographs, description of map units, and correlation of map units. The pamphlet gives the full text about the geologic map. The area covered by this map includes parts of four U.S. Geological Survey 7.5' topographic quadrangles (Kilauea Crater, Volcano, Ka`u Desert, and Makaopuhi). It encompasses the summit, upper rift zones, and Koa`e Fault System of Kilauea Volcano and a part of the adjacent, southeast flank of Mauna Loa Volcano. The map is dominated by products of eruptions from Kilauea Volcano, the southernmost of the five volcanoes on the Island of Hawai`i and one of the world's most active volcanoes. At its summit (1,243 m) is Kilauea Crater, a 3 km-by-5 km collapse caldera that formed, possibly over several centuries, between about 200 and 500 years ago. Radiating away from the summit caldera are two linear zones of intrusion and eruption, the east and the southwest rift zones. Repeated subaerial eruptions from the summit and rift zones have built a gently sloping, elongate shield volcano covering approximately 1,500 km2. Much of the volcano lies under water; the east rift zone extends 110 km from the summit to a depth of more than 5,000 m below sea level; whereas the southwest rift zone has a more limited submarine continuation. South of the summit caldera, mostly north-facing normal faults and open fractures of the Koa`e Fault System extend between the two rift zones. The Koa`e Fault System is interpreted as a tear-away structure that accommodates southward movement of Kilauea's flank in response to distension of the volcano perpendicular to the rift zones.

  4. Volcano infrasound: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Jeffrey Bruce; Ripepe, Maurizio

    2011-09-01

    Exploding volcanoes, which produce intense infrasound, are reminiscent of the veritable explosion of volcano infrasound papers published during the last decade. Volcano infrasound is effective for tracking and quantifying eruptive phenomena because it corresponds to activity occurring near and around the volcanic vent, as opposed to seismic signals, which are generated by both surface and internal volcanic processes. As with seismology, infrasound can be recorded remotely, during inclement weather, or in the dark to provide a continuous record of a volcano's unrest. Moreover, it can also be exploited at regional or global distances, where seismic monitoring has limited efficacy. This paper provides a literature overview of the current state of the field and summarizes applications of infrasound as a tool for better understanding volcanic activity. Many infrasound studies have focused on integration with other geophysical data, including seismic, thermal, electromagnetic radiation, and gas spectroscopy and they have generally improved our understanding of eruption dynamics. Other work has incorporated infrasound into volcano surveillance to enhance capabilities for monitoring hazardous volcanoes and reducing risk. This paper aims to provide an overview of volcano airwave studies (from analog microbarometer to modern pressure transducer) and summarizes how infrasound is currently used to infer eruption dynamics. It also outlines the relative merits of local and regional infrasound surveillance, highlights differences between array and network sensor topologies, and concludes with mention of sensor technologies appropriate for volcano infrasound study.

  5. San Cristobal Volcano, Nicaragua

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    A white plume of smoke, from San Cristobal Volcano (13.0N, 87.5W) on the western coast of Nicaragua, blows westward along the Nicaraguan coast just south of the Gulf of Fonseca and the Honduran border. San Csistobal is a strato volcano some 1,745 meters high and is frequently active.

  6. Shiveluch Volcano, Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    On the night of June 4, 2001, the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) captured this thermal image of the erupting Shiveluch volcano. Located on Russia's Kamchatka Peninsula, Shiveluch rises to an altitude of 2,447 meters (8,028 feet). The active lava dome complex is seen as a bright (hot) area on the summit of the volcano. To the southwest, a second hot area is either a debris avalanche or hot ash deposit. Trailing to the west is a 25-kilometer (15-mile) ash plume, seen as a cold 'cloud' streaming from the summit. At least 60 large eruptions have occurred here during the last 10,000 years; the largest historical eruptions were in 1854 and 1964.

    Because Kamchatka is located along the major aircraft routes between North America/Europe and Asia, this area is constantly monitored for potential ash hazards to aircraft. The area is part of the 'Ring of Fire,' a string of volcanoes that encircles the Pacific Ocean.

    The lower image is the same as the upper, except it has been color-coded: red is hot, light greens to dark green are progressively colder, and gray/black are the coldest areas.

    The image is located at 56.7 degrees north latitude, 161.3 degrees east longitude.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched Dec. 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of International Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. The primary goal of the ASTER mission is to obtain high-resolution image data in 14 channels over the entire land surface, as well as black and white stereo images. With revisit time of between 4 and 16 days, ASTER will provide the capability for repeat coverage of changing areas on Earth's surface.

  7. Newberry Volcano's youngest lava flows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, Joel E.; Donnelly-Nolan, Julie M.; Jensen, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    The central caldera is visible in the lower right corner of the center map, outlined by the black dashed line. The caldera collapsed about 75,000 years ago when massive explosions sent volcanic ash as far as the San Francisco Bay area and created a 3,000-ft-deep hole in the center of the volcano. The caldera is now partly refilled by Paulina and East Lakes, and the byproducts from younger eruptions, including Newberry Volcano’s youngest rhyolitic lavas, shown in red and orange. The majority of Newberry Volcano’s many lava flows and cinder cones are blanketed by as much as 5 feet of volcanic ash from the catastrophic eruption of Mount Mazama that created Crater Lake caldera approximately 7,700 years ago. This ash supports abundant tree growth and obscures the youthful appearance of Newberry Volcano. Only the youngest volcanic vents and lava flows are well exposed and unmantled by volcanic ash. More than one hundred of these young volcanic vents and lava flows erupted 7,000 years ago during Newberry Volcano’s northwest rift zone eruption.

  8. Constraints on the timing of Quaternary volcanism and duration of magma residence at Ciomadul volcano, east-central Europe, from combined U-Th/He and U-Th zircon geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harangi, S.; Lukács, R.; Schmitt, A. K.; Dunkl, I.; Molnár, K.; Kiss, B.; Seghedi, I.; Novothny, Á.; Molnár, M.

    2015-08-01

    High-spatial resolution zircon geochronology was applied to constrain the timescales of volcanic eruptions of the youngest, mostly explosive volcanic phase of Ciomadul volcano (Carpathian-Pannonian region, Romania). Combined U-Th and (U-Th)/He zircon dating demonstrates that intermittent volcanic eruptions occurred in a time range of 56-32 ka. The reliability of the eruption dates is supported by concordant ages obtained from different dating techniques, such as zircon geochronology, radiocarbon analysis, and infrared stimulated luminescence dating for the same deposits. The new geochronological data suggest that volcanism at Ciomadul is much younger (< ca. 200 ka) than previously thought (up to 600 ka). A dominantly explosive volcanic phase occurred after an apparent lull in volcanism that lasted for several 10's of ka, after a period of lava dome extrusion that defines the onset of the known volcanism at Ciomadul. At least four major eruptive episodes can be distinguished within the 56-32 ka period. Among them, relatively large (sub-plinian to plinian) explosive eruptions produced distal tephra covering extended areas mostly southeast from the volcano. The 38.9 ka tephra overlaps the age of the Campanian Ignimbrite eruption and has an overlapping dispersion axis towards the Black Sea region. The wide range of U-Th model ages of the studied zircons indicates prolonged existence of a low-temperature (< 800 °C) silicic crystal mush beneath Ciomadul. The main zircon crystallization period was between ca. 100 and 200 ka, coeval with the older, mostly extrusive lava dome building stage of volcanism. Even the youngest U-Th model ages obtained for the outermost 4 μm rim of individual zircon crystals predate the eruption by several 10's of ka. The zircon age distributions suggest re-heating above zircon saturation temperatures via injection of hot mafic magmas prior to eruption. Intermittent intrusions of fresh magma could play a significant role in keeping the

  9. Volcanoes. A planetary perspective.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, P.

    In this book, the author gives an account of the familiar violent aspects of volcanoes and the various forms that eruptions can take. He explores why volcanoes exist at all, why volcanoes occur where they do, and how examples of major historical eruptions can be interpreted in terms of physical processes. Throughout he attempts to place volcanism in a planetary perspective, exploring the pre-eminent role of submarine volcanism on Earth and the stunning range of volcanic phenomena revealed by spacecraft exploration of the solar system.

  10. Results of exploratory drilling for water in Waihanau Valley, Molokai, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Takasaki, K.J.

    1986-01-01

    Three exploratory wells, located in lower Waihanau Valley on Molokai, were drilled and tested for their yields during the period May to October 1983. The first well, 582 ft deep, tapped the main water body in a basaltic aquifer intruded by scattered near-parallel volcanic dikes. Water in this water body is impounded by the dikes and has a head of about nine feet above sea level. A 48-hour pumping test was conducted on this well. The well was pumped at various rates ranging from 144 to 455 gal/min for nine hours. Thereafter, the well was pumped for 39 hours at a rate of 156 gal/min approximating the planned operational rate of 150 gal/min. The specific capacities of the well at the rates pumped averaged about 30 gal/min/ft of drawdown. The temperature of the pumped water remained nearly constant at 69 F (20.5 C). The chloride concentration ranged from 19 to 22 mg/L during the test. Analyses of the chemical constituents and trace metals of the water pumped indicated that it was of excellent quality. Based on these results, the well was finished as a production well. A shallow water body perched about 30 ft below ground surface and more than 400 ft above the main water body was discovered during the drilling of the first well when about 50 gal/min of water cascaded down the well. Two wells were drilled to depths of 200 and 150 ft, respectively, to explore this perched water. The yields obtained from this perched water body were low and indicated that its development was not feasible. (Author 's abstract)

  11. Sediment resuspension and transport patterns on a fringing reef flat, Molokai, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ogston, A.S.; Storlazzi, C.D.; Field, M.E.; Presto, M.K.

    2004-01-01

    Corals are known to flourish in various turbid environments around the world. The quantitative distinction between clear and turbid water in coral habitats is not well defined nor are the amount of sediment in suspension and rates of sedimentation used to evaluate the condition of reef environments well established. This study of sediment resuspension, transport, and resulting deposition on a fringing reef flat off Molokai, Hawaii, uses a year of time-series data from a small, instrumented tripod. It shows the importance of trade winds and ocean wave heights in controlling the movement of sediment. Sediment is typically resuspended daily and the dominant controls on the magnitude of events (10-25 mg/l) are the trade-wind-generated waves and currents and tidal elevation on the reef flat. The net flux of sediment on this reef is primarily along the reef flat in the direction of the prevailing trade winds (to the west), with a secondary direction of slightly offshore, towards a zone of low coral abundance. These results have application to reef studies and reef management in other areas in several ways. First, the observed resuspension and turbidity results from fine-grained terrigenous sediment that appears to be trapped and recycled on the reef flat. Thus corals are subjected to light attenuation by the same particles repeatedly, however small the amount. Secondly, the measurements show high temporal variability (from daily to seasonal scales) of sediment resuspension, indicating that single measurements are inadequate to accurately describe conditions on a reef flat. ?? Springer-Verlag 2004.

  12. Coastal circulation and water column properties off Kalaupapa National Historical Park, Molokai, Hawaii, 2008-2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Storlazzi, Curt D.; Presto, Katherine; Brown, Eric K.

    2011-01-01

    More than 2.2 million measurements of oceanographic forcing and the resulting water-column properties were made off U.S. National Park Service's Kalaupapa National Historical Park on the north shore of Molokai, Hawaii, between 2008 and 2010 to understand the role of oceanographic processes on the health and sustainability of the area's marine resources. The tides off the Kalaupapa Peninsula are mixed semidiurnal. The wave climate is dominated by two end-members: large northwest Pacific winter swell that directly impacts the study site, and smaller, shorter-period northeast trade-wind waves that have to refract around the peninsula, resulting in a more northerly direction before propagating over the study site. The currents primarily are alongshore and are faster at the surface than close to the seabed; large wave events, however, tend to drive flow in a more cross-shore orientation. The tidal currents flood to the north and ebb to the south. The waters off the peninsula appear to be a mix of cooler, more saline, deeper oceanic waters and shallow, warmer, lower-salinity nearshore waters, with intermittent injections of freshwater, generally during the winters. Overall, the turbidity levels were low, except during large wave events. The low overall turbidity levels and rapid return to pre-event background levels following the cessation of forcing suggest that there is little fine-grained material. Large wave events likely inhibit the settlement of fine-grained sediment at the site. A number of phenomena were observed that indicate the complexity of coastal circulation and water-column properties in the area and may help scientists and resource managers to better understand the implications of the processes on marine ecosystem health.

  13. Shaking up volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prejean, Stephanie G.; Haney, Matthew M.

    2014-01-01

    Most volcanic eruptions that occur shortly after a large distant earthquake do so by random chance. A few compelling cases for earthquake-triggered eruptions exist, particularly within 200 km of the earthquake, but this phenomenon is rare in part because volcanoes must be poised to erupt in order to be triggered by an earthquake (1). Large earthquakes often perturb volcanoes in more subtle ways by triggering small earthquakes and changes in spring discharge and groundwater levels (1, 2). On page 80 of this issue, Brenguier et al. (3) provide fresh insight into the interaction of large earthquakes and volcanoes by documenting a temporary change in seismic velocity beneath volcanoes in Honshu, Japan, after the devastating Tohoku-Oki earthquake in 2011.

  14. Volcano hazard mitigation program in Indonesia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sudradjat, A.

    1990-01-01

    Volcanological investigations in Indonesia were started in the 18th century, when Valentijn in 1726 prepared a chronological report of the eruption of Banda Api volcno, Maluku. Modern and intensive volcanological studies did not begin until the catastrophic eruption of Kelut volcano, East Java, in 1919. The eruption took 5,011 lives and destroyed thousands of acres of coffee plantation. An eruption lahar generated by the crater lake water mixed with volcanic eruptions products was the cause of death for a high number of victims. An effort to mitigate the danger from volcanic eruption was first initiated in 1921 by constructing a tunnel to drain the crater lake water of Kelut volcano. At the same time a Volcanological Survey was established by the government with the responsibility of seeking every means for minimizing the hazard caused by volcanic eruption. 

  15. EARTHQUAKES - VOLCANOES (Causes - Forecast - Counteraction)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsiapas, Elias

    2014-05-01

    Earthquakes and volcanoes are caused by: 1)Various liquid elements (e.g. H20, H2S, S02) which emerge from the pyrosphere and are trapped in the space between the solid crust and the pyrosphere (Moho discontinuity). 2)Protrusions of the solid crust at the Moho discontinuity (mountain range roots, sinking of the lithosphere's plates). 3)The differential movement of crust and pyrosphere. The crust misses one full rotation for approximately every 100 pyrosphere rotations, mostly because of the lunar pull. The above mentioned elements can be found in small quantities all over the Moho discontinuity, and they are constantly causing minor earthquakes and small volcanic eruptions. When large quantities of these elements (H20, H2S, SO2, etc) concentrate, they are carried away by the pyrosphere, moving from west to east under the crust. When this movement takes place under flat surfaces of the solid crust, it does not cause earthquakes. But when these elements come along a protrusion (a mountain root) they concentrate on its western side, displacing the pyrosphere until they fill the space created. Due to the differential movement of pyrosphere and solid crust, a vacuum is created on the eastern side of these protrusions and when the aforementioned liquids overfill this space, they explode, escaping to the east. At the point of their escape, these liquids are vaporized and compressed, their flow accelerates, their temperature rises due to fluid friction and they are ionized. On the Earth's surface, a powerful rumbling sound and electrical discharges in the atmosphere, caused by the movement of the gasses, are noticeable. When these elements escape, the space on the west side of the protrusion is violently taken up by the pyrosphere, which collides with the protrusion, causing a major earthquake, attenuation of the protrusions, cracks on the solid crust and damages to structures on the Earth's surface. It is easy to foresee when an earthquake will occur and how big it is

  16. Earthquakes - Volcanoes (Causes - Forecast - Counteraction)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsiapas, Elias

    2013-04-01

    Earthquakes and volcanoes are caused by: 1)Various liquid elements (e.g. H20, H2S, S02) which emerge from the pyrosphere and are trapped in the space between the solid crust and the pyrosphere (Moho discontinuity). 2)Protrusions of the solid crust at the Moho discontinuity (mountain range roots, sinking of the lithosphere's plates). 3)The differential movement of crust and pyrosphere. The crust misses one full rotation for approximately every 100 pyrosphere rotations, mostly because of the lunar pull. The above mentioned elements can be found in small quantities all over the Moho discontinuity, and they are constantly causing minor earthquakes and small volcanic eruptions. When large quantities of these elements (H20, H2S, SO2, etc) concentrate, they are carried away by the pyrosphere, moving from west to east under the crust. When this movement takes place under flat surfaces of the solid crust, it does not cause earthquakes. But when these elements come along a protrusion (a mountain root) they concentrate on its western side, displacing the pyrosphere until they fill the space created. Due to the differential movement of pyrosphere and solid crust, a vacuum is created on the eastern side of these protrusions and when the aforementioned liquids overfill this space, they explode, escaping to the east. At the point of their escape, these liquids are vaporized and compressed, their flow accelerates, their temperature rises due to fluid friction and they are ionized. On the Earth's surface, a powerful rumbling sound and electrical discharges in the atmosphere, caused by the movement of the gasses, are noticeable. When these elements escape, the space on the west side of the protrusion is violently taken up by the pyrosphere, which collides with the protrusion, causing a major earthquake, attenuation of the protrusions, cracks on the solid crust and damages to structures on the Earth's surface. It is easy to foresee when an earthquake will occur and how big it is

  17. Earthquakes - Volcanoes (Causes - Forecast - Counteraction)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsiapas, Elias

    2015-04-01

    Earthquakes and volcanoes are caused by: 1) Various liquid elements (e.g. H20, H2S, S02) which emerge from the pyrosphere and are trapped in the space between the solid crust and the pyrosphere (Moho discontinuity). 2) Protrusions of the solid crust at the Moho discontinuity (mountain range roots, sinking of the lithosphere's plates). 3) The differential movement of crust and pyrosphere. The crust misses one full rotation for approximately every 100 pyrosphere rotations, mostly because of the lunar pull. The above mentioned elements can be found in small quantities all over the Moho discontinuity, and they are constantly causing minor earthquakes and small volcanic eruptions. When large quantities of these elements (H20, H2S, SO2, etc) concentrate, they are carried away by the pyrosphere, moving from west to east under the crust. When this movement takes place under flat surfaces of the solid crust, it does not cause earthquakes. But when these elements come along a protrusion (a mountain root) they concentrate on its western side, displacing the pyrosphere until they fill the space created. Due to the differential movement of pyrosphere and solid crust, a vacuum is created on the eastern side of these protrusions and when the aforementioned liquids overfill this space, they explode, escaping to the east. At the point of their escape, these liquids are vaporized and compressed, their flow accelerates, their temperature rises due to fluid friction and they are ionized. On the Earth's surface, a powerful rumbling sound and electrical discharges in the atmosphere, caused by the movement of the gasses, are noticeable. When these elements escape, the space on the west side of the protrusion is violently taken up by the pyrosphere, which collides with the protrusion, causing a major earthquake, attenuation of the protrusions, cracks on the solid crust and damages to structures on the Earth's surface. It is easy to foresee when an earthquake will occur and how big it is

  18. Observing ground surface change series at active volcanoes in Indonesia using backscattering intensity of SAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saepuloh, Asep; Trianaputri, Mila Olivia

    2015-04-01

    Indonesia contains 27 active volcanoes passing the West through the East part. Therefore, Indonesia is the most hazard front due to the volcanic activities. To obtain the new precursory signals leading to the eruptions, we applied remote sensing technique to observe ground surface change series at the summit of Sinabung and Kelud volcanoes. Sinabung volcano is located at Karo Region, North Sumatra Province. This volcano is a strato volcano type which is re-activated in August 2010. The eruption continues to the later years by ejecting volcanic products such as lava, pyroclastic flow, and ash fall deposits. This study is targeted to observe ground surface change series at the summit of Sinabung volcano since 2007 to 2011. In addition, we also compared the summit ground surface changes after the eruptions of Kelud volcano in 2007. Kelud volcano is also strato volcano type which is located at East Java, Indonesia. The Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) remotely sensed technology makes possible to observe rapidly a wide ground surface changes related to ground surface roughness. Detection series were performed by extracting the backscattering intensity of the Phased Array type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR) onboard the Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS). The intensity values were then calculated using a Normalized Radar Cross-Section (NRCS). Based on surface roughness criterion at the summit of Sinabung volcano, we could observe the ground surface changes prior to the early eruption in August 2010. The continuous increment of NRCS values showed clearly at window size 3×3 pixel of the summit of Sinabung volcano. The same phenomenon was also detected at the summit of Kelud volcano after the 2007 eruptions. The detected ground surface changes were validated using optical Landsat-8, backscattering intensity ratio for volcanic products detection, and radial component of a tilt-meter data.

  19. False Color Image of Volcano Sapas Mons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This false-color image shows the volcano Sapas Mons, which is located in the broad equatorial rise called Atla Regio (8 degrees north latitude and 188 degrees east longitude). The area shown is approximately 650 kilometers (404 miles) on a side. Sapas Mons measures about 400 kilometers (248 miles) across and 1.5 kilometers (0.9 mile) high. Its flanks show numerous overlapping lava flows. The dark flows on the lower right are thought to be smoother than the brighter ones near the central part of the volcano. Many of the flows appear to have been erupted along the flanks of the volcano rather than from the summit. This type of flank eruption is common on large volcanoes on Earth, such as the Hawaiian volcanoes. The summit area has two flat-topped mesas, whose smooth tops give a relatively dark appearance in the radar image. Also seen near the summit are groups of pits, some as large as one kilometer (0.6 mile) across. These are thought to have formed when underground chambers of magma were drained through other subsurface tubes and lead to a collapse at the surface. A 20 kilometer-diameter (12-mile diameter) impact crater northeast of the volcano is partially buried by the lava flows. Little was known about Atla Regio prior to Magellan. The new data, acquired in February 1991, show the region to be composed of at least five large volcanoes such as Sapas Mons, which are commonly linked by complex systems of fractures or rift zones. If comparable to similar features on Earth, Atla Regio probably formed when large volumes of molten rock upwelled from areas within the interior of Venus known as'hot spots.' Magellan is a NASA spacecraft mission to map the surface of Venus with imaging radar. The basic scientific instrument is a synthetic aperture radar, or SAR, which can look through the thick clouds perpetually shielding the surface of Venus. Magellan is in orbit around Venus which completes one turn around its axis in 243 Earth days. That period of time, one Venus day

  20. Hazard maps of Colima volcano, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suarez-Plascencia, C.; Nunez-Cornu, F. J.; Escudero Ayala, C. R.

    2011-12-01

    Colima volcano, also known as Volcan de Fuego (19° 30.696 N, 103° 37.026 W), is located on the border between the states of Jalisco and Colima and is the most active volcano in Mexico. Began its current eruptive process in February 1991, in February 10, 1999 the biggest explosion since 1913 occurred at the summit dome. The activity during the 2001-2005 period was the most intense, but did not exceed VEI 3. The activity resulted in the formation of domes and their destruction after explosive events. The explosions originated eruptive columns, reaching attitudes between 4,500 and 9,000 m.a.s.l., further pyroclastic flows reaching distances up to 3.5 km from the crater. During the explosive events ash emissions were generated in all directions reaching distances up to 100 km, slightly affected nearby villages as Tuxpan, Tonila, Zapotlán, Cuauhtemoc, Comala, Zapotitlan de Vadillo and Toliman. During the 2005 this volcano has had an intense effusive-explosive activity, similar to the one that took place during the period of 1890 through 1900. Intense pre-plinian eruption in January 20, 1913, generated little economic losses in the lower parts of the volcano due to low population density and low socio-economic activities at the time. Shows the updating of the volcanic hazard maps published in 2001, where we identify whit SPOT satellite imagery and Google Earth, change in the land use on the slope of volcano, the expansion of the agricultural frontier on the east and southeast sides of the Colima volcano, the population inhabiting the area is approximately 517,000 people, and growing at an annual rate of 4.77%, also the region that has shown an increased in the vulnerability for the development of economic activities, supported by the construction of highways, natural gas pipelines and electrical infrastructure that connect to the Port of Manzanillo to Guadalajara city. The update the hazard maps are: a) Exclusion areas and moderate hazard for explosive events

  1. Volcanoes: Coming Up from Under.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science and Children, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Provides specific information about the eruption of Mt. St. Helens in March 1980. Also discusses how volcanoes are formed and how they are monitored. Words associated with volcanoes are listed and defined. (CS)

  2. Organizational changes at Earthquakes & Volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gordon, David W.

    1992-01-01

    Primary responsibility for the preparation of Earthquakes & Volcanoes within the Geological Survey has shifted from the Office of Scientific Publications to the Office of Earthquakes, Volcanoes, and Engineering (OEVE). As a consequence of this reorganization, Henry Spall has stepepd down as Science Editor for Earthquakes & Volcanoes(E&V).

  3. Erupting Volcano Mount Etna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Expedition Five crew members aboard the International Space Station (ISS) captured this overhead look at the smoke and ash regurgitated from the erupting volcano Mt. Etna on the island of Sicily, Italy in October 2002. Triggered by a series of earthquakes on October 27, 2002, this eruption was one of Etna's most vigorous in years. This image shows the ash plume curving out toward the horizon. The lighter-colored plumes down slope and north of the summit seen in this frame are produced by forest fires set by flowing lava. At an elevation of 10,990 feet (3,350 m), the summit of the Mt. Etna volcano, one of the most active and most studied volcanoes in the world, has been active for a half-million years and has erupted hundreds of times in recorded history.

  4. Demise of reef-flat carbonate accumulation with late Holocene sea-level fall: Evidence from Molokai, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Engels, M.S.; Fletcher, C.H.; Field, M.; Conger, C.L.; Bochicchio, C.

    2008-01-01

    Twelve cores from the protected reef-flat of Molokai revealed that carbonate sediment accumulation, ranging from 3 mm year-1 to less than 1 mm year-1, ended on average 2,500 years ago. Modern sediment is present as a mobile surface veneer but is not trapped within the reef framework. This finding is consistent with the arrest of deposition at the end of the mid-Holocene highstand, known locally as the "Kapapa Stand of the Sea," ???2 m above the present datum ca. 3,500 years ago in the main Hawaiian Islands. Subsequent erosion, non-deposition, and/or a lack of rigid binding were probable factors leading to the lack of reef-flat accumulation during the late Holocene sea-level fall. Given anticipated climate changes, increased sedimentation of reef-flat environments is to be expected as a consequence of higher sea level. ?? 2008 Springer-Verlag.

  5. Quantity, composition, and source of sediment collected in sediment traps along the fringing coral reef off Molokai, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bothner, Michael H.; Reynolds, R.L.; Casso, M.A.; Storlazzi, C.D.; Field, M.E.

    2006-01-01

    Sediment traps were used to evaluate the frequency, cause, and relative intensity of sediment mobility/resuspension along the fringing coral reef off southern Molokai (February 2000–May 2002). Two storms with high rainfall, floods, and exceptionally high waves resulted in sediment collection rates > 1000 times higher than during non-storm periods, primarily because of sediment resuspension by waves. Based on quantity and composition of trapped sediment, floods recharged the reef flat with land-derived sediment, but had a low potential for burying coral on the fore reef when accompanied by high waves. The trapped sediments have low concentrations of anthropogenic metals. The magnetic properties of trapped sediment may provide information about the sources of land-derived sediment reaching the fore reef. The high trapping rate and low sediment cover indicate that coral surfaces on the fore reef are exposed to transient resuspended sediment, and that the traps do not measure net sediment accumulation on the reef surface.

  6. Helminth parasites of intermingling axis deer, wild swine and domestic cattle from the island of Molokai, Hawaii.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, M E; Davidson, W R

    1989-04-01

    Helminth infections of axis deer (Cervus axis), wild swine (Sus scrofa) and domestic cattle (Bos taurus) were studied among intermingling herds on the Puu-O-Hoku Ranch, Molokai, Hawaii. Twenty-four species of helminths were collected from the 10 deer, 10 swine and 10 cattle. Capillaria bovis, Cooperia punctata, Haemonchus contortus and Trichostrongylus axei infected both axis deer and cattle, whereas Gongylonema pulchrum infected both axis deer and wild swine. None of the species of helminths occurred in both wild swine and cattle nor was any species found in all three hosts. Wild swine and domestic cattle supported separate and distinct helminth communities. In contrast, the helminth community of axis deer appeared to be derived from the helminth communities of cattle and wild swine and consisted only of those species capable of parasitizing either a broad range of ruminants or many mammalian taxa.

  7. Hawaii's volcanoes revealed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eakins, Barry W.; Robinson, Joel E.; Kanamatsu, Toshiya; Naka, Jiro; Smith, John R.; Takahashi, Eiichi; Clague, David A.

    2003-01-01

    Hawaiian volcanoes typically evolve in four stages as volcanism waxes and wanes: (1) early alkalic, when volcanism originates on the deep sea floor; (2) shield, when roughly 95 percent of a volcano's volume is emplaced; (3) post-shield alkalic, when small-volume eruptions build scattered cones that thinly cap the shield-stage lavas; and (4) rejuvenated, when lavas of distinct chemistry erupt following a lengthy period of erosion and volcanic quiescence. During the early alkalic and shield stages, two or more elongate rift zones may develop as flanks of the volcano separate. Mantle-derived magma rises through a vertical conduit and is temporarily stored in a shallow summit reservoir from which magma may erupt within the summit region or be injected laterally into the rift zones. The ongoing activity at Kilauea's Pu?u ?O?o cone that began in January 1983 is one such rift-zone eruption. The rift zones commonly extend deep underwater, producing submarine eruptions of bulbous pillow lava. Once a volcano has grown above sea level, subaerial eruptions produce lava flows of jagged, clinkery ?a?a or smooth, ropy pahoehoe. If the flows reach the ocean they are rapidly quenched by seawater and shatter, producing a steep blanket of unstable volcanic sediment that mantles the upper submarine slopes. Above sea level then, the volcanoes develop the classic shield profile of gentle lava-flow slopes, whereas below sea level slopes are substantially steeper. While the volcanoes grow rapidly during the shield stage, they may also collapse catastrophically, generating giant landslides and tsunami, or fail more gradually, forming slumps. Deformation and seismicity along Kilauea's south flank indicate that slumping is occurring there today. Loading of the underlying Pacific Plate by the growing volcanic edifices causes subsidence, forming deep basins at the base of the volcanoes. Once volcanism wanes and lava flows no longer reach the ocean, the volcano continues to submerge, while

  8. Volcano-electromagnetic effects

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnston, Malcolm J. S.

    2007-01-01

    Volcano-electromagnetic effects—electromagnetic (EM) signals generated by volcanic activity—derive from a variety of physical processes. These include piezomagnetic effects, electrokinetic effects, fluid vaporization, thermal demagnetization/remagnetization, resistivity changes, thermochemical effects, magnetohydrodynamic effects, and blast-excited traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs). Identification of different physical processes and their interdependence is often possible with multiparameter monitoring, now common on volcanoes, since many of these processes occur with different timescales and some are simultaneously identified in other geophysical data (deformation, seismic, gas, ionospheric disturbances, etc.). EM monitoring plays an important part in understanding these processes.

  9. Volcanoes and the Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marti, Edited By Joan; Ernst, Gerald G. J.

    2005-10-01

    Volcanoes and the Environment is a comprehensive and accessible text incorporating contributions from some of the world's authorities in volcanology. This book is an indispensable guide for those interested in how volcanism affects our planet's environment. It spans a wide variety of topics from geology to climatology and ecology; it also considers the economic and social impacts of volcanic activity on humans. Topics covered include how volcanoes shape the environment, their effect on the geological cycle, atmosphere and climate, impacts on health of living on active volcanoes, volcanism and early life, effects of eruptions on plant and animal life, large eruptions and mass extinctions, and the impact of volcanic disasters on the economy. This book is intended for students and researchers interested in environmental change from the fields of earth and environmental science, geography, ecology and social science. It will also interest policy makers and professionals working on natural hazards. An all-inclusive text that goes beyond the geological working of volcanoes to consider their environmental and sociological impacts Each chapter is written by one of the world's leading authorities on the subject Accessible to students and researchers from a wide variety of backgrounds

  10. Nyamuragira Volcano Erupts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Nyamuragira volcano erupted on July 26, 2002, spewing lava high into the air along with a large plume of steam, ash, and sulfur dioxide. The 3,053-meter (10,013-foot) volcano is located in eastern Congo, very near that country's border with Rwanda. Nyamuragira is the smaller, more violent sibling of Nyiragongo volcano, which devastated the town of Goma with its massive eruption in January 2002. Nyamuragira is situated just 40 km (24 miles) northeast of Goma. This true-color image was acquired by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASA's Terra satellite, on July 28, 2002. Nyamuragira is situated roughly in the center of this scene, roughly 100 km south of Lake Edward and just north of Lake Kivu (which is mostly obscured by the haze from the erupting volcano and the numerous fires burning in the surrounding countryside). Due south of Lake Kivu is the long, narrow Lake Tanganyika running south and off the bottom center of this scene.

  11. Nyamuragira Volcano Erupts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Nyamuragira volcano erupted on July 26, 2002, spewing lava high into the air along with a large plume of steam, ash, and sulfur dioxide. The 3,053-meter (10,013-foot) volcano is located in eastern Congo, very near that country's border with Rwanda. Nyamuragira is the smaller, more violent sibling of Nyiragongo volcano, which devastated the town of Goma with its massive eruption in January 2002. Nyamuragira is situated just 40 km (24 miles) northeast of Goma. This pair of images was acquired by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASA's Terra satellite, on July 26. The image on the left shows the scene in true color. The small purple box in the upper righthand corner marks the location of Nyamuragira's hot summit. The false-color image on the right shows the plume from the volcano streaming southwestward. This image was made using MODIS' channels sensitive at wavelengths from 8.5 to 11 microns. Red pixels indicate high concentrations of sulphur dioxide. Image courtesy Liam Gumley, Space Science and Engineering Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison

  12. Geology of kilauea volcano

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, R.B.; Trusdell, F.A.

    1993-01-01

    This paper summarizes studies of the structure, stratigraphy, petrology, drill holes, eruption frequency, and volcanic and seismic hazards of Kilauea volcano. All the volcano is discussed, but the focus is on its lower cast rift zone (LERZ) because active exploration for geothermal energy is concentrated in that area. Kilauea probably has several separate hydrothermal-convection systems that develop in response to the dynamic behavior of the volcano and the influx of abundant meteoric water. Important features of some of these hydrothermal-convection systems are known through studies of surface geology and drill holes. Observations of eruptions during the past two centuries, detailed geologic mapping, radiocarbon dating, and paleomagnetic secular-variation studies indicate that Kilauea has erupted frequently from its summit and two radial rift zones during Quaternary time. Petrologic studies have established that Kilauea erupts only tholeiitic basalt. Extensive ash deposits at Kilauea's summit and on its LERZ record locally violent, but temporary, disruptions of local hydrothermal-convection systems during the interaction of water or steam with magma. Recent drill holes on the LERZ provide data on the temperatures of the hydrothermal-convection systems, intensity of dike intrusion, porosity and permeability, and an increasing amount of hydrothermal alteration with depth. The prehistoric and historic record of volcanic and seismic activity indicates that magma will continue to be supplied to deep and shallow reservoirs beneath Kilauea's summit and rift zones and that the volcano will be affected by eruptions and earthquakes for many thousands of years. ?? 1993.

  13. The Volcano Adventure Guide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, Rosaly

    2005-02-01

    This guide contains vital information for anyone wishing to visit, explore, and photograph active volcanoes safely and enjoyably. Following an introduction that discusses eruption styles of different types of volcanoes and how to prepare for an exploratory trip that avoids volcanic dangers, the book presents guidelines to visiting 42 different volcanoes around the world. It is filled with practical information that includes tour itineraries, maps, transportation details, and warnings of possible non-volcanic dangers. Three appendices direct the reader to a wealth of further volcano resources in a volume that will fascinate amateur enthusiasts and professional volcanologists alike. Rosaly Lopes is a planetary geology and volcanology specialist at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory in California. In addition to her curatorial and research work, she has lectured extensively in England and Brazil and written numerous popular science articles. She received a Latinas in Science Award from the Comision Feminil Mexicana Nacional in 1991 and since 1992, has been a co-organizer of the United Nations/European Space Agency/The Planetary Society yearly conferences on Basic Science for the Benefit of Developing Countries.

  14. Catalogue of Icelandic Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilyinskaya, Evgenia; Larsen, Gudrun; Gudmundsson, Magnus T.; Vogfjord, Kristin; Pagneux, Emmanuel; Oddsson, Bjorn; Barsotti, Sara; Karlsdottir, Sigrun

    2016-04-01

    The Catalogue of Icelandic Volcanoes is a newly developed open-access web resource in English intended to serve as an official source of information about active volcanoes in Iceland and their characteristics. The Catalogue forms a part of an integrated volcanic risk assessment project in Iceland GOSVÁ (commenced in 2012), as well as being part of the effort of FUTUREVOLC (2012-2016) on establishing an Icelandic volcano supersite. Volcanic activity in Iceland occurs on volcanic systems that usually comprise a central volcano and fissure swarm. Over 30 systems have been active during the Holocene (the time since the end of the last glaciation - approximately the last 11,500 years). In the last 50 years, over 20 eruptions have occurred in Iceland displaying very varied activity in terms of eruption styles, eruptive environments, eruptive products and the distribution lava and tephra. Although basaltic eruptions are most common, the majority of eruptions are explosive, not the least due to magma-water interaction in ice-covered volcanoes. Extensive research has taken place on Icelandic volcanism, and the results reported in numerous scientific papers and other publications. In 2010, the International Civil Aviation Organisation (ICAO) funded a 3 year project to collate the current state of knowledge and create a comprehensive catalogue readily available to decision makers, stakeholders and the general public. The work on the Catalogue began in 2011, and was then further supported by the Icelandic government and the EU through the FP7 project FUTUREVOLC. The Catalogue of Icelandic Volcanoes is a collaboration of the Icelandic Meteorological Office (the state volcano observatory), the Institute of Earth Sciences at the University of Iceland, and the Civil Protection Department of the National Commissioner of the Iceland Police, with contributions from a large number of specialists in Iceland and elsewhere. The Catalogue is built up of chapters with texts and various

  15. Comparative Study of Submarine Volcanoes and Small Venusian Volcanic Edifices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komatsu, G.; Krempasky, M. C.

    1996-03-01

    The small volcanic edifices on Venus are important because of their common occurrence on the planet's surface. They normally range 0-10 km in diameter. An extensive inventory has been compiled for more than 2000 small edifices. Based on this inventory, it is estimated that there are about half million identifiable small volcanic edifices on the planet. This work also indicates that the small volcanic edifices' size frequency distribution is very similar to that of submarine volcanoes (seamounts) distributed on the East Pacific Rise. It has been suggested that submarine volcanoes, particularly flat-topped seamounts located off the coast of Hawaii, are analogous to "pancake domes" on Venus. However the detailed geomorphic analysis of seamounts located on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge and Pacific Ocean Basin indicates that submarine volcanoes are better analogs for small volcanic edifices.

  16. Catalogue of Icelandic volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilyinskaya, Evgenia; Larsen, Gudrun; Vogfjörd, Kristin; Tumi Gudmundsson, Magnus; Jonsson, Trausti; Oddsson, Björn; Reynisson, Vidir; Barsotti, Sara; Karlsdottir, Sigrun

    2015-04-01

    Volcanic activity in Iceland occurs on volcanic systems that usually comprise a central volcano and fissure swarm. Over 30 systems have been active during the Holocene. In the last 100 years, over 30 eruptions have occurred displaying very varied activity in terms of eruption styles, eruptive environments, eruptive products and their distribution. Although basaltic eruptions are most common, the majority of eruptions are explosive, not the least due to magma-water interaction in ice-covered volcanoes. Extensive research has taken place on Icelandic volcanism, and the results reported in scientific papers and other publications. In 2010, the International Civil Aviation Organisation funded a 3 year project to collate the current state of knowledge and create a comprehensive catalogue readily available to decision makers, stakeholders and the general public. The work on the Catalogue began in 2011, and was then further supported by the Icelandic government and the EU. The Catalogue forms a part of an integrated volcanic risk assessment project in Iceland (commenced in 2012), and the EU FP7 project FUTUREVOLC (2012-2016), establishing an Icelandic volcano Supersite. The Catalogue is a collaborative effort between the Icelandic Meteorological Office (the state volcano observatory), the Institute of Earth Sciences at the University of Iceland, and the Icelandic Civil Protection, with contributions from a large number of specialists in Iceland and elsewhere. The catalogue is scheduled for opening in the first half of 2015 and once completed, it will be an official publication intended to serve as an accurate and up to date source of information about active volcanoes in Iceland and their characteristics. The Catalogue is an open web resource in English and is composed of individual chapters on each of the volcanic systems. The chapters include information on the geology and structure of the volcano; the eruption history, pattern and products; the known precursory signals

  17. The Alaska Volcano Observatory - Expanded Monitoring of Volcanoes Yields Results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brantley, Steven R.; McGimsey, Robert G.; Neal, Christina A.

    2004-01-01

    Recent explosive eruptions at some of Alaska's 52 historically active volcanoes have significantly affected air traffic over the North Pacific, as well as Alaska's oil, power, and fishing industries and local communities. Since its founding in the late 1980s, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) has installed new monitoring networks and used satellite data to track activity at Alaska's volcanoes, providing timely warnings and monitoring of frequent eruptions to the aviation industry and the general public. To minimize impacts from future eruptions, scientists at AVO continue to assess volcano hazards and to expand monitoring networks.

  18. Nyiragongo volcano, Congo, Anaglyph, SRTM / Landsat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Nyiragongo volcano in the Congo erupted on January 17, 2002, and subsequently sent streams of lava into the city of Goma on the north shore of Lake Kivu. More than 100 people were killed, more than 12,000 homes were destroyed, and hundreds of thousands were forced to flee the broader community of nearly half a million people. This stereoscopic (anaglyph) visualization combines a Landsat satellite image and an elevation model from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) to provide a view of the volcano, the city of Goma, and surrounding terrain.

    Nyiragongo is the steep volcano to the lower right of center, Lake Kivu is at the bottom, and the city of Goma is located along the northeast shore (bottom center). Nyiragongo peaks at about 3,470 meters (11,380 feet) elevation and reaches almost exactly 2,000 meters (6,560 feet) above Lake Kivu. The shorter but broader Nyamuragira volcano appears to the upper left of Nyiragongo.

    Goma, Lake Kivu, Nyiragongo, Nyamuragira and other nearby volcanoes sit within the East African Rift Valley, a zone where tectonic processes are cracking, stretching, and lowering the Earth's crust. The cliff at the top center of the image is the western edge of the rift. Volcanic activity is common in the rift, and older but geologically recent lava flows (dark in this depiction) are particularly apparent on the flanks of the Nyamuragira volcano.

    This anaglyph was produced by first shading an elevation model from data acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission and blending it with a single band of a Landsat scene. The stereoscopic effect was then created by generating two differing perspectives, one for each eye. When viewed through special glasses, the result is a vertically exaggerated view of the Earth's surface in its full three dimensions. Anaglyph glasses cover the left eye with a red filter and the right eye with a blue filter.

    The Landsat image used here was acquired on December 11, 2001, about a month before

  19. Shiveluch and Klyuchevskaya Volcanoes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    A distance of about 80 kilometers (50 miles) separates Shiveluch and Klyuchevskaya Volcanoes on Russia's Kamchatka Peninsula. Despite this distance, however, the two acted in unison on April 26, 2007, when the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite caught them both erupting simultaneously. ASTER 'sees' a slightly different portion of the light spectrum than human eyes. Besides a portion of visible light, ASTER detects thermal energy, meaning it can detect volcanic activity invisible to human eyes. Inset in each image above is a thermal infrared picture of the volcano's summit. In these insets, dark red shows where temperatures are coolest, and yellowish-white shows where temperatures are hottest, heated by molten lava. Both insets show activity at the crater. In the case of Klyuchevskaya, some activity at the crater is also visible in the larger image. In the larger images, the landscapes around the volcanoes appear in varying shades of blue-gray. Dark areas on the snow surface are likely stains left over from previous eruptions of volcanic ash. Overhead, clouds dot the sky, casting their shadows on the snow, especially southeast of Shiveluch and northeast of Klyuchevskaya. To the northwest of Klyuchevskaya is a large bank of clouds, appearing as a brighter white than the snow surface. Shiveluch (sometimes spelled Sheveluch) and Klyuchevskaya (sometimes spelled Klyuchevskoy or Kliuchevskoi) are both stratovolcanoes composed of alternating layers of hardened lava, solidified ash, and rocks from earlier eruptions. Both volcanoes rank among Kamchatka's most active. Because Kamchatka is part of the Pacific 'Ring of Fire,' the peninsula experiences regular seismic activity as the Pacific Plate slides below other tectonic plates in the Earth's crust. Large-scale plate tectonic activity causing simultaneous volcanic eruptions in Kamchatka is not uncommon.

  20. 4D volcano gravimetry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Battaglia, Maurizio; Gottsmann, J.; Carbone, D.; Fernandez, J.

    2008-01-01

    Time-dependent gravimetric measurements can detect subsurface processes long before magma flow leads to earthquakes or other eruption precursors. The ability of gravity measurements to detect subsurface mass flow is greatly enhanced if gravity measurements are analyzed and modeled with ground-deformation data. Obtaining the maximum information from microgravity studies requires careful evaluation of the layout of network benchmarks, the gravity environmental signal, and the coupling between gravity changes and crustal deformation. When changes in the system under study are fast (hours to weeks), as in hydrothermal systems and restless volcanoes, continuous gravity observations at selected sites can help to capture many details of the dynamics of the intrusive sources. Despite the instrumental effects, mainly caused by atmospheric temperature, results from monitoring at Mt. Etna volcano show that continuous measurements are a powerful tool for monitoring and studying volcanoes.Several analytical and numerical mathematical models can beused to fit gravity and deformation data. Analytical models offer a closed-form description of the volcanic source. In principle, this allows one to readily infer the relative importance of the source parameters. In active volcanic sites such as Long Valley caldera (California, U.S.A.) and Campi Flegrei (Italy), careful use of analytical models and high-quality data sets has produced good results. However, the simplifications that make analytical models tractable might result in misleading volcanological inter-pretations, particularly when the real crust surrounding the source is far from the homogeneous/ isotropic assumption. Using numerical models allows consideration of more realistic descriptions of the sources and of the crust where they are located (e.g., vertical and lateral mechanical discontinuities, complex source geometries, and topography). Applications at Teide volcano (Tenerife) and Campi Flegrei demonstrate the

  1. Volcanoes and climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toon, O. B.

    1982-01-01

    The evidence that volcanic eruptions affect climate is reviewed. Single explosive volcanic eruptions cool the surface by about 0.3 C and warm the stratosphere by several degrees. Although these changes are of small magnitude, there have been several years in which these hemispheric average temperature changes were accompanied by severely abnormal weather. An example is 1816, the "year without summer" which followed the 1815 eruption of Tambora. In addition to statistical correlations between volcanoes and climate, a good theoretical understanding exists. The magnitude of the climatic changes anticipated following volcanic explosions agrees well with the observations. Volcanoes affect climate because volcanic particles in the atmosphere upset the balance between solar energy absorbed by the Earth and infrared energy emitted by the Earth. These interactions can be observed. The most important ejecta from volcanoes is not volcanic ash but sulfur dioxide which converts into sulfuric acid droplets in the stratosphere. For an eruption with its explosive magnitude, Mount St. Helens injected surprisingly little sulfur into the stratosphere. The amount of sulfuric acid formed is much smaller than that observed following significant eruptions and is too small to create major climatic shifts. However, the Mount St. Helens eruption has provided an opportunity to measure many properties of volcanic debris not previously measured and has therefore been of significant value in improving our knowledge of the relations between volcanic activity and climate.

  2. Volcanoes generate devastating waves

    SciTech Connect

    Lockridge, P. )

    1988-01-01

    Although volcanic eruptions can cause many frightening phenomena, it is often the power of the sea that causes many volcano-related deaths. This destruction comes from tsunamis (huge volcano-generated waves). Roughly one-fourth of the deaths occurring during volcanic eruptions have been the result of tsunamis. Moreover, a tsunami can transmit the volcano's energy to areas well outside the reach of the eruption itself. Some historic records are reviewed. Refined historical data are increasingly useful in predicting future events. The U.S. National Geophysical Data Center/World Data Center A for Solid Earth Geophysics has developed data bases to further tsunami research. These sets of data include marigrams (tide gage records), a wave-damage slide set, digital source data, descriptive material, and a tsunami wall map. A digital file contains information on methods of tsunami generation, location, and magnitude of generating earthquakes, tsunami size, event validity, and references. The data can be used to describe areas mot likely to generate tsunamis and the locations along shores that experience amplified effects from tsunamis.

  3. Sulfur volcanoes on Io?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, R.; Fink, J. H.

    1984-01-01

    The unusual rheological properties of sulfur are discussed in order to determine the distinctive volcanic flow morphologies which indicate the presence of sulfur volcanoes on the Saturnian satellite Io. An analysis of high resolution Voyager imagery reveals three features which are considered to be possible sulfur volcanoes: Atar Patera, Daedalus Patera, and Kibero Patera. All three features are distinguished by circular-to-oval central masses surrounded by irregular widespread flows. The central zones of the features are interpreted to be domes formed of high temperature sulfur. To confirm the interpretations of the satellite data, molten sulfur was extruded in the laboratory at a temperature of 210 C on a flat surface sloping 0.5 deg to the left. At this temperature, the sulfur formed a viscous domelike mass over the event. As parts of the mass cooled to 170 C the viscosity decreased to a runny stage, forming breakout flows. It is concluded that a case can be made for sulfur volcanoes on Io sufficient to warrant further study, and it is recommended that the upcoming Galileo mission examine these phenomena.

  4. The diversity of mud volcanoes in the landscape of Azerbaijan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashidov, Tofig

    2014-05-01

    As the natural phenomenon the mud volcanism (mud volcanoes) of Azerbaijan are known from the ancient times. The historical records describing them are since V century. More detail study of this natural phenomenon had started in the second half of XIX century. The term "mud volcano" (or "mud hill") had been given by academician H.W. Abich (1863), more exactly defining this natural phenomenon. All the previous definitions did not give such clear and capacious explanation of it. In comparison with magmatic volcanoes, globally the mud ones are restricted in distribution; they mainly locate within the Alpine-Himalayan, Pacific and Central Asian mobile belts, in more than 30 countries (Columbia, Trinidad Island, Italy, Romania, Ukraine, Georgia, Azerbaijan, Turkmenistan, Iran, Pakistan, Indonesia, Burma, Malaysia, etc.). Besides it, the zones of mud volcanoes development are corresponded to zones of marine accretionary prisms' development. For example, the South-Caspian depression, Barbados Island, Cascadia (N.America), Costa-Rica, Panama, Japan trench. Onshore it is Indonesia, Japan, and Trinidad, Taiwan. The mud volcanism with non-accretionary conditions includes the areas of Black Sea, Alboran Sea, the Gulf of Mexico (Louisiana coast), Salton Sea. But new investigations reveal more new mud volcanoes and in places which were not considered earlier as the traditional places of mud volcanoes development (e.g. West Nile Rive delta). Azerbaijan is the classic region of mud volcanoes development. From over 800 world mud volcanoes there are about 400 onshore and within the South-Caspian basin, which includes the territory of East Azerbaijan (the regions of Shemakha-Gobustan and Low-Kura River, Absheron peninsula), adjacent water area of South Caspian (Baku and Absheron archipelagoes) and SW Turkmenistan and represents an area of great downwarping with thick (over 25 km) sedimentary series. Generally, in the modern relief the mud volcanoes represent more or less large uplifts

  5. CO32- concentration and pCO2 thresholds for calcification and dissolution on the Molokai reef flat, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yates, K.K.; Halley, R.B.

    2006-01-01

    The severity of the impact of elevated atmospheric pCO2 to coral reef ecosystems depends, in part, on how sea-water pCO2 affects the balance between calcification and dissolution of carbonate sediments. Presently, there are insufficient published data that relate concentrations of pCO 2 and CO32- to in situ rates of reef calcification in natural settings to accurately predict the impact of elevated atmospheric pCO2 on calcification and dissolution processes. Rates of net calcification and dissolution, CO32- concentrations, and pCO2 were measured, in situ, on patch reefs, bare sand, and coral rubble on the Molokai reef flat in Hawaii. Rates of calcification ranged from 0.03 to 2.30 mmol CaCO3 m-2 h-1 and dissolution ranged from -0.05 to -3.3 mmol CaCO3 m-2 h-1. Calcification and dissolution varied diurnally with net calcification primarily occurring during the day and net dissolution occurring at night. These data were used to calculate threshold values for pCO2 and CO32- at which rates of calcification and dissolution are equivalent. Results indicate that calcification and dissolution are linearly correlated with both CO32- and pCO2. Threshold pCO2 and CO32- values for individual substrate types showed considerable variation. The average pCO2 threshold value for all substrate types was 654??195 ??atm and ranged from 467 to 1003 ??atm. The average CO32- threshold value was 152??24 ??mol kg-1, ranging from 113 to 184 ??mol kg-1. Ambient seawater measurements of pCO2 and CO32- indicate that CO32- and pCO2 threshold values for all substrate types were both exceeded, simultaneously, 13% of the time at present day atmospheric pCO2 concentrations. It is predicted that atmospheric pCO2 will exceed the average pCO2 threshold value for calcification and dissolution on the Molokai reef flat by the year 2100.

  6. Database for the Geologic Map of the Summit Region of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dutton, Dillon R.; Ramsey, David W.; Bruggman, Peggy E.; Felger, Tracey J.; Lougee, Ellen; Margriter, Sandy; Showalter, Patrick; Neal, Christina A.; Lockwood, John P.

