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Sample records for ebd

  1. Community Influences on E/BD Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madyun, Na'im; Lee, Moosung

    2008-01-01

    No Child Left Behind has mandated that all students reach proficiency by 2014. This mandate places special emphasis on the performance of special education students. The purpose of this study is to use social theory to understand the factors that explain the achievement of emotionally or behaviorally disordered (E/BD) students. Results suggest a…

  2. Prevalence of Students with EBD: Impact on General Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forness, S. R.; Kim, J.; Walker, H. M.

    2012-01-01

    As the Council for Children with Behavior Disorders(CCBD) celebrates its 50th anniversary, it seems like a good time to take stock of our field (Peck et al.,2011). There is probably no more fundamental way to do so than an analysis of prevalence; that is, how many school-age children actually have an emotional or behavior disorder (EBD)? We do…

  3. Evidence-Based Social Skills Interventions for Students at Risk for EBD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gresham, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Children and youth with or at risk for emotional and behavioral disorders (EBDs) present substantial challenges for schools, teachers, parents, and peers. Social skills interventions have been shown to be effective for this population. Meta-analytic reviews of this literature show that about 65% of students with EBD will improve when given social…

  4. Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties (EBD): The Special Educational Need Justifying Exclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jull, Stephen K.

    2008-01-01

    Students identified with emotional and behavioural difficulties (EBD) present a special case within special educational needs (SEN) and inclusion. EBD is perhaps the only category of SEN that exposes a child to increased risk of exclusion as a function of the very SEN identified as requiring special provision in the first instance. Students…

  5. Hearts of Hope: Experiences of EBD Teachers and Factors Contributing to Career Longevity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boe, Val Rae Marie

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative study examined EBD teacher experiences through phenomenological research. Data was collated through interviews, a focus group, memos, and field notes. Questions focused on how EBD teachers described their work and the factors that contributed to career longevity. The study was conducted in one self-contained school for students…

  6. Future Research Directions for the Field of E/BD: Standing on the Shoulders of Giants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane, Kathleen Lynne; Jolivette, Kristine; Conroy, Maureen; Nelson, C. Michael; Benner, Gregory J.

    2011-01-01

    The origins and evolution of the field of emotional/behavioral disorders (E/BD) provide a context for offering suggestions for advancing the field. Building from this historical past and the research of others in the field, four broad recommendations which focus on academic and social needs of students with E/BD are offered: (a) ensuring high…

  7. Using Self-Regulated Strategy Development to Help High School Students with EBD Summarize Informational Text in Social Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ennis, Robin Parks

    2016-01-01

    Students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) often struggle to be effective writers. Self-regulated strategy development (SRSD) is one approach to writing instruction that has demonstrated success for students with EBD. However, there is little research exploring its utility to teach writing to students with EBD in social studies. The…

  8. The Effects of Self Regulated Strategy Development (SRSD) on Reading Comprehension for Secondary Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disabilities (EBD)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoyt, Lisa R.

    2010-01-01

    Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disabilities (EBD) in the United States are characterized by behavioral deficits that impact their academic performance and social relationships. Students with EBD have lower academic performance in reading and math, more failed courses, higher rates of grade retention, and fewer than fifty percent graduate…

  9. Defining "Effectiveness" for Students with E/BD: Teacher, Instruction, and Management Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Terrance M.; Jolivette, Kristine; Ennis, Robin Parks; Hirn, Regina Gilkey

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss how issues of effectiveness and efficiency are considered most logically in the field of education. More specifically, the focus is on the importance of these issues as they pertain to teaching, instruction, and management strategies for students with emotional and behavioral disorders (E/BD). The driving…

  10. Cross-Cultural Comparisons and Implications for Students with EBD: A Decade of Understanding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chakraborti-Ghosh, Sumita; Mofield, Emily; Orellana, Karee

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents cross-cultural comparisons on definitions, prevalence, and outcomes of students with emotional-behavior disorders (EBD). In addition, the paper addresses the concern of disproportionality and the need for teachers of students with behavior problems to be culturally responsive to perceived inappropriate behaviors. A review of…

  11. Three-Tiered Support for Students with E/BD: Highlights of the Universal Tier

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George, Michael P.; George, Nancy L.; Kern, Lee; Fogt, Julie B.

    2013-01-01

    The scant data available suggest there is a critical need for improving service delivery within alternative education (AE) settings for children and youth with emotional and behavioral disorders (E/BD). A promising approach for improving student outcomes in AE settings is school-wide positive behavior interventions and supports (SWPBIS), an…

  12. K-12 Principal's Perceptions of Educational Programming for Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders (EBD)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knuth, Richard; Beaudoin, Kathleen M.; Benner, Greg

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated school administrators' perceptions of the effectiveness of their programs serving students with emotional behavioral disorders (EBD). Specifically, the perceptions of principals in schools that provided self-contained programs were compared to the perceptions of principals in schools without self-contained programs. Also…

  13. Behavioral Disorders: Identification, Assessment, and Instruction of Students with EBD. Advances in Special Education. Volume 22

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakken, Jeffrey P., Ed.; Obiakor, Festus E., Ed.; Rotatori, Anthony F., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    Volumes 22 and 23 of "Advances in Special Education" address the current top perspectives and issues in the field of EBD by providing chapters written by active researchers and scholarly university professors who specialize in this area. Volume 22 first delineates legal issues, themes, and dimensions related to the historical development of the…

  14. Reflections and Perceptions: My Third of a Century in the Field of EBD.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guetzloe, Eleanor

    2001-01-01

    A professor of special education specializing in students with emotional or behavioral disorders (EBD) reviews her career from 1966 to the present noting the influence of the literature, authorities, and Public Law 94-142. Changes during this time identified include more effective interventions and increasing danger from student weapons. She urges…

  15. Behavioral Disorders: Practice Concerns and Students with EBD. Advances in Special Education. Volume 23

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakken, Jeffrey P., Ed.; Obiakor, Festus E., Ed.; Rotatori, Anthony F., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    Volumes 22 and 23 of the "Advances in Special Education" address the current top perspectives and issues in the field of emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) by providing chapters written by active researchers and scholarly university professors who specialize in this area. Volume 22 first delineates legal issues, themes, and dimensions…

  16. A Review of Self-Regulated Strategy Development for Writing for Students with EBD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sreckovic, Melissa A.; Common, Eric A.; Knowles, Meagan M.; Lane, Kathleen Lynne

    2014-01-01

    In this systematic review, we evaluated the evidence base of self-regulated strategy development (SRSD; Harris & Graham, 1992) for writing with students with and at risk for emotional or behavioral disorders (EBD). First, we evaluated the quality of studies identified (n 5 13) by applying the quality indicators for single case (Horner et al.,…

  17. Understanding the Experience of Girls with EBD in a Gender-Responsive Support Group

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Srsic, Amy; Rice, Elisabeth Hess

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the perceptions of adolescent girls with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) who were participating in a support group. The focus of the study was to explore the perceptions of the girls' friendships, connectedness with others, ability to establish and maintain relationships, and self-perceptions within the group. The…

  18. Personality Traits of Expert Teachers of Students with EBD: Clarifying a Teacher's X-Factor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buttner, Svenja; Pijl, Sip Jan; Bijstra, Jan; Van den Bosch, Els

    2016-01-01

    Teaching students with emotional and behavioural difficulties (EBD) is a challenge for many teachers in inclusive education. Much research has been done to find out what differentiates expert teachers from their less skilled colleagues. Recent evidence points to personality as an underlying core factor influencing teacher performance. In this…

  19. Combating the Attrition of Teachers of Students with EBD: What Can Administrators Do?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cancio, Edward Joseph; Albrecht, Susan Fread; Johns, Beverley Holden

    2014-01-01

    Students with emotional/behavioral disorders (EBD) can present intensive needs, requiring the intervention and instruction of well-trained and qualified teachers who work with them in the classroom. However, schools face serious shortages in the field of special education, particularly for staff who work with this population of children (McLeskey,…

  20. The Message from the Pioneers in EBD: Learning from the Past and Preparing for the Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albrecht, Susan Fread

    2009-01-01

    The Minnesota Conference for Teachers of Children with Emotional and Behavior Disorders (EBD) hosted a panel discussion in the fall of 2005 to reunite pioneers in the field of research and publication who shaped the early instructional practices of educators working with disturbed and disturbing youth in schools. The distinguished researchers and…

  1. Improving Mathematics Performance among Secondary Students with EBD: A Methodological Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulcahy, Candace A.; Krezmien, Michael P.; Travers, Jason

    2016-01-01

    In this methodological review, the authors apply special education research quality indicators and standards for single case design to analyze mathematics intervention studies for secondary students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD). A systematic methodological review of literature from 1975 to December 2012 yielded 19 articles that…

  2. Preliminary Psychometrics of the Participatory Evaluation and Expert Review for Classrooms Serving Students with Emotional/Behavioral Disabilities (PEER-EBD)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsai, Shu-Fei; Cheney, Douglas; Walker, Bridget

    2013-01-01

    The quality of classrooms serving students with emotional and behavioral disabilities (EBD) is a continuing concern because of its influence on students' educational outcomes. Program evaluation of classrooms for students with EBD has been a recommended practice for many years since Grosenick, George, and George (1987) conducted their…

  3. Support Services to Teachers to Increase Preparedness of Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disabilities (EBD) for Statewide Assessments: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Terry L.

    2010-01-01

    There is a significant need to address the academic outcomes of students with emotional and behavioral disabilities (EBD). Of the 13 federal disability categories under which a student can be classified to receive special education services, students with EBD have the highest dropout rate, the highest failure rate, and pose the most behavioral…

  4. Early-Career EBD Teacher Knowledge, Ratings of Competency Importance, and Observed Use of Instruction and Management Competencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Lori F.; Hendrickson, Jo M.

    2007-01-01

    The empirical, conceptual, and theoretical knowledge of early-career EBD teachers was assessed two years after student teaching and compared to their ratings of the importance of specific instruction and classroom management competencies as well as to their application of those competencies. Twelve teachers, six elementary and six secondary, with…

  5. An Examination of Intervention Research with Secondary Students with EBD in Light of Common Core State Standards for Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulcahy, Candace A.; Maccini, Paula; Wright, Kenneth; Miller, Jason

    2014-01-01

    In this review, the authors offer a critical analysis of published interventions for improving mathematics performance among middle and high school students with EBD in light of the Common Core State Standards. An exhaustive review of literature from 1975 to December 2012 yielded 20 articles that met criteria for inclusion. The authors analyzed…

  6. Combining Self-Monitoring and an Interdependent Group Contingency to Improve the Behavior of Sixth Graders with EBD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denune, Hilary; Hawkins, Renee; Donovan, Lauren; Mccoy, Dacia; Hall, Lyndsie; Moeder, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    A withdrawal design was used to examine the influence of a self-monitoring procedure on the overall effectiveness of an interdependent group contingency intervention implemented in a sixth-grade classroom in an alternative school serving students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD). Dependent variables included student on-task, off-task,…

  7. Relationships of Aggression Subtypes and Peer Status among Aggressive Boys in General Education and Emotional/Behavioral Disorder (EBD) Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Useche, Ana Carolina; Sullivan, Amanda L.; Merk, Welmoet; Orobio de Castro, Bram

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the concurrent and longitudinal relationships between reactive and proactive aggression and children's peer status. Participants were 94 Dutch elementary school-aged boys in self-contained special education classrooms for students with emotional/behavioral disorders (EBD) and 47 boys with no disabilities in general education…

  8. SRSD in Practice: Creating a Professional Development Experience for Teachers to Meet the Writing Needs of Students with EBD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKeown, Debra; FitzPatrick, Erin; Sandmel, Karin

    2014-01-01

    Self-regulated strategy development (SRSD) is one of the most effective writing interventions (Graham, McKeown, Kiuhara, & Harris, 2012) and has improved the writing skills of students with emotional and behavior disorders (EBD). Practice-based professional development (PBPD) has been effective for teaching participants how to implement SRSD…

  9. Educating Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders: Historical Perspective and Future Directions. From the Third CCBD Mini-Library Series, What Works for Children and Youth with E/BD: Linking Yesterday and Today with Tomorrow.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whelan, Richard J.; Kauffman, James M.

    This monograph on teaching students with emotional and behavioral disorders (E/BD) is divided into two parts, one that offers historical perspectives and one that looks at future directions. Following an introduction, individual sections of Part 1 address the following topics: (1) a brief history of special education for E/BD students; (2) key…

  10. Cost Effectiveness of the Instrumentalism in Occupational Therapy (IOT) Conceptual Model as a Guide for Intervention with Adolescents with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders (EBD)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ikiugu, Moses N.; Anderson, Lynne

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to demonstrate the cost-effectiveness of using the Instrumentalism in Occupational Therapy (IOT) conceptual practice model as a guide for intervention to assist teenagers with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) transition successfully into adulthood. The cost effectiveness analysis was based on a project…

  11. Working Successfully towards Inclusion--or Excluding Pupils? A Comparative Retroductive Study of Three Similar Schools in Their Work with EBD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malmqvist, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Sweden uses municipally run pupil referral units (PRUs) for students displaying emotional behavioural difficulties (EBD). This study investigates one Swedish municipality where transfers of students to PRUs were related to school practices favouring either inclusion or exclusion. A purposeful sampling procedure was used to select three elementary…

  12. Does the Field of EBD Need a Distinct Set of "Intensive" Interventions or More Systemic Intensity within a Continuum of Social/Emotional Supports?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    The challenges of educating children and youth with intensive social, emotional, and academic needs have been well documented. Students with emotional/ behavioral disorders (EBD) present a range of daily challenges from low intensity, high frequency chronic behaviors such as poor school attendance, disrespect addressed to adults and peers,…

  13. The "B" in EBD Is Not Just for Bullying

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kauffman, James M.

    2015-01-01

    Problems in defining emotional and behavioural difficulties of all types, including bullying, are discussed. Interactions among seeing, naming and communicating about these phenomena are considered. School and community characteristics of students with emotional and behavioural difficulties are touched upon. Major problems in definition and…

  14. Classwide PBIS for Students with EBD: Initial Evaluation of an Integrity Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeffrey, Jennifer L.; McCurdy, Barry L.; Ewing, Sam; Polis, Dustin

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot project was to develop a tool and a process for providing performance feedback on evidence-based classroom management strategies to teachers of students in emotional support classrooms. The project was carried out with nine classroom teachers and descriptive results are discussed. Initial results found increases in…

  15. Reliability of Frequent Retrospective Behavior Ratings for Elementary School Students with EBD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Mack D.; Vannest, Kimberly; Davis, John; Davis, Cole; Parker, Richard

    2009-01-01

    This study is a preliminary examination of the reliability of frequent retrospective teacher behavior ratings. Frequent retrospective behavior ratings are an approach for creating scales that can be used to monitor individual behavioral progress. In this study, the approach is used to progress monitor behavioral individualized education plan goals…

  16. Considerations for the Placement of Youth with EBD in Alternative Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkins, Trent; Bartuska, Jamie

    2010-01-01

    Alternative education programs (also called alternative schools) first appeared on the American landscape in the 1960s. Despite the proliferation of these programs, a generic description of what constitutes an alternative education program, historically, has been elusive. Most alternative education programs have the general criteria of serving…

  17. Reintegrating Elementary Students with EBD from Alternative Placement to Public School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avery-Sterud, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    Significant numbers of children with emotional and behavioral disorders receive services in settings other than general education, but it is expected they will return to a less restrictive environment. Reintegrating these students once they have completed treatment is a significant problem. Students can demonstrate improved behavior and…

  18. Introduction to The Special Issue: Cognitive-Behavioral Interventions with Students with EBD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayer, Matthew; Lochman, John; Van Acker, Richard

    2005-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in developing models of social information processing, and cognitive-behavioral processes and related interventions. While there has been limited attention to cognitive-behavioral modification (CBM) in the special education literature, the majority of the contributions have come from the fields of school,…

  19. Systematic Academic Instruction for Students with EBD: The Construction and Use of a Tool for Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Worp-van der Kamp, Lidy; Pijl, Sip Jan; Post, Wendy J.; Bijstra, Jan O.; van den Bosch, Els J.

    2017-01-01

    Educating students with behavioural, emotional and social difficulties requires a thorough systematic approach with the focus on academic instruction. This study addresses the development of a tool, consisting of two questionnaires, for measuring systematic academic instruction. The questionnaires cover the Plan-Do-Check-Act cycle and academic…

  20. 75 FR 70730 - EBD Hydro; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing and Soliciting Comments, Motions To...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-18

    ... comments received by resource agencies, the 60-day timeframe specified in 18 CFR 4.43(b) for filing all... submitted by any resource agency, Indian Tribe, or person, must be filed with the Commission within 30 days... relating to the merits of an issue that may affect the responsibilities of a particular resource...

  1. Examination of the Relationship between Teacher Praise and Opportunities for Students with EBD To Respond to Academic Requests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutherland, Kevin S.; Wehby, Joseph H.; Yoder, Paul J.

    2002-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between opportunities to respond (OTR) to academic requests and teacher praise in 20 classrooms for students with emotional and/or behavior disorders using time-window sequential analysis. Results suggest that: (1) a summary-level relationship represented by a significant positive correlation and (2) a…

  2. Exploring the Relationship between Increased Opportunities To Respond to Academic Requests and the Academic and Behavioral Outcomes of Students with EBD: A Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutherland, Kevin S.; Wehby, Joseph H.

    2001-01-01

    This article reviews the literature and examines the effect of increased opportunities to respond (OTR) to academic requests on academic and behavioral outcomes of students with emotional/behavioral disorders. Findings indicate increased rates of OTR result in higher task engagement and academic achievement rates and low rates of inappropriate…

  3. Supporting Early Adolescent Learning and Social Strengths: Promoting Productive Contexts for Students At-Risk for EBD during the Transition to Middle School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, Thomas W.; Hamm, Jill V.; Petrin, Robert A.; Robertson, Dylan; Murray, Robert A.; Meece, Judith L.; Brooks, Debbie Sprott

    2010-01-01

    This study involved a pilot examination of the impact of the Supporting Early Adolescent Learning and Social Strengths (SEALS) model on the 6th grade academic and social context following the transition to middle school. Two middle schools from a high poverty Appalachian school district were randomly assigned to the intervention and control…

  4. Effects of Sentence Instruction and Frequency Building to a Performance Criterion on Elementary-Aged Students with Behavioral Concerns and EBD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Datchuk, Shawn M.; Kubina, Richard M.; Mason, Linda H.

    2015-01-01

    Elementary-aged students with behavioral concerns and disabilities struggling to construct sentences stand a high likelihood for continued academic difficulty. Several studies have used sentence instruction with picture-word prompts to improve sentence level writing skills, including construction of simple sentences, syntax, capitalization, and…

  5. The Effects of Reading Fluency Instruction on the Academic and Behavioral Success of Middle School Students in a Self-Contained EBD Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Terrance M.; Shearer-Lingo, Amy

    2002-01-01

    This study used two reading programs with three students in a self-contained class for children with emotional and/or behavior disorders. Results indicated that when instruction sets students up to succeed on a daily basis and monitor their own progress, positive academic and social outcomes are likely. Single subject research results and…

  6. Pragmatic Language and the Child with Emotional/Behavioural Difficulties (EBD): A Pilot Study Exploring the Interaction between Behaviour and Communication Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mackie, Leila; Law, James

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: The relationship between mental health, behaviour and language development is widely recognized in the literature. Recent advances in assessment tools allows one to consider the role of pragmatic language skills in this co-occurrence. Aims: This pilot study aimed to investigate (1) the level of association between pragmatic language…

  7. Implementation and effect of life space crisis intervention in special schools with residential treatment for students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD).

    PubMed

    DOosterlinck, Franky; Goethals, Ilse; Broekaert, Eric; Boekaert, Eric; Schuyten, Gilberte; De Maeyer, Jessica

    2008-03-01

    The increase of violence in present-day society calls for adequate crisis interventions for students with behavioral problems. Life Space Crisis Intervention (LSCI) is a systematic and formatted response to a student's crisis, based on cognitive, behavioral, psychodynamic and developmental theory. The following research article evaluates a LSCI Program with students referred to special schools with residential treatment because of severe behavioral problems. The evaluation was conducted using a quasi experimental pre-test-post-test control group design. Thirty-one match paired students were pre-tested before the interventions started and post-tested after a period of 11 months. Five standardized questionnaires were examined to assess the effectiveness of the LSCI Program. General Linear Model (GLM) with repeated measures was used to analyze all data. For the total group of subjects (n = 62) it was found that students' perception about their athletic competence decrease significantly after 11 months in residential care. A positive effect of LSCI was found on direct aggression and social desirability.

  8. "Some People Aren't Cut Out for It": The Role of Personality Factors in the Careers of Teachers of Students with EBD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prather-Jones, Bianca

    2011-01-01

    This qualitative study explores reasons that experienced teachers of students with emotional and/or behavioral disorders give for remaining in their field. Previous research, usually conducted among the wider population of special education teachers, has focused on the relationship of employment and demographic factors to attrition and has…

  9. Do Adolescents with Emotional and Behavioral Disturbances Attending Schools for Special Education Have Lower Expectations Regarding the Transition to Adulthood?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Margraf, Hannah; Pinquart, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Individuals with emotional and behavioral disturbances (EBD) and those attending special schools tend to have poorer adult outcomes than adolescents without EBD and peers from regular schools. Using a four-group comparison (students with or without EBD from special schools and students with or without EBD from regular schools), the present study…

  10. Developing Positive Behavioral Support for Students with Challenging Behaviors. From the Third CCBD Mini-Library Series, What Works for Children and Youth with E/BD: Linking Yesterday and Today with Tomorrow.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sugai, George, Ed.; Lewis, Timothy J., Ed.

    This monograph is a guide to positive behavioral intervention and support (PBIS) and functional behavioral assessment (FBA) in the special education of students with behavior disorders as emphasized in the 1997 amendments to the Individuals with Disabilities Act (IDEA 97). An introduction explains that positive behavioral support represents the…

  11. Historical Chronology of the Council for Children with Behavioral Disorders 1964-1999. From the Third CBD Mini-Library Series, What Works for Children and Youth with E/BD: Linking Yesterday and Today with Tomorrow.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bullock, Lyndal M.; Menendez, Anthony L.

    This monograph presents a history of the Council for Children with Behavioral Disorders (CCBD), a division of the Council for Exceptional Children. Since its founding in 1964, the CCBD has been concerned with children and youth with emotional and behavioral disorders. Following an introductory chapter, Chapter 1 highlights CCBD, including its…

  12. Libyan Children's Views on the Importance of School Factors Which Contributed to Their Emotional and Behavioral Difficulties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gadour, Abdelbasit

    2006-01-01

    A group of 34 children from mainstream schools in Libya representing four Local Education Authorities (LEAs) were interviewed about their emotional and behavioral difficulties (EBD) and the factors which might be responsible for their EBD. Although, in general, children's views of EBD did not yield remarkably different accounts to those already…

  13. Characteristics of Successful Teachers of Students with Emotional Behavioral Disabilities: Teacher and Expert Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delport, John

    2012-01-01

    This study used a mixed methods design to examine the characteristics--including competencies (i.e., knowledge and skills), and personal attributes--of successful teachers of students with E/BD. The characteristics were examined through the perceptions of teachers of students with E/BD (teachers who are expert in E/BD, n = 14, MEd Graduates…

  14. Education and Services for Children and Youths with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders in Singapore

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Kaili; Soon, Tan Chee

    2006-01-01

    To describe the current status of special education and services for children and youths with emotional and behavioral disorders (E/BD) in Singapore, the authors highlight the country's overall structure of special education and mental health, identification of and intervention with children and youths with E/BD, perspectives about E/BD, and…

  15. Teacher Perceptions of Inclusionary Practices for Students with Emotional

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Yu-wen Grace

    2012-01-01

    The present study examined variables affecting teachers' perceptions of inclusionary practices for students with emotional and behavioral disorders (E/BD) in three areas: inclusion of students with E/BD, behaviors of students with E/BD, and teacher efficacy. Teachers listed in the database of one Education Service Center located in north central…

  16. Intensive Academic Interventions for Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders: An Experimental Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maggin, Daniel M.; Wehby, Joseph H.; Gilmour, Allison F.

    2016-01-01

    Research has consistently demonstrated that students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) are at risk for academic underachievement. Despite the persistent and strong association between academic problems and EBD, there remains a dearth of information on the process for developing intensive academic interventions for students with EBD.…

  17. Emotional and Behavioral Disorders in South Korea: Current Status and Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Joungmin; Kim, Kyeong-hwa

    2016-01-01

    In South Korea, there is no consensus on the definition of emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD). This column focuses on how the definition has affected the prevalence rates and services available for students with EBDs. Of the legal, clinical, and educational definitions, the legal definition of EBDs is currently in common use, which raises…

  18. Medicating Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders and ADHD: A State Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Runnheim, Veronica A.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Wisconsin teachers provided information on 1,300 students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) who were receiving medication for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The ADHD/EBD students comprised approximately 26% of all EBD students. The most common medication was Ritalin, and teachers believed the medication effectively…

  19. The challenge of integrating evidence-based design.

    PubMed

    Martin, Caren S

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the integration of evidence-based design (EBD) into the design process as an innovation, illuminates the significance and progress of the diffusion of this innovation, and identifies EBD advocates and the consequences of meeting the EBD challenge. A free tool for engaging in EBD is explored. Healthcare designers are leading the EBD charge, because their clients depend on it. But not all designers engage in EBD, because it may be beyond the resources of a firm or outside its culture. However, as with other meaningful design innovations, designers who do not practice EBD could fall by the wayside. EBD is a product of the diffusion of the innovation of evidence-based medicine. The academy (i.e., the collective of institutions of higher education), design organizations, design communities, and the media all contribute to the diffusion of EBD. However, the quantity, quality, and understandability of evidence continue to challenge its broad adoption. InformeDesign®, a free, Internet-based tool, presents information to designers in a concise, understandable way. Firms must invest in EBD incrementally as a value-added component of design to meet current and future challenges. It is important for designers to realize that engaging in EBD is not a rejection of creativity, but a means by which to elevate their design solutions.

  20. Optimization of Evans blue quantitation in limited rat tissue samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hwai-Lee; Lai, Ted Weita

    2014-10-01

    Evans blue dye (EBD) is an inert tracer that measures plasma volume in human subjects and vascular permeability in animal models. Quantitation of EBD can be difficult when dye concentration in the sample is limited, such as when extravasated dye is measured in the blood-brain barrier (BBB) intact brain. The procedure described here used a very small volume (30 µl) per sample replicate, which enabled high-throughput measurements of the EBD concentration based on a standard 96-well plate reader. First, ethanol ensured a consistent optic path length in each well and substantially enhanced the sensitivity of EBD fluorescence spectroscopy. Second, trichloroacetic acid (TCA) removed false-positive EBD measurements as a result of biological solutes and partially extracted EBD into the supernatant. Moreover, a 1:2 volume ratio of 50% TCA ([TCA final] = 33.3%) optimally extracted EBD from the rat plasma protein-EBD complex in vitro and in vivo, and 1:2 and 1:3 weight-volume ratios of 50% TCA optimally extracted extravasated EBD from the rat brain and liver, respectively, in vivo. This procedure is particularly useful in the detection of EBD extravasation into the BBB-intact brain, but it can also be applied to detect dye extravasation into tissues where vascular permeability is less limiting.

  1. Attitudes, awareness and perceptions on evidence based dentistry and scientific publications among dental professionals in the county of Halland, Sweden: a questionnaire survey.

    PubMed

    Rabe, Per; Holmén, Anders; Sjögren, Petteri

    2007-01-01

    The objective was to identify dental professionals' attitudes and awareness on evidence based dentistry (EBD), and to elucidate perceived barriers and views on how to move towards EBD. A questionnaire was sent to 290 dental professionals (dental hygienists, general dentists, specialist dentists) in the county of Halland, Sweden. The questionnaire consisted of closed questions and free text sections, related to attitudes, awareness and skills on databases, EBD, and terms related to scientific publications, as well as perceived barriers towards EBD. A majority of the respondents had a welcoming attitude towards EBD. The respondents perceived their colleagues less positive towards EBD. The respondents considered EBD, at least partly, useful in daily dental practice. With the exception of general dentists in private practice, a vast majority of the dental professionals thought that EBD would improve the care of their patients. Dental professionals in the county of Halland, in Sweden, had a welcoming attitude towards EBD, and indicated an open attitude for learning more about interpretation of evidence from scientific publications. The most commonly perceived barriers towards EBD, were 'lack of time' and 'poor availability of evidence'.

  2. Randomized phase 2 study: elotuzumab plus bortezomib/dexamethasone vs bortezomib/dexamethasone for relapsed/refractory MM

    PubMed Central

    Offidani, Massimo; Pégourie, Brigitte; De La Rubia, Javier; Garderet, Laurent; Laribi, Kamel; Bosi, Alberto; Marasca, Roberto; Laubach, Jacob; Mohrbacher, Ann; Carella, Angelo Michele; Singhal, Anil K.; Tsao, L. Claire; Lynch, Mark; Bleickardt, Eric; Jou, Ying-Ming; Robbins, Michael; Palumbo, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    In this proof-of-concept, open-label, phase 2 study, patients with relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma (RRMM) received elotuzumab with bortezomib and dexamethasone (EBd) or bortezomib and dexamethasone (Bd) until disease progression/unacceptable toxicity. Primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS); secondary/exploratory endpoints included overall response rate (ORR) and overall survival (OS). Two-sided 0.30 significance level was specified (80% power, 103 events) to detect hazard ratio (HR) of 0.69. Efficacy and safety analyses were performed on all randomized patients and all treated patients, respectively. Of 152 randomized patients (77 EBd, 75 Bd), 150 were treated (75 EBd, 75 Bd). PFS was greater with EBd vs Bd (HR, 0.72; 70% confidence interval [CI], 0.59-0.88; stratified log-rank P = .09); median PFS was longer with EBd (9.7 months) vs Bd (6.9 months). In an updated analysis, EBd-treated patients homozygous for the high-affinity FcγRIIIa allele had median PFS of 22.3 months vs 9.8 months in EBd-treated patients homozygous for the low-affinity allele. ORR was 66% (EBd) vs 63% (Bd). Very good partial response or better occurred in 36% of patients (EBd) vs 27% (Bd). Early OS results, based on 40 deaths, revealed an HR of 0.61 (70% CI, 0.43-0.85). To date, 60 deaths have occurred (28 EBd, 32 Bd). No additional clinically significant adverse events occurred with EBd vs Bd. Grade 1/2 infusion reaction rate was low (5% EBd) and mitigated with premedication. In patients with RRMM, elotuzumab, an immunostimulatory antibody, appears to provide clinical benefit without added clinically significant toxicity when combined with Bd vs Bd alone. Registered to ClinicalTrials.gov as NCT01478048. PMID:27091875

  3. The Winds of Change Revisited: Progress Towards Building a Culture of Evidence-Based Dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Hinton, Robert J.; McCann, Ann L.; Schneiderman, Emet D.; Dechow, Paul C.

