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Sample records for eccrine sweat gland

  1. Histochemical demonstration of sialomucin in human eccrine sweat glands.

    PubMed

    Constantine, V S; Mowry, R W

    1966-06-01

    Eccrine sweat glands in paraffin sections of human skin fixed in neutral buffered formalin nearly always contained acidic carbohydrate detected by the colloidal iron stain, and to a less extent by Alcian blue 8 GX. Additional histochemical procedures designed to detect sulfated carbohydrates showed none. The acidic carbohydrate demonstrated in eccrine sweat glands was presumed to contain only carboxyl groups. As incubation of tissue sections in neuraminidase abolished stainability of the acidic carbohydrate with colloidal iron, the material removed was considered to be a sialomucin. To the best of our knowledge, the identification of the acidic mucin in human eccrine sweat glands as sialomucin has not been reported previously.

  2. Precise measurement of instantaneous volume of eccrine sweat gland in mental sweating by optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugawa, Yoshihiko; Fukuda, Akihiro; Ohmi, Masato

    2015-03-01

    We have demonstrated dynamic analysis of the physiological function of eccrine sweat glands underneath skin surface by optical coherence tomography (OCT). We propose a method for extraction of the target eccrine sweat gland by use of the connected component extraction process and the adaptive threshold method, where the en-face OCT images are constructed by the SS-OCT. Furthermore, we demonstrate precise measurement of instantaneous volume of the sweat gland in response to the external stimulus. The dynamic change of instantaneous volume of eccrine sweat gland in mental sweating is performed by this method during the period of 300 sec with the frame intervals of 3.23 sec.

  3. Precise measurement of volume of eccrine sweat gland in mental sweating by optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugawa, Yoshihiko; Fukuda, Akihiro; Ohmi, Masato

    2015-04-01

    We have demonstrated dynamic analysis of the physiological function of eccrine sweat glands underneath skin surface by optical coherence tomography (OCT). In this paper, we propose a method for extraction of the specific eccrine sweat gland by means of the connected component extraction process and the adaptive threshold method, where the en face OCT images are constructed by the swept-source OCT. In the experiment, we demonstrate precise measurement of the volume of the sweat gland in response to the external stimulus.

  4. Ultrastructural study of iron deposition in the eccrine sweat glands of patients with iron overload.

    PubMed

    Falanga, V; Zheng, P; Lavker, R M

    1984-01-01

    An ultrastructural study of eccrine sweat glands was carried out on three patients with iron overload (two with idiopathic haemochromatosis and one with transfusional haemosiderosis). In all three patients small electron-dense particles were seen in both eccrine sweat glands and macrophages. They appeared primarily in the clear cells of the eccrine sweat glands as membrane-bound irregularly shaped bodies, and were shown to contain iron by energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis. Iron aggregates in and around sweat glands were also seen on light microscopy.

  5. Eccrine Sweat Glands are Major Contributors to Reepithelialization of Human Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Rittié, Laure; Sachs, Dana L.; Orringer, Jeffrey S.; Voorhees, John J.; Fisher, Gary J.

    2014-01-01

    Eccrine sweat glands are skin-associated epithelial structures (appendages) that are unique to some primates including humans and are absent in the skin of most laboratory animals including rodents, rabbits, and pigs. On the basis of the known importance of other skin appendages (hair follicles, apocrine glands, and sebaceous glands) for wound repair in model animals, the present study was designed to assess the role of eccrine glands in the repair of wounded human skin. Partial-thickness wounds were generated on healthy human forearms, and epidermal repair was studied in skin biopsy samples obtained at precise times during the first week after wounding. Wound reepithelialization was assessed using immunohistochemistry and computer-assisted 3-dimensional reconstruction of in vivo wounded skin samples. Our data demonstrate a key role for eccrine sweat glands in reconstituting the epidermis after wounding in humans. More specifically, i) eccrine sweat glands generate keratinocyte outgrowths that ultimately form new epidermis; ii) eccrine sweat glands are the most abundant appendages in human skin, outnumbering hair follicles by a factor close to 3; and iii) the rate of expansion of keratinocyte outgrowths from eccrine sweat glands parallels the rate of reepithelialization. This novel appreciation of the unique importance of eccrine sweat glands for epidermal repair may be exploited to improve our approaches to understanding and treating human wounds. PMID:23159944

  6. Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide promotes eccrine gland sweat secretion.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, S; Watanabe, J; Ohtaki, H; Matsumoto, M; Murai, N; Nakamachi, T; Hannibal, J; Fahrenkrug, J; Hashimoto, H; Watanabe, H; Sueki, H; Honda, K; Miyazaki, A; Shioda, S

    2017-02-01

    Sweat secretion is the major function of eccrine sweat glands; when this process is disturbed (paridrosis), serious skin problems can arise. To elucidate the causes of paridrosis, an improved understanding of the regulation, mechanisms and factors underlying sweat production is required. Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) exhibits pleiotropic functions that are mediated via its receptors [PACAP-specific receptor (PAC1R), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) receptor type 1 (VPAC1R) and VPAC2R]. Although some studies have suggested a role for PACAP in the skin and several exocrine glands, the effects of PACAP on the process of eccrine sweat secretion have not been examined. To investigate the effect of PACAP on eccrine sweat secretion. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and immunostaining were used to determine the expression and localization of PACAP and its receptors in mouse and human eccrine sweat glands. We injected PACAP subcutaneously into the footpads of mice and used the starch-iodine test to visualize sweat-secreting glands. Immunostaining showed PACAP and PAC1R expression by secretory cells from mouse and human sweat glands. PACAP immunoreactivity was also localized in nerve fibres around eccrine sweat glands. PACAP significantly promoted sweat secretion at the injection site, and this could be blocked by the PAC1R-antagonist PACAP6-38. VIP, an agonist of VPAC1R and VPAC2R, failed to induce sweat secretion. This is the first report demonstrating that PACAP may play a crucial role in sweat secretion via its action on PAC1R located in eccrine sweat glands. The mechanisms underlying the role of PACAP in sweat secretion may provide new therapeutic options to combat sweating disorders. © 2016 British Association of Dermatologists.

  7. Dynamic analysis of mental sweating of eccrine sweat glands for various sound stimulus by optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmi, Masato; Wada, Yuki; Sugawa, Yoshihiko

    2014-03-01

    We demonstrate dynamic analysis of mental sweating of a few tens of eccrine sweat glands on a human fingertip by optical coherence tomography. We propose a novel method for evaluation of the amount of excess sweat in response to mental stress, where the en-face OCT images of the spiral lumen of the eccrine sweat gland are constructed by data acquisition of the 128 B-mode OCT images. The dynamic analysis of mental sweating is performed by the time-sequential piled-up en-face OCT images with the frame spacing of 3.3 sec. It is found that the amount of sweat in eccrine sweat glands is significantly increased in proportion to the strength of the sound stimulus.

  8. Matrigel basement membrane matrix induces eccrine sweat gland cells to reconstitute sweat gland-like structures in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Haihong; Chen, Lu; Zeng, Shaopeng; Li, Xuexue; Zhang, Xiang; Lin, Changmin; Zhang, Mingjun; Xie, Sitian; He, Yunpu; Shu, Shenyou; Yang, Lvjun; Tang, Shijie; Fu, Xiaobing

    2015-03-01

    Severe burn results in irreversible damage to eccrine sweat glands, for which no effective treatment is available. Interaction between the extracellular matrix and epithelial cells is critical for proper three-dimensional organization and function of the epithelium. Matrigel-embedded eccrine sweat gland cells were subcutaneously implanted into the inguinal regions of nude mice. Two weeks later, the Matrigel plugs were removed and evaluated for series of detection items. Sweat gland cells developed into sweat gland-like structures in the Matrigel plugs based on: (1) de novo formation of tubular-like structures with one or more hollow lumens, (2) expression of epithelial and sweat gland markers (pancytokeratin, CK5/7/14/19, α-SMA and CEA), (3) basement membrane formation, (4) myoepithelial cells presenting in and encompassing the tubular-like structures, (5) cellular polarization, evident by the expression of tight junction proteins (claudin-1 and ZO-2), anchoring junctions (desmoglein-1 and -2 and E-cadherin) and CEA in the luminal membrane, (6) expression of proteins related to sweat secretion and absorption (Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase α/β, Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl-cotranspoter 1, Na(+)/H(+) exchanger 1, aquaporin-5, epithelial sodium channel, cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator, potassium channel and vacuolar-type H+-ATPase), and (7) about 20% of the tubular-like structures are de novo coils and 80% are de novo ducts. This study provides not only an excellent model to study eccrine sweat gland development, cytodifferentiation and reconstitution, but also an in vivo model for regeneration of eccrine sweat glands. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Simultaneous measurement of the sweating dynamics of a few tens of eccrine sweat glands by optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmi, Masato; Wada, Yuki

    2013-03-01

    We demonstrate the dynamic OCT analysis of mental sweating of a few tens of eccrine sweat glands on a human fingertip. We propose a novel method for evaluation of the amount of excess sweat in response to mental stress, where the en-face OCT images of the spiral lumen of the eccrine sweat gland are constructed by data acquisition of the 128 B-mode OCT images. The dynamic analysis of mental sweating is performed by the time-sequential piled-up en-face OCT images with the frame spacing of 3.3 sec. Strong non-uniformity is observed in mental sweating where the amount of excess sweat in response to sound stress and physical stress is different for each sweat gland.

  10. A genetic basis of variation in eccrine sweat gland and hair follicle density

    PubMed Central

    Kamberov, Yana G.; Karlsson, Elinor K.; Kamberova, Gerda L.; Lieberman, Daniel E.; Sabeti, Pardis C.; Morgan, Bruce A.; Tabin, Clifford J.

    2015-01-01

    Among the unique features of humans, one of the most salient is the ability to effectively cool the body during extreme prolonged activity through the evapotranspiration of water on the skin’s surface. The evolution of this novel physiological ability required a dramatic increase in the density and distribution of eccrine sweat glands relative to other mammals and a concomitant reduction of body hair cover. Elucidation of the genetic underpinnings for these adaptive changes is confounded by a lack of knowledge about how eccrine gland fate and density are specified during development. Moreover, although reciprocal changes in hair cover and eccrine gland density are required for efficient thermoregulation, it is unclear if these changes are linked by a common genetic regulation. To identify pathways controlling the relative patterning of eccrine glands and hair follicles, we exploited natural variation in the density of these organs between different strains of mice. Quantitative trait locus mapping identified a large region on mouse Chromosome 1 that controls both hair and eccrine gland densities. Differential and allelic expression analysis of the genes within this interval coupled with subsequent functional studies demonstrated that the level of En1 activity directs the relative numbers of eccrine glands and hair follicles. These findings implicate En1 as a newly identified and reciprocal determinant of hair follicle and eccrine gland density and identify a pathway that could have contributed to the evolution of the unique features of human skin. PMID:26195765

  11. Human eccrine sweat gland cells reconstitute polarized spheroids when subcutaneously implanted with Matrigel in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Haihong; Zhang, Mingjun; Chen, Liyun; Li, Xuexue; Zhang, Bingna

    2016-10-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that maintenance of cell polarity plays a pivotal role in the regulation of glandular homeostasis and function. We examine the markers for polarity at different time points to investigate the formation of cell polarity during 3D reconstitution of eccrine sweat glands. Mixtures of eccrine sweat gland cells and Matrigel were injected subcutaneously into the inguinal regions of nude mice. At 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 weeks post-implantation, Matrigel plugs were removed and immunostained for basal collagen IV, lateral β-catenin, lateroapical ZO-1 and apical F-actin. The results showed that the cell polarity of the spheroids appeared in sequence. Formation of basal polarity was prior to lateral, apical and lateroapical polarity. Collagen IV was detected basally at 2 weeks, β-catenin laterally and ZO-1 lateroapically at 3 weeks, and F-actin apically at 4 weeks post-implantation. At week 5 and week 6, the localization and the positive percentage of collagen IV, β-catenin, ZO-1 or F-actin in spheroids was similar to that in native eccrine sweat glands. We conclude that the reconstituted 3D eccrine sweat glands are functional or potentially functional.

  12. An analysis on the rates and regulation of insensible water loss through the eccrine sweat glands.

    PubMed

    Jeje, A; Koon, D

    1989-12-07

    An analysis is presented on insensible water loss from the human body at rest through exposed skin surfaces into still air. Possible sites of moisture release are identified as the stratum corneum of the skin, free surfaces of dilute sweat liquids perpetually present in the microscopic ducts of a large population of eccrine sweat glands, and moist microvillous processes which line part of the periductal surfaces in the glands, particularly in the helical coils within the stratum spinosum of the epidermis. Water supply to the sites involves transepidermal migration across skin tissue layers, secretion and partial reabsorption of solutes and water within eccrine glands, and transport across periductal lining of eccrine glands from the surrounding connective tissues respectively. Evaporation and gas phase diffusion within eccrine ducts were modelled. Basal loss rates of water (as regulated by the ambient temperature and relative humidity and by aspects of the anatomy of and physiological factors for eccrine glands, the epidermis and the dermis) were calculated at between 1 and 20 g hr-1 at an ambient temperature of 25 degrees C and a relative humidity of 60% as an example. Such rates are significant fractions of experimental values for insensible water loss rates reported at between 4 and 35 g hr-1 in air at 22-30 degrees C and a relative humidity of 30-60%.

  13. The evolution of eccrine sweat gland research towards developing a model for human sweat gland function.

    PubMed

    Bovell, Douglas L

    2018-04-07

    For several decades now, researchers, professional bodies, governments and journals such as the journal of Experimental Dermatology, have worked to reduce the number of animals used in experimentation. This review centers on investigations into how human sweat glands produce sweat and how that research has evolved over the years. It is hoped that this review will show, that as methodologies advanced, sweat gland research has come to rely less and less on a variety of animal models as investigative tools and information is being primarily obtained through human and mouse material, with a view to further reductions in using animal models. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  14. Immunohistochemical evidence suggests intrinsic regulatory activity of human eccrine sweat glands

    PubMed Central

    ZANCANARO, CARLO; MERIGO, FLAVIA; CRESCIMANNO, CATERINA; ORLANDINI, SIMONETTA; OSCULATI, ANTONIO

    1999-01-01

    Immunohistochemistry of normal eccrine sweat glands was performed on paraffin sections of human skin. Immunoreactivity (ir) for neuron specific enolase, S100 protein (S100), regulatory peptides, nitric oxide synthase type I (NOS-I) and choline-acetyltransferase (ChAT) was found in small nerve bundles close to sweat glands. In the glands, secretory cells were labelled with anticytokeratin antibody. Using antibodies to S100, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and substance P (SP) a specific distribution pattern was found in secretory cells. Granulated (dark) and parietal (clear) cells were immunopositive for CGRP, and S100 and SP, respectively. Immunoreactivity was diffuse in the cytoplasm for CGRP and S100, and peripheral for SP. Myoepithelial cells were not labelled. Electron microscopy revealed electron dense granules, probably containing peptide, in granulated cells. Using antibodies to NOS-I and ChAT, ir was exclusively found in myoepithelial cells. Immunoreactivity for the atrial natriuretic peptide was absent in sweat glands. These results provide evidence for the presence of both regulatory peptides involved in vasodilation and key enzymes for the synthesis of nitric oxide and acetylcholine in the secretory coil of human sweat glands. It is suggested that human sweat glands are capable of some intrinsic regulation in addition to that carried out by their nerve supply. PMID:10386780

  15. Comparisons of eccrine sweat gland anatomy in genetic, chromosomal, and other diseases, and a suggested procedure for use of sweat gland measurements in differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Shankle, W R; Azen, S P; Landing, B H

    1982-04-01

    Statistical analysis of the dimensions of microdissected eccrine sweat glands (duct length, coil volume, ratio of coil volume to duct length, and axis ratio of coil) was performed for several diseases (cystic fibrosis of the pancreas, Werdnig-Hoffmann disease, tetralogy of Fallot, chronic renal disease, and trisomies 13, 18, and 21) using both individual and grouped age-matched control patients. Duct length, coil volume, and the ratio of the two all rise with age. Eccrine gland duct length was found to be significantly large in tetralogy of Fallot and Werdnig-Hoffmann disease and small in chronic renal disease (less so in males than in females, trisomy 13 and trisomy 18). Secretory coil volume was significantly smaller than normal in trisomy 21 (Down syndrome) and in chronic renal disease, and the ratio of coil volume to duct length was low in trisomy 21 and chronic renal disease. The shape of the secretory coil (axis ratio) was possibly abnormal in trisomy 13. Gland dimensions were normal for cystic fibrosis. Using the multivariate procedure of discriminant analysis, it was found that sweat gland measures significantly contributed to the differentiation of diseases, after adjustments were made for variations in age-at-death. This suggested the possibility that criteria for distinction of clinically similar genetic, metabolic, or chromosomal diseases by study of the anatomic properties of eccrine glands obtained by skin biopsy could be developed. A procedure of analysis comparing the "percentage of normal" of gland dimensions for each disease to control values, and thereby differentiating disease categories on the basis of the "percentage of normal" values, is presented.

  16. Store-operated Ca2+ entry regulates Ca2+-activated chloride channels and eccrine sweat gland function

    PubMed Central

    Concepcion, Axel R.; Vaeth, Martin; Wagner, Larry E.; Eckstein, Miriam; Hecht, Lee; Yang, Jun; Crottes, David; Seidl, Maximilian; Shin, Hyosup P.; Weidinger, Carl; Cameron, Scott; Turvey, Stuart E.; Issekutz, Thomas; Meyts, Isabelle; Lacruz, Rodrigo S.; Cuk, Mario; Yule, David I.

    2016-01-01

    Eccrine sweat glands are essential for sweating and thermoregulation in humans. Loss-of-function mutations in the Ca2+ release–activated Ca2+ (CRAC) channel genes ORAI1 and STIM1 abolish store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE), and patients with these CRAC channel mutations suffer from anhidrosis and hyperthermia at high ambient temperatures. Here we have shown that CRAC channel–deficient patients and mice with ectodermal tissue–specific deletion of Orai1 (Orai1K14Cre) or Stim1 and Stim2 (Stim1/2K14Cre) failed to sweat despite normal sweat gland development. SOCE was absent in agonist-stimulated sweat glands from Orai1K14Cre and Stim1/2K14Cre mice and human sweat gland cells lacking ORAI1 or STIM1 expression. In Orai1K14Cre mice, abolishment of SOCE was associated with impaired chloride secretion by primary murine sweat glands. In human sweat gland cells, SOCE mediated by ORAI1 was necessary for agonist-induced chloride secretion and activation of the Ca2+-activated chloride channel (CaCC) anoctamin 1 (ANO1, also known as TMEM16A). By contrast, expression of TMEM16A, the water channel aquaporin 5 (AQP5), and other regulators of sweat gland function was normal in the absence of SOCE. Our findings demonstrate that Ca2+ influx via store-operated CRAC channels is essential for CaCC activation, chloride secretion, and sweat production in humans and mice. PMID:27721237

  17. Store-operated Ca2+ entry regulates Ca2+-activated chloride channels and eccrine sweat gland function.

    PubMed

    Concepcion, Axel R; Vaeth, Martin; Wagner, Larry E; Eckstein, Miriam; Hecht, Lee; Yang, Jun; Crottes, David; Seidl, Maximilian; Shin, Hyosup P; Weidinger, Carl; Cameron, Scott; Turvey, Stuart E; Issekutz, Thomas; Meyts, Isabelle; Lacruz, Rodrigo S; Cuk, Mario; Yule, David I; Feske, Stefan

    2016-11-01

    Eccrine sweat glands are essential for sweating and thermoregulation in humans. Loss-of-function mutations in the Ca2+ release-activated Ca2+ (CRAC) channel genes ORAI1 and STIM1 abolish store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE), and patients with these CRAC channel mutations suffer from anhidrosis and hyperthermia at high ambient temperatures. Here we have shown that CRAC channel-deficient patients and mice with ectodermal tissue-specific deletion of Orai1 (Orai1K14Cre) or Stim1 and Stim2 (Stim1/2K14Cre) failed to sweat despite normal sweat gland development. SOCE was absent in agonist-stimulated sweat glands from Orai1K14Cre and Stim1/2K14Cre mice and human sweat gland cells lacking ORAI1 or STIM1 expression. In Orai1K14Cre mice, abolishment of SOCE was associated with impaired chloride secretion by primary murine sweat glands. In human sweat gland cells, SOCE mediated by ORAI1 was necessary for agonist-induced chloride secretion and activation of the Ca2+-activated chloride channel (CaCC) anoctamin 1 (ANO1, also known as TMEM16A). By contrast, expression of TMEM16A, the water channel aquaporin 5 (AQP5), and other regulators of sweat gland function was normal in the absence of SOCE. Our findings demonstrate that Ca2+ influx via store-operated CRAC channels is essential for CaCC activation, chloride secretion, and sweat production in humans and mice.

  18. Function of human eccrine sweat glands during dynamic exercise and passive heat stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kondo, N.; Shibasaki, M.; Aoki, K.; Koga, S.; Inoue, Y.; Crandall, C. G.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the pattern of change in the density of activated sweat glands (ASG) and sweat output per gland (SGO) during dynamic constant-workload exercise and passive heat stress. Eight male subjects (22.8 +/- 0.9 yr) exercised at a constant workload (117.5 +/- 4.8 W) and were also passively heated by lower-leg immersion into hot water of 42 degrees C under an ambient temperature of 25 degrees C and relative humidity of 50%. Esophageal temperature, mean skin temperature, sweating rate (SR), and heart rate were measured continuously during both trials. The number of ASG was determined every 4 min after the onset of sweating, whereas SGO was calculated by dividing SR by ASG. During both exercise and passive heating, SR increased abruptly during the first 8 min after onset of sweating, followed by a slower increase. Similarly for both protocols, the number of ASG increased rapidly during the first 8 min after the onset of sweating and then ceased to increase further (P > 0.05). Conversely, SGO increased linearly throughout both perturbations. Our results suggest that changes in forearm sweating rate rely on both ASG and SGO during the initial period of exercise and passive heating, whereas further increases in SR are dependent on increases in SGO.

  19. Regional variations in transepidermal water loss, eccrine sweat gland density, sweat secretion rates and electrolyte composition in resting and exercising humans

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Literature from the past 168 years has been filtered to provide a unified summary of the regional distribution of cutaneous water and electrolyte losses. The former occurs via transepidermal water vapour diffusion and secretion from the eccrine sweat glands. Daily insensible water losses for a standardised individual (surface area 1.8 m2) will be 0.6–2.3 L, with the hands (80–160 g.h−1) and feet (50–150 g.h−1) losing the most, the head and neck losing intermediate amounts (40–75 g.h−1) and all remaining sites losing 15–60 g.h−1. Whilst sweat gland densities vary widely across the skin surface, this same individual would possess some 2.03 million functional glands, with the highest density on the volar surfaces of the fingers (530 glands.cm−2) and the lowest on the upper lip (16 glands.cm−2). During passive heating that results in a resting whole-body sweat rate of approximately 0.4 L.min−1, the forehead (0.99 mg.cm−2.min−1), dorsal fingers (0.62 mg.cm−2.min−1) and upper back (0.59 mg.cm−2.min−1) would display the highest sweat flows, whilst the medial thighs and anterior legs will secrete the least (both 0.12 mg.cm−2.min−1). Since sweat glands selectively reabsorb electrolytes, the sodium and chloride composition of discharged sweat varies with secretion rate. Across whole-body sweat rates from 0.72 to 3.65 mg.cm−2.min−1, sodium losses of 26.5–49.7 mmol.L−1 could be expected, with the corresponding chloride loss being 26.8–36.7 mmol.L−1. Nevertheless, there can be threefold differences in electrolyte losses across skin regions. When exercising in the heat, local sweat rates increase dramatically, with regional glandular flows becoming more homogeneous. However, intra-regional evaporative potential remains proportional to each local surface area. Thus, there is little evidence that regional sudomotor variations reflect an hierarchical distribution of sweating either at rest or during exercise. PMID:23849497

  20. Sweating

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    ... half million eccrine sweat glands all over the body. They lie deep in the skin and are ... can evaporate through the sweat glands. As the body becomes overheated, a person sweats, which evaporates and ...

  1. Late Lung Metastasis of a Primary Eccrine Sweat Gland Carcinoma 10 Years after Initial Surgical Treatment: The First Clinical Documentation

    PubMed Central

    Falkenstern-Ge, R. F.; Bode-Erdmann, S.; Ott, G.; Wohlleber, M.; Kohlhäufl, M.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Sweat gland carcinoma is a rare malignancy with a high metastatic potential seen more commonly in elderly patients. The scalp is the most common site of occurrence and it usually spreads to regional lymph nodes. Liver, lungs, and bones are the most common sites of distant metastasis. Late lung metastasis of sweat gland adenocarcinoma after a time span of 5 years is extremely rare. Aim. We report a patient with late lung metastasis of a primary sweat gland carcinoma 10 years after initial surgical resection. Conclusion. Sweat gland carcinomas are rare cancers with a poor prognosis. Surgery in the form of wide local excision and lymph node dissection is the mainstay of treatment. Late pulmonary metastases with a latency of 10 years have never been reported in the literature. This is the first clinical documentation of late lung metastasis from sweat gland carcinoma with a latency period of 10 years. PMID:23710393

  2. Eccrine sweat glands associate with the human hair follicle within a defined compartment of dermal white adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Poblet, E; Jimenez-Acosta, F; Escario-Travesedo, E; Hardman, J A; Hernández-Hernández, I; Agudo-Mena, J L; Cabrera-Galvan, J J; Nicu, C; Paus, R

    2018-02-12

    Eccrine sweat glands (ESGs) are critical for thermoregulation and involved in wound healing. ESGs have traditionally been considered as separate skin appendages without connection to the pilosebaceous unit (PSU). However, recent preliminary evidence has encouraged the hypothesis that PSU and ESG are more interconnected than previously thought. To reevaluate the morphology of human skin adnexa with an integrated 3D perspective in order to explore the possible interconnections that the PSU and the ESG may form. A systematic 3D reconstruction method of skin sections, direct visualization of human scalp follicular unit transplant grafts and a scalp strip ex vivo were used to validate and further explore the hypothesis. We demonstrate that the coiled portion of most ESGs is morphologically integrated into the PSU of human scalp skin and forms a structural unit that is embedded into a specific, HF-associated region of dermal white adipose tissue (dWAT). This newly recognized unit is easily accessible and experimentally tractable by organ culture of follicular units and can be intravitally visualized. We propose a model of functional human skin anatomy in which ESGs are closely associated with the PSU and the dWAT to form a common homeostatic tissue environment, which may best be encapsulated in the term adnexal skin unit (aSU). The challenge now is to dissect how each component of this superstructure of human skin functionally cooperates with and influences the other under physiological conditions, during regeneration/repair and in selected skin diseases. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. An efficient method for eccrine gland isolation from human scalp.

    PubMed

    Jimenez, F; Alam, M; Hernandez, I; Poblet, E; Hardman, J A; Paus, R

    2018-02-02

    We describe a simple and efficient method to isolate eccrine sweat glands from the human scalp. This method is inspired by the hair graft harvesting method used in hair transplantation. Based on the recently described anatomical relationship between the scalp hair follicle and the eccrine gland, we have found that scalp follicular unit grafts are an excellent eccrine gland isolation source, especially for the coiled component. In order to make the gland visible for stereoscopic microdissection, the follicular units need to be previously stained with a vital dye like Methylene Blue or Neutral Red. The simplicity and efficiency of this isolation method should encourage further research into human eccrine sweat gland function which has always been hindered by the difficulty of gland isolation. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. A novel organotypic 3D sweat gland model with physiological functionality

    PubMed Central

    Grüdl, Sabine; Banowski, Bernhard; Giesen, Melanie; Sättler, Andrea; Proksch, Peter; Welss, Thomas; Förster, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Dysregulated human eccrine sweat glands can negatively impact the quality-of-life of people suffering from disorders like hyperhidrosis. Inability of sweating can even result in serious health effects in humans affected by anhidrosis. The underlying mechanisms must be elucidated and a reliable in vitro test system for drug screening must be developed. Here we describe a novel organotypic three-dimensional (3D) sweat gland model made of primary human eccrine sweat gland cells. Initial experiments revealed that eccrine sweat gland cells in a two-dimensional (2D) culture lose typical physiological markers. To resemble the in vivo situation as close as possible, we applied the hanging drop cultivation technology regaining most of the markers when cultured in its natural spherical environment. To compare the organotypic 3D sweat gland model versus human sweat glands in vivo, we compared markers relevant for the eccrine sweat gland using transcriptomic and proteomic analysis. Comparing the marker profile, a high in vitro-in vivo correlation was shown. Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 5 (CEACAM5), muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M3 (CHRM3), Na+-K+-Cl- cotransporter 1 (NKCC1), calcium-activated chloride channel anoctamin-1 (ANO1/TMEM16A), and aquaporin-5 (AQP5) are found at significant expression levels in the 3D model. Moreover, cholinergic stimulation with acetylcholine or pilocarpine leads to calcium influx monitored in a calcium flux assay. Cholinergic stimulation cannot be achieved with the sweat gland cell line NCL-SG3 used as a sweat gland model system. Our results show clear benefits of the organotypic 3D sweat gland model versus 2D cultures in terms of the expression of essential eccrine sweat gland key regulators and in the physiological response to stimulation. Taken together, this novel organotypic 3D sweat gland model shows a good in vitro-in vivo correlation and is an appropriate alternative for screening of potential bioactives

  5. Determination of the maximum rate of eccrine sweat glands’ ion reabsorption using the galvanic skin conductance to local sweat rate relationship.

    PubMed

    Amano, Tatsuro; Gerrett, Nicola; Inoue, Yoshimitsu; Nishiyasu, Takeshi; Havenith, George; Kondo, Narihiko

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of the present study was to develop and describe a simple method to evaluate the rate of ion reabsorption of eccrine sweat glands in human using the measurement of galvanic skin conductance (GSC) and local sweating rate (SR). This purpose was investigated by comparing the SR threshold for increasing GSC with following two criteria of sweat ion reabsorption in earlier studies such as (1) the SR threshold for increasing sweat ion was at approximately 0.2–0.5 mg/cm2/min and (2) exercise heat acclimation improved the sweat ion reabsorption ability and would increase the criteria 1. Seven healthy non-heat-acclimated male subjects received passive heat treatment both before and after 7 days of cycling in hot conditions (50% maximum oxygen uptake, 60 min/day, ambient temperature 32 °C, and 50% relative humidity). Subjects became partially heat-acclimated, as evidenced by the decreased end-exercise heart rate (p < 0.01), rate of perceived exhaustion (p < 0.01), and oesophageal temperature (p = 0.07), without alterations in whole body sweat loss, from the first to the last day of training. As hypothesized, we confirmed that the SR threshold for increasing GSC was near the predicted SR during passive heating before exercise heat acclimation, and increased significantly after training (0.19 ± 0.09–0.32 ± 0.10 mg/cm2/min, p < 0.05). The reproducibility of sweat ion reabsorption by the eccrine glands in the present study suggests that the relationship between GSC and SR can serve as a new index for assessing the maximum rate of sweat ion reabsorption of eccrine sweat glands in humans.

  6. Peripheral Sweat Gland Function Improves With Humid Heat Acclimation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-01

    Maresh, e.M .. 1991. The induction and decay of heat acclimatisa- tion in trained athletes. Sports Med. 12, 302-312. Chen, W.Y .. Elizondo, R.s...Weiner, j.s" 1966. The local training effect of secretory activity on the response of eccrine sweat glands. j. Physio!. 184, 203-214. Eichna, L.W...exercise training and heat acclimation. j. Appl. Physiol. 43, 133-137. saltin, B., Gagge, A.P .. stolwijk, j.A.j., 1970. Body temperatures and sweating

  7. Immunolocalization and translocation of aquaporin-5 water channel in sweat glands.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Risako; Sohara, Eisei; Rai, Tatemitsu; Satoh, Takahiro; Yokozeki, Hiroo; Sasaki, Sei; Uchida, Shinichi

    2013-04-01

    Aquaporin-5 (AQP5) is a member of the water channel protein family. Although AQP5 was shown to be present in sweat glands, the presence or absence of regulated intracellular translocation of AQP5 in sweat glands remained to be determined. We investigated whether AQP5 in sweat glands translocated during sweating, and also sought to determine the intracellular signal that triggers this translocation. Immunofluorescent analyses of AQP5 in mouse and human sweat glands were performed. Madin-Darby Canine kidney (MDCK) cell lines stably expressing human AQP5 were generated, and the regulated translocation of AQP5 in the polarized cells was assessed by immunofluorescent analysis and biotinylation assays. AQP5 showed rapid translocation to the apical membranes during sweating. In human eccrine sweat glands, immunoreactive AQP5 was detected in the apical membranes and the intercellular canaliculi of secretory coils, and in the basolateral membranes of the clear cells. Treatment of human AQP5-expressing MDCK cells with calcium ionophore A23187 resulted in a twofold increase of AQP5 in the apical membranes within 5min. The regulated AQP5 translocation may contribute to sweat secretion by increasing the water permeability of apical plasma membranes of sweat glands. Copyright © 2013 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Immunohistological Expression of p16INK4a is Commonly Present Both in Benign and Malignant Sweat Gland Neoplasias.

    PubMed

    Tsujita, Jun; Kaku, Yumiko; Ichiki, Toshio; Eto, Ayaka; Maemura, Hiromi; Otsuka, Akiko; Nakaie, Risa; Kitagawa, Noriko; Morioka, Yuka; Matsuda, Tomoyo; Yoshida, Maiko; Furue, Masutaka

    2015-12-01

    The expression of p16INK4a has been reported to be a significant marker for malignant transformation of epidermal tumors. However, little is known about sweat gland tumors. We examined the immunohistological expression of p16INK4a in benign and malignant sweat gland tumors. The ductal and acrosyringial portion of normal eccrine glands were positively stained with p16INK4a while it was negative in the normal epidermis. Moderate to strong expression of p16INK4a was found in 16 of 17 eccrine poromas, 4 of 5 hidradenomas, 3 of 3 syringocystadenoma papilliferums, 2 of 2 mixed tumors, and 3 of 3 syringomas. The p16INK4a expression was observed focally or diffusely in 4 of 4 porocarcinomas, 4 of 4 apocrine carcinomas and 12 of 17 extramammary Paget's diseases. We conclude that the p16INK4a expression is not a good marker for dictating malignant transformation of sweat gland tumors.

  9. Apocrine sweat glands in the circumanal glands of the dog.

    PubMed

    Atoji, Y; Yamamoto, Y; Suzuki, Y

    1998-11-01

    Apocrine sweat glands in the circumanal glands of the dog are not connected morphologically with the lobules of the circumanal glands. However, an apparent functional association has been demonstrated and it is possible that the apocrine sweat glands might serve as excretory ducts for degenerated polyhedral cells of the circumanal glands. In this study, we examined the ultrastructure of the apocrine sweat glands in the circumanal glands of the dog in an effort to define more precisely the relationship between the apocrine sweat glands and the circumanal glands. Paraffin sections stained with azan and sections after immunohistochemical staining with antibodies against actin were examined by light microscopy. Samples fixed by aldehyde perfusion were examined with the electron microscope. Diameters of apocrine sweat glands and height of cells in the secretory epithelium varied considerably. Immunohistochemical staining for actin was weakly positive in the supranuclear regions of secretory cells and very intense in myoepithelial cells. In secretory cells, the endoplasmic reticulum was well-developed. Multivesicular bodies were abundant and were discharged into lumens. Apocrine secretion and exocytosis were observed at luminal surfaces of secretory cells. There were three types of large granule in the cytoplasm: giant mitochondria without cristae; membrane-enclosed globules with or without myelin-like contents; and electron-dense, homogeneous, globular structures. Luminal surfaces were always covered with microvilli, and extensive folding of the cell membrane was found in basal regions. Bundles of actin filaments were dispersed throughout the cytoplasm. In the lumens of apocrine tubules, we observed shed secretory cells with well-preserved normal fine structures. We also noted the differentiation of secretory cells that was due to cell renewal. Apocrine sweat glands in the circumanal glands of the dog appear to be more active than those on the general body surface in

  10. Sweating

    MedlinePlus

    ... is the release of liquid from the body's sweat glands. This liquid contains salt. This process is ... called perspiration. Sweating helps your body stay cool. Sweat is commonly found under the arms, on the ...

  11. Heat Tolerance and the Peripheral Effects of Anticholinergics. 1. A Non-Invasive Method for Estimating the Cholinergic Sensitivity of the Eccrine Glands in Humans.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-01-30

    significant interanodal currents. Solutions. Stock solutions of NaCl and acetyl-B- methacholine are prepared at a concentration of 20 mM in twice-distilled... methacholine . In both the pretreatment and treatment stages, the same procedure is followed: The anode assembly is placed into the template and the...quantitative response of human eccrine sweat glands to intradermal injections of acethylcholine and methacholine . J Physiol (Lond) 213: 277-290, 1971

  12. Effect of chloride ion concentration on the galvanic corrosion of α phase brass by eccrine sweat.

    PubMed

    Meekins, Andrew; Bond, John W; Chaloner, Penelope

    2012-07-01

    Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry measurement of the relative concentration of sodium, chloride, calcium, and potassium ions in eccrine sweat deposits from 40 donors revealed positive correlations between chloride and sodium (ρ = 0.684, p < 0.01) and chloride and calcium ions (ρ = 0.91, p < 0.01). Correlations between ion concentration and the corrosion of α phase brass by the donated sweat were investigated by visual grading of the degree of corrosion, by measuring the copper/zinc ratio using energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and from a measurement of the potential difference between corroded and uncorroded brass when a large potential was applied to the uncorroded brass. An increasing copper/zinc ratio (indicative of dezincification) was found to correlate positively to both chloride ion concentration and visual grading of corrosion, while visual grading gave correlations with potential difference measurements that were indicative of the preferential surface oxidation of zinc rather than copper. © 2012 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  13. Sweat

    MedlinePlus

    Sweat is a clear, salty liquid produced by glands in your skin. Sweating is how your body cools itself. You sweat mainly under your arms and on your feet and palms. When sweat mixes with bacteria on your skin, it can ...

  14. Wilson protein expression, copper excretion and sweat production in sweat glands of Wilson disease patients and controls

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, Mark; Schellenberg, Mavi; Merle, Uta; Weiss, Karl Heinz; Stremmel, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    Background In Wilson disease, copper is not sufficiently excreted into bile due to the absence or malfunction of the Wilson protein copper ATPase in the excretory pathway of hepatocytes. Copper is found in sweat. It is unknown if the Wilson protein plays a role in copper excretion into sweat. It is the aim of this study to investigate Wilson protein expression in sweat glands and analysing its effects on copper excretion into sweat in controls and patients with Wilson disease. Methods Immunofluorescent analysis of the Wilson protein in skin samples from normal rat, LEC rat and human skin biopsies were performed. Pilocarpin-induced sweat gland stimulation by iontophoretic transfer adapted from the methods used for cystic fibrosis sweat test was used for sweat induction. Sweat volume, sweat copper concentration, serum ceruloplasmin and serum copper were analysed in 28 Wilson patients and 21 controls. Results The Wilson protein is expressed in human and rat sweat gland epithelia. Copper concentration in sweat is not significantly different between controls and Wilson patients. Wilson patients produce significantly smaller volumes of sweat compared to controls. Sweat production is partially reversible in Wilson patients under medical treatment for Wilson disease or after liver transplantation Conclusion Wilson patients show a reduced sweat production with unaltered sweat copper concentration. The Wilson protein might play an important role in physiological sweat production. PMID:18637198

  15. Maintenance of sweat glands by stem cells located in the acral epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Ohe, Shuichi; Department of Dermatology, Kansai Medical University, Osaka 573-1010; Tanaka, Toshihiro

    2015-10-23

    The skin is responsible for a variety of physiological functions and is critical for wound healing and repair. Therefore, the regenerative capacity of the skin is important. However, stem cells responsible for maintaining the acral epithelium had not previously been identified. In this study, we identified the specific stem cells in the acral epithelium that participate in the long-term maintenance of sweat glands, ducts, and interadnexal epidermis and that facilitate the regeneration of these structures following injury. Lgr6-positive cells and Bmi1-positive cells were found to function as long-term multipotent stem cells that maintained the entire eccrine unit and the interadnexalmore » epidermis. However, while Lgr6-positive cells were rapidly cycled and constantly supplied differentiated cells, Bmi1-positive cells were slow to cycle and occasionally entered the cell cycle under physiological conditions. Upon irradiation-induced injury, Bmi1-positive cells rapidly proliferated and regenerated injured epithelial tissue. Therefore, Bmi1-positive stem cells served as reservoir stem cells. Lgr5-positive cells were rapidly cycled and maintained only sweat glands; therefore, we concluded that these cells functioned as lineage-restricted progenitors. Taken together, our data demonstrated the identification of stem cells that maintained the entire acral epithelium and supported the different roles of three cellular classes. - Highlights: • The acral epithelium have two types of stem cells. • Lgr6-positive cells are rapid-cycling, short-term stem cells. • Bmi1-positive cells are slow-cycling stem cells that act as reserver stem cells. • Lgr5 may be a useful sweat gland marker in mice.« less

  16. Cathepsin D is present in human eccrine sweat and involved in the postsecretory processing of the antimicrobial peptide DCD-1L.

    PubMed

    Baechle, Daniel; Flad, Thomas; Cansier, Alexander; Steffen, Heiko; Schittek, Birgit; Tolson, Jonathan; Herrmann, Timo; Dihazi, Hassan; Beck, Alexander; Mueller, Gerhard A; Mueller, Margret; Stevanovic, Stefan; Garbe, Claus; Mueller, Claudia A; Kalbacher, Hubert

    2006-03-03

    The protein pattern of healthy human eccrine sweat was investigated and 10 major proteins were detected from which apolipoprotein D, lipophilin B, and cathepsin D (CatD) were identified for the first time in human eccrine sweat. We focused our studies on the function of the aspartate protease CatD in sweat. In vitro digestion experiments using a specific fluorescent CatD substrate showed that CatD is enzymatically active in human sweat. To identify potential substrates of CatD in human eccrine sweat LL-37 and DCD-1L, two antimicrobial peptides present in sweat, were digested in vitro with purified CatD. LL-37 was not significantly digested by CatD, whereas DCD-1L was cleaved between Leu(44) and Asp(45) and between Leu(29) and Glu(30) almost completely. The DCD-1L-derived peptides generated in vitro by CatD were also found in vivo in human sweat as determined by surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization (SELDI) mass spectrometry. Furthermore, besides the CatD-processed peptides we identified additionally DCD-1L-derived peptides that are generated upon cleavage with a 1,10-phenanthroline-sensitive carboxypeptidase and an endoprotease. Taken together, proteolytic processing generates 12 DCD-1L-derived peptides. To elucidate the functional significance of postsecretory processing the antimicrobial activity of three CatD-processed DCD-1L peptides was tested. Whereas two of these peptides showed no activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, one DCD-1L-derived peptide showed an even higher activity against Escherichia coli than DCD-1L. Functional analysis indicated that proteolytic processing of DCD-1L by CatD in human sweat modulates the innate immune defense of human skin.

  17. Recurrent endocrine mucin-producing sweat gland carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Emanuel, Patrick O; de Vinck, David; Waldorf, Heidi A; Phelps, Robert G

    2007-12-01

    Endocrine mucin-producing sweat gland carcinoma is a rare skin tumor that most commonly involves the eyelid of elderly women. Morphologically and immunohistochemically, it is analogous to endocrine ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast and mammary solid papillary carcinoma; also, like the analogous breast lesion, there is an often associated invasive mucinous carcinoma with neuroendocrine differentiation. We describe the case of a 65-year-old woman with endocrine mucin-producing sweat gland carcinoma of the eyelid that recurred 3 years after an apparently complete excision.

  18. Mesenchymal stem cells for sweat gland regeneration after burns: From possibility to reality.

    PubMed

    Ma, Kui; Tan, Zhijun; Zhang, Cuiping; Fu, Xiaobing

    2016-05-01

    Sweat glands play important roles in homeostasis maintenance and body temperature regulation. In patients with deep burns, the injury can reach the muscle tissues and damage sweat glands. However, the plasticity of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) may offer the possibility to regenerate sweat glands after severe burn. In particular, recent studies have changed the possibility to reality. Here, we analyze the barriers of sweat gland regeneration in situ after deep burns, propose the possibilities of MSCs in regeneration of sweat glands, summarize the recent researches into sweat gland regeneration with MSCs, and sum up the possible mechanisms during this process. In addition, the advantage and disadvantage of sweat gland regeneration with MSCs from different tissues have been discussed. So this review will provide meaningful guidance in the clinic for sweat gland regeneration with MSCs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  19. Metastatic apocrine sweat gland adenocarcinoma in a terrier dog.

    PubMed

    Baharak, Akhtardanesh; Reza, Kheirandish; Shahriar, Dabiri; Omid, Azari; Daruoosh, Vosoogh; Nasrin, Askari

    2012-08-01

    This report describes the clinical and pathological aspects of an apocrine sweat gland carcinoma with distant metastasis in an aged dog. A 7-year-old male terrier dog was referred to small animal hospital of Shahid Bahonar University of Kerman with a 5.5×3.5 centimeter pedunculated mass on its head near left auricular region which had been progressively growing since three months ago. The radiography showed no local and distant metastasis. Surgical excision and histological evaluation was done. Histologically, the mass was composed of epithelial cells arranged in glandular and solid patterns. The morphologic findings suggested either a primary or metastatic apocrine-gland carcinoma. Immunohistochemically, the tumor cells were intensely positive for cytokeratin 7 and 20 and negative for S100 protein. On the basis of histopathological and clinical findings, the tumor was diagnosed as a malignant apocrine gland tumor, arising from apocrine sweat glands of the skin. Local tumor recurrence with anorexia and weight loss was reported by the owner nine month later. Severe submandibular and prescapular lymphadenomegaly was noted in clinical examination. Several large pulmonary nodules were noted in chest radiographs resembling mediastinal lymph node metastasis. Second surgery and chemotherapy was rejected by the owner due to grave prognosis of the patient. The animal was died 45 days later due to respiratory complications. Tumors of apocrine sweat glands are relatively uncommon in dogs whereas apocrine gland adenocarcinoma with distant metastasis is extremely rare.

  20. Metastatic apocrine sweat gland adenocarcinoma in a terrier dog

    PubMed Central

    Baharak, Akhtardanesh; Reza, Kheirandish; Shahriar, Dabiri; Omid, Azari; Daruoosh, Vosoogh; Nasrin, Askari

    2012-01-01

    This report describes the clinical and pathological aspects of an apocrine sweat gland carcinoma with distant metastasis in an aged dog. A 7-year-old male terrier dog was referred to small animal hospital of Shahid Bahonar University of Kerman with a 5.5×3.5 centimeter pedunculated mass on its head near left auricular region which had been progressively growing since three months ago. The radiography showed no local and distant metastasis. Surgical excision and histological evaluation was done. Histologically, the mass was composed of epithelial cells arranged in glandular and solid patterns. The morphologic findings suggested either a primary or metastatic apocrine-gland carcinoma. Immunohistochemically, the tumor cells were intensely positive for cytokeratin 7 and 20 and negative for S100 protein. On the basis of histopathological and clinical findings, the tumor was diagnosed as a malignant apocrine gland tumor, arising from apocrine sweat glands of the skin. Local tumor recurrence with anorexia and weight loss was reported by the owner nine month later. Severe submandibular and prescapular lymphadenomegaly was noted in clinical examination. Several large pulmonary nodules were noted in chest radiographs resembling mediastinal lymph node metastasis. Second surgery and chemotherapy was rejected by the owner due to grave prognosis of the patient. The animal was died 45 days later due to respiratory complications. Tumors of apocrine sweat glands are relatively uncommon in dogs whereas apocrine gland adenocarcinoma with distant metastasis is extremely rare. PMID:23569992

  1. Mucinous sweat gland adenocarcinoma of eyelid: a clinicopathologic study of 21 cases with histochemical and electron microscopic observations.

    PubMed

    Wright, J D; Font, R L

    1979-11-01

    This is a clinicopathologic study of 21 cases of mucinous sweat gland adenocarcinoma involving the eyelid. The tumor occurred in middle-aged adults (median age 60 years) and has a predilection for males. In this series eight patients (40%) had one or more local recurrences, one of whom died with extensive local invasion of the face after multiple recurrences in a 15-year interval. Only one patient had metastasis to the submandibular lymph nodes, which was treated by radical neck dissection. Involvement of the head, especially the face and scalp, was observed in 78% of the cases from the literature. Combining our cases with those previously reported, we found that the eyelid was involved in almost half of the cases (21 out of 45 lesions). We believe that the identification by light microscopy of a mixed population of light and dark secretory cells within the tumor lobules, the histochemical findings (presence of sialomucin and absence of iron as well as periodic acid-Schiff positive, diastase-resistant granules), and the results of ultrastructural studies support the histogenetic postulate that this mucinous adenocarcinoma is probably derived from the secretory cells of the eccrine coil. Our interpretation concurs with Headington's view of origin from the eccrine glands.

  2. Characteristics of sweating responses and peripheral sweat gland function during passive heating in sprinters.

    PubMed

    Amano, Tatsuro; Koga, Shunsaku; Inoue, Yoshimitsu; Nishiyasu, Takeshi; Kondo, Narihiko

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare sweating function in sprinters who have trained for several years with untrained subjects and trained endurance runners. Two separate experiments were conducted. Nine sprinters, eight untrained men, and nine distance runners (VO2 max 50.9 ± 1.4, 38.2 ± 1.8, and 59.1 ± 1.2 mL/kg/min, respectively; P < 0.05) were passively heated for 50 min (Experiment 1), and ten sprinters, 11 untrained men and nine distance runners (similar VO2 max levels compared with Experiment 1 in each group) had their sweat gland capacity assessed based on acetylcholine-induced sweating rate (SR) (Experiment 2). The slope of the mean non-glabrous SR plotted against change in mean body temperature during passive heating did not differ significantly between sprinters and untrained men (1.21 ± 0.10 and 0.97 ± 0.12 mg cm(-2)/min/°C, respectively); in contrast, compared with untrained men, distance runners exhibited a significantly greater slope (1.42 ± 0.11 mg cm(-2)/min/°C, P < 0.05). The mean body temperature threshold for SR was not significantly different among the groups. Acetylcholine-induced SR did not differ significantly between sprinters and untrained men, whereas distance runners showed a significantly higher induced SR compared with untrained men. The sweating function was not improved in sprinters who have trained 2-3 h/day, 5 days/week, for at least 3 years compared with untrained men, although the VO2 max was markedly greater in sprinters. Thus, there is a case that daily training was not sufficient to improve sweating function in sprinters relative to those in distance runners.

  3. Nature of the sweat glands in the hairy skin of the beagle.

    PubMed

    Cotton, D W; van Hasselt, P; Bergers, A M

    1975-01-01

    The local pharmacology, the thermal response and the response to hypothalamic stimulation of sweat glands of the hairy surface of the beagle are described. The results, together with those of electron-microscopic examinations, support the idea that these sweat glands are apocrine and are not directly innervated. No clear relationship with thermoregulation could be found and a pheromonal function is tentatively suggested.

  4. A retrospective study of 44 canine apocrine sweat gland adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Simko, Elemir; Wilcock, Brian P; Yager, Julie A

    2003-01-01

    Apocrine sweat gland adenocarcinomas (AACs) are relatively uncommon skin tumors in dogs. Little prognostic or behavioral information has been published for these tumors. In this retrospective study, 44 AACs from diagnostic archives were reexamined and clinical postexcisional follow-ups for 25 of the 44 cases were obtained by a survey. There were 28 out of 44 (65.9%) AACs that invaded the capsule, stroma, or both, 5 of 44 (11.4%) invaded blood vessels and stroma, and 1 out of 25 (4%) had distant metastases. The presence or absence of stromal and vascular invasion was predicted by clinical examination with more than 80% accuracy. Postexcisional median survival of dogs with AACs was 30 mo at the time of survey. Determination of a correlation between histological features and malignant behavior of AACs was compromised by the low number of cases with clinical AAC-related problems; however, it appears that intravascular invasion is an important indicator of potential systemic metastases.

  5. Requirement for Shh and Fox family genes at different stages in sweat gland development

    PubMed Central

    Kunisada, Makoto; Cui, Chang-Yi; Piao, Yulan; Ko, Minoru S.H.; Schlessinger, David

    2009-01-01

    Sweat glands play a fundamental role in thermal regulation in man, but the molecular mechanism of their development remains unknown. To initiate analyses, we compared the model of Eda mutant Tabby mice, in which sweat glands were not formed, with wild-type (WT) mice. We inferred developmental stages and critical genes based on observations at seven time points spanning embryonic, postnatal and adult life. In WT footpads, sweat gland germs were detected at E17.5. The coiling of secretory portions started at postnatal day 1 (P1), and sweat gland formation was essentially completed by P5. Consistent with a controlled morphological progression, expression profiling revealed stage-specific gene expression changes. Similar to the development of hair follicles—the other major skin appendage controlled by EDA—sweat gland induction and initial progression were accompanied by Eda-dependent up-regulation of the Shh pathway. During the further development of sweat gland secretory portions, Foxa1 and Foxi1, not at all expressed in hair follicles, were progressively up-regulated in WT but not in Tabby footpads. Upon completion of WT development, Shh declined to Tabby levels, but Fox family genes remained at elevated levels in mature sweat glands. The results provide a framework for the further analysis of phased down-stream regulation of gene action, possibly by a signaling cascade, in response to Eda. PMID:19270025

  6. Human pancreatic cell surface antigens with homologous expression in liver, sweat glands, and other exocrine tissues.

    PubMed

    Shienvold, F L; Alejandro, R; Latif, Z; Mintz, D H

    1986-01-01

    We have generated two panels of monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) that represent a unique array of immunolabeling reagents specific for diverse cell surface and intracellular antigens of ductal epithelial cells (DEC) and of acinar cells (AC) within the human pancreas. Eight of the MoAbs are specific within the pancreas for the DEC plasma membrane (PM), three for DEC intracellular antigens, seven for AC-PM, and one for AC secretory granules. The MoAbs with PM reactivities have permitted us to substantially enhance our assessment of exocrine contamination in our human islet preparations. However, we have been unable to demonstrate consistently the effectiveness of these MoAbs in complement-mediated cytotoxicity protocols designed to improve the purity of our islet preparations by exocrine cytolysis. It is possible that primary cell isolates of pancreas or epithelial organs in general may lack inherent susceptibility to complement-mediated cytolysis or, instead, that this particular panel of MoAbs lacks the appropriate characteristics needed to achieve consistent complement-mediated cytolysis. We have also begun to explore the potentially broader applicability of the anti-DEC MoAbs as immunocytochemical tools and have observed intriguing patterns of cross-reactivities in other exocrine tissues, particularly bile duct epithelial cells in the liver and functionally discrete subsets of DEC in the eccrine sweat gland and the parotid gland. These homologous antigenic patterns, by virtue of their specificities for ductal tissue, most likely reflect the molecular bases for functions common to these tissues, e.g., active ion transport and mucin secretion. In addition, the anti-DEC and the anti-AC MoAbs exhibit patterns of binding specificity for human cell lines derived from pancreatic adenocarcinoma that suggest the potential value of these MoAbs in tumor diagnosis and therapy. We believe that these panels of MoAbs will find broad utility in immunopathology and in experimental

  7. A retrospective study of 44 canine apocrine sweat gland adenocarcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Simko, Elemir; Wilcock, Brian P.; Yager, Julie A.

    2003-01-01

    Apocrine sweat gland adenocarcinomas (AACs) are relatively uncommon skin tumors in dogs. Little prognostic or behavioral information has been published for these tumors. In this retrospective study, 44 AACs from diagnostic archives were reexamined and clinical postexcisional follow-ups for 25 of the 44 cases were obtained by a survey. There were 28 out of 44 (65.9%) AACs that invaded the capsule, stroma, or both, 5 of 44 (11.4%) invaded blood vessels and stroma, and 1 out of 25 (4%) had distant metastases. The presence or absence of stromal and vascular invasion was predicted by clinical examination with more than 80% accuracy. Postexcisional median survival of dogs with AACs was 30 mo at the time of survey. Determination of a correlation between histological features and malignant behavior of AACs was compromised by the low number of cases with clinical AAC-related problems; however, it appears that intravascular invasion is an important indicator of potential systemic metastases. PMID:12619554

  8. Normal and PPP-affected palmoplantar sweat gland express neuroendocrine markers chromogranins and synaptophysin differently.

    PubMed

    Hagforsen, Eva; Michaëlsson, Gerd; Stridsberg, Mats

    2010-11-01

    Earlier findings indicate the acrosyringium as the target for the inflammation in the chronic and intensely inflammatory skin disease palmoplantar pustulosis (PPP). The sweat gland apparatus seems to be an immune-competent structure that probably contributes to the defence of the skin. Furthermore, the sweat gland and duct may be a hitherto unrecognized neuroendocrine organ because it expresses cholineacetyl-transferase and acetylcholinesterase, nicotinic receptors, beta-adrenergic and angiotensin receptors. The aim of this study was to obtain further information about neuroendocrine properties of the sweat gland apparatus by examining the expression of common neuroendocrine markers synaptophysin and chromogranins A and B in healthy palmar skin and in PPP skin. Synaptophysin and chromogranins were expressed in the sweat glands and ducts with some variation in the pattern and intensity of the expression. In PPP skin the expression differed, being higher and lower, depending on the part of the sweat duct. Chromogranins were further expressed in the epidermis, endothelium and inflammatory cells, but its intensity was weaker in epidermis than in the sweat gland apparatus. In most cases, chromogranins in epidermis in involved PPP were weakly expressed compared to healthy controls. The presence of synaptophysin and chromogranins in palmoplantar skin may have marked neuroendocrine effects, and the palmoplantar skin is likely to have important neuroimmuno-endocrine properties. Moreover, the altered chromogranin expression in PPP skin might influence both the neuroendocrine and neuroimmunologic properties of palmoplantar skin in these patients. These results indicate important neuroendocrine properties of the palmoplantar skin.

  9. Involvement of Wnt, Eda and Shh at defined stages of sweat gland development.

    PubMed

    Cui, Chang-Yi; Yin, Mingzhu; Sima, Jian; Childress, Victoria; Michel, Marc; Piao, Yulan; Schlessinger, David

    2014-10-01

    To maintain body temperature, sweat glands develop from embryonic ectoderm by a poorly defined mechanism. We demonstrate a temporal cascade of regulation during mouse sweat gland formation. Sweat gland induction failed completely when canonical Wnt signaling was blocked in skin epithelium, and was accompanied by sharp downregulation of downstream Wnt, Eda and Shh pathway genes. The Wnt antagonist Dkk4 appeared to inhibit this induction: Dkk4 was sharply downregulated in β-catenin-ablated mice, indicating that it is induced by Wnt/β-catenin; however, its overexpression repressed Wnt target genes and significantly reduced gland numbers. Eda signaling succeeded Wnt. Wnt signaling was still active and nascent sweat gland pre-germs were still seen in Eda-null mice, but the pre-germs failed to develop further and the downstream Shh pathway was not activated. When Wnt and Eda were intact but Shh was ablated, germ induction and subsequent duct formation occurred normally, but the final stage of secretory coil formation failed. Thus, sweat gland development shows a relay of regulatory steps initiated by Wnt/β-catenin - itself modulated by Dkk4 - with subsequent participation of Eda and Shh pathways. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  10. Three-dimensional cell shapes and arrangements in human sweat glands as revealed by whole-mount immunostaining

    PubMed Central

    Kurata, Ryuichiro; Futaki, Sugiko; Nakano, Itsuko; Fujita, Fumitaka; Tanemura, Atsushi; Murota, Hiroyuki; Katayama, Ichiro; Okada, Fumihiro

    2017-01-01

    Because sweat secretion is facilitated by mechanical contraction of sweat gland structures, understanding their structure-function relationship could lead to more effective treatments for patients with sweat gland disorders such as heat stroke. Conventional histological studies have shown that sweat glands are three-dimensionally coiled tubular structures consisting of ducts and secretory portions, although their detailed structural anatomy remains unclear. To better understand the details of the three-dimensional (3D) coiled structures of sweat glands, a whole-mount staining method was employed to visualize 3D coiled gland structures with sweat gland markers for ductal luminal, ductal basal, secretory luminal, and myoepithelial cells. Imaging the 3D coiled gland structures demonstrated that the ducts and secretory portions were comprised of distinct tubular structures. Ductal tubules were occasionally bent, while secretory tubules were frequently bent and formed a self-entangled coiled structure. Whole-mount staining of complex coiled gland structures also revealed the detailed 3D cellular arrangements in the individual sweat gland compartments. Ducts were composed of regularly arranged cuboidal shaped cells, while secretory portions were surrounded by myoepithelial cells longitudinally elongated along entangled secretory tubules. Whole-mount staining was also used to visualize the spatial arrangement of blood vessels and nerve fibers, both of which facilitate sweat secretion. The blood vessels ran longitudinally parallel to the sweat gland tubules, while nerve fibers wrapped around secretory tubules, but not ductal tubules. Taken together, whole-mount staining of sweat glands revealed the 3D cell shapes and arrangements of complex coiled gland structures and provides insights into the mechanical contraction of coiled gland structures during sweat secretion. PMID:28636607

  11. Diagnostic value of eccrine glands and hair follicles in direct immunofluorescent analysis of pemphigus vulgaris and bullous pemphigoid.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Cheng; Yu, Yan; Elston, Dirk M

    2016-04-01

    The immunofluorescence pattern in adnexal structures may be of value, especially when the epidermis is not well represented in diagnostic sections. We studied a total of 88 cases of pemphigus vulgaris (PV) and bullous pemphigoid (BP) accessioned between 2010 and 2015 (40 cases of PV and 48 cases of BP). Immunofluorescence patterns and sensitivity in adnexal structures were similar to those observed in the epidermis. One case of PV and three cases of BP showed weak or absent fluorescence in the epidermis, while the eccrine glands were strongly positive, suggesting that careful examination of adnexal structures can be of value. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. 3D bioprinted extracellular matrix mimics facilitate directed differentiation of epithelial progenitors for sweat gland regeneration.

    PubMed

    Huang, Sha; Yao, Bin; Xie, Jiangfan; Fu, Xiaobing

    2016-03-01

    Sweat glands perform a vital thermoregulatory function in mammals. Like other skin appendages, they originate from epidermal progenitors. However, they have low regenerative potential in response to injury, and whether adult epidermal progenitors could be specified to differentiate to a sweat gland cell lineage remains largely unexplored. We used bioprinting technology to create a functional in vitro cell-laden 3D extracellular matrix mimics (3D-ECM) with composite hydrogels based on gelatin and sodium alginate because of chemical and structural similarity to ECM components. To achieve specific cell differentiation, mouse plantar dermis and epidermal growth factor were synchronously incorporated into the 3D-ECM mimics to create an inductive niche for epidermal progenitor cells obtained from mice. The biological 3D construct could maintain cell viability, thereby facilitating cell spreading and matrix formation. In vitro data by immunofluorescence and gene expression assay of key cell-surface markers demonstrated that the bioprinted 3D-ECM could effectively create a restrictive niche for epidermal progenitors that ensures unilateral differentiation into sweat gland cells. Furthermore, direct delivery of bioprinted 3D-ECM into burned paws of mice resulted in functional restoration of sweat glands. This study represents the rational design to enhance the specific differentiation of epidermal lineages using 3D bioprinting and may have clinical and translational implications in regenerating sweat glands. Sweat gland regeneration after injury is of clinical importance but remains largely unsolved because of low regenerative potential and lack of a definite niche. Some studies have shown sweat gland regeneration with gene-based interventions or cell-based induction via embryonic components, but translation to clinic is challenging. The novelty and significance of the work lies in the fact that we design a 3D bioprinted extracellular matrix that provides the spatial

  13. Surgical treatment of axillary hyperhidrosis by suction-curettage of sweat glands*

    PubMed Central

    de Rezende, Rebeca Maffra; Luz, Flávio Barbosa

    2014-01-01

    Suction curettage is a dermatologic surgery technique for the treatment of axillary hyperhidrosis, which is becoming more popular. Objective: The purpose of this study is to describe the current technique of removal of axillary sweat glands, and evaluate its efficacy and safety. Conclusion: Suction-curettage of sweat glands is a minimally invasive surgical technique that is easy to perform, safe, has high rates of success and relatively few side-effects. It is generally well tolerated by patients and requires shorter time away from daily activities, when compared with other surgical modalities. PMID:25387499

  14. Aquaporins and Gland Secretion.

    PubMed

    Delporte, Christine

    2017-01-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs ) are expressed in most exocrine and endocrine secretory glands. Consequently, summarizing the expression and functions of AQPs in secretory glands represents a daunting task considering the important number of glands present in the body, as well as the number of mammalian AQPs - thirteen. The roles played by AQPs in secretory processes have been investigated in many secretory glands. However, despite considerable research, additional studies are clearly needed to pursue our understanding of the role played by AQPs in secretory processes. This book chapter will focus on summarizing the current knowledge on AQPs expression and function in the gastrointestinal tract , including salivary glands, gastric glands, Duodenal Brunner's gland, liver and gallbladder, intestinal goblets cells, exocrine and endocrine pancreas, as well as few other secretory glands including airway submucosal glands, lacrimal glands, mammary glands and eccrine sweat glands.

  15. Analysis of the temporal requirement for eda in hair and sweat gland development.

    PubMed

    Cui, Chang-Yi; Kunisada, Makoto; Esibizione, Diana; Douglass, Eric G; Schlessinger, David

    2009-04-01

    EDA signaling is important in skin appendage initiation. Its possible involvement in appendage subtype determination and postinduction stage appendage development, however, has not been studied systematically. To address these issues we manipulated Eda-A1 transgene expression in a tetracycline-regulated conditional mouse model, where the transgene is the only source of active ectodysplasin (Eda). We find that Eda-A1 restores sweat glands and all hair subtypes in Tabby, but each requires its action at an idiosyncratic time of development: by E17 for guard, by E19 for awl, and starting at E18 for zigzag/auchen hair. Guard and awl hairs were indistinguishable from their wild-type counterparts; but restored zigzag and auchen hairs, although recognizable, were somewhat smaller and lacked characteristic bends. Notably, secondary hair follicle formation of awl, auchen, and zigzag hairs required higher Eda-A1 expression level than did guard hair or sweat glands. Furthermore, Eda-A1 expression is required until the early dermal papilla stage for guard hair germs to make follicles, but is dispensable for their maturation. Similarly, sweat gland pegs require Eda-A1 at an early stage to form mature glands. Thus we infer that EDA signaling is needed for the determination and development of various skin appendages at spatiotemporally restricted intervals.

  16. In Vivo Readout of CFTR Function: Ratiometric Measurement of CFTR-Dependent Secretion by Individual, Identifiable Human Sweat Glands

    PubMed Central

    Wine, Jeffrey J.; Char, Jessica E.; Chen, Jonathan; Cho, Hyung-ju; Dunn, Colleen; Frisbee, Eric; Joo, Nam Soo; Milla, Carlos; Modlin, Sara E.; Park, Il-Ho; Thomas, Ewart A. C.; Tran, Kim V.; Verma, Rohan; Wolfe, Marlene H.

    2013-01-01

    To assess CFTR function in vivo, we developed a bioassay that monitors and compares CFTR-dependent and CFTR-independent sweat secretion in parallel for multiple (∼50) individual, identified glands in each subject. Sweating was stimulated by intradermally injected agonists and quantified by optically measuring spherical sweat bubbles in an oil-layer that contained dispersed, water soluble dye particles that partitioned into the sweat bubbles, making them highly visible. CFTR-independent secretion (M-sweat) was stimulated with methacholine, which binds to muscarinic receptors and elevates cytosolic calcium. CFTR-dependent secretion (C-sweat) was stimulated with a β-adrenergic cocktail that elevates cytosolic cAMP while blocking muscarinic receptors. A C-sweat/M-sweat ratio was determined on a gland-by-gland basis to compensate for differences unrelated to CFTR function, such as gland size. The average ratio provides an approximately linear readout of CFTR function: the heterozygote ratio is ∼0.5 the control ratio and for CF subjects the ratio is zero. During assay development, we measured C/M ratios in 6 healthy controls, 4 CF heterozygotes, 18 CF subjects and 4 subjects with ‘CFTR-related’ conditions. The assay discriminated all groups clearly. It also revealed consistent differences in the C/M ratio among subjects within groups. We hypothesize that these differences reflect, at least in part, levels of CFTR expression, which are known to vary widely. When C-sweat rates become very low the C/M ratio also tended to decrease; we hypothesize that this nonlinearity reflects ductal fluid absorption. We also discovered that M-sweating potentiates the subsequent C-sweat response. We then used potentiation as a surrogate for drugs that can increase CFTR-dependent secretion. This bioassay provides an additional method for assessing CFTR function in vivo, and is well suited for within-subject tests of systemic, CFTR-directed therapeutics. PMID:24204751

  17. The congenital chloride diarrhea gene is expressed in seminal vesicle, sweat gland, inflammatory colon epithelium, and in some dysplastic colon cells.

    PubMed

    Haila, S; Saarialho-Kere, U; Karjalainen-Lindsberg, M L; Lohi, H; Airola, K; Holmberg, C; Hästbacka, J; Kere, J; Höglund, P

    2000-04-01

    Congenital chloride diarrhea (CLD) is an autosomal recessive disorder of intestinal electrolyte transportation caused by mutations in the anion transporter protein encoded by the down-regulated in adenoma (DRA), or CLD, gene. In this study, in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry were performed to investigate the expression of CLD in extraintestinal normal epithelia and in intestinal inflammatory and neoplastic epithelia. The expression of the closely related anion transporter diastrophic dysplasia sulfate transporter, DTDST, was also examined and compared with that of CLD in colon. The only extraintestinal tissues showing CLD expression were eccrine sweat glands and seminal vesicles. In inflammatory bowel disease and ischemic colitis, expression of CLD mRNA in colon epithelium was similar to histologically normal colon epithelium, but the protein was found deeper in crypts, including proliferative epithelial cells. In intestinal tumors, the expression pattern of CLD was dependent on the differentiation status of the tissue studied: epithelial polyps with no or minor dysplasia showed abundant expression, whereas adenocarcinomas were negative. The DTDST gene was abundantly expressed in the upper crypt epithelium of colonic mucosa.