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The area covered by this map includes parts of four U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) 7.5' topographic quadrangles (Kilauea Crater, Volcano, Ka`u Desert, and Makaopuhi). It encompasses the summit, upper rift zones, and Koa`e Fault System of Kilauea Volcano and a part of the adjacent, southeast flank of Mauna Loa Volcano. The map is dominated by products of eruptions from Kilauea Volcano, the southernmost of the five volcanoes on the Island of Hawai`i and one of the world's most active volcanoes. At its summit (1,243 m) is Kilauea Crater, a 3 km-by-5 km collapse caldera that formed, possibly over several centuries, between about 200 and 500 years ago. Radiating away from the summit caldera are two linear zones of intrusion and eruption, the east and the southwest rift zones. Repeated subaerial eruptions from the summit and rift zones have built a gently sloping, elongate shield volcano covering approximately 1,500 km2. Much of the volcano lies under water: the east rift zone extends 110 km from the summit to a depth of more than 5,000 m below sea level; whereas, the southwest rift zone has a more limited submarine continuation. South of the summit caldera, mostly north-facing normal faults and open fractures of the Koa`e Fault System extend between the two rift zones. The Koa`e Fault System is interpreted as a tear-away structure that accommodates southward movement of Kilauea's flank in response to distension of the volcano perpendicular to the rift zones. This digital release contains all the information used to produce the geologic map published as USGS Geologic Investigations Series I-2759 (Neal and Lockwood, 2003). The main component of this digital release is a geologic map database prepared using ArcInfo GIS. This release also contains printable files for the geologic map and accompanying descriptive pamphlet from I-2759.

  7. Digital Data for Volcano Hazards at Newberry Volcano, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schilling, S.P.; Doelger, S.; Sherrod, D.R.; Mastin, L.G.; Scott, W.E.

    2008-01-01

    Newberry volcano is a broad shield volcano located in central Oregon, the product of thousands of eruptions, beginning about 600,000 years ago. At least 25 vents on the flanks and summit have been active during the past 10,000 years. The most recent eruption 1,300 years ago produced the Big Obsidian Flow. Thus, the volcano's long history and recent activity indicate that Newberry will erupt in the future. Newberry Crater, a volcanic depression or caldera has been the focus of Newberry's volcanic activity for at least the past 10,000 years. Newberry National Volcanic Monument, which is managed by the U.S. Forest Service, includes the caldera and extends to the Deschutes River. Newberry volcano is quiet. Local earthquake activity (seismicity) has been trifling throughout historic time. Subterranean heat is still present, as indicated by hot springs in the caldera and high temperatures encountered during exploratory drilling for geothermal energy. The report USGS Open-File Report 97-513 (Sherrod and others, 1997) describes the kinds of hazardous geologic events that might occur in the future at Newberry volcano. A hazard-zonation map is included to show the areas that will most likely be affected by renewed eruptions. When Newberry volcano becomes restless, the eruptive scenarios described herein can inform planners, emergency response personnel, and citizens about the kinds and sizes of events to expect. The geographic information system (GIS) volcano hazard data layers used to produce the Newberry volcano hazard map in USGS Open-File Report 97-513 are included in this data set. Scientists at the USGS Cascades Volcano Observatory created a GIS data layer to depict zones subject to the effects of an explosive pyroclastic eruption (tephra fallout, pyroclastic flows, and ballistics), lava flows, volcanic gasses, and lahars/floods in Paulina Creek. A separate GIS data layer depicts drill holes on the flanks of Newberry Volcano that were used to estimate the probability

  8. Geochemical fingerprint of the primary magma composition in the marine tephras originated from the Baegdusan and Ulleung volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Chungwan; Kim, Seonyoung; Lee, Changyeol

    2014-12-01

    The intraplate Baegdusan (Changbai) and Ulleung volcanoes located on the border of China, North Korea, and East/Japan Sea, respectively, have been explained by appeals to both hotspots and asthenospheric mantle upwelling (wet plume) caused by the stagnant Pacific plate. To understand the origin of the Baegdusan and Ulleung volcanism, we performed geochemical analyses on the tephra deposits in the East/Japan Sea basins originating from the Baegdusan and Ulleung volcanoes. The volcanic glass in the tephra from the Baegdusan and Ulleung volcanoes ranged from alkaline trachyte to peralkaline rhyolite and from phonolite to trachyte, respectively. The tephra from the two intraplate volcanoes showed highly enriched incompatible elements, such as Tb, Nb, Hf, and Ta, distinct from those of the ordinary arc volcanoes of the Japanese islands. The straddle distribution of the Th/Yb and Ta/Yb ratios of the tephra deposits from the Baegdusan volcano may originate from the alkali basaltic magma resulting from mixing between the wet plume from the stagnant Pacific plate in the transition zone and the overlying shallow asthenospheric mantle. In contrast, the deposits from the Ulleung volcano show a minor contribution of the stagnant slab to the basaltic magma, implying either partial melting of a more enriched mantle, smaller degrees of partial melting of a garnet-bearing mantle source, or a combination of both processes as the magma genesis. Our study indicated that the Baegdusan and Ulleung volcanoes have different magma sources and evolutionary histories.

  9. The lifecycle of caldera-forming volcanoes in the Main Ethiopian Rift: insights from Aluto volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mather, T. A.; Hutchison, W.; Yirgu, G.; Biggs, J.; Cohen, B. E.; Barfod, D. N.; Lewi, E.; Pyle, D. M.

    2015-12-01

    The silicic peralkaline volcanoes of the East African Rift are some of the least studied and yet potentially most dangerous volcanoes in the world. We present the first detailed account of the eruptive history of Aluto, a restless silicic volcano located in the Main Ethiopian Rift, using new constraints from fieldwork, remote sensing, 40Ar/39Ar geochronology and geochemistry. Prior to the growth of the Aluto volcanic complex (before 500 ka) the region was characterized by a significant period of fault development and mafic fissure eruptions. The earliest volcanism at Aluto built up a trachytic complex over 8 km in diameter. Aluto then underwent large-volume ignimbrite eruptions at ca. 300 ka developing a ~42 km2 collapse structure. After a hiatus of ~250 kyr, a phase of post-caldera volcanism began. Since ca. 60 ka, highly-evolved peralkaline rhyolite lavas, ignimbrites and pumice fall deposits have erupted from vents across the complex. The age of the youngest volcanism is not well known. Geochemical modelling is consistent with rhyolite genesis from protracted fractionation (>80 %) of typical 'rift basalt'. Based on the field stratigraphy and the number, style and volume of recent eruptions we suggest that silicic eruptions occur at an average rate of 1 per 1000 years, and that future eruptions of Aluto will involve explosive emplacement of localised pumice cones and effusive obsidian coulees of volumes between 1-100 × 106 m3. Comparisons with other caldera volcanoes in this section of the rift suggest that there may be parallels between Aluto's behaviour and that of other volcanic centres, both in terms of the volcanic 'lifecycle', and broad timings of caldera collapse events.

  10. Digital Geologic Map Database of Medicine Lake Volcano, Northern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsey, D. W.; Donnelly-Nolan, J. M.; Felger, T. J.

    2010-12-01

    Medicine Lake volcano, located in the southern Cascades ~55 km east-northeast of Mount Shasta, is a large rear-arc, shield-shaped volcano with an eruptive history spanning nearly 500 k.y. Geologic mapping of Medicine Lake volcano has been digitally compiled as a spatial database in ArcGIS. Within the database, coverage feature classes have been created representing geologic lines (contacts, faults, lava tubes, etc.), geologic unit polygons, and volcanic vent location points. The database can be queried to determine the spatial distributions of different rock types, geologic units, and other geologic and geomorphic features. These data, in turn, can be used to better understand the evolution, growth, and potential hazards of this large, rear-arc Cascades volcano. Queries of the database reveal that the total area covered by lavas of Medicine Lake volcano, which range in composition from basalt through rhyolite, is about 2,200 km2, encompassing all or parts of 27 U.S. Geological Survey 1:24,000-scale topographic quadrangles. The maximum extent of these lavas is about 80 km north-south by 45 km east-west. Occupying the center of Medicine Lake volcano is a 7 km by 12 km summit caldera in which nestles its namesake, Medicine Lake. The flanks of the volcano, which are dotted with cinder cones, slope gently upward to the caldera rim, which reaches an elevation of nearly 2,440 m. Approximately 250 geologic units have been mapped, only half a dozen of which are thin surficial units such as alluvium. These volcanic units mostly represent eruptive events, each commonly including a vent (dome, cinder cone, spatter cone, etc.) and its associated lava flow. Some cinder cones have not been matched to lava flows, as the corresponding flows are probably buried, and some flows cannot be correlated with vents. The largest individual units on the map are all basaltic in composition, including the late Pleistocene basalt of Yellowjacket Butte (296 km2 exposed), the largest unit on the

  11. Copahue volcano and its regional magmatic setting

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Varekamp, J C; Zareski, J E; Camfield, L M; Todd, Erin

    2016-01-01

    Copahue volcano (Province of Neuquen, Argentina) has produced lavas and strombolian deposits over several 100,000s of years, building a rounded volcano with a 3 km elevation. The products are mainly basaltic andesites, with the 2000–2012 eruptive products the most mafic. The geochemistry of Copahue products is compared with those of the main Andes arc (Llaima, Callaqui, Tolhuaca), the older Caviahue volcano directly east of Copahue, and the back arc volcanics of the Loncopue graben. The Caviahue rocks resemble the main Andes arc suite, whereas the Copahue rocks are characterized by lower Fe and Ti contents and higher incompatible element concentrations. The rocks have negative Nb-Ta anomalies, modest enrichments in radiogenic Sr and Pb isotope ratios and slightly depleted Nd isotope ratios. The combined trace element and isotopic data indicate that Copahue magmas formed in a relatively dry mantle environment, with melting of a subducted sediment residue. The back arc basalts show a wide variation in isotopic composition, have similar water contents as the Copahue magmas and show evidence for a subducted sedimentary component in their source regions. The low 206Pb/204Pb of some backarc lava flows suggests the presence of a second endmember with an EM1 flavor in its source. The overall magma genesis is explained within the context of a subducted slab with sediment that gradually looses water, water-mobile elements, and then switches to sediment melt extracts deeper down in the subduction zone. With the change in element extraction mechanism with depth comes a depletion and fractionation of the subducted complex that is reflected in the isotope and trace element signatures of the products from the main arc to Copahue to the back arc basalts.

  12. Ruiz Volcano: Preliminary report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz Volcano, Colombia (4.88°N, 75.32°W). All times are local (= GMT -5 hours).An explosive eruption on November 13, 1985, melted ice and snow in the summit area, generating lahars that flowed tens of kilometers down flank river valleys, killing more than 20,000 people. This is history's fourth largest single-eruption death toll, behind only Tambora in 1815 (92,000), Krakatau in 1883 (36,000), and Mount Pelée in May 1902 (28,000). The following briefly summarizes the very preliminary and inevitably conflicting information that had been received by press time.

  13. Volcanoes of the Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frankel, Charles

    1996-09-01

    Nothing can be more breathtaking than the spectacle of a volcano erupting. Space-age lunar and planetary missions offer us an unprecedented perspective on volcanism. Starting with the Earth, Volcanoes of the Solar System takes the reader on a guided tour of the terrestrial planets and moons and their volcanic features. We see lunar lava fields through the eyes of the Apollo astronauts, and take an imaginary hike up the Martian slopes of Olympus Mons--the tallest volcano in the solar system. Complemented by over 150 photographs, this comprehensive and lucid account of volcanoes describes the most recent data on the unique and varied volcanic features of Venus and updates our knowledge on the prodigiously active volcanoes of Io. A member of the Association of European Volcanologists, Charles Frankel has directed documentary films on geology, astronomy and space exploration and has authored a number of articles on the earth sciences.

  14. Preliminary volcano-hazard assessment for Iliamna Volcano, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waythomas, Christopher F.; Miller, Thomas P.

    1999-01-01

    Iliamna Volcano is a 3,053-meter-high, ice- and snow-covered stratovolcano in the southwestern Cook Inlet region about 225 kilometers southwest of Anchorage and about 100 kilometers northwest of Homer. Historical eruptions of Iliamna Volcano have not been positively documented; however, the volcano regularly emits steam and gas, and small, shallow earthquakes are often detected beneath the summit area. The most recent eruptions of the volcano occurred about 300 years ago, and possibly as recently as 90-140 years ago. Prehistoric eruptions have generated plumes of volcanic ash, pyroclastic flows, and lahars that extended to the volcano flanks and beyond. Rock avalanches from the summit area have occurred numerous times in the past. These avalanches flowed several kilometers down the flanks and at least two large avalanches transformed to cohesive lahars. The number and distribution of known volcanic ash deposits from Iliamna Volcano indicate that volcanic ash clouds from prehistoric eruptions were significantly less voluminous and probably less common relative to ash clouds generated by eruptions of other Cook Inlet volcanoes. Plumes of volcanic ash from Iliamna Volcano would be a major hazard to jet aircraft using Anchorage International Airport and other local airports, and depending on wind direction, could drift at least as far as the Kenai Peninsula and beyond. Ashfall from future eruptions could disrupt oil and gas operations and shipping activities in Cook Inlet. Because Iliamna Volcano has not erupted for several hundred years, a future eruption could involve significant amounts of ice and snow that could lead to the formation of large lahars and downstream flooding. The greatest hazards in order of importance are described below and shown on plate 1.

  15. Monitoring Mount Baker Volcano

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Malone, S.D.; Frank, D.

    1976-01-01

    Hisotrically active volcanoes in the conterminous United States are restricted to the Cascade Range and extend to the Cascade Range and extend from Mount Baker near the Canadian border to Lassen Peak in northern California. Since 1800 A.D, most eruptive activity has been on a relatively small scale and has not caused loss of life or significant property damage. However, future  volcanism predictably will have more serious effects because of greatly increased use of land near volcanoes during the present century. (See "Appraising Volcanic Hazards of the Cascade Range of the Northwestern United States," Earthquake Inf. Bull., Sept.-Oct. 1974.) The recognition an impending eruption is highly important in order to minimize the potential hazard to people and property. Thus, a substantial increase in hydrothermal activity at Mount Baker in March 1975 ( see "Mount Baker Heating Up," July-Aug. 1975 issue) was regarded as a possible first signal that an eruption might occur, and an intensive monitoring program was undertaken. 

  16. Sulfur Volcanoes on Io?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, R.; Fink, J.

    1985-01-01

    The unusual rheological properties of molten sulfur, in which viscosity decreases approximately four orders of magnitude as it cools from 170 to 120 C, may result in distinctive volcanic flow morphologies that allow sulfur flows and volcanoes to be identified on Io. Search of high resolution Voyager images reveals three features--Atar Patera, Daedalus Patera, and Kibero Patera--considered to be possible sulfur volcanoes based on their morphology. All three average 250 km in diameter and are distinguished by circular-to-oval central masses surrounded by irregular, widespread flows. Geometric relations indicate that the flows were emplaced after the central zone and appear to have emanated from their margins. The central zones are interpreted to be domes representing the high temperature stage of sulfur formed initially upon eruption. Rapid quenching formed a crust which preserved this phase of the emplacement. Upon cooling to 170 C, the sulfur reached a low viscosity runny stage and was released as the thin, widespread flows.

  17. Optimizing remote sensing and GIS tools for mapping and managing the distribution of an invasive mangrove (Rhizophora mangle) on South Molokai, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    D'Iorio, M.; Jupiter, S.D.; Cochran, S.A.; Potts, D.C.

    2007-01-01

    In 1902, the Florida red mangrove, Rhizophora mangle L., was introduced to the island of Molokai, Hawaii, and has since colonized nearly 25% of the south coast shoreline. By classifying three kinds of remote sensing imagery, we compared abilities to detect invasive mangrove distributions and to discriminate mangroves from surrounding terrestrial vegetation. Using three analytical techniques, we compared mangrove mapping accuracy for various sensor-technique combinations. ANOVA of accuracy assessments demonstrated significant differences among techniques, but no significant differences among the three sensors. We summarize advantages and disadvantages of each sensor and technique for mapping mangrove distributions in tropical coastal environments.

  18. Flood-Frequency Estimates for Streams on Kaua`i, O`ahu, Moloka`i, Maui, and Hawai`i, State of Hawai`i

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oki, Delwyn S.; Rosa, Sarah N.; Yeung, Chiu W.

    2010-01-01

    This study provides an updated analysis of the magnitude and frequency of peak stream discharges in Hawai`i. Annual peak-discharge data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey during and before water year 2008 (ending September 30, 2008) at stream-gaging stations were analyzed. The existing generalized-skew value for the State of Hawai`i was retained, although three methods were used to evaluate whether an update was needed. Regional regression equations were developed for peak discharges with 2-, 5-, 10-, 25-, 50-, 100-, and 500-year recurrence intervals for unregulated streams (those for which peak discharges are not affected to a large extent by upstream reservoirs, dams, diversions, or other structures) in areas with less than 20 percent combined medium- and high-intensity development on Kaua`i, O`ahu, Moloka`i, Maui, and Hawai`i. The generalized-least-squares (GLS) regression equations relate peak stream discharge to quantified basin characteristics (for example, drainage-basin area and mean annual rainfall) that were determined using geographic information system (GIS) methods. Each of the islands of Kaua`i,O`ahu, Moloka`i, Maui, and Hawai`i was divided into two regions, generally corresponding to a wet region and a dry region. Unique peak-discharge regression equations were developed for each region. The regression equations developed for this study have standard errors of prediction ranging from 16 to 620 percent. Standard errors of prediction are greatest for regression equations developed for leeward Moloka`i and southern Hawai`i. In general, estimated 100-year peak discharges from this study are lower than those from previous studies, which may reflect the longer periods of record used in this study. Each regression equation is valid within the range of values of the explanatory variables used to develop the equation. The regression equations were developed using peak-discharge data from streams that are mainly unregulated, and they should not be used to

  19. Preliminary volcano-hazard assessment for Kanaga Volcano, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waythomas, Christopher F.; Miller, Thomas P.; Nye, Christopher J.

    2002-01-01

    Kanaga Volcano is a steep-sided, symmetrical, cone-shaped, 1307 meter high, andesitic stratovolcano on the north end of Kanaga Island (51°55’ N latitude, 177°10’ W longitude) in the western Aleutian Islands of Alaska. Kanaga Island is an elongated, low-relief (except for the volcano) island, located about 35 kilometers west of the community of Adak on Adak Island and is part of the Andreanof Islands Group of islands. Kanaga Volcano is one of the 41 historically active volcanoes in Alaska and has erupted numerous times in the past 11,000 years, including at least 10 eruptions in the past 250 years (Miller and others, 1998). The most recent eruption occurred in 1993-95 and caused minor ash fall on Adak Island and produced blocky aa lava flows that reached the sea on the northwest and west sides of the volcano (Neal and others, 1995). The summit of the volcano is characterized by a small, circular crater about 200 meters in diameter and 50-70 meters deep. Several active fumaroles are present in the crater and around the crater rim. The flanking slopes of the volcano are steep (20-30 degrees) and consist mainly of blocky, linear to spoonshaped lava flows that formed during eruptions of late Holocene age (about the past 3,000 years). The modern cone sits within a circular caldera structure that formed by large-scale collapse of a preexisting volcano. Evidence for eruptions of this preexisting volcano mainly consists of lava flows exposed along Kanaton Ridge, indicating that this former volcanic center was predominantly effusive in character. In winter (October-April), Kanaga Volcano may be covered by substantial amounts of snow that would be a source of water for lahars (volcanic mudflows). In summer, much of the snowpack melts, leaving only a patchy distribution of snow on the volcano. Glacier ice is not present on the volcano or on other parts of Kanaga Island. Kanaga Island is uninhabited and is part of the Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge, managed by

  20. Migration of a Caldera Eruptive Center, Newberry Volcano, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frone, Z.; Waibel, A.; Blackwell, D. D.

    2012-12-01

    Newberry Volcano is located in Deschutes County, Oregon about 35 km south of the city of Bend. It is a bi-modal Quaternary volcano and is one of the largest volcanos in the Cascade Range. The volcano is positioned near the junction of three geologic provinces: the Cascade Range to the west, the High Lava Plains portion of the Basin and Range to the south and east, and the Blue Mountains to the northeast. Newberry Volcano has been active for the past 600,000 years and has had at least two caldera-forming eruptions. The most recent major caldera-related eruptions, resulting in significant silicic ash and pyroclastic deposits, occurred approximately 300,000 and 80,000 years ago. A large-volume basaltic eruption that occurred about 72,000 years ago is represented by the widespread Bend Lavas which extend approximately 70 km to the north of the central caldera. About 6,000 years ago numerous basaltic eruptions occurred along a northwest fracture zone. The most recent eruption, a silicic obsidian flow and associated pumice fall that vented from within the caldera, has been dated at 1,300 ybp. Newberry has been the site of multiple rounds of geothermal exploration over the past 30 years. Geophysical data including gravity, resistivity, and seismic studies collected in the 1980s in early exploration of the volcano have identified anomalous features beneath the west flank of the volcano. Four deep (<2.8km) wells have been drilled on the northern half of the west flank; all of the wells have encountered temperatures in excess of 300°C, however, three of the wells have low permeability and unconnected fractures. The fourth well showed evidence of a hydrothermal system, but the well caved before a flow test could be completed. Recent geophysical analysis coupled with well geochemistry has identified evidence for older nested caldera related eruptive events buried under younger west flank lavas. A strong gravity gradient, a sharp MT boundary, and arcuate surface features from

  1. Newberry Volcano, Oregon: No traveling hot spot is needed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly-Nolan, J. M.

    2009-12-01

    Newberry Volcano (NV) has been interpreted as forming the end of the traveling “Newberry Hot Spot” responsible for producing progressively younger rhyolites as it passed westward under the High Lava Plains (HLP). However, Newberry rhyolites are unlike those to the east in the HLP. HLP rhyolites are characterized by high silica (>74%) and high FeO (Ford et al., 2009 GSA abs.). None of the Holocene Newberry rhyolites and only a few of its older rhyolites have such high silica contents. The NV rhyolites have low FeO contents comparable to those of rhyolites to the west near the Cascades axis. NV is situated at the western edge of the HLP (a subprovince of the Basin & Range) east of the Cascades arc axis, its broad shield shape in striking contrast to typical Cascades stratocones. Isotopic and petrologic evidence (Graham et al., JVGR 2009; Carlson et al., 2008 Goldschmidt abs.; Grove et al, 2009 GSA abs.) indicate that Newberry lava compositions are unlike HLP lavas, and instead include a strong input of subduction fluid. The shape, size, and rear-arc position of NV are like those of Medicine Lake volcano (MLV) east of Mount Shasta in northern California, also often misinterpreted as a Basin & Range volcano. Newberry is even larger than the 2000 km2 MLV. In fewer than half a million years, NV has built a km-high edifice, suffered at least 3 caldera collapses, and its lavas have covered approximately 3000 km2, making it the largest of any Cascade volcano. At both NV and MLV, the central caldera is situated over the intersection of major tectonic trends. The widespread distribution of vents and their dominant NE to NW trends at both volcanoes attest to tectonic control of eruptive pathways and to broad magmatic foci. Fluids are required to generate the calcalkaline basalts present at both volcanoes (especially NV) in addition to tholeiitic basalts. Hydrous arc magmatic inputs also play a key role at both NV and MLV in generation of significant volumes of rhyolite and

  2. Mount Rainier active cascade volcano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Mount Rainier is one of about two dozen active or recently active volcanoes in the Cascade Range, an arc of volcanoes in the northwestern United States and Canada. The volcano is located about 35 kilometers southeast of the Seattle-Tacoma metropolitan area, which has a population of more than 2.5 million. This metropolitan area is the high technology industrial center of the Pacific Northwest and one of the commercial aircraft manufacturing centers of the United States. The rivers draining the volcano empty into Puget Sound, which has two major shipping ports, and into the Columbia River, a major shipping lane and home to approximately a million people in southwestern Washington and northwestern Oregon. Mount Rainier is an active volcano. It last erupted approximately 150 years ago, and numerous large floods and debris flows have been generated on its slopes during this century. More than 100,000 people live on the extensive mudflow deposits that have filled the rivers and valleys draining the volcano during the past 10,000 years. A major volcanic eruption or debris flow could kill thousands of residents and cripple the economy of the Pacific Northwest. Despite the potential for such danger, Mount Rainier has received little study. Most of the geologic work on Mount Rainier was done more than two decades ago. Fundamental topics such as the development, history, and stability of the volcano are poorly understood.

  3. Eruptive viscosity and volcano morphology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Posin, Seth B.; Greeley, Ronald

    1988-01-01

    Terrestrial central volcanoes formed predominantly from lava flows were classified as shields, stratovolcanoes, and domes. Shield volcanoes tend to be large in areal extent, have convex slopes, and are characterized by their resemblance to inverted hellenic war shields. Stratovolcanoes have concave slopes, whereas domes are smaller and have gentle convex slopes near the vent that increase near the perimeter. In addition to these differences in morphology, several other variations were observed. The most important is composition: shield volcanoes tend to be basaltic, stratovolcanoes tend to be andesitic, and domes tend to be dacitic. However, important exceptions include Fuji, Pico, Mayon, Izalco, and Fuego which have stratovolcano morphologies but are composed of basaltic lavas. Similarly, Ribkwo is a Kenyan shield volcano composed of trachyte and Suswa and Kilombe are shields composed of phonolite. These exceptions indicate that eruptive conditions, rather than composition, may be the primary factors that determine volcano morphology. The objective of this study is to determine the relationships, if any, between eruptive conditions (viscosity, erupted volume, and effusion rate) and effusive volcano morphology. Moreover, it is the goal of this study to incorporate these relationships into a model to predict the eruptive conditions of extraterrestrial (Martian) volcanoes based on their morphology.

  4. Explosive Eruptions of Kamchatkan Volcanoes in 2012 and Danger to Aviation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girina, Olga; Manevich, Alexander; Melnikov, Dmitry; Nuzhdaev, Anton; Demyanchuk, Yury; Petrova, Elena

    2013-04-01

    Strong explosive eruption of volcanoes is the most dangerous for aircraft because in a few hours or days in the atmosphere and the stratosphere can produce about several cubic kilometers of volcanic ash and aerosols. Ash plumes and the clouds, depending on the power of the eruption, the strength and wind speed, can travel thousands of kilometers from the volcano for several days, remaining hazardous to aircraft, as the melting temperature of small particles of ash below the operating temperature of jet engines. There are 30 active volcanoes in the Kamchatka and 6 active volcanoes in the Northern Kuriles, and 4 of them continuously active. In 2012 seven strong explosive eruptions of the Kamchatkan and the Northern Kuriles volcanoes Sheveluch, Bezymianny, Kizimen, Tolbachik, Klyuchevskoy, and Karymsky took place. In addition, higher fumarolic activity of Gorely volcano was observed. The eruptive activity of Sheveluch Volcano began since 1980 (growth of the lava dome) and is continuing at present. Strong explosive events of the volcano occurred in 2012: on January 22-23; on March 16-17; March 25-30 - June 03; and on September 18: ash plumes rose up to 10 km a.s.l. and extended about 200-2000 km to the different directions of the volcano. The eruptive activity of Bezymianny volcano began since 1955, and is continuing at present as growth of the lava dome. Two paroxysmal explosive phases of the eruption occurred on March 08 and September 01: ash plumes rose up to 8-12 km a.s.l. and extended about 1500 km to the east-north-east of the volcano. Eruption of Kizimen volcano began on December 09, 2010, and continues. Strong explosive eruption began in mid-December, 2010, - ash plumes rose up to 10 km a.s.l. and extended > 800 km from the volcano. There are several stages of the eruption: explosive (from 09 December 2010 to mid-January 2011); explosive-effusive (mid-January to mid-June 2011); effusive (mid-January 2011 to September 2012). Extrusive-effusive phase of eruption

  5. Volcan Baru: Eruptive History and Volcano-Hazards Assessment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sherrod, David R.; Vallance, James W.; Tapia Espinosa, Arkin; McGeehin, John P.

    2008-01-01

    Volcan Baru is a potentially active volcano in western Panama, about 35 km east of the Costa Rican border. The volcano has had four eruptive episodes during the past 1,600 years, including its most recent eruption about 400?500 years ago. Several other eruptions occurred in the prior 10,000 years. Several seismic swarms in the 20th century and a recent swarm in 2006 serve as reminders of a restless tectonic terrane. Given this history, Volcan Baru likely will erupt again in the near or distant future, following some premonitory period of seismic activity and subtle ground deformation that may last for days or months. Future eruptions will likely be similar to past eruptions?explosive and dangerous to those living on the volcano?s flanks. Outlying towns and cities could endure several years of disruption in the wake of renewed volcanic activity. Described in this open-file report are reconnaissance mapping and stratigraphic studies, radiocarbon dating, lahar-inundation modeling, and hazard-analysis maps. Existing data have been compiled and included to make this report as comprehensive as possible. The report is prepared in coooperation with National Secretariat for Science, Technology and Innovation (SENACYT) of the Republic of Panama and the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID).

  6. A Preliminary Study of Hazus-MH Volcano for Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, S.; An, H.; Oh, J.

    2013-12-01

    This presentation will introduce our design to develop a volcano risk modeling capacity within the Hazus-MH loss estimation framework. In particular, we will present how to build fragility curves within the Hazus-MH framework for loss estimation from volcanoes. This capability is designed to analyze the risk from volcanic hazards in Korea. The Korean peninsula has Mt. Baekdu in North Korea, which will soon enter an active phase, according to some volcanologists. The anticipated eruption will be explosive given the viscous and grassy silica-rich magma, and is expected to be one of the largest in recent millennia. We aim to assess the impacts of this eruption, in particular to South Korea. There are several types of hazards related to volcanic eruption, including ash, pyroclastic flows, volcanic floods and earthquakes. However, our initial efforts focus on modeling losses from volcanic ash. The proposed volcanic ash model is anticipated to be used to estimate losses caused by yellow dust in East Asia as well. Also, many countries, which are exposed to potentially dangerous volcanoes, can benefit from the proposed Hazus-MH Volcano risk model. Acknowledgement: this research was supported by a grant [NEMA-BAEKDUSAN-2012-1-3] from the Volcanic Disaster Preparedness Research Center sponsored by National Emergency Management Agency of Korea. We would like to thank Federal Emergency Management Agency which develops Hazus-MH and allows the international use of Hazus-MH.

  7. Volcano and earthquake hazards in the Crater Lake region, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bacon, Charles R.; Mastin, Larry G.; Scott, Kevin M.; Nathenson, Manuel

    1997-01-01

    Crater Lake lies in a basin, or caldera, formed by collapse of the Cascade volcano known as Mount Mazama during a violent, climactic eruption about 7,700 years ago. This event dramatically changed the character of the volcano so that many potential types of future events have no precedent there. This potentially active volcanic center is contained within Crater Lake National Park, visited by 500,000 people per year, and is adjacent to the main transportation corridor east of the Cascade Range. Because a lake is now present within the most likely site of future volcanic activity, many of the hazards at Crater Lake are different from those at most other Cascade volcanoes. Also significant are many faults near Crater Lake that clearly have been active in the recent past. These faults, and historic seismicity, indicate that damaging earthquakes can occur there in the future. This report describes the various types of volcano and earthquake hazards in the Crater Lake area, estimates of the likelihood of future events, recommendations for mitigation, and a map of hazard zones. The main conclusions are summarized below.

  8. High-resolution seismic tomography of compressional wave velocity structure at Newberry Volcano, Oregon Cascade Range

    SciTech Connect

    Achauer, U.; Evans, J.R.; Stauber, D.A.

    1988-09-10

    Compressional wave velocity structure is determined for the upper crust beneath Newberry Volcano, central Oregon, using a high-resolution active-source seismic-tomography method. Newberry Volcano is a bimodal shield volcano east of the axis of the Cascade Range. It is associated both with the Cascade Range and with northwest migrating silicic volcanism in southeast Oregon. High-frequency (approx.7 Hz) crustal phases, nominally Pg and a midcrustal reflected phase, travel upward through a target volume beneath Newberry Volcano to a dense array of 120 seismographs. This arrangement is limited by station spacing to 1- to 2-km resolution in the upper 5 to 6 km of the crust beneath the volcano's summit caldera. The experiment tests the hypothesis that Cascade Range volcanoes are underlain only by small magma chambers. A small low-velocity anomaly delineated abosut 3 km below the summit caldera supports this hypothesis for Newberry Volcano and is interpreted as a possible magma chamber of a few to a few tens of km/sup 3/ in volume. A ring-shaped high-velocity anomaly nearer the surface coincides with the inner mapped ring fractures of the caldera. It also coincides with a circular gravity high, and we interpret it as largely subsolidus silicic cone sheets. The presence of this anomaly and of silicic vents along the ring fractures suggests that the fractures are a likely eruption path between the small magma chamber and the surface.

  9. Geology of El Chichon volcano, Chiapas, Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duffield, W.A.; Tilling, R.I.; Canul, R.

    1984-01-01

    The (pre-1982) 850-m-high andesitic stratovolcano El Chicho??n, active during Pleistocene and Holocene time, is located in rugged, densely forested terrain in northcentral Chiapas, Me??xico. The nearest neighboring Holocene volcanoes are 275 km and 200 km to the southeast and northwest, respectively. El Chicho??n is built on Tertiary siltstone and sandstone, underlain by Cretaceous dolomitic limestone; a 4-km-deep bore hole near the east base of the volcano penetrated this limestone and continued 770 m into a sequence of Jurassic or Cretaceous evaporitic anhydrite and halite. The basement rocks are folded into generally northwest-trending anticlines and synclines. El Chicho??n is built over a small dome-like structure superposed on a syncline, and this structure may reflect cumulative deformation related to growth of a crustal magma reservoir beneath the volcano. The cone of El Chicho??n consists almost entirely of pyroclastic rocks. The pre-1982 cone is marked by a 1200-m-diameter (explosion?) crater on the southwest flank and a 1600-m-diameter crater apparently of similar origin at the summit, a lava dome partly fills each crater. The timing of cone and dome growth is poorly known. Field evidence indicates that the flank dome is older than the summit dome, and K-Ar ages from samples high on the cone suggest that the flank dome is older than about 276,000 years. At least three pyroclastic eruptions have occurred during the past 1250 radiocarbon years. Nearly all of the pyroclastic and dome rocks are moderately to highly porphyritic andesite, with plagioclase, hornblende and clinopyroxene the most common phenocrysts. Geologists who mapped El Chicho??n in 1980 and 1981 warned that the volcano posed a substantial hazard to the surrounding region. This warning was proven to be prophetic by violent eruptions that occurred in March and April of 1982. These eruptions blasted away nearly all of the summit dome, blanketed the surrounding region with tephra, and sent

  10. Eruption of Shiveluch Volcano, Kamchatka, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    On the night of June 4, 2001 ASTER captured this thermal image of the erupting Shiveluch volcano. Located on Russia's Kamchatka Peninsula, Shiveluch rises to an altitude of 8028'. The active lava dome complex is seen as a bright (hot) area on the summit of the volcano. To the southwest, a second hot area is either a debris avalanche or hot ash deposit. Trailing to the west is a 25 km ash plume, seen as a cold 'cloud' streaming from the summit. At least 60 large eruptions have occurred during the last 10,000 years; the largest historical eruptions were in 1854 and 1964. Because Kamchatka is located along the major aircraft routes between North America/Europe and the Far East, this area is constantly monitored for potential ash hazards to aircraft. The lower image is the same as the upper, except it has been color coded: red is hot, light greens to dark green are progressively colder, and gray/black are the coldest areas.

    The image is located at 56.7 degrees north latitude, 161.3 degrees east longitude.

    Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of International Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., is the U.S. Science team leader; Moshe Pniel of JPL is the project manager. ASTER is the only high resolution imaging sensor on Terra. The primary goal of the ASTER mission is to obtain high-resolution image data in 14 channels over the entire land surface, as well as black and white stereo images. With revisit time of between 4 and 16 days, ASTER will provide the capability for repeat coverage of changing areas on Earth's surface.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in

  11. Counterfactual Volcano Hazard Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Gordon

    2013-04-01

    , if a major storm surge happens to arrive at a high astronomical tide, sea walls may be overtopped and flooding may ensue. In the domain of geological hazards, periods of volcanic unrest may generate precursory signals suggestive of imminent volcanic danger, but without leading to an actual eruption. Near-miss unrest periods provide vital evidence for assessing the dynamics of volcanoes close to eruption. Where the volcano catalogue has been diligently revised to include the maximum amount of information on the phenomenology of unrest periods, dynamic modelling and hazard assessment may be significantly refined. This is illustrated with some topical volcano hazard examples, including Montserrat and Santorini.

  12. Soufriere Hills Volcano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    In this ASTER image of Soufriere Hills Volcano on Montserrat in the Caribbean, continued eruptive activity is evident by the extensive smoke and ash plume streaming towards the west-southwest. Significant eruptive activity began in 1995, forcing the authorities to evacuate more than 7,000 of the island's original population of 11,000. The primary risk now is to the northern part of the island and to the airport. Small rockfalls and pyroclastic flows (ash, rock and hot gases) are common at this time due to continued growth of the dome at the volcano's summit.

    This image was acquired on October 29, 2002 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.

    Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is the U.S. Science team leader; Bjorn Eng of JPL is the project manager. The Terra mission is

  13. Numerical simulation of tsunami generation by cold volcanic mass flows at Augustine Volcano, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waythomas, C.F.; Watts, P.; Walder, J.S.

    2006-01-01

    Many of the world's active volcanoes are situated on or near coastlines. During eruptions, diverse geophysical mass flows, including pyroclastic flows, debris avalanches, and lahars, can deliver large volumes of unconsolidated debris to the ocean in a short period of time and thereby generate tsunamis. Deposits of both hot and cold volcanic mass flows produced by eruptions of Aleutian arc volcanoes are exposed at many locations along the coastlines of the Bering Sea, North Pacific Ocean, and Cook Inlet, indicating that the flows entered the sea and in some cases may have initiated tsunamis. We evaluate the process of tsunami generation by cold granular subaerial volcanic mass flows using examples from Augustine Volcano in southern Cook Inlet. Augustine Volcano is the most historically active volcano in the Cook Inlet region, and future eruptions, should they lead to debris-avalanche formation and tsunami generation, could be hazardous to some coastal areas. Geological investigations at Augustine Volcano suggest that as many as 12-14 debris avalanches have reached the sea in the last 2000 years, and a debris avalanche emplaced during an A.D. 1883 eruption may have initiated a tsunami that was observed about 80 km east of the volcano at the village of English Bay (Nanwalek) on the coast of the southern Kenai Peninsula. Numerical simulation of mass-flow motion, tsunami generation, propagation, and inundation for Augustine Volcano indicate only modest wave generation by volcanic mass flows and localized wave effects. However, for east-directed mass flows entering Cook Inlet, tsunamis are capable of reaching the more populated coastlines of the southwestern Kenai Peninsula, where maximum water amplitudes of several meters are possible.

  14. The California Volcano Observatory: Monitoring the state's restless volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stovall, Wendy K.; Marcaida, Mae; Mangan, Margaret T.

    2014-01-01

    Volcanic eruptions happen in the State of California about as frequently as the largest earthquakes on the San Andreas Fault Zone. At least 10 eruptions have taken place in California in the past 1,000 years—most recently at Lassen Peak in Lassen Volcanic National Park (1914 to 1917) in the northern part of the State—and future volcanic eruptions are inevitable. The U.S. Geological Survey California Volcano Observatory monitors the State's potentially hazardous volcanoes.

  15. Monitoring active volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tilling, Robert I.

    1987-01-01

    One of the most spectacular, awesomely beautiful, and at times destructive displays of natural energy is an erupting volcano, belching fume and ash thousands of meters into the atmosphere and pouring out red-hot molten lava in fountains and streams. Countless eruptions in the geologic past have produced volcanic rocks that form much of the Earth's present surface. The gradual disintegration and weathering of these rocks have yielded some of the richest farmlands in the world, and these fertile soils play a significant role in sustaining our large and growing population. Were it not for volcanic activity, the Hawaiian Islands with their sugar cane and pineapple fields and magnificent landscapes and seascapes would not exist to support their residents and to charm their visitors. Yet, the actual eruptive processes are catastrophic and can claim life and property.

  16. Volcanoes, Third Edition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nye, Christopher J.

    It takes confidence to title a smallish book merely “Volcanoes” because of the impliction that the myriad facets of volcanism—chemistry, physics, geology, meteorology, hazard mitigation, and more—have been identified and addressed to some nontrivial level of detail. Robert and Barbara Decker have visited these different facets seamlessly in Volcanoes, Third Edition. The seamlessness comes from a broad overarching, interdisciplinary, professional understanding of volcanism combined with an exceptionally smooth translation of scientific jargon into plain language.The result is a book which will be informative to a very broad audience, from reasonably educated nongeologists (my mother loves it) to geology undergraduates through professional volcanologists. I bet that even the most senior professional volcanologists will learn at least a few things from this book and will find at least a few provocative discussions of subjects they know.

  17. Living with volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wright, Thomas L.; Pierson, Thomas C.

    1992-01-01

    The 1980 cataclysmic eruption of Mount St. Helens (Lipman and Mullineaux, 1981) in southwestern Washington ushered in a decade marked by more worldwide volcanic disasters and crises than any other in recorded history. Volcanoes killed more people (over 28,500) in the 1980's than during the 78 years following 1902 eruption of Mount Pelee (Martinique). Not surprisingly, volcanic phenomena and attendant hazards received attention from government authorities, the news media, and the general public. As part of this enhanced global awareness of volcanic hazards, the U.S. Geological Survey (Bailey and others, 1983) in response to the eruptions or volcanic unrest during the 1980's at Mount St. Helens and Redoubt are still erupting intermittently, and the caldera unrest at Long Valley also continues, albeit less energetically than during the early 1980's.

  18. Active submarine volcano sampled

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taylor, B.

    1983-01-01

    On June 4, 1982, two full dredge hauls of fresh lava were recovered from the upper flanks of Kavachi submarine volcano, Solomon Islands, in the western Pacific Ocean, from the water depths of 1,200 and 2,700 feet. the shallower dredge site was within 0.5 mile of the active submarine vent shown at the surface by an area of slick water, probably caused by gas emissions. Kavachi is a composite stratovolcano that has been observed to erupt every year or two for at least the last 30 years (see photographs). An island formed in 1952, 1961, 1965, and 1978; but, in each case, it rapidly eroded below sea level. The latest eruption was observed by Solair pilots during the several weeks up to and including May 18, 1982. 

  19. Space Radar Image of Kiluchevskoi, Volcano, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This is an image of the area of Kliuchevskoi volcano, Kamchatka, Russia, which began to erupt on September 30, 1994. Kliuchevskoi is the blue triangular peak in the center of the image, towards the left edge of the bright red area that delineates bare snow cover. The image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on its 88th orbit on October 5, 1994. The image shows an area approximately 75 kilometers by 100 kilometers (46 miles by 62 miles) that is centered at 56.07 degrees north latitude and 160.84 degrees east longitude. North is toward the bottom of the image. The radar illumination is from the top of the image. The Kamchatka volcanoes are among the most active volcanoes in the world. The volcanic zone sits above a tectonic plate boundary, where the Pacific plate is sinking beneath the northeast edge of the Eurasian plate. The Endeavour crew obtained dramatic video and photographic images of this region during the eruption, which will assist scientists in analyzing the dynamics of the recent activity. The colors in this image were obtained using the following radar channels: red represents the L-band (horizontally transmitted and received); green represents the L-band (horizontally transmitted and vertically received); blue represents the C-band (horizontally transmitted and vertically received). In addition to Kliuchevskoi, two other active volcanoes are visible in the image. Bezymianny, the circular crater above and to the right of Kliuchevskoi, contains a slowly growing lava dome. Tolbachik is the large volcano with a dark summit crater near the upper right edge of the red snow covered area. The Kamchatka River runs from right to left across the bottom of the image. The current eruption of Kliuchevskoi included massive ejections of gas, vapor and ash, which reached altitudes of 15,000 meters (50,000 feet). Melting snow mixed with volcanic ash triggered mud flows on the

  20. Temporal and spatial variability in the flow and dispersal of suspended-sediment on a fringing reef flat, Molokai, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Presto, M. K.; Ogston, A. S.; Storlazzi, C. D.; Field, M. E.

    2006-03-01

    A multi-year study was conducted on a shallow fringing reef flat on Molokai, Hawaii to determine the temporal and spatial dispersal patterns of terrigenous suspended sediment. During this study, trade-wind conditions existed for the majority of the year on the reef flat. The trade-wind conditions produced strong currents and resuspended moderate amounts of sediment on the reef flat on a daily basis during the year of study, resulting in an overwhelming contribution to the total sediment flux. The magnitude and direction of the trade winds relative to the orientation of the coastline, the shallow-relief and broad morphology, and tidal elevation, provided the primary control of the physical processes that resuspended and transported sediment on the reef flat over the period of record. Spatial data indicate that much of the terrigenous sediment resuspended on the reef flat is transported predominantly alongshore and is confined to the inner- to mid-reef flat. Evidence for the limited across-shore mixing and transport is provided by the dominantly alongshore wind-driven currents during trade-wind conditions and the well-defined across-shore gradient in percentage calcium carbonate of the suspended sediment. Regions of slightly offshore suspended-sediment transport along the reef flat can be attributed to the circulation pattern set up by the interaction between the trade winds, coastal morphology, and anthropogenic coastal structures (i.e., fish ponds and wharf). The regions in which sediment were seen to move offshore provide the strongest link between the sediment dynamics on reef flat and fore reef, and qualitatively appears to be correlated with low coral coverage on the fore reef.

  1. Wave- and tidally-driven flow and sediment flux across a fringing coral reef: Southern Molokai, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Storlazzi, C.D.; Ogston, A.S.; Bothner, Michael H.; Field, M.E.; Presto, M.K.

    2004-01-01

    The fringing coral reef off the south coast of Molokai, Hawaii is currently being studied as part of a US Geological Survey (USGS) multi-disciplinary project that focuses on geologic and oceanographic processes that affect coral reef systems. For this investigation, four instrument packages were deployed across the fringing coral reef during the summer of 2001 to understand the processes governing fine-grained terrestrial sediment suspension on the shallow reef flat (h=1m) and its advection across the reef crest and onto the deeper fore reef. The time-series measurements suggest the following conceptual model of water and fine-grained sediment transport across the reef: Relatively cool, clear water flows up onto the reef flat during flooding tides. At high tide, more deep-water wave energy is able to propagate onto the reef flat and larger Trade wind-driven waves can develop on the reef flat, thereby increasing sediment suspension. Trade wind-driven surface currents and wave breaking at the reef crest cause setup of water on the reef flat, further increasing the water depth and enhancing the development of depth-limited waves and sediment suspension. As the tide ebbs, the water and associated suspended sediment on the reef flat drains off the reef flat and is advected offshore and to the west by Trade wind- and tidally- driven currents. Observations on the fore reef show relatively high turbidity throughout the water column during the ebb tide. It therefore appears that high suspended sediment concentrations on the deeper fore reef, where active coral growth is at a maximum, are dynamically linked to processes on the muddy, shallow reef flat.

  2. Temporal and spatial variability in the flow and dispersal of suspended-sediment on a fringing reef flat, Molokai, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Presto, M.K.; Ogston, A.S.; Storlazzi, C.D.; Field, M.E.

    2006-01-01

    A multi-year study was conducted on a shallow fringing reef flat on Molokai, Hawaii to determine the temporal and spatial dispersal patterns of terrigenous suspended sediment. During this study, trade-wind conditions existed for the majority of the year on the reef flat. The trade-wind conditions produced strong currents and resuspended moderate amounts of sediment on the reef flat on a daily basis during the year of study, resulting in an overwhelming contribution to the total sediment flux. The magnitude and direction of the trade winds relative to the orientation of the coastline, the shallow-relief and broad morphology, and tidal elevation, provided the primary control of the physical processes that resuspended and transported sediment on the reef flat over the period of record. Spatial data indicate that much of the terrigenous sediment resuspended on the reef flat is transported predominantly alongshore and is confined to the inner- to mid-reef flat. Evidence for the limited across-shore mixing and transport is provided by the dominantly alongshore wind-driven currents during trade-wind conditions and the well-defined across-shore gradient in percentage calcium carbonate of the suspended sediment. Regions of slightly offshore suspended-sediment transport along the reef flat can be attributed to the circulation pattern set up by the interaction between the trade winds, coastal morphology, and anthropogenic coastal structures (i.e., fish ponds and wharf). The regions in which sediment were seen to move offshore provide the strongest link between the sediment dynamics on reef flat and fore reef, and qualitatively appears to be correlated with low coral coverage on the fore reef. ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Eruptive history and tectonic setting of Medicine Lake Volcano, a large rear-arc volcano in the southern Cascades

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Donnelly-Nolan, J. M.; Grove, T.L.; Lanphere, M.A.; Champion, D.E.; Ramsey, D.W.

    2008-01-01

    Medicine Lake Volcano (MLV), located in the southern Cascades ??? 55??km east-northeast of contemporaneous Mount Shasta, has been found by exploratory geothermal drilling to have a surprisingly silicic core mantled by mafic lavas. This unexpected result is very different from the long-held view derived from previous mapping of exposed geology that MLV is a dominantly basaltic shield volcano. Detailed mapping shows that < 6% of the ??? 2000??km2 of mapped MLV lavas on this southern Cascade Range shield-shaped edifice are rhyolitic and dacitic, but drill holes on the edifice penetrated more than 30% silicic lava. Argon dating yields ages in the range ??? 475 to 300??ka for early rhyolites. Dates on the stratigraphically lowest mafic lavas at MLV fall into this time frame as well, indicating that volcanism at MLV began about half a million years ago. Mafic compositions apparently did not dominate until ??? 300??ka. Rhyolite eruptions were scarce post-300??ka until late Holocene time. However, a dacite episode at ??? 200 to ??? 180??ka included the volcano's only ash-flow tuff, which was erupted from within the summit caldera. At ??? 100??ka, compositionally distinctive high-Na andesite and minor dacite built most of the present caldera rim. Eruption of these lavas was followed soon after by several large basalt flows, such that the combined area covered by eruptions between 100??ka and postglacial time amounts to nearly two-thirds of the volcano's area. Postglacial eruptive activity was strongly episodic and also covered a disproportionate amount of area. The volcano has erupted 9 times in the past 5200??years, one of the highest rates of late Holocene eruptive activity in the Cascades. Estimated volume of MLV is ??? 600??km3, giving an overall effusion rate of ??? 1.2??km3 per thousand years, although the rate for the past 100??kyr may be only half that. During much of the volcano's history, both dry HAOT (high-alumina olivine tholeiite) and hydrous calcalkaline

  4. Eruptive history and tectonic setting of Medicine Lake Volcano, a large rear-arc volcano in the southern Cascades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly-Nolan, Julie M.; Grove, Timothy L.; Lanphere, Marvin A.; Champion, Duane E.; Ramsey, David W.

    2008-10-01

    Medicine Lake Volcano (MLV), located in the southern Cascades ˜ 55 km east-northeast of contemporaneous Mount Shasta, has been found by exploratory geothermal drilling to have a surprisingly silicic core mantled by mafic lavas. This unexpected result is very different from the long-held view derived from previous mapping of exposed geology that MLV is a dominantly basaltic shield volcano. Detailed mapping shows that < 6% of the ˜ 2000 km 2 of mapped MLV lavas on this southern Cascade Range shield-shaped edifice are rhyolitic and dacitic, but drill holes on the edifice penetrated more than 30% silicic lava. Argon dating yields ages in the range ˜ 475 to 300 ka for early rhyolites. Dates on the stratigraphically lowest mafic lavas at MLV fall into this time frame as well, indicating that volcanism at MLV began about half a million years ago. Mafic compositions apparently did not dominate until ˜ 300 ka. Rhyolite eruptions were scarce post-300 ka until late Holocene time. However, a dacite episode at ˜ 200 to ˜ 180 ka included the volcano's only ash-flow tuff, which was erupted from within the summit caldera. At ˜ 100 ka, compositionally distinctive high-Na andesite and minor dacite built most of the present caldera rim. Eruption of these lavas was followed soon after by several large basalt flows, such that the combined area covered by eruptions between 100 ka and postglacial time amounts to nearly two-thirds of the volcano's area. Postglacial eruptive activity was strongly episodic and also covered a disproportionate amount of area. The volcano has erupted 9 times in the past 5200 years, one of the highest rates of late Holocene eruptive activity in the Cascades. Estimated volume of MLV is ˜ 600 km 3, giving an overall effusion rate of ˜ 1.2 km 3 per thousand years, although the rate for the past 100 kyr may be only half that. During much of the volcano's history, both dry HAOT (high-alumina olivine tholeiite) and hydrous calcalkaline basalts erupted

  5. Active high-resolution seismic tomography of compressional wave velocity and attenuation structure at Medicine Lake Volcano, northern California Cascade Range

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evans, J.R.; Zucca, J.J.

    1988-01-01

    Medicine Lake volcano is a basalt through rhyolite shield volcano of the Cascade Range, lying east of the range axis. The Pg wave from eight explosive sources which has traveled upward through the target volume to a dense array of 140 seismographs provides 1- to 2-km resolution in the upper 5 to 7 km of the crust beneath the volcano. The experiment tests the hypothesis that Cascade Range volcanoes of this type are underlain only by small silicic magma chambers. We image a low-velocity low-Q region not larger than a few tens of cubic kilometers in volume beneath the summit caldera, supporting the hypothesis. A shallower high-velocity high-density feature, previously known to be present, is imaged for the first time in full plan view; it is east-west elongate, paralleling a topographic lineament between Medicine Lake volcano and Mount Shasta. Differences between this high-velocity feature and the equivalent feature at Newberry volcano, a volcano in central regon resembling Medicine Lake volcano, may partly explain the scarcity of surface hydrothermal features at Medicine Lake volcano. A major low-velocity low-Q feature beneath the southeast flank of the volcano, in an area with no Holocene vents, is interpreted as tephra, flows, and sediments from the volcano deeply ponded on the downthrown side of the Gillem fault. A high-Q normal-velocity feature beneath the north rim of the summit caldera may be a small, possibly hot, subsolidus intrusion. A high-velocity low-Q region beneath the eastern caldera may be an area of boiling water between the magma chamber and the ponded east flank material. -from Authors

  6. Mount St. Helens and Kilauea volcanoes

    SciTech Connect

    Barrat, J. )

    1989-01-01

    Mount St. Helens' eruption has taught geologists invaluable lessons about how volcanoes work. Such information will be crucial in saving lives and property when other dormant volcanoes in the northwestern United States--and around the world--reawaken, as geologists predict they someday will. Since 1912, scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey's Hawaiian Volcano Observatory have pioneered the study of volcanoes through work on Mauna Loa and Kilauea volcanoes on the island of Hawaii. In Vancouver, Wash., scientists at the Survey's Cascades Volcano Observatory are studying the after-effects of Mount St. Helens' catalysmic eruption as well as monitoring a number of other now-dormant volcanoes in the western United States. This paper briefly reviews the similarities and differences between the Hawaiian and Washington volcanoes and what these volcanoes are teaching the volcanologists.