    2016-01-01

    In 2008, Texas A&M University Baylor College of Dentistry launched a comprehensive four-year curriculum in evidence-based dentistry (EBD) along with a series of faculty development initiatives to create an EBD culture. The aim of this study was to determine the institution's success in achieving this goal. The assessment tool used was the PEAK instrument, which measures respondents’ EBD Practices, Experience, Attitudes, and Knowledge. Two EBD-trained classes of students and one class untrained in EBD (approximately 100 students in each class) were assessed annually. The faculty were assessed before and after completion of the initiative. Nearly all students responded, with samples ranging from 87 to 102; the faculty response rates were 53% (62/117) in 2009 and 66% in 2013 (81/123). In the results, the trained students scored significantly higher in knowledge than the untrained students at each of the first three PEAK administrations (p≤0.001). Regarding confidence in appraising a research report, the first trained group significantly gained in appropriate use of statistical tests (p<0.001), while the second trained group significantly gained in this aspect and five others (p≤0.032). At the final PEAK administration, the second trained group agreed more than the untrained group that EBD was important for the practice of dentistry (p<0.001). Faculty comfort level with reading peer-reviewed articles increased significantly from 2009 to 2013 (p=0.039). Faculty members who participated in the summer EBD Fundamentals course (n=28) had significantly higher EBD knowledge scores than those who did not participate (p=0.013), and their EBD attitudes and practices were more positive (p<0.05). Students and faculty trained in EBD were more knowledgeable and exhibited more positive attitudes, supporting a conclusion that the college has made substantial progress towards achieving an EBD culture. PMID:25941143

  4. The winds of change revisited: progress towards building a culture of evidence-based dentistry.

    PubMed

    Hinton, Robert J; McCann, Ann L; Schneiderman, Emet D; Dechow, Paul C

    2015-05-01

    In 2008, Texas A&M University Baylor College of Dentistry launched a comprehensive four-year curriculum in evidence-based dentistry (EBD) along with a series of faculty development initiatives to create an EBD culture. The aim of this study was to determine the institution's success in achieving this goal. The assessment tool used was the PEAK instrument, which measures respondents' EBD Practices, Experience, Attitudes, and Knowledge. Two EBD-trained classes of students and one class untrained in EBD (approximately 100 students in each class) were assessed annually. The faculty were assessed before and after completion of the initiative. Nearly all students responded, with samples ranging from 87 to 102; the faculty response rates were 53% (62/117) in 2009 and 66% in 2013 (81/123). In the results, the trained students scored significantly higher in knowledge than the untrained students at each of the first three PEAK administrations (p≤0.001). Regarding confidence in appraising a research report, the first trained group significantly gained in appropriate use of statistical tests (p<0.001), while the second trained group significantly gained in this aspect and five others (p≤0.032). At the final PEAK administration, the second trained group agreed more than the untrained group that EBD was important for the practice of dentistry (p<0.001). Faculty comfort level with reading peer-reviewed articles increased significantly from 2009 to 2013 (p=0.039). Faculty members who participated in the summer EBD Fundamentals course (n=28) had significantly higher EBD knowledge scores than those who did not participate (p=0.013), and their EBD attitudes and practices were more positive (p<0.05). Students and faculty trained in EBD were more knowledgeable and exhibited more positive attitudes, supporting a conclusion that the college has made substantial progress towards achieving an EBD culture.

  5. Bullying and Social Support: Variation by School-Type and Emotional or Behavioural Disturbances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Margraf, Hannah; Pinquart, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The present study analysed whether bullying/victimisation and related social support vary by emotional and behavioural disturbances (EBD) as well as school type. We examined 540 German adolescents with and without emotional disturbances (ED)/behavioural disturbances (BD) attending regular and special schools for students with EBD. Adolescents with…

  6. Self-Regulated Strategy Development for Students with Emotional/Behavioral Disorders in a Residential School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ennis, Robin Parks

    2013-01-01

    Students with emotional and behavioral disorders (E/BD) have academic deficits that affect their success in school; however, few researchers have investigated what strategies work best for this population, especially in the area of writing. One promising intervention to support the writing skills of students with and at-risk for E/BD is…

  7. Investigation of a Multi-Component Intervention Addressing Mathematical Reasoning and Self-Regulation of Behavior for Students with Emotional/Behavioral Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Marie B.

    2013-01-01

    For students with Emotional/Behavioral Disabilities (EBD), negative student outcomes are the poorest across disability categories, including high rates of school dropouts, unemployment and incarcerations. Mathematically, students with EBD receiving instruction in special education settings experience practices not consistent with recommendations…

  8. Uncovering Stereotypes and Identifying Characteristics of Gifted Students and Students with Emotional/Behavioral Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rizza, Mary G.; Morrison, William F.

    2002-01-01

    Ninety-two preservice or inservice teachers were asked to categorize characteristics and behaviors according to whether each described a student identified with an emotional/behavior disability (EBD), who is gifted, both, or neither. Results revealed stereotypical thinking in the identification of characteristics of students labeled EBD. Results…

  9. Teacher Implementation of Trial-Based Functional Analysis and Function-Based Interventions for Students with Challenging Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flynn, Susan Dagenhart

    2012-01-01

    Children and youth with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) or emotional and behavioral disabilities (E/BD) often exhibit challenging behavior including aggression, self-injury, non-compliance, or property destruction (Kamps, Kravits, Rauch, Kamps, & Chung, 2000; National Autism Center, 2009). As a result, students with ASD or E/BD often miss out…

  10. The Lived Experiences of Teachers of Students with Emotional Behavior Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Sheneka L.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this phenomenological study was to gain an understanding of teacher attrition among the emotional and behavior disorder (EBD) student population within a self-contained environment through the lived experiences of former EBD teachers. Attrition among special education teachers has been a perennial issue. Special education teacher…

  11. Using Precorrection as a Secondary-Tier Intervention for Reducing Problem Behaviors in Instructional and Noninstructional Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ennis, Robin Parks; Schwab, James Raymond; Jolivette, Kristine

    2012-01-01

    Students with emotional and behavioral disorders (E/BD) have academic, behavioral, and social characteristics that present unique needs within schools. Educators across the country are responding to the academic, behavioral, and social needs of all students, including students with E/BD, by implementing a continuum of supports across a…

  12. Transplantation of epidermal cell sheets by endoscopic balloon dilatation to avoid esophageal re-strictures: initial experience in a porcine model

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Shinichiro; Kanai, Nobuo; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Maeda, Masanori; Hosoi, Takahiro; Fukai, Fumio; Eguchi, Susumu; Yamato, Masayuki

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Epidermal cell sheet (ECS) transplantation immediately after aggressive endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) has been shown to be safe and effective in the prevention of esophageal strictures. This study evaluated the feasibility of ECS transplantation after endoscopic balloon dilation (EBD) in a porcine model. Methods: Six pigs underwent circumferential esophageal ESD under general anesthesia. Two weeks later, two pigs underwent EBD and transplantation of an autologous ECS, two underwent EBD alone, and two underwent endoscopic observation only (control). Results: The two pigs in the transplantation group underwent six ECS transplants after EBD with five of the six (83 %) being successful, as shown by engraftment of transplanted ECSs after 7 days. No adverse events were observed. Stricture rates were lower in the two transplanted pigs (55 % and 60 %) than in the control (92.2 % and 87.7 %) and EBD-treated (71.7 % and 78.2 %) pigs. Infiltration of inflammatory cells was significantly lower in the transplanted pigs than in the control and EBD-treated pigs. Conclusion: Preliminary results indicate the stability of the ECS transplantation procedure and the engraftment of transplanted ECS in the tears after EBD. This proof-of-concept study suggests that covering tears with ECSs after EBD may avoid re-strictures. PMID:27853736

  13. Teachers of Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders' Perceptions of the Importance of Selected Professional Standards of Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lusk, Mandy E.; Bullock, Lyndal M.

    2013-01-01

    Utilizing the Council for Exceptional Children's (CEC) standards delineated for preparation programs in teaching students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD), the present study sought to determine how graduates of one teacher preparation program perceived the importance of the standards in their work with students with EBD. Results…

  14. Effective Practices/Interventions for Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bock, Stacey Jones; Borders, Christy

    2012-01-01

    Students with emotional and behavioral disorders (E/BD) present unique challenges to the families and educators supporting them. Even though families and educators report that behavioral issues can be identified by age 3 (Walker, Ramsey, & Gresham, 2004), the commonly used wait-and-see approach to intervening results in children with E/BD not…

  15. Struggling Readers with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders and Their Teachers: Perceptions of Corrective Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDaniel, Sara C.; Duchaine, Ellen L.; Jolivette, Kristine

    2010-01-01

    Students with emotional and behavioral disorders (E/BD) experience deficits in social, behavioral, and academic areas. Of great importance in the academic area is reading achievement. Students with E/BD who struggle with reading tend to have negative in-school and post-school outcomes. Due to the severity of potential outcomes, it is essential to…

  16. A Literature Review of Research Quality and Effective Practices in Alternative Education Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flower, Andrea; McDaniel, Sara C.; Jolivette, Kristine

    2011-01-01

    Effective behavioral practices for students with emotional/behavioral disorders (E/BD) are critical. Students with E/BD are often served in alternative education (AE) settings due to behavior that cannot be supported in a typical school setting or due to court adjudication based on delinquent activity. Like other settings for students with E/BD,…

  17. Put Me in, Coach! A Powerful and Efficient Tier 2 Behavioral Intervention for Alternative Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDaniel, Sara C.; Flower, Andrea; Cheney, Douglas

    2011-01-01

    Students with high-incidence disabilities, including emotional and behavioral disorders (E/BD), learning disabilities (LD), and mild intellectual disabilities (MID), demonstrate academic, social, and behavioral deficits to varying degrees, which places them at risk for school failure. Because students with E/BD face dire consequences, it is…

  18. Promise and Possibility in Special Education Services for Students with Emotional or Behavioral Disorders: Peacock Hill Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gage, Nicholas A.; Adamson, Reesha; Mitchell, Barbara S.; Lierheimer, Kristin; O'Connor, Karen V.; Bailey, Natasha; Schultz, Tia; Schmidt, Carla; Jones, Stacey

    2010-01-01

    This article provides an historical look at how programs and practices for students with emotional or behavior disorders (E/BD) have been evaluated since 1964, leading to a codified, although not universally recognized, set of recommendations for evaluating best practices for students with E/BD set out by The Peacock Hill Working Group (1991). The…

  19. Corrective Reading as a Supplementary Curriculum for Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDaniel, Sara C.; Houchins, David E.; Terry, Nicole P.

    2013-01-01

    Reading deficits among students with emotional and behavioral disorders (E/BD) are well documented. One approach to addressing these deficits has been providing students with intensive and explicit reading instruction. In this study, 31 students with E/BD and reading deficits in self-contained settings were provided with 8 weeks of…

  20. The Central Role of Teaching Social Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johns, Beverley H.; Crowley, E. Paula; Guetzloe, Eleanor

    2005-01-01

    According to Shores and Jack (1996), children and youth are identified as having behavioral disorders based on their excesses and their deficits of social behavior. They respond to available social stimuli in unpredictable ways. The teaching of social skills should be an integral part of any program for E/BD students. E/BD teachers work on…

  1. How We Might Make Special Education for Students with Emotional or Behavioral Disorders Less Stigmatizing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kauffman, James M.; Badar, Jeanmarie

    2013-01-01

    The authors note that identification as having emotional or behavioral disorders (EBD) is generally acknowledged to be stigmatizing. The stigma associated with identification as needing special education for EBD (or any other disability) could be reduced by talking in readily understood language about differences, accepting the reality of…

  2. Promoting Longevity: Strategies for Teachers of Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cancio, Edward J.; Conderman, Greg

    2008-01-01

    Mrs. Donohue, a middle school teacher of students with emotional and behavior disorders (EBD), emphasizes that her job is extremely challenging. Her biggest issue is lack of administrative support. Mr. Clark, a teacher for students with EBD at an alternative school, had similar experiences with administrators in the past. He says, "The current…

  3. Learned Helplessness and Students with Emotional or Behavioral Disorders: Deprivation in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutherland, Kevin S.; Singh, Nirbhay N.

    2004-01-01

    Students with emotional or behavioral disorders (E/BD) are characterized by academic deficits and classroom behavioral problems. The relationship between problem behavior and academic difficulties is complex, and some researchers have hypothesized that the classroom behavior problems of students with E/BD are responses to aversive stimuli, namely…

  4. Effects of the WhyTry Social Skills Program on Students with Emotional and/or Behavioral Problems in an Alternative School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilhite, Shannon; Bullock, Lyndal M.

    2012-01-01

    Social skills training (SST) is an evidence-based intervention to help increase social competence for students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD), but there is limited research that addresses SST for students identified as experiencing EBD at alternative campuses. A mixed methods design was utilized to examine SST at an alternative…

  5. Schema-Based Strategy Instruction and the Mathematical Problem-Solving Performance of Two Students with Emotional or Behavioral Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peltier, Corey; Vannest, Kimberly J.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the effects of schema instruction on the mathematical problem solving of students with emotional or behavioral disorders (EBD). The participants were two fourth-grade students identified with EBD. The intervention package consisted of schema instruction, strategy instruction on problem-solving heuristics…

  6. An Initial Psychometric Evaluation of the CBCL 6-18 in a Sample of Youth with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pandolfi, Vincent; Magyar, Caroline I.; Dill, Charles A.

    2012-01-01

    Individuals with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) often present with co-occurring emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD). The Child Behavior Checklist 6-18 (CBCL; Achenbach & Rescorla, 2001) is an EBD measure that contains several norm-referenced scales derived through factor analysis of data from the general pediatric population. The…

  7. Examining the Effectiveness of Numbered Heads Together for Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, William; Haydon, Todd

    2013-01-01

    Challenging behaviors displayed in both general education classrooms and self-contained classrooms by students with emotional behavioral disorders (EBD) can be a difficult challenge for novice and experienced teachers (Kennedy & Jolivette, 2008; Turnbull, Turnbull, & Wehmeyer, 2010). Furthermore, students with EBD demonstrate broad…

  8. Utilizing Literary Texts in Teacher Education to Promote Positive Attitudes toward Children with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marlowe, Mike; Maycock, George A.; Palmer, Laurie F.; Morrison, William F.

    1997-01-01

    This study examined the effects of a literary text-based course in emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) on changing preservice teachers' (N=32) attitudes toward children with EBD. Comparison with a control group instructed with a professional text-based approach found the experimental group had a significantly more positive change in attitudes…

  9. Legal Requirements for Assessing Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yell, Mitchell L.; Drasgow, Erik

    2001-01-01

    This article examines the legal requirements of assessing students with disabilities, especially students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD). It reviews assessment legislation and litigation in special education and explains specific requirements for assessing students with EBD. The article also examines school districts' obligations…

  10. Constant Time Delay: One Way to Provide Positive Behavioral Support for Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Kay B.; Lingo, Amy S.

    2005-01-01

    Teachers of students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) understand conceptually, emotionally, and legally the importance of using research-based procedures as well as positive behavioral supports. One way to provide positive behavioral support for students with EBD is constant time delay (CTD). CTD is an instructional delivery procedure…

  11. Integrating Research, Policy, and Practice to Bring Science to the Classroom: New Leaders' Perspectives on the Field of Emotional and Behavioral Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maggin, Daniel M.; Robertson, Rachel; Oliver, Regina M.; Hollo, Alex; Partin, Tara C. Moore

    2010-01-01

    In 1991, the Peacock Hill Working Group provided the field of emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) a roadmap for improving the quality of services provided to students with EBD. The working group considered issues at every level of the educational system, from the classroom to federal policy. Although many strides have been made in the past 20…

  12. Improving Family Involvement for Juvenile Offenders with Emotional/Behavioral Disorders and Related Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garfinkel, Lili

    2010-01-01

    Youth with emotional and behavioral (E/BD) and other disorders, who in many cases have not received needed interventions and supports in school, are overrepresented in the juvenile justice system. This article considers how parents of youth with E/BDs can become more involved in the process when their child is referred to juvenile court, thereby…

  13. Critical Educational Program Components for Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders: Science, Policy, and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Richard L.; Peterson, Reece L.; Smith, Carl R.

    2011-01-01

    In spite of recent education reform and reorganization efforts requiring the use of research-based methods, the fundamental elements of an effective program for children and youth with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) have not been succinctly identified. This article presents the essential features of programs for students with EBD.…

  14. Cultivating Caring Relationships between Teachers and Secondary Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders: Implications for Research and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mihalas, Stephanie; Morse, William C.; Allsopp, David H.; Alvarez McHatton, Patricia

    2009-01-01

    Educating secondary students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) is often an overwhelming task that places high demands on teachers. Existing research on effective social-emotional/behavioral and academic interventions for students with EBD is limited but expanding. Unfortunately, school and life outcomes for these students are dismal…

  15. The Effects of Self-Regulation Strategy Development on Written Expression of Students with Emotional/Behavioral Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pannell, Ronald Howard

    2012-01-01

    This investigation examined the effects of self-regulated strategy development (SRSD) on the written expression of students with emotional and behavioral disabilities (EBD). The target students for this study were elementary students who receive special education services under the category of EBD. An AB Multiple Baseline Design (i.e., Baseline,…

  16. The Influence of Professional Development for Special Education Teachers: Self-Regulated Strategy Development in Writing for Students with Emotional Behavioral Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liberty, Lisa M.

    2013-01-01

    Students with emotional behavioral disorders (EBD) are well known for their challenging, demanding, unpredictable, and difficult behaviors. Many students with EBD exhibit significant academic deficits, especially in writing. Writing instruction is challenging for teachers because they lack knowledge of the writing process, strategies, and…

  17. Effective Teachers for Students with Emotional/Behavioral Disorders: Active Ingredients Leading to Positive Teacher and Student Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conroy, Maureen A.; Sutherland, Kevin S.

    2012-01-01

    Teachers of students with emotional/behavioral disorders (E/BD) have varied skills and abilities. Within the field there are some teachers, who teach students with E/BD by actively engaging them in learning tasks and who have few behavior problems in comparison to other teachers, who struggle with classroom management. Many researchers have found…

  18. Difficulties Associated with the Coding and Categorization of Students with Emotional and Behavioural Disabilities in Alberta

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wishart, Diane; Jahnukainen, Markku

    2010-01-01

    In Canada, there is a recent trend toward non-categorization of services of students with emotional and behavioural disabilities (EBD). Yet in Alberta, the coding of students with EBD provides opportunities to diagnose students' learning difficulties but is hindered in this process, in large part, by being tied into special needs funding. Current…

  19. Supervising Paraeducators in Classrooms for Children with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maggin, Daniel M.; Wehby, Joseph H.; Moore-Partin, Tara C.; Robertson, Rachel; Oliver, Regina M.

    2009-01-01

    The academic and behavioral difficulties exhibited by students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) provide educators with unique challenges. The Study of Personnel Needs in Special Education estimated that 40% of the 400,000 special education paraeducators presently employed nationwide are assigned to classrooms for children with EBD.…

  20. Elementary Day and Residential Schools for Children With Emotional and Behavioral Disorders: Characteristics and Entrance and Exit Policies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gagnon, Joseph Calvin; Leone, Peter E.

    2005-01-01

    Limited information exists about treatment programs for children with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) in the elementary grades. This national study provides a description of first-through sixth-grade day treatment and residential schools for students with EBD in two areas: (a) characteristics of schools (e.g., philosophy, accreditation,…

  1. Defining Administrative Support and Its Relationship to the Attrition of Teachers of Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cancio, Edward J.; Albrecht, Susan Fread; Johns, Beverley H.

    2013-01-01

    Special education faces serious shortages of teachers, and the area of special education teaching with the greatest shortage is in the field emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD). This study was conducted to identify the perceptions of current teachers of students with EBD on the definition of and the extent and importance of administrative…

  2. Comorbid Diagnosis and Concomitant Medical Treatment for Children with Emotional and Behavioral Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Kristina M.; Bowman, Krista A.; Ley, Katie; Frankenberger, William

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to determine the types of psychiatric disorders and the corresponding medications prescribed to children enrolled in elementary Emotional Behavioral Disability (EBD) programs. The project employed a questionnaire that was distributed to elementary level teachers (EBD) to: (a) determine the proportion of …

  3. Themes and Dimensions of Emotional and Behavioral Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mustian, April L.; Cuenca-Sanchez, Yojanna

    2012-01-01

    Students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) are one of the most underserved populations in today's schools (Kauffman, Mock, & Simpson, 2011). Many of these students also have additional disabilities in conjunction with an EBD identification, such as Learning Disabilities (LD), Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD), Attention Deficit…

  4. Toward Improved Accuracy: A Response to Kauffman and Badar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamphaus, Randy; DiStefano, Christine

    2013-01-01

    The number of children estimated to suffer mental health disorders, and therefore, creating the need for special education services for children with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD), is between 5% and 25% of children under the age of 18 (Brauner & Stephens, 2006). Admittedly, not all children with EBD have been identified and served,…

  5. Academic Instruction and Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagaman, Jessica L.

    2012-01-01

    Students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) are known to experience academic deficits across core subject areas such as reading and mathematics. Until recently, less attention had been paid to the academic deficits of students with EBD. This was due, in part, to a common belief that academic deficits could not be addressed until problem…

  6. Special Needs Characteristics of Children with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders that Affect Inclusion in Regular Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoutjesdijk, Regina; Scholte, Evert M.; Swaab, Hanna

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the discriminating special needs characteristics of children with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) that predict restrictiveness of placement in special education. The focus is on dynamic factors instead of static factors. To this end, 235 children with EBD in special schools and 111 children with EBD…

  7. Existing Research and Future Directions for Self-Regulated Strategy Development with Students with and at Risk for Emotional and Behavioral Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ennis, Robin Parks; Jolivette, Kristine

    2014-01-01

    Students with emotional and behavioral disorders (E/BD) have academic deficits that affect their success in school. However, there are few research studies investigating what strategies work best for this population, especially in the area of writing. One promising intervention to support the writing skills of students with and at risk for E/BD is…

  8. Electrical characterization of defects introduced in n-Ge during electron beam deposition or exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Coelho, S. M. M.; Auret, F. D.; Janse van Rensburg, P. J.; Nel, J. M.

    2013-11-07

    Schottky barrier diodes prepared by electron beam deposition (EBD) on Sb-doped n-type Ge were characterized using deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS). Pt EBD diodes manufactured with forming gas in the chamber had two defects, E{sub 0.28} and E{sub 0.31}, which were not previously observed after EBD. By shielding the samples mechanically during EBD, superior diodes were produced with no measureable deep levels, establishing that energetic ions created in the electron beam path were responsible for the majority of defects observed in the unshielded sample. Ge samples that were first exposed to the conditions of EBD, without metal deposition (called electron beam exposure herein), introduced a number of new defects not seen after EBD with only the E-center being common to both processes. Substantial differences were noted when these DLTS spectra were compared to those obtained using diodes irradiated by MeV electrons or alpha particles indicating that very different defect creation mechanisms are at play when too little energy is available to form Frenkel pairs. These observations suggest that when EBD ions and energetic particles collide with the sample surface, inducing intrinsic non-localised lattice excitations, they modify defects deeper in the semiconductor thus rendering them observable.

  9. Analysis of Zebrafish Larvae Skeletal Muscle Integrity with Evans Blue Dye

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Ann E.; Dowling, James

    2015-01-01

    The zebrafish model is an emerging system for the study of neuromuscular disorders. In the study of neuromuscular diseases, the integrity of the muscle membrane is a critical disease determinant. To date, numerous neuromuscular conditions display degenerating muscle fibers with abnormal membrane integrity; this is most commonly observed in muscular dystrophies. Evans Blue Dye (EBD) is a vital, cell permeable dye that is rapidly taken into degenerating, damaged, or apoptotic cells; in contrast, it is not taken up by cells with an intact membrane. EBD injection is commonly employed to ascertain muscle integrity in mouse models of neuromuscular diseases. However, such EBD experiments require muscle dissection and/or sectioning prior to analysis. In contrast, EBD uptake in zebrafish is visualized in live, intact preparations. Here, we demonstrate a simple and straightforward methodology for performing EBD injections and analysis in live zebrafish. In addition, we demonstrate a co-injection strategy to increase efficacy of EBD analysis. Overall, this video article provides an outline to perform EBD injection and characterization in zebrafish models of neuromuscular disease. PMID:26649573

  10. Implementation of evidence-based dentistry into practice: analysis of awareness, perceptions and attitudes of dentists in the World Dental Federation-European Regional Organization zone.

    PubMed

    Yamalik, Nermin; Nemli, Secil Karakoca; Carrilho, Eunice; Dianiskova, Simona; Melo, Paulo; Lella, Anna; Trouillet, Joel; Margvelashvili, Vladimer

    2015-06-01

    Based on evidence-based dentistry (EBD) being a relatively new concept in dentistry, the attitudes, perceptions and level of awareness of dentists regarding EBD, and perceived barriers to its implementation into daily practice, were comparatively analysed in six countries of the FDI (World Dental Federation-Federation Dentaire Internationale)-European Regional Organization (ERO) zone (France, Georgia, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia and Turkey). For this purpose, a questionnaire, 'The Relationship Between Dental Practitioners and Universities', was developed by the FDI-ERO Working Group and applied by National Dental Associations (NDAs). A total of 850 valid responses were received, and cumulative data, comparisons between countries and potential impact of demographic variables were analysed. Regarding EBD, similar percentages of respondents reported that they 'know what it is' (32.8%) and 'they practice' (32.1%). Most respondents believed that 'EBD is beneficial' (89.1%); however, they had different thoughts regarding 'who actually benefited from EBD'. Of the participants, 60% believed that 'dentists experience difficulties in implementing EBD'. Although lack of time, lack of education and limited availability of evidence-based clinical guidelines were among the major barriers, there were differences among countries (P<0.05). Significant differences were also observed between countries regarding certain questions such as 'where EBD needed to be taught' (P<0.05), as both undergraduate and continuing education were suggested to be suitable. Age, practice mode and years of practice significantly affected many of the responses (P<0.05). There was a general, positive attitude toward EBD; however, there was also a clear demand for more information and support to enhance dentists' knowledge and use of EBD in everyday practice and a specific role for the NDAs.

  11. Safety of energy based devices for hemostasis in thyroid surgery.

    PubMed

    Dionigi, Gianlorenzo; Wu, Che-Wei; Kim, Hoon-Yub; Liu, Xiaoli; Liu, Renbin; Randolph, Gregory W; Anuwong, Angkoon

    2016-10-01

    Energy based devices (EBD) have been developed, implemented and increasingly applied in thyroid surgery because they can provide a combined dissection and haemostatic effect. In particular, advantages of EBD have been described in terms of efficacious haemostasis, reduction of procedure-associated time, reduced incision length, less operative blood loss and transfusion need, decreased postoperative drain, pain and hospital stay. In addition, EBD are essential for endoscopic procedures. On the contrary, a potential drawback is the increased health care costs. This paper reviews relevant medical literature published on the safety of new devices for achieving hemostasis and dissection around the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN).

  12. Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders: An Australian Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conway, Robert

    2006-01-01

    This article provides an Australian perspective on students with emotional and behavioral disorders (E/BD). Consideration is given to the cultural issues, structure of special services, identification procedures, delivery system, and types of services provided.

  13. Abgrenzung Lebensmittel - Arzneimittel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streit, Helmut

    Angereicherte Lebensmittel (ALM), Arzneimittel (AM), Diätetische Lebensmittel (DLM), Ergänzende bilanzierte Diäten (EbD), Funktionelle Lebensmittel (FF), Lebensmittel (LM), Medizinprodukte (MP), Nahrungsergänzungsmittel (NEM), Neuartige Lebensmittel (NF).

  14. Human primordial germ cell-derived progenitors give rise to neurons and glia in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, Yincheng; Chen, Bin; Tao, Minfang

    2009-12-18

    We derived a cell population from cultured human primordial germ cells from early human embryos. The derivates, termed embryoid body-derived (EBD) cells, displayed an extensive capacity for proliferation and expressed a panel of markers in all three germ layers. Interestingly, EBD cells were also positive for markers of neural stem/progenitor cells, such as nestin and glial fibrillary acidic protein. When these cells were transplanted into the brain cavities of fetal sheep and postnatal NOD-SCID mice or nerve-degenerated tibialis anterior muscles, they readily gave rise to neurons or glial cells. To our knowledge, our data are the first to demonstrate that EBD cells can undergo further neurogenesis under suitable environments in vivo. Hence, with the abilities of extensive expansion, self-renewal, and differentiation, EBD cells may provide a useful donor source for neural stem/progenitor cells to be used in cell-replacement therapies for diseases of the nervous system.

  15. Phase distribution of products of radiation and post-radiation distillation of biopolymers: Cellulose, lignin and chitin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponomarev, A. V.; Kholodkova, Е. M.; Metreveli, A. K.; Metreveli, P. K.; Erasov, V. S.; Bludenko, A. V.; Chulkov, V. N.

    2011-11-01

    Influence of both the absorbed dose and the dose rate of 8 MeV electron-beam radiation on destruction of microcrystalline cellulose, pine lignin and krill chitin was investigated. Two conversion modes were compared: (1) post-radiation distillation PRD and (2) electron-beam distillation EBD. Cellulose, chitin and lignin demonstrate different responses to irradiation and distillation in PRD and EBD modes. Treatment in EBD mode transforms biopolymers to organic liquid more productively than conventional dry distillation and treatment in PRD mode. Both radiation heating and an irradiation without heating intensify chitin and cellulose decomposition and distillation. At the same time lignin decaying rather efficiently in EBD mode appears to be insensitive to a preliminary irradiation in PRD mode up to a dose of 2.4 MGy.

  16. Integrating critical thinking and evidence-based dentistry across a four-year dental curriculum: a model for independent learning.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Teresa A; Straub-Morarend, Cheryl L; Handoo, Nidhi; Solow, Catherine M; Cunningham-Ford, Marsha A; Finkelstein, Michael W

    2014-03-01

    Introducing critical thinking and evidence-based dentistry (EBD) content into an established dental curriculum can be a difficult and challenging process. Over the past three years, the University of Iowa College of Dentistry has developed and implemented a progressive four-year integrated critical thinking and EBD curriculum. The objective of this article is to describe the development and implementation process to make it available as a model for other dental schools contemplating introduction of critical thinking and EBD into their curricula. The newly designed curriculum built upon an existing problem-based learning foundation, which introduces critical thinking and the scientific literature in the D1 year, in order to expose students to the rationale and resources for practicing EBD in the D2 and D3 years and provide opportunities to practice critical thinking and apply the EBD five-step process in the D2, D3, and D4 years. All curricular content is online, and D3 and D4 EBD activities are integrated within existing clinical responsibilities. The curricular content, student resources, and student activities are described.

  17. Assessment of knowledge, attitude, and practice with regard to evidence-based dentistry among dental students in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences

    PubMed Central

    Eslamipour, Faezeh; Ghaiour, Marzieh

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Evidence-based dentistry (EBD) is an approach to oral health that requires the application and examination of relevant scientific data related to the patient's oral health and his priorities. The aim of this study was to assess knowledge, attitude, and practice of dental students of Isfahan about EBD. Materials and Methods: In this descriptive study, 168 dental students in 3 final years of their education who engaged in clinical practice by consensus sampling were recruited. For data collection, a validated questionnaire was used. The questionnaire was consisted of demographic questions and some questions about four issues: Knowledge of self-assess (KSA), evidence-based practice, actual knowledge and attitude about EBD. Data were analyzed with t-test, one-way ANOVA, Chi-square, and linear regression with SPSS 16. Results: One hundred and thirty-six students from 168 students were filled the questionnaire. The mean of KSA was 13 ± 4.3, mean of usage of useful references in EBD was 16.9 ± 7.6. One-third of students were studied their last article in last 6 months before. The mean of actual knowledge and attitude was 7.4 ± 2.3 and 24 ± 3.8, respectively. The relation between 4 main issues was significant (P < 0.05). Conclusion: By considering overall interest and positive attitude toward learning EBD in dental students, it is highly recommended that practical educational courses about EBD be planned by dental faculties. PMID:27500165

  18. Self-Perceived Knowledge, Skills, Attitudes, and Use of Evidence-Based Dentistry Among Practitioners Transitioning to Dental Educators.