  18. Polarizable crystals in apocrine sweat gland tumors: A series of 3 cases.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Gina; Gardner, Jerad M; Shalin, Sara C

    2017-08-01

    Polarizable calcium oxalate (CaOx) crystals have been well documented in breast biopsies, generally associated with benign apocrine metaplasia. In contrast, polarizable crystals are only rarely reported in skin adnexal neoplasms. We report 3 different cases of sweat gland tumors with polarizable crystals morphologically suggestive of CaOx: 1 apocrine hidrocystoma and 2 tubular apocrine adenomas. The histologic features were examined in 3 cases. Clinical presentation summary included 2 males and 1 female, ages 53 to 74 years, with lesions located on the left cheek, inferior vertex scalp and the left eyebrow. All 3 cases showed polarizable, geometric, plate-like and fractured, colorless crystals within the lumens of the neoplasm. Of note, these crystals were seen only on the toluidine blue-stained section of Case #1, but were not present on the corresponding permanent section. We hypothesize that polarizable crystals may be present in sweat gland neoplasms more often than previously documented, but that they may often dissolve with routine processing, accounting for their rare visibility. We highlight this rare finding, and suggest that it may be underreported. We only noted this finding in benign apocrine tumors; further investigation would be necessary to determine whether these crystals are also seen in other cutaneous adnexal neoplasms. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Immunocytochemical demonstration of intermediate filament proteins, S-100 protein and CEA in apocrine sweat glands and apocrine gland derived lesions of the dog.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, L; Rabanal, R M; Fondevila, D; Prats, N

    1990-09-01

    The presence of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), intermediate filament proteins and S-100 protein in normal and pathological canine apocrine sweat glands was investigated, using a standard immunoperoxidase technique. The normal apocrine sweat glands showed a constant immunoreactivity in all the cases studied. The cells of the acini and of the ducts only reacted with the antikeratin antibody. The myoepithelial cells reacted positively with the antisera antikeratin and anti protein S-100. Epithelial cells of apocrine cysts, sweat gland adenomas and sweat gland carcinomas showed the same immunoreaction than normal apocrine cells. Proliferating myoepithelial cells were also positive for vimentin. In two out of three adenocarcinomas a positive reaction with the anti CEA could be detected in the glandular cells. This can be due to the presence in glandular cells of CEA or of Nonspecific Crossreacting Antigen (NCA). These findings indicate that demonstration of keratin is a useful aid in the detection of apocrine gland derived lesions in the dog. Similarly, S-100 protein is a marker for myoepithelial cells. Further research is necessary to investigate the expression of CEA in canine tumours.

  20. Skin Tattoos Alter Sweat Rate and Na+ Concentration.

    PubMed

    Luetkemeier, Maurie Joe; Hanisko, Joseph Michael; Aho, Kyle Mathiew

    2017-07-01

    The popularity of tattoos has increased tremendously in the last 10 yr particularly among athletes and military personnel. The tattooing process involves permanently depositing ink under the skin at a similar depth as eccrine sweat glands (3-5 mm). The purpose of this study was to compare the sweat rate and sweat Na concentration of tattooed versus nontattooed skin. The participants were 10 healthy men (age = 21 ± 1 yr), all with a unilateral tattoo covering a circular area at least 5.2 cm. Sweat was stimulated by iontophoresis using agar gel disks impregnated with 0.5% pilocarpine nitrate. The nontattooed skin was located contralateral to the position of the tattooed skin. The disks used to collect sweat were composed of Tygon® tubing wound into a spiral so that the sweat was pulled into the tubing by capillary action. The sweat rate was determined by weighing the disk before and after sweat collection. The sweat Na concentration was determined by flame photometry. The mean sweat rate from tattooed skin was significantly less than nontattooed skin (0.18 ± 0.15 vs 0.35 ± 0.25 mg·cm·min; P = 0.001). All 10 participants generated less sweat from tattooed skin than nontattooed skin and the effect size was -0.79. The mean sweat Na concentration from tattooed skin was significantly higher than nontattooed skin (69.1 ± 28.9 vs 42.6 ± 15.2 mmol·L; P = 0.02). Nine of 10 participants had higher sweat Na concentration from tattooed skin than nontattooed skin, and the effect size was 1.01. Tattooed skin generated less sweat and a higher Na concentration than nontattooed skin when stimulated by pilocarpine iontophoresis.

  1. Latent heat loss and sweat gland histology of male goats in an equatorial semi-arid environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Melo Costa, Cíntia Carol; Maia, Alex Sandro Campos; Neto, José Domingues Fontenele; Oliveira, Steffan Edward Octávio; de Queiroz, João Paulo Araújo Fernandes

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this work was to quantify the heat loss by cutaneous evaporation of goats in an equatorial semi-arid environment. The latent heat loss from the body surfaces of these ten undefined breed goats was measured using a ventilated capsule in sun and shade and in the three body regions (neck, flank and hindquarters). Skin samples from these three regions were histologically analyzed to relate the quantity of sweat glands, the area of sweat glands and the epithelium thickness of each of these regions to the heat loss by cutaneous evaporation of the examined goats. The epithelium thickness that was measured varied significantly for body regions with different quantities and areas of sweat glands ( P < 0.01). Among the body regions that were examined, the samples from the neck demonstrated the highest epithelium thickness (16.23 ± 0.13 μm). However, the samples of sweat glands from the flank had the biggest area (43330.51 ± 778.71 μm2) and quantity per square centimeter (390 ± 9 cm-2). After the animals were exposed to sun, the flanks lost the greatest amount of heat by cutaneous evaporation (73.03 ± 1.75 W m-2) and possessed the highest surface temperatures (39.47 ± 0.18 °C). The histological characteristics may have influenced the heat loss by cutaneous evaporation that was observed in the flank region after the animals were exposed to sun.

  2. Neoplasms of the apocrine sweat glands in 44 dogs and 10 cats.

    PubMed

    Kalaher, K M; Anderson, W I; Scott, D W

    1990-10-20

    Neoplasms of the apocrine sweat glands accounted for 2.0 per cent and 3.6 per cent, respectively, of all canine and feline skin neoplasms diagnosed during a period of three years. They occurred in dogs from six to 17 years of age of both sexes, and golden retrievers appeared to be predisposed; they occurred in cats from six to 17 years of age and there were no breed or sex predilections. In both species, the neoplasms were usually solitary and occurred anywhere on the body; they were nearly always carcinomas and histologically were usually of the solid type. There were no clinical measurements that made it possible to distinguish reliably between benign and malignant lesions. No distant metastases were recorded, even though 22.5 per cent of the canine carcinomas had invaded the lymphatic system.

  3. Eccrine Porocarcinoma: Patient Characteristics, Clinical and Histopathologic Features, and Treatment in 7 Cases.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Zubiaur, A; Medina-Montalvo, S; Vélez-Velázquez, M D; Polo-Rodríguez, I

    2017-05-01

    Eccrine porocarcinoma is a rare, malignant cutaneous adnexal tumor that arises from the ducts of sweat glands. Found mainly in patients of advanced age, this tumor has diverse clinical presentations. Histology confirms the diagnosis, detects features relevant to prognosis, and guides treatment. Growth is slow, but the prognosis is poor if the tumor metastasizes to lymph nodes or visceral organs. We report 7 cases of eccrine porocarcinoma, describing patient characteristics, the clinical and histopathologic features of the tumors, and treatments used. Our observations were similar to those of other published case series. Given the lack of therapeutic algorithms or protocols for this carcinoma, we propose a decision-making schema based on our review of the literature and our experience with this case series. The algorithm centers on sentinel lymph node biopsy and histologic features. Copyright © 2016 AEDV. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Prolonged and localized sweat stimulation by iontophoretic delivery of the slowly-metabolized cholinergic agent carbachol.

    PubMed

    Simmers, Phillip; Li, S Kevin; Kasting, Gerald; Heikenfeld, Jason

    2018-01-01

    Continuous non-invasive sampling and sensing of multiple classes of analytes could revolutionize medical diagnostics and wearable technologies, but also remains highly elusive because of the many confounding factors for candidate biofluids such as interstitial fluid, tears, saliva, and sweat. Eccrine sweat biosensing has seen a recent surge in demonstrations of wearable sampling and sensing devices. However, for subjects at rest, access to eccrine sweat is highly limited and unpredictable compared to saliva and tears. Reported here is a prolonged and localized sweat stimulation by iontophoretic delivery of the slowly-metabolized nicotinic cholinergic agonist carbachol. Presented here are detailed measurements of natural baseline sweat rates across multiple days, confirming a clear need for localized sweat stimulation. Iontophoresis was performed with either carbachol or pilocarpine in order to stimulate sweat in subjects at rest. Furthermore, improved methods of quantifying sweat generation rates (nL/min/gland) are demonstrated. In-vivo testing reveals that carbachol stimulation can surpass a major goal of 24-h sweat access, in some cases providing more than an order of magnitude longer duration than stimulation with commonly-used pilocarpine. Also demonstrated is reduction of the traditional iontophoretic dosage for sweat stimulation (<5.25-42mC/cm 2 ). This increases the viability of repeated dosing as demonstrated herein, and for carbachol is as much as 100-1000X less than used for other applications. This work is not only significant for wearable sweat biosensing technology, but could also have broader impact for those studying topical skin products, antiperspirants, textiles and medical adhesives, nerve disorders, the effects of perspiration on skin-health, skin related diseases such as idiopathic pure sudomotor failure and hyperhidrosis, and other skin- and perspiration-related applications. Copyright © 2017 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology

  5. A case of canine apocrine sweat gland adenoma, clear cell variant.

    PubMed

    Nibe, K; Uchida, K; Itoh, T; Tateyama, S

    2005-03-01

    A cutaneous mass at the base of the retroauricular region of a 4-year-old, female Golden Retriever was examined pathologically. Histologically, the mass formed multiple nodules consisting of a proliferation of large clear cells with abundant cytoplasm. Mitotic figures among the neoplastic cells were very sparse. The large clear cells were intensely positive for cytokeratins (AE1/AE4, cytokeratin 8 and 18) and moderately positive for lysozyme and contained periodic acid-Schiff-positive granules in the cytoplasm. In addition, small flat cells lined the islands of neoplastic large clear cells, and these were strongly positive for alpha-smooth muscle actin and vimentin, and some were positive for cytokeratin (AE1/AE4), suggesting they were myoepithelial cells. No local recurrence or metastasis has been recognized during the 18 months since surgical excision. On the basis of these findings, the present tumor was diagnosed as apocrine sweat gland adenoma, clear cell variant. There have been few previous reports of canine apocrine adenomas showing a clear cell morphology.

  6. Eccrine-Centric Melanocytic Nevus.

    PubMed

    Fertig, Raymond M; Berghoff, Adar; Cervantes, Jessica; Darwin, Evan; Jukic, Drazen

    2017-10-27

    Benign melanocytic neoplasms present with a diverse array of well-known histopathologic patterns. It is imperative to recognize the benign patterns to render accurate diagnoses. We describe here an interesting and hitherto not described low-power architectural pattern of a benign melanocytic lesion: eccrine-centric melanocytic nevus. The patient was a 50-year-old African American woman who noticed a new mole on her foot that began as a dark speck but quickly grew larger. The lesion was excised to exclude the possibility of melanoma. Upon review of the specimen, the lesion was noted to demonstrate a distinctive pattern consistent with a melanocytic nevus of possible congenital onset. Remarkably, the ducts of eccrine glands were increased in density and the nests of melanocytes were found solely in a peri-eccrine distribution without melanocytes in any other locations (ie, interstitial, perifollicular). Additionally, all melanocytes in the nevus were rather heavily pigmented. Although this pattern demonstrated no atypical features that would cause one to consider it malignant to the trained eye, this presentation could implicate a metastatic disease (well-delineated nests in the dermis without concomitant interstitial component) and it is important to recognize.

  7. Making Plants Break a Sweat: the Structure, Function, and Evolution of Plant Salt Glands.

    PubMed

    Dassanayake, Maheshi; Larkin, John C

    2017-01-01

    Salt stress is a complex trait that poses a grand challenge in developing new crops better adapted to saline environments. Some plants, called recretohalophytes, that have naturally evolved to secrete excess salts through salt glands, offer an underexplored genetic resource for examining how plant development, anatomy, and physiology integrate to prevent excess salt from building up to toxic levels in plant tissue. In this review we examine the structure and evolution of salt glands, salt gland-specific gene expression, and the possibility that all salt glands have originated via evolutionary modifications of trichomes. Salt secretion via salt glands is found in more than 50 species in 14 angiosperm families distributed in caryophyllales, asterids, rosids, and grasses. The salt glands of these distantly related clades can be grouped into four structural classes. Although salt glands appear to have originated independently at least 12 times, they share convergently evolved features that facilitate salt compartmentalization and excretion. We review the structural diversity and evolution of salt glands, major transporters and proteins associated with salt transport and secretion in halophytes, salt gland relevant gene expression regulation, and the prospect for using new genomic and transcriptomic tools in combination with information from model organisms to better understand how salt glands contribute to salt tolerance. Finally, we consider the prospects for using this knowledge to engineer salt glands to increase salt tolerance in model species, and ultimately in crops.

  8. Making Plants Break a Sweat: the Structure, Function, and Evolution of Plant Salt Glands

    PubMed Central

    Dassanayake, Maheshi; Larkin, John C.

    2017-01-01

    Salt stress is a complex trait that poses a grand challenge in developing new crops better adapted to saline environments. Some plants, called recretohalophytes, that have naturally evolved to secrete excess salts through salt glands, offer an underexplored genetic resource for examining how plant development, anatomy, and physiology integrate to prevent excess salt from building up to toxic levels in plant tissue. In this review we examine the structure and evolution of salt glands, salt gland-specific gene expression, and the possibility that all salt glands have originated via evolutionary modifications of trichomes. Salt secretion via salt glands is found in more than 50 species in 14 angiosperm families distributed in caryophyllales, asterids, rosids, and grasses. The salt glands of these distantly related clades can be grouped into four structural classes. Although salt glands appear to have originated independently at least 12 times, they share convergently evolved features that facilitate salt compartmentalization and excretion. We review the structural diversity and evolution of salt glands, major transporters and proteins associated with salt transport and secretion in halophytes, salt gland relevant gene expression regulation, and the prospect for using new genomic and transcriptomic tools in combination with information from model organisms to better understand how salt glands contribute to salt tolerance. Finally, we consider the prospects for using this knowledge to engineer salt glands to increase salt tolerance in model species, and ultimately in crops. PMID:28400779

  9. Sweat gland bioelectrics differ in cystic fibrosis: a new concept for potential diagnosis and assessment of CFTR function in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Gonska, T; Ip, W; Turner, D; Han, W S; Rose, J; Durie, P; Quinton, P

    2009-11-01

    For nearly 50 years the diagnosis of cystic fibrosis (CF) has depended on measurements of sweat chloride concentration. While the validity of this test is universally accepted, increasing diagnostic challenges and the search for adequate biomarker assays to support curative-orientated clinical drug trials have created a new demand for accurate, reliable and more practical CF tests. A novel concept is proposed that may provide a more efficient real-time method for assessing CFTR function in vivo. Cholinergic and beta-adrenergic agonists were iontophoresed to stimulate sweating. The bioelectric potential from stimulated sweat glands (SPD) was measured in vivo using a standard ECG electrode applied to the skin surface. SPD and sweat chloride concentrations were compared in cohorts predicted to express a range of CFTR function as presented by healthy controls (HC), heterozygotes (Hz), pancreatic sufficient (CFPS) and pancreatic insufficient patients with CF (CFPI). The median SPD was hyperpolarized in patients with CF compared with control subjects (-47.4 mV vs -14.5 mV, p<0.001). In distinguishing between control and CF subjects, SPD (area under receiver operator curve (AUC) = 0.997) was similar to sweat chloride concentration (AUC = 0.986). Sequential cholinergic/beta-adrenergic sweat stimulation dramatically depolarised the SPD in patients with CF (p<0.001) but had no effect in control subjects (p = 0.6) or on the sweat chloride concentration in either group (p>0.5). Furthermore, the positive SPD response was larger in CFPI than in CFPS subjects (p = 0.04). These results support the concept that skin surface voltages arising from stimulated sweat glands can be exploited to assess expressed CFTR function in vivo and may prove to be a useful diagnostic tool.

  10. Why Do I Sweat So Much?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family Life First Aid & Safety Doctors & ... people to sweat when they're nervous because emotions can affect the sweat glands. Sweating is one ...

  11. Characterization of X-linked Hypohidrotic Ectodermal Dysplasia (XL-HED) Hair and Sweat Gland Phenotypes Using Phototrichogram Analysis and Live Confocal Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Kyle B.; Goodwin, Alice F.; Landan, Maya; Seidel, Kerstin; Tran, Dong-Kha; Hogue, Jacob; Chavez, Miquella; Fete, Mary; Yu, Wenli; Hussein, Tarek; Johnson, Ramsey; Huttner, Kenneth; Jheon, Andrew H.; Klein, Ophir D.

    2015-01-01

    Hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (HED) is the most common type of ectodermal dysplasia (ED), which encompasses a large group of syndromes that share several phenotypic features such as missing or malformed ectodermal structures, including skin, hair, sweat glands, and teeth. X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (XL-HED) is associated with mutations in ectodysplasin (EDA1). Hypohidrosis due to hypoplastic sweat glands and thin, sparse hair are phenotypic features that significantly affect the daily lives of XL-HED individuals and therefore require systematic analysis. We sought to determine the quality of life of individuals with XL-HED and to quantify sweat duct and hair phenotypes using confocal imaging, pilocarpine iontophoresis, and phototrichogram analysis. Using these highly sensitive and non-invasive techniques, we demonstrated that 11/12 XL-HED individuals presented with a complete absence of sweat ducts and that none produced sweat. We determined that the thin hair phenotype observed in XL-HED was due to multiple factors, such as fewer terminal hairs with decreased thickness and slower growth rate, as well as fewer follicular units and fewer hairs per unit. The precise characterization of XL-HED phenotypes using sensitive and non-invasive techniques presented in our study will improve upon larger genotype-phenotype studies and in the assessment of future therapies in XL-HED. PMID:23687000

  12. Red Eccrine Chromhidrosis with Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Jaiswal, Ashok Kumar; Ravikiran, Shilpashree P; Roy, Prasoon Kumar

    2017-01-01

    A 22-year-old male presented with reddish discoloration of the vest following perspiration for 6 months. He was a habituated consumer of cranberry juice. The peak absorption on spectrophotometric analysis of the extracted sweat coincided approximately with the peak absorption of diluted distillate of the juice. A diagnosis of eccrine chromhidrosis, probably due to the coloring agents in the juice, was considered. This rare case report emphasizes the possible side effect of the various coloring agents used as food additives. PMID:29263551

  13. Specificity of granular IgM deposition in folliculosebaceous units and sweat gland apparatus in direct immunofluorescence (DIF) of lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Elbendary, Amira; Zhou, Cheng; Valdebran, Manuel; Yu, Yan; Gad, AbdAllah; Kwon, Eun Ji; Elston, Dirk M

    2016-08-01

    Diagnosis of lupus erythematosus (LE) in direct immunofluorescence testing is based on the finding of positive immunofluorescence at the dermoepidermal junction (DEJ). We sought to evaluate the sensitivity of IgM deposition at the DEJ and adnexal structures in the diagnosis of lupus erythematosus. We conducted a retrospective study of 100 previously diagnosed cases of lupus erythematosus and 158 cases of other immune-mediated dermatosis. Deposition of IgG, IgM, IgA, and C3 at the DEJ, follicular units, and sweat glands were recorded. Presence or absence of adnexal structures was documented. The immunoreactant deposition was documented as linear, coarse granular, or stippled. The most frequently deposited immunoreactant in lupus erythematosus cases was IgM along the DEJ and stromal-epithelial junction of hair follicles and sweat glands. IgM deposition along the stromal-epithelial junction of hair follicles and sweat glands was strongly associated with a diagnosis of lupus erythematosus compared with other immune-mediated diseases collectively (P value < .001). The pattern of IgM in lupus and dermatomyositis is granular, in contrast to the linear deposition in the other disorders evaluated. This was a retrospective study of archived material. Granular IgM deposition at the stromal-epithelial junction of cutaneous adnexal structures suggests a diagnosis of lupus erythematosus or dermatomyositis. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Sweating - absent

    MedlinePlus

    An abnormal lack of sweat in response to heat may be harmful, because sweating allows heat to be released from the ... heat or exertion fails to cause sweating. Overall lack of sweating can be life threatening because the ...

  15. Label Retaining Cells (LRCs) with Myoepithelial Characteristic from the Proximal Acinar Region Define Stem Cells in the Sweat Gland

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Yvonne; Kandyba, Eve; Chen, Yi-Bu; Ruffins, Seth; Kobielak, Krzysztof

    2013-01-01

    Slow cycling is a common feature shared among several stem cells (SCs) identified in adult tissues including hair follicle and cornea. Recently, existence of unipotent SCs in basal and lumenal layers of sweat gland (SG) has been described and label retaining cells (LRCs) have also been localized in SGs; however, whether these LRCs possess SCs characteristic has not been investigated further. Here, we used a H2BGFP LRCs system for in vivo detection of infrequently dividing cells. This system allowed us to specifically localize and isolate SCs with label-retention and myoepithelial characteristics restricted to the SG proximal acinar region. Using an alternative genetic approach, we demonstrated that SG LRCs expressed keratin 15 (K15) in the acinar region and lineage tracing determined that K15 labeled cells contributed long term to the SG structure but not to epidermal homeostasis. Surprisingly, wound healing experiments did not activate proximal acinar SG cells to participate in epidermal healing. Instead, predominantly non-LRCs in the SG duct actively divided, whereas the majority of SG LRCs remained quiescent. However, when we further challenged the system under more favorable isolated wound healing conditions, we were able to trigger normally quiescent acinar LRCs to trans-differentiate into the epidermis and adopt its long term fate. In addition, dissociated SG cells were able to regenerate SGs and, surprisingly, hair follicles demonstrating their in vivo plasticity. By determining the gene expression profile of isolated SG LRCs and non-LRCs in vivo, we identified several Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP) pathway genes to be up-regulated and confirmed a functional requirement for BMP receptor 1A (BMPR1A)-mediated signaling in SG formation. Our data highlight the existence of SG stem cells (SGSCs) and their primary importance in SG homeostasis. It also emphasizes SGSCs as an alternative source of cells in wound healing and their plasticity for regenerating

  16. Eccrine Angiomatous Naevus Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Sumit; Chatterjee, Gobinda; Mitra, Pradip K; Gangopadhyay, Anusree

    2012-01-01

    Hamartomatous, circumscribed swellings of the extremities make an interesting study. Presentations are manifold and the naevi are not always present from birth. Excessive growth of hairs leads to remarkable appearance of such swellings. A young woman presented to the dermatology department, complaining of tenderness over 4th finger of her left hand. The defect was present for the last couple of years and was typified by visible hyperhidrosis on gentle tapping. Counseling of the affected lady made her agree for a skin biopsy. The histopathology revealed it to be of the nature of eccrine angiomatous hamartoma. Blood vessels were scarce. Eccrine ducts were plentiful without other associated anomalies. The deformity was removed by simple excision with good result. PMID:22837574

  17. Night Sweats

    MedlinePlus

    Symptoms Night sweats By Mayo Clinic Staff Night sweats are repeated episodes of extreme perspiration that may soak your nightclothes or ... these episodes are usually not labeled as night sweats and typically aren't a sign of a ...

  18. What's Sweat?

    MedlinePlus

    ... body breaks down protein.) The sweat leaves your skin through tiny holes called pores. When the sweat hits the air, the air makes it evaporate (this means it turns from a liquid to a vapor). As the sweat evaporates off your skin, you cool down. Sweat is a great cooling ...

  19. The Effect of Varying the Composition of Fingerprint Sweat Deposits on the Corrosion of Brass and Fingerprint Visibility.

    PubMed

    Cooper-Dunn, Alice; Jones, Owen; Bond, John W

    2017-09-01

    Corrosion of α-phase brass by sebaceous sweat fingerprint deposits produced identifiable impressions in a majority of samples (n = 40) 4 days after deposition. Combining sebaceous with eccrine sweat yielded a greater percentage of identifiable fingerprint deposits, although this increase was not statistically significant. Production of identifiable fingerprints from eccrine sweat deposits was dependent on the sampling time of year with deposits taken during summer months giving similar percentages of identifiable fingerprints to sebaceous deposits. A statistically significant positive correlation was found between elapsed days after deposition and identifiable eccrine (ρ = 0.787, p < 0.05), sebaceous (ρ = 0.724, p < 0.05), and eccrine/sebaceous mixture (ρ = 0.908, p < 0.01) fingerprints deposited during summer months. The summer increase in the percentage of identifiable eccrine sweat deposits was statistically significant compared to winter eccrine deposits (p < 0.0001). Observations were consistent with results obtained from artificial sebaceous and eccrine sweat. © 2017 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  20. Super-Absorbent Polymer Valves and Colorimetric Chemistries for Time-Sequenced Discrete Sampling and Chloride Analysis of Sweat via Skin-Mounted Soft Microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Bong; Zhang, Yi; Won, Sang Min; Bandodkar, Amay J; Sekine, Yurina; Xue, Yeguang; Koo, Jahyun; Harshman, Sean W; Martin, Jennifer A; Park, Jeong Min; Ray, Tyler R; Crawford, Kaitlyn E; Lee, Kyu-Tae; Choi, Jungil; Pitsch, Rhonda L; Grigsby, Claude C; Strang, Adam J; Chen, Yu-Yu; Xu, Shuai; Kim, Jeonghyun; Koh, Ahyeon; Ha, Jeong Sook; Huang, Yonggang; Kim, Seung Wook; Rogers, John A

    2018-03-01

    This paper introduces super absorbent polymer valves and colorimetric sensing reagents as enabling components of soft, skin-mounted microfluidic devices designed to capture, store, and chemically analyze sweat released from eccrine glands. The valving technology enables robust means for guiding the flow of sweat from an inlet location into a collection of isolated reservoirs, in a well-defined sequence. Analysis in these reservoirs involves a color responsive indicator of chloride concentration with a formulation tailored to offer stable operation with sensitivity optimized for the relevant physiological range. Evaluations on human subjects with comparisons against ex situ analysis illustrate the practical utility of these advances. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Sweat electrolytes test

    MedlinePlus

    Sweat test; Sweat chloride; Iontophoretic sweat test; CF - sweat test; Cystic fibrosis - sweat test ... cystic fibrosis have higher amounts of sodium and chloride in their sweat that are detected by the ...

  2. Regulation of epithelial ion transport in exocrine glands by store-operated Ca2+ entry.

    PubMed

    Concepcion, Axel R; Feske, Stefan

    2017-05-01

    Store-operated Ca 2+ entry (SOCE) is a conserved mechanism of Ca 2+ influx that regulates Ca 2+ signaling in many cell types. SOCE is activated by depletion of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca 2+ stores in response to physiological agonist stimulation. After it was first postulated by J.W. Putney Jr. in 1986, SOCE has been described in a large number of non-excitable cell types including secretory cells of different exocrine glands. Here we discuss the mechanisms by which SOCE controls salt and fluid secretion in exocrine glands, with a special focus on eccrine sweat glands. In sweat glands, SOCE plays an important, non-redundant role in regulating the function of Ca 2+ -activated Cl - channels (CaCC), Cl - secretion and sweat production. In the absence of key regulators of SOCE such as the CRAC channel pore subunit ORAI1 and its activator STIM1, the Ca 2+ -activated chloride channel TMEM16A is inactive and fails to secrete Cl - , resulting in anhidrosis in mice and human patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Porocarcinome sudoral eccrine de la face: tumeur annexielle rare

    PubMed Central

    Lakouichmi, Mohammed; El Bouihi, Mohamed; Zrara, Ibtissam; Lahmiti, Saad; Hattab, Nadia Mansouri

    2013-01-01

    Le porocarcinome sudoral eccrine est une tumeur cutanée maligne à point de départ glande sudorale. Un homme de 48 ans s'est présenté à la consultation avec une lésion simulant un carcinome basocellulaire de la tempe droite. La biopsie de cette lésion a révélé un porocarcinome eccrine. Le siège facial de cette tumeur est très rare. Elle pose un problème diagnostique et thérapeutique. Nous discutons les différents aspects de cette tumeur avec revue de la littérature. PMID:23734280

  4. The effects of St. John's wort extract and amitriptyline on autonomic responses of blood vessels and sweat glands in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Siepmann, Martin; Kirch, Wilhelm; Krause, Stephanie; Joraschky, Peter; Mueck-Weymann, Michael

    2004-02-01

    St. John's wort extract is widely used and advertised as a "natural antidepressant" lacking autonomic side effects. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study compared the effects of St. John's wort extract on autonomic responses of blood vessels and sweat glands with those of amitriptyline and placebo. A randomized, double-blind, crossover study was performed in healthy male volunteers aged 22 to 31 years (25 +/- 3 years; mean +/- SD) years. Subjects orally received capsules with 255 to 285 mg St. John's wort extract (900 microg hypericin content), 25 mg amitriptyline, and placebo 3 times daily for periods of 14 days each with at least 14 days between. Vasoconstrictory response of cutaneous blood flow (VR) and skin conductance response (SR) following a single deep inspiration were employed as parameters of autonomic function. St. John's wort extract had no effect on VR and SR. In contrast, SR was diminished and the dilation phase of VR was prolonged following multiple dosing with amitriptyline (P < 0.05). Decreased electrodermal reactivity observed with amitriptyline reflects inhibition of acetylcholine at peripheral m3-cholinoreceptors, whereas prolongation of VR induced by the tricyclic drug may be due to sustained activation of central and/or peripheral sympathetic neurons.

  5. Integrated sudomotor axon reflex sweat stimulation for continuous sweat analyte analysis with individuals at rest.

    PubMed

    Sonner, Zachary; Wilder, Eliza; Gaillard, Trudy; Kasting, Gerald; Heikenfeld, Jason

    2017-07-25

    Eccrine sweat has rapidly emerged as a non-invasive, ergonomic, and rich source of chemical analytes with numerous technological demonstrations now showing the ability for continuous electrochemical sensing. However, beyond active perspirers (athletes, workers, etc.), continuous sweat access in individuals at rest has hindered the advancement of both sweat sensing science and technology. Reported here is integration of sudomotor axon reflex sweat stimulation for continuous wearable sweat analyte analysis, including the ability for side-by-side integration of chemical stimulants & sensors without cross-contamination. This integration approach is uniquely compatible with sensors which consume the analyte (enzymatic) or sensors which equilibrate with analyte concentrations. In vivo validation is performed using iontophoretic delivery of carbachol with ion-selective and impedance sensors for sweat analysis. Carbachol has shown prolonged sweat stimulation in directly stimulated regions for five hours or longer. This work represents a significant leap forward in sweat sensing technology, and may be of broader interest to those interested in on-skin sensing integrated with drug-delivery.

  6. Endothelin-1 modulates methacholine-induced cutaneous vasodilatation but not sweating in young human skin.

    PubMed

    Halili, Lyra; Singh, Maya Sarah; Fujii, Naoto; Alexander, Lacy M; Kenny, Glen P

    2016-06-15

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) is a potent endothelial-derived vasoconstrictor that may modulate cholinergic cutaneous vascular regulation. Endothelin receptors are also expressed on the human eccrine sweat gland, although it remains unclear whether ET-1 modulates cholinergic sweating. We investigated whether ET-1 attenuates cholinergic cutaneous vasodilatation and sweating through a nitric oxide synthase (NOS)-dependent mechanism. Our findings show that ET-1 attenuates methacholine-induced cutaneous vasodilatation through a NOS-independent mechanism. We also demonstrate that ET-1 attenuates cutaneous vasodilatation in response to sodium nitroprusside, suggesting that ET-1 diminishes the dilatation capacity of vascular smooth muscle cells. We show that ET-1 does not modulate methacholine-induced sweating at any of the administered concentrations. Our findings advance our knowledge pertaining to the peripheral control underpinning the regulation of cutaneous blood flow and sweating and infer that ET-1 may attenuate the heat loss responses of cutaneous blood flow, but not sweating. The present study investigated the effect of endothelin-1 (ET-1) on cholinergic mechanisms of end-organs (i.e. skin blood vessels and sweat glands) for heat dissipation. We evaluated the hypothesis that ET-1 attenuates cholinergic cutaneous vasodilatation and sweating through a nitric oxide synthase (NOS)-dependent mechanism. Cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) and sweat rate were assessed in three protocols: in Protocol 1 (n = 8), microdialysis sites were perfused with lactated Ringer solution (Control), 40 pm, 4 nm or 400 nm ET-1; in Protocol 2 (n = 11) sites were perfused with lactated Ringer solution (Control), 400 nm ET-1, 10 mm N(G) -nitro-l-arginine (l-NNA; a NOS inhibitor) or a combination of 400 nm ET-1 and 10 mm l-NNA; in Protocol 3 (n = 8), only two sites (Control and 400 nm ET-1) were utilized to assess the influence of ET-1 on the dilatation capacity of vascular smooth

  7. Endothelin‐1 modulates methacholine‐induced cutaneous vasodilatation but not sweating in young human skin

    PubMed Central

    Halili, Lyra; Singh, Maya Sarah; Fujii, Naoto; Alexander, Lacy M.

    2016-01-01

    Key points Endothelin‐1 (ET‐1) is a potent endothelial‐derived vasoconstrictor that may modulate cholinergic cutaneous vascular regulation. Endothelin receptors are also expressed on the human eccrine sweat gland, although it remains unclear whether ET‐1 modulates cholinergic sweating.We investigated whether ET‐1 attenuates cholinergic cutaneous vasodilatation and sweating through a nitric oxide synthase (NOS)‐dependent mechanism. Our findings show that ET‐1 attenuates methacholine‐induced cutaneous vasodilatation through a NOS‐independent mechanism.We also demonstrate that ET‐1 attenuates cutaneous vasodilatation in response to sodium nitroprusside, suggesting that ET‐1 diminishes the dilatation capacity of vascular smooth muscle cells.We show that ET‐1 does not modulate methacholine‐induced sweating at any of the administered concentrations.Our findings advance our knowledge pertaining to the peripheral control underpinning the regulation of cutaneous blood flow and sweating and infer that ET‐1 may attenuate the heat loss responses of cutaneous blood flow, but not sweating. Abstract The present study investigated the effect of endothelin‐1 (ET‐1) on cholinergic mechanisms of end‐organs (i.e. skin blood vessels and sweat glands) for heat dissipation. We evaluated the hypothesis that ET‐1 attenuates cholinergic cutaneous vasodilatation and sweating through a nitric oxide synthase (NOS)‐dependent mechanism. Cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) and sweat rate were assessed in three protocols: in Protocol 1 (n = 8), microdialysis sites were perfused with lactated Ringer solution (Control), 40 pm, 4 nm or 400 nm ET‐1; in Protocol 2 (n = 11) sites were perfused with lactated Ringer solution (Control), 400 nm ET‐1, 10 mm NG‐nitro‐l‐arginine (l‐NNA; a NOS inhibitor) or a combination of 400 nm ET‐1 and 10 mm l‐NNA; in Protocol 3 (n = 8), only two sites (Control and 400 nm ET‐1) were utilized to assess

  8. Histamine Modulates Sweating and Affects Clinical Manifestations of Atopic Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Aya; Tani, Saki; Murota, Hiroyuki; Katayama, Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    Many factors such as food or environmental allergens, bacteria, fungi, and mental stress aggravate the condition of atopic dermatitis (AD) eczema. Sweating can also exacerbate AD, and patients are aware of that. In the past, it has been reported that contamination of skin surface antigens by sweat induces acute allergic reactions and that sweating functions of AD patients via axonal reflexes are decreased. Histamine demonstrably inhibits acetylcholine-induced sweating in both mice and humans via histamine H1 receptor-mediated signaling. In sweat glands, acetylcholine inactivates glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β), a kinase involved in endocytosis and secretion, whereas simultaneous stimulation with histamine activates GSK3β and inhibits sweat secretion. Thus, histamine might be involved in the mechanism of abnormal skin dryness in patients with AD via decreasing sweat secretion. On another front, some patients secrete sweat normally. Patients with regular sweating are prone to develop skin disorders such as papules or erythema by residual sweat left on the skin surface. Patients with decreased sweating are prone to develop disorders characterized by xerosis, lichenoid changes, prurigo by elevated skin temperature, skin dryness, and compromised skin conditions. Careful inspection of skin manifestations provides a good indication of a patient's ability to sweat. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Effect of Sweating on Insulation of Footwear.

    PubMed

    Kuklane, Kalev; Holmér, Ingvar

    1998-01-01

    The study aimed to find out the influence of sweating on footwear insulation with a thermal foot model. Simultaneously, the influence of applied weight (35 kg), sock, and steel toe cap were studied. Water to 3 sweat glands was supplied with a pump at the rate of 10 g/hr in total. Four models of boots with steel toe caps were tested. The same models were manufactured also without steel toe. Sweating reduced footwear insulation 19-25% (30-37% in toes). During static conditions, only a minimal amount of sweat evaporated from boots. Weight affected sole insulation: Reduction depended on compressibility of sole material. The influence of steel toe varied with insulation. The method of thermal foot model appears to be a practical tool for footwear evaluation.

  10. Iron losses in sweat.

    PubMed

    Brune, M; Magnusson, B; Persson, H; Hallberg, L

    1986-03-01

    The losses of iron in whole body cell-free sweat were determined in eleven healthy men. A new experimental design was used with a very careful cleaning procedure of the skin and repeated consecutive sampling periods of sweat in a sauna. The purpose was to achieve a steady state of sweat iron losses with minimal influence from iron originating from desquamated cells and iron contaminating the skin. A steady state was reached in the third sauna period (second sweat sampling period). Iron loss was directly related to the volume of sweat lost and amounted to 22.5 micrograms iron/l sweat. The findings indicate that iron is a physiological constituent of sweat and derived not only from contamination. Present results imply that variations in the amount of sweat lost will have only a marginal effect on the variation in total body iron losses.

  11. Infectious eccrine hidradenitis: a report of 3 cases and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Bassas-Vila, J; Fernández-Figueras, M T; Romaní, J; Ferrándiz, C

    2014-03-01

    Neutrophilic eccrine hidradenitis (NEH) is a nonspecific clinicopathological reaction pattern, classified as a neutrophilic dermatosis, that usually develops in patients receiving chemotherapy for a hematologic malignancy. More rarely, it has been reported in association with infectious agents such as Serratia and Enterobacter species, Staphylococcus aureus, and human immunodeficiency virus. We describe 3 cases of infectious eccrine hidradenitis secondary to infection with Nocardia species, Mycobacterium chelonae, and S aureus. Histological findings revealed a dense infiltrate with perivascular and periductal neutrophils in the dermis. In the eccrine glands, there was vacuolar degeneration and necrosis of the epithelial cells. Our cases support the assertion that NEH is a characteristic cutaneous response to nonspecific stimuli. Clinical and histopathological findings of infectious and noninfectious NEH are generally indistinguishable and when NEH is suspected, the possibility of an infectious association must be investigated by skin tissue culture. In this article we also discuss differential diagnoses and review the literature. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  12. Sweating Like a Pig: Physics or Irony?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohren, Craig F.

    2016-03-01

    In his interesting and informative book Is That a Fact?, Joe Schwarcz avers that pigs do not sweat and the saying "sweating like a pig" originates in iron smelting. Oblong pieces of hot iron, with a fancied resemblance to a sow with piglets, cool in sand to the dew point of the surrounding air, and hence water condenses on the "pig." But this explanation, which I have seen on the Internet, lacks a few caveats. It implies that molten iron, solidifying and cooling, anywhere, anytime, accretes liquid water, as if this were a special property of cooling iron. Set aside that real pigs sweat perceptibly from their snouts; kiss a pig and verify for yourself. Pigs also sweat imperceptibly. Imperceptible (insensible) perspiration is water vapor from the skin and lungs exuded without sensible condensation. That from humans is about 1 liter/day. Sweat is 99% liquid water, NaCl the dominant solute, secreted quickly, sometimes profusely, by subcutaneous sweat glands in response to thermal stress, in contrast to the slow, continuous diffusion of water vapor through skin.

  13. Eccrine poromatosis in a patient with acute myeloid leukemia following chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Garshick, Marisa; DeFilippis, Ersilia M; Harp, Joanna; Gaan, Jalong

    2014-11-15

    Eccrine poromas are rare, benign adnexal tumors that often occur as solitary papules. Rarely, eccrine poromas can present as multiple lesions, which is referred to as eccrine poromatosis. We report a case of eccrine poromatosis occuring on the palms and soles occuring after chemotherapy in a patient with a history of acute myeloid leukemia.

  14. Porokeratotic eccrine ostial and dermal duct nevus

    PubMed Central

    Bandyopadhyay, Debabrata; Saha, Abanti; Das, Dipti; Das, Anupam

    2015-01-01

    Porokeratotic eccrine ostial and dermal duct nevus (PEODDN) is a rare nevoid condition characterized by asymptomatic grouped keratotic papules and plaques with a linear pattern on the extremities, having distinct porokeratotic histopathological features. The lesions usually present at birth or in childhood. We present here a case of late-onset PEODDN in a 23-year-old man who had lesions on the palm, forearm, arm and the chest along the lines of Blaschko, strictly localized to the left side of the body. PMID:25821735

  15. [Malignant eccrine poromas (poro-epitheliomas, porocarcinomas)].

    PubMed

    Grosshans, E; Vetter, J M; Capesius, M C

    1975-01-01

    Malignant eccrine poromas set first of all the problem of the diagnosis of intra-epidermic cutaneous tumours. The epidermic symbiosis of the neoplastic cells and their natural disposition to keratinization and to differentiation of excretosudoral structures are their main pathological characteristics; they account for their acrosyringeal origin. The multitude of epidermotropic metastatic resurgences by the lymphatic route and their transcutaneous expulsion characterizes the evolution of these tumours. According to the study of the 8 cases published since 1956 and of this personal case the precession of a benign porosyringeal tumour seems probable but has never been proved.

  16. In vivo sweat film layer thickness measured with Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonathan, Enock

    2008-06-01

    While human sweat secretion is accepted as a mechanism by which the body cools off, excessive sweating (hyperhidrosis) is now appreciated as a medical condition and the primary site for diagnosis is the palm of the hand. We propose sweat film layer thickness as a potential clinical diagnostic parameter when screening for excessive sweating. In this preliminary study we demonstrate the usefulness of Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT) for measurement of sweat film thickness in vivo with micron-scale resolution on the hand of a human volunteer. FD-OCT has a superior image acquisition time and identification of active sweat glands, ducts and pores is also possible.

  17. Dermoscopy of eccrine acrospiroma masquerading as nodular malignant melanoma.

    PubMed

    Gatti, A; di Meo, N; Trevisan, G

    2010-12-01

    Eccrine acrospiroma, better known as eccrine poroma, is a benign adnexal neoplasm of the skin. Its clinical aspect can masquerade as some other nodular and cystic lesions. The current dermoscopy literature offers very few case studies. Moreover, these very few examples present a totally different appearance pattern compared to the one we examined. Its homogeneous blue pattern suggested the better-known nodular malignant melanoma; in fact, this dermoscopic appearance was due to the Tyndall effect.

  18. Sweat collection capsule

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Delaplaine, R. W. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A sweat collection capsule permitting quantitative collection of sweat is described. The device consists of a frame held immobile on the skin, a closure secured to the frame and absorbent material located next to the skin in a cavity formed by the frame and the closure. The absorbent material may be removed from the device by removing the closure from the frame while the frame is held immobile on the skin.

  19. Tropical Malaysians and temperate Koreans exhibit significant differences in sweating sensitivity in response to iontophoretically administered acetylcholine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jeong-Beom; Bae, Jun-Sang; Matsumoto, Takaaki; Yang, Hun-Mo; Min, Young-Ki

    2009-03-01

    Natives of the tropics are able to tolerate high ambient temperatures. This results from their long-term residence in hot and often humid tropical climates. This study was designed to compare the peripheral mechanisms of thermal sweating in tropical natives with that of their temperate counterparts. Fifty-five healthy male subjects including 20 native Koreans who live in the temperate Korean climate (Temperate-N) and 35 native tropical Malaysian men that have lived all of their lives in Malaysia (Tropical-N) were enrolled in this study after providing written informed consent to participate. Quantitative sudomotor axon reflex testing after iontophoresis (2 mA for 5 min) with 10% acetylcholine (ACh) was used to determine directly activated (DIR) and axon reflex-mediated (AXR) sweating during ACh iontophoresis. The sweat rate, activated sweat gland density, sweat gland output per single gland activated, and oral and skin temperature changes were measured. The sweat onset time of AXR (nicotinic-receptor-mediated) was 56 s shorter in the Temperate-N than in the Tropical-N subjects ( P < 0.0001). The nicotinic-receptor-mediated sweating activity AXR (1), and the muscarinic-receptor-mediated sweating activity DIR, in terms of sweat volume, were 103% and 59% higher in the Temperate-N compared to the Tropical-N subjects ( P < 0.0001). The Temperate-N group also had a 17.8% ( P < 0.0001) higher active sweat gland density, 35.4% higher sweat output per gland, 0.24°C higher resting oral temperature, and 0.62°C higher resting forearm skin temperature compared to the Tropical-N subjects ( P < 0.01). ACh iontophoresis did not influence oral temperature, but increased skin temperature near where the ACh was administered, in both groups. These results suggest that suppressed thermal sweating in the Tropical-N subjects was, at least in part, due to suppressed sweat gland sensitivity to ACh through both recruitment of active sweat glands and the sweat gland output per each gland

  20. Aluminium in human sweat.

    PubMed

    Minshall, Clare; Nadal, Jodie; Exley, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    It is of burgeoning importance that the human body burden of aluminium is understood and is measured. There are surprisingly few data to describe human excretion of systemic aluminium and almost no reliable data which relate to aluminium in sweat. We have measured the aluminium content of sweat in 20 healthy volunteers following mild exercise. The concentration of aluminium ranged from 329 to 5329μg/L. These data equate to a daily excretion of between 234 and 7192μg aluminium and they strongly suggest that perspiration is the major route of excretion of systemic aluminium in humans. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. Thin, Soft, Skin-Mounted Microfluidic Networks with Capillary Bursting Valves for Chrono-Sampling of Sweat.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jungil; Kang, Daeshik; Han, Seungyong; Kim, Sung Bong; Rogers, John A

    2017-03-01

    Systems for time sequential capture of microliter volumes of sweat released from targeted regions of the skin offer the potential to enable analysis of temporal variations in electrolyte balance and biomarker concentration throughout a period of interest. Current methods that rely on absorbent pads taped to the skin do not offer the ease of use in sweat capture needed for quantitative tracking; emerging classes of electronic wearable sweat analysis systems do not directly manage sweat-induced fluid flows for sample isolation. Here, a thin, soft, "skin-like" microfluidic platform is introduced that bonds to the skin to allow for collection and storage of sweat in an interconnected set of microreservoirs. Pressure induced by the sweat glands drives flow through a network of microchannels that incorporates capillary bursting valves designed to open at different pressures, for the purpose of passively guiding sweat through the system in sequential fashion. A representative device recovers 1.8 µL volumes of sweat each from 0.8 min of sweating into a set of separate microreservoirs, collected from 0.03 cm 2 area of skin with approximately five glands, corresponding to a sweat rate of 0.60 µL min -1 per gland. Human studies demonstrate applications in the accurate chemical analysis of lactate, sodium, and potassium concentrations and their temporal variations. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. [French guidelines for sweat test practice and interpretation for cystic fibrosis neonatal screening].

    PubMed

    Sermet-Gaudelus, I; Munck, A; Rota, M; Roussey, M; Feldmann, D; Nguyen-Khoa, T

    2010-09-01

    These guidelines aim to standardize the standard operating procedures for the sweat test in newborn cystic fibrosis (CF) screening. They have been implemented by the national Neonatal Screening working group of the French Federation for Cystic Fibrosis. It is recommended that the sweat test be performed when the infant weighs more than 3 kg and is at least 3 weeks of age. Sweat gland secretion is stimulated by transdermal administration of pilocarpine by iontophoresis. Sweat is preferentially collected in a Macroduct coil. Diagnosis of CF is based on the sweat chloride level. A sweat chloride level below 30 mmol/l very probably rules out CF; 60 mmol/l or higher supports the diagnosis of CF. Values between 30 and 60 mmol/l are considered abnormal. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Sweat production during global heating and during isometric exercise in people with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Petrofsky, Jerrold Scott; Lee, Scott; Patterson, Chris; Cole, Melissa; Stewart, Brian

    2005-11-01

    While sweat production in response to heat is impaired in people with diabetes, sweat production has not been examined during isometric exercise. Eight subjects with type 2 diabetes and 9 control subjects exerted a fatiguing isometric contraction of the handgrip muscles at a tension of 40% of the maximum voluntary strength (MVC) after exposure to a 32 deg C environment for 30 min. compared to 10 controls and 10 subjects with diabetes exposed to a 39 deg C environment. Sweat was impaired to all areas of the body during heat exposure in patients with diabetes under both environmental conditions. For example, on the chest, the average sweat rates after exposure to the 32 deg environment was 259.2 +/- 55.2 nanoliters/min in control subjects and 198.3 +/- 46.2 nanoliters/min for subjects with diabetes. Compared to the 32 deg C environment, control subjects increased sweat in all 4 areas proportionally more than subjects with diabetes. Sudomotor rhythm was present in sweat in control subjects at a rate of repetition of 11 and 50 seconds but almost absent in subjects with diabetes. During exercise, sweat rates slowly increased from the beginning to the end of the exercise. But the head of the subjects with diabetes showed hypersweating while the other areas showed diminished sweating compared to control subjects. Thus some of the impairment in sweating may be due to central mechanisms associated with heat sensitivity or in the hypothalamus and not to the sweat glands themselves.

  4. The relationship between exercise intensity and the sweat lactate excretion rate.

    PubMed

    Buono, Michael J; Lee, Nanette V L; Miller, Paul W

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of increases in exercise intensity on the sweat lactate concentration and lactate excretion rate. Eight healthy male volunteers complete a 90-min exercise bout of treadmill walking in a 35 degrees C and 40% relative humidity environmental chamber. During the exercise trial, the subjects performed three 30-min ordered exercise bouts at 60, 70, and 80% of their age-predicted maximum heart rate (HR(max)), with 10 min of rest outside the chamber between bouts. Sweat rate was measured volumetrically during each of the three exercise bouts on the flexor surface of the proximal half of the right forearm. Sweat lactate concentration ([lactate](sweat)) was measured in each sample and multiplied by the forearm sweat rate to calculate the lactate excretion rate (LER). There was a significant (P < 0.05) decrease in the [lactate](sweat) at the 70 and 80% HR(max) exercise intensities compared to the 60% HR(max) exercise intensity. Conversely, the LER increased significantly at the highest two exercise intensities compared to the 60% HR(max) exercise intensity. Such data suggest that increases in exercise intensity require an increase in lactate production, as measured by the LER. Furthermore, the decreased [lactate](sweat) at the higher exercise intensities is most likely the result of increased sweat production causing a dilution effect on the [lactate](sweat), thus limiting its ability to accurately indicate the metabolic activity of the sweat gland.

  5. Prolonged head-down tilt exposure reduces maximal cutaneous vasodilator and sweating capacity in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crandall, C. G.; Shibasaki, M.; Wilson, T. E.; Cui, J.; Levine, B. D.

    2003-01-01

    Cutaneous vasodilation and sweat rate are reduced during a thermal challenge after simulated and actual microgravity exposure. The effects of microgravity exposure on cutaneous vasodilator capacity and on sweat gland function are unknown. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that simulated microgravity exposure, using the 6 degrees head-down tilt (HDT) bed rest model, reduces maximal forearm cutaneous vascular conductance (FVC) and sweat gland function and that exercise during HDT preserves these responses. To test these hypotheses, 20 subjects were exposed to 14 days of strict HDT bed rest. Twelve of those subjects exercised (supine cycle ergometry) at 75% of pre-bed rest heart rate maximum for 90 min/day throughout HDT bed rest. Before and after HDT bed rest, maximal FVC was measured, via plethysmography, by heating the entire forearm to 42 degrees C for 45 min. Sweat gland function was assessed by administering 1 x 10(-6) to 2 M acetylcholine (9 doses) via intradermal microdialysis while simultaneously monitoring sweat rate over the microdialysis membranes. In the nonexercise group, maximal FVC and maximal stimulated sweat rate were significantly reduced after HDT bed rest. In contrast, these responses were unchanged in the exercise group. These data suggest that 14 days of simulated microgravity exposure, using the HDT bed rest model, reduces cutaneous vasodilator and sweating capacity, whereas aerobic exercise training during HDT bed rest preserves these responses.

  6. Intracellular ion concentrations and cell volume during cholinergic stimulation of eccrine secretory coil cells

    SciTech Connect

    Takemura, T.; Sato, F.; Saga, K.

    1991-02-01

    Methacholine (MCh)-induced changes in intracellular concentrations of Na, K, and Cl (( Na)i, (K)i, and (Cl)i, respectively) and in cellular dry mass (a measure of cell shrinkage) were examined in isolated monkey eccrine sweat secretory coils by electron probe X-ray microanalysis using the peripheral standard method. To further confirm the occurrence of cell shrinkage during MCh stimulation, the change in cell volume of dissociated clear and dark cells were directly determined under a light microscope equipped with differential interference contrast (DIC) optics. X-ray microanalysis revealed a biphasic increase in cellular dry mass in clear cells during continuous MCh stimulation; anmore » initial increase of dry mass to 158% (of control) followed by a plateau at 140%, which correspond to the decrease in cell volume of 37 and 29%, respectively. The latter agrees with the MCh-induced cell shrinkage of 29% in dissociated clear cells. The MCh-induced increase in dry mass in myoepithelial cells was less than half that of clear cells. During the steady state of MCh stimulation, both (K+)i and (Cl)i of clear cells decreased by about 45%, whereas (Na)i increased in such a way to maintain the sum of (Na) i + (K)i constant. There was a small (12-15 mM) increase in (Na)i and a decrease in (K)i in myoepithelial cells during stimulation with MCh. Dissociated dark cells failed to significantly shrink during MCh stimulation. The decrease in (Cl)i in the face of constant (Na)i + (K)i suggests the accumulation of unknown anion(s) inside the clear cell during MCh stimulation.« less

  7. Circular polarization induced by the three-dimensional chiral structure of human sweat ducts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayut, Itai; Ben Ishai, Paul; Agranat, Aharon J.; Feldman, Yuri

    2014-04-01

    The upper part of the human eccrine sweat ducts, embedded within the epidermis layer, have a well-defined helical structure. It was recently suggested that, as electromagnetic entities, the sweat ducts interact with sub-mm waves [Y. Feldman et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 128102 (2008), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.100.128102]. Although correlation between changes in the reflectance spectrum in this frequency range and physiological activities has been shown, a direct link between the electromagnetic reflection and the helical structure itself has remained to be established. The fact that the sweat ducts manifest natural homochirality is henceforth used to produce this link. We report the detection of circular polarization asymmetry in the electromagnetic reflection from the human skin at sub-THz frequencies in vivo. We compare the results to numerical simulations and to measurements of a fabricated metamaterial. We argue that the observed circular dichroism can be interpreted uniquely as the signature of the helical structure itself. By twisting reflected electromagnetic waves, the human skin exhibits properties which are usually discussed only in the framework of metamaterial science.

  8. A close positive correlation between malodor and sweating as a marker for the treatment of axillary bromhidrosis with Botulinum toxin A.

    PubMed

    He, Jinguang; Wang, Tao; Dong, Jiasheng

    2012-12-01

    Botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) has been demonstrated to be only effective for some types of axillary bromhidrosis. It is necessary to explore the indications for BTX-A application. Sixty-seven consecutive outpatients with axillary bromhidrosis were recruited after informed content. Then, 50 U of BTX-A was injected intracutaneously into 20 different sites within each axilla. The follow-up was done every month and terminated when the malodor returned to the previous level. Of 67 cases, 74.6% (50/67) had mild or moderate malodor, and 80.6% (54/67) experienced mild or moderate sweating. In 76.1% (51/67) of patients, there were a close correlation between malodor and sweating. After BTX-A injection, the malodor was eliminated in 73.1% (49/67) of patients. Logistic regression analysis revealed that the correlation between malodor and sweating differed significantly between the group that maintained no malodor after initial injection and the group that still exhibited malodor. BTX-A ameliorates malodor mainly by the inhibition of eccrine and apoeccrine sweating but no apocrine sweating. A close positive correlation between malodor and sweating is the indication for BTX-A treatment.

  9. Ratiometric sweat secretion optical test in cystic fibrosis, carriers and healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Bergamini, Gabriella; Tridello, Gloria; Calcaterra, Elisa; Ceri, Stefano; Tagliasacchi, Marco; Bianchi, Federico; Monti, Federico; Masciadri, Andrea; Laudanna, Eugenia; Peserico, Denise; Sorio, Elena; Esposito, Valeria; Leal, Teresinha; Assael, Baroukh Maurice; Sorio, Claudio; Melotti, Paola

    2018-03-01

    We have simplified the published procedure (5) for measuring sweat rates in individual human sweat glands. Sweat secretion rates were obtained from sweat drops secreted on the forearm by multiple individual glands. We computed a ratio between CFTR-dependent (by intradermal microinjection of a β adrenergic cocktail) and CFTR-independent (by methacoline as cholinergic stimulus) sweat secretion rates. We obtained a reproducible, approximately linear readout of CFTR function with measurements performed by two different independent teams. We considered three groups (CF subjects, CF carriers and non-CF controls, n=22 in each group); their mean ratios was respectively 0.000, 0.104 and 0.205 The average ratio of CF subjects was consistent with diagnosis in 3 additional cases clinically resembling CF. All groups were clearly discriminated, with sensibility and specificity ranging from 82% to 100%. A software was developed for detecting sweat droplets. This bioassay is suitabile for multicentre studies focusing on CFTR targeted therapies, controversial diagnosis and functional relevance of rare CFTR mutations. Copyright © 2017 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Body mapping of sweating patterns in male athletes in mild exercise-induced hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Smith, Caroline J; Havenith, George

    2011-07-01

    Regional variation in sweating over the body is widely recognised. However, most studies only measured a limited number of regions, with the use of differing thermal states across studies making a good meta-analysis to obtain a whole body map problematic. A study was therefore conducted to investigate regional sweat rates (RSR) and distributions over the whole body in male athletes. A modified absorbent technique was used to collect sweat at two exercise intensities [55% (I1) and 75% (I2) VO₂(max)] in moderately warm conditions (25°C, 50% rh, 2 m s(-1) air velocity). At I1 and I2, highest sweat rates were observed on the central (upper and mid) and lower back, with values as high as 1,197, 1,148, and 856 g m(-2) h(-1), respectively, at I2. Lowest values were observed on the fingers, thumbs, and palms, with values of 144, 254, and 119 g m(-2) h(-1), respectively at I2. Sweat mapping of the head demonstrated high sweat rates on the forehead (1,710 g m(-2) h(-1) at I2) compared with low values on the chin (302 g m(-2) h(-1) at I2) and cheeks (279 g m(-2) h(-1) at I2). Sweat rate increased significantly in all regions from the low to high exercise intensity, with exception of the feet and ankles. No significant correlation was present between RSR and regional skin temperature (T (sk)), nor did RSR correspond to known patterns of regional sweat gland density. The present study has provided detailed regional sweat data over the whole body and has demonstrated large intra- and inter-segmental variation and the presence of consistent patterns of regional high versus low sweat rate areas in Caucasians male athletes. This data may have important applications for clothing design, thermophysiological modelling and thermal manikin design.

  11. A Little CFTR Goes a Long Way: CFTR-Dependent Sweat Secretion from G551D and R117H-5T Cystic Fibrosis Subjects Taking Ivacaftor

    PubMed Central

    Char, Jessica E.; Wolfe, Marlene H.; Cho, Hyung-ju; Park, Il-Ho; Jeong, Jin Hyeok; Frisbee, Eric; Dunn, Colleen; Davies, Zoe; Milla, Carlos; Moss, Richard B.; Thomas, Ewart A. C.; Wine, Jeffrey J.

    2014-01-01

    To determine if oral dosing with the CFTR-potentiator ivacaftor (VX-770, Kalydeco) improves CFTR-dependent sweating in CF subjects carrying G551D or R117H-5T mutations, we optically measured sweat secretion from 32–143 individually identified glands in each of 8 CF subjects; 6 F508del/G551D, one G551D/R117H-5T, and one I507del/R117H-5T. Two subjects were tested only (−) ivacaftor, 3 only (+) ivacaftor and 3 (+/−) ivacaftor (1–5 tests per condition). The total number of gland measurements was 852 (−) ivacaftor and 906 (+) ivacaftor. A healthy control was tested 4 times (51 glands). For each gland we measured both CFTR-independent (M-sweat) and CFTR-dependent (C-sweat); C-sweat was stimulated with a β-adrenergic cocktail that elevated [cAMP]i while blocking muscarinic receptors. Absent ivacaftor, almost all CF glands produced M-sweat on all tests, but only 1/593 glands produced C-sweat (10 tests, 5 subjects). By contrast, 6/6 subjects (113/342 glands) produced C-sweat in the (+) ivacaftor condition, but with large inter-subject differences; 3–74% of glands responded with C/M sweat ratios 0.04%–2.57% of the average WT ratio of 0.265. Sweat volume losses cause proportionally larger underestimates of CFTR function at lower sweat rates. The losses were reduced by measuring C/M ratios in 12 glands from each subject that had the highest M-sweat rates. Remaining losses were estimated from single channel data and used to correct the C/M ratios, giving estimates of CFTR function (+) ivacaftor  = 1.6%–7.7% of the WT average. These estimates are in accord with single channel data and transcript analysis, and suggest that significant clinical benefit can be produced by low levels of CFTR function. PMID:24520399

  12. Bioanalytical devices: Technological leap for sweat sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heikenfeld, Jason

    2016-01-01

    Sweat analysis is an ideal method for continuously tracking a person's physiological state, but developing devices for this is difficult. A wearable sweat monitor that measures several biomarkers is a breakthrough. See Letter p.509

  13. Maximal sweating rate in humans.

    PubMed

    Torii, M

    1995-12-01

    We reviewed the literature concerning the maximal sweating rate (SRmax) during heat acclimatization, walking in desert heat and marathon running, and analyzed it from the viewpoint of sex, age, level of maximal oxygen uptake, and experimental conditions, i.e., ambient temperature, relative humidity, work intensity, work type, working duration, seasonal factors and the techniques of heat acclimatization. Exercise simulation, walking, running or bicycling, to induce the SRmax was conducted in a hot climatic chamber or in the desert. The SRmaxs due to marathon running were 1,000 to 1,200 g.h-1 in the cold season and 1,500 to 2,000 g.h-1 in the hot season. After several days of heat acclimatization, sweating capacity in the exercise simulation reached a maximum rate, over 2,000 g.h-1. There was a sexual difference in the SRmax, and the sweating capacity in the female was less than that in the male. Thus, the maximal sweating capacity in human was observed by prolonged moderate muscular exercise under thermal stress and internal and/or external heat loads.

  14. A Soft, Wearable Microfluidic Device for the Capture, Storage, and Colorimetric Sensing of Sweat

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Ahyeon; Kang, Daeshik; Xue, Yeguang; Lee, Seungmin; Pielak, Rafal M.; Kim, Jeonghyun; Hwang, Taehwan; Min, Seunghwan; Banks, Anthony; Bastien, Philippe; Manco, Megan C.; Wang, Liang; Ammann, Kaitlyn R.; Jang, Kyung-In; Won, Phillip; Han, Seungyong; Ghaffari, Roozbeh; Paik, Ungyu; Slepian, Marvin J.; Balooch, Guive; Huang, Yonggang; Rogers, John A.

    2017-01-01

    Capabilities in health monitoring via capture and quantitative chemical analysis of sweat could complement, or potentially obviate the need for, approaches based on sporadic assessment of blood samples. Established sweat monitoring technologies use simple fabric swatches and are limited to basic analysis in controlled laboratory or hospital settings. We present a collection of materials and device designs for soft, flexible and stretchable microfluidic systems, including embodiments that integrate wireless communication electronics, which can intimately and robustly bond to the surface of skin without chemical and mechanical irritation. This integration defines access points for a small set of sweat glands such that perspiration spontaneously initiates routing of sweat through a microfluidic network and set of reservoirs. Embedded chemical analyses respond in colorimetric fashion to markers such as chloride and hydronium ions, glucose and lactate. Wireless interfaces to digital image capture hardware serve as a means for quantitation. Human studies demonstrated the functionality of this microfluidic device during fitness cycling in a controlled environment and during long-distance bicycle racing in arid, outdoor conditions. The results include quantitative values for sweat rate, total sweat loss, pH and concentration of both chloride and lactate. PMID:27881826

  15. Salivary Glands

    MedlinePlus

    ... salivary gland tumors usually show up as painless enlargements of these glands. Tumors rarely involve more than ... otolaryngologist-head and neck surgeon should check these enlargements. Malignant tumors of the major salivary glands can ...

  16. Autonomous sweat extraction and analysis applied to cystic fibrosis and glucose monitoring using a fully integrated wearable platform

    PubMed Central

    Emaminejad, Sam; Gao, Wei; Wu, Eric; Davies, Zoe A.; Yin Yin Nyein, Hnin; Challa, Samyuktha; Ryan, Sean P.; Fahad, Hossain M.; Chen, Kevin; Shahpar, Ziba; Talebi, Salmonn; Milla, Carlos; Javey, Ali; Davis, Ronald W.

    2017-01-01

    Perspiration-based wearable biosensors facilitate continuous monitoring of individuals’ health states with real-time and molecular-level insight. The inherent inaccessibility of sweat in sedentary individuals in large volume (≥10 µL) for on-demand and in situ analysis has limited our ability to capitalize on this noninvasive and rich source of information. A wearable and miniaturized iontophoresis interface is an excellent solution to overcome this barrier. The iontophoresis process involves delivery of stimulating agonists to the sweat glands with the aid of an electrical current. The challenge remains in devising an iontophoresis interface that can extract sufficient amount of sweat for robust sensing, without electrode corrosion and burning/causing discomfort in subjects. Here, we overcame this challenge through realizing an electrochemically enhanced iontophoresis interface, integrated in a wearable sweat analysis platform. This interface can be programmed to induce sweat with various secretion profiles for real-time analysis, a capability which can be exploited to advance our knowledge of the sweat gland physiology and the secretion process. To demonstrate the clinical value of our platform, human subject studies were performed in the context of the cystic fibrosis diagnosis and preliminary investigation of the blood/sweat glucose correlation. With our platform, we detected the elevated sweat electrolyte content of cystic fibrosis patients compared with that of healthy control subjects. Furthermore, our results indicate that oral glucose consumption in the fasting state is followed by increased glucose levels in both sweat and blood. Our solution opens the possibility for a broad range of noninvasive diagnostic and general population health monitoring applications. PMID:28416667

  17. Autonomous sweat extraction and analysis applied to cystic fibrosis and glucose monitoring using a fully integrated wearable platform

    DOE PAGES

    Emaminejad, Sam; Gao, Wei; Wu, Eric; ...