  7. Mahukona: The missing Hawaiian volcano

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, M.O.; Muenow, D.W. ); Kurz, M.D. )

    1990-11-01

    New bathymetric and geochemical data indicate that a seamount west of the island of Hawaii, Mahukona, is a Hawaiian shield volcano. Mahukona has weakly alkalic lavas that are geochemically distinct. They have high {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He ratios (12-21 times atmosphere), and high H{sub 2}O and Cl contents, which are indicative of the early state of development of Hawaiian volcanoes. The He and Sr isotopic values for Mahukona lavas are intermediate between those for lavas from Loihi and Manuna Loa volcanoes and may be indicative of a temporal evolution of Hawaiian magmas. Mahukona volcano became extinct at about 500 ka, perhaps before reaching sea level. It fills the previously assumed gap in the parallel chains of volcanoes forming the southern segment of the Hawaiian hotspot chain. The paired sequence of volcanoes was probably caused by the bifurcation of the Hawaiian mantle plume during its ascent, creating two primary areas of melting 30 to 40 km apart that have persisted for at least the past 4 m.y.

  8. EARTHQUAKES - VOLCANOES(Causes - Forecast - Counteraction)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsiapas, E.; Soumelidou, D.; Tsiapas, C.

    2012-04-01

    Earthquakes and volcanoes are caused by: Α) Various liquid elements (e.g. H20, H2S, S02) which emerge from the pyrosphere and are trapped in the space between the solid crust and the pyrosphere (Moho discontinuity). Β) Protrusions of the solid crust at the Moho discontinuity (mountain range roots, sinking of the lithosphere's plates). C) The differential movement of crust and pyrosphere. The crust misses one full rotation for approximately every 100 pyrosphere rotations, mostly because of the lunar pull. The above mentioned elements can be found in small quantities all over the Moho discontinuity, and they are constantly causing minor earthquakes and small volcanic eruptions. When large quantities of these elements (H20, H2S, SO2, etc) concentrate, they are carried away by the pyrosphere, moving from west to east under the crust. When this movement takes place under flat surfaces of the solid crust, it does not cause earthquakes. But when these elements come along a protrusion (a mountain root) they concentrate on its western side, displacing the pyrosphere until they fill the space created. Due to the differential movement of pyrosphere and solid crust, a vacuum is created on the eastern side of these protrusions and when the aforementioned liquids overfill this space, they explode, escaping to the east. At the point of their escape, these liquids are vaporized and compressed, their flow accelerates, their temperature rises due to fluid friction and they are ionized. On the Earth's surface, a powerful rumbling sound and electrical discharges in the atmosphere, caused by the movement of the gasses, are noticeable. When these elements escape, the space on the west side of the protrusion is violently taken up by the pyrosphere, which collides with the protrusion, causing a major earthquake, attenuation of the protrusions, cracks on the solid crust and damages to structures on the Earth's surface. It is easy to foresee when an earthquake will occur and how big it is

  9. Evaluation of volcanic risk management in Merapi and Bromo Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachri, S.; Stöetter, J.; Sartohadi, J.; Setiawan, M. A.

    2012-04-01

    Merapi (Central Java Province) and Bromo (East Java Province) volcanoes have human-environmental systems with unique characteristics, thus causing specific consequences on their risk management. Various efforts have been carried out by many parties (institutional government, scientists, and non-governmental organizations) to reduce the risk in these areas. However, it is likely that most of the actions have been done for temporary and partial purposes, leading to overlapping work and finally to a non-integrated scheme of volcanic risk management. This study, therefore, aims to identify and evaluate actions of risk and disaster reduction in Merapi and Bromo Volcanoes. To achieve this aims, a thorough literature review was carried out to identify earlier studies in both areas. Afterward, the basic concept of risk management cycle, consisting of risk assessment, risk reduction, event management and regeneration, is used to map those earlier studies and already implemented risk management actions in Merapi and Bromo. The results show that risk studies in Merapi have been developed predominantly on physical aspects of volcanic eruptions, i.e. models of lahar flows, hazard maps as well as other geophysical modeling. Furthermore, after the 2006 eruption of Merapi, research such on risk communication, social vulnerability, cultural vulnerability have appeared on the social side of risk management research. Apart from that, disaster risk management activities in the Bromo area were emphasizing on physical process and historical religious aspects. This overview of both study areas provides information on how risk studies have been used for managing the volcano disaster. This result confirms that most of earlier studies emphasize on the risk assessment and only few of them consider the risk reduction phase. Further investigation in this field work in the near future will accomplish the findings and contribute to formulate integrated volcanic risk management cycles for both

  10. Seismic Structure of Villarrica Volcano obtained through Local Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mora-Stock, Cindy; Thorwart, Martin; Rabbel, Wolfgang

    2016-04-01

    We present a first model of the inner structure of the Villarrica volcano (Southern Chile) derived from P-wave arrival time inversion from local volcano tectonic (VT) events. A total set of 75 DSS-Cube stations was installed at the volcano surroundings between March 1st and 14th, 2012, with 50 of them at the crater, flanks and around the volcano. Volcano tectonic earthquakes located inside the network describe a NS-trending structure between 2 and 7 km below sea level at a transition zone between low and high P-wave velocity zones. The location and trend of the volume is consistent with a branch of the Liquiñe - Ofqui Fault Zone, a long lived arc-parallel 1000 km long strike-slip fault at the Chilean subduction zone. Values for P-wave velocity (Vp) averaged 4.5 km/s, and Vp/Vs ratios gave values of 1.6 to 1.7. The maximum variation of Vp is of the order of ±20%. Checkerboard test and Bootstrap method were applied. Bootstrap method shows that the standard deviation of the tomographic solutions is of the order of ±9%. Resolution given by Checkerboard test is of the order of 2-3 km. We observed three low velocity zones (LVZs) located between 1 and 5 km depth that can be associated with magma and/or other fluids. One main LVZ at 1-2 km towards NNW from the locus of seismicity; and two conduit-like LVZ s reaching from the locus of seismicity towards the surface features of the Los Nevados and Challupén pyroclastic flows (ENE and S of the crater, respectively). These two LVZs are thought to be remnant conduits of these previous eruptions. High velocity zones are observed to the east and below the crater, and can be interpreted as consolidated crustal rocks and volcanic products from previously collapsed caldera.

  11. Volcano hazards in the Mount Jefferson region, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walder, Joseph S.; Gardner, Cynthia A.; Conrey, Richard M.; Fisher, Bruce J.; Schilling, Steven P.

    1999-01-01

    Mount Jefferson is a prominent feature of the landscape seen from highways east and west of the Cascades. Mount Jefferson (one of thirteen major volcanic centers in the Cascade Range) has erupted repeatedly for hundreds of thousands of years, with its last eruptive episode during the last major glaciation which culminated about 15,000 years ago. Geologic evidence shows that Mount Jefferson is capable of large explosive eruptions. The largest such eruption occurred between 35,000 and 100,000 years ago, and caused ash to fall as far away as the present-day town of Arco in southeast Idaho. Although there has not been an eruption at Mount Jefferson for some time, experience at explosive volcanoes elsewhere suggests that Mount Jefferson cannot be regarded as extinct. If Mount Jefferson erupts again, areas close to the eruptive vent will be severely affected, and even areas tens of kilometers (tens of miles) downstream along river valleys or hundreds of kilometers (hundreds of miles) downwind may be at risk. Numerous small volcanoes occupy the area between Mount Jefferson and Mount Hood to the north, and between Mount Jefferson and the Three Sisters region to the south. These small volcanoes tend not to pose the far-reaching hazards associated with Mount Jefferson, but are nonetheless locally important. A concern at Mount Jefferson, but not at the smaller volcanoes, is the possibility that small to- moderate sized landslides could occur even during periods of no volcanic activity. Such landslides may transform as they move into lahars (watery flows of rock, mud, and debris) that can inundate areas far downstream. The population at immediate risk in the Mount Jefferson region is small, but these residents as well as other people who visit the area for recreation and work purposes should be aware of the potential hazards. Probably the greatest concern in the Mount Jefferson region is the possibility that large lahars might enter reservoirs on either side of the volcano

  12. Deep structure and origin of active volcanoes in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, D.

    2010-12-01

    Recent geophysical studies have provided important constraints on the deep structure and origin of the active intraplate volcanoes in Mainland China. Magmatism in the western Pacific arc and back-arc areas is caused by the corner flow in the mantle wedge and dehydration of the subducting slab (e.g., Zhao et al., 2009a), while the intraplate magmatism in China has different origins. The active volcanoes in Northeast China (such as the Changbai and Wudalianchi) are caused by hot upwelling in the big mantle wedge (BMW) above the stagnant slab in the mantle transition zone and deep slab dehydration as well (Zhao et al., 2009b). The Tengchong volcano in Southwest China is caused by a similar process in the BMW above the subducting Burma microplate (or Indian plate) (Lei et al., 2009a). The Hainan volcano in southernmost China is a hotspot fed by a lower-mantle plume which may be associated with the Pacific and Philippine Sea slabs' deep subduction in the east and Indian slab's deep subduction in the west down to the lower mantle (Lei et al., 2009b; Zhao, 2009). The stagnant slab finally collapses down to the bottom of the mantle, which can trigger the upwelling of hot mantle materials from the lower mantle to the shallow mantle beneath the subducting slabs and may cause the slab-plume interactions (Zhao, 2009). References Lei, J., D. Zhao, Y. Su, 2009a. Insight into the origin of the Tengchong intraplate volcano and seismotectonics in southwest China from local and teleseismic data. J. Geophys. Res. 114, B05302. Lei, J., D. Zhao, B. Steinberger et al., 2009b. New seismic constraints on the upper mantle structure of the Hainan plume. Phys. Earth Planet. Inter. 173, 33-50. Zhao, D., 2009. Multiscale seismic tomography and mantle dynamics. Gondwana Res. 15, 297-323. Zhao, D., Z. Wang, N. Umino, A. Hasegawa, 2009a. Mapping the mantle wedge and interplate thrust zone of the northeast Japan arc. Tectonophysics 467, 89-106. Zhao, D., Y. Tian, J. Lei, L. Liu, 2009b. Seismic

  13. Chiliques volcano, Chile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A January 6, 2002 ASTER nighttime thermal infrared image of Chiliques volcano in Chile shows a hot spot in the summit crater and several others along the upper flanks of the edifice, indicating new volcanic activity. Examination of an earlier nighttime thermal infrared image from May 24,2000 showed no thermal anomaly. Chiliques volcano was previously thought to be dormant. Rising to an elevation of 5778 m, Chiliques is a simple stratovolcano with a 500-m-diameter circular summit crater. This mountain is one of the most important high altitude ceremonial centers of the Incas. It is rarely visited due to its difficult accessibility. Climbing to the summit along Inca trails, numerous ruins are encountered; at the summit there are a series of constructions used for rituals. There is a beautiful lagoon in the crater that is almost always frozen.

    The daytime image was acquired on November 19, 2000 and was created by displaying ASTER bands 1,2 and 3 in blue, green and red. The nighttime image was acquired January 6, 2002, and is a color-coded display of a single thermal infrared band. The hottest areas are white, and colder areas are darker shades of red. Both images cover an area of 7.5 x 7.5 km, and are centered at 23.6 degrees south latitude, 67.6 degrees west longitude.

    Both images cover an area of 7.5 x 7.5 km, and are centered at 23.6 degrees south latitude, 67.6 degrees west longitude.

    These images were acquired by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER will image Earth for the next 6 years to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18,1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A

  14. Investigation of Surtsey Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, James G.; Jakobsson, Sveinn P.; Norrman, John O.

    The volcanic island of Surtsey, Iceland, was built during the period November 1963 to June 1967 and is one of the few oceanic volcanic islands that has formed and survived in recent times. New stimulus to geologic work on the island was provided in 1979 by completion of a 181-m-deep hole that was drilled to investigate the structure of the volcano and the active hydrothermal system below.During August 1985 an international group of researchers undertook a series of geologic and biologic investigations on the island. This work was facilitated by new aerial photographs taken by the Icelandic Geodetic Survey and a new bathymetric map of the Surtsy region made by the Icelandic Hydrographic Service (both in Reykjavik). Ground surveying of markers appearing in the photographs will permit a major revision of the to pographic map of the island (scale 1:5000). The new bathymetry defines the extent of continuing erosion of three volcanic vents, two of which formed short-lived islands during the Surtsey eruptive episode. Since 1967, when the first bathymetry of these submarine features was made, the summitt errace of Syrtlingur has been reduced from 23 to 32 m below sea level; that of Jolnir, from 15 to 37 m; and that of Surtla, from 32 t o 46 m.

  15. Sand Volcano Following Earthquake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Sand boil or sand volcano measuring 2 m (6.6 ft.) in length erupted in median of Interstate Highway 80 west of the Bay Bridge toll plaza when ground shaking transformed loose water-saturated deposit of subsurface sand into a sand-water slurry (liquefaction) in the October 17, 1989, Loma Prieta earthquake. Vented sand contains marine-shell fragments. Sand and soil grains have faces that can cause friction as they roll and slide against each other, or even cause sticking and form small voids between grains. This complex behavior can cause soil to behave like a liquid under certain conditions such as earthquakes or when powders are handled in industrial processes. Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiments aboard the Space Shuttle use the microgravity of space to simulate this behavior under conditions that carnot be achieved in laboratory tests on Earth. MGM is shedding light on the behavior of fine-grain materials under low effective stresses. Applications include earthquake engineering, granular flow technologies (such as powder feed systems for pharmaceuticals and fertilizers), and terrestrial and planetary geology. Nine MGM specimens have flown on two Space Shuttle flights. Another three are scheduled to fly on STS-107. The principal investigator is Stein Sture of the University of Colorado at Boulder. (Credit: J.C. Tinsley, U.S. Geological Survey)

  16. Space Radar Image of Karisoke & Virunga Volcanoes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This is a false-color composite of Central Africa, showing the Virunga volcano chain along the borders of Rwanda, Zaire and Uganda. This area is home to the endangered mountain gorillas. The image was acquired on October 3, 1994, on orbit 58 of the space shuttle Endeavour by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR). In this image red is the L-band (horizontally transmitted, vertically received) polarization; green is the C-band (horizontally transmitted and received) polarization; and blue is the C-band (horizontally transmitted and received) polarization. The area is centered at about 2.4 degrees south latitude and 30.8 degrees east longitude. The image covers an area 56 kilometers by 70 kilometers (35 miles by 43 miles). The dark area at the top of the image is Lake Kivu, which forms the border between Zaire (to the right) and Rwanda (to the left). In the center of the image is the steep cone of Nyiragongo volcano, rising 3,465 meters (11,369 feet) high, with its central crater now occupied by a lava lake. To the left are three volcanoes, Mount Karisimbi, rising 4,500 meters (14,800 feet) high; Mount Sabinyo, rising 3,600 meters (12,000 feet) high; and Mount Muhavura, rising 4,100 meters (13,500 feet) high. To their right is Nyamuragira volcano, which is 3,053 meters (10,017 feet) tall, with radiating lava flows dating from the 1950s to the late 1980s. These active volcanoes constitute a hazard to the towns of Goma, Zaire and the nearby Rwandan refugee camps, located on the shore of Lake Kivu at the top left. This radar image highlights subtle differences in the vegetation of the region. The green patch to the center left of the image in the foothills of Karisimbi is a bamboo forest where the mountain gorillas live. The vegetation types in this area are an important factor in the habitat of mountain gorillas. Researchers at Rutgers University in New Jersey and the Dian Fossey Gorilla Fund in London will use this data to produce

  17. Mud Volcanoes Formation And Occurrence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guliyev, I. S.

    2007-12-01

    Mud volcanoes are natural phenomena, which occur throughout the globe. They are found at a greater or lesser scale in Azerbaijan, Turkmenistan, Georgia, on the Kerch and Taman peninsulas, on Sakhalin Island, in West Kuban, Italy, Romania, Iran, Pakistan, India, Burma, China, Japan, Indonesia, Malaysia, New Zealand, Mexico, Colombia, Trinidad and Tobago, Venezuela and Ecuador. Mud volcanoes are most well-developed in Eastern Azerbaijan, where more than 30% of all the volcanoes in the world are concentrated. More than 300 mud volcanoes have already been recognized here onshore or offshore, 220 of which lie within an area of 16,000 km2. Many of these mud volcanoes are particularly large (up to 400 m high). The volcanoes of the South Caspian form permanent or temporary islands, and numerous submarine banks. Many hypotheses have been developed regarding the origin of mud volcanoes. Some of those hypotheses will be examined in the present paper. Model of spontaneous excitation-decompaction (proposed by Ivanov and Guliev, 1988, 2002). It is supposed that one of major factors of the movement of sedimentary masses and formation of hydrocarbon deposits are phase transitions in sedimentary basin. At phase transitions there are abnormal changes of physical and chemical parameters of rocks. Abnormal (high and negative) pressure takes place. This process is called as excitation of the underground environment with periodicity from several tens to several hundreds, or thousand years. The relationship between mud volcanism and the generation of hydrocarbons, particularly methane, is considered to be a critical factor in mud volcano formation. At high flow rates the gas and sediment develops into a pseudo-liquid state and as flow increases the mass reaches the "so-called hover velocity" where mass transport begins. The mass of fluid moves as a quasi-uniform viscous mass through the sediment pile in a piston like manner until expelled from the surface as a "catastrophic eruption

  18. Ash and Steam, Soufriere Hills Volcano, Monserrat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    International Space Station crew members are regularly alerted to dynamic events on the Earth's surface. On request from scientists on the ground, the ISS crew observed and recorded activity from the summit of Soufriere Hills on March 20, 2002. These two images provide a context view of the island (bottom) and a detailed view of the summit plume (top). When the images were taken, the eastern side of the summit region experienced continued lava growth, and reports posted on the Smithsonian Institution's Weekly Volcanic Activity Report indicate that 'large (50-70 m high), fast-growing, spines developed on the dome's summit. These spines periodically collapsed, producing pyroclastic flows down the volcano's east flank that sometimes reached the Tar River fan. Small ash clouds produced from these events reached roughly 1 km above the volcano and drifted westward over Plymouth and Richmond Hill. Ash predominately fell into the sea. Sulfur dioxide emission rates remained high. Theodolite measurements of the dome taken on March 20 yielded a dome height of 1,039 m.' Other photographs by astronauts of Montserrat have been posted on the Earth Observatory: digital photograph number ISS002-E-9309, taken on July 9, 2001; and a recolored and reprojected version of the same image. Digital photograph numbers ISS004-E-8972 and 8973 were taken 20 March, 2002 from Space Station Alpha and were provided by the Earth Sciences and Image Analysis Laboratory at Johnson Space Center. Additional images taken by astronauts and cosmonauts can be viewed at the NASA-JSC Gateway to Astronaut Photography of Earth.

  19. Seismic exploration of Fuji volcano with active sources in 2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oikawa, J.; Kagiyama, T.; Tanaka, S.; Miyamachi, H.; Tsutsui, T.; Ikeda, Y.; Katayama, H.; Matsuo, N.; Oshima, H.; Nishimura, Y.; Yamamoto, K.; Watanabe, T.; Yamazaki, F.

    2004-12-01

    Fuji volcano (altitude 3,776 m) is the largest basaltic stratovolcano in Japan. In late August and early September 2003, seismic exploration was conducted around Fuji volcano by the detonation of 500 kg charges of dynamite to investigate the seismic structure of that area. Seismographs with an eigenfrequency of 2 Hz were used for observation, positioned along a WSW-ENE line passing through the summit of the mountain. A total of 469 observation points were installed at intervals of 250-500 m. The data were stored in memory on-site using data loggers. The sampling interval was 4 ms. Charges were detonated at 5 points, one at each end of the observation line and 3 along its length. The first arrival times at each observation point for each detonation were recorded as data. The P-wave velocity structure directly below the observation line was determined by forward calculation using the ray tracing method [Zelt and Smith, 1992]. The P-wave velocity structure below the volcano, assuming a layered structure, was found to be as follows. (1) The first layer extends for about 40 km around the summit and to a depth of 1-2 km. The P-wave velocity is 2.5 km/s on the upper surface of the layer and 3.5 km/s on the lower interface. (2) The second layer has P-wave velocities of 4.0 km/s on the top interface and 5.5 km/s at the lower interface. The layer is 25 km thick to the west of the summit and 1-2 km thick to the east, and forms a dome shape with a peak altitude of 2000 m directly below the summit. (3) The third layer is 5-12 km thick and has P-wave velocities of 5.7 km/s at the top interface and 6.5 km/s at the lower interface. This layer reaches shallower levels to the east of the summit, corresponding to the area where the second layer is thinner. Mt. Fuji is located slightly back from where the Philippine Sea Plate subducts below the Eurasian plate in association with collision with the Izu Peninsula. Matsuda (1971) suggested that Mt. Fuji lies on the same uplifted body as

  20. Earthquakes & Volcanoes, Volume 23, Number 6, 1992

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,; Gordon, David W.

    1993-01-01

    Earthquakes and Volcanoes is published bimonthly by the U.S. Geological Survey to provide current information on earthquakes and seismology, volcanoes, and related natural hazards of interest to both generalized and specialized readers.

  1. Lifespans of Cascade Arc volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvert, A. T.

    2015-12-01

    Compiled argon ages reveal inception, eruptive episodes, ages, and durations of Cascade stratovolcanoes and their ancestral predecessors. Geologic mapping and geochronology show that most Cascade volcanoes grew episodically on multiple scales with periods of elevated behavior lasting hundreds of years to ca. 100 kyr. Notable examples include the paleomag-constrained, few-hundred-year-long building of the entire 15-20 km3 Shastina edifice at Mt. Shasta, the 100 kyr-long episode that produced half of Mt. Rainier's output, and the 30 kyr-long episode responsible for all of South and Middle Sister. Despite significant differences in timing and rates of construction, total durations of active and ancestral volcanoes at discrete central-vent locations are similar. Glacier Peak, Mt. Rainier, Mt. Adams, Mt. Hood, and Mt. Mazama all have inception ages of 400-600 ka. Mt. St. Helens, Mt. Jefferson, Newberry Volcano, Mt. Shasta and Lassen Domefield have more recent inception ages of 200-300 ka. Only the Sisters cluster and Mt. Baker have established eruptive histories spanning less than 50 kyr. Ancestral volcanoes centered 5-20 km from active stratocones appear to have similar total durations (200-600 kyr), but are less well exposed and dated. The underlying mechanisms governing volcano lifecycles are cryptic, presumably involving tectonic and plumbing changes and perhaps circulation cycles in the mantle wedge, but are remarkably consistent along the arc.

  2. Volcano surveillance using infrared cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spampinato, Letizia; Calvari, Sonia; Oppenheimer, Clive; Boschi, Enzo

    2011-05-01

    Volcanic eruptions are commonly preceded, accompanied, and followed by variations of a number of detectable geophysical and geochemical manifestations. Many remote sensing techniques have been applied to tracking anomalies and eruptive precursors, and monitoring ongoing volcanic eruptions, offering obvious advantages over in situ techniques especially during hazardous activity. Whilst spaceborne instruments provide a distinct advantage for collecting data remotely in this regard, they still cannot match the spatial detail or time resolution achievable using portable imagers on the ground or aircraft. Hand-held infrared camera technology has advanced significantly over the last decade, resulting in a proliferation of commercially available instruments, such that volcano observatories are increasingly implementing them in monitoring efforts. Improved thermal surveillance of active volcanoes has not only enhanced hazard assessment but it has contributed substantially to understanding a variety of volcanic processes. Drawing on over a decade of operational volcano surveillance in Italy, we provide here a critical review of the application of infrared thermal cameras to volcano monitoring. Following a summary of key physical principles, instrument capabilities, and the practicalities and methods of data collection, we discuss the types of information that can be retrieved from thermal imagery and what they have contributed to hazard assessment and risk management, and to physical volcanology. With continued developments in thermal imager technology and lower instrument costs, there will be increasing opportunity to gather valuable observations of volcanoes. It is thus timely to review the state of the art and we hope thereby to stimulate further research and innovation in this area.

  3. An unusual volcano on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, H. J.; Plaut, J. J.; Schenk, P. M.; Head, J. W.

    1992-01-01

    Materials that issued from an unusual Venusian volcano produced (1) a complex domical structure about 100 km across with thick, broad flow lobes up to 41 wide, (2) an extensive sheet of thick flows, and (3) radar-bright surfaces that extend to 360-400 km from the volcano. Altimetry indicates that the relief of the domical structure is about 0.5-1.1 km. The lobes and flows have prominant regularly spaced ridges about 686-820 m apart. Thick flows with large ridge separations and broad lobes are rare on Venus. The viscosities of these flows were larger than those of most lava flows on Venus. Comparisons of the dimensions of the volcano's lobes with lava flows on earth suggest that the Venusian lavas may have large silica contents. Radar-bright surfaces around the volcano may represent the result of an explosive eruption or very thin deposits of low-viscosity lavas. Thus, the radar-bright surfaces and lavas of the volcano were derived from a magma that differentiated within the crust or mantle of Venus. The differentiation produced (1) a gas-rich low-viscosity phase, (2) high-viscosity lavas, and (3) a residual primary magma.

  4. Seismic signals from Lascar Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellweg, M.

    1999-03-01

    Lascar, the most active volcano in northern Chile, lies near the center of the region studied during the Proyecto de Investigación Sismológica de la Cordillera Occidental 94 (PISCO '94). Its largest historical eruption occurred on 19 April 1993. By the time of the PISCO '94 deployment, its activity consisted mainly of a plume of water vapor and SO 2. In April and May 1994, three short-period, three-component seismometers were placed on the flanks of the volcano, augmenting the broadband seismometer located on the NW flank of the volcano during the entire deployment. In addition to the usual seismic signals recorded at volcanoes, Lascar produced two unique tremor types: Rapid-fire tremor and harmonic tremor. Rapid-fire tremor appears to be a sequence of very similar, but independent, "impulsive" events with a large range of amplitudes. Harmonic tremor, on the other hand, is a continuous, cyclic signal lasting several hours. It is characterized by a spectrum with peaks at a fundamental frequency and its integer multiples. Both types of tremor seem to be generated by movement of fluids in the volcano, most probably water, steam or gas.

  5. Aerogeophysical measurements of collapse-prone hydrothermally altered zones at Mount Rainier volcano

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Finn, C.A.; Sisson, T.W.; Deszcz-Pan, M.

    2001-01-01

    Hydrothermally altered rocks can weaken volcanoes, increasing the potential for catastrophic sector collapses that can lead to destructive debris flows1. Evaluating the hazards associated with such alteration is difficult because alteration has been mapped on few active volcanoes1-4 and the distribution and severity of subsurface alteration is largely unknown on any active volcano. At Mount Rainier volcano (Washington, USA), collapses of hydrothermally altered edifice flanks have generated numerous extensive debris flows5,6 and future collapses could threaten areas that are now densely populated7. Preliminary geological mapping and remote-sensing data indicated that exposed alteration is contained in a dyke-controlled belt trending east-west that passes through the volcano's summit3-5,8. But here we present helicopter-borne electromagnetic and magnetic data, combined with detailed geological mapping, to show that appreciable thicknesses of mostly buried hydrothermally altered rock lie mainly in the upper west flank of Mount Rainier. We identify this as the likely source for future large debris flows. But as negligible amounts of highly altered rock lie in the volcano's core, this might impede collapse retrogression and so limit the volumes and inundation areas of future debris flows. Our results demonstrate that high-resolution geophysical and geological observations can yield unprecedented views of the three-dimensional distribution of altered rock.

  6. Mangroves and shoreline change on Molokai, Hawaii: Assessing the role of introduced Rhizophora mangle in sediment dynamics and coastal change using remote sensing and GIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Iorio, Margaret Mary

    The Florida red mangrove, Rhizophora mangle, was introduced to the high volcanic island of Molokai, Hawaii in 1902 to trap sediment and stabilize eroding coastal mudflats along the island's reef-fringed south coast. This prolific invasive species now occupies 2.4 km2 of inter-tidal land and borders approximately 20% of the south coast shoreline. Integrating the fundamentals of remote sensing and Geographical Information Systems, this research investigates the effects of mangrove introduction on sediment dynamics and coastal change on south Molokai throughout the 20th century and provides a baseline of mangrove distribution, a detailed record of shoreline change rates, and a chronological history of island land use and environmental change. Monitoring of coastal change associated with mangroves is essential to understanding how natural coastal ecosystems react to alien species introductions and adapt overall to changing climatic regimes. Comparing the accuracy of various remote sensing instruments and processing techniques, this study has shown that the remote sensing with modern airborne and satellite sensors offers an effective management tool for mapping baseline conditions and monitoring change in remote island environments like that on the south coast of Molokai. Shoreline change assessment found that shoreline change rates on the island's south coast varied both alongshore and through time and that the dominant change has been one of progradation. Rates of change peaked in the early part of the 20th century and have since decayed exponentially over time. Changing land use practices coupled with the introduction of invasive species may have strongly influenced observed variability in rates of coastal change. Field observations and sediment analysis suggest that sediment transfer across the coastal boundary on the mangrove-fringed south coast is relatively limited and appears to be mainly event-driven. For shallow, reef-fringed, coastal regions vulnerable to

  7. Global Volcano Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparks, R. S. J.; Loughlin, S. C.; Cottrell, E.; Valentine, G.; Newhall, C.; Jolly, G.; Papale, P.; Takarada, S.; Crosweller, S.; Nayembil, M.; Arora, B.; Lowndes, J.; Connor, C.; Eichelberger, J.; Nadim, F.; Smolka, A.; Michel, G.; Muir-Wood, R.; Horwell, C.

    2012-04-01

    Over 600 million people live close enough to active volcanoes to be affected when they erupt. Volcanic eruptions cause loss of life, significant economic losses and severe disruption to people's lives, as highlighted by the recent eruption of Mount Merapi in Indonesia. The eruption of Eyjafjallajökull, Iceland in 2010 illustrated the potential of even small eruptions to have major impact on the modern world through disruption of complex critical infrastructure and business. The effects in the developing world on economic growth and development can be severe. There is evidence that large eruptions can cause a change in the earth's climate for several years afterwards. Aside from meteor impact and possibly an extreme solar event, very large magnitude explosive volcanic eruptions may be the only natural hazard that could cause a global catastrophe. GVM is a growing international collaboration that aims to create a sustainable, accessible information platform on volcanic hazard and risk. We are designing and developing an integrated database system of volcanic hazards, vulnerability and exposure with internationally agreed metadata standards. GVM will establish methodologies for analysis of the data (eg vulnerability indices) to inform risk assessment, develop complementary hazards models and create relevant hazards and risk assessment tools. GVM will develop the capability to anticipate future volcanism and its consequences. NERC is funding the start-up of this initiative for three years from November 2011. GVM builds directly on the VOGRIPA project started as part of the GRIP (Global Risk Identification Programme) in 2004 under the auspices of the World Bank and UN. Major international initiatives and partners such as the Smithsonian Institution - Global Volcanism Program, State University of New York at Buffalo - VHub, Earth Observatory of Singapore - WOVOdat and many others underpin GVM.

  8. Volcanoes and global catastrophes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simkin, Tom

    1988-01-01

    The search for a single explanation for global mass extinctions has let to polarization and the controversies that are often fueled by widespread media attention. The historic record shows a roughly linear log-log relation between the frequency of explosive volcanic eruptions and the volume of their products. Eruptions such as Mt. St. Helens 1980 produce on the order of 1 cu km of tephra, destroying life over areas in the 10 to 100 sq km range, and take place, on the average, once or twice a decade. Eruptions producing 10 cu km take place several times a century and, like Krakatau 1883, destroy life over 100 to 1000 sq km areas while producing clear global atmospheric effects. Eruptions producting 10,000 cu km are known from the Quaternary record, and extrapolation from the historic record suggests that they occur perhaps once in 20,000 years, but none has occurred in historic time and little is known of their biologic effects. Even larger eruptions must also exist in the geologic record, but documentation of their volume becomes increasingly difficult as their age increases. The conclusion is inescapable that prehistoric eruptions have produced catastrophes on a global scale: only the magnitude of the associated mortality is in question. Differentiation of large magma chambers is on a time scale of thousands to millions of years, and explosive volcanoes are clearly concentrated in narrow belts near converging plate margins. Volcanism cannot be dismissed as a producer of global catastrophes. Its role in major extinctions is likely to be at least contributory and may well be large. More attention should be paid to global effects of the many huge eruptions in the geologic record that dwarf those known in historic time.

  9. Remote sensing of volcanos and volcanic terrains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mouginis-Mark, Peter J.; Francis, Peter W.; Wilson, Lionel; Pieri, David C.; Self, Stephen; Rose, William I.; Wood, Charles A.

    1989-01-01

    The possibility of using remote sensing to monitor potentially dangerous volcanoes is discussed. Thermal studies of active volcanoes are considered along with using weather satellites to track eruption plumes and radar measurements to study lava flow morphology and topography. The planned use of orbiting platforms to study emissions from volcanoes and the rate of change of volcanic landforms is considered.

  10. Remote Sensing of Active Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, Peter; Rothery, David

    The synoptic coverage offered by satellites provides unparalleled opportunities for monitoring active volcanoes, and opens new avenues of scientific inquiry. Thermal infrared radiation can be used to monitor levels of activity, which is useful for automated eruption detection and for studying the emplacement of lava flows. Satellite radars can observe volcanoes through clouds or at night, and provide high-resolution topographic data. In favorable conditions, radar inteferometery can be used to measure ground deformation associated with eruptive activity on a centimetric scale. Clouds from explosive eruptions present a pressing hazard to aviation; therefore, techniques are being developed to assess eruption cloud height and to discriminate between ash and meterological clouds. The multitude of sensors to be launched on future generations of space platforms promises to greatly enhance volcanological studies, but a satellite dedicated to volcanology is needed to meet requirements of aviation safety and volcano monitoring.

  11. Volcano Hazards - A National Threat

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2006-01-01

    When the violent energy of a volcano is unleashed, the results are often catastrophic. The risks to life, property, and infrastructure from volcanoes are escalating as more and more people live, work, play, and travel in volcanic regions. Since 1980, 45 eruptions and 15 cases of notable volcanic unrest have occurred at 33 U.S. volcanoes. Lava flows, debris avalanches, and explosive blasts have invaded communities, swept people to their deaths, choked major riverways, destroyed bridges, and devastated huge tracts of forest. Noxious volcanic gas emissions have caused widespread lung problems. Airborne ash clouds have disrupted the health, lives, and businesses of hundreds of thousands of people; caused millions of dollars of aircraft damage; and nearly brought down passenger flights.

  12. Three-dimensional P-wave velocity structure of Damavand Volcano, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostafanejad, A.; Shomali, H.

    2009-04-01

    Damavand volcano is the highest peak in the Middle East ( 5670 m ). It is a large intraplate composite cone representing an accumulation of more than 400 km3 of trachyandesite lavas and pyroclastic material overlying the active fold and-thrust belt of the Alborz Mountains,the range that fringes the southern Caspian Sea. It shows fumarolic activity near the summit but no evidence of eruption in the past 1000 yr. The target region, Damavand volcano, is a Quaternary age volcano laying about 65 km northeast of Tehran metropolitan, Iran. A data set of over 1200 earthquakes recorded on a local 19 station short-period network between 1996 and 2006 provided by the Iranian Seismological Centre (ISC) is used for inversion in a well constrained and worldwide adopted code (SIMULPS). A 3-D velocity model beneath Damavand volcano has been obtained through inversion of P-wave arrivals of local earthquakes. About 1200 seismic events distributed around this volcano from surface up to a depth of about 30 km have been used to infer the P-wave velocity structure. The seismic arrival times were directly inverted using a 1D velocity model optimally representing the background structure. We used different grid spacing that provided detailed images of the volcano in order to investigate whether or not the anomalies are resolved by the data or are artifacts of the inversion. The resolution analysis carefully performed on the model parameters allowed the determination of a more reliable final model that represented the best results for the velocity structure beneath the volcano. The final model revealed an anomalous structure with a high velocity anomaly located beneath the volcano and a low velocity anomaly dominated the shallower depths. The spatial pattern of 3D velocity anomalies resolved in the region appears to be correlated at surface with the distribution of seismicity and major tectonic units and faults.

  13. Of Rings and Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-01-01

    show it. The bright spot close to the equator is the remnant of a giant storm in Saturn's extended atmosphere that has lasted more than 5 years. The present photo provides what is possibly the sharpest view of the ring system ever achieved from a ground-based observatory . Many structures are visible, the most obvious being the main ring sections, the inner C-region (here comparatively dark), the middle B-region (here relatively bright) and the outer A-region, and also the obvious dark "divisions", including the well-known, broad Cassini division between the A- and B-regions, as well as the Encke division close to the external edge of the A-region and the Colombo division in the C-region. Moreover, many narrow rings can be seen at this high image resolution , in particular within the C-region - they may be compared with those seen by the Voyager spacecraft during the flybys, cf. the weblinks below. This image demonstrates the capability of NAOS-CONICA to observe also extended objects with excellent spatial resolution. It is a composite of four short-exposure images taken through the near-infrared H (wavelength 1.6 µm) and K (2.2 µm) filters. This observation was particularly difficult because of the motion of Saturn during the exposure. To provide the best possible images, the Adaptive Optics system of NAOS was pointed towards the Saturnian moon Tethys , while the image of Saturn was kept at a fixed position on the CONICA detector by means of "differential tracking" (compensating for the different motions in the sky of Saturn and Tethys). This is also why the (faint) image of Tethys - visible south of Saturn (i.e., below the planet in PR Photo 04a/02 ) - appears slightly trailed. Io - volcanoes and sulphur ESO PR Photo 04b/02 ESO PR Photo 04b/02 [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 478 pix - 39k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 955 pix - 112k] ESO PR Photo 04c/02 ESO PR Photo 04c/02 [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 469 pix - 58k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 937 pix - 368k] Caption : PR Photo 04b/02 shows

  14. Alaska volcanoes guidebook for teachers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Adleman, Jennifer N.

    2011-01-01

    Alaska’s volcanoes, like its abundant glaciers, charismatic wildlife, and wild expanses inspire and ignite scientific curiosity and generate an ever-growing source of questions for students in Alaska and throughout the world. Alaska is home to more than 140 volcanoes, which have been active over the last 2 million years. About 90 of these volcanoes have been active within the last 10,000 years and more than 50 of these have been active since about 1700. The volcanoes in Alaska make up well over three-quarters of volcanoes in the United States that have erupted in the last 200 years. In fact, Alaska’s volcanoes erupt so frequently that it is almost guaranteed that an Alaskan will experience a volcanic eruption in his or her lifetime, and it is likely they will experience more than one. It is hard to imagine a better place for students to explore active volcanism and to understand volcanic hazards, phenomena, and global impacts. Previously developed teachers’ guidebooks with an emphasis on the volcanoes in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park (Mattox, 1994) and Mount Rainier National Park in the Cascade Range (Driedger and others, 2005) provide place-based resources and activities for use in other volcanic regions in the United States. Along the lines of this tradition, this guidebook serves to provide locally relevant and useful resources and activities for the exploration of numerous and truly unique volcanic landscapes in Alaska. This guidebook provides supplemental teaching materials to be used by Alaskan students who will be inspired to become educated and prepared for inevitable future volcanic activity in Alaska. The lessons and activities in this guidebook are meant to supplement and enhance existing science content already being taught in grade levels 6–12. Correlations with Alaska State Science Standards and Grade Level Expectations adopted by the Alaska State Department of Education and Early Development (2006) for grades six through eleven are listed at

  15. Large landslides from oceanic volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holcomb, R.T.; Searle, R.C.

    1991-01-01

    Large landslides are ubiquitous around the submarine flanks of Hawaiian volcanoes, and GLORIA has also revealed large landslides offshore from Tristan da Cunha and El Hierro. On both of the latter islands, steep flanks formerly attributed to tilting or marine erosion have been reinterpreted as landslide headwalls mantled by younger lava flows. These landslides occur in a wide range of settings and probably represent only a small sample from a large population. They may explain the large volumes of archipelagic aprons and the stellate shapes of many oceanic volcanoes. Large landslides and associated tsunamis pose hazards to many islands. -from Authors

  16. Climbing in the high volcanoes of central Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Secor, R. J.

    1984-01-01

    A chain of volcanoes extends across central Mexico along the 19th parallel, a line just south of Mexico City. The westernmost of these peaks is Nevado de Colima at 4,636 feet above sea level. A subsidiary summit of Nevado de Colima is Volcan de Colima, locally called Fuego (fire) it still emits sulphurous fumes and an occasional plume of smoke since its disastrous eruption in 1941. Parictuin, now dormant, was born in the fall of 1943 when a cornfield suddenly erupted. Within 18 months, the cone grew more than 1,700 feet. Nevado de Toluca is a 15,433-foot volcanic peak south of the city of Toluca. Just southeast of Mexico City are two high volcanoes that are permanently covered by snow: Iztaccihuatl (17,342 fet) and Popocatepetl (17,887 feet) Further east is the third highest mountain in North America: 18,700-foot Citlateptl, or El Pico de Orizaba. North of these high peaks are two volcanoes, 14, 436-foot La Malinche and Cofre de Perote at 14,048 feet. This range of mountains is known variously as the Cordillera de Anahuac, the Sierra Volcanica Transversal, or the Cordillera Neovolcanica. 

  17. High resolution seismic attenuation tomography at Medicine Lake Volcano, California

    SciTech Connect

    Zucca, J.J.; Kasameyer, P.W.

    1987-07-10

    Medicine Lake Volcano, a broad shield volcano about 50km east of Mount Shasta in northern California, produced rhylotic eruptions as recently as 400 years ago. Because of this recent activity it is of considerable interest to producers of geothermal energy. In a joint project sponsored by the Geothermal Research Program of the USGS and the Division of Geothermal and Hydropower Division of the US-DOE, the USGS and LLNL conducted an active seismic experiment designed to explore the area beneath and around the caldera. The experiment of eight explosions detonated in a 50 km radius circle around the volcano recorded on a 11 x 15 km grid of 140 seismographs. The travel time data from the experiment have been inverted for structure and are presented elsewhere in this volume. In this paper we present the results of an inversion for 1/Q structure using t* data in a modified Aki inversion scheme. Although the data are noisy, we find that in general attenuative zones correlate with low velocity zones. In particular, we observe a high 1/Q zone roughly in the center of the caldera at 4 km depth in between two large recent dacite flows. This zone could represent the still molten or partially molten source of the flows.

  18. Drilling, Construction, Water-Level, and Water-Quality Information for the Kualapuu Deep Monitor Well, 4-0800-01, Molokai, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oki, Delwyn S.; Bauer, Glenn R.

    2001-01-01

    A monitor well was completed in January 2001 by the U.S. Geological Survey in the Kualapuu area of central Molokai, Hawaii that allows for monitoring the thicknesses of the freshwater body and the upper part of the underlying freshwater-saltwater transition zone. The well was drilled in cooperation with the State Department of Hawaiian Home Lands and the Maui County Department of Water Supply, and is located near the area that supplies much of the drinking water on Molokai. The well is at a ground-surface elevation of about 982 feet and penetrated a 1,585-foot section of soil and volcanic rock to a depth of 603 feet below sea level. Prior to casing, a cave-in caused the bottom 55 feet of the well to be filled with rocks originating from a zone above. Thus, the final well depth reported by the driller was 1,530 feet. Measured water levels in the well during the period from February 1 to July 13, 2001 range from 8.68 to 9.05 feet above sea level. The most recent available water-conductivity profile from July 13, 2001 indicates that the lowest salinity water in the well is in the upper zone from the water table to a depth of about 220 feet below sea level. Below this upper zone, water salinity increases with depth. The water-temperature profile from July 13, 2001 indicates that the lowest temperature water (20.2 degrees Celsius) in the well is located in the upper zone from the water table to a depth of about 200 feet below sea level. Water temperature increases to 24.5 degrees Celsius near the bottom of the measured profile, 507 feet below sea level.

  19. Laboratory volcano geodesy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Færøvik Johannessen, Rikke; Galland, Olivier; Mair, Karen

    2014-05-01

    intrusion can be excavated and photographed from several angles to compute its 3D shape with the same photogrammetry method. Then, the surface deformation pattern can be directly compared with the shape of underlying intrusion. This quantitative dataset is essential to quantitatively test and validate classical volcano geodetic models.

  20. Using multiplets to track volcanic processes at Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thelen, W. A.

    2011-12-01

    Multiplets, or repeating earthquakes, are commonly observed at volcanoes, particularly those exhibiting unrest. At Kilauea, multiplets have been observed as part of long period (LP) earthquake swarms [Battaglia et al., 2003] and as volcano-tectonic (VT) earthquakes associated with dike intrusion [Rubin et al., 1998]. The focus of most previous studies has been on the precise location of the multiplets based on reviewed absolute locations, a process that can require extensive human intervention and post-processing. Conversely, the detection of multiplets and measurement of multiplet parameters can be done in real-time without human interaction with locations approximated by the stations that best record the multiplet. The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) is in the process of implementing and testing an algorithm to detect multiplets in near-real time and to analyze certain metrics to provide enhanced interpretive insights into ongoing volcanic processes. Metrics such as multiplet percent of total seismicity, multiplet event recurrence interval, multiplet lifespan, average event amplitude, and multiplet event amplitude variability have been shown to be valuable in understanding volcanic processes at Bezymianny Volcano, Russia and Mount St. Helens, Washington and thus are tracked as part of the algorithm. The near real-time implementation of the algorithm can be triggered from an earthworm subnet trigger or other triggering algorithm and employs a MySQL database to store results, similar to an algorithm implemented by Got et al. [2002]. Initial results using this algorithm to analyze VT earthquakes along Kilauea's Upper East Rift Zone between September 2010 and August 2011 show that periods of summit pressurization coincide with ample multiplet development. Summit pressurization is loosely defined by high rates of seismicity within the summit and Upper East Rift areas, coincident with lava high stands in the Halema`uma`u lava lake. High percentages, up to 100%, of

  1. A Newly Recognized Shield Volcano Southwest of Oahu Island, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, E.; Moore, J. G.; Yokose, H.; Clague, D. A.; Nakagawa, M.; Kani, T.; Coombs, M.; Moore, G.; Harada, Y.; Kunikiyo, T.; Robinson, J.

    2001-12-01

    During the 2001 Hawaiian cruise of the JAMSTEC research ship Kairei (with ROV-Kaiko; P.I.: E. Takahashi, Co P.I.: T. Kanamatsu), Seabeam mapping revealed a previously unidentified volcanic edifice (submarine shield) located about 100 km southwest of Oahu. The volcano (centered at 21\\deg35'N, 158\\deg45'W) is approximately 100 km in diameter and 0.5 km high with its summit at 4200 m depth. Near the top of the volcano, a lava flow field with high reflectivity in the GLORIA image has been previously reported (Moore et al., 1989) but the presence of the shield volcano was not known. The low submarine shield is studded with numerous flat top cones typically less than 100m in height and several km across (similar to those described by Clague et al, 2000). In addition, more than 30 steep cones (circular to irregular in shape; typically 300 to 500 m in height) are distributed over the submarine shield volcano. Much of the east side of the volcano is mantled by thick sediment probably due to landsliding of Waianae volcano. The maximum thickness of such material is more than a few hundred meters. Accordingly, the flat top cones are not visible (if present) and only some steep cones are exposed on the east side. ROV dive K203 (20\\deg40.0'N, 158\\deg51.5'W) collected samples from the high-reflectivity lava flow shown on the GLORIA image as well as from one of the steep cones. Judging from the thin sediment and the thickness of the Mn-coating (1-2 mm), the high-reflectivity lava flow may be similar in age to the North Arch alkalic lavas (0.5 to 1.5 Ma, Clague et al., 1990). The steep cone consists of vesiculated pillow lava and hyaloclastite and is apparently older than the flow judging from the thick sediment cover and the Mn-coating (up to 6 mm) similar to that on the north slope of the ca. 3 Ma old Koolau volcano (Shinozaki et al., 2001). The high vesicularity of some of the lavas (collected at depths of 4000 m) indicates a high volatile content and almost certainly an

  2. Active high-resolution seismic tomography of compressional wave velocity and attenuation structure at Medicine Lake Volcano, Northern California Cascade Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, John R.; Zucca, John J.

    1988-12-01

    We determine compressional wave velocity and attenuation structures for the upper crust beneath Medicine Lake volcano in northeast California using a high-resolution active source seismic tomography method. Medicine Lake volcano is a basalt through rhyolite shield volcano of the Cascade Range, lying east of the range axis. The Pg wave from eight explosive sources which has traveled upward through the target volume to a dense array of 140 seismographs provides 1- to 2-km resolution in the upper 5 to 7 km of the crust beneath the volcano. The experiment tests the hypothesis that Cascade Range volcanoes of this type are underlain only by small silicic magma chambers. We image a low-velocity low-Q region not larger than a few tens of cubic kilometers in volume beneath the summit caldera, supporting the hypothesis. A shallower high-velocity high-density feature, previously known to be present, is imaged for the first time in full plan view; it is east-west elongate, paralleling a topographic lineament between Medicine Lake volcano and Mount Shasta. This lineament is interpreted to be the result of an old crustal weakness now affecting the emplacement of magma, both on direct ascent from the lower crust and mantle and in migration from the shallow silicic chamber to summit vents. Differences between this high-velocity feature and the equivalent feature at Newbeny volcano, a volcano in central Oregon resembling Medicine Lake volcano, may partly explain the scarcity of surface hydrothermal features at Medicine Lake volcano. A major low-velocity low-Q feature beneath the southeast flank of the volcano, in an area with no Holocene vents, is interpreted as tephra, flows, and sediments from the volcano deeply ponded on the downthrown side of the Gillem fault, a normal fault mapped at the surface north of the volcano. A high-Q normal-velocity feature beneath the north rim of the summit caldera may be a small, possibly hot, subsolidus intrusion. A high-velocity low-Q region

  3. On the geometric form of volcanoes - Comment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, C. A.

    1982-01-01

    The model of Lacey et al. (1981) accounting for the geometric regularity and approximate cone shape of volcanoes is discussed. It is pointed out that, contrary to the model, volcano eruptions do not occur randomly in elevation and azimuth, but are commonly restricted to summit vents and a few well defined flank zones, so that the form of a volcano is determined by its vent locations and styles of eruption. Other false predictions of the model include the constancy of lava volumes at all vent elevations, the increase in volcano radius as the square root of time, a critical height for volcano growth, the influence of planetary gravity on volcano height and the negligible influence of ash falls and flows and erosional deposition. It is noted that the model of Shteynberg and Solov'yev, in which cone shape is related to stresses due to increasing cone height, may provide a better understanding of volcano morphology.

  4. Nyiragongo volcano, Congo, Pre-eruption Perspective View, SRTM / Landsat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Nyiragongo volcano in the Congo erupted on January 17, 2002, and subsequently sent streams of lava into the city of Goma on the north shore of Lake Kivu. More than 100 people were killed, more than 12000 homes were destroyed, and hundreds of thousands were forced to flee the broader community of nearly half a million people. This computer generated visualization combines a Landsat satellite image and an elevation model from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) to provide a view of both the volcano and the city of Goma, looking slightly east of north.

    Nyiragongo is the steep volcano on the right, Lake Kivu is in the foreground, and the city of Goma has a light pink speckled appearance along the shoreline. Nyiragongo peaks at about 3470 meters (11,380 feet) elevation and reaches almost exactly 2000 meters (6560 feet) above Lake Kivu. The shorter but broader Nyamuragira volcano appears in the left background. Topographic expression has been exaggerated vertically by a factor of 1.5 for this visualization.

    Goma, Lake Kivu, Nyiragongo, Nyamuragira and other nearby volcanoes sit within the East African Rift Valley, a zone where tectonic processes are cracking, stretching, and lowering the Earth's crust. Volcanic activity is common here, and older but geologically recent lava flows (magenta in this depiction) are particularly apparent on the flanks of the Nyamuragira volcano.

    The Landsat image used here was acquired on December 11, 2001, about a month before the eruption, and shows an unusually cloud-free view of this tropical terrain. Minor clouds and their shadows were digitally removed to clarify the view, topographic shading derived from the SRTM elevation model was added to the Landsat image, and a false sky was added.

    Landsat has been providing visible and infrared views of the Earth since 1972. SRTM elevation data matches the 30-meter (98-foot) resolution of most Landsat images and substantially helps in analyzing the large and growing

  5. Mount Rainier, a decade volcano

    SciTech Connect

    Kuehn, S.C.; Hooper, P.R. . Dept. of Geology); Eggers, A.E. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-04-01

    Mount Rainier, recently designated as a decade volcano, is a 14,410 foot landmark which towers over the heavily populated southern Puget Sound Lowland of Washington State. It last erupted in the mid-1800's and is an obvious threat to this area, yet Rainier has received little detailed study. Previous work has divided Rainier into two distinct pre-glacial eruptive episodes and one post-glacial eruptive episode. In a pilot project, the authors analyzed 253 well-located samples from the volcano for 27 major and trace elements. Their objective is to test the value of chemical compositions as a tool in mapping the stratigraphy and understanding the eruptive history of the volcano which they regard as prerequisite to determining the petrogenesis and potential hazard of the volcano. The preliminary data demonstrates that variation between flows is significantly greater than intra-flow variation -- a necessary condition for stratigraphic use. Numerous flows or groups of flows can be distinguished chemically. It is also apparent from the small variation in Zr abundances and considerable variation in such ratios as Ba/Nb that fractional crystallization plays a subordinate role to some form of mixing process in the origin of the Mount Rainier lavas.

  6. Infrared surveys of Hawaiian volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fischer, W. A.; Moxham, R.M.; Polcyn, F.; Landis, G.H.