    PubMed

    Ciancio, Mae J; Lee, Michelle M; Krumdick, Nathaniel D; Lencioni, Catherine; Kanjirath, Preetha P

    2017-03-01

    Dental practitioners transitioning to dental educators (PTEs) have an integral role in dental education. While PTEs intrinsically apply some form of evidence-based dentistry (EBD) in patient care, it may not be a standardized, systematic approach. The aims of this study were to determine the self-perceived knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behaviors of PTEs regarding EBD at one U.S. dental school and to identify areas where formal calibration may be warranted to facilitate their competence and confidence as dental educators. Participants voluntarily completed a 32-question survey regarding their EBD training and self-perceived EBD skills in several areas: use of the clinical evidence pyramid; systematic, objective, and critical appraisal of the evidence; application of the evidence to patient care; and integrating clinical expertise, scientific evidence, and patient's preferences to formulate a treatment plan. The PTEs were invited to participate in the anonymous survey during regularly scheduled calibration sessions held between May and July 2014. After study information was distributed, 100% of the attendees (n=43) completed the survey. The percentage of total PTEs at the school could not be calculated. Of the responding PTEs, 69% rated themselves better than satisfactory (70% proficiency) in their knowledge, skills, and attitudes regarding EBD skills application. However, only 33-42% of the respondents indicated that they frequently used the evidence pyramid and systematically, objectively, and critically appraised the evidence, even though 65% indicated they applied the evidence to improve patient care over 70% of the time. In addition, the participating PTEs identified a need for more frequent use of formal EBD skills. Providing case-based EBD projects involving PTEs as mentors may provide more opportunities for the judicious and effective use of these important skills and may improve PTEs' self-perceived confidence.

  19. External birth defects in southern Vietnam: a population-based study at the grassroots level of health care in Binh Thuan province

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There currently exists no data on birth defects from population-based studies in Vietnam. Our study's aim was to assess external birth defect (EBD) prevalence among live newborns in Binh Thuan Province in Vietnam with the help of health workers at all levels of the health system. Methods A 2-month training session for 452 health professionals (HP) practicing delivery care in 127 Commune Health Stations (CHS) and in 12 provincial or district hospitals (DH) was setup in 2006. After a successful 6-month pilot study, a one-year registry of EBDs was established in 2008. All live newborns were screened for EBDs within 24 hours after birth in all DH obstetric departments and in all CHSs. Trained local HPs collected information by filling out a predesigned form and by photographing the affected newborn. EBDs were coded using the International Classification of Diseases system-10, Clinical Modification. The study was repeated in 2010. Results Throughout 2010, out of a total of 13,954 newborns, 84 cases with one or more EBDs were reported, representing an overall prevalence rate of 60.2 per 10,000 live births. The most common groups of EBDs were limbs (27.2/10,000), orofacial clefts (20.1/10,000) and the central nervous system (7.9/10,000). Conclusions This first population-based study in Vietnam, which required coordination efforts at the local level, provides baseline prevalences of external birth defects. Data on EBDs from this study in southern Vietnam may be useful for setting up a regional population-based registry of birth defects in Vietnam. PMID:23631673

  20. Endoscopic Papillary Balloon Dilation with Large Balloon after Limited Sphincterotomy for Retrieval of Choledocholithiasis

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Seungmin; Kim, Myoung Hwan; Park, Jeong Youp; Park, Seung Woo; Song, Si Young

    2006-01-01

    Endoscopic papillary balloon dilation (EBD) for choledocholithiasis is known to be comparable to endoscopic sphincterotomy (EST) especially in cases of small stones. With larger stones, EBD with conventional balloon, which have a diameter of 6-8 mm, was reported as less effective for extraction of stones. We evaluated the efficacy and complications of EBD with large balloons (10-15 mm) after limited EST for retrieval of choledocholithiasis. From February 2005, we have performed EBD with limited EST for retrieval of common bile duct (CBD) stones. The patients who admitted with hyperamylasemia and gallstone pancreatitis were excluded. In cases without CBD dilation, EPBD with 12 mm for 40 seconds was performed. And in cases with CBD dilation, we dilated the sphincters with 15 mm sized balloon for 40 seconds. Total 22 patients (11 of male) were performed EBD with limited EST for retrieval of CBD stones. The median diameter of the stones was 10 mm (5-25 mm). Ten cases had multiple stones and 6 cases periampullary diverticuli. Successful stone removal in the initial session of ERCP with EBD was accomplished in 16 patients (72.7%). And complete retrieval of bile duct stones was achieved in all patients with repeated ERCP. In the aspect of complications, any episodes of perforation, bleeding was not developed. Only one case of mild grade of post-procedural pancreatitis was noted. However, post-procedural hyperamylasemia was developed in 16 cases (68.2%). EBD with larger balloon seems to be a feasible and safe alternative technique for conventional EST in CBD stone extraction. PMID:17191309

  1. DNA damage induced by three major metabolites of 1,3-butadiene in human hepatocyte L02 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pan-Pan; Wen, Ying; An, Jing; Yu, Ying-Xin; Wu, Ming-Hong; Zhang, Xin-Yu

    2012-09-18

    1,3-Butadiene (BD) is a carcinogenic air pollutant. Its bioactivation produces four major metabolites, i.e., 3,4-epoxy-1-butene (EB), 3,4-epoxy-1,2-butanediol (EBD), 1,2,3,4-diepoxybutane (DEB), and 3-butene-1,2-diol (BDD). Studies have been mostly focused on DEB due to its strong mutagenicity/carcinogenicity. In contrast, studies of genotoxicity of EB, EBD, and BDD have been limited. In particular, genotoxicity of EBD and BDD using strand breaks as the endpoint has not been investigated. To obtain a more complete understanding of BD toxicity, in the present study, we used comet assay to investigate DNA damage induced by EB, EBD, and BDD in human hepatocyte L02 cells, with the aim to determine their relative potencies, the types of DNA damage, and the possible pathway to form strand breaks. Using alkaline comet assay (pH>13), it was observed that EB and EBD caused similar concentration-dependent increases in DNA migration from 50 to 1000μM. However, BDD induced a statistically significant increase only at 1000μM, and the increase itself was very small. EBD was as potent as EB at lower concentrations (≤200μM), and was slightly less potent than EB at higher concentrations. The results indicated that these metabolites could generate strand breaks in cells with the rank order of the potencies being EB>≈EBD≫BDD. All three compounds failed to cause statistically significant increases in DNA migration in pre-lysed cells, suggesting that they did not produce strand breaks through chemical pathways under our experimental conditions. By using comet assays at pH 11.9 and pH 9, it was demonstrated that EB and EBD generated both single-strand breaks (SSB) and alkali-labile sites, but BDD produced only SSB. To our knowledge, this is the first report to investigate EBD- and BDD-induced strand breaks in cells. The results implied that EBD could play an important role in toxicity of BD.

  2. Comparison of device structures for the dielectric breakdown measurement of hexagonal boron nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattori, Yoshiaki; Taniguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Kenji; Nagashio, Kosuke

    2016-12-01

    Improving the film quality in the synthesis of large-area hexagonal boron nitride films (h-BN) for two-dimensional material devices remains a great challenge. The measurement of electrical breakdown dielectric strength (EBD) is one of the most important methods to elucidate the insulating quality of h-BN. In this work, the EBD of high quality exfoliated single-crystal h-BN was investigated using three different electrode structures under different environmental conditions to determine the ideal electrode structure and environment for EBD measurement. A systematic investigation revealed that EBD is not sensitive to contact force or electrode area but strongly depends on the relative humidity during measurement. Once the measurement environment is properly managed, it was found that the EBD values are consistent within experimental error regardless of the electrode structure, which enables the evaluation of the crystallinity of synthesized h-BN at the microscopic and macroscopic level by utilizing the three different electrode structures properly for different purposes.

  3. The research-design interaction: lessons learned from an evidence-based design studio.

    PubMed

    Haq, Saif; Pati, Debajyoti

    2010-01-01

    As evidence-based design (EBD) emerges as a model of design practice, considerable attention has been given to its research component. However, this overshadows another essential component of EBD-the change agent, namely the designer. EBD introduced a new skill set to the practitioner: the ability to interact with scientific evidence. Industry sources suggest adoption of the EBD approach across a large number of design firms. How comfortable are these designers in integrating research with design decision making? Optimizing the interaction between the primary change agent (the designer) and the evidence is crucial to producing the desired outcomes. Preliminary to examining this question, an architectural design studio was used as a surrogate environment to examine how designers interact with evidence. Twelve students enrolled in a healthcare EBD studio during the spring of 2009. A three-phase didactic structure was adopted: knowing a hospital, knowing the evidence, and designing with knowledge and evidence. Products of the studio and questionnaire responses from the students were used as the data for analysis. The data suggest that optimization of the research-design relationship warrants consideration in four domains: (1) a knowledge structure that is easy to comprehend; (2) phase-complemented representation of evidence; (3) access to context and precedence information; and (4) a designer-friendly vocabulary.

  4. Increasing the on-task homework behavior of youth with behavior disorders using functional behavioral assessment.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Renee O; Axelrod, Michael I

    2008-11-01

    Research has shown a positive correlation between time spent on homework and learning. However, students often engage in off-task behaviors to escape the demands of homework. Youth with emotional or behavioral disorders (EBD) are especially likely to engage in off-task behaviors. Effective interventions to increase on-task behavior during homework are needed to increase students' academic success. Functional behavioral assessment (FBA) procedures may be helpful for intervention planning; however, there has been limited research on use of FBA with youth with EBD experiencing poor academic performance or task completion problems. In the current study, FBA methods were used to identify the contingencies maintaining the off-task behavior of four youth with behavior problems. Effects of interventions based on functional hypotheses were compared to the effects of interventions not linked to such hypotheses. Discussion focuses on utility of FBA procedures for developing and implementing effective interventions for youth with EBD.

  5. Professionalizing midwifery: exploring medically imagined labor rooms in rural Rajasthan.

    PubMed

    Price, Sara

    2014-12-01

    In India, globalized flows of biomedical discourse like evidence-based delivery practices (EBDs) and new technologies are reshaping the field of reproductive health care. As iterations of evidence-based medicine shift, non-governmental organizations (NGOs) increasingly act as distributive agents for biomedical projects that equate modernized health care spaces and provider-care techniques with a marked improvement in the safety of birth outcomes. In this article, I examine how particular local iterations of EBDs are distributed to skilled birth attendants (SBAs) who have become sites for globalized projects aimed at reshaping their professional designation. I draw on data collected through in-depth ethnographic interviews with SBAs practicing in health centers around southern Rajasthan to explore the dynamics and tensions surrounding the professionalization of midwives and the increasing promotion of EBDs in institutional labor rooms.

  6. Mechanism and influencing factors on critical pulse width of oil-immersed polymer insulators under short pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Liang; Su, Jian Cang; Li, Rui; Zeng, Bo; Cheng, Jie; Zheng, Lei; Yu, Bin Xiong; Wu, Xiao Long; Zhang, Xi Bo; Pan, Ya Feng

    2015-04-01

    The critical pulse width (τc) is a pulse width at which the surface flashover threshold (Ef) is equal to the bulk breakdown threshold (EBD) for liquid-polymer composite insulation systems, which is discovered by Zhao et al. [Annual Report Conference on Electrical Insulation and Dielectric Phenomena (IEEE Dielectrics and Electrical Insulation Society, Shenzhen, China, 2013), Vol. 2, pp. 854-857]. In this paper, the mechanism of τc is interpreted in perspective of the threshold and the time delay (td) of surface flashover and bulk breakdown, respectively. It is found that two changes appear as the pulse width decreases which are responsible for the existence of τc: (1) EBD is lower than Ef; (2) td of bulk breakdown is shorter than td of surface flashover. In addition, factors which have influences on τc are investigated, such as the dielectric type, the insulation length, the dielectric thickness, the dielectrics configuration, the pulse number, and the liquid purity. These influences of factors are generalized as three types if τc is expected to increase: (1) factors causing EBD to decrease, such as increasing the pulse number or employing a dielectric of lower EBD; (2) factors causing Ef to increase, such as complicating the insulator's configuration or increasing the liquid purity; (3) factors causing EBD and Ef to increase together, but Ef increases faster than EBD, such as decreasing the dielectric thickness or the insulation length. With the data in references, all the three cases are verified experimentally. In the end, a general method based on τc for solid insulation design is presented and the significance of τc on solid insulation design and on solid demolition are discussed.

  7. Sparkling extreme-ultraviolet bright dots observed with Hi-C

    SciTech Connect

    Régnier, S.; Alexander, C. E.; Walsh, R. W.; Winebarger, A. R.; Cirtain, J.; Golub, L.; Korreck, K. E.; Weber, M.; Mitchell, N.; Platt, S.; De Pontieu, B.; Title, A.; Kobayashi, K.; Kuzin, S.; DeForest, C. E.

    2014-04-01

    Observing the Sun at high time and spatial scales is a step toward understanding the finest and fundamental scales of heating events in the solar corona. The high-resolution coronal (Hi-C) instrument has provided the highest spatial and temporal resolution images of the solar corona in the EUV wavelength range to date. Hi-C observed an active region on 2012 July 11 that exhibits several interesting features in the EUV line at 193 Å. One of them is the existence of short, small brightenings 'sparkling' at the edge of the active region; we call these EUV bright dots (EBDs). Individual EBDs have a characteristic duration of 25 s with a characteristic length of 680 km. These brightenings are not fully resolved by the SDO/AIA instrument at the same wavelength; however, they can be identified with respect to the Hi-C location of the EBDs. In addition, EBDs are seen in other chromospheric/coronal channels of SDO/AIA, which suggests a temperature between 0.5 and 1.5 MK. Based on their frequency in the Hi-C time series, we define four different categories of EBDs: single peak, double peak, long duration, and bursty. Based on a potential field extrapolation from an SDO/HMI magnetogram, the EBDs appear at the footpoints of large-scale, trans-equatorial coronal loops. The Hi-C observations provide the first evidence of small-scale EUV heating events at the base of these coronal loops, which have a free magnetic energy of the order of 10{sup 26} erg.

  8. Fabrication of electron beam deposited tip for atomic-scale atomic force microscopy in liquid.

    PubMed

    Miyazawa, K; Izumi, H; Watanabe-Nakayama, T; Asakawa, H; Fukuma, T

    2015-03-13

    Recently, possibilities of improving operation speed and force sensitivity in atomic-scale atomic force microscopy (AFM) in liquid using a small cantilever with an electron beam deposited (EBD) tip have been intensively explored. However, the structure and properties of an EBD tip suitable for such an application have not been well-understood and hence its fabrication process has not been established. In this study, we perform atomic-scale AFM measurements with a small cantilever and clarify two major problems: contaminations from a cantilever and tip surface, and insufficient mechanical strength of an EBD tip having a high aspect ratio. To solve these problems, here we propose a fabrication process of an EBD tip, where we attach a 2 μm silica bead at the cantilever end and fabricate a 500-700 nm EBD tip on the bead. The bead height ensures sufficient cantilever-sample distance and enables to suppress long-range interaction between them even with a short EBD tip having high mechanical strength. After the tip fabrication, we coat the whole cantilever and tip surface with Si (30 nm) to prevent the generation of contamination. We perform atomic-scale AFM imaging and hydration force measurements at a mica-water interface using the fabricated tip and demonstrate its applicability to such an atomic-scale application. With a repeated use of the proposed process, we can reuse a small cantilever for atomic-scale measurements for several times. Therefore, the proposed method solves the two major problems and enables the practical use of a small cantilever in atomic-scale studies on various solid-liquid interfacial phenomena.

  9. Laparoscopic Heller's cardiomyotomy achieved lesser recurrent dysphagia with better quality of life when compared with endoscopic balloon dilatation for treatment of achalasia.

    PubMed

    Chan, S M; Chiu, P W Y; Wu, J C Y; Kwan, S M; Kwong, P Y; Lam, K W; Lo, K K; Tee, M K M; Wong, C P; Teoh, A Y B; Wong, S K H; Ng, E K W

    2013-04-01

    Achalasia is a rare primary motility disorder of esophagus; treatments include endoscopic balloon dilatation (EBD) and laparoscopic Heller's cardiomyotomy (LC). This study compared EBD versus LC for treatment of achalasia with focus on quality of life (QoL) and prevalence of post-treatment gastroesophageal reflux disease. This was a retrospective cohort study of all patients diagnosed with achalasia older than 16 treated with either EBD or LC from January 1998 to April 2008. Patients' demographic data, comorbidities, postintervention GERD symptoms, QoL, recurrence of dysphagia, reintervention rate, hospital stay, and time to resumption of diet were collected. Sixty-eight patients were recruited into the study (EBD n= 50; LC n= 18). A significant improvement in QoL was found in patients undergoing LC (0.917 vs. 0.807, P= 0.006). A higher proportion of patients treated with EBD developed post-treatment gastroesophageal reflux symptoms (60.5% vs. 43.8%) when compared with LC, although statistically insignificant (P= 0.34). Patients treated with balloon dilatation had a greater percentage of recurrence of dysphagia (55.1% vs. 26.7%; P= 0.235) and need of reintervention (42.1% vs. 9.1%; P= 0.045). However, these patients had a shorter median hospital stay (1d [range 0-4]) and earlier resumption of diet (0d [range 0-3]). Although EBD is associated with a quicker perioperative recovery, LC accomplished a better QoL, lower incidence of recurrence of dysphagia, and need of reintervention after treatment for achalasia.

  10. A novel method for blood volume estimation using trivalent chromium in rabbit models

    PubMed Central

    Baby, Prathap Moothamadathil; Kumar, Pramod; Kumar, Rajesh; Jacob, Sanu S.; Rawat, Dinesh; Binu, V. S.; Karun, Kalesh M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Blood volume measurement though important in management of critically ill-patients is not routinely estimated in clinical practice owing to labour intensive, intricate and time consuming nature of existing methods. Aims: The aim was to compare blood volume estimations using trivalent chromium [51Cr(III)] and standard Evans blue dye (EBD) method in New Zealand white rabbit models and establish correction-factor (CF). Materials and Methods: Blood volume estimation in 33 rabbits was carried out using EBD method and concentration determined using spectrophotometric assay followed by blood volume estimation using direct injection of 51Cr(III). Twenty out of 33 rabbits were used to find CF by dividing blood volume estimation using EBD with blood volume estimation using 51Cr(III). CF is validated in 13 rabbits by multiplying it with blood volume estimation values obtained using 51Cr(III). Results: The mean circulating blood volume of 33 rabbits using EBD was 142.02 ± 22.77 ml or 65.76 ± 9.31 ml/kg and using 51Cr(III) was estimated to be 195.66 ± 47.30 ml or 89.81 ± 17.88 ml/kg. The CF was found to be 0.77. The mean blood volume of 13 rabbits measured using EBD was 139.54 ± 27.19 ml or 66.33 ± 8.26 ml/kg and using 51Cr(III) with CF was 152.73 ± 46.25 ml or 71.87 ± 13.81 ml/kg (P = 0.11). Conclusions: The estimation of blood volume using 51Cr(III) was comparable to standard EBD method using CF. With further research in this direction, we envisage human blood volume estimation using 51Cr(III) to find its application in acute clinical settings. PMID:25190922

  11. Fabrication of electron beam deposited tip for atomic-scale atomic force microscopy in liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazawa, K.; Izumi, H.; Watanabe-Nakayama, T.; Asakawa, H.; Fukuma, T.

    2015-03-01

    Recently, possibilities of improving operation speed and force sensitivity in atomic-scale atomic force microscopy (AFM) in liquid using a small cantilever with an electron beam deposited (EBD) tip have been intensively explored. However, the structure and properties of an EBD tip suitable for such an application have not been well-understood and hence its fabrication process has not been established. In this study, we perform atomic-scale AFM measurements with a small cantilever and clarify two major problems: contaminations from a cantilever and tip surface, and insufficient mechanical strength of an EBD tip having a high aspect ratio. To solve these problems, here we propose a fabrication process of an EBD tip, where we attach a 2 μm silica bead at the cantilever end and fabricate a 500-700 nm EBD tip on the bead. The bead height ensures sufficient cantilever-sample distance and enables to suppress long-range interaction between them even with a short EBD tip having high mechanical strength. After the tip fabrication, we coat the whole cantilever and tip surface with Si (30 nm) to prevent the generation of contamination. We perform atomic-scale AFM imaging and hydration force measurements at a mica-water interface using the fabricated tip and demonstrate its applicability to such an atomic-scale application. With a repeated use of the proposed process, we can reuse a small cantilever for atomic-scale measurements for several times. Therefore, the proposed method solves the two major problems and enables the practical use of a small cantilever in atomic-scale studies on various solid-liquid interfacial phenomena.

  12. The role of stents in the treatment of Crohn’s disease strictures

    PubMed Central

    Loras Alastruey, Carme; Andújar Murcia, Xavier; Esteve Comas, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims: Stenosis is one of the most frequent local complications in Crohn’s disease (CD). Surgery is not the ideal treatment because of the high rate of postoperative recurrence. Endoscopic balloon dilation (EBD) currently is the current treatment of choice for short strictures amenable to the procedure. However, it is not applicable or effective in all the cases, and it is not without related complications. Our goal was to summarize the published information regarding the use and the role of the stents in the treatment of CD stricture. A Medline search was performed on the terms “stricture,” “stenosis,” “stent” and “Crohn’s disease.” Results: a total of 19 publications met our search criteria for an overall number of 65 patients. Placing a self-expanding metal stent (SEMS) may be a safe and effective alternative to EBD and/or surgical intervention in the treatment of short stenosis in patients with CD. Indications are the same as those for EBD. In addition, SEMS may be useful in stenosis refractory to EBD and may be suitable in the treatment of longer or more complex strictures that cannot be treated by EBD. With the current information, it seems that the best treatment option is the placement of a fully covered stent for a mean time of 4 weeks. Regarding the use of biodegradable stents, the information is limited and showing poor results. Conclusions: the use of stents in the treatment of strictures in CD should be taken into account either as a first endoscopic therapy or in case of EBD failure. PMID:27014743

  13. Effects of an Interdependent Group Contingency on the Transition Behavior of Middle School Students With Emotional and Behavioral Disorders.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Renee O; Haydon, Todd; McCoy, Dacia; Howard, Andrea

    2017-04-06

    An ABAB design was used to evaluate the effectiveness of an interdependent group contingency with randomized components to improve the transition behavior of middle school students identified with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBDs) served in an alternative educational setting. The intervention was implemented by one teacher with three classes of students, and the dependent variable was the percentage of students ready to begin class at the appropriate time. Data revealed significant improvements in student behavior, providing support for implementation of group contingencies for students with EBDs in alternative educational settings and an example of feasible procedures and data collection methods. (PsycINFO Database Record

  14. Extension of thickness-dependent dielectric breakdown law on adiabatically compressed ferroelectric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shkuratov, Sergey I.; Baird, Jason; Talantsev, Evgueni F.

    2013-02-01

    It is experimentally found that the Eb(d) = γ . d-ξ law describing the thickness-dependent breakdown electric field for solid dielectrics at ambient conditions can be extended for dielectrics in other thermodynamic states. It follows from the experimental results reported herein that the breakdown field, Eb(d), of Pb(Zr0.95Ti0.05)O3 (PZT 95/5) and Pb(Zr0.52Ti0.48)O3 (PZT 52/48) ferroelectrics subjected to explosive adiabatic compression obeys the above-mentioned law in a wide range of voltages, up to 150 kV.

  15. An evidence-based journal club for dental residents in a GPR program.

    PubMed

    Grant, William D

    2005-06-01

    The journal club offers a significant opportunity to serve as both an educational experience but also as a real-world example of the application of the principles and practices of evidence-based dentistry (EBD). Designed around the American Dental Association's recommended four steps in the implementation of the EBD process, the journal clubs are held once per month for GPR residents. The structured process allows residents to formulate answerable clinical questions, track down with maximum efficiency the best evidence with which to answer the questions, critically appraise the evidence for its validity and usefulness, and apply the results of this appraisal in clinical practice as appropriate.

  16. Effects of Oral Reading Fluency on Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders' Latency to Continue Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vostal, Brooks R.; Lee, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Adolescents with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders (EBD) present deficits in literacy skills, in part because their disruptive behaviors interfere with task engagement. Antecedent manipulations, such as those based on behavioral momentum theory, can increase students' contact with reinforcement, leading to greater task engagement. This study…

  17. Behavioral Momentum during a Continuous Reading Task: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vostal, Brooks R.; Lee, David L.

    2011-01-01

    Adolescents with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) often fail to master literacy skills, in part because disruptive behaviors interfere with task engagement and persistence. The theory of behavioral momentum explains the persistence of behavior in the face of changing environmental conditions. The current exploratory study examined…

  18. Differentiating Instruction in Co-Taught Classrooms for Students with Emotional/Behaviour Difficulties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conderman, Greg; Hedin, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Students with emotional and behavioural difficulties (EBD) are increasingly receiving more of their instruction in the general education classroom where they have access to a rigorous curriculum and a highly qualified teacher. In some cases, a co-taught classroom (one in which a general educator and a special service provider equally co-plan,…

  19. Prove Them Wrong: Be There for Secondary Students with an Emotional or Behavioral Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solar, Ernest

    2011-01-01

    Students with an emotional or behavioral disability (EBD) are sometimes judged and feared based on their label before teachers even meet them. These students are different than other students that walk into a classroom, but they should never be feared. They have had more "loops" in their roller coaster ride of adolescent life than the average…

  20. The Effects of Function-Based Self-Management Interventions on Student Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Blake D.; Wills, Howard P.; Kamps, Debra M.; Greenwood, Charles R.

    2014-01-01

    Children with emotional and behavioral disorders (E/BD) struggle to achieve social and academic outcomes. Many studies have demonstrated self-management interventions to be effective at reducing problem behavior and increasing positive social and academic behaviors. Functional behavior assessment (FBA) information may be used in designing…

  1. Peer Relations and Emotion Regulation of Children with Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties with and without a Developmental Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynn, Sasha; Carroll, Annemaree; Houghton, Stephen; Cobham, Vanessa

    2013-01-01

    Children with emotional and behavioural difficulties (EBD) and those who also have developmental disorders, such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) or autism spectrum disorder (ASD), can experience the same adverse consequences in their peer interactions and relationships. This present study compared the emotion regulation and peer…

  2. Teaching Academic Skills as an Answer to Behavioural Problems of Students with Emotional or Behavioural Disorders: A Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Worp-van der Kamp, Lidy; Pijl, Sip Jan; Bijstra, Jan O.; van den Bosch, Els J.

    2014-01-01

    Academic learning has always been a serious issue for students with emotional and behavioural disorders (EBD) and their teachers. However, teaching academic skills could be an important protective and curative factor for the problem behaviour of these students. The current review was conducted to study the effect of interventions developed to…

  3. Burnout Experience of Teachers Serving Students with Emotional Behavioral Disorders in Grades PreK-8 within Non-Public Special Education Day Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Kendra A.

    2011-01-01

    This exploratory study examined the relationships between five predictor variables identified by the literature (age, years of special education teaching experience, level of emotional behavioral disorders (EBD) preparation, principal support, and principal feedback) and two higher order terms (age and years of special education teaching…

  4. Curriculum and Assessment Policies and Practices in a Day Treatment Center in North Carolina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrell, Kimberly Ann

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative single case study was to describe current instructional policies and practices in a one-day treatment center in North Carolina for students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD). The following research questions guided the study: (1) What are the curriculum policies, practices, and philosophies of day…

  5. Endoscopic biliary drainage for patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer with obstructive jaundice who are to undergo gemcitabine chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Takasawa, Osamu; Fujita, Naotaka; Kobayashi, Go; Noda, Yutaka; Ito, Kei; Horaguchi, Jun

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To assess optimum endoscopic biliary drainage (EBD) in cases with unresectable pancreatic cancer in the era of gemcitabine (GEM). METHODS: Thirty patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer, who presented with jaundice and underwent chemotherapy using GEM after EBD were included in this study (GEM group). Fifteen cases with the same clinical manifestation and stage of pancreatic cancer treated with EBD alone were also included as controls. A covered metallic stent (CMS) or a plastic stent (PS) was used for EBD. The mean survival time (MST) in each group, risk factors of survival time, type of stent used and associated survival time, occlusion rate of stent, patency period of stent, and risk factors of stent occlusion were evaluated. RESULTS: MST in the GEM group was longer than that in the control (9.9 mo vs 6.2 mo). In the GEM group, the survival time was not different between those who underwent metallic stenting and those who underwent plastic stenting. Stent occlusion occurred in 60% of the PS group and 7% of the CMS group. The median stent patency in the PS-GEM group and the CMS-GEM group was 5 mo and 7.5 mo, respectively. Use of a PS was the only risk factor of stent occlusion. CONCLUSION: A CMS is recommended in cases presenting with jaundice due to unresectable pancreatic cancer, since the use of a CMS makes it possible to continue chemotherapy using GEM without repetition of stent replacement. PMID:17143944

  6. Role Models, Approaches to Studying, and Self-Efficacy in Forensic and Mainstream High School Students: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skidmore, Michael; Dede, Yemi U.; Moneta, Giovanni B.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the relationships between role models, approaches to studying, and self-efficacy in students attending a high school specialising in educating those with emotional and behavioural difficulties (EBD, n = 30) and students attending a mainstream high school (n = 41) in the UK. Types and quantity of role models held by students…

  7. Special Education Teacher Preparation in Classroom Management: Implications for Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Regina M.; Reschly, Daniel J.

    2010-01-01

    Special education teachers' skills with classroom organization and behavior management affect the emergence and persistence of behavior problems as well as the success of inclusive practice for students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD). Adequate special education teacher preparation and strong classroom organization and behavior…

  8. Outcomes of Functional Assessment-Based Interventions for Students with and at Risk for Emotional and Behavioral Disorders in a Job-Share Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane, Kathleen Lynne; Eisner, Shanna L.; Kretzer, James; Bruhn, Allison L.; Crnobori, Mary; Funke, Laura; Lerner, Tara; Casey, Amy

    2009-01-01

    In this article, we describe a systematic approach to designing, implementing, and evaluating functional assessment-based interventions developed by Umbreit, Ferro, Liaupsin, and Lane (2007), implemented in a job-share classroom with two first-grade students. One student was at risk for emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) according to…

  9. Effects of a Summer Learning Program for Students at Risk for Emotional and Behavioral Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeng, Songtian; Benner, Gregory J.; Silva, Rayann M.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this evaluation was to examine the effectiveness and feasibility of a summer learning program for students at risk for emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD). We used a quasi-experimental design with pre and post assessments for both the treatment and comparison groups. Participants were fourth grade students (N = 92) below…

  10. Validation of the Ford Score as a Measure for Predicting the Level of Emotional and Behavioural Problems in Mainstream Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Anna; Ford, Tamsin

    2008-01-01

    Emotional and behavioural difficulties (EBD) are common in children, and forecasting their prevalence in schools is of interest to both academic researchers and local authorities. Percentage of pupils eligible for free school meals is one measure often used for this purpose. The article presents the first independent validation of a simple…

  11. A Response to Kauffman's The Devaluation of Special Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mostert, Mark P.

    2004-01-01

    Kauffman indicts the President's Commission on Excellence in Special Education (PCESE) for sometimes implying the opposite of its stated aim of helping children in special education, including students with EBD, as he believes does the No Child Left Behind act (NCLB, 2002). This response addresses (a) two pivotal, but implied aspects the PCESE and…

  12. Three Children with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders Tell Why People Do Right

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardman, Elizabeth L.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a small preliminary investigation of the moral judgment of three children with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) using case study research methodology to describe their moral orientations and explore how their reasoning patterns might affect the development of a cooperative moral orientation. Data were…

  13. Functional Behavioral Assessment and Intervention with Emotional/Behaviorally Disordered Students: In Pursuit of State of the Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waguespack, Angela; Vaccaro, Terrence; Continere, Lauren

    2006-01-01

    The application of functional behavioral assessment (FBA) procedures for the purposes of developing interventions for students with emotional and behavioral disorders (E/BD) has received considerable attention since the 1997 reauthorization of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). The purpose of this paper is to review the…

  14. Placement of Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Students in Programs for Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders: Contemporary Trends and Research Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Artiles, Alfredo J.; Bal, Aydin; Trent, Stanley C.; Thorius, Kathleen King

    2012-01-01

    Little research has been conducted regarding the disproportionate representation of minority learners in programs for students with Emotional/Behavioral Disorders (E/BD). To date, the majority of the disproportionality literature examines multiple eligibility categories, most frequently the high incidence disabilities of Mild Intellectual…

  15. Placement of Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathur, Sarup R.; Jolivette, Kristine

    2012-01-01

    Students with emotional and behavioral disorders (E/BD) receive educational and related services within a continuum of placement options per the Individual with Disabilities Education Act. The continuum of placement options ranges from fully included general education type classrooms to more restrictive environments such as alternative education…

  16. Perspectives of Pre-Service Teachers on Students with Emotional Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beam, Andrea P.; Yocum, Russell G.; Pinkie, Elyse C.