    2017-04-17

    Perspiration-based wearable biosensors facilitate continuous monitoring of individuals' health states with real-time and molecular-level insight. The inherent inaccessibility of sweat in sedentary individuals in large volume (≥10 μL) for on-demand and in situ analysis has limited our ability to capitalize on this noninvasive and rich source of information. A wearable and miniaturized iontophoresis interface is an excellent solution to overcome this barrier. The iontophoresis process involves delivery of stimulating agonists to the sweat glands with the aid of an electrical current. The challenge remains in devising an iontophoresis interface that can extract sufficient amount of sweat for robust sensing, withoutmore » electrode corrosion and burning/causing discomfort in subjects. Here, we overcame this challenge through realizing an electrochemically enhanced iontophoresis interface, integrated in a wearable sweat analysis platform. This interface can be programmed to induce sweat with various secretion profiles for real-time analysis, a capability which can be exploited to advance our knowledge of the sweat gland physiology and the secretion process. To demonstrate the clinical value of our platform, human subject studies were performed in the context of the cystic fibrosis diagnosis and preliminary investigation of the blood/sweat glucose correlation. With our platform, we detected the elevated sweat electrolyte content of cystic fibrosis patients compared with that of healthy control subjects. Furthermore, our results indicate that oral glucose consumption in the fasting state is followed by increased glucose levels in both sweat and blood. In conclusion, our solution opens the possibility for a broad range of noninvasive diagnostic and general population health monitoring applications.« less

  18. Sweating the small stuff: adequacy and accuracy in sweat chloride determination.

    PubMed

    DeMarco, Mari L; Dietzen, Dennis J; Brown, Sarah M

    2015-04-01

    Sweat chloride testing is the gold standard for diagnosis of cystic fibrosis (CF). Our objectives were to: 1) describe variables that determine sweat rate; 2) determine the analytic and diagnostic capacity of sweat chloride analysis across the range of observed sweat rates; and 3) determine the biologic variability of sweat chloride concentration. A retrospective analysis was performed using data from all sweat chloride tests performed at St. Louis Children's Hospital over a 21-month period. A total of 1397 sweat chloride tests (1155 sufficient [≥75 mg], 242 insufficient [<75 mg]), were performed on 904 individuals. The sweat weight collected from forearms was statistically greater than that collected from legs. There was a negligible correlation between sweat weight and chloride concentration (r=-0.06). The mean individual biologic CV calculated from individuals with two or more sweat collections ≥75 mg was 13.1% (95% CI: 11.3-14.9%; range 0-88%) yielding a reference change value of 36%. Using 60 mmol/L as the diagnostic chloride cutoff, 100% of CF cases were detected whether a minimum sweat weight of 75, 40, or 20 mg was required. 1) Collection of sweat from forearms is preferable to upper legs, particularly in very young infants; 2) sweat chloride concentrations are not highly dependent upon sweat rate; 3) a change in sweat chloride concentration exceeding 36% may be considered a clinically significant response to cystic fibrosis transmembrane receptor targeted therapy, and 4) sweat collections of less than 75 mg provide clinically accurate information. Copyright © 2014 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Working Up a Good Sweat – The Challenges of Standardising Sweat Collection for Metabolomics Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Joy N; Mantri, Nitin; Cohen, Marc M

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Human sweat is a complex biofluid of interest to diverse scientific fields. Metabolomics analysis of sweat promises to improve screening, diagnosis and self-monitoring of numerous conditions through new applications and greater personalisation of medical interventions. Before these applications can be fully developed, existing methods for the collection, handling, processing and storage of human sweat need to be revised. This review presents a cross-disciplinary overview of the origins, composition, physical characteristics and functional roles of human sweat, and explores the factors involved in standardising sweat collection for metabolomics analysis. Methods A literature review of human sweat analysis over the past 10 years (2006–2016) was performed to identify studies with metabolomics or similarly applicable ‘omics’ analysis. These studies were reviewed with attention to sweat induction and sampling techniques, timing of sweat collection, sweat storage conditions, laboratory derivation, processing and analytical platforms. Results Comparative analysis of 20 studies revealed numerous factors that can significantly impact the validity, reliability and reproducibility of sweat analysis including: anatomical site of sweat sampling, skin integrity and preparation; temperature and humidity at the sweat collection sites; timing and nature of sweat collection; metabolic quenching; transport and storage; qualitative and quantitative measurements of the skin microbiota at sweat collection sites; and individual variables such as diet, emotional state, metabolic conditions, pharmaceutical, recreational drug and supplement use. Conclusion Further development of standard operating protocols for human sweat collection can open the way for sweat metabolomics to significantly add to our understanding of human physiology in health and disease. PMID:28798503

  20. Eccrine Syringofibroadenoma in Association With Acquired Epidermodysplasia Verruciformis.

    PubMed

    Tan, Timothy; Guitart, Joan; Liu, Luzheng Lisa; Brieva, Joaquin C; Amin, Sapna; Rani, Monica; Gerami, Pedram; Yazdan, Pedram

    2017-07-01

    A 75-year-old man with human immunodeficiency virus infection and numerous biopsy-proven warts for 10 years, refractory to cryosurgery, cimetidine, and topical imiquimod, presented with numerous pink to hypopigmented verrucous papules and plaques involving the face, trunk, buttocks, and groin. Laboratory evaluation revealed a CD4 T-cell count of 62 cells per microliter and human immunodeficiency virus viral load of <117 copies per milliliter. Biopsy of a plaque groin lesion was performed. Histopathology revealed vertically oriented anastomosing strands of basaloid epithelium arising from multiple points along the epidermis in a background fibrovascular stroma. Ductal differentiation was identified. Areas of epidermis showed compact orthokeratosis, coarse hypergranulosis, and keratinocytes with abundant steel-blue-gray cytoplasm, indicative of viral cytopathic changes. Cytologic atypia was not identified. Human papillomavirus (HPV) genotyping of this lesion was positive for types 5 and 14. Overall, the findings were consistent with epidermodysplasia verruciformis in association with eccrine syringofibroadenoma (ESFA). The patient was subsequently treated with acitretin and showed clinical improvement. ESFA is an uncommon benign adnexal tumor with unknown pathogenesis. Although its association with HPV has rarely been reported, ESFA in the setting of acquired epidermodysplasia verruciformis has not been described. The development of ESFA in this case may be the result of HPV-induced cellular transformation.

  1. Fast imaging of eccrine latent fingerprints with nontoxic Mn-doped ZnS QDs.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chaoying; Zhou, Ronghui; He, Wenwei; Wu, Lan; Wu, Peng; Hou, Xiandeng

    2014-04-01

    Fingerprints are unique characteristics of an individual, and their imaging and recognition is a top-priority task in forensic science. Fast LFP (latent fingerprint) acquirement can greatly help policemen in screening the potential criminal scenes and capturing fingerprint clues. Of the two major latent fingerprints (LFP), eccrine is expected to be more representative than sebaceous in LFP identification. Here we explored the heavy metal-free Mn-doped ZnS quantum dots (QDs) as a new imaging moiety for eccrine LFPs. To study the effects of different ligands on the LFP image quality, we prepared Mn-doped ZnS QDs with various surface-capping ligands using QDs synthesized in high-temperature organic media as starting material. The orange fluorescence emission from Mn-doped ZnS QDs clearly revealed the optical images of eccrine LFPs. Interestingly, N-acetyl-cysteine-capped Mn-doped ZnS QDs could stain the eccrine LFPs in as fast as 5 s. Meanwhile, the levels 2 and 3 substructures of the fingerprints could also be simultaneously and clearly identified. While in the absence of QDs or without rubbing and stamping the finger onto foil, no fluorescent fingerprint images could be visualized. Besides fresh fingerprint, aged (5, 10, and 50 days), incomplete eccrine LFPs could also be successfully stained with N-acetyl-cysteine-capped Mn-doped ZnS QDs, demonstrating the analytical potential of this method in real world applications. The method was also robust for imaging of eccrine LFPs on a series of nonporous surfaces, such as aluminum foil, compact discs, glass, and black plastic bags.

  2. Effect of heat acclimation on sweat minerals.

    PubMed

    Chinevere, Troy D; Kenefick, Robert W; Cheuvront, Samuel N; Lukaski, Henry C; Sawka, Michael N

    2008-05-01

    This study examined the impact of 10 d of exercise-heat acclimation on sweat mineral concentrations. Eight male subjects walked on a treadmill at 3.5 mph, 4% grade for 100 continuous minutes or until rectal temperature reached 39.5 degrees C on 10 consecutive days in an environmental chamber set at 45 degrees C, 20% relative humidity. Arm sweat samples were collected during the first 30 min of exercise-heat stress on days 1 and 10 using a polyethylene arm glove. Final core temperature and HR values were significantly lower (P < 0.05) on day 10 versus day 1. Whole-body sweating rates increased by approximately 6% (P = 0.12). Sweat sodium concentration on day 10 (36.22 +/- 7.22 mM) was significantly lower than day 1 (54.49 +/- 16.18 mM) (P < 0.05). Sweat mineral concentrations of calcium (approximately 29%), copper (approximately 50%), and magnesium (approximately 43%) were also significantly lower on day 10 versus day 1 of heat acclimation (P < 0.05). A trend for lower sweat iron (approximately 75%; P = 0.07) and zinc (approximately 23%; P = 0.10) concentrations were observed from day 1 to day 10. The estimated hourly sweat mineral losses (arm concentration x whole-body sweat rate) were reduced for calcium (approximately 27%), copper (approximately 46%), and magnesium (approximately 42%) (P < 0.05), but not iron (75%) or zinc (approximately 16%) (P > 0.05), from day 1 to day 10. Exercise-heat acclimation conserves arm sweat mineral concentrations and possibly whole-body sweat losses of calcium, copper, and magnesium, and may reduce sweat iron and zinc concentrations.

  3. 7 CFR 29.2306 - Sweated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Sweated. 29.2306 Section 29.2306 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Sweated. The condition of tobacco which has passed through one or more fermentations natural to tobacco...

  4. 7 CFR 29.3554 - Sweating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Sweating. 29.3554 Section 29.3554 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Type 95) § 29.3554 Sweating. The condition of tobacco in the process of fermentation. [30 FR 9207, July...

  5. 7 CFR 29.2558 - Sweated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Sweated. 29.2558 Section 29.2558 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing...-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Types 22, 23, and Foreign Type 96) § 29.2558 Sweated. The condition of tobacco...

  6. 7 CFR 29.3064 - Sweated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Sweated. 29.3064 Section 29.3064 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Sweated. The condition of tobacco which has passed through one or more fermentations natural to tobacco...

  7. 7 CFR 29.1065 - Sweating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Sweating. 29.1065 Section 29.1065 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Type 92) § 29.1065 Sweating. The condition of tobacco in the process of fermentation. [42 FR 21092, Apr...

  8. 7 CFR 29.3065 - Sweating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Sweating. 29.3065 Section 29.3065 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Sweating. The condition of tobacco in the process of fermentation. [24 FR 8771, Oct. 29, 1959. Redesignated...

  9. 7 CFR 29.2307 - Sweating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Sweating. 29.2307 Section 29.2307 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Sweating. The condition of tobacco in the process of fermentation. [37 FR 13521, July 11, 1972...

  10. 7 CFR 29.3553 - Sweated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Sweated. 29.3553 Section 29.3553 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Type 95) § 29.3553 Sweated. The condition of tobacco which has passed through one or more fermentations...

  11. 7 CFR 29.6042 - Sweated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Sweated. 29.6042 Section 29.6042 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... INSPECTION Standards Definitions § 29.6042 Sweated. The condition of tobacco which has passed through one or...

  12. 7 CFR 29.2559 - Sweating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Sweating. 29.2559 Section 29.2559 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing...-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Types 22, 23, and Foreign Type 96) § 29.2559 Sweating. The condition of tobacco in...

  13. 7 CFR 29.1064 - Sweated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Sweated. 29.1064 Section 29.1064 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Type 92) § 29.1064 Sweated. The condition of tobacco which has passed through one or more fermentations...

  14. 7 CFR 29.6042 - Sweated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Sweated. 29.6042 Section 29.6042 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... INSPECTION Standards Definitions § 29.6042 Sweated. The condition of tobacco which has passed through one or...

  15. 7 CFR 29.3065 - Sweating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Sweating. 29.3065 Section 29.3065 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Sweating. The condition of tobacco in the process of fermentation. [24 FR 8771, Oct. 29, 1959. Redesignated...

  16. 7 CFR 29.2306 - Sweated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Sweated. 29.2306 Section 29.2306 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Sweated. The condition of tobacco which has passed through one or more fermentations natural to tobacco...

  17. 7 CFR 29.2558 - Sweated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Sweated. 29.2558 Section 29.2558 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing...-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Types 22, 23, and Foreign Type 96) § 29.2558 Sweated. The condition of tobacco...

  18. 7 CFR 29.3064 - Sweated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Sweated. 29.3064 Section 29.3064 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Sweated. The condition of tobacco which has passed through one or more fermentations natural to tobacco...

  19. 7 CFR 29.2307 - Sweating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Sweating. 29.2307 Section 29.2307 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Sweating. The condition of tobacco in the process of fermentation. [37 FR 13521, July 11, 1972...

  20. 7 CFR 29.3553 - Sweated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Sweated. 29.3553 Section 29.3553 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Type 95) § 29.3553 Sweated. The condition of tobacco which has passed through one or more fermentations...

  1. 7 CFR 29.3554 - Sweating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Sweating. 29.3554 Section 29.3554 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Type 95) § 29.3554 Sweating. The condition of tobacco in the process of fermentation. [30 FR 9207, July...

  2. 7 CFR 29.1065 - Sweating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Sweating. 29.1065 Section 29.1065 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Type 92) § 29.1065 Sweating. The condition of tobacco in the process of fermentation. [42 FR 21092, Apr...

  3. 7 CFR 29.1064 - Sweated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Sweated. 29.1064 Section 29.1064 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Type 92) § 29.1064 Sweated. The condition of tobacco which has passed through one or more fermentations...

  4. 7 CFR 29.2559 - Sweating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Sweating. 29.2559 Section 29.2559 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing...-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Types 22, 23, and Foreign Type 96) § 29.2559 Sweating. The condition of tobacco in...

  5. Sweating Like a Pig: Physics or Irony?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohren, Craig F.

    2016-01-01

    In his interesting and informative book "Is That a Fact?," Joe Schwarcz avers that pigs do not sweat and the saying "sweating like a pig" originates in iron smelting. Oblong pieces of hot iron, with a fancied resemblance to a sow with piglets, cool in sand to the dew point of the surrounding air, and hence water condenses on…

  6. Endocrine glands

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002351.htm Endocrine glands To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Endocrine glands release (secrete) hormones into the bloodstream. The endocrine ...

  7. Effect of local acetylcholinesterase inhibition on sweat rate in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shibasaki, M.; Crandall, C. G.

    2001-01-01

    ACh is the neurotransmitter responsible for increasing sweat rate (SR) in humans. Because ACh is rapidly hydrolyzed by acetylcholinesterase (AChE), it is possible that AChE contributes to the modulation of SR. Thus the primary purpose of this project was to identify whether AChE around human sweat glands is capable of modulating SR during local application of various concentrations of ACh in vivo, as well as during a heat stress. In seven subjects, two microdialysis probes were placed in the intradermal space of the forearm. One probe was perfused with the AChE inhibitor neostigmine (10 microM); the adjacent membrane was perfused with the vehicle (Ringer solution). SR over both membranes was monitored via capacitance hygrometry during microdialysis administration of various concentrations of ACh (1 x 10(-7)-2 M) and during whole body heating. SR was significantly greater at the neostigmine-treated site than at the control site during administration of lower concentrations of ACh (1 x 10(-7)-1 x 10(-3) M, P < 0.05), but not during administration of higher concentrations of ACh (1 x 10(-2)-2 M, P > 0.05). Moreover, the core temperature threshold for the onset of sweating at the neostigmine-treated site was significantly reduced relative to that at the control site. However, no differences in SR were observed between sites after 35 min of whole body heating. These results suggest that AChE is capable of modulating SR when ACh concentrations are low to moderate (i.e., when sudomotor activity is low) but is less effective in governing SR after SR has increased substantially.

  8. Split gland

    DOEpatents

    Petranto, J.J.

    1989-09-05

    A split gland having only three parts is described. The gland has substantially the same stability to the relative motion of the constituent half-gland members during the attachment process to a female fitting as have more complicated designs. Ease of manufacture and use result from the reduction in complexity of the present invention. 15 figs.

  9. Split gland

    DOEpatents

    Petranto, Joseph J.

    1989-01-01

    A split gland having only three parts is described. The gland has substantially the same stability to the relative motion of the constituent half-gland members during the attachment process to a female fitting as have more complicated designs. Ease of manufacture and use result from the reduction in complexity of the present invention.

  10. [The morphogenesis of mammalian cutaneous glands in evolutionary perspective].

    PubMed

    Chernova, O F

    2012-01-01

    The morphogenesis of mammalian cutaneous glands is considered based on the analysis of the literature and our own original data with the focus on the issues of gland polymorphism and specific features in postnatal development (from the case study of circumanal hepatoid glands of newborn domestic dogs), including the features reflecting the evolutionary relationships of various types of cutaneous glands. The hepatoid glands are a component of the glandular complex ofthe hair follicle, which also includes sebaceous and sweat glands; have a specific structure; and produce protein secretion by a merocrine pathway. Characteristic of these glands are wide polymorphism, sex- and age-related differences in the degree of development, occurrence in only a few phylogenetically related mammalian taxa (even-toed ungulates and carnivores); and a signaling type of their secretion. The data support the "generative concept," relying on the idea of a separate and independent origination of diverse derivatives of the external integuments.

  11. Treatment of gustatory sweating with low-dose botulinum toxin A: a case report.

    PubMed

    Bakke, Merete; Max Thorsen, Niels; Bardow, Allan; Dalager, Torben; Eckhart Thomsen, Carsten; Regeur, Lisbeth

    2006-06-01

    Frey's syndrome, gustatory sweating in the preauricular area, is an unpleasant phenomenon occurring during meals after surgery on the parotid gland. Recently, botulinum toxin A (BTX) has been shown to reduce the symptoms, but the variation in the reported doses is large. To quantify the effect of treatment with low-dose BTX in a case of Frey's syndrome over a period of 6 months. A 56-year-old woman was treated with 10 U Botox given as 20 single, intracutaneous injections of 0.5 U, one for each cm(2), 3 years after resection of the parotid gland. Before treatment and repeatedly during the 6-month period, the sweating was rated subjectively on a 100-mm visual analog scale (VAS) and by a severity index, and objectively by assessment of the extent of the involved skin area using Minor's iodine-starch test, staining the area of sweating dark. The treatment decreased the involved area from 20 to 5 cm(2) and the VAS ratings from 98 to 8 mm. The index showed that treatment affected the sweating intensity, not the frequency. After the 6-month period the patient was still satisfied, but the involved skin area had increased; however, not entirely to pretreatment values. The effect of BTX injections for gustatory sweating obtained in this case was comparable to results reported using higher doses. Low doses of BTX can therefore be used in the treatment of Frey's syndrome, but studies to clarify the dose-response relationship, in terms of both time-course and obtained effect, are needed.

  12. Non-thermoregulatory modulation of sweating in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shibasaki, Manabu; Kondo, Narihiko; Crandall, Craig G.

    2003-01-01

    Sweating in humans is critical for appropriate thermoregulation during exercise and/or exposure to warm environmental temperatures. In addition to thermal controllers of sweating, a number of non-thermal factors modulate the sweating response. This review summarizes the primary non-thermal neural modifiers of sweating in humans.

  13. Effect of Heat Acclimation on Sweat Minerals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-01

    KB. Hypohy- dration and exercise : effects of heat acclimation, gender , and environment. J Appl Physiol. 1983;55:1147–53. 37. Sawka MN, Wenger CB...891, 2008. Purpose: This study examined the impact of 10 d of exercise -heat acclimation on sweat mineral concentrations. Methods: Eight male subjects...environmental chamber set at 45-C, 20% relative humidity. Arm sweat samples were collected during the first 30 min of exercise -heat stress on days 1 and 10

  14. [Cutaneous adnexal and salivary gland tumours. Similarities and differences].

    PubMed

    Ihrler, S; Weiler, C; Eckert, F; Mollenhauer, M

    2014-09-01

    Despite major discrepancies in basic microscopic anatomy, remarkable similarities are manifest within the wide spectrum of cutaneous adnexal and salivary gland tumors. In this study salivary gland and adnexal tumors were identified and investigated with respect to similarities in histology, terminology and pathogenesis. Histological similarities of certain types of salivary gland tumors relate to eccrine, apocrine and rarely sebaceous (but not trichofollicular) types of adnexal tumors. The most striking similarity was found with salivary gland pleomorphic adenoma and cutaneous mixed tumor. Multistep carcinogenesis starting with intraductal carcinoma, identified in carcinoma ex pleomorphic adenoma is identical to that found in cutaneous carcinoma ex spiradenoma. Further histological and terminological similarities are shown for mucinous and mucoepidermoid carcinoma, for lymphadenoma and lymphoepithelial carcinoma, for sebaceous adenoma and carcinoma, for adenoid-cystic carcinoma, as well as for salivary gland basal cell adenoma versus cutaneous spiradenoma. Manifest diagnostic problems related to histologically similar salivary gland and adnexal tumors are rare and are topographically limited to the parotid and oral areas.

  15. Sweat test for cystic fibrosis: Wearable sweat sensor vs. standard laboratory test.

    PubMed

    Choi, Dong-Hoon; Thaxton, Abigail; Jeong, In Cheol; Kim, Kain; Sosnay, Patrick R; Cutting, Garry R; Searson, Peter C

    2018-03-23

    Sweat chloride testing for diagnosis of cystic fibrosis (CF) involves sweat induction, collection and handling, and measurement in an analytical lab. We have developed a wearable sensor with an integrated salt bridge for real-time measurement of sweat chloride concentration. Here, in a proof-of-concept study, we compare the performance of the sensor to current clinical practice in CF patients and healthy subjects. Sweat was induced on both forearms of 10 individuals with CF and 10 healthy subjects using pilocarpine iontophoresis. A Macroduct sweat collection device was attached to one arm and sweat was collected for 30 min and then sent for laboratory analysis. A sensor was attached to the other arm and the chloride ion concentration monitored in real time for 30 min using a Bluetooth transceiver and smart phone app. Stable sweat chloride measurements were obtained within 15 min following sweat induction using the wearable sensor. We define the detection time as the time at which the standard deviation of the real-time chloride ion concentration remained below 2 mEq/L for 5 min. The sweat volume for sensor measurements at the detection time was 13.1 ± 11.4 μL (SD), in many cases lower than the minimum sweat volume of 15 μL for conventional testing. The mean difference between sweat chloride concentrations measured by the sensor and the conventional laboratory practice was 6.2 ± 9.5 mEq/L (SD), close to the arm-to-arm variation of about 3 mEq/L. The Pearson correlation coefficient between the two measurements was 0.97 highlighting the excellent agreement between the two methods. A wearable sensor can be used to make real-time measurements of sweat chloride within 15 min following sweat induction, requiring a small sweat volume, and with excellent agreement to standard methods. Copyright © 2018 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Were the English Sweating Sickness and the Picardy Sweat Caused by Hantaviruses?

    PubMed Central

    Heyman, Paul; Simons, Leopold; Cochez, Christel

    2014-01-01

    The English sweating sickness caused five devastating epidemics between 1485 and 1551, England was hit hardest, but on one occasion also mainland Europe, with mortality rates between 30% and 50%. The Picardy sweat emerged about 150 years after the English sweat disappeared, in 1718, in France. It caused 196 localized outbreaks and apparently in its turn disappeared in 1861. Both diseases have been the subject of numerous attempts to define their origin, but so far all efforts were in vain. Although both diseases occurred in different time frames and were geographically not overlapping, a common denominator could be what we know today as hantavirus infections. This review aims to shed light on the characteristics of both diseases from contemporary as well as current knowledge and suggests hantavirus infection as the most likely cause for the English sweating sickness as well as for the Picardy sweat. PMID:24402305

  17. Evidence for β-adrenergic modulation of sweating during incremental exercise in habitually trained males.

    PubMed

    Amano, Tatsuro; Shitara, Yosuke; Fujii, Naoto; Inoue, Yoshimitsu; Kondo, Narihiko

    2017-07-01

    -adrenoceptor blockade in humans in vivo. β-Adrenergic sweating was evident in habitually trained individuals during exercise at a submaximal high relative intensity (80-90% maximal work). This observation advances our understanding of human thermoregulation during exercise and of the mechanism that underlies sweat gland adaptation to habitual exercise training. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  18. Night sweats: it may be hemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Murday, H K M; Rusli, F D; Blandy, C; Vollenhoven, B

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this case report is to show that hemochromatosis can present, unusually, with night sweats. At presentation, hemochromatosis often tends to have non-specific symptoms, making it easy to misdiagnose, especially if it presents with rare symptoms. Misdiagnosis of hemochromatosis can lead to lethal outcomes, given it can cause multiple organ dysfunctions if left untreated and hence the need to identify it early on. The case we present is a 41-year-old woman with previously undiagnosed hemochromatosis complaining of night sweats. She thought she was menopausal. The diagnosis of hemochromatosis was made solely on investigations given that she did not have any other symptoms other than night sweats. Her serum iron concentrations were within the normal range due to menstruation. It is uncommon for women to present with symptoms of hemochromatosis during their reproductive life since their iron concentration is kept within normal range through monthly menstrual bleeding.

  19. Sweat iron loss of male and female runners during exercise.

    PubMed

    Lamanca, J J; Haymes, E M; Daly, J A; Moffatt, R J; Waller, M F

    1988-02-01

    Male (n = 9) and female (n = 8) collegiate cross-country runners were studied during a training session to determine the amount of iron lost in the sweat. Sweat samples were collected from the arm using polyethylene bags. Total sweat loss was determined by weighing subjects before and after the runs. Average time of sweat collection was 42 min for males and 39 min for females. Sweat rate for the males (717.5 +/- 145.9 g/m2/h) was significantly greater than for the females (460.1 +/- 142.9 g/m2/h); however, the sweat rate per km was not significantly different. Females had a significantly greater sweat iron concentration (0.417 +/- 0.024 mg/l) than males (0.179 +/- 0.011 mg/l). Rate of sweat iron loss was not significantly different for females (0.276 +/- 0.140 mg/h) and males (0.21 +/- 0.13 mg/h). Sweat iron concentration was inversely related with sweat rate (r = -0.64). Our data suggest that although males lose more total sweat than females, the higher sweat iron concentration of females leads to similar rates of iron loss. For female runners, sweat iron loss coupled with a low dietary iron intake may result in a negative iron balance.

  20. Real-time sweat analysis via alternating current conductivity of artificial and human sweat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Gengchen; Alomari, Mahmoud; Sahin, Bunyamin; Snelgrove, Samuel E.; Edwards, Jeffrey; Mellinger, Axel; Kaya, Tolga

    2015-03-01

    Dehydration is one of the most profound physiological challenges that significantly affects athletes and soldiers if not detected early. Recently, a few groups have focused on dehydration detection using sweat as the main biomarker. Although there are some proposed devices, the electrical and chemical characteristics of sweat have yet to be incorporated into the validations. In this work, we have developed a simple test setup to analyze artificial sweat that is comprised the main components of human sweat. We provide theoretical and experimental details on the electrical and chemical behavior of the artificial sweat for various concentration values within a temperature range of 5 °C to 50 °C. We have also developed an efficient sweat collecting and detection system based on 3D printing. Human studies were conducted and this particular protocol has shown that dehydration starts to take effect as early as 40 min into the physical activity if there is no fluid intake during the exercise. We believe that our device will lead to developing viable real-time sweat analysis systems.

  1. Excretion of Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol in sweat.

    PubMed

    Huestis, Marilyn A; Scheidweiler, Karl B; Saito, Takeshi; Fortner, Neil; Abraham, Tsadik; Gustafson, Richard A; Smith, Michael L

    2008-01-30

    Sweat testing is a noninvasive technique for monitoring drug exposure over a 7-day period in treatment, criminal justice, and employment settings. We evaluated Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) excretion in 11 daily cannabis users after cessation of drug use. PharmChek sweat patches worn for 7 days were analyzed for THC by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The limit of quantification (LOQ) for the method was 0.4 ng THC/patch. Sweat patches worn the first week of continuously monitored abstinence had THC above the United States Substance Abuse Mental Health Services Administration's proposed cutoff concentration for federal workplace testing of 1 ng THC/patch. Mean+/-S.E.M. THC concentrations were 3.85+/-0.86 ng THC/patch. Eight of 11 subjects had negative patches the second week and one produced THC positive patches for 4 weeks of monitored abstinence. We also tested daily and weekly sweat patches from seven subjects who were administered oral doses of up to 14.8 mg THC/day for five consecutive days. In this oral THC administration study, no daily or weekly patches had THC above the LOQ; concurrent plasma THC concentrations were all less than 6.1 microg/L. In conclusion, using proposed federal cutoff concentrations, most daily cannabis users will have a positive sweat patch in the first week after ceasing drug use and a negative patch after subsequent weeks, although patches may remain positive for 4 weeks or more. Oral ingestion of up to 14.8 mg THC daily does not produce a THC positive sweat patch test.

  2. Excretion of Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol in Sweat

    PubMed Central

    Huestis, Marilyn A.; Scheidweiler, Karl B.; Saito, Takeshi; Fortner, Neil; Abraham, Tsadik; Gustafson, Richard A.; Smith, Michael L.

    2008-01-01

    Sweat testing is a noninvasive technique for monitoring drug exposure over a 7-day period in treatment, criminal justice, and employment settings. We evaluated Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) excretion in 11 daily cannabis users after cessation of drug use. PharmChek® sweat patches worn for 7 days were analyzed for THC by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The limit of quantification (LOQ) for the method was 0.4 ng THC/patch. Sweat patches worn the first week of continuously monitored abstinence had THC above the United States Substance Abuse Mental Health Services Administration’s proposed cutoff concentration for federal workplace testing of 1 ng THC/patch. Mean ± S.E.M. THC concentrations were 3.85 ± 0.86 ng THC/patch. Eight of 11 subjects had negative patches the second week and one produced THC positive patches for four weeks of monitored abstinence. We also tested daily and weekly sweat patches from 7 subjects who were administered oral doses of up to 14.8 mg THC/day for five consecutive days. In this oral THC administration study, no daily or weekly patches had THC above the LOQ; concurrent plasma THC concentrations were all less than 6.1 μg/L. In conclusion, using proposed federal cutoff concentrations, most daily cannabis users will have a positive sweat patch in the first week after ceasing drug use and a negative patch after subsequent weeks, although patches may remain positive for four weeks or more. Oral ingestion of up to 14.8 mg THC daily does not produce a THC positive sweat patch test. PMID:17481836

  3. Karyotyping, dermatoglyphic, and sweat pore analysis of five families affected with ectodermal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, Manpreet; Kale, Alka D; Kotrashetti, Vijayalakshmi S

    2012-09-01

    Hereditary ectodermal dysplasia is a genetic recessive trait characterized by hypohydrosis, hypotrichosis, and hypodontia. The affected individual show characteristic physiognomy like protruded forehead, depressed nasal bridge, periorbital wrinkling, protruded lips, etc. There is marked decrease in sweat and salivary secretion. Due to skin involvement palm and sole ridge patterns are disrupted. In this study an attempt has been made to classify the affected members according to the degree of penetrance by pedigree analysis and also study karyotyping for cytogenetics, dermatoglyphic analysis for the various ridge patterns and variations in the number of sweat glands by sweat pore analysis in affected individuals. A total of five families who were affected with ectodermal dysplasia were considered. Pedigree analysis was drawn up to three generation by obtaining history. Dermatoglyphics and sweat pore analysis was done by obtaining palm and finger print impression using stamp pad ink. Karyotyping was done by collecting 3-5 ml peripheral blood. Karyotyping was prepared using lymphocyte culture. Chromosomes were examined at 20 spreads selected randomly under ×100 magnification. Results were analyzed by calculating mean values and percentage was obtained. Karyotyping did not show any abnormalities, dermatoglyphic analysis and sweat pore counts showed marked variations when compared with normal. Moreover, pedigree analysis confirmed the status of the disease as that of the recessive trait. Large number of affected patients needs to be evaluated for dermatoglypic analysis. Genetic aspect of the disease needs to be looked into the molecular level in an attempt to locate the gene locus responsible for ectodermal dysplasia and its manifestation.

  4. Morphology of human sweat ducts observed by optical coherence tomography and their frequency of resonance in the terahertz frequency region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Saroj R.; Miyata, Eisuke; Ishai, Paul Ben; Kawase, Kodo

    2015-03-01

    It is crucial to understand the various biological effects induced by terahertz (THz) electromagnetic waves with the rapid development of electronic and photonic devices operating in the THz frequency region. The presence of sweat glands plays an important role in THz wave interactions with human skin. We investigated the morphological features of sweat ducts using optical coherence tomography (OCT) to further understand such phenomena. We observed remarkable features of the ducts, such as their clear helical structure. The intersubject and intrasubject variations in the diameter of sweat ducts were considerably smaller than the variations in other structural parameters, such as length and number of turns. Based on the sweat duct dimensions and THz dielectric properties of skin measured using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS), we calculated the resonating frequency of the sweat duct under the assumption of it functioning as a helical antenna. Here, we show that the resonance frequency in the axial mode of operation lies in the THz wave region with a centre frequency of 0.44 +/- 0.07 THz. We expect that these findings will further our understanding of the various health consequences of the interaction of THz waves with human beings.

  5. Genetics Home Reference: cold-induced sweating syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Encyclopedia: Scoliosis Encyclopedia: Sweating Health Topic: Autonomic Nervous System Disorders Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (1 link) Crisponi syndrome Educational Resources (6 links) MalaCards: cold-induced sweating syndrome ...

  6. Cancer treatment: dealing with hot flashes and night sweats

    MedlinePlus

    ... ency/patientinstructions/000826.htm Cancer treatment: dealing with hot flashes and night sweats To use the sharing ... JavaScript. Certain types of cancer treatments can cause hot flashes and night sweats. Hot flashes are when ...

  7. Endocrine glands

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... and nervous systems work very closely together. The brain continuously sends instructions to the endocrine system, and ... master switchboard because it's the part of the brain that controls the endocrine system. The pituitary gland, ...

  8. A portable optical human sweat sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-omari, Mahmoud; Liu, Gengchen; Mueller, Anja; Mock, Adam; Ghosh, Ruby N.; Smith, Kyle; Kaya, Tolga

    2014-11-01

    We describe the use of HNQ (2-hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone or Lawsone) as a potential sweat sensor material to detect the hydration levels of human beings. We have conducted optical measurements using both artificial and human sweat to validate our approach. We have determined that the dominant compound that affects HNQ absorbance in artificial sweat is sodium. The presence of lactate decreases the reactivity of HNQ while urea promotes more interactions of sodium and potassium ions with HNQ. The interactions between the hydroxyl group of HNQ and the artificial sweat components (salts, lactic acid, and urea) were investigated comprehensively. We have also proposed and developed a portable diode laser absorption sensor system that converts the absorbance at a particular wavelength range (at 455 ± 5 nm, where HNQ has an absorbance peak) into light intensity measurements via a photocell. The absorbance intensity values obtained from our portable sensor system agrees within 10.4% with measurements from a laboratory based ultraviolet-visible spectrometer. Findings of this research will provide significant information for researchers who are focusing on real-time, in-situ hydration level detection.

  9. Methylxanthine Drug Monitoring with Wearable Sweat Sensors.

    PubMed

    Tai, Li-Chia; Gao, Wei; Chao, Minghan; Bariya, Mallika; Ngo, Quynh P; Shahpar, Ziba; Nyein, Hnin Y Y; Park, Hyejin; Sun, Junfeng; Jung, Younsu; Wu, Eric; Fahad, Hossain M; Lien, Der-Hsien; Ota, Hiroki; Cho, Gyoujin; Javey, Ali

    2018-04-16

    Drug monitoring plays crucial roles in doping control and precision medicine. It helps physicians tailor drug dosage for optimal benefits, track patients' compliance to prescriptions, and understand the complex pharmacokinetics of drugs. Conventional drug tests rely on invasive blood draws. While urine and sweat are attractive alternative biofluids, the state-of-the-art methods require separate sample collection and processing steps and fail to provide real-time information. Here, a wearable platform equipped with an electrochemical differential pulse voltammetry sensing module for drug monitoring is presented. A methylxanthine drug, caffeine, is selected to demonstrate the platform's functionalities. Sweat caffeine levels are monitored under various conditions, such as drug doses and measurement time after drug intake. Elevated sweat caffeine levels upon increasing dosage and confirmable caffeine physiological trends are observed. This work leverages a wearable sweat sensing platform toward noninvasive and continuous point-of-care drug monitoring and management. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. THE TRACE MINERAL LOSSES IN SWEAT,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The results of this study show that considerable quantities of the trace minerals , including zinc, selenium, copper, cobalt, iodine, strontium...As in previous studies, the excretion of these trace minerals in sweat decreases appreciably during acclimatization to hot environments. (Author)

  11. Loss of carbonic anhydrase XII function in individuals with elevated sweat chloride concentration and pulmonary airway disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Melissa; Vecchio-Pagán, Briana; Sharma, Neeraj; Waheed, Abdul; Li, Xiaopeng; Raraigh, Karen S; Robbins, Sarah; Han, Sangwoo T; Franca, Arianna L; Pellicore, Matthew J; Evans, Taylor A; Arcara, Kristin M; Nguyen, Hien; Luan, Shan; Belchis, Deborah; Hertecant, Jozef; Zabner, Joseph; Sly, William S; Cutting, Garry R

    2016-05-15

    Elevated sweat chloride levels, failure to thrive (FTT), and lung disease are characteristic features of cystic fibrosis (CF, OMIM #219700). Here we describe variants in CA12 encoding carbonic anhydrase XII in two pedigrees exhibiting CF-like phenotypes. Exome sequencing of a white American adult diagnosed with CF due to elevated sweat chloride, recurrent hyponatremia, infantile FTT and lung disease identified deleterious variants in each CA12 gene: c.908-1 G>A in a splice acceptor and a novel frameshift insertion c.859_860insACCT. In an unrelated consanguineous Omani family, two children with elevated sweat chloride, infantile FTT, and recurrent hyponatremia were homozygous for a novel missense variant (p.His121Gln). Deleterious CFTR variants were absent in both pedigrees. CA XII protein was localized apically in human bronchiolar epithelia and basolaterally in the reabsorptive duct of human sweat glands. Respiratory epithelial cell RNA from the adult proband revealed only aberrant CA12 transcripts and in vitro analysis showed greatly reduced CA XII protein. Studies of ion transport across respiratory epithelial cells in vivo and in culture revealed intact CFTR-mediated chloride transport in the adult proband. CA XII protein bearing either p.His121Gln or a previously identified p.Glu143Lys missense variant localized to the basolateral membranes of polarized Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells, but enzyme activity was severely diminished when assayed at physiologic concentrations of extracellular chloride. Our findings indicate that loss of CA XII function should be considered in individuals without CFTR mutations who exhibit CF-like features in the sweat gland and lung. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Loss of carbonic anhydrase XII function in individuals with elevated sweat chloride concentration and pulmonary airway disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Melissa; Vecchio-Pagán, Briana; Sharma, Neeraj; Waheed, Abdul; Li, Xiaopeng; Raraigh, Karen S.; Robbins, Sarah; Han, Sangwoo T.; Franca, Arianna L.; Pellicore, Matthew J.; Evans, Taylor A.; Arcara, Kristin M.; Nguyen, Hien; Luan, Shan; Belchis, Deborah; Hertecant, Jozef; Zabner, Joseph; Sly, William S.; Cutting, Garry R.

    2016-01-01

    Elevated sweat chloride levels, failure to thrive (FTT), and lung disease are characteristic features of cystic fibrosis (CF, OMIM #219700). Here we describe variants in CA12 encoding carbonic anhydrase XII in two pedigrees exhibiting CF-like phenotypes. Exome sequencing of a white American adult diagnosed with CF due to elevated sweat chloride, recurrent hyponatremia, infantile FTT and lung disease identified deleterious variants in each CA12 gene: c.908-1 G>A in a splice acceptor and a novel frameshift insertion c.859_860insACCT. In an unrelated consanguineous Omani family, two children with elevated sweat chloride, infantile FTT, and recurrent hyponatremia were homozygous for a novel missense variant (p.His121Gln). Deleterious CFTR variants were absent in both pedigrees. CA XII protein was localized apically in human bronchiolar epithelia and basolaterally in the reabsorptive duct of human sweat glands. Respiratory epithelial cell RNA from the adult proband revealed only aberrant CA12 transcripts and in vitro analysis showed greatly reduced CA XII protein. Studies of ion transport across respiratory epithelial cells in vivo and in culture revealed intact CFTR-mediated chloride transport in the adult proband. CA XII protein bearing either p.His121Gln or a previously identified p.Glu143Lys missense variant localized to the basolateral membranes of polarized Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells, but enzyme activity was severely diminished when assayed at physiologic concentrations of extracellular chloride. Our findings indicate that loss of CA XII function should be considered in individuals without CFTR mutations who exhibit CF-like features in the sweat gland and lung. PMID:26911677

  13. Salivary gland tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... and neck glands References National Cancer Institute. PDQ salivary gland cancer treatment. Bethesda, MD: National Cancer Institute. Last modified ... and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team. Salivary Gland Cancer Read more Salivary Gland Disorders Read more NIH ...

  14. A curious case of sweating blood.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Saugato; Surana, Trupti; De, Abhishek; Nag, Falguni

    2013-11-01

    Hematohidrosis is a very rare condition in which an individual sweats blood. It may occur in an individual who is suffering from extreme levels of stress. Various causative factors have been suggested like component of systemic disease, vicarious menstruation, excessive exertion, psychogenic, and unknown causes. Fear and intense mental contemplation are the most frequent causes. It may also occur in bleeding disorders. We here report a case where bloody sweat was discharged from the forehead, face, and body episodically in a 12-year-old healthy girl with no bleeding disorder or any other underlying cause. All investigations done were within normal limits, except low intelligent quotient and loss of insight. The patient was given atropine sulphate transdermal patch with marked improvement in severity.

  15. Devices Would Detect Drugs In Sweat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mintz, Fredrick W.; Richards, Gil; Kidwell, David A.; Foster, Conrad; Kern, Roger G.; Nelson, Gregory A.

    1996-01-01

    Proposed devices worn on skin detect such substances as methamphetamine, morphine, tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), and cocaine in wearers' sweat and transmits radio signals in response to computer queries. Called Remote Biochemical Assay Telemetering System (R-BATS), commonly referred to as "drug badge," attached to wearer by use of adhesive wristband. Used for noninvasive monitoring of levels of prescribed medications in hospital and home-care settings and to detect overdoses quickly.

  16. Interindividual variability in sweat electrolyte concentration in marathoners.

    PubMed

    Lara, Beatriz; Gallo-Salazar, César; Puente, Carlos; Areces, Francisco; Salinero, Juan José; Del Coso, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Sodium (Na(+)) intake during exercise aims to replace the Na(+) lost by sweat to avoid electrolyte imbalances, especially in endurance disciplines. However, Na(+) needs can be very different among individuals because of the great inter-individual variability in sweat electrolyte concentration. The aim of this investigation was to determine sweat electrolyte concentration in a large group of marathoners. A total of 157 experienced runners (141 men and 16 women) completed a marathon race (24.4 ± 3.6 °C and 27.7 ± 4.8 % of humidity). During the race, sweat samples were collected by using sweat patches placed on the runners' forearms. Sweat electrolyte concentration was measured by using photoelectric flame photometry. As a group, sweat Na(+) concentration was 42.9 ± 18.7 mmol·L(-1) (minimal-maximal value = 7.0-95.5 mmol·L(-1)), sweat Cl(-) concentration was 32.2 ± 15.6 mmol·L(-1) (7.3-90.6 mmol·L(-1)) and sweat K(+) concentration was 6.0 ± 0.9 mmol·L(-1) (3.1-8.0 mmol·L(-1)). Women presented lower sweat Na(+) (33.9 ± 12.1 vs 44.0 ± 19.1 mmol·L(-1); P = 0.04) and sweat Cl(-) concentrations (22.9 ± 10.5 vs 33.2 ± 15.8 mmol·L(-1); P = 0.01) than men. A 20 % of individuals presented a sweat Na(+) concentration higher than 60 mmol·L(-1) while this threshold was not surpassed by any female marathoner. Sweat electrolyte concentration did not correlate to sweat rate, age, body characteristics, experience or training. Although there was a significant correlation between sweat Na(+) concentration and running pace (r = 0.18; P = 0.03), this association was weak to interpret that sweat Na(+) concentration increased with running pace. The inter-individual variability in sweat electrolyte concentration was not explained by any individual characteristics except for individual running pace and sex. An important portion (20 %) of marathoners might need special sodium intake recommendations due to

  17. Thermal panting in dogs: the lateral nasal gland, a source of water for evaporative cooling.

    PubMed

    Blatt, C M; Taylor, C R; Habal, M B

    1972-09-01

    Two lateral nasal glands appear to provide a large part of the water for evaporative cooling in the panting dog; their function is analogous to that of sweat glands in man. Each gland drains through a single duct which opens about 2 centimeters inside the opening of the nostril. This location may be essential to avoid desiccation of the nasal mucosa during thermal panting. The rate of secretion from one gland increased from 0 to an average of 9.6 g (gland . hour)(-1) as air temperature was increased from 10 degrees to 50 degrees C. Evaporation of the fluid from the paired glands could account for between 19 and 36 percent of the increase in respiratory evaporation associated with thermal panting. The fluid secreted by the gland was hypoosmotic to plasma.

  18. Testing in artificial sweat - Is less more? Comparison of metal release in two different artificial sweat solutions.

    PubMed

    Midander, Klara; Julander, Anneli; Kettelarij, Jolinde; Lidén, Carola

    2016-11-01

    Metal release from materials immersed in artificial sweat can function as a measure of potential skin exposure. Several artificial sweat models exist that, to various degree, mimic realistic conditions. Study objective was to evaluate metal release from previously examined and well characterized materials in two different artificial sweat solutions; a comprehensive sweat model intended for use within research, based on the composition of human sweat; and the artificial sweat, EN1811, intended for testing compliance with the nickel restriction in REACH. The aim was to better understand whether there are advantages using either of the sweat solutions in bio-elution testing of materials. Metal release in two different artificial sweat solutions was compared for discs of a white gold alloy and two hard metals, and a rock drilling insert of tungsten carbide at 1 h, 24 h, 1 week and 1 month. The released amount of metal was analysed by means of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Similar levels of released metals were measured from test materials in the two different artificial sweat solutions. For purposes in relation to legislations, it was concluded that a metal release test using a simple artificial sweat composition may provide results that sufficiently indicate the degree of metal release at skin contact. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Sweat Chlorides in Salt-Deprived Cystic Fibrosis Heterozygotes

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Michael F.

    1965-01-01

    Sweat chlorides of 10 sets of parents of children with cystic fibrosis and 11 controls were studied in an attempt to develop a test for the diagnosis of cystic fibrosis heterozygotes by subjecting both the parents and controls to a low sodium diet and comparing sweat chloride values as the diet progressed. It was hoped that the sweat chloride levels of the parents, the heterozygotes, would remain stationary throughout the diet, since their children, the homozygotes, reveal this finding under similar conditions of salt deprivation. The sweat chloride levels of the controls, because of effects of aldosterone, were expected to decrease steadily from the commencement of the diet to its termination. A decrease in sweat chloride values of similar magnitude was found in both parents and controls as the diet continued. It is concluded that the study of sweat electrolyte levels in salt-deprived subjects is of no value in the diagnosis of cystic fibrosis heterozygotes. PMID:14289142

  20. Sweat iron and zinc losses during prolonged exercise.

    PubMed

    DeRuisseau, Keith C; Cheuvront, Samuel N; Haymes, Emily M; Sharp, Regina G

    2002-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a 2-hour exercise bout on sweat iron and zinc concentrations and losses in males and females. Nine male and 9 female recreational cyclists exercised at approximately 50% VO(2peak) in a temperate environment (Ta = 23 degrees C, RH = 51%). Sweat samples were collected for 15 min during each of four 30-min exercise bouts. No significant differences were observed between males' and females' sweat iron or zinc concentrations or losses. Sweat iron concentrations decreased significantly between 60 and 90 min of exercise. Sweating rates increased significantly from 30 to 60 min and remained constant during the second hour. Sweat iron losses were significantly lower during the second hour (0.042 mg/m2/h) than the first hour of exercise (0.060 mg/m2/h). Sweat zinc concentrations also decreased significantly over the 2-hour exercise bout. Dietary intakes of iron and zinc were not significantly correlated to sweat iron and zinc concentrations. Sweat iron and zinc losses during 2 hours of exercise represented 3% and 1% of the RDA for iron and 9% and 8% of the RDA for zinc for men and women, respectively. These results suggest a possible iron conservation that prevents excessive iron loss during prolonged exercise.

  1. Importance of dynamics of sweating in men during exercise.

    PubMed

    Grucza, R; Hänninen, O

    1990-01-01

    Influence of dynamics of sweating on rectal temperature increase was tested in 3 groups of men performing cycle exercise with intensity of 65, 90 and 120 W, respectively, in 22 degrees C chamber temperature and 30% of relative air humidity. During exercise at 65 and 90 W the subjects wore suits while exercising with intensity of 120 W they wore only shorts. The dynamics of sweating was described by delay in onset of sweating and time constant of the reaction. Wearing caused significant increase in skin humidity and decreased evaporative rate of sweating. Sweat rate during steady state was related to the metabolic rate in naked (r = 0.89, p less than 0.002) as well as in wearing subjects (r = 0.93, p less than 0.01). Delay in onset of sweating was, in average, 5 min with a time constant of 7 min. Both factors showed a tendency to be shorter with increasing work intensity. Mean increase in rectal temperature was proportional to the intensity of exercise although the individual delta Tre correlated well with the dynamics of sweating in naked (r = 0.83, p less than 0.01) and wearing subjects (r = 0.84, p less than 0.01). Since delta Tre was smaller in subjects with shorter inertia time of sweating in response to beginning of exercise at the same intensity it is concluded that the dynamics of sweating can play an important role in limiting body temperature increase in working men.

  2. Sweat testing in addicts under methadone treatment: an Italian experience.

    PubMed

    Fucci, N; De Giovanni, N; Scarlata, S

    2008-01-30

    In the last years the interest in monitoring drug exposure with human sweat as alternative biological fluid, is increasing. Sweat collection is convenient, less invasive and difficult to adulterate compared to traditional specimens. The objective of this study was to determine the excretion profile of methadone and other drugs into human sweat. Pharmscope sweat patches (Medical Europe Diagnostic, Madrid, Spain) were used on heroin abusers under methadone treatment. Sweat patches were applied to 10 heroin addicts and 3 drug free volunteers admitted into the study. Sweat patches were worn for about 1 week; urine, saliva and hair samples were collected at the time of the removal of patches. After the extraction, sweat eluates were directly analyzed by GC/MS for the presence of nicotine, cotinine, caffeine, methadone, EDDP and cocaine. The extracts were subsequently derivatized to detect benzoylecgonine, ecgonine methyl ester, morphine, codeine and 6-acetylmorphine. No false positive results were obtained on the drug free samples. All the patches showed positive results for methadone. Cocaine was detected in two cases. Mainly the parent drug was identified rather than the metabolites. The results obtained show the usefulness of sweat as complementary specimen to saliva and urine providing a longer detection window. Moreover, sweat testing offers the advantage of being a non-invasive means of obtaining information about drug exposure.

  3. Acupuncture for the treatment of paraneoplastic night sweats.

    PubMed

    Ramasamy, Visweswaran

    2018-03-21

    This case report describes acupuncture treatment to manage paraneoplastic night sweating secondary to pancreatic cancer. A 56 year old gentleman with a 2 month history of night sweating responded well over a 10 week course of acupuncture treatment. Acupuncture was selected for symptom management after no success was achieved with pharmacological and conventional managements. The severity of night sweating had reduced from 9/10 to 1/10 on Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) at the end of treatment. This case report suggests that acupuncture has a favourable effect on paraneoplastic night sweating in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer and recommends further research. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Adenolipoma of the skin.

    PubMed

    Del Agua, C; Felipo, F

    2004-10-15

    Adenolipoma of the skin is an unusual variant of lipoma recently described by Hitchcock et al. and characterized by the presence of normal eccrine sweat glands within a lipoma. We report a case and review the literature. A 45-year-old woman presented with a slow-growing, painless nodule on the thigh, clinically considered to be lipoma. Microscopically it comprised an adipose-tissue proliferation with a single eccrine secretory coil and associated duct in the periphery and in the center of the nodule. This benign lesion has been termed adenolipoma because of the presence of adipose tissue and eccrine glands. It probably represents only a histological curiosity in which the eccrine glands are entrapped by the adipose proliferation. Adenolipoma of the skin is a distinct lesion that can occur in the dermis or subcutaneous tissue.

  5. Evaluation of the Megaduct sweat collector for mineral analysis.

    PubMed

    Ely, M R; Ely, B R; Chinevere, T D; Lacher, C P; Lukaski, H C; Cheuvront, S N

    2012-03-01

    Accurate measurement of sweat mineral loss is important for whole body mineral balance estimates and dietary reference intake formulation. Currently, common localized sweat collection methods such as the pouch and patch techniques may be limited by skin encapsulation and/or hidromeiosis, which may alter sweat mineral concentrations. The design of the newly developed Megaduct sweat collector may avoid these possible limitations. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the utility of the Megaduct sweat collector for mineral analysis. Megaduct sweat collectors were affixed to ten volunteers on the final day of a heat acclimation protocol; collection time, sweat volume, and mineral concentrations of calcium, copper, iron, potassium, sodium, and zinc were measured. Megaduct filling required a collection period of 62 ± 3 min due to a small collection surface (22.1 cm(2)). The mineral content of the sweat was 0.3 ± 0.1 mmol L(-1), 1.5 ± 1.5 µmol L(-1), 8.5 ± 2.1 mmol L(-1), 43.2 ± 15.0 mmol L(-1), and 10.1 ± 5.7 µmol L(-1) for Ca, Cu, K, Na, and Zn, respectively. The Megaduct sweat collector appears to avoid skin encapsulation and hidromeiosis, and captures sweat with similar mineral concentrations as reported in the literature for pouches. However, the filling time of the Megaduct (>60 min) may not capture possible changes in sweat mineral concentrations that are documented to occur in as little as 15 to 30 min.

  6. Latherin: A Surfactant Protein of Horse Sweat and Saliva

    PubMed Central

    Beeley, John G.; Bovell, Douglas L.; Lu, Jian R.; Zhao, Xiubo; Cooper, Alan; Kennedy, Malcolm W.

    2009-01-01

    Horses are unusual in producing protein-rich sweat for thermoregulation, a major component of which is latherin, a highly surface-active, non-glycosylated protein. The amino acid sequence of latherin, determined from cDNA analysis, is highly conserved across four geographically dispersed equid species (horse, zebra, onager, ass), and is similar to a family of proteins only found previously in the oral cavity and associated tissues of mammals. Latherin produces a significant reduction in water surface tension at low concentrations (≤1 mg ml−1), and therefore probably acts as a wetting agent to facilitate evaporative cooling through a waterproofed pelt. Neutron reflection experiments indicate that this detergent-like activity is associated with the formation of a dense protein layer, about 10 Å thick, at the air-water interface. However, biophysical characterization (circular dichroism, differential scanning calorimetry) in solution shows that latherin behaves like a typical globular protein, although with unusual intrinsic fluorescence characteristics, suggesting that significant conformational change or unfolding of the protein is required for assembly of the air-water interfacial layer. RT-PCR screening revealed latherin transcripts in horse skin and salivary gland but in no other tissues. Recombinant latherin produced in bacteria was also found to be the target of IgE antibody from horse-allergic subjects. Equids therefore may have adapted an oral/salivary mucosal protein for two purposes peculiar to their lifestyle, namely their need for rapid and efficient heat dissipation and their specialisation for masticating and processing large quantities of dry food material. PMID:19478940

  7. Eccrine porocarcinoma arising in two African American patients: distinct presentations both treated with Mohs micrographic surgery.

    PubMed

    Cowden, Alissa; Dans, Michael; Militello, Giuseppe; Junkins-Hopkins, Jacqueline; Van Voorhees, Abby S

    2006-02-01

    Abstract Background Eccrine porocarcinoma (EPC) is a rare, malignant adnexal tumor that has been reported only three times specifically in African American individuals. Diagnosis and treatment of EPC is important, given the 20% local recurrence and regional metastatic rates. However, no standard of care has been developed to guide effective treatment. Methods We report two distinct clinical presentations of EPC, both in African Americans, and discuss a review of the literature. Results The neoplasms were successfully removed from both patients by Mohs micrographic surgery. Conclusions These two cases illustrate that EPC can have a variety of presentations and can occur in African Americans. Although there is no standard of care for treating EPC, Mohs is becoming a common technique of removing these lesions.

  8. Adrenal Gland Tumors: Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Gland Tumor: Statistics Request Permissions Adrenal Gland Tumor: Statistics Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , 03/ ... primary adrenal gland tumor is very uncommon. Exact statistics are not available for this type of tumor ...

  9. Adrenal Gland Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... stress and has many other important functions. With adrenal gland disorders, your glands make too much or not enough ... born unable to make enough cortisol. Causes of adrenal gland disorders include Genetic mutations Tumors including pheochromocytomas Infections A ...

  10. The effects of heat and exercise on sweat iron loss.

    PubMed

    Waller, M F; Haymes, E M

    1996-02-01

    Arm sweat was collected from nine male and nine female athletes sitting in a hot environment (HR, 40 degrees C) and exercising at 50% VO2max in neutral (NE, 25 degrees C) and hot (HE, 35 degrees C) environments to compare sweat iron concentrations and losses. Whole body sweat rate was determined from weight loss at 30-min intervals for 1 h. Sweat iron concentration was significantly higher during HR and NE than during HE, but was not significantly different between males and females. During exercise, sweat iron concentration decreased significantly from 30 to 60 min. Whole body sweat rates differed significantly across all environments with the highest rate in HE and the lowest in HR. Males lost significantly more sweat during exercise than females, but the difference at rest was not significant. Estimated whole body iron loss was significantly greater during exercise (NE = 0.08 mg.m-2.h-1, HE = 0.077 mg.m-2.h-1) than rest (0.039 mg.m-2.h-1), and the average iron loss was significantly greater in males (0.09 mg.m-2.h-1) than females (0.04 mg.m-2.h-1). Results suggest that the use of resting sweat iron concentration to estimate iron loss for 1 h of exercise in neutral environments is accurate but may overestimate iron loss during exercise in hot environments and during more prolonged exercise.

  11. Salivary gland disease.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Bethan L; Brown, Jackie E; McGurk, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Salivary gland disease covers a wide range of pathological entities, including salivary gland-specific disease, as well as manifestations of systemic diseases. This chapter discusses the recent advances in managing obstructive salivary gland disease, the move from gland excision to gland preservation, the dilemmas in diagnosing and managing tumours of the salivary glands, and the international data collection to understand the aetiology and progression of Sjögren's disease. Copyright 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. The excretion of trace metals in human sweat.

    PubMed

    Cohn, J R; Emmett, E A

    1978-01-01

    The concentrations of zinc, copper, iron, nickel, cadmium, lead, manganese, sodium and chloride in the sweat of six males and three females were determined after collections utilizing a total body washdown technique. From our results, sweat appears to be an important excretory pathway for zinc and copper. The mean concentrations of nickel and cadmium in sweat were higher than those reported for urine, that of lead was similar to urine. The loss of manganese in sweat is significant. Levels of zinc and iron were lower in sweat from females, possibly reflecting compensation for menstrual and other losses. Collections were made in six subjects simultaneously utilizing a total body washdown method and collections from one arm in an occlusive arm-bag. The arm-bag collection method gave higher and more variable results and is not recommended as an indicator of loss from the entire skin surface.

  13. Local excision of the parotid gland in the treatment of Warthin's tumour.

    PubMed

    Yu, G Y; Ma, D Q; Liu, X B; Zhang, M Y; Zhang, Q

    1998-06-01

    The results of local excision of Warthin's tumour in the parotid gland (n = 61) (resection of the tumour together with surrounding normal gland and associated lymph nodes) were compared with those of superficial parotidectomy (n = 88) for incidence of recurrence, duration of operation, and degree of facial deformity. A subgroup of patients in each group were tested for gustatory sweating (iodine starch test) and parotid function (quantitative scintigraphy). Local excision had the following advantages over superficial parotidectomy: shorter operating time, less risk of facial nerve damage, less facial deformity, lower incidence of Frey's syndrome, and better preservation of the function of the parotid gland.

  14. Improved Devices for Collecting Sweat for Chemical Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feedback, Daniel L.; Clarke, Mark S. F.

    2011-01-01

    Improved devices have been proposed for collecting sweat for biochemical analysis - especially for determination of the concentration of Ca2+ ions in sweat as a measure of loss of Ca from bones. Unlike commercially available sweat-collection patches used previously in monitoring osteoporosis and in qualitative screening for some drugs, the proposed devices would not allow evaporation of the volatile chemical components (mostly water) of sweat. Moreover, the proposed devices would be designed to enable determination of the volumes of collected sweat. From these volumes and the quantities of Ca(2+) and/or other analytes as determined by other means summarized below, one could determine the concentrations of the analytes in sweat. A device according to the proposal would be flexible and would be worn like a commercial sweat-collection patch. It would be made of molded polydimethylsiloxane (silicone rubber) or other suitable material having properties that, for the purpose of analyzing sweat, are similar to those of glass. The die for molding the silicone rubber would be fabricated by a combination of lithography and electroplating. The die would reproducibly form, in the silicone rubber, a precisely defined number of capillary channels per unit area, each channel having a precisely defined volume. Optionally, electrodes for measuring the Ca(2+) content of the sweat could be incorporated into the device. The volume of sweat collected in the capillary channels of the device would be determined from (1) the amount of light or radio waves of a given wavelength absorbed by the device and (2) the known geometry of the array of capillary channels. Then, in one of two options, centrifugation would be performed to move the sweat from the capillary tubes to the region containing the electrodes, which would be used to measure the Ca(2+) content by a standard technique. In the other option, centrifugation would be performed to remove the sweat from the device to make the sweat

  15. Improved Devices for Collecting Sweat for Chemical Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feeback, Daniel L.; Clarke, Mark S. F.

    2011-01-01

    Improved devices have been proposed for collecting sweat for biochemical analysis especially for determination of the concentration of Ca2+ ions in sweat as a measure of loss of Ca from bones. Unlike commercially available sweat-collection patches used previously in monitoring osteoporosis and in qualitative screening for some drugs, the proposed devices would not allow evaporation of the volatile chemical components (mostly water) of sweat. Moreover, the proposed devices would be designed to enable determination of the volumes of collected sweat. From these volumes and the quantities of Ca2+ and/or other analytes as determined by other means summarized below, one could determine the concentrations of the analytes in sweat. A device according to the proposal would be flexible and would be worn like a commercial sweat-collection patch. It would be made of molded polydimethylsiloxane (silicone rubber) or other suitable material having properties that, for the purpose of analyzing sweat, are similar to those of glass. The die for molding the silicone rubber would be fabricated by a combination of lithography and electroplating. The die would reproducibly form, in the silicone rubber, a precisely defined number of capillary channels per unit area, each channel having a precisely defined volume. Optionally, electrodes for measuring the Ca2+ content of the sweat could be incorporated into the device. The volume of sweat collected in the capillary channels of the device would be determined from (1) the amount of light or radio waves of a given wavelength absorbed by the device and (2) the known geometry of the array of capillary channels. Then, in one of two options, centrifugation would be performed to move the sweat from the capillary tubes to the region containing the electrodes, which would be used to measure the Ca2+ content by a standard technique. In the other option, centrifugation would be performed to remove the sweat from the device to make the sweat available

  16. Potentiometric sensor for non invasive lactate determination in human sweat.

    PubMed

    Onor, Massimo; Gufoni, Stefano; Lomonaco, Tommaso; Ghimenti, Silvia; Salvo, Pietro; Sorrentino, Fiodor; Bramanti, Emilia

    2017-10-09

    The present work describes a non invasive lactate sensing in sweat during workout. The sensing system is based on a non-equilibrium potentiometric measure performed using disposable, chemically modified, screen printed carbon electrodes (SPCEs) that can be wetted with sweat during the exercise. The potentiometric signal, which is proportional to lactate concentration in sweat, is produced by a redox reaction activated by UV radiation, as opposed to the enzymatic reaction employed in traditional, blood-based measuring devices. The sensing system exhibits chemical selectivity toward lactate with linearity from 1 mM up to 180 mM. The dynamic linear range is suitable for measurement of lactate in sweat, which is more than 10 times concentrated than hematic lactate and reaches more than 100 mM in sweat during workout. The noninvasive measure can be repeated many times during exercise and during the recovery time in order to get personal information on the physiological and training status as well as on the physical performance. The device was successfully applied to several human subjects for the measurement of sweat lactate during prolonged cycling exercise. During the exercise sweat was simultaneously sampled on filter paper and extracted in water, and the lactate was determined by HPLC for method validation. The lactate concentration changes during the exercise reflected the intensity of physical effort. This method has perspectives in many sport disciplines as well as in health care and biomedical area. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Arsenic, Cadmium, Lead, and Mercury in Sweat: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Sears, Margaret E.; Kerr, Kathleen J.; Bray, Riina I.

    2012-01-01

    Arsenic, cadmium, lead, and mercury exposures are ubiquitous. These toxic elements have no physiological benefits, engendering interest in minimizing body burden. The physiological process of sweating has long been regarded as “cleansing” and of low risk. Reports of toxicant levels in sweat were sought in Medline, Embase, Toxline, Biosis, and AMED as well as reference lists and grey literature, from inception to March 22, 2011. Of 122 records identified, 24 were included in evidence synthesis. Populations, and sweat collection methods and concentrations varied widely. In individuals with higher exposure or body burden, sweat generally exceeded plasma or urine concentrations, and dermal could match or surpass urinary daily excretion. Arsenic dermal excretion was severalfold higher in arsenic-exposed individuals than in unexposed controls. Cadmium was more concentrated in sweat than in blood plasma. Sweat lead was associated with high-molecular-weight molecules, and in an interventional study, levels were higher with endurance compared with intensive exercise. Mercury levels normalized with repeated saunas in a case report. Sweating deserves consideration for toxic element detoxification. Research including appropriately sized trials is needed to establish safe, effective therapeutic protocols. PMID:22505948

  18. Flexible nanoporous tunable electrical double layer biosensors for sweat diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Munje, Rujuta D.; Muthukumar, Sriram; Panneer Selvam, Anjan; Prasad, Shalini

    2015-01-01

    An ultra-sensitive and highly specific electrical double layer (EDL) modulated biosensor, using nanoporous flexible substrates for wearable diagnostics is demonstrated with the detection of the stress biomarker cortisol in synthetic and human sweat. Zinc oxide thin film was used as active region in contact with the liquid i.e. synthetic and human sweat containing the biomolecules. Cortisol detection in sweat was accomplished by measuring and quantifying impedance changes due to modulation of the double layer capacitance within the electrical double layer through the application of a low orthogonally directed alternating current (AC) electric field. The EDL formed at the liquid-semiconductor interface was amplified in the presence of the nanoporous flexible substrate allowing for measuring the changes in the alternating current impedance signal due to the antibody-hormone interactions at diagnostically relevant concentrations. High sensitivity of detection of 1 pg/mL or 2.75 pmol cortisol in synthetic sweat and 1 ng/mL in human sweat is demonstrated with these novel biosensors. Specificity in synthetic sweat was demonstrated using a cytokine IL-1β. Cortisol detection in human sweat was demonstrated over a concentration range from 10–200 ng/mL. PMID:26420511

  19. Flexible nanoporous tunable electrical double layer biosensors for sweat diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munje, Rujuta D.; Muthukumar, Sriram; Panneer Selvam, Anjan; Prasad, Shalini

    2015-09-01

    An ultra-sensitive and highly specific electrical double layer (EDL) modulated biosensor, using nanoporous flexible substrates for wearable diagnostics is demonstrated with the detection of the stress biomarker cortisol in synthetic and human sweat. Zinc oxide thin film was used as active region in contact with the liquid i.e. synthetic and human sweat containing the biomolecules. Cortisol detection in sweat was accomplished by measuring and quantifying impedance changes due to modulation of the double layer capacitance within the electrical double layer through the application of a low orthogonally directed alternating current (AC) electric field. The EDL formed at the liquid-semiconductor interface was amplified in the presence of the nanoporous flexible substrate allowing for measuring the changes in the alternating current impedance signal due to the antibody-hormone interactions at diagnostically relevant concentrations. High sensitivity of detection of 1 pg/mL or 2.75 pmol cortisol in synthetic sweat and 1 ng/mL in human sweat is demonstrated with these novel biosensors. Specificity in synthetic sweat was demonstrated using a cytokine IL-1β. Cortisol detection in human sweat was demonstrated over a concentration range from 10-200 ng/mL.

  20. Skin-interfaced systems for sweat collection and analytics.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jungil; Ghaffari, Roozbeh; Baker, Lindsay B; Rogers, John A

    2018-02-01

    Recent interdisciplinary advances in materials, mechanics, and microsystem designs for biocompatible electronics, soft microfluidics, and electrochemical biosensors establish the foundations for emerging classes of thin, skin-interfaced platforms capable of capturing, storing, and performing quantitative, spatiotemporal measurements of sweat chemistry, instantaneous local sweat rate, and total sweat loss. This review summarizes scientific and technical progress in this area and highlights the implications in real time and ambulatory modes of deployment during physical activities across a broad range of contexts in clinical health, physiology research, fitness/wellness, and athletic performance.

  1. Skin-interfaced systems for sweat collection and analytics

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jungil; Ghaffari, Roozbeh; Baker, Lindsay B.; Rogers, John A.

    2018-01-01

    Recent interdisciplinary advances in materials, mechanics, and microsystem designs for biocompatible electronics, soft microfluidics, and electrochemical biosensors establish the foundations for emerging classes of thin, skin-interfaced platforms capable of capturing, storing, and performing quantitative, spatiotemporal measurements of sweat chemistry, instantaneous local sweat rate, and total sweat loss. This review summarizes scientific and technical progress in this area and highlights the implications in real time and ambulatory modes of deployment during physical activities across a broad range of contexts in clinical health, physiology research, fitness/wellness, and athletic performance. PMID:29487915

  2. Adrenal gland disorders.

    PubMed

    Berry, Matthew E

    2009-01-01

    Medical imaging of the adrenal glands is an important aspect of the diagnosis of any adrenal gland disorder. This article discusses the normal anatomy and functions of the adrenal glands, as well as specific adrenal gland disorders and how they are diagnosed and treated. Radiologic technologists need to understand the causes, signs, symptoms, diagnosis and management of disorders that prevent the adrenal glands from functioning properly.

  3. New Findings on the Mechanism of Perspiration Including Aquaporin-5 Water Channel.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Risako

    2016-01-01

    Aquaporin-5 (AQP5) is a member of the water channel protein family. Although AQP5 has been shown to be present in sweat glands, the presence or absence of regulated intracellular translocation of AQP5 in sweat glands remains to be determined. In this article, recent findings on AQP5 in sweat glands are presented. (1) Immunoreactive AQP5 was detected in the apical membranes and the intercellular canaliculi of secretory coils, and in the basolateral membranes of the clear cells in human eccrine sweat glands. (2) AQP5 rapidly concentrated at the apical membranes during sweating in mouse sweat glands. (3) Treatment of human AQP5-expressing Madin-Darby canine kidney cells with calcium ionophore A23187 resulted in a twofold increase in the AQP5 level in the apical membranes within 5 min. (4) Anoctamin-1, a calcium-activated chloride channel was detected in the apical membranes and it completely colocalized with AQP5 in the apical membranes in mouse sweat glands. AQP5 may be involved in sweating and its translocation may help to increase the water permeability of the apical membranes of sweat glands. AQP5 is a potential target molecule for the design of a sweat-modulating drug. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Hydrochromic conjugated polymers for human sweat pore mapping.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joosub; Pyo, Minkyeong; Lee, Sang-hwa; Kim, Jaeyong; Ra, Moonsoo; Kim, Whoi-Yul; Park, Bum Jun; Lee, Chan Woo; Kim, Jong-Man

    2014-04-29

    Hydrochromic materials have been actively investigated in the context of humidity sensing and measuring water contents in organic solvents. Here we report a sensor system that undergoes a brilliant blue-to-red colour transition as well as 'Turn-On' fluorescence upon exposure to water. Introduction of a hygroscopic element into a supramolecularly assembled polydiacetylene results in a hydrochromic conjugated polymer that is rapidly responsive (<20 μs), spin-coatable and inkjet-compatible. Importantly, the hydrochromic sensor is found to be suitable for mapping human sweat pores. The exceedingly small quantities (sub-nanolitre) of water secreted from sweat pores are sufficient to promote an instantaneous colorimetric transition of the polymer. As a result, the sensor can be used to construct a precise map of active sweat pores on fingertips. The sensor technology, developed in this study, has the potential of serving as new method for fingerprint analysis and for the clinical diagnosis of malfunctioning sweat pores.