    1964-01-01

    Aerial infrared-sensor surveys of Kilauea volcano have depicted the areal extent and the relative intensity of abnormal thermal features in the caldera area of the volcano and along its associated rift zones. Many of these anomalies show correlation with visible steaming and reflect convective transfer of heat to the surface from subterranean sources. Structural details of the volcano, some not evident from surface observation, are also delineated by their thermal abnormalities. Several changes were observed in the patterns of infrared emission during the period of study; two such changes show correlation in location with subsequent eruptions, but the cause-and-effect relationship is uncertain. Thermal anomalies were also observed on the southwest flank of Mauna Loa; images of other volcanoes on the island of Hawaii, and of Haleakala on the island of Maui, revealed no thermal abnormalities. Approximately 25 large springs issuing into the ocean around the periphery of Hawaii have been detected. Infrared emission varies widely with surface texture and composition, suggesting that similar observations may have value for estimating surface conditions on the moon or planets.

  7. Infrared science of Hawaiian volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fischer, William A.; Moxham, R.M.; Polcyn, R.C.; Landis, G.H.

    1964-01-01

    Aerial infrared-sensor surveys of Kilauea volcano have depicted the areal extent and the relative intensity of abnormal thermal features in the caldera area of the volcano and along its associated rift zones. Many of these anomalies show correlation with visible steaming and reflect convective transfer of heat to the surface from subterranean sources. Structural details of the volcano, some not evident from surface observation, are also delineated by their thermal abnormalities. Several changes were observed in the patterns of infrared emission during the period of study; two such changes show correlation in location with subsequent eruptions, but the cause-and-effect relationship is uncertain. Thermal anomalies were also observed on the southwest flank of Mauna Loa; images of other volcanoes on the island of Hawaii, and of Haleakala on the island of Maui, revealed no thermal abnormalities. Approximately 25 large springs is- suing into the ocean around the periphery of Hawaii have been detected. Infrared emission varies widely with surface texture and composition, suggesting that similar observations may have value for estimating surface conditions on the moon or planets.

  8. What Happened to Our Volcano?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangiante, Elaine Silva

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author presents an investigative approach to "understanding Earth changes." The author states that students were familiar with earthquakes and volcanoes in other regions of the world but never considered how the land beneath their feet had experienced changes over time. Here, their geology unit helped them understand and…

  9. Ceboruco Volcano Gravimetric Analysis, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez Cordoba, J.; Espindola, J. M.; Gutierrez, Q. J.; Garcia Serrano, A.; Zamora-Camacho, A.; Pinzon, J. I.; Nuñez-Cornu, F. J.

    2015-12-01

    The Ceboruco is a late Quaternary dacitic-andesitic stratovolcano, is located in the Tepic-Zacoalco graben in the western part of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB) near to Ahuacatlan and Jala towns in Mexico. There have been at least eight eruptions from this volcano in the last thousand years, and for this reason Ceboruco must be considered an active volcano whit the possibility of erupting again in the future. This work aims to contribute with a regional density contrasts model from gravity measurements of volcano area. 163 observations were measured every 500 meters with a Scintrex CG-5 gravimeter. We corrected data were measured in the area to filter information dependent of external gravitational fields or outside to object of study. Post-filtering of data, we obtained gravity anomalies distribution and with other supporting data (aeromagnetic and geological data) we made 8 profiles around Ceboruco to build an approximate model of density changes in the lithological units under the volcano.

  10. Late Holocene history of Chaitén Volcano: new evidence for a 17th century eruption

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lara, Luis E.; Moreno, Rodrigo; Amigo, Álvaro; Hoblitt, Richard P.; Pierson, Thomas C.

    2013-01-01

    Prior to May 2008, it was thought that the last eruption of Chaitén Volcano occurred more than 5,000 years ago, a rather long quiescent period for a volcano in such an active arc segment. However, increasingly more Holocene eruptions are being identified. This article presents both geological and historical evidence for late Holocene eruptive activity in the 17th century (AD 1625-1658), which included an explosive rhyolitic eruption that produced pumice ash fallout east of the volcano and caused channel aggradation in the Chaitén River. The extents of tephra fall and channel aggradation were similar to those of May 2008. Fine ash, pumice and obsidian fragments in the pre-2008 deposits are unequivocally derived from Chaitén Volcano. This finding has important implications for hazards assessment in the area and suggests the eruptive frequency and magnitude should be more thoroughly studied.

  11. Early growth of Kohala volcano and formation of long Hawaiian rift zones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lipman, P.W.; Calvert, A.T.

    2011-01-01

    Transitional-composition pillow basalts from the toe of the Hilo Ridge, collected from outcrop by submersible, have yielded the oldest ages known from the Island of Hawaii: 1138 ?? 34 to 1159 ?? 33 ka. Hilo Ridge has long been interpreted as a submarine rift zone of Mauna Kea, but the new ages validate proposals that it is the distal east rift zone of Kohala, the oldest subaerial volcano on the island. These ages constrain the inception of tholeiitic volcanism at Kohala, provide the first measured duration of tholeiitic shield building (???870 k.y.) for any Hawaiian volcano, and show that this 125-km-long rift zone developed to near-total length during early growth of Kohala. Long eastern-trending rift zones of Hawaiian volcanoes may follow fractures in oceanic crust activated by arching of the Hawaiian Swell in front of the propagating hotspot. ?? 2011 Geological Society of America.

  12. Space Radar Image of Taal Volcano, Philippines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This is an image of Taal volcano, near Manila on the island of Luzon in the Philippines. The black area in the center is Taal Lake, which nearly fills the 30-kilometer-diameter (18-mile) caldera. The caldera rim consists of deeply eroded hills and cliffs. The large island in Taal Lake, which itself contains a crater lake, is known as Volcano Island. The bright yellow patch on the southwest side of the island marks the site of an explosion crater that formed during a deadly eruption of Taal in 1965. The image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on its 78th orbit on October 5, 1994. The image shows an area approximately 56 kilometers by 112 kilometers (34 miles by 68 miles) that is centered at 14.0 degrees north latitude and 121.0 degrees east longitude. North is toward the upper right of the image. The colors in this image were obtained using the following radar channels: red represents the L-band (horizontally transmitted and received); green represents the L-band (horizontally transmitted and vertically received); blue represents the C-band (horizontally transmitted and vertically received). Since 1572, Taal has erupted at least 34 times. Since early 1991, the volcano has been restless, with swarms of earthquakes, new steaming areas, ground fracturing, and increases in water temperature of the lake. Volcanologists and other local authorities are carefully monitoring Taal to understand if the current activity may foretell an eruption. Taal is one of 15 'Decade Volcanoes' that have been identified by the volcanology community as presenting large potential hazards to population centers. The bright area in the upper right of the image is the densely populated city of Manila, only 50 kilometers (30 miles) north of the central crater. Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth

  13. Space Radar Image of Kliuchevskoi Volcano, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This is an image of the Kliuchevskoi volcano, Kamchatka, Russia, which began to erupt on September 30, 1994. Kliuchevskoi is the bright white peak surrounded by red slopes in the lower left portion of the image. The image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on its 25th orbit on October 1, 1994. The image shows an area approximately 30 kilometers by 60 kilometers (18.5 miles by 37 miles) that is centered at 56.18 degrees north latitude and 160.78 degrees east longitude. North is toward the top of the image. The Kamchatka volcanoes are among the most active volcanoes in the world. The volcanic zone sits above a tectonic plate boundary, where the Pacific plate is sinking beneath the northeast edge of the Eurasian plate. The Endeavour crew obtained dramatic video and photographic images of this region during the eruption, which will assist scientists in analyzing the dynamics of the current activity. The colors in this image were obtained using the following radar channels: red represents the L-band (horizontally transmitted and received); green represents the L-band (horizontally transmitted and vertically received); blue represents the C-band (horizontally transmitted and vertically received). The Kamchatka River runs from left to right across the image. An older, dormant volcanic region appears in green on the north side of the river. The current eruption included massive ejections of gas, vapor and ash, which reached altitudes of 20,000 meters (65,000 feet). New lava flows are visible on the flanks of Kliuchevskoi, appearing yellow/green in the image, superimposed on the red surfaces in the lower center. Melting snow triggered mudflows on the north flank of the volcano, which may threaten agricultural zones and other settlements in the valley to the north. Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars

  14. Lahar Hazards at Casita and San Cristóbal Volcanoes, Nicaragua

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vallance, J.W.; Schilling, S.P.; Devoli, G.; Reid, M.E.; Howell, M.M.; Brien, D.L.

    2004-01-01

    Casita and San Cristóbal volcanoes are part of a volcano complex situated at the eastern end of the Cordillera de los Maribios. Other centers of volcanism in the complex include El Chonco, Cerro Moyotepe, and La Pelona. At 1745 m, San Cristóbal is the highest and only historically active volcano of the complex. The volcano’s crater is 500 to 600 m across and elongate east to west; its western rim is more than 100 m higher than its eastern rim. The conical volcano is both steep and symmetrical. El Chonco, which lies west of San Cristóbal, is crudely conical but has been deeply dissected by streams. Cerro Moyotepe to the northeast of San Cristóbal is even more deeply incised by erosion than El Chonco, and its crater is breached by erosion. Casita volcano, about 5 km east of San Cristóbal volcano, comprises a broad ridge like form, elongate along an eastwest axis, that is deeply dissected. Nested along the ridge are two craters. The younger one, La Ollada crater, truncates an older smaller crater to the east near Casita’s summit (1430 m). La Ollada crater is about 1 km across and 100 m deep. Numerous small fumarole fields occur near the summit of Casita and on nearby slopes outside of the craters. Casita volcano overlaps the 3-km-wide crater of La Pelona to the east. Stream erosion has deeply incised the slopes of La Pelona, and it is likely the oldest center of the Casita-San Cristóbal volcano complex. In late October and early November 1998, torrential rains of Hurricane Mitch caused numerous slope failures in Central America. The most catastrophic occurred at Casita volcano, on October 30, 1998. At Casita, five days of heavy rain triggered a 1.6-million-cubic-meter rock and debris avalanche that generated an 2- to 4- million-cubic-meter debris flow that swept down the steep slopes of the volcano. The debris flow spread out across the volcano’s apron, destroyed two towns, and killed more than 2500 people. In prehistoric time, Casita erupted explosively

  15. Subsidence of Surtsey volcano, 1967 1991

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, James G.; Jakobsson, Sveinn; Holmjarn, Josef

    1992-12-01

    The Surtsey marine volcano was built on the southern insular shelf of Iceland, along the seaward extension of the east volcanic zone, during episodic explosive and effusive activity from 1963 to 1967. A 1600-m-long, east-west line of 42 bench marks was established across the island shortly after volcanic activity stopped. From 1967 to 1991 a series of leveling surveys measured the relative elevation of the original bench marks, as well as additional bench marks installed in 1979, 1982 and 1985. Concurrent measurements were made of water levels in a pit dug on the north coast, in a drill hole, and along the coastline exposed to the open ocean. These surveys indicate that the dominant vertical movement of Surtsey is a general subsidence of about 1.1±0.3 m during the 24-year period of observations. The rate of subsidence decreased from 15 20 cm/year for 1967 1968 to 1 2 cm/year in 1991. Greatest subsidence is centered about the eastern vent area. Through 1970, subsidence was locally greatest where the lava plain is thinnest, adjacent to the flanks of the eastern tephra cone. From 1982 onward, the region closest to the hydrothermal zone, which is best developed in the vicinity of the eastern vent, began showing less subsidence relative to the rest of the surveyed bench marks. The general subsidence of the island probably results from compaction of the volcanic material comprising Surtsey, compaction of the sea-floor sediments underlying the island, and possibly downwarping of the lithosphere due to the laod of Surtsey. The more localized early downwarping near the eastern tephra cone is apparently due to greater compaction of tephra relative to lava. The later diminished local subsidence near the hydrothermal zone is probably due to a minor volume increase caused by hydrous alteration of glassy tephra. However, this volume increase is concentrated at depth beneath the bottom of the 176-m-deep cased drillhole.

  16. Iridium emissions from Hawaiian volcanoes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finnegan, D. L.; Zoller, W. H.; Miller, T. M.

    1988-01-01

    Particle and gas samples were collected at Mauna Loa volcano during and after its eruption in March and April, 1984 and at Kilauea volcano in 1983, 1984, and 1985 during various phases of its ongoing activity. In the last two Kilauea sampling missions, samples were collected during eruptive activity. The samples were collected using a filterpack system consisting of a Teflon particle filter followed by a series of 4 base-treated Whatman filters. The samples were analyzed by INAA for over 40 elements. As previously reported in the literature, Ir was first detected on particle filters at the Mauna Loa Observatory and later from non-erupting high temperature vents at Kilauea. Since that time Ir was found in samples collected at Kilauea and Mauna Loa during fountaining activity as well as after eruptive activity. Enrichment factors for Ir in the volcanic fumes range from 10,000 to 100,000 relative to BHVO. Charcoal impregnated filters following a particle filter were collected to see if a significant amount of the Ir was in the gas phase during sample collection. Iridium was found on charcoal filters collected close to the vent, no Ir was found on the charcoal filters. This indicates that all of the Ir is in particulate form very soon after its release. Ratios of Ir to F and Cl were calculated for the samples from Mauna Loa and Kilauea collected during fountaining activity. The implications for the KT Ir anomaly are still unclear though as Ir was not found at volcanoes other than those at Hawaii. Further investigations are needed at other volcanoes to ascertain if basaltic volcanoes other than hot spots have Ir enrichments in their fumes.

  17. Remote sensing and tectonic analysis of active volcanoes in continental arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wessels, Rick Lee

    Variations in arc volcano spatial distribution and morphology are influenced by the crustal structure beneath the arc. In Colombia and Ecuador, most of the active volcanoes lie on or near regional arc-parallel fault zones, and many of the major volcanoes are aligned or elongated parallel to the faults. Two dominant volcano-fault geometry patterns exist: (1) From north to south, the orientation of the fractures and volcano-shapes changes along the arc from primarily north-northwest trending to east-northeast trending; and (2) From west to east, the fault and volcano alignment patterns vary from north-northwest trends at the outer edges of the arc to east-northeast trending in the middle of the arc. The fault and volcano orientation patterns are related to the age and type of crust being faulted during oblique subduction. The regionally active strike-slip faults in the Northern Andes and other arcs provide long-lasting paths for magma ascent that penetrate much deeper through the lithosphere than the secondary features. Local zones of extension and pre-existing fractures in the last several kilometers of lithosphere provide the plumbing that diverts magma slightly away from the primary linear volcanic front. The dissertation also describes a technique for merging multiple remote sensing data sets over the extremely rough terrain of silicic volcanoes. The major focus of this work was on overcoming coregistration errors from geometric distortion induced by local topography. The geometric distortion was compensated for by first creating an accurate base image with a combination of global positioning system (GPS) ground control, high resolution digital elevation models (DEM), and orthorectified aerial photographs. The individual sensor data were then rectified to the new reference base using triangulation geocoding. The final multi-layered, geocoded product is being used to enhance an existing thermal infrared technique for mapping complex textural patterns in silicic

  18. Effects of Ground-Water Withdrawal on Kaunakakai Stream Environmental Restoration Plan, Moloka`i, Hawai`i

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oki, Delwyn S.

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, in cooperation with the County of Maui Department of Public Works and Environmental Management, has proposed to construct 2.75 acres of shallow ponds and mudflats near the mouth of Kaunakakai Stream, Moloka`i, Hawai`i to restore habitat for the endangered native Hawaiian Stilt. Kaunakakai Stream is ephemeral upstream from the habitat-restoration site. Where the pond and wetland bottoms are below the water table, the ponds and wetland will be sustained by ground-water discharge during dry-weather conditions. Because ground water is the main source of water for the proposed ponds and wetland, a reduction of ground-water levels and discharge near the mouth of Kaunakakai Stream will have an effect on the availability of habitat. In response to concerns about the possible effects of ground-water withdrawal on the habitat restoration project near the mouth of Kaunakakai Stream, the U.S. Geological Survey undertook the present investigation to estimate, using an existing numerical ground-water-flow model, the changes in ground-water level and coastal discharge caused by redistributed and additional ground-water withdrawals. Steady-state water-level and coastal-discharge changes, relative to recent base-case conditions, were estimated for each of six withdrawal scenarios. Redistributed and additional ground-water withdrawals in the six scenarios were simulated from selected sites in the area between Kualapu`u and `Ualapu`e. For the scenarios tested, model results indicate that withdrawals from existing and proposed wells cause a water-level decline of about 0.1 ft in the vicinity of the Kaunakakai habitat-restoration site. In addition, model results indicate a reduction of ground-water discharge, ranging from 98,000 to 170,000 gal/d, to the model element containing the habitat-restoration site, although the existing spatial discretization in the model is too coarse to reliably estimate the reduction of ground-water discharge to the stream

  19. Preliminary Volcano-Hazard Assessment for Redoubt Volcano, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waythomas, Christopher F.; Dorava, Joseph M.; Miller, Thomas P.; Neal, Christina A.; McGimsey, Robert G.

    1997-01-01

    Redoubt Volcano is a stratovolcano located within a few hundred kilometers of more than half of the population of Alaska. This volcano has erupted explosively at least six times since historical observations began in 1778. The most recent eruption occurred in 1989-90 and similar eruptions can be expected in the future. The early part of the 1989-90 eruption was characterized by explosive emission of substantial volumes of volcanic ash to altitudes greater than 12 kilometers above sea level and widespread flooding of the Drift River valley. Later, the eruption became less violent, as developing lava domes collapsed, forming short-lived pyroclastic flows associated with low-level ash emission. Clouds of volcanic ash had significant effects on air travel as they drifted across Alaska, over Canada, and over parts of the conterminous United States causing damage to jet aircraft. Economic hardships were encountered by the people of south-central Alaska as a result of ash fallout. Based on new information gained from studies of the 1989-90 eruption, an updated assessment of the principal volcanic hazards is now possible. Volcanic hazards from a future eruption of Redoubt Volcano require public awareness and planning so that risks to life and property are reduced as much as possible.

  20. Morne aux Diables. a potentially active volcano in northern Dominica, Lesser Antilles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rheubottom, A. N.; Smith, A. L.; Roobol, M. J.

    2005-12-01

    The island of Dominica, which is located near the center of the Lesser Antilles island arc, comprises at least 8 potentially active volcanoes. One of these is Morne aux Diables, an isolated composite cone situated at the extreme northern end of the island. Age dating suggests that the main cone building activity occurred between 1.5 and 1.0 million years ago. Exposed on the volcano's flanks however are a number of unconsolidated valley-fill block and ash flow deposits suggesting more recent activity. One of these deposits, on the north-east flank of the volcano, has been recently dated at > 46,000 years B.P. Other evidence of potential activity from this center includes the presence of warm (27°C), acidic (pH 1.6), sulfate-rich springs on the summit of the volcano, hot springs on the coast, and the occurrence in 2002 and 2003 of shallow earthquake swarms partially located beneath the volcano. Morne aux Diables is dominantly composed of deposits of block and ash flows and associated domes from Pelean-style activity, however, semi-vesicular andesite block and ash flows and surges (Asama-style activity) and pumiceous lapilli falls (Plinian-style activity) are locally abundant. The Pelean domes are located both in the summit region and along the southern flanks of the volcano. Petrologically, the volcano is composed of a monotonous series of porphyritic andesites and dacites containing phenocrysts of plagioclase+augite-hypersthene with very sparse crystals of hornblende and quartz. Petrological models suggest the Morne aux Diables andesites and dacites can be produced by fractional crystallization of basaltic magma (such as those erupted from centers such as Morne Anglais and Morne Plat Pays in the south). Minor variations within this suite of andesites and dacites can be related to upper crustal fractionation of phenocryst phases.

  1. Seismic signature of a phreatic explosion: Hydrofracturing damage at Karthala volcano, Grande Comore Island, Indian Ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savin, C.; Grasso, J.-R.; Bachelery, P.

    2005-01-01

    Karthala volcano is a basaltic shield volcano with an active hydrothermal system that forms the southern two-thirds of the Grande Comore Island, off the east coat of Africa, northwest of Madagascar. Since the start of volcano monitoring by the local volcano observatory in 1988, the July 11th, 1991 phreatic eruption was the first volcanic event seismically recorded on this volcano, and a rare example of a monitored basaltic shield. From 1991 to 1995 the VT locations, 0.5volcanoes, during the climax of the 1991 phreatic explosion, are due to the activation of the whole hydrothermal system, as roughly sized by the distribution of VT hypocenters. The seismicity rate in 1995 was still higher than the pre-eruption seismicity rate, and disagrees with the time pattern of thermo-elastic stress readjustment induced by single magma intrusions at basaltic volcanoes. We propose that it corresponds to the still ongoing relaxation of pressure heterogeneity within the hydrothermal system as suggested by the few LP events that still occurred in 1995. ?? Springer-Verlag 2005.

  2. Moloka'i: Fishponds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawaii State Dept. of Education, Honolulu. Office of Instructional Services.

    Designed to help teachers implement marine education in their classrooms, this module provides information regarding a vanishing Hawaiian resource, fishponds. Due to the impact of present day human activities on shoreline areas, the size and number of fishponds have been greatly reduced; therefore, this module focuses on fishponds as a resource…

  3. Integrated volcanologic and petrologic analysis of the 1650 AD eruption of Kolumbo submarine volcano, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantner, Kathleen; Carey, Steven; Nomikou, Paraskevi

    2014-01-01

    Kolumbo submarine volcano, located 7 km northeast of Santorini, Greece in the Aegean Sea, last erupted in 1650 AD. Submarine and subaerial explosive activity lasted for a period of about four months and led to the formation of thick (~ 250 m) highly stratified pumice deposits on the upper crater walls as well as extensive pumice rafts that were dispersed throughout the southern Aegean Sea. Subaerial tephra fallout from eruption columns that breached the surface occurred as far east as Turkey.

  4. Active Deformation of Etna Volcano Combing IFSAR and GPS data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundgren, Paul

    1997-01-01

    The surface deformation of an active volcano is an important indicator of its eruptive state and its hazard potential. Mount Etna volcano in Sicily is a very active volcano with well documented eruption episodes.

  5. 2. PARKING LOT AT JAGGAR MUSEUM, VOLCANO OBSERVATORY. VIEW OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. PARKING LOT AT JAGGAR MUSEUM, VOLCANO OBSERVATORY. VIEW OF MEDIAN. NOTE VOLCANIC STONE CURBING (EDGING) TYPICAL OF MOST PARKING AREAS; TRIANGLING AT END NOT TYPICAL. MAUNA LOA VOLCANO IN BACK. - Crater Rim Drive, Volcano, Hawaii County, HI

  6. East Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This image shows the East African nations of Ethiopia, Eritrea, and Somalia, as well as portions of Kenya, Sudan, Yemen, and Saudi Arabia. Dominating the scene are the green Ethiopian Highlands. With altitudes as high as 4,620 meters (15,157 feet), the highlands pull moisture from the arid air, resulting in relatively lush vegetation. In fact, coffee-one of the world's most prized crops-originated here. To the north (above) the highlands is Eritrea, which became independent in 1993. East (right) of Ethiopia is Somalia, jutting out into the Indian Ocean. The Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) captured this true-color image on November 29, 2000. Provided by the SeaWiFS Project, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, and ORBIMAGE

  7. Middle East

    SciTech Connect

    Hemer, D.O.; Mason, J.F.; Hatch, G.C.

    1981-10-01

    Petroleum production in Middle East countries during 1980 totaled 6,747,719,000 bbl or an average rate of 18,436,390,000 bbl/d, down 13.9% from 1979. Increases were in Saudi Arabia and Syria. Significant decreases occurred in Iraq, Iran, Kuwait, and Turkey. New discoveries were made in Abu Dhabi, Iran, Saudi Arabia, Sharjah, and Oman. New areas were explored in Bahrain, Oman, Syria, and Yemen. 9 figures, 16 tables.

  8. Continuous monitoring of Hawaiian volcanoes using thermal cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patrick, M. R.; Orr, T. R.; Antolik, L.; Lee, R.; Kamibayashi, K.

    2012-12-01

    Thermal cameras are becoming more common at volcanoes around the world, and have become a powerful tool for observing volcanic activity. Fixed, continuously recording thermal cameras have been installed by the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory in the last two years at four locations on Kilauea Volcano to better monitor its two ongoing eruptions. The summit eruption, which began in March 2008, hosts an active lava lake deep within a fume-filled vent crater. A thermal camera perched on the rim of Halema`uma`u Crater, acquiring an image every five seconds, has now captured about two years of sustained lava lake activity, including frequent lava level fluctuations, small explosions , and several draining events. This thermal camera has been able to "see" through the thick fume in the crater, providing truly 24/7 monitoring that would not be possible with normal webcams. The east rift zone eruption, which began in 1983, has chiefly consisted of effusion through lava tubes onto the surface, but over the past two years has been interrupted by an intrusion, lava fountaining, crater collapse, and perched lava lake growth and draining. The three thermal cameras on the east rift zone, all on Pu`u `O`o cone and acquiring an image every several minutes, have captured many of these changes and are providing an improved means for alerting observatory staff of new activity. Plans are underway to install a thermal camera at the summit of Mauna Loa to monitor and alert to any future changes there. Thermal cameras are more difficult to install, and image acquisition and processing are more complicated than with visual webcams. Our system is based in part on the successful thermal camera installations by Italian volcanologists on Stromboli and Vulcano. Equipment includes custom enclosures with IR transmissive windows, power, and telemetry. Data acquisition is based on ActiveX controls, and data management is done using automated Matlab scripts. Higher-level data processing, also done with

  9. Thematic mapper studies of Andean volcanoes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Francis, P. W.

    1986-01-01

    The primary objective was to identify all the active volcanoes in the Andean region of Bolivia. Morphological features of the Tata Sabaya volcano, Bolivia, were studied with the thematic mapper. Details include marginal levees on lava and pyroclastic flows, and summit crater structure. Valley glacier moraine deposits, not easily identified on the multispectral band scanner, were also unambiguous, and provide useful marker horizons on large volcanic edifices which were built up in preglacial times but which were active subsequently. With such high resolution imagery, it is not only possible to identify potentially active volcanoes, but also to use standard photogeological interpretation to outline the history of individual volcanoes.

  10. Update of the volcanic risk map of Colima volcano, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suarez-Plascencia, C.; Nuñez Cornu, F. J.; Marquez-Azua, B.

    2010-12-01

    The Colima volcano, located in western Mexico (19° 30.696 N, 103° 37.026 W) began its current eruptive process in February 10, 1999. This event was the basis for the development of two volcanic hazard maps: one for ballistics (rock fall) lahars, and another one for ash fall. During the period of 2003 to 2008 this volcano has had an intense effusive-explosive activity, similar to the one that took place during the period of 1890 through 1900. Intense pre-Plinian eruption in January 20, 1913, generated little economic losses in the lower parts of the volcano thanks to the low population density and low socio-economic activities at the time The current volcanic activity has triggered ballistic projections, pyroclastic and ash flows, and lahars, all have exceeded the maps limits established in 1999. Vulnerable elements within these areas have gradually changed due to the expansion of the agricultural frontier on the east and southeast sides of the Colima volcano. On the slopes of the northwest side, new blue agave Tequilana weber and avocado orchard crops have emerged along with important production of greenhouse tomato, alfalfa and fruit (citrus) crops that will eventually be processed and dried for exportation to the United States and Europe. Also, in addition to the above, large expanses of corn and sugar cane have been planted on the slopes of the volcano since the nineteenth century. The increased agricultural activity has had a direct impact in the reduction of the available forest land area. Coinciding with this increased activity, the 0.8% growth population during the period of 2000 - 2005, - due to the construction of the Guadalajara-Colima highway-, also increased this impact. The growth in vulnerability changed the level of risk with respect to the one identified in the year 1999 (Suarez, 2000), thus motivating us to perform an update to the risk map at 1:25,000 using vector models of the INEGI, SPOT images of different dates, and fieldwork done in order

  11. Alaska Volcano Observatory at 20

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichelberger, J. C.

    2008-12-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) was established in 1988 in the wake of the 1986 Augustine eruption through a congressional earmark. Even within the volcanological community, there was skepticism about AVO. Populations directly at risk in Alaska were small compared to Cascadia, and the logistical costs of installing and maintaining monitoring equipment were much higher. Questions were raised concerning the technical feasibility of keeping seismic stations operating through the long, dark, stormy Alaska winters. Some argued that AVO should simply cover Augustine with instruments and wait for the next eruption there, expected in the mid 90s (but delayed until 2006), rather than stretching to instrument as many volcanoes as possible. No sooner was AVO in place than Redoubt erupted and a fully loaded passenger 747 strayed into the eruption cloud between Anchorage and Fairbanks, causing a powerless glide to within a minute of impact before the pilot could restart two engines and limp into Anchorage. This event forcefully made the case that volcano hazard mitigation is not just about people and infrastructure on the ground, and is particularly important in the heavily traveled North Pacific where options for flight diversion are few. In 1996, new funding became available through an FAA earmark to aggressively extend volcano monitoring far into the Aleutian Islands with both ground-based networks and round-the-clock satellite monitoring. Beyond the Aleutians, AVO developed a monitoring partnership with Russians volcanologists at the Institute of Volcanology and Seismology in Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky. The need to work together internationally on subduction phenomena that span borders led to formation of the Japan-Kamchatka-Alaska Subduction Processes (JKASP) consortium. JKASP meets approximately biennially in Sapporo, Petropavlovsk, and Fairbanks. In turn, these meetings and support from NSF and the Russian Academy of Sciences led to new international education and

  12. Preparing for Routine Satellite Global Volcano Deformation Observations: The Volcano Deformation Database Task Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pritchard, M. E.; Jay, J.; Andrews, B. J.; Cooper, J.; Henderson, S. T.; Delgado, F.; Biggs, J.; Ebmeier, S. K.

    2014-12-01

    Satellite Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) has greatly expanded the number volcanoes that can be monitored for ground deformation - the number of known deforming volcanoes has increased almost five-fold since 1997 (to more than 213 volcanoes in 2014). However, from 1992-2014, there are still gaps in global volcano surveillance and only a fraction of the 1400 subaerial Holocene volcanoes have frequent observations in this time period. Starting in 2014, near global observations of volcano deformation should begin with the Sentinel satellites from the European Space Agency, ALOS-2 from the Japanese Space Agency, and eventually NISAR from the Indian Space Agency and NASA. With more frequent observations, more volcano deformation episodes are sure to be observed, but evaluating the significance of the observed deformation is not always straightforward -- how can we determine if deformation will lead to eruption? To answer this question, an international task force has been formed to create an inventory of volcano deformation events as part of the Global Volcano Model (http://globalvolcanomodel.org/gvm-task-forces/volcano-deformation-database/). We present the first results from our global study focusing on volcanoes that have few or no previous studies. In some cases, there is a lack of SAR data (for example, volcanoes of the South Sandwich Islands). For others, observations either show an absence of deformation or possible deformation that requires more data to be verified. An example of a deforming volcano that has few past studies is Pagan, an island in the Marianas Arc comprised of 2 stratovolcanoes within calderas. Our new InSAR measurements from both the ALOS and Envisat satellites show deformation near the 1981 May VEI 4 lava flow eruption on North Pagan at 2-3 cm/year between 2004-2010. Another example of a newly observed volcano is Karthala volcano in the Comoros. InSAR observations between 2004-2010 span four eruptions, only one of which is

  13. East Asia: Seismotectonics, magmatism and mantle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Dapeng; Yu, Sheng; Ohtani, Eiji

    2011-02-01

    In this article, we review the significant recent results of geophysical studies and discuss their implications on seismotectonics, magmatism, and mantle dynamics in East Asia. High-resolution geophysical imaging revealed structural heterogeneities in the source areas of large crustal earthquakes, which may reflect magma and fluids that affected the rupture nucleation of large earthquakes. In subduction zone regions, the crustal fluids originate from the dehydration of the subducting slab. Magmatism in arc and back-arc areas is caused by the corner flow in the mantle wedge and dehydration of the subducting slab. The intraplate magmatism has different origins. The continental volcanoes in Northeast Asia (such as Changbai and Wudalianchi) seem to be caused by the corner flow in the big mantle wedge (BMW) above the stagnant slab in the mantle transition zone and the deep dehydration of the stagnant slab as well. The Tengchong volcano in Southwest China is possibly caused by a similar process in BMW above the subducting Burma microplate (or Indian plate). The Hainan volcano in southernmost China seems to be a hotspot fed by a lower-mantle plume associated with the Pacific and Philippine Sea slabs' deep subduction in the east and the Indian slab's deep subduction in the west down to the lower mantle. The occurrence of deep earthquakes under the Japan Sea and the East Asia margin may be related to a metastable olivine wedge in the subducting Pacific slab. The stagnant slab finally collapses down to the bottom of the mantle, which may trigger upwelling of hot mantle materials from the lower mantle to the shallow mantle beneath the subducting slabs and cause the slab-plume interactions. Some of these issues, such as the origin of intraplate magmatism, are still controversial, and so further detailed studies are needed from now.

  14. Geophysical characteristics of the hydrothermal systems of Kilauea volcano, Hawaii

    SciTech Connect

    Kauahikaua, J. )

    1993-08-01

    Clues to the structure of Kilauea volcano can be obtained from spatial studies of gravity, magnetic, and seismic velocity variations. The rift zones and summit are underlain by dense, magnetic, and seismic velocity variations. The rift zones and summit are underlain by dense, magnetic, high P-wave-velocity rocks at depths of about 2 km less. The gravity and seismic velocity studies indicate that the rift structures are broad, extending farther to the north than to the south of the surface features. The magnetic data allow separation into a narrow, highly-magnetized, shallow zone and broad, flanking, magnetic lows. The patterns of gravity, magnetic variations, and seismicity document the southward migration of the upper east rift zone. Regional, hydrologic features of Kilauea can be determined from resistivity and self-potential studies. High-level groundwater exists beneath Kilauea summit to elevations of +800 m within a triangular area bounded by the west edge of the upper southwest rift zone, the east edge of the upper east rift zone, and the Koa'e fault system. High-level groundwater is present within the east rift zone beyond the triangular summit area. Self-potential mapping shows that areas of local heat produce local fluid circulation in the unconfined aquifer (water table). Shallow seismicity and surface deformation indicate that magma is intruding and that fractures are forming beneath the rift zones and summit area. Heat flows of 370--820 mW/m[sup 2] are calculated from deep wells within the lower east rift zone. The estimated heat input rate for Kilauea of 9 gigawatts (GW) is at least 25 times higher than the conductive heat loss as estimated from the heat flow in wells extrapolated over the area of the summit caldera and rift zones. 115 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Satellite Observations of Volcanic Clouds from the Eruption of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska, 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, K. G.; Ekstrand, A. L.; Webley, P.; Dehn, J.

    2009-12-01

    Redoubt Volcano began erupting on 23 March 2009 (UTC) and consisted of 19 events over a 14 day period. The volcano is located on the Alaska Peninsula, 175 km southwest of Anchorage, Alaska. The previous eruption was in 1989/1990 and seriously disrupted air traffic in the region, including the near catastrophic engine failure of a passenger airliner. Plumes and ash clouds from the recent eruption were observed on a variety of satellite data (AVHRR, MODIS and GOES). The eruption produced volcanic clouds up to 19 km which are some of the highest detected in recent times in the North Pacific region. The ash clouds primarily drifted north and east of the volcano, had a weak ash signal in the split window data and resulted in light ash falls in the Cook Inlet basin and northward into Alaska’s Interior. Volcanic cloud heights were measured using ground-based radar, and plume temperature and wind shear methods but each of the techniques resulted in significant variations in the estimates. Even though radar showed the greatest heights, satellite data and wind shears suggest that the largest concentrations of ash may be at lower altitudes in some cases. Sulfur dioxide clouds were also observed on satellite data (OMI, AIRS and Calipso) and they primarily drifted to the east and were detected at several locations across North America, thousands of kilometers from the volcano. Here, we show time series data collected by the Alaska Volcano Observatory, illustrating the different eruptive events and ash clouds that developed over the subsequent days.

  16. Iceland: Eyjafjallajökull Volcano

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-17

    ... to capture a series of images of the Eyjafjallajökull volcano and its erupting ash plume. Figure 1 is a view from MISR's nadir ... The companion image, Figure 2, is a stereo anaglyph (see  Volcano Plume Heights Anaglyph ) generated from the nadir and 46-degree ...

  17. Iceland: Eyjafjallajökull Volcano

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-17

    ... height map   Ash from Iceland's Eyjafjallajökull volcano, viewed here in imagery from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer ... natural-color, nadir (vertical) view of the scene, with the volcano itself located outside the upper left corner of the image. The ash ...

  18. Iceland: Eyjafjallajökull Volcano

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-17

    article title:  Ash from Eyjafjallajökull Volcano, Iceland Stretches over the North Atlantic   ... that occurred in late March 2010, the Eyjafjallajökull Volcano in Iceland began erupting again on April 14, 2010. The resulting ash ...

  19. Geoflicks Reviewed--Films about Hawaiian Volcanoes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bykerk-Kauffman, Ann

    1994-01-01

    Reviews 11 films on volcanic eruptions in the United States. Films are given a one- to five-star rating and the film's year, length, source and price are listed. Top films include "Inside Hawaiian Volcanoes" and "Kilauea: Close up of an Active Volcano." (AIM)

  20. ASTER Images Mt. Usu Volcano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    On April 3, the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra Satellite captured this image of the erupting Mt. Usu volcano in Hokkaido, Japan. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER will image the Earth for the next 6 years to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    This false color infrared image of Mt Usu volcano is dominated by Lake Toya, an ancient volcanic caldera. On the south shore is the active Usu volcano. On Friday, March 31, more than 11,000 people were evacuated by helicopter, truck and boat from the foot of Usu, that began erupting from the northwest flank, shooting debris and plumes of smoke streaked with blue lightning thousands of feet in the air. Although no lava gushed from the mountain, rocks and ash continued to fall after the eruption. The region was shaken by thousands of tremors before the eruption. People said they could taste grit from the ash that was spewed as high as 2,700 meters (8,850 ft) into the sky and fell to coat surrounding towns with ash. 'Mount Usu has had seven significant eruptions that we know of, and at no time has it ended quickly with only a small scale eruption,' said Yoshio Katsui, a professor at Hokkaido University. This was the seventh major eruption of Mount Usu in the past 300 years. Fifty people died when the volcano erupted in 1822, its worst known eruption.

    In the image, most of the land is covered by snow. Vegetation, appearing red in the false color composite, can be seen in the agricultural fields, and forests in the mountains. Mt. Usu is crossed by three dark streaks. These are the paths of ash deposits that rained out from eruption plumes two days earlier. The prevailing wind was from the northwest, carrying the ash away from the main city of Date. Ash deposited can be traced on the image as far away as 10 kilometers (16

  1. Ambient noise recovery of surface wave Green's functions: Application at Hawaiian volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballmer, S.; Wolfe, C. J.; Okubo, P.; Haney, M. M.; Thurber, C. H.

    2010-12-01

    Hazard assessment of Hawaiian volcanoes critically depends on the understanding of their evolution and dynamics. Previous studies suggest that ambient seismic noise analyses may aid in volcano research and monitoring. Green’s functions derived from ambient noise have been used to perform tomography of the shallow structures (< 5 km depth) at other volcanoes [1, 2]. Moreover, these Green’s functions have been used to monitor very small shallow velocity perturbations prior to eruptions [3]. This promising technique, however, has not yet been applied to any Hawaiian volcano. Here, we examine data from the USGS Hawaii Volcano Observatory short-period seismic network to assess the potential of such ambient noise analyses to constrain spatial velocity heterogeneity and temporal perturbations at Kilauea and Mauna Loa volcanoes. We have obtained continuous seismic data from May 2007 through April 2008. This time period includes two important volcanic events. 1) The Father’s Day dike intrusion into Kilauea’s east rift zone that occurred on June 17, 2007. 2) The Kilauea summit eruption of March 19, 2008 and the high summit activity (that includes high tremor levels) that has since followed. The success of any noise study of temporal velocity perturbations will depend critically on whether stable Green’s functions can be recovered. However, for applications at Hawaii it is possible that during some time frames high volcanic tremor levels may distort ambient noise records and hence limit the results. Using the technical approach described in [2], we plan to examine numerous station pairs to determine the times when stable Green’s functions can be extracted from noise (0.1-1 Hz) that is typically made up of Rayleigh waves created by wind-generated ocean waves. As a first step, we investigate the period around the 2007 dike intrusion to evaluate the applicability of noise interferometry to Kilauea volcano. [1] Brenguier, F., N. M. Shapiro, M. Campillo, A. Nercessian

  2. Dynamics of degassing at Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    SciTech Connect

    Vergniolle, S.; Jaupart, C. )

    1990-03-10

    In the volcano chamber, gas bubbles rise through magma and accumulate at the roof in a foam layer. The foam flows toward the conduit, and its shape is determined by a dynamic balance between the input of bubbles from below and the output into the conduit. The bubbles in the foam deform under the action of buoyancy. If the critical thickness is reached, the foam collapses into a large gas pocket which erupts into the conduit. Foam accumulation then resumes, and a new cycle begins. The attainment of the foam collapse threshold requires a gas flux in excess of a critical value which depends on viscosity, suface tension, and bubble size. Hence two different eruption regimes are predicted: (1) alternating regimes of foam buildup and collapse leading to the periodic eruption of large gas volumes and (2) steady foam flow at the roof leading to continuous bubbly flow in the conduit. Data on eruption rates and repose times between fountaining phases from the 1969 Mauna Ulu and the 1983-1986 Pu'u O'o eruptions yield constraints on three key variables. The area of the chamber roof must be a few tens of square kilometers, with a minimum value of about 8 km{sup 2}. Magma reservoirs of similar dimensions are imaged by seismic attenuation tomography below the east rift zone. Close to the roof, the gas volume fraction is a few percent, and the gas bubbles have diameters lying between 0.1 and 0.6 mm. These estimates are close to the predictions of models for bubble nucleation and growth in basaltic melts, as well as to the observations on deep submarine basalts. The transition between cyclic and continuous activity occurs when the mass flux of gas becomes lower than a critical value of the order of 10{sup 3} kg/s. In this model, changes of eruptive regime reflect changes in the amount and size of bubbles which reach the chamber roof.

  3. Volcano Flank Terraces on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, P. K.; van Wyk de Vries, B.; Murray, J. B.; Troll, V. R.

    2008-12-01

    Flank terraces are bulge-like structures that occur on the slopes of at least nine large shield volcanoes on Mars, and three on Earth. Terraces have a convex-upward, convex-outward morphology, with an imbricate "fish scale" stacking pattern in plan. They occur at all elevations, are scale-invariant structures, and have similar proportions to thrust faults on Earth. Suggested mechanisms of formation include elastic self-loading, lithospheric flexure, magma chamber tumescence, flank relaxation, and shallow gravitational slumping. Terrace geometries predicted by most of these mechanisms do not agree with our observations, however. Only lithospheric flexure can fully account for terrace geometry on Mars and Earth, and so is the most likely candidate mechanism for flank terrace formation. To verify this hypothesis, we conducted scaled analogue modelling experiments, and investigated the structures formed during flexure. Cones of a sand-gypsum mix were placed upon a deep layer of silicone gel, to simulate volcanic loads upon viscoelastic Martian crust. Key parameters were varied across our experimental program. In all cases convex topographic structures developed on the cones' flanks, arranged in an imbricate, overlapping plan-view pattern. These structures closely resemble flank terraces observed on Mars, and our results provide for a basic kinematic model of terrace formation. Analogue volcanoes experienced a decrease in upper surface area whilst volume was conserved; the contractional surface strain was accommodated by outward verging, circumferentially striking thrusts. The morphology of experimental structures suggests an orientation of the principal stress axes of σ1 = radial, σ2 = concentric, and σ3 = vertical. Elsewhere (J. B. Murray et al., this volume) we detail the relationship between flank terraces and other structures such as pit craters and gräben, using Ascraeus Mons as a case study. We suggest that terraces may influence the distribution and location

  4. Dike injection and magma mixing in Kenya rift volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anthony, E. Y.; Espejel, V.; Biggs, J.

    2009-12-01

    A nexus of volcanoes in the rift graben at approximately the latitude of Nairobi consist of central vent trachyte, phonolite, and peralkaline rhyolite and cinder cone and fissure-fed flows of basalt to benmoreite. The volcanoes are referred to as the Central Kenya Peralkaline Province (CKPP, Macdonald and Scaillet, 2006, Lithos 91, 59-73) and formed by a combination of processes including fractional crystallization, magma mixing, and volatile transport (Ren et al., 2006, Lithos 91, 109-124; Macdonald et al., 2008, JPet 49, 1515-1547). This presentation focuses on magma mixing for trachytes and phonolites for Suswa rocks, which are the southernmost part of the CKPP. We also explore the contribution of magma process studies to the interpretation of recent geodetic data, which indicate inflation/deflation of up to 21 cm for Kenyan volcanoes from 1997 to present (Biggs et al., 2009, Geology, in press). Incontrovertible evidence for magma mixing is found in field evidence, where a basaltic trachyandesite ash horizon is found interbedded with syncaldera trachyte (Skilling, 1993, J. Geol. Society London 150, 885-896), hand-specimen and thin-section petrography, and disequilibrium mineral chemistry. Precaldera lavas contain a homogeneous group of anorthoclase crystals with An content 6% or less. Syncaldera samples contain this same group and two other populations: polysynthetic twinned labradorite and andesine and anorthoclase with An content of 17%. Textures for all three groups indicate disequilibrium. Postcaldera flows contain the high and low An anorthoclase populations but lack the polysynthetic twinned labradorite and andesine. These observations suggest a model of injection of mafic magmas via diking into shallow trachtytic magma systems. Recent geodetic studies of dike injection and subsequent seismic/volcanic activity in both Ethiopia and Lengai point to the ongoing importance of these processes to rift evolution in East Africa.

  5. Subsidence of Surtsey volcano, 1967-1991

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, J.G.; Jakobsson, S.; Holmjarn, J.

    1992-01-01

    The Surtsey marine volcano was built on the southern insular shelf of Iceland, along the seaward extension of the east volcanic zone, during episodic explosive and effusive activity from 1963 to 1967. A 1600-m-long, east-west line of 42 bench marks was established across the island shortly after volcanic activity stopped. From 1967 to 1991 a series of leveling surveys measured the relative elevation of the original bench marks, as well as additional bench marks installed in 1979, 1982 and 1985. Concurrent measurements were made of water levels in a pit dug on the north coast, in a drill hole, and along the coastline exposed to the open ocean. These surveys indicate that the dominant vertical movement of Surtsey is a general subsidence of about 1.1??0.3 m during the 24-year period of observations. The rate of subsidence decreased from 15-20 cm/year for 1967-1968 to 1-2 cm/year in 1991. Greatest subsidence is centered about the eastern vent area. Through 1970, subsidence was locally greatest where the lava plain is thinnest, adjacent to the flanks of the eastern tephra cone. From 1982 onward, the region closest to the hydrothermal zone, which is best developed in the vicinity of the eastern vent, began showing less subsidence relative to the rest of the surveyed bench marks. The general subsidence of the island probably results from compaction of the volcanic material comprising Surtsey, compaction of the sea-floor sediments underlying the island, and possibly downwarping of the lithosphere due to the laod of Surtsey. The more localized early downwarping near the eastern tephra cone is apparently due to greater compaction of tephra relative to lava. The later diminished local subsidence near the hydrothermal zone is probably due to a minor volume increase caused by hydrous alteration of glassy tephra. However, this volume increase is concentrated at depth beneath the bottom of the 176-m-deep cased drillhole. ?? 1992 Springer-Verlag.

  6. Analytical volcano deformation source models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lisowski, Michael; Dzurisin, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    Primary volcanic landforms are created by the ascent and eruption of magma. The ascending magma displaces and interacts with surrounding rock and fluids as it creates new pathways, flows through cracks or conduits, vesiculates, and accumulates in underground reservoirs. The formation of new pathways and pressure changes within existing conduits and reservoirs stress and deform the surrounding rock. Eruption products load the crust. The pattern and rate of surface deformation around volcanoes reflect the tectonic and volcanic processes transmitted to the surface through the mechanical properties of the crust.

  7. Thermal surveillance of active volcanoes. [infrared scanner recordings of thermal anomalies of Mt. Baker volcano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, J. D. (Principal Investigator)

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. By the end of 1973, aerial infrared scanner traverses for thermal anomaly recordings of all Cascade Range volcanoes were essentially completed. Amplitude level slices of the Mount Baker anomalies were completed and compiled at a scale of 1:24,000, thus producing, for the first time, an accurate map of the distribution and intensity of thermal activity on Mount Baker. The major thermal activity is concentrated within the crater south of the main summit and although it is characterized by intensive solfataric activity and warm ground, it is largely subglacial, causing the development of sizable glacier perforation features. The outgoing radiative flux from the east breach anomalies is sufficient to account for the volume of ice melted to form the glacier perforations. DCP station 6251 has been monitoring a thermally anomalous area on the north slope of Mount Baker. The present thermal activity of Mount Baker accounts for continuing hydrothermal alteration in the crater south of the main summit and recurrent debris avalanches from Sherman Peak on its south rim. The infrared anomalies mapped as part of the experiment SR 251 are considered the basic evidence of the subglacial heating which was the probable triggering mechanism of an avalanche down Boulder Glacier on August 20-21, 1973.

  8. Late Holocene volcanism at Medicine Lake Volcano, northern California Cascades

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Donnelly-Nolan, Julie M.; Champion, Duane E.; Grove, Timothy L.

    2016-01-01

    accessibility and good exposure of lavas, combined with physical and petrologic evidence for multiple and varied mafic inputs, has created an unusual opportunity to understand the workings of this large magmatic system. A combined total of more than 25 intrusive and extrusive events are indicated for late Holocene time. Plutonic inclusions, some with ages as young as Holocene, were also brought to the surface in five of the eruptions. All eruptions took place along northwest- to northeast-trending alignments of vents, reflecting the overall east-west extensional tectonic environment. The interaction of tectonism and volcanism is a dominant influence at this subduction-related volcano, located where the west edge of the extensional Basin and Range Province impinges on the Cascades arc. Ongoing subsidence focused at the central caldera has been documented along with geophysical evidence for a small magma body. This evidence, combined with the frequency of eruptive and intrusive activity in late Holocene time, an active geothermal system, and intermittent long-period seismic events indicate that the volcano is likely to erupt again.

  9. Late Holocene volcanism at Medicine Lake Volcano, northern California Cascades

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Donnelly-Nolan, Julie M.; Champion, Duane E.; Grove, Timothy L.

    2016-05-23

    accessibility and good exposure of lavas, combined with physical and petrologic evidence for multiple and varied mafic inputs, has created an unusual opportunity to understand the workings of this large magmatic system. A combined total of more than 25 intrusive and extrusive events are indicated for late Holocene time. Plutonic inclusions, some with ages as young as Holocene, were also brought to the surface in five of the eruptions. All eruptions took place along northwest- to northeast-trending alignments of vents, reflecting the overall east-west extensional tectonic environment. The interaction of tectonism and volcanism is a dominant influence at this subduction-related volcano, located where the west edge of the extensional Basin and Range Province impinges on the Cascades arc. Ongoing subsidence focused at the central caldera has been documented along with geophysical evidence for a small magma body. This evidence, combined with the frequency of eruptive and intrusive activity in late Holocene time, an active geothermal system, and intermittent long-period seismic events indicate that the volcano is likely to erupt again.

  10. Plume composition and volatile flux from Nyamulagira volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calabrese, Sergio; Bobrowski, Nicole; Giuffrida, Giovanni Bruno; Scaglione, Sarah; Liotta, Marcello; Brusca, Lorenzo; D'Alessandro, Walter; Arellano, Santiago; Yalire, Matiew; Galle, Bo; Tedesco, Dario

    2015-04-01

    Nyamulagira, in the Virunga volcanic province (VVP), Democratic Republic of Congo, is one of the most active volcanoes in Africa. The volcano is located about 25 km north-northwest of Lake Kivu in the Western Branch of the East African Rift System (EARS). The activity is characterized by frequent eruptions (on average, one eruption every 2-4 years) which occur both from the summit crater and from the flanks (31 flank eruptions over the last 110 years). Due to the peculiar low viscosity of its lava and its location in the floor of the rift, Nyamulagira morphology is characterized by a wide lava field that covers over 1100 km2 and contains more than 100 flank cones. Indeed, Nyamulagira is a SiO2- undersaturated and alkali-rich basaltic shield volcano with a 3058 m high summit caldera with an extension of about 2 km in diameter. In November 2014 a field expedition was carried out at Nyamulagira volcano and we report here the first assessment of the plume composition and volatile flux from Nyamulagira volcano. Helicopter flights and field observations allowed us to recognize the presence of lava fountains inside an about 350-meter wide pit crater. The lava fountains originated from an extended area of about 20 to 40 m2, in the northeast sector of the central caldera. A second smaller source, close to the previous described one, was clearly visible with vigorous spattering activity. There was no evidence of a lave lake but the persistence of intense activity and the geometry of the bottom of the caldera might evolve in a new lava lake. Using a variety of in situ and remote sensing techniques, we determined the bulk plume concentrations of major volatiles, halogens and trace elements. We deployed a portable MultiGAS station at the rim of Nyamulagira crater, measuring (at 0.5 Hz for about 3 hours) the concentrations of major volcanogenic gas species in the plume (H2O, CO2, SO2, H2S). Simultaneously, scanning differential optical absorption spectroscopy instruments were

  11. Response of reef corals on a fringing reef flat to elevated suspended-sediment concentrations: Moloka'i, Hawai'i.

    PubMed

    Jokiel, Paul L; Rodgers, Kuʻulei S; Storlazzi, Curt D; Field, Michael E; Lager, Claire V; Lager, Dan

    2014-01-01

    A long-term (10 month exposure) experiment on effects of suspended sediment on the mortality, growth, and recruitment of the reef corals Montipora capitata and Porites compressa was conducted on the shallow reef flat off south Moloka'i, Hawai'i. Corals were grown on wire platforms with attached coral recruitment tiles along a suspended solid concentration (SSC) gradient that ranged from 37 mg l(-1) (inshore) to 3 mg l(-1) (offshore). Natural coral reef development on the reef flat is limited to areas with SSCs less than 10 mg l(-1) as previously suggested in the scientific literature. However, the experimental corals held at much higher levels of turbidity showed surprisingly good survivorship and growth. High SSCs encountered on the reef flat reduced coral recruitment by one to three orders of magnitude compared to other sites throughout Hawai'i. There was a significant correlation between the biomass of macroalgae attached to the wire growth platforms at the end of the experiment and percentage of the corals showing mortality. We conclude that lack of suitable hard substrate, macroalgal competition, and blockage of recruitment on available substratum are major factors accounting for the low natural coral coverage in areas of high turbidity. The direct impact of high turbidity on growth and mortality is of lesser importance. PMID:25653896

  12. Determination of Diphacinone in Sea Water, Vertebrates, Invertebrates, and Bait Pellet Formulations Following Aerial Broadcast on Mokapu Island, Molokai, Hawai'i

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gale, Robert W.; Tanner, Michael; Orazio, Carl E.