    2016-01-01

    Perceptions of working with students of emotional disabilities or who are considered Emotionally/Behaviorally Disturbed (E/BD) is varied across the spectrum. However, one constant that does hold true is that all pre-service teachers have some hesitation in working with such students, especially if they lack any previous exposure to students with…

  17. Promising Practices for Effective Transition for Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katsiyannis, Antonis; Zhang, Dalun; Mackiewicz, Sara Moore

    2012-01-01

    Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders (E/BD) have been consistently experiencing dismal outcomes. The purpose of this chapter is to provide a brief overview of outcomes for this population, examine school-based instructional and behavioral strategies, and discuss transition related practices intended to improve present and future…

  18. Using Comparison Peers as an Objective Measure of Social Validity: Recommendations for Researchers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ennis, Robin Parks; Jolivette, Kristine; Fredrick, Laura D.; Alberto, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    In this article, students with challenging behaviors (SWCB) in a classroom may include those with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), autism spectrum disorder (ASD), emotional and behavioral disorders (E/BD), intellectual disabilities, learning disabilities, and those at risk of these disabilities. These students may present…

  19. Canadian School Programs for Students with Emotional/Behavioral Disorders: An Updated Look

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dworet, Don; Maich, Kimberly

    2007-01-01

    Canada is a country composed of 10 provinces and three territories with very limited federal control over the public K-12 education system. This lack of consistent direction has led to a range of diverse educational policies for educating students with emotional/behavioral disorders (E/BD). This article investigates the current state of policies…

  20. Perceived Social Support and Domain-Specific Adjustment of Children with Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popliger, Mina; Toste, Jessica R.; Heath, Nancy L.

    2009-01-01

    The perceived availability of social support has been documented as a protective mechanism among adults and adolescents. However, little research has explored the role of social support among children with emotional and behavioural difficulties (E/BD). The current study sought to investigate the effects of perceived social support from family,…

  1. Disability as Metaphor: Examining the Conceptual Framing of Emotional Behavioral Disorder in American Public Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danforth, Scot

    2007-01-01

    A growing, interdisciplinary field of cognitive linguistics has developed in recent decades, bringing together research from many fields to explore the ways that metaphors provide structure and semantic content to thought and language. In this article, the American public school disability emotional/behavioral disorder (E/BD) is examined in regard…

  2. The Effects of Praise Notes on the Disruptive Behaviors of Elementary Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders in a Residential Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Christina

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the effects of two secondary tier positive behavioral support strategies, teacher praise notes (TPNs) and peer praise notes (PPNs), were investigated using an alternating treatments single-subject design in residential classroom settings with eight elementary students with emotional and behavioral disorders (E/BD) in grades one…

  3. Problems Related to Underservice: A Rejoinder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kauffman, James M.; Simpson, Richard L.; Mock, Devery R.

    2009-01-01

    Objective data provide overwhelming evidence that children and youth with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) are underidentified and underserved. This was the central argument in our November 2007 Forum article to which Harry, Hart, Klingner, Cramer, and Sturges responded. In this rejoinder, we continue to assert the dramatic need to offer…

  4. Leading Inclusive Programs for All Special Education Students: A Pre-Service Training Program for Principals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Lisa; White, George P.

    This paper describes a model program for training pre-service elementary and secondary school principals in educationally sound and legally defensible inclusion programs extending to students with emotional and behavioral disorders (E/BD). The program has three major objectives: (1) to train pre-service school administrators (principals and…

  5. Changing Attitudes: Supporting Teachers in Effectively Including Students with Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties in Mainstream Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scanlon, Geraldine; Barnes-Holmes, Yvonne

    2013-01-01

    Pupils with emotional and behavioural difficulties (EBD) are often considered the most challenging group to manage within mainstream education. The challenges perceived by teachers may be due, in part, to negative attitudes towards this cohort of pupils, which may exacerbate feelings of inadequacy and impact negatively upon direct interactions…

  6. The Characteristics and Experiences of Canadian Students Receiving Special Education Services for Emotional/Behavioural Difficulties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitley, Jessica; Lupart, Judy L.; Beran, Tanya

    2009-01-01

    This paper provides a description of the demographic characteristics as well as the social and academic experiences of a nationally representative sample of Canadian students receiving special education services for an Emotional/Behavioural Difficulty (EBD) and a comparison group of students without disabilities (ND). Data summarized in this…

  7. Measuring Technology and Engineering Literacy in the Engineering by Design™ Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huffman, Tanner; Burke, Barry

    2015-01-01

    Engineering byDesign™ (EbD) provides teachers and students with reflective, formative, and comprehensive summative assessment tools throughout the curriculum. Each lesson, unit, and course is created with a list of essential questions that are meant to guide students to a deeper understanding of national standards across the STEM domains (STL,…

  8. The Social, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties of Primary School Children with Poor Attendance Records

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, H. C. M.

    2013-01-01

    Two complementary studies of poor and better attenders are presented. To measure emotional and behavioural difficulties (EBD) different teacher-completed rating scales were employed, and to determine social difficulties, the studies used sociometry and some items from the scales. One study had a longitudinal design. It revealed that, after…

  9. Function-Based Planning for Young Children at Risk for Emotional and Behavioral Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nahgahgwon, Kari N.; Umbreit, John; Liaupsin, Carl J.; Turton, Amina M.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the efficacy of function-based intervention for young children at-risk for emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) in inclusive environments. Participants were two kindergarten students and one first-grade student, all of whom exhibited chronic disruptive behavior in the classroom despite previous interventions implemented…

  10. Social Skills Training in Natural Play Settings: Educating through the Physical Theory to Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aljadeff-Abergel, Elian; Ayvazo, Shiri; Eldar, Eitan

    2012-01-01

    Social skills are prerequisite to academic performance and success in school. Training of these skills is particularly important for students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) who have social deficits and struggle maintaining appropriate and accepted behavior in and outside of the classroom. Educating through the "physical" model is a…

  11. Consider the Opportunities: A Response to No Child Left Behind

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neel, Richard S.

    2006-01-01

    No Child Left Behind offers many challenges to those who work with children with EBD [emotional and behavioral disorders]. It also offers opportunities never before available for collaboration and cooperation between general and special educators. Two snapshots of opportunities are provided. The first summarizes some of the challenges our field…

  12. Comparison of Repeated and Non-Repeated Readings on the Reading Performances of Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Escarpio, Raul; Barbetta, Patricia M.

    2016-01-01

    This study used an alternating treatments design to compare the effects of three conditions on the reading fluency, errors, and comprehension of four, sixth-grade students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) who were struggling readers. The conditions were (a) repeated readings in which participants read three times a passage of 100 or…

  13. Cross-Setting Correspondence in Sociometric Nominations among Children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mikami, Amori Yee; Hoza, Betsy; Hinshaw, Stephen P.; Arnold, L. Eugene; Hechtman, Lily; Pelham, William E., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    Peer problems are common among children with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD). However, the extent to which children's peer functioning varies across settings is unknown, as is the incremental power of peer functioning in different settings in predicting subsequent psychopathology. Participants were 57 children with…

  14. Medicine in the Classroom: A Review of Psychiatric Medications for Students with Emotional or Behavioral Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoenfeld, Naomi A.; Konopasek, Dean

    2007-01-01

    There are many ways to help children with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) succeed in school. Behavior intervention plans provide support to help students adjust their actions to fit school norms. Inclusive philosophy and practices continue to break the cycle of restricted and segregated placements, whereas schoolwide intervention models…

  15. Effects of Sound-Field Amplification to Increase Compliance of Students with Emotional and Behavior Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maag, John W.; Anderson, Jean M.

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated the efficacy of sound-field amplification (SFA) for improving the speed with which students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) follow teacher directions. We used a multiple baseline design across six students in general education classrooms. Latency data were collected under nonamplified and amplified conditions…

  16. Social Validation of Services for Youth with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders: A Comparative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaudoin, Kathleen M.; Knuth, Richard; Benner, Gregory J.

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the perceptions of 302 building administrators regarding their building level programs serving students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD). Comparisons were made between administrators of schools that housed self-contained programs and administrators from schools without self-contained programs on factors…

  17. A Brief Social Skills Intervention to Reduce Challenging Classroom Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDaniel, Sara C.; Bruhn, Allison L.; Troughton, Leonard

    2017-01-01

    Social skills instruction has been recommended as a way of improving behavioral and social outcomes for students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD). A brief social skills intervention ("Stop and Think" (Knoff in "The stop & think social skills program," Sopris West, Longmont, CO, 2001) was used to extend the…

  18. The Perceptions of Urban School Principals Regarding the Education of Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anoh, Jean-Dominique Herve

    2013-01-01

    This research investigated the perceptions and attitudes of principals and headmasters about the inclusion of students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD), the factors supporting or inhibiting school leaders in their effort to implement inclusive practices, and the approaches they use to initiate, facilitate, support and sustain the…

  19. Review of Video Modeling with Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Sonia D.; Lang, Russell; O'Reilly, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) often engage in behavior that is disruptive in the classroom, impedes educational progress, and inhibits peer relationships. Video modeling has been demonstrated to be an effective intervention for other challenging populations (e.g., autism) and has been identified as a feasible intervention…

  20. Bridging the Research-to-Practice Gap: Empowering Staff to Implement Meaningful Program Evaluation and Improvement to Better Serve Students with Emotional or Behavioral Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Bridget; Clancy, Michaela; Tsai, Shu-Fei; Cheney, Doug

    2013-01-01

    In the past few years researchers have published lists of evidence-based practices that research indicates "should" be in place in programs and supports for students with emotional or behavioral disorders (EBD) (e.g., Farley, Torres, Wailehua, & Cook, 2012; Ryan, Pierce, & Mooney, 2008; Simpson, Peterson, & Smith, 2011). Some…

  1. Considerations for Establishing a Multi-Tiered Problem-Solving Model for Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders and Comorbid Emotional-Behavioral Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magyar, Caroline I.; Pandolfi, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    Students with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) present unique programming challenges to school personnel because of the wide variability of clinical symptoms and the high rates of emotional and/or behavior disorders (EBD) that can affect learning outcomes. Currently, there is little empirically based guidance to assist in determining the support…

  2. The Effects of Instruction in Peer-Revision on the Persuasive Writing of Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Sara J.

    2012-01-01

    A growing body of research supports the use of self-regulated strategy development (SRSD) to improve the writing skills of students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD). This single subject multiple baseline, multiple probe design study extends this research base by investigating the effects of peer-revision instruction on the persuasive…

  3. Working Conditions as Risk or Resiliency Factors for Teachers of Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albrecht, Susan Fread; Johns, Beverley H.; Mounsteven, Joyce; Olorunda, Olufunmilola

    2009-01-01

    This pilot study examined working conditions reported by special education teachers of students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) to identify factors common to teachers likely to leave their positions within the next 2 years and factors common to those likely to stay. Survey responses from an international sample of 776 teachers and…

  4. Mental Health Intervention Teams: A Collaborative Model to Promote Positive Behavioral Support for Youth with Emotional or Behavioral Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambros, Katina M.; Culver, Shirley K.; Angulo, Aidee; Hosmer, Pamela

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes an innovative intervention model for promoting mental health and positive social adjustment for youth with emotional or behavioral disorders (EBD) in San Diego. More specifically, it highlights a unique partnership between several program divisions within the San Diego Unified School District (SDUSD), namely, the Mental Health…

  5. Who Is Writing? Author Affiliation across Peer-Reviewed Journals of Emotional or Behavioral Disorders, 2000-2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoenfeld, Naomi A.; Janney, Donna M.; Rekart, Jerome L.

    2013-01-01

    The importance of practitioner participation in identifying and maintaining use of best educational practice is well established; however, little is known about the ways in which practitioners contribute to the development and dissemination of those practices within the field of emotional or behavioral disorders (EBD). This review examines…

  6. Engaging Students with Behavior Disorders in Mathematics Practice Using the High-"p" Strategy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vostal, Brooks R.

    2011-01-01

    Students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) demonstrate significant academic deficits across content areas (Coutinho, 1986; Lane, Barton-Arwood, Nelson, & Wehby, 2008; Nelson, Benner, Lane, & Smith, 2004; Reid, Gonzalez, Nordness, Trout, & Epstein, 2004; Ruhl & Berlinghoff, 1992). Mathematics, however, appears to be especially…

  7. Reading Instruction in Secondary Day Treatment and Residential Schools for Youth with Emotional or Behavioral Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkerson, Kimber L.; Gagnon, Joseph Calvin; Melekoglu, Macid Ayhan; Cakiroglu, Orhan

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to obtain the first national picture of the characteristics of special educators who provide reading or English instruction in secondary day treatment and residential schools for youth with emotional or behavioral disorders (EBD) as well as their approach to reading instruction. Also, information was collected concerning…

  8. From FBA to Implementation: A Look at What Is Actually Being Delivered

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blood, Erika; Neel, Richard S.

    2007-01-01

    This study looks at the utilization of assessments on developing behavior intervention plans (BIPs) and their use in designing actual implementation for the children (elementary through high school) labeled EBD in a mid-sized district in eastern Washington. Files were reviewed to determine the types of assessments used, FBA components addressed,…

  9. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Child Behavior Checklist 1.5-5 in a Sample of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pandolfi, Vincent; Magyar, Caroline I.; Dill, Charles A.

    2009-01-01

    Validity studies of measures for emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) for use with preschool children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are lacking. The Child Behavior Checklist 1.5-5 (CBCL; Achenbach and Rescorla, Manual for the ASEBA Preschool Forms & Profiles. VT: University of Vermont, Research Center for Children, Youth, and…

  10. Improving the Consistency of Interventions in a Public Middle School Therapeutic Program for Students with Severe Emotional/Behavioral Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pelton, Robert P.

    This study was designed to improve teachers' abilities to respond effectively to 8 students with emotional and behavior disorders (EBD) in a self-contained class in a public middle school through the implementation of individualized treatment plans (ITPs), a form of individualized behavior plans. ITPs are intended to stimulate staff to think…

  11. Working Together: Lessons Learned from School, Family, and Community Collaborations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Robert; Linker, Julie A.; Stutts, Liza

    2006-01-01

    Recent advances in treatment modalities and the manner in which services are organized have made it possible to serve children with severe emotional or behavioral disorders (EBD) in a more responsive and less restrictive manner. Current approaches rely on collaboration among child-serving agencies as well as between parents and service providers.…

  12. Increasing Secondary Teachers' Behavior-Specific Praise Using a Video Self-Modeling and Visual Performance Feedback Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, Shannon M.; Heflin, L. Juane

    2011-01-01

    Teachers working with students with emotional/behavioral disorders (EBD) in elementary schools can be helped to increase use of an important behavioral strategy, behavior-specific praise statements (BSPS). Unfortunately, teachers' behaviors return to baseline levels when researchers leave, and little is known about the use of praise on high school…

  13. Scaffolding Dynamics and the Emergence of Problematic Learning Trajectories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steenbeek, Henderien; Jansen, Louise; van Geert, Paul

    2012-01-01

    This study aims at examining problematic learning trajectories of students with emotional behavioral disorders (EBD) by means of a longitudinal and time serial (micro genetic) study of individual instruction sessions during arithmetic lessons. Micro genetic analysis techniques were applied on the variable "responsiveness" in the scaffolding…

  14. The Prevention of Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties in Schools: Teachers' Suggestions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poulou, Maria

    2005-01-01

    Teachers are highly concerned about students with Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties (EBD). Lately, much emphasis has been given to the field of prevention in schools, through the Competence-Enhancement Perspective. Emotional Intelligence (EI) and Social and Emotional Learning (SEL) provide the necessary skills to be acquired by students. The…

  15. Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders in Different Learning Environments: Academic and Self-Concept Differences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chisolm, Terrence Ranier

    2013-01-01

    Students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) perform poorly both academically and behaviorally, and this performance tends not to improve over time. There is a need to understand the effect of learning environments on the academic achievement and self-concept of this population. In this quantitative, archival study, academic achievement…

  16. Capacity and Opportunity: Predicting Engagement for Middle School Students with Behavioral Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herron, Marsha Dempsey; Martin, Jim

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the capacity and opportunity scores of 36 middle school students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) on the student version of the "American Institutes for Research (AIR) Self-Determination Scale" across three school engagement factors: grade point averages (GPA), school absences, and frequency of school…

  17. Behavior Modification/Traditional Techniques for Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mooney, Paul; Ryan, Joseph B.; Gunter, Philip L.; Denny, R. Kenton

    2012-01-01

    In addressing positive general education teaching practices for use with students with or at risk for emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD), the chapter emphasizes teacher behavior change research that has been informed by applied behavior analytic (ABA) principles. Its central theme is that general education teachers can access research…

  18. An Action Plan for Working with Students Who Are Gifted and Have Emotional/Behavior Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rizza, Mary G.; Morrison, William F.

    2002-01-01

    This article presents a plan for teaching gifted students with emotional/behavior disabilities (EBD). Educators are advised to assemble student background information, consider goals that the student needs to accomplish and needed accommodations, develop specific behavior plans, and design a curriculum that is both challenging and addresses…

  19. The Twice Exceptional Student.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, William F.; Omdal, Stuart N.

    2000-01-01

    Research and programs in gifted education and programs for students who exhibit emotional and behavioral disabilities (EBD) do not often consider students who display violent or other negative behaviors and also exhibit gifted and talented behaviors. A qualitative analysis of responses to an interview with one such individual reveals information…

  20. Best Practices to Support Student Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regan, Kelley S.; Michaud, Kim M.

    2011-01-01

    The "No Child Left Behind Act" mandates that teachers employ evidence-based practices (EBPs) in the classroom in order to improve student performance. For students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) to be successful, particularly in inclusive settings, the most salient practices would probably be those promoting classroom organization…

  1. Understanding the Emotional Development of Twice Exceptional Rural Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benge, Beverly; Montgomery, Diane

    Twice exceptional students are those who have emotional disturbances or behavioral disorders (E/BD) and who also display characteristics of high intellectual ability. Case studies were developed over a 3-year period on three male junior high school students who fit this definition. Data were interpreted using Kazimierz Dabrowski's Theory of…

  2. Validating Curriculum-Based Measurement for Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders in Middle School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fore, Cecil, III; Boon, Richard T.; Burke, Mack D.; Martin, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the concurrent validity of curriculum-based measurement (CBM) for students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) in middle school using the Maze (MAZE); Oral Reading Fluency (ORF); and the "Woodcock-Johnson, Third Edition" (WJ-III), Passage Comprehension (WJ-PC) and Reading Fluency (WJ-RF)…

  3. Teaching Paragraph Composition to Students with Emotional/Behavioral Disorders Using the Simultaneous Prompting Procedure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson, Tina Marlene; Hinkson-Lee, Kim; Collins, Belva

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of the simultaneous prompting procedure in teaching paragraph composition to 4, 5th grade students identified with emotional behavioral disorder (EBD) and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The instructor taught students how to construct and proofread a 5-sentence paragraph…

  4. Comparison of Repeated and Two Non-Repeated Readings Conditions on Reading Abilities of Students with Emotional and/or Behavioral Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Escarpio, Raul

    2011-01-01

    Students with emotional and/or behavioral disorders (EBD) present considerable academic challenges along with emotional and/or behavioral problems. In terms of reading, these students typically perform one-to-two years below grade level (Kauffman, 2001). Given the strong correlation between reading failure and school failure and overall success…

  5. Measuring Implementation of Evidence-Based Programs Targeting Young Children at Risk for Emotional/Behavioral Disorders: Conceptual Issues and Recommendations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutherland, Kevin S.; McLeod, Bryce D.; Conroy, Maureen A.; Cox, Julia R.

    2013-01-01

    Young children with and at risk for emotional/behavioral disorders (EBD) present challenges for early childhood teachers. Evidence-based programs designed to address these young children's behavior problems exist, but there are a number of barriers to implementing these programs in early childhood settings. Advancing the science of treatment…

  6. BEST in CLASS: A Classroom-Based Model for Ameliorating Problem Behavior in Early Childhood Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vo, Abigail; Sutherland, Kevin S.; Conroy, Maureen A.

    2012-01-01

    As more young children enter school settings to attend early childhood programs, early childhood teachers and school psychologists have been charged with supporting a growing number of young children with chronic problem behaviors that put them at risk for the development of emotional/behavioral disorders (EBDs). There is a need for effective,…

  7. Best in Class: A Classroom-Based Model for Ameliorating Problem Behavior in Early Childhood Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vo, Abigail K.; Sutherland, Kevin S.; Conroy, Maureen A.

    2012-01-01

    As more young children enter school settings to attend early childhood programs, early childhood teachers and school psychologists have been charged with supporting a growing number of young children with chronic problem behaviors that put them at risk for the development of emotional/behavioral disorders (EBDs). There is a need for effective,…

  8. Teaching Students with Emotional and Behavior Disorder How to Write Persuasive Essays Fluently

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cerar, Nancy Irby

    2012-01-01

    A multiprobe, multiple baseline design was used to evaluate the effectiveness of persuasive writing strategy instruction. Six middle school students with emotional and behavioral disabilities (EBD) received two instructional phases of Self-Regulated Strategy Development (SRSD) instruction for writing persuasive essays over 33 days of intervention.…

  9. Preparing Teachers for Students with Emotional or Behavioral Disabilities in Professional Development Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belknap, Nancy; Mosca, Frank J.

    This paper describes George Washington University's Teacher Preparation Programs for Children with Emotional Disturbance, which uses a Professional Development School (PDS) model to deepen understanding about the specific needs of students with emotional or behavioral disorders (EBD) and prepare outstanding classroom teachers. Goals are to improve…

  10. The Effects of a Dog Reading Visitation Program on Academic Engagement Behavior in Three Elementary Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disabilities: A Single Case Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bassette, Laura A.; Taber-Doughty, Teresa

    2013-01-01

    Background: Children with emotional and behavioral disabilities (EBD) struggle with behavioral problems during reading activities in school. One way to address these concerns may be through dog reading programs which are increasing in popularity in schools and libraries. Preliminary anecdotal research suggests dog reading programs may improve…

  11. The Wraparound Approach for Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders: Opportunities for School Psychologists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinn, Kevin P.; Lee, Virginia

    2007-01-01

    Students with significant emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) present school personnel with complex challenges. For those students who present especially pervasive and chronic challenges, the National Association of School Psychologists (NASP) has recommended comprehensive assessments and interventions that empower families and involve close…

  12. Classroom-Based Functional Analysis and Intervention for Students with Emotional/Behavioral Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright-Gallo, Glenna L.; Higbee, Thomas S.; Reagon, Kara A.; Davey, Bryan J.

    2006-01-01

    We conducted functional analyses of disruptive behavior in a classroom setting for two students of typical intelligence with emotional/behavioral disorders (E/BD) using the classroom teacher to implement functional analysis conditions. The functional analyses suggested that both participants' disruptive behavior was maintained by escape from task…

  13. Job Stressors and Teacher Job Satisfaction in Programs Serving Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adera, Beatrice A.; Bullock, Lyndal M.

    2010-01-01

    Teacher turnover is problem that continues to plague the field of special education, given the associated costs when a teacher leaves his or her job. The challenges associated with recruitment and retention of quality teachers, especially in programs serving students with emotional and behavioral disorders (E/BD) have been attributed to a variety…

  14. Eye-Tracking: An Alternative Vigilance Detector

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-01

    CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON Suzanne Smith a. REPORT U...software recorded a variety of measurements including eye-blink duration (EBD), eye-blink frequency (EBF), eye-blink velocity ( EBV ), percentage of time

  15. After High School: The Status of Youth with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Rhonda; Bunsen, Teresa D.

    1995-01-01

    This literature review examined the current status of young adults with emotional/behavioral disorders (EBD) two to five years after leaving high school, in employment, residential environment, social and interpersonal networks, dependency, and learned helplessness. Suggestions for school-implemented community adjustment programs are offered. (DB)

  16. Preservice Teachers' Self Efficacy and Knowledge of Emotional and Behavioural Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shillingford, Shani; Karlin, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    This research examined preservice teachers' knowledge of emotional and behavioural disorders (EBD) and their sense of efficacy. The participants included a convenience sample of 230 undergraduate general education and special education preservice teachers enrolled in teacher education classes. The age of the participants ranged from 19 to 51 with…

  17. The Effects of Positive Verbal Reinforcement on the Time Spent outside the Classroom for Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders in a Residential Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Christina; Jolivette, Kristine

    2008-01-01

    To more effectively instruct the entire class, teachers of students with emotional behavioral disorders (EBD) often choose to send students who display inappropriate behavior out of the room. A multiple baseline across settings was used to evaluate the effects of increasing teacher positive verbal reinforcement on the amount of time 2 students…

  18. Differences in Drinking Expectancies and Motives for Regular Education and Special Education High School Students with Emotional/Behavioral Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laurent, Jeff; Harbke, Colin R.; Blake, Dawn; Catanzaro, Salvatore J.

    2012-01-01

    Alcohol expectancies and drinking motives were compared for regular education students (n = 159) and students with emotional/behavioral disorders (EBD) receiving special education services (n = 51). Differences existed between groups with respect to expected negative social consequences and emotional and physical outcomes associated with drinking.…

  19. Direct Observation of Teacher and Student Behavior in School Settings: Trends, Issues and Future Directions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Timothy J.; Scott, Terrance M.; Wehby, Joseph H.; Wills, Howard P.

    2014-01-01

    Across the modern history of the field of special education and emotional/behavioral disorders (EBD), direct observation of student and educator behavior has been an essential component of the diagnostic process, student progress monitoring, and establishing functional and statistical relationships within research. This article provides an…

  20. Associations between Social Potential and Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties in Egyptian Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emam, Mahmoud Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    A number of Egyptian children experience psychiatric or mental health problems owing to a variety of internal and external qualities in their social context. These problems may mask strengths, particularly their social potential represented in their prosocial behaviour (PB). Research on emotional and behavioural difficulties (EBDs) should thus…

  1. Unidentified Language Deficits in Children with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollo, Alexandra; Wehby, Joseph H.; Oliver, Regina M.

    2014-01-01

    Low language proficiency and problem behavior often co-occur, yet language deficits are likely to be overlooked in children with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD). Random effects meta-analyses were conducted to determine prevalence and severity of the problem. Across 22 studies, participants included 1,171 children ages 5-13 with formally…

  2. Rediscovering the Art of Developmental Therapy: An Interview with Mary M. Wood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teagarden, James M.; Kaff, Marilyn S.; Zabel, Robert H.

    2013-01-01

    Dr. Mary Margaret Wood is best known for developing psychoeducational programs that integrate mental health and special education interventions for children with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD). Developmental Therapy (DT) includes comprehensive assessment of student behavior, communication, social, and cognitive development,…

  3. Effects of Direct Instruction Plus Procedural Facilitation on the Expository Writing of Adolescents with Emotional and Behavioral Disabilities in Residential Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Mark W.; Houchins, David E.; Viel-Ruma, Kimberly A.; Dever, Bridget V.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of the "Expressive Writing (EW)" direct instruction curriculum on the expository writing skills of secondary grade students with serious emotional and behavioral disabilities (EBD). The "EW" program targets writing mechanics, sentence writing, and editing but does not include pre-writing…

  4. What Are They Thinking? The Moral Judgment of Children with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardman, Elizabeth L.

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to describe the moral judgment of 12 third- through fifth-grade children with and without emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) and to explore how feelings affected their thought processes. Data were gathered via three individually conducted moral dilemma interviews with each child participant. These procedures produced…

  5. Disproportionality of English Learners with Emotional and/or Behavioral Disorders: A Comparative Meta-Analysis with English Learners with Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gage, Nicholas; Gersten, Russell; Sugai, George; Newman-Gonchar, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    Disproportionate representation of English learners in special education has been a longstanding and ongoing concern. However, research examining disproportionate representation of English learners receiving special education services for emotional and/or behavioral disorders (EBD) has been limited. To address this gap, a meta-analysis of…

  6. Ecological Factors in Social Skill Acquisition: High School Students with Emotional and/or Behavioral Disorders in the United States and Norway

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Sarah K.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of my study was to develop a grounded theory of the underlying social processes and/or other ecological factors that impact the effectiveness of skill acquisition for students with emotional and/or behavioral disorders (EBD) in "sister" cities located in the United States (Site One) and in Norway (Site Two). Theory…

  7. Romanian Preschool Teachers' Understanding of Emotional and Behavioral Difficulties: Implications for Designing Teacher Trainings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stefan, Catrinel A.; Rebega, Oana L.; Cosma, Alina

    2015-01-01

    Researchers have emphasized the role of the teacher-child relationship on children's adjustment. Children lacking such positive relationships are placed at increased risk for emotional and behavioral difficulties (EBD). We propose a qualitative approach to exploring Romanian teachers' knowledge and strategies related to preschoolers who are at…

  8. Teacher-Mediated Instructional Strategies for Students with Emotional or Behavioral Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirn, Regina Gilkey; Park, Kristy L.

    2012-01-01

    Students with emotional and behavioral disorders (E/BD) may exhibit both learning and behavioral needs that affect the teacher's ability to provide effective instruction. Extending beyond simple academic content knowledge, effective teacher-based interventions include preventive and predictive actions that manage the disruptive behaviors often…

  9. Expert-Recommended Strategies for Teaching the Twice-Exceptional Student in the General Education Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moody, Cherylynn Jody

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the best practice strategies, those that bring the most value for the twice-exceptional (2e) student (giftedness with autism spectrum disorder [ASD], attention deficit hyperactivity disorder [ADHD], specific learning disabilities [SLD], and/or emotional and behavioral disorder [EBD]) in the…

  10. Collecting Behavioral Data in General Education Settings: A Primer for Behavioral Data Collection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, David L.; Vostal, Brooks; Lylo, Brooke; Hua, Youjia

    2011-01-01

    Recent trends toward the inclusion of students with disabilities mean that a majority of students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) now spend at least 40% of their day in general education settings. With this change in location, teachers in general education settings are now asked to perform tasks that were not given much emphasis…

  11. Update on endoscopic management of gastric outlet obstruction in children

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Hsun-Chin

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic balloon dilatation (EBD) and surgical intervention are two most common and effective treatments for gastric outlet obstruction. Correction of gastric outlet obstruction without the need for surgery is an issue that has been tried to be resolved in these decades; this management has developed with EBD, advanced treatments like local steroid injection, electrocauterization, and stent have been added recently. The most common causes of pediatric gastric outlet obstruction are idiopathic hypertrophic pyloric stenosis, peptic ulcer disease followed by the ingestion of caustic substances, stenosis secondary to surgical anastomosis; antral web, duplication cyst, ectopic pancreas, and other rare conditions. A complete clinical, radiological and endoscopic evaluation of the patient is required to make the diagnosis, with complimentary histopathologic studies. EBD are used in exceptional cases, some with advantages over surgical intervention depending on each patient in particular and on the characteristics and etiology of the gastric outlet obstruction. Local steroid injection and electrocauterization can augment the effect of EBD. The future of endoscopic treatment seems to be aimed at the use of endoscopic electrocauterization and balloon dilatations. PMID:27803770

  12. Stakeholders' Voices: Defining Needs of Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders Transitioning between School Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchanan, Rohanna; Nese, Rhonda N. T.; Clark, Miriam

    2016-01-01

    Students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) too often do not receive adequate services or care in their school settings, particularly during transitions in educational placements. In addition, school support teams often struggle with creating transition plans that honor the needs of students with input from key stakeholders responsible…

  13. Families and Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brigham, Fredrick J.; Bakken, Jeffrey P.; Rotatori, Anthony F.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the present chapter is to provide an overview of issues facing families of children and youths with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD). We argue that although much is written about families of individuals with disabilities, comparatively little is known about families with children in this category. We suggest that the…

  14. Challenges of Serving Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders: Legal and Policy Considerations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Carl R.; Katsiyannis, Antonis; Ryan, Joseph B.