  5. Plantar Sweating as an Indicator of Lower Risk of Compensatory Sweating after Thoracic Sympathectomy.

    PubMed

    Kargi, Ahmet Bulent

    2017-09-01

    Background  Hyperhidrosis is a dysfunction of the autonomic nervous system that results in regional excessive sweating, mostly in the hands, armpits, and feet. A permanent and effective treatment of hyperhidrosis can be achieved by interruption of the thoracic sympathetic chain with endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy (ETS). However, some side effects, particularly compensatory sweating (CS), are the limitations of this procedure. The mechanism of CS and the associated risk factors are still controversial. The aim of this retrospective study was to determine the relationship with various parameters associated with CS in patients undergoing ETS. Materials and Methods  ETS was performed on a total of 95 patients for palmar hyperhidrosis, axillary hyperhidrosis and facial blushing by the same surgeon. The mean age of the patients was 26.41 (± 7) years, and 54 (56.8%) were males. Palmar hyperhidrosis was present in 54 (56.8%) patients, axillary hyperhidrosis in 33 (34.7%) patients, and facial blushing in 8 (8.5%) patients. Moreover, 38 (40%) patients also had plantar sweating. The severity of CS was rated into three scales as less, moderate, and severe. Results  Regarding the severity of CS, 55 (57.9%) patients had no or less CS, 28 (29.5%) had moderate CS, and 12 (12.6%) patients had severe CS. Higher age group had a significant increased risk of severe CS ( p  = 0.03) ( r  = 0.262). Patients with body mass index (BMI) > 25 kg/m 2 had a statistically significantly increased risk of severe CS ( p  = 0.016). Facial blushing resulted in severe CS in a significantly higher proportion of patients than by palmar and axillary hyperhidrosis ( p  = 0.001). The level of surgery was another important risk factor for CS, with the T2 level showing an increased risk of severe CS compared with T3 level ( p  < 0.001). Furthermore, plantar sweating was inversely and significantly related to the development of CS. Patients with plantar sweating had a

  6. Metabolomics analysis of human sweat collected after moderate exercise.

    PubMed

    Delgado-Povedano, M M; Calderón-Santiago, M; Luque de Castro, M D; Priego-Capote, F

    2018-01-15

    Sweat is a promising biofluid scarcely used in clinical analysis despite its non-invasive sampling. A more frequent clinical use of sweat requires to know its whole composition, especially concerning to non-polar compounds, and the development of analytical strategies for its characterization. The aim of the present study was to compare different sample preparation strategies to maximize the detection of metabolites in sweat from humans collected after practicing moderate exercise. Special emphasis was put on non-polar compounds as they have received scant attention in previous studies dealing with this biofluid. Sample preparation by liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) using extractants with different polarity index was compared to deproteination. Then, derivatization by methoxymation with subsequent silylation was compared to direct analysis of sweat extracts to check the influence of derivatization on the subsequent determination of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). 135 compounds were tentatively identified by combining spectral and retention time information after analysis by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry in high resolution mode (GC-TOF/MS). Lipids, VOCs, benzenoids and other interesting metabolites such as alkaloids and ethanolamines were identified. Among the tested protocols, methyoxiamination plus silylation after LLE with dichloromethane was the best option to obtain a representative snapshot of sweat metabolome collected from different body parts after moderate exercise. Passive and active sweat pools from a cohort of volunteers (n = 6) were compared to detect compositional differences which can be explained by the sampling process and sweating induction. As most of the identified compounds are metabolites involved in key biochemical pathways, this study opens new opportunities to extend the applicability of human sweat as a source of metabolite biomarkers of pathologies or specific processes such as dehydration or nutritional unbalance

  7. Sources of Variation in Sweat Chloride Measurements in Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Collaco, Joseph M; Blackman, Scott M; Raraigh, Karen S; Corvol, Harriet; Rommens, Johanna M; Pace, Rhonda G; Boelle, Pierre-Yves; McGready, John; Sosnay, Patrick R; Strug, Lisa J; Knowles, Michael R; Cutting, Garry R

    2016-12-01

    Expanding the use of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) potentiators and correctors for the treatment of cystic fibrosis (CF) requires precise and accurate biomarkers. Sweat chloride concentration provides an in vivo assessment of CFTR function, but it is unknown the degree to which CFTR mutations account for sweat chloride variation. To estimate potential sources of variation for sweat chloride measurements, including demographic factors, testing variability, recording biases, and CFTR genotype itself. A total of 2,639 sweat chloride measurements were obtained in 1,761 twins/siblings from the CF Twin-Sibling Study, French CF Modifier Gene Study, and Canadian Consortium for Genetic Studies. Variance component estimation was performed by nested mixed modeling. Across the tested CF population as a whole, CFTR gene mutations were found to be the primary determinant of sweat chloride variability (56.1% of variation) with contributions from variation over time (e.g., factors related to testing on different days; 13.8%), environmental factors (e.g., climate, family diet; 13.5%), other residual factors (e.g., test variability; 9.9%), and unique individual factors (e.g., modifier genes, unique exposures; 6.8%) (likelihood ratio test, P < 0.001). Twin analysis suggested that modifier genes did not play a significant role because the heritability estimate was negligible (H 2  = 0; 95% confidence interval, 0.0-0.35). For an individual with CF, variation in sweat chloride was primarily caused by variation over time (58.1%) with the remainder attributable to residual/random factors (41.9%). Variation in the CFTR gene is the predominant cause of sweat chloride variation; most of the non-CFTR variation is caused by testing variability and unique environmental factors. If test precision and accuracy can be improved, sweat chloride measurement could be a valuable biomarker for assessing response to therapies directed at mutant CFTR.

  8. The physiological effects of dehydration caused by sweat loss. [athletes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Israel, S.

    1981-01-01

    The mechanisms of fluid loss in the human body while sweating due to physical exercise are discussed. Trained and untrained persons were examined and compared. Since sweat is hypotonous, a disruption in the hydrosalinic balance occurs; the consequences of this finding, also pertaining to the fluid and electrolytic substitution, are presented. Further explanations on the problem of dehydration refer to reactions of individual organ systems, to alterations in bodily capabilities as well as to questions relating to sex and age.

  9. Expanded Prediction Equations of Human Sweat Loss and Water Needs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    1, 7, 8, 10). It is imperative that improved equations be developed and validated that predict sweating rates over wider thermal environments , with...from) the surrounding surfaces, and K, the rate of conductive heat flux to or from the environment . Radiation exchange. In any thermal environment , a...wide thermal environments by knowledge of only two key variables, Ereq and Emax, which Fig. 1. A: individual sweating rate measurements from data sets

  10. A Simple and Valid Method to Determine Thermoregulatory Sweating Threshold and Sensitivity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    at which sweating increases above some baseline (threshold), and the change in gain or slope of the sweating response once initiated ( sensitiv - ity...methodology for deter- mining sweating threshold temperature and sweating sensitiv - ity values by comparing SReg to the variety of Rater ap- proaches. Data...Brengelmann GL. Control of sweating rate and skin blood flow during exercise. In: Problems with Temperature Regulation During Exercise, edited by Nadel ER. New

  11. Sweat Farm Road Fire in Georgia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Dense plumes of blue-white smoke billowed from the Sweat Farm Road Fire in southern Georgia on April 19, 2007, when the Landsat 5 satellite captured this detailed image. The fire started on April 16, when a tree fell on a power line and, fanned by strong winds, quickly exploded into a major fire. By April 19, the fire had forced officials to close several roads, including U.S. Highway 1, and to evacuate hundreds of people from the perimeter of the city of Waycross, the silver cluster along the top edge of the image. The nearness of the fire is evident in the dark brown, charred land just south of the city. The active fire front is along the south edge of the burned area, where the flames are eating into the dark green hardwood forests, pine plantations, and shrubs in Okefenokee Swamp. Because of the difficult terrain, the fire and the adjoining Big Turnaround Complex fire are expected to burn until significant rain falls, said the morning report issued by the Southern Area Coordination Center on May 4. 'In the long term, the burning of the swamp will ultimately benefit the swamp wilderness habitat, which is a fire-dependent ecosystem,' said a press release issued from the Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge on May 4. Such ecosystems require fire to remain healthy. In the case of southern pine forests, many pine species need fire to remove litter from the ground and release soil nutrients so that new seedlings can grow.

  12. Wearable Sweat Rate Sensors for Human Thermal Comfort Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Sim, Jai Kyoung; Yoon, Sunghyun; Cho, Young-Ho

    2018-01-19

    We propose watch-type sweat rate sensors capable of automatic natural ventilation by integrating miniaturized thermo-pneumatic actuators, and experimentally verify their performances and applicability. Previous sensors using natural ventilation require manual ventilation process or high-power bulky thermo-pneumatic actuators to lift sweat rate detection chambers above skin for continuous measurement. The proposed watch-type sweat rate sensors reduce operation power by minimizing expansion fluid volume to 0.4 ml through heat circuit modeling. The proposed sensors reduce operation power to 12.8% and weight to 47.6% compared to previous portable sensors, operating for 4 hours at 6 V batteries. Human experiment for thermal comfort monitoring is performed by using the proposed sensors having sensitivity of 0.039 (pF/s)/(g/m 2 h) and linearity of 97.9% in human sweat rate range. Average sweat rate difference for each thermal status measured in three subjects shows (32.06 ± 27.19) g/m 2 h in thermal statuses including 'comfortable', 'slightly warm', 'warm', and 'hot'. The proposed sensors thereby can discriminate and compare four stages of thermal status. Sweat rate measurement error of the proposed sensors is less than 10% under air velocity of 1.5 m/s corresponding to human walking speed. The proposed sensors are applicable for wearable and portable use, having potentials for daily thermal comfort monitoring applications.

  13. Thymus Gland Anatomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Thymus Gland, Adult, Anatomy Add to My Pictures View / ... 1500x1200 View Download Large: 3000x2400 View Download Title: Thymus Gland, Adult, Anatomy Description: Anatomy of the thymus ...

  14. Adrenal Gland Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... either benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer. Malignant ones are. Most adrenal gland tumors are ... and may not require treatment. Malignant adrenal gland cancers are uncommon. Types of tumors include Adrenocortical carcinoma - ...

  15. Copper and iron complexes catalytic for oxygen radical reactions in sweat from human athletes.

    PubMed

    Gutteridge, J M; Rowley, D A; Halliwell, B; Cooper, D F; Heeley, D M

    1985-02-15

    Sweat collected from 'explosive' and 'endurance' athletes immediately after exercise contains low molecular mass complexes of copper detectable by their ability to bind to o-phenanthroline. Concentrations of these copper complexes are much greater in arm sweat than in trunk sweat. The iron content of arm sweat, as determined by the ferrozine method, is also greater than that of trunk sweat. However, much of the iron in trunk sweat exists in a low molecular mass form that can bind to the antibiotic bleomycin, whereas the iron in arm sweat does not exist in this form. The metal complexes in human sweat are capable of stimulating the peroxidation of membrane lipids in the presence of ascorbic acid. The physiological significance of the presence of iron and copper complexes in sweat is discussed.

  16. A Real-Time Wireless Sweat Rate Measurement System for Physical Activity Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Brueck, Andrew; Iftekhar, Tashfin; Stannard, Alicja B.; Kaya, Tolga

    2018-01-01

    There has been significant research on the physiology of sweat in the past decade, with one of the main interests being the development of a real-time hydration monitor that utilizes sweat. The contents of sweat have been known for decades; sweat provides significant information on the physiological condition of the human body. However, it is important to know the sweat rate as well, as sweat rate alters the concentration of the sweat constituents, and ultimately affects the accuracy of hydration detection. Towards this goal, a calorimetric based flow-rate detection system was built and tested to determine sweat rate in real time. The proposed sweat rate monitoring system has been validated through both controlled lab experiments (syringe pump) and human trials. An Internet of Things (IoT) platform was embedded, with the sensor using a Simblee board and Raspberry Pi. The overall prototype is capable of sending sweat rate information in real time to either a smartphone or directly to the cloud. Based on a proven theoretical concept, our overall system implementation features a pioneer device that can truly measure the rate of sweat in real time, which was tested and validated on human subjects. Our realization of the real-time sweat rate watch is capable of detecting sweat rates as low as 0.15 µL/min/cm2, with an average error in accuracy of 18% compared to manual sweat rate readings. PMID:29439398

  17. A Real-Time Wireless Sweat Rate Measurement System for Physical Activity Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Brueck, Andrew; Iftekhar, Tashfin; Stannard, Alicja B; Yelamarthi, Kumar; Kaya, Tolga

    2018-02-10

    There has been significant research on the physiology of sweat in the past decade, with one of the main interests being the development of a real-time hydration monitor that utilizes sweat. The contents of sweat have been known for decades; sweat provides significant information on the physiological condition of the human body. However, it is important to know the sweat rate as well, as sweat rate alters the concentration of the sweat constituents, and ultimately affects the accuracy of hydration detection. Towards this goal, a calorimetric based flow-rate detection system was built and tested to determine sweat rate in real time. The proposed sweat rate monitoring system has been validated through both controlled lab experiments (syringe pump) and human trials. An Internet of Things (IoT) platform was embedded, with the sensor using a Simblee board and Raspberry Pi. The overall prototype is capable of sending sweat rate information in real time to either a smartphone or directly to the cloud. Based on a proven theoretical concept, our overall system implementation features a pioneer device that can truly measure the rate of sweat in real time, which was tested and validated on human subjects. Our realization of the real-time sweat rate watch is capable of detecting sweat rates as low as 0.15 µL/min/cm², with an average error in accuracy of 18% compared to manual sweat rate readings.

  18. Heat--sweat--dehydration--rehydration: a praxis oriented approach.

    PubMed

    Brouns, F

    1991-01-01

    In any situation where heat production as a result of physical exercise exceeds heat elimination from the body by radiation and convection, the body will depend on sweat secretion and evaporation for its thermoregulation. Sweat secretion will reach maximal levels at high energy expenditures in the heat but will be limited when exercising in the cold climate. Athletes and their coaches should understand some of the principles of thermoregulation in order to make an adequate decision about optimal fluid and carbohydrate replacement in a specific situation. In general it is advised that the carbohydrate content of rehydration drinks should be low (max 80 g l-1) when sweat loss is maximal, may be intermediate when both carbohydrate availability and moderate dehydration influence performance (up to 110 g l-1), and may be maximal (up to 160 g l-1) when the sweat loss is minimized and carbohydrate is the major determinant of the rate of fatigue development. Sodium should be added to rehydration drinks in order to maximize fluid and carbohydrate absorption. A range of electrolyte values for replacement of sweat induced losses, based on whole body wash down procedure is presented.

  19. Human Elimination of Organochlorine Pesticides: Blood, Urine, and Sweat Study

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Kevin; Birkholz, Detlef

    2016-01-01

    Background. Many individuals have been exposed to organochlorinated pesticides (OCPs) through food, water, air, dermal exposure, and/or vertical transmission. Due to enterohepatic reabsorption and affinity to adipose tissue, OCPs are not efficiently eliminated from the human body and may accrue in tissues. Many epidemiological studies demonstrate significant exposure-disease relationships suggesting OCPs can alter metabolic function and potentially lead to illness. There is limited study of interventions to facilitate OCP elimination from the human body. This study explored the efficacy of induced perspiration as a means to eliminate OCPs. Methods. Blood, urine, and sweat (BUS) were collected from 20 individuals. Analysis of 23 OCPs was performed using dual-column gas chromatography with electron-capture detectors. Results. Various OCPs and metabolites, including DDT, DDE, methoxychlor, endrin, and endosulfan sulfate, were excreted into perspiration. Generally, sweat samples showed more frequent OCP detection than serum or urine analysis. Many OCPs were not readily detected in blood testing while still being excreted and identified in sweat. No direct correlation was found among OCP concentrations in the blood, urine, or sweat compartments. Conclusions. Sweat analysis may be useful in detecting some accrued OCPs not found in regular serum testing. Induced perspiration may be a viable clinical tool for eliminating some OCPs. PMID:27800487

  20. Normal sweat chloride test does not rule out cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Başaran, Abdurrahman Erdem; Karataş-Torun, Nimet; Maslak, İbrahim Cemal; Bingöl, Ayşen; Alper, Özgül M

    2017-01-01

    Başaran AE, Karataş-Torun N, Maslak İC, Bingöl A, Alper ÖM. Normal sweat chloride test does not rule out cystic fibrosis. Turk J Pediatr 2017; 59: 68-70. A 5-month-old patient presented with complaints of fever and cough. He was hospitalized with the diagnosis of bronchopneumonia and pseudo-Bartter's syndrome. Patient was further investigated for diagnosis of cystic fibrosis. The chloride (Cl) level in sweat was determined within the normal range (25.1 mmol/L, 20.3 mmol/L). CFTR (Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Regulator gene; NM_000492.2) genotyping results were positive for p.E92K; p.F1052V mutations. The patient was diagnosed with cystic fibrosis. In our patient, with features of CF and normal sweat test, mutation analysis was helpful for the diagnosis of cystic fibrosis.

  1. Increase in sweating sensitivity by endurance conditioning in man.

    PubMed

    Henane, R; Flandrois, R; Charbonnier, J P

    1977-11-01

    Sweating sensitivity has been evaluated at rest in 10 competitive athletes (cross-country skiers and swimmers). Three sedentary men underwent a 3-mo period of endurance training in a temperate climate, (dry bulb temperature (Tdb): 18 degrees C) and had their sweating sensitivity measured before and after the training period. Mean maximum oxygen uptake (Vo2max, ml.min(-1).kg(-1)) was: skiers: 66.5; swimmers 65.8; sedentary men, pretraining 40.9; posttraining: 48.3 (+18%). Sweat output of athletes under a given stress (passive heating) was markedly higher than that of sedentary men. Skiers exhibited a high level of heat tolerance and were better acclimatized than swimmers, although they had never experienced exposure to heat. The increase in Vo2max of sedentary men was accompanied by 1) an increase in sweating sensitivity with a decrease of body heat storage at steady state (pretraining: 5.4 kJ.kg(-1); posttraining: 3.5 kJ.kg(-1); P less than 0.05); 2) significant shift down the temperature scale with reduced rectal temperature (Tre) for sweat onset; 3) an increase of gain constants of sweating (W.m-2 degrees C(-1) (pretraining: 168; posttraining: 269; gain constant of swimmers: 222). It was suggested that endurance training in cold or temperate conditions with significant increase of Vo2max could act on the thermoregulatory function in a way similar to body heating procedures, such as work in heat, and could contribute to heat acclimatization.

  2. Sweat sodium loss influences serum sodium concentration in a marathon.

    PubMed

    Lara, B; Salinero, J J; Areces, F; Ruiz-Vicente, D; Gallo-Salazar, C; Abián-Vicén, J; Del Coso, J

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this investigation was to determine the influence of sweat electrolyte concentration on body water and electrolyte homeostasis during a marathon. Fifty-one runners completed a marathon race in a warm and dry environment (24.4 ± 3.6 °C). Runners were classified as low-salt sweaters (n = 21; <30 mmol/L of sweat Na + concentration), typical sweaters (n = 20; ≥30 and <60 mmol/L of sweat Na + concentration), and salty sweaters (n = 10; ≥60 mmol/L of sweat Na + concentration). Before and after the race, body mass and a sample of venous blood were obtained. During the race, sweat samples were collected by using sweat patches, and fluid and electrolyte intake were recorded by using self-reported questionnaires. Low-salt, typical and salty sweaters presented similar sweat rates (0.93 ± 0.2, 0.92 ± 0.29, 0.99 ± 0.21 L/h, respectively), body mass changes (-3.0 ± 1.0, -3.3 ± 1.0, -3.2 ± 0.8%), total Na + intake (12.7 ± 8.1, 11.5 ± 9.7, 14.5 ± 16.6 mmol), and fluid intake (1.3 ± 0.8, 1.2 ± 0.8, 1.2 ± 0.6 L) during the race. However, salty sweaters presented lower post-race serum Na + concentration (140.8 ± 1.3 vs 142.5 ± 1.1, 142.4 ± 1.4 mmol/L; P < 0.01) and serum osmolality (297 ± 6 vs 299 ± 5, 301 ± 6 mOsm/kg; P < 0.05) than low-salt and typical sweaters. Sweat electrolyte concentration could influence post-race serum electrolyte concentration in the marathon. However, even the saltiest sweaters did not develop exercise-associated hyponatremia or associated symptoms. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Sources of Variation in Sweat Chloride Measurements in Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Blackman, Scott M.; Raraigh, Karen S.; Corvol, Harriet; Rommens, Johanna M.; Pace, Rhonda G.; Boelle, Pierre-Yves; McGready, John; Sosnay, Patrick R.; Strug, Lisa J.; Knowles, Michael R.; Cutting, Garry R.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale: Expanding the use of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) potentiators and correctors for the treatment of cystic fibrosis (CF) requires precise and accurate biomarkers. Sweat chloride concentration provides an in vivo assessment of CFTR function, but it is unknown the degree to which CFTR mutations account for sweat chloride variation. Objectives: To estimate potential sources of variation for sweat chloride measurements, including demographic factors, testing variability, recording biases, and CFTR genotype itself. Methods: A total of 2,639 sweat chloride measurements were obtained in 1,761 twins/siblings from the CF Twin-Sibling Study, French CF Modifier Gene Study, and Canadian Consortium for Genetic Studies. Variance component estimation was performed by nested mixed modeling. Measurements and Main Results: Across the tested CF population as a whole, CFTR gene mutations were found to be the primary determinant of sweat chloride variability (56.1% of variation) with contributions from variation over time (e.g., factors related to testing on different days; 13.8%), environmental factors (e.g., climate, family diet; 13.5%), other residual factors (e.g., test variability; 9.9%), and unique individual factors (e.g., modifier genes, unique exposures; 6.8%) (likelihood ratio test, P < 0.001). Twin analysis suggested that modifier genes did not play a significant role because the heritability estimate was negligible (H2 = 0; 95% confidence interval, 0.0–0.35). For an individual with CF, variation in sweat chloride was primarily caused by variation over time (58.1%) with the remainder attributable to residual/random factors (41.9%). Conclusions: Variation in the CFTR gene is the predominant cause of sweat chloride variation; most of the non-CFTR variation is caused by testing variability and unique environmental factors. If test precision and accuracy can be improved, sweat chloride measurement could be a valuable biomarker

  4. Sweat chloride as a biomarker of CFTR activity: proof of concept and ivacaftor clinical trial data.

    PubMed

    Accurso, Frank J; Van Goor, Fredrick; Zha, Jiuhong; Stone, Anne J; Dong, Qunming; Ordonez, Claudia L; Rowe, Steven M; Clancy, John Paul; Konstan, Michael W; Hoch, Heather E; Heltshe, Sonya L; Ramsey, Bonnie W; Campbell, Preston W; Ashlock, Melissa A

    2014-03-01

    We examined data from a Phase 2 trial {NCT00457821} of ivacaftor, a CFTR potentiator, in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients with aG551D mutation to evaluate standardized approaches to sweat chloride measurement and to explore the use of sweat chloride and nasal potential difference (NPD) to estimate CFTR activity. Sweat chloride and NPD were secondary endpoints in this placebo-controlled, multicenter trial. Standardization of sweat collection, processing,and analysis was employed for the first time. Sweat chloride and chloride ion transport (NPD) were integrated into a model of CFTR activity. Within-patient sweat chloride determinations showed sufficient precision to detect differences between dose-groups and assess ivacaftor treatment effects. Analysis of changes in sweat chloride and NPD demonstrated that patients treated with ivacaftor achieved CFTR activity equivalent to approximately 35%–40% of normal. Sweat chloride is useful in multicenter trials as a biomarker of CFTR activity and to test the effect of CFTR potentiators.

  5. Salivary gland disorders.

    PubMed

    Mandel, Louis

    2014-11-01

    Patients with salivary gland disease present with certain objective and/or subjective signs. An accurate diagnosis for these patients requires a range of techniques that includes the organized integration of information derived from their history, clinical examination, imaging, serology, and histopathology. This article highlights the signs and symptoms of the salivary gland disorders seen in the Salivary Gland Center, and emphasizes the methodology used to achieve a definitive diagnosis and therapy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. [Medicines and thyroid gland].

    PubMed

    Tajtáková, M

    2012-02-01

    From their primary pharmacological effect, many drugs may also affect the thyroid gland function or the results of thyroid function tests. In addition to the drugs with a known effect on thyroid gland, including thionamides, thyroid hormones, recombinant TSH, iodine, iodide, amiodarone, lithium and heparin, novel compounds, including tyrosin-kinase inhibitors, immunomodulators and cytokines also have adverse effects on the thyroid gland. Novel drugs are then associated with new types of adverse thyroid effects.

  7. Exercise- and methylcholine-induced sweating responses in older and younger men: effect of heat acclimation and aerobic fitness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Y.; Havenith, George; Kenney, W. Larry; Loomis, Joseph L.; Buskirk, Elsworth R.

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine the effects of aging and aerobic fitness on exercise- and methylcholine-induced sweating responses during heat acclimation. Five younger [Y group - age: 23+/-1 (SEM) years; maximal oxygen consumption (V.O2max): 47+/-3 ml.kg-1.min-1], four highly fit older (HO group - 63+/-3 years; 48+/-4 ml.kg-1.min-1) and five normally fit older men (NO group - 67+/-3 years; 30+/-1 ml.kg-1.min-1) who were matched for height, body mass and percentage fat, were heat acclimated by daily cycle exercise ( 35% V.O2max for 90 min) in a hot (43°C, 30% RH) environment for 8 days. The heat acclimation regimen increased performance time, lowered final rectal temperature (Tre) and percentage maximal heart rate (%HRmax), improved thermal comfort and decreased sweat sodium concentration similarly in all groups. Although total body sweating rates (M.sw) during acclimation were significantly greater in the Y and HO groups than in the NO group (P<0.01) (because of the lower absolute workload in the NO group), the M.sw did not change in all groups with the acclimation sessions. Neither were local sweating rates (m.sw) on chest, back, forearm and thigh changed in all groups by the acclimation. The HO group presented greater forearm m.sw (30-90 min) values and the Y group had greater back and thigh m.sw (early in exercise) values, compared to the other groups (P<0.001). In a methylcholine injection test on days immediately before and after the acclimation, the order of sweat output per gland (SGO) on chest, back and thigh was Y>HO>NO, and on the forearm Y=HO>NO. No group differences were observed for activated sweat gland density at any site. The SGO at the respective sites increased in the post-acclimation test regardless of group (P<0.01), but on the thigh the magnitude of the increase was lower in the NO (P<0.02) and HO (P=0.07) groups than in the Y group. These findings suggest that heat tolerance and the improvement with acclimation are little

  8. Effects of stimulation technique, anatomical region and time on human sweat lipid mediator profiles.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Few studies compare sampling protocol effect on sweat composition. Here we evaluate the impact of sweat stimulation mode and site of collection on lipid mediator composition. Sweat from healthy males (n = 7) was collected weekly for three weeks from the volar forearm following either pilocarpine ion...

  9. Relationship between lactate concentrations in active muscle sweat and whole blood.

    PubMed

    Sakharov, D A; Shkurnikov, M U; Vagin, M Yu; Yashina, E I; Karyakin, A A; Tonevitsky, A G

    2010-12-01

    Lactate (lactic acid) concentrations in sweat and venous and capillary blood of athletes were measured before and after exercise of the maximum aerobic power. Correlations between the increment of blood and sweat lactate concentrations were found. Lactate concentrations in the sweat can be used for evaluation of changes in blood lactate levels.

  10. Crying for a Vision: The Native American Sweat Lodge Ceremony as Therapeutic Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrett, Michael Tlanusta; Torres-Rivera, Edil; Brubaker, Michael; Portman, Tarrell Awe Agahe; Brotherton, Dale; West-Olatunji, Cirecie; Conwill, William; Grayshield, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    The Native American sweat lodge ceremony or sweat therapy is being used increasingly in various medical, mental health, correctional, and substance abuse treatment centers serving both Native and non-Native clients. This article explores the sweat lodge ceremony's background, elements of Native American spirituality, origin story, cultural…

  11. Sweat lipid mediator profiling: a non-invasive approach for cutaneous research

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sweat is a complex biological fluid with potential diagnostic value for the investigation of skin disorders. Previous efforts in sweat testing focused on analysis of small molecules and ions for forensic and diagnostic testing, but with advances in analytical and sweat collection techniques, there h...

  12. Parathyroid gland removal

    MedlinePlus

    Removal of parathyroid gland; Parathyroidectomy; Hyperparathyroidism - parathyroidectomy; PTH - parathyroidectomy ... too much parathyroid hormone . This condition is called hyperparathyroidism . It is often caused by a small non- ...

  13. The Sweat Lodge Ceremony in Challenge/Adventure Programming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinn, William J.; Smith, Thomas E.

    This paper advocates the potentials of "sweat lodge" rituals for adventure education programs. Historically, rituals and ceremonies have been instrumental in passing major philosophical and sociological paradigms from one generation to the next. However, there is little theory and research about how ritual and ceremony results in the…

  14. In the Search for the Treatment of Compensatory Sweating

    PubMed Central

    Stefaniak, Tomasz; Cwigon, Marta; Łaski, Dariusz

    2012-01-01

    Background. Despite success of thoracic sympathectomy (ETS), there are patients that develop postoperatively intensive sweating of the trunk. The aim of the study was to present outcomes of three of those methods: removal of the clips, clipping of T6-9, and regional abdomino-lumbar iontophoresis (RALI). Methods. Out of the group of 229 patients treated with ETS, there were 9 that requested removal of the clips, 3 were treated with T6-9 video thoracoscopic block, and 5 were treated with RALI. The intensity of the side effect has been evaluated subjectively (with overall and localized perception of intensity of sweating) and objectively (with gravimetry). Results. The removal of the clips resulted in slow (about 12 months) diminishing of the intensity of sweating of the trunk; but the symptom did not disappear to the degree satisfactory for the patients. The T6-9 block resulted in partial and transient diminishing of the symptom. The iontophoresis resulted in very promising short-term results. Conclusion. Removal of the clips from the sympathetic trunk does not provide resolution of compensatory sweating in 1 year of observation. T6-9 block does not provide remedy for compensatory hyperhidrosis. Regional abdomino-lumbar iontophoresis seems to be very promising, but further research and followup are mandatory. PMID:23028247

  15. Social polymorphism in the sweat beeLasioglossum(Evylaeus)calceatum.

    PubMed

    Davison, P J; Field, J

    Temperate-zone socially polymorphic sweat bees (Hymenoptera: Halictidae) are ideal model systems for elucidating the origins of eusociality, a major evolutionary transition. Bees express either social or solitary behaviour in different parts of their range, and social phenotype typically correlates with season length. Despite their obvious utility, however, socially polymorphic sweat bees have received relatively little attention with respect to understanding the origins of eusociality. Lasioglossum ( Evylaeus ) calceatum is a widespread sweat bee that is thought to be socially polymorphic, with important potential as an experimental model species. We first determined the social phenotype of L. calceatum at three sites located at different latitudes within the UK. We then investigated sociality in detail across two years at the southernmost site. We found that L. calceatum exhibits latitudinal social polymorphism within the UK; bees were solitary at our two northern sites but the majority of nests were social at our southern site. Sociality in the south was characterised by a relatively small mean of two and 3.5 workers per nest in each year, respectively, and a small to medium mean caste-size dimorphism of 6.6 %. Foundresses were smaller in our more northern and high altitude populations. Sociality is clearly less specialised than in some closely related obligately social species but probably more specialied than other polymorphic sweat bees. Our research provides a starting point for future experimental work to investigate mechanisms underlying social polymorphism in L . calceatum .

  16. A liquid cooled garment temperature controller based on sweat rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chambers, A. B.; Blackaby, J. R.

    1972-01-01

    An automatic controller for liquid cooled space suits is reported that utilizes human sweat rate as the primary input signal. The controller is so designed that the coolant inlet temperature is inversely proportional to the subject's latent heat loss as evidenced by evaporative water loss.

  17. Predicting Sweat Loss Response to Exercise, Environment and Clothing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-09

    Response To Exercise, Environment and Clothing 0 U S ARMY RESEARCH INSTITUTE -OF ENVIRONMENTAL MEDICINE Natick, Massachusetts July 1980 Appoved W.r...vapor transfer properties of the clothing and environment . miflationships between metabolic load, environmental conditions, clothing and sweat loss...heat exchange), and with the maximal evaporative capacity of the environment which, as originally defined by Gagge (1937), together with the actual

  18. Cyclooxygenase inhibition does not alter methacholine-induced sweating.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Naoto; McGinn, Ryan; Paull, Gabrielle; Stapleton, Jill M; Meade, Robert D; Kenny, Glen P

    2014-11-01

    Cholinergic agents (e.g., methacholine) induce cutaneous vasodilation and sweating. Reports indicate that either nitric oxide (NO), cyclooxygenase (COX), or both can contribute to cholinergic cutaneous vasodilation. Also, NO is reportedly involved in cholinergic sweating; however, whether COX contributes to cholinergic sweating is unclear. Forearm sweat rate (ventilated capsule) and cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC, laser-Doppler perfusion units/mean arterial pressure) were evaluated in 10 healthy young (24 ± 4 yr) adults (7 men, 3 women) at four skin sites that were continuously perfused via intradermal microdialysis with 1) lactated Ringer (control), 2) 10 mM ketorolac (a nonselective COX inhibitor), 3) 10 mM N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME, a nonselective NO synthase inhibitor), or 4) a combination of 10 mM ketorolac + 10 mM l-NAME. At the four skin sites, methacholine was simultaneously infused in a dose-dependent manner (1, 10, 100, 1,000, 2,000 mM). Relative to the control site, forearm CVC was not influenced by ketorolac throughout the protocol (all P > 0.05), whereas l-NAME and ketorolac + l-NAME reduced forearm CVC at and above 10 mM methacholine (all P < 0.05). Conversely, there was no main effect of treatment site (P = 0.488) and no interaction of methacholine dose and treatment site (P = 0.711) on forearm sweating. Thus forearm sweating (in mg·min(-1)·cm(-2)) from baseline up to the maximal dose of methacholine was not different between the four sites (at 2,000 mM, control 0.50 ± 0.23, ketorolac 0.44 ± 0.23, l-NAME 0.51 ± 0.22, and ketorolac + l-NAME 0.51 ± 0.23). We show that both NO synthase and COX inhibition do not influence cholinergic sweating induced by 1-2,000 mM methacholine. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  19. Cyclooxygenase inhibition does not alter methacholine-induced sweating

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Naoto; McGinn, Ryan; Paull, Gabrielle; Stapleton, Jill M.; Meade, Robert D.

    2014-01-01

    Cholinergic agents (e.g., methacholine) induce cutaneous vasodilation and sweating. Reports indicate that either nitric oxide (NO), cyclooxygenase (COX), or both can contribute to cholinergic cutaneous vasodilation. Also, NO is reportedly involved in cholinergic sweating; however, whether COX contributes to cholinergic sweating is unclear. Forearm sweat rate (ventilated capsule) and cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC, laser-Doppler perfusion units/mean arterial pressure) were evaluated in 10 healthy young (24 ± 4 yr) adults (7 men, 3 women) at four skin sites that were continuously perfused via intradermal microdialysis with 1) lactated Ringer (control), 2) 10 mM ketorolac (a nonselective COX inhibitor), 3) 10 mM NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME, a nonselective NO synthase inhibitor), or 4) a combination of 10 mM ketorolac + 10 mM l-NAME. At the four skin sites, methacholine was simultaneously infused in a dose-dependent manner (1, 10, 100, 1,000, 2,000 mM). Relative to the control site, forearm CVC was not influenced by ketorolac throughout the protocol (all P > 0.05), whereas l-NAME and ketorolac + l-NAME reduced forearm CVC at and above 10 mM methacholine (all P < 0.05). Conversely, there was no main effect of treatment site (P = 0.488) and no interaction of methacholine dose and treatment site (P = 0.711) on forearm sweating. Thus forearm sweating (in mg·min−1·cm−2) from baseline up to the maximal dose of methacholine was not different between the four sites (at 2,000 mM, control 0.50 ± 0.23, ketorolac 0.44 ± 0.23, l-NAME 0.51 ± 0.22, and ketorolac + l-NAME 0.51 ± 0.23). We show that both NO synthase and COX inhibition do not influence cholinergic sweating induced by 1–2,000 mM methacholine. PMID:25213633

  20. DEET insect repellent: effects on thermoregulatory sweating and physiological strain.

    PubMed

    Kenefick, Robert W; Cheuvront, Samuel N; Ely, Brett R; Palombo, Laura J; Sawka, Michael N

    2011-12-01

    Insect repellents (e.g. N,N-diethyl-m-toluamide or DEET) applied to the skin can potentially interfere with sweat production and evaporation, thus increasing physiological strain during exercise-heat stress. The purpose was to determine the impact of 33% DEET lotion on sweating responses, whole body thermoregulation and thermal sensation during walking exercise in the heat. Nine volunteers (2 females, 7 males; 22.1 ± 4.9 years; 176.4 ± 10.0 cm; 79.9 ± 12.9 kg) completed 5 days of heat acclimation (45°C, 20% rh; 545 watts; 100 min/day) and performed three trials: control (CON); DEET applied to forearm (DEET(LOC), 12 cm(2)); and DEET applied to ~13% body surface area (DEET(WB),). Trials consisted of 30 min walking (645 watts) in 40°C, 20% rh environment. Local sweat rate (SR), onset and skin wettedness were measured in DEET(LOC), and heart rate (HR), rectal temperature (T (re)), skin temperature (T (sk)), RPE, and thermal sensations (TS) were measured during DEET(WB). No differences (p > 0.05) were observed between DEET(LOC) versus CON, respectively, for steady state SR (1.89 ± 0.44 vs. 2.09 ± 0.84 mg/cm(2)/min), SR area under the curve (46.9 ± 11.7 vs. 55.0 ± 20.8 mg/cm(2)), sweating onset, or skin wettedness. There were no differences (p > 0.05) in HR, T (re), T (sk), Physiological Strain Index, RPE or TS between DEET(WB) versus CON. DEET did not impact measures of local forearm sweating and when applied according to military doctrine, did not adversely impact physiological responses during exercise-heat stress. DEET can be safely worn during military, occupational and recreational activities in hot, insect infested environments.

  1. Salivary Gland Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... contains antibodies that can kill germs. Salivary gland cancer is a type of head and neck cancer. It is rare. It may not cause any ... pain in your face Doctors diagnose salivary gland cancer using a physical exam, imaging tests, and a ...

  2. Quality of sweat test (ST) based on the proportion of sweat sodium (Na) and sweat chloride (Cl) as diagnostic parameter of cystic fibrosis: are we on the right way?

    PubMed

    Faria, Alethéa Guimarães; Marson, Fernando Augusto Lima; Gomez, Carla Cristina de Souza; Ribeiro, Maria Ângela Gonçalves de Oliveira; Morais, Lucas Brioschi; Servidoni, Maria de Fátima; Bertuzzo, Carmen Sílvia; Sakano, Eulália; Goto, Maura; Paschoal, Ilma Aparecida; Pereira, Mônica Corso; Hessel, Gabriel; Levy, Carlos Emílio; Toro, Adyléia Aparecida Dalbo Contrera; Peixoto, Andressa Oliveira; Simões, Maria Cristina Ribeiro; Lomazi, Elizete Aparecida; Nogueira, Roberto José Negrão; Ribeiro, Antônio Fernando; Ribeiro, José Dirceu

    2016-10-26

    To assess the quality of sweat test (ST) based on the proportion of sweat sodium and sweat chloride as diagnostic parameter of cystic fibrosis (CF). A retrospective study of 5,721 sweat samples and subsequent descriptive analysis were carried out. The test was considered "of good quality" (correct) when: (i) sweat chloride was lower than 60 mEq/L, and sweat sodium was higher than sweat chloride; (ii) sweat chloride was higher than 60 mEq/L, and sweat sodium was lower than sweat chloride. The study included 5,692/5,721 sweat samples of ST which had been requested due to clinical presentations compatible with CF and/or neonatal screenings with altered immunoreactive trypsinogen values. Considering the proportion of sweat sodium and sweat chloride as ST quality parameter, the test was performed correctly in 5,023/5,692 (88.2 %) sweat samples. The sweat chloride test results were grouped into four reference ranges for chloride (i) chloride < 30 mEq/L: 3,651/5,692 (64.1 %); (ii) chloride ≥ 30 mEq/L to < 40 mEq/L: 652/5,692 (11.5 %); (iii) ≥ 40 mEq/L to < 60 mEq/L: 673/5,692 (11.8 %); (iv) ≥ 60 mEq/L: 716/5,692 (12.6 %). In the comparative analysis, there was no association between ST quality and: (i) symptoms to indicate a ST [respiratory (p = 0.084), digestive (p = 0.753), nutritional (p = 0.824), and others (p = 0.136)], (ii) sweat weight (p = 0.416). However, there was a positive association with: (i) gender, (ii) results of ST (p < 0.001), (iii) chloride/sodium ratio (p < 0.001), (iv) subject's age at the time of ST [grouped according to category (p < 0.001) and numerical order (p < 0.001)]. For the subset of 169 patients with CF and two CFTR mutations Class I, II and/or III, in comparative analysis, there was a positive association with: (i) sweat chloride/sodium ratio (p < 0.001), (ii) sweat chloride values (p = 0.047), (iii) subject's age at the time of the ST grouped by

  3. Nabilone for the treatment of paraneoplastic night sweats: a report of four cases.

    PubMed

    Maida, Vincent

    2008-07-01

    ABSTRACT Night sweats are one of many symptoms experienced by patients with advanced cancer. The prevalence of night sweats ranges from 10%-48% in cancer patients. Persistent night sweats tend to decrease quality of life through interference with sleep. A recent study has demonstrated that night sweats occur as part of a symptom pattern, and are associated with the anorexia-cachexia symptom cluster. In addition, night sweats represent one of the symptoms that displays a tendency not to improve as patients with advanced cancer approach end of life. This paper serves to report on the successful management of four patients suffering from persistent paraneoplastic night sweats using the synthetic orally administered cannabinoid nabilone. The four patients had been referred to a regional consultative palliative medicine program and identified night sweats as one of their most significant symptomatic concerns reported on their Edmonton Symptom Assessment System (ESAS) questionnaires.

  4. Sunscreen Use and Sweat Production in Men and Women

    PubMed Central

    Aburto-Corona, Jorge; Aragón-Vargas, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Context: Sunscreen lotions are important to protect the skin during outdoor exercise, but they may interfere with sweating. Objective: To measure the effect of 2 water-resistant sunscreens on local sweat production in men and women exercising in the heat and to compare those effects with the expected inhibition resulting from the use of an antiperspirant. Design: Randomized crossover study. Setting: Exercise in the heat (ambient temperature = 30.2°C ± 0.4°C dry bulb and 58% ± 4.3% relative humidity) in a controlled-environment laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Twenty physically active, apparently healthy college students, 10 men (age = 22.5 ± 2.8 years, height = 1.771 ± 0.069 m, mass = 70.2 ± 11.0 kg) and 10 women (age = 22.2 ± 3.2 years, height = 1.625 ± 0.075 m, mass = 57.7 ± 7.9 kg). Intervention(s): With sweat-collection patches applied to their right and left scapular regions, the participants performed 2 exercise sessions on consecutive days. We assigned skin treatments (antiperspirant; organic chemical sun filter, sunscreen A; inorganic physical sun block, sunscreen B; no lotion) randomly to side and session. Participants pedaled at 79% ± 1% of maximum heart rate for 20 minutes in the heat. Main Outcome Measure(s): Scapular localized sweat rate. Results: No baseline, environmental, or exercise condition was different among skin treatments. Scapular localized sweat rate was lower for the antiperspirant treatment (88.3 μL/min·dm2; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 82.0, 94.7 μL/min·dm2) and the inorganic physical sun block (sunscreen B) treatment (99.3 μL/min·dm2; 95% CI = 93.1, 105.5 μL/min·dm2) than for the organic chemical sun filter (sunscreen A) treatment (114.8 μL/min·dm2; 95% CI = 108.8, 120.6 μL/min·dm2) or the no-lotion treatment (122.6 μL/min·dm2; 95% CI = 116.2, 129.0 μL/min·dm2; P < .01). Conclusions: The inorganic physical sun block, sunscreen B, hindered effective sweating to the same extent as the antiperspirant

  5. Thermoregulation, Fluid Balance, and Sweat Losses in American Football Players.

    PubMed

    Davis, Jon K; Baker, Lindsay B; Barnes, Kelly; Ungaro, Corey; Stofan, John

    2016-10-01

    Numerous studies have reported on the thermoregulation and hydration challenges athletes face in team and individual sports during exercise in the heat. Comparatively less research, however, has been conducted on the American Football player. Therefore, the purpose of this article is to review data collected in laboratory and field studies and discuss the thermoregulation, fluid balance, and sweat losses of American Football players. American Football presents a unique challenge to thermoregulation compared with other sports because of the encapsulating nature of the required protective equipment, large body size of players, and preseason practice occurring during the hottest time of year. Epidemiological studies report disproportionately higher rates of exertional heat illness and heat stroke in American Football compared with other sports. Specifically, larger players (e.g., linemen) are at increased risk for heat ailments compared with smaller players (e.g., backs) because of greater body mass index, increased body fat, lower surface area to body mass ratio, lower aerobic capacity, and the stationary nature of the position, which can reduce heat dissipation. A consistent finding across studies is that larger players exhibit higher sweating rates than smaller players. Mean sweating rates from 1.0 to 2.9 L/h have been reported for college and professional American Football players, with several studies reporting 3.0 L/h or more in some larger players. Sweat sodium concentration of American Football players does not seem to differ from that of athletes in other sports; however, given the high volume of sweat loss, the potential for sodium loss is higher in American Football than in other sports. Despite high sweating rates with American Football players, the observed disturbances in fluid balance have generally been mild (mean body mass loss ≤2 %). The majority of field-based studies have been conducted in the northeastern part of the United States, with limited

  6. Characterization of the effects of the vasopressin V2 receptor on sweating, fluid balance, and performance during exercise

    PubMed Central

    Hummel, Jed; Rider, Brian C.; Verbalis, Joseph G.

    2014-01-01

    A regulatory effect of arginine vasopressin (AVP) on sweat water conservation has been hypothesized but not definitively evaluated. AVP-mediated insertion of sweat and salivary gland aquaporin-5 (AQP5) water channels through activation of the vasopressin type 2 receptor (V2R) remains an attractive, yet unexplored, mechanism that could result in a more concentrated sweat with resultant decreased water loss. Ten runners participated in a double-blind randomized control treadmill trial under three separate pharmacological conditions: a placebo, V2R agonist (0.2 mg desmopressin), or V2R antagonist (30 mg tolvaptan). After a familiarization trial, runners ran for 60 min at 60% of peak speed followed by a performance trial to volitional exhaustion. Outcome variables were collected at three exercise time points: baseline, after the steady-state run, and after the performance run. Body weight losses were <2% across all three trials. Significant pharmacological condition effects were noted for urine osmolality [F = 84.98; P < 0.0001] and urine sodium concentration ([Na+]) [F = 38.9; P < 0.0001], which verified both pharmacological activation and inhibition of the V2R at the kidney collecting duct. Plasma osmolality and [Na+] demonstrated significant exercise (F = 26.0 and F = 11.1; P < 0.0001) and condition (F = 5.1 and F = 3.8; P < 0.05) effects (osmolality and [Na+], respectively). No significant exercise or condition effects were noted for either sweat or salivary [Na+]. Significant exercise effects were noted for plasma [AVP] (F = 22.3; P < 0.0001), peak core temperature (F = 103.3; P < 0.0001), percent body weight change (F = 6.3; P = 0.02), plasma volume change (F = 21.8; P < 0.0001), and thirst rating (F = 78.2; P < 0.0001). Performance time was not altered between conditions (P = 0.80). In summary, AVP acting at V2R does not appear to regulate water losses from body fluids other than renal excretion during exercise. PMID:24944242

  7. A new oil/membrane approach for integrated sweat sampling and sensing: sample volumes reduced from μL's to nL's and reduction of analyte contamination from skin.

    PubMed

    Peng, R; Sonner, Z; Hauke, A; Wilder, E; Kasting, J; Gaillard, T; Swaille, D; Sherman, F; Mao, X; Hagen, J; Murdock, R; Heikenfeld, J

    2016-11-01

    Wearable sweat biosensensing technology has dominantly relied on techniques which place planar-sensors or fluid-capture materials directly onto the skin surface. This 'on-skin' approach can result in sample volumes in the μL regime, due to the roughness of skin and/or due to the presence of hair. Not only does this increase the required sampling time to 10's of minutes or more, but it also increases the time that sweat spends on skin and therefore increases the amount of analyte contamination coming from the skin surface. Reported here is a first demonstration of a new paradigm in sweat sampling and sensing, where sample volumes are reduced from the μL's to nL's regime, and where analyte contamination from skin is reduced or even eliminated. A micro-porous membrane is constructed such that it is porous to sweat only. To complete a working device, first placed onto skin is a cosmetic-grade oil, secondly this membrane, and thirdly the sensors. As a result, spreading of sweat is isolated to only regions above the sweat glands before it reaches the sensors. Best case sampling intervals are on the order of several minutes, and the majority of hydrophilic (low oil solubility) contaminants from the skin surface are blocked. In vitro validation of this new approach is performed with an improved artificial skin including human hair. In vivo tests show strikingly consistent results, and reveal that the oil/membrane is robust enough to even allow horizontal sliding of a sensor.

  8. Body Odor Trait Disgust Sensitivity Predicts Perception of Sweat Biosamples.

    PubMed

    Liuzza, Marco Tullio; Olofsson, Jonas K; Sabiniewicz, Agnieszka; Sorokowska, Agnieszka

    2017-07-01

    Body odors are potent triggers of disgust and regulate social behaviors in many species. The role of olfaction in disgust-associated behaviors has received scant attention in the research literature, in part because olfactory disgust assessments have required laboratory testing with odors. We have devised the "Body Odor Disgust Scale" (BODS) to facilitate research on olfactory disgust. In this study, we evaluated whether individual differences in BODS scores would be associated with the perception of disgust for sweat samples in a laboratory setting. Results show that BODS was a strong predictor of disgust ratings of sweat samples even when controlling for general disgust sensitivity. In contrast, odor intensity ratings were unrelated to BODS scores. Our findings suggest that the BODS scores reflect body odor disgust perception. The BODS scale might facilitate research on olfactory disgust responses and associated behaviors. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. 3D modeling and characterization of a calorimetric flow rate sensor for sweat rate sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iftekhar, Ahmed Tashfin; Ho, Jenny Che-Ting; Mellinger, Axel; Kaya, Tolga

    2017-03-01

    Sweat-based physiological monitoring has been intensively explored in the last decade with the hopes of developing real-time hydration monitoring devices. Although the content of sweat (electrolytes, lactate, urea, etc.) provides significant information about the physiology, it is also very important to know the rate of sweat at the time of sweat content measurements because the sweat rate is known to alter the concentrations of sweat compounds. We developed a calorimetric based flow rate sensor using PolydimethylSiloxane that is suitable for sweat rate applications. Our simple approach on using temperature-based flow rate detection can easily be adapted to multiple sweat collection and analysis devices. Moreover, we have developed a 3D finite element analysis model of the device using COMSOL Multiphysics™ and verified the flow rate measurements. The experiment investigated flow rate values from 0.3 μl/min up to 2.1 ml/min, which covers the human sweat rate range (0.5 μl/min-10 μl/min). The 3D model simulations and analytical model calculations covered an even wider range in order to understand the main physical mechanisms of the device. With a verified 3D model, different environmental heat conditions could be further studied to shed light on the physiology of the sweat rate.

  10. Laboratory performance of sweat conductivity for the screening of cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Greaves, Ronda F; Jolly, Lisa; Massie, John; Scott, Sue; Wiley, Veronica C; Metz, Michael P; Mackay, Richard J

    2018-03-28

    There are several complementary English-language guidelines for the performance of the sweat chloride test. These guidelines also incorporate information for the collection of conductivity samples. However, recommendations for the measurement and reporting of sweat conductivity are less clear than for sweat chloride. The aim of the study was to develop an understanding of the testing and reporting practices of sweat conductivity in Australasian laboratories. A survey specifically directed at conductivity testing was sent to the 12 laboratories registered with the Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia Quality Assurance Programs. Nine (75%) laboratories participated in the survey, seven of whom used Wescor Macroduct® for collecting sweat and the Wescor SWEAT·CHEK™ for conductivity testing, and the remaining two used the Wescor Nanoduct®. There was considerable variation in frequency and staffing for this test. Likewise, criteria about which patients it was inappropriate to test, definitions of adequate collection sweat rate, cutoffs and actions recommended on the basis of the result showed variations between laboratories. Variations in sweat conductivity testing and reporting reflect many of the same issues that were revealed in sweat chloride test audits and have the potential to lead to uncertainty about the result and the proper action in response to the result. We recommend that sweat testing guidelines should include clearer statements about the use of sweat conductivity.

  11. Enlarged prostate gland

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... section, you can see that part of the urethra is encased within the prostate gland. As a ... enlarged prostate crowds its anatomical neighbors, particularly the urethra, causing it to narrow. The narrowed urethra results ...

  12. Adrenal Gland Tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... medical, surgical, radiation, gynecologic, and pediatric oncologists, oncology nurses, physician assistants, social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Adrenal Gland Tumor Introduction Statistics Risk Factors Symptoms and Signs Diagnosis Stages Treatment Options ...

  13. Salivary gland biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... biopsy References Miloro M, Kolokythas A. Diagnosis and management of salivary gland disorders. In: Hupp JR, Ellis E, Tucker MR, eds. Contemporary Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery . 6th ed. St Louis, ...

  14. [Adrenal gland ganglioneuroma].

    PubMed

    Benchekroun, A; Ghadouane, M; Alami, M; Amhahajji, R; Benslimane, L; Faik, M

    2000-09-01

    The authors report a case of adrenal ganglioneuroma in a 25 year old woman. This rare and benign tumor is localized in the adrenal gland in 20% of cases. Considerations on diagnosis, pathogenesis and management are discussed.

  15. Expanded prediction equations of human sweat loss and water needs.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, R R; Cheuvront, S N; Montain, S J; Goodman, D A; Blanchard, L A; Berglund, L G; Sawka, M N

    2009-08-01

    The Institute of Medicine expressed a need for improved sweating rate (msw) prediction models that calculate hourly and daily water needs based on metabolic rate, clothing, and environment. More than 25 years ago, the original Shapiro prediction equation (OSE) was formulated as msw (g.m(-2).h(-1))=27.9.Ereq.(Emax)(-0.455), where Ereq is required evaporative heat loss and Emax is maximum evaporative power of the environment; OSE was developed for a limited set of environments, exposures times, and clothing systems. Recent evidence shows that OSE often overpredicts fluid needs. Our study developed a corrected OSE and a new msw prediction equation by using independent data sets from a wide range of environmental conditions, metabolic rates (rest to sweat losses were carefully measured in 101 volunteers (80 males and 21 females; >500 observations) by using a variety of metabolic rates over a range of environmental conditions (ambient temperature, 15-46 degrees C; water vapor pressure, 0.27-4.45 kPa; wind speed, 0.4-2.5 m/s), clothing, and equipment combinations and durations (2-8 h). Data are expressed as grams per square meter per hour and were analyzed using fuzzy piecewise regression. OSE overpredicted sweating rates (P<0.003) compared with observed msw. Both the correction equation (OSEC), msw=147.exp (0.0012.OSE), and a new piecewise (PW) equation, msw=147+1.527.Ereq-0.87.Emax were derived, compared with OSE, and then cross-validated against independent data (21 males and 9 females; >200 observations). OSEC and PW were more accurate predictors of sweating rate (58 and 65% more accurate, P<0.01) and produced minimal error (standard error estimate<100 g.m(-2).h(-1)) for conditions both within and outside the original OSE domain of validity. The new equations provide for more accurate sweat predictions over a broader range of conditions with applications to public health, military, occupational, and sports

  16. Mammary Gland Development

    PubMed Central

    Macias, Hector

    2012-01-01

    The mammary gland develops through several distinct stages. The first transpires in the embryo as the ectoderm forms a mammary line that resolves into placodes. Regulated by epithelial/mesenchymal interactions, the placodes descend into the underlying mesenchyme and produce the rudimentary ductal structure of the gland present at birth. Subsequent stages of development – pubertal growth, pregnancy, lactation and involution – occur postnatally under the regulation of hormones. Puberty initiates branching morphogenesis, which requires growth hormone and estrogen, as well as IGF1, to create a ductal tree that fills the fat pad. Upon pregnancy the combined actions of progesterone and prolactin generate alveoli, which secrete milk during lactation. Lack of demand for milk at weaning initiates the process of involution whereby the gland is remodeled back to its pre-pregnancy state. These processes require numerous signaling pathways that have distinct regulatory functions at different stages of gland development. Signaling pathways also regulate a specialized subpopulation of mammary stem cells that fuel the dramatic changes in the gland occurring with each pregnancy. Our knowledge of mammary gland development and mammary stem cell biology has significantly contributed to our understanding of breast cancer and has advanced the discovery of therapies to treat this disease. PMID:22844349

  17. Imaging calcium carbonate distribution in human sweat pore in vivo using nonlinear microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xueqin; Gasecka, Alicja; Formanek, Florian; Galey, Jean-Baptiste; Rigneault, Hervé

    2015-03-01

    Nonlinear microscopies, including two-photon excited autofluorescence (TPEF) and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), were used to study individual human sweat pore morphology and topically applied antiperspirant salt penetration inside sweat pore, in vivo on human palms. Sweat pore inner morphology in vivo was imaged up to the depth of 100 μm by TPEF microscopy. The 3D penetration and distribution of "in situ calcium carbonate" (isCC), an antiperspirant salt model, was investigated using CARS microscopy.

  18. Improvement of diabetic autonomic gustatory sweating by botulinum toxin type A.

    PubMed

    Restivo, D A; Lanza, S; Patti, F; Giuffrida, S; Marchese-Ragona, R; Bramanti, P; Palmeri, A

    2002-12-24

    Fourteen diabetic subjects with gustatory sweating were treated by intracutaneous injections of botulinum toxin type A into the affected facial skin areas. In all subjects, sweating (measured by Minor starch iodine test) ceased within 4 days, with the maximal follow-up time lasting 24 weeks. This therapeutic approach, which could be used to reduce the severity of diabetic gustatory sweating, appears to be long lasting, adverse effect free, and minimally invasive.

  19. The prognostic implications of night sweats in two cohorts of older patients.

    PubMed

    Mold, James W; Lawler, Frank

    2010-01-01

    When asked, a significant number of patients report having experienced night sweats. Those who do are more likely to report decreased physical health, mental health, and quality of life. In most cases the cause of night sweats is unknown. We therefore do not know how much to worry about patients with this symptom. The present study examined associations between night sweats and mortality. We used logistic regression and proportional hazards analyses to investigate potential predictors of mortality, including night sweats reported at baseline, among 2 different cohorts of people older than 65 years of age (n = 682 and n = 852) who were followed for an average of 7.3 and 7.5 years, respectively. Patients who reported night sweats were not more likely to die or to die sooner than those who did not report night sweats after controlling for age, sex, body mass index, education, and income. This held true as well for patients who reported more severe night sweats among the cohort in which the severity of night sweats was quantified. Patients who report night sweats on a primary care health history questionnaire do not seem, on average, to be at increased risk for mortality.

  20. Comparison of fabric skins for the simulation of sweating on thermal manikins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koelblen, Barbara; Psikuta, Agnes; Bogdan, Anna; Annaheim, Simon; Rossi, René M.

    2017-09-01

    Sweating is an important thermoregulatory process helping to dissipate heat and, thus, to prevent overheating of the human body. Simulations of human thermo-physiological responses in hot conditions or during exercising are helpful for assessing heat stress; however, realistic sweating simulation and evaporative cooling is needed. To this end, thermal manikins dressed with a tight fabric skin can be used, and the properties of this skin should help human-like sweat evaporation simulation. Four fabrics, i.e., cotton with elastane, polyester, polyamide with elastane, and a skin provided by a manikin manufacturer (Thermetrics) were compared in this study. The moisture management properties of the fabrics have been investigated in basic tests with regard to all phases of sweating relevant for simulating human thermo-physiological responses, namely, onset of sweating, fully developed sweating, and drying. The suitability of the fabrics for standard tests, such as clothing evaporative resistance measurements, was evaluated based on tests corresponding to the middle phase of sweating. Simulations with a head manikin coupled to a thermo-physiological model were performed to evaluate the overall performance of the skins. The results of the study showed that three out of four evaluated fabrics have adequate moisture management properties with regard to the simulation of sweating, which was confirmed in the coupled simulation with the head manikin. The presented tests are helpful for comparing the efficiency of different fabrics to simulate sweat-induced evaporative cooling on thermal manikins.

  1. Relationship of Q-sweat to quantitative sudomotor axon reflex test (QSART) volumes.

    PubMed

    Sletten, David M; Weigand, Stephen D; Low, Phillip A

    2010-02-01

    Q-Sweat, a commercial quantitative sweat measurement system, is modeled on quantitative sudomotor axon reflex testing (QSART). This study investigated the sweat response using Q-Sweat and Mayo-QSART recordings under identical conditions in healthy normal controls. Ninety-four participants were recruited for this study. All participants underwent randomized bilateral QSART recordings over the four standard recording regions. For both men and women, Wilcoxon signed rank tests of paired differences showed significantly lower volumes at each of the four sites for Q-Sweat vs. Mayo-QSART. Linear regression analysis was used to estimate the relationship between Q-Sweat and Mayo-QSART volume measurements separately for men and women. Although there was variability about the regression lines, these fitted models can be used to estimate the expected Mayo-QSART volume given an observed Q-Sweat volume, although it is preferable to use the Q-Sweat normative database directly. We hypothesize that the constant-current generator used in conjunction with Q-Sweat provides a less efficient iontophoresis of acetylcholine than the Mayo-constructed constant-current stimulator and results in lower volumes.

  2. Relationships between micronutrient losses in sweat and blood pressure among heat-exposed steelworkers

    PubMed Central

    TANG, Yong-Mei; WANG, Dao-Gang; LI, Jun; LI, Xing-Hua; WANG, Qian; LIU, Nan; LIU, Wei-Tian; LI, Ying-Xue

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to examine the effect of micronutrient losses through sweat on blood pressure (BP) among heat-exposed steelworkers. A total of 224 heat-exposed male steelworkers from an ironworks facility were evaluated in July 2012. We measured the Wet Bulb Globe Temperature Index to evaluate the level of heat stress in the workplace. We collected sweat from the workers during an eight-hour work, and then we measured the micronutrients in the sweat. We also measured the BP of each worker. The results revealed that vitamin C, potassium, and calcium losses in sweat were positively correlated with systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) blood pressure (all P<0.05). A linear stepwise regression analysis revealed that potassium, and calcium losses in sweat adversely affected SBP and DBP (all P<0.05). An analysis of covariance showed that SBP increased when potassium or calcium losses in sweat were >900 mg, or >100 mg, respectively. Further, DBP increased when potassium or calcium losses in sweat were >600 mg or >130 mg, respectively. Therefore, vitamin C, potassium, and calcium losses in sweat may adversely effect BP. To help steelworkers maintain healthy BP, facilities with high temperatures should try to lower environmental temperatures to reduce vitamin C, potassium, and calcium losses in sweat. Additionally, heat-exposed steelworkers may need to increase their dietary intakes of vitamin C, potassium, and calcium. Further research is needed to confirm these findings and support these recommendations. PMID:27087421

  3. Aquagenic pruritus. Water-induced activation of acetylcholinesterase.

    PubMed

    Bircher, A J; Meier-Ruge, W

    1988-01-01

    Four patients with aquagenic pruritus (AP), one patient with polycythemia rubra vera, one patient with cold urticaria, and three normal control volunteers were studied to better understand the pathophysiology of water-induced itching. Punch biopsy specimens were taken before and after water contact; the specimens were immediately frozen, sectioned, and stained histochemically for acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity. This was localized in the nerve fibers surrounding eccrine sweat glands and was quantified by microspectrophotometry. In AP and polycythemia rubra vera after water exposure a significantly increased AChE activity suggesting acetylcholine release was observed, whereas in the patient with cold urticaria and the controls, a significant decrease was noted. Two related patients with AP had an inherited abnormality of serum cholinesterase, which, however, had no obvious correlation with their particular disease. The proof of AChE activation might support the clinical diagnosis and indicate a hypothetical involvement of eccrine sweat glands in the pathogenesis of AP.

  4. A wearable multisensing patch for continuous sweat monitoring.

    PubMed

    Anastasova, Salzitsa; Crewther, Blair; Bembnowicz, Pawel; Curto, Vincenzo; Ip, Henry Md; Rosa, Bruno; Yang, Guang-Zhong

    2017-07-15

    In sport, exercise and healthcare settings, there is a need for continuous, non-invasive monitoring of biomarkers to assess human performance, health and wellbeing. Here we report the development of a flexible microfluidic platform with fully integrated sensing for on-body testing of human sweat. The system can simultaneously and selectively measure metabolite (e.g. lactate) and electrolytes (e.g. pH, sodium) together with temperature sensing for internal calibration. The construction of the platform is designed such that continuous flow of sweat can pass through an array of flexible microneedle type of sensors (50µm diameter) incorporated in a microfluidic channel. Potentiometric sodium ion sensors were developed using a polyvinyl chloride (PVC) functional membrane deposited on an electrochemically deposited internal layer of Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) polymer. The pH sensing layer is based on a highly sensitive membrane of iridium oxide (IrOx). The amperometric-based lactate sensor consists of doped enzymes deposited on top of a semipermeable copolymer membrane and outer polyurethane layers. Real-time data were collected from human subjects during cycle ergometry and treadmill running. A detailed comparison of sodium, lactate and cortisol from saliva is reported, demonstrating the potential of the multi-sensing platform for tracking these outcomes. In summary, a fully integrated sensor for continuous, simultaneous and selective measurement of sweat metabolites, electrolytes and temperature was achieved using a flexible microfluidic platform. This system can also transmit information wirelessly for ease of collection and storage, with the potential for real-time data analytics. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of local cooling on sweating rate and cold sensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawshaw, L. I.; Nadel, E. R.; Stolwijk, J. A. J.; Stamford, B. A.

    1975-01-01

    Subjects resting in a 39 C environment were stimulated in different skin regions with a water-cooled thermode. Results indicate that cooling different body regions produces generally equivalent decreases in sweating rate and increases in cold sensation, with the forehead showing a much greater sensitivity per unit area and temperature decrease than other areas. The high thermal sensitivity of the face may have evolved when it was the thinnest-furred area of the body; today's clothing habits have reestablished the importance of the face in the regulation of body temperature.

  6. Evaluating performance in sweat testing in medical biochemistry laboratories in Croatia

    PubMed Central

    Aralica, Merica; Krleza, Jasna Lenicek

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Sweat test has a diagnostic role in evaluation of cystic fibrosis. Its performance includes sweat stimulation, collection and analysis. All listed may be sources of inconsistencies in everyday practice. The aim of this study was an evaluation of external quality assessment (EQA) of sweat chloride measurement including sweat test performance in medical biochemistry laboratories in Croatia. Materials and methods EQA for sweat chloride measurement was provided by Croatian Centre for Quality Assessment in Laboratory Medicine (CROQALM) in five consecutive exercises to medical biochemistry laboratories (MBL) that offered sweat testing. A questionnaire regarding all phases of testing was mailed to involved MBL (N = 10). Survey results were compared to current guidelines for sweat test performance. Results Reported results of EQA in 2015 exercises showed coefficients of variation (CV) from 28.9%, 29.0% to 35.3%, respectively. An introduction of uniform sweat chloride measurement protocol resulted in CV of 15.5% and 14.7% reported in following two exercises in 2016. All MBL included in this study replied to the questionnaire. Results reported by MBL indicated: lack of patient information policy (7/10), use of unacceptable electrodes (6/9), misuse of minimum of acceptable sweat weight (6/9), lack of internal quality assessment (5/9) and recommended reference ranges (5/9 and 4/9). Agreements to guidelines were found in approach to unsuitable patients (9/10) and sweat collection (8/9). Conclusion Presented results indicate major weak points of current practice in sweat test performance in Croatian MBL and stress the need for its standardization on a national level. PMID:28392735

  7. Evaluating performance in sweat testing in medical biochemistry laboratories in Croatia.

    PubMed

    Aralica, Merica; Krleza, Jasna Lenicek

    2017-02-15

    Sweat test has a diagnostic role in evaluation of cystic fibrosis. Its performance includes sweat stimulation, collection and analysis. All listed may be sources of inconsistencies in everyday practice. The aim of this study was an evaluation of external quality assessment (EQA) of sweat chloride measurement including sweat test performance in medical biochemistry laboratories in Croatia. EQA for sweat chloride measurement was provided by Croatian Centre for Quality Assessment in Laboratory Medicine (CROQALM) in five consecutive exercises to medical biochemistry laboratories (MBL) that offered sweat testing. A questionnaire regarding all phases of testing was mailed to involved MBL (N = 10). Survey results were compared to current guidelines for sweat test performance. Reported results of EQA in 2015 exercises showed coefficients of variation (CV) from 28.9%, 29.0% to 35.3%, respectively. An introduction of uniform sweat chloride measurement protocol resulted in CV of 15.5% and 14.7% reported in following two exercises in 2016. All MBL included in this study replied to the questionnaire. Results reported by MBL indicated: lack of patient information policy (7/10), use of unacceptable electrodes (6/9), misuse of minimum of acceptable sweat weight (6/9), lack of internal quality assessment (5/9) and recommended reference ranges (5/9 and 4/9). Agreements to guidelines were found in approach to unsuitable patients (9/10) and sweat collection (8/9). Presented results indicate major weak points of current practice in sweat test performance in Croatian MBL and stress the need for its standardization on a national level.