    2008-01-01

    This report presents the results of a study to determine diphacinone concentrations in samples of sea water and in fillet samples of fish and in limpets from the ocean adjacent to Mokapu Island and from reference samples from Molokai, Hawai'i; concentrations of the active ingredient (diphacinone) were also determined in samples of the Ramik Green bait pellets used for the broadcast study. After preparation, diphacinone concentrations were determined with high-performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array detection. No detectable concentrations of diphacinone were found in the fish, limpets, or sea-water samples from Mokapu Island or from the reference sites. The limit of detection for diphacinone in sea water was 18 nanograms per milliliter (parts per billion); the limit of detection in fish fillets was 10 nanograms per gram (parts per billion); and the limit of detection in limpets was 17 nanograms per gram. The average concentration of diphacinone in the Ramik Green bait pellets was 45 micrograms per gram (parts per million), which represents 90 percent of the nominal concentration stated for the product by the manufacturer.

  13. Costa Rica's Chain of laterally collapsed volcanoes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, E.; Fernandez, E.

    2007-05-01

    From the NW extreme to the SW end of Costa Rica's volcanic backbone, a number of laterally collapsed volcanoes can be observed. Due to several factors, attention has been given to active volcanoes disregarding the importance of collapsed features in terms of assessing volcanic hazards for future generations around inhabited volcanoes. In several cases the typical horseshoe shape amphitheater-like depression can be easily observed. In other cases due to erosion, vegetation, topography, seismic activity or drastic weather such characteristics are not easily recognized. In the order mentioned above appear: Orosi-Cacao, Miravalles, Platanar, Congo, Von Frantzius, Cacho Negro and Turrialba volcanoes. Due to limited studies on these structures it is unknown if sector collapse occurred in one or several phases. Furthermore, in the few studied cases no evidence has been found to relate collapses to actual eruptive episodes. Detailed studies on the deposits and materials composing dome-like shapes will shed light on unsolved questions about petrological and chemical composition. Volume, form and distance traveled by deposits are part of the questions surrounding most of these collapsed volcanoes. Although most of these mentioned structures are extinct, at least Irazú volcano (active volcano) has faced partial lateral collapses recently. It did presented strombolian activity in the early 60s. Collapse scars show on the NW flank show important mass removal in historic and prehistoric times. Moreover, in 1994 a minor hydrothermal explosion provoked the weakening of a deeply altered wall that holds a crater lake (150m diameter, 2.6x106 ). A poster will depict images of the collapsed volcanoes named above with mayor descriptive characteristics. It will also focus on the importance of deeper studies to assess the collapse potential of Irazú volcano with related consequences. Finally, this initiative will invite researchers interested in such topic to join future studies in

  14. Volcano-tectonic structures and CO2-degassing patterns in the Laacher See basin, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goepel, Andreas; Lonschinski, Martin; Viereck, Lothar; Büchel, Georg; Kukowski, Nina

    2015-07-01

    The Laacher See Volcano is the youngest (12,900 year BP) eruption center of the Quarternary East-Eifel Volcanic Field in Germany and has formed Laacher See, the largest volcanic lake in the Eifel area. New bathymetric data of Laacher See were acquired by an echo sounder system and merged with topographic light detection and ranging (LiDAR) data of the Laacher See Volcano area to form an integrated digital elevation model. This model provides detailed morphological information about the volcano basin and results of sediment transport therein. Morphological analysis of Laacher See Volcano indicates a steep inner crater wall (slope up to 30°) which opens to the south. The Laacher See basin is divided into a deep northern and a shallower southern part. The broader lower slopes inclined with up to 25° change to the almost flat central part (maximum water depth of 51 m) with a narrow transition zone. Erosion processes of the crater wall result in deposition of volcaniclastics as large deltas in the lake basin. A large subaqueous slide was identified at the northeastern part of the lake. CO2-degassing vents (wet mofettes) of Laacher See were identified by a single-beam echo sounder system through gas bubbles in the water column. These are more frequent in the northern part of the lake, where wet mofettes spread in a nearly circular-shaped pattern, tracing the crater rim of the northern eruption center of the Laacher See Volcano. Additionally, preferential paths for gas efflux distributed concentrically inside the crater rim are possibly related to volcano-tectonic faults. In the southern part of Laacher See, CO2 vents occur in a high spatial density only within the center of the arc-shaped structure Barschbuckel possibly tracing the conduit of a tuff ring.

  15. Digital Data for Volcano Hazards in the Crater Lake Region, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schilling, S.P.; Doelger, S.; Bacon, C.R.; Mastin, L.G.; Scott, K.E.; Nathenson, M.

    2008-01-01

    Crater Lake lies in a basin, or caldera, formed by collapse of the Cascade volcano known as Mount Mazama during a violent, climactic eruption about 7,700 years ago. This event dramatically changed the character of the volcano so that many potential types of future events have no precedent there. This potentially active volcanic center is contained within Crater Lake National Park, visited by 500,000 people per year, and is adjacent to the main transportation corridor east of the Cascade Range. Because a lake is now present within the most likely site of future volcanic activity, many of the hazards at Crater Lake are different from those at most other Cascade volcanoes. Also significant are many faults near Crater Lake that clearly have been active in the recent past. These faults, and historic seismicity, indicate that damaging earthquakes can occur there in the future. The USGS Open-File Report 97-487 (Bacon and others, 1997) describes the various types of volcano and earthquake hazards in the Crater Lake area, estimates of the likelihood of future events, recommendations for mitigation, and a map of hazard zones. The geographic information system (GIS) volcano hazard data layers used to produce the Crater Lake earthquake and volcano hazard map in USGS Open-File Report 97-487 are included in this data set. USGS scientists created one GIS data layer, c_faults, that delineates these faults and one layer, cballs, that depicts the downthrown side of the faults. Additional GIS layers chazline, chaz, and chazpoly were created to show 1)the extent of pumiceous pyroclastic-flow deposits of the caldera forming Mount Mazama eruption, 2)silicic and mafic vents in the Crater Lake region, and 3)the proximal hazard zone around the caldera rim, respectively.

  16. Volcanic gas impacts on vegetation at Turrialba Volcano, Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teasdale, R.; Jenkins, M.; Pushnik, J.; Houpis, J. L.; Brown, D. L.

    2010-12-01

    Turrialba volcano is an active composite stratovolcano that is located approximately 40 km east of San Jose, Costa Rica. Seismic activity and degassing have increased since 2005, and gas compositions reflect further increased activity since 2007 peaking in January 2010 with a phreatic eruption. Gas fumes dispersed by trade winds toward the west, northwest, and southwest flanks of Turrialba volcano have caused significant vegetation kill zones, in areas important to local agriculture, including dairy pastures and potato fields, wildlife and human populations. In addition to extensive vegetative degradation is the potential for soil and water contamination and soil erosion. Summit fumarole temperatures have been measured over 200 degrees C and gas emissions are dominated by SO2; gas and vapor plumes reach up to 2 km (fumaroles and gases are measured regularly by OVSICORI-UNA). A recent network of passive air sampling, monitoring of water temperatures of hydrothermal systems, and soil pH measurements coupled with measurement of the physiological status of surrounding plants using gas exchange and fluorescence measurements to: (1) identify physiological correlations between leaf-level gas exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence measurements of plants under long term stress induced by the volcanic gas emissions, and (2) use measurements in tandem with remotely sensed reflectance-derived fluorescence ratio indices to track natural photo inhibition caused by volcanic gas emissions, for use in monitoring plant stress and photosynthetic function. Results may prove helpful in developing potential land management strategies to maintain the biological health of the area.

  17. Continuous monitoring of Hawaiian volcanoes with thermal cameras

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patrick, Matthew R.; Orr, Tim R.; Antolik, Loren; Lee, Robert Lopaka; Kamibayashi, Kevan P.

    2014-01-01

    Continuously operating thermal cameras are becoming more common around the world for volcano monitoring, and offer distinct advantages over conventional visual webcams for observing volcanic activity. Thermal cameras can sometimes “see” through volcanic fume that obscures views to visual webcams and the naked eye, and often provide a much clearer view of the extent of high temperature areas and activity levels. We describe a thermal camera network recently installed by the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory to monitor Kīlauea’s summit and east rift zone eruptions (at Halema‘uma‘u and Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō craters, respectively) and to keep watch on Mauna Loa’s summit caldera. The cameras are long-wave, temperature-calibrated models protected in custom enclosures, and often positioned on crater rims close to active vents. Images are transmitted back to the observatory in real-time, and numerous Matlab scripts manage the data and provide automated analyses and alarms. The cameras have greatly improved HVO’s observations of surface eruptive activity, which includes highly dynamic lava lake activity at Halema‘uma‘u, major disruptions to Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō crater and several fissure eruptions.

  18. Introduction to Special Section on How Volcanoes Work: Part 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilling, Robert I.

    1988-05-01

    The special section on "How Volcanoes Work" is a collection of some of the nearly 300 papers presented at the Hawaii Symposium on How Volcanoes Work, held in Hilo in January 1987 [Tilling, 1987a]. The response of the symposium participants to the invitation to submit their papers for consideration in the special section exceeded expectations. In all, more than 70 manuscripts were received, reviewed, and handled following regular JGR editorial procedures. Part 1 of the special section, composed of the papers that were processed and accepted in time to meet the production schedule, was published in the December 1987 issue of the Journal of Geophysical Research-Solid Earth and Planets [Tilling, 1987a]. Even though part 1 contained only eight papers, it nonetheless provided a representative sampling of the multidisciplinary nature of the investigations undertaken to improve our understanding of volcanic systems. The papers published in part 1 included ground deformation studies on caldera systems [Dzurisin and Yamashita, 1987; Mortensen and Hopkins, 1987], geochemical and observational studies of the lava fountains and of volcanic fume during the 1983-1984 activity of Pu'u 'O'o in Kilauea's east rift zone [Crowe et al., 1987; Head and Wilson, 1987], magmatic crystal stratigraphy and theoretical petrology [Pearce et al., 1987; Russell, 1987], dynamics of active lava lakes [Tilling, 1987b], and seismic evidence for a subcrustal intrusive complex beneath the Island of Oahu, Hawaii [ten Brink and Brocher, 1987].

  19. SCHLUMBERGER SOUNDING RESULTS OVER THE NEWBERRY VOLCANO AREA, OREGON.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bisdorf, Robert J.

    1985-01-01

    Schlumberger soundings were made in the Newberry volcano area of Oregon to categorize the electrical properties of possible Cascade geothermal systems. An east-west geoelectric cross section constructed from the interpreted soundings shows a low-resistivity zone in the caldera, that corresponds to the increase in thermal gradient observed in a U. S. Geological Survey test well. Another low resistivity zone about 600 m deep is present just to the west of the caldera boundary. A north-south geoelectric cross section shows the configuration of the western low-resistivity zone. Maps of interpreted resistivity at depths of 750 and 1000 m show that the main low resistivity area west of the caldera has two tongues, one oriented easterly and the other oriented southerly.

  20. Exploring Geology on the World-Wide Web--Volcanoes and Volcanism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schimmrich, Steven Henry; Gore, Pamela J. W.

    1996-01-01

    Focuses on sites on the World Wide Web that offer information about volcanoes. Web sites are classified into areas of Global Volcano Information, Volcanoes in Hawaii, Volcanoes in Alaska, Volcanoes in the Cascades, European and Icelandic Volcanoes, Extraterrestrial Volcanism, Volcanic Ash and Weather, and Volcano Resource Directories. Suggestions…

  1. Studying temporal velocity changes with ambient seismic noise at Hawaiian volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballmer, S.; Wolfe, C. J.; Okubo, P. G.; Haney, M. M.; Thurber, C. H.

    2012-04-01

    In order to understand the dynamics of volcanoes and to assess the associated hazards, the analysis of ambient seismic noise - a continuous passive source - has been used for both imaging and monitoring temporal changes in seismic velocity. Between pairs of seismic stations, surface wave Green's functions can be retrieved from the background ocean-generated noise being sensitive to the shallow subsurface. Such Green's functions allow the measurement of very small temporal perturbations in seismic velocity with a variety of applications. In particular, velocity decreases prior to some volcanic eruptions have been documented and motivate our present study. Here we perform ambient seismic noise interferometry to study temporal changes in seismic velocities within the shallow (<5km) subsurface of the Hawaiian volcanoes. Our study is the first to assess the potential for using ambient noise analyses as a tool for Hawaiian volcano monitoring. Five volcanoes comprise the island of Hawaii, of which two are active: Mauna Loa volcano, which last erupted in 1984, and Kilauea volcano, where the Pu'u'O'o-Kupaianaha eruption along the east rift zone has been ongoing since 1983. For our analysis, we use data from the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) seismic network from 05/2007 to 12/2009. Our study period includes the Father's Day dike intrusion into Kilauea's east rift zone in mid-June 2007 as well as increased summit activity commencing in late 2007 and leading to several minor explosions in early 2008. These volcanic events are of interest for the study of potential associated seismic velocity changes. However, we find that volcanic tremor complicates the measurement of velocity changes. Volcanic tremor is continuously present during most of our study period, and contaminates the recovered Green's functions for station pairs across the entire island. Initial results suggest that a careful quality assessment (i.e. visually inspecting the Green's functions and filtering

  2. Instrumentation Recommendations for Volcano Monitoring at U.S. Volcanoes Under the National Volcano Early Warning System

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moran, Seth C.; Freymueller, Jeff T.; LaHusen, Richard G.; McGee, Kenneth A.; Poland, Michael P.; Power, John A.; Schmidt, David A.; Schneider, David J.; Stephens, George; Werner, Cynthia A.; White, Randall A.

    2008-01-01

    As magma moves toward the surface, it interacts with anything in its path: hydrothermal systems, cooling magma bodies from previous eruptions, and (or) the surrounding 'country rock'. Magma also undergoes significant changes in its physical properties as pressure and temperature conditions change along its path. These interactions and changes lead to a range of geophysical and geochemical phenomena. The goal of volcano monitoring is to detect and correctly interpret such phenomena in order to provide early and accurate warnings of impending eruptions. Given the well-documented hazards posed by volcanoes to both ground-based populations (for example, Blong, 1984; Scott, 1989) and aviation (for example, Neal and others, 1997; Miller and Casadevall, 2000), volcano monitoring is critical for public safety and hazard mitigation. Only with adequate monitoring systems in place can volcano observatories provide accurate and timely forecasts and alerts of possible eruptive activity. At most U.S. volcanoes, observatories traditionally have employed a two-component approach to volcano monitoring: (1) install instrumentation sufficient to detect unrest at volcanic systems likely to erupt in the not-too-distant future; and (2) once unrest is detected, install any instrumentation needed for eruption prediction and monitoring. This reactive approach is problematic, however, for two reasons. 1. At many volcanoes, rapid installation of new ground-1. based instruments is difficult or impossible. Factors that complicate rapid response include (a) eruptions that are preceded by short (hours to days) precursory sequences of geophysical and (or) geochemical activity, as occurred at Mount Redoubt (Alaska) in 1989 (24 hours), Anatahan (Mariana Islands) in 2003 (6 hours), and Mount St. Helens (Washington) in 1980 and 2004 (7 and 8 days, respectively); (b) inclement weather conditions, which may prohibit installation of new equipment for days, weeks, or even months, particularly at

  3. A scale for ranking volcanoes by risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scandone, Roberto; Bartolini, Stefania; Martí, Joan

    2016-01-01

    We propose a simple volcanic risk coefficient (VRC) useful for comparing the degree of risk arising from different volcanoes, which may be used by civil protection agencies and volcano observatories to rapidly allocate limited resources even without a detailed knowledge of each volcano. Volcanic risk coefficient is given by the sum of the volcanic explosivity index (VEI) of the maximum expected eruption from the volcano, the logarithm of the eruption rate, and the logarithm of the population that may be affected by the maximum expected eruption. We show how to apply the method to rank the risk using as examples the volcanoes of Italy and in the Canary Islands. Moreover, we demonstrate that the maximum theoretical volcanic risk coefficient is 17 and pertains to the large caldera-forming volcanoes like Toba or Yellowstone that may affect the life of the entire planet. We develop also a simple plugin for a dedicated Quantum Geographic Information System (QGIS) software to graphically display the VRC of different volcanoes in a region.

  4. Endogenous growth of persistently active volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, Peter; Oppenheimer, Clive; Stevenson, David

    1993-12-01

    LAVA lakes and active strombolian vents have persisted at some volcanoes for periods exceeding the historic record. They liberate prodigious amounts of volatiles and thermal energy but erupt little lava, a paradox that raises questions about how volcanoes grow. Although long-lasting surface manifestations can be sustained by convective exchange of magma with deeper reservoirs, residence times of magmas beneath several basaltic volcanoes are & sim10-100 years1,2, indicating that where surface activity continues for more than 100-1,000 years, the reservoirs are replenished by new magma. Endogenous growth of Kilauea volcano (Hawaii) through dyke intrusion and cumulate formation is a well-understood consequence of the steady supply of mantle-derived magma3,4. As we show here, inferred heat losses from the Halemaumau lava lake indicate a period of dominantly endogenous growth of Kilauea volcano during the nineteenth century. Moreover, heat losses and degassing rates for several other volcanoes, including Stromboli, also indicate cryptic influxes of magma that far exceed visible effluxes of lavas. We propose that persistent activity at Stromboli, and at other volcanoes in different tectonic settings, is evidence of endogenous growth, involving processes similar to those at Kilauea.

  5. Monte Vulture Volcano (Basilicata, Italy): an analysis of morphology and volcaniclastic facies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guest, J. E.; Duncan, A. M.; Chester, D. K.

    1988-07-01

    The earliest activity of Monte Vulture, central Italy, included ignimbrites but the bulk of the volcano was built up by plinian airfall deposits. Contemporaneous remobilisation of these deposits formed an apron of lahars around the base of the main cone. The volcano was constructed on a ridge; the valley to the east and tributaries to the north and south became sediment traps for volcaniclastic materials emplaced by fluvial reworking and directly from volcanic activity. To the west the valley was swept clear by active downcutting. Instability of the west flank as a result of this erosion was probably a contributory cause of major gravitational sector collapse on the volcano's flank, terminating the main cone-building phase. The resultant scar is an amphitheatre-shaped hollow called here the Valle dei Grigi. Previous workers have attributed this feature to coalescing calderas formed by engulfment. The last volcanic phase was the production of the Monticchio calderas and associated phreatomagmatic explosions producing airfall and surge deposits. Because most of the activity at Vulture has been repeated plinian eruptions producing similar assemblages of products, detailed stratigraphy of the volcano is difficult to accomplish. To characterise Vulture in terms of its products, various facies are identified and interpreted in relation to volcanic processes, distance from vent and environmental conditions.

  6. Preliminary volcano-hazard assessment for the Tanaga volcanic cluster, Tanaga Island, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coombs, Michelle L.; McGimsey, Robert G.; Browne, Brandon L.

    2007-01-01

    Summary of Volcano Hazards at Tanaga Volcanic Cluster The Tanaga volcanic cluster lies on the northwest part of Tanaga Island, about 100 kilometers west of Adak, Alaska, and 2,025 kilometers southwest of Anchorage, Alaska. The cluster consists of three volcanoes-from west to east, they are Sajaka, Tanaga, and Takawangha. All three volcanoes have erupted in the last 1,000 years, producing lava flows and tephra (ash) deposits. A much less frequent, but potentially more hazardous phenomenon, is volcanic edifice collapse into the sea, which likely happens only on a timescale of every few thousands of years, at most. Parts of the volcanic bedrock near Takawangha have been altered by hydrothermal activity and are prone to slope failure, but such events only present a local hazard. Given the volcanic cluster's remote location, the primary hazard from the Tanaga volcanoes is airborne ash that could affect aircraft. In this report, we summarize the major volcanic hazards associated with the Tanaga volcanic cluster.

  7. Seismic structure and origin of active intraplate volcanoes in Northeast Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Yonghong; Zhao, Dapeng; Zhang, Xiankang; Xia, Shaohong; Liu, Zhi; Wang, Fuyun; Li, Li

    2009-05-01

    Three-dimensional P-wave velocity structure beneath the Changbai and other intraplate volcanic areas in Northeast Asia is determined by inverting 1378 high-quality P-wave arrival times from 186 teleseismic events recorded by 61 broadband seismic stations. Low-velocity (low-V) anomalies are revealed beneath the Changbai, Longgan, Xianjindao volcanoes. High-velocity (high-V) anomalies are found in the mantle transition zone, where deep-focus earthquakes under Hunchun occur at depths of 500-600 km. The high-V anomaly reflects the deep subduction of the Pacific slab under NE Asia which may have contributed to the formation of the Changbai, Longgang, Xianjindao and Jingpohu intraplate volcanoes. A low-V anomaly is also revealed in the mantle transition zone, which may have a close relationship with the occurrence of deep earthquakes under the Hunchun area. Our results support the Big Mantle Wedge (BMW) model by Zhao et al. [Zhao, D., Lei, J., Tang, Y., 2004. Origin of the Changbai volcano in northeast China: evidence from seismic tomography, Chin. Sci. Bull. 49, 1401-1408; Zhao, D., Maruyama, S., Omori, S., 2007. Mantle dynamics of western Pacific and East Asia: insight from seismic tomography and mineral physics. Gondwana Res. 11, 120-131.] who proposed that the intraplate volcanoes in NE Asia are caused by the back-arc magmatism associated with the deep dehydration process of the subducting slab and convective circulation process in the BMW above the stagnant Pacific slab.

  8. Eruption of Shiveluch Volcano, Kamchatka Peninsula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    On March 29, 2007, the Shiveluch Volcano on the Russian Federation's Kamchatka Peninsula erupted. According to the Alaska Volcano Observatory the volcano underwent an explosive eruption between 01:50 and 2:30 UTC, sending an ash cloud skyward roughly 9,750 meters (32,000 feet), based on visual estimates. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) flying onboard NASA's Aqua satellite took this picture at 02:00 UTC on March 29. The top image shows the volcano and its surroundings. The bottom image shows a close-up view of the volcano at 250 meters per pixel. Satellites often capture images of volcanic ash plumes, but usually as the plumes are blowing away. Plumes have been observed blowing away from Shiveluch before. This image, however, is different. At the time the Aqua satellite passed overhead, the eruption was recent enough (and the air was apparently still enough) that the ash cloud still hovered above the summit. In this image, the bulbous cloud casts its shadow northward over the icy landscape. Volcanic ash eruptions inject particles into Earth's atmosphere. Substantial eruptions of light-reflecting particles can reduce temperatures and even affect atmospheric circulation. Large eruptions impact climate patterns for years. A massive eruption of the Tambora Volcano in Indonesia in 1815, for instance, earned 1816 the nickname 'the year without a summer.' Shiveluch is a stratovolcano--a steep-sloped volcano composed of alternating layers of solidified ash, hardened lava, and volcanic rocks. One of Kamchatka's largest volcanoes, it sports a summit reaching 3,283 meters (10,771 feet). Shiveluch is also one of the peninsula's most active volcanoes, with an estimated 60 substantial eruptions in the past 10,000 years.

  9. Unzipping of the volcano arc, Japan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stern, R.J.; Smoot, N.C.; Rubin, M.

    1984-01-01

    A working hypothesis for the recent evolution of the southern Volcano Arc, Japan, is presented which calls upon a northward-progressing sundering of the arc in response to a northward-propagating back-arc basin extensional regime. This model appears to explain several localized and recent changes in the tectonic and magrnatic evolution of the Volcano Arc. Most important among these changes is the unusual composition of Iwo Jima volcanic rocks. This contrasts with normal arc tholeiites typical of the rest of the Izu-Volcano-Mariana and other primitive arcs in having alkaline tendencies, high concentrations of light REE and other incompatible elements, and relatively high silica contents. In spite of such fractionated characteristics, these lavas appear to be very early manifestations of a new volcanic and tectonic cycle in the southern Volcano Arc. These alkaline characteristics and indications of strong regional uplift are consistent with the recent development of an early stage of inter-arc basin rifting in the southern Volcano Arc. New bathymetric data are presented in support of this model which indicate: 1. (1) structural elements of the Mariana Trough extend north to the southern Volcano Arc. 2. (2) both the Mariana Trough and frontal arc shoal rapidly northwards as the Volcano Arc is approached. 3. (3) rugged bathymetry associated with the rifted Mariana Trough is replaced just south of Iwo Jima by the development of a huge dome (50-75 km diameter) centered around Iwo Jima. Such uplifted domes are the immediate precursors of rifts in other environments, and it appears that a similar situation may now exist in the southern Volcano Arc. The present distribution of unrifted Volcano Arc to the north and rifted Mariana Arc to the south is interpreted not as a stable tectonic configuration but as representing a tectonic "snapshot" of an arc in the process of being rifted to form a back-arc basin. ?? 1984.

  10. Analysis of Vulnerability Around The Colima Volcano, MEXICO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlos, S. P.

    2001-12-01

    agriculture and forestry, mainly in the east hillslope of the volcano is another factor that generate remoulded material that in the event of an extraordinary rainsfall during an explosive events, could increase the size of the lahar or generate flows of mud that may affect the towns, villages (like Atenquique, which has been affected in 1957 by a large lahar), and could generate strong damages to the communication lines affecting distant places as Guadalajara city and the Port of Manzanillo.

  11. Augustine Volcano, Cook Inlet, Alaska (January 31, 2006)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Since last spring, the U.S. Geological Survey's Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) has detected increasing volcanic unrest at Augustine Volcano in Cook Inlet, Alaska near Anchorage. Based on all available monitoring data, AVO regards that an eruption similar to 1976 and 1986 is the most probable outcome. During January, activity has been episodic, and characterized by emission of steam and ash plumes, rising to altitudes in excess of 9,000 m (30,000 ft), and posing hazards to aircraft in the vicinity. In the last week, volcanic flows have been seen on the volcano's flanks. An ASTER thermal image was acquired at night at 22:50 AST on January 31, 2006, during an eruptive phase of Augustine. The image shows three volcanic flows down the north flank of Augustine as white (hot) areas. The eruption plume spreads out to the east in a cone shape: it appears dark blue over the summit because it is cold and water ice dominates the composition; further downwind a change to orange color indicates that the plume is thinning and the signal is dominated by the presence of ash.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.

    The U.S. science team is located at

  12. Growth and collapse of the Reunion Island volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oehler, Jean-François; Lénat, Jean-François; Labazuy, Philippe

    2008-04-01

    This work presents the first exhaustive study of the entire surface of the Reunion Island volcanic system. The focus is on the submarine part, for which a compilation of all multibeam data collected during the last 20 years has been made. Different types of submarine features have been identified: a coastal shelf, debris avalanches and sedimentary deposits, erosion canyons, volcanic constructions near the coast, and seamounts offshore. Criteria have been defined to differentiate the types of surfaces and to establish their relative chronology where possible. Debris avalanche deposits are by far the most extensive and voluminous formations in the submarine domain. They have built four huge Submarine Bulges to the east, north, west, and south of the island. They form fans 20-30 km wide at the coastline and 100-150 km wide at their ends, 70-80 km offshore. They were built gradually by the superimposition and/or juxtaposition of products moved during landslide episodes, involving up to several hundred cubic kilometers of material. About 50 individual events deposits can be recognized at the surface. The landslides have recurrently dismantled Piton des Neiges, Les Alizés, and Piton de La Fournaise volcanoes since 2 Ma. About one third are interpreted as secondary landslides, affecting previously emplaced debris avalanche deposits. On land, landslide deposits are observed in the extensively eroded central area of Piton des Neiges and in its coastal areas. Analysis of the present-day topography and of geology allows us to identify presumed faults and scars of previous large landslides. The Submarine Bulges are dissected and bound by canyons up to 200 m deep and 40 km long, filled with coarse-grained sediments, and generally connected to streams onshore. A large zone of sedimentary accumulation exists to the north-east of the island. It covers a zone 20 km in width, extending up to 15 km offshore. Volcanic constructions are observed near the coast on both Piton des Neiges

  13. Volcanoes of the World, Second Edition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Charles A.

    How do you review an indispensable classic? In 1981, Tom Simkin and colleagues at the Smithsonian Institution's Global Volcanism Project (GVP) published Volcanoes of the World. This was the first complete modern English language listing of volcanoes and their eruptions, and it became the fundamental reference for such information. In 1994, Simkin and Lee Siebert published a second edition, which adds 170 volcanoes, 2322 eruptions, and hundreds of references and corrections to the first edition. The value of this compilation is indicated by the fact that even though it is now 6 years old, it warrants a review in Eos!

  14. Igneous rocks of the East Pacific Rise

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Engel, A.E.J.; Engel, C.G.

    1964-01-01

    The apical parts of large volcanoes along the East Pacific Rise (islands and seamounts) are encrusted with rocks of the alkali volcanic suite (alkali basalt, andesine- and oligoclase-andesite, and trachyte). In contrast, the more submerged parts of the Rise are largely composed of a tholeiitic basalt which has low concentrations of K, P, U, Th, Pb, and Ti. This tholeiitic basalt is either the predominant or the only magma generated in the earth's mantle under oceanic ridges and rises. It is at least 1000-fold more abundant than the alkali suite, which is probably derived from tholeiitic basalt by magmatic differentiation in and immediately below the larger volcanoes. Distinction of oceanic tholeiites from almost all continental tholeiites is possible on the simple basis of total potassium content, with the discontinuity at 0.3 to 0.5 percent K2O by weight. Oceanic tholeiites also are readily distinguished from some 19 out of 20 basalts of oceanic islands and seamount cappings by having less than 0.3 percent K2O by weight and more than 48 percent SiO2. Deep drilling into oceanic volcanoes should, however, core basalts transitional between the oceanic tholeiites and the presumed derivative alkali basalts.The composition of the oceanic tholeiites suggests that the mantle under the East Pacific Rise contains less than 0.10 percent potassium oxide by weight; 0.1 part per million of uranium and 0.4 part of thorium; a potassium:rubidium ratio of about 1200 and a potassium: uranium ratio of about 104.

  15. Volcanoes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hazards Preventing Violence Pressure Washer Safety High-Pressure Water Injection Injury Trench Foot or Immersion Foot Emergency Wound Care Wound Management for Healthcare Pros Power Outages When the Power Goes Out Worker Safety ...

  16. Volcanoes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hazardous Materials Incidents Home Fires Household Chemical Emergencies Hurricanes Landslides & Debris Flow Nuclear Blast Nuclear Power Plants ... Hazardous Materials Incidents Home Fires Household Chemical Emergencies Hurricanes Landslides & Debris Flow Nuclear Blast Nuclear Power Plants ...

  17. Volcanoes

    MedlinePlus

    ... a Flood Worker Safety Educational Materials Floods PSAs Hurricanes Before a Hurricane Make a Plan Get Supplies Get Your Family, ... Ready Evacuate or Stay at Home After a Hurricane Make Sure Your Food and Water Are Safe ...

  18. Volcanoes

    MedlinePlus

    ... and landslides, acid rain, fires, and even tsunamis. Volcanic gas and ash can damage the lungs of ... older adults, and people with severe respiratory illnesses. Volcanic ash can affect people hundreds of miles away ...

  19. Linking space observations to volcano observatories in Latin America: Results from the CEOS DRM Volcano Pilot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado, F.; Pritchard, M. E.; Biggs, J.; Arnold, D. W. D.; Poland, M. P.; Ebmeier, S. K.; Wauthier, C.; Wnuk, K.; Parker, A. L.; Amelug, F.; Sansosti, E.; Mothes, P. A.; Macedo, O.; Lara, L.; Zoffoli, S.; Aguilar, V.

    2015-12-01

    Within Latin American, about 315 volcanoes that have been active in the Holocene, but according to the United Nations Global Assessment of Risk 2015 report (GAR15) 202 of these volcanoes have no seismic, deformation or gas monitoring. Following the 2012 Santorini Report on satellite Earth Observation and Geohazards, the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS) has developed a 3-year pilot project to demonstrate how satellite observations can be used to monitor large numbers of volcanoes cost-effectively, particularly in areas with scarce instrumentation and/or difficult access. The pilot aims to improve disaster risk management (DRM) by working directly with the volcano observatories that are governmentally responsible for volcano monitoring, and the project is possible thanks to data provided at no cost by international space agencies (ESA, CSA, ASI, DLR, JAXA, NASA, CNES). Here we highlight several examples of how satellite observations have been used by volcano observatories during the last 18 months to monitor volcanoes and respond to crises -- for example the 2013-2014 unrest episode at Cerro Negro/Chiles (Ecuador-Colombia border); the 2015 eruptions of Villarrica and Calbuco volcanoes, Chile; the 2013-present unrest and eruptions at Sabancaya and Ubinas volcanoes, Peru; the 2015 unrest at Guallatiri volcano, Chile; and the 2012-present rapid uplift at Cordon Caulle, Chile. Our primary tool is measurements of ground deformation made by Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) but thermal and outgassing data have been used in a few cases. InSAR data have helped to determine the alert level at these volcanoes, served as an independent check on ground sensors, guided the deployment of ground instruments, and aided situational awareness. We will describe several lessons learned about the type of data products and information that are most needed by the volcano observatories in different countries.

  20. Volcanoes can muddle the greenhouse

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, R.A.

    1990-01-01

    As scientists and politicians anxiously eye signs of global greenhouse warming, climatologists are finding the best evidence yet that a massive volcanic eruption can temporarily bring the temperature down a notch or two. Such a cooling could be enough to set the current global warming back more than a decade, confusing any efforts to link it to the greenhouse effect. By effectively eliminating some nonvolcanic climate changes from the record of the past 100 years, researchers have detected drops in global temperature of several tenths of a degree within 1 to 2 years of volcanic eruptions. Apparently, the debris spewed into the stratosphere blocked sunlight and caused the temperature drops. For all their potential social significance, the climate effects of volcanoes have been hard to detect. The problem has been in identifying a volcanic cooling among the nearly continuous climate warmings and coolings of a similar size that fill the record. The paper reviews how this was done.

  1. Hydrothermal systems and volcano geochemistry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fournier, R.O.

    2007-01-01

    The upward intrusion of magma from deeper to shallower levels beneath volcanoes obviously plays an important role in their surface deformation. This chapter will examine less obvious roles that hydrothermal processes might play in volcanic deformation. Emphasis will be placed on the effect that the transition from brittle to plastic behavior of rocks is likely to have on magma degassing and hydrothermal processes, and on the likely chemical variations in brine and gas compositions that occur as a result of movement of aqueous-rich fluids from plastic into brittle rock at different depths. To a great extent, the model of hydrothermal processes in sub-volcanic systems that is presented here is inferential, based in part on information obtained from deep drilling for geothermal resources, and in part on the study of ore deposits that are thought to have formed in volcanic and shallow plutonic environments.

  2. Small Volcano in Terra Cimmeria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 26 June 2002) The Science This positive relief feature (see MOLA context) in the ancient highlands of Mars appears to be a heavily eroded volcanic center. The top of this feature appears to be under attack by the erosive forces of the martian wind. Light-toned streaks are visible, trending northeast to southwest, and may be caused by scouring of the terrain, or they may be dune forms moving sand. The northeast portion of the caldera area looks as though a layer of material is being removed to expose a slightly lighter-toned surface underneath. The flanks of this feature are slightly less cratered than the surrounding terrain, which could be explained in two ways: 1) this feature may be younger than the surrounding area, and has had less time to accumulate meteorite impacts, or 2) the slopes that are observed today may be so heavily eroded that the original, cratered surfaces are now gone, exposing relatively uncratered rocks. Although most of Terra Cimmeria has low albedo, some eastern portions, such as shown in this image, demonstrate an overall lack of contrast that attests to the presence of a layer of dust mantling the surface. This dust, in part, is responsible for the muted appearance and infill of many of the craters at the northern and southern ends of this image The Story This flat-topped volcano pops out from the surface, the swirls of its ancient lava flows running down onto the ancient highlands of Mars. Its smooth top appears to be under attack by the erosive forces of the martian wind. How can you tell? Click on the image above for a close-up look. You'll see some light-toned streaks that run in a northeast-southwest direction. They are caused either by the scouring of the terrain or dunes of moving sand. Either way, the wind likely plays upon the volcano's surface. Look also for the subtle, nearly crescent shaped feature at the northeast portion of the volcano's cap. It looks as if a layer of material has been removed by the wind, exposing

  3. Intraplate volcanism and mantle dynamics in East Asia: Big mantle wedge (BMW) model (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, D.

    2009-12-01

    In the East Asia continent there are many Cenozoic volcanoes, but only a few are still active now, such as the Changbai, Wudalianchi, and Tengchong volcanoes which have erupted several times in the past 1000 years. Although many studies have been made by using various approaches, the origin of the intraplate volcanoes in East Asia is still not very clear. Recently we used regional and global seismic tomography to determine high-resolution 3-D mantle structure under Western Pacific to East Asia (Zhao, 2004; Huang and Zhao, 2006; Zhao et al., 2009). Our results show prominent low-velocity anomalies from the surface down to 410 km depth beneath the intraplate volcanoes and a broad high-velocity anomaly in the mantle transition zone under East Asia. Focal-mechanism solutions of deep earthquakes indicate that the subducting Pacific slab under the Japan Sea and the East Asia margin is subject to compressive stress regime. These results suggest that the Pacific slab meets strong resistance at the 660-km discontinuity and so it becomes stagnant in the mantle transition zone under East Asia. The Philippine Sea slab has also subducted down to the mantle transition zone under western Japan and the Ryukyu back-arc region. The western edge of the stagnant slab is generally parallel with the Japan trench and the Ryukyu trench and roughly coincides with a prominent surface topography and gravity boundary in East China, which is located approximately 1800 km west of the trenches. The upper mantle under East Asia has formed a big mantle wedge (BMW) above the stagnant slab. The BMW exhibits low seismic-velocity and high electrical-conductivity, which is hot and wet because of the deep dehydration reactions of the stagnant slab and the convective circulation process in the BMW. These processes lead to the upwelling of hot and wet asthenospheric materials and thinning and fracturing of the continental lithosphere, leading to the formation of the active intraplate volcanoes in East

  4. One hundred volatile years of volcanic gas studies at the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory: Chapter 7 in Characteristics of Hawaiian volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sutton, A.J.; Elias, Tamar; Poland, Michael P.; Takahashi, T. Jane; Landowski, Claire M.

    2014-01-01

    The first volcanic gas studies in Hawai‘i, beginning in 1912, established that volatile emissions from Kīlauea Volcano contained mostly water vapor, in addition to carbon dioxide and sulfur dioxide. This straightforward discovery overturned a popular volatile theory of the day and, in the same action, helped affirm Thomas A. Jaggar, Jr.’s, vision of the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) as a preeminent place to study volcanic processes. Decades later, the environmental movement produced a watershed of quantitative analytical tools that, after being tested at Kīlauea, became part of the regular monitoring effort at HVO. The resulting volatile emission and fumarole chemistry datasets are some of the most extensive on the planet. These data indicate that magma from the mantle enters the shallow magmatic system of Kīlauea sufficiently oversaturated in CO2 to produce turbulent flow. Passive degassing at Kīlauea’s summit that occurred from 1983 through 2007 yielded CO2-depleted, but SO2- and H2O-rich, rift eruptive gases. Beginning with the 2008 summit eruption, magma reaching the East Rift Zone eruption site became depleted of much of its volatile content at the summit eruptive vent before transport to Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō. The volatile emissions of Hawaiian volcanoes are halogen-poor, relative to those of other basaltic systems. Information gained regarding intrinsic gas solubilities at Kīlauea and Mauna Loa, as well as the pressure-controlled nature of gas release, have provided useful tools for tracking eruptive activity. Regular CO2-emission-rate measurements at Kīlauea’s summit, together with surface-deformation and other data, detected an increase in deep magma supply more than a year before a corresponding surge in effusive activity. Correspondingly, HVO routinely uses SO2 emissions to study shallow eruptive processes and effusion rates. HVO gas studies and Kīlauea’s long-running East Rift Zone eruption also demonstrate that volatile emissions can

  5. Volcano Monitoring Using Google Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, W.; Dehn, J.; Bailey, J. E.; Webley, P.

    2009-12-01

    At the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO), remote sensing is an important component of its daily monitoring of volcanoes. AVO’s remote sensing group (AVORS) primarily utilizes three satellite datasets; Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) data, from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) Polar Orbiting Satellites (POES), Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA) Terra and Aqua satellites, and NOAA’s Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) data. AVHRR and MODIS data are collected by receiving stations operated by the Geographic Information Network of Alaska (GINA) at the University of Alaska’s Geophysical Institute. An additional AVHRR data feed is supplied by NOAA’s Gilmore Creek satellite tracking station. GOES data are provided by the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), Monterey Bay. The ability to visualize these images and their derived products is critical for the timely analysis of the data. To this end, AVORS has developed javascript web interfaces that allow the user to view images and metadata. These work well for internal analysts to quickly access a given dataset, but they do not provide an integrated view of all the data. To do this AVORS has integrated its datasets with Keyhole Markup Language (KML) allowing them to be viewed by a number of virtual globes or other geobrowsers that support this code. Examples of AVORS’ use of KML include the ability to browse thermal satellite image overlays to look for signs of volcanic activity. Webcams can also be viewed interactively through KML to confirm current activity. Other applications include monitoring the location and status of instrumentation; near real-time plotting of earthquake hypocenters; mapping of new volcanic deposits using polygons; and animated models of ash plumes, created by a combination of ash dispersion modeling and 3D visualization packages.

  6. The Volcano Disaster Assistance Program (VDAP) - Past and Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewert, J. W.; Pallister, J. S.

    2010-12-01

    For 24 years the U.S. Geological Survey and USAID’s Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance have supported a small team of scientists and the monitoring equipment required to respond to volcanic crises at short notice anywhere in the world. This VDAP team was founded following the 1985 tragedy at Nevado del Ruiz, where 23,000 perished following an eruption-triggered lahar that swept through the town of Armero, Colombia. Through its first two decades, VDAP has deployed teams and equipment to assist host-country counterparts in responding to volcanic eruptions and unrest at numerous volcanoes in Central and South America, the Caribbean, the Western Pacific and Africa and the Middle East. VDAP and the larger USGS Volcano Hazards Program (VHP) have a synergistic relationship. VDAP contributes to domestic eruption responses (e.g., Anatahan, Commonwealth of the Marianas Islands (2003-05), Mount St. Helens (2004) and several Alaskan eruptions). In turn, when VDAP lacks sufficient capability, the larger USGS Volcano Hazards Program provides a “backstop” of staff and expertise to support its international work. Between crises, VDAP conducts capacity-building projects, including construction of volcano-monitoring networks and education programs in monitoring, hazard assessment and eruption forecasting. Major capacity-building projects have focused on Central and South America (1998-present), Papua New Guinea (1998-2000) and Indonesia (2004-present). In all cases, VDAP scientists work in the background, providing support to counterpart agencies and representing the U.S. Government as scientist-diplomats. All VDAP monitoring equipment (whether used in crisis response or in capacity building) is donated to counterpart agencies as a form of U.S. foreign aid. Over the years, VDAP has helped build and sustain volcano observatories and monitoring programs in more than a dozen countries. As observatories, monitoring networks, and the science of volcanology and forecasting have

  7. Field-wind Distribution and Eruption Columns: Colima Volcano, México.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonseca, R.; Martin, A. L.; Perez, I.

    2006-12-01

    Colima Volcano (19º51'N 103º62'W) is characterized by explosive behaviour. Recently this volcano has shown an increase in explosive activity suggesting the possibility of a subplinian event in the next future like the ones occurred in 1818 and 1913. They were characterized by eruptive columns higher than 20 Km. Considering the possibility of a new explosive event we carried out a wind study based on the radiosonde balloon data set (1980-1995) with 15 atmospheric levels. This data set was collected by Global Gridded Upper Air Statistics (GGUAS) of the European Centre for Médium Range Weather Forecast (ECMRWF). The data was processed with a cinematic model for the study of global atmospheric wind circulation. In this model the current function (vorticity) and a potential function (convergency and/or divergency) was calculated with the Poison equation, utilizing a spectral numeric model. Dominant wind direction in January-May and October-December is toward the East with variations to the East/South East. On the contrary during July-September the dominant wind direction is toward the West, South-West, North-East; East and North-East. The fluctuations related to anticyclonic circulation occur in May, July, September and November at the altitude between 5 and 18 Km. The wind model allows identification of the wind horizontal circulation during the whole year at different atmospheric levels. Moreover, the perturbations of the normal circulation have also been identified. These results are applied to an a ash fall map for ash-fall hazard zonification.

  8. Wide Angle View of Arsia Mons Volcano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Arsia Mons (above) is one of the largest volcanoes known. This shield volcano is part of an aligned trio known as the Tharsis Montes--the others are Pavonis Mons and Ascraeus Mons. Arsia Mons is rivaled only by Olympus Mons in terms of its volume. The summit of Arsia Mons is more than 9 kilometers (5.6 miles) higher than the surrounding plains. The crater--or caldera--at the volcano summit is approximately 110 km (68 mi) across. This view of Arsia Mons was taken by the red and blue wide angle cameras of the Mars Global Surveyor Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) system. Bright water ice clouds (the whitish/bluish wisps) hang above the volcano--a common sight every martian afternoon in this region. Arsia Mons is located at 120o west longitude and 9o south latitude. Illumination is from the left.

  9. Lahar hazards at Agua volcano, Guatemala

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schilling, S.P.; Vallance, J.W.; Matías, O.; Howell, M.M.

    2001-01-01

    At 3760 m, Agua volcano towers more than 3500 m above the Pacific coastal plain to the south and 2000 m above the Guatemalan highlands to the north. The volcano is within 5 to 10 kilometers (km) of Antigua, Guatemala and several other large towns situated on its northern apron. These towns have a combined population of nearly 100,000. It is within about 20 km of Escuintla (population, ca. 100,000) to the south. Though the volcano has not been active in historical time, or about the last 500 years, it has the potential to produce debris flows (watery flows of mud, rock, and debris—also known as lahars when they occur on a volcano) that could inundate these nearby populated areas.

  10. Eruption of Alaska volcano breaks historic pattern

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larsen, Jessica; Neal, Christina A.; Webley, Peter; Freymueller, Jeff; Haney, Matthew; McNutt, Stephen; Schneider, David; Prejean, Stephanie; Schaefer, Janet; Wessels, Rick L.

    2009-01-01

    In the late morning of 12 July 2008, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) received an unexpected call from the U.S. Coast Guard, reporting an explosive volcanic eruption in the central Aleutians in the vicinity of Okmok volcano, a relatively young (~2000-year-old) caldera. The Coast Guard had received an emergency call requesting assistance from a family living at a cattle ranch on the flanks of the volcano, who reported loud "thunder," lightning, and noontime darkness due to ashfall. AVO staff immediately confirmed the report by observing a strong eruption signal recorded on the Okmok seismic network and the presence of a large dark ash cloud above Okmok in satellite imagery. Within 5 minutes of the call, AVO declared the volcano at aviation code red, signifying that a highly explosive, ash-rich eruption was under way.

  11. A field guide to Newberry Volcano, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jenson, Robert A.; Donnelly-Nolan, Julie M.; McKay, Daniele

    2009-01-01

    Newberry Volcano is located in central Oregon at the intersection of the Cascade Range and the High Lava Plains. Its lavas range in age from ca. 0.5 Ma to late Holocene. Erupted products range in composition from basalt through rhyolite and cover ~3000 km2. The most recent caldera-forming eruption occurred ~80,000 years ago. This trip will highlight a revised understanding of the volcano's history based on new detailed geologic work. Stops will also focus on evidence for ice and flooding on the volcano, as well as new studies of Holocene mafic eruptions. Newberry is one of the most accessible U.S. volcanoes, and this trip will visit a range of lava types and compositions including tholeiitic and calc-alkaline basalt flows, cinder cones, and rhyolitic domes and tuffs. Stops will include early distal basalts as well as the youngest intracaldera obsidian flow.

  12. Radial anisotropy ambient noise tomography of volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mordret, Aurélien; Rivet, Diane; Shapiro, Nikolai; Jaxybulatov, Kairly; Landès, Matthieu; Koulakov, Ivan; Sens-Schönfelder, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    The use of ambient seismic noise allows us to perform surface-wave tomography of targets which could hardly be imaged by other means. The frequencies involved (~ 0.5 - 20 s), somewhere in between active seismic and regular teleseismic frequency band, make possible the high resolution imaging of intermediate-size targets like volcanic edifices. Moreover, the joint inversion of Rayleigh and Love waves dispersion curves extracted from noise correlations allows us to invert for crustal radial anisotropy. We present here the two first studies of radial anisotropy on volcanoes by showing results from Lake Toba Caldera, a super-volcano in Indonesia, and from Piton de la Fournaise volcano, a hot-spot effusive volcano on the Réunion Island (Indian Ocean). We will see how radial anisotropy can be used to infer the main fabric within a magmatic system and, consequently, its dominant type of intrusion.

  13. Iceland: Eyjafjallajökull Volcano

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-17

    ... Eyjafjallajökull Volcano Ash Plume Particle Properties     View larger image ... background maritime particles are typically tiny spherical liquid droplets. In the last panel, the plume stands out relative to the ...

  14. Lahar hazards at Mombacho Volcano, Nicaragua

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vallance, J.W.; Schilling, S.P.; Devoli, G.

    2001-01-01

    Mombacho volcano, at 1,350 meters, is situated on the shores of Lake Nicaragua and about 12 kilometers south of Granada, a city of about 90,000 inhabitants. Many more people live a few kilometers southeast of Granada in 'las Isletas de Granada and the nearby 'Peninsula de Aseses. These areas are formed of deposits of a large debris avalanche (a fast moving avalanche of rock and debris) from Mombacho. Several smaller towns with population, in the range of 5,000 to 12,000 inhabitants are to the northwest and the southwest of Mombacho volcano. Though the volcano has apparently not been active in historical time, or about the last 500 years, it has the potential to produce landslides and debris flows (watery flows of mud, rock, and debris -- also known as lahars when they occur on a volcano) that could inundate these nearby populated areas. -- Vallance, et.al., 2001

  15. 2005 Volcanic Activity in Alaska, Kamchatka, and the Kurile Islands: Summary of Events and Response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGimsey, R.G.; Neal, C.A.; Dixon, J.P.; Ushakov, Sergey

    2008-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptive activity or suspected volcanic activity at or near 16 volcanoes in Alaska during 2005, including the high profile precursory activity associated with the 2005?06 eruption of Augustine Volcano. AVO continues to participate in distributing information about eruptive activity on the Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia, and in the Kurile Islands of the Russian Far East, in conjunction with the Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT) and the Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Team (SVERT), respectively. In 2005, AVO helped broadcast alerts about activity at 8 Russian volcanoes. The most serious hazard posed from volcanic eruptions in Alaska, Kamchatka, or the Kurile Islands is the placement of ash into the atmosphere at altitudes traversed by jet aircraft along the North Pacific and Russian Trans East air routes. AVO, KVERT, and SVERT work collaboratively with the National Weather Service, Federal Aviation Administration, and the Volcanic Ash Advisory Centers to provide timely warnings of volcanic eruptions and the production and movement of ash clouds.

  16. Gravity fluctuations induced by magma convection at Kilauea Volcano, Hawai'i

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carbone, Daniele; Poland, Michael P.

    2012-01-01

    Convection in magma chambers is thought to play a key role in the activity of persistently active volcanoes, but has only been inferred indirectly from geochemical observations or simulated numerically. Continuous microgravity measurements, which track changes in subsurface mass distribution over time, provide a potential method for characterizing convection in magma reservoirs. We recorded gravity oscillations with a period of ~150 s at two continuous gravity stations at the summit of Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai‘i. The oscillations are not related to inertial accelerations caused by seismic activity, but instead indicate variations in subsurface mass. Source modeling suggests that the oscillations are caused by density inversions in a magma reservoir located ~1 km beneath the east margin of Halema‘uma‘u Crater in Kīlauea Caldera—a location of known magma storage.

  17. Predictions of turbidity due to enhanced sediment resuspension resulting from sea-level rise on a fringing Coral Reef: Evidence from Molokai, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ogston, A.S.; Field, M.E.

    2010-01-01

    Accelerating sea-level rise associated with global climate change will affect sedimentary processes on coral reefs and other shoreline environments by increasing energy and sediment resuspension. On reefs, sedimentation is known to increase coral stress and bleaching as particles that settle on coral surfaces interfere with photosynthesis and feeding, and turbidity induced by suspended sediment reduces incident light levels. Using relationships developed from observations of wave orbital velocity, water-surface elevation, and suspended-sediment concentration on a fringing reef flat of Molokai, Hawaii, predictions of the average daily maximum in suspended-sediment concentration increase from ~11 mg/l to ~20 mg/l with 20 cm sea-level rise. The duration of time concentrations exceeds 10 mg/l increases from 9 to 37. An evaluation of the reduction of wave energy flux through breaking and frictional dissipation across the reef flat shows an increase of ~80 relative to the present will potentially reach the shoreline as sea level increases by 20 cm. Where the shoreline exists on low, flat terrain, the increased energy could cause significant erosion of the shoreline. Considering the sediment budget, the sediment flux is predicted to increase and removal of fine-grained sediment may be expedited on some fringing reefs, and sediment in storage on the inner reef could ultimately be reduced. However, increased shoreline erosion may add sediment and offset removal from the reef flat. The shifts in sediment availability and transport that will occur as result of a modest increase in sea level have wide application to fringing coral reefs elsewhere, as well as other shoreline environments. ?? 2010 the Coastal Education & Research Foundation (CERF).

  18. Ambient Noise Tomography at Bezymianny Volcano, Kamchatka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuler, A. E.; Ekström, G.; West, M.; Senyukov, S.