    2011-01-01

    Significant issues still confront the field of emotional or behavioral disorders (E/BD) in providing a free, appropriate, public educational (FAPE) program for these students. This paper reviews recent case law for several critical areas of concern to the field today, including: (a) response to intervention (RTI) and child find procedures, (b)…

  15. Social Skills Intervention for Students with Emotional/Behavioral Disorders: A Literature Review from the American Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Kaili

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a part of a research report from a study conducted to investigate the social skills competence of students with emotional/behavioral disorders (E/BD) by the author (Chen, 2004). The purpose of this paper is to review literature published from 1970 through 2004 that are associated with social skills training for students with…

  16. A Comparison of the Instructional Context for Students with Behavioral Issues Enrolled in Self-Contained and General Education Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maggin, Daniel M.; Wehby, Joseph H.; Moore Partin, Tara C.; Robertson, Rachel; Oliver, Reginal M.

    2011-01-01

    Students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) are often placed into self-contained settings to provide more focused academic and behavioral supports. Little is known, however, about differences in the instructional contexts of self-contained and general education classrooms. Using direct observation and self-report measures, the present…

  17. Social Skills Training for Students Who Demonstrate Poor Self-Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, DaShaunda S.; Jolivette, Kristine; Crosby, Shane

    2006-01-01

    This article presents a scenario which is a classic example of a student becoming frustrated because her needs are not being met. Unequipped to advocate for herself in a socially acceptable manner, Marcy, a 12-year-old, sixth-grade student diagnosed with an emotional and behavioral disorder (EBD), used the most effective strategy in her…

  18. Special Educators as Intervention Specialists: Dynamic Systems and the Complexity of Intensifying Intervention for Students With Emotional and Behavioral Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, Thomas W.; Sutherland, Kevin S.; Talbott, Elizabeth; Brooks, Debbie S.; Norwalk, Kate; Huneke, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    We present a dynamic systems perspective for the intensification of interventions for students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD). With this framework, we suggest behavior involves the contributions of multiple factors and reflects the interplay between the characteristics of the student and the ecologies in which he or she is embedded.…

  19. The Education of Students with Emotional and Behavior Disabilities in Australia: Current Trends and Future Directions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cumming, Therese M.

    2012-01-01

    A discussion about the current state of special education, more specifically the field of emotional and behavior disabilities (EBD), in Australia cannot take place without first providing an overview of the Australian education system. Education comes under the jurisdiction of state and territory responsibility. The federal government coordinates…

  20. Perspectives on Select Field-Based Experiences for Pre-Service Teachers of Students with Emotional and Behavioural Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Short, Maureen N.; Bullock, Lyndal M.

    2013-01-01

    The proficiency with which teachers of students with emotional and behavioural disorders (EBD) plan for, provide instructional activities, and address the challenging behaviour of their students is influenced by the nature of their preservice teacher preparation. The purpose of this study was to examine educators' perceptions of the…

  1. Are Social Competence Difficulties Caused by Performance or Acquisition Deficits? The Importance of Self-Regulatory Mechanisms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gumpel, Thomas P.

    2007-01-01

    We conducted three studies which examined the performance vs. skill acquisition model of social skills deficits. In Study 1, baseline social behaviors for a random sample of 12 boys with comorbid emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD), learning disabilities (LD), language delays, and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) revealed that…

  2. Mindfulness for Students Classified with Emotional/Behavioral Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malow, Micheline S.; Austin, Vance L.

    2016-01-01

    A six-week investigation utilizing a standard mindfulness for adolescents curriculum and norm-based standardized resiliency scale was implemented in a self-contained school for students with Emotional/Behavioral Disorders (E/BD). Informal integration of mindfulness activities into a classroom setting was examined for ecological appropriateness and…

  3. Writing Performance of Students with Emotional and/or Behavioral Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gage, Nicholas A.; Wilson, Joshua; MacSuga-Gage, Ashley S.

    2014-01-01

    Students with emotional and/or behavioral disabilities (E/BD), including students with emotional disturbance and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, receiving special education services perform significantly worse on academic performance measures than same age peers. Researchers have focused on reading and math performance while less is…

  4. Social Skills Instruction for Urban Learners with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders: A Culturally Responsive and Computer-Based Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson-Ervin, Porsha; Cartledge, Gwendolyn; Musti-Rao, Shobana; Gibson, Lenwood, Jr.; Keyes, Starr E.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the effects of culturally relevant/responsive, computer-based social skills instruction on the social skill acquisition and generalization of 6 urban African American sixth graders with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD). A multiple-probe across participants design was used to evaluate the effects of the social skills…

  5. Reflections on the Future of Council for Children with Behavioral Disorders: A Response to Colvin, Forness, and Nelson

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peck, Alec F.; Albrecht, Susan Fread; George, Cheryl L.; Mathur, Sarup R.; Paget, Mike; Ryan, Joseph B.; White, Richard B.; Baker, Diana

    2012-01-01

    In issue 37(1) of this journal, the authors published the findings of three studies addressing the status of Council for Children with Behavioral Disorders (CCBD) as an organization and of the field of special education for students with emotional and behavioral disorders (E/BD). In order to continue discussion of the status of CCBD, the editors…

  6. Service Provisions for Youth with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dean, Latoya Lavan

    2012-01-01

    Youth with emotional or behavioral disorders (EBD) have poorer outcomes compared to their peers with and without disabilities. As a result, the federal government has mandated transition services to improve supports and ultimately student outcomes. Using data from the National Longitudinal Transition Study-2 (NLTS-2), this secondary analysis…

  7. Reducing Overload in Students with Learning and Behavioral Disorders: The Role of Assistive Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parette, Howard P., Jr.; Crowley, E. Paula; Wojcik, Brian W.

    2007-01-01

    The academic and social demands of school and classroom environments place unique demands on students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD). Assistive technologies provide a resource that largely remains untapped in the management of behaviors. This article outlines four tips teachers may use as they select from an array of assistive…

  8. C-CARD: A Strategy to Improve Revising Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saddler, Bruce; Asaro-Saddler, Kristie; Thomas, Job

    2015-01-01

    Students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) often perform well below their peers across academic areas, with lower math and reading scores and higher school failure and grade retention rates (Reid, Gonzalez, Nordness, Trout, & Epstein, 2004). However, writing is the most significant academic deficit for these students (Austinner,…

  9. Relations between Secondary Art Teachers' Personal Education Theories and Attitudes about Inclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manjack, Sharon Kay

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this study was multifold: to define secondary art teachers. personal practical theories about the purposes of art education; to examine teachers. attitudes toward the inclusion of students with learning disabilities (LD) and those with emotional/behavioral disabilities (EBD) into their classrooms; and to determine the relation between…

  10. Canadian Children's Mental Health: Building Capacity in School-Based Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Climie, Emma A.

    2015-01-01

    Given the increasing identification of children with emotional/behavioral disorders (EBD), it is imperative that innovative ways of addressing these concerns are explored. Fewer than half of students identified with mental illness receive treatment, leaving a significant proportion of students to cope with mental illness without support. One…

  11. The Influence of Schooling on the Aspirations of Young People with Special Educational Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casey, Lorraine; Davies, Peter; Kalambouka, Afroditi; Nelson, Nick; Boyle, Bill

    2006-01-01

    The authors investigate the effect of schooling on the aspirations of young people designated as having mild learning difficulties (MLD) or emotional and behavioural difficulties (EBD) in the first large-scale study of its kind in England. Data were collected from parents and their 15/16 year-old children in the final year of their compulsory…

  12. Best Practices in Programs for Children with Emotional Behavioral Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bak, Nicole L.

    2013-01-01

    Students with emotional behavioral disorders (EBD) are educated in restrictive placements at higher rates than students in other disability categories due to their challenging behavior and inability to function in the general educational environment (Bullock & Gable, 2006). The increasing utilization of alternative programming to educate…

  13. Preparation of Teachers of Students with Emotional/Behavioral Disorders. Retrospective Series on Critical Issues in Emotional/Behavioral Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bullock, Lyndal M., Ed.; Gable, Robert A., Ed.; Rutherford, Robert B., Jr., Ed.

    The third in a series, this collection of previously published monographs examines the challenges of preparing teachers to work with students who have emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD). Monographs include: (1) "Issues in Training Teachers for the Seriously Emotionally Disturbed" (Frank H. Wood), which discusses preparing regular and special…

  14. Anisotropic Dielectric Breakdown Strength of Single Crystal Hexagonal Boron Nitride.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Yoshiaki; Taniguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Kenji; Nagashio, Kosuke

    2016-10-11

    Dielectric breakdown has historically been of great interest from the perspectives of fundamental physics and electrical reliability. However, to date, the anisotropy in the dielectric breakdown has not been discussed. Here, we report an anisotropic dielectric breakdown strength (EBD) for h-BN, which is used as an ideal substrate for two-dimensional (2D) material devices. Under a well-controlled relative humidity, EBD values in the directions both normal and parallel to the c axis (EBD⊥c and EBD∥c) were measured to be 3 and 12 MV/cm, respectively. When the crystal structure is changed from sp(3) of cubic-BN (c-BN) to sp(2) of h-BN, EBD⊥c for h-BN becomes smaller than that for c-BN, while EBD∥c for h-BN drastically increases. Therefore, h-BN can possess a relatively high EBD concentrated only in the direction parallel to the c axis by conceding a weak bonding direction in the highly anisotropic crystal structure. This explains why the EBD∥c for h-BN is higher than that for diamond. Moreover, the presented EBD value obtained from the high quality bulk h-BN crystal can be regarded as the standard for qualifying the crystallinity of h-BN layers grown via chemical vapor deposition for future electronic applications.

  15. The Effects of Using Direct Instruction and the Equal Additions Algorithm to Promote Subtraction with Regrouping Skills of Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders with Mathematics Difficulties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fain, Angela Christine

    2013-01-01

    Students with emotional and behavioral disorders (E/BD) display severe social and academic deficits that can adversely affect their academic performance in mathematics and result in higher rates of failure throughout their schooling compared to other students with disabilities (U.S. Department of Education, 2005; Webber & Plotts, 2008).…

  16. Teaching Disturbed and Disturbing Students: An Integrative Approach. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zionts, Paul

    This book examines intervention with children having emotional or behavioral disorders (EBD), through the use of many case studies, activities, and examples. The text is organized in a developmental manner, with behavioral interventions recommended for lower grades and cognitive-behavioral approaches recommended for older students. The first unit…

  17. Risk and Protective Factors of Emotional and/or Behavioral Disorders in Children and Adolescents: A Mega-Analytic Synthesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crews, S. Dean; Bender, Hermine; Vanderwood, Mike; Cook, Clayton R.; Gresham, Frank M.; Kern, Lee

    2007-01-01

    Professionals working with children who have severe emotional/behavioral disorders (E/BD) need to understand the risk and protective factors (RPFs) that are correlated with the development of these behavior patterns, for at least 3 reasons. First, significant numbers of students experience negative outcomes or fail to achieve positive outcomes.…

  18. Individual and Systemic Approaches to Collaboration and Consultation on Behalf of Students with Emotional/Behavioral Disorders. From the Second CCBD Mini Library Series: Successful Interventions for the 21st Century.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gable, Robert A.; Sugai, George; Lewis, Tim; Nelson, J. Ron; Cheney, Douglas; Safran, Stephen P.; Safran, Joan S.

    This monograph discusses using collaboration and consultation to teach children and youth with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) in the general education classroom. After an introductory chapter, Chapter 2, "Collaboration and Consultation: Promises and Limitations," compares collaboration and consultation as they relate to serving…

  19. The Impact of Targeted Classroom Interventions and Function-Based Behavior Interventions on Problem Behaviors of Students with Emotional/Behavioral Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trussell, Robert P.; Lewis, Timothy J.; Stichter, Janine P.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of both functional behavior assessment-based interventions and targeted classroom interventions for reducing problem behaviors of children with emotional/behavioral disorders (EBD) in special education classrooms. Specifically, this study was interested in how interventions based on changes in…

  20. Functional Behavioral Assessment-Based Interventions for Students with or at Risk for Emotional and/or Behavioral Disorders in School: A Hierarchical Linear Modeling Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gage, Nicholas A.; Lewis, Timothy J.; Stichter, Janine P.

    2012-01-01

    Of the myriad practices currently utilized for students with disabilities, particularly students with or at risk for emotional and/or behavioral disorder (EBD), functional behavior assessment (FBA) is a practice with an emerging solid research base. However, the FBA research base relies on single-subject design (SSD) and synthesis has relied on…

  1. Psychometric properties of the Arabic self-report version of the strengths and difficulties questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Emam, Mahmoud Mohamed; Abu Hilal, Maher M; Kazem, Ali Mahdi; Alkharousi, Suad Juma

    2016-12-01

    Students in middle school tend to display emotional and behavioural difficulties (EBDs) compared to other forms of psychopathology. Early identification of EBDs is therefore a priority in order to prevent the chronic co-morbidity with other forms of psychopathology which may affect students' academic achievement. Assessment of EBDs has been traditionally undertaken via proxy reporting; but psychometrically rigorous instruments are needed so that children and adolescents can report on their own emotions and behaviours. Such need increases in the Omani context given the lack of EBDs adequate assessment instruments. In the current study the factor structure of the Arabic self-report version of the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (A-SDQ) was examined in a sample of 815 middle school students (mean age=14 years). The study tested the SDQ original five-factor model which received considerable empirical support. Responses on the A-SDQ were compared to responses obtained via proxy reports from teachers and parents through confirmatory factor analyses (CFAs). Results showed a reasonable fit for the three informant forms. Nevertheless, there were differences in item loadings across the three informant forms. Additionally, participants' self-report responses were tested for invariance across gender. CFAs provided support to the invariance hypothesis for item loadings, indicating that the items were similarly valid indices of the five factors for males and females. Factor correlations, factor variances and item residuals were not invariant across gender.

  2. Teachers' Perceptions of the Concomitance of Emotional Behavioural Difficulties and Learning Disabilities in Children Referred for Learning Disabilities in Oman

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emam, Mahmoud Mohamed; Kazem, Ali Mahdi

    2015-01-01

    Research has documented overlapping and coexisting characteristics of learning disabilities (LD) and emotional and behavioural difficulties (EBD). Such concomitance may impact teacher referrals of children at risk for LD which in turn may influence service delivery. Using the Learning Disabilities Diagnostic Inventory (LDDI) and the Strengths and…

  3. Assessment of Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plotts, Cynthia A.

    2012-01-01

    Assessment and identification of children with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) is complex and involves multiple techniques, levels, and participants. While federal law sets the general parameters for identification in school settings, these criteria are vague and may lead to inconsistencies in selection and interpretation of assessment…

  4. Considering Systematic Direct Observation after a Century of Research--Commentary on the Special Issue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stichter, Janine P.; Riley-Tillman, T. Chris

    2014-01-01

    Systematic Direct Observation (SDO) has played a pivotal role in the field of Emotional and/or Behavioral Disorders (EBD) since its inception as a key part of understanding more about the behaviors, contexts that impact them, and the effective supports necessary for this population. This methodology is an ongoing charge for everyone. The authors…

  5. Conservatism and the Underidentification of Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders in Special Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiley, Andrew L.; Kauffman, James M.; Plageman, Kristen

    2014-01-01

    Underidentification of students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD; emotional disturbance or ED in federal language) is a critical issue, perhaps explainable in part by causal attributions of problem behavior associated with conservatism. Conservatism in 58 counties in the state of California was measured by finding the percentage of…

  6. Class-Wide Function-Related Intervention Teams: Effects of Group Contingency Programs in Urban Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamps, Debra; Wills, Howard P.; Heitzman-Powell, Linda; Laylin, Jeff; Szoke, Carolyn; Petrillo, Tai; Culey, Amy

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the effectiveness of the Class-Wide Function-related Intervention Teams (CW-FIT) program, a group contingency intervention for whole classes, and for students with disruptive behaviors who are at risk for emotional/behavioral disorders (EBD). The CW-FIT program includes four elements designed from…

  7. Teachers Working Together: How to Communicate, Collaborate, and Facilitate Positive Behavior in Inclusive Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Chan; Weiss, Stacy L.

    2014-01-01

    The use of a school wide positive behavior intervention and support (PBIS) framework is well established as a beneficial model for the majority of students taught in general education classrooms (e.g., Bradshaw, Mitchell, & Leaf, 2010). Some students, whether at-risk for or school-identified with emotional behavioral disorders (EBD) or other…

  8. Special Education Teachers' Perceptions of Students with Emotional Impairments and Their Same-Sex Behaviors: A Multiple Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arrieta, Stefanie A.; Palladino, John M.

    2014-01-01

    Although recent trends in educational research have addressed the educational plight of LGBT [lesbian, gay, bi-sexual, transgender, and queer/questioning] students, a dearth of literature exists about the subpopulation of LGBT youth with disabilities, namely those with verified emotional-behavior disorders (EBDs). Discussions throughout what…

  9. Refractory strictures despite steroid injection after esophageal endoscopic resection

    PubMed Central

    Hanaoka, Noboru; Ishihara, Ryu; Uedo, Noriya; Takeuchi, Yoji; Higashino, Koji; Akasaka, Tomofumi; Kanesaka, Takashi; Matsuura, Noriko; Yamasaki, Yasushi; Hamada, Kenta; Iishi, Hiroyasu

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although steroid injection prevents stricture after esophageal endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD), some patients require repeated sessions of endoscopic balloon dilation (EBD). We investigated the risk for refractory stricture despite the administration of steroid injections to prevent stricture in patients undergoing esophageal ESD. Refractory stricture was defined as the requirement for more than three sessions of EBD to resolve the stricture. In addition, the safety of steroid injections was assessed based on the rate of complications. Patients and methods: We analyzed data from 127 consecutive patients who underwent esophageal ESD and had mucosal defects with a circumferential extent greater than three-quarters of the esophagus. To prevent stricture, steroid injection was performed. EBD was performed whenever a patient had symptoms of dysphagia. Results: The percentage of patients with a tumor circumferential extent greater than 75 % was significantly higher in those with refractory stricture than in those without stricture (P = 0.001). Multivariate analysis adjusted for age, sex, history of radiation therapy, tumor location, and tumor diameter showed that a tumor circumferential extent greater than 75 % was an independent risk factor for refractory stricture (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 5.49 [95 %CI 1.91 – 15.84], P = 0.002). Major adverse events occurred in 3 patients (2.4 %): perforation during EBD in 2 patients and delayed perforation after EBD in 1 patient. The patient with delayed perforation underwent esophagectomy because of mediastinitis. Conclusions: A tumor circumferential extent greater than 75 % is an independent risk factor for refractory stricture despite steroid injections. The development of more extensive interventions is warranted to prevent refractory stricture. PMID:27004256

  10. Directed self-assembly of block copolymers for high breakdown strength polymer film capacitors

    DOE PAGES

    Samant, Saumil P.; Grabowski, Christopher A.; Kisslinger, Kim; ...

    2016-03-04

    Emerging needs for fast charge/discharge yet high-power, lightweight, and flexible electronics requires the use of polymer-film-based solid-state capacitors with high energy densities. Fast charge/discharge rates of film capacitors on the order of microseconds are not achievable with slower charging conventional batteries, supercapacitors and related hybrid technologies. However, the current energy densities of polymer film capacitors fall short of rising demand, and could be significantly enhanced by increasing the breakdown strength (EBD) and dielectric permittivity (εr) of the polymer films. Co-extruded two-homopolymer component multilayered films have demonstrated much promise in this regard showing higher EBD over that of component polymers. Multilayeredmore » films can also help incorporate functional features besides energy storage, such as enhanced optical, mechanical, thermal and barrier properties. In this work, we report accomplishing multilayer, multicomponent block copolymer dielectric films (BCDF) with soft-shear driven highly oriented self-assembled lamellar diblock copolymers (BCP) as a novel application of this important class of self-assembling materials. Results of a model PS-b-PMMA system show ~50% enhancement in EBD of self-assembled multilayer lamellar BCP films compared to unordered as-cast films, indicating that the breakdown is highly sensitive to the nanostructure of the BCP. The enhancement in EBD is attributed to the “barrier effect”, where the multiple interfaces between the lamellae block components act as barriers to the dielectric breakdown through the film. The increase in EBD corresponds to more than doubling the energy storage capacity using a straightforward directed self-assembly strategy. Lastly, this approach opens a new nanomaterial paradigm for designing high energy density dielectric materials.« less

  11. Directed Self-Assembly of Block Copolymers for High Breakdown Strength Polymer Film Capacitors.

    PubMed

    Samant, Saumil P; Grabowski, Christopher A; Kisslinger, Kim; Yager, Kevin G; Yuan, Guangcui; Satija, Sushil K; Durstock, Michael F; Raghavan, Dharmaraj; Karim, Alamgir

    2016-03-01

    Emerging needs for fast charge/discharge yet high-power, lightweight, and flexible electronics requires the use of polymer-film-based solid-state capacitors with high energy densities. Fast charge/discharge rates of film capacitors on the order of microseconds are not achievable with slower charging conventional batteries, supercapacitors and related hybrid technologies. However, the current energy densities of polymer film capacitors fall short of rising demand, and could be significantly enhanced by increasing the breakdown strength (EBD) and dielectric permittivity (εr) of the polymer films. Co-extruded two-homopolymer component multilayered films have demonstrated much promise in this regard showing higher EBD over that of component polymers. Multilayered films can also help incorporate functional features besides energy storage, such as enhanced optical, mechanical, thermal and barrier properties. In this work, we report accomplishing multilayer, multicomponent block copolymer dielectric films (BCDF) with soft-shear driven highly oriented self-assembled lamellar diblock copolymers (BCP) as a novel application of this important class of self-assembling materials. Results of a model PS-b-PMMA system show ∼50% enhancement in EBD of self-assembled multilayer lamellar BCP films compared to unordered as-cast films, indicating that the breakdown is highly sensitive to the nanostructure of the BCP. The enhancement in EBD is attributed to the "barrier effect", where the multiple interfaces between the lamellae block components act as barriers to the dielectric breakdown through the film. The increase in EBD corresponds to more than doubling the energy storage capacity using a straightforward directed self-assembly strategy. This approach opens a new nanomaterial paradigm for designing high energy density dielectric materials.

  12. Bioimpedence to Assess Breast Density as a Risk Factor for Breast Cancer in Adult Women and Adolescent Girls.

    PubMed

    Maskarinec, Gertraud; Morimoto, Yukiko; Laguana, Michelle B; Novotny, Rachel; Leon Guerrero, Rachael T

    2016-01-01

    Although high mammographic density is one of the strongest predictors of breast cancer risk, X-ray based mammography cannot be performed before the recommended screening age, especially not in adolescents and young women. Therefore, new techniques for breast density measurement are of interest. In this pilot study in Guam and Hawaii, we evaluated a radiation-free, bioimpedance device called Electrical Breast DensitometerTM (EBD; senoSENSE Medical Systems, Inc., Ontario, Canada) for measuring breast density in 95 women aged 31-82 years and 41 girls aged 8-18 years. Percent density (PD) was estimated in the women's most recent mammogram using a computer-assisted method. Correlation coefficients and linear regression were applied for statistical analysis. In adult women, mean EBD and PD values of the left and right breasts were 230±52 and 226±50 Ω and 23.7±15.1 and 24.2±15.2%, respectively. The EBD measurements were inversely correlated with PD (rSpearman=-0.52, p<0.0001); the correlation was stronger in Caucasians (rSpearman=-0.70, p<0.0001) than Asians (rSpearman=-0.54, p<0.01) and Native Hawaiian/Chamorro/Pacific Islanders (rSpearman=-0.34, p=0.06). Using 4 categories of PD (<10, 10-25, 26-50, 51-75%), the respective mean EBD values were 256±32, 249±41, 202±46, and 178±43 Ω (p<0.0001). In girls, the mean EBD values in the left and right breast were 148±40 and 155±54 Ω; EBD values decreased from Tanner stages 1 to 4 (204±14, 154±79, 136±43, and 119±16 Ω for stages 1-4, respectively) but were higher at Tanner stage 5 (165±30 Ω). With further development, this bioimpedance method may allow for investigations of breast development among adolescent, as well as assessment of breast cancer risk early in life and in populations without access to mammography.

  13. Bioimpedence to Assess Breast Density as a Risk Factor for Breast Cancer in Adult Women and Adolescent Girls

    PubMed Central

    Maskarinec, Gertraud; Morimoto, Yukiko; Laguaña, Michelle B; Novotny, Rachel; Guerrero, Rachael T Leon

    2016-01-01

    Although high mammographic density is one of the strongest predictors of breast cancer risk, X-ray based mammography cannot be performed before the recommended screening age, especially not in adolescents and young women. Therefore, new techniques for breast density measurement are of interest. In this pilot study in Guam and Hawaii, we evaluated a radiation-free, bioimpedance device called Electrical Breast Densitometer™ (EBD; senoSENSE Medical Systems, Inc., Ontario, Canada) for measuring breast density in 95 women aged 31–82 years and 41 girls aged 8–18 years. Percent density (PD) was estimated in the women’s most recent mammogram using a computer-assisted method. Correlation coefficients and linear regression were applied for statistical analysis. In adult women, mean EBD and PD values of the left and right breasts were 230±52 and 226±50 Ω and 23.7±15.1 and 24.2±15.2%, respectively. The EBD measurements were inversely correlated with PD (rSpearman=−0.52, p<0.0001); the correlation was stronger in Caucasians (rSpearman=−0.70, p<0.0001) than Asians (rSpearman=−0.54, p<0.01) and Native Hawaiian/Chamorro/Pacific Islanders (rSpearman=−0.34, p=0.06). Using 4 categories of PD (<10, 10–25, 26–50, 51–75%), the respective mean EBD values were 256±32, 249±41, 202±46, and 178±43 Ω (p<0.0001). In girls, the mean EBD values in the left and right breast were 148±40 and 155±54 Ω; EBD values decreased from Tanner stages 1 to 4 (204±14, 154±79, 136±43, and 119±16 Ω for stages 1–4, respectively) but were higher at Tanner stage 5 (165±30 Ω). With further development, this bioimpedance method may allow for investigations of breast development among adolescent, as well as assessment of breast cancer risk early in life and in populations without access to mammography. PMID:26838256

  14. Achalasia: advances in treatment.

    PubMed

    Schoenberg, Markus Bo; Vassiliou, Melina Catherine; von Renteln, Daniel

    2014-09-01

    Achalasia is a primary esophageal motility disorder, which shows distinct clinical, manometric, radiologic, and pathologic features. Available treatment strategies are pharmacological, endoscopic or surgical. In the past decades preferred treatment has alternated between surgical myotomy (presently Laparoscopic Heller Myotomy [LHM]) and endoscopic balloon dilation (EBD). While surgical myotomy promises superior long-term results and significantly less retreatment, endoscopic balloon dilation is initially far less invasive and yields comparable results after redilation. Peroral Endoscopic Myotomy (POEM) aims to combine the minimal invasive approach through the mouth with the better long-term results after LHM. Initial findings in the literature point to comparable success-rates after POEM and LHM. In the literature complication rates are similar to those obtained after surgery. This new interventional technique should be subject to randomized controlled trials and compared to EBD and LHM.

  15. Using architecture and technology to promote improved quality of life for military service members with traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Pasquina, Paul F; Pasquina, Lavinia Fici; Anderson-Barnes, Victoria C; Giuggio, Jeffrey S; Cooper, Rory A

    2010-02-01

    Today, injured service members are surviving wounds that would have been fatal in previous wars. A recent RAND report estimates that approximately 320,000 service members may have experienced a traumatic brain injury (TBI) during deployment, and it is not uncommon for a soldier to sustain multiple associated injuries such as limb loss, paralysis, sensory loss, and psychological damage. As a result, many military service members and their families face significant challenges returning to a high quality of independent life. The architectural concepts of universal design (UD) and evidence-based design (EBD) are gaining interest as an integral part of the rehabilitation process of veterans with TBI. This article examines the possibilities presented by UD and EBD in accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, in terms of high-end building and interior design quality, and possible technological options for individuals with disabilities.

  16. Using the experience-based design approach to improve orthodontic care.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Pamela E; Silverton, Sarah

    2014-12-01

    The experience-based design (ebd) approach is a method of measuring patient experience, which deliberately draws out subjective, emotional and personal feelings of the patients using a service. We describe how the experience-based design approach has been used to measure the experiences of teenage patients at orthodontic consultation appointments in a district general hospital. This has allowed us to identify the points in the patient's journey where they experience most anxiety and nervousness and to target service improvements in these areas. We found the ebd approach effective in measuring patient experience in a teenage patient population. We demonstrate how the service improvements implemented have reduced negative feelings during new patient consultations.

  17. Effect of periodic alterations in shear on vascular macromolecular uptake.

    PubMed

    Friedman, M H; Henderson, J M; Aukerman, J A; Clingan, P A

    2000-01-01

    Experiments were carried out in swine to test the hypothesis that changes in the fluid dynamic environment of the arterial wall, with time constants of several minutes to perhaps a few hours, prompt adaptive responses that transiently increase endothelial permeability. After parenteral Evans Blue Dye (EBD) administration, the hemodynamics of the external iliac arteries of the experimental animals were altered using a reversible arteriovenous femoral shunt. For 3 h, the shunt was opened and closed with a period (tau) between 1-180 min. Subsequently, the animal was euthanized and the iliac vessels were photographed en face to obtain the distribution of EBD-bound albumin uptake by the tissue during its exposure to the dye. Albumin uptake increases with tau in a fashion that can be explained by an a priori model of the adaptive permeability response, with a time constant of about an hour.

  18. Primer of statistics in dental research: part I.

    PubMed

    Shintani, Ayumi

    2014-01-01

    Statistics play essential roles in evidence-based dentistry (EBD) practice and research. It ranges widely from formulating scientific questions, designing studies, collecting and analyzing data to interpreting, reporting, and presenting study findings. Mastering statistical concepts appears to be an unreachable goal among many dental researchers in part due to statistical authorities' limitations of explaining statistical principles to health researchers without elaborating complex mathematical concepts. This series of 2 articles aim to introduce dental researchers to 9 essential topics in statistics to conduct EBD with intuitive examples. The part I of the series includes the first 5 topics (1) statistical graph, (2) how to deal with outliers, (3) p-value and confidence interval, (4) testing equivalence, and (5) multiplicity adjustment. Part II will follow to cover the remaining topics including (6) selecting the proper statistical tests, (7) repeated measures analysis, (8) epidemiological consideration for causal association, and (9) analysis of agreement.

  19. Crystal Structures of the Global Regulator DasR from Streptomyces coelicolor: Implications for the Allosteric Regulation of GntR/HutC Repressors

    PubMed Central

    Fillenberg, Simon B.; Friess, Mario D.; Körner, Samuel; Böckmann, Rainer A.; Muller, Yves A.