  8. Dermal Influence on Epidermal Resurfacing during the Repair of Split Thickness Wounds.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-08-15

    blood vessels and hair follicles (4). The appendages of human skin are the hair follicles and their associated sebaceous glands, the eccrine sweat...skin is very similar to human skin, with respect to relative thicknesses epidermis and dermis, relative sparsity of hair and the presence of a layer...metoxyfluorane (3%, open mask). The skin on the back was prepared for excision as follows: Hair was as removed with fine barber’s clippers and a razor. The skin

  9. [The skin and the endocrine system].

    PubMed

    Valdés-Rodríguez, Rodrigo; Torres-Álvarez, Bertha; González-Muro, Jorge; Almeda-Valdés, Paloma

    2012-01-01

    The skin is an organ closely related to the endocrine system. The endocrine system has an important role in the skin development and its normal physiology. Skin, pilosebaceous unit, eccrine, and apocrine sweat glands have hormonal receptors and are targets of hormones. On the other hand, the skin synthesizes a variety of hormones and thus it may be considered as an endocrine organ. This article is an overview of the effects of some hormones on the skin.

  10. Heat Tolerance and the Peripheral Effects of Anticholinergics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-30

    devised for graded stimulation and inhibition of eccrine sweat glands with the cholinergic agonist acetyl-beta- methacholine C1 (MCh) and the antagonists... methacholine (mecholyl) are prepared at a concentration of 20 mM in twice-distilled, deionized, bacteria-free water (Sigma Chemical Company, St. Louis, MO...4 -- .2 .16 .40 1.0 2.5 6.3 16 40 100 percent methacholine cations in iontophoresis solution (logarithmic scale) Figure 15. The effect of acclimation

  11. Botulinum A exotoxin in cosmetic dermatology.

    PubMed

    Markey, A C

    2000-05-01

    Botulinum A exotoxin, a neurotoxin produced by the bacterium Clostridium botulinum, is now being used by cosmetically oriented specialists for treatment of a large variety of movement associated wrinkles on the face and neck. This form of temporary chemical denervation compliments the cosmetic practitioner's armamentarium alongside resurfacing and tissue augmentation. Additionally, the use of Botulinum toxin to block sympathetic innervation of eccrine sweat glands is proving a valuable treatment of hyperhidrosis of the axillae, palms and soles.

  12. Stretchable wireless system for sweat pH monitoring.

    PubMed

    Dang, Wenting; Manjakkal, Libu; Navaraj, William Taube; Lorenzelli, Leandro; Vinciguerra, Vincenzo; Dahiya, Ravinder

    2018-06-01

    Sensor-laden wearable systems that are capable of providing continuous measurement of key physiological parameters coupled with data storage, drug delivery and feedback therapy have attracted huge interest. Here we report a stretchable wireless system for sweat pH monitoring, which is able to withstand up to 53% uniaxial strain and more than 500 cycles to 30% strain. The stretchability of the pH sensor patch is provided by a pair of serpentine-shaped stretchable interconnects. The pH sensing electrode is made of graphite-polyurethane composite, which is suitable for biosensor application. The sensing patch validated through in-depth electrochemical studies, exhibits a pH sensitivity of 11.13 ± 5.8 mV/pH with a maximum response time of 8 s. Interference study of ions and analyte (Na + , K + and glucose) in test solutions shows negligible influence on the pH sensor performance. The pH data can be wirelessly and continuously transmitted to smartphone through a stretchable radio-frequency-identification antenna, of which the radiating performance is stable under 20% strain, as proved by vector network analyzer measurement. To evaluate the full system, the pH value of a human sweat equivalent solution has been measured and wirelessly transmitted to a custom-developed smart phone App. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Responses of Human Neonates to Highly Diluted Odorants from Sweat.

    PubMed

    Loos, Helene M; Doucet, Sébastien; Védrines, Fanny; Sharapa, Constanze; Soussignan, Robert; Durand, Karine; Sagot, Paul; Buettner, Andrea; Schaal, Benoist

    2017-01-01

    Conjugated forms of odorants contributing to sweat odor occur not only in human sweat but also in amniotic fluid, colostrum, and milk. However, it is unclear whether the released odorants are detected and hedonically discriminated by human newborns. To investigate this issue, we administered highly diluted solutions of (R)/(S)-3-methyl-3-sulfanylhexan-1-ol (MSH), (R)/(S)-3-sulfanylhexan-1-ol (SH), (E)/(Z)-3-methylhex-2-enoic acid (3M2H), and (R)/(S)-3-hydroxy-3-methylhexanoic acid (HMHA) to 3-d-old infants while their respiratory rate and oro-facial movements were recorded. Adult sensitivity to these odorants was assessed via triangle tests. Whereas no neonatal stimulus-specific response was found for respiratory rate, oro-facial reactivity indicated orthonasal detection of MSH and SH by male neonates, and of HMHA by the whole group of neonates. Dependent on the dilution of odorants, newborns evinced neutral responses or longer negative oro-facial expressions compared with the reference stimuli. Finally, newborns appeared to be more sensitive to the target odorants than did adults.

  14. Corrosion behavior of nickel-containing alloys in artificial sweat.

    PubMed

    Randin, J P

    1988-07-01

    The corrosion resistance of various nickel-containing alloys was measured in artificial sweat (perspiration) using the Tafel extrapolation method. It was found that Ni, CuNi 25 (coin alloy), NiAl (colored intermetallic compounds), WC + Ni (hard metal), white gold (jewelry alloy), FN42 and Nilo Alby K (controlled expansion alloys), and NiP (electroless nickel coating) are in an active state and dissolve readily in oxygenated artificial sweat. By contrast, austenitic stainless steels, TiC + Mo2C + Ni (hard metal), NiTi (shape-memory alloy), Hastelloy X (superalloy), Phydur (precipitation hardening alloy), PdNi and SnNi (nickel-containing coatings) are in a passive state but may pit under certain conditions. Cobalt, Cr, Ti, and some of their alloys were also investigated for the purpose of comparison. Cobalt and its alloys have poor corrosion resistance except for Stellite 20. Chromium and high-chromium ferritic stainless steels have a high pitting potential but the latter are susceptible to crevice corrosion. Ti has a pitting potential greater than 3 V. Comparison between the in vitro measurements of the corrosion rate of nickel-based alloys and the clinical observation of the occurrence of contact dermatitis is discussed.

  15. Nickel release from nickel particles in artificial sweat.

    PubMed

    Midander, Klara; Pan, Jinshan; Wallinder, Inger Odnevall; Heim, Katherine; Leygraf, Christofer

    2007-06-01

    Nickel is widely used in a broad range of products, primarily made of alloys, used by humans on a daily basis. Previous assessments have shown that skin contact with some such products may cause nickel allergic contact dermatitis, induced by the release of nickel. However, data on nickel release from small nickel particles in artificial sweat for assessment of potential risks of workers in nickel-producing and nickel-using facilities are not available. The objective of this study was to fill this knowledge gap by determining nickel release from fine nickel powder ( approximately 4 microm diameter) of different loadings varying from 0.1 to 5 mg/cm(2), when immersed in artificial sweat. The amount of nickel released increased with increasing particle loading, whereas the highest release rate per surface area of particles was observed for the medium particle loading, 1 mg/cm(2), at current experimental conditions. All particle loadings showed time-dependent release rates, reaching a relative steady-state level of less than 0.1 microg/cm(2)/hr after 12 hr of immersion, whereby less than 0.5% of the nickel particle loading was released. Nickel release from particles was influenced by the surface composition, the active surface area for corrosion, particle size, and loading.

  16. Immunological multimetal deposition for rapid visualization of sweat fingerprints.

    PubMed

    He, Yayun; Xu, Linru; Zhu, Yu; Wei, Qianhui; Zhang, Meiqin; Su, Bin

    2014-11-10

    A simple method termed immunological multimetal deposition (iMMD) was developed for rapid visualization of sweat fingerprints with bare eyes, by combining the conventional MMD with the immunoassay technique. In this approach, antibody-conjugated gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were used to specifically interact with the corresponding antigens in the fingerprint residue. The AuNPs serve as the nucleation sites for autometallographic deposition of silver particles from the silver staining solution, generating a dark ridge pattern for visual detection. Using fingerprints inked with human immunoglobulin G (hIgG), we obtained the optimal formulation of iMMD, which was then successfully applied to visualize sweat fingerprints through the detection of two secreted polypeptides, epidermal growth factor and lysozyme. In comparison with the conventional MMD, iMMD is faster and can provide additional information than just identification. Moreover, iMMD is facile and does not need expensive instruments. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Rabbit submandibular salivary gland replantation.

    PubMed

    Almansoori, Akram A; Khentii, Namuun; Hei, Wei-Hong; Seo, Nari; Lee, Sung-Ho; Kim, Soung Min; Lee, Jong Ho

    2017-10-01

    To test the feasibility of submandibular salivary gland (SMG) replantation techniques and the survival of the replanted glands. Such a study can provide a rationale for later allotransplantation procedures, along with implementation of conventional and advanced immunosuppression therapy. Six SMG replantations were performed in New Zealand white rabbits. One week postoperatively, 99m Tc scintigraphy was performed and the uptake ratio and salivary excretion fraction were calculated. Two to four weeks later, submandibular glands were excised, fixed, and stained with H&E for histomorphometric evaluation. Intraoperatively, all glands showed patent blood perfusion except gland 5. Positive tracer uptake and saliva excretion were documented by scintigraphy. On excision, all of the glands except glands 4 and 5 looked viable, with a red color and patent pedicles. Gland 4 was infected and filled with creamy pus, while gland 5 looked pale and necrotic. Histologically, glands 1, 2, 3, and 6 had preserved normal glandular tissue with slight variations from the contralateral normal glands, as their parenchyma was composed of mildly atrophic acini. Four out of six replanted SMGs successfully survived. The glands maintained good viability and function. Such success depends on safe harvesting, short anastomosis time, and strict control of infection.

  18. Anatomy of the thymus gland.

    PubMed

    Safieddine, Najib; Keshavjee, Shaf

    2011-05-01

    In the case of the thymus gland, the most common indications for resection are myasthenia gravis or thymoma. The consistency and appearance of the thymus gland make it difficult at times to discern from mediastinal fatty tissues. Having a clear understanding of the anatomy and the relationship of the gland to adjacent structures is important. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Relationship between osmotic pressure of the blood and secretion of sweat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montuori, A.

    1978-01-01

    Experiments with cats show that the thermic secretion of sweat represents a specific case of a general law: The central nervous apparatus that controls the secretion of sweat begins to function when the osmotic pressure of the blood drops below normal.

  20. The detection of cortisol in human sweat: implications for measurement of cortisol in hair.

    PubMed

    Russell, Evan; Koren, Gideon; Rieder, Michael; Van Uum, Stan H M

    2014-02-01

    Hair cortisol analysis has been shown to be an effective measure of chronic stress. Cortisol is assumed to incorporate into hair via serum, sebum, and sweat sources; however, the extent to which sweat contributes to hair cortisol content is unknown. Sweat and saliva samples were collected from 17 subjects after a period of intensive exercise and analyzed by salivary enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Subsequently, an in vitro test on exposure of hair to hydrocortisone was conducted. Residual hair samples were immersed in a 50-ng/mL hydrocortisone solution for periods lasting 15 minutes to 24 hours, followed by a wash or no-wash condition. Hair cortisol content was determined using our modified protocol for a salivary ELISA. Postexercise control sweat cortisol concentrations ranged from 8.16 to 141.7 ng/mL and correlated significantly with the log-transformed time of day. Sweat cortisol levels significantly correlated with salivary cortisol concentrations. In vitro hair exposure to a 50-ng/mL hydrocortisone solution (mimicking sweat) for 60 minutes or more resulted in significantly increased hair cortisol concentrations. Washing with isopropanol did not affect immersion-increased hair cortisol concentrations. Human sweat contains cortisol in concentrations comparable with salivary cortisol levels. This study suggests that perfuse sweating after intense exercise may increase cortisol concentrations detected in hair. This increase likely cannot be effectively decreased with conventional washing procedures and should be considered carefully in studies using hair cortisol as a biomarker of chronic stress.

  1. Biological Variation of Chloride and Sodium in Sweat Obtained by Pilocarpine Iontophoresis in Adults: How Sure are You About Sweat Test Results?

    PubMed

    Willems, Philippe; Weekx, Steven; Meskal, Anissa; Schouwers, Sofie

    2017-04-01

    The measurement of chloride and sodium concentrations in sweat is an important test for the diagnosis of cystic fibrosis (CF). The aim of this study was to assess the analytical variation (CV A ) and within-subject (CV I ) and between-subject (CV G ) biological variation of chloride and sodium concentrations in sweat, collected by pilocarpine iontophoresis and to determine their effect on the clinical interpretation of sweat test results. Twelve Caucasian adults (six male and six female) without symptoms suggestive for CF and with a mean age of 41 years (range 28-59) were included in the study. At least eight samples of sweat were collected from each individual by pilocarpine iontophoresis. Chloride and sodium concentrations were measured in duplicate for each sample using ion selective electrodes. After the removal of outliers, the CV A , CV I , and CV G of chloride and sodium were determined, and their impact on measurement uncertainty and reference change value were calculated. The CV A , CV I , and CV G of chloride in sweat samples were 6.5, 17.7, and 47.2%, respectively. The CV A , CV I , and CV G of sodium sweat samples were 6.0, 17.5, and 42.6%, respectively. Our study indicates that sweat chloride and sodium concentration results must be interpreted with great care. Different components of variation, particularly the biological variations, have a considerable impact on the interpretation of these results. If no pre-analytical, analytical, or post-analytical errors are suspected, repeated sweat testing to confirm first-measurement results might not be desirable.

  2. Thyroid gland removal - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... 30. Read More Goiter - simple Hyperthyroidism Hypothyroidism Thyroid cancer Thyroid gland removal Thyroid nodule Patient Instructions Surgical wound ... MD, FACS, general surgery practice specializing in breast cancer, Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle, WA. Also ... Diseases Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., ...

  3. Canine mammary gland tumors.

    PubMed

    Sorenmo, Karin

    2003-05-01

    The National Consensus Group recommends that all women with tumors larger than 1 cm be offered chemotherapy regardless of tumor histology of lymph node status. This recommendation is to ensure that everyone at risk for failing, even though the risk may be low in women with relatively small tumors and favorable histology, has a choice and receives the benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy. This type of treatment recommendation may also be made in dogs based on recognized, well-accepted prognostic factors such as tumor size, stage, type, and histologic differentiation. Based on the limited clinical information available in veterinary medicine, the drugs that are effective in human breast cancer, such as cyclophosphamide, 5-fluorouracil, and doxorubicin, may also have a role in the treatment of malignant mammary gland tumors in dogs. Randomized prospective studies are needed, however, to evaluate the efficacy of chemotherapy in dogs with high-risk mammary gland tumors and to determine which drugs and protocols are the most efficacious. Until such studies are performed, the treatment of canine mammary gland tumors will be based on the individual oncologist's understanding of tumor biology, experience, interpretation of the available studies, and a little bit of gut-feeling. Table 2 is a proposal for treatment guidelines for malignant canine mammary gland tumors according to established prognostic factors, results from published veterinary studies, and current recommendations for breast cancer treatment in women.

  4. An estimation of mineral losses through arm sweat of preadolescent children.

    PubMed

    Harrison, M E; Walls, C; Korslund, M K; Ritchey, S J

    1976-08-01

    Balance studies were conducted to determine the effects of three levels of nitrogen intake on the loss of nitrogen through sweat in preadolescent boys and girls. During the studies, the losses of calcium, iron, magnesium, manganese, potassium, sodium, and zinc were determined in the arm sweat of the subjects. Sweat from the forearm was collected in a polyethylene bag for 1 hr on three different occasions. Using the concentrations of nitrogen in the arm bag and in the whole body collection and the concentration of minerals in the arm bag, the total body loss of minerals were estimated. Losses of minerals through sweat, expressed as a percentage of intake, ranged from 0.12 to 1.10%. Under conditions of these studies, sweat losses of the essential minerals were not a significant factor in estimating total losses.

  5. Treatment of focal axillary hyperhidrosis using a long-pulsed Nd:YAG 1064 nm laser at hair reduction settings.

    PubMed

    Letada, Philip R; Landers, John T; Uebelhoer, Nathan S; Shumaker, Peter R

    2012-01-01

    Axillary hyperhidrosis is a rather common idiopathic disorder of the eccrine sweat glands, which can interfere with daily activities and cause significant social distress. The effects of 1064 nm laser hair reduction on sweat production in a pilot study in patients with focal axillary hyperhidrosis are described. In a prospective, case-controlled, randomized pilot study, one axilla from six different subjects with axillary hyperhidrosis was treated with monthly laser hair reduction sessions using the 1064 nm Nd:YAG laser at typical settings. The contralateral axilla acted as a control. Subjects were asked to subjectively classify improvement of axillary sweating using a Global Assessment Questionnaire (GAQ) weekly after each treatment. Qualitative evaluation of sweating was also performed using a modified starch iodine test monthly after each treatment. In addition, prior to the first treatment and at one month following the final treatment, a punch biopsy was performed on the treatment axilla to assess for histologic changes to the eccrine gland and surrounding structures. Statistically significant improvements in subjective ratings of sweating using the GAQ compared to baseline were observed. Objective improvements in sweating with modified starch iodine testing comparing treated versus non-treated axillae were also seen for at least nine months in selected subjects. No significant differences in pre- and post-treatment biopsies were noted on routine histology. Laser hair reduction using the 1064 nm Nd:YAG at laser hair removal settings provides subjective and objective improvements in patients with focal axillary hyperhidrosis.

  6. Evidence for metaboreceptor stimulation of sweating in normothermic and heat-stressed humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shibasaki, M.; Kondo, N.; Crandall, C. G.

    2001-01-01

    1. Isometric handgrip (IHG) exercise increases sweat rate and arterial blood pressure, and both remain elevated during post-exercise ischaemia. The purpose of this study was to identify whether the elevation in arterial blood pressure during post-exercise ischaemia contributes to the increase in sweating. 2. In normothermia and during whole-body heating, 2 min IHG exercise at 40% maximal voluntary contraction, followed by 2 min post-exercise ischaemia, was performed with and without bolus intravenous administration of sodium nitroprusside during the ischaemic period. Sodium nitroprusside was administered to reduce blood pressure during post-exercise ischaemia to pre-exercise levels. Sweat rate was monitored over two microdialysis membranes placed in the dermal space of forearm skin. One membrane was perfused with the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor neostigmine, while the other was perfused with the vehicle. 3. In normothermia, IHG exercise increased sweat rate at the neostigmine-treated site but not at the control site. Sweat rate remained elevated during post-exercise ischaemia even after mean arterial blood pressure returned to the pre-IHG exercise baseline. Subsequent removal of the ischaemia stimulus returned sweat rate to pre-IHG exercise levels. Sweat rate during post-exercise ischaemia without sodium nitroprusside administration followed a similar pattern. 4. During whole-body heating, IHG exercise increased sweat rate at both neostigmine-treated and untreated sites. Similarly, regardless of whether mean arterial blood pressure remained elevated or was reduced during post-exercise ischaemia, sweat rate remained elevated during the ischaemic period. 5. These results suggest that sweating in non-glabrous skin during post-IHG exercise ischaemia is activated by metaboreflex stimulation and not via baroreceptor loading.

  7. SWEAT: Snow Water Equivalent with AlTimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agten, Dries; Benninga, Harm-Jan; Diaz Schümmer, Carlos; Donnerer, Julia; Fischer, Georg; Henriksen, Marie; Hippert Ferrer, Alexandre; Jamali, Maryam; Marinaci, Stefano; Mould, Toby JD; Phelan, Liam; Rosker, Stephanie; Schrenker, Caroline; Schulze, Kerstin; Emanuel Telo Bordalo Monteiro, Jorge

    2017-04-01

    To study how the water cycle changes over time, satellite and airborne remote sensing missions are typically employed. Over the last 40 years of satellite missions, the measurement of true water inventories stored in sea and land ice within the cryosphere have been significantly hindered by uncertainties introduced by snow cover. Being able to determine the thickness of this snow cover would act to reduce such error, improving current estimations of hydrological and climate models, Earth's energy balance (albedo) calculations and flood predictions. Therefore, the target of the SWEAT (Snow Water Equivalent with AlTimetry) mission is to directly measure the surface Snow Water Equivalent (SWE) on sea and land ice within the polar regions above 60°and below -60° latitude. There are no other satellite missions currently capable of directly measuring SWE. In order to achieve this, the proposed mission will implement a novel combination of Ka- and Ku-band radioaltimeters (active microwave sensors), capable of penetrating into the snow microstructure. The Ka-band altimeter (λ ≈ 0.8 cm) provides a low maximum snow pack penetration depth of up to 20 cm for dry snow at 37 GHz, since the volume scattering of snow dominates over the scattering caused by the underlying ice surface. In contrast, the Ku-band altimeter (λ ≈ 2 cm) provides a high maximum snowpack penetration depth of up to 15 m in high latitudes regions with dry snow, as volume scattering is decreased by a factor of 55. The combined difference in Ka- and Ku-band signal penetration results will provide more accurate and direct determination of SWE. Therefore, the SWEAT mission aims to improve estimations of global SWE interpreted from passive microwave products, and improve the reliability of numerical snow and climate models.

  8. Evaluation of artificial sweat in athletes with spinal cord injuries.

    PubMed

    Pritchett, R C; Bishop, P A; Yang, Z; Pritchett, K L; Green, J M; Katica, C P; Del Pozzi, A T

    2010-05-01

    Athletes with spinal cord injury often experience high heat storage due to reduced sweating capacity below the spinal injury. Spray bottle (SB) may be used to apply mist for evaporative cooling during breaks in competitions. This study examined the efficacy of SB during rest breaks. Seven participants, four female and three males, (mean +/- SD age 24 +/- 4.1 year, weight 56.2 +/- 7.0 kg, upper-body VO(2) peak 2.4 +/- 0.6 l/min) volunteered for the study. Participants were paraplegic athletes (T3-T12/L1) with both complete and incomplete lesions. Participants arm-cranked using a ramp protocol in an environment of 21 +/- 1.5 degrees C and 55 +/- 3% rh once using a SB during 1-min rest between 7-min stages of increasing intensity and once without the SB (CON). Mean total work was similar (p = 0.86) for the SB and CON (2495.7 +/- 914.6 vs. 2407.1 +/- 982.3 kJ, respectively). Likewise, the mean work times were similar between trials (27 +/- 6 and 26 +/- 7 min for SB and CON, respectively). Furthermore, there were no significant differences detected between trials for skin temperature, rectal temperature, esophageal temperature (p > 0.05). There were no statistically significant differences detected between trials for RPE (p > 0.05). In conclusion, the application of artificial sweat via SB was ineffective in attenuating the onset of uncompensable heat strain during high-intensity arm exercise in a comfortable environment.

  9. Salivary gland disorders.

    PubMed

    Mandel, Louis

    2011-01-01

    Salivary gland abnormalities and salivary dysfunction are important orofacial disorders. Patients with such problems are usually seen in the dental office for evaluation and therapy, and the dental practitioner is required to make a diagnosis and institute care. Therefore, it is necessary for the dentist to be knowledgeable regarding the more common pathologic entities that involve the salivary apparatus, and also be familiar with the diagnostic and therapeutic tools that are available. Successful diagnosis is dependent on the organized integration of the information derived from past history, clinical examination, salivary volume study, imaging, serology, and histopathologic examination. This article discusses the most common disorders seen in the Salivary Gland Center and indicates the current approaches to diagnosis. Improvement in diagnostic skills will avoid serious complications and lead to specific and effective therapy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Wearable sweat detector device design for health monitoring and clinical diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qiuchen; Zhang, Xiaodong; Tian, Bihao; Zhang, Hongyan; Yu, Yang; Wang, Ming

    2017-06-01

    Miniaturized sensor is necessary part for wearable detector for biomedical applications. Wearable detector device is indispensable for online health care. This paper presents a concept of an wearable digital health monitoring device design for sweat analysis. The flexible sensor is developed to quantify the amount of hydrogen ions in sweat and skin temperature in real time. The detection system includes pH sensor, temperature sensor, signal processing module, power source, microprocessor, display module and so on. The sweat monitoring device is designed for sport monitoring or clinical diagnosis.

  11. Heparan Sulfate Regulates Hair Follicle and Sebaceous Gland Morphogenesis and Homeostasis*

    PubMed Central

    Coulson-Thomas, Vivien Jane; Gesteira, Tarsis Ferreira; Esko, Jeffrey; Kao, Winston

    2014-01-01

    Hair follicle (HF) morphogenesis and cycling are a result of intricate autonomous epithelial-mesenchymal interactions. Once the first HF cycle is complete it repeatedly undergoes cyclic transformations. Heparan sulfate (HS) proteoglycans are found on the cell surface and in the extracellular matrix where they influence a variety of biological processes by interacting with physiologically important proteins, such as growth factors. Inhibition of heparanase (an HS endoglycosidase) in in vitro cultured HFs has been shown to induce a catagen-like process. Therefore, this study aimed to elucidate the precise role of HS in HF morphogenesis and cycling. An inducible tetratransgenic mouse model was generated to excise exostosin glycosyltransferase 1 (Ext1) in keratin 14-positive cells from P21. Interestingly, EXT1StEpiΔ/StEpiΔ mice presented solely anagen HFs. Moreover, waxing the fur to synchronize the HFs revealed accelerated hair regrowth in the EXT1StEpiΔ/StEpiΔ mice and hindered cycling into catagen. The ablation of HS in the interfollicular epidermal cells of mature skin led to the spontaneous formation of new HFs and an increase in Sonic Hedgehog expression resembling wild-type mice at P0, thereby indicating that the HS/Sonic Hedgehog signaling pathway regulates HF formation during embryogenesis and prevents HF formation in mature skin. Finally, the knock-out of HS also led to the morphogenesis and hyperplasia of sebaceous glands and sweat glands in mature mice, leading to exacerbated sebum production and accumulation on the skin surface. Therefore, our findings clearly show that an intricate control of HS levels is required for HF, sebaceous gland, and sweat gland morphogenesis and HF cycling. PMID:25053416

  12. Adenocarcinoma of mammary-like glands of the vulva: Report of a case and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Jared J; Ahmed, Iftikhar

    2006-04-01

    Mammary-like glands are a poorly recognized structure of normal vulvar skin. Adenocarcinomas arising from these glands are rare and represent a distinct clinicopathologic entity that must be distinguished from metastatic tumors. We reviewed 19 cases reported in the literature and describe a 51-year-old patient with a long-standing nodule on her right interlabial sulcus. Excisional biopsy and Mohs micrographic surgery demonstrated an infiltrating adenocarcinoma of the mammary-like glands involving the dermis and subcutis. On review of all 20 cases, the mean age at diagnosis was 59.6 years, the labia majora were involved in 13 cases (65%), and the mean lesional size was 2.5 cm. The tumor's histologic patterns varied greatly, although the histomorphologic similarity among this neoplasm, sweat gland carcinomas, and invasive extramammary Paget disease suggested a morphologic spectrum among these tumors. Criteria for establishing the diagnosis of adenocarcinoma of mammary-like glands include identifying transition zones between normal mammary-like glands and adenocarcinomatous areas. This tumor is best categorized as a locally aggressive neoplasm with a low risk for widespread metastasis. Use of aggressive surgical therapeutic regimens, particularly in the case of tumors localized to the skin, must be reassessed, especially given the likelihood of long-term morbidity with such regimens. In our patient, successful Mohs micrographic surgery suggests that alternate management may be adopted for tumors localized to the skin, especially in elderly patients.

  13. Stress and Salivary Glands.

    PubMed

    Keremi, Beata; Beck, Anita; Fabian, Tibor Karoly; Fabian, Gabor; Szabo, Geza; Nagy, Akos; Varga, Gabor

    2017-10-30

    Salivary glands produce a bicarbonate-rich fluid containing digestive and protective proteins and other components to be delivered into the gastrointestinal tract. Its function is under strict control of the autonomic nervous system. Salivary electrolyte and fluid secretion are primarily controlled by parasympathetic activity, while protein secretion is primaily triggered by sympathetic stimulation. Stress activates the hypothalamic - pituitary - adrenal axis. The peripheral limb of this axis is the efferent sympathetic/adrenomedullary system. Stress reaction, even if it is sustained for long, does not cause obvious damage to salivary glands. However, stress induces dramatic changes in the constituents of secreted saliva. Since salivary protein secretion is strongly dependent on sympathetic control, changes in saliva can be utilized as sensitive stress indicators. Some of the secreted compounds are known for their protective effect in the mouth and the gut, while others may just pass through the glands from blood plasma because of their chemical nature and the presence of transcellular salivary transporting systems. Indeed, most compounds that appear in blood circulation can also be identified in saliva, although at different concentrations. This work overviews the presently recognized salivary stress biosensors, such as amylase, cortisol, heat shock proteins and other compounds. It also demonstrates that saliva is widely recognised as a diagnostic tool for early and sensitive discovery of salivary and systemic conditions and disorders. At present it may be too early to introduce most of these biomarkers in daily routine diagnostic applications, but advances in salivary biomarker standardisation should permit their wide-range utilization in the future including safe, reliable and non-invasive estimation of acute and chronic stress levels in patients. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  14. Iron, copper and zinc concentrations in human sweat and plasma; the effect of exercise.

    PubMed

    Aruoma, O I; Reilly, T; MacLaren, D; Halliwell, B

    1988-09-30

    The effect of 30 or 40 min hard exercise on a cycle ergometer upon plasma concentrations of zinc, iron and copper in twelve healthy male athletes was studied. Sweat samples were also collected from different body sites and analyzed for these metals. The metal content of sweat from different body sites varied, as did the sweating rates of different subjects. Pre-exercise plasma iron concentrations in 10 of the 12 subjects were within the normal range, but at least 4 subjects had sub-normal plasma zinc whereas six had plasma copper levels above normal. The effects of exercise on plasma metal concentrations varied from subject to subject; no general conclusions could be drawn about the biological significance of loss of metals in sweat in relation to whole body metal metabolism. It is suggested that a mild acute phase response may account for lowered zinc and raised copper in the plasma of athletes.

  15. Two patients with localised hyperhidrosis of the hand based on functional and structural abnormalities of sweat glands.

    PubMed

    Kristiansen, Bjørn H; Lindahl, Kim H; Pallesen, Kristine A U; Bygum, Anette

    2018-01-31

    A 14-year-old girl and a 30-year-old woman presented with localised hyperhidrosis on the dorsal hand and wrist, respectively, provoked by different stimuli such as physical activity and minor trauma to the skin. The skin was seemingly normal in both patients where an iodine-starch test revealed a well-demarcated area of hyperhidrosis. Following histopathological examination, the diagnosis was unilateral localised hyperhidrosis in both cases; one with normal histology and one with a nevus sudoriferous. Both patients were successfully treated with botulinum toxin type A. The 30-year-old woman additionally used low-dose propantheline bromide periodically and experienced long-term remission on this therapy. Hyperhidrosis may embarrass and interfere with patients' school and careers, and it is therefore important to tailor an effective individual treatment. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  16. Male and female upper body sweat distribution during running measured with technical absorbents.

    PubMed

    Havenith, George; Fogarty, Alison; Bartlett, Rebecca; Smith, Caroline J; Ventenat, Vincent

    2008-09-01

    Body sweat distribution over the upper body in nine clothed male and female runners of equal fitness while running at 65% VO(2max) and subsequent 15-min rest in a moderate climate (25 degrees C, 53% rh) was investigated using technical absorbent materials to collect the sweat produced. No significant difference in whole body mass loss (male 474 SD 80; female 420 SD 114 g m(-2) h(-1)) nor surface weighted average of all tested zones for exercise (male 636 SD 165; female 565 SD 222 g m(-2) h(-1)) nor rest (male 159 SD 46; female 212 SD 75 g m(-2) h(-1)) were observed. Local sweat rate (LSR) ranges were large and overlapped substantially in most areas. Males showed higher LSR for the mid-front (P < 0.05), sides (P < 0.05), and mid lateral back (P < 0.01) compare to females. Both sexes showed similar sweat distribution patterns over the upper body with some exceptions. Males showed higher relative (local to overall) sweat rates than females for the mid lateral back (P < 0.001), while it was lower for the upper arm (P < 0.001), lateral lower back (P < 0.05), and upper central back (P < 0.05). Sweating in both sexes was highest along the spine, and higher on the back as a whole than the chest as a whole. Upper arm sweat rate was lowest. Males showed a higher ratio of highest to lowest LSR (4.4 vs. 2.8; P < 0.05). The present study has provided more detailed information, based on more subjects, on upper body sweat distribution than previously available, which can be used in clothing design, thermo-physiological modelling, and thermal manikin design.

  17. Correlation of sweat chloride and percent predicted FEV1 in cystic fibrosis patients treated with ivacaftor.

    PubMed

    Fidler, Meredith C; Beusmans, Jack; Panorchan, Paul; Van Goor, Fredrick

    2017-01-01

    Ivacaftor, a CFTR potentiator that enhances chloride transport by acting directly on CFTR to increase its channel gating activity, has been evaluated in patients with different CFTR mutations. Several previous analyses have reported no statistical correlation between change from baseline in ppFEV 1 and reduction in sweat chloride levels for individuals treated with ivacaftor. The objective of the post hoc analysis described here was to expand upon previous analyses and evaluate the correlation between sweat chloride levels and absolute ppFEV 1 changes across multiple cohorts of patients with different CF-causing mutations who were treated with ivacaftor. The goal of the analysis was to help define the potential value of sweat chloride as a pharmacodynamic biomarker for use in CFTR modulator trials. For any given study, reductions in sweat chloride levels and improvements in absolute ppFEV 1 were not correlated for individual patients. However, when the data from all studies were combined, a statistically significant correlation between sweat chloride levels and ppFEV 1 changes was observed (p<0.0001). Thus, sweat chloride level changes in response to potentiation of the CFTR protein by ivacaftor appear to be a predictive pharmacodynamic biomarker of lung function changes on a population basis but are unsuitable for the prediction of treatment benefits for individuals. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The Relevance of Sweat Testing for the Diagnosis of Cystic Fibrosis in the Genomic Era

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most common inherited disorder of childhood. The diagnosis of CF has traditionally been based on clinical features with confirmatory evidence by sweat electrolyte analysis. Since 1989 it has been possible to also use gene mutation analysis to aid the diagnosis. Cloning of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene has advanced our understanding of CF, in particular the molecular basis of an expanded CF phenotype. However, because there are over 1000 mutations and 200 polymorphisms, many without recognised effects on CFTR, the molecular diagnosis can be troublesome. This has necessitated measurement of CFTR function with renewed interest in the sweat test. This review provides an overview of the clinical features of CF, the diagnosis and complex genetics. We provide a detailed discussion of the structure and function of CFTR and the classification of CFTR mutations. Sweat electrolyte analysis is discussed, from the physiology of sweating to the rigours of a properly performed sweat test and its interpretation. With this information it is possible to understand the relevance of the sweat test in the genomic era. PMID:16648884

  19. Human Elimination of Phthalate Compounds: Blood, Urine, and Sweat (BUS) Study

    PubMed Central

    Genuis, Stephen J.; Beesoon, Sanjay; Lobo, Rebecca A.; Birkholz, Detlef

    2012-01-01

    Background. Individual members of the phthalate family of chemical compounds are components of innumerable everyday consumer products, resulting in a high exposure scenario for some individuals and population groups. Multiple epidemiological studies have demonstrated statistically significant exposure-disease relationships involving phthalates and toxicological studies have shown estrogenic effects in vitro. Data is lacking in the medical literature, however, on effective means to facilitate phthalate excretion. Methods. Blood, urine, and sweat were collected from 20 individuals (10 healthy participants and 10 participants with assorted health problems) and analyzed for parent phthalate compounds as well as phthalate metabolites using high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Results. Some parent phthalates as well as their metabolites were excreted into sweat. All patients had MEHP (mono(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate) in their blood, sweat, and urine samples, suggesting widespread phthalate exposure. In several individuals, DEHP (di (2-ethylhexl) phthalate) was found in sweat but not in serum, suggesting the possibility of phthalate retention and bioaccumulation. On average, MEHP concentration in sweat was more than twice as high as urine levels. Conclusions. Induced perspiration may be useful to facilitate elimination of some potentially toxic phthalate compounds including DEHP and MEHP. Sweat analysis may be helpful in establishing the existence of accrued DEHP in the human body. PMID:23213291

  20. Sweat lipid mediator profiling: a noninvasive approach for cutaneous research[S

    PubMed Central

    Hassoun, Lauren A.; Foolad, Negar; Pedersen, Theresa L.; Sivamani, Raja K.; Newman, John W.

    2017-01-01

    Recent advances in analytical and sweat collection techniques provide new opportunities to identify noninvasive biomarkers for the study of skin inflammation and repair. This study aims to characterize the lipid mediator profile including oxygenated lipids, endocannabinoids, and ceramides/sphingoid bases in sweat and identify differences in these profiles between sweat collected from nonlesional sites on the unflared volar forearm of subjects with and without atopic dermatitis (AD). Adapting routine procedures developed for plasma analysis, over 100 lipid mediators were profiled using LC-MS/MS and 58 lipid mediators were detected in sweat. Lipid mediator concentrations were not affected by sampling or storage conditions. Increases in concentrations of C30–C40 [NS] and [NdS] ceramides, and C18:1 sphingosine, were observed in the sweat of study participants with AD despite no differences being observed in transepidermal water loss between study groups, and this effect was strongest in men (P < 0.05, one-way ANOVA with Tukey’s post hoc HSD). No differences in oxylipins and endocannabinoids were observed between study groups. Sweat mediator profiling may therefore provide a noninvasive diagnostic for AD prior to the presentation of clinical signs. PMID:27875258

  1. Thermoregulatory vs. event sweating--comparison of clinical methodologies, physiology and results.

    PubMed

    Biehle-Hulette, S J; Krailler, J M; Elstun, L T; Bentz, S; Benzing, K W; Spruell, R D; Hellhammer, J; Swaile, D F

    2014-02-01

    Although the mechanisms of sweating due to thermoregulation vs. stress are distinct, the antiperspirant industry focuses primarily on perspiration due to heat as their method of efficacy testing. To better understand the overall protection afforded by a 'Clinical Strength' over-the-counter antiperspirant product, we compare results from a standard hot-room study with results from two studies using the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST). For each study, unscented antiperspirant was applied to one axilla, leaving the other untreated for internal control. The hot-room protocol involved a 40-min warm-up period with 2-20 min sweat collections at 100 ± 2 °F (35% RH). The TSST requires naïve subjects to give an impromptu speech and conduct mental arithmetic, with collections of sweat, heart rate and other biomarkers of stress before, during and after the event. During the TSST, heart rate and salivary cortisol data indicate significant emotional stress. Wetness results show that sweat was reduced by 69.4% in the hot-room study, compared with 83.7% and 89.3% reductions in the stress studies. We have found added value in investigating antiperspirancy from several causes of sweat production to give a more encompassing picture of the protection afforded by an antiperspirant product, specifically wetness protection from heat, activity and stress-induced sweat. © 2013 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  2. Stretchable, wireless sensors and functional substrates for epidermal characterization of sweat.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xian; Liu, Yuhao; Chen, Kaile; Shin, Woo-Jung; Lu, Ching-Jui; Kong, Gil-Woo; Patnaik, Dwipayan; Lee, Sang-Heon; Cortes, Jonathan Fajardo; Rogers, John A

    2014-08-13

    This paper introduces materials and architectures for ultrathin, stretchable wireless sensors that mount on functional elastomeric substrates for epidermal analysis of biofluids. Measurement of the volume and chemical properties of sweat via dielectric detection and colorimetry demonstrates some capabilities. Here, inductively coupled sensors consisting of LC resonators with capacitive electrodes show systematic responses to sweat collected in microporous substrates. Interrogation occurs through external coils placed in physical proximity to the devices. The substrates allow spontaneous sweat collection through capillary forces, without the need for complex microfluidic handling systems. Furthermore, colorimetric measurement modes are possible in the same system by introducing indicator compounds into the depths of the substrates, for sensing specific components (OH(-) , H(+) , Cu(+) , and Fe(2+) ) in the sweat. The complete devices offer Young's moduli that are similar to skin, thus allowing highly effective and reliable skin integration without external fixtures. Experimental results demonstrate volumetric measurement of sweat with an accuracy of 0.06 μL/mm(2) with good stability and low drift. Colorimetric responses to pH and concentrations of various ions provide capabilities relevant to analysis of sweat. Similar materials and device designs can be used in monitoring other body fluids. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Implementation of a microfluidic conductivity sensor -- a potential sweat electrolyte sensing system for dehydration detection.

    PubMed

    Gengchen Liu; Smith, Kyle; Kaya, Tolga

    2014-01-01

    As dehydration continues to plague performance athletes and soldiers, the need for improved dehydration detection is clear. We propose the use of a conductometric sensor as the foundation of a sweat-sensing patch to address this need. The conductometric sensor evaluates the conductivity of solutions with varying sodium concentrations. A lithographic process was used to fabricate a Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic channel through which solution was flowed. The ionization of the solution that occurs when a voltage is applied results in an effective resistance across the channel. The measured resistance therefore, reflects the ionization of the solution and the corresponding sodium concentration. The potential application of the conductometric sensor in a sweat-sensing patch requires compatibility with a microcontroller and Bluetooth module. Thus, a circuit interface was created. A voltage divider was utilized to convert the output resistance of the sensor to a voltage that could be input into a microcontroller. An AC voltage signal with a frequency of 10 kHz was used as the source voltage of the voltage divider to minimize the faradaic impedance and the double layer effect of the ionized solution. Tests have revealed that the conductometric is capable of precisely measuring the conductivity of a sodium solution. The conductometric sensor will be applied to a sweat sensing patch through future work involving studying the link between sodium concentration in sweat and an individual's dehydration level, developing a sweat-collection method, and developing a method of consideration for the other ions contained in sweat.

  4. Estimation of sweat rates during cycling exercise by means of the closed chamber condenser technology.

    PubMed

    Clarys, P; Clijsen, R; Barel, A O; Schouteden, R; van Olst, B; Aerenhouts, D

    2017-02-01

    Knowledge of local sweating patterns is of importance in occupational and exercise physiology settings. The recently developed closed chamber condenser technology (Biox Aquaflux ® ) allows the measurement of evaporative skin water loss with a greater measurement capacity (up to 1325 g/h/m 2 ) compared to traditional evaporimeters. The aim of this study was to evaluate the applicability of the Biox Aquaflux ® to estimate sweat production during exercise. Fourteen healthy subjects performed a 20-min cycle ergometer trial at respectively 55% heart rate (HR reserve and 75% HR reserve . Sweat production was estimated by measuring body weight before and after exercise, by calculating the amount of sweat collected in a patch, and by measuring the water flux (in g/h/m 2 ) with the Biox Aquaflux ® instrument. The Biox Aquaflux ® instrument allowed the follow up of sweat kinetics at both intensities. Correlations between the measurement methods were all significant for the 75% HR reserve trial (with r ranging from 0.68 to 0.76) whilst for the 55% HR reserve a significant relation was detected between the patch method and the Biox Aquaflux ® only (with r ranging from 0.41 to 0.79). The Biox Aquaflux ® instrument is a practical and direct method for the estimation of local sweat rates under field conditions. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Revisiting sweat chloride test results based on recent guidelines for diagnosis of cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Pagaduan, Jayson V; Ali, Mahesheema; Dowlin, Michael; Suo, Liye; Ward, Tabitha; Ruiz, Fadel; Devaraj, Sridevi

    2018-03-01

    Recent sweat chloride guidelines published by the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation changed the intermediate sweat chloride concentration range from 40-59 mmol/L to 30-59 mmol/L for age > 6 months. We wanted to know how this new guideline would impact detection of cystic fibrosis among patients who previously had sweat tests done at Texas Children's Hospital. We revisited sweat chloride test results (n = 3012) in the last 5 years at Texas Children's Hospital based on the new guidelines on diagnosis of cystic fibrosis from the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation. We identified 125 patients that would be reclassified in the intermediate sweat chloride value with the new guidelines that were classified as "unlikely to have CF" in the previous guidelines. 8 (32%) patients with CFTR gene testing were positive for CFTR gene mutation(s). 4 (50%) of these patients were identified to have 2 CFTR mutations. One had variant combination that was reported to cause CF but all were diagnosed with CFTR-related metabolic syndrome. Our findings concur with the new CF diagnosis guidelines that changing the intermediate cut-off to 30-59 mmol/L sweat chloride concentration in combination with CFTR genetic analysis enhances the probability of identifying individuals that have risk of developing CF or have CF and enables for earlier therapeutic intervention.

  6. Human Excretion of Bisphenol A: Blood, Urine, and Sweat (BUS) Study

    PubMed Central

    Genuis, Stephen J.; Beesoon, Sanjay; Birkholz, Detlef; Lobo, Rebecca A.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Bisphenol A (BPA) is an ubiquitous chemical contaminant that has recently been associated with adverse effects on human health. There is incomplete understanding of BPA toxicokinetics, and there are no established interventions to eliminate this compound from the human body. Using 20 study participants, this study was designed to assess the relative concentration of BPA in three body fluids—blood, urine, and sweat—and to determine whether induced sweating may be a therapeutic intervention with potential to facilitate elimination of this compound. Methods. Blood, urine, and sweat were collected from 20 individuals (10 healthy participants and 10 participants with assorted health problems) and analyzed for various environmental toxicants including BPA. Results. BPA was found to differing degrees in each of blood, urine, and sweat. In 16 of 20 participants, BPA was identified in sweat, even in some individuals with no BPA detected in their serum or urine samples. Conclusions. Biomonitoring of BPA through blood and/or urine testing may underestimate the total body burden of this potential toxicant. Sweat analysis should be considered as an additional method for monitoring bioaccumulation of BPA in humans. Induced sweating appears to be a potential method for elimination of BPA. PMID:22253637

  7. Salivary gland diseases in children

    PubMed Central

    Iro, Heinrich; Zenk, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    Salivary gland diseases in children are rare, apart from viral-induced diseases. Nevertheless, it is essential for the otolaryngologist to recognize these uncommon findings in children and adolescents and to diagnose and initiate the proper treatment. The present work provides an overview of the entire spectrum of congenital and acquired diseases of the salivary glands in childhood and adolescence. The current literature was reviewed and the results discussed and summarized. Besides congenital diseases of the salivary glands in children, the main etiologies of viral and bacterial infections, autoimmune diseases and tumors of the salivary glands were considered. In addition to the known facts, new developments in diagnostics, imaging and therapy, including sialendoscopy in obstructive diseases and chronic recurrent juvenile sialadenitis were taken into account. In addition, systemic causes of salivary gland swelling and the treatment of sialorrhoea were discussed. Although salivary gland diseases in children are usually included in the pathology of the adult, they differ in their incidence and some­times in their symptoms. Clinical diagnostics and especially the surgical treatment are influenced by a stringent indications and a less invasive strategy. Due to the rarity of tumors of the salivary glands in children, it is recommended to treat them in a specialized center with greater surgical experience. Altogether the knowledge of the differential diagnoses in salivary gland diseases in children is important for otolaryngologists, to indicate the proper therapeutic approach. PMID:25587366

  8. [Salivary gland diseases in childhood].

    PubMed

    Iro, H; Zenk, J

    2014-03-01

    Salivary gland diseases in children are rare, apart from viral--induced diseases. Nevertheless, it is essential for the otolaryngologist to recognize these uncommon findings in children and adolescents and to diagnose and initiate the proper treatment. The present work provides an overview of the entire spectrum of congenital and acquired diseases of the salivary glands in childhood and adolescence. The current literature was reviewed and the results discussed and summarized. Besides congenital diseases of the salivary glands in children, the main etiologies of viral and bacterial infections, autoimmune diseases and tumors of the salivary glands were considered. In addition to the known facts, new developments in diagnostics, imaging and therapy, including sialendoscopy in obstructive diseases and chronic recurrent juvenile sialadenitis were taken into account. In addition, systemic causes of salivary gland swelling and the treatment of sialorrhoea were discussed. Although salivary gland diseases in children are usually included in the pathology of the adult, they differ in their incidence and some-times in their symptoms. Clinical diagnostics and especially the surgical treatment are influenced by a stringent indications and a less invasive strategy. Due to the rarity of tumors of the salivary glands in children, it is recommended to treat them in a specialized center with greater surgical experience. Altogether the knowledge of the differential diagnoses in salivary gland diseases in children is important for otolaryngologists, to indicate the proper therapeutic approach. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. Functional studies of the parotid and pancreas glands in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Charchaflie, R. J.; Fernandez, L. Bustos; Perec, C. J.; Gonzalez, E.; Marzi, A.

    1974-01-01

    Functional studies of the pancreas and parotid glands are reported in 17 patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The exocrine function of the pancreas was studied by measuring amylase concentration after stimulation with the endogenous secretin-pancreozymine test (ESP). Under these conditions, the pancreatic amylase concentration in ALS patients was found to be markedly decreased by about 45% when compared with those of healthy control subjects. Different conclusions in the literature about a possible impairment of the exocrine pancreas in ALS patients induced us to study the function of the parotid gland, which has close structural, functional, and physiopathological relationship with the pancreas. Flow rate and bicarbonate concentration of parotid saliva were measured after indirect stimulation (intraoral citric acid) and direct stimulation (pilocarpine). After indirect stimulation, both parotid flow rate and bicarbonate concentration from ALS patients were found to be decreased by about 66% and 70% respectively, when compared with controls. On the other hand, direct stimulation with pilocarpine in ALS patients elicited normal responses in both flow rate and bicarbonate concentration of saliva. It is concluded that the pancreatic and parotid deficiencies observed in ALS patients do not indicate primary disease of these exocrine glands. This interpretation is further emphasized by the results obtained by a sweat test, plasma osmolarity, and sialographic studies. The possibility that the gland impairments observed might be due to modifications of the neuroendocrine mechanisms regulating their secretory activity is suggested. PMID:4852110

  10. Accumulation of pigment granules in lacrymal gland epithelium in practolol-treated beagle dogs.

    PubMed

    Tsuchitani, M; Narama, I; Kohda, S

    1989-04-01

    A 6-month oral toxicity test of practolol was carried out in beagle dogs as a reference control for a newly developed beta blocker. No significant drug-induced changes were detected in any animals by various ophthalmological examinations such as ERG, tear flow, lysozymal activity in tears, etc. However, an unusual pathological change was detected in the lacrymal gland of all five dogs treated with practolol and not in control animals. Macroscopically, the lacrymal glands assumed a blackish brown to deep black colour on both the outside and the cut surface. Microscopically, fine, dark-brown pigment granules were present in the apical and supra-nuclear portion of the cytoplasm of predominantly serosal type epithelial cells. These pigments reacted positively to Schmorl's method for lipofuscin, but gave a negative PAS reaction for polysaccharide, Prussian blue for iron and Ziehl-Neelsen method for ceroid pigment. They were detected as membrane-bound electron-dense bodies by electron microscopy. Similar pigments were also deposited in the cytoplasm of the apocrine sweat gland. Although the mechanism of the accumulation of these granules is far from clear, concentration of practolol in the lacrymal gland is considered to be very closely related to the presence of these granules. A possible mechanism for ocular toxicity by practolol, involving this change, is discussed.

  11. Myoepithelial Cells (MEC) of the Salivary Glands in Health and Tumours

    PubMed Central

    Veeravarmal, V.; Nirmal, R. Madhavan; Reddy, B. Venkat Ramana

    2015-01-01

    Myoepithelial cells (MEC) are found in the secretory units of many mammalian exocrine glands such as mammary, sweat, lacrimal and salivary glands. They are interposed between the secretory cells and the basal lamina. Immunohistochemically they are found to contain keratin intermediate filaments and are, therefore, considered to have an epithelial origin but at the same time they contain a large number of myofilaments which represent a massive expression of contractile proteins such as actin, myosin, calponin and caldesmon. Thus have smooth muscle like property also and hence the name. Numerous functions of MEC have been described, the most important of them being important for contraction of the glands and recently it has been found to prevent tumour progression. It should be noted that the diversity in the occurrence and dilemma regarding the pathogenesis of salivary gland tumours is due to lack in uniformity regarding the cells participating in its oncogenesis, especially the MEC. Also proper and extensive studies regarding MEC are very limited and thus have posed difficulty for a pathologist to understand this cell. In this review we try to bring about a thorough description of this cell in both physiological and pathological aspects. PMID:25954719

  12. Trastuzumab in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-02-27

    High-grade Salivary Gland Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Salivary Gland Acinic Cell Tumor; Salivary Gland Adenocarcinoma; Salivary Gland Poorly Differentiated Carcinoma; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVB Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVC Salivary Gland Cancer

  13. Variability of sweat chloride concentration in subjects with cystic fibrosis and G551D mutations.

    PubMed

    Vermeulen, F; Le Camus, C; Davies, J C; Bilton, D; Milenković, D; De Boeck, K

    2017-01-01

    Sweat chloride concentration, a biomarker of CFTR function, is an appropriate outcome parameter in clinical trials aimed at correcting the basic CF defect. Although there is consensus on a cut-off value to diagnose CF, we have only limited information on the within subject variability of sweat chloride over time. Such information would be useful for sample size calculations in clinical trials. Therefore, we retrospectively analyzed repeated sweat chloride values obtained in patients with G551D mutation(s) assigned to placebo in an ivacaftor interventional trial. In subjects with G551D at least 12years of age, a pilocarpine sweat test using Macroduct collector was taken on both arms at 8 time points over 48weeks. We explored 1062 pilocarpine sweat test values obtained in 78 placebo patients of the VX08-770-102 trial. Mean overall sweat chloride value (all patients, all tests, n=1062) was 100.8mmol/L (SD 12.7mmol/L). Using a multilevel mixed model, the between-subject standard deviation (SD) for sweat chloride was 8.9mmol/L (95% CI 7.4-10.6) and within-subject SD was 8.1mmol/L (95% CI 7.5-8.7). Limits of repeatability for repeat measurements were -19.7 to +21.6mmol/L using values from one arm, and -13.3 to 11.8mmol/L using mean of values obtained at 4 test occasions. Sample size calculations showed that the minimal treatment effect on sweat chloride concentration that can be demonstrated for a group of 5 patients is around 15mmol/L, using a cross-over design and combinations of 4 tests for each phase of the trial. Although the sweat test is considered a robust measure, sweat chloride measurements in patients with CF and a G551D mutation had an inherent biological variability that is higher than commonly considered. Further analyses of placebo group data are crucial to learn more about the natural variability of this outcome parameter. Copyright © 2016 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Sweat Facilitated Amino Acid Losses in Male Athletes during Exercise at 32-34°C

    PubMed Central

    Dunstan, R. Hugh; Sparkes, Diane L.; Dascombe, Benjamin J.; Macdonald, Margaret M.; Evans, Craig A.; Stevens, Christopher J.; Crompton, Marcus J.; Gottfries, Johan; Franks, Jesse; Murphy, Grace; Wood, Ryan; Roberts, Timothy K.

    2016-01-01

    Sweat contains amino acids and electrolytes derived from plasma and athletes can lose 1-2L of sweat per hour during exercise. Sweat may also contain contributions of amino acids as well as urea, sodium and potassium from the natural moisturizing factors (NMF) produced in the stratum corneum. In preliminary experiments, one participant was tested on three separate occasions to compare sweat composition with surface water washings from the same area of skin to assess contributions from NMF. Two participants performed a 40 minute self-paced cycle session with sweat collected from cleansed skin at regular intervals to assess the contributions to the sweat load from NMF over the period of exercise. The main study investigated sweat amino acid composition collected from nineteen male athletes following standardised endurance exercise regimes at 32–34°C and 20–30% RH. Plasma was also collected from ten of the athletes to compare sweat and plasma composition of amino acids. The amino acid profiles of the skin washings were similar to the sweat, suggesting that the NMF could contribute certain amino acids into sweat. Since the sweat collected from athletes contained some amino acid contributions from the skin, this fluid was subsequently referred to as “faux” sweat. Samples taken over 40 minutes of exercise showed that these contributions diminished over time and were minimal at 35 minutes. In the main study, the faux sweat samples collected from the athletes with minimal NMF contributions, were characterised by relatively high levels of serine, histidine, ornithine, glycine and alanine compared with the corresponding levels measured in the plasma. Aspartic acid was detected in faux sweat but not in the plasma. Glutamine and proline were lower in the faux sweat than plasma in all the athletes. Three phenotypic groups of athletes were defined based on faux sweat volumes and composition profiles of amino acids with varying relative abundances of histidine, serine

  15. Salivary gland branching morphogenesis: a quantitative systems analysis of the Eda/Edar/NFkappaB paradigm.

    PubMed

    Melnick, Michael; Phair, Robert D; Lapidot, Smadar A; Jaskoll, Tina

    2009-06-06

    Ectodysplasin-A appears to be a critical component of branching morphogenesis. Mutations in mouse Eda or human EDA are associated with absent or hypoplastic sweat glands, sebaceous glands, lacrimal glands, salivary glands (SMGs), mammary glands and/or nipples, and mucous glands of the bronchial, esophageal and colonic mucosa. In this study, we utilized EdaTa (Tabby) mutant mice to investigate how a marked reduction in functional Eda propagates with time through a defined genetic subcircuit and to test the proposition that canonical NFkappaB signaling is sufficient to account for the differential expression of developmentally regulated genes in the context of Eda polymorphism. The quantitative systems analyses do not support the stated hypothesis. For most NFkappaB-regulated genes, the observed time course of gene expression is nearly unchanged in Tabby (EdaTa) as compared to wildtype mice, as is NFkappaB itself. Importantly, a subset of genes is dramatically differentially expressed in Tabby (Edar, Fgf8, Shh, Egf, Tgfa, Egfr), strongly suggesting the existence of an alternative Eda-mediated transcriptional pathway pivotal for SMG ontogeny. Experimental and in silico investigations have identified C/EBPalpha as a promising candidate. In Tabby SMGs, upregulation of the Egf/Tgfalpha/Egfr pathway appears to mitigate the potentially severe abnormal phenotype predicted by the downregulation of Fgf8 and Shh. Others have suggested that the buffering of the phenotypic outcome that is coincident with variant Eda signaling could be a common mechanism that permits viable and diverse phenotypes, normal and abnormal. Our results support this proposition. Further, if branching epithelia use variations of a canonical developmental program, our results are likely applicable to understanding the phenotypes of other branching organs affected by Eda (EDA) mutation.

  16. Characterization of Coastal Hydraulics: Simple Tools and Sweat Equity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McInnis, D.; Fertenbaugh, C.; Orou-Pete, S.; Mullen, A.; Smith, C.; Silliman, S. E.; Yalo, N.; Boukari, M.

    2009-12-01

    Field efforts are targeted at providing characterization of surface / subsurface interaction along coastal Benin as part of an overall research effort examining coastal hydrology and salt-water intrusion near the large urban center of Cotonou, Benin. Specifically, efforts at adapting an existing numerical model indicate substantial sensitivity of the model results to assumed conditions in a vast region of interconnected fresh-water / salt-water lagoons which are home to a distributed human population. Limits on funding for this project resulted in choice of a series of field techniques that focused predominantly on manual labor (truly sweat equity of undergraduate and graduate students from Benin and the United States) in order to characterize the shallow (less than 10 meters) hydrology and geochemistry of this coastal region. An integrated picture is therefore being developed through application of shallow geochemical analysis to depths less than 10 meters (collection of samples using a manual direct-push drilling method based on a Geoprobe® apparatus and chemical analyses of Cl, Na, Br, Fl, and conductivity performed using specific-ion electrodes), monitoring of the rate of advance of the direct-push to determine vertical distribution of sediment resistance, a home-made falling-head field permeameter to measure shallow (less than 2 meters) permeabilities, manually installed, multi-level piezometers at several points within Lake Nokoue (a large, shallow-water lake bordering Cotonou and the southern coast), and electrical resistivity imaging (using an entry-level resistivity assembly). All tests are performed by students and faculty from the U.S. and Benin, with plans in place for the Benin students to return multiple times per year to monitor changes at the field stations. Results to date have provided significant insight into spatial structure within the surface/subsurface that was not apparent in either satellite imagery or ground-level inspection of the region

  17. Organizing the thymus gland.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Juan José; García-Ceca, Javier; Alfaro, David; Stimamiglio, Marco Augusto; Cejalvo, Teresa; Jiménez, Eva; Zapata, Agustín G

    2009-02-01

    Eph receptors and their ligands, ephrins, are molecules involved in the morphogenesis of numerous tissues, including the central nervous system in which they play a key role in determining cell positioning and tissue domains containing or excluding nerve fibers. Because common features have been suggested to occur in the microenvironmental organization of brain and thymus, a highly compartmentalized organ central for T cell differentiation, we examined the expression and possible role of Eph/ephrins in the biology of the thymus gland. We reviewed numerous in vivo and in vitro results that confirm a role for Eph and ephrins in the maturation of the thymic epithelial cell (TEC) network and T cell differentiation. Their possible involvement in different steps of early thymus organogenesis, including thymus primordium branching, lymphoid colonization, and thymocyte-TEC interactions, that determine the organization of a mature three-dimensional thymic epithelial network is also analyzed.

  18. Is sweat chloride predictive of severity of cystic fibrosis lung disease assessed by chest computed tomography?

    PubMed

    Caudri, Daan; Zitter, David; Bronsveld, Inez; Tiddens, Harm

    2017-09-01

    Cystic Fibrosis (CF) lung disease is characterized by a marked heterogeneity. Sweat chloride-level is a functional marker of the CF Transmembrane Regulator (CFTR) protein and could be an important predictor of later disease severity. In this retrospective analysis children from the Rotterdam CF clinic with available sweat chloride level at diagnosis and at least one routine spirometry-controlled volumetric chest CT scan in follow-up were included. CT scans were scored using the CF-CT scoring system (% of maximum). Associations between sweat chloride-levels and CF-CT scores were calculated using linear regression models, adjusting for age at sweat test and age at follow-up. Because structural lung damage develops over the course of many years, effect modification by the age at follow-up CT-scan was tested for by age-stratification. In 59 children (30 male) sweat chloride was measured at diagnosis (median age 0.5 years, range 0-13) and later chest CT performed (median age 14 years, range 6-18). Sweat chloride was associated with significantly higher CT-CT total score, bronchiectasis score, and mucus plugging score. Stratification for age at follow-up in tertiles showed this association remained only in the oldest age group (range 15-18 years). In that subgroup associations were found with all but one of the CF-CT subscores, as well as with all tested lung functions parameters. Sweat chloride-level is a significant predictor of CF lung disease severity as determined by chest CT and lung function. This association could only be demonstrated in children with follow-up to age 15 years and above. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Excretion of Methamphetamine and Amphetamine in Human Sweat Following Controlled Oral Methamphetamine Administration

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Allan J.; Smith, Michael L.; Kacinko, Sherri L.; Schwilke, Eugene W.; Cone, Edward J.; Moolchan, Eric T.; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND Understanding methamphetamine (MAMP) and amphetamine (AMP) excretion in sweat is important for interpreting sweat and hair testing results in judicial, workplace, and drug treatment settings. METHODS Participants (n = 8) received 4 10-mg (low) oral doses of sustained-release S-(+)-MAMP HCl (d-MAMP HCl) within 1 week in a double-blind, institutional review board–approved study. Five participants also received 4 20-mg (high) doses 3 weeks later. PharmChek sweat patches (n = 682) were worn for periods of 2 h to 1 week during and up to 3 weeks after dosing. The mass of MAMP and AMP in each patch was measured by GC-MS, with a limit of quantification of 2.5 ng/patch. RESULTS MAMP was measurable in sweat within 2 h of dosing. After low and high doses, 92.9% and 62.5% of weekly sweat patches were positive, with a median (range) MAMP of 63.0 (16.8 – 175) and 307 (199 – 607) ng MAMP/patch, respectively; AMP values were 15.5 (6.5 – 40.5) and 53.8 (34.0 – 83.4) ng AMP/patch. Patches applied 2 weeks after the drug administration week had no measurable MAMP following the low doses, and only 1 positive result following the high doses. Using criteria proposed by the Substance Abuse Mental Health Services Administration, 85.7% (low) and 62.5% (high) weekly sweat patches from the dosing week were positive for MAMP, and all patches applied after the dosing week were negative. CONCLUSIONS These data characterize the excretion of MAMP and AMP after controlled MAMP administration and provide a framework for interpretation of MAMP sweat test results in clinical and forensic settings. PMID:17981924

  20. Excretion of methamphetamine and amphetamine in human sweat following controlled oral methamphetamine administration.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Allan J; Smith, Michael L; Kacinko, Sherri L; Schwilke, Eugene W; Cone, Edward J; Moolchan, Eric T; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2008-01-01

    Understanding methamphetamine (MAMP) and amphetamine (AMP) excretion in sweat is important for interpreting sweat and hair testing results in judicial, workplace, and drug treatment settings. Participants (n = 8) received 4 10-mg (low) oral doses of sustained-release S-(+)-MAMP HCl (d-MAMP HCl) within 1 week in a double-blind, institutional review board-approved study. Five participants also received 4 20-mg (high) doses 3 weeks later. PharmChek sweat patches (n = 682) were worn for periods of 2 h to 1 week during and up to 3 weeks after dosing. The mass of MAMP and AMP in each patch was measured by GC-MS, with a limit of quantification of 2.5 ng/patch. MAMP was measurable in sweat within 2 h of dosing. After low and high doses, 92.9% and 62.5% of weekly sweat patches were positive, with a median (range) MAMP of 63.0 (16.8-175) and 307 (199-607) ng MAMP/patch, respectively; AMP values were 15.5 (6.5-40.5) and 53.8 (34.0-83.4) ng AMP/patch. Patches applied 2 weeks after the drug administration week had no measurable MAMP following the low doses, and only 1 positive result following the high doses. Using criteria proposed by the Substance Abuse Mental Health Services Administration, 85.7% (low) and 62.5% (high) weekly sweat patches from the dosing week were positive for MAMP, and all patches applied after the dosing week were negative. These data characterize the excretion of MAMP and AMP after controlled MAMP administration and provide a framework for interpretation of MAMP sweat test results in clinical and forensic settings.

  1. Maximal Oxygen Uptake, Sweating and Tolerance to Exercise in the Heat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Castle, B. L.; Ruff, W. K.

    1972-01-01

    The physiological mechanisms that facilitate acute acclimation to heat have not been fully elucidated, but the result is the establishment of a more efficient cardiovascular system to increase heat dissipation via increased sweating that allows the acclimated man to function with a cooler internal environment and to extend his performance. Men in good physical condition with high maximal oxygen uptakes generally acclimate to heat more rapidly and retain it longer than men in poorer condition. Also, upon first exposure trained men tolerate exercise in the heat better than untrained men. Both resting in heat and physical training in a cool environment confer only partial acclimation when first exposed to work in the heat. These observations suggest separate additive stimuli of metabolic heat from exercise and environmental heat to increase sweating during the acclimation process. However, the necessity of utilizing physical exercise during acclimation has been questioned. Bradbury et al. (1964) have concluded exercise has no effect on the course of heat acclimation since increased sweating can be induced by merely heating resting subjects. Preliminary evidence suggests there is a direct relationship between the maximal oxygen uptake and the capacity to maintain thermal regulation, particularly through the control of sweating. Since increased sweating is an important mechanism for the development of heat acclimation, and fit men have high sweat rates, it follows that upon initial exposure to exercise in the heat, men with high maximal oxygen uptakes should exhibit less strain than men with lower maximal oxygen uptakes. The purpose of this study was: (1) to determine if men with higher maximal oxygen uptakes exhibit greater tolerance than men with lower oxygen uptakes during early exposure to exercise in the heat, and (2) to investigate further the mechanism of the relationship between sweating and maximal work capacity.

  2. Normative data on regional sweat-sodium concentrations of professional male team-sport athletes.

    PubMed

    Ranchordas, Mayur K; Tiller, Nicholas B; Ramchandani, Girish; Jutley, Raj; Blow, Andrew; Tye, Jonny; Drury, Ben

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to report normative data on regional sweat sweat-sodium concentrations of various professional male team-sport athletes, and to compare sweat-sodium concentrations among sports. Data to this effect would inform our understanding of athlete sodium requirements, thus allowing for the individualisation of sodium replacement strategies. Accordingly, data from 696 athletes (Soccer, n = 270; Rugby, n = 181; Baseball, n = 133; American Football, n = 60; Basketball, n = 52) were compiled for a retrospective analysis. Regional sweat-sodium concentrations were collected using the pilocarpine iontophoresis method, and compared to self-reported measures collected via questionnaire. Sweat-sodium concentrations were significantly higher ( p < 0.05) in American football (50.4 ± 15.3 mmol·L -1 ), baseball (54.0 ± 14.0 mmol·L -1 ), and basketball (48.3 ± 14.0 mmol·L -1 ) than either soccer (43.2 ± 12.0 mmol·L -1 ) or rugby (44.0 ± 12.1 mmol·L -1 ), but with no differences among the N.American or British sports. There were strong positive correlations between sweat-sodium concentrations and self-reported sodium losses in American football ( r s = 0.962, p < 0.001), basketball ( r s = 0.953, p < 0.001), rugby ( r s = 0.813, p < 0.001), and soccer ( r s = 0.748, p < 0.001). The normative data provided on sweat-sodium concentrations might assist sports science/medicine practitioners in generating bespoke hydration and electrolyte-replacement strategies to meet the sodium demands of professional team-sport athletes. Moreover, these novel data suggest that self-reported measures of sodium loss might serve as an effective surrogate in the absence of direct measures; i.e., those which are more expensive or non-readily available.

  3. [Immunoendocrine associations in adrenal glands].

    PubMed

    Sterzl, I; Hrdá, P

    2010-12-01

    Immune and endocrine systems are basic regulatory mechanisms of organism and, including the nervous system, maintain the organism's homeostasis. The main immune system representatives are mononuclear cells, T- and B-cells and their products, in the endocrine system the main representatives are cells of the glands with inner secretion and their products. One of the most important glands for maintaining homeostasis are adrenal glands. It has been proven that either cells of the immune system, either endocrine cells can, although in trace amounts, produce mutually mediators of both systems (hormones, cytokines). Disorders in one system can lead to pathological symptoms in the other system. Also here represent adrenals an important model.