    2008-12-01

    Bezymianny Volcano is an active stratovolcano located in the Kluychevskoy volcanic group on the Kamchatka Peninsula in eastern Russia. Since its dramatic sector collapse eruption in 1956, the volcano's activity has been characterized by nearly twice annual plinian eruptions accompanying ongoing lava-dome growth. Its frequent eruptions and similarity to Mt. St. Helens have made it the target of a multifaceted geologic and geophysical project supported by the NSF Partners in Research and Education (PIRE) program. Since mid- 2006, the volcano has been monitored by a broadband seismic array that is currently composed of 8 stations within 10 kilometers of the active dome. In this project, we use continuous data from these stations to investigate the static and dynamic structure of the volcano. Using methods similar to those used by Brenguier et al. (2007, 2008), we estimate the Green's function for each pair of stations by cross-correlating day-long time series of ambient noise. Paths with high signal-to-noise ratios can be used to estimate group velocity dispersion curves. From these measurements, we work towards constructing the first velocity model of this volcano. Furthermore, we begin to test whether measurements of ambient noise can be used to monitor changes inside the volcano prior to eruptive activity. These problems will continue to be addressed as more data becomes available in future field seasons.

  19. Evolution of large shield volcanoes on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrick, Robert R.; Dufek, Josef; McGovern, Patrick J.

    2005-01-01

    We studied the geologic history, topographic expression, and gravity signature of 29 large Venusian shield volcanoes with similar morphologies in Magellan synthetic aperture radar imagery. While they appear similar in imagery, 16 have a domical topographic expression and 13 have a central depression. Typical dimensions for the central depression are 150 km wide and 500 m deep. The central depressions are probably not calderas resulting from collapse of a shallow magma chamber but instead are the result of a corona-like sagging of a previously domical volcano. The depressions all have some later volcanic filling. All but one of the central depression volcanoes have been post-dated by geologic features unrelated to the volcano, while most of the domical volcanoes are at the top of the stratigraphic column. Analysis of the gravity signatures in the spatial and spectral domains shows a strong correlation between the absence of post-dating features and the presence of dynamic support by an underlying plume. We infer that the formation of the central depressions occurred as a result of cessation of dynamic support. However, there are some domical volcanoes whose geologic histories and gravity signatures also indicate that they are extinct, so sagging of the central region apparently does not always occur when dynamic support is removed. We suggest that the thickness of the elastic lithosphere may be a factor in determining whether a central depression forms when dynamic support is removed, but the gravity data are of insufficient resolution to test this hypothesis with admittance methods.

  20. Lahar-hazard zonation for San Miguel volcano, El Salvador

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Major, J.J.; Schilling, S.P.; Pullinger, C.R.; Escobar, C.D.; Chesner, C.A.; Howell, M.M.

    2001-01-01

    San Miguel volcano, also known as Chaparrastique, is one of many volcanoes along the volcanic arc in El Salvador. The volcano, located in the eastern part of the country, rises to an altitude of about 2130 meters and towers above the communities of San Miguel, El Transito, San Rafael Oriente, and San Jorge. In addition to the larger communities that surround the volcano, several smaller communities and coffee plantations are located on or around the flanks of the volcano, and the PanAmerican and coastal highways cross the lowermost northern and southern flanks of the volcano. The population density around San Miguel volcano coupled with the proximity of major transportation routes increases the risk that even small volcano-related events, like landslides or eruptions, may have significant impact on people and infrastructure. San Miguel volcano is one of the most active volcanoes in El Salvador; it has erupted at least 29 times since 1699. Historical eruptions of the volcano consisted mainly of relatively quiescent emplacement of lava flows or minor explosions that generated modest tephra falls (erupted fragments of microscopic ash to meter sized blocks that are dispersed into the atmosphere and fall to the ground). Little is known, however, about prehistoric eruptions of the volcano. Chemical analyses of prehistoric lava flows and thin tephra falls from San Miguel volcano indicate that the volcano is composed dominantly of basalt (rock having silica content

  1. Hydrogeochemical exploration of the Tecuamburro Volcano region, Guatemala

    SciTech Connect

    Goff, F.; Truesdell, A.H.; Janik, C.J.; Adams, A.; Roldan-M, A.; Meeker, K.; Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA; Los Alamos National Lab., NM; Instituto Nacional de Electrificacion, Guatemala City . Unidad de Desarollo Geotermico; Los Alamos National Lab., NM )

    1989-01-01

    Approximately 100 thermal and nonthermal water samples and 20 gas samples from springs and fumaroles have been chemically and isotopically analyzed to help evaluate the geothermal potential of the Tecuamburro Volcano region, Guatemala. Thermal waters of the acid- sulfate, steam condensate, and neutral-chloride types generally occur in restricted hydrogeologic areas: Tecuamburro-Laguna Ixpaco (acid- sulfate); andesite highland north of Tecuamburro (steam-condensate); Rio Los Esclavos (neutral-chloride). One small area of neutral-chloride springs east of the village of Los Esclavos has no relation to the Tecuamburro geothermal system. Neutral-chloride springs on the Rio Los Esclavos east and southeast of Tecuamburro show mixing with various types of groundwaters and display a maximum oxygen-18 enrichment compared to the world meteoric line of only about 1.5 parts per thousand. Maximum estimated subsurface temperatures are {le}200{degree}C. In contrast, maximum estimated subsurface temperatures based on gas compositions in the Laguna Ixpaco area are about 300{degree}C. The relation of neutral-chloride waters to the overall Tecuamburro geothermal system is not entirely resolved but we have suggested two system models. Regardless of model, we believe that a first exploration drill hole should be sited within 0.5 km of Laguna Ixpaco to tap the main geothermal reservoir or its adjacent, main upflow zone. 9 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. An Admittance Survey of Large Volcanoes on Venus: Implications for Volcano Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brian, A. W.; Smrekar, S. E.; Stofan, E. R.

    2004-01-01

    Estimates of the thickness of the venusian crust and elastic lithosphere are important in determining the rheological and thermal properties of Venus. These estimates offer insights into what conditions are needed for certain features, such as large volcanoes and coronae, to form. Lithospheric properties for much of the large volcano population on Venus are not well known. Previous studies of elastic thickness (Te) have concentrated on individual or small groups of edifices, or have used volcano models and fixed values of Te to match with observations of volcano morphologies. In addition, previous studies use different methods to estimate lithospheric parameters meaning it is difficult to compare their results. Following recent global studies of the admittance signatures exhibited by the venusian corona population, we performed a similar survey into large volcanoes in an effort to determine the range of lithospheric parameters shown by these features. This survey of the entire large volcano population used the same method throughout so that all estimates could be directly compared. By analysing a large number of edifices and comparing our results to observations of their morphology and models of volcano formation, we can help determine the controlling parameters that govern volcano growth on Venus.

  3. Interagency collaboration on an active volcano: a case study at Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kauahikaua, James P.; Orlando, Cindy

    2014-01-01

    Because Kilauea and Mauna Loa are included within the National Park, there is a natural intersection of missions for the National Park Service (NPS) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). HAVO staff and the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory scientists have worked closely together to monitor and forecast multiple eruptions from each of these volcanoes since HAVO’s founding in 1916.

  4. New Isopach Maps of Holocene Rhyolitic Tephras at Medicine Lake Volcano, Northern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, C.; Ramsey, D. W.; Ewert, J. W.

    2008-12-01

    Medicine Lake Volcano, located in the southern Cascades ~55 km east-northeast of Mount Shasta, is a large rear-arc, shield-shaped volcano with an eruptive history spanning nearly 500 ka (Donnelly-Nolan, et al., 2008). The most recent eruptions at Medicine Lake Volcano are the late Holocene explosive to effusive events at Glass Mountain (~950 yr) and Little Glass Mountain (~1000 yr), which began as sub- Plinian to Plinian eruptions of rhyolite pumice from fissure vents (Heiken, 1978), and culminated in the rhyolite-dacite of Glass Mountain and the rhyolite of Little Glass Mountain. Vents for these eruptions are located 15 km apart on opposite sides of the summit caldera of Medicine Lake Volcano. Glass Mountain erupted from a 5-km-long fissure on the east side and Little Glass Mountain from an 8-km-long fissure on the west side of the volcano. New isopach maps of tephra deposits from these eruptions are based on more extensive fieldwork and on a different interpretation of Little Glass Mountain tephras than previous work. The maps show a strong northeast-southwest trend of the Little Glass Mountain tephras as previously shown by Fisher (1964) and by Heiken (1978), extending in the direction of Mount Shasta, where D. Miller found individual lapilli from the Little Glass Mountain eruption. Tephras from Glass Mountain are not deposited along a single strong trend, but rather are found in lobes extending from the fissure vents to the west, north, and northeast. More than 2 m of Little Glass Mountain tephra was deposited proximal to its vents, although the deposit thins quickly to less than 50 cm within 2 km perpendicular to trend and within 7 km along trend. The maximum observed thickness of Glass Mountain tephra is between 7-8 m proximal to its vents, thinning to less than 50 cm within 7 km distance from the vents. As rhyolite eruptions in the Cascade Range are quite rare, mapping the thickness, extent, and character of these tephra deposits to better comprehend the

  5. Nyiragongo volcano, Congo, Perspective View with Lava SRTM / ASTER / Landsat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Nyiragongo volcano in the Congo erupted on January 17, 2002, and subsequently sent streams of lava into the city of Goma on the north shore of Lake Kivu. More than 100 people were killed, more than 12,000 homes were destroyed, and hundreds of thousands were forced to flee the broader community of nearly half a million people. This computer-generated visualization combines a Landsat satellite image and an elevation model from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) to provide a view of both the volcano and the city of Goma, looking slightly east of north. Additionally, image data from the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite were used to supply a partial map of the recent lava flows (red), including a complete mapping of their intrusion into Goma as of January 28, 2002. Lava is also apparent within the volcanic crater and at a few other locations. Thick (but broken) cloud cover during the ASTER image acquisition prevented a complete mapping of the lava distribution, but future image acquisitions should complete the mapping.

    Nyiragongo is the steep volcano on the right, Lake Kivu is in the foreground, and the city of Goma has a light pink speckled appearance along the shoreline. Nyiragongo peaks at about 3,470 meters (11,380 feet) elevation and reaches almost exactly 2,000 meters (6,560 feet) above Lake Kivu. The shorter but broader Nyamuragira volcano appears in the left background. Topographic expression has been exaggerated vertically by a factor of 1.5 for this visualization.

    Goma, Lake Kivu, Nyiragongo, Nyamuragira and other nearby volcanoes sit within the East African Rift Valley, a zone where tectonic processes are cracking, stretching, and lowering the Earth's crust. Volcanic activity is common here, and older but geologically recent lava flows (magenta in this depiction) are particularly apparent on the flanks of the Nyamuragira volcano.

    The Landsat image used here was acquired

  6. Spreading and collapse of big basaltic volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puglisi, Giuseppe; Bonforte, Alessandro; Guglielmino, Francesco; Peltier, Aline; Poland, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Among the different types of volcanoes, basaltic ones usually form the most voluminous edifices. Because volcanoes are growing on a pre-existing landscape, the geologic and structural framework of the basement (and earlier volcanic landforms) influences the stress regime, seismicity, and volcanic activity. Conversely, the masses of these volcanoes introduce a morphological anomaly that affects neighboring areas. Growth of a volcano disturbs the tectonic framework of the region, clamps and unclamps existing faults (some of which may be reactivated by the new stress field), and deforms the substratum. A volcano's weight on its basement can trigger edifice spreading and collapse that can affect populated areas even at significant distance. Volcano instability can also be driven by slow tectonic deformation and magmatic intrusion. The manifestations of instability span a range of temporal and spatial scales, ranging from slow creep on individual faults to large earthquakes affecting a broad area. In the frame of MED-SVU project, our work aims to investigate the relation between basement setting and volcanic activity and stability at three Supersite volcanoes: Etna (Sicily, Italy), Kilauea (Island of Hawaii, USA) and Piton de la Fournaise (La Reunion Island, France). These volcanoes host frequent eruptive activity (effusive and explosive) and share common features indicating lateral spreading and collapse, yet they are characterized by different morphologies, dimensions, and tectonic frameworks. For instance, the basaltic ocean island volcanoes of Kilauea and Piton de la Fournaise are near the active ends of long hotspot chains while Mt. Etna has developed at junction along a convergent margin between the African and Eurasian plates and a passive margin separating the oceanic Ionian crust from the African continental crust. Magma supply and plate velocity also differ in the three settings, as to the sizes of the edifices and the extents of their rift zones. These

  7. Nyiragongo Volcano before the Eruption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Nyiragongo is an active stratovolcano situated on the Eastern African Rift; it is part of Africa's Virunga Volcanic Chain. In a massive eruption that occurred on January 17, 2002, Nyiragongo sent a vast plume of smoke and ash skyward, and three swifly-moving rivers of lava streaming down its western and eastern flanks. Previous lava flows from Nyiragongo have been observed moving at speeds of up to 40 miles per hour (60 kph). The lava flows from the January 17 eruption destroyed more than 14 villages in the surrounding countryside, forcing tens of thousands to flee into the neighboring country of Rwanda. Within one day the lava ran to the city of Goma, situated on the northern shore of Lake Kivu about 12 miles (19 km) south of Nyiragongo. The lava cut a 200 foot (60 meter) wide swath right through Goma, setting off many fires, as it ran into Lake Kivu. Goma, the most heavily populated city in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo, is home to about 400,000 people. Most of these citizens were forced to flee, while many have begun to return to their homes only to find their homes destroyed. This true-color scene was captured by the Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+), flying aboard the Landsat 7 satellite, on December 11, 2001, just over a month before the most recent eruption. Nyiragongo's large crater is clearly visible in the image. As recently as June 1994, there was a large lava lake in the volcano's crater which had since solidified. The larger Nyamuragira Volcano is located roughly 13 miles (21 km) to the north of Nyiragongo. Nyamuragira last erupted in February and March 2001. That eruption was also marked by columns of erupted ash and long fluid lava flows, some of which are apparent in the image as dark greyish swaths radiating away from Nyamuragira. Both peaks are also notorious for releasing large amounts of sulfur dioxide, which presents another health hazard to people and animals living in close proximity. Image by Robert Simmon, based on data supplied

  8. Latest Isopach Mapping of Holocene Rhyolitic Tephras at Medicine Lake Volcano, Northern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsey, D. W.; Miller, C. D.

    2011-12-01

    Medicine Lake Volcano, located in the southern Cascades ~55 km east-northeast of Mount Shasta, is a large rear-arc, shield-shaped volcano with an eruptive history spanning nearly 500,000 years. The most recent eruptions at Medicine Lake Volcano are the late Holocene explosive to effusive events at Glass Mountain (~950 yr) and Little Glass Mountain (~1000 yr), which began as sub-Plinian to Plinian eruptions of rhyolite pumice from fissure vents, and culminated in the rhyolite-dacite of Glass Mountain and the rhyolite of Little Glass Mountain. Vents for these eruptions lie along fissures located 15 km apart on opposite sides of the summit caldera of Medicine Lake Volcano. Previous mapping of these deposits by Fisher (1964) and by Heiken (1978) showed a strong northeast-southwest trend of the Little Glass Mountain tephras. Our latest isopach maps of primary tephra deposits from the Glass Mountain and Little Glass Mountain eruptions are based on more extensive fieldwork and on a different interpretation of Little Glass Mountain tephras than previous work Our work shows a strong northeast-southwest trend of the Little Glass Mountain tephras and extends the deposit further in the direction of Mount Shasta, where C. D. Miller found individual lapilli from the Little Glass Mountain eruption. This plume direction is unusual given the dominant westerly wind directions in the region. Winds blow from the northeast less than 2 percent of the time in a typical year. Our field investigations have also shown that Little Glass Mountain tephras consist of two distinct deposits: a coarse, white, pumiceous deposit erupted from Little Glass Mountain and found along the strong northeast-southwest trend; and a fine-grained, salmon-colored tephra erupted from fissure vents north of Little Glass Mountain around Crater Glass Flow and found to the north and east. Field relationships show that the salmon-colored tephra was erupted just prior to the white, pumiceous tephra, and that its fine

  9. Update of map the volcanic hazard in the Ceboruco volcano, Nayarit, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suarez-Plascencia, C.; Camarena-Garcia, M. A.; Nunez-Cornu, F. J.

    2012-12-01

    The Ceboruco Volcano (21° 7.688 N, 104° 30.773 W) is located in the northwestern part of the Tepic-Zacoalco graben. Its volcanic activity can be divided in four eruptive cycles differentiated by their VEI and chemical variations as well. As a result of andesitic effusive activity, the "paleo-Ceboruco" edifice was constructed during the first cycle. The end of this cycle is defined by a plinian eruption (VEI between 3 and 4) which occurred some 1020 years ago and formed the external caldera. During the second cycle an andesitic dome built up in the interior of the caldera. The dome collapsed and formed the internal caldera. The third cycle is represented by andesitic lava flows which partially cover the northern and south-southwestern part of the edifice. The last cycle is represented by the andesitic lava flows of the nineteenth century located in the southwestern flank of the volcano. Actually, moderate fumarolic activity occurs in the upper part of the volcano showing temperatures ranging between 20° and 120°C. Some volcanic high frequency tremors have also been registered near the edifice. Shows the updating of the volcanic hazard maps published in 1998, where we identify with SPOT satellite imagery and Google Earth, change in the land use on the slope of volcano, the expansion of the agricultural frontier on the east sides of the Ceboruco volcano. The population inhabiting the area is 70,224 people in 2010, concentrated in 107 localities and growing at an annual rate of 0.37%, also the region that has shown an increased in the vulnerability for the development of economic activities, supported by highway, high road, railroad, and the construction of new highway to Puerto Vallarta, which is built in the southeast sector of the volcano and electrical infrastructure that connect the Cajon and Yesca Dams to Guadalajara city. The most important economic activity in the area is agriculture, with crops of sugar cane (Saccharum officinarum), corn, and jamaica

  10. Linear volcanic segments in the Sunda Arc, Indonesia: Implications for arc lithosphere control upon volcano distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macpherson, C. G.; Pacey, A.; McCaffrey, K. J.

    2012-12-01

    in the central Sunda Arc from Java to central Flores. We focus on this section because of the complicating influences of the Great Sumatran Fault, further to the west, and the collision between the arc and Australian continental lithosphere, to the east of central Flores. Volcano distribution in the central Sunda Arc is best described as linear segments, rather than as small circles. We conclude that the stress field in the Sunda Arc lithosphere is the primary control on the distribution of its volcanoes. Changes in the location and petrographic/geochemical characteristics in magmatism from initiation, in the late-Plio-Pleistocene, until the present day can also be attributed to the evolving stress in the upper plate.

  11. Effects of Volcanoes on the Natural Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mouginis-Mark, Peter J.

    2005-01-01

    The primary focus of this project has been on the development of techniques to study the thermal and gas output of volcanoes, and to explore our options for the collection of vegetation and soil data to enable us to assess the impact of this volcanic activity on the environment. We originally selected several volcanoes that have persistent gas emissions and/or magma production. The investigation took an integrated look at the environmental effects of a volcano. Through their persistent activity, basaltic volcanoes such as Kilauea (Hawaii) and Masaya (Nicaragua) contribute significant amounts of sulfur dioxide and other gases to the lower atmosphere. Although primarily local rather than regional in its impact, the continuous nature of these eruptions means that they can have a major impact on the troposphere for years to decades. Since mid-1986, Kilauea has emitted about 2,000 tonnes of sulfur dioxide per day, while between 1995 and 2000 Masaya has emotted about 1,000 to 1,500 tonnes per day (Duffel1 et al., 2001; Delmelle et al., 2002; Sutton and Elias, 2002). These emissions have a significant effect on the local environment. The volcanic smog ("vog" ) that is produced affects the health of local residents, impacts the local ecology via acid rain deposition and the generation of acidic soils, and is a concern to local air traffic due to reduced visibility. Much of the work that was conducted under this NASA project was focused on the development of field validation techniques of volcano degassing and thermal output that could then be correlated with satellite observations. In this way, we strove to develop methods by which not only our study volcanoes, but also volcanoes in general worldwide (Wright and Flynn, 2004; Wright et al., 2004). Thus volcanoes could be routinely monitored for their effects on the environment. The selected volcanoes were: Kilauea (Hawaii; 19.425 N, 155.292 W); Masaya (Nicaragua; 11.984 N, 86.161 W); and Pods (Costa Rica; 10.2OoN, 84.233 W).

  12. Seismic unrest at Katla Volcano- southern Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    jeddi, zeinab; Tryggvason, Ari; Gudmundsson, Olafur; Bödvarsson, Reynir; SIL Seismology Group

    2014-05-01

    Katla volcano is located on the propagating Eastern Volcanic Zone (EVZ) in South Iceland. It is located beneath Mýrdalsjökull ice-cap which covers an area of almost 600 km2, comprising the summit caldera and the eruption vents. 20 eruptions between 930 and 1918 with intervals of 13-95 years are documented at Katla which is one of the most active subglacial volcanoes in Iceland. Eruptions at Katla are mainly explosive due to the subglacial mode of extrusion and produce high eruption columns and catastrophic melt water floods (jökulhlaups). The present long Volcanic repose (almost 96 years) at Katla, the general unrest since 1955, and the 2010 eruption of the neighbouring Eyjafjallajökull volcano has prompted concerns among geoscientists about an imminent eruption. Thus, the volcano has been densely monitored by seismologists and volcanologists. The seismology group of Uppsala University as a partner in the Volcano Anatomy (VA) project in collaboration with the University of Iceland and the Icelandic Meteorological Office (IMO) installed 9 temporary seismic stations on and around the Mýrdalsjökull glacier in 2011. Another 10 permanent seismic stations are operated by IMO around Katla. The project's data collection is now finished and temporary stations were pulled down in August 2013. According to seismicity maps of the whole recording period, thousands of microearthquakes have occurred within the caldera region. At least three different source areas are active in Katla: the caldera region, the western Godaland region and a small cluster at the southern rim of Mýrdalsjökull near the glacial stream of Hafursarjökull. Seismicity in the southern flank has basically started after June 2011. The caldera events are mainly volcano-tectonic, while western and southern events are mostly long period (lp) and can be related to glacial or magmatic movement. One motivation of the VA Katla project is to better understand the physical mechanism of these lp events. Changes

  13. Climate model calculations of the effects of volcanoes on global climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robock, Alan

    1992-01-01

    An examination of the Northern Hemisphere winter surface temperature patterns after the 12 largest volcanic eruptions from 1883-1992 shows warming over Eurasia and North America and cooling over the Middle East which are significant at the 95 percent level. This pattern is found in the first winter after tropical eruptions, in the first or second winter after midlatitude eruptions, and in the second winter after high latitude eruptions. The effects are independent of the hemisphere of the volcanoes. An enhanced zonal wind driven by heating of the tropical stratosphere by the volcanic aerosols is responsible for the regions of warming, while the cooling is caused by blocking of incoming sunlight.

  14. Interferometric Synthetic Aperture radar studies of Alaska volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Zhong; Wicks, Charles W.; Dzurisin, Daniel; Power, John A.; Thatcher, Wayne R.; Masterlark, Timothy

    2003-01-01

    In this article, we summarize our recent InSAR studies of 13 Alaska volcanoes, including New Trident, Okmok, Akutan, Kiska, Augustine, Westdahl, Peulik, Makushin, Seguam, Shishaldin, Pavlof, Cleveland, and Korovin volcanoes.

  15. Volcanoes in the Classroom--an Explosive Learning Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Susan A.; Thompson, Keith S.

    1996-01-01

    Presents a unit on volcanoes for third- and fourth-grade students. Includes demonstrations; video presentations; building a volcano model; and inviting a scientist, preferably a vulcanologist, to share his or her expertise with students. (JRH)

  16. Volcanoes and volcanic provinces - Martian western hemisphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, D. H.

    1982-01-01

    The recognition of some Martian landforms as volcanoes is based on their morphology and geologic setting. Other structures, however, may exhibit classic identifying features to a varying or a less degree; these may be only considered provisionally as having a volcanic origin. Regional geologic mapping of the western hemisphere of Mars from Viking images has revealed many more probable volcanoes and volcanotectonic features than were recognized on Mariner 9 pictures. These abundant volcanoes have been assigned to several distinct provinces on the basis of their areal distribution. Although the Olympus-Tharsis region remains as the principle center of volcanism on Mars, four other important provinces are now also recognized: the lowland plains, Tempe Terra plateau, southern highlands (in the Phaethontis and Thaumasia quadrangles), and a probable ignimbrite province, situated along the highland-lowland boundary in Amazonis Planitia. Volcanoes in any one province vary in morphlogy, size, and age, but volcanoes in each province tend to have common characteristics that distinguish that particular group.

  17. Space Radar Image of Rabaul Volcano, New Guinea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This is a radar image of the Rabaul volcano on the island of New Britain, Papua, New Guinea taken almost a month after its September 19, 1994, eruption that killed five people and covered the town of Rabaul and nearby villages with up to 75 centimeters (30 inches) of ash. More than 53,000 people have been displaced by the eruption. The image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on its 173rd orbit on October 11, 1994. This image is centered at 4.2 degrees south latitude and 152.2 degrees east longitude in the southwest Pacific Ocean. The area shown is approximately 21 kilometers by 25 kilometers (13 miles by 15.5 miles). North is toward the upper right. The colors in this image were obtained using the following radar channels: red represents the L-band (horizontally transmitted and received); green represents the L-band (horizontally transmitted and vertically received); blue represents the C-band (horizontally transmitted and vertically received). Most of the Rabaul volcano is underwater and the caldera (crater) creates Blanche Bay, the semi-circular body of water that occupies most of the center of the image. Volcanic vents within the caldera are visible in the image and include Vulcan, on a peninsula on the west side of the bay, and Rabalanakaia and Tavurvur (the circular purple feature near the mouth of the bay) on the east side. Both Vulcan and Tavurvur were active during the 1994 eruption. Ash deposits appear red-orange on the image, and are most prominent on the south flanks of Vulcan and north and northwest of Tavurvur. A faint blue patch in the water in the center of the image is a large raft of floating pumice fragments that were ejected from Vulcan during the eruption and clog the inner bay. Visible on the east side of the bay are the grid-like patterns of the streets of Rabaul and an airstrip, which appears as a dark northwest-trending band at the right-center of

  18. A new volcano-structural map of the Virunga Volcanic Province, D.R.Congo and Rwanda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poppe, Sam; Smets, Benoît; Albino, Fabien; Kervyn, François; Kervyn, Matthieu

    2013-04-01

    The Virunga Volcanic Province (VVP) is situated within the Western branch of the East African Rift system at the boundary of D.R.Congo, Rwanda and Uganda. The Western VVP comprises two active volcanoes, Nyamulagira and Nyiragongo. Six supposedly historically inactive volcanoes are present in the Central and Eastern VVP. Nyamulagira is recently the most active volcano on the African continent, with 30 eruptions since 1900, while Nyiragongo hosts a semi-permanent lava lake in its crater and fed a catastrophic lava flow in 2002. Additionally, numerous volcanic vents, fissures and cones are scattered on and around the main edifices. Except for geological maps from the colonial times and limited studies of historical eruptions, little is known about the volcano-tectonic structure and long term volcanic history of the VVP. A new Digital Elevation Model (TanDEM-X) with a resolution of 5 m, combined with SPOT and SAR images served as a base for the development of a new volcano-structural map for the entire VVP. A GIS data base was developed including the location of eruptive cones and fissures and the distribution of lava flows. The boundaries of historic and pre-historic lava flows and pyroclastic cones were traced from from interpretation of topographic and multispectral remote sensing data and re-analysis of ancient geological maps.Larger-scale lineaments interpreted as potential volcano-tectonic structures were also systematically mapped. All previously geochemically analyzed samples were localized. This GIS-based volcano-structural map will serve as a base for the quantitative characterization of recent and historic volcanic eruption products, such as pyroclastic cones and lava flows, of Nyamulagira and Nyiragongo, as well as for the assessment of potential Holocene activity in the Central and Eastern VVP. The orientation of feeder dykes inferred from cone alignments and morphology is used to identify the main volcanic structures and infer the locally dominant stress

  19. Living with Volcanoes: Year Eleven Teaching Resource Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le Heron, Kiri; Andrews, Jill; Hooks, Stacey; Larnder, Michele; Le Heron, Richard

    2000-01-01

    Presents a unit on volcanoes and experiences with volcanoes that helps students develop geography skills. Focuses on four volcanoes: (1) Rangitoto Island; (2) Lake Pupuke; (3) Mount Smart; and (4) One Tree Hill. Includes an answer sheet and resources to use with the unit. (CMK)

  20. How Do Volcanoes Affect Human Life? Integrated Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dayton, Rebecca; Edwards, Carrie; Sisler, Michelle

    This packet contains a unit on teaching about volcanoes. The following question is addressed: How do volcanoes affect human life? The unit covers approximately three weeks of instruction and strives to present volcanoes in an holistic form. The five subject areas of art, language arts, mathematics, science, and social studies are integrated into…

  1. Predicting the Timing and Location of the next Hawaiian Volcano

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russo, Joseph; Mattox, Stephen; Kildau, Nicole

    2010-01-01

    The wealth of geologic data on Hawaiian volcanoes makes them ideal for study by middle school students. In this paper the authors use existing data on the age and location of Hawaiian volcanoes to predict the location of the next Hawaiian volcano and when it will begin to grow on the floor of the Pacific Ocean. An inquiry-based lesson is also…

  2. Nyiragongo Volcano, Congo, Map View with Lava, Landsat / ASTER / SRTM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Nyiragongo volcano in the Congo erupted on January 17, 2002, and subsequently sent streams of lava into the city of Goma on the north shore of Lake Kivu. More than 100 people were killed, more than 12,000 homes were destroyed, and hundreds of thousands were forced to flee the broader community of nearly half a million people. This Landsat satellite image shows the volcano (right of center), the city of Goma, and surrounding terrain. Image data from the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite were used to supply a partial map of the recent lava flows (red overlay), including a complete mapping of their intrusion into Goma as of January 28, 2002. Lava is also apparent within the volcanic crater and at a few other locations. Thick (but broken) cloud cover during the ASTER image acquisition prevented a complete mapping of the lava distribution, but future image acquisitions should complete the mapping.

    Goma has a light pink speckled appearance along the shore of Lake Kivu. The city airport parallels, and is just right (east) of, the larger lava flow. Nyiragongo peaks at about 3,470 meters (11,380 feet) elevation and reaches almost exactly 2,000 meters (6,560 feet) above Lake Kivu. The shorter but much broader Nyamuragira volcano appears in the upper left.

    Goma, Lake Kivu, Nyiragongo, Nyamuragira and other nearby volcanoes sit within the East African Rift Valley, a zone where tectonic processes are cracking, stretching, and lowering the Earth's crust. Volcanic activity is common here, and older but geologically recent lava flows (magenta in this depiction) are particularly apparent on the flanks of the Nyamuragira volcano.

    The Landsat image used here was acquired on December 11, 2001, about a month before the eruption, and shows an unusually cloud-free view of this tropical terrain. Minor clouds and their shadows were digitally removed to clarify the view and topographic shading derived from the SRTM

  3. Success in East Harlem.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meier, Deborah

    1987-01-01

    Traces the history of the Central Park East Elementary and Secondary Schools in Manhattan (NY), discusses the educational philosophy of the schools, and pinpoints changes Central Park East teachers have made in the traditional school structure. (PS)

  4. Volcano monitoring at the U.S. Geological Survey's Hawaiian Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    1986-01-01

    The island of Hawaii has one of the youngest landscapes on Earth, formed by the frequent addition of new lava to its surface. Because Hawaiian eruptions are generally nonexplosive and easily accessible, the island has long attracted geologists interested in studying the extraordinary power of volcanic eruption. The U.S. Geological Survey's Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO), now nearing its 75th anniversary, has been in the forefront of volcanology since the early 1900s. This issue of Earthquakes and Volcanoes is devoted to the work of the Observatory and its role in studying the most recent eruptions of Hawaii's two currently active volcanoes, Kilauea and Mauna Loa.

  5. Volcano hazards program in the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tilling, R.I.; Bailey, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    Volcano monitoring and volcanic-hazards studies have received greatly increased attention in the United States in the past few years. Before 1980, the Volcanic Hazards Program was primarily focused on the active volcanoes of Kilauea and Mauna Loa, Hawaii, which have been monitored continuously since 1912 by the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory. After the reawakening and catastrophic eruption of Mount St. Helens in 1980, the program was substantially expanded as the government and general public became aware of the potential for eruptions and associated hazards within the conterminous United States. Integrated components of the expanded program include: volcanic-hazards assessment; volcano monitoring; fundamental research; and, in concert with federal, state, and local authorities, emergency-response planning. In 1980 the David A. Johnston Cascades Volcano Observatory was established in Vancouver, Washington, to systematically monitor the continuing activity of Mount St. Helens, and to acquire baseline data for monitoring the other, presently quiescent, but potentially dangerous Cascade volcanoes in the Pacific Northwest. Since June 1980, all of the eruptions of Mount St. Helens have been predicted successfully on the basis of seismic and geodetic monitoring. The largest volcanic eruptions, but the least probable statistically, that pose a threat to western conterminous United States are those from the large Pleistocene-Holocene volcanic systems, such as Long Valley caldera (California) and Yellowstone caldera (Wyoming), which are underlain by large magma chambers still potentially capable of producing catastrophic caldera-forming eruptions. In order to become better prepared for possible future hazards associated with such historically unpecedented events, detailed studies of these, and similar, large volcanic systems should be intensified to gain better insight into caldera-forming processes and to recognize, if possible, the precursors of caldera-forming eruptions

  6. Volcano hazards program in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilling, Robert I.; Bailey, Roy A.

    1985-10-01

    Volcano monitoring and volcanic-hazards studies have received greatly increased attention in the United States in the past few years. Before 1980, the Volcanic Hazards Program was primarily focused on the active volcanoes of Kilauea and Mauna Loa, Hawaii, which have been monitored continuously since 1912 by the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory. After the reawakening and catastrophic eruption of Mount St. Helens in 1980, the program was substantially expanded as the government and general public became aware of the potential for eruptions and associated hazards within the conterminous United States. Integrated components of the expanded program include: volcanic-hazards assessment; volcano monitoring; fundamental research; and, in concert with federal, state, and local authorities, emergency-response planning. In 1980 the David A. Johnston Cascades Volcano Observatory was established in Vancouver, Washington, to systematically monitor the continuing activity of Mount St. Helens, and to acquire baseline data for monitoring the other, presently quiescent, but potentially dangerous Cascade volcanoes in the Pacific Northwest. Since June 1980, all of the eruptions of Mount St. Helens have been predicted successfully on the basis of seismic and geodetic monitoring. The largest volcanic eruptions, but the least probable statistically, that pose a threat to western conterminous United States are those from the large Pleistocene-Holocene volcanic systems, such as Long Valley caldera (California) and Yellowstone caldera (Wyoming), which are underlain by large magma chambers still potentially capable of producing catastrophic caldera-forming eruptions. In order to become better prepared for possible future hazards associated with such historically unpecedented events, detailed studies of these, and similar, large volcanic systems should be intensified to gain better insight into caldera-forming processes and to recognize, if possible, the precursors of caldera-forming eruptions.

  7. Volcanoes muon imaging using Cherenkov telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catalano, O.; Del Santo, M.; Mineo, T.; Cusumano, G.; Maccarone, M. C.; Pareschi, G.

    2016-01-01

    A detailed understanding of a volcano inner structure is one of the key-points for the volcanic hazards evaluation. To this aim, in the last decade, geophysical radiography techniques using cosmic muon particles have been proposed. By measuring the differential attenuation of the muon flux as a function of the amount of rock crossed along different directions, it is possible to determine the density distribution of the interior of a volcano. Up to now, a number of experiments have been based on the detection of the muon tracks crossing hodoscopes, made up of scintillators or nuclear emulsion planes. Using telescopes based on the atmospheric Cherenkov imaging technique, we propose a new approach to study the interior of volcanoes detecting of the Cherenkov light produced by relativistic cosmic-ray muons that survive after crossing the volcano. The Cherenkov light produced along the muon path is imaged as a typical annular pattern containing all the essential information to reconstruct particle direction and energy. Our new approach offers the advantage of a negligible background and an improved spatial resolution. To test the feasibility of our new method, we have carried out simulations with a toy-model based on the geometrical parameters of ASTRI SST-2M, i.e. the imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescope currently under installation onto the Etna volcano. Comparing the results of our simulations with previous experiments based on particle detectors, we gain at least a factor of 10 in sensitivity. The result of this study shows that we resolve an empty cylinder with a radius of about 100 m located inside a volcano in less than 4 days, which implies a limit on the magma velocity of 5 m/h.

  8. Applications of geophysical methods to volcano monitoring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wynn, Jeff; Dzurisin, Daniel; Finn, Carol A.; Kauahikaua, James P.; Lahusen, Richard G.

    2006-01-01

    The array of geophysical technologies used in volcano hazards studies - some developed originally only for volcano monitoring - ranges from satellite remote sensing including InSAR to leveling and EDM surveys, campaign and telemetered GPS networks, electronic tiltmeters and strainmeters, airborne magnetic and electromagnetic surveys, short-period and broadband seismic monitoring, even microphones tuned for infrasound. They include virtually every method used in resource exploration except large-scale seismic reflection. By “geophysical ” we include both active and passive methods as well as geodetic technologies. Volcano monitoring incorporates telemetry to handle high-bandwith cameras and broadband seismometers. Critical geophysical targets include the flux of magma in shallow reservoir and lava-tube systems, changes in active hydrothermal systems, volcanic edifice stability, and lahars. Since the eruption of Mount St. Helens in Washington State in 1980, and the eruption at Pu’u O’o in Hawai’i beginning in 1983 and still continuing, dramatic advances have occurred in monitoring technology such as “crisis GIS” and lahar modeling, InSAR interferograms, as well as gas emission geochemistry sampling, and hazards mapping and eruption predictions. The on-going eruption of Mount St. Helens has led to new monitoring technologies, including advances in broadband Wi-Fi and satellite telemetry as well as new instrumentation. Assessment of the gap between adequate monitoring and threat at the 169 potentially dangerous Holocene volcanoes shows where populations are dangerously exposed to volcanic catastrophes in the United States and its territories . This paper focuses primarily on Hawai’ian volcanoes and the northern Pacific and Cascades volcanoes. The US Geological Survey, the US National Park System, and the University of Utah cooperate in a program to monitor the huge Yellowstone volcanic system, and a separate observatory monitors the restive Long Valley

  9. Turrialba volcano: awaking indications of possible unrest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, G.; Ramirez, C. J.; Mora-Amador, R.; Rouwet, D.; Mora, R.; Alpizar, Y.; Picado, C.

    2012-12-01

    Based on historical descriptions and reports, Turrialba volcano has presented events like incandescence, SO2 combustion, phreatic eruptions, that preceded the only historical magmatic eruption (1864-1866), this VEI value 2 eruption covered a surface area of 3400 km2, successively the volcano enter in a period of calm. During most of the 80's and 90's the volcano was under low seismic activity and low temperature fumaroles (<100°C). At the end of the 90's and the firsts years of 00's there was a small changes on fumarole fields sizes and small increase on temperature and microquakes, but it was after 2005 that the volcano increased the seismicity from 10 to 100 diary microquakes, accompained by a higher degassing, acid rain and fumaroles over ≈250°C. On January 5th, 2010 the volcano had a serial of phreatic eruptions, which formed an elongated intracrateric vent named "Boquete 2010", at the NW crater, which reached maximum temperatures of 560°C, also incandescence at night with sporadically emission of non-juvenile ashes. Later on June 2011, "Boquete 2010" temperature decreased to ≈300°C, but some new fumaroles appeared in the NW intracrater with a maximum temperature of 531°C, also with incandescence and SO2 blue combustion gases. Finally on January 11, 2012 during a fieldwork caused by thermal images showing the increase on temperature of fumaroles (≈250°C to ≈450°C), a couple of active sulphur flows of at least 100m long appeared, that flows behaved like a newtonian liquid with similar setting of a pahoehoe lava. Next day on January 12, the volcano had a serial of phreatic eruptions with emission of non-juvenile ashes and formed a new vent ("Boquete 2012") in outer eastern wall of the NW crater, that reach temperatures of 780°C also with incandescence and SO2 combustion gases.

  10. Mafic Plinian volcanism and ignimbrite emplacement at Tofua volcano, Tonga

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caulfield, J. T.; Cronin, S. J.; Turner, S. P.; Cooper, L. B.

    2011-11-01

    Tofua Island is the largest emergent mafic volcano within the Tofua arc, Tonga, southwest Pacific. The volcano is dominated by a distinctive caldera averaging 4 km in diameter, containing a freshwater lake in the south and east. The latest paroxysmal (VEI 5-6) explosive volcanism includes two phases of activity, each emplacing a high-grade ignimbrite. The products are basaltic andesites with between 52 wt.% and 57 wt.% SiO2. The first and largest eruption caused the inward collapse of a stratovolcano and produced the `Tofua' ignimbrite and a sub-circular caldera located slightly northwest of the island's centre. This ignimbrite was deposited in a radial fashion over the entire island, with associated Plinian fall deposits up to 0.5 m thick on islands >40 km away. Common sub-rounded and frequently cauliform scoria bombs throughout the ignimbrite attest to a small degree of marginal magma-water interaction. The common intense welding of the coarse-grained eruptive products, however, suggests that the majority of the erupted magma was hot, water-undersaturated and supplied at high rates with moderately low fragmentation efficiency and low levels of interaction with external water. We propose that the development of a water-saturated dacite body at shallow (<6 km) depth resulted in failure of the chamber roof to cause sudden evacuation of material, producing a Plinian eruption column. Following a brief period of quiescence, large-scale faulting in the southeast of the island produced a second explosive phase believed to result from recharge of a chemically distinct magma depleted in incompatible elements. This similar, but smaller eruption, emplaced the `Hokula' Ignimbrite sheet in the northeast of the island. A maximum total volume of 8 km3 of juvenile material was erupted by these events. The main eruption column is estimated to have reached a height of ˜12 km, and to have produced a major atmospheric injection of gas, and tephra recorded in the widespread series of

  11. Venus small volcano classification and description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubele, J. C.

    1993-03-01

    The high resolution and global coverage of the Magellan radar image data set allows detailed study of the smallest volcanoes on the planet. A modified classification scheme for volcanoes less than 20 km in diameter is shown and described. It is based on observations of all members of the 556 significant clusters or fields of small volcanoes located and described by this author during data collection for the Magellan Volcanic and Magmatic Feature Catalog. This global study of approximately 10 exp 4 volcanoes provides new information for refining small volcano classification based on individual characteristics. Total number of these volcanoes was estimated to be 10 exp 5 to 10 exp 6 planetwide based on pre-Magellan analysis of Venera 15/16, and during preparation of the global catalog, small volcanoes were identified individually or in clusters in every C1-MIDR mosaic of the Magellan data set. Basal diameter (based on 1000 measured edifices) generally ranges from 2 to 12 km with a mode of 34 km, and follows an exponential distribution similar to the size frequency distribution of seamounts as measured from GLORIA sonar images. This is a typical distribution for most size-limited natural phenomena unlike impact craters which follow a power law distribution and continue to infinitely increase in number with decreasing size. Using an exponential distribution calculated from measured small volcanoes selected globally at random, we can calculate total number possible given a minimum size. The paucity of edifice diameters less than 2 km may be due to inability to identify very small volcanic edifices in this data set; however, summit pits are recognizable at smaller diameters, and 2 km may represent a significant minimum diameter related to style of volcanic eruption. Guest, et al, discussed four general types of small volcanic edifices on Venus: (1) small lava shields; (2) small volcanic cones; (3) small volcanic domes; and (4) scalloped margin domes ('ticks'). Steep

  12. Seismic Structure Beneath Taal Volcano, Philippines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, S. H.; Gung, Y.; Konstantinou, K. I.; Lin, C. H.

    2014-12-01

    The very active Taal Volcano is situated 60 km south of Metro Manila in the southern part of Luzon Island. Based on its frequent explosive eruptions and high potential hazards to nearby population of several million, Taal Volcano is chosen as one of the 15 most dangerous "Decade Volcanoes" in the world. We deployed a temporary seismic network consisting of 8 stations since March 2008. The temporal network was operated from late March 2008 to mid March 2010 and recorded over 2270 local earthquakes. In the early data processing stages, unexpected linear drifting of clock time was clearly identified from ambient noise cross-correlation functions for a number of stations. The drifting rates of all problematic stations were determined as references to correct timing errors prior to further processing. Initial locations of earthquakes were determined from manually picking P- and S-phases arrivals with a general velocity model based on AK135. We used travel times of 305 well-located local events to derive a minimum 1-D model using VELEST. Two major earthquake groups were noticed from refined locations. One was underneath the western shore of Taal Lake with a linear feature, and the other spread at shallower depths showing a less compact feature around the eastern flank of Taal Volcano Island. We performed seismic tomography to image the 3D structure beneath Taal Volcano using a well-established algorithm, LOTOS. Some interesting features are noted in the tomographic results, such as a probable solidified past magma conduit below the northwestern corner of Taal Volcano Island, characterized by high Vp, Vs, and low Vp/Vs ratio, and a potential large hydrothermal reservoir beneath the central of Taal Volcano Island, characterized by low Vs and high Vp/Vs ratio. Combining the results of seismicity and tomographic images, we also suggest the potential existence of a magma chamber beneath the southwestern Taal Lake, and a magma conduit or fault extending from there to the

  13. In search of ancestral Kilauea volcano

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lipman, P.W.; Sisson, T.W.; Ui, T.; Naka, J.

    2000-01-01

    Submersible observations and samples show that the lower south flank of Hawaii, offshore from Kilauea volcano and the active Hilina slump system, consists entirely of compositionally diverse volcaniclastic rocks; pillow lavas are confined to shallow slopes. Submarine-erupted basalt clasts have strongly variable alkalic and transitional basalt compositions (to 41% SiO2, 10.8% alkalies), contrasting with present-day Kilauea tholeiites. The volcaniclastic rocks provide a unique record of ancestral alkalic growth of an archetypal hotspot volcano, including transition to its tholeiitic shield stage, and associated slope-failure events.

  14. Mantle fault zone beneath Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Cecily J; Okubo, Paul G; Shearer, Peter M

    2003-04-18

    Relocations and focal mechanism analyses of deep earthquakes (>/=13 kilometers) at Kilauea volcano demonstrate that seismicity is focused on an active fault zone at 30-kilometer depth, with seaward slip on a low-angle plane, and other smaller, distinct fault zones. The earthquakes we have analyzed predominantly reflect tectonic faulting in the brittle lithosphere rather than magma movement associated with volcanic activity. The tectonic earthquakes may be induced on preexisting faults by stresses of magmatic origin, although background stresses from volcano loading and lithospheric flexure may also contribute.

  15. Mantle fault zone beneath Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wolfe, C.J.; Okubo, P.G.; Shearer, P.M.

    2003-01-01

    Relocations and focal mechanism analyses of deep earthquakes (???13 kilometers) at Kilauea volcano demonstrate that seismicity is focused on an active fault zone at 30-kilometer depth, with seaward slip on a low-angle plane, and other smaller, distinct fault zones. The earthquakes we have analyzed predominantly reflect tectonic faulting in the brittle lithosphere rather than magma movement associated with volcanic activity. The tectonic earthquakes may be induced on preexisting faults by stresses of magmatic origin, although background stresses from volcano loading and lithospheric flexure may also contribute.

  16. Venus small volcano classification and description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aubele, J. C.

    1993-01-01

    The high resolution and global coverage of the Magellan radar image data set allows detailed study of the smallest volcanoes on the planet. A modified classification scheme for volcanoes less than 20 km in diameter is shown and described. It is based on observations of all members of the 556 significant clusters or fields of small volcanoes located and described by this author during data collection for the Magellan Volcanic and Magmatic Feature Catalog. This global study of approximately 10 exp 4 volcanoes provides new information for refining small volcano classification based on individual characteristics. Total number of these volcanoes was estimated to be 10 exp 5 to 10 exp 6 planetwide based on pre-Magellan analysis of Venera 15/16, and during preparation of the global catalog, small volcanoes were identified individually or in clusters in every C1-MIDR mosaic of the Magellan data set. Basal diameter (based on 1000 measured edifices) generally ranges from 2 to 12 km with a mode of 34 km, and follows an exponential distribution similar to the size frequency distribution of seamounts as measured from GLORIA sonar images. This is a typical distribution for most size-limited natural phenomena unlike impact craters which follow a power law distribution and continue to infinitely increase in number with decreasing size. Using an exponential distribution calculated from measured small volcanoes selected globally at random, we can calculate total number possible given a minimum size. The paucity of edifice diameters less than 2 km may be due to inability to identify very small volcanic edifices in this data set; however, summit pits are recognizable at smaller diameters, and 2 km may represent a significant minimum diameter related to style of volcanic eruption. Guest, et al, discussed four general types of small volcanic edifices on Venus: (1) small lava shields; (2) small volcanic cones; (3) small volcanic domes; and (4) scalloped margin domes ('ticks'). Steep

  17. The origin of the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Dvorak, John

    2011-05-15

    I first stepped through the doorway of the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory in 1976, and I was impressed by what I saw: A dozen people working out of a stone-and-metal building perched at the edge of a high cliff with a spectacular view of a vast volcanic plain. Their primary purpose was to monitor the island's two active volcanoes, Kilauea and Mauna Loa. I joined them, working for six weeks as a volunteer and then, years later, as a staff scientist. That gave me several chances to ask how the observatory had started.

  18. In Brief: Russian volcano warnings reinstated

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielinski, Sarah

    2007-04-01

    The Kamchatka Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT) is again issuing warnings for aviation during periods of activity by Kamchatkan volcanoes. KVERT had stopped issuing warnings on 1 March due to a loss of funding by the Federal Unitary Enterprise State Air Traffic Management Corporation of Russia (see Eos 88(12), 2007). The funding for this work has now resumed. KVERT is a collaborative project of scientists from the Russian Institute of Volcanology and Seismology, the Kamchatka Experimental and Methodical Seismological Department, and the Alaska Volcano Observatory.

  19. Ground deformation associated with the March 1996 earthquake swarm at Akutan volcano, Alaska, revealed by satellite radar interferometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Zhiming; Wicks, C.; Power, J.A.; Dzurisin, D.

    2000-01-01

    In March 1996 an intense swarm of volcano-tectonic earthquakes (???3000 felt by local residents, Mmax = 5.1, cumulative moment of 2.7 ??1018 N m) beneath Akutan Island in the Aleutian volcanic arc, Alaska, produced extensive ground cracks but no eruption of Akutan volcano. Synthetic aperture radar interferograms that span the time of the swarm reveal complex island-wide deformation: the western part of the island including Akutan volcano moved upward, while the eastern part moved downward. The axis of the deformation approximately aligns with new ground cracks on the western part of the island and with Holocene normal faults that were reactivated during the swarm on the eastern part of the island. The axis is also roughly parallel to the direction of greatest compressional stress in the region. No ground movements greater than 2.83 cm were observed outside the volcano's summit caldera for periods of 4 years before or 2 years after the swarm. We modeled the deformation primarily as the emplacement of a shallow, east-west trending, north dipping dike plus inflation of a deep, Mogi-type magma body beneath the volcano. The pattern of subsidence on the eastern part of the island is poorly constrained. It might have been produced by extensional tectonic strain that both reactivated preexisting faults on the eastern part of the island and facilitated magma movement beneath the western part. Alternatively, magma intrusion beneath the volcano might have been the cause of extension and subsidence in the eastern part of the island. We attribute localized subsidence in an area of active fumaroles within the Akutan caldera, by as much as 10 cm during 1992-1993 and 1996-1998, to fluid withdrawal or depressurization of the shallow hydrothermal system. Copyright 2000 by the American Geophysical Union.

  20. Swift snowmelt and floods (lahars) caused by great pyroclastic surge at Mount St Helens volcano, Washington, 18 May 1980

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waitt, R.B.

    1989-01-01

    The initial explosions at Mount St. Helens, Washington, on the moring of 18 May 1980 developed into a huge pyroclastic surge that generated catastrophic floods off the east and west flanks of the volcano. Near-source surge deposits on the east and west were lithic, sorted, lacking in accretionary lapilli and vesiculated ash, not plastered against upright obstacles, and hot enough to char wood - all attributes of dry pyroclastic surge. Material deposited at the surge base on steep slopes near the volcano transformed into high-concentration lithic pyroclastic flows whose deposits contain charred wood and other features indicating that these flows were hot and dry. Stratigraphy shows that even the tail of the surge had passed the east and west volcano flanks before the geomorphically distinct floods (lahars) arrived. This field evidence undermines hypotheses that the turbulent surge was itself wet and that its heavy components segregated out to transform directly into lahars. Nor is there evidence that meters-thick snow-slab avalanches intimately mixed with the surge to form the floods. The floods must have instead originated by swift snowmelt at the base of a hot and relatively dry turbulent surge. Impacting hot pyroclasts probably transferred downslope momentum to the snow surface and churned snow grains into the surge base. Melting snow and accumulating hot surge debris may have moved initially as thousands of small thin slushflows. As these flows removed the surface snow and pyroclasts, newly uncovered snow was partly melted by the turbulent surge base; this and accumulating hot surge debris in turn began flowing, a self-sustaining process feeding the initial flows. The flows thus grew swiftly over tens of seconds and united downslope into great slushy ejecta-laden sheetfloods. Gravity accelerated the floods to more than 100 km/h as they swept down and off the volcano flanks while the snow component melted to form great debris-rich floods (lahars) channeled into

  1. Crustal stress and structure at Kīlauea Volcano inferred from seismic anisotropy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Jessica H.; Swanson, Donald; Roman, Diana C.; Poland, Michael P.; Thelen, Weston A.