    2016-01-01

    Small molecule effectors regulate gene transcription in bacteria by altering the DNA-binding affinities of specific repressor proteins. Although the GntR proteins represent a large family of bacterial repressors, only little is known about the allosteric mechanism that enables their function. DasR from Streptomyces coelicolor belongs to the GntR/HutC subfamily and specifically recognises operators termed DasR-responsive elements (dre-sites). Its DNA-binding properties are modulated by phosphorylated sugars. Here, we present several crystal structures of DasR, namely of dimeric full-length DasR in the absence of any effector and of only the effector-binding domain (EBD) of DasR without effector or in complex with glucosamine-6-phosphate (GlcN-6-P) and N-acetylglucosamine-6-phosphate (GlcNAc-6-P). Together with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and a comparison with other GntR/HutC family members these data allowed for a structural characterisation of the different functional states of DasR. Allostery in DasR and possibly in many other GntR/HutC family members is best described by a conformational selection model. In ligand-free DasR, an increased flexibility in the EBDs enables the attached DNA-binding domains (DBD) to sample a variety of different orientations and among these also a DNA-binding competent conformation. Effector binding to the EBDs of DasR significantly reorganises the atomic structure of the latter. However, rather than locking the orientation of the DBDs, the effector-induced formation of β-strand β* in the DBD-EBD-linker segment merely appears to take the DBDs ‘on a shorter leash’ thereby impeding the ‘downwards’ positioning of the DBDs that is necessary for a concerted binding of two DBDs of DasR to operator DNA. PMID:27337024

  20. Introduction to the basics of evidence-based dentistry: concepts and skills.

    PubMed

    Forrest, Jane L

    2009-09-01

    The purpose of this section of the ADA Champions Pre-Conference is to review the basics of Evidence-based dentistry (EBD), research designs and levels of evidence, and identify the skills necessary for clinicians to efficiently use an evidence-based approach in practice. This session of the pre-conference preceded the session on the skills needed to define a clinical question and search for the evidence to answer that question.

  1. Mammea coumarins from the flowers of Mammea siamensis.

    PubMed

    Mahidol, Chulabhorn; Kaweetripob, Wirongrong; Prawat, Hunsa; Ruchirawat, Somsak

    2002-05-01

    Four new mammea coumarins, mammea E/BA cyclo D (1), mammea E/BC cyclo D (2), mammea E/BD cyclo D (3), and mammea E/AC cyclo D (4), were isolated from the flowers of Mammea siamensis, along with six known coumarins. Extensive 1D and 2D NMR experiments and other spectroscopic studies, as well as chemical transformations, were employed to determine the structures of 1-4.

  2. Hybrid therapy with locoregional steroid injection and polyglycolic acid sheets to prevent stricture after esophageal endoscopic submucosal dissection

    PubMed Central

    Nagami, Yasuaki; Shiba, Masatsugu; Tominaga, Kazunari; Ominami, Masaki; Fukunaga, Shusei; Sugimori, Satoshi; Tanaka, Fumio; Kamata, Noriko; Tanigawa, Tetsuya; Yamagami, Hirokazu; Watanabe, Toshio; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Arakawa, Tetsuo

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aim: The incidence of stricture formation caused by endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) for widespread lesions is high, and stricture formation can reduce quality of life. We evaluated the prophylactic efficacy of hybrid therapy using a locoregional steroid injection and polyglycolic acid (PGA) sheets with fibrin glue to prevent stricture formation after esophageal ESD in high risk patients in whom we predicted stricture formation would be difficult to prevent with a single prophylactic steroid injection. Methods: Ten patients who underwent esophageal ESD were enrolled (entire-circumference: n = 6; sub-circumference, more than 5/6 of the circumference: n = 4). A single locoregional steroid injection and PGA sheets with fibrin glue were used after ESD. We evaluated the incidence of stricture formation, the number of endoscopic balloon dilation (EBD) procedures needed to treat the stricture formation, and adverse events of the therapy. Results: Esophageal stricture formation occurred in 50.0 % of patients (5/10) (median EBD sessions 0.5, range 0 – 16). Subanalysis showed that stricture formation occurred in 37.5 % of patients (3/8) excluded the lesions located near a previous scar from ESD or surgical anastomosis site (median EBD sessions 0, range 0 – 4). Conclusion: Hybrid therapy using a locoregional steroid injection and PGA sheets with fibrin glue may have the potential to prevent esophageal stricture formation after esophageal ESD in high risk patients. PMID:27652294

  3. Risk factors and management for pyloric stenosis occurred after endoscopic submucosal dissection adjacent to pylorus

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Un; Park, Moon Sik; Yun, So Hee; Yang, Min A.; Han, Shang Hoon; Lee, Young Jae; Jung, Gum Mo; Kim, Ji Woong; Cho, Yong Keun; Cho, Jin Woong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) has been widely accepted as a curative treatment for gastric neoplasm. Pyloric stenosis is a chronic complication that can be caused by ESD. The aim of this study is to clarify the risk factors and management for pyloric stenosis. From January 2004 to January 2014, a total of 126 patients who underwent ESD adjacent to pylorus were reviewed retrospectively. Pyloric mucosal defect was defined as when any resection margin of ESD was involved in the pyloric ring. Pyloric stenosis was defined as when a conventional endoscope could not be passed to the duodenum. Among the 126 patients, pyloric stenosis was identified in 9. In a univariate analysis, pyloric stenosis was more common in older patients (P < 0.05) and in lesions with resections over 75% of the pyloric ring circumference (P < 0.001). In a multivariate analysis, the factor that was associated with pyloric stenosis was the extent of the pyloric ring dissection (P < 0.001). Four of the 9 patients with pyloric stenosis had mild dyspepsia, and the others had gastric outlet obstruction symptoms. The 5 symptomatic patients underwent endoscopic balloon dilation (EBD), and the frequency of EBD was 1 to 8 times. The asymptomatic patients were treated conservatively. The incidence of pyloric stenosis was higher in lesions with resections over 75% of the pyloric ring circumference. Although EBD was an effective treatment for pyloric stenosis, conservative management was also helpful in patients who had mild symptoms. PMID:27977608

  4. An approach to define semantics for BPM systems interoperability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rico, Mariela; Caliusco, María Laura; Chiotti, Omar; Rosa Galli, María

    2015-04-01

    This article proposes defining semantics for Business Process Management systems interoperability through the ontology of Electronic Business Documents (EBD) used to interchange the information required to perform cross-organizational processes. The semantic model generated allows aligning enterprise's business processes to support cross-organizational processes by matching the business ontology of each business partner with the EBD ontology. The result is a flexible software architecture that allows dynamically defining cross-organizational business processes by reusing the EBD ontology. For developing the semantic model, a method is presented, which is based on a strategy for discovering entity features whose interpretation depends on the context, and representing them for enriching the ontology. The proposed method complements ontology learning techniques that can not infer semantic features not represented in data sources. In order to improve the representation of these entity features, the method proposes using widely accepted ontologies, for representing time entities and relations, physical quantities, measurement units, official country names, and currencies and funds, among others. When the ontologies reuse is not possible, the method proposes identifying whether that feature is simple or complex, and defines a strategy to be followed. An empirical validation of the approach has been performed through a case study.

  5. A Botrytis cinerea Emopamil Binding Domain Protein, Required for Full Virulence, Belongs to a Eukaryotic Superfamily Which Has Expanded in Euascomycetes▿

    PubMed Central

    Gioti, A.; Pradier, J. M.; Fournier, E.; Le Pêcheur, P.; Giraud, C.; Debieu, D.; Bach, J.; Leroux, P.; Levis, C.

    2008-01-01

    A previous transcriptomic analysis of 3,032 fungal genes identified the Botrytis cinerea PIE3 (BcPIE3) gene to be up-regulated early in planta (A. Gioti, A. Simon, P. Le Pêcheur, C. Giraud, J. M. Pradier, M. Viaud, and C. Levis, J. Mol. Biol. 358:372-386, 2006). In the present study, BcPIE3 was disrupted in order to determine its implication in pathogenicity. BcPIE3 was shown to be a virulence factor, since the ΔBcPIE3 mutant was blocked during the colonization of tomato and bean leaves, giving lesions reduced in size by at least 74%. Within the emopamil binding domain (EBD), BcPIE3 shows significant structural similarities to mammalian emopamil binding proteins (EBPs). Mammalian EBPs function as sterol isomerases, but an analysis of the sterol content and the results of growth inhibition experiments with the ΔBcPIE3 strain indicated that BcPIE3 is dispensable for ergosterol biosynthesis. The systematic identification of EBD-containing proteins included in public databases showed that these proteins constitute a protein superfamily present only in eukaryotes. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the ancestral EBD-encoding gene was duplicated in the common ancestor of animals and fungi after the split from plants. Finally, we present evidence that the EBP phylogenetic clade of this superfamily has further expanded exclusively in euascomycetes, especially in B. cinerea, which contains three copies of the EBP gene. PMID:18156289

  6. A Dynamic Programming Algorithm For (1,2)-Exemplar Breakpoint Distance.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zhexue; Zhu, Daming; Wang, Lusheng

    2015-07-01

    The exemplar breakpoint distance problem is motivated by finding conserved sets of genes between two genomes. It asks to find respective exemplars in two genomes to minimize the breakpoint distance between them. If one genome has no repeated gene (called trivial genome) and the other has genes repeating at most twice, it is referred to as the (1, 2)-exemplar breakpoint distance problem, EBD(1, 2) for short. Little has been done on algorithm design for this problem by now. In this article, we propose a parameter to describe the maximum physical span between two copies of a gene in a genome, and based on it, design a fixed-parameter algorithm for EBD(1, 2). Using a dynamic programming approach, our algorithm can take O(4(s)n(2)) time and O(4(s)n) space to solve an EBD(1, 2) instance that has two genomes of n genes where the second genome has each two copies of a gene spanning at most s copies of the genes. Our algorithm can also be used to compute the maximum adjacencies between two genomes. The algorithm has been implemented in C++. Simulations on randomly generated data have verified the effectiveness of our algorithm. The software package is available from the authors.

  7. Making the Case for Practice-Based Research and the Imperative Role of Design Practitioners.

    PubMed

    Freihoefer, Kara; Zborowsky, Terri

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this article is to justify the need for evidence-based design (EBD) in a research-based architecture and design practice. This article examines the current state of practice-based research (PBR), supports the need for EBD, illustrates PBR methods that can be applied to design work, and explores how findings can be used as a decision-making tool during design and as a validation tool during postoccupancy. As a result, design professions' body of knowledge will advance and practitioners will be better informed to protect the health, safety, and welfare of the society. Furthermore, characteristics of Friedman's progressive research program are used as a framework to examine the current state of PBR in design practice. A modified EBD approach is proposed and showcased with a case study of a renovated inpatient unit. The modified approach demonstrates how a highly integrated project team, especially the role of design practitioners, contributed to the success of utilizing baseline findings and evidence in decision-making throughout the design process. Lastly, recommendations and resources for learning research concepts are provided for practitioners. It is the role of practitioners to pave the way for the next generation of design professionals, as the request and expectation for research become more prevalent in design practice.

  8. Isolation and Characterization of Anaerobic Ethylbenzene Dehydrogenase, a Novel Mo-Fe-S Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Hope A.; Pelletier, Dale A.; Spormann, Alfred M.

    2001-01-01

    The first step in anaerobic ethylbenzene mineralization in denitrifying Azoarcus sp. strain EB1 is the oxidation of ethylbenzene to (S)-(−)-1-phenylethanol. Ethylbenzene dehydrogenase, which catalyzes this reaction, is a unique enzyme in that it mediates the stereoselective hydroxylation of an aromatic hydrocarbon in the absence of molecular oxygen. We purified ethylbenzene dehydrogenase to apparent homogeneity and showed that the enzyme is a heterotrimer (αβγ) with subunit masses of 100 kDa (α), 35 kDa (β), and 25 kDa (γ). Purified ethylbenzene dehydrogenase contains approximately 0.5 mol of molybdenum, 16 mol of iron, and 15 mol of acid-labile sulfur per mol of holoenzyme, as well as a molydopterin cofactor. In addition to ethylbenzene, purified ethylbenzene dehydrogenase was found to oxidize 4-fluoro-ethylbenzene and the nonaromatic hydrocarbons 3-methyl-2-pentene and ethylidenecyclohexane. Sequencing of the encoding genes revealed that ebdA encodes the α subunit, a 974-amino-acid polypeptide containing a molybdopterin-binding domain. The ebdB gene encodes the β subunit, a 352-amino-acid polypeptide with several 4Fe-4S binding domains. The ebdC gene encodes the γ subunit, a 214-amino-acid polypeptide that is a potential membrane anchor subunit. Sequence analysis and biochemical data suggest that ethylbenzene dehydrogenase is a novel member of the dimethyl sulfoxide reductase family of molybdopterin-containing enzymes. PMID:11443088

  9. Introducing evidence-based dentistry to dental students using histology.

    PubMed

    Lallier, Thomas E

    2014-03-01

    The expansion of evidence-based dentistry (EBD) is essential to the continued growth and development of the dental profession. Expanding EBD requires increased emphasis on critical thinking skills during dental education, as noted in the American Dental Education Association's Competencies for the New General Dentist. In order to achieve this goal, educational exercises must be introduced to increase the use of critical thinking skills early in the dental curriculum, with continued reinforcement as students progress through subsequent years. Described in this article is one approach to increasing student exposure to critical thinking during the early basic science curriculum-specifically, within the confines of a traditional histology course. A method of utilizing the medical and dental research literature to reinforce and enliven the concepts taught in histology is described, along with an approach for using peer-to-peer presentations to demonstrate the tools needed to critically evaluate research studies and their presentation in published articles. This approach, which could be applied to any basic science course, will result in a stronger foundation on which students can build their EBD and critical thinking skills.

  10. Creating an Evidence-Based Dentistry Culture at Baylor College of Dentistry: The Winds of Change

    PubMed Central

    Hinton, Robert J.; Dechow, Paul C.; Abdellatif, Hoda; Jones, Daniel L.; McCann, Ann L.; Schneiderman, Emet D.; D’Souza, Rena

    2011-01-01

    In the early years of the new millennium, the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research of the National Institutes of Health began funding Oral Health Research Education Grants using the R25 mechanism to promote the application of basic and clinical research findings to clinical training and to encourage students to pursue careers in oral health research. This report describes the impact of an R25 grant awarded to the Texas A&M Health Science Center’s Baylor College of Dentistry (BCD) on its curriculum and faculty development efforts. At BCD, the R25 grant supports a multipronged initiative that employs clinical research as a vehicle for acquainting both students and faculty with the tools of evidence-based dentistry (EBD). New coursework and experiences in all four years of the curriculum plus a variety of faculty development offerings are being used to achieve this goal. Progress on these fronts is reflected in a nascent EBD culture characterized by increasing participation and buy-in by students and faculty. The production of a new generation of dental graduates equipped with the EBD skill set as well as a growing nucleus of faculty members who can model the importance of evidence-based practice is of paramount importance for the future of dentistry. PMID:21368252

  11. Interaction of wall shear stress magnitude and gradient in the prediction of arterial macromolecular permeability.

    PubMed

    LaMack, Jeffrey A; Himburg, Heather A; Li, Xue-Mei; Friedman, Morton H

    2005-04-01

    Large spatial shear stress gradients have anecdotally been associated with early atherosclerotic lesion susceptibility in vivo and have been proposed as promoters of endothelial cell dysfunction in vitro. Here, experiments are presented in which several measures of the fluid dynamic shear stress, including its gradient, at the walls of in vivo porcine iliac arteries, are correlated against the transendothelial macromolecular permeability of the vessels. The fluid dynamic measurements are based on postmortem vascular casts, and permeability is measured from Evans blue dye (EBD) uptake. Time-averaged wall shear stress (WSS), as well as a new parameter termed maximum gradient stress (MGS) that describes the spatial shear stress gradient due to flow acceleration at a given point, are mapped for each artery and compared on a point-by-point basis to the corresponding EBD patterns. While there was no apparent relation between MGS and EBD uptake, a composite parameter, WSS(-0.11) MGS(0.044), was highly correlated with permeability. Notwithstanding the small exponents, the parameter varied widely within the region of interest. The results suggest that sites exposed to low wall shear stresses are more likely to exhibit elevated permeability, and that this increase is exacerbated in the presence of large spatial shear stress gradients.

  12. Anti-parallel filament flows and bright dots observed in the EUV with Hi-C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, C. E.; Regnier, S.; Walsh, R. W.; Winebarger, A. R.; Cirtain, J. W.

    2013-12-01

    The Hi-C instrument imaged the million degree corona at the highest spatial and temporal resolution to date. The instrument imaged a complicated active region which contained several interesting features. Scientists at UCLan in the UK, in collaboration with other members of the Hi-C science team, studied two of these festures: anti-parallel filament flows and bright EUV dots. Plasma flows within prominences/filaments have been observed for many years and hold valuable clues concerning the mass and energy balance within these structures. Evidence of ';counter-steaming' flows has previously been inferred from these cool plasma observations but now, for the first time, these flows have been directly imaged along fundamental filament threads within the million degree corona (at 193 Å). We present observations of an active region filament observed with Hi-C that exhibits anti-parallel flows along adjacent filament threads. The ultra-high spatial and temporal resolution of Hi-C allow the anti-parallel flow velocities to be measured (70 - 80 km/s) and gives an indication of the resolvable thickness of the individual strands (0.8' × 0.1'). The temperature distribution of the plasma flows was estimated to be log T(K) = 5.45 × 0.10 using EM loci analysis. Short-lived, small brightenings sparkling at the edge of the active region, calle EUV Bright Dots (EBDs) were also investigated. EBDs have a characteristic duration of 25 s with a characteristic length of 680 km. These brightenings are not fully resolved by the SDO/AIA instrument at the same wavelength, but can however be identified with respect to the Hi-C location of the EBDs. In addition, EBDs are seen in other chromospheric/coronal channels of SDO/AIA suggesting a temperature between 0.5 and 1.5 MK. Based on a potential field extrapolation from an SDO/HMI magnetogram, the EBDs appear at the footpoints of large-scale trans-equatorial coronal loops. The Hi-C observations provide the first evidence of small-scale EUV

  13. Factors promoting or potentially impeding school success: disparities and state variations for children with special health care needs.

    PubMed

    Bethell, Christina; Forrest, Christopher B; Stumbo, Scott; Gombojav, Narangerel; Carle, Adam; Irwin, Charles E

    2012-04-01

    School success predicts many pathways for health and well-being across the life span. Factors promoting or potentially impeding school success are critical to understand for all children and for children with special health care needs (CSHCN), whose life course trajectories are already impacted by their chronic health problems. The 2007 National Survey of Children's Health was used (1) to estimate national and state prevalence and within and across states disparities in factors promoting school success (engagement, participation, safety) or potentially impeding success (missing school, grade repetition, school identified problems) for all children and CSHCN and (2) to evaluate associations with CSHCN service need complexity and presence of emotional, behavioral or developmental problems (EBD) as well as with school case management policies in states. Among school age children, 60 % experienced all three factors promoting school success (49.3-73.8 % across states), dropping to 51.3 % for CSHCN (39.4-64.7 % across states) and to 36.2 % for the 40 % of all CSHCN who have both more complex service needs and EBD. CSHCN were more likely to experience factors potentially impeding school success. After accounting for child factors, CSHCN living in states requiring case management in schools for children with disabilities were less likely to experience grade repetition (OR 0.65). Within-state disparities between non-CSHCN and CSHCN varied across states. Threats to school success for US children are pervasive and are especially pronounced for CSHCN with more complex needs and EBD. Findings support broad, non-condition specific efforts to promote school success for CSHCN and consideration of state school policies, such as case management.

  14. The human metabolic response to chronic ketosis without caloric restriction: physical and biochemical adaptation.

    PubMed

    Phinney, S D; Bistrian, B R; Wolfe, R R; Blackburn, G L

    1983-08-01

    To study the metabolic effects of ketosis without weight loss, nine lean men were fed a eucaloric balanced diet (EBD) for one week providing 35-50 kcal/kg/d, 1.75 g of protein per kilogram per day and the remaining kilocalories as two-thirds carbohydrate (CHO) and one-third fat. This was followed by four weeks of a eucaloric ketogenic diet (EKD)--isocaloric and isonitrogenous with the EBD but providing less than 20 g CHO daily. Both diets were appropriately supplemented with minerals and vitamins. Weight and whole-body potassium estimated by potassium-40 counting (40K) did not vary significantly during the five-week study. Nitrogen balance (N-Bal) was regained after one week of the EKD. The fasting blood glucose remained lower during the EKD than during the control diet (4.4 mmol/L at EBD, 4.1 mmol/L at EKD-4, P less than 0.01). The fasting whole-body glucose oxidation rate determined by a 13C-glucose primed constant infusion technique fell from 0.71 mg/kg/min during the control diet to 0.50 mg/kg/min (P less than 0.01) during the fourth week of the EKD. The mean serum cholesterol level rose (from 159 to 208 mg/dL) during the EKD, while triglycerides fell from 107 to 79 mg/dL. No disturbance of hepatic or renal function was noted at EKD-4. These findings indicate that the ketotic state induced by the EKD was well tolerated in lean subjects; nitrogen balance was regained after brief adaptation, serum lipids were not pathologically elevated, and blood glucose oxidation at rest was measurably reduced while the subjects remained euglycemic.

  15. Detection of and response to a probable volcanogenic T-wave event swarm on the western Blanco Transform Fault Zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dziak, R.P.; Fox, C.G.; Embley, R.W.; Lupton, J.E.; Johnson, G.C.; Chadwick, W.W.; Koski, R.A.

    1996-01-01

    The East Blanco Depression (EBD), a pull-apart basin within the western Blanco Transform Fault Zone (BTFZ), was the site of an intense earthquake T-wave swarm that began at 1317Z on January 9, 1994. Although tectonically generated earthquakes occur frequently along the BTFZ, this swarm was unusual in that it was preceded and accompanied by periodic, low-frequency, long-duration acoustic signals, that originated from near the swarm epicenters. These tremor-like signals were very similar in character to acoustic energy produced by a shallow-submarine eruption near Socorro Island, a seamount several hundred km west of Baja, California. The ???69 earthquakes and ???400 tremor-like events at the EBD occurred sporadically, with two periods of peak activity occurring between January 5-16 and 27-31. The swarm-like character of the earthquakes and the similarity of the tremor activity to the Socorro eruption indicated that the EBD was undergoing an intrusion or eruption episode. On January 27, six CTD/rosette casts were conducted at the site. Water samples from two of the stations yielded anomalous 3He concentrations, with maxima at ???2800 m depth over the main basin. In June 1994 two camera tows within the basin yielded evidence of pillow-lava volcanism and hydrothermal deposits, but no conclusive evidence of a recent seafloor eruption. In September 1994, deployments of the U.S. Navy's Advanced Tethered Vehicle resulted in the discovery of an active hydrothermal mound on the flanks of a pillow-lava volcano. The hydrothermal mound consists of Fe-rich hydrothermal precipitate and bacterial mats. Temperatures to 60??C were measured 30 cm below the surface. This is the first discovery of active hydrothermal vents along an oceanic fracture zone. Although no conclusive evidence of volcanic activity associated with the T-wave event swarm was found during these response efforts, the EBD has been the site of recent seafloor eruptions. Copyright 1996 by the American Geophysical

  16. Metalliferous sediment and a silica-hematite deposit within the Blanco fracture zone, Northeast Pacific

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hein, J.R.; Clague, D.A.; Koski, R.A.; Embley, R.W.; Dunham, R.E.

    2008-01-01

    A Tiburon ROV dive within the East Blanco Depression (EBD) increased the mapped extent of a known hydrothermal field by an order of magnitude. In addition, a unique opal-CT (cristobalite-tridymite)-hematite mound was discovered, and mineralized sediments and rock were collected and analyzed. Silica-hematite mounds have not previously been found on the deep ocean floor. The light-weight rock of the porous mound consists predominantly of opal-CT and hematite filaments, rods, and strands, and averages 77.8% SiO2 and 11.8% Fe2O3. The hematite and opal-CT precipitated from a low-temperature (???115?? C), strongly oxidized, silica- and iron-rich, sulfur-poor hydrothermal fluid; a bacterial mat provided the framework for precipitation. Samples collected from a volcaniclastic rock outcrop consist primarily of quartz with lesser plagioclase, smectite, pyroxene, and sulfides; SiO2 content averages 72.5%. Formation of these quartz-rich samples is best explained by cooling in an up-flow zone of silica-rich hydrothermal fluids within a low permeability system. Opal-A, opal-CT, and quartz mineralization found in different places within the EBD hydrothermal field likely reflects decreasing silica saturation and increasing temperature of the mineralizing fluid with increasing silica crystallinity. Six push cores recovered gravel, coarse sand, and mud mineralized variously by Fe or Mn oxides, silica, and sulfides. Total rare-earth element concentrations are low for both the rock and push core samples. Ce and Eu anomalies reflect high and low temperature hydrothermal components and detrital phases. A remarkable variety of types of mineralization occur within the EBD field, yet a consistent suite of elements is enriched (relative to basalt and unmineralized cores) in all samples analyzed: Ag, Au, S, Mo, Hg, As, Sb, Sr, and U; most samples are also enriched in Cu, Pb, Cd, and Zn. On the basis of these element enrichments, the EBD hydrothermal field might best be described as a base

  17. Sphincterotomy with endoscopic biliary drainage for severe acute cholangitis: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sawas, Tarek; Arwani, Noura; Al Halabi, Shadi; Vargo, John

    2017-01-01

    Aims To investigate the role of endoscopic sphincterotomy (ES) with endoscopic biliary drainage (EBD) in acute severe obstructive cholangitis management by performing a meta-analysis of controlled trials. Method We searched PubMed and Embase for controlled studies that compared endoscopic drainage with ES versus Non-ES in acute obstructive cholangitis. Two reviewers selected the studies and extracted the data. Disagreement was addressed by a third reviewer. Heterogeneity of the studies was analyzed by Cochran’s Q statistics. A Mantel–Haenszel risk ratio was calculated utilizing a random effects model. Results Four controlled studies met our inclusion criteria with 392 participants (201 ES, 191 Non-ES). The outcomes were drainage insertion success rate, drainage effectiveness, post drainage pancreatitis, bleeding, procedure duration, perforation, cholecystitis, and 30-day mortality. Drainage insertion success rate was identical in both groups (RR: 1.00, 95 %CI% 0.96 – 1.04). Effective drainage was not significantly different (RR: 1.11, 95 %CI 0.73 – 1.7). There was no significant difference in the incidence of pancreatitis post EBD between the ES and Non-ES groups at 3 % and 4 %, respectively (RR: 0.73, 95 %CI 0.24 – 2.27). However, there was a significant increase in post EBD bleeding with ES compared to Non-ES (RR: 8.58, 95 %CI 2.03 – 36.34). Thirty-day mortality was similar between ES and Non-ES groups at 0.7 % and 1 %, respectively (RR: 0.5, 95 %CI 0.05 – 5.28). Conclusion Our findings show that EBD without ES is an effective drainage technique and carries less risk for post procedure bleeding. Patients who are critically ill and have coagulopathy should be spared from undergoing ES in the acute phase. PMID:28229129

  18. Comparison of biophysical factors influencing on emphysema quantification with low-dose CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heo, Chang Yong; Kim, Jong Hyo

    2014-03-01

    Emphysema Index(EI) measurements in MDCT is known to be influenced by various biophysical factors such as total lung volume, and body size. We investigated the association of the four biophysical factors with emphysema index in low-dose MDCT. In particular, we attempted to identify a potentially stronger biophysical factor than total lung volume. A total of 400 low-dose MDCT volumes taken at 120kVp, 40mAs, 1mm thickness, and B30f reconstruction kernel were used. The lungs, airways, and pulmonary vessels were automatically segmented, and two Emphysema Indices, relative area below -950HU(RA950) and 15th percentile(Perc15), were extracted from the segmented lungs. The biophysical factors such as total lung volume(TLV), mode of lung attenuation(ModLA), effective body diameter(EBD), and the water equivalent body diameter(WBD) were estimated from the segmented lung and body area. The association of biophysical factors with emphysema indices were evaluated by correlation coefficients. The mean emphysema indices were 8.3±5.5(%) in RA950, and -930±18(HU) in Perc15. The estimates of biophysical factors were 4.7±1.0(L) in TLV, -901±21(HU) in ModLA, 26.9±2.2(cm) in EBD, and 25.9±2.6(cm) in WBD. The correlation coefficients of biophysical factors with RA950 were 0.73 in TLV, 0.94 in ModLA, 0.31 in EBD, and 0.18 WBD, the ones with Perc15 were 0.74 in TLV, 0.98 in ModLA, 0.29 in EBD, and 0.15 WBD. Study results revealed that two biophysical factors, TLV and ModLA, mostly affects the emphysema indices. In particular, the ModLA exhibited strongest correlation of 0.98 with Perc15, which indicating the ModLA is the most significant confounding biophysical factor in emphysema indices measurement.

  19. Linear and Non-Linear Response of Liquid and Solid Particles to Energetic Radiation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-03-11

    for particle 2 located on the + x6 axis (perpendicular to the beam propagation axis) one diameter surface-to-surface from particle 1 (i 12 = 4.0, Obd2 ...axis direction. Off is the far field scattering angle relative to the beam propagation axis. Obd2 is the orientation angle of particle 2 relative to...Particle 2 in the Xb - Zb plane and positioned one diameter surface-to-surface from particle 1 (P12 = 4.0). a.) Obd2 = 00, b.) Obd2 = 30 ° , c.) ebd

  20. Decision making.

    PubMed

    Chambers, David W

    2011-01-01

    A decision is a commitment of resources under conditions of risk in expectation of the best future outcome. The smart decision is always the strategy with the best overall expected value-the best combination of facts and values. Some of the special circumstances involved in decision making are discussed, including decisions where there are multiple goals, those where more than one person is involved in making the decision, using trigger points, framing decisions correctly, commitments to lost causes, and expert decision makers. A complex example of deciding about removal of asymptomatic third molars, with and without an EBD search, is discussed.

  1. Strengths and Limitations of Evidence-Based Dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Hywel C

    2014-01-01

    The need for understanding and reflecting on evidence-based dermatology (EBD) has never been greater given the exponential growth of new external evidence to inform clinical practice. Like any other branch of medicine, dermatologists need to acquire new skills in constructing answerable questions, efficiently searching electronic bibliographic databases, and critically appraising different types of studies. Secondary summaries of evidence in the form of systematic reviews (SR), that is, reviews that are conducted in a systematic, unbiased and explicit manner, reside at the top of the evidence hierarchy, because they are less prone to bias than traditional expert reviews. In addition to providing summaries of the best external evidence, systematic reviews and randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are also powerful ways of identifying research gaps and ultimately setting the agenda of future clinical research in dermatology. But like any paradigm, EBD can have its limitations. Wrong application, misuse and overuse of EBD can have serious consequences. For example, mindless pooling together of data from dissimilar studies in a meta-analysis may render it a form of reductionism that does not make any sense. Similarly, even highly protocolised study designs such as SRs and RCTs are still susceptible to some degree of dishonesty and bias. Over-reliance on randomized controlled trials (RCT) may be inappropriate, as RCTs are not a good source for picking up rare but important adverse effects such as lupus syndrome with minocycline. A common criticism leveled against SRs is that these frequently conclude that there is lack of sufficient evidence to inform current clinical practice, but arguably, such a perception is grounded more on the interpretation of the SRs than anything else. The apparent absence of evidence should not paralyze the dermatologist to adopt a state of therapeutic nihilism. Poor primary data and an SR based on evidence that is not up-to-date are also

  2. Extended Burnup Demonstration Reactor Fuels Program. Annual progress report, April 1983-March 1984. [BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Exarhos, C.A.

    1985-06-20

    The US Department of Energy, Consumers Power Company, Exxon Nuclear Company, and General Public Utilities Nuclear Corporation have participated since 1979 in a cooperative Extended Burnup Demonstration Program. Under the program, standard ENC-fabricated reload fuel in the Big Rock Point and Oyster Creek reactor cores has been irradiated to discharge burnups at or beyond 35,000 MWD/MTU, one to two cycles beyond its originally projected exposure life. The program provides for examination of the fuel at poolside before and after each extended burnup cycle as well as for limited destructive hot cell examination. The 1984 progress report covers work performed under the EBD program between April 1983 and March 1984. Major milestones reached during the period include completion of a hot cell examination on four high burnup rods from Big Rock Point and of a poolside on the Oyster Creek EBD fuel at discharge. The hot cell examination of four rods at burnups to 37.2 GWD/MTU confirmed poolside measurements on the same fuel, showing the urania and gadolinia-bearing fuel rods to be in excellent condition. No major cladding degradation, pellet restructuring, or pellet-clad interaction was found in any of the samples examined. The Oyster Creek fuel, examined at an assembly average exposure of 34.5 GWD/MTU, showed good performance with regard to both diametral creepdown and clad oxide accumulation.