  4. Telocytes in Exocrine Glands Stroma.

    PubMed

    Nicolescu, Mihnea Ioan

    2016-01-01

    Stroma is viewed as the supportive framework of a predominant epithelial organ, comprising mostly of connective tissue, blood vessels and nerves. Since the discovery of telocytes one decade ago (Popescu and Faussone-Pellegrini J Cell Mol Med 2010;14(4):729-40), their presence was proven in several exocrine gland stromata, including major and minor salivary glands, mammary glands as well as exocrine pancreas.Telocytes have been found in a close connection with acinar and ductal structures but also with their stromal neighbours - nerves, blood vessels or other connective elements, either cells or collagen fibres.The approaches used to reveal the telocytes' location were immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy.

  5. Assessing the impact of egg sweating on Salmonella Enteritidis penetration into shell eggs.

    PubMed

    Gradl, Janet A; Curtis, Patricia A; Jones, Deana R; Anderson, Kenneth E

    2017-07-01

    Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevalence in eggs is a major concern to the egg industry. Some research has shown that egg sweating can increase Salmonella penetration into egg contents when refrigerated eggs are moved to a warmer temperature. This occurs when eggs are tempered before wash, to minimize thermal cracks. The effect of egg sweating on SE penetration into shell eggs over a 6 week storage period at 4°C was assessed. A 2 × 2 factorial of SE inoculation and egg sweating was utilized. Treatments included (SES) nalidixic acid (NA)-resistant SE inoculated and sweated, (SENS) NA-resistant SE inoculated and not sweated, (NSES) buffered peptone water (BPW) inoculated and sweated, and (NSENS) BPW inoculated and not sweated. Eggs were inoculated with 108 SE. Eggs formed condensation for approximately 17 min in a 32°C incubator. Shell rinse, shell emulsion, and egg contents were sampled then enumerated and assessed for prevalence of SE over a 6 wk storage period at 4°C. After wk 1, the SENS shell rinse had higher SE counts (0.32 log10 CFU/mL) than the other 3 treatments, where no SE was enumerated. A significant week by treatment interaction was found for the shell rinse SE detection (P < 0.05). In subsequent weeks, no SE counts were obtained from the egg shell rinse, shell emulsion, or egg contents. The SENS shell rinses had significantly higher SE prevalence than the SES rinses in weeks 1 (100% vs. 34.3%), 2 (57.6% vs. 22.2%), and 3 (38.2% vs. 11.1%) (P < 0.05). In samples from weeks 4, 5, and 6, there was no difference in SE prevalence between SES and SENS. Egg sweating did not increase SE penetration into the shell emulsion across treatment or week (P < 0.05). The decreasing trend of SE prevalence obtained over the study period indicate that refrigeration is effective at inhibiting SE growth. These results indicate that egg sweating occurring under common US egg handling practices is not harmful to egg safety. © 2017 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  6. Realistic Facial Expression of Virtual Human Based on Color, Sweat, and Tears Effects

    PubMed Central

    Alkawaz, Mohammed Hazim; Basori, Ahmad Hoirul; Mohamad, Dzulkifli; Mohamed, Farhan

    2014-01-01

    Generating extreme appearances such as scared awaiting sweating while happy fit for tears (cry) and blushing (anger and happiness) is the key issue in achieving the high quality facial animation. The effects of sweat, tears, and colors are integrated into a single animation model to create realistic facial expressions of 3D avatar. The physical properties of muscles, emotions, or the fluid properties with sweating and tears initiators are incorporated. The action units (AUs) of facial action coding system are merged with autonomous AUs to create expressions including sadness, anger with blushing, happiness with blushing, and fear. Fluid effects such as sweat and tears are simulated using the particle system and smoothed-particle hydrodynamics (SPH) methods which are combined with facial animation technique to produce complex facial expressions. The effects of oxygenation of the facial skin color appearance are measured using the pulse oximeter system and the 3D skin analyzer. The result shows that virtual human facial expression is enhanced by mimicking actual sweating and tears simulations for all extreme expressions. The proposed method has contribution towards the development of facial animation industry and game as well as computer graphics. PMID:25136663

  7. Feasibility and normal values of an integrated conductivity (Nanoduct™) sweat test system in healthy newborns.

    PubMed

    Kuehni, Claudia E; Schindler, Matthias; Mazur, Agnieszka; Malzacher, Andreas; Hornung, René; Barben, Juerg

    2017-07-01

    Nanoduct™ is a simple and practical sweat analysis system measuring conductivity in situ. It requires only three microlitres of sweat, making it especially applicable to newborns. We measured conductivity in 260 healthy term infants at the age of four days, and again at four weeks to determine the proportion of successful tests, test duration, and normal values for sweat conductivity in newborns. Sufficient sweat was collected in 159/260 of four-day olds (61%), and in 225/239 of four-week olds (94%). Mean (sd) test duration was 27 (5) and 25 (5) min. Mean (sd, range) conductivity was 53mmol/l (16, 8-114) at age four days, and 36 (9, 12-64) at four weeks. Determination of sweat conductivity using Nanoduct™ cannot be recommended for four-day old newborns. However, at the age of four weeks the success rate is high (94%), and conductivity values at that age are comparable to older healthy children. Copyright © 2017 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Regional and circadian variations of sweating rate and body surface temperature in camels (Camelus dromedarius).

    PubMed

    Abdoun, Khalid A; Samara, Emad M; Okab, Aly B; Al-Haidary, Ahmed A

    2012-07-01

    It was the aim of this study to investigate the regional variations in surface temperature and sweating rate and to visualize body thermal windows responsible for the dissipation of excess body heat in dromedary camels. This study was conducted on five dromedary camels with mean body weight of 450 ± 20.5 kg and 2 years of age. Sweating rate, skin and body surface temperature showed significant (P < 0.001) circadian variation together with the variation in ambient temperature. However, daily mean values of sweating rate, skin and body surface temperature measured on seven regions of the camel body did not significantly differ. The variation in body surface temperature compared to the variation in skin temperature was higher in the hump compared to the axillary and flank regions, indicating the significance of camel's fur in protecting the skin from daily variation in ambient temperature. Infrared thermography revealed that flank and axillary regions had lower thermal gradients at higher ambient temperature (T(a) ) and higher thermal gradients at lower T(a) , which might indicate the working of flank and axillary regions as thermal windows dissipating heat during the night. Sweating rate showed moderate correlation to skin and body surface temperatures, which might indicate their working as potential thermal drivers of sweating in camels. © 2012 The Authors. Animal Science Journal © 2012 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  9. Adrenal Gland Disorders: Condition Information

    MedlinePlus

    ... gland, called the adrenal cortex, produces the hormones cortisol (pronounced KAWR-tuh-sohl ) and aldosterone (pronounced al- ... produces the hormones adrenaline and noradrenaline. These hormones—cortisol, aldosterone, adrenaline, and noradrenaline—control many important functions ...

  10. Autophagy in the endocrine glands.

    PubMed

    Weckman, Andrea; Di Ieva, Antonio; Rotondo, Fabio; Syro, Luis V; Ortiz, Leon D; Kovacs, Kalman; Cusimano, Michael D

    2014-04-01

    Autophagy is an important cellular process involving the degradation of intracellular components. Its regulation is complex and while there are many methods available, there is currently no single effective way of detecting and monitoring autophagy. It has several cellular functions that are conserved throughout the body, as well as a variety of different physiological roles depending on the context of its occurrence in the body. Autophagy is also involved in the pathology of a wide range of diseases. Within the endocrine system, autophagy has both its traditional conserved functions and specific functions. In the endocrine glands, autophagy plays a critical role in controlling intracellular hormone levels. In peptide-secreting cells of glands such as the pituitary gland, crinophagy, a specific form of autophagy, targets the secretory granules to control the levels of stored hormone. In steroid-secreting cells of glands such as the testes and adrenal gland, autophagy targets the steroid-producing organelles. The dysregulation of autophagy in the endocrine glands leads to several different endocrine diseases such as diabetes and infertility. This review aims to clarify the known roles of autophagy in the physiology of the endocrine system, as well as in various endocrine diseases.

  11. Exercise-induced trace mineral element concentration in regional versus whole-body wash-down sweat.

    PubMed

    Baker, Lindsay B; Stofan, John R; Lukaski, Henry C; Horswill, Craig A

    2011-06-01

    Simultaneous whole-body wash-down (WBW) and regional skin surface sweat collections were completed to compare regional patch and WBW sweat calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg), copper (Cu), manganese (Mn), iron (Fe), and zinc (Zn) concentrations. Athletes (4 men, 4 women) cycled in a plastic open-air chamber for 90 min in the heat. Before exercise, the subjects and cycle ergometer (covered in plastic) were washed with deionized water. After the onset of sweating, sterile patches were attached to the forearm, back, chest, forehead, and thigh and removed on saturation. After exercise, the subjects and cycle ergometer were washed with 5 L of 15-mM ammonium sulfate solution to collect all sweat minerals and determine the volume of unevaporated sweat. Control trials were performed to measure mineral contamination in regional and WBW methods. Because background contamination in the collection system was high for WBW Mn, Fe, and Zn, method comparisons were not made for these minerals. After correction for minimal background contamination, WBW sweat [Ca], [Mg], and [Cu] were 44.6 ± 20.0, 9.8 ± 4.8, and 0.125 ± 0.069 mg/L, respectively, and 5-site regional (weighted for local sweat rate and body surface area) sweat [Ca], [Mg], and [Cu] were 59.0 ± 15.9, 14.5 ± 4.8, and 0.166 ± 0.031 mg/L, respectively. Five-site regional [Ca], [Mg], and [Cu] overestimated WBW by 32%, 48%, and 33%, respectively. No individual regional patch site or 5-site regional was significantly correlated with WBW sweat [Ca] (r = -.21, p = .65), [Mg] (r = .49, p = .33), or [Cu] (r = .17, p = .74). In conclusion, regional sweat [Ca], [Mg], and [Cu] are not accurate surrogates for or significantly correlated with WBW sweat composition.

  12. Role of Sweat in Accumulation of Orally Administered Griseofulvin in Skin

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Vinod P.; Epstein, William L.; Riegelman, Sidney

    1974-01-01

    Griseofulvin, an orally effective antimicrobial agent, appears in the stratum corneum within 4-8 h after oral administration. Griseofulvin distribution was found to be highest in the outermost layers of the stratum corneum (level I, 20.8±1.5 ng/mg) and lowest inside (level II, 10.0±1.5; level III, 7.5±2.2 ng/mg). In order to study the precise mechanism of griseofulvin transfer to stratum corneum, the role of sweat in the accumulation of griseofulvin was considered. Heat-induced total body sweating decreased the mean stratum corneum concentration of griseofulvin by 55%, and 200-300 ng of griseofulvin accumulated per ml of sweat. A silicone hydrophobic resin was used to differentiate between “wash-off” and carrier properties of sweat for griseofulvin. Prevention of transepidermal water and sweat loss by (a) topical application of formaldehyde-releasing cream to one palm, (b) occlusion by a 2 × 2-cm patch on one arm, and (c) wearing a rubber glove for 24 h, showed a lower griseofulvin concentration when compared to control areas in the same subjects. The results of the gloved hand experiment show that a complete equilibrium is established at all three levels of stratum corneum, thereby removing the reversed gradient. These results support the hypothesis that a “wick effect” is responsible for the observed reversed drug gradient within the stratum corneum. The results of the experiments suggest that sweat and transepidermal fluid loss play an important role in griseofulvin transfer in stratum corneum. PMID:4830229

  13. Hydration, sweat and thermoregulatory responses to professional football training in the heat.

    PubMed

    Duffield, Rob; McCall, Allan; Coutts, Aaron James; Peiffer, Jeremiah John

    2012-01-01

    AbstThis study examined the relationship between intensity of training and changes in hydration status, core temperature, sweat rate and composition and fluid balance in professional football players training in the heat. Thirteen professional football players completed three training sessions; "higher-intensity" (140 min; HI140), "lower-intensity" (120 min; LI120) and "game-simulation" (100 min; GS100). Movement demands were measured by Global Positioning System, sweat rate and concentration were determined from dermal patches and body mass change. Despite similar environmental conditions (26.9 ± 0.1 °C and 65.0 ± 7.0% relative humidity [Rh]), higher relative speeds (m · min(-1)) and increased perceptions of effort and thermal strain were observed in HI140 and GS100 compared with LI120 (P < 0.05). Significantly (P < 0.05) greater sweat rate (L · h(-1)) and electrolyte losses (g) were observed in HI140 and GS100 compared with LI120. Rate of rise in core temperature was correlated with mean speed (r = 0.85), session rating of perceived exertion (sRPE) (r = 0.61), loss of potassium (K+) (r = 0.51) sweat rate (r = 0.49), and total sweat loss (r = 0.53), with mean speed the strongest predictor. Sodium (Na+) (r = 0.39) and K+ (r = 0.50) losses were associated with total distance covered. In hot conditions, individualised rehydration practices should be adopted following football training to account for differences in sweat rate and electrolyte losses in response to intensity and overall activity within a session.

  14. Use of an electrical resistance hygrometer to measure human sweat rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suga, T.

    1980-01-01

    The application of the resistance hygrometer as a tool to measure the localized sweat rate from the human body in both the active and passive sweat regions was studied. It was found that the physiological function of the skin membrane and fluid carrier transport phenomena from the outer skin have an indistinguishable effect on the observed findings from the instrument. The problems associated with the resistance hygrometer technique are identified and the usage of the instrument in the physiological experimentation from the engineering standpoint is evaluated.

  15. Dasatinib in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Malignant Salivary Gland Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-01

    High-grade Salivary Gland Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma; Low-grade Salivary Gland Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Salivary Gland Acinic Cell Tumor; Salivary Gland Adenocarcinoma; Salivary Gland Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Anaplastic Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Malignant Mixed Cell Type Tumor; Salivary Gland Poorly Differentiated Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Salivary Gland Cancer

  16. Effect of sweating set rate on clothing real evaporative resistance determined on a sweating thermal manikin in a so-called isothermal condition (T manikin = T a = T r).

    PubMed

    Lu, Yehu; Wang, Faming; Peng, Hui; Shi, Wen; Song, Guowen

    2016-04-01

    The ASTM F2370 (2010) is the only standard with regard to measurement of clothing real evaporative resistance by means of a sweating manikin. However, the sweating set-point is not recommended in the standard. In this study, the effect of sweating rate on clothing real evaporative resistance was investigated on a 34-zone "Newton" sweating thermal manikin in a so-called isothermal condition (T manikin = T a = T r). Four different sweating set rates (i.e., all segments had a sweating rate of 400, 800, 1200 ml/hr ∙ m(2), respectively, and different sweating rates were assigned to different segments) were applied to determine the clothing real evaporative resistance of five clothing ensembles and the boundary air layer. The results indicated that the sweating rate did not affect the real evaporative resistance of clothing ensembles with the absence of strong moisture absorbent layers. For the clothing ensemble with tight cotton underwear, a sweating rate of lower than 400 ml/hr ∙ m(2) is not recommended. This is mainly because the wet fabric "skin" might not be fully saturated and thus led to a lower evaporative heat loss and thereby a higher real evaporative resistance. For vapor permeable clothing, the real evaporative resistance determined in the so-called isothermal condition should be corrected before being used in thermal comfort or heat strain models. However, the reduction of wet thermal insulation due to moisture absorption in different test scenarios had a limited contribution to the effect of sweating rate on the real evaporative resistance.

  17. Sauna, sweat and science - quantifying the proportion of condensation water versus sweat using a stable water isotope ((2)H/(1)H and (18)O/(16)O) tracer experiment.

    PubMed

    Zech, Michael; Bösel, Stefanie; Tuthorn, Mario; Benesch, Marianne; Dubbert, Maren; Cuntz, Matthias; Glaser, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Most visitors of a sauna appreciate the heat pulse that is perceived when water is poured on the stones of a sauna stove. However, probably only few bathers are aware that this pleasant heat pulse is caused by latent heat being released onto our skin due to condensation of water vapour. In order to quantify the proportion of condensation water versus sweat to dripping water of test persons we conducted sauna experiments using isotopically labelled (δ(18)O and δ(2)H) thrown water as tracer. This allows differentiating between 'pure sweat' and 'condensation water'. Two ways of isotope mass balance calculations were applied and yielded similar results for both water isotopes. Accordingly, condensation contributed considerably to dripping water with mean proportions of 52 ± 12 and 54 ± 7% in a sauna experiment in winter semester 2011/12 and 30 ± 13 and 33 ± 6% in a sauna experiment in winter semester 2012/13, respectively, depending on the way of calculating the isotope mass balance. It can be concluded from the results of our dual isotope labelling sauna experiment that it is not all about sweat in the sauna.

  18. The Mammary Glands of Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Cline, J. Mark; Wood, Charles E.

    2009-01-01

    This review describes the normal biology and physiology of the mammary gland in macaques, including the typical histologic appearance across the life span (development, reproductive maturity, lactation, and senescence). The molecular events regulating breast morphogenesis are described, as well as systemic and local hormonal regulators of mammary gland proliferation, differentiation, and function. Similarities and differences to the human breast are described. Regulatory events are illuminated by discussion of genetically modified mouse models. Tissue response markers, including immunohistochemical markers of proliferation and other hormonally induced changes and studies to date, regarding the effects of exogenous hormones, are briefly summarized. In general, estrogens stimulate progesterone receptor expression and proliferation in the mammary gland, and combinations of estrogens and progestogens cause greater proliferation than estrogens alone. Evaluation of novel chemical agents in macaques requires careful evaluation of age and hormonal context to avoid the confounding effects of mammary gland development, past reproductive history, and other influences on mammary gland morphology. The expression of proliferation markers and progesterone receptors may be used as biomarkers to measure chemically induced hormonal effects. PMID:21475638

  19. Associated change in plantar temperature and sweating after transthoracic endoscopic T2-3 sympathectomy for palmar hyperhidrosis.

    PubMed

    Chen, H J; Liang, C L; Lu, K

    2001-07-01

    Transthoracic endoscopic T2-3 sympathectomy is currently the treatment of choice for palmar hyperhidrosis. Compensatory sweating of the face, trunk, thigh, and sole of the foot was found in more than 50% of patients who underwent this procedure. The authors conducted this study to investigate the associated intraoperative changes in plantar skin temperature and postoperative plantar sweating. One hundred patients with palmar hyperhidrosis underwent bilateral transthoracic endoscopic T2-3 sympathectomy. There were 60 female and 40 male patients who ranged in age from 13 to 40 years (mean age 21.6 years). Characteristics studied included changes in palmar and plantar skin temperature measured intraoperatively, as well as pre- and postoperative changes in plantar sweating and sympathetic skin responses (SSRs). In 59 patients (59%) elevation of plantar temperature was demonstrated at the end of the surgical procedure. In this group, plantar sweating was found to be exacerbated in three patients (5%); plantar sweating was improved in 52 patients (88.1%); and no change was demonstrated in four patients (6.8%). In the other group of patients in whom no temperature change occurred, increased plantar sweating was demonstrated in three patients (7.3%); plantar sweating was improved in 20 patients (48.8%); and no change was shown in 18 patients (43.9%). The difference between temperature and sweating change was significant (p = 0.001). Compared with the presympathectomy rate, the rate of absent SSR also significantly increased after sympathectomy: from 20 to 76% after electrical stimulation and 36 to 64% after deep inspiration stimulation, respectively (p < 0.05). In contrast to compensatory sweating in other parts of the body after T2-3 sympathetomy, improvement: in plantar sweating was shown in 72% and worsened symptoms in 6% of patients. The intraoperative plantar skin temperature change and perioperative SSR demonstrated a correlation between these changes.

  20. Determination of silver nanoparticle release from antibacterial fabrics into artificial sweat

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles have been used in numerous commercial products, including textiles, to prevent bacterial growth. Meanwhile, there is increasing concern that exposure to these nanoparticles may cause potential adverse effects on humans as well as the environment. This study determined the quantity of silver released from commercially claimed nanosilver and laboratory-prepared silver coated fabrics into various formulations of artificial sweat, each made according to AATCC, ISO and EN standards. For each fabric sample, the initial amount of silver and the antibacterial properties against the model Gram-positive (S. aureus) and Gram-negative (E. coli) bacteria on each fabric was investigated. The results showed that silver was not detected in some commercial fabrics. Furthermore, antibacterial properties of the fabrics varied, ranging from 0% to greater than 99%. After incubation of the fabrics in artificial sweat, silver was released from the different fabrics to varying extents, ranging from 0 mg/kg to about 322 mg/kg of fabric weight. The quantity of silver released from the different fabrics was likely to be dependent on the amount of silver coating, the fabric quality and the artificial sweat formulations including its pH. This study is the unprecedented report on the release of silver nanoparticles from antibacterial fabrics into artificial sweat. This information might be useful to evaluate the potential human risk associated with the use of textiles containing silver nanoparticles. PMID:20359338

  1. Biomonitoring and Elimination of Perfluorinated Compounds and Polychlorinated Biphenyls through Perspiration: Blood, Urine, and Sweat Study

    PubMed Central

    Genuis, Stephen J.; Beesoon, Sanjay; Birkholz, Detlef

    2013-01-01

    Perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) are man-made organofluorine chemicals manufactured and marketed for their stain-resistant properties. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are anthropogenic organochlorine compounds previously used in various industrial and chemical applications prior to being banned in the Western world in the 1970s. Both PFCs and PCBs are persistent contaminants within the human organism and both have been linked to adverse health sequelae. Data is lacking on effective means to facilitate clearance of PFCs and PCBs from the body. Methods. Blood, urine, and sweat were collected from 20 individuals (10 healthy participants and 10 participants with assorted health problems) and analyzed for PFCs and PCBs using high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Results. Some individual PCB congeners, but not all, were released into sweat at varying concentrations. None of the PFCs found in serum testing appeared to be excreted efficiently into perspiration. Conclusions. Induced perspiration may have some role in facilitating elimination of selected PCBs. Sweat analysis may be helpful in establishing the existence of some accrued PCBs in the human body. Sweating does not appear to facilitate clearance of accrued PFHxS (perfluorohexane sulfonate), PFOS (perfluorooctane sulfonate), or PFOA (perfluorooctanoic acid), the most common PFCs found in the human body. PMID:24083032

  2. The Italian pilot external quality assessment program for cystic fibrosis sweat test.

    PubMed

    Salvatore, Marco; Floridia, Giovanna; Amato, Annalisa; Censi, Federica; Carta, Claudio; de Stefano, Maria Chiara; Ferrari, Gianluca; Tosto, Fabrizio; Capoluongo, Ettore; Caruso, Ubaldo; Castaldo, Giuseppe; Cirilli, Natalia; Corbetta, Carlo; Padoan, Rita; Raia, Valeria; Taruscio, Domenica

    2016-05-01

    Sweat chloride test is the gold standard test for cystic fibrosis (CF) diagnosis. In 2014 the Istituto Superiore di Sanità established the Italian pilot external quality assessment program for CF sweat test (IEQA-ST). Ten laboratories, included among the 33 Italian CF Referral Centers, were selected and enrolled on the basis of their attitude to perform sweat test (ST) analysis by using methods recommended by the Italian Guidelines. They received three different sweat-like samples (normal, borderline and pathologic chloride concentration), with mock clinical indications, for analysis according to routine procedures. Assessment, performed by a panel of experts, covered analytical performance, interpretation and reporting of results; categories of "poor" and "satisfactory" performance were not defined. All data were managed through a web utility. The program identified important areas of interest and, in some case, of concern. It is important to underline that results are referred to a small proportion, i.e. about 30%, of Italian laboratories performing CF ST in the context of the Referral Centers. Data collected highlight the importance of participation in EQA programs as it may improve laboratory/clinical performance; our study represents a model for the setting up of a large-scale EQA scheme for ST. Copyright © 2016 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Effectiveness and safety of endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy for excessive sweating and facial blushing: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Malmivaara, Antti; Kuukasjärvi, Pekka; Autti-Ramo, Ilona; Kovanen, Niina; Mäkelä, Marjukka

    2007-01-01

    Despite controversies, endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy (ETS) has been used as a treatment for excessive sweating of hands and face and for facial blushing. This study aims to evaluate the effectiveness of ETS for the current indications in a systematic review. Controlled clinical trials and cohort studies with more than 100 patients were included. Abstracts were searched from MEDLINE and CCTR from 1966 to June 2004. Two reviewers extracted the data and assessed study quality. Data on effectiveness and safety were synthesized qualitatively. We did not find any controlled clinical trials. Fifteen prospective studies were included. The internal and external quality of these studies were poor overall. Follow-up was commonly less than 2 years, during which time excessive sweating and facial blushing seemed to decrease among most patients. Immediate complications related to thoracoscopy occurred in up to 10 percent of patients. Compensatory sweating below breast level was reported in up to 90 percent of the patients. Other common side effects included dryness of face and hands, gustatory sweating, and neuralgic pain. Several other less common side effects were reported. The evidence of the effectiveness of ETS is weak due to a lack of randomized trials. The intervention leads to severe immediate complications in some of the patients, and to persistent side-effects for many of the patients.

  4. Measurements of clothing evaporative resistance using a sweating thermal manikin: an overview

    PubMed Central

    WANG, Faming

    2017-01-01

    Evaporative resistance has been widely used to describe the evaporative heat transfer property of clothing. It is also a critical variable in heat stress models for predicting human physiological responses in various environmental conditions. At present, sweating thermal manikins provide a fast and cost-effective way to determine clothing evaporative resistance. Unfortunately, the measurement repeatability and reproducibility of evaporative resistance are rather low due to the complicated moisture transfer processes through clothing. This review article presents a systematical overview on major influential factors affecting the measurement precision of clothing evaporative resistance measurements. It also illustrates the state-of-the-art knowledge on the development of test protocol to measure clothing evaporative resistance by means of a sweating manikin. Some feasible and robust test procedures for measurement of clothing evaporative resistance using a sweating manikin are described. Recommendations on how to improve the measurement accuracy of clothing evaporative resistance are addressed and expected future trends on development of advanced sweating thermal manikins are finally presented. PMID:28566566

  5. Morphological study of human sweat ducts for the investigation of THz-wave interaction (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawase, Kodo; Tripathi, Saroj R.

    2016-03-01

    Recently, some studies reported that the sweat ducts act as a low-Q-factor helical antenna due to their helical structure, and resonate in the terahertz frequency range according to their structural parameters. According to the antenna theory, when the duct works as a helical antenna, the dimension of the helix plays a key role to determine the frequency of resonance. Therefore, the accurate determination of structural parameters of sweat duct is crucially important to obtain the reliable frequency of resonance and modes of operations. Therefore, here we performed the optical coherence tomography (OCT) of human subjects on their palm and foot to investigate the density, distribution and morphological features of sweat ducts. Moreover, we measured the dielectric properties of stratum corneum using terahertz time domain spectroscopy and based upon this information, we determined the frequency of resonance. We recruited 32 subjects for the measurement and the average duct diameter was 95±11μm. Based upon this information on diameter of duct and THz dielectric properties of stratum corneum (ɛ=5.1±1.3), we have calculated the frequency of resonance of sweat duct. Finally, we determined that the center frequency of resonance was 442±76 GHz. We believe that these findings will facilitate further investigation of the THz-skin interaction and provide guidelines for safety levels with respect to human exposure. We will also report on the EEG measurement while being shined by micro watt order THz waves.

  6. Skin-Attachable, Stretchable Electrochemical Sweat Sensor for Glucose and pH Detection.

    PubMed

    Oh, Seung Yun; Hong, Soo Yeong; Jeong, Yu Ra; Yun, Junyeong; Park, Heun; Jin, Sang Woo; Lee, Geumbee; Oh, Ju Hyun; Lee, Hanchan; Lee, Sang-Soo; Ha, Jeong Sook

    2018-04-11

    As part of increased efforts to develop wearable healthcare devices for monitoring and managing physiological and metabolic information, stretchable electrochemical sweat sensors have been investigated. In this study, we report on the fabrication of a stretchable and skin-attachable electrochemical sensor for detecting glucose and pH in sweat. A patterned stretchable electrode was fabricated via layer-by-layer deposition of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on top of patterned Au nanosheets (AuNS) prepared by filtration onto stretchable substrate. For the detection of glucose and pH, CoWO 4 /CNT and polyaniline/CNT nanocomposites were coated onto the CNT-AuNS electrodes, respectively. A reference electrode was prepared via chlorination of silver nanowires. Encapsulation of the stretchable sensor with sticky silbione led to a skin-attachable sweat sensor. Our sensor showed high performance with sensitivities of 10.89 μA mM -1 cm -2 and 71.44 mV pH -1 for glucose and pH, respectively, with mechanical stability up to 30% stretching and air stability for 10 days. The sensor also showed good adhesion even to wet skin, allowing the detection of glucose and pH in sweat from running while being attached onto the skin. This work suggests the application of our stretchable and skin-attachable electrochemical sensor to health management as a high-performance healthcare wearable device.

  7. Sweating Rates of Dairy and Feedlot Cows in Stressful Thermal Environments

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sweating rates from heat-stressed dairy and feedlot cows were measured using a portable calorimeter. Measurements were made when cows were in shade and exposed to direct sunlight (120 to 1100 W/m2) under different air velocities (0.1 to 1.8 m/s). The effect of color of hair coat (black and white) on...

  8. Sweating rates of dairy cows and beef heifers in hot conditions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sweating rates from heat-stressed dairy and feedlot cows were measured using a “Portable Calorimeter” and a “Bovine Evaporation Meter” designed and fabricated for the studies reported herein. Measurements were taken when cows were in their natural habitat. The focus of the study was to compare swea...

  9. Sweating rates of dairy and feedlot cows under stressful thermal environments

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sweating rates from heat-stressed dairy and feedlot cows were measured using a portable calorimeter. Measurements were made when cows were in shade and exposed to direct sunlight (120 to 1100 W/m2) under different air velocities (0.1 to 1.8 m/s). The effect of color of hair coat (black and white) on...

  10. Determination of silver nanoparticle release from antibacterial fabrics into artificial sweat.

    PubMed

    Kulthong, Kornphimol; Srisung, Sujittra; Boonpavanitchakul, Kanittha; Kangwansupamonkon, Wiyong; Maniratanachote, Rawiwan

    2010-04-01

    Silver nanoparticles have been used in numerous commercial products, including textiles, to prevent bacterial growth. Meanwhile, there is increasing concern that exposure to these nanoparticles may cause potential adverse effects on humans as well as the environment. This study determined the quantity of silver released from commercially claimed nanosilver and laboratory-prepared silver coated fabrics into various formulations of artificial sweat, each made according to AATCC, ISO and EN standards. For each fabric sample, the initial amount of silver and the antibacterial properties against the model Gram-positive (S. aureus) and Gram-negative (E. coli) bacteria on each fabric was investigated. The results showed that silver was not detected in some commercial fabrics. Furthermore, antibacterial properties of the fabrics varied, ranging from 0% to greater than 99%. After incubation of the fabrics in artificial sweat, silver was released from the different fabrics to varying extents, ranging from 0 mg/kg to about 322 mg/kg of fabric weight. The quantity of silver released from the different fabrics was likely to be dependent on the amount of silver coating, the fabric quality and the artificial sweat formulations including its pH. This study is the unprecedented report on the release of silver nanoparticles from antibacterial fabrics into artificial sweat. This information might be useful to evaluate the potential human risk associated with the use of textiles containing silver nanoparticles.

  11. Imaging the major salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Burke, C J; Thomas, R H; Howlett, D

    2011-06-01

    Advances in imaging have led to improved sensitivity in the diagnosis of diseases that involve the major salivary glands. Ultrasound (US), plain radiography and sialography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT), and nuclear scintigraphy/positron emission tomography (PET) all play a part, and imaging often assists in the planning of further management, operative or otherwise. We review the methods used for imaging the major salivary glands, and apply the indications for these methods to the principal pathological processes. Copyright © 2010 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Histogenesis of salivary gland neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Regezi, J A; Batsakis, J G

    1977-06-01

    In an attempt to explain the histogenesis of salivary gland tumors, a bicellular theory of origin has been presented. This theory is supported by indirect evidence from light and electron microscopy. Two cells, the excretory duct reserve cell and the intercalated duct reserve cell, are presented as the hypothetical cells of origin for salivary gland neoplasms. It is argued that the excretory duct reserve cell gives rise to squamous cell carcinomas and mucoepidermoid carcinomas, and that the intercalated duct reserve cell gives rise to all others. It It is also shown that myoepithelial cells are responsible in part for the wide histologic variation of these neoplasms.

  13. Characterization of human pineal gland proteome.

    PubMed

    Yelamanchi, Soujanya D; Kumar, Manish; Madugundu, Anil K; Gopalakrishnan, Lathika; Dey, Gourav; Chavan, Sandip; Sathe, Gajanan; Mathur, Premendu P; Gowda, Harsha; Mahadevan, Anita; Shankar, Susarla K; Prasad, T S Keshava

    2016-11-15

    The pineal gland is a neuroendocrine gland located at the center of the brain. It is known to regulate various physiological functions in the body through secretion of the neurohormone melatonin. Comprehensive characterization of the human pineal gland proteome has not been undertaken to date. We employed a high-resolution mass spectrometry-based approach to characterize the proteome of the human pineal gland. A total of 5874 proteins were identified from the human pineal gland in this study. Of these, 5820 proteins were identified from the human pineal gland for the first time. Interestingly, 1136 proteins from the human pineal gland were found to contain a signal peptide domain, which indicates the secretory nature of these proteins. An unbiased global proteomic profile of this biomedically important organ should benefit molecular research to unravel the role of the pineal gland in neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases.

  14. Oncocytic Sialolipoma of the Submandibular Gland

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Dongbin; Park, Tae In; Park, Junesik

    2014-01-01

    Sialolipoma, a rare tumor of the salivary gland, is a recently described variant of salivary gland lipoma. Oncocytic sialolipoma was first described by Pusiol et al. in 2009. We report the case of an oncocytic sialolipoma of the submandibular gland in a 43-year-old female. Excision of the tumor was performed with preservation of the submandibular gland. The tumor had a thin, fibrous capsule and consisted of abundant adipose tissue, an oncocytic nodule, and scattered normal glandular structures surrounded by adipose tissue. Four cases of sialolipoma of the submandibular gland, including the present case, were reviewed. All 4 tumors were developed on the right submandibular glands, with a composition of adipose tissue as high as that of sialolipoma of the parotid gland; in contrast to previous reports, three cases were in females. As newly described tumor type, care should be taken to distinguish oncocytic sialolipoma from other salivary gland neoplasms such as simple lipoma, pleomorphic adenoma, or oncocytoma. PMID:24917915

  15. Oncocytic sialolipoma of the submandibular gland.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Dongbin; Park, Tae In; Park, Junesik; Heo, Sung Jae

    2014-06-01

    Sialolipoma, a rare tumor of the salivary gland, is a recently described variant of salivary gland lipoma. Oncocytic sialolipoma was first described by Pusiol et al. in 2009. We report the case of an oncocytic sialolipoma of the submandibular gland in a 43-year-old female. Excision of the tumor was performed with preservation of the submandibular gland. The tumor had a thin, fibrous capsule and consisted of abundant adipose tissue, an oncocytic nodule, and scattered normal glandular structures surrounded by adipose tissue. Four cases of sialolipoma of the submandibular gland, including the present case, were reviewed. All 4 tumors were developed on the right submandibular glands, with a composition of adipose tissue as high as that of sialolipoma of the parotid gland; in contrast to previous reports, three cases were in females. As newly described tumor type, care should be taken to distinguish oncocytic sialolipoma from other salivary gland neoplasms such as simple lipoma, pleomorphic adenoma, or oncocytoma.

  16. Muscle metaboreceptors modulate postexercise sweating, but not cutaneous blood flow, independent of baroreceptor loading status.

    PubMed

    Paull, Gabrielle; Dervis, Sheila; McGinn, Ryan; Haqani, Baies; Flouris, Andreas D; Kondo, Narihiko; Kenny, Glen P

    2015-12-01

    We examined whether sustained changes in baroreceptor loading status during prolonged postexercise recovery can alter the metaboreceptors' influence on heat loss. Thirteen young males performed a 1-min isometric handgrip exercise (IHG) at 60% maximal voluntary contraction followed by 2 min of forearm ischemia (to activate metaboreceptors) before and 15, 30, 45, and 60 min after a 15-min intense treadmill running exercise (>90% maximal heart rate) in the heat (35°C). This was repeated on three separate days with continuous lower body positive (LBPP, +40 mmHg), negative (LBNP, -20 mmHg), or no pressure (Control) from 13- to 65-min postexercise. Sweat rate (ventilated capsule; forearm, chest, upper back) and cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC; forearm, upper back) were measured. Relative to pre-IHG levels, sweating at all sites increased during IHG and remained elevated during ischemia at baseline and similarly at 30, 45, and 60 min postexercise (site average sweat rate increase during ischemia: Control, 0.13 ± 0.02; LBPP, 0.12 ± 0.02; LBNP, 0.15 ± 0.02 mg·min(-1)·cm(-2); all P < 0.01), but not at 15 min (all P > 0.10). LBPP and LBNP did not modulate the pattern of sweating to IHG and ischemia (all P > 0.05). At 15-min postexercise, forearm CVC was reduced from pre-IHG levels during both IHG and ischemia under LBNP only (ischemia: 3.9 ± 0.8% CVCmax; P < 0.02). Therefore, we show metaboreceptors increase postexercise sweating in the middle to late stages of recovery (30-60 min), independent of baroreceptor loading status and similarly between skin sites. In contrast, metaboreflex modulation of forearm but not upper back CVC occurs only in the early stages of recovery (15 min) and is dependent upon baroreceptor unloading. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  17. Muscle metaboreceptors modulate postexercise sweating, but not cutaneous blood flow, independent of baroreceptor loading status

    PubMed Central

    Paull, Gabrielle; Dervis, Sheila; McGinn, Ryan; Haqani, Baies; Flouris, Andreas D.; Kondo, Narihiko

    2015-01-01

    We examined whether sustained changes in baroreceptor loading status during prolonged postexercise recovery can alter the metaboreceptors' influence on heat loss. Thirteen young males performed a 1-min isometric handgrip exercise (IHG) at 60% maximal voluntary contraction followed by 2 min of forearm ischemia (to activate metaboreceptors) before and 15, 30, 45, and 60 min after a 15-min intense treadmill running exercise (>90% maximal heart rate) in the heat (35°C). This was repeated on three separate days with continuous lower body positive (LBPP, +40 mmHg), negative (LBNP, −20 mmHg), or no pressure (Control) from 13- to 65-min postexercise. Sweat rate (ventilated capsule; forearm, chest, upper back) and cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC; forearm, upper back) were measured. Relative to pre-IHG levels, sweating at all sites increased during IHG and remained elevated during ischemia at baseline and similarly at 30, 45, and 60 min postexercise (site average sweat rate increase during ischemia: Control, 0.13 ± 0.02; LBPP, 0.12 ± 0.02; LBNP, 0.15 ± 0.02 mg·min−1·cm−2; all P < 0.01), but not at 15 min (all P > 0.10). LBPP and LBNP did not modulate the pattern of sweating to IHG and ischemia (all P > 0.05). At 15-min postexercise, forearm CVC was reduced from pre-IHG levels during both IHG and ischemia under LBNP only (ischemia: 3.9 ± 0.8% CVCmax; P < 0.02). Therefore, we show metaboreceptors increase postexercise sweating in the middle to late stages of recovery (30–60 min), independent of baroreceptor loading status and similarly between skin sites. In contrast, metaboreflex modulation of forearm but not upper back CVC occurs only in the early stages of recovery (15 min) and is dependent upon baroreceptor unloading. PMID:26377560

  18. [Efficacy of sweat-antigen-inactivating skin care products on itching of patients with atopic dermatitis].

    PubMed

    Shindo, Hajime; Takahagi, Shunsuke; Mihara, Shoji; Tanaka, Toshihiko; Ishii, Kaori; Hide, Michihiro; Suzuki, Shigeru; Kanatani, Hirotoshi; Yano, Shingo

    2011-01-01

    Many patients with atopic dermatitis showed immediate-type hypersensitivity against sweat antigen. Therefore, to deal with sweating is important to prevent itching and aggravations of dermatitis of patient with atopic dermatitis. We had searched a substance that inactivated sweat antigen adopting histamine release test. And we found that tannic acid which selected by screening various natural products inactivated sweat antigen. We evaluate skin care products (spray, after-bathing water and aerosol-spray) containing tannic acid for patients with atopic dermatitis. We administered in a tannic acid-containing spray and after-bathing water on 17 patients with atopic dermatitis. After treatment, total clinical assessment score and itching in the afternoon had significantly decreased from that on day 0. To evaluate the effect of tannic acid containing-aerosol spray on itching of patients with AD, we assessed symptoms of atopic dermatitis patients who used a tannic acid containing-aerosol spray every day for 4 weeks in a cross-over, double-blind study. Clinical severity of atopic dermatitis and degrees of itching in daily life of patients were evaluated by physicians and patients themselves, respectively. Degrees of itching in morning and those at night were significantly more largely improved by the use of tannic acid-containing aerosol spray than those by the use of placebo control aerosol spray. The overall efficacy of tannic acid-containing aerosol sprays was also significantly higher than those of tannic acid free spray. Sweat antigen inactivating skin care products may be effective to reduce itching of patients with atopic dermatitis.

  19. Quantification of sweat secretion in focal axillary hyperhidrosis related to area and time: the hyperhidrosis area and secretion index.

    PubMed

    Bahmer, Friedrich A

    2015-11-01

    Severity of focal axillary hyperhidrosis (FAH) hitherto is estimated semiquantitatively by weighting the secreted sweat with the sweating area visualized by iodine starch test. In this study, we quantified secretion (mg/cm(2) per min) simply by estimating the sweating area morphometrically via point counting. We have named the numeric value obtained the hyperhidrosis area and secretion index (HASI). In 183 patients (146 women, 37 men) with focal axillary hyperhidrosis, seen in a city hospital outpatient clinic, sweat secretion was assessed by gravimetry and the area of Minor's iodine-starch test determined by point counting. Values were analyzed with respect to gender, age, and body surface area. HASI values, combined for both axillae, ranged from 0.21 to 22.8 mg/cm(2) per minute with only minor gender differences. Men had larger sweating areas than women did. The comparison of left to right side axillae did not disclose substantial differences. No correlation was found between age and HASI values. A subgroup analysis of 91 patients showed a good correlation of HASI values with body surface area. HASI allows for a quantification of sweat secretion per time interval and area unit, thus facilitating pre- and post-test assessment of sweat intensity as well as a comparison between the results of different studies. © 2015 The International Society of Dermatology.

  20. Undifferentiated carcinoma of parotid gland.

    PubMed Central

    López, J I; Alfaro, J; Ballestin, C

    1991-01-01

    Two cases of undifferentiated carcinomas of the major salivary glands were studied using immunohistochemical techniques. Results showed that this entity was a high grade malignant neoplasm arising from the excretory duct. Despite the undifferentiated appearance multiple immunophenotypes were evident in both cases. PMID:2045506

  1. Newly described salivary gland tumors.

    PubMed

    Skalova, Alena; Michal, Michal; Simpson, Roderick Hw

    2017-01-01

    This review concentrates on three salivary gland tumors that have been accepted in the recent literature as new neoplastic entities: mammary analog secretory carcinoma (MASC), sclerosing polycystic adenoma (SPA) and cribriform adenocarcinoma of tongue and other minor salivary glands (CAMSGs). MASC is a distinctive low-grade malignant salivary cancer that harbors a characteristic chromosomal translocation, t(12;15) (p13;q25) resulting in an ETV6-NTRK3 fusion. SPA is a rare lesion often mistaken histologically for low-grade salivary carcinoma. Previously thought to be a reactive fibroinflammatory process, but recent evidence of clonality, recurrences in up 30%, and dysplastic foci suggest it may be truly neoplastic. CAMSG is a distinct tumor entity that differs from polymorphous low-grade adenocarcinoma (PLGA) by location (ie, most often arising on the tongue), by prominent nuclear clearing, alterations of the PRKD gene family and clinical behavior with frequent metastases at the time of presentation of the primary tumor. Early metastatic disease seen in most cases of CAMSG associated with indolent behavior makes it a unique neoplasm among all low-grade salivary gland tumors. Salivary glands may give rise to a wide spectrum of different tumors. They are often diagnostically challenging as morphological features often overlap between different entities. Although conventional morphology in combination with immunohistochemical findings still provide the most important clues for diagnosis, recent advances in molecular pathology offer new diagnostic tools in investigating the differential diagnosis, as well as providing potentially valuable prognostic indicators. In the last two decades, several new salivary gland tumor entities have been described, namely MASC, SPA and CAMSGs.

  2. Evidence for cyclooxygenase-dependent sweating in young males during intermittent exercise in the heat

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Naoto; McGinn, Ryan; Stapleton, Jill M; Paull, Gabrielle; Meade, Robert D; Kenny, Glen P

    2014-01-01

    Our recent work implicated nitric oxide (NO) in the control of sweating during intermittent exercise; however, it is unclear if cyclooxygenase (COX) is also involved. On separate days, ten healthy young (24 ± 4 years) males cycled in the heat (35°C). Two 30 min exercise bouts were performed at either a moderate (400 W, moderate heat load) or high (700 W, high heat load) rate of metabolic heat production and were followed by 20 and 40 min of recovery, respectively. Forearm sweating (ventilated capsule) was evaluated at four skin sites that were continuously perfused via intradermal microdialysis with: (1) lactated Ringer solution (Control), (2) 10 mm ketorolac (a non-selective COX inhibitor), (3) 10 mm NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME; a non-selective NO synthase inhibitor) or (4) a combination of 10 mm ketorolac + 10 mml-NAME. During the last 5 min of the first exercise at moderate heat load, forearm sweating (mg min−1 cm−2) was equivalently reduced with ketorolac (0.54 ± 0.08), l-NAME (0.55 ± 0.07) and ketorolac+l-NAME (0.56 ± 0.08) compared to Control (0.67 ± 0.06) (all P < 0.05). Similar results were obtained for the second exercise at moderate heat load (all P < 0.05). However, forearm sweating was similar between the four sites during exercise at high heat load and during recovery regardless of exercise intensity (all P > 0.05). We show that (1) although both COX and NO modulate forearm sweating during intermittent exercise bouts in the heat at a moderate heat load, the effects are not additive, and (2) the contribution of both enzymes to forearm sweating is less evident during intermittent exercise when the heat load is high and during recovery. PMID:25326453

  3. Anatomy, biogenesis, and regeneration of salivary glands

    PubMed Central

    Holmberg, Kyle V.; Hoffman, Matthew P.

    2014-01-01

    An overview of the anatomy and biogenesis of salivary glands is important in order to understand the physiology, functions and disorders associated with saliva. A major disorder of salivary glands is salivary hypofunction and resulting xerostomia, or dry mouth, which affects hundreds of thousands of patients per year who suffer from salivary gland diseases or undergo head and neck cancer treatment. There is currently no curative therapy for these patients. To improve these patients’ quality of life, new therapies are being developed based on findings in salivary gland cell and developmental biology. Here we discuss the anatomy and biogenesis of the major human salivary glands and the rodent submandibular gland (SMG), which has been used extensively as a research model. We also include a review of recent research on the identification and function of stem cells in salivary glands, and the emerging field of research suggesting nerves play an instructive role during development and may be essential for adult gland repair and regeneration. Understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in gland biogenesis provides a template for regenerating, repairing or reengineering diseased or damaged adult human salivary glands. We provide an overview of three general approaches currently being developed to regenerate damaged salivary tissue, including gene therapy, stem cell-based therapy, and tissue engineering. In the future, it may be that a combination of all three will be used to repair, regenerate and reengineer functional salivary glands in patients to increase the secretion of their saliva, the focus of this monograph. PMID:24862590

  4. Anatomy, biogenesis and regeneration of salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Holmberg, Kyle V; Hoffman, Matthew P

    2014-01-01

    An overview of the anatomy and biogenesis of salivary glands is important in order to understand the physiology, functions and disorders associated with saliva. A major disorder of salivary glands is salivary hypofunction and resulting xerostomia, or dry mouth, which affects hundreds of thousands of patients each year who suffer from salivary gland diseases or undergo head and neck cancer treatment. There is currently no curative therapy for these patients. To improve these patients' quality of life, new therapies are being developed based on findings in salivary gland cell and developmental biology. Here we discuss the anatomy and biogenesis of the major human salivary glands and the rodent submandibular gland, which has been used extensively as a research model. We also include a review of recent research on the identification and function of stem cells in salivary glands, and the emerging field of research suggesting that nerves play an instructive role during development and may be essential for adult gland repair and regeneration. Understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in gland biogenesis provides a template for regenerating, repairing or reengineering diseased or damaged adult human salivary glands. We provide an overview of 3 general approaches currently being developed to regenerate damaged salivary tissue, including gene therapy, stem cell-based therapy and tissue engineering. In the future, it may be that a combination of all three will be used to repair, regenerate and reengineer functional salivary glands in patients to increase the secretion of their saliva, the focus of this monograph.

  5. Surgery for Malignant Submandibular Gland Neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Silver, Natalie L; Chinn, Steven B; Bradley, Patrick J; Weber, Randal S

    2016-01-01

    For many decades, surgery has been the primary treatment for malignant submandibular gland neoplasms. Nonetheless, due to the heterogeneity and rarity of submandibular gland malignant tumors and the high frequency of chronic benign processes in this region, management can be complex. Preoperative investigations, such as fine-needle aspiration and imaging, are critical to achieve the correct diagnosis so that appropriate surgery can be planned. In general, for malignant submandibular gland neoplasms, the minimal treatment necessary is excision of the submandibular gland with level I lymph node dissection. Salivary gland cancer in the submandibular gland is generally more aggressive than the same histologic type in the parotid gland. Neck dissection may be required and primarily depends on the stage and histological grade. Adjuvant therapy most frequently consists of radiation and can improve overall survival. Some factors that influence prognosis after surgical treatment include the histologic grade, stage at presentation, and positive surgical margins. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Correlation of disease activity and serum level of carcinoembryonic antigen in acquired idiopathic generalized anhidrosis: A case report.

    PubMed

    Honma, Masaru; Iinuma, Shin; Kanno, Kyoko; Komatsu, Shigetsuna; Minami-Hori, Masako; Ishida-Yamamoto, Akemi

    2015-09-01

    Hypohidrosis and anhidrosis are congenital or acquired conditions which are characterized by inadequate sweating. Acquired idiopathic generalized hypohidrosis/anhidrosis (AIGA) includes idiopathic pure sudomotor failure (IPSF), which has the following distinct features: sudden onset in youth, increased serum immunoglobulin E and responds favorably to systemic corticosteroid. No clinical markers reflecting the disease severity or activity have been established. Here, we report a case of AIGA in a Japanese patient successfully treated with repeated methylprednisolone pulse therapy. In this case, serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) levels increased up to 19.8 ng/mL along with aberrant CEA immunoreactivity of eccrine sweat glands. Interestingly, the serum CEA level normalized as sweating improved with repeated methylprednisolone pulse therapy. Therefore, serum CEA level may serve as a useful clinical marker of hypohidrosis or anhidrosis. © 2015 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  7. Paroxetine useful for palmar-plantar hyperhidrosis.

    PubMed

    Praharaj, Samir Kumar; Arora, Manu

    2006-10-01

    To report a case of palmar-plantar hyperhidrosis (PPH) in which paroxetine was found to be helpful. A 32-year-old man with a history of excessive sweating of the palms and soles since childhood was diagnosed with PPH and was prescribed paroxetine 10 mg/day, which was increased to 20 mg/day. After one month, he experienced a marked reduction in sweating and improvement in socio-occupational functioning, which were sustained during follow-up at 6 months without any emergent adverse effects. Paroxetine's anticholinergic action may be responsible for its beneficial effect in PPH, as it may override the adrenergic mechanism, which has a minor effect on sweating from eccrine glands. Alternatively, paroxetine's beneficial effect in PPH may be secondary to its antianxiety effect, through central mechanisms. Paroxetine may be a useful option in the treatment of PPH.

  8. Effect of two sweating simulation methods on clothing evaporative resistance in a so-called isothermal condition.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yehu; Wang, Faming; Peng, Hui

    2016-07-01

    The effect of sweating simulation methods on clothing evaporative resistance was investigated in a so-called isothermal condition (T manikin  = T a  = T r ). Two sweating simulation methods, namely, the pre-wetted fabric "skin" (PW) and the water supplied sweating (WS), were applied to determine clothing evaporative resistance on a "Newton" thermal manikin. Results indicated that the clothing evaporative resistance determined by the WS method was significantly lower than that measured by the PW method. In addition, the evaporative resistances measured by the two methods were correlated and exhibited a linear relationship. Validation experiments demonstrated that the empirical regression equation showed highly acceptable estimations. The study contributes to improving the accuracy of measurements of clothing evaporative resistance by means of a sweating manikin.

  9. A comparison of fingerprint sweat corrosion of different alloys of brass.

    PubMed

    Sykes, Stephanie; Bond, John W

    2013-01-01

    Fingerprint sweat from 40 donors was deposited onto samples of five α and α + β phase brasses, comprising five alloys with different copper and zinc concentrations, two of which also had the addition of small concentrations of lead. Visual grading of the visibility of the corrosion revealed that brasses with the least amount of zinc produced the most visible and fully formed fingerprints from the most donors. Consideration of previously reported mechanisms for the corrosion of brass suggests red copper (I) oxide as a likely corrosion product for low zinc brasses, and a consideration of the color, composition, and solubility of fingerprint sweat corrosion products suggests that copper (I) oxide produces good contrast and visibility with the brass substrate. Scanning electron microscope images of the corrosion of all five alloys confirmed the enhanced contrast between corroded and uncorroded areas for low zinc alloys. © 2012 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  10. Study on moisture absorption and sweat discharge of honeycomb polyester fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Aifen; Zhang, Yongjiu

    2015-07-01

    The moisture absorption and liberation properties of honeycomb polyester fiber were studied in order to understand its moisture absorption and sweat discharge. Through testing moisture absorption and liberation regains of honeycomb polyester fiber and normal polyester fiber in standard atmospheric conditions, their moisture absorption and liberation curves were depicted, and the regression equations of moisture regains to time during their reaching the balance of moisture absorption and moisture liberation were obtained according to the curves. Their moisture absorption and liberation rate curves were analyzed and the regression equations of the rates to time were obtained. The results shows that the moisture regain of honeycomb polyester fiber is much bigger than the normal polyester fiber's, and the initial moisture absorption and moisture liberation rates of the former are much higher than the latter's, so that the moisture absorbance and sweat discharge of honeycomb polyester fiber are excellent.

  11. Upright LBPP application attenuates elevated postexercise resting thresholds for cutaneous vasodilation and sweating.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Dwayne N; Kenny, Glen P

    2003-07-01

    We evaluated postexercise venous pooling as a factor leading to previously reported increases in the postexercise esophageal temperature threshold for cutaneous vasodilation (ThVD) and sweating (ThSW). Six subjects were randomly exposed to lower body positive pressure (LBPP) and to no LBPP after an exercise and no-exercise treatment protocol. The exercise treatment consisted of 15 min of upright cycling at 65% of peak oxygen consumption, and the no-exercise treatment consisted of 15 min upright seated rest. Immediately after either treatment, subjects donned a liquid-conditioned suit used to regulate mean skin temperature and then were positioned within an upright LBPP chamber. The suit was first perfused with 20 degrees C water to control and stabilize skin and core temperature before whole body heating. Subsequently the skin was heated ( approximately 4.0 degrees C/h) until cutaneous vasodilation and sweating occurred. Forearm skin blood flow and arterial blood pressure were measured noninvasively and were used to calculate cutaneous vascular conductance during whole body heating. Sweat rate response was estimated from a 5.0-cm2 ventilated capsule placed on the upper back. Postexercise ThVD and ThSW were both significantly elevated (0.27 +/- 0.04 degrees C and 0.25 +/- 0.04 degrees C, respectively) compared with the no-exercise trial without LBPP (P < 0.05). However, the postexercise increases in both ThVD and ThSW were reversed with the application of LBPP. Our results support the hypothesis that the postexercise warm thermal responses of cutaneous vasodilation and sweating are attenuated by baroreceptor modulation via lower body venous pooling.

  12. Detection of cannabis in oral fluid (saliva) and forehead wipes (sweat) from impaired drivers.

    PubMed

    Kintz, P; Cirimele, V; Ludes, B

    2000-10-01

    Saliva and sweat have been presented as two alternative matrices for the establishment of drug abuse. The noninvasive collection of a saliva or sweat sample, which is relatively easy to perform and can be achieved under close supervision, is one of the most important benefits in a driving-under-the-influence situation. Moreover, the presence of certain analytes in saliva is a better indication of recent use than when the drug is detected in urine, so there is a higher probability that the subject is experiencing pharmacological effects at the time of sampling. We developed an original procedure using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to test for delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the psychoactive ingredient of cannabis, in oral fluid and forehead wipes, collected with Sarstedt Salivettes and cosmetic pads, respectively. Blood, urine, oral fluid, and forehead wipes were simultaneously collected from 198 injured drivers admitted to an Emergency Hospital in Strasbourg, France. Of the 22 subjects positive for 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC (THCCOOH) in urine, 14 and 16 were positive for THC in oral fluid (1 to 103 ng/Salivette) and forehead wipe (4 to 152 ng/pad), respectively. 11-Hydroxy-THC and THCCOOH were not detected in these body fluids. Two main limitations of saliva and sweat are apparent: the amount of matrix collected is smaller when compared to urine, and the levels of drugs are higher in urine than in saliva and sweat. A current limitation in the use of these specimens for roadside testing is the absence of a suitable immunoassay that detects the parent compound in sufficiently low concentrations.

  13. Sweat Collecting Device and Methods for Use and Detection of Tampering

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-09-28

    Laboratories, Inc. Menlo Park, CA. 1999. 19 An article by P. Kintz , Drug Testing in Addicts: a Comparison between Urine, Sweat, 20 and Hair , Therapeutic Drug...drug-contaminated environment. Several of these cases involved 10 individuals identified as methamphetamine positive, who denied vehemently any 11... methamphetamine use, some even while admitting they used other illegal drugs. In at least one 12 instance, consecutive 48-hour urine specimens which

  14. Control of skin blood flow, sweating, and heart rate - Role of skin vs. core temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyss, C. R.; Brengelmann, G. L.; Johnson, J. M.; Rowell, L. B.; Niederberger, M.

    1974-01-01

    A study was conducted to generate quantitative expressions for the influence of core temperature, skin temperature, and the rate of change of skin temperature on sweat rate, skin blood flow, and heart rate. A second goal of the study was to determine whether the use of esophageal temperature rather than the right atrial temperature as a measure of core temperature would lead to different conclusions about the control of measured effector variables.

  15. Corrections to the Shapiro Equation used to Predict Sweating and Water Requirements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    evaporative power of a thermal environment . Within the limits of the data, the equation has been shown to be a valid estimator of sweating rate for a...requirements over wide thermal environments by knowledge of only two key variables, Ereq and Emax, which directly or indirectly integrate the effects of...exchange: Biophysics and physiology. Handbook on Adaptation to the Environment . Part I, The Thermal Environment , edited by M. J. Fregly and C. M

  16. Sweat conductivity and coulometric quantitative test in neonatal cystic fibrosis screening.

    PubMed

    Domingos, Mouseline Torquato; Magdalena, Neiva Isabel Rodrigues; Cat, Mônica Nunes Lima; Watanabe, Alexandra Mitiru; Rosário Filho, Nelson Augusto

    2015-01-01

    To compare the results obtained with the sweat test using the conductivity method and coulometric measurement of sweat chloride in newborns (NBs) with suspected cystic fibrosis (CF) in the neonatal screening program. The sweat test was performed simultaneously by both methods in children with and without CF. The cutoff values to confirm CF were >50 mmol/L in the conductivity and >60 mmol/L in the coulometric test. There were 444 infants without CF (185 males, 234 females, and 24 unreported) submitted to the sweat test through conductivity and coulometric measurement simultaneously, obtaining median results of 32 mmol/L and 12 mmol/L, respectively. For 90 infants with CF, the median values of conductivity and coulometric measurement were 108 mmol/L and 97 mmol/L, respectively. The false positive rate for conductivity was 16.7%, and was higher than 50 mmol/L in all patients with CF, which gives this method a sensitivity of 100% (95% CI: 93.8-97.8), specificity of 96.2% (95% CI: 93.8-97.8), positive predictive value of 83.3% (95% CI: 74.4-91.1), negative predictive value of 100% (95% CI: 90.5-109.4), and 9.8% accuracy. The correlation between the methods was r=0.97 (p>0.001). The best suggested cutoff value was 69.0 mmol/L, with a kappa coefficient=0.89. The conductivity test showed excellent correlation with the quantitative coulometric test, high sensitivity and specificity, and can be used in the diagnosis of CF in children detected through newborn screening. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  17. Heat of sorption induced by sweating affects thermoregulatory responses during heat load.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, K; Hirata, K; Kamata, Y

    2001-01-01

    To investigate the effects of heat of sorption per se induced by sweating on thermoregulatory responses in clothed subjects, two experiments were carried out. In experiment 1 [ambient temperature (Ta) 27.2 degrees C, 50% relative humidity (r.h.)], seven female subjects immersed their lower-legs in a water bath at a temperature raised between 35-41 degrees C during 70 min wearing garments made for the experiment of either 100% cotton (C) or 100% polyester (P). Skin blood flow at the forearm was significantly greater in C than in P (P < 0.05). The increase of mean skin temperature (Tsk) and clothing surface and clothing microclimate temperatures were significantly higher in C than that of P after the onset of sweating (P < 0.05). Furthermore, these responses were accompanied by warmer and more uncomfortable sensations in C than in P despite a lower rectal temperature in C compared with P and identical mean body temperature in both sets of garments. In experiment 2, to simulate the clothing microclimate after the onset of sweating, C and P garments were exposed in the climate chamber to r.h. raised from 50% to 95% at a constant Ta of 27.2 degrees C. The clothing surface temperature rose by 2.2 degrees C for C and by 0.5 degree C for P after the increase of r.h. These results clearly showed a more marked increase in heat of sorption in C than in P. These results indicated that the heat of sorption per se after the onset of an increasing clothing microclimate vapour pressure, mimicking the onset of sweating, enhanced thermoregulatory responses such as skin blood flow, (Tsk) and subjective voting in C.

  18. Tactile cues significantly modulate the perception of sweat-induced skin wetness independently of the level of physical skin wetness

    PubMed Central

    Fournet, Damien; Hodder, Simon; Havenith, George

    2015-01-01

    Humans sense the wetness of a wet surface through the somatosensory integration of thermal and tactile inputs generated by the interaction between skin and moisture. However, little is known on how wetness is sensed when moisture is produced via sweating. We tested the hypothesis that, in the absence of skin cooling, intermittent tactile cues, as coded by low-threshold skin mechanoreceptors, modulate the perception of sweat-induced skin wetness, independently of the level of physical wetness. Ten males (22 yr old) performed an incremental exercise protocol during two trials designed to induce the same physical skin wetness but to induce lower (TIGHT-FIT) and higher (LOOSE-FIT) wetness perception. In the TIGHT-FIT, a tight-fitting clothing ensemble limited intermittent skin-sweat-clothing tactile interactions. In the LOOSE-FIT, a loose-fitting ensemble allowed free skin-sweat-clothing interactions. Heart rate, core and skin temperature, galvanic skin conductance (GSC), and physical (wbody) and perceived skin wetness were recorded. Exercise-induced sweat production and physical wetness increased significantly [GSC: 3.1 μS, SD 0.3 to 18.8 μS, SD 1.3, P < 0.01; wbody: 0.26 no-dimension units (nd), SD 0.02, to 0.92 nd, SD 0.01, P < 0.01], with no differences between TIGHT-FIT and LOOSE-FIT (P > 0.05). However, the limited intermittent tactile inputs generated by the TIGHT-FIT ensemble reduced significantly whole-body and regional wetness perception (P < 0.01). This reduction was more pronounced when between 40 and 80% of the body was covered in sweat. We conclude that the central integration of intermittent mechanical interactions between skin, sweat, and clothing, as coded by low-threshold skin mechanoreceptors, significantly contributes to the ability to sense sweat-induced skin wetness. PMID:25878153

  19. [Duplication of the pituitary gland].

    PubMed

    Krnić, Nevena; Dumić, Katja; Rados, Marko; Putarek, Natasa Rojnić; Stanimirović, Andrija

    2009-01-01

    Duplication of the pituitary gland is a rare malformation. To the best of our knowledge, only 40 cases throughout the world have been reported previously. Due to associated severe developmental anomalies lots of these cases were diagnosed at autopsy. Only 7 patients survived beyond puberty, however, it is important to stress that none of them had major brain anomalies. We present the case of a girl with duplication of the pituitary gland (DPG), central precocious puberty and associated midline defects. Among fenestration of basilar artery, previously described in the literature, we also found, for the first time, a duplication of the M1-segment of the left median cerebral artery. Our patient is one of the 4 DPG patients with associated precocious puberty treated with gonadotropine releasing hormone agonists (GnRH), but the only one in whom this treatment was finished successfully.

  20. Pituitary gland development: an update.

    PubMed

    Bancalari, Rodrigo E; Gregory, Louise C; McCabe, Mark J; Dattani, Mehul T

    2012-01-01

    The embryonic development of the pituitary gland involves a complex and highly spatio-temporally regulated network of integrating signalling molecules and transcription factors. Genetic mutations in any of these factors can lead to congenital hypopituitarism in association with a wide spectrum of craniofacial/midline defects ranging from incompatibility with life to holoprosencephaly (HPE) and cleft palate and septo-optic dysplasia (SOD). Increasing evidence supports a genotypic overlap with hypogonadotrophic hypogonadal disorders such as Kallmann syndrome, which is consistent with the known overlap in phenotypes between these disorders. This chapter reviews the cascade of events leading up to the successful development of the pituitary gland and to highlight key areas where genetic variations can occur thus leading to congenital hypopituitarism and associated defects. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Development of the thyroid gland.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Mikael; Fagman, Henrik

    2017-06-15

    Thyroid hormones are crucial for organismal development and homeostasis. In humans, untreated congenital hypothyroidism due to thyroid agenesis inevitably leads to cretinism, which comprises irreversible brain dysfunction and dwarfism. Elucidating how the thyroid gland - the only source of thyroid hormones in the body - develops is thus key for understanding and treating thyroid dysgenesis, and for generating thyroid cells in vitro that might be used for cell-based therapies. Here, we review the principal mechanisms involved in thyroid organogenesis and functional differentiation, highlighting how the thyroid forerunner evolved from the endostyle in protochordates to the endocrine gland found in vertebrates. New findings on the specification and fate decisions of thyroid progenitors, and the morphogenesis of precursor cells into hormone-producing follicular units, are also discussed. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  2. Cancers of major salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Panwar, Aru; Kozel, Jessica A; Lydiatt, William M

    2015-07-01

    Major salivary gland malignancies are a rare but histologically diverse group of entities. Establishing the diagnosis of a malignant salivary neoplasm may be challenging because of the often minimally symptomatic nature of the disease, and limitations of imaging modalities and cytology. Treatment is centered on surgical therapy and adjuvant radiation in selected scenarios. Systemic therapy with chemotherapeutic agents and monoclonal antibodies lacks evidence in support of its routine use. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Second-hand stress: inhalation of stress sweat enhances neural response to neutral faces

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, Denis; Botanov, Yevgeny; Hajcak, Greg

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated whether human chemosensory-stress cues affect neural activity related to the evaluation of emotional stimuli. Chemosensory stimuli were obtained from the sweat of 64 male donors during both stress (first-time skydive) and control (exercise) conditions, indistinguishable by odor. We then recorded event-related potentials (ERPs) from an unrelated group of 14 participants while they viewed faces morphed with neutral-to-angry expressions and inhaled nebulized stress and exercise sweat in counter-balanced blocks, blind to condition. Results for the control condition ERPs were consistent with previous findings: the late positive potential (LPP; 400–600 ms post stimulus) in response to faces was larger for threatening than both neutral and ambiguous faces. In contrast, the stress condition was associated with a heightened LPP across all facial expressions; relative to control, the LPP was increased for both ambiguous and neutral faces in the stress condition. These results suggest that stress sweat may impact electrocortical activity associated with attention to salient environmental cues, potentially increasing attentiveness to otherwise inconspicuous stimuli. PMID:21208988

  4. Frequency of the resonance of the human sweat duct in a normal mode of operation.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Saroj R; Ben Ishai, Paul; Kawase, Kodo

    2018-03-01

    The applications of terahertz (THz) waves have been increasing rapidly in different fields such as information and communication technology, homeland security and biomedical engineering. However, study on the possible health implications due to various biological effects induced by THz waves is relatively scarce. Previously, it has been reported that the human sweat ducts play a significant role in the interaction of the THz wave with human skin due to its coiled structure. This structure imposes on them the electromagnetic character of a helical antenna. To further understand these phenomena, we investigated the morphological features of human sweat ducts and the dielectric properties of their surrounding medium. Based upon these parameters, we estimated the frequency of the resonance of the human sweat duct in a normal mode of operation and our estimation showed that there is a broad resonance around 228 GHz. This result indicates that careful consideration should be given while designing electronic and photonic devices operating in the sub-terahertz frequency region in order to avoid various effects on human health due to these waves.

  5. The English sweating sickness, with particular reference to the 1551 outbreak in Chester.

    PubMed

    Hunter, P R

    1991-01-01

    During the 15th and 16th centuries in England, there were five epidemics of a disease characterized by fever and profuse sweating and associated with high mortality. This disease became known as the English sweating sickness. The first epidemic occurred during 1485 at around the time of Henry Tudor's victory at Bosworth Field, and the last took place during the reign of Edward VI in 1551. The disease tended to occur during the summer and early autumn. The relatively affluent male adult population, particularly the clergy, seemed to suffer the highest attack rates, and, except in one epidemic, the disease appears to have attacked only individuals native to England. Despite the reputation of the English sweating sickness as a disease with a high fatality rate, records of burials and wills in Chester suggest that the 1551 epidemic did not have a marked effect on the demographics of the population. The etiologic agent is still unknown, although an enterovirus seems to this author to be the most likely pathogen.