    2015-01-01

    Seismic anisotropy, measured through shear wave splitting (SWS) analysis, can be indicative of the state of stress in Earth's crust. Changes in SWS at Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai‘i, associated with the onset of summit eruptive activity in 2008 hint at the potential of the technique for tracking volcanic activity. To use SWS observations as a monitoring tool, however, it is important to understand the cause of seismic anisotropy at the volcano throughout the eruptive cycle. To address this need, we analyzed SWS results from across Kīlauea in combination with macroscopic surface structures (mapped fractures, faults, and fissures) and stress orientations inferred from fault plane solutions. Seismic anisotropy seems to be due to pervasive aligned structures in most regions of the volcano. The upper East and Southwest Rift Zones, however, show a bimodality in stress and SWS, suggesting a stress discontinuity with depth, perhaps related to magma conduits that trend obliquely to the dominant structure. Other areas in and around Kīlauea Caldera display principal stresses of similar magnitudes, indicating that small stress perturbations can rotate the maximum horizontal compressive stress direction by up to 90°. In these locations, static structures generally control SWS, but dynamic conditions due to magmatic activity can override the structural control. Monitoring of SWS may therefore provide important signs of impending volcanism.

  2. Probabilistic Reasoning Over Seismic Time Series: Volcano Monitoring by Hidden Markov Models at Mt. Etna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassisi, Carmelo; Prestifilippo, Michele; Cannata, Andrea; Montalto, Placido; Patanè, Domenico; Privitera, Eugenio

    2016-07-01

    From January 2011 to December 2015, Mt. Etna was mainly characterized by a cyclic eruptive behavior with more than 40 lava fountains from New South-East Crater. Using the RMS (Root Mean Square) of the seismic signal recorded by stations close to the summit area, an automatic recognition of the different states of volcanic activity (QUIET, PRE-FOUNTAIN, FOUNTAIN, POST-FOUNTAIN) has been applied for monitoring purposes. Since values of the RMS time series calculated on the seismic signal are generated from a stochastic process, we can try to model the system generating its sampled values, assumed to be a Markov process, using Hidden Markov Models (HMMs). HMMs analysis seeks to recover the sequence of hidden states from the observations. In our framework, observations are characters generated by the Symbolic Aggregate approXimation (SAX) technique, which maps RMS time series values with symbols of a pre-defined alphabet. The main advantages of the proposed framework, based on HMMs and SAX, with respect to other automatic systems applied on seismic signals at Mt. Etna, are the use of multiple stations and static thresholds to well characterize the volcano states. Its application on a wide seismic dataset of Etna volcano shows the possibility to guess the volcano states. The experimental results show that, in most of the cases, we detected lava fountains in advance.

  3. The New USGS Volcano Hazards Program Web Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venezky, D. Y.; Graham, S. E.; Parker, T. J.; Snedigar, S. F.

    2008-12-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) Volcano Hazard Program (VHP) has launched a revised web site that uses a map-based interface to display hazards information for U.S. volcanoes. The web site is focused on better communication of hazards and background volcano information to our varied user groups by reorganizing content based on user needs and improving data display. The Home Page provides a synoptic view of the activity level of all volcanoes for which updates are written using a custom Google® Map. Updates are accessible by clicking on one of the map icons or clicking on the volcano of interest in the adjacent color-coded list of updates. The new navigation provides rapid access to volcanic activity information, background volcano information, images and publications, volcanic hazards, information about VHP, and the USGS volcano observatories. The Volcanic Activity section was tailored for emergency managers but provides information for all our user groups. It includes a Google® Map of the volcanoes we monitor, an Elevated Activity Page, a general status page, information about our Volcano Alert Levels and Aviation Color Codes, monitoring information, and links to monitoring data from VHP's volcano observatories: Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO), Cascades Volcano Observatory (CVO), Long Valley Observatory (LVO), Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO), and Yellowstone Volcano Observatory (YVO). The YVO web site was the first to move to the new navigation system and we are working on integrating the Long Valley Observatory web site next. We are excited to continue to implement new geospatial technologies to better display our hazards and supporting volcano information.

  4. Gas analyses from the Pu'u O'o eruption in 1985, Kilauea volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greenland, L.P.

    1986-01-01

    Volcanic gas samples were collected from July to November 1985 from a lava pond in the main eruptive conduit of Pu'u O'o from a 2-week-long fissure eruption and from a minor flank eruption of Pu'u O'o. The molecular composition of these gases is consistent with thermodynamic equilibrium at a temperature slightly less than measured lava temperatures. Comparison of these samples with previous gas samples shows that the composition of volatiles in the magma has remained constant over the 3-year course of this episodic east rift eruption of Kilauea volcano. The uniformly carbon depleted nature of these gases is consistent with previous suggestions that all east rift eruptive magmas degas during prior storage in the shallow summit reservoir of Kilauea. Minor compositional variations within these gas collections are attributed to the kinetics of the magma degassing process. ?? 1986 Springer-Verlag.

  5. A dynamic balance between magma supply and eruption rate at Kilauea volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Denlinger, R.P.

    1997-01-01

    The dynamic balance between magma supply and vent output at Kilauea volcano is used to estimate both the volume of magma stored within Kilauea volcano and its magma supply rate. Throughout most of 1991 a linear decline in volume flux from the Kupaianaha vent on Kilauea's east rift zone was associated with a parabolic variation in the elevation of Kilauea's summit as vent output initially exceeded then lagged behind the magma supply to the volcano. The correspondence between summit elevation and tilt established with over 30 years of data provided daily estimates of summit elevation in terms of summit tilt. The minimum in the parabolic variation in summit tilt and elevation (or zero elevation change) occurs when the magma supply to the reservoir from below the volcano equals the magma output from the reservoir to the surface, so that the magma supply rate is given by vent flux on that day. The measurements of vent flux and tilt establish that the magma supply rate to Kilauea volcano on June 19, 1991, was 217,000 ?? 10,000 m3/d (or 0.079 ?? 0.004 km3/yr). This is close to the average eruptive rate of 0.08 km3/yr between 1958 and 1984. In addition, the predictable response of summit elevation and tilt to each east rift zone eruption near Puu Oo since 1983 shows that summit deformation is also a measure of magma reservoir pressure. Given this, the correlation between the elevation of the Puu Oo lava lake (4 km uprift of Kupaianaha and 18 km from the summit) and summit tilt provides an estimate for magma pressure changes corresponding to summit tilt changes. The ratio of the change in volume to the change in reservoir pressure (dV/dP) during vent activity may be determined by dividing the ratio of volume erupted to change in summit tilt (dV/dtilt) by the ratio of pressure change to change in summit tilt (dP/dtilt). This measure of dV/dP, when combined with laboratory measurements of the bulk modulus of tholeitic melt, provides an estimate of 240 ?? 50 km3 for the volume

  6. Mobile Response Team Saves Lives in Volcano Crises

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ewert, John W.; Miller, C. Dan; Hendley, James W.; Stauffer, Peter H.

    1997-01-01

    The world's only volcano crisis response team, organized and operated by the USGS, can be quickly mobilized to assess and monitor hazards at volcanoes threatening to erupt. Since 1986, the team has responded to more than a dozen volcano crises as part of the Volcano Disaster Assistance Program (VDAP), a cooperative effort with the Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance of the U.S. Agency for International Development. The work of USGS scientists with VDAP has helped save countless lives, and the valuable lessons learned are being used to reduce risks from volcano hazards in the United States.

  7. Geophysical characteristics of the hydrothermal systems of Kilauea volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kauahikaua, J.

    1993-01-01

    Clues to the overall structure of Kilauea volcano can be obtained from spatial studies of gravity, magnetic, and seismic velocity variations. The rift zones and summit are underlain by dense, magnetic, high P-wave-velocity rocks at depths of about 2 km less. The gravity and seismic velocity studies indicate that the rift structures are broad, extending farther to the north than to the south of the surface features. The magnetic data give more definition to the rift structures by allowing separation into a narrow, highly-magnetized, shallow zone and broad, flanking, magnetic lows. The patterns of gravity, magnetic variations, and seismicity document the southward migration of the upper cast rift zone. Regional, hydrologic features of Kilauea can be determined from resistivity and self-potential studies. High-level groundwater exists beneath Kilauea summit to elevations of +800 m within a triangular area bounded by the west edge of the upper southwest rift zone, the east edge of the upper east rift zone, and the Koa'c fault system. High-level groundwater is present within the east rift zone beyond the triangular summit area. Self-potential mapping shows that areas of local heat produce local fluid circulation in the unconfined aquifer (water table). The dynamics of Kilauea eruptions are responsible for both the source of heat and the fracture permeability of the hydrothermal system. Shallow seismicity and surface deformation indicate that magma is intruding and that fractures are forming beneath the rift zones and summit area. Magma supply estimates are used to calculate the rate of heat input to Kilauea's hydrothermal systems. Heat flows of 370-820 mW/m2 are calculated from deep wells within the lower east rift zone. The estimated heat input rate for Kilauea of 9 gigawatts (GW) is at least 25 times higher than the conductive heat loss as estimated from the heat flow in wells extrapolated over the area of the summit caldera and rift zones. Heat must be dissipated by

  8. Digital data set of volcano hazards for active Cascade Volcanos, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schilling, Steve P.

    1996-01-01

    Scientists at the Cascade Volcano Observatory have completed hazard assessments for the five active volcanos in Washington. The five studies included Mount Adams (Scott and others, 1995), Mount Baker (Gardner and others, 1995), Glacier Peak (Waitt and others, 1995), Mount Rainier (Hoblitt and others, 1995) and Mount St. Helens (Wolfe and Pierson, 1995). Twenty Geographic Information System (GIS) data sets have been created that represent the hazard information from the assessments. The twenty data sets have individual Open File part numbers and titles

  9. Mantle CO2 degassing at Mt. Vulture volcano (Italy): Relationship between CO2 outgassing of volcanoes and the time of their last eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caracausi, Antonio; Paternoster, Michele; Nuccio, Pasquale Mario

    2015-02-01

    tectonic discontinuities that controlled the magma upwelling during the most recent volcanic activity are still the main active degassing structures. The new estimate of CO2 budget in the Mt. Vulture area, together with literature data on CO2 budget from historically active and inactive Italian volcanoes, suggests a power-law functional relationship between the age of the most recent volcanic eruption and both total discharged CO2 (R2 = 0.73) and volcano size-normalized CO2 flux (R2 = 0.66). This relation is also valid by using data from worldwide volcanoes highlighting that deep degassing can occur over very long time too. In turn, the highlighted relation provides also an important tool to better evaluate the state of activity of a volcano, whose last activity occurred far in time. Finally, our study highlights that in the southern Apennines, an active degassing of mantle-derived volatiles (i.e., He, CO2) occurs indiscriminately from west to east. This is in contrast to the central-northern Apennine, which is characterized by a crustal radiogenic volatile contribution, which increases eastward, coupled to a decrease in deep CO2 flux. This difference between the two regions is probably due to lithospheric tears which control the upwelling of mantle melts, their degassing and the transport of volatiles through the crust.

  10. Detecting Volcano-Tectonic Earthquakes at the Tatun Volcano Group in Taiwan with Dense Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, W. F.; Lin, C. H.; Chang, W. Y.

    2015-12-01

    The Tatun Volcano Group (TVG) is located at the northernmost tip of the island of Taiwan. Although TVG have been erupted 0.1-0.2 Ma ago and are considered being extinct, some recent studies suggest that they are active or dormant volcanos. We perform a systematic detection of volcano-tectonic earthquakes beneath TVG using three dense, small-aperture seismic arrays, which were deployed for six months in 2012. We use broadband frequency-wavenumber beam forming and moving-window grid-search methods to compute array parameters for all nearly continuous data and identify volcano-tectonic earthquakes. We detect much more events than that listed in the TVG volcano-tectonic earthquake catalog, about 50 events per month. Our results suggest that dense array techniques are capable of capturing detailed spatiotemporal evolution of volcano-tectonic earthquake behaviours at TVG, and also help to better understand the source mechanism of the brittle, uppermost part of the crust to the combined effect of the local hydrothermal fluid pressure and the regional stress field in the volcanic environment.

  11. Characteristics and management of the 2006-2008 volcanic crisis at the Ubinas volcano (Peru)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera, Marco; Thouret, Jean-Claude; Mariño, Jersy; Berolatti, Rossemary; Fuentes, José

    2010-12-01

    Ubinas volcano is located 75 km East of Arequipa and ca. 5000 people are living within 12 km from the summit. This composite cone is considered the most active volcano in southern Peru owing to its 24 low to moderate magnitude (VEI 1-3) eruptions in the past 500 years. The onset of the most recent eruptive episode occurred on 27 March 2006, following 8 months of heightened fumarolic activity. Vulcanian explosions occurred between 14 April 2006 and September 2007, at a time ejecting blocks up to 40 cm in diameter to distances of 2 km. Ash columns commonly rose to 3.5 km above the caldera rim and dispersed fine ash and aerosols to distances of 80 km between April 2006 and April 2007. Until April 2007, the total volume of ash was estimated at 0.004 km 3, suggesting that the volume of fresh magma was small. Ash fallout has affected residents, livestock, water supplies, and crop cultivation within an area of ca. 100 km 2 around the volcano. Continuous degassing and intermittent mild vulcanian explosions lasted until the end of 2008. Shortly after the initial explosions on mid April 2006 that spread ash fallout within 7 km of the volcano, an integrated Scientific Committee including three Peruvian institutes affiliated to the Regional Committee of Civil Defense for Moquegua, aided by members of the international cooperation, worked together to: i) elaborate and publish volcanic hazard maps; ii) inform and educate the population; and iii) advise regional authorities in regard to the management of the volcanic crisis and the preparation of contingency plans. Although the 2006-2008 volcanic crisis has been moderate, its management has been a difficult task even though less than 5000 people now live around the Ubinas volcano. However, the successful management has provided experience and skills to the scientific community. This volcanic crisis was not the first one that Peru has experienced but the 2006-2008 experience is the first long-lasting crisis that the Peruvian civil

  12. Observing changes at Santiaguito Volcano, Guatemala with an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Aulock, Felix W.; Lavallée, Yan; Hornby, Adrian J.; Lamb, Oliver D.; Andrews, Benjamin J.; Kendrick, Jackie E.

    2016-04-01

    Santiaguito Volcano (Guatemala) is one of the most active volcanoes in Central America, producing several ash venting explosions per day for almost 100 years. Lahars, lava flows and dome and flank collapses that produce major pyroclastic density currents also present a major hazard to nearby farms and communities. Optical observations of both the vent as well as the lava flow fronts can provide scientists and local monitoring staff with important information on the current state of volcanic activity and hazard. Due to the strong activity, and difficult terrain, unmanned aerial vehicles can help to provide valuable data on the activities of the volcano at a safe distance. We collected a series of images and video footage of A.) The active vent of Caliente and B.) The flow front of the active lava flow and its associated lahar channels, both in May 2015 and in December 2015- January 2016. Images of the crater and the lava flows were used for the reconstruction of 3D terrain models using structure-from-motion. These were supported by still frames from the video recording. Video footage of the summit crater (during two separate ash venting episodes) and the lava flow fronts indicate the following differences in activity during those two field campaigns: A.) - A new breach opened on the east side of the crater rim, possibly during the collapse in November 2015. - The active lava dome is now almost completely covered with ash, only leaving the largest blocks and faults exposed in times without gas venting - A recorded explosive event in December 2015 initiates at subparallel linear faults near the centre of the dome, rather than arcuate or ring faults, with a later, separate, and more ash-laden burst occurring from an off-centre fracture, however, other explosions during the observation period were seen to persist along the ring fault system observed on the lava dome since at least 2007 - suggesting a diversification of explosive activity. B.) - The lava flow fronts did

  13. Steady subsidence of Medicine Lake volcano, northern California, revealed by repeated leveling surveys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dzurisin, D.; Poland, Michael P.; Burgmann, R.

    2002-01-01

    Leveling surveys of a 193-km circuit across Medicine Lake volcano (MLV) in 1954 and 1989 show that the summit area subsided by as much as 302 ?? 30 mm (-8.6 ?? 0.9 mm/yr) with respect to a datum point near Bartle, California, 40 km to the southwest. This result corrects an error in the earlier analysis of the same data by Dzurisin et al. [1991], who reported the subsidence rate as -11.1 ?? 1.2 mm/yr. The subsidence pattern extends across the entire volcano, with a surface area of nearly 2000 km2. Two areas of localized subsidence by as much as 20 cm can be attributed to shallow normal faulting near the volcano's periphery. Surveys of an east-west traverse across Lava Beds National Monument on the north flank of the volcano in 1990 and of a 23-km traverse across the summit area in 1999 show that subsidence continued at essentially the same rate during 1989-1999 as 1954-1989. Volcano-wide subsidence can be explained by either a point source of volume loss (Mogi) or a contracting horizontal rectangular dislocation (sill) at a depth of 10-11 km. Volume loss rate estimates range from 0.0013 to 0.0032 km3/yr, depending mostly on the source depth estimate and source type. Based on first-order quantitative considerations, we can rule out that the observed subsidence is due to volume loss from magma withdrawal, thermal contraction, or crystallizing magma at depth. Instead, we attribute the subsidence and faulting to: (1 gravitational loading of thermally weakened crust by the mass of the volcano and associated intrusive rocks, and (2) thinning of locally weakened crust by Basin and Range deformation. The measured subsidence rate exceeds long-term estimates from drill hole data, suggesting that over long timescales, steady subsidence and episodic uplift caused by magmatic intrusions counteract each other to produce the lower net subsidence rate.

  14. Different types of small volcanos on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slyuta, E. N.; Shalimov, I. V.; Nikishin, A. M.

    1992-01-01

    One of the studies of volcanic activity on Venus is the comparison of that with the analogous volcanic activity on Earth. The preliminary report of such a comparison and description of a small cluster of small venusian volcanos is represented in detail in this paper.

  15. Iceland: Eyjafjallajökull Volcano

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-17

    ... of the plume features between camera views. A quantitative computer analysis is necessary to separate out wind and height (see  Volcano ... NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington, D.C. The Terra spacecraft is managed ...

  16. Bathymetry of southern Mauna Loa Volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chadwick, William W.; Moore, James G.; Garcia, Michael O.; Fox, Christopher G.

    1993-01-01

    Manua Loa, the largest volcano on Earth, lies largely beneath the sea, and until recently only generalized bathymetry of this giant volcano was available. However, within the last two decades, the development of multibeam sonar and the improvement of satellite systems (Global Positioning System) have increased the availability of precise bathymetric mapping. This map combines topography of the subaerial southern part of the volcano with modern multibeam bathymetric data from the south submarine flank. The map includes the summit caldera of Mauna Loa Volcano and the entire length of the 100-km-long southwest rift zone that is marked by a much more pronounced ridge below sea level than above. The 60-km-long segment of the rift zone abruptly changes trend from southwest to south 30 km from the summit. It extends from this bend out to sea at the south cape of the island (Kalae) to 4 to 4.5 km depth where it impinges on the elongate west ridge of Apuupuu Seamount. The west submarine flank of the rift-zone ridge connects with the Kahuku fault on land and both are part of the ampitheater head of a major submarine landslide (Lipman and others, 1990; Moore and Clague, 1992). Two pre-Hawaiian volcanic seamounts in the map area, Apuupuu and Dana Seamounts, are apparently Cretaceous in age and are somewhat younger than the Cretaceous oceanic crust on which they are built.

  17. Preliminary radon measurements at Villarrica volcano, Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cigolini, C.; Laiolo, M.; Coppola, D.; Ulivieri, G.

    2013-10-01

    We report data from a radon survey conducted at Villarrica volcano. Measurements have been obtained at selected sites by E-PERM® electrets and two automatic stations utilizing DOSEman detectors (SARAD Gmbh). Mean values for Villarrica are 1600 (±1150) Bq/m3 are similar to values recorded at Cerro Negro and Arenal in Central America. Moderately higher emissions, at measurement sites, were recorded on the NNW sector of the volcano and the summit, ranging from 1800 to 2400 Bq/m3. These measurements indicate that this area could potentially be a zone of flank weakness. In addition, the highest radon activities, up to 4600 Bq/m3, were measured at a station located near the intersection of the Liquiñe-Ofqui Fault Zone with the Gastre Fault Zone. To date, the Villarrica radon measurements reported here are, together with those collected at Galeras (Colombia), the sole radon data reported from South American volcanoes. This research may contribute to improving future geochemical monitoring and volcano surveillance.

  18. Volcano hazards at Fuego and Acatenango, Guatemala

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vallance, J.W.; Schilling, S.P.; Matías, O.; Rose, William I.; Howell, M.M.

    2001-01-01

    The Fuego-Acatenango massif comprises a string of five or more volcanic vents along a north-south trend that is perpendicular to that of the Central American arc in Guatemala. From north to south known centers of volcanism are Ancient Acatenango, Yepocapa, Pico Mayor de Acatenango, Meseta, and Fuego. Volcanism along the trend stretches back more than 200,000 years. Although many of the centers have been active contemporaneously, there is a general sequence of younger volcanism, from north to south along the trend. This massive volcano complex towers more than 3500 meters (m) above the Pacific coastal plain to the south and 2000 m above the Guatemalan Highlands to the north. The volcano complex comprises remnants of multiple eruptive centers, which periodically have collapsed to form huge debris avalanches. The largest of these avalanches extended more than 50 kilometers (km) from its source and covered more than 300 square km. The volcano has potential to produce huge debris avalanches that could inundate large areas of the Pacific coastal plain. In areas around the volcanoes and downslope toward the coastal plain, more than 100,000 people are potentially at risk from these and other flowage phenomena.

  19. Biological Studies on a Live Volcano.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zipko, Stephen J.

    1992-01-01

    Describes scientific research on an Earthwatch expedition to study Arenal, one of the world's most active volcanoes, in north central Costa Rica. The purpose of the two-week project was to monitor and understand the past and ongoing development of a small, geologically young, highly active stratovolcano in a tropical, high-rainfall environment.…

  20. Volcano deformation and gravity workshop synopsis and outcomes: the 2008 volcano deformation and temporal gravity change workshop

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dzurisin, Daniel; Lu, Zhong

    2009-01-01

    A volcano workshop was held in Washington State, near the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Cascades Volcano Observatory. The workshop, hosted by the USGS Volcano Hazards Program (VHP), included more than 40 participants from the United States, the European Union, and Canada. Goals were to promote (1) collaboration among scientists working on active volcanoes and (2) development of new tools for studying volcano deformation. The workshop focused on conventional and emerging techniques, including the Global Positioning System (GPS), borehole strain, interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR), gravity, and electromagnetic imaging, and on the roles of aqueous and magmatic fluids.

  1. 3D-ambient noise Rayleigh wave tomography of Snæfellsjökull volcano, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obermann, Anne; Lupi, Matteo; Mordret, Aurélien; Jakobsdóttir, Steinunn S.; Miller, Stephen A.

    2016-05-01

    From May to September 2013, 21 seismic stations were deployed around the Snæfellsjökull volcano, Iceland. We cross-correlate the five months of seismic noise and measure the Rayleigh wave group velocity dispersion curves to gain more information about the geological structure of the Snæfellsjökull volcano. In particular, we investigate the occurrence of seismic wave anomalies in the first 6 km of crust. We regionalize the group velocity dispersion curves into 2-D velocity maps between 0.9 and 4.8 s. With a neighborhood algorithm we then locally invert the velocity maps to obtain accurate shear-velocity models down to 6 km depth. Our study highlights three seismic wave anomalies. The deepest, located between approximately 3.3 and 5.5 km depth, is a high velocity anomaly, possibly representing a solidified magma chamber. The second anomaly is also a high velocity anomaly east of the central volcano that starts at the surface and reaches approximately 2.5 km depth. It may represent a gabbroic intrusion or a dense swarm of inclined magmatic sheets (similar to the dike swarms found in the ophiolites), typical of Icelandic volcanic systems. The third anomaly is a low velocity anomaly extending up to 1.5 km depth. This anomaly, located directly below the volcanic edifice, may be interpreted either as a shallow magmatic reservoir (typical of Icelandic central volcanoes), or alternatively as a shallow hydrothermal system developed above the cooling magmatic reservoir.

  2. Nephelinite lavas at early stage of rift initiation (Hanang volcano, North Tanzanian Divergence)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baudouin, Céline; Parat, Fleurice; Denis, Carole M. M.; Mangasini, Fredrik

    2016-07-01

    North Tanzanian Divergence is the first stage of continental break-up of East African Rift (<6 Ma) and is one of the most concentrated areas of carbonatite magmatism on Earth, with singular Oldoinyo Lengai and Kerimasi volcanoes. Hanang volcano is the southernmost volcano in the North Tanzanian Divergence and the earliest stage of rift initiation. Hanang volcano erupted silica-undersaturated alkaline lavas with zoned clinopyroxene, nepheline, andradite-schorlomite, titanite, apatite, and pyrrhotite. Lavas are low MgO-nephelinite with low Mg# and high silica content (Mg# = 22.4-35.2, SiO2 = 44.2-46.7 wt%, respectively), high incompatible element concentrations (e.g. REE, Ba, Sr) and display Nb-Ta fractionation (Nb/Ta = 36-61). Major elements of whole rock are consistent with magmatic differentiation by fractional crystallization from a parental melt with melilititic composition. Although fractional crystallization occurred at 9-12 km and can be considered as an important process leading to nephelinite magma, the complex zonation of cpx (e.g. abrupt change of Mg#, Nb/Ta, and H2O) and trace element patterns of nephelinites recorded magmatic differentiation involving open system with carbonate-silicate immiscibility and primary melilititic melt replenishment. The low water content of clinopyroxene (3-25 ppm wt. H2O) indicates that at least 0.3 wt% H2O was present at depth during carbonate-rich nephelinite crystallization at 340-640 MPa and 1050-1100 °C. Mg-poor nephelinites from Hanang represent an early stage of the evolution path towards carbonatitic magmatism as observed in Oldoinyo Lengai. Paragenesis and geochemistry of Hanang nephelinites require the presence of CO2-rich melilititic liquid in the southern part of North Tanzanian Divergence and carbonate-rich melt percolations after deep partial melting of CO2-rich oxidized mantle source.

  3. Activity of Earthquakes with Similar Waveforms Around Ontake Volcano, Central Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamawaki, T.; Yamazaki, F.; Tadokoro, K.

    2005-12-01

    Ontake volcano area is known for its very high seismicity. Swarm activity has been repeatedly observed since 1976. The volcano erupted in 1979 and a large earthquake with a magnitude of 6.8 occurred in 1984 in the southeastern part of the volcano. A dense seismic network has been constructed for monitoring in this area. Recent studies using leveling survey reveal uplift above the swarm area. Earthquakes with similar waveforms (similar earthquakes) have been observed mainly at geothermal areas and plate boundaries. It is possible to use them to detect temporal change of crustal structure due to large earthquakes or volcanic eruptions using repeating similar earthquakes. With a view to use them as a monitoring tool, we search for similar earthquakes in Ontake area and examine temporal change of observed seismic waveforms. We use ~3300 events which occurred in this area from January 1999 to August 2000. First we pick up event pairs of which hypocenters are manually determined within 4 km. Then we calculate cross-correlation coefficients at each station from the waveform pairs band-pass-filtered at 4 to 8 Hz. The calculation uses 15-second time window that contains both P- and S-waves. We define similar earthquake pairs as event pairs with cross-correlation coefficients larger than 0.9 at more than 8 stations. Such event pairs are distributed mainly in earthquake clusters located to the east and southeastern flank of the volcano. The similar earthquakes have magnitude ranging from 1 to 2 and focal depths of 1 to 7 km. Occurrence intervals of the most pairs are very short, between a few hours and a few days. A few pairs have intervals of several months. But repeating groups with nearly the same interval have not been found due probably to the short data period. We will further analyze using expanded data period and area.

  4. Reevaluation of tsunami formation by debris avalanche at Augustine Volcano, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waythomas, C.F.

    2000-01-01

    Debris avalanches entering the sea at Augustine Volcano, Alaska have been proposed as a mechanism for generating tsunamis. Historical accounts of the 1883 eruption of the volcano describe 6- to 9-meter-high waves that struck the coastline at English Bay (Nanwalek), Alaska about 80 kilometers east of Augustine Island. These accounts are often cited as proof that volcanigenic tsunamis from Augustine Volcano are significant hazards to the coastal zone of lower Cook Inlet. This claim is disputed because deposits of unequivocal tsunami origin are not evident at more than 50 sites along the lower Cook Inlet coastline where they might be preserved. Shallow water (<25 m) around Augustine Island, in the run-out zone for debris avalanches, limits the size of an avalanche-caused wave. If the two most recent debris avalanches, Burr Point (A.D. 1883) and West Island (<500 yr. B.P.) were traveling at velocities in the range of 50 to 100 meters per second, the kinetic energy of the avalanches at the point of impact with the ocean would have been between 1014 and 1015 joules. Although some of this energy would be dissipated through boundary interactions and momentum transfer between the avalanche and the sea, the initial wave should have possessed sufficient kinetic energy to do geomorphic work (erosion, sediment transport, formation of wave-cut features) on the coastline of lowwer Cook Inlet. Because widespread evidence of the effects of large waves cannot be found, it appears that the debris avalanches could not have been traveling very fast when they entered the sea, or they happened during low tide and displaced only small volumes of water. In light of these results, the hazard from volcanigenic tsunamis from Augustine Volcano appears minor, unless a very large debris avalanche occurs at high tide.

  5. Sangay volcano, Ecuador: structural development, present activity and petrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monzier, Michel; Robin, Claude; Samaniego, Pablo; Hall, Minard L.; Cotten, Jo; Mothes, Patricia; Arnaud, Nicolas

    1999-05-01

    Sangay (5230 m), the southernmost active volcano of the Andean Northern Volcanic Zone (NVZ), sits ˜130 km above a >32-Ma-old slab, close to a major tear that separates two distinct subducting oceanic crusts. Southwards, Quaternary volcanism is absent along a 1600-km-long segment of the Andes. Three successive edifices of decreasing volume have formed the Sangay volcanic complex during the last 500 ka. Two former cones (Sangay I and II) have been largely destroyed by sector collapses that resulted in large debris avalanches that flowed out upon the Amazon plain. Sangay III, being constructed within the last avalanche amphitheater, has been active at least since 14 ka BP. Only the largest eruptions with unusually high Plinian columns are likely to represent a major hazard for the inhabited areas located 30 to 100 km west of the volcano. However, given the volcano's relief and unbuttressed eastern side, a future collapse must be considered, that would seriously affect an area of present-day colonization in the Amazon plain, ˜30 km east of the summit. Andesites greatly predominate at Sangay, there being few dacites and basalts. In order to explain the unusual characteristics of the Sangay suite—highest content of incompatible elements (except Y and HREE) of any NVZ suite, low Y and HREE values in the andesites and dacites, and high Nb/La of the only basalt found—a preliminary five-step model is proposed: (1) an enriched mantle (in comparison with an MORB source), or maybe a variably enriched mantle, at the site of the Sangay, prior to Quaternary volcanism; (2) metasomatism of this mantle by important volumes of slab-derived fluids enriched in soluble incompatible elements, due to the subduction of major oceanic fracture zones; (3) partial melting of this metasomatized mantle and generation of primitive basaltic melts with Nb/La values typical of the NVZ, which are parental to the entire Sangay suite but apparently never reach the surface and subordinate

  6. Long Period Earthquakes Beneath California's Young and Restless Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitt, A. M.; Dawson, P. B.; Shelly, D. R.; Hill, D. P.; Mangan, M.

    2013-12-01

    The newly established USGS California Volcano Observatory has the broad responsibility of monitoring and assessing hazards at California's potentially threatening volcanoes, most notably Mount Shasta, Medicine Lake, Clear Lake Volcanic Field, and Lassen Volcanic Center in northern California; and Long Valley Caldera, Mammoth Mountain, and Mono-Inyo Craters in east-central California. Volcanic eruptions occur in California about as frequently as the largest San Andreas Fault Zone earthquakes-more than ten eruptions have occurred in the last 1,000 years, most recently at Lassen Peak (1666 C.E. and 1914-1917 C.E.) and Mono-Inyo Craters (c. 1700 C.E.). The Long Valley region (Long Valley caldera and Mammoth Mountain) underwent several episodes of heightened unrest over the last three decades, including intense swarms of volcano-tectonic (VT) earthquakes, rapid caldera uplift, and hazardous CO2 emissions. Both Medicine Lake and Lassen are subsiding at appreciable rates, and along with Clear Lake, Long Valley Caldera, and Mammoth Mountain, sporadically experience long period (LP) earthquakes related to migration of magmatic or hydrothermal fluids. Worldwide, the last two decades have shown the importance of tracking LP earthquakes beneath young volcanic systems, as they often provide indication of impending unrest or eruption. Herein we document the occurrence of LP earthquakes at several of California's young volcanoes, updating a previous study published in Pitt et al., 2002, SRL. All events were detected and located using data from stations within the Northern California Seismic Network (NCSN). Event detection was spatially and temporally uneven across the NCSN in the 1980s and 1990s, but additional stations, adoption of the Earthworm processing system, and heightened vigilance by seismologists have improved the catalog over the last decade. LP earthquakes are now relatively well-recorded under Lassen (~150 events since 2000), Clear Lake (~60 events), Mammoth Mountain

  7. An isotope hydrology study of the Kilauea volcano area, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scholl, M.A.; Ingebritsen, S.E.; Janik, C.J.; Kauahikaua, J.P.

    1995-01-01

    Isotope tracer methods were used to determine flow paths, recharge areas, and relative age for ground water in the Kilauea volcano area on the Island of Hawaii. Stable isotopes in rainfall show three distinct isotopic gradients with elevation, which are correlated with trade-wind, rain shadow, and high-elevation climatological patterns. Temporal variations in isotopic composition of precipitation are controlled more by the frequency of large storms than b.y seasonal temperature fluctuations. Consistency in results between two separate areas with rainfall caused by tradewinds and thermally-driven upslope airflow suggests that isotopic gradients with elevation may be similar on other islands in the tradewind belt, especially the other Hawaiian Islands, which have similar climatology and temperature lapse rates. Areal contrasts in ground-water stable isotopes and tritium indicate that the volcanic ri~ zones compartmentalize the regional ground-water system. Tritium levels in ground water within and downgradient of Kilauea's ri~ zones indicate relatively long residence times. Part of Kilauea's Southwest Ri~ Zone appears to act as a conduit for water from higher elevation, but there is no evidence for extensive down-ri~ flow in the lower East Ri~ Zone.

  8. Mechanism of explosive eruptions of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dvorak, J.J.

    1992-01-01

    A small explosive eruption of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, occurred in May 1924. The eruption was preceded by rapid draining of a lava lake and transfer of a large volume of magma from the summit reservoir to the east rift zone. This lowered the magma column, which reduced hydrostatic pressure beneath Halemaumau and allowed groundwater to flow rapidly into areas of hot rock, producing a phreatic eruption. A comparison with other events at Kilauea shows that the transfer of a large volume of magma out of the summit reservoir is not sufficient to produce a phreatic eruption. For example, the volume transferred at the beginning of explosive activity in May 1924 was less than the volumes transferred in March 1955 and January-February 1960, when no explosive activity occurred. Likewise, draining of a lava lake and deepening of the floor of Halemaumau, which occurred in May 1922 and August 1923, were not sufficient to produce explosive activity. A phreatic eruption of Kilauea requires both the transfer of a large volume of magma from the summit reservoir and the rapid removal of magma from near the surface, where the surrounding rocks have been heated to a sufficient temperature to produce steam explosions when suddenly contacted by groundwater. ?? 1992 Springer-Verlag.

  9. Volcanic Processes and Geology of Augustine Volcano, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waitt, Richard B.; Beget, James E.

    2009-01-01

    recently in A.D. 1883. The decapitated summit after the 1883 eruption, replaced by andesite domes of six eruptions since, shows a general process: collapse of steep summit domes, then the summit regrown by later dome eruptions. The island's stratigraphy is based on six or seven coarse-pumice tephra 'marker beds'. In upward succession they are layers G (2,100 yr B.P.), I (1,700 yr B.P.), H (1,400 yr B.P.), C (1,200-1,000 yr B.P.), M (750 yr B.P.), and B (390 yr B.P.). A coarse, hummocky debris-avalanche deposit older than about 2,100 yr B.P. - or perhaps a stack of three of them - lies along the east coast, the oldest exposed such bouldery diamicts on Augustine Island. Two large debris avalanches swept east and southeast into the sea between about 2,100 and 1,800 yr B.P. A large debris avalanche shed east and east-northeast into the sea between 1,700 and 14,00 yr B.P. Between about 1,400 and 1,100 yr B.P. debris avalanches swept into the sea on the volcano's south, southwest, and north-northwest. Pumiceous pyroclastic fans spread to the southeast and southwest, lithic pyroclastic flows and lahars (?) to the south and southeast. Pyroclastic flows, pyroclastic surges, and lahars swept down the west and south flanks between about 1,000 and 750 yr B.P. A debris avalanche swept into the sea on the west, and a small one on the south-southeast, between about 750 and 400 yr B.P. Large lithic pyroclastic flows shed to the southeast; smaller ones descended existing swales on the southwest and south. Between about 400 yr B.P. and historical time (late 1770s), three debris avalanches swept into the sea on the west-northwest, north-northwest, and north flanks. One of them (West Island) was large and fast: most of it rode to sea far beyond a former sea cliff, and its surface includes geomorphic evidence of having initiating a tsunami. Augustine's only conspicuous lava flow erupted on the north flank. During this prehistoric period numerous domes grew at th

  10. The complex filling of alae crater, Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swanson, D.A.; Duffield, W.A.; Jackson, D.B.; Peterson, D.W.

    1972-01-01

    Since February 1969 Alae Crater, a 165-m-deep pit crater on the east rift of Kilauea Volcano, has been completely filled with about 18 million m3 of lava. The filling was episodic and complex. It involved 13 major periods of addition of lava to the crater, including spectacular lava falls as high as 100 m, and three major periods of draining of lava from the crater. Alae was nearly filled by August 3, 1969, largely drained during a violent ground-cracking event on August 4, 1969, and then filled to the low point on its rim on October 10, 1969. From August 1970 to May 1971, the crater acted as a reservoir for lava that entered through subsurface tubes leading from the vent fissure 150 m away. Another tube system drained the crater and carried lava as far as the sea, 11 km to the south. Much of the lava entered Alae by invading the lava lake beneath its crust and buoying the crust upward. This process, together with the overall complexity of the filling, results in a highly complicated lava lake that would doubtless be misinterpreted if found in the fossil record. ?? 1972 Stabilimento Tipografico Francesco Giannini & Figli.

  11. Sulfur dioxide emissions from Alaskan volcanoes quantified using an ultraviolet SO_{2} camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kern, Christoph; Werner, Cynthia; Kelly, Peter; Brewer, Ian; Ketner, Dane; Paskievitch, John; Power, John

    2016-04-01

    Alaskan volcanoes are difficult targets for direct gas measurements as they are extremely remote and their peaks are mostly covered in ice and snow throughout the year. This makes access extremely difficult. In 2015, we were able to make use of an ultraviolet SO2 camera to quantify the SO2 emissions from Augustine Volcano, Redoubt Volcano, Mount Cleveland and Shishaldin Volcano in the Aleutian Arc. An airborne gas survey performed at Augustine Volcano in April 2015 found that the SO2 emission rate from the summit area was below 10 tonnes per day (t/d). SO2 camera measurements were performed two months later (June 2015) from a snow-free area just 100 meters from the fumarole on the south side of Augustine's summit dome to maximize camera sensitivity. Though the visible appearance of the plume emanating from the fumarole was opaque, the SO2 emissions were only slightly above the 40 ppmṡm detection limit of the SO2 camera. Still, SO2 could be detected and compared to coincident MultiGAS measurements of SO2, CO2 and H2S. At Redoubt Volcano, SO2 camera measurements were conducted on 13 June 2015 from a location 2 km to the north of the final 72x106 m3 dome extruded during the 2009 eruption. Imagery was collected of the plume visibly emanating from the top of the dome. Preliminary evaluation of the imagery and comparison with a coincident, helicopter-based DOAS survey showed that SO2 emission rates had dropped below 100 t/d (down from 180 t/d measured in April 2014). Mount Cleveland and Shishaldin Volcano were visited in August 2015 as part of an NSF-funded ship-based research expedition in the Central Aleutian Arc. At Mount Cleveland, inclement weather prohibited the collection of a lengthy time-series of SO2 camera imagery, but the limited data that was collected shows an emission rate of several hundred t/d. At Shishaldin, several hours of continuous imagery was acquired from a location 5 km east of the summit vent. The time series shows an SO2 emission rate of

  12. Images of Kilauea East Rift Zone eruption, 1983-1993

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Takahashi, Taeko Jane; Abston, C.C.; Heliker, C.C.

    1995-01-01

    This CD-ROM disc contains 475 scanned photographs from the U.S. Geological Survey Hawaii Observatory Library. The collection represents a comprehensive range of the best photographic images of volcanic phenomena for Kilauea's East Rift eruption, which continues as of September 1995. Captions of the images present information on location, geologic feature or process, and date. Short documentations of work by the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory in geology, seismology, ground deformation, geophysics, and geochemistry are also included, along with selected references. The CD-ROM was produced in accordance with the ISO 9660 standard; however, it is intended for use only on DOS-based computer systems.

  13. Space Radar Image of Colombian Volcano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This is a radar image of a little known volcano in northern Colombia. The image was acquired on orbit 80 of space shuttle Endeavour on April 14, 1994, by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR). The volcano near the center of the image is located at 5.6 degrees north latitude, 75.0 degrees west longitude, about 100 kilometers (65 miles) southeast of Medellin, Colombia. The conspicuous dark spot is a lake at the bottom of an approximately 3-kilometer-wide (1.9-mile) volcanic collapse depression or caldera. A cone-shaped peak on the bottom left (northeast rim) of the caldera appears to have been the source for a flow of material into the caldera. This is the northern-most known volcano in South America and because of its youthful appearance, should be considered dormant rather than extinct. The volcano's existence confirms a fracture zone proposed in 1985 as the northern boundary of volcanism in the Andes. The SIR-C/X-SAR image reveals another, older caldera further south in Colombia, along another proposed fracture zone. Although relatively conspicuous, these volcanoes have escaped widespread recognition because of frequent cloud cover that hinders remote sensing imaging in visible wavelengths. Four separate volcanoes in the Northern Andes nations ofColombia and Ecuador have been active during the last 10 years, killing more than 25,000 people, including scientists who were monitoring the volcanic activity. Detection and monitoring of volcanoes from space provides a safe way to investigate volcanism. The recognition of previously unknown volcanoes is important for hazard evaluations because a number of major eruptions this century have occurred at mountains that were not previously recognized as volcanoes. Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of

  14. Common processes at unique volcanoes - a volcanological conundrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cashman, Katharine; Biggs, Juliet

    2014-11-01

    An emerging challenge in modern volcanology is the apparent contradiction between the perception that every volcano is unique, and classification systems based on commonalities among volcano morphology and eruptive style. On the one hand, detailed studies of individual volcanoes show that a single volcano often exhibits similar patterns of behaviour over multiple eruptive episodes; this observation has led to the idea that each volcano has its own distinctive pattern of behaviour (or “personality”). In contrast, volcano classification schemes define eruption “styles” referenced to “type” volcanoes (e.g. Plinian, Strombolian, Vulcanian); this approach implicitly assumes that common processes underpin volcanic activity and can be used to predict the nature, extent and ensuing hazards of individual volcanoes. Actual volcanic eruptions, however, often include multiple styles, and type volcanoes may experience atypical eruptions (e.g., violent explosive eruptions of Kilauea, Hawaii1). The volcanological community is thus left with a fundamental conundrum that pits the uniqueness of individual volcanic systems against generalization of common processes. Addressing this challenge represents a major challenge to volcano research.

  15. Cladistic analysis applied to the classification of volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hone, D. W. E.; Mahony, S. H.; Sparks, R. S. J.; Martin, K. T.

    2007-11-01

    Cladistics is a systematic method of classification that groups entities on the basis of sharing similar characteristics in the most parsimonious manner. Here cladistics is applied to the classification of volcanoes using a dataset of 59 Quaternary volcanoes and 129 volcanic edifices of the Tohoku region, Northeast Japan. Volcano and edifice characteristics recorded in the database include attributes of volcano size, chemical composition, dominant eruptive products, volcano morphology, dominant landforms, volcano age and eruptive history. Without characteristics related to time the volcanic edifices divide into two groups, with characters related to volcano size, dominant composition and edifice morphology being the most diagnostic. Analysis including time based characteristics yields four groups with a good correlation between these groups and the two groups from the analysis without time for 108 out of 129 volcanic edifices. Thus when characters are slightly changed the volcanoes still form similar groupings. Analysis of the volcanoes both with and without time yields three groups based on compositional, eruptive products and morphological characters. Spatial clusters of volcanic centres have been recognised in the Tohoku region by Tamura et al. ( Earth Planet Sci Lett 197:105 106, 2002). The groups identified by cladistic analysis are distributed unevenly between the clusters, indicating a tendency for individual clusters to form similar kinds of volcanoes with distinctive but coherent styles of volcanism. Uneven distribution of volcano types between clusters can be explained by variations in dominant magma compositions through time, which are reflected in eruption products and volcanic landforms. Cladistic analysis can be a useful tool for elucidating dynamic igneous processes that could be applied to other regions and globally. Our exploratory study indicates that cladistics has promise as a method for classifying volcanoes and potentially elucidating dynamic

  16. Acid deposition in east Asia

    SciTech Connect

    Phadnis, M.J.; Carmichael, G.R.; Ichikawa, Y.

    1996-12-31

    A comparison between transport models was done to study the acid deposition in east Asia. The two models in question were different in the way the treated the pollutant species and the way simulation was carried out. A single-layer, trajectory model with simple (developed by the Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI), Japan) was compared with a multi-layered, eulerian type model (Sulfur Transport Eulerian Model - II [STEM-II]) treating the chemical processes in detail. The acidic species used in the simulation were sulfur dioxide and sulfate. The comparison was done for two episodes: each a month long in winter (February) and summer (August) of 1989. The predicted results from STEM-II were compared with the predicted results from the CRIEPI model as well as the observed data at twenty-one stations in Japan. The predicted values from STEM-II were similar to the ones from the CRIEPI results and the observed values in regards to the transport features. The average monthly values of SO{sub 2} in air, sulfate in air and sulfate in precipitation were in good agreement. Sensitivity studies were carried out under different scenarios of emissions, dry depositions velocities and mixing heights. The predicted values in these sensitivity studies showed a strong dependence on the mixing heights. The predicted wet deposition of sulfur for the two months is 0.7 gS/m2.mon, while the observed deposition is around 1.1 gS/m2.mon. It was also observed that the wet deposition on the Japan sea side of the islands is more than those on the Pacific side and the Okhotsk sea, mainly because of the continental outflow of pollutant air masses from mainland China and Korea. The effects of emissions from Russia and volcanoes were also evaluated.

  17. HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE RESOLVES VOLCANOES ON IO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This picture is a composite of a black and white near infrared image of Jupiter and its satellite Io and a color image of Io at shorter wavelengths taken at almost the same time on March 5, 1994. These are the first images of a giant planet or its satellites taken by NASA's Hubble Space Telescope (HST) since the repair mission in December 1993. Io is too small for ground-based telescopes to see the surface details. The moon's angular diameter of one arc second is at the resolution limit of ground based telescopes. Many of these markings correspond to volcanoes that were first revealed in 1979 during the Voyager spacecraft flyby of Jupiter. Several of the volcanoes periodically are active because Io is heated by tides raised by Jupiter's powerful gravity. The volcano Pele appears as a dark spot surrounded by an irregular orange oval in the lower part of the image. The orange material has been ejected from the volcano and spread over a huge area. Though the volcano was first discovered by Voyager, the distinctive orange color of the volcanic deposits is a new discovery in these HST images. (Voyager missed it because its cameras were not sensitive to the near-infrared wavelengths where the color is apparent). The sulfur and sulfur dioxide that probably dominate Io's surface composition cannot produce this orange color, so the Pele volcano must be generating material with a more unusual composition, possibly rich in sodium. The Jupiter image, taken in near-infrared light, was obtained with HST's Wide Field and Planetary Camera in wide field mode. High altitude ammonia crystal clouds are bright in this image because they reflect infrared light before it is absorbed by methane in Jupiter's atmosphere. The most prominent feature is the Great Red Spot, which is conspicuous because of its high clouds. A cap of high-altitude haze appears at Jupiter's south pole. The Wide Field/Planetary Camera 2 was developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and managed by the Goddard Spaced

  18. Hubble Space Telescope Resolves Volcanoes on Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This picture is a composite of a black and white near infrared image of Jupiter and its satellite Io and a color image of Io at shorter wavelengths taken at almost the same time on March 5, 1994. These are the first images of a giant planet or its satellites taken by NASA's Hubble Space Telescope (HST) since the repair mission in December 1993.

    Io is too small for ground-based telescopes to see the surface details. The moon's angular diameter of one arc second is at the resolution limit of ground based telescopes.

    Many of these markings correspond to volcanoes that were first revealed in 1979 during the Voyager spacecraft flyby of Jupiter. Several of the volcanoes periodically are active because Io is heated by tides raised by Jupiter's powerful gravity.

    The volcano Pele appears as a dark spot surrounded by an irregular orange oval in the lower part of the image. The orange material has been ejected from the volcano and spread over a huge area. Though the volcano was first discovered by Voyager, the distinctive orange color of the volcanic deposits is a new discovery in these HST images. (Voyager missed it because its cameras were not sensitive to the near-infrared wavelengths where the color is apparent). The sulfur and sulfur dioxide that probably dominate Io's surface composition cannot produce this orange color, so the Pele volcano must be generating material with a more unusual composition, possibly rich in sodium.

    The Jupiter image, taken in near-infrared light, was obtained with HST's Wide Field and Planetary Camera in wide field mode. High altitude ammonia crystal clouds are bright in this image because they reflect infrared light before it is absorbed by methane in Jupiter's atmosphere. The most prominent feature is the Great Red Spot, which is conspicuous because of its high clouds. A cap of high-altitude haze appears at Jupiter's south pole.

    The Wide Field/Planetary Camera 2 was developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and managed by the

  19. A Benthic Invertebrate Survey of Jun Jaegyu Volcano: An active undersea volcano in Antarctic Sound, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinones, G.; Brachfeld, S.; Gorring, M.; Prezant, R. S.; Domack, E.

    2005-12-01

    Jun Jaegyu volcano, an Antarctic submarine volcano, was dredged in May 2004 during cruise 04-04 of the RV Laurence M. Gould to determine rock, sediment composition and marine macroinvertebrate diversity. The objectives of this study are to examine the benthic assemblages and biodiversity present on a young volcano. The volcano is located on the continental shelf of the northeastern Antarctic Peninsula, where recent changes in surface temperature and ice shelf stability have been observed. This volcano was originally swath-mapped during cruise 01-07 of the Research Vessel-Ice Breaker Nathaniel B. Palmer. During LMG04-04 we also studied the volcano using a SCUD video camera, and performed temperature surveys along the flanks and crest. Both the video and the dredge indicate a seafloor surface heavily colonized by benthic organisms. Indications of fairly recent lava flows are given by the absence of marine life on regions of the volcano. The recovered dredge material was sieved, and a total of thirty-three invertebrates were extracted. The compilation of invertebrate community data can subsequently be compared to other benthic invertebrate studies conducted along the peninsula, which can determine the regional similarity of communities over time, their relationship to environmental change and health, if any, and their relationship to geologic processes in Antarctic Sound. Twenty-two rock samples, all slightly weathered and half bearing encrusted organisms, were also analyzed using inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). Except for one conglomerate sample, all are alkali basalts and share similar elemental compositions with fresh, unweathered samples from the volcano. Two of the encrusted basalt samples have significantly different compositions than the rest. We speculate this difference could be due to water loss during sample preparation, loss of organic carbon trapped within the vesicles of the samples and/or elemental uptake by the

  20. Darwin's triggering mechanism of volcano eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galiev, Shamil

    2010-05-01

    Charles Darwin wrote that ‘… the elevation of many hundred square miles of territory near Concepcion is part of the same phenomenon, with that splashing up, if I may so call it, of volcanic matter through the orifices in the Cordillera at the moment of the shock;…' and ‘…a power, I may remark, which acts in paroxysmal upheavals like that of Concepcion, and in great volcanic eruptions,…'. Darwin reports that ‘…several of the great chimneys in the Cordillera of central Chile commenced a fresh period of activity ….' In particular, Darwin reported on four-simultaneous large eruptions from the following volcanoes: Robinson Crusoe, Minchinmavida, Cerro Yanteles and Peteroa (we cite the Darwin's sentences following his The Voyage of the Beagle and researchspace. auckland. ac. nz/handle/2292/4474). Let us consider these eruptions taking into account the volcano shape and the conduit. Three of the volcanoes (Minchinmavida (2404 m), Cerro Yanteles (2050 m), and Peteroa (3603 m)) are stratovolcanos and are formed of symmetrical cones with steep sides. Robinson Crusoe (922 m) is a shield volcano and is formed of a cone with gently sloping sides. They are not very active. We may surmise, that their vents had a sealing plug (vent fill) in 1835. All these volcanoes are conical. These common features are important for Darwin's triggering model, which is discussed below. The vent fill material, usually, has high level of porosity and a very low tensile strength and can easily be fragmented by tension waves. The action of a severe earthquake on the volcano base may be compared with a nuclear blast explosion of the base. It is known, that after a underground nuclear explosion the vertical motion and the surface fractures in a tope of mountains were observed. The same is related to the propagation of waves in conical elements. After the explosive load of the base. the tip may break and fly off at high velocity. Analogous phenomenon may be generated as a result of a

  1. Darwin's triggering mechanism of volcano eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galiev, Shamil

    2010-05-01

    Charles Darwin wrote that ‘… the elevation of many hundred square miles of territory near Concepcion is part of the same phenomenon, with that splashing up, if I may so call it, of volcanic matter through the orifices in the Cordillera at the moment of the shock;…' and ‘…a power, I may remark, which acts in paroxysmal upheavals like that of Concepcion, and in great volcanic eruptions,…'. Darwin reports that ‘…several of the great chimneys in the Cordillera of central Chile commenced a fresh period of activity ….' In particular, Darwin reported on four-simultaneous large eruptions from the following volcanoes: Robinson Crusoe, Minchinmavida, Cerro Yanteles and Peteroa (we cite the Darwin's sentences following his The Voyage of the Beagle and researchspace. auckland. ac. nz/handle/2292/4474). Let us consider these eruptions taking into account the volcano shape and the conduit. Three of the volcanoes (Minchinmavida (2404 m), Cerro Yanteles (2050 m), and Peteroa (3603 m)) are stratovolcanos and are formed of symmetrical cones with steep sides. Robinson Crusoe (922 m) is a shield volcano and is formed of a cone with gently sloping sides. They are not very active. We may surmise, that their vents had a sealing plug (vent fill) in 1835. All these volcanoes are conical. These common features are important for Darwin's triggering model, which is discussed below. The vent fill material, usually, has high level of porosity and a very low tensile strength and can easily be fragmented by tension waves. The action of a severe earthquake on the volcano base may be compared with a nuclear blast explosion of the base. It is known, that after a underground nuclear explosion the vertical motion and the surface fractures in a tope of mountains were observed. The same is related to the propagation of waves in conical elements. After the explosive load of the base. the tip may break and fly off at high velocity. Analogous phenomenon may be generated as a result of a

  2. Nabro and Mallahle Volcanoes, Eritrea and Ethiopia, SRTM Colored Height and Shaded Relief

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The area known as the Afar Triangle is located at the northern end of the East Africa Rift, where it approaches the southeastern end of the Red Sea and the southwestern end of the Gulf of Aden. The East African Rift, the Red Sea, and the Gulf of Aden are all zones where Earth's crust is pulling apart in a process known as crustal spreading. Their three-way meeting is known as a triple junction, and their spreading creates a triangular topographic depression for which the area was named.