  3. Electron random walk and collisional crossover in a gas in presence of electromagnetic waves and magnetostatic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharjee, Sudeep; Dey, Indranuj; Paul, Samit

    2013-04-01

    This paper deals with random walk of electrons and collisional crossover in a gas evolving toward a plasma, in presence of electromagnetic (EM) waves and magnetostatic (B) fields, a fundamental subject of importance in areas requiring generation and confinement of wave assisted plasmas. In presence of EM waves and B fields, the number of collisions N suffered by an electron with neutral gas atoms while diffusing out of the volume during the walk is significantly modified when compared to the conventional field free square law diffusion; N =1.5(Λ /λ)2, where Λ is the characteristic diffusion length and λ is the mean free path. There is a distinct crossover and a time scale associated with the transition from the elastic to inelastic collisions dominated regime, which can accurately predict the breakdown time (τc) and the threshold electric field (EBD) for plasma initiation. The essential features of cyclotron resonance manifested as a sharp drop in τc, lowering of EBD and enhanced electron energy gain is well reproduced in the constrained random walk.

  4. Androctonus australis hector venom contributes to the interaction between neuropeptides and mast cells in pulmonary hyperresponsiveness.

    PubMed

    Chaïr-Yousfi, Imène; Laraba-Djebari, Fatima; Hammoudi-Triki, Djelila

    2015-03-01

    Lung injury and respiratory distress syndrome are frequent symptoms observed in the most severe cases of scorpion envenomation. The uncontrolled transmigration of leukocyte cells into the lung interstitium and alveolar space and pulmonary edema may be the cause of death. Mast cells can release various inflammatory mediators known to be involved in the development of lung edema following scorpion venom injection. The present study was designed to determine the evidence of neurokinin 1 (NK1) receptor and the involvement of mast cell activation to induce pulmonary edema and to increase vascular permeability after Androctonus australis hector (Aah) venom administration. To this end, mast cells were depleted using compound 48/80 (C48/80). Furthermore, the involvement of tachykinin NK1 receptors expressed on mast cell membranes was elucidated by their blocking with an antagonist. On the other hand, the ability of Aah venom to increase vascular permeability and to induce edema was also assessed by measuring the amount of Evans blue dye (EBD) extravasation in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and in the lungs of mice. Pulmonary edema, as assessed by the levels of EBD extravasation, was completely inhibited in compound 48/80-treated animals. Depletion by stimuli non-immunological C48/80 component markedly reduced induced inflammatory response following the venom administration. The mast cells seem to play an important role in the development of lung injury and the increase of vascular permeability in mice following the subcutaneous administration of Aah scorpion venom through the NK1 receptor.

  5. Recovery of graft steatosis and protein-losing enteropathy after biliary diversion in a PFIC 1 liver transplanted child.

    PubMed

    Nicastro, Emanuele; Stephenne, Xavier; Smets, Françoise; Fusaro, Fabio; de Magnée, Catherine; Reding, Raymond; Sokal, Etienne M

    2012-08-01

    PFIC 1 is a genetic disorder characterized by hepatic and gastrointestinal disease, often requiring LT during childhood. Extrahepatic symptoms, such as diarrhea and malabsorption, do not improve or may be aggravated after LT, as graft steatosis or steatohepatitis as consequences of the interaction between transplanted liver and native bowel. We describe a patient with PFIC 1 who presented with cholestasis in infancy, who developed intractable pruritus and liver fibrosis. The child underwent living donor LT at 3.6 yr of age, and he early developed severe refractory diarrhea, secondary malabsorption with protein-losing enteropathy, and an early fatty liver disease trough graft steatohepatitis. As the response to cholestyramine was unsatisfactory, we decided to perform an EBD by using the jejunal loop used for the cholangiojejunostomy. Diarrhea resolved rapidly after surgery. He remained well after six months following biliary diversion, with normal stool output and no protein loss. We documented a dramatic improvement of graft steatosis at histology as well as normalization of liver function test. EBD can be considered a valuable treatment option to avoid organ disfunction and loss in PFIC 1 transplanted patients who develop graft steatohepatitis.

  6. In-situ laser-induced contamination monitoring using long-distance microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Paul; Schröder, Helmut; Riede, Wolfgang

    2014-10-01

    Operating high power space-based laser systems in the visible and UV range is problematic due to laser-induced contamination (LIC). In this paper LIC growth on high-reflective (HR) coated optics is investigated for UV irradiation of 355 nm with naphthalene as contamination material in the range of 10-5 mbar. The investigated HR optics were coated by different processes: electron beam deposition (EBD), magnetron sputtering (MS) or ion beam sputtering (IBS). In-situ observation of contamination induced damage was performed using a long distance microscope. Additionally the onset and evolution of deposit formation and contamination induced damage of optical samples was observed by in-situ laserinduced fluorescence and reflection monitoring. Ex-situ characterization of deposits and damage morphology was performed by differential interference contrast and fluorescence microscopy. It was found that contamination induced a drastic reduction of laser damage threshold compared to values obtained without contamination. Contamination deposit and damage formation was strongest on IBS followed by MS and smallest on EBD.

  7. Gilles de la Tourette's syndrome in special education schools: a United Kingdom study.

    PubMed

    Eapen, V; Robertson, M M; Zeitlin, H; Kurlan, R

    1997-06-01

    In order to determine the prevalence of tic disorders in children with severe school problems requiring a residential facility and comparison groups of children in regular day schools, we performed direct clinical examinations for the presence of tics and Gilles de la Tourette's syndrome (GTS) in 20 children from a residential school for emotional and behavioral difficulties (EBD); 25 children from a residential school for learning disabilities; 17 "problem" children (PC) (identified by teachers as having academic or behaviour problems) and 19 normal children (NC) selected at random (using random numbers) from a regular school. Of the EBD students, 65% were judged to have definite tics as compared with 24% of students with learning difficulties (P < 0.05), 6% of PC (P < 0.003) and none of the NC (P < 0.0006) group. Most of the affected students met diagnostic criteria for GTS. Our findings suggest that GTS is commonly associated with the need for special education and that this association is particularly robust for children with severe school problems. In these children, the presence of tics may be an indicator of an underlying dysfunction of neurological development.

  8. Expanded beam deflection method for simultaneous measurement of displacement and vibrations of multiple microcantilevers.

    PubMed

    Nieradka, K; Małozięć, G; Kopiec, D; Grabiec, P; Janus, P; Sierakowski, A; Gotszalk, T

    2011-10-01

    Here we present an extension of optical beam deflection (OBD) method for measuring displacement and vibrations of an array of microcantilevers. Instead of focusing on the cantilever, the optical beam is either focused above or below the cantilever array, or focused only in the axis parallel to the cantilevers length, allowing a wide optical line to span multiple cantilevers in the array. Each cantilever reflects a part of the incident beam, which is then directed onto a photodiode array detector in a manner allowing distinguishing between individual beams. Each part of reflected beam behaves like a single beam of roughly the same divergence angle in the bending sensing axis as the incident beam. Since sensitivity of the OBD method depends on the divergence angle of deflected beam, high sensitivity is preserved in proposed expanded beam deflection (EBD) method. At the detector, each spot's position is measured at the same time, without time multiplexing of light sources. This provides real simultaneous readout of entire array, unavailable in most of competitive methods, and thus increases time resolution of the measurement. Expanded beam can also span another line of cantilevers allowing monitoring of specially designed two-dimensional arrays. In this paper, we present first results of application of EBD method to cantilever sensors. We show how thermal noise resolution can be easily achieved and combined with thermal noise based resonance frequency measurement.

  9. Expanded beam deflection method for simultaneous measurement of displacement and vibrations of multiple microcantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieradka, K.; Małozieć, G.; Kopiec, D.; Grabiec, P.; Janus, P.; Sierakowski, A.; Gotszalk, T.

    2011-10-01

    Here we present an extension of optical beam deflection (OBD) method for measuring displacement and vibrations of an array of microcantilevers. Instead of focusing on the cantilever, the optical beam is either focused above or below the cantilever array, or focused only in the axis parallel to the cantilevers length, allowing a wide optical line to span multiple cantilevers in the array. Each cantilever reflects a part of the incident beam, which is then directed onto a photodiode array detector in a manner allowing distinguishing between individual beams. Each part of reflected beam behaves like a single beam of roughly the same divergence angle in the bending sensing axis as the incident beam. Since sensitivity of the OBD method depends on the divergence angle of deflected beam, high sensitivity is preserved in proposed expanded beam deflection (EBD) method. At the detector, each spot's position is measured at the same time, without time multiplexing of light sources. This provides real simultaneous readout of entire array, unavailable in most of competitive methods, and thus increases time resolution of the measurement. Expanded beam can also span another line of cantilevers allowing monitoring of specially designed two-dimensional arrays. In this paper, we present first results of application of EBD method to cantilever sensors. We show how thermal noise resolution can be easily achieved and combined with thermal noise based resonance frequency measurement.

  10. Different techniques for management of common bile duct stones: a single centre experience.

    PubMed

    El Wakil, Mohamed Reda M; Abdelkader, Nadia A; Salem, Hossam El-Deen M; Halima Abo, Ahmed Samir

    2014-12-01

    Local experience on the combined technique of endoscopic sphincterotomy followed by endo: scopic balloon dilation is scarce. This study clarified whether this crombined technique will offer any advantages, with respect to therapeutic outcome and complications rate, as compared with endoscopic sphincterotomy (ES) and endoscopic balloon dilatation (EBD) alone for the extraction of large and/or multiple common bile duct stones. For a total of 76 patients, extraction of large and/or multiple common bile duct (CBD) stones during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography was performed. According to the used technique, they were categorized into 3 groups; Endoscopic sphincterotomy, endoscopic balloon dilatation or combined technique. The success rate of complete stone removal and the incidence of procedure-related complications were compared among the three groups. Success rate after one session was recorded to be comparable among the three groups. Relative Risk Ratio assessment of success rate after single session among the three groups showed no statistically significant difference. Regarding bleeding, only 3 (10%) cases were recorded in the ES group with no cases in the, other 2 groups. No significant difference was noted among the three groups regarding other complication. The combined technique of ES followed by EBD is an effective and safe technique enables extraction of multiple and/or relatively large stones. It could be a reasonable alternative option when standard techniques are inadequate to remove bile duct stones.

  11. Fabrication of wide-bandgap transparent electrodes by using conductive filaments: Performance breakthrough in vertical-type GaN LED

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Su Jin; Kim, Hee-Dong; Kim, Kyeong Heon; Shin, Hee Woong; Han, Il Ki; Kim, Tae Geun

    2014-01-01

    For realizing next-generation solid-state lighting devices, performance breakthroughs must be accomplished for nitride-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Highly transparent conductive electrodes (TCEs) may be key to achieving this goal, as they provide uniform current injection and distribution across a large device area, eventually increasing the light output power. However, the trade-off between electrical conductivity and optical transmittance of LEDs must be addressed. Herein, we introduce a novel strategy based on TCEs fabricated using wide-bandgap (WB) materials such as SiNx, incorporated beneath the n-type electrode of vertical-type LEDs, and show the feasibility of this strategy. We employ a novel electrical breakdown (EBD) technique to form conductive filaments (or current paths) between a TCE and n-GaN (GaN: gallium nitride). By employing the EBD process, we obtain both ohmic behavior for SiNx TCE/n-GaN and a current spreading effect across n-GaN. These results demonstrate the tremendous potential of WB-TCEs for use in high-performance optoelectronic devices. PMID:25059757

  12. Comparison of two stochastic techniques for reliable urban runoff prediction by modeling systematic errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Giudice, Dario; Löwe, Roland; Madsen, Henrik; Mikkelsen, Peter Steen; Rieckermann, Jörg

    2015-07-01

    In urban rainfall-runoff, commonly applied statistical techniques for uncertainty quantification mostly ignore systematic output errors originating from simplified models and erroneous inputs. Consequently, the resulting predictive uncertainty is often unreliable. Our objective is to present two approaches which use stochastic processes to describe systematic deviations and to discuss their advantages and drawbacks for urban drainage modeling. The two methodologies are an external bias description (EBD) and an internal noise description (IND, also known as stochastic gray-box modeling). They emerge from different fields and have not yet been compared in environmental modeling. To compare the two approaches, we develop a unifying terminology, evaluate them theoretically, and apply them to conceptual rainfall-runoff modeling in the same drainage system. Our results show that both approaches can provide probabilistic predictions of wastewater discharge in a similarly reliable way, both for periods ranging from a few hours up to more than 1 week ahead of time. The EBD produces more accurate predictions on long horizons but relies on computationally heavy MCMC routines for parameter inferences. These properties make it more suitable for off-line applications. The IND can help in diagnosing the causes of output errors and is computationally inexpensive. It produces best results on short forecast horizons that are typical for online applications.

  13. Expanded beam deflection method for simultaneous measurement of displacement and vibrations of multiple microcantilevers

    SciTech Connect

    Nieradka, K.; MaloziePc, G.; Kopiec, D.; Gotszalk, T.

    2011-10-15

    Here we present an extension of optical beam deflection (OBD) method for measuring displacement and vibrations of an array of microcantilevers. Instead of focusing on the cantilever, the optical beam is either focused above or below the cantilever array, or focused only in the axis parallel to the cantilevers length, allowing a wide optical line to span multiple cantilevers in the array. Each cantilever reflects a part of the incident beam, which is then directed onto a photodiode array detector in a manner allowing distinguishing between individual beams. Each part of reflected beam behaves like a single beam of roughly the same divergence angle in the bending sensing axis as the incident beam. Since sensitivity of the OBD method depends on the divergence angle of deflected beam, high sensitivity is preserved in proposed expanded beam deflection (EBD) method. At the detector, each spot's position is measured at the same time, without time multiplexing of light sources. This provides real simultaneous readout of entire array, unavailable in most of competitive methods, and thus increases time resolution of the measurement. Expanded beam can also span another line of cantilevers allowing monitoring of specially designed two-dimensional arrays. In this paper, we present first results of application of EBD method to cantilever sensors. We show how thermal noise resolution can be easily achieved and combined with thermal noise based resonance frequency measurement.

  14. Intraparenchymal ultrasound application and improved distribution of infusate with convection-enhanced delivery in rodent and nonhuman primate brain.

    PubMed

    Mano, Yui; Saito, Ryuta; Haga, Yoichi; Matsunaga, Tadao; Zhang, Rong; Chonan, Masashi; Haryu, Shinya; Shoji, Takuhiro; Sato, Aya; Sonoda, Yukihiko; Tsuruoka, Noriko; Nishiyachi, Keisuke; Sumiyoshi, Akira; Nonaka, Hiroi; Kawashima, Ryuta; Tominaga, Teiji

    2016-05-01

    OBJECT Convection-enhanced delivery (CED) is an effective drug delivery method that delivers high concentrations of drugs directly into the targeted lesion beyond the blood-brain barrier. However, the drug distribution attained using CED has not satisfactorily covered the entire targeted lesion in tumors such as glioma. Recently, the efficacy of ultrasound assistance was reported for various drug delivery applications. The authors developed a new ultrasound-facilitated drug delivery (UFD) system that enables the application of ultrasound at the infusion site. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the efficacy of the UFD system and to examine effective ultrasound profiles. METHODS The authors fabricated a steel bar-based device that generates ultrasound and enables infusion of the aqueous drug from one end of the bar. The volume of distribution (Vd) after infusion of 10 ml of 2% Evans blue dye (EBD) into rodent brain was tested with different frequencies and applied voltages: 252 kHz/30 V; 252 kHz/60 V; 524 kHz/13 V; 524 kHz/30 V; and 524 kHz/60 V. In addition, infusion of 5 mM gadopentetate dimeglumine (Gd-DTPA) was tested with 260 kHz/60 V, the distribution of which was evaluated using a 7-T MRI unit. In a nonhuman primate (Macaca fascicularis) study, 300 μl of 1 mM Gd-DTPA/EBD was infused. The final distribution was evaluated using MRI. Two-sample comparisons were made by Student t-test, and 1-way ANOVA was used for multiple comparisons. Significance was set at p < 0.05. RESULTS After infusion of 10 μl of EBD into the rat brain using the UFD system, the Vds of EBD in the UFD groups were significantly larger than those of the control group. When a frequency of 252 kHz was applied, the Vd of the group in which 60 V was applied was significantly larger than that of the group in which 30 V was used. When a frequency of 524 kHz was applied, the Vd tended to increase with application of a higher voltage; however, the differences were not significant (1-way

  15. Toxicity of 2,6-Di-tert-butyl-4-Nitrophenol (DBNP).

    PubMed

    Alexander, W K; Briggs, G B; Still, K R; Jederberg, W W; MacMahon, K; Baker, W H; Mackerer, C

    2001-04-01

    U.S. Navy submarines reported a yellowing of metal surfaces on their internal surfaces. The yellowing was initially identified on the painted steel bulkheads but further examination indicated that it was not limited to steel surfaces and included bedding, thread tape, Formica, plastisol covered hand-wheels, and aluminum lockers. Crew members also reported to the medical department that their skin turned yellow when they came in contact with these contaminated surfaces and requested information on the effects of exposure. Studies conducted by General Dynamics' Electric Boat Division (EBD) determined that the agent was 2,6-Di-tertbutyl-4-Nitrophenol (DBNP). 2,6-Di-butylphenol (DBP) is an antioxidant additive used in lubricating oils and hydraulic fluids. In the enclosed atmosphere of a submarine, the oil mist could be spread throughout the boat by venting the lube oil to the atmosphere. Submarines use electrostatic precipitators (ESP) to clean the air of particulate materials. During passage through the ESP, oil mist containing DBP is nitrated to DBNP, which is then moved throughout the boat in the ventilation system. Analysis of the EBD data indicated 24-hour exposure concentrations to be in the range of <3.0 to 122 ppb in the laboratory and submarine settings. Submarine crews may be exposed to these concentrations for as many as 24 hours/ day for 90 days during underway periods. Toxicity studies regarding the oral and dermal uptake of DBNP were conducted. From the literature the lethal dose to 50 percent of the population (LD50) of DBNP (rat) was reported by Vesselinovitch et al. in 1961 to be 500 mg/kg. Our studies indicated that the LD50 is in the range of 80 mg/kg in the rat. Our work also includes dermal absorption studies, which indicated that DBNP is not well absorbed through intact skin. Within this study, no no-observable adverse effect level (NOAEL) or lowest observable adverse effect level (LOAEL) was identified. Calculation of a reference dose was

  16. Agonists binding nicotinic receptors elicit specific channel-opening patterns at αγ and αδ sites

    PubMed Central

    Stock, Patrick; Ljaschenko, Dmitrij; Heckmann, Manfred; Dudel, Josef

    2014-01-01

    ‘Embryonic’ muscle-type nicotinic acetylcholine receptor channels (nAChRs) bind ligands at interfaces of α- and γ- or δ-subunits. αγ and αδ sites differ in affinity, but their contributions to opening the channel have remained elusive. We compared high-resolution patch clamp currents evoked by epibatidine (Ebd), carbamylcholine (CCh) and acetylcholine (ACh). Ebd binds with 75-fold higher affinity at αγ than at αδ sites, whereas CCh and ACh prefer αδ sites. Similar short (τO1), intermediate (τO2) and long (τO3) types of opening were observed with all three agonists. τO2 openings were maximally prevalent at low Ebd concentrations, binding at αγ sites. By contrast, τO1 openings appear to be generated at αδ sites. In addition, two types of burst appeared: short bursts of an average of 0.75 ms (τB1) that should arise from the αγ site, and long bursts of 12–25 ms (τB2) in duration arising from double liganded receptors. Limited by the temporal resolution, the closings within bursts were invariant at 3 μs. Corrected for missed closings, in the case of ACh the openings within long bursts lasted 170 μs and those in short bursts about 30 μs. Blocking αδ sites with α-conotoxin M1 (CTx) eliminated both τO1 and τB2 and left only τO2 and the short τB1 bursts, as expected. Furthermore we found desensitization when the receptors bound ACh only at the αγ site. When CTx was applied to ‘embryonic’ mouse endplates, monoquantal current rise times were increased, and amplitude and decay time constants were reduced, as expected. Thus the αγ and αδ sites of nAChRs elicit specific channel-opening patterns. PMID:24665094

  17. [Social network analysis and eating disorders: a study concerning blogs].

    PubMed

    Bastianelli, Alessia; Spoto, Andrea; Vidotto, Giulio

    2011-01-01

    This study is aimed at analyzing the structure of relations among blogs referring to Eating Disorders (ED). Through the use Of Social Network Analysis (SNA) we investigated both the groups and their structure in order to study the social processes within the network. A formal analysis of the ED blogs' characteristics has been carried out. This analysis provided us with information about network Centrality and Cohesion parameters. Results allow us to highlight the most relevant blogs in the network. Even if the extremely variable nature of the blogs does not allow to have a precise picture of the blogosphere referring to ED, this first attempt to apply SNA in this field allowed us to suggest interesting remarks about EBD both from the research and from the social perspective.

  18. Corrosion resistance evaluation of Pd-free Ag-Au-Pt-Cu dental alloys.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Takeshi; Shiraishi, Takanobu; Takuma, Yasuko; Hisatsune, Kunihiro

    2011-01-01

    The corrosion resistance of nine experimental Pd-free Ag-Au-Pt-Cu dental alloys in a 0.9% NaCl solution was investigated using cyclic voltammetry (CV), optical microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). CV measurements revealed that the breakdown potential (E(bd)) and zero current potential (E(zc)) increased with increasing Au/(Au+Ag) atomic ratio. Thus, the Au/(Au+Ag) atomic ratio, but not the Cu content, influenced the corrosion resistance of Ag-Au-Pt-Cu alloys. After the forward scan of CV, both optical and scanning electron microscope images showed that in all the experimental alloys, the matrix phase was corroded but not the second phase. From corrosion resistance viewpoint, the Ag-Au-Pt-Cu alloys seemed to be suitable for clinical application.

  19. The American Dental Association's Center for Evidence-Based Dentistry: a critical resource for 21st century dental practice.

    PubMed

    Frantsve-Hawley, Julie; Jeske, Arthur

    2011-02-01

    Through its website (http:// www.ada.org/prof/resources/ebd/index.asp), the American Dental Association's Center for Evidence-Based Dentistry offers dental health professionals access to systematic reviews of oral health-related research findings, as well as Clinical Recommendations, which summarize large bodies of scientific evidence in the form of practice recommendations, e.g., the use of professionally-applied topical fluoride and pit-and-fissure sealants. Another feature of the site of great practical importance to the practicing dentist is the Critical Summary, which is a concise review of an individual systematic review's methodology and findings, as well as the importance and context of the outcomes, and the strengths and weaknesses of the systematic review and its implications for dental practice.

  20. [Anaesthetic management in a paediatric patient with a difficult airway due to epidermolysis bullosa dystrophica].

    PubMed

    Blázquez Gómez, E; Garcés Aletá, A; Monclus Diaz, E; Manen Berga, F; García-Aparicio, L; Ontanilla López, A

    2015-05-01

    Dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (DEB) is a rare inherited disorder characterized by blistering after minimal trauma. These blisters tend to form dystrophic scars, leading to limiting and life-threatening sequelae. The anaesthetic management of patients with DEB is a challenge, even for the most experienced anaesthesiologists, but basic principles can help us prepare the plan of care. The main goals are to prevent trauma/infection of skin/mucous, and to establish a secure airway without causing bullae. Patient positioning and the instruments used to monitor vital signs and administering anaesthetic agents can cause new lesions. It is advisable to lubricate the instruments and to avoid adhesive material and shearing forces on the skin. Besides the implications of the comorbidities, there is a potential difficult intubation and difficult vascular access. Acute airway obstruction can occur due to airway instrumentation. We report the case of a patient diagnosed with EBD difficult airway and undergoing correction of syndactylyl and dental extractions.

  1. [Chronic hepatitis non-A, non-B hepatitis: a clinical and morphologic study].

    PubMed

    da Silva, L C; Coêlho, M E; Pessôa, M G; Carrilho, F J; Cançado, E L; Muszkat, R M; da Fonseca, L E; Antonelli, R; Alves, V A; Gayotto, L C

    1989-01-01

    Few data on chronic non-A, non-B hepatitis (NANB-CH) have been published so far in our country. We have studied 85 patients classified into four groups: I. post-transfusional (PT), 35 patients (41.2%); II. risk group (GR), including health professionals and drug addicts, 11 (12.9%); III. sporadic with a well defined beginning (EBD), 19 (22.4%) and IV. sporadic with ill-defined beginning (END), 20 (23.5%). The mean age in group I was significantly higher than in groups II and III. A polyphasic pattern of serum aminotransferases and severe histological forms were observed in all groups. It is concluded that the way of infection has probably no prognostic importance.

  2. Membrane Sealant Poloxamer P188 Protects Against Isoproterenol Induced Cardiomyopathy in Dystrophin Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Cardiomyopathy in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an increasing cause of death in patients. The absence of dystrophin leads to loss of membrane integrity, cell death and fibrosis in cardiac muscle. Treatment of cardiomyocyte membrane instability could help prevent cardiomyopathy. Methods Three month old female mdx mice were exposed to the β1 receptor agonist isoproterenol subcutaneously and treated with the non-ionic tri-block copolymer Poloxamer P188 (P188) (460 mg/kg/dose i.p. daily). Cardiac function was assessed using high frequency echocardiography. Tissue was evaluated with Evans Blue Dye (EBD) and picrosirius red staining. Results BL10 control mice tolerated 30 mg/kg/day of isoproterenol for 4 weeks while death occurred in mdx mice at 30, 15, 10, 5 and 1 mg/kg/day within 24 hours. Mdx mice tolerated a low dose of 0.5 mg/kg/day. Isoproterenol exposed mdx mice showed significantly increased heart rates (p < 0.02) and cardiac fibrosis (p < 0.01) over 4 weeks compared to unexposed controls. P188 treatment of mdx mice significantly increased heart rate (median 593 vs. 667 bpm; p < 0.001) after 2 weeks and prevented a decrease in cardiac function in isoproterenol exposed mice (Shortening Fraction = 46 ± 6% vs. 35 ± 6%; p = 0.007) after 4 weeks. P188 treated mdx mice did not show significant differences in cardiac fibrosis, but demonstrated significantly increased EBD positive fibers. Conclusions This model suggests that chronic intermittent intraperitoneal P188 treatment can prevent isoproterenol induced cardiomyopathy in dystrophin deficient mdx mice. PMID:21575230

  3. Bis-butanediol-mercapturic acid (bis-BDMA) as a urinary biomarker of metabolic activation of butadiene to its ultimate carcinogenic species.

    PubMed

    Kotapati, Srikanth; Sangaraju, Dewakar; Esades, Amanda; Hallberg, Lance; Walker, Vernon E; Swenberg, James A; Tretyakova, Natalia Y

    2014-06-01

    Human carcinogen 1,3-butadiene (BD) undergoes metabolic activation to 3,4-epoxy-1-butene (EB), hydroxymethylvinyl ketone (HMVK), 3,4-epoxy-1,2-butanediol (EBD) and 1,2,3,4-diepoxybutane (DEB). Among these, DEB is by far the most genotoxic metabolite and is considered the ultimate carcinogenic species of BD. We have shown previously that BD-exposed laboratory mice form 8- to 10-fold more DEB-DNA adducts than rats exposed at the same conditions, which may be responsible for the enhanced sensitivity of mice to BD-mediated cancer. In the present study, we have identified 1,4-bis-(N-acetyl-L-cystein-S-yl)butane-2,3-diol (bis-BDMA) as a novel DEB-specific urinary biomarker. Isotope dilution high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry was employed to quantify bis-BDMA and three other BD-mercapturic acids, 2-(N-acetyl-L-cystein-S-yl)-1-hydroxybut-3-ene/1-(N-acetyl-L-cystein-S-yl)-2-hydroxy-but-3-ene (MHBMA, from EB), 4-(N-acetyl-L-cystein-S-yl)-1,2-dihydroxybutane (DHBMA, from HMVK) and 4-(N-acetyl-L-cystein-S-yl)-1,2,3-trihydroxybutane (THBMA, from EBD), in urine of confirmed smokers, occupationally exposed workers and BD-exposed laboratory rats. Bis-BDMA was formed in a dose-dependent manner in urine of rats exposed to 0-200 p.p.m. BD by inhalation, although it was a minor metabolite (1%) as compared with DHBMA (47%) and THBMA (37%). In humans, DHBMA was the most abundant BD-mercapturic acid excreted (93%), followed by THBMA (5%) and MHBMA (2%), whereas no bis-BDMA was detected. These results reveal significant differences in metabolism of BD between rats and humans.

  4. New Small Hydropower Technology to be Deployed in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Hadjerioua, Boualem; Opsahl, Egil; Gordon, Jim; Bishop, Norm

    2012-01-01

    Earth By Design Inc, (EBD), in collaboration with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Knight Pi sold and Co., and CleanPower AS, has responded to a Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) published by the Department of Energy (DOE) in April 2011. EBD submitted a proposal to install an innovative, small hydropower technology, the Turbinator, a Norwegian technology from CleanPower. The Turbinator combines an axial flow, fixed-blade Kaplan turbine and generator in a compact and sealed machine. This makes it a very simple and easy technology to be deployed and installed. DOE has awarded funding for this two-year project that will be implemented in Culver, Oregon. ORNL with the collaboration of CleanPower, will assess and evaluate the technology before and during the manufacturing phase and produce a full report to DOE. The goal of this phase-one report is to provide DOE Head Quarters (HQ), water power program management, a report with findings about the performance, readiness, capability, strengths and weakness, limitation of the technology, and potential full-scale deployment and application in the United States. Because of the importance of this information to the conventional hydropower industry and regulators, preliminary results will rapidly be distributed in the form of conference presentations, ORNL/DOE technical reports (publically available online, and publications in the peer-reviewed, scientific literature. These reports will emphasize the relevance of the activities carried out over the two-year study (i.e., performance, robustness, capabilities, reliability, and cost of the Turbinator). A final report will be submitted to a peer-reviewed publication that conveys the experimental findings and discusses their implications for the Turbinator application and implementation. Phase-two of the project consists of deployment, construction, and project operations. A detailed report on assessment and the performance of the project will be presented and communicated

  5. Quantitative analysis of trihydroxybutyl mercapturic acid, a urinary metabolite of 1, 3-butadiene, in humans

    PubMed Central

    Kotapati, Srikanth; Matter, Brock A.; Grant, Amy L.; Tretyakova, Natalia Y.

    2011-01-01

    1,3-butadiene (BD)* is a known human carcinogen present in cigarette smoke and in automobile exhaust, leading to widespread exposure of human populations. BD requires cytochrome P450-mediated metabolic activation to electrophilic species, e.g. 3,4-epoxy-1-butene (EB), hydroxymethylvinylketone (HMVK), and 3,4-epoxy-1,2-diol (EBD), which form covalent adducts with DNA. EB, HMVK, and EBD can be conjugated with glutathione and ultimately excreted in urine as monohydroxybutenyl mercapturic acid (MHBMA), dihydroxybutyl mercapturic acid (DHBMA), and trihydroxybutyl mercapturic acid (THBMA), respectively, which can serve as biomarkers of BD exposure and metabolic processing. While MHBMA and DHBMA have been found in smokers and non-smokers, THBMA has not been previously detected in humans. In the present work, an isotope dilution HPLC-ESI−-MS/MS methodology was developed and employed to quantify THBMA in urine of known smokers and non-smokers (19–27 per group). The new method has excellent sensitivity (LOQ, 1 ng/mL urine) and achieves accurate quantitation using a small sample volume (100 µl). Mean urinary THBMA concentrations in smokers and non-smokers were found to be 21.6 and 13.7 ng/mg creatinine, respectively, suggesting that there are sources of THBMA other than exposure to tobacco smoke in humans, as is also the case for DHBMA. However, THBMA concentrations are significantly greater in urine of smokers than that of non-smokers (p < 0.01). Furthermore, THBMA amounts in human urine declined 25–50 % following smoking cessation, suggesting that smoking is an important source of this metabolite in humans. The HPLC-ESI−-MS/MS methodology developed in the present work will be useful for future epidemiological studies of BD exposure and metabolism. PMID:21749114

  6. [Health care analysis of eating disorders in Valladolid].