  6. CFTR genotypes in patients with normal or borderline sweat chloride levels.

    PubMed

    Feldmann, Delphine; Couderc, Remy; Audrezet, Marie-Pierre; Ferec, Claude; Bienvenu, Thierry; Desgeorges, Marie; Claustres, Mireille; Mittre, Hervé; Blayau, Martine; Bozon, Dominique; Malinge, Marie-Claire; Monnier, Nicole; Bonnefont, Jean-Paul; Iron, Albert; Bieth, Eric; Dumur, Viviane; Clavel, Christine; Cazeneuve, Cécile; Girodon, Emmanuelle

    2003-10-01

    In recent years, some patients bearing "atypical" forms of cystic fibrosis (CF) with normal sweat chloride concentrations have been described. To identify the spectrum of mutant combinations causing such atypical CF, we collected the results of CFTR (ABCC7) mutation analysis from 15 laboratories. Thirty patients with one or more typical symptoms of the disease associated with normal or borderline sweat chloride levels and bearing two CFTR mutations were selected. Phenotypes and genotypes of these 30 patients are described. A total of 18 different CFTR mutations were observed in the 60 chromosomes analysed. F508del was present in 31.6 % of the mutated chromosomes and 3849+10kbC>T in 13.3 %. R117H, D1152H, L206W, 3272-26A>G, S1235R, G149R, R1070W, S945L, and the poly-T tract variation commonly called IVS8-5T were also observed. The relative frequency of CFTR mutations clearly differed from that observed in typical CF patients or in CBAVD patients with the same ethnic origin. A mild genotype with one or two mild or variable mutations was observed in all the patients. These findings improve our understanding of the distribution of CFTR alleles in CF with normal or borderline sweat chloride concentrations and will facilitate the development of more sensitive CFTR mutation screening. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Textile Functionalization and Its Effects on the Release of Silver Nanoparticles into Artificial Sweat.

    PubMed

    Wagener, Sandra; Dommershausen, Nils; Jungnickel, Harald; Laux, Peter; Mitrano, Denise; Nowack, Bernd; Schneider, Gregor; Luch, Andreas

    2016-06-07

    This study addresses the release of total silver (Ag) and silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) from textiles into artificial sweat, particularly considering the functionalization technology used in textile finishing. Migration experiments were conducted for four commercially available textiles and for six laboratory-prepared textiles. Two among these lab-prepared textiles represent materials in which Ag-NPs were embedded within the textile fibers (composites), whereas the other lab-prepared textiles contain Ag particles on the respective fiber surfaces (coatings). The results indicate a smaller release of total Ag from composites in comparison to surface-coated textiles. The particulate fraction determined within the artificial sweat was negligible for most textiles, meaning that the majority of the released Ag is present as dissolved Ag. It is also relevant to note that nanotextiles do not release more particulate Ag than conventional Ag textiles. The results rather indicate that the functionalization type is the most important parameter affecting the migration. Furthermore, after measuring different Ag-NP types in their pristine form with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry in the single particle mode, there is evidence that particle modifications, like surface coating, may also influence the dissolution behavior of the Ag-NPs in the sweat solutions. These factors are important when discussing the likelihood of consumer exposure.

  8. Skin temperature, thermal comfort, sweating, clothing and activity of men sledging in Antarctica

    PubMed Central

    Budd, G. M.

    1966-01-01

    1. Three men were studied while dog-sledging 320 km in 12 days in Antarctica. Conventional Antarctic clothing (`sweaters and windproofs') was worn. Four hundred observations were made of medial thigh skin temperature, thermal comfort, sweating, clothing, activity and environmental conditions. 2. Work occupied an average of 11·0 hr/day and sleep 7·5 hr. Estimated daily energy expenditure averaged 5100 kcal (range 2740-6660 kcal). 3. Skin temperature fell on exposure to cold despite the clothing worn, but was not changed by the level of activity. Sweating, and thermal comfort, were directly related to both skin temperature and activity. 4. Inside the tent, the modal value of skin temperature was 33° C (range 27-36° C) and the men were comfortable in 94% of observations. 5. During the 9·2 hr/day spent outdoors the modal value of skin temperature was 27° C (range 18-33° C) and the men felt too cold (but did not shiver) in 11% (range 7-20%) of observations, suggesting that cold stress was not negligible. However, they also felt too hot in 20% of observations and were sweating in 23%. PMID:5914254

  9. Quantitative assessment of the intensity of palmar and plantar sweating in patients with primary palmoplantar hyperhidrosis.

    PubMed

    Sakiyama, Bruno Yoshihiro Parlato; Monteiro, Thaís Vera; Ishy, Augusto; Campos, José Ribas Milanez de; Kauffman, Paulo; Wolosker, Nelson

    2012-01-01

    To compare individuals with and without hyperhidrosis in terms of the intensity of palmar and plantar sweating. We selected 50 patients clinically diagnosed with palmoplantar hyperhidrosis and 25 normal individuals as controls. We quantified sweating using a portable noninvasive electronic device that has relative humidity and temperature sensors to measure transepidermal water loss. All of the individuals had a body mass index of 20-25 kg/cm². Subjects remained at rest for 20-30 min before the measurements in order to reduce external interference. The measurements were carried out in a climate-controlled environment (21-24ºC). Measurements were carried out on the hypothenar region on both hands and on the medial plantar region on both feet. In the palmoplantar hyperhidrosis group, the mean transepidermal water loss on the hands and feet was 133.6 ± 51.0 g/m²/h and 71.8 ± 40.3 g/m²/h, respectively, compared with 37.9 ± 18.4 g/m²/h and 27.6 ± 14.3 g/m²/h, respectively, in the control group. The differences between the groups were statistically significant (p < 0.001 for hands and feet). This method proved to be an accurate and reliable tool to quantify palmar and plantar sweating when performed by a trained and qualified professional.

  10. Effects of botulinum toxin-a therapy for palmar hyperhidrosis in plantar sweat production.

    PubMed

    Gregoriou, Stamatis; Rigopoulos, Dimitris; Makris, Michael; Liakou, Anastasia; Agiosofitou, Efi; Stefanaki, Christina; Kontochristopoulos, George

    2010-04-01

    Patients with focal hyperhidrosis in multiple areas often report improvement of plantar hyperhidrosis after botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) therapy for palmar hyperhidrosis. To assess sweat production from the soles in patients receiving BTX-A treatment for their palmar hyperhidrosis. Thirty-six patients with both palmar and plantar hyperhidrosis received 100 U of BTX-A per palm. Sweat production of palms and soles was assessed using a starch iodine test and gravimetry at baseline and 1, 3, and 8 months after treatment. Patients were subjectively assessed using a percentile scale. All patients had significant improvement in their palmar hyperhidrosis that lasted for 6.2 +/- 1.8 months. Gravimetry revealed marginal improvement of plantar hyperhidrosis in 12 patients (from 39.7 +/- 21.3 to 31.5 +/- 18.0 mg/min; p=.01) and statistically significant worsening in 24 patients (from 71.6 +/- 70.60 to 109.94 +/- 82.93 mg/min, p<.001). Treatment of palmar hyperhidrosis with BTX-A increased plantar sweating in many patients affected by both palmar and plantar hyperhidrosis in the population under study. Regardless, patients reported satisfaction with the results and were willing to repeat treatment.

  11. Acute changes in arginine vasopressin, sweat, urine and serum sodium concentrations in exercising humans: does a coordinated homeostatic relationship exist?

    PubMed Central

    Hew-Butler, T; Noakes, T D; Soldin, S J; Verbalis, J G

    2013-01-01

    The parallel response of sweat rate and urine production to changes in plasma osmolality and volume support a role for arginine vasopressin (AVP) as the main endocrine regulator of both excretions. A maximal test to exhaustion and a steady-state run on a motorised treadmill were both completed by 10 moderately trained runners, 1 week apart. Sweat, urine and serum sodium concentrations ([Na+]) were evaluated in association with the plasma concentrations of cytokines, neurohypophyseal and natriuretic peptides, and adrenal steroid hormones. When data from both the high-intensity and steady-state runs were combined, significant linear correlations were noted between: sweat [Na+] versus postexercise urine [Na+] (r = 0.80; p<0.001), postexercise serum [Na+] versus both postexercise urine [Na+] (r = 0.56; p<0.05) and sweat [Na+] (r = 0.64; p<0.01) and postexercise urine [Na+] versus postexercise plasma arginine vasopressin concentration ([AVP]P) (r = 0.48; p<0.05). A significant positive correlation was noted between postexercise [AVP]P and sweat [Na+] during the steady-state condition only (r = 0.66; p<0.05). These correlations suggest that changes in serum [Na+] during exercise may evoke corresponding changes in sweat and urine [Na+], which are likely regulated coordinately by changes in [AVP]P to preserve body fluid homeostasis. PMID:18801773

  12. Nanoduct Sweat Conductivity Measurements in 2664 Patients: Relationship to Age, Arterial Blood Gas, Serum Electrolyte Profiles and Clinical Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Sezer, Rabia Gonul; Aydemir, Gokhan; Akcan, Abdullah Baris; Paketci, Cem; Karaoglu, Abdulbaki; Aydinoz, Secil; Bozaykut, Abdulkadir

    2013-01-01

    Background The Nanoduct® device has acceptable diagnostic accuracy, but there is not enough systematic data supporting its usage in the diagnosis of cystic fibrosis (CF). Methods A retrospective review of patients with an indication for the sweat test was conducted. The conductivity test was repeated in patients who had values higher than 60 mmol/L, and they were referred for sweat chloride measurements. Associations between sweat conductivity measurements and age, gender, (pH, HCO3, pCO2, Na, K, Cl), family history, consanguinity, indications for the test and number of hospitalization were studied. Results Among 2,664 patients, 16 children had sweat conductivity values higher than 80. The median age of patients diagnosed with CF was 4 months old. Age, pH, HCO3, Na, Cl, K and the sweat conductivity test were statistically related (P < 0.001). The ROC curve showed very high agreement between the 2nd conductivity test and the sweat test. Conclusions Patients suspected to have CF can be screened using the Nanoduct® conductivity device in non-qualified centers. PMID:23390474

  13. Association of sweat chloride concentration at time of diagnosis and CFTR genotype with mortality and cystic fibrosis phenotype.

    PubMed

    McKone, Edward F; Velentgas, Priscilla; Swenson, Anna J; Goss, Christopher H

    2015-09-01

    The extent to which sweat chloride concentration predicts survival and clinical phenotype independently of CFTR genotype in cystic fibrosis is not well understood. We analyzed the US Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Patient Registry data using Cox regression to examine the relationship between sweat chloride concentration (<60, 60-<80, ≥80mmol/L), CFTR genotype (high and lower risk for lung function decline), and survival and mixed linear regression to examine the relationship between sweat chloride, CFTR genotype, and measures of lung function and growth. When included in the same model, CFTR genotype, but not sweat chloride, was independently associated with survival and with lung function, height, and BMI. Among patients with unclassified CFTR genotype, sweat chloride was an independent predictor of survival (<60 HR 0.53 [0.37, 0.77], 60-<80 0.51 [0.42, 0.63]). Sweat chloride concentration may be a useful predictor of mortality and clinical phenotype when CFTR genotype functional class is unclassified. Copyright © 2015 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Submandibular Gland Transfer: A Potential Imaging Pitfall.

    PubMed

    Wu, X; Yom, S S; Ha, P K; Heaton, C M; Glastonbury, C M

    2018-03-29

    The Seikaly and Jha submandibular gland transfer surgery is performed to facilitate gland shielding during radiation therapy for head and neck tumors to circumvent radiation-induced xerostomia. It results in an asymmetric postsurgical appearance of the submandibular and submental spaces. Our purpose was to characterize the morphologic and enhancement characteristics of the transferred submandibular gland and identify potential pitfalls in postoperative radiologic interpretation. This retrospective study identified patients with head and neck cancer who had undergone the submandibular gland transfer procedure at our institution. Chart reviews were performed to identify relevant oncologic histories and therapies. CT and MR neck imaging was reviewed to characterize morphologic and enhancement characteristics of the pre- and postoperative submandibular glands, as well as interpretive accuracy. Eleven patients with oropharyngeal and nasopharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas who underwent submandibular gland transfer were identified. The transferred glands were significantly lengthened in the anteroposterior dimension compared with contralateral glands ( P < .001) and displaced anteriorly and inferiorly within the submandibular and submental spaces. Enhancement patterns of the transferred submandibular glands varied, depending on the time of imaging relative to the operation and radiation therapy. Submandibular gland transfer was acknowledged in the postoperative report in 7/11 cases. Errors in interpretation were present in 2/11 reports. After the submandibular gland transfer procedure, the submandibular and submental spaces lose their symmetric appearances as the transferred submandibular glands become lengthened and located more anteriorly and inferiorly, with variable enhancement characteristics. Familiarity with the postsurgical appearance of the transferred submandibular glands is key to accurate imaging interpretation. © 2018 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  15. Limited social plasticity in the socially polymorphic sweat beeLasioglossum calceatum.

    PubMed

    Davison, P J; Field, J

    2018-01-01

    Eusociality is characterised by a reproductive division of labour, where some individuals forgo direct reproduction to instead help raise kin. Socially polymorphic sweat bees are ideal models for addressing the mechanisms underlying the transition from solitary living to eusociality, because different individuals in the same species can express either eusocial or solitary behaviour. A key question is whether alternative social phenotypes represent environmentally induced plasticity or predominantly genetic differentiation between populations. In this paper, we focus on the sweat bee Lasioglossum calceatum , in which northern or high-altitude populations are solitary, whereas more southern or low-altitude populations are typically eusocial. To test whether social phenotype responds to local environmental cues, we transplanted adult females from a solitary, northern population, to a southern site where native bees are typically eusocial. Nearly all native nests were eusocial, with foundresses producing small first brood (B1) females that became workers. In contrast, nine out of ten nests initiated by transplanted bees were solitary, producing female offspring that were the same size as the foundress and entered directly into hibernation. Only one of these ten nests became eusocial. Social phenotype was unlikely to be related to temperature experienced by nest foundresses when provisioning B1 offspring, or by B1 emergence time, both previously implicated in social plasticity seen in two other socially polymorphic sweat bees. Our results suggest that social polymorphism in L. calceatum predominantly reflects genetic differentiation between populations, and that plasticity is in the process of being lost by bees in northern populations. Phenotypic plasticity is thought to play a key role in the early stages of the transition from solitary to eusocial behaviour, but may then be lost if environmental conditions become less variable. Socially polymorphic sweat bees exhibit

  16. Possible biphasic sweating response during short-term heat acclimation protocol for tropical natives.

    PubMed

    Magalhães, Flávio de Castro; Machado-Moreira, Christiano Antônio; Vimieiro-Gomes, Ana Carolina; Silami-Garcia, Emerson; Lima, Nilo Resende Viana; Rodrigues, Luiz Oswaldo Carneiro

    2006-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the sweat loss response during short-term heat acclimation in tropical natives. Six healthy young male subjects, inhabitants of a tropical region, were heat acclimated by means of nine days of one-hour heat-exercise treatments (40+/-0 degrees C and 32+/-1% relative humidity; 50% (.)VO(2peak) on a cycle ergometer). On days 1 to 9 of heat acclimation whole-body sweat loss was calculated by body weight variation corrected for body surface area. On days 1 and 9 rectal temperature (T(re)) and heart rate (HR) were measured continuously, and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) every 4 minutes. Heat acclimation was confirmed by reduced HR (day 1 rest: 77+/-5 b.min(-1); day 9 rest: 68+/-3 b.min(-1); day 1 final exercise: 161+/-15 b.min(-1); day 9 final exercise: 145+/-11 b.min(-1), p<0.05), RPE (13 vs. 11, p<0.05) and T(re) (day 1 rest: 37.2+/-0.2 degrees C; day 9 rest: 37.0+/-0.2 degrees C; day 1 final exercise: 38.2+/-0.2 degrees C; day 9 final exercise: 37.9+/-0.1 degrees C, p<0.05). The main finding was that whole-body sweat loss increased in days 5 and 7 (9.49+/-1.84 and 9.56+/-1.86 g.m(-2).min(-1), respectively) compared to day 1 (8.31+/-1.31 g.m(-2).min(-1), p<0.05) and was not different in day 9 (8.48+/-1.02 g.m(-2).min(-1)) compared to day 1 (p>0.05) of the protocol. These findings are consistent with the heat acclimation induced adaptations and suggest a biphasic sweat response (an increase in the sweat rate in the middle of the protocol followed by return to initial values by the end of it) during short-term heat acclimation in tropical natives.

  17. Wearing graduated compression stockings augments cutaneous vasodilation but not sweating during exercise in the heat.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Naoto; Nikawa, Toshiya; Tsuji, Bun; Kenny, Glen P; Kondo, Narihiko; Nishiyasu, Takeshi

    2017-05-01

    The activation of cutaneous vasodilation and sweating are essential to the regulation of core temperature during exercise in the heat. We assessed the effect of graduated compression induced by wearing stockings on cutaneous vasodilation and sweating during exercise in the heat (30°C). On two separate occasions, nine young males exercised for 45 min or until core temperature reached ~1.5°C above baseline resting while wearing either (1) stockings causing graduated compression (graduate compression stockings, GCS), or (2) loose-fitting stockings without compression (Control). Forearm vascular conductance was evaluated by forearm blood flow (venous occlusion plethysmography) divided by mean arterial pressure to estimate cutaneous vasodilation. Sweat rate was estimated using the ventilated capsule technique. Core and skin temperatures were measured continuously. Exercise duration was similar between conditions (Control: 42.2 ± 3.6 min vs. GCS: 42.2 ± 3.6 min, P  = 1.00). Relative to Control, GCS increased forearm vascular conductance during the late stages (≥30 min) of exercise (e.g., at 40 min, 15.6 ± 5.6 vs. 18.0 ± 6.0 units, P  = 0.01). This was paralleled by a greater sensitivity (23.1 ± 9.1 vs. 32.1 ± 15.0 units°C -1 , P  = 0.043) and peak level (14.1 ± 5.1 vs. 16.3 ± 5.7 units, P  = 0.048) of cutaneous vasodilation as evaluated from the relationship between forearm vascular conductance with core temperature. However, the core temperature threshold at which an increase in forearm vascular conductance occurred did not differ between conditions (Control: 36.9 ± 0.2 vs. GCS: 37.0 ± 0.3°C, P  = 0.13). In contrast, no effect of GCS on sweating was measured (all P  > 0.05). We show that the use of GCS during exercise in the heat enhances cutaneous vasodilation and not sweating. © 2017 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American

  18. Talimogene Laherparepvec and Nivolumab in Treating Patients With Refractory Lymphomas or Advanced or Refractory Non-melanoma Skin Cancers

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2018-04-02

    Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma; Adnexal Carcinoma; Apocrine Carcinoma; Eccrine Porocarcinoma; Extraocular Cutaneous Sebaceous Carcinoma; Hidradenocarcinoma; Keratoacanthoma; Malignant Sweat Gland Neoplasm; Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Microcystic Adnexal Carcinoma; NK-Cell Lymphoma, Unclassifiable; Non-Melanomatous Lesion; Paget Disease; Papillary Adenocarcinoma; Primary Cutaneous Mucinous Carcinoma; Refractory Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Mycosis Fungoides; Refractory Primary Cutaneous T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Sezary Syndrome; Signet Ring Cell Carcinoma; Skin Basal Cell Carcinoma; Skin Basosquamous Cell Carcinoma; Skin Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Spiradenocarcinoma; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of Unknown Primary Origin; Stage III Skin Cancer; Stage IV Skin Cancer; Sweat Gland Carcinoma; Trichilemmocarcinoma; Vulvar Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  19. Coma blisters after poisoning caused by central nervous system depressants: case report including histopathological findings.

    PubMed

    Branco, Maira Migliari; Capitani, Eduardo Mello De; Cintra, Maria Letícia; Hyslop, Stephen; Carvalho, Adriana Camargo; Bucaretchi, Fabio

    2012-01-01

    Blister formation and eccrine sweat gland necrosis is a cutaneous manifestation associated with states of impaired consciousness, most frequently reported after overdoses of central nervous system depressants, particularly phenobarbital. The case of a 45-year-old woman who developed "coma blisters" at six distinct anatomic sites after confirmed (laboratory) phenobarbital poisoning, associated with other central nervous system depressants (clonazepam, promethazine, oxcarbazepine and quetiapine), is presented. A biopsy from the left thumb blister taken on day 4 revealed focal necrosis of the epidermis and necrosis of sweat gland epithelial cells; direct immunofluorescence was strongly positive for IgG in superficial blood vessel walls but negative for IgM, IgA, C3 and C1q. The patient was discharged on day 21 with no sequelae.

  20. Idiopathic neonatal iron storage involving the liver, pancreas, heart, and endocrine and exocrine glands.

    PubMed

    Goldfischer, S; Grotsky, H W; Chang, C H; Berman, E L; Richert, R R; Karmarkar, S D; Roskamp, J O; Morecki, R

    1981-01-01

    Autopsy studies of two infants, one a newborn, the other 4 months old, revealed massive amounts of iron in lysosomes of hepatocytes and pancreatic acinar cells. Iron, which had been transported across the placenta, accumulated in the same cell types as in adults with primary and secondary hemochromatosis. Hemosiderin was found in cardiac muscle cells, gastric and intestinal glands, and endocrine and exocrine organs including pituitary, thyroid, adrenals, islets of Langerhans, and sublingual and sweat glands. The liver was the most affected organ and the normal hepatic architecture was replaced by hepatocytes which were arranged in cluster, pseudoacinar structures, and multinucleated giant cells embedded in a collagen matrix. The islets of Langerhans were hyperplastic and hypertrophic. Ten similar cases, in five families, have been described; no patients liver longer than 4 months. Neonatal iron storage disease is clinically and pathologically distinct from Zellweger's cerebrohepatorenal syndrome and hypermethioninemia (tyrosinemia) neonatal diseases in which large stores of iron are present in hepatocytes. No abnormalities in serum iron, ferritin, or transferrin concentrations were detected in five parents of the affected children.

  1. Visceral leishmaniasis with cutaneous lesions in a patient infected with human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Ara, M; Maillo, C; Peón, G; Clavel, A; Cuesta, J; Grasa, M P; Carapeto, F J

    1998-07-01

    We report a case of visceral leishmaniasis (VL) with cutaneous lesions in a patient infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The cutaneous lesions consisted of erythematous papules on the legs. Biopsy of one lesion showed abundant Leishmania amastigotes within epithelial cells of an eccrine sweat gland in the dermis. Leishmania organisms were also found in a blood smear. Rapid and complete clearance of the cutaneous lesions was achieved after antimony therapy. Cutaneous lesions in VL are being reported increasingly frequently in patients with HIV infection and their significance remains in discussion.

  2. [Kufs-disease; a rare cause of early-onset dementia].

    PubMed

    Schreiner, R; Becker, I; Wiegand, M H

    2000-05-01

    The case of a 35-year-old man with progressive dementia from the age of 17 is presented. Clinical examination showed mild extrapyramidal and cerebellar signs and rare myoclonus. Neuropsychological evaluation disclosed severe cognitive deficits. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed moderate generalized atrophy with abnormal iron deposition in the basal ganglia. Positron emission tomography (PET) with 18-fluorodeoxyglucose (18-FDG) demonstrated clear temporoparietal hypometabolism. The clinical symptoms and course are typical for the rare adult type of neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (Kufs' disease). The diagnosis is supported by the electron microscope detection of an abnormal accumulation of lipid vacuoles and lipofuscin in the eccrine sweat glands and the rectal ganglia cells.

  3. Exocrine Glands of Schwarziana quadripunctata (Hymenoptera, Apinae, Meliponini).

    PubMed

    Cruz-Landim, C; Reginato, R D

    2001-08-01

    This article 'describes the location, anatomy, histology and ontogeny of adult Schwarziana quadripunctata exocrine glands. These glands appear either as individualized organs (salivary gland system and Dufour gland) or as epidermis differentiation (tegumentary glands). Variations in the occurrence and degree of development among colony components with regard to their degree of maturity are also described.

  4. Hemangioblastoma arising from the submandibular gland.

    PubMed

    Ayala, Marco A; Morawiecki, Peter A; Yencha, Myron W

    2014-08-01

    The objective was to document and describe the clinical features of a hemangioblastoma arising from a submandibular gland. A case report of a 63-year-old man with a right submandibular gland hemangioblastoma. Submandibular gland excision and histological examination revealed a hemangioblastoma. Subsequent evaluation with imaging studies found no association with von Hippel-Lindau disease. We report the first presentation of a hemangioblastoma arising in a salivary gland. Further evaluation of patients with a hemangioblastoma is recommended given the neoplasms' association with von Hippel-Lindau disease.

  5. Gland-preserving surgery can effectively preserve gland function without increased recurrence in treatment of benign submandibular gland tumour.

    PubMed

    Min, Ruan; Zun, Zhang; Siyi, Li; Wenjun, Yang; Jian, Sun; Chenping, Zhang

    2013-10-01

    The most widely accepted treatment for neoplasms of the submandibular gland usually involves excision of the entire gland. Our aim was to establish a gland-preserving operation for benign tumours of the submandibular gland and evaluate its efficacy. We treated 40 patients from January 2007 to December 2008 with benign submandibular gland tumours who were listed to have an operation that either preserved the gland or sacrificed it. Duration of operation, extent of injury to the nerve, postoperative function of the gland, aesthetic appearance, and recurrence were assessed. We found no significant difference in baseline characteristics among the 20 patients in each group (19 men; 21 women, mean (SD) age of 34 (33.8 ± 5.72) years. The extent of injury to the lingual nerve and submandibular branch, together with deformities of the facial contour, were significantly less in the group in which the gland was preserved. Postoperative salivary production and overall patients' satisfaction were also better in that group. There was no recurrence in either group during the follow up period of 38 months-5 years. The gland-preserving procedure has advantages over the typical approach in which the gland is sacrificed. There is less risk of injury to the nerve, less deformity of the facial contour, better preservation of function, and patients are more satisfied. The gland-preserving technique should therefore be the first choice for management of benign submandibular tumours. Copyright © 2013 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. [Sweat chloride measurement using direct potentiometry: Spotchem(®) (Elitech-Arkray) evaluation and comparison with coulometry and conductivity].

    PubMed

    Nguyen-Khoa, Thao; Borgard, Jean-Pierre; Miled, Ryad; Rota, Michèle

    2013-01-01

    Sweat chloride (Cl(-)) measurement is a key step for the diagnosis of cystic fibrosis. The coulometric technique is validated in this context by international guidelines. The aim of our study was to evaluate the assay for sweat Cl(-) ions using direct potentiometry on disposable cassette (Spotchem™ SE EL-1520, Elitech-Arkray) by comparing results to those obtained on the same sample, by coulometry (Chloride analyser Sherwood 926S, Dutscher). To complete our table of correspondence between the results of Cl(-) ions and sweat conductivity (Sweat Check™ 3100), conductivity has been also achieved for 99 of the 139 sweat samples studied. Linearity of each technique performed extends from 10 to 120 mmol/L. The coefficients of variation within and between runs are < 5%. Comparison of 139 results (Passing - Bablock regression) shows a significant difference (p < 0.001): [Spotchem] = 1.026 [Chloride analyser] + 1.8, r = 0.996. After correction with regression factors, only 6 pairs of values (4.6%) had a difference greater than ± 5 mmol/L). The results of conductivity measurement is strongly correlated with those of Cl(-) ions (r = 0.959 for Chloride analyser and 0.965 for Spotchem; p = 0.576) with a linear relationship between the decision thresholds from 30 to 60 mmol/L Cl(-). Sweat Cl(-) determinations using Spotchem™ analyser meet the criteria required by analytical recommendations. The technique is standardized, easy to perform and fast. Its good practicability makes the sweat test independent to operator and allows point-of care use.

  7. Sex differences in amino acids lost via sweating could lead to differential susceptibilities to disturbances in nitrogen balance and collagen turnover.

    PubMed

    Dunstan, R H; Sparkes, D L; Dascombe, B J; Stevens, C J; Murphy, G R; Macdonald, M M; Gottfries, J; Gottfries, C-G; Roberts, T K

    2017-08-01

    Fluid collected during sweating is enriched with amino acids derived from the skin's natural moisturising factors and has been termed "faux" sweat. Little is known about sex differences in sweat amino acid composition or whether faux sweat amino acid losses affect nitrogen balance. Faux sweat collected by healthy adults (n = 47) after exercise, and at rest by chronic fatigue patients, was analysed for amino acid composition. Healthy females had higher total amino acid concentrations in sweat (10.5 ± 1.2 mM) compared with healthy males (6.9 ± 0.9 mM). Females had higher levels of 13 amino acids in sweat including serine, alanine and glycine. Higher hydroxyproline and proline levels suggested greater collagen turnover in females. Modelling indicated that with conservative levels of exercise, amino acid losses in females via faux sweat were triple than those predicted for urine, whereas in males they were double. It was concluded that females were more susceptible to key amino acid loss during exercise and/or hot conditions. Females reporting chronic fatigue had higher levels of methionine in faux sweat than healthy females. Males reporting chronic fatigue had higher levels of numerous amino acids in faux sweat compared to healthy males. Higher amino acid loss in faux sweat associated with chronic fatigue could contribute to a hypometabolic state. Depending on activity levels, climatic conditions and gender, amino acid losses in sweat and skin leachate could influence daily protein turnover where periods of continuously high turnover could lead to a negative net nitrogen balance.

  8. [MRI of the pineal gland].

    PubMed

    Langevad, Line; Madsen, Camilla Gøbel; Siebner, Hartwig; Garde, Ellen

    2014-11-10

    The pineal gland (CP) is located centrally in the brain and produces melatonin. Cysts and concrements are frequent findings on MRI but their significance is still unclear. The visualization of CP is difficult due to its location and surrounding structures and so far, no standardized method exists. New studies suggest a correlation between CP-morphology and melatonin secretion as well as a connection between melatonin, disturbed circadian rhythm, and the development of cancer and cardiovascular diseases, underlining the need for a standardized approach to CP on MRI.

  9. Breast metastases to thyroid gland.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Mike S; Ginat, Daniel T; Giampoli, Ellen J; O'Connell, Avice M

    2013-12-01

    Metastases to the thyroid gland are uncommon. We present the sonographic features of metastatic breast adenocarcinoma to the thyroid in a 67-year-old woman. The lesion measured up to 0.9 cm in diameter, contained an echogenic focus with associated ring-down, and was predominantly cystic, thereby resembling a benign nodule. Because of the patient's history of breast adenocarcinoma, the nodule nevertheless underwent fine-needle aspiration. The unusual appearance of the thyroid nodule underscores the importance of considering patient history in deciding whether obtaining tissue diagnosis of thyroid nodules is warranted.

  10. Expression and localization of the vascular endothelial growth factor and changes of microvessel density during hair follicle development of Liaoning cashmere goats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Q L; Li, J P; Li, Y M; Chang, Q; Chen, Y; Jiang, H Z; Zhao, Z H; Guo, D

    2013-12-10

    Vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGFs) play important roles in neovascularization, tissue development, and angiogenesis. In this study, changes in VEGF expression patterns and microvessel density (MVD), and their correlations, were investigated during hair follicle development in epidermal appendages of Liaoning cashmere goats. Polyclonal antibodies to VEGF and microvessels were used for monthly immunohistochemical examinations of normal skin specimens from adult female goats for one year. VEGF was expressed in the hair bulb of primary and secondary hair follicles, the outer and inner root sheaths, sebaceous glands (ductal and secretory portions), eccrine sweat glands (ductal and secretory portions), and the epidermis. Abundant expression of VEGF was observed in the follicular basement membrane zone surrounding the bulb matrix and in ductal and secretory portions of eccrine sweat glands. The change in VEGFs in primary hair follicles showed a bimodal pattern, with the first peak observed from March to May, and the second in August. Maximal expression in secondary hair follicles occurred in May and August. Therefore, VEGF expression in primary and secondary hair follicles is synchronized throughout the year, and is correlated to hair development. In the later telogen and anagen phases, VEGF expression was higher in the secondary, compared to the primary, hair follicle. Changes in MVD also showed a bimodal pattern with peaks in May and August. VEGF expression and MVD showed moderate and strongly positive correlation in the primary and secondary hair follicles, respectively. Therefore, MVD and VEGF are closely related to the processes involved in hair cycle regulation.

  11. Meibomian gland dysfunction: endocrine aspects.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Ozlem G; Kartal, Elçin; Taheri, Nusret

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To compare the hormone levels of patients with seborrheic meibomian gland dysfunction with controls. Procedures. This is a retrospective case-control study involving 50 patients and 50 controls. Blood workup for hormones was studied in both groups by using macroELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay). Statistical evaluation was done by using SPSS 15.0 independent samples t-test. Results. There were statistically significant differences of serum testosterone and dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate levels between patients and controls (P = 0.000). Female gender showed statistically significant differences of serum thyroid-stimulating hormone and prolactin levels between patients and controls (P = 0.014 and P = 0.043), in addition to serum testosterone and dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate levels (P = 0.000 and P = 0.001). However, male gender showed statistically significant differences of only serum testosterone and dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate levels between patients and controls. (P = 0.003 and P = 0.003 resp.). Conclusions. Increased serum levels of testosterone and dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate in both genders should be considered as diagnostic markers for seborrheic meibomian gland dysfunction.

  12. Morphogenesis of the thyroid gland.

    PubMed

    Fagman, Henrik; Nilsson, Mikael

    2010-07-08

    Congenital hypothyroidism is mainly due to structural defects of the thyroid gland, collectively known as thyroid dysgenesis. The two most prevalent forms of this condition are abnormal localization of differentiated thyroid tissue (thyroid ectopia) and total absence of the gland (athyreosis). The clinical picture of thyroid dysgenesis suggests that impaired specification, proliferation and survival of thyroid precursor cells and loss of concerted movement of these cells in a distinct spatiotemporal pattern are major causes of malformation. In normal development the thyroid primordium is first distinguished as a thickening of the anterior foregut endoderm at the base of the prospective tongue. Subsequently, this group of progenitors detaches from the endoderm, moves caudally and ultimately differentiates into hormone-producing units, the thyroid follicles, at a distant location from the site of specification. In higher vertebrates later stages of thyroid morphogenesis are characterized by shape remodeling into a bilobed organ and the integration of a second type of progenitors derived from the caudal-most pharyngeal pouches that will differentiate into C-cells. The present knowledge of thyroid developmental dynamics has emerged from embryonic studies mainly in chicken, mouse and more recently also in zebrafish. This review will highlight the key morphogenetic steps of thyroid organogenesis and pinpoint which crucial regulatory mechanisms are yet to be uncovered. Considering the co-incidence of thyroid dysgenesis and congenital heart malformations the possible interactions between thyroid and cardiovascular development will also be discussed.

  13. A new method of artificial latent fingerprint creation using artificial sweat and inkjet printer.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sungwook; Hong, Ingi; Han, Aleum; Seo, Jin Yi; Namgung, Juyoung

    2015-12-01

    In order to study fingerprinting in the field of forensic science, it is very important to have two or more latent fingerprints with identical chemical composition and intensity. However, it is impossible to obtain identical fingerprints, in reality, because fingerprinting comes out slightly differently every time. A previous research study had proposed an artificial fingerprint creation method in which inkjet ink was replaced with amino acids and sodium chloride solution: the components of human sweat. But, this method had some drawbacks: divalent cations were not added while formulating the artificial sweat solution, and diluted solutions were used for creating weakly deposited latent fingerprint. In this study, a method was developed for overcoming the drawbacks of the methods used in the previous study. Several divalent cations were added in this study because the amino acid-ninhydrin (or some of its analogues) complex is known to react with divalent cations to produce a photoluminescent product; and, similarly, the amino acid-1,2-indanedione complex is known to be catalyzed by a small amount of zinc ions to produce a highly photoluminescent product. Also, in this study, a new technique was developed which enables to adjust the intensity when printing the latent fingerprint patterns. In this method, image processing software is used to control the intensity of the master fingerprint patterns, which adjusts the printing intensity of the latent fingerprints. This new method opened the way to produce a more realistic artificial fingerprint in various strengths with one artificial sweat working solution. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Core Temperature and Sweat Responses in Professional Women's Tennis Players During Tournament Play in the Heat

    PubMed Central

    Tippet, Melissa L.; Stofan, John R.; Lacambra, Magie; Horswill, Craig A.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Context: Tennis is often played in hot, humid environments, intensifying the thermoregulatory strain placed on the athletes. As a safety measure, some tennis organizations allow for a 10-minute break in play between the second and third sets when environmental conditions are extreme. However, the actual effect of these breaks in reducing core temperature is unknown. Objective: To determine change in core temperature after a 10-minute break in play and assess fluid balance in professional female tennis players during tournament matches in the heat. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: A Women's Tennis Association Tour–sanctioned outdoor tournament on hard courts under hot conditions (30.3°C ± 2.3°C). Patients or Other Participants: Seven professional tennis players. Main Outcome Measure(s): Change in core temperature after a 10-minute break in tournament play, fluid intake, and sweat losses during match play. Results: Core temperature was reduced from 38.92°C to 38.67°C (change of −0.25°C ± 0.20°C) when a break was taken (P  =  .02). Mean sweat rate during match play was 2.0 ± 0.5 L/h. During that time, mean fluid intake was 1.5 ± 0.5 L/h, resulting in a 1.2% ± 1.0% reduction in body mass. Conclusions: Female professional tennis players are subjected to high heat loads during match play in hot environments. However, a 10-minute break in play decreased core temperature in 6 of 7 players by an average of 0.25°C, indicating that the break provides practical benefits in the field. Furthermore, although mean sweat rate in this group of female tennis players was high, most athletes were still able to minimize mass loss to less than 2% of their prematch weight. PMID:21214351

  15. Clinical phenotype and genotype of children with borderline sweat test and abnormal nasal epithelial chloride transport.

    PubMed

    Sermet-Gaudelus, Isabelle; Girodon, Emanuelle; Sands, Dorota; Stremmler, Nathalie; Vavrova, Vera; Deneuville, Eric; Reix, Philippe; Bui, Stéphanie; Huet, Frédéric; Lebourgeois, Muriel; Munck, Anne; Iron, Albert; Skalicka, Veronika; Bienvenu, Thierry; Roussel, Delphine; Lenoir, Gérard; Bellon, Gabriel; Sarles, Jacques; Macek, Milan; Roussey, Michel; Fajac, Isabelle; Edelman, Aleksander

    2010-10-01

    The diagnosis of cystic fibrosis (CF) is based on a characteristic clinical picture in association with a sweat chloride (Cl(-)) concentration greater than 60 mmol/L or the identification of two CF-causing mutations. A challenging problem is the significant number of children for whom no definitive diagnosis is possible because they present with symptoms suggestive of CF, a sweat chloride level in the intermediate range between 30 and 60 mmol/L, and only one or no identified CF-causing mutation. To investigate the function of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein in the airways of children with intermediate sweat tests and inconclusive genetic findings in correlation with clinical phenotype and genotype. We developed a composite nasal potential difference (NPD) diagnostic score to discriminate patients with CF from non-CF patients. We tested NPD in 50 children (age, 6 mo to 18 yr) with equivocal diagnoses and correlated the NPD diagnostic score with clinical phenotypes and genotypes. Fifteen of the 50 children had NPD scores in the CF range. Eight of the 15 carried two CFTR mutations compared with only 5 of the 35 children with normal NPD scores (P = 0.01). They were significantly younger at evaluation and had recurrent lower respiratory tract infections, chronic productive coughs, and chronic Staphylococcus aureus colonization significantly more often than the 35 children with normal NPD results. Evaluation of CFTR function in the nasal epithelium of children with inconclusive CF diagnoses can be a useful diagnostic tool and help clinicians to individualize therapeutic strategy.

  16. Core temperature and sweat responses in professional women's tennis players during tournament play in the heat.

    PubMed

    Tippet, Melissa L; Stofan, John R; Lacambra, Magie; Horswill, Craig A

    2011-01-01

    Tennis is often played in hot, humid environments, intensifying the thermoregulatory strain placed on the athletes. As a safety measure, some tennis organizations allow for a 10-minute break in play between the second and third sets when environmental conditions are extreme. However, the actual effect of these breaks in reducing core temperature is unknown. To determine change in core temperature after a 10-minute break in play and assess fluid balance in professional female tennis players during tournament matches in the heat. Cross-sectional study. A Women's Tennis Association Tour-sanctioned outdoor tournament on hard courts under hot conditions (30.3°C ± 2.3°C). Seven professional tennis players. Change in core temperature after a 10-minute break in tournament play, fluid intake, and sweat losses during match play. Core temperature was reduced from 38.92°C to 38.67°C (change of -0.25°C ± 0.20°C) when a break was taken (P  =  .02). Mean sweat rate during match play was 2.0 ± 0.5 L/h. During that time, mean fluid intake was 1.5 ± 0.5 L/h, resulting in a 1.2% ± 1.0% reduction in body mass. Female professional tennis players are subjected to high heat loads during match play in hot environments. However, a 10-minute break in play decreased core temperature in 6 of 7 players by an average of 0.25°C, indicating that the break provides practical benefits in the field. Furthermore, although mean sweat rate in this group of female tennis players was high, most athletes were still able to minimize mass loss to less than 2% of their prematch weight.

  17. Impact of sweating on equivalent dose of patients treated with (131)Iiodine.

    PubMed

    Haghighatafshar, Mahdi; Banani, Aida; Gheisari, Farshid; Alikhani, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Radioiodine therapy is used for the treatment of patients with differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) who undergo total thyroidectomy. After radioiodine administration, regulations require to quarantine these patients until their retained activity reduces to <33 mCi. Some of the injected radioiodine is excreted by perspiration which helps dose reduction so that performing the activities which stimulate sweating such as exercise may shorten the time of dose reduction. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study in the literature that has evaluated the impact of specific exercise program on the ambient equivalent dose of (131)I gamma rays. Patients with DTC without metastasis who had undergone total thyroidectomy and were treated with radioiodine were included in this study. 30 patients were chosen among patients who were able to exercise, did not have renal failure, and did not use diuretics. Patients were divided into two control and intervention groups. Intervention group members walked on treadmills under a specific program, in 3 time intervals. The control group did not have any specific activity. Immediately after each exercise process, both groups took a shower, and their doses were measured by a survey dosimeter. It was revealed that there was a significant difference between mean values before and after each exercise time. The calculated P value which evaluates the overall impact was 0.939 which revealed that there was no significant difference between total ambient equivalent dose reductions of both groups. According to the study, it may conclude that sweating is an effective alternative way for radioiodine excretion, and if sweating is accompanied with well-hydrated status they may have synergism effect to shorten quarantine period. This could be an important consideration in patients which over-hydration is intolerable especially those with cardiac, liver, or renal problems.

  18. The adrenal glands and their functions.

    PubMed

    De Silva, Deepthi C; Wijesiriwardene, Bandula

    2007-09-01

    The adrenal glands secrete hormones essential for metabolism, regulation of blood pressure, and sodium and glucose homeostasis. Hypo- or hypersecretion of these hormones is life threatening. Understanding the physiological functions of adrenal hormones is a prerequisite to the management of adrenal gland disease.

  19. What Does the Thyroid Gland Do?

    MedlinePlus

    ... it helps other cells do their job. hypothyroidism (hi-poh-THY-royd-izm): when your thyroid gland ... thyroid hormone (“hypo” means ‘under’ or ‘below’). hyperthyroidism (hi-purr-THY-royd-izm): when your thyroid gland ...

  20. Morphological pattern of salivary gland tumours.

    PubMed

    Gill, M S; Muzaffar, S; Soomro, I N; Kayani, N; Hussainy, A S; Pervez, S; Hasan, S H

    2001-10-01

    To delineate the spectrum of salivary gland tumors in our setup. The Aga Khan University Medical Centre, Karachi. Tumors were analysed considering histological type, age and sex of the patients and anatomic location. The diagnosis of individual tumours was based on the 1991 World Health Organisation Classification. During the span of eight years (1991-1998), 379 cases of salivary gland tumours were diagnosed. Of these, 205 (65.7%) were male and 174 (34.3%) were female. The median age at the time of diagnosis was 35 years. The median age for patients with malignant lesions (44 years) was 12 years older than those with benign tumours (34 years). Overall, malignant tumours were seen more frequently in males, however benign tumours were distributed equally between the two sexes. The most common site was parotid gland (82.85%). Only five cases of minor salivary gland tumours were seen. The most frequently diagnosed benign salivary gland neoplasm was pleomorphic adenoma (84.5%), followed by Warthin's tumours (6.18%), Mucoepidermoid carcinoma was the most commonly encountered malignant lesion (56.9%), followed by adenoid cystic carcinoma (19.6%). Plemorphic adenoma was the most common benign salivary gland tumour and mucoepidermoid carcinoma was the most frequent malignant neoplasm. Parotid gland was the most common site of origin in both benign and malignant tumours. The overall relative frequency of salivary gland tumours in this series correlates with that reported in the international literature.

  1. Ductal carcinoma of the parotid gland.

    PubMed

    Eriksen, H E; Greisen, O; Hastrup, N

    1987-06-01

    A case of ductal carcinoma of the parotid gland is described. The medical literature contains only 13 previous reports on this kind of adenocarcinoma of the parotid gland. The tumour is characterized by its histologic resemblance to ductal carcinomas of the breast and prostate. The course of previously described cases suggests that this tumour has a highly aggressive biological behaviour.

  2. Chronic cough with normal sweat chloride: Phenotypic descriptions of two rare cystic fibrosis genotypes.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Hemang; Lim, Kaiser G

    2016-01-01

    While our understanding of cystic fibrosis genetics has expanded in recent decades, the genetics and clinical manifestations of the disease remains highly heterogeneous. Diagnosis of CF in non-classical mutations remains a clinical challenge. We describe the clinical presentation of two patients with chronic cough found to have normal sweat chlorides. We discuss the subsequent evaluation that lead to the diagnosis of two rare CF mutations. We briefly discuss the use of the expanded 106-panel of CF mutations (homozygous 3849 + 10  kb C > T), and the role of whole CFTR gene sequencing (heterozygous c.2752-26 A > G/5T).

  3. A comparison between the technical absorbent and ventilated capsule methods for measuring local sweat rate.

    PubMed

    Morris, Nathan B; Cramer, Matthew N; Hodder, Simon G; Havenith, George; Jay, Ollie

    2013-03-15

    This study assessed the accuracy of the technical absorbent (TA) method for measuring local sweat rate (LSR) relative to the well-established ventilated capsule (VC) method during steady-state and nonsteady-state sweating using large and small sample surface areas on the forearm and midback. Forty participants (38 males and two females) cycled at 60% peak oxygen consumption for 75 min in either a temperate [22.3 ± 0.9°C, 32 ± 17% relative humidity (RH)] or warm (32.5 ± 0.8°C, 29 ± 7% RH) environment. Simultaneous bilateral comparisons of 5-min LSR measurements using the TA and VC methods were performed for the back and forearm after 10, 30, 50, and 70 min. LSR values, measured using the TA method, were highly correlated with the VC method at all time points, irrespective of sample surface area and body region (all P < 0.001). On average, ≈ 79% of the variability observed in LSR measured with the VC method was described by the TA method. The mean difference in absolute LSR using the TA method (TA-VC with 95% confidence intervals) was -0.23 [-0.30,-0.16], -0.11 [-0.21,0.00], -0.03 [-0.14,+0.08], and +0.02 [-0.07,+0.11] mg · cm(-2) · min(-1) after 10, 30, 50, and 70 min of exercise, respectively. Duplicate LSR measurements within each method during steady-state sweating were highly correlated (TA: r = 0.96, P < 0.001, n = 20; VC: r = 0.97, P < 0.001, n = 20) with a mean bias of +0.07 ± 0.14 and +0.01 ± 0.10 mg · cm(-2) · min(-1) for TA and VC methods, respectively. The mean smallest detectable difference in LSR was 0.12 and 0.05 mg · min(-1) · cm(-2) for TA and VC methods, respectively. These data support the TA method as a reliable alternative for measuring the rate of sweat appearance on the skin surface.

  4. Microscopy of the echidna sublingual glands.

    PubMed

    Krause, William J

    2011-10-01

    The secretory units and duct system of the echidna sublingual glands exhibit subtle architectural modifications to accommodate the viscous secretion produced by these glands. The glands are compound tubular glands, the secretory units of which are elongate with open lumina and consist only of mucous cells. Closely packed spindle-shaped myoepithelial cells invest the secretory units, but are absent around the ducts. The branched secretory tubules open into an abbreviated duct system characterized by wide lumina. Striated ducts normally associated with the second portion of the intralobular duct system are absent. The duct system shows the most obvious modification of general salivary gland architecture presumably to accommodate the viscous secretion propelled from the secretory units by surrounding myoepithelial cells. © 2011 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  5. No Sweat.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strickland, Gary

    2001-01-01

    Explains how changes in school design in the last 10 years have caused heating, ventilation, and cooling system (HVAC) designers to reexamine their choice of classroom unit ventilators (UV). The influence of indoor lighting systems, insulation, indoor air quality, energy code compliance, and HVAC system design on UV decision making are also…

  6. Compensatory sweating after restricting or lowering the level of sympathectomy: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Song-Wang; Shen, Ning; Li, Dong-Xia; Wei, Bo; An, Jun; Zhang, Jun-Hang

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare compensatory sweating after lowering or restricting the level of sympathectomy. METHOD: A systematic review and meta-analysis were conducted of all randomized controlled trials published in English that compared compensatory sweating after lowering or restricting the level of sympathectomy. The Cochrane collaboration tool was used to assess the risk of bias, and the Mantel-Haenszel odds ratio method was used for the meta-analysis. RESULTS: A total of 11 randomized controlled trials were included, including a total of 1079 patients. Five of the randomized controlled trials studied restricting the level of sympathectomy, and the remaining six studied lowering the level of sympathectomy. CONCLUSIONS: The compiled randomized controlled trial results published so far in the literature do not support the claims that lowering or restricting the level of sympathetic ablation results in less compensatory sweating. PMID:26017654

  7. The friction sweat test as a new method for detecting facial anhidrosis in patients with Horner's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, M L

    1989-10-15

    Forty-eight patients with Horner's syndrome documented by cocaine test were examined with the friction sweat test, a method of detecting a mild sweating asymmetry using alcohol and a standard office prism bar. In all but one patient, the results of the friction test corresponded with the results predicted by the history, physical examination, and Paredrine testing, or with the results of a starch-iodine sweat test. The test is a quick, simple, and reproducible procedure that allows a more accurate determination of the location of the Horner's syndrome at the initial office visit, and therefore assists in determining what tests need to be performed in the further examination of the patient.

  8. Absence of arterial baroreflex modulation of skin sympathetic activity and sweat rate during whole-body heating in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, T. E.; Cui, J.; Crandall, C. G.

    2001-01-01

    1. Prior findings suggest that baroreflexes are capable of modulating skin blood flow, but the effects of baroreceptor loading/unloading on sweating are less clear. Therefore, this project tested the hypothesis that pharmacologically induced alterations in arterial blood pressure in heated humans would lead to baroreflex-mediated changes in both skin sympathetic nerve activity (SSNA) and sweat rate. 2. In seven subjects mean arterial blood pressure was lowered (approximately 8 mmHg) and then raised (approximately 13 mmHg) by bolus injections of sodium nitroprusside and phenylephrine, respectively. Moreover, in a separate protocol, arterial blood pressure was reduced via steady-state administration of sodium nitroprusside. In both normothermia and heat-stress conditions the following responses were monitored: sublingual and mean skin temperatures, heart rate, beat-by-beat blood pressure, skin blood flow (laser-Doppler flowmetry), local sweat rate and SSNA (microneurography from peroneal nerve). 3. Whole-body heating increased skin and sublingual temperatures, heart rate, cutaneous blood flow, sweat rate and SSNA, but did not change arterial blood pressure. Heart rate was significantly elevated (from 74 +/- 3 to 92 +/- 4 beats x min(-1); P < 0.001) during bolus sodium nitroprusside-induced reductions in blood pressure, and significantly reduced (from 92 +/- 4 to 68 +/- 4 beats x min(-1); P < 0.001) during bolus phenylephrine-induced elevations in blood pressure, thereby demonstrating normal baroreflex function in these subjects. 4. Neither SSNA nor sweat rate was altered by rapid (bolus infusion) or sustained (steady-state infusion) changes in blood pressure regardless of the thermal condition. 5. These data suggest that SSNA and sweat rate are not modulated by arterial baroreflexes in normothermic or moderately heated individuals.

  9. Sweat testing for the detection of atomoxetine from paediatric patients with attention deficit/ hyperactivity disorder: application to clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Marchei, Emilia; Papaseit, Esther; Garcia-Algar, Oscar; Bilbao, Amaia; Farré, Magí; Pacifici, Roberta; Pichini, Simona

    2013-03-01

    Atomoxetine (ATX) is a selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor approved since 2002 for the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children, adolescents, and adults as an alternative treatment to methylphenidate. Within the framework of a project evaluating the use of alternative biological matrices for therapeutic monitoring of psychoactive drugs in paediatric and non-paediatric individuals, the excretion of ATX and its principal metabolites has been recently studied in oral fluid and hair. The aim of this study was to describe the excretion profile of ATX and its metabolites 4-hydroxyatomoxetine (4-OH-ATX) and N-desmethylatomoxetine (N-des-ATX) in sweat following the administration of different dosage regimens (60, 40, 35, and 18 mg/day) of ATX to six paediatric patients. Sweat patches were applied to the back of each participant and removed at timed intervals. ATX and its metabolites were measured in patches using a previously validated liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric (LC-MS/MS) method. Independently from the administered dose, ATX appeared in the sweat patches 1 h post administration and reached its maximum concentration generally at 24 h. Peak ATX concentrations ranged between 2.31 and 40.4 ng/patch and did not correlate with the administered drug dose, or with body surface area. Total ATX excreted in sweat ranged between 0.008 and 0.121 mg, corresponding to 0.02 and 0.3% of the administered drug. Neither 4-OH-ATX, nor N-des-ATX was detected in either of the collected sweat patches. Measuring ATX in sweat patches can provide information on cumulative drug use from patch application until removal. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Dissolution of the metal sensitizers Ni, Be, Cr in artificial sweat to improve estimates of dermal bioaccessibility

    PubMed Central

    Stefaniak, Aleksandr B.; Duling, Mathew G.; Geer, Laura; Virji, M. Abbas

    2015-01-01

    Dermal exposure to sensitizing metals is a serious occupational and public health problem. The usual approach to dermal exposure assessment is to process samples by chemical methods that use reactants to digest the metal particles and quantify the mass. In the case of dermal exposure assessment, these reactants are not representative of the skin surface film liquids and hence, may overestimate bioaccessibility. We hypothesize that the amount and form of sensitizer on a sample that leaches in a biological fluid, as can be estimated using artificial sweat, may be a more relevant metric for assessing health risks. Beryllium metal (Be), nickel metal (Ni), and chromium carbide (Cr3C2) particles were characterized and masses of sensitizing ions were measured using established reactant-assisted digestion procedures and extraction in artificial sweat under physiologically relevant conditions. Chromium ions released into artificial sweat were speciated to understand valence states. The ratios of the fraction of metal dissolved in artificial sweat relative to that dissolved by chemical-specific reactants were 1/2 (Be), 1/108 (Ni), and 1/2500 (Cr). The divalent Be and Ni cations were stable in artificial sweat over time (did not precipitate) whereas hexavalent chromium [Cr(vi)] ions decayed over time. Further analysis using speciated isotope dilution mass spectrometry revealed that the decay of Cr(vi) was accompanied by the formation of Cr(iii) in the sweat model. Use of reactant-assisted analytical chemistry to quantify amounts of metal sensitizers on samples could overestimate biologically relevant exposure. In addition to mass, the valence state also influences penetration through the outer stratum corneum of the skin and is an important consideration when assessing exposure to complex sensitizers such as Cr which have multiple valence states with differing penetration efficiencies. PMID:24448251

  11. Effect of temperature on rectifying Schottky barriers formed from fingerprint sweat corrosion of brass.

    PubMed

    Bond, John W

    2011-09-01

    Corrosive electrochemical processes of brass, including those resulting from fingerprint sweat, continue to be studied because of the widespread industrial use of brass. Here, we examine how increased temperature affects the relative abundance of fingerprint sweat corrosion products and the rectifying Schottky barrier formed between p-type copper (I) oxide corrosion and brass. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirms increasing dezincification with increasing temperature. This leads to n-type zinc oxide replacing copper (I) oxide as the dominant corrosion product, which then forms a rectifying Schottky barrier with the brass, instead of copper oxide, when the temperature reaches c. 600°C. Using X-ray diffraction, resulting diodes show polycrystalline oxides embedded in amorphous oxidation products that have a lower relative abundance than the diode forming oxide. Conventional current/voltage (I/V) characteristics of these diodes show good rectifying qualities. At temperatures between c. 100 and c. 600°C, when neither oxide dominates, the semiconductor/brass contact displays an absence of rectification. © 2011 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  12. Epidermal tattoo potentiometric sodium sensors with wireless signal transduction for continuous non-invasive sweat monitoring.

    PubMed

    Bandodkar, Amay J; Molinnus, Denise; Mirza, Omar; Guinovart, Tomás; Windmiller, Joshua R; Valdés-Ramírez, Gabriela; Andrade, Francisco J; Schöning, Michael J; Wang, Joseph

    2014-04-15

    This article describes the fabrication, characterization and application of an epidermal temporary-transfer tattoo-based potentiometric sensor, coupled with a miniaturized wearable wireless transceiver, for real-time monitoring of sodium in the human perspiration. Sodium excreted during perspiration is an excellent marker for electrolyte imbalance and provides valuable information regarding an individual's physical and mental wellbeing. The realization of the new skin-worn non-invasive tattoo-like sensing device has been realized by amalgamating several state-of-the-art thick film, laser printing, solid-state potentiometry, fluidics and wireless technologies. The resulting tattoo-based potentiometric sodium sensor displays a rapid near-Nernstian response with negligible carryover effects, and good resiliency against various mechanical deformations experienced by the human epidermis. On-body testing of the tattoo sensor coupled to a wireless transceiver during exercise activity demonstrated its ability to continuously monitor sweat sodium dynamics. The real-time sweat sodium concentration was transmitted wirelessly via a body-worn transceiver from the sodium tattoo sensor to a notebook while the subjects perspired on a stationary cycle. The favorable analytical performance along with the wearable nature of the wireless transceiver makes the new epidermal potentiometric sensing system attractive for continuous monitoring the sodium dynamics in human perspiration during diverse activities relevant to the healthcare, fitness, military, healthcare and skin-care domains. © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Sweat Rates During Continuous and Interval Aerobic Exercise: Implications for NASA Multipurpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryder, Jeffrey W.; Scott, Jessica; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert; Ploutz-Snyder, Lori L.

    2016-01-01

    Aerobic deconditioning is one of the effects spaceflight. Impaired crewmember performance due to loss of aerobic conditioning is one of the risks identified for mitigation by the NASA Human Research Program. Missions longer than 8 days will involve exercise countermeasures including those aimed at preventing the loss of aerobic capacity. The NASA Multipurpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) will be NASA's centerpiece architecture for human space exploration beyond low Earth orbit. Aerobic exercise within the small habitable volume of the MPCV is expected to challenge the ability of the environmental control systems, especially in terms of moisture control. Exercising humans contribute moisture to the environment by increased respiratory rate (exhaling air at 100% humidity) and sweat. Current acceptable values are based on theoretical models that rely on an "average" crew member working continuously at 75% of their aerobic capacity (Human Systems Integration Requirements Document). Evidence suggests that high intensity interval exercise for much shorter durations are equally effective or better in building and maintaining aerobic capacity. This investigation will examine sweat and respiratory rates for operationally relevant continuous and interval aerobic exercise protocols using a variety of different individuals. The results will directly inform what types of aerobic exercise countermeasures will be feasible to prescribe for crewmembers aboard the MPCV.

  14. Effect of botulinum toxin concentration on reduction in sweating: a randomized, double-blind study.

    PubMed

    Rystedt, Alma; Karlqvist, Mattias; Bertilsson, Maria; Naver, Hans; Swartling, Carl

    2013-11-01

    Dose-response studies of botulinum toxin for reduction of sweating are sparse in the literature. The aim of this study was to determine the most appropriate concentrations of Botox®, Dysport®, Xeomin® and NeuroBloc®, respectively, in order to achieve the greatest reduction in sweating, thus reducing the costs and increasing the safety of treatment. Four concentrations of each product were investigated. Intradermal injections of all products and concentrations were applied to the backs of 20 consenting subjects, in a randomized, double-blind manner. Areas of anhidrotic and hypohidrotic skin were measured with an iodine-starch test after 4, 8 and 12 weeks, respectively. Optimal concentrations were found to be 25 U/ml for Botox and Xeomin, approximately 100 U/ml for Dysport, and 50 U/ml for NeuroBloc. When comparing the mean anhidrotic area per unit for 100 U/ml of each product, the calculated dose conversion ratios were 1:1.6:1.2:1.3 (Botox:Dysport:Xeomin:NeuroBloc). If, instead, the optimal concentration for each product was compared, the dose conversion ratios were 1:4.8:1.3:2.2. Thus, it is crucial to consider botulinum toxin concentration in a treatment regimen.

  15. EEMCO guidance for the efficacy assessment of antiperspirants and deodorants.

    PubMed

    Piérard, G E; Elsner, P; Marks, R; Masson, P; Paye, M

    2003-01-01

    Overproduction of sweat, sweaty skin and body odours are unpleasant for many social groups. Body cleansing products are designed to combat these undesirable features of skin. In addition, antiperspirant and deodorant products are more specifically used in the underarm site by a large part of the adult population. Antiperspirants are offered to control emotionally triggered sweating in the armpit. Deodorants are designed to combat malodour generated from bacteria-modified sweat. This review summarizes the physiology of eccrine, apocrine and apoeccrine sweat glands. The mechanisms of action of antiperspirants and deodorants are described as well as the factors influencing their efficacies. A series of tests using various measurement methods can be used to demonstrate the efficacy of antiperspirants. These include the gravimetric method, water evaporation quantification, electrodermal measurements, staining procedures, dye injections and cyanoacrylate skin surface strippings and casting replicas. Deodorant efficacy can be evaluated by sensory assessments performed by an expert panel. Indirect support is provided by visualization of apocrine gland excretion and collection of sweat and volatile compounds. Microbiological assessments and chromatographic analysis also provide indirect information. Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel

  16. Appearance of Ingested H sub 2 (18)O in Plasma and Sweat during Exercise-Heat Exposure,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-11-24

    15.3% 0) via nasogastric tube at 0 min. Samples were analyzed using isotopic ratio mass spectro- metry. The isotopic enrichnent oflas~ine sweat samples...scraped sweat samples were collected (-30 to 0 min) prior to administration of 100 g of labelled water (84.7 Z 0, 15.3 % via nasogastric tube at 0...during a hot, humid marathon competition (2), in spite of his efforts to prehydrate and to drink often. The common advice given to athletes and fitness

  17. Bioengineered Lacrimal Gland Organ Regeneration in Vivo.

    PubMed

    Hirayama, Masatoshi; Tsubota, Kazuo; Tsuji, Takashi

    2015-07-30

    The lacrimal gland plays an important role in maintaining a homeostatic environment for healthy ocular surfaces via tear secretion. Dry eye disease, which is caused by lacrimal gland dysfunction, is one of the most prevalent eye disorders and causes ocular discomfort, significant visual disturbances, and a reduced quality of life. Current therapies for dry eye disease, including artificial tear eye drops, are transient and palliative. The lacrimal gland, which consists of acini, ducts, and myoepithelial cells, develops from its organ germ via reciprocal epithelial-mesenchymal interactions during embryogenesis. Lacrimal tissue stem cells have been identified for use in regenerative therapeutic approaches aimed at restoring lacrimal gland functions. Fully functional organ replacement, such as for tooth and hair follicles, has also been developed via a novel three-dimensional stem cell manipulation, designated the Organ Germ Method, as a next-generation regenerative medicine. Recently, we successfully developed fully functional bioengineered lacrimal gland replacements after transplanting a bioengineered organ germ using this method. This study represented a significant advance in potential lacrimal gland organ replacement as a novel regenerative therapy for dry eye disease. In this review, we will summarize recent progress in lacrimal regeneration research and the development of bioengineered lacrimal gland organ replacement therapy.

  18. Bioengineered Lacrimal Gland Organ Regeneration in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Hirayama, Masatoshi; Tsubota, Kazuo; Tsuji, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The lacrimal gland plays an important role in maintaining a homeostatic environment for healthy ocular surfaces via tear secretion. Dry eye disease, which is caused by lacrimal gland dysfunction, is one of the most prevalent eye disorders and causes ocular discomfort, significant visual disturbances, and a reduced quality of life. Current therapies for dry eye disease, including artificial tear eye drops, are transient and palliative. The lacrimal gland, which consists of acini, ducts, and myoepithelial cells, develops from its organ germ via reciprocal epithelial-mesenchymal interactions during embryogenesis. Lacrimal tissue stem cells have been identified for use in regenerative therapeutic approaches aimed at restoring lacrimal gland functions. Fully functional organ replacement, such as for tooth and hair follicles, has also been developed via a novel three-dimensional stem cell manipulation, designated the Organ Germ Method, as a next-generation regenerative medicine. Recently, we successfully developed fully functional bioengineered lacrimal gland replacements after transplanting a bioengineered organ germ using this method. This study represented a significant advance in potential lacrimal gland organ replacement as a novel regenerative therapy for dry eye disease. In this review, we will summarize recent progress in lacrimal regeneration research and the development of bioengineered lacrimal gland organ replacement therapy. PMID:26264034

  19. Dysfunctional ectopic thyroid gland: a case report.

    PubMed

    Stokić, Edita; Kljajić, Vladimir; Idjuški, Stevan; Benc, Damir; Popović, Djordje; Protić, Mladjan; Crnobrnja, Veljko

    2014-01-01

    Lingual thyroid gland is a rare anomaly of thyroid gland development, occurring more frequently in females. If it causes local symptomatology such as dysphagia, dysphonia or dyspnea it is diagnosed in childhood, however, if it is asymptomatic it is usually diagnosed in adulthood. We present a 23-year-old female patient in whom we diagnosed lingual thyroid gland coincidentally during diagnostic procedures of a concomitant disease. The application of 131I scintigraphy showed an oval field of intensive accumulation of radio markers in the zone of medial face line, around tongue base, with the absence of thyroid gland in its physiological position. Functional testing proved primary hypothyroidism and we started the application of substitution therapy. The application of levothyroxine resulted in reaching euthyroid state and the reduction of thyroid gland size. We present a very rare anomaly of the thyroid gland, and so far there have been no clear attitudes about further treatment. The general condition of the patient, age, the size of ectopic thyroid gland and the existence of local symptomatology or complications represent the factors that have influence on the choice of treatment method.

  20. [Salivary gland drainage into the thyroglossal duct].

    PubMed

    Siem, G; Natvig, K; Kolbenstvedt, A; Lømo, J

    2001-01-20

    Failure in regression of the thyroglossal duct is one of the most common reasons for midline swellings in the neck. Several authors have described recurrent thyroglossal duct remnants with persisting draining sinuses. However, few have described accessory salivary glands that drain into the thyroglossal duct. In this article we report two such cases with midline salivary glands in the floor of the mouth. These two patients were subsequently successfully treated with radical tissue resection in the area between the hyoid bone and foramen cecum. Preoperative fistulography or sinography was useful to demonstrate the ductal ramification of the salivary glands, and use of methylene blue during surgery proved of significant value for the result.

  1. Imaging of Submandibular and Sublingual Salivary Glands.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Amit K; Kanekar, Sangam G

    2018-05-01

    The submandibular and sublingual salivary glands are major salivary glands with a wide spectrum of pathologic conditions. The corresponding spaces along the floor of mouth have complex anatomy, best evaluated with cross-sectional imaging. The spectrum of diseases in these regions varies from simple infection to advanced malignancy, not just from the gland itself but also from the surrounding structures. The most common abnormalities in these spaces are inflammatory and infectious, and computed tomography is currently the most common imaging modality used. The anatomy of these spaces is much better depicted with MR; however, all the modalities have their unique roles. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Pleomorphic adenoma occurring outside the submandibular gland: a case report of an accessory submandibular gland.

    PubMed

    Bryan, Stephanie; Bodner, Lipa; Manor, Esther; Brennan, Peter A

    2013-10-01

    The accessory submandibular gland is a rare anatomic variant and the incidence of pathology reported within an accessory submandibular gland is even rarer. This report describes the case of a 22-year-old woman who presented with a slowly enlarging mass in the submandibular triangle, which on ultrasound examination suggested that it was close to, but not arising from, the submandibular gland. Fine-needle aspiration cytology was consistent with a pleomorphic adenoma. At surgery, the tumor was found to be entirely separate from the submandibular gland. This case presents an extremely rare occurrence of an accessory submandibular gland and, to the authors' knowledge, is the first report of a pleomorphic adenoma occurring within an accessory submandibular gland. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. [Rapid identification of crude and sweated dipsaci radix based on near-infrared spectroscopy combined with principal component analysis-mahalanobis distance].

    PubMed

    Du, Wei-Feng; Jia, Yong-Qiang; Jiang, Dong-Jing; Zhang, Hao

    2014-12-01

    In order to discriminate the crude and sweated Dipsaci Radix correctly and rapidly, the crude and sweated Dipsaci Radix were scanned by the NIR spectrometer, and an identifying model was developed by near infrared spectroscopy combined with principal component-Mahalanobis distance pattern recognition method. The pretreated spectra data of 129 crude samples and 86 sweated ones were analyzed through principal component analysis (PCA). The identifying model was developed by choosing the spectrum for 9 881.46-4 119.20 cm(-1) and "SNV + spectrum + S-G" to the original spectral preprocessing with 14 principal components, and then was verified by prediction set, identifying with 100% accuracy. The rapid identification model of the crude and sweated Dipsaci Radix by NIR is feasible and efficient, and could be used as an assistant means for identifying the crude and sweated Dipsaci Radix.

  4. New exocrine glands in ants: the hypostomal gland and basitarsal gland in the genus Melissotarsus (Hymenoptera: Formicidae).

    PubMed

    Hölldobler, Bert; Obermayer, Malu; Plowes, Nicola J R; Fisher, Brian L

    2014-07-01

    Fisher and Robertson (Insect Soc 46: 78-83, 1999) discovered the production of silk-like secretions emerging from slit-shaped openings along the anterior margin of the ventral hypostoma of Melissotarsus ant workers. The current histological study describes a hitherto unknown hypostomal gland from which this silk-like substance originates. In addition, this study describes a new basitarsal gland in the three pairs of legs of Melissotarsus workers.