    Not surprisingly, the topographic effects of crustal spreading are more dramatic in the Afar Triangle than anywhere else upon Earth's landmasses. The spreading is primarily evident as patterns of numerous tension cracks. But some of these cracks provide conduits for magma to rise to the surface to form volcanoes.

    Shown here are a few of the volcanoes of the Afar Triangle. The larger two are Nabro Volcano (upper right, in Eritrea) and Mallahle Volcano (lower left, in Ethiopia). Nabro Volcano shows clear evidence of multiple episodes of activity that resulted in a crater in a crater in a crater. Many volcanoes in this area are active, including one nearby that last erupted in 1990.

    This image was created directly from an SRTM elevation model. A shade image was derived by computing topographic slope in the north-south direction. Northern slopes appear bright and southern slopes appear dark. The shade image was then combined with a color coding of topographic height, with green at the lower elevations, rising through yellow, orange, and red, up to purple at the highest elevations.

    Elevation data used in this image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect three

  3. SAR4Volcanoes: an international ASI funded research project on volcano deformation through new generation SAR sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sansosti, E.; Pepe, S.; Solaro, G.; Casu, F.; Tizzani, P.; Acocella, V.; Ruch, J.; Nobile, A.; Puglisi, G.; Guglielmino, F.; Zoffoli, S.

    2012-04-01

    Volcano deformation monitoring is crucial to understand how magma emplaces, propagates and erupts. Therefore, volcano deformation research projects are particularly important opportunities to improve our understanding of volcano dynamics. SAR4Volcanoes is a 2-year research project funded by the Italian Space Agency (ASI) within the framework of a cooperation agreement with the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA). It focuses on volcano deformation analysis through Differential SAR Interferometry (DInSAR) techniques by means of COSMO-SkyMed and ALOS data, through the joint use of L-band and X-band SAR data. It also aims to the identification of methods and techniques to support decision making in emergency cases. Main target volcanoes in the projects are Etna, Vesuvio, Campi Flegrei and Stromboli (Italy) and Sakurajima and Kirishima (Japan). Secondary target volcanoes include recently or currently erupting volcanoes, as El Hierro (Spain), Nabro (Ethiopia) and Galapagos volcanoes (Ecuador). Since the project kickoff (July 2011) a large number of COSMO-SkyMed data has been acquired at these volcanoes; in some cases, the acquisitions are available almost at every satellite orbit, with an average interval down to 4 days. On these premises, the project represents an important opportunity to: (1) collect a significant amount of X-band data on active and erupting volcanoes and (2) study surface deformation to understand magma dynamics in different volcanic settings. We will present preliminary results on the ground deformation analysis of the main and secondary target volcanoes. In particular, target volcanoes without a pre-project archive are analyzed using single deformation maps, while those with archives are analysed through a time series approach, based on the SBAS technique.

  4. Source processes of short-term, transient tilt events at Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poland, M. P.; Huth, T. E.; Miklius, A.

    2009-12-01

    Small tilt transients are a common occurrence at the summit of Kilauea Volcano. The events generally consist of a deflationary phase with a magnitude of a few microradians (as measured at the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory) that lasts for hours to a few days, followed by an abrupt transition to inflationary deformation that also lasts for hours to a few days, ultimately tapering to pre-event tilt levels. Models of tilt, InSAR, and strain data suggest a source location at shallow levels (about 1-2 km) beneath the center of the caldera (a region of subsurface magma storage known from other geophysical data). Except for during 2005-2007, the summit tilt patterns are duplicated at Kilauea’s east rift zone eruption site, but with a lag of approximately 30-90 minutes. The temporal correlation of tilt at the summit and east rift zone indicates that these events affect much of Kilauea’s magma plumbing system, from magma reservoir to eruption site. Tilt events with long-lived (several days) deflation phases are usually associated with decreases in lava effusion or even eruptive pauses on the east rift zone, and events with large inflationary phases are often followed by surges in lava effusion from east rift zone vents. Since the onset of Kilauea’s summit eruption in early 2008, the tilt events have become more common, increasing from about 5-10 per year before 2008 to about 50 per year during 2008 and 2009. At least two mechanisms can explain these tilt transients. As previously hypothesized by Cervelli and Miklius (2003, USGS Professional Paper 1676, p. 149-163), blockages in Kilauea’s magma plumbing system would reasonably lead to summit deflation and a waning of lava effusion, followed by summit inflation and an effusive surge upon removal of the blockage. Alternatively, the transients may represent small-scale convective overturns within Kilauea’s shallow summit magma storage area, with degassed magma being flushed downward (deflation) and replaced by gas

  5. Preliminary Geologic Map of Mount Pagan Volcano, Pagan Island, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trusdell, Frank A.; Moore, Richard B.; Sako, Maurice K.

    2006-01-01

    Pagan Island is the subaerial portion of two adjoining Quaternary stratovolcanoes near the middle of the active Mariana Arc, [FAT1]north of Saipan. Pagan and the other volcanic islands that constitute part of the Arc form the northern half of the East Mariana Ridge[FAT2], which extends about 2-4 km above the ocean floor. The > 6-km-deep Mariana Trench adjoins the East Mariana Ridge on the east, and the Mariana Trough, partly filled with young lava flows and volcaniclastic sediment, lies on the west of the Northern Mariana Islands (East Mariana Ridge. The submarine West Mariana Ridge, Tertiary in age, bounds the western side of the Mariana Trough. The Mariana Trench and Northern Mariana Islands (East Mariana Ridge) overlie an active subduction zone where the Pacific Plate, moving northwest at about 10.3 cm/year, is passing beneath the Philippine Plate, moving west-northwest at 6.8 cm/year. Beneath the Northern Mariana Islands, earthquake hypocenters at depths of 50-250 km identify the location of the west-dipping subduction zone, which farther west becomes nearly vertical and extends to 700 km depth. During the past century, more than 40 earthquakes of magnitude 6.5-8.1 have shaken the Mariana Trench. The Mariana Islands form two sub-parallel, concentric, concave-west arcs. The southern islands comprise the outer arc and extend north from Guam to Farallon de Medinilla. They consist of Eocene to Miocene volcanic rocks and uplifted Tertiary and Quaternary limestone. The nine northern islands extend from Anatahan to Farallon de Pajaros and form part of the inner arc. The active inner arc extends south from Anatahan, where volcanoes, some of which are active, form seamounts west of the older outer arc. Other volcanic seamounts of the active arc surmount the East Mariana Ridge in the vicinity of Anatahan and Sarigan and north and south of Farallon de Pajaros. Six volcanoes (Farallon de Pajaros, Asuncion, Agrigan, Mount Pagan, Guguan, and Anatahan) in the northern islands

  6. Bubble mobility in mud and magmatic volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Aaron; Rudolph, Maxwell L.; Manga, Michael

    2015-03-01

    The rheology of particle-laden fluids with a yield stress, such as mud or crystal-rich magmas, controls the mobility of bubbles, both the size needed to overcome the yield stress and their rise speed. We experimentally measured the velocities of bubbles and rigid spheres in mud sampled from the Davis-Schrimpf mud volcanoes adjacent to the Salton Sea, Southern California. Combined with previous measurements in the polymer gel Carbopol, we obtained an empirical model for the drag coefficient and bounded the conditions under which bubbles overcome the yield stress. Yield stresses typical of mud and basaltic magmas with sub-mm particles can immobilize millimeter to centimeter sized bubbles. At Stromboli volcano, Italy, a vertical yield stress gradient in the shallow conduit may immobilize bubbles with diameter ≲ 1 cm and hinder slug coalescence.

  7. Natrocarbonatite tephra of Kerimasi volcano, Tanzania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hay, Richard L.

    1983-10-01

    Carbonatite tephra was discharged in the final eruptive phase of Kerimasi, an extinct nephelinite volcano in the eastern rift valley of northern Tanzania. The tephra was dominantly of alkali carbonatite composition, thus providing the first well-documented example of premodern natrocarbonatite volcanism. The principal carbonate mineral was nyerereite, which is the dominant mineral in modern natrocarbonatite lava flows of the adjacent volcano Oldoinyo Lengai. The nyerereite of Kerimasi was leached of its alkalis by meteoric water and is now represented by calcite pseudomorphs. Natrocarbonatite tephra of Kerimasi shows that the alkali-rich eruptive rocks of Oldoinyo Lengai are not unique, thus supporting the hypothesis that carbonatite magmas associated with nephelinite volcanism were originally alkaline and that the subvolcanic calcitic carbonatites are a residuum from which the alkalis have been removed, either by volcanism or fenetizing fluids. A hypothesis to be tested is that eruptive carbonatite magma is, worldwide, commonly and perhaps dominantly of natrocarbonatite composition.

  8. Investigation of prototype volcano surveillance network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eaton, J. P. (Principal Investigator); Ward, P. L.

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Earthquake counters in Guatemala were being installed between February 13 and 17. The volcano Fuego began erupting ash and ash flows on February 23. On February 17, 6 days before the eruption there were 80 earthquakes at two counters 5 and 15 km from the volcano. This was a substantial increase of a fairly constant level of events per day recorded for the previous four days. A counter 30 km away did not show an increase. Had the DCP been operating longer and had the data been sent immediately from Goddard, it might have been possible to warn of a possible eruption six days in advance.

  9. Imaging Magma Plumbing Beneath Askja Volcano, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenfield, T. S.; White, R. S.

    2015-12-01

    Using a dense seismic network we have imaged the plumbing system beneath Askja, a large central volcano in the Northern Volcanic Zone, Iceland. Local and regional earthquakes have been used as sources to solve for the velocity structure beneath the volcano. We find a pronounced low-velocity anomaly beneath the caldera at a depth of ~7 km around the depth of the brittle-ductile transition. The anomaly is ~10% slower than the initial best fitting 1D model and has a Vp/Vs ratio higher than the surrounding crust, suggesting the presence of increased temperature or partial melt. We use relationships between mineralogy and seismic velocities to estimate that this region contains ~10% partial melt, similar to observations made at other volcanoes such as Kilauea. This low-velocity body is deeper than the depth range suggested by geodetic studies of a deflating source beneath Askja. Beneath the large low-velocity zone a region of reduced velocities extends into the lower crust and is coincident with seismicity in the lower crust. This is suggestive of a high temperature channel into the lower crust which could be the pathway for melt rising from the mantle. This melt either intrudes into the lower crust or stalls at the brittle-ductile boundary in the imaged body. Above this, melt can travel into the fissure swarm through large dikes or erupt within the Askja caldera itself.We generate travel time tables using a finite difference technique and the residuals used to simultaneously solve for both the earthquake locations and velocity structure. The 2014-15 Bárðarbunga dike intrusion has provided a 45 km long, distributed source of large earthquakes which are well located and provide accurate arrival time picks. Together with long-term background seismicity these provide excellent illumination of the Askja volcano from all directions.hhhh

  10. Buried caldera of mauna kea volcano, hawaii.

    PubMed

    Porter, S C

    1972-03-31

    An elliptical caldera (2.1 by 2.8 kilometers) at the summit of Mauna Kea volcano is inferred to lie buried beneath hawaiite lava flows and pyroclastic cones at an altitude of approximately 3850 meters. Stratigraphic relationships indicate that hawaiite eruptions began before a pre-Wisconsin period of ice-cap glaciation and that the crest of the mountain attained its present altitude and gross form during a glaciation of probable Early Wisconsin age.

  11. Buried caldera of mauna kea volcano, hawaii.

    PubMed

    Porter, S C

    1972-03-31

    An elliptical caldera (2.1 by 2.8 kilometers) at the summit of Mauna Kea volcano is inferred to lie buried beneath hawaiite lava flows and pyroclastic cones at an altitude of approximately 3850 meters. Stratigraphic relationships indicate that hawaiite eruptions began before a pre-Wisconsin period of ice-cap glaciation and that the crest of the mountain attained its present altitude and gross form during a glaciation of probable Early Wisconsin age. PMID:17842285

  12. Colima Volcano, State of Jalisco, Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Located about 125 km south of Guadalajara, state of Jalisco, Mexico, the 13,325 ft. Colima (19.5N, 103.5W) is the most active volcano in Mexico. The activity depicted occurred in early March 1991 with avalanches followed soon after by lava extrusion with ash and steam emission from the caldera. The steam plume can be seen drifting eastward from the summit and groundscars from the earlier avalanches can also be seen on the southwest slope.

  13. On the morphometry of terrestrial shield volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosse, Pablo; Kervyn, Matthieu

    2016-04-01

    Shield volcanoes are described as low angle edifices that have convex up topographic profiles and are built primarily by the accumulation of lava flows. This generic view of shields' morphology is based on a limited number of monogenetic shields from Iceland and Mexico, and a small set of large oceanic islands (Hawaii, Galapagos). Here, the morphometry of over 150 monogenetic and polygenetic shield volcanoes, identified inthe Global Volcanism Network database, are analysed quantitatively from 90-meter resolution DEMs using the MORVOLC algorithm. An additional set of 20 volcanoes identified as stratovolcanoes but having low slopes and being dominantly built up by accumulation of lava flows are documented for comparison. Results show that there is a large variation in shield size (volumes range from 0.1 to >1000 km3), profile shape (height/basal width ratios range from 0.01 to 0.1), flank slope gradients, elongation and summit truncation. Correlation and principal component analysis of the obtained quantitative database enables to identify 4 key morphometric descriptors: size, steepness, plan shape and truncation. Using these descriptors through clustering analysis, a new classification scheme is proposed. It highlights the control of the magma feeding system - either central, along a linear structure, or spatially diffuse - on the resulting shield volcano morphology. Genetic relationships and evolutionary trends between contrasted morphological end-members can be highlighted within this new scheme. Additional findings are that the Galapagos-type morphology with a central deep caldera and steep upper flanks are characteristic of other shields. A series of large oceanic shields have slopes systematically much steeper than the low gradients (<4-8°) generally attributed to large Hawaiian-type shields. Finally, the continuum of morphologies from flat shields to steeper complex volcanic constructs considered as stratovolcanoes calls for a revision of this oversimplified

  14. Degassing and differentiation in subglacial volcanoes, Iceland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, J.G.; Calk, L.C.

    1991-01-01

    Within the neovolcanic zones of Iceland many volcanoes grew upward through icecaps that have subsequently melted. These steep-walled and flat-topped basaltic subglacial volcanoes, called tuyas, are composed of a lower sequence of subaqueously erupted, pillowed lavas overlain by breccias and hyaloclastites produced by phreatomagmatic explosions in shallow water, capped by a subaerially erupted lava plateau. Glass and whole-rock analyses of samples collected from six tuyas indicate systematic variations in major elements showing that the individual volcanoes are monogenetic, and that commonly the tholeiitic magmas differentiated and became more evolved through the course of the eruption that built the tuya. At Herdubreid, the most extensively studies tuya, the upward change in composition indicates that more than 50 wt.% of the first erupted lavas need crystallize over a range of 60??C to produce the last erupted lavas. The S content of glass commonly decreases upward in the tuyas from an average of about 0.08 wt.% at the base to < 0.02 wt.% in the subaerially erupted lava at the top, and is a measure of the depth of water (or ice) above the eruptive vent. The extensive subsurface crystallization that generates the more evolved, lower-temperature melts during the growth of the tuyas, apparently results from cooling and degassing of magma contained in shallow magma chambers and feeders beneath the volcanoes. Cooling may result from percolation of meltwater down cracks, vaporization, and cycling in a hydrothermal circulation. Degassing occurs when progressively lower pressure eruption (as the volcanic vent grows above the ice/water surface) lowers the volatile vapour pressure of subsurface melt, thus elevating the temperature of the liquidus and hastening liquid-crystal differentiation. ?? 1991.

  15. Controls on the location of arc volcanoes: an Andean study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Erin; Allen, Mark B.; McCaffrey, Kenneth J. W.; Macpherson, Colin G.; Davidson, Jon P.; Saville, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    Depth corrected data of earthquake hypocentres from South America are used to generate new models of depth to the subducting Nazca slab. This new slab model shows a general correlation between the 100 km depth to the slab, the western edge of the Altiplano-Puna Plateau (defined by the 3500 m elevation contour) and the frontal volcanic arc. Across the entire Altiplano-Puna Plateau, volcanic centres are found to be either at or above the 3500 m critical elevation contour, which also defines the cut off for seismogenic thrusting. Normal faults are only found above this critical elevation contour, suggesting that there may be a change in the stress regime associated with high elevations in the plateau. The Salar de Atacama basin (23-24oS) defines a major break in topography on the west side of the Puna Plateau. Here, the volcanism deviates around the eastern edge of the basin, approximately 80 km inland from the general trend of the arc, remaining above the 3500 m elevation contour. The volcanoes bordering the Salar de Atacama have a depth to slab approximately 30 km deeper than those in the adjacent arc segment 200 km to the north of the basin. Across this distance there is no significant difference in subduction parameters such as the slab dip, subduction rate and age of the oceanic plate entering the trench. It is likely, therefore, that melt forms at the same depth in both locations, as the factors affecting the melt source are constant. However, in the case of the Salar de Atacama region, magma is diverted to the east due to preferential emplacement under the higher elevations of the plateau. We suggest that although mantle and subduction processes have a primary control on the location of arc volcanoes, shaping the general trend of the arc, they cannot explain anomalies from the trend. Such anomalies, such as the arc deviation around the Atacama basin, can be explained by the influence of structures and stress regime within the overriding plate.

  16. Monitoring Hekla Volcano with Shallow Background Microseismicity, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eibl, Eva P. S.; Bean, Christopher J.; Vogfjörd, Kristin

    2015-04-01

    Hekla is one of Iceland's most active volcanoes located at the connection between the South Iceland Seismic Zone striking east-west and the Eastern Volcanic Zone striking north-south. It erupted four times in the past 45 years with a repose time of about ten years and a period of quiescence of 14 years since the last eruption. The permanent monitoring network includes satellites, seismometers and strainmeters most of which are in at least 15 km distance of the volcano. Eruptions in 1970, 1980/81, 1991 and 2000 were detected by the network 25, 23, 28 and 80 minutes, respectively, before the visual onset. Based on measurements from this network, Hekla is thought to be in an inflated but seismically inactive state at the moment. We installed five seismometers temporarily within 4 km of the summit and detected high levels of background microseismicity in autumn 2012. Amplitude and travel-time based location methods were applied and located two populations of events at shallow depths on the northern flank, close to the summit. The recorded events were either short, high-frequency events with distinct arrivals located beneath the summit on the northern flank of Hekla or longer, emergent, low-frequency events about 4 km northeast of the summit in 200 - 400 m depth below the surface. Estimated moment magnitudes were MW=-1.1 to -0.1 and MW=-0.9 to -0.0 and local magnitudes ML=-0.5 to +0.3 and ML=-0.3 to+0.3, respectively. This seismicity does not show any correlation with gas output or deformation measurements but is located at the steepest slopes of the edifice. Hence we suggest that current shallow microseismicity at Hekla is structurally controlled. This offers a possible opportunity of using near summit microseismicity monitoring as a tool for monitoring emerging unrest at Hekla. The current detection threshold only allowed increased seismicity to be detected 23 to 80 minutes prior to full scale eruptions. Microseismicity monitoring can increase this time span as

  17. 2. VIEW EAST, East Control Area, west radar tower in ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW EAST, East Control Area, west radar tower in foreground, east radar lower in background - Newport NIKE Missile Battery D-57/58, Integrated Fire Control Area, Newport Road, Carleton, Monroe County, MI

  18. 3. VIEW FROM EAST. EAST ELEVATION SHOWING THE ROOF INTERSECTION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW FROM EAST. EAST ELEVATION SHOWING THE ROOF INTERSECTION OF THE EAST AND NORTH WINGS OF THE BUILDING. - Navy Yard, Ordnance Building, Intersection of Paulding & Kennon Streets, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  19. 8. EAST PORTAL AND DECK VIEW, FROM EAST, SHOWING PORTAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. EAST PORTAL AND DECK VIEW, FROM EAST, SHOWING PORTAL CONFIGURATION AND LATERAL BRACING, STEEL MESH FLOOR, METAL RAILINGS, AND PORTION OF EAST APPROACH - Glendale Road Bridge, Spanning Deep Creek Lake on Glendale Road, McHenry, Garrett County, MD

  20. 55. LOOKING EAST FROM HEAD OF PLANE 2 EAST. POWER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    55. LOOKING EAST FROM HEAD OF PLANE 2 EAST. POWER HOUSE AND FLUME VISIBLE TO RIGHT, TAILRACE RUNNING THROUGH CENTER OF PHOTOGRAPH. CRADLE TO INCLINED PLANE 3 EAST IS VISIBLE IN BACKGROUND TO LEFT. - Morris Canal, Phillipsburg, Warren County, NJ

  1. 15. VIEW LOOKING EAST, SHOWING RETAINING WALL ON EAST SIDE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. VIEW LOOKING EAST, SHOWING RETAINING WALL ON EAST SIDE OF PARK, SOUTH OF ENGINE HOUSE (4' X 5' negative) - Fairmount Waterworks, East bank of Schuylkill River, Aquarium Drive, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  2. Nanoscale volcanoes: accretion of matter at ion-sculpted nanopores.

    PubMed

    Mitsui, Toshiyuki; Stein, Derek; Kim, Young-Rok; Hoogerheide, David; Golovchenko, J A

    2006-01-27

    We demonstrate the formation of nanoscale volcano-like structures induced by ion-beam irradiation of nanoscale pores in freestanding silicon nitride membranes. Accreted matter is delivered to the volcanoes from micrometer distances along the surface. Volcano formation accompanies nanopore shrinking and depends on geometrical factors and the presence of a conducting layer on the membrane's back surface. We argue that surface electric fields play an important role in accounting for the experimental observations.

  3. Deep structure of Medicine Lake volcano, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ritter, J.R.R.; Evans, J.R.

    1997-01-01

    Medicine Lake volcano (MLV) in northeastern California is the largest-volume volcano in the Cascade Range. The upper-crustal structure of this Quaternary shield volcano is well known from previous geological and geophysical investigations. In 1981, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted a teleseismic tomography experiment on MLV to explore its deeper structure. The images we present, calculated using a modern form of the ACH-inversion method, reveal that there is presently no hint of a large (> 100 km3), hot magma reservoir in the crust. The compressional-wave velocity perturbations show that directly beneath MLV's caldera there is a zone of increased seismic velocity. The perturbation amplitude is +10% in the upper crust, +5% in the lower crust, and +3% in the lithospheric mantle. This positive seismic velocity anomaly presumably is caused by mostly subsolidus gabbroic intrusive rocks in the crust. Heat and melt removal are suggested as the cause in the upper mantle beneath MLV, inferred from petro-physical modeling. The increased seismic velocity appears to be nearly continuous to 120 km depth and is a hint that the original melts come at least partly from the lower lithospheric mantle. Our second major finding is that the upper mantle southeast of MLV is characterized by relatively slow seismic velocities (-1%) compared to the northwest side. This anomaly is interpreted to result from the elevated temperatures under the northwest Basin and Range Province.

  4. Electrical structure of Newberry Volcano, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fitterman, D.V.; Stanley, W.D.; Bisdorf, R.J.

    1988-01-01

    From the interpretation of magnetotelluric, transient electromagnetic, and Schlumberger resistivity soundings, the electrical structure of Newberry Volcano in central Oregon is found to consist of four units. From the surface downward, the geoelectrical units are 1) very resistive, young, unaltered volcanic rock, (2) a conductive layer of older volcanic material composed of altered tuffs, 3) a thick resistive layer thought to be in part intrusive rocks, and 4) a lower-crustal conductor. This model is similar to the regional geoelectrical structure found throughout the Cascade Range. Inside the caldera, the conductive second layer corresponds to the steep temperature gradient and alteration minerals observed in the USGS Newberry 2 test-hole. Drill hole information on the south and north flanks of the volcano (test holes GEO N-1 and GEO N-3, respectively) indicates that outside the caldera the conductor is due to alteration minerals (primarily smectite) and not high-temperature pore fluids. On the flanks of Newberry the conductor is generally deeper than inside the caldera, and it deepens with distance from the summit. A notable exception to this pattern is seen just west of the caldera rim, where the conductive zone is shallower than at other flank locations. The volcano sits atop a rise in the resistive layer, interpreted to be due to intrusive rocks. -from Authors

  5. Quantifying shapes of volcanoes on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garvin, J. B.

    1994-01-01

    A large population of discrete volcanic edifices on Venus has been identified and cataloged by means of Magellan SAR images, and an extensive database describing thousands of such features is in final preparation. Those volcanoes categorized as Intermediate to Large in scale, while relatively small in number (approx. 400), nonetheless constitute a significant volumetric component (approx. 13 x 10(exp 6) cu km) of the total apparent crustal volume of Venus. For this reason, we have focused attention on the morphometry of a representative suite of the larger edifices on Venus and, in particular, on ways of constraining the eruptive histories of these possibly geologically youthful landforms. Our approach has been to determine a series of reproducible morphometric parameters for as many of the discrete volcanoes on Venus that have an obvious expression within the global altimetry data acquired by Magellan. In addition, we have attempted to objectively and systematically define the mathematical essence of the shapes of these larger volcanoes using a polynomial cross-section approximation involving only parameters easily measured from digital topography, as well as with simple surface cylindrical harmonic expansions. The goal is to reduce the topological complexities of the larger edifices to a few simple parameters which can then be related to similar expressions for well-studied terrestrial and martian features.

  6. Geothermal Exploration of Newberry Volcano, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Waibel, Albert F.; Frone, Zachary S.; Blackwell, David D.

    2014-12-01

    Davenport Newberry (Davenport) has completed 8 years of exploration for geothermal energy on Newberry Volcano in central Oregon. Two deep exploration test wells were drilled by Davenport on the west flank of the volcano, one intersected a hydrothermal system; the other intersected isolated fractures with no hydrothermal interconnection. Both holes have bottom-hole temperatures near or above 315°C (600°F). Subsequent to deep test drilling an expanded exploration and evaluation program was initiated. These efforts have included reprocessing existing data, executing multiple geological, geophysical, geochemical programs, deep exploration test well drilling and shallow well drilling. The efforts over the last three years have been made possible through a DOE Innovative Exploration Technology (IET) Grant 109, designed to facilitate innovative geothermal exploration techniques. The combined results of the last 8 years have led to a better understanding of the history and complexity of Newberry Volcano and improved the design and interpretation of geophysical exploration techniques with regard to blind geothermal resources in volcanic terrain.

  7. Atmospheric influence on volcano-acoustic signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matoza, Robin; de Groot-Hedlin, Catherine; Hedlin, Michael; Fee, David; Garcés, Milton; Le Pichon, Alexis

    2010-05-01

    Volcanoes are natural sources of infrasound, useful for studying infrasonic propagation in the atmosphere. Large, explosive volcanic eruptions typically produce signals that can be recorded at ranges of hundreds of kilometers propagating in atmospheric waveguides. In addition, sustained volcanic eruptions can produce smaller-amplitude repetitive signals recordable at >10 km range. These include repetitive impulsive signals and continuous tremor signals. The source functions of these signals can remain relatively invariant over timescales of weeks to months. Observed signal fluctuations from such persistent sources at an infrasound recording station may therefore be attributed to dynamic atmospheric propagation effects. We present examples of repetitive and sustained volcano infrasound sources at Mount St. Helens, Washington and Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, USA. The data recorded at >10 km range show evidence of propagation effects induced by tropospheric variability at the mesoscale and microscale. Ray tracing and finite-difference simulations of the infrasound propagation produce qualitatively consistent results. However, the finite-difference simulations indicate that low-frequency effects such as diffraction, and scattering from topography may be important factors for infrasonic propagation at this scale.

  8. Patterns of historical eruptions at Hawaiian volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klein, F.W.

    1982-01-01

    Hawaiian eruptions are largely random phenomena displaying no periodicity; that is, future eruptions are relatively independent of the date of the last eruption. Several simultaneous processes probably govern eruption timing so that it appears random. I have performed statistical tests for nonrandomness on the repose times between eruptions and on the sequence of event types. Statistical differences that have physical consequences exist between large and small eruptions, summit and flank eruptions, and intrusive and extrusive events. Thus, large-volume eruptions tend to be followed by longer reposes as shallow magma reservoirs refill. On Kilauea, both summit eruptions and rapid intrusions tend to cluster at times associated with other physical events on the volcano. The longest recorded reposes of both Kilauea and Mauna Loa apparently are not random phenomena, for they appear to be associated with increased activity at the other volcano. Both eruption rates and volumes are consistent with a constant but alternating magma supply to the two volcanoes and an approximately five-fold larger magma reservoir at Mauna Loa than at Kilauea. ?? 1982.

  9. The geologic history of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Till, A.B.; Yount, M.E.; Bevier, M.L.

    1994-01-01

    Redoubt Volcano is a composite cone built on continental crust at the northeast end of the Aleutian arc. Magmas erupted at Redoubt are medium-K calc-alkaline basalts, andesites, and dacites. The eruptive history of the volcano can be divided into four parts: the early explosive stage, early cone-building stage, late cone-building stage, and post-glacial stage. The most silicic products of the volcano were erupted during the early explosive stage about 0.888 Ma and include pumiceous pyroclastic flow deposits, block-and-ash flow deposits, and a dome or shallow intrusive complex. Basalt and basaltic andesite lava flows and scoria and ash flows were produced during the early cone-building stage, which was underway by 0.340 Ma. During the late cone-building stage, andesitic lava flows and block-and-ash flows were emplaced. Airfall deposits produced during post-glacial eruptions are silicic andesite in composition. Since the early cone-building stage, magmas have become progressively more silicic, but none are as silicic as those in the early explosive stage. Limited Pb and Sr isotopic data suggest that Redoubt magmas were contaminated by North American continental crust. ?? 1994.

  10. The (East) Indian Woman.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naidoo, Josephine

    The focus of this paper is on the social, cultural, and psychological problems women of East Indian origin share with other immigrant women in Canada. Also examined are problems that are unique to the East Indian woman and the ways in which she deals with the challenges, conflicting cultural values, and expectations that confront her. The…

  11. The Middle East.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blouin, Virginia; And Others

    This sixth grade resource unit focuses on Middle East culture as seen through five areas of the social sciences: anthropology-sociology, geography, history, economics, and political science. Among objectives that the student is expected to achieve are the following: 1) given general information on the Middle East through the use of film, visuals,…

  12. Citizen empowerment in volcano monitoring, communication and decision-making at Tungurahua volcano, Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartel, B. A.; Mothes, P. A.

    2013-12-01

    Trained citizen volunteers called vigías have worked to help monitor and communicate warnings about Tungurahua volcano, in Ecuador, since the volcano reawoke in 1999. The network, organized by the scientists of Ecuador's Instituto Geofísico de la Escuela Politécnica Nacional (Geophysical Institute) and the personnel from the Secretaría Nacional de Gestión de Riesgos (Risk Management, initially the Civil Defense), has grown to more than 20 observers living around the volcano who communicate regularly via handheld two-way radios. Interviews with participants conducted in 2010 indicate that the network enables direct communication between communities and authorities; engenders trust in scientists and emergency response personnel; builds community; and empowers communities to make decisions in times of crisis.

  13. Citizen Empowerment in Volcano Monitoring, Communication and Decision-Making at Tungurahua Volcano, Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartel, B.; Mothes, P. A.

    2013-05-01

    Trained citizen volunteers called vigías have worked to help monitor and communicate warnings about Tungurahua volcano, in Ecuador, since the volcano reawoke in 1999. The network, organized by the scientists of Ecuacor's Instituto Geofísico de la Escuela Politécnica Nacional (Geophysical Institute) and the personnel from the Secretaría Nacional de Gestión de Riesgos (Risk Management, initially the Civil Defense), has grown to well over 20 observers living around the volcano who communicate regularly via handheld two-way radios. Interviews with participants in 2010 indicate that the network enables direct communication between communities and authorities, engenders trust in scientists and emergency response personnel, builds community, and empowers communities to make decisions in times of crisis.

  14. Adakitic volcanism in the eastern Aleutian arc: Petrology and geochemistry of Hayes volcano, Cook Inlet, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McHugh, K.; Hart, W. K.; Coombs, M. L.

    2012-12-01

    Located in south-central Alaska, 135 km northwest of Anchorage, Hayes volcano is responsible for the most widespread tephra fall deposit in the regional Holocene record (~3,500 BP). Hayes is bounded to the west by the Cook Inlet volcanoes (CIV; Mt. Spurr, Redoubt, Iliamna, and Augustine) and separated from the nearest volcanism to the east, Mount Drum of the Wrangell Volcanic Field (WVF), by a 400 km-wide volcanic gap. We report initial results of the first systematic geochemical and petrologic study of Hayes volcano. Hayes eruptive products are calc-alkaline dacites and rhyolites that have anomalous characteristics within the region. Major and trace element analyses reveal that the Hayes rhyolites are more silicic (~74 wt. % SiO2) than compositions observed in other CIV, and its dacitic products possess the distinctive geochemical signatures of adakitic magmas. Key aspects of the Hayes dacite geochemistry include: 16.03 - 17.54 wt. % Al2O3, 0.97 - 2.25 wt. % MgO, Sr/Y = 60 - 78, Yb = 0.9 - 1.2 ppm, Ba/La = 31 - 79. Such signatures are consistent with melting of a metamorphosed basaltic source that leaves behind a residue of garnet ± amphibole ± pyroxene via processes such as melting of a subducting oceanic slab or underplated mafic lower crust, rather than flux melting of the mantle wedge by dehydration of the down-going slab. Additionally, Hayes tephras display a distinctive mineralogy of biotite with amphibole in greater abundance than pyroxene, a characteristic not observed at other CIV. Furthermore, Hayes rhyolites and dacites exhibit little isotopic heterogeneity (87Sr/86Sr = 0.70384 - 0.70395, 206Pb/204Pb = 18.866 - 18.889) suggesting these lavas originate from the same source. Hayes volcano is approximately situated above the western margin of the subducting Yakutat terrane and where the dip of the Pacific slab beneath Cook Inlet shallows northward. Due to its position along the margin of the subducting Yakutat terrane, it is plausible that Hayes magmas

  15. Gravity, magnetic, and radiometric data for Newberry Volcano, Oregon, and vicinity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wynn, Jeff

    2014-01-01

    Newberry Volcano in central Oregon is a 3,100-square-kilometer (1,200-square-mile) shield-shaped composite volcano, occupying a location east of the main north-south trend of the High Cascades volcanoes and forming a transition between the High Lava Plains subprovince of the Basin and Range Province to the east and the Cascade Range to the west. Magnetic, gravity, and radiometric data have been gathered and assessed for the region around the volcano. These data have widely varying quality and resolution, even within a given dataset, and these limitations are evaluated and described in this release. Publicly available gravity data in general are too sparse to permit detailed modeling except along a few roads with high-density coverage. Likewise, magnetic data are also unsuitable for all but very local modeling, primarily because available data consist of a patchwork of datasets with widely varying line-spacing. Gravity data show only the broadest correlation with mapped geology, whereas magnetic data show moderate correlation with features only in the vicinity of Newberry Caldera. At large scales, magnetic data correlate poorly with both geologic mapping and gravity data. These poor correlations are largely due to the different sensing depths of the two potential fields methods, which respond to physical properties deeper than the surficial geology. Magnetic data derive from rocks no deeper than the Curie-point isotherm depth (10 to 15 kilometers, km, maximum), whereas gravity data reflect density-contrasts to 100 to 150 km depths. Radiometric data from the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) surveys of the 1980s have perhaps the coarsest line-spacing of all (as much as 10 km between lines) and are extremely “noisy” for several reasons inherent to this kind of data. Despite its shallow-sensing character, only a few larger anomalies in the NURE data correlate well with geologic mapping. The purpose of this data series release is to collect and place the

  16. Kamchatkan Volcanoes Explosive Eruptions in 2014 and Danger to Aviation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girina, Olga; Manevich, Alexander; Melnikov, Dmitry; Demyanchuk, Yury; Nuzhdaev, Anton; Petrova, Elena

    2015-04-01

    There are 30 active volcanoes in the Kamchatka, and several of them are continuously active. In 2014, three of the Kamchatkan volcanoes - Sheveluch, Karymsky and Zhupanovsky - had strong and moderate explosive eruptions. Moderate gas-steam activity was observing of Klyuchevskoy, Bezymianny, Avachinsky, Koryaksky, Gorely, Mutnovsky and other volcanoes. Strong explosive eruption of volcanoes is the most dangerous for aircraft because in a few hours or days in the atmosphere and the stratosphere can produce about several cubic kilometers of volcanic ash and aerosols. Ash plumes and the clouds, depending on the power of the eruption, the strength and wind speed, can travel thousands of kilometers from the volcano for several days, remaining hazardous to aircraft, as the melting temperature of small particles of ash below the operating temperature of jet engines. The eruptive activity of Sheveluch Volcano began since 1980 (growth of the lava dome) and is continuing at present. Strong explosive events of the volcano occurred in 2014: on January 08 and 12, May 12, September 24, October 02 and 28, November 16, 22 and 26, and December 05, 17, 26 and 29: ash plumes rose up to 9-12 km a.s.l. and extended more 900 km to the eastern and western directions of the volcano. Ashfalls occurred at Klyuchi Village (on January 12, June 11, and November 16). Activity of the volcano was dangerous to international and local aviation. Karymsky volcano has been in a state of explosive eruption since 1996. The moderate ash explosions of this volcano were noting during 2014: from March 24 till April 02; and from September 03 till December 10. Ash plumes rose up to 5 km a.s.l. and extended more 300 km mainly to the eastern directions of the volcano. Activity of the volcano was dangerous to local aviation. Explosive eruption of Zhupanovsky volcano began on June 06, 2014 and continues in January 2015 too. Ash explosions rose up to 8-10 km a.s.l. on June 19, September 05 and 07, October 11

  17. The critical role of volcano monitoring in risk reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilling, R. I.

    2008-01-01

    Data from volcano-monitoring studies constitute the only scientifically valid basis for short-term forecasts of a future eruption, or of possible changes during an ongoing eruption. Thus, in any effective hazards-mitigation program, a basic strategy in reducing volcano risk is the initiation or augmentation of volcano monitoring at historically active volcanoes and also at geologically young, but presently dormant, volcanoes with potential for reactivation. Beginning with the 1980s, substantial progress in volcano-monitoring techniques and networks - ground-based as well space-based - has been achieved. Although some geochemical monitoring techniques (e.g., remote measurement of volcanic gas emissions) are being increasingly applied and show considerable promise, seismic and geodetic methods to date remain the techniques of choice and are the most widely used. Availability of comprehensive volcano-monitoring data was a decisive factor in the successful scientific and governmental responses to the reawakening of Mount St. elens (Washington, USA) in 1980 and, more recently, to the powerful explosive eruptions at Mount Pinatubo (Luzon, Philippines) in 1991. However, even with the ever-improving state-of-the-art in volcano monitoring and predictive capability, the Mount St. Helens and Pinatubo case histories unfortunately still represent the exceptions, rather than the rule, in successfully forecasting the most likely outcome of volcano unrest.

  18. Living on Active Volcanoes - The Island of Hawai'i

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heliker, Christina; Stauffer, Peter H.; Hendley, James W.

    1997-01-01

    People on the Island of Hawai'i face many hazards that come with living on or near active volcanoes. These include lava flows, explosive eruptions, volcanic smog, damaging earthquakes, and tsunamis (giant seawaves). As the population of the island grows, the task of reducing the risk from volcano hazards becomes increasingly difficult. To help protect lives and property, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists at the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory closely monitor and study Hawai'i's volcanoes and issue timely warnings of hazardous activity.

  19. The critical role of volcano monitoring in risk reduction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tilling, R.I.

    2008-01-01

    Data from volcano-monitoring studies constitute the only scientifically valid basis for short-term forecasts of a future eruption, or of possible changes during an ongoing eruption. Thus, in any effective hazards-mitigation program, a basic strategy in reducing volcano risk is the initiation or augmentation of volcano monitoring at historically active volcanoes and also at geologically young, but presently dormant, volcanoes with potential for reactivation. Beginning with the 1980s, substantial progress in volcano-monitoring techniques and networks - ground-based as well space-based - has been achieved. Although some geochemical monitoring techniques (e.g., remote measurement of volcanic gas emissions) are being increasingly applied and show considerable promise, seismic and geodetic methods to date remain the techniques of choice and are the most widely used. Availability of comprehensive volcano-monitoring data was a decisive factor in the successful scientific and governmental responses to the reawakening of Mount St. Helens (Washington, USA) in 1980 and, more recently, to the powerful explosive eruptions at Mount Pinatubo (Luzon, Philippines) in 1991. However, even with the ever-improving state-ofthe-art in volcano monitoring and predictive capability, the Mount St. Helens and Pinatubo case histories unfortunately still represent the exceptions, rather than the rule, in successfully forecasting the most likely outcome of volcano unrest.

  20. Mud volcanoes of the Orinoco Delta, Eastern Venezuela

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aslan, A.; Warne, A.G.; White, W.A.; Guevara, E.H.; Smyth, R.C.; Raney, J.A.; Gibeaut, J.C.

    2001-01-01

    Mud volcanoes along the northwest margin of the Orinoco Delta are part of a regional belt of soft sediment deformation and diapirism that formed in response to rapid foredeep sedimentation and subsequent tectonic compression along the Caribbean-South American plate boundary. Field studies of five mud volcanoes show that such structures consist of a central mound covered by active and inactive vents. Inactive vents and mud flows are densely vegetated, whereas active vents are sparsely vegetated. Four out of the five mud volcanoes studied are currently active. Orinoco mud flows consist of mud and clayey silt matrix surrounding lithic clasts of varying composition. Preliminary analysis suggests that the mud volcano sediment is derived from underlying Miocene and Pliocene strata. Hydrocarbon seeps are associated with several of the active mud volcanoes. Orinoco mud volcanoes overlie the crest of a mud-diapir-cored anticline located along the axis of the Eastern Venezuelan Basin. Faulting along the flank of the Pedernales mud volcano suggests that fluidized sediment and hydrocarbons migrate to the surface along faults produced by tensional stresses along the crest of the anticline. Orinoco mud volcanoes highlight the proximity of this major delta to an active plate margin and the importance of tectonic influences on its development. Evaluation of the Orinoco Delta mud volcanoes and those elsewhere indicates that these features are important indicators of compressional tectonism along deformation fronts of plate margins. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. July 1973 ground survey of active Central American volcanoes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoiber, R. E. (Principal Investigator); Rose, W. I., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Ground survey has shown that thermal anomalies of various sizes associated with volcanic activity at several Central American volcanoes should be detectable from Skylab. Anomalously hot areas of especially large size (greater than 500 m in diameter) are now found at Santiaguito and Pacaya volcanoes in Guatemala and San Cristobal in Nicaragua. Smaller anomalous areas are to be found at least seven other volcanoes. This report is completed after ground survey of eleven volcanoes and ground-based radiation thermometry mapping at these same points.

  2. Volcano-Monitoring Instrumentation in the United States, 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guffanti, Marianne; Diefenbach, Angela K.; Ewert, John W.; Ramsey, David W.; Cervelli, Peter F.; Schilling, Steven P.

    2010-01-01

    The United States is one of the most volcanically active countries in the world. According to the global volcanism database of the Smithsonian Institution, the United States (including its Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands) is home to about 170 volcanoes that are in an eruptive phase, have erupted in historical time, or have not erupted recently but are young enough (eruptions within the past 10,000 years) to be capable of reawakening. From 1980 through 2008, 30 of these volcanoes erupted, several repeatedly. Volcano monitoring in the United States is carried out by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Volcano Hazards Program, which operates a system of five volcano observatories-Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO), Cascades Volcano Observatory (CVO), Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO), Long Valley Observatory (LVO), and Yellowstone Volcano Observatory (YVO). The observatories issue public alerts about conditions and hazards at U.S. volcanoes in support of the USGS mandate under P.L. 93-288 (Stafford Act) to provide timely warnings of potential volcanic disasters to the affected populace and civil authorities. To make efficient use of the Nation's scientific resources, the volcano observatories operate in partnership with universities and other governmental agencies through various formal agreements. The Consortium of U.S. Volcano Observatories (CUSVO) was established in 2001 to promote scientific cooperation among the Federal, academic, and State agencies involved in observatory operations. Other groups also contribute to volcano monitoring by sponsoring long-term installation of geophysical instruments at some volcanoes for specific research projects. This report describes a database of information about permanently installed ground-based instruments used by the U.S. volcano observatories to monitor volcanic activity (unrest and eruptions). The purposes of this Volcano-Monitoring Instrumentation Database (VMID) are to (1) document the Nation's existing

  3. Volcano Deformation and Modeling on Active Volcanoes in the Philippines from ALOS InSAR Time Series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales Rivera, Anieri M.; Amelung, Falk; Eco, Rodrigo

    2015-05-01

    Bulusan, Kanlaon, and Mayon volcanoes have erupted over the last decade, and Taal caldera showed signs of volcanic unrest within the same time range. Eruptions at these volcanoes are a threat to human life and infrastructure, having over 1,000,000 people living within 10 km from just these 4 volcanic centers. For this reason, volcano monitoring in the Philippines is of extreme importance. We use the ALOS-1 satellite from the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) to make an InSAR time series analysis over Bulusan, Kanlaon, Mayon, and Taal volcanoes for the 2007-2011 period. Time-dependent deformation was detected at all of the volcanoes. Deformation related to changes in pressurization of the volcanic systems was found on Taal caldera and Bulusan volcanoes, with best fitting Mogi sources located at half-space depths of 3.07 km and 0.5 km respectively.

  4. Long-term multi-hazard assessment for El Misti volcano (Peru)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandri, Laura; Thouret, Jean-Claude; Constantinescu, Robert; Biass, Sébastien; Tonini, Roberto

    2014-02-01

    We propose a long-term probabilistic multi-hazard assessment for El Misti Volcano, a composite cone located <20 km from Arequipa. The second largest Peruvian city is a rapidly expanding economic centre and is classified by UNESCO as World Heritage. We apply the Bayesian Event Tree code for Volcanic Hazard (BET_VH) to produce probabilistic hazard maps for the predominant volcanic phenomena that may affect c.900,000 people living around the volcano. The methodology accounts for the natural variability displayed by volcanoes in their eruptive behaviour, such as different types/sizes of eruptions and possible vent locations. For this purpose, we treat probabilistically several model runs for some of the main hazardous phenomena (lahars, pyroclastic density currents (PDCs), tephra fall and ballistic ejecta) and data from past eruptions at El Misti (tephra fall, PDCs and lahars) and at other volcanoes (PDCs). The hazard maps, although neglecting possible interactions among phenomena or cascade effects, have been produced with a homogeneous method and refer to a common time window of 1 year. The probability maps reveal that only the north and east suburbs of Arequipa are exposed to all volcanic threats except for ballistic ejecta, which are limited to the uninhabited but touristic summit cone. The probability for pyroclastic density currents reaching recently expanding urban areas and the city along ravines is around 0.05 %/year, similar to the probability obtained for roof-critical tephra loading during the rainy season. Lahars represent by far the most probable threat (around 10 %/year) because at least four radial drainage channels can convey them approximately 20 km away from the volcano across the entire city area in heavy rain episodes, even without eruption. The Río Chili Valley represents the major concern to city safety owing to the probable cascading effect of combined threats: PDCs and rockslides, dammed lake break-outs and subsequent lahars or floods

  5. The Organic Chemistry of Volcanoes: Case Studies at Cerro Negro, Nicaragua and Oldoinyo Lengai, Tanzania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teague, A. J.; Seward, T. M.; Gize, A. P.; Hall, T.

    2005-12-01

    Though it has long been known that volcanoes emit organic compounds within their fumarolic gases, it is only in recent years that a concerted attempt has been made to catalogue and quantify the species and fluxes. Two general lines of interest dominate this study. Firstly, volcanic gases represent some of the most likely environments in which the precursor molecules necessary for the origin of life were synthesised. The existence of an active, abiotic, organic chemistry in such settings today is fundamental to our understanding of the early Earth. Secondly, the presence of halogenated organic compounds is of interest to the atmospheric sciences, particularly with respect to their ozone depleting potential. It is clear that natural sources of halocarbons must exist, and though current natural fluxes are low with respect to the anthropogenic signature, volcanogenic halocarbons may have proved to be significant during the eruption of supervolcanoes and continental flood basalts. In this study, gases were collected from fumaroles in the craters of two, very different, active volcanoes. Cerro Negro, a young basaltic cinder cone belonging to the Central American Volcanic Belt, could be defined as a typical subduction zone volcano. Gases were collected from Cerro Negro during March 2003 and 2004 from a single fumarole discharging close to the crater floor. In contrast, Oldoinyo Lengai is the world's only active carbonatite volcano and represents the most extreme case of alkali volcanism in the East African Rift system. Fieldwork was conducted in the northern summit crater of Lengai over 8 days in October 2003. In this period, the volcano was in near continuous eruption and gases were sampled from two fumaroles situated within 20m of the eruptive centre, though measured gas temperatures were low at around 195°C. Organic compounds were collected using a variety of activated carbon, molecular sieve type adsorbents, packed into glass cartridges. The water and acid matrix of

  6. Edifice and substrata deformation induced by intrusive complexes and gravitational loading in the Mull volcano (Scotland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathieu, Lucie; Vries, Benjamin Van Wyk De

    2009-12-01

    It is likely that the structure of a volcanic edifice can be significantly modified by deformation caused by large, shallow intrusions. Such deformation may interact with that caused by volcano loading. We explore such intrusion-related and loading-related deformation with field evidence and analogue models. To do this we have chosen the eroded Palaeogene Mull volcano (Scotland) that had a major edifice, has well exposed intrusions and significant deformation. There are thin Mesozoic sedimentary rocks forming ductile layers below the volcano, but their thickness is insufficient to allow the gravitational spreading of the volcanic edifice, especially when considering that a thick lava pile covers them. Thus intrusive push may have been the driving force for deformation. The Mull activity migrated toward the northwest, forming three successive intrusive complexes (Centres 1, 2 and 3). Our detailed fieldwork reveals that deformation due to these was accommodated on three levels; along thrust planes in lava sequences, along a décollement located in a thin clay-rich sediment succession and in basement schists. A relative chronology has been established between different groups of structures using dyke and sill cross-cutting relationships. Centre 1 is surrounded by a fold and thrust belt leading to radial expansion. In contrast, Centre 2 and 3 are connected to thrusts located to the south and east, bounded by strike-slip faults, leading to expansion to the southeast. The migration of centres and the directed sliding of the edifice may be related to the presence to the southeast of low-resistance Dalradian basement that failed significantly during growth of Centres 2 and 3. To study the observed relationships we have carried out scaled analogue models. Models are made with fine powder intruded by a viscous magma analogue. The models show an intimate relationship between intrusion growth, uplift of the volcano and subsequent flank sliding. The structures produced can be

  7. Plume composition changes during the birth of a new lava lake - Nyamulagira volcano, DR Congo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobrowski, Nicole; Giuffrida, Giovanni Bruno; Calabrese, Sergio; Scaglione, Sarah; Yalire, Mathieu; Liotta, Marcello; Brusca, Lorenzo; Arellano, Santiago; Rüdiger, Julian; Galle, Bo; Castro, Jonathan; Tedesco, Dario

    2016-04-01

    Nyamulagira, in the Virunga Volcanic Province (VVP), Democratic Republic of Congo, is one of the most active volcanoes in Africa. The volcano is located about 25 km north-northwest of Lake Kivu in the Western Branch of the East African Rift System (EARS) with a distance of only 15 km to Nyiragongo, which is well known for its decades-old active lava lake. Nyamulagira is a shield volcano with a 3058 m high and ~2000 m wide summit caldera. The volcano is characterized by frequent eruptions, which occur both from the summit crater and from the flanks (31 flank eruptions over the last 110 years). Due to the low viscosity lava, although significantly higher than the one of Nyiragongo, wide lava fields cover over 1100 km2 and lava flows often reach > 20 km length. More than 100 flank cones can be counted around the summit crater. A part from its frequent eruptions Nyamulagira had a long period of lava lake activity in the past, at least from 1912 to 1938. During the past decades, gas emissions from Nyamulagira have been only reported during eruptions. This changed in 2012, however, when Nyamulagira began emitting a persistent gas plume above its crater. By the end of 2014, and beginning in 2015, a lava lake was born, a feature that - as of the time of this writing - is still growing. To date, very little is known about gas emissions of Nyamulagira volcano with the only exception for SO2. Very few studies have been conducted regarding the volatile chemistry of Nyamulagira. We try to fill this gap by reporting gas composition measurements of Nyamulagira's volcanic plume during the birth of the lava lake, and in the first year of the lake's activity. Two field surveys have been carried out, the first one on November 1st, 2014 and the second one October 13th - 15th, 2015. Applying the broad toolbox of volcanic gas composition measurement techniques offered us the opportunity to characterize Nyamulagira's plume in excruciating detail. Nyamulagira is known to be a significant