    PubMed

    Imaz, C; Ballesteros, Mc; Higuera, Mbn; Conde, Vjm

    2008-01-01

    One of the aims of epidemiological research is to provide some information that makes it possible to adapt and structure health care services. There is an open debate on the need and/or adequacy of the specific units for care given to eating behavior disorders (EBD) and a proper health care model. One way to contribute some ideas in this debate is to make a critical analysis of the reality of the care given for eating behavior disorders, observing the activity of the different health care levels, in our case in the province of Valladolid. The existence of several epidemiological studies, coinciding in space and time, makes it possible to conclude that 23% of new cases treated in the Community are detected in primary health care, while the percentage of those seen by the child-adolescent psychiatry departments is reduced to 2.56%, 16% of which are referred from hospital admission. The regional proposal of promoting a reference hospital admission unit for eating behavior disorders for all of the region of Castilla y Leon is considered ineffective according to this reality, the creation of specific functional units being proposed.

  7. An integrative variant analysis pipeline for accurate genotype/haplotype inference in population NGS data.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Lu, James; Yu, Jin; Gibbs, Richard A; Yu, Fuli

    2013-05-01

    Next-generation sequencing is a powerful approach for discovering genetic variation. Sensitive variant calling and haplotype inference from population sequencing data remain challenging. We describe methods for high-quality discovery, genotyping, and phasing of SNPs for low-coverage (approximately 5×) sequencing of populations, implemented in a pipeline called SNPTools. Our pipeline contains several innovations that specifically address challenges caused by low-coverage population sequencing: (1) effective base depth (EBD), a nonparametric statistic that enables more accurate statistical modeling of sequencing data; (2) variance ratio scoring, a variance-based statistic that discovers polymorphic loci with high sensitivity and specificity; and (3) BAM-specific binomial mixture modeling (BBMM), a clustering algorithm that generates robust genotype likelihoods from heterogeneous sequencing data. Last, we develop an imputation engine that refines raw genotype likelihoods to produce high-quality phased genotypes/haplotypes. Designed for large population studies, SNPTools' input/output (I/O) and storage aware design leads to improved computing performance on large sequencing data sets. We apply SNPTools to the International 1000 Genomes Project (1000G) Phase 1 low-coverage data set and obtain genotyping accuracy comparable to that of SNP microarray.

  8. Ultrasonographic fetometry and determination of fetal sex in buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Ali, A; Fahmy, S

    2008-06-01

    The aim of the current study was to establish ultrasonic biometric threshold of different fetal parts in buffaloes and to evaluate the feasibility and accuracy of ultrasonic fetal sex determination. Serial ultrasonographic examinations were carried out on twelve pregnant buffalo-cows, during which fetal parts were measured, and fetal sex and presentation were determined. The obtained results revealed that embryo and amniotic vesicle (AV) were detected by the forth and fifth week of pregnancy, respectively. Organization was observed by the seventh week, while ossification was indicated between the eighth and 10th week. High correlations were found between different studied parameters and gestational age, where the highest correlation was found with the crown-rump length (CRL) and amniotic vesicle diameter (AVD) at the early-gestation; the biparietal diameter (BPD) at the mid-gestation; and the eyeball diameter (EBD) at the mid- and late-gestation. The results also revealed that the best window for fetal sexing was found between the 10th and 18th week of gestations, with an overall accuracy of 97.1%. The final polarity with all fetuses in anterior presentation was adopted by the 30th week. In conclusion, the overall data indicated the feasibility and value of ultrasonographic fetometry in buffaloes for evaluation of fetal development, estimation of gestational age and determination of fetal sex.

  9. Electron beam exposure mechanisms in hydrogen silsesquioxane investigated by vibrational spectroscopy and in-situ electron beam induced desorption

    SciTech Connect

    Olynick, D.L.; Cord, B.; Schipotinin, A.; Ogletree, D.F.; Schuck, P.J.

    2009-11-13

    Hydrogen Silsesquioxane (HSQ) is used as a high-resolution resist with resolution down below 10nm half-pitch. This material or materials with related functionalities could have widespread impact in nanolithography and nanoscience applications if the exposure mechanism was understood and instabilities controlled. Here we have directly investigated the exposure mechanism using vibrational spectroscopy (both Raman and Fourier transform Infrared) and electron beam desorption spectrocscopy (EBDS). In the non-networked HSQ system, silicon atoms sit at the corners of a cubic structure. Each silicon is bonded to a hydrogen atom and bridges 3 oxygen atoms (formula: HSiO3/2). For the first time, we have shown, via changes in the Si-H2 peak at ~;;2200 cm -1 in the Raman spectra and the release of SiHx products in EBID, that electron-bam exposed materials crosslinks via a redistribution reaction. In addition, we observe the release of significantly more H2 than SiH2 during EBID, which is indicative of additional reaction mechanisms. Additionally, we compare the behavior of HSQ in response to both thermal and electron-beam induced reactions.

  10. Cu passivation for integration of gap-filling ultralow-k dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liping; de Marneffe, Jean-Francois; Lesniewska, Alicja; Verdonck, Patrick; Heylen, Nancy; Murdoch, Gayle; Croes, Kristof; Boemmels, Juergen; Tokei, Zsolt; De Gendt, Stefan; Baklanov, Mikhail R.

    2016-12-01

    For Cu/low-k interconnects, the reversed damascene is an alternative integration approach where the metal wires are patterned first and then the spacing filled with a flowable dielectric. In this paper, the replacement of a sacrificial template by gap-filling ultralow-k dielectrics is studied, focusing on yield and transport performance ("replacement dielectric" scheme). On non-passivated copper, the low-k curing processes induce severe damage to the metal lines, leading to the degraded electrical properties. This is confirmed by chemical inspection on the blanket Cu films and morphological inspection on patterned structures. In order to avoid Cu oxidation and out-diffusion at elevated temperature, Cu passivation by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition SiCN is proposed and studied in detail. The inter-metal dielectric properties of replacement low-k are evaluated by resistance-capacitance and IV measurements using a Meander-Fork structure. By tuning the passivation layer thickness and ultraviolet curing time, high electrical yield is obtained with integrated porous low-k showing promising effective k-values (keff) and breakdown voltages (Ebd), confirming the interest of this specific integration scheme.

  11. The effects of atorvastatin therapy on endothelıal function in patients with coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Yildiz, Ahmet; Cakar, M Akif; Baskurt, Murat; Okcun, Barıs; Guzelsoy, Deniz; Coskun, Ugur

    2007-01-01

    Background Statins improve the endothelial function in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). However, they contribute to the substantial decrease in coronary heart disease by reducing plasma cholesterol levels. They also, reduce oxidative stress, stabilize the atherosclerotic plaque and inhibit inflammatory response. These functions of statins have been briefly described as pleiotropic effects. The aim of our study was to evaluate the effect of atorvastatin therapy on endothelial functions in patients with CAD. Methods Fourty-nine patients (40 men, 9 women, mean age 59 +/- 11 years) with diagnosed CAD were selected as the study group. The patients were given 10 mg/day atorvastatin for 12 weeks. If the target cholesterol levels has not been achieved 6 weeks after the treatment, then the daily atorvastatin dosage has been increased. The endothelial function was evaluated by flow mediated dilatation (FMD) of the brachial artery. Results It has been figured out that 12 weeks later, atorvastatin caused a statistically significant decrease in the plasma levels of LDL-cholesterol and total cholesterol (p < 0,0001). Meanwhile, it was determined that the FMD got statistically significant improved 12 weeks after the atorvastatin therapy (8,1%–4,2%, p < 0,001). However there was no statistically significant change in non-endothelium dependent dilatation (NID). Conclusion Endothelium derived vasodilatation (EBD), which was non-invasively detected via brachial artery ultrasonography, had statistically significant improvment within 12 weeks of atorvastatin therapy whereas non-endothelium dependent dilatation (NID) had no change. PMID:18163915

  12. “Evidence-Based Dentistry in Oral Surgery: Could We Do Better?”

    PubMed Central

    Nocini, Pier Francesco; Verlato, Giuseppe; Frustaci, Andrea; de Gemmis, Antonio; Rigoni, Giovanni; De Santis, Daniele

    2010-01-01

    Evidence-based Dentistry (EBD), like Evidence-based Medicine (EBM), was born in order to seek the “best available research evidence” in the field of dentistry both in research and clinical routine. But evidence is not clearly measurable in all fields of healthcare: in particular, while drug effect is rather independent from clinician’s characteristics, the effectiveness of surgical procedures is strictly related to surgeon’s expertise, which is difficult to quantify. The research problems of dentistry have a lot in common with other surgical fields, where at the moment the best therapeutic recommendations and guidelines originates from an integration of evidence-based medicine and data from consensus conferences. To cope with these problems, new instruments have been developed, aimed at standardizing clinical procedures (CAD-CAM technology) and at integrating EBM achievements with the opinions of expert clinicians (GRADE System). One thing we have to remember however: it is necessary to use the instruments developed by evidence-based medicine but is impossible to produce sound knowledge without considering clinical expertise and quality of surgical procedures simultaneously. Only in this way we will obtain an evidence-based dentistry both in dental research and clinical practice, which is up to third millennium standards. PMID:20871758

  13. Developing assessment system for wireless capsule endoscopy videos based on event detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ying-ju; Yasen, Wisam; Lee, Jeongkyu; Lee, Dongha; Kim, Yongho

    2009-02-01

    Along with the advancing of technology in wireless and miniature camera, Wireless Capsule Endoscopy (WCE), the combination of both, enables a physician to diagnose patient's digestive system without actually perform a surgical procedure. Although WCE is a technical breakthrough that allows physicians to visualize the entire small bowel noninvasively, the video viewing time takes 1 - 2 hours. This is very time consuming for the gastroenterologist. Not only it sets a limit on the wide application of this technology but also it incurs considerable amount of cost. Therefore, it is important to automate such process so that the medical clinicians only focus on interested events. As an extension from our previous work that characterizes the motility of digestive tract in WCE videos, we propose a new assessment system for energy based events detection (EG-EBD) to classify the events in WCE videos. For the system, we first extract general features of a WCE video that can characterize the intestinal contractions in digestive organs. Then, the event boundaries are identified by using High Frequency Content (HFC) function. The segments are classified into WCE event by special features. In this system, we focus on entering duodenum, entering cecum, and active bleeding. This assessment system can be easily extended to discover more WCE events, such as detailed organ segmentation and more diseases, by using new special features. In addition, the system provides a score for every WCE image for each event. Using the event scores, the system helps a specialist to speedup the diagnosis process.

  14. High throughput HPLC-ESI(-)-MS/MS methodology for mercapturic acid metabolites of 1,3-butadiene: Biomarkers of exposure and bioactivation.

    PubMed

    Kotapati, Srikanth; Esades, Amanda; Matter, Brock; Le, Chap; Tretyakova, Natalia

    2015-11-05

    1,3-Butadiene (BD) is an important industrial and environmental carcinogen present in cigarette smoke, automobile exhaust, and urban air. The major urinary metabolites of BD in humans are 2-(N-acetyl-L-cystein-S-yl)-1-hydroxybut-3-ene/1-(N-acetyl-L-cystein-S-yl)-2-hydroxybut-3-ene (MHBMA), 4-(N-acetyl-L-cystein-S-yl)-1,2-dihydroxybutane (DHBMA), and 4-(N-acetyl-L-cystein-S-yl)-1,2,3-trihydroxybutyl mercapturic acid (THBMA), which are formed from the electrophilic metabolites of BD, 3,4-epoxy-1-butene (EB), hydroxymethyl vinyl ketone (HMVK), and 3,4-epoxy-1,2-diol (EBD), respectively. In the present work, a sensitive high-throughput HPLC-ESI(-)-MS/MS method was developed for simultaneous quantification of MHBMA and DHBMA in small volumes of human urine (200 μl). The method employs a 96 well Oasis HLB SPE enrichment step, followed by isotope dilution HPLC-ESI(-)-MS/MS analysis on a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. The validated method was used to quantify MHBMA and DHBMA in urine of workers from a BD monomer and styrene-butadiene rubber production facility (40 controls and 32 occupationally exposed to BD). Urinary THBMA concentrations were also determined in the same samples. The concentrations of all three BD-mercapturic acids and the metabolic ratio (MHBMA/(MHBMA+DHBMA+THBMA)) were significantly higher in the occupationally exposed group as compared to controls and correlated with BD exposure, with each other, and with BD-hemoglobin biomarkers. This improved high throughput methodology for MHBMA and DHBMA will be useful for future epidemiological studies in smokers and occupationally exposed workers.

  15. Safety of immediate endoscopic sphincterotomy in acute suppurative cholangitis caused by choledocholithiasis

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Tomoyasu; Sai, Jin Kan; Okubo, Hironao; Saito, Hiroaki; Ishii, Shigeto; Kanazawa, Ryo; Tomishima, Ko; Watanabe, Sumio; Shiina, Shuichiro

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To examine the safety of immediate endoscopic sphincterotomy (EST) in patients with acute suppurative cholangitis (ASC) caused by choledocholithiasis, as compared with elective EST. METHODS: Patients with ASC due to choledocholithiasis were allocated to two groups: Those who underwent EST immediately and those who underwent EBD followed by EST 1 wk later because they were under anticoagulant therapy, had a coagulopathy (international normalized ratio > 1.3, partial thromboplastin time greater than twice that of control), or had a platelet count < 50000 × 103/μL. One of four trainees [200-400 cases of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP)] supervised by a specialist (> 10000 cases of ERCP) performed the procedures. The success and complication rates associated with EST in each group were examined. RESULTS: Of the 87 patients with ASC, 59 were in the immediate EST group and 28 in the elective EST group. EST was successful in all patients in both groups. There were no complications associated with EST in either group of patients, although white blood cell count, C-reactive protein, total bilirubin, and serum concentrations of liver enzymes just before EST were significantly higher in the immediate EST group than in the elective EST group. CONCLUSION: Immediate EST can be as safe as elective EST for patients with ASC associated with choledocholithiasis provided they are not under anticoagulant therapy, or do not have a coagulopathy or a platelet count < 50000 × 103/μL. Moreover, the procedure was safely performed by a trainee under the supervision of an experienced specialist. PMID:26862368

  16. Oestrous cycle-dependent equine uterine immune response to induced infectious endometritis.

    PubMed

    Marth, Christina D; Firestone, Simon M; Glenton, Lisa Y; Browning, Glenn F; Young, Neil D; Krekeler, Natali

    2016-11-08

    Infectious endometritis is a major cause of reduced pregnancy rates in horses. The objectives of this study were to establish a timeline of the innate immune response in the uterus of healthy horses and to investigate the oestrous cycle effect on this. Endometrial biopsies were collected from five horses before and at 3, 12, 24, 48 and 72 h after inoculation of Escherichia coli, once in oestrus and once in dioestrus. They were analysed by quantitative real-time PCR, microbiology and histology. Neutrophil numbers increased from very low levels in the absence of inflammation to severe neutrophilia 3 h after inoculation. The concentrations of mRNAs for Toll-like receptor (TLR)2, TLR4, NOD-like receptor NLRC5, tissue inhibitor of metallopeptidases 1 (TIMP1) and chemokines CCL2, CXCL9, CXCL10 and CXCL11 were all increased 3 h after inoculation of E. coli compared to levels detected prior to inoculation. Chemokine mRNA levels remained elevated for 48 h. Concentrations of mRNAs for the antimicrobial peptides equine β-defensin 1 (EBD1), lysozyme, secretory leukoprotease inhibitor (SLPI), lipocalin 2 (LCN2), lactoferrin and uteroferrin were increased between 3 and 12 h post inoculation. The gene for secreted phospholipase A2 (sPLA2) was expressed constitutively. P19 uterocalin mRNA levels were higher in dioestrus than in oestrus over the first 24 h of inflammation. Neutrophils and many innate immune genes responded rapidly to the introduction of E. coli into the uterus, while the oestrous cycle stage had only a relatively minor effect on the response to E. coli. This study has delineated a useful model of innate immunity in infectious endometritis of healthy animals.

  17. Pharmacological activation of PPARbeta/delta stimulates utrophin A expression in skeletal muscle fibers and restores sarcolemmal integrity in mature mdx mice.

    PubMed

    Miura, Pedro; Chakkalakal, Joe V; Boudreault, Louise; Bélanger, Guy; Hébert, Richard L; Renaud, Jean-Marc; Jasmin, Bernard J

    2009-12-01

    A therapeutic strategy to treat Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) involves identifying compounds that can elevate utrophin A expression in muscle fibers of affected patients. The dystrophin homologue utrophin A can functionally substitute for dystrophin when its levels are enhanced in the mdx mouse model of DMD. Utrophin A expression in skeletal muscle is regulated by mechanisms that promote the slow myofiber program. Since activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) beta/delta promotes the slow oxidative phenotype in skeletal muscle, we initiated studies to determine whether pharmacological activation of PPARbeta/delta provides functional benefits to the mdx mouse. GW501516, a PPARbeta/delta agonist, was found to stimulate utrophin A mRNA levels in C2C12 muscle cells through an element in the utrophin A promoter. Expression of PPARbeta/delta was greater in skeletal muscles of mdx versus wild-type mice. We treated 5-7-week-old mdx mice with GW501516 for 4 weeks. This treatment increased the percentage of muscle fibers expressing slower myosin heavy chain isoforms and stimulated utrophin A mRNA levels leading to its increased expression at the sarcolemma. Expression of alpha1-syntrophin and beta-dystroglycan was restored to the sarcolemma. Improvement of mdx sarcolemmal integrity was evidenced by decreased intracellular IgM staining and decreased in vivo Evans blue dye (EBD) uptake. GW501516 treatment also conferred protection against eccentric contraction (ECC)-induced damage of mdx skeletal muscles, as shown by a decreased contraction-induced force drop and reduction of dye uptake during ECC. These results demonstrate that pharmacological activation of PPARbeta/delta might provide functional benefits to DMD patients through enhancement of utrophin A expression.

  18. Comparative analyses of bioactive Mammea coumarins from seven parts of Mammea americana by HPLC-PDA with LC-MS.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hui; Jiang, Bei; Reynertson, Kurt A; Basile, Margaret J; Kennelly, Edward J

    2006-06-14

    Mammea americana L. is tropical plant in the Clusiaceae family that bears edible fruit. Mammea coumarins are isoprenylated derivatives of the lactones of the 2-hydroxy-Z-cinnamic acids that are bioactive and have limited distribution in three Clusiaceae genera. Qualitative and quantitative analyses were performed to determine the distribution of mammea coumarins in the seed nucleus, seed coat, fruit flesh, fruit skin, leaf, stem, and root of M. americana using high-performance liquid chromatography-photodiode array detector (HPLC-PDA) and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Ten major mammea coumarins, mammea E/BD (1), mammea E/BC (2), mammea E/BA (3), mammea E/BB (4), mammea B/BA hydroxycyclo F (5), mammea B/BD (6), mammea B/BC (7), mammea B/BA (8), mammea B/BB (9), and mammea B/BA cyclo F (10), were isolated and identified from the seed nucleus of M. americana and employed as standards. The HPLC-PDA method was validated with respect to sensitivity, linearity, recovery, accuracy, and precision. The total content (w/w %) of the 10 major mammea coumarins in M. americana was determined to be highest in the root (0.75%), followed by the leaf (0.64%), seed nucleus (0.48%), fruit skin (0.11%), stem (0.08%), seed coat (0.02%), and fruit flesh (<0.01%). The leaf and seed nucleus are rich and sustainable natural sources of mammea coumarins. Additionally, the described HPLC-PDA and LC-MS methods are sensitive and accurate and can be applied to the analysis of mammea coumarins in other samples.

  19. LifeWatchGreece Portal development: architecture, implementation and challenges for a biodiversity research e-infrastructure

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Biodiversity data is characterized by its cross-disciplinary character, the extremely broad range of data types and structures, and the plethora of different data sources providing resources for the same piece of information in a heterogeneous way. Since the web inception two decades ago, there are multiple initiatives to connect, aggregate, share, and publish biodiversity data, and to establish data and work flows in order to analyze them. The European program LifeWatch aims at establishing a distributed network of nodes implementing virtual research environment in Europe to facilitate the work of biodiversity researchers and managers. LifeWatchGreece is one of these nodes where a portal was developed offering access to a suite of virtual laboratories and e-services. New information Despite its strict definition in information technology, in practice "portal" is a fairly broad term that embraces many web architectures. In the biodiversity domain, the term "portal" is usually used to indicate either a web site that provides access to a single or an aggregation of data repositories (like: http://indiabiodiversity.org/, http://www.mountainbiodiversity.org/, http://data.freshwaterbiodiversity.eu), a web site that gathers information about various online biodiversity tools (like http://test-eubon.ebd.csic.es/, http://marine.lifewatch.eu/) or a web site that just gathers information and news about the biodiversity domain (like http://chm.moew.government.bg). LifeWatchGreece's portal takes the concept of a portal a step further. In strict IT terms, LifeWatchGreece's portal is partly a portal, partly a platform and partly an aggregator. It includes a number of biodiversity-related web tools integrated into a centrally-controlled software ecosystem. This ecosystem includes subsystems for access control, traffic monitoring, user notifications and web tool management. These subsystems are shared to all the web tools that have been integrated to the portal

  20. Anesthesia-Induced Hypothermia Attenuates Early-Phase Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption but Not Infarct Volume following Cerebral Ischemia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Cheng; Lee, Yu-Da; Wang, Hwai-Lee; Liao, Kate Hsiurong; Chen, Kuen-Bao; Poon, Kin-Shing; Pan, Yu-Ling; Lai, Ted Weita

    2017-01-01

    Blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption is thought to facilitate the development of cerebral infarction after a stroke. In a typical stroke model (such as the one used in this study), the early phase of BBB disruption reaches a peak 6 h post-ischemia and largely recovers after 8-24 h, whereas the late phase of BBB disruption begins 48-58 h post-ischemia. Because cerebral infarct develops within 24 h after the onset of ischemia, and several therapeutic agents have been shown to reduce the infarct volume when administered at 6 h post-ischemia, we hypothesized that attenuating BBB disruption at its peak (6 h post-ischemia) can also decrease the infarct volume measured at 24 h. We used a mouse stroke model obtained by combining 120 min of distal middle cerebral arterial occlusion (dMCAo) with ipsilateral common carotid arterial occlusion (CCAo). This model produced the most reliable BBB disruption and cerebral infarction compared to other models characterized by a shorter duration of ischemia or obtained with dMCAO or CCAo alone. The BBB permeability was measured by quantifying Evans blue dye (EBD) extravasation, as this tracer has been shown to be more sensitive for the detection of early-phase BBB disruption compared to other intravascular tracers that are more appropriate for detecting late-phase BBB disruption. We showed that a 1 h-long treatment with isoflurane-anesthesia induced marked hypothermia and attenuated the peak of BBB disruption when administered 6 h after the onset of dMCAo/CCAo-induced ischemia. We also demonstrated that the inhibitory effect of isoflurane was hypothermia-dependent because the same treatment had no effect on ischemic BBB disruption when the mouse body temperature was maintained at 37°C. Importantly, inhibiting the peak of BBB disruption by hypothermia had no effect on the volume of brain infarct 24 h post-ischemia. In conclusion, inhibiting the peak of BBB disruption is not an effective neuroprotective strategy, especially in comparison

  1. Anesthesia-Induced Hypothermia Attenuates Early-Phase Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption but Not Infarct Volume following Cerebral Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yu-Cheng; Lee, Yu-Da; Wang, Hwai-Lee; Liao, Kate Hsiurong; Chen, Kuen-Bao; Poon, Kin-Shing; Pan, Yu-Ling

    2017-01-01

    Blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption is thought to facilitate the development of cerebral infarction after a stroke. In a typical stroke model (such as the one used in this study), the early phase of BBB disruption reaches a peak 6 h post-ischemia and largely recovers after 8–24 h, whereas the late phase of BBB disruption begins 48–58 h post-ischemia. Because cerebral infarct develops within 24 h after the onset of ischemia, and several therapeutic agents have been shown to reduce the infarct volume when administered at 6 h post-ischemia, we hypothesized that attenuating BBB disruption at its peak (6 h post-ischemia) can also decrease the infarct volume measured at 24 h. We used a mouse stroke model obtained by combining 120 min of distal middle cerebral arterial occlusion (dMCAo) with ipsilateral common carotid arterial occlusion (CCAo). This model produced the most reliable BBB disruption and cerebral infarction compared to other models characterized by a shorter duration of ischemia or obtained with dMCAO or CCAo alone. The BBB permeability was measured by quantifying Evans blue dye (EBD) extravasation, as this tracer has been shown to be more sensitive for the detection of early-phase BBB disruption compared to other intravascular tracers that are more appropriate for detecting late-phase BBB disruption. We showed that a 1 h-long treatment with isoflurane-anesthesia induced marked hypothermia and attenuated the peak of BBB disruption when administered 6 h after the onset of dMCAo/CCAo-induced ischemia. We also demonstrated that the inhibitory effect of isoflurane was hypothermia-dependent because the same treatment had no effect on ischemic BBB disruption when the mouse body temperature was maintained at 37°C. Importantly, inhibiting the peak of BBB disruption by hypothermia had no effect on the volume of brain infarct 24 h post-ischemia. In conclusion, inhibiting the peak of BBB disruption is not an effective neuroprotective strategy, especially in

  2. Interface Electrical Properties of Al2O3 Thin Films on Graphene Obtained by Atomic Layer Deposition with an in Situ Seedlike Layer.

    PubMed

    Fisichella, Gabriele; Schilirò, Emanuela; Di Franco, Salvatore; Fiorenza, Patrick; Lo Nigro, Raffaella; Roccaforte, Fabrizio; Ravesi, Sebastiano; Giannazzo, Filippo

    2017-03-01

    High-quality thin insulating films on graphene (Gr) are essential for field-effect transistors (FETs) and other electronics applications of this material. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is the method of choice to deposit high-κ dielectrics with excellent thickness uniformity and conformal coverage. However, to start the growth on the sp(2) Gr surface, a chemical prefunctionalization or the physical deposition of a seed layer are required, which can effect, to some extent, the electrical properties of Gr. In this paper, we report a detailed morphological, structural, and electrical investigation of Al2O3 thin films grown by a two-steps ALD process on a large area Gr membrane residing on an Al2O3-Si substrate. This process consists of the H2O-activated deposition of a Al2O3 seed layer a few nanometers in thickness, performed in situ at 100 °C, followed by ALD thermal growth of Al2O3 at 250 °C. The optimization of the low-temperature seed layer allowed us to obtain a uniform, conformal, and pinhole-free Al2O3 film on Gr by the second ALD step. Nanoscale-resolution mapping of the current through the dielectric by conductive atomic force microscopy (CAFM) demonstrated an excellent laterally uniformity of the film. Raman spectroscopy measurements indicated that the ALD process does not introduce defects in Gr, whereas it produces a partial compensation of Gr unintentional p-type doping, as confirmed by the increase of Gr sheet resistance (from ∼300 Ω/sq in pristine Gr to ∼1100 Ω/sq after Al2O3 deposition). Analysis of the transfer characteristics of Gr field-effect transistors (GFETs) allowed us to evaluate the relative dielectric permittivity (ε = 7.45) and the breakdown electric field (EBD = 7.4 MV/cm) of the Al2O3 film as well as the transconductance and the holes field-effect mobility (∼1200 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1)). A special focus has been given to the electrical characterization of the Al2O3-Gr interface by the analysis of high frequency capacitance

  3. Antioxidant and cytotoxic isoprenylated coumarins from Mammea americana.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hui; Protiva, Petr; Gil, Roberto R; Jiang, Bei; Baggett, Scott; Basile, Margaret J; Reynertson, Kurt A; Weinstein, I Bernard; Kennelly, Edward J

    2005-09-01

    Antioxidant-guided fractionation of Mammea americana L. seeds resulted in the identification of three new isoprenylated coumarins, mammea B/BA hydroxycyclo F (1), mammea E/BC (2), and mammea E/BD (3). In addition, twelve known isoprenylated coumarins, mammea A/AA (4), mammea A/AA cyclo D (5), mammea A/AA cyclo F (6), mammea A/AC cyclo D (7), mammea A/AD cyclo D (8), mammea B/BA (9), mammea B/BA cyclo F (10), mammea B/BB (11), mammea B/BC (12), mammea B/BD (13), mammea E/BA (14), and mammea E/BB (15), as well as two known flavanols, (+)-catechin (16) and (-)-epicatechin (17) were identified. The fifteen isoprenylated coumarins were screened for their cytotoxicity in the SW-480, HT-29, and HCT-116 human colon cancer cell lines and antioxidant capacities in the DPPH (1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl) free-radical assay. Compounds 1 - 15 exhibited significant cytotoxic activities in the SW-480, HT-29, and HCT-116 human colon cancer cell lines (IC50 ranges 13.9 - 88.1, 11.2 - 85.3, and 10.7 - 76.7 microM, in the three cell lines, respectively) at concentrations comparable to 5-fluorouracil (IC50 = 53.0, 46.1, and 45.1 microM), a drug frequently used for human colon cancer treatment. Compounds 2 - 4, 9, and 11 - 15 displayed high antioxidant activity in the DPPH assay (IC50 range 86 - 135 microM), compounds 1, 5 - 8, and 10, however, had no antioxidant activity (IC50 > 200 microg/mL) in the DPPH assay. The results of these assays were used to study the structure-activity relationships for this class of compounds. In the SW-480 cell line, the three new coumarins, 1 - 3, also exhibited dose-dependent increases in sub-diploid cells by flow cytometry, indicating that they induce apoptosis.

  4. Processing-property relationships in epoxy resin/titanium dioxide nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Polyzos, Georgios; Tuncer, Enis; Sauers, Isidor; More, Karren Leslie

    2010-01-01

    obtained from conventional, ex situ synthesis that requires high shear mixing of the organic and inorganic phases. Using the ex situ technique, we synthesized TiO{sub 2} particles (also {le}5nm in diameter) in a polyethylene glycol solution - see Figure 1(c) - and subsequently mixed them with the resin. The mixing process, even at low concentrations (1% by weight), resulted in the formation of aggregates of several hundred nanometers in size. We performed optical, thermomechanical, and electrical measurements of systems with similar weight fractions of TiO{sub 2} to evaluate the impact of particle size and dispersion on the macroscopic properties of the nanocomposite. In agreement with the TEM images, UV-visible transmittance spectra show the same optical properties for the unfilled resin and in situ nanocomposite owing to the small particle-cluster size. Because of the formation of clusters of comparable size to the wavelength of light in the visible range, the ex situ specimen showed decreased transmittance, producing an opaque composite. Moreover, we found that creating large and weak interfaces between the phases degrades the macroscopic thermomechanical and electrical properties of the specimen. The in situ nanocomposite exhibited superior mechanical performance compared to both the unfilled resin and ex situ nanocomposite over the entire temperature range. Notably, at the lowest measured temperature (-145 C), the increase in the storage modulus (G') relative to that of the unfilled resin is approximately 30%. Furthermore, the in situ technique did not degrade the thermodynamic properties of the polymer network. The glass-transition temperature (T{sub g}) remains unchanged. In contrast, the ex situ nanocomposite displayed a 55% relative decrease in Tg because of the formation of weak and large interfaces. This morphology is also associated with significant degradation of dielectric properties under high electric fields. The dielectric-breakdown strength (EBD) of the