  5. New exocrine glands in ants: the hypostomal gland and basitarsal gland in the genus Melissotarsus (Hymenoptera: Formicidae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hölldobler, Bert; Obermayer, Malu; Plowes, Nicola J. R.; Fisher, Brian L.

    2014-07-01

    Fisher and Robertson (Insect Soc 46: 78-83, 1999) discovered the production of silk-like secretions emerging from slit-shaped openings along the anterior margin of the ventral hypostoma of Melissotarsus ant workers. The current histological study describes a hitherto unknown hypostomal gland from which this silk-like substance originates. In addition, this study describes a new basitarsal gland in the three pairs of legs of Melissotarsus workers.

  6. Diagnosis of cystic fibrosis with chloride meter (Sherwood M926S chloride analyzer®) and sweat test analysis system (CFΔ collection system®) compared to the Gibson Cooke method.

    PubMed

    Emiralioğlu, Nagehan; Özçelik, Uğur; Yalçın, Ebru; Doğru, Deniz; Kiper, Nural

    2016-01-01

    Sweat test with Gibson Cooke (GC) method is the diagnostic gold standard for cystic fibrosis (CF). Recently, alternative methods have been introduced to simplify both the collection and analysis of sweat samples. Our aim was to compare sweat chloride values obtained by GC method with other sweat test methods in patients diagnosed with CF and whose CF diagnosis had been ruled out. We wanted to determine if the other sweat test methods could reliably identify patients with CF and differentiate them from healthy subjects. Chloride concentration was measured with GC method, chloride meter and sweat test analysis system; also conductivity was determined with sweat test analysis system. Forty eight patients with CF and 82 patients without CF underwent the sweat test, showing median sweat chloride values 98.9 mEq/L with GC method, 101 mmol/L with chloride meter, 87.8 mmol/L with sweat test analysis system. In non-CF group, median sweat chloride values were 16.8 mEq/L with GC method, 10.5 mmol/L with chloride meter, and 15.6 mmol/L with sweat test analysis system. Median conductivity value was 107.3 mmol/L in CF group and 32.1 mmol/L in non CF group. There was a strong positive correlation between GC method and the other sweat test methods with a statistical significance (r=0.85) in all subjects. Sweat chloride concentration and conductivity by other sweat test methods highly correlate with the GC method. We think that the other sweat test equipments can be used as reliably as the classic GC method to diagnose or exclude CF.

  7. Morphology and diversity of exocrine glands in lepidopteran larvae.

    PubMed

    Vegliante, Francesca; Hasenfuss, Ivar

    2012-01-01

    The morphology of 21 exocrine glands and 13 supposedly exocrine structures recorded for lepidopteran larvae is reviewed. The epitracheal glands, for which a double role (exocrine and endocrine) has been demonstrated, are examined as well. Function is well known for at least 8 glands but completely unknown for 6 glands, for 10 putative glandular structures, and for the exocrine component of the epitracheal glands. Functional studies on the remaining structures are insufficient; in some cases (mandibular gland and adenosma) homologous glands may play a different role depending on the species, and only a few taxa have been examined. The secretions of 13 glandular types have been analyzed chemically. The histology of 11 glands is known at the ultrastructural level, whereas that of 6 glands and 7 putative glandular structures is completely unknown. Comparative anatomical studies of the osmeterium, adenosma, and Verson's glands may yield useful information for phylogenetic reconstructions. Copyright © 2012 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved.

  8. The nasus gland: a new gland in soldiers of Angularitermes (Termitidae, Nasutitermitinae).

    PubMed

    Šobotník, Jan; Bourguignon, Thomas; Carrijo, Tiago F; Bordereau, Christian; Robert, Alain; Křížková, Barbora; Constantini, Joice P; Cancello, Eliana M

    2015-09-01

    Termites have developed many exocrine glands, generally dedicated to defence or communication. Although a few of these glands occur in all termite species, or represent synapomorphies of larger clades, others are morphological innovations of a single species, or a few related species. Here, we describe the nasus gland, a new gland occurring at the base of the nasus of Angularitermes soldiers. The nasus gland is composed of class 1, 2, and 3 secretory cells, a rare combination that is only shared by the sternal and tergal glands of some termites and cockroaches. The ultrastructural observations suggest that the secretion is produced by class 2 and 3 secretory cells, and released mostly by class 3 cells. The base of the nasus has a rough appearance due to numerous pits bearing openings of canals conducting the secretion from class 3 secretory cells to the exterior. We tentatively assign a defensive function to the nasus gland, although further research is needed to confirm this function. Although the gland is described only from species of Angularitermes, other genera of Nasutitermitinae also present a rough nasus base, suggesting the presence of a similar, possibly homologous, gland. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Assessment of post-radiotherapy salivary glands

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, S C H; Wu, V W C; Kwong, D L W; Ying, M T C

    2011-01-01

    Salivary glands are usually irradiated during radiotherapy for head and neck cancers, which can lead to radiation-induced damage. Radiation-induced xerostomia (oral dryness) is the most common post-radiotherapy complication for head and neck cancer patients and can reduce the patient’s quality of life. Accurate and efficient salivary gland assessment methods provide a better understanding of the cause and degree of xerostomia, and may help in patient management. At present, there are different methods for the assessment of salivary gland hypofunction; however, none of them are considered to be standard procedure. This article reviews the value of common methods in the assessment of post-radiotherapy salivary glands. PMID:21511748

  10. [Primary synovial sarcoma of the parotid gland].

    PubMed

    Ziani, Y; Khalfi, L; Choumi, F; Boudhas, A; Al Bouzidi, A; Abouchadi, A; Elkhatib, K

    2014-04-01

    Synovial sarcoma is a malignant soft tissue neoplasm which occurs most of the time in teenagers and young adults. Facial, and especially parotid gland localization, is very uncommon. A 15-year-old male patient, with no prior history, was hospitalized for swelling in the left parotid area noted 5 months before. The mass was painful and there was no facial paralysis. A CT scan revealed a tumoral process of mixed density in the left parotid gland. The thorax and abdominal CT scan was normal. The patient was initially treated by surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy. He died, 8 months after this multimodal therapy. Five percent of salivary gland primitive tumors are of mesenchymatous origin, 0.3 to 1.5% of which are sarcomas. The diagnosis of parotid gland synovial sarcoma is confirmed by immune-histochemistry and cytogenetic tests. Surgery combined to radiotherapy seems to be the best treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Meibomian Gland Dysfunction and Treatment (Posterior Blepharitis)

    MedlinePlus

    ... 4) OMEGA- 3 FATTY ACID: FLAX SEED and FISH OIL In addition to the above, some people benefit ... by the Meibomian glands. Flax seed oil and fish oil are excellent sources of omega- 3 fatty acids. ...

  12. [Autoimmune diseases of the thyroid gland].

    PubMed

    Allelein, S; Feldkamp, J; Schott, M

    2017-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases of the thyroid gland are considered to be the most frequent cause of thyroid gland disorders. Autoimmune thyroid diseases consist of two subgroups: autoimmune thyroiditis (AIT) and Graves' disease. The AIT is the most common human autoimmune disease. Infiltration of the thyroid gland with cytotoxic T‑cells can lead to an initial thyrotoxicosis und during the course to hypothyroidism due to destruction of the thyroid gland. Substitution with Levothyroxine is indicated for manifest hypothyroidism and subclinical hypothyroidism with increased thyroid antibodies with the intention of normalizing the serum thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH). Graves' disease is characterized by the appearance of stimulating TSH receptor antibodies leading to hyperthyroidism. Endocrine ophthalmopathy may also occur. Ablative therapy with radioiodine therapy or thyroidectomy is administered to patients with Graves' disease without remission after at least 1 year of antithyroid drug therapy.

  13. The harderian gland: a tercentennial review.

    PubMed Central

    Payne, A P

    1994-01-01

    The harderian gland was first described in 1694 by Johann Jacob Harder (1656-1711). It occurs in most terrestrial vertebrates and is located within the orbit where, in some species, it is the largest structure. It may be compound tubular or compound tubuloalveolar, and its secretory duct is usually morphologically distinct only after leaving the substance of the gland to open on the surface of the nictitating membrane. The tubules of the gland are formed of a single layer of columnar epithelial cells surrounded by myoepithelial cells. The chief product(s) of the gland varies between different groups of vertebrates, and epithelial cells possess granules or vacuoles whose contents may be mucous, serous or lipid. In rodents, the gland synthesises lipids, porphyrins and indoles. In the case of lipid vacuoles, the gland is unusual in releasing these by an exocytotic mechanism. It is unclear whether the gland can act both as an exocrine and endocrine organ. There is control of gland structure and synthesis through a variety of humoral agents, including gonadal, thyroid and pituitary hormones; in addition there is a rich autonomic innervation and many neuropeptides have been identified. The proposed functions of the gland are remarkably diverse and include the gland being (1) a source of 'saliva', (2) a site of immune response, (3) a photoprotective organ, (4) part of a retinal-pineal axis, (5) a source of pheromones, (6) a source of thermoregulatory lipids, (7) a site of osmoregulation, and (8) a source of growth factors. The gland is discussed in terms of its embryology and phylogeny, and in relation to ecological variables. Several goals of future research are identified. Images Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 Fig. 14 Fig. 15 Fig. 16 Fig. 16 Fig. 17 Fig. 18 Fig. 19 Fig. 20 Fig. 21 Fig. 22 Fig. 23 Fig. 24 Fig. 25 Fig. 26 Fig. 27 Fig. 28 Fig. 29 Fig. 30 Fig. 31 Fig. 32 Fig. 36 Fig. 37 Fig. 38 Fig. 40 PMID:7559104

  14. Salivary Gland Tumors: Current Concepts and Controversies.

    PubMed

    Seethala, Raja R

    2017-03-01

    This current review focuses on current concepts and controversies for select key salivary gland epithelial neoplasms. Rather than the traditional organization of benign and malignant tumors, this review is structured around select key topics: biphasic tumors, mammary analogue secretory carcinoma, and the controversy surrounding polymorphous low-grade adenocarcinoma and cribriform adenocarcinoma of (minor) salivary gland origin. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. [Sialoadenosis of the parotid glands: diagnostic considerations].

    PubMed

    Bagán Sebastián, J V; Silvestre Donat, F J

    1990-09-01

    We present 3 cases of Sialoadenosis of the parotid glands, one male and two females, who presented associated systemic pathology (liver cirrhosis and diabetes mellitus), detected following clinically suspect syaloadenosis (the patients were unaware of their systemic disease). In all three cases definitive diagnosis was established by needle aspiration of the gland. Which revealed great acinar dilatation. Finally, differential diagnosis was established between sialoadenosis and those conditions with clinical presentations similar to those described for sialoadenosis.

  16. [Clinical features of accessory parotid gland tumors].

    PubMed

    Iguchi, Hiroyoshi; Wada, Tadashi; Yamamoto, Hidefumi; Yamada, Kei; Matsushita, Naoki; Okamoto, Sachimi; Teranishi, Yuichi; Koda, Yuki; Kosugi, Yuki; Yamane, Hideo

    2013-12-01

    Accessory parotid gland tumors are relatively rare; hence, adequately detailed clinical analyses of these tumors are difficult to perform at a single institution. In this report, we describe the findings for 65 patients [29 men, 36 women; median age, 51 (9-81) years] with accessory parotid gland tumors, consisting of 4 cases documented by us and 61 cases previously reported by other Japanese authors. Approximately 50% of the patients were treated in an otolaryngology department, while the remaining patients were treated in plastic surgery, oral surgery, or dermatology departments. In 4 patients, the results of preoperative fine-needle aspiration cytology indicated that the tumor was benign; however, the postoperative histopathology results revealed malignant tumors. The frequencies of malignant and benign tumors were 44.6% (n = 29) and 55.4% (n = 36), respectively. Mucoepidermoid carcinoma and pleomorphic adenoma were the most frequent types of malignant and benign accessory parotid gland tumors, respectively. Among the various surgical methods that were used, such as direct cheek and intraoral incisions, a standard parotidectomy incision was the most preferred treatment approach for these tumors. Recently, an endoscopic approach has also been found to yield satisfactory results. An optimal approach should be selected after evaluating the advantages and disadvantages of these methods. No definite guidelines are available regarding the choice of elective neck dissection and postoperative radiation therapy for malignant accessory parotid gland tumors. Although tumor resection (plus elective neck dissection) and postoperative radiation therapy have been frequently performed for various kinds of malignant accessory parotid gland tumors to date, additional studies are needed regarding the criteria for selecting elective neck dissection and postoperative radiation therapy. Since the malignancy rate for accessory parotid gland tumors is higher than that for parotid gland

  17. Modification of the submandibular gland transfer procedure.

    PubMed

    Marzouki, Hani Z; Elkhalidy, Youness; Jha, Naresh; Scrimger, Rufus; Debenham, Brock J; Harris, Jeffrey R; O'Connell, Daniel A; Seikaly, Hadi

    2016-11-01

    The treatment for most advanced head and neck cancers (stage III and IV) usually includes radiation, and the most common side effect of this treatment modality is a permanent decrease in salivary production. Xerostomia is a devastating complication that significantly affects patients' quality of life by interfering with functions of taste, mastication, deglutition, and speech production. Treatment of xerostomia is varied, but one of the strategies developed by our group was to preserve one submandibular gland by surgically transferring it to the submental space and shielding it from the full dose of radiation. This procedure is proven to reduce the rate of radiation-induced xerostomia, but its main disadvantage is that it is contraindicated in oral cavity cancer. This study describes and evaluates a modification of the submandibular gland transfer (SGT) procedure, where the submandibular gland contralateral to the disease process is relocated to the parotid region. This modification has the potential of expanding the benefits of submandibular gland transfer procedures to patients with oral cavity cancers. Prospective feasibility study. This study involved nine patients with a new diagnosis of advanced head and neck cancer undergoing major head and neck cancer resection with postoperative adjuvant radiation therapy. The new modified salivary gland transfer procedure was performed on all nine patients, and the glands total dose received with radiation therapy was assessed. All the modified SGT procedures were successful with no post-operative complications. The radiation oncology team has been able to successfully localize the transferred submandibular glands and shield them from the radiation beam postoperatively. We have successfully demonstrated that surgical transfer of a submandibular salivary gland to the parotid region is feasible, surgically viable, oncologically sound, and does not interfere with radiation therapy. 4 Laryngoscope, 126:2492-2496, 2016.

  18. Pheromones and exocrine glands in Isoptera.

    PubMed

    Costa-Leonardo, Ana Maria; Haifig, Ives

    2010-01-01

    Termites are eusocial insects that have a peculiar and intriguing system of communication using pheromones. The termite pheromones are composed of a blend of chemical substances and they coordinate different social interactions or activities, including foraging, building, mating, defense, and nestmate recognition. Some of these sociochemicals are volatile, spreading in the air, and others are contact pheromones, which are transmitted by trophallaxis and grooming. Among the termite semiochemicals, the most known are alarm, trail, sex pheromones, and hydrocarbons responsible for the recognition of nestmates. The sources of the pheromones are exocrine glands located all over the termite body. The principal exocrine structures considered pheromone-producing glands in Isoptera are the frontal, mandibular, salivary or labial, sternal, and tergal glands. The frontal gland is the source of alarm pheromone and defensive chemicals, but the mandibular secretions have been little studied and their function is not well established in Isoptera. The secretion of salivary glands involves numerous chemical compounds, some of them without pheromonal function. The worker saliva contains a phagostimulating pheromone and probably a building pheromone, while the salivary reservoir of some soldiers contains defensive chemicals. The sternal gland is the only source of trail-following pheromone, whereas sex pheromones are secreted by two glandular sources, the sternal and tergal glands. To date, the termite semiochemicals have indicated that few molecules are involved in their chemical communication, that is, the same compound may be secreted by different glands, different castes and species, and for different functions, depending on the concentration. In addition to the pheromonal parsimony, recent studies also indicate the occurrence of a synergic effect among the compounds involved in the chemical communication of Isoptera. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Elevated neuroimmune biomarkers in sweat patches and plasma of premenopausal women with major depressive disorder in remission: the POWER study.

    PubMed

    Cizza, Giovanni; Marques, Andrea H; Eskandari, Farideh; Christie, Israel C; Torvik, Sara; Silverman, Marni N; Phillips, Terry M; Sternberg, Esther M

    2008-11-15

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is inconsistently associated with elevations in proinflammatory cytokines and neuropeptides. We used a skin sweat patch, recently validated in healthy control subjects, and recycling immunoaffinity chromatography to measure neuroimmune biomarkers in patients with MDD mostly in remission. We collected blood at 8:00 am and applied skin sweat patches for 24 hours in 21- to 45-year-old premenopausal women (n = 19) with MDD (17/19 in remission) and age-matched healthy controls (n = 17) participating in the POWER (Premenopausal, Osteopenia/Osteoporosis, Women, Alendronate, Depression) Study. Proinflammatory cytokines, neuropeptide Y, substance P, and calcitonin-gene-related peptide were significantly higher and vasoactive intestinal peptide, a marker of parasympathetic activity, was significantly lower in patients compared to controls, and depressive symptomatology strongly correlated with biomarker levels. All analytes were strongly correlated in the skin sweat patch and plasma in patients (r = .73 to .99; p < .0004). The skin sweat patch allows detection of disrupted patterns of proinflammatory cytokines and neuropeptides in women with MDD in clinical remission, which could predispose to medical consequences such as cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, and diabetes. This method permits measurement of cytokines in ambulatory settings where blood collection is not feasible.

  20. Pleomorphic Adenoma Of Minor Salivary Glands.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mohammad Naeem; Raza, Syed Shahmeer; Hussain Zaidi, Syed Aizaz; Haq, Ihtisham Ul; Hussain, Amer Kamal; Nadeem, Muhammad Daniyal; Farid, Khayyam

    2016-01-01

    Pleomorphic adenoma is the most common benign tumour of salivary glands which is Known for its wide pleomorphic architecture. It accounts for 45-75% of all salivary gland neoplasm. It can involve major as well as minor salivary glands. Among minor salivary glands (5-10% of cases) the palate lip, nasal cavity, pharynx, larynx and trachea are the most common sites. Diagnosis is made with biopsy along with histopathology. Wide excision with biopsy and removal of underlying extension of tumour is the treatment of choice. Sixty years old farmer presented with painless swelling in the upper lip for the last 8 years. History revealed recurrent mass in the midline of upper lip with no other complaints. He was operated 3 times for this complaint in the past. Belonging to poor socioeconomic status no biopsy records were found. On examination 3×4 cm hard and mobile mass was found. Lymph nodes of head and neck and parotid gland revealed no enlargement. Surgery by wide excision was planned. After baseline investigation surgery was done and the mass sent for histopathology. Biopsy reports showed pleomorphic adenoma on unusual site. Dissection of salivary gland tumour is important as they have propensity to metastasize. Wide local excision along with biopsy is the method of choice. Proper surgical techniques are required to avoid recurrence.

  1. The pineal gland from development to function.

    PubMed

    Sapède, Dora; Cau, Elise

    2013-01-01

    The pineal gland is a small neuroendocrine organ whose main and most conserved function is the nighttime secretion of melatonin. In lower vertebrates, the pineal gland is directly photosensitive. In contrast, in higher vertebrates, the direct photosensitivity of the pineal gland had been lost. Rather, the action of this gland as a relay between environmental light conditions and body functions involves reception of light information by the retina. In parallel to this sensory regression, the pineal gland (and its accessory organs) appears to have lost several functions in relation to light and temperature, which are important in lower vertebrate species. In humans, the functions of the pineal gland overlap with the functions of melatonin. They are extremely widespread and include general effects both on cell protection and on more precise functions, such as sleep and immunity. Recently, the role of melatonin has received a considerable amount of attention due to increased cancer risk in shift workers and the discovery that patients suffering from neurodegenerative diseases, autism, or depression exhibit abnormal melatonin rhythms. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Lacrimal Gland Radiosensitivity in Uveal Melanoma Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Muller, Karin; Nowak, Peter J.C.M.; Naus, Nicole

    2009-06-01

    Purpose: To find a dose-volume effect for inhomogeneous irradiated lacrimal glands. Methods and Materials: Between 1999 and 2006, 72 patients (42 men and 30 women) were treated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy in a prospective, nonrandomized clinical trial (median follow-up, 32 months). A total dose of 50 Gy was given on 5 consecutive days. The mean of all Schirmer test results obtained {>=}6 months after treatment was correlated with the radiation dose delivered to the lacrimal gland. Also, the appearance of dry eye syndrome (DES) was related to the lacrimal gland dose distribution. Results: Of the 72 patients, 17 developed amore » late Schirmer value <10 mm; 9 patients developed DES. A statistically significant relationship was found between the received median dose in the lacrimal gland vs. reduced tear production (p = 0.000) and vs. the appearance of DES (p = 0.003), respectively. A median dose of 7 Gy/fraction to the lacrimal gland caused a 50% risk of low Schirmer results. A median dose of 10 Gy resulted in a 50% probability of DES. Conclusion: We found a clear dose-volume relationship for irradiated lacrimal glands with regard to reduced tear production and the appearance of DES.« less

  3. Surgical complications of submandibular gland excision.

    PubMed

    Hernando, Monica; Echarri, Rosa Maria; Taha, Muhammad; Martin-Fragueiro, Luz; Hernando, Ana; Mayor, Guillermo Plaza

    2012-01-01

    Submandibular gland excision is the treatment of choice in chronic pathology resistant to medical treatments or in oncological cases. The aim of this study was to analyse its current postoperative complications. Retrospective study on submandibular gland excisions performed at our University Hospital between 2004 and 2010. A total of 29 submandibular gland excisions were performed: 44.8% (13) for chronic sialadenitis, 37.9% (11) for salivary gland neoplasm and 17.2% (5) for adjacent tumours. Median length of hospital stay was 2 days. Complications were more common after gland excision due to inflammatory causes. There were only 2 cases of paralysis of the marginal facial nerve branch (6.8%); 1 was due to neoplastic pathology and 1, from inflammatory pathology. Despite marginal facial nerve paresis being one of the most relevant issues after submandibular gland excision, this type of surgery is a safe technique in our experience. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  4. Sweat rate and fluid intake in young elite basketball players on the FIBA Europe U20 Championship.

    PubMed

    Vukasinović-Vesić, Milica; Andjelković, Marija; Stojmenović, Tamara; Dikić, Nenad; Kostić, Marija; Curcić, Djordje

    2015-12-01

    Previous investigations in many sports indicated that continued exercise, especially in hot environments, can cause high sweat rate and huge water and electrolyte losses, thus impairing the performance of athletes. Most these studies were conducted during training sessions, but rarely during an official competition. Therefore, the aim of our study was to determine pre- and post-competition hydration, fluid intake and sweat loss of young elite basketball players during the FIBA Europe U20 Championship. The study included 96 basketball male players, (19 ± 0.79 years) of eight national teams. Ambient temperature was 30 ± 2°C, humidity 55 ± 4% and the mean playing time in game 18.8 ± 10.5 min. The following parameters related to hydration status were measured: fluid intake, urine output, sweat rate, percent of dehydration, urine parameters (specific gravity, color and osmolarity), body mass and body surface area. We found that the mean fluid intake was 1.79 ± 0.8 L/h, sweat rate 2.7 ± 0.9 L/h, urine output 55 ± 61 mL and the percentage of dehydration 0.99 ± 0.7%. According to urine osmolarity more than 75% of players were dehydrated before the game and the process continued during the game. The difference in body mass (0.9 ± 0.7 kg) before and after the game was statistically significant. There were statistically significant correlations between the sweat rate and fluid intake, urine osmolarity, body mass loss, body surface area and percentage of dehydration. Fluid intake correlated with the percentage of dehydration, body mass loss, urine specific gravity and urine color. The sweat rate, which varied between the teams, was the highest for centers when this parameter was calculated on the effective time in game. Most of the athletes start competition dehydrated, fail to compensate sweat loss during the game and continue to be dehydrated, regardless what kind of drink was used. These results suggest that hydration strategies must be carefully taken into

  5. The metapleural gland of ants.

    PubMed

    Yek, Sze Huei; Mueller, Ulrich G

    2011-11-01

    The metapleural gland (MG) is a complex glandular structure unique to ants, suggesting a critical role in their origin and ecological success. We synthesize the current understanding of the adaptive function, morphology, evolutionary history, and chemical properties of the MG. Two functions of the MG, sanitation and chemical defence, have received the strongest empirical support; two additional possible functions, recognition odour and territorial marking, are less well supported. The design of the MG is unusual for insects; glandular secretions are stored in a rigid, non-compressible invagination of the integument and the secretion is thought to ooze out passively through the non-closable opening of the MG or is groomed off by the legs and applied to target surfaces. MG loss has occurred repeatedly among the ants, particularly in the subfamilies Formicinae and Myrmicinae, and the MG is more commonly absent in males than in workers. MG chemistry has been characterized mostly in derived ant lineages with unique biologies (e.g. leafcutter ants, fire ants), currently precluding any inferences about MG chemistry at the origin of the ants. A synthetic approach integrating functional morphology, phylogenetic transitions and chemical ecology of the MGs of both the derived and the unstudied early-branching (basal) ant lineages is needed to elucidate the evolutionary origin and diversification of the MG of ants. © 2010 The Authors. Biological Reviews © 2010 Cambridge Philosophical Society.

  6. Recurrent Benign Salivary Gland Neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Witt, Robert Lee; Nicolai, Piero

    2016-01-01

    The most important causes of recurrence of benign pleomorphic adenoma are enucleation with intraoperative spillage and incomplete tumor excision in association with characteristic histologic findings for the lesion (incomplete pseudocapsule and the presence of pseudopodia). Most recurrent pleomorphic adenomas (RPAs) are multinodular. MRI is the imaging method of choice for their assessment. Nerve integrity monitoring may reduce morbidity of RPA surgery. Although treatment of RPA must be individualized, total parotidectomy is generally recommended given the multicentricity of the lesions. However, surgery alone may be inadequate for controlling RPA over the long term. There is growing evidence from retrospective series that postoperative radiotherapy results in significantly better local control. A high percentage of RPAs are incurable. All patients should therefore be informed about the possibility of needing multiple treatment procedures, with possible impairment of facial nerve function, and radiation therapy for RPA. Reappearance of Warthin tumor is a metachronous occurrence of a new focus or residual incomplete excision of all primary multicentric foci of Warthin tumor. Selected cases can be observed. Conservative surgical management can include partial superficial parotidectomy or extracapsular dissection. Not uncommonly, other major and minor salivary gland neoplasms, including myoepithelioma, basal cell adenoma, oncocytoma, canalicular adenoma, cystadenoma, and ductal papilloma, follow an indolent course after surgical resection, with rare cases of recurrence. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Lapatinib in Treating Patients With Recurrent and/or Metastatic Adenoid Cystic Cancer or Other Salivary Gland Cancers

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-06

    High-grade Salivary Gland Carcinoma; High-grade Salivary Gland Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma; Low-grade Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Low-grade Salivary Gland Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma; Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Salivary Gland Acinic Cell Tumor; Salivary Gland Adenocarcinoma; Salivary Gland Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Malignant Mixed Cell Type Tumor

  8. The accessory parotid gland and facial process of the parotid gland on computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Dongbin; Yeo, Chang Ki; Han, Soon Yong

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of an anterior extension of the parotid gland, such as an accessory parotid gland (APG) or facial process (FP) and to evaluate its characteristics on computed tomography (CT) scans. We reviewed CT scans of 1,600 parotid glands from 800 patients. An APG on CT was defined as a soft-tissue mass of the same density as the main parotid gland, located at the anterior part of the main parotid gland, and completely separate from the main parotid gland. An FP was defined as a lobe of the parotid gland protruding anteriorly over the anterior edge of the ramus of the mandible on CT and showing continuity with the main gland. The overall incidence rates and characteristics of APGs and FPs were evaluated according to age, sex, and side. The incidence rates of APGs and FPs were 10.2% (163/1,600) and 28.3% (452/1,600), respectively. The mean size of an APG was 15.8 mm × 5.0 mm and the mean distance from the main parotid gland was 10.5 mm. The FP reached anteriorly between the anterior edge of the mandibular ramus and the anterior border of the masseter muscle in 405 (89.6%) cases, while it extended over the anterior border of the masseter muscle in 47 (10.4%) cases. The incidence rates of APGs and FPs decreased and increased, respectively, with increasing age, showing significant linear correlations. However, the incidence of an anterior extension of the parotid gland (either an APG or an FP) was similar across all age groups. The present study showed that CT might be helpful in identifying anterior extensions of the parotid gland including APGs and FPs. The anatomical information gained from this study contributes to a better understanding of APGs and FPs and how their incidence changes with age. PMID:28915265

  9. Botulinum toxin A for quality of life improvement in post-parotidectomy gustatory sweating (Frey's syndrome).

    PubMed

    Hartl, D M; Julieron, M; LeRidant, A-M; Janot, F; Marandas, P; Travagli, J-P

    2008-10-01

    To measure patient-reported quality of life before and after botulinum toxin A treatment of post-parotidectomy Frey's syndrome (gustatory sweating). A questionnaire concerning functional, social and emotional aspects of Frey's syndrome (14 questions, with responses on a zero to three point scale) was administered to 17 patients (13 women and four men) before and one month after intradermal injection of botulinum toxin A. Parotidectomy had been performed one to 19 years previously, for benign (n = 10) or malignant (n = 7) tumours, with gustatory sweating occurring a median of 15 months after surgery (range: one month to 14 years). Pre- and post-treatment quality of life scores were compared using Wilcoxon's test (p < 0.05). Patients' reported functional quality of life improved significantly (p = 0.0004). Their social and emotional scores were not significantly modified (p = 0.155 and 0.142, respectively). Seven patients (41 per cent) found the injections painful, but all patients said that the effects were beneficial, that they would undergo new injections if necessary and that they would recommend this treatment to other patients. The benefit lasted over 1.5 years for 60 per cent of patients. No correlation was found between duration of the effect and the extent of parotidectomy (p = 0.067). Botulinum toxin A significantly improved patients' functional quality of life, without significant improvement in their social or emotional quality of life, according to our questionnaire results. The duration of the effect was longer than the reported physiological effect of botulinum toxin A on acetylcholine receptors.

  10. A device to improve the Schleger and Turner method for sweating rate measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Alfredo Manuel Franco; Alves, Alexandre; Infante, Paulo; Titto, Evaldo A. L.; Baccari, Flávio; Almeida, J. A. Afonso

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to test a device developed to improve the functionality, accuracy and precision of the original technique for sweating rate measurements proposed by Schleger and Turner [Schleger AV, Turner HG (1965) Aust J Agric Res 16:92-106]. A device was built for this purpose and tested against the original Schleger and Turner technique. Testing was performed by measuring sweating rates in an experiment involving six Mertolenga heifers subjected to four different thermal levels in a climatic chamber. The device exhibited no functional problems and the results obtained with its use were more consistent than with the Schleger and Turner technique. There was no difference in the reproducibility of the two techniques (same accuracy), but measurements performed with the new device had lower repeatability, corresponding to lower variability and, consequently, to higher precision. When utilizing this device, there is no need for physical contact between the operator and the animal to maintain the filter paper discs in position. This has important advantages: the animals stay quieter, and several animals can be evaluated simultaneously. This is a major advantage because it allows more measurements to be taken in a given period of time, increasing the precision of the observations and diminishing the error associated with temporal hiatus (e.g., the solar angle during field studies). The new device has higher functional versatility when taking measurements in large-scale studies (many animals) under field conditions. The results obtained in this study suggest that the technique using the device presented here could represent an advantageous alternative to the original technique described by Schleger and Turner.

  11. Role of skin blood flow and sweating rate in exercise thermoregulation after bed rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Stuart M C.; Williams, W. Jon; Schneider, Suzanne M.

    2002-01-01

    Two potential mechanisms, reduced skin blood flow (SBF) and sweating rate (SR), may be responsible for elevated intestinal temperature (T(in)) during exercise after bed rest and spaceflight. Seven men underwent 13 days of 6 degrees head-down bed rest. Pre- and post-bed rest, subjects completed supine submaximal cycle ergometry (20 min at 40% and 20 min at 65% of pre-bed rest supine peak exercise capacity) in a thermoneutral room. After bed rest, T(in) was elevated at rest (+0.31 +/- 0.12 degrees C) and at the end of exercise (+0.33 +/- 0.07 degrees C). Percent increase in SBF during exercise was less after bed rest (211 +/- 53 vs. 96 +/- 31%; P < or = 0.05), SBF/T(in) threshold was greater (37.09 +/- 0.16 vs. 37.33 +/- 0.13 degrees C; P < or = 0.05), and slope of SBF/T(in) tended to be reduced (536 +/- 184 vs. 201 +/- 46%/ degrees C; P = 0.08). SR/T(in) threshold was delayed (37.06 +/- 0.11 vs. 37.34 +/- 0.06 degrees C; P < or = 0.05), but the slope of SR/T(in) (3.45 +/- 1.22 vs. 2.58 +/- 0.71 mg x min-1 x cm-2 x degrees C-1) and total sweat loss (0.42 +/- 0.06 vs. 0.44 +/- 0.08 kg) were not changed. The higher resting and exercise T(in) and delayed onset of SBF and SR suggest a centrally mediated elevation in the thermoregulatory set point during bed rest exposure.

  12. Modulation of muscle metaboreceptor activation upon sweating and cutaneous vascular responses to rising core temperature in humans.

    PubMed

    Amano, Tatsuro; Ichinose, Masashi; Inoue, Yoshimitsu; Nishiyasu, Takeshi; Koga, Shunsaku; Kondo, Narihiko

    2015-06-15

    The present study investigated the role of muscle metaboreceptor activation on human thermoregulation by measuring core temperature thresholds and slopes for sweating and cutaneous vascular responses during passive heating associated with central and peripheral mechanisms. Six male and eight female subjects inserted their lower legs into hot water (43°C) while wearing a water perfusion suit on the upper body (34°C). One minute after immersion, an isometric handgrip exercise--40% of maximum voluntary contraction-was conducted for 1.5 min in both control and experimental conditions, while postexercise occlusion was performed in the experimental condition only for 9 min. The postexercise forearm occlusion during passive heating consistently stimulated muscle metaboreceptors, as implicated by significantly elevated mean arterial blood pressure throughout the experimental period (P <0.05). Stimulation of the forearm muscle metaboreceptors increased sweating and cutaneous vascular responses during passive heating, and was associated with significant reductions in esophageal temperature threshold of sweating and cutaneous vasodilation (Δ threshold, sweating: 0.33 ± 0.05 and 0.16 ± 0.04°C, cutaneous vascular conductance: 0.38 ± 0.08 and 0.16 ± 0.05°C for control and experimental groups, respectively, P < 0.05). The slopes of these responses were not different between the conditions. These results suggest that muscle metaboreceptor activation in the forearm accelerates sweating and cutaneous vasodilation during passive heating associated with a reduction in core temperature thresholds and may be related to central mechanisms controlling heat loss responses. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  13. Simultaneous analysis of buprenorphine, methadone, cocaine, opiates and nicotine metabolites in sweat by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Concheiro, Marta; Shakleya, Diaa M.

    2013-01-01

    A liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry method for buprenorphine (BUP), norbuprenorphine (NBUP), methadone, 2-ethylidene-1,5-dimethyl-3,3-diphenylpyrrolidine (EDDP), cocaine, benzoylecgonine, ecgonine methyl ester (EME), morphine, codeine, 6-acetylmorphine, heroin, 6-acetylcodeine, cotinine, and trans-3′-hydroxycotinine quantification in sweat was developed and comprehensively validated. Sweat patches were mixed with 6 mL acetate buffer at pH 4.5, and supernatant extracted with Strata-XC-cartridges. Reverse-phase separation was achieved with a gradient mobile phase of 0.1% formic acid and acetonitrile in 15 min. Quantification was achieved by multiple reaction monitoring of two transitions per compound. The assay was a linear 1–1,000 ng/patch, except EME 5–1,000 ng/patch. Intra-, inter-day and total imprecision were <10.1%CV, analytical recovery 87.2–107.7%, extraction efficiency 35.3– 160.9%, and process efficiency 25.5–91.7%. Ion suppression was detected for EME (−63.3%) and EDDP (−60.4%), and enhancement for NBUP (42.6%). Deuterated internal standards compensated for these effects. No carryover was detected, and all analytes were stable for 24 h at 22 °C, 72 h at 4 °C, and after three freeze/thaw cycles. The method was applied to weekly sweat patches from an opioid-dependent BUP-maintained pregnant woman; 75.0% of sweat patches were positive for BUP, 93.8% for cocaine, 37.5% for opiates, 6.3% for methadone and all for tobacco biomarkers. This method permits a fast and simultaneous quantification of 14 drugs and metabolites in sweat patches, with good selectivity and sensitivity. PMID:21125263

  14. Simultaneous analysis of buprenorphine, methadone, cocaine, opiates and nicotine metabolites in sweat by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Concheiro, Marta; Shakleya, Diaa M; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2011-04-01

    A liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry method for buprenorphine (BUP), norbuprenorphine (NBUP), methadone, 2-ethylidene-1,5-dimethyl-3,3-diphenylpyrrolidine (EDDP), cocaine, benzoylecgonine, ecgonine methyl ester (EME), morphine, codeine, 6-acetylmorphine, heroin, 6-acetylcodeine, cotinine, and trans-3'-hydroxycotinine quantification in sweat was developed and comprehensively validated. Sweat patches were mixed with 6 mL acetate buffer at pH 4.5, and supernatant extracted with Strata-XC-cartridges. Reverse-phase separation was achieved with a gradient mobile phase of 0.1% formic acid and acetonitrile in 15 min. Quantification was achieved by multiple reaction monitoring of two transitions per compound. The assay was a linear 1-1,000 ng/patch, except EME 5-1,000 ng/patch. Intra-, inter-day and total imprecision were <10.1%CV, analytical recovery 87.2-107.7%, extraction efficiency 35.3-160.9%, and process efficiency 25.5-91.7%. Ion suppression was detected for EME (-63.3%) and EDDP (-60.4%), and enhancement for NBUP (42.6%). Deuterated internal standards compensated for these effects. No carryover was detected, and all analytes were stable for 24 h at 22 °C, 72 h at 4 °C, and after three freeze/thaw cycles. The method was applied to weekly sweat patches from an opioid-dependent BUP-maintained pregnant woman; 75.0% of sweat patches were positive for BUP, 93.8% for cocaine, 37.5% for opiates, 6.3% for methadone and all for tobacco biomarkers. This method permits a fast and simultaneous quantification of 14 drugs and metabolites in sweat patches, with good selectivity and sensitivity.

  15. Study of sample preparation for quantitative analysis of amino acids in human sweat by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Delgado-Povedano, M M; Calderón-Santiago, M; Priego-Capote, F; Luque de Castro, M D

    2016-01-01

    The determination of physiological levels of amino acids is important to aid in the diagnosis and treatment of several diseases and nutritional status of individuals. Amino acids are frequently determined in biofluids such as blood (serum or plasma) and urine; however, there are less common biofluids with different concentration profiles of amino acids that could be of interest. One of these biofluids is sweat that can be obtained in a non-invasive manner and is characterized by low complex composition. The analysis of amino acids in human sweat requires the development of sample preparation strategies according to the sample matrix and small collected volume. The influence of sample preparation on the quantitative analysis of amino acids in sweat by LC-MS/MS has been assessed through a comparison between two strategies: dilution of sweat and centrifugal microsolid-phase extraction (c-μSPE). In both cases, several dilution factors were assayed for in-depth knowledge of the matrix effects, and the use of c-μSPE provided the best results in terms of accuracy. The behavior of the target analytes was a function of the dilution factor, thus providing a pattern for sample preparation that depended on the amino acid to be determined. The concentration of amino acids in sweat ranges between 6.20 ng mL(-1) (for homocysteine) and 259.77 µg mL(-1) (for serine) with precision, expressed as relative standard deviation, within 1.1-21.4%. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Measurement of nasal potential difference in young children with an equivocal sweat test following newborn screening for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Sermet-Gaudelus, Isabelle; Girodon, Emmanuelle; Roussel, Delphine; Deneuville, Eric; Bui, Stéphanie; Huet, Frédéric; Guillot, Marcel; Aboutaam, Rola; Renouil, Michel; Munck, Anne; des Georges, Marie; Iron, Albert; Thauvin-Robinet, Christel; Fajac, Isabelle; Lenoir, Gerard; Roussey, Michel; Edelman, Aleksander

    2010-06-01

    A challenging problem arising from cystic fibrosis (CF) newborn screening is the significant number of infants with hypertrypsinaemia (HIRT) with sweat chloride levels in the intermediate range and only one or no identified CF-causing mutations. To investigate the diagnostic value for CF of assessing CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein function by measuring nasal potential difference in children with HIRT. A specially designed protocol was used to assess nasal potential difference (NPD) in 23 young children with HIRT (3 months-4 years) with inconclusive neonatal screening. Results were analysed with a composite score including CFTR-dependent sodium and chloride secretion. Results were correlated with genotype after extensive genetic screening and with clinical phenotype at follow-up 3 years later. NPD was interpretable for 21 children with HIRT: 13 had NPD composite scores in the CF range. All 13 were finally found to carry two CFTR mutations. At follow-up, nine had developed a chronic pulmonary disease consistent with a CF diagnosis. The sweat test could be repeated in nine children, and six had sweat chloride values >or=60 mmol/l. Of the eight children with normal NPD scores, only two had two CFTR mutations, both wide-spectrum mutations. None had developed a CF-like lung disease at follow-up. The sweat test could be reassessed in five of these eight children and all had sweat chloride values <60 mmol/l. CF diagnosis was ruled out in six of these eight children. Evaluation of CFTR function in the nasal epithelium of young children with inconclusive results at CF newborn screening is a useful diagnostic tool for CF.

  17. Sweating response to passive stretch of the calf muscle during activation of forearm muscle metaboreceptors in heated humans.

    PubMed

    Amano, Tatsuro; Ichinose, Masashi; Nishiyasu, Takeshi; Inoue, Yoshimitsu; Koga, Shunsaku; Miwa, Mikio; Kondo, Narihiko

    2014-05-15

    Activation of muscle metaboreceptors and mechanoreceptors has been shown to independently influence the sweating response, while their integrative control effects remain unclear. We examined the sweating response when the two muscle receptors are concurrently activated in different limbs, as well as the blood pressure response. In total, 27 young males performed passive calf muscle stretches (muscle mechanoreceptor activation) for 30 s in a semisupine position with and without postisometric handgrip exercise muscle ischemia (PEMI, muscle metaboreceptor activation) at exercise intensities of 35 and 50% of maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) under hot conditions (ambient temperature, 35°C, relative humidity, 50%). Passive calf muscle stretching alone increased the mean sweating rate significantly on the forehead, chest, and thigh (SRmean) and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), but not the heart rate (HR), from prestretching levels by 0.04 ± 0.01 mg·cm(2)·min(-1), 4.0 ± 1.3 mmHg (P < 0.05), and -1.0 ± 0.5 beats/min (P > 0.05), respectively. The SRmean and MAP during PEMI were significantly higher than those at rest. The passive calf muscle stretch during PEMI increased MAP significantly by 3.4 ± 1.0 and 2.0 ± 0.7 mmHg for 35 and 50% of MVC, respectively (P < 0.05), but not that of SRmean or HR at either exercise intensity. These results suggest that sweating and blood pressure responses to concurrent activation of the two muscle receptors in different limbs differ and that the influence of calf muscle mechanoreceptor activation alone on the sweating response disappears during forearm muscle metaboreceptor activation. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  18. Intradermal administration of ATP augments methacholine-induced cutaneous vasodilation but not sweating in young males and females

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Naoto; Halili, Lyra; Singh, Maya Sarah; Meade, Robert D.

    2015-01-01

    Acetylcholine released from cholinergic nerves is a key neurotransmitter contributing to heat stress-induced cutaneous vasodilation and sweating. Given that sympathetic cholinergic nerves also release ATP, ATP may play an important role in modulating cholinergic cutaneous vasodilation and sweating. However, the pattern of response may differ between males and females given reports of sex-related differences in the peripheral mechanisms governing these heat loss responses. Cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC, laser-Doppler perfusion units/mean arterial pressure) and sweat rate (ventilated capsule) were evaluated in 17 young adults (8 males, 9 females) at four intradermal microdialysis skin sites continuously perfused with: 1) lactated Ringer (Control), 2) 0.3 mM ATP, 3) 3 mM ATP, or 4) 30 mM ATP. At all skin sites, methacholine was coadministered in a concentration-dependent manner (0.0125, 0.25, 5, 100, 2,000 mM, each for 25 min). In both males and females, CVC was elevated with the lone infusion of 30 mM ATP (both P < 0.05), but not with 0.3 and 3 mM ATP compared with control (all P >0.27). However, 0.3 mM ATP induced a greater increase in CVC compared with control in response to 100 mM methacholine infusion in males (P < 0.05). In females, 0.3 mM ATP infusion resulted in a lower concentration of methacholine required to elicit a half-maximal response (EC50) (P < 0.05). In both males and females, methacholine-induced sweating was unaffected by any concentration of ATP (all P > 0.44). We demonstrate that ATP enhances cholinergic cutaneous vasodilation albeit the pattern of response differs between males and females. Furthermore, we show that ATP does not modulate cholinergic sweating. PMID:26290105

  19. Intradermal administration of ATP augments methacholine-induced cutaneous vasodilation but not sweating in young males and females.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Naoto; Halili, Lyra; Singh, Maya Sarah; Meade, Robert D; Kenny, Glen P

    2015-10-15

    Acetylcholine released from cholinergic nerves is a key neurotransmitter contributing to heat stress-induced cutaneous vasodilation and sweating. Given that sympathetic cholinergic nerves also release ATP, ATP may play an important role in modulating cholinergic cutaneous vasodilation and sweating. However, the pattern of response may differ between males and females given reports of sex-related differences in the peripheral mechanisms governing these heat loss responses. Cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC, laser-Doppler perfusion units/mean arterial pressure) and sweat rate (ventilated capsule) were evaluated in 17 young adults (8 males, 9 females) at four intradermal microdialysis skin sites continuously perfused with: 1) lactated Ringer (Control), 2) 0.3 mM ATP, 3) 3 mM ATP, or 4) 30 mM ATP. At all skin sites, methacholine was coadministered in a concentration-dependent manner (0.0125, 0.25, 5, 100, 2,000 mM, each for 25 min). In both males and females, CVC was elevated with the lone infusion of 30 mM ATP (both P < 0.05), but not with 0.3 and 3 mM ATP compared with control (all P >0.27). However, 0.3 mM ATP induced a greater increase in CVC compared with control in response to 100 mM methacholine infusion in males (P < 0.05). In females, 0.3 mM ATP infusion resulted in a lower concentration of methacholine required to elicit a half-maximal response (EC50) (P < 0.05). In both males and females, methacholine-induced sweating was unaffected by any concentration of ATP (all P > 0.44). We demonstrate that ATP enhances cholinergic cutaneous vasodilation albeit the pattern of response differs between males and females. Furthermore, we show that ATP does not modulate cholinergic sweating. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  20. A retrospective evaluation of submandibular gland involvement in oral cavity cancers: a case for gland preservation.

    PubMed

    Okoturo, E M; Trivedi, N P; Kekatpure, V; Gangoli, A; Shetkar, G S; Mohan, M; Kuriakose, M A

    2012-11-01

    The key factor mitigating against prognosis in head and neck cancer is nodal metastasis and its management. Neck dissection has been known to play an integral part in this type of cancer management. Submandibular gland preservation during neck dissection and post radiotherapy, have been known to improve subjective symptoms of xerostomia. The authors retrospectively surveyed the involvement of submandibular gland involvement in oral cancer with a view to confirm oncologic safety of submandibular gland preservation, as a first step in a quest to manage radiation induced xerostomia by submandibular gland transfer. The medical and pathological records of oral cancer patients who underwent surgical treatment at the authors' centre were reviewed retrospectively. 194 patients were included in the study. 229 submandibular glands were excised from the same number of neck dissections. 3 (1.3%) submandibular glands were involved with malignancies microscopically. The mode of involvement was by direct infiltration. In conclusion, no metastasis to submandibular gland was observed. This may suggest the oncologic safety of submandibular gland preservation and transfer. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. The clypeal gland: a new exocrine gland in termite imagoes (Isoptera: Serritermitidae, Rhinotermitidae, Termitidae).

    PubMed

    Křížková, Barbora; Bourguignon, Thomas; Vytisková, Blahoslava; Sobotník, Jan

    2014-11-01

    Social insects possess a rich set of exocrine organs producing diverse pheromones and defensive compounds. This is especially true for termite imagoes, which are equipped with several glands producing, among others, sex pheromones and defensive compounds protecting imagoes during the dispersal flight and colony foundation. Here, we describe the clypeal gland, a new termite exocrine organ occurring in the labro-clypeal region of imagoes of most Rhinotermitidae, Serritermitidae and Termitidae species. The clypeal gland of Coptotermes testaceus consists of class 1 (modified epidermal cell) and class 3 (bicellular gland unit) secretory cells. Ultrastructural features suggest that the gland secretes volatile compounds and proteins, probably after starting the reproduction. One peculiar feature of the gland is the presence of multiple secretory canals in a single canal cell, a feature never observed before in other insect glands. Although the function of the gland remains unknown, we hypothesize that it could produce secretion signalling the presence of functional reproductives or their need to be fed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Consistency between Sweat Rate and Wet Bulb Globe Temperature for the Assessment of Heat Stress of People Working Outdoor in Arid and Semi-arid Regions.

    PubMed

    Heidari, Hamidreza; Golbabaei, Farideh; Shamsipour, Aliakbar; Rahimi Forushani, Abbas; Gaeini, Abbasali

    2018-01-01

    Heat stress is common among workers in arid and semi-arid areas. In order to take every preventive measure to protect exposed workers against heat-related disorders, it is crucial to choose an appropriate index that accurately relates environmental parameters to physiological responses. To investigate the consistency between 2 heat stress and strain indices, ie , sweat rate and wet bulb globe temperature (WBGT), for the assessment of heat stress of people working outdoor in arid and semi-arid regions in Iran. During spring and summer, 136 randomly selected outdoor workers were enrolled in this study. Using a defined protocol, the sweat rate of these workers was measured 3 times a day. Simultaneously, the environmental parameters including WBGT index were recorded for each working station. The level of agreement between sweat rate and WBGT was poor ( κ <0.2). Based on sweat rate, no case exceeding the reference value was observed during the study. WBGT overestimated the heat stress in outdoor workers compared to sweat rate. It seems that the sweat rate standards may need some modifications related to real condition of work in arid and semi-arid regions in Iran. Moreover, it seems that judging workers solely based on monitoring their sweat rate in such regions, can probably result in underestimation of heat stress.

  3. Metrial gland cells in deciduomata of pseudopregnancy.

    PubMed Central

    Peel, S; Stewart, I; Bulmer, D

    1979-01-01

    Light and electron microscope studies were carried out on the metrial gland cells of deciduomata of pseudopregnancy in the rat. At the light microscope level these cells were characterised by a comparatively pale staining cytoplasm with numerous glycoprotein granules. Some also had extensive cytoplasmic deposits of glycogen. In electron micrographs the metrial gland cell cytoplasm as a whole was much less electron-dense than that of fibroblasts and decidual cells, but it contained densely stained pleomorphic granules. There were stacks of rough endoplasmic reticulum, oval or round profiles of fibroblasts and decidual cells, but it contained densely stained pleomorphic granules. There were stacks of rough endoplasmic reticulum, oval or round profiles of mitochondria, and an extensive Golgi network. The metrial gland cells were roughly spherical in appearance, with irregular surface projections. In all these features, and in the sequence of their appearance, first in the decidua basalis, and later in the mesometrial triangle, the granulated metrial gland cells of deciduomata resembled the metrial gland cells of pregnancy. In addition to granulated metrial gland cells, decidual cells and fibroblasts, a number of other cell types were identified. These cells could be placed in a series, with each member of the series minimally different in morphological appearances from its neighbours. It is proposed that the series represents the differentiation of granulated metrial gland cells, in situ, from lymphocyte-like cells. The differentiation from a lymphocyte precursor appears to follow a sequence in deciduomata formation similar to that previously described in pregnancy. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 PMID:511767

  4. Palmar hyperhidrosis treated by noninvasive ultrasound stellate ganglion block.

    PubMed

    Heinig, Birgit; Koch, Andrè; Wollina, Uwe

    2016-07-05

    Focal palmar hyperhidrosis is a common and often debilitating eccrine sweat gland disorder with negative impact on quality of life and self-esteem. For treatment of recalcitrant cases, a stellate ganglion block is a nonsurgical alternative. Although this method has only a temporary effect, surgical risks can be avoided. The usual way to perform the block is by ultrasound-guided injection of local anesthetics. Here we describe the use of therapeutic ultrasound at 0.8 MHz for stellate ganglion block. Ultrasound was applied for 1 min unilaterally every other day for 6 days. The efficacy was monitored by video capillaroscopy and Minor's iodine starch test. Treatment was well tolerated and no adverse effects were noted. Sweating was stopped and capillary blood flow increased. The effect lasted for several weeks.

  5. Nivolumab and Ipilimumab in Treating Patients With Metastatic/Recurrent ACC of All Sites and Non-ACC Salivary Gland Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2018-04-12

    Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Minor Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Recurrent Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IV Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVA Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVB Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVC Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma

  6. Submandibular gland involvement in early stage oral cavity carcinomas: can the gland be left behind?

    PubMed

    Ashfaq, Kamran; Ashfaq, Muhammed; Ahmed, Attique; Khan, Maryam; Azhar, Muhammed

    2014-08-01

    To determine the frequency of submandibular gland involvement in early oral cavity tumors. Observational study. ENT Department, CMH, Rawalpindi, from January 2008 to December 2011. Data of 110 oral cavity tumors operated over 2008 - 2011 was retrieved from ENT OPD, tumor registry in AFIP and from Head and Neck Oncology Forum Registry. Cases of oral cavity tumors that had undergone elective neck dissections were retrospectively studied for invasion of the submandibular gland, TNM Staging, perineural, perivascular, lymphovascular invasion, site specific frequency of oral cavity tumors and frequency of lymph node metastasis. Tumors of tongue were the most common constituting 42%, squamous cell carcinoma was the histological diagnosis in 90% cases. Sixty eight (61.8%) cases were node negative. Selective neck dissection was done in 55.5% of the cases. Submandibular gland was involved in 2 cases (1.8%). Submandibular gland metastasis from early oral cavity tumors is rare; any neoplastic involvement of the gland usually occurs via direct spread.

  7. Impact of submandibular gland excision on salivary gland function in head and neck cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Jaguar, G C; Lima, E N P; Kowalski, L P; Pellizon, A C; Carvalho, A L; Alves, F A

    2010-05-01

    Head and neck cancer surgery is often associated with neck dissection and usually includes the submandibular glands. Literature data related to remaining salivary gland function after surgery is scarce and controversial. A reduction in salivary output and increase in complaints of xerostomia have been suggested. However, a compensatory salivary mechanism has also been reported. The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate the effect of neck dissection (with submandibular excision) on salivary gland function measured by salivary flow rate and salivary gland scintigraphy. A total of 80 patients with head and neck tumors were evaluated. The surgery group was composed of 37 patients, who underwent submandibular gland resection, and the non-surgery group of 43 patients evaluated prior to radiation and/or chemotherapy treatment. Whole unstimulated and stimulated saliva collection and salivary gland scintigraphy were performed in all patients. Twenty-one percent of patients in the surgery group reported xerostomia, whereas 7% in the non-surgery group. The mean unstimulated salivary flow was 0.60 and 0.94 m/min for the surgery and non-surgery groups, respectively (p=0.008). Nevertheless, no statistical difference in the stimulated salivary flow was observed between the groups (p=0.26). In addition, the mean uptake and excretion rates for parotid and remaining submandibular glands also showed no statistical difference. The data of the present study support the contention that submandibular gland resection causes a decrease in unstimulated salivary volume. However, the residual submandibular glands in the surgery group showed similar function to that of submandibular glands in the non-surgery group. Consequently, the compensatory salivary mechanism seems not to be a possibility. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. [Morphofunctional and molecular bases of pineal gland aging].

    PubMed

    Khavinson, V Kh; Lin'kova, N S

    2012-01-01

    The review analyzed morphology, molecular and functional aspects of pineal gland aging and methods of it correction. The pineal gland is central organ, which regulates activity of neuroimmunoendocrine, antioxidant and other organisms systems. Functional activity of pineal gland is discreased at aging, which is the reason of melatonin level changing. The molecular and morphology research demonstrated, that pineal gland hadn't strongly pronounced atrophy at aging. Long-term experience showed, that peptides extract of pineal gland epithalamin and synthetic tetrapeptide on it base epithalon restored melatonin secretion in pineal gland and had strong regulatory activity at neuroimmunoendocrine and antioxidant organism systems.

  9. Management of the thyroid gland during laryngectomy

    PubMed Central

    LI, SX; POLACCO, MA; GOSSELIN, BJ; HARRINGTON, LX; TITUS, AJ; PAYDARFAR, JA

    2017-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to: describe the incidence of thyroid gland involvement in advanced laryngeal cancer, analyse patterns of spread to the thyroid and elucidate predictors of thyroid involvement. Methods A retrospective review was performed on patients who underwent laryngectomy from 1991 to 2015 as a primary or salvage treatment for squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx, hypopharynx or base of tongue. The incidence of thyroidectomy during total laryngectomy, type of thyroidectomy, incidence of gland involvement, route of spread, and positive predictors of spread were analysed and reported. Results A total of 188 patients fit the inclusion criteria. Of these, 125 (66 per cent) underwent thyroidectomy. The thyroid was involved in 10 of the 125 patients (8 per cent), 9 by direct extension and 1 by metastasis. Cartilage invasion was a predictor of thyroid gland involvement, with a positive predictive value of 26 per cent. Conclusion There is a low incidence of thyroid gland involvement in laryngeal carcinoma. Most cases of gland involvement occurred by direct extension. Thyroidectomy during laryngectomy should be considered for advanced stage tumours with cartilage invasion. PMID:28592347

  10. Management of the thyroid gland during laryngectomy.

    PubMed

    Li, S X; Polacco, M A; Gosselin, B J; Harrington, L X; Titus, A J; Paydarfar, J A

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to: describe the incidence of thyroid gland involvement in advanced laryngeal cancer, analyse patterns of spread to the thyroid and elucidate predictors of thyroid involvement. A retrospective review was performed on patients who underwent laryngectomy from 1991 to 2015 as a primary or salvage treatment for squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx, hypopharynx or base of tongue. The incidence of thyroidectomy during total laryngectomy, type of thyroidectomy, incidence of gland involvement, route of spread, and positive predictors of spread were analysed and reported. A total of 188 patients fit the inclusion criteria. Of these, 125 (66 per cent) underwent thyroidectomy. The thyroid was involved in 10 of the 125 patients (8 per cent), 9 by direct extension and 1 by metastasis. Cartilage invasion was a predictor of thyroid gland involvement, with a positive predictive value of 26 per cent. There is a low incidence of thyroid gland involvement in laryngeal carcinoma. Most cases of gland involvement occurred by direct extension. Thyroidectomy during laryngectomy should be considered for advanced stage tumours with cartilage invasion.

  11. Mammary gland immunity and mastitis susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Sordillo, Lorraine M; Streicher, Katie L

    2002-04-01

    Lactation is considered the final phase of the mammalian reproductive cycle, and the mammary gland provides milk for nourishment and disease resistance to the newborn. However, the cellular and soluble immune components associated with mammary tissues and secretion also can play an important role in protecting the gland from infectious diseases, such as mastitis. Mastitis can affect essentially all lactating mammals, but is especially problematic for dairy cattle. The most recent estimates from the National Mastitis Council suggest that mastitis affects one third of all dairy cows and will cost the dairy industry over 2 billion dollars annually in the United States in lost profits (National Mastitis Council (1996) Current Concepts in Bovine Mastitis, National Mastitis Council, Madison, WI). The overall impact of mastitis on the quality and quantity of milk produced for human consumption has provided the impetus to better understand the pathophysiology of the mammary gland and develop ways to enhance disease resistance through immunoregulation. As such, the bovine species has played a critical and prominent role in our current understanding of mammary gland immunobiology. This paper provides a comprehensive overview of mammary gland immunity and how the stage of lactation can impact important host defenses While this review emphasizes the bovine system, comparisons to humans and other domestic mammals will be addressed as well.

  12. Validated gas chromatographic-negative ion chemical ionization mass spectrometric method for delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol in sweat patches.

    PubMed

    Saito, Takeshi; Wtsadik, Abraham; Scheidweiler, Karl B; Fortner, Neil; Takeichi, Sanae; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2004-11-01

    A sensitive gas chromatography-negative ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry (GC/MS-NICI) method was developed and validated for the measurement of Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in human sweat patches. THC-d(0) and THC-d(3) were added to worn blank sweat patches (PharmChek; PharmChem Incorporated) and extracted with 3 mL of methanol-0.2 mol/L sodium acetate buffer (pH 5.0, 3:1 by volume) on a reciprocating shaker at ambient temperature for 30 min. Extracted solution (2 mL) was diluted with 8 mL of 0.1 mol/L sodium acetate buffer (pH 4.5) and extracted by use of solid-phase extraction columns (CleanScreen; United Chemical Technologies). Dried extracts were derivatized with trifluoroacetic acid and analyzed with an Agilent 6890 gas chromatograph interfaced with an Agilent 5973 mass selective detector operated in NICI-selected ion-monitoring mode. The lower limits of detection and quantification for THC in human sweat were 0.2 and 0.4 ng/patch, respectively. The calibration curve was linear from 0.4 to 10 ng/patch (R(2) >0.995). Overall recovery of THC from blank worn patches to which 0.6, 4.0, and 8.0 ng of THC had been added was 44-46%. Assay imprecision, expressed as CV, was <10% for 0.6, 4.0, and 8.0 ng/patch quality-control samples. Twenty-one potential interfering compounds (50 ng/patch) added to low quality-control samples (0.6 ng/patch) did not influence THC quantification. This GC/MS-NICI assay for THC in human sweat provides adequate sensitivity and performance characteristics for analyzing THC in sweat patches and meets the requirements of the proposed Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration's guidelines for sweat testing.

  13. Cadmium effects on the thyroid gland.

    PubMed

    Jancic, Snezana A; Stosic, Bojan Z

    2014-01-01

    Cadmium has been listed as one of the 126 priority pollutants and a category I carcinogen. Carcinogenic effects of cadmium on the lungs, testicles, and prostate are widely recognized, but there has been insufficient research on the effect of cadmium on the thyroid gland. Cadmium has the affinity to accumulate not only in the liver, kidneys, and pancreas but also in the thyroid gland. It has been established that cadmium blood concentration correlates positively with its accumulation in the thyroid gland. Women of fertile age have higher cadmium blood and urine concentrations than men. In spite of its redox inertia, cadmium brings about oxidative stress and damage to the tissue by indirect mechanisms. Mitochondria are considered to be the main intracellular targets for cadmium. Colloid cystic goiter, adenomatoid follicular hyperplasia with low-grade dysplasia and thyroglobulin hypo- and asecretion, and parafollicular cell diffuse and nodular hyperplasia and hypertrophy are often found in chronic cadmium toxicity. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Experimental autotransplantation of the parathyroid gland.

    PubMed

    Prigouris, S; Lorentziadis, M; Stylogiannis, S; Nafas, R; Masouras, A; Poulantzas, I

    1996-03-01

    The lateral parathyroid gland of the rabbit was resected and autotransplanted under an ear skin flap. A skin flap at the opposite side was used as control. The success of autotransplantation was established by microangiography of the transplant and by measuring plasma concentrations of parathyroid hormone (PTH), calcium and phosphorus. After 4 months the animals were killed and the transplant was studied histologically and by electron microscopy. Fourteen animals were included in the study. There was an increase in PTH derived from the transplanted gland after 4-6 postoperative days. All animals developed hypocalcaemia during the 3 days after transplantation. There were no significant changes in serum phosphorus. Transplantation did not alter the morphology of the distribution of the cells in the transplanted gland, which functioned normally after the fourth postoperative day.

  15. Thyroid gland in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Miłkowska-Dymanowska, Joanna; Białas, Adam J; Laskowska, Paulina; Górski, Paweł; Piotrowski, Wojciech J

    2017-01-01

    The risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), as well as thyroid diseases increases with age. COPD is a common systemic disease associated with chronic inflammation. Many endocrinological disorders, including thyroid gland diseases are related to systemic inflammation. Epidemiological studies suggest that patients with COPD are at higher risk of thyroid disorders. These associations are not well-studied and thyroid gland diseases are not included on the broadly acknowledged list of COPD comorbidities. They may seriously handicap quality of life of COPD patients. Unfortunately, the diagnosis may be difficult, as many signs are masked by the symptoms of the index disease. The comprehension of the correlation between thyroid gland disorders and COPD may contribute to better care of patients. In this review, we attempt to revise available literature describing existing links between COPD and thyroid diseases.

  16. Mistakes in ultrasound examination of salivary glands

    PubMed Central

    Jakubowski, Wiesław

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasonography is the first imaging method applied in the case of diseases of the salivary glands. The article discusses basic mistakes that can be made during an ultrasound examination of these structures. The reasons for these mistakes may be examiner-dependent or may be beyond their control. The latter may include, inter alia, difficult conditions during examination (technical or patient-related), similarity of ultrasound images in different diseases, the lack of clinical and laboratory data as well as the lack of results of other examinations, their insufficient number or incorrectness. Doctor-related mistakes include: the lack of knowledge of normal anatomy, characteristics of ultrasound images in various salivary gland diseases and statistical incidence of diseases, but also attaching excessive importance to such statistical data. The complex anatomical structures of the floor of the oral cavity may be mistaken for benign or malignant tumors. Fragments of correct anatomical structures (bones, arterial wall fibrosis, air bubbles in the mouth) can be wrongly interpreted as deposits in the salivary gland or in its excretory duct. Correct lymph nodes in the parotid glands may be treated as pathologic structures. Lesions not being a simple cyst, e.g. lymphoma, benign or malignant tumors of the salivary glands or metastatic lymph nodes, can be mistaken for one. The image of disseminated focal changes, both anechoic and solid, is not pathognomonic for specific diseases in the salivary glands. However, in part, it occurs typically and requires an extended differential diagnosis. Small focal changes and infiltrative lesions pose a diagnostic problem because their etiology cannot be safely suggested on the basis of an ultrasound examination itself. The safest approach is to refer patients with abnormal focal changes for an ultrasoundguided fine-needle aspiration biopsy. PMID:27446603

  17. Metastasis to submandibular glands in oral cavity cancers: Can we preserve the gland safely?

    PubMed

    Panda, Naresh K; Patro, Sourabha K; Bakshi, Jaimanti; Verma, Roshan K; Das, Ashim; Chatterjee, Debajyoti

    2015-08-01

    To analyze submandibular gland (SMG) involvement in cases of oral cavity cancers and decide whether to remove submandibular glands while performing neck dissections for oral cavity cancers to decrease the incidence of xerostomia, a common issue post-operatively. Retrospective analysis of 157 neck dissections out of 204 neck dissections performed for oral cavity carcinomas in the Department of Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery from 2008 to 2013 was done. SMG was bilaterally removed in 6 dissections, hence a total of 163 glands were analyzed. Those involved by tumor in histopathology were further studied for the pattern of involvement. 3.68% (6/163) glands showed involvement by the tumor. 9.20% (15/163) showed chronic sialo-adenitic changes. Four of the six involved glands showed direct contiguous spread from primary lesion, one showed extra-capsular spread from level IB lymph nodes and evidence of both modes of spread was seen in one. Evidence of metastasis was not seen in any of the glands (0%). Literature review showed a metastasis rate of 0.096% (2/2074). Metastatic involvement of submandibular gland is extremely rare. Submandibular gland preservation, in the absence of evidence of gross contiguous involvement, does not affect survival. Hence, SMG can be safely spared during neck dissections for oral cavity squamous cell cancers except in certain situations such as close proximity of the primary lesion to gland, presence of intra-capsular lymph nodes in radiology, gross intraoperative evidence of invasion of the SMG and in salvage surgeries performed in post-irradiated and recurrent cases. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  18. The Parathyroid Gland and Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Brown, Spandana J; Ruppe, Mary D; Tabatabai, Laila S

    2017-01-01

    The parathyroid glands are critical to maintaining calcium homeostasis through actions of parathyroid hormone (PTH). Recent clinical and molecular research has shown that direct and indirect actions of PTH also affect the heart and vasculature through downstream actions of G protein-coupled receptors in the myocardium and endothelial cells. Patients with disorders of the parathyroid gland have higher incidences of hypertension, arrhythmias, left ventricular hypertrophy, heart failure, and calcific disease which translate into increased cardiac morbidity and mortality. Importantly, clinical research also suggests that early treatment of parathyroid disorders through medical or surgical management may reverse cardiovascular remodeling and mitigate cardiac risk factors.

  19. Lymphopoiesis in the chicken pineal gland

    SciTech Connect

    Cogburn, L.A.; Glick, B.

    1981-10-01

    Pineal lymphoid development was studied in two breeds of chickens from hatching until sexual maturity. No lymphocytes were found in the pineal prior to 9 days of age (da). Lymphocytes migrate through the endothelium of venules into the pineal stroma. Lymphoid tissue reached its maximal accumulation in 32-da pineal glands of both breeds. At this age, the New Hampshire (NH) breed had a larger proportion of lymphoid volume to total pineal volume (32%) than did pineal glands from White Leghorn (WL) chickens (18%).

  20. Parotid Gland Tumors and the Facial Nerve.

    PubMed

    Gandolfi, Michele M; Slattery, William

    2016-04-01

    Various types of parotid gland tumors are discussed from nonneoplastic to both benign and malignant neoplasms. The anatomic relationship of the facial nerve is discussed as it exits the stylomastoid foramen and courses through the parotid gland. The effect of certain tumors on facial nerve function is also characterized. Details on which types of parotid tumors are more likely to affect facial nerve function and different prognostic predictors of return to function are evaluated. In addition, the prognostic value of tumor size and histologic type of parotid tumor is included. